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Sample records for chicken major histocompatibility

  1. The major histocompatibility complex in the chicken

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guillemot, F; Kaufman, J F; Skjoedt, K; Auffray, C

    1989-01-01

    The chicken B complex is the first non-mammalian MHC characterized at the molecular level. It differs from the human HLA and murine H-2 complexes in the small size of the class I (B-F) and class II (B-L) genes and their close proximity. This proximity accounts for the absence of recombination...

  2. Molecular Genotype Identification of Different Chickens: Major Histocompatibility Complex

    OpenAIRE

    Hongzhi Wang; Teng Ma; Guobin Chang; Fang Wan; Xiangping Liu; Lu Liu; Lu Xu; Jing Chen; Guohong Chen

    2014-01-01

    Chicken is a main poultry in China. Molecular breeding for disease resistance plays an important role in the control of diseases, especially infectious diseases. Choice of genes for disease resistance is the key technology of molecular breeding. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is of great interest to poultry breeding scientists for its extraordinary polymorphism and close relation with traits of resistance against infectious diseases. The MHC-B haplotype plays an important role in ...

  3. Molecular Genotype Identification of Different Chickens: Major Histocompatibility Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongzhi Wang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Chicken is a main poultry in China. Molecular breeding for disease resistance plays an important role in the control of diseases, especially infectious diseases. Choice of genes for disease resistance is the key technology of molecular breeding. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC is of great interest to poultry breeding scientists for its extraordinary polymorphism and close relation with traits of resistance against infectious diseases. The MHC-B haplotype plays an important role in the study of disease resistance in chicken. The traditional chicken MHC-B haplotype is commonly defined by serologic reactions of erythrocytes and the majority of studies have been conducted in Leghorn and broiler but study about other chicken breeds is little. In this study, firstly, the microsatellite marker LEI0258 which is located within the MHC was sequenced by using target sequence capture assay in different chicken breeds, and then according to the number of repeated structures and polymorphic sequences in microsatellite, sequence information for the region defined by LEI0258 was obtained for different haplotypes. Afterwards, we identified the relation between MHC-B haplotypes and disease resistance. Collectively, these observed results provided the reference data for disease-resistant breeding association with blood type and for further study of MHC gene function in poultry.

  4. Correlation in chicken between the marker LEI0258 alleles and Major Histocompatibility Complex sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chazara, Olympe; Juul-Madsen, Helle Risdahl; Chang, Chi-Seng;

    Background The LEI0258 marker is located within the B region of the chicken Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC), and is surprisingly well associated with serology. Therefore, the correlation between the LEI0258 alleles and the MHC class I and the class II alleles at the level of sequences is w...

  5. Gastrointestinal helminths in indigenous and exotic chickens in Vietnam: association of the intensity of infection with the Major Histocompatibility Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schou, T W; Permin, A; Juul-Madsen, H R; Sørensen, P; Labouriau, R; Nguyên, T L H; Fink, M; Pham, S L

    2007-04-01

    This study compared the prevalence and intensity of infections of helminths in 2 chicken breeds in Vietnam, the indigenous Ri and the exotic Luong Phuong. Also, possible correlations with the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) were tested. The most prevalent helminths were Ascaridia galli, Heterakis beramporia, Tetrameres mothedai, Capillaria obsignata, Raillietina echinobothrida and Raillietina tetragona. Differences in prevalence and intensity of infection were found between the 2 breeds. Comparing the 2 groups of adult birds, Ri chickens were observed to have higher prevalence and infection intensities of several species of helminths, as well as a higher mean number of helminth species. In contrast, A. galli and C. obsignata were shown to be more prevalent in Luong Phuong chickens. Furthermore, an age-dependent difference was indicated in the group of Ri chickens in which the prevalence and the intensity of infection was higher for the adult than the young chickens for most helminths. The most notable exception was the significantly lower prevalence and intensities of A. galli in the group of adult chickens. In contrast, the prevalence and intensity were very similar in both age groups of Luong Phuong chickens. Using a genetic marker located in the MHC, a statistically significant correlation between several MHC haplotypes and the infection intensity of different helminth species was inferred. This is the first report of an association of MHC haplotype with the intensity of parasite infections in chickens. PMID:17166322

  6. Chicken major histocompatibility complex-encoded B-G antigens are found on many cell types that are important for the immune system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomonsen, J; Dunon, D; Skjødt, K; Thorpe, D; Vainio, O; Kaufman, J

    1991-01-01

    B-G antigens are a polymorphic multigene family of cell surface molecules encoded by the chicken major histocompatibility complex (MHC). They have previously been described only on cells of the erythroid lineage. By using flow cytometry, section staining, and immunoprecipitation with monoclonal a...

  7. Selection for immunoresponsiveness in chickens: effects of the major histocompatibility complex and resistance to Marek's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pinard, M.H.

    1992-01-01

    Improving genetic disease resistance may be an attractive preventive measure in the control of infectious diseases in livestock production. Chickens were selected for high and low antibody response to sheep red blood cells for ten generations. Divergent selection was successfully achieved and led to

  8. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hála, K.; Plachý, Jiří; Kaufman, J.

    New York : Academic Press, 1998 - (Pastoret, P.; Griebel, P.; Bazin, H.; Govaerts, A.), s. 92-95 ISBN 0-12-546401-0 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA523/96/0670 Keywords : chicken MHC * histocompatibility antigens * disease resistance Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  9. Transcriptome analysis reveals an activation of major histocompatibility complex 1 and 2 pathways in chicken trachea immunized with infectious laryngotracheitis virus vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Juan; Carrillo, José A; Menendez, Kimberly R; Tablante, Nathaniel L; Song, Jiuzhou

    2014-04-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis is an acute, contagious, upper respiratory disease of chickens caused by gallid herpes virus 1. Due to mortality rates that can reach up to 70% depending on the virulence of the virus, the disease is of great economic importance to the poultry industry. In this study, 15-d-old specific pathogen-free White Leghorn chickens were used to perform transcriptome analysis of chicken trachea immunized with infectious laryngotracheitis virus vaccine. Myosin and several collagen-related genes were downregulated in the immunized group, suggesting that normal function and structure may be compromised. In addition, we identified some cytokine receptors and several immune genes, such as Granzyme A (GZMA), CD4 molecule (CD4), CD8a molecule (CD8A), and CD8b molecule (CD8B), that were upregulated upon vaccination. The gene ontology analysis shows that genes included in the biological process cluster were related to antigen processing and presentation, positive regulation of immune system processes, T cell selection, and positive regulation of T cell activation. In conclusion, chicken embryo origin vaccine activation of the major histocompatibility complex 1 and 2 pathways provides insight for evaluation and design of infectious laryngotracheitis vaccines. PMID:24706961

  10. The major histocompatibility complex (Mhc class IIB region has greater genomic structural flexibility and diversity in the quail than the chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulski Jerzy K

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The quail and chicken major histocompatibility complex (Mhc genomic regions have a similar overall organization but differ markedly in that the quail has an expanded number of duplicated class I, class IIB, natural killer (NK-receptor-like, lectin-like and BG genes. Therefore, the elucidation of genetic factors that contribute to the greater Mhc diversity in the quail would help to establish it as a model experimental animal in the investigation of avian Mhc associated diseases. Aims and approaches The main aim here was to characterize the genetic and genomic features of the transcribed major quail MhcIIB (CojaIIB region that is located between the Tapasin and BRD2 genes, and to compare our findings to the available information for the chicken MhcIIB (BLB. We used four approaches in the study of the quail MhcIIB region, (1 haplotype analyses with polymorphic loci, (2 cloning and sequencing of the RT-PCR CojaIIB products from individuals with different haplotypes, (3 genomic sequencing of the CojaIIB region from the individuals with the different haplotypes, and (4 phylogenetic and duplication analysis to explain the variability of the region between the quail and the chicken. Results Our results show that the Tapasin-BRD2 segment of the quail Mhc is highly variable in length and in gene transcription intensity and content. Haplotypic sequences were found to vary in length between 4 to 11 kb. Tapasin-BRD2 segments contain one or two major transcribed CojaIIBs that were probably generated by segmental duplications involving c-type lectin-like genes and NK receptor-like genes, gene fusions between two CojaIIBs and transpositions between the major and minor CojaIIB segments. The relative evolutionary speed for generating the MhcIIBs genomic structures from the ancestral BLB2 was estimated to be two times faster in the quail than in the chicken after their separation from a common ancestor. Four types of genomic rearrangement

  11. Brief review of the chicken Major Histocompatibility Complex: the genes, their distribution on chromosome 16, and their contributions to disease resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Marcia M; Taylor, Robert L

    2016-02-01

    Nearly all genes presently mapped to chicken chromosome 16 (GGA 16) have either a demonstrated role in immune responses or are considered to serve in immunity by reason of sequence homology with immune system genes defined in other species. The genes are best described in regional units. Among these, the best known is the polymorphic major histocompatibility complex-B (MHC-B) region containing genes for classical peptide antigen presentation. Nearby MHC-B is a small region containing two CD1 genes, which encode molecules known to bind lipid antigens and which will likely be found in chickens to present lipids to specialized T cells, as occurs with CD1 molecules in other species. Another region is the MHC-Y region, separated from MHC-B by an intervening region of tandem repeats. Like MHC-B, MHC-Y is polymorphic. It contains specialized class I and class II genes and c-type lectin-like genes. Yet another region, separated from MHC-Y by the single nucleolar organizing region (NOR) in the chicken genome, contains olfactory receptor genes and scavenger receptor genes, which are also thought to contribute to immunity. The structure, distribution, linkages and patterns of polymorphism in these regions, suggest GGA 16 evolves as a microchromosome devoted to immune defense. Many GGA 16 genes are polymorphic and polygenic. At the moment most disease associations are at the haplotype level. Roles of individual MHC genes in disease resistance are documented in only a very few instances. Provided suitable experimental stocks persist, the availability of increasingly detailed maps of GGA 16 genes combined with new means for detecting genetic variability will lead to investigations defining the contributions of individual loci and more applications for immunogenetics in breeding healthy poultry. PMID:26740135

  12. The Major Histocompatibility Complex in Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Ayala García

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The transplant of organs is one of the greatest therapeutic achievements of the twentieth century. In organ transplantation, the adaptive immunity is considered the main response exerted to the transplanted tissue, since the principal target of the immune response is the MHC (major histocompatibility complex molecules expressed on the surface of donor cells. However, we should not forget that the innate and adaptive immunities are closely interrelated and should be viewed as complementary and cooperating. When a human transplant is performed, HLA (human leukocyte antigens molecules from a donor are recognized by the recipient's immune system triggering an alloimmune response Matching of donor and recipient for MHC antigens has been shown to have a significant positive effect on graft acceptance. This paper will present MHC, the innate and adaptive immunities, and clinical HLA testing.

  13. Major histocompatibility complex-linked immune response of young chickens vaccinated with an attenuated live infectious bursal disease virus vaccine followed by an infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul-Madsen, Helle; Nielsen, O.L.; Krogh-Maibom, T.; Rontved, C.M.; Dalgaard, T.S.; Bumstead, N.; Jørgensen, Poul Henrik

    2002-01-01

    further contains the BW1 haplotype isolated from a Red jungle Fowl. Line 131 further contains the B131 haplotype isolated from a meat-type chicken, Finally, Line 21 further contains the international B21 haplotype. The chickens were vaccinated with live attenuated commercial IBDV vaccine at 3 wk of age...... weight, relative weights of the bursa and the spleen, percentage and relative number of MHC II molecules on MHC II-positive lymphocytes, percentage and relative number of CD4 molecules on CD4-positive lymphocytes, and the specific antibody response all differed significantly among lines. Line 1, with Red...

  14. The major histocompatibility complex of primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heise, E R; Cook, D J; Schepart, B S; Manning, C H; McMahan, M R; Chedid, M; Keever, C A

    1987-08-31

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) encodes cell surface glycoproteins that function in self-nonself recognition and in allograft rejection. Among primates, the MHC has been well defined only in the human; in the chimpanzee and in two species of macaque monkeys the MHC is less well characterized. Serologic, biochemical and genetic evidence indicates that the basic organization of the MHC linkage group has been phylogenetically conserved. However, the number of genes and their linear relationship on the chromosomes differ between species. Class I MHC loci encode molecules that are the most polymorphic genes known. These molecules are ubiquitous in their tissue distribution and typically are recognized together with nominal antigens by cytotoxic lymphocytes. Class II MHC loci constitute a smaller family of serotypes serving as restricting elements for regulatory T lymphocytes. The distribution of class II antigens is limited mainly to cell types serving immune functions, and their expression is subject to up and down modulation. Class III loci code for components C2, C4 and Factor B (Bf) of the complement system. Interspecies differences in the extent of polymorphism occur, but the significance of this finding in relation to fitness and natural selection is unclear. Detailed information on the structure and regulation of MHC gene expression will be required to understand fully the biologic role of the MHC and the evolutionary relationships between species. Meanwhile, MHC testing has numerous applications to biomedical research, especially in preclinical tissue and organ transplantation studies, the study of disease mechanisms, parentage determination and breeding colony management. In this review, the current status of MHC definition in nonhuman primates will be summarized. Special emphasis is placed on the CyLA system of M. fascicularis which is a major focus in our laboratory. A highly polymorphic cynomolgus MHC has been partially characterized and consists

  15. Characterization of antigens of the dog major histocompatibility complex

    OpenAIRE

    Feltz, Machteld

    1983-01-01

    textabstractIn this thesis, an immunochemical analysis of dog Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) antigens, also called DLA antigens, is described. MHC antigens play a prominent role in the immune system, particularly in the recognition of foreign material. They can be divided into four classes. As only DLA class I antigens have been defined by well characterized reagents (antisera), they were chosen as the object of the investigation

  16. Signal transduction by the major histocompatibility complex class I molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Elm; Skov, S; Bregenholt, S; Ruhwald, M; Claesson, M H

    1999-01-01

    Ligation of cell surface major histocompatibility class I (MHC-I) proteins by antibodies, or by their native counter receptor, the CD8 molecule, mediates transduction of signals into the cells. MHC-I-mediated signaling can lead to both increased and decreased activity of the MHC-I-expressing cell...... immediately after and at later intervals following MHC-I ligation. It is hypothesized that MHC-I expression, both ontogenically and in evolution, is driven by a cell-mediated selection pressure advantageous to the MHC-I-expressing cell. Accordingly, in addition to their role in T-cell selection and...

  17. Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) markers in conservation biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujvari, Beata; Belov, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    Human impacts through habitat destruction, introduction of invasive species and climate change are increasing the number of species threatened with extinction. Decreases in population size simultaneously lead to reductions in genetic diversity, ultimately reducing the ability of populations to adapt to a changing environment. In this way, loss of genetic polymorphism is linked with extinction risk. Recent advances in sequencing technologies mean that obtaining measures of genetic diversity at functionally important genes is within reach for conservation programs. A key region of the genome that should be targeted for population genetic studies is the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC). MHC genes, found in all jawed vertebrates, are the most polymorphic genes in vertebrate genomes. They play key roles in immune function via immune-recognition and -surveillance and host-parasite interaction. Therefore, measuring levels of polymorphism at these genes can provide indirect measures of the immunological fitness of populations. The MHC has also been linked with mate-choice and pregnancy outcomes and has application for improving mating success in captive breeding programs. The recent discovery that genetic diversity at MHC genes may protect against the spread of contagious cancers provides an added impetus for managing and protecting MHC diversity in wild populations. Here we review the field and focus on the successful applications of MHC-typing for conservation management. We emphasize the importance of using MHC markers when planning and executing wildlife rescue and conservation programs but stress that this should not be done to the detriment of genome-wide diversity. PMID:21954351

  18. Transmembrane signaling through major histocompatibility complex (MHC) encoded molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) encoded molecules has traditionally been ascribed to the role these molecules play as restriction elements for T lymphocytes. This is, in order for T cell activation to occur the T cell must recognize antigen in association with MHC molecules. More controversial, however, is the potential role MHC molecules play as signal transducing receptors/acceptors to the B lymphocyte. In other words, do class II MHC molecules (Ia antigens) actively transduce a signal to the B cell which drives its differentiation into an antibody secreting cell? Two approaches to this question are described. The first involves biochemical characterization of those molecules which consistently copurify with I-A/sup k/ by two dimensional gel electrophoresis. The second approach utilizes two types of analyses: first, an examination of the biochemical changes which occur in the cell as a result of Ia ligation; and second, analysis of changes in the B cell's physiological response as a result of Ia perturbation. Molecules were examined which may couple the antigen binding event in the B lymphocyte to the antigen driven signal transduction cascade which ultimately leads to immunoglobulin secretion. In these experiments, cells were labelled with [32P] and stimulated cells with phorbol myristate acetate. The membrane form of immunoglobulin was then isolated from detergent lysates of whole cells and passed over an anti-k affinity column. The eluates were analyzed by SDS-PAGE

  19. Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC Markers in Conservation Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Belov

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Human impacts through habitat destruction, introduction of invasive species and climate change are increasing the number of species threatened with extinction. Decreases in population size simultaneously lead to reductions in genetic diversity, ultimately reducing the ability of populations to adapt to a changing environment. In this way, loss of genetic polymorphism is linked with extinction risk. Recent advances in sequencing technologies mean that obtaining measures of genetic diversity at functionally important genes is within reach for conservation programs. A key region of the genome that should be targeted for population genetic studies is the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC. MHC genes, found in all jawed vertebrates, are the most polymorphic genes in vertebrate genomes. They play key roles in immune function via immune-recognition and -surveillance and host-parasite interaction. Therefore, measuring levels of polymorphism at these genes can provide indirect measures of the immunological fitness of populations. The MHC has also been linked with mate-choice and pregnancy outcomes and has application for improving mating success in captive breeding programs. The recent discovery that genetic diversity at MHC genes may protect against the spread of contagious cancers provides an added impetus for managing and protecting MHC diversity in wild populations. Here we review the field and focus on the successful applications of MHC-typing for conservation management. We emphasize the importance of using MHC markers when planning and executing wildlife rescue and conservation programs but stress that this should not be done to the detriment of genome-wide diversity.

  20. The chicken beta 2-microglobulin gene is located on a non-major histocompatibility complex microchromosome: a small, G+C-rich gene with X and Y boxes in the promoter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riegert, P; Andersen, R; Bumstead, N;

    1996-01-01

    a similar genomic organization but smaller introns and higher G+C content than mammalian beta 2-microglobulin genes. The promoter region is particularly G+C-rich and contains, in addition to interferon regulatory elements, potential S/W, X, and Y boxes that were originally described for mammalian...... class II but not class I alpha or beta 2-microglobulin genes. There is a single chicken beta 2-microglobulin gene that has little polymorphism in the coding region. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms from Mhc homozygous lines, Mhc congenic lines, and backcross families, as well as in situ...

  1. Examining the evidence for major histocompatibility complex-dependent mate selection in humans and nonhuman primates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Winternitz, Jamie Caroline; Abbate, J. L.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 6, 13 May (2015), s. 73-88. ISSN 1179-7274 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : major histocompatibility complex * sexual selection * olfaction * facial attraction * parasite resistance * inbreeding avoidance Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  2. Distribution of class ii major histocompatibility complex antigenexpressing cells in human dental pulp with carious lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Tetiana Haniastuti

    2012-01-01

    Background: Dental caries is a bacterial infection which causes destruction of the hard tissues of the tooth. Exposure of the dentin to the oral environment as a result of caries inevitably results in a cellular response in the pulp. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a group of genes that code for cell-surface histocompatibility antigens. Cells expressing class II MHC molecules participate in the initial recognition and the processing of antigenic substances to serve as antigen-pr...

  3. Gene duplication and fragmentation in the zebra finch major histocompatibility complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burt David W

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to its high polymorphism and importance for disease resistance, the major histocompatibility complex (MHC has been an important focus of many vertebrate genome projects. Avian MHC organization is of particular interest because the chicken Gallus gallus, the avian species with the best characterized MHC, possesses a highly streamlined minimal essential MHC, which is linked to resistance against specific pathogens. It remains unclear the extent to which this organization describes the situation in other birds and whether it represents a derived or ancestral condition. The sequencing of the zebra finch Taeniopygia guttata genome, in combination with targeted bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC sequencing, has allowed us to characterize an MHC from a highly divergent and diverse avian lineage, the passerines. Results The zebra finch MHC exhibits a complex structure and history involving gene duplication and fragmentation. The zebra finch MHC includes multiple Class I and Class II genes, some of which appear to be pseudogenes, and spans a much more extensive genomic region than the chicken MHC, as evidenced by the presence of MHC genes on each of seven BACs spanning 739 kb. Cytogenetic (FISH evidence and the genome assembly itself place core MHC genes on as many as four chromosomes with TAP and Class I genes mapping to different chromosomes. MHC Class II regions are further characterized by high endogenous retroviral content. Lastly, we find strong evidence of selection acting on sites within passerine MHC Class I and Class II genes. Conclusion The zebra finch MHC differs markedly from that of the chicken, the only other bird species with a complete genome sequence. The apparent lack of synteny between TAP and the expressed MHC Class I locus is in fact reminiscent of a pattern seen in some mammalian lineages and may represent convergent evolution. Our analyses of the zebra finch MHC suggest a complex history involving

  4. MOLECULAR GENETICS OF THE SWINE MAJOR HISTOCOMPATIBILITY COMPLEX, THE SLA COMPLEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    The swine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) or swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) complex is one of the most gene-dense regions in the swine genome. It consists of three major gene clusters, the SLA class I, class III and class II regions, that span ~1.1, 0.7 and 0.5 Mb, respectively, making the swi...

  5. Polarisation of Major Histocompatibility Complex II Host Genotype with Pathogenesis of European Brown Hare Syndrome Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iacovakis, Christos; Mamuris, Zissis; Moutou, Katerina A;

    2013-01-01

    A study was conducted in order to determine the occurrence of European Brown Hare Syndrome virus (EBHSV) in Denmark and possible relation between disease pathogenesis and Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) host genotype. Liver samples were examined from 170 brown hares (hunted, found sick or...

  6. Role of the major histocompatibility complex in immune responsiveness in a Holstein Charolais cattle cross population

    OpenAIRE

    Baxter, Rebecca Jayne

    2011-01-01

    Infectious disease is a major issue facing the livestock industry. Further understanding of the role of genetic factors in the observed phenotypic variability of the immune response to pathogens and vaccination could assist in designing improved preventative measures such as more efficacious vaccines and targeted breeding strategies to select for disease resistance. Major candidate genes for controlling immune responsiveness are located within the major histocompatibility co...

  7. Sexual selection and the evolutionary dynamics of the major histocompatibility complex

    OpenAIRE

    Jan Ejsmond, Maciej; Radwan, Jacek; Wilson, Anthony B

    2014-01-01

    The genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are a key component of the adaptive immune system and among the most variable loci in the vertebrate genome. Pathogen-mediated natural selection and MHC-based disassortative mating are both thought to structure MHC polymorphism, but their effects have proven difficult to discriminate in natural systems. Using the first model of MHC dynamics incorporating both survival and reproduction, we demonstrate that natural and sexual selection pro...

  8. Neurotrophins inhibit major histocompatibility class II inducibility of microglia: Involvement of the p75 neurotrophin receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Neumann, Harald; Misgeld, Thomas; Matsumuro, Kenji; Wekerle, Hartmut

    1998-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules are rare in the healthy brain tissue, but are heavily expressed on microglial cells after inflammatory or neurodegenerative processes. We studied the conditions leading to the induction of MHC class II molecules in microglia by using explant cultures of neonatal rat hippocampus, a model of interacting neuronal networks. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-dependent MHC class II inducibility in microglia cells was very low, but strongly increased in the hippoc...

  9. Disruption and pseudoautosomal localization of the major histocompatibility complex in monotremes

    OpenAIRE

    Dohm, Juliane C; Tsend-Ayush, Enkhjargal; Reinhardt, Richard; Grützner, Frank; Himmelbauer, Heinz

    2007-01-01

    Background The monotremes, represented by the duck-billed platypus and the echidnas, are the most divergent species within mammals, featuring a flamboyant mix of reptilian, mammalian and specialized characteristics. To understand the evolution of the mammalian major histocompatibility complex (MHC), the analysis of the monotreme genome is vital. Results We characterized several MHC containing bacterial artificial chromosome clones from platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) and the short-beaked ...

  10. Variation of the major histocompatibility complex genes in the Grey Partridge (Perdix perdix; Galliformes)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Králová, Tereza; Promerová, Marta; Bryjová, Anna; Albrecht, Tomáš; Bryja, Josef

    Brno: Ústav biologie obratlovců AV ČR, 2012 - (Bryja, J.; Albrechtová, J.; Tkadlec, E.). s. 110-111 ISBN 978-80-87189-11-5. [Zoologické dny. 09.02.2012-10.02.2012, Olomouc] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/08/1281 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes * Grey Partridge Subject RIV: EG - Zoology

  11. Two mechanisms that account for major histocompatibility complex restriction of T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kranz, David M.

    2009-01-01

    In recent studies, two distinct mechanisms have been proposed to account for major histocompatibility complex (MHC) restriction of T-cell activity: (a) evolution-driven interactions between T-cell receptor (TCR) variable regions and MHC, and (b) a requirement for CD4 or CD8 binding to MHC to initiate signalling through the TCR complex. Both mechanisms are likely to be essential, but for different reasons.

  12. 454 sequencing reveals extreme complexity of the class II Major Histocompatibility Complex in the collared flycatcher

    OpenAIRE

    Gustafsson Lars; Stuglik Michał; Babik Wiesław; Zagalska-Neubauer Magdalena; Cichoń Mariusz; Radwan Jacek

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Because of their functional significance, the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I and II genes have been the subject of continuous interest in the fields of ecology, evolution and conservation. In some vertebrate groups MHC consists of multiple loci with similar alleles; therefore, the multiple loci must be genotyped simultaneously. In such complex systems, understanding of the evolutionary patterns and their causes has been limited due to challenges posed by ge...

  13. Evolution of the major histocompatibility complex: Molecular cloning of major histocompatibility complex class I from the amphibian Xenopus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Class I major histocopatibility complex (MHC) cDNA clones have been isolated from an expression library derived from mRNA of an MHC homozygous Xenopus laevis. The nucleotide and predicted amino acid sequences show definite similarity to MHC class I molecules of higher vertebrates. The immunoglobulin-likeα-3 domain is more similar to the immunoglobulin-like domains of mammalian class II β chains than to those of mammalian class I molecules, and a tree based on nucleotide sequences of representative MHC genes is presented

  14. Major histocompatibility complex locus DRA polymorphism in the endangered Sorraia horse and related breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luís, C; Cothran, E G; Oom, M M; Bailey, E

    2005-02-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes play well-defined roles in eliciting immune responses and combating infectious diseases. This genetic system is among the most polymorphic. The extent of genetic variation within a population has been directly correlated with fitness for many traits. The MHC class II locus DRA polymorphism was analysed in the endangered Sorraia horse, two other Portuguese and four New World horse breeds considered to be historically close to the Sorraia. Comparison of the Sorraia with other breeds demonstrated less MHC variation among Sorraia horses. If DRA polymorphism provides greater disease resistance, selective breeding to increase MHC polymorphism may increase fitness of this population. PMID:16130491

  15. Efficient assembly of recombinant major histocompatibility complex class I molecules with preformed disulfide bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard Pedersen, L; Nissen, Mogens Holst; Hansen, N J;

    2001-01-01

    The expression of major histocompatibility class I (MHC-I) crucially depends upon the binding of appropriate peptides. MHC-I from natural sources are therefore always preoccupied with peptides complicating their purification and analysis. Here, we present an efficient solution to this problem...... suggests that de novo folding of denatured MHC-I molecules proceed efficiently if directed by preformed disulfide bond(s). Importantly, these molecules express serological epitopes and stain specific T cells; and they bind peptides specifically. Several denatured MHC-I heavy chains were analyzed and shown...

  16. Major histocompatibility complex haplotypes and class II genes in non-Jewish patients with pemphigus vulgaris.

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, A. R.; Wagner, R; Khatri, K; Notani, G.; Awdeh, Z; Alper, C A; Yunis, E J

    1991-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that HLA-DR4 was markedly increased among Ashkenazi Jewish patients with pemphigus vulgaris (PV), almost entirely as the common Jewish extended haplotype [HLA-B38, SC21, DR4, DQw8] or as the haplotype HLA-B35, SC31, DR4, DQw8, and that HLA-DR4, DQw8 was distributed among patients in a manner consistent with dominant expression of a class II (D-region or D-region-linked) susceptibility gene. In the present study of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotypes...

  17. Major histocompatibility complex haplotype studies in Ashkenazi Jewish patients with pemphigus vulgaris.

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, A. R.; Yunis, E J; Khatri, K; Wagner, R; Notani, G.; Awdeh, Z; Alper, C A

    1990-01-01

    Of 26 Ashkenazi Jewish patients with pemphigus vulgaris, 24 (92.3%) carried the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II alleles HLA-DR4, DQw3, of which all were of the subtype DR4, DQw8. From studies of the patients and their families, haplotypes were defined. It was found that, of the patients who carried HLA-DR4, DQw8, 75% carried one or the other (and in one case, both) of two haplotypes [HLA-B38, SC21, DR4] or HLA-B35, SC31, DR4. The former is a known extended haplotype among norm...

  18. Toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 binds to major histocompatibility complex class II molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1) is a 22-kDa exotoxin produced by strains of Staphylococcus aureus and implicated in the pathogenesis of toxic shock syndrome. In common with other staphylococcal exotoxins, TSST-1 has diverse immunological effects. These include the induction of interleukin 2 receptor expression, interleukin 2 synthesis, proliferation of human T lymphocytes, and stimulation of interleukin 1 synthesis by human monocytes. In the present study, the authors demonstrate that TSST-1 binds with saturation kinetics and with a dissociation constant of 17-43 nM to a single class of binding sites on human mononuclear cells. There was a strong correlation between the number of TSST-1 binding sites and the expression of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules. Affinity chromatography of 125I-labeled cell membranes over TSST-1-agarose resulted in the recovery of two bands of 35 kDa and 31 kDa that comigrated, respectively, with the α and β chains of HLA-DR and that could be immunoprecipitated with anti-HLA-DR monoclonal antibodies. Binding of TSST-1 was demonstrated to HLA-DR and HLA-DQ L-cell transfectants. These results indicate that major histocompatibility complex class II molecules represent the major binding site for TSST-1 on human cells

  19. Passive Immunotherapy for Retroviral Disease: Influence of Major Histocompatibility Complex Type and T-Cell Responsiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenkrug, Kim J.; Brooks, Diane M.; Chesebro, Bruce

    1995-11-01

    Administration of virus-specific antibodies is known to be an effective early treatment for some viral infections. Such immunotherapy probably acts by antibody-mediated neutralization of viral infectivity and is often thought to function independently of T-cell-mediated immune responses. In the present experiments, we studied passive antibody therapy using Friend murine leukemia virus complex as a model for an immunosuppressive retroviral disease in adult mice. The results showed that antibody therapy could induce recovery from a well-established retroviral infection. However, the success of therapy was dependent on the presence of both CD4^+ and CD8^+ T lymphocytes. Thus, cell-mediated responses were required for recovery from infection even in the presence of therapeutic levels of antibody. The major histocompatibility type of the mice was also an important factor determining the relative success of antibody therapy in this system, but it was less critical for low-dose than for high-dose infections. Our results imply that limited T-cell responsiveness as dictated by major histocompatibility genes and/or stage of disease may have contributed to previous immunotherapy failures in AIDS patients. Possible strategies to improve the efficacy of future therapies are discussed.

  20. MH2c: Characterization of major histocompatibility α-helices - an information criterion approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hischenhuber, B.; Frommlet, F.; Schreiner, W.; Knapp, B.

    2012-07-01

    Major histocompatibility proteins share a common overall structure or peptide binding groove. Two binding groove domains, on the same chain for major histocompatibility class I or on two different chains for major histocompatibility class II, contribute to that structure that consists of two α-helices (“wall”) and a sheet of eight anti-parallel beta strands (“floor”). Apart from the peptide presented in the groove, the major histocompatibility α-helices play a central role for the interaction with the T cell receptor. This study presents a generalized mathematical approach for the characterization of these helices. We employed polynomials of degree 1 to 7 and splines with 1 to 2 nodes based on polynomials of degree 1 to 7 on the α-helices projected on their principal components. We evaluated all models with a corrected Akaike Information Criterion to determine which model represents the α-helices in the best way without overfitting the data. This method is applicable for both the stationary and the dynamic characterization of α-helices. By deriving differential geometric parameters from these models one obtains a reliable method to characterize and compare α-helices for a broad range of applications. Catalogue identifier: AELX_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AELX_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 327 565 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 17 433 656 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Matlab Computer: Personal computer architectures Operating system: Windows, Linux, Mac (all systems on which Matlab can be installed) RAM: Depends on the trajectory size, min. 1 GB (Matlab) Classification: 2.1, 4.9, 4.14 External routines: Curve Fitting Toolbox and Statistic Toolbox of

  1. Humans with chimpanzee-like major histocompatibility complex-specificities control HIV-1 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoof, Ilka; Kesmir, Can; Lund, Ole;

    2008-01-01

    the progression rate to AIDS. Chimpanzees control HIV-1 viral replication and develop a chronic infection without progressing to AIDS. A similar course of disease is observed in human long-term non-progressors. Objective: To investigate if long-term non-progressors and chimpanzees have functional......Background: Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules allow immune surveillance by presenting a snapshot of the intracellular state of a cell to circulating cytotoxic T lymphocytes. The MHC class I alleles of an HIV-1 infected individual strongly influence the level of viremia and...... similarities in their MHC class I repertoire. Methods: We compared the specificity of groups of human MHC molecules associated with different levels of viremia in HIV-1 infected individuals with those of chimpanzee. Results and conclusion: We demonstrate that human MHC with control of HIV-1 viral load share...

  2. Establishment of major histocompatibility complex homozygous gnotobiotic miniature swine colony for xenotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jeong Ho; Gupta, Mukesh Kumar; Park, Chan Kyu; Kim, Yoon Berm; Lee, Hoon Taek

    2015-04-01

    To overcome shortages of human donor organs for organ failure patients, we made a commitment to develop gnotobiotic miniature swine as an alternative organ donor source for xenotransplantation. For this, we have constructed an absolute barrier-sustained gnotobiotic facility. Pregnant sows of gnotobiotic miniature swine, were procured and germfree piglets were obtained by hysterectomy. These were maintained in germfree isolators for about 4 weeks, deprived of colostrum and were fed sterilized soybean milk. They were associated with di-flora, anaerobic Lactobacillus sp. and Streptococcus sp. After confirmation of successful associations, gnotobiotic piglets were transferred into the facility aseptically. The piglets are maintained on high-efficiency particle air-filtered air in and out; maintaining constant room air pressure of 33 ± 3 mmAq, and sterile water and diet. In 10 sessions of hysterectomy, 18 male and 32 female piglets were obtained of which piglets (M six, F eight) died within 5 days. Among live piglets, piglets (M eight, F 12) were confirmed to be germfree by microbiological monitoring. For research of xenotransplantation, one consistent experimental result was essential. Therefore, major histocompatibility complex class II which related innate immunity, homozygotic gnotobiotic miniature swine was developed. As a result, genotyping revealed 14 individuals to be homozygous for major histocompatibility complex class II (DRB, DQB) as 0301, three individuals were homozygous as 0201 and each of two were homozygous for DQB as 0701 and DRB as 0404, respectively. Genetic modifications and immunological research for ideal alternative organ sources are in progress. PMID:25491717

  3. Structure and expression of major histocompatibility complex-binding protein 2, a 275-kDa zinc finger protein that binds to an enhancer of major histocompatibility complex class I genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, L.J. van 't; Lutz, P.M.; Isselbacher, K.J.; Bernards, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    We have isolated a cDNA encoding a transcription factor that binds to the enhancer of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I genes. MHC-binding protein 2 (MBP-2) is a 275-kDa protein, containing two sets of widely separated zinc fingers and a stretch of highly acidic amino acids, a putative

  4. In vitro analysis of a primary, major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response to avian leukosis virus (ALV), using target cells expressing MHC class I cDNA inserted into a recombinant ALV vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacker, E L; Fulton, J E; Hunt, H D

    1995-10-01

    The interaction between the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) is an important component of the host's resistance to viral infections and tumor formation. In this study, an avian leukosis virus (ALV) vector system, RCASBP, expressing MHC chicken class I (B-F) cDNA was used to develop target cells expressing the chicken class I glycoproteins complexed with ALV antigens on the cell surface. Peripheral blood from chickens inoculated with ALV was shown to contain antigen-specific, MHC-restricted, CD8+ effector CTLs, using a 51Cr release assay utilizing the RCASBP B-F target cells. The stimulated effector cells were also predominantly alpha beta T-cell receptor-positive (TCR2) T cells. The CTL response varied between two haplotypes of chickens which differed in their response to Rous sarcoma virus (RSV)-induced tumors. Chickens with the B21 haplotype which regress RSV-induced tumors showed maximal cytolytic activity, while chickens with the B13 haplotype which do not regress RSV-induced tumors had minimal to no cytolytic activity. In addition to assessing the CTL response to ALV, the creation of MHC-specific immortal target cell lines will be extremely useful in evaluating CTL responses to other viral disease in chickens. PMID:7666545

  5. T cell responses affected by aminopeptidase N (CD13)-mediated trimming of major histocompatibility complex class II-bound peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, S L; Pedersen, L O; Buus, S; Stryhn, A

    1996-01-01

    the exopeptidase Aminopeptidase N (APN, CD13) as one of the enzymes involved in the observed cell-surface antigen processing. The NH2-terminal end of the longer peptide could, even while bound to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules, be digested by APN with dramatic consequences...

  6. Ancient, highly polymorphic human major histocompatibility complex DQA1 intron sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGinnis, M.D.; Quinn, D.L.; Lebo, R.V. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Simons, M.J. [GeneType Pty. Ltd., Fitzroy, Victoria (Australia)

    1994-10-01

    A 438 basepair intron 1 sequence adjacent to exon 2 in the human major histocompatibility complex DQA1 gene defined 16 allelic variants in 69 individuals from wide ethnic backgrounds. In contrast, the most variable coding region spanned by the 247 basepair exon 2 defined 11 allelic variants. Our phylogenetic human intron 1 tree derived by the Bootstrap algorithm reflects the same relative allelic relationships as the reported DQA1 exon 2 have cosegregated since divergence of the human races. Comparison of human alleles to a Rhesus monkey DQA1 first intron sequence found only 10 nucleotide substitutions unique to Rhesus, with the other 428 positions (98%) found in at least one human allele. This high degree of homology reflects the evolutionary stability of intron sequences since these two species diverged over 20 million years ago. Because more intron 1 alleles exist than exon 2 alleles, these polymorphic introns can be used to improve tissue typing for transplantation, paternity testing, and forensics and to derive more complete phylogenetic trees. These results suggest that introns represent a previously underutilized polymorphic resource. 42 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  7. IMGT/HLA Database—a sequence database for the human major histocompatibility complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, James; Waller, Matthew J.; Parham, Peter; Bodmer, Julia G.; Marsh, Steven G. E.

    2001-01-01

    The IMGT/HLA Database (www.ebi.ac.uk/imgt/hla/) specialises in sequences of polymorphic genes of the HLA system, the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC). The HLA complex is located within the 6p21.3 region on the short arm of human chromosome 6 and contains more than 220 genes of diverse function. Many of the genes encode proteins of the immune system and these include the 21 highly polymorphic HLA genes, which influence the outcome of clinical transplantation and confer susceptibility to a wide range of non-infectious diseases. The database contains sequences for all HLA alleles officially recognised by the WHO Nomenclature Committee for Factors of the HLA System and provides users with online tools and facilities for their retrieval and analysis. These include allele reports, alignment tools and detailed descriptions of the source cells. The online IMGT/HLA submission tool allows both new and confirmatory sequences to be submitted directly to the WHO Nomenclature Committee. The latest version (release 1.7.0 July 2000) contains 1220 HLA alleles derived from over 2700 component sequences from the EMBL/GenBank/DDBJ databases. The HLA database provides a model which will be extended to provide specialist databases for polymorphic MHC genes of other species. PMID:11125094

  8. IMGT/HLA Database--a sequence database for the human major histocompatibility complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J; Waller, M J; Parham, P; Bodmer, J G; Marsh, S G

    2001-01-01

    The IMGT/HLA Database (www.ebi.ac.uk/imgt/hla/) specialises in sequences of polymorphic genes of the HLA system, the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC). The HLA complex is located within the 6p21.3 region on the short arm of human chromosome 6 and contains more than 220 genes of diverse function. Many of the genes encode proteins of the immune system and these include the 21 highly polymorphic HLA genes, which influence the outcome of clinical transplantation and confer susceptibility to a wide range of non-infectious diseases. The database contains sequences for all HLA alleles officially recognised by the WHO Nomenclature Committee for Factors of the HLA System and provides users with online tools and facilities for their retrieval and analysis. These include allele reports, alignment tools and detailed descriptions of the source cells. The online IMGT/HLA submission tool allows both new and confirmatory sequences to be submitted directly to the WHO Nomenclature Committee. The latest version (release 1.7.0 July 2000) contains 1220 HLA alleles derived from over 2700 component sequences from the EMBL/GenBank/DDBJ databases. The HLA database provides a model which will be extended to provide specialist databases for polymorphic MHC genes of other species. PMID:11125094

  9. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecules: their common characteristics and relations with diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Başak Yalçın

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecules or human leukocyte antigens (HLA are the cell surface molecules responsible from antigen presentation and activation of T cells. At the same time MHC molecules determine direction of T cell response. Unlike T cells, antigen specificity of MHC molecules is not high and they can not differenciate self and non-self antigens from each other. MHC molecules are classified as MHC I (HLA- A, B, C and MHC II (HLA-DP, DR, DQ molecules which are structurally similar. MHC I molecules present intracellular antigens such as viruses and tumor antigens to CD8+ cytotoxic T cells and MHC II molecules present endocytosed bacterial antigens to CD4+ helper T cells. MHC molecules are encoded by the highly polymorphic genes in a giant locus called MHC. In addition to high polymorphism in MHC genes, they are also charactized by having continuous mutations and codominant expression pattern to increase the diversity among individuals. In evolutionary context, immunologic diversity is important for an uninterrupted life on the Earth. However this diversity causes vast differances among the people in terms of their responses to infections and tendency to have autoimmune and allergic diseases. In this article, structural and functional features of MHC molecules and their common roles in disease formation are discussed.

  10. DNA variation of the mammalian major histocompatibility complex reflects genomic diversity and population history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a multigene complex of tightly linked homologous genes that encode cell surface antigens that play a key role in immune regulation and response to foreign antigens. In most species, MHC gene products display extreme antigenic polymorphism, and their variability has been interpreted to reflect an adaptive strategy for accommodating rapidly evolving infectious agents that periodically afflict natural populations. Determination of the extent of MHC variation has been limited to populations in which skin grafting is feasible or for which serological reagents have been developed. The authors present here a quantitative analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphism of MHC class I genes in several mammalian species (cats, rodents, humans) known to have very different levels of genetic diversity based on functional MHC assays and on allozyme surveys. When homologous class I probes were employed, a notable concordance was observed between the extent of MHC restriction fragment variation and functional MHC variation detected by skin grafts or genome-wide diversity estimated by allozyme screens. These results confirm the genetically depauperate character of the African cheetah, Acinonyx jubatus, and the Asiatic lion, Panthera leo persica; further, they support the use of class I MHC molecular reagents in estimating the extent and character of genetic diversity in natural populations

  11. Measuring complexity, nonextensivity and chaos in the DNA sequence of the Major Histocompatibility Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlos, G. P.; Karakatsanis, L. P.; Iliopoulos, A. C.; Pavlos, E. G.; Xenakis, M. N.; Clark, Peter; Duke, Jamie; Monos, D. S.

    2015-11-01

    We analyze 4 Mb sequences of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC), which is a DNA segment on chromosome 6 with high gene density, controlling many immunological functions and associated with many diseases. The analysis is based on modern theoretical and mathematical tools of complexity theory, such as nonlinear time series analysis and Tsallis non-extensive statistics. The results revealed that the DNA complexity and self-organization can be related to fractional dynamical nonlinear processes with low-dimensional deterministic chaotic and non-extensive statistical character, which generate the DNA sequences under the extremization of Tsallis q-entropy principle. While it still remains an open question as to whether the DNA walk is a fractional Brownian motion (FBM), a static anomalous diffusion process or a non-Gaussian dynamical fractional anomalous diffusion process, the results of this study testify for the latter, providing also a possible explanation for the previously observed long-range power law correlations of nucleotides, as well as the long-range correlation properties of coding and non-coding sequences present in DNA sequences.

  12. Induction of embryonic major histocompatibility complex antigen expression by gamma-IFN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, C M; Almquist, C D; Toulimat, M H; Xu, Y

    1993-07-01

    Preimplantation mouse embryos were incubated in vitro with mouse recombinant gamma-interferon (IFN). The effect of the gamma-IFN on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antigen expression was tested using an ELISA procedure. It was found that there is a doubling of Db antigens and a tripling of Qa-2 antigens on C57BL/6 mouse embryos cultured from the 8-cell stage for 24 h in the presence of 10(5) units/ml gamma-IFN. The effect of gamma-IFN on the rate of preimplantation embryonic development was tested by culturing 2-cell embryos for 48 h and 8-cell embryos for 24 h in the presence of varying concentrations of gamma-IFN up to 10(6) units/ml. Two methods were used to assess the cell number per embryo after the culture period: incorporation of [3H]thymidine into DNA, and direct counting of nuclei in fixed and stained embryos. Both methods showed that treatment with gamma-IFN increases the rate of development of preimplantation mouse embryos. Since rate of preimplantation embryonic development is genetically controlled by the Ped gene, it is suggested that gamma-IFN has a direct effect on the Ped gene phenotype of preimplantation mouse embryos. PMID:8229991

  13. Red Queen Processes Drive Positive Selection on Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC Genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Jan Ejsmond

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC genes code for proteins involved in the incitation of the adaptive immune response in vertebrates, which is achieved through binding oligopeptides (antigens of pathogenic origin. Across vertebrate species, substitutions of amino acids at sites responsible for the specificity of antigen binding (ABS are positively selected. This is attributed to pathogen-driven balancing selection, which is also thought to maintain the high polymorphism of MHC genes, and to cause the sharing of allelic lineages between species. However, the nature of this selection remains controversial. We used individual-based computer simulations to investigate the roles of two phenomena capable of maintaining MHC polymorphism: heterozygote advantage and host-pathogen arms race (Red Queen process. Our simulations revealed that levels of MHC polymorphism were high and driven mostly by the Red Queen process at a high pathogen mutation rate, but were low and driven mostly by heterozygote advantage when the pathogen mutation rate was low. We found that novel mutations at ABSs are strongly favored by the Red Queen process, but not by heterozygote advantage, regardless of the pathogen mutation rate. However, while the strong advantage of novel alleles increased the allele turnover rate, under a high pathogen mutation rate, allelic lineages persisted for a comparable length of time under Red Queen and under heterozygote advantage. Thus, when pathogens evolve quickly, the Red Queen is capable of explaining both positive selection and long coalescence times, but the tension between the novel allele advantage and persistence of alleles deserves further investigation.

  14. Red Queen Processes Drive Positive Selection on Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejsmond, Maciej Jan; Radwan, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) genes code for proteins involved in the incitation of the adaptive immune response in vertebrates, which is achieved through binding oligopeptides (antigens) of pathogenic origin. Across vertebrate species, substitutions of amino acids at sites responsible for the specificity of antigen binding (ABS) are positively selected. This is attributed to pathogen-driven balancing selection, which is also thought to maintain the high polymorphism of MHC genes, and to cause the sharing of allelic lineages between species. However, the nature of this selection remains controversial. We used individual-based computer simulations to investigate the roles of two phenomena capable of maintaining MHC polymorphism: heterozygote advantage and host-pathogen arms race (Red Queen process). Our simulations revealed that levels of MHC polymorphism were high and driven mostly by the Red Queen process at a high pathogen mutation rate, but were low and driven mostly by heterozygote advantage when the pathogen mutation rate was low. We found that novel mutations at ABSs are strongly favored by the Red Queen process, but not by heterozygote advantage, regardless of the pathogen mutation rate. However, while the strong advantage of novel alleles increased the allele turnover rate, under a high pathogen mutation rate, allelic lineages persisted for a comparable length of time under Red Queen and under heterozygote advantage. Thus, when pathogens evolve quickly, the Red Queen is capable of explaining both positive selection and long coalescence times, but the tension between the novel allele advantage and persistence of alleles deserves further investigation. PMID:26599213

  15. Sequence variability analysis on major histocompatibility complex class Ⅱ DRB alleles in three felines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The variation of the exon 2 of the major histo-compatibility complex (MHC) class Ⅱ gene DRB locus in three feline species were examined on clouded leopard (Neofelis nebulosa), leopard (Panthera pardus) and Amur tiger (Panthera tigris altaica). A pair of degenerated primers was used to amplify DRB locus covering almost the whole exon 2. Exon 2 encodes the β1 domain which is the most vari-able fragments of the MHC class Ⅱ molecule. Single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis was applied to detect different MHC class Ⅱ DRB haplotypes. Fifteen recombinant plasmids for each individual were screened out, isolated, purified and sequenced finally. Totally eight distinct haplotypes of exon 2 were obtained in four individuals. With-in 237 bp nucleotide sequences from four samples, 30 vari-able positions were found, and 21 putative peptide-binding positions were disclosed in 79 amino acid residues. The ratio of nonsynonymous substitutions (dN) was much higher than that of synonymous substitutions (dS), which indicated that balancing selection probably maintain the variation ofexon 2. MEGA neighbor joining (N J) and PAUP maximum parsimo-ny (MP) methods were used to reconstruct phylogenetic trees among species, respectively. Results displayed a more close relationship between leopard and tiger; however, clouded leopard has a comparatively distant relationship form the other two.

  16. T cell receptor reversed polarity recognition of a self-antigen major histocompatibility complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beringer, Dennis X; Kleijwegt, Fleur S; Wiede, Florian; van der Slik, Arno R; Loh, Khai Lee; Petersen, Jan; Dudek, Nadine L; Duinkerken, Gaby; Laban, Sandra; Joosten, Antoinette; Vivian, Julian P; Chen, Zhenjun; Uldrich, Adam P; Godfrey, Dale I; McCluskey, James; Price, David A; Radford, Kristen J; Purcell, Anthony W; Nikolic, Tatjana; Reid, Hugh H; Tiganis, Tony; Roep, Bart O; Rossjohn, Jamie

    2015-11-01

    Central to adaptive immunity is the interaction between the αβ T cell receptor (TCR) and peptide presented by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule. Presumably reflecting TCR-MHC bias and T cell signaling constraints, the TCR universally adopts a canonical polarity atop the MHC. We report the structures of two TCRs, derived from human induced T regulatory (iT(reg)) cells, complexed to an MHC class II molecule presenting a proinsulin-derived peptide. The ternary complexes revealed a 180° polarity reversal compared to all other TCR-peptide-MHC complex structures. Namely, the iT(reg) TCR α-chain and β-chain are overlaid with the α-chain and β-chain of MHC class II, respectively. Nevertheless, this TCR interaction elicited a peptide-reactive, MHC-restricted T cell signal. Thus TCRs are not 'hardwired' to interact with MHC molecules in a stereotypic manner to elicit a T cell signal, a finding that fundamentally challenges our understanding of TCR recognition. PMID:26437244

  17. Diversity at the major histocompatibility complex Class II in the platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillie, Mette; Woodward, Rachael E; Sanderson, Claire E; Eldridge, Mark D B; Belov, Katherine

    2012-07-01

    The platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) is the sole survivor of a previously widely distributed and diverse lineage of ornithorhynchid monotremes. Its dependence on healthy water systems imposes an inherent sensitivity to habitat degradation and climate change. Here, we compare genetic diversity at the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Class II-DZB gene and 3 MHC-associated microsatellite markers with diversity at 6 neutral microsatellite markers in 70 platypuses from across their range, including the mainland of Australia and the isolated populations of Tasmania, King Island, and Kangaroo Island. Overall, high DZB diversity was observed in the platypus, with 57 DZB β1 alleles characterized. Significant positive selection was detected within the DZB peptide-binding region, promoting variation in this domain. Low levels of genetic diversity were detected at all markers in the 2 island populations, King Island (endemic) and Kangaroo Island (introduced), with the King Island platypuses monomorphic at the DZB locus. Loss of MHC diversity on King Island is of concern, as the population may have compromised immunological fitness and reduced ability to resist changing environmental conditions. PMID:22563128

  18. Expression of major histocompatibility complex class II antigens in porcine leptospiral nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radaelli, E; Del Piero, F; Aresu, L; Sciarrone, F; Vicari, N; Mattiello, S; Tagliabue, S; Fabbi, M; Scanziani, E

    2009-09-01

    Class II major histocompatibility complex (MHCII) is required for the presentation of antigens to CD4 helper T cells. During nephritis, not only primary antigen presenting cells such as histiocytes and lymphocytes, but also cytokine-stimulated tubular epithelial cells express MHCII. Leptospirosis in fattening pigs is characterized by several degrees of nephritis, from absence of lesions to severe multifocal tubulo-interstitial inflammation. Renal tissue from 20 8-month-old pigs with spontaneous nephritis and 6 control pigs without renal lesions were investigated for leptospirosis by indirect immunohistochemistry (IHC) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). IHC for MHCII also was performed on renal samples. Serum samples were tested for different serovars of Leptospira interrogans. Control pigs were free of interstitial nephritis and negative for leptospirosis by all tests. In pigs with nephritis, serology was positive for serovar Pomona in 19/20 pigs. In 16 of these 19 pigs, leptospiral renal infection was confirmed by PCR and/or indirect IHC. Nephritic lesions were classified histologically into perivascular lymphocytic (4 pigs), lymphofollicular (6 pigs), lymphohistiocytic (8 pigs), and neutrophilic (2 pigs) pattern. MHCII expression by histiocytes and lymphocytes was observed in all lesions. Prominent MHCII expression in regenerating tubular epithelium was observed in lymphofollicular and lymphohistiocytic nephritis. No tubular colocalization between leptospiral and MHCII antigen was observed. Results suggest that during leptospiral nephritis, MHCII contributes to the intensity of the inflammatory response. Furthermore de novo MHCII expression in regenerating tubules may play a role in the defence mechanism against leptospiral tubular colonization. PMID:19179617

  19. Contribution of chromosomal abnormalities and genes of the major histocompatibility complex to early pregnancy losses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tkach I. R.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The determination of chromosomal abnormalities in samples from early pregnancy losses and allelic polymorphism of HLA–DRB1 and DQA1 genes in couples with recurrent miscarriage. Methods. Banding cytogenetic and interphase mFISH analysis, DNA extraction by salting method, PCR, agarose gel electrophoresis. Results. Cytogenetic and molecular-cytogenetic investigations of SA material identified karyotype anomalies in 32.4 % of cases with prevalence of autosomal trisomy – 42.65 %, triploidy – 30.38 % and monosomy X – 19.11 %. Complex analysis of frequency and distribution of allelic variants of genes HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQA1 allowed establishing the alleles DRB1*0301, DRB1*1101-1104 and DQA1*0501 to be aggressor alleles in women with recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL. The cumulative homology of allelic polymorphism of more than 50 % of HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQA1 loci between partners increases the risk of RPL by almost four times. Conclusion. The detected chromosome aneuploidies in the samples from products of conception and the changes in the major histocompatibility complex genes can cause the failure of a couples reproductive function and can lead to an early fetal loss.

  20. Sequence variation at the major histocompatibility complex locus DQ beta in beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, B W; Malik, S; White, B N

    1995-07-01

    Genetic variation at the Major Histocompatibility Complex locus DQ beta was analyzed in 233 beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) from seven populations: St. Lawrence Estuary, eastern Beaufort Sea, eastern Chukchi Sea, western Hudson Bay, eastern Hudson Bay, southeastern Baffin Island, and High Arctic and in 12 narwhals (Monodon monoceros) sympatric with the High Arctic beluga population. Variation was assessed by amplification of the exon coding for the peptide binding region via the polymerase chain reaction, followed by either cloning and DNA sequencing or single-stranded conformation polymorphism analysis. Five alleles were found across the beluga populations and one in the narwhal. Pairwise comparisons of these alleles showed a 5:1 ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitutions per site leading to eight amino acid differences, five of which were nonconservative substitutions, centered around positions previously shown to be important for peptide binding. Although the amount of allelic variation is low when compared with terrestrial mammals, the nature of the substitutions in the peptide binding sites indicates an important role for the DQ beta locus in the cellular immune response of beluga whales. Comparisons of allele frequencies among populations show the High Arctic population to be different (P Dele-DQ beta*0101-2, was found in 98% of the animals, while in the High Arctic it was found in only 52% of the animals. Two other alleles were found at high frequencies in the High Arctic population, one being very similar to the single allele found in narwhal. PMID:7659014

  1. Major histocompatibility complex class II-associated p41 invariant chain fragment is a strong inhibitor of lysosomal cathepsin L

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    The invariant chain (Ii) is associated with major histocompatibility complex class II molecules during early stages of their intracellular transport. In an acidic endosomal/lysosomal compartment, it is proteolytically cleaved and removed from class II heterodimers. Participation of aspartic and cysteine proteases has been observed in in vitro degradation of Ii, but the specific enzymes responsible for its in vivo processing are as yet undefined. We have previously isolated a noncovalent compl...

  2. Evolutionary history of black grouse major histocompatibility complex class IIB genes revealed through single locus sequence-based genotyping

    OpenAIRE

    Strand, Tanja; Wang, Biao; Meyer-Lucht, Yvonne; Höglund, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Background: Gene duplications are frequently observed in the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) of many species, and as a consequence loci belonging to the same MHC class are often too similar to tell apart. In birds, single locus genotyping of MHC genes has proven difficult due to concerted evolution homogenizing sequences at different loci. But studies on evolutionary history, mode of selection and heterozygosity correlations on the MHC cannot be performed before it is possible to analy...

  3. Simian and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Nef Proteins Use Different Surfaces To Downregulate Class I Major Histocompatibility Complex Antigen Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Swigut, Tomek; Iafrate, A. John; Muench, Jan; Kirchhoff, Frank; Skowronski, Jacek

    2000-01-01

    Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Nef proteins are related regulatory proteins that share several functions, including the ability to downregulate class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and CD4 expression on the cell surface and to alter T-cell-receptor-initiated signal transduction in T cells. We compared the mechanisms used by SIV mac239 Nef and HIV-1 Nef to downregulate class I MHC and found that the ability of SIV Nef to downregula...

  4. Low major histocompatibility complex diversity in the Tasmanian devil predates European settlement and may explain susceptibility to disease epidemics

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, Katrina; Austin, Jeremy J.; Belov, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) is at risk of extinction owing to the emergence of a contagious cancer known as devil facial tumour disease (DFTD). The emergence and spread of DFTD has been linked to low genetic diversity in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). We examined MHC diversity in historical and ancient devils to determine whether loss of diversity is recent or predates European settlement in Australia. Our results reveal no additional diversity in historical Tasman...

  5. In vitro lymphocyte proliferation response to therapeutic insulin components. Evidence for genetic control by the human major histocompatibility complex.

    OpenAIRE

    Mann, D L; Mendell, N; Kahn, C R; Johnson, A H; Rosenthal, A

    1983-01-01

    Genes in the major histocompatibility complex of mice and guinea pigs control immunologic responsiveness to insulins from other animal species. In order to determine if similar genetic control exists in man, we have examined lymphocyte proliferation responses to components of therapeutic insulins by employing lymphocytes from diabetic patients that receive insulin. Distinct groups of individuals demonstrated positive lymphocyte proliferative responses to beef insulin, beef and pork insulin, b...

  6. Evaluation of two approaches to genotyping major histocompatibility complex class I in a passerine—CE-SSCP and 454 pyrosequencing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Promerová, Marta; Babik, W.; Bryja, Josef; Albrecht, Tomáš; Stuglik, M.; Radwan, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 2 (2012), s. 285-292. ISSN 1755-098X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA600930608; GA ČR GA206/06/0851; GA ČR GAP505/10/1871 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : avian * Carpodacus erythrinus * major histocompatibility complex * next-generation sequencing * scarlet rosefinch Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 7.432, year: 2012

  7. Molecular Mechanisms Used by Tumors to Escape Immune Recognition: Immunogenetherapy and the Cell Biology of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I

    OpenAIRE

    Restifo, Nicholas P; Kawakami, Yutaka; Marincola, Franco; Shamamian, Peter; Taggarse, Akash; ESQUIVEL, FERNANDO; Rosenberg, Steven A.

    1993-01-01

    In this article, we explore the hypothesis that tumor cells can escape recognition by CD8+ T cells via deficiencies in antigen processing and presentation. Aspects of the molecular and cellular biology of major histocompatibility complex class I are reviewed. Evidence for histology-specific molecular mechanisms in the antigen-processing and -presentation deficiencies observed in some human and murine tumors is presented. Mechanisms identified include down-regulation of antigen processing, los...

  8. Absence of major histocompatibility complex class II mediated immunity in pipefish, Syngnathus typhle: evidence from deep transcriptome sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Haase, David; Roth, Olivia; Kalbe, Martin; Schmiedeskamp, Gisela; Scharsack, Jörn P; Rosenstiel, Philip; Reusch, Thorsten B. H.

    2013-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-mediated adaptive immune system is the hallmark of gnathostome immune defence. Recent work suggests that cod-like fishes (Gadidae) lack important components of the MHC class II mediated immunity. Here, we report a putative independent loss of functionality of this pathway in another species, the pipefish Syngnathus typhle, that belongs to a distantly related fish family (Syngnathidae). In a deep transcriptome sequencing approach comprising several in...

  9. Murine Cytomegalovirus Perturbs Endosomal Trafficking of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Molecules in the Early Phase of Infection ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Tomaš, Maja Ilić; Kučić, Natalia; Mahmutefendić, Hana; Blagojević, Gordana; Lučin, Pero

    2010-01-01

    Murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) functions interfere with protein trafficking in the secretory pathway. In this report we used Δm138-MCMV, a recombinant virus with a deleted viral Fc receptor, to demonstrate that MCMV also perturbs endosomal trafficking in the early phase of infection. This perturbation had a striking impact on cell surface-resident major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules due to the complementary effect of MCMV immunoevasins, which block their egress from the ...

  10. Pervasive haplotypic variation in the spliceo-transcriptome of the human major histocompatibility complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandiedonck, Claire; Taylor, Martin S; Lockstone, Helen E; Plant, Katharine; Taylor, Jennifer M; Durrant, Caroline; Broxholme, John; Fairfax, Benjamin P; Knight, Julian C

    2011-07-01

    The human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) on chromosome 6p21 is a paradigm for genomics, showing remarkable polymorphism and striking association with immune and non-immune diseases. The complex genomic landscape of the MHC, notably strong linkage disequilibrium, has made resolving causal variants very challenging. A promising approach is to investigate gene expression levels considered as tractable intermediate phenotypes in mapping complex diseases. However, how transcription varies across the MHC, notably relative to specific haplotypes, remains unknown. Here, using an original hybrid tiling and splice junction microarray that includes alternate allele probes, we draw the first high-resolution strand-specific transcription map for three common MHC haplotypes (HLA-A1-B8-Cw7-DR3, HLA-A3-B7-Cw7-DR15, and HLA-A26-B18-Cw5-DR3-DQ2) strongly associated with autoimmune diseases including type 1 diabetes, systemic lupus erythematosus, and multiple sclerosis. We find that haplotype-specific differences in gene expression are common across the MHC, affecting 96 genes (46.4%), most significantly the zing finger protein gene ZFP57. Differentially expressed probes are correlated with polymorphisms between haplotypes, consistent with cis effects that we directly demonstrate for ZFP57 in a cohort of healthy volunteers (P = 1.2 × 10(-14)). We establish that alternative splicing is significantly more frequent in the MHC than genome-wide (72.5% vs. 62.1% of genes, P ≤ 1 × 10(-4)) and shows marked haplotypic differences. We also unmask novel and abundant intergenic transcription involving 31% of transcribed blocks identified. Our study reveals that the renowned MHC polymorphism also manifests as transcript diversity, and our novel haplotype-based approach marks a new step toward identification of regulatory variants involved in the control of MHC-associated phenotypes and diseases. PMID:21628452

  11. Evolution of major histocompatibility complex class I and class II genes in the brown bear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuduk Katarzyna

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major histocompatibility complex (MHC proteins constitute an essential component of the vertebrate immune response, and are coded by the most polymorphic of the vertebrate genes. Here, we investigated sequence variation and evolution of MHC class I and class II DRB, DQA and DQB genes in the brown bear Ursus arctos to characterise the level of polymorphism, estimate the strength of positive selection acting on them, and assess the extent of gene orthology and trans-species polymorphism in Ursidae. Results We found 37 MHC class I, 16 MHC class II DRB, four DQB and two DQA alleles. We confirmed the expression of several loci: three MHC class I, two DRB, two DQB and one DQA. MHC class I also contained two clusters of non-expressed sequences. MHC class I and DRB allele frequencies differed between northern and southern populations of the Scandinavian brown bear. The rate of nonsynonymous substitutions (dN exceeded the rate of synonymous substitutions (dS at putative antigen binding sites of DRB and DQB loci and, marginally significantly, at MHC class I loci. Models of codon evolution supported positive selection at DRB and MHC class I loci. Both MHC class I and MHC class II sequences showed orthology to gene clusters found in the giant panda Ailuropoda melanoleuca. Conclusions Historical positive selection has acted on MHC class I, class II DRB and DQB, but not on the DQA locus. The signal of historical positive selection on the DRB locus was particularly strong, which may be a general feature of caniforms. The presence of MHC class I pseudogenes may indicate faster gene turnover in this class through the birth-and-death process. South–north population structure at MHC loci probably reflects origin of the populations from separate glacial refugia.

  12. Major histocompatibility complex linked databases and prediction tools for designing vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Satarudra Prakash; Mishra, Bhartendu Nath

    2016-03-01

    Presently, the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is receiving considerable interest owing to its remarkable role in antigen presentation and vaccine design. The specific databases and prediction approaches related to MHC sequences, structures and binding/nonbinding peptides have been aggressively developed in the past two decades with their own benchmarks and standards. Before using these databases and prediction tools, it is important to analyze why and how the tools are constructed along with their strengths and limitations. The current review presents insights into web-based immunological bioinformatics resources that include searchable databases of MHC sequences, epitopes and prediction tools that are linked to MHC based vaccine design, including population coverage analysis. In T cell epitope forecasts, MHC class I binding predictions are very accurate for most of the identified MHC alleles. However, these predictions could be further improved by integrating proteasome cleavage (in conjugation with transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) binding) prediction, as well as T cell receptor binding prediction. On the other hand, MHC class II restricted epitope predictions display relatively low accuracy compared to MHC class I. To date, pan-specific tools have been developed, which not only deliver significantly improved predictions in terms of accuracy, but also in terms of the coverage of MHC alleles and supertypes. In addition, structural modeling and simulation systems for peptide-MHC complexes enable the molecular-level investigation of immune processes. Finally, epitope prediction tools, and their assessments and guidelines, have been presented to immunologist for the design of novel vaccine and diagnostics. PMID:26585361

  13. The tammar wallaby major histocompatibility complex shows evidence of past genomic instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrow Jennifer

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major histocompatibility complex (MHC is a group of genes with a variety of roles in the innate and adaptive immune responses. MHC genes form a genetically linked cluster in eutherian mammals, an organization that is thought to confer functional and evolutionary advantages to the immune system. The tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii, an Australian marsupial, provides a unique model for understanding MHC gene evolution, as many of its antigen presenting genes are not linked to the MHC, but are scattered around the genome. Results Here we describe the 'core' tammar wallaby MHC region on chromosome 2q by ordering and sequencing 33 BAC clones, covering over 4.5 MB and containing 129 genes. When compared to the MHC region of the South American opossum, eutherian mammals and non-mammals, the wallaby MHC has a novel gene organization. The wallaby has undergone an expansion of MHC class II genes, which are separated into two clusters by the class III genes. The antigen processing genes have undergone duplication, resulting in two copies of TAP1 and three copies of TAP2. Notably, Kangaroo Endogenous Retroviral Elements are present within the region and may have contributed to the genomic instability. Conclusions The wallaby MHC has been extensively remodeled since the American and Australian marsupials last shared a common ancestor. The instability is characterized by the movement of antigen presenting genes away from the core MHC, most likely via the presence and activity of retroviral elements. We propose that the movement of class II genes away from the ancestral class II region has allowed this gene family to expand and diversify in the wallaby. The duplication of TAP genes in the wallaby MHC makes this species a unique model organism for studying the relationship between MHC gene organization and function.

  14. 454 sequencing reveals extreme complexity of the class II Major Histocompatibility Complex in the collared flycatcher

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustafsson Lars

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because of their functional significance, the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC class I and II genes have been the subject of continuous interest in the fields of ecology, evolution and conservation. In some vertebrate groups MHC consists of multiple loci with similar alleles; therefore, the multiple loci must be genotyped simultaneously. In such complex systems, understanding of the evolutionary patterns and their causes has been limited due to challenges posed by genotyping. Results Here we used 454 amplicon sequencing to characterize MHC class IIB exon 2 variation in the collared flycatcher, an important organism in evolutionary and immuno-ecological studies. On the basis of over 152,000 sequencing reads we identified 194 putative alleles in 237 individuals. We found an extreme complexity of the MHC class IIB in the collared flycatchers, with our estimates pointing to the presence of at least nine expressed loci and a large, though difficult to estimate precisely, number of pseudogene loci. Many similar alleles occurred in the pseudogenes indicating either a series of recent duplications or extensive concerted evolution. The expressed alleles showed unambiguous signals of historical selection and the occurrence of apparent interlocus exchange of alleles. Placing the collared flycatcher's MHC sequences in the context of passerine diversity revealed transspecific MHC class II evolution within the Muscicapidae family. Conclusions 454 amplicon sequencing is an effective tool for advancing our understanding of the MHC class II structure and evolutionary patterns in Passeriformes. We found a highly dynamic pattern of evolution of MHC class IIB genes with strong signals of selection and pronounced sequence divergence in expressed genes, in contrast to the apparent sequence homogenization in pseudogenes. We show that next generation sequencing offers a universal, affordable method for the characterization and, in perspective

  15. Major Histocompatibility Complex, demographic, and environmental predictors of antibody presence in a free-ranging mammal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-López, María José; Monello, Ryan J; Schuttler, Stephanie G; Lance, Stacey L; Gompper, Matthew E; Eggert, Lori S

    2014-12-01

    Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) variability plays a key role in pathogen resistance, but its relative importance compared to environmental and demographic factors that also influence resistance is unknown. We analyzed the MHC II DRB exon 2 for 165 raccoons (Procyon lotor) in Missouri (USA). For each animal we also determined the presence of immunoglobulin G (IgG) and immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies to two highly virulent pathogens, canine distemper virus (CDV) and parvovirus. We investigated the role of MHC polymorphism and other demographic and environmental factors previously associated with predicting seroconversion. In addition, using an experimental approach, we studied the relative importance of resource availability and contact rates. We found important associations between IgG antibody presence and several MHC alleles and supertypes but not between IgM antibody presence and MHC. No effect of individual MHC diversity was found. For CDV, supertype S8, one allele within S8 (Prlo-DRB(∗)222), and a second allele (Prlo-DRB(∗)204) were positively associated with being IgG+, while supertype S4 and one allele within the supertype (Prlo-DRB(∗)210) were negatively associated with being IgG+. Age, year, and increased food availability were also positively associated with being IgG+, but allele Prlo-DRB(∗)222 was a stronger predictor. For parvovirus, only one MHC allele was negatively associated with being IgG+ and age and site were stronger predictors of seroconversion. Our results show that negative-frequency dependent selection is likely acting on the raccoon MHC and that while the role of MHC in relation to other factors depends on the pathogen of interest, it may be one of the most important factors predicting successful immune response. PMID:25446941

  16. Introgression from domestic goat generated variation at the major histocompatibility complex of Alpine ibex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Grossen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The major histocompatibility complex (MHC is a crucial component of the vertebrate immune system and shows extremely high levels of genetic polymorphism. The extraordinary genetic variation is thought to be ancient polymorphisms maintained by balancing selection. However, introgression from related species was recently proposed as an additional mechanism. Here we provide evidence for introgression at the MHC in Alpine ibex (Capra ibex ibex. At a usually very polymorphic MHC exon involved in pathogen recognition (DRB exon 2, Alpine ibex carried only two alleles. We found that one of these DRB alleles is identical to a DRB allele of domestic goats (Capra aegagrus hircus. We sequenced 2489 bp of the coding and non-coding regions of the DRB gene and found that Alpine ibex homozygous for the goat-type DRB exon 2 allele showed nearly identical sequences (99.8% to a breed of domestic goats. Using Sanger and RAD sequencing, microsatellite and SNP chip data, we show that the chromosomal region containing the goat-type DRB allele has a signature of recent introgression in Alpine ibex. A region of approximately 750 kb including the DRB locus showed high rates of heterozygosity in individuals carrying one copy of the goat-type DRB allele. These individuals shared SNP alleles both with domestic goats and other Alpine ibex. In a survey of four Alpine ibex populations, we found that the region surrounding the DRB allele shows strong linkage disequilibria, strong sequence clustering and low diversity among haplotypes carrying the goat-type allele. Introgression at the MHC is likely adaptive and introgression critically increased MHC DRB diversity in the genetically impoverished Alpine ibex. Our finding contradicts the long-standing view that genetic variability at the MHC is solely a consequence of ancient trans-species polymorphism. Introgression is likely an underappreciated source of genetic diversity at the MHC and other loci under balancing selection.

  17. Antibodies against major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A in transplant recipients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yizhou Zou; Peter Stastny

    2011-01-01

    Objective To review the role of polymorphism of major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A (MICA) gene and antibodies against MICA antigens in transplant immunology.Data sources The data used in this review were mainly from our own results and from the relevant English language literatures published from 1999 to 2010. Some data presented in this review are in press.Study selection Articles regarding MICA gene discovery and pioneering finding of antibodies against MICA antigen and allograft rejection were selected. This review chronicles the development of our understanding of the role that MICA antigens and antibodies may play in organ transplantation.Results Polymorphic glycoprotein MICA antigens were detected on freshly isolated human umbilical cord endothelial cells, but not on peripheral lymphocytes. Antibodies were found and typing of recipients and donors by sequencing the MICA alleles has established that de novo antibodies produced in kidney transplant recipients are directed at mismatched MICA epitopes and are associated with acute rejection and chronic transplant failure. The specificity of antibodies against the epitopes of MICA antigens were well characterized by donor MICA typing, single antigen array testing with antibody absorption and elution. Acute graft-versus-host disease was observed in stem-cell recipients who were mismatched for MICA.Conclusions Immunization against mismatched MICA epitopes encountered in donor organs after transplantation may result in antibodies against MICA alleles. Testing for MICA donor-specific antibodies (DSA) which are associated with early failure of kidney transplants may be helpful for identifying some of the targets of antibodies against antigens other than the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and for improving transplantation outcome.

  18. Distribution of class ii major histocompatibility complex antigenexpressing cells in human dental pulp with carious lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetiana Haniastuti

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental caries is a bacterial infection which causes destruction of the hard tissues of the tooth. Exposure of the dentin to the oral environment as a result of caries inevitably results in a cellular response in the pulp. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC is a group of genes that code for cell-surface histocompatibility antigens. Cells expressing class II MHC molecules participate in the initial recognition and the processing of antigenic substances to serve as antigen-presenting cells. Purpose: The aim of the study was to elucidate the alteration in the distribution of class II MHC antigen-expressing cells in human dental pulp as carious lesions progressed toward the pulp. Methods: Fifteen third molars with caries at the occlusal site at various stages of decay and 5 intact third molars were extracted and used in this study. Before decalcifying with 10% EDTA solution (pH 7.4, all the samples were observed by micro-computed tomography to confirm the lesion condition three-dimensionally. The specimens were then processed for cryosection and immunohistochemistry using an anti-MHC class II monoclonal antibody. Results: Class II MHC antigen-expressing cells were found both in normal and carious specimens. In normal tooth, the class II MHC-immunopositive cells were observed mainly at the periphery of the pulp tissue. In teeth with caries, class II MHC-immunopositive cells were located predominantly subjacent to the carious lesions. As the caries progressed, the number of class II MHC antigen-expressing cells was increased. Conclusion: The depth of carious lesions affects the distribution of class II MHC antigen-expressing cells in the dental pulp.Latar belakang: Karies merupakan penyakit infeksi bakteri yang mengakibatkan destruksi jaringan keras gigi. Dentin yang terbuka akibat karies akan menginduksi respon imun seluler pada pulpa. Kompleks histokompatibilitas utama (MHC merupakan sekumpulan gen yang mengkode histokompatibilitas

  19. Major histocompatibility complex haplotypes and class II genes in non-Jewish patients with pemphigus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, A R; Wagner, R; Khatri, K; Notani, G; Awdeh, Z; Alper, C A; Yunis, E J

    1991-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that HLA-DR4 was markedly increased among Ashkenazi Jewish patients with pemphigus vulgaris (PV), almost entirely as the common Jewish extended haplotype [HLA-B38, SC21, DR4, DQw8] or as the haplotype HLA-B35, SC31, DR4, DQw8, and that HLA-DR4, DQw8 was distributed among patients in a manner consistent with dominant expression of a class II (D-region or D-region-linked) susceptibility gene. In the present study of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotypes in 25 non-Jewish PV patients, DR4, DQw8 was found in 12 of the patients and DRw6, DQw5 was found in 15. Only 3 patients had neither. Only 1 of the DR4, DQw8 haplotypes was [HLA-B38, SC21, DR4, DQw8] and 2 were HLA-B35, SC31, DR4, DQw8; most were the presumed fragments (SC31, DR4, DQw8) or (SC21, DR4, DQw8) or DR4, DQw8 with some other complotype. Of the patients with DRw6, DQw5, all were DRw14, DQw5, and 6 had a rare Caucasian haplotype, HLA-Bw55, SB45, DRw14, DQw5. Four of 6 of these were found in patients of Italian extraction, as was the 1 normal example. The non-Jewish patients were of more Southern European extraction than our controls. This suggests that there are two major MHC susceptibility alleles in American patients with PV. The more ancient apparently arose on a haplotype in the Jews, HLA-B38(35), SC21(SC31), DR4, DQw8, and spread to other populations largely as D-region segments. The other arose in or near Italy on the haplotype HLA-Bw55, SB45, DRw14, DQw5 and has also partially fragmented so that many patients carry only DRw14, DQw5. The available data do not permit the specific localization of either the DR4, DQw8- or the DRw14, DQw5-linked susceptibility genes. Images PMID:1675792

  20. Genomic organization of duplicated major histocompatibility complex class I regions in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillips Ruth B

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously identified associations between major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I and resistance towards bacterial and viral pathogens in Atlantic salmon. To evaluate if only MHC or also closely linked genes contributed to the observed resistance we ventured into sequencing of the duplicated MHC class I regions of Atlantic salmon. Results Nine BACs covering more than 500 kb of the two duplicated MHC class I regions of Atlantic salmon were sequenced and the gene organizations characterized. Both regions contained the proteasome components PSMB8, PSMB9, PSMB9-like and PSMB10 in addition to the transporter for antigen processing TAP2, as well as genes for KIFC1, ZBTB22, DAXX, TAPBP, BRD2, COL11A2, RXRB and SLC39A7. The IA region contained the recently reported MHC class I Sasa-ULA locus residing approximately 50 kb upstream of the major Sasa-UBA locus. The duplicated class IB region contained an MHC class I locus resembling the rainbow trout UCA locus, but although transcribed it was a pseudogene. No other MHC class I-like genes were detected in the two duplicated regions. Two allelic BACs spanning the UBA locus had 99.2% identity over 125 kb, while the IA region showed 82.5% identity over 136 kb to the IB region. The Atlantic salmon IB region had an insert of 220 kb in comparison to the IA region containing three chitin synthase genes. Conclusion We have characterized the gene organization of more than 500 kb of the two duplicated MHC class I regions in Atlantic salmon. Although Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout are closely related, the gene organization of their IB region has undergone extensive gene rearrangements. The Atlantic salmon has only one class I UCA pseudogene in the IB region while trout contains the four MHC UCA, UDA, UEA and UFA class I loci. The large differences in gene content and most likely function of the salmon and trout class IB region clearly argues that sequencing of salmon will not

  1. T-cell activation. VI. Inhibitory and stimulatory effects of anti-major histocompatibility complex class I antibodies in allogeneic mixed lymphocyte culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Röpke, M; Röpke, C; Claesson, Mogens Helweg

    1993-01-01

    Murine T splenocytes stimulated in primary allogeneic mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) were incubated with soluble anti-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I monoclonal antibodies. These antibodies induced inhibition in the cytotoxicity of the responding population and this inhibition was...

  2. A recombinant antibody with the antigen-specific, major histocompatibility complex-restricted specificity of T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P S; Stryhn, A; Hansen, B E; Fugger, L; Engberg, J; Buus, S

    1996-01-01

    lead to novel approaches in immunotherapy. However, it has proven difficult to generate antibodies with the specificity of T cells by conventional hybridoma techniques. Here we report that the phage display technology is a feasible alternative to generate antibodies recognizing specific, predetermined......Specific recognition of peptide/major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule complexes by the T-cell receptor is a key reaction in the specific immune response. Antibodies against peptide/MHC complexes would therefore be valuable tools in studying MHC function and T-cell recognition and might...

  3. Role of the major histocompatibility complex in resistance and granuloma formation in response to Mycobacterium lepraemurium infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Adu, H O; Curtis, J.; Turk, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    Resistance to a subcutaneous infection with a moderate dose of Mycobacterium lepraemurium was investigated in C57BL/6 mice and in three congenic strains with the BALB background (BALB/c, BALB/B, and BALB/K). Resistance after 10 weeks of infection was found not to be linked to the major histocompatibility complex. The ability to develop a delayed hypersensitivity response to an ultrasonicate of M. lepraemurium was associated with the background genes, and this ability had no influence on resis...

  4. Zygosity at the major histocompatibility class IIB locus predicts susceptibility to Renibacterium salmoninarum in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, S M; Faisal, M; DeWoody, J A

    2007-10-01

    Major histocompatibility (MH) class II genes play an important role in the vertebrate immune response. Here, we investigate the relationship between Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) MH class IIB zygosity and susceptibility to Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causal agent of bacterial kidney disease. By combining DNA sequences from the salmon MH class IIB gene with quantitative ELISA data on R. salmoninarum antigen levels, we found that MH class IIB homozygotes were significantly more susceptible to R. salmoninarum than heterozygotes. These findings are discussed in the context of current evolutionary theory. PMID:17627802

  5. Natural selection of the major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) in Hawaiian honeycreepers (Drepanidinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvi, S.I.; Tarr, C.L.; Mcintosh, C.E.; Atkinson, C.T.; Fleischer, R.C.

    2004-01-01

    The native Hawaiian honeycreepers represent a classic example of adaptive radiation and speciation, but currently face one the highest extinction rates in the world. Although multiple factors have likely influenced the fate of Hawaiian birds, the relatively recent introduction of avian malaria is thought to be a major factor limiting honeycreeper distribution and abundance. We have initiated genetic analyses of class II ?? chain Mhc genes in four species of honeycreepers using methods that eliminate the possibility of sequencing mosaic variants formed by cloning heteroduplexed polymerase chain reaction products. Phylogenetic analyses group the honeycreeper Mhc sequences into two distinct clusters. Variation within one cluster is high, with dN > d S and levels of diversity similar to other studies of Mhc (B system) genes in birds. The second cluster is nearly invariant and includes sequences from honeycreepers (Fringillidae), a sparrow (Emberizidae) and a blackbird (Emberizidae). This highly conserved cluster appears reminiscent of the independently segregating Rfp-Y system of genes defined in chickens. The notion that balancing selection operates at the Mhc in the honeycreepers is supported by transpecies polymorphism and strikingly high dN/dS ratios at codons putatively involved in peptide interaction. Mitochondrial DNA control region sequences were invariant in the i'iwi, but were highly variable in the 'amakihi. By contrast, levels of variability of class II ?? chain Mhc sequence codons that are hypothesized to be directly involved in peptide interactions appear comparable between i'iwi and 'amakihi. In the i'iwi, natural selection may have maintained variation within the Mhc, even in the face of what appears to a genetic bottleneck.

  6. DNA Methylation Profiling of the Human Major Histocompatibility Complex: A Pilot Study for the Human Epigenome Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakyan Vardhman K

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The Human Epigenome Project aims to identify, catalogue, and interpret genome-wide DNA methylation phenomena. Occurring naturally on cytosine bases at cytosine-guanine dinucleotides, DNA methylation is intimately involved in diverse biological processes and the aetiology of many diseases. Differentially methylated cytosines give rise to distinct profiles, thought to be specific for gene activity, tissue type, and disease state. The identification of such methylation variable positions will significantly improve our understanding of genome biology and our ability to diagnose disease. Here, we report the results of the pilot study for the Human Epigenome Project entailing the methylation analysis of the human major histocompatibility complex. This study involved the development of an integrated pipeline for high-throughput methylation analysis using bisulphite DNA sequencing, discovery of methylation variable positions, epigenotyping by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry, and development of an integrated public database available at http://www.epigenome.org. Our analysis of DNA methylation levels within the major histocompatibility complex, including regulatory exonic and intronic regions associated with 90 genes in multiple tissues and individuals, reveals a bimodal distribution of methylation profiles (i.e., the vast majority of the analysed regions were either hypo- or hypermethylated, tissue specificity, inter-individual variation, and correlation with independent gene expression data.

  7. Human major histocompatibility complex contains a minimum of 19 genes between the complement cluster and HLA-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 600-kilobase (kb) DNA segment from the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class III region was isolated by extension of a previous 435-kb chromosome walk. The contiguous series of cloned overlapping cosmids contains the entire 555-kb interval between C2 in the complement gene cluster and HLA-B. This region is known to encode the tumor necrosis factors (TNFs) α and β, B144, and the major heat shock protein HSP70. Moreover, a cluster of genes, BAT1-BAT5 (HLA-B-associated transcripts) have been localized in the vicinity of the genes for TNFα and TNFβ. An additional four genes were identified by isolation of corresponding cDNA clones with cosmid DNA probes. These genes for BAT6-BAT9 were mapped near the gene for C2 within a 120-kb region that includes a HSP70 gene pair. These results, together with complementary data from a similar recent study, indicated the presence of a minimum of 19 genes within the C2-HLA-B interval of the MHC class III region. Although the functional properties of most of these genes are yet unknown, they may be involved in some aspects of immunity. This idea is supported by the genetic mapping of the hematopoietic histocompatibility locus-1 (Hh-1) in recombinant mice between TNFα and H-2S, which is homologous to the complement gene cluster in humans

  8. Clinical, immunological and genetic features in eleven Algerian patients with major histocompatibility complex class II expression deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djidjik Réda

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Presenting processed antigens to CD4+ lymphocytes during the immune response involves major histocompatibility complex class II molecules. MHC class II genes transcription is regulated by four transcription factors: CIITA, RFXANK, RFX5 and RFXAP. Defects in these factors result in major histocompatibility complex class II expression deficiency, a primary combined immunodeficiency frequent in North Africa. Autosomal recessive mutations in the RFXANK gene have been reported as being the principal defect found in North African patients with this disorder. In this paper, we describe clinical, immunological and genetic features of 11 unrelated Algerian patients whose monocytes display a total absence of MHC class II molecules. They shared mainly the same clinical picture which included protracted diarrhoea and respiratory tract recurrent infections. Genetic analysis revealed that 9 of the 11 patients had the same RFXANK founder mutation, a 26 bp deletion (named I5E6-25_I5E6+1, also known as 752delG26. Immunological and genetic findings in our series may facilitate genetic counselling implementation for Algerian consanguineous families. Further studies need to be conducted to determine 752delG26 heterozygous mutation frequency in Algerian population.

  9. Oriented coupling of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) to sensor surfaces using light assisted immobilisation technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snabe, Torben; Røder, Gustav Andreas; Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa; Buus, Søren; Petersen, Steffen Bjørn

    2005-01-01

    histocompatibility complex (MHC class I) to a sensor surface is presented. The coupling was performed using light assisted immobilisation--a novel immobilisation technology which allows specific opening of particular disulphide bridges in proteins which then is used for covalent bonding to thiol-derivatised surfaces...... via a new disulphide bond. Light assisted immobilisation specifically targets the disulphide bridge in the MHC-I molecule alpha(3)-domain which ensures oriented linking of the complex with the peptide binding site exposed away from the sensor surface. Structural analysis reveals that a similar...... procedure can be used for covalent immobilisation of MHC class II complexes. The results open for the development of efficient T cell sensors, sensors for recognition of peptides of pathogenic origin, as well as other applications that may benefit from oriented immobilisation of MHC proteins....

  10. Preformed purified peptide/major histocompatibility class I complexes are potent stimulators of class I-restricted T cell hybridomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stryhn, A; Pedersen, L O; Ortiz-Navarrete, V;

    1994-01-01

    A panel of antigen-specific, major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted T cell hybridomas has been generated to examine the capacity of peptide/class I complexes to stimulate T cells at the molecular level. Peptide/class I complexes were generated in detergent solution, purified and...... quantitated. Latex particles were subsequently coated with known amounts of preformed complexes and used to stimulate the T cell hybridomas. Stimulation was specific, i.e. only the appropriate peptide/class I combination were stimulatory, and quite sensitive, i.e. as little as 300 complexes per bead could be...... detected by the T cells. Preformed complexes were about 500,000 times more potent than free peptide in terms of T cell stimulation, demonstrating the physiological relevancy of the biochemically generated complexes. Surprisingly, the majority (including the most sensitive of the hybridomas) had lost CD8...

  11. Low major histocompatibility complex diversity in the Tasmanian devil predates European settlement and may explain susceptibility to disease epidemics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Katrina; Austin, Jeremy J; Belov, Katherine

    2013-02-23

    The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) is at risk of extinction owing to the emergence of a contagious cancer known as devil facial tumour disease (DFTD). The emergence and spread of DFTD has been linked to low genetic diversity in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). We examined MHC diversity in historical and ancient devils to determine whether loss of diversity is recent or predates European settlement in Australia. Our results reveal no additional diversity in historical Tasmanian samples. Mainland devils had common modern variants plus six new variants that are highly similar to existing alleles. We conclude that low MHC diversity has been a feature of devil populations since at least the Mid-Holocene and could explain their tumultuous history of population crashes. PMID:23221872

  12. Non-major histocompatibility complex-restricted cytotoxic activity of blood mononuclear cells stimulated with secreted mycobacterial proteins and other mycobacterial antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, P; Pedersen, B K

    1994-01-01

    Several observations indicate that non-major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted cytotoxicity, mediated for example by natural killer cells and lymphokine-activated killer cells, may serve as an important antimicrobial defense mechanism. The purpose of the present study was to investigate...

  13. Major histocompatibility complex associations of ankylosing spondylitis are complex and involve further epistasis with ERAP1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cortes, Adrian; Pulit, Sara L; Leo, Paul J; Pointon, Jenny J; Robinson, Philip C; Weisman, Michael H; Ward, Michael; Gensler, Lianne S; Zhou, Xiaodong; Garchon, Henri-Jean; Chiocchia, Gilles; Nossent, Johannes; Lie, Benedicte A; Førre, Øystein; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Laiho, Kari; Bradbury, Linda A; Elewaut, Dirk; Burgos-Vargas, Ruben; Stebbings, Simon; Appleton, Louise; Farrah, Claire; Lau, Jonathan; Haroon, Nigil; Mulero, Juan; Blanco, Francisco J; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A; Lopez-Larrea, C; Bowness, Paul; Gaffney, Karl; Gaston, Hill; Gladman, Dafna D; Rahman, Proton; Maksymowych, Walter P; Crusius, J Bart A; van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E; Valle-Oñate, Raphael; Romero-Sánchez, Consuelo; Hansen, Inger Myrnes; Pimentel-Santos, Fernando M; Inman, Robert D; Martin, Javier; Breban, Maxime; Wordsworth, Bryan Paul; Reveille, John D; Evans, David M; de Bakker, Paul I W; Brown, Matthew A

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a common, highly heritable, inflammatory arthritis for which HLA-B*27 is the major genetic risk factor, although its role in the aetiology of AS remains elusive. To better understand the genetic basis of the MHC susceptibility loci, we genotyped 7,264 MHC SNPs in 22,64

  14. The role of the pleiotropic genes of the major histocompatibility complex in evolution: The example of the three-spined stickleback

    OpenAIRE

    Eizaguirre, C

    2008-01-01

    Plants and animals share their environments with a rich fauna of parasites and potentially, there is no species without at least one pathogen. Selection by parasites is recognized as one of the principal evolutionary processes and has probably even led to the evolution of sexual reproduction- a major paradox in evolutionary biology. To counter this constant threat, vertebrates have developed different immune defenses. In particularly the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) p...

  15. Characterization of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) DRB Exon 2 and DRA Exon 3 Fragments in a Primary Terrestrial Rabies Vector (Procyon lotor)

    OpenAIRE

    Castillo, Sarrah; Srithayakumar, Vythegi; Meunier, Vanessa; Christopher J Kyle

    2010-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) presents a unique system to explore links between genetic diversity and pathogens, as diversity within MHC is maintained in part by pathogen driven selection. While the majority of wildlife MHC studies have investigated species that are of conservation concern, here we characterize MHC variation in a common and broadly distributed species, the North American raccoon (Procyon lotor). Raccoons host an array of broadly distributed wildlife diseases (e.g...

  16. Sequence-specific interactions of nuclear factors with conserved sequences of human class II major histocompatibility complex genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All class II major histocompatibility complex genes contain two highly conserved sequences, termed X and Y, with the promoter region(s), which may have a role in regulation of expression. To study trans-acting factors that interact with these sequences, sequence-specific DNA binding activity has been examined by the gel electrophoresis retardation assay using the HLA-DQ2β gene 5' flanking DNA and nuclear extracts derived from various cell types. Several specific protein-binding activities were found using a 45-base-pair (bp) HinfI/Sau96I (-142 to -98 bp) and a 38-bp Sau96I/Sau96I (-97 to -60 bp) fragment, which include conserved sequence X (-113 to -100 bp) and conserved sequence Y (-80 to -71 bp), respectively. Competition experiments, methylation interference analysis, and DNase I footprinting demonstrated that distinct proteins in a nuclear extract of Raji cells (a human B lymphoma line) bind to sequence X, to sequence Y, and to DNA 5' of the X sequence (termed sequence W). The factor binding site in the W sequence is also found to be conserved among β-chain genes and is suggested to be a γ-interferon control region

  17. Major histocompatibility complex class I molecules protect motor neurons from astrocyte-induced toxicity in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, SungWon; Miranda, Carlos J; Braun, Lyndsey; Meyer, Kathrin; Frakes, Ashley E; Ferraiuolo, Laura; Likhite, Shibi; Bevan, Adam K; Foust, Kevin D; McConnell, Michael J; Walker, Christopher M; Kaspar, Brian K

    2016-04-01

    Astrocytes isolated from individuals with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are toxic to motor neurons (MNs) and play a non-cell autonomous role in disease pathogenesis. The mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of MNs to cell death remain unclear. Here we report that astrocytes derived from either mice bearing mutations in genes associated with ALS or human subjects with ALS reduce the expression of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) molecules on MNs; reduced MHCI expression makes these MNs susceptible to astrocyte-induced cell death. Increasing MHCI expression on MNs increases survival and motor performance in a mouse model of ALS and protects MNs against astrocyte toxicity. Overexpression of a single MHCI molecule, HLA-F, protects human MNs from ALS astrocyte-mediated toxicity, whereas knockdown of its receptor, the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor KIR3DL2, on human astrocytes results in enhanced MN death. Thus, our data indicate that, in ALS, loss of MHCI expression on MNs renders them more vulnerable to astrocyte-mediated toxicity. PMID:26928464

  18. Vaccine-induced antibodies linked to bovine neonatal pancytopenia (BNP recognize cattle major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deutskens Fabian

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A mysterious disease affecting calves, named bovine neonatal pancytopenia (BNP, emerged in 2007 in several European countries. Epidemiological studies revealed a connection between BNP and vaccination with an inactivated vaccine against bovine virus diarrhea (BVD. Alloantibodies reacting with blood leukocytes of calves were detected in serum and colostrum of dams, which have given birth to calves affected by BNP. To understand the linkage between vaccination and the development of alloantibodies, we determined the antigens reacting with these alloantibodies. Immunoprecipitation of surface proteins from bovine leukocytes and kidney cells using sera from dams with a confirmed case of BNP in their gestation history reacted with two dominant protein species of 44 and 12 kDa. These proteins were not detected by sera from dams, free of BVDV and not vaccinated against BVD, and from sera of animals vaccinated with a different inactivated BVD vaccine. The 44 kDa protein was identified by mass spectrometry analysis as MHC I, the other as β-2-microglobulin. The presence of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I in the vaccine was confirmed by Western blot using a MHC I specific monoclonal antibody. A model of BNP pathogenesis is proposed.

  19. Trophoblast Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Expression Is Associated with Immune-Mediated Rejection of Bovine Fetuses Produced by Cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutigliano, Heloisa M; Thomas, Aaron J; Wilhelm, Amanda; Sessions, Benjamin R; Hicks, Brady A; Schlafer, Donald H; White, Kenneth L; Davies, Christopher J

    2016-08-01

    Trophoblast cells from bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) conceptuses express major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) proteins early in gestation, and this may be one cause of the significant first-trimester embryonic mortality observed in these pregnancies. MHC-I homozygous-compatible (n = 9), homozygous-incompatible (n = 8), and heterozygous-incompatible (n = 5) SCNT pregnancies were established. The control group consisted of eight pregnancies produced by artificial insemination. Uterine and placental samples were collected on Day 35 ± 1 of pregnancy, and expression of MHC-I, leukocyte markers, and cytokines were examined by immunohistochemistry. Trophoblast cells from all SCNT pregnancies expressed MHC-I, while trophoblast cells from age-matched control pregnancies were negative for MHC-I expression. Expression of MHC-I antigens by trophoblast cells from SCNT pregnancies was associated with lymphocytic infiltration in the endometrium. Furthermore, MHC-I-incompatible conceptuses, particularly the heterozygous-incompatible ones, induced a more pronounced lymphocytic infiltration than MHC-I-compatible conceptuses. Cells expressing cluster of differentiation (CD) 3, gamma/deltaTCR, and MHC-II were increased in the endometrium of SCNT pregnancies compared to the control group. CD4(+) lymphocytes were increased in MHC-I-incompatible pregnancies compared to MHC-I-compatible and control pregnancies. CD8(+), FOXP3(+), and natural killer cells were increased in MHC-I heterozygous-incompatible SCNT pregnancies compared to homozygous SCNT and control pregnancies. PMID:27385783

  20. B-cell-specific enhancer activity of conserved upstream elements of the class II major histocompatibility complex DQB gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurai, M.; Strominger, J.L.

    1988-09-01

    A 95-base-pair immediate upstream sequence of the human class II major histocompatibility complex DQB gene containing the conserved X and Y elements showed enhancer activity in a transient expression assay. An enhancer test plasmid harboring the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene under the control of a truncated simian virus 40 enhancerless early promoter was employed. The DQB sequence inserted into this plasmid was active as an enhancer in Raji cells (human Burkitt lymphoma cells) but not active in Jurkat cells (human T-cell leukemia cells) or in HeLa cells (human cervical carcinoma cells). This cell-type specificity suggests that this enhancer activity may be involved in the tissue specificity of the DQB gene that is normally expressed only in mature B cells, macrophages, and thymic epithelial cells. Deletion analysis showed that both X and Y box sequences are essential for the full activity of the enhancer sequence and that these two sequences may function in a cooperative manner as cis-acting elements. Further deletions were used to define the 5' border of the X element. These results suggest that previously characterized protein factors that bind to X and Y include transcription factors involved in the cell-type specificity of this enhancer activity.

  1. Organization and characteristics of the major histocompatibility complex class II region in the Yangtze finless porpoise (Neophocaena asiaeorientalis asiaeorientalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Rui; Ruan, Jue; Wan, Xiao-Ling; Zheng, Yang; Chen, Min-Min; Zheng, Jin-Song; Wang, Ding

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in the genome of Yangtze finless porpoise (Neophocaena asiaeorientalis asiaeorientalis) (YFP) or other cetaceans. In this study, a high-quality YFP bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library was constructed. We then determined the organization and characterization of YFP MHC class II region by screening the BAC library, followed by sequencing and assembly of positive BAC clones. The YFP MHC class II region consists of two segregated contigs (218,725 bp and 328,435 bp respectively) that include only eight expressed MHC class II genes, three pseudo MHC genes and twelve non-MHC genes. The YFP has fewer MHC class II genes than ruminants, showing locus reduction in DRB, DQA, DQB, and loss of DY. In addition, phylogenic and evolutionary analyses indicated that the DRB, DQA and DQB genes might have undergone birth-and-death evolution, whereas the DQB gene might have evolved under positive selection in cetaceans. These findings provide an essential foundation for future work, such as estimating MHC genetic variation in the YFP or other cetaceans. This work is the first report on the MHC class II region in cetaceans and offers valuable information for understanding the evolution of MHC genome in cetaceans. PMID:26932528

  2. Generation of a genomic tiling array of the human Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC and its application for DNA methylation analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ottaviani Diego

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major histocompatibility complex (MHC is essential for human immunity and is highly associated with common diseases, including cancer. While the genetics of the MHC has been studied intensively for many decades, very little is known about the epigenetics of this most polymorphic and disease-associated region of the genome. Methods To facilitate comprehensive epigenetic analyses of this region, we have generated a genomic tiling array of 2 Kb resolution covering the entire 4 Mb MHC region. The array has been designed to be compatible with chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP, methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP, array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH and expression profiling, including of non-coding RNAs. The array comprises 7832 features, consisting of two replicates of both forward and reverse strands of MHC amplicons and appropriate controls. Results Using MeDIP, we demonstrate the application of the MHC array for DNA methylation profiling and the identification of tissue-specific differentially methylated regions (tDMRs. Based on the analysis of two tissues and two cell types, we identified 90 tDMRs within the MHC and describe their characterisation. Conclusion A tiling array covering the MHC region was developed and validated. Its successful application for DNA methylation profiling indicates that this array represents a useful tool for molecular analyses of the MHC in the context of medical genomics.

  3. Hard wiring of T cell receptor specificity for the major histocompatibility complex is underpinned by TCR adaptability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrows, Scott R.; Chen, Zhenjun; Archbold, Julia K.; Tynan, Fleur E.; Beddoe, Travis; Kjer-Nielsen, Lars; Miles, John J.; Khanna, Rajiv; Moss, Denis J.; Liu, Yu Chih; Gras, Stephanie; Kostenko, Lyudmila; Brennan, Rebekah M.; Clements, Craig S.; Brooks, Andrew G.; Purcell, Anthony W.; McCluskey, James; Rossjohn, Jamie (Monash); (Queensland Inst. of Med. Rsrch.); (Melbourne)

    2010-07-07

    {alpha}{beta} T cell receptors (TCRs) are genetically restricted to corecognize peptide antigens bound to self-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) molecules; however, the basis for this MHC specificity remains unclear. Despite the current dogma, evaluation of the TCR-pMHC-I structural database shows that the nongermline-encoded complementarity-determining region (CDR)-3 loops often contact the MHC-I, and the germline-encoded CDR1 and -2 loops frequently participate in peptide-mediated interactions. Nevertheless, different TCRs adopt a roughly conserved docking mode over the pMHC-I, in which three MHC-I residues (65, 69, and 155) are invariably contacted by the TCR in one way or another. Nonetheless, the impact of mutations at these three positions, either individually or together, was not uniformly detrimental to TCR recognition of pHLA-B*0801 or pHLA-B*3508. Moreover, when TCR-pMHC-I recognition was impaired, this could be partially restored by expression of the CD8 coreceptor. The structure of a TCR-pMHC-I complex in which these three (65, 69, and 155) MHC-I positions were all mutated resulted in shifting of the TCR footprint relative to the cognate complex and formation of compensatory interactions. Collectively, our findings reveal the inherent adaptability of the TCR in maintaining peptide recognition while accommodating changes to the central docking site on the pMHC-I.

  4. Proteolysis of the heavy chain of major histocompatibility complex class I antigens by complement component C1s

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, H; Nissen, Mogens Holst

    1990-01-01

    into at least two fragments, with apparent molecular weights of 22,000 and 24,000 g/mol on sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), under both reducing and non-reducing conditions. The cleavage of the heavy chain is inhibited by the presence of C1 esterase inhibitor. The......The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antigens contain a light chain, beta 2-microglobulin, non-covalently associated to the transmembrane heavy alpha-chain carrying the allotypic determinants. Since the C1q complement component is known to associate with beta 2-microglobulin, and we...... mouse MHC class II antigen (I-Ad). Mouse MHC class I antigen-specific determinants could also be detected in supernatant from mouse spleen cells incubated with C1r and C1s. These results indicate the presence in the body fluids of a non-membrane-bound soluble form of the alpha 1-and alpha 2-domains...

  5. Elevation of soluble major histocompatibility complex class I related chain A protein in malignant and infectious diseases in Chinese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Xiaoxin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elevation of soluble major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A (sMICA products in serum has been linked to tissue/organ transplantation, autoimmune diseases and some malignant disorders. Cells infected by microbiological pathogens may release sMICA, whereas less is known whether and to what extent serum sMICA levels may change in infectious diseases. Methods The present study determined serum sMICA levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA in a southern China population, including patients (n = 1041 suffering from several types of malignant and infectious diseases and healthy controls (n = 141. Results Relative to controls, serum sMICA elevation was significant in patients of hepatic cancer, and was approaching statistical significance in patients with lung, gastric and nasopharyngeal cancers. sMICA elevation was also associated with some bacterial (Enterobacteriaceae, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, non-fermenting Gram-negative bacteria and Gram-positive cocci, viral (hepatitis B and C and the Microspironema pallidum infections. Conclusion Serum sMICA levels may be informative for the diagnosis of some malignant and infectious diseases. The results also indicate that microbiological infections should be considered as a potential confounding clinical condition causing serum sMICA elevation while using this test to evaluate the status of other disorders, such as cancers, host-graft response and autoimmune diseases.

  6. Zinc Induces Dimerization of the Class II Major Histocompatibility Complex Molecule That Leads to Cooperative Binding to a Superantigen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li,H.; Zhao, Y.; Guo, Y.; Li, Z.; Eislele, L.; Mourad, W.

    2007-01-01

    Dimerization of class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) plays an important role in the MHC biological function. Mycoplasma arthritidis-derived mitogen (MAM) is a superantigen that can activate large fractions of T cells bearing specific T cell receptor V{beta} elements. Here we have used structural, sedimentation, and surface plasmon resonance detection approaches to investigate the molecular interactions between MAM and the class II MHC molecule HLA-DR1 in the context of a hemagglutinin peptide-(306-318) (HA). Our results revealed that zinc ion can efficiently induce the dimerization of the HLA-DR1/HA complex. Because the crystal structure of the MAM/HLA-DR1/hemagglutinin complex in the presence of EDTA is nearly identical to the structure of the complex crystallized in the presence of zinc ion, Zn{sup 2+} is evidently not directly involved in the binding between MAM and HLA-DR1. Sedimentation and surface plasmon resonance studies further revealed that MAM binds the HLA-DR1/HA complex with high affinity in a 1:1 stoichiometry, in the absence of Zn{sup 2+}. However, in the presence of Zn{sup 2+}, a dimerized MAM/HLA-DR1/HA complex can arise through the Zn{sup 2+}-induced DR1 dimer. In the presence of Zn{sup 2+}, cooperative binding of MAM to the DR1 dimer was also observed.

  7. Active suppression of major histocompatibility complex class II gene expression during differentiation from B cells to plasma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constitutive expression of major histocompatibility complex class II genes is acquired very early in B-cell ontogeny and is maintained up to the B-cell blast stage. Terminal differentiation in plasma cells is, however, accompanied by a loss of class II gene expression. In B cells this gene system is under the control of several loci encoding transacting factors with activator function, one of which, the aIr-1 gene product, operates across species barriers. In this report human class II gene expression is shown to be extinguished in somatic cell hybrids between the human class II-positive B-cell line Raji and the mouse class-II negative plasmacytoma cell line P3-U1. Since all murine chromosomes are retained in these hybrids and no preferential segregation of a specific human chromosome is observed, the results are compatible with the presence of suppressor factors of mouse origin, operating across species barriers and inhibiting class II gene expression. Suppression seems to act at the level of transcription or accumulation of class II-specific mRNA, since no human, and very few murine, class II transcripts are detectable in the hybrids

  8. Major Histocompatibility Complex class I proteins are critical for maintaining neuronal structural complexity in the aging brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarczyk, Maciej J; Kemmler, Julia E; Eyford, Brett A; Short, Jennifer A; Varghese, Merina; Sowa, Allison; Dickstein, Daniel R; Yuk, Frank J; Puri, Rishi; Biron, Kaan E; Leist, Marcel; Jefferies, Wilfred A; Dickstein, Dara L

    2016-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) proteins have been implicated in neuronal function through the modulation of neuritogenesis, synaptogenesis, synaptic plasticity, and memory consolidation during development. However, the involvement of MHCI in the aged brain is unclear. Here we demonstrate that MHCI deficiency results in significant dendritic atrophy along with an increase in thin dendritic spines and a reduction in stubby spines in the hippocampus of aged (12 month old) mice. Ultrastructural analyses revealed a decrease in spine head diameter and post synaptic density (PSD) area, as well as an increase in overall synapse density, and non-perforated, small spines. Interestingly, we found that the changes in synapse density and morphology appear relatively late (after the age of 6 months). Finally, we found a significant age dependent increase in the levels of the glutamate receptor, GluN2B in aged MHCI knockout mice, with no change in GluA2/3, VGluT1, PSD95 or synaptophysin. These results indicate that MHCI may be also be involved in maintaining brain integrity at post-developmental stages notably in the modulation of neuronal and spine morphology and synaptic function during non-pathological aging which could have significant implications for cognitive function. PMID:27229916

  9. Regulation of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Genes in Bovine Trophoblast Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Bi

    2014-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), or cloning, is a form of artificial reproductive technology that can be used to improve economic traits of domestic animals. However, extreme inefficiency of producing viable offspring via this method is a major limitation. An aggressive immune response at the maternal-fetal interface is an important reason for SCNT pregnancy loss. The goal of this project was to investigate the molecular mechanisms of immune-mediated miscarriage in cloned cattle pregnanc...

  10. Major histocompatibility complex associations of ankylosing spondylitis are complex and involve further epistasis with ERAP1

    OpenAIRE

    Cortes, Adrian; Pulit, Sara L.; Leo, Paul J.; Pointon, Jenny J; Robinson, Philip C; Weisman, Michael H.; Ward, Michael; Gensler, Lianne S.; Zhou, Xiaodong; Garchon, Henri-Jean; Chiocchia, Gilles; Nossent, Johannes; Benedicte A Lie; Forre, Øystein; Tuomilehto, Jaakko

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a common, highly heritable, inflammatory arthritis for which HLA-B*27 is the major genetic risk factor, although its role in the aetiology of AS remains elusive. To better understand the genetic basis of the MHC susceptibility loci, we genotyped 7,264 MHC SNPs in 22,647 AS cases and controls of European descent. We impute SNPs, classical HLA alleles and amino-acid residues within HLA proteins, and tested these for association to AS status. Here we show that in a...

  11. Major histocompatibility complex associations of ankylosing spondylitis are complex and involve further epistasis with ERAP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Adrian; Pulit, Sara L; Leo, Paul J; Pointon, Jenny J; Robinson, Philip C; Weisman, Michael H; Ward, Michael; Gensler, Lianne S; Zhou, Xiaodong; Garchon, Henri-Jean; Chiocchia, Gilles; Nossent, Johannes; Lie, Benedicte A; Førre, Øystein; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Laiho, Kari; Bradbury, Linda A; Elewaut, Dirk; Burgos-Vargas, Ruben; Stebbings, Simon; Appleton, Louise; Farrah, Claire; Lau, Jonathan; Haroon, Nigil; Mulero, Juan; Blanco, Francisco J; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A; Lopez-Larrea, C; Bowness, Paul; Gaffney, Karl; Gaston, Hill; Gladman, Dafna D; Rahman, Proton; Maksymowych, Walter P; Crusius, J Bart A; van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E; Valle-Oñate, Raphael; Romero-Sánchez, Consuelo; Hansen, Inger Myrnes; Pimentel-Santos, Fernando M; Inman, Robert D; Martin, Javier; Breban, Maxime; Wordsworth, Bryan Paul; Reveille, John D; Evans, David M; de Bakker, Paul I W; Brown, Matthew A

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a common, highly heritable, inflammatory arthritis for which HLA-B*27 is the major genetic risk factor, although its role in the aetiology of AS remains elusive. To better understand the genetic basis of the MHC susceptibility loci, we genotyped 7,264 MHC SNPs in 22,647 AS cases and controls of European descent. We impute SNPs, classical HLA alleles and amino-acid residues within HLA proteins, and tested these for association to AS status. Here we show that in addition to effects due to HLA-B*27 alleles, several other HLA-B alleles also affect susceptibility. After controlling for the associated haplotypes in HLA-B, we observe independent associations with variants in the HLA-A, HLA-DPB1 and HLA-DRB1 loci. We also demonstrate that the ERAP1 SNP rs30187 association is not restricted only to carriers of HLA-B*27 but also found in HLA-B*40:01 carriers independently of HLA-B*27 genotype. PMID:25994336

  12. Major histocompatibility complex associations of ankylosing spondylitis are complex and involve further epistasis with ERAP1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Adrian; Pulit, Sara L.; Leo, Paul J.; Pointon, Jenny J.; Robinson, Philip C.; Weisman, Michael H.; Ward, Michael; Gensler, Lianne S.; Zhou, Xiaodong; Garchon, Henri-Jean; Chiocchia, Gilles; Nossent, Johannes; Lie, Benedicte A.; Førre, Øystein; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Laiho, Kari; Bradbury, Linda A.; Elewaut, Dirk; Burgos-Vargas, Ruben; Stebbings, Simon; Appleton, Louise; Farrah, Claire; Lau, Jonathan; Haroon, Nigil; Mulero, Juan; Blanco, Francisco J.; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A.; Lopez-Larrea, C; Bowness, Paul; Gaffney, Karl; Gaston, Hill; Gladman, Dafna D.; Rahman, Proton; Maksymowych, Walter P.; Crusius, J. Bart A.; van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E.; Valle-Oñate, Raphael; Romero-Sánchez, Consuelo; Hansen, Inger Myrnes; Pimentel-Santos, Fernando M.; Inman, Robert D.; Martin, Javier; Breban, Maxime; Wordsworth, Bryan Paul; Reveille, John D.; Evans, David M.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Brown, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a common, highly heritable, inflammatory arthritis for which HLA-B*27 is the major genetic risk factor, although its role in the aetiology of AS remains elusive. To better understand the genetic basis of the MHC susceptibility loci, we genotyped 7,264 MHC SNPs in 22,647 AS cases and controls of European descent. We impute SNPs, classical HLA alleles and amino-acid residues within HLA proteins, and tested these for association to AS status. Here we show that in addition to effects due to HLA-B*27 alleles, several other HLA-B alleles also affect susceptibility. After controlling for the associated haplotypes in HLA-B, we observe independent associations with variants in the HLA-A, HLA-DPB1 and HLA-DRB1 loci. We also demonstrate that the ERAP1 SNP rs30187 association is not restricted only to carriers of HLA-B*27 but also found in HLA-B*40:01 carriers independently of HLA-B*27 genotype. PMID:25994336

  13. Initiation Codon Scanthrough versus Termination Codon Readthrough Demonstrates Strong Potential for Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I–restricted Cryptic Epitope Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Bullock, Timothy N.J.; Patterson, Anthony E.; Franlin, Laura L.; Notidis, Evangelia; Eisenlohr, Laurence C.

    1997-01-01

    Accumulating evidence shows that the repertoire of major histocompatibility complex class I–restricted epitopes extends beyond conventional translation reading frames. Previously, we reported that scanthrough translation, where the initiating AUG of a primary open reading frame is bypassed, is most likely to account for the presentation of cryptic epitopes from alternative reading frames within the influenza A PR/8/34 nucleoprotein gene. Here, we confirm and extend these findings using an epi...

  14. Modulation of the major histocompatibility complex by neural stem cell-derived neurotrophic factors used for regenerative therapy in a rat model of stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Sun Chongran; Zhang Han; Li Jin; Huang Hua; Cheng Hongbin; Wang Yajie; Li Ping, [No Value; An Yihua

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The relationship between functional improvements in ischemic rats given a neural stem cell (NSC) transplant and the modulation of the class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) mediated by NSC-derived neurotrophins was investigated. Methods The levels of gene expression of nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) were assayed from cultures of cortical NSC from Sprague-Dawley rat E16 embryos. The levels of translated N...

  15. From Sanger to NGS: Detecting MHC (Major Histocompatibility Complex) Class II and OR (Olfactory Receptors) Genetic Variability in Italian Wolves (Canis Lupus) and relative Canids

    OpenAIRE

    Lapalombella, Silvana

    2016-01-01

    In this PhD thesis I will describe different aspects of conservation genetics and genomics of two wild Canidae species, the wolf (Canis lupus) and the golden jackal (Canis aureus), through the study of two of the most variable gene families: the Major Histocompatibility Complex genes (MHC), and Olfactory Receptors genes (OR). In order to perform these studies both Sanger and next generation sequencing (NGS) DNA techniques have been used. The background of the thesis is described in the “Gener...

  16. Parasite Manipulation of the Invariant Chain and the Peptide Editor H2-DM Affects Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Antigen Presentation during Toxoplasma gondii Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Leroux, Louis-Philippe; Nishi, Manami; El-Hage, Sandy; Fox, Barbara A.; Bzik, David J.; Dzierszinski, Florence S.

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite. This apicomplexan is the causative agent of toxoplasmosis, a leading cause of central nervous system disease in AIDS. It has long been known that T. gondii interferes with major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) antigen presentation to attenuate CD4+ T cell responses and establish persisting infections. Transcriptional downregulation of MHC-II genes by T. gondii was previously established, but the precise mechanisms...

  17. Surface Downregulation of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I, PE-CAM, and ICAM-1 following De Novo Infection of Endothelial Cells with Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus

    OpenAIRE

    Tomescu, Costin; Law, Wai K.; Dean H Kedes

    2003-01-01

    Under selective pressure from host cytotoxic T lymphocytes, many viruses have evolved to downregulate major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and/or T-cell costimulatory molecules from the surface of infected cells. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) encodes two proteins, MIR-1 and MIR-2, that serve this function during lytic replication. In vivo, however, KSHV exists in a predominantly latent state, with less than 5% of infected cells expressing discernible lytic gene prod...

  18. Inhibition of Heavy Chain and β2-Microglobulin Synthesis as a Mechanism of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Downregulation during Epstein-Barr Virus Replication▿

    OpenAIRE

    Guerreiro-Cacais, Andre Ortlieb; Uzunel, Mehmet; Levitskaya, Jelena; Levitsky, Victor

    2006-01-01

    The mechanisms of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I downregulation during Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) replication are not well characterized. Here we show that in several cell lines infected with a recombinant EBV strain encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP), the virus lytic cycle coincides with GFP expression, which thus can be used as a marker of virus replication. EBV replication resulted in downregulation of MHC class II and all classical MHC class I alleles independently of ...

  19. Comprehensive Analysis of Contributions from Protein Conformational Stability and Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II-Peptide Binding Affinity to CD4+ Epitope Immunogenicity in HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Tingfeng; Steede, N. Kalaya; Nguyen, Hong-Nam P.; Freytag, Lucy C.; McLachlan, James B.; Mettu, Ramgopal R.; Robinson, James E.; Landry, Samuel J.

    2014-01-01

    Helper T-cell epitope dominance in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein gp120 is not adequately explained by peptide binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins. Antigen processing potentially influences epitope dominance, but few, if any, studies have attempted to reconcile the influences of antigen processing and MHC protein binding for all helper T-cell epitopes of an antigen. Epitopes of gp120 identified in both humans and mice occur on the C-te...

  20. Inhibition of Class II Major Histocompatibility Complex Antigen Processing by Escherichia coli Heat-Labile Enterotoxin Requires an Enzymatically Active A Subunit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matousek, Milita P.; Nedrud, John G.; Cieplak, Witold; Harding, Clifford V.

    1998-01-01

    Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) and cholera toxin (CT) were found to inhibit intracellular antigen processing. Processing was not inhibited by mutant LT with attenuated ADP-ribosyltransferase activity, CT B or LT B subunit, which enhanced presentation of preexisting cell surface peptide-class II major histocompatibility complex complexes. Inhibition of antigen processing correlated with A subunit ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. PMID:9632629

  1. Sequence variation at the major histocompatibility complex DRB loci in beluga (Delphinapterus leucas) and narwhal (Monodon monoceros).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, B W; White, B N

    1998-09-01

    The variation at loci with similarity to DRB class II major histocompatibility complex loci was assessed in 313 beluga collected from 13 sampling locations across North America, and 11 narwhal collected in the Canadian high Arctic. Variation was assessed by amplification of exon 2, which codes for the peptide binding region, via the polymerase chain reaction, followed by either cloning and DNA sequencing or single-stranded conformation polymorphism analysis. Two DRB loci were identified in beluga: DRB1, a polymorphic locus, and, DRB2, a monomorphic locus. Eight alleles representing five distinct lineages (based on sequence similarity) were found at the beluga DRB1 locus. Although the relative number of alleles is low when compared with terrestrial mammals, the amino acid variation found among the lineages is moderate. At the DRB1 locus, the average number of nonsynonymous substitutions per site is greater than the average number of synonymous substitutions per site (0.0806 : 0.0207, respectively; P<0.01). Most of the 31 amino acid substitutions do not conserve the physiochemical properties of the residue, and 21 of these are located at positions implicated as forming pockets responsible for the selective binding of foreign peptide side chains. Only DRB1 variation was examined in 11 narwhal, revealing a low amount of variation. These data are consistent with an important role for the DRB1 locus in the cellular immune response of beluga. In addition, the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitutions is similar to that among primate alleles, arguing against a reduction in the balancing selection pressure in the marine environment. Two hypotheses may explain the modest amount of Mhc variation when compared with terrestrial mammals: small population sizes at speciation or a reduced neutral substitution rate in cetaceans. PMID:9716643

  2. Major Histocompatibility Complex Genes Map to Two Chromosomes in an Evolutionarily Ancient Reptile, the Tuatara Sphenodon punctatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Hilary C; O'Meally, Denis; Ezaz, Tariq; Amemiya, Chris; Marshall-Graves, Jennifer A; Edwards, Scott

    2015-07-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes are a central component of the vertebrate immune system and usually exist in a single genomic region. However, considerable differences in MHC organization and size exist between different vertebrate lineages. Reptiles occupy a key evolutionary position for understanding how variation in MHC structure evolved in vertebrates, but information on the structure of the MHC region in reptiles is limited. In this study, we investigate the organization and cytogenetic location of MHC genes in the tuatara (Sphenodon punctatus), the sole extant representative of the early-diverging reptilian order Rhynchocephalia. Sequencing and mapping of 12 clones containing class I and II MHC genes from a bacterial artificial chromosome library indicated that the core MHC region is located on chromosome 13q. However, duplication and translocation of MHC genes outside of the core region was evident, because additional class I MHC genes were located on chromosome 4p. We found a total of seven class I sequences and 11 class II β sequences, with evidence for duplication and pseudogenization of genes within the tuatara lineage. The tuatara MHC is characterized by high repeat content and low gene density compared with other species and we found no antigen processing or MHC framework genes on the MHC gene-containing clones. Our findings indicate substantial differences in MHC organization in tuatara compared with mammalian and avian MHCs and highlight the dynamic nature of the MHC. Further sequencing and annotation of tuatara and other reptile MHCs will determine if the tuatara MHC is representative of nonavian reptiles in general. PMID:25953959

  3. Major histocompatibility complex class II (DR) antigen and costimulatory molecules on in vitro and in vivo activated human polymorphonuclear neutrophils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandilands, Gavin P; McCrae, Jame; Hill, Kathryn; Perry, Martin; Baxter, Derek

    2006-01-01

    We have previously shown that normal human peripheral blood polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) contain cytoplasmic ‘stores’ of three key molecules normally associated with antigen presentation and T-cell costimulation, i.e. major histocompatibility complex class II (DR) antigen, CD80 (B7-1) and CD86 (B7-2). These cytoplasmic molecules were found to translocate to the cell surface within a few minutes following cross-linking (X-L) of Mac-1: an early neutrophil activation signal. In this study we have compared X-L of Mac −1 in parallel with four other well documented in vitro neutrophil activators: phorbol myristate acetate, N-formyl methionyl leucyl phenylalanine, lipopolysaccharide, and phagocytosis of immunoglobulin G–Latex particles. In addition, we have used paired samples of neutrophils obtained from peripheral blood (as a control) and synovial fluid from patients with rheumatoid arthritis as a source of in vivo activated cells. With the exception of phagocytosis, all activators resulted in the rapid (within 30 min) generation of two populations of activated neutrophils (designated P1 and P2) based on flow-cytometry measurements of size, granularity and phenotype. Significant up-regulation of DR and costimulatory molecules was observed, predominantly on P2 cells, with all activators except phagocytosis. CD80 and CD86 were noted to respond to the various activation signals in a different pattern suggesting that their intracellular granule location may be different. Dual-staining confocal laser microscopy studies showed that CD80 is largely confined to secretory vesicles (SVs) while CD86 appears to have a much wider distribution being found in SVs and within secondary (specific) and primary (azurophilic) granules. Increased surface expression of these antigens was also observed on P2 synovial fluid neutrophils appearing as large heterogeneous clusters on the cell surface when visualized by confocal laser microscopy. PMID:17034427

  4. Hepatitis B virus-like particles access major histocompatibility class I and II antigen presentation pathways in primary dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffat, Jessica M; Cheong, Wan-Shoo; Villadangos, José A; Mintern, Justine D; Netter, Hans J

    2013-04-26

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) represent high density displays of viral proteins that efficiently trigger immunity. VLPs composed of the small hepatitis B virus envelope protein (HBsAgS) are useful vaccine platforms that induce humoral and cellular immune responses. Notably, however, some studies suggest HBsAgS VLPs impair dendritic cell (DC) function. Here we investigated HBsAgS VLP interaction with DC subsets and antigen access to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II antigen presentation pathways in primary DCs. HBsAgS VLPs impaired plasmacytoid DC (pDC) interferon alpha (IFNα) production in response to CpG in vitro, but did not alter conventional DC (cDC) or pDC phenotype when administered in vivo. To assess cellular immune responses, HBsAgS VLPs were generated containing the ovalbumin (OVA) model epitopes OVA(257-264) and OVA(323-339) to access MHCI and MHCII antigen presentation pathways, respectively; both in vitro and following immunisation in vivo. HBsAgS VLP-OVA(257-264) elicited CTL responses in vivo that were not enhanced by inclusion of an additional MHCII helper epitope. HBsAgS VLP-OVA(257-264) administered in vivo was cross-presented by CD8(+) DCs, but not CD8(-) DCs. Therefore, HBsAgS VLPs can deliver antigen to both MHCI and MHCII antigen presentation pathways in primary DCs and promote cytotoxic and helper T cell priming despite their suppressive effect on pDCs. PMID:23473776

  5. Major histocompatibility complex class I expression on neurons in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis and experimental subacute measles encephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogate, N.; Yamabe, Toshio; Verma, L.; Dhib-Jalbut, S. [Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    Lack of major histocompatibility class I antigens on neurons has been implicated as a possible mechanism for viral persistence in the brain since these antigens are required for cytotoxic T-lymphocyte recognition of infected cells. In subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE), measles virus (MV) persists in neurons, resulting in a fatal chronic infection. MHC class I mRNA expression was examined in formalin-fixed brain tissue from 6 SSPE patients by in situ hybridization. In addition MHC class I protein expression in MV-infected neurons was examined in experimental Subacute Measles Encephalitis (SME) by double immunohistochemistry. MHC class I mRNA expression was found to be upregulated in SSPE tissues studied, and in 5 out of 6 cases the expression was definitively seen on neurons. The percentage of neurons expressing MHC class I mRNA ranged between 20 to 84% in infected areas. There was no correlation between the degree of infection and expression of MHC class I molecules on neurons. Importantly, the number of neurons co-expressing MHC class I and MV antigens was markedly low, varying between 2 to 8%. Similar results were obtained in SME where 20 to 30% of the neurons expressed MHC class I but < 8% co-expressed MHC class I and MV antigens. Perivascular infiltrating cells in the infected regions in SME expressed IFN{gamma} immunoreactivity. The results suggest that MV may not be directly involved in the induction of MHC class I on neurons and that cytokines such as IFN{gamma} may play an important role. Furthermore, the paucity of neurons co-expressing MHC class I and MV antigens in SSPE and SME suggests that such cells are either rapidly cleared by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), or, alternatively, lack of co-expression of MHC class I on MV infected neurons favors MV persistence in these cells by escaping CTL recognition. 33 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Murine cytomegalovirus perturbs endosomal trafficking of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules in the early phase of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomas, Maja Ilić; Kucić, Natalia; Mahmutefendić, Hana; Blagojević, Gordana; Lucin, Pero

    2010-11-01

    Murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) functions interfere with protein trafficking in the secretory pathway. In this report we used Δm138-MCMV, a recombinant virus with a deleted viral Fc receptor, to demonstrate that MCMV also perturbs endosomal trafficking in the early phase of infection. This perturbation had a striking impact on cell surface-resident major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules due to the complementary effect of MCMV immunoevasins, which block their egress from the secretory pathway. In infected cells, constitutively endocytosed cell surface-resident MHC-I molecules were arrested and retained in early endosomal antigen 1 (EEA1)-positive and lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA)-negative perinuclear endosomes together with clathrin-dependent cargo (transferrin receptor, Lamp1, and epidermal growth factor receptor). Their progression from these endosomes into recycling and degradative routes was inhibited. This arrest was associated with a reduction of the intracellular content of Rab7 and Rab11, small GTPases that are essential for the maturation of recycling and endolysosomal domains of early endosomes. The reduced recycling of MHC-I in Δm138-MCMV-infected cells was accompanied by their accelerated loss from the cell surface. The MCMV function that affects cell surface-resident MHC-I was activated in later stages of the early phase of viral replication, after the expression of known immunoevasins. MCMV without the three immunoevasins (the m04, m06, and m152 proteins) encoded a function that affects endosomal trafficking. This function, however, was not sufficient to reduce the cell surface expression of MHC-I in the absence of the transport block in the secretory pathway. PMID:20719942

  7. Expression of triggering receptor on myeloid cell 1 and histocompatibility complex molecules in sepsis and major abdominal surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nestor González-Roldán; Constantino López-Macías; Armando Isibasi; Eduardo Ferat-Osorio; Rosalía Aduna-Vicente; Isabel Wong-Baeza; Noemí Esquivel-Callejas; Horacio Astudillo-de la Vega; Patricio Sánchez-Fernández; Lourdes Arriaga-Pizano; Miguel Angel Villasís Keever

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the surface expression of triggering receptor on myeloid cell 1 (TREM-1), class Ⅱ major histocompatibility complex molecules (HLA-DR), andthe expression of the splicing variant (svTREM-1) ofTREM-1 in septic patients and those subjected to major abdominal surgery.METHODS: Using flow cytometry, we examined the surface expression of TREM-1 and HLA-DR in peripheral blood monocytes from 11 septic patients, 7 elective gastrointestinal surgical patients, and 10 healthy volunteers. svTREM-1 levels were analyzed by RT-PCR. RESULTS: Basal expression of TREM-1 and HLA-DR in healthy volunteers was 35.91±14.75 MFI and75.8±18.3%, respectively. In septic patients, TREM-1 expression was 59.9±23.9 MFI and HLA-DR expression was 44.39±20.25%, with a significant differencebetween healthy and septic groups (P<0.05) for bothmolecules. In the surgical patients, TREM-1 and HLA-DR expressions were 56.8±20.85 MFI and 71±13.8% before surgery and 72.65±29.92 MlFI and 72.82±22.55% after surgery. TREM-1 expression was significantly different(P = 0.0087) between the samples before and aftersurgery and svTREM-1 expression was 0.8590±0.1451 MF1, 0.8820±0.1460 MF1, and 2.210±0.7873MF1 in the healthy, surgical (after surgery) and septic groups, respectively. There was a significant difference (P = 0.048) in svTREM-1 expression between the healthy and surgical groups and the septic group.CONCLUSION: TREM-1 expression is increased during systemic inflammatory conditions such as sepsis and the postoperative phase. Simultaneous low expression of HLA-DR molecules correlates with the severity of illness and increases susceptibility to infection. Additionally, TREM-1 expression is distinctly different in surgical patients at different stages of the inflammatory response before and after surgery. Thus, surface TREM-1 appears to be an endogenous signal during the course of the inflammatory response. svTREM-1 expression is significantly increased during sepsis, appearing to be

  8. Haplotype-specific pattern of association of human major histocompatibility complex with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, J; Kalinka-Warzocha, E; Juszczyński, P; Mika-Witkowska, R; Zajko, M; Graczyk-Pol, E; Coiffier, B; Salles, G; Warzocha, K

    2008-01-01

    In the previous studies, some human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes such as TNF, LTA and human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR2 genes and A1-B8-TNF(-308A) haplotype were implied in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) outcome. In the current study, we have assigned most probable six-locus haplotypes determined by HLA-A, -Cw, -B and -DRB1 highly polymorphic genes and non-HLA LTA(+252) and TNF(-308) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 152 NHL Caucasian French patients. We have broadly mapped the MHC region by its component blocks and tagging alleles. Ten frequent (with haplotype frequency >1%) six-locus extended haplotypes (EHs) were revealed in NHL patients. The only two adjacent locus fragment of 8.1 EH associated with shortened freedom from progression (FFP) was B*08-LTA(+252G) (P= 0.0084, RR = 2.45). Interestingly, 305-kbp-long, four-locus fragment of 8.1 EH, Cw*07-B*08-LTA(+252G)-TNF(-308A) block was much strongly associated with shortened FFP (P= 0.00045, RR = 3.26). The analysis of further extended haploblocks comprising five or six loci showed weaker association with outcome measures, suggesting linkage disequilibrium to be the cause of DRB1*03 and A*01 allele associations. In contrast, all fragments of 7.1 EH influenced FFP favorably with top association of TNF(-308G) allele. In multivariate analysis, only Cw*07-B*08-LTA(+252G)-TNF(-308A) and TNF(-308G)-DRB1*01 haplotypes remained predictive for shortened FFP (P= 0.024 and 0.027, respectively) and independent of International Prognostic Index (P= 0.00044). This study reveals that the block composition of EHs may cause important functional differences for NHL outcomes. Further study will be required in NHL patients by fine mapping with dense microsatellite or SNP tags to define susceptibility genes in associating regions. PMID:17971052

  9. Ancestral polymorphism at the major histocompatibility complex (MHCIIß in the Nesospiza bunting species complex and its sister species (Rowettia goughensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Rensburg Alexandra

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major histocompatibility complex (MHC is an important component of the vertebrate immune system and is frequently used to characterise adaptive variation in wild populations due to its co-evolution with pathogens. Passerine birds have an exceptionally diverse MHC with multiple gene copies and large numbers of alleles compared to other avian taxa. The Nesospiza bunting species complex (two species on Nightingale Island; one species with three sub-species on Inaccessible Island represents a rapid adaptive radiation at a small, isolated archipelago, and is thus an excellent model for the study of adaptation and speciation. In this first study of MHC in Nesospiza buntings, we aim to characterize MHCIIß variation, determine the strength of selection acting at this gene region and assess the level of shared polymorphism between the Nesospiza species complex and its putative sister taxon, Rowettia goughensis, from Gough Island. Results In total, 23 unique alleles were found in 14 Nesospiza and 2 R. goughensis individuals encoding at least four presumably functional loci and two pseudogenes. There was no evidence of ongoing selection on the peptide binding region (PBR. Of the 23 alleles, 15 were found on both the islands inhabited by Nesospiza species, and seven in both Nesospiza and Rowettia; indications of shared, ancestral polymorphism. A gene tree of Nesospiza MHCIIß alleles with several other passerine birds shows three highly supported Nesospiza-specific groups. All R. goughensis alleles were shared with Nesospiza, and these alleles were found in all three Nesospiza sequence groups in the gene tree, suggesting that most of the observed variation predates their phylogenetic split. Conclusions Lack of evidence of selection on the PBR, together with shared polymorphism across the gene tree, suggests that population variation of MHCIIß among Nesospiza and Rowettia is due to ancestral polymorphism rather than local selective

  10. Gene knockout mice establish a primary protective role for major histocompatibility complex class II-restricted responses in Chlamydia trachomatis genital tract infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Morrison, R P; Feilzer, K; Tumas, D B

    1995-01-01

    Mice with disrupted beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m-/-), I-A (class II-/-), or CD4 (CD4-/-) genes were examined for their capacity to resolve Chlamydia trachomatis genital tract infection. C57BL/6 and beta 2m-/- mice resolved infection similarly and were culture negative by 4 to 5 weeks following infection. Conversely, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-/- mice failed to resolve infection, and CD4-/- mice showed a significant delay (2 weeks). Secondary challenge of C57BL/6, beta 2m...

  11. Predicting binding affinities of protein ligands from three-dimensional models: application to peptide binding to class I major histocompatibility proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rognan, D; Lauemoller, S L; Holm, A; Buus, S; Tschinke, V

    1999-01-01

    A simple and fast free energy scoring function (Fresno) has been developed to predict the binding free energy of peptides to class I major histocompatibility (MHC) proteins. It differs from existing scoring functions mainly by the explicit treatment of ligand desolvation and of unfavorable protein...... interactions were found to contribute the most to HLA-A0201-peptide interactions, whereas H-bonding predominates in H-2K(k) recognition. Both cross-validated models were afterward used to predict the binding affinity of a test set of 26 peptides to HLA-A0204 (an HLA allele closely related to HLA-A0201) and of...

  12. A gene pair from the human major histocompatibility complex encodes large proline-rich proteins with multiple repeated motifs and a single ubiquitin-like domain.

    OpenAIRE

    Banerji, J.; Sands, J; Strominger, J.L.; Spies, T

    1990-01-01

    A large number of genes has been identified previously between the class I and class II gene families within the class III region of the human major histocompatibility complex. The complete sequences of two of these genes, BAT2 and BAT3 (where BAT is HLA-B-associated transcript), which are closely linked, were determined from cDNA clones. The putative BAT2 and BAT3 proteins are 228 and 110 kDa, respectively, and do not appear to be members of any known family of proteins. However, BAT3 contai...

  13. MHC Expression on Spleen Lymphocyte Subsets in Genetically Resistant and Susceptible Chickens Infected with Marek's Disease Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Tina; Bøving, Mette K.; Handberg, Kurt;

    2009-01-01

    Resistance and susceptibility to Marek's disease (MD) are strongly influenced by the chicken major histocompatibility complex (MHC). In this study, splenic lymphocytes from MD-resistant and MD-susceptible chickens of three MHC genotypes (B21/B21, B19/B21, and B19/B19) were analyzed by flow...

  14. Homozygosity at the major histocompatibility complex is required for optimal immunogenicity of bone marrow cell allografts in irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemopoietic histocompatibility (Hh) genes associated with the H-2 region control the antigenicity of hemopoietic cell grafts in the mouse. We have tested for similar genes in rats. Wistar Furth (WF,RTl sup(u)) or Lewis (LEW RTl1) bone marrow cell grafts did not profilerate in spleens of lethally irradiated (WFxLEW) Fl hybrid rats as assessed by measuring the incorporation of 5-iodo-2' deoxyuridine-125I(IUdR) into recipient spleens 5 days after transplantation. In contrast, (WFxLEW)Fl hybrid marrow cells grew well in both WF and LEW parental strain hosts. (WFxDA)Fl or (WFxLEW)Fl hybrid rats were backcrossed to WF parental strain rats to produce progeny, either homozygous, or heterozygous for the MHC. The RTl type of 46 individual backcross progeny was determined using a 5 day mixed-lymphocyte reaction (MLR). Correlation between RTl type and growth of marrow grafts of individual backcross rats was determined bt using each rat as bone marrow donor for irrdiated LEW hosts. Marrow grafts from rats heterozygous for RTl were accepted in all 25 cases, whereas, grafts from 19 of 21 homozygous donors were rejected by the LEW hosts. Thus, homozygosity, for Hh determinants in or near the RTl region appears to be necessary for optimal immunogenicity of bone marrow allografts. (author)

  15. Ligation of major histocompatibility complex class I antigens (MHC-I) prevents apoptosis induced by Fas or SAPK/JNK activation in T-lymphoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamberth, K; Claesson, M H

    2001-01-01

    Early apoptosis in Jurkat T-lymphoma cells was induced by agonistic anti-Fas Ab or by anisomycin which activates the stress kinases SAPK/JNK. Apoptosis was inhibited by ligation of major histocompatibility complex class I antigens (MHC-I). MHC-I ligation induced upregulation of the anti......-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein and stabilized the mitochondrial membrane potential (Deltapsim). MHC-I ligation also prevented downregulation of Bcl-2 and destabilization of Deltapsim induced by anti-Fas Ab treatment or anisomycin exposure. Studies on three different Jurkat cell mutants deficient for src p56(lck), ZAP......-70 kinase, or TCR/CD3 gamma-chain showed that the cells undergo apoptosis after Fas ligation. Anisomycin exposure induced apoptosis in the src p56(lck)-deficient cell line but not in the two other mutant cell lines. Simultaneous cross-linking of MHC-I and Fas ligation inhibited apoptosis in the ZAP...

  16. Activation of Stat-3 is involved in the induction of apoptosis after ligation of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules on human Jurkat T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, S; Nielsen, M; Bregenholt, S; Odum, Niels; Claesson, M H

    1998-01-01

    Activation of Janus tyrosine kinases (Jak) and Signal transducers and activators of transcription (Stat) after ligation of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) was explored in Jurkat T cells. Cross-linking of MHC-I mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of Tyk2, but not Jak1, Jak2, and Jak3......-coupled agarose. To investigate the function of the activated Stat-3, Jurkat T cells were transiently transfected with a Stat-3 isoform lacking the transactivating domain. This dominant-negative acting Stat-3 isoform significantly inhibited apoptosis induced by ligation of MHC-I. In conclusion, our data suggest....... In addition, the transcription factor Stat-3 was tyrosine phosphorylated in the cytoplasm and subsequently translocated to the cell nucleus. Data obtained by electrophoretic mobility shift assay suggested that the activated Stat-3 protein associates with the human serum-inducible element (hSIE) DNA...

  17. CD54/intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and major histocompatibility complex II signaling induces B cells to express interleukin 2 receptors and complements help provided through CD40 ligation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poudrier, J; Owens, T

    1994-01-01

    We have examined signaling roles for CD54 intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) II as contact ligands during T help for B cell activation. We used a T helper 1 (Th1)-dependent helper system that was previously shown to be contact as well as interleukin 2 (IL-2......) dependent to demonstrate the relative roles of CD54, MHC II, and CD40 signaling in the events leading to the induction of B cell proliferation and responsiveness to IL-2. Paraformaldehyde-fixed activated Th1-induced expression of IL-2R alpha, IL-2R beta, and B7, and upregulated MHC II and CD54 on B cells...

  18. Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 function and its pathogenic role in regulating innate and adaptive immunity in cancer and major histocompatibility complex class I-associated autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruci, D; Romania, P; D'Alicandro, V; Locatelli, F

    2014-08-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules present antigenic peptides on the cell surface to alert natural killer (NK) cells and CD8(+) T cells for the presence of abnormal intracellular events, such as virus infection or malignant transformation. The generation of antigenic peptides is a multistep process that ends with the trimming of N-terminal extensions in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by aminopeptidases ERAP1 and ERAP2. Recent studies have highlighted the potential role of ERAP1 in reprogramming the immunogenicity of tumor cells in order to elicit innate and adaptive antitumor immune responses, and in conferring susceptibility to autoimmune diseases in predisposed individuals. In this review, we will provide an overview of the current knowledge about the role of ERAP1 in MHC class I antigen processing and how its manipulation may constitute a promising tool for cancer immunotherapy and treatment of MHC class I-associated autoimmune diseases. PMID:25066018

  19. A step-by-step overview of the dynamic process of epitope selection by major histocompatibility complex class II for presentation to helper T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadegh-Nasseri, Scheherazade

    2016-01-01

    T cell antigen receptors (TCRs) expressed on cytotoxic or helper T cells can only see their specific target antigen as short sequences of peptides bound to the groove of proteins of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I, and class II respectively. In addition to the many steps, several participating proteins, and multiple cellular compartments involved in the processing of antigens, the MHC structure, with its dynamic and flexible groove, has perfectly evolved as the underlying instrument for epitope selection. In this review, I have taken a step-by-step, and rather historical, view to describe antigen processing and determinant selection, as we understand it today, all based on decades of intense research by hundreds of laboratories. PMID:27347387

  20. Non-major histocompatibility complex-restricted cytotoxic activity of blood mononuclear cells stimulated with secreted mycobacterial proteins and other mycobacterial antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, P; Pedersen, B K

    1994-01-01

    Several observations indicate that non-major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted cytotoxicity, mediated for example by natural killer cells and lymphokine-activated killer cells, may serve as an important antimicrobial defense mechanism. The purpose of the present study was to investigate...... the influences of different mycobacterial antigens on non-MHC-restricted cytotoxicity and further to investigate the ways by which various lymphocyte subpopulations contribute to the development of this cytotoxicity. Non-MHC-restricted cytotoxicity was induced following stimulation of mononuclear...... interferon. The CD4+ cells proliferated and expressed interleukin-2 receptors following stimulation with mycobacterial antigens.Depletion studies after antigen stimulation showed that the cytotoxic effector cells were CD16+ CD56+ and CD4-; the CD4+ cells alone did not mediate non-MHC-restricted cytotoxicity...

  1. Detecting Site-Specific Physicochemical Selective Pressures: Applications to the Class I HLA of the Human Major Histocompatibility Complex and the SRK of the Plant Sporophytic Self-Incompatibility System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sainudiin, Raazesh; Wong, Wendy Shuk Wan; Yogeeswaran, Krithika;

    2005-01-01

    :transversion biases. Here, we apply this method to two positively selected receptors involved in ligand-recognition: the class I alleles of the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) of known structure and the S-locus receptor kinase (SRK) of the sporophytic self-incompatibility system (SSI) in cruciferous...

  2. Detection and Quantification of CD4+ T Cells with Specificity for a New Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II-Restricted Influenza A Virus Matrix Protein Epitope in Peripheral Blood of Influenza Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Linnemann, Thomas; Jung, Günther; Walden, Peter

    2000-01-01

    FVFTLTVPS was identified as the core sequence of a new major histocompatibility complex class II-restricted T-cell epitope of influenza virus matrix protein. Epitope-specific CD4+ T cells were detected in the peripheral blood of patients with frequencies of up to 0.94%, depending on the number of additional terminal amino acids.

  3. Making the animal model for AIDS research more precise: the impact of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes on pathogenesis and disease progression in SIV-infected monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauermann, U

    2001-09-01

    Experimentally infected rhesus monkeys serve as an indispensable animal model to assess the pathogenesis, to validate therapy approaches and to develop vaccination strategies against viral diseases such as AIDS threatening the human population. Upon infection with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), a retrovirus closely related to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), macaques develop clinical manifestations similar to those of HIV-infected humans. As in humans, the disease course is variable. Polymorphic genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are required for the initiation and regulation of a specific immune response and represent a major host factor accounting for the differential outcome of infection. During the last few years, our understanding of the structure and function of the rhesus macaque MHC has increased substantially. Functional studies have led to the identification of specific SIV and HIV peptide epitopes presented by rhesus macaque MHC molecules. The subsequent development of MHC class I tetramers has allowed further insight into the cellular immune response following SIV-infection. Detailed studies demonstrated that viral escape mutants are generated during the acute and chronic phase of infection and explain why control of viral replication ultimately fails. Furthermore, particular MHC haplotypes which influence disease progression have been discovered. Thus, MHC-typing can have a prognostic potential. The further elucidation of the rhesus macaque MHC and the search for other relevant genes will remain an important task for future research and will stimulate all immunologically-related investigations in macaques. PMID:11899095

  4. Low Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Variation in the Endangered Indo-Pacific Humpback Dolphin (Sousa chinensis): Inferences About the Role of Balancing Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiyang; Lin, Wenzhi; Zhou, Ruilian; Gui, Duan; Yu, Xinjian; Wu, Yuping

    2016-03-01

    It has been widely reported that the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is under balancing selection due to its immune function across terrestrial and aquatic mammals. The comprehensive studies at MHC and other neutral loci could give us a synthetic evaluation about the major force determining genetic diversity of species. Previously, a low level of genetic diversity has been reported among the Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin (Sousa chinensis) in the Pearl River Estuary (PRE) using both mitochondrial marker and microsatellite loci. Here, the expression and sequence polymorphism of 2 MHC class II genes (DQB and DRB) in 32 S. chinensis from PRE collected between 2003 and 2011 were investigated. High ratios of non-synonymous to synonymous substitution rates, codon-based selection analysis, and trans-species polymorphism (TSP) support the hypothesis that balancing selection acted on S. chinensis MHC sequences. However, only 2 haplotypes were detected at either DQB or DRB loci. Moreover, the lack of deviation from the Hardy-Weinberg expectation at DRB locus combined with the relatively low heterozygosity at both DQB locus and microsatellite loci suggested that balancing selection might not be sufficient, which further suggested that genetic drift associated with historical bottlenecks was not mitigated by balancing selection in terms of the loss of MHC and neutral variation in S. chinensis. The combined results highlighted the importance of maintaining the genetic diversity of the endangered S. chinensis. PMID:26787544

  5. Modulation of the major histocompatibility complex by neural stem cell-derived neurotrophic factors used for regenerative therapy in a rat model of stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Chongran

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relationship between functional improvements in ischemic rats given a neural stem cell (NSC transplant and the modulation of the class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC mediated by NSC-derived neurotrophins was investigated. Methods The levels of gene expression of nerve growth factor (NGF, brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3 were assayed from cultures of cortical NSC from Sprague-Dawley rat E16 embryos. The levels of translated NGF in spent culture media from NSC cultures and the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF of rats with and without NGF injection or NSC transplant were also measured. Results We found a significant increase of NGF, BDNF and NT-3 transcripts and NGF proteins in both the NSC cultures and the CSF of the rats. The immunochemical staining for MHC in brain sections and the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of CSF were carried out in sham-operated rats and rats with surgically induced focal cerebral ischemia. These groups were further divided into animals that did and did not receive NGF administration or NSC transplant into the cisterna magna. Our results show an up-regulation of class I MHC in the ischemic rats with NGF and NSC administration. The extent of caspase-III immunoreactivity was comparable among three arms in the ischemic rats. Conclusion Readouts of somatosensory evoked potential and the trap channel test illustrated improvements in the neurological function of ischemic rats treated with NGF administration and NSC transplant.

  6. Applicability of major histocompatibility complex DRB1 alleles as markers to detect vertebrate hybridization: a case study from Iberian ibex × domestic goat in southern Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alasaad Samer

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hybridization between closely related wild and domestic species is of great concern because it can alter the evolutionary integrity of the affected populations. The high allelic variability of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC loci usually excludes them from being used in studies to detect hybridization events. However, if a the parental species don’t share alleles, and b one of the parental species possesses an exceptionally low number of alleles (to facilitate analysis, then even MHC loci have the potential to detect hybrids. Results By genotyping the exon2 of the MHC class II DRB1 locus, we were able to detect hybridization between domestic goats (Capra hircus and free-ranging Iberian ibex (Capra pyrenaica hispanica by molecular means. Conclusions This is the first documentation of a Capra pyrenaica × Capra hircus hybridization, which presented us the opportunity to test the applicability of MHC loci as new, simple, cost-effective, and time-saving approach to detect hybridization between wild species and their domesticated relatives, thus adding value to MHC genes role in animal conservation and management.

  7. Monoclonal antibodies directed against major histocompatibility complex antigens bind to the surface of Treponema pallidum isolated from infected rabbits or humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchitto, K S; Kindt, T J; Norgard, M V

    1986-09-01

    Evidence is presented for the association of class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens with the surface of Treponema pallidum during infection. A monoclonal antibody (IgG2a) directed against a murine H-2Kb epitope of public specificity reacted with the cell surface of T. pallidum, as assayed by the binding of protein A-colloidal gold in immunoelectron microscopy. Monoclonal antibodies directed against class I rabbit MHC antigens also reacted in immunofluorescence assays with material on the surface of rabbit-cultivated T. pallidum. In addition, impression smears of human syphilitic genital ulcers that were darkfield-positive for the presence of spirochetes were tested in immunofluorescence assays with monoclonal antibodies directed against human MHC antigens; antibody directed against HLA-ABC (class I) was reactive whereas antibody directed against HLA-DR (class II) was nonreactive. Results of the study suggest that the association of host-derived class I MHC antigens or molecular mimicry may play a role in T. pallidum evasion of host immune defenses. PMID:2428519

  8. Bone marrow transplantation across major histocompatibility barriers in mice: II. T cell requirement for engraftment in total lymphoid irradiation-conditioned recipients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies were undertaken to examine the role of T lymphocytes in engraftment of bone marrow (BM) in animals conditioned with total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) prior to transplantation across major histocompatability barriers.Donor BM (added as a source of lymphohematopoietic stem cells) and spleen cells (added as a source of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD)-causing cells) were pretreated in vitro with monoclonal anti-Thy-1.2 plus complement (C). T cell-depleted grafts were then given to allogeneic mice conditioned with 900 rad of single dose TLI plus cyclophosphamide (CY). These mice did not engraft. Even in the absence of added spleen cells, elimination of the small T cell population from donor BM grafts prevented engraftment compared with animals that received the same conditioning regimen and untreated donor cells. These control animals demonstrated uniform evidence of engraftment about 1 month after transplantation. Similar findings were reported when recipients were conditioned with fractionated 17 x 100-rad TLI. In TLI plus CY-conditioned recipients, it was also observed that increasing the donation of treated bone marrow cells still did not result in significant engraftment. In contrast to TLI conditioning, when Thy-1.2 plus C-treated donor cells were given to recipients conditioned with total body irradiation (TBI), a high percentage of engraftment was demonstrated by an H-2 microcytotoxicity assay. Plausible mechanisms for these findings are discussed

  9. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi live vector vaccines delivered intranasally elicit regional and systemic specific CD8+ major histocompatibility class I-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasetti, Marcela F; Salerno-Gonçalves, Rosangela; Sztein, Marcelo B

    2002-08-01

    We investigated the ability of live attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi strains delivered to mice intranasally to induce specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses at regional and systemic levels. Mice immunized with two doses (28 days apart) of Salmonella serovar Typhi strain Ty21a, the licensed oral typhoid vaccine, and genetically attenuated mutants CVD 908 (DeltaaroC DeltaaroD), CVD 915 (DeltaguaBA), and CVD 908-htrA (DeltaaroC DeltaaroD DeltahtrA) induced CTL specific for Salmonella serovar Typhi-infected cells in spleens and cervical lymph nodes. CTL were detected in effector T cells that had been expanded in vitro for 7 days in the presence of Salmonella-infected syngeneic splenocytes. A second round of stimulation further enhanced the levels of specific cytotoxicity. CTL activity was observed in sorted alphabeta+ CD8+ T cells, which were remarkably increased after expansion, but not in CD4+ T cells. CTL from both cervical lymph nodes and spleens failed to recognize Salmonella-infected major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-mismatched cells, indicating that the responses were MHC restricted. Studies in which MHC blocking antibodies were used showed that H-2L(d) was the restriction element. This is the first demonstration that Salmonella serovar Typhi vaccines delivered intranasally elicit CD8+ MHC class I-restricted CTL. The results further support the usefulness of the murine intranasal model for evaluating the immunogenicity of typhoid vaccine candidates at the preclinical level. PMID:12117906

  10. Loss of T Cell Antigen Recognition Arising from Changes in Peptide and Major Histocompatibility Complex Protein Flexibility: Implications for Vaccine Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Insaidoo, Francis K.; Borbulevych, Oleg Y.; Hossain, Moushumi; Santhanagopolan, Sujatha M.; Baxter, Tiffany K.; Baker, Brian M. (Notre)

    2012-05-08

    Modification of the primary anchor positions of antigenic peptides to improve binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins is a commonly used strategy for engineering peptide-based vaccine candidates. However, such peptide modifications do not always improve antigenicity, complicating efforts to design effective vaccines for cancer and infectious disease. Here we investigated the MART-1{sub 27-35} tumor antigen, for which anchor modification (replacement of the position two alanine with leucine) dramatically reduces or ablates antigenicity with a wide range of T cell clones despite significantly improving peptide binding to MHC. We found that anchor modification in the MART-1{sub 27-35} antigen enhances the flexibility of both the peptide and the HLA-A*0201 molecule. Although the resulting entropic effects contribute to the improved binding of the peptide to MHC, they also negatively impact T cell receptor binding to the peptide {center_dot} MHC complex. These results help explain how the 'anchor-fixing' strategy fails to improve antigenicity in this case, and more generally, may be relevant for understanding the high specificity characteristic of the T cell repertoire. In addition to impacting vaccine design, modulation of peptide and MHC flexibility through changes to antigenic peptides may present an evolutionary strategy for the escape of pathogens from immune destruction.

  11. Characterization of major histocompatibility complex (MHC DRB exon 2 and DRA exon 3 fragments in a primary terrestrial rabies vector (Procyon lotor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarrah Castillo

    Full Text Available The major histocompatibility complex (MHC presents a unique system to explore links between genetic diversity and pathogens, as diversity within MHC is maintained in part by pathogen driven selection. While the majority of wildlife MHC studies have investigated species that are of conservation concern, here we characterize MHC variation in a common and broadly distributed species, the North American raccoon (Procyon lotor. Raccoons host an array of broadly distributed wildlife diseases (e.g., canine distemper, parvovirus and raccoon rabies virus and present important human health risks as they persist in high densities and in close proximity to humans and livestock. To further explore how genetic variation influences the spread and maintenance of disease in raccoons we characterized a fragment of MHC class II DRA exon 3 (250 bp and DRB exon 2 (228 bp. MHC DRA was found to be functionally monomorphic in the 32 individuals screened; whereas DRB exon 2 revealed 66 unique alleles among the 246 individuals screened. Between two and four alleles were observed in each individual suggesting we were amplifying a duplicated DRB locus. Nucleotide differences between DRB alleles ranged from 1 to 36 bp (0.4-15.8% divergence and translated into 1 to 21 (1.3-27.6% divergence amino acid differences. We detected a significant excess of nonsynonymous substitutions at the peptide binding region (P = 0.005, indicating that DRB exon 2 in raccoons has been influenced by positive selection. These data will form the basis of continued analyses into the spatial and temporal relationship of the raccoon rabies virus and the immunogenetic response in its primary host.

  12. Genetic diversity and differentiation of the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) population in western Sichuan, China, based on the second exon of the major histocompatibility complex class II DQB (MhcMamu-DQB1) alleles

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Yong-Fang; Dai, Qiu-Xia; Li, Jing; Ni, Qing-Yong; Zhang, Ming-Wang; Xu, Huai-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Abstracts Background Rhesus macaques living in western Sichuan, China, have been separated into several isolated populations due to habitat fragmentation. Previous studies based on the neutral or nearly neutral markers (mitochondrial DNA or microsatellites) showed high levels of genetic diversity and moderate genetic differentiation in the Sichuan rhesus macaques. Variation at the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) loci is widely accepted as being maintained by balancing selection, even w...

  13. Evolution of major histocompatibility complex genes in New World bats and their functional importance in parasite resistance and life-history decisions in the lesser bulldog bat (Noctilio albiventris)

    OpenAIRE

    Schad, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Immune genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) constitute a central component of the adaptive immune system and play an essential role in parasite resistance and associated life-history strategies. In addition to pathogen-mediated selection also sexual selection mechanisms have been identified as the main drivers of the typically-observed high levels of polymorphism in functionally important parts of the MHC. The recognition of the individual MHC constitution is presumed to be med...

  14. Adoptive Transfer of Lymphocytes Isolated from Simian Immunodeficiency Virus SIVmac239Δnef-Vaccinated Macaques Does Not Affect Acute-Phase Viral Loads but May Reduce Chronic-Phase Viral Loads in Major Histocompatibility Complex-Matched Recipients

    OpenAIRE

    Greene, Justin M; Lhost, Jennifer J; Hines, Paul J.; Scarlotta, Matthew; Harris, Max; Burwitz, Benjamin J.; Budde, Melisa L; Dudley, Dawn M.; Pham, Ngoc; Cain, Brian; Mac Nair, Caitlin E.; Weiker, Madelyn K.; O'Connor, Shelby L.; Friedrich, Thomas C.; O'Connor, David H.

    2013-01-01

    The live attenuated simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) SIVmac239Δnef is the most effective SIV/human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccine in preclinical testing. An understanding of the mechanisms responsible for protection may provide important insights for the development of HIV vaccines. Leveraging the uniquely restricted genetic diversity of Mauritian cynomolgus macaques, we performed adoptive transfers between major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-matched animals to assess the role of ...

  15. Sequence polymorphism of two major histocompatibility (MH) class Ⅱ B genes and their association with Vibrio anguillarum infection in half-smooth tongue sole ( Cynoglossus semilaevis)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chunmei; WANG Xubo; ZHANG Quanqi; YU Yan; LI Shuo; ZHONG Oiwang; SUN Yeying; WANG Zhigang; QI Jie; ZHAI Jieming

    2011-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class Ⅱ B molecules play an important role in the adaptive immune response in fish.Previous study has reported that two highly polymorphic class Ⅱ B genes,Cyse-DAB and Cyse-DBB exist in half-smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis).In this study,the polymorphism within exon 2 of the class Ⅱ B genes following bacterial challenge was evaluated.Two hundred C.semilaevis individuals were injected intraperitoneally with Vibrio anguillarum.Muscle tissue from the first 20 dead and 20 of the survivors was collected for genotyping.Sixty alleles from the 40 individuals were isolated,of which 32 belonged to Cyse-DAB and 28 belonged to Cyse-DBB.The rate of dN (non-synonymous substitution) was higher than that of ds (synonymous substitution) in the PBRs (peptide binding residues) of both class Ⅱ B genes.Conversely,the rate of ds was higher than dN in the non-PBRs and the complete exon 2 sequence.Thus,the results suggest that positive selection has occurred in the PBRs and purifying selection in the non-PBRs and exon 2.Thirteen class Ⅱ B alleles were used to study the association between alleles and resistance to infection.Though not significant,alleles Cyse-DAB*0601,Cyse-DAB*0706,and Cyse-DBB*0101,Cyse-DBB*1301 were only found in surviving individuals and may represent alleles that have resistance against Ⅴ.anguillarum infection.Alleles Cyse-DAB*0701 and Cyse-DAB*1301 were significantly more prevalent in dead individuals than in surviving ones and may represent alleles that are associated with increased susceptibility to Ⅴ.anguillarum infection.

  16. Several regions in the major histocompatibility complex confer risk for anti-CCP-antibody positive rheumatoid arthritis, independent of the DRB1 locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye-Soon; Lee, Annette T; Criswell, Lindsey A; Seldin, Michael F; Amos, Christopher I; Carulli, John P; Navarrete, Cristina; Remmers, Elaine F; Kastner, Daniel L; Plenge, Robert M; Li, Wentian; Gregersen, Peter K

    2008-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that additional risk loci for RA are present in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), independent of the class II HLA-DRB1 locus. We have now tested a total of 1,769 SNPs across 7.5Mb of the MHC located from 6p22.2 (26.03 Mb) to 6p21.32 (33.59 Mb) derived from the Illumina 550K Beadchip (Illumina, San Diego, CA, USA). For an initial analysis in the whole dataset (869 RA CCP + cases, 1,193 controls), the strongest association signal was observed in markers near the HLA-DRB1 locus, with additional evidence for association extending out into the Class I HLA region. To avoid confounding that may arise due to linkage disequilibrium with DRB1 alleles, we analyzed a subset of the data by matching cases and controls by DRB1 genotype (both alleles matched 1:1), yielding a set of 372 cases with 372 controls. This analysis revealed the presence of at least two regions of association with RA in the Class I region, independent of DRB1 genotype. SNP alleles found on the conserved A1-B8-DR3 (8.1) haplotype show the strongest evidence of positive association (P ~ 0.00005) clustered in the region around the HLA-C locus. In addition, we identified risk alleles that are not present on the 8.1 haplotype, with maximal association signals (P ~ 0.001-0.0027) located near the ZNF311 locus. This latter association is enriched in DRB1*0404 individuals. Finally, several additional association signals were found in the extreme centromeric portion of the MHC, in regions containing the DOB1, TAP2, DPB1, and COL11A2 genes. These data emphasize that further analysis of the MHC is likely to reveal genetic risk factors for rheumatoid arthritis that are independent of the DRB1 shared epitope alleles. PMID:18309376

  17. Autoantibody Profiles in Collagen Disease Patients with Interstitial Lung Disease (ILD): Antibodies to Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I-Related Chain A (MICA) as Markers of ILD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Hiroshi; Oka, Shomi; Shimada, Kota; Masuo, Kiyoe; Nakajima, Fumiaki; Funano, Shunichi; Tanaka, Yuki; Komiya, Akiko; Fukui, Naoshi; Sawasaki, Tatsuya; Tadokoro, Kenji; Nose, Masato; Tsuchiya, Naoyuki; Tohma, Shigeto

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is frequently associated with collagen disease. It is then designated as collagen vascular disease-associated ILD (CVD-ILD), and influences patients' prognosis. The prognosis of acute-onset diffuse ILD (AoDILD) occurring in patients with collagen disease is quite poor. Here, we report our investigation of auto-antibody (Ab) profiles to determine whether they may be useful in diagnosing CVD-ILD or AoDILD in collagen disease. Auto-Ab profiles were analyzed using the Lambda Array Beads Multi-Analyte System, granulocyte immunofluorescence test, Proto-Array Human Protein Microarray, AlphaScreen assay, and glutathione S-transferase capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 34 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with or without CVD-ILD and in 15 patients with collagen disease with AoDILD. The average anti-major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A (MICA) Ab levels were higher in RA patients with CVD-ILD than in those without (P = 0.0013). The ratio of the average anti-MICA Ab level to the average anti-human leukocyte antigen class I Ab level (ie, MICA/Class I) was significantly higher in RA patients with CVD-ILD compared with those without (P = 4.47 × 10(-5)). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of auto-Ab profiles in CVD-ILD. The MICA/Class I ratio could be a better marker for diagnosing CVD-ILD than KL-6 (Krebs von den lungen-6). PMID:26327779

  18. Parasite Manipulation of the Invariant Chain and the Peptide Editor H2-DM Affects Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Antigen Presentation during Toxoplasma gondii Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroux, Louis-Philippe; Nishi, Manami; El-Hage, Sandy; Fox, Barbara A; Bzik, David J; Dzierszinski, Florence S

    2015-10-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite. This apicomplexan is the causative agent of toxoplasmosis, a leading cause of central nervous system disease in AIDS. It has long been known that T. gondii interferes with major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) antigen presentation to attenuate CD4(+) T cell responses and establish persisting infections. Transcriptional downregulation of MHC-II genes by T. gondii was previously established, but the precise mechanisms inhibiting MHC-II function are currently unknown. Here, we show that, in addition to transcriptional regulation of MHC-II, the parasite modulates the expression of key components of the MHC-II antigen presentation pathway, namely, the MHC-II-associated invariant chain (Ii or CD74) and the peptide editor H2-DM, in professional antigen-presenting cells (pAPCs). Genetic deletion of CD74 restored the ability of infected dendritic cells to present a parasite antigen in the context of MHC-II in vitro. CD74 mRNA and protein levels were, surprisingly, elevated in infected cells, whereas MHC-II and H2-DM expression was inhibited. CD74 accumulated mainly in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and this phenotype required live parasites, but not active replication. Finally, we compared the impacts of genetic deletion of CD74 and H2-DM genes on parasite dissemination toward lymphoid organs in mice, as well as activation of CD4(+) T cells and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) levels during acute infection. Cyst burdens and survival during the chronic phase of infection were also evaluated in wild-type and knockout mice. These results highlight the fact that the infection is influenced by multiple levels of parasite manipulation of the MHC-II antigen presentation pathway. PMID:26195549

  19. Us3 kinase encoded by herpes simplex virus 1 mediates downregulation of cell surface major histocompatibility complex class I and evasion of CD8+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiko Imai

    Full Text Available Detection and elimination of virus-infected cells by CD8(+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs depends on recognition of virus-derived peptides presented by major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I molecules on the surface of infected cells. In the present study, we showed that inactivation of the activity of viral kinase Us3 encoded by herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1, the etiologic agent of several human diseases and a member of the alphaherpesvirinae, significantly increased cell surface expression of MHC-I, thereby augmenting CTL recognition of infected cells in vitro. Overexpression of Us3 by itself had no effect on cell surface expression of MHC-I and Us3 was not able to phosphorylate MHC-I in vitro, suggesting that Us3 indirectly downregulated cell surface expression of MHC-I in infected cells. We also showed that inactivation of Us3 kinase activity induced significantly more HSV-1-specific CD8(+ T cells in mice. Interestingly, depletion of CD8(+ T cells in mice significantly increased replication of a recombinant virus encoding a kinase-dead mutant of Us3, but had no effect on replication of a recombinant virus in which the kinase-dead mutation was repaired. These results indicated that Us3 kinase activity is required for efficient downregulation of cell surface expression of MHC-I and mediates evasion of HSV-1-specific CD8(+ T cells. Our results also raised the possibility that evasion of HSV-1-specific CD8(+ T cells by HSV-1 Us3-mediated inhibition of MHC-I antigen presentation might in part contribute to viral replication in vivo.

  20. Genetic drift vs. natural selection in a long-term small isolated population: major histocompatibility complex class II variation in the Gulf of California endemic porpoise (Phocoena sinus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munguia-Vega, Adrian; Esquer-Garrigos, Yareli; Rojas-Bracho, Lorenzo; Vazquez-Juarez, Ricardo; Castro-Prieto, Aines; Flores-Ramirez, Sergio

    2007-10-01

    Although many studies confirm long-term small isolated populations (e.g. island endemics) commonly sustain low neutral genetic variation as a result of genetic drift, it is less clear how selection on adaptive or detrimental genes interplay with random forces. We investigated sequence variation at two major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) class II loci on a porpoise endemic to the upper Gulf of California, México (Phocoena sinus, or vaquita). Its unique declining population is estimated around 500 individuals. Single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis revealed one putative functional allele fixed at the locus DQB (n = 25). At the DRB locus, we found two presumed functional alleles (n = 29), differing by a single nonsynonymous nucleotide substitution that could increase the stability at the dimer interface of alphabeta-heterodimers on heterozygous individuals. Identical trans-specific DQB1 and DRB1 alleles were identified between P. sinus and its closest relative, the Burmeister's porpoise (Phocoena spinipinnis). Comparison with studies on four island endemic mammals suggests fixation of one allele, due to genetic drift, commonly occurs at the DQA or DQB loci (effectively neutral). Similarly, deleterious alleles of small effect are also effectively neutral and can become fixed; a high frequency of anatomical malformations on vaquita gave empirical support to this prediction. In contrast, retention of low but functional polymorphism at the DRB locus was consistent with higher selection intensity. These observations indicated natural selection could maintain (and likely also purge) some crucial alleles even in the face of strong and prolonged genetic drift and inbreeding, suggesting long-term small populations should display low inbreeding depression. Low levels of Mhc variation warn about a high susceptibility to novel pathogens and diseases in vaquita. PMID:17727623

  1. Construction of Soluble Mamu-B*1703, a Class I Major Histocompatibility Complex of Chinese Rhesus Macaques, Monomer and Tetramer Loaded with a Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Peptide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongyun Ouyang; Xiaoying Wang; Xianhui He; Lihui Xu; Huanjing Shi; Qi Gao; He Guo

    2009-01-01

    Chinese-descent rhesus macaques have become more prevalent for HIV infection and vaccine investigation than Indian-origin macaques. Most of the currently available data and reagents such as major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I tetramers, however, were derived from Indian-origin macaques due to the dominant use of these animals in history. Although there are significant differences in the immunogenetic background between the two macaque populations, they share a few of common MHC class I alleles. We reported in this study the procedure for preparation of a soluble Mamu-B*1703 (a MHC class I molecule of Chinese macaques) monomer and tetramer loaded with a dominant simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) epitope IW9 (IRYPKTFGW) that was identified to be Mamu-B*1701-restricted in Indian macaques. The DNA fragment encoding the Mamu-B*1703 extracellular domain fused with a BirA substrate peptide (BSP) was amplified from a previously cloned cDNA and inserted into a prokaratic expression vector. In the presence of the antigenic peptide IW9 and light chain ?2-microglobulin, the expressed heavy chain was refolded into a soluble monomer. After biotinylation, four monomers were polymerized as a tetramer by phycoerythrin-conjugated streptavidin. The tetramer, having been confirmed to have the right conformation, was a potential tool for investigation of antigen-specific CD8+ T-lymphocytes in SIV vaccine models of Chinese macaques. And our results also suggested that some antigenic peptides reported in Indian-origin macaques could be directly recruited as ligands for construction of Chinese macaque MHC tetramers. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.

  2. Cloning and modeling of CD8 beta in the amphibian ambystoma Mexicanum. Evolutionary conserved structures for interactions with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellah, Julien S; Tuffèry, Pierre; Etchebest, Catherine; Guillet, Françoise; Bleux, Christian; Charlemagne, Jacques

    2002-04-17

    Mammalian and avian T-cells exhibit a large number of well characterized surface molecules associated with their maturation degree. Very little is known in comparison with T-cell differentiation in ectothermic vertebrates. This is mainly due to the lack of probes to identify T-cell subsets. We cloned and sequenced the first ectothermic CD8 beta DNA complementary to RNA from an amphibian species, the Mexican axolotl. The CD8 beta chain was 30-36% identical with its avian and mammalian homologues. The extracellular V-like domain contained the two typically conserved cysteines and was followed by a J-like sequence containing the canonical Phe-Gly-X-Gly stretch. The connecting peptide was much longer than in other species and contained potential O-glycosylation sites. The axolotl CD8 beta and major histocompatibility complex class I molecules were modeled using human HLA-A2/CD8 alphaalpha complex as template. The backbone conformation of axolotl CD8 beta matched well with the CD8 alpha-2 subunit of the human complex but significant structural differences were located in the CDR1, CDR2 and DE loops. Both axolotl and human class I showed large negative surface potential. The interacting area of the human CD8 alpha chain and of the corresponding region of axolotl CD8 beta had positive electrostatic potential compatible with complexation with the corresponding class I molecules. The presence of a CD8 beta homologue in an amphibian species implies that it was already present in the Devonian ancestor of amphibians and mammals, i.e. more than 400 million years ago. PMID:12034498

  3. Characterization and 454 pyrosequencing of Major Histocompatibility Complex class I genes in the great tit reveal complexity in a passerine system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepil Irem

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The critical role of Major Histocompatibility Complex (Mhc genes in disease resistance and their highly polymorphic nature make them exceptional candidates for studies investigating genetic effects on survival, mate choice and conservation. Species that harbor many Mhc loci and high allelic diversity are particularly intriguing as they are potentially under strong selection and studies of such species provide valuable information as to the mechanisms maintaining Mhc diversity. However comprehensive genotyping of complex multilocus systems has been a major challenge to date with the result that little is known about the consequences of this complexity in terms of fitness effects and disease resistance. Results In this study, we genotyped the Mhc class I exon 3 of the great tit (Parus major from two nest-box breeding populations near Oxford, UK that have been monitored for decades. Characterization of Mhc class I exon 3 was adopted and bidirectional sequencing was carried using the 454 sequencing platform. Full analysis of sequences through a stepwise variant validation procedure allowed reliable typing of more than 800 great tits based on 214,357 reads; from duplicates we estimated the repeatability of typing as 0.94. A total of 862 alleles were detected, and the presence of at least 16 functional loci was shown - the highest number characterized in a wild bird species. Finally, the functional alleles were grouped into 17 supertypes based on their antigen binding affinities. Conclusions We found extreme complexity at the Mhc class I of the great tit both in terms of allelic diversity and gene number. The presence of many functional loci was shown, together with a pseudogene family and putatively non-functional alleles; there was clear evidence that functional alleles were under strong balancing selection. This study is the first step towards an in-depth analysis of this gene complex in this species, which will help

  4. Leishmania major-specific, CD4+, major histocompatibility complex class II-restricted T cells derived in vitro from lymphoid tissues of naive mice

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    Several studies indicate that the outcome of experimental murine cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania major (Lm) is determined by immunological events occurring shortly after infection. These events lead to outgrowth of either protective CD4+ T cells in the C57BL/6 mouse, which cures, or exacerbative cells in the BALB/c mouse, which succumbs to disease. Potential factors influencing the outgrowth of protective or exacerbative T cells include antigen-presenting cells (APC), cytokines, ...

  5. Two major histocompatibility complex haplotypes influence susceptibility to sporadic inclusion body myositis: critical evaluation of an association with HLA-DR3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, P; Santoso, L; Mastaglia, F; Garlepp, M; Kok, C C; Allcock, R; Laing, N

    2004-11-01

    Previous studies of sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM) have shown a strong association with HLA-DR3 and other components of the 8.1 ancestral haplotype (AH) (HLA-A1, B8, DR3), where the susceptibility locus has been mapped to the central major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region between HLA-DR and C4. Here, the association with HLA-DR3 and other genes in the central MHC and class II region was further investigated in a group of 42 sIBM patients and in an ethnically similar control group (n = 214), using single-nucleotide polymorphisms and microsatellite screening. HLA-DR3 (marking DRB1*0301 in Caucasians) was associated with sIBM (Fisher's test). However, among HLA-DR3-positive patients and controls, carriage of HLA-DR3 without microsatellite and single-nucleotide polymorphism alleles of the 8.1AH (HLA-A1, B8, DRB3*0101, DRB1*0301, DQB1*0201) was marginally less common in patients. Patients showed no increase in carriage of the 18.2AH (HLA-A30, B18, DRB3*0202, DRB1*0301, DQB1*0201) or HLA-DR3 without the central MHC of the 8.1AH, further arguing against HLA-DRB1 as the direct cause of susceptibility. Genes between HLA-DRB1 and HOX12 require further investigation. BTL-II lies in this region and is expressed in muscle. Carriage of allele 2 (exon 6) was more common in patients. BTL-II(E6)*2 is characteristic of the 35.2AH (HLA-A3, B35, DRB1*01) in Caucasians and HLA-DR1, BTL-II(E6)*2, HOX12*2, RAGE*2 was carried by several patients. The 8.1AH and 35.2AH may confer susceptibility to sIBM independently or share a critical allele. PMID:15496200

  6. Immunization with a single major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted cytotoxic T-lymphocyte recognition epitope of herpes simplex virus type 2 confers protective immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaney, J E; Nobusawa, E; Brehm, M A; Bonneau, R H; Mylin, L M; Fu, T M; Kawaoka, Y; Tevethia, S S

    1998-12-01

    We have evaluated the potential of conferring protective immunity to herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) by selectively inducing an HSV-specific CD8(+) cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) response directed against a single major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted CTL recognition epitope. We generated a recombinant vaccinia virus (rVV-ES-gB498-505) which expresses the H-2Kb-restricted, HSV-1/2-cross-reactive CTL recognition epitope, HSV glycoprotein B residues 498 to 505 (SSIEFARL) (gB498-505), fused to the adenovirus type 5 E3/19K endoplasmic reticulum insertion sequence (ES). Mucosal immunization of C57BL/6 mice with this recombinant vaccinia virus induced both a primary CTL response in the draining lymph nodes and a splenic memory CTL response directed against HSV gB498-505. To determine the ability of the gB498-505-specific memory CTL response to provide protection from HSV infection, immunized mice were challenged with a lethal dose of HSV-2 strain 186 by the intranasal (i.n.) route. Development of the gB498-505-specific CTL response conferred resistance in 60 to 75% of mice challenged with a lethal dose of HSV-2 and significantly reduced the levels of infectious virus in the brains and trigeminal ganglia of challenged mice. Finally, i.n. immunization of C57BL/6 mice with either a recombinant influenza virus or a recombinant vaccinia virus expressing HSV gB498-505 without the ES was also demonstrated to induce an HSV-specific CTL response and provide protection from HSV infection. This finding confirms that the induction of an HSV-specific CTL response directed against a single epitope is sufficient for conferring protective immunity to HSV. Our findings support the role of CD8(+) T cells in the control of HSV infection of the central nervous system and suggest the potential importance of eliciting HSV-specific mucosal CD8(+) CTL in HSV vaccine design. PMID:9811690

  7. High-density SNP screening of the major histocompatibility complex in systemic lupus erythematosus demonstrates strong evidence for independent susceptibility regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa F Barcellos

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A substantial genetic contribution to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE risk is conferred by major histocompatibility complex (MHC gene(s on chromosome 6p21. Previous studies in SLE have lacked statistical power and genetic resolution to fully define MHC influences. We characterized 1,610 Caucasian SLE cases and 1,470 parents for 1,974 MHC SNPs, the highly polymorphic HLA-DRB1 locus, and a panel of ancestry informative markers. Single-marker analyses revealed strong signals for SNPs within several MHC regions, as well as with HLA-DRB1 (global p = 9.99 x 10(-16. The most strongly associated DRB1 alleles were: *0301 (odds ratio, OR = 2.21, p = 2.53 x 10(-12, *1401 (OR = 0.50, p = 0.0002, and *1501 (OR = 1.39, p = 0.0032. The MHC region SNP demonstrating the strongest evidence of association with SLE was rs3117103, with OR = 2.44 and p = 2.80 x 10(-13. Conditional haplotype and stepwise logistic regression analyses identified strong evidence for association between SLE and the extended class I, class I, class III, class II, and the extended class II MHC regions. Sequential removal of SLE-associated DRB1 haplotypes revealed independent effects due to variation within OR2H2 (extended class I, rs362521, p = 0.006, CREBL1 (class III, rs8283, p = 0.01, and DQB2 (class II, rs7769979, p = 0.003, and rs10947345, p = 0.0004. Further, conditional haplotype analyses demonstrated that variation within MICB (class I, rs3828903, p = 0.006 also contributes to SLE risk independent of HLA-DRB1*0301. Our results for the first time delineate with high resolution several MHC regions with independent contributions to SLE risk. We provide a list of candidate variants based on biologic and functional considerations that may be causally related to SLE risk and warrant further investigation.

  8. Comprehensive Analysis of Contributions from Protein Conformational Stability and Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II-Peptide Binding Affinity to CD4+ Epitope Immunogenicity in HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tingfeng; Steede, N. Kalaya; Nguyen, Hong-Nam P.; Freytag, Lucy C.; McLachlan, James B.; Mettu, Ramgopal R.; Robinson, James E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Helper T-cell epitope dominance in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein gp120 is not adequately explained by peptide binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins. Antigen processing potentially influences epitope dominance, but few, if any, studies have attempted to reconcile the influences of antigen processing and MHC protein binding for all helper T-cell epitopes of an antigen. Epitopes of gp120 identified in both humans and mice occur on the C-terminal flanks of flexible segments that are likely to be proteolytic cleavage sites. In this study, the influence of gp120 conformation on the dominance pattern in gp120 from HIV strain 89.6 was examined in CBA mice, whose MHC class II protein has one of the most well defined peptide-binding preferences. Only one of six dominant epitopes contained the most conserved element of the I-Ak binding motif, an aspartic acid. Destabilization of the gp120 conformation by deletion of single disulfide bonds preferentially enhanced responses to the cryptic I-Ak motif-containing sequences, as reported by T-cell proliferation or cytokine secretion. Conversely, inclusion of CpG in the adjuvant with gp120 enhanced responses to the dominant CD4+ T-cell epitopes. The gp120 destabilization affected secretion of some cytokines more than others, suggesting that antigen conformation could modulate T-cell functions through mechanisms of antigen processing. IMPORTANCE CD4+ helper T cells play an essential role in protection against HIV and other pathogens. Thus, the sites of helper T-cell recognition, the dominant epitopes, are targets for vaccine design; and the corresponding T cells may provide markers for monitoring infection and immunity. However, T-cell epitopes are difficult to identify and predict. It is also unclear whether CD4+ T cells specific for one epitope are more protective than T cells specific for other epitopes. This work shows that the three-dimensional (3D) structure of an

  9. Boosting immune response with the invariant chain segments via association with non-peptide binding region of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Fangfang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Based on binding of invariant chain (Ii to major histocompatibility complex (MHC class II molecules to form complexes, Ii-segment hybrids, Ii-key structure linking an epitope, or Ii class II-associated invariant chain peptide (CLIP replaced with an epitope were used to increase immune response. It is currently unknown whether the Ii-segment cytosolic and transmembrane domains bind to the MHC non-peptide binding region (PBR and consequently influence immune response. To investigate the potential role of Ii-segments in the immune response via MHC II/peptide complexes, a few hybrids containing Ii-segments and a multiepitope (F306 from Newcastle disease virus fusion protein (F were constructed, and their binding effects on MHC II molecules and specific antibody production were compared using confocal microscopy, immunoprecipitation, western blotting and animal experiments. Results One of the Ii-segment/F306 hybrids, containing ND (Asn–Asp outside the F306 in the Ii-key structure (Ii-key/F306/ND, neither co-localized with MHC II molecules on plasma membrane nor bound to MHC II molecules to form complexes. However, stimulation of mice with the structure produced 4-fold higher antibody titers compared with F306 alone. The two other Ii-segment/F306 hybrids, in which the transmembrane and cytosolic domains of Ii were linked to this structure (Cyt/TM/Ii-key/F306/ND, partially co-localized on plasma membrane with MHC class II molecules and weakly bound MHC II molecules to form complexes. They induced mice to produce approximately 9-fold higher antibody titers compared with F306 alone. Furthermore, an Ii/F306 hybrid (F306 substituting CLIP co-localized well with MHC II molecules on the membrane to form complexes, although it increased antibody titer about 3-fold relative to F306 alone. Conclusions These results suggest that Ii-segments improve specific immune response by binding to the non-PBR on MHC class II molecules and enabling

  10. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Envelope Epitope-Specific CD4+ T Lymphocytes in Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected and Vaccinated Rhesus Monkeys Detected Using a Peptide-Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Tetramer

    OpenAIRE

    Kuroda, Marcelo J.; Schmitz, Jörn E.; Lekutis, Christine; Nickerson, Christine E.; Lifton, Michelle A.; Franchini, Genoveffa; Harouse, Janet M.; Cheng-Mayer, Cecilia; Letvin, Norman L.

    2000-01-01

    A tetrameric recombinant major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-peptide complex was used to quantitate human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope (Env)-specific CD4+ T cells in vaccinated and in simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)-infected rhesus monkeys. A rhesus monkey MHC class II DR molecule, Mamu-DR*W201, and an HIV-1 Env peptide (p46) were employed to construct this tetrameric complex. A p46-specific proliferative response was seen in sorted, tetramer-binding, ...

  11. Analysis of Gag-specific Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus–infected Rhesus Monkeys by Cell Staining with a Tetrameric Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I–Peptide Complex

    OpenAIRE

    Kuroda, Marcelo J.; Schmitz, Jörn E.; Barouch, Dan H.; Craiu, Abie; Allen, Todd M.; Sette, Alessandro; Watkins, David I.; Forman, Meryl A.; Letvin, Norman L.

    1998-01-01

    A tetrameric recombinant major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I–peptide complex was used as a staining reagent in flow cytometric analyses to quantitate and define the phenotype of Gag-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in the peripheral blood of simian immunodeficiency virus macaque (SIVmac)-infected rhesus monkeys. The heavy chain of the rhesus monkey MHC class I molecule Mamu-A*01 and β2-microglobulin were refolded in the presence of an SIVmac Gag synthetic peptide (p11C, C–M)...

  12. Myxoma Virus Leukemia-Associated Protein Is Responsible for Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I and Fas-CD95 Down-Regulation and Defines Scrapins, a New Group of Surface Cellular Receptor Abductor Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Guerin, Jean-Luc; Gelfi, Jacqueline; Boullier, Severine; Delverdier, Maxence; Bellanger, Frederique-Anne; Bertagnoli, Stephane; Drexler, Ingo; Sutter, Gerd; Messud-Petit, Frederique

    2002-01-01

    Down-modulation of major histocompatibility class I (MHC-I) molecules is a viral strategy for survival in the host. Myxoma virus, a member of the Poxviridae family responsible for rabbit myxomatosis, can down-modulate the expression of MHC-I molecules, but the viral factor(s) has not been described. We cloned and characterized a gene coding for an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident protein containing an atypical zinc finger and two transmembrane domains, which we called myxoma virus leukemia...

  13. Bone marrow-derived immature dendritic cells prime in vivo alloreactive T cells for interleukin-4-dependent rejection of major histocompatibility complex class II antigen-disparate cardiac allograft.

    OpenAIRE

    Buonocore, Sofia; Flamand, Véronique; Goldman, Michel; Braun, Michel Y

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dendritic cells (DC) at the immature state express low levels of major histocompatibility complex and costimulatory molecules and are poor stimulators of primary T-cell response in vitro. Injection of immature bone marrow-derived DC, however, was shown to prime in vivo alloreactive CD4 T lymphocytes toward type 2 cytokine-producing cells in the absence of CD8 T-cell activation. METHODS: We undertook the present study to determine whether Th2-immunization by immature DC could lead ...

  14. Human CD4-major histocompatibility complex class II (DQw6) transgenic mice in an endogenous CD4/CD8-deficient background: reconstitution of phenotype and human-restricted function

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    To reconstitute the human immune system in mice, transgenic mice expressing human CD4 and human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II (DQw6) molecules in an endogenous CD4- and CD8-deficient background (mCD4/8-/-), after homologous recombination, have been generated. We report that expression of human CD4 molecule in mCD4/8-/- mice rescues thymocyte development and completely restores the T cell compartment in peripheral lymphoid organs. Upon vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) challen...

  15. Autologous CD4 T-cell responses to ectopic class II major histocompatibility complex antigen-expressing single-cell islet cells: an in vitro insight into the pathogenesis of lymphocytic insulitis in nonobese diabetic mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Formby, B; Miller, N.

    1990-01-01

    We investigated by flow cytometric analysis the expression of class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules by viable single-cell islet cells (SCICs) prepared from male and female 4- and 10-week-old nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse islets. With anti-I-Ak monoclonal antibody (specific for I-Ak,f,r,s beta and produced by clone 11-5-2), and fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated goat anti-mouse IgG as second-step antibody, we found that SCICs from both sexes aberrantly expressed class II...

  16. The Influence of Nutrition, Sex and Slaughter Age on Characteristics of Pectoralis Major Muscle at Broiler Chickens Ross-308

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adela Marcu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper was studied the effect of dietary energy and protein levels on characteristics of pectoralis major (P. major muscle at broiler chickens, which were sacrificed at 35 and 42 days old. The genetic material was represented by broiler chickens that belonged to the „Ross-308” hybrid, with two groups (LC-control group and LE experimental group. During the growth periods (starter, growing and finishing they have received compound feed ad libitum, with different energy and protein levels (LC-conforming to recommendations of Aviagen Company; LE-higher with 10%. After slaughter, from each group were sampled breast muscles (five per sex and for P. major were determined: the weight, pH value, the thickness of myocytes (fiber diameter, cross-sectional area of fibers. At the LE group, high levels of dietary proteins and energy has significantly influenced pH value and the thickness of myocytes in the P. major muscle, as compared with LC. The sex and slaughter age have significantly influenced the fibers diameter from P. major muscle, that were thicker at female chickens, as compared with male chickens and at 42 days age vs. 35 days. Normal 0 21 false false false RO X-NONE X-NONE

  17. A step-by-step overview of the dynamic process of epitope selection by major histocompatibility complex class II for presentation to helper T cells [version 1; referees: 4 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheherazade Sadegh-Nasseri

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available T cell antigen receptors (TCRs expressed on cytotoxic or helper T cells can only see their specific target antigen as short sequences of peptides bound to the groove of proteins of major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I, and class II respectively. In addition to the many steps, several participating proteins, and multiple cellular compartments involved in the processing of antigens, the MHC structure, with its dynamic and flexible groove, has perfectly evolved as the underlying instrument for epitope selection. In this review, I have taken a step-by-step, and rather historical, view to describe antigen processing and determinant selection, as we understand it today, all based on decades of intense research by hundreds of laboratories.

  18. Size polymorphism of chicken major histocompatibility complex-encoded B-G molecules is due to length variation in the cytoplasmic heptad repeat region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaufman, J; Salomonsen, J; Skjødt, K;

    1990-01-01

    , which bear intrachain disulfide bonds. All 3-6 bands have different mobilities in SDS gels between different haplotypes, ranging from 30 to 55 kDa. This size polymorphism is not affected by glycosidase treatment or addition of protease inhibitors. Partial proteolysis of cell surface-iodinated B...... that the extracellular regions of these molecules are very similar and that the length polymorphism is due to variations in the cytoplasmic regions. Inspection of the cDNA-derived protein sequence in this region shows many heptad repeats, which may allow variation in length by step deletion and alternative splicing...

  19. Recovery of CD4+ T Cells in HIV patients with a stable virologic response to antiretroviral therapy is associated with polymorphisms of interleukin-6 and central major histocompatibility complex genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Sonia; Rosenow, Ann A; James, Ian R; Roberts, Steven G; Nolan, Richard C; French, Martyn A; Price, Patricia

    2006-01-01

    We investigated whether polymorphisms in genes associated with HIV disease progression and/or immune activation affect CD4+ T-cell recovery in HIV patients who began combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) with advanced immunodeficiency and achieved stable control of plasma viremia. Patients with CD4 T-cell counts 400 cells/microL (n = 37) on ART were compared. A multiple case-control logistic regression associated carriage of BAT1(1,2) or interleukin (IL)6-174(2,2) with low CD4 T-cell counts (P = 0.012). BAT1*2 uniquely marks the central major histocompatibility complex region of a conserved haplotype (HLA-A1,B8,BAT1*2,TNFA-308*2,DR3,DQ2). There was no association between alleles carried at CCR5Delta32, CCR5 59029, CCR5 59353, CCR2+190 (V64I), SDF1 3'UTR, IL1A+4845, IL1B+3953, IL4-589, IL10-592, IL10-R1+536, IL10-R1+1112, IL12B 3'UTR, TNFA-308, or TNFA-1031 and CD4 T-cell counts. We suggest that immune activation and/or CD4 T-cell apoptosis in HIV patients on effective ART is influenced by genetic factors. PMID:16340466

  20. Type I strain of Toxoplasma gondii from chicken induced different immune responses with that from human, cat and swine in chicken

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Guang-wei; Xu Li-xin; LI Xiang-rui; WanG Shuai; WanG Wang; ZhanG Zhen-chao; XIe Qing; ZhanG Meng; I a hassan; Yan Ruo-feng; SonG Xiao-kai

    2015-01-01

    In this study, four strains of Toxoplasma gondi with the same genetic type (Type I) originated from chicken, human, cat and swine were used to compare the immune responses in resistant chicken host to investigate the relationships between the parasite origins and the pathogenicity in certain host. A total of 300, 10-day-old chickens were al ocated randomly into ifve groups which named JS (from chicken), CAT (from cat), CN (from swine), RH (from human) and a negative control group (–Ve) with 60 birds in each group. Tachyzoites of four different T. gondi strains (JS, CAT, CN and RH) were inocu-lated intraperitoneal y with the dose of 1×107 in the four designed groups, respectively. The negative control (–Ve) group was mockly inoculated with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) alone. Blood and spleen samples were obtained on the day of inoculation (day 0) and at days 4, 11, 25, 39 and 53 post-infection to screen the immunopathological changes. The results demonstrated some different immune characters of T. gondi infected chickens with that of mice or swine previous reported. These differences included up-regulation of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) molecules in the early stage of infection, early peak expressions of interleukin (IL)-12 (IL-12) and-10 (IL-10) and long keep of IL-17. These might partial y contribute to the resistance of chicken to T. gondi infection. Comparisons to chickens infected with strains from human, cat and swine, chickens infected with strain from chicken showed signiifcant high levels of CD4+and CD8+T cel s, interferon gamma (IFN-γ), IL-12 and IL-10. It suggested that the strain from chicken had different ability to stimulate cel ular immunity in chicken.

  1. Expression of major histocompatibility complex class I and class II antigens in human Schwann cell cultures and effects of infection with Mycobacterium leprae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, N M; Mirsky, R; Grange, J M; Jessen, K R

    1987-06-01

    Recent experiments on rats have raised the possibility that Schwann cells can present antigens to T lymphocytes. We have investigated whether this mechanism might be relevant in leprosy by determining under what conditions human Schwann cells express class I and class II antigens, and whether infection with Mycobacterium leprae affects this expression. The distribution of these antigens was examined on human Schwann cells in dissociated cell cultures derived from human fetal peripheral nerves. We find that both Schwann cells and fibroblastic cells in these cultures normally express class I antigens but not class II antigens. When Schwann cells are infected with live Mycobacterium leprae for 48 h, 73% of Schwann cells phagocytose the bacteria. Mycobacterium leprae prevents 3H-thymidine incorporation into cultured human Schwann cells, but does not affect class I expression in these cells. Treatment of normal and Mycobacterium leprae infected cultures with gamma-interferon for 72 h induces class II expression on most Schwann cells but not on the majority of fibroblastic cells. The fact that human Schwann cells infected with Mycobacterium leprae can be induced by gamma-interferon to express class II antigens suggests that they may be able to present Mycobacterium leprae antigens to T lymphocytes and thus initiate immune responses against the bacteria. We suggest that a failure of this response, such as that seen within nerve trunks in lepromatous leprosy, is caused by deficient class II expression on Schwann cells. This deficiency in class II expression, in turn, may be caused by the reduced gamma-interferon production characteristic of lepromatous leprosy. PMID:3115648

  2. Major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A/B (MICA/B) expression in tumor tissue and serum of pancreatic cancer: Role of uric acid accumulation in gemcitabine-induced MICA/B expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A and B (MICA/B) are two stress-inducible ligands that bind the immunoreceptor NKG2D and play an important role in mediating the cyotoxicity of NK and T cells. In this study, we sought to study MICA/B expression in pancreatic cancer and to determine whether and how genotoxic drugs such as gemcitabine can affect MICA/B expression and natural killer cytotoxity. Seven pancreatic cancer cell lines were analyzed for MICA/B expression by flow cytometry and for their sensitivity to NK-92 cell killing by a 51Cr release assay. MICA/B expression in tumor tissues and sera of pancreatic cancer was analyzed by immunohistochemical staining (IHC) and ELISA, respectively. Two MICA/B-positive cell lines were sensitive to the cytotoxic activity of NK-92 cells. Other two MICA/B-positive cell lines and three MICA/B-negative cell lines were resistant to NK-92 cell killing. MICA/B expression was positive in 17 of 25 (68%) pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas but not in normal pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. Serum MICA/B levels were significantly elevated in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinomas but did not correlate with the stage of pancreatic cancer and patient survival. Gemcitabine therapy led to increased serum MICA levels in 6 of 10 patients with detectable serum MICA. Allopurinol, an inhibitor of xanthine oxidoreductase that converts xanthine to uric acid, blocked uric acid production, MICA/B expression, and sensitivity to NK-92 cell killing toward a PANC-1 cancer cell line exposed to radiation and two genotoxic drugs, gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil. The levels of MICA/B expression in serum and tissue of pancreatic cancer are elevated. DNA damage-induced MICA/B expression is mediated through increased uric acid production

  3. Rapid serodiagnosis with the use of surface plasmon resonance imaging for the detection of antibodies against major surface protein A of Mycoplasma synoviae in chickens

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, Kiseok; Lee, Semi; Seo, Jayoung; Lee, Dongwoo; Kim, Taejung

    2010-01-01

    Mycoplasma synoviae, a major worldwide pathogen in poultry, causes respiratory tract infection and arthritis in chickens and turkeys. Two major surface antigens of M. synoviae are encoded by a single gene, vlhA (variably expressed lipoprotein and hemagglutinin). The gene product is cleaved post-translationally to yield the lipoprotein major surface protein (MSP) B (MSPB) and the hemagglutinin MSPA. The availability of MSPA as an antigen for serodiagnosis was studied by means of a protein chip...

  4. Co-infection dynamics of a major food-borne zoonotic pathogen in chicken

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skanseng, Beate; Trosvik, Pal; Zimonja, Monika;

    2007-01-01

    A major bottleneck in understanding zoonotic pathogens has been the analysis of pathogen co-infection dynamics. We have addressed this challenge using a novel direct sequencing approach for pathogen quantification in mixed infections. The major zoonotic food-borne pathogen Campylobacter jejuni...

  5. The relationship between insomnia and major depressive disorder: a chicken and egg situation?

    OpenAIRE

    Gulec, Mustafa; Ozcan, Halil; ORAL, Elif; Selvi, Yavuz; Aydin, Adem

    2012-01-01

    Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) is highly prevalent, severely debilitating, and often recurrent. The majority of individuals with MDD experience sleep disturbances. MDD is also over-represented in populations with a variety of sleep disorders. Although sleep disturbances are typical features of MDD, such symptoms sometimes appear prior to an episode of MDD. The bidirectional association between sleep disturbance, especially insomnia and MDD, increases the difficulty of differentiating cause-a...

  6. Multipotent adult germ-line stem cells, like other pluripotent stem cells, can be killed by cytotoxic T lymphocytes despite low expression of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayernia Karim

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multipotent adult germ-line stem cells (maGSCs represent a new pluripotent cell type that can be derived without genetic manipulation from spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs present in adult testis. Similarly to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, they could provide a source of cellular grafts for new transplantation therapies of a broad variety of diseases. To test whether these stem cells can be rejected by the recipients, we have analyzed whether maGSCs and iPSCs can become targets for cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL or whether they are protected, as previously proposed for embryonic stem cells (ESCs. Results We have observed that maGSCs can be maintained in prolonged culture with or without leukemia inhibitory factor and/or feeder cells and still retain the capacity to form teratomas in immunodeficient recipients. They were, however, rejected in immunocompetent allogeneic recipients, and the immune response controlled teratoma growth. We analyzed the susceptibility of three maGSC lines to CTL in comparison to ESCs, iPSCs, and F9 teratocarcinoma cells. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I molecules were not detectable by flow cytometry on these stem cell lines, apart from low levels on one maGSC line (maGSC Stra8 SSC5. However, using a quantitative real time PCR analysis H2K and B2m transcripts were detected in all pluripotent stem cell lines. All pluripotent stem cell lines were killed in a peptide-dependent manner by activated CTLs derived from T cell receptor transgenic OT-I mice after pulsing of the targets with the SIINFEKL peptide. Conclusion Pluripotent stem cells, including maGSCs, ESCs, and iPSCs can become targets for CTLs, even if the expression level of MHC class I molecules is below the detection limit of flow cytometry. Thus they are not protected against CTL-mediated cytotoxicity. Therefore, pluripotent cells might be rejected after transplantation by this mechanism if specific antigens are presented

  7. Augmented serum level of major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A (MICA) protein and reduced NKG2D expression on NK and T cells in patients with cervical cancer and precursor lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women worldwide. NK and cytotoxic T cells play an important role in the elimination of virus-infected and tumor cells through NKG2D activating receptors, which can promote the lysis of target cells by binding to the major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A (MICA) proteins. Increased serum levels of MICA have been found in patients with epithelial tumors. The aim of this study was to compare the levels of soluble MICA (sMICA) and NKG2D-expressing NK and T cells in blood samples from patients with cervical cancer or precursor lesions with those from healthy donors. Peripheral blood with or without heparin was collected to obtain mononuclear cells or sera, respectively. Serum sMICA levels were measured by ELISA and NKG2D-expressing immune cells were analyzed by flow cytometry. Also, a correlation analysis was performed to associate sMICA levels with either NKG2D expression or with the stage of the lesion. Significant amounts of sMICA were detected in sera from nearly all patients. We found a decrease in the number of NKG2D-expressing NK and T cells in both cervical cancer and lesion groups when compared to healthy donors. Pearson analysis showed a negative correlation between sMICA and NKG2D-expressing T cells; however, we did not find a significant correlation when the analysis was applied to sMICA and NKG2D expression on NK cells. Our results show for the first time that high sMICA levels are found in sera from patients with both cervical cancer and precursor lesions when compared with healthy donors. We also observed a diminution in the number of NKG2D-expressing NK and T cells in the patient samples; however, a significant negative correlation between sMICA and NKG2D expression was only seen in T cells

  8. Cryopreservation of specialized chicken lines using cultured primordial germ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, S; Whyte, J; Taylor, L; Sherman, A; Nair, V; Kaiser, P; McGrew, M J

    2016-08-01

    Biosecurity and sustainability in poultry production requires reliable germplasm conservation. Germplasm conservation in poultry is more challenging in comparison to other livestock species. Embryo cryopreservation is not feasible for egg-laying animals, and chicken semen conservation has variable success for different chicken breeds. A potential solution is the cryopreservation of the committed diploid stem cell precursors to the gametes, the primordial germ cells ( PGCS: ). Primordial germ cells are the lineage-restricted cells found at early embryonic stages in birds and form the sperm and eggs. We demonstrate here, using flocks of partially inbred, lower-fertility, major histocompatibility complex- ( MHC-: ) restricted lines of chicken, that we can easily derive and cryopreserve a sufficient number of independent lines of male and female PGCs that would be sufficient to reconstitute a poultry breed. We demonstrate that germ-line transmission can be attained from these PGCs using a commercial layer line of chickens as a surrogate host. This research is a major step in developing and demonstrating that cryopreserved PGCs could be used for the biobanking of specialized flocks of birds used in research settings. The prospective application of this technology to poultry production will further increase sustainability to meet current and future production needs. PMID:27099306

  9. Histology, composition, and quality traits of chicken Pectoralis major muscle affected by wooden breast abnormality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soglia, F; Mudalal, S; Babini, E; Di Nunzio, M; Mazzoni, M; Sirri, F; Cavani, C; Petracci, M

    2016-03-01

    Only a few years ago, the poultry industry began to face a recent abnormality in breast meat, known as wooden breast, which frequently overlaps with white striping. This study aimed to assess the impact of wooden breast abnormality on quality traits of meat. For this purpose, 32 normal (NRM), 32 wooden (WB), and 32 wooden and white-striped (WB/WS) Pectoralis major muscles were selected from the same flock of heavy broilers (males, Ross 708, weighing around 3.7 kg) in the deboning area of a commercial processing plant at 3 h postmortem and used to assess histology, proximate (moisture, protein, fat, ash, and collagen) and mineral composition (Mg, K, P, Na and Ca), sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar protein patterns, and technological traits of breast meat. Compared to the normal group, WB/WS fillets showed more severe histological lesions characterized by fiber degeneration, fibrosis, and lipidosis, coupled with a significantly harder texture. With regard to proximate and mineral composition, abnormal samples exhibited significantly (P < 0.001) higher moisture, fat, and collagen contents coupled with lower (P < 0.001) amounts of protein and ash. Furthermore, increased calcium (131 vs. 84 mg kg(-1); P < 0.05) and sodium (741 vs. 393 mg kg(-1); P < 0.001) levels were found in WB/WS meat samples. The SDS-PAGE analysis revealed a significantly lower amount of calcium-ATPase (SERCA, 114 kDa), responsible for the translocation of Ca ions across the membrane, in normal breasts compared to abnormal ones. As for meat quality traits, fillets affected by wooden abnormality exhibited significantly (P < 0.001) higher ultimate pH and lower water-holding/water-binding capacity. In particular, compared to normal, abnormal samples showed reduced marinade uptake coupled with increased drip loss and cooking losses as well. In conclusion, this study revealed that meat affected by wooden breast or both wooden breast and white striping abnormalities exhibit poorer nutritional value, harder

  10. Comparison of parasite-specific immunoglobulin levels in two chicken lines during sustained infection with Ascaridia galli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norup, Liselotte Rothmann; Dalgaard, Tina S; Pleidrup, Janne; Permin, Anders; Schou, Torben W; Jungersen, Gregers; Fink, Dorte R; Juul-Madsen, Helle R

    2013-01-16

    Increasingly large numbers of poultry are held in production systems with access to outdoor areas. In these systems intestinal helminths are found with flock prevalences of up to 100%. Helminth infections influence chicken health negatively, which is why the following investigation has been performed. In the present experiment, 20 chickens of two inbred chicken lines containing the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotypes, B14 and R5, were inoculated with 500 embryonated Ascaridia galli eggs. The A. galli-specific IgG titres of serum samples and the excretion of A. galli eggs in chicken faeces were measured for a period of 81 weeks. The level of excreted A. galli eggs measured as eggs per gram chicken faeces (EPG) varied greatly between chickens in each line. Significant differences were found between the two lines and with the R5 chickens reaching the highest levels. Likewise, the A. galli-specific IgG titres in serum differed significantly between the two lines, and an inverse relationship between infection level (EPG) and antibody titres was found. Although this inverse relationship suggests that humoral immunity may be involved in protection against A. galli infection, the high antibody titres did not prevent continued infection. PMID:22981407

  11. Role of CD4 molecule in the induction of interleukin 2 and interleukin 2 receptor in class II major histocompatibility complex-restricted antigen-specific T helper clones. T cell receptor/CD3 complex transmits CD4-dependent and CD4-independent signals.

    OpenAIRE

    Oyaizu, N; Chirmule, N; Pahwa, S.

    1992-01-01

    The CD4 molecule plays an essential role in antigen-induced activation of T helper (Th) cells, but its contribution to signal transduction events resulting in physiologic T cell function is ill defined. By utilizing anti-CD4 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that recognize distinct epitopes of CD4, we have investigated the role of CD4 molecule in antigen-induced interleukin 2 (IL-2) and IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) alpha chain expression in class II major histocompatibility complex-restricted antigen-spe...

  12. Profiling of chicken adipose tissue gene expression by genome array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Shou-Zhi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Excessive accumulation of lipids in the adipose tissue is a major problem in the present-day broiler industry. However, few studies have analyzed the expression of adipose tissue genes that are involved in pathways and mechanisms leading to adiposity in chickens. Gene expression profiling of chicken adipose tissue could provide key information about the ontogenesis of fatness and clarify the molecular mechanisms underlying obesity. In this study, Chicken Genome Arrays were used to construct an adipose tissue gene expression profile of 7-week-old broilers, and to screen adipose tissue genes that are differentially expressed in lean and fat lines divergently selected over eight generations for high and low abdominal fat weight. Results The gene expression profiles detected 13,234–16,858 probe sets in chicken adipose tissue at 7 weeks, and genes involved in lipid metabolism and immunity such as fatty acid binding protein (FABP, thyroid hormone-responsive protein (Spot14, lipoprotein lipase(LPL, insulin-like growth factor binding protein 7(IGFBP7 and major histocompatibility complex (MHC, were highly expressed. In contrast, some genes related to lipogenesis, such as leptin receptor, sterol regulatory element binding proteins1 (SREBP1, apolipoprotein B(ApoB and insulin-like growth factor 2(IGF2, were not detected. Moreover, 230 genes that were differentially expressed between the two lines were screened out; these were mainly involved in lipid metabolism, signal transduction, energy metabolism, tumorigenesis and immunity. Subsequently, real-time RT-PCR was performed to validate fifteen differentially expressed genes screened out by the microarray approach and high consistency was observed between the two methods. Conclusion Our results establish the groundwork for further studies of the basic genetic control of growth and development of chicken adipose tissue, and will be beneficial in clarifying the molecular mechanism of

  13. Histocompatibility and Hematopoietic Transplantation in the Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill L. O. de Jong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The zebrafish has proven to be an excellent model for human disease, particularly hematopoietic diseases, since these fish make similar types of blood cells as humans and other mammals. The genetic program that regulates the development and differentiation of hematopoietic cells is highly conserved. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs are the source of all the blood cells needed by an organism during its lifetime. Identifying an HSC requires a functional assay, namely, a transplantation assay consisting of multilineage engraftment of a recipient and subsequent serial transplant recipients. In the past decade, several types of hematopoietic transplant assays have been developed in the zebrafish. An understanding of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC genes in the zebrafish has lagged behind transplantation experiments, limiting the ability to perform unbiased competitive transplantation assays. This paper summarizes the different hematopoietic transplantation experiments performed in the zebrafish, both with and without immunologic matching, and discusses future directions for this powerful experimental model of human blood diseases.

  14. New recombinants within the MHC (B-complex) of the chicken

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, C; Skjødt, K; Toivanen, A;

    1983-01-01

    In a search for genetic recombinations within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) of the chicken, the B-complex, the offspring from matings between heterozygous B15/B21 and B4/B6 animals were analysed by red cell agglutination. Among the progeny, 8,912 informative typings were performed...... followed B-F/B-L. The mapping distance between the two loci B-F and B-G is in the range of 0.04 centimorgan. The lack of recombinants separating individual B-F loci in this study and in the studies of others might indicate that chicken MHC is less complex than those of mammalian species, but alternative...

  15. Assessment of Newcastle Disease specific T cell proliferation in different inbred MHC chicken lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norup, Liselotte Rothmann; Dalgaard, Tina Sørensen; Pedersen, Asger Roer;

    2011-01-01

    In this study we have described the establishment of an antigen-specific T cell proliferation assay based on recall stimulation with Newcastle disease (ND) antigen; further, we have described the results obtained after recall stimulation of animals containing different Major Histocompatibility...... Complex (MHC) haplotypes, vaccinated against ND. First optimization of the assay was performed to lower unspecific proliferation and to enhance antigen-specific T cell proliferation. These two issues were achieved using ethylene diamine tetra acetic-acid as stabilizing agent in blood samples and...... autologous immune serum in culture medium. The optimized assay was used to screen chickens with different MHC haplotypes for their ability to perform T cell proliferation. Results showed that the antigen-specific response of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from B12 chickens was generally low, whereas B13, B130 and B...

  16. Rapid serodiagnosis with the use of surface plasmon resonance imaging for the detection of antibodies against major surface protein A of Mycoplasma synoviae in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Kiseok; Lee, Semi; Seo, Jayoung; Lee, Dongwoo; Kim, Taejung

    2010-01-01

    Mycoplasma synoviae, a major worldwide pathogen in poultry, causes respiratory tract infection and arthritis in chickens and turkeys. Two major surface antigens of M. synoviae are encoded by a single gene, vlhA (variably expressed lipoprotein and hemagglutinin). The gene product is cleaved post-translationally to yield the lipoprotein major surface protein (MSP) B (MSPB) and the hemagglutinin MSPA. The availability of MSPA as an antigen for serodiagnosis was studied by means of a protein chip based on surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi). The diagnostic potential of SPRi for measurement of levels of antibody to MSPA was compared with that of a conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit. The results from SPRi, a process that took only 1 h, were similar to those from ELISA. Therefore, MSPA can be used as an antigen for serologic studies, and SPRi, a label-free and high-throughput method, may be a valuable tool in avian serodiagnostic studies. PMID:20357963

  17. Molecular characterization by high-resolution isoelectric focusing of the products encoded by the class II region loci of the major histocompatibility complex in humans. I. DR and DQ gene variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez de Cordoba, S; Nunez-Roldan, A; Winchester, R; Marshall, P; Carrier, C; Mollen, N; Walker, M; Ginsberg-Fellner, F; Rubinstein, P

    1987-09-01

    We describe a new approach to the analysis of the structural polymorphism of the DR beta, DQ alpha, and DQ beta polypeptide chains of human histocompatibility class II antigens. In comparison to conventional two-dimensional gel studies, this method provides sharper definition of the protein bands and side-by-side comparisons within the same gel, thereby permitting the detection of minor differences in the isoelectric points of the protein chains. Using this methodology we have analyzed the IEF polymorphism and the variability in the number of the DR beta chains encoded by different DR haplotypes. Twenty DR beta chain variants, which include the products of no less than two separate DR beta loci, have been thus far identified. Alleles at one of these loci are assumed to code for DR beta chains carrying the DR alloespecificities DR1, DR2, DR3, DR4, DR5, DRw6, DR7, and DR8. Alleles at a second DR beta locus encode DR beta chains that may be shared by serologically DR-different haplotypes and carry supertypic serologic specificities (i.e., DRw52 and DRw53). We also demonstrate here that the structural polymorphisms of the DQ alpha and DQ beta chains are more extensive than previously thought, report the characterization of 14 DQ beta variants, and define their relationship to the previously described DQw serologic specificities. In addition, we describe the class II haplotype associations observed for the different DR and DQ variants characterized. PMID:3679903

  18. Glycan analysis of the chicken synaptic plasma membrane glycoproteins - a major synaptic N-glycan carries the LewisX determinant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The majority of synaptic plasma membrane components are glycosylated. It is now widely accepted that this post-translational modification is crucial during the establishment, maintenance and function of the nervous system. Despite its significance, structural information about the glycosylation of nervous system specific glycoproteins is very limited. In the present study the major glycan structures of the chicken synaptic plasma membrane (SPM associated glycoprotein glycans were determined. N-glycans were released by hydrazinolysis, labelled with 2-aminobenzamide, treated with neuraminidase and subsequently fractionated by size exclusion chromatography. Individual fractions were characterized by the combination of high-pressure liquid chromatography, exoglycosidase treatment or reagent array analysis method (RAAM. In addition to oligomannose-type glycans, core-fucosylated complex glycans with biantennary bisecting glycans carrying the LewisX epitope were most abundant. The overall chicken glycan profile was strikingly similar to the rat brain glycan profile. The presence of the LewisX determinant in relatively large proportions suggests a tissue-specific function for these glycans.

  19. Recombinant duck enteritis viruses expressing major structural proteins of the infectious bronchitis virus provide protection against infectious bronchitis in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huixin; Wang, Yulong; Han, Zongxi; Wang, Yu; Liang, Shulin; Jiang, Lu; Hu, Yonghao; Kong, Xiangang; Liu, Shengwang

    2016-06-01

    To design an alternative vaccine for control of infectious bronchitis in chickens, three recombinant duck enteritis viruses (rDEVs) expressing the N, S, or S1 protein of infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) were constructed using conventional homologous recombination methods, and were designated as rDEV-N, rDEV-S, and rDEV-S1, respectively. Chickens were divided into five vaccinated groups, which were each immunized with one of the rDEVs, covalent vaccination with rDEV-N & rDEV-S, or covalent vaccination with rDEV-N & rDEV-S1, and a control group. An antibody response against IBV was detectable and the ratio of CD4(+)/CD8(+) T-lymphocytes decreased at 7 days post-vaccination in each vaccinated group, suggesting that humoral and cellular responses were elicited in each group as early as 7 days post-immunization. After challenge with a homologous virulent IBV strain at 21 days post-immunization, vaccinated groups showed significant differences in the percentage of birds with clinical signs, as compared to the control group (p < 0.01), as the two covalent-vaccination groups and the rDEV-S group provided better protection than the rDEV-N- or rDEV-S1-vaccinated group. There was less viral shedding in the rDEV-N & rDEV-S- (2/10) and rDEV-N & rDEV-S1- (2/10) vaccinated groups than the other three vaccinated groups. Based on the clinical signs, viral shedding, and mortality rates, rDEV-N & rDEV-S1 covalent vaccination conferred better protection than use of any of the single rDEVs. PMID:26946113

  20. MHC haplotype and susceptibility to experimental infections (Salmonella Enteritidis, Pasteurella multocida or Ascaridia galli) in a commercial and an indigenous chicken breed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schou, T W; Labouriau, R; Permin, A; Christensen, J P; Sørensen, P; Cu, H P; Nguyen, V K; Juul-Madsen, H R

    2010-05-15

    In three independent experimental infection studies, the susceptibility and course of infection of three pathogens considered of importance in most poultry production systems, Ascaridia galli, Salmonella Enteritidis and Pasteurella multocida were compared in two chicken breeds, the indigenous Vietnamese Ri and the commercial Luong Phuong. Furthermore, the association of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) with disease-related parameters was evaluated, using alleles of the LEI0258 microsatellite as markers for MHC haplotypes. The Ri chickens were found to be more resistant to A. galli and S. Enteritidis than commercial Luong Phuong chickens. In contrast, the Ri chickens were more susceptible to P. multocida, although production parameters were more affected in the Luong Phuong chickens. Furthermore, it was shown that the individual variations observed in response to the infections were influenced by the MHC. Using marker alleles of the microsatellite LEI0258, which is located within the MHC region, several MHC haplotypes were identified as being associated with infection intensity of A. galli. An association of the MHC with the specific antibody response to S. Enteritidis was also found where four MHC haplotypes were shown to be associated with high specific antibody response. Finally, one MHC haplotype was identified as being associated with pathological lesions and mortality in the P. multocida experiment. Although not statistically significant, our analysis suggested that this haplotype might be associated with resistance. These results demonstrate the presence of local genetic resources in Vietnamese chickens, which could be utilized in breeding programmes aiming at improving disease resistance. PMID:19945754

  1. Evolutionary Analysis of Minor Histocompatibility Genes In Hydra

    KAUST Repository

    Aalismail, Nojood

    2016-05-01

    Hydra is a simple freshwater solitary polyp used as a model system to study evolutionary aspects. The immune response of this organism has not been studied extensively and the immune response genes have not been identified and characterized. On the other hand, immune response has been investigated and genetic analysis has been initiated in other lower invertebrates. In the present study we took initiative to study the self/nonself recognition in hydra and its relation to the immune response. Moreover, performing phylogenetic analysis to look for annotated immune genes in hydra gave us a potential to analyze the expression of minor histocompatibility genes that have been shown to play a major role in grafting and transplantation in mammals. Here we obtained the cDNA library that shows expression of minor histocompatibility genes and confirmed that the annotated sequences in databases are actually present. In addition, grafting experiments suggested, although still preliminary, that homograft showed less rejection response than in heterograft. Involvement of possible minor histocompatibility gene orthologous in immune response was examined by qPCR.

  2. Analysis of the role of 13 major fimbrial subunits in colonisation of the chicken intestines by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis reveals a role for a novel locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barrow Paul A

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonella enterica is a facultative intracellular pathogen of worldwide importance. Over 2,500 serovars exist and infections in humans and animals may produce a spectrum of symptoms from enteritis to typhoid depending on serovar- and host-specific factors. S. Enteritidis is the most prevalent non-typhoidal serovar isolated from humans with acute diarrhoeal illness in many countries. Human infections are frequently associated with direct or indirect contact with contaminated poultry meat or eggs owing to the ability of the organism to persist in the avian intestinal and reproductive tract. The molecular mechanisms underlying colonisation of poultry by S. Enteritidis are ill-defined. Targeted and genome-wide mutagenesis of S. Typhimurium has revealed conserved and host-specific roles for selected fimbriae in intestinal colonisation of different hosts. Here we report the first systematic analysis of each chromosomally-encoded major fimbrial subunit of S. Enteritidis in intestinal colonisation of chickens. Results The repertoire, organisation and sequence of the fimbrial operons within members of S. enterica were compared. No single fimbrial locus could be correlated with the differential virulence and host range of serovars by comparison of available genome sequences. Fimbrial operons were highly conserved among serovars in respect of gene number, order and sequence, with the exception of safA. Thirteen predicted major fimbrial subunit genes were separately inactivated by lambda Red recombinase-mediated linear recombination followed by P22/int transduction. The magnitude and duration of intestinal colonisation by mutant and parent strains was measured after oral inoculation of out-bred chickens. Whilst the majority of S. Enteritidis major fimbrial subunit genes played no significant role in colonisation of the avian intestines, mutations affecting pegA in two different S. Enteritidis strains produced statistically significant

  3. Relationship between Expression Level of Soluble Major Histocompatibility Complex Class Ⅰ Chain-related Protein A and Gynecologic Malignant Tumors%可溶性主要组织相容性复合体Ⅰ类链相关蛋白A表达水平与妇科恶性肿瘤的相关性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭茵; 黄颖烽; 杨劭宇; 罗宏图; 周泰成

    2011-01-01

    Objective To analyze the relationship between expression level of soluble major histocompatibility complex class Ⅰ chain-related protein A (sMICA) and gynecologic malignant tumors. Methods The sMICA levels in sera of 59 patients with confirmed gynecologic malignant tumors and 98 healthy women were determined by ELISA, and the results were analyzed and evaluated by ROC curve. Results The sMICA levels in sera of patients with gynecologic malignant tumors [( 1.04 ± 1.33) ng/ml] were significantly higher than those of healthy women [(0. 29 ± 0. 30) ng/ml), P< 0. 000 1 ]. The area under ROC curve was 0. 816, and the cut-off value of sMICA for clinical diagnosis was 0. 302 ng/ ml. Conclusion The sMICA level in sera was closely related to the onset of gynecologic malignant tumors, which might be used as a novel tumor maker for clinical diagnosis.%目的 分析血清中可溶性主要组织相容性复合体I类链相关蛋白A(Soluble major histocompatibility complexclass Ⅰ chain-related protein A,sMICA)与妇科恶性肿瘤的相关性.方法 应用ELISA法检测59例确诊为妇科恶性肿瘤患者和98名健康对照者血清中sMICA的水平,应用ROC曲线对检测结果进行分析与评价.结果 病例组患者血清中sMlCA平均水平[(1.04±1.33)ng/ml]明显高于健康对照组[(0.29±0.30)ng/ml)],且差异有统计学意义(P<0.000 1).ROC曲线下面积为0.816,sMICA的临床诊断界点为0.302ng/ml.结论 血清中sMICA水平与妇科恶性肿瘤的发生密切相关,有望作为临床妇科肿瘤诊断的一种新型肿瘤标志物.

  4. Transcriptional profiles of host-pathogen responses to necrotic enteritis and differential regulation of immune genes in two inbreed chicken lines showing disparate disease susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Duk Kyung; Lillehoj, Hyun S; Jang, Seung I; Lee, Sung Hyen; Hong, Yeong Ho; Cheng, Hans H

    2014-01-01

    Necrotic enteritis (NE) is an important intestinal infectious disease of commercial poultry flocks caused by Clostridium perfringens. Using an experimental model of NE involving co-infection with C. perfringens and Eimeria maxima, transcriptome profiling and functional genomics approaches were applied to identify the genetic mechanisms that might regulate the host response to this disease. Microarray hybridization identified 1,049 transcripts whose levels were altered (601 increased, 448 decreased) in intestinal lymphocytes from C. perfringens/E. maxima co-infected Ross chickens compared with uninfected controls. Five biological functions, all related to host immunity and inflammation, and 11 pathways were identified from this dataset. To further elucidate the role of host genetics in NE susceptibility, two inbred chicken lines, ADOL line 6 and line 7 which share an identical B2 major histocompatibility complex haplotype but differ in their susceptibility to virus infection, were compared for clinical symptoms and the expression levels of a panel of immune-related genes during experimental NE. Line 6 chickens were more susceptible to development of experimental NE compared with line 7, as revealed by decreased body weight gain and increased E. maxima oocyst shedding. Of 21 immune-related genes examined, 15 were increased in C. perfringens/E. maxima co-infected line 6 vs. line 7 chickens. These results suggest that immune pathways are activated in response to experimental NE infection and that genetic determinants outside of the chicken B complex influence resistance to this disease. PMID:25504150

  5. Expression, purification and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the chicken MHC class I molecule YF1*7.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chicken classical MHC class I antigen YF1*7.1 was crystallized together with β2-microglobulin but without a peptide ligand. Crystals diffracted synchrotron radiation to 1.32 Å and belonged to the monoclinic space group P21. YF1*7.1 is an allele of a polymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-like locus within the chicken Y gene complex. With the aim of understanding the possible role of the YF1*7.1 molecule in antigen presentation, the complex of YF1*7.1 heavy chain and β2-microglobulin was reconstituted and purified without a peptide. Crystals diffracted synchrotron radiation to 1.32 Å resolution and belonged to the monoclinic space group P21. The phase problem was solved by molecular replacement. A detailed examination of the structure may provide insight into the type of ligand that could be bound by the YF1*7.1 molecule

  6. Molecular characterization of chicken syndecan-2 proteoglycan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Ligong; Couchman, John R; Smith, Jacqueline; Woods, Anne

    A partial syndecan-2 sequence (147 bp) was obtained from chicken embryonic fibroblast poly(A)+ RNA by reverse transcription-PCR. This partial sequence was used to produce a 5'-end-labelled probe. A chicken liver cDNA library was screened with this probe, and overlapping clones were obtained......Da. Western blotting of chicken embryonic fibroblast cell lysates with species-specific monoclonal antibody mAb 8.1 showed that chicken syndecan-2 is substituted with heparan sulphate, and that the major form of chicken syndecan-2 isolated from chicken fibroblasts is consistent with the formation of SDS......-resistant dimers, which is common for syndecans. A 5'-end-labelled probe hybridized to two mRNA species in chicken embryonic fibroblasts, while Northern analysis with poly(A)+ RNAs from different tissues of chicken embryos showed wide and distinct distributions of chicken syndecan-2 during embryonic development...

  7. Chicken TAP genes differ from their human orthologues in locus organisation, size, sequence features and polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Brian A; van Hateren, Andrew; Milne, Sarah; Beck, Stephan; Kaufman, Jim

    2005-05-01

    We have previously shown that in the chicken major histocompatibility complex, the two transporters associated with antigen processing genes (TAP1 and TAP2) are located head to head between two classical class I genes. Here we show that the region between these two TAP genes has transcription factor-binding sites in common with class I gene promoters. The TAP genes are also up-regulated by interferon-gamma in a similar way to mammalian TAP genes and in a way that suggests they are both transcribed from a bi-directional promoter. The gene structures of TAP1 and TAP2 differ from that of human TAPs in that TAP1 has a truncated exon 1 and TAP2 has fused exons, resulting in a much smaller gene size. The truncation of TAP1 results in the loss of approximately 150 amino acids, which are thought to be involved in endoplasmic reticulum retention, heterodimer formation and tapasin binding, compared to human TAP1. Most of the protein sequence features involved in binding ATP are conserved, with two exceptions: chicken TAP1 has a glycine in the switch region where other TAPs have glutamine or histidine, and both chicken TAP genes have serines in the C motif where mammalian TAP2 has an alanine. Lastly, the chicken TAP genes are highly polymorphic, with at least as many TAP alleles as there are class I alleles, as seen by investigating nine inbred lines of chicken. The close proximity of the TAP genes to the class I genes and the high level of polymorphism may allow co-evolution of the genes, allowing TAP molecules to transport peptides specifically for the class I molecules of that haplotype. PMID:15900495

  8. Improving the outcome of a Marek's disease challenge in multiple lines of egg type chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, J E; Arango, J; Arthur, J A; Settar, P; Kreager, K S; O'Sullivan, N P

    2013-06-01

    A challenge test following inoculation with a standard amount of a vv+ strain of the Marek's disease (MD) virus in multiple lines and multiple generations of egg type chicken and the corresponding phenotypic trend are described. This program significantly reduced mortality of progeny from selected sires for three to 11 generations in eight of the nine elite lines studied herein. In brown egg lines, a retrospective analysis of DNA indicated an association between the blood type B (major histocompatibility complex) of the sire and the MD mortality in the challenge of its progeny. As a result of the multigeneration stock amplification and crossbreeding processes used in the commercial breeding industry, improvement in survival after challenge at the elite level will translate to improved welfare for millions of birds at the commercial production level. PMID:23901770

  9. Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Markers in Conservation Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Katherine Belov; Beata Ujvari

    2011-01-01

    Human impacts through habitat destruction, introduction of invasive species and climate change are increasing the number of species threatened with extinction. Decreases in population size simultaneously lead to reductions in genetic diversity, ultimately reducing the ability of populations to adapt to a changing environment. In this way, loss of genetic polymorphism is linked with extinction risk. Recent advances in sequencing technologies mean that obtaining measures of genetic diversity at...

  10. Murine major histocompatibility complex and immune response to Eimeria falciformis.

    OpenAIRE

    Mahrt, J L; Shi, Y F

    1988-01-01

    The genetics of the immune response to Eimeria falciformis were investigated in three inbred and six congenic strains of mice. There were significant differences among strains in oocyst production and age-related mortality from parasitic infection. Genes within the H-2 complex and also non-H-2 genes share in the immune response to eimerian infection.

  11. Histocompatibility antigens in coal miners with pneumoconiosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Soutar, C A; Coutts, I.; Parkes, W R; Dodi, I. A.; Gauld, S; Castro, J E; Turner-Warwick, M

    1983-01-01

    Twenty-five histocompatibility antigens have been measured in 100 coal miners with pneumoconiosis attending a pneumoconiosis medical panel and the results compared with a panel of 200 normal volunteers not exposed to dust. Chest radiographs were read independently by three readers according to the ILO U/C classification. On a combined score, 40 men were thought to have simple pneumoconiosis and 60 men complicated pneumoconiosis. The number of antigens tested and associations between antigens ...

  12. Variations in the cytoplasmic region account for the heterogeneity of the chicken MHC class I (B-F) molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, L B; Kaufman, J; Verland, S;

    1991-01-01

    Molecular variation among major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I (B-F) proteins from B-homozygous chickens is apparently caused by C-terminal variation. Analysis of the total B-F protein pool revealed substantial heterogeneity with two or three molecular mass constituents, each being....... Unlike the parent proteins, the Mr 36,000 fragment derived from isolated variants yielded identical, simple patterns in two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and identical finger prints in peptide mapping. This, together with N-terminal amino acid sequencing, as well as comparison of hydrophobicity...... properties of fragments obtained by gradual proteolytic digestion, indicated that the small peptide responsible for the major B-F heterogeneity was situated in the intracellular, C-terminal part. Udgivelsesdato: 1991-null...

  13. Chicken Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickett, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how a visit from a flock of chickens provided inspiration for the children's chicken art. The gentle clucking of the hens, the rooster crowing, and the softness of the feathers all provided rich aural, tactile, visual, and emotional experiences. The experience affirms the importance and value of direct…

  14. Chicken Toast

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    Ingredients: 200 grams chicken breast; 50 grams sliced bread; 5 grams vegetable oil; one egg; minced ginger root and scallions; 25 grams Shredded radish; vinegar; sugar; salt and pepper to taste. Method: First chop the chicken and mix it with the vegetable oil, a beaten egg, ginger, scallions, Salt

  15. MHC haplotype and susceptibility to experimental infections (Salmonella Enteritidis, Pasteurella multocida or Ascaridia galli) in a commercial and an indigenous chicken breed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Torben Wilde; Labouriau, R.; Permin, A.; Christensen, Jens Peter; Sørensen, P.; Cu, H.P.; Nguyen, V.K.; Juul-Madsen, H.R.

    In three independent experimental infection studies, the susceptibility and course of infection of three pathogens considered of importance in most poultry production systems, Ascaridia galli, Salmonella Enteritidis and Pasteurella multocida was compared in two chicken breeds, the indigenous...... Vietnamese Ri and the commercial Luong Phuong. Furthermore, the association of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) with disease-related parameters was evaluated, using alleles of the LEI0258 microsatellite as markers for MHC haplotypes. The Ri chickens were found to be more resistant to A. galli and S...... by the MHC. Using marker alleles of the microsatellite LEI0258, which is located within the MHC region, several MHC haplotypes were identified as being associated with infection intensity of A. galli. An association of the MHC with the specific antibody response to S. Enteritidis was also found where...

  16. Metagenomic Analysis of Chicken Gut Microbiota for Improving Metabolism and Health of Chickens — A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Ki Young; Lee, Tae Kwon; Sul, Woo Jun

    2015-01-01

    Chicken is a major food source for humans, hence it is important to understand the mechanisms involved in nutrient absorption in chicken. In the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), the microbiota plays a central role in enhancing nutrient absorption and strengthening the immune system, thereby affecting both growth and health of chicken. There is little information on the diversity and functions of chicken GIT microbiota, its impact on the host, and the interactions between the microbiota and host....

  17. Prairie Chicken

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — An outline of the general range occupied by greayter and lesser prairie chickens. The range was delineated by expert opinion, then varified by local wildlife...

  18. The role of class I histocompatibility antigens in the regulation of T-cell activation.

    OpenAIRE

    Dasgupta, J D; Cemach, K; Dubey, D P; Yunis, E J; Amos, D. B.

    1987-01-01

    Class I major histocompatibility antigens in humans (HLA antigens) were found to participate in the regulation of T-cell activation and proliferation induced by phytohemagglutinin. W6/32, a monomorphic antibody directed against class I HLA-A,B,C antigens, significantly inhibited the phytohemagglutinin-induced cell proliferation of peripheral blood lymphocytes. Almost complete suppression of cell activation was achieved on a subfraction of peripheral blood lymphocytes enriched in Mo1+ monocyte...

  19. Strategies for future histocompatible stem cell therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nehlin, Jan; Barington, Torben

    2009-01-01

    Stem cell therapy based on the safe and unlimited self-renewal of human pluripotent stem cells is envisioned for future use in tissue or organ replacement after injury or disease. A gradual decline of regenerative capacity has been documented among the adult stem cell population in some body organs...... during the aging process. Recent progress in human somatic cell nuclear transfer and inducible pluripotent stem cell technologies has shown that patient-derived nuclei or somatic cells can be reprogrammed in vitro to become pluripotent stem cells, from which the three germ layer lineages can be generated......, genetically identical to the recipient. Once differentiation protocols and culture conditions can be defined and optimized, patient-histocompatible pluripotent stem cells could be directed towards virtually every cell type in the human body. Harnessing this capability to enrich for given cells within...

  20. 甘肃高山细毛羊和小尾寒羊 DQB1基因第2外显子多态性及其与乳房炎相关性%Polymorphism of ovine major histocompatibility complex class Ⅱ DQB1 gene exon 2 and its correlation with mastitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋晓育; 张小丽; 马小军; 李发弟; 张晨; 张欣

    2015-01-01

    为探讨绵羊MHC-DQB1第2外显子基因多态性与乳房炎的抗性,采用PCR-SSCP方法对200只甘肃高山细毛羊和212只小尾寒羊MHC-DQB1第2外显子基因多态性进行了分析。结果表明,甘肃高山细毛羊和小尾寒羊的MHC-DQB1基因第2外显子均存在丰富多态性,2个绵羊品种共检测出14个等位基因,卡方适合性检验结果显示2个绵羊品种的SSCP带型均未达到哈德温伯格平衡。甘肃高山细毛羊中等位基因B (P<0.01,RR=0.158)与乳房炎抗性有较强相关性,等位基因F(P<0.01,RR=3.513)和L (P<0.01,RR=10.197)与乳房炎易感性具有较强相关性;小尾寒羊等位基因A(0.01major histocompatibility complexⅡDQB1 (MHC-DQB1)and mastitis, the DQB1 gene exon 2 in 200 Gansu alpine fine-wool sheep and 212 small tail Han sheep were amplified by PCR and characterized by single-strand conformation polymorphism(SSCP) technique. Abundant polymor-phism was detected in the exon 2 of MHC-DQB1. Fourteen alleles were found in the DQB1 gene exon 2. Results ofχ2 test showed that patterns of MHC-DQB1 were significantly deviant from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P<0. 01). Al-lele B (P<0. 01,RR=0. 158) was correlated with mastitis resistance in Gansu alpine fine-wool sheep, while alleles F (P<0. 01,RR=3. 513) and L(P<0. 01,RR=10. 197) were correlated with mastitis susceptibility. Allele A (0. 01

  1. Complex assembly, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the chicken MHC class I molecule BF2*1501

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.6 Å resolution from a crystal of the chicken MHC class I molecule BF2*1501. The crystal belonged to space group P3121, with unit-cell parameters a = 125.1, b = 125.1, c = 80.9 Å, and contained two molecules in the asymmetric unit. The Matthews coefficient and solvent content were calculated to be 2.08 Å3 Da−1 and 40.78%, respectively. The chicken major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules named BF are strongly associated with Marek’s disease (MD). A single structure, that of chicken BF2*2101 from the B21 haplotype, which might provide resistance to MD, has been determined. However, little is known about other structures apart from BF2*2101. In order to provide further structures of chicken MHC class I molecules, BF2*1501 and chicken β2-microglobulin complexed with a nonapeptide (MDV-MEQRRR9) derived from Marek’s disease virus MEQ protein (MDV EcoRI Q fragment, residues 72–80) were assembled and crystallized. Diffraction data from the crystal were collected to 2.6 Å resolution; the crystal belonged to space group P3121, with unit-cell parameters a = 125.1, b = 125.1, c = 80.9 Å and two molecules in the asymmetric unit. The Matthews coefficient VM was 2.08 Å3 Da−1, with a calculated solvent content of 40.78%. These data will be helpful in obtaining insight into the structural basis of the involvement of BF2*1501 in MD

  2. IFN-induced modulation of histocompatibility antigens on human cells. Background, mechanisms and perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hokland, M; Basse, P; Justesen, J; Hokland, P

    1989-01-01

    IFN proteins are a family of lymphokines with anti-viral effects. Several other effects of IFNs have also been described, including enhancement of natural killer (NK) cell activity, enhancement of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity, and enhancement of the expression of major histocompatibility compl...... the classical anti-viral mechanism. This concept proposes that the MHC-enhancing effect of IFNs is a vital part of the immunological defense against virus infections and an integral part of the anti-viral effects of IFN proteins. Udgivelsesdato: 1988-Nov...

  3. [Evaluation of the histocompatibility of endodontic cement in subcutaneous connective tissue using three methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz, S L; Birman, E G; Antoniazzi, J H; Magalhães, J

    1990-01-01

    It was employed three methods to evaluate the histocompatibility of a root canal filling cement, as the N-Rickert paste: implantation of round glass cover slips, polyethylene tubes and pellets of the cement. The results demonstrated qualitative and quantitative differences among the methods utilized indicating as a good toll the use of glass cover slips covered by the cement, since they provide good conditions of work, major areas of study, as also facilities in obtaining the specimens for study. The pellets didn't simulate the clinical conditions of the cement and the very small areas of study of the polyethylene tubes don't give definitive conclusions. PMID:2135431

  4. O papel do complexo principal de histocompatibilidade na fisiologia da gravidez e na patogênese de complicações obstétricas Major histocompatibility complex: its role in the physiology of pregnancy and in the pathogenic mechanisms of obstetric complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crésio Alves

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho tem por objetivo discutir a estrutura e função dos Antígenos Leucocitários Humanos (HLA, seus métodos de detecção, nomenclatura e os mecanismos imunopatológicos que o associam com a fisiologia da gestação e morbidades obstétricas. Sabe-se que o equilíbrio imunológico entre mãe e concepto é imprescindível na manutenção da gravidez. Moléculas do HLA - notadamente o HLA-G expresso na interface materno-fetal - exercem função importante na tolerância imunológica materna, evitando rejeição fetal e algumas complicações obstétricas. Além disso, o HLA permeia diversas etapas do desenvolvimento conceptual como clivagem, formação do trofoblasto e implantação. Para revisão, foram pesquisados os bancos de dados MEDLINE e LILACS, utilizando os descritores: "HLA antigens"; "pregnancy"; "embryonic development"; "pregnancy complication"; "abortion, habitual"; "pre-eclampsia". O conhecimento sobre a influência do HLA na gravidez é necessário para melhor manejo da gestação e patologias obstétricas auto-imunes, favorecendo intervenções precoces e terapêutica específica, reduzindo a morbimortalidade materna e perinatal.The aim of this paper is to review Human Histocompatibility Antigens (HLA structure and function, its detection methods, nomenclature and pathogenic mechanisms associated with pregnancy physiology and obstetrics diseases. Immunological equilibrium between mother and conceptus is indispensable for the maintenance of pregnancy. Molecules from the HLA - mainly HLA-G expressed in the mother-fetus interface - fulfill an important function in maternal immune tolerance, contributing to avoid fetal rejection and obstetrical complications. In addition, HLA influences different stages of fetal development, such as embryonic cleavage, trophoblast, formation and implantation. For this review, were surveyed in the MEDLINE and LILACS databases, using the following keywords: "HLA antigens", "pregnancy

  5. Complete amino acid sequence of human plasma Zn-α2-glycoprotein and its homology to histocompatibility antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study the complete amino acid sequence of human plasma Zn-α2-glycoprotein was determined. This protein whose biological function is unknown consists of a single polypeptide chain of 276 amino acid residues including 8 tryptophan residues and has a pyroglutamyl residue at the amino terminus. The location of the two disulfide bonds in the polypeptide chain was also established. The three glycans, whose structure was elucidated with the aid of 500 MHz 1H NMR spectroscopy, were sialylated N-biantennas. The molecular weight calculated from the polypeptide and carbohydrate structure is 38,478, which is close to the reported value of ≅ 41,000 based on physicochemical measurements. The predicted secondary structure appeared to comprised of 23% α-helix, 27% β-sheet, and 22% β-turns. The three N-glycans were found to be located in β-turn regions. An unexpected finding was made by computer analysis of the sequence data; this revealed that Zn-α2-glycoprotein is closely related to antigens of the major histocompatibility complex in amino acid sequence and in domain structure. There was an unusually high degree of sequence homology with the α chains of class I histocompatibility antigens. Moreover, this plasma protein was shown to be a member of the immunoglobulin gene superfamily. Zn-α2-glycoprotein appears to be truncated secretory major histocompatibility complex-related molecule, and it may have a role in the expression of the immune response

  6. Transcriptomics Research in Chicken

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The chicken (Gallus gallus) is an important model organism in genetics, developmental biology, immunology and evolutionary research. Moreover, besides being an important model organism the chicken is also a very important agricultural species and an important source of food (eggs and meat). The availability of the draft chicken genome sequence provided many possibilities to in detail study a variety of genomic changes during evolution using a comparison between chicken and mammals. For exampl...

  7. Identification of irradiated chicken

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frozen chicken and chicken parts were irradiated at a dose of 5 kGy with Co-60. The irradiated chicken and chicken parts were identified by determination of three radiation-induced hydrocarbons from the lipid fraction. Isolation was carried out by high-vacuum distillation with a cold-finger apparatus. The detection of the hydrocarbons was possible in all irradiated samples by gaschromatography/mass spectrometry. (orig.)

  8. Gestagens and glucocorticoids in chicken eggs

    OpenAIRE

    Rettenbacher, S.; Moestl, E.; Groothuis, T.G.G.

    2009-01-01

    Avian eggs contain a variety of steroid hormones, which have been attributed as a tool for maternal phenotypic engineering. The majority of studies focuses on androgens, but also significant amounts of progesterone as well as other steroid hormones have been measured. The question if corticosterone is also present in eggs of chickens is currently under debate. The only analytical validation performed so far has failed to demonstrate corticosterone in the yolk of chickens, suggesting that anti...

  9. Metagenomic Analysis of Chicken Gut Microbiota for Improving Metabolism and Health of Chickens - A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ki Young; Lee, Tae Kwon; Sul, Woo Jun

    2015-09-01

    Chicken is a major food source for humans, hence it is important to understand the mechanisms involved in nutrient absorption in chicken. In the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), the microbiota plays a central role in enhancing nutrient absorption and strengthening the immune system, thereby affecting both growth and health of chicken. There is little information on the diversity and functions of chicken GIT microbiota, its impact on the host, and the interactions between the microbiota and host. Here, we review the recent metagenomic strategies to analyze the chicken GIT microbiota composition and its functions related to improving metabolism and health. We summarize methodology of metagenomics in order to obtain bacterial taxonomy and functional inferences of the GIT microbiota and suggest a set of indicator genes for monitoring and manipulating the microbiota to promote host health in future. PMID:26323514

  10. Pathogenicity of Shigella in Chickens

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Run; Yang, Xia; Chen, Lu; Chang, Hong-tao; Liu, Hong-Ying; Zhao, Jun; Wang, Xin-Wei; Wang, Chuan-qing

    2014-01-01

    Shigellosis in chickens was first reported in 2004. This study aimed to determine the pathogenicity of Shigella in chickens and the possibility of cross-infection between humans and chickens. The pathogenicity of Shigella in chickens was examined via infection of three-day-old SPF chickens with Shigella strain ZD02 isolated from a human patient. The virulence and invasiveness were examined by infection of the chicken intestines and primary chicken intestinal epithelial cells. The results show...

  11. Public Attitudes to the Welfare of Broiler Chickens

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Clare; Sandilands, Victoria

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports results from two workshops held in York, England that investigated public attitudes towards the welfare of broiler chickens. At the outset the majority of participants admitted that they knew little about how broiler chickens are reared and were shocked at some of the facts presented to them. Cognitive mapping and aspects of Q methodology were used to reveal the range of variables that participants believed affected chicken welfare, the causal relationships between those va...

  12. Extensive Microbial and Functional Diversity within the Chicken Cecal Microbiome

    OpenAIRE

    Sergeant, Martin J.; Chrystala Constantinidou; Tristan A Cogan; Bedford, Michael R.; Penn, Charles W.; Pallen, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    Chickens are major source of food and protein worldwide. Feed conversion and the health of chickens relies on the largely unexplored complex microbial community that inhabits the chicken gut, including the ceca. We have carried out deep microbial community profiling of the microbiota in twenty cecal samples via 16S rRNA gene sequences and an in-depth metagenomics analysis of a single cecal microbiota. We recovered 699 phylotypes, over half of which appear to represent previously unknown speci...

  13. Expressão do complexo de histocompatilidade principal de classe I (MHC I no sistema nervoso central: plasticidade sináptica e regeneração Expresión del complejo principal de histocompatibilidad de clase I (MHC I en el sistema nervioso central: plasticidad sináptica y regeneración Expression of class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC I in the central nervous system: role in synaptic plasticity and regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Graciele Zanon

    2010-06-01

    consecuencia, con la recuperación funcional. Por consiguiente, estos nuevos aspectos sobre la función del MHC I en el SNC orientan nuevas investigaciones con miras a entender el papel del MHC I en las enfermedades neurológicas y a desarrollar nuevas estrategias terapéuticas.It has been recently demonstrated that the major histocompatibility complex of class I (MHC I expressed in the central nervous system (CNS does not only function as a molecule of the immune system, but also plays a role in the synaptic plasticity. The expression of MHC I influences the intensity and selectivity of elimination of synapses apposed to neurons that were subjected to lesion, besides influencing the reactivity of neighboring glial cells. MHC I expression and the degree of synaptic rearrangement and glial response after injury correlate with differences in the regenerative potential and functional recovery of isogenic mice strains. In this way, the new aspects regarding MHC I functions in the CNS may guide further studies aiming at searching the involvement of MCH I in neurologic disorders, as well as the development of new therapeutic strategies.

  14. Transcriptomics Research in Chicken

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, D.Y.; Gao, C.; Zhu, L.Q.; Tang, L.G.; Liu, J.; Nie, H.

    2012-01-01

    The chicken (Gallus gallus) is an important model organism in genetics, developmental biology, immunology and evolutionary research. Moreover, besides being an important model organism the chicken is also a very important agricultural species and an important source of food (eggs and meat). The avai

  15. Genetic Traceability of Chicken Breeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massino De Marchi

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Aims of this study were to apply AFLP markers to assess the genetic diversity and to define a marker-assisted traceability system in local chicken breeds. Data were based on 107 cocks of three different local chicken breeds from Veneto region (Italy: Robusta (PRR: n=54, Pepoi (PPP: n=33 and Padovana (PPD: n=20. Chickens were individually identified at birth with wing tag and reared in four different herds using a free-range system. Genomic DNA was extracted from whole blood and AFLP analysis was performed according to the protocol described in Barcaccia et al. (1998. Values of expected heterozygosity (H and polymorphism information content (PIC at AFLP loci were calculated for each breed. Genetic similarities of all possible pairs of genotypes were estimates using a Jaccard index; the values obtained were subsequently used in a factorial analysis in order to define latent variables which explain the whole genetic similarity relation system between individuals. The average PIC index within breed was generally low: 24.1% for PRR, 23.6% for PPD and 17.2% for PPP. The average heterozygosities of the three breeds for all markers were 29.5% for PRR and PPD and 21.3% for PPP. In the majority of cases (from 90% to 100% of individuals within breed, marker-assisted traceability system used in this research correctly identified the breed of cocks. Hence, results are promising to identify biological tissue (meat, gamets, embryo, etc. from these local chicken breeds. However, the method used in this study should be improved in terms of cost reduction for single sample, work effort, reproducibility and accuracy of results obtained.

  16. Esophageal trichomoniasis in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, D H; Bickford, A A; Charlton, B R; Cooper, G L

    1995-01-01

    Esophageal trichomoniasis has been rarely reported in chickens. At the California Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory System-Turlock Branch, this disease was recently diagnosed in two cases submitted from backyard chicken flocks. The esophageal lesions observed were similar to those seen in several other important diseases of chickens. The causative trichomonad organisms were readily demonstrated on wet smears and by histologic studies. In both cases, the investigated flocks were afflicted with several concurrent diseases. California has experienced an increase in the number of small nontraditional chicken production operations. These facilities are sometimes in close proximity to commercial poultry operations and biosecurity barriers occasionally fail. The poor husbandry practices often used in these small flocks make them a potential reservoir for rare diseases such as trichomoniasis and also for disease organisms that are devastating to commercial poultry. PMID:8719231

  17. The Chicken Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Charles A.

    2000-01-01

    Uses the chicken problem for sixth grade students to scratch the surface of systems of equations using intuitive approaches. Provides students responses to the problem and suggests similar problems for extensions. (ASK)

  18. Eggcited about Chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Carolyn; Brown, Paul

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe St Peter's Primary School's and Honiton Primary School's experiences of keeping chickens. The authors also describe the benefits they bring and the reactions of the children. (Contains 5 figures.)

  19. The selective adherence of lymphoblasts to antigenic cell monolayers. A method for determining the specificity of lymphocytes proliferating in response to histocompatibility antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The specificity and intensity of the immune response of rat lymph nodes draining a skin allograft were examined by exploiting a monolayer of donor-type thoracic duct lymphocytes as an immunoabsorbent. Stable monolayers were produced by attaching lymphocytes from different strains of rat to Petri dishes pretreated with poly-L-lysine. The responding lymph node cells were labelled in vitro with [3H]thymidine, incubated on the monolayer and mechanically separated into non-adherent and adherent fractions. The radioactivity associated with the adherent fraction was 7-8 times greater when the monolayer displayed the immunizing major histocompatibility antigens than when syngeneic or 'third party' monolayers were used. The non-specific adherence to syngeneic monolayers was low and consistent. Immunization to minor histocompatibility antigens may also be studied by this method. (Auth.)

  20. Association of smoking behavior with an odorant receptor allele telomeric to the human major histocompatibility complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Pablo Sandro Carvalho; Füst, George; Prohászka, Zoltán; Volz, Armin; Horton, Roger; Miretti, Marcos; Yu, Chack-Yung; Beck, Stephan; Uchanska-Ziegler, Barbara; Ziegler, Andreas

    2008-12-01

    Smoking behavior has been associated in two independent European cohorts with the most common Caucasian human leukocyte antigen (HLA) haplotype (A1-B8-DR3). We aimed to test whether polymorphic members of the two odorant receptor (OR) clusters within the extended HLA complex might be responsible for the observed association, by genotyping a cohort of Hungarian women in which the mentioned association had been found. One hundred and eighty HLA haplotypes from Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain families were analyzed in silico to identify single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within OR genes that are in linkage disequilibrium with the A1-B8-DR3 haplotype, as well as with two other haplotypes indirectly linked to smoking behavior. A nonsynonymous SNP within the OR12D3 gene (rs3749971(T)) was found to be linked to the A1-B8-DR3 haplotype. This polymorphism leads to a (97)Thr --> Ile exchange that affects a putative ligand binding region of the OR12D3 protein. Smoking was found to be associated in the Hungarian cohort with the rs3749971(T) allele (p = 1.05 x 10(-2)), with higher significance than with A1-B8-DR3 (p = 2.38 x 10(-2)). Our results link smoking to a distinct OR allele, and demonstrate that the rs3749971(T) polymorphism is associated with the HLA haplotype-dependent differential recognition of cigarette smoke components, at least among Caucasian women. PMID:18939942

  1. Arsenic trioxide attenuated the rejection of major histocompatibility complex fully-mismatched cardiac allografts in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, S; Zhang, Q Y; Zhou, B; Xue, L; Chen, H; Wang, Y; Zheng, S S

    2009-06-01

    We investigated the effects of arsenic trioxide (As(2)O(3)) on allogeneic immune response using a mouse heart transplantation model. Mice were randomly divided into 4 groups of 6 animals each. The control group received phosphate-buffered saline (PBS); the As(2)O(3)-treated group, intraperitoneal (IP) injection of As(2)O(3) (1 mg/kg) from days -3 to 10 after heart transplantation. The cyclosporine (CsA)-treated group was given a subtherapeutic dose of CsA (10 mg/kg) IP, and the As(2)O(3) plus CsA-treated group, a combined protocol of As(2)O(3) and CsA. Six days after transplantation, cardiac allografts were harvested for immunohistology and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. The survival of the allografts was significantly improved among the As(2)O(3)-treated group compared with the control group (17.2 +/- 1.9 vs 8.0 +/- 0.9 days; P < .05). A marked prolongation (28.6 +/- 6.0 days) of graft survival was achieved by the combined protocol compared with the CsA-treated group (9.6 +/- 3.0 days; P < .05) or the As(2)O(3)-treated group. Allografts of As(2)O(3)-treated and As(2)O(3) plus CsA-treated mice showed a changing pattern of Th1/Th2 cytokine mRNA expression. Allograft rejection was apparently alleviated by low-dose As(2)O(3), and particularly when combined with a subtherapeutic CsA dose. PMID:19545743

  2. Major histocompatibility lineages and immune gene function in teleost fishes: the road not taken

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stet, R.J.M.; Kruiswijk, C.P.; Dixon, B.

    2003-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear over the course of the past decade that the immune system genes of teleosts and tetrapods are plainly derived from common ancestral genes. The last 5 years, however, have also made it abundantly clear that in the teleost genome some of these genes are organized in a

  3. Porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules and analysis of their peptide-binding specificities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lasse Eggers; Harndahl, Mikkel; Rasmussen, Michael;

    2011-01-01

    CTL staining and manipulation. This has enabled a complete mapping of all HLA-I specificities (“the Human MHC Project”). Here, we demonstrate that these approaches can be applied to other species. We systematically transferred domains of the frequently expressed swine MHC-I molecule, SLA-1*0401, onto...... a HLA-I molecule (HLA-A*11:01), thereby generating recombinant human/swine chimeric MHC-I molecules as well as the intact SLA-1*0401 molecule. Biochemical peptide-binding assays and positional scanning combinatorial peptide libraries were used to analyze the peptide-binding motifs of these molecules....... A pan-specific predictor of peptide–MHC-I binding, NetMHCpan, which was originally developed to cover the binding specificities of all known HLA-I molecules, was successfully used to predict the specificities of the SLA-1*0401 molecule as well as the porcine/human chimeric MHC-I molecules. These...

  4. Function and Mode of Regulation of Endothelial Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander, Irina; Edelman, Elazer R.; Methe, Heiko

    2009-01-01

    Tissue engineering is a promising approach to implement endothelial cells as a cellular delivery therapy for vascular disease. We and others previously demonstrated that endothelial cells embedded in three-dimensional collagen-based matrices retain their full biosecretory spectrum, enabling them to serve as powerful regulators of vascular diseases. Fascinatingly, matrix embedding of endothelial cells not only allows for their implantation but also seems to provide protection from allo- and xe...

  5. Expression of ras oncogene and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigen in carcinomas of the uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consecutive 50 cases of squamous cell carcinomas of the uterine cervix diagnosed in 1992 were subjected to immunohistochemical study for ras oncogene product (p21) and MHC class II (DR) antigen using a microprobe immunostainer. Activated ras and aberrant DR expression were noted in 26 cases (52%) and 11 cases (22%) of cervical squamous cell carcinomas, respectively, without difference among histologic types. The reaction was mainly intracytoplasmic, with granular staining pattern and diffuse distribution. No direct histologic correlation between ras and DR expression was found. Four cases with HPV 16/18 DNA in superficial koilocytotic cells, revealed by in situ hybridization, showed various expression of ras and DR, and these 3 factors histologically did not seem to be affected one another. (Author)

  6. Salmonella infections in the absence of the major histocompatibility complex II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapes, S. K.; Beharka, A. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    We examined the pathogenesis of the facultative intracellular bacterium, Salmonella typhimurium in MHCII-/-, C2D knock-out mice, and wild-type C57BL/6J mice. The MHCII knock-out shortened the kinetics of animal death and reduced the dose of S. typhimurium needed to kill mice. We measured the physiological and cytokine responses of both mouse strains after S. typhimurium injection. Animal weight loss, spleen weights, liver weights, thymus weights, and serum corticosterone concentrations were comparable after injection with several doses of bacteria. The only physiological differences observed between the two strains were observed 3 days after injection of the highest dose of bacteria tested. Serum concentrations of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-2, and interleukin-6 increased in a dose-dependent fashion irrespective of mouse MHCII expression. Therefore, even in the absence of MHCII, mice are able to mount relatively normal physiological and immunological responses. Consistent with these normal responses, an increased percentage of MHCII-/- mice, primed with a low dose of bacteria 13 days earlier, were able to survive a lethal challenge of Salmonella compared with unprimed controls. Lastly, C2D mice had significantly higher serum interleukin-10 concentrations than C57BL/6J mice 48 h after infection with all doses of S. typhimurium. C2D macrophages also secreted significantly more IL-10 and less NO and O2- after lipopolysaccharide or phorbol ester stimulation in vitro than wild-type macrophages.

  7. Major histocompatibility complex class I binding predictions as a tool in epitope discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundegaard, Claus; Lund, Ole; Buus, Søren;

    2010-01-01

    , highlighting the most useful and historically important. Selected case stories, where these 'reverse immunology' systems have been used in actual epitope discovery, are briefly reviewed. We conclude that this new generation of epitope discovery systems has become a highly efficient tool for epitope discovery...

  8. NetMHCcons: a consensus method for the major histocompatibility complex class I predictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karosiene, Edita; Lundegaard, Claus; Lund, Ole;

    2012-01-01

    the distance to the training data. NetMHCpan has the highest performance when close neighbours are present in the training set, while the combination of NetMHCpan and PickPocket outperforms either of the two methods for alleles with more remote neighbours. The final method, NetMHCcons, is publicly...

  9. Remarkably low affinity of CD4/peptide-major histocompatibility complex class II protein interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Peter; Southcombe, Jennifer H; Santos, Ana Mafalda;

    2016-01-01

    value is two to three orders of magnitude higher than previously measured 2D Kd values for interacting leukocyte surface proteins. Calculations indicated, however, that CD4/pMHC II binding would increase rates of T-cell receptor (TCR) complex phosphorylation by threefold via the recruitment of Lck, with...

  10. The great diversity of major histocompatibility complex class II genes in Philippine native cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshima, S N; Miyasaka, T; Polat, M; Kikuya, M; Matsumoto, Y; Mingala, C N; Villanueva, M A; Salces, A J; Onuma, M; Aida, Y

    2014-12-01

    Bovine leukocyte antigens (BoLA) are extensively used as markers for bovine disease and immunological traits. However, none of the BoLA genes in Southeast Asian breeds have been characterized by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-sequence-based typing (SBT). Therefore, we sequenced exon 2 of the BoLA class II DRB3 gene from 1120 individual cows belonging to the Holstein, Sahiwal, Simbrah, Jersey, Brahman, and Philippine native breeds using PCR-SBT. Several cross-breeds were also examined. BoLA-DRB3 PCR-SBT identified 78 previously reported alleles and five novel alleles. The number of BoLA-DRB3 alleles identified in each breed from the Philippines was higher (71 in Philippine native cattle, 58 in Brahman, 46 in Holstein × Sahiwal, and 57 in Philippine native × Brahman) than that identified in breeds from other countries (e.g., 23 alleles in Japanese Black and 35 in Bolivian Yacumeño cattle). A phylogenetic tree based on the DA distance calculated from the BoLA-DRB3 allele frequency showed that Philippine native cattle from different Philippine islands are closely related, and all of them are closely similar to Philippine Brahman cattle but not to native Japanese and Latin American breeds. Furthermore, the BoLA-DRB3 allele frequency in Philippine native cattle from Luzon Island, located in the Northern Philippines was different from that in cattle from Iloilo, Bohol, and Leyte Islands, which are located in the Southern Philippines. Therefore, we conclude that Philippine native cattle can be divided into two populations, North and South areas. Moreover, a neutrality test revealed that Philippine native cattle from Leyte showed significantly greater genetic diversity, which may be maintained by balancing selection. This study shows that Asian breeds have high levels of BoLA-DRB3 polymorphism. This finding, especially the identification of five novel BoLA-DRB3 alleles, will be helpful for future SBT studies of BoLA-DRB3 alleles in East Asian cattle. PMID:25606401

  11. The great diversity of major histocompatibility complex class II genes in Philippine native cattle

    OpenAIRE

    S.N. Takeshima; Miyasaka, T; M. Polat; Kikuya, M.; Matsumoto, Y; C.N. Mingala; Villanueva, M.A.; Salces, A.J.; ONUMA, M.; Aida, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Bovine leukocyte antigens (BoLA) are extensively used as markers for bovine disease and immunological traits. However, none of the BoLA genes in Southeast Asian breeds have been characterized by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-sequence-based typing (SBT). Therefore, we sequenced exon 2 of the BoLA class II DRB3 gene from 1120 individual cows belonging to the Holstein, Sahiwal, Simbrah, Jersey, Brahman, and Philippine native breeds using PCR-SBT. Several cross-breeds were also examined. BoLA-D...

  12. The great diversity of major histocompatibility complex class II genes in Philippine native cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.N. Takeshima

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bovine leukocyte antigens (BoLA are extensively used as markers for bovine disease and immunological traits. However, none of the BoLA genes in Southeast Asian breeds have been characterized by polymerase chain reaction (PCR-sequence-based typing (SBT. Therefore, we sequenced exon 2 of the BoLA class II DRB3 gene from 1120 individual cows belonging to the Holstein, Sahiwal, Simbrah, Jersey, Brahman, and Philippine native breeds using PCR-SBT. Several cross-breeds were also examined. BoLA-DRB3 PCR-SBT identified 78 previously reported alleles and five novel alleles. The number of BoLA-DRB3 alleles identified in each breed from the Philippines was higher (71 in Philippine native cattle, 58 in Brahman, 46 in Holstein × Sahiwal, and 57 in Philippine native × Brahman than that identified in breeds from other countries (e.g., 23 alleles in Japanese Black and 35 in Bolivian Yacumeño cattle. A phylogenetic tree based on the DA distance calculated from the BoLA-DRB3 allele frequency showed that Philippine native cattle from different Philippine islands are closely related, and all of them are closely similar to Philippine Brahman cattle but not to native Japanese and Latin American breeds. Furthermore, the BoLA-DRB3 allele frequency in Philippine native cattle from Luzon Island, located in the Northern Philippines was different from that in cattle from Iloilo, Bohol, and Leyte Islands, which are located in the Southern Philippines. Therefore, we conclude that Philippine native cattle can be divided into two populations, North and South areas. Moreover, a neutrality test revealed that Philippine native cattle from Leyte showed significantly greater genetic diversity, which may be maintained by balancing selection. This study shows that Asian breeds have high levels of BoLA-DRB3 polymorphism. This finding, especially the identification of five novel BoLA-DRB3 alleles, will be helpful for future SBT studies of BoLA-DRB3 alleles in East Asian cattle.

  13. Contribution of chromosomal abnormalities and genes of the major histocompatibility complex to early pregnancy losses

    OpenAIRE

    Tkach I. R.; Sosnina K. O.; Huleyuk N. L.; Terpylyak O. I.; Zastavna D. V.; Weise A.; Kosyakova N.; Liehr T.

    2015-01-01

    Aim. The determination of chromosomal abnormalities in samples from early pregnancy losses and allelic polymorphism of HLA–DRB1 and DQA1 genes in couples with recurrent miscarriage. Methods. Banding cytogenetic and interphase mFISH analysis, DNA extraction by salting method, PCR, agarose gel electrophoresis. Results. Cytogenetic and molecular-cytogenetic investigations of SA material identified karyotype anomalies in 32.4 % of cases with prevalence of autosomal trisomy – 42.65 %, triploidy – ...

  14. Clarifying the association of genes within the major histocompatibility complex with narcolepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acton, R.T.; Watson, B.; Rivers, C. [Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham, AL (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    HLA-DR2 and DQwl has been reported to be strongly associated with narcolepsy. The particular phenotype and strength of these associations varies between races. For example DQB*0601 has been reported associated with some African American (AA) narcoleptics while some Caucasian American (CA) narcoleptics do not possess DR2 or DQw1. We have sought to clarify the relationship of MHC genes with narcolepsy in the local CA and AA population. There was no significant difference in the frequency of DR phenotypes in CA or AA narcoleptics compared to race, age, sex and geographic region-matched controls. DR2 was increased in CA cataplexy positive (Cat+) narcoleptics compared to controls (p=0.028, odds ratio (OR)=2.4) and to Cat- narcoleptics (p=<0.001, OR=8.8). DR11 was increased in AA Cat+ narcoleptics compared to controls (p=0.004, OR=11.2) and to Cat- narcoleptics (p=0.002). DQB1*0601 was not significantly associated with narcolepsy in our AA population. We have assessed the frequency of the TNFa (13 alleles, 1.1Mb telomeric to DQ{alpha}), D6S105 (13 alleles, 1kb telomeric of HLA-A), and GLP-1R (19 alleles, 18.5 Mb centromeric of DQ{alpha}), dinucleotide repeats in narcoleptics compared to controls. The TNFa allele 117 was increased in CA Cat+ vs. controls (p=0.003). The GLP-1R allele 144 was increased in CA Cat- vs. controls (p=0.02). In AA narcoleptics, the TNFa allele 109 was significantly increased (p=0.04) along with the D6S105 allele 130 (p=0.02) compared to controls. The D6S105 allele 130 was increased in AA Cat- vs. controls (p=0.03). The GLP-1R allele 154 was significantly decreased in AA Cat+ vs. Cat- (p=0.04). These data suggest that DR and/or DQ genes are not responsible for narcolepsy and that cataplexy is associated with different regions around the MHC in various racial groups.

  15. Major histocompatibility complex class II alleles and haplotypes associated with non-suppurative meningoencephalitis in greyhounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiel, R E; Kennedy, L J; Nolan, C M; Mooney, C T; Callanan, J J

    2014-09-01

    Non-suppurative meningoencephalitis is a breed-restricted canine neuroinflammatory disorder affecting young greyhounds in Ireland. A genetic risk factor is suspected because of the development of disease in multiple siblings and an inability to identify a causative infectious agent. The aim of this study was to examine potential associations between dog leucocyte antigen (DLA) class II haplotype and the presence of the disease. DLA three locus haplotypes were determined in 31 dogs with non-suppurative meningoencephalitis and in 115 healthy control dogs using sequence-based typing (SBT) methods. All dogs were unrelated at the parental level. Two haplotypes (DRB1*01802/DQA1*00101/DQB1*00802 and DRB1*01501/DQA1*00601/DQB1*02201) were significantly (P = 0.0099 and 0.037) associated with the presence of meningoencephalitis, with odds ratios (95% confidence interval) of 5.531 (1.168-26.19) and 3.736 (1.446-9.652), respectively. These results confirm that there is an association between DLA class II haplotype and greyhound meningoencephalitis, suggesting an immunogenetic risk factor for the development of the disease. Greyhound meningoencephalitis may be a suitable model for human neuroinflammatory diseases with an immunogenetic component. PMID:24851745

  16. Expression of major histocompatibility complex genes in carp (Cyprinus carpio L.).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodrigues, P.N.S.

    1996-01-01

    The common carp ( Cyprinus carpio L.) has been the experimental animal of choice because many features of the immune system of this Cyprinid fish have been well characterized. The immune system consists of an integrated set of organs containing cells such as Ig + 

  17. Restriction fragment length polymorphism within the class I gene loci of the equine major histocompatibility complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourteen standard bred horses were serotyped as homozygous for 1 of 6 Equine Leukocyte Antigen (ELA) specificities. DNA was purified from peripheral leukocytes and digested with Hind III or Pvu II. Southern blot hybridization analysis was carried out using a 32P-labeled mouse cDNA probe (PH2IIa) specific for class I MHC genes. Both enzymes generated blots that contained a large number of bands (23 to 30) per horse. Significant polymorphism existed among most fragment sizes, while a dozen highly conserved band sizes suggested the presence of Qa/tla - like genes. Only 2 animals (both W6's) showed identical band patterns. Polymorphism was greatest between horses of different serotypes and was significantly decreased within serotypes. Unique bands were present on both blots for both W1's and W6's and may account for the serologic specificity seen in ELA W1 and W6 horses. This study is consistent with the findings in other higher vertebrates and implies that the MHC of the horse includes a highly polymorphic class I multigene family

  18. Location of T cell and major histocompatibility complex antigens in the human thymus

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    A series of monoclonal antibodies were used to study the intrathymic distribution of T cell-specific antigens, Ia antigens, and beta 2- microglobulin in frozen sections of human thymus by immunofluorescence and immunoperoxidase techniques. Most of the cortical thymocytes reacted with anti-T4, anti-T5, anti-T6, anti-T8, and anti-T10 antibodies, thus indicating coexpression of multiple antigens on cortical lymphocytes. The staining of cells in the medulla was most satisfactorily judged in secti...

  19. Minor histocompatibility antigens on canine hemopoietic progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Martin; Lange, Claudia; Günther, Wolfgang; Franz, Monika; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Kolb, Hans-Jochem

    2003-06-15

    Adoptive immunotherapy with CTL against minor histocompatibility Ags (mHA) provides a promising way to treat leukemia relapse in allogeneic chimeras. Here we describe the in vitro generation of CTL against mHA in the dog. We tested their inhibitory effect on the growth of hemopoietic progenitor cells stimulated by hemopoietic growth factors in a 4-day suspension culture. CTL were produced by coculture of donor PBMC with bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DCs). These DCs were characterized by morphology, high expression of MHC class II and CD1a, and the absence of the monocyte-specific marker CD14. Characteristically these cells stimulated allogeneic lymphocytes (MLR) and, after pulsing with a foreign Ag (keyhole limpet hemocyanin), autologous T cells. CTL were generated either ex vivo by coculture with DCs of DLA-identical littermates or in vivo by immunization of the responder with DCs obtained from a DLA-identical littermate. In suspension culture assays the growth of hemopoietic progenitor cells was inhibited in 53% of DLA-identical littermate combinations. In canine families mHA segregated with DLA as restriction elements. One-way reactivity against mHA was found in five littermate combinations. In two cases mHA might be Y chromosome associated, in three cases autosomally inherited alleles were detected. We conclude that CTL can be produced in vitro and in vivo against mHA on canine hemopoietic progenitor cells using bone marrow-derived DCs. PMID:12794111

  20. Identification of a Novel UTY‐Encoded Minor Histocompatibility Antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, B. K.; Rasmussen, A. H.; Larsen, Malene Erup; Larsen, Mette Voldby; Lund, Ole; Braendstrup, P.; Harndahl, Mikkel Nors; Rasmussen, M.; Buus, S.; Stryhn, A.; Vindeløv, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Minor histocompatibility antigens (mHags) encoded by the Y‐chromosome (H‐Y‐mHags) are known to play a pivotal role in allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) involving female donors and male recipients. We present a new H‐Y‐mHag, YYNAFHWAI (UTY139–147), encoded by the UTY gene and...... obtained post‐HCT from male recipients of female donor grafts. In one of these recipients, a CD8+ T cell response was observed against a peptide stretch encoded by the UTY gene. Another bioinformatics tool, HLArestrictor, was used to identify the optimal peptide and HLA‐restriction element. Using peptide...... degranulation (CD107a). In contrast, no responses were seen when the T cells were stimulated with patient tumour cells alone. CD8+ T cells specific for this new H‐Y‐mHag were found in three of five HLA‐A*24:02‐positive male recipients of female donor HCT grafts available for this study....

  1. Multiple sequence-specific DNA binding activities are eluted from chicken nuclei at low ionic strengths.

    OpenAIRE

    Plumb, M A; Nicolas, R H; Wright, C. A.; Goodwin, G H

    1985-01-01

    DNA sequence-specific binding proteins eluted from chicken erythrocyte and thymus nuclei, and fractionated as described by Emerson and Felsenfeld (19), have been investigated by filter binding and footprint analyses. The erythrocyte nuclear protein fraction specifically binds to at least two sites within the 5' flanking chromatin hypersensitive site of the chicken beta A-globin gene, and to a site 5' to the human beta-globin gene. The major chicken beta A globin gene binding site [G)18CGGGTGG...

  2. The incidence of antibiotic resistant bacteria in chicken and pork / Eugénie van Wijk

    OpenAIRE

    Van Wijk, Eugénie

    2003-01-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistance in important human pathogens has globally become a public health concern. Consumption of contaminated meat and meat products constitute a major route for the transmission of antibiotic resistant organisms and the dissemination of resistance genes in the human environment. The aim of this study was to determine the level of antibiotic resistance in potentially pathogenic bacteria associated with pork, chicken meat, chicken manure, chicken f...

  3. DNA analysis of histocompatibility antigens: identification of new DQw specificities and of DPw patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, A C; Kalil, J

    1989-01-01

    1. The HLA-D region of the major histocompatibility complex has several subregions, the most important of which are DR, DQ and DP. The genes coding for the beta chains of these proteins present most of the polymorphisms which result in the large variety of class II antigens observed. 2. We have studied the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the DQ beta and DP beta genes in order to establish accurate typing patterns. 3. The data show that DQ typing based on RFLP permits the identification of the recently described DQw1 splits (new antigenic specificities), DQw5 and DQw6. The TA10-monoclonal antibody-positive split of DQw3, designated DQw7, is associated with specific DNA fragments after digestion with four different enzymes: Taq I, Hind III, Pvu II and Bgl II. Furthermore, the recently reported specificity DQw4 (formerly typed as a blank) is associated with a specific 2.4-kb fragment when the DNA is digested with EcoRV. 4. DP typing proved to be more difficult even though six enzymes were used, and only broad groups could be identified. PMID:2483530

  4. Strategy for Developing Local Chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofjan Iskandar

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Chicken industry in Indonesia offer jobs for people in the village areas . The balance in development industry of selected and local chicken has to be anticipated as there has been threat of reducing importation of grand parent stock of selected chicken due to global avian influenza . In the mean time, high appreciation to the local chicken has been shown by the existence of local chicken farms in the size of business scale . For local chicken business, the government has been built programs, projects, and infrastructures, although the programs and projects were dropped scattered in to several institutions, which were end up with less significant impact to the people. Therefore, it is the time that the government should put more efforts to integrate various sources . focusing in enhancing local chicken industry .

  5. Evolutionary relationships of Red Jungle Fowl and chicken breeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevastyanova Antonina A

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Published results were reassessed and original data are provided regarding the origin and relatedness of four postulated chicken breed lineages, egg-type, game, meat-type and Bantam, to each other and to the basic ancestral species of jungle fowls, Gallus gallus. A system approach was employed concerning the planning of the experiments. One element of the system approach is the choice of the breeds to be compared with G. gallus. These breeds were supposed to represent major evolutionary branches of chickens. Four experiments on genetic relationships were conducted using different estimation criteria including morphological discrete characters, body measurements, biochemical markers, and the activity of serum esterase-1. The greatest similarity was found between G. gallus and the egg-type breeds of Mediterranean roots and/or true Bantams. This fact might testify that the indicated chicken groups occupied earlier stages in the evolution from the wild progenitor to the present biodiversity of chickens in the world.

  6. Twin Flavor Chicken Wings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Ingredients:1000g chicken wings,about,100g Shredded rape-seedleaves,100g black sesame seeds,7g salt,5g sugar,3gMSG,10g cooking wine,5g cassia bark,1000g cookingoil(actual consumption only 100 grams),one egg,anoptional amount of scallion,ginger root,starch and

  7. Three-Cup Chicken

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Ingredents:500 grams chicken legs,100 grams(about one tea cup)rice wine,50 grams(a small tea cup)sesame oil,50grams refined soy sauce,25 grams white sugar,10grams oyster sauce,chopped scallions,ginger root,garlic,and some hot chili peppers

  8. Welfare of broiler chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Sirri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Broiler chickens have been selected for their rapid growth rate as well as for high carcass yields, with particular regard to the breast, and reared in intensive systems at high stocking density ranging from 30 to 40 kg live weight/m2. These conditions lead to a worsening of the welfare status of birds. In Europe a specific directive for the protection of broiler chickens has been recently approved whereas in Italy there is not yet any regulation. The EU directive lays down minimum rules for the protection of chickens kept for meat production and gives indications on management practices with particular focus on stocking density, light regimen and air quality, training and guidance for people dealing with chickens, as well as monitoring plans for holding and slaughterhouse. In this review the rearing factors influencing the welfare conditions of birds are described and detailed information on the effects of stocking density, light regimen, litter characteristic and air quality (ammonia, carbon dioxide, humidity, dust are provided. Moreover, the main health implications of poor welfare conditions of the birds, such as contact dermatitis, metabolic, skeletal and muscular disorders are considered. The behavioural repertoire, including scratching, dust bathing, ground pecking, wing flapping, locomotor activity, along with factors that might impair these aspects, are discussed. Lastly, farm animal welfare assessment through physiological and behavioural indicators is described with particular emphasis on the “Unitary Welfare Index,” a tool that considers a wide range of indicators, including productive traits, in order to audit and compare the welfare status of chickens kept in different farms.

  9. Starch digestion in the small intestine of broiler chickens differs among feedstuffs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weurding, R.E.; Veldman, A.; Veen, W.A.G.; Aar, van de P.J.; Verstegen, M.W.A.

    2001-01-01

    Dietary starch is the major energy source for broiler chickens, and knowledge about its digestive behavior can be important. In a digestibility trial with 720 broiler chickens, site, rate and extent of starch digestion were measured for 12 feedstuffs. Starch digestion was determined using the slaugh

  10. Riemerella Anatipestifer Infection in Chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. X. Li*, Y. Tang, J. Y. Gao, C. H. Huang1 and M. J. Ding

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Riemerella anatipestifer (RA is the causative agent of septicemic and exudative disease for a variety of bird species. Although RA had been isolated from chickens, whether can bring damages to them is not unrevealed yet. In this study, we report a flock of SanHuang chickens infected by RA with 15% morbidity and less than 8% mortality. The infection is further substantiated by case duplicate. The tested chickens demonstrate typical signs of pericarditis, air sacculitis and perihepatitis that are completely consistent with the field outbreak. The results suggest that RA is pathogenic to SanHuang chickens, which can then be theoretically and practicably incorporated into its infection spectrum.

  11. Characterization of vascular endothelial progenitor cells from chicken bone marrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bai Chunyu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endothelial progenitor cells (EPC are a type of stem cell used in the treatment of atherosclerosis, vascular injury and regeneration. At present, most of the EPCs studied are from human and mouse, whereas the study of poultry-derived EPCs has rarely been reported. In the present study, chicken bone marrow-derived EPCs were isolated and studied at the cellular level using immunofluorescence and RT-PCR. Results We found that the majority of chicken EPCs were spindle shaped. The growth-curves of chicken EPCs at passages (P 1, -5 and -9 were typically “S”-shaped. The viability of chicken EPCs, before and after cryopreservation was 92.2% and 81.1%, respectively. Thus, cryopreservation had no obvious effects on the viability of chicken EPCs. Dil-ac-LDL and FITC-UAE-1 uptake assays and immunofluorescent detection of the cell surface markers CD34, CD133, VEGFR-2 confirmed that the cells obtained in vitro were EPCs. Observation of endothelial-specific Weibel-Palade bodies using transmission electron microscopy further confirmed that the cells were of endothelial lineage. In addition, chicken EPCs differentiated into endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells upon induction with VEGF and PDGF-BB, respectively, suggesting that the chicken EPCs retained multipotency in vitro. Conclusions These results suggest that chicken EPCs not only have strong self-renewal capacity, but also the potential to differentiate into endothelial and smooth muscle cells. This research provides theoretical basis and experimental evidence for potential therapeutic application of endothelial progenitor cells in the treatment of atherosclerosis, vascular injury and diabetic complications.

  12. Chickens prefer beautiful humans

    OpenAIRE

    Ghirlanda, Stefano; Jansson, Liselotte; Enquist, Magnus

    2002-01-01

    We trained chickens to react to an average human female face but not to an average male face (or vice-versa). In a subsequent test, the animals showed preferences for faces consistent with human sexual preferences (obtained from university students). This suggests that human preferences arise from general properties of nervous systems, rather than from face-specific adaptations. We discuss this result in the light of current debate on the meaning of sexual signals, and suggest further tests o...

  13. 冰鲜鸡肉中3种主要致病菌的共修复-增菌条件研究%Co-Recovery-Enrichment Conditions of Three Major Pathogenic Bacteria in Fresh Chicken Meat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王虎虎; 董洋; 闫振国; 徐幸莲; 周光宏

    2012-01-01

    In order to detect S.typhimurium,Listeria monocytogenes and E.coli O157:H7 in fresh chicken accurately and rapidly,traditional and multiple PCR methods were combined to explore co-recovery-enrichment conditions of heat-injured S.typhimurium,Listeria monocytogenes and E.coli O157:H7 in this study.The results showed that the scalding process could bring S.typhimurium,Listeria monocytogenes and E.coli O157: H7 into a sub-lethal state.TSB-YE was the best medium that could repair sub-lethal pathogenic bacteria.The recovery time of S.typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes was 2 h,and that of E.coli O157:H7 was 4 h.After 16 h of enrichment,the best enrichment results were obtained for S.typhimurium,Listeria monocytogenes and E.coli O157: H7 in TSB-YE medium Under these co-recovery-enrichment conditions,the positive rates of S.typhimurium,Listeria monocytogenes and E.coli O157:H7 in 80 samples were 22.5%(18/80),11.3%(9/80) and 18.8%(15/80),respectively.%研究冰鲜鸡肉中鼠伤寒沙门氏菌(S.typhimurium)、单增李斯特菌(L.monocytogenes)和大肠杆菌(E.coli)O157:H7的共修复-增菌条件。通过传统技术和PCR技术相结合的方法,研究肉鸡屠宰浸烫脱毛工艺对3种目标菌的热激损伤及共修复-增菌条件,并利用共修复-增菌结果,对生产线和超市的冰鲜鸡肉样品中3种目标菌的污染状况进行调查。结果表明:肉鸡屠宰浸烫脱毛工艺条件能使部分S.typhimurium、L.monocytogenes和E.coli O157:H7处于亚致死状态;TSB-YE培养基对热损伤S.typhimurium、L.monocytogenes和E.coli O157:H7的修复效果最好,且对前两种菌的修复时间为2h,对后一种菌的修复时间为4h;TSB-YE培养基在16h对3种致病菌的共增菌效果最好;运用共修复-增菌条件,对80份实际样品中的3种致病菌检出率分别为:S.typhimurium 22.5%(18/80)、L.monocytogenes 11.3%(9/80)和E.coli O157:H7 18.8%(15/80)。

  14. The candidate histocompatibility locus of a Basal chordate encodes two highly polymorphic proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie L Nydam

    Full Text Available The basal chordate Botryllus schlosseri undergoes a natural transplantation reaction governed by a single, highly polymorphic locus called the fuhc. Our initial characterization of this locus suggested it encoded a single gene alternatively spliced into two transcripts: a 555 amino acid-secreted form containing the first half of the gene, and a full-length, 1008 amino acid transmembrane form, with polymorphisms throughout the ectodomain determining outcome. We have now found that the locus encodes two highly polymorphic genes which are separated by a 227 bp intergenic region: first, the secreted form as previously described, and a second gene encoding a 531 amino acid membrane-bound gene containing three extracellular immunoglobulin domains. While northern blotting revealed only these two mRNAs, both PCR and mRNA-seq detect a single capped and polyadenylated transcript that encodes processed forms of both genes linked by the intergenic region, as well as other transcripts in which exons of the two genes are spliced together. These results might suggest that the two genes are expressed as an operon, during which both genes are co-transcribed and then trans-spliced into two separate messages. This type of transcriptional regulation has been described in tunicates previously; however, the membrane-bound gene does not encode a typical Splice Leader (SL sequence at the 5' terminus that usually accompanies trans-splicing. Thus, the presence of stable transcripts encoding both genes may suggest a novel mechanism of regulation, or conversely may be rare but stable transcripts in which the two mRNAs are linked due to a small amount of read-through by RNA polymerase. Both genes are highly polymorphic and co-expressed on tissues involved in histocompatibility. In addition, polymorphisms on both genes correlate with outcome, although we have found a case in which it appears that the secreted form may be major allorecognition determinant.

  15. Common minor histocompatibility antigen discovery based upon patient clinical outcomes and genomic data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M Armistead

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Minor histocompatibility antigens (mHA mediate much of the graft vs. leukemia (GvL effect and graft vs. host disease (GvHD in patients who undergo allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT. Therapeutic decision making and treatments based upon mHAs will require the evaluation of multiple candidate mHAs and the selection of those with the potential to have the greatest impact on clinical outcomes. We hypothesized that common, immunodominant mHAs, which are presented by HLA-A, B, and C molecules, can mediate clinically significant GvL and/or GvHD, and that these mHAs can be identified through association of genomic data with clinical outcomes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Because most mHAs result from donor/recipient cSNP disparities, we genotyped 57 myeloid leukemia patients and their donors at 13,917 cSNPs. We correlated the frequency of genetically predicted mHA disparities with clinical evidence of an immune response and then computationally screened all peptides mapping to the highly associated cSNPs for their ability to bind to HLA molecules. As proof-of-concept, we analyzed one predicted antigen, T4A, whose mHA mismatch trended towards improved overall and disease free survival in our cohort. T4A mHA mismatches occurred at the maximum theoretical frequency for any given SCT. T4A-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes (CTLs were detected in 3 of 4 evaluable post-transplant patients predicted to have a T4A mismatch. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our method is the first to combine clinical outcomes data with genomics and bioinformatics methods to predict and confirm a mHA. Refinement of this method should enable the discovery of clinically relevant mHAs in the majority of transplant patients and possibly lead to novel immunotherapeutics.

  16. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in chicken lmbr1 gene were associated with chicken growth and carcass traits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Lmbr1 is the key candidate gene controlling vertebrate limb development, but its effects on animal growth and carcass traits have never been reported. In this experiment, lmbr1 was taken as the candi-date gene affecting chicken growth and carcass traits. T/C and G/A mutations located in exon 16 and one A/C mutation located in intron 5 of chicken lmbr1 were detected from Silky, White Plymouth Rock broilers and their F2 crossing chickens by PCR-SSCP and sequencing methods. The analysis of vari-ance (ANOVA) results suggests that T/C polymorphism of exon 16 had significant association with eviscerated yield rate (EYR), gizzard rate (GR), shank and claw rate (SCR) and shank girth (SG); A/C polymorphism of intron 5 was significantly associated with SCR, liver rate and head-neck weight (HNW), while both sites had no significant association with other growth and carcass traits. These results demonstrate that lmbr1 gene could be a genetic locus or linked to a major gene significantly affecting these growth and carcass traits in chicken.

  17. Genetic diversity and maternal origin of Bangladeshi chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuiyan, M S A; Chen, Shanyuan; Faruque, S; Bhuiyan, A K F H; Beja-Pereira, Albano

    2013-06-01

    Local domestic chicken populations are of paramount importance as a source of protein in developing countries. Bangladesh possesses a large number of native chicken populations which display a broad range of phenotypes well adapted to the extreme wet and hot environments of this region. This and the fact that wild jungle fowls (JFs) are still available in some regions of the country, it urges to study the present genetic diversity and relationships between Bangladeshi autochthonous chicken populations. Here, we report the results of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence polymorphisms analyses to assess the genetic diversity and possible maternal origin of Bangladeshi indigenous chickens. A 648-bp fragment of mtDNA control region (D-loop) was analyzed in 96 samples from four different chicken populations and one red JF population. Sequence analysis revealed 39 variable sites that defined 25 haplotypes. Estimates of haplotype and nucleotide diversities ranged from 0.745 to 0.901 and from 0.011 to 0.016, respectively. The pairwise differences between populations ranged from 0.091 to 1.459 while most of the PhiST (ΦST) values were significant. Furthermore, AMOVA analysis revealed 89.16 % of the total genetic diversity was accounted for within population variation, indicating little genetic differentiation among the studied populations. The median network analysis from haplotypes of Bangladeshi chickens illustrated five distinct mitochondrial haplogroups (A, D, E, F and I). Individuals from all Bangladeshi chicken populations were represented in the major clades D and E; those maternal origins are presumed to be from Indian Subcontinent and Southeast Asian countries, more particularly from South China, Vietnam, Myanmar and Thailand. Further, phylogenetic analysis between indigenous chicken populations and sub-species of red JFs showed G. g. gallus and G. g. spadiceus shared with almost all haplogroups and had major influence than G. g. murghi in the origin of

  18. The G protein-coupled receptor subset of the chicken genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malin C Lagerström

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are one of the largest families of proteins, and here we scan the recently sequenced chicken genome for GPCRs. We use a homology-based approach, utilizing comparisons with all human GPCRs, to detect and verify chicken GPCRs from translated genomic alignments and Genscan predictions. We present 557 manually curated sequences for GPCRs from the chicken genome, of which 455 were previously not annotated. More than 60% of the chicken Genscan gene predictions with a human ortholog needed curation, which drastically changed the average percentage identity between the human-chicken orthologous pairs (from 56.3% to 72.9%. Of the non-olfactory chicken GPCRs, 79% had a one-to-one orthologous relationship to a human GPCR. The Frizzled, Secretin, and subgroups of the Rhodopsin families have high proportions of orthologous pairs, although the percentage of amino acid identity varies. Other groups show large differences, such as the Adhesion family and GPCRs that bind exogenous ligands. The chicken has only three bitter Taste 2 receptors, and it also lacks an ortholog to human TAS1R2 (one of three GPCRs in the human genome in the Taste 1 receptor family [TAS1R], implying that the chicken's ability and mode of detecting both bitter and sweet taste may differ from the human's. The chicken genome contains at least 229 olfactory receptors, and the majority of these (218 originate from a chicken-specific expansion. To our knowledge, this dataset of chicken GPCRs is the largest curated dataset from a single gene family from a non-mammalian vertebrate. Both the updated human GPCR dataset, as well the chicken GPCR dataset, are available for download.

  19. Sequence of a complete chicken BG haplotype shows dynamic expansion and contraction of two gene lineages with particular expression patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomonsen, Jan; Chattaway, John A; Chan, Andrew C Y; Parker, Aimée; Huguet, Samuel; Marston, Denise A; Rogers, Sally L; Wu, Zhiguang; Smith, Adrian L; Staines, Karen; Butter, Colin; Riegert, Patricia; Vainio, Olli; Nielsen, Line; Kaspers, Bernd; Griffin, Darren K; Yang, Fengtang; Zoorob, Rima; Guillemot, Francois; Auffray, Charles; Beck, Stephan; Skjødt, Karsten; Kaufman, Jim

    2014-01-01

    Many genes important in immunity are found as multigene families. The butyrophilin genes are members of the B7 family, playing diverse roles in co-regulation and perhaps in antigen presentation. In humans, a fixed number of butyrophilin genes are found in and around the major histocompatibility c...

  20. Market trials of irradiated chicken

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential market for irradiated chicken breasts was investigated using a mail survey and a retail trial. Results from the mail survey suggested a significantly higher level of acceptability of irradiated chicken than did the retail trial. A subsequent market experiment involving actual purchases showed levels of acceptability similar to that of the mail survey when similar information about food irradiation was provided

  1. 7 CFR 65.160 - Ground chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ground chicken. 65.160 Section 65.160 Agriculture... OF BEEF, PORK, LAMB, CHICKEN, GOAT MEAT, PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, MACADAMIA NUTS, PECANS, PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.160 Ground chicken. Ground chicken...

  2. Lipoxygenase in chicken muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of lipoxygenase-type enzymes was demonstrated in chick muscles. Examination of the oxidation products of [14C]arachidonic acid revealed the presence of 15-lipoxygenase. The enzyme was partially purified by affinity chromatography on linoleoyl-aminoethyl-Sepharose. The enzyme was stable on frozen storage, and activity was almost completely preserved after 12-month storage at -20 degree C. During this period the content of cis,cis-1,4-pentadiene fatty acids decreased slightly. It is suggested that lipoxygenase may be responsible for some of the oxidative changes occurring in fatty acids on frozen storage of chicken meat

  3. Native Darag Chicken Menu Variations: Its Acceptability

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Rosario Clarabel C. Contreras; REMEDIOS D. CATAMIN; Delia A. Paragados; AILEEN C. DE LA CRUZ

    2014-01-01

    Traditional native chicken delicacies like lechon and adobo are very common dishes in a rural Filipino folks’ dining table. As the family economic standing improves, meat becomes a main item in a family diet, dishes like fried chicken and chicken nuggets have also become part of the family choices of chicken dishes in their meal. Intensification of the production of native Darag chicken would lead to optimization of food technological output for the university which will hopefu...

  4. Kinetics of starch digestion and performance of broiler chickens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weurding, R.E.

    2002-01-01

    Keywords: starch, digestion rate, broiler chickens, peas, tapiocaStarch is stored in amyloplasts of various plants like cereals and legumes and seeds of these plants are used as feedstuffs for farm animals. Starch is the major energy source in broiler feeds. The properties of star

  5. Participatory evaluation of chicken health and production constraints in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambo, Emmanuel; Bettridge, Judy; Dessie, Tadelle; Amare, Alemayehu; Habte, Tadiose; Wigley, Paul; Christley, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    Chicken production has a major role in the economy of developing countries and backyard production is particularly important to women. Several programmes, in Ethiopia and elsewhere, have attempted to improve chicken production as a means to reduce poverty. A key constraint to chicken production identified by farmers is disease. This study used participatory rural appraisal methods to work with chicken-keepers in order to prioritise chicken diseases, place these within the context of other production constraints, and to explore perceptions of disease risk factors and biosecurity measures. The study, focused on Debre Zeit, Ethiopia, included 71 poultry keepers (41 backyard and 30 semi-intensive chicken producers). Although women played an important role in backyard production systems, semi-intensive farms were more likely to be controlled by men. Participants identified 9 constraints to production: 7 of 8 groups of backyard producers and 15/31 semi-intensive producers ranked diseases as the most important constraint to chicken production. In contrast to previous reports, farmers in both groups had considerable knowledge of diseases and of factors affecting disease risk. Both groups, but particularly semi-intensive producers, highlighted access to feed as a constraint. Many of the challenges faced by both groups were associated with difficulty accessing agricultural and veterinary inputs and expertise. Whilst many of the constraints identified by farmers could be viewed as simply technical issues to be overcome, we believe it is important to recognise the social factors underpinning what are, in reality, relatively modest technical challenges. The low involvement of women in semi-intensive production needs to be recognised by poultry development schemes. Provision needs to be made to allow access to inputs for a wide range of business models, particularly for those, such as women, who have limited access to the capital to allow them to make the jump from backyard to

  6. The chicken gastrointestinal microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, Brian B; Lillehoj, Hyun S; Kogut, Michael H; Kim, Woo K; Maurer, John J; Pedroso, Adriana; Lee, Margie D; Collett, Stephen R; Johnson, Timothy J; Cox, Nelson A

    2014-11-01

    The domestic chicken is a common model organism for human biological research and of course also forms the basis of a global protein industry. Recent methodological advances have spurred the recognition of microbiomes as complex communities with important influences on the health and disease status of the host. In this minireview, we provide an overview of the current state of knowledge of the chicken gastrointestinal microbiome focusing on spatial and temporal variability, the presence and importance of human pathogens, the influence of the microbiota on the immune system, and the importance of the microbiome for poultry nutrition. Review and meta-analysis of public data showed cecal communities dominated by Firmicutes and Bacteroides at the phylum level, while at finer levels of taxonomic resolution, a phylogenetically diverse assemblage of microorganisms appears to have similar metabolic functions that provide important benefits to the host as inferred from metagenomic data. This observation of functional redundancy may have important implications for management of the microbiome. We foresee advances in strategies to improve gut health in commercial operations through management of the intestinal microbiota as an alternative to in-feed subtherapeutic antibiotics, improvements in pre- and probiotics, improved management of polymicrobial poultry diseases, and better control of human pathogens via colonization reduction or competitive exclusion strategies. PMID:25263745

  7. Safety and efficacy of a turkey herpesvirus vector laryngotracheitis vaccine for chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esaki, Motoyuki; Noland, Lauren; Eddins, Tim; Godoy, Alecia; Saeki, Sakiko; Saitoh, Shuji; Yasuda, Atsushi; Dorsey, Kristi Moore

    2013-06-01

    Turkey herpesvirus vector laryngotracheitis vaccine (HVT/LT) expressing the glycoprotein B gene of laryngotracheitis virus (LTV) has been developed. In vitro growth kinetics of HVT/LT were similar to those of parental turkey herpesvirus (HVT), FC-126 strain. Genetic and phenotypic stabilities of HVT/LT after in vitro (in cell culture) or in vivo (in chickens) passage were confirmed by various assays, including Southern blot analysis, western blot analysis, and an indirect immunofluorescence assay. Safety of HVT/LT was assessed by an overdose study as well as by a backpassage study in specific-pathogen-free (SPF) chickens. The overdose study indicated that HVT/LT did not cause any adverse effects in chickens. The backpassage study confirmed that HVT/LT does not revert to virulence after five passages in chickens. The vaccine did not transmit laterally from vaccinated chickens to commingled nonvaccinated chickens. Efficacy of HVT/LT was evaluated in SPF layer chickens after vaccination by the subcutaneous route at 1 day of age. The majority of the vaccinated chickens (92%-100%) were protected against challenge with virulent LTV at 7 wk of age. Efficacy of HVT/LT was further evaluated in broiler chickens from a commercial source after in ovo vaccination to embryos at 18 days of incubation. After challenge with virulent LTV at 21 and 35 days of age, 67% and 87% of HVT/LT-vaccinated chickens did not develop LT clinical signs, respectively, while 100% (21 days of age) and 73% (35 days of age) of the challenge control chickens showed clinical signs of LT. These results suggest that HVT/LT is a safe and efficacious vaccine for control of laryngotracheitis (LT). PMID:24689173

  8. Antimicrobial resistance profiles of Campylobacter from humans, retail chicken meat, and cattle feces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormley, Fraser J; Strachan, Norval J C; Reay, Kenneth; MacKenzie, Fiona M; Ogden, Iain D; Dallas, John F; Forbes, Ken J

    2010-09-01

    We determined the antimicrobial resistance profiles of Campylobacter isolates from cases of sporadic human infection (n = 119), retail chicken meat (n = 105), and cattle feces (n = 105). Ampicillin and tetracycline resistance was highest in human isolates (32% and 29%, respectively) and retail chicken isolates (25% and 25%, respectively), whereas nalidixic acid resistance was highest in cattle fecal isolates (20%). We found that the antimicrobial resistance profiles were more similar in human and chicken meat isolates than those observed when comparing human and cattle fecal isolates. When we analyzed the distribution of minimum inhibitory concentrations for each antibiotic, in each host, the distribution was similar between human and chicken meat isolates, whereas cattle fecal isolates remained highly distinct from the other two hosts. This study suggests that chicken may be a major source of human Campylobacter infection and that the antimicrobial resistances found in the Campylobacter from this source will therefore also be prevalent in clinical isolates. PMID:20528465

  9. Chicken and Fish Maw Gruel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Mince the chicken breast, add egg white and chicken broth, and cook until the mixture thickens.Slice the soaked fish maw, and cleanse in lukewarm water. Slice the cooked ham and then shred. Put green soya beans in a wok and scald. Rinse in cold water to retain the original color.Heat some lard in a wok, add spring onion sections, stir-fry until their fragrance exudes, and remove the onion. Add chicken broth, salt, the Shaoxing wine, spring onion and ginger mixture, and fish maw slices. Bring to the boil, turn down the heat

  10. The sensory quality of irradiated whole fresh chicken carcasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The colour, odour, flavour and texture of fresh chicken carcasses irradiated at doses up to 10 kGy was assessed using a trained sensory panel. In addition, colour was measured spectrophotometrically while texture was examined using the Instron. In a second experiment, the influence of storage following irradiation at doses up to 5 kGy on the sensory quality was established. Irradiation induced a slight pinkness in the chicken flesh which was detected by both the panelists and the spectrophotometer (a* -redness). During storage the pinkness decreased. The odour of raw chicken carcasses was not significantly affected by irradiation until a dose of 10kGy had been applied. The major changes in the flavour of irradiated chicken occurred during storage when an 'unpleasant' flavour with an 'after taste' developed. These flavour changes were more apparent in the breast than the leg meat but, it was only when doses greater than 5kGy were applied that significant differences were detected between irradiated and unirradiated samples. Texture changes were detected by the sensory panel but not by the Instron apparatus. Although the trained panelists were able to detect significant differences between irradiated and unirradiated chicken, the numerical differences between treatments were often quite small. It is possible that an untrained consumer group would be unable to detect these differences. (author). 2 refs, 1 fig., 14 tabs

  11. Earliest economic exploitation of chicken outside East Asia: Evidence from the Hellenistic Southern Levant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry-Gal, Lee; Erlich, Adi; Gilboa, Ayelet; Bar-Oz, Guy

    2015-08-11

    Chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) is today one of the most widespread domesticated species and is a main source of protein in the human diet. However, for thousands of years exploitation of chickens was confined to symbolic and social domains such as cockfighting. The question of when and where chickens were first used for economic purposes remains unresolved. The results of our faunal analysis demonstrate that the Hellenistic (fourth-second centuries B.C.E.) site of Maresha, Israel, is the earliest site known today where economic exploitation of chickens was widely practiced. We base our claim on the exceptionally high frequency of chicken bones at that site, the majority of which belong to adult individuals, and on the observed 2:1 ratio of female to male bones. These results are supported further by an extensive survey of faunal remains from 234 sites in the Southern Levant, spanning more than three millennia, which shows a sharp increase in the frequency of chicken during the Hellenistic period. We further argue that the earliest secure evidence for economic exploitation of chickens in Europe dates to the first century B.C.E. and therefore is predated by the finds in the Southern Levant by at least a century. We suggest that the gradual acclimatization of chickens in the Southern Levant and its gradual integration into the local economy, the latter fully accomplished in the Hellenistic period, was a crucial step in the adoption of this species in European husbandry some 100 y later. PMID:26195775

  12. Chicken from Farm to Table

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chickens are graded according to the USDA Agricultural Marketing Service 's regulations and standards for meatiness, appearance, and ... ahead of time and refrigerated. However, do not mix wet and dry ingredients until just before spooning ...

  13. Histocompatibility testing: microlymphocytotoxicity techniques used in conjunction with mixed lymphocyte cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Definitions and descriptions of the DLA and MLC assays used to type canine cells for histocompatibility are presented, followed by an explanation of applications of the typing system to several LEHR projects such as bone marrow and fetal liver transplantation as well as the production of antibodies to tumor associated antigens. The data obtained from the typing of two typical families are presented and discussed

  14. Acquired immunologic tolerance in chimeras and histocompatibility factors in cattle and their relationship to those in humans. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the course of this project we have studied 35 pairs of chimeric cattle twins. It is now clear that fractionated doses of whole-body 60Co irradiation can cause marked shifts in the proportions of the two erythrocyte populations that make up the chimeric mixture. However, it has not been possible to eliminate one of the two cell types and thus abrogate the acquired immunologic tolerance. The results of our extensive skin-grafting experiments are remarkable because they show that a chimeric twin may mount a sufficient immune response to reject its cotwin's skin while remaining completely tolerant to erythropoietic elements of its cotwin. In conjunction with these studies, we have acquired sufficient data to define a major histocompatibility locus in cattle using alloimmune anti-lymphocyte typing sera as well as the mixed lymphocyte culture technic. This project has also yielded a considerable number of new immunogenetic parameters for cattle, monkeys and birds. Such parameters are useful for basic and applied studies in immunology

  15. 7 CFR 65.120 - Chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 CFR 381.170(a)(1). ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Chicken. 65.120 Section 65.120 Agriculture Regulations..., PORK, LAMB, CHICKEN, GOAT MEAT, PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, MACADAMIA NUTS, PECANS,...

  16. Sequencing and alignment of mitochondrial genomes of Tibetan chicken and two lowland chicken breeds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Tibetan chicken lives in high-altitude area and has adapted well to hypoxia genetically. Shouguang chicken and Silky chicken are both lowland chicken breeds. In the present study, the complete mito-chondrial genome sequences of the three chicken breeds were all sequenced. The results showed that the mitochondrial DNAs (mtDNAs) of Shouguang chicken and Silky chicken consist of 16784 bp and 16785 bp respectively, and Tibetan chicken mitochondrial genome varies from 16784 bp to 16786 bp. After sequence analysis, 120 mutations, including 4 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in tRNA genes, 9 SNPs and 1 insertion in rRNA genes, 38 SNPs and 1 deletion in D-LOOP, 66 SNPs in pro-tein-coding genes, were found. This work will provide clues for the future study on the association between mitochondrial genes and the adaptation to hypoxia.Tibetan chicken, lowland chicken, mitochondrial genome, hypoxia.

  17. Colonization properties of Campylobacter jejuni in chickens

    OpenAIRE

    Pielsticker, C.; Glünder, G.; Rautenschlein, S.

    2012-01-01

    Campylobacter is the most common bacterial food-borne pathogen worldwide. Poultry and specifically chicken and raw chicken meat is the main source for human Campylobacter infection. Whilst being colonized by Campylobacter spp. chicken in contrast to human, do scarcely develop pathological lesions. The immune mechanisms controlling Campylobacter colonization and infection in chickens are still not clear. Previous studies and our investigations indicate that the ability to ...

  18. Chicken pox in pregnancy : An obstetric concern

    OpenAIRE

    Wiwanitkit Viroj

    2010-01-01

    Chicken pox is a common viral infection presenting with fever and discrete vesicular lesions. This infection can be widely detected in developing countries, especially for those tropical countries. The pregnant can get chicken pox, and this becomes an important obstetrical concern. In this specific paper, the author hereby details and discusses on chicken pox in pregnancy. Clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention are briefly summarized. In addition, the effects of chicken p...

  19. Changes of lipids in irradiated chickens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chickens were irradiated in a 6deg Co gamma irradiation source. The irradiation has been done to reduce or eliminate Salmonella. The experiments were done to test this decontamination method of chickens if changes of lipids take place. It was to be seen, that peroxidation of lipids was more rapidly as in control. The time of storage of irradiated chickens has to be shorter because of changes in lipids. After irradiation the chickens had trade quality. (orig.)

  20. Evolutionary conservation of alternative splicing in chicken

    OpenAIRE

    Katyal, S.; Gao, Z.; Liu, R.-Z.; R Godbout

    2007-01-01

    Alternative splicing represents a source of great diversity for regulating protein expression and function. It has been estimated that one-third to two-thirds of mammalian genes are alternatively spliced. With the sequencing of the chicken genome and analysis of transcripts expressed in chicken tissues, we are now in a position to address evolutionary conservation of alternative splicing events in chicken and mammals. Here, we compare chicken and mammalian transcript sequences of 41 alternati...

  1. Reactivation of chicken erythrocyte nuclei in heterokaryons results in expression of adult chicken globin genes.

    OpenAIRE

    Linder, S.; Zuckerman, S H; Ringertz, N R

    1981-01-01

    Activation of chicken globin gene transcription has been demonstrated in chicken erythrocyte--rat L6 myoblast heterokaryons. The globin mRNA is polyadenylylated and is translated into adult chicken alpha A-, alpha D-, and beta-globin polypeptides. No fetal globin mRNA or globin polypeptides were detected. Heterokaryons between chicken erythrocytes and mouse neuroblastoma cells or hamster BHK cells also synthesized adult chicken globins.

  2. Assessment of Tetracycline, Lead and Cadmium Residues in Frozen Chicken Vended in Lagos and Ibadan, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Belleh Efie Diana; Adetunji Victoria Olusola; Odetokun Ismail Ayoade

    2012-01-01

    This study determined the levels of tetracycline and heavy metals (lead and cadmium) levels in frozen chicken. One hundred frozen chicken muscle samples were sourced from major markets in Lagos and Ibadan (fifty samples each). The samples were analyzed using High Power Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) for tetracycline residue determination while Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS) was used to determine the levels of lead and cadmium residues in the samples. Mean concentrations of tetracycline re...

  3. Poisoning of chickens and ducks by pyrrolizidine alkaloids of Heliotropium europaeum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pass, D A; Hogg, G G; Russell, R G; Edgar, J A; Tence, I M; Rikard-Bell, L

    1979-06-01

    The disease produced by feeding chickens and ducks a commercial poultry feed containing heliotrine and lasiocarpine, pyrrolizidine alkaloids of Heliotropium europaeum, is described. Illthrift, ascites and degenerative lesions in the liver were the major findings. Similar lesions occurred in chickens fed a diet containing H. europaeum. The source of the alkaloids in commercial poultry feed was probably the seeds of H. europaeum harvested with wheat. PMID:518422

  4. Dietary Inulin Supplementation Modifies Significantly the Liver Transcriptomic Profile of Broiler Chickens

    OpenAIRE

    Sevane, Natalia; Bialade, Federica; Velasco, Susana; Rebolé, Almudena; Rodríguez, Maria Luisa; Ortiz, Luís T.; Cañón, Javier; Dunner, Susana

    2014-01-01

    Inclusion of prebiotics in the diet is known to be advantageous, with positive influences both on health and growth. The current study investigated the differences in the hepatic transcriptome profiles between chickens supplemented with inulin (a storage carbohydrate found in many plants) and controls. Liver is a major metabolic organ and has been previously reported to be involved in the modification of the lipid metabolism in chickens fed with inulin. A nutrigenomic approach through the ana...

  5. Nunukan Chicken: Genetic Characteristics, Phenotype and Utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tike Sartika

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Nunukan chicken is a local chicken from East Kalimantan which spreads out in Tarakan and Nunukan Islands . The chicken has a specific buff color and Columbian type feather and also has very late feathering (VLF trait . The Nunukan cocks and hens have no wing and tail primary feather; the tail feathers are short and fragile . The VLF trait is known to have association with a K gene on the Z chromosome. The chicken is efficient in protein metabolism . Sulfur amino acids (cystine and methionine that needed for feather growth, could be utilized for meat and egg production . The egg production of Nunukan chicken was better than the Kampung chicken . The average of hen day, hen house and peak production of Nunukan chicken was 45 . 39.1 and 62%, respectively, while the Kampung chicken was 35 .9, 30 .9 and 48%, respectively . Based on genetic analysis, the external genotype characteristic of the Nunukan chicken is ii ce ss Idld pp. It means that the phenotype appearance of the Nunukan chicken was columbian and gold feathering type, yellow and white shank color and single comb type. This phenotype is similar to Merawang Chicken . The genetic introgression of the Nunukan chicken is affected by the Rhode Island Red with the genetic introgression value of 0.964 .

  6. Major depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depression - major; Depression - clinical; Clinical depression; Unipolar depression; Major depressive disorder ... Doctors do not know the exact causes of depression. It is believed that chemical changes in the ...

  7. Decay of maternal antibodies in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharaibeh, Saad; Mahmoud, Kamel

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the decay rate of maternal antibodies against major broiler chicken pathogens. A total of 30 one-day-old broiler chicks were obtained from a commercial hatchery and reared in isolation. These chicks were retrieved from a parent flock that received a routine vaccination program. Chicks were bled at hatch and sequentially thereafter every 5 d through 30 d of age. Maternal antibody titers were measured by ELISA for avian encephalomyelitis (AEV), avian influenza virus (AIV), chicken anemia virus (CAV), infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV), infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV), Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG), Mycoplasma synoviae (MS), and reovirus (Reo). Maternal antibody titers for Newcastle disease virus (NDV) were measured using a hemagglutination inhibition test. Half-life estimates of maternal antibody titers were 5.3, 4.2, 7, 5.1, 3.9, 3.8, 4.9, 4.1, 6.3, and 4.7 d for AEV, AIV, CAV, IBDV, IBV, ILTV, MG, MS, NDV, and Reo, respectively. The statistical analysis revealed significant differences among half-lives of maternal antibody titers against certain pathogens. Furthermore, all maternal antibody titers were depleted by 10 d of age except for IBDV. PMID:23960115

  8. Identification and association of the single nucleotide polymorphisms in calpain3 (CAPN3 gene with carcass traits in chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du Hua-Rui

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study is to screen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP of chicken Calpain3 (CAPN3 gene and to analyze the potential association between CAPN3 gene polymorphisms and carcass traits in chickens. We screened CAPN3 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP in 307 meat-type quality chicken from 5 commercial pure lines (S01, S02, S03, S05, and D99 and 4 native breeds from Guangdong Province (Huiyang Huxu chicken and Qingyuan Ma chicken and Sichuan Province (Caoke chicken and Shandi Black-bone chicken, China. Results Two SNPs (11818T>A and 12814T>G were detected by single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP method and were verified by DNA sequencing. Association analysis showed that the 12814T>G genotypes were significantly associated with body weight (BW, carcass weight (CW, breast muscle weight (BMW, and leg muscle weight (LMW. Haplotypes constructed on the two SNPs (H1, TG; H2, TT; H3, AG; and H4, AT were associated with BW, CW (P P Conclusion We speculated that the CAPN3 gene was a major gene affecting chicken muscle growth and carcass traits or it was linked with the major gene(s. Diplotypes H1H2 and H2H2 might be advantageous for carcass traits.

  9. Native Darag Chicken Menu Variations: Its Acceptability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Rosario Clarabel C. Contreras

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Traditional native chicken delicacies like lechon and adobo are very common dishes in a rural Filipino folks’ dining table. As the family economic standing improves, meat becomes a main item in a family diet, dishes like fried chicken and chicken nuggets have also become part of the family choices of chicken dishes in their meal. Intensification of the production of native Darag chicken would lead to optimization of food technological output for the university which will hopefully be a potential one town-one product (OTOP of the municipality.

  10. Downregulation of Ke 6, a Novel Gene Encoded within the Major Histocompatibility Complex, in Murine Polycystic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Aziz, N; M.M. Maxwell; St Jacques, B; Brenner, B M

    1993-01-01

    Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is characterized by progressive enlargement of the kidneys due to numerous expanding cysts ultimately leading to renal failure. We have identified a gene, Ke 6, located within the H-2K/tw5 region on mouse chromosome 17, which is downregulated in two distinct murine models of heritable PKD. Ke 6 is a member of the short-chain alcohol dehydrogenase family and possess remarkable amino acid sequence conservation with several bacterial proteins with oxidoreductase f...

  11. Simulation of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) structure and peptide loading into an MHC binding pocket with teachers'hands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankian, Mojtaba

    2013-10-01

    Molecular understanding of three-dimensional (3D) peptide: MHC models require both basic knowledge of computational modeling and skilled visual perception, which are not possessed by all students. The present model aims to simulate MHC molecular structure with the hands and make a profound impression on the students. PMID:26989722

  12. Analysis of major histocompatibility complex class II gene in water voles using capillary electrophoresis-single stranded conformation polymorphism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bryja, Josef; Galan, M.; Charbonnel, N.; Cosson, J.-F.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 1 (2005), s. 173-176. ISSN 1471-8278 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6093917 Keywords : water vole * population genetics Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.219, year: 2005

  13. Major histocompatibility complex: its role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune rheumatic diseases - doi:10.5020/18061230.2006.p155

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crésio Alves

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to allow early diagnosis and more efficient treatments, many studies have been trying to define genetic markers of rheumatic diseases. Amongst them, antigens and alleles of the HLA (Human Leukocyte Antigens system are distinguished. Located in the short arm of chromosome 6, the HLA system exerts genetic influence on the susceptibility and severity of these diseases. The discovery of new molecular methods to typify HLA alleles and the recent nomenclature updates have been contributing to a better understanding of this system. Unfortunately, this information has not been adequately published in the clinical literature. The present work aimed at presenting the function, nomenclature and methods of detection of the HLA polymorphism; and to review its associations with rheumatic fever, systemic erythematosus lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis and spondyloarthropathies. Articles that were published between 1980 and 2005 were searched in the MEDLINE and LILACS data basis. This review demonstrated that although the HLA association is well established for some rheumatic diseases (e.g., HLA-B27 and spondyloarthropathies, HLA DR-3 and HLA-DR4 with rheumatoid arthritis, HLA-DR4 and lupus others vary in different ethnic-racial group and illnesses, due to its polymorphism. It is necessary to study populations from different ethnic backgrounds to identify new associations or to strengthen associations with the ones already identified. This knowledge will contribute to future prophylactic or therapeutic interventions in patients with rheumatic disorders or at risk to develop them.

  14. Characterization of major histocompatibility complex class I and class II genes from the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddle, Hannah V; Sanderson, Claire; Belov, Katherine

    2007-09-01

    The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) is currently threatened by an emerging wildlife disease, devil facial tumour disease. The disease is decreasing devil numbers dramatically and may lead to the extinction of the species. At present, nothing is known about the immune genes or basic immunology of the devil. In this study, we report the construction of the first genetic library for the Tasmanian devil, a spleen cDNA library, and the isolation of full-length MHC Class I and Class II genes. We describe six unique Class II beta chain sequences from at least three loci, which belong to the marsupial Class II DA gene family. We have isolated 13 unique devil Class I sequences, representing at least seven Class I loci, two of which are most likely non-classical genes. The MHC Class I sequences from the devil have little heterogeneity, indicating recent divergence. The MHC genes described here are most likely involved in antigen presentation and are an important first step for studying MHC diversity and immune response in the devil. PMID:17673996

  15. Biochemical identification of the bovine blood group M' antigen as a major histocompatibility complex class I-like molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hønberg, L S; Larsen, B; Koch, C;

    1995-01-01

    Absorption and elution experiments showed that it was impossible to separate antibodies against blood group factor M' from antibodies against bovine lymphocyte antigen (BoLA) A16 in an antiserum showing haemolytic activity against M' as well as lymphocytotoxic activity against BoLA-A16....... To elucidate the structural relationship between BoLA-A16 and blood group antigen M', immunoprecipitation experiments on red and white cell lysates isolated from M'-A16 positive and negative cattle were carried out. These results showed that M(r) 44,000 and M(r) 12000 polypeptides can be precipitated from both...... difference in the pI of the immunoprecipitable components of red and white cells was observed. All together, this indicates that either the blood group antigen M' is the BoLA-A16 class I antigen or M' and BoLA-A16 are two different class I polypeptides with the same relative mass, sharing identical epitopes...

  16. Major histocompatibility complex class I-associated vaccine protection from simian immunodeficiency virus-infected peripheral blood cells

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of vaccine protection from infected cells from another individual of the same species, vaccinated rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) were challenged with peripheral blood mononuclear cells from another animal diagnosed with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Half of the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)- vaccinated animals challenged were protected, whereas unprotected vaccinates progressed as rapidly to AIDS. Protection was unrelated to either total ant...

  17. Complement component C1r mediated cleavage of the heavy chain of the major histocompatibility class I antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, H; Nissen, Mogens Holst

    1992-01-01

    Apart from cleaving C1s, we demonstrate for the first time that: 1) at concentrations found in serum, the activated forms of the complement components C1r in addition to C1s can cleave the heavy chain of MHC class I antigens, 2) the cleavage by C1r and C1s is seemingly dependent upon a native con...... MHC class I was shown to take place between the alpha 2- and alpha 3- domains as estimated by the Con A-Sepharose precipitation pattern on SDS-PAGE. The alpha 1/alpha 2 fragment was still shown to interact with beta 2-microglobulin as shown by immunoprecipitation....

  18. Small organic compounds enhance antigen loading of class II major histocompatibility complex proteins by targeting the polymorphic P1 pocket

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höpner, Sabine; Dickhaut, Katharina; Hofstätter, Maria;

    2006-01-01

    the peptide loading rate. The effect was evident only for an allelic subset and strictly correlated with the presence of glycine at the dimorphic position beta86 of the HLA-DR molecule. The residue forms the floor of the conserved pocket P1, located in the peptide binding site of MHC molecule...... "adamantyl-susceptible" MHC molecules. As catalysts of antigen loading, compounds targeting P1 may be useful molecular tools to amplify the immune response. The observation, however, that the ligand repertoire can be affected through polymorphic sites form the outside may also imply that environmental...

  19. Major histocompatibility complex harbors widespread genotypic variability of non-additive risk of rheumatoid arthritis including epistasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wen-Hua; Bowes, John; Plant, Darren; Viatte, Sebastien; Yarwood, Annie; Massey, Jonathan; Worthington, Jane; Eyre, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Genotypic variability based genome-wide association studies (vGWASs) can identify potentially interacting loci without prior knowledge of the interacting factors. We report a two-stage approach to make vGWAS applicable to diseases: firstly using a mixed model approach to partition dichotomous phenotypes into additive risk and non-additive environmental residuals on the liability scale and secondly using the Levene's (Brown-Forsythe) test to assess equality of the residual variances across genotype groups per marker. We found widespread significant (P TYK2 and ANKRD55. Both PTPN22 and TYK2 had evidence of interactions reported elsewhere. We conclude that vGWAS can help discover interacting loci for complex diseases but require large samples to find additional signals. PMID:27109064

  20. Differential immune response of congenic mice to ultraviolet-treated major histocompatibility complex class II-incompatible skin grafts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of ultraviolet (UVB) irradiation on the survival of H-2 class II-disparate skin grafts was studied in congenic mouse strains. Isolated skin was UVB irradiated in vitro at a dose of 40 mJ/cm2 from both sides to remove Ia immunogenicity. Immediately after irradiation the skin was transplanted onto the flank of allogeneic mice. When B10.AQR grafts were transplanted onto B10.T(6R) recipients, a significant prolongation of the survival time was observed, while 50% of the UVB-treated grafts were not rejected at all. However, in the opposite direction--i.e., B10.T(6R) grafts onto B10.AQR recipients, no significant prolongation of the survival was observed. To test whether this effect was due to a difference in susceptibility of the donor skin to UVB irradiation or to a different immune response in the recipients, (B10.T(6R) x B10.AQR) grafts were transplanted onto the parent strains. Similar results were obtained, in that UVB-treated grafts did not show a prolonged survival in B10.AQR recipients, whereas a significant prolongation (50% of the grafts survived more than 100 days) was observed in B10.T(6R) recipients. UVB-treated (B10.T(6R) x B10.AQR)F1 grafts were also transplanted onto (B10.T(6R) x C57B1/10)F1, (B10.AQR x C57B1/10)F1, (B10.T(6R) x Balb/c)F1 and (B10.AQR x Balb/c)F1 recipients--but in none of these combinations was a prolonged survival time observed. These data suggest that, in contrast to all in vitro experiments, the abrogation of the immune response by UVB treatment of the stimulator cells is, in vivo, not a general phenomenon. The genetic constitution of the responder mice seems to play an important role in determining whether or not an immune response takes place

  1. Shared amino acid sequences between major histocompatibility complex class II glycoproteins, type XI collagen and Proteus mirabilis in rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, C.; Ebringer, A; K. Ahmadi; Wrigglesworth, J; Tiwana, H.; Fielder, M; Binder, A.; Ettelaie, C.; Cunningham, P.; Joannou, C

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To show molecular similarity between two sequences of Proteus mirabilis (haemolysin--ESRRAL; urease--IRRET) with HLA-DR antigens (EQRRAA) which are associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and type XI collagen (LRREI), respectively; and, in patients with RA, to measure levels of antibody against a 16-mer synthetic peptide containing the ESRRAL sequence, and the haemolysin and urease proteins of Proteus mirabilis. METHODS--The homologous sequences EQRRAA and ESRRAL were modelled w...

  2. Genetic structure and contrasting selection pattern at two major histocompatibility complex genes in wild house mouse populations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čížková, Dagmar; Goüy de Bellocq, J.; Baird, S. J. E.; Piálek, Jaroslav; Bryja, Josef

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 106, č. 5 (2011), s. 727-740. ISSN 0018-067X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA600930608; GA ČR GA206/08/0640 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : MHC * house mouse * selection * population structure * trans-species polymorphism Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.597, year: 2011

  3. Density-related changes in selection pattern for major histocompatibility complex genes in fluctuating populations of voles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bryja, Josef; Charbonnel, N.; Berthier, K.; Galan, M.; Cosson, J.-F.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 23 (2007), s. 5084-5097. ISSN 0962-1083 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA600930608 Grant ostatní: 6th Framework Programme EC(XE) GOCE-2003-010284 EDEN Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Source of funding: R - rámcový projekt EK Keywords : Arvicola terrestris * balancing selection * local adaptation * MHC * population cycle s Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.169, year: 2007

  4. High-affinity binding of short peptides to major histocompatibility complex class II molecules by anchor combinations.

    OpenAIRE

    Hammer, J.; Belunis, C; Bolin, D; Papadopoulos, J.; Walsky, R; Higelin, J; Danho, W; Sinigaglia, F; Nagy, Z A

    1994-01-01

    We have previously identified four anchor positions in HLA-DRB1*0101-binding peptides, and three anchors involved in peptide binding to DRB1*0401 and DRB1*1101 molecules, by screening of an M13 peptide display library (approximately 20 million independent nonapeptides) for DR-binding activity. In this study, high stringency screening of the M13 library for DRB1*0401 binding has resulted in identification of three further anchor positions. Taken together, a peptide-binding motif has been obtai...

  5. Analysis of associations between major histocompatibility complex (BoLA) class I haplotypes and subclinical mastitis of dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Jensen, N. E.; Østergård, H.

    1995-01-01

    The associations between BoLA class I haplotypes and subclinical mastitis were investigated using information on 333 cows from three different breeds and crossbreeds from 14 dairy herds in Denmark. Somatic cell count and bacteriological status were used as markers for subclinical mastitis....... Associations between BoLA class I haplotypes and IMI status were also determined. The association between BoLA class I haplotypes and subclinical mastitis was weak. The A10(W50), A11, A12(A30), A16, A19(A6), A21, A26, and A31(A30) alleles were associated with different markers of subclinical mastitis....... Susceptibility or resistance to the two bacteria categories was associated with different alleles. This study indicated that BoLA antigens may be involved in resistance to mastitis and that resistance may be specific for a particular pathogen....

  6. DNA sequence and characterization of human class II major histocompatibility complex beta chains from the DR1 haplotype.

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, J I; Estess, P; St John, T; Saiki, R; Watling, D L; Erlich, H A; McDevitt, H O

    1985-01-01

    Two HLA class II beta-chain clones from a cell line homozygous for the DR1 haplotype have been characterized and sequenced. They represent a DR beta chain (2918.4) and a DQ beta chain (2918.8). Clone 2918.4 has been used to select mRNA from a lymphoblastoid cell line, and this was injected into Xenopus oocytes with mRNA selected with a DR alpha chain. The translation products were immunoprecipitated with a beta-chain-specific monoclonal antibody and electrophoresed on two-dimensional gels. Th...

  7. Long-term T cell memory requires the surface expression of self-peptide/major histocompatibility complex molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Markiewicz, Mary A.; Girao, Cristina; Opferman, Joseph T.; Sun, Jiling; Hu, Qinghui; Agulnik, Alexander A.; Bishop, Colin E.; Thompson, Craig B.; Ashton-Rickardt, Philip G.

    1998-01-01

    How memory T cells are maintained in vivo is poorly understood. To address this problem, a male-specific peptide (H-Y) was identified and used to activate female anti-H-Y T cells in vitro. Anti-H-Y T cells survived in vivo for at least 70 days in the absence of antigen. This persistence was not because of the intrinsic ability of memory T cells to survive in vivo. Instead, the survival and function of adoptively transferred memory cells was found to require transporter of antigen protein 1-de...

  8. The interaction between beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m) and purified class-I major histocompatibility (MHC) antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, L O; Hansen, A S; Olsen, A C;

    1994-01-01

    been generated recently and this paper reports on a similar assay for the interaction between beta 2m and class I. As a model system human beta 2m binding to mouse class I was used. The assay is strictly biochemical using purified reagents which interact in solution and complex formation is determined...... by size separation. It is specific and highly sensitive. The observed affinity of the interaction, KD, is close to 0.4 nM. The rate of association at 37 degrees C is very fast (the ka is around 5 x 10(4)/M/s) whereas the dissociation is slow (the kd is around 8 x 10(-6)/s); the ratio of dissociation...

  9. Surfactant protein D augments bacterial association but attenuates major histocompatibility complex class II presentation of bacterial antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Søren; Lo, Bernice; Evans, Kathy;

    2006-01-01

    Development of dementia, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), is associated with lipid dysregulation and inflammation. As the host defense lectin surfactant protein D (SP-D) has multiple effects in lipid homeostasis and inflammation, the correlation between SP-D concentrations and development of d...

  10. ESR dosimetry of irradiated chicken legs and chicken eggs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionising radiation induces stable free radicals in chicken bones and in the shell of chicken eggs which can be detected, by the electrons spin resonance (ESR) technique, well beyond the shelf-life of the food and can be used for dosimetry. The method usually adopted to evaluate ''a posteriori'' the dose given during the ionising radiation treatment of food, is the dose additive method. To assess the dose, the ESR signal amplitude of the irradiated food (bone or egg shell in the present case) is measured and then the dose-effect relationship is obtained by re-irradiating the sample with some additive doses (usually of 1 kGy). The dose-effect curve is back-extrapolated and the initial given dose determined. At the Istituto Superiore di Sanita (ISS), Rome, Italy, a research programme was approved two years ago aimed to, (1) study new methodological approaches for ESR dose assessment, and (2) analyse the factors which may influence the ESR readout of irradiated chicken bones and chicken egg shells. (author)

  11. In vitro efficacy of allicin on chicken Eimeria tenella sporozoites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnassan, Alaa Aldin; Thabet, Ahmed; Daugschies, Arwid; Bangoura, Berit

    2015-10-01

    Chicken coccidiosis is a major parasitic disease caused by Eimeria spp. It is controlled and treated using chemical anticoccidial agents. Development of partial or complete resistance toward these anticoccidials is considered a major problem in poultry industry. Allicin is an organosulfur compound produced as a result of the reaction between alliin and alliinase after hacking of garlic. In this study, tenfold dilution from 180 mg/ml to 1.8 ng/ml of allicin in distilled water was tested against E. tenella in vitro. The percent of inhibition in allicin was from 99.9 to 71.53% using 180 mg/ml and 180 ng/ml, respectively. The percent of inhibition was 56.24% using 1.8 ng/ml. We used allicin as a treatment from plants against chicken coccidiosis; however, in vivo study should be performed to confirm these results. PMID:26264230

  12. Mimicry of human histocompatibility HLA-B27 antigens by Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    OpenAIRE

    Ogasawara, M.; Kono, D H; Yu, D T

    1986-01-01

    Anti-HLA-B27 monoclonal antibody M2, which was relatively specific for human histocompatibility antigen HLA-B27, was used to test several bacteria, some of which could potentially induce chronic arthritis in HLA-B27-positive individuals. Using the Western blot procedure, we observed positive reactions with 80,000- and 60,000-dalton antigens with one strain of Klebsiella pneumoniae. Reactivity was not observed with five other monoclonal antibodies which were not reactive with HLA-B27 antigens,...

  13. Kinetics of starch digestion and performance of broiler chickens

    OpenAIRE

    Weurding, R.E.

    2002-01-01

    Keywords: starch, digestion rate, broiler chickens, peas, tapiocaStarch is stored in amyloplasts of various plants like cereals and legumes and seeds of these plants are used as feedstuffs for farm animals. Starch is the major energy source in broiler feeds. The properties of starch from different origin vary condiderably and these properties determine its resistance to enzymatic digestion. The objective of the research project described in this thesis was to study starch digestion behaviour ...

  14. Factors affecting wheat nutritional value for broiler chickens

    OpenAIRE

    Gutierrez del Alamo Oms, A.

    2009-01-01

    In Europe, broiler chickens are fed with balanced diets where the energy is mainly supplied by wheat. The feed industry considers wheat a moderately uniform raw material and therefore its energy content and nutrient digestibility are taken from feeding tables (tabulated values) and assigned to all wheat grains. However, all major wheat-producing countries report considerable variability in energy content of wheat which invalidates the assumption of uniformity among wheat grains and forces the...

  15. Study on the prevalence of Campylobacter spp. from chicken meat in Hanoi, Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, Quynh Huong; Tran, Thi Hanh; Phung, Dac Cam; Nguyen, Thi Be

    2006-10-01

    Campylobacter spp. is considered to be the most common bacterial cause of human gastroenteritis worldwide. In developing countries, Campylobacter spp. diarrhea is an important cause of childhood morbidity. Chicken meat is known to be a major source of Campylobacteriosis infection in the world. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of Campylobacter spp. in chicken meat. A total of 100 samples from breast part of chicken carcass were collected from retail market in Hanoi. The samples were taken for bacteriological analysis following the ISO 10272 standards. Thirty one samples (31%) were found positive for Campylobacter spp. The most frequently isolated Campylobacter was Campylobacter jejuni (45.2%) followed by Campylobacter coli (25.8%). Due to high contamination rates of retail chicken products, special attention must be paid to good manufacturing practices of food processors and vendors. Further studies should be done to assess the risk factors of Campylobacter spp. contamination in the Vietnamese fowl production chain. PMID:17135525

  16. Determination and analysis of the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Taoyuan chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li-Li; Xie, Hong-Bing; Yu, Qi-Fang; He, Shao-Ping; He, Jian-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Taoyuan chicken is excellent native breeds in China. This study firstly determined the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Taoyuan chicken using PCR-based amplification and Sanger sequencing. The characteristic of the entire mitochondrial genome was analyzed in detail, with the base composition of 30.26% A, 23.79% T, 32.44% C, 13.50% G in the Taoyuan chicken (16,784 bp in length). It contained 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and a major non-coding control region (D-loop region). The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Taoyuan chicken will be useful for the phylogenetics of poultry, and be available as basic data for the genetics and breeding. PMID:24617480

  17. Killer cells in the chicken

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 51chromium (51Cr) release microcytotoxicity assay has been established for studying cell-mediated immunity in chickens to a potentially wide variety of antigens. The system investigated in detail uses thyroglobulin-coated chicken red blood cells (Tg-CRBC) to analyse effector cell mechanisms operative in spontaneous autoimmune thyroiditis in Obese strain (OS) chickens. A variety of technical parameters were investigated in order to optimise reliable, reproducible target cell preparation and to minimise spontaneous 51Cr-release. The final method adopted used tannic acid for coupling antigen to carefully selected donor erythrocytes of uniform MHC genotype. For the study of antibody dependent, cell-mediated cytotoxicity, Tg-CRBE were pre-sensitised with OS serum containing high titre Tg-autoantibody. Tannic acid-treated CRBC (TA-CRBC) served simultaneously as controls for the Tg specificity of direct cellular cytotoxicity (DCC) to Tg-CRBC, and also as target cells for natural, or spontaneous cellular cytotoxicity (SCC). With such an assay, cells capable of mediating Tg-specific DCC were demonstrated in the OS, but not in normal chickens. No differences in ADCC or SCC were observed when the two strains were considered as a whole, i.e. regardless of age, sex, MHC genotype or extent of disease. (Auth.)

  18. Chicken Soup for the Portfolio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Edward J.

    The popular "Chicken Soup for the Soul" series of books demonstrates the tremendous desire of people in all walks of life to tell their stories. A professor of reading/language arts methods for students in a program leading to teacher certification reads to his classes every day from a wide variety of materials, including stories from the "Chicken…

  19. The Chicken and Egg Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkon, Ivette

    2004-01-01

    This article describes a project on chickens and eggs undertaken by 5-year-old children in a bilingual school in Mexico City. It describes the three phases of the project and includes photographs and other documentation of the children's work.

  20. Identification of irradiated chicken by GC/MS determination of radiation-induced volatile from the lipids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the detection of irradiated meat, a procedure is reported which involves high vacuum distillation of the separated fat and analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) of hydrocarbons. This equipment was well sulted for the method described in this report for the detection of irradiated chicken by separating the volatiles from the lipid fraction and further identification by GC/MS. The results are based on investigations of 7 types of whole frozen chicken 2 types of frozen chicken thigh, and 1 type of frozen chicken. The results demonstrate that irradiated chicken can be monitored by cold-finger high-vacuum distillation-and further GC/MS-Identification of the major hydrocarbons formed during the radiolysis of lipids. The detection of these compounds was simplified by Single Ion Monitoring. 4 figs., 20 refs

  1. Extensive microbial and functional diversity within the chicken cecal microbiome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin J Sergeant

    Full Text Available Chickens are major source of food and protein worldwide. Feed conversion and the health of chickens relies on the largely unexplored complex microbial community that inhabits the chicken gut, including the ceca. We have carried out deep microbial community profiling of the microbiota in twenty cecal samples via 16S rRNA gene sequences and an in-depth metagenomics analysis of a single cecal microbiota. We recovered 699 phylotypes, over half of which appear to represent previously unknown species. We obtained 648,251 environmental gene tags (EGTs, the majority of which represent new species. These were binned into over two-dozen draft genomes, which included Campylobacter jejuni and Helicobacter pullorum. We found numerous polysaccharide- and oligosaccharide-degrading enzymes encoding within the metagenome, some of which appeared to be part of polysaccharide utilization systems with genetic evidence for the co-ordination of polysaccharide degradation with sugar transport and utilization. The cecal metagenome encodes several fermentation pathways leading to the production of short-chain fatty acids, including some with novel features. We found a dozen uptake hydrogenases encoded in the metagenome and speculate that these provide major hydrogen sinks within this microbial community and might explain the high abundance of several genera within this microbiome, including Campylobacter, Helicobacter and Megamonas.

  2. Immunity to bacterial infection in the chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigley, Paul

    2013-11-01

    Bacterial infections remain important to the poultry industry both in terms of animal and public health, the latter due to the importance of poultry as a source of foodborne bacterial zoonoses such as Salmonella and Campylobacter. As such, much focus of research to the immune response to bacterial infection has been to Salmonella. In this review we will focus on how research on avian salmonellosis has developed our understanding of immunity to bacteria in the chicken from understanding the role of TLRs in recognition of bacterial pathogens, through the role of heterophils, macrophages and γδ lymphocytes in innate immunity and activation of adaptive responses to the role of cellular and humoral immunity in immune clearance and protection. What is known of the immune response to other bacterial infections and in particular infections that have emerged recently as major problems in poultry production including Campylobacter jejuni, Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli, Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale and Clostridium perfringens are discussed. PMID:23648643

  3. Echocardiographic characteristics of chickens with ascites syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, G; Zhang, Y; Peng, X; Guo, D; Li, C

    2006-12-01

    1. B- and M-mode echocardiography was used to compare cardiac function in broilers with spontaneous ascites syndrome with that of normal chickens. 2. Thirty ascitic chickens and 15 normal chickens aged three, 4, 5, and 6 weeks from the same flock (180 birds in total) were examined. They were restrained gently in a natural standing position, and echocardiographs were obtained from a 7.0-MHz linear transducer placed on the left pectoral apterium. Indices of cardiac structure and functioning were calculated from the echocardiographs, and some were normalised to body weight. Heart rate was also measured. 3. All cardiac structural indices in both ascitic and normal chickens increased with age. Compared with normal chickens, right ventricular diameter at the end of systole in ascitic chickens was greater at 4, 5 and 6 weeks of age. Ventricular septal thickness at the end of both systole and diastole was greater in ascitic chickens at 5 and 6 weeks. Left ventricular free wall thickness at the end of diastole was less in ascitic chickens at 3 weeks. However, all the structural indices decreased with age after normalisation with body weight. 4. The heart rate of ascitic chickens was lower at 4, 5 and 6 weeks. Normalised left ventricular fractional shortening was lower in ascitic chickens at 4, 5 and 6 weeks, as was normalised right ventricular fractional shortening. Incrassation of the ventricular septum (Delta T), which changed little in normal chickens, was less at 4, 5 and 6 weeks in ascitic chickens. Left ventricular fractional shortening, right ventricular fractional shortening and Delta T were all negatively correlated with ascites heart index at all ages. 5. Taken together the results suggest heart failure of both ventricle, but that right ventricular dysfunction is more extensive than left ventricular dysfunction. We suggest that secondary pulmonary hypertension would result in these ascitic chickens due to volume overload. PMID:17190684

  4. Effect of gamma irradiation on microbial load, chemical and sensory properties of chicken kabab and sausage; as prepared chilled meals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chicken kabab and sausage were treated with 0, 2, 4 or 6 kGy doses of gamma irradiation in a 60CO package irradiator. Treated and untreated samples were kept in a refrigerator (1-4 degree centigrade). Microbiological, chemical and sensory characteristics of chicken kabab and sausage were evaluated at 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 months of storage. Proximate composition and sensory evaluation of the chicken kabab and sausage were also investigated, but only immediately after treatment. Irradiation did not influence the major constituents of chicken kabab and sausage (moisture, protein and fats). Gamma irradiation decreased the microbial load and increased the shelf-life of chicken kabab and sausage. The dose needed to decrease by 1 log cfu/g (D10 value) of Salmonella spp and E coli. numbers were 213 and 400 Gy in chicken kabab, while 345 and 250 Gy in chicken sausage, respectively. The chemical parameters, total acidity, volatile basic nitrogen (VBN), and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), which were chosen as the indices of freshness, were all well within the acceptable limit for up to 5 months for chicken kabab and sausage treated with 4 and 6 kGy. Sensory evaluation showed no significant differences between irradiated and non-irradiated samples. (author)

  5. High-throughput identification of potential minor histocompatibility antigens by MHC tetramer-based screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hombrink, Pleun; Hadrup, Sine R; Bakker, Arne;

    2011-01-01

    T-cell recognition of minor histocompatibility antigens (MiHA) plays an important role in the graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effect of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT). However, the number of MiHA identified to date remains limited, making clinical application of MiHA reactive T-cell inf......T-cell recognition of minor histocompatibility antigens (MiHA) plays an important role in the graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effect of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT). However, the number of MiHA identified to date remains limited, making clinical application of MiHA reactive T......MHC-tetramer-based enrichment and multi-color flow cytometry. Using this approach, 71 peptide-reactive T-cell populations were generated. The isolation of a T-cell line specifically recognizing target cells expressing the MAP4K1(IMA) antigen demonstrates that identification of MiHA through this approach is in principle...

  6. The development and characterization of a 60K SNP chip for chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vereijken Addie

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In livestock species like the chicken, high throughput single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP genotyping assays are increasingly being used for whole genome association studies and as a tool in breeding (referred to as genomic selection. To be of value in a wide variety of breeds and populations, the success rate of the SNP genotyping assay, the distribution of the SNP across the genome and the minor allele frequencies (MAF of the SNPs used are extremely important. Results We describe the design of a moderate density (60k Illumina SNP BeadChip in chicken consisting of SNPs known to be segregating at high to medium minor allele frequencies (MAF in the two major types of commercial chicken (broilers and layers. This was achieved by the identification of 352,303 SNPs with moderate to high MAF in 2 broilers and 2 layer lines using Illumina sequencing on reduced representation libraries. To further increase the utility of the chip, we also identified SNPs on sequences currently not covered by the chicken genome assembly (Gallus_gallus-2.1. This was achieved by 454 sequencing of the chicken genome at a depth of 12x and the identification of SNPs on 454-derived contigs not covered by the current chicken genome assembly. In total we added 790 SNPs that mapped to 454-derived contigs as well as 421 SNPs with a position on Chr_random of the current assembly. The SNP chip contains 57,636 SNPs of which 54,293 could be genotyped and were shown to be segregating in chicken populations. Our SNP identification procedure appeared to be highly reliable and the overall validation rate of the SNPs on the chip was 94%. We were able to map 328 SNPs derived from the 454 sequence contigs on the chicken genome. The majority of these SNPs map to chromosomes that are already represented in genome build Gallus_gallus-2.1.0. Twenty-eight SNPs were used to construct two new linkage groups most likely representing two micro-chromosomes not covered by the

  7. Regulation of T cell response to leishmania antigens by determinants of histocompatibility leukocyte class I and II molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bacellar O.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that HLA class I molecules play a significant role in the regulation of the proliferation of T cells activated by mitogens and antigens. We evaluated the ability of mAb to a framework determinant of HLA class I molecules to regulate T cell proliferation and interferon gamma (IFN-g production against leishmania, PPD, C. albicans and tetanus toxoid antigens in patients with tegumentary leishmaniasis and healthy subjects. The anti-major histocompatibility complex (MHC mAb (W6/32 suppressed lymphocyte proliferation by 90% in cultures stimulated with aCD3, but the suppression was variable in cultures stimulated with leishmania antigen. This suppression ranged from 30-67% and was observed only in 5 of 11 patients. IFN-g production against leishmania antigen was also suppressed by anti-HLA class I mAb. In 3 patients IFN-g levels were suppressed by more than 60%, while in the other 2 cultures IFN-g levels were 36 and 10% lower than controls. The suppression by HLA class I mAb to the proliferative response in leishmaniasis patients and in healthy controls varied with the antigens and the patients or donors tested. To determine whether the suppression is directed at antigen presenting cells (APCs or at the responding T cells, experiments with antigen-primed non-adherent cells, separately incubated with W6/32, were performed. Suppression of proliferation was only observed when the W6/32 mAb was added in the presence of T cells. These data provide evidence that a mAb directed at HLA class I framework determinants can suppress proliferation and cytokine secretion in response to several antigens.

  8. Effect of Replacing Beef Fat with Chicken Skin on Some Properties of Model System Chicken Emulsions

    OpenAIRE

    Aslı Zungur; Berker Nacak; Meltem Serdaroglu

    2015-01-01

    Model system chicken emulsions were prepared by replacing 5, 10, 15 and 20 % beef fat with chicken skin. Moisture, protein, fat, ash and pH were determined in raw and heat processed emulsions. Emulsion samples were evaluated for cooking characteristics, TBA values and colour parameters (L*, a*, b*). Addition of chicken skin decreased fat content and increased moisture and protein content of emulsion samples. Chicken skin replacement significantly increased water holding capacity and cooking ...

  9. Improvement of village chicken production in a mixed (chicken-ram) farming system in Burkina Faso

    OpenAIRE

    Kondombo, S.R.

    2005-01-01

    Keywords:Village chickens, sheep, production system, feeding, fattening, integration,Burkina Faso.Animal production in general and chickens and small ruminants in particular play importantsoci-economic roles in developing countries. Production of village chickens is a source of easy and regular income for rural farmers in developing countries in general and inBurkina Fasoin particular. Unfortunately efforts to improve this production system were not very effective and village chickens still h...

  10. Population structure of four Thai indigenous chicken breeds

    OpenAIRE

    Mekchay, Supamit; Supakankul, Pantaporn; Assawamakin, Anunchai; Wilantho, Alisa; Chareanchim, Wanwisa; Tongsima, Sissades

    2014-01-01

    Background In recent years, Thai indigenous chickens have increasingly been bred as an alternative in Thailand poultry market. Due to their popularity, there is a clear need to improve the underlying quality and productivity of these chickens. Studying chicken genetic variation can improve the chicken meat quality as well as conserving rare chicken species. To begin with, a minimal set of molecular markers that can characterize the Thai indigenous chicken breeds is required. Results Using AFL...

  11. Formulation of Spices mixture for preparation of Chicken Curry

    OpenAIRE

    Deogade; A H; Zanjad; P. N.; Ambadkar; R. K. and Raziuddin; M

    2008-01-01

    Considering the scope of utilization of processed chicken in convenient form, a study was undertaken to optimize the levels of spice mixture salt and commercial chicken masala in a spice formulation to be used for preparation of chicken curry. The sensory quality of ready to eat chicken curry added with hot spice mixture containing salt and chicken masala, revealed that the flavour, juiciness, texture and overall palatability scores of chicken curry improved significantly with addition of 3.0...

  12. The Control of Infectious Coryza in Chicken

    OpenAIRE

    Tati Ariyanti; Supar

    2007-01-01

    Infectious coryza or infectious snot is a disease caused by Haemophilus paragallinarum (HPG), that infects upper respiratory tract of either layer or broiler chickens or other poultry raised under small and large farm conditions. Infection on growing chicken caused reduction of weight gain, whereas in adult layer chicken caused decreasing egg productions, and hence significantly caused economic losses in poultry industries. Coryza cases in the farms are difficult to control by antibiotic trea...

  13. Facilitating functional annotation of chicken microarray data

    OpenAIRE

    Buza, Teresia J; Kumar, Ranjit; Gresham, Cathy R; Burgess, Shane C.; McCarthy, Fiona M

    2009-01-01

    Modeling results from chicken microarray studies is challenging for researchers due to little functional annotation associated with these arrays. The Affymetrix GenChip chicken genome array, one of the biggest arrays that serve as a key research tool for the study of chicken functional genomics, is among the few arrays that link gene products to Gene Ontology (GO). However the GO annotation data presented by Affymetrix is incomplete, for example, they do not show references linked to manually...

  14. Chicken pox in pregnancy : An obstetric concern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiwanitkit Viroj

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chicken pox is a common viral infection presenting with fever and discrete vesicular lesions. This infection can be widely detected in developing countries, especially for those tropical countries. The pregnant can get chicken pox, and this becomes an important obstetrical concern. In this specific paper, the author hereby details and discusses on chicken pox in pregnancy. Clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention are briefly summarized. In addition, the effects of chicken pox on pregnancy as well as the vertical transmission are also documented.

  15. Nunukan Chicken: Genetic Characteristics, Phenotype and Utilization

    OpenAIRE

    Tike Sartika; Sri Sulandari; M.S.A. Zein; Sri Paryanti

    2006-01-01

    Nunukan chicken is a local chicken from East Kalimantan which spreads out in Tarakan and Nunukan Islands . The chicken has a specific buff color and Columbian type feather and also has very late feathering (VLF) trait . The Nunukan cocks and hens have no wing and tail primary feather; the tail feathers are short and fragile . The VLF trait is known to have association with a K gene on the Z chromosome. The chicken is efficient in protein metabolism . Sulfur amino acids (cystine and methionine...

  16. A radioimmunoassay for chicken avidin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A double-antibody solid-phase radioimmunoassay for chicken avidin is reported. Avidin was labelled with 125I by the chloramine-T method. The bound and free avidin were separated with a second antibody bound to a solid matrix. In the logit-log scale the standard curve was linear from 1-2 to 100-200ng of avidin/ml. Cross-reaction of ovalbumin was less than 0.015%. Saturation of biotin-binding sites of avidin with an excess of biotin decreased radioimmunoassay values by about 15%. Recovery studies indicated that avidin can be assayed from all chicken tissues studied with radioimmunoassay, whereas the [14C]biotin/bentonite method gave poor recoveries for avidin in the liver and kidney. Radioimmunoassay and the [14C]biotin/bentonite method gave similar concentrations for oviduct avidin. (author)

  17. Effects of Mechanically Deboned Chicken Meat (MDCM) and Collagen on the Quality Characteristics of Semi-dried Chicken Jerky

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Dong-Heon; Choi, Ji-Hun; Choi, Yun-Sang; Kim, Hyun-Wook; Hwang, Ko-Eun; Kim, Yong-Jae; Ham, Youn-Kyung; Kim, Cheon-Jei

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of using mechanically deboned chicken meat (MDCM) and collagen on quality characteristics of semi-dried chicken jerky. In experiment I, semi-dried chicken jerky was prepared with the replacement of chicken breast with MDCM (0, 10, 20, and 30%). The pH value of the jerky formulated with only chicken breast was 5.94, while the replacement of chicken breast with MDCM significantly increased the pH (p

  18. Experimental-confirmation and functional-annotation of predicted proteins in the chicken genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCarthy Fiona M

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The chicken genome was sequenced because of its phylogenetic position as a non-mammalian vertebrate, its use as a biomedical model especially to study embryology and development, its role as a source of human disease organisms and its importance as the major source of animal derived food protein. However, genomic sequence data is, in itself, of limited value; generally it is not equivalent to understanding biological function. The benefit of having a genome sequence is that it provides a basis for functional genomics. However, the sequence data currently available is poorly structurally and functionally annotated and many genes do not have standard nomenclature assigned. Results We analysed eight chicken tissues and improved the chicken genome structural annotation by providing experimental support for the in vivo expression of 7,809 computationally predicted proteins, including 30 chicken proteins that were only electronically predicted or hypothetical translations in human. To improve functional annotation (based on Gene Ontology, we mapped these identified proteins to their human and mouse orthologs and used this orthology to transfer Gene Ontology (GO functional annotations to the chicken proteins. The 8,213 orthology-based GO annotations that we produced represent an 8% increase in currently available chicken GO annotations. Orthologous chicken products were also assigned standardized nomenclature based on current chicken nomenclature guidelines. Conclusion We demonstrate the utility of high-throughput expression proteomics for rapid experimental structural annotation of a newly sequenced eukaryote genome. These experimentally-supported predicted proteins were further annotated by assigning the proteins with standardized nomenclature and functional annotation. This method is widely applicable to a diverse range of species. Moreover, information from one genome can be used to improve the annotation of other genomes and

  19. Infectious laryngotracheitis virus in chickens

    OpenAIRE

    Ou, Shan-Chia; Giambrone, Joseph J.

    2012-01-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is an important respiratory disease of chickens and annually causes significant economic losses in the poultry industry world-wide. ILT virus (ILTV) belongs to alphaherpesvirinae and the Gallid herpesvirus 1 species. The transmission of ILTV is via respiratory and ocular routes. Clinical and post-mortem signs of ILT can be separated into two forms according to its virulence. The characteristic of the severe form is bloody mucus in the trachea with high morta...

  20. Refinement of molecular approaches to improve the chance of identification of hematopoietic-restricted minor histocompatibility antigens.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijke, B. de; Horssen-Zoetbrood, A. van; Veenbergen, S.; Fredrix, H.; Witte, T.J.M. de; Kemenade, E van de Wiel-van; Dolstra, H.

    2008-01-01

    Minor histocompatibility antigens (mHAgs) constitute the target antigens of the T cell-mediated graft-versus-leukemia response after HLA-identical allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). Several human mHAgs have been identified, but only a few are selectively expressed by hematopoietic cells rep

  1. The MET Gene Is a Common Integration Target in Avian Leukosis Virus Subgroup J-Induced Chicken Hemangiomas

    OpenAIRE

    Justice, James; Malhotra, Sanandan; Ruano, Miguel; Li, Yingying; Zavala, Guillermo; Lee, Nathan; Morgan, Robin; Beemon, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) is a simple retrovirus that can cause hemangiomas and myeloid tumors in chickens and is currently a major economic problem in Asia. Here we characterize ALV-J strain PDRC-59831, a newly studied U.S. isolate of ALV-J. Five-day-old chicken embryos were infected with this virus, and the chickens developed myeloid leukosis and hemangiomas within 2 months after hatching. To investigate the mechanism of pathogenesis, we employed high-throughput sequencing to ...

  2. Diagnosis of Infectious Bronchitis Disease in Broiler Chickens by Serological Test (ELISA and RT-PCR in Duhok

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyar Adil Morad AL-Barwary

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Infectious Bronchitis (IB is one of the most important viral diseases of poultry and it causes major economic losses in poultry industry. The study was conducted to detect Infectious Bronchitis virus (IBV in broilers chicken farms in Duhok Governorate. To achieve this goal two tests have been used throughout the study protocol Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA and Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR. One hundred and eighty Serum samples were collected from 11 chicken farms including (120 samples from 9 symptomatic non vaccinated chicken farms, (30 samples from one asymptomatic vaccinated chicken farm and another (30 samples from one asymptomatic non vaccinated chicken farm and screened for the presence of IBV antibodies by ELISA kit. The total RNAs were extracted from tracheal tissues using RNX TM-Plus reagent (Cinnagen,Iran. Eighty serum samples were positive: 50/120 (41.6% sample were symptomatic non vaccinated, another 30/30 (100% were asymptomatic vaccinated chickens samples, and the remaining samples (100 were negative by ELISA , including 70 /120 (58.4% from symptomatic non vaccinated chickens, and 30/30 (100% from asymptomatic non vaccinated chickens. The molecular detection of avian infectious bronchitis virus by use of RT-PCR was applied to extract RNAs from tracheal tissues. The test was performed on (80 symptomatic non vaccinated chickens and 36 vaccinated and non vaccinated chickens. Detection was performed using universal types of primers including XCE2+ and XCE2- 80 symptomatic chickens were examined by RT-PCR (50 with positive ELISA and 30 with negative ELISA results, 36 (44.4 % have detectable IBV-cDNA and the remaining 44 (55.6% did not have detectable IBVcDNA. Another 36 (18 asymptomatic vaccinated and 18 non vaccinated chickens were examined by RT-PCR, 8 (22.2% have detectable IBV-cDNA, and the remaining 28 (77.8% were negative. This study has determined the presences of IBV in flocks of Duhok

  3. Comprehensive splicing graph analysis of alternative splicing patterns in chicken, compared to human and mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranganathan Shoba

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternative transcript diversity manifests itself as a prime cause of complexity in higher eukaryotes. Recently, transcript diversity studies have suggested that 60–80% of human genes are alternatively spliced. We have used a splicing pattern approach for the bioinformatics analysis of Alternative Splicing (AS in chicken, human and mouse. Exons involved in splicing are subdivided into distinct and variant exons, based on the prevalence of the exons across the transcripts. Four possible permutations of these two different groups of exons were categorised as class I (distinct-variant, class II (distinct-variant, class III (variant-distinct and class IV (variant-variant. This classification quantifies the variation in transcript diversity in the three species. Results In all, 3901 chicken AS genes have been compared with 16,715 human and 16,491 mouse AS genes, with 23% of chicken genes being alternatively spliced, compared to 68% in humans and 57% in mice. To minimize any gene structure bias in the input data, comparative genome analysis has been carried out on the orthologous subset of AS genes for the three species. Gene-level analysis suggested that chicken genes show fewer AS events compared to human and mouse. An event-level analysis showed that the percentage of AS events in chicken is similar to that of human, which implies that a smaller number of chicken genes show greater transcript diversity. Overall, chicken genes were found to have fewer transcripts per gene and shorter introns than human and mouse genes. Conclusion In chicken, the majority of genes generate only two or three isoforms, compared to almost eight in human and six in mouse. We observed that intron definition is expressed strongly when compared to exon definition for chicken genome, based on 3% intron retention in chicken, compared to 2% in human and mouse. Splicing patterns with variant exons account for 33% of AS chicken orthologous genes compared to

  4. Quality Evaluation of Chicken Nugget Formulated with Various Contents of Chicken Skin and Wheat Fiber Mixture

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hack-Youn; Kim, Kon-Joong; Lee, Jong-Wan; Kim, Gye-Woong; Choe, Ju-Hui; Kim, Hyun-Wook; Yoon, Yohan; Kim, Cheon-Jei

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of various mixtures of the chicken skin and wheat fiber on the properties of chicken nuggets. Two skin and fiber mixtures (SFM) were prepared using the following formulations; SFM-1: chicken skin (50%), wheat fiber (20%), and ice (30%); and SFM-2: chicken skin (30%), wheat fiber (20%), and ice (50%). Chicken nugget samples were prepared by adding the following amounts of either SFM-1 or SFM-2: 0%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, and 10%. The water content for sampl...

  5. Crowing Sound Analysis of Gaga' Chicken; Local Chicken from South Sulawesi Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Aprilita Bugiwati, Sri Rachma

    2008-01-01

    Gaga??? chicken was known as a local chicken at South Sulawesi Indonesia which has unique, specific, and different crowing sound, especially at the ending of crowing sound which is like the voice character of human laughing, comparing with the other types of singing chicken in the world. 287 birds of Gaga??? chicken at 3 districts at the centre habitat of Gaga??? chicken were separated into 2 groups (163 birds of Dangdut type and 124 birds of Slow type) which is based on the speed...

  6. CROWING SOUND ANALYSIS OF GAGA??? CHICKEN: LOCAL CHICKEN FROM SOUTH SULAWESI INDONESIA

    OpenAIRE

    Aprilita Bugiwati, Sri Rachma; Ashari, Fachri

    2008-01-01

    Gaga??? chicken was known as a local chicken at South Sulawesi Indonesia which has unique, specific, and different crowing sound, especially at the ending of crowing sound which is like the voice character of human laughing, comparing with the other types of singing chicken in the world. 287 birds of Gaga??? chicken at 3 districts at the centre habitat of Gaga??? chicken were separated into 2 groups (163 birds of Dangdut type and 124 birds of Slow type) which is based on the speed...

  7. Isolation of atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli from chicken and chicken-derived products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, M Z; Sanz, M E; Irino, K; Krüger, A; Lucchesi, P M A; Padola, N L

    2016-04-01

    Atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) strains from chicken and chicken-derived products were isolated and characterised. The strains presented a wide variety of serotypes, some have been reported in other animal species (O2:H40, O5:H40) and in children with diarrhoea (O8:H-). Most of the strains carried intimin β. The results indicate that chicken and chicken products are important sources of atypical EPEC strains that could be associated with human disease, and highlight the need to improve hygiene practices in chicken slaughtering and meat handling. PMID:26810335

  8. Major Roads

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This data set contains roadway centerlines for major roads (interstates and trunk highways) found on the USGS 1:24,000 mapping series. These roadways are current...

  9. Complete association between a retroviral insertion in the tyrosinase gene and the recessive white mutation in chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oulmouden Ahmad

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In chickens, three mutant alleles have been reported at the C locus, including the albino mutation, and the recessive white mutation, which is characterized by white plumage and pigmented eyes. The albino mutation was found to be a 6 bp deletion in the tyrosinase (TYR gene. The present work describes an approach to identify the structural rearrangement in the TYR gene associated with the recessive white mutation. Results Molecular analysis of the chicken TYR gene has revealed a major structural difference (Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism, RFLP in the genomic DNA of the recessive white chicken. A major size difference of 7.7 kb was found in intron 4 of the TYR gene by long-range PCR. Molecular cloning and sequencing results showed the insertion of a complete avian retroviral sequence of the Avian Leukosis Virus (ALV family. Several aberrant transcripts of the tyrosinase gene were found in 10 week old recessive white chickens but not in the homozygous wild type colored chicken. We established a rapid genotyping diagnostic test based on the discovery of this retroviral insertion. It shows that all homozygous carriers of this insertion had a white plumage in various chicken strains. Furthermore, it was possible to distinguish heterozygous carriers from homozygous normal chickens in a segregating line. Conclusion In this study, we conclude that the insertion of a complete avian retroviral sequence in intron 4 of the tyrosinase gene is diagnostic of the recessive white mutation in chickens. This insertion causes aberrant transcripts lacking exon 5, and we propose that this insertion is the causal mutation for the recessive white allele in the chicken.

  10. Monoclonal antibodies against chicken interleukin-6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) were produced against a recombinant (r) chicken interleukin-6 (IL-6). Eight mAbs that were produced were tested for isotype; ability to inhibit recombinant forms of chicken (ch), human (h) and murine (m) IL-6; and recognition of rchIL-6 by Western immunoblotting. The mA...

  11. Avian Influenza Outbreaks in Chickens, Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Paritosh K Biswas; Christensen, Jens P.; Ahmed, Syed S.U.; Barua, Himel; Das, Ashutosh; Rahman, Mohammed H.; Giasuddin, Mohammad; Hannan, Abu S. M. A.; Habib, Mohammad A.; Ahad, Abdul; Rahman, Abu S.M.S.; Faruque, Rayhan; Nitish C Debnath

    2008-01-01

    To determine the epidemiology of outbreaks of avian influenza A virus (subtypes H5N1, H9N2) in chickens in Bangladesh, we conducted surveys and examined virus isolates. The outbreak began in backyard chickens. Probable sources of infection included egg trays and vehicles from local live bird markets and larger live bird markets.

  12. Virulence of Campylobacter jejuni for chicken embryos.

    OpenAIRE

    Mahajan, S; Rodgers, F G

    1989-01-01

    The pathogenicity of Campylobacter jejuni was examined in chicken embryos. In this system, mortality data and histopathological findings induced by organisms and by bacterium-free filtered broth were identical. The absence in chicken embryo tissues both of organisms and of an inflammatory infiltrate suggests a toxin etiology.

  13. ISOLATION OF CHICKEN FOLLICULAR DENDRITIC CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aim of the present study was to isolate chicken follicular dendritic cells (FDC). A combination of methods involving panning, iodixanol density gradient centrifugation, and magnetic cell separation technology made it possible to obtain functional FDC from the cecal tonsils from chickens, which h...

  14. Exencephaly in araucana chickens and silkie bantams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, G L; Softly, A

    1985-01-01

    Exencephaly and hydranencephaly were diagnosed in two 6-week-old araucana chickens (Gallus domesticus) and one adult silkie bantam (Gallus domesticus). The chickens were presented with large, subcutaneous, cranial soft-tissue masses and exhibited neurological signs. There was partial aplasia of the frontal bones, resulting in herniation of the cerebral hemispheres. PMID:4026741

  15. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia secondary to chicken pox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham M Ittyachen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA is a rare complication of chicken pox. It is described mainly in children. Even in children it is a rare complication and the long-term prognosis remains to be elucidated. Herein we report an adult, a 23-year-old male who developed AIHA secondary to chicken pox.

  16. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia secondary to chicken pox

    OpenAIRE

    Abraham M Ittyachen; Mohan B Jose; Varghese Abraham

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a rare complication of chicken pox. It is described mainly in children. Even in children it is a rare complication and the long-term prognosis remains to be elucidated. Herein we report an adult, a 23-year-old male who developed AIHA secondary to chicken pox.

  17. What's so special about chicken immunology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    What’s so special about chickens? Firstly, chickens are not only an invaluable model for studying immunology, they also provide the world’s main source of meat and will be a key protein source needed to feed the growing human population into the future. Poultry meat production is highly efficient ...

  18. Village-based indigenous chicken production system in north-west Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halima, H; Neser, F W C; Van Marle-Koster, E; De Kock, A

    2007-04-01

    Surveys using both purposive and random sampling methods was carried out in four zones of north-west Ethiopia to describe the village-based poultry production systems and constraints in order to design future improvement and conservation strategies. The majority of the respondents were female (74.16%). This indicated that most of the time the women, whether in male-headed or female-headed households, are responsible for chicken rearing while the men are responsible for crop cultivation and other off-farm activities. About 99% of the respondents gave supplementary feeds to their chickens. Almost all farmers provided night shelter for their chickens, in part of the kitchen (1.36%), in the main house (39.07%), in hand-woven baskets (7.29%), in bamboo cages (1.51%) or in a separate shed purpose-made for chickens (50.77%). The major causes of death of chickens during the study were seasonal outbreaks of Newcastle disease (locally known as fengele) and predation. It is important to collect and conserve local poultry breeds before they are fully replaced by the so-called improved breeds. As most of the poultry production is managed by women, focusing on training and education of women will enable not only the improvement of poultry production but also family planning and the overall living standards of the family and the community. PMID:17691543

  19. [Mitochondrial DNA Polymorphism in Different Populations of Spangled Orloff Chickens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyuna, N Yu; Moiseyeva, I G; Sevastianova, A A; Vakhrameev, A B; Alexandrov, A V; Kuzevanova, A Yu; Alimov, A A; Sulimova, G E

    2015-09-01

    For the first time, the genetic diversity of the Spangled Orloff chickens was studied by analyzing the polymorphism of the hypervariable region in the D-loop of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Samples for the analysis were collected at the farms ofthe All-Russia Poultry Research and Technological Institute (VNITIP), the All-Russia Institute of Farm Animal Genetics and Breeding (VNIIGRZh), and the Moscow Zoo. The D-loop partial sequences (between nucleotide positions 57 and 523) were determined according to the reference sequence of Gallus gallus spadiceus mtDNA, NC_007235 in 39 individuals obtained from these populations (GenBank Accession Nos. KM391754-KM391792). In the analyzed mtDNA fragment, a total of 20 polymorphic sites localized between positions 167 and 368, as well as at position 446, were described in Spangled Orloff chickens. One polymorphic site at position 221 (haplogroup E, haplotype ORL-2) was unique. All of the identified nucleotide changes were transition-type substitutions. Overall, based on the analysis of poly- morphic sites in the hypervariable fragment of the D-loop of Spangled Orloff chicken mtDNA, we found seven haplotypes belonging to four haplogroups (A, B, C, and E). Haplogroup E (haplotypes ORL-1, ORL-2, and ORL-3) was present in the majority of the studied individual, with the frequencies of 0.77 in the total sample and 0.47 in the VNIIGRZh farm population. Haplogroups A (haplotypes ORL-4 and ORL-7), B (ORL-6), and C (ORL-5) were found only in samples from the VNIIGRZh farm. The studied mtDNA region revealed a lower level of polymorphism in the VNITIP and Moscow Zoo populations, which only had the ORL-1 and ORL-3 haplotypes belonging to Haplogroup E, respectively. Our data suggested that the studied Spangled Orloff chicken populations differed in the composition and frequencies of mtDNA haplogroups and haplotypes. PMID:26606802

  20. Tissue expression and developmental regulation of chicken cathelicidin antimicrobial peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achanta Mallika

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cathelicidins are a major family of antimicrobial peptides present in vertebrate animals with potent microbicidal and immunomodulatory activities. Four cathelicidins, namely fowlicidins 1 to 3 and cathelicidin B1, have been identified in chickens. As a first step to understand their role in early innate host defense of chickens, we examined the tissue and developmental expression patterns of all four cathelicidins. Real-time PCR revealed an abundant expression of four cathelicidins throughout the gastrointestinal, respiratory, and urogenital tracts as well as in all primary and secondary immune organs of chickens. Fowlicidins 1 to 3 exhibited a similar tissue expression pattern with the highest expression in the bone marrow and lung, while cathelicidin B1 was synthesized most abundantly in the bursa of Fabricius. Additionally, a tissue-specific regulatory pattern was evident for all four cathelicidins during the first 28 days after hatching. The expression of fowlicidins 1 to 3 showed an age-dependent increase both in the cecal tonsil and lung, whereas all four cathelicidins were peaked in the bursa on day 4 after hatching, with a gradual decline by day 28. An abrupt augmentation in the expression of fowlicidins 1 to 3 was also observed in the cecum on day 28, while the highest expression of cathelicidin B1 was seen in both the lung and cecal tonsil on day 14. Collectively, the presence of cathelicidins in a broad range of tissues and their largely enhanced expression during development are suggestive of their potential important role in early host defense and disease resistance of chickens.

  1. Functional Genomics in Chickens: Development of Integrated-Systems Microarrays for Transcriptional Profiling and Discovery of Regulatory Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. E. Porter

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The genetic networks that govern the differentiation and growth of major tissues of economic importance in the chicken are largely unknown. Under a functional genomics project, our consortium has generated 30 609 expressed sequence tags (ESTs and developed several chicken DNA microarrays, which represent the Chicken Metabolic/Somatic (10 K and Neuroendocrine/Reproductive (8 K Systems (http://udgenome.ags.udel.edu/cogburn/. One of the major challenges facing functional genomics is the development of mathematical models to reconstruct functional gene networks and regulatory pathways from vast volumes of microarray data. In initial studies with liver-specific microarrays (3.1 K, we have examined gene expression profiles in liver during the peri-hatch transition and during a strong metabolic perturbation—fasting and re-feeding—in divergently selected broiler chickens (fast vs. slow-growth lines. The expression of many genes controlling metabolic pathways is dramatically altered by these perturbations. Our analysis has revealed a large number of clusters of functionally related genes (mainly metabolic enzymes and transcription factors that control major metabolic pathways. Currently, we are conducting transcriptional profiling studies of multiple tissues during development of two sets of divergently selected broiler chickens (fast vs. slow growing and fat vs. lean lines. Transcriptional profiling across multiple tissues should permit construction of a detailed genetic blueprint that illustrates the developmental events and hierarchy of genes that govern growth and development of chickens. This review will briefly describe the recent acquisition of chicken genomic resources (ESTs and microarrays and our consortium's efforts to help launch the new era of functional genomics in the chicken.

  2. Functional genomics in chickens: development of integrated-systems microarrays for transcriptional profiling and discovery of regulatory pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogburn, L A; Wang, X; Carre, W; Rejto, L; Aggrey, S E; Duclos, M J; Simon, J; Porter, T E

    2004-01-01

    The genetic networks that govern the differentiation and growth of major tissues of economic importance in the chicken are largely unknown. Under a functional genomics project, our consortium has generated 30 609 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and developed several chicken DNA microarrays, which represent the Chicken Metabolic/Somatic (10 K) and Neuroendocrine/Reproductive (8 K) Systems (http://udgenome.ags.udel.edu/cogburn/). One of the major challenges facing functional genomics is the development of mathematical models to reconstruct functional gene networks and regulatory pathways from vast volumes of microarray data. In initial studies with liver-specific microarrays (3.1 K), we have examined gene expression profiles in liver during the peri-hatch transition and during a strong metabolic perturbation-fasting and re-feeding-in divergently selected broiler chickens (fast vs. slow-growth lines). The expression of many genes controlling metabolic pathways is dramatically altered by these perturbations. Our analysis has revealed a large number of clusters of functionally related genes (mainly metabolic enzymes and transcription factors) that control major metabolic pathways. Currently, we are conducting transcriptional profiling studies of multiple tissues during development of two sets of divergently selected broiler chickens (fast vs. slow growing and fat vs. lean lines). Transcriptional profiling across multiple tissues should permit construction of a detailed genetic blueprint that illustrates the developmental events and hierarchy of genes that govern growth and development of chickens. This review will briefly describe the recent acquisition of chicken genomic resources (ESTs and microarrays) and our consortium's efforts to help launch the new era of functional genomics in the chicken. PMID:18629153

  3. "Chickens Are a Lot Smarter than I Originally Thought": Changes in Student Attitudes to Chickens Following a Chicken Training Class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazel, Susan J; O'Dwyer, Lisel; Ryan, Terry

    2015-01-01

    A practical class using clicker training of chickens to apply knowledge of how animals learn and practice skills in animal training was added to an undergraduate course. Since attitudes to animals are related to their perceived intelligence, surveys of student attitudes were completed pre- and post- the practical class, to determine if (1) the practical class changed students' attitudes to chickens and their ability to experience affective states, and (2) any changes were related to previous contact with chickens, training experience or gender. In the post- versus pre-surveys, students agreed more that chickens are easy to teach tricks to, are intelligent, and have individual personalities and disagreed more that they are difficult to train and are slow learners. Following the class, they were more likely to believe chickens experience boredom, frustration and happiness. Females rated the intelligence and ability to experience affective states in chickens more highly than males, although there were shifts in attitude in both genders. This study demonstrated shifts in attitudes following a practical class teaching clicker training in chickens. Similar practical classes may provide an effective method of teaching animal training skills and promoting more positive attitudes to animals. PMID:26479388

  4. Campylobacter jejuni is not merely a commensal in commercial broiler chickens and affects bird welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, Suzanne; Chaloner, Gemma; Kemmett, Kirsty; Davidson, Nicola; Williams, Nicola; Kipar, Anja; Humphrey, Tom; Wigley, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the leading cause of bacterial food-borne infection; chicken meat is its main source. C. jejuni is considered commensal in chickens based on experimental models unrepresentative of commercial production. Here we show that the paradigm of Campylobacter commensalism in the chicken is flawed. Through experimental infection of four commercial breeds of broiler chickens, we show that breed has a significant effect on C. jejuni infection and the immune response of the animals, although these factors have limited impact on the number of bacteria in chicken ceca. All breeds mounted an innate immune response. In some breeds, this response declined when interleukin-10 was expressed, consistent with regulation of the intestinal inflammatory response, and these birds remained healthy. In another breed, there was a prolonged inflammatory response, evidence of damage to gut mucosa, and diarrhea. We show that bird type has a major impact on infection biology of C. jejuni. In some breeds, infection leads to disease, and the bacterium cannot be considered a harmless commensal. These findings have implications for the welfare of chickens in commercial production where C. jejuni infection is a persistent problem. Importance: Campylobacter jejuni is the most common cause of food-borne bacterial diarrheal disease in the developed world. Chicken is the most common source of infection. C. jejuni infection of chickens had previously not been considered to cause disease, and it was thought that C. jejuni was part of the normal microbiota of birds. In this work, we show that modern rapidly growing chicken breeds used in intensive production systems have a strong inflammatory response to C. jejuni infection that can lead to diarrhea, which, in turn, leads to damage to the feet and legs on the birds due to standing on wet litter. The response and level of disease varied between breeds and is related to regulation of the inflammatory immune response. These findings

  5. The Characteristic and The Use of Pelung Chicken in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Sofjan Iskandar; Triana Susanti

    2007-01-01

    Pelung chicken is one of livestock genetic resources in Indonesia, which has been playing an important role for years in the villagers in West Java Province. Pelung chicken originally came from Cianjur district in West Java area. It has been raised as a singing cockerel. This singing ability of the cockerel has become the main criteria for Pelung chicken regular competition in Cianjur. A serious attention on Pelung chicken can maintain the existence of Pelung chicken. The specific character o...

  6. Assessment of Tetracycline, Lead and Cadmium Residues in Frozen Chicken Vended in Lagos and Ibadan, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belleh Efie Diana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study determined the levels of tetracycline and heavy metals (lead and cadmium levels in frozen chicken. One hundred frozen chicken muscle samples were sourced from major markets in Lagos and Ibadan (fifty samples each. The samples were analyzed using High Power Liquid Chromatography (HPLC for tetracycline residue determination while Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS was used to determine the levels of lead and cadmium residues in the samples. Mean concentrations of tetracycline residue levels in the frozen chicken sampled ranged from 1.1589-1.0463ppm which is higher than the maximum residue limit set by international food safety agencies. Pb contents were higher in chicken muscles sampled from markets in Ibadan (0.0227±0.0069 μg dL-1 than Lagos (0.0207±0.0082 μg dL-1, while Cd levels were 0.0013 μg dL-1 higher than in the Lagos samples (0.0065±0.0026 μg dL-1. These values were within maximum residue limits. There were no significant differences (p<0.05 in levels of tetracycline, lead and cadmium levels from the two market locations (Lagos and Ibadan and parts (wings and thigh muscles. However, significant differences occurred in tetracycline and Pb levels in frozen chicken sourced from Cotonou. Though not significant, tetracycline contents in the thigh muscles of the frozen chicken samples was higher than that of the wings muscles and this was attributed to the site of administration of antibiotic injection and failure to observe the pre-slaughter withdrawal period by the farmers. This study is of public health importance as the presence of these residues above the maximum residue limit in frozen chicken predisposes consumers to drug resistance, allergic reactions and poisoning as a result of toxicity.

  7. Histocompatibility and Long-Term Results of the Follicular Unit-Like Wigs after Xenogeneic Hair Transplantation: An Experimental Study in Rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Yu Sun; Feng Lu; Ge Liu; Zhi-Dan Zhang; Zijie Zhang; Zhi-Qi Hu

    2011-01-01

    Objective. This study was designed to observe the histocompatibility and long-term results of wigs after xenogeneic hair transplantation and to explore the possibility of industrial products in clinical application. Methods. The human hair and melted medical polypropylene were preceded into the follicular unit-like wigs according to the natural follicular unit by extrusion molding. 12 New Zealand rabbits were used as experimental animals for wigs transplantation. The histocompatibility of pol...

  8. Infectious laryngotracheitis virus in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Shan-Chia; Giambrone, Joseph J

    2012-10-12

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is an important respiratory disease of chickens and annually causes significant economic losses in the poultry industry world-wide. ILT virus (ILTV) belongs to alphaherpesvirinae and the Gallid herpesvirus 1 species. The transmission of ILTV is via respiratory and ocular routes. Clinical and post-mortem signs of ILT can be separated into two forms according to its virulence. The characteristic of the severe form is bloody mucus in the trachea with high mortality. The mild form causes nasal discharge, conjunctivitis, and reduced weight gain and egg production. Conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR), nested PCR, real-time PCR, and loop-mediated isothermal amplification were developed to detect ILTV samples from natural or experimentally infected birds. The PCR combined with restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) can separate ILTVs into several genetic groups. These groups can separate vaccine from wild type field viruses. Vaccination is a common method to prevent ILT. However, field isolates and vaccine viruses can establish latent infected carriers. According to PCR-RFLP results, virulent field ILTVs can be derived from modified-live vaccines. Therefore, modified-live vaccine reversion provides a source for ILT outbreaks on chicken farms. Two recently licensed commercial recombinant ILT vaccines are also in use. Other recombinant and gene-deficient vaccine candidates are in the developmental stages. They offer additional hope for the control of this disease. However, in ILT endemic regions, improved biosecurity and management practices are critical for improved ILT control. PMID:24175219

  9. Evaluation of the ejaculate quality of the red jungle fowl, domestic chicken, and bantam chicken in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Malik, Abdul; HARON, Abd Wahid; YUSOFF, Rosnina; NESA, M.; BUKAR, Muhammad; Kasim, Azhar

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the semen quality of 3 chicken breeds: the red jungle fowl, domestic chicken, and bantam chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus). A total of 27 cocks, including 9 cocks each of red jungle fowl, domestic chicken, and bantam chicken, were used in this study. Semen was collected once a week by dorso-abdominal massage method. The semen was evaluated for volume, concentration, motility, live/dead ratio, and percentage abnormalities. There were no significa...

  10. Microbiological Safety of Chicken Litter or Chicken Litter-Based Organic Fertilizers: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao Chen; Xiuping Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Chicken litter or chicken litter-based organic fertilizers are usually recycled into the soil to improve the structure and fertility of agricultural land. As an important source of nutrients for crop production, chicken litter may also contain a variety of human pathogens that can threaten humans who consume the contaminated food or water. Composting can inactivate pathogens while creating a soil amendment beneficial for application to arable agricultural land. Some foodborne pathogens may ha...

  11. Dietary inulin supplementation modifies significantly the liver transcriptomic profile of broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevane, Natalia; Bialade, Federica; Velasco, Susana; Rebolé, Almudena; Rodríguez, Maria Luisa; Ortiz, Luís T; Cañón, Javier; Dunner, Susana

    2014-01-01

    Inclusion of prebiotics in the diet is known to be advantageous, with positive influences both on health and growth. The current study investigated the differences in the hepatic transcriptome profiles between chickens supplemented with inulin (a storage carbohydrate found in many plants) and controls. Liver is a major metabolic organ and has been previously reported to be involved in the modification of the lipid metabolism in chickens fed with inulin. A nutrigenomic approach through the analysis of liver RNA hybridized to the Affymetrix GeneChip Chicken Genome Array identified 148 differentially expressed genes among both groups: 104 up-regulated (≥ 1.4-fold) and 44 down-regulated (≤ 0.6-fold). Quantitative real-time PCR analysis validated the microarray expression results for five out of seven genes tested. The functional annotation analyses revealed a number of genes, processes and pathways with putative involvement in chicken growth and performance, while reinforcing the immune status of animals, and fostering the production of long chain fatty acids in broilers supplemented with 5 g of inulin kg(-1) diet. As far as we are aware, this is the first report of a microarray based gene expression study on the effect of dietary inulin supplementation, supporting further research on the use of this prebiotic on chicken diets as a useful alternative to antibiotics for improving performance and general immunity in poultry farming, along with a healthier meat lipid profile. PMID:24915441

  12. Effect of irradiation on lipid oxidation in eviscerated chicken carcasses during storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxidative changes induced in pectoralis major muscle of chicken after irradiation treatments with 0,6,10 and 20 KGy in both non frozen or frozen conditions during subsequent storage were investigated. Ultraviolet (UV) absorption, peroxides and thiobarbituric reactive substances increased in chicken lipids with increasing irradiation doses. These oxidative changes are greater in irradiated refrigerated (4 ± 1°C) than in irradiated frozen (-20°C) chicken lipids during storage. It was found the peroxides and TBA reactive substances do not accumulate as a stable end products of fat oxidation but reach a maximum during storage followed by gradual declining. The UV absorption provides an objective measure of chicken lipids autoxidation suitable for following the progress of autoxidation of irradiated chicken during subsequent non frozen (4 ± 1°C) or frozen (-20°C) storage. The extent of Maillard-like browning was followed in both unirradiated and irradiated samples during storage. All tested objective parameters correlated well with sensory assessment of odour particularly when irradiation dose was increased as well as in frozen samples

  13. Farmer-driven research on village chicken production in Sanyati, Zimbabwe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies on village chicken production in Sanyati, Zimbabwe, were initiated in 1998. The objective was, in cooperation with the farmers, to find means to improve chicken production by decreasing mortality and increasing growth. The aim is that more chickens should reach slaughter weight. Thus, household consumption and income can be increased. The improvements will facilitate women empowerment since women traditionally are responsible for chicken management. The studies are primarily carried out as on-farm trials but on-station support trials are also conducted. The approach has been practical and multi-factorial, while improvements in management and feeding have been subjects for research. The studies are on-going and, thus, no final results are presented in this paper. All figures shown on mortality and growth should be considered as indications and trends only. However, the results so far have shown that high mortality among young chickens is a major constraint. The causes of mortality are numerous, e.g. predation, diseases, parasites and accidents. (author)

  14. Construction of EGFP-tagged rBCG of E.tenella and distribution in chickens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG QiuYue; LI JianHua; ZHANG XiChen; LIU ChengWu; CAO LiLi; REN KeYan; GONG PengTao; CAI YaNan

    2009-01-01

    Chicken coccidiosis is a major parasitic disease with substantial economic burden to the poultry in-dustry. Enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) tagged recombinant Bacille Calmette-Guerin (rBCG), as a fusion protein with coccidian rhomboid antigen was constructed to track rBCG in vivo in chickens in this study. Immunization of chickens with one dose of rBCG pMV361-Rho/EGFP induced humoral immune response. The colonization of rBCG in liver, spleen, lung, kidney and caecum was observed by laser confocal microscopy. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR showed s rise expression level of rhomboid protein on the 7th day and a peak on the 14th day and disappearance on the 28th day after immunization. These results have significant implications for the development of rBCG vaccines against avian coccidiosis.

  15. Construction of EGFP-tagged rBCG of E.tenella and distribution in chickens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Chicken coccidiosis is a major parasitic disease with substantial economic burden to the poultry industry.Enhanced green fluorescent protein(EGFP) tagged recombinant Bacille Calmette-Guerin(rBCG),as a fusion protein with coccidian rhomboid antigen was constructed to track rBCG in vivo in chickens in this study.Immunization of chickens with one dose of rBCG pMV361-Rho/EGFP induced humoral immune response.The colonization of rBCG in liver,spleen,lung,kidney and caecum was observed by laser confocal microscopy.Real-time quantitative RT-PCR showed a rise expression level of rhomboid protein on the 7th day and a peak on the 14th day and disappearance on the 28th day after immunization.These results have significant implications for the development of rBCG vaccines against avian coccidiosis.

  16. Carcass and meat quality traits of chickens fed diets concurrently supplemented with vitamins C and E under constant heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeferino, C P; Komiyama, C M; Pelícia, V C; Fascina, V B; Aoyagi, M M; Coutinho, L L; Sartori, J R; Moura, A S A M T

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if a diet supplemented simultaneously with vitamins C and E would alleviate the negative effects of heat stress, applied between 28 and 42 days of age, on performance, carcass and meat quality traits of broiler chickens. A total of 384 male broiler chickens were assigned to a completely randomized design, with a 2×3 factorial arrangement (diet with or without vitamin supplementation and two ambient temperatures plus a pair-feeding group) and 16 replicates. Chickens were kept in thermoneutral conditions up to 28 days of age. They were then housed in groups of four per cage, in three environmentally controlled chambers: two thermoneutral (22.5 and 22.6°C) and one for heat stress (32°C). Half the chickens were fed a diet supplemented with vitamins C (257 to 288 mg/kg) and E (93 to 109 mg/kg). In the thermoneutral chambers, half of the chickens were pair-fed to heat stressed chickens, receiving each day the average feed intake recorded in the heat stress chamber in the previous day. Meat physical quality analyses were performed on the pectoralis major muscle. No ambient temperature×diet supplementation interaction effects were detected on performance, carcass, or meat quality traits. The supplemented diet resulted in lower growth performance, attributed either to a carry-over effect of the lower initial BW, or to a possible catabolic effect of vitamins C and E when supplemented simultaneously at high levels. Heat stress reduced slaughter and carcass weights, average daily gain and feed intake, and increased feed conversion. Growth performance of pair-fed chickens was similar to that of heat stressed chickens. Exposure to heat stress increased carcass and abdominal fat percentages, but reduced breast, liver and heart percentages. Pair-fed chickens showed the lowest fat percentage and their breast percentage was similar to controls. Heat stress increased meat pH and negatively affected meat color and cooking loss. In pair

  17. Conservation of minor histocompatibility antigens between human and non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Haan, J M; Bontrop, R E; Pool, J; Sherman, N; Blokland, E; Engelhard, V H; Hunt, D F; Goulmy, E

    1996-11-01

    It is well accepted that minor histocompatibility antigens (mHag) can function as transplantation barriers between HLA-matched individuals. Little is known about the molecular nature and evolutionary conservation of mHag. It is only very recently that the first human mHag were identified. The HLA-A2.1-restricted mHag HA-2 and the HLA-B7-restricted mHag H-Y appeared to be peptides derived from polymorphic self proteins. Here we show that the HLA-A2.1-restricted mHag HA-1, HA-2, and the H-Y peptides are conserved between man, chimpanzees and rhesus macaques. Human cytotoxic T cell clones specific for the HLA-A2.1-restricted mHag HA-1, HA-2, and H-Y recognized HLA-A2.1 gene-transfected chimpanzee and rhesus macaque cells. High-pressure liquid chromatography fractionation of HLA-A2.1-bound peptides isolated from the HLA-A2.1-transfected chimpanzee cells revealed that the chimpanzee HA-1 and HA-2 co-eluted with the human HA-1 and HA-2. Subsequent amino acid sequencing showed that the chimpanzee HA-2 peptide is identical to the human HA-2 peptide. Our functional and biochemical results demonstrate that mHag peptides are conserved for over 35 million years. PMID:8921955

  18. Proteogenomic-based discovery of minor histocompatibility antigens with suitable features for immunotherapy of hematologic cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados, D P; Rodenbrock, A; Laverdure, J-P; Côté, C; Caron-Lizotte, O; Carli, C; Pearson, H; Janelle, V; Durette, C; Bonneil, E; Roy, D C; Delisle, J-S; Lemieux, S; Thibault, P; Perreault, C

    2016-06-01

    Pre-clinical studies have shown that injection of allogeneic T cells primed against a single minor histocompatibility antigen (MiHA) could cure hematologic cancers (HC) without causing any toxicity to the host. However, translation of this approach in humans has been hampered by the paucity of molecularly defined human MiHAs. Using a novel proteogenomic approach, we have analyzed cells from 13 volunteers and discovered a vast repertoire of MiHAs presented by the most common HLA haplotype in European Americans: HLA-A*02:01;B*44:03. Notably, out of >6000 MiHAs, we have identified a set of 39 MiHAs that share optimal features for immunotherapy of HCs. These 'optimal MiHAs' are coded by common alleles of genes that are preferentially expressed in hematopoietic cells. Bioinformatic modeling based on MiHA allelic frequencies showed that the 39 optimal MiHAs would enable MiHA-targeted immunotherapy of practically all HLA-A*02:01;B*44:03 patients. Further extension of this strategy to a few additional HLA haplotypes would allow treatment of almost all patients. PMID:26857467

  19. Developmental cell death programs license cytotoxic cells to eliminate histocompatible partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corey, Daniel M; Rosental, Benyamin; Kowarsky, Mark; Sinha, Rahul; Ishizuka, Katherine J; Palmeri, Karla J; Quake, Stephen R; Voskoboynik, Ayelet; Weissman, Irving L

    2016-06-01

    In a primitive chordate model of natural chimerism, one chimeric partner is often eliminated in a process of allogeneic resorption. Here, we identify the cellular framework underlying loss of tolerance to one partner within a natural Botryllus schlosseri chimera. We show that the principal cell type mediating chimeric partner elimination is a cytotoxic morula cell (MC). Proinflammatory, developmental cell death programs render MCs cytotoxic and, in collaboration with activated phagocytes, eliminate chimeric partners during the "takeover" phase of blastogenic development. Among these genes, the proinflammatory cytokine IL-17 enhances cytotoxicity in allorecognition assays. Cellular transfer of FACS-purified MCs from allogeneic donors into recipients shows that the resorption response can be adoptively acquired. Transfer of 1 × 10(5) allogeneic MCs eliminated 33 of 78 (42%) recipient primary buds and 20 of 76 (20.5%) adult parental adult organisms (zooids) by 14 d whereas transfer of allogeneic cell populations lacking MCs had only minimal effects on recipient colonies. Furthermore, reactivity of transferred cells coincided with the onset of developmental-regulated cell death programs and disproportionately affected developing tissues within a chimera. Among chimeric partner "losers," severe developmental defects were observed in asexually propagating tissues, reflecting a pathologic switch in gene expression in developmental programs. These studies provide evidence that elimination of one partner in a chimera is an immune cell-based rejection that operates within histocompatible pairs and that maximal allogeneic responses involve the coordination of both phagocytic programs and the "arming" of cytotoxic cells. PMID:27217570

  20. Regulation of delayed-type hypersensitivity: VI. Antigen-specific suppressor T cells and suppressor factor for delayed-type hypersensitivity to histocompatibility antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mice develop highly significant levels of delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) to major and minor histocompatibility antigens when injected s.c. with lymphoid cells from X-irradiated allogeneic donors. However, when mice are inoculated i.v. with a high dose of X-irradiated allogeneic lymphoid cells, they not only fail to develop DTH to the allogeneic cells, but their ability to respond to an immunogenic challenge of the alloantigens is also significantly depressed. This suppression is adoptively transferable by antigen-specific suppressor T cells and not by immune serum. Cell surface phenotypic analysis shows that the primary suppressor cells for alloantigens are Thy-1+, Lyt-1+2-, and Ia-, whereas the secondary suppressor cells appearing after boosting injection are Thy-+, Lyt-1+2+, and Ia-. These suppressor T (Ts) cells localize in the lymphoid organs shortly after their induction and are largely absent from the spleen or lymph node 1 month later.However, ''suppressor memory'' can be recalled by an immunogenic dose of alloantigens which would normally induce DTH effector cells rather than suppressor cells in naive mice. When the suppressor cells were cultured in vitro for 48 hr, the supernatant contained suppressive activity. It appears likely that the manifestation of the suppressor cells is via soluble, antigen-specific suppressor factor(s), the production of which is dependent on viable T cells

  1. Clodronate treatment significantly depletes macrophages in chickens

    OpenAIRE

    Kameka, Amber M.; Haddadi, Siamak; Jamaldeen, Fathima Jesreen; Moinul, Prima; He, Xiao T.; Nawazdeen, Fathima Hafsa P.; Bonfield, Stephan; Sharif, Shayan; van Rooijen, Nico; Abdul-Careem, Mohamed Faizal

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages function as phagocytes and antigen-presenting cells in the body. As has been demonstrated in mammals, administration of clodronate [dichloromethylene bisphosphonate (Cl2MBP)] encapsulated liposomes results in depletion of macrophages. Although this compound has been used in chickens, its effectiveness in depleting macrophages has yet to be fully determined. Here, we show that a single administration of clodronate liposomes to chickens results in a significant depletion of macropha...

  2. Genetic improvement in indigenous chicken of Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Woldegiorgiss, W.E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Wondmeneh Esatu Woldegiorgiss (2015). Genetic improvement in indigenous chicken of Ethiopia. PhD thesis, Wageningen University, the Netherlands This thesis considered various approaches to study the potential for improvement of village poultry production system using improved indigenous chicken. The approaches were structured survey questionnaire, village poultry simulation model (VIPOSIM), Heckman two-step model (econometric model), and experiments involving laboratory and field. Fi...

  3. Molecular genetics of chicken egg quality

    OpenAIRE

    Honkatukia, Mervi

    2010-01-01

    Faultless quality in eggs is important in all production steps, from chicken to packaging, transportation, storage, and finally to the consumer. The egg industry (specifically transportation and packing) is interested in robustness, the consumer in safety and taste, and the chicken itself in the reproductive performance of the egg. High quality is commercially profitable, and egg quality is currently one of the key traits in breeding goals. In conventional breeding schemes, the more traits th...

  4. The chicken gene nomenclature committee report

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Comparative genomics is an essential component of the post-genomic era. The chicken genome is the first avian genome to be sequenced and it will serve as a model for other avian species. Moreover, due to its unique evolutionary niche, the chicken genome can be used to understand evolution of functional elements and gene regulation in mammalian species. However comparative biology both within avian species and within amniotes is hampered due to the difficulty of recognising functional ortholog...

  5. Flavour Chemistry of Chicken Meat: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Jayasena, Dinesh D.; Ahn, Dong Uk; Nam, Ki Chang; Jo, Cheorun

    2013-01-01

    Flavour comprises mainly of taste and aroma and is involved in consumers’ meat-buying behavior and preferences. Chicken meat flavour is supposed to be affected by a number of ante- and post-mortem factors, including breed, diet, post-mortem ageing, method of cooking, etc. Additionally, chicken meat is more susceptible to quality deterioration mainly due to lipid oxidation with resulting off-flavours. Therefore, the intent of this paper is to highlight the mechanisms and chemical compounds res...

  6. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of chicken anaemia virus obtained from backyard and commercial chickens in Nigeria : research communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.O. Oluwayelu

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This work reports the first molecular analysis study of chicken anaemia virus (CAV in backyard chickens in Africa using molecular cloning and sequence analysis to characterize CAV strains obtained from commercial chickens and Nigerian backyard chickens. Partial VP1 gene sequences were determined for three CAVs from commercial chickens and for six CAV variants present in samples from a backyard chicken. Multiple alignment analysis revealed that the 6 % and 4 % nucleotide diversity obtained respectively for the commercial and backyard chicken strains translated to only 2 % amino acid diversity for each breed. Overall, the amino acid composition of Nigerian CAVs was found to be highly conserved. Since the partial VP1 gene sequence of two backyard chicken cloned CAV strains (NGR/Cl-8 and NGR/Cl-9 were almost identical and evolutionarily closely related to the commercial chicken strains NGR-1, and NGR-4 and NGR-5, respectively, we concluded that CAV infections had crossed the farm boundary.

  7. Campylobacter jejuni strains of human and chicken origin are invasive in chickens after oral challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Katrine Nørrelund; Bang, Dang Duong; Andresen, Lars Ole; Madsen, Mogens

    2006-01-01

    associated with the Guillain Barre Syndrome (GBS) in humans. The minimum dose for establishing colonization in the clay-old chickens was approximately 2 cfu, whereas two- to threefold higher doses were required for establishing colonization in the 14-day-old chickens. Two of the C jejuni strains were shown...

  8. Microbiological Safety of Chicken Litter or Chicken Litter-Based Organic Fertilizers: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chicken litter or chicken litter-based organic fertilizers are usually recycled into the soil to improve the structure and fertility of agricultural land. As an important source of nutrients for crop production, chicken litter may also contain a variety of human pathogens that can threaten humans who consume the contaminated food or water. Composting can inactivate pathogens while creating a soil amendment beneficial for application to arable agricultural land. Some foodborne pathogens may have the potential to survive for long periods of time in raw chicken litter or its composted products after land application, and a small population of pathogenic cells may even regrow to high levels when the conditions are favorable for growth. Thermal processing is a good choice for inactivating pathogens in chicken litter or chicken litter-based organic fertilizers prior to land application. However, some populations may become acclimatized to a hostile environment during build-up or composting and develop heat resistance through cross-protection during subsequent high temperature treatment. Therefore, this paper reviews currently available information on the microbiological safety of chicken litter or chicken litter-based organic fertilizers, and discusses about further research on developing novel and effective disinfection techniques, including physical, chemical, and biological treatments, as an alternative to current methods.

  9. Comparative advantage of the use of a thermostable vaccine in the protection of rural chickens against Newcastle disease in Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rural poultry production systems in Ghana and in Africa as a whole face a number of both health and husbandry problems which greatly limit their improvement. In the survey carried out earlier to highlight these problems, Newcastle disease (ND) was acknowledged as the major constraint. Other constraints included diseases such as fowl pox, endo- and ecto-parasites. Poor husbandry practices such as lack of proper housing, resulting in high incidence of predation, and insufficient supplementary feeding are other factors that have further limited the production potential of the rural chicken. The improvement of rural chicken production in Ghana therefore requires a holistic approach focusing on both health and husbandry practices. This paper presents the results of a study to compare the effectiveness of a thermostable, live vaccine (ND I-2) and an oil-adjuvant inactivated vaccine (virus strain Brescia) in the protection of rural chickens against virulent ND. The I-2 ND vaccine when administered twice (three weeks apart) via eye drop was found to be equally as effective as the oil-adjuvant inactivated vaccine in the control of ND in rural chickens. Partial budget studies indicated that ND control interventions yielded a very high return. For many years, the oil-adjuvant inactivated vaccine has been used in the protection of rural chickens against ND. However, vaccination coverage has always been very low resulting in insignificant protection of the rural chicken flocks with the consequent annual high mortalities of the birds due to ND. (author)

  10. Backyard chickens in the United States: a survey of flock owners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkhoraibi, C; Blatchford, R A; Pitesky, M E; Mench, J A

    2014-11-01

    Although it has become increasingly popular to keep backyard chickens in the United States, few studies have provided information about these flocks. An online survey of backyard chicken owners was conducted, advertised through Master Gardeners' websites, social platforms, and other sites. The survey had 56 questions about flock history, husbandry, health care, and owner attitudes and demographics. Surveys received (n = 1,487) came almost equally from urban, suburban, and rural areas. Most (71%) respondents owned fewer than 10 chickens and had kept chickens for less than 5 yr (70%). Major reasons for keeping chickens were as food for home use (95%), gardening partners (63%), pets (57%), or a combination of these. Rural respondents had larger flocks (P ≤ 0.001) and were more likely to keep chickens as a source of income or for show (P ≤ 0.001) than urban and suburban respondents. Owners thought that eggs/meat from their chickens were more nutritious (86%), safer to consume (84%), and tasted better (95%) than store-bought products, and also that the health and welfare of their chickens was better (95%) than on commercial farms. The majority (59%) indicated no flock health problems in the last 12 mo. However, there was a lack of awareness about some poultry health conditions. Many knew either little or nothing about exotic Newcastle or Marek's disease, and most (61%) did not vaccinate against Marek's. Respondents wanted to learn more about various flock management topics, especially how to detect (64%) and treat (66%) health problems. The Internet was the main source of information (87%) used by backyard flock owners, followed by books/magazines (62%) and feed stores (40%). Minimizing predation was the most cited challenge (49%), followed by providing adequate feed at low cost (28%), dealing with soil management (25%), and complying with zoning regulations (23%). The evidence obtained from this survey will help to determine what information and resources are

  11. Autosomal minor histocompatibility antigens; How genetic variants create diversity in immune targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke eGriffioen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT can be a curative treatment for hematological malignancies. Unfortunately, the desired anti-tumor or Graft-versus-Leukemia (GvL effect is often accompanied with undesired side effects against healthy tissues known as Graft-versus-Host Disease (GvHD. After HLA-matched alloSCT, GvL and GvHD are both mediated by donor-derived T-cells recognizing polymorphic peptides presented by HLA surface molecules on patient cells. These polymorphic peptides or minor histocompatibility antigens (MiHA are produced by genetic differences between patient and donor. Since polymorphic peptides may be useful targets to manipulate the balance between GvL and GvHD, the dominant repertoire of MiHA needs to be discovered. In this review, the diversity of autosomal MiHA characterized thus far as well as the various molecular mechanisms by which genetic variants create immune targets and the role of cryptic transcripts and proteins as antigen sources are described. The tissue distribution of MiHA as important factor in GvL and GvHD is considered as well as possibilities how hematopoietic MiHA can be used for immunotherapy to augment GvL after alloSCT. Although more MiHA are still needed for comprehensive understanding of the biology of GvL and GvHD and manipulation by immunotherapy, this review shows insight into the composition and kinetics of in vivo immune responses with respect to specificity, diversity and frequency of specific T-cells and surface expression of HLA-peptide complexes and other (accessory molecules on the target cell. A complex interplay between these factors and their environment ultimately determines the spectrum of clinical manifestations caused by immune responses after alloSCT.

  12. Autosomal Minor Histocompatibility Antigens: How Genetic Variants Create Diversity in Immune Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffioen, Marieke; van Bergen, Cornelis A M; Falkenburg, J H Frederik

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) can be a curative treatment for hematological malignancies. Unfortunately, the desired anti-tumor or graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effect is often accompanied with undesired side effects against healthy tissues known as graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). After HLA-matched alloSCT, GvL and GvHD are both mediated by donor-derived T-cells recognizing polymorphic peptides presented by HLA surface molecules on patient cells. These polymorphic peptides or minor histocompatibility antigens (MiHA) are produced by genetic differences between patient and donor. Since polymorphic peptides may be useful targets to manipulate the balance between GvL and GvHD, the dominant repertoire of MiHA needs to be discovered. In this review, the diversity of autosomal MiHA characterized thus far as well as the various molecular mechanisms by which genetic variants create immune targets and the role of cryptic transcripts and proteins as antigen sources are described. The tissue distribution of MiHA as important factor in GvL and GvHD is considered as well as possibilities how hematopoietic MiHA can be used for immunotherapy to augment GvL after alloSCT. Although more MiHA are still needed for comprehensive understanding of the biology of GvL and GvHD and manipulation by immunotherapy, this review shows insight into the composition and kinetics of in vivo immune responses with respect to specificity, diversity, and frequency of specific T-cells and surface expression of HLA-peptide complexes and other (accessory) molecules on the target cell. A complex interplay between these factors and their environment ultimately determines the spectrum of clinical manifestations caused by immune responses after alloSCT. PMID:27014279

  13. Effect of antibiotic, Lacto-lase and probiotic addition in chicken feed on protein and fat content of chicken meat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhar, Noor Amiza; Abdullah, Aminah

    2015-09-01

    This research was conducted to investigate the effect of chicken feed additives (antibiotic, Lacto-lase® and probiotic) on protein and fat content of chicken meat. Chicken fed with control diet (corn-soy based diet) served as a control. The treated diets were added with zinc bacitracin (antibiotic), different amount of Lacto-lase® (a mixture of probiotic and enzyme) and probiotic. Chicken were slaughtered at the age of 43-48 days. Each chicken was divided into thigh, breast, drumstick, drumette and wing. Protein content in chicken meat was determined by using macro-Kjeldahl method meanwhile Soxhlet method was used to analyse fat content. The result of the study showed that the protein content of chicken breast was significantly higher (p≤0.05) while thigh had the lowest protein content (p≤0.05). Antibiotic fed chicken was found to have the highest protein content among the treated chickens but there was no significant different with 2g/kg Lacto-lase® fed chicken (p>0.05). All thighs were significantly higher (p≤0.05) in fat content except for drumette of control chicken while breast contained the lowest fat content compared to other chicken parts studied. The control chicken meat contained significantly higher (p≤0.05) amount of fat compared to the other treated chickens. Chicken fed with 2g/kg Lacto-lase® had the lowest (p≤0.05) fat content. The result of this study indicated that the addition of Lacto-lase® as a replacement of antibiotic in chicken feed will not affect the content of protein and fat of chicken meat.

  14. MCU-Based Solar Powered Chicken Feeder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elenor M. Reyes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Poultry is a great potential industry particularly in Batangas Province. The method of feeding chicken needs to be considered as chicken must be fed regularly to be more productive. The conventional method of feeding chicken is the need to continuously provide the food, be alert and conscious on the food remaining in cages and to feed the chickens in a correct period of time to avoid the decline of the production. Growers also find it difficult to manage their businesses effectively because they need to be around the cages every now and then to monitor the poultry. Timing and exactness are the key to provide a uniform time in feeding the chickens. This will benefit the owner of the business in terms of time and effort. Another advantage of this project is in terms of savings to the owner of the poultry business. This technology was designed to automatically feed chickens at a given period of time and to give alarm when the feeds are running out of supply. The power to be supplied to this prototype will be drawn from the sun by means of solar panels and will be stored in typical car battery. The feeds will be stored in a container and evenly distributed by using a conveyor to the feeding basin of the poultry. It will be more efficient than manual conventional way of feeding because less effort will be needed in feeding the chickens and less feeds will be wasted. In addition to that, the stored power can also be used for lighting purposes for the growers to save energy and energy bills.

  15. Probiotic and Acetic Acid Effect on Broiler Chickens Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Martin Král; Mária Angelovičová; Ľubica Mrázová; Jana Tkáčová; Martin Kliment

    2011-01-01

    Probiotics and organic acids are widely accepted as an alternative to in-feed antibiotics in poultry production. We carried the experiment with broiler chickens. In experiment we research effect of probiotic and acetic acids on the performance of broiler chickens. A total number of 200 one day old broiler chickens were distributed to two dietary groups. Broiler chickens in control group were fed with standard feed mixture and experimental group 1% vinegar contained 5% acetic acid used in drin...

  16. RAW CHICKEN LEG AND BREAST SENSORY EVALUATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavian Baston

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the paper we presented a method of sensorial evaluation for chicken meat (red and white. This is a descriptive method of analysis. It was perform with trained assessors for chicken refrigerated raw meat organoleptical evaluation. The sensorial attributes considered were: external aspect of anatomical part of chicken analyzed by slime, the surface odor, the skin and muscle color and muscular elasticity. Color was determined for the skin and white and red muscles. Our scale of analysis is formed by three values that characterize each quality attribute. The trained assessor appreciated the sensorial quality of raw anatomical part of chicken as excellent, acceptable and unacceptable. The objectives were: to establish the sensorial attributes to be analyzed for each type of muscular fiber, to describe the quality of each considered attribute and to realize a sensorial scale of quantification for the considered sensorial attributes. Our purpose was to determine the quality of the red and white refrigerated raw chicken anatomical parts (respectively for legs and breasts after one week of storage.

  17. A chicken consultation with ramifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opitz, John M

    2005-04-15

    In Madison I once worked with two postdoctoral fellows who had spent their youth in New York City and who, when asked what birds they knew both responded "why, pigeons and LBJ's!" (little brown jobbies). Despite their undoubted brilliance, they clearly had an educational deficiency not fixed by buying eggs and poultry at a grocery store. Though of enormous economic and nutritional importance to humans, turkeys and chickens constitute only a minute fraction of the disappearing avian life in our ecology. One could easily teach an entire middle or high school biology course around the reproduction, embryology, evolution, genetics, anatomy, special adaptations, virology, bacteriology, taxonomy, behavior, and extinctions of birds, as paradigmatic of all of life. Where would developmental or evolutionary biology be without the Galapagos finches, chick embryo, or neurobiology without the Zebra Finch? The modifications of the original red jungle fowl of India and South East Asia into hundreds of races through artificial selection and breeding practices provide as beautiful an example of developmental plasticity, well-known to Darwin, as the domestic dog, cat, laboratory mice, and guinea pigs. In what follows I have begun to repay my indebtedness to my mentor Emil Witschi who introduced me to developmental biology, physiology, and genetics and its historical study on the basis of birds (and amphibians); and to Mark Leppert, Professor of Human Genetics at the University of Utah for collaborative support, and bird-watching fieldtrips. PMID:15666310

  18. Role of the H-2 complex in the induction of T cell tolerance to self minor histocompatibility antigens

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    The present study has utilized cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses specific for minor histocompatibility (minor H) antigens as an experimental approach to determining whether recognition of self MHC determinants is involved in the induction of T cell tolerance to self antigens. It was observed that C3H.SW splenic T cells from C3H.SW leads to B10 X B10.BR radiation bone marrow chimeras contained CTL precursors (pCTL) reactive against self C3H minor H antigens + H-2k but were tolerant to sel...

  19. Effects of Hypoxia on Activities of GPx, GSR and GST in Tibet Chicken and Silky Chicken Hearts

    OpenAIRE

    J. Y. Li; H.G. Bao

    2011-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate whether differences exist in activities of Glutathione Peroxidase (GPx), Glutathione Reductase (GSR) and Glutathione S-transferase (GST) in hearts between Tibet chicken and a lowland chicken breed (Silky chicken). At the end of 5 days of age, 24 chicklings of each breed were divided into 3 groups treated with three different oxygen concentrations, respectively for 20 h. Activities of the three enzymes in chicken hearts were determined spectrophotometric...

  20. Correlation Analysis on Single Nucleotide Polymorphism of CAPN1 Gene and Meat Quality and Carcass Traits in Chickens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zeng-rong; ZHU Qing; LIU Yi-ping

    2007-01-01

    The selection of meat quality has received considerable focus in chicken breeding. This study was aimed at investigating the effect of CAPN1 gene on meat quality traits in chicken populations. Primer pairs for 3'UTR in CAPN1 were designed from database of chicken genomic sequence. Polymorphisms were detected using PCR-SSCP and DNA sequencing. A mutation at position 9 950 nt (G/A, locus A) was found among individuals in each population. The allele and genotype frequencies significantly differed among eight lines with higher frequencies of allele A2 and genotype A1A2 (P<0.01). The least square analysis showed that there was significant difference (P<0.05) in muscle fiber density and some carcass traits among genotypes and that the breast muscle fiber density (BFD) of birds of A1A1 genotype was significantly higher (P<0.05) than that of birds of A2A2 genotype. It was concluded that the CAPN1 gene was the major gene affecting the muscle fiber traits of chicken or was linked with the major gene. These results were useful for studying the molecular mechanism that influences meat traits and were used as the base of molecular-assisted selection to meat quality traits. So, this site may be a potential marker affecting the muscle traits of chickens.

  1. Studies On Quality Criteria For Irradiated Breaded Chicken Breast Fillets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quality criteria of irradiated breaded chicken breast fillets were studied. Fresh boneless and skinless breaded chicken breast meats samples were divided into four separate batches and packed in plastic bags and sealed by an impulse sealer. Samples in plastic bags were exposed to different doses of gamma irradiation (2.5, 5 and 7 kGy) at ambient temperature. Just after irradiation, the samples were stored at 4 ±10C. All samples were evaluated for microbiological, chemical and sensorial properties after irradiation and throughout the storage periods. During storage, the total bacterial count was significantly increased (P<0.05) in all samples with higher rates of increase in non-irradiated samples. In all irradiated samples, Staphylococcus aureus did not detected up to 6 days then detected after 22 days in samples treated with 2.5 kGy as well as 31 days in samples treated with 5 kGy. On the other hand, Staphylococcus aureus was detected after 45 days in samples treated with 7 kGy. Salmonella sp., Listeria monocytogenes and Campylobacter jejuni could not detected in untreated and treated samples. The protein content showed significant decrease immediately after irradiation and during the refrigerated storage. The TVN values for non-irradiated samples were significantly higher (P<0.05) than irradiated samples. The present data showed significant decrease (P<0.05) in protein solubility percentages of irradiated samples at day 0 and 6 of refrigerated storage. The observed decrease was related to the increase of radiation dose. At the end of storage period (62 days), 2.5 kGy samples were significantly higher in TBA values than other irradiated samples. On the other hand, irradiation was significantly reduced (P<0.05) the amount of major mono unsaturated and poly unsaturated fatty acids. Sensory attributes of breaded chicken breast fillets did not affected by irradiation. It could be concluded that irradiation dose of 5 kGy can be used in chicken samples stored in

  2. Aetheroleum and fat oxidation of chicken meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Tkáčová

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available 1024x768 The quality of meat changges during storage. The experiment was performed on the final fattening type of chickens COBB 500. Chickens were fed by feed mixture with   aetheroleum. Premix of aetheroleum  contained  aetheroleum from Origanum vulgare L. (30 g, Thymus vulgaris L. (10 g and Cinnamomum zeylanicum (10 g. The carcass was stored at -18 °C in a freezer box. Acid number of fat in chicken meat was ranged from 4.74 to 14.57 mg KOH/g fat after 9 months and after 12 months was ranged from 5.75 to 9.11 mg KOH/g fat.doi:10.5219/267   Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE

  3. Toxigenic penicillia spoiling frozen chicken nuggets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigmann, Evelin Francine; Saccomori, Fernanda; Bernardi, Angelica Olivier;

    2015-01-01

    since mold can develop when frozen foods are allowed to attain temperatures of -10ºC, or above. The growth of fungi on the food surface results in economic losses and represents a hazard to public health due to the possibility of mycotoxin production. The aim of this study was to identify the species of......Frozen chicken nuggets are classified as pre-prepared frozen meals. These products are convenient to consumers as they are easy to prepare and allow for long storage by freezing. Over the years, spoilage of frozen food products caused by fungi has been a continual problem for the food industry...... filamentous fungi involved in the spoilage of frozen chicken nuggets and determine their ability to produce mycotoxins under laboratorial conditions. A total of 7 samples of frozen chicken nuggets were analyzed by dilution plating in potato dextrose agar (PDA). These products had been returned by customers...

  4. The Early Stages of Heart Development: Insights from Chicken Embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes G. Wittig

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The heart is the first functioning organ in the developing embryo and a detailed understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in its formation provides insights into congenital malformations affecting its function and therefore the survival of the organism. Because many developmental mechanisms are highly conserved, it is possible to extrapolate from observations made in invertebrate and vertebrate model organisms to humans. This review will highlight the contributions made through studying heart development in avian embryos, particularly the chicken. The major advantage of chick embryos is their accessibility for surgical manipulation and functional interference approaches, both gain- and loss-of-function. In addition to experiments performed in ovo, the dissection of tissues for ex vivo culture, genomic, or biochemical approaches is straightforward. Furthermore, embryos can be cultured for time-lapse imaging, which enables tracking of fluorescently labeled cells and detailed analysis of tissue morphogenesis. Owing to these features, investigations in chick embryos have led to important discoveries, often complementing genetic studies in mice and zebrafish. As well as including some historical aspects, we cover here some of the crucial advances made in understanding early heart development using the chicken model.

  5. Prediction of chicken quality attributes by near infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbin, Douglas Fernandes; Kaminishikawahara, Cintia Midori; Soares, Adriana Lourenco; Mizubuti, Ivone Yurika; Grespan, Moises; Shimokomaki, Massami; Hirooka, Elisa Yoko

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, near-infrared (NIR) reflectance was tested as a potential technique to predict quality attributes of chicken breast (Pectoralis major). Spectra in the wavelengths between 400 and 2500nm were analysed using principal component analysis (PCA) and quality attributes were predicted using partial least-squares regression (PLSR). PCA performed on NIR dataset revealed the influence of muscle reflectance (L(∗)) influencing the spectra. PCA was not successful to completely discriminate between pale, soft and exudative (PSE) and pale-only muscles. High-quality PLSR were obtained for L(∗) and pH models predicted individually (R(2)CV of 0.91 and 0.81, and SECV of 1.99 and 0.07, respectively). Water-holding capacity was the most challenging attribute to determine (R(2)CV of 0.70 and SECV of 2.40%). Sample mincing and different spectra pre-treatments were not necessary to maximise the predictive performance of models. Results suggest that NIR spectroscopy can become useful tool for quality assessment of chicken meat. PMID:25172747

  6. Metabolism of Deoxynivalenol and Deepoxy-Deoxynivalenol in Broiler Chickens, Pullets, Roosters and Turkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi E. Schwartz-Zimmermann

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Recently, deoxynivalenol-3-sulfate (DON-3-sulfate was proposed as a major DON metabolite in poultry. In the present work, the first LC-MS/MS based method for determination of DON-3-sulfate, deepoxy-DON-3-sulfate (DOM-3-sulfate, DON, DOM, DON sulfonates 1, 2, 3, and DOM sulfonate 2 in excreta samples of chickens and turkeys was developed and validated. To this end, DOM-3-sulfate was chemically synthesized and characterized by NMR and LC-HR-MS/MS measurements. Application of the method to excreta and chyme samples of four feeding trials with turkeys, chickens, pullets, and roosters confirmed DON-3-sulfate as the major DON metabolite in all poultry species studied. Analogously to DON-3-sulfate, DOM-3-sulfate was formed after oral administration of DOM both in turkeys and in chickens. In addition, pullets and roosters metabolized DON into DOM-3-sulfate. In vitro transcription/translation assays revealed DOM-3-sulfate to be 2000 times less toxic on the ribosome than DON. Biological recoveries of DON and DOM orally administered to broiler chickens, turkeys, and pullets were 74%–106% (chickens, 51%–72% (roosters, and 131%–151% (pullets. In pullets, DON-3-sulfate concentrations increased from jejunum chyme samples to excreta samples by a factor of 60. This result, put into context with earlier studies, indicates fast and efficient absorption of DON between crop and jejunum, conversion to DON-3-sulfate in intestinal mucosa, liver, and possibly kidney, and rapid elimination into excreta via bile and urine.

  7. Facilitating functional annotation of chicken microarray data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gresham Cathy R

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modeling results from chicken microarray studies is challenging for researchers due to little functional annotation associated with these arrays. The Affymetrix GenChip chicken genome array, one of the biggest arrays that serve as a key research tool for the study of chicken functional genomics, is among the few arrays that link gene products to Gene Ontology (GO. However the GO annotation data presented by Affymetrix is incomplete, for example, they do not show references linked to manually annotated functions. In addition, there is no tool that facilitates microarray researchers to directly retrieve functional annotations for their datasets from the annotated arrays. This costs researchers amount of time in searching multiple GO databases for functional information. Results We have improved the breadth of functional annotations of the gene products associated with probesets on the Affymetrix chicken genome array by 45% and the quality of annotation by 14%. We have also identified the most significant diseases and disorders, different types of genes, and known drug targets represented on Affymetrix chicken genome array. To facilitate functional annotation of other arrays and microarray experimental datasets we developed an Array GO Mapper (AGOM tool to help researchers to quickly retrieve corresponding functional information for their dataset. Conclusion Results from this study will directly facilitate annotation of other chicken arrays and microarray experimental datasets. Researchers will be able to quickly model their microarray dataset into more reliable biological functional information by using AGOM tool. The disease, disorders, gene types and drug targets revealed in the study will allow researchers to learn more about how genes function in complex biological systems and may lead to new drug discovery and development of therapies. The GO annotation data generated will be available for public use via AgBase website and

  8. Tissue-Specific Expression of the Chicken Calpain2 Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Qing Zhu; Yi-Ping Liu; Xiao-Cheng Li; Hua-Rui Du; Xiao-Song Jiang; Zeng-Rong Zhang

    2010-01-01

    We quantified chicken calpain 2 (CAPN2) expression in two Chinese chicken breeds (mountainous black-bone chicken breed [MB] and a commercial meat type chicken breed [S01]) to discern the tissue and ontogenic expression pattern and its effect on muscle metabolism. Real-time quantitative PCR assay was developed for accurate measurement of the CAPN2 mRNA expression in various tissues from chickens of different ages (0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 weeks). Results showed that the breast muscle and leg ...

  9. Butyrate enhances disease resistance of chickens by inducing antimicrobial host defense peptide gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunkara, Lakshmi T; Achanta, Mallika; Schreiber, Nicole B; Bommineni, Yugendar R; Dai, Gan; Jiang, Weiyu; Lamont, Susan; Lillehoj, Hyun S; Beker, Ali; Teeter, Robert G; Zhang, Guolong

    2011-01-01

    Host defense peptides (HDPs) constitute a large group of natural broad-spectrum antimicrobials and an important first line of immunity in virtually all forms of life. Specific augmentation of synthesis of endogenous HDPs may represent a promising antibiotic-alternative approach to disease control. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that exogenous administration of butyrate, a major type of short-chain fatty acids derived from bacterial fermentation of undigested dietary fiber, is capable of inducing HDPs and enhancing disease resistance in chickens. We have found that butyrate is a potent inducer of several, but not all, chicken HDPs in HD11 macrophages as well as in primary monocytes, bone marrow cells, and jejuna and cecal explants. In addition, butyrate treatment enhanced the antibacterial activity of chicken monocytes against Salmonella enteritidis, with a minimum impact on inflammatory cytokine production, phagocytosis, and oxidative burst capacities of the cells. Furthermore, feed supplementation with 0.1% butyrate led to a significant increase in HDP gene expression in the intestinal tract of chickens. More importantly, such a feeding strategy resulted in a nearly 10-fold reduction in the bacterial titer in the cecum following experimental infections with S. enteritidis. Collectively, the results indicated that butyrate-induced synthesis of endogenous HDPs is a phylogenetically conserved mechanism of innate host defense shared by mammals and aves, and that dietary supplementation of butyrate has potential for further development as a convenient antibiotic-alternative strategy to enhance host innate immunity and disease resistance. PMID:22073293

  10. Genetical Genomics of Behavior: A Novel Chicken Genomic Model for Anxiety Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsson, Martin; Williams, Michael J; Jensen, Per; Wright, Dominic

    2016-01-01

    The identification of genetic variants responsible for behavioral variation is an enduring goal in biology, with wide-scale ramifications, ranging from medical research to evolutionary theory on personality syndromes. Here, we use for the first time a large-scale genetical genomics analysis in the brains of chickens to identify genes affecting anxiety as measured by an open field test. We combine quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis in 572 individuals and expression QTL (eQTL) analysis in 129 individuals from an advanced intercross between domestic chickens and Red Junglefowl. We identify 10 putative quantitative trait genes affecting anxiety behavior. These genes were tested for an association in the mouse Heterogeneous Stock anxiety (open field) data set and human GWAS data sets for bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, and schizophrenia. Although comparisons between species are complex, associations were observed for four of the candidate genes in mice and three of the candidate genes in humans. Using a multimodel approach we have therefore identified a number of putative quantitative trait genes affecting anxiety behavior, principally in chickens but also with some potentially translational effects as well. This study demonstrates that chickens are an excellent model organism for the genetic dissection of behavior. PMID:26733665

  11. PIXE analysis of chinese chicken-blood stone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the chemical compositions of chicken-blood stone Ji Xue Shi measured by Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). The experimental result show that for the red portion of chicken-blood stone, the concentration of Hg is as high as 20 wt%, and the concentration of S can be above 10 wt%. For the non-red portion the main chemical compositions are Al2O3 and SiO2. The obtained chemical compositions are close to those of kaolinite for Balin chicken-blood stone, and of pyrophyllite for Changhua chicken-blood stone, respectively. So far many Changhua chicken-blood stones and Balin chicken-blood stones were found in China, the PIXE method can be used to explore the provenance of available chicken-blood stones. (author)

  12. Campylobacter jejuni strains of human and chicken origin are invasive in chickens after oral challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Katrine Nørrelund; Bang, Dang Duong; Andresen, Lars Ole;

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the colonizing ability and the invasive capacity of selected Campylobacter jejuni strains of importance for the epidemiology of C jejuni in Danish broiler chickens. Four C jejuni strains were selected for experimental colonization Studies in day-old and 14-day......-old chickens hatched from specific pathogen free (SPF) eggs. Of the four C jejuni strains tested, three were Penner heat-stable serotype 2,flaA type 1/1, the most common type found among broilers and human cases in Denmark. The fourth strain was Penner heat-stable serotype 19, which has been shown to be...... associated with the Guillain Barre Syndrome (GBS) in humans. The minimum dose for establishing colonization in the clay-old chickens was approximately 2 cfu, whereas two- to threefold higher doses were required for establishing colonization in the 14-day-old chickens. Two of the C jejuni strains were shown...

  13. Comparison of the Prevalence of Microbial Contamination in Packed and Unpacked Redmeat and Chicken Meat at Retail Outlets and Department Stores in Southern Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Kamkar

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Despite advances in disease prevention and food materials technology, food – borne diseases are still a major problem in both developed and developing countries. Morever, meat plays a key role in transfer of bacteria, especially “Zoonotic” to humans. Therefore, we decided to investigate the outbreak of pathogenic bacteria such as Salmonella,Campylobacter, Yersinia and Aeromonas in red meat and chicken offered as packed and unpacked in areas under the authority of Tehran university of medical sciences . Methods: 630 samples including 315 raw chicken meat and 315 raw red meat samples were collected and tested for a period of one year from July, 2004 to August,2005. Samples were collected from shops selling packed meat and chicken as well as shops selling unpacked meat and chicken in different parts of the south of Tehran The methods used for the laboratory investigation were based on Iranian National Standard Procedure No. 2394. Results: Of the 630 samples of chicken and meat, 183 samples (29 % were contaminated. 49.2 percent of the contaminated samples were chicken meat and 8.9 percent were red meat. From the total, 71 samples were contaminated with salmonella (11.3 %, 68 samples with Campylobacter (10.8 %, 26 samples with Yersinia entrocolitica (4.1 % and 18 samples with Aeromonas (2.9 %. In red meat samples, microbial contamination was observed in 4.9 % of packed and 10.3 percent of unpacked samples. Contamination rate of chicken samples was higher including 59.3 % of packed and 45.7 % of unpacked chicken samples. The observed difference between the remitting samples of packed and unpacked chicken was statistically significant. (P 0.05

  14. Mean total arsenic concentrations in chicken 1989-2000 and estimated exposures for consumers of chicken.

    OpenAIRE

    Lasky, Tamar; Sun, Wenyu; Kadry, Abdel; Hoffman, Michael K

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate mean concentrations of total arsenic in chicken liver tissue and then estimate total and inorganic arsenic ingested by humans through chicken consumption. We used national monitoring data from the Food Safety and Inspection Service National Residue Program to estimate mean arsenic concentrations for 1994-2000. Incorporating assumptions about the concentrations of arsenic in liver and muscle tissues as well as the proportions of inorganic and organic a...

  15. Detection and characterization of chicken anemia virus from commercial broiler breeder chickens

    OpenAIRE

    Omar Abdul; Hailemariam Zerihun; Hair-Bejo Mohd; Giap Tan

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Chicken anemia virus (CAV) is the causative agent of chicken infectious anemia (CIA). Study on the type of CAV isolates present and their genetic diversity, transmission to their progeny and level of protection afforded in the breeder farms is lacking in Malaysia. Hence, the present study was aimed to detect CAV from commercial broiler breeder farms and characterize CAV positive samples based on sequence and phylogenetic analysis of partial VP1 gene. Results A total of 12 ...

  16. Differential effects of age on chicken heterophil functional activation by recombinant chicken interleukin-2

    OpenAIRE

    Kogut, Michael; Rothwell, Lisa; Kaiser, Pete

    2002-01-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) exercises an array of biological effects on many cells including the functional activation of cells of the innate immune response. Heterophils, the avian equivalent of the neutrophil, function as professional phagocytes to aid in regulation of innate host defenses. The objective of the present studies was to examine the effects of recombinant chicken IL-2 (rChIL-2) on functional activities of heterophils from chickens during the first 3 weeks after hatch. Peripheral blood...

  17. Effect of sample preparation method on sensory quality of cooked chicken breast fillets processed for food service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicken fillets (Pectoralis major) are one of popular items for food service. In the store, especially in fast food service stores, ready-to-cook meat products are commonly stored in freezers before use. The frozen meat can be cooked either directly from a frozen stage or after thawing. However, the...

  18. Nucleotide Sequence of a Chicken Vitellogenin Gene and Derived Amino Acid Sequence of the Encoded Yolk Precursor Protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schip, Fred D. van het; Samallo, John; Broos, Jaap; Ophuis, Jan; Mojet, Mart; Gruber, Max; AB, Geert

    1987-01-01

    The gene encoding the major vitellogenin from chicken has been completely sequenced and its exon-intron organization has been established. The gene is 20,342 base-pairs long and contains 35 exons with a combined length of 5787 base-pairs. They encode the 1850-amino acid pre-peptide of vitellogenin,

  19. Genome-wide assessment of worldwide chicken SNP genetic diversity indicates significant absence of rare alleles in commercial breeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breed utilization, genetic improvement, and industry consolidation are predicted to have major impacts on the genetic composition of commercial chickens. Consequently, the question arises as to whether sufficient genetic diversity remains within industry stocks to address future needs. With the ch...

  20. Effects of irradiation on bacterial load and Listeria monocytogenes in raw chicken

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After irradiation of chickens to a dose of 2.5 kGy, the decrease in the standard plate count (SPC) was similar in air and in vacuum-packaged chickens. During storage at 4 degrees C for 15 d, the SPC increased progressively in both types of packaged chickens. At the end of the storage period, the SPC was higher in air-packaged chicken than in vacuum-packaged chickens. In irradiated chickens, Listeria monocytogenes was only recovered from the vacuum-packaged chickens after 7 d cold storage. In unirradiated chickens, L. monocytogenes proliferated similarly in both air- and vacuum-packaged chickens

  1. Prevalence of Salmonella spp. in Packed and Unpacked Red Meat and Chicken in South of Tehran

    OpenAIRE

    Soltan Dallal, Mohammad Mehdi; Sharifi Yazdi, Mohammad kazem; Nima MIRZAEI; kalantar, enayat

    2014-01-01

    Background: Despite of the advances in infectious diseases prevention and food technology, food-borne diseases are considered major problems in developed and developing countries. Meat plays a key role in transferring zoonotic diseases to human. Objectives: This study was conducted in south of Tehran, Iran, to investigate the prevalence rate of Salmonella spp. in packed and unpacked red meat and chicken. Materials and Methods: A total of 379 packed and unpacked samples including 189 red meat ...

  2. Rodents on pig and chicken farms – a potential threat to human and animal health

    OpenAIRE

    Backhans, Annette; Fellström, Claes

    2012-01-01

    Rodents can cause major problems through spreading various diseases to animals and humans. The two main species of rodents most commonly found on farms around the world are the house mouse (Mus musculus) and the brown rat (Rattus norvegicus). Both species are omnivorous and can breed year-round under favourable conditions. This review describes the occurrence of pathogens in rodents on specialist pig and chicken farms, which are usually closed units with a high level of bio-security. However,...

  3. Close linkage of genes encoding receptors for subgroups A and C of avian sarcoma/leucosis virus on chicken chromosome 28.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elleder, D; Plachý, J; Hejnar, J; Geryk, J; Svoboda, J

    2004-06-01

    Avian sarcoma and leucosis viruses (ASLV) are classified into six major subgroups (A to E and J) according to the properties of the viral envelope proteins and the usage of cellular receptors for virus entry. Subgroup A and B receptors are identified molecularly and their genomic positions TVA and TVB are mapped. The subgroup C receptor is unknown, its genomic locus TVC is reported to be genetically linked to TVA, which resides on chicken chromosome 28. In this study, we used two chicken inbred lines that carry different alleles coding for resistance (TVC(R) and sensitivity (TVC(S)) to infection by subgroup C viruses. A backross population of these lines was tested for susceptibility to subgroup C infection and genotyped for markers from chicken chromosome 28. We confirmed the close linkage between TVA and TVC loci. Further, we have described the position of TVC on chromosome 28 relative to markers from the consensus map of the chicken genome. PMID:15147387

  4. Comparative Study of Human Liver Ferritin and Chicken Liver by Moessbauer Spectroscopy. Preliminary Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparative study of normal human liver ferritin and livers from normal chicken and chicken with Marek disease was made by Moessbauer spectroscopy. Small differences of quadrupole splitting and isomer shift were found for human liver ferritin and chicken liver. Moessbauer parameters for liver from normal chicken and chicken with Marek disease were the same.

  5. Comparative Study of Human Liver Ferritin and Chicken Liver by Moessbauer Spectroscopy. Preliminary Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshtrakh, M. I. [Ural State Technical University - UPI, Division of Applied Biophysics, Faculty of Physical Techniques and Devices for Quality Control (Russian Federation); Milder, O. B.; Semionkin, V. A. [Ural State Technical University - UPI, Faculty of Experimental Physics (Russian Federation); Prokopenko, P. G. [Russian State Medical University, Faculty of Biochemistry (Russian Federation); Malakheeva, L. I. [Simbio Holding, Science Consultation Department (Russian Federation)

    2004-12-15

    A comparative study of normal human liver ferritin and livers from normal chicken and chicken with Marek disease was made by Moessbauer spectroscopy. Small differences of quadrupole splitting and isomer shift were found for human liver ferritin and chicken liver. Moessbauer parameters for liver from normal chicken and chicken with Marek disease were the same.

  6. In ovo administration of copper nanoparticles and copper sulfate positively influences chicken performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mroczek-Sosnowska, Natalia; Łukasiewicz, Monika; Wnuk, Agnieszka;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Copper (Cu) is a key trace mineral involved in a variety of physiological processes, and is commonly used in poultry production. However, regardless of the inclusion level the majority of Cu is excreted with poultry faeces. We hypothesise that in ovo administration will allow for better...... utilisation of Cu during embryo development than when supplied post-natally with feed to growing chickens. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate effects of in ovo administration of NanoCu and copper sulfate (CuSO4 ) on broiler chicken performance. RESULTS: The study showed the positive influences...

  7. Zoonotic Public Health Hazards in Backyard Chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohjola, L; Nykäsenoja, S; Kivistö, R; Soveri, T; Huovilainen, A; Hänninen, M L; Fredriksson-Ahomaa, M

    2016-08-01

    Backyard poultry has become increasingly popular in industrialized countries. In addition to keeping chickens for eggs and meat, owners often treat the birds as pets. However, several pathogenic enteric bacteria have the potential for zoonotic transmission from poultry to humans but very little is known about the occurrence of zoonotic pathogens in backyard flocks. The occurrence and the antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella enterica, Campylobacter spp., Listeria monocytogenes and enteropathogenic Yersinia spp. was studied in 51 voluntary backyard chicken farms in Finland during October 2012 and January 2013. Campylobacter isolates were further characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and the occurrence of ESBL/AmpC-producing E. coli was investigated. The findings from this study indicate that backyard chickens are a reservoir of Campylobacter jejuni strains and a potential source of C. jejuni infection for humans. Backyard chickens can also carry L. monocytogenes, although their role as a primary reservoir is questionable. Campylobacter coli, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Salmonella enterica were only found sporadically in the faecal and environmental samples of backyard poultry in Finland. No Yersinia enterocolitica carrying the virulence plasmid was isolated. All pathogens were highly susceptible to most of the antimicrobials studied. Only a few AmpC- and no ESBL-producing E. coli were found. PMID:26752227

  8. Gene finding in the chicken genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonarakis Stylianos E

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the continuous production of genome sequence for a number of organisms, reliable, comprehensive, and cost effective gene prediction remains problematic. This is particularly true for genomes for which there is not a large collection of known gene sequences, such as the recently published chicken genome. We used the chicken sequence to test comparative and homology-based gene-finding methods followed by experimental validation as an effective genome annotation method. Results We performed experimental evaluation by RT-PCR of three different computational gene finders, Ensembl, SGP2 and TWINSCAN, applied to the chicken genome. A Venn diagram was computed and each component of it was evaluated. The results showed that de novo comparative methods can identify up to about 700 chicken genes with no previous evidence of expression, and can correctly extend about 40% of homology-based predictions at the 5' end. Conclusions De novo comparative gene prediction followed by experimental verification is effective at enhancing the annotation of the newly sequenced genomes provided by standard homology-based methods.

  9. Chicken models of retroviral insertional mutagenesis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pečenka, Vladimír; Karafiát, Vít; Dvořák, Michal

    New York: Springer, 2011 - (Dupuy, A.; Largaespada, D.), s. 77-112 ISBN 978-1-4419-7655-0 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/09/1727 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : insertional mutagenesis * chicken model * MAV retroviruses Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  10. Triploid-diploid mosaic chicken embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, S E; Buss, E G

    1966-08-12

    Cytological analysis of an underdeveloped chicken embryo at 6 days of incubation revealed a triploid-diploid mosaic condition. Of the 30 metaphases observed, 19 were triploid and 11 diploid. The triploid cells were 3A-ZZZ and diploid cells 2A-ZZ, as determined for the six largest pairs of chromnosomes. PMID:5328678

  11. Precise Centromere Positioning on Chicken Chromosome 3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zlotina, A.; Galkina, S.A.; Krasikova, A.; Crooijmans, R.P.M.A.; Groenen, M.A.M.; Gaginskaya, E.; Deryusheva, S.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the progress of the chicken (Gallus gallus) genome sequencing project, the centromeric sequences of most macrochromosomes remain unknown. This makes it difficult to determine centromere positions in the genome sequence assembly. Using giant lampbrush chromosomes from growing oocytes, we anal

  12. Chicken energia metabolism after single gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study investigated changes in the concentration of cholesterol and glucose in the serum of poultry after single whole-body gamma irradiation with 4,5 Gy dose. In the experiment we used chickens of initial age 21 and 35 days at the beginning of the experiment. (authors)

  13. CHICKEN FEATHER FIBERS FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summary of Findings (Outputs/Outcomes): A Sievert’s apparatus for measuring the H2 storage capacities of adsorbents was built. The nitrogen adsorption and H2 storage test performed on the pyrolyzed chicken feather fibers (PCFF) prepared by a p...

  14. Lymphoid cells in chicken intestinal epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, P

    1975-01-01

    The intraepithelial lymphoid cells of chicken small intestine were studied by light microscopy using 1 mu Epon sections, and by electron microscopy. Three cell types were found: small lymphocytes, large lymphoid cells, and granular cells. These cells correspond to the theliolymphocytes and globule...

  15. Toxigenic penicillia spoiling frozen chicken nuggets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigmann, Evelin Francine; Saccomori, Fernanda; Bernardi, Angelica Olivier;

    2015-01-01

    Frozen chicken nuggets are classified as pre-prepared frozen meals. These products are convenient to consumers as they are easy to prepare and allow for long storage by freezing. Over the years, spoilage of frozen food products caused by fungi has been a continual problem for the food industry si...... reserved....

  16. Chicken models of retroviral insertional mutagenesis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pečenka, Vladimír; Karafiát, Vít; Dvořák, Michal

    New York : Springer, 2011 - (Dupuy, A.; Largaespada, D.), s. 77-112 ISBN 978-1-4419-7655-0 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/09/1727 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : insertional mutagenesis * chicken model * MAV retroviruses Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  17. Responsive Reading: Caring for Chicken Little

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maderazo, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Media images and news about current events have the potential to strike like acorns. In these moments, children, like Chicken Little, need caring adults who can help them understand what is happening. As early childhood educators, one must recognize and provide opportunities to guide children's social and emotional well-being in addition to…

  18. In vitro responses of chicken macrophage-like monocytes following exposure to pathogenic and non-pathogenic E. coli ghosts loaded with a rational design of conserved genetic materials of influenza and Newcastle disease viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagzian, Milad; Bassami, Mohammad Reza; Dehghani, Hesam

    2016-08-01

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV) are two important viral diseases in the poultry industry. Therefore, new disease-fighting strategies, especially effective genetic vaccination, are in high demand. Bacterial Ghost (BG) is a promising platform for delivering genetic materials to macrophages, cells that are among the first to encounter these viruses. However, there is no investigation on the immune response of these macrophage-targeted treatments. Here, we investigated the effect of genetic materials of AIV and NDV on the gene expression profile of important pro-inflammatory cytokines, a chemokine, a transcription factor, major histocompatibility complexes, and the viability of the chicken macrophage-like monocyte cells (CMM). Our genetic construct contained the external domain of matrix protein 2 and nucleoprotein gene of AIV, and immunodominant epitopes of fusion and hemagglutinin-neuraminidase proteins of NDV (hereinafter referred to as pAIV-Vax), delivered via the pathogenic and non-pathogenic BGs (Escherichia coli O78K80 and E. coli TOP10 respectively). The results demonstrated that both types of BGs were able to efficiently deliver the construct to the CMM, although the pathogenic strain derived BG was a significantly better stimulant and delivery vehicle. Both BGs were safe regarding LPS toxicity and did not induce any cell death. Furthermore, the loaded BGs were more powerful in modulating the pro-inflammatory cytokines' responses and antigen presentation systems in comparison to the unloaded BGs. Nitric oxide production of the BG-stimulated cells was also comparable to those challenged by the live bacteria. According to the results, the combination of pAIV-Vax construct and E. coli O78K80 BG is promising in inducing a considerable innate and adaptive immune response against AIV-NDV and perhaps the pathogenic E. coli, provided that the current combination be a potential candidate for in vivo testing regarding the development of an

  19. Phylogenetic analyses indicate little variation among reticuloendotheliosis viruses infecting avian species, including the endangered Attwater's prairie chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohls, Ryan L; Linares, Jose A; Gross, Shannon L; Ferro, Pam J; Silvy, Nova J; Collisson, Ellen W

    2006-08-01

    Reticuloendotheliosis virus infection, which typically causes systemic lymphomas and high mortality in the endangered Attwater's prairie chicken, has been described as a major obstacle in repopulation efforts of captive breeding facilities in Texas. Although antigenic relationships among reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) strains have been previously determined, phylogenetic relationships have not been reported. The pol and env of REV proviral DNA from prairie chickens (PC-R92 and PC-2404), from poxvirus lesions in domestic chickens, the prototype poultry derived REV-A and chick syncytial virus (CSV), and duck derived spleen necrosis virus (SNV) were PCR amplified and sequenced. The 5032bp, that included the pol and most of env genes, of the PC-R92 and REV-A were 98% identical, and nucleotide sequence identities of smaller regions within the pol and env from REV strains examined ranged from 95 to 99% and 93 to 99%, respectively. The putative amino acid sequences were 97-99% identical in the polymerase and 90-98% in the envelope. Phylogenetic analyses of the nucleotide and amino acid sequences indicated the closest relationship among the recent fowl pox-associated chicken isolates, the prairie chicken isolates and the prototype CSV while only the SNV appeared to be distinctly divergent. While the origin of the naturally occurring viruses is not known, the avian poxvirus may be a critical component of transmission of these ubiquitous oncogenic viruses. PMID:16497405

  20. Vaccination with a Recombinant Chicken FGFR-1 Bypasses Immunological Tolerance against Self-FGFR-1 in Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Shaojiang; HUANG Fengying; ZHENG Shaoping; WANG Wei; YIN Hui; WU Renliang

    2006-01-01

    The possibility that a recombinant protein vaccine based on xenogeneic homologous FGFR-1 of chicken induces production of autoantibodies against self-FGFR-1 in BALB/c mice was examined by using ELISA, Western blot analysis and ELISPOT assay respectively. Autoantibodies against mouse FGFR-1 were identified by Western blot analysis and ELISA. Compared with the two control groups, the number of APBCs, which were detected by ELISPOT assay, was significantly increased in the spleens of mice immunized with cFR1 (P<0.05). IgG1 and IgG2b, which were detected by ELISA, were the major subclasses and were substantially increased in response to chicken FGFR-1 when compared with control group. The recombinant chicken FGFR-1 protein used as a vaccine can induce autoantibodies against self-FGFR-1 in mice and provide a basis for the active immunotherapy of tumor angiogenesis.

  1. Correlation analysis of relationships between polymorphisms of high quality chicken myogenin gene and slaughter and meat quality traits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiong WANG; Chaowu YANG; Yiping LIU; Xiaosong JIANG; Huarui DU; Mohan QIU; Qing ZHU

    2008-01-01

    In this study, PCR-SSCP technique was de-signed to investigate the effect of the myogenin (MyoG) gene on quality of chicken meat (developed by Sichuan Dahen Poultry Breeding Company using local breeds). Four muta-tions at base position in the promoter region were detected among individuals in each line, i.e. T/C in locus A, and T/A, T/C and A/G in locus B. Least squares analysis showed that there was a significant difference between genotype and breast muscle percentage and some carcass traits (P0.05) was detected in the other traits. It was concluded that the MyoG gene is the major gene affecting the muscle fiber traits of chicken or it links with the candidate gene, and the mutation can be used as the molecular genetic marker to select the chickens for meat quality traits.

  2. Serum levels of mannan-binding lectin in chickens prior to and during experimental infection with avian infectious bronchitis virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul-Madsen, H.R.; Munch, M.; Handberg, Kurt;

    2003-01-01

    increase of 24%, whereas the acute phase response in chickens challenged after 12 h of rest peaked after 3.1 d with an increase of 51%. The specific antibody titer against IBV was also tested, and a difference (P <0.0091) between the two experimental groups was found with peak titer values of 6,816 and 4...... or complement activation via MBL-associated serine proteases (MASP) -1 and -2. Thus, MBL plays a major role in the first-line innate defense against pathogens. We investigated the MBL concentrations in serum during experimental infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) infections in chickens. The results......,349. However, the highest value was found in chickens inoculated after 12 h of activity. Thus, an inverse relation exists between the MBL response and the IBV specific antibody response. The ability of MBL to activate the complement cascade was tested in a heterologous system by deposition of human C4 on the...

  3. Integrative mapping analysis of chicken microchromosome 16 organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bed'hom Bertrand

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The chicken karyotype is composed of 39 chromosome pairs, of which 9 still remain totally absent from the current genome sequence assembly, despite international efforts towards complete coverage. Some others are only very partially sequenced, amongst which microchromosome 16 (GGA16, particularly under-represented, with only 433 kb assembled for a full estimated size of 9 to 11 Mb. Besides the obvious need of full genome coverage with genetic markers for QTL (Quantitative Trait Loci mapping and major genes identification studies, there is a major interest in the detailed study of this chromosome because it carries the two genetically independent MHC complexes B and Y. In addition, GGA16 carries the ribosomal RNA (rRNA genes cluster, also known as the NOR (nucleolus organizer region. The purpose of the present study is to construct and present high resolution integrated maps of GGA16 to refine its organization and improve its coverage with genetic markers. Results We developed 79 STS (Sequence Tagged Site markers to build a physical RH (radiation hybrid map and 34 genetic markers to extend the genetic map of GGA16. We screened a BAC (Bacterial Artificial Chromosome library with markers for the MHC-B, MHC-Y and rRNA complexes. Selected clones were used to perform high resolution FISH (Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization mapping on giant meiotic lampbrush chromosomes, allowing meiotic mapping in addition to the confirmation of the order of the three clusters along the chromosome. A region with high recombination rates and containing PO41 repeated elements separates the two MHC complexes. Conclusions The three complementary mapping strategies used refine greatly our knowledge of chicken microchromosome 16 organisation. The characterisation of the recombination hotspots separating the two MHC complexes demonstrates the presence of PO41 repetitive sequences both in tandem and inverted orientation. However, this region still needs to

  4. Village Chicken Husbandry Practice, Marketing and Constraints in Eastern Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarekegn, Getachew

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This experiment is designed to study the characteristics of village chicken husbandry practice, marketing and constraints in eastern Ethiopia. The study was conducted from July in four selected districts in the highlands of eastern Ethiopia (Haramaya, Kersa, Jarso and Meta. A total of 80 chicken owner households were randomly selected and interviewed using a structured questionnaire. Data on characteristics of village chicken production, feeds and feeding practices, housing, management of chicken and eggs, Marketing, diseases and constraints of village chicken production system were collected. Scavenging chicken production system is observed in all households of the districts. Average flock size of chickens in the study area was 9.4 birds and varied between 4 and 17 birds. In the present study, 82% of the households provide overnight housing within the family house for their chicken. Scavenging is the only feeding system encountered in all study districts with little grain supplementation. Most of the chicken are owned and managed by women (36.75%. Selling of unprocessed eggs and live chickens is mainly practiced. External parasites (mites, Coccidiosis and Newcastle disease were the most important and prevailing diseases in the study area with 39%, 38% and 34% incidence rates, respectively. The magnitude of occurrence of the parasites and diseases were higher in the wet season. Poor genetic quality, lack of extension service, inadequate veterinary service and poor management were the main constraints of village poultry production in the study area.

  5. Improvement of bacteriological quality of frozen chicken by gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possible use of gamma irradiation at doses of 1.6 to 4.0 kGy to improve bacteriological quality of frozen chicken was investigated. The effects of gamma irradiation on salmonella viability in frozen chicken and on sensory quality of frozen chicken were also evaluated. D10-values for different isolated strains of salmonella in frozen chicken varied from 0.41 to 0.57 kGy. A dose of 4 kGy is required for a seven log cycle reduction of salmonella contamination in frozen chicken. Approximately 21 per cent of frozen chicken examined were contaminated with salmonella. Salmonella typhimurium, salmonella virchow, and salmonella java were predominant. Irradiation of frozen chicken at a minimum dose of 3.2 kGy eliminated salmonella, coliform, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus aureus and, in addition, reduced baterial load by 2 log cycles. Faecal streptococci was still present in a 3.2 kGy samples but in a very small percentage and the count was not over 100 colonies per g. Discoloring of chicken meat was noted after a 2 kGy treatment. The sensory quality of frozen chicken irradiated at 3 and 4 kGy tended to decrease during frozen storage but was within the acceptable range on a nine point hedonic scale even after eight months of frozen storage. Dosage at 3.2 kGy appeared to be sufficient for improving bacteriological quality of frozen chicken

  6. Transcriptomic and metabolomic profiling of chicken adipose tissue in response to insulin neutralization and fasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Bo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Domestic broiler chickens rapidly accumulate adipose tissue due to intensive genetic selection for rapid growth and are naturally hyperglycemic and insulin resistant, making them an attractive addition to the suite of rodent models used for studies of obesity and type 2 diabetes in humans. Furthermore, chicken adipose tissue is considered as poorly sensitive to insulin and lipolysis is under glucagon control. Excessive fat accumulation is also an economic and environmental concern for the broiler industry due to the loss of feed efficiency and excessive nitrogen wasting, as well as a negative trait for consumers who are increasingly conscious of dietary fat intake. Understanding the control of avian adipose tissue metabolism would both enhance the utility of chicken as a model organism for human obesity and insulin resistance and highlight new approaches to reduce fat deposition in commercial chickens. Results We combined transcriptomics and metabolomics to characterize the response of chicken adipose tissue to two energy manipulations, fasting and insulin deprivation in the fed state. Sixteen to 17 day-old commercial broiler chickens (ISA915 were fed ad libitum, fasted for five hours, or fed but deprived of insulin by injections of anti-insulin serum. Pair-wise contrasts of expression data identified a total of 2016 genes that were differentially expressed after correction for multiple testing, with the vast majority of differences due to fasting (1780 genes. Gene Ontology and KEGG pathway analyses indicated that a short term fast impacted expression of genes in a broad selection of pathways related to metabolism, signaling and adipogenesis. The effects of insulin neutralization largely overlapped with the response to fasting, but with more modest effects on adipose tissue metabolism. Tissue metabolomics indicated unique effects of insulin on amino acid metabolism. Conclusions Collectively, these data provide a foundation

  7. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers in chicken tissues and eggs from an electronic waste recycling area in southeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaofei Qin; Yongjian Yang; Zhanfen Qin; Yan Li; Yaxian Zhao; Xijuan Xia; Shishuai Yan; Mi Tian; Xingru Zhao; Xiaobai XU

    2011-01-01

    The levels and distributions of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in chicken tissues from an electronic waste (e-waste)recycling area in southeast China were investigated. Human dietary intake by local residents via chicken muscle and eggs was estimated.The mean PBDEs concentrations in tissues ranged from 15.2 to 3138.1 ng/g lipid weight (lw) and in egg the concentration was 563.5 ng/g lw. The results showed that the level of total PBDEs (∑PBDEs) in the chicken tissue was 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than those reported in the literature. The large difference of ΣPBDEs concentrations between tissues confirmed that the distribution of PBDEs in tissues depend on tissue-specificity rather than the “lipid-compartment”. BDE-209 was the predominant congener (82.5%-94.7% of ∑PBDEs) in all chicken tissues except in brain (34.7% of ∑PBDEs), which indicated that deca-BDE (the major commercial PBDE formulation comprising 65%-70% of total production) was major pollution source in this area and could be bioaccumulated in terrestrial animals. The dietary PBDEs intake of the local residents from chicken muscle and egg, assuming only local bred chickens and eggs were consumed, ranged from 2.2 to 22.5 ng/(day·kg body weight (bw)) with a mean value of 13.5 ng/(day.kg bw), which was one order of magnitude higher than the value reported in previous studies for consumption of all foodstuffs.

  8. Generalized immunological recognition of the major merozoite surface antigen (gp195) of Plasmodium falciparum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, S.P.; Hui, G.S.N.; Kato, A.; Siddiqui, W.A. (Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu (USA))

    1989-08-01

    The antibody response to the Plasmodium falciparum major merozoite surface antigen (gp195) of congenic mouse strains differing in H-2 haplotype has been examined. All seven strains of mice were capable of producing gp195-specific antibodies. Generalized immune recognition of gp195 by mice of diverse H-2 haplotypes distinguished gp195 from the P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein and the 230-kDa and 48/45-kDa gamete surface antigens. However, the H-2 genetic locus appeared to influence the specificity of gp105-specific antibodies. Immunoblot patterns of mouse sera with parasite antigens revealed a complex pattern of reactivity with terminal and intermediate processing fragments of gp195. The majority of immunoblot bands observed were similar for all of the mouse strains; however, there were several strains that additionally recognized a few unique fragments or displayed more intense reactivities with specific processing fragments. These results suggest that while individuals of diverse major histocompatibility complex makeup are capable of recognizing the gp195 antigen, the recognition of specific gp195 B-cell and T-cell epitopes may be under control of the major histocompatibility complex.

  9. Phenotypic variation of native chicken populations in northwest Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halima, Hassen; Neser, F W C; van Marle-Koster, E; de Kock, A

    2007-10-01

    Seven indigenous chicken populations were identified and characterized from four administrative zones in northwest Ethiopia. A total of three hundred chickens were characterized under field conditions for qualitative and quantitative traits following standard chicken descriptors. Large phenotypic variability among chicken populations was observed for plumage color. About 25.49, 22.3, and 16.4 % of the chickens have white, grayish and red plumage colors, respectively. The rest showed a considerable heterogeneity like black, multicolor, black with white tips, red brownish and white with red striped plumage colors. The following characteristics were also displayed: plain head shape (51.18%), yellow shank color (64.42%) and pea comb (50.72%). About 97.52% of the chickens did not have feathers on their legs. Variations were also observed on quantitative characters such as shank length, egg size and body weight and other reproductive traits characterized on intensive management system. PMID:17969713

  10. CONTENT OF NUTRIENTS AND NUTRICINES - CARNOSINE IN DARK CHICKEN MEAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordana Kralik

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine content of nutrients and carnosine concentration in thighs (dark meat of chickens of the Ross 308 provenance with respect to chicken gender. Amount of carnosine is determined by the HPLC device. Thigh muscle tissue of female and male chickens contains 339.28±68.17 μg/g and 319.29±65.47 μg/g of carnosine (P>0.05, respectively. Live end weights of chickens are also shown, with average male chickens weights of 2377 g and female chickens 2104 g (P0.05 are also shown. The obtained research results are explained in the context of other relevant studies on a similar topic.

  11. Some hematological changes in chickens infected with ectoparasites in Mosul

    OpenAIRE

    T. M. Al-Saffar; E. D. Al-Mawla

    2008-01-01

    The study was conducted to identify different ectoparasites infesting 280 chicken (native breed out door house reared layers, 6 months – 2 years old), from various regions of Mosul city (poultry market, Hadba' Flock, and six flocks at Kogialli village), for one year. Total percentage of ectoparasites in chickens were 19.3 % of which (54 positive case out of 280 chicken) 81% were single infections and 19 % mixed infections. Lice infestation (12.5 %) and four types of chewing lice were classifi...

  12. Village Chicken Husbandry Practice, Marketing and Constraints in Eastern Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Tarekegn, Getachew; Ewonetu, Kebede; Negassi, Ameha; Aemro, Terefe Terefe

    2015-01-01

    This experiment is designed to study the characteristics of village chicken husbandry practice, marketing and constraints in eastern Ethiopia. The study was conducted from July in four selected districts in the highlands of eastern Ethiopia (Haramaya, Kersa, Jarso and Meta). A total of 80 chicken owner households were randomly selected and interviewed using a structured questionnaire. Data on characteristics of village chicken production, feeds and feeding practices, housing, management of ch...

  13. A Consensus Linkage Map of the Chicken Genome

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    A consensus linkage map has been developed in the chicken that combines all of the genotyping data from the three available chicken mapping populations. Genotyping data were contributed by the laboratories that have been using the East Lansing and Compton reference populations and from the Animal Breeding and Genetics Group of the Wageningen University using the Wageningen/Euribrid population. The resulting linkage map of the chicken genome contains 1889 loci. A framework map is presented tha...

  14. Sequence conservation of linker histones between chicken and mammalian species

    OpenAIRE

    Bettina Sarg; Rita Lopez; Herbert Lindner; Inma Ponte; Pedro Suau; Alicia Roque

    2014-01-01

    The percent identity matrices of two sequence multiple alignments between linker histones from chicken and mammalian species are described. Linker histone protein sequences for chicken, mouse, rat and humans, available on public databases were used. This information is related to the research article entitled “Identification of novel post-translational modifications in linker histones from chicken erythrocytes”published in the Journal of Proteomics [1].

  15. Factors Affecting Willingness to Pay for Chicken from Biosecure Farms

    OpenAIRE

    sri lestari, veronica; Natsir, Asmuddin; Karim, Hasmida; Patrick, Ian

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research was to know factors affecting willingness to pay for chicken meat from biosecure farms. This research was conducted in Makassar regency, South Sulawesi province. Sample were choosed through random sampling at two supermarkets namely Lotte Mart and Gelael. Total sample were 50 respondents which consisted of chicken meat consumers. To know the willingness to pay for chicken meat from biosecure farms, contingent valuation method was used. Data were collected through int...

  16. Evidence of the adaptive evolution of immune genes in chicken

    OpenAIRE

    Cormican Paul; Downing Tim; O'Farrelly Cliona; Bradley Daniel G; Lloyd Andrew T

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The basis for understanding the characteristics of gene functional categories in chicken has been enhanced by the ongoing sequencing of the zebra finch genome, the second bird species to be extensively sequenced. This sequence provides an avian context for examining how variation in chicken has evolved since its divergence from its common ancestor with zebra finch as well as well as a calibrating point for studying intraspecific diversity within chicken. Immune genes have been subjec...

  17. Meta-analysis of Chicken - Salmonella infection experiments.

    OpenAIRE

    te Pas Marinus FW; Hulsegge Ina; Schokker Dirkjan; Smits Mari A; Fife Mark; Zoorob Rima; Endale Marie-Laure; Rebel Johanna MJ

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Chicken meat and eggs can be a source of human zoonotic pathogens, especially Salmonella species. These food items contain a potential hazard for humans. Chickens lines differ in susceptibility for Salmonella and can harbor Salmonella pathogens without showing clinical signs of illness. Many investigations including genomic studies have examined the mechanisms how chickens react to infection. Apart from the innate immune response, many physiological mechanisms and pathways...

  18. Gene Transfer into Older Chicken Embryos by ex ovo Electroporation

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Jiankai; Yan, Xin; Lin, Juntang; Rolfs, Arndt

    2012-01-01

    The chicken embryo provides an excellent model system for studying gene function and regulation during embryonic development. In ovo electroporation is a powerful method to over-express exogenous genes or down-regulate endogenous genes in vivo in chicken embryos1. Different structures such as DNA plasmids encoding genes2-4, small interfering RNA (siRNA) plasmids5, small synthetic RNA oligos6, and morpholino antisense oligonucleotides7 can be easily transfected into chicken embryos by electrop...

  19. Structural Analysis of the Angiogenesis in the Chicken Chorioallantoic Membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Verhoelst, Eva

    2011-01-01

    During the last decades, the poultry sector is in search of ways to monitor chicken embryonic growth, health and quality, as to control and optimize the incubation conditions, especially the gas concentrations. One of the parameters of chicken development which may change under different gas concentrations is the angiogenesis in the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM), the organ for gas exchange of the chicken embryo. To be able to perform large incubation experiments under different gaseous condi...

  20. Complex assembly, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the swine major histocompatibility complex molecule SLA-1*1502

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A crystal of a swine MHC class I molecule diffracted to 2.2 Å resolution and belonged to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 66.1, b = 74.1, c = 98.6 Å; it contained one molecule in the asymmetric unit. The Matthews coefficient and the solvent content were calculated to be 2.74 Å3 Da−1 and 55.17%, respectively. In order to illustrate the structure of the swine MHC class I (SLA-I) molecule and to evaluate the cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), the ternary complex of the SLA-I molecule termed SLA-1*1502 with β2-microglobulin and the CTL epitope TMPPGFELY (PRRSV-NSP9TY9) derived from PRRSV nonstructural protein 9 (residues 198–206) was assembled and crystallized. The crystal diffracted X-rays to 2.2 Å resolution and belonged to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 66.1, b = 74.1, c = 98.6 Å; it contained one molecule in the asymmetric unit. The Matthews coefficient and the solvent content were calculated to be 2.74 Å3 Da−1 and 55.17%, respectively. The results will be helpful in obtaining insight into the structural basis of the presentation of viral epitopes by SLA-I

  1. Exceptional Hyperthyroidism and a Role for both Major Histocompatibility Class I and Class II Genes in a Murine Model of Graves' Disease

    OpenAIRE

    McLachlan, Sandra M.; Aliesky, Holly A.; Chen, Chun-Rong; Williams, Robert W.; Rapoport, Basil

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune hyperthyroidism, Graves' disease, can be induced by immunizing susceptible strains of mice with adenovirus encoding the human thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) or its A-subunit. Studies in two small families of recombinant inbred strains showed that susceptibility to developing TSHR antibodies (measured by TSH binding inhibition, TBI) was linked to the MHC region whereas genes on different chromosomes contributed to hyperthyroidism. We have now investigated TSHR antibody production and h...

  2. Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Variable Region and Major Histocompatibility Region Genes Are Linked to Induced Graves' Disease in Females From Two Very Large Families of Recombinant Inbred Mice

    OpenAIRE

    McLachlan, Sandra M.; Aliesky, Holly; Banuelos, Bianca; Magana, Jessica; Williams, Robert W.; Rapoport, Basil

    2014-01-01

    Graves' hyperthyroidism is caused by antibodies to the TSH receptor (TSHR) that mimic thyroid stimulation by TSH. Stimulating TSHR antibodies and hyperthyroidism can be induced by immunizing mice with adenovirus expressing the human TSHR A-subunit. Prior analysis of induced Graves' disease in small families of recombinant inbred (RI) female mice demonstrated strong genetic control but did not resolve trait loci for TSHR antibodies or elevated serum T4. We investigated the genetic basis for in...

  3. Exceptional hyperthyroidism and a role for both major histocompatibility class I and class II genes in a murine model of Graves' disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra M McLachlan

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hyperthyroidism, Graves' disease, can be induced by immunizing susceptible strains of mice with adenovirus encoding the human thyrotropin receptor (TSHR or its A-subunit. Studies in two small families of recombinant inbred strains showed that susceptibility to developing TSHR antibodies (measured by TSH binding inhibition, TBI was linked to the MHC region whereas genes on different chromosomes contributed to hyperthyroidism. We have now investigated TSHR antibody production and hyperthyroidism induced by TSHR A-subunit adenovirus immunization of a larger family of strains (26 of the AXB and BXA strains. Analysis of the combined AXB and BXA families provided unexpected insight into several aspects of Graves' disease. First, extreme thyroid hyperplasia and hyperthyroidism in one remarkable strain, BXA13, reflected an inability to generate non-functional TSHR antibodies measured by ELISA. Although neutral TSHR antibodies have been detected in Graves' sera, pathogenic, functional TSHR antibodies in Graves' patients are undetectable by ELISA. Therefore, this strain immunized with A-subunit-adenovirus that generates only functional TSHR antibodies may provide an improved model for studies of induced Graves' disease. Second, our combined analysis of linkage data from this and previous work strengthens the evidence that gene variants in the immunoglobulin heavy chain V region contribute to generating thyroid stimulating antibodies. Third, a broad region that encompasses the MHC region on mouse chromosome 17 is linked to the development of TSHR antibodies (measured by TBI. Most importantly, unlike other strains, TBI linkage in the AXB and BXA families to MHC class I and class II genes provides an explanation for the unresolved class I/class II difference in humans.

  4. Human epidermal Langerhans cells cointernalize by receptor-mediated endocytosis "nonclassical" major histocompatibility complex class I molecules (T6 antigens) and class II molecules (HLA-DR antigens).

    OpenAIRE

    Hanau, D.; Fabre, M.; Schmitt, D A; Garaud, J C; Pauly, G; Tongio, M M; Mayer, S.; Cazenave, J. P.

    1987-01-01

    HLA-DR and T6 surface antigens are expressed only by Langerhans cells and indeterminate cells in normal human epidermis. We have previously demonstrated that T6 antigens are internalized in Langerhans cells and indeterminate cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis. This process is induced by the binding of BL6, a monoclonal antibody directed against T6 antigens. In the present study, using a monoclonal antibody directed against HLA-DR antigens, on human epidermal cells in suspension, we show t...

  5. In situ localisation of major histocompatibility complex class I and class II and CD8 positive cells in infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV)-infected Atlantic salmon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hetland, Dyveke Lem; Jørgensen, Sven Martin; Skjødt, Karsten;

    2010-01-01

    the early viraemia of ISAV was undertaken. Immunohistochemical investigations of spleen, head kidney and gills using monoclonal antibodies against recombinant proteins from MHC I, II and CD8 were performed on tissues from Atlantic salmon collected day 17 post-challenge in a cohabitant infection model...... MHC I, MHC II and CD8 positive cell populations differed between control salmon and cohabitant salmon in the early stages of ISAV infection. The changes in MHC I labelled cells differed between organs in ISAV cohabitants but all investigated organs showed a decreased presence of MHC II labelled cells...

  6. Narcolepsy: Autoimmunity, Effector T Cell Activation Due to Infection, or T Cell Independent, Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Induced Neuronal Loss?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Adriano; Gast, Heidemarie; Reith, Walter; Recher, Mike; Birchler, Thomas; Bassetti, Claudio L.

    2010-01-01

    Human narcolepsy with cataplexy is a neurological disorder, which develops due to a deficiency in hypocretin producing neurons in the hypothalamus. There is a strong association with human leucocyte antigens HLA-DR2 and HLA-DQB1*0602. The disease typically starts in adolescence. Recent developments in narcolepsy research support the hypothesis of…

  7. Lysis of pig endothelium by IL-2 activated human natural killer cells is inhibited by swine and human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I gene products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itescu, S; Artrip, J H; Kwiatkowski, P A; Wang, S F; Minanov, O P; Morgenthau, A S; Michler, R E

    1997-01-01

    We have previously described a form of xenograft rejection, mediated by natural killer (NK) cells, occurring in pig-to-primate organ transplants beyond the period of antibody-mediated hyperacute rejection. In this study, two distinct NK activation pathways were identified as mechanisms of pig aortic endotheliual cell (PAEC) lysis by human NK cells. Using an antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) assay, a progressive increase in human NK lysis of PAEC was observed following incubation with human IgG at increasing serum titer. In the absence of IgG, a second mechanism of PAEC lysis by human NK cells was observed following activation with IL-2. IL-2 activation of human NK cells increased lysis of PAEC by over 3-fold compared with ADCC. These results indicate that IL-2 activation of human NK cells induces significantly higher levels of lytic activity than does conventional ADCC involving IgG and FcRIII. We next investigated the role of MHC class I molecules in the regulation of NK lysis following IL-2 activation. PAEC expression of SLA class I molecules was increased by up to 75% by treatment with human TNFa. Following treatment with TNFa at 1 u/ml, IL-2 activated human NK lysis of PAEC was inhibited at every effector:target (E:T) ratio tested. Maximal effect occurred at an E:T ratio of 10:1, with TNFa inhibiting specific lysis by 59% (p < 0.01). Incubation with an anti-SLA class I Mab, but not IgG isotype control, abrogated the protective effects of TNFa on NK lysis of PAEC, suggesting direct inhibitory effects of SLA class I molecules on human NK function. To investigate whether human MHC class I molecules might have similar effects on human NK lysis of PAEC, further experiments were performed using a soluble peptide derived from the alpha-helical region of HLA-B7. Incubation with the HLA-B7 derived peptide significantly reduced the IL-2 activated NK lytic activity against PAEC in a dose-dependent fashion. Maximal effect occurred at a concentration of 10 mg/ml, where an 8-fold reduction in IL-2 augmented NK lysis was observed (p < 0.01). These results suggest that IL-2 activated human NK lysis of porcine xenografts may be inhibited by strategies which increase PAEC expression of SLA class I molecules, introduce HLA class I genes into PAEC, or use soluble HLA class I peptides. PMID:9869836

  8. T-cell activation. V. Anti-major histocompatibility complex class I antibody-induced activation and clonal abortion in Jurkat T-leukaemic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claesson, M H; Dissing, S; Tscherning, T;

    1993-01-01

    We have studied activation-induced changes in intracellular calcium [Ca2+]i, interleukin-2 (IL-2) secretion, and clonal abortion of the human leukaemic T-cell line Jurkat and three T-cell receptor (TcR)/CD3 receptor negative clones deficient for the TcR alpha, TcR beta and CD3 gamma chains...... an increased IL-2 secretion was preceded by a rise in [Ca2+]i and was relatively dependent on the expression of the a TcR/CD3 complex. In contrast, anti-MHC class I mAb-induced clonal abortion in Jurkat T cells may occur without previous fluctuations in [Ca2+]i and appeared to be independent of Tc......R/CD3 expression. The present observation suggest the existence of different secondary messenger systems operating in Jurkat cells following activation via the TcR/CD3, CD2 and the MHC class I pathways, respectively....

  9. Major histocompatibility complex-linked immune-responsiveness is acquired by lymphocytes of low-responder mice differentiating in thymus of high-responder mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Female murine T cells can respond to the Y antigen of male cells by generating cytotoxic T-killer lymphocytes. Responsiveness is linked to several H-2 genes. Two types of low responders can be distinguished: the B10.A(5R)(H-2/sup i5/) strain, a low responder because it lacks Y-specific precursor T cells able to differentiate into cytotoxic T-killer cells; and the CBA/J (H-2/sup k/) strain, a low responder because it lacks Y-specific T-helper cells able to support differentiation of T-killer cell precursors. B10.A(5R) stem cells differentiating in an x-irradiated (CBA/J x C57BL/6) (H-2/sup k/ x H-2/sup b/)F1 host respond to Y antigen by generating T-killer cells whereas CBA/J stem cells do not. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that diversity of T-cell receptors is generated by somatic mutation of germ-line genes encoding specificity for self-H-2. A detailed account of this hypothesis is presented

  10. Heritable major histocompatibility complex class II-associated differences in production of tumor necrosis factor. alpha. : Relevance to genetic predisposition to systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, C.O.; Fronek, Z.; Koo, M.; McDevitt, H.O. (Stanford Univ. School of Medicine, CA (USA)); Lewis, G.C. (Genentech Inc., San Francisco, CA (USA)); Hansen, J.A. (Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (USA))

    1990-02-01

    The authors report on the production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha} and TNF-{beta} by mitogen-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes or enriched monocyte subpopulations from human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-typed healthy subjects. The results indicate that HLA-DR2- and DQw1-positive donors frequently exhibit low production of TNF-{alpha}, whereas DR3- and DR4-positive subjects show high levels of TNF-{alpha} production. No correlation between TNF-{alpha} levels and HLA-A, -B, and -C genotype was found. The relevance of this quantitative polymorphism to the genetic predisposition to lupus nephritis in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients was investigated. DR2, DQw1-positive SLE patients show low levels of TNF-{alpha} inducibility; this genotype is also associated with an increased incidence of lupus nephritis. DR3-positive SLE patients, on the other hand, are not predisposed to nephritis, and these patients have high TNF-{alpha} production. DR4 haplotype is associated with high TNF-{alpha} inducibility and is negatively correlated with lupus nephritis. These data may help explain the strong association between HLA-DR2, DQw1 in SLE patients and their susceptibility to nephritis.

  11. Lack of association between Behçet's disease and major histocompatibility complex class II antigens in an ethnically diverse North American Caucasoid patient group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, S B; O'Duffy, J D

    1986-08-01

    A group of 25 North American Caucasoid patients with well defined Behcet's disease were serologically typed for HLA-DR and DQw antigens. No significant associations were seen when results were compared with a group of 73 normal Caucasoid controls tested concomitantly. PMID:3772926

  12. Expression and T cell recognition of hybrid antigens with amino-terminal domains encoded by Qa-2 region of major histocompatibility complex and carboxyl termini of transplantation antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroynowski, I; Forman, J; Goodenow, R S; Schiffer, S G; McMillan, M; Sharrow, S O; Sachs, D H; Hood, L

    1985-05-01

    Coding potential of the Q6 gene from the Qa-2a region of BALB/c Crgl mice was analyzed by a combination of hybrid class I gene construction and DNA-mediated gene transfer. Recombinant genes were created by exon shuffling of the 5' coding region of the Q6 gene and the 3' coding region of a gene encoding a transplantation antigen (Kd, Dd, or Ld), or the inverse. Some of these hybrid class I genes were expressed in the transfected mouse fibroblasts (L cells). The hybrid class I molecules encoded by the 5' end of the Q6 gene and the 3' end of the Ld gene precipitated as 45,000 mol wt molecules associated with beta 2-microglobulin. The expression of the hybrid proteins indicates that 926 basepairs of the 5' flanking region upstream of the structural Q6 gene contain a promoter that functions as a transcription initiation site in L cells. The 3' portion of the Q6 gene appears to be responsible for the lack of cell surface expression of the intact Q6 and the hybrid Ld/Q6 genes in mouse fibroblasts. Accordingly, this portion of the Q6 class I gene may play a regulatory role in tissue-specific expression. Serological analyses of hybrid Q6 proteins suggested that Q6 may be a structural gene for CR (H-2 crossreactive) antigen found normally on subpopulations of lymphocytes. If this identification is correct, Q6 gene will define a new category of class I genes encoding approximately 40,000 mol wt molecules and carrying a characteristic truncated cytoplasmic tail. Analysis of L cells transfected with Q6 hybrid genes demonstrated also that the cytotoxic T cells specific for Qa-2a region-coded antigens recognize the amino-terminal alpha 1-alpha 2 domain of Q6 fusion products. This recognition can be blocked by anti-Qa-2a alloantiserum and monoclonal antibodies reactive with the alpha 3-beta 2-microglobulin portion of the Q6 hybrids. We propose that the structural requirements for the anti-Qa-2a cytotoxic T lymphocyte-specific epitopes on target molecules are the same as for anti-H-2-alloreactive cytotoxic T lymphocyte determinants on transplantation antigens and that the mechanism of target recognition is similar in both cases. This interpretation is consistent with the following structural similarities found in both categories of class I molecules: (a) Kd and Q6 alpha 1-alpha 2 domains share serologically defined epitopes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:2580938

  13. N-glycosylation of asparagine 8 regulates surface expression of major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related protein A (MICA) alleles dependent on threonine 24

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Maiken Mellergaard; Skovbakke, Sarah Line; Schneider, Christine L.;

    2014-01-01

    NKG2D is an activating receptor expressed on several types of human lymphocytes. NKG2D ligands can be induced upon cell stress and are frequently targeted post-translationally in infected or transformed cells, in order to avoid immune recognition. Virus infection and inflammation alter protein N...... addition we show that this regulatory mechanism of MICA surface expression is likely targeted during different pathological conditions....

  14. The Major Histocompatibility Complex–related Fc Receptor for IgG (FcRn) Binds Albumin and Prolongs Its Lifespan

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudhury, Chaity; Mehnaz, Samina; Robinson, John M.; Hayton, William L.; Pearl, Dennis K.; Roopenian, Derry C.; Anderson, Clark L.

    2003-01-01

    The inverse relationship between serum albumin concentration and its half-life suggested to early workers that albumin would be protected from a catabolic fate by a receptor-mediated mechanism much like that proposed for IgG. We show here that albumin binds FcRn in a pH dependent fashion, that the lifespan of albumin is shortened in FcRn-deficient mice, and that the plasma albumin concentration of FcRn-deficient mice is less than half that of wild-type mice. These results affirm the hypothesi...

  15. Depleted genetic variation of the European ground squirrel in Central Europe in both microsatellites and the major histocompatibility complex gene: implications for conservation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Říčanová, Štěpánka; Bryja, Josef; Cosson, J.-F.; Gedeon, C.; Choleva, Lukáš; Ambros, M.; Sedláček, F.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 4 (2011), s. 1115-1129. ISSN 1566-0621 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06073 Grant ostatní: European Science Foundation(XE) ConGen EX/1141 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519; CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : Souslik * Endangered species * Habitat fragmentation * DRB * MHC Class II Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 1.610, year: 2011

  16. Detection of major histocompatibility complex/human cartilage gp-39 complexes in rheumatoid arthritis synovitis as a specific and independent histologic marker

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baeten, D; Steenbakkers, PGA; Rijnders, AMW; Boots, AM; Veys, EM; De Keyser, F

    2004-01-01

    Objective. Peptide 263-275 is the immunodominant epitope of human cartilage (HC) gp-39, a candidate autoantigen in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We recently generated and characterized a monoclonal antibody (mAb) called 12A, which is directed against HLA-DR4/HC gp-39(263-275) complexes and inhibits spe

  17. Localization at high resolution of antibody-induced mobilization of vaccinia virus hemagglutinin and the major histocompatibility antigens on the plasma membrane of infected cells

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    We examined the consequence of simultaneous or independent binding of monospecific antibody to the hemagglutinin (HA) of vaccinia virus and the A-, B- and -determinants of HLA on HeLa or Raji cells or KkDk determinants of H-2 on L929 cells. The bound antibodies were marked by goat-anti-mouse (GAM) or goat-anti-rabbit (GAR) fluorochrome conjugates suitable for light microscopy and GAM or GAR gold conjugates, used in electron microscopy. Specificity and amount of antibody adsorbed was ascertain...

  18. Increased calcium deposits and decreased Ca2+ -ATPase in erythrocytes of ascitic broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai; Zhao, Lihong; Geng, Guangrui; Ma, Liqin; Dong, Shishan; Xu, Tong; Wang, Jianlin; Wang, Huiyu; Tian, Yong; Qiao, Jian

    2011-06-01

    The decrease of erythrocyte deformability may be one of the predisposing factors for pulmonary hypertension and ascites in broiler chickens. In mammals, the cytoplasmic calcium is a major regulator of erythrocyte deformability. In this study, the erythrocyte deformability was measured, and the precise locations of Ca2+ and Ca2+ -ATPase in the erythrocytes were investigated in chickens with ascites syndrome induced by low ambient temperature. The results showed that ascitic broilers had higher filtration index of erythrocyte compared with control groups, indicating a decrease in erythrocyte deformability in ascitic broilers. The more calcium deposits were observed in the erythrocytes of ascitic broilers compared with those of the age-matched control birds. The Ca2+ -ATPase reactive grains were significantly decreased on the erythrocyte membranes of ascitic broilers. Our data suggest that accumulation of intracellular calcium and inhibition of Ca2+ -ATPase might be important factors for the reduced deformability of the erythrocytes of ascitic broilers. PMID:20728193

  19. GC and GC-MS studies of the effects of gamma-irradiation on olive oil and chicken skin tissue fat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reduction of the microbial cell count in a frozen packaged chicken by ionizing radiation is an advantageous method with a microbiologically optimum dose of 4 kGy (5). However, the detection of irradiation in poultry is a problem in food analysis. Our study focused on to the possible changes in the fatty acid composition and formation of long-chain hydrocarbons in the chicken fat. The composition of chicken fat is complex. Therefore, our study was started with some pure fatty acids and a vegetable oil consisting mainly of triglycerides of fatty acids and having, qualitatively, the same fatty acids as the chicken. Pure olive oil (a retail oil from Italy) was chosen for the purpose. Later, also fat extracted from chicken skin was analysed. All samples were analysed as irradiated and non-irradiated. The results show that no new radiolytically induced fatty acids or other related compounds could be detected by using a BP-21 polar capillary column and flame ionization detector. Moreover, the composition of the major fatty acids remained constant. In the qualitative analysis of hydrocarbons produced by irradiation, it was shown that there is a distinct difference in the hydrocarbon pattern between non-irradiated and irradiated chicken skin tissues. (5 figs, 2 tabs, 6 refs)

  20. Updating parameters of the chicken processing line model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurowicka, Dorota; Nauta, Maarten; Jozwiak, Katarzyna; Cooke, Roger

    2010-01-01

    updating parameters of the model to better describe processes observed in slaughterhouses. We propose Bayesian updating as a suitable technique to update expert judgment with microbiological data. Berrang and Dickens’s data are used to demonstrate performance of this method in updating parameters of the......A mathematical model of chicken processing that quantitatively describes the transmission of Campylobacter on chicken carcasses from slaughter to chicken meat product has been developed in Nauta et al. (2005). This model was quantified with expert judgment. Recent availability of data allows...... chicken processing line model....