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Sample records for chest

  1. Chest MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclear magnetic resonance - chest; Magnetic resonance imaging - chest; NMR - chest; MRI of the thorax; Thoracic MRI ... healthy enough to filter the contrast. During the MRI, the person who operates the machine will watch ...

  2. Chest drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Chris

    2014-07-15

    As an intensive care nurse with experience of caring for critically ill patients in the UK and on deployed operations overseas, I found the CPD article useful in reviewing the pathophysiology of a pneumothorax, use of intrapleural chest drains, observations that should be recorded, and nursing care and management of a patient with an intrapleural chest drain. Reflecting on the time out activities in the CPD article was valuable. PMID:25005418

  3. What Is Chest MRI?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Chest MRI? Chest MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) is a safe, noninvasive test. "Noninvasive" means that ... your chest wall, heart, and blood vessels. Chest MRI uses radio waves, magnets, and a computer to ...

  4. The chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiographic interpretation of chest films of newborns in respiratory distress remains one of the most difficult aspects of pediatric radiology. Complex pulmonary and cardiac adjustments to extrauterine life are rapidly taking place. The small, fluid-filled fetal lung must rid itself of fluid and fill with air. The high vascular resistance of the fetal pulmonary bed and the open ductus arteriosus allow shunting of blood in both directions. Films taken in this period of time may show lungs that resemble those seen in congestive heart failure or fluid overload. When these findings are observed in infants who may appear dusky or even cyanotic, the result may be the diagnosis of disease in normal infants passing through a stormy transition period. To make things worse, the films are taken as portable surpine films, usually in an isolette in the intensive care unit (ICU). The phase of respiration is difficult, if not impossible, to control, and lateral films are usually not obtained. Many of the infants are on assisted ventilation either by tube or nasal prongs-nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP)-and lungs can appear over-inflated or whited out, depending on the pressures used and the phase of the respiratory cycle. Prolonged crying itself can make lungs appear semiopaque; the next breath may show such a dramatic reinflation that it is hard to believe the two films are of the same infant, made only seconds apart. Is the heart large? Or is it the thymus? Are the lungs ''wet''? Is there infection? Is there pulmonary vascular engorgement? Why are these films so hard to interpret? They have no easy answers. The radiologist must realize that the neonatal intensive care personnel, armed though they may be with blood gas values, are no better at interpreting films. If anything, they read into them what they wish to see

  5. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by: Image/Video Gallery Your radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, ... you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most commonly performed ...

  6. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... chest x-ray is used to evaluate the lungs, heart and chest wall and may be used ... diagnose and monitor treatment for a variety of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A ...

  7. Chest computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loeve, Martine; Krestin, Gabriel P.; Rosenfeld, Margaret;

    2013-01-01

    are not suitable to study CF lung disease in young children. Chest computed tomography (CT) holds great promise for use as a sensitive surrogate endpoint in CF. A large body of evidence has been produced to validate the use of chest CT as primary endpoint to study CF lung disease. However, before chest CT can...

  8. Chest x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chest radiography; Serial chest x-ray; X-ray - chest ... You stand in front of the x-ray machine. You will be told to hold your breath when the x-ray is taken. Two images are usually taken. You will ...

  9. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... this Site RadiologyInfo.org is produced by: Image/Video Gallery Your radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript ... time! Spotlight Recently posted: Pediatric MRI Intravascular Ultrasound Video: Chest CT Video:Thyroid Ultrasound Video: Head CT ...

  10. Learning chest imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedrozo Pupo, John C. (ed.) [Magdalena Univ., Santa Maria (Colombia). Respire - Inst. for Respiratory Care

    2013-03-01

    Useful learning tool for practitioners and students. Overview of the imaging techniques used in chest radiology. Aid to the correct interpretation of chest X-ray images. Radiology of the thorax forms an indispensable element of the basic diagnostic process for many conditions and is of key importance in a variety of medical disciplines. This user-friendly book provides an overview of the imaging techniques used in chest radiology and presents numerous instructive case-based images with accompanying explanatory text. A wide range of clinical conditions and circumstances are covered with the aim of enabling the reader to confidently interpret chest images by correctly identifying structures of interest and the causes of abnormalities. This book, which will be an invaluable learning tool, forms part of the Learning Imaging series for medical students, residents, less experienced radiologists, and other medical staff. Learning Imaging is a unique case-based series for those in professional education in general and for physicians in prarticular.

  11. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... However, it’s important to consider the likelihood of benefit to your health. While a chest x-ray use a tiny dose of ionizing radiation, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs any risk. ...

  12. Digital chest radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debess, Jeanne Elisabeth; Johnsen, Karen Kirstine; Thomsen, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chest radiography is one of the most common examinations in radiology departments. In 2013 approximately 80,000 chest x-rays were performed on women in the fertile age. Even low dose for the examinationCorrect collimation Purpose: Quality improvement of basic radiography focusing...... on collimation and dose reduction in digital chest radiography Methods and Materials A retrospective study of digital chest radiography is performed to evaluate the primary x-ray tube collimation of the PA and lateral radiographs. Data from one hundred fifty self-reliant female patients between 15 and 55 years...... of age are included in the study. The clinical research is performed between September and November 2014 where 3rd year Radiography students collect data on four Danish x-ray departments using identical procedures under guidance of clinical supervisors. Optimal collimation is determined by European...

  13. Management of chest keloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim June Kyu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Keloid formation is one of the most challenging clinical problems in wound healing. With increasing frequency of open heart surgery, chest keloid formations are not infrequent in the clinical practice. The numerous treatment methods including surgical excision, intralesional steroid injection, radiation therapy, laser therapy, silicone gel sheeting, and pressure therapy underscore how little is understood about keloids. Keloids have a tendency to recur after surgical excision as a single treatment. Stretching tension is clearly associated with keloid generation, as keloids tend to occur on high tension sites such as chest region. The authors treated 58 chest keloid patients with surgical excision followed by intraoperative and postoperative intralesional steroid injection. Even with minor complications and recurrences, our protocol results in excellent outcomes in cases of chest keloids.

  14. Digital chest radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debess, Jeanne Elisabeth; Vejle-Sørensen, Jens Kristian; Thomsen, Henrik;

    2015-01-01

    of clinical supervisors. Optimal collimation is determined by European and Regional Danish guidelines. The areal between current and optimal collimation is calculated. The experimental research is performed in September - October 2014 Siemens Axiom Aristos digital radiography system DR using 150 kV, 1,25 -3......Purpose: Quality improvement of basic radiography focusing on collimation and dose reduction in digital chest radiography Methods and Materials:A retrospective study of digital chest radiography is performed to evaluate the primary x-ray tube collimation of the PA and lateral radiographs. Data from...

  15. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pediatric Ultrasound Video: Angioplasty & vascular stenting Video: Arthrography Radiology and You About this Site RadiologyInfo.org is ... radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, I’m Dr. Geoffrey ...

  16. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... this Site RadiologyInfo.org is produced by: Image/Video Gallery Your radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript ... Recently posted: Focused Ultrasound for Uterine Fibroids Dementia Video: General Ultrasound Video: Pediatric Nuclear Medicine Radiology and ...

  17. Sandstorm in the chest?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talluri MR

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A 32 year old female presented with dry cough and progressive breathlessness of one year duration. There was no history suggestive of collagen vascular disease, lung parenchymal infection or allergic airway disease. Clinical evaluation showed basal fine inspiratory crepitations. Radiographic examination of the chest revealed a black pleura line and lung parenchymal calcification. CT scan of the chest demonstrated nodular calcification of lung parenchyma with a “crazy pavement” pattern, which is suggestive of alveolar calcification. Pulmonary function test showed a severe restrictive defect. On transbronchial lung biopsy calcific spherules suggestive of the alveolar microlithiasis were seen. Diagnosis of pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis was made and symptomatic treatment was given, as there is no specific therapy available. The case illustrates an unusual cause of shortness of breath in a young female with striking radiographic features.

  18. CHEST PHYSIOTHERAPY FOR INFANTS

    OpenAIRE

    Preeti S. Christian (M.P.T Cardiopulmonary Conditions)

    2014-01-01

    In the normal lung, secretions are removed by Mucociliary activity, normal breathing cycles, and cough. In disease, increased secretion viscosity and volume, dyskinesia of the cilia, and ineffective cough combine to reduce the ability to clear secretions, and may increase exacerbations and infections. Many chest physiotherapy techniques like postural drainage, percussion and vibration are used since many years. These techniques are derived from adult studies but these techniques are quite str...

  19. The neonatal chest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobo, Luisa [Servico de Imagiologia Geral do Hospital de Santa Maria, Av. Prof. Egas Moniz, 1649-035 Lisbon (Portugal)]. E-mail: mluisalobo@gmail.com

    2006-11-15

    Lung diseases represent one of the most life threatening conditions in the newborn. Important progresses in modern perinatal care has resulted in a significantly improved survival and decreased morbidity, in both term and preterm infants. Most of these improvements are directly related to the better management of neonatal lung conditions, and infants of very low gestational ages are now surviving. This article reviews the common spectrum of diseases of the neonatal lung, including medical and surgical conditions, with emphasis to the radiological contribution in the evaluation and management of these infants. Imaging evaluation of the neonatal chest, including the assessment of catheters, lines and tubes are presented.

  20. The neonatal chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung diseases represent one of the most life threatening conditions in the newborn. Important progresses in modern perinatal care has resulted in a significantly improved survival and decreased morbidity, in both term and preterm infants. Most of these improvements are directly related to the better management of neonatal lung conditions, and infants of very low gestational ages are now surviving. This article reviews the common spectrum of diseases of the neonatal lung, including medical and surgical conditions, with emphasis to the radiological contribution in the evaluation and management of these infants. Imaging evaluation of the neonatal chest, including the assessment of catheters, lines and tubes are presented

  1. American College of Chest Physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... American College of Chest Physicians and Sunovion announce strategic initiative focused on the importance of drug delivery in the management of COPD Sunovion Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (Sunovion) and the ...

  2. Radiology illustrated. Chest radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung Soo [Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology; Han, Joungho [Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Pathology; Chung, Man Pyo [Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Medicine; Jeong, Yeon Joo [Pusan National Univ. Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology

    2014-04-01

    Pattern approach to the diagnosis of lung diseases based on CT scan appearances. Guide to quick and reliable differential diagnosis. CT-pathology correlation. Emphasis on state-of-the-art MDCT. The purpose of this atlas is to illustrate how to achieve reliable diagnoses when confronted by the different abnormalities, or ''disease patterns'', that may be visualized on CT scans of the chest. The task of pattern recognition has been greatly facilitated by the advent of multidetector CT (MDCT), and the focus of the book is very much on the role of state-of-the-art MDCT. A wide range of disease patterns and distributions are covered, with emphasis on the typical imaging characteristics of the various focal and diffuse lung diseases. In addition, clinical information relevant to differential diagnosis is provided and the underlying gross and microscopic pathology is depicted, permitting CT-pathology correlation. The entire information relevant to each disease pattern is also tabulated for ease of reference. This book will be an invaluable handy tool that will enable the reader to quickly and easily reach a diagnosis appropriate to the pattern of lung abnormality identified on CT scans.

  3. Chest radiographic findings of leptospirosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mee Hyun; Jung, Hee Tae; Lee, Young Joong; Yoon, Jong Sup [Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-04-15

    1. A study on chest radiographic findings of 54 cases with pneumonia like symptoms was performed. Of 54 cases, 8 cases were confirmed to be leptospirosis and 7 cases were leptospirosis combined with Korean hemorrhagic fever. 2. Of 8 cases of leptospirosis, 4 cases showed abnormal chest radiographic findings: acinar nodular type 2, massive confluent consolidation type 2. Of 7 cases of leptospirosis combined with Korean hemorrhagic fever: acinar nodular type 3, massive confluent consolidation type 1, and increased interstitial markings type 1 respectively. 3. It was considered to be difficult to diagnose the leptospirosis on chest radiographic findings alone, especially the case combined with Korean hemorrhagic fever.

  4. Interpretation of neonatal chest radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hye Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Kangwon National University Hospital, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Plain radiographs for infants in the neonatal intensive care unit are obtained using the portable X-ray equipment in order to evaluate the neonatal lungs and also to check the position of the tubes and catheters used for monitoring critically-ill neonates. Neonatal respiratory distress is caused by a variety of medical or surgical disease conditions. Clinical information about the gestational week, respiratory symptoms, and any events during delivery is essential for interpretation of the neonatal chest radiographs. Awareness of common chest abnormality in the prematurely born or term babies is also very important for chest evaluation in the newborn. Furthermore, knowledge about complications such as air leaks and bronchopulmonary dysplasia following treatment are required to accurately inform the clinicians. The purpose of this article was to briefly review radiographic findings of chest diseases in newborns that are relatively common in daily practice.

  5. Chest Pain (Beyond the Basics)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... number of problems related to the stomach and intestines can cause pain that spreads to or even begins in the chest, including ulcers, gallbladder disease, pancreatitis, and irritable bowel syndrome. (See "Patient information: Peptic ulcer disease (Beyond the ...

  6. Lymphomas presenting as chest wall tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Witte, Biruta; Hürtgen, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Four cases of thoracic lymphoma mimicking chest wall tumors are presented. As resection is not the treatment of first choice in lymphomas, pretherapeutical evaluation of chest wall tumors should include a thoroughly staging and a biopsy for histopathological diagnosis. Chest wall destruction due to an anterior mediastinal mass, or a chest wall tumor associated with mediastinal lymph node enlargement, could be suspicious of thoracic lymphoma. Lymphoma with chest wall involvement mostly turns o...

  7. Imaging of blunt chest trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wicky, S.; Wintermark, M.; Schnyder, P.; Capasso, P.; Denys, A. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland). Dept. of Radiology

    2000-10-01

    In western European countries most blunt chest traumas are associated with motor vehicle and sport-related accidents. In Switzerland, 39 of 10,000 inhabitants were involved and severely injured in road accidents in 1998. Fifty two percent of them suffered from blunt chest trauma. According to the Swiss Federal Office of Statistics, traumas represented in men the fourth major cause of death (4 %) after cardiovascular disease (38 %), cancer (28 %), and respiratory disease (7 %) in 1998. The outcome of chest trauma patients is determined mainly by the severity of the lesions, the prompt appropriate treatment delivered on the scene of the accident, the time needed to transport the patient to a trauma center, and the immediate recognition of the lesions by a trained emergency team. Other determining factors include age as well as coexisting cardiac, pulmonary, and renal diseases. Our purpose was to review the wide spectrum of pathologies related to blunt chest trauma involving the chest wall, pleura, lungs, trachea and bronchi, aorta, aortic arch vessels, and diaphragm. A particular focus on the diagnostic impact of CT is demonstrated. (orig.)

  8. Chest Wall tumor: combined management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer is relatively rare disease among children and adolescents. The incidence of solid tumors other than CNS is less than 2/100,000. Tumors of the chest wall can arise either from the somatic tissue or ribs. These are rare, so either institutional reviews or multi institutional studies should determine optimal therapeutic management. Of the bony chest wall, Ewing's sarcoma or the family of tumor (peripheral neuro epithelioma, Askin tumor), are the most common. These lesions are lytic and have associated large extra pleural component. This large extra pleural component often necessitates major chest wall resection (3 or more ribs), and when lower ribs are involved, this entails resection of portion of diaphragm. Despite this resection, survival in the early 1970 was 10-20%. Since 1970 multi agent chemotherapy has increased survival rates. of importance, however, is these regimens have caused significant reduction of these extra pleural components so that major chest wall resections have become a rarity. With improved survival and decreased morbidity preoperative chemotherapy followed by surgery is now the accepted modality of treatment. Another major advantage of this regimen is that potential radiation therapy may be obviated. The most common chest wall lesion is rhabdomyosarcoma. In the IRS study of 1620 RMS patients, in 141 (9%) the primary lesion was in the chest wall. these are primarily alveolar histology. when lesions were superficial, wide local excision with supplemental radiation therapy was associated with low morbidity and good overall survival. however, a majority have significant intra- thoracic components. in these circumstances the resectability rate is less than 30% and the survival poor. Other lesions include non rhabdomyosarcomas, eosinophilic granuloma, chondrosarcoma, and osteomyelitis. The management of these lesions varies according to extent, histology, and patient characteristics

  9. Contemporary management of flail chest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vana, P Geoff; Neubauer, Daniel C; Luchette, Fred A

    2014-06-01

    Thoracic injury is currently the second leading cause of trauma-related death and rib fractures are the most common of these injuries. Flail chest, as defined by fracture of three or more ribs in two or more places, continues to be a clinically challenging problem. The underlying pulmonary contusion with subsequent inflammatory reaction and right-to-left shunting leading to hypoxia continues to result in high mortality for these patients. Surgical stabilization of the fractured ribs remains controversial. We review the history of management for flail chest alone and when combined with pulmonary contusion. Finally, we propose an algorithm for nonoperative and surgical management. PMID:24887787

  10. Contemporary management of flail chest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vana, P Geoff; Neubauer, Daniel C; Luchette, Fred A

    2014-06-01

    Thoracic injury is currently the second leading cause of trauma-related death and rib fractures are the most common of these injuries. Flail chest, as defined by fracture of three or more ribs in two or more places, continues to be a clinically challenging problem. The underlying pulmonary contusion with subsequent inflammatory reaction and right-to-left shunting leading to hypoxia continues to result in high mortality for these patients. Surgical stabilization of the fractured ribs remains controversial. We review the history of management for flail chest alone and when combined with pulmonary contusion. Finally, we propose an algorithm for nonoperative and surgical management.

  11. Gunshot wounds to the chest

    OpenAIRE

    Holmen, Lillian Beate

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: This is a review of gunshot wounds to the chest. Although uncommon in Norway, they represent a big health problem in other parts of the world and in war situations. Method: A systematic literature search using PubMed and McMaster+. Results: Gunshot wounds to the chest can be highly lethal. Depending on the injured organ, a large percentage of the patients die before reaching the hospital. There is a big difference between low-velocity and high-velocity weapons. Low velocity inju...

  12. Accuracy of chest radiography versus chest computed tomography in hemodynamically stable patients with blunt chest trauma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mojtaba Chardoli; Toktam Hasan-Ghaliaee; Hesam Akbari; Vafa Rahimi-Movaghar

    2013-01-01

    Objective:Thoracic injuries are responsible for 25% of deaths of blunt traumas.Chest X-ray (CXR) is the first diagnostic method in patients with blunt trauma.The aim of this study was to detect the accuracy of CXR versus chest computed tomograpgy (CT) in hemodynamically stable patients with blunt chest trauma.Methods:Study was conducted at the emergency department of S ina Hospital from March 2011 to March 2012.Hemodynamically stable patients with at least 16 years of age who had blunt chest trauma were included.All patients underwent the same diagnostic protocol which consisted of physical examination,CXR and CT scan respectively.Results:Two hundreds patients (84% male and 16% female) were included with a mean age of(37.9±13.7) years.Rib fracture was the most common finding of CXR (12.5%) and CT scan (25.5%).The sensitivity of CXR for hemothorax,thoracolumbar vertebra fractures and rib fractures were 20%,49% and 49%,respectively.Pneumothorax,foreign body,emphysema,pulmonary contusion,liver hematoma and sternum fracture were not diagnosed with CXR alone.Conclusion:Applying CT scan as the first-line diagnostic modality in hemodynamically stable patients with blunt chest trauma can detect pathologies which may change management and outcome.

  13. Actinomycosis involving the chest wall: CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two cases of pulmonary actinomycosis with extension to involve the chest wall that were evaluated using computerized tomography are reported. In both cases, the relation of pulmonary and chest wall disease was best shown using CT

  14. Nuclear imaging of the chest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahk, Y.W. [Samsung Cheil General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology; Kim, E.E. [Texas Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Cancer Center; Isawa, T. [Yokohama Higashi National Hospital (Japan)

    1998-01-01

    This book provides up-to-the minute information on the diagnostic nuclear imaging of chest disorders. The authors have endeavored to integrate and consolidate the many different subspecialities in order to enable a holistic understanding of chest diseases from the nuclear medicine standpoint. Highlights of the book include in addition to the cardiac scan the description of aerosol lung imaging in COPD and other important pulmonary diseases and the updates on breast and lung cancer imaging, as well as imaging of the bony thorax and esophagus. It is required reading not only for nuclear medicine practitioners and researchers but also for all interested radiologists, traumatologists, pulmonologists, oncologists and cardiologists. (orig.) 217 figs., 25 tabs.

  15. Actinomycosis - Left Post Chest Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kafil Akhtar, M. Naim, S. Shamshad Ahmad, Nazoora Khan, Uroos Abedi, A.H. Khan*

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A forty year old female of weak body built presented with recurring small hard lumps in let posteriorchest wall for 3 years and discharging ulcers for 3 months duration. Clinically, the provisional diagnosiswas malignancy with secondary infection. FNAC showed features suggestive of dysplasia buthistopathology confirmed the diagnosis as actinomycosis. The present case is reported due to rare incidenceof actinomycosis at post chest wall with muscle involvement.

  16. Chest wall, lung, and pleural space trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lisa A

    2006-03-01

    Chest radiographs frequently underestimate the severity and extent of chest trauma and, in some cases, fail to detect the presence of injury. CT is more sensitive than chest radiography in the detection of pulmonary, pleural, and osseous abnormalities in the patient who has chest trauma. With the advent of multidetector CT (MDCT), high-quality multiplanar reformations are obtained easily and add to the diagnostic capabilities of MDCT. This article reviews the radiographic and CT findings of chest wall, pleural, and pulmonary injuries that are seen in the patient who has experienced blunt thoracic trauma.

  17. Chest shape in preterm newborn infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The suggestion that thoracic shape of anteroposterior radiographs reflects lung compliance was examined in 62 preterm newborn infants (none with pulmonary hypoplasia) by measuring ratios of upper to lower chest widths. Chest shape did not vary significantly with the presence of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) or with gender, Apgar score, endotracheal intubation, radiographic severity of RDS, or age at radiography. However, decreased maturity was associated with a relatively wide upper chest and narrow lower chest. Developmental factors may be more important than lung compliance (and the other factors noted) in determining the radiographic configuration of the infantile chest

  18. Gastric tumors on chest radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastric neoplasms of three patients protruded into their gas-containing fornices and were first visualized on plain chest radiographs. Endoscopy and/or surgery confirmed these to be a polyp, a leiomyoma, and an adenocarcinoma. The polyp, 1.3 cm in diameter, was the smallest of these three, but smaller lesions may be detectable under suitable conditions. Adequate technique and positioning, sufficiently large lesions in the upper portion of the stomach, a central beam tangential to the tumor, sufficient gas in the stomach, and careful scrutiny by the observer are required. Lesions may be more readily visualized during chest radiography when oral sodium bicarbonate is used to distend the stomach. In chest radiography, exposure limited to the lung fields has been advocated for economy and dose reduction. However, too small an exposure field may result in loss of information potentially beneficial to the patient. Using the smaller of two popular film sizes (35 x 43 cm and 35 x 35 cm), the saving in surface and bone marrow doses is negligible, and the saving in gonad dose may be nil over that when shielding is used. The interest of the observer may be absorbed by a concomitant cardiac or pulmonary lesion. Careful scrutiny of the entire radiograph is therefore essential. (author)

  19. Imaging of fetal chest masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barth, Richard A. [Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Prenatal imaging with high-resolution US and rapid acquisition MRI plays a key role in the accurate diagnosis of congenital chest masses. Imaging has enhanced our understanding of the natural history of fetal lung masses, allowing for accurate prediction of outcome, parental counseling, and planning of pregnancy and newborn management. This paper will focus on congenital bronchopulmonary malformations, which account for the vast majority of primary lung masses in the fetus. In addition, anomalies that mimic masses and less common causes of lung masses will be discussed. (orig.)

  20. Chest neoplasms with infectious etiologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, Carlos S; Chen, Melissa M; Martinez-Jimenez, Santiago; Carrillo, Jorge; Restrepo, Catalina

    2011-12-28

    A wide spectrum of thoracic tumors have known or suspected viral etiologies. Oncogenic viruses can be classified by the type of genomic material they contain. Neoplastic conditions found to have viral etiologies include post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease, lymphoid granulomatosis, Kaposi's sarcoma, Castleman's disease, recurrent respiratory papillomatosis, lung cancer, malignant mesothelioma, leukemia and lymphomas. Viruses involved in these conditions include Epstein-Barr virus, human herpes virus 8, human papillomavirus, Simian virus 40, human immunodeficiency virus, and Human T-lymphotropic virus. Imaging findings, epidemiology and mechanism of transmission for these diseases are reviewed in detail to gain a more thorough appreciation of disease pathophysiology for the chest radiologist.

  1. Anterior chest wall examination reviewed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Trotta

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Anterior chest wall involvement is not infrequently observed within inflammatory arthropaties, particularly if one considers seronegative spondiloarthritides and SAPHO syndrome. Physical examination is unreliable and conventional X-rays analysis is an unsatisfactory tool during diagnostic work-up of this region. Scintigraphic techniques yield informations both on the activity and on the anatomical extent of the disease while computerized tomography visualize the elementary lesions, such as erosions, which characterize the process. Moreover, when available, magnetic resonance imaging couple the ability to finely visualize such lesions with the possibility to show early alterations and to characterize the “activity” of the disease, presenting itself as a powerful tool both for diagnosis and follow-up. This review briefly shows the applications of imaging techniques for the evaluation of the anterior chest wall focusing on what has been done in the SAPHO syndrome which can be considered prototypical for this regional involvement since it is the osteo-articular target mainly affected by the disease.

  2. Potential of ultrasound in the pediatric chest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trinavarat, Panruethai, E-mail: pantrinavarat@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Rama IV Road, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Riccabona, Michael, E-mail: michael.riccabona@klinikum-graz.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Pediatric Radiology, University Hospital Graz (Austria)

    2014-09-15

    Ultrasound (US) of chest, even with inherent limitations of the US beam and air, has been useful in many pediatric chest conditions. It has extended its role and is now widely used by many subspecialists in medicine. This review article will cover techniques, indications, and applications of chest US in neonates, infants and children, including also different common as well as some rare and modern aspects and applications, such as pleural effusion, pneumothorax, pulmonary lesions, mediastinum, diaphragm, and chest wall. Other related imaging modalities are also briefly discussed.

  3. Anteroposterior chest radiograph vs. chest CT scan in early detection of pneumothorax in trauma patients

    OpenAIRE

    Omar, Hesham R.; Mangar, Devanand; Khetarpal, Suneel; Shapiro, David H; Kolla, Jaya; Rashad, Rania; Helal, Engy; Camporesi, Enrico M

    2011-01-01

    Pneumothorax is a common complication following blunt chest wall trauma. In these patients, because of the restrictions regarding immobilization of the cervical spine, Anteroposterior (AP) chest radiograph is usually the most feasible initial study which is not as sensitive as the erect chest X-ray or CT chest for detection of a pneumothorax. We will present 3 case reports which serve for better understanding of the entity of occult pneumothorax. The first case is an example of a true occult ...

  4. Remote interpretation of chest roentgenograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrus, W S; Hunter, C H; Bird, K T

    1975-04-01

    A series of 98 chest films was interpreted by two physicians on the basis of monitor display of the transmitted television signal representing the roentgenographic image. The transmission path was 14 miles long, and included one active repeater station. Receiver operating characteristic curves were drawn to compare interpretations rendered on television view of the image with classic, direct view interpretations of the same films. Performance in these two viewing modes was found to be quite similar. When films containing only hazy densities lacking internal structure or sharp margins, were removed from the sample, interpretation of the remaining films was essentially identical via the two modes. Since hazy densities are visible on retrospective examination, interpretation of roentgenograms at a distance via television appears to be a feasible route for delivery of radiologic services.

  5. Chest pain in focal musculoskeletal disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen; Christensen, Henrik Wulff

    2010-01-01

    The musculoskeletal system is a recognized source of chest pain. However, despite the apparently benign origin, patients with musculoskeletal chest pain remain under-diagnosed, untreated, and potentially continuously disabled in terms of anxiety, depression, and activities of daily living. Several...

  6. Chest pain and exacerbations of bronchiectasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King PT

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Paul T King,1,2 Stephen R Holdsworth,2 Michael Farmer,1 Nicholas J Freezer,1 Peter W Holmes11Department of Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, 2Monash University Department of Medicine, Monash Medical Centre, Melbourne, Victoria, AustraliaBackground: Bronchiectasis is a common disease and a major cause of respiratory morbidity. Chest pain has been described as occurring in the context of bronchiectasis but has not been well characterized. This study was performed to describe the characteristics of chest pain in adult bronchiectasis and to define the relationship of this pain to exacerbations.Subjects and methods: We performed a prospective study of 178 patients who were followed-up for 8 years. Subjects were reviewed on a yearly basis and assessed for the presence of chest pain. Subjects who had chest pain at the time of clinical review by the investigators were included in this study. Forty-four patients (25% described respiratory chest pain at the time of assessment; in the majority of cases 39/44 (89%, this occurred with an exacerbation and two distinct types of chest pain could be described: pleuritic (n = 4 and non-pleuritic (n = 37, with two subjects describing both forms. The non-pleuritic chest pain occurred most commonly over both lower lobes and was mild to moderate in severity. The pain subsided as patients recovered. Conclusion: Non-pleuritic chest pain occurs in subjects with bronchiectasis generally in association with exacerbations.Keywords: sputum, collapse, bronchitis, airway obstruction

  7. Solitary Plasmacytoma of the Chest Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Servet Kayhan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A previously healthy 55-year-old man with right sided lateral chest pain admitted to clinic. It was found a solid and painful mass at the right 4th rib in physical examination. Chest X-ray and thoracic computarized tomography showed an opacity measured 60x33 mm within the right chest wall destructing the 4th rib. Needle aspiration was performed from tumor and cytologic examination showed atypic plasma cell infiltration. The patient was scheduled for a chest wall resection and reconstructive surgery. Examination of a permanent section showed that the chest wall tumor was solitary plasmacytoma. There was no evidence of multiple myeloma recurrence after two years from the operation.

  8. CT of blunt chest trauma in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While trauma is still the leading cause of death in the pediatric age range, it is surprising how little the CT appearances of pediatric chest injury have been investigated in the literature. We have reviewed the CT findings of blunt chest trauma in 44 children for whom chest CT examinations were requested to investigate the extent of intrathoracic injury. We noted a propensity for pulmonary contusions to be located posteriorly or posteromedially, and for them to be anatomically nonsegmental and crescentic in shape. This is possibly attributable to the relatively compliant anterior chest wall in children. The CT appearances of other major thoracic injuries are described, including pulmonary lacerations, pneumothoraces, malpositioned chest tubes, mediastinal hematomas, aortic injury, tracheobronchial injury, hemopericardium, and spinal injuries with paraspinal fluid collections. Children demonstrating findings incidental to the actual injury yet important to the subsequent therapy are also presented. We conclude that, in the event of clinically significant blunt chest trauma, the single supine chest examination in the trauma room is insufficient to adequately identify the extent of intrathoracic injury. With the exception of concern for aortic injury for which aortography is indicated, a dynamically enhanced CT scan of the thorax should be performed as clinically significant findings may result in altered therapy. (orig.)

  9. Chest CT in children: anesthesia and atelectasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, Beverley; Gawande, Rakhee [Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Krane, Elliot J. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Holmes, Tyson H. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford, CA (United States); Robinson, Terry E. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Pulmonary Medicine and Cystic Fibrosis Center for Excellence in Pulmonary Biology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2014-02-15

    There has been an increasing tendency for anesthesiologists to be responsible for providing sedation or anesthesia during chest CT imaging in young children. Anesthesia-related atelectasis noted on chest CT imaging has proven to be a common and troublesome problem, affecting image quality and diagnostic sensitivity. To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a standardized anesthesia, lung recruitment, controlled-ventilation technique developed at our institution to prevent atelectasis for chest CT imaging in young children. Fifty-six chest CT scans were obtained in 42 children using a research-based intubation, lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation CT scanning protocol. These studies were compared with 70 non-protocolized chest CT scans under anesthesia taken from 18 of the same children, who were tested at different times, without the specific lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation technique. Two radiology readers scored all inspiratory chest CT scans for overall CT quality and atelectasis. Detailed cardiorespiratory parameters were evaluated at baseline, and during recruitment and inspiratory imaging on 21 controlled-ventilation cases and 8 control cases. Significant differences were noted between groups for both quality and atelectasis scores with optimal scoring demonstrated in the controlled-ventilation cases where 70% were rated very good to excellent quality scans compared with only 24% of non-protocol cases. There was no or minimal atelectasis in 48% of the controlled ventilation cases compared to 51% of non-protocol cases with segmental, multisegmental or lobar atelectasis present. No significant difference in cardiorespiratory parameters was found between controlled ventilation and other chest CT cases and no procedure-related adverse events occurred. Controlled-ventilation infant CT scanning under general anesthesia, utilizing intubation and recruitment maneuvers followed by chest CT scans, appears to be a safe and effective method to obtain

  10. Chest CT in children: anesthesia and atelectasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There has been an increasing tendency for anesthesiologists to be responsible for providing sedation or anesthesia during chest CT imaging in young children. Anesthesia-related atelectasis noted on chest CT imaging has proven to be a common and troublesome problem, affecting image quality and diagnostic sensitivity. To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a standardized anesthesia, lung recruitment, controlled-ventilation technique developed at our institution to prevent atelectasis for chest CT imaging in young children. Fifty-six chest CT scans were obtained in 42 children using a research-based intubation, lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation CT scanning protocol. These studies were compared with 70 non-protocolized chest CT scans under anesthesia taken from 18 of the same children, who were tested at different times, without the specific lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation technique. Two radiology readers scored all inspiratory chest CT scans for overall CT quality and atelectasis. Detailed cardiorespiratory parameters were evaluated at baseline, and during recruitment and inspiratory imaging on 21 controlled-ventilation cases and 8 control cases. Significant differences were noted between groups for both quality and atelectasis scores with optimal scoring demonstrated in the controlled-ventilation cases where 70% were rated very good to excellent quality scans compared with only 24% of non-protocol cases. There was no or minimal atelectasis in 48% of the controlled ventilation cases compared to 51% of non-protocol cases with segmental, multisegmental or lobar atelectasis present. No significant difference in cardiorespiratory parameters was found between controlled ventilation and other chest CT cases and no procedure-related adverse events occurred. Controlled-ventilation infant CT scanning under general anesthesia, utilizing intubation and recruitment maneuvers followed by chest CT scans, appears to be a safe and effective method to obtain

  11. Classification of chest wall diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzi, E; Gulotta, C

    1993-01-01

    Several disorders of the thoracic cage are known to cause respiratory failure, by means of relatively simple mechanisms, such as the increased work of breathing, which results in alveolar hypoventilation. A variety of pathogenic mechanisms may be considered, as functions of the types of thoracic disorders present. As causes of these additional potential mechanisms, we considered the following: 1) ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) inhomogeneity; 2) inability to cough; 3) malformation or acquired defect of the respiratory centres; and 4) excess blood volume and fluid retention, which aggravate work of breathing and V/Q inhomogeneity. All of these disorders can be grouped into two major categories (which nevertheless have some of the pathophysiology in common): the mechanical syndrome and the neuromuscular or paralytic syndrome. In this paper we discuss chest wall diseases falling into the first category; namely, kyphoscoliosis, fibrothorax, thoracoplasty, ankylosing spondylitis and obesity-hypoventilation. Congenital deformities of the thoracic cage, which do not have important effects on ventilatory apparatus (e.g. pectus excavatum and pectus carinatum), were also considered. PMID:8472068

  12. Impacts to the chest of PMHSs - Influence of impact location and load distribution on chest response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmqvist, Kristian; Svensson, Mats Y; Davidsson, Johan; Gutsche, Andreas; Tomasch, Ernst; Darok, Mario; Ravnik, Dean

    2016-02-01

    The chest response of the human body has been studied for several load conditions, but is not well known in the case of steering wheel rim-to-chest impact in heavy goods vehicle frontal collisions. The aim of this study was to determine the response of the human chest in a set of simulated steering wheel impacts. PMHS tests were carried out and analysed. The steering wheel load pattern was represented by a rigid pendulum with a straight bar-shaped front. A crash test dummy chest calibration pendulum was utilised for comparison. In this study, a set of rigid bar impacts were directed at various heights of the chest, spanning approximately 120mm around the fourth intercostal space. The impact energy was set below a level estimated to cause rib fracture. The analysed results consist of responses, evaluated with respect to differences in the impacting shape and impact heights on compression and viscous criteria chest injury responses. The results showed that the bar impacts consistently produced lesser scaled chest compressions than the hub; the Middle bar responses were around 90% of the hub responses. A superior bar impact provided lesser chest compression; the average response was 86% of the Middle bar response. For inferior bar impacts, the chest compression response was 116% of the chest compression in the middle. The damping properties of the chest caused the compression to decrease in the high speed bar impacts to 88% of that in low speed impacts. From the analysis it could be concluded that the bar impact shape provides lower chest criteria responses compared to the hub. Further, the bar responses are dependent on the impact location of the chest. Inertial and viscous effects of the upper body affect the responses. The results can be used to assess the responses of human substitutes such as anthropomorphic test devices and finite element human body models, which will benefit the development process of heavy goods vehicle safety systems. PMID:26687541

  13. Technique for chest radiography for pneumoconiosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Routine radiographic chest examinations have been performed using a variety of techniques. Although chest radiography is one of the most commonly performed radiographic examinations, it is often difficult to obtain consistently good quality roentgenograms. This publication provides a simple guide and relatively easy solution to the many problems that radiologic technologists might encounter. The language is purposely relatively simple and care has been taken to avoid difficult mathematical and physical explanations. The intent is to provide an easily referrable text for those who may encounter difficulties in producing acceptable chest radiographs

  14. Chest pain: a time for concern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Joan E; Magdic, Kathy S

    2014-01-01

    When a patient complains of chest pain, the first priority is to establish whether the situation is life threatening. Life-threatening differential diagnoses that clinicians must consider include acute coronary syndrome, cardiac tamponade, pulmonary embolus, aortic dissection, and tension pneumothorax. Nonthreatening causes of chest pain that should be considered include spontaneous pneumothorax, pleural effusion, pneumonia, valvular diseases, gastric reflux, and costochondritis. The challenge for clinicians is not to be limited by "satisfaction of search" and fail to consider important differential diagnoses. The challenge, however, can be met by developing a systematic method to assess chest pain that will lead to the appropriate diagnosis and appropriate treatment plan.

  15. Common Acupoints in Chest and Abdomen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Journal of Acupuncture and Tuina Science Editor; CUI Xue-jun

    2003-01-01

    @@ Tiantu (CV 21) Location: In the center of the suprasternal fossa(Fig. l ). Indications: Cough, dyspnea, chest pain, pharyngolaryngeal swelling and pains, sudden hoarseness of the voice, goiter, globus hystericus, and dysphagia.

  16. Tuberculosis, advanced - chest x-rays (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis is an infectious disease that causes inflammation, the formation of tubercules and other growths within tissue, ... death. These chest x-rays show advanced pulmonary tuberculosis. There are multiple light areas (opacities) of varying ...

  17. Aspergillosis - chest x-ray (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... usually occurs in immunocompromised individuals. Here, a chest x-ray shows that the fungus has invaded the lung ... are usually seen as black areas on an x-ray. The cloudiness on the left side of this ...

  18. Angina - when you have chest pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or having sex. How to treat your chest pain Sit, stay calm, and rest. Your symptoms will often go away soon after you stop activity. If you are lying down, sit up in bed. Try deep breathing to ...

  19. Open-Chest Management after Heart Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Takayama, Hiroo; Leone, Richard J.; Aldea, Gabriel S.; Fishbein, Daniel P.; Verrier, Edward D.; Salerno, Christopher T.

    2006-01-01

    Postcardiotomy open-chest management has been widely used in cardiac surgery. Although this strategy can be applied to heart transplantation, the use of immunosuppressants in transplant recipients raises particular concerns about sternal wound infection and impaired healing.

  20. [Dedifferentiated Chondrosarcoma of the Chest Wall].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitoh, Genkichi; Yoneshima, Yasuto; Nakamura, Toshihiko; Kitagawa, Dai; Kinjo, Nao; Ohgaki, Kippei; Maehara, Shinichiro; Teramoto, Seiichi; Adachi, Eisuke; Ikeda, Yoichi; Mine, Mari

    2016-08-01

    A 79-year-old man complaining of an anterior chest mass with pain had an abnormal shadow on chest X-ray. A mass, 7 cm in size, with destruction of the right 4th rib was found on chest computed tomography. A F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) corresponding to the lesion showed an abnormal accumulation of FDG with the standardized uptake value(SUV) max=16.19. A malignant tumor of the chest wall origin was suspected and the tumor was resected with the 3th, 4th, and 5th ribs. Histologically, the tumor was diagnosed as dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma. He died of local recurrence about 5 months after the operation. PMID:27476566

  1. Surface Chest Motion Decomposition for Cardiovascular Monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Ghufran Shafiq; Kalyana C. Veluvolu

    2014-01-01

    Surface chest motion can be easily monitored with a wide variety of sensors such as pressure belts, fiber Bragg gratings and inertial sensors, etc. The current applications of these sensors are mainly restricted to respiratory motion monitoring/analysis due to the technical challenges involved in separation of the cardiac motion from the dominant respiratory motion. The contribution of heart to the surface chest motion is relatively very small as compared to the respiratory motion. Further, t...

  2. Misdiagnosed Chest Pain: Spontaneous Esophageal Rupture

    OpenAIRE

    Inci, Sinan; Gundogdu, Fuat; Gungor, Hasan; Arslan, Sakir; Turkyilmaz, Atila; Eroglu, Atila

    2013-01-01

    Chest pain is one of themost common complaints expressed by patients presenting to the emergency department, and any initial evaluation should always consider life-threatening causes. Esophageal rupture is a serious condition with a highmortality rate. If diagnosed, successful therapy depends on the size of the rupture and the time elapsed between rupture and diagnosis.We report on a 41-year-old woman who presented to the emergency department complaining of left-sided chest pain for two hours.

  3. Pediatric chest imaging. Chest imaging in infants and children. 2. rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaging of the pediatric chest continues to evolve rapidly. All chapters in this 2nd edition of Pediatric Chest Imaging have been extensively updated, with additional disease-specific information and numerous new illustrations. The book thus presents the state of the art in the diagnosis of pediatric chest disorders, highlighting the role played by advanced technology. As the conventional features of most of these disorders are extremely well known, special attention is devoted to the technical aspects of the modern imaging modalities, their indications, and the diagnostic information that they supply. Individual chapters focus on chest ultrasound, nuclear medicine imaging, high-resolution chest CT, helical CT, and pediatric cardiac CT and pediatric cardiacMRI. Others are directed towards specific disorders, including congenital malformations of the chest, chest tumors, pulmonary infection, trauma, the lung in systemic diseases, the pediatric airway, foreign bodies, the thymus, and the chest wall. Without exception, the authors of this book are internationally known specialists with great expertise in the field. This book will serve as a handy, superbly illustrated reference for all who routinely image children, as well as for those who need access to information on how best to image them. (orig.)

  4. Chest trauma in children: A local experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chest trauma in childhood is relatively uncommon in clinical practice andhas been the subject of few reports in literature. This study was undertakento examine our experience in dealing with chest trauma in children. This wasa retrospective study of 74 children who sustained chest trauma and werereferred to King Fahd Hospital in Medina over a two-year period. The age,cause of injury, severity of injury, associated extrathoracic injuries,treatment and outcome were analyzed. The median age of patients was nineyears. Fifty-nine of them (80%) sustained blunt trauma in 62% of thechildren, gun shot wounds were seen in five and stab wounds in 10 children.Head injury was the most common injury associated with thoracic trauma andwas seen in 14 patients (19%) and associated intra-abdominal injuries wereseen in nine patients. Chest x-ray of the blunt trauma patients revealedfractured ribs in 24 children, pneumothorax in six, hemothorax in four,hemoneumothorax in three, and pulmonary contusions in 22 patients. Fifty onepercent of children were managed conservatively, 37% required tubethoracostomy, 8% were mechanically ventilated and 4% underwent thoractomy.The prevalence of chest trauma in children due to road traffic accidents ishigh in Saudi Arabia. Head injury is thought to be the most common associatedextrathoracic injuries, however, most of these patients can be managedconservatively. (author)

  5. Radiation induced osteosarcoma of the chest wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Tsutomu; Yuki, Yoshihiro; Oizumi, Hiroyuki; Iijima, Yoshiyuki; Fujishima, Tsukasa; Shimazaki, Yasuhisa [Yamagata Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-11-01

    We report a successful resection of an osteosarcoma in the chest wall developed 25 years after irradiation. A 74-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for her swelling in the left chest wall at August 24, 1995. At 49-year-old, she had undergone an operation and postoperative irradiation for left breast cancer. A computed tomography demonstrated a mass in the left chest wall that destructed the first rib, extending into the pleural space and invaded into the left common carotid and subclavian arteries. We planned a radical resection of the mass after repeated CT scannings, since it was histopathologically diagnosed as a chondrosarcoma and showed a rapid growth. The tumor was completely removed with radical transmediastinal forequarter amputation of the partial chest wall and total left upper extremity. The left common carotid artery was partially replaced with 6 mm EPTFE vascular prosthesis. The chest wall was reconstructed with Marlex-mesh prosthesis and a myocutaneous flap. She was discharged uneventfully and has not shown any evidence of recurrence. (author)

  6. Imaging of Chest Wall Lesions in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hekmatnia

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Chest wall lesions in childhood include a wide range of pathologies; Benign lesions include lipoma, neurofibroma, lymphangioma, hemangioma, and mesenchymal hamartoma."nMalignant lesions include Neuroblastoma, Rhabdo-myosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, and Askin tumor."nSystemic diseases such as leukemia, lymphoma, Langerhans cell histiocytosis, and also infections such as tuberculosis, and actinomycosis may also cause chest wall lesions."nThe imaging characteristics of these lesions are re-viewed, but only a minority of the lesions shows diagnostic imaging features, and most of lesions re-quire biopsy and histopathological examination for "ndefinitive diagnosis."nThe role of different modalities is discussed with an emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging for demonstrating lesion morphology and local spread. Computed tomography and neuclear medicine being used mainly to assess remote disease."nIn this lecture, we discuss about imaging of chest wall lesions in children.

  7. Cardiogenic shock following blunt chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez-González Fayna

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac contusion, usually caused by blunt chest trauma, has been recognized with increased frequency over the past decades. Traffic accidents are the most frequent cause of cardiac contusions resulting from a direct blow to the chest. Other causes of blunt cardiac injury are numerous and include violent fall impacts, interpersonal aggression, explosions, and various types of high-risk sports. Myocardial contusion is difficult to diagnose; clinical presentation varies greatly, ranging from lack of symptoms to cardiogenic shock and arrhythmia. Although death is rare, cardiac contusion can be fatal. We present a case of cardiac contusion due to blunt chest trauma secondary to a fall impact, which manifested as cardiogenic shock.

  8. Misdiagnosed Chest Pain: Spontaneous Esophageal Rupture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inci, Sinan; Gundogdu, Fuat; Gungor, Hasan; Arslan, Sakir; Turkyilmaz, Atila; Eroglu, Atila

    2013-01-01

    Chest pain is one of themost common complaints expressed by patients presenting to the emergency department, and any initial evaluation should always consider life-threatening causes. Esophageal rupture is a serious condition with a highmortality rate. If diagnosed, successful therapy depends on the size of the rupture and the time elapsed between rupture and diagnosis.We report on a 41-year-old woman who presented to the emergency department complaining of left-sided chest pain for two hours. PMID:27122690

  9. Chest trauma in childhood. Radiological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blunt thoracic trauma is frequently associated with further injuries (head and/or blunt abdominal trauma). The prognosis also depends on the concurrent injuries. The initial evaluation of an injured child is based on the chest X-ray and abdominal ultrasound examination. Additional information can be obtained by a CT scan in mediastinal injuries. (orig./MG)

  10. Cardiac injuries in blunt chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobon-Gomez Catalina

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Blunt chest traumas are a clinical challenge, both for diagnosis and treatment. The use of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance can play a major role in this setting. We present two cases: a 12-year-old boy and 45-year-old man. Late gadolinium enhancement imaging enabled visualization of myocardial damage resulting from the trauma.

  11. Coccidioidomycosis - chest x-ray (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chest x-ray shows the affects of a fungal infection, coccidioidomycosis. In the middle of the left lung (seen on the ... defined borders. Other diseases that may explain these x-ray findings include lung abscesses, chronic pulmonary tuberculosis, chronic ...

  12. Adenocarcinoma - chest x-ray (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chest x-ray shows adenocarcinoma of the lung. There is a rounded light spot in the right upper lung (left side ... density. Diseases that may cause this type of x-ray result would be tuberculous or fungal granuloma, and ...

  13. Chest Pain: Delays in seeking medical attention

    OpenAIRE

    Dickson, R.; Shuster, M; Brown, G B

    1992-01-01

    A multicenter prospective survey of 101 patients who presented to the emergency departments of five metropolitan medical centers complaining of non-traumatic chest pain showed that many delayed going to hospital. We call for more effective communication between physicians, patients, and the public and for improved public education on the signs and symptoms of myocardial infarction and the correct response.

  14. Treatment of 336 cases of chest trauma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jing; CHU Xiang-yang; LIU Yi; WANG Yun-xi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To summarize the clinical features,diagnosis and treatment of chest trauma.Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted among 336 cases of chest trauma admitted to our hospital from January 2009 to May 2011.Results:Out of all cases,325 were cured,accounting for 96.7%; 11 died,accounting for 3.3%.Among the dead cases,one died of hemorrhagic shock,three of acute respiratory distress syndrome,three of multiple organ failure,and four of severe multiple traumas.Conclusions:(1) For patients with severe chest trauma,early emergency treatment is crucial to save life.(2) Open thoracic surgery is needed for acute cardiac tamponade,intrapulmonary vascular injuries,progressive intrathoracic bleeding,lung laceration,tracheal breakage,and diaphragmatic injury.In addition,operative timing and method should be well chosen.(3) Pulmonary contusion is one of common complications in chest trauma,for which the combination of strong anti-infection therapy and mechanical ventilation is an effective treatment strategy.

  15. The HEART score for chest pain patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Backus, B.E.

    2012-01-01

    The HEART score was developed to improve risk stratification in chest pain patients in the emergency department (ED). This thesis describes series of validation studies of the HEART score and sub studies for individual elements of the score. The predictive value of the HEART score for the occurrence

  16. VAC® for external fixation of flail chest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winge, Rikke; Berg, Jais O; Albret, Rikke;

    2012-01-01

    A large aterior chest wall defect following tumor resection was reconstructed with a Gore-Tex® membrane and a combined musculocutaneous rectus femoris and tensor fasciae latae free flap. Subsequent paradoxical respiration impeded weaning from the ventilator. Appliance of Vacuum Assisted Closure...

  17. Chest injury in victims of Bam earthquake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seyed Mohammad Ghodsi; Moosa Zargar; Ali Khaji; Mojgan Karbakhsh

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the data of trauma patients with thoracic injury in the earthquake of Bam admitted to hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Science (TUMS)for better understanding the type and consequence of thoracic injuries in a major earthquake.Methods: After Bam earthquake registering 6.5 on the Richter scale, 526 trauma patients were admitted to hospitals of TUMS. Among them, 53 patients sustained thoracic injury.Results: This group was composed of 21 females (39.6%) and 32 males (60.4%). Fifteen patients (28.3%) had isolated chest injuries. Rib fracture (36.4%) was the most common injury in our patients and haemo/pneumothorax (25.5%) followed. Superficial injury was the most common accompanying injury. Multipletrauma patients with chest injury had higher injury severity score (ISS) versus patients with isolated chest injury (P =0.003).Conclusions: Chest wall injuries and haemo/pneumothorax comprise a considerable number of injuries in survival victims of earthquakes. Consequently, the majority of these patients can be treated with observation or tube thoracostomy. We should train and equip the health workers and members of rescue teams to treat and manage these patients in the field.

  18. Cardiac injuries in blunt chest trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Tobon-Gomez Catalina; Huguet Marina; Bijnens Bart H; Frangi Alejandro F; Petit Marius

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Blunt chest traumas are a clinical challenge, both for diagnosis and treatment. The use of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance can play a major role in this setting. We present two cases: a 12-year-old boy and 45-year-old man. Late gadolinium enhancement imaging enabled visualization of myocardial damage resulting from the trauma.

  19. Algorithm of chest wall keloid treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Xiao; Zhang, Mingzi; Wang, Yang; Zhao, Ru; Wang, Youbin; Wang, Xiaojun

    2016-08-01

    Keloids are common in the Asian population. Multiple or huge keloids can appear on the chest wall because of its tendency to develop acne, sebaceous cyst, etc. It is difficult to find an ideal treatment for keloids in this area due to the limit of local soft tissues and higher recurrence rate. This study aims at establishing an individualized protocol that could be easily applied according to the size and number of chest wall keloids.A total of 445 patients received various methods (4 protocols) of treatment in our department from September 2006 to September 2012 according to the size and number of their chest wall keloids. All of the patients received adjuvant radiotherapy in our hospital. Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS) was used to assess the treatment effect by both doctors and patients. With mean follow-up time of 13 months (range: 6-18 months), 362 patients participated in the assessment of POSAS with doctors.Both the doctors and the patients themselves used POSAS to evaluate the treatment effect. The recurrence rate was 0.83%. There was an obvious significant difference (P keloids. This algorithm could play a guiding role for surgeons when dealing with chest wall keloid treatment. PMID:27583896

  20. Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work - Bronchitis (Chest Cold)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Farm Get Smart About Antibiotics Week Bronchitis (Chest Cold) Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... types—acute bronchitis. Causes Acute bronchitis, or chest cold, often occurs after an upper respiratory infection like ...

  1. CNE article: pain after lung transplant: high-frequency chest wall oscillation vs chest physiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esguerra-Gonzalez, Angeli; Ilagan-Honorio, Monina; Fraschilla, Stephanie; Kehoe, Priscilla; Lee, Ai Jin; Marcarian, Taline; Mayol-Ngo, Kristina; Miller, Pamela S; Onga, Jay; Rodman, Betty; Ross, David; Sommer, Susan; Takayanagi, Sumiko; Toyama, Joy; Villamor, Filma; Weigt, S Samuel; Gawlinski, Anna

    2013-03-01

    Background Chest physiotherapy and high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) are routinely used after lung transplant to facilitate removal of secretions. To date, no studies have been done to investigate which therapy is more comfortable and preferred by lung transplant recipients. Patients who have less pain may mobilize secretions, heal, and recover faster. Objectives To compare effects of HFCWO versus chest physiotherapy on pain and preference in lung transplant recipients. Methods In a 2-group experimental, repeated-measures design, 45 lung transplant recipients (27 single lung, 18 bilateral) were randomized to chest physiotherapy (10 AM, 2 PM) followed by HFCWO (6 PM, 10 PM; group 1, n=22) or vice versa (group 2, n=23) on postoperative day 3. A verbal numeric rating scale was used to measure pain before and after treatment. At the end of the treatment sequence, a 4-item patient survey was administered to assess treatment preference, pain, and effectiveness. Data were analyzed with χ(2) and t tests and repeated-measures analysis of variance. Results A significant interaction was found between mean difference in pain scores from before to after treatment and treatment method; pain scores decreased more when HFCWO was done at 10 AM and 6 PM (P =.04). Bilateral transplant recipients showed a significant preference for HFCWO over chest physiotherapy (11 [85%] vs 2 [15%], P=.01). However, single lung recipients showed no significant difference in preference between the 2 treatments (11 [42%] vs 14 [54%]). Conclusions HFCWO seems to provide greater decreases in pain scores than does chest physiotherapy. Bilateral lung transplant recipients preferred HFCWO to chest physiotherapy. HFCWO may be an effective, feasible alternative to chest physiotherapy. (American Journal of Critical Care. 2013;22:115-125).

  2. Investigation of the Chest-Ear Radio Propagation Channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvist, Søren Helstrup; Jakobsen, Kaj Bjarne

    2010-01-01

    The path gain (|S21|) between antennas on the chest and at the ear is presented as a function of the position of the antenna on the chest. A monopole antenna and a printed Inverted-F Antenna (IFA) are considered for placement on the chest. The path gain is found by HFSS simulations as well as...

  3. Digital chest radiography: collimation and dose reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debess, Jeanne; Johnsen, Karen Kirstine; Vejle-Sørensen, Jens Kristian;

    Purpose: Quality improvement of basic radiography focusing on collimation and dose reduction in digital chest radiography Methods and Materials:A retrospective study of digital chest radiography is performed to evaluate the primary x-ray tube collimation of the PA and lateral radiographs. Data from...... one hundred fifty self-reliant female patients between 15 and 55 years of age are included in the study. The clinical research is performed between September and November 2014 where 3rd year Radiography students collect data on four Danish x-ray departments using identical procedures under guidance...... of clinical supervisors. Optimal collimation is determined by European and Regional Danish guidelines. The areal between current and optimal collimation is calculated. The experimental research is performed in September - October 2014 Siemens Axiom Aristos digital radiography system DR using 150 kV, 1,25 -3...

  4. Salmonella typhimurium abscess of the chest wall

    OpenAIRE

    Tonziello, Gilda; Valentinotti, Romina; Arbore, Enrico; Cassetti, Paolo; Luzzati, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Male, 73 Final Diagnosis: Salmonella typhimurium abscess of the chest wall Symptoms: — Medication: Ciprofloxacin Clinical Procedure:— Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Non-typhoid Salmonella extra-intestinal infections usually develop in infants and in adult patients with pre-existing predisposing conditions. Blood stream infections and urinary tract infections are the most common clinical presentations, but other sites of infection may be ...

  5. Primary Burkitt Lymphoma of the Chest Wall

    OpenAIRE

    Rommel Lu

    2012-01-01

    Burkitt lymphoma (BL) originating in the skin and soft tissue at any site is exceedingly rare. This paper is about a case of primary sporadic BL that presented as an isolated, rapidly enlarging chest wall mass arising from skin and/or soft tissue in an adult. As with other BL presentations, this patient was treated with aggressive chemotherapy with central nervous system (CNS) chemoprophylaxis, but he later died because of sepsis.

  6. Primary Burkitt Lymphoma of the Chest Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rommel Lu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Burkitt lymphoma (BL originating in the skin and soft tissue at any site is exceedingly rare. This paper is about a case of primary sporadic BL that presented as an isolated, rapidly enlarging chest wall mass arising from skin and/or soft tissue in an adult. As with other BL presentations, this patient was treated with aggressive chemotherapy with central nervous system (CNS chemoprophylaxis, but he later died because of sepsis.

  7. Reconstruction of chest, abdominal walls and perineum

    OpenAIRE

    Vijaykumar D; Vijayaraghavan Sundeep

    2007-01-01

    The structural integrity of the chest and abdominal walls and perineum is frequently altered by cancer extirpation. Advances in reconstructive surgery and the availability of innovative techniques have helped the cancer surgeon to proceed with radical excisions with minimum morbidity. The ability to harvest flaps from distant sites and the availability of good prosthetic materials have now become part of the routine armamentarium of the plastic surgeon engaged in reconstructive surgery of the...

  8. Effective dose from chest tomosynthesis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomosynthesis (digital tomography) is a recently introduced low-dose alternative to CT in the evaluation of the lungs in patients with cystic fibrosis and pulmonary nodules. Previous studies have reported an adult effective dose of 0.12-0.13 mSv for chest tomosynthesis. The aim of this study was to determine the paediatric effective dose from the dose-area-product. During a 3-y period, 38 children with cystic fibrosis and 36 paediatric oncology patients were examined with chest tomosynthesis, totally 169 posteroanterior and 17 anteroposterior examinations (40 boys and 34 girls, mean age 13.7 y, range 7-20 y). Using recently reported paediatric chest tomosynthesis conversion factors (0.23-1.09 mSv Gy cm-2) corrected for sex, age and energy, the mean posteroanterior effective dose calculated was 0.17 mSv; using the proposed simplified conversion factors of 0.6 (8-10 y), 0.4 (11-14 y) and 0.3 mSv Gy cm-2 (15-19 y), the mean posteroanterior effective dose calculated was 0.15 mSv. As the difference in the calculated effective dose was minor, it is recommendable to use the simplified conversion factors. Using the conversion factor for adult chest tomosynthesis (0.26 mSv Gy cm-2), the mean effective dose was 0.11 mSv. Anteroposterior exposures had considerably higher effective dose. By using conversion factors adapted for children, the calculated risks from radiologic procedures will be more accurate. (authors)

  9. Injuries of the chestFNx01

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deodhar S

    1979-01-01

    Full Text Available Thirty cases of chest injuries were admitted in the Department of Surgery, K.E.M. Hospital, Bombay. These injuries seem to be fairly common. Detailed examination at the time of admission is necessary to assess the clinical presentation and the presence of major complications. Institution of intra-peritoneal drainage, restoration of negative intra-pleural pressure and active respiratory physiotherapy constitute an important part of the treatment. The literature on this subject is briefly reviewed

  10. VAC® for external fixation of flail chest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rikke Winge

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A large anterior chest wall defect following tumor resection was reconstructed with a Gore- Tex® membrane and a combined musculocutaneous rectus femoris and tensor fasciae latae free flap. Subsequent paradoxical respiration impeded weaning from the ventilator. Appliance of Vacuum Assisted Closure® (VAC® resulted in immediate chest wall stability and a decrease in the patient’s need for respiratory support. Shortly thereafter, the VAC® was discontinued and the patient was discharged from the intensive care unit (ICU. This case report is the first to describe the successful use of VAC® as an adjuvant to a one-stage procedure for large thoracic wall reconstruction, allowing sufficient temporary external fixation to eliminate paradoxical respiration and plausibly shorten the stay in the ICU. No adverse effects on flap healing or haemodynamics were recorded. It is likely that external VAC® can improve thoracic stability and pulmonary function in a patient with flail chest and decrease the need for mechanical ventilation.

  11. Lung involvement quantification in chest radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuberculosis (TB) caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is an infectious disease which remains a global health problem. The chest radiography is the commonly method employed to assess the TB's evolution. The methods for quantification of abnormalities of chest are usually performed on CT scans (CT). This quantification is important to assess the TB evolution and treatment and comparing different treatments. However, precise quantification is not feasible for the amount of CT scans required. The purpose of this work is to develop a methodology for quantification of lung damage caused by TB through chest radiographs. It was developed an algorithm for computational processing of exams in Matlab, which creates a lungs' 3D representation, with compromised dilated regions inside. The quantification of lung lesions was also made for the same patients through CT scans. The measurements from the two methods were compared and resulting in strong correlation. Applying statistical Bland and Altman, all samples were within the limits of agreement, with a confidence interval of 95%. The results showed an average variation of around 13% between the two quantification methods. The results suggest the effectiveness and applicability of the method developed, providing better risk-benefit to the patient and cost-benefit ratio for the institution. (author)

  12. Chest pain associated with moderator band pacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goli, Anil K; Kaszala, Karoly; Osman, Mohammed N; Lucke, John; Carrillo, Roger

    2014-10-01

    A 65-year-old man was evaluated for chronic chest pain that had been present for 8 years after placement of a dual-chamber implantable cardioverter-defibrillator to treat inducible ventricular tachycardia. Previous coronary angiography had revealed nonobstructive coronary artery disease and a left ventricular ejection fraction of 0.45 to 0.50, consistent with mild idiopathic nonischemic cardiomyopathy. Evaluation with chest radiography and transthoracic echocardiography showed the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator lead to be embedded within the right ventricle at the moderator band, which had mild calcification. Treatment included extraction of the dual-coil lead and placement of a new single-coil right ventricular lead at the mid septum. The patient had complete relief of symptoms after the procedure. This case shows that chest pain can be associated with the placement of a right ventricular implantable cardioverter-defibrillator lead in the moderator band and that symptomatic relief can occur after percutaneous lead extraction and the implantation of a new right ventricular lead to the mid septal region.

  13. Surface Chest Motion Decomposition for Cardiovascular Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiq, Ghufran; Veluvolu, Kalyana C.

    2014-05-01

    Surface chest motion can be easily monitored with a wide variety of sensors such as pressure belts, fiber Bragg gratings and inertial sensors, etc. The current applications of these sensors are mainly restricted to respiratory motion monitoring/analysis due to the technical challenges involved in separation of the cardiac motion from the dominant respiratory motion. The contribution of heart to the surface chest motion is relatively very small as compared to the respiratory motion. Further, the heart motion spectrally overlaps with the respiratory harmonics and their separation becomes even more challenging. In this paper, we approach this source separation problem with independent component analysis (ICA) framework. ICA with reference (ICA-R) yields only desired component with improved separation, but the method is highly sensitive to the reference generation. Several reference generation approaches are developed to solve the problem. Experimental validation of these proposed approaches is performed with chest displacement data and ECG obtained from healthy subjects under normal breathing and post-exercise conditions. The extracted component morphologically matches well with the collected ECG. Results show that the proposed methods perform better than conventional band pass filtering.

  14. Segmentation of ribs in digital chest radiographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Lin; Guo, Wei; Li, Qiang

    2016-03-01

    Ribs and clavicles in posterior-anterior (PA) digital chest radiographs often overlap with lung abnormalities such as nodules, and cause missing of these abnormalities, it is therefore necessary to remove or reduce the ribs in chest radiographs. The purpose of this study was to develop a fully automated algorithm to segment ribs within lung area in digital radiography (DR) for removal of the ribs. The rib segmentation algorithm consists of three steps. Firstly, a radiograph was pre-processed for contrast adjustment and noise removal; second, generalized Hough transform was employed to localize the lower boundary of the ribs. In the third step, a novel bilateral dynamic programming algorithm was used to accurately segment the upper and lower boundaries of ribs simultaneously. The width of the ribs and the smoothness of the rib boundaries were incorporated in the cost function of the bilateral dynamic programming for obtaining consistent results for the upper and lower boundaries. Our database consisted of 93 DR images, including, respectively, 23 and 70 images acquired with a DR system from Shanghai United-Imaging Healthcare Co. and from GE Healthcare Co. The rib localization algorithm achieved a sensitivity of 98.2% with 0.1 false positives per image. The accuracy of the detected ribs was further evaluated subjectively in 3 levels: "1", good; "2", acceptable; "3", poor. The percentages of good, acceptable, and poor segmentation results were 91.1%, 7.2%, and 1.7%, respectively. Our algorithm can obtain good segmentation results for ribs in chest radiography and would be useful for rib reduction in our future study.

  15. Pitfalls and variants in pediatric chest imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Asensio, D; Fernández Martín, M

    2016-05-01

    Most pitfalls in the interpretation of pediatric chest imaging are closely related with the technique used and the characteristics of pediatric patients. To obtain a quality image that will enable the correct diagnosis, it is very important to use an appropriate technique. It is important to know how technical factors influence the image and to be aware of the possible artifacts that can result from poor patient cooperation. Moreover, radiologists need to be familiar with the normal anatomy in children, with the classic radiologic findings, and with the anatomic and developmental variants to avoid misinterpreting normal findings as pathological.

  16. Radiological diagnosis and therapy of chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The causes and localization of chest pain are numerous. They can derive from infections, traumas, or tumors. Possible sites of origin are: skeletal portions, vertebral column, ribs, and sternum, as well as mediastinum and pleura. In women, occurrence tends to be cyclic and affect the mamma region. Radiological diagnosis includes radiography, nuclear techniques as well as whole body computer-tomography. Radiation therapy is indicated in cases of mediastinal tumor formation. Radiation of painful osteolytic vertebral metastases and rib destructions proves to be an efficient palliative measure. (orig.)

  17. Bacteriological research for the contamination of equipment in chest radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Seung Gu; Song, Woon Heung; Kweon, Dae Cheol [Shinhan University, Uijeongbu (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    The purpose is to determine the degree of contamination of the equipment for infection control in chest radiography of the radiology department. We confirmed by chemical and bacterial identification of bacteria of the equipment and established a preventive maintenance plan. Chest X-ray radiography contact area on the instrument patients shoulder, hand, chin, chest lateral radiography patient contact areas with a 70% isopropyl alcohol cotton swab were compared to identify the bacteria before and after sterilization on the patient contact area in the chest radiography equipment of the department. The gram positive Staphylococcus was isolated from side shoots handle before disinfection in the chest radiography equipment. For the final identification of antibiotic tested that it was determined by performing the nobobiocin to the sensitive Staphylococcus epidermidis. Chest radiography equipment before disinfecting the handle side of Staphylococcus epidermidis bacteria were detected using a disinfectant should be to prevent hospital infections.

  18. Effectiveness of chest physiotherapy in the management of bronchiectasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronchiectasis is a chronic disease in which clearance of sputum is disturbed because bronchi dilated permanently. So for the clearance of sputum we have to use physiotherapy techniques such as postural drainage percussion and vibration (PDPY), active cycle of breathing technique (ACBT), autogenic drainage, positive expiratory pressure, high frequency chest wall oscillation. Objective: To determine the role of Chest Physical therapy intervention in the management of Bronchi ectasis. To compare the prognosis of bronchiectasis with and without chest physiotherapy. Methodology: Data was collected from Gulab Devi Chest Hospital, Lahore. A Randomized Control Trial (RCT) study method was used and 60 patients are studied. In this study, they were divided into 03 groups 1- Antibiotics Therapy 2-Chest Physical therapy 3-Antibiotics and Chest Physical therapy. Each group consistant. (author)

  19. Evaluation of radiation doses delivered in different chest CT protocols

    OpenAIRE

    Gorycki, Tomasz; Lasek, Iwona; Kamiński, Kamil; Studniarek, Michał

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background There are differences in the reference diagnostic levels for the computed tomography (CT) of the chest as cited in different literature sources. The doses are expressed either in weighted CT dose index (CTDIVOL) used to express the dose per slice, dose-length product (DLP), and effective dose (E). The purpose of this study was to assess the radiation dose used in Low Dose Computer Tomography (LDCT) of the chest in comparison with routine chest CT examinations as well as to ...

  20. Severe Pulmonary Valve Regurgitation 40 Years After Blunt Chest Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuglsang, Simon; Heiberg, Johan; Hjortdal, Vibeke Elisabeth

    2015-10-01

    Severe pulmonary valve regurgitation caused by a pulmonary valve tear is a rare complication to a blunt chest trauma. In this case report, we present a patient with pulmonary regurgitation originating from a chest trauma 40 years ago. Possible mechanisms are osseous pinch of the pulmonary valve between the anterior chest wall and the vertebral column, and retrograde blowout from severe compression of the lungs. PMID:26434447

  1. Chest Radiography Findings in Primary Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Milković, Đurđica; Richter, Darko; Zoričić-Letoja, Ivka; Raos, Miljenko; Koncul, Ivan

    2005-01-01

    Plain chest radiography plays a major role in the diagnosis and follow-up of pulmonary tuberculosis in childhood. The aim of our study was to investigate the distribution of characteristic chest radiographic findings at diagnosis in children with pulmonary tuberculosis. The age of the patients and the type and localization of radiographic changes at admission were retrospectively analyzed. We reviewed chest radiographs in 204 children admitted from January 1, 1991 until June 30, 1994 for newl...

  2. Spectral characteristics of chest wall breath sounds in normal subjects.

    OpenAIRE

    Gavriely, N; Nissan, M.; Rubin, A. H.; Cugell, D. W.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--This study was carried out to establish a reliable bank of information on the spectral characteristics of chest wall breath sounds from healthy men and women, both non-smokers and smokers. METHODS--Chest wall breath sounds from 272 men and 81 women were measured using contact acoustic sensors, amplifiers, and fast Fourier transform (FFT) based spectral analysis software. Inspiratory and expiratory sounds were picked up at three standard locations on the chest wall during breathing...

  3. Optical compensation device for chest film radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Robert G.; Hasegawa, Bruce H.; DeForest, Sherman E.; Schmidt, Gregory W.; Hier, Richard G.

    1990-07-01

    Although chest radiography is the most commonly performed radiographic examination and one of the most valuable and cost-effective studies in medicine it suffers from relatively high error rates in both missing pathology and false positive interpretations. Detectability of lung nodules and other structures in underpenetrated regions of the chest film can be improved by both exposure and optical compensation but current compensation systems require major capital cost or a significant change in normal clinical practice. A new optical compensation system called the " Intelligent X-Ray Illuminator" (IXI) automatically and virtually instantaneously generates a patient-specific optical unsharp mask that is projected directly on a radiograph. When a radiograph is placed on the IXI which looks much like a conventional viewbox it acquires a low-resolution electronic image of this film from which the film transmission is derived. The transmission information is inverted and blurred in an image processor to form an unsharp mask which is fed into a spatial light modulator (SLM) placed between a light source and the radiograph. The SLM tailors the viewbox luminance by decreasing illumination to underexposed (i. e. transmissive) areas of the radiograph presenting the observer with an optically unsharp-masked image. The IXI uses the original radiograph and will allow it to be viewed on demand with conventional (uniform illumination. Potentially the IXI could introduce the known beneficial aspects of optical unsharp masking into radiology at low capital

  4. Chest Traumas due to Fall in Childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ufuk Cobanoglu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Falls are the most common reason for childhood traumas. The aim of this study is to investigate the causes, types, monthly frequencies and results f injuries due to fall of children in our region and to recommend somep recautions for preventing these injuries. Material and Methods: A retrospective evaluation was performed in 47 pediatric patients admitted to the Department of Thoracic Surgery during 2006-2009 with a diagnosis of chest trauma due to fall. For every patient, a pediatric trauma score (PTS was calculated. Descriptive statistics were performed for PTS and the duration of hospital stay. Results: The mean PTS of the cases who had additional system injuries were significantly worse than the cases who had isolated chest traumas. Similarly, the length of hospital stay was also much longer in the cases with associated system injuries.Conclusions: Injuries occur mostly in summer season. It may be due to the fact that the children do not go to the school and usually spend their times outside in this period. The children and their parents should be educated about the prevention of these accidents. Additionally, the accident and injury rates may also be reduced by constructing safer games and sports grounds with robust infrastructure.

  5. Cross-chest liposuction in gynaecomastia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biju Murali

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gynaecomastia is usually treated with liposuction or liposuction with excision of the glandular tissue. The type of surgery chosen depends on the grade of the condition. Objective: Because gynaecomastia is treated primarily as a cosmetic procedure, we aimed at reducing the invasiveness of the surgery. Materials and Methods: The technique complies with all recommended protocols for different grades of gynaecomastia. It uses liposuction, gland excision, or both, leaving only minimal post-operative scars. The use of cross-chest liposuction through incisions on the edge of the areola helps to get rid of all the fat under the areola without an additional scar as in the conventional method. Results: This is a short series of 20 patients, all with bilateral gynaecomastia (i.e., 40 breasts, belonging to Simon′s Stage 1 and 2, studied over a period of 2 years. The average period of follow-up was 15 months. Post-operative complications were reported in only two cases, with none showing long-term complications or issues specifically due to the procedure. Conclusions : Cross-chest liposuction for gynaecomastia is a simple yet effective surgical tool in bilateral gynaecomastia treatment to decrease the post-operative scars. The use of techniques like incision line drain placement and post-drain removal suturing of wounds aid in decreasing the scar.

  6. Acute chest pain emergencies - spouses' prehospital experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forslund, Kerstin; Quell, Robin; Sørlie, Venke

    2008-10-01

    The call to the Emergency Medical Dispatch Centre is often a person's first contact with the health-care system in cases of acute illness or injury and acute chest pain is a common reason for calling. The aim was to illuminate how spouses to persons with acute chest pain experienced the alarm situation, the emergency call and the prehospital emergency care. Interviews were conducted with nineteen spouses. A phenomenological-hermeneutic approach was used for the analyses. The themes responsibility and uneasiness emerged as well as an overall theme of aloneness. Being a spouse to a person in need of acute medical and nursing assistance was interpreted as "Being responsible and trying to preserve life" and "Being able to manage the uneasiness and having trust in an uncertain situation." When their partners' life was at risk the spouses were in an escalating spiral of worry, uncertainty, stress, fear of loss, feeling of loneliness and desperation. They had to manage emotional distress and felt compelled to act to preserve life, a challenging situation. PMID:18929341

  7. Multidetector Computer Tomography: Evaluation of Blunt Chest Trauma in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Palas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Imaging plays an essential part of chest trauma care. By definition, the employed imaging technique in the emergency setting should reach the correct diagnosis as fast as possible. In severe chest blunt trauma, multidetector computer tomography (MDCT has become part of the initial workup, mainly due to its high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of the technique for the detection and characterization of thoracic injuries and also due to its wide availability in tertiary care centers. The aim of this paper is to review and illustrate a spectrum of characteristic MDCT findings of blunt traumatic injuries of the chest including the lungs, mediastinum, pleural space, and chest wall.

  8. Multidetector Computer Tomography: Evaluation of Blunt Chest Trauma in Adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaging plays an essential part of chest trauma care. By definition, the employed imaging technique in the emergency setting should reach the correct diagnosis as fast as possible. In severe chest blunt trauma, multidetector computer tomography (MDCT) has become part of the initial workup, mainly due to its high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of the technique for the detection and characterization of thoracic injuries and also due to its wide availability in tertiary care centers. The aim of this paper is to review and illustrate a spectrum of characteristic MDCT findings of blunt traumatic injuries of the chest including the lungs, mediastinum, pleural space, and chest wall.

  9. Staphylococcus aureus sternal osteomyelitis: a rare cause of chest pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaur M

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Chest pain is a common presenting symptom with a broad differential. Life-threatening cardiac and pulmonary etiologies of chest pain should be evaluated first. However, it is critical to perform a thorough assessment for other sources of chest pain in order to limit morbidity and mortality from less common causes. We present a rare case of a previously healthy 45 year old man who presented with focal, substernal, reproducible chest pain and Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia who was later found to have primary Staphylococcus aureus sternal osteomyelitis.

  10. Chest trauma in children: current imaging guidelines and techniques.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moore, Michael A

    2011-09-01

    Given the heterogeneous nature of pediatric chest trauma, the optimal imaging approach is tailored to the specific patient. Chest radiography remains the most important imaging modality for initial triage. The decision to perform a chest computed tomography scan should be based on the nature of the trauma, the child\\'s clinical condition, and the initial radiographic findings, taking the age-related pretest probabilities of serious injury into account. The principles of as low as reasonably achievable and Image Gently should be followed. The epidemiology and pathophysiology, imaging techniques, characteristic findings, and evidence-based algorithms for pediatric chest trauma are discussed.

  11. Primary Chest Wall Abscess Mimicking a Breast Tumor That Occurred after Blunt Chest Trauma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Yamaoka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary chest wall abscess occurring after blunt chest trauma is rare. We present the case of a 50-year-old woman who presented with a swelling in her left breast. The patient had experienced blunt chest trauma 2 months back. Needle aspiration revealed pus formation in the patient’s chest. Computed tomography revealed a mass in the lower region of the left mammary gland, with thickening of the parietal pleura and skin and fracture of the fifth rib under the abscess. Following antibiotic administration and irrigation of the affected region, surgical debridement was performed. During surgery, we found that the pectoralis major muscle at the level of the fifth rib was markedly damaged, although the necrotic tissue did not contact the mammary gland. We diagnosed the lesion as a chest wall abscess that occurred in response to blunt chest trauma. Her postoperative course was uneventful. There has been no recurrence for six months after surgery.

  12. Comparison of chest compression quality between the modified chest compression method with the use of smartphone application and the standardized traditional chest compression method during CPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Sub

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to grasp difference in quality of chest compression accuracy between the modified chest compression method with the use of smartphone application and the standardized traditional chest compression method. Participants were progressed 64 people except 6 absentees among 70 people who agreed to participation with completing the CPR curriculum. In the classification of group in participants, the modified chest compression method was called as smartphone group (33 people). The standardized chest compression method was called as traditional group (31 people). The common equipments in both groups were used Manikin for practice and Manikin for evaluation. In the meantime, the smartphone group for application was utilized Android and iOS Operating System (OS) of 2 smartphone products (G, i). The measurement period was conducted from September 25th to 26th, 2012. Data analysis was used SPSS WIN 12.0 program. As a result of research, the proper compression depth (mm) was shown the proper compression depth (p< 0.01) in traditional group (53.77 mm) compared to smartphone group (48.35 mm). Even the proper chest compression (%) was formed suitably (p< 0.05) in traditional group (73.96%) more than smartphone group (60.51%). As for the awareness of chest compression accuracy, the traditional group (3.83 points) had the higher awareness of chest compression accuracy (p< 0.001) than the smartphone group (2.32 points). In the questionnaire that was additionally carried out 1 question only in smartphone group, the modified chest compression method with the use of smartphone had the high negative reason in rescuer for occurrence of hand back pain (48.5%) and unstable posture (21.2%). PMID:24704648

  13. Ultrasonic measurements of chest wall thickness and realistic chest phantom for calibration of Pu lung counting facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are four important problems for the measurements of chest wall thickness using ultrasonic device: (1) selection of optimum position of transducer and the number of measured points on the chest covered with detector, (2) estimation of adipose-to-muscle ratio in the chest wall, especially for dispersed adipose like 'marbled beef', (3) determination of regression equations for the prediction of chest wall thickness, derived from groups of different body shape, i.e. corpulent and lean, and (4) estimation of effective chest wall thickness involved self-absorption layer of lung tissue, which changes with distribution of activity in the lungs. This quantity can not be measured with ultrasonic device. Realistic chest phantom was developed. The phantom contains removable model organs (lungs, liver, kidneys and heart), model trachea and artificial rib cage, and also includes chest plates that can be placed over the chest to simulate wide range adipose-to-muscle ratio in the chest wall. Various soft tissue substitutes were made of polyurethane with different concentrations of additive, and the rib cage were made of epoxy resin with calcium carbonate. The experimental data have shown that the phantom can be used as a standard phantom for the calibration. (author)

  14. An unusual cause for recurrent chest infections.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lobo, Ronstan

    2012-10-01

    We present a case of an elderly non-smoking gentleman who, since 2005, had been admitted multiple times for recurrent episodes of shortness of breath, wheeze, cough and sputum. The patient was treated as exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and\\/or lower respiratory tract infections. Bronchoscopy was done which revealed multiple hard nodules in the trachea and bronchi with posterior tracheal wall sparing. Biopsies confirmed this as tracheopathia osteochondroplastica (TO). He had increasing frequency of admission due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and pseudomonas infections, which failed to clear despite intravenous, prolonged oral and nebulised antibiotics. The patient developed increasing respiratory distress and respiratory failure. The patient died peacefully in 2012. This case report highlights the typical pathological and radiological findings of TO and the pitfalls of misdiagnosing patients with recurrent chest infections as COPD.

  15. Relevance of an incidental chest finding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Télles, Arturo; Mendoza, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Solitary pulmonary nodule represents 0.2% of incidental findings in routine chest X-ray images. One of the main diagnoses includes lung cancer in which small-cell subtype has a poor survival rate. Recently, a new classification has been proposed including the very limited disease stage (VLD stage) or T1-T2N0M0 with better survival rate, specifically in those patients who are treated with surgery. However, current recommendations postulate that surgery remains controversial as a first-line treatment in this stage. We present the case of a 46-year-old female referred to our hospital with a preoperative diagnosis of a solitary pulmonary nodule. On initial approach, a biopsy revealed a small cell lung cancer. She received multimodal therapy with surgery, chemotherapy, and prophylactic cranial irradiation and is currently alive without recurrence on a 2-year follow-up. PMID:22345914

  16. Pleural fluids associated with chest infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadri, Amal; Thomson, Anne H

    2002-12-01

    Pleural effusions are commonly associated with pneumonias and a small number of these progress to empyema. An understanding of the physiology and pathophysiology of pleural fluid aids the clinician in the management of empyema. There remains much debate about the optimal treatment of empyema in children. Early recognition of the condition is important since delayed therapy may result in unnecessary morbidity. Conventional management with high dose parenteral antibiotics and chest tube drainage remains the mainstay of therapy. However, this treatment modality may fail if the pleural fluid becomes viscous and loculated and, therefore, a more aggressive approach is required. Intrapleural fibrinolytic therapy has been shown to decrease the length of hospital stay and may reduce the need for surgical intervention. The prognosis in children with parapneumonic empyema is excellent with the vast majority retaining normal lung function at long term follow-up.

  17. An Atypical Cause of Atypical Chest Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Zaheen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present report describes a case involving a 57-year-old HIV-positive man who presented with acute retrosternal chest pain accompanied by 24 h of fever. Septic arthritis of the manubriosternal joint was diagnosed based on magnetic resonance imaging findings in addition to Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. To the authors’ knowledge, the present case is only the 12th reported case of manubriosternal septic arthritis, and the first in an HIV-positive patient. Early diagnosis and treatment can circumvent the need for surgical intervention. Based on the present case report and review of the literature, the authors summarize the epidemiology, appropriate imaging and suggestions for antibiotic therapy for this rare presentation.

  18. Chest magnetic resonance imaging: a protocol suggestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Hochhegger

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the recent years, with the development of ultrafast sequences, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has been established as a valuable diagnostic modality in body imaging. Because of improvements in speed and image quality, MRI is now ready for routine clinical use also in the study of pulmonary diseases. The main advantage of MRI of the lungs is its unique combination of morphological and functional assessment in a single imaging session. In this article, the authors review most technical aspects and suggest a protocol for performing chest MRI. The authors also describe the three major clinical indications for MRI of the lungs: staging of lung tumors; evaluation of pulmonary vascular diseases; and investigation of pulmonary abnormalities in patients who should not be exposed to radiation.

  19. Digital luminescence radiography of the chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of a digital system in chest radiology compared to the conventional film-screen system. The first studies (1-3) were purely clinical, had two parts, one clinical and one using phantoms, and the 5:th used solely phantoms. Except for the first - pilot - study, the studies were performed as receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. From one exposure, two digital radiographs were obtained, one simulating the film-screen radiograph and one enhanced, using an unsharp mask. The conventional radiograph was compared to this double-image, but in addition to this, even to the simulated normal and enhanced separately (1-3). To evaluate the value of inverted (positive) radiographs, the original digital (negative) radiographs were inverted, and then compared to the originals (4). As digitzation means easy storing and transfer of data and possibility of electronic display, the diagnostic performance of an interactive workstation was assessed (5). In the clinical studies, a variety of chest affections were used: atelectasis, tumor, pneumothorax, fibrosis, mediastinal and bony changes, tuberculosis, incompensations and enlargement of the heart (1), pneumothorax (2), fibrosis (3), and tumor (4). In the phantom studies, test objects simulating tumors (4) and pneumothorax (5) were used. In no study was statistical significant difference seen between the digital and conventional system (p>0.05). Neither in the clinical nor the phantom study did inversion of the radiographs improve diagnostic performance. The workstation performed almost equally well as the radiographs even with a resolution of 1.25 1p/mm compared to the digital radiographs 2.5 and film-screen radiographs 5 1p/mm. (au) (50 refs.)

  20. Coping in Chest Pain Patients with and without Psychiatric Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitaliano, Peter P.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Examined relations between psychiatric disorder and coronary heart disease (CHD) in 77 patients with chest pain, and compared coping profiles of chest pain patients with and without psychiatric disorders and CHD. Psychiatric patients with no medical disease were also studied. Results are discussed in the context of illness behavior and…

  1. Low dose computed tomography of the chest : Applications and limitations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gietema, H.A.

    2007-01-01

    In areas with a high intrinsic contrast such as the chest, radiation dose can be reduced for specific indications. Low dose chest CT is feasible and cannot only be applied for lung cancer screening, but also in daily routine and for early detection of lung destruction. We showed in a small sample of

  2. Segmentation of anatomical structures in chest CT scans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rikxoort, E.M.

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, methods are described for the automatic segmentation of anatomical structures from chest CT scans. First, a method to segment the lungs from chest CT scans is presented. Standard lung segmentation algorithms rely on large attenuation differences between the lungs and the surrounding

  3. Chest physical therapy in acute viral bronchiolitis: an updated review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postiaux, Guy; Zwaenepoel, Bruno; Louis, Jacques

    2013-09-01

    We describe the various therapies for infant acute viral bronchiolitis and the contradictory results obtained with chest physical therapy. The treatment target is bronchial obstruction, which is a multifactorial phenomenon that includes edema, bronchoconstriction, and increased mucus production, with a clinical grading defined as severe, moderate, or mild. Chest physical therapy is revisited in its various modalities, according to preliminary scoring of the disease.

  4. Effect of rib-cage structure on acoustic chest impedance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmermann, Niels Henrik; Møller, Henrik; Hansen, John;

    2011-01-01

    When a stethoscope is placed on the surface of the chest, the coupler picks up sound from heart and lungs transmitted through the tissues of the ribcage and from the surface of the skin. If the acoustic impedance of the chest surface is known, it is possible to optimize the coupler for picking up...

  5. Giant pericardial cyst mimicking dextrocardia on chest X-ray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, Hamad M; Galrinho, Ana; Abreu, João; Valente, Bruno; Bakero, Luis; Ferreira, Rui C

    2013-01-01

    Pericardial cysts are rare benign congenital malformations, usually small, asymptomatic and detected incidentally on chest X-ray as a mass located in the right costophrenic angle. Giant pericardial cysts are very uncommon and produce symptoms by compressing adjacent structures. In this report, the authors present a case of a symptomatic giant pericardial cyst incorrectly diagnosed as dextrocardia on chest X-ray.

  6. Lung mass, right upper lung - chest x-ray (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This picture is a chest x-ray of a person with a lung mass. This is a front view, where the lungs are the two dark areas and ... visible in the middle of the chest. The x-ray shows a mass in the right upper lung, ...

  7. Sexual, Physical, Verbal/Emotional Abuse and Unexplained Chest Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslick, Guy D.; Koloski, Natasha A.; Talley, Nicholas J.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Approximately one third of patients with non cardiac chest pain (NCCP) report a history of abuse, however no data exists on the prevalence of abuse among people with unexplained chest pain in the general population. We aimed to determine if there is a relationship between childhood sexual, physical, emotional abuse and unexplained…

  8. Resuscitation, prolonged cardiac arrest, and an automated chest compression device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risom, Martin; Jørgensen, Henrik; Rasmussen, Lars S;

    2010-01-01

    The European Resuscitation Council's 2005 guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) emphasize the delivery of uninterrupted chest compressions of adequate depth during cardiac arrest.......The European Resuscitation Council's 2005 guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) emphasize the delivery of uninterrupted chest compressions of adequate depth during cardiac arrest....

  9. Management of chest drainage tubes after lung surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Yukitoshi

    2016-06-01

    Since chest tubes have been routinely used to drain the pleural space, particularly after lung surgery, the management of chest tubes is considered to be essential for the thoracic surgeon. The pleural drainage system requires effective drainage, suction, and water-sealing. Another key point of chest tube management is that a water seal is considered to be superior to suction for most air leaks. Nowadays, the most common pleural drainage device attached to the chest tube is the three-bottle system. An electronic chest drainage system has been developed that is effective in standardizing the postoperative management of chest tubes. More liberal use of digital drainage devices in the postoperative management of the pleural space is warranted. The removal of chest tubes is a common procedure occurring almost daily in hospitals throughout the world. Extraction of the tube is usually done at the end of full inspiration or at the end of full expiration. The tube removal technique is not as important as how it is done and the preparation for the procedure. The management of chest tubes must be based on careful observation, the patient's characteristics, and the operative procedures that had been performed. PMID:27048219

  10. Measurement of characteristic leap interval between chest and falsetto registers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miller, DG; Svec, JG; Schutte, HK

    2002-01-01

    A markedly smaller time constant distinguishes a chest-falsetto leap from the more usual execution of a sung interval by muscular adjustments in the length and tension of the vocal folds. The features of such a chest-falsetto leap are examined in detail with respect to F-0, peak-to-peak amplitude of

  11. Electronic versus traditional chest tube drainage following lobectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lijkendijk, Marike; Licht, Peter B; Neckelmann, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Electronic drainage systems have shown superiority compared with traditional (water seal) drainage systems following lung resections, but the number of studies is limited. As part of a medico-technical evaluation, before change of practice to electronic drainage systems for routine...... thoracic surgery, we conducted a randomized controlled trial (RCT) investigating chest tube duration and length of hospitalization. METHODS: Patients undergoing lobectomy were included in a prospective open label RCT. A strict algorithm was designed for early chest tube removal, and this decision...... time for chest tube removal, as well as length of hospitalization. RESULTS: A total of 105 patients were randomized. We found no significant difference between the electronic group and traditional group in optimal chest tube duration (HR = 0.83; 95% CI: 0.55-1.25; P = 0.367), actual chest tube duration...

  12. Age-related changes in chest geometry during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, J M; Koehler, R C; Schleien, C L; Michael, J R; Chantarojanasiri, T; Rogers, M C; Traystman, R J

    1987-06-01

    We studied alterations of chest geometry during conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation in anesthetized immature swine. Pulsatile force was applied to the sternum in increments to determine the effects of increasing compression on chest geometry and intrathoracic vascular pressures. In 2-wk- and 1-mo-old piglets, permanent changes in chest shape developed due to incomplete recoil of the chest along the anteroposterior axis, and large intrathoracic vascular pressures were generated. In 3-mo-old animals, permanent chest deformity did not develop, and large intrathoracic vascular pressures were not produced. We propose a theoretical model of the chest as an elliptic cylinder. Pulsatile displacement along the minor axis of an ellipse produces a greater decrease in cross-sectional area than displacement of a circular cross section. As thoracic cross section became less circular due to deformity, greater changes in thoracic volume, and hence pressure, were produced. With extreme deformity at high force, pulsatile displacement became limited, diminishing pressure generation. We conclude that changes in chest geometry are important in producing intrathoracic intravascular pressure during conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation in piglets. PMID:3610916

  13. Measurement of chest wall displacement based on terahertz wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Lv, Hao; Jiao, Teng; Lu, Guohua; Li, Sheng; Li, Zhao; Liu, Miao; Jing, Xijing; Wang, Jianqi

    2015-02-01

    Measurement of chest wall displacement is an important approach for measuring mechanics of chest wall, which has considerable significance for assessing respiratory system and diagnosing pulmonary diseases. However, existing optical methods for measuring chest wall displacement are inconvenient for some specific patients such as the female patients and the patients with bandaged chest. In this letter, we proposed a method for measuring chest wall displacement based on terahertz wave and established corresponding mathematic model and set up a terahertz measurement system. The main advantages of this method are that it can measure the chest wall displacement of the subjects without taking off clothes or arranging any markers. To validate this method and assess the performance of the terahertz system, in vitro, the displacement of a water module driven by a linear guide rail was measured by the terahertz system and compared with the actual displacement of the water module. The results showed that the waveforms measured with two methods have a good agreement, and the relative error is less than 5% and sufficiently good for measurement demands. In vivo, the synchronous experiment was performed on five human volunteers with the terahertz system and a respiratory belt transducer. The results demonstrate that this method has good performance and promising prospects for measuring chest wall displacement.

  14. Dose profile in computed tomography chest scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the optimization of the patient dose in computed tomography (CT), the Brazilian legislation only established the diagnostic reference levels (DRL's) in terms of Multiple Scan Average Dose (MSAD) in a typical adult as a parameter of quality control of CT scanners. Conformity to the DRL's can be verified by measuring the dose distribution in CT scans and MSAD determination. An analysis of the quality of CT scans of the metropolitan region of Belo Horizonte is necessary by conducting pertinent tests to the study that are presented in the ANVISA (National Agency of Sanitary Vigilance) Guide. The purpose of this study is to investigate, in a chest scan, the variation of dose in CT. To measure the dose profile are used lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100 Rod) distributed in cylinders positioned in peripheral and central regions of a phantom of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). The data obtained allow us to observe the variation of the dose profile inside the phantom. The peripheral region shows higher dose values than the central region. The longitudinal variation can be observed and the maximum dose was recorded at the edges of the phantom (41,58±5,10) mGy at the midpoint of the longitudinal axis. The results will contribute to disseminate the proper procedure and optimize the dosimetry and the tests of quality control in CT, as well as make a critical analysis of the DRL's. (author)

  15. An uncommon cause of chest pain - penetrating atherosclerotic aortic ulcer

    OpenAIRE

    Kyaw, Htoo; Sadiq, Sanah; Chowdhury, Arnab; Gholamrezaee, Rashin; Yoe, Linus

    2016-01-01

    Chest pain is a very common symptom and can be of cardiac or non-cardiac origin. It accounts for approximately 5.5 million annual emergency room visits in the United States, according to 2011 CDC data. Penetrating atherosclerotic aortic ulcer (PAU), an uncommon condition, is also a potential cause of chest pain. We here report the case of a 65-year-old woman who presented with atypical chest and back pain. The pain persisted for 4 weeks necessitating two emergency room visits. Initial tests w...

  16. Chest X-ray in newborns and infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chest X-ray in newborns and infants shows great differences to that in adults. Therefore all radiologists, who engage in X-rays in this age group, must be familiar with the special features. At the beginning specific items of examination methods are explained, which must be strictly followed due to radiological protection. Focus of the paper is the discussion of the important chest diseases in newborn and infants, which are mostly unknown in chest diagnosis in adults. Many of them can be life-threatening, thus their knowledge is essential. Pathophysiological explanations shall make the special radiological signs understandable. (orig.)

  17. Response to the argument on the risk of cancer with chest CT screening. Is low-dose chest CT safe?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The steady increase in the annual number of chest CT screening has become a worldwide concern because of its associated risk of lung cancer. Epidemiological studies, however, have shown that repeated exposure to low-dose radiation does not increase the risk of lung cancer. In addition, a recent randomized controlled study on chest CT screening has shown its usefulness for reducing lung cancer mortality. We reviewed the risk of lung cancer after repeated exposure to low-dose radiation, the efficacy of chest CT screening, and device technology for reducing the irradiation dose. (author)

  18. Chest trauma: A case for single lung ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraj Pandharikar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chest trauma is one of the important causes of mortality and morbidity in pediatric trauma patients. The complexity, magnitude, and type of lung injury make it extremely challenging to provide optimal oxygenation and ventilation while protecting the lung from further injury due to mechanical ventilation. Independent lung ventilation is used sporadically in these patients who do not respond to these conventional ventilatory strategies using double-lumen endotracheal tubes, bronchial blocker balloons, etc. However, this equipment may not be easily available in developing countries, especially for pediatric patients. Here, we present a case of severe chest trauma with pulmonary contusion, flail chest, and bronchopleural fistula, who did not respond to conventional lung protective strategies. She was successfully managed with bronchoscopy-guided unilateral placement of conventional endotracheal tube followed by single lung ventilation leading to resolution of a chest injury.

  19. Evaluation of different imaging chains in clinical chest radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manninen, H.; Terho, E.O.; Wiljasalo, M.; Wiljasalo, S.; Soimakallio, S. (Kuopio Central Hospital (Finland))

    1984-11-01

    Six imaging techniques in clinical chest radiography have been evaluated: four film-screen combinations in the conventional grid technique and two combinations in the air gap technique. Five parameters characterising the quality of a chest radiograph were evaluated by three radiologists and one chest physician by using a nominal grading scale from -2 to +2 compared with the standard technique. The quality parameters judged were: the visibility of peripheral lung vessels, lung parenchyme, the pulmonary hilum, and lung structure behind the heart shadow, as well as the visibility of miscellaneous findings of clinical interest. The air gap technique was shown to be superior to the ordinary grid technique. The diagnostic quality of chest radiography does not necessarily deteriorate with the screen speed. However, statistically significant differences were noticed, even between techniques which had equal speed and physical resolution.

  20. Thoracoscopic pulmonary wedge resection without post-operative chest drain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbek, Bo Laksáfoss; Hansen, Henrik Jessen; Kehlet, Henrik;

    2016-01-01

    effusion and coagulopathy. Chest X-rays were done twice on the day of surgery. 30-day complications were compiled from patient records. RESULTS: 49 patients underwent 51 unilateral VATS wedge resections without using a post-operative chest drain. No patient required reinsertion of a chest drain. 30 (59...... %) patients had a pneumothorax of mean size 12 ± 12 mm on supine 8-h post-operative X-ray for which the majority resolved spontaneously within 2-week control. There were no complications on 30-day follow-up. Median length of stay was 1 day. CONCLUSIONS: The results support that VATS wedge resection...... for pulmonary nodules without a post-operative chest drain may be safe in a selected group of patients....

  1. Chest X ray examination of workers exposed to pneumoconiosis risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chest X-ray examination of workers exposed to pneumoconiosis risk: critical analysis of legal and radiation protection aspects. Chest X-ray examination is one of the most common radiological examinations practised in Italy. According to Presidential Decree 1124/65, workers exposed to risk of asbestosis and silicosis must undergo a chest radiography once a year, on occasion of the periodic medical examination. Basic requirements aimed at the radiation protection of the patient must therefore be complied with, and optimization of the chest radiography execution procedures is required. This paper illustrates the results obtained with the implementation of the NEXT programme in Italy for this kind of X-ray examination. The main objective of the NEXT programme is the optimization of radiological techniques. On the basis of the most recent publications in the field of radiation protection, a critical analysis is made of the laws in force in Italy

  2. Radiological chest manifestations in diffuse infiltrative lymphocytosis syndrome (DILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Ismail

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This report focuses on the radiological manifestations of diffuse interstitial lymphocytosis syndrome (DILS in the chest. Awareness of this entity and early diagnosis by radiologists will enable timeous intervention by clinicians.

  3. The chest pain center in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalenski, R J; Grzybowski, M

    2001-05-01

    Despite the improvement of medical treatment for acute coronary syndromes throughout the 20th century, the authors believe that many cases of life-threatening coronary events could be avoided through early detection of CAD and the use of preventive strategies. Establishing chest pain units that are linked to the ED is one excellent strategy to risk-stratify patients with symptoms who are at risk for sustaining an AMI or having lethal arrhythmias. There is a need for more research on chest pain units to determine the value for cost and to further optimize strategies for ACI detection and screening. In EDs with high volumes of chest pain patients, or high pressures to avoid hospital admissions, a planned, systematic, and rapid approach to the treatment of AMI and the diagnosis of chest pain is a rewarding necessity. PMID:11373990

  4. Histiocytic disorders of the chest: imaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Jitesh; Kanne, Jeffrey P; Meyer, Cristopher A; Pipavath, Sudhakar N J; Schmidt, Rodney A; Swanson, Jonathan O; Godwin, J David

    2015-01-01

    Histiocytic disorders of the chest comprise a broad spectrum of diseases. The lungs may be involved in isolation or as part of systemic disease. Some of these disorders are primary and have unknown etiology, and others result from a histiocytic response to a known cause. Among primary histiocytic disorders, pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis (PLCH) is the most common; others include Erdheim-Chester disease and Rosai-Dorfman disease. Adult PLCH occurs almost exclusively in adults aged 20-40 years who smoke. Pediatric PLCH is extremely rare and typically occurs as part of multisystemic disease. Erdheim-Chester disease affects middle-aged and older adults; thoracic involvement usually occurs as part of systemic disease. Rosai-Dorfman disease affects children and young adults and manifests as painless cervical lymphadenopathy. Examples of secondary histiocytic disorders are storage diseases such as Gaucher disease, Niemann-Pick disease, and Fabry disease; pneumoconiosis such as silicosis and coal workers' pneumoconiosis; and infections such as Whipple disease and malakoplakia. These disorders are characterized at histopathologic examination on the basis of infiltration of alveoli or the pulmonary interstitium by histiocytes, which are a group of cells that includes macrophages and dendritic cells. Dendritic cells are a heterogeneous group of nonphagocytic antigen-presenting immune cells. Immunohistochemical markers help to distinguish among various primary histiocytic disorders. Characteristic radiologic findings in the appropriate clinical context may obviate biopsy to establish a correct diagnosis. However, in the absence of these findings, integration of clinical, pathologic, and radiologic features is required to establish a diagnosis. PMID:25763722

  5. High-Frequency Chest Compression: A Summary of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Dosman, Cara F; Jones, Richard L

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the present literature summary is to describe high-frequency chest compression (HFCC), summarize its history and outline study results on its effect on mucolysis, mucus transport, pulmonary function and quality of life. HFCC is a mechanical method of self-administered chest physiotherapy, which induces rapid air movement in and out of the lungs. This mean oscillated volume is an effective method of mucolysis and mucus clearance. HFCC can increase independence. Some studies have...

  6. Computer-aided recognition of emphysema on digital chest radiography.

    OpenAIRE

    Miniati, Massimo; Coppini, Giuseppe; Monti, Simonetta; Bottai, Matteo; Paterni, Marco; Ferdeghini, Ezio Maria

    2011-01-01

    Background Computed tomography (CT) is the benchmark for diagnosis emphysema, but is costly and imparts a substantial radiation burden to the patient. Objective To develop a computer-aided procedure that allows recognition of emphysema on digital chest radiography by using simple descriptors of the lung shape. The procedure was tested against CT. Methods Patients (N=225), who had undergone postero-anterior and lateral digital chest radiographs and CT for diagnostic purposes, were studied and ...

  7. The molecular fingerprint of lung inflammation after blunt chest trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Ehrnthaller, Christian; Flierl, Michael; Perl, Mario; Denk, Stephanie; Unnewehr, Heike; Ward, Peter A.; Radermacher, Peter; Ignatius, Anita; Gebhard, Florian; Chinnaiyan, Arul; Huber-Lang, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Background After severe blunt chest trauma, the development of an acute lung injury (ALI) is often associated with severe or even lethal complications. Especially in multiple injured patients after blunt chest trauma ALI/ARDS [acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)] is frequent. However, in the initial posttraumatic phase, inflammatory clinical signs are often not apparent and underlying changes in gene-expression profile are unknown. Methods Therefore, inflammation in lung tissue followi...

  8. Quick identification of acute chest pain patients study (QICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Horst Iwan CC

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with acute chest pain are often referred to the emergency ward and extensively investigated. Investigations are costly and could induce unnecessary complications, especially with invasive diagnostics. Nevertheless, chest pain patients have high mortalities. Fast identification of high-risk patients is crucial. Therefore several strategies have been developed including specific symptoms, signs, laboratory measurements, and imaging. Methods/Design The Quick Identification of acute Chest pain Study (QICS will investigate whether a combined use of specific symptoms and signs, electrocardiography, routine and new laboratory measures, adjunctive imaging including electron beam (EBT computed tomography (CT and contrast multislice CT (MSCT will have a high diagnostic yield for patients with acute chest pain. All patients will be investigated according a standardized protocol in the Emergency Department. Serum and plasma will be frozen for future analysis for a wide range of biomarkers at a later time point. The primary endpoint is the safe recognition of low-risk chest pain patients directly at presentation. Secondary endpoint is the identification of a wide range of sensitive predictive clinical markers, chemical biomarkers and radiological markers in acute chest pain patients. Chemical biomarkers will be compared to quantitative CT measurements of coronary atherosclerosis as a surrogate endpoint. Chemical biomarkers will also be compared in head to head comparison and for their additional value. Discussion This will be a very extensive investigation of a wide range of risk predictors in acute chest pain patients. New reliable fast and cheap diagnostic algorithm resulting from the test results might improve chest pain patients' prognosis, and reduce unnecessary costs and diagnostic complications.

  9. Comparison of Fentanyl with Sufentanil for Chest Tube Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Golmohammadi

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: After cardiac surgery, the chest tubes cause pain and their removal is painful and unpleasant forpatients. The aim of this research was to study and compare the analgesic effect of fentanyl and sufentanil on painrelief during chest tube removal in post-cardiac surgical patients.Patients and Methods: A total of 80 patients scheduled for elective cardiac surgery, were recruited in prospective,randomized and double-blind study. Patients received 1.5μg/kg fentanyl or 0.15μg/kg sufentanyl, intravenously10 minutes before removal of chest tube. Pain intensity was assessed by measuring visual analogscale (VAS pain score, 10 minutes before, during, and 5 and10 minutes after removing chest tubes. Level ofsedation, heart rate, arterial blood pressure, and oxygenation saturation were recorded at each stage by a blindedobserver.Results: Mean pain intensity scores 10 minutes before removal of chest tube in fentanyl, and sufentanil groupswere 29.5±12.1 and 31±11.2 respectively. Pain scores during chest tube removal were 38.5±11.6 in fentanylgroup and 44.7±12.8 in sufentanil group (P =0.02. In addition, pain scores during chest tube removal were significantly(P value=0.02 more reduced in fentanyl (17.21±7.5 than in sufentanil group (21.51±11.2. Sedationscores remained low in two groups. None of the patients showed any adverse side effects of opioids. No differenceswere seen in the heart rate or arterial blood pressure, but oxygenation saturation was significantly greaterin sufentanil group than in fentanyl group.Conclusion: Both fentanyl and sufentanil provide adequate analgesia for chest tube removal without increasinguntoward side effects.

  10. Incidentally Detected Enhancing Breast Lesions on Chest Computed Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Wen-Chiung; Hsu, Hsian-He; Li, Chao-Shiang; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hsu, Giu-Cheng; Yu, Cheng-Ping; Chang, Tsun-Hou; Huang, Guo-Shu

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the nature and imaging appearance of incidental enhancing breast lesions detected on a routine contrast-enhanced chest CT. Materials and Methods Twenty-three patients with incidental enhancing breast lesions on contrast-enhanced chest CT were retrospectively reviewed. The breast lesions were reviewed by unenhanced and enhanced CT, and evaluated by observing the shapes, margins, enhancement patterns and backgrounds of breast lesions. A histopathologic diagnosis or long-te...

  11. Pleuritic Chest Pain; Where Should We Search for?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad-Hassan Moradinejad

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Pleuritic pain is not an unusual problem in children. Other concomitant symptoms should be considered for diagnostic approach in a child with pleuritic chest pain. In this report we discuss chest pain in a 6-year-old child with regard to other signs and symptoms. Finally, we found a rare life-threatening complication of juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE in our patient.

  12. Comparison of expectorated sputum after manual chest physical therapy and high-frequency chest compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warwick, Warren J; Wielinski, Catherine L; Hansen, Leland G

    2004-01-01

    This study is a quantitative comparison of the sputum produced by 12 subjects with cystic fibrosis (CF) who received high-frequency chest compression (HFCC) and standard chest physical therapy (CPT) in randomized order. Six subjects routinely used manual CPT and six routinely used the HFCC. None had acute infections or hospitalization in the six weeks before the study. Two certified respiratory therapists alternated subjects and CPT vs HFCC order during the two weeks of the matched study. For all sessions, the expectorated sputum was collected in preweighed cups, which were reweighed immediately after collection and again after evaporation to dryness. The wet and dry weights of the sputum produced as a result of the two techniques were significantly different, with HFCC having greater weight. Regardless of the mode of therapy, the sputum produced by the subjects who regularly received HFCC had greater water content than did the sputum produced by those subjects who regularly received CPT. No significant difference was found between the two therapists regarding sputum expectorated by the subjects during CPT. These results show that sputum production by subjects with CF who receive CPT by certified respiratory therapists can be as great as the sputum produced by the same subjects who receive HFCC. The results also suggest that unknown factors attributed to the therapists may produce different levels of effort from time to time that may decrease the respiratory therapists' effectiveness, whereas the HFCC therapy may be more consistently effective because it is entirely machine based.

  13. Chest X ray effective doses estimation in computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conventional chest radiography is technically difficult because of wide in tissue attenuations in the chest and limitations of screen-film systems. Computed radiography (CR) offers a different approach utilizing a photostimulable phosphor. photostimulable phosphors overcome some image quality limitations of chest imaging. The objective of this study was to estimate the effective dose in computed radiography at three hospitals in Khartoum. This study has been conducted in radiography departments in three centres Advanced Diagnostic Center, Nilain Diagnostic Center, Modern Diagnostic Center. The entrance surface dose (ESD) measurement was conducted for quality control of x-ray machines and survey of operators experimental techniques. The ESDs were measured by UNFORS dosimeter and mathematical equations to estimate patient doses during chest X rays. A total of 120 patients were examined in three centres, among them 62 were males and 58 were females. The overall mean and range of patient dosed was 0.073±0.037 (0.014-0.16) mGy per procedure while the effective dose was 3.4±01.7 (0.6-7.0) mSv per procedure. This study compared radiation doses to patients radiographic examinations of chest using computed radiology. The radiation dose was measured in three centres in Khartoum- Sudan. The results of the measured effective dose showed that the dose in chest radiography was lower in computed radiography compared to previous studies.(Author)

  14. Chest wall segmentation in automated 3D breast ultrasound scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Tao; Platel, Bram; Mann, Ritse M; Huisman, Henkjan; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we present an automatic method to segment the chest wall in automated 3D breast ultrasound images. Determining the location of the chest wall in automated 3D breast ultrasound images is necessary in computer-aided detection systems to remove automatically detected cancer candidates beyond the chest wall and it can be of great help for inter- and intra-modal image registration. We show that the visible part of the chest wall in an automated 3D breast ultrasound image can be accurately modeled by a cylinder. We fit the surface of our cylinder model to a set of automatically detected rib-surface points. The detection of the rib-surface points is done by a classifier using features representing local image intensity patterns and presence of rib shadows. Due to attenuation of the ultrasound signal, a clear shadow is visible behind the ribs. Evaluation of our segmentation method is done by computing the distance of manually annotated rib points to the surface of the automatically detected chest wall. We examined the performance on images obtained with the two most common 3D breast ultrasound devices in the market. In a dataset of 142 images, the average mean distance of the annotated points to the segmented chest wall was 5.59 ± 3.08 mm. PMID:23273891

  15. A new specifically designed forceps for chest drain insertion.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Andrews, Emmet

    2012-02-03

    Insertion of a chest drain can be associated with serious complications. It is recommended that the drain is inserted with blunt dissection through the chest wall but there is no specific instrument to aid this task. We describe a new reusable forceps that has been designed specifically to facilitate the insertion of chest drains.A feasibility study of its use in patients who required a chest drain as part of elective cardiothoracic operations was undertaken. The primary end-point was successful and accurate placement of the drain. The operators also completed a questionnaire rating defined aspects of the procedure. The new instrument was used to insert the chest drain in 30 patients (19 male, 11 female; median age 61.5 years (range 16-81 years)). The drain was inserted successfully without the trocar in all cases and there were no complications. Use of the instrument rated as significantly easier relative to experience of previous techniques in all specified aspects. The new device can be used to insert intercostal chest drains safely and efficiently without using the trocar or any other instrument.

  16. Chest wall segmentation in automated 3D breast ultrasound scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Tao; Platel, Bram; Mann, Ritse M; Huisman, Henkjan; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we present an automatic method to segment the chest wall in automated 3D breast ultrasound images. Determining the location of the chest wall in automated 3D breast ultrasound images is necessary in computer-aided detection systems to remove automatically detected cancer candidates beyond the chest wall and it can be of great help for inter- and intra-modal image registration. We show that the visible part of the chest wall in an automated 3D breast ultrasound image can be accurately modeled by a cylinder. We fit the surface of our cylinder model to a set of automatically detected rib-surface points. The detection of the rib-surface points is done by a classifier using features representing local image intensity patterns and presence of rib shadows. Due to attenuation of the ultrasound signal, a clear shadow is visible behind the ribs. Evaluation of our segmentation method is done by computing the distance of manually annotated rib points to the surface of the automatically detected chest wall. We examined the performance on images obtained with the two most common 3D breast ultrasound devices in the market. In a dataset of 142 images, the average mean distance of the annotated points to the segmented chest wall was 5.59 ± 3.08 mm.

  17. Posterior diaphragmatic defect detected on chest CT: the incidence according to age and the lateral chest radiographic appearances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Son Youl; Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Seok Chol; Heo, Jeong Nam; Park, Choong Ki [College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    We wanted to investigate the incidence of posterior diaphragmatic defect on chest CT in various age groups and its lateral chest radiographic appearances. The chest CT scans of 78 patients of various ages with posterior diaphragmatic defect were selected among 1,991 patients, and they were analyzed for the incidence of defect in various age groups, the defect location and the herniated contents. Their lateral chest radiographs were analyzed for the shape of the posterior diaphragm and the posterior costophrenic sulcus. The patients' ages ranged from 34 to 87 with the tendency of a higher incidence in the older patients. The defect most frequently involved the medial two thirds (n = 49, 50.4%) and middle one third (n = 36, 37%) of the posterior diaphragm. The retroperitoneal fat was herniated into the thorax through the defect in all patients, and sometimes with the kidney (n = 8). Lateral chest radiography showed a normal diaphragmatic contour (n = 51, 49.5%), blunting of the posterior costophrenic sulcus (n = 41, 39.8%), focal humping of the posterior diaphragm (n = 7, 6.8%), or upward convexity (n = 4, 3.9%) of the posterior costophrenic sulcus on the affected side. The posterior diaphragmatic defect discovered in asymptomatic patients who are without a history of peridiaphragmatic disease is most likely acquired, and this malady increases in incidence according to age. An abnormal contour of the posterior diaphragm or the costophrenic sulcus on a lateral chest radiograph may be a finding of posterior diaphragmatic defect.

  18. [Chest pain - not always the heart! Clinical impact of gastrointestinal diseases in non-cardiac chest pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frieling, T; Bergdoldt, G; Allescher, H D; Riemann, J F

    2015-02-01

    Non cardiac chest pain (NCCP) are recurrent angina pectoris like pain without evidence of coronary heart disease in conventional diagnostic evaluation. The prevalence of NCCP is up to 70 % and may be detected in this order at all levels of the medical health care system (general practitioner, emergency department, chest pain unit, coronary care). Reduction of quality of life in NCCP is comparable, partially even higher compared to cardiac chest pain. Reasons for psychological strain are symptom recurrence in app. 50 %, nonspecific diagnosis with resulting uncertainty and insufficient integration of other medical disciplines in diagnostic work-up. Managing of patients with NCCP has to be interdisciplinary because non cardiac causes of chest pain may be found frequently. Especially gastroenterological expertise is required because in 50 - 60 % of cases gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), in 15 - 18 % hypercontractile esophageal motility disorders with nutcracker, jackhammer esophagus or distal esophageal spasmus or achalasia and in 32 - 35 % other esophageal alterations (e. g. infectious esophageal inflammation, drug-induced ulcer, rings, webs, eosinophilic esophagitis) as cause of chest pain may be detected. This implicates that regular interdisciplinary round wards and management of chest pain units are mandatory.

  19. Chest radiograph usefulness in the diagnosis of acute aortic dissection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nancy Welch; Chat Dang; Carlton Allen; Robert Cook

    2005-01-01

    Objective To assess the diagnostic value of chest radiographs in patients presenting to a busy inner-city Emergency Department with subsequently proven acute aortic dissection. Methods A retrospective review of initial chest radiographs and charts of patients with the confirmed diagnosis of acute aortic dissection was done for a period of 5 years from 1998 to 2003. A comparison was made between the initial readings of chest radiographs prior to confirmation of the aortic dissection, and a retrospective review of the same radiographs by two board-certified radiologists with special attention to the classic findings of acute aortic dissection identifiable on plain films. Results The charts of nine patients (four men, five women) with proven acute aortic dissection were reviewed. All nine patients were suspected of having acute aortic dissection based on presenting history and symptoms of chest pain (66% ), migratory pain (89% ), back pain (89% ), and the abruptness of onset of pain (89% ). Initial plain portable chest X-rays were obtained in the Emergency Department in all nine patients. Six of nine (67%) radiographs were read as normal, while three (33%) demonstrated a widened mediastinum (> 8.0cm), two (22%) showed an abnormal aortic contour, with one ( 11% ) displaying an apical cap. Confirmation of the diagnosis was obtained with either a spiral CT angiogram or transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). All nine plain radiographs were retrospectively reviewed by two board-certified radiologists aware of the diagnosis of acute dissection without a change in the readings. Conclusions Plain portable chest radiographs are of limited usefulness for the screening of acute aortic dissection. Further radiologic evaluation should be dictated by the clinical presentation and an awareness of the low sensitivity of portable chest X- rays.

  20. Dose and perceived image quality in chest radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chest radiography is the most commonly performed diagnostic X-ray examination. The radiation dose to the patient for this examination is relatively low but because of its frequent use, the contribution to the collective dose is considerable. Consequently, optimization of dose and image quality offers a challenging area of research. In this article studies on dose reduction, different detector technologies, optimization of image acquisition and new technical developments in image acquisition and post processing will be reviewed. Studies indicate that dose reduction in PA chest images to at least 50% of commonly applied dose levels does not affect diagnosis in the lung fields; however, dose reduction in the mediastinum, upper abdomen and retrocardiac areas appears to directly deteriorate diagnosis. In addition to patient dose, also the design of the various digital detectors seems to have an effect on image quality. With respect to image acquisition, studies showed that using a lower tube voltage improves visibility of anatomical structures and lesions in digital chest radiographs but also increases the disturbing appearance of ribs. New techniques that are currently being evaluated are dual energy, tomosynthesis, temporal subtraction and rib suppression. These technologies may improve diagnostic chest X-ray further. They may for example reduce the negative influence of over projection of ribs, referred to as anatomic noise. In chest X-ray this type of noise may be the dominating factor in the detection of nodules. In conclusion, optimization and new developments will enlarge the value of chest X-ray as a mainstay in the diagnosis of chest diseases.

  1. Chest X-ray imaging of patients with SARS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆普选; 周伯平; 陈心春; 袁明远; 龚小龙; 杨根东; 刘锦清; 袁本通; 郑广平; 杨桂林; 王火生

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the chest X-ray manifestations of SARS cases.Methods A retrospective study was conducted among 52 clinically confirmed SARS patients from February 9 to May 10, 2003. Chest X-ray scanning was performed at a interval of 1-3 days according to the requirements. The manifestations and special features of SARS in X-ray were analyzed. Results Small or large patchy shadows with intensive density in both lungs were observed in 31 cases, ground-glass like opacification in 16, small patchy shadows in one lung lobe or one lung segment in 18, nodular shadows in one lung segment in 1, and increased lung marking in lung interstitial tissues in 2. Rapidly changing consolidations revealed in chest X-ray images were found to be associated with SARS infections, and they were not affected by treatment with antibiotics.Conclusion Chest X-ray provides a sensitive and specific method for the diagnosis and treatment of SARS, and those present with symptoms and signs should undergo chest X-ray scanning every 1-3 days.

  2. Chest physiotherapy in children with acute bacterial pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lieselotte Corten

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pneumonia is the single leading cause of death in children younger than 5 years of age. Chest physiotherapy is often prescribed as an additional therapy in children with pneumonia. Different chest physiotherapy techniques are available that aim to improve airway clearance, gas exchange and reduce the work of breathing. However, it is unclear if these techniques are effective in this population.Objective: The present review aimed to determine the efficacy of different chest physiotherapy techniques compared with no physiotherapy or other chest physiotherapy treatments in hospitalised children with bacterial pneumonia.Method: Six electronic databases (PubMed, Medline, Cochrane Library, PEDro, CINAHL and Africa-wide information, clinicaltrials.gov and pactr.org were searched for eligible studies.Results: Two randomised controlled trials and one ongoing study were identified. Neither completed trial reported differences between the control and intervention groups, although one study reported a longer duration of coughing (p = 0.04 and rhonchi (p = 0.03 in the intervention group.Conclusion: Because of the limited number of included articles and different presentations of outcome measures, we could not reject or accept chest physiotherapy as either an effective or harmful treatment option in this population.

  3. Pleural controversy: optimal chest tube size for drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, Richard W

    2011-02-01

    In recent years, a higher and higher percentage of patients with pleural effusions or pneumothorax are being treated with small-bore (10-14 F) chest tubes rather than large-bore (>20 F). However, there are very few randomized controlled studies comparing the efficacy and complication rates with the small- and large-bore catheters. Moreover, the randomized trials that are available have flaws in their design. The advantages of the small-bore catheters are that they are easier to insert and there is less pain with their insertion while they are in place. The placement of the small-bore catheters is probably more optimal when placement is done with ultrasound guidance. Small-bore chest tubes are recommended when pleurodesis is performed. The success of the small-bore indwelling tunnelled catheters that are left in place for weeks documents that the small-bore tubes do not commonly become obstructed with fibrin. Patients with complicated parapneumonic effusions are probably best managed with small-bore catheters even when the pleural fluid is purulent. Patients with haemothorax are best managed with large-bore catheters because of blood clots and the high volume of pleural fluid. Most patients with pneumothorax can be managed with aspiration or small-bore chest tubes. If these fail, a large-bore chest tube may be necessary. Patients on mechanical ventilation with barotrauma induced pneumothoraces are best managed with large-bore chest tubes.

  4. CT chest under general anesthesia: pulmonary, anesthetic and radiologic dilemmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoud, Mohamed [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Anesthesiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Towe, Christopher [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Fleck, Robert J. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Today's practice of medicine involves ever more complex patients whose care is coordinated with multidisciplinary teams. Caring for these patients can challenge all members of the health care team. Sedation/anesthesia in infants/toddlers as well as uncooperative or intellectually or emotionally impaired children who require imaging studies of the chest are ongoing challenges. High-quality computed tomography (CT) chest imaging studies in children under general anesthesia are extremely important for accurate interpretation and subsequent medical decision-making. Anesthesia-induced atelectasis may obscure or mimic true pathology creating a significant quality issue. Obtaining a high-quality, motion-free chest imaging study in infants and children under general anesthesia remains a difficult task in many institutions. Meticulous attention to anesthesia and imaging techniques and specialized knowledge are required to properly perform and interpret chest imaging studies. In this commentary, we discuss the continuous struggle to obtain high-quality CT chest imaging under general anesthesia. We will also discuss the major concerns of the anesthesiologist, radiologist and pulmonologist and why cooperation and coordination among these providers are critical for an optimal quality study.

  5. Chest x-ray analysis by computer: final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and demonstrate the feasibility of the automated analysis of chest x-rays for the classification of pneumoconiosis films according to the U.I.C.C./Cincinnati standard films. Toward this end, computer programs simulating the proposed systems were prepared. Using these programs, the authors then examined three sets of chest radiographs to determine the extent of pneumoconiosis present. The results of the examinations of these x-rays clearly indicated the feasibility of the proposed system. Based on the outcome of these examinations, a complete set of hardware and software specifications were established for a system which can be used for the large scale automatic analysis of chest x-rays

  6. Massive chest wall resection and reconstruction for malignant disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foroulis CN

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Christophoros N Foroulis,1 Athanassios D Kleontas,1 George Tagarakis,1 Chryssoula Nana,1 Ioannis Alexiou,1 Vasilis Grosomanidis,1 Paschalis Tossios,1 Elena Papadaki,2 Ioannis Kioumis,2 Sofia Baka,3 Paul Zarogoulidis,2 Kyriakos Anastasiadis11Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Aristotle University School of Medicine, AHEPA University Hospital, 2Pulmonary Department-Oncology Unit, “G. Papanikolaou” General Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 3Oncology Department, European Interbalkan Medical Center, Thessaloniki, GreeceObjective: Malignant chest wall tumors are rare neoplasms. Resection with wide-free margins is an important prognostic factor, and massive chest wall resection and reconstruction are often necessary. A recent case series of 20 consecutive patients is reported in order to find any possible correlation between tumor histology, extent of resection, type of reconstruction, and adjuvant treatment with short- and long-term outcomes.Methods: Twenty patients were submitted to chest wall resection and reconstruction for malignant chest wall neoplasms between 2006 and 2014. The mean age (ten males was 59±4 years. The size and histology of the tumor, the technique of reconstruction, and the short- and long-term follow-up records were noted.Results: The median maximum diameter of tumors was 10 cm (5.4–32 cm. Subtotal sternal resection was performed in nine cases, and the resection of multiple ribs was performed in eleven cases. The median area of chest wall defect was 108 cm2 (60–340 cm2. Histology revealed soft tissue, bone, and cartilage sarcomas in 16 cases (80%, most of them chondrosarcomas. The rest of the tumors was metastatic tumors in two cases and localized malignant pleural mesothelioma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma in one case. The chest wall defect was reconstructed by using the “sandwich technique” (propylene mesh/methyl methacrylate/propylene mesh in nine cases of large anterior defects or by using a 2

  7. Computer-aided diagnosis in chest radiography: Beyond nodules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginneken, Bram van [University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands)], E-mail: bram@isi.uu.nl; Hogeweg, Laurens; Prokop, Mathias [University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2009-11-15

    Chest radiographs are the most common exam in radiology. They are essential for the management of various diseases associated with high mortality and morbidity and display a wide range of findings, many of them subtle. In this survey we identify a number of areas beyond pulmonary nodules that could benefit from computer-aided detection and diagnosis (CAD) in chest radiography. These include interstitial infiltrates, catheter tip detection, size measurements, detection of pneumothorax and detection and quantification of emphysema. Recent work in these areas is surveyed, but we conclude that the amount of research devoted to these topics is modest. Reasons for the slow pace of CAD development in chest radiography beyond nodules are discussed.

  8. Poor interpretation of chest X-rays by junior doctors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Janus Mølgaard; Gerke, Oke; Karstoft, Jens;

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Studies targeting medical students and junior doctors have shown that their radiological skills are insufficient. Despite the widespread use of chest X-ray; however, a study of Danish junior doctors' skills has not previously been performed. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 22...... participants per-used a standardised series of ten chest X-rays. The test used a multiple-choice form for each image, and the clinical data and the tentative diagnosis of each image were also made available to the participants. For each image, the participant chose a single primary diagnosis; and for each......): 0.41-0.57) and the specificity to 0.55 (95% CI: 0.41-0.68). CONCLUSION: Based on the results from this study, we conclude that BCE doctors do not meet the minimum requirements for radiological diagnostic skills for the use of chest X-ray that were established for this study. FUNDING: not relevant...

  9. RECURRENT SALMONELLA TYPHI CHEST WALL ABSCESSES IN A DIABETIC LADY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayasri Helen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available : Salmonella enterica serovar typhi causing typhoid fever is common in many parts of the world particularly in developing countries. Extra intestinal manifestations are uncommon and occur in immunocompromised individuals such as patients with diabetes, HIV infection, chronic steroid use, chemotherapy and malignancy. We report a case of Salmonella typhi causing recurrent chest wall abscesses in a lady with uncontrolled diabetes. She was admitted with high grade fever, left sided chest wall abscess and a previous history of two similar chest wall abscesses. After hospitalization prompt incision and drainage was done and aerobic culture of pus grew moderate growth of Salmonella typhi resistant to ciprofloxacin and sensitive to cephalosporins. Based on culture report our patient was treated with oral azithromycin for ten days and parenteral ceftriaxone for six weeks. There was rapid and full recovery and six months follow up revealed no recurrence.

  10. Role of small calibre chest tube drainage for iatrogenic pneumothorax.

    OpenAIRE

    Laub, M; Milman, N.; Müller, D.; Struve-Christensen, E

    1990-01-01

    A 2 mm Teflon catheter was used as a chest tube in 28 patients with iatrogenic pneumothorax. Frequent aspirations through the catheter were performed in 16 of the patients. In the remaining 12 patients the catheter was connected to a one way flutter valve. The treatment was successful in 27 of the 28 patients--one patient required a large calibre chest tube. The mean drainage time was 48 hours. The small catheter technique is superior to the use of a large intercostal drain as it is much less...

  11. Computer Analysis Of ILO Standard Chest Radiographs Of Pneumoconiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C. C.; Shu, David B. C.; Tai, H. T.; Hou, W.; Kunkle, G. A.; Wang, Y.; Hoy, R. J.

    1982-11-01

    This paper presents study of computer analysis of the 1980 ILO standard chest radiographs of pneumoconiosis. Algorithms developed for detection of individual small rounded and irregular opacities have been experimented and evaluated on these standard radiographs. The density, shape, and size distribution of the detected objects in the lung field, in spite of false positives, can be used as indicators for the beginning of pneumoconiosis. This approach is potentially useful in computer-assisted screening and early detection process where the annual chest radiograph of each worker is compared with his (her) own normal radiograph obtained previously.

  12. Melioidosis:a rare cause of anterior chest wall abscess

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rashidi Ahmad; Azhar Amir Hamzah; Ahmad Kasfi Abdul Rahman; Phee Kheng Cheah

    2010-01-01

    Melioidosis is an unusual tropical infectious disease caused by the gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei, which was formerly known asPseudomonas pseudomallei. Melioidosis is characterized by abscess formation and it may manifest in any part of the human body, however, musculoskeletel melioidosis is uncommon and chest wall melioidosis is very rare. To determine the exact organism based solely on clinical presentation poses a great challenge to the physician. Yet, delay administration of antibiotic may be harmful. We describe a diabetic patient who had anterior chest wall melioidosis that mimicsStaphylococcus aureus infection. A description of his presentation and management, along with a review of literature is presented.

  13. Radiodiagnostic measurements radiation load of children by chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the aim of optimisation of the radiographic examinations in paediatric radiology the entrance surface doses measured by chest examinations, as the most frequent procedure for children in Slovakia were surveyed. In this paper the results of measurements and calculations of doses obtained by paediatric patients with ages ranging from newborn to 15 years, who undergone chest radiodiagnostic examinations during the year 1996 are presented.. The obtained results are compared with dose assessment procedures based on total absorbed dose calculations using the published conversion factors between energy impaired to the patient and and entrance surface doses integrated over the beam area

  14. HRCT findings of chest complications in patients with leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Matsumoto, Tsuneo; Miura, Gouji; Emoto, Takuya; Matsunaga, Naofumi [Department of Radiology, Yamaguchi University School of Medicine (Japan)

    2002-06-01

    High-resolution CT (HRCT) findings of several chest complications occurring in leukemic patients were reviewed. Although most entities show non-specific HRCT findings including ground-glass opacity and air-space consolidation, characteristic findings are observed in several pulmonary complications including Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, fungal infections, miliary tuberculosis, leukemic infiltration, pulmonary edema, bronchiolitis obliterans, and bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia. A combination of these characteristic HRCT findings and the information obtained from the clinical setting may help in achieving a correct diagnosis of chest complications occurring in leukemic patients. (orig.)

  15. Evaluation and Management of Chest Pain in the Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rohit; Munoz, Robert

    2016-08-01

    Geriatric patients are at increased risk for serious morbidity and mortality from life-threatening causes of chest pain. This article covers 5 life-threatening causes of chest pain in the elderly: acute coronary syndrome, aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism, pneumothorax, and esophageal rupture. Atypical presentations, frailty, and significant comorbidities that characterize the elderly make the diagnosis and treatment of these already complicated conditions even more complicated. The emergency provider must be vigilant and maintain a low threshold to test. When a diagnosis is made, treatment must be aggressive. The elderly benefit from optimal care. PMID:27475013

  16. CYSTIC HYGROMA OF CHEST WALL- 2 Reported Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapan Shah

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Hygromas arise in the sites of primitive lymphatic lakes, on the floor of the mouth, under the jaw, in the neck and in the axillae, but they can occur virtually anywhere in the body. Their occurrence on the chest wall is very rare and they progressively grow with age infiltrating into the local tissues, insinuating lymphatic pseudopods and form cysts in and around muscle fibers and nerves, making them difficult and hazardous to remove. Here, we have reported 2 cases of cystic hygroma of chest wall in children

  17. CYSTIC HYGROMA OF CHEST WALL- 2 Reported Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Tapan Shah; Dipen Patel; Yash Vaidhya; Jigar Jadeja; Sharad Patel; Asit Patel

    2012-01-01

    Hygromas arise in the sites of primitive lymphatic lakes, on the floor of the mouth, under the jaw, in the neck and in the axillae, but they can occur virtually anywhere in the body. Their occurrence on the chest wall is very rare and they progressively grow with age infiltrating into the local tissues, insinuating lymphatic pseudopods and form cysts in and around muscle fibers and nerves, making them difficult and hazardous to remove. Here, we have reported 2 cases of cystic hygroma of chest...

  18. Chest surgical disorders in ancient Egypt: evidence of advanced knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungraithmayr, Wolfgang; Weder, Walter

    2012-03-01

    The ancient Egyptians laid the foundation for the development of the earliest recorded systems of medical treatment. Many specialties such as gynecology, neurosurgery, ophthalmology, and chest disorders were subject to diagnosis, which were followed by an appropriate treatment. Here, we elucidate the remarkable level of their knowledge and understanding of anatomy and physiology in the field of chest medicine. Furthermore, we look at how ancient Egyptian physicians came to a diagnosis and treatment based on the thoracic cases in the Edwin Smith papyrus. PMID:22330033

  19. Chest X-ray : a cost-diagnostic benefit analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although plain chest radiography is one of the most useful diagnostic tools available to the physician, this procedure has not evolved into a consistent method. Two Large Field of View Image Intensifiers (LFOV-II) became available; the large imaging area makes them suitable for chest imaging. Both modalities supply 100 mm images to the radiologist. In this thesis the 'diagnostic benefits and 'costs' of these modalities are evaluated and related to the 'gold' standard (conventional full-size). The emphasis is on diagnostic image quality using phantoms for observer performance qualities. (author). 170 refs.; 21 figs.; 47 tabs

  20. Acute diaphragmatic paralysis caused by chest-tube trauma to phrenic nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 31/2-year-old child developed unilateral diaphragmatic paralysis after chest drain insertion. Plain chest X-ray demonstrated paravertebral positioning of the chest-tube tip, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed hematomas in the region of the chest-tube tip and the phrenic nerve fibers. The trauma to the phrenic nerve was apparently secondary to malposition of the chest tube. This is a rare complication and has been reported mainly in neonates. Radiologists should notify the treating physicians that the correct position of a chest drain tip is at least 2 cm distant from the vertebrae. (orig.)

  1. Comparison of high frequency chest compression and conventional chest physiotherapy in hospitalized patients with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arens, R; Gozal, D; Omlin, K J; Vega, J; Boyd, K P; Keens, T G; Woo, M S

    1994-10-01

    Clearance of bronchial secretions is essential in the management of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients admitted for acute pulmonary exacerbation. Conventional physiotherapy (CPT) is labor-intensive, time-consuming, expensive, and may not be available as frequently as desired during hospitalization. High frequency chest compression (HFCC), which uses an inflatable vest linked to an air-pulse delivery system, may offer an attractive alternative. To study this, we prospectively studied 50 CF patients admitted for acute pulmonary exacerbation who were randomly allocated to receive either HFCC or CPT three times a day. On admission, clinical status and pulmonary function tests (PFT) in the HFCC group were not significantly different from those measured in the CPT group. Significant improvements in clinical status and PFT were observed after 7 and 14 d of treatment, and were similar in the two study groups, leading to patient discharge after similar periods of hospitalization. We conclude that HFCC and CPT are equally safe and effective when used during acute pulmonary exacerbations in CF patients. We speculate that HFCC may provide an adequate alternative in management of CF patients in a hospital setting.

  2. Diagnosis of chest pain with foregut symptoms in Chinese patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Deng; Ru-Wen Wang; Yao-Guang Jiang; Qun-You Tan; Xiang-Li Liao; Jing-Hai Zhou; Yun-Ping Zhao; Tai-Qian Gong; Zheng Ma

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the diagnosis of chest pain with foregut symptoms in Chinese patients. METHODS: Esophageal manomet r ic studies, 24-h introesophageal pH monitoring and 24-h electrocardiograms (Holter electrocardiography) were performed in 61 patients with chest pain. RESULTS: Thirty-nine patients were diagnosed with non-specific esophageal motility disorders (29 patients with abnormal gastroesophageal reflux and eight patients with myocardial ischemia). Five patients had diffuse spasm of the esophagus plus abnormal gastroesophageal reflux (two patients had concomitant myocardial ischemia), and one patient was diagnosed with nutcracker esophagus. CONCLUSION: The esophageal manometric studies, 24-h intra-esophageal pH monitoring and Holter electrocardiography are significant for the differential diagnosis of chest pain, particularly in patients with foregut symptoms. In cases of esophageal motility disorders, pathological gastroesophageal reflux may be a major cause of chest pain with non-specific esophageal motility disorders. Spasm of the esophageal smooth muscle might affect the heart-coronary smooth muscle, leading to myocardial ischemia.

  3. Picture quiz: a case of sudden severe chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabia, Mustafa Abu; Sullivan, P; Stivaros, Stavros M

    2007-01-01

    An 18-year-old male with no previous medical history presented to hospital with sudden onset of acute epigastric pain radiating to the anterior chest wall and both shoulders. There was no history of recent trauma and he had not been vomiting. PMID:21611610

  4. Chest wall tuberculosis; CT findings in 14 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To present CT findings of chest wall tuberculosis. CT scans were obtained in 14 patients with proven chest wall tuberculosis. Diagnosis was confirmed by means of right open thoracostomy with abscess evacuation (n=1), excision and curettage (n=11) or excision and curettage along with resection of the involved lung (n=2). The images were assessed with emphasis for the extrapleural, pleural, and pulmonary lesions. All patients showed juxtacostal soft tissue mass with central low attenuation and peripheral rim enhancement. The lesions were located in the left hemithorax in eight patients and in the right in six. Multiple lesions were found in three patients (two in one and three in two). Rib destruction was observed in four patients. Intercostal muscle involvement of thickening and enhancement were shown in all patients. Thirteen patients (93%) had evidence of pulmonary tuberculosis: active pulmonary tuberculosis in nine and stable tuberculosis in four. Pleural lesions, including empyema necessitatis in six, were observed in eleven (79%). On CT scan, chest wall tuberculosis is characterized by juxtacostal soft tissue lesion with central low attenuation and peripheral rim enhancement. Rib destruction may be associated. Additionally, enhancing intercostal muscle suggest direct inflammatory process of tuberculosis and spread channel to the chest wall involvement of pleuropulmonary tuberculosis

  5. Assessment of chest impedance in relation to phonocardiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmermann, Niels Henrik; Møller, Henrik; Hammershøi, Dorte;

    2010-01-01

    ), it is possible to measure the impedance of the surface of the skin and at the same time investigate the influence of different pressures and diameters of a transducer. The impedance tube is made specifically with the purpose of measuring chest impedances in the frequency range from 50 Hz to 5 kHz. An MLS...

  6. Coal worker's lungs - chest x-ray (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chest x-ray shows coal worker's lungs. There are diffuse, small, light areas on both sides (1 to 3 mm) in ... the lungs. Diseases that may result in an x-ray like this include: simple coal workers pneumoconiosis (CWP) - ...

  7. Sudden chest pain and cardiac emergencies in the obstetric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabie, W C; Freire, C M

    1995-03-01

    The differential diagnosis and work-up of a patient with chest pain during pregnancy is presented in this article. This is followed by discussions of cardiac emergencies including hypertensive crisis, pulmonary edema, arrhythmias, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, myocardial infarction, and aortic dissection. PMID:7784039

  8. Segmentation of individual ribs from low-dose chest CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaesung; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2010-03-01

    Segmentation of individual ribs and other bone structures in chest CT images is important for anatomical analysis, as the segmented ribs may be used as a baseline reference for locating organs within a chest as well as for identification and measurement of any geometric abnormalities in the bone. In this paper we present a fully automated algorithm to segment the individual ribs from low-dose chest CT scans. The proposed algorithm consists of four main stages. First, all the high-intensity bone structure present in the scan is segmented. Second, the centerline of the spinal canal is identified using a distance transform of the bone segmentation. Then, the seed region for every rib is detected based on the identified centerline, and each rib is grown from the seed region and separated from the corresponding vertebra. This algorithm was evaluated using 115 low-dose chest CT scans from public databases with various slice thicknesses. The algorithm parameters were determined using 5 scans, and remaining 110 scans were used to evaluate the performance of the segmentation algorithm. The outcome of the algorithm was inspected by an author for the correctness of the segmentation. The results indicate that over 98% of the individual ribs were correctly segmented with the proposed algorithm.

  9. Localized Fisher vector representation for pathology detection in chest radiographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geva, Ofer; Lieberman, Sivan; Konen, Eli; Greenspan, Hayit

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we present a novel framework for automatic detection of abnormalities in chest radiographs. The representation model is based on the Fisher Vector encoding method. In the representation process, we encode each chest radiograph using a set of extracted local descriptors. These include localized texture features that address typical local texture abnormalities as well as spatial features. Using a Gaussian Mixture Model, a rich image descriptor is generated for each chest radiograph. An improved representation is obtained by selection of features that correspond to the relevant region of interest for each pathology. Categorization of the X-ray images is conducted using supervised learning and the SVM classifier. The proposed system was tested on a dataset of 636 chest radiographs taken from a real clinical environment. We measured the performance in terms of area (AUC) under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Results show an AUC value of 0.878 for abnormal mediastinum detection, and AUC values of 0.827 and 0.817 for detection of right and left lung opacities, respectively. These results improve upon the state-of-the-art as compared with two alternative representation models.

  10. Lyme Myocarditis Presenting as Chest Pain in an Adolescent Girl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishe, Jennifer N; Marchese, Ronald F; Callahan, James M

    2016-07-01

    A previously healthy adolescent girl presented to the emergency department with new onset chest and right upper quadrant abdominal pain. Laboratory studies and imaging were consistent with myocarditis. She developed heart block after admission and required stabilization in the cardiac intensive care unit. Lyme serology returned positive, and her condition was diagnosed as Lyme disease-associated myocarditis. PMID:26945194

  11. 46 CFR 194.10-20 - Magazine chest construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    .... Side shields shall be offset from the body a distance of 1 inch. The top shield shall be offset a distance of 11/2 inches. Sun shields may be omitted when chests are installed “on deck protected,” shielded... lid shall have a minimum thickness of 1/8 inch. (b) Permanent sun shields shall be provided for...

  12. Lung mass, right upper lung - chest x-ray (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chest x-ray of a person with a lung mass. This is a front view, where the lungs are the two dark areas and the heart ... ray shows a mass in the right upper lung, indicated with the arrow (seen on the left ...

  13. CT and MR findings of chest wall masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Woo; Kim, Jin Hee; Lee, Eun Suk; Kwon, Sun Young; Ko, Eun Ju [Eul Ji General Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Young [Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Hye Jeong [Eul Ji General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-15

    To evaluate the characteristic radiological findings of various diseases forming chest wall masses by CT and MR. We retrospectively reviewed CT and MR findings of the chest wall masses in 31 patients. Morphology, density, features of contrast enhancement, and location of the mass within the bony thorax or soft tissue were analyzed. Benign lesions of bony thorax were osteochondritis (n = 2), tuberculosis (n = 1), and osteochon droma (n = 1). Malignant lesions of bony thorax were Ewing's sarcoma (n = 1) and metastasis (n = 3). Benign lesions of soft tissue were abscess (n = 1), tuberculosis (n = 7), lipoma (n = 1), cavernous hemangioma (n = 2), cavernous lymphangioma (n = 1), and neurofibroma (n = 1). Malignant lesions of soft tissue were lymphoma (n = 1), spindle cell sarcoma (n = 1), metastasis (n = 8). Tuberculosis of the chest wall (n = 8) were ill-defined hypodense (n = 7) or isodense (n = 1) mass than surrounding muscle on pre-enhanced CT scan. All massess showed peripheral rim enhancement after contrast enhancement. Five cases were associated with pulmonary or pleural tuberculosis. All malignant lesions of bony thorax showed bone destruction, but inflammatory processes also showed bone destruction. MR showed characteristic signal intensity in the case of lipoma (n = 1) and hemangioma (n = 1). We conclude that CT and MR are helpful for differential diagnosis of chest wall masses.

  14. Early chest tube removal after coronary artery bypass graft surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Mirmohammad-Sadeghi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is no clear data about the optimum time for chest tube removal after coronary artery bypass surgery. Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the impact of the chest tube removal time following coronary artery bypass grafting surgery on the clinical outcome of the patients. Material and Methods: An analysis of data from 307 patients was performed. The patients were randomized into two groups: in group 1 (N=107 chest tubes were removed within the first 24 hours after surgery, whereas in group 2 (N=200, chest tubes were removed in the second 24 hours after surgery. Demographics, lactate and pH at the beginning, during and after the operation, creatinine, left ventricular ejection fraction, inotropic drugs administration, length of ICU stay, and mortality data were collected. Respiratory rate and pain level was assessed. Results: In these surgeries, the mean± standard deviation for the aortic clamping time was 49.18±17.59 minutes and cardiopulmonary bypass time was 78.39±25.12 minutes. The amount of heparin consumed by the second group was higher (P <0.001 which could be considered as an important factor in increasing the drainage time after the surgery (P =0.047. The pain level evaluated 24 hours post-operation was lower in the first group, and the difference in the pain level between the 2 groups evaluated 30 hours post-operation was significant (P=0.016. The mean time of intensive care unit stay was longer in the second group but it was not statistically significant. Conclusion: Early extracting of chest tubes after coronary artery bypass graft surgery when there is no significant drainage can lead to pain reduction and consuming oxygen is an effective measure after surgery toward healing; it doesn′t increase the risk of creation of plural effusion and pericardial effusion.

  15. Imaging of blunt chest trauma; Bildgebung des stumpfen Thoraxtraumas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prosch, H. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Allgemeines Krankenhaus, Univ.-Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Wien (Austria); Negrin, L. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Allgemeines Krankenhaus, Univ.-Klinik fuer Unfallchirurgie, Wien (Austria)

    2014-09-15

    Blunt chest trauma is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Consequently, all patients should be evaluated radiologically after blunt chest trauma to allow timely and appropriate treatment. Conventional chest radiographs and computed tomography (CT) are proven modalities with which to evaluate patients after blunt chest trauma. Over the last several years extended focused assessment with sonography for trauma (eFAST) has gained increasing importance for the initial assessment of seriously injured patients. In the acute phase of severely injured patients eFAST examinations are helpful to exclude pneumothorax, hemothorax and hemopericardium. Chest radiographs may also be used to diagnose a pneumothorax or hemothorax; however, the sensitivity is limited and CT is the diagnostic modality of choice to evaluate severely injured patients. (orig.) [German] Stumpfe Thoraxtraumen gehen mit einer hohen Morbiditaet und Mortalitaet einher. Daher sollten Patienten mit Verdacht auf ein stumpfes Thoraxtrauma rasch radiologisch untersucht werden, damit die entsprechenden therapeutischen Schritte zeitgerecht eingeleitet werden koennen. Zur Abklaerung von Patienten nach einem stumpfen Thoraxtrauma sind seit Jahren das konventionelle Lungenroentgen und die Computertomographie bewaehrte Verfahren. In den letzten Jahren hat die fokussierte Ultraschalluntersuchung (eFAST, Extended Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma) von schwerverletzten Patienten vermehrt an Bedeutung gewonnen. Durch eine eFAST-Untersuchung kann in der Akutphase rasch geklaert werden, ob bei dem Patienten ein therapiebeduerftiger Pneumothorax, Haematoperikard oder Haematothorax vorliegen. Auch das Lungenroentgen wird zur Diagnose eines Pneumothorax oder Haematothorax eingesetzt, wenngleich seine Sensitivitaet deutlich eingeschraenkt ist. Die CT ist das diagnostische Verfahren der Wahl, um v. a. Patienten mit einem schweren Thoraxtrauma abzuklaeren. (orig.)

  16. Conventional chest physiotherapy compared to other airway clearance techniques for cystic fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Main, E; Prasad, A; van der Schans, C

    2005-01-01

    Background Cystic fibrosis is an inherited life-limiting disorder, characterised by pulmonary infections and thick airway secretions. Chest physiotherapy has been integral to clinical management in facilitating removal of airway secretions. Conventional chest physiotherapy techniques (CCPT) have dep

  17. Characterisation of manual chest physiotherapy and respiratory response in mechanically ventilated children

    OpenAIRE

    Gregson, Rachael Kathleen

    2008-01-01

    Chest physiotherapy is integral to the management of mechanically ventilated children and previous research has confirmed that chest wall vibrations are the manual techniques used most frequently by physiotherapists in this population. Chest wall vibrations involve the application of a compressive force to the chest during expiration, with the aim of removing accumulated secretions and improving lung aeration. However, these techniques are largely unquantified and may vary grea...

  18. Chest roentgenology in the intensive care unit: an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maffessanti, M. [Istituto di Radiologia, Universita di Trieste, Ospedale di Cattinara, I-34 100 Trieste (Italy); Berlot, G. [Istituto di Anestesia e Rianimazione, Universita di Trieste, Ospedale di Cattinara, I-34 100 Trieste (Italy); Bortolotto, P. [Servizio di Radiologia, Ospedale Maggiore, I-34 100 Trieste (Italy)

    1998-02-01

    Chest roentgenology in the intensive care unit is a real challenge for the general radiologist. Beyond the basic disease, the critically ill is at risk for developing specific cardiopulmonary disorders, all presenting as chest opacities, their diagnosis often being impossible if based only on the radiological aspect. To make things harder, their appearance can vary with the subject`s position and the mechanical ventilation. Patients require a continuous monitoring of the vital functions and their mechanical and pharmacological support, for which they are connected to different instruments. The radiologist should know the normal position of these devices, and promptly recognize when they are misplaced or when complications from their insertion occurred. Our aim is to suggest for each of the above-mentioned conditions a guideline of interpretation based not only on the radiological aspect and distribution of the lesions, but also on the physiopathological and clinical grounds. (orig.) With 13 figs., 58 refs.

  19. A Computer-Aided Detection System for Digital Chest Radiographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-de-Gea, Juan Manuel; García-Mateos, Ginés; Fernández-Alemán, José Luis; Hernández-Hernández, José Luis

    2016-01-01

    Computer-aided detection systems aim at the automatic detection of diseases using different medical imaging modalities. In this paper, a novel approach to detecting normality/pathology in digital chest radiographs is proposed. The problem tackled is complicated since it is not focused on particular diseases but anything that differs from what is considered as normality. First, the areas of interest of the chest are found using template matching on the images. Then, a texture descriptor called local binary patterns (LBP) is computed for those areas. After that, LBP histograms are applied in a classifier algorithm, which produces the final normality/pathology decision. Our experimental results show the feasibility of the proposal, with success rates above 87% in the best cases. Moreover, our technique is able to locate the possible areas of pathology in nonnormal radiographs. Strengths and limitations of the proposed approach are described in the Conclusions. PMID:27372536

  20. Rheumatoid arthritis: Skeletal manifestations observed on portable chest roentgenograms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levine, R.B.; Sullivan, K.L.

    1985-04-01

    This report describes the thoracic skeletal radiographic findings of rheumatoid arthritis, observed on portable chest examinations of 21 patients. The pathophysiology is reviewed and additional examples of a recently described finding are illustrated: erosion of the medial surface of the proximal humerus with subsequent pathologic fracture, associated with superior and medial migration of the humeral head. It has been proposed that erosion of the medial aspect of the proximal humerus is due to impingement wear, and that pathologic fracture results from the fulcrum effect of the inferior lip of the glenoid on the humerus. Rheumatoid arthritis is often diagnosed by the clinician rather than the radiologist. However, in acutely ill patients receiving portable chest radiographs, complete history and laboratory findings are often unavailable. Attention to the thoracic skeleton may clarify pleural and/or parenchymal lung disease in these patients.

  1. Pectus excavatum in blunt chest trauma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liodakis Emmanouil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Blunt cardiac rupture is an exceedingly rare injury. Case presentation We report a case of blunt cardiac trauma in a 43-year-old Caucasian German mother with pectus excavatum who presented after a car accident in which she had been sitting in the front seat holding her two-year-old boy in her arms. The mother was awake and alert during the initial two hours after the accident but then proceeded to hemodynamically collapse. The child did not sustain any severe injuries. Intraoperatively, a combined one-cm laceration of the left atrium and right ventricle was found. Conclusion Patients with pectus excavatum have an increased risk for cardiac rupture after blunt chest trauma because of compression between the sternum and spine. Therefore, patients with pectus excavatum and blunt chest trauma should be admitted to a Level I Trauma Center with a high degree of suspicion.

  2. Chest radiography in acute traumatic rupture of the thoracic aorta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heystraten, F.M.; Rosenbusch, G.; Kingma, L.M.; Lacquet, L.K.; Boo, T. de; Lemmens, W.A.

    Of 123 patients who had suffered blunt trauma to the chest traumatic aortic rupture was eventually confirmed in 61 and absent in 62 patients. The chest radiographs of these patients were examined for 15 signs reported in the literature as being associated with traumatic aortic rupture. Although many individual signs were significantly more frequent in the aortic rupture group they were not useful in differentiating between patients with and those without rupture of the aorta. By using discriminant analysis combining 2 or 3 signs, patients were classified as having aortic rupture or not. The best discrimination between the two groups was obtained using the combined signs of a widened paratracheal stripe, and opacified pulmonary window, a widened right paraspinal interface and a displaced nasogastric tube.

  3. A Computer-Aided Detection System for Digital Chest Radiographs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Carrillo-de-Gea

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Computer-aided detection systems aim at the automatic detection of diseases using different medical imaging modalities. In this paper, a novel approach to detecting normality/pathology in digital chest radiographs is proposed. The problem tackled is complicated since it is not focused on particular diseases but anything that differs from what is considered as normality. First, the areas of interest of the chest are found using template matching on the images. Then, a texture descriptor called local binary patterns (LBP is computed for those areas. After that, LBP histograms are applied in a classifier algorithm, which produces the final normality/pathology decision. Our experimental results show the feasibility of the proposal, with success rates above 87% in the best cases. Moreover, our technique is able to locate the possible areas of pathology in nonnormal radiographs. Strengths and limitations of the proposed approach are described in the Conclusions.

  4. Computerized detection of pneumothorax on digital chest radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on neumothoraces that are clinically important abnormalities that usually appear as a subtle, fine line pattern on chest radiographs. We are developing a computer vision system for automated detection of pneumothorax to aid radiologists diagnosis. Chest images were digitized with a 0.175-mm pixel size, yielding a 2,000 x 2,430 matrix size, and 10 bits of gray scale. After indentification of the lung regions, an edge detection filter was employed in the apical areas to enhance a pneumothorax pattern. Ribs were detected with a technique based on statistical analysis of edge gradients and their orientations. Points located on a curved line suggestive of a pneumothorax in this enhanced image were detected with a Hough transform

  5. Clinical Implications High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO)

    OpenAIRE

    Mantellini E.; Perrero L.; Petrozzino S.; Gatta A.; Bona S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: patients with neuromuscular diseases presents an high incidence of respiratory infections favoured by stagnation of deep bronchial secretions and deficit of cough. The aim of the study is to evaluate the correct treatment of this condition and the role of High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO) in helping the removal of bronchial secretions and reduce the incidence of infections in patients with neuromuscular disease.Methods: analysis of the current bibliography related to resp...

  6. Image processing in digital chest radiography: effect on diagnostic efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manninen, H; Partanen, K; Lehtovirta, J; Matsi, P; Soimakallio, S

    1992-01-01

    The usefulness of digital image processing of chest radiographs was evaluated in a clinical study. In 54 patients, chest radiographs in the posteroanterior projection were obtained by both 14 inch digital image intensifier equipment and the conventional screen-film technique. The digital radiographs (512 x 512 image format) viewed on a 625 line monitor were processed in three different ways: (1) standard display; (2) digital edge enhancement for the standard display; and (3) inverse intensity display. The radiographs were interpreted independently by three radiologists. The diagnoses were confirmed by CT, follow-up radiographs and clinical records. Chest abnormalities of the films analyzed included 21 primary lung tumors, 44 pulmonary nodules, 16 cases with mediastinal disease and 17 cases with pneumonia/atelectasis. Interstitial lung disease, pleural plaques, and pulmonary emphysema were found in 30, 18 and 19 cases, respectively. The sensitivity of conventional radiography when averaged overall findings was better than that of the digital techniques (P less than 0.001). The differences in diagnostic accuracy measured by sensitivity and specificity between the three digital display modes were small. Standard image display showed better sensitivity for pulmonary nodules (0.74 vs 0.66; P less than 0.05) but poorer specificity for pulmonary emphysema (0.85 vs. 0.93; P less than 0.05) compared with inverse intensity display. We conclude that when using 512 x 512 image format, the routine use of digital edge enhancement and tone reversal at digital chest radiographs is not warranted. PMID:1563421

  7. Chest physiotherapy in preterm infants with lung diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Cota Francesco; Purcaro Velia; Tesfagabir Mikael; Ciarniello Roberta; Papacci Patrizia; Giannantonio Carmen; Semeraro Carla; Romagnoli Costantino

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background In neonatology the role of chest physiotherapy is still uncertain because of the controversial outcomes. Methods The aim of this study was to test the applicability in preterm infants of 'reflex rolling', from the Vojta method, in preterm neonates with lung pathology, with particular attention to the effects on blood gases and oxygen saturation, on the spontaneous breathing, on the onset of stress or pain. The study included 34 preterm newborns with mean gestational age of...

  8. Dose reduction using Bismuth protectors in chest computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This monography is about the Dose reduction using Bismuth protectors in chest CT. The radiation protection of specific areas is necessary when the tissues or radiosensitive organs are near the path of light beam. The correct use of protection represents a challenge for the radiologist because of the time and materials required. The method used was a prospective investigatio in CHPR (TC service) and the doses was measured with TLD dosimeters. It is important to use these protectors in children hospitals.

  9. Radiation exposure of children during radiodiagnostic examination of chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organ doses in a tissue-equivalent anthropomorphous child phantom (corresponding to the age of 1 to 3 years) were measured during chest radiography by thermoluminescence dosimetry. The effective dose obtained by children of selected age was 0.044 mSv. The reproducibility of dose determination on phantom and on patient are compared. The obtained results are analyzed from the standpoint of optimization and reduction of patient doses. (author)

  10. Musculoskeletal problems of the chest wall in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Peter L; Biswas, Anita C; Batt, Mark E

    2002-01-01

    Chest pain in the athlete has a wide differential diagnosis. Pain may originate from structures within the thorax, such as the heart, lungs or oesophagus. However, musculoskeletal causes of chest pain must be considered. The aim of this review is to help the clinician to diagnose chest wall pain in athletes by identifying the possible causes, as reported in the literature. Musculoskeletal problems of the chest wall can occur in the ribs, sternum, articulations or myofascial structures. The cause is usually evident in the case of direct trauma. Additionally, athletes' bodies may be subjected to sudden large indirect forces or overuse, and stress fractures of the ribs caused by sporting activity have been extensively reported. These have been associated with golf, rowing and baseball pitching in particular. Stress fractures of the sternum reported in wrestlers cause pain and tenderness of the sternum, as expected. Diagnosis is by bone scan and limitation of activity usually allows healing to occur. The slipping rib syndrome causes intermittent costal margin pain related to posture or movement, and may be diagnosed by the 'hooking manoeuvre', which reproduces pain and sometimes a click. If reassurance and postural advice fail, good results are possible with resection of the mobile rib. The painful xiphoid syndrome is a rare condition that causes pain and tenderness of the xiphoid and is self-limiting. Costochondritis is a self-limiting condition of unknown aetiology that typically presents with pain around the second to fifth costochondral joints. It can be differentiated from Tietze's syndrome in which there is swelling and pain of the articulation. Both conditions eventually settle spontaneously although a corticosteroid injection may be useful in particularly troublesome cases. The intercostal muscles may be injured causing tenderness between the ribs. Other conditions that should be considered include epidemic myalgia, precordial catch syndrome and referred pain

  11. Painful palpitations: chest pain associated with postextrasystolic ST depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ul Haq, Ehtesham; Kleyn, Emile; Omar, Bassam

    2014-01-01

    Postextrasystolic T-wave changes have been described as early as 1915. The significance and mechanism of such changes remain controversial. Because postextrasystolic ST changes are rare, much of the ensuing discussion concentrates on the closely related and more commonly reported phenomenon of postextrasystolic T-wave inversion. This report documents the case of a 67-year-old man with a history of coronary artery disease who was admitted to the hospital with chest pain. PMID:25662929

  12. Recurrent inflight chest pain due to a solitary bulla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echevarria, Carlos; Harrison, Richard N.

    2011-01-01

    Ms L is a 47-year-old lady who was referred with severe, left-sided pleuritic chest pain and painful left arm weakness that occurred predictably during consecutive commercial flights. Subsequent investigations diagnosed a large left-sided, isolated bulla. A VATS bullectomy was performed with no complications, and a symptomless flight followed. We discuss here the physiological explanation for her symptoms and the treatment of bulla in this unusual case. PMID:26057108

  13. Slipping Rib Syndrome as Persistent Abdominal and Chest Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolaños-Vergaray, Juan Javier; de la Gala García, Francisco; Obaya Rebollar, Juan Carlos; Bové Alvarez, Maria

    2015-11-01

    Slipping rib syndrome is an overlooked cause of persistent abdominal or chest pain. The etiology of this syndrome is not well understood, but the characteristic pain is from hypermobility of the false ribs. Although it is a diagnosis of exclusion, misdiagnosis may lead to an excessive workup. A simple clinical examination via the hooking maneuver is the most significant feature of its diagnosis. We describe the case of a 41-year-old woman with slipping rib syndrome. PMID:26528703

  14. A rare cause of chest pain in a cancer patient

    OpenAIRE

    Welaya, Karim; Yousuf, Kabir; Morales, Maria del Pilar

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that cancer and hypercoagulability go hand in hand. Most thromboembolism is venous in nature although arterial thrombosis can occur. Arterial thrombosis secondary to malignancy is usually seen in the lower extremities; however, it can also be seen elsewhere. This is a case of bronchogenic carcinoma with no history of typical atherosclerotic risk factors including smoking, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, or hyperlipidemia presented with chest pain and was found to have an acu...

  15. Filtering of Chest Compression Artefacts in the Electrocardiogram

    OpenAIRE

    Jekova I.; Krasteva V.; Dotsinsky I.

    2009-01-01

    Long interruptions of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in case of a sudden cardiac arrest result in higher failure rate of resuscitation. The current work concerns the filtering of the chest compression (CC) artefacts during CPR, which is essential for the CPR continuation during electrocardiogram (ECG) analysis by automated external defibrillators (AEDs). We have studied two possible approaches - one based on high-pass filter (HPF), and another using band-stop filter (BSF) with adjustable...

  16. Acute aortic and mitral valve regurgitation following blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabeu, Eduardo; Mestres, Carlos A; Loma-Osorio, Pablo; Josa, Miguel

    2004-03-01

    Traumatic rupture of intracardiac structures is an uncommon phenomenon although there are a number of reports with regards to rupture of the tricuspid, mitral and aortic valves. We report the case of a 25-year-old patient who presented with acute aortic and mitral valve regurgitation of traumatic origin. Both lesions were seen separated by 2 weeks. Pathophysiology is reviewed. The combination of both aortic and mitral lesions following blunt chest trauma is almost exceptional.

  17. High-Frequency Chest Compression: A Summary of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cara F Dosman

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present literature summary is to describe high-frequency chest compression (HFCC, summarize its history and outline study results on its effect on mucolysis, mucus transport, pulmonary function and quality of life. HFCC is a mechanical method of self-administered chest physiotherapy, which induces rapid air movement in and out of the lungs. This mean oscillated volume is an effective method of mucolysis and mucus clearance. HFCC can increase independence. Some studies have shown that HFCC leads to more mucus clearance and better lung function compared with conventional chest physiotherapy. However, HFCC also decreases end-expiratory lung volume, which can lead to increased airway resistance and a decreased oscillated volume. Adding positive end-expiratory pressure to HFCC has been shown to prevent this decrease in end-expiratory lung volume and to increase the oscillated volume. It is possible that the HFCC-induced decrease in end-expiratory lung volume may result in more mucus clearance in airways that remain open by reducing airway size. Adjunctive methods, such as positive end-expiratory pressure, may not always be needed to make HFCC more effective.

  18. High-frequency chest compression: a summary of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosman, Cara F; Jones, Richard L

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the present literature summary is to describe high-frequency chest compression (HFCC), summarize its history and outline study results on its effect on mucolysis, mucus transport, pulmonary function and quality of life. HFCC is a mechanical method of self-administered chest physiotherapy, which induces rapid air movement in and out of the lungs. This mean oscillated volume is an effective method of mucolysis and mucus clearance. HFCC can increase independence. Some studies have shown that HFCC leads to more mucus clearance and better lung function compared with conventional chest physiotherapy. However, HFCC also decreases end-expiratory lung volume, which can lead to increased airway resistance and a decreased oscillated volume. Adding positive end-expiratory pressure to HFCC has been shown to prevent this decrease in end-expiratory lung volume and to increase the oscillated volume. It is possible that the HFCC-induced decrease in end-expiratory lung volume may result in more mucus clearance in airways that remain open by reducing airway size. Adjunctive methods, such as positive end-expiratory pressure, may not always be needed to make HFCC more effective.

  19. Clinical Implications High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantellini E.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: patients with neuromuscular diseases presents an high incidence of respiratory infections favoured by stagnation of deep bronchial secretions and deficit of cough. The aim of the study is to evaluate the correct treatment of this condition and the role of High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO in helping the removal of bronchial secretions and reduce the incidence of infections in patients with neuromuscular disease.Methods: analysis of the current bibliography related to respiratory infections and neuromuscular disease. PCEF (Peak Cough Expiratory Flow is used as a standardized indicator of efficiency of cough.Results: the High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO is useful, in cases of increased production of mucus and impairment of muco-ciliary clearance, to remove the tracheobronchial secretions and reduce the incidence of infections.Conclusions: the correct approach to patients with neuromuscular disease and frequent respiratory infections is focused on treatment of cough ineffective and management of bronchial secretions. High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO (VEST has a central role in treatment of cough ineffective and management of bronchial secretions reducing respiratory infections.

  20. [Psychosomatic medicine for non-cardiac chest pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funakoshi, Seiko; Hosoi, Masako; Tsuchida, Osamu

    2009-09-01

    Recently, it has become problematic that the number of noncardiac chest pain (NCCP) patients are increasing among those who come to the emergency room with chest pain as a chief complaint. They tend to come to hospitals often and over many years, even after cardiac-chest pain has been excluded from their diagnosis. Moreover, studies have shown that NCCP patients have a high prevalence of anxiety, depression and disability. However, most NCCP patients are usually treated by cardiologists or primary physicians. Ordinary biomedical approaches often fail to treat NCCP. NCCP is one of the most important functional somatic syndromes from the view of medical economics. The cause of NCCP includes gastroesophageal reflux disease, panic disorder and esophageal dysmotility. In this review article, we summarize the definition, epidemiology, pathology, and process of diagnosis of NCCP. Finally, we propose a pathological hypothesis from a psychosomatic view. We discuss the effects of anxiety, fear and hyperactive behavior induced by affective stressors on the dysmotility and the lowering of the pain threshold.

  1. Value of the lateral chest radiograph in tuberculosis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The value of the lateral chest radiograph, often considered a useful adjunct in the detection of hilar adenopathy, was evaluated in a prospective study of 449 children assessed for tuberculosis. Of these children 298 presented to the hospital with signs and symptoms suggestive of tuberculosis, while 151 were investigated in a regional clinic solely because they were in close contact with an adult household member on treatment for tuberculosis. Tuberculosis was confirmed by culture in 176 of the 449 children (39%). In 40 of these (23%) hilar adenopathy was visible on frontal and lateral view, in 19 of the 176 confirmed cases (11%) only on a frontal view and in 22 (13%) on a lateral view only. Probable tuberculosis was diagnosed in a further 140 of the 449 children (31%), and hilar adenopathy was visible on frontal and lateral views in 39 of these children (28%), on the frontal view only in 8 (6%) and on the lateral view only in 27 (19%). In the symptomatic children investigated in the hospital, and the asymptomatic children investigated in the clinic, hilar adenopathy was detected on the lateral chest radiograph only in 36 (12%) and 14 (9%) cases respectively. Lateral chest radiographs will considerably improve the accuracy of the diagnosis of childhood tuberculosis. (orig.)

  2. Chest Pain: The Need to Consider Less Frequent Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Magalhães

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chest pain is one of the most frequent patient’s complaints. The commonest underlying causes are well known, but, sometimes, in some clinical scenarios, it is necessary to consider other diagnoses. We report a case of a 68-year-old Caucasian male, chronically hypertensive, who complained of recurrent episodes of chest pain and fever with elevated acute phase reactants. The first investigation was negative for some of the most likely diagnosis and he quickly improved with anti-inflammatory drugs. Over a few months, his symptoms continued to recur periodically, his hypertension was aggravated, and he developed headaches and lower limbs claudication. After a temporal artery biopsy that was negative for vasculitis, he underwent a positron emission tomography suggestive of Takayasu Arteritis. Takayasu Arteritis is a rare chronic granulomatous vasculitis of the aorta and its first-order branches affecting mostly females up to 50 years old. Chest pain is experienced by >40% of the patients and results from the inflammation of the aorta, pulmonary artery, or coronaries.

  3. Chest Pain: The Need to Consider Less Frequent Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Anabela; Carvalho, Sofia; Cunha, Joana; Lima, Ana R.; Moreira, J. Ilídio; Faria, Trigo

    2016-01-01

    Chest pain is one of the most frequent patient's complaints. The commonest underlying causes are well known, but, sometimes, in some clinical scenarios, it is necessary to consider other diagnoses. We report a case of a 68-year-old Caucasian male, chronically hypertensive, who complained of recurrent episodes of chest pain and fever with elevated acute phase reactants. The first investigation was negative for some of the most likely diagnosis and he quickly improved with anti-inflammatory drugs. Over a few months, his symptoms continued to recur periodically, his hypertension was aggravated, and he developed headaches and lower limbs claudication. After a temporal artery biopsy that was negative for vasculitis, he underwent a positron emission tomography suggestive of Takayasu Arteritis. Takayasu Arteritis is a rare chronic granulomatous vasculitis of the aorta and its first-order branches affecting mostly females up to 50 years old. Chest pain is experienced by >40% of the patients and results from the inflammation of the aorta, pulmonary artery, or coronaries. PMID:27034853

  4. Using "Rebar" to Stabilize Rigid Chest Wall Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Lary A; Grubbs, Deanna M

    2016-04-01

    After major chest wall resection, reconstruction of the bony defect with a rigid prosthesis is mandatory to protect the underlying thoracic organs, and to prevent flail chest physiology. Although many methods have been described for chest wall reconstruction, a commonly used technique employs a composite Marlex (polypropylene) mesh with methyl-methacrylate cement sandwiched between two layers of mesh (MMS), which is tailored to the defect size and shape. In building construction, steel "rebar" is used to strengthen and reinforce masonry structures. To avoid the initial residual motion of the rigid prosthesis used to reconstruct very large defects, particularly the sternum, we devised a simple technique of adding one or more Steinmann steel pins as "rebar" to strengthen and immediately stabilize the prosthesis to the surrounding ribs and sternum. For the very large defects, particularly over the heart and great vessels, titanium mesh may also be readily added into the sandwich construction for increased strength and to prevent late prosthetic fractures. Short- and long-term results of this inexpensive modification of the MMS reconstruction technique are excellent. This modified MMS tailor-made prosthesis is only one-third the cost of the recently popular prosthetic titanium systems, takes much less operative time to create and implant, and avoids the well-described complications of late titanium bar fracture and erosion/infection as well as loosening of screws and/or titanium bars.

  5. Initial clinical evaluation of stationary digital chest tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Allison E.; Shan, Jing; Wu, Gongting; Lee, Yueh Z.; Zhou, Otto; Lu, Jianping; Heath, Michael; Wang, Xiaohui; Foos, David

    2016-03-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) is the gold standard for image evaluation of lung disease, including lung cancer and cystic fibrosis. It provides detailed information of the lung anatomy and lesions, but at a relatively high cost and high dose of radiation. Chest radiography is a low dose imaging modality but it has low sensitivity. Digital chest tomosynthesis (DCT) is an imaging modality that produces 3D images by collecting x-ray projection images over a limited angle. DCT is less expensive than CT and requires about 1/10th the dose of radiation. Commercial DCT systems acquire the projection images by mechanically scanning an x-ray tube. The movement of the tube head limits acquisition speed. We recently demonstrated the feasibility of stationary digital chest tomosynthesis (s-DCT) using a carbon nanotube (CNT) x-ray source array in benchtop phantom studies. The stationary x-ray source allows for fast image acquisition. The objective of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of s-DCT for patient imaging. We have successfully imaged 31 patients. Preliminary evaluation by board certified radiologists suggests good depiction of thoracic anatomy and pathology.

  6. Imaging of chest disease due to intravenous heroin abuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the imaging findings of the chest disease due to intravenous heroin abuse. Methods: Twenty-five cases of clinically confirmed chest disease due to intravenous heroin abuse were retrospectively analyzed. 25 cases had conventional X-ray film, 6 cases had CT scanning, and 6 cases had echocardiography scanning. Results: On X-ray and CT, the following signs were found: lung making manifold (n = 5), small patchy shadow (n = 15), pneumatocele (n = 16), small cavity (n = 16), small node (n = 7), pleural effusion (n = 8 ), pneumothorax (n = 2), hydropneumothorax (n = 6), pulmonary edema (n = 2), megacardia (n = 11), multiple-shaped lesion (n = 20). On echocardiography, tricuspid vegetation (n = 4) and tricuspid insufficiency (n = 4) were found. Conclusion: The X-ray and CT manifestations of chest inflammation due to intravenous heroin abuse are multiple. The multiple small cavities and pneumatoceles sign are of some value in the diagnosis of lung inflammation due to intravenous heroin abuse among young patients

  7. Air pollution and ED visits for chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szyszkowicz, Mieczyslaw

    2009-02-01

    This was a study of 157,028 emergency department (ED)-diagnosed visits for chest pain (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision [ICD-9]: 786) in 6 cities in Canada. The generalized linear mixed methods technique was applied to analyze the relations between daily counts of ED visits for chest pain on the levels of ambient air pollutants after adjusting for meteorological variables. The daily counts of visits were analyzed separately for the whole period (January-December), warm (April-September), and cold (October-March). The results are presented in the form of the excess risks associated with an increase in the mean values of the pollutant concentrations. The highest increase was obtained for nitrogen dioxide (NO2) exposure in the warm period as follows: 5.9% (95% confidence interval, 3.3-5.8) for mean value equals to 20.1 ppb. The associations of ED visits for chest pain with air pollution are very similar to the associations of ED visits related to cardiac problems. PMID:19371523

  8. Radiological imaging of the neonatal chest. 2. rev. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donoghue, Veronica (ed.) [Children' s University Hospital, Dublin (Ireland). Dept. of Radiology; National Maternity Hospital, Dublin (Ireland)

    2008-07-01

    This second, revised edition of Radiological Imaging of the Neonatal Chest provides a comprehensive and up-to-date discussion of the subject. It is written primarily from the point of view of the paediatric radiologist but will be of particular interest to all antenatal ultrasonographers, neonatologists, paediatric cardiologists, paediatricians and paediatric surgeons. It includes an update on clinical management and appraises the advantages of the various techniques available to image the newborn chest. There is particular emphasis on the impact of recent therapeutic advances on imaging findings. Extensive consideration is given to both antenatal and postnatal imaging of congenital chest malformations, as well as to controversies regarding the postnatal management of asymptomatic infants with these anomalies. There are dedicated chapters on upper airway problems, infection and congenital heart disease, with special emphasis on the current role of magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and interventional therapy. There is also a chapter devoted to computed radiography and digital radiography. This book contains important information for all those involved in caring for the neonate. (orig.)

  9. Differential points of mediastinal cystic lesion in chest computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Jin; Baek, Jang Mi; Song, Jang Hyeon; Seon, Hyun Ju [Dept. of Radiology, Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yun Hyeon [Dept. of Radiology, Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Hwasun (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    To find differential diagnostic imaging findings of mediastinal cystic lesions in chest computed tomography. We retrospectively reviewed imaging findings of 70 patients with histopathologically proven mediastinal cystic lesions. They were 33 male and 37 female patients. Among 70 cases, 49 cases were in the anterior mediastinum, 12 cases were in the middle mediastinum, and 9 cases were in the posterior mediastinum. 19 patients had symptoms. Chest discomfort was the most common symptom. When the cystic lesion was located in the anterior mediastinum, and unilocular, the possibility of thymic cyst was the most likely (p < 0.0027). When the cystic lesion was located in the anterior mediastinum and was multilocular with a relatively thick wall, the possibility of a mature cystic teratoma was the most likely (p < 0.001). When the lesion was a high attenuation cystic lesion located around the air-way, the possibility of a bronchogenic cyst was the most likely (p < 0.001). Chest CT gives information about the location, loculation, wall thickness and internal attenuation of mediastinal cystic lesions. And certain details seen on CT imaging can help with the correct diagnosis, especially in the cases of thymic cyst, mature cystic teratoma and bronchogenic cyst.

  10. Pediatric chest CT after trauma: impact on surgical and clinical management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Rina P. [Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States); Hernanz-Schulman, Marta; Hilmes, Melissa A.; Kan, J.H. [Vanderbilt University, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt Children' s Hospital, Nashville, TN (United States); Yu, Chang [Vanderbilt University, Department of Biostatistics, Nashville, TN (United States); Ray, Jackie [Vanderbilt University, Department of Pediatric Surgery, Vanderbilt Children' s Hospital, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Chest CT after pediatric trauma is frequently performed but its clinical impact, particularly with respect to surgical intervention, has not been adequately evaluated. To assess the impact of chest CT compared with chest radiography on pediatric trauma management. Two hundred thirty-five consecutive pediatric trauma patients who had both chest CT and radiography were identified. Images were reviewed and findings were categorized and correlated with subsequent chest interventions, blinded to final outcome and management. Of the 235 children, 38.3% (90/235) had an abnormal chest radiograph and 63.8% (150/235) had an abnormal chest CT (P < 0.0001). Chest interventions followed in 4.7% (11/235); of these, the findings could be made 1 cm above the dome of the liver in 91% (10/11). Findings requiring chest intervention included pneumothorax (PTX) and vertebral fractures. PTX was found on 2.1% (5/235) of chest radiographs and 20.0% (47/235) of chest CTs (P < 0.0001); 1.7% (4/235) of the children received a chest tube for PTX, 0.85% (2/235) seen on chest CT only. Vertebral fractures were present in 3.8% of the children (9/235) and 66.7% (6/9) of those cases were treated with spinal fusion or brace. There were no instances of mediastinal vascular injury. Most intrathoracic findings requiring surgical management in our population were identified in the lower chest and would be included in routine abdominopelvic CT exams; this information needs to be taken into consideration in the diagnostic algorithm of pediatric trauma patients. (orig.)

  11. Evaluation of chest pain in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, R L; Kontos, M C

    1997-04-01

    The evaluation of chest pain in the emergency setting should be systematic, risk based, and goal driven. An effective program must be able to evaluate all patients with equal thoroughness under the assumption that any patient with chest pain could potentially be having an MI. The initial evaluation is based on the history, a focused physical examination, and the ECG. This information is sufficient to categorize patients into groups at high, moderate, and low risk. Table 14 is a template for a comprehensive chest-pain evaluation program. Patients at high risk need rapid initiation of appropriate therapy: thrombolytics or primary angioplasty for the patients with MIs or aspirin/heparin for the patients with unstable angina. Patients at moderate risk need to have an acute coronary syndrome ruled in or out expediently and additional comorbidities addressed before discharge. Patients at low risk also need to be evaluated, and once the likelihood of an unstable acute coronary syndrome is eliminated, they can be discharged with further evaluation performed as outpatients. Subsequent evaluation should attempt to assign a definitive diagnosis while also addressing issues specific to risk reduction, such as cholesterol lowering and smoking cessation. It is well documented that 4% to 5% of patients with MIs are inadvertently missed during the initial evaluation. This number is surprisingly consistent among many studies using various protocols and suggests that an initial evaluation limited to the history, physical examination, and ECG will fail to identify the small number of these patients who otherwise appear at low risk. The solution is to improve the sensitivity of the evaluation process to identify these patients. It appears that more than simple observation is required, and at the present time, no simple laboratory test can meet this need. However, success has been reported with a number of strategies including emergency imaging with either radionuclides such as

  12. Mucopolysaccharidosis: abnormal findings on abdomen and chest excluding musculoskeletal system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KimHan, Bo Kyung; Yoon, Hye Kyung; Cho, Jae Min [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Jeung Hee; Yoon, Dae Young; Seo, Young Lan; Han, Dae Hee; Choi, Chul Soon; Bae, Sang Hoon; Yoon, Young Cheol; Park, Sang Joon [Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-06-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) is a lysosomal storage disease that causes tissue distortion and dysfunction due to the infiltration of mucopolysaccharide in connective tissue. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the characteristic findings of abdominal CT and plain chest radiography in patients with MPS. Sixty-two children with MPS diagnosed by urine analysis were involved in this study; 24 of these underwent abdominal CT and the findings were reviewed by two radiologists, who reached a consensus. Organomegaly was classified as severe, moderate or mild. On chest PA radiographs of 42 of the children, the transverse diameter of the trachea was measured and compared with that of 42 normal controls. Student's t test was used for statistical analysis. At abdominal CT, hepatomegaly was observed in 22 patients (92%; 2 severe, 15 moderate and 5 mild); and splenomegaly was present in 18 (75%; 2 severe, 4 moderate and 12 mild). Among eight patients (33%) with pancreatic enlargement, one had a severly enlarged pancreas, while in the remaining seven, enlargement was mild. Also present were inguinal hernia (n=15), umbilical hernia (n=12), undulation with thickening of the diaphragmatic crura (n=10). abnormalities related to the male genitalia (n=5) and vascular anomaly (n=3). In MPS patients, the mid-point diameter of the trachea (range, 5.6-9 mm; mean, 6.9 mm) was significantly less than in normal controls (range, 8-14 mm; mean, 10.8 mm)(p<0.001). An awareness of the characteristic abnormalities observed at abdominal CT and chest PA radiography can lead to a better understanding of MPS in children.

  13. Mucopolysaccharidosis: abnormal findings on abdomen and chest excluding musculoskeletal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) is a lysosomal storage disease that causes tissue distortion and dysfunction due to the infiltration of mucopolysaccharide in connective tissue. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the characteristic findings of abdominal CT and plain chest radiography in patients with MPS. Sixty-two children with MPS diagnosed by urine analysis were involved in this study; 24 of these underwent abdominal CT and the findings were reviewed by two radiologists, who reached a consensus. Organomegaly was classified as severe, moderate or mild. On chest PA radiographs of 42 of the children, the transverse diameter of the trachea was measured and compared with that of 42 normal controls. Student's t test was used for statistical analysis. At abdominal CT, hepatomegaly was observed in 22 patients (92%; 2 severe, 15 moderate and 5 mild); and splenomegaly was present in 18 (75%; 2 severe, 4 moderate and 12 mild). Among eight patients (33%) with pancreatic enlargement, one had a severly enlarged pancreas, while in the remaining seven, enlargement was mild. Also present were inguinal hernia (n=15), umbilical hernia (n=12), undulation with thickening of the diaphragmatic crura (n=10). abnormalities related to the male genitalia (n=5) and vascular anomaly (n=3). In MPS patients, the mid-point diameter of the trachea (range, 5.6-9 mm; mean, 6.9 mm) was significantly less than in normal controls (range, 8-14 mm; mean, 10.8 mm)(p<0.001). An awareness of the characteristic abnormalities observed at abdominal CT and chest PA radiography can lead to a better understanding of MPS in children

  14. Mucopolysaccharidosis: abnormal findings on abdomen and chest excluding musculoskeletal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) is a lysosomal storage disease that causes tissue distortion and dysfunction due to the infiltration of mucopolysaccharide in connective tissue. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the characteristic findings of abdominal CT and plain chest radiography in patients with MPS. Sixty-two children with MPS diagnosed by urine analysis were involved in this study; 24 of these underwent abdominal CT and the findings were reviewed by two radiologists, who reached a consensus. Organomegaly was classified as severe, moderate or mild. On chest PA radiographs of 42 of the children, the transverse diameter of the trachea was measured and compared with that of 42 normal controls. Student's t test was used for statistical analysis. At abdominal CT, hepatomegaly was observed in 22 patients (92%; 2 severe, 15 moderate and 5 mild); and splenomegaly was present in 18 (75%; 2 severe, 4 moderate and 12 mild). Among eight patients(33%) with pancreatic enlargement, one had a severly enlarged pancreas, while in the remaining seven, enlargement was mild. Also present were inguinal hernia (n=15), umbilical hernia (n=12), undulation with thickening of the diaphragmatic crura (n=10), abnormalities related to the male genitalia (n=5) and vascular anomaly (n=3). In MPS patients, the mid-point diameter of the trachea (range, 5.6-9 mm; mean, 6.9 mm) was significantly less than in normal controls (range, 8-14 mm; mean, 10.8 mm) (p<0.001). An awareness of the characteristic abnormalities observed at abdominal CT and chest PA radiography can lead to a better understanding of MPS in children

  15. Mucopolysaccharidosis: abnormal findings on abdomen and chest excluding musculoskeletal system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Jeung Hee; Yoon, Dae Young; Seo, Young Lan; Han, Dae Hee; Choi, Chul Soon; Bae, Sang Hoon; Yoon, Young Cheol; Park, Sang Joon [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim Han, Bok Yung; Yoon, Hye Kyung; Cho, Jae Min [Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-06-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) is a lysosomal storage disease that causes tissue distortion and dysfunction due to the infiltration of mucopolysaccharide in connective tissue. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the characteristic findings of abdominal CT and plain chest radiography in patients with MPS. Sixty-two children with MPS diagnosed by urine analysis were involved in this study; 24 of these underwent abdominal CT and the findings were reviewed by two radiologists, who reached a consensus. Organomegaly was classified as severe, moderate or mild. On chest PA radiographs of 42 of the children, the transverse diameter of the trachea was measured and compared with that of 42 normal controls. Student's t test was used for statistical analysis. At abdominal CT, hepatomegaly was observed in 22 patients (92%; 2 severe, 15 moderate and 5 mild); and splenomegaly was present in 18 (75%; 2 severe, 4 moderate and 12 mild). Among eight patients(33%) with pancreatic enlargement, one had a severly enlarged pancreas, while in the remaining seven, enlargement was mild. Also present were inguinal hernia (n=15), umbilical hernia (n=12), undulation with thickening of the diaphragmatic crura (n=10), abnormalities related to the male genitalia (n=5) and vascular anomaly (n=3). In MPS patients, the mid-point diameter of the trachea (range, 5.6-9 mm; mean, 6.9 mm) was significantly less than in normal controls (range, 8-14 mm; mean, 10.8 mm) (p<0.001). An awareness of the characteristic abnormalities observed at abdominal CT and chest PA radiography can lead to a better understanding of MPS in children.

  16. Novel computed tomographic chest metrics to detect pulmonary hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Chin-Shang

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension (PH can potentially improve survival and quality of life. Detecting PH using echocardiography is often insensitive in subjects with lung fibrosis or hyperinflation. Right heart catheterization (RHC for the diagnosis of PH adds risk and expense due to its invasive nature. Pre-defined measurements utilizing computed tomography (CT of the chest may be an alternative non-invasive method of detecting PH. Methods This study retrospectively reviewed 101 acutely hospitalized inpatients with heterogeneous diagnoses, who consecutively underwent CT chest and RHC during the same admission. Two separate teams, each consisting of a radiologist and pulmonologist, blinded to clinical and RHC data, individually reviewed the chest CT's. Results Multiple regression analyses controlling for age, sex, ascending aortic diameter, body surface area, thoracic diameter and pulmonary wedge pressure showed that a main pulmonary artery (PA diameter ≥29 mm (odds ratio (OR = 4.8, right descending PA diameter ≥19 mm (OR = 7.0, true right descending PA diameter ≥ 16 mm (OR = 4.1, true left descending PA diameter ≥ 21 mm (OR = 15.5, right ventricular (RV free wall ≥ 6 mm (OR = 30.5, RV wall/left ventricular (LV wall ratio ≥0.32 (OR = 8.8, RV/LV lumen ratio ≥1.28 (OR = 28.8, main PA/ascending aorta ratio ≥0.84 (OR = 6.0 and main PA/descending aorta ratio ≥ 1.29 (OR = 5.7 were significant predictors of PH in this population of hospitalized patients. Conclusion This combination of easily measured CT-based metrics may, upon confirmatory studies, aid in the non-invasive detection of PH and hence in the determination of RHC candidacy in acutely hospitalized patients.

  17. Chest pain following oesophageal stenting for malignant dysphagia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golder, Mark; Tekkis, Paris P.; Kennedy, Colette; Lath, Sadaf; Toye, Rosemary; Steger, Adrian C

    2001-03-01

    AIM: The palliative use of self-expanding metallic stents has been widely reported to relieve dysphagia in cases of oesophageal carcinoma. Little has been documented on the severity of chest pain following oesophageal stenting. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of pain with oesophageal stenting for malignant dysphagia. METHODS: Fifty-two patients with inoperable oesophageal carcinoma underwent stent placement between 1995-1999. Daily opioid analgesic requirements (mg of morphine equivalent doses) were monitored for 3 days before and 7 days after stenting. The degree of palliation was expressed as a dysphagia score (0-3). Hospital stay, readmission days, stent complications and patient survival time were also recorded. RESULTS: Twenty-six patients (50%) required opioid analgesia for chest pain (median dose: 80 mg morphine/day) within 48 h of the procedure compared to 11 (21.2%) patients before stenting (P = 0.0041). A significant increase was evident in the analgesic consumption following stent deployment (P < 0.001). The dysphagia score improved by a median value of 1 (CI 0.25)P < 0.001, with a re-intervention rate of 11.5%. The median survival time was 40 days post stenting (range 1-120). CONCLUSION: A significant proportion of patients developed chest pain after oesophageal stenting, requiring high dose opioid analgesia. As the origin of the pain is still unknown, pre-emptive analgesia may a play role in reducing stent-related morbidity and possibly in-hospital stay. Golder, M. et al. (2001)

  18. Chest reporting by radiographers: Findings of an accredited postgraduate programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To analyse the objective structured examination (OSE) results of the first six cohorts of radiographers (n = 40) who successfully completed an accredited postgraduate programme in clinical reporting of adult chest radiographs. Methods: One hundred chest radiographs were used in the OSE which included a range of abnormal cases (prevalence of abnormal examinations approximated 50%) and included: cardiac, pulmonary, pleural, interstitial, inflammatory, neoplastic and traumatic appearances on patients referred from a range of referral sources. Normal variants and incidental findings were also included. True/false positive and negative fractions were used to mark the responses which were also scored for agreement with the previously agreed expected answers based on agreement between three consultant radiologists' reports. Results: Mean sensitivity and specificity rates, for all six cohorts (4000 reports), was 95.4% (95% CI 94.4%–96.3%) and 95.9% (95% CI 94.9%–96.7%), respectively. The mean agreement rate was 89% (95% CI 88.0%–89.0%) and the most common errors were related to heart size, hilar enlargement or pleural effusion (false positive); and skeletal appearances or pneumothoraces (false negative). Conclusions: These OSE results suggest therefore that in an academic setting, and following an accredited postgraduate education programme, this group of radiographers has the ability to correctly identify normal chest radiographs and are able to provide a report on the abnormal appearances to a high standard. Further work is required to confirm the clinical application of these findings

  19. Novel computed tomographic chest metrics to detect pulmonary hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension (PH) can potentially improve survival and quality of life. Detecting PH using echocardiography is often insensitive in subjects with lung fibrosis or hyperinflation. Right heart catheterization (RHC) for the diagnosis of PH adds risk and expense due to its invasive nature. Pre-defined measurements utilizing computed tomography (CT) of the chest may be an alternative non-invasive method of detecting PH. This study retrospectively reviewed 101 acutely hospitalized inpatients with heterogeneous diagnoses, who consecutively underwent CT chest and RHC during the same admission. Two separate teams, each consisting of a radiologist and pulmonologist, blinded to clinical and RHC data, individually reviewed the chest CT's. Multiple regression analyses controlling for age, sex, ascending aortic diameter, body surface area, thoracic diameter and pulmonary wedge pressure showed that a main pulmonary artery (PA) diameter ≥29 mm (odds ratio (OR) = 4.8), right descending PA diameter ≥19 mm (OR = 7.0), true right descending PA diameter ≥ 16 mm (OR = 4.1), true left descending PA diameter ≥ 21 mm (OR = 15.5), right ventricular (RV) free wall ≥ 6 mm (OR = 30.5), RV wall/left ventricular (LV) wall ratio ≥0.32 (OR = 8.8), RV/LV lumen ratio ≥1.28 (OR = 28.8), main PA/ascending aorta ratio ≥0.84 (OR = 6.0) and main PA/descending aorta ratio ≥ 1.29 (OR = 5.7) were significant predictors of PH in this population of hospitalized patients. This combination of easily measured CT-based metrics may, upon confirmatory studies, aid in the non-invasive detection of PH and hence in the determination of RHC candidacy in acutely hospitalized patients

  20. Chest dynamics asymmetry facilitates earlier detection of pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waisman, D; Landesberg, A; Kohn, S; Faingersh, A; Klotzman, I C; Gover, A; Kessel, I; Rotschild, A

    2016-02-01

    Pneumothorax is usually diagnosed when signs of life-threatening tension pneumothorax develop. The case report describes novel data derived from miniature superficial sensors that continuously monitored the amplitude and symmetry of the chest wall tidal displacement (TDi) in a premature infant that suffered from pneumothorax. Off-line analysis of the TDi revealed slowly progressing asymmetric ventilation that could be detected 38 min before the diagnosis was made. The TDi provides novel and valuable information that can assist in early detection and decision making. PMID:26814803

  1. High frequency chest compression therapy: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, S; O'Neill, B

    1995-01-01

    A new device, the ThAIRapy Bronchial Drainage System, enables patients with cystic fibrosis to self-administer the technique of high frequency chest compression (HFCC) to assist with mucociliary clearance. We review the literature on HFCC and outline a case study of a patient currently using the ThAIRapy Bronchial Drainage System. While mucociliary clearance and lung function may be enhanced by HFCC therapy, more research is needed to determine its efficacy, cost benefits, and optimum treatment guidelines. Although our initial experience with the patient using this device has been positive, we were unable to accurately evaluate the ThAIRapy Bronchial Drainage System.

  2. Pneumocephalus Following Thoracic Surgery with Posterior Chest Wall Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Ina; Tönnies, Mario; Pfannschmidt, Joachim; Kaiser, Dirk

    2015-12-01

    Pneumocephalus can be seen after head injury with fracture of the skull-base or in cerebral neoplasm, infection, or after intracranial or spinal surgery. We report on a 69-year-old male patient with pneumocephalus after right-sided lobectomy and en bloc resection of the chest wall for non-small-cell lung cancer. Postoperatively, the patient showed a reduced vigilance level with no response to pain stimuli and anisocoria. The CCT scan revealed an extensive pneumocephalus; following which, the patient underwent neurosurgery with laminectomy and ligature of the transected nerve roots. After operation the patient returned to his baseline mental status. PMID:26693117

  3. Automatic screening for tuberculosis in chest radiographs: a survey

    OpenAIRE

    Jaeger, Stefan; Karargyris, Alexandros; Candemir, Sema; Siegelman, Jenifer; Folio, Les; Antani, Sameer; Thoma, George

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major global health threat. An estimated one-third of the world’s population has a history of TB infection, and millions of new infections are occurring every year. The advent of new powerful hardware and software techniques has triggered attempts to develop computer-aided diagnostic systems for TB detection in support of inexpensive mass screening in developing countries. In this paper, we describe the medical background of TB detection in chest X-rays and present a su...

  4. Palpation for muscular tenderness in the anterior chest wall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Wulff; Vach, Werner; Manniche, Claus;

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To asses the interobserver and intraobserver reliability (in terms of day-to-day and hour-to-hour reliability) of palpation for muscular tenderness in the anterior chest wall. DESIGN: A repeated measures designs was used. SETTING: Department of Nuclear Medicine, Odense University...... Hospital, Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: Two experienced chiropractors examined 29 patients and 27 subjects in the interobserver part, and 1 of the 2 chiropractors examined 14 patients and 15 subjects in the intraobserver studies. INTERVENTION: Palpation for muscular tenderness was done in 14 predetermined areas...

  5. Prediction of chronic lung disease from the chest radiograph appearance at seven days of age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to assess if the chest radiograph appearance at seven days of age could be used to predict chronic lung disease. 60 preterm infants who were ventilated and/or had supplementary oxygen at seven days of age and had a chest radiograph performed at that postnatal age, were prospectively recruited. These chest radiographs were scored according to lung volume, presence of opacification, haziness, interstitial changes and cystic elements. 28 infants subsequently developed chronic lung disease; their median chest radiograph score was 5.5 which was significantly higher than that of the non-chronic lung disease infants. A chest radiograph score of 4 had a 71% sensitivity and 88% specificity in predicting chronic lung disease. It is concluded that chest radiograph appearance at seven days of age is a sensitive and specific predictor of chronic lung disease and thus could be used to indicate the need for preventive therapy. 22 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  6. Clinical utility of coronary CT angiography with low-dose chest CT in the evaluation of patients with atypical chest pain: a preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Soo Jin [Kimhae Bokum Hospital, Kimhae (Korea, Republic of); Choo, Ki Seok; Kim, Chang Won [Pusan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2008-04-15

    To determine the clinical utility of coronary CT angiography (CCTA) with low-dose chest CT in the evaluation of patients with atypical chest pain. Ninety-six patients (mean age 60.2 years; age range, 41-68 years; 70 males) were referred for CCTA with low-dose chest CT (16-slice MDCT, Siemens) for an evaluation of atypical chest pain. When significant stenoses (lumen diameter reduction > 50%) were detected on CCTA, invasive coronary angiography (CA) was performed as the standard of reference. In all patients, medical chart review or telephone contact with patients was used to evaluate the contribution of CCTA with low-dose chest CT to the final clinical diagnosis, at least 6 months after performing CCTA. Among 96 patients, seven patients (7%) had significant stenoses as detected on CCTA, whereas two patients (2%) had significant stenoses and five patients had insignificant stenoses or no stenosis, as detected on conventional catheter angiography. In 18 (19%) of the 89 patients without significant stenosis detected on CCTA, this protocol provided additional information that suggested or confirmed an alternate clinical diagnosis. In patients with atypical chest pain, CCTA with low-dose chest CT could help to exclude ischemic heart disease and could provide important ancillary information for the final diagnosis.

  7. Measurements of the human anterior chest wall by ultrasound and estimates of chest wall thickness for use in determination of transuranic nuclides in the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The low energy photons on which the in vivo detection of plutonium isotopes and americium 241 is based are severely attenuated in body tissues. To assess the activity of these radionuclides in the lungs by external measurement it is necessary to estimate or measure the thickness of tissues overlying the lungs. It is also desirable to distinguish between muscle and adipose tissues in the chest wall because of the difference in their attenuation properties. Diagnostic ultrasound machines developed for medical use are suitable for this purpose. Experience gained since 1978 in ultrasonic measurements of chest wall thickness and the current measurement procedure are described. The concept of ''equivalent muscle chest wall thickness'' is introduced and a method for calculating the parameter is given. Both chest wall thickness and equivalent muscle chest wall thickness have been found to correlate well with Quetelets Index (weight divided by height squared). Residual correlations with other parameters have been examined. Empirical formulae are given that can be used to predict the chest wall thickness and equivalent muscle chest wall thickness of a subject of given weight, height and age. (author)

  8. Chest physiotherapy techniques in neurological intensive care units of India: A survey

    OpenAIRE

    Anup Bhat; Kalyana Chakravarthy; Rao, Bhamini K.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Neurological intensive care units (ICUs) are a rapidly developing sub-specialty of neurosciences. Chest physiotherapy techniques are of great value in neurological ICUs in preventing, halting, or reversing the impairments caused due to neurological disorder and ICU stay. However, chest physiotherapy techniques should be modified to a greater extent in the neurological ICU as compared with general ICUs. Aim: The aim of this study is to obtain data on current chest physiotherapy practi...

  9. Esophageal Manometry in Patients with Chest Pain and Normal Coronary Arteriogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, S C; Hodges, K; Hersh, T; Jinich, H

    1981-02-01

    Evaluation of the esophagus is helpful in determining the source of chest pain. Eighteen per cent of 72 patients with a normal coronary angiogram had esophageal disease as a source of chest pain. Eight had diffuse esophageal spasm, four had reflux esophagitis and one had an esophageal ulcer. Five of eight patients with diffuse esophageal spasm had relief of symptoms with nitroglycerin. Despite normal coronary arteriogram and normal esophageal manometry 42 of 49 other patients had relief of chest pain with nitroglycerin.

  10. Overview of two years of clinical experience of chest tomo-synthesis at Sahlgrenska university hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since December 2006, ∼ 3800 clinical chest tomo-synthesis examinations have been performed at our department at Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital. A subset of the examinations has been included in studies of the detectability of pulmonary nodules, using computed tomography (CT) as the gold standard. Visibility studies, in which chest tomo-synthesis and CT have been compared side-by side, have been used to determine the depiction potential of chest tomo-synthesis. Comparisons with conventional chest radiography have been made. In the clinical setting, chest tomo-synthesis has mostly been used as an additional examination. The most frequent indication for chest tomo-synthesis has been suspicion of a nodule or tumour. In visibility studies, tomo-synthesis has depicted over 90% of the nodules seen on the CT scan. The corresponding figure for chest radiography has been <30%. In the detection studies, the lesion-level sensitivity has been ∼ 60% for tomo-synthesis and 20% for chest radiography. In one of the detection studies, an analysis of all false-positive nodules was performed. This analysis showed that all findings had morphological correlates on the CT examinations. The majority of the false-positive nodules were localised in the immediate sub-pleural region. In conclusion, chest tomo-synthesis is an improved chest radiography method, which can be used to optimise the use of CT resources, thereby reducing the radiation dose to the patient population. However, there are some limitations with chest tomo-synthesis. For example, patients undergoing tomo-synthesis have to be able to stand still and hold their breath firmly for 10 s. Also, chest tomo-synthesis has a limited depth resolution, which may explain why pathology in the sub-pleural region is more difficult to interpret and artefacts from medical devices may occur. (authors)

  11. Isolated blunt chest injury leads to transient activation of circulating neutrophils

    OpenAIRE

    Visser, T.; Hietbrink, F.; Groeneveld, K. M.; Koenderman, L; Leenen, L.P.H.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a severe and frequently seen complication in multi-trauma patients. ARDS is caused by an excessive innate immune response with a clear role for neutrophils. As ARDS is more frequently seen in trauma patients with chest injury, we investigated the influence of chest injury on the systemic neutrophil response and the development of ARDS. Materials and methods Thirteen patients with isolated blunt chest injury [abbreviated injury sco...

  12. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance of myocardial infarction after blunt chest trauma: a heartbreaking soccer-shot

    OpenAIRE

    Fogarassy Peter; Maunz Martin; Beck Torsten; Baccouche Hannibal; Beyer Martin

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Cardiac injury occasionally occurs as a result of blunt chest trauma. Most cardiac complications in chest trauma are due to myocardial contusion rather than direct damage to the coronary arteries. However, traumatic coronary injury has been reported, and a variety of underlying pathophysiological mechanisms have been proposed. We present a 26 year old patient presenting with an acute coronary syndrome as a consequence of a soccer-shot impact to the chest. CMR showed apical inferior i...

  13. Severity of chest disease in cystic fibrosis patients in relation to their genotypes.

    OpenAIRE

    al-Jader, L. N.; Meredith, A L; Ryley, H C; Cheadle, J P; Maguire, S.; Owen, G.; Goodchild, M.C.; Harper, P S

    1992-01-01

    A detailed comparison of the severity of chest disease with mutational status was carried out by cross sectional study of 127 cystic fibrosis patients, aged 1 to 31 years, living in Wales. Lung disease was classified according to severity, depending on pulmonary function tests (carried out on 76 patients) and chest radiograph status; information was obtained also on age at diagnosis in relation to severity of chest disease and colonisation with Pseudomonas species. Genotypes were determined b...

  14. Determining symptoms for chest radiographs in patients with swine flu (H1N1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The question arises about the chest X-ray findings and clinical symptoms in swine flu and about the most important clinical finding when correlated with the chest radiograph. Should physicians order a chest X-ray in each patient suspected of having swine flu? There were 179 patients with a high suspicion of swine flu. All 179 patients had an initial chest radiograph. As many as 65 males (representing 56% of the projected study population) had a normal chest radiograph, while 35 males (representing 55.6% of the study population) had an abnormal chest X-ray. As many as 51 females (representing 44% of the population) had a normal chest X-ray, while 20 females (representing 44% of the study population) had abnormal chest X-rays. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was not a determining factor for normal vs. abnormal chest X-ray (CXR). Rapid antigen test was not a determining factor for normal vs. abnormal CXR. Fever was not a determining factor for normal vs. abnormal CXR. Cough appears to be a determining factor for normal vs. abnormal CXR. Sore throat appears to be a determining factor for normal vs. abnormal CXR. Chest pain was not a determining factor for normal vs. abnormal CXR. Presence of cough with PCR was statistically significant. In my opinion, chest radiographs in patients with suspected H1N1 should only be obtained if there is a cough or sore throat. Other symptoms associated with H1N1 do not warrant a chest radiograph unless absolutely necessary

  15. Evaluation of chest injury mechanisms in nearside oblique frontal impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iraeus, Johan; Lindquist, Mats; Wistrand, Sofie; Sibgård, Elin; Pipkorn, Bengt

    2013-01-01

    Despite the use of seat belts and modern safety systems, many automobile occupants are still seriously injured or killed in car crashes. Common configurations in these crashes are oblique and small overlap frontal impacts that often lead to chest injuries.To evaluate the injury mechanism in these oblique impacts, an investigation was carried out using mathematical human body model simulations. A model of a simplified vehicle interior was developed and validated by means of mechanical sled tests with the Hybrid III dummy. The interior model was then combined with the human body model THUMS and validated by means of mechanical PMHS sled tests. Occupant kinematics as well as rib fracture patterns were predicted with reasonable accuracy.The final model was updated to conform to modern cars and a simulation matrix was run. In this matrix the boundary conditions, ΔV and PDOF, were varied and rib fracture risk as a function of the boundary conditions was evaluated using a statistical framework.In oblique frontal impacts, two injury producing mechanisms were found; (i) diagonal belt load and (ii) side structure impact. The second injury mechanism was found for PDOFs of 25°-35°, depending on ΔV. This means that for larger PDOFs, less ΔV is needed to cause a serious chest injury.

  16. A triceps musculocutaneous flap for chest-wall defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartrampf, C.R. Jr.; Elliott, L.F.; Feldman, S. (Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (USA))

    1990-09-01

    A posterior upper arm flap based on the profunda brachii vessels has been described to cover soft-tissue defects in the upper anterolateral chest. In our series, the posterior upper arm skin is elevated with the long head of the triceps muscle to cover seven chest-wall defects resulting from indolent postradiation open wounds following partial TRAM flap failure (n = 2), soft-tissue deficiencies following partial TRAM flap loss (n = 3), and primarily as an ancillary flap in TRAM flap breast reconstruction (n = 2). This flap also may be used to supply well-vascularized tissue in the regions of the shoulder, axilla, and posterolateral back. A prerequisite for this operation is redundant tissue of the upper arm often present in middle-aged women and in patients with lymphedema following mastectomy. In our series of seven patients, all donor sites were closed primarily, and there was no subjective functional deficit following transfer of the long head of the triceps muscle.

  17. Estimation of cartilaginous region in noncontrast CT of the chest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qian; Safdar, Nabile; Yu, Glenna; Myers, Emmarie; Sandler, Anthony; Linguraru, Marius George

    2014-03-01

    Pectus excavatum is a posterior depression of the sternum and adjacent costal cartilages and is the most common congenital deformity of the anterior chest wall. Its surgical repair can be performed via minimally invasive procedures that involve sternum and cartilage relocation and benefit from adequate surgical planning. In this study, we propose a method to estimate the cartilage regions in thoracic CT scans, which is the first step of statistical modeling of the osseous and cartilaginous structures for the rib cage. The ribs and sternum are first segmented by using interactive region growing and removing the vertebral column with morphological operations. The entire chest wall is also segmented to estimate the skin surface. After the segmentation, surface meshes are generated from the volumetric data and the skeleton of the ribs is extracted using surface contraction method. Then the cartilage surface is approximated via contracting the skin surface to the osseous structure. The ribs' skeleton is projected to the cartilage surface and the cartilages are estimated using cubic interpolation given the joints with the sternum. The final cartilage regions are formed by the cartilage surface inside the convex hull of the estimated cartilages. The method was validated with the CT scans of two pectus excavatum patients and three healthy subjects. The average distance between the estimated cartilage surface and the ground truth is 2.89 mm. The promising results indicate the effectiveness of cartilage surface estimation using the skin surface.

  18. A case of radiation ulcer of chest wall with osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a case of anterior chest skin ulcer with rib and sternum osteomyelitis following radiation therapy for post operative mammary carcinoma. Operation was performed six times including debridement with sternum and rib resection reconstruction and skin grafting. It took about one and a half years after first operation to heal the ulcer with osteomyelitis. Principle of treatment for radiation ulcer accompanied by osteomyelitis is complete resection of the damaged lesion. However, it is difficult to evaluate the exact area of the damaged lesion. Therefore it is not rare to repeat its recurrence and have trouble with its treatment. In this case, it was considered that the resected area was insufficient on the initial operation. In order to treat for radiation ulcers accompanied by osteomyelitis, enough resection of the damaged lesion in the initial operation is necessary. Ultimately, in our case, the resection of all sternum, part of the right second to fifth rib and part of left second to seventh rib was necessary. It is generally said that reconstructing bone structure is required in the case of wide defect of chest wall. Though, we did not perform reconstruction of the bone structures, there is no problem in the condition of respiratory system. The surrounding soft tissues changed to hard enough to avoid paradoxical breathing. (author)

  19. Emphysema in heavy smokers with normal chest radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the severity and extent of emphysema in heavy smokers by high-resolution CT (HRCT) and to correlate the findings with spirometric tests (STs) and symptomatology. Material and Methods: Fifty adult smokers with a mean age of 53 years with a smoking history of more than 30 pack years and normal chest radiographs underwent HRCT of the chest and ST (FEV1, FEV1/FVC, PEFR). Among these, 22 had symptoms of pulmonary disease and 28 were asymptomatic. Quantification of emphysema was done using a density mask program and the visual scoring method. The results were correlated with ST and symptomatology. Results: 58% (29 out of 50) of the subjects had significant emphysema on HRCT. Eleven out of 15 with normal ST showed emphysema on HRCT while 2 with airflow obstruction on ST showed normal CT scores. 14% (4 out of 28) asymptomatic subjects had severe emphysema compared to 64% of symptomatic subjects. Emphysematous changes were predominantly seen in upper lung zones in 48% of the patients while in 52% it was distributed equally in both upper and lower zones. The number of pack years of smoking showed a positive correlation with CT scores. The correlation between HRCT scores and ST was statistically significant. Conclusion: A significant number of asymptomatic and clinically undiagnosed smokers tend to have significant emphysema. HRCT helps in early detection of disease and thus helps implementation of preventive measures

  20. Emphysema in heavy smokers with normal chest radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sashidhar, K.; Monga, S.; Suri, S. [Postgraduate Inst. of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh (India). Dept. of Radiodiagnosis; Gulati, M.; Gupta, D. [Postgraduate Inst. of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh (India). Dept. of Pulmonary Medicine

    2002-04-01

    Purpose: To determine the severity and extent of emphysema in heavy smokers by high-resolution CT (HRCT) and to correlate the findings with spirometric tests (STs) and symptomatology. Material and Methods: Fifty adult smokers with a mean age of 53 years with a smoking history of more than 30 pack years and normal chest radiographs underwent HRCT of the chest and ST (FEV1, FEV1/FVC, PEFR). Among these, 22 had symptoms of pulmonary disease and 28 were asymptomatic. Quantification of emphysema was done using a density mask program and the visual scoring method. The results were correlated with ST and symptomatology. Results: 58% (29 out of 50) of the subjects had significant emphysema on HRCT. Eleven out of 15 with normal ST showed emphysema on HRCT while 2 with airflow obstruction on ST showed normal CT scores. 14% (4 out of 28) asymptomatic subjects had severe emphysema compared to 64% of symptomatic subjects. Emphysematous changes were predominantly seen in upper lung zones in 48% of the patients while in 52% it was distributed equally in both upper and lower zones. The number of pack years of smoking showed a positive correlation with CT scores. The correlation between HRCT scores and ST was statistically significant. Conclusion: A significant number of asymptomatic and clinically undiagnosed smokers tend to have significant emphysema. HRCT helps in early detection of disease and thus helps implementation of preventive measures.

  1. Anterior chest wall tuberculous abscess: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papavramidis Theodossis S

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The granulomatous inflammation of tuberculosis usually involves the lungs and the hilar lymph nodes. Musculoskeletal tuberculosis (TB occurs in 1–3% of patients with TB, while TB of the chest wall constitutes 1% to 5% of all cases of musculoskeletal TB. Furthermore, nowadays it is rarer to find extrapulmonary TB in immunocompetent rather that non-immunocompetent patients. The present case reports a fifty-six-year-old immunocompetent man with an anterior chest wall tuberculous abscess. The rarity of the present case relates both to the localization of the tuberculous abscess, and to the fact that the patient was immunocompetent. The diagnosis of musculoskeletal tuberculous infection remains a challenge for clinicians and requires a high index of suspicion. The combination of indolent onset of symptoms, positive tuberculin skin test, and compatible radiographic findings, strongly suggests the diagnosis. TB, however, must be confirmed by positive culture or histologic proof. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are important to prevent serious bone and joint destruction.

  2. Auscultation of the Chest and Abdomen by Athletic Trainers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McChesney, John A.; McChesney, John W.

    2001-06-01

    OBJECTIVE: To present a practical overview of the methods and techniques of auscultation of the chest and abdomen for use during the physical examination of athletes. Our intent is to provide information on this clinical technique to assist athletic trainers in recognizing and referring athletes presenting with potentially serious internal organ conditions. BACKGROUND: Use of the stethoscope is a clinical skill increasingly necessary for athletic trainers. Given the expanding breadth of both the assessment techniques used by athletic trainers and the populations they care for and the fact that clinical instruction guidelines have changed in the newly adopted National Athletic Trainers' Association Educational Competencies, our goal is to provide a framework upon which future instruction can be based. DESCRIPTION: This review covers the use of a stethoscope for auscultation of the chest and abdomen. Auscultation of the heart is covered first, followed by techniques for auscultating the breath sounds. Lastly, auscultation of the abdomen describes techniques for listening for bowel sounds and arterial bruits. CLINICAL ADVANTAGES: During the assessment of injuries to and illnesses of athletes, knowledge of auscultatory techniques is valuable and of increasing importance to athletic trainers. Athletic trainers who do not know how to perform auscultation may fail to recognize, and therefore fail to refer for further evaluation, athletes with potentially serious pathologic conditions.

  3. Plastic surgery in chest wall reconstruction: relevant aspects - case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Franco

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to discuss the participation of Plastic Surgery in the reconstruction of the chest wall, highlighting relevant aspects of interdisciplinaryness. Methods: we analyzed charts from 20 patients who underwent extensive resection of the thoracic integument, between 2000 and 2014, recording the indication of resection, the extent and depth of the raw areas, types of reconstructions performed and complications. Results: among the 20 patients, averaging 55 years old, five were males and 15 females. They resections were: one squamous cell carcinoma, two basal cell carcinomas, five chondrosarcomas and 12 breast tumors. The extent of the bloody areas ranged from 4x9 cm to 25x40 cm. In 12 patients the resection included the muscular plane. In the remaining eight, the tumor removal achieved a total wall thickness. For reconstruction we used: one muscular flap associated with skin grafting, nine flaps and ten regional fasciocutaneous flaps. Two patients undergoing reconstruction with fasciocutaneous flaps had partially suffering of the flap, solved with employment of a myocutaneous flap. The other patients displayed no complications with the techniques used, requiring only one surgery. Conclusion: the proper assessment of local tissues and flaps available for reconstruction, in addition to the successful integration of Plastic Surgery with the specialties involved in the treatment, enable extensive resections of the chest wall and reconstructions that provide patient recovery.

  4. Radiation Load of Children by Chest Radiodiagnostic Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiodiagnostic examinations of children present particular importance from the radiation hygiene point of view. The estimation of the radiation load of pediatric patient is not easy, because of the lack of information about organ weighting factors for various ages of patients, as well as due to the differences in applied X-ray examination parameters. In the district of Slovak Republic, in which also the working Nuclear Power Plant Jaslovske Bohunice is included, efforts were done to estimate the radiation load of children to 15 years by chest radiodiagnostic examinations. The data of entrance surface doses were collected using measurements with TLD for 100 patients divided in 5 age categories at six radiodiagnostic departments. The calculations of the total absorbed dose were performed using the measured ESD values (entrance surface dose in mGy) integrated over the X-ray beam area, the conversion factors between the imparted energy and the dose-area product and the known irradiation parameters (kV, HVL, mass, etc.). The analysis of the obtained absorbed doses (Ea) as a function of age for chest PA radiodiagnostic examinations has shown, that the investigated Slovak radiodiagnostic centres use rather lower voltage techniques and the entrance surface doses are much higher than the proposed value of European Communities. (author)

  5. Plasmacytoma presenting as missing rib on chest film: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffery, Terrell; Foy, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    A 33-year-old man presented to the emergency department (ED) with chief complaint of chest pain, persisting for approximately one year. Chest X-ray revealed he was missing the right posterior fifth rib. Physical examination showed no surgical scars, and he reported no history of chest trauma. A CT of his chest demonstrated a mass involving the posterior aspect of the right fifth rib, and subsequent biopsy revealed plasma cells. Laboratory results indicated the tumor was a solitary plasmacytoma of the rib. He was referred to oncology and treated with radiation therapy. This case report illustrates an unusual presentation of a solitary plasmacytoma of the rib.

  6. Predicting Chest Wall Pain From Lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Different Fractionation Schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Recent studies with two fractionation schemes predicted that the volume of chest wall receiving >30 Gy (V30) correlated with chest wall pain after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to the lung. This study developed a predictive model of chest wall pain incorporating radiobiologic effects, using clinical data from four distinct SBRT fractionation schemes. Methods and Materials: 102 SBRT patients were treated with four different fractionations: 60 Gy in three fractions, 50 Gy in five fractions, 48 Gy in four fractions, and 50 Gy in 10 fractions. To account for radiobiologic effects, a modified equivalent uniform dose (mEUD) model calculated the dose to the chest wall with volume weighting. For comparison, V30 and maximum point dose were also reported. Using univariable logistic regression, the association of radiation dose and clinical variables with chest wall pain was assessed by uncertainty coefficient (U) and C statistic (C) of receiver operator curve. The significant associations from the univariable model were verified with a multivariable model. Results: 106 lesions in 102 patients with a mean age of 72 were included, with a mean of 25.5 (range, 12–55) months of follow-up. Twenty patients reported chest wall pain at a mean time of 8.1 (95% confidence interval, 6.3–9.8) months after treatment. The mEUD models, V30, and maximum point dose were significant predictors of chest wall pain (p < 0.0005). mEUD improved prediction of chest wall pain compared with V30 (C = 0.79 vs. 0.77 and U = 0.16 vs. 0.11). The mEUD with moderate weighting (a = 5) better predicted chest wall pain than did mEUD without weighting (a = 1) (C = 0.79 vs. 0.77 and U = 0.16 vs. 0.14). Body mass index (BMI) was significantly associated with chest wall pain (p = 0.008). On multivariable analysis, mEUD and BMI remained significant predictors of chest wall pain (p = 0.0003 and 0.03, respectively). Conclusion: mEUD with moderate weighting better predicted chest wall pain

  7. Acute chest pain in a patient with a non-strangulated hiatal hernia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alexander John Scumpia; Megan Elizabeth Dekok; Daniel Michael Aronovich; Gurpaul Bajwa; Randy Barros; Randy Katz; Jordan Ditchek

    2015-01-01

    Acute chest pain resulting in spontaneous idiopathic hemomediastinum is a rare, potentially life-threatening occurrence. Acute chest pain is a common chief complaint of patients, accounting for 2.4%-6% of adult emergency room visits. The clinician’s differential diagnoses for acute chest pain rarely include complications of hiatal hernias. An 83-year-old male presented with acute chest pain and was emergently diagnosed with hemomediastinum secondary to spontaneous gastric mesenteric vessel rupture due to a non-strangulated hiatal hernia after physical exertion.

  8. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS): chest radiographic features in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We abstracted data (n=62) on the radiologic appearance and course of SARS in pediatric patients with suspect (n=25) or probable (n=37) SARS, diagnosed in five hospital sites located in three cities: Toronto, Singapore, and Hong Kong. Available chest radiographs and thoracic CTs were reviewed for the presence of the following radiographic findings: airspace disease, air bronchograms, airways inflammation and peribronchial thickening, interstitial disease, pleural effusion, and hilar adenopathy. A total of 62 patients (suspect=25, probable=37) were evaluated for SARS. Patient ages ranged from 5.5 months to 17 years and 11.5 months (average, 6 years and 10 months) with a female-to-male ratio of 32:30. Forty-one patients (66.1%) were in close contact with other probable, suspect, or quarantined cases; 10 patients (16.1%) had recently traveled to WHO-designated affected areas within 10 days; and 7 patients (11.2%) were transferred from other hospitals that had SARS patients. Three patients, who did not have close/hospital contact or travel history to affected areas, were classified as SARS cases based on their clinical signs and symptoms and on the fact that they were living in an endemic area. The most prominent clinical presentations were fever, with a temperature over 38 C (100%), cough (62.9%), rhinorrhea (22.6%), myalgia (17.7%), chills (14.5%), and headache (11.3%). Other findings included sore throat (9.7%), gastrointestinal symptoms (9.7%), rigor (8.1%), and lethargy (6.5%). In general, fever and cough were the most common clinical presentations amongst younger pediatric SARS cases (age<10 years), whereas, in addition to these symptoms, headache, myalgia, sore throat, chills, and/or rigor were common in older patients (age≥10 years). The chest radiographs of 35.5% of patients were normal. The most prominent radiological findings that were observed in the remaining patients were areas of consolidation (45.2%), often peripheral with multifocal lesions in 22

  9. The comparison of three high-frequency chest compression devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong W; Lee, Jongwon; Warwick, Warren J

    2008-01-01

    High-frequency chest compression (HFCC) is shown to enhance clearance of pulmonary airway secretions. Several HFCC devices have been designed to provide this therapy. Standard equipment consists of an air pulse generator attached by lengths of tubing to an adjustable, inflatable vest/jacket (V/J) garment. In this study, the V/Js were fitted over a mannequin. The three device air pulse generators produced characteristic waveform patterns. The variations in the frequency and pressure setting of devices were consistent with specific device design features. These studies suggest that a better understanding of the effects of different waveform, frequency, and pressure combinations may improve HFCC therapeutic efficacy of three different HFCC machines. The V/J component of HFCC devices delivers the compressive pulses to the chest wall to produce both airflow through and oscillatory effects in the airways. The V/J pressures of three HFCC machines were measured and analyzed to characterize the frequency, pressure, and waveform patterns generated by each of three device models. The dimensions of all V/Js were adjusted to a circumference of approximately 110% of the chest circumference. The V/J pressures were measured, and maximum, minimum, and mean pressure, pulse pressure, and root mean square of three pulse generators were calculated. Jacket pressures ranged between 2 and 34 mmHg. The 103 and 104 models' pulse pressures increased with the increase in HFCC frequency at constant dial pressure. With the ICS the pulse pressure decreased when the frequency increased. The waveforms of models 103 and 104 were symmetric sine wave and asymmetric sine wave patterns, respectively. The ICS had a triangular waveform. At 20 Hz, both the 103 and 104 were symmetric sine waveform but the ICS remained triangular. Maximum crest factors emerged in low-frequency and high-pressure settings for the ICS and in the high-frequency and low-pressure settings for models 103 and 104. Recognizing the

  10. Patient-specific dose estimation for pediatric chest CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Colsher, James G.; Frush, Donald P. [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiology, Duke Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiology, Duke Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Global Applied Science Laboratory, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, Wisconsin 53188 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiology, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2008-12-15

    Current methods for organ and effective dose estimations in pediatric CT are largely patient generic. Physical phantoms and computer models have only been developed for standard/limited patient sizes at discrete ages (e.g., 0, 1, 5, 10, 15 years old) and do not reflect the variability of patient anatomy and body habitus within the same size/age group. In this investigation, full-body computer models of seven pediatric patients in the same size/protocol group (weight: 11.9-18.2 kg) were created based on the patients' actual multi-detector array CT (MDCT) data. Organs and structures in the scan coverage were individually segmented. Other organs and structures were created by morphing existing adult models (developed from visible human data) to match the framework defined by the segmented organs, referencing the organ volume and anthropometry data in ICRP Publication 89. Organ and effective dose of these patients from a chest MDCT scan protocol (64 slice LightSpeed VCT scanner, 120 kVp, 70 or 75 mA, 0.4 s gantry rotation period, pitch of 1.375, 20 mm beam collimation, and small body scan field-of-view) was calculated using a Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated to simulate radiation transport in the same CT system. The seven patients had normalized effective dose of 3.7-5.3 mSv/100 mAs (coefficient of variation: 10.8%). Normalized lung dose and heart dose were 10.4-12.6 mGy/100 mAs and 11.2-13.3 mGy/100 mAs, respectively. Organ dose variations across the patients were generally small for large organs in the scan coverage (<7%), but large for small organs in the scan coverage (9%-18%) and for partially or indirectly exposed organs (11%-77%). Normalized effective dose correlated weakly with body weight (correlation coefficient: r=-0.80). Normalized lung dose and heart dose correlated strongly with mid-chest equivalent diameter (lung: r=-0.99, heart: r=-0.93); these strong correlation relationships can be used to estimate patient-specific organ

  11. Chest Traumas due to Bicycle accident in Childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ufuk Cobanoglu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim:Childhood injuries are the leading cause of death in children and result in significant healthcare utilization. Trauma is the second most common cause of mortality in children aged 1-4 years and leading cause of death in children older than 4 years. Thoracic injury is the second most leading cause of death in traumatized children. Multisystemic injury is found in more than 50% of children with thoracic injuries most of which are secondary to blunt traumas. We planned this study to evaluate thorax trauma cases secondary to bicycle driving in childhood and to draw attention to the importance of the regulation of traffic rules, the education of bicycle drivers.Material and Methods:  A retrospective evaluation was performed in 17 pediatric patients admitted to the Department of Thoracic Surgery during 2006-2010 with a diagnosis of chest trauma due to bicycle driving. For every patient, a pediatric trauma score (PTS was calculated. Descriptive statistics were performed for PTS. Results; Eleven (64.70% cases were injured due to the tricycle accidents and six cases 6 (35.29% were injured due to the two-wheeled bicycle accidents. The most frequent thoracic pathologies included pulmonary contusion (41.2% and chest wall contusion (29.41%. Extrathoracic injuries were seen in 35.29%, the extremities (17.64% and abdomino pelvic (11.76% being the most commonly involved. Treatment consisted of symptomatic treatment in 12 patients (70.58%, tube thoracostomy in 2 patients (11.76%, and thoracotomy in 1 patient (5.9%. The morbidity was seen in 3 patients (17.64%. The mortality rate was 5.9% (n:1. The mean PTS of the cases who had additional system injuries were significantly worse than the cases who had isolated chest traumas Conclusions: The pediatric thorax has a greater cartilage content and incomplete ossification of the ribs. Due to the pliability of the pediatric rib cage and mediastinal mobility, significant intrathoracic injury may exist in the

  12. Anatomical decomposition in dual energy chest digital tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Donghoon; Kim, Ye-seul; Choi, Sunghoon; Lee, Haenghwa; Choi, Seungyeon; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2016-03-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide and the early diagnosis of lung cancer has recently become more important. For early screening lung cancer, computed tomography (CT) has been used as a gold standard for early diagnosis of lung cancer [1]. The major advantage of CT is that it is not susceptible to the problem of misdiagnosis caused by anatomical overlapping while CT has extremely high radiation dose and cost compared to chest radiography. Chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) is a recently introduced new modality for lung cancer screening with relatively low radiation dose compared to CT [2] and also showing high sensitivity and specificity to prevent anatomical overlapping occurred in chest radiography. Dual energy material decomposition method has been proposed for better detection of pulmonary nodules as means of reducing the anatomical noise [3]. In this study, possibility of material decomposition in CDT was tested by simulation study and actual experiment using prototype CDT. Furthermore organ absorbed dose and effective dose were compared with single energy CDT. The Gate v6 (Geant4 application for tomographic emission), and TASMIP (Tungsten anode spectral model using the interpolating polynomial) code were used for simulation study and simulated cylinder shape phantom consisted of 4 inner beads which were filled with spine, rib, muscle and lung equivalent materials. The patient dose was estimated by PCXMC 1.5 Monte Carlo simulation tool [4]. The tomosynthesis scan was performed with a linear movement and 21 projection images were obtained over 30 degree of angular range with 1.5° degree of angular interval. The proto type CDT system has same geometry with simulation study and composed of E7869X (Toshiba, Japan) x-ray tube and FDX3543RPW (Toshiba, Japan) detector. The result images showed that reconstructed with dual energy clearly visualize lung filed by removing unnecessary bony structure. Furthermore, dual energy CDT could enhance

  13. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS): chest radiographic features in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babyn, Paul S.; Gahunia, Harpal K.; Manson, David [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chu, Winnie C.W.; Metreweli, Constantine [Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin (China); Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging, Chinese University of Hong Kong (China); Tsou, Ian Y.Y.; Wansaicheong, Gervais K.L.; Chee, Thomas S.G.; Kaw, Gregory J.L. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, 11 Jalan Tan Tock Seng (Singapore); Allen, Upton; Bitnun, Ari; Read, Stanley [Division of Infectious Diseases, Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Cheng, Frankie W.T.; Fok, Tai-Fai; Hon, Ellis K.L.; Li, Albert M.; Ng, Pak-Cheung [Department of Paediatrics, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, 30-32 Ngan Shing Street, Shatin, Hong Kong, SAR (China); Chiu, Man-Chun; Leung, Chi-Wai [Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Princess Margaret Hospital, Lai King Hill Road, Lai Chi Kok, Hong Kong, SAR (China); Khong, Pek L. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, The University of Hong Kong, Queen Mary Hospital, 102 Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong, SAR (China); Stringer, David A.

    2004-01-01

    We abstracted data (n=62) on the radiologic appearance and course of SARS in pediatric patients with suspect (n=25) or probable (n=37) SARS, diagnosed in five hospital sites located in three cities: Toronto, Singapore, and Hong Kong. Available chest radiographs and thoracic CTs were reviewed for the presence of the following radiographic findings: airspace disease, air bronchograms, airways inflammation and peribronchial thickening, interstitial disease, pleural effusion, and hilar adenopathy. A total of 62 patients (suspect=25, probable=37) were evaluated for SARS. Patient ages ranged from 5.5 months to 17 years and 11.5 months (average, 6 years and 10 months) with a female-to-male ratio of 32:30. Forty-one patients (66.1%) were in close contact with other probable, suspect, or quarantined cases; 10 patients (16.1%) had recently traveled to WHO-designated affected areas within 10 days; and 7 patients (11.2%) were transferred from other hospitals that had SARS patients. Three patients, who did not have close/hospital contact or travel history to affected areas, were classified as SARS cases based on their clinical signs and symptoms and on the fact that they were living in an endemic area. The most prominent clinical presentations were fever, with a temperature over 38 C (100%), cough (62.9%), rhinorrhea (22.6%), myalgia (17.7%), chills (14.5%), and headache (11.3%). Other findings included sore throat (9.7%), gastrointestinal symptoms (9.7%), rigor (8.1%), and lethargy (6.5%). In general, fever and cough were the most common clinical presentations amongst younger pediatric SARS cases (age<10 years), whereas, in addition to these symptoms, headache, myalgia, sore throat, chills, and/or rigor were common in older patients (age{>=}10 years). The chest radiographs of 35.5% of patients were normal. The most prominent radiological findings that were observed in the remaining patients were areas of consolidation (45.2%), often peripheral with multifocal lesions in 22

  14. Sexual signalling in Propithecus verreauxi: male "chest badge" and female mate choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Olio, Stefania; Norscia, Ivan; Antonacci, Daniela; Palagi, Elisabetta

    2012-01-01

    Communication, an essential prerequisite for sociality, involves the transmission of signals. A signal can be defined as any action or trait produced by one animal, the sender, that produces a change in the behaviour of another animal, the receiver. Secondary sexual signals are often used for mate choice because they may inform on a potential partner's quality. Verreaux's sifaka (Propithecus verreauxi) is characterized by the presence of two different morphs of males (bimorphism), which can show either a stained or clean chest. The chest becomes stained by secretions of the sternal gland during throat marking (rubbing throat and chest on a vertical substrate while smearing the scent deposition). The role of the chest staining in guiding female mate choice was previously hypothesized but never demonstrated probably due to the difficulty of observing sifaka copulations in the wild. Here we report that stained-chested males had a higher throat marking activity than clean-chested males during the mating season, but not during the birth season. We found that females copulated more frequently with stained-chested males than the clean-chested males. Finally, in agreement with the biological market theory, we found that clean-chested males, with a lower scent-releasing potential, offered more grooming to females. This "grooming for sex" tactic was not completely unsuccessful; in fact, half of the clean-chested males copulated with females, even though at low frequency. In conclusion, the chest stain, possibly correlated with different cues targeted by females, could be one of the parameters which help females in selecting mates.

  15. Sexual signalling in Propithecus verreauxi: male "chest badge" and female mate choice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Dall'Olio

    Full Text Available Communication, an essential prerequisite for sociality, involves the transmission of signals. A signal can be defined as any action or trait produced by one animal, the sender, that produces a change in the behaviour of another animal, the receiver. Secondary sexual signals are often used for mate choice because they may inform on a potential partner's quality. Verreaux's sifaka (Propithecus verreauxi is characterized by the presence of two different morphs of males (bimorphism, which can show either a stained or clean chest. The chest becomes stained by secretions of the sternal gland during throat marking (rubbing throat and chest on a vertical substrate while smearing the scent deposition. The role of the chest staining in guiding female mate choice was previously hypothesized but never demonstrated probably due to the difficulty of observing sifaka copulations in the wild. Here we report that stained-chested males had a higher throat marking activity than clean-chested males during the mating season, but not during the birth season. We found that females copulated more frequently with stained-chested males than the clean-chested males. Finally, in agreement with the biological market theory, we found that clean-chested males, with a lower scent-releasing potential, offered more grooming to females. This "grooming for sex" tactic was not completely unsuccessful; in fact, half of the clean-chested males copulated with females, even though at low frequency. In conclusion, the chest stain, possibly correlated with different cues targeted by females, could be one of the parameters which help females in selecting mates.

  16. Evaluation and Management of Patients with Noncardiac Chest Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Shekhar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Up to a third of patients undergoing coronary angiography for angina-like chest pain are found to have normal coronary arteries and a substantial proportion of these individuals continue to consult and even attend emergency departments. Initially, these patients are usually seen by cardiologists but with accumulating evidence that the pain might have a gastrointestinal origin, it may be more appropriate for them to be cared for by the gastroenterologist once a cardiological cause has been excluded. This review covers the assessment and management of this challenging condition, which includes a combination of education, reassurance, and pharmacotherapy. For the more refractory cases, behavioral treatments, such as cognitive behavioral therapy or hypnotherapy, may have to be considered.

  17. Evaluation of an anatomical compensation filter for chest radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manninen, H.; Rytkoenen, H.; Soimakallio, S.; Terho, E.O.; Hentunen, J.

    1986-11-01

    An anatomical compensation filter for improving the radiographic demonstration of the mediastinal and retrocardiac areas of a chest radiograph has been evaluated. The filter, made of a transparent, light-weight lead-plastic material was attached to the X-ray collimator housing. The device reliably improved the visibility of normally underpenetrated areas without producing detectable artefacts, provided the patient was correctly positioned. Hilar structures were also slightly better visualised. At the same time there was no statistically significant deterioration in visualisation of peripheral pulmonary vessels or parenchymal structures. Rib details and pleural calcifications were less well seen, however, a result that was to be expected because of the X-ray beam hardening.

  18. Digital radiography of the chest in pediatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hopes placed in digital radiography have been fulfilled only partly in pediatric radiology. Specifically, the option of gaining reduced radiation exposure in combination with a similar or even improved image quality was hard to realize. The only portable digital system available for a long time were storage phosphors which were disadvantaged by an extremely limited dose-quantum-efficiency (DQE) in comparison to digital flat panel detectors. New developments and the introduction of the dual-reading system led to image qualities comparable to film-screen-systems with high resolution and achievable without dose increase, sometimes even with dose reduction. A study using an animal model suggests that these systems can even be used in preterm infants with very low birth weights. A new portable flat panel detector by Canon may improve digital chest radiography in pediatric patients. (orig.)

  19. Lung cancer screening: Computed tomography or chest radiographs?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Edwin; JR; van; Beek; Saeed; Mirsadraee; John; T; Murchison

    2015-01-01

    Worldwide, lung cancer is the leading cause of mortalitydue to malignancy. The vast majority of cases of lung cancer are smoking related and the most effective way of reducing lung cancer incidence and mortality is by smoking cessation. In the Western world, smoking cessation policies have met with limited success. The other major means of reducing lung cancer deaths is to diagnose cases at an earlier more treatable stage employing screening programmes using chest radiographs or low dose computed tomography. In many countries smoking is still on the increase, and the sheer scale of the problem limits the affordability of such screening programmes. This short review article will evaluate the current evidence and potential areas of research which may benefit policy making across the world.

  20. Photodynamic therapy for chest wall recurrence from breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, R R; Sibata, C; Mang, T S; Bagnato, V S; Downie, G H; Hu, X H; Cuenca, R

    2004-09-01

    Breast cancer is common with over 230,000 new cases diagnosed each year in North America alone. While great strides have been made to achieve excellent cancer control and survival, a significant minority of patients fail locally. While initial salvage to regain disease control is of the utmost importance, it is not universally successful. This leads to a therapeutic quagmire. Additional surgery, radiation and chemo-hormonal therapy are possible, but they are usually highly morbid with low success rates. Photodynamic therapy appears to be an underutilized salvage modality for this unfortunate patient population. This report analyzes and reviews the role of photodynamic therapy for patients with chest wall re-recurrence from breast cancer.

  1. Clinical image: Hydatid disease of the chest wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, R.J.; Berlin, J.W.; Ghahremani, G.G. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Hydatid disease is rarely encountered among the population of the United States, but it affects several million people in sheep-raising regions of the world. Human infestation with Echinococcus granulosus begins following ingestion of its ova, which are excreted into the contaminated water during the usual dog-sheep cycle. Hydatid cysts will then develop most frequently in the liver (75% of cases) and lungs (15%) of the human host. Skeletal involvement has been reported to occur in only 0.5-4.0% of patients in the endemic areas. Because of the rarity and perplexing imaging features of hydatid disease involving the chest wall, we wish herein to present a case evaluated recently at our institution. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Imaging of occupational and environmental disorders of the chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spectrum of occupational and environmental diseases has changed markedly in recent years. New industrial processes have led to the production and use of a wide range of chemicals, metals, and alloys, an increasing number of which have been reported to cause interstitial lung disease in exposed workers. Thus, while the workforce in coal mining and asbestos handling has decreased, new groups of workers are at risk of exposure to agents potentially responsible for pneumoconiosis. This well-illustrated book, written by internationally acclaimed experts, provides a comprehensive approach to modern imaging of environmental and occupational diseases of the chest. The first part of the book addresses the basic knowledge required to understand imaging in this context, while the second focuses on the imaging results achieved in a variety of specific disorders. There is particular emphasis on thin-section computed tomography since this technique facilitates the detection of early subclinical abnormalities. (orig.)

  3. [The chest CT findings and pathologic findings of pulmonary tuberculosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Hideo

    2009-08-01

    The past research of the radiologic manifestations of pulmonary tuberculosis in Japan was based on morphological pathology of the untreated patient autopsy. I would like to show the chest CT scan of tuberculosis diseases with caseous granuloma at its exudative reaction, proliferative reaction, productive reaction, cirrhotic reaction until self cure. This progress reflects the normal cell mediated immunological responses. Also I would like to show the cavitation of granuloma, which results from liquefaction of caseous materials during the course and results in the formation of the source of infection. And finally I would like to show the morphological differences of acinous lesion, acino-nodular lesion and caseous lobular pneumonia. These differences reflect the amount of bacilli disseminated in the peripheral parts under the lobules. In this study, I do not show old age cases and HIV positive cases, who do not form typical granuloma due to the decreased cell mediated immnunity and whose X ray findings are atypical.

  4. A rare cause of chest pain in a cancer patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Welaya

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that cancer and hypercoagulability go hand in hand. Most thromboembolism is venous in nature although arterial thrombosis can occur. Arterial thrombosis secondary to malignancy is usually seen in the lower extremities; however, it can also be seen elsewhere. This is a case of bronchogenic carcinoma with no history of typical atherosclerotic risk factors including smoking, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, or hyperlipidemia presented with chest pain and was found to have an acute ST segment elevation myocardial infection. Coronary angiography showed a large thrombus in the left anterior descending artery in the absence of any atherosclerotic lesions. Malignancy is considered to be the major contributing factor for this myocardial infarction in the absence of both atherosclerotic risk factors and atherosclerotic lesions in the coronary angiography. We will focus on the relationship between cancer and thrombosis with special emphasis on arterial thromboembolism with subsequent development of myocardial infarction.

  5. Imaging of occupational and environmental disorders of the chest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gevenois, P.A. [Hopital Erasme, Univ. Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium). Clinic of Chest Imaging; Vuyst, P. de (eds.) [Hopital Erasme, Univ. Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium). Dept. of Respiratory Medicine

    2006-07-01

    The spectrum of occupational and environmental diseases has changed markedly in recent years. New industrial processes have led to the production and use of a wide range of chemicals, metals, and alloys, an increasing number of which have been reported to cause interstitial lung disease in exposed workers. Thus, while the workforce in coal mining and asbestos handling has decreased, new groups of workers are at risk of exposure to agents potentially responsible for pneumoconiosis. This well-illustrated book, written by internationally acclaimed experts, provides a comprehensive approach to modern imaging of environmental and occupational diseases of the chest. The first part of the book addresses the basic knowledge required to understand imaging in this context, while the second focuses on the imaging results achieved in a variety of specific disorders. There is particular emphasis on thin-section computed tomography since this technique facilitates the detection of early subclinical abnormalities. (orig.)

  6. Segmenting anatomy in chest x-rays for tuberculosis screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karargyris, Alexandros; Antani, Sameer; Thoma, George

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we describe the development of a screening system for pulmonary pathologies (i.e. pneumonia, tuberculosis) application in global healthcare settings. As a first step toward this goal, the paper presents a novel approach for detecting lungs and ribs in chest radiographs. The approach is a unified method combining two detection schemes resulting in reduced cost. The novelty of our approach lies on the fact that instead of using pixel-wise techniques exclusively we used region-based features computed as wavelet features that take into consideration the orientation of anatomic structures. Initial results are described. Next steps include classification of non-rib lung regions for radiographic patterns suggesting tuberculosis infection. PMID:22256142

  7. Profile of chest trauma in Zaria Nigeria: A prelminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S A Edaigbini

    2011-01-01

    Materials and Methods A prospective study of trauma patients admitted to Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital through the Accident and Emergency units was commenced in January 2008.This preliminary report is for the period of 27months.The clinical history, physical examination and outcome of management recorded in a predesigned proforma, were analysed with SPSS 15 and the patients were followed up in the surgical outpatient department. Results A total of 4784 patients (3143 men and 1641 women were admitted during this period for trauma. There were a total of 628(13.13% deaths. Of the 42 consecutive patients identified with chest trauma35 (83.3% were males and 7(16.7% were females. The age range was from 5-75years and the mean age was 35.4years, while the most affected ages were in the range of 20 to 49years. Blunt injury constituted 71.4% and penetrating injury constituted 28.6%. Road traffic accident was responsible for 61.9%, stab injury 21.4%, falls 7.1%, gunshot injury 4.8%, impalement 2.4% and animal attack also 2.4%. The average time taken between accident and admission was 31hours,40minutes and 12seconds while the average duration of hospital stay was 16.10 days. The injury pattern included rib fracture(s (23.8%, hemopneumothorax (14.3%, hemothorax (7.1%, pneumothorax (4.8%, combinations of chest injuries (7.1%, chest laceration 7.1%, bruises 11.9%, lung contusion 4.8%, subcutaneous empyema 2.4%, flail chest 4.8% and no specific injury (11.9%. Associated injuries included head injury (63.6%, orthopaedic injury (27.3% and combinations (abdominal, head, orthopaedic (9.1%. The fatality of road traffic accident was 36.8%. No patient was attended to by paramedics at the scene of accident while 21.9% of the patients had pre-hospital resuscitation in peripheral clinics before admission. The transfusion requirement was 14.3%. One patient (2.4% required a median sternotomy and cardiopulmonary bypass, 54.8% required tube thoracostomy while 42.9% had general

  8. Death following rubber bullet wounds to the chest: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalebi, A; Olumbe, A K O

    2005-07-01

    The rubber bullet has been portrayed as a non-lethal weapon and has gained preference in riot-control over live ammunition. Despite the fact that it was designed to be safer than live ammunition, several cases of fatalities have been reported from its use. Most of these fatalities were because of abuse of the weapon in terms of range of fire and anatomical area of the body targeted. This is a case report of such a fatality following shotgun rubber bullet injury, including the circumstance surrounding this unusual occurrence, the autopsy findings and reports of the ballistic analysis. Four projectiles penetrated the right chest lodging in the right lung and injuring the right pulmonary artery, causing death. The mechanism of death in this case is rapid massive pulmonary haemorrhage. PMID:16167715

  9. A system for automatic aorta sections measurements on chest CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeffer, Yitzchak; Mayer, Arnaldo; Zholkover, Adi; Konen, Eli

    2016-03-01

    A new method is proposed for caliber measurement of the ascending aorta (AA) and descending aorta (DA). A key component of the method is the automatic detection of the carina, as an anatomical landmark around which an axial volume of interest (VOI) can be defined to observe the aortic caliber. For each slice in the VOI, a linear profile line connecting the AA with the DA is found by pattern matching on the underlying intensity profile. Next, the aortic center position is found using Hough transform on the best linear segment candidate. Finally, region growing around the center provides an accurate segmentation and caliber measurement. We evaluated the algorithm on 113 sequential chest CT scans, slice thickness of 0.75 - 3.75mm, 90 with contrast agent injected. The algorithm success rates were computed as the percentage of scans in which the center of the AA was found. Automated measurements of AA caliber were compared with independent measurements of two experienced chest radiologists, comparing the absolute difference between the two radiologists with the absolute difference between the algorithm and each of the radiologists. The measurement stability was demonstrated by computing the STD of the absolute difference between the radiologists, and between the algorithm and the radiologists. Results: Success rates of 93% and 74% were achieved, for contrast injected cases and non-contrast cases, respectively. These results indicate that the algorithm can be robust in large variability of image quality, such as the cases in a realworld clinical setting. The average absolute difference between the algorithm and the radiologists was 1.85mm, lower than the average absolute difference between the radiologists, which was 2.1mm. The STD of the absolute difference between the algorithm and the radiologists was 1.5mm vs 1.6mm between the two radiologists. These results demonstrate the clinical relevance of the algorithm measurements.

  10. Epicardial surface dynamics in the closed-chest normal canine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInerney, J J; Kim, E F; Herr, M D; Copenhaver, G L

    1995-11-01

    Past studies of the changing three-dimensional shape of the heart in the closed chest during the cardiac cycle have been restricted to the measurement of local deformations at a relatively few specific locations, and often have required surgical procedures that alter the measurements obtained. In the study reported here, high precision displacement and velocity measurements were obtained at the epicardial interface using a Compton backscatter imaging technique that does not require a surgical intervention or contrast injections. Displacement and velocity measurements were obtained at more than 200 locations at the epicardial interface at 13 ms intervals throughout the cardiac cycle. Measurements of the changing shape of the heart during the cardiac cycle with this technique are precise to 0.1 mm (S.D.). Displacement and velocity patterns recorded in this study confirm and integrate the studies of many others and also add new information. An unexpected vigorous inward motion of both the LV (39 mm s-1) and RV (26 mm s-1) surfaces during isovolumic relaxation and early rapid refill is demonstrated. Velocities during this period equal or exceed those that occur during ejection. During ejection, inward LV motion at the base of the heart precedes that at the apex by 80-90 ms. Posterior LV displacements and velocities during ejection are 4-6 times greater than those at the anterior and apex. The Compton backscatter imaging technique for obtaining undisturbed measurements of cardiac dynamics in the closed chest has potential as a non-invasive clinical tool for serial studies of cardiac surface motion abnormalities. The data presented can also be used to set surface boundary conditions for biomechanical models of heart deformation. PMID:8522545

  11. Cost-effectiveness of chiropractic care versus self-management in patients with musculoskeletal chest pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen; Sørensen, Jan; Vach, Werner;

    2016-01-01

    , non-specific chest pain of musculoskeletal origin were recruited from a cardiology department in Denmark. After ruling out acute coronary syndrome and receiving usual care, patients with musculoskeletal chest pain were randomised to 4 weeks of community-based chiropractic care (n=59) or to a single...

  12. Computer aided diagnosis in digital chest radiography: evaluation of pulmonary emphysema in COPD patients

    OpenAIRE

    Coppini, Giuseppe; Ferdeghini, Ezio Maria; Paterni, Marco; Tonelli, Lucia; Bauleo, Carolina; Monti, Simonetta; Miniati, Massimo

    2004-01-01

    Computer-aided quantitative analysis of chest radiographs is a useful tool in describing alterations in lung shape that occur in patients with emphysema. In the present study, the analysis was limited to the lateral chest radiograph, but we expect that the use of the postero-anterior view may further improve the rate of correct classification.

  13. Chest Wall Motion during Speech Production in Patients with Advanced Ankylosing Spondylitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalliakosta, Georgia; Mandros, Charalampos; Tzelepis, George E.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that ankylosing spondylitis (AS) alters the pattern of chest wall motion during speech production. Method: The pattern of chest wall motion during speech was measured with respiratory inductive plethysmography in 6 participants with advanced AS (5 men, 1 woman, age 45 plus or minus 8 years, Schober test 1.45 plus or…

  14. Reconstruction of the decision-making process in assessing musculoskeletal chest pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochkendahl, Mette J; Vach, Werner; Hartvigsen, Jan;

    2012-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to identify the most important determinants from the patient history and clinical examination in diagnosing musculoskeletal chest pain (MSCP) in patients with acute noncardiac chest pain when supported by a structured protocol and to construct a decision tree...

  15. [ANMCO/SIMEU Consensus document: In-hospital management of patients presenting with chest pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuin, Guerrino; Parato, Vito Maurizio; Groff, Paolo; Gulizia, Michele Massimo; Di Lenarda, Andrea; Cassin, Matteo; Cibinel, Gian Alfonso; Del Pinto, Maurizio; Di Tano, Giuseppe; Nardi, Federico; Rossini, Roberta; Ruggieri, Maria Pia; Ruggiero, Enrico; Scotto Di Uccio, Fortunato; Valente, Serafina

    2016-06-01

    Chest pain is a common general practice presentation that requires careful diagnostic assessment because of its diverse and potentially serious causes. However, the evaluation of acute chest pain remains challenging, despite many new insights over the past two decades. The percentage of patients presenting to the emergency departments because of acute chest pain appears to be increasing. Nowadays, there are two essential chest pain-related issues: 1) the missed diagnoses of acute coronary syndromes with a poor short-term prognosis; 2) the increasing percentage of hospitalizations of low-risk cases.It is well known that hospitalization of a low-risk chest pain patient can lead to unnecessary tests and procedures, with an increasing trend of complications and burden of costs. Therefore, the significantly reduced financial resources of healthcare systems induce physicians and administrators to improve the efficiency of care protocols for patients with acute chest pain. Despite the efforts of the Scientific Societies in producing statements on this topic, in Italy there is still a significant difference between emergency physicians and cardiologists in managing patients with chest pain. For this reason, the aim of the present consensus document is double: first, to review the evidence-based efficacy and utility of various diagnostic tools, and, second, to delineate the critical pathways (describing key steps) that need to be implemented in order to standardize the management of chest pain patients, making a correct diagnosis and treatment as uniform as possible across the entire country. PMID:27311086

  16. Computed tomography of the chest in blunt thoracic trauma: results of a prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blunt thoracic injuries detected by computed tomography of the chest infrequently require immediate therapy. If immediate therapy is needed, findings will be visible on plain roentgenograms or on clinical exam. Routine Computed Tomography of the chest in blunt trauma is not recommended but may be helpful in selected cases. (N.C.)

  17. It's Not Your Heart: Group Treatment for Non-Cardiac Chest Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Sherry M.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a brief group psychoeducational treatment for non-cardiac chest pain, supplemented with a composite case study. Patients present to emergency rooms for chest pain they believe is a heart attack symptom. When cardiac testing is negative, this pain is usually a panic symptom, often occurring with a cluster of other panic…

  18. Cost effectiveness of diagnostic strategies for patients with acute, undifferentiated chest pain

    OpenAIRE

    Goodacre, S; Calvert, N.

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: Patients presenting to hospital with acute, undifferentiated chest pain have a low, but important, risk of significant myocardial ischaemia. Potential diagnostic strategies for patients with acute, undifferentiated chest pain vary from low cost, poor effectiveness (discharging all home) to high cost, high effectiveness (admission and intensive investigation). This paper aimed to estimate the relative cost effectiveness of these strategies.

  19. Patient-centered clinical impact of incidentally detected abnormalities on chest CT scans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherine G. Moftah

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: The clinically significant different incidental abnormalities on chest CT scans represented 10.4% of all incidental findings, 3.3% were due to malignancies. The clinical impact of incidental abnormalities on chest CT may be of utmost importance on patient care.

  20. Reverse airflow in certain chest drains may be misinterpreted as prolonged air leakage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stouby, Anna; Neckelmann, Kirsten; Licht, Peter B

    2011-01-01

    Prolonged air leakage is common after lung resection. We observed that during deep inspiration some patients were able to empty the water-seal of commercial chest drainage systems and retract air back into the chest tube, which subsequently escaped during the following expiration, mimicking "true...

  1. A case report of neck, chest and upper limb cutaneous metastasis from synchronous colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jian; SHI Yu-qian; WU Zhi-yong

    2009-01-01

    Cutaneous metastasis from colorectal carcinoma is uncommon, occurring in less than 4% of the whole patients.' The most frequently involved are incision scar or abdominal skin,24 while cutaneous metastasis to neck and chest is very rare. We hereby report a case of synchronous, postoperative cutaneous metastasis from colorectal carcinoma to neck, upper limb and chest skin, which were confirmed by biopsy.

  2. Psychological trauma of funnel chest in adolescents and the appropriate age for minimally invasive surgery repair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Jing; LUO Li; XIAO Li-jun; GU Ling-yun; SUN Tian-sheng

    2013-01-01

    Background Funnel chest has a negative effect on adolescents and it has a strong effect on adolescents' psychological and behavior.This study aimed to investigate the psychological characteristics and factors that affect adolescents with funnel chest and to evaluate the relationship between the patients' age and their physiological and psychological health.We aimed to establish an age model for maximum surgery benefits for funnel chest patients to provide an objective basis for choosing surgery.Methods The study adopted a general evaluation approach to assess the risk and benefits of minimally invasive surgery for funnel chest.The funnel chest index,the Symptom Checklist-90,and the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire were used as assessment tools to observe physiological and psychological features in funnel chest patients.A sample of 234adolescents with funnel chest was selected from a third-grade class-A hospital in Beijing.Age groups were adopted as an independent variable,and other factors in funnel chest patients were dependent variables.Results There was a significant difference in the relapse rate for funnel chest in the different age groups (x2=11.883,P=0.008).There was a higher relapse rate in patients of ≤10 or ≥19 years old than in patients of 11-18 years old.There was a significant difference in the SCL-90 total score in the different age groups (F=12.538,P=0.0001),the patients older than 13 years had a higher score than those younger than 13 years in the SCL-90.There was a significant difference in the standard score of E (introversion/extraversion) in the different age groups (F=10.06,P=0.0001).There was also a significance in the funnel chest index before surgery in the different psychological scales (P<0.01),with a higher funnel chest index score associated with more obvious psychological trauma.Age and the number of variables,including the relapse rate,SCL-90 score,standard score of E,and standard score of N in the EPQ were significantly

  3. Study of fractal dimension in chest images using normal and interstitial lung disease cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Douglas M.; Correa, Jose L.; Souto, Miguel; Malagari, Katerina S.

    1993-09-01

    A quantitative computerized method which provides accurate discrimination between chest radiographs with positive findings of interstitial disease patterns and normal chest radiographs may increase the efficacy of radiologic screening of the chest and the utility of digital radiographic systems. This report is a comparison of fractal dimension measured in normal chest radiographs and in radiographs with abnormal lungs having reticular, nodular, reticulonodular and linear patterns of interstitial disease. Six regions of interest (ROI's) from each of 33 normal chest radiographs and 33 radiographs with positive findings of interstitial disease were studied. Results indicate that there is a statistically significant difference between the distribution of the fractal dimension in normal radiographs and radiographs where disease is present.

  4. Two cases of Chest Heating Sensation treated by Hwangryunhaedok-tang Herbal-Acupuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwon-Il Cho

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical effect of Hwangryunhaedok-tang Herbal-Acupuncture. Hwangryunhaedok-tang is used in all heating diseases. Chest Heating Sensation is a unique concept in Oriental Medicine. So we applied Hwangryunhaedok-tang Herbal-Acupuncture to treat the Chest Heating Sensation. We used DITI(Digital Infrared Thermographic Imaging to estimate the temperatures of chest surface for the outcome assessment. We came to know that the chest surface temperatures were all reduced in both cases after Herbal-Acupuncture treatment. The reduced average temperature was 1.5℃ in case 1 and 0.9℃ in case 2. The above result indicates that Hwangryunhaedok-tang Herbal-Acupuncture treatment has an effect on Chest Heating Sensation, thus continuous Hwangryunhaedok-tang Herbal-Acupuncture study will be needed for more clinical applications.

  5. Chest radiography practice in critically ill patients: a postal survey in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korevaar Johanna C

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To ascertain current chest radiography practice in intensive care units (ICUs in the Netherlands. Methods Postal survey: a questionnaire was sent to all ICUs with > 5 beds suitable for mechanical ventilation; pediatric ICUs were excluded. When an ICU performed daily-routine chest radiographs in any group of patients it was considered to be a "daily-routine chest radiography" ICU. Results From the number of ICUs responding, 63% practice a daily-routine strategy, in which chest radiographs are obtained on a daily basis without any specific reason. A daily-routine chest radiography strategy is practiced less frequently in university-affiliated ICUs (50% as compared to other ICUs (68%, as well as in larger ICUs (> 20 beds, 50% as compared to smaller ICUs (P > 0.05. Remarkably, physicians that practice a daily-routine strategy consider daily-routine radiographs helpful in guiding daily practice in less than 30% of all performed radiographs. Chest radiographs are considered essential for verification of the position of invasive devices (81% and for diagnosing pneumothorax, pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome (82%, 74% and 69%, respectively. On demand chest radiographs are obtained after introduction of thoracic drains, central venous lines and endotracheal tubes in 98%, 84% and 75% of responding ICUs, respectively. Chest films are also obtained in case of ventilatory deterioration (49% of responding ICUs, and after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (59%, tracheotomy (58% and mini-tracheotomy (23%. Conclusion There is notable lack of consensus on chest radiography practice in the Netherlands. This survey suggests that a large number of intensivists may doubt the value of daily-routine chest radiography, but still practice a daily-routine strategy.

  6. Mucus transport mechanisms in relation to the effect of high frequency chest compression (HFCC) on mucus clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, L G; Warwick, W J; Hansen, K L

    1994-02-01

    High frequency chest compression (HFCC) appears promising as a form of chest physiotherapy. Studies published by several clinical centers support its efficacy, and further clinical data are expected to become available.

  7. Mouth-to-mouth ventilation reduces interruptions in chest compressions during lifeguard CPR: A randomized manikin study,

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løfgren, Bo; Adelborg, Kasper; Dalgas, Christian;

    Mouth-to-mouth ventilation reduces interruptions in chest compressions during lifeguard CPR: A randomized manikin study.......Mouth-to-mouth ventilation reduces interruptions in chest compressions during lifeguard CPR: A randomized manikin study....

  8. The Chest Pain Choice trial: a pilot randomized trial of a decision aid for patients with chest pain in the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branda Megan E

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chest pain is a common presenting complaint in the emergency department (ED. Despite the frequency with which clinicians evaluate patients with chest pain, accurately determining the risk of acute coronary syndrome (ACS and sharing risk information with patients is challenging. The aims of this study are (1 to develop a decision aid (CHEST PAIN CHOICE that communicates the short-term risk of ACS and (2 to evaluate the impact of the decision aid on patient participation in decision-making and resource use. Methods/Design This is a protocol for a parallel, 2-arm randomized trial to compare an intervention group receiving CHEST PAIN CHOICE to a control group receiving usual ED care. Adults presenting to the Saint Mary's Hospital ED in Rochester, MN USA with a primary complaint of chest pain who are being considered for admission for prolonged ED observation in a specialized unit and urgent cardiac stress testing will be eligible for enrollment. We will measure the effect of CHEST PAIN CHOICE on six outcomes: (1 patient knowledge regarding their short-term risk for ACS and the risks of radiation exposure; (2 quality of the decision making process; (3 patient and clinician acceptability and satisfaction with the decision aid; (4 the proportion of patients who decided to undergo observation unit admission and urgent cardiac stress testing; (5 economic costs and healthcare utilization; and (6 the rate of delayed or missed ACS. To capture these outcomes, we will administer patient and clinician surveys after each visit, obtain video recordings of the clinical encounters, and conduct 30-day phone follow-up. Discussion This pilot randomized trial will develop and evaluate a decision aid for use in ED chest pain patients at low risk for ACS and provide a preliminary estimate of its effect on patient participation in decision-making and resource use. Trial registration Clinical Trials.gov Identifier: NCT01077037

  9. Small-bore chest tubes seem to perform better than larger tubes in treatment of spontaneous pneumothorax

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iepsen, Ulrik Winning; Ringbæk, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and complications of surgical (large-bore) chest tube drainage with smaller and less invasive chest tubes in the treatment of non-traumatic pneumothorax (PT). ......The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and complications of surgical (large-bore) chest tube drainage with smaller and less invasive chest tubes in the treatment of non-traumatic pneumothorax (PT). ...

  10. Effects of high-frequency chest wall oscillation on pleural pressure and oscillated flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucker, Tal; Skjodt, Neil M; Jones, Richard L

    2008-01-01

    The effectiveness of high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HF-CWO) is directly related to the level of oscillated flow (osc) in the airways. We used the Vest system to investigate the effects of HFCWO on chest wall and pleural pressures and we correlated these pressures to the resultant osc. We also compared the latest HFCWO device with it predecessor. Different combinations of vest inflation pressure (background pressure) and oscillation frequency were randomly applied to 10 healthy volunteers. Chest wall pressure was determined using an air-filled bag under the vest and pleural pressure was estimated using an esophageal balloon. Reverse plethysmography was used to measure osc at the mouth and a spirometer was used to measure changes in end-expired lung volume. We found a significant correlation between chest wall and pleural pressure with approximately one-third of the chest wall pressure transmitted into the pleural space. Mean esophageal pressure remained negative at all background pressure/frequency combinations. There was a significant correlation (pHFCWO and since osc is dependent on esophageal pulse pressure, which in turn is dependent on chest wall pulse pressure, it follows that the effectiveness of HFCWO is influenced by the ability to generate an effective chest wall pulse pressure.

  11. Diagnosis of IPA in HIV: The role of the chest X-ray and radiologist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaspel, Uta [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Institut fuer Radiologie, Berlin (Germany); Denning, David W. [The University of Manchester, Education and Research Centre, Wythenshawe Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom); Lemke, Arne J.; Roettgen, Rainer; Bittner, Roland; Oestmann, Joerg W. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Berlin (Germany); Greene, Reginald [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston (United States); Schuermann, Dirk [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Medizinische Klinik mit Schwerpunkt Infektiologie und Asthma-Poliklinik, Berlin (Germany); Maschmeyer, Georg [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Medizinische Klinik mit Schwerpunkt Haematologie und Onkologie, Berlin (Germany); Ruhnke, Markus [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Medizinische Klinik mit Schwerpunkt Onkologie und Haematologie, Berlin (Germany); Herbrecht, Raoul [Hopital de Hautepierre, Department d' Hematologie et d' Oncologie, Strasbourg (France); Ribaud, Patricia [Hopital Saint-Louis, Service d' Hematologie, Paris (France); Lortholary, Olivier [Universite Paris V, Centre National de Reference des Mycoses et des Antifongiques, Institut Pasteur, Service des Maladies Infectieuses et Tropicales, Hopital Necker, Paris (France); Zonderland, Harmien [Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Rabe, Klaus F. [Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Pulmology, Leiden (Netherlands); Neumann, Klaus [Krankenhaus und Herzzentrum Bernau, Bernau (Germany)

    2004-11-01

    The role of clinical information and chest film for the discrimination between invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) and its differential diagnoses in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection was studied. The diagnostic performance of clinical information and chest film alone and in combination was studied for eight internists and eight radiologists with regular exposure to IPA patients. The multicenter case sample consisted of 25 patients with proven IPA and 25 with other pulmonary diseases typical for HIV. The cases were presented on a CD-ROM. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) methodology was employed. With clinical information alone, internists achieved the highest diagnostic performance (area under curve/AUC=0.84). Viewing the chest films did not contribute to their performance (AUC=0.80, P=0.26). The radiologist's performance on the basis of viewing the chest film (AUC=0.75) increased significantly (P=0.012) when clinical information (AUC=0.83) was supplied. IPA cases with characteristic radiological appearance were correctly identified in 90% with chest film. For radiologists with regular exposure to HIV patients, chest films hold relevant information and contribute to the determination in cases with characteristic radiological appearance. Overall and especially in cases with less characteristic radiological appearance, they have significant profit from full access to the clinical data. For internists with regular exposure to HIV patients, chest films do not provide information essential for the verification or differentiation of potential IPA. (orig.)

  12. Obesity Increases the Risk of Chest Wall Pain From Thoracic Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is increasingly being used to treat thoracic tumors. We attempted here to identify dose-volume parameters that predict chest wall toxicity (pain and skin reactions) in patients receiving thoracic SBRT. Patients and Methods: We screened a database of patients treated with SBRT between August 2004 and August 2008 to find patients with pulmonary tumors within 2.5 cm of the chest wall. All patients received a total dose of 50 Gy in four daily 12.5-Gy fractions. Toxicity was scored according to the NCI-CTCAE V3.0. Results: Of 360 patients in the database, 265 (268 tumors) had tumors within 30, or volume of the chest wall receiving 30 Gy. Body mass index (BMI) was also strongly associated with the development of chest pain: patients with BMI ≥29 had almost twice the risk of chronic pain (p = 0.03). Among patients with BMI >29, diabetes mellitus was a significant contributing factor to the development of chest pain. Conclusion: Safe use of SBRT with 50 Gy in four fractions for lesions close to the chest wall requires consideration of the chest wall volume receiving 30 Gy and the patient's BMI and diabetic state.

  13. Reconstruction with a patient-specific titanium implant after a wide anterior chest wall resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turna, Akif; Kavakli, Kuthan; Sapmaz, Ersin; Arslan, Hakan; Caylak, Hasan; Gokce, Hasan Suat; Demirkaya, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    The reconstruction of full-thickness chest wall defects is a challenging problem for thoracic surgeons, particularly after a wide resection of the chest wall that includes the sternum. The location and the size of the defect play a major role when selecting the method of reconstruction, while acceptable cosmetic and functional results remain the primary goal. Improvements in preoperative imaging techniques and reconstruction materials have an important role when planning and performing a wide chest wall resection with a low morbidity rate. In this report, we describe the reconstruction of a wide anterior chest wall defect with a patient-specific custom-made titanium implant. An infected mammary tumour recurrence in a 62-year old female, located at the anterior chest wall including the sternum, was resected, followed by a large custom-made titanium implant. Latissimus dorsi flap and split-thickness graft were also used for covering the implant successfully. A titanium custom-made chest wall implant could be a viable alternative for patients who had large chest wall tumours. PMID:24227881

  14. Derivation and validation of two decision instruments for selective chest CT in blunt trauma: a multicenter prospective observational study (NEXUS Chest CT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M Rodriguez

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Unnecessary diagnostic imaging leads to higher costs, longer emergency department stays, and increased patient exposure to ionizing radiation. We sought to prospectively derive and validate two decision instruments (DIs for selective chest computed tomography (CT in adult blunt trauma patients.From September 2011 to May 2014, we prospectively enrolled blunt trauma patients over 14 y of age presenting to eight US, urban level 1 trauma centers in this observational study. During the derivation phase, physicians recorded the presence or absence of 14 clinical criteria before viewing chest imaging results. We determined injury outcomes by CT radiology readings and categorized injuries as major or minor according to an expert-panel-derived clinical classification scheme. We then employed recursive partitioning to derive two DIs: Chest CT-All maximized sensitivity for all injuries, and Chest CT-Major maximized sensitivity for only major thoracic injuries (while increasing specificity. In the validation phase, we employed similar methodology to prospectively test the performance of both DIs. We enrolled 11,477 patients-6,002 patients in the derivation phase and 5,475 patients in the validation phase. The derived Chest CT-All DI consisted of (1 abnormal chest X-ray, (2 rapid deceleration mechanism, (3 distracting injury, (4 chest wall tenderness, (5 sternal tenderness, (6 thoracic spine tenderness, and (7 scapular tenderness. The Chest CT-Major DI had the same criteria without rapid deceleration mechanism. In the validation phase, Chest CT-All had a sensitivity of 99.2% (95% CI 95.4%-100%, a specificity of 20.8% (95% CI 19.2%-22.4%, and a negative predictive value (NPV of 99.8% (95% CI 98.9%-100% for major injury, and a sensitivity of 95.4% (95% CI 93.6%-96.9%, a specificity of 25.5% (95% CI 23.5%-27.5%, and a NPV of 93.9% (95% CI 91.5%-95.8% for either major or minor injury. Chest CT-Major had a sensitivity of 99.2% (95% CI 95.4%-100%, a specificity of

  15. CT of the chest in suspected child abuse using submillisievert radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, Thomas R.; Seibert, J.A.; Stein-Wexler, Rebecca [Medical Center Children' s Hospital, Division of Pediatric Radiology, University of California-Davis, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lee, Justin S. [University of California-Davis, Department of Radiology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Coulter, Kevin P. [Medical Center Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, University of California-Davis, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2015-07-15

    The cornerstone of child abuse imaging is the skeletal survey, but initial imaging with radiographs may not demonstrate acute and non-displaced fractures, especially those involving the ribs. Given the high mortality of undiagnosed non-accidental trauma, timely diagnosis is crucial. CT is more sensitive in assessing rib fractures; however the effective radiation dose of a standard chest CT is high. We retrospectively identified four children (three boys, one girl; age range 1-4 months) admitted between January 2013 and February 2014 with high suspicion for non-accidental trauma from unexplained fractures of the long bones; these children all had CT of the chest when no rib fractures were evident on the skeletal survey. The absorbed radiation dose estimates for organs and tissue from the four-view chest radiographs and subsequent CT were determined using Monte Carlo photon transport software, and the effective dose was calculated using published tissue-weighting factors. In two children, CT showed multiple fractures of the ribs, scapula and vertebral body that were not evident on the initial skeletal survey. The average effective dose for a four-view chest radiograph across the four children was 0.29 mSv and the average effective dose for the chest CT was 0.56 mSv. Therefore the effective dose of a chest CT is on average less than twice that of a four-view chest radiograph. Our protocol thus shows that a reduced-dose chest CT may be useful in the evaluation of high specificity fractures of non-accidental trauma when the four-view chest radiographs are negative. (orig.)

  16. Should chest examination be reinstated in the early diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oshaug K

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Katja Oshaug, Peder A Halvorsen, Hasse Melbye General Practice Research Unit, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway Background: Although proven to be associated with bronchial obstruction, chest signs are not listed among cues that should prompt spirometry in the early diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD in established guidelines. Aims: We aimed to explore how chest findings add to respiratory symptoms and a history of smoking in the diagnosis of COPD. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, patients aged 40 years or older, previously diagnosed with either asthma or COPD in primary care, answered questionnaires and underwent physical chest examination and spirometry. Results: Among the 375 patients included, 39.7% had forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity <0.7. Hyperresonance to percussion was the strongest predictor of COPD, with a sensitivity of 20.8, a specificity of 97.8, and likelihood ratio of 9.5. In multivariate logistic regression, where pack-years, shortness of breath, and chest findings were among the explanatory variables, three physical chest findings were independent predictors of COPD. Hyperresonance to percussion yielded the highest odds ratio (OR = 6.7, followed by diminished breath sounds (OR = 5.0, and thirdly wheezes (OR = 2.3. These three chest signs also gave significant diagnostic information when added to shortness of breath and pack-years in receiver operating-characteristic curve analysis. Conclusion: We found that chest signs may add to respiratory symptoms and a history of smoking in the diagnosis of COPD, and we conclude that chest signs should be reinstated as cues to early diagnosis of COPD in patients 40 years or older. Keywords: diagnosis, COPD, physical chest examination, spirometry

  17. Novel Influenza A (H1N1) Virus Infection in Children: Chest Radiographic and CT Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the chest radiographic and CT findings of novel influenza A (H1N1) virus infection in children, the population that is more vulnerable to respiratory infection than adults. The study population comprised 410 children who were diagnosed with an H1N1 infection from August 24, 2009 to November 11, 2009 and underwent chest radiography at Dankook University Hospital in Korea. Six of these patients also underwent chest CT. The initial chest radiographs were classified as normal or abnormal. The abnormal chest radiographs and high resolution CT scans were assessed for the pattern and distribution of parenchymal lesions, and the presence of complications such as atelectasis, pleural effusion, and pneumomediastinum. The initial chest radiograph was normal in 384 of 410 (94%) patients and abnormal in 26 of 410 (6%) patients. Parenchymal abnormalities seen on the initial chest radiographs included prominent peribronchial marking (25 of 26, 96%), consolidation (22 of 26, 85%), and ground-glass opacities without consolidation (2 of 26, 8%). The involvement was usually bilateral (19 of 26, 73%) with the lower lung zone predominance (22 of 26, 85%). Atelectasis was observed in 12 (46%) and pleural effusion in 11 (42%) patients. CT (n = 6) scans showed peribronchovascular interstitial thickening (n = 6), ground-glass opacities (n = 5), centrilobular nodules (n = 4), consolidation (n = 3), mediastinal lymph node enlargement (n = 5), pleural effusion (n = 3), and pneumomediastinum (n = 3). Abnormal chest radiographs were uncommon in children with a swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus (S-OIV) infection. In children, H1N1 virus infection can be included in the differential diagnosis, when chest radiographs and CT scans show prominent peribronchial markings and ill-defined patchy consolidation with mediastinal lymph node enlargement, pleural effusion and pneumomediastinum

  18. Comparison of Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Between Mild and Severe Non-cardiac Chest Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahremand

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Physical and psychological factors affect one another in patients presenting with non-cardiac chest pain. Studying the psychological components of these patients may improve their treatment process. Objectives To compare depression, anxiety, and stress severity between mild and severe chest pain in patients with non-cardiac chest pain. Patients and Methods A cross-sectional design was used. The statistical population comprised patients with non-cardiac chest pain admitted to the Heart Emergency Center in Kermanshah, Iran. Using a matching method, 94 participants with mild and severe non-cardiac chest pain were selected and studied in two groups of 47. The instruments used in this study include the Comorbidity Index, the brief pain index (BPI, and the depression, anxiety, and stress scale (DASS. The multivariate analysis of variance, chi-squared test, and t-test were used for data analysis. Results After adjusting for the effects of age and comorbid conditions, results showed that there was a significant difference between the two groups in terms of depression, anxiety, and stress; the severity of these variables was exacerbated in patients with severe chest pain (P < 0.001. Conclusions Depression, anxiety, and stress are common psychological components in patients with non-cardiac chest pain especially those with severe chest pain and it is essential that health professionals pay attention to these factors. Therefore, paying attention to psychological factors could help experts to choose solutions that will decrease pain and side effects of the diseases. It may also facilitate treatment procedures among patients in severe pain. Further investigation to determine the association between these variables and non-cardiac chest pain should be considered.

  19. CT of the chest in suspected child abuse using submillisievert radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cornerstone of child abuse imaging is the skeletal survey, but initial imaging with radiographs may not demonstrate acute and non-displaced fractures, especially those involving the ribs. Given the high mortality of undiagnosed non-accidental trauma, timely diagnosis is crucial. CT is more sensitive in assessing rib fractures; however the effective radiation dose of a standard chest CT is high. We retrospectively identified four children (three boys, one girl; age range 1-4 months) admitted between January 2013 and February 2014 with high suspicion for non-accidental trauma from unexplained fractures of the long bones; these children all had CT of the chest when no rib fractures were evident on the skeletal survey. The absorbed radiation dose estimates for organs and tissue from the four-view chest radiographs and subsequent CT were determined using Monte Carlo photon transport software, and the effective dose was calculated using published tissue-weighting factors. In two children, CT showed multiple fractures of the ribs, scapula and vertebral body that were not evident on the initial skeletal survey. The average effective dose for a four-view chest radiograph across the four children was 0.29 mSv and the average effective dose for the chest CT was 0.56 mSv. Therefore the effective dose of a chest CT is on average less than twice that of a four-view chest radiograph. Our protocol thus shows that a reduced-dose chest CT may be useful in the evaluation of high specificity fractures of non-accidental trauma when the four-view chest radiographs are negative. (orig.)

  20. Novel Influenza A (H1N1) Virus Infection in Children: Chest Radiographic and CT Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Min Jeong; Lee, Young Seok; Lee, Jee Young; Lee, Kun Song [Dankook University College of Medicine, Dankook University Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the chest radiographic and CT findings of novel influenza A (H1N1) virus infection in children, the population that is more vulnerable to respiratory infection than adults. The study population comprised 410 children who were diagnosed with an H1N1 infection from August 24, 2009 to November 11, 2009 and underwent chest radiography at Dankook University Hospital in Korea. Six of these patients also underwent chest CT. The initial chest radiographs were classified as normal or abnormal. The abnormal chest radiographs and high resolution CT scans were assessed for the pattern and distribution of parenchymal lesions, and the presence of complications such as atelectasis, pleural effusion, and pneumomediastinum. The initial chest radiograph was normal in 384 of 410 (94%) patients and abnormal in 26 of 410 (6%) patients. Parenchymal abnormalities seen on the initial chest radiographs included prominent peribronchial marking (25 of 26, 96%), consolidation (22 of 26, 85%), and ground-glass opacities without consolidation (2 of 26, 8%). The involvement was usually bilateral (19 of 26, 73%) with the lower lung zone predominance (22 of 26, 85%). Atelectasis was observed in 12 (46%) and pleural effusion in 11 (42%) patients. CT (n = 6) scans showed peribronchovascular interstitial thickening (n = 6), ground-glass opacities (n = 5), centrilobular nodules (n = 4), consolidation (n = 3), mediastinal lymph node enlargement (n = 5), pleural effusion (n = 3), and pneumomediastinum (n = 3). Abnormal chest radiographs were uncommon in children with a swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus (S-OIV) infection. In children, H1N1 virus infection can be included in the differential diagnosis, when chest radiographs and CT scans show prominent peribronchial markings and ill-defined patchy consolidation with mediastinal lymph node enlargement, pleural effusion and pneumomediastinum

  1. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: an overlooked cause of chest pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Hackbart Bermudes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC, also known as apical ballooning syndrome, broken heart syndrome, or stress-induced cardiomyopathy, is defined as a transient disturbance of the left ventricle, which is quite often associated with electrocardiographic abnormalities that may mimic acute myocardial infarction. The syndrome is also characterized by a mild alteration of cardiac biomarkers in absence of coronary blood flow obstruction on the coronariography. Clinical presentation is often manifested by angina, dyspnea, syncope, and arrhythmias. Peculiarly, the left ventricle takes the form of “tako-tsubo” (a Japanese word for “octopus trap” on the imaging workup. The authors report the case of a post-menopausal, hypertensive, dyslipidemic and type-II diabetic woman admitted at the emergency service with acute chest pain post physical exertion. Electrocardiogram showed signs of ischemia and myocardial necrosis markers were mildly increased. Echocardiography and ventriculography showed apical and mid-ventricular akinesia, with mild atherosclerotic coronary lesions. Thus diagnostic workup and the outcome followed the diagnostic criteria for TTC. The authors called attention to the potential of overlooking this diagnosis, since this syndrome is still not widely recognized.

  2. Detection of interstitial lung disease in PA chest radiographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loog, Marco; van Ginneken, Bram; Nielsen, Mads

    2004-05-01

    A computer-aided diagnosis scheme for the detection of interstitial disease in standard digital posteroanterior (PA) chest radiographs is presented. The detection technique is supervised-manually labelled data should be provided for training the algorithm-and fully automatic, and can be used as part of a computerized analysis scheme for X-ray lung images. Prior to the detection, a segmentation should be performed which delineates the lung field boundaries. Subsequently, a quadratic decision rule is employed for every pixel within the lung fields to associate with each pixel a probabilistic measure indicating interstitial disease. The locally obtained per-pixel probabilities are fused to a single global probability indicating to what extent there is interstitial disease present in the image. Finally, a threshold on this quantity classifies the image as containing interstitial disease or not. The probability combination scheme presented utilizes the quantiles of the local posterior probabilities to fuse the local probability into a global one. Using this nonparametric technique, reasonable results are obtained on the interstitial disease detection task. The area under the receiver operating characteristic equals 0.92 for the optimal setting.

  3. What can we learn from chest radiographs in hypoxemic asthmatics?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Chest radiographs (X-rays) are frequently obtained on children with asthma exacerbations who remain hypoxemic after therapy eventhough their utility has not been evaluated. Objective: To compare X-rays in hypoxemic and non-hypoxemic asthmatic children. Methods: Over 21 months, X-rays were obtained on all persistently hypoxemic asthmatics (1-17 years, oxygen saturation <93% in room air), and some non-hypoxemic asthmatics. A pediatric radiologist blinded to the patients' symptoms evaluated each X-ray for lung size, extravascular lung fluid, and atelectasis. Clinical outcomes including duration of hypoxemia, length of hospital stay, and admission to the PICU were assessed through chart audit after hospital discharge. Results: A total of 445 patients were enrolled and stratified into four groups based on initial and post-treatment pulse oximetry measurements. Hypoxemic groups I and II were more likely to have large or small lungs (P<0.05), severe interstitial fluid (P<0.01), and atelectasis (P<0.01) compared to non-hypoxemic group IV. Group I was more likely to have fluid in the alveolar space compared to all other groups (P<0.01). Within hypoxemic group I, there was no association between any radiographic findings and our clinical outcomes. (orig.)

  4. High frequency chest compression effects heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jongwon; Lee, Yong W; Warwick, Warren J

    2007-01-01

    High frequency chest compression (HFCC) supplies a sequence of air pulses through a jacket worn by a patient to remove excessive mucus for the treatment or prevention of lung disease patients. The air pulses produced from the pulse generator propagates over the thorax delivering the vibration and compression energy. A number of studies have demonstrated that the HFCC system increases the ability to clear mucus and improves lung function. Few studies have examined the change in instantaneous heart rate (iHR) and heart rate variability (HRV) during the HFCC therapy. The purpose of this study is to measure the change of HRV with four experimental protocols: (a) without HFCC, (b) during Inflated, (c)HFCC at 6Hz, and (d) HFCC at 21Hz. The nonlinearity and regularity of HRV was assessed by approximate entropy (ApEn), a method used to quantify the complexities and randomness. To compute the ApEn, we sectioned with a total of eight epochs and displayed the ApEn over the each epoch. Our results show significant differences in the both the iHR and HRV between the experimental protocols. The iHR was elevated at both the (c) 6Hz and (d) 21Hz condition from without HFCC (10%, 16%, respectively). We also found that the HFCC system tends to increase the HRV. Our study suggests that monitoring iHR and HRV are very important physiological indexes during HFCC therapy.

  5. Chest x-ray findings of opportunistic infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yul; Jeon, Suk Chul; Lim, Jeong Ki; Park, Jae Hyung; Kim, Chu Wan [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1983-06-15

    The chest x-ray findings of 20 cases of pulmonary opportunistic infection were analyzed according to causative agents. The results were as follows: 1. Final diagnoses of 20 cases of opportunistic infections were tuberculosis in 6 cases, pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in 5 cases, bacterial infection in 7 cases, and fungal infection in 2 cases. 2. The underlying diseases were leukemia in 6 cases, kidney transplantation in 6 cases, lymphoma in 3 cases, nephrotic syndrome in 1 case, nasopharyngeal cancer in 1 case, multiple myeloma in 1 case, agranulocytosis in 1 case, and hypogammaglobulinemia in 1 case. 3. In tuberculosis, all the 6 cases showed severe manifestations such as military tuberculosis, tuberculous pneumonia, moderately advanced tuberculosis and tuberculous pericarditis. 4. In pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, the most frequent findings were bilateral alveolar densities and peripheral field of the lung was saved in most cases. 5. In 2 cases of fungal infections bilateral multiple cavity nodules were noted. 6. In cases of bacterial infection there was more cases of gram negative infection than gram positive and 2 cases of pseudomonas revealed bilateral multiple cavitary nodules.

  6. Lung boundary detection in pediatric chest x-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candemir, Sema; Antani, Sameer; Jaeger, Stefan; Browning, Renee; Thoma, George R.

    2015-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major public health problem worldwide, and highly prevalent in developing countries. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), over 95% of TB deaths occur in low- and middle- income countries that often have under-resourced health care systems. In an effort to aid population screening in such resource challenged settings, the U.S. National Library of Medicine has developed a chest X-ray (CXR) screening system that provides a pre-decision on pulmonary abnormalities. When the system is presented with a digital CXR image from the Picture Archive and Communication Systems (PACS) or an imaging source, it automatically identifies the lung regions in the image, extracts image features, and classifies the image as normal or abnormal using trained machine-learning algorithms. The system has been trained on adult CXR images, and this article presents enhancements toward including pediatric CXR images. Our adult lung boundary detection algorithm is model-based. We note the lung shape differences during pediatric developmental stages, and adulthood, and propose building new lung models suitable for pediatric developmental stages. In this study, we quantify changes in lung shape from infancy to adulthood toward enhancing our lung segmentation algorithm. Our initial findings suggest pediatric age groupings of 0 - 23 months, 2 - 10 years, and 11 - 18 years. We present justification for our groupings. We report on the quality of boundary detection algorithm with the pediatric lung models.

  7. Computerized tomography of chest in emphysema and interstitial diseases diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the effect of increasing the spatial resolution on thin section (1.5 mm) computed tomography (CT) of the chest, we compared images reconstructed with the standard algorithm (SA) to three other images obtained with 1) a high spatial frequency algorithm, 2) retrospective targeting to a small field of view (FOV) reconstructed with the high spatial frequency algorithm, and 3) the same high spatial frequency algorithm with images acquired with the small (0.6 mm) rather the large (0.9 mm) focal spot. Examinations were performed on a phantom, on normal subjects, and on patients with emphysema and other diffuse lung diseases. Modulation transfer function (MTF) calculations revealed that higher resolution was achieved on the small focal spot and high spatial frequency algorithm than on the standard algorithm. Evaluation of the four images from 25 normal subjects, 16 patients with emphysema and 9 with interstitial disease was performed by means of an ROC study. Results from the areas under the ROC curves, sensitivity and specificity have shown that images reconstructed with the high spatial frequency algorithm were preferred. We conclude that the use of a high spatial frequency algorithm increases spatial resolution and improves visibility of lung parenchyma. Although more evaluation is needed, the potential of increasing spatial resolution further by using a smaller focal spot is currently limited by the mas Available per slice and the associated increased level of quantum noise. (Author)

  8. Abnormal chest shadow on CT in immunosuppressed patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Matsumoto, Tsuneo; Nakamura, Hiroshi (Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). School of Medicine) (and others)

    1992-12-01

    An abnormal chest shadow was observed on CT scans in 25 cases of 23 immunosuppressed patients. Pulmonary disease was pathologically confirmed to be pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PC pneumonia) in four patients, cytomegalovirus pneumonia (CMV pneumonia) in one, bacterial pneumonia in seven, fungal infection in three, miliary tuberculosis in one, leukemic infiltration in two, lymphangitis carcinomatosa in three, drug-induced pneumonitis in three, and ARDS in one. In almost all patients, especially those with infectious diseases such as PC pneumonia, CMV pneumonia, and bacterial pneumonia, the abnormal shadow was wide and visible in the bilateral lung fields. We presumed that such findings as lobular shadow, centrilobular shadow, and mosaic pattern reflected the extension of disease via the respiratory tract, and that those findings are typical of infectious diseases. Because such findings as abnormal linear shadow and swelling of a broncho-vascular bundle were very frequently recognized in patients with lymphangitis carcinomatosa and frequently recognized in those with drug-induced pneumonitis, these diseases may be distinguished from other diseases. An area of slightly increased density was frequently recognized in patients with PC pneumonia, bacterial pneumonia, and drug-induced pneumonitis. Such lesions were pathologically confirmed to be located in the interstitium and/or alveolus. CT was extremely useful in comprehending the character and extension of particular diseases among various diseases. As the number of patients studied was small, the utility of CT in immunosuppressed patients requires further investigation in a larger number of patients. (author).

  9. Chest x-ray findings of opportunistic infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chest x-ray findings of 20 cases of pulmonary opportunistic infection were analyzed according to causative agents. The results were as follows: 1. Final diagnoses of 20 cases of opportunistic infections were tuberculosis in 6 cases, pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in 5 cases, bacterial infection in 7 cases, and fungal infection in 2 cases. 2. The underlying diseases were leukemia in 6 cases, kidney transplantation in 6 cases, lymphoma in 3 cases, nephrotic syndrome in 1 case, nasopharyngeal cancer in 1 case, multiple myeloma in 1 case, agranulocytosis in 1 case, and hypogammaglobulinemia in 1 case. 3. In tuberculosis, all the 6 cases showed severe manifestations such as military tuberculosis, tuberculous pneumonia, moderately advanced tuberculosis and tuberculous pericarditis. 4. In pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, the most frequent findings were bilateral alveolar densities and peripheral field of the lung was saved in most cases. 5. In 2 cases of fungal infections bilateral multiple cavity nodules were noted. 6. In cases of bacterial infection there was more cases of gram negative infection than gram positive and 2 cases of pseudomonas revealed bilateral multiple cavitary nodules

  10. Stationary digital chest tomosynthesis for coronary artery calcium scoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Gongting; Wang, Jiong; Potuzko, Marci; Harman, Allison; Pearce, Caleb; Shan, Jing; Lee, Yueh Z.; Zhou, Otto; Lu, Jianping

    2016-03-01

    The coronary artery calcium score (CACS) measures the buildup of calcium on the coronary artery wall and has been shown to be an important predictor of the risk of coronary artery diseases (CAD). Currently CACS is measured using CT, though the relatively high cost and high radiation dose has limited its adoption as a routine screening procedure. Digital Chest Tomosynthesis (DCT), a low dose and low cost alternative to CT, and has been shown to achieve 90% of sensitivity of CT in lung disease screening. However commercial DCT requires long scanning time and cannot be adapted for high resolution gated cardiac imaging, necessary for CACS. The stationary DCT system (s- DCT), developed in our lab, has the potential to significantly shorten the scanning time and enables high resolution cardiac gated imaging. Here we report the preliminary results of using s-DCT to estimate the CACS. A phantom heart model was developed and scanned by the s-DCT system and a clinical CT in a phantom model with realistic coronary calcifications. The adapted fan-beam volume reconstruction (AFVR) method, developed specifically for stationary tomosynthesis systems, is used to obtain high resolution tomosynthesis images. A trained cardiologist segmented out the calcifications and the CACS was obtained. We observed a strong correlation between the tomosynthesis derived CACS and CT CACS (r2 = 0.88). Our results shows s-DCT imaging has the potential to estimate CACS, thus providing a possible low cost and low dose imaging protocol for screening and monitoring CAD.

  11. An audit of CT chest surveillance following oral cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, G; Hughes, T; Hanlon, R; Jones, H Lewis; Rogers, S N

    2016-07-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the chest is an integral part of the staging of patients with oral cancer. It identifies metastases, synchronous pulmonary primaries, and detects small nodules of indeterminate character that require a follow-up scan. We aimed to find out how many patients with small nodules had had subsequent scans, and the outcome of those who did. Between 2010 and 2013, 413 patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) were treated with curative intent or were actively monitored at the Merseyside and Cheshire Regional Surgical Head and Neck Unit. A total of 324 (78%) had CT at diagnosis. The scans of 246 were clear, metastases were detected in 4, and 51 showed abnormalities. Forty-nine of the patients with abnormalities were recommended for further interval scans but only 20 (41%) actually had them. Further pathological findings were found in 11 (increase in the size of the nodule n=2; metastatic disease n=5; and primary pulmonary tumour n=4). A substantial number of patients did not have the recommended follow-up scans and potentially serious disease was found in some who did. As a result of this audit we have changed the process regarding the booking of CT surveillance scans, and we now check periodically that they have been done. The audit will be repeated to include other sites in the head and neck. PMID:27156437

  12. Clinical assessment of chest pain and guidelines for imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruettner, J., E-mail: joachim.gruettner@umm.de [1st Department of Medicine (Cardiology), University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Henzler, T. [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Sueselbeck, T. [1st Department of Medicine (Cardiology), University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Fink, C. [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Borggrefe, M.; Walter, T. [1st Department of Medicine (Cardiology), University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    For many emergency facilities, risk assessment of patients with diffuse chest pain still poses a major challenge. In their currently valid recommendations, the international cardiological societies have defined a standardized assessment of the prognostically relevant cardiac risk criteria. Here the classic sequence of basic cardiac diagnostics including case history (cardiac risk factors), physical examination (haemodynamic and respiratory vital parameters), ECG (ST segment analysis) and laboratory risk markers (troponin levels) is paramount. The focus is, on the one hand, on timely indication for percutaneous catheterization, especially in patients at high cardiac risk with or without ST-segment elevation in the ECG, and, on the other hand, on the possibility of safely discharging patients with intermediate or low cardiac risk after non-invasive exclusion of a coronary syndrome. For patients in the intermediate or low risk group, physical or pharmacological stress testing in combination with scintigraphy, echocardiography or magnetic resonance imaging is recommended in addition to basic diagnostics. Moreover, the importance of non-invasive coronary imaging, primarily cardiac CT angiography (CCTA), is increasing. Current data show that in intermediate or low risk patients this method is suitable to reliably rule out coronary heart disease. In addition, attention is paid to the major differential diagnoses of acute coronary syndrome, particularly pulmonary embolism and aortic dissection. Here the diagnostic method of choice is thoracic CT, possibly also in combination with CCTA aiming at a triple rule-out.

  13. Inter-observer variation of chest radiography for pneumoconiosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to assess the inter-obeserver variability in the interpretation of chest radiographs for the diagnosis of pneumoconiosis, 1040 radiographs were re-read simultaneously by four radiologists. The radiographs had been performed previously by 8 different radiology services on workers exposed to low silica content dust (<5%). Assessment of variability by pairs of readers was performed by calculating the ''k'' coefficient, as proposed by fleiss, which permits measurement of agreement of diagnosis, escluding any change agreement. Agreement of diagnosis for profusion of lung opacities was satisfactory (k 0.39 -0.68) for all the categories considered as a whole, but some categories (0/1 in particular), coefficients were recorded that were significantly lower than 0.4 (the value taken as the minimum agreement limit). The percentage of ''negative'' radiological pictures (0/0 in this case and the technical quality of radiographs did not affect agreement. There was substantial variability of interpretation particulary between one radiologist and the other three, but agreement between radiologist with greater experience was very good (k=0.6). An attempt is made to explain the greater variability observed in classifying category 0/1, which could depend on the definition of the category itself or on its interpretation

  14. Chest Radiographs for Pediatric TB Diagnosis: Interrater Agreement and Utility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kaguthi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The chest radiograph (CXR is considered a key diagnostic tool for pediatric tuberculosis (TB in clinical management and endpoint determination in TB vaccine trials. We set out to compare interrater agreement for TB diagnosis in western Kenya. A pediatric pulmonologist and radiologist (experts, a medical officer (M.O, and four clinical officers (C.Os with basic training in pediatric CXR reading blindly assessed CXRs of infants who were TB suspects in a cohort study. C.Os had access to clinical findings for patient management. Weighted kappa scores summarized interrater agreement on lymphadenopathy and abnormalities consistent with TB. Sensitivity and specificity of raters were determined using microbiologically confirmed TB as the gold standard (n=8. A total of 691 radiographs were reviewed. Agreement on abnormalities consistent with TB was poor; k=0.14 (95% CI: 0.10–0.18 and on lymphadenopathy moderate k=0.26 (95% CI: 0.18–0.36. M.O [75% (95% CI: 34.9%–96.8%] and C.Os [63% (95% CI: 24.5%–91.5%] had high sensitivity for culture confirmed TB. TB vaccine trials utilizing expert agreement on CXR as a nonmicrobiologically confirmed endpoint will have reduced specificity and will underestimate vaccine efficacy. C.Os detected many of the bacteriologically confirmed cases; however, this must be interpreted cautiously as they were unblinded to clinical features.

  15. Clinical assessment of chest pain and guidelines for imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For many emergency facilities, risk assessment of patients with diffuse chest pain still poses a major challenge. In their currently valid recommendations, the international cardiological societies have defined a standardized assessment of the prognostically relevant cardiac risk criteria. Here the classic sequence of basic cardiac diagnostics including case history (cardiac risk factors), physical examination (haemodynamic and respiratory vital parameters), ECG (ST segment analysis) and laboratory risk markers (troponin levels) is paramount. The focus is, on the one hand, on timely indication for percutaneous catheterization, especially in patients at high cardiac risk with or without ST-segment elevation in the ECG, and, on the other hand, on the possibility of safely discharging patients with intermediate or low cardiac risk after non-invasive exclusion of a coronary syndrome. For patients in the intermediate or low risk group, physical or pharmacological stress testing in combination with scintigraphy, echocardiography or magnetic resonance imaging is recommended in addition to basic diagnostics. Moreover, the importance of non-invasive coronary imaging, primarily cardiac CT angiography (CCTA), is increasing. Current data show that in intermediate or low risk patients this method is suitable to reliably rule out coronary heart disease. In addition, attention is paid to the major differential diagnoses of acute coronary syndrome, particularly pulmonary embolism and aortic dissection. Here the diagnostic method of choice is thoracic CT, possibly also in combination with CCTA aiming at a triple rule-out.

  16. Usefulness of chest radiographs in first asthma attacks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the value of routine chest radiography during acute first attacks of asthma, we studied 371 consecutive children over one year of age who presented with an initial episode of wheezing. Three hundred fifty children (94.3%) had radiographic findings that were compatible with uncomplicated asthma and were considered negative. Twenty-one (5.7%) had positive findings: atelectasis and pneumonia were noted in seven, segmental atelectasis in six, pneumonia in five, multiple areas of subsegmental atelectasis in two, and pneumomediastinum in one. The patients with positive films were more likely to have a respiratory rate above 60 or a pulse rate above 160 (P < 0.001), localized rales or localized decreased breath sounds before treatment (P < 0.01), and localized rales (P < 0.005) and localized wheezing (P < 0.02) after treatment; also, these patients were admitted to the hospital more often (P < 0.001). Ninety-five percent (20 of 21) of the children with positive films could be identified before treatment on the basis of a combination of tachypnea, tachycardia, fever, and localized rales or localized decreased breath sounds. Most first-time wheezers will not have positive radiographs; careful clinical evaluation should reveal which patients will have abnormal radiographs and will therefore benefit from the procedure. 20 references, 3 tables

  17. Filtering of Chest Compression Artefacts in the Electrocardiogram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jekova I.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Long interruptions of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR in case of a sudden cardiac arrest result in higher failure rate of resuscitation. The current work concerns the filtering of the chest compression (CC artefacts during CPR, which is essential for the CPR continuation during electrocardiogram (ECG analysis by automated external defibrillators (AEDs. We have studied two possible approaches - one based on high-pass filter (HPF, and another using band-stop filter (BSF with adjustable cut-off frequency. The purpose is to improve the quality of the signal provided to the ECG analysis module, aiming at a reliable decision to Stop CC if VF is present or to Continue CC for all other rhythms, including asystole (ASYS or 'normal' rhythms with ventricular complexes (NR. The two filters are tested with artificially constructed ECG+CC signals, as well as with real ECGs recorded during CPR. The HPF passes the high-frequency components of the QRS complexes and effectively suppresses CC artefacts. This allows correct recognition of NR and ASYS. However, HPF suppresses the VF amplitude thus compromising the VF detection sensitivity. The BSF is favorable for detection of NR and VF but presents problems for ASYS detection because there are often attending residual high-frequency components belonging to the CC artefacts.

  18. Necrotizing Fasciitis of the Chest in a Neonate in Southern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwafemi Olasupo Awe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the successful saving of a male neonate with necrotizing fasciitis of the chest following a hot fomentation of the umbilicus with exposure of the ribs and the pleural space on the right side. He recovered 5 weeks after admission. We stressed the need to recognize necrotizing fasciitis extending from the upper anterior abdominal wall to the chest following hot fomentation of the umbilicus. The need for multidisciplinary cooperation for excellent outcome is very important, that is, neonatologist, medical microbiologist, and plastic and chest surgeons.

  19. Utility of chest X-ray and abdominal ultrasound for stage III cutaneous malignant melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breitenbauch, M. T. W.; Holm, J.; Rødgaard, J. C.;

    2015-01-01

    . Patients were identified by procedure codes and cross-checked with the Danish National Pathology Database. Results: Ninety patients were included. All patients had chest X-ray and abdominal ultrasound performed. Five chest X-rays raised suspicion of lung metastases and four ultrasounds of liver metastases....... One patient had pleural metastases. Additional imaging and biopsies ruled out metastases in eight of nine cases. Eighty patients had normal imaging, and among these, two had metastases in the lungs and two in the liver at 1-year follow-up. For chest X-ray and abdominal ultrasound, sensitivity...

  20. Chest X-ray in newborns and infants; Konventionelle Thoraxdiagnostik bei Neugeborenen und Kleinkindern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moritz, Joerg D. [Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany). Klinik fuer diagnostische Radiologie, Paediatrische Radiologie und Sonographie

    2012-12-15

    Chest X-ray in newborns and infants shows great differences to that in adults. Therefore all radiologists, who engage in X-rays in this age group, must be familiar with the special features. At the beginning specific items of examination methods are explained, which must be strictly followed due to radiological protection. Focus of the paper is the discussion of the important chest diseases in newborn and infants, which are mostly unknown in chest diagnosis in adults. Many of them can be life-threatening, thus their knowledge is essential. Pathophysiological explanations shall make the special radiological signs understandable. (orig.)

  1. Diagnostic values of chest pain history, ECG, troponin and clinical gestalt in patients with chest pain and potential acute coronary syndrome assessed in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtari, Arash; Dryver, Eric; Söderholm, Martin; Ekelund, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    In the assessment of chest pain patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in the emergency department (ED), physicians rely on global diagnostic impressions ('gestalt'). The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic value of the ED physician's overall assessment of ACS likelihood, and the values of the main diagnostic modalities underlying this assessment, namely the chest pain history, the ECG and the initial troponin result. 1,151 consecutive ED chest pain patients were prospectively included. The ED physician's interpretation of the chest pain history, the ECG, and the global likelihood of ACS were recorded on special forms. The discharge diagnoses were retrieved from the medical records. A chart review was carried out to determine whether patients with a non-ACS diagnosis at the index visit had ACS or suffered cardiac death within 30 days. The gestalt was better than its components both at ruling in ("Obvious ACS", LR 29) and at ruling out ("No Suspicion of ACS", LR 0.01) ACS. In the "Strong suspicion of ACS" group, 60% of the patients did not have ACS. A positive TnT (LR 24.9) and an ischemic ECG (LR 8.3) were strong predictors of ACS and seemed superior to pain history for ruling in ACS. In patients with a normal TnT and non-ischemic ECG, chest pain history typical of AMI was not a significant predictor of AMI (LR 1.9) while pain history typical of unstable angina (UA) was a moderate predictor of UA (LR 4.7). Clinical gestalt was better than its components both at ruling in and at ruling out ACS, but overestimated the likelihood of ACS when cases were assessed as strong suspicion of ACS. Among the components of the gestalt, TnT and ECG were superior to the chest pain history for ruling in ACS, while pain history was superior for ruling out ACS.

  2. Analysis of chest image performance in patients with acute chlorine poisoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore chest image features of patients with acute chlorine poisoning and their clinical values. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed by chest image features of 117 patients with acute chlorine poisoning. All the patients were classified according to Chinese management of occupational acute chlorine poisoning diagnosis standard. Results: Sixty-five patients presented with stimulus response, and normal or both lungs had a little more white on their chest images. Thirty-one cases presented with minor poisoning, and without or the texture of both lungs was increased, and grew hazy and coarse.seventeen cases were moderate, and small sample vague shadows or single or multiple limitations lamellar shadow. Four cases were serious,and two lungs had extensive and density homogeneous consolidation shadow. Conclusions: It would make the diagnosis and assessment of chlorine poisoning more easier based on the combination of chest image features, the clear history of acute chlorine poisoning and relevant clinical performance. (authors)

  3. A prehospital use of ITClamp for haemostatic control and fixation of a chest tube

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnung, S; Steinmetz, J

    2014-01-01

    We here present three cases in which a new device, the ITClamp Hemorrhage Control System (Innovative Trauma Care, Inc., Edmonton, Canada), was used for bleeding control and for securing a chest tube....

  4. The RI study of regional pulmonary function in the funnel chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regional pulmonary function in 8 patients (between 7 and 14 years) with funnel-chest was investigated with 133Xe and sup(99m)TcMAA. The left/right lung volume averaged 76%, and the corresponding over inflation of the right lung was observed in 75% of the patients. In the left lower region of the lung, ventilation and blood flow were decreased below the normal level. The ratio of ventilation to blood flow was close to the normal level. The relationship between the degree of recess of the funnel chest and ventilation or blood flow (r) was r= -0.52 or r= -0.42, respectively. Surgical treatment for funnel chest produced none of significant results in patients' prognosis. The present study suggests that we should be cautious in undergoing operation of a funnel chest, at least in childhood of the patients. (Ueda, J.)

  5. 20 percent lower lung cancer mortality with low-dose CT vs chest X-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists have found a 20 percent reduction in deaths from lung cancer among current or former heavy smokers who were screened with low-dose helical computed tomography (CT) versus those screened by chest X-ray.

  6. Quality of Life After Bypass Surgery in Patients with Chest Pain and Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annals of Internal Medicine Summaries for Patients Quality of Life After Bypass Surgery in Patients With Chest Pain and Heart Failure The full report is titled “Quality-of-Life Outcomes With Coronary Artery ...

  7. Aspergillosis of bilateral breast and chest wall in an immunocompetent male masquerading as breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra G Nasit

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal species are not frequently encountered in an immunocompetent host. Invasive aspergillosis typically occurs in severely immunocompromised patient. Aspergillus infection of breast and chest wall are rarely encountered in an immunocompetent as well as in immunocompromised host. Till date only 13 cases of fungal infection of breast and chest wall have been reported in the literature. This report presents a case of aspergillosis of bilateral breast and chest wall in an immunocompetent male, clinically mimicking breast cancer. Diagnosis was achieved by fine-needle aspiration cytology and subsequently Aspergillus flavus was identified on fungal culture. The patient was successfully treated with voriconazole. Prompt diagnosis by cytology and appropriate treatment is necessary to prevent adverse outcome. Here, we present this rare case of fungal infection of breast and chest wall with relevant review of the literature.

  8. Cardiac CT for the assessment of chest pain: Imaging techniques and clinical results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Hans-Christoph, E-mail: christoph.becker@med.uni-muenchen.de [Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Grosshadern Clinic, Department of Clinical Radiology, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Johnson, Thorsten [Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Grosshadern Clinic, Department of Clinical Radiology, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Immediate and efficient risk stratification and management of patients with acute chest pain in the emergency department is challenging. Traditional management of these patients includes serial ECG, laboratory tests and further on radionuclide perfusion imaging or ECG treadmill testing. Due to the advances of multi-detector CT technology, dedicated coronary CT angiography provides the potential to rapidly and reliably diagnose or exclude acute coronary artery disease. Life-threatening causes of chest pain, such as aortic dissection and pulmonary embolism can simultaneously be assessed with a single scan, sometimes referred to as “triple rule out” scan. With appropriate patient selection, cardiac CT can accurately diagnose heart disease or other sources of chest pain, markedly decrease health care costs, and reliably predict clinical outcomes. This article reviews imaging techniques and clinical results for CT been used to evaluate patients with chest pain entering the emergency department.

  9. Estimated Probabililty of Chest Injury During an International Space Station Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Beth E.; Milo, Eric A.; Brooker, John E.; Weaver, Aaron S.; Myers, Jerry G., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    The Integrated Medical Model (IMM) is a decision support tool that is useful to spaceflight mission planners and medical system designers when assessing risks and optimizing medical systems. The IMM project maintains a database of medical conditions that could occur during a spaceflight. The IMM project is in the process of assigning an incidence rate, the associated functional impairment, and a best and a worst case end state for each condition. The purpose of this work was to develop the IMM Chest Injury Module (CIM). The CIM calculates the incidence rate of chest injury per person-year of spaceflight on the International Space Station (ISS). The CIM was built so that the probability of chest injury during one year on ISS could be predicted. These results will be incorporated into the IMM Chest Injury Clinical Finding Form and used within the parent IMM model.

  10. Emergency department evaluation and management of blunt chest and lung trauma (Trauma CME).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, Eric J; Johnson, Scott; Leibner, Evan; Shahid, Jawad

    2016-06-01

    The majority of blunt chest injuries are minor contusions or abrasions; however, life-threatening injuries, including tension pneumothorax, hemothorax, and aortic rupture can occur and must be recognized early. This review focuses on the diagnosis, management, and disposition of patients with blunt injuries to the ribs and lung. Utilization of decision rules for chest x-ray and computed tomography are discussed, along with the emerging role of bedside lung ultrasonography. Management controversies presented include the limitations of needle thoracostomy us¬ing standard needle, chest tube placement, and chest tube size. Finally, a discussion is provided related to airway and ventilation management to assist in the timing and type of interventions needed to maintain oxygenation. PMID:27177417

  11. Cardiac findings on non-gated chest computed tomography: A clinical and pictorial review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanza, Rene Epunza; Allard, Christian; Berube, Michel

    2016-02-01

    The use of chest computed tomography (CT) as an imaging test for the evaluation of thoracic pathology has significantly increased during the last four decades. Although cardiopulmonary diseases often overlap in their clinical manifestation, radiologists tend to overlook the heart while interpreting routine chest CT. Recent advances in CT technology have led to significant reduction of heart motion artefacts and now allow for the identification of several cardiac findings on chest CT even without electrocardiogram (ECG) gating. These observations range from simple curiosity to both benign and malignant discoveries, to life-threatening discoveries. We here present a clinical and radiologic review of common and less common cardiac findings discovered on non-gated chest CT in order to draw the attention of radiologists and referring physicians to these possibilities. PMID:26781150

  12. A Shocking Complication of a Pneumothorax: Chest Tube-Induced Arrhythmias and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaun Cardozo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a patient with a recent chest tube insertion leading to atrial fibrillation with rapid ventricular rate that led to multiple inappropriate internal cardiac defibrillator (ICD shocks. This is the first reported case of this occurring in a patient with an ICD leading to inappropriate shocks. Our elderly patient with emphysema presented with a spontaneous pneumothorax and developed rapid atrial fibrillation following emergency tube thoracostomy. The patient had a single lead ICD and received multiple inappropriate shocks for the rapid ventricular rate in the therapy zone. Although medical treatment helped stabilize the patient, resolution of the atrial fibrillation occurred only after the chest tube was removed. In a patient with a chest tube or other intrathoracic catheters, maintaining a high index of suspicion that chest tube insertions can cause secondary life threatening cardiovascular complications needs to be considered. In such patients, removal of the device proves to be the most prudent treatment action.

  13. Prediction of Chest Wall Toxicity From Lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephans, Kevin L., E-mail: stephak@ccf.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Djemil, Toufik; Tendulkar, Rahul D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Robinson, Cliff G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University, St Louis, MO (United States); Reddy, Chandana A.; Videtic, Gregory M.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To determine patient, tumor, and treatment factors related to the development of late chest wall toxicity after lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: We reviewed a registry of 134 patients treated with lung SBRT to 60 Gy in 3 fractions who had greater than 1 year of clinical follow-up and no history of multiple treatments to the same lobe (n = 48). Patients were treated as per Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 0236 without specific chest wall avoidance criteria. The chest wall was retrospectively contoured. Thirty-two lesions measured less than 3 cm, and sixteen measured 3 to 5 cm. The median planning target volume was 29 cm{sup 3}. Results: With a median follow-up of 18.8 months, 10 patients had late symptomatic chest wall toxicity (4 Grade 1 and 6 Grade 2) at a median of 8.8 months after SBRT. No patient characteristics (age, diabetes, hypertension, peripheral vascular disease, or body mass index) were predictive for toxicity, whereas there was a trend for continued smoking (p = 0.066; odds ratio [OR], 4.4). Greatest single tumor dimension (p = 0.047; OR, 2.63) and planning target volume (p = 0.040; OR, 1.04) were correlated with toxicity, whereas distance from tumor edge to chest wall and gross tumor volume did not reach statistical significance. Volumes of chest wall receiving 30 Gy (V30) through 70 Gy (V70) were all highly significant, although this correlation weakened for V65 and V70 and maximum chest wall point dose only trended to significance (p = 0.06). On multivariate analysis, tumor volume was no longer correlated with toxicity and only V30 through V60 remained statistically significant. Conclusions: Tumor size and chest wall dosimetry are correlated to late chest wall toxicity. Only chest wall V30 through V60 remained significant on multivariate analysis. Restricting V30 to 30 cm{sup 3} or less and V60 to 3 cm{sup 3} or less should result in a 10% to 15% risk of late chest wall toxicity or lower.

  14. Breast cancer following multiple chest fluoroscopies among tuberculosis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A case-control study of breast cancer among tuberculosis (TB) patients in Denmark (1937-1954) was conducted to provide additional information on the radiation risk associated with low-dose chest fluorscopy exposures. Records of 46013 TB patients were linked to the Danish Cancer Registry and 125 subsequent female breast cancers identified. Medical records were located for 89 (71%) of these women who developed breast cancer and on 390 controls, who were individually matched to cases on age and calendar year of TB diagnosis, and survival. Common risk factors for breast cancer such as nulliparity (relative risk (RR)=2.5) and high relative weight (RR=2.6) were also identified in this population of TB patients. However no risk was evident with exposure to any type of fluoroscopy (RR=0.6; 95% CI=0.2-1.4), or to fluoroscopies performed to monitor lung collapse therapy (RR=0.8; 95% CI=0.5-1.4). Although based on only 7 breast cancers, there was a suggestion of an increased risk among women who received greater than 1 Gy to their breasts (RR=1.6; 95% CI=0.4-6.3). Because of the infrequent use of fluoroscopy in our study, the breast doses were too low, 0.27 Gy on average, to expect to detect a significant elevation in breast cancer risk overall. The findings do suggest, however, that current estimates of breast cancer risk following radiation are not greater than presently accepted, and that a relative excess of 40 per cent can be excluded with reasonable confidence following breast doses on the order of 0.3 Gy. (orig.)

  15. Chest physiotherapy in preterm infants with lung diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cota Francesco

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In neonatology the role of chest physiotherapy is still uncertain because of the controversial outcomes. Methods The aim of this study was to test the applicability in preterm infants of 'reflex rolling', from the Vojta method, in preterm neonates with lung pathology, with particular attention to the effects on blood gases and oxygen saturation, on the spontaneous breathing, on the onset of stress or pain. The study included 34 preterm newborns with mean gestational age of 30.5 (1.6 weeks - mean (DS - and birth weight of 1430 (423 g - mean (DS -, who suffered from hyaline membrane disease, under treatment with nasal CPAP (continuous positive airways pressure, or from pneumonia, under treatment with oxygen-therapy. The neonates underwent phase 1 of 'reflex rolling' according to Vojta method three times daily. Respiratory rate, SatO2, transcutaneous PtcCO2 e PtcO2 were monitored; in order to evaluate the onset of stress or pain following the stimulations, the NIPS score and the PIPP score were recorded; cerebral ultrasound scans were performed on postnatal days 1-3-5-7, and then weekly. Results In this population the first phase of Vojta's 'reflex rolling' caused an increase of PtcO2 and SatO2 values. No negative effects on PtcCO2 and respiratory rate were observed, NIPS and PIPP stress scores remained unmodified during the treatment; in no patient the intraventricular haemorrhage worsened in time and none of the infants developed periventricular leucomalacia. Conclusions Our experience, using the Vojta method, allows to affirm that this method is safe for preterm neonates, but further investigations are necessary to confirm its positive effects and to evaluate long-term respiratory outcomes.

  16. Fat segmentation on chest CT images via fuzzy models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Wu, Caiyun; Pednekar, Gargi; Subramanian, Janani Rajan; Lederer, David J.; Christie, Jason; Torigian, Drew A.

    2016-03-01

    Quantification of fat throughout the body is vital for the study of many diseases. In the thorax, it is important for lung transplant candidates since obesity and being underweight are contraindications to lung transplantation given their associations with increased mortality. Common approaches for thoracic fat segmentation are all interactive in nature, requiring significant manual effort to draw the interfaces between fat and muscle with low efficiency and questionable repeatability. The goal of this paper is to explore a practical way for the segmentation of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) components of chest fat based on a recently developed body-wide automatic anatomy recognition (AAR) methodology. The AAR approach involves 3 main steps: building a fuzzy anatomy model of the body region involving all its major representative objects, recognizing objects in any given test image, and delineating the objects. We made several modifications to these steps to develop an effective solution to delineate SAT/VAT components of fat. Two new objects representing interfaces of SAT and VAT regions with other tissues, SatIn and VatIn are defined, rather than using directly the SAT and VAT components as objects for constructing the models. A hierarchical arrangement of these new and other reference objects is built to facilitate their recognition in the hierarchical order. Subsequently, accurate delineations of the SAT/VAT components are derived from these objects. Unenhanced CT images from 40 lung transplant candidates were utilized in experimentally evaluating this new strategy. Mean object location error achieved was about 2 voxels and delineation error in terms of false positive and false negative volume fractions were, respectively, 0.07 and 0.1 for SAT and 0.04 and 0.2 for VAT.

  17. Brugada ECG Sign & Chest Pain Mimicking ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Mousa

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Management of patients with the brugada ECG sign who have no previous history of syncope is still negotiable. We present a case of a 57 year-old Caucasian lady who presented to the emergency department with substernal chest pain. Results: Her past medical history showed that she had two previous episodes of lightheadedness, but no syncope. She had a family history of sudden death secondary to unknown cause in her aunt at the age of 61. Physical exam was unremarkable except for diaphoresis. Electrocardiography (ECG showed ST elevation in the right precordial leads (V1-V2 with T inversion, mimicking a STEMI. Emergent cardiac catheterization revealed normal coronary arteries. Echocardiogram was normal. Again, interpretation of ECG revealed a Brugada type 1 pattern, characterized by coved-type, gradually descending ST-T segment, elevated J point of more than 2 mm and T wave inversion. Electrophysiological (EPS testing with a Sodium channel blocker challenge showed a persistent Brugada type 1 pattern with non inducible ventricular tachycardia. This patient had Brugada type 1 ECG pattern with no previous history of syncope (asymptomatic. Thus she was considered at low risk of developing a serious arrhythmogenic event in the future. Conclusion: A history of syncope remains the best available predictor for arrhythmogenic events. EPS testing in such patients, to stratify the risk and predict for any future events, is still controversial. It is still unjustified to place an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator in asymptomatic non-inducible individuals with the Brugada pattern. These patients should follow up closely with a cardiologist and be aware of the risk of possible triggers of ventricular arrhythmias.

  18. Radiology of chest diseases. 3. tot. rev. and upd. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lange, S. [Knappschaftshospital Recklinghausen (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Walsh, G. [Royal Berkshire Hospital, Reading (United Kingdom). Dept. of Radiology

    2007-07-01

    Almost a decade has passed since the publication of the second edition of Radiology of Chest Diseases in 1997. This period has seen tremendous advances in imaging technology. Single-slice helical CT has given way to multi-detector row CT (MDCT), and with increasing numbers of detectors we move toward the concept of 'isotropic' spatial resolution. This has been combined with decreased scan times and improved temporal resolution. The rapid evolution of CT technology has led to marked improvements in the quality of thoracic CT studies and has allowed us to contemplate and perform with some success cardiac evaluation and CT coronary angiography. Positron emission tomography (PET)/PET-CT has been incorporated into everyday clinical practice in the past decade and today plays a significant role in imagin evaluation of thoracic disease, particularly in oncologic staging and assessment. Advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) today allow improved cardiac evaluation and particularly myocardial first-pass perfusion and viability assessment. In this text, we have tried to convey how these exciting advances in technology fit into the clinical setting of cardiothoracic imaging evaluation. We also recognize the ever-increasing availability and use of CT as an 'early' second-line imaging tool in assessment of the patient with suspected pulmonary disease and have placed a greater emphasis on the role of high-resolution/thin-section CT in evaluation of parenchymal lung disease. A new chapter on interventional procedures in the thorax describes a spectrum of procedures from the standard image-guided biopsy and drainage through to the more specialized interventions of pulmonary AVM and pulmonary false aneurysm embolization. Once again, we hope that this text conveys the fascinating diversity of cardiothoracic radiology and that it will prove a useful guide to the practitioner in the every-day clinical setting. (orig.)

  19. Routine chest radiography after permanent pacemaker implantation: Is it necessary?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwards N

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Chest radiographs (CXRs are performed routinely after permanent pacemaker implantation to identify pacemaker lead position and exclude pneumothorax. We assessed the clinical value and need for this procedure. Design: Retrospective analysis of pacemaker data and CXRs following permanent pacemaker insertion between December 2002 and February 2004. Materials and Methods: Post-procedural CXRs were available in 125/126 consecutive patients after either first endocardial pacemaker implantation or insertion of at least one new lead. Subclavian vein puncture was used for venous access in all cases. CXRs were examined to establish the incidence of pneumothorax and assess pacing lead positions. The clinical records were examined in all patients who had subsequent CXRs or a further pacemaker procedure to identify the indication for these and to establish whether CXR had influenced patient management. Results: In total, 192 post-procedural CXRs were performed, either postero-anterior (PA and/or lateral views. Ventricular and/or atrial pacing lead contour and electrode position was considered radiographically appropriate in 86% CXRs. Fourteen per cent of post-procedural radiographs were considered to have radiologically sub-optimal pacemaker lead positioning. None of the patients with these "abnormal" radiographs experienced subsequent pacemaker complications or had further radiographs recorded at a later date. Later repeat CXRs were performed in 16 patients (13% but only 3 patients (2% had pacing abnormalities as the primary indication. All three had satisfactory pacing lead position on initial post-implantation and later radiographs, but required further procedures for lead re-positioning. Iatrogenic pneumothorax occurred in one patient (incidence 0.8% in our series. CXR confirmed the clinical diagnosis and allowed an assessment of size to guide treatment. Conclusion: Routine CXR after permanent pacemaker insertion is not necessary in

  20. Sternoclavicular joint septic arthritis with chest wall abscess in a healthy adult: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Yoshihito; Kato, Hisaaki; SHIRAI, Kunihiro; NAKAJIMA, Yasuhiro; YAMADA, Noriaki; Okada, Hideshi; Yoshida, Takahiro; Toyoda, Izumi; Ogura, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Background Septic arthritis of the sternoclavicular joint is rare. It can be associated with serious complications such as osteomyelitis, chest wall abscess, and mediastinitis. In this report, we describe a case of an otherwise healthy adult with septic arthritis of the sternoclavicular joint with chest wall abscess. Case presentation A 68-year-old Japanese man presented to our hospital complaining of pain and erythema near the right sternoclavicular joint. Despite 1 week of oral antibiotics,...

  1. Chest Compression Synchronized Ventilation versus Intermitted Positive Pressure Ventilation during Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in a Pig Model

    OpenAIRE

    Kill, Clemens; Galbas, Monika; Neuhaus, Christian; Hahn, Oliver; Wallot, Pascal; Kesper, Karl; Wulf, Hinnerk; Dersch, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Background Guidelines recommend mechanical ventilation with Intermitted Positive Pressure Ventilation (IPPV) during resuscitation. The influence of the novel ventilator mode Chest Compression Synchronized Ventilation (CCSV) on gas exchange and arterial blood pressure compared with IPPV was investigated in a pig model. Methods In 12 pigs (general anaesthesia/intubation) ventricular fibrillation was induced and continuous chest compressions were started after 3min. Pigs were mechanically ventil...

  2. Chest pain units: A necessity or only a name to encourage patients

    OpenAIRE

    Reza Assareh, Ahmad; Azadi, Nasim; Tahmasebi, Safar Ali; Sahraei, Tooba; Dabbagh, Razieh; Hajizadeh, Ebrahim; Mahdavi, Kamran; Heydari, Ali; Alasti, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Acute chest pain is a common symptom among patients presenting to emergency wards. Identification and admission of patients with real acute coronary syndrome and preventing the hospitalization of people with false diagnosis of coronary syndrome are the most important tasks in emergency wards. The purpose of this study was to investigate the usefulness of designing a special chest pain unit in emergency department of Imam Khomeini Hospital (Ahvaz, Iran). METHODS The patients with ma...

  3. Dynamic Chest Image Analysis: Model-Based Perfusion Analysis in Dynamic Pulmonary Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Kiuru Aaro; Kormano Martti; Svedström Erkki; Liang Jianming; Järvi Timo

    2003-01-01

    The "Dynamic Chest Image Analysis" project aims to develop model-based computer analysis and visualization methods for showing focal and general abnormalities of lung ventilation and perfusion based on a sequence of digital chest fluoroscopy frames collected with the dynamic pulmonary imaging technique. We have proposed and evaluated a multiresolutional method with an explicit ventilation model for ventilation analysis. This paper presents a new model-based method for pulmonary perfusion ana...

  4. Imaging manifestations and the related clinical characteristics of chest trauma during the Yushu Earthquake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Zhijin; Tang Guibo; He Xiaofen; Zhang Ming; Wu Dangjie; Geng Gasongbao

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was focused on the imaging features of the chest trauma and its relation to clinical characteristics.All the injured patients were from the Yushu Earthquake areas on days April 14-23,2010.After an initial treatment,the injurers were rapidly transported from Yushu at an altitude of 4000 m via air to Xining at 2260 m within 6~8 h,and promptly admitted to Qinghai Provincial People' s Hospital.A total of 130 wounded injurers who had high suspicion of chest injuries all had examinations of Chest X-ray and computed tomography (CT) images.Of them 63 injurers presented at least one of the features of the chest trauma in imaging with a positive rate of 48.5 %.Of these,37 cases (28.5 %) were multi-system with multiple injuries,33 cases (25.4 %) were chest trauma with multi-injury types,which included thoracic fractures in 54 cases (85.7 %),pleural injury in 56 cases (88.9 %),lung injury in 54 cases (85.7 %),lungs complications in 37 cases (58.7 %),and extrapulmonary complications of 35 cases (55.6 %).The radiological data were analyzed retrospectively.The features of chest trauma in Yushu Earthquake,the complications of chest injuries,and the relation between imaging findings and clinical manifestations,as well as the differences of chest trauma between Yushu Earthquake and Wenchuan Earthquake were discussed in detail.

  5. MINIMAL PNEUMOTHORAX CHEST POSTERO ANTERIOR VIEW VS OPPOSITE LATERAL DECUBITUS VIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Chaitanya

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pneumothorax is a life threatening condition, which can be massive or minimal, usually can be detected on chest x-ray posteroanterior view, but minimal pneumothorax will be difficult to diagnose on chest x-ray posteroanterior view even in expiratory film, as collapsed lung border can be behind the rib density. In such conditions, opposite lateral decubitus view will be helpful in diagnosing minimal pneumothorax. Details are given below.

  6. Chest wall reconstruction with acellular dermal matrix (Strattice™) and a TRAM flap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunbjerg, Mette Eline; Juhl, Alexander Andersen; Damsgaard, Tine Engberg

    2014-01-01

    Mette Eline Brunbjerg, Alexander Andersen Juhl, Tine E. Damsgaard. "Chest wall reconstruction with acellular dermal matrix (Strattice™) and a TRAM flap.” Acta Oncol. 2013 Jun;52(5):1052-4. Epub 2012 Oct 24. PMID: 23095144......Mette Eline Brunbjerg, Alexander Andersen Juhl, Tine E. Damsgaard. "Chest wall reconstruction with acellular dermal matrix (Strattice™) and a TRAM flap.” Acta Oncol. 2013 Jun;52(5):1052-4. Epub 2012 Oct 24. PMID: 23095144...

  7. A Rare Cause of Chest Pain in a Young Man: Primary Pneumomediastinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Ekiz

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous pneumomediastinum (SPM is described as the presence of air in the mediastinum. It is a rare clinical condition that often affects adult young men. Patients are rarely symptomatic and detected incidentally. Symptoms often resolve without need of treatment. Diagnosis is made by physical examination and chest X-ray, and further study is rarely needed. We aimed to highlight spontaneous pneumomedisatinum as the differential diagnosis of chest pain.

  8. Reconstruction with a patient-specific titanium implant after a wide anterior chest wall resection

    OpenAIRE

    Turna, Akif; KAVAKLI, Kuthan; SAPMAZ, Ersin; Arslan, Hakan; Caylak, Hasan; Gokce, Hasan Suat; Demirkaya, Ahmet

    2013-01-01

    The reconstruction of full-thickness chest wall defects is a challenging problem for thoracic surgeons, particularly after a wide resection of the chest wall that includes the sternum. The location and the size of the defect play a major role when selecting the method of reconstruction, while acceptable cosmetic and functional results remain the primary goal. Improvements in preoperative imaging techniques and reconstruction materials have an important role when planning and performing a wide...

  9. Inflation and deflation pressure-volume loops in anesthetized pinnipeds confirms compliant chest and lungs

    OpenAIRE

    Fahlman, Andreas; Loring, Stephen H.; Johnson, Shawn P.; Haulena, Martin; Trites, Andrew W.; Fravel, Vanessa A.; Van Bonn, William G.

    2014-01-01

    We examined structural properties of the marine mammal respiratory system, and tested Scholander's hypothesis that the chest is highly compliant by measuring the mechanical properties of the respiratory system in five species of pinniped under anesthesia (Pacific harbor seal, Phoca vitulina; northern elephant seal, Mirounga angustirostris; northern fur seal Callorhinus ursinus; California sea lion, Zalophus californianus; and Steller sea lion, Eumetopias jubatus). We found that the chest wall...

  10. Computerized analysis of abnormal asymmetry in digital chest radiographs: Evaluation of potential utility

    OpenAIRE

    Armato, Samuel G; Giger, Maryellen L.; MacMahon, Heber

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and test a computerized method for the fully automated analysis of abnormal asymmetry in digital posteroanterior (PA) chest radiographs. An automated lung segmentation method was used to identify the aerated lung regions in 600 chest radiographs. Minimal apriori lung morphology information was required for this gray-level thresholding-based segmentation. Consequently, segmentation was applicable to grossly abnormal cases. The relative areas of segmente...

  11. Pleuritic chest pain and fluid levels on imaging in a heavy cannabis smoker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cary, Rachel Margaret; Bragg, Craig; Mukherjee, Jayanta

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a 48-year-old man with an extensive cannabis smoking history who presented with pleuritic chest pain. A chest X-ray revealed multiple large, apical lung bullae with fluid levels, an appearance consistent with infection. Lung function tests showed moderate airflow obstruction and decreased gas transfer. The infection was treated with a prolonged course of antimicrobials, and the patient followed up by respiratory physicians. PMID:25650062

  12. Estimating adipose tissue in the chest wall using ultrasonic and alternate 40K and biometric measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The percentage of adipose (fat) tissue in the chest wall must be known to accurately measure Pu in the human lung. Correction factors of 100% or more in x-ray detection efficiency are common. Methods using simple 40K and biometric measurement techniques were investigated to determine the adipose content in the human chest wall. These methods predict adipose content to within 15% of the absolute ultrasonic value. These new methods are discussed and compared with conventional ultrasonic measurement techniques

  13. A CASE REPORT ON SICKLE CELL DISEASE WITH HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA, NEPHROTIC SYNDROME AND ACUTE CHEST SYNDROME

    OpenAIRE

    Putta; Yamini Devi

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is an autoimmune hemolytic anemia due to abnormal hemoglobin. Sickling of RBCs occur due to abnormal hemoglobin which leads to vaso - occlusive crisis. This disease manifests as hemolytic anemia, acute chest syndrome, stroke, ischemic leg ulcers and nephrotic syndrome. This patient presented with hemolytic anemia, nephrotic syndrome and acute chest syndrome. This case was diagnosed by electrophoresis of h emoglobin and peripheral smear. Thi...

  14. The effects of breathing with mainly inspiration or expiration on pulmonary function and chest expansion

    OpenAIRE

    Woo, Seong-Dae; Kim, Tae-Ho; Lim, Jin-Yong

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the effects of inspiration- and expiration-oriented breathing on pulmonary function and chest expansion. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty healthy male university students were divided randomly into inspiration-oriented and expiration-oriented breathing groups. Their pulmonary function and chest size during inspiration or expiration were evaluated and then re-evaluated after 15 minutes of breathing exercise five times a week for four weeks. [Results] The br...

  15. Cash's textbook of chest, heart and vascular disorders for physiotherapists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downie, P.A.; Innocenti, D.M.; Jackson, S.E.

    1987-01-01

    This book includes a chapter on chest radiographs. A very high proportion of the patients treated by physiotherapy will have had a chest radiograph (x-ray) either because their primary disease is pulmonary or there is some long standing heart or lung illness which should be taken into account during the management of an acute problem. The chapter outlines the principles involved in reading the radiograph.

  16. Chest Wall Resection and Reconstruction as a Substitute to Treat Malignant Tumours in Chinese Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Yu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Chest wall cancers are a mixed group of lesions that offer an exciting diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for surgeons. The present study is an attempt to evaluate the pathology, treatment methodologies, role of surgical resection and reconstruction, and consequences of patients with these tumours. Methods: All the patients with malignant primary chest wall cancers treated at our institution between February 2007 and July 2013, were included in this study. Fifteen cases were identified with tumours. Seven of them were malignant small round cell tumour (MSRCT, six were rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS and the remaining two were other tumours. Five patients underwent initial biopsy, followed by chemotherapy (n = 4 and radiotherapy (n = 1. Results: Three of these five survived to undertake late chest wall resections. Six of the nine resected patients required en bloc resection of neighbouring muscles or organs; three required complex chest wall reconstruction. At the end of the study, we found that eight out of 15 patients (53% have survived (six years of follow-up, all with no evidence of disease; the other seven patients died of progressive disease. Two patients with tumour categories other than MSRCT or RMS, metastatic or not, at diagnosis, are alive with no indication of disease. There were no local recurrences. Conclusions: Surgical resection, with en bloc removal of involved structures and chest wall reconstruction, provides outstanding survival improvement in malignant chest wall tumours.

  17. Dynamic chest radiography: flat-panel detector (FPD) based functional X-ray imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Rie

    2016-07-01

    Dynamic chest radiography is a flat-panel detector (FPD)-based functional X-ray imaging, which is performed as an additional examination in chest radiography. The large field of view (FOV) of FPDs permits real-time observation of the entire lungs and simultaneous right-and-left evaluation of diaphragm kinetics. Most importantly, dynamic chest radiography provides pulmonary ventilation and circulation findings as slight changes in pixel value even without the use of contrast media; the interpretation is challenging and crucial for a better understanding of pulmonary function. The basic concept was proposed in the 1980s; however, it was not realized until the 2010s because of technical limitations. Dynamic FPDs and advanced digital image processing played a key role for clinical application of dynamic chest radiography. Pulmonary ventilation and circulation can be quantified and visualized for the diagnosis of pulmonary diseases. Dynamic chest radiography can be deployed as a simple and rapid means of functional imaging in both routine and emergency medicine. Here, we focus on the evaluation of pulmonary ventilation and circulation. This review article describes the basic mechanism of imaging findings according to pulmonary/circulation physiology, followed by imaging procedures, analysis method, and diagnostic performance of dynamic chest radiography. PMID:27294264

  18. Effect of seawater immersion on plasma osmotic pressure and electrolyte balance following open chest trauma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李辉; 鹿尔驯; 虞积耀; 王大鹏; 马聪

    2002-01-01

    To explore the effect of seawater immersion on serum osmotic pressure and electrolytes balance following chest trauma in dogs. Methods: Twenty-five healthy adult dogs were used in the experiment. A canine model of right open pneumothorax was established by chest puncturing on all animals. Animals were divided into three groups: a control group (n = 10) with chest trauma without any immersion;a seawater group ( n = 10) immersed in seawater after chest trauma and a normal saline group ( n = 5 ) immersed in normal saline solution following chest trauma. Blood samples were taken at different time intervals to determine plasma osmotic pressure and electrolytes. The hemodynamic changes were also recorded. Results: Mortality in the seawater group was much higher than that of the control group and the normal saline group. The mean survival time in the seawater group lasted only 45 minutes, while in the control group and the normal saline group the average survival time was more than 4 hours (P < 0.01 ). One of the most important causes of death was hypernatremia and high osmolality. Severe electrolytes imbalance was observed in seawater group.Hypernatremia and high osmolality were the most significant factors of high mortality in the seawater group. Conclusions: Seawater immersion after chest trauma appears to be associated with severe electrolyte imbalance as well as high osmotic pressure, These may be the risk factors leading to fatal outcome.

  19. Normalized mean shapes and reference index values for computerized quantitative assessment indices of chest wall deformities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ho Chul; Park, Man Sik; Lee, Seong Keon; Nam, Ki Chang; Park, Hyung Joo; Kim, Min Gi; Song, Jae-Jun; Choi, Hyuk

    2015-11-01

    We previously proposed a computerized index (eccentricity index [EI]) for chest-wall deformity measurements, such as pectus excavatum. We sought to define mean shapes based on normal chest walls and to propose for computerized index reference values of that are used in the quantitative analysis of the severity of chest-wall deformities. A total of 584 patients were classified into 18 groups, and a database of their chest-wall computed tomography (CT) scan images was constructed. The boundaries of the chest wall were extracted by using a segmentation algorithm, and the mean shapes were subsequently developed. The reference index values were calculated from the developed mean shapes. Reference index values for the EI were compared with a conventional index, the Haller index (HI). A close association has been shown between the two indices in multiple subjects (r = 0.974, P < 0.001). The newly developed mean shapes and reference index values supply both reliability and objectivity to the diagnosis, analysis, and treatment of chest-wall deformities. They promise to be highly useful in clinical settings.

  20. Use of resting myocardial scintigraphy during chest pain to exclude diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbirato, Gustavo Borges; Azevedo, Jader Cunha de; Felix, Renata Christian Martins; Correa, Patricia Lavatori; Volschan, Andre; Viegas, Monica; Pimenta, Lucia; Dohmann, Hans Fernando Rocha; Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Mesquita, Claudio Tinoco [Centro de Estudos do Hospital Pro-Cardiaco (Procep), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-04-15

    Background: Images of myocardial perfusion taken during an episode of chest pain have been used for patients in the emergency department. Objective: To evaluate the operating characteristics of {sup 99m}Tc-Tetrofosmin scintigraphy during an episode of chest pain to exclude the diagnosis of cute myocardial infarction. Methods: One hundred and eight patients admitted with chest pain, or up to four hours after the end of symptoms and non diagnostic electrocardiogram, underwent resting scintigraphy and measurement of troponin I concentrations. Patients with a history of myocardial infarction (MI) were not excluded (24 patients). Troponin I concentrations were determined at admission and 6 hours later. Nuclear physicians performed a blind analysis of the images, and myocardial infarction was confirmed whenever troponin I level increase was three times that of the control. Results: Resting perfusion image was abnormal in all 6 patients with MI. Only 1 patient had a normal image and increased troponin levels. Fifty-five patients had positive images without MI, and 46 patients had normal images and troponin levels. The prevalence of the disease was 6.5%. The sensitivity and specificity of the resting images during an episode of chest pain to diagnose MI was 85.7% and 45.5%, respectively. The negative predictive value was 97.7%. Conclusion: Patients undergoing chest pain protocol with SPECT showed an excellent negative predictive value to exclude diagnosis of myocardial infarction. These results suggest that resting perfusion image is an important tool at the chest pain unit. (author)

  1. Bronchiolitis obliterans following exposure to sulfur mustard: chest high resolution computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghanei, Mostafa E-mail: m.ghanei@bmsu.ac.ir; Mokhtari, Majid; Mohammad, Mehdi Mir; Aslani, Jafar

    2004-11-01

    Background: Pulmonary complications are known to occur in over half of the patients exposed to sulfur mustard (SM). Chemical weapons of mass destruction (WMD) including SM were used by Iraq during Iran-Iraq war between 1983 and 1989. We undertook this study to evaluate the chest high resolution computerized tomography (HRCT) as a diagnostic tool in patients with documented exposure to SM and chronic respiratory symptoms. Method: The medical records of 155 patients exposed to SM during Iran-Iraq war and suffered respiratory complications were reviewed. Chest HRCTs of these patients were examined. Ten healthy controls with no history of exposure to HD were matched for age, gender, and chest HRCT protocol applied. Results: Fifty chest HRCTs of these patients were randomly selected for this study. The most frequent findings were; air trapping 38 (76%), bronchiectasis 37 (74%), mosaic parenchymal attenuation (MPA) 36 (72%), irregular and dilated major airways 33 (66%) bronchial wall thickening (BWT) 45 (90%), and interlobular septal wall thickening (SWT) 13 (26%), respectively. Air trapping in one patient (10%) was the only positive finding in the control group. Conclusions: Chest HRCT findings of bronchiectasis, air trapping, MPA, SWT, and BWT were seen in our patients 15 years after exposure to HD. These findings suggest the diagnosis of bronchiolitis obliterans (BO). We did not encounter chest HRCT features consistent with pulmonary fibrosis.

  2. Post-traumatic pulmonary pseudocyst with hemopneumothorax following blunt chest trauma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fagkrezos Dimitris

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Post-traumatic pulmonary pseudocyst is an uncommon cavitary lesion of the lung and develops after blunt chest trauma and even more rarely following penetrating injuries. It is generally seen in young adults presenting with cough, chest pain, hemoptysis, and dyspnea. Post-traumatic pulmonary pseudocyst should be included in the differential diagnosis of cavitary pulmonary lesions. We describe the case of a 60-year-old Caucasian Greek woman who sustained traumatic pulmonary pseudocyst with hemopneumothorax due to a blunt chest trauma after a traffic accident. Case presentation After a traffic accident, a 60-year-old Caucasian Greek woman sustained a hemopneumothorax due to a blunt chest trauma. There was evidence of an extensive contusion in the posterior and lateral segments of the right lower lobe, a finding that was attributed to an early sign of a cavitation, and the presence of a thin-walled air cavity was detected on the anterior segment of the right lower lobe in the control computed tomography taken 24 hours after admission. Our patient was treated by catheter aspiration, and the findings of computed tomography evaluation about one month later showed complete resolution of one of the two air-filled cavitary lesions. The second pseudocyst also disappeared completely, as shown by the control computed tomography scan performed six months later. Conclusions Traumatic pulmonary pseudocyst is a rare complication of blunt chest trauma, and computed tomography is a more valuable imaging technique than chest radiograph for early diagnosis.

  3. Detection of ROSC in Patients with Cardiac Arrest During Chest Compression Using NIRS: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Tsukasa; Nagao, Ken; Kawamorita, Tsuyoshi; Soga, Taketomo; Ishii, Mitsuru; Chiba, Nobutaka; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Tani, Shigemasa; Yoshino, Atsuo; Hirayama, Atsushi; Sakatani, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    Return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) during chest compression is generally detected by arterial pulse palpation and end-tidal CO2 monitoring; however, it is necessary to stop chest compression during pulse palpation, and to perform endotracheal intubation for monitoring end-tidal CO2. In the present study, we evaluated whether near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) allows the detection of ROSC during chest compression without interruption. We monitored cerebral blood oxygenation in 19 patients with cardiac arrest using NIRS (NIRO-200NX, Hamamatsu Photonics, Japan). On arrival at the emergency room, the attending physicians immediately assessed whether a patient was eligible for this study after conventional advanced life support (ALS) and employed NIRS to measure cerebral blood oxygenation (CBO) in the bilateral frontal lobe in patients. We found cerebral blood flow waveforms in synchrony with chest compressions in all patients. In addition, we observed abrupt increases of oxy-hemoglobin concentration and tissue oxygen index (TOI), which were associated with ROSC detected by pulse palpation. The present findings indicate that NIRS can be used to assess the quality of chest compression in patients with cardiac arrest as demonstrated by the detection of synchronous waveforms during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). NIRS appears to be applicable for detection of ROSC without interruption of chest compression and without endotracheal intubation. PMID:26782207

  4. Impact of chest radiography for children with lower respiratory tract infection: a propensity score approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Ecochard-Dugelay

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Management of acute respiratory tract infection varies substantially despite this being a condition frequently encountered in pediatric emergency departments. Previous studies have suggested that the use of antibiotics was higher when chest radiography was performed. However none of these analyses had considered the inherent indication bias of observational studies. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this work was to assess the relationship between performing chest radiography and prescribing antibiotics using a propensity score analysis to address the indication bias due to non-random radiography assignment. METHODS: We conducted a prospective study of 697 children younger than 2 years of age who presented during the winter months of 2006-2007 for suspicion of respiratory tract infection at the Pediatric Emergency Department of an urban general hospital in France (Paris suburb. We first determined the individual propensity score (probability of having a chest radiography according to baseline characteristics. Then we assessed the relation between radiography and antibiotic prescription using two methods: adjustment and matching on the propensity score. RESULTS: We found that performing a chest radiography lead to more frequent antibiotic prescription that may be expressed as OR = 2.3, CI [1.3-4.1], or as an increased use of antibiotics of 18.6% [0.08-0.29] in the group undergoing chest radiography. CONCLUSION: Chest radiography has a significant impact on the management of infants admitted for suspicion of respiratory tract infection in a pediatric emergency department and may lead to unnecessary administration of antibiotics.

  5. Clinical Findings in Patients with Splenic Injuries: Are Injuries to the Left Lower Chest Important?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneir, Aaron

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical findings in patients with splenic injury and to determine if isolated left lower chest injury may be the single clinical indicator of splenic injury. The medical records of all adult blunt trauma patients with splenic injury over a 14 month period were reviewed. Significant left lower chest injury was considered present if the patient had left sided pleuritic chest pain with tenderness to ribs 7-12 or if these ribs were visualized as fractured on any imaging study. Patients were considered to have clinical findings suggestive of splenic injury if they had pre-hospital or emergency department hypotension, abdominal pain or tenderness, a Glasgow coma scale < 15, or gross hematuria. Ninety patients had splenic injury. Thirty-nine (43%. 95% CI 33, 54% patients had significant left lower chest injury. In five (6%. 95% CI 2, 12% patients, injury to this portion of the chest was the single indicator of splenic injury. Nearly half the patients with splenic injury will have significant injury to the left lower chest and this finding may be the only indicator of splenic injury.

  6. Active breathing control (ABC): Determination and reduction of breathing-induced organ motion in the chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Extensive radiotherapy volumes for tumors of the chest are partly caused by interfractional organ motion. We evaluated the feasibility of respiratory observation tools using the active breathing control (ABC) system and the effect on breathing cycle regularity and reproducibility. Methods and Materials: Thirty-six patients with unresectable tumors of the chest were selected for evaluation of the ABC system. Computed tomography scans were performed at various respiratory phases starting at the same couch position without patient movement. Threshold levels were set at minimum and maximum volume during normal breathing cycles and at a volume defined as shallow breathing, reflecting the subjective maximal tolerable reduction of breath volume. To evaluate the extent of organ movement, 13 landmarks were considering using commercial software for image coregistration. In 4 patients, second examinations were performed during therapy. Results: Investigating the differences in a normal breathing cycle versus shallow breathing, a statistically significant reduction of respiratory motion in the upper, middle, and lower regions of the chest could be detected, representing potential movement reduction achieved through reduced breath volume. Evaluating interfraction reproducibility, the mean displacement ranged between 0.24 mm (chest wall/tracheal bifurcation) to 3.5 mm (diaphragm) for expiration and shallow breathing and 0.24 mm (chest wall) to 5.25 mm (diaphragm) for normal inspiration. Conclusions: By modifying regularity of the respiratory cycle through reduction of breath volume, a significant and reproducible reduction of chest and diaphragm motion is possible, enabling reduction of treatment planning margins

  7. The Role of Chest Physiotherapy in Prevention of Postextubation Atelectasis in Pediatric Patients with Neuromuscular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemat BILAN

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Bilan N, Poorshiri B.The Role of Chest Physiotherapy in Prevention of Postextubation Atelectasis in Pediatric Patients with Neuromuscular Diseases. Iran J Child Neurol. 2013 Winter; 7 (1:21-24. ObjectiveThere are controversial findings in the literature on the effects of chest physiotherapy on postextubation lung collapse in pediatric age group. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the efficacy of chest physiotherapy in prevention of postextubation atelectasis in pediatric patients. Materials & Methods In a case-control study from March 2007 to March 2011, two groups of patients (35 patients in each group susceptible to lung collapse were enrolled in the study. The studied patients had neuromuscular diseases such as spinal muscular atrophy, Guillain-Barre syndrome, critical illness polyneuropathy/myopathy, and cerebral palsy. The patients were randomly divided into two groups (case and control; The case group underwent daily chest physiotherapy through vibrator and chest percussion and the control group was under supervision. In the latter group, the underlying disease was treated and the lung collapse was managed, if occurred. Results The frequency of atelectasis was lower in the case group who received prophylactic chest physiotherapy compared to the control group (16.6% vs. 40%. Conclusion Chest physiotherapy as well as appropriate and regular change of position can considerably reduce the rate of pulmonary collapse in pediatric patients.References Jorgensen J, Wei JL, Sykes KJ, Klem SA, Weatherly RA, Bruegger DE, Latz AD, Nicklaus PJ. Incidence of and risk factors for airway complications following endotracheal intubation for bronchiolitis. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2007;137(3:394-9.Flenady VJ, Gray PH. Chest physiotherapy for preventing morbidity in babies being extubated from mechanical ventilation. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2002;(2:CD000283.Odita JC, Kayyali M, Ammari A. Post-extubation atelectasis in ventilated

  8. Chest CT findings in patients with non-cardiovascular causes of chest pain: Focusing on pulmonary tuberculosis in a tuberculosis endemic country

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, So Won; Shim, Sung Shine; Kim, Yoo Kyung; Ryu, Yon Ju [Mokdong Hospital, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    To review the common causes of non-cardiovascular chest pain (NCCP) according to the location and lesion type as seen on chest CT, and to evaluate CT findings in tuberculosis (TB) as a cause of NCCP. In the period 2009 to 2012, patients having NCCP without definitive evidence of acute myocardial infarction, pulmonary thromboembolism, and aortic dissection, were included. In total, 162 patients (60.5% male; 39.5% female), with a mean age of 51 years, were enrolled. CT images were evaluated by location and lesion type, for causes of NCCP. Chest CT revealed that the most common location for the cause of NCCP was the pleura (45.1%), followed by the subpleural lung parenchyma (30.2%). The most common lesion causing NCCP was TB (33.3%), followed by pneumonia (19.1%). Of the 54 TB cases, 40 (74.1%) were stable TB and 14 (25.9%) were active TB; among these 54 patients, NCCP was most commonly the result of fibrotic pleural thickening (55.6%), followed by subpleural stable pulmonary TB (14.8%). Results of chest CT revealed that TB was a major cause of NCCP in a TB endemic area. Among the TB patients, fibrotic pleural thickening in patients with stable TB was the most common cause of NCCP.

  9. Chest CT findings in patients with non-cardiovascular causes of chest pain: Focusing on pulmonary tuberculosis in a tuberculosis endemic country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To review the common causes of non-cardiovascular chest pain (NCCP) according to the location and lesion type as seen on chest CT, and to evaluate CT findings in tuberculosis (TB) as a cause of NCCP. In the period 2009 to 2012, patients having NCCP without definitive evidence of acute myocardial infarction, pulmonary thromboembolism, and aortic dissection, were included. In total, 162 patients (60.5% male; 39.5% female), with a mean age of 51 years, were enrolled. CT images were evaluated by location and lesion type, for causes of NCCP. Chest CT revealed that the most common location for the cause of NCCP was the pleura (45.1%), followed by the subpleural lung parenchyma (30.2%). The most common lesion causing NCCP was TB (33.3%), followed by pneumonia (19.1%). Of the 54 TB cases, 40 (74.1%) were stable TB and 14 (25.9%) were active TB; among these 54 patients, NCCP was most commonly the result of fibrotic pleural thickening (55.6%), followed by subpleural stable pulmonary TB (14.8%). Results of chest CT revealed that TB was a major cause of NCCP in a TB endemic area. Among the TB patients, fibrotic pleural thickening in patients with stable TB was the most common cause of NCCP

  10. Computed tomography of the chest with model-based iterative reconstruction using a radiation exposure similar to chest X-ray examination: preliminary observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neroladaki, Angeliki; Botsikas, Diomidis; Boudabbous, Sana; Becker, Christoph D.; Montet, Xavier [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Geneva 4 (Switzerland)

    2013-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic image quality of ultra-low-dose chest computed tomography (ULD-CT) obtained with a radiation dose comparable to chest radiography and reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP), adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) in comparison with standard dose diagnostic CT (SDD-CT) or low-dose diagnostic CT (LDD-CT) reconstructed with FBP alone. Unenhanced chest CT images of 42 patients acquired with ULD-CT were compared with images obtained with SDD-CT or LDD-CT in the same examination. Noise measurements and image quality, based on conspicuity of chest lesions on all CT data sets were assessed on a five-point scale. The radiation dose of ULD-CT was 0.16 {+-} 0.006 mSv compared with 11.2 {+-} 2.7 mSv for SDD-CT (P < 0.0001) and 2.7 {+-} 0.9 mSv for LDD-CT. Image quality of ULD-CT increased significantly when using MBIR compared with FBP or ASIR (P < 0.001). ULD-CT reconstructed with MBIR enabled to detect as many non-calcified pulmonary nodules as seen on SDD-CT or LDD-CT. However, image quality of ULD-CT was clearly inferior for characterisation of ground glass opacities or emphysema. Model-based iterative reconstruction allows detection of pulmonary nodules with ULD-CT with radiation exposure in the range of a posterior to anterior (PA) and lateral chest X-ray. (orig.)

  11. The early risk stratification of the patients with acute chest pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective:This investigation was designed to stratify patients with acute chest pain based on their symptoms,electrocardiogram (ECG),cardiac injury markers and the number of accompanying traditional risk factors(smoking,obesity,hyperlipemia,hypertension,diabetes),and to assess the effect of the above factors to obtain a risk stratification for patients with chest pain.Methods:We identified 139 patients with acute chest pain,including 45 myocardiac infarction patients,65 unstable angina patients and 29 chest pain patients without identified acute coronary syndrome(ACS)admitted to our Coronary Heart Center during December 2004 to February 2005.All patients accepted coronary angiography.All data was collected using questionnaires.Based on reported symptom,electrocardiogram (ECG),cardiac injury markers and the number of the accompanying traditional risk factors,we stratified all patients into four groups:Group l,patients with acute chest pain,ECG changes and abnormal cardiac injury biomarkers.Group 2,patients with acute chest pain and ECG changes(without abnormal cardiac injury biomarkers).Group 3,patients with acute chest pain,normal ECG,normal cardiac injury biomarkers and>2 traditional risk factors.Group 4,patients with acute chest pain,normal ECG and normal cardiac injury biomarkers.but only≤2 traditional risk factors.From this data we examined the difference of ACS incidence in the four groups.Results:After stratification the ACS incidence of the grouped patients in turn was 100%,84%,69.6%and 53.3%.The combination of early phase ECG and cardiac injury markers identified 70.9% patients with ACS(the specificity being 90.7%).The mortality of group 3 was higher compared with group 4(69.6% vs 53.3%),however the P value was more than 0.05 and didn't show significant statistical difference.The correlation analysis found the number of the traditional risk factors had a significant positive correlation(r=0.202,P=0.044)with the number of stenosis being more than 50% of

  12. Mechanisms and Clinical Management of Ventricular Arrhythmias following Blunt Chest Trauma

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    Daniel H. Wolbrom

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonpenetrating, blunt chest trauma is a serious medical condition with varied clinical presentations and implications. This can be the result of a dense projectile during competitive and recreational sports but may also include other etiologies such as motor vehicle accidents or traumatic falls. In this setting, the manifestation of ventricular arrhythmias has been observed both acutely and chronically. This is based on two entirely separate mechanisms and etiologies requiring different treatments. Ventricular fibrillation can occur immediately after chest wall injury (commotio cordis and requires rapid defibrillation. Monomorphic ventricular tachycardia can develop in the chronic stage due to underlying structural heart disease long after blunt chest injury. The associated arrhythmogenic tissue may be complex and provides the necessary substrate to form a reentrant VT circuit. Ventricular tachycardia in the absence of overt structural heart disease appears to be focal in nature with rapid termination during ablation. Regardless of the VT mechanism, patients with recurrent episodes, despite antiarrhythmic medication in the chronic stage following blunt chest injury, are likely to require ablation to achieve VT control. This review article will describe the mechanisms, pathophysiology, and treatment of ventricular arrhythmias that occur in both the acute and chronic stages following blunt chest trauma.

  13. A second defibrillator chest patch electrode will increase implantation rates for nonthoracotomy defibrillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, A J; Swartz, J F; Rodak, D J; Moore, H J; Hannan, R L; Tracy, C M; Fletcher, R D

    1996-09-01

    Nonthoracotomy defibrillator systems can be implanted with a lower morbidity and mortality, compared to epicardial systems. However, implantation may be unsuccessful in up to 15% of patients, using a monophasic waveform. It was the purpose of this study to prospectively examine the efficacy of a second chest patch electrode in a nonthoracotomy defibrillator system. Fourteen patients (mean age 62 +/- 11 years, ejection fraction = 0.29 +/- 0.12) with elevated defibrillation thresholds, defined as > or = 24 J, were studied. The initial lead system consisted of a right ventricular electrode (cathode), a left innominate vein, and subscapular chest patch electrode (anodes). If the initial defibrillation threshold was > or = 24 J, a second chest patch electrode was added. This was placed subcutaneously in the anterior chest (8 cases), or submuscularly in the subscapular space (6 cases). This resulted in a decrease in the system impedance at the defibrillation threshold, from 72.3 +/- 13.3 omega to 52.2 +/- 8.6 omega. Additionally, the defibrillation threshold decreased from > or = 24 J, with a single patch, to 16.6 +/- 2.8 J with two patches. These changes were associated with successful implantation of a nonthoracotomy defibrillator system in all cases. In conclusion, the addition of a second chest patch electrode (using a subscapular approach) will result in lower defibrillation thresholds in patients with high defibrillation thresholds, and will subsequently increase implantation rates for nonthoracotomy defibrillators.

  14. The diagnosis of pneumonia requires a chest radiograph (x-ray – yes, no or sometimes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Gower Wootton

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP remains a common condition associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Outcome is improved by early recognition and rapid institution of empirical antibiotic therapy. A number of international guidelines recommend a chest radiograph (x-ray is obtained when pneumonia is suspected; the argument forwarded is that chest radiographs are relatively inexpensive and enable pneumonia (lung consolidation to be confirmed or excluded. But, radiographs are not available in the community setting and introduce a delay in diagnosis and treatment. For these reasons, in mild CAP treated by primary care, guidelines suggest criteria for clinical diagnosis. However, there is debate as to whether clinical features alone are sufficiently reliable to support a diagnosis of CAP with some suggesting diagnostic precision is improved by chest radiographs. Conversely, several studies have demonstrated a lack of agreement in the interpretation of chest radiographs bringing their role as the ultimate arbiter of diagnosis into question. Below we debate the diagnostic role of the humble chest radiograph in the context of suspected CAP.

  15. ACR Appropriateness Criteria chronic chest pain-low to intermediate probability of coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, Pamela K; White, Richard D; Abbara, Suhny; Araoz, Philip A; Cury, Ricardo C; Dorbala, Sharmila; Earls, James P; Hoffmann, Udo; Hsu, Joe Y; Jacobs, Jill E; Javidan-Nejad, Cylen; Krishnamurthy, Rajesh; Mammen, Leena; Martin, Edward T; Ryan, Thomas; Shah, Amar B; Steiner, Robert M; Vogel-Claussen, Jens; White, Charles S

    2013-05-01

    Chronic chest pain can arise from a variety of etiologies. However, of those potential causes, the most life-threatening include cardiac disease. Chronic cardiac chest pain may be caused either by ischemia or atherosclerotic coronary artery disease or by other cardiac-related etiologies, such as pericardial disease. To consider in patients, especially those who are at low risk for coronary artery disease, are etiologies of chronic noncardiac chest pain. Noncardiac chest pain is most commonly related to gastroesophageal reflux disease or other esophageal diseases. Alternatively, it may be related to costochondritis, arthritic or degenerative diseases, old trauma, primary or metastatic tumors, or pleural disease. Rarely, noncardiac chest pain may be referred pain from organ systems below the diaphragm, such as the gallbladder. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 2 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. PMID:23542027

  16. A national survey of emergency department chest pain centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalenski, R J; Rydman, R J; Ting, S; Kampe, L; Selker, H P

    1998-06-01

    Although chest pain centers are promoted as improving emergency cardiac care, no data exist on their structure and processes. This national study determines the 1995 prevalence rate for emergency department (ED)-based chest pain centers in the United States and compares organizational differences of EDs with and without such centers. A mail survey was directed to 476 EDs randomly selected from the American Hospital Association's database of metropolitan hospitals (n = 2,309); the response rate was 63%. The prevalence of chest pain centers was 22.5% (95% confidence interval 18% to 27%), which yielded a projection of 520 centers in the United States in 1995. EDs with centers had higher overall patient volumes, greater use of high-technology testing, lower treatment times for thrombolytic therapy, and more advertising (all p <0.05). Hospitals with centers had greater market competition and more beds per annual admissions, cardiac catheterization, and open heart surgery capability (all p <0.05). Logistic regression identified open heart surgery, high-admission volumes, and nonprofit status as independent predictors of hospitals having chest pain centers. Thus, chest pain centers have a moderate prevalence, offer more services and marketing efforts than standard EDs, and tend to be hosted by large nonprofit hospitals. PMID:9631967

  17. New developments in ultrasonic imaging of the chest and other body organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ultrasonic imaging system described herein was developed to measure chest-wall thickness and the percentage of fat in the chest and around other body organs. The system uses pulse-echo techniques to transmit and detect sound waves reflected from the interfaces of body organs and adjacent tissue. A computer draws these interfaces on color scans, and a code is used to exponentially average data from several points on each scan to find the average thicknesses of the chest wall and fat layers. These average thicknesses are then used to adjust x-ray calibration factors for plutonium lung counters. The correction factor for three subjects measured for fat content ranging from 12.6 to 22.2% was 18 to 41%. The ultrasonic system also defines the shape and position of the kidneys and liver so we are able to more accurately place detectors on the body during in-vivo radiation measurements. We have also developed a technique for displaying the interfaces from a series of ultrasonic chest scans to produce a topographical map that enables us to better understand the shape and contour of the lung and chest-wall interface

  18. New developments in ultrasonic imaging of the chest and other body organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accurate measurement of transuranic elements deposited in the lung is a complex task. One of the problems is measuring uranium-L x-rays associated with plutonium passing through the chest of an accidentally exposed subject. Because the normal human chest-wall thickness varies from about 1 to 4.5 cm, it is important that an accurate determination be made for every person counted for plutonium or for other heavy elements with similar emissions. An ultrasonic B-scanning system (brightness modulated time-base) was developed for defining the structure within the body. Computer programs were written to determine the distance between the lung and chest-wall interface and the outer surface of the chest wall at several points on each scan. These points are exponentially averaged to obtain an average chest-wall thickness that is used, with other information, to derive a calibration factor for plutonium in the subject. It is also combined with the counting data to obtain the plutonium lung burden. Since photon transmission characteristics differ in fat and soft tissue, assessing the fat content is important and can provide a correction factor for counter sensitivity when viewing various organs. The main advantage of the B-scanning and three-dimensional systems are discussed

  19. The use of ultrasonics to investigate soft tissue thicknesses on the human chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The calibration of detectors used for the 'in vivo' estimation of plutonium-239 and americium-241 in the human lung, requires the use of a very realistic chest phantom. The mean energy of the L.X-ray emissions from these isotopes is 17 KeV, at which energy the half value thickness in soft tissue is approximately 0.6 cm. Variations in the distribution and amount of soft tissue between the chests of individuals mean that large corrections must be applied to results obtained from the chest phantom. This paper describes the measurement of soft tissue thicknesses over the chests of nineteen male subjects using an ultrasonic probe. The apparatus and techniques are briefly described. The results are tabulated and correlations of the mean soft tissue thicknesses with various combinations of body parameters are given. The best correlations obtained, enable the mean soft tissue thickness to be predicted to within 0.2 cms (95% confidence limit) from a knowledge of the individuals weight, height and chest circumference. The corresponding error in an estimation of plutonium-239 in the lung would be ± 20%. (author)

  20. Robust and Reproducible Quantification of the Extent of Chest Radiographic Abnormalities (And It's Free!.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Requena-Méndez

    Full Text Available Objective, reproducible quantification of the extent of abnormalities seen on a chest radiograph would improve the user-friendliness of a previously proposed severity scoring system for pulmonary tuberculosis and could be helpful in monitoring response to therapy, including in clinical trials.In this study we report the development and evaluation of a simple tool using free image editing software (GIMP to accurately and reproducibly quantify the area of affected lung on the chest radiograph of tuberculosis patients. As part of a pharmacokinetic study in Lima, Peru, a chest radiograph was performed on patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and this was subsequently photographed using a digital camera. The GIMP software was used by two independent and trained readers to estimate the extent of affected lung (expressed as a percentage of total lung area in each radiograph and the resulting radiographic SCORE.56 chest radiographs were included in the reading analysis. The Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC between the 2 observers was 0.977 (p<0.001 for the area of lung affected and was 0.955 (p<0.001 for the final score; and the kappa coefficient of Interobserver agreement for both the area of lung affected and the score were 0.9 (p<0.001 and 0.86 (p<0.001 respectively.This high level of between-observer agreement suggests that this freely available software could constitute a simple and useful tool for robust evaluation of individual and serial chest radiographs.

  1. Evaluation of the safety of high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) therapy in blunt thoracic trauma patients

    OpenAIRE

    Becker Brian; Ney Arthur L; Palmer Cassandra A; Anderson Casandra A; Schaffel Steven D; Quickel Robert R

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Airway clearance is frequently needed by patients suffering from blunt chest wall trauma. High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO) has been shown to be effective in helping to clear secretions from the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis, bronchiectasis, asthma, primary ciliary dyskinesia, emphysema, COPD, and many others. Chest wall trauma patients are at increased risk for development of pulmonary complications related to airway clearance. These patients frequent...

  2. Chest Computed Tomography (CT) Immediately after CT-Guided Transthoracic Needle Aspiration Biopsy as a Predictor of Overt Pneumothorax

    OpenAIRE

    Noh, Tae June; Lee, Chang Hoon; Kang, Young Ae; Kwon, Sung-Youn; Yoon, Ho-Il; Kim, Tae Jung; Lee, Kyung Won; Lee, Jae Ho; Lee, Choon-Taek

    2009-01-01

    Background/Aims This study examined the correlation between pneumothorax detected by immediate post-transthoracic needle aspiration-biopsy (TTNB) chest computed tomography (CT) and overt pneumothorax detected by chest PA, and investigated factors that might influence the correlation. Methods Adult patients who had undergone CT-guided TTNB for lung lesions from May 2003 to June 2007 at Seoul National University Bundang Hospital were included. Immediate post-TTNB CT and chest PA follow-up at 4 ...

  3. High-resolution chest CT in the evaluation of dyspneic smokers with pulmonary fibrosis and normal spirometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper evaluates the utility of high- resolution CT (HRCT) of the chest in dyspneic smokers who present with normal or near-normal spirometric measurement and a reduced diffusing capacity. Eight dyspneic smokers with near-normal spirometric measurements were imaged with a Picker Fastrac scanner. Prone 3-mm images and supine 10-mm images of the chest were obtained. All CT scans and concurrently obtained plain chest radiographs were reviewed by two chest radiologists and two pulmonologists. One outside CT scan and plain film of a ventilator-dependent, postpneumonectomy patient was also included

  4. Development of realistic chest phantom for calibration of in-vivo plutonium counting facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed realistic chest phantom with removable model organs. The phantom is a torso and is terminated just above the femoral region. Tissue equivalent materials used in the phantom have been made of polyurethane with different amounts of ester of phosphoric acid, in order to simulate human soft tissues such as muscle, muscle-adipose mixtures and cartilage. Lung simulant has been made of foamed polyurethane. Capsulized small sources can be inserted into the holes, drilled in each sliced section of the model organ. Counting efficiencies, obtained with a pair of 12 cm diameter phoswich detectors set above the phantom chest, are 0.195 cpm/nCi for Pu-239 and 44.07 cpm/nCi for Am-241, respectively. The results agree well with efficiencies obtained with IAEA-Phantom. We conclude that the phantom can be used as a standard phantom for the calibration of Pu chest counting equipment. (author)

  5. Interpretation of posterior wall of bronchus intermedius and subcarinal region in lateral chest radiographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Dong Wook; Oh, Joo Hyeong; Yoon, Yup [Kyunghee Univ. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-08-01

    a lateral chest radiograph is frequently useful and sometimes decisive in detecting chest pathology. Certain parts, such as the posterior wall of the branchus intermedius (PWBI) and subcarinal regions, can be evaluated only on lateral chest radiograph. The authors present and emphasize the findings of PWBI and subcarinal abnormalities. Abnormal PWBI, more than 3 mm thick, is seen in cases of minor degree of oblique position, pulmonary edema, inflammation, neoplasm and enlarged lymph nodes. It can also be seen in patients with subcarinal mass. The findings of subcarinal mass on lateral view are ill-defined increased opacity, fullness of the inferior hilar region, doughnut sign, extra-density and thickening of the PWBI. Detection of changes in the PWBI and subcarinal region may be the only diagnostic evidence of hilar and subcarinal disease and helps in its early detection prior to computed tomography.

  6. New chest imaging techniques: a comparison of five analogue and digital methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years new analogue and digital techniques have become available for chest imaging. This study compares conventional film/screen, asymmetric film/screen (InSight), equalization (Amber), storage phosphor and digital image intensifier techniques by phantom exposures and patient examinations. The quality of chest images of 43 patients was classified by seven observers in four different hospitals. According to the results of phantom measurements and a previous study, digital image intensifier radiography was excluded from the patient examinations because of its low image quality. The Amber system had the best image quality. Images of the storage phosphor system were of good quality in both mediastinal and peripheral fields of the chest. Compared to conventional film/screen, the asymmetric film/screen (InSight) was graded higher in the mediastinal field, but lower in the peripheral field. (orig.)

  7. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance of myocardial infarction after blunt chest trauma: a heartbreaking soccer-shot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fogarassy Peter

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cardiac injury occasionally occurs as a result of blunt chest trauma. Most cardiac complications in chest trauma are due to myocardial contusion rather than direct damage to the coronary arteries. However, traumatic coronary injury has been reported, and a variety of underlying pathophysiological mechanisms have been proposed. We present a 26 year old patient presenting with an acute coronary syndrome as a consequence of a soccer-shot impact to the chest. CMR showed apical inferior infarction, as well as multiple small septal lesions which were presumed to have resulted from embolization. The culprit lesion was a proximal 75% LAD stenosis with a prominent plaque-rupture and thrombus-formation, and the distal LAD was occluded by thromboembolic material.

  8. Chest radiological patterns predict the duration of mechanical ventilation in children with RSV infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RSV-infected children demonstrate various radiographic features, some of which are associated with worse clinical outcomes. To investigate whether specific chest radiological patterns in RSV-infected children with acute respiratory failure (ARF) in the peri-intubation period are associated with prolonged duration of mechanical ventilation. We included RSV-infected children 8 days, a backward stepwise regression arrived at a model that included age and right and left lung atelectasis. Using day 2 chest radiograph results, the best model included age and left lung atelectasis. A model combining the two days' findings yielded an area under the ROC curve of 0.92 with a satisfactory fit (P = 0.95). Chest radiological patterns around the time of intubation can identify children with RSV-associated ARF who would require prolonged mechanical ventilation. (orig.)

  9. A CASE REPORT ON SICKLE CELL DISEASE WITH HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA, NEPHROTIC SYNDROME AND ACUTE CHEST SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell disease is an autoimmune hemolytic anemia due to abnormal hemoglobin. Sickling of RBCs occur due to abnormal hemoglobin which leads to vaso - occlusive crisis. This disease manifests as hemolytic anemia, acute chest syndrome, stroke, ischemic leg ulcers and nephrotic syndrome. This patient presented with hemolytic anemia, nephrotic syndrome and acute chest syndrome. This case was diagnosed by electrophoresis of h emoglobin and peripheral smear. This patient recovered with blood transfusion, antibiotics, steroids, diuretics and oxygen inhalation. Sickle cell patients have a known predisposition to bacterial infection, particularly pneumococcal infection. The most si gnificant advance in the therapy of sickle cell anemia has been the introduction of hydroxyurea, but hydroxyurea should be considered in patients experiencing repeated episodes of acute chest syndrome. But in this patient as this is first episode, hydroxyu rea was not given and he recovered well.

  10. Chest pain, panic disorder and coronary artery disease: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares-Filho, Gastão L F; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Santulli, Gaetano; Silva, Adriana C; Machado, Sergio; Valenca, Alexandre M; Nardi, Antonio E

    2014-01-01

    Chest pain may be due benign diseases but often suggests an association with coronary artery disease, which justifies a quick search for medical care. However, some people have anxiety disorder with symptoms that resemble clearly an acute coronary syndrome. More specifically, during a panic attack an abrupt feeling of fear accompanied by symptoms such as breathlessness, palpitations and chest pain, makes patients believe they have a heart attack and confuse physicians about the diagnosis. The association between panic disorder and coronary artery disease has been extensively studied in recent years and, although some studies have shown anxiety disorders coexisting or increasing the risk of heart disease, one causal hypothesis is still missing. The aim of this systematic review is to present the various ways in which the scientific community has been investigating the relation between chest pain, panic disorder and coronary artery disease. PMID:24923348

  11. Radioisotope lung scanning and the chest radiograph in pulmonary disease. Chapter 12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship between the chest radiograph and images of regional ventilation and perfusion is considered. Procedures using radioactive tracers for regional pulmonary blood flow and ventilation studies are reviewed. The normal perfusion scan used injected particles labelled with sup(99m)Tc. Ventilation scans use inhaled 133Xe or sup(81m)Kr. Chest radiographs are compared with perfusion and ventilation scans in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolic disease, chronic obstructive lung disease, emphysema, chronic bronchitis, asthma, carcinoma of the bronchus, pneumonia, collapse and acute bronchitis. It is concluded that the regional physiology as complementary information to the chest radiograph would greatly enhance the diagnostic skill of the radiologist and should therefore be more readily available to him. (author)

  12. Colon in the chest: an incidental dextrocardia: a case report study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd Elrazek, Abd Elrazek; Shehab, Abdullah; Elnour, Asim A; Al Nuaimi, Saif K; Baghdady, Shazly

    2015-02-01

    Diaphragmatic injury is an uncommon traumatic injury (Dextrocardia was an incidental finding, diagnosed by electrocardiography, chest radiograph, and CT chest. Parts of the colon, small intestine, and stomach were within the thorax in the left side due to left diaphragmatic hernia of a nontraumatic cause. Acquired incidental dextrocardia was the main problem due to displacement of the heart to contralateral side by the GI (gastrointestinal) viscera (left diaphragmatic hernia).The patient was prepared for the laparoscopic surgical repair, using a polyethylene mesh 20 cm to close the defect, and the patient recovered with accepted general condition. However, 5 days postoperative, the patient passed away suddenly due to unexplained cardiac arrest.Intrathoracic herniation of abdominal viscera should be considered in patients presented with sudden chest pain concomitant with a history of increased intra-abdominal pressure.

  13. Chest Pain and Costochondritis Associated with Vitamin D Deficiency: A Report of Two Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert C. Oh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D is integral for bone health, and severe deficiency can cause rickets in children and osteomalacia in adults. Although osteomalacia can cause severe generalized bone pain, there are only a few case reports of chest pain associated with vitamin D deficiency. We describe 2 patients with chest pain that were initially worked up for cardiac etiologies but were eventually diagnosed with costochondritis and vitamin D deficiency. Vitamin D deficiency is known to cause hypertrophic costochondral junctions in children (“rachitic rosaries” and sternal pain with adults diagnosed with osteomalacia. We propose that vitamin D deficiency may be related to the chest pain associated with costochondritis. In patients diagnosed with costochondritis, physicians should consider testing and treating for vitamin D deficiency.

  14. Imaging of non-cardiac, non-traumatic causes of acute chest pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kienzl, Daniela, E-mail: daniela.kienzl@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Prosch, Helmut; Töpker, Michael; Herold, Christian [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria)

    2012-12-15

    Non-traumatic chest pain is a common symptom in patients who present in the emergency department. From a clinical point of view, it is important to differentiate cardiac chest pain from non-cardiac chest pain (NCCP). Among the plethora of potential causes of NCCP, life-threatening diseases, such as aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism, tension pneumothorax, and esophageal rupture, must be differentiated from non-life threatening causes. The majority of NCCP, however, is reported to be benign in nature. The presentation of pain plays an important role in narrowing the differential diagnosis and initiating further diagnostic management and treatment. As the benign causes tend to recur, and may lead to patient anxiety and great costs, a meticulous evaluation of the patient is necessary to diagnose the underlying disorder or disease.

  15. Reverse Abdominoplasty Flap in Reconstruction of Post-Bilateral Mastectomies Anterior Chest Wall Defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William HC Tiong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reverse abdominoplasty was originally described for epigastric lift. Since the work by Baroudi and Huger in the 1970s, it has become clear that reverse abdominoplasty application can be extended beyond just aesthetic procedure. Through the knowledge of anterior abdominal wall vascularity, its application had included reconstructive prospect in the coverage of various chest wall defects. To date, reverse abdominoplasty flap has been used to reconstruct unilateral anterior chest wall defect or for larger defect but only in combination with other reconstructive techniques. Here, we presented a case where it is used as a standalone flap to reconstruct bilateral anterior chest wall soft tissue defect post-bilateral mastectomies in oncological resection. In conclusion, reverse abdominoplasty flap provided us with a simple, faster, and satisfactory reconstructive outcome.

  16. Acute fatal coronary artery dissection following exercise-related blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbesier, Marie; Boval, Catherine; Desfeux, Jacques; Lebreton, Catherine; Léonetti, Georges; Piercecchi, Marie-Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Coronary artery injury such as acute coronary dissection is an uncommon and potentially life-threatening complication after blunt chest trauma. The authors report an unusual autopsy case of a 43-year-old healthy man who suddenly collapsed after receiving a punch to the chest during the practice of kung fu. The occurrence of the punch was supported by the presence of one recent contusion on the left lateral chest area at the external examination and by areas of hemorrhage next to the left lateral intercostal spaces at the internal examination. The histological examination revealed the presence of an acute dissection of the proximal segment of the left anterior descending coronary artery. Only few cases of coronary artery dissection have been reported due to trauma during sports activities such as rugby and soccer games, but never during the practice of martial arts, sports usually considered as safe and responsible for only minor trauma.

  17. Occult pulmonary lymphangitic carcinomatosis presenting as 'chronic cough' with a normal HRCT chest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen K. Jinnur

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A diagnosis of ‘chronic cough’ (CC requires the exclusion of sinister pulmonary pathology, including infection and malignancy. We present a patient with a 3 month history of CC who had an extensive workup including a normal high resolution computed tomography of the chest (HRCT 6 weeks prior to consultation at our center. He subsequently developed constitutional symptoms including weight loss and loss of appetite 5 weeks after initial consultation. A repeat HRCT chest and a subsequent whole body PET scan found that he had developed extensive pulmonary lymphangitic carcinomatosis (PLC from a colon primary. Treatment of the colon cancer resulted in significant decrease in metastatic disease burden and cough resolution. PLC is a very rare cause of ‘chronic cough’ and incipient/occult PLC presenting with chronic cough and a normal initial HRCT chest has not been previously reported.

  18. Occult pulmonary lymphangitic carcinomatosis presenting as 'chronic cough' with a normal HRCT chest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinnur, Praveen K.; Pannu, Bibek S.; Boland, Jennifer M.; Iyer, Vivek N.

    2016-01-01

    A diagnosis of ‘chronic cough’ (CC) requires the exclusion of sinister pulmonary pathology, including infection and malignancy. We present a patient with a 3 month history of CC who had an extensive workup including a normal high resolution computed tomography of the chest (HRCT) 6 weeks prior to consultation at our center. He subsequently developed constitutional symptoms including weight loss and loss of appetite 5 weeks after initial consultation. A repeat HRCT chest and a subsequent whole body PET scan found that he had developed extensive pulmonary lymphangitic carcinomatosis (PLC) from a colon primary. Treatment of the colon cancer resulted in significant decrease in metastatic disease burden and cough resolution. PLC is a very rare cause of ‘chronic cough’ and incipient/occult PLC presenting with chronic cough and a normal initial HRCT chest has not been previously reported. PMID:26958342

  19. Heart failure due to severe myocardial calcification; A rare complication after irradiation on the chest wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Shouichi; Maida, Kiyoshi; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Shigeo (Aomori Prefectural Central Hospital (Japan))

    1993-11-01

    A 28-year-old female who had had irradiation on the chest wall at the age of 5 as a remedy for keloid granulation after burn, recently developed congestive heart failure. Severe tricuspid regurgitation was demonstrated by echocardiography with a certain calcification in the cardiac shadow on chest radiogram. Calcified right ventricle and ventricular septum were noticed operatively, which disturbed ventricular motion and also caused tricuspid valve deformity. These calcified myocardium apparently corresponded with the irradiation field. After tricuspid valve replacement, she regained physical activity satisfactorily without congestive heart failure. Because she had no other known causes of cardiac calcification such as hypercalcemia, myocarditis, myocardial infarction or renal diseases, irradiation on the chest wall could be responsible for the severe myocardial calcification. (author).

  20. Association of pneumonia and lung cancer: the value of convalescent chest radiography and follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A retrospective study of 1011 hospitalized patients with pneumonia was undertaken to assess the value of routine convalescent chest radiography for detection of underlying lung cancer. To investigate the mode of clinical onset of pulmonary carcinoma, 232 inpatients with this diagnosis were also studied. The findings may be summarized as follows: 1. 13/1011 pneumonia patients were found to have previously undiagnosed pulmonary carcinoma; 2. many of these carcinomas (8/13) were disclosed by an acute chest X-ray; 3. pulmonary carcinoma was found by convalescent chest X-ray in 2/88 patients not feeling well and in 2/524 patients feeling well at follow-up, and non of these 4 patients benefitted from the carcinoma diagnosis; 4. ESR was of no value in detecting underlying pulmonary carcinoma at follow-up in patients with pneumonia; 5. of the 232 patients with pulmonary carcinoma, 29 (12.5%) presented with an acute respiratory tract infection; 6. most of these latter patients did not recover as expected and their correct diagnosis was made based on a chest X-ray performed because of persistent symptoms. We suggest that patients with radiologically verified pneumonia undergo clinical examination or are interviewed 4-5 weeks after the onset. If signs or symptoms of respiratory disease persist, chest X-ray should be performed. We consider, however, that routine convalescent chest radiography with the aim of detecting any underlying pulmonary tumour could be omitted if the patient has completely recovered 1 month after the acute onset of illness. (9 refs.)

  1. Another cause of chest pain: Staphylococcus aureus sternal osteomyelitis in an otherwise healthy adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vacek TP

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Thomas P Vacek, Shahnaz Rehman, Shipeng Yu, Ankush Moza, Ragheb Assaly Department of Internal Medicine, The University of Toledo Medical Center, Toledo OH, USAAbstract: Chest pain requires a detailed differential diagnosis with good history-taking skills to differentiate between cardiogenic and noncardiogenic causes. Moreover, when other symptoms such as fever and elevated white blood cell count are involved, it may be necessary to consider causes that include infectious sources. A 53-year-old female with no significant past medical history returned to the hospital with recurrent complaints of chest pain that was constant, substernal, reproducible, and exacerbated with inspiration and expiration. The chest pain was thought to be noncardiogenic, as electrocardiography did not demonstrate changes, and cardiac enzymes were found to be negative for signs of ischemia. The patient's blood cultures were analyzed from a previous admission and were shown to be positive for Staphylococcus aureus. The patient was started empirically on vancomycin, which was later switched to ceftriaxone as the bacteria were more sensitive to this antibiotic. A transthoracic echocardiogram did not demonstrate any vegetation or signs of endocarditis. There was a small right pleural effusion discovered on X-ray. Therefore, computed tomography as well as magnetic resonance imaging of the chest were performed, and showed osteomyelitis of the chest. The patient was continued on intravenous ceftriaxone for a total of 6 weeks. Tests for HIV, hepatitis A, B, and C were all found to be negative. The patient had no history of childhood illness, recurrent infections, or previous trauma to the chest, and had had no recent respiratory infections, pneumonia, or any underlying lung condition. Hence, her condition was thought to be a case of primary sternal osteomyelitis without known cause.Keywords: substernal, pleuritic, myocardial infarction, differential

  2. Simple pulmonary eosinophilia (loeffler's syndrome): chest radiographic and CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Kyung Jae; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kim, Tae Sung; Chung, Man Pyo; Choi, Dong Chull; Kwon, O Jung [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of our study is to describe the chest radiographic and CT findings of simple pulmonary eosinophilia. Twenty-six patients with simple pulmonary eosinophilia underwent chest radiography and CT scanning; the results were analyzed retrospectively by two chest radiologists, focusing on the patterns and distribution of the parenchymal abnormalities. The chest radiographs were normal in eight patients (31%), while among the remaining 18 patients, they showed subtle opacity (n=3D9), nodules (n=3D8), consolidation (n=3D2), and mass (n=3D1). Follow-up chest radiographs (m=3D18) demonstrated complete (n=3D16) or partial (n=3D1) resolution of parenchymal lesions or migratory lesions (n=3D1). On CT, nodule(s) (n=3D19) were most commonly seen, followed by ground-glass opacity (n=3D16), consolidation (n=3D3), and mass (n=3D1). A peripheral halo surrounding a nodule or an area of consolidation was seen in 18 patients. The nodules(s) (n=3D19) were subpleural (n=3D13) or random (=3D6). Areas of ground-glass opacity (n=3D16) were subpleural (n=3D13), random (n=3D2), or central (n=3D1). All lesions were patchy rather than diffuse. Follow-up CT in nine patients showed complete (n=3D7) or partial (n=3D2) resolution of parenchymal lesions. Chest radiographs of patients with simple pulmonary eosinophilia often reveal no abnormality. The most common finding is subtle opacity or nodule(s), while CT reveals transient nodule(s) with a surrounding halo or transient areas of ground glass opacity. (author)

  3. Treatments for blunt chest trauma and their impact on patient outcomes and health service delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsworth, Annalise; Curtis, Kate; Asha, Stephen Edward

    2015-01-01

    Blunt chest trauma is associated with a high risk of morbidity and mortality. Complications in blunt chest trauma develop secondary to rib fractures as a consequence of pain and inadequate ventilation. This literature review aimed to examine clinical interventions in rib fractures and their impact on patient and hospital outcomes. A systematic search strategy, using a structured clinical question and defined search terms, was performed in MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library. The search was limited to studies of adult humans from 1990-March 2014 and yielded 977 articles, which were screened against inclusion/exclusion criteria. A hand search was then performed of the articles that met the eligibility criteria, 40 articles were included in this review. Each article was assessed using a quantitative critiquing guideline. From these articles, interventions were categorised into four main groups: analgesia, surgical fixation, clinical protocols and other interventions. Surgical fixation was effective in patients with flail chest at improving patient outcomes. Epidural analgesia, compared to both patient controlled analgesia and intravenous narcotics in patients with three or more rib fractures improved both hospital and patient outcomes, including pain relief and pulmonary function. Clinical pathways improve outcomes in patients ≥ 65 with rib fractures. The majority of reviewed papers recommended a multi-disciplinary approach including allied health (chest physiotherapy and nutritionist input), nursing, medical (analgesic review) and surgical intervention (stabilisation of flail chest). However there was a paucity of evidence describing methods to implement and evaluate such multidisciplinary interventions. Isolated interventions can be effective in improving patient and health service outcomes for patients with blunt chest injuries, however the literature recommends implementing strategies such as clinical pathways to improve the care and outcomes of

  4. Value of routine chest radiography in the diagnostic work-up of ill returned travelers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Genderen PJ

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available David Severs,1 Carla Moolenaar,2 Perry JJ van Genderen1,31Institute for Tropical Diseases, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; 2Department of Radiology, Harbor Hospital, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; 3Travel Clinic, Harbor Hospital, Rotterdam, The NetherlandsBackground: Respiratory tract infections frequently occur in ill returned travelers, a minority of whom present with pneumonia. The most accurate and cost-effective diagnostic work-up remains an area of uncertainty. In this retrospective cohort study, the utility of routine chest radiography was evaluated.Methods: This study was performed at the Institute for Tropical Diseases in Rotterdam and included all returned travelers in the period between 2007 and 2009 that were ill with symptoms lasting less than 1 month and had chest radiography on admission. Travelers' demographic (including travel history, clinical, and laboratory data were collected on admission and evaluated for their diagnostic power to predict radiographic evidence of a pulmonary infiltrate.Results: Fifty-three (7% of 750 ill returned travelers had radiographic evidence of a pulmonary infiltrate. Presentation with cough (odds ratio [OR] 2.80, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.46–5.38, or elevated C-reactive protein values (OR 1.13, 95% CI 1.09–1.17, and white blood cell count (OR 1.08, 95% CI 1.05–1.17 strongly correlated with the presence of a pulmonary infiltrate. Recursive partitioning analysis identified a subset of 384 patients presenting with both cough and fever, or C-reactive protein values in excess of 23 mg/L that would optimally benefit from chest radiography.Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that a more judicious use of chest radiography in the routine work-up of ill returned travelers is warranted.Keywords: chest radiography, chest X-ray, travelers, pneumonia, routine, lower respiratory tract infection

  5. Value of conventional chest radiography for the detection of coronary calcifications: Comparison with MSCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahnken, Andreas H. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital, RWTH Aachen University, Pauwelsstrasse 30, D-52074 Aachen (Germany)], E-mail: mahnken@rad.rwth-aachen.de; Wein, Berthold B. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital, RWTH Aachen University, Pauwelsstrasse 30, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Sinha, Anil M. [II Medical Clinic, Coburg Hospital, Coburg (Germany); Guenther, Rolf W.; Wildberger, Joachim E. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital, RWTH Aachen University, Pauwelsstrasse 30, D-52074 Aachen (Germany)

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate if computed tomography (CT) coronary calcium scoring is needed after detection of coronary calcifications on conventional chest radiographs. Materials and methods: One hundred and five patients (67 men; 57.2 {+-} 12.8 years) with suspected coronary artery disease underwent conventional chest radiography and non-enhanced, retrospectively ECG-gated multislice spiral CT (MSCT) of the heart (4 mm x 2.5 mm, 120 kV, 133 mAs{sub eff.}). Chest radiographs were assessed independently by two radiologists. Detection of coronary calcifications was compared between both methods. Sensitivity, specificity, negative and positive predictive values, median, 25% and 75% percentiles for the detection of coronary calcifications were calculated. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analyses were computed. Results: In 90 patients, MSCT revealed coronary calcifications. The mean coronary calcium score was 526.2 (0-4784.5). On chest radiographs, coronary calcifications were correctly detected in 46 (61) patients by observer 1 (observer 2). The corresponding sensitivity was 51.1% in observer 1 and 67.8% in observer 2. Median of detected coronary calcifications was 361.9 (426.4) for observer 1 (observer 2). Corresponding 25% und 75% percentiles were 109.6 (109.6) and 798.5 (898.5). The area under the ROC curve was 0.636 for observer 1 and 0.715 for observer 2. There was no correlation between image quality and the detection of coronary calcifications on plain film radiographs. Conclusion: As coronary calcifications of various extents are inconsistently detected on plain chest radiographs, CT calcium scoring may not be omitted even if coronary artery calcifications were detected on conventional chest radiographs.

  6. Scatter rejection and low-contrast performance of a slot-scan digital chest radiography system with electronic aft-collimation: A chest phantom study

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xinming; Shaw, Chris C.; Lai, Chao-Jen; Altunbas, Mustafa C.; Chen, Lingyun; Han, Tao; Wang, Tianpeng

    2008-01-01

    Anti-scatter grids have been widely used to reject scatter and increase the perceptibility of low-contrast object in chest radiography; however they also attenuate the primary x-rays, resulting in a substantial degradation of primary information. Compensation for this degradation requires the use of higher exposure technique hence higher dose to the patient. A more efficient approach to reject scatter is the slot-scan imaging technique which employs a narrow scanning x-ray fan beam in conjunc...

  7. Predicting outcomes after blunt chest wall trauma: development and external validation of a new prognostic model

    OpenAIRE

    Battle, Ceri Elisabeth; Hutchings, Hayley; Lovett, Simon; Bouamra, Omar; Jones, Sally; Sen, Aruni; Gagg, James; Robinson, David; Hartford-Beynon, Jake; Williams, Jeremy; Evans, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Blunt chest wall trauma accounts for over 15% of all trauma admissions to Emergency Departments worldwide. Reported mortality rates vary between 4 and 60%. Management of this patient group is challenging as a result of the delayed on-set of complications. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a prognostic model that can be used to assist in the management of blunt chest wall trauma. Methods There were two distinct phases to the overall study; the development and the v...

  8. Using the ADDIE Model of Instructional Design to Teach Chest Radiograph Interpretation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Cheung

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Interpreting basic chest radiographs is an important skill for internal medicine residents to help them adequately diagnose and manage respiratory diseases. Educators need tools to ensure that they take a systematic approach when creating a curriculum to teach this, as well as other skills, knowledge, or attitudes. Using an instructional design model helps educators accomplish this task by giving them a guide they can follow to ensure that the curriculum meets the needs of the learners. Using the creation of a curriculum to teach chest radiograph interpretation as an example, this paper illustrates how educators can use the ADDIE model of instructional design to help develop their own curricula.

  9. Free Tensor Fascia Lata Flap and Synthetic Mesh Reconstruction for Full-Thickness Chest Wall Defect

    OpenAIRE

    Jumpei Ono; Akira Takeda; Minekatsu Akimoto; Akira Iyoda; Yoshio Matsui; Yukitoshi Satoh; Eiju Uchinuma

    2013-01-01

    A large full-thickness chest wall defect over 10 cm in diameter requires skeletal reconstruction and soft tissue coverage. Use of various flaps for soft tissue coverage was previously reported, but en bloc resection in each case affects these flap pedicles and sizes. We present a case of a 74-year-old man with a soft tissue tumor involving the left lateral chest wall. We performed an en block resection and skeletal reconstruction using a mesh, free tensor fascia lata (TFL) flap for soft tissu...

  10. Exertional esophageal pH-metry and manometry in recurrent chest pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jacek; Budzyński

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the diagnostic efficacy of 24-h and exertional esophageal pH-metry and manometry in patients with recurrent chest pain. METHODS: The study included 111 patients (54% male) with recurrent angina-like chest pain, non-respon- sive to therapy with proton pump inhibitors. Sixty-five (59%) had non-obstructive lesions in coronary artery angiography, and in 46 (41%) significant coronary artery narrowing was found. In all patients, 24-h esophageal pH-metry and manometry, and treadmill stress test...

  11. Exercise-provoked esophageal motility disorder in patients with recurrent chest pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jacek; Budzyński

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the relationship between exerciseprovoked esophageal motility disorders and the prognosis for patients with chest pain.METHODS:The study involved 63 subjects with recurrent angina-like chest pain non-responsive to empirical therapy with proton pump inhibitor(PPI).In all,a coronary artery angiography,panendoscopy,24-h esophageal pH-metry and manometry,as well as a treadmill stress test with simultaneous esophageal pH-metry and manometry monitoring,were performed.Thirtyfive subjects had no ...

  12. Atypical Chest Pain: An Unusual Presentation of Spinal Metastasis due to Penile Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pywell, Sarah; Dott, Cameron; Khan, Mohammad Taimur; Sivanadarajah, Naveethan

    2016-01-01

    Spinal metastases may present in a myriad of ways, most commonly back pain with or without neurology. We report an unusual presentation of isolated atypical chest pain preceding metastatic cord compression, secondary to penile carcinoma. Spinal metastasis from penile carcinoma is rare with few cases reported. This unusual presentation highlights the need for a heightened level of clinical suspicion for spinal metastases as a possible cause for chest pain in any patients with a history of carcinoma. The case is discussed with reference to the literature. PMID:27429829

  13. Atypical Chest Pain: An Unusual Presentation of Spinal Metastasis due to Penile Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Pywell

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal metastases may present in a myriad of ways, most commonly back pain with or without neurology. We report an unusual presentation of isolated atypical chest pain preceding metastatic cord compression, secondary to penile carcinoma. Spinal metastasis from penile carcinoma is rare with few cases reported. This unusual presentation highlights the need for a heightened level of clinical suspicion for spinal metastases as a possible cause for chest pain in any patients with a history of carcinoma. The case is discussed with reference to the literature.

  14. Novel use of hand fracture fixation plates in the surgical stabilisation of flail chest.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dunlop, Rebecca L E

    2010-01-01

    Plastic surgeons specialize in working closely with other surgical colleagues to help solve clinical problems. In this case, we performed surgical stabilisation of a large flail chest fragment in conjunction with the cardiothoracic surgical team, using the mini-plating set more commonly used for hand fracture fixation. The use of this fixation system for flail chest has not previously been described, but offers advantages over other reported methods, primarily by dispensing with the need for an extensive thoracotomy incision and by providing robust stabilisation without the presence of prominent hardware.

  15. Radiographic, CT and MRI spectrum of hydatid disease of the chest: a pictorial essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinner, W.N. von [Dept. of Radiology MBC28, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    1993-01-01

    Thirty patients with thoracic hydatidosis (Echinococcus granulosus) were studied. The hydatid cysts were located in the lung parenchyma (70%), mediastinum (6.7%), inside the heart (10%), the pleurae (10%) and the chest wall (3.3%). Complications of thoracic hydatid cysts, such as rupture, infection, pleural involvement, spread and calcifications are presented. Computed tomography (CT) without and/or with contrast enhancement was performed in all patients (30). Findings from conventional chest radiographs were compared with CT and confirmed by pathology (30). In 10 cases (33.3%), magnetic resonance imaging was also performed. The diagnostic spectrum of hydatid cysts, including variations and developmental stages, is presented in this pictorial essay. (orig.)

  16. Illness perceptions, negative emotions, and pain in patients with noncardiac chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, Jared I; White, Kamila S; Gervino, Ernest V

    2015-03-01

    Illness-specific cognitions are associated with outcomes in numerous health conditions, however, little is known about their role in noncardiac chest pain (NCCP). NCCP is prevalent, impairing, and associated with elevated health care utilization. Our objective was to investigate the relations between illness perceptions, emotion, and pain in a sample of 196 adult patients diagnosed with NCCP. We found that negative illness perceptions were associated with greater anxiety, depression, chest pain, and pain-related life interference while controlling for the effects of demographic and pain-related variables. These results expand current NCCP theory and may inform future treatment development.

  17. Progressive Dyspnea Associated with a Crazy-Paving Appearance on a Chest Computed Tomography Scan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nimrod Maimon

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A ‘crazy-paving’ appearance of the lungs on computed tomography scanning of the chest was first described nearly 20 years ago in patients with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, and was thought to be characteristic of this condition. However, this pattern has subsequently been reported in a variety of pulmonary diseases and is now considered to be nonspecific. The present report describes a case of a 74-year-old man in whom congestive heart failure presented with a crazy-paving appearance of the lungs on a chest computed tomography scan. This uncommon association illustrates the importance of the correlation of clinical and radiographic information.

  18. Digital and smart chest drainage systems to monitor air leaks: the birth of a new era?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerfolio, Robert J; Varela, Gonzalo; Brunelli, Alessandro

    2010-08-01

    Recently, several companies have manufactured and commercialized new pleural drainage units that incorporate electronic components for the digital quantification of air through chest tubes and, in some instances, pleural pressure assessment. The goal of these systems is to objectify this previously subjective bedside clinical parameter and allow for more objective, consistent measurement of air leaks. The belief is this will lead to quicker and more accurate chest tube management. In addition, some systems feature portable suction devices. These may afford earlier mobilization of patients because the pleural drainage chamber is attached to a battery-powered smart suction device. In this article we review the clinical experiences using these new devices. PMID:20619233

  19. Radiographic, CT and MRI spectrum of hydatid disease of the chest: a pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty patients with thoracic hydatidosis (Echinococcus granulosus) were studied. The hydatid cysts were located in the lung parenchyma (70%), mediastinum (6.7%), inside the heart (10%), the pleurae (10%) and the chest wall (3.3%). Complications of thoracic hydatid cysts, such as rupture, infection, pleural involvement, spread and calcifications are presented. Computed tomography (CT) without and/or with contrast enhancement was performed in all patients (30). Findings from conventional chest radiographs were compared with CT and confirmed by pathology (30). In 10 cases (33.3%), magnetic resonance imaging was also performed. The diagnostic spectrum of hydatid cysts, including variations and developmental stages, is presented in this pictorial essay. (orig.)

  20. Determination of the chest wall thickness as calibration parameter for dosimetric partial-body counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors describe actual partial body measurements with Phoswich detectors in the in-vivo laboratory of the Institute for Technology in Karlsruhe. The chest wall thickness is estimated from the radio of body weight to body length. This formula includes several uncertainties. The aim of the project was the reduction of the uncertainties of the empirical formula using ultrasonography. This method allows an accuracy of plus or minus 1.1 mm for the determined chest wall thickness. Besides the experimental study several voxel models were used to determine the efficiency of modeled measuring systems. The voxel models reach the same accuracy as the ultrasound method.

  1. Unilateral chest wall anomaly in a patient with Gardner' s syndrome: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Eun Hee; Lee, So Yeon; Park, Hee Jin; Kwon, Heon Ju; Kim, Mi Sung; Park, Hae Won; Kwang, Hyon Joo [Dept. of Radiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hye Jin [Dept. of Radiology, Eulji General Hospital, Eulji University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Gardner syndrome is a familial disease consisting of colonic polyposis, osteomas, and soft tissue tumors. We describe unilateral chest wall anomaly in a 32-year-old man with Gardner syndrome. A chest radiograph showed asymmetric hypertrophy of the right seventh to tenth ribs. CT images showed increased size of the medullary portions of these lesions, but relatively normal thickness of the cortex. Intercostal muscles along the right seventh to tenth ribs were hypertrophied as compared with the contralateral ribs. Both lungs were clear but the volume of right lung showed slightly smaller than left one.

  2. Surgical management for large chest keloids with internal mammary artery perforator flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Dan; Qian, Huan

    2016-01-01

    Therapy for large symptomatic keloids is often plagued with complicated reconstruction manner and recurrence. This article reports a rare treatment combination for a chest keloid with internal mammary artery perforator flap reconstruction and radiation therapy. We excised the keloid and covered the defect with an internal mammary artery perforator flap. Immediate electron-beam irradiation therapy was applied on the second postoperative day. There was no sign of recurrence over the follow-up period of 18 months. The combination of internal mammary artery perforator flap and immediate radiation therapy is useful when faced with chest keloids of similar magnitude and intractability. PMID:26982790

  3. Transauricular embolization of the rabbit coronary artery for experimental myocardial infarction: comparison of a minimally invasive closed-chest model with open-chest surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsanos Konstantinos

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction To date, most animal studies of myocardial ischemia have used open-chest models with direct surgical coronary artery ligation. We aimed to develop a novel, percutaneous, minimally-invasive, closed-chest model of experimental myocardial infarction (EMI in the New Zealand White rabbit and compare it with the standard open-chest surgical model in order to minimize local and systemic side-effects of major surgery. Methods New Zealand White rabbits were handled in conformity with the "Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals" and underwent EMI under intravenous anesthesia. Group A underwent EMI with an open-chest method involving surgical tracheostomy, a mini median sternotomy incision and left anterior descending (LAD coronary artery ligation with a plain suture, whereas Group B underwent EMI with a closed-chest method involving fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous transauricular intra-arterial access, superselective LAD catheterization and distal coronary embolization with a micro-coil. Electrocardiography (ECG, cardiac enzymes and transcatheter left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP measurements were recorded. Surviving animals were euthanized after 4 weeks and the hearts were harvested for Hematoxylin-eosin and Masson-trichrome staining. Results In total, 38 subjects underwent EMI with a surgical (n = 17 or endovascular (n = 21 approach. ST-segment elevation (1.90 ± 0.71 mm occurred sharply after surgical LAD ligation compared to progressive ST elevation (2.01 ± 0.84 mm;p = 0.68 within 15-20 min after LAD micro-coil embolization. Increase of troponin and other cardiac enzymes, abnormal ischemic Q waves and LVEDP changes were recorded in both groups without any significant differences (p > 0.05. Infarct area was similar in both models (0.86 ± 0.35 cm in the surgical group vs. 0.92 ± 0.54 cm in the percutaneous group;p = 0.68. Conclusion The proposed model of transauricular coronary coil embolization avoids

  4. No Value for Routine Chest Radiography in the Work-Up of Early Stage Cervical Cancer Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogendam, Jacob P.; Zweemer, Ronald P.; Verkooijen, Helena M.; de Jong, Pim A.; van den Bosch, Maurice A. A. J.; Verheijen, Rene H. M.; Veldhuis, WB

    2015-01-01

    Aim Evidence supporting the recommendation to include chest radiography in the work-up of all cervical cancer patients is limited. We investigated the diagnostic value of routine chest radiography in cervical cancer staging. Methods All consecutive cervical cancer patients who presented at our terti

  5. Fast assessment and management of chest pain without ST-elevation in the pre-hospital gateway : rationale and design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ishak, Maycel; Ali, Danish; Fokkert, Marion J; Slingerland, Robbert J; Dikkeschei, Bert; Tolsma, Rudolf T; Lichtveld, Rob A; Bruins, Wendy; Boomars, René; Bruheim, Kim; van Eenennaam, Fred; Timmers, Leo; Voskuil, Michiel; Doevendans, Pieter A; Mosterd, Arend; Hoes, Arno W; ten Berg, Jurriën M; van 't Hof, Arnoud W J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For chest pain patients without ST-segment elevation in the pre-hospital setting, current clinical guidelines merely offer in-hospital risk stratification and management, as opposed to chest pain patients with ST-segment elevation for whom there is a straightforward pre-hospital strategy

  6. Volumetric measurement of pulmonary nodules at low-dose chest CT : effect of reconstruction setting on measurement variability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Y.; de Bock, G.H.; van Klaveren, R.J.; van Ooyen, P.; Tukker, W.; Zhao, Y.; Dorrius, M.D.; Proenca, R.V.; Post, W.J.; Oudkerk, M.

    2010-01-01

    To assess volumetric measurement variability in pulmonary nodules detected at low-dose chest CT with three reconstruction settings. The volume of 200 solid pulmonary nodules was measured three times using commercially available semi-automated software of low-dose chest CT data-sets reconstructed wit

  7. 20 CFR Appendix A to Part 718 - Standards for Administration and Interpretation of Chest Roentgenograms (X-Rays)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Interpretation of Chest Roentgenograms (X-Rays) A Appendix A to Part 718 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT STANDARDS... 718—Standards for Administration and Interpretation of Chest Roentgenograms (X-Rays) The following... procedures are used in administering and interpreting X-rays and that the best available medical...

  8. Diagnosis of vertebral fractures on lateral chest X-ray: Intraobserver agreement of semi-quantitative vertebral fracture assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • (Lateral) chest X-ray's are often performed in older individuals for various reasons. • Vertebral fractures are visualized on lateral chest X-ray, but the diagnosis of vertebral fractures is until now only validated on (lateral) spine X-ray's. • This study shows that a (lateral) chest X-ray is sufficient for the diagnosis of vertebral fractures. • Older individuals with a vertebral fracture on a (lateral) chest X-ray do not need further radiography with thoracic spine X-ray or vertebral fracture assessment with DXA. - Abstract: Background: In clinical practice lateral images of the chest are performed for various reasons. As these lateral chest X rays show the vertebrae of the thoracic and thoraco-lumbar region, we wondered if these X-rays can be used for evaluation of vertebral fractures instead of separate thoracic spine X-rays. Methods: To evaluate the agreement and intraobserver reliability of the semi-quantitative method for vertebral fractures on the lateral chest X-ray (X-chest) in comparison to the lateral thoracic spine X-ray (X-Tspine), two observers scored vertebral fractures on X-Tspine and twice on X-chest, separately, blinded and in different time periods. Agreement and Cohens’ kappa were calculated for a diagnosis of any fracture on patient level and on vertebral body level. The study was done in patients visiting an outpatient geriatric day clinic, with a high prevalence of vertebral fractures. Results: 109 patients were included. The intraobserver agreement for X-chest versus X-Tspine was 95–98% for the two levels of fracturing, with a Cohen's kappa of 0.88–0.91. The intraobserver agreement and reliability of the re-test on the X-chest showed an agreement between 91 and 98% with a Cohen's kappa of 0.81–0.93. More vertebrae were visible on the X-chest, mean 10.2, SD 0.66 versus mean 9.8, SD 0.73 on the X-Tspine (p < 0.001). Conclusion: The results show good agreement and intraobserver reliability on

  9. Salivary gland choristoma (heterotopic salivary gland tissue) on the anterior chest wall of a newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aby, Janelle L; Patel, Mayha; Sundram, Uma; Benjamin, Latanya T

    2014-01-01

    Salivary gland choristoma (heterotopic salivary gland tissue) is a rare condition typically seen in the newborn period. This developmental heterotopia is generally nonprogressive, with little risk of malignant transformation. We present the second known reported case of a salivary gland choristoma located on the anterior chest wall. Knowledge of this rare entity will allow for accurate diagnosis and management of this benign anatomic variant.

  10. Atherosclerotic plaque burden in cocaine users with acute chest pain : Analysis by coronary computed tomography angiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ebersberger, Ullrich; Sudarski, Sonja; Schoepf, U. Joseph; Bamberg, Fabian; Tricarico, Francesco; Apfaltrer, Paul; Blanke, Philipp; Schindler, Andreas; Makowski, Marcus R.; Headden, Gary F.; Leber, Alexander W.; Hoffmann, Ellen; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn

    2013-01-01

    Chest pain associated with cocaine use represents an increasing problem in the emergency department (ED). Cocaine use has been linked to the acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and acute myocardial infarction (AMI). We used coronary computed tomography angiography (cCTA) to evaluate the prevalence, severi

  11. Association of Aortic Calcification on Plain Chest Radiography with Obstructive Coronary Artery Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Yeong Han; Chang, Jeong Ho [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Daegu Catholic University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jong Sam [Dept. of Radiologic Tecnology, Daegu Health College, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-03-15

    This study was conducted to determine an association between aortic calcification viewed on plain chest radiography and obstructive coronary artery disease. Retrospective review of all chest radiography obtained from consecutive patients undergoing coronary angiography. Chest PA images were reviewed by technical radiologist and radiologist. Considering the presence of aortic arch calcification, images were compared with the results of coronary angiography. In addition, the size of aortic arch calcification were divided into two groups - the smaller and the larger than 10 mm. Among the total 846 patients, the number of the patients with obstructive coronary artery disease is total 417 (88.3%) in males and 312 (83.4%) in females. Considering the presence of aortic arch calcification, the positive predictive value of relation between aortic arch calcification and obstructive coronary artery disease was 91.4% and the relative risk of the group with aortic arch calcification to the opposite group was 1.10. According to the size of aortic arch calcification and obstructive coronary artery disease, the positive predictive value was 91.9% and the relative risk between two groups was 1.04. This study shows that aortic calcification was closely associated with obstructive coronary artery disease. If the aortic calcification is notified on plain chest radiography, we strongly recommend to consult with doctor.

  12. [Diagnostic value of the procalcitonine test in purulent-septic complications of chest traumas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadachkoriia, V K; Gogishvili, Sh G; Shapatava, K K

    2007-04-01

    The aim of the present work was to assess the value of the semi-quantitative procalcitonine test (PCT) in diagnosis of purulent-septic complications of chest traumas, efficacy of the therapy carried out, and outcome prognosis. For this, 71 patients with chest traumas were enrolled in the study. Concentrations of PCT were assessed in dynamics using an immunochromatographic, semi-quantitative quick test. Semi-quantitative quick PCT test is highly sensitive diagnostic marker that can be used for the assessment of a chest trauma, infectious-septic complication severity, and efficiency of the therapy indicated. Thus, it can be successfully used for monitoring trauma therapy. PCT sensitivity during first 12 hrs of infectious-septic complication development is 2-3-times higher than that of routine methods for laboratory diagnostics, and even more sensitive that IL-6 and CRT, when we are dealing with combined chest traumas. PCT concentration increase is 4-times more frequent in gram-positive bacterial processes than in gram-negative ones. This has to be taken into account, when appropriate antibacterial treatment is selected for restricted infectious-septic complications. PMID:17525495

  13. What did we learn from two decades of chest computed tomography in cystic fibrosis?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiddens, Harm A.W.M. [Erasmus MC-Sophia Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Pulmonology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus MC, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Rosenow, Tim [Erasmus MC-Sophia Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Pulmonology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); The University of Western Australia, Telethon Institute for Child Health Research, Perth (Australia); The University of Western Australia, School of Paediatrics and Child Health Research, Perth (Australia)

    2014-12-15

    Despite our current treatment, many cystic fibrosis (CF) patients still show progressive bronchiectasis and small airways disease. Adequate detection and monitoring of progression of these structural abnormalities is needed to personalize treatment to the severity of CF lung disease of the patient. Chest computed tomography (CT) is the gold standard to diagnose and monitor bronchiectasis. Many studies have been done to validate the role of chest CT in CF and to improve the protocols. From these studies it became clear that for correct interpretation of the severity of bronchiectasis and small airways disease standardization of lung volume for the inspiratory and expiratory CT scan acquisition is needed. The risk related to the radiation exposure of a chest CT scan every second year is considered low. Automated and quantitative image analysis systems are developed to improve the reliability and sensitivity of assessments of structural lung changes in CF, particularly in early life. In this paper an overview is given of the lessons learned from two decades of monitoring CF lung disease using chest CT. (orig.)

  14. Prognostic Factors in Chest Pain Patients : A Quantitative Analysis of the HEART Score

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Backus, Barbra E; Six, A Jacob; Doevendans, Pieter A; Kelder, Johannes C; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Vergouwe, Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Risk stratification for chest pain patients at the emergency department is recommended in several guidelines. The history, ECG, age, risk factors, and troponin (HEART) score is based on medical literature and expert opinion to estimate the risk of a major adverse cardiac event. We aimed

  15. Chest HRCT findings in acute transformation of adult T-cell lymphoma/leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess chest high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) findings in patients with acute transformation of adult T cell leukaemia/lymphoma (ATLL). We retrospectively identified 72 consecutive patients at our institution with ATLL between October 2000 and March 2014. The cases included acute type (n = 20), lymphoma type (n = 21), smouldering type (n = 24) and chronic type (n = 7). Sixteen (7 men, 9 women; aged 36-85 years, mean 63.3 years) of 31 patients (24 with smouldering and seven with chronic type; 51.6 %) developed acute transformation of ATLL, and had undergone chest HRCT examinations. Parenchymal abnormalities, enlarged lymph nodes, pericardial effusion, pleural effusion and skin lesions were evaluated on HRCT. Chest HRCT of 15 of the 16 patients showed abnormal findings, including ground-glass opacity (GGO) (n = 8), consolidation (n = 5), interlobular septal thickening (n = 5) and nodules (n = 5). Pleural effusion was found in five patients, lymph node enlargement in 10 patients and multiple skin thickening in two patients. Almost all patients with acute transformation of ATLL had abnormal findings on chest HRCT, which consisted mainly of lymph node enlargement, GGO, interlobular septal thickening, nodules and bilateral pleural effusions. (orig.)

  16. Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography in the Assessment of Acute Chest Pain in the Emergency Room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prazeres, Carlos Eduardo Elias dos; Cury, Roberto Caldeira; Carneiro, Adriano Camargo de Castro [Hospital do Coração - HCor, Associação do Sanatório Sírio, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rochitte, Carlos Eduardo, E-mail: rochitte@cardiol.br [Hospital do Coração - HCor, Associação do Sanatório Sírio, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Instituto do Coração - InCor - HCFMUSP, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-12-15

    The coronary computed tomography angiography has recently emerged as an accurate diagnostic tool in the evaluation of coronary artery disease, providing diagnostic and prognostic data that correlate directly with the data provided by invasive coronary angiography. The association of recent technological developments has allowed improved temporal resolution and better spatial coverage of the cardiac volume with significant reduction in radiation dose, and with the crucial need for more effective protocols of risk stratification of patients with chest pain in the emergency room, recent evaluation of the computed tomography coronary angiography has been performed in the setting of acute chest pain, as about two thirds of invasive coronary angiographies show no significantly obstructive coronary artery disease. In daily practice, without the use of more efficient technologies, such as coronary angiography by computed tomography, safe and efficient stratification of patients with acute chest pain remains a challenge to the medical team in the emergency room. Recently, several studies, including three randomized trials, showed favorable results with the use of this technology in the emergency department for patients with low to intermediate likelihood of coronary artery disease. In this review, we show data resulting from coronary angiography by computed tomography in risk stratification of patients with chest pain in the emergency room, its diagnostic value, prognosis and cost-effectiveness and a critical analysis of recently published multicenter studies.

  17. The vascular pedicle width seen on chest PA in normal Korean adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunwoo, Hee Jung; Ahn, Myeong Im; Baik, Jun Hyun; Jung, Youn Ju; Kim, Jee Young [St. Vincent' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seog Hee [Kangnam St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    We wanted to measure the vascular pedicle width (VPW) in normal Korean adults and correlate the VPW with the body physique and we also wanted to establish the index for normal VPWs, which could be utilized in reading chest PAs. We VPW was measured on the posteroanterior (PA) chest radiographs of 262 normal Korean adults (134 men and 128 women, age range: 22-88 years, mean age: 45.2 years), who visited the hospital for a general health examination. The relationship between the VPW and the height and the Body Mass Index (BMI) was evaluated. Correlations between height and the thoracic spine length (TSL) and between the BMI and the lateral chest wall thickness (CWT) were analyzed as well. The mean VPW was 47.4 ({+-} 6.4) mm. The VPW was positively correlated with the height ({rho} < 0.01) and the BMI ({rho} < 0.01) of the subject. The patient's height was well correlated with the TSL, and the BMI was correlated with the CWT (r = 0.75, r = 0.76). The table for the normal VPWs according to patient's TSL and CWT was established. By measuring the TSL and the CWT on chest PA, which reflect the height and BMI, respectively, and by utilizing the provided table for the normal VPW, we can determine the normality of a patient's VPW.

  18. Urgent resection of bleeding congenital mesenchymal chest wall hamartoma in an infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bieda, Jan-Christoph

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We report a case with prenatally diagnosed large cystic-solid mesenchymal chest wall hamartoma. An attempt of conservative management was made however repeated intralesional hemorrhage led to enlargement and severe anemia which required urgent resection at the age of 8 weeks. The infant had an unimpaired development over a follow-up of 4 years.

  19. Short TI inversion-recovery MR imaging of chest wall malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Short-T1 inversion-recovery (STIR) sequences have greater constant, less motion sensitivity, and require shorter imaging times than conventional T2-weighted spin-echo (SE) sequences and are therefore particularly useful for staging chest wall malignancies. MR studies of 49 patients with possible chest wall malignancies were reviewed. Images were produced at 0.15 T with a variety of SE sequences. Forty-five also had STIR (repetition time, 1,400 - 2,100; echo time, 36 or 40; inversion time, 100 or 125). MR studies indicated chest wall involvement in 39 of 49 patients; 12 had obvious rib encasement, the most definitive finding. IN 13, lesions detected on STIR were either not visible or seen only in retrospect on T1 SE images. In five of five, STIR was clearly superior to T2 SE for delineation of tumor margins. The authors have discontinued using T2 SE sequences for chest neoplasms in favor of the higher contrast and sensitivity of STIR

  20. Acute chest syndrome of sickle cell disease: radiographic and clinical analysis of 70 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, L. [Department of Radiology, Children`s Hospital, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Buonomo, C. [Department of Radiology, Children`s Hospital, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Background. Acute chest syndrome (ACS) is a pulmonary illness with fever, chest pain, leukocytosis and new pulmonary opacity in a patient with sickle cell disease. It is a common reason for hospitalization in sickle cell patients, and a significant cause of mortality. The etiology of ACS is unclear. Lung or bone infarction and infection, among other possible causes, have been proposed. Objective. We reviewed the chest radiographs and medical records of 41 patients with 70 episodes of ACS and correlated the clinical and radiographic courses in an attempt to better characterize and understand the syndrome. Results. In 87 % of episodes, no identifiable etiology of ACS was found. This group of patients had a median age of 14 years and showed dramatic clinical and radiographic improvement within 24 h of therapy. In the remainder of episodes (13 %), an identifiable etiology was found, usually bacterial pneumonia. These patients were younger than the group without an identifiable etiology (median age 2 years) and had a prolonged radiographic course of illness. Conclusion. The chest radiographs of children with ACS without an identifiable etiology have an extremely typical appearance and evolution. Only in cases which do not have this typical pattern should infection be suspected as the underlying cause. (orig.). With 3 figs.

  1. Morganella morganii causing abscess over the anterior chest wall- a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D, Vijaya; Jv, Sathish; Mk, Yashaswini; S, Sulaiman

    2014-09-01

    A 17-year-old female college student presented with recurrent abscess over the anterior chest wall since one and half year. Morganella morganii was isolated from the aspirated pus. Patient was started on oral ciprofloxacin and the lesion resolved in two weeks.

  2. Diaphragm motion characterization using chest motion data for biomechanics-based lung tumor tracking during EBRT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karami, Elham; Gaede, Stewart; Lee, Ting-Yim; Samani, Abbas

    2016-03-01

    Despite recent advances in image-guided interventions, lung cancer External Beam Radiation Therapy (EBRT) is still very challenging due to respiration induced tumor motion. Among various proposed methods of tumor motion compensation, real-time tumor tracking is known to be one of the most effective solutions as it allows for maximum normal tissue sparing, less overall radiation exposure and a shorter treatment session. As such, we propose a biomechanics-based real-time tumor tracking method for effective lung cancer radiotherapy. In the proposed algorithm, the required boundary conditions for the lung Finite Element model, including diaphragm motion, are obtained using the chest surface motion as a surrogate signal. The primary objective of this paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of developing a function which is capable of inputting the chest surface motion data and outputting the diaphragm motion in real-time. For this purpose, after quantifying the diaphragm motion with a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) model, correlation coefficient between the model parameters of diaphragm motion and chest motion data was obtained through Partial Least Squares Regression (PLSR). Preliminary results obtained in this study indicate that the PCA coefficients representing the diaphragm motion can be obtained through chest surface motion tracking with high accuracy.

  3. Ultrasonido de tórax en ninos Ultrasound of the pediatric's chest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Fuentealba T

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available El Ultrasonido es un examen complementario en el estudio por imágenes del tórax. En los últimos tiempos se ha ampliado su utilización especialmente en el estudio del tórax pediátrico ya que es una alternativa de imagen que no usa radiación y por otra parte, es considerado por algunos autores como el examen de primera línea en la evaluación de algunas patologías específicas como: aumento de volumen superficial de la pared torácica, movimiento diafragmático, timo y derrame pleural. El objetivo de este artículo es revisar las principales indicaciones en el estudio del tórax pediátrico por ultrasonido en patología no cardiológica.Ultrasound is an alternative technique for the examination of the chest. Recently chest ultrasound has expanded its use mainly on the study of pediatric patients, since it does not use radiation and it is considered by some authors as the first line test in the evaluation of some specific conditions like: superficial lumps and bumps of the chest wall, diaphragm motility, thymus characterization and pleural effusions. The purpose of this paper is to review the main indications for pediatric chest ultrasound in non-cardiac diseases.

  4. Comparison of Computed Tomography and Chest Radiography in the Detection of Rib Fractures in Abused Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootton-Gorges, Sandra L.; Stein-Wexler, Rebecca; Walton, John W.; Rosas, Angela J.; Coulter, Kevin P.; Rogers, Kristen K.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Chest radiographs (CXR) are the standard method for evaluating rib fractures in abused infants. Computed tomography (CT) is a sensitive method to detect rib fractures. The purpose of this study was to compare CT and CXR in the evaluation of rib fractures in abused infants. Methods: This retrospective study included all 12 abused infants…

  5. Attenuation and image quality in the use of protective bismuth in chest CT scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For chest CT scans are protective of bismuth (Bi) with the aim of reducing the dose in the breast. The aim of this study was to evaluate the attenuation with thermoluminescent dosimeters in the glandular dose average when using these protective breast CT scans and to evaluate the image quality with and without protective Bismuth.

  6. Dynamic preload indicators fail to predict fluid responsiveness in open-chest conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Waal, Eric E. C.; Rex, Steffen; Kruitwagen, Cas L. J. J.; Kalkman, Cor J.; Buhre, Wolfgang F.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Dynamic preload indicators like pulse pressure variation (PPV) and stroke volume variation (SVV) are increasingly being used for optimizing cardiac preload since they have been demonstrated to predict fluid responsiveness in a variety of perioperative settings. However, in open-chest cond

  7. Estimated risk of radiation-induced cancer from paediatric chest CT: two-year cohort study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niemann, Tilo [Cantonal Hospital Baden, Department of Radiology, Baden (Switzerland); University Lille Nord de France, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette, Lille (France); Colas, Lucie; Santangelo, Teresa; Faivre, Jean Baptiste; Remy, Jacques; Remy-Jardin, Martine [University Lille Nord de France, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette, Lille (France); Roser, Hans W.; Bremerich, Jens [University of Basel Hospital, Clinic of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Medical Physics, Basel (Switzerland)

    2015-03-01

    The increasing absolute number of paediatric CT scans raises concern about the safety and efficacy and the effects of consecutive diagnostic ionising radiation. To demonstrate a method to evaluate the lifetime attributable risk of cancer incidence/mortality due to a single low-dose helical chest CT in a two-year patient cohort. A two-year cohort of 522 paediatric helical chest CT scans acquired using a dedicated low-dose protocol were analysed retrospectively. Patient-specific estimations of radiation doses were modelled using three different mathematical phantoms. Per-organ attributable cancer risk was then estimated using epidemiological models. Additional comparison was provided for naturally occurring risks. Total lifetime attributable risk of cancer incidence remains low for all age and sex categories, being highest in female neonates (0.34%). Summation of all cancer sites analysed raised the relative lifetime attributable risk of organ cancer incidence up to 3.6% in female neonates and 2.1% in male neonates. Using dedicated scan protocols, total lifetime attributable risk of cancer incidence and mortality for chest CT is estimated low for paediatric chest CT, being highest for female neonates. (orig.)

  8. 75 FR 15448 - Notice of Issuance of Final Determination Concerning a Wood Chest

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-29

    ... presented, the wood chest, assembled in the U.S. from parts made in Malaysia and the U.S., is substantially... granting waivers of certain ``Buy American'' restrictions in U.S. law or practice for products offered for.... ULC's principal place of business is in Greenfield, Indiana. The company manufactures the wood...

  9. Association of Aortic Calcification on Plain Chest Radiography with Obstructive Coronary Artery Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was conducted to determine an association between aortic calcification viewed on plain chest radiography and obstructive coronary artery disease. Retrospective review of all chest radiography obtained from consecutive patients undergoing coronary angiography. Chest PA images were reviewed by technical radiologist and radiologist. Considering the presence of aortic arch calcification, images were compared with the results of coronary angiography. In addition, the size of aortic arch calcification were divided into two groups - the smaller and the larger than 10 mm. Among the total 846 patients, the number of the patients with obstructive coronary artery disease is total 417 (88.3%) in males and 312 (83.4%) in females. Considering the presence of aortic arch calcification, the positive predictive value of relation between aortic arch calcification and obstructive coronary artery disease was 91.4% and the relative risk of the group with aortic arch calcification to the opposite group was 1.10. According to the size of aortic arch calcification and obstructive coronary artery disease, the positive predictive value was 91.9% and the relative risk between two groups was 1.04. This study shows that aortic calcification was closely associated with obstructive coronary artery disease. If the aortic calcification is notified on plain chest radiography, we strongly recommend to consult with doctor.

  10. A comparative study of collimation in bedside chest radiography for preterm infants in two teaching hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Stollfuss

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: In our study, the only identifiable factor influencing the collimation of portable chest radiographs in preterm infants was the radiographer’s dedication and awareness. There were no apparent differences between the hospitals investigated. Exposure of non-thoracic structures was relatively frequent and mainly involved the proximal humeri.

  11. Development and evaluation of a novel taekwondo chest protector to improve mobility when performing axe kicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, J H; Ko, J Y; Choi, E Y; Her, J G; O'Sullivan, D M

    2013-03-01

    The axe kick, in Olympic style taekwondo, has been identified as the most popular scoring technique aimed to the head during full contact competition. The first purpose of this study was to identify and investigate design issues with the current World Taekwondo Federation approved chest protector. A secondary purpose was to develop a novel chest protector addressing the identified design issues and to conduct a biomechanical analysis. Fifteen male elite Taekwondo players were selected to perform three different styles of the axe kick, i.e., front, in-out, and out-in axe kick five times each for a total of 45 kicks. Two-way repeated measures ANOVA showed significant differences between the novel and existing chest protector conditions for vertical height of the toe, downward kicking foot speed, hip flexion angle and ipsilateral shoulder flexion extension range of motion (ROM) (p 0.05). These results indicate that the novel chest protector interferes less with both the lower and upper limbs during the performance of the axe kick and provides a more natural, free-moving alternative to the current equipment used.

  12. Women and Chest Pain: Recognizing the Different Faces of Angina in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safdar, Basmah; D'Onofrio, Gail

    2016-06-01

    Emergency departments (ED) in the United States see over eight million cases of chest pain annually. While a cardinal symptom of acute coronary syndrome (ACS), multiple emergent and non-emergent causes can attribute to chest pain. This case-based perspective describes the different sex-specific causes of angina seen in ED patients. Once coronary artery disease (CAD) is ruled out with standard protocols, microvascular dysfunction is perhaps the most prevalent but under-diagnosed cause of non-CAD related angina in ED patients. Additional causes include coronary artery spasm, coronary artery dissection, coronary artery endothelial dysfunction and myocardial bridging. Non-CAD related angina is associated with persistent chest pain causing poor function, quality of life, and recidivism. Clinicians should consider additional diagnostics to routinely screen for non-CAD related causes of angina in patients with recurrent chest pain. Future work is needed to better define the epidemiological, clinical, biological, and genetic correlates of microvascular dysfunction in these patients. PMID:27354848

  13. Improved detection of focal pneumonia by chest radiography with bone suppression imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate radiologists' ability to detect focal pneumonia by use of standard chest radiographs alone compared with standard plus bone-suppressed chest radiographs. Standard chest radiographs in 36 patients with 46 focal airspace opacities due to pneumonia (10 patients had bilateral opacities) and 20 patients without focal opacities were included in an observer study. A bone suppression image processing system was applied to the 56 radiographs to create corresponding bone suppression images. In the observer study, eight observers, including six attending radiologists and two radiology residents, indicated their confidence level regarding the presence of a focal opacity compatible with pneumonia for each lung, first by use of standard images, then with the addition of bone suppression images. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate the observers' performance. The mean value of the area under the ROC curve (AUC) for eight observers was significantly improved from 0.844 with use of standard images alone to 0.880 with standard plus bone suppression images (P < 0.001) based on 46 positive lungs and 66 negative lungs. Use of bone suppression images improved radiologists' performance for detection of focal pneumonia on chest radiographs. (orig.)

  14. An improved automatic computer aided tube detection and labeling system on chest radiographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishna, Bharath; Brown, Matthew; Goldin, Jonathan; Cagnon, Christopher; Enzmann, Dieter

    2012-03-01

    Tubes like Endotracheal (ET) tube used to maintain patient's airway and the Nasogastric (NG) tube used to feed the patient and drain contents of the stomach are very commonly used in Intensive Care Units (ICU). The placement of these tubes is critical for their proper functioning and improper tube placement can even be fatal. Bedside chest radiographs are considered the quickest and safest method to check the placement of these tubes. Tertiary ICU's typically generate over 250 chest radiographs per day to confirm tube placement. This paper develops a new fully automatic prototype computer-aided detection (CAD) system for tube detection on bedside chest radiographs. The core of the CAD system is the randomized algorithm which selects tubes based on their average repeatability from seed points. The CAD algorithm is designed as a 5 stage process: Preprocessing (removing borders, histogram equalization, anisotropic filtering), Anatomy Segmentation (to identify neck, esophagus, abdomen ROI's), Seed Generation, Region Growing and Tube Selection. The preliminary evaluation was carried out on 64 cases. The prototype CAD system was able to detect ET tubes with a True Positive Rate of 0.93 and False Positive Rate of 0.02/image and NG tubes with a True Positive Rate of 0.84 and False Positive Rate of 0.02/image respectively. The results from the prototype system show that it is feasible to automatically detect both tubes on chest radiographs, with the potential to significantly speed the delivery of imaging services while maintaining high accuracy.

  15. Case report: Pulmonary syphilis mimicking pulmonary hematogenous metastases on chest CT and integrated PET/CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung Jun Kim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of syphilis with pulmonary involvement. Chest CT scan and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG PET/CT showed multiple pulmonary nodules mimicking pulmonary hematogenous metastases. This was confirmed on follow-up images that showed therapeutic response to penicillin.

  16. Willingness to Perform Chest Compression Only in Witnessed Cardiac Arrest Victims versus Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesreen Yaghmour

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Performing immediate bystander Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR is the most important factor that determines survival from cardiac arrest. Recommended mouth to mouth ventilation maneuver during CPR has led to lower rate of CPR performance in the population. Objectives: The present survey aimed to evaluate the willingness of nurses at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences for performing CPR versus chest-compression-only CPR. Patients and Methods: During a CPR course, we performed a survey on 25 nurses from Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Iran. This survey included age and gender of the participants. In the first question, they were asked about their willingness to perform CPR with mouth to mouth breathing for witnessed cardiac arrest victims. In the second question, they were asked about their willingness to perform chest compression only for cardiac arrest victims. Results: Among the participating nurses, 96% were female with a mean age of 31 years. Only 40% were willing to perform CPR that requires mouth to mouth ventilation. On the other hand, 92% were willing to perform chest compression only without mouth to mouth ventilation. The mean age of the nurses who would do CPR was lower compared to those who would not. Conclusions: In this survey, we demonstrated that eliminating mouth to mouth ventilation maneuver could lead to markedly higher willingness to perform CPR for witnessed cardiac arrest victims in CPR trained nursing personnel. Our study is in agreement with other studies advocating that chest-compression-only CPR could lead to higher bystander resuscitation efforts.

  17. Unusual chest wall pain caused by thoracic disc herniation in a professional baseball pitcher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Kinshi; Yabuki, Shoji; Otani, Koji; Nikaido, Takuya; Otoshi, Ken-Ichi; Watanabe, Kazuyuki; Kikuchi, Shin-Ichi; Konno, Shin-Ichi

    2016-06-01

    Symptomatic thoracic disc herniation is clinically rare. There are few cases of disc herniation of the thoracic spine in top athletes described in the literature. We herein present a rare case of chest wall pain due to thoracic disc herniation in a professional baseball pitcher. A 30-year-old, left-handed pitcher complained of left-sided chest wall pain in the region of his lower ribs during a game. Neurological examination revealed hypoesthesia of the left side of the chest at the level of the lower thoracic spine. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the thoracic spine showed a left-sided paramedian disc herniation at the T9-T10 level. The player was initially prescribed rest, administration of pregabalin (150 mg twice a day), and subsequent physical rehabilitation. He was able to resume full training and pitching without medication 6 months after the onset. A follow-up MRI of the thoracic spine showed a reduction in the size of the herniated disc compared to the initial findings. Though relatively rare, thoracic disc herniation should be considered in cases of chest wall pain in athletes. PMID:26983590

  18. Traumatic asphyxia due to blunt chest trauma: a case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sertaridou Eleni

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Crush asphyxia is different from positional asphyxia, as respiratory compromise in the latter is caused by splinting of the chest and/or diaphragm, thus preventing normal chest expansion. There are only a few cases or small case series of crush asphyxia in the literature, reporting usually poor outcomes. Case presentation We present the case of a 44-year-old Caucasian man who developed traumatic asphyxia with severe thoracic injury and mild brain edema after being crushed under heavy auto vehicle mechanical parts. He remained unconscious for an unknown time. The treatment included oropharyngeal intubation and mechanical ventilation, bilateral chest tube thoracostomies, treatment of brain edema and other supportive measures. Our patient’s outcome was good. Traumatic asphyxia is generally under-reported and most authors apply supportive measures, while the final outcome seems to be dependent on the length of time of the chest compression and on the associated injuries. Conclusion Treatment for traumatic asphyxia is mainly supportive with special attention to the re-establishment of adequate oxygenation and perfusion; treatment of the concomitant injuries might also affect the final outcome.

  19. Most frequent causes, complications and differential diagnosis of neonatal respiratory distress in chest X-ray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponhold, W. (Vienna Univ. (Austria). Kinderklinik)

    1982-01-01

    The radiologic changes of the chest X-ray of 270 newborns with respiratory distress were analyzed. In cases of Hyaline Membranes the chest X-Ray showed finely granular evenly disseminated structures combined with signs of hypoventilation. Localized, patchy, streaky, homogenous and reticulonodular shadows were found in cases of pneumonia and hemorrhage. Hyperinflation were an additional sign for an inflammatory disease. This symptom was also demonstrated in pulmonary bleeding, but was less common. The bilateral interstitial augmentation of the pulmonary structure in combination with cardiomegaly was mainly a symptom for cardial insufficiency and transient tachypnea. The differentiation between fine granular and reticulo-nodular structures should create no problem if the chest X-ray is of good quality. Extrapulmonary air collections were found in a high percentage in the course of artificial ventilation as a consequence of the 'baro-trauma'. The radiologic diagnosis of BPD was no problem. The value of the chest X-ray lies in the demonstration of a pulmonary cause for the respiratory distress, in the demonstration of complications and in the radiological observation of the disease.

  20. Case report: Pulmonary syphilis mimicking pulmonary hematogenous metastases on chest CT and integrated PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a case of syphilis with pulmonary involvement. Chest CT scan and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT showed multiple pulmonary nodules mimicking pulmonary hematogenous metastases. This was confirmed on follow-up images that showed therapeutic response to penicillin

  1. Viewing Another Person's Eye Movements Improves Identification of Pulmonary Nodules in Chest X-Ray Inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litchfield, Damien; Ball, Linden J.; Donovan, Tim; Manning, David J.; Crawford, Trevor

    2010-01-01

    Double reading of chest x-rays is often used to ensure that fewer abnormalities are missed, but very little is known about how the search behavior of others affects observer performance. A series of experiments investigated whether radiographers benefit from knowing where another person looked for pulmonary nodules, and whether the expertise of…

  2. Chest HRCT findings in acute transformation of adult T-cell lymphoma/leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Fumito; Sato, Haruka; Omeri, Ahmad Khalid; Ono, Asami; Tokuyama, Kouhei; Ando, Yumiko; Matsumoto, Akira; Mori, Hiromu [Oita University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Yufu, Oita (Japan); Ogata, Masao; Kohno, Kazuhiro; Takano, Kuniko [Oita University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Oncology and Hematology, Yufu, Oita (Japan)

    2015-06-01

    To assess chest high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) findings in patients with acute transformation of adult T cell leukaemia/lymphoma (ATLL). We retrospectively identified 72 consecutive patients at our institution with ATLL between October 2000 and March 2014. The cases included acute type (n = 20), lymphoma type (n = 21), smouldering type (n = 24) and chronic type (n = 7). Sixteen (7 men, 9 women; aged 36-85 years, mean 63.3 years) of 31 patients (24 with smouldering and seven with chronic type; 51.6 %) developed acute transformation of ATLL, and had undergone chest HRCT examinations. Parenchymal abnormalities, enlarged lymph nodes, pericardial effusion, pleural effusion and skin lesions were evaluated on HRCT. Chest HRCT of 15 of the 16 patients showed abnormal findings, including ground-glass opacity (GGO) (n = 8), consolidation (n = 5), interlobular septal thickening (n = 5) and nodules (n = 5). Pleural effusion was found in five patients, lymph node enlargement in 10 patients and multiple skin thickening in two patients. Almost all patients with acute transformation of ATLL had abnormal findings on chest HRCT, which consisted mainly of lymph node enlargement, GGO, interlobular septal thickening, nodules and bilateral pleural effusions. (orig.)

  3. Bone suppressed images improve radiologists’ detection performance for pulmonary nodules in chest radiographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schalekamp, Steven, E-mail: steven.schalekamp@gmail.com [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Geert Grooteplein 10, 6525 GA Nijmegen (Netherlands); Ginneken, Bram van, E-mail: b.vanginneken@rad.umcn.nl [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Geert Grooteplein 10, 6525 GA Nijmegen (Netherlands); Meiss, Louis, E-mail: L.Meiss@meandermc.nl [Meander Medical Centre, Utrechtseweg 160, 3800 BM Amersfoort (Netherlands); Peters-Bax, Liesbeth, E-mail: l.petersbax@rad.umcn.nl [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Geert Grooteplein 10, 6525 GA Nijmegen (Netherlands); Quekel, Lorentz G.B.A., E-mail: Lgba.quekel@meandermc.nl [Meander Medical Centre, Utrechtseweg 160, 3800 BM Amersfoort (Netherlands); Snoeren, Miranda M., E-mail: m.snoeren@rad.umcn.nl [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Geert Grooteplein 10, 6525 GA Nijmegen (Netherlands); Tiehuis, Audrey M., E-mail: am.tiehuis@meandermc.nl [Meander Medical Centre, Utrechtseweg 160, 3800 BM Amersfoort (Netherlands); Wittenberg, Rianne, E-mail: rianne_wittenberg@hotmail.com [Meander Medical Centre, Utrechtseweg 160, 3800 BM Amersfoort (Netherlands); Karssemeijer, Nico, E-mail: n.karssemeijer@rad.umcn.nl [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Geert Grooteplein 10, 6525 GA Nijmegen (Netherlands); Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia M., E-mail: cornelia.schaeferprokop@gmail.com [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Geert Grooteplein 10, 6525 GA Nijmegen (Netherlands); Meander Medical Centre, Utrechtseweg 160, 3800 BM Amersfoort (Netherlands)

    2013-12-01

    Objectives: To assess the effect of bone suppression imaging on observer performance in detecting lung nodules in chest radiographs. Materials and methods: Posteroanterior (PA) and lateral digital chest radiographs of 111 (average age 65) patients with a CT proven solitary nodule (median diameter 15 mm), and 189 (average age 63) controls were read by 5 radiologists and 3 residents. Conspicuity of nodules on the radiographs was classified in obvious (n = 32), moderate (n = 32), subtle (n = 29) and very subtle (n = 18). Observers read the PA and lateral chest radiographs without and with an additional PA bone suppressed image (BSI) (ClearRead Bone Suppression 2.4, Riverain Technologies, Ohio) within one reading session. Multi reader multi case (MRMC) receiver operating characteristics (ROC) were used for statistical analysis. Results: ROC analysis showed improved detection with use of BSI compared to chest radiographs alone (AUC = 0.883 versus 0.855; p = 0.004). Performance also increased at high specificities exceeding 80% (pAUC = 0.136 versus 0.124; p = 0.0007). Operating at a specificity of 90%, sensitivity increased with BSI from 66% to 71% (p = 0.0004). Increase of detection performance was highest for nodules with moderate and subtle conspicuity (p = 0.02; p = 0.03). Conclusion: Bone suppressed images improve radiologists’ detection performance for pulmonary nodules, especially for those of moderate and subtle conspicuity.

  4. Fully automatic lung segmentation and rib suppression methods to improve nodule detection in chest radiographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleymanpour, Elaheh; Pourreza, Hamid Reza; Ansaripour, Emad; Yazdi, Mehri Sadooghi

    2011-07-01

    Computer-aided Diagnosis (CAD) systems can assist radiologists in several diagnostic tasks. Lung segmentation is one of the mandatory steps for initial detection of lung cancer in Posterior-Anterior chest radiographs. On the other hand, many CAD schemes in projection chest radiography may benefit from the suppression of the bony structures that overlay the lung fields, e.g. ribs. The original images are enhanced by an adaptive contrast equalization and non-linear filtering. Then an initial estimation of lung area is obtained based on morphological operations and then it is improved by growing this region to find the accurate final contour, then for rib suppression, we use oriented spatial Gabor filter. The proposed method was tested on a publicly available database of 247 chest radiographs. Results show that this method outperformed greatly with accuracy of 96.25% for lung segmentation, also we will show improving the conspicuity of lung nodules by rib suppression with local nodule contrast measures. Because there is no additional radiation exposure or specialized equipment required, it could also be applied to bedside portable chest x-rays. In addition to simplicity of these fully automatic methods, lung segmentation and rib suppression algorithms are performed accurately with low computation time and robustness to noise because of the suitable enhancement procedure.

  5. What did we learn from two decades of chest computed tomography in cystic fibrosis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite our current treatment, many cystic fibrosis (CF) patients still show progressive bronchiectasis and small airways disease. Adequate detection and monitoring of progression of these structural abnormalities is needed to personalize treatment to the severity of CF lung disease of the patient. Chest computed tomography (CT) is the gold standard to diagnose and monitor bronchiectasis. Many studies have been done to validate the role of chest CT in CF and to improve the protocols. From these studies it became clear that for correct interpretation of the severity of bronchiectasis and small airways disease standardization of lung volume for the inspiratory and expiratory CT scan acquisition is needed. The risk related to the radiation exposure of a chest CT scan every second year is considered low. Automated and quantitative image analysis systems are developed to improve the reliability and sensitivity of assessments of structural lung changes in CF, particularly in early life. In this paper an overview is given of the lessons learned from two decades of monitoring CF lung disease using chest CT. (orig.)

  6. A prospective validation of the HEART score for chest pain patients at the emergency department

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Backus, B. E.; Six, A. J.; Kelder, J. C.; Bosschaert, M. A. R.; Mast, E. G.; Mosterd, A.; Veldkamp, R. F.; Wardeh, A. J.; Tio, R.; Braam, R.; Monnink, S. H. J.; van Tooren, R.; Mast, T. P.; van den Akker, F.; Cramer, M. J. M.; Poldervaart, J. M.; Hoes, A. W.; Doevendans, P. A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The focus of the diagnostic process in chest pain patients at the emergency department is to identify both low and high risk patients for an acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The HEART score was designed to facilitate this process. This study is a prospective validation of the HEART score.

  7. [Isolated left ventricular--right atrial shunt after blunt chest trauma (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuzer, E; Beyer, J

    1978-12-01

    A case of left-ventricular-right-atrial septal defect secundary to blunt chest trauma is described. The etiology of this type of septal defect, e. g. congenital, following aortic and mitral valve replacement, endocarditis and trauma, is discussed. Early defect closure is recommended in the presence of significant shunt volume. PMID:751280

  8. Properties of novel composite meshes in chest wall reconstruction: A comparative animal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Zardo

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: We consider composite grafts a suitable alternative for chest wall reconstruction. They are characterized by good overall biointegration and limited perigraft-fibrosis, thus potentially facilitating redo-procedures, even though a hydrophilic coating per se does not appear to prevent intrathoracic adhesion formation.

  9. Soluble Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor for Risk Prediction in Patients Admitted with Acute Chest Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngbæk, Stig; Andersson, Charlotte; Marott, Jacob L;

    2013-01-01

    Plasma concentrations of soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) predict mortality in several clinical settings, but the long-term prognostic importance of suPAR in chest pain patients admitted on suspicion of non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTEACS) is uncertain....

  10. The low therapeutic efficacy of postoperative chest radiographs for surgical intensive care unit patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Kröner; E. van Iperen; J. Horn; J.M. Binnekade; P.E. Spronk; J. Stoker; M.J. Schultz

    2011-01-01

    Background. The clinical value of postoperative chest radiographs (CXRs) for surgical intensive care unit (ICU) patients is largely unknown. In the present study, we determined the diagnostic and therapeutic efficacy of postoperative CXRs for different surgical subgroups and related their efficacy t

  11. Computer-Aided Segmentation and Volumetry of Artificial Ground-Glass Nodules at Chest CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, E.T.; Jacobs, C.; Ginneken, B. van; Willemink, M.J.; Kuhnigk, J.-M.; Ooijen, PM van; Oudkerk, M.; Mali, W.P.Th.; Jong, P.A. de

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to investigate a new software program for semiautomatic measurement of the volume and mass of ground-glass nodules (GGNs) in a chest phantom and to investigate the influence of CT scanner, reconstruction filter, tube voltage, and tube current. MATERIALS AND M

  12. Automatic coronary calcium scoring in low-dose chest computed tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Isgum, I.; Prokop, M.; Niemeijer, M.; Viergever, M.; Ginneken, B. van

    2012-01-01

    The calcium burden as estimated from non-ECGsynchronized CT exams acquired in screening of heavy smokers has been shown to be a strong predictor of cardiovascular events. We present a method for automatic coronary calcium scoring with low-dose, non-contrast-enhanced, non-ECG-synchronized chest CT. F

  13. Prevalence of Radiologic Findings in Patients with Blunt Chest Trauma in Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Haghighi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objective: Chest trauma due to its vital organs can be very dangerous and lethal. Our country has the first grade of accidents in the word, so rapid diagnosis and treatment in patients with chest trauma is necessary. One cost benefit and available imaging modality in each Region of our country is X-ray."nCXR interpretation needs to knowledge about prevalence of abnormal Radiologic findings and their accuracy. Therefore, it is necessary to perform a study about the rate of CXR abnormal findings in patients with blunt chest trauma."nPatients and Methods: In this descriptive and prospective study, CXR of patients with blunt chest trauma that admitted in Alzahra and Kashani hospitals studied and percent of vital radiologic findings prevalence determined."nResults: The final results were as below:"n1- Rib FX (18.5% (143, 2- Hemothorax (13.6% (105, 3- Pneumothorax (11.8% (91, 4- Sub cutaneous emphysema (10.2% (79, 5- Lung laceration (8.1% (63, 6- Mediastinal winding (6.4% (50, 7- Clavicular and sternal FX (5.8% (44, 8- Pneumo mediastinum (4.1% (32, 9- spinal FX (3.5% (27, 10- Great vessels injury signs (1.4% (11."nConclusion: According to above results, accurate investigation of CXR, helps physician and radiologist to find any threatened finding, so determination of next step as clinical follow up or spiral CT, angiography or surgery; accordingly.

  14. High sensitivity of chest radiograph reading by clinical officers in a tuberculosis prevalence survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.H.V.t. Hoog; H.K. Meme; H. van Deutekom; A.M. Mithika; C. Olunga; F. Onyino; M.W. Borgdorff

    2011-01-01

    Chest radiographs (CXRs) are used in tuberculosis (TB) prevalence surveys to identify participants for bacteriological examination. Expert readers are rare in most African countries. In our survey, clinical of cers scored CXRs of 19 216 participants once. We assessed to what extent missed CXR abnorm

  15. Chest Wall Thickness Measurements and the Dosimetric Implications for Male Radiation Workers at the KAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using ultrasound techniques, the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute has measured chest wall thicknesses of a group of male workers at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. A site-specific biometric equation has been developed for these workers. Chest wall thickness is an important modifier on lung counting efficiency. These data have been put into the perspective of the ICRP recommended dose limits for occupationally exposed workers:100 mSv in a 5-year period with a maximum of 50 mSv in any one year. For measured chest wall thicknesses of 1.9 cm to 4.1 cm and a 30 min counting time, the achievable MDAs for natural uranium in the KAERI lung counter vary from 5.75 mg to 11.28 mg. These values are close to, or even exceed, the predicted amounts of natural uranium that will remain in the lung (absorption type M and S) after an intake equal to the Annual Limit on Intake corresponding to a committed dose of 20 mSv. This paper shows that the KAERI lung counter probably cannot detect an intake of Type S natural uranium in a worker with a chest wall thickness equal to the average value (2.7 cm) under routine counting conditions

  16. Robust and Reproducible Quantification of the Extent of Chest Radiographic Abnormalities (And It’s Free!)

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Requena-Méndez; Edelweiss Aldasoro; Jose Muñoz; Moore, David A. J.

    2015-01-01

    RATIONALE: Objective, reproducible quantification of the extent of abnormalities seen on a chest radiograph would improve the user-friendliness of a previously proposed severity scoring system for pulmonary tuberculosis and could be helpful in monitoring response to therapy, including in clinical trials. METHODS: In this study we report the development and evaluation of a simple t...

  17. Endobronchial Ultrasound-Guided Transbronchial Needle Aspiration of Undiagnosed Chest Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckardt, Jens; Olsen, Karen E; Licht, Peter B

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A number of patients with radiologically suspicious chest tumors remain undiagnosed despite bronchoscopy or CT-guided fine-needle aspiration (CT-FNA). Such patients are often referred for mediastinoscopy, which is an invasive surgical procedure that poses a small but significant risk...

  18. Severe chest pain in a pediatric ulcerative colitis patient after 5-aminosalicylic acid therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Severe reactions to mesalamine products are rarely seen in pediatric patients. We report a case of a 12-year-old boy who had a severe cardiac reaction to a mesalamine product Asacol. Past medical history is significant for ulcerative colitis (UC) diagnosed at 9 years of age. Colo- noscopy one week prior to admission revealed pancoli- tis. He was treated with Asacol 800 mg three times per day and prednisone 20 mg/d. He was subsequently ad- mitted to the hospital for an exacerbation of his UC and started on intravenous solumedrol. He had improvement of his abdominal pain and diarrhea. The patient com- plained of new onset of chest pain upon initiating Asacol therapy. Electrocardiogram (ECG) revealed non-specific ST-T wave changes with T-wave inversion in the lateral leads. Echocardiogram (ECHO) revealed low-normal to mildly depressed left ventricular systolic function. The left main coronary artery and left anterior descending artery were mildly prominent measuring 5 mm and 4.7 mm, respectively. His chest pain completely resolved within 24-36 h of discontinuing Asacol. A repeat echo- cardiogram performed two days later revealed normal left ventricular function with normal coronary arteries (< 3.5 mm). Onset of chest pain after Asacol and im- mediate improvement of chest pain, as well as improve- ment of echocardiogram and ECG findings after discon- tinuing Asacol suggests that our patient suffered from a rare drug-hypersensitivity reaction to Asacol.

  19. Examination of the chest computed tomography scan condition optimization in consideration of the influence of the position of the arms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed tomography automatic exposure control (CT-AEC) technique is calculated from a localizer radiograph. When we perform neck and chest CT examination, at first, we acquire localizer radiograph and neck images by placing the arm in a lowered position. Next, the arm is raised for the chest scan. Therefore, the localizer radiograph and subject information are different in the chest scan. In this situation, the chest scan with the use of the CT-AEC causes radiation over-dose. The purpose of this study is to optimize the CT-AEC by controlling noise index (NI), and make a chest CT scan condition considering the position of the arms. We measured the image noise (SD) in the phantom by using CT-AEC. In addition, dose length product (DLP) was recorded. Moreover, we examined the correlation with the clinical images. The results of our experiments show that radiation dose can be reduced with the image quality kept by controlling NI. (author)

  20. Chest x-ray quality in the diagnosis of pneumonia in children: From prescription to optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acute lower respiratory tract infection (ALRI), primarily pneumonia, is the leading cause of childhood death in developing countries. The increasing incidence of antimicrobial resistance and the high cost of vaccines lead to considering the first strategy to reduce pneumonia deaths the early detection of the disease. Case management begins with the clinical examination and may continue with the prescription of a chest x-ray. Consequently, the radiograph should meet quality standards, and radiologists and paediatricians must know how to interpret the images. Special attention should be paid on patient dose due to children radiosensitivity, high frequency and chest x rays rejection rate. This paper is a retrospective study of chest radiographs performed in 5731 children with clinical diagnosis of ALRI assisted in three Uruguayan hospitals during the three year investigation supported by the Division of Vaccines and Immunization of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) that had the aim of estimating the burden of pneumonia (from 2001 to 2004). It is analyzed the prescription of radiographs during the diagnosis and in later controls (2220 children assisted in two of the three hospitals). Patient doses are estimated from technical parameters and equipment specifications. The investigation also analyzes patient doses that could have been avoided if paediatricians had managed the disease according to the established protocols. Results show that 82.4 % of chest x-rays diagnosed pneumonia and that some children underwent up to ten radiographs. Significant differences were found in patient dose in the three hospitals, concluding that education on image quality on chest radiographs of radiologists, paediatricians and radiological technologists is the first and best tool for the earlier diagnosis of pneumonia in children and for the application of Radiation Protection (RP) principles in medical exposures. (author)