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Sample records for chiapas se mexico

  1. Organochlorine pesticides in the ambient air of Chiapas, Mexico

    Alegria, Henry; Bidleman, Terry F.; Figueroa, Miguel Salvador

    2006-01-01

    Organochlorine (OC) pesticides were measured in the ambient air of Chiapas, Mexico during 2000-2001. Concentrations of some OC pesticides (DDTs, chlordanes, toxaphene) were elevated compared with levels in the Great Lakes region, while those of other pesticides were not (hexachlorocyclohexanes, dieldrin). While this suggests southern Mexico as a source region for the former group of chemicals, comparably high levels have also been reported in parts of the southern United States, where their suspected sources are soil emissions (DDTs, toxaphene) and termiticide usage (chlordane). Ratios of p,p'-DDT/p,p'-DDE and trans-chlordane/cis-chlordane/trans-nonachlor (TC/CC/TN) in Chiapas suggest a mixture of fresh and weathered sources, while congener profiles of toxaphene suggest emission of old residues from soils. This is supported by air parcel back trajectory analysis, which indicated that air masses over Chiapas at the time of sampling had previously passed over areas of continuing or recent use of some OC pesticides as well as areas of past use. - Elevated levels of several organochlorine pesticides were found in the ambient air of southern Mexico

  2. Organochlorine pesticides in the ambient air of Chiapas, Mexico.

    Alegria, Henry; Bidleman, Terry F; Figueroa, Miguel Salvador

    2006-04-01

    Organochlorine (OC) pesticides were measured in the ambient air of Chiapas, Mexico during 2000-2001. Concentrations of some OC pesticides (DDTs, chlordanes, toxaphene) were elevated compared with levels in the Great Lakes region, while those of other pesticides were not (hexachlorocyclohexanes, dieldrin). While this suggests southern Mexico as a source region for the former group of chemicals, comparably high levels have also been reported in parts of the southern United States, where their suspected sources are soil emissions (DDTs, toxaphene) and termiticide usage (chlordane). Ratios of p,p'-DDT/p,p'-DDE and trans-chlordane/cis-chlordane/trans-nonachlor (TC/CC/TN) in Chiapas suggest a mixture of fresh and weathered sources, while congener profiles of toxaphene suggest emission of old residues from soils. This is supported by air parcel back trajectory analysis, which indicated that air masses over Chiapas at the time of sampling had previously passed over areas of continuing or recent use of some OC pesticides as well as areas of past use.

  3. Geology of El Chichon volcano, Chiapas, Mexico

    Duffield, Wendell A.; Tilling, Robert I.; Canul, Rene

    1984-03-01

    The (pre-1982) 850-m-high andesitic stratovolcano El Chichón, active during Pleistocene and Holocene time, is located in rugged, densely forested terrain in northcentral Chiapas, México. The nearest neighboring Holocene volcanoes are 275 km and 200 km to the southeast and northwest, respectively. El Chichón is built on Tertiary siltstone and sandstone, underlain by Cretaceous dolomitic limestone; a 4-km-deep bore hole near the east base of the volcano penetrated this limestone and continued 770 m into a sequence of Jurassic or Cretaceous evaporitic anhydrite and halite. The basement rocks are folded into generally northwest-trending anticlines and synclines. El Chichón is built over a small dome-like structure superposed on a syncline, and this structure may reflect cumulative deformation related to growth of a crustal magma reservoir beneath the volcano. The cone of El Chichón consists almost entirely of pyroclastic rocks. The pre-1982 cone is marked by a 1200-m-diameter (explosion?) crater on the southwest flank and a 1600-m-diameter crater apparently of similar origin at the summit, a lava dome partly fills each crater. The timing of cone and dome growth is poorly known. Field evidence indicates that the flank dome is older than the summit dome, and K-Ar ages from samples high on the cone suggest that the flank dome is older than about 276,000 years. At least three pyroclastic eruptions have occurred during the past 1250 radiocarbon years. Nearly all of the pyroclastic and dome rocks are moderately to highly porphyritic andesite, with plagioclase, hornblende and clinopyroxene the most common phenocrysts. Geologists who mapped El Chichón in 1980 and 1981 warned that the volcano posed a substantial hazard to the surrounding region. This warning was proven to be prophetic by violent eruptions that occurred in March and April of 1982. These eruptions blasted away nearly all of the summit dome, blanketed the surrounding region with tephra, and sent pyroclastic

  4. Prehispanic use of chili peppers in Chiapas, Mexico.

    Terry G Powis

    Full Text Available The genus Capsicum is New World in origin and represents a complex of a wide variety of both wild and domesticated taxa. Peppers or fruits of Capsicum species rarely have been identified in the paleoethnobotanical record in either Meso- or South America. We report here confirmation of Capsicum sp. residues from pottery samples excavated at Chiapa de Corzo in southern Mexico dated from Middle to Late Preclassic periods (400 BCE to 300 CE. Residues from 13 different pottery types were collected and extracted using standard techniques. Presence of Capsicum was confirmed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC/MS-MS Analysis. Five pottery types exhibited chemical peaks for Capsicum when compared to the standard (dihydrocapsaicin. No peaks were observed in the remaining eight samples. Results of the chemical extractions provide conclusive evidence for Capsicum use at Chiapas de Corzo during a 700 year period (400 BCE-300 CE. Presence of Capsicum in different types of culinary-associated pottery raises questions how chili pepper could have been used during this early time period. As Pre-Columbian cacao products sometimes were flavored using Capsicum, the same pottery sample set was tested for evidence of cacao using a theobromine marker: these results were negative. As each vessel that tested positive for Capsicum had a culinary use we suggest here the possibility that chili residues from the Chiapas de Corzo pottery samples reflect either paste or beverage preparations for religious, festival, or every day culinary use. Alternatively, some vessels that tested positive merely could have been used to store peppers. Most interesting from an archaeological context was the presence of Capsicum residue obtained from a spouted jar, a pottery type previously thought only to be used for pouring liquids.

  5. A taxonomic monograph of the genus Tylodinus Champion (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Cryptorhynchinae: Tylodina) of Chiapas, Mexico.

    Luna-Cozar, Jesús; Anderson, Robert S; Jones, Robert W; León-Corté, Jorge L

    2014-04-15

    The species of the genus Tylodinus from the Mexican state of Chiapas are revised. We examined 989 specimens representing 36 species; 23 species are grouped into eight species groups with 13 species considered as Incertae sedis. A total of 32 species are described as new and one species is a new record for México. Species groups  (numbers of species in parentheses) and species are: Tylodinus buchanani species group (6) T. buchanani new species (type locality: Chiapas, Unión Juárez, Volcán Tacan), T. exiguus new species (type locality: Chiapas, Motozintla, 7 km SSW Motozintla de Mendoza), T. ixchel new species (type locality: Chiapas, Unión Juarez, Volcán Tacan), T. jonesi new species (type locality: Chiapas, Angel Albino Corzo, Reserva de la Biosfera el Triunfo, Campamento el Quetzal), T. variabilis new species (type locality: Chiapas, San Cristóbal de las Casas, Cerro Huitepec), T. wibmeri new species (type locality: Chiapas, Motozintla, 7 km SSW Motozintla de Mendoza); Tylodinus canaliculatus species group (3) T. canaliculatus Champion (Chiapas, Unión Juárez, Volcán Tacan, new record for  México), T. sepulturaensis new species (Type locality: Chiapas, Villa Corzo, Ejido Sierra Morena), T. triumforium new species (Type locality: Chiapas, La Concordia, 4 km SE Custepec); Tylodinus cavicrus species group (3) T. cavicrus Champion, T. pseudocavicrus new species (type locality: Chiapas, San Cristóbal de las Casas, Cerro Huitepec), T. rugosus new species (type locality: Chiapas, Villa Flores, Sierra Morena); Tylodinus coapillensis species group (2) T. coapillensis new species (type locality: Chiapas, Coapilla, ca. 10.5 km NE Coapilla), T. leoncortesi new species (type locality: Chiapas, Pueblo Nuevo Solistahuacán, La Yerbabuena); Tylodinus mutabilis species group (2) Tylodinus mutabilis new species (type locality: Chiapas, Villa Corzo, Ejido Sierra Morena), T. parvus new species (type locality: Chiapas, Trinitaria, Lagunas de Montebello); Tylodinus

  6. Chemical and isotopic study of thermal springs and gas discharges from Sierra de Chiapas, Mexico

    Nencetti, A; Tassi, F; Vaselli, O [Department of Earth Sciences, Florence (Italy); Macias, J. L [Instituto de Geofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Magro, G [CNR-Institute of Geosciences and Earth Resources, Pisa (Italy); Capaccioni, B [Institute of Volcanology and Geochemistry, Urbino (Italy); Minissale, A [CNR-Institute of Geosciences and Earth Resources, Florence (Italy); Mora, J. C [Instituto de Geofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-01-15

    Thermal water and gas discharges south-east of El Chichon volcano, Mexico are associated mainly with NW-SE oriented fault systems. Spring discharges include i) waters with Na-Cl composition and TDS>3000 mg/L; ii) waters with Ca-SO{sub 4} composition and TDS values between 1400 and 2300 mg/L; iii) waters with Na-Cl composition and TDS of 800 to 2400 mg/L and sulphate content up to 650 mg/L and iv) waters with Ca-HCO{sub 3} composition and low salinity (TDS <250mg/L). Most of these waters are associated with free-gas discharges of N{sub 2} (up to 93 % by vol.), CO{sub 2} (2.4 to 31.2 % by vol.) and Ar (up to 1.25 % by vol.) with a predominant meteoric origin. H{sub 2}S is present only in gas samplers collected at El Azufre (up to 1.1 % by vol.). The {delta}13C CO{sub 2} values are always below -9.7% (PDB) and suggest a partially biogenic origin for CO{sub 2}. Chemical and isotopic features of spring discharges indicate that fluid circulation in the Sierra de Chiapas is mainly regulated by meteoric waters that tend to infiltrate the upper and middle-Cretaceous carbonate units up to the lower Cretaceous-upper Jurassic evaporitic formations (by Lopez-Ramos, 1982). The latter provide the main source of the species in solution. No evidence for high-to-medium enthalpy systems at depth beneath the Sierra de Chiapas has been found. [Spanish] La Sierra de Chiapas localizada en el Sureste de Mexico, se caracteriza por la presencia de descargas de gas y agua. La mayoria de los manantiales termales se asocian a rocas volcanicas Terciarias a lo largo de fallas regionales con orientacion NOSE. Las descargas termales se dividen en cuatro grupos: i) aguas con composicion Na-Cl y Solidos Disueltos Totales (SDT) >3000 mg/L; ii) aguas con composicion Ca-SO{sub 4} y valores de SDT entre 1400 y 2300 mg/L; iii) aguas con composicion Na-Cl, bajos contenidos de SDT (800 2400 mg/L) y un contenido de sulfato alto (hasta 650 mg/L) y iv) aguas con una composicion Ca-HCO{sub 3} y salinidad baja

  7. Screening markers for chronic atrophic gastritis in Chiapas, Mexico.

    Ley, C; Mohar, A; Guarner, J; Herrera-Goepfert, R; Figueroa, L S; Halperin, D; Parsonnet, J

    2001-02-01

    Intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinomas usually are preceded by chronic atrophic gastritis. Studies of gastric cancer prevention often rely on identification of this condition. In a clinical trial, we sought to determine the best serological screening method for chronic atrophic gastritis and compared our findings to the published literature. Test characteristics of potential screening tests (antibodies to Helicobacter pyloni or CagA, elevated gastrin, low pepsinogen, increased age) alone or in combination were examined among consecutive subjects enrolled in a study of H. pylori and preneoplastic gastric lesions in Chiapas, Mexico; 70% had chronic atrophic gastritis. English-language articles concerning screening for chronic atrophic gastritis were also reviewed. Sensitivity for chronic atrophic gastritis was highest for antibodies to H. pylori (92%) or CagA, or gastrin levels >25 ng/l (both 83%). Specificity, however, was low for these tests (18, 41, and 22%, respectively). Pepsinogen levels were highly specific but insensitive markers of chronic atrophic gastritis (for pepsinogen I gastritis screening. However, no screening test was both highly sensitive and highly specific for chronic atrophic gastritis.

  8. METALS POLLLUTION IN EL LIMON LAGOON, CHIAPAS, MEXICO

    Ma. Teresa Leal-Ascencio

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available El Limón Lagoon belongs to the Reforma county, in the State of Chiapas, Mexico. Massive fish killings have occurred in the lagoon, demanding a deeper study to determine the pollution state of the lagoon, as well as the possible cause of the deaths. Results show that the average concentrations of Zn, Ni, Cr, Cd and Cu in the lagoon are beyond the recommended limits in Canada and USA to avoid deleterious biological effects in aquatic species. Special mention has to be done for the case of Zn, with a maximum concentration of 1360 mg/kg, presumably associated with the use of this metal as a catalyst in a natural gas plant close to the lagoon. Although the industrial discharges comply with the Mexican Standards for metals in wastewaters, this has not been enough to avoid the accumulation of metals in sediments, which is a demonstration of failure of the Mexican Wastewater Standards that should be more restrictive especially in the case of lagoons with a low water recharge, taking into account the type of water body where the wastewater is loading. In the case of the application of this water for agriculture, the metals can accumulate in soils, with unwanted effects on crops.

  9. Integrated Risk Assessment to Natural Hazards in Motozintla, Chiapas, Mexico

    Novelo-Casanova, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    An integrated risk assessment includes the analysis of all components of individual constituents of risk such as baseline study, hazard identification and categorization, hazard exposure, and vulnerability. Vulnerability refers to the inability of people, organizations, and societies to withstand adverse impacts from multiple stressors to which they are exposed. These impacts are due to characteristics inherent in social interactions, institutions, and systems of cultural values. Thus, social vulnerability is a pre-existing condition that affects a society's ability to prepare for and recover from a disruptive event. Risk is the probability of a loss, and this loss depends on three elements: hazard, exposure, and vulnerability. Thus, risk is the estimated impact that a hazard event would have on people, services, facilities, structures and assets in a community. In this work we assess the risk to natural hazards in the community of Motozintla located in southern Mexico in the state of Chiapas (15.37N, 92.25W) with a population of about 20 000 habitants. Due to its geographical and geological location, this community is continuously exposed to many different natural hazards (earthquakes, landslides, volcanic eruptions, and floods). To determine the level of exposure of the community to natural hazards, we developed integrated studies and analysis of seismic microzonation, landslide and flood susceptibility as well as volcanic impact using standard methodologies. Social vulnerability was quantified from data obtained from local families interviews. Five variables were considered: household structure quality and design, availability of basic public services, family economic conditions, existing family plans for disaster preparedness, and risk perception.The number of families surveyed was determined considering a sample statistically significant. The families that were interviewed were selected using the simple random sampling technique with replacement. With these

  10. Integrated Risk Research. Case of Study: Motozintla, Chiapas, Mexico

    Novelo-Casanova, D. A.; Jaimes, M.

    2015-12-01

    This integrated risk research include the analysis of all components of individual constituents of risk such hazard identification, hazard exposure, and vulnerability. We determined risk to natural hazards in the community of Motozintla located in southern Mexico in the state of Chiapas (15.37ºN, 92.25ºW. Due to its geographical and geological location, this community is continuously exposed mainly to earthquakes, landslides and floods. We developed integrated studies and analysis of seismic zonation, landslides and flood susceptibility using standard methodologies. Vulnerability was quantified from data collected from local families interviews considering five social variables: characteristics of housing construction, availability of basic public services, family economic conditions, existing community plans for disaster preparedness, and risk perception. Local families surveyed were randomly selected considering a sample statistically significant. Our results were spatially represented using a Geographical Information System (GIS). Structural vulnerability curves were generated for typical housing constructions. Our integrated risk analysis demonstrates that the community of Motozintla has a high level of structural and socio-economical risk to floods and earthquakes. More than half of the population does not know any existing Civil Protection Plan and perceive that they are in high risk to landslides and floods. Although the community is located in a high seismic risk zone, most of the local people believe that cannot be impacted by a large earthquake. These natural and social conditions indicate that the community of Motozintla has a very high level of risk to natural hazards. This research will support local decision makers in developing an integrated comprehensive natural hazards mitigation and prevention program.

  11. Embracing epiphytes in sustainable forest management: a pilot study from the Highlands of Chiapas, Mexico

    Wolf, J.H.D.; Bruijnzeel, L.A.; Scatena, F.N.; Hamilton, L.S.

    2010-01-01

    Vascular epiphyte biomass and species richness were investigated in 16 anthropogenically disturbed pine-oak forests within an area of ~400 km2 in the Highlands of Chiapas, southern Mexico. Epiphyte biomass on 35 host oak trees in six diameter classes varied from 0.8 to 243 kg dry-weight and

  12. Technology-Based Participatory Learning for Indigenous Children in Chiapas Schools, Mexico

    Heredia, Yolanda; Icaza, Jose I.

    2012-01-01

    This research created a technology-based learning environment at two schools belonging to the National Council of Educational Development (CONAFE) for indigenous children in the state of Chiapas, Mexico. The purpose of the study was to describe the educational impact of using the Classmate PC netbooks and the Sugar Educational Platform in the…

  13. Patterns in species richness and distribution of vascular epiphytes in Chiapas, Mexico

    Wolf, J.H.D.; Flamenco-S., A.

    2003-01-01

    Aim We aim to assess regional patterns in the distribution and species richness of vascular epiphytes with an emphasis on forests that differ in altitude and the amount of rainfall. Location Tropical America, in particularly the 75000 km2 large state of Chiapas in southern Mexico at 14.5-18.0º N.

  14. Sedimentation in Rio La Venta Canyon in Netzahualcoyotl Reservoir, Chiapas, Mexico

    Juan Antonio de la Fuente; Tom Lisle; Jose Velasquez; Bonnie L. Allison; Alisha Miller

    2000-01-01

    Sedimentation of Rio La Venta as it enters the Netzahualcoyotl Reservoir in Chiapas, Mexico, threatens a unique part of the aquatic ecosystem. Rio La Venta enters the reservoir via a narrow canyon about 16 km long with spectacular, near-vertical limestone bluffs up to 320 m high and inhabited by the flora and fauna of a pristine tropical forest.

  15. Hookworm infection and anemia in adult women in rural Chiapas, Mexico Anemia e infección por Necator americanus en mujeres en Chiapas, México

    Paula E. Brentlinger

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe associations between anemia and hookworm (Necator americanus infection in hospitalized women in rural Chiapas, Mexico. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the hospital records of 68 anemic women (defined as having a hemoglobin level OBJETIVO: Describir la asociación entre anemia severa e infección con Necator americanus en una población de mujeres hospitalizadas en el estado de Chiapas, México. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: En el registro de ingresos del año 1999 de un hospital rural en Altamirano, Chiapas, se identificaron a las pacientes con diagnósticos de egreso de anemia (definida como hemoglobina<10mg/dl y/o parasitosis intestinal. También se revisó el registro de transfusiones para identificar a las mujeres mayores de 14 años de edad que recibieron sangre. La revisión de expedientes y el análisis de datos se llevó a cabo en el año 2000. Las comparaciones de las características de las pacientes se hicieron con la prueba t de Student (para variables continuas y la prueba ji2 (para variables categóricas. La significancia estadística se estableció con un valor de p< 0.01. RESULTADOS: En las mujeres en quienes se realizó examen coproscópico, 50% tuvieron N. americanus. La presencia de N. americanus no excluyó la presencia de otro factor de riesgo para anemia, por ejemplo embarazo o hemorragia. Los niveles de hemoglobina de las mujeres infectadas con N. americanus fueron significativamente más bajos (promedio 4.1 g/dl que los de las demás mujeres anémicas (promedio 7.0 gm/dl, y la prevalencia de N. americanus en mujeres anémicas fue más alta (50.0% que en la población atendida por el hospital (1.9%. CONCLUSIONES: Aunque la prevalencia de infección con N. americanus no se considera alta en la población general mexicana, fue importante en las mujeres anémicas que se sometieron a coproscopía en nuestro estudio. Las mujeres anémicas ameritan coproscopía donde existe N. americanus, y pueden

  16. Comportamiento etológico de bovinos en sistemas silvopastoriles en Chiapas, México Ethological performance of cattle in silvopastoral systems of Chiapas, Mexico

    E Pérez

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available En el Centro Agropecuario de Capacitación y Desarrollo Sustentable San Antonio, en el municipio Chiapa de Corzo, Estado de Chiapas, México, se desarrolló esta investigación con el objetivo de determinar el efecto del uso. de árboles forrajeros en el comportamiento etológico de bovinos en condiciones de pastoreo intensivo. Se utiliza­ron 12 toretes encastados (Suizo x Cebú, con un peso vivo promedio de 157±3 kg, en un diseño completamente al azar con dos tratamientos (T1: Sistema silvopastoril y T2: Sistema monocultivo y seis repeticiones. El estrato herbáceo estaba formado por Panicum maximum var. Tanzania, en ambos sitios. Con relación al tiempo que los animales destinaban a la actividad de pastoreo, no se encontraron diferencias significativas entre tratamientos. Se observó una menor temperatura durante las horas de la mañana y la tarde en el sistema silvopastoril (23,9 y 26,6°C, en comparación con el sistema en monocultivo (26,4 y 28,1°C. Entre las variables pastoreo y tempera­tura in situ se encontró una correlación negativa en ambos sistemas, pero más marcada en el T2 (R=-0,41166­P=0,0003 que en el T1 (R=-0,28453-P=0,0154. Sin embargo, la tasa de crecimiento mostró diferencias signifi­cativas (PIn the San Antonio Agricultural Center of Training and Sustainable Development, in the Chiapa de Corzo municipality, Chiapas State, Mexico, this study was developed with the objective of determining the effect of the use of forage trees on the ethological performance of cattle under intensive grazing conditions. Twelve young bulls wee used (Swiss x Zebu, with an average live weight of 157±3 kg, in a completely randomized design with two treatments (T1: Silvopastoral system and T2: Monocrop system and six repetitions. The herbaceous stratum was formed by Panicum maximum var. Tanzania, in both sites. Regarding the time the animals destined to the grazing activity, no significant differences were found between treatments. A

  17. [Parasites of the Central American tapir Tapirus bairdii (Perissodactyla: Tapiridae) in Chiapas, Mexico].

    Cruz Aldán, Epigmenio; Lira Torres, Iván; Güiris Andrade, Dario Marcelino; Osorio Sarabia, David; Quintero M, Ma Teresa

    2006-06-01

    We analyzed 19 samples of Baird's tapir feces from La Sepultura Biosphere Reserve, collected between March and July 1999. We also took samples directly from a male tapir captured at the Montes Azules Biosphere Reserve. Both reserves are in Chiapas, Mexico. We used five techniques: flotation, MacMaster, micrometric, Ritchie's sedimentation and Ferreira's quantitative. In addition, we collected ectoparasites from animals captured in both reserves and from a captive couple from Tuxtla Gutierrez, Chiapas. These nematodes and protozoans were found: Agriostomun sp., Lacandoria sp., Neomurshidia sp., Trichostrongylus sp., Strongylus sp., Brachylumus sp, and an unidentified species of ancilostomaide. We also found Eimeria sp. and Balantidium coli, as well as the mites Dermacentor halli, Dermacentor latus, Amblyomma cajannense, Amblyomma coelebs, Amblyomma ovale, Anocentor nitens and Ixodes bicornis.

  18. Woody plant diversity and structure of shade-grown-coffee plantations in Northern Chiapas, Mexico

    Lorena Soto-Pinto

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Shade-grown coffee is an agricultural system that contains some forest-like characteristics. However, structure and diversity are poorly known in shade coffee systems. In 61 coffee-growers’ plots of Chiapas, Mexico, structural variables of shade vegetation and coffee yields were measured, recording species and their use. Coffee stands had five vegetation strata. Seventy seven woody species mostly used as wood were found (mean density 371.4 trees per hectare. Ninety percent were native species (40% of the local flora, the remaining were introduced species, mainly fruit trees/shrubs. Diametric distribution resembles that of a secondary forest. Principal Coordinates Analysis grouped plots in four classes by the presence of Inga, however the majority of plots are diverse. There was no difference in equitability among groups or coffee yields. Coffee yield was 835 g clean coffee per shrub, or ca. 1668 kg ha-1. There is a significant role of shade-grown coffee as diversity refuge for woody plants and presumably associated fauna, as well as an opportunity for shade-coffee growers to participate in the new biodiversity-friendly-coffee marketEl café bajo sombra es un sistema agrícola que contiene algunas características de los bosques. Sin embargo, las características estructurales y de diversidad de la sombra del café son poco conocidas. En 61 parcelas de productores del norte de Chiapas, Mexico, se midieron variables estructurales de la vegetación de sombra y los rendimientos de café, registrando las especies y sus usos. Los cafetales presentaron cinco estratos de vegetación. Se encontraron 77 especies leñosas, la mayoría de uso maderable (densidad promedio de 371.4 árboles por hectárea. Noventa por ciento fueron especies nativas (40% de la flora local, el porcentaje restante fueron especies introducidas, principalmente árboles o arbustos frutales. La distribución diamétrica se asemeja a la distribución típica de bosques secundarios

  19. Apatite Fission-Track Analysis of the Middle Jurassic Todos Santos Formation from Chiapas, Mexico.

    Abdullin, Fanis; Solé, Jesús; Shchepetilnikova, Valentina; Solari, Luigi; Ortega-Obregón, Carlos

    2014-05-01

    The Sierra de Chiapas (SCH), located in the south of Mexico, is a complex geological province that can be divided on four different lithological or tectonic areas: (1) the Chiapas Massif Complex (CMC); (2) the Central Depression; (3) the Strike-slip Fault Province, and (4) the Chiapas Fold-and-thrust Belt. The CMC mostly consists of Permian granitoids and meta-granitoids, and represents the basement of the SCH. During the Jurassic period red beds and salt were deposited on this territory, related to the main pulse of rifting and opening of the Gulf of Mexico. Most of the Cretaceous stratigraphy contains limestones and dolomites deposited on a marine platform setting during the postrift stage of the Gulf of Mexico rift. During the Cenozoic Era took place the major clastic sedimentation along the SCH. According the published low-temperature geochronology data (Witt et al., 2012), SCH has three main phases of thermo-tectonic history: (1) slow exhumation between 35 and 25 Ma, that affected mainly the basement (CMC) and is probably related to the migration of the Chortís block; (2) fast exhumation during the Middle-Late Miocene caused by strike-slip deformation that affects almost all Chiapas territory; (3) period of rapid cooling from 6 to 5 Ma, that affects the Chiapas Fold-and-thrust Belt, coincident with the landward migration of the Caribbean-North America plate boundaries. The two last events were the most significant on the formation of the present-day topography of the SCH. However, the stratigraphy of the SCH shows traces of the existence of earlier tectonic events. This study presents preliminary results of apatite fission-track (AFT) dating of sandstones from the Todos Santos Formation (Middle Jurassic). The analyses are performed with in situ uranium determination using LA-ICP-MS (e.g., Hasebe et al., 2004). The AFT data indicate that this Formation has suffered high-grade diagenesis (probably over 150 ºC) and the obtained cooling ages, about 70-60 Ma

  20. Malnutrition Among Children Younger Than 5 Years-Old in Conflict Zones of Chiapas, Mexico

    Sánchez-Pérez, Héctor Javier; Hernán, Miguel A.; Ríos-González, Adriana; Arana-Cedeño, Marcos; Navarro, Albert; Ford, Douglas; Micek, Mark A.; Brentlinger, Paula

    2007-01-01

    We performed a cross-sectional, community-based survey, supplemented by interviews with community leaders in Chiapas, Mexico, to examine the prevalence and predictors of child malnutrition in regions affected by the Zapatista conflict. The prevalence rates of stunting, wasting, and underweight were 54.1%, 2.9%, and 20.3%, respectively, in 2666 children aged younger than 5 years. Stunting was associated with indigenous ethnicity, poverty, region of residence, and intracommunity division. The results indicate that malnutrition is a serious public health problem in the studied regions. PMID:17194868

  1. Characterization of archaeological ceramic from Lagartero, Chiapas, Mexico, by nuclear and conventional techniques

    Tenorio, D.; Jimenez R, M.; Monroy G, F.; Romero G, E. T. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Rivero T, S., E-mail: dolores.tenorio@inin.gob.m [Instituto Nacional de Antropologia e Historia, Lic. Primo Verdad No. 3, 06060 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    Ceramic pot shards collected at the archaeological Mayan site of Lagartero, Chiapas, Mexico were analyzed by neutron activation analysis and data were statistically studied. The ceramics were of local manufacture and from other sites of the Upper Grijalva Basin and Guatemalan Lowlands and Highlands. X-ray diffraction indicated that quartz, feldspars montmorillonite and calcite are the main components of pastes. Pigments were analyzed by means of scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, and hematite, pyrolusite, maghemite and calcite were identified. A discussion is presented in the context of the Mayan region. (Author)

  2. Characterization of archaeological ceramic from Lagartero, Chiapas, Mexico, by nuclear and conventional techniques

    Tenorio, D.; Jimenez R, M.; Monroy G, F.; Romero G, E. T.; Rivero T, S.

    2010-01-01

    Ceramic pot shards collected at the archaeological Mayan site of Lagartero, Chiapas, Mexico were analyzed by neutron activation analysis and data were statistically studied. The ceramics were of local manufacture and from other sites of the Upper Grijalva Basin and Guatemalan Lowlands and Highlands. X-ray diffraction indicated that quartz, feldspars montmorillonite and calcite are the main components of pastes. Pigments were analyzed by means of scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, and hematite, pyrolusite, maghemite and calcite were identified. A discussion is presented in the context of the Mayan region. (Author)

  3. The 8 September 2017 Tsunami Triggered by the M w 8.2 Intraplate Earthquake, Chiapas, Mexico

    Ramírez-Herrera, María Teresa; Corona, Néstor; Ruiz-Angulo, Angel; Melgar, Diego; Zavala-Hidalgo, Jorge

    2018-01-01

    The 8 September 2017, M w 8.2 earthquake offshore Chiapas, Mexico, is the largest earthquake in recorded history in Chiapas since 1902. It caused damage in the states of Oaxaca, Chiapas and Tabasco, including more than 100 fatalities, over 1.5 million people were affected, and 41,000 homes were damaged in the state of Chiapas alone. This earthquake, an intraplate event on a normal fault on the oceanic subducting plate, generated a tsunami recorded at several tide gauge stations in Mexico and on the Pacific Ocean. Here, we report the physical effects of the tsunami on the Chiapas coast and analyze the societal implications of this tsunami on the basis of our post-tsunami field survey. The associated tsunami waves were recorded first at Huatulco tide gauge station at 5:04 (GMT) 12 min after the earthquake. We covered ground observations along 41 km of the coast of Chiapas, encompassing the sites with the highest projected wave heights based on our preliminary tsunami model (maximum tsunami amplitudes between 94.5° and 93.0°W). Runup and inundation distances were measured along eight sites. The tsunami occurred at low tide. The maximum runup was 3 m at Boca del Cielo, and maximum inundation distance was 190 m in Puerto Arista, corresponding to the coast in front of the epicenter and in the central sector of the Gulf of Tehuantepec. Tsunami scour and erosion was evident along the Chiapas coast. Tsunami deposits, mainly sand, reached up to 32 cm thickness thinning landward up to 172 m distance.

  4. Levels of Organochlorine Pesticides in Blood Plasma from Residents of Malaria-Endemic Communities in Chiapas, Mexico

    Ruiz-Suarez, L.E.; Castro-Chan, R.A.; Rivero-Perez, N.E.; Trejo-Acevedo, A.; Guillen-Navarro, G.K.; Geissen, V.; Bello-Mendoza, R.

    2014-01-01

    Organochlorine (OC) pesticides have been extensively used for pest control in agriculture and against malaria vectors in the region of Soconusco, Chiapas, in southern Mexico. Our study aimed to identify whether the inhabitants of four Soconusco communities at different locations (i.e., altitudes)

  5. MONUMENTOS ARQUEOLÓGICOS DEL ÁREA DE GUAQUITEPEC-SITALÁ, CHIAPAS, MÉXICO: DATOS DISPONIBLES Y NUEVAS INTERPRETACIONES (Archaeological Monuments of the Guaquitepec-Sitalá Area, Chiapas, Mexico: Available Data and New Interpretations

    Alejandro Sheseña

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available El artículo está dedicado al estudio de un grupo de monumentos arqueológicos localizados en la región de Guaquitepec y Sitalá, en el norte de Chiapas, México, una región poco socorrida por los estudiosos de la cultura maya. Se propone, a la luz de los conocimientos con los que actualmente se cuenta sobre la historia de los antiguos mayas, que dichos monumentos son evidencia de la existencia de una importante confluencia de rutas de comunicación en este lugar, ampliamente usada en la antigüedad por las entidades políticas circunvecinas. ENGLISH: This article is devoted to the study of a group of archaeological monuments located in the region around Guaquitepec and Sitalá in the north of Chiapas, Mexico, a region little served by scholars of Maya culture. In light of current research available on the history of the ancient Maya in the region, this article proposes that these monuments are evidence of an important confluence of communication routes that were widely used in antiquity by the surrounding political entities.

  6. [The effect of contraception on fertility in the border region of Chiapas, Mexico].

    Nazar-Beutelspacher, A; Halperin-Frisch, D; Salvatierra-Izaba, B

    1996-01-01

    To estimate the effect of contraception on fertility in the border region of Chiapas, Mexico. In 1994 an epidemiological cross-sectional study was carried out on a representative sample of 1,560 non-indigenous women between ages 15 and 49 in the border region of Chiapas. The prevalence of contraception practices and the total fertility rates (TFR) were obtained and stratified by rural, intermediate and urban communities. TFR were compared between women who had never used contraceptives and those who had used them. The estimated TFR was 3.67 and varied from 4.14 in rural areas to 3.36 in urban areas. There were no differences in the TFR (3.74 and 3.88) nor in the average live births (3.47 and 3.48) between women who had never used contraceptives and those who had used them. The major effect of contraception on fertility was observed in rural areas. Factors which influence the small impact of contraception on fertility include the late use of these methods and the early age of first union among users.

  7. New constraints on the origin of the Sierra Madre de Chiapas (south Mexico) from sediment provenance and apatite thermochronometry

    Witt, C.; Brichau, S.; Carter, A.

    2012-12-01

    The timing and source of deformation responsible for formation of the Sierra Madre de Chiapas (south Mexico) are unclear. To address this, apatite fission track and U-Th-He thermochronometry, combined with zircon U-Pb dating, were performed on bedrock and sedimentary samples of the Sierra Madre de Chiapas to discern timing of exhumation and identify sediment source areas. The U-Pb results show that Paleocene-Eocene terrigenous units outcropping at the northern section of the Sierra were mostly derived from Grenville (˜1 Ga) basement whereas the internal sections of the chain yield mainly Permian to Triassic ages (circa 270-230 Ma) typical of the Chiapas massif complex. Grenville-sourced sediments are most probably sourced by the Oaxacan block or the Guichicovi complex and were deposited to the north of the Sierra in a foreland setting related to a Laramide deformation front. Other possibly source areas may be related to metasedimentary units widely documented at the south Maya block such as the Baldi unit. The apatite fission track and U-Th-He data combined with previously published results record three main stages in exhumation history: (1) slow exhumation between 35 and 25 Ma affecting mainly the Chiapas massif complex; (2) fast exhumation between 16 and 9 Ma related to the onset of major strike-slip deformation affecting both the Chiapas massif complex and Chiapas fold-and-thrust belt; and (3) a 6 to 5 Ma period of rapid cooling that affected the Chiapas fold-and-thrust belt, coincident with the landward migration of the Caribbean-North America plate boundaries. These data suggest that most of the topographic growth of the Sierra Madre de Chiapas took place in the middle to late Miocene. The new thermochronological evidence combined with stratigraphic and kinematic information suggests that the left-lateral strike-slip faults bounding the Chiapas fold-and-thrust belt to the west may have accommodated most of the displacement between the North American and

  8. Seroprevalence of human Trypanosoma cruzi infection in diferent geografic zones of Chiapas, Mexico.

    Mazariego-Arana, M A; Monteón, V M; Ballinas-Verdugo, M A; Hernández-Becerril, N; Alejandre-Aguilar, R; Reyes, P A

    2001-01-01

    A serologic survey was carried out in four different geographic zones of Chiapas, Mexico. A total of 1,333 samples were collected from residents of thirteen communities located on the Coast, Central Mountain, Lacandon Forest and a zone called Mesochiapas. One hundred and fifty one seropositive individuals (11.3%) were identified. Human Trypanosoma cruzi infection was influenced by geography. In the Lacandon Forest and Central Mountains there was a higher seroprevalence 32.1 and 13.8% respectively, than on the coast (1.2%). In Mesochiapas there were no seropositive individuals among the 137 persons tested. An active transmission is probably continuing because seropositive cases (13.8%) were detected in children under 10 years of age. The vector recognized on the Coast was Triatoma dimidiata while in the Lacandon Forest it was Rhodnius prolixus.

  9. Paleomagnetism of the Todos Santos Formation in the Maya Block, Chiapas, Mexico: Preliminary Results

    Godinez-Urban, A.; Molina-Garza, R. S.; Iriondo, A.; Geissman, J. W.

    2008-12-01

    Preliminary results of a paleomagnetic study on jurassic volcanic rocks (U-Pb 188.8 +/- 3.2Ma) locally interbedded with red beds assigned to the Todos Santos Formation, sampled in the Homoclinal Tectonic Province of the Neogene Fold Belt, Chiapas-Mexico, reveal multi component magnetizations acquired during pre- and post- folding of these rocks. The samples responded well to thermal demagnetization, but not so to AF demagnetization, suggesting that a high coercivity mineral phase like hematite is the main remanence carrier. The post-folding B-component direction of Dec=174.3 Inc=-30.6 (k=46; alpha95=13.6; N=4) represents a recent Tertiary? overprint; while the pre-folding C-component direction of Dec=329.9 Inc=7.8 (k=12.5; alpha95=16.3; N=8) is in agreement with a previously reported small data set for the Todos Santos Formation. When compared to the North American reference direction (Jurassic Kayenta Formation) the observed direction indicates a counterclockwise rotation of 35.9 +/- 16.6 degrees, and moderate north to south latitudinal displacement. If a reference pole from NE North America is used, the amount of counterclockwise rotation and latitudinal displacement are both slightly reduced. If the assumption that Jurassic strata in Chiapas reflect displacement of the Maya Block, then these data are consistent with reconstructions of the Maya Block in the Gulf of Mexico region. Other sites sampled in Jurassic strata suggest that in addition to the interpreted regional rotation, local (vertical-axis) rotations may have affected the region in more recent times.

  10. Estrategia educativa para incrementar el cumplimiento del régimen antituberculoso en Chiapas, México Educational strategy for improving patient compliance with the tuberculosis treatment regimen in Chiapas, Mexico

    Guadalupe del Carmen Álvarez Gordillo

    2003-12-01

    ,4%, respectivamente; RR = 1,20; IC95%: 1,03 a 1,39; P = 0,015. Se observó que los médicos de la región fronteriza de Chiapas enfocan su actividad hacia la medicina curativa, más que a la preventiva y a la comprensión de las causas sociales de las enfermedades. CONCLUSIONES: Mediante las actividades educativas de la intervención se logró aumentar la proporción de pacientes que cumplieron el tratamiento. Los servicios de salud pueden mejorar el control de la tuberculosis en Chiapas con los recursos de los que disponen actualmente. Se debe transmitir a los médicos una visión integral de los problemas de salud en Chiapas y fomentar una mejor relación entre médico y paciente. También se debe procurar que los servicios de salud abran espacios educativos y de participación comunitaria que permitan enfrentar de manera global los problemas de salud pública.OBJECTIVE: To implement a training program for physicians and patients and assess its effectiveness in terms of patient compliance with the pulmonary tuberculosis treatment regimen in the border region of Chiapas, Mexico. METHODS: A controlled intervention study was performed with patients over 15 years of age who had pulmonary tuberculosis diagnosed by direct microscopy (bacilloscopy between 1 February 2001 and 31 January 2002 in health units randomly selected in the border region of Chiapas, Mexico. The sample was made up of patients who sought consultation at 23 and 25 health units over that period (intervention and control group, respectively. The intervention group took part in a training program for health personnel in which the following were discussed: the social, cultural, and economic aspects of tuberculosis; the theoretical and practical underpinnings of the diagnosis and treatment of the illness, and the establishment of self-help groups. Self-help groups were also created for all patients at the 23 units where the intervention group sought consultation. All patients were given a short-term treatment regimen with

  11. Levels of Organochlorine Pesticides in Blood Plasma from Residents of Malaria-Endemic Communities in Chiapas, Mexico

    Ruiz-Suárez, Luz E.; Castro-Chan, Ricardo A.; Rivero-Pérez, Norma E.; Trejo-Acevedo, Antonio; Guillén-Navarro, Griselda K.; Geissen, Violette; Bello-Mendoza, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Organochlorine (OC) pesticides have been extensively used for pest control in agriculture and against malaria vectors in the region of Soconusco, Chiapas, in southern Mexico. Our study aimed to identify whether the inhabitants of four Soconusco communities at different locations (i.e., altitudes) and with different history of use of OC pesticides, have been similarly exposed to residues of these pesticides. In particular, we analyzed the potential relationship between levels of OC pesticides ...

  12. Anti-tuberculosis treatment defaulting: an analysis of perceptions and interactions in Chiapas, Mexico Abandono del tratamiento antituberculosis: un análisis de percepciones e interacciones en Chiapas, México

    Ivett Reyes-Guillén

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the perceptions and interactions of the actors involved in anti-tuberculosis treatment, and to explore their influence in treatment defaulting in Los Altos region of Chiapas, Mexico. MATERIAL AND METHODS: From November 2002 to August 2003, in-depth interviews were administered to patients with PTB, patients' family members, institutional physicians, community health coordinators, and traditional medicine practitioners. RESULTS: We found different perceptions about PTB between patients and their families and among health personnel, as well as communication barriers between actors. Defaulting is considered to be mainly due to the treatment's adverse effects. CONCLUSIONS: It is necessary to conduct research and interventions in the studied area with the aim of changing perceptions, improving sensitization, quality and suitability of management of patients with PTB in a multicultural context, and promoting collaboration between institutional and traditional medicine.OBJETIVO: Analizar percepciones e interacciones entre actores involucrados en el tratamiento antituberculosis y su influencia en el abandono del tratamiento en los Altos de Chiapas, México. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: De noviembre 2002 a agosto 2003, se realizaron entrevistas a profundidad a pacientes con TBP, familiares, médicos institucionales, coordinadores comunitarios de salud y médicos tradicionales. RESULTADOS: Se encontraron diferentes percepciones entre los pacientes y sus familiares, respecto a las del personal de salud, así como barreras de comunicación entre los distintos actores. Los efectos adversos del tratamiento antituberculosis, son consideradas como una de las principales causas de su abandono. CONCLUSIONES: Es necesario que en la región estudiada se realicen investigaciones e intervenciones encaminadas a: cambiar percepciones y mejorar la sensibilidad, calidad y adecuación del manejo de pacientes con TBP en contextos multiculturales, así como

  13. Calidad bacteriológica del agua para consumo humano en zonas de alta marginación de Chiapas Bacteriological quality of drinking water in areas of high levels of poverty in Chiapas, Mexico

    Héctor Javier Sánchez-Pérez

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analizar la calidad bacteriológica del agua (CBA para consumo humano y su relación con diarreas y enteroparasitosis en niños de 1 a 14 años en comunidades de alta marginación socioeconómica de Chiapas, México. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: En una muestra aleatoria de 99 viviendas de la Región Fronteriza de Chiapas, de marzo a septiembre de 1998, se recolectaron muestras de agua para consumo humano, se indagó sobre diarreas en los últimos 15 días y se recolectaron muestras de heces de 322 niños de 1 a 14 años. La CBA se determinó mediante la técnica de filtración por membranas y las enteroparasitosis por el método de Faust. Se utilizó el estadístico ji² para el análisis de la CBA con relación a los diversos factores analizados. RESULTADOS: Sólo 31% de las muestras de agua fueron aptas para consumo humano. La CBA y la presencia de diarreas referida por las madres de los menores no mostraron asociación. Los niños con mala CBA en sus viviendas mostraron mayor prevalencia de Entamoeba histolytica y mayor tendencia a estar parasitados. CONCLUSIONES: Es necesario desarrollar medidas que mejoren la CBA y campañas de educación que incrementen el uso de agua hervida, su manejo adecuado y el cuidado de las fuentes de abastecimiento comunitarias.OBJECTIVE: To analyze the bacteriological quality of drinking water (BQDW and its association with diarrhoea and intestinal parasites in children 1 to 14 years old, in areas of high levels of poverty in Chiapas, Mexico. MATERIAL AND METHODS: From March to September 1998, drinking water was collected from a random sample of 99 households in the Border Region of Chiapas, Mexico; data on diarrhoeal disease (in the past 15 days were collected and stool testing for intestinal parasites was performed in children 1 to 14 years old (n= 322. The BQDW was determined by the filtration membrane technique. Intestinal parasitic infections were determined by the Faust Method. The chi² statistic was

  14. Burkholderia species associated with legumes of Chiapas, Mexico, exhibit stress tolerance and growth in aromatic compounds.

    de León-Martínez, José A; Yañez-Ocampo, Gustavo; Wong-Villarreal, Arnoldo

    Leguminous plants have received special interest for the diversity of β-proteobacteria in their nodules and are promising candidates for biotechnological applications. In this study, 15 bacterial strains were isolated from the nodules of the following legumes: Indigofera thibaudiana, Mimosa diplotricha, Mimosa albida, Mimosa pigra, and Mimosa pudica, collected in 9 areas of Chiapas, Mexico. The strains were grouped into four profiles of genomic fingerprints through BOX-PCR and identified based on their morphology, API 20NE biochemical tests, sequencing of the 16S rRNA, nifH and nodC genes as bacteria of the Burkholderia genus, genetically related to Burkholderia phenoliruptrix, Burkholderia phymatum, Burkholderia sabiae, and Burkholderia tuberum. The Burkholderia strains were grown under stress conditions with 4% NaCl, 45°C, and benzene presence at 0.1% as the sole carbon source. This is the first report on the isolation of these nodulating species of the Burkholderia genus in legumes in Mexico. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Ethnomedical syndromes and treatment-seeking behavior among Mayan refugees in Chiapas, Mexico.

    Smith, Bryce D; Sabin, Miriam; Berlin, Elois Ann; Nackerud, Larry

    2009-09-01

    This survey investigated the prevalence of ethnomedical syndromes and examined treatments and treatment-seeking in Mayan Guatemalans living in United Nations High Commissioner for Refugee (UNHCR) camps in Chiapas, Mexico. Methods included a rapid ethnographic assessment to refine survey methods and inform the cross-sectional survey, which also examined mental health outcomes; 183 households were approached for interview, representing an estimated 1,546 residents in five refugee camps and 93% of all households. One adult per household (N = 170) was interviewed regarding his or her health; an additional 9 adults in three surveyed households participated and were included in this analysis; of the 179 participants, 95 primary child-care providers also answered a children's health questionnaire for their children. Results indicated that ethnomedical syndromes were common in this sample, with 59% of adults and 48.4% of children having experienced susto (fright condition) and 34.1% of adults reporting ataques de nervios (nervous attacks); both conditions were significantly associated with symptoms consistent with posttraumatic stress disorder, anxiety and depression and are mental health conditions recognized by the American Psychiatric Association. Combining healthcare provider and indigenous treatments such as physician prescribed medication (65%), medicinal plants (65.7%), and limpias (spiritual cleansings) (40.6%) was reported. Most participants (86%) sought routine medical treatment from UNHCR trained health promoters in their camp. Assessing ethnomedical health is important for informing mental health programs among this population.

  16. Farmer preference for improved corn seeds in Chiapas, Mexico: A choice experiment approach

    Sánchez-Toledano, Blanca I.; Kallas, Zein; Gil-Roig, José M.

    2017-01-01

    Appropriate technologies must be developed for adoption of improved seeds based on the farmers’ preferences and needs. Our research identified the farmers’ willingness to pay (WTP) as a key determinant for selecting the improved varieties of maize seeds and landraces in Chiapas, Mexico. This work also analyzed the farmers’ observed heterogeneity on the basis of their socio-economic characteristics. Data were collected using a semi-structured questionnaire from 200 farmers. A proportional choice experiment approach was applied using a proportional choice variable, where farmers were asked to state the percentage of preference for different alternative varieties in a choice set. The generalized multinomial logit model in WTP-space approach was used. The results suggest that the improved seed varieties are preferred over the Creole alternatives, thereby ensuring higher yields, resistance to diseases, and larger ear size. For the preference heterogeneity analyses, a latent class model was applied. Three types of farmers were identified: innovators (60.5%), transition farmers (29.4%), and conservative farmers (10%). An understanding of farmers’ preferences is useful in designing agricultural policies and creati

  17. Farmer preference for improved corn seeds in Chiapas, Mexico: A choice experiment approach

    Blanca I. Sánchez-Toledano

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate technologies must be developed for adoption of improved seeds based on the farmers’ preferences and needs. Our research identified the farmers’ willingness to pay (WTP as a key determinant for selecting the improved varieties of maize seeds and landraces in Chiapas, Mexico. This work also analyzed the farmers’ observed heterogeneity on the basis of their socio-economic characteristics. Data were collected using a semi-structured questionnaire from 200 farmers. A proportional choice experiment approach was applied using a proportional choice variable, where farmers were asked to state the percentage of preference for different alternative varieties in a choice set. The generalized multinomial logit model in WTP-space approach was used. The results suggest that the improved seed varieties are preferred over the Creole alternatives, thereby ensuring higher yields, resistance to diseases, and larger ear size. For the preference heterogeneity analyses, a latent class model was applied. Three types of farmers were identified: innovators (60.5%, transition farmers (29.4%, and conservative farmers (10%. An understanding of farmers’ preferences is useful in designing agricultural policies and creating pricing and marketing strategies for the dissemination of quality seeds.

  18. Predictors of leafhopper abundance and richness in a coffee agroecosystem in Chiapas, Mexico.

    Burdine, Justin D; Domínguez Martínez, Gabriel H; Philpott, Stacy M

    2014-04-01

    Coffee agroecosystems with a vegetatively complex shade canopy contain high levels of biodiversity. However, as coffee management is intensified, diversity may be lost. Most biodiversity studies in coffee agroecosystems have examined predators and not herbivores, despite their importance as potential coffee pests and coffee disease vectors. We sampled one abundant herbivore group of leafhoppers on an organic coffee farm in Chiapas, Mexico. We sampled leafhoppers with elevated pan traps in high- and moderate-shade coffee during the dry and wet seasons of 2011. The two major objectives were to 1) compare leafhopper abundance and richness during the wet and dry seasons and 2) examine the correlations between habitat characteristics (e.g., vegetation, elevation, and presence of aggressive ants) and leafhopper richness and abundance. We collected 2,351 leafhoppers, representing eight tribes and 64 morphospecies. Leafhopper abundance was higher in the dry season than in the wet season. Likewise, leafhopper richness was higher in the dry season. Several vegetation and other habitat characteristics correlated with abundance and richness of leafhoppers. The number of Inga trees positively correlated with leafhopper abundance, and other significant correlates of abundance included vegetation complexity. Leafhopper richness was correlated with the number of Inga trees. As leafhoppers transmit important coffee diseases, understanding the specific habitat factors correlating with changes in abundance and richness may help predict future disease outbreaks.

  19. Organochlorine Pesticides in the Ferruginous Pygmy Owl (Glaucidium brasilianum) in Chiapas, Mexico.

    Arrona-Rivera, Alicia E; Enríquez, Paula L; García-Feria, Luis M; Orellana, Sergio Alvarado; von Osten, Jaime Rendón

    2016-09-01

    Concentrations of organochlorine pesticides were quantified in samples of feathers (n = 17) and blood (n = 15) of the ferruginous pygmy owl (Glaucidium brasilianum). The individuals were captured near the Protected Natural Area Cerro Sonsonate, Chiapas, Mexico, between February and June 2014. In both tissues, pesticides belonging to seven organochlorine chemical families were detected. However, the organochlorine pesticide concentrations differed between feathers and blood. The highest concentrations of hexachlorocyclohexanes were found in feathers (0.63 ± 0.89 μg/g), whereas the highest concentrations of ΣDrines were found in blood (0.31 ± 0.47 μg/mL). By using the summed concentrations for each of the seven families of pesticides found in feathers, we did not find any significant correlation between the pesticides and pectoral muscle or body weight (p > 0.15). The ΣDDT group was the only pesticide family that showed a positive correlation with owl body weight (r = 0.60, p = 0.05); the concentrations of these pesticides were also high in feather and blood tissues (r = 0.87, p = 0.02). Our results confirm that ferruginous pygmy owls in the study area are exposed to these pesticides.

  20. Organochlorine pesticide distribution in an organic production system for cow's milk in Chiapas, Mexico.

    Murga, María N; Gutiérrez, Rey; Vega, Salvador; Pérez, José J; Ortiz, Rutilio; Schettino, Beatriz; Yamasaki, Alberto; Ruíz, Jorge L

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the presence of organochlorine pesticides in samples of forage, soil, water, and milk in four units of an organic production system for cow´s milk (samples of forage, milk, soil, and water) in Tecpatan, Chiapas, Mexico. The organochlorine pesticides were extracted from forage, soil and water based on the USEPA (2005) guideline and from milk based on the IDF 1991 guideline. The pesticides were identified and quantified by gas chromatography with electron capture detector (CG-ECD). In general, the highest average concentration of total pesticides was found in the samples of milk and forage (311 ± 328 and 116.5 ±77 ng g(-1) respectively). Although, the production systems analyzed are organic, organochlorine pesticides were detected in all environmental samples (forage, soil, water, and organic milk). Although no values surpassed the defined limits of Mexican and International regulation it is advisable that a monitoring program of contaminants in these production systems is continued.

  1. Farmer preference for improved corn seeds in Chiapas, Mexico: A choice experiment approach

    Sánchez-Toledano, Blanca I.; Kallas, Zein; Gil-Roig, José M.

    2017-07-01

    Appropriate technologies must be developed for adoption of improved seeds based on the farmers’ preferences and needs. Our research identified the farmers’ willingness to pay (WTP) as a key determinant for selecting the improved varieties of maize seeds and landraces in Chiapas, Mexico. This work also analyzed the farmers’ observed heterogeneity on the basis of their socio-economic characteristics. Data were collected using a semi-structured questionnaire from 200 farmers. A proportional choice experiment approach was applied using a proportional choice variable, where farmers were asked to state the percentage of preference for different alternative varieties in a choice set. The generalized multinomial logit model in WTP-space approach was used. The results suggest that the improved seed varieties are preferred over the Creole alternatives, thereby ensuring higher yields, resistance to diseases, and larger ear size. For the preference heterogeneity analyses, a latent class model was applied. Three types of farmers were identified: innovators (60.5%), transition farmers (29.4%), and conservative farmers (10%). An understanding of farmers’ preferences is useful in designing agricultural policies and creati.

  2. Flood risk assessment. Case of study: Motozintla de Mendoza, Chiapas, Mexico

    David A. Novelo-Casanova

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to its geographical location, the community of Motozintla de Mendoza (Motozintla in the State of Chiapas, Mexico, is continuously exposed to the impact of natural hazards. In this work, we assessed the flood risk of Motozintla considering the structural, socioeconomic, organizational, and global (structural, socioeconomic, and organizational vulnerabilities. In addition, we also measured the local risk perception. Spatial maps were generated to determine the most vulnerable and risk areas of this community. Our results indicate that the population has a high level of risk to flooding mainly because (1 the majority of the local houses has high structural vulnerability; (2 a high percentage of the families has a daily income less than the official Mexican minimum wage and lacks of basic public services as well as of proper social security services; (3 most of the community does not know any existing Civil Protection Plan; and (4 the community organization for disaster mitigation and response is practically non-existent. For these reasons, we believe that it is necessary for local authorities to establish in the short-term, preparedness, mitigation and response plans as well as land-use measures to reduce the risk to floods in Motozintla.

  3. Household firewood use and the health of children and women of Indian communities in Chiapas, Mexico.

    Riojas-Rodríguez, H; Romano-Riquer, P; Santos-Burgoa, C; Smith, K R

    2001-01-01

    A follow-up study in two rural communities in the state of Chiapas, Mexico, compared families that used an improved stove for cooking with those that used traditional open-fire stoves, to assess the risks of respiratory symptoms in children and women exposed to wood smoke. 16-hour measurements showed that the concentration of particles less than 10 microm in diameter was significantly lower in households with the better stoves in the kitchen area, where children usually play, i.e., 158 microg/m3 vs 305 microg/m3 (p = 0.03). Multivariate models showed that using the better stove tended to protect against symptoms such as the common cold in children (RR 0.24; 9.5% CI 0.05, 1.02). Use of more firewood was linked to greater risks of experiencing difficulty breathing (RR 1.15; 95% CI 1.04, 1.27) and the common cold (RR 1.09; 95% CI 1.01, 1.18) in women. The use of stoves that require less wood for cooking reduces the risks of respiratory symptoms that may contribute to complicated respiratory diseases and mortality.

  4. Multidrug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis in Los Altos, Selva and Norte regions, Chiapas, Mexico.

    Sánchez-Pérez, H J; Díaz-Vázquez, A; Nájera-Ortiz, J C; Balandrano, S; Martín-Mateo, M

    2010-01-01

    To analyse the proportion of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in cultures performed during the period 2000-2002 in Los Altos, Selva and Norte regions, Chiapas, Mexico, and to analyse MDR-TB in terms of clinical and sociodemographic indicators. Cross-sectional study of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) from the above regions. Drug susceptibility testing results from two research projects were analysed, as were those of routine sputum samples sent in by health personnel for processing (n = 114). MDR-TB was analysed in terms of the various variables of interest using bivariate tests of association and logistic regression. The proportion of primary MDR-TB was 4.6% (2 of 43), that of secondary MDR-TB was 29.2% (7/24), while among those whose history of treatment was unknown the proportion was 14.3% (3/21). According to the logistic regression model, the variables most highly associated with MDR-TB were as follows: having received anti-tuberculosis treatment previously, cough of >3 years' duration and not being indigenous. The high proportion of MDR cases found in the regions studied shows that it is necessary to significantly improve the control and surveillance of PTB.

  5. [The household economy: a determinant of maternal death among indigenous women in Chiapas, Mexico].

    Herrera Torres, María del Carmen; Cruz Burguete, Jorge Luis; Robledo Hernández, Gabriela Patricia; Montoya Gómez, Guillermo

    2006-02-01

    To assess the determining role of financial situation and gender relations on maternal mortality among Indigenous women in Chiapas, Mexico. A quantitative/qualitative study was performed by means of a survey of 158 families, as well as in-depth interviews of persons linked to cases of maternal death, community leaders from throughout the region, and focal groups composed of traditional birth attendants. Decision-making surrounding women's health within the household is a critical problem because it is entirely in the hands of the husband and his relatives. In cases of high-risk pregnancy or birth, options for seeking care outside the community become limited, so that 48.7% of all obstetric cases are assisted by traditional birth attendants, 45.3% by relatives, and 6% by the mate. The problem is compounded by the high level of marginalization and very low human development index that characterize the region under study, by women's exclusion from the ownership of goods, including land, and by the fact that 97.7% of women only speak indigenous languages. Gender inequities within Indigenous families, together with a household economy that does not cover the basic necessities, are among the factors that keep women from receiving the necessary care during their reproductive processes. Because of the low socioeconomic status these women have, decisions surrounding care during pregnancy, birth, and the puerperium take a large toll on their health and their lives.

  6. Factores asociados a la colonización por Streptococcus del grupo B en mujeres embarazadas de Los Altos, Chiapas Factors associated with group B Streptococcus colonization in pregnant women of Los Altos, Chiapas, Mexico

    Moisés Ocampo-Torres

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estimar la prevalencia de colonización por Streptococcus del grupo B (SGB en mujeres embarazadas de Los Altos, Chiapas, y analizar factores asociados a la misma. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Es un estudio transversal realizado de febrero a septiembre de 1999 en tres hospitales públicos de segundo nivel en San Cristóbal de las Casas, Chiapas. A 910 mujeres que acudieron para atención de parto a dichos hospitales, se les tomaron muestras (vaginal y perianal para detección de SGB por cultivo e identificación de grupo y serotipo mediante aglutinación en látex. El análisis de factores asociados a la colonización se realizó medianteji² y modelos log-lineales. RESULTADOS: La colonización por SGB fue de 8.6% (IC 95% 6.8 - 10.5. Las mujeres con mayor probabilidad de colonización fueron las de > o = 5 embarazos, residentes de municipios marginados, de ocupación diferente al hogar y con jefe/jefa de familia agrícola (26.8%, RM= 7.25, IC 95% 1.83 - 28.67. CONCLUSIONES: Es necesario que las acciones para la prevención y control de infección por SGB se dirijan principalmente a la población de mayor riesgo de colonización en el área de estudio, con el fin de disminuir la transmisión perinatal de SGB.OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence and analyze the factors associated with group B Streptococcus (GBS colonization in pregnant women of Los Altos, Chiapas, Mexico. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Between February and September 1999, a cross-sectional study was conducted among 910 women who sought delivery care at three public hospitals of San Cristobal de Las Casas, Chiapas. Vaginal and perianal samples were taken for GBS detection by bacteriological culture. Identification of groups and serotypes was performed using latex agglutination. The analysis of factors associated with colonization was done using chi-squared tests and log-linear modeling. RESULTS: GBS colonization was found in 8.6% (95% CI 6.8 - 10.5 of study subjects. Women with the

  7. Two new species of the genus Paramitraceras Pickard-Cambridge, 1905 (Opiliones: Laniatores: Stygnopsidae) from Chiapas, Mexico.

    Cruz-López, Jesús A; Francke, Oscar F

    2013-01-01

    Parainitraceras pickardcanibridgei sp. nov. and Paramitraceras tzotzil sp. nov. from Chiapas, Mexico are described based on specimens previously determined as Paramitraceras granulatum Pickard-Cambridge, 1905 by Goodnight and Goodnight. The male genitalia of the new species and P. granulatum are illustrated with scanning electronic micrographs (SEMs) or drawings derived from them. The importance of the ocular tubercle, cheliceral dentition and sexual dimorphism, pedipalpal armature and male genitalia as taxonomic characters within the genus is discussed as well as differences and similarities between Paramitraceras Pickard-Cambridge, 1905 and its most similar genus, Sbordonia Šilhavý, 1977.

  8. Two flat-backed polydesmidan millipedes from the Miocene Chiapas-amber Lagerstätte, Mexico.

    Francisco Riquelme

    Full Text Available Two species of fossil polydesmidan millipedes (Diplopoda: Polydesmida embedded in amber are described from Miocene strata near Simojovel, in the Chiapas Highlands, Mexico. Maatidesmus paachtun gen. et sp. nov., placed into Chelodesmidae Cook, 1895, and Anbarrhacus adamantis gen. et sp. nov., assigned in the family Platyrhacidae Pocock, 1895. Morphological data from fossil specimens have been recovered using 3D X-ray micro-computed tomography and regular to infrared-reflected microscopy. Both fossil species are recognizable as new primarily but not exclusively, by collum margin modification and remarkable paranotal and metatergite dorsal sculpture.

  9. Two Flat-Backed Polydesmidan Millipedes from the Miocene Chiapas-Amber Lagerstätte, Mexico

    Riquelme, Francisco; Hernández-Patricio, Miguel; Martínez-Dávalos, Arnulfo; Rodríguez-Villafuerte, Mercedes; Montejo-Cruz, Maira; Alvarado-Ortega, Jesús; Ruvalcaba-Sil, José L.; Zúñiga-Mijangos, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Two species of fossil polydesmidan millipedes (Diplopoda: Polydesmida) embedded in amber are described from Miocene strata near Simojovel, in the Chiapas Highlands, Mexico. Maatidesmus paachtun gen. et sp. nov., placed into Chelodesmidae Cook, 1895, and Anbarrhacus adamantis gen. et sp. nov., assigned in the family Platyrhacidae Pocock, 1895. Morphological data from fossil specimens have been recovered using 3D X-ray micro-computed tomography and regular to infrared-reflected microscopy. Both fossil species are recognizable as new primarily but not exclusively, by collum margin modification and remarkable paranotal and metatergite dorsal sculpture. PMID:25162220

  10. Genetic Diversity in Jatropha curcas Populations in the State of Chiapas, Mexico

    Miguel Salvador-Figueroa

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Jatropha curcas L. has become an important source of oil production for biodiesel fuel. Most genetic studies of this plant have been conducted with Asian and African accessions, where low diversity was encountered. There are no studies of this kind focusing in the postulated region of origin. Therefore, five populations of J. curcas were studied in the state of Chiapas, Mexico, using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP markers. One hundred and fifty-two useful markers were obtained: overall polymorphism = 81.18% and overall Nei’s genetic diversity (He = 0.192. The most diverse population was the Border population [He: 0.245, Shanon’s information index (I: 0.378]. A cluster analysis revealed the highest dissimilarity coefficient (0.893 yet to be reported among accessions. An analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA revealed that the greatest variation is within populations (87.8%, followed by the variation among populations (7.88%. The PhiST value (0.121 indicated moderate differentiation between populations. However, a spatial AMOVA (SAMOVA detected a stronger genetic structure of populations, with a PhiST value of 0.176. To understand the fine structure of populations, an analysis of data with Bayesian statistics was conducted with software Structure©. The number of genetic populations (K was five, with mixed ancestry in most individuals (genetic migrants, except in the Soconusco, where there was a tiny fraction of fragments from other populations. In contrast, SAMOVA grouped populations in four units. To corroborate the above findings, we searched for possible genetic barriers, determining as the main barrier that separating the Border from the rest of the populations. The results are discussed based on the possible ancestry of populations.

  11. Paleoserranus lakamhae gen. et sp. nov., a Paleocene seabass (Perciformes: Serranidae) from Palenque, Chiapas, southeastern Mexico

    Cantalice, Kleyton M.; Alvarado-Ortega, Jesús; Alaniz-Galvan, Abril

    2018-04-01

    Paleoserranus lakamhae gen. et sp. nov. is here described based on well-preserved fossils from the Paleocene marine sediments of the Tenejapa-Lacandón geological unit, belonging to both Division del Norte and Belisario Domínguez quarries, near Palenque, Chiapas, southeastern Mexico. This species exhibits distinctive characters of the order Perciformes, such as the presence of spines in the dorsal, pelvic, and anal fins, as well as the pelvic and pectoral girdles in contact between them. This fish also has neither procurrent spur nor posterior uroneural, characters that support its place within the family Serranidae. It also has a distinctive combination of characters, including a serrated lacrimal and a toothed ectopterygoid, never recorded before among serranids. Additionally, this fossil fish shares some characters with different species nested within the subfamilies Serraninae, Anthiinae, and Ephinephelinae; these include a predorsal formula of 0/0/0 + 2/1 + 1/1; a preopercle with its ventral edge sinuous and showing a strong antrorse spine; its dorsal fin consists of nine spines and eight to ten soft rays; 13 rays in its pectoral fin; and its rounded caudal fin structured with formula I+8-7+I. Paleoserranus lakamhae gen. et sp. nov. is a Serranidae incertae sedis because it does not fit into any subgroup; however, this Paleocene fish is the earliest fossil record of the family Serranidae. The place of occurrence of this new fossil record suggests that the origin and of the seabasses took place in the Caribbean region of North America.

  12. [Cytopathologic features of childhood acute leukemia at the Hospital de Especialidades Pediátricas, Chiapas, Mexico].

    Lepe-Zúñiga, José Luis; Jerónimo-López, Francisco Javier; Hernández-Orantes, Jorge Gregorio

    Childhood acute leukemia cytological features are unknown in Chiapas, Mexico. Defining these features is important because this is a relatively isolated population with high consanguinity index, and these aspects could determine differences in responses to treatment and outcome. Eighty-one childhood acute leukemia cases treated at the Hospital de Especialidades Pediátricas in Chiapas were characterized by morphology, immunophenotype, genotype, initial risk assignment and status at the time of the study. The proportion of leukemic cell types found in this study was B cell, 75.3%; myeloid, 16%; T cell, 3.7% and NK 1.2%. In B cell leukemia, genetic alterations were present in 40.6% of cases and had a specific outcome regardless of initial risk assessment. Cases with MLL gene alteration died within a month from diagnosis. Translocations were present in 17.5% B cases; t(1;19) was present in those with a favorable outcome. The t(12;21) translocation was related to initial remission and midterm relapse and dead. Hyperdiploidy was present in 20% of B cell cases with good outcome. In 38.5%of myeloid cases were translocations and karyotypic abnormalities. Short-term outcome in this group has been poor; 69% have died or abandoned treatment in relapse from 15 days to 37 months after diagnosis. Relative frequency of different types of acute leukemia in patients treated at a tertiary level pediatric hospital in Chiapas, Mexico, was similar to the one found in other parts of the country. Patients' outcome, under a standardized treatment, differs according to the group, the subgroup and the presence and type of genetic alterations. Copyright © 2017 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  13. A Comparison of ectoparasite infestation by chigger mite larvae (Acarina: Trombiculidae) on resident and migratory birds in Chiapas, Mexico illustrating a rapid visual assessment protocol

    Thomas V. Dietsch

    2005-01-01

    This study presents a protocol developed to rapidly assess ectoparasite prevalence and intensity. Using this protocol during a mist-netting project in two different coffee agroecosystems in Chiapas, Mexico, data were collected on ectoparasitic chigger mite larvae (Acarina: Trombiculidae) found on resident and migratory birds. Surprisingly high infestation rates were...

  14. A new species of myrmecophilous lady beetle in the genus Diomus (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae: Diomini) from Chiapas, Mexico that feeds on green coffee scale, Coccus viridis (Green) (Hemiptera: Coccidae)

    A new species of myrmecophilous lady beetle in the genus Diomus (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae: Diomini) is described from a coffee agroecosystem in Chiapas, Mexico. The new species was found preying on the green coffee scale pest, Coccus viridis (Green), tended primarily by Azteca sericeasur Longino an...

  15. Navigating and circumventing a fragmented health system: the patient's pathway in the Sierra Madre Region of Chiapas, Mexico.

    Molina, Rose Leonard; Palazuelos, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    Mexico has implemented several important reforms in how health care for its poorest is financed and delivered. Seguro Popular, in particular, a recently implemented social insurance program, aims to provide new funds for a previously underfunded state-based safety net system. Through in-depth ethnographic structured interviews with impoverished farmers in the state of Chiapas, this article presents an analysis of Seguro Popular from the perspective of a highly underserved beneficiary group. Specific points of tension among the various stakeholders--the government system (including public clinics, hospitals, and vertical programs), community members, private doctors, and pharmacies--are highlighted and discussed. Ethnographic data presented in this article expose distinct gaps between national health policy rhetoric and the reality of access to health services at the community level in a highly marginalized municipality in one of Mexico's poorest states. These insights have important implications for the structure and implementation of on-going reforms. © 2014 by the American Anthropological Association.

  16. Percepciones y prácticas relacionadas con la tuberculosis y la adherencia al tratamiento en Chiapas, México Perceptions and practices of tuberculosis patients and non-adherence to therapy in Chiapas, Mexico

    Guadalupe del Carmen Alvarez-Gordillo

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Conocer las percepciones y prácticas que los enfermos de tuberculosis tienen sobre la enfermedad y la adherencia al tratamiento. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Estudio cualitativo de 11 entrevistas grupales a 62 pacientes con tuberculosis diagnosticados durante 1997 y 1998 en las regiones Centro, Los Altos y Fronteriza de Chiapas, México. RESULTADOS: Las causas de la enfermedad referidas por los pacientes fueron el contagio por trastes, el trabajo excesivo, la alimentación, el frío y otras sin relación con la transmisión de persona a persona. La incapacidad para el trabajo se reflejó en crisis económica del paciente y su familia. El estigma social impactó emocionalmente en la vida personal, familiar, laboral y de comunidad. CONCLUSIONES: El desconocimiento sobre la enfermedad propició la elección de diferentes alternativas para su atención. Los servicios de salud y la inadecuada relación médico-paciente influyó en el retardo en el diagnóstico y falta de adherencia al tratamiento. Se sugiere un programa de difusión sobre aspectos básicos de la enfermedad y su tratamiento.OBJECTIVE: To identify health perceptions and practices and non-adherence to therapy among tuberculosis patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Qualitative research work consisting of 11 group interviews with 62 tuberculosis patients during 1997-1998 in the Central, Highlands, and Border Regions of Chiapas, Mexico. RESULTS: Perceived causes of tuberculosis included contagion via food utensils, excess work, malnutrition, and cold, as well as other causes unrelated to person-to-person contagion. The resulting incapability to work resulted in an economic crisis for both the patients and their family members. As a result of the social stigma imposed by the disease, patients perceived a negative impact on their personal life, family, work, and community. CONCLUSIONS: Lack of knowledge regarding tuberculosis is an important factor in the selection of and adherence to

  17. Estrategia para el manejo de suelos ácidos en frijol (phaseolus vulgaris l. en el estado de Chiapas, Mexico

    Bernardo Villar S\\u00E1nchez

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Estrategia para el manejo de suelos ácidos en frijol (Phaseolus vulgaris L. en el estado de Chiapas, México. Por su contribución en la dieta alimenticia y la generación de empleos, y por existir una ancestral cultura productiva y una superficie de siembra de más de 100 mil hectáreas, el cultivo de frijol es de fundamental importancia en el estado de Chiapas. Sin embargo, se ha determinado una brecha tecnológica de más de 700 kg/ha entre el potencial del cultivo y los rendimientos actuales. Esta es ocasionada por numerosos factores limitantes entre los que destaca la presencia de suelos de baja fertilidad y ácidos. La estrategia adoptada para el manejo de este problema incluye: 1.Aplicación de cal y fósforo; 2. Mejoramiento genético para resistencia; 3.Manejo de los ciclos de materia orgánica y nutrientes del suelo; y 4.Combinación de las tres alternativas. En este reporte se dan los avances obtenidos con relación a la primera alternativa considerada como el paso inicial para el logro de un manejo integral de suelos en Chiapas. Durante 1997 se estudiaron cinco dosis de cal y tres de fósforo en condiciones de invernadero y campo para suelos de diferentes localidades. Se utilizó un experimento factorial completo con cuatro repeticiones, los experimentos fueron evaluados en términos de la producción de grano y al efecto de la cal sobre las propiedades químicas del suelo. Hubo respuesta del frijol en rendimiento a la aplicación de cal y fósforo

  18. El Chichón Volcano (Chiapas Volcanic Belt, Mexico) Transitional Calc-Alkaline to Adakitic-Like Magmatism: Petrologic and Tectonic Implications

    Ignacio San José, Cristina de; Castiñeiras García, Pedro; Márquez González, Álvaro; Oyarzun, Roberto; Lillo Ramos, F. Javier; López Ruiz-Labranderas, Iván

    2003-01-01

    The rocks of the 1982 eruption of El Chichón volcano (Chiapas, Mexico) display a series of geochemical and mineralogical features that make them a special case within the NW-trending Chiapas volcanic belt. The rocks are transitional between normal arc and adakitic-like trends. They are anhydrite-rich, and were derived from a water-rich, highly oxidized sulfur-rich magma, thus very much resembling adakitic magmas (e.g., the 1991 Pinatubo eruption). We propose that these rocks we...

  19. Opportunities for involving men and families in chronic disease management: a qualitative study from Chiapas, Mexico.

    Fort, Meredith P; Castro, Maricruz; Peña, Liz; López Hernández, Sergio Hernán; Arreola Camacho, Gabriel; Ramírez-Zea, Manuel; Martínez, Homero

    2015-10-05

    A healthy lifestyle intervention was implemented in primary care health centers in urban parts of Tuxtla Gutiérrez, Chiapas, Mexico with an aim of reducing cardiovascular disease risk for patients with type 2 diabetes and/or hypertension. During implementation, research questions emerged. Considerably fewer men participated in the intervention than women, and an opportunity was identified to increase the reach of activities aimed at improving disease self-management through strategies involving family members. A qualitative study was conducted to identify strategies to involve men and engage family members in disease management and risk reduction. Nine men with hypertension and/or type 2 diabetes with limited to no participation in disease self-management and health promotion activities, six families in which at least one family member had a diagnosis of one or both conditions, and nine health care providers from four different government health centers were recruited for the study. Participants took part in semi-structured interviews. During interviews with families, genograms and eco-maps were used to diagram family composition and structure, and capture the nature of patients' relationships to the extended family and community resources. Transcripts were coded and a general inductive analytic approach was used to identify themes related to men's limited participation in health promotion activities, family support and barriers to disease management, and health care providers' recommendations. Participants reported barriers to men's participation in chronic disease management and healthy lifestyle education activities that can be grouped into two categories: internal and external factors. Internal factors are those for which they are able to make the decision on their own and external factors are those that are not related solely to their decision to take part or not. Four primary aspects were identified related to families' relationships with disease: different

  20. Sedimentation in Rio La Venta Canyon in Netzahualcoyotl Reservoir, Chiapas, Mexico

    de La Fuente, J. A.; Lisle, T.; Velasquez, J.; Allison, B. L.; Miller, A.

    2002-12-01

    Sedimentation of Rio La Venta as it enters the Netzahualcoyotl Reservoir in Chiapas, Mexico, threatens a unique part of the aquatic ecosystem. Rio La Venta enters the reservoir via a narrow canyon about 16 km long with spectacular, near-vertical limestone bluffs up to 320 m high and inhabited by the flora and fauna of a pristine tropical forest. Karst terrain underlies most of the Rio La Venta basin in the vicinity of the reservoir, while deeply weathered granitic terrain underlies the Rio Negro basin, and the headwaters of the Rio La Venta to the south. The Rio Negro joins Rio La Venta 3 km downstream of the upper limit of the reservoir and delivers the bulk of the total clastic sediment (mostly sand and finer material). The canyon and much of the contributing basin lie within the Reserva de la Biosfera, Selva El Ocote, administered by the Comision Nacional de Areas Naturales Protegidas, part of the Secretaria de Medioambiente y Recursos Naturales. The Klamath National Forest Forest has cooperated with its Mexican counterparts since 1993 in natural resource management, neo-tropical bird inventories, wildfire management, and more recently in watershed analyses. Rates of sedimentation are estimated from bathymetric surveys conducted in March, 2002. A longitudinal profile down the inundated canyon during a high reservoir level shows an inflection from a slope of 0.0017 to one of 0.0075 at 7.2 km downstream of the mouth of Rio Negro. The bed elevation at this point corresponds to the lowest reservoir level, suggesting that the gentler sloping bed upstream is formed by fluvial processes during drawdown and that downstream by pluvial processes. Using accounts that boats could access Rio Negro during low water levels in 1984, we estimate an annual sedimentation rate of roughly 3 million cubic meters per year. This suggests that boats might no longer be able to access the most spectacular section of canyon upstream of Rio Negro within a decade, depending on how the

  1. Cultural significance of wild mammals in Mayan and mestizo communities of the Lacandon Rainforest, Chiapas, Mexico.

    García Del Valle, Yasminda; Naranjo, Eduardo J; Caballero, Javier; Martorell, Carlos; Ruan-Soto, Felipe; Enríquez, Paula L

    2015-05-07

    Several ethnobiology studies evaluate the cultural significance (CS) of plants and mushrooms. However, this is not the case for mammals. It is important to make studies of CS allowing the comparison of cultural groups because the value given to groups of organisms may be based on different criteria. Such information would be valuable for wildlife preservation plans. In this study, the most culturally significant species of mammals from the Lacandon Rainforest (Chiapas, Mexico) for people from two Mayan-Lacandon and mestizo communities were identified. The reasons behind the CS of the studied species were explored and the existence of differences among the cultural groups was evaluated. One hundred ninety-eight semi-structured and structured interviews were applied to compile socio-demographic information, qualitative data on CS categories, and free listings. Frequency of mention was a relative indicator to evaluate the CS of each species of mammal. Comparison of responses between communities was carried out through multivariate analyses. The non-parametric Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare the number of mentioned species by Lacandons and mestizos as well as different responses in the qualitative categories. A χ2 test was used to compare frequency of categories. 38 wild mammal species were identified. The classification and Principal Components Analyses show an apparent separation between Lacandon and mestizo sites based on the relative importance of species. All four communities mentioned the lowland paca the most, followed by peccary, white-tailed deer, armadillo, and jaguar. No significant difference was found in the number of mentioned species between the two groups. Eight CS categories were identified. The most important category was "harmful mammals", which included 28 species. Other relevant categories were edible, medicinal, and appearing in narratives. The data obtained in this study demonstrates the existence of differential cultural patterns in the

  2. Gaining ground : land reform and the constitution of community in the Tojolabal Highlands of Chiapas, Mexico

    Haar, van der G.

    2001-01-01

    This study reconstructs the process of land redistribution in an indigenous region of Chiapas, the Tojolabal Highlands, situated between the better known Central Highlands and the Lacandona Rainforest. Until 1930 this region was dominated by large private estates or fincas ,

  3. Traditional knowledge on integrated pest and weed management in chayote (Sechium edule (Jacq. Sw. crops from localities of Chiapas, Mexico

    Luis Alfredo Rodríguez-Larramendi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This research was carried out in Villaflores and Villa Corzo, located in Chiapas State of Mexico. Specifically, throughout an ethno-agronomical approach, semi-structured interviews were designed and applied to the chayote producers who were selected by random routes. The results indicate the 57.89% of chayote producers in both municipalities, have allowed to control weeds in their crops, and being a higher proportion represented by Villaflores. Given these concerns, they prefer to control weeds throughout traditional methods, basically using mattocks with frequencies of 15 to 30 days after sowing or two to four times per cycle of crop production. Both pest and diseases are mainly controlled throughout chemical methods application. A preference to perform control among periods of higher rainfall or drought is not distinguished. A considerable percentage, which reaches 44% of the interviewed population among both municipalities, report they do not need to control pests and crop diseases.

  4. List of participants of the VI School on Cosmic Rays and Astrophysics 17-25 November 2015, Chiapas, Mexico

    2017-01-01

    Lecturers: 1.- Oscar Saavedra San Martín Università di Torino and Istituto Nazionale di FisicaNucleare (INFN, Italy) 2.- Mario Rodríguez Cahuantzi Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla (BUAP) 3.- Alberto Carramiñana Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica (INAOE, Mexico) 4.- Marco Casolino Rikagaku Kenkyusho, Research Institute (RIKEN, Japan) and INFN (Italy) 5.- Paolo Desiati Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center (WIPAC), Department of Astronomy (Madison, USA) 6.- Paolo Lipari Sezione Roma I dell’ INFN, Universita’ degli Studi “La Sapienza” c/o Istituto di Fisica (Italy) 7.- Juan Carlos Arteaga Velázquez Instituto de Física y Matemáticas of Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo (IFM-UMSNH, Mexico) 8.- Karen Salomé Caballero Mora Facultad de Ciencias en Física y Matemáticas, Universidad Autónoma de Chiapas (FCFM-UNACH, Mexico) 9.- Pat Harding Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL, USA) 10.- Omar Miranda Romagnoli Departamento de Física, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CINVESTAV-Mexico) 11.- Pierluigi Belli INFN Roma Tor Vergata (Italy) 12.- Giuseppe Di Sciascio Departament of Physics (INFN, Italy) 13.- César Álvarez Ochoa FCFM-UNACH, Mexico 14.- Luis Villaseñor IFM-UMSNH, Mexico 15.- Jorge Romo FCFM-UNACH, Mexico 16.- Lukas Nellen Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (ICN-UNAM, Mexico) Students: 1.- Ibrahim Torres, INAOE, Mexico 2.-Andrea Correa, Escuela Politécnica Nacional, Ecuador 3.- Humberto Martínez Huerta, CINVESTAV, Mexico 4.- Iván Antonio Cárdenas Muñoz, Universidad de Sonora, Mexico 5.- Juan Antonio Salazar Contreras, Escuela de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de San Carlos de Guatemala, USAC, Guatemala 6.- Pravda Linda Flor Cabrera Vogel, USAC, Guatemala 7.- Luis Guillermo García Ordóñez, USAC, Guatemala 8.- Marco Antonio Morales Ovalle, USAC, Guatemala 9.- Joshua Raphael L

  5. Biofertilización de café orgánico en etapa de vivero en Chiapas, México Biofertilizer of organic coffee in stage of seedlings in Chiapas, Mexico

    María de Lourdes Adriano Anaya; Ramón Jarquín Gálvez; Carlos Hernández Ramos; Miguel Salvador Figueroa; Clara Teresa Monreal Vargas

    2011-01-01

    En Chiapas, la producción de plántulas de café, se realiza convencionalmente con la aplicación de fertilizantes químicos. La producción de café orgánico, requiere la nutrición de plántulas con biofertilizantes y por ello el objetivo fue evaluar el efecto de algunos de éstos en el desarrollo de plántulas de café (Coffe arábica) variedad Bourbon en vivero. El experimento se realizó durante 2007 y 2008 en Cacahohatan,Chiapas. Los inoculantes fueron una cepa Glomus intraradices Schenck y Smith, c...

  6. La economía del grupo doméstico: determinante de muerte materna entre mujeres indígenas de Chiapas, México The household economy: a determinant of maternal death among indigenous women in Chiapas, Mexico

    María del Carmen Herrera Torres

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Evaluar la situación económica y las relaciones de género en cuanto factores determinantes de muerte materna en la subregión de Patwitz, en Chiapas, México. MÉTODOS: Se realizó un estudio cuantitativo y cualitativo mediante la aplicación de una encuesta a 158 familias, entrevistas a profundidad a personas vinculadas con los casos de muerte materna y a líderes sociales de la región, así como grupos focales con parteras. RESULTADOS: La toma de decisiones respecto a la salud de la mujer en el seno de la familia constituye un problema crítico por cuanto depende exclusivamente del esposo y los familiares de este. Cuando el embarazo o el parto conllevan algún riesgo, tal situación introduce restricciones en la elección de opciones de atención fuera de la comunidad, de modo que 48,7% de los casos obstétricos son atendidos por parteras, 45,3% por familiares y 6% por la pareja. El problema se agrava por la alta marginación y el muy bajo índice de desarrollo humano que caracterizan a la región estudiada, por la falta de acceso de las mujeres a la posesión de bienes, incluida la herencia de la tierra, y por el hecho de que 97,7% de ellas hablan solamente lenguas indígenas. CONCLUSIONES: Las inequidades por razones de género en las familias indígenas, aunadas a una economía que no cubre las necesidades básicas, son factores que contribuyen a que las mujeres no reciban atención en el proceso reproductivo. Debido al bajo nivel socioeconómico, las decisiones que se toman en torno a la atención del embarazo, el parto y el puerperio tienen un alto costo en la salud y en la vida de las mujeres.OBJECTIVE: To assess the determining role of financial situation and gender relations on maternal mortality among Indigenous women in Chiapas, Mexico. METHODS: A quantitative/qualitative study was performed by means of a survey of 158 families, as well as in-depth interviews of persons linked to cases of maternal death, community

  7. Epizoic Fauna Survey on Phyllostomid Bats (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae) in a Shaded Coffee Plantation of Southeastern Chiapas, Mexico.

    Colín-Martínez, Helisama; Morales-Malacara, Juan B; García-Estrada, Carlos

    2018-01-10

    This is the first complete assessment of the ectoparasite fauna on phyllostomid bats in a shaded coffee plantation in Mexico. The study was carried out at Finca San Carlos, in the municipality of Tapachula, southeastern Chiapas, Mexico. The bats were captured over three consecutive nights every month, from December 2005 to November 2006, using four mist nets. We captured 192 phyllostomid bats, representing 18 species, upon which 1,971 ectoparasites, belonging to 11 families and 65 species, were found. We found that 160 of the 192 captured bats were hosts to ectoparasites, giving an infestation prevalence of 83.3%. Of the 65 ectoparasitic species, 14 were classified as monoxenous and 17 as stenoxenous. More ectoparasites were recorded in the dry season (n = 1,439) than the wet season (n = 532), and we recorded some families of ectoparasite on particular areas of the bat body. An ordination of bat species, based on their ectoparasitic species community structure, formed groups at the subfamily level or lower taxonomic categories. We suggest that the close ectoparasite-host relationships could be examined as an additional tool to elucidate the taxonomic relationships between the hosts. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Lack of Active Onchocerca volvulus Transmission in the Northern Chiapas Focus of Mexico

    Rodríguez-Pérez, Mario A.; Unnasch, Thomas R.; Domínguez-Vázquez, Alfredo; Morales-Castro, Alba L.; Richards, Frank; Peña-Flores, Graciela P.; Orozco-Algarra, María Eugenia; Prado-Velasco, Gibert

    2010-01-01

    The northern Chiapas onchocerciasis focus has undergone 11 years of ivermectin mass treatment. No evidence of microfilariae in the cornea and/or anterior chamber of the eye or in skin snips was seen in residents examined in 2006 in two sentinel communities (upper limit of the 95% confidence interval [UL 95% CI] = 0.5% and 0.3%, respectively). In children 10 and under, 0 of 305 were found to harbor antibodies to Ov16, a marker of parasite exposure; 0 of 4,400 Simulium ochraceum s.l. collected in 2005 contained parasite DNA, giving an UL 95% CI for the infective rate of 0.9/2,000, and an UL 95% CI of the seasonal transmission potential of 1.2 L3/person. These data, assumed to be representative of the focus as a whole, suggest that there is no ongoing transmission of Onchocerca volvulus in the northern Chiapas focus. Community-wide treatments with ivermectin were halted in 2008, and a post-treatment surveillance phase was initiated. PMID:20595471

  9. Maternal-fetal transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi, a health problem slightly studied in Mexico: case Chiapas

    Guillermina Campos-Valdez

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine the Trypanosoma cruzi infection prevalence in 1125 pregnant women and the transmission frequency to their children from Tapachula and Palenque, Chiapas. Materials and methods. We determined the prevalence by serology tests and the transmission frequency by polymerase chain reaction (PCR and T. cruzi reactivity capacity after 12 months. Results. Total maternal infection prevalence were 23/1 125 (2.04%, 9/600 (1.5% were from Tapachula and 14/525 (2.6% from Palenque. The seropositive women were between 20 and 35 years old, 31.8% have Premature Rapture of Membrane and 9.1% have history of perinatal death. The total percentage of positive newborns by PCR was 9/23 (39.13%, out of those 2/9 (22.2% are from Tapachula and 7/14 (50% from Palenque. The Maternal Fetal transmission frequency was. 2/9 (22.2% in Tapachula and 1/14 (7.14% in Palenque, all positive infants were asynthomatic. Conclusion. The maternal-fetal transmission rate in Chiapas State is variable; the reason could be the maternal immunological status and T. cruzi strain.

  10. Comparative cytogenetics of two species of ground skinks: Scincella assata and S. cherriei (Squamata: Scincidae: Lygosominae from Chiapas, Mexico

    Riccardo Castiglia

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Standard karyotypes of two species of the genus Scincella, S. assata and S. cherriei, both from Chiapas State, Mexico, were described for the first time. The diploid chromosome number was 28 in S. assata, whereas 30 in S. cherriei. The karyotypes of the two species, while differing in the number of microchromosomes, 14-15 in S. assata and 16-17 in S. cherriei, share four pairs of large metacentric, two pairs of medium-sized metacentric, and one particular pair (number 7 of chromosomes. Female S. assata carries chromosome pair 7 composed of two identical medium-sized subtelocentric chromosomes. This chromosome pair is heteromorphic in males of both species, i.e., one component of the pair is similar to the homomorphic chromosomes 7 of the S. assata female, while the other is nearly one-half the size of its counterpart and resembles a microchromosome. The homology of such externally different elements is deducted from the presence of an asymmetric bivalent in spermatocytes at diplotene-diakinesis. Female S. cherriei was not available. We suspect that the two Scincella species possess an XY sex determination system, as previously reported for the North American congeneric species, S. lateralis.

  11. Levels of organochlorine pesticides in blood plasma from residents of malaria-endemic communities in Chiapas, Mexico.

    Ruiz-Suárez, Luz E; Castro-Chan, Ricardo A; Rivero-Pérez, Norma E; Trejo-Acevedo, Antonio; Guillén-Navarro, Griselda K; Geissen, Violette; Bello-Mendoza, Ricardo

    2014-10-10

    Organochlorine (OC) pesticides have been extensively used for pest control in agriculture and against malaria vectors in the region of Soconusco, Chiapas, in southern Mexico. Our study aimed to identify whether the inhabitants of four Soconusco communities at different locations (i.e., altitudes) and with different history of use of OC pesticides, have been similarly exposed to residues of these pesticides. In particular, we analyzed the potential relationship between levels of OC pesticides in plasma and the age, gender, and residence of the study population (n = 60). We detected seven pesticides in total (γ-HCH, β-HCH, heptachlor, p,p'-DDE, p,p'-DDT, β-endosulfan, endrin aldehyde). Of these, p,p'-DDE and β-endosulfan were the most frequently found (in 98% and 38% of the samples, respectively). The low-altitude (60 years) had the highest p,p'-DDE level (56.94 ± 57.81 µg/L) of all age groups, while men had higher p,p'-DDE (34.00 ± 46.76 µg/L) than women. Our results demonstrate that residents of the Soconusco region are exposed to p,p'-DDE because of high exposure to DDT in the past and current environmental exposure to this DDT-breakdown product.

  12. Building ties: social capital network analysis of a forest community in a biosphere reserve in Chiapas, Mexico

    Luis Rico García-Amado

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Governance of the commons depends on the capacity to generate collective action. Networks and rules that foster that collective action have been defined as social capital. However, their causal link is still not fully understood. We use social network analysis to assess social capital, decision-making, and collective action in a forest-based common pool resource management in La Sepultura Biosphere Reserve (Chiapas, Mexico. Our research analyzes the productive networks and the evolution of coffee groups in one community. The network shows some centrality, with richer landholders tending to occupy core positions and poorer landless peasants occupying peripheral ones. This has fostered the community's environmentally oriented development but has also caused internal conflicts. Market requirements have shaped different but complementary productive networks, where organic coffee commercialization is the main source of bridging ties, which has resulted in more connectivity and resilience. Conservation attitudes, along with the institutional setting of the community, have promoted collective action. The unresolved conflicts, however, still leave some concerns about governance in the future.

  13. Resolving the Conflict Between Ecosystem Protection and Land Use in Protected Areas of the Sierra Madre de Chiapas, Mexico

    Cortina-Villar, Sergio; Plascencia-Vargas, Héctor; Vaca, Raúl; Schroth, Götz; Zepeda, Yatziri; Soto-Pinto, Lorena; Nahed-Toral, José

    2012-03-01

    Livelihoods of people living in many protected areas (PAs) around the world are in conflict with biodiversity conservation. In Mexico, the decrees of creation of biosphere reserves state that rural communities with the right to use buffer zones must avoid deforestation and their land uses must become sustainable, a task which is not easily accomplished. The objectives of this paper are: (a) to analyze the conflict between people's livelihoods and ecosystem protection in the PAs of the Sierra Madre de Chiapas (SMC), paying special attention to the rates and causes of deforestation and (b) to review policy options to ensure forest and ecosystem conservation in these PAs, including the existing payments for environmental services system and improvements thereof as well as options for sustainable land management. We found that the three largest PAs in the SMC are still largely forested, and deforestation rates have decreased since 2000. Cases of forest conversion are located in specific zones and are related to agrarian and political conflicts as well as growing economic inequality and population numbers. These problems could cause an increase in forest loss in the near future. Payments for environmental services and access to carbon markets are identified as options to ensure forest permanence but still face problems. Challenges for the future are to integrate these incentive mechanisms with sustainable land management and a stronger involvement of land holders in conservation.

  14. Development of attractant systems for trapping female Ceratitis capitata (Wied.) (Diptera: Tephritidae) in the Soconusco region, Chiapas, Mexico

    Montoya, P.; Miranda, H.; Paxtian, J.; Celedonio, H.; Orozco, D.

    1999-01-01

    With the aim of developing a system of attractants and trapping to optimize the capture of female Mediterranean fruit flies, Ceratitis capitata (Wied.) as well as other fruit flies, six experiments were carried out during the period 1994-1997, in a sterile-insect release zone in the Soconusco region of Chiapas, Mexico. Relating to the system of attractants, the evaluation focused on the comparison of food attractants (i.e. ammonium acetate, putrescine and trimethylamine) with standard attractants, such as Trimedlure and liquid hydrolyzed protein. For the trapping system, dry traps (Jackson trap, Open bottom dry trap, etc.) as well as wet traps (McPhail trap, Tephri trap, etc.) were tested alternately with the different kinds of attractants. The experiments were performed in agrosystems of coffee and groves of citrus and mango. Results consistently showed that a combination of ammonium acetate + putrescine + trimethylamine was the best for the capture of female Ceratitis capitata (Wied.) when used in traps such as the OBDT and the plastic McPhail trap (IPMT), while for Anastrepha spp., the McPhail trap baited with liquid hydrolyzed protein still appears to be the best option, although the combination of ammonium acetate with putrescine was quite consistent in the trapping of A. obliqua and A. ludens in traps such as the IPMT. (author)

  15. Estrategia educativa para incrementar el cumplimiento del régimen antituberculoso en Chiapas, México Educational strategy for improving patient compliance with the tuberculosis treatment regimen in Chiapas, Mexico

    Guadalupe del Carmen Álvarez Gordillo; Julio Félix Álvarez Gordillo; José Eugenio Dorantes Jiménez

    2003-01-01

    OBJETIVO: Aplicar un plan de capacitación para médicos y pacientes y evaluar su eficacia en términos del cumplimiento por parte de los pacientes del tratamiento contra la tuberculosis pulmonar en la región fronteriza de Chiapas, México. MÉTODOS: Se realizó un estudio de intervención controlado en pacientes mayores de 15 años con tuberculosis pulmonar diagnosticada por baciloscopia entre el 1 de febrero de 2001 y el 31 de enero de 2002 en unidades de salud seleccionadas al azar en la región fr...

  16. Estrategias campesinas de reproducción económica y paludismo en la microregión pliegues fallados de los Altos de Chiapas, México: estudio de caso Peasant strategies for economic reproduction and malaria epidemiology in the ravines microregion of the Chiapas mountains, Mexico: a case study

    Mauricio Gutiérrez Ortega

    1996-09-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de esta investigación fue establecer relaciones iniciales entre actividad agrícola y paludismo, definíendose riesgos y prevalencia a través del análisis de la integración de estrategias de reproducción de los pobladores de una comunidad indígena de Los Altos de Chiapas. Se obtuvo información sobre sitios de trabajo, uso del suelo, volúmenes de producción de café, maíz y frijol y número de unidades familiares involucradas en esta producción, el trabajo asalariado y en las artesanías. Se analizó la circulación productiva a los "trabajaderos" de tierra caliente. Se compararon unidades familiares con casos y sin casos de paludismo, entre 1987 y 1993, en Ybeljoj, Municipio de Chenalhó, Chiapas. Entre los resultados más sobresalientes encontramos que las estrategias que ofrecieron mayores riesgos y prevalencia de paludismo fueron aquellas donde la actividad del cultivo del maíz y el trabajo asalariado estaban presentes; contrariamente, aquellas estrategias en donde la artesanía era la actividad principal o de segunda importancia estaban asociadas con la ausencia del paludismo o prevalencia mínima de la enfermedad.The goal of this investigation was to establish an initial correlation between farming activities and malaria and to define risk factors and prevalence of the latter through an analysis of the integration of farm production strategies by members of an indigenous peasant community in the Chiapas mountains in Mexico. Information was obtained on places of work, land use, coffee, corn, and bean farming, and number of family members involved in farming activities, wage labor, and handicrafts production. Migration of farm workers to warmer climates was also analyzed. The study compared families with and without cases of malaria from 1987 to 1993 in the town of Yibeljoj, Chenalhó county. The most outstanding characteristics of this analysis were the following: strategies involving greater risk and prevalence of

  17. Levels of Organochlorine Pesticides in Blood Plasma from Residents of Malaria-Endemic Communities in Chiapas, Mexico

    Luz E. Ruiz-Suárez

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Organochlorine (OC pesticides have been extensively used for pest control in agriculture and against malaria vectors in the region of Soconusco, Chiapas, in southern Mexico. Our study aimed to identify whether the inhabitants of four Soconusco communities at different locations (i.e., altitudes and with different history of use of OC pesticides, have been similarly exposed to residues of these pesticides. In particular, we analyzed the potential relationship between levels of OC pesticides in plasma and the age, gender, and residence of the study population (n = 60. We detected seven pesticides in total (γ-HCH, β-HCH, heptachlor, p,pʹ-DDE, p,p'-DDT, β-endosulfan, endrin aldehyde. Of these, p,pʹ-DDE and β-endosulfan were the most frequently found (in 98% and 38% of the samples, respectively. The low-altitude (<20 m above sea level; masl and mid-altitude (520 masl locations had the highest levels of p,pʹ-DDE, with geometric means of 50.6 µg/L and 44.46 µg/L, respectively. The oldest subjects (>60 years had the highest p,pʹ-DDE level (56.94 ± 57.81 µg/L of all age groups, while men had higher p,pʹ-DDE (34.00 ± 46.76 µg/L than women. Our results demonstrate that residents of the Soconusco region are exposed to p,pʹ-DDE because of high exposure to DDT in the past and current environmental exposure to this DDT-breakdown product.

  18. Assessment of soil erosion vulnerability in the heavily populated and ecologically fragile communities in Motozintla de Mendoza, Chiapas, Mexico

    González-Morales, Selene B.; Mayer, Alex; Ramírez-Marcial, Neptalí

    2018-06-01

    Variability in physical rates and local knowledge of soil erosion was assessed across six rural communities in the Sierra Madre del Sur, Chiapas, Mexico. The average erosion rate estimated using the RUSLE model is 274 t ha-1 yr-1, with the estimated erosion rates ranging from 28 to 717 t ha-1 yr-1. These very high erosion rates are associated with high rainfall erosivity (17 000 MJ mm ha-1 h-1 yr-1) and steep slopes (mean slope = 67 %). Many of the highest soil erosion rates are found in communities that are dominated by forestland, but where most of the tree cover has been removed. Conversely, lower erosion rates are often found where corn is cultivated for most of the year. According to the results of the soil erosion KAP (knowledge, attitude and practices) survey, awareness of the concept of soil erosion was reasonably high in all of the communities, but awareness of the causes of erosion was considerably lower. More than half of respondents believed that reforestation is a viable option for reducing soil erosion, but only a third of respondents were currently implementing reforestation practices. Another third of the respondents indicated that they were not following any soil conservation practices. Respondents indicated that adoption of government reforestation efforts have been hindered by the need to clear their land to sell forest products or cultivate corn. Respondents also mentioned the difficulties involved with obtaining favorable tree stocks for reforestation. The KAP results were used to assess the overall level of motivation to solve soil erosion problems by compiling negative responses. The relationship between the magnitude of the soil erosion problem and the capacity to reduce soil erosion is inconsistent across the communities. One community, Barrio Vicente Guerrero, had the highest average negative response rate and the second highest soil erosion rate, indicating that this community is particularly vulnerable.

  19. Chikungunya Virus as Cause of Febrile Illness Outbreak, Chiapas, Mexico, 2014

    Kautz, Tiffany F.; Díaz-González, Esteban E.; Erasmus, Jesse H.; Malo-García, Iliana R.; Langsjoen, Rose M.; Patterson, Edward I.; Auguste, Dawn I.; Forrester, Naomi L.; Sanchez-Casas, Rosa Maria; Hernández-Ávila, Mauricio; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia M.; Fernández-Salas, Ildefonso

    2015-01-01

    Since chikungunya virus (CHIKV) was introduced into the Americas in 2013, its geographic distribution has rapidly expanded. Of 119 serum samples collected in 2014 from febrile patients in southern Mexico, 79% were positive for CHIKV or IgM against CHIKV. Sequencing results confirmed CHIKV strains closely related to Caribbean isolates. PMID:26488312

  20. Biochemical evidence that Dendroctonus frontalis consists of two sibling species in Belize and Chiapas, Mexico

    Brian T. Sullivan; Alicia Nino; Benjamin Moreno; Cavell Brownie; Jorge Macias-Samano; Stephen R. Clarke; Lawrence R. Kirkendall; Gerardo. and Zuniga

    2012-01-01

    Dendroctonus frontalis Zimmermann (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) is a major economic pest of pines in the United States, Mexico, and Central America. We report biochemical investigations relevant to the taxonomic status and semiochemistry of two distinct morphotypes of D. frontalis recently detected in the Central American...

  1. Caracterización de la ganadería de doble propósito en una región de Chiapas, México / Characterization of dual purpose livestock in a Region of Chiapas Mexico

    Miguel Ángel Orantes-Zebadúa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del estudio fue caracterizar el sistema de ganado bovino de Doble Propósito (DP de la región 01 Centro de Chiapas, México y los factores socioeconómicos, tecnológicos y comerciales que limitan la producción. El estudio se desarrollo de octubre de 2007 a mayo de 2008. Se aplicó una encuesta aleatoria de 246 productores de una población de 1240 productores, correspondientes a nueve municipios de los 22 que conforma la región 01 Centro de Chiapas. Se analizaron variables cuantitativas, calculando medias aritméticas y porcentajes. En las variables cualitativas se realizaron tablas de frecuencias. Los datos fueron analizados utilizando el paquete estadístico Statistic® 6.0. Los resultados del estudio mostraron que la edad promedio de los productores fue de 50 años y con nivel de estudio de sexto de primaria promedio, 62 % son pequeños propietarios con un promedio de 26 ha y los ejidatarios representan solo 38 % con un promedio de 10 ha. La genética de los hatos está formada de ganado cebú/suizo (63 %, el ingreso económico es la ordeña (67 %, con producción promedio diario del hato de 54 I y el precio de venta del litro de leche a $2.62. Así mismo, 61 % de los productores realizan la comercialización de ganado y leche en el rancho. Aún no existe la organización empresarial y no han innovado tecnología para mejorar los procesos de comercialización.

  2. When the Scars Begin to Heal: Narratives of Obstetric Violence in Chiapas, Mexico

    Murray De Lopez, Jenna

    2018-01-01

    Purpose –The purpose is to examine how obstetric violence is embodied and understood by the women who experience it, how it impacts on maternal subjectivity and what the long-term health implications may be. Design/methodology/approach – This paper is a qualitative, non-clinical analysis of women’s experiences of obstetric violence in Mexico. Data sources are derived from ethnographic interviews, participant observation and an extensive revision of public reports and policy. Findings - Local ...

  3. An Analysis of Stakeholder Engagement in Tourism Development in Mexico's Chiapas Region

    Amaya Loustaunau, Rodolfo

    2007-01-01

    Tourism activity in Mexico has been one of the most important components of revenue generation as a proportion of GDP. Moreover, tourism has shown to increase economic growth, but the unmeasured exploitation of resources and inefficient planning of tourism development could lead to dyer consequences affecting local communities. The Mexican public and private sectors have to consider these limitations if they want to continue generating revenues from the tourism industry. Therefore, sustainabl...

  4. Constraining the Source of the M w 8.1 Chiapas, Mexico Earthquake of 8 September 2017 Using Teleseismic and Tsunami Observations

    Heidarzadeh, Mohammad; Ishibe, Takeo; Harada, Tomoya

    2018-04-01

    The September 2017 Chiapas (Mexico) normal-faulting intraplate earthquake (M w 8.1) occurred within the Tehuantepec seismic gap offshore Mexico. We constrained the finite-fault slip model of this great earthquake using teleseismic and tsunami observations. First, teleseismic body-wave inversions were conducted for both steep (NP-1) and low-angle (NP-2) nodal planes for rupture velocities (V r) of 1.5-4.0 km/s. Teleseismic inversion guided us to NP-1 as the actual fault plane, but was not conclusive about the best V r. Tsunami simulations also confirmed that NP-1 is favored over NP-2 and guided the V r = 2.5 km/s as the best source model. Our model has a maximum and average slips of 13.1 and 3.7 m, respectively, over a 130 km × 80 km fault plane. Coulomb stress transfer analysis revealed that the probability for the occurrence of a future large thrust interplate earthquake at offshore of the Tehuantepec seismic gap had been increased following the 2017 Chiapas normal-faulting intraplate earthquake.

  5. Seroprevalence of human Trypanosoma cruzi infection in diferent geografic zones of Chiapas, Mexico Soroprevalência da infecção humana pelo Trypanosoma cruzi em diferentes regiões de Chiapas, México

    Miguel Angel Mazariego-Arana

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available A serologic survey was carried out in four different geographic zones of Chiapas, Mexico. A total of 1,333 samples were collected from residents of thirteen communities located on the Coast, Central Mountain, Lacandon Forest and a zone called Mesochiapas. One hundred and fifty one seropositive individuals (11.3% were identified. Human Trypanosoma cruzi infection was influenced by geography. In the Lacandon Forest and Central Mountains there was a higher seroprevalence 32.1 and 13.8% respectively, than on the coast (1.2%. In Mesochiapas there were no seropositive individuals among the 137 persons tested. An active transmission is probably continuing because seropositive cases (13.8% were detected in children under 10 years of age. The vector recognized on the Coast was Triatoma dimidiata while in the Lacandon Forest it was Rhodnius prolixus.Foi feito um estudo sorológico em quatro zonas geográficas do estado de Chiapas México. Foram colhidas 1333 amostras dos habitantes das 13 comunidades situadas na costa, na região central montanhosa, na floresta lacandona e na região chamada mesochiapas. Cento cinqüenta e uma pessoas (11,3% foram identificadas como soropositivas. A infecção pelo Trypanosoma cruzi teve a influência da geografia local. Na floresta lacandona nas montanhas centrais, foi encontrada uma prevalência de 32,1 e 13,8% respectivamente, mais que na costa 1,2%. Na zona de mesochiapas não foi encontrada nenhuma pessoa com sorologia positiva entre 137 estudadas. Como encontramos sorologia positiva em crianças menores de 10 anos, pensamos que exista uma transmissão ativa contínua. Na costa foi reconhecido o vetor Triatoma dimidiata e na floresta Lacandona o Rhodnius prolixus.

  6. Simulation of the concentration of SO{sub 2} issued by major stationary sources in 2003 in northwestern Chiapas and central Tabasco, Mexico; Simulacion de la concentracion de SO{sub 2} emitido por fuentes fijas mayores durante 2003 en el noroeste de Chiapas y centro de Tabasco, Mexico

    Valdes Manzanilla, Arturo [Division Academica de Ciencias Biologicas, UJAT, Villahermosa, Tabasco (Mexico)]. E-mail: avmanzanilla@hotmail.com; Fernandez Garcia, German [Universidad Autonoma de Guadalajara Campus Tabasco, Villahermosa, Tabasco (Mexico); Ramos Herrera, Sergio [Division Academica de Ciencias Biologicas, UJAT, Villahermosa, Tabasco (Mexico); Bautista Margulis, Raul G. [Division Academica de Ciencias Biologicas, UJAT, Villahermosa, Tabasco (Mexico)

    2008-05-15

    The CALPUFF dispersion model was used to simulate the spatial distribution of the SO{sub 2} emitted by Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX) gas-processing complexes in Cactus, NW Chiapas, Nuevo PEMEX and Ciudad PEMEX, in central Tabasco, during 2003. It was found that the zone with the highest concentrations of SO{sub 2} is located SW from the PEMEX facilities. The zone, where the World Health Organization's norm for SO{sub 2} is surpassed (20 {mu}g/m{sup 3}), includes the city of Reforma, Chiapas and Ciudad PEMEX, Tabasco. [Spanish] El modelo de dispersion CALPUFF fue usado para simular la distribucion espacial de la concentracion de SO{sub 2} emitido por los complejos procesadores de gas de Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX) en Cactus, en el noroeste de Chiapas, Nuevo PEMEX y Ciudad PEMEX, en el centro de Tabasco, durante 2003. Se encontro que la zona con mayor concentracion de SO{sub 2} esta localizada al suroeste de las instalaciones de la empresa petrolera. La zona, donde la norma de la Organizacion Mundial de la Salud para el SO{sub 2} es sobrepasada (20 {mu}g/m{sup 3}), incluye la ciudad de Reforma, Chiapas y Ciudad PEMEX, Tabasco.

  7. Symbiotic germination of three species of epiphytic orchids susceptible to genetic erosion, from Soconusco (Chiapas, Mexico

    Vincenzo Bertolini

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The Soconusco region of southeast Mexico has almost a quarter of the orchid species registered in Mexico and 37 threatened species (NOM-059-SEMARNAT-2001, many with severely reduced and non-viable populations. We chose two of the most threatened species, Rossioglossum grande (Lindl. Garay and G. C. Kenn. and Cuitlauzina convallarioides (Schltr. Dressler and N. H. Williams and a rare species recently discovered in the region, Rhynchostele bictoniensis (Bateman Soto Arenas and Salazar, to study the mycorrhizal fungi associated with the roots, isolate them and use them to induce seed germination and promote development in asymbiotically produced protocorms, in the laboratory. We isolated ten strains of Rhizoctonia-like orchid mycorrhizal fungi from Rossioglossum grande and three from Cuitlauzina convallarioides. Using selected fungal strains from the same species, we tested for the promotion of further development of asymbiotically pre-germinated protocorms of R. grande and the promotion of seed germination of C. convallarioides. In the case of R. bictoniensis, we studied the effects on seed germination of nine strains of Rhizoctonia-like fungi isolated from other orchid species. For R. grande, after 10 months, one strain of Rhizoctonia promoted development of the pre-germinated protocorms, and almost 90% of the protocorms produced rhizoids. For C. convallarioides, after 3 months, one fungal strain promoted protocorm development to the stage where they produced green tissue under illumination, suggesting the onset of photosynthesis. For R. bictoniensis three of the fungal strains (from other orchid species promoted germination and, after 4 months, autotrophic protocorms.

  8. Respuesta de Anopheles albimanus a compuestos volátiles de casas del sur de Chiapas, México Behavioral response of Anopheles albimanus to volatile compounds collected inside houses from the south of Chiapas, Mexico

    Silvany Mayoly Ríos-Delgado

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar el efecto de los compuestos volátiles en las casas sobre la respuesta conductual del vector del paludismo Anopheles albimanus. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: El estudio se realizó en enero de 2006 en el ejido Nueva Independencia, municipio de Suchiate, Chiapas. Se colectaron compuestos volátiles dentro de casas y los extractos se probaron sobre hembras sin alimentar en un olfatómetro en "Y". Los extractos se analizaron mediante cromatografía de gases-espectrometría de masas (CG-EM. RESULTADOS: Se obtuvieron 28 extractos, 12 presentaron respuesta de atracción y dos de repelencia. Los análisis por CG-EM indicaron variación en la presencia de compuestos volátiles y no se vincularon con compuestos específicos indicativos de algún efecto. CONCLUSIONES: Los volátiles en casas presentaron efecto de atracción y repelencia para An. albimanus. No se reconoció un patrón definido en cuanto a la presencia de compuestos químicos característicos y la respuesta obtenida.OBJECTIVE: To determine effects of volatile compounds in homes on the behavioral response of Anopheles albimanus. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was conducted in January 2006, in the village of Nueva Independencia village, Suchiate, Chiapas. Volatile compounds were collected inside homes and the extracts were tested on unfed females in a Y-olfactometer. Extracts were analyzed in a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry system (GC-MS. RESULTS: Twenty eight extracts were obtained, twelve presented attraction and two repellency responses. GC-MS analyses of the extracts indicated variation in the volatile compound present in the extracts, but could not associated specific compounds with any particular effect. CONCLUSIONS: Within homes, volatiles presented attraction and repellency responses to An. albimanus. A definate pattern concerning the presence of a characteristic chemical compound and the observed response was not found.

  9. Morphometry of Vieja species (Cichlidae) in rivers of Usumacinta's basin, Chiapas, Mexico

    Soria-Barreto, Miriam; Rodiles-Hernández, Rocío; González-Díaz, Alfonso A.

    2011-01-01

    Se evaluaron y compararon diversas características morfológicas de 6 especies de Vieja Fernández-Yépez, 1969 del río Usumacinta. Se emplearon 20 organismos adultos por especie y 33 medidas corporales que fueron estandarizadas y examinadas con un análisis discriminante. Además se comparó la forma del cuerpo entre las especies, mediante el análisis de morfometría geométrica a partir de imágenes digitalizadas. El análisis con la morfometría tradicional y geométrica permitió diferenciar los seis ...

  10. In the market for carbon: conventions, coordination and narratives of voluntary carbon offsetting in Chiapas, Mexico

    Hendrickson, Cary Yungmee

    2017-01-01

    Bibliografia. Esta tesis tiene el objetivo de investigar cómo las narrativas globales alrededor de los bonos de carbono en el sector forestal crean valor e influencian lo que los mercados de carbono otorgan, cómo y a quién. Se relaciona con el marco teórico de las convenciones y con el enfoque del análisis del discurso para analizar las diferentes convenciones movilizadas en las narrativas utilizadas por los actores involucrados en la cadena de valor del carbono. Se examina un estudio de c...

  11. Respuesta kairomonal de coleópteros asociados a Dendroctonus frontalis y dos especies de Ips (Coleoptera: Curculionidae en bosques de Chiapas, México Kairomonal response of coleopterans associated with Dendroctonus frontalis and two Ips species (Coleoptera: Curculionidae in forest of Chiapas, Mexico

    Bernardo Domínguez-Sánchez

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Se evaluó la diversidad de escarabajos descortezadores y la respuesta diferencial de sus coleópteros asociados a feromonas comerciales de agregación, en bosques de pino del estado de Chiapas, México. Durante los meses de junio a octubre del 2006, se colocaron 40 trampas multiembudo tipo Lindgren cebadas con las feromonas racémicas frontalina, ipsenol e ipsdienol y un testigo (sin feromona. La captura fue más abundante para los escarabajos descortezadores Dendroctonus frontalis (Zimmermann con frontalina, y de Ips spp. con ipsenol e ipsdienol. Se registró respuesta kairomonal específica de los depredadores Temnochila chlorodia (Mannerheim, Enoclerus ablusus (Barr y Elacatis sp. hacia las feromonas de agregación. Tanto para descortezadores como para depredadores, las mayores abundancias fueron registradas durante el verano y a comienzos del otoño. Temmnochila chlorodia exhibió una atracción diferencial hacia los semioquímicos evaluados, mientras que E. ablusus, Elacatis sp. y Leptostylus sp. fueron atraídos principalmente por las feromonas ipsenol e ipsdienol. Además, por primera vez para México se determinó la respuesta kairomonal del fitófago Leptostylus sp. (Cerambycidae. Estos resultados indican que hay una comunicación intra e inter específica entre los escarabajos descortezadores y sus especies asociadas que promueven interacciones de competencia y depredación.We assessed the bark beetle diversity and the response of associated predators to aggregation pheromones in pine forests in Chiapas, Mexico. From June to October 2006, 40 Lindgren funnel traps were established with different baits that included frontalin, ipsenol and ipsdienol pheromones and a control (without pheromone. We registered the attractiveness of frontalin to the bark beetle Dendroctonus frontalis (Zimmermann, and ipsenol and ipsdienol to Ips spp. Kairomonal specific response of the predators Temnochila chlorodia (Mannerheim, Enoclerus ablusus (Barr and

  12. Intestinal parasites in children, in highly deprived areas in the border region of Chiapas, Mexico Parasitosis intestinal en niños, en áreas de alta marginación socioeconómica de la región fronteriza de Chiapas, México

    Emma Marianela Morales-Espinoza

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections among children in highly deprived areas, and its possible association with demographic and socioeconomic indicators. MATERIAL AND METHODS: From March to September 1998 in a convenience sample of 32 communities of the border region of Chiapas, Mexico, selected at random based on the level of poverty and distance from the community to the nearest health care unit (OBJETIVO: Estimar la prevalencia de parasitosis intestinal en niños de zonas de alta marginación y su asociación con indicadores demográficos y socioeconómicos de interés. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: En una muestra de 1478 menores de edad, de entre 1 a 14 años, provenientes de 32 comunidades de la región fronteriza de Chiapas, México, de marzo a septiembre de 1998, se recolectaron tres muestras de heces fecales, seleccionadas aleatoriamente a partir del grado de marginación (alto y muy alto del municipio al que pertenecen, y distancia de la unidad de salud más cercana a la comunidad (<1 hora; 1 hora o más. En una de cada cuatro viviendas con niños menores de 15 años de edad, seleccionadas aleatoriamente, se obtuvieron tres muestras de heces fecales de éstos. Se efectuaron análisis bivariados con la prueba de ji cuadrada y multivariados con modelos lineales generalizados. RESULTADOS: La prevalencia global de parasitosis fue de 67% (intervalo de confianza IC 95% 64-70%. Sesenta por ciento de los niños estaban multiparasitados. La prevalencia de Entamoeba histolytica/E dispar fue de 51.2%, de Giardia lamblia, 18.3% y de Ascaris lumbricoides, 14.5%. La mayor prevalencia de E histolytica/E dispar se asoció con la edad y hablar algún idioma indígena; la de Ascaris lumbricoides con el sitio de obtención de agua y la carencia de refrigerador y electricidad. CONCLUSIONES: Es necesario hacer intervenciones locales de salud (calidad del agua, sistemas de desagüe, programas de educación sanitaria (promoción de la

  13. Occurrence of entomopathogenic fungi and parasitic nematodes on Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) larvae collected in Central Chiapas, Mexico

    Fall armyworm larvae (FAW), Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) were collected from whorl-stage cornfields, between the V2 and V4 stages, in 22 localities of Central, Chiapas, México, called "La Frailesca" during late June 2009 to determine the occurrence of native entomopathogens and parasitic nema...

  14. Genetic identification of Theobroma cacao L. trees with high Criollo ancestry in Soconusco, Chiapas, Mexico.

    Vázquez-Ovando, J A; Molina-Freaner, F; Nuñez-Farfán, J; Ovando-Medina, I; Salvador-Figueroa, M

    2014-12-12

    Criollo-type cacao trees are an important pool of genes with potential to be used in cacao breeding and selection programs. For that reason, we assessed the diversity and population structure of Criollo-type trees (108 cultivars with Criollo phenotypic characteristics and 10 Criollo references) using 12 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Cultivars were selected from 7 demes in the Soconusco region of southern Mexico. SSRs amplified 74 alleles with an average of 3.6 alleles per population. The overall populations showed an average observed heterozygosity of 0.28, indicating heterozygote deficiency (average fixation index F = 0.50). However, moderate allelic diversity was found within populations (Shannon index for all populations I = 0.97). Bayesian method analysis determined 2 genetic clusters (K = 2) within individuals. In concordance, an assignment test grouped 37 multilocus genotypes (including 10 references) into a first cluster (Criollo), 54 into a second (presumably Amelonado), and 27 admixed individuals unassigned at the 90% threshold likely corresponding to the Trinitario genotype. This classification was supported by the principal coordinate analysis and analysis of molecular variance, which showed 12% of variation among populations (FST = 0.123, P cocoa.

  15. Testing earthquake links in Mexico from 1978 up to the 2017 M=8.1 Chiapas and M=7.1 Puebla shocks

    Segou, Margarita; Parsons, Thomas E.

    2018-01-01

    The M = 8.1 Chiapas and the M = 7.1 Puebla earthquakes occurred in the bending part of the subducting Cocos plate 11 days and ~600 km apart, a range that puts them well outside the typical aftershock zone. We find this to be a relatively common occurrence in Mexico, with 14% of M > 7.0 earthquakes since 1900 striking more than 300 km apart and within a 2 week interval, not different from a randomized catalog. We calculate the triggering potential caused by crustal stress redistribution from large subduction earthquakes over the last 40 years. There is no evidence that static stress transfer or dynamic triggering from the 8 September Chiapas earthquake promoted the 19 September earthquake. Both recent earthquakes were promoted by past thrust events instead, including delayed afterslip from the 2012 M = 7.5 Oaxaca earthquake. A repeated pattern of shallow thrust events promoting deep intraslab earthquakes is observed over the past 40 years.

  16. Nucleation and kinematic rupture of the 2017 Mw 8.2 Chiapas Mexico earthquake

    Meng, L.; Huang, H.; Xie, Y.; Feng, T.; Dominguez, L. A.; Han, J.; Davis, P. M.

    2017-12-01

    Integrated geophysical observations from the 2017 Mw 8.2 Oaxaca, Mexico earthquake allow the exploration of one of the largest recorded normal faulting events inside a subducting slab. In this study, we collect seismic data from regional and teleseismic stations, and regional tsunami recordings to better understand the preparation and rupture processes. The mainshock occurred on the steeply dipping plane of a mega-normal fault, confirmed by time reversal analysis of tsunami waves. We utilize a template matching approach to detect possible missing earthquakes within a 2-month period before the Oaxaca mainshock. The seismicity rate (M > 3.7) shows an abrupt increase in the last day within 30 km around the mainshock hypocenter. The largest one is a M 4.6 event with similar normal faulting as the mainshock located at about 18 km updip from the hypocenter. The waveforms of the subsequent foreshocks are not similar, supporting the diversity of their locations or focal mechanisms. The nucleation process can be explained by a cascading process which eventually triggers the mainshock. Back-projection using the USArray network in Alaska reveals that the mainshock rupture propagated northwestward unilaterally at a speed of 3.1 km/s, for about 200 km and terminated near the Tehuantepec Fracture Zone. We also document the tectonic fabric of bending related faulting of the incoming Cocos plate. The mainshock is likely a reactivation of subducted outer rise faults, supported by the similarity of the strike angle between the mainshock and the outer rise faults. The surprisingly large magnitude is consistent with the exceedingly large dimensions of outer rise faulting in this particular segment of the central Mexican trench.

  17. Journalists' working conditions in Chiapas/ La condición laboral del periodista en Chiapas

    Ddo. Hugo A. Villar Pinto; hvillar@unach.mx

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Even if they are at the center of the opinion and the information, journalists are not well-known. In fact, we know little about them: their salary, the relationships they establish with their sources, the values they profess, their level of education, their social security benefits and their work routines. In the absence of studies about journalists in the context of Chiapas, Mexico, this work aims to investigate the conditions under which journalists perform, the average salary they receive, their benefits and the social organizations they belong to. In Chiapas, there are approximately 300 journalists; the remaining employees are sometimes involved in the tasks of information and opinion. We have focused on these 300 journalists in order to do this project. They have become the object of our study. We surveyed 158 journalists who live in different parts of the state and, afterwards, we interviewed 88 of them. The article shows the workings conditions in which the Chiapas journalists perform their job: low wages and little support from their companies to carry out their task of providing information.Aunque están en el centro de la opinión y de la información, los periodistas son poco conocidos. Se sabe escasamente de ellos: salarios, relaciones que establecen con sus fuentes, valores que profesan, grados de estudio, prestaciones sociales y rutinas laborales. Ante la inexistencia de estudios sobre el periodista chiapaneco en el contexto de Chiapas, México, este trabajo tiene como objetivo indagar las condiciones en que se desempeña el periodista, el salario promedio que percibe, prestaciones sociales y las organizaciones a las que pertenece.El número aproximado de periodistas en Chiapas es de 300; el restante son colaboradores que participan ocasionalmente en las labores de información y opinión. En esos 300 nos hemos centrado para hacer este trabajo. Ellos fueron nuestro objeto de estudio. Encuestamos a 158 comunicadores que viven en

  18. Mass rearing of the Mexican fruit fly, Anastrepha ludens, at the Fruit Flies Biofactory in Metapa de Dominguez, Chiapas, Mexico

    Zavala Lopez, J.L.; Dominguez G, J.; Gomez S, Y.; Moreno, P.

    1999-01-01

    A description of the present methods for mass rearing Anastrepha ludens, known as the Mexican fruit fly, at the Fruit Flies Biofactory in Metapa de Dominguez, Chiapas, is given. Important contributions and improvements are described for the rearing stages, e.g. egg production and incubation, larvae diets, lab conditions for the development of larvae and pupae, larvae and pupae handling and environmental control. (author)

  19. Parásitos del tapir centroamericano Tapirus bairdii (Perissodactyla: Tapiridae en Chiapas, México

    Epigmenio Cruz Aldán

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Se recolectaron 19 muestras de excretas del tapir centroamericano (Tapirus bairdii en la Reserva "La Sepultura" (marzo a julio de 1999, así como un muestreo directo a un tapir macho de la Reserva "Montes Azules" (Chiapas, México. Se analizaron con cinco técnicas (flotación, MacMaster, micrometría, sedimentación de Ritchie y cuantitativa de Ferreira. Además se recolectaron muestras en piel de animales capturados en en las dos reservas y en una pareja de zoológico proveniente de Tuxtla Gutiérrez, Chiapas. Se hallaron nematodos y protozoarios: Agriostomun sp., Lacandoria sp., Neomurshidia sp., Trichostrongylus sp., Strongylus sp., Brachylumus sp., y un ancilostomaideo aun por identificar. Además se informa la presencia de Eimeria sp., y Balantidium coli. Los ácaros hallados fueron; Dermacentor halli, Dermacentor latus, Amblyomma cajannense, Amblyomma coelebs, Amblyomma ovale, Anocentor nitens e Ixodes bicornis.Parasites of the Central American tapir Tapirus bairdii (Perissodactyla: Tapiridae in Chiapas, Mexico. We analyzed 19 samples of Baird´s tapir feces from La Sepultura Biosphere Reserve, collected between March and July 1999. We also took samples directly from a male tapir captured at the Montes Azules Biosphere Reserve. Both reserves are in Chiapas, Mexico. We used five techniques: flotation, MacMaster, micrometric, Ritchie’s sedimentation and Ferreira´s quantitative. In addition, we collected ectoparasites from animals captured in both reserves and from a captive couple from Tuxtla Gutierrez, Chiapas. These nematodes and protozoans were found: Agriostomun sp., Lacandoria sp., Neomurshidia sp., Trichostrongylus sp., Strongylus sp., Brachylumus sp, and an unidentified species of ancilostomaide. We also found Eimeria sp. and Balantidium coli, as well as the mites Dermacentor halli, Dermacentor latus, Amblyomma cajannense, Amblyomma coelebs, Amblyomma ovale, Anocentor nitens and Ixodes bicornis. Rev. Biol. Trop. 54(2: 445

  20. Movement of Sediment Associated With Lowered Reservoir Levels in the Rio La Venta Arm of the Presa Netzahualcoyotl, Chiapas, Mexico

    Hilton, S.; de La Fuente, J.; Lisle, T. E.; Velasquez, J.; Allison, B.; Olson, B.; Quinones, R.

    2003-12-01

    A joint sedimentation study is currently underway at the Netzahualcoyotl reservoir in Chiapas, Mexico, involving the Comision Nacional de Areas Naturales Protegidas (CONANP) of the Secretaria de Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales and the USDA Forest Service. The reservoir is adjacent to the Reserva de la Biosfera, Selva El Ocote, administered by CONANP. Ongoing research is intended to provide watershed and reservoir managers with strategies to protect the resources of Rio La Venta canyon. The Rio La Venta arm of the reservoir is incised into karst terrain, with near-vertical limestone walls up to 300 meters high. The canyon is fed by two rivers, Rio La Selva and Rio Negro, and is surrounded by pristine tropical forest. The majority of the clastic sediment (predominantly sand and fine gravel) entering the reservoir originates in the headwaters of the two rivers which are underlain by weathered and dissected granitic terrain. Rapid sedimentation of the partially inundated canyon poses a threat to the aquatic ecosystem, as well as to recreational resources. Longitudinal and transverse profiles were surveyed in the inundated canyon in March of 2002 and repeated in April of 2003 when the reservoir level was 15 meters lower. The 2002 longitudinal profile shows an inflection from a slope of 0.0017 to one of 0.0075 at 7.2 km downstream of the mouth of Rio Negro. In 2003, the two slopes remained the same, but the bed lowered about 5 meters and the inflection point moved downstream about 2.3 km. We calculated that reservoir lowering in 2003 allowed the transport of 2.5 million cubic meters of sand further out into the reservoir. This volume is more than the average annual rate of filling up to the 2002 level since 1984 when sedimentation was not as advanced (De la Fuente et al., 2002), which was calculated disregarding loss of sediment to the main reservoir. Field observations at late dry season low flows in 2003 revealed active transport of sand and pebbles and formation

  1. The September 2017 M=8.1 Chiapas and M=7.1 Puebla, Mexico, earthquakes: Chain reaction or coincidence?

    Toda, S.; Stein, R. S.

    2017-12-01

    The M=8.1 and M=7.1 events struck 12 days and 600 km apart, both with an independent probability of occurrence of 0.5% per year, based on the GEAR model [Bird et al., 2015]. Are they related? First, we calculated the static stress imparted by the M=8.1 shock to the fault that ruptured in the M=7.1, and find a tiny push that would favor rupture. But the stress increase (0.2 kPa) is less than the fault would experience from the tidal stresses, and so it should be inconsequential. We next used the México Servicio Sismológico Nacional (UNAM) online catalog to look at the quakes in the month before the M=8.1 and in the 13 days since. We calculate the completeness to be M≥4.0. There are virtually no remote aftershocks from the Chiapas rupture that extend within 250 km of the M=7.1 shock during the first week after the M=8.1. So, if anything, the M=8.1 turned off for a week or more the region that ruptured in the M=7.1. Events started turning on about 2-3 days before the M=7.1, but none of those struck within 40 km of the future M=7.1 mainshock. The seismic surface waves unleashed by great earthquakes envelop the globe in just 160 minutes, and yet triggering of remote large aftershocks during these 2-3 hours is either very rare [Pollitz et al., Nature 2012] or in dispute [Fan & Shearer, 2016 vs. Yue et al., 2017]. So, the waves must trigger tiny shocks that cascade into larger shocks after some delay. Or, perhaps the stresses conveyed by the waves pump pockets of fluids that slowly diffuse into nearby fault zones, lubricating them to the point of failure [Parsons at al., 2017]. In the cases where great earthquakes are indisputably seen to trigger aftershocks at great distances or even globally, they to do so within several days, or a week at most. Since Puebla struck 12 days later, this seems to us too long a period to be explained by dynamic triggering. Even though neither quake on their own is rare, what's the chance of independent M=8.1 and M=7.1 events just 12

  2. Chagas cardiomyopathy and serologic testing in a small rural hospital in Chiapas, Mexico Miocardiopatía chagásica y pruebas serológicas de enfermedad de Chagas en un hospital rural pequeño de Chiapas, México

    Linnea Capps

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To conduct a study in a small rural hospital located in the state of Chiapas, Mexico, to: (1 examine the prevalence of chagasic cardiomyopathy among patients with the diagnosis of congestive heart failure and (2 assess the prevalence of positive serologic results in blood donors in the hospital, in an attempt to ascertain whether Chagas' disease remains an important cause of heart failure at least in some areas of Mexico. METHODS: The study of patients with cardiomyopathy was conducted by retrospective chart review of patients with the diagnosis of congestive heart failure treated at the hospital during the years 2000­2002. With the blood donors, the results of their serologic screening were reviewed for a six-month period beginning in April 2002. Serologic testing was done in both groups with either indirect hemagglutination (IHA or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, or with both. RESULTS: Of 67 patients with heart failure and no risk factors for other causes of heart failure, 40 of them had serologic tests performed. Thirty-three of these 40 (82.5% were positive by ELISA, IHA, or both. With 97 blood donors, one or both serologic tests were positive in 17 of them (17.5%. CONCLUSIONS: This research adds to the evidence that Chagas' disease continues to be a major cause of heart failure in some areas of Mexico and that there continues to be a risk of transmission by blood transfusion if donated blood is not consistently screened.OBJETIVO: Llevar a cabo un estudio en un hospital rural pequeño del Estado de Chiapas, México, con el fin de: 1 examinar la prevalencia de miocardiopatía chagásica en pacientes con un diagnóstico de insuficiencia cardíaca congestiva y 2 estimar la prevalencia de positividad serológica en donantes de sangre del hospital, con objeto de determinar si la enfermedad de Chagas sigue siendo una causa importante de insuficiencia cardíaca en algunas partes de México. MÉTODOS: El estudio de los

  3. La atención del parto en Chiapas, México: ¿dónde y quién los atiende Childbirth in Chiapas, Mexico: who provides delivery care and where?

    Héctor Javier Sánchez-Pérez

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Identificar el sitio y el agente de atención del parto; analizar el agente de atención del parto según la atención prenatal (AP y factores sociodemográficos; identificar grupos con menor y mayor probabilidad de recibir atención por parte del personal de los servicios de salud; identificar los motivos de no atenderse en la unidad de salud más cercana al domicilio. Material y métodos. Se analizan datos sobre la atención del parto en 297 mujeres de la Región Fraylesca (Chiapas, usando modelos logit para la identificación de grupos. Resultados. El 32% de los partos ocurrieron en instituciones de salud, y 60%, en el hogar (mayoritariamente en condiciones higiénico-sanitarias desfavorables. Sólo 10% del grupo de mujeres con menos de cinco consultas de AP, una escolaridad menor al tercero de primaria y un jefe de hogar dedicado a labores agropecuarias, fue atendido por personal de salud. Conclusiones. Es necesario mejorar la cobertura, la aceptabilidad y la calidad de los servicios de salud e instrumentar un programa dirigido a incrementar el número de partos en condiciones higiénico-sanitarias adecuadas.Objective. To identify the place and provider of delivery care; to analyse the relationship between the type of delivery care provider and prenatal care and sociodemographic factors; to identify groups with greater and lesser probability of receiving attention at health centers and to identify the reasons for not attending the health center nearest to the household. Material and methods. Data on the delivery care of 297 women of La Fraylesca Region, Chiapas, were gathered using multivariate logit models to identify groups. Results. From the total, 32% of childbirths occurred at health centers and 60% at home (mostly with poor sanitary conditions. Only 10% of women with less than 5 prenatal visits, school level under 3 years and whose household head was a peasant were attended by health care personnel. Conclusions. The

  4. Perceptions of and barriers to family planning services in the poorest regions of Chiapas, Mexico: a qualitative study of men, women, and adolescents.

    Dansereau, Emily; Schaefer, Alexandra; Hernández, Bernardo; Nelson, Jennifer; Palmisano, Erin; Ríos-Zertuche, Diego; Woldeab, Alex; Zúñiga, Maria Paola; Iriarte, Emma Margarita; Mokdad, Ali H; El Bcheraoui, Charbel

    2017-10-17

    In the poorest regions of Chiapas, Mexico, 50.2% of women in need of contraceptives do not use any modern method. A qualitative study was needed to design effective and culturally appropriate interventions. We used purposive maximum-variation sampling to select eight municipalities with a high proportion of residents in the poorest wealth quintile, including urban, rural, indigenous, and non-indigenous communities. We conducted 44 focus group discussions with 292 women, adolescent women, and men using semi-structured topic guides. We analyzed the data through recursive abstraction. There were intergenerational and cultural gaps in the acceptability of family planning, and in some communities family planning use was greatly limited by gender roles and religious objections to contraception. Men strongly influenced family planning choices in many households, but were largely unreached by outreach and education programs due to their work hours. Respondents were aware of many modern methods but often lacked deeper knowledge and held misconceptions about long-term fertility risks posed by some hormonal methods. Acute physical side effects also dissuaded use. The implant was a new and highly acceptable method due to ease of use, low upkeep, and minimal side effects; however, it was perceived as subject to stock-outs. Adolescent women reported being refused services at health facilities and requested more reproductive health information from their parents and schools. Mass and social media are growing sources of reproductive health information. Our study identifies a number of barriers to family planning that have yet to be adequately addressed by existing programs in Chiapas' poorest regions, and calls for reinvigorated efforts to provide effective, acceptable, and culturally appropriate interventions for these communities.

  5. [Evaluation of the nutritional status of children under 5 years of age: concordance between anthropometric indices in the indigenous population of Chiapas (Mexico)].

    Ochoa-Díaz López, Héctor; García-Parra, Esmeralda; Flores-Guillén, Elena; García-Miranda, Rosario; Solís-Hernández, Roberto

    2017-07-28

    Nutritional status is determined through various methods, including anthropometry. In children under 5 years of age indeces as weight/age (w/a), height/age (h/a), weight/height (w/h) and body mass index (BMI) are used. The purpose of this article is to analyze and compare the ability of different anthropometric indeces to identify children from marginalized communities in Chiapas (Mexico) with nutritional problems. To analyze the correlation among the different anthropometric indeces to determine the nutritional status of children under 5 years of age in poor rural areas with a background of short stature. Cross-sectional study in 1,160 children under 5 years of age in 13 high poverty communities in three regions of Chiapas. The variables studied were age, sex, weight and height. Nutritional status was determined through the indeces w/a, h/a, w/h and BMI. Field staff in charge of taking measurements of weight and height were trained and standardized. Kappa coefficients for agreement between the indeces were calculated. No correlation between BMI and w/a and h/a was found. The prevalence of malnutrition according to h/a was 64.8%. Only high concordance (0.726) between BMI and w/h was found. BMI showed a low prevalence of malnutrition and a higher prevalence of overweight and obesity rates. For a reliable and accurate diagnosis in individuals with a background of chronic malnutrition, it is recommended to use the four indeces together. Doing so it will reduce the risk of underestimating or overestimating nutritional status and will focus actions toward addressing and improving the health and nutrition of children living under extreme poverty conditions.

  6. Factores asociados a mortalidad perinatal en el hospital general de Chiapas, México Perinatal mortality associated factors in a general hospital of Chiapas, Mexico

    Leonor Rivera

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: El objetivo del estudio es identificar factores socioeconómicos, gineco-obstétricos y del producto asociados a mortalidad perinatal. MÉTODOS: Se realizó un estudio de casos y controles pareado. Se consideró caso a los nacidos vivos o muertos que nacieron y fallecieron entre las 28 semanas de gestación a los 7 días de vida extrauterina. y control al producto nacido vivo entre las 28 semanas de gestación y los 7 días de vida extrauterina. Los datos se obtuvieron de los expedientes clínicos hospitalarios. Se estudiaron 99 casos y 197 controles. Se hizo un análisis estadístico utilizando Stata 6.0. RESULTADOS La media de edad de la madre fue de 24.82 años y del producto de 37.78 semanas de gestación. El promedio de peso del producto fue de 2,760 gramos. Los factores asociados a mortalidad perinatal fueron: ocupación del padre agricultor (RM ajustada 3,31; IC 95% 1,26-8,66; índice de riesgo obstétrico alto (RM ajustada 10,57; IC 95% 2,82-39,66, antecedente de cesárea (RM ajustada 2,75; IC 95% 1,37-5,51; cinco y más consultas prenatales (RM ajustada 4,43; IC 95% 1.86-10,54; producto pretérmino (RM ajustada 9,20; IC 95% 4,39-19,25. CONCLUSIONES: Los resultados muestran que es necesario implementar medidas de prevención y control que aseguren la identificación del riesgo en las mujeres embarazadas, con el fin de abatir la incidencia de mortalidad perinatal.OBJECTIVE: To identify socioeconomic, gynecological-obstetric and fetal factors associated with perinatal mortality. METHODS: A matched case-control study was carried out. Cases were newborns (born live or dead that were born and died between 28 weeks gestation and 7 days of life. Controls were live newborns between 28 weeks gestation and 7 days of life. A total of 99 cases and 197 controls were studied. Data were obtained from the corresponding medical charts. Statistical analysis was performed using Stata 6.0 software. RESULTS: Mean maternal age was 24.82 years and

  7. [Bird biodiversity in natural and modified habitats in a landscape of the Central Depression of Chiapas, Mexico].

    Ramírez-Albores, Jorge E

    2010-03-01

    In many parts of the neotropics, the original habitats are rapidly changing because of excessive logging, agriculture and livestock activity, with an often negative impact on bird communities. I present an analysis of the diversity and richness of birds in a fragmented landscape of the Central Chiapas Depression. Fieldwork was conducted from February 2003 to January 2004. Using point counts, a total of 35 families and 225 bird species were registered (164 residents and 61 migratory); 3% are abundant and 30% rare. Diversity, species richness and number of individuals were significantly higher in tropical deciduous forest (H'=3.41, 178 species ANOVA pbirds species in the study area.

  8. Towards a National Hazard Map of Landslides: Juan de Grijalva, Chiapas, and Mitlatongo, Oaxaca, two catastrophic landslides on southeastern of Mexico

    Dominguez-M, L.; Castañeda, A.; Ramirez, A.; González, A. E.

    2013-05-01

    One of the most catastrophic events, with economical losses and deaths, in Mexico and Latin America, is the landslide event. The Juan de Grijalva landslide, which blocked one of the largest rivers in the Chiapas state of Mexico, on November 4, 2007, is considered one of the greatest that have occurred in the world in the last 100 years (Dominguez, 2008) and it could be the one with the largest economic impact in the history of Mexico. This landslide occurred four days after a period of very heavy rains that caused, in the peak of the emergency, flooding in almost 62% of the area of the state of Tabasco (CENAPRED, 2009) and is also one of the most serious disasters that were faced by the Mexican government in the past 10 years. The Juan de Grijalva landslide mobilized the entire government apparatus and required an investment of just over 0.1 billions of US Dollars (CENAPRED, 2009) for the rehabilitation of the river runway and additional works in order to prevent further damages if another landslide occurs in the vicinity. A similar case of interest for Mexican researchers and specialists in earth sciences is the big landslide occurred in the communities of Santa Cruz Mitlatongo, municipality of Magdalena Jaltepec, and Santiago Mitlatongo, municipality of Nochixtlan, both in the state of Oaxaca (Dominguez, 2011). This landslide has dimensions of just over 2,500 m long and 900 m wide, and it remains active from September 2011. Since then, the landslide has moved just over 230 m in length and has destroyed about 850 houses. Given the geological and geotechnical characteristics of these landslides and the economic and social impact caused, the National Center for Disaster Prevention (CENAPRED) has initiated a research project in order to learn the main factors (constraints and triggers) that influenced both landslides. In relation with the National Hazard Landslide Map, developed by CENAPRED, these events are an important task of the National Inventory of Landslides

  9. TRANSFERS BETWEEN GENERATIONS AND GENDERS. THE CASE OF DIABETES MELLITUS TYPE 2 IN A POOR URBAN CONTEXT OF CHIAPAS, MEXICO

    Emma Zapata-Martelo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The transfer between generations of populations with diabetes mellitus type 2, play an important role in adherence to the treatment or disease control. The objective of the present study is to identify the magnitude, characteristics and reasons of the intergenerational transfers, and their effect on the absence of medical control from those who have diabetes mellitus type 2. The present study is inserted into the project: prevalence of chronic diseases in Chiapas. Epidemiology, social barriers and attention needs in the adult population (ECPA, in the city of Tuxtla Gutierrez, Chiapas; the information was obtained from September 2005 to April 2006. For purposes of the present study were considered people of 40 years and older with diabetes mellitus type 2 previously diagnosed, resulting in the selection of 125 people with those characteristics: 43 men and 82 women. The results showed that approximately 90% of the people received any type of economical or emotional transfer, there is greater support from children to mothers, and the reasons for transfers were mainly voluntary. The effect of emotional support in women it’s greater than in men in the adherence to treatment and disease control.

  10. Demographic, health services and socio-economic factors associated with pulmonary tuberculosis mortality in Los Altos Region of Chiapas, Mexico.

    Nájera-Ortiz, J C; Sánchez-Pérez, H J; Ochoa-Díaz, H; Arana-Cedeño, M; Lezama, Ma Salazar; Mateo, M Martín

    2008-08-01

    Chiapas is one of the Mexican states having the highest rates of Pulmonary Tuberculosis (PTB), due to the numerous factors impeding its management and control (poverty, poor housing and nutrition, shortage of health resources, among others). To analyse the PTB mortality of a cohort of patients in Los Altos Region of Chiapas, who had been diagnosed with PTB from January 1, 1998 to December 31, 2002; and, to identify demographic, socioeconomic and health services utilization factors, associated with death from PTB. Analysis of a cohort of patients aged over 14 years diagnosed with PTB in the above mentioned period (n = 431) in Los Altos region of Chiapas. The records of the Tuberculosis Programme were reviewed, and patients were located through a search attempting to locate them in their homes. Those found alive were interviewed and asked to provide sputum samples. In the case of deceased patients, a verbal autopsy was obtained from a member of their family. The records of the PTB Programme in the area were incomplete and erroneous in many cases. The results of the home follow-up visits were: 208 (48%) patients located alive, five of whom were still PTB positive (three with multi-drug resistance); 145 (34%) could not be located and 78 (18%) had already died. Apparently, in at least 40 cases, the deaths were associated with PTB. Of these forty, 33 (83%) died without having received any medical care. The factors associated with dying from PTB were: 45 and over years of age (OR = 1.3; 95% CI = 0.98-1.3), 0-3 schooling years (OR = 3.3; 95% CI = 1.1-9.6), engaged in agriculture (OR = 2.2; 95% CI = 1.1-4.4), not living in main villages of their municipality (OR = 1.2; 95% CI = 1.0-1.3), living in a rural community (OR = 2.7; 95% CI = 1.1-6.8), not having been treated in DOTS (OR = 1.2; 95% CI = 1.0-1.3) and having defaulted from treatment (OR = 11.5; 95% CI = 5.3-24.8). The high rate of mortality due to PTB observed constitutes a serious public health problem deserving

  11. [Behavioral response of Anopheles albimanus to volatile compounds collected inside houses from the south of Chiapas, Mexico].

    Ríos-Delgado, Silvany Mayoly; Rodríguez-Ramírez, Américo David; Cruz-López, Leopoldo; Escobar-Pérez, Luis Alonso; Aburto-Juárez, Ma de Lourdes; Torres-Estrada, José Luis

    2008-01-01

    To determine effects of volatile compounds in homes on the behavioral response of Anopheles albimanus. The study was conducted in January 2006, in the village of Nueva Independencia village, Suchiate, Chiapas. Volatile compounds were collected inside homes and the extracts were tested on unfed females in a Y-olfactometer. Extracts were analyzed in a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry system (GC-MS). Twenty eight extracts were obtained, twelve presented attraction and two repellency responses. GC-MS analyses of the extracts indicated variation in the volatile compound present in the extracts, but could not associated specific compounds with any particular effect. Within homes, volatiles presented attraction and repellency responses to An. albimanus. A definate pattern concerning the presence of a characteristic chemical compound and the observed response was not found.

  12. Seasonal variation of infestation by ectoparasitic chigger mite larvae (Acarina: Trombiculidae) on resident and migratory birds in coffee agroecosystems of Chiapas, Mexico.

    Dietsch, Thomas V

    2005-12-01

    Parasitism is not well documented for birds found in tropical habitats. Long-distance migratory birds may face additional risks to an already hazardous journey when infected. This study explores the ecology of an ectoparasite infestation in Chiapas, Mexico. During a mist-netting project in 2 different coffee management systems, chigger mites (Acarina: Trombiculidae), ectoparasitic during the larval stage, were found on both resident and migratory birds. Using a rapid assessment protocol, it was observed that 17 of 26 species of long-distance migrants and 33 of 71 resident species had at least 1 infested individual. Infestation prevalences were unexpectedly high on some long-distance migrants, as high as 0.73 for Swainson's thrush (Catharus ustulatus), a value on par with heavily infested resident species. Prevalence was highest during winter sampling: 0.18 overall, 0.16 of migrants, and 0.23 of residents. Prevalence was 0.14 for resident birds during the summer breeding season. Mean abundance and mean intensity of infestation are reported for 97 species captured and inspected during the course of this study. In this region, chigger mite larvae are relatively common on birds and their abundance varies seasonally. High prevalence for some migratory birds suggests that more research and monitoring of ectoparasites are needed, especially in light of emerging diseases.

  13. Limnological and botanical characterization of larval habitats for two primary malarial vectors, Anopheles albimanus and Anopheles pseudopunctipennis, in coastal areas of Chiapas State, Mexico.

    Savage, H M; Rejmankova, E; Arredondo-Jim'enez, J I; Roberts, D R; Rodr'iguez, M H

    1990-12-01

    Field surveys of mosquito breeding sites on the Pacific coastal plain and foothill regions of southern Chiapas, Mexico, were carried out in the dry and wet seasons of 1988. At each site, selected environmental variables were measured or estimated, presence and percent cover of aquatic plants recorded, a water sample collected for subsequent analyses, and 10-30 dips made for mosquito larvae. Logistic regression and discriminant analyses revealed that the occurrence of Anopheles albimanus larvae in both the wet and dry seasons was positively associated with planktonic algae and negatively associated with altitude. In the dry season, An. albimanus larvae were largely restricted to the margins of permanent water bodies and were associated with the presence of floating plants, particularly Eichhornia crassipes. During the wet season An. albimanus larvae were positively associated with emergent plants, particularly seasonally flooded Cyperaceae, and phosphorus (PO4) concentrations, and were negatively associated with abundant filamentous algae, high levels of total suspended solids (TSS) and Salvinia. In the dry season, An. pseudopunctipennis larvae were positively associated with filamentous algae, altitude and the presence of Heteranthera if encountered in a riverine setting, and were negatively associated with water depth. During the wet season, flooding eliminated typical flood plain An. pseudopunctipennis habitats, and larvae were rarely encountered.

  14. Non–invasive sampling of endangered neotropical river otters reveals high levels of dispersion in the Lacantun River System of Chiapas, Mexico

    Ortega, J.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Patterns of genetic dispersion, levels of population genetic structure, and movement of the neotropical river otter (Lontra longicaudis were investigated by screening eight polymorphic microsatellites from DNA extracted from fecal samples, collected in a hydrologic system of the Lacandon rainforest in Chiapas, Mexico. A total of 34 unique genotypes were detected from our surveys along six different rivers, and the effect of landscape genetic structure was studied. We recovered 16 of the 34 individuals in multiple rivers at multiple times. We found high levels of dispersion and low levels of genetic differentiation among otters from the six surveyed rivers (P > 0.05, except for the pairwise comparison among the Lacantún and José rivers (P < 0.05. We recommend that conservation management plans for the species consider the entire Lacantún River System and its tributaries as a single management unit to ensure the maintenance of current levels of population genetic diversity, because the population analyzed seems to follow a source–sink dynamic mainly determined by the existence of the major river.

  15. Hydrogeology of northern Sierra de Chiapas, Mexico: a conceptual model based on a geochemical characterization of sulfide-rich karst brackish springs

    Rosales Lagarde, Laura; Boston, Penelope J.; Campbell, Andrew R.; Hose, Louise D.; Axen, Gary; Stafford, Kevin W.

    2014-09-01

    Conspicuous sulfide-rich karst springs flow from Cretaceous carbonates in northern Sierra de Chiapas, Mexico. This is a geologically complex, tropical karst area. The physical, geologic, hydrologic and chemical attributes of these springs were determined and integrated into a conceptual hydrogeologic model. A meteoric source and a recharge elevation below 1,500 m are estimated from the spring-water isotopic signature regardless of their chemical composition. Brackish spring water flows at a maximum depth of 2,000 m, as inferred from similar chemical attributes to the produced water from a nearby oil well. Oil reservoirs may be found at depths below 2,000 m. Three subsurface environments or aquifers are identified based on the B, Li+, K+ and SiO2 concentrations, spring water temperatures, and CO2 pressures. There is mixing between these aquifers. The aquifer designated Local is shallow and contains potable water vulnerable to pollution. The aquifer named Northern receives some brackish produced water. The composition of the Southern aquifer is influenced by halite dissolution enhanced at fault detachment surfaces. Epigenic speleogenesis is associated with the Local springs. In contrast, hypogenic speleogenesis is associated with the brackish sulfidic springs from the Northern and the Southern environments.

  16. Social inequalities and health in rural Chiapas, Mexico: agricultural economy, nutrition, and child health in La Fraylesca Region

    Héctor Ochoa-Díaz López

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the association between farmers' socioeconomic conditions and their children's health in La Fraylesca, Chiapas. Data were collected using a cross-sectional survey of 1046 households (5546 individuals sampled from locations in two counties situated in the study area. The survey included anthropometric measurements, a 24-hour dietary recall, stool tests, and childhood mortality data. Children of private farmers and "wealthy peasants" displayed better nutritional status, higher quality diet, lower prevalence of intestinal parasites, and a lower risk of dying than those whose parents were communal farmers, from ejidos, or "poor peasants". The results suggest that using volume of maize production as a classification method proved more valuable than land tenure to identify agricultural groups with different health status. It appears that the main determinants of health differentials are structural inequities in resource distribution. Thus, the impact of medical interventions on inequalities will be limited unless they are accompanied by redistribution of resources.

  17. Cash Only? Unveiling Preferences for a PES Contract through a Choice Experiment in Chiapas, Mexico, Land Use Policy

    Costedoat, S.; Koetse, M.J.; Corbera, E.; Ezzine de Blas, D.

    2016-01-01

    Payments for Ecosystem Services (PES) have been promoted worldwide as a means to incentivise biodiversity, forest conservation and sustainable forest management. Mexico has been at the forefront of PES implementation since 2003, and the country has now more than 2.6 million hectares under a variety

  18. Service, training, mentorship: first report of an innovative education-support program to revitalize primary care social service in Chiapas, Mexico

    Andrew Van Wieren

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Mexican mandatory year of social service following medical school, or pasantía, is designed to provide a safety net for the underserved. However, social service physicians (pasantes are typically unpracticed, unsupervised, and unsupported. Significant demotivation, absenteeism, and underperformance typically plague the social service year. Objective: Compañeros en Salud (CES aimed to create an education-support package to turn the pasantía into a transformative learning experience. Design: CES recruited pasantes to complete their pasantía in CES-supported Ministry of Health clinics in rural Chiapas. The program aims to: 1 train pasantes to more effectively deliver primary care, 2 expose pasantes to central concepts of global health and social medicine, and 3 foster career development of pasantes. Program components include supportive supervision, on-site mentorship, clinical information resources, monthly interactive seminars, and improved clinic function. We report quantitative and qualitative pasante survey data collected from February 2012 to August 2013 to discuss strengths and weaknesses of this program and its implications for the pasante workforce in Mexico. Results: Pasantes reported that their medical knowledge, and clinical and leadership skills all improved during the CES education-support program. Most pasantes felt the program had an overall positive effect on their career goals and plans, although their self-report of preparedness for the Mexican residency entrance exam (ENARM decreased during the social service year. One hundred percent reported they were satisfied with the CES-supported pasantía experience and wished to help the poor and underserved in their careers. Conclusions: Education-support programs similar to the CES program may encourage graduating medical students to complete their social service in underserved areas, improve the quality of care provided by pasantes, and address many of the known

  19. Service, training, mentorship: first report of an innovative education-support program to revitalize primary care social service in Chiapas, Mexico.

    Van Wieren, Andrew; Palazuelos, Lindsay; Elliott, Patrick F; Arrieta, Jafet; Flores, Hugo; Palazuelos, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The Mexican mandatory year of social service following medical school, or pasantía, is designed to provide a safety net for the underserved. However, social service physicians (pasantes) are typically unpracticed, unsupervised, and unsupported. Significant demotivation, absenteeism, and underperformance typically plague the social service year. Compañeros en Salud (CES) aimed to create an education-support package to turn the pasantía into a transformative learning experience. CES recruited pasantes to complete their pasantía in CES-supported Ministry of Health clinics in rural Chiapas. The program aims to: 1) train pasantes to more effectively deliver primary care, 2) expose pasantes to central concepts of global health and social medicine, and 3) foster career development of pasantes. Program components include supportive supervision, on-site mentorship, clinical information resources, monthly interactive seminars, and improved clinic function. We report quantitative and qualitative pasante survey data collected from February 2012 to August 2013 to discuss strengths and weaknesses of this program and its implications for the pasante workforce in Mexico. Pasantes reported that their medical knowledge, and clinical and leadership skills all improved during the CES education-support program. Most pasantes felt the program had an overall positive effect on their career goals and plans, although their self-report of preparedness for the Mexican residency entrance exam (ENARM) decreased during the social service year. One hundred percent reported they were satisfied with the CES-supported pasantía experience and wished to help the poor and underserved in their careers. Education-support programs similar to the CES program may encourage graduating medical students to complete their social service in underserved areas, improve the quality of care provided by pasantes, and address many of the known shortcomings of the pasantía. Additional efforts should focus on

  20. The influence of humidity, nutrients and light on the establishment of the epiphytic bromeliad Tillandsia guatemalensis in the highlands of Chiapas, Mexico

    J. C Castro Hernández

    1999-12-01

    after being transplanted out of their original habitat suggest that nutrients are limiting growth.En los Altos de Chiapas, la rápida destrucción y alteración del hábitat amenaza a las epífitas. Aparentemente, la transformación del bosque incrementa la vegetación abierta y de borde, caracterizada por condiciones más secas que las prevalecientes en el interior del bosque. De acuerdo con esto, las epífitas mésicas serían especialmente afectadas. Investigamos el papel de la disponibilidad de agua durante el crecimiento de una población de la ampliamente distribuida bromelia fitotelma mésica C3 Tillandsia guatemalensis. Chiapas presenta una pronunciada estación seca entre noviembre y abril, cuando las plantas observadas en el campo liberaron sus semillas. La germinación en altos porcentajes (arriba del 93%, observación confirmada en laboratorio se presentó siete semanas después del inicio de las lluvias. Muchas de las livianas plántulas desaparecieron antes de poder anclarse al sustrato, probablemente arrastradas por las lluvias torrenciales. Más de la mitad de las plántulas de una población establecida naturalmente murió durante la estación seca. Esta alta mortalidad se puede deducir también de la distribución de tamaños en una población natural. La mortalidad de plántulas sobre cortezas de árboles grandes, de la base del tronco hasta una altura de 1.3 m, es similar sobre dos especies de encino comparada con dos especies de pino. Estas cortezas también mostraron una alta capacidad de retención de agua. Sin embargo, la corteza de encino de las partes altas en el árbol absorbió mayor cantidad de agua por superficie y liberó agua durante un mayor período de tiempo que las cortezas equivalentes de Pinus tecunumanii. Además la capacidad de la corteza de absorber agua por lo general fue mayor en los árboles más grandes. Sugerimos que las diferencias en la absorción de agua pueden explicar, al menos en parte, la "preferencia" de las ep

  1. Género, etnia y generación en la prevención e interrupción de embarazos en jóvenes estudiantes hablantes de lenguas mayas migrantes a San Cristóbal de las Casas, Chiapas (México Gênero, etnia e geração na prevenção e interrupção da gravidez em jovens estudantes de língua maia migrantes para San Cristobal de las Casas, Chiapas (México Gender, ethnicity and generation in pregnancy prevention and interruption among young Mayan speaking migrant students in San Cristobal de las Casas, Chiapas (Mexico

    Diana L. Reartes

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Desde hace algunos años la investigación sociodemográfica en México está registrando procesos de cambios importantes en la vida sexual y reproductiva de las y los jóvenes, particularmente entre aquellas/os jóvenes urbanos. De ahí la importancia de explorar qué está ocurriendo con los jóvenes rurales e indígenas al tomar en cuenta eventos tales como el inicio sexual, el uso del condón, la adopción de anticonceptivos o los conocimientos que cambian en función de la escolaridad alcanzada, el lugar de residencia, la lengua que habla, entre otros. El artículo se aproxima a las modalidades que adquiere la prevención e interrupción de embarazos entre estudiantes (mujeres y varones hablantes de lenguas mayas que han migrado de comunidades indígenas a la ciudad de San Cristóbal de Las Casas, en Chiapas.Nos últimos anos a pesquisa sócio-demográficas no México está passando por grandes mudanças nos processos da juventude sexual e reprodutiva e, particularmente entre a juventude urbana. Daí a importância de explorar o que está acontecendo com a juventude rural e indígena estar ciente que eventos como a iniciação sexual, uso de preservativos, a adoção de contracepção ou mudar o que é conhecido em termos de escolaridade, local de residência, idioma falado, entre outros. O artigo aborda as modalidades de prevenção e se torna a interrupção da gravidez entre os alunos (masculino e feminino falantes de línguas maias das comunidades indígenas migraram para a cidade de San Cristobal de las Casas, em Chiapas.In the past several years socio-demographic research in Mexico has been showing important changes in the sexual and reproductive lives of youth, especially among urban population. Hence the importance of exploring what processes are taking place among rural and indigenous youth, where events such as sexual initiation, the use of condoms or other forms of contraception, and knowledge vary according to the level of

  2. Main causes and factors associated with liver cirrhosis in patients in the General Hospital of Zone 2 of Chiapas, Mexico

    Carlos Alfredo Meléndez González

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Liver cirrhosis is a worldwide public health problem. Its main characteristic is low life expectancy. In Mexico, it is the second leading cause of death in the age group with the highest work productivity. Methods: The study is observational, retrospective, descriptive and cross-sectional. Data were collected on age, sex, occupation, origin, risk factors for liver damage and probable etiology of patients referred with a diagnosis of cirrhosis in a period of 2 years. Purpose: To determine the causes and factors associated with liver cirrhosis in our population. Results: Females prevailed over males by 57.2% over 42.7%. Average age was 55.27 and 55.02% were Tuxtla Gutierrez residents. The following risk factors were found: alcohol consumption (74.67%, diabetes mellitus (56.33%, obesity (41.92%, use of alternative medicines (19.22%, frequent use of drugs (12.66%, and transfusion (9.17%. Housewives were most affected (50.21% [95% CI 43.6-56.9]. Alcoholism in 47.59% was found to be a triggering factor; in 41.92% the cause was unexplained or cryptogenic; and in 5.24% the cause was chronic viral hepatitis. Portal hypertension data were found in 89.5%: 59.8% had esophageal varices, 37.11% had ascites, and 2.62% had chronic hepatic encephalopathy. VP > 11 mm in 18.7%. The prevalence during the study period was 9.85%. Conclusions: There are significant differences observed in gender and cause of cirrhosis in this study. In the future more research should be done to look into the conditions under which women live in the city of Tuxtla Gutierrez, as well as whether other idiosyncratic factors or cultural conditions are leading to a higher prevalence of cirrhosis in this population group in the Southeast of Mexico.

  3. Source Of Hydrogen Sulfide To Sulfidic Spring And Watershed Ecosystems In Northern Sierra De Chiapas, Mexico Based On Sulfur And Carbon Isotopes

    Rosales Lagarde, L.; Boston, P. J.; Campbell, A.

    2013-12-01

    At least four watersheds in northern Sierra de Chiapas, Mexico are fed by conspicuous karst sulfide-rich springs. The toxic hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in these springs nurtures rich ecosystems including especially adapted microorganisms, invertebrates and fish. Sulfur and carbon isotopic analysis of various chemical species in the spring water are integrated within their hydrogeologic context to evaluate the hydrogen sulfide source. Constraining the H2S origin can also increase the understanding of this compound effect in the quality of the nearby hydrocarbon reservoirs, and the extent to which its oxidation to sulfuric acid increases carbonate dissolution and steel corrosion in surface structures. The SO42-/H2S ratio in the spring water varies from 70,000 to 2 meq/L thus sulfate is the dominant species in the groundwater system. This sulfate is mainly produced from anhydrite dissolution based on its isotopic signature. The Δ SO42--H2S range of 16 spring water samples (30-50 ‰) is similar to the values determined by Goldhaber & Kaplan (1975) and Canfield (2001) for low rates of bacterial sulfate reduction suggesting that this is the most important mechanism producing H2S. Although the carbon isotopes do not constrain the nature of the organic matter participating in this reaction, this material likely comes from depth, perhaps as hydrocarbons, due to the apparent stability of the system. The organic matter availability and reactivity probably control the progress of sulfate reduction. The subsurface environments identified in the area also have different sulfur isotopic values. The heavier residual sulfate isotopic value in the Northern brackish springs (δ34S SO42- ≥ 18 ‰) compared to the Southern springs (δ34S SO42- ~18 ‰) suggests sulfate reduction is particularly enhanced in the former, probably by contribution of organic matter associated with oil produced water. In comparison, the composition of the Southern aquifer is mainly influenced by halite

  4. Outbreak of Zika Virus Infection, Chiapas State, Mexico, 2015, and First Confirmed Transmission by Aedes aegypti Mosquitoes in the Americas.

    Guerbois, Mathilde; Fernandez-Salas, Ildefonso; Azar, Sasha R; Danis-Lozano, Rogelio; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia M; Leal, Grace; Garcia-Malo, Iliana R; Diaz-Gonzalez, Esteban E; Casas-Martinez, Mauricio; Rossi, Shannan L; Del Río-Galván, Samanta L; Sanchez-Casas, Rosa M; Roundy, Christopher M; Wood, Thomas G; Widen, Steven G; Vasilakis, Nikos; Weaver, Scott C

    2016-11-01

     After decades of obscurity, Zika virus (ZIKV) has spread through the Americas since 2015 accompanied by congenital microcephaly and Guillain-Barré syndrome. Although these epidemics presumably involve transmission by Aedes aegypti, no direct evidence of vector involvement has been reported, prompting speculation that other mosquitoes such as Culex quinquefasciatus could be involved.  We detected an outbreak of ZIKV infection in southern Mexico in late 2015. Sera from suspected ZIKV-infected patients were analyzed for viral RNA and antibodies. Mosquitoes were collected in and around patient homes and tested for ZIKV.  Of 119 suspected ZIKV-infected patients, 25 (21%) were confirmed by RT-PCR of serum collected 1-8 days after the onset of signs and symptoms including rash, arthralgia, headache, pruritus, myalgia, and fever. Of 796 mosquitoes collected, A. aegypti yielded ZIKV detection by RT-PCR in 15 of 55 pools (27.3%). No ZIKV was detected in C. quinquefasciatus ZIKV sequences derived from sera and mosquitoes showed a monophyletic relationship suggestive of a point source introduction from Guatemala.  These results demonstrate the continued, rapid northward progression of ZIKV into North America with typically mild disease manifestations, and implicate A. aegypti for the first time as a principal vector in North America. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Entrapment bias of arthropods in Miocene amber revealed by trapping experiments in a tropical forest in Chiapas, Mexico.

    Solórzano Kraemer, Mónica M; Kraemer, Mónica M Solórzano; Kraemer, Atahualpa S; Stebner, Frauke; Bickel, Daniel J; Rust, Jes

    2015-01-01

    All entomological traps have a capturing bias, and amber, viewed as a trap, is no exception. Thus the fauna trapped in amber does not represent the total existing fauna of the former amber forest, rather the fauna living in and around the resin producing tree. In this paper we compare arthropods from a forest very similar to the reconstruction of the Miocene Mexican amber forest, and determine the bias of different trapping methods, including amber. We also show, using cluster analyses, measurements of the trapped arthropods, and guild distribution, that the amber trap is a complex entomological trap not comparable with a single artificial trap. At the order level, the most similar trap to amber is the sticky trap. However, in the case of Diptera, at the family level, the Malaise trap is also very similar to amber. Amber captured a higher diversity of arthropods than each of the artificial traps, based on our study of Mexican amber from the Middle Miocene, a time of climate optimum, where temperature and humidity were probably higher than in modern Central America. We conclude that the size bias is qualitatively independent of the kind of trap for non-extreme values. We suggest that frequent specimens in amber were not necessarily the most frequent arthropods in the former amber forest. Selected taxa with higher numbers of specimens appear in amber because of their ecology and behavior, usually closely related with a tree-inhabiting life. Finally, changes of diversity from the Middle Miocene to Recent time in Central and South America can be analyzed by comparing the rich amber faunas from Mexico and the Dominican Republic with the fauna trapped using sticky and Malaise traps in Central America.

  6. Landmark Points for Sierra County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  7. Roads for Lea County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  8. Airports for Valencia County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  9. Railroads for Roosevelt County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  10. Landmark Points for Chaves County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  11. Roads for San Juan County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  12. Roads for Mora County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  13. Railroads for Sierra County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  14. Roads for Otero County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  15. Roads for Guadalupe County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  16. Railroads for Chaves County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  17. Roads for Roosevelt County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  18. Railroads for Lincoln County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  19. Railroads for Curry Curry, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  20. Roads for Taos County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  1. Roads for Torrance County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  2. Railroads for Mora County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  3. Railroads for Union County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  4. Roads for Luna County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  5. Roads for Quay County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  6. Roads for Santa Fe County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  7. Roads for Bernalillo County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  8. Roads for Rio Arriba County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  9. Railroads for Bernalillo County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  10. Railroads for Guadalupe County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  11. Roads for Chaves County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  12. Railroads for Valencia County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  13. Roads for Eddy County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  14. Railroads for Hidalgo County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  15. Roads for Catron County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  16. Railroads for Santa Fe County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  17. Roads for Harding County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  18. Railroads for Eddy County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  19. Railroads for San Juan County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  20. Railroads for Quay County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  1. Landmark Polygons for Guadalupe County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  2. Railroads for San Miguel County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  3. Hydrography for Dona Ana County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  4. Landmark Polygons for Lea County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  5. Nodes for Union County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  6. Nodes for Sandoval County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  7. Roads for Hidalgo County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  8. Landmark Polygons for Mora County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  9. Airports for Curry County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  10. Airports for De Baca County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  11. Roads for Los Alamos County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  12. Hydrography for San Miguel County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  13. Airports for Rio Arriba County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  14. Roads for Sandoval County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  15. Airports for Colfax County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  16. Airports for Los Alamos County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  17. Landmark Polygons for Torrance County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  18. Railroads for Cibola County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  19. Nodes for Taos County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  20. Hydrography for Harding County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  1. Landmark Points for Colfax County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  2. Landmark Polygons for Colfax County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  3. Hydrography for Catron County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  4. Airports for Mora County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  5. Characterization of Archaeological Sediments Using Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) and Portable X-ray Fluorescence (pXRF): An Application to Formative Period Pyro-Industrial Sites in Pacific Coastal Southern Chiapas, Mexico.

    Neff, Hector; Bigney, Scott J; Sakai, Sachiko; Burger, Paul R; Garfin, Timothy; George, Richard G; Culleton, Brendan J; Kennett, Douglas J

    2016-01-01

    Archaeological sediments from mounds within the mangrove zone of far-southern Pacific coastal Chiapas, Mexico, are characterized in order to test the hypothesis that specialized pyro-technological activities of the region's prehistoric inhabitants (salt and ceramic production) created the accumulations visible today. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) is used to characterize sediment mineralogy, while portable X-ray fluorescence (pXRF) is used to determine elemental concentrations. Elemental characterization of natural sediments by both instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and pXRF also contribute to understanding of processes that created the archaeological deposits. Radiocarbon dates combined with typological analysis of ceramics indicate that pyro-industrial activity in the mangrove zone peaked during the Late Formative and Terminal Formative periods, when population and monumental activity on the coastal plain and piedmont were also at their peaks. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Late Mesoproterozoic to Early Paleozoic history of metamorphic basement from the southeastern Chiapas Massif Complex, Mexico, and implications for the evolution of NW Gondwana

    Weber, Bodo; González-Guzmán, Reneé; Manjarrez-Juárez, Román; Cisneros de León, Alejandro; Martens, Uwe; Solari, Luigi; Hecht, Lutz; Valencia, Victor

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, U-Pb zircon geochronology, Lu-Hf and Sm-Nd isotope systematics, geochemistry and geothermobarometry of metaigneous basement rocks exposed in the southeastern Chiapas Massif Complex are presented. Geologic mapping of the newly defined "El Triunfo Complex" located at the southeastern edge of the Chiapas Massif reveals (1) partial melting of a metamorphic basement mainly constituted by mafic metaigneous rocks (Candelaria unit), (2) an Ediacaran metasedimentary sequence (Jocote unit), and (3) occurrence of massif-type anorthosite. All these units are intruded by undeformed Ordovician plutonic rocks of the Motozintla suite. Pressure and temperature estimates using Ca-amphiboles, plagioclase and phengite revealed prograde metamorphism that reached peak conditions at 650 °C and 6 kbar, sufficient for partial melting under water saturated conditions. Relict rutile in titanite and clinopyroxene in amphibolite further indicate a previous metamorphic event at higher P-T conditions. U-Pb zircon ages from felsic orthogneiss boudins hosted in deformed amphibolite and migmatite yield crystallization ages of 1.0 Ga, indicating that dry granitic protoliths represent remnants of Rodinia-type basement. Additionally, a mid-Tonian ( 920 Ma) metamorphic overprint is suggested by recrystallized zircon from a banded gneiss. Zircon from folded amphibolite samples yield mainly Ordovician ages ranging from 457 to 444 Ma that are indistinguishable from the age of the undeformed Motozintla plutonic suite. Similar ages between igneous- and metamorphic- zircon suggest a coeval formation during a high-grade metamorphic event, in which textural discrepancies are explained in terms of differing zircon formation mechanisms such as sub-solidus recrystallization and precipitation from anatectic melts. In addition, some amphibolite samples contain inherited zircon yielding Stenian-Tonian ages around 1.0 Ga. Lu-Hf and Sm-Nd isotopes and geochemical data indicate that the protoliths of

  7. Social inequalities and health in rural Chiapas, Mexico: agricultural economy, nutrition, and child health in La Fraylesca Region Desigualdades sociales y salud en Chiapas, México: economía agrícola, nutrición y salud infantil en la región de La Fraylesca

    Héctor Ochoa-Díaz López

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the association between farmers' socioeconomic conditions and their children's health in La Fraylesca, Chiapas. Data were collected using a cross-sectional survey of 1046 households (5546 individuals sampled from locations in two counties situated in the study area. The survey included anthropometric measurements, a 24-hour dietary recall, stool tests, and childhood mortality data. Children of private farmers and "wealthy peasants" displayed better nutritional status, higher quality diet, lower prevalence of intestinal parasites, and a lower risk of dying than those whose parents were communal farmers, from ejidos, or "poor peasants". The results suggest that using volume of maize production as a classification method proved more valuable than land tenure to identify agricultural groups with different health status. It appears that the main determinants of health differentials are structural inequities in resource distribution. Thus, the impact of medical interventions on inequalities will be limited unless they are accompanied by redistribution of resources.El objetivo de este trabajo es investigar la relación entre las condiciones socioeconómicas de los productores agrícolas y la salud de sus hijos en La Fraylesca, Chiapas, México. Los datos se recopilaron mediante una encuesta transversal de una muestra de 1046 hogares (5546 individuos de dos municipios del área de estudio. La encuesta incluyó mediciones antropométricas, recordatorio alimentario de 24 horas, exámenes coprológicos y datos sobre mortalidad infantil. Los hijos de productores privados y campesinos "ricos" presentaron mejor estado nutricio, mejor dieta, prevalencias más bajas de parásitos intestinales y menor riesgo de morir que los hijos de ejidatarios/comuneros o campesinos "pobres". Estos resultados sugieren que el volumen de producción de maíz es mejor indicador que la tenencia de la tierra para analizar desigualdades

  8. Responses by Dendroctonus frontalis and Dendroctonus mesoamericanus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) to Ssemiochemical lures in Chiapas, Mexico: possible roles of pheromones during joint host attacks

    Alicia Nino-Dominguez; Brian T. Sullivan; Jose H. Lopez-Urbina; Jorge E. Macias-Samano

    2016-01-01

    In southern Mexico and Central America, the southern pine beetle Dendroctonus frontalis Zimmermann (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) commonly colonizes host trees simultaneously with Dendroctonus mesoamericanus Armend

  9. Ocupación y abundancia de aves rapaces nocturnas (Strigidae en la Reserva de la Biosfera Selva El Ocote, Chiapas, México Occupancy and abundance of nocturnal raptors (Strigidae in the Selva El Ocote Biosphere Reserve, Chiapas, Mexico

    Emerenciano Rivera-Rivera

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Evaluar la proporción de sitios ocupados explica la distribución espacial de los individuos dentro de una comunidad y es importante para desarrollar estrategias de conservación. En este estudio se evalúan los patrones de ocupación y abundancia de 5 especies de aves rapaces nocturnas en 2 sitios con diferentes niveles de heterogeneidad (estructura y composición del paisaje en la Reserva de la Biosfera Selva El Ocote. Se utilizaron puntos de conteo y provocación auditiva para estimar índices de ocupación y abundancia y modelos lineales generalizados para determinar las posibles relaciones entre los índices estimados y los atributos estructurales del hábitat. La variación espacial de los patrones de ocupación y abundancia se explica por la estructura del hábitat (i.e., altura de árboles, área basal, distancia con asentamientos humanos y áreas abiertas a escala local, y por la heterogeneidad (2 o más tipos de coberturas en el paisaje. Dado que se encontraron relaciones especie-específicas con los atributos del bosque tropical perennifolio, es recomendable promover el manejo diversificado y sustentable del paisaje que favorezca la presencia de áreas extensas con cobertura forestal y por lo tanto la persistencia de especies amenazadas asociadas al interior del bosque.Evaluation of occupancy explains the spatial distribution of species in the community and is important to develop conservation strategies. We evaluated occupancy and abundance patterns of nocturnal raptors in 2 sites with different level of heterogeneity (landscape structure and composition in the Selva El Ocote Biosphere Reserve. Through point counts and owl playback callings we estimate occupancy and abundance patterns. We explored possible relationships between patterns of recorded species and structural habitat attributes using generalized linear models. Occupancy and abundance spatial variation was explained by structural habitat characteristics (i.e., tree height

  10. Morfometría de las especies de Vieja (Cichlidae en ríos de la cuenca del Usumacinta, Chiapas, México Morphometry of Vieja species (Cichlidae in rivers of Usumacinta's basin, Chiapas, Mexico

    Miriam Soria-Barreto

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Se evaluaron y compararon diversas características morfológicas de 6 especies de Vieja Fernández-Yépez, 1969 del río Usumacinta. Se emplearon 20 organismos adultos por especie y 33 medidas corporales que fueron estandarizadas y examinadas con un análisis discriminante. Además se comparó la forma del cuerpo entre las especies, mediante el análisis de morfometría geométrica a partir de imágenes digitalizadas. El análisis con la morfometría tradicional y geométrica permitió diferenciar los seis taxones. Se encontraron 10 medidas discriminantes, que expresan diferencias significativas en la longitud de las aletas y la región cefálica, de las cuales la posición de la boca diferenció estadísticamente más taxones. Las relaciones de similitud con ambos análisis mostraron 2 grupos, siendo V. bifasciata (Steindachner, 1864 y V. synspila (Hubbs, 1935 las especies más parecidas. Las gradillas de deformación mostraron que la mayor variación está en la región cefálica, específicamente en la posición de la boca y los ojos. Las diferencias morfométricas encontradas pueden servir para la determinación taxonómica en trabajos futuros. La variación encontrada en la morfología cefálica y trófica puede ser un mecanismo que favorece la coexistencia de las especies y la diversidad del grupo en la región.We evaluated and compared morphological characteristics among the 6 species of Vieja Fernández-Yépez, 1969 from Usumacinta River. We analyzed 20 adults by specie, obtaining 33 measurements, which were standardized and analyzed with a discriminant analysis. We also performed a comparison of body shape among species, using the geometric morphometric analysis from digitalized images. Traditional and geometric morphometrics allowed distinguishing each taxa. We found 10 discriminants measures, related with the head region and length of fins, only mouth position was different among more taxa. In both analyses, similarity relationships

  11. Diversidad de frutos que consumen tres especies de murciélagos (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae en la selva lacandona, Chiapas, México Diversity of fruits consumed by three species of bats (Chiroptera:Phyllostomidae in the Lacandona rainforest, Chiapas, Mexico

    Alinka Olea-Wagner

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Este estudio amplía el conocimiento de los hábitos alimentarios de 3 especies de murciélagos frugívoros como dispersores de semillas en 2 localidades de la selva alta perennifolia en la zona sur de la Reserva de la Biosfera de Montes Azules (REBIMA, y dentro del Ejido Playón de la Gloria (PDLG. Se estimó la abundancia relativa de Artibeus lituratus, Carollia perspicillata y Sturnira lilium, así como la diversidad y categoría sucesional de los frutos que consumen estas 3 especies en ambas localidades, mediante la identificación de semillas en las excretas. La división de especies vegetales por categoría sucesional mostró que A. lituratus y C. perspicillata consumen frutos tanto de especies pioneras como de especies persistentes, mientras que S. lilium únicamente se alimenta de especies pioneras. Durante la época seca A. lituratus y C. perspicillata presentaron una mayor diversidad y riqueza de especies consumidas dentro de la REBIMA, en tanto que en la época de lluvia mostraron mayor diversidad y riqueza dentro de PDLG; es decir, la diversidad de semillas colectadas por ambos dispersores responde a la época anual. S. lilium presentó mayor riqueza y diversidad dentro de PDLG a lo largo del muestreo indicando preferencia por frutos establecidos en estadios tempranos en la sucesión vegetal.This study examined the feeding habits of three species of frugivorous bats in relation to their role as seed dispersers in two localities, one in a Neotropical rainforest area in the southern part of the Montes Azules Biosphere Reserve (REBIMA, and the other in Ejido Playón de la Gloria (PDLG. We estimated the relative abundance of Artibeus lituratus, Carollia perspicillata and Sturnira lilium. We determined the diversity and the successional category of fruits consumed by these species in both localities through the identification of seeds in their feces. The plant species diversity based on successional category showed that A. lituratus and C

  12. del turista politizado en Chiapas

    Gabriela Coronado

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available El artículo analiza las interrelaciones entre turismo y política considerando el impacto de la rebelión indígena zapatista en el turismo en Chiapas, México. Mediante el análisis de productos turísticos y observaciones de campo la transformación de la industria turística se explica como efecto de las presiones de un nuevo tipo de visitante, el “turista politizado’. Atraído por el movimiento indígena y su relevancia como movimiento social global su posición política e ideológica creó demandas que impactaron sobre las redes organizacionales interétnicas y el valor social de la actividad turística. Como respuesta agentes turísticos indígenas y no indígenas generaron nuevas estrategias para la recuperación de su economía, incluyendo cambios en las redes organizacionales y comercializando símbolos e ideologías como “productos” turísticos.

  13. DE FRANCIA Y FRANCESES QUE NO LO FUERON: BORDUIN Y DUGELAY — CHIAPAS, SIGLO XIX—

    Luz del Rocío Bermúdez H.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Escasa y mal documentada, la migración francesa en Chiapas durante el siglo XIX puede encontrar una veta de investigación? en los casos de Borduin y Dugelay, padre e hijo, en la ciudad de San Cristóbal de Las Casas. El primero, conocido como «francés», aunque procedente del Bajo Canadá, se convirtió desde 1839 en figura central local, entre otros aspectos, por su apreciada profesión en medio de continuos brotes epidémicos. Más de cuatro décadas después, en pleno auge de la influencia francesa en México, Diego Dugelay gozó por su parte el privilegio doble del origen de su padre y el poder social, político y económico, heredados de su madre. Además del testimonio individual ambas trayectorias, alguna vez contrastantes y complementarias, muestran también ciertos mecanismos, aspiraciones y paradojas ocurridas en Chiapas durante su primera apertura hacia los «hermanos de allende los mares». ABSTRACT Scarcely and poorly documented, the French migration in Chiapas during the 19th century may find a vein of research[*] in the cases of Borduin and Dugelay, father and son, in the city of San Cristóbal de Las Casas. The first, known as “French” although in reality originating from francophone Canada, converted after 1839 into a central local figure, among other aspects, due to his esteemed profession amidst continuous epidemic outbreaks. More than four decades later, in the boom of French influence in Mexico, Diego Dugelay for his part enjoyed the double privilege of his father’s origin and the social, political and economic power inherited from his mother. In addition to the individual testimony, both trajectories, at times contrasting and others complementary, also demonstrate certain mechanisms, aspirations and paradoxes occurred in Chiapas during its first opening toward the “overseas brothers.”

  14. Analysis of economic convergence within Chiapas municipalities, regions and apparent inconsistencies Análisis de convergencia económica en el interior de Chiapas: municipios, regiones e inconsistencias aparentes

    Óscar PELÁEZ HERREROS

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The data of annual per capita income estimated by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP for the municipal human development index in Mexico shows that, in Chiapas, during the period 2000-2005, there was a strong convergence at the municipal level while there was no regional convergence. To explain this apparent inconsistency, the article «Regression towards mediocrity in hereditary stature», published by Galton in 1886, is examined, concluding that the clustering level of the data (municipal or regional determines the convergence analysis results, because the grouping of municipalities in regions causes loss of information that can generate phenomena of «regression towards the mean» or just the opposite, as is the case. In Chiapas, the municipal convergence would have led to convergence within the regions but not between regions.A partir de los datos de ingreso per cápita anual estimados por el Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Desarrollo (PNUD en la elaboración del índice de desarrollo humano municipal en México, se comprueba que, en el interior de Chiapas durante el periodo 2000- 2005, se dio un proceso de fuerte convergencia a nivel municipal al tiempo que no hubo convergencia regional. Para explicar esta aparente inconsistencia, se reexamina el artículo «Regression towards mediocrity in hereditary stature» publicado por Galton en 1886, concluyendo que el nivel de agrupación de los datos (municipal o regional condiciona los resultados del análisis de convergencia, ya que la agrupación de los municipios en regiones origina pérdidas de información que pueden generar fenómenos de «regresión hacia la media» o justo lo contrario, como es el caso. En Chiapas, la convergencia municipal habría dado lugar a la convergencia dentro de las regiones, pero no entre regiones.

  15. La importancia de Palenque, Chiapas, para la conservación de los murciélagos de México The importance of Palenque, Chiapas, for the conservation of Mexican bats

    Luis Gerardo Avila-Torresagatón

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available La fauna de murciélagos de Chiapas, una de las más estudiadas del país, representa cerca del 77% de las especies registradas para México. Sin embargo, se ha prestado poca atención a los murciélagos de la región selva-norte, área convergente entre la Planicie del Golfo, la Sierra Chiapaneca y la porción más norteña de la Selva Lacandona. Con el objetivo de complementar el listado de las especies de la Región Selva Norte, entre febrero de 2008 y mayo de 2010 se capturaron murciélagos en 130 sitios mediante redes de niebla en Palenque, Chiapas. Los muestreos se realizaron en el continuo de vegetación del Parque Nacional Palenque (PNP y en fragmentos aislados de vegetación en diferente grado de sucesión, así como en cercas vivas, corredores riparios y pastizales inducidos, localizados desde 1 hasta 14 kilómetros al norte del Parque. Con un esfuerzo de muestreo de 432 m-red/noche, en 130 noches se registraron 52 especies de murciélagos; 10 catalogadas como especies hábitat-dependientes, 26 vulnerables a la fragmentación y 16 tolerables a la fragmentación. Entre las especies registradas se encuentran Noctilio leporinus, Mimon crenulatum, Chiroderma salvini, Myotis californicus, M. elegans, Rhogeessa tumida, Molosus rufus y M. sinaloae que no se habían registrado previamente en la zona. Los resultados de este trabajo muestran que la diversidad de murciélagos encontrada en Palenque representa el 42% de la fauna de quirópteros mexicanos, por lo que el PNP y su periferia deben considerarse como área focal para la conservación de este grupo de mamíferos.The bat fauna of Chiapas, is one of the most studied of Mexico, and representing about 77% of the bat species reported to the country. Although, low attention have received the bats from the Selva-Norte region (located in the Plains of the Gulf of Mexico, the Chiapas Mountains and the northern portion of Lacandona. With the objective of obtain a comprehensive list of the bat

  16. El fenómeno delictivo juvenil de la mara: Un estudio regional en Chiapas/The mara youth criminal phenomenon: A regional study in Chiapas

    Jorge Humberto Martínez Trejo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de la presente investigación es comprender el fenómeno de la tropicalización de la organización delictiva juvenil de La Mara en la región de Chiapas. El desarrollo de la misma, es eminentemente de corte etnometodológico, y se encuentra actualmente en proceso de desarrollo. Sin embargo, se recogen evidencias parciales del perfil criminológico de los miembros de La Mara de Centroamérica y la de Chiapas. Dichos estudios se realizaron en el período de junio del 2011 a junio del 2012, en uno de los Centros de Tratamiento y Diagnóstico del Estado de Chiapas.

  17. Thermal conductivity of S.E. New Mexico rocksalt and anhydrite

    Acton, R.U.

    1977-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of several rocksalt materials has been determined. Some of the materials were core samples from well AEC 8, Carlsbad, New Mexico. These samples ranged from nearly pure halite (NaCl) to nearly pure anhydrite (CaSO 4 ). Core sample crystallite size ranged from about 3 centimeters to essentially packed salt sand (approx. = 0.5mm). The samples exhibited thermal conductivities from approx. = 1.5 to 7.5 W/mK which depended upon purity and grain size. A one meter cube of rocksalt from the Mississippi Chemical Company's S.E. New Mexico potash mine was obtained for other experiments. The thermal conductivity of one sample from each of the orthogonal directions of the cube was measured. This material had a high conductivity of approx. = 8.5 W/mK and was very isotrophic. A core of rocksalt from the Morton Salt Company, Paynesville, Ohio had a thermal conductivity of 6 W/mK, which is in the upper band of the results on cores from well AEC 8. Finally, a concrete made with salt sand and rocksalt aggregate was determined to have a conductivity of approx. = 2 W/mK. A longitudinal heat flow apparatus was used to determine the thermal conductivity. An analysis of the experiment gave an accuracy within +- 15% on geological samples and within +- 10% on 304 stainless steel. 8 references, 5 figures, 2 tables

  18. Bioaccumulation of microplastics in the terrestrial food chain: an example from home gardens in SE Mexico

    Huerta, Esperanza; Mendoza Vega, Jorge; Quej, Victor Ku; Chi, Jesus de los Angeles; Sanchez del Cid, Lucero; Quijano, Cesar; Escalona-Segura, Griselda; Gertsen, Henny; Salánki, Tamás; van der Ploeg, Martine; Koelmans, Albert A.; Geissen, Violette

    2017-04-01

    Plastic in the aquatic environment has been studied since many years and is a well known problem. Plastic in the terrestrial environment is a neglected issue of high importance in regions with waste mismanagement. Therefore, we studied the bioaccumulation of plastics in the terrestrial food chain in home gardens of SE Mexico, a typical example for many countries in development. Plastic waste is not regularly collected and people burn it and burry the residues or the plastic waste directly into the soil of their home gardens, causing the risk of plastic fragmentation, formation of microplastics (MP) in the soil and accumulation in the food chain. To assess the risk, we sampled soil, earthworm cast and chicken feces as well as chicken gizzard and crop in 10 home gardens of Campeche, SE Mexico in September 2016. We analyzed their (micro)plastic content. (Micro)plastics were present in soil with 0.87±1.9 particles g-1, in earthworms casts with 14.8±28.8 particles g-1 casts and in chicken feces with 129.8±82.3 particles g-1 chicken feces), showing a magnification factor of 17±14.6 between the soil and the earthworms casts, and of 149±41.8 between the soil and the chicken feces. Macroplastics were also found in chicken gizzard (57±41.1 particles per chicken) and in the crop (32.4±15.1 particles per chicken). Chicken gizzard is a specialty in the Mexican kitchen and the intake of the present plastics form a strong risk for human health.

  19. Macroinfauna and sediment data from swash zones of sandy beaches along the SE Gulf of Mexico and SE Florida coast, 2010-2011 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill (NODC Accession 0083190)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Sampling for macroinfauna from swash zones of beaches along the SE Gulf of Mexico and SE coast of Florida was conducted from May 2010- July 2011. At each site,...

  20. "Se Puede Conservar La Cultura y Tambien Se Puede Aspirar": Language and Cultural Identities among the Cora of Mexico

    Lopez, Jacqueline; Frawley, William; Peyton, Joy Kreeft

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the connection between heritage language and culture and the construction and maintenance of social and personal identities of the Cora, an indigenous people of the Mexican Sierra del Nayar, in Northwestern Mexico. Using the frameworks of the socially and linguistically mediated mind (Dennet, 1991; Harre & Gillet, 1994;…

  1. ANÁLISIS FUNCIONALES EN ARTEFACTOS LÍTICOS DE GRUPOS CAZADORES-RECOLECTORES EN REGIONES TROPICALES DURANTE LA TRANSICIÓN PLEISTOCENO FINAL-HOLOCENO TEMPRANO: EL ABRIGO SANTA MARTA, CHIAPAS, MÉXICO (Functional Analysis of Lithic Artifacts of Hunter-Gatherer Groups in Tropical Regions During the Late Pleistocene-Early Holocene Transition: Santa Marta's Shelter, Chiapas, Mexico

    Patricia Pérez Martínez

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Los análisis funcionales vieron la luz en la década de los sesenta con la publicación de la Tecnología Prehistórica de Semenov (1964, desde entonces se ha realizado un gran número de investigaciones para dilucidar actividades de subsistencia a partir de la funcionalidad de los artefactos. Desafortunadamente, en México pocos han sido los trabajos enfocados a este tipo de análisis (Elizalde y Mandujano 2000; Lewenstein 1990; Mirambell 1964. En el presente estudio se analizaron microscópicamente 36 artefactos líticos con el objetivo de caracterizar los micropulidos e inferir la funcionalidad de estos conjuntos asociados a grupos cazadores-recolectores procedentes de contextos de la transición Pleistoceno-Holoceno (13130-12671 cal. AP. ENGLISH: Use-wear studies began in the 1960s with Semenov’s publication entitled Prehistoric Technology (1964. Since then, a great number of investigations have been carried out to elucidate subsistence activities based on the functionality of the artifacts. Unfortunately, in Mexico few studies have focused on this type of analysis (Elizalde & Mandujano 2000; Lewenstein 1990; Mirambell 1964. In the present study, 36 lithic artifacts associated with hunter-gatherer groups from Pleistocene-Holocene transition contexts (13130–12671 cal. AP were analyzed microscopically with the aim of characterizing micropolishes and inferring functionality.

  2. Chrysothemis y Episcia (Gesneriaceae: Gesnerioideae: Episcieae, registros nuevos para la flora nativa de México Chrysothemis and Episcia (Gesneriaceae: Gesnerioideae: Episcieae, new records for the native flora of Mexico

    Angélica Ramírez-Roa

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Chrysothemis pulchella y Episcia lilacina (Gesneriaceae: Gesnerioideae: Episcieae se registran por primera vez como elementos de la flora nativa de México. Ambas especies se encontraron en la localidad Frontera Corozal, municipio de Ocosingo, Chiapas, en una selva alta perennifolia sobre sustrato cárstico. Con estos hallazgos, la riqueza de la familia Gesneriaceae en México es de 26 géneros y 117 especies.Chrysothemis pulchella and Episcia lilacina (Gesneriaceae: Gesnerioideae: Episcieae are reported for first time in the native flora of Mexico. Both species were found in Frontera Corozal, municipality of Ocosingo, Chiapas in tropical rain forest on karst substrate. With these records, the richness of the family Gesneriaceae in Mexico reach up 26 genera and 117 species.

  3. An annotated list of the avifauna of Palenque, Chiapas Lista comentada de la avifauna de Palenque, Chiapas

    Michael A. Patten

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The primary lowland rainforest around the Mayan ruins of Palenque, in the state of Chiapas, Mexico, has been the focus of much study. The second growth and the mosaic of pasture and farmland surrounding the protected area of Palenque National Park also have received some attention by researchers and visitors. Until now though, a complete avifaunal list for this area had not been compiled. In our judgment, 353 species have been recorded reliably, a hundred more than previously reported. An additional 27 species have been reported at the site on multiple occasions but for which we feel there is no definitive evidence. There are 202 regular breeders, most of them resident, and 87 migrants that winter or pass through regularly. Relative capture rates for understorey birds indicate that Phaethornis longirostris and Henicorhina leucosticta are most often caught, and some rarely seen birds, such a Geotrygon montana, are less rare than previously thought. In a state in which habitat destruction is routine, in which national parks are increasingly becoming forested islands, we need baseline data such as these to get a clearer idea of what occurs there if we are to understand anthropogenic effects on forests.La selva tropical perennifolia primaria en los alrededores de las ruinas mayas de Palenque, en el estado de Chiapas, México, ha sido objeto de muchos estudios. El bosque secundario y el mosaico de potreros y tierras agrícolas que rodean el área protegida del Parque Nacional Palenque también han recibido la atención de investigadores y visitantes. Sin embargo, hasta ahora no ha sido recopilado un inventario de la avifauna. Consideramos que 353 especies han sido registradas confiablemente, 100 más de las que han sido registradas previamente. Otras 27 especies han sido reportadas para este sitio, pero sentimos que no hay suficiente evidencia de su presencia allí. Hay 202 especies que anidan de manera regular, la mayoría residentes permanentes, y

  4. CHIAPAS: FUTBOL Y MODERNIDAD

    Andrés Fábregas Puig

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available En este ensayo, se aborda el papel del equipo de primera división, los Jaguares, en el contexto de la realidad chiapaneca. La capacidad del futbol para crear símbolos que conformen “comunidades de identificación” e “integración de la diversidad” se analiza en dos vertientes, la de las transformaciones económicas, y en concreto del empresariado chiapaneco y, por otra parte, la condensación de las fragmentadas identidades locales hacia una posible identificación estatal mediante el equipo de los Jaguares.  

  5. El fútbol en Chiapas (México: ¿un símbolo de identidad?

    Fábregas Puig, Andrés

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The author discusses the way soccer is organized, practiced and lived out in the Mexican state of Chiapas where, since 2002, upon the arrival of the professional team Los Jaguares de Chiapas, the world around this sport has changed substantially with regard to both the construction of Chiapaneco identity and the national context of Mexican sports.

    Este artículo pretende revisar la organización futbolística y su vivencia en el estado mexicano de Chiapas donde, desde el año 2002, con la llegada de un equipo profesional de fútbol: los Jaguares de Chiapas, la articulación en torno a este deporte se ha modificado sustancialmente, tanto dentro del panorama deportivo mexicano como en referencia a la construcción de la identidad chiapaneca.

  6. Current Census Tracts for Torrance County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  7. Current Federal Congressional Districts for Cibola County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  8. Current Census Tracts for Cibola County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  9. Current Census Blocks for San Miguel County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  10. 2000 Census Unified School Districts for Harding County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  11. American Indian/ Alaska Native Area/ Hawaiian Homeland Areas for Socorro County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  12. 2000 Census Voting Precincts for Santa Fe County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  13. Miscellaneous Ground Transportation (Utilities) for Valencia County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  14. Current State Senate Districts for Catron County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  15. Current State Senate Districts for Curry County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  16. Current Urban Areas for Santa Fe County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  17. Current Block Groups for Guadalupe County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  18. 2000 Census Urban Areas for Los Alamos County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  19. Current 5-Digit ZIP Code Tabulation Areas (ZCTAs) for Quay County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  20. Current Census Tracts for San Juan County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  1. Current Census Blocks for Los Alamos County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  2. 2000 Census Voting Precincts for Bernalillo County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  3. American Indian/ Alaska Native Area/ Hawaiian Homeland Areas for Bernalillo County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  4. County Economic Census for Hidalgo County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  5. Economic Census Designated Places for San Juan County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  6. County Economic Census for Roosevelt County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  7. County Economic Census for Dona Ana County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  8. Economic Census Designated Places for Los Alamos County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  9. Economic Census Designated Places for Catron County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  10. County Economic Census for Taos County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  11. Economic Census Designated Places for Mora County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  12. County Economic Census for Cibola County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  13. Economic Census Designated Places for Lea County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  14. Economic Census Designated Places for Guadalupe County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  15. Current County Boundary for Mora County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  16. County Economic Census for McKinley County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  17. Economic Census Designated Places for De Baca County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  18. County Economic Census for San Miguel County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  19. County Economic Census for Union County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  20. County Economic Census for Chaves County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  1. County Economic Census for San Juan County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  2. Economic Census Designated Places for Dona Ana County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  3. Economic Census Designated Places for San Miguel County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  4. County Economic Census for Harding County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  5. Economic Census Designated Places for Roosevelt County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  6. County Economic Census for Curry County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  7. County Economic Census for Lea County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  8. Economic Census Designated Places for Cibola County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  9. County Economic Census for Guadalupe County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  10. Economic Census Designated Places for Harding County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  11. Economic Census Designated Places for Quay County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  12. Economic Census Designated Places for Rio Arriba County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  13. County Economic Census for Otero County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  14. Economic Census Designated Places for Taos County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  15. Economic Census Designated Places for Torrance County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  16. Economic Census Designated Places for Eddy County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  17. Economic Census Designated Places for Bernalillo County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  18. County Economic Census for Mora County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  19. County Economic Census for Catron County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  20. Economic Census Designated Places for Santa Fe County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  1. County Economic Census for Rio Arriba County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  2. Economic Census Designated Places for Socorro County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  3. County Economic Census for Sandoval County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  4. County Economic Census for Socorro County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  5. County Economic Census for Santa Fe County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  6. County Economic Census for Grant County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  7. County Economic Census for Bernalillo County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  8. Economic Census Designated Places for Curry County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  9. Economic Census Designated Places for Sierra County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  10. County Economic Census for Colfax County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  11. Economic Census Designated Places for Grant County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  12. Economic Census Designated Places for Chaves County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  13. County Economic Census for Luna County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  14. Economic Census Designated Places for Luna County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  15. County Economic Census for De Baca County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  16. County Economic Census for Quay County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  17. County Economic Census for Valencia County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  18. Economic Census Designated Places for Valencia County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  19. Economic Census Designated Places for Sandoval County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  20. Economic Census Designated Places for McKinley County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  1. Economic Census Designated Places for Otero County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  2. Economic Census Designated Places for Lincoln County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  3. County Economic Census for Lincoln County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  4. Economic Census Designated Places for Colfax County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  5. County Economic Census for Torrance County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  6. Miscellaneous Ground Transportation (Utilities) for Lincoln County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  7. Miscellaneous Ground Transportation (Utilities) for Rio Arriba County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  8. Miscellaneous Ground Transportation (Utilities) for Mora County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  9. Miscellaneous Ground Transportation (Utilities) for Torrance County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  10. Miscellaneous Ground Transportation (Utilities) for McKinley County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  11. Miscellaneous Ground Transportation (Utilities) for Union County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  12. Railroads for McKinley County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  13. Roads for McKinley County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  14. Miscellaneous Ground Transportation (Utilities) for Catron County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  15. Miscellaneous Ground Transportation (Utilities) for Los Alamos County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  16. Miscellaneous Ground Transportation (Utilities) for Cibola County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  17. Miscellaneous Ground Transportation (Utilities) for San Juan County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  18. Current County Boundary for Santa Fe County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  19. Current County Census Subdivision for Union County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  20. 2000 Census Unified School Districts for Valencia County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  1. 2000 Census Designated Places for Harding County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  2. Current Urban Areas for Luna County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  3. Current Core Based Statistical Areas for Chaves County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  4. Current County Census Subdivision for Lincoln County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  5. Current Unified School Districts for Socorro County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  6. 2000 Census Voting Precincts for Eddy County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  7. 2000 Census Public Use Microdata Area (PUMA) 1% for Chaves County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  8. Current Census Blocks for Hidalgo County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  9. Current County Boundary for Cibola County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  10. 2000 Census Public Use Microdata Area (PUMA) 1% for Sandoval County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  11. 2000 Census Voting Precincts for Hidalgo County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  12. American Indian/ Alaska Native Area/ Hawaiian Homeland Areas for Catron County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  13. Current State Senate Districts for Guadalupe County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  14. Current Block Groups for Luna County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  15. Current County Census Subdivision for De Baca County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  16. American Indian Tribal Subdivision Areas for Socorro County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  17. Current Block Groups for San Juan County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  18. Current State House Districts for Colfax County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  19. Current Water Polygons for Hidalgo County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  20. 2000 Census Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSA) for Sandoval County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  1. American Indian Tribal Subdivision Areas for Sandoval County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  2. Current Federal Congressional Districts for Rio Arriba County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  3. County Economic Census for Sierra County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  4. Current Federal Congressional Districts for Lea County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  5. Current Census Blocks for Luna County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  6. Current State House Districts for Lea County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  7. Current State House Districts for San Miguel County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  8. American Indian Tribal Subdivision Areas for Bernalillo County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  9. 2000 Census Public Use Microdata Area (PUMA) 5% for Hidalgo County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  10. Current Block Groups for Hidalgo County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  11. 2000 Census Public Use Microdata Area (PUMA) 1% for Catron County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  12. Miscellaneous Ground Transportation (Utilities) for Dona Ana County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  13. 2000 Census Public Use Microdata Area (PUMA) 1% for Otero County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  14. Miscellaneous Ground Transportation (Utilities) for Hidalgo County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  15. Current Census Blocks for Catron County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  16. Landmark Points for San Miguel County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  17. Current State House Districts for Harding County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  18. Current 3-Digit ZIP Code Tabulation Areas (ZCTAs) for Guadalupe County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  19. 2000 Census Designated Places for Quay County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  20. County Economic Census for Eddy County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  1. Current Designated Places for San Miguel County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  2. County Economic Census for Los Alamos County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  3. Current Urban Areas for Hidalgo County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  4. Current Census Blocks for Chaves County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  5. 2000 Census Public Use Microdata Area (PUMA) 5% for Sandoval County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  6. Current Census Tracts for Sierra County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  7. 2000 Census Designated Places for Chaves County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  8. Current Federal Congressional Districts for Chaves County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  9. Current County Boundary for Bernalillo County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  10. Current 3-Digit ZIP Code Tabulation Areas (ZCTAs) for Union County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  11. Miscellaneous Ground Transportation (Utilities) for Grant County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  12. Current County Boundary for Sandoval County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  13. Economic Census Designated Places for Hidalgo County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  14. Current Census Blocks for Quay County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  15. 2000 Census Public Use Microdata Area (PUMA) 5% for Otero County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  16. 2000 Census Unified School Districts for San Juan County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  17. 2000 Census Voting Precincts for Torrance County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  18. Current State House Districts for Bernalillo County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  19. Current County Boundary for San Miguel County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  20. 2000 Census Public Use Microdata Area (PUMA) 5% for Mora County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  1. 2000 Census Voting Precincts for Sierra County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  2. Current 3-Digit ZIP Code Tabulation Areas (ZCTAs) for Torrance County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  3. Current Combined Statistical Areas for Curry County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  4. Current 3-Digit ZIP Code Tabulation Areas (ZCTAs) for Sierra County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  5. Landmark Polygons for Santa Fe County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  6. Current Urban Areas for Lincoln County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  7. Current State House Districts for Taos County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  8. 2000 Census Unified School Districts for Los Alamos County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  9. Current Designated Places for Catron County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  10. Current State Senate Districts for Torrance County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  11. Current Traffic Analysis Zones for Dona Ana County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  12. Current Designated Places for Mora County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  13. Current State Senate Districts for Harding County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  14. Current County Boundary for Valencia County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  15. Current Census Tracts for Taos County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  16. Current Traffic Analysis Zones for Bernalillo County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  17. Current State House Districts for Dona Ana County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  18. Current Census Tracts for McKinley County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  19. Landmark Points for McKinley County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  20. American Indian Tribal Subdivision Areas for San Juan County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  1. American Indian/ Alaska Native Area/ Hawaiian Homeland Areas for Valencia County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  2. American Indian/ Alaska Native Area/ Hawaiian Homeland Areas for Lincoln County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  3. Current Census Tracts for De Baca County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  4. 2000 Census Unified School Districts for Mora County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  5. American Indian/ Alaska Native Area/ Hawaiian Homeland Areas for Taos County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  6. Current County Boundary for Chaves County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  7. Current Unified School Districts for Otero County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  8. 2000 Census Voting Precincts for Colfax County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  9. Current Federal Congressional Districts for Luna County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  10. Landmark Polygons for McKinley County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  11. Current 5-Digit ZIP Code Tabulation Areas (ZCTAs) for Guadalupe County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  12. Current Urban Areas for Cibola County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  13. Current Core Based Statistical Areas for Los Alamos County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  14. Current State Senate Districts for Bernalillo County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  15. 2000 Census Unified School Districts for Lea County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  16. American Indian Tribal Subdivision Areas for Rio Arriba County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  17. Economic Census Designated Places for Union County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  18. Current 5-Digit ZIP Code Tabulation Areas (ZCTAs) for Valencia County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  19. 2000 Census Unified School Districts for Colfax County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  20. Current Federal Congressional Districts for Dona Ana County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  1. Current 3-Digit ZIP Code Tabulation Areas (ZCTAs) for Roosevelt County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  2. 2000 Census Voting Precincts for Rio Arriba County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  3. Mexico.

    Semaan, Leslie

    The text explores Mexico's history, geography, art, religion, and lifestyles in the context of its complex economy. The text focuses on Mexico's economy and reasons for its current situation. Part I of this teaching unit includes: Teacher Overview, Why Study Mexico, Mexico Fact Sheet, Map of Mexico, the Land and Climate, History, Government,…

  4. La disputa por la homologación de los procesos electorales en Chiapas

    Álvaro F. López Lara

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se analizan las decisiones y estrategias de los actores políticos en torno al proceso de reforma para homologar el calendario electoral en Chiapas. Este caso muestra que aunque las reformas para homologar los procesos son deseables, su realización moviliza ambiciones de los poderes locales e incrementan las tensiones institucionales.

  5. La crisis de Chiapas: negociaciones, democracia y gobernabilidad

    Tania Carrasco

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available El conflicto en Chiapas se encuentra en una especie de impasse porque el gobierno mexicano y el EZLN han desarrollado estrategias diferentes. El gobierno ha apostado a transformaciones legislativas evitando llegar a la negociación política; el EZLN no desea reducir sus demandas de transformar política, económica e ideológicamente al Estado y transformarse de una fuerza militar en una política. Ambas estrategias dejan de lado la negociación y ponen en cuestionamiento el proceso democrático y la gobernabilidad en México.

  6. Mamíferos de la Reserva de la Biosfera "La Sepultura", Chiapas, México

    Eduardo Espinoza Medinilla

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Con el objeto de conocer la riqueza de mamíferos de la Reserva de la Biosfera La Sepultura, fue elaborado un listado de especies para esta área natural protegida. Através de transectos lineales, donde se realizaron observaciones directas, búsqueda de rastros y captura de ejemplares, durante el periodo de mayo de 1994 a diciembre de 1999, además de la revisión de bases de datos nacionales y extranjeras; con registros de esta localidad, se pudo recolectar 848 especimenes (248 pieles y cráneos, 32 huellas en molde de yeso y nueve fragmentos óseos. Se obtuvo un listado compuesto de 98 especies, 70 géneros, 29 familias y 10 órdenes. El 86.7 % de estas especies pertenecen a los órdenes Chiroptera, Rodentia y Carnivora. Por lo menos 21 especies están clasificadas dentro de alguna categoría de conservación. Los datos obtenidos de este manuscrito son una base sólida y actualizada y pueden ser usados como parte de los planes de manejo y conservación para esta reservaA species list was elaborated for La Sepultura Biosphere Reserve, Chiapas, Mexico. Line transects and direct observations were made, national and international databases were consulted, and animal traces were registered. Animals were captured during the period May 1994 - December 1999. A total of 848 specimen (248 furs and skulls, 32 tracks in plaster, and 9 osseous fragments were collected. A total of 98 species, 70 genera, 29 families, and 10 orders compose the species list. Of these species 87.7% belong to the orders Chiroptera, Rodentia and Carnivora and 21 species were classified according to some kind of legal protection. These data represent a solid and actualized database useful for designing management and conservation plans for this Biosphere Reserve

  7. Árboles forrajeros de tres regiones ganaderas de Chiapas, México: Usos y características nutricionales

    Pinto-Ruiz, R; Hernández, D; Gómez, Η; Cobos, ΜΑ; Quiroga, R; Pezo, D

    2010-01-01

    El trabajo tuvo como objetivo conocer las plantas leñosas que poseen potencial forrajero de tres regiones ganaderas de Chiapas, México e identificar usos, composición química y características de degradación ruminal. Se aplicó un cuestionario a productores pecuarios de la región Costa, Frontera y Norte de Chiapas. Los resultados de la encuesta se procesaron utilizando frecuencias y porcentajes. El diagnóstico obtenido derivó en el conocimiento de 103 especies leñosas reconocidas como proveedo...

  8. Candidate Vectors and Rodent Hosts of Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus, Chiapas, 2006–2007

    Deardorff, Eleanor R.; Estrada-Franco, Jose G.; Freier, Jerome E.; Navarro-Lopez, Roberto; Da Rosa, Amelia Travassos; Tesh, Robert B.; Weaver, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    Enzootic Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) has been known to occur in Mexico since the 1960s. The first natural equine epizootic was recognized in Chiapas in 1993 and since then, numerous studies have characterized the etiologic strains, including reverse genetic studies that incriminated a specific mutation that enhanced infection of epizootic mosquito vectors. The aim of this study was to determine the mosquito and rodent species involved in enzootic maintenance of subtype IE VEEV in coastal Chiapas. A longitudinal study was conducted over a year to discern which species and habitats could be associated with VEEV circulation. Antibody was rarely detected in mammals and virus was not isolated from mosquitoes. Additionally, Culex (Melanoconion) taeniopus populations were found to be spatially related to high levels of human and bovine seroprevalence. These mosquito populations were concentrated in areas that appear to represent foci of stable, enzootic VEEV circulation. PMID:22144461

  9. Daño al ADN en mujeres expuestas al humo de la leña en Chiapas, México DNA damage in women exposed to firewod fuel smoke , in Chiapas, México

    Crispín Herrera-Portugal

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Actualmente alrededor de la cuarta parte de la población mexicana, entre 25 y 28 millones de habitantes, cocina con leña, Sin embargo, el humo de la leña contiene una amplia gama de sustancias tóxicas, entre ellas el monóxido de carbono (CO cuyo impacto en la salud de la población rural debe ser estudiado. Por esto, el potencial daño al ADN asociado con la exposición a CO de 30 mujeres que cocinaban con leña en Chiapas, México, fue evaluado por el ensayo cometa. Los resultados se compararon con 30 controles comparables en edad y condiciones socioeconómicas, quienes cocinaban con gas licuado de petróleo (GLP. Se obtuvieron muestras de sangre total para medir carboxihemoglobina (COHb y llevar a cabo el ensayo cometa. Se encontró diferencia significativa (PCurrently, about a quarter of the Mexican population, between 25 and 28 million people, cook with firewood. However, wood smoke contains a wide range of toxic substances, including carbon monoxide (CO whose impact on health of the rural population should be studied. Therefore, the potential DNA damage associated with the exposition to CO of 30 women who cooked with wood in Chiapas, Mexico, was assessed using Comet Assay. Results were compared with 30 controls of similar age and socioeconomic status, who cooked with liquefied petroleum gas (LPG. We obtained whole blood samples to measure carboxyhemoglobin (% COHb and perform the comet assay. There was a significant difference (P <0.001 in the percentages of COHb between women who cooked with wood (mean= 6.6% and those who did it with LPG (mean=1.8% being 3.6 times higher in the former compared with the latter. There was a significant difference in comet tail length between the two groups examined (mean 18.5 +/- 4.21 versus 5.97 +/- 1.0 μm, P <0.001 and tail moment (mean 4.55 +/- 1.5 versus 1.5 +/- 0.40, P <0.001. The results of this study strongly suggest that exposure to carbon monoxide and compounds present in wood smoke can cause

  10. Entre el textil y el ámbar: Las funciones psicosociales del trabajo artesanal en artesanos tsotsiles de La Ilusión, Chiapas, México

    Perla Shiomara Del Carpio Ovando

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available

    The aim of this research is to study the psychosocial functions of the artisan work made by indigenous artisans from a Tsotsil community in Chiapas, Mexico. The analysis of handicrafts encourages reflection on economic aspects in intimate relation with cultural and psychosocial elements. It is argued that those who work on the production of handicrafts face many difficulties such as precariousness, little social recognition, discrimination and exclusion. Despite this all, handicrafts contribute to the economic, social and cultural reproduction of those who make them. Also, handicrafts are privileged elements as they are vehicles of multiple social, historical and group belonging meanings through which is possible to “track” processes of social transformation. Based on the findings obtained while conducting field work in Chiapas, a model of the psychosocial functions of the indigenous artisan work is proposed in this dissertation.

    Esta investigación tiene como objetivo principal el estudio de las funciones psicosociales del trabajo artesanal que realizan artesanos indígenas de una comunidad tsotsil de Chiapas, México. Constata esta tesis que el análisis de las artesanías invita a reflexionar necesariamente sobre aspectos económicos en íntima relación con aspectos de índole cultural y psicosocial. Se defiende también aquí que quienes se dedican a la producción de artesanías enfrentan múltiples dificultades dentro de las que sobresale la precariedad, el poco reconocimiento social, la discriminación y la exclusión. A pesar de ello, las artesanías contribuyen a la reproducción económica, social y cultural de quienes lo realizan, y constituyen elementos privilegiados en tanto vehículos de múltiples significados sociales, históricos y de pertenencia grupal, a través de los cuales es posible “rastrear” procesos de transformación social. Por ello, a la luz de los datos obtenidos en el trabajo de campo, esta tesis

  11. Cólera, Iglesia católica y gobierno civil en Chiapas, 1833-1835

    José Javier Guillén Villafuerte

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available En 1833, la República mexicana padeció el embate de la primera epidemia de cólera morbo de su historia. Este artículo estudia las medidas que adoptaron las autoridades civiles y religiosas de Chiapas para proteger de ese mal a los habitantes de la región. Asimismo, se busca mostrar cómo las diversas problemáticas —de carácter político y financiero en el caso del gobierno y de orden social en el de la Iglesia— que enfrentaban ambas instancias dificultaron su actuación durante el tiempo que la epidemia se cebó sobre la población de Chiapas. Finalmente, establecer, después de un ejercicio de crítica documental, cuál pudo ser su impacto demográfico.

  12. Análisis de convergencia económica en el interior de Chiapas: municipios, regiones e inconsistencias aparentes

    López Arévalo, Jorge Alberto; Peláez Herreros, Óscar

    2012-01-01

    The data of annual per capita income estimated by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) for the municipal human development index in Mexico shows that, in Chiapas, during the period 2000-2005, there was a strong convergence at the municipal level while there was no regional convergence. To explain this apparent inconsistency, the article «Regression towards mediocrity in hereditary stature», published by Galton in 1886, is examined, concluding that the clustering level of the data (...

  13. LA IMPORTANCIA DEL CUERPO EN LA NOCIÓN DE PERSONA ENTRE MAYAS ACTUALES DE OXCHUC, CHAMULA Y CHENALHÓ, CHIAPAS

    Jaime Tomás Page Pliego

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Suele asumirse que la noción de persona es igual entre los pueblos de tsotsiles y tesltales de los Altos de Chiapas. Sin embargo, su configuración varía sustancialmente, sin perder la base que los une. Este trabajo trata sobre las diferencias y similitudes que se presentan en el concepto denominado complejo persona en tres municipios: Oxchuc —de habla tseltal—, Chamula y Chenalhó —de habla tsotsil—, y en forma destacada sobre la importancia del cuerpo en dicho concepto. Asimismo, se abordan las variaciones que se han suscitado en torno a esa noción a partir de 1940, bajo la incidencia de la escalada proselitista cristiana. THE IMPORTANCE OF THE BODY WITHIN THE COMPLEX OF THE NOTION OF PERSONHOOD AMONG CONTEMPORARY MAYANS FROM OXCHUC, CHAMULA AND CHENALHÓ IN CHIAPAS STATE There is a tendency to assume that the Tsotsil and Tseltal communities in the Chiapas Highlands (Altos de Chiapas share the same notion of personhood. However, the way this notion is constructed does vary substantially without losing a common foundation. This piece of research deals with the similarities and differences present in the concept of personhood complex in three different municipalities: Oxchuc —a tseltal-speaking community—, Chamula and Chenalhó —tsotsil-speaking communities—, and emphasizes the importance of the body in this concept. It also addresses the permutations that have emerged around this notion since 1940, under the escalating influence of Christian proselytism.

  14. Textiles para turistas: tejedoras y comerciantes en los Altos de Chiapas

    Eugenia Bayona Escat

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The present work investigates the role played by indigenous women as producers and sellers of textile pieces, considered handworks and indigenous tradition, with high demand in the tourism market in the region to the Highlands of Chiapas, Mexico. The presence of tourism in the area has led to the consolidation of a complex local market of textiles in which intertwine weavers, distributors and traders, commercial chains and multiple retail spaces. Through this female agency and marketing of “indigenous”, the research studied a local context that allows indigenous women take new social positions while it integrates social global goods and imaginary aspects.

  15. LA INDUSTRIA DE LA PALMA DE ACEITE EN ACAPETAHUA, CHIAPAS: EL CASO DE PROPALMA

    Mazariegos Sánchez, Adriana; Ã guila González, José Manuel; Martínez Chávez, Josefina; Arévalo Lozano, Ovidio

    2014-01-01

    This research presents a socio-organizational within the African Palm industry in Mexico, specifically in the company "Promotora de Palma del Soconusco S.A.P.I. CV- (Propalma)5, located in the municipality of Acapetahua, in the State of Chiapas, whose primary activity is the extraction of palm oil and palm kernel oil, and the production of products such as palm kernel and palm kernel husk flour. This research was developed under the qualitative approach, using the descriptive method, to see f...

  16. INTERCAMBIO DE PLANTAS ENTRE HUERTOS Y OTROS ESPACIOS: ¿UNA ESTRATEGIA DE CONSERVACIÓN PARA EL BOSQUE MESÓFILO DE MONTAÑA DEL VOLCÁN TACANÁ, CHIAPAS, MÉXICO?

    María Eugenia Escobar Hernández

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Se analiza el papel que realiza una de las prácticas de conservación en los huertos de una comunidad mame en la Reserva de Biosfera Volcán Tacaná; Chiquihuite, Unión Juárez, Chiapas. Lo anterior, se llevó a cabo mediante la recolecta e identificación de las especies presentes en veinticuatro huertos de la comunidad y entrevistas semi estructuradas sobre el espacio de origen y el uso a la especie. Con esta información se elaboró una matriz de presencia-ausencia y una red de relaciones entre espacios, y se concluyó que existe una práctica de intercambio, principalmente entre los espacios huerto-montaña y huerto-huerto. La base de este intercambio es el uso y por ello la definición local del concepto de conservación, no se explica sin este concepto. INTERCHANGE OF PLANTS BETWEEN HOME GARDENS AND OTHER SPACES: A CONSERVATION STRATEGY FOR THE CLOUD FOREST OF THE TACANÁ VOLCANO IN CHIAPAS STATE, MEXICO? This paper analyzes the role played by one of the conservation practices carried out in the home gardens of a Mame community in the Tacaná Volcano Biosphere Reserve: Chiquihuite, in the Unión Juárez municipality of Chiapas State. This analysis was conducted through collecting and identifying the species present in 24 of the home gardens of the community as well as semi-structured interviews regarding the space of origin and use of the species. Based on this information, a presence-absence matrix was developed as well as a network of relationships between spaces. It was concluded that there is a practice of interchange, mainly between home garden and mountain, and between home garden and home garden. This interchange is based on use and therefore the local definition of conservation cannot be explained without this concept.

  17. De la plegaria y de la cocina ritual (Chiapas, México)

    Pujol, Helios Figuerola

    2014-01-01

    Intentaremos mostrar cómo, entre los tzeltales de Cancuc, en los altos de Chiapas, el ch’abajom (rezador) se transforma, durante el tiempo del ritual, en un delicado chef cocinero. Los conocimientos culinarios del ch’abajom se encuentran resumidos en un libro de recetas que, en un sueño premonitorio, un mestizo le entregará para facilitar sus actividades. En ese escrito encontrará los versos con metáforas y figuras retóricas con las que los dioses se alimentan. Para que éstas sean eficaces de...

  18. Análisis espacial de la fecundidad adolescente en municipios de Chiapas

    Gerardo Núñez Medina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Se analiza la distribución espacial de la fecundidad de adolescentes entre 10 y 19 años y algunos de sus determinantes en Chiapas en 2015. La importancia de esta investigación radica en tres factores: 1 Chiapas es el estado con mayor proporción de población joven-adolescente en el país; 2 es la tercera entidad con el mayor número de embarazos adolescentes, y 3 85 de sus 118 municipios fueron catalogados por CONAPO como de alta y muy alta marginación, lo que hace evidente que la entidad presenta importantes problemas de segregación económica, social y espacial.

  19. Leyendas y narrativa popular en Chiapas

    Antonio Cruz Coutiño

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available El presente informe sintetiza la labor de identificación, acopio y sistematización de una parte importante de la narrativa tradicional de los pueblos del estado de Chiapas, México: relatos populares identificados como leyendas en el ámbito de la mitología religiosa y cosmogónica de las culturas ancestrales mesoamericanas.

  20. El estado mexicano de Chiapas: ¿Qué ha cambiado en veinte años?

    Agustín Ávila Romero

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available En el presente texto se hace un recorrido sobre las causas económicas y sociales que posibilitaron la rebelión zapatista hace veinte años, para mostrar que este hecho ocasionó la llegada creciente de recursos económicos al estado de Chiapas y exponer, a su vez, como se utilizaron los dineros por parte de los municipios oficiales y el Gobierno del estado. Se concluye que las finanzas públicas de Chiapas son sumamente débiles y que pese a la creciente inyección de capital que ha recibido, el estado se encuentra sobre endeudado y en condiciones de marginación y pobreza similares a las de hace dos décadas.

  1. REDIMENSIONAMIENTO DE UNA FRONTERA LARGAMENTE OLVIDADA: CHIAPAS 1973-1993

    Diana Guillén

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A pesar de su colindancia con tres países, en México todavía, al iniciar la década de los setenta, parecía predominar la idea de que la única frontera importante era la que nos separa de Estados Unidos. En el extremo sur, Chiapas constituía un territorio lejano al que siempre podía acudirse en busca de recursos naturales y favores políticos, pero sobre el que no existía mayor interés por parte de las autoridades federales. Conforme se delinearon en el horizonte nuevas variables vinculadas tanto a la explotación petrolera e hidroeléctrica como a los conflictos centroamericanos y a los ajustes en el interior de la clase política nacional, el escenario se transformó y la entidad pasó del abandono al interés estratégico. El trabajo se centra en tales consideraciones y busca comprobar que, a principios de los noventa, la relación entre las esferas de gobierno federal y estatal se había ya modificado.

  2. Microcrédito y pobreza. La experiencia del programa Microempresas Sociales de Banmujer en Chiapas

    Emma Del Carmen Aguilar-Pinto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Se analiza la experiencia de beneficiarias del programa Microempresas Sociales (MES que opera en Chiapas desde 2001, a partir de los conceptos de pobre (sujeto, pobreza (contexto y empobrecimiento (proceso, propuestos por Vega- Estrada. Los resultados muestran que el papel de los microcréditos en la erradicación de la pobreza se ha sobrevalorado y que, si bien pueden contribuir a revertir el proceso de empobrecimiento, no inciden en el problema estructural de la pobreza. Con esto esperamos contribuir a la discusión en torno a si el microcrédito femenino es una herramienta efectiva de combate a la pobreza.

  3. SOCIAL EXCLUSION: GUATEMALAN YOUTH WITHIN COFFEE PLANTATIONS AT SOCONUSCO CHIAPAS

    Laura Itzel Ramírez-Ramos

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Mexico's southern border is the entry point for different migratory flows, mainly from Central America, these flows have taken place under socioeconomic contexts and conditions which demand the constant livelihood strategies pursuit from people. This paper is focused on the agricultural laborers from Guatemalan origin, within coffee plantation farms at the Soconusco, Chiapas. The main objective is arguing how the lack of access -or restricted access- to education and the precarious inclusion to work and migration, have positioned youth population of migrant laborers, from Guatemalan origin, into social processes of social exclusion and vulnerability. It is concluded that conditions generated from these processes, preclude the generation of different work expectations, the access to a higher quality of life and the social mobility in a men and woman development crucial stage. The exposed information comes from quantitative and qualitative research methods. A nonrandom survey was applied to 129 families; 20 semi-structured interviews for children and adolescents within farms and 25 to actors involved in the recognition and performance of the human rights of migrant children in the southern Mexican border area.

  4. 2000 Census 3-Digit ZIP Code Tabulation Areas (ZCTAs) for Luna County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  5. 2000 Census 3-Digit ZIP Code Tabulation Areas (ZCTAs) for Harding County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  6. American Indian/ Alaska Native Area/ Hawaiian Homeland Areas for San Juan County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  7. 2000 Census 5-Digit ZIP Code Tabulation Areas (ZCTAs) for Catron County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  8. 2000 Census 3-Digit ZIP Code Tabulation Areas (ZCTAs) for De Baca County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  9. 2000 Census 3-Digit ZIP Code Tabulation Areas (ZCTAs) for Roosevelt County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  10. Current 3-Digit ZIP Code Tabulation Areas (ZCTAs) for McKinley County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  11. 2000 Census 3-Digit ZIP Code Tabulation Areas (ZCTAs) for Santa Fe County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  12. 2000 Census 3-Digit ZIP Code Tabulation Areas (ZCTAs) for Colfax County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  13. 2000 Census 5-Digit ZIP Code Tabulation Areas (ZCTAs) for Union County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  14. Current 5-Digit ZIP Code Tabulation Areas (ZCTAs) for McKinley County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  15. 2000 Census 5-Digit ZIP Code Tabulation Areas (ZCTAs) for Taos County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  16. 2000 Census 3-Digit ZIP Code Tabulation Areas (ZCTAs) for Quay County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  17. 2000 Census 3-Digit ZIP Code Tabulation Areas (ZCTAs) for San Miguel County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  18. 2000 Census 5-Digit ZIP Code Tabulation Areas (ZCTAs) for Bernalillo County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  19. 2000 Census 5-Digit ZIP Code Tabulation Areas (ZCTAs) for Rio Arriba County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  20. 2000 Census 3-Digit ZIP Code Tabulation Areas (ZCTAs) for Rio Arriba County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  1. 2000 Census 3-Digit ZIP Code Tabulation Areas (ZCTAs) for Los Alamos County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  2. 2000 Census 3-Digit ZIP Code Tabulation Areas (ZCTAs) for Bernalillo County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  3. 2000 Census 5-Digit ZIP Code Tabulation Areas (ZCTAs) for San Miguel County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  4. 2000 Census 5-Digit ZIP Code Tabulation Areas (ZCTAs) for Los Alamos County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  5. 2000 Census 3-Digit ZIP Code Tabulation Areas (ZCTAs) for McKinley County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  6. 2000 Census 5-Digit ZIP Code Tabulation Areas (ZCTAs) for Eddy County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  7. 2000 Census Public Use Microdata Area (PUMA) 5% for Rio Arriba County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  8. 2000 Census 5-Digit ZIP Code Tabulation Areas (ZCTAs) for McKinley County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  9. Current 5-Digit ZIP Code Tabulation Areas (ZCTAs) for San Juan County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  10. Hábitat y distribución de cinco especies de Quercus (Fagaceae en la Meseta Central de Chiapas, México

    J.G. Alvarez-Moctezuma

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo fue describir el hábitat de las especies del subgénero Lepidobalanus en la Meseta Central de Chiapas e identificar las principales variables que condicionan su distribución. En 258 parcelas se utilizó un índice de dominancia, basado en la abundancia y cobertura de las especies, para conocer la distribución de Quercus peduncularis, Q. polymorpha, Q. rugosa, Q. sebifera y Q. segoviensis. Además se midieron las variables ambientales: altitud, precipitación de noviembre a abril (PPNA, exposición, pendiente, intensidad de extracción de leña y pastoreo. Se utilizó el Detrended Canonical Correspondence Analysis para la evaluación estadística de los datos. Se encontró una relación negativa entre el índice de dominancia de Q. peduncularis y Q. segoviensis con la altitud y la PPNA. El índice de dominancia de Q. rugosa y Q. segoviensis mostró correlación con la exposición y la intensidad de extracción de leña. La altitud fue la variable ambiental que condiciona la distribución diferencial de las especies, seguida por la PPNA. El resultado de este estudio sugiere que hay hábitat diferenciados para Q. peduncularis, Q. polymorpha, Q. rugosa, Q. sebifera y Q. segoviensis determinados por variables naturales (altitud y PPNA, aunque también las variables culturales (pastoreo y extracción de leña pueden condicionar la distribución y abundancia de estas especies.We describe the habitat of species within the Fagaceae subgenus Lepidobalanus (genus Quercus and identify environmental variables related to their distribution in the Meseta Central of Chiapas, Southern Mexico. In 258 plots a dominance index was used, combining tree density and crown cover, for Quercus peduncularis, Q. polymorpha, Q. rugosa, Q. sebifera and Q. segoviensis. The following variables were measured: altitude, precipitation from November through April (PPNA, exposure, slope, fuel-wood harvesting and grazing. Detrended Canonical

  11. Evaluación de líneas de frijol negro, en Veracruz y Chiapas, México

    Ernesto Lopez

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaluación de líneas de frijol negro, en Veracruz y Chiapas, México. El presente estudio se llevó a cabo durante los ciclos agrícolas de 1999-2000 y 2000-2001; se evaluó la adaptación y rendimiento de 15 líneas avanzadas de frijol negro, así como un testigo local. Dichos genotipos forman parte al Ensayo Centroamericano de Adaptación y Rendimiento (ECAR. La evaluación se realizó en 11 localidades, cinco en el estado de Chiapas y seis en Veracruz, los experimentos se establecieron bajo condiciones de riego, temporal y humedad residual. Las líneas ICTA-Ju 97-1, ICTA-Ju II- 307, DOR-678 y Cut-45, resultaron sobresalientes por su rendimiento, amplia adaptación y estabilidad. En el ciclo agrícola de otoño-invierno 1999-2000, se evaluó la respuesta de las líneas a las siguientes enfermedades: mosaico dorado (BGMV, mancha angular (Phaseoisariopsis griseola, roya (Uromyces appendiculatus y la antracnosis (Colletotrichum lindemuthianum. Las líneas que resultaron tolerantes fueron ICTA Ju 97-1 y Cut-45. Ambas serán validadas en campos de agricultores para su posible liberación como nuevas variedades para algunas regiones productoras de Veracruz y Chiapas, México

  12. Mexico.

    1993-01-01

    The background notes on Mexico provide text and recent statistical information on the geography, population, government, economy, and foreign relations, specifically the North American Free Trade Agreement with US. The 1992 population is estimated at 89 million of which 60% are mestizo (Indian-Spanish), 30% are American Indian, 9% are Caucasian, and 1% are other. 90% are Roman Catholic. There are 8 years of compulsory education. Infant mortality is 30/1000 live births. Life expectancy for males is 68 years and 76 years for females. The labor force is comprised of 30% in services, 24% in agriculture and fishing, 19% in manufacturing, 13% in commerce, 7% in construction, 4% in transportation and communication, and .4% in mining. There are 31 states and a federal district. Gross domestic product (GDP) per capita was $3200 in 1991. Military expenditures were .5% of GDP in 1991. The average inflation rate is 19%. Mexico City with 20 million is the largest urban center in the world. In recent years, the economy has been restructured with market oriented reforms; the result has been a growth of GDP of 3.6% in 1991 from 2% in 1987. Dependence on oil exports has decreased. There has been privatization and deregulation of state-owned companies. Subsidies to inefficient companies have been stopped. Tariff rates were reduced. The financial debt has been reduced and turned into a surplus of .8% in 1992. Mexico's foreign debt has been reduced from its high in 1987 of $107 billion. Agricultural reforms have been ongoing for 50 years. Land was redistributed, but standards of living and productivity have improved only slightly. Rural land tenure regulations have been changed, and other economic reforms are expected. Mexico engages in ad hoc international groups and is selective about membership in international organizations.

  13. Ts’umbal activo en las transformaciones rurales de Oxchuc, Chiapas

    Abraham Sántiz Gómez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se discute y reflexiona sobre las transformaciones rurales, a partir de los sujetos y actores sociales, desde el término ts’umbal, que se vincula con el grupo doméstico patrilineal. Se basa en revisión documental, teórica y empírica, y se contextualiza en la sociedad tseltal de Oxchuc, Chiapas. Se realizó una reflexión crítica sobre la racionalidad instrumental del conocimiento científico, y la conclusión se abocó a la diversidad de racionalidades de la vida rural en constantes trasformaciones y a la relación entre ellas.

  14. Una aproximación biográfica a don Fermín José Fuero: obispo de Chiapas

    David Martínez Vellisca

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available A partir de un minucioso trabajo de archivo, y con el propósito de contribuir a salvaguardar la memoria histórica de Chiapas, en este texto se explora la vida peninsular de quien fuera obispo de Chiapa y Soconusco, don Fermín José Fuero Gómez, natural de la villa de Cañizares (Cuenca, quien fue preconizado el 18 de julio de 1795 y consagrado en Guatemala el 11 de septiembre de 1796.

  15. MAKING SENSE OF AUTONOMY IN INFORMATION ONLINE JOURNALISM IN CHIAPAS

    Luis Fernando Bolaños Gordillo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Censorship prevalent historically in the practice of journalism in Chiapas, several organizations have taken over the use of new information technologies to inform and comment on the events in Chiapas, including his own, thus creating an autonomous way of exercising this important activity.This article is the product of research done in 2010, which analyzed the influence of the EZLN in the development of a regional sense in the online journalism in Chiapas as well as the presence that gradually increases in several pages, blogs and social networks.

  16. Eficacia de una prueba rápida para el diagnóstico de Plasmodium vivax en pacientes sintomáticos de Chiapas, México Eficacia de una prueba rápida para el diagnóstico de Plasmodium vivax en pacientes sintomáticos de Chiapas, México

    Lilia González-Cerón

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Evaluar en condiciones de laboratorio la sensibilidad y especificidad de una prueba rápida de diagnóstico (OptiMAL, basada en tiras inmunorreactivas para detectar Plasmodium vivax en pacientes febriles del sur de Chiapas, México. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Entre diciembre de 2000 a abril de 2002 se investigó la presencia de parásitos en muestras sanguíneas de 893 pacientes por examen microscópico de gotas gruesas teñidas con Giemsa (prueba de referencia. Otra gota de sangre de la misma punción fue empleada en las tiras inmunorreactivas para investigar la presencia de pLDH del parásito. Los resultados discordantes se resolvieron por PCR del gen de la subunidad ribosomal 18S del parásito para descartar infección. RESULTADOS: OptiMAL mostró una sensibilidad de 93.3% y especificidad de 99.5%, con valores predictivo positivo y negativo de 96.5 y 98.9%, respectivamente. La intensidad de las reacciones en las tiras OptiMAL correlacionaron con la densidad parasitaria (r=0.601, p=0.0001. CONCLUSIONES: La prueba rápida presentó sensibilidad y especificidad aceptables para detectar P. vivax en condiciones de laboratorio y podría ser útil para el diagnóstico de paludismo en operaciones de campo en México.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate, under laboratory conditions, the sensitivity and specificity of a rapid diagnostic test (OptiMAL, based on immunoreactive strips, to detect Plasmodium vivax infection in febrile patients in Southern Chiapas, Mexico. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The presence of parasites in blood samples of 893 patients was investigated by Giemsa-stained thick blood smear microscopic examination (gold standard. A blood drop from the same sample was smeared on immunoreactive strips to investigate the presence of the parasite pLDH. Discordant results were resolved by PCR amplification of the parasite's 18S SSU rRNA, to discard infection. RESULTS: OptiMAL had an overall sensitivity of 93.3% and its specificity was 99.5%. Its positive and

  17. Entre el textil y el ámbar: Las funciones psicosociales del trabajo artesanal en artesanos tsotsiles de La Ilusión, Chiapas, México

    Perla Shiomara Del Carpio Ovando

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this research is to study the psychosocial functions of the artisan work made by indigenous artisans from a Tsotsil community in Chiapas, Mexico. The analysis of handicrafts encourages reflection on economic aspects in intimate relation with cultural and psychosocial elements. It is argued that those who work on the production of handicrafts face many difficulties such as precariousness, little social recognition, discrimination and exclusion. Despite this all, handicrafts...

  18. La televisión educativa en Chiapas, un proyecto para rescatar

    Mtra. Juliana Matus López

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta un panorama nacional y estatal de la televisión educativa con resultados de su evaluación; se presenta el Sistema de Televisión Educativa de Chiapas de la Secretaría de Educación Pública como un proyecto interinstitucional que plantea la participación de las instancias públicas para generar una barra de programación elaborada localmente, que atienda a las demandas de su audiencia. En Chiapas, la televisión como instrumento educativo cumple una función limitada en la divulgación del conocimiento, si bien se implementa una programación de temas generales, no ha logrado vincularse a la problemática del estado. El sistema de televisión local ha permanecido ajeno a la riqueza y tradición cultural del pueblo chiapaneco. Esto se traduce en la falta de una clara política educativa que considere a la televisión como medio de comunicación para alcanzar objetivos pedagógicos. El trabajo invita a la reflexión de los especialistas educadores.

  19. Mexico

    2003-06-01

    This document summarizes the key energy data for Mexico: 1 - energy organizations and policy: Ministry of energy (SENER), Comision Reguladora de Energia (CRE), Ministry of Finances, Ministry of trade and industrial development (SECOFI), national commission for energy savings (CONAE); 2 - companies: federal commission of electricity (CFE), Minera Carbonifera Rio Escondido (MICARE - coal), Pemex (petroleum); 3 - energy production: resources, electric power, petroleum, natural gas; 4 - energy consumption; 5 - stakes and perspectives. Some economic and energy indicators are summarized in a series of tables: general indicators, supply indicators (reserves, refining and electric capacity, energy production, foreign trade), demand indicators (consumption trends, end use, energy independence, energy efficiency, CO 2 emissions), energy status per year and per energy source. (J.S.)

  20. Los mayas del altiplano: supervivencia indígena en Chiapas y Guatemala

    Lovell, W. George

    2002-01-01

    En el contexto americano, pocos grupos indígenas han demostrado la capacidad de sobrevivir a lo largo de la historia como los mayas del altiplano. Hoy día en Chiapas existen más de un millón de indígenas mayas, un número que asciende a cinco o seis millones en el caso de Guatemala. Los pueblos mayas han respondido a la invasión y a la dominación para conservar elementos importantes de su cultura. Este artículo discute las formas en que los mayas del altiplano se han adaptado para sobrevivir a...

  1. Cólera, Iglesia católica y gobierno civil en Chiapas, 1833-1835

    José Javier Guillén Villafuerte

    2017-01-01

    En 1833, la República mexicana padeció el embate de la primera epidemia de cólera morbo de su historia. Este artículo estudia las medidas que adoptaron las autoridades civiles y religiosas de Chiapas para proteger de ese mal a los habitantes de la región. Asimismo, se busca mostrar cómo las diversas problemáticas —de carácter político y financiero en el caso del gobierno y de orden social en el de la Iglesia— que enfrentaban ambas instancias dificultaron su actuación durante el tiempo que la ...

  2. Cólera, Iglesia católica y gobierno civil en Chiapas, 1833-1835

    Guillén Villafuerte, José Javier

    2017-01-01

    Resumen: En 1833, la República mexicana padeció el embate de la primera epidemia de cólera morbo de su historia. Este artículo estudia las medidas que adoptaron las autoridades civiles y religiosas de Chiapas para proteger de ese mal a los habitantes de la región. Asimismo, se busca mostrar cómo las diversas problemáticas-de carácter político y financiero en el caso del gobierno y de orden social en el de la Iglesia-que enfrentaban ambas instancias dificultaron su actuación durante el tiempo ...

  3. Monitoreo de prensa en el proceso estatal electoral de Chiapas 2000

    Mtra. Juliana Matus López

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Políticamente el año 2000 resultó significativo para los mexicanos que vivimos el proceso electoral más controvertido en la historia de nuestro país. Esta contienda electoral no sólo fue definitiva en la vida nacional, lo fue también para muchas entidades federativas como Chiapas, que, coincidentemente se eligió también a un representante para gobernar al iniciar este nuevo milenio ante un clima de conflictos políticos, sociales y económicos que requieren ser atendidos.

  4. La reinvención de una vocación regional agroexportadora. El corredor costero de Chiapas

    Héctor B. Fletes Ocón

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Desde una perspectiva antropológica, se analizan procesos de producción, representaciones sociales y discursos que en diferentes momentos han otorgado una cualidad agroexportadora al corredor costero de Chiapas, en particular al Soconusco. Se sostiene que la región se construye por un conjunto de representaciones simbólicas que reafirman la identidad y el poder regional. La reinvención de una vocación regional agroexportadora manifiesta la capacidad de los actores sociales locales para responder a diferentes situaciones problemáticas.

  5. Imaginarios en el arte popular de Chiapas

    Jesús Morales Bermúdez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Under the guidance of intuition, in this paper I concentrate on the theme of certain imaginaries and representations in Chiapas from a rare point of view. It traverses some route of conception of the world and of the language inscribed in the craft objects, objects useful in first instance for its creators, before its decorative function or aesthetic stimulation for the consumers. This conception of the world does not exist as an explicit formulation in objects but our effort derives them from substrates of imagination, orality and literature, from which I try to draw a line, derived from myths, rites, poems. Apart from humanizing with our hands, we also humanized ourselves with the word.

  6. A Socio-Cultural Diagnosis of Adolescent Diets in Comitán, Chiapas

    Claudia Elizabeth Ramírez Domínguez

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This study, based on group interviews with adolescents (pre-university level students from various educational institutions and socio-cultural backgrounds in Comitán, Chiapas (Mexico, was undertaken to identify the settings for the dietary practices of young people. Using a multi-dimensional analysis, we found that the predominant paradigm in public health, based on concepts such as risk factors and lifestyle, tends to obscure the complexity of social processes and to place responsibility for health on each individual. The dietary practices of adolescents are determined by the dynamics established in school and family environments and occur in a context of time pressures as well as the poor provision and choice of foods. We noted a discrepancy between knowledge on the one hand and dietary practices, weight control and perceived risks or expectations concerning body image on the other.

  7. Competencies in Community Instructors who Provide Service to the Indigenous Peoples of the State of Chiapas

    Marcela Georgina Gómez Zermeño

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This article shows the results of an exploratory-descriptive study on intercultural competencies in community instructors of the National Council for Educational Development (CONAFE providing service in the Modality of Educational Attention to the Indigenous Population (MAEPI in the region of San Cristobal de las Casas, Chiapas. It describes the historical background of Indian education in Mexico, and the contributions to community education, and develops concepts regarding intercultural education and intercultural competencies. The research methodology adopted a mixed method based on a non-experimental, trans-sectional and naturalistic ethnographic design of convergent triangulation. The conclusions outline the need to strengthen teacher training so as to build an educational model that would fully incorporate the intercultural approach.

  8. Insurgencia y turismo: reflexiones sobre el impacto del turista politizado en Chiapas

    Coronado, Gabriela

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses the interrelations between politics and tourism considering the impact of political instability generated by the Zapatista indigenous rebellion on tourism in Chiapas, Mexico. By analysing tourist products and fieldwork observations the transformation of the tourist industry is explained as an effect of pressures from a new kind of visitor, “political tourists”. Attracted by the indigenous movement and its relevance as a global social movement, their political and ideological position created demands that affected interethnic organisational networks and the social value of tourism activity. As a response indigenous and non indigenous tourist agents generated new strategies for economic recovery, including changes in the organisational networks and marketing symbols and ideologies as “commodities”.

  9. Entre el textil y el ámbar: Las funciones psicosociales del trabajo artesanal en artesanos tsotsiles de La Ilusión, Chiapas, México

    Perla Shiomara Del Carpio Ovando

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to study the psychosocial functions of the artisan work made by indigenous artisans from a Tsotsil community in Chiapas, Mexico. The analysis of handicrafts encourages reflection on economic aspects in intimate relation with cultural and psychosocial elements. It is argued that those who work on the production of handicrafts face many difficulties such as precariousness, little social recognition, discrimination and exclusion. Despite this all, handicrafts contribute to the economic, social and cultural reproduction of those who make them. Also, handicrafts are privileged elements as they are vehicles of multiple social, historical and group belonging meanings through which is possible to “track” processes of social transformation. Based on the findings obtained while conducting field work in Chiapas, a model of the psychosocial functions of the indigenous artisan work is proposed in this dissertation.

  10. Caracterización de agricultores de maíz en el estado de Chiapas, México

    Sánchez, Blanca Isabel; Kallas, Zein; Gil Roig, José María

    2015-01-01

    México es uno de los países con mayor producción de maíz en el mundo (22.6 millones de toneladas), el estado de Chiapas cuenta con la mayor superficie sembrada. No obstante, históricamente los agricultores de esta zona se caracterizan por bajos rendimientos (2 tha-1) comparados con la media nacional. Las instituciones públicas se han planteado analizar estrategias y políticas para la adopción de semillas mejoradas que aumenten la eficiencia y producción del cultivo. Esta investigación pretend...

  11. Artesanas y artesanías: indígenas y mestizas de Chiapas construyendo espacios de cambio

    María Teresa Ramos Maza

    2004-01-01

    El propósito de este artículo es mostrar que las mujeres indígenas artesanas y comerciantes mestizas de los Altos de Chiapas, han creado una nueva artesanía textil que se ha originado a partir de la conjunción de creatividades, intereses y habilidades de las artesanas tseltales y las comerciantes mestizas. Una de sus consecuencias es que se ha creado un espacio a través del cual han obtenido una mayor capacidad de tomar decisiones al interior de la familia, de manejar y controlar recursos, y ...

  12. Etnografía de una territorialidad sagrada. La apropiación del espacio por exrefugiados guatemaltecos en Trinitaria, Chiapas

    Enriqueta Lerma Rodríguez

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A partir del registro etnográfico, se aborda la construcción de la territorialidad sagrada en un asentamiento fundado durante el refugio de guatemaltecos en Chiapas, México. El objetivo es describir la ritualidad que actualmente realiza la población acateca de La Gloria, en el municipio de Trinitaria, para reivindicar su lugar de origen: San Miguel Acatán, en Huehuetenango, y sedimentar su apropiación territorial en Chiapas. Se analiza la importancia de la fiesta a San Miguel Arcángel, como continuidad de la identidad acateca, y la fiesta a la Virgen de la Candelaria, como forma de construir nuevas territorialidades sagradas. Con este análisis se muestra el proceso de hierofanización del territorio en contextos de movilidad.

  13. Programa de investigación interdisciplinario: desarrollo humano en Chiapas, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana (UAM), México

    Cortez Ruiz, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    En el estado de Chiapas se sintetizan algunos de los problemas más complejos a los que se enfrenta la sociedad mexicana en la búsqueda de una vía de desarrollo humano sostenible: • El estado tiene los más bajos niveles nacionales de desarrollo humano. • Existe una creciente polarización social y pobreza (amplios sectores de la población se enfrentan a la exclusión social, económica y política). • En Chiapas el 64,62% de la población es indígena. • Existe desde 1994 un conflict...

  14. Mortalidad infantil y migración en Chiapas, México

    Olga Lidia Lópes-Gonzáles

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo fue analizar, en términos causales, la relación entre mortalidad infantil y migración en cuatro zonas socioeconómicas de la región Soconusco en Chiapas, México. El análisis de este estudio se basó en los resultados de una encuesta socio demográfica y de salud con base poblacional (probabilística que se llevó a cabo en el Soconusco, Chiapas en 1996-97. Se contrastan zonas con distinta condición socioeconómica, cultural y productiva. Se realizó análisis de regresión lineal y logística para identificar el efecto de la migración y la mortalidad infantil, así como de la migración y la zona geográfica sobre la tasa de mortalidad infantil. Los datos muestran que aunque más del 70% de la varianza de la mortalidad infantil se explica por la migración, no existe evidencia de una relación causal concluyente. La relación identificada entre mortalidad infantil, migración y zonas geográficas orientan a una explicación alternativa. Planteamos la hipótesis de que en la región estudiada, la magnitud y características de la emigración, así como de las tasas de mortalidad infantil, son consecuencia de las condiciones de vulnerabilidad económica y social de las poblaciones.

  15. Mortalidad infantil y migración en Chiapas, México

    Olga Lidia Lópes-Gonzáles

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo fue analizar, en términos causales, la relación entre mortalidad infantil y migración en cuatro zonas socioeconómicas de la región Soconusco en Chiapas, México. El análisis de este estudio se basó en los resultados de una encuesta socio demográfica y de salud con base poblacional (probabilística que se llevó a cabo en el Soconusco, Chiapas en 1996-97. Se contrastan zonas con distinta condición socioeconómica, cultural y productiva. Se realizó análisis de regresión lineal y logística para identificar el efecto de la migración y la mortalidad infantil, así como de la migración y la zona geográfica sobre la tasa de mortalidad infantil. Los datos muestran que aunque más del 70% de la varianza de la mortalidad infantil se explica por la migración, no existe evidencia de una relación causal concluyente. La relación identificada entre mortalidad infantil, migración y zonas geográficas orientan a una explicación alternativa. Planteamos la hipótesis de que en la región estudiada, la magnitud y características de la emigración, así como de las tasas de mortalidad infantil, son consecuencia de las condiciones de vulnerabilidad económica y social de las poblaciones.

  16. Desigualdad de género y muerte de niños en Ocotepec, Chiapas

    Cortez Gómez, Renata Gabriela

    2017-01-01

    Resumen: El objetivo de este artículo es analizar cómo la desigualdad de género afecta las trayectorias de atención de niños menores de cinco años que fallecieron por causas prevenibles en el periodo 2005-2010 en Ocotepec, Chiapas. Se emplea un enfoque de género constructivista-relacional para demostrar que la atención médica de los niños está mediada por los acuerdos y desacuerdos entre el padre, la madre y la familia extensa, situación que se torna más problemática cuando las mujeres sufren...

  17. Firewood deficit in coffee communities of Chenalhó, Chiapas

    Juan Manuel Ramírez López

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Firewood is the main energy source for many indigenous communities in Mexico. We studied the relationship between consumption and availability of firewood in a group of coffee producers and describe their strategies developed to meet the shortfall in supply of firewood in eight coffee communities of Chenalho, Chiapas. The analysis included participatory workshops, interviews, direct measurement of consumption, collection and botanical identification of plant material of species used for firewood. The consumption of firewood varied between 3.7 ± 1.5 to 3.9 ± 2.7 kg person -1 days-1. In general, families with more members optimize the use of fuel to reduce the rate of consumption per capita, families with 10 to 12 members take up to 55% less in relation to families of 2-4 people. The loss of original vegetation cover has resulted in a dearth of species traditionally used for firewood (eg., oaks as now used species from agroforestry systems to meet the demand for firewood. Actions to reduce consumption are limited to keep the fire off when not in use in food preparation and use of devices to reduce the time of preparation of “tortillas”. Although some families have adopted theuse of saving stoves as a strategy to reduce consumption found not found significant differences (p> 0.05 in relation to consumption using the traditional stove (4.1 ± 1.7 vs. 3.7 ± 1.5 kg person-1 days-1, respectively. Although the coffeeplantations are ongoing source of supply of firewood, they do not meet the demands, so that some families must buy investing $1631 ± 1203 Mexican pesos yearly. It is envisaged that the firewood deficit will worsen in coming years giventhe increase in population density, the floristic impoverishment, continued deforestation and forest fragmentation. There is low potential for wood energy plantations in current areas of coffee production, while they do not outweigh the economic benefits obtained from the coffee.

  18. Estrategia educativa para incrementar el cumplimiento del régimen antituberculoso en Chiapas, México

    Guadalupe del Carmen Álvarez Gordillo

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Aplicar un plan de capacitación para médicos y pacientes y evaluar su eficacia en términos del cumplimiento por parte de los pacientes del tratamiento contra la tuberculosis pulmonar en la región fronteriza de Chiapas, México. MÉTODOS: Se realizó un estudio de intervención controlado en pacientes mayores de 15 años con tuberculosis pulmonar diagnosticada por baciloscopia entre el 1 de febrero de 2001 y el 31 de enero de 2002 en unidades de salud seleccionadas al azar en la región fronteriza de Chiapas, México. La muestra estuvo formada por pacientes que acudieron por demanda de consulta en ese período a 23 y 25 unidades de salud para cada uno de los grupos en estudio: intervención y control, respectivamente. En el grupo de intervención se aplicó un plan de capacitación para el personal de salud en el que se abordaron los aspectos sociales, culturales y económicos de la tuberculosis; las bases teóricas y prácticas del diagnóstico y el tratamiento de la enfermedad y la formación de grupos de autoayuda. También se formaron grupos de autoayuda para todos los pacientes que acudieron a las 23 unidades del grupo de intervención. A todos los pacientes se les administró un régimen terapéutico abreviado con isoniacida, rifampicina, pirazinamida y etambutol durante 25 semanas, hasta completar 105 dosis. El seguimiento de los pacientes se extendió hasta el mes de diciembre de 2003. Los grupos de intervención y control se compararon mediante la prueba de la ji al cuadrado y se empleó la prueba de la t de Student para comparar las medias. Se calculó el riesgo relativo (RR de no cumplir y sus intervalos de confianza de 95% (IC95%. RESULTADOS: En la investigación participaron 87 pacientes: 44 en el grupo sometido a intervención y 43 en el grupo de control. El cumplimiento del tratamiento fue significativamente mayor en el grupo que recibió la intervención que en el grupo que sirvió de control (97,7% frente a 81

  19. Agrarian Structure and Labor Migration in Rural Mexico: The Case of Circular Migration of Undocumented Workers to the U.S.

    1980-07-01

    States. Ojeda emphasizes, "the great majority of migrants do not come from the poorest states such as Oaxaca, Chiapas , or Guerrero, but with the exception...the poorest and most isolated regions of Mexico, such as are found in other areas of Oaxaca, Chiapas , and Guerrero. Examination of the patterns of off...technology, dominated by textiles woven at home or in local shops, and brickmaking. Thus the occupational composition of the zone is similar to that

  20. Interruption of transmission of Onchocerca volvulus in the Southern Chiapas Focus, México.

    Mario A Rodríguez-Pérez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Southern Chiapas focus of onchocerciasis in Southern Mexico represents one of the major onchocerciasis foci in Latin America. All 559 endemic communities of this focus have undergone semi-annual mass treatment with ivermectin since 1998. In 50 communities of this focus, ivermectin frequency shifted from twice to four times a year in 2003; an additional 113 communities were added to the quarterly treatment regimen in 2009 to achieve a rapid suppression of transmission. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In-depth epidemiologic and entomologic assessments were performed in six sentinel communities (which had undergone 2 rounds of ivermectin treatment per year and three extra-sentinel communities (which had undergone 4 rounds of ivermectin treatment per year. None of the 67,924 Simulium ochraceum s.l. collected from this focus during the dry season of 2011 were found to contain parasite DNA when tested by polymerase chain reaction-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (PCR-ELISA, resulting in an upper bound of the 95% confidence interval (95%-ULCI of the infective rate in the vectors of 0.06/2,000 flies examined. Serological assays testing for Onchocerca volvulus exposure conducted on 4,230 children 5 years of age and under (of a total population of 10,280 in this age group revealed that 2/4,230 individuals were exposed to O. volvulus (0.05%; one sided 95% confidence interval = 0.08%. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The in-depth epidemiological and entomological findings from the Southern Chiapas focus meet the criteria for interruption of transmission developed by the international community.

  1. Interruption of Transmission of Onchocerca volvulus in the Southern Chiapas Focus, México

    Rodríguez-Pérez, Mario A.; Domínguez-Vázquez, Alfredo; Unnasch, Thomas R.; Hassan, Hassan K.; Arredondo-Jiménez, Juan I.; Orozco-Algarra, María Eugenia; Rodríguez-Morales, Kristel B.; Rodríguez-Luna, Isabel C.; Prado-Velasco, Francisco Gibert

    2013-01-01

    Background The Southern Chiapas focus of onchocerciasis in Southern Mexico represents one of the major onchocerciasis foci in Latin America. All 559 endemic communities of this focus have undergone semi-annual mass treatment with ivermectin since 1998. In 50 communities of this focus, ivermectin frequency shifted from twice to four times a year in 2003; an additional 113 communities were added to the quarterly treatment regimen in 2009 to achieve a rapid suppression of transmission. Methodology/Principal findings In-depth epidemiologic and entomologic assessments were performed in six sentinel communities (which had undergone 2 rounds of ivermectin treatment per year) and three extra-sentinel communities (which had undergone 4 rounds of ivermectin treatment per year). None of the 67,924 Simulium ochraceum s.l. collected from this focus during the dry season of 2011 were found to contain parasite DNA when tested by polymerase chain reaction-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (PCR-ELISA), resulting in an upper bound of the 95% confidence interval (95%-ULCI) of the infective rate in the vectors of 0.06/2,000 flies examined. Serological assays testing for Onchocerca volvulus exposure conducted on 4,230 children 5 years of age and under (of a total population of 10,280 in this age group) revealed that 2/4,230 individuals were exposed to O. volvulus (0.05%; one sided 95% confidence interval = 0.08%). Conclusions/Significance The in-depth epidemiological and entomological findings from the Southern Chiapas focus meet the criteria for interruption of transmission developed by the international community. PMID:23556018

  2. Una Normal y un Método. La iniciativa de Fray Matías de Córdova en Chiapas (1828

    Morelos Torres Aguilar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available El art culo es producto de una investigaci n m s amplia sobre las iniciativas de ense anza que fueron realizadas en el Estado de Chiapas, en M xico, durante el siglo XIX, y se centra en la idea que dio origen a la Escuela Normal de Ense anza Primaria, fundada en Ciudad Real por fray Mat as de C rdova en 1828. El principal objetivo de la investigaci n consiste en conocer, describir, analizar y comprender las principales caracter sticas de esta instituci n, as como el m todo de lectoescritura inventado por su fundador, el cual fue aplicado con xito en la misma. Un segundo prop sito consiste en contextualizar dicha escuela normal respecto a otras que surgieron en M xico durante el mismo per odo, como la de Oaxaca o Zacatecas. Por ltimo, se pretende relacionar esta iniciativa con las tendencias educativas de la poca, en particular con la Escuela Lancasteriana, y asimismo analizar su trascendencia. El m todo utilizado consisti en una UHYLVLyQ GRFXPHQWDO ELEOLRJUi FD \\ KHPHURJUi FD VREUH HO WHPD FRQ HO PDUFR te rico de la historia institucional, la nueva historia de las ideas pedag gicas -a partir del planteamiento de Antonio Novoa-, y un modelo hermen utico que permiti profundizar en las caracter sticas de la primera Normal de Chiapas. A partir de la investigaci n se puede concluir que aunque la Normal solo funcion durante un corto tiempo, el m todo de ense anza de Mat as de C rdova que le dio fundamento tuvo una amplia trascendencia, pues se sigui empleando a lo largo del siglo XIX e incluso a principios del XX, tanto en el Estado de Chiapas como en otros lugares de M xico. De esta manera, la investigaci n aporta conocimientos relevantes sobre la historia de la educaci n en el Estado de Chiapas en la primera mitad del siglo XIX.

  3. Desigualdad de género y muerte de niños en Ocotepec, Chiapas

    Renata Gabriela Cortez Gómez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este artículo es analizar cómo la desigualdad de género afecta las trayectorias de atención de niños menores de cinco años que fallecieron por causas prevenibles en el periodo 2005-2010 en Ocotepec, Chiapas. Se emplea un enfoque de género constructivista-relacional para demostrar que la atención médica de los niños está mediada por los acuerdos y desacuerdos entre el padre, la madre y la familia extensa, siendo más problemática cuando las mujeres sufren violencia de género.

  4. Textiles para turistas: tejedoras y comerciantes en los Altos de Chiapas

    Eugenia Bayona Escat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available El presente trabajo indaga en el papel que ocupan las mujeres indígenas como productoras y vendedoras de piezas textiles, consideradas artesanales y de tradición indígena, con alta demanda en el mercado turístico de la región de los Altos de Chiapas, México. La presencia del turismo en la zona ha provocado la consolidación de un complejo mercado local de textiles en el que se entrelazan tejedoras, distribuidoras y comerciantes, cadenas mercantiles y múltiples espacios de venta. A través de este protagonismo femenino y de la comercialización de lo “indígena”, el trabajo indaga en un contexto local que permite a las mujeres indígenas tomar nuevas posiciones sociales a la vez que integra aspectos globales sobre mercancías e imaginarios sociales.

  5. Vulnerabilidad suicida en localidades rurales de Chiapas: una aproximación etnográfica

    Gracia Imberton Deneke

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se examina la dimensión social de la muerte autoinflingida en las localidades Río Grande y Cantioc del estado de Chiapas, México, y propongo una aproximación etnográfica para su análisis. Consciente de las dificultades metodológicas que entraña la construcción tanto de los datos empíricos del suicidio como de sus explicaciones causales, planteo que un acercamiento al contexto histórico del espacio social en cuestión y a las condiciones de vida actuales de la población permite derivar algunas correlaciones entre posiciones sociales, tensiones y conflictos, y vulnerabilidad suicida.

  6. Vulnerabilidad suicida en localidades rurales de Chiapas: una aproximación etnográfica

    Gracia Imberton Deneke

    2014-01-01

    En este artículo se examina la dimensión social de la muerte autoinflingida en las localidades Río Grande y Cantioc del estado de Chiapas, México, y propongo una aproximación etnográfica para su análisis. Consciente de las dificultades metodológicas que entraña la construcción tanto de los datos empíricos del suicidio como de sus explicaciones causales, planteo que un acercamiento al contexto histórico del espacio social en cuestión y a las condiciones de vida actuales de la población permite...

  7. Análisis de convergencia económica en el interior de Chiapas: municipios, regiones e inconsistencias aparentes

    Jorge Alberto LÓPEZ ARÉVALO

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A partir de los datos de ingreso per cápita anual estimados por el Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Desarrollo (PNUD en la elaboración del índice de desarrollo humano municipal en México, se comprueba que, en el interior de Chiapas durante el periodo 2000- 2005, se dio un proceso de fuerte convergencia a nivel municipal al tiempo que no hubo convergencia regional. Para explicar esta aparente inconsistencia, se reexamina el artículo «Regression towards mediocrity in hereditary stature» publicado por Galton en 1886, concluyendo que el nivel de agrupación de los datos (municipal o regional condiciona los resultados del análisis de convergencia, ya que la agrupación de los municipios en regiones origina pérdidas de información que pueden generar fenómenos de «regresión hacia la media» o justo lo contrario, como es el caso. En Chiapas, la convergencia municipal habría dado lugar a la convergencia dentro de las regiones, pero no entre regiones.

  8. La familia Apocynaceae sensu lato en México: diversidad y distribución The family Apocynaceae sensu lato in Mexico: diversity and distribution

    Verónica Juárez-Jaimes

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available La familia Apocynaceae s.l. se ubica entre las 15 familias más diversas de México, con 385 especies repartidas en 50 géneros y 3 subfamilias, de las cuales Asclepiadoideae es la de mayor diversidad en géneros, especies y endemismos. Los géneros con más especies nativas (y endémicas son Asclepias y Matelea. Los estados más ricos en diversidad de taxones son los ubicados en ambas vertientes; destacan Chiapas, Guerrero, Oaxaca y Veracruz. Por su número de especies, sobresalen el bosque tropical caducifolio y los matorrales xerófilos. Del total de especies, 176 son endémicas de México. Se presenta la lista de especies registradas, señalándose su distribución por estados.Apocynaceae s.l. is among the 15 most diverse families in Mexico, with a total of 385 species, distributed in 50 genera and 3 subfamilies of which Asclepiadoideae is the most diverse in numbers of genera, species and endemics. The genera with the most native species and endemics are Asclepias and Matelea. The richest states in terms of taxon diversity are those at the Pacific and Atlantic slopes, Chiapas, Oaxaca, Guerrero and Veracruz being the most prominent. Tropical deciduous forest and arid tropical scrub are the most important vegetation types by their total number of species, 176 of which are endemic to Mexico. A list of species recorded in México is provided, indicating their state distribution.

  9. CERN servers go to Mexico

    Stefania Pandolfi

    2015-01-01

    On Wednesday, 26 August, 384 servers from the CERN Computing Centre were donated to the Faculty of Science in Physics and Mathematics (FCFM) and the Mesoamerican Centre for Theoretical Physics (MCTP) at the University of Chiapas, Mexico.   CERN’s Director-General, Rolf Heuer, met the Mexican representatives in an official ceremony in Building 133, where the servers were prepared for shipment. From left to right: Frédéric Hemmer, CERN IT Department Head; Raúl Heredia Acosta, Deputy Permanent Representative of Mexico to the United Nations and International Organizations in Geneva; Jorge Castro-Valle Kuehne, Ambassador of Mexico to the Swiss Confederation and the Principality of Liechtenstein; Rolf Heuer, CERN Director-General; Luis Roberto Flores Castillo, President of the Swiss Chapter of the Global Network of Qualified Mexicans Abroad; Virginia Romero Tellez, Coordinator of Institutional Relations of the Swiss Chapter of the Global Network of Qualified Me...

  10. Acción pública y desarrollo social en el sureste de México: la Agenda Chiapas-ONU

    Luis Rodríguez Castillo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available En esta colaboración presento diferentes interpretaciones y acciones en torno a la Agenda Chiapas-ONU, sustentada idealmente en los Objetivos de Desarrollo del Milenio. La estrategia de comunicación social del gobierno del estado generó una relación metonímica entre esta política y el programa Ciudades Rurales Sustentables. Desde una perspectiva antropológica, documento los conocimientos y valoraciones, así como los comportamientos de diversos agentes, que se alinean en torno a proyectos a favor o en contra de esas políticas —la Agenda Chiapas-ONU y el programa Ciudades Rurales Sustentables—.

  11. The drive for accumulation: environmental contestation and agrarian support to Mexico's oil palm expansion

    Castellanos Navarrete, A.; Jansen, K.

    2013-01-01

    Oil palm expansion has been related to rural dispossession, environmental degradation and rural resistance. This paper explores the politics and impact of farmer-based oil palm expansion in Chiapas, Mexico. In relation to the debate on the greening of the agrarian question, this paper engages with

  12. Cultural Capital and Innovative Pedagogy: A Case Study among Indigenous Communities in Mexico and Honduras

    Gregorcic, Marta

    2009-01-01

    This article introduces case studies of innovative approaches to pedagogy among indigenous Mayan communities in Chiapas (Mexico) and Lencan communities in Intibuca (Honduras). Innovative approaches to researching alternative theories and practices of pedagogy are used by the author to develop an epistemology of critical pedagogy and its potential…

  13. Socio-spatial gender relations and women’s participation in the Maize Merged with Fruit Trees Project in Chiapas

    Arli Juárez Paulín

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes from a spatial and gender perspective the experience of the “Maize Merged with Fruit Trees” project in Chiapas, Mexico. Its objective is to make visible the ways in which gender relations materialize in space and are translated into opportunities and/or socio-territorial boundaries for women’s participation in production support programs. A qualitative methodology was used that included: participant observation, interviews, participatory workshops and participatory mapping. The results show the duality of processes that women face as a consequence of their incorporation into the project, as while they question and renegotiate their gendered situations, they also face subordination associated with the superficial role for women reproduced within the same organizational dynamic.

  14. Que La Tortilla Se Vuelvai A History of U.S. Agribusiness Companies in Mexico. (May the Tortilla Return! A History of U.S. Agribusiness Companies in Mexico.)

    Murdy, Jack

    1978-01-01

    There is a direct link, today and historically, between Mexico's underdevelopment and maldistribution of wealth, and U.S. domination of Mexico's economy, including the current penetration by U.S. transnationals. Activity in the food production and processing industries is just one facet of the total picture, but one of the most important.…

  15. Ecoturismo y el trabajo invisibilizado de las mujeres en la Selva Lacandona, Chiapas, México

    Gloria Mariel Suárez Gutiérrez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available El presente artículo analiza la situación de invisibilización de las mujeres respecto a la actividad ecoturística, observando efectos que mantienen los estereotipos de género dentro de la actividad ecoturística como una alternativa económica y social para las mujeres. Se busca señalar desde la planificación de los centros, la diferenciación de género a través de los procesos sociales, y que son trasladados al marco laboral de los centros ecoturísticos, con base en un análisis de dos dimensiones (comunidad y centro ecoturístico, los cuales permiten analizar las relaciones de género y cómo éstas se transforman en cada dimensión. En particular se estudian dos centros ecoturísticos: Top Che en Lacanja-Chansayab y Las Guacamayas en Marqués de Comillas, Chiapas, México. Se utilizan métodos de corte cualitativo basados en el modelo propuesto hacia las dos dimensiones, con ayuda de herramientas como la observación participante, entrevistas semiestructuradas y talleres participativos. Los resultados indican la presencia de los estereotipos de género dentro de las actividades ecoturísticas de los centros, evidentes en las dobles jornadas por parte de las mujeres, se observa cómo se mantiene la división de trabajo en la relación productivo-reproductivo. No obstante, se percibe que las mujeres encuentran en el ecoturismo un nuevo espacio para el emprendimiento económico y social, modificando actitudes, manera de ser y hacer, así como roles y uso del tiempo dentro de las dos dimensiones de estudio planteados.

  16. The Lost Path: Regulating Transit Illegal Immigration on Mexico’s Southern Border

    2014-12-01

    Latinoamericana de Ciencias Sociales, August 2013), 160. 7 George W. Grayson, “Mexico’s Forgotten Southern Border: Does Mexico Practice at Home What...Migraciones en el Sur de México y Centroamérica (Universidad de Ciencias y Artes de Chiapas, 2008), 239. 243 Cervera, “ La Otra Frontera,” 144. 244...Tensiones entre los Derechos Humanos, Ley y Justicia,” in Migraciones en el Sur de México y Centroamérica (Universidad de Ciencias y Artes de Chiapas

  17. Hábitat y distribución de cinco especies de Quercus (Fagaceae) en la Meseta Central de Chiapas, México

    J.G. Alvarez-Moctezuma; S. Ochoa-Gaona; B.H.J. de Jong; M.L. Soto-Pinto

    1999-01-01

    El objetivo de este trabajo fue describir el hábitat de las especies del subgénero Lepidobalanus en la Meseta Central de Chiapas e identificar las principales variables que condicionan su distribución. En 258 parcelas se utilizó un índice de dominancia, basado en la abundancia y cobertura de las especies, para conocer la distribución de Quercus peduncularis, Q. polymorpha, Q. rugosa, Q. sebifera y Q. segoviensis. Además se midieron las variables ambientales: altitud, precipitación de noviembr...

  18. Entre el textil y el ámbar : las funciones psicosociales del trabajo artesanal en artesanos tsotsiles de la ilusión, Chiapas, México

    Carpio Ovando, Perla Shiomara Del

    2012-01-01

    Esta investigación tiene como objetivo principal el estudio de las funciones psicosociales del trabajo artesanal que realizan artesanos indígenas de una comunidad tsotsil de Chiapas, México. Constata esta tesis que el análisis de las artesanías invita a reflexionar necesariamente sobre aspectos económicos en íntima relación con aspectos de índole cultural y psicosocial. Se defiende aquí que quienes se dedican a la producción de artesanías enfrentan múltiples dificultades dentro de las que sob...

  19. "Sin música no hay fiesta, no hay nada": aproximaciones a las expresiones musicales indígenas en Chiapas

    Marina Alonso Bolaños

    2012-01-01

    Desde un enfoque antropológico del arte y la estética, en este artículo se exploran las posibilidades para abordar aspectos de la constitución de las expresiones musicales indígenas contemporáneas del estado del Chiapas, en el sureste de México. Se discuten también, las perspectivas indígenas acerca de los procesos de creación musical (interpretación y transmisión-aprendizaje), el papel de los instrumentos musicales y en la audiencia, así como la coexistencia de los distintos estilos y formas...

  20. The Effect of Saturation on the Slope Sliding in the San Juan de Grijalva Comunity, Chiapas

    Mora-Ortiz R.S.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of slopes that have been stable during many years may fail when an extraordinary rain period occurs. This phenomenon involves not only the lithology, the geometric and the mechanical characteristics of the slope but also the rain-evaporation-infiltration regime of the site. In this paper, the stability of a slope in the comunity of San Juan de Grijalva, Ostuacán, Chiapas (Mexico that failed during an intense raining period is analyzed. The volume of this slide was over 5 millions of cubics meters of soil and it produced the obstruction of the Grijalva river. The stratigraphic and geometric properties of the slope were determined and undisturbed samples were obtained in the site to determine the mechanical properties of the material. The stability analysis considered the variation of the cohesion of the soil caused by wetting and it was possible to observe the evolution of the safety factor with the water content of the material. Through the analysis of the rain infiltration and the stability of the slope, it has been possible to reproduce the failure process.