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Sample records for chest

  1. Chest MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclear magnetic resonance - chest; Magnetic resonance imaging - chest; NMR - chest; MRI of the thorax; Thoracic MRI ... healthy enough to filter the contrast. During the MRI, the person who operates the machine will watch ...

  2. [Chest trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freixinet Gilart, Jorge; Ramírez Gil, María Elena; Gallardo Valera, Gregorio; Moreno Casado, Paula

    2011-01-01

    Chest trauma is a frequent problem arising from lesions caused by domestic and occupational activities and especially road traffic accidents. These injuries can be analyzed from distinct points of view, ranging from consideration of the most severe injuries, especially in the context of multiple trauma, to the specific characteristics of blunt and open trauma. In the present article, these injuries are discussed according to the involvement of the various thoracic structures. Rib fractures are the most frequent chest injuries and their diagnosis and treatment is straightforward, although these injuries can be severe if more than three ribs are affected and when there is major associated morbidity. Lung contusion is the most common visceral lesion. These injuries are usually found in severe chest trauma and are often associated with other thoracic and intrathoracic lesions. Treatment is based on general support measures. Pleural complications, such as hemothorax and pneumothorax, are also frequent. Their diagnosis is also straightforward and treatment is based on pleural drainage. This article also analyzes other complex situations, notably airway trauma, which is usually very severe in blunt chest trauma and less severe and even suitable for conservative treatment in iatrogenic injury due to tracheal intubation. Rupture of the diaphragm usually causes a diaphragmatic hernia. Treatment is always surgical. Myocardial contusions should be suspected in anterior chest trauma and in sternal fractures. Treatment is conservative. Other chest injuries, such as those of the great thoracic and esophageal vessels, are less frequent but are especially severe.

  3. Chest Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samad Shams-Vahdati

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acute chest pain is an important and frequently occurring symptom in patients. Chest pain is often a sign of ischemic heart disease. Associated findings of electrocardiograph (ECG are rather heterogeneous, and traditional cardiac biomarkers such as Creatine Kinase-MB (CK-MB suffer from low cardiac specificity and sensitivity. In this study cost effectiveness of cardiac biomarkers single quantitative measurement was examined.Methods: The present descriptive-analytic study conducted on patients who were asked for troponin I and CK-MB. All patients who referred to Emergency unit of Tabriz Imam Reza educational-medical center during January 2012 to July the 2013 were included in study. All patients included in the study were documented in terms of age, sex, working shift of referring, main complaint of patient, symptoms in referring, ECG findings, and results of troponin I and CK-MB tests.Results: In this study, 2900 patients were studied including 1440 (49.7% males and 1460 (50.3% females. Mean age of patients was 62.91 (SD=14.36. Of all patients 1880 (64.8% of patients referred during 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. and 1020 (35.2% patients were referred during 8 p.m. to 8 a.m. The sensitivity of cardiac biomarkers’ test in diagnosing Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS disease was calculated as 44.8% and its specificity was 86.6%. For diagnosing Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI, sensitivity of cardiac biomarkers’ test was 72.2% and its specificity was 86%. None of patients who were finally underwent unstable angina diagnosis showed increase in cardiac enzymes.Conclusion: In conclusion, cardiac biomarkers can be used for screening acute chest pains, also cost effectiveness of cardiac biomarkers, appropriate specificity and sensitivity can guarantee their usefulness in emergency room.

  4. Chest radiation - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation - chest - discharge; Cancer - chest radiation; Lymphoma - chest radiation ... When you have radiation treatment for cancer, your body goes through changes. About 2 weeks after your first treatment: It may be hard ...

  5. Chest X Ray?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Chest X Ray A chest x ray is a fast and painless imaging test ... tissue scarring, called fibrosis. Doctors may use chest x rays to see how well certain treatments are ...

  6. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI of the Chest? What is MRI of the Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the chest is performed ...

  7. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Chest Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the chest ... limitations of MRI of the Chest? What is MRI of the Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  8. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... breath, persistent cough, fever, chest pain or injury. It may also be useful to help diagnose and ... have some concerns about chest x-rays. However, it’s important to consider the likelihood of benefit to ...

  9. Management of flail chest.

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, H A; Taylor, G.A.; Harrison, A. W.; Maggisano, R.; Hanna, S.; de Lacy, J. L.; Shulman, H.

    1983-01-01

    This paper compares the management of two groups of patients with flail chest. The 25 patients in group 1 had a flail chest without other significant injuries or shock, whereas the 57 in group 2 had a flail chest with multiple injuries, shock or both. The group 1 patients were treated with repeated multiple intercostal nerve blocks or high segmental epidural analgesia, oxygen, intensive chest physiotherapy, fluid restriction, furosemide diuretics, methylprednisolone sodium succinate and collo...

  10. American College of Chest Physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Master Fellows Staff & Contact Us CHEST Newsroom Staff Job Opportunities at CHEST Contact Us Industry Support Industry Support ... of Global Governors Master Fellows CHEST Newsroom Staff Job Opportunities at CHEST Contact Us Industry Support Industry Advisory ...

  11. Chest computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loeve, Martine; Krestin, Gabriel P.; Rosenfeld, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Clinical trials for the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease are important to test and optimize new therapeutic interventions. To evaluate the effect of these interventions, sensitive and accurate outcome measures are needed. The most commonly used endpoints are spirometric variables...... are not suitable to study CF lung disease in young children. Chest computed tomography (CT) holds great promise for use as a sensitive surrogate endpoint in CF. A large body of evidence has been produced to validate the use of chest CT as primary endpoint to study CF lung disease. However, before chest CT can...

  12. Digital chest radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debess, Jeanne Elisabeth; Johnsen, Karen Kirstine; Thomsen, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    on collimation and dose reduction in digital chest radiography Methods and Materials A retrospective study of digital chest radiography is performed to evaluate the primary x-ray tube collimation of the PA and lateral radiographs. Data from one hundred fifty self-reliant female patients between 15 and 55 years...... collimations depending on side of radiograph. Results from dose reduction will be presented on the congress Conclusion: Correct positioning and collimation of digital chest radiographs can reduce the radiation dose significant to the patients and by that improve the quality of basic radiography....

  13. Chest tube insertion - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... presentations/100008.htm Chest tube insertion - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features ... pleural space is the space between the inner and outer lining of the lung. It is normally very thin, and lined only ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the chest uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... medical conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... primarily used to assess abnormal masses such as cancer and determine the size, extent and degree of ... chest is performed to: assess abnormal masses, including cancer of the lungs or other tissues, which either ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... detailed pictures of the structures within the chest. It is primarily used to assess abnormal masses such ... and determine the size, extent and degree of its spread to adjacent structures. It’s also used to ...

  17. Neonatal Chest Wall Rhabdomyosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Michael; Steiner, Zvi; Groisman, Gabriel; Nadir, Erez

    2015-06-01

    An infant was born at term with a huge chest mass diagnosed as rhabdomyosarcoma. Treatment consisted of surgical resection and chemotherapy. We describe this very rare congenital mass and the problematic therapeutic management of such a tumor in a newborn.

  18. Neonatal Chest Wall Rhabdomyosarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Feldman, Michael; Steiner, Zvi; Groisman, Gabriel; Nadir, Erez

    2015-01-01

    An infant was born at term with a huge chest mass diagnosed as rhabdomyosarcoma. Treatment consisted of surgical resection and chemotherapy. We describe this very rare congenital mass and the problematic therapeutic management of such a tumor in a newborn.

  19. CHEST PHYSIOTHERAPY FOR INFANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti S. Christian (M.P.T Cardiopulmonary Conditions

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In the normal lung, secretions are removed by Mucociliary activity, normal breathing cycles, and cough. In disease, increased secretion viscosity and volume, dyskinesia of the cilia, and ineffective cough combine to reduce the ability to clear secretions, and may increase exacerbations and infections. Many chest physiotherapy techniques like postural drainage, percussion and vibration are used since many years. These techniques are derived from adult studies but these techniques are quite stressful for the infants as the infant respiratory system is different from the adult respiratory system. Advance chest physiotherapy techniques were developed specifically for infants; in accordance with their physiological characteristics. So this review is to introduce some new chest physiotherapy helpful for newborn infants.

  20. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... vertebrae, ribs and sternum) and chest wall soft tissue (muscles and fat). assess for pericardial (thin sac around the heart) disease. characterize mediastinal or pleural lesions seen by other ... chemical changes in the tissues. As the hydrogen atoms return to their usual ...

  1. Sandstorm in the chest?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talluri MR

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A 32 year old female presented with dry cough and progressive breathlessness of one year duration. There was no history suggestive of collagen vascular disease, lung parenchymal infection or allergic airway disease. Clinical evaluation showed basal fine inspiratory crepitations. Radiographic examination of the chest revealed a black pleura line and lung parenchymal calcification. CT scan of the chest demonstrated nodular calcification of lung parenchyma with a “crazy pavement” pattern, which is suggestive of alveolar calcification. Pulmonary function test showed a severe restrictive defect. On transbronchial lung biopsy calcific spherules suggestive of the alveolar microlithiasis were seen. Diagnosis of pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis was made and symptomatic treatment was given, as there is no specific therapy available. The case illustrates an unusual cause of shortness of breath in a young female with striking radiographic features.

  2. Digital chest radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debess, Jeanne Elisabeth; Vejle-Sørensen, Jens Kristian; Thomsen, Henrik;

    2015-01-01

    of clinical supervisors. Optimal collimation is determined by European and Regional Danish guidelines. The areal between current and optimal collimation is calculated. The experimental research is performed in September - October 2014 Siemens Axiom Aristos digital radiography system DR using 150 kV, 1,25 -3......Purpose: Quality improvement of basic radiography focusing on collimation and dose reduction in digital chest radiography Methods and Materials:A retrospective study of digital chest radiography is performed to evaluate the primary x-ray tube collimation of the PA and lateral radiographs. Data from...... one hundred fifty self-reliant female patients between 15 and 55 years of age are included in the study. The clinical research is performed between September and November 2014 where 3rd year Radiography students collect data on four Danish x-ray departments using identical procedures under guidance...

  3. CHEST PHYSIOTHERAPY FOR INFANTS

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    In the normal lung, secretions are removed by Mucociliary activity, normal breathing cycles, and cough. In disease, increased secretion viscosity and volume, dyskinesia of the cilia, and ineffective cough combine to reduce the ability to clear secretions, and may increase exacerbations and infections. Many chest physiotherapy techniques like postural drainage, percussion and vibration are used since many years. These techniques are derived from adult studies but these techniques are quite str...

  4. The neonatal chest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobo, Luisa [Servico de Imagiologia Geral do Hospital de Santa Maria, Av. Prof. Egas Moniz, 1649-035 Lisbon (Portugal)]. E-mail: mluisalobo@gmail.com

    2006-11-15

    Lung diseases represent one of the most life threatening conditions in the newborn. Important progresses in modern perinatal care has resulted in a significantly improved survival and decreased morbidity, in both term and preterm infants. Most of these improvements are directly related to the better management of neonatal lung conditions, and infants of very low gestational ages are now surviving. This article reviews the common spectrum of diseases of the neonatal lung, including medical and surgical conditions, with emphasis to the radiological contribution in the evaluation and management of these infants. Imaging evaluation of the neonatal chest, including the assessment of catheters, lines and tubes are presented.

  5. Radiology illustrated. Chest radiology

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    Lee, Kyung Soo [Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology; Han, Joungho [Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Pathology; Chung, Man Pyo [Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Medicine; Jeong, Yeon Joo [Pusan National Univ. Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology

    2014-04-01

    Pattern approach to the diagnosis of lung diseases based on CT scan appearances. Guide to quick and reliable differential diagnosis. CT-pathology correlation. Emphasis on state-of-the-art MDCT. The purpose of this atlas is to illustrate how to achieve reliable diagnoses when confronted by the different abnormalities, or ''disease patterns'', that may be visualized on CT scans of the chest. The task of pattern recognition has been greatly facilitated by the advent of multidetector CT (MDCT), and the focus of the book is very much on the role of state-of-the-art MDCT. A wide range of disease patterns and distributions are covered, with emphasis on the typical imaging characteristics of the various focal and diffuse lung diseases. In addition, clinical information relevant to differential diagnosis is provided and the underlying gross and microscopic pathology is depicted, permitting CT-pathology correlation. The entire information relevant to each disease pattern is also tabulated for ease of reference. This book will be an invaluable handy tool that will enable the reader to quickly and easily reach a diagnosis appropriate to the pattern of lung abnormality identified on CT scans.

  6. Chest radiographic findings of leptospirosis

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    Kim, Mee Hyun; Jung, Hee Tae; Lee, Young Joong; Yoon, Jong Sup [Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-04-15

    1. A study on chest radiographic findings of 54 cases with pneumonia like symptoms was performed. Of 54 cases, 8 cases were confirmed to be leptospirosis and 7 cases were leptospirosis combined with Korean hemorrhagic fever. 2. Of 8 cases of leptospirosis, 4 cases showed abnormal chest radiographic findings: acinar nodular type 2, massive confluent consolidation type 2. Of 7 cases of leptospirosis combined with Korean hemorrhagic fever: acinar nodular type 3, massive confluent consolidation type 1, and increased interstitial markings type 1 respectively. 3. It was considered to be difficult to diagnose the leptospirosis on chest radiographic findings alone, especially the case combined with Korean hemorrhagic fever.

  7. Interpretation of neonatal chest radiography

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    Yoon, Hye Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Kangwon National University Hospital, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Plain radiographs for infants in the neonatal intensive care unit are obtained using the portable X-ray equipment in order to evaluate the neonatal lungs and also to check the position of the tubes and catheters used for monitoring critically-ill neonates. Neonatal respiratory distress is caused by a variety of medical or surgical disease conditions. Clinical information about the gestational week, respiratory symptoms, and any events during delivery is essential for interpretation of the neonatal chest radiographs. Awareness of common chest abnormality in the prematurely born or term babies is also very important for chest evaluation in the newborn. Furthermore, knowledge about complications such as air leaks and bronchopulmonary dysplasia following treatment are required to accurately inform the clinicians. The purpose of this article was to briefly review radiographic findings of chest diseases in newborns that are relatively common in daily practice.

  8. CHEST WALL HAMARTOMA : Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Gülden DİNİZ; Ortaç, Ragıp; Aktaş, Safiye; TEMİR, Günyüz; HOŞGÖR, Münevver; Karaca, İrfan

    2005-01-01

    A case of four-month – old girl diagnosed as chest wall hamartoma is presented. This entity is an extremely rare but characteristic lesion of the ribs usually presenting in the neonate or infant with a mass or respiratory symptoms. Complete sponraneous regression of the lesion has been reported. Recently conservative management of asymptomatic childiren was recommended. Although rare, this condition ought to be kept in mind while dealing with infantile chest wall masses to avoid an errone...

  9. CHEST WALL HAMARTOMA : Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Gülden DİNİZ; Ortaç, Ragıp; Aktaş, Safiye; HOŞGÖR, Günyüz TEMİR2Münevver; Karaca, İrfan

    2005-01-01

    A case of four-month – old girl diagnosed as chest wall hamartoma is presented. This entity is an extremely rare but characteristic lesion of the ribs usually presenting in the neonate or infant with a mass or respiratory symptoms. Complete sponraneous regression of the lesion has been reported. Recently conservative management of asymptomatic childiren was recommended. Although rare, this condition ought to be kept in mind while dealing with infantile chest wall masses to avoid...

  10. Contemporary management of flail chest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vana, P Geoff; Neubauer, Daniel C; Luchette, Fred A

    2014-06-01

    Thoracic injury is currently the second leading cause of trauma-related death and rib fractures are the most common of these injuries. Flail chest, as defined by fracture of three or more ribs in two or more places, continues to be a clinically challenging problem. The underlying pulmonary contusion with subsequent inflammatory reaction and right-to-left shunting leading to hypoxia continues to result in high mortality for these patients. Surgical stabilization of the fractured ribs remains controversial. We review the history of management for flail chest alone and when combined with pulmonary contusion. Finally, we propose an algorithm for nonoperative and surgical management.

  11. Accuracy of chest radiography versus chest computed tomography in hemodynamically stable patients with blunt chest trauma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mojtaba Chardoli; Toktam Hasan-Ghaliaee; Hesam Akbari; Vafa Rahimi-Movaghar

    2013-01-01

    Objective:Thoracic injuries are responsible for 25% of deaths of blunt traumas.Chest X-ray (CXR) is the first diagnostic method in patients with blunt trauma.The aim of this study was to detect the accuracy of CXR versus chest computed tomograpgy (CT) in hemodynamically stable patients with blunt chest trauma.Methods:Study was conducted at the emergency department of S ina Hospital from March 2011 to March 2012.Hemodynamically stable patients with at least 16 years of age who had blunt chest trauma were included.All patients underwent the same diagnostic protocol which consisted of physical examination,CXR and CT scan respectively.Results:Two hundreds patients (84% male and 16% female) were included with a mean age of(37.9±13.7) years.Rib fracture was the most common finding of CXR (12.5%) and CT scan (25.5%).The sensitivity of CXR for hemothorax,thoracolumbar vertebra fractures and rib fractures were 20%,49% and 49%,respectively.Pneumothorax,foreign body,emphysema,pulmonary contusion,liver hematoma and sternum fracture were not diagnosed with CXR alone.Conclusion:Applying CT scan as the first-line diagnostic modality in hemodynamically stable patients with blunt chest trauma can detect pathologies which may change management and outcome.

  12. Accuracy of chest radiography versus chest computed tomography in hemodynamically stable patients with blunt chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chardoli Mojtaba

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】 Objective: Thoracic injuries are respon- sible for 25% of deaths of blunt traumas. Chest X-ray (CXR is the first diagnostic method in patients with blunt trauma. The aim of this study was to detect the accuracy of CXR versus chest computed tomograpgy (CT in hemodynami- cally stable patients with blunt chest trauma. Methods: Study was conducted at the emergency department of Sina Hospital from March 2011 to March 2012. Hemodynamically stable patients with at least 16 years of age who had blunt chest trauma were included. All patients underwent the same diagnostic protocol which consisted of physical examination, CXR and CT scan respectively. Results: Two hundreds patients (84% male and 16% female were included with a mean age of (37.9±13.7 years. Chin J Traumatol 2013;16(6:351-354 Rib fracture was the most common finding of CXR (12.5% and CT scan (25.5%. The sensitivity of CXR for hemothorax, thoracolumbar vertebra fractures and rib fractures were 20%, 49% and 49%, respectively. Pneumothorax, foreign body, emphysema, pulmonary contusion, liver hematoma and ster- num fracture were not diagnosed with CXR alone. Conclusion: Applying CT scan as the first-line diag- nostic modality in hemodynamically stable patients with blunt chest trauma can detect pathologies which may change management and outcome. Key words: Radiography; Thoracic injuries; Tomography, X-ray computed

  13. Actinomycosis - Left Post Chest Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kafil Akhtar, M. Naim, S. Shamshad Ahmad, Nazoora Khan, Uroos Abedi, A.H. Khan*

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A forty year old female of weak body built presented with recurring small hard lumps in let posteriorchest wall for 3 years and discharging ulcers for 3 months duration. Clinically, the provisional diagnosiswas malignancy with secondary infection. FNAC showed features suggestive of dysplasia buthistopathology confirmed the diagnosis as actinomycosis. The present case is reported due to rare incidenceof actinomycosis at post chest wall with muscle involvement.

  14. Chest wall, lung, and pleural space trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lisa A

    2006-03-01

    Chest radiographs frequently underestimate the severity and extent of chest trauma and, in some cases, fail to detect the presence of injury. CT is more sensitive than chest radiography in the detection of pulmonary, pleural, and osseous abnormalities in the patient who has chest trauma. With the advent of multidetector CT (MDCT), high-quality multiplanar reformations are obtained easily and add to the diagnostic capabilities of MDCT. This article reviews the radiographic and CT findings of chest wall, pleural, and pulmonary injuries that are seen in the patient who has experienced blunt thoracic trauma.

  15. CARDIOVASCULAR DISORDERS IN ADOLESCENTS WITH CHEST PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Endah Rahayuningsih

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To detect cardiovascular abnormalities in adolescents with chest pain. Methods: In this cross sectional study, the subjects were 25 adolescents with chest pain who came to the Cardiac Center of Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital, Bandung during the period of January 2008 to January 2011. The presence of established cardiovascular disorders were based on history, physical examination, electrocardiography and echocardiography Results: It was found that 13/25 adolescents with chest pain had cardiovascular abnormalities. Of the 25 teens that came with chest pain, most of which showed normal electrocardiographic results, only 9/25 of those with dysrhythmias experienced sinus tachycardia and 8 had a first degree AV block. Echocardiography examination showed only four patients with abnormal cardiac anatomy. No correlation between nutritional status and chest pain, and cardiovascular abnormalities and chest pain (p=0.206 and p=0.632, respectively. There was a positive correlation between sex and cardiovascular abnormalities in adolescents with chest pain (p=0.007. Chest pain is a prevalent problem that is usually benign and that it frequently signals underlying cardiac disease. Conclusions: Cardiovascular abnormalities in adolescents with symptoms of chest pain are found in some cases. There is no correlation between female and male adolescents with chest pain and cardiovascular abnormalities.

  16. Flail chest and pulmonary contusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, Renata; Calhoon, John H; Baisden, Clinton E

    2008-01-01

    Flail chest is most often accompanied by a significant underlying pulmonary parenchymal injury and can be a life-threatening thoracic injury. Its management is often complicated by the other injuries it is frequently associated with. Similarly, mortality and morbidity are dictated most often by the associated injuries and findings. Its treatment is complex and should first be one of pain management, judicious fluid resuscitation, and excellent pulmonary toilet. In those patients requiring mechanical ventilatory support, or who require ipsilateral thoracocotomy, rib stabilization may be considered depending on a host of potentially conflicting indications and contraindications. At the end of this section are listed the current major recommendations and their levels of evidence.

  17. Chest neoplasms with infectious etiologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, Carlos S; Chen, Melissa M; Martinez-Jimenez, Santiago; Carrillo, Jorge; Restrepo, Catalina

    2011-12-28

    A wide spectrum of thoracic tumors have known or suspected viral etiologies. Oncogenic viruses can be classified by the type of genomic material they contain. Neoplastic conditions found to have viral etiologies include post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease, lymphoid granulomatosis, Kaposi's sarcoma, Castleman's disease, recurrent respiratory papillomatosis, lung cancer, malignant mesothelioma, leukemia and lymphomas. Viruses involved in these conditions include Epstein-Barr virus, human herpes virus 8, human papillomavirus, Simian virus 40, human immunodeficiency virus, and Human T-lymphotropic virus. Imaging findings, epidemiology and mechanism of transmission for these diseases are reviewed in detail to gain a more thorough appreciation of disease pathophysiology for the chest radiologist.

  18. Technique for chest compressions in adult CPR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajab Taufiek K

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chest compressions have saved the lives of countless patients in cardiac arrest as they generate a small but critical amount of blood flow to the heart and brain. This is achieved by direct cardiac massage as well as a thoracic pump mechanism. In order to optimize blood flow excellent chest compression technique is critical. Thus, the quality of the delivered chest compressions is a pivotal determinant of successful resuscitation. If a patient is found unresponsive without a definite pulse or normal breathing then the responder should assume that this patient is in cardiac arrest, activate the emergency response system and immediately start chest compressions. Contra-indications to starting chest compressions include a valid Do Not Attempt Resuscitation Order. Optimal technique for adult chest compressions includes positioning the patient supine, and pushing hard and fast over the center of the chest with the outstretched arms perpendicular to the patient's chest. The rate should be at least 100 compressions per minute and any interruptions should be minimized to achieve a minimum of 60 actually delivered compressions per minute. Aggressive rotation of compressors prevents decline of chest compression quality due to fatigue. Chest compressions are terminated following return of spontaneous circulation. Unconscious patients with normal breathing are placed in the recovery position. If there is no return of spontaneous circulation, then the decision to terminate chest compressions is based on the clinical judgment that the patient's cardiac arrest is unresponsive to treatment. Finally, it is important that family and patients' loved ones who witness chest compressions be treated with consideration and sensitivity.

  19. Anterior chest wall examination reviewed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Trotta

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Anterior chest wall involvement is not infrequently observed within inflammatory arthropaties, particularly if one considers seronegative spondiloarthritides and SAPHO syndrome. Physical examination is unreliable and conventional X-rays analysis is an unsatisfactory tool during diagnostic work-up of this region. Scintigraphic techniques yield informations both on the activity and on the anatomical extent of the disease while computerized tomography visualize the elementary lesions, such as erosions, which characterize the process. Moreover, when available, magnetic resonance imaging couple the ability to finely visualize such lesions with the possibility to show early alterations and to characterize the “activity” of the disease, presenting itself as a powerful tool both for diagnosis and follow-up. This review briefly shows the applications of imaging techniques for the evaluation of the anterior chest wall focusing on what has been done in the SAPHO syndrome which can be considered prototypical for this regional involvement since it is the osteo-articular target mainly affected by the disease.

  20. Potential of ultrasound in the pediatric chest

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    Trinavarat, Panruethai, E-mail: pantrinavarat@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Rama IV Road, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Riccabona, Michael, E-mail: michael.riccabona@klinikum-graz.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Pediatric Radiology, University Hospital Graz (Austria)

    2014-09-15

    Ultrasound (US) of chest, even with inherent limitations of the US beam and air, has been useful in many pediatric chest conditions. It has extended its role and is now widely used by many subspecialists in medicine. This review article will cover techniques, indications, and applications of chest US in neonates, infants and children, including also different common as well as some rare and modern aspects and applications, such as pleural effusion, pneumothorax, pulmonary lesions, mediastinum, diaphragm, and chest wall. Other related imaging modalities are also briefly discussed.

  1. Relevant surgical anatomy of the chest wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Babu V; Rajesh, Pala B

    2010-11-01

    The chest wall, like other regional anatomy, is a remarkable fusion of form and function. Principal functions are the protection of internal viscera and an expandable cylinder facilitating variable gas flow into the lungs. Knowledge of the anatomy of the whole cylinder (ribs, sternum, vertebra, diaphragm, intercostal spaces, and extrathoracic muscles) is therefore not only important in the local environment of a specific chest wall resection but also in its relation to overall function. An understanding of chest wall kinematics might help define the loss of function after resection and the effects of various chest wall substitutes. Therefore, this article is not an exhaustive anatomic description but a focused summary and discussion.

  2. Potential of ultrasound in the pediatric chest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinavarat, Panruethai; Riccabona, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Ultrasound (US) of chest, even with inherent limitations of the US beam and air, has been useful in many pediatric chest conditions. It has extended its role and is now widely used by many subspecialists in medicine. This review article will cover techniques, indications, and applications of chest US in neonates, infants and children, including also different common as well as some rare and modern aspects and applications, such as pleural effusion, pneumothorax, pulmonary lesions, mediastinum, diaphragm, and chest wall. Other related imaging modalities are also briefly discussed.

  3. Remote interpretation of chest roentgenograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrus, W S; Hunter, C H; Bird, K T

    1975-04-01

    A series of 98 chest films was interpreted by two physicians on the basis of monitor display of the transmitted television signal representing the roentgenographic image. The transmission path was 14 miles long, and included one active repeater station. Receiver operating characteristic curves were drawn to compare interpretations rendered on television view of the image with classic, direct view interpretations of the same films. Performance in these two viewing modes was found to be quite similar. When films containing only hazy densities lacking internal structure or sharp margins, were removed from the sample, interpretation of the remaining films was essentially identical via the two modes. Since hazy densities are visible on retrospective examination, interpretation of roentgenograms at a distance via television appears to be a feasible route for delivery of radiologic services.

  4. Examination of musculoskeletal chest pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunse, Mads Hostrup; Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen; Vach, Werner

    2010-01-01

    using a standardized examination protocol, (2) to determine inter-observer reliability of single components of the protocol, and (3) to determine the effect of observer experience. Eighty patients were recruited from an emergency cardiology department. Patients were eligible if an obvious cardiac or non......-cardiac diagnosis could not be established at the cardiology department. Four observers (two chiropractors and two chiropractic students) performed general health and manual examination of the spine and chest wall. Percentage agreement, Cohen's Kappa and ICC were calculated for observer pairs (chiropractors.......01 to 0.59. Provided adequate training of observers, the examination protocol can be used in carefully selected patients in clinical settings and should be included in pre- and post-graduate clinical training....

  5. Chest pain and exacerbations of bronchiectasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King PT

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Paul T King,1,2 Stephen R Holdsworth,2 Michael Farmer,1 Nicholas J Freezer,1 Peter W Holmes11Department of Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, 2Monash University Department of Medicine, Monash Medical Centre, Melbourne, Victoria, AustraliaBackground: Bronchiectasis is a common disease and a major cause of respiratory morbidity. Chest pain has been described as occurring in the context of bronchiectasis but has not been well characterized. This study was performed to describe the characteristics of chest pain in adult bronchiectasis and to define the relationship of this pain to exacerbations.Subjects and methods: We performed a prospective study of 178 patients who were followed-up for 8 years. Subjects were reviewed on a yearly basis and assessed for the presence of chest pain. Subjects who had chest pain at the time of clinical review by the investigators were included in this study. Forty-four patients (25% described respiratory chest pain at the time of assessment; in the majority of cases 39/44 (89%, this occurred with an exacerbation and two distinct types of chest pain could be described: pleuritic (n = 4 and non-pleuritic (n = 37, with two subjects describing both forms. The non-pleuritic chest pain occurred most commonly over both lower lobes and was mild to moderate in severity. The pain subsided as patients recovered. Conclusion: Non-pleuritic chest pain occurs in subjects with bronchiectasis generally in association with exacerbations.Keywords: sputum, collapse, bronchitis, airway obstruction

  6. Solitary Plasmacytoma of the Chest Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Servet Kayhan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A previously healthy 55-year-old man with right sided lateral chest pain admitted to clinic. It was found a solid and painful mass at the right 4th rib in physical examination. Chest X-ray and thoracic computarized tomography showed an opacity measured 60x33 mm within the right chest wall destructing the 4th rib. Needle aspiration was performed from tumor and cytologic examination showed atypic plasma cell infiltration. The patient was scheduled for a chest wall resection and reconstructive surgery. Examination of a permanent section showed that the chest wall tumor was solitary plasmacytoma. There was no evidence of multiple myeloma recurrence after two years from the operation.

  7. [Chest pains in the dental environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfunkel, A; Galili, D; Findler, M; Zusman, S P; Malamed, S F; Elad, S; Kaufman, E

    2002-01-01

    Chest pain does not necessarily indicate cardiac disease. The most common causes of acute chest pain encountered in dental situations include hyperventilation, pulmonary embolism, angina pectoris and myocardial infarction. Stress and fear often cause rapid breathing or hyperventilation. This usually occurs in young adults and although the hyperventilating patient often complains of chest pain, this is rarely a manifestation of cardiac disease. Pulmonary embolism usually indicates the occlusion of a pulmonary artery causing severe chest pain. The primary clinical manifestation of angina pectoris is chest pain. Although most instances of anginal pain are easily terminated, the dentist must always consider the possibility that the supposed anginal attack is actually a sign of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). AMI is a clinical syndrome caused by a deficient coronary arterial blood supply to a region of myocardium that results in cellular death. There is a high incidence of mortality among AMI with death often occurring within 2 hours of the onset of signs and symptoms. The initial clinical manifestations of all types of chest pain can be similar. Therefore the dentist must develop proficiency in constituting a differential diagnosis and an efficient management protocol. As in most medical situations prevention is the most powerful tool. However, if chest pains do occur, measures such as airway management, oxygen supplementation, coronary artery dilation, analgesis and in extreme cases, cardiopulmonary resuscitation and evacuation to the emergency room, may be necessary.

  8. Chest CT in children: anesthesia and atelectasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, Beverley; Gawande, Rakhee [Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Krane, Elliot J. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Holmes, Tyson H. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford, CA (United States); Robinson, Terry E. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Pulmonary Medicine and Cystic Fibrosis Center for Excellence in Pulmonary Biology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2014-02-15

    There has been an increasing tendency for anesthesiologists to be responsible for providing sedation or anesthesia during chest CT imaging in young children. Anesthesia-related atelectasis noted on chest CT imaging has proven to be a common and troublesome problem, affecting image quality and diagnostic sensitivity. To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a standardized anesthesia, lung recruitment, controlled-ventilation technique developed at our institution to prevent atelectasis for chest CT imaging in young children. Fifty-six chest CT scans were obtained in 42 children using a research-based intubation, lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation CT scanning protocol. These studies were compared with 70 non-protocolized chest CT scans under anesthesia taken from 18 of the same children, who were tested at different times, without the specific lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation technique. Two radiology readers scored all inspiratory chest CT scans for overall CT quality and atelectasis. Detailed cardiorespiratory parameters were evaluated at baseline, and during recruitment and inspiratory imaging on 21 controlled-ventilation cases and 8 control cases. Significant differences were noted between groups for both quality and atelectasis scores with optimal scoring demonstrated in the controlled-ventilation cases where 70% were rated very good to excellent quality scans compared with only 24% of non-protocol cases. There was no or minimal atelectasis in 48% of the controlled ventilation cases compared to 51% of non-protocol cases with segmental, multisegmental or lobar atelectasis present. No significant difference in cardiorespiratory parameters was found between controlled ventilation and other chest CT cases and no procedure-related adverse events occurred. Controlled-ventilation infant CT scanning under general anesthesia, utilizing intubation and recruitment maneuvers followed by chest CT scans, appears to be a safe and effective method to obtain

  9. Chest pain: a time for concern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Joan E; Magdic, Kathy S

    2014-01-01

    When a patient complains of chest pain, the first priority is to establish whether the situation is life threatening. Life-threatening differential diagnoses that clinicians must consider include acute coronary syndrome, cardiac tamponade, pulmonary embolus, aortic dissection, and tension pneumothorax. Nonthreatening causes of chest pain that should be considered include spontaneous pneumothorax, pleural effusion, pneumonia, valvular diseases, gastric reflux, and costochondritis. The challenge for clinicians is not to be limited by "satisfaction of search" and fail to consider important differential diagnoses. The challenge, however, can be met by developing a systematic method to assess chest pain that will lead to the appropriate diagnosis and appropriate treatment plan.

  10. Chest pain of cardiac and noncardiac origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenfant, Claude

    2010-10-01

    Chest pain is one of the most common symptoms driving patients to a physician's office or the hospital's emergency department. In approximately half of the cases, chest pain is of cardiac origin, either ischemic cardiac or nonischemic cardiac disease. The other half is due to noncardiac causes, primarily esophageal disorder. Pain from either origin may occur in the same patient. In addition, psychological and psychiatric factors play a significant role in the perception and severity of the chest pain, irrespective of its cause. Chest pain of ischemic cardiac disease is called angina pectoris. Stable angina may be the prelude of ischemic cardiac disease; and for this reason, it is essential to ensure a correct diagnosis. In most cases, further testing, such as exercise testing and angiography, should be considered. The more severe form of chest pain, unstable angina, also requires a firm diagnosis because it indicates severe coronary disease and is the earliest manifestation of acute myocardial infarction. Once a diagnosis of stable or unstable angina is established, and if a decision is made not to use invasive therapy, such as coronary bypass, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, or stent insertion, effective medical treatment of associated cardiac risk factors is a must. Acute myocardial infarction occurring after a diagnosis of angina greatly increases the risk of subsequent death. Chest pain in women warrants added attention because women underestimate their likelihood to have coronary heart disease. A factor that complicates the clinical assessment of patients with chest pain (both cardiac and noncardiac in origin) is the relatively common presence of psychological and psychiatric conditions such as depression or panic disorder. These factors have been found to cause or worsen chest pain; but unfortunately, they may not be easily detected. Noncardiac chest pain represents the remaining half of all cases of chest pain. Although there are a number of

  11. Common Acupoints in Chest and Abdomen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Journal of Acupuncture and Tuina Science Editor; CUI Xue-jun

    2003-01-01

    @@ Tiantu (CV 21) Location: In the center of the suprasternal fossa(Fig. l ). Indications: Cough, dyspnea, chest pain, pharyngolaryngeal swelling and pains, sudden hoarseness of the voice, goiter, globus hystericus, and dysphagia.

  12. Tuberculosis, advanced - chest x-rays (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis is an infectious disease that causes inflammation, the formation of tubercules and other growths within tissue, ... death. These chest x-rays show advanced pulmonary tuberculosis. There are multiple light areas (opacities) of varying ...

  13. CARDIOVASCULAR DISORDERS IN ADOLESCENTS WITH CHEST PAIN

    OpenAIRE

    Sri Endah Rahayuningsih; Rahmat Budi; Herry Garna

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To detect cardiovascular abnormalities in adolescents with chest pain. Methods: In this cross sectional study, the subjects were 25 adolescents with chest pain who came to the Cardiac Center of Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital, Bandung during the period of January 2008 to January 2011. The presence of established cardiovascular disorders were based on history, physical examination, electrocardiography and echocardiography Results: It was found that 13/25 adolesce...

  14. Relevant surgical anatomy of the chest wall

    OpenAIRE

    Rajesh, Pala Babu; Naidu, Babu V.

    2010-01-01

    The chest wall, like other regional anatomy, is a remarkable fusion of form and function. Principal functions are the protection of internal viscera and an expandable cylinder facilitating variable gas flow into the lungs. Knowledge of the anatomy of the whole cylinder (ribs, sternum, vertebra, diaphragm, intercostal spaces, and extrathoracic muscles) is therefore not only important in the local environment of a specific chest wall resection but also in its relation to overall function. An un...

  15. Tuberculous spondylitis presenting as severe chest pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha A. Kaeser

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes a 32-year-old male who presented to an emergency department with severe chest pain and a history of cough, fever, night sweats, loss of appetite and weight. Chest radiography revealed a left upper lobe consolidation and multiple compression deformities in the thoracic spine. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated significant kyphosis and vertebral plana at two thoracic levels. Anterior compression of the spinal cord and adjacent soft tissue masses were also noted.

  16. Psychiatric syndromes associated with atypical chest pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Gordana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Chest pain often indicates coronary disease, but in 25% of patients there is no evidence of ischemic heart disease using standard diagnostic tests. Beside that, cardiologic examinations are repeated several times for months. If other medical causes could not be found, there is a possibility that chest pain is a symptom of psychiatric disorder. The aim of this study was to determine the presence of psychiatric syndromes, increased somatization, anxiety, stress life events exposure and characteristic of chest pain expression in persons with atypical chest pain and coronary patients, as well as to define predictive parameters for atypical chest pain. Method. We compared 30 patients with atypical chest pain (E group to 30 coronary patients (K group, after cardiological and psychiatric evaluation. We have applied: Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI, The Symptom Checklist 90-R (SCL-90 R, Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI, Holms-Rahe Scale of stress life events (H-R, Questionnaire for pain expression Pain-O-Meter (POM. Significant differences between groups and predictive value of the parameters for atypical chest pain were determined. Results. The E group participants compared to the group K were younger (33.4 ± 5.4 : 48.3 ± 6,4 years, p < 0.001, had a moderate anxiety level (20.4 ± 11.9 : 9.6 ± 3.8, p < 0.001, panic and somatiform disorders were present in the half of the E group, as well as eleveted somatization score (SOM ≥ 63 -50% : 10%, p < 0.01 and a higher H-R score level (102.0 ± 52.2 : 46.5 ± 55.0, p < 0.001. Pain was mild, accompanied with panic. The half of the E group subjects had somatoform and panic disorders. Conclusion. Somatoform and panic disorders are associated with atypical chest pain. Pain expression is mild, accompained with panic. Predictive factors for atypical chest pain are: age under 40, anxiety level > 20, somatization ≥ 63, presence of panic and somatoform disorders, H-R score > 102

  17. Radiation induced osteosarcoma of the chest wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Tsutomu; Yuki, Yoshihiro; Oizumi, Hiroyuki; Iijima, Yoshiyuki; Fujishima, Tsukasa; Shimazaki, Yasuhisa [Yamagata Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-11-01

    We report a successful resection of an osteosarcoma in the chest wall developed 25 years after irradiation. A 74-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for her swelling in the left chest wall at August 24, 1995. At 49-year-old, she had undergone an operation and postoperative irradiation for left breast cancer. A computed tomography demonstrated a mass in the left chest wall that destructed the first rib, extending into the pleural space and invaded into the left common carotid and subclavian arteries. We planned a radical resection of the mass after repeated CT scannings, since it was histopathologically diagnosed as a chondrosarcoma and showed a rapid growth. The tumor was completely removed with radical transmediastinal forequarter amputation of the partial chest wall and total left upper extremity. The left common carotid artery was partially replaced with 6 mm EPTFE vascular prosthesis. The chest wall was reconstructed with Marlex-mesh prosthesis and a myocutaneous flap. She was discharged uneventfully and has not shown any evidence of recurrence. (author)

  18. Prephonatory chest wall posturing in stutterers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baken, R J; McManus, D A; Cavallo, S A

    1983-09-01

    The possibility that prephonatory chest wall posturing is abnormal in stutterers was explored by observing rib cage and abdominal hemicircumference changes during the interval between the presentation of a stimulus and the production of/alpha/by a group of stutterers (N = 5). It was found that the patterns of chest wall adjustment for phonation were qualitatively identical in the stutterers and in a comparable group of normal men studied previously. There was, however, a significant difference in the way in which lung volume changed during the execution of the chest wall adjustment. This was considered to be indicative of delayed glottal closure among the stutterers rather than representative of a primary ventilatory disturbance.

  19. Imaging of Chest Wall Lesions in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hekmatnia

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Chest wall lesions in childhood include a wide range of pathologies; Benign lesions include lipoma, neurofibroma, lymphangioma, hemangioma, and mesenchymal hamartoma."nMalignant lesions include Neuroblastoma, Rhabdo-myosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, and Askin tumor."nSystemic diseases such as leukemia, lymphoma, Langerhans cell histiocytosis, and also infections such as tuberculosis, and actinomycosis may also cause chest wall lesions."nThe imaging characteristics of these lesions are re-viewed, but only a minority of the lesions shows diagnostic imaging features, and most of lesions re-quire biopsy and histopathological examination for "ndefinitive diagnosis."nThe role of different modalities is discussed with an emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging for demonstrating lesion morphology and local spread. Computed tomography and neuclear medicine being used mainly to assess remote disease."nIn this lecture, we discuss about imaging of chest wall lesions in children.

  20. Cardiogenic shock following blunt chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez-González Fayna

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac contusion, usually caused by blunt chest trauma, has been recognized with increased frequency over the past decades. Traffic accidents are the most frequent cause of cardiac contusions resulting from a direct blow to the chest. Other causes of blunt cardiac injury are numerous and include violent fall impacts, interpersonal aggression, explosions, and various types of high-risk sports. Myocardial contusion is difficult to diagnose; clinical presentation varies greatly, ranging from lack of symptoms to cardiogenic shock and arrhythmia. Although death is rare, cardiac contusion can be fatal. We present a case of cardiac contusion due to blunt chest trauma secondary to a fall impact, which manifested as cardiogenic shock.

  1. [Chest wall mesenchymal hamartoma: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Olga Lucía; Valencia, María de la Luz; Gómez, Carolina; Pérez, María del Pilar; Sanín, Emilio; Vásquez, Luz Marina

    2010-01-01

    Chest wall mesenchymal hamartoma is an extremely rare benign tumor. Approximately 80 cases have been reported in the literature. Most tumors are manifested at birth with a painless palpable mass of the chest wall, usually unilateral. Respiratory symptoms result from extrinsic compression of the pulmonary parenchyma, and the severity of the symptoms will depend on the size and location of the lesion. Imaging features are characteristic, but definitive diagnosis is histological. Herein, a case is described of a four month old infant with diagnosis of chest wall mesenchymal hamartoma, manifested at birth. Different treatment options are described, including expectations from tumor management, the possibility of spontaneous regression, and the morbidity associated with the surgical option.

  2. Misdiagnosed Chest Pain: Spontaneous Esophageal Rupture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inci, Sinan; Gundogdu, Fuat; Gungor, Hasan; Arslan, Sakir; Turkyilmaz, Atila; Eroglu, Atila

    2013-01-01

    Chest pain is one of themost common complaints expressed by patients presenting to the emergency department, and any initial evaluation should always consider life-threatening causes. Esophageal rupture is a serious condition with a highmortality rate. If diagnosed, successful therapy depends on the size of the rupture and the time elapsed between rupture and diagnosis.We report on a 41-year-old woman who presented to the emergency department complaining of left-sided chest pain for two hours. PMID:27122690

  3. Chest wall abscess due to Prevotella bivia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gwo-jong HSU; Cheng-ren CHEN; Mei-chu LAI; Shi-ping LUH

    2009-01-01

    Prevotella bivia is associated with pelvic inflammatory disease. A 77-year-old man developed a rapidly growing chest wall abscess due to P. Bivia within days. He underwent surgical resection of the infected area; his postoperative course was un-eventful. This is the first case of chest wall abscess due to P. Bivia infection. Its correct diagnosis cannot be underestimated be-cause fulminam infections can occur in aged or immunocompromised patients if treated incorrectly. Prompt, appropriate surgical management, and antibiotic therapy affect treatment outcome.

  4. Diagnosis and Treatment of Chest Injury and Emergency Diseases of Chest Organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Khadjibaev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Goal of research: to evaluate efficiency of videothoracoscopy in diagnosis and treatment of patients with injuries and emergency diseases ща chest organs.Material and methods: Study wasbased on treatment results analysis of 2111 patients with injuries and chest organs emergency diseases, who were treated at Republican Research Centre of Emergency Medicine in 2001-2014. Chest trauma made up 1396 (66,1% victims. There were 477 (22,6% patients with spontaneous pneumothorax. At the stages of initial diagnosis, the radiologic evaluations, CT investigations and videothoracoscopies were performed. In chest trauma patients the videothoracoscopy underwent in 844 cases, in spontaneous pneu#mothorax this method was employed in 290 patients. Complicated forms of lung echinococcosis were observed in 238 (11,3% patients and complicated forms of lung echinococcosis were evident in 72 patients.Results. Videothoracoscopy and video-assisted interventions allowed to eliminate lungs and pleura pathology in 1206 (57,1% patients, whereas the traditional methods were effective only in 905 cases (42,9%.Conclusions. Investigation methods such as multiplanar radioscopy, radiography, chest CT and videothora-coscopy must be included into algorithm of diagnosis and surgical treatment of chest injuries and emergency diseases of chest organs. At chest trauma the videothoracoscopy allows to avoid broad thoracotomy from 9,4% to 4,7% of cases, to reduce the frequency of repeated interventions from 17,4% to 0,5% and diminish a number of early postsurgery complications from 25,4% to 10,9%. Videothoracoscopy of chest traumas allows to reduce frequency of repeated interventions from 19,8 to 1,7%.

  5. The HEART score for chest pain patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Backus, B.E.

    2012-01-01

    The HEART score was developed to improve risk stratification in chest pain patients in the emergency department (ED). This thesis describes series of validation studies of the HEART score and sub studies for individual elements of the score. The predictive value of the HEART score for the occurrence

  6. When to Remove a Chest Tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoa, Nuria M; Jiménez, Marcelo F; Varela, Gonzalo

    2017-02-01

    Despite the increasing knowledge about the pleural physiology after lung resection, most practices around chest tube removal are dictated by personal preferences and experience. This article discusses recently published data on the topic and suggests opportunities for further investigation and future improvements.

  7. Chest pain in focal musculoskeletal disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen; Christensen, Henrik Wulff

    2010-01-01

    overlapping conditions and syndromes of focal disorders, including Tietze syndrome, costochondritis, chest wall syndrome, muscle tenderness, slipping rib, cervical angina, and segmental dysfunction of the cervical and thoracic spine, have been reported to cause pain. For most of these syndromes, evidence...

  8. Treatment of 336 cases of chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Jing

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To summarize the clinical features, diagnosis and treatment of chest trauma. Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted among 336 cases of chest trauma admitted to our hospital from January 2009 to May 2011. Results: Out of all cases, 325 were cured, accounting for 96.7%; 11 died, accounting for 3.3%. Among the dead cases, one died of hemorrhagic shock, three of acute respi-ratory distress syndrome, three of multiple organ failure, and four of severe multiple traumas. Conclusions: (1 For patients with severe chest trauma, early emergency treatment is crucial to save life. (2 Open thoracic surgery is needed for acute cardiac tamponade, intrapulmonary vascular injuries, progressive intrathoracic bleeding, lung laceration, tracheal breakage, and diaphrag-matic injury. In addition, operative timing and method should be well chosen. (3 Pulmonary contusion is one of common complications in chest trauma, for which the com-bination of strong anti-infection therapy and mechanical ventilation is an effective treatment strategy. Key words: Thoracic injuries; Thoracotomy; Emer-gency treatment

  9. VAC® for external fixation of flail chest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winge, Rikke; Berg, Jais O; Albret, Rikke

    2012-01-01

    A large aterior chest wall defect following tumor resection was reconstructed with a Gore-Tex® membrane and a combined musculocutaneous rectus femoris and tensor fasciae latae free flap. Subsequent paradoxical respiration impeded weaning from the ventilator. Appliance of Vacuum Assisted Closure...

  10. Treatment of 336 cases of chest trauma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jing; CHU Xiang-yang; LIU Yi; WANG Yun-xi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To summarize the clinical features,diagnosis and treatment of chest trauma.Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted among 336 cases of chest trauma admitted to our hospital from January 2009 to May 2011.Results:Out of all cases,325 were cured,accounting for 96.7%; 11 died,accounting for 3.3%.Among the dead cases,one died of hemorrhagic shock,three of acute respiratory distress syndrome,three of multiple organ failure,and four of severe multiple traumas.Conclusions:(1) For patients with severe chest trauma,early emergency treatment is crucial to save life.(2) Open thoracic surgery is needed for acute cardiac tamponade,intrapulmonary vascular injuries,progressive intrathoracic bleeding,lung laceration,tracheal breakage,and diaphragmatic injury.In addition,operative timing and method should be well chosen.(3) Pulmonary contusion is one of common complications in chest trauma,for which the combination of strong anti-infection therapy and mechanical ventilation is an effective treatment strategy.

  11. The Funen Neck and Chest Pain study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fejer, René; Hartvigsen, Jan; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the Funen Neck and Chest Pain (FNCP) study and carry out a comprehensive non-response analysis of the quality of the survey. METHODS: The FNCP questionnaire was sent out to 7000 randomly selected individuals aged 20-71 years living in Funen County, Denmark. A full description...

  12. Chest radiography in the critically ill

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kröner, A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The chest radiograph (CXR) is a frequently obtained test to complement physical examination in ICU and post-surgery PACU patients. The opinion on indications for a CXR in these two patient categories varies worldwide. One approach is to obtain CXR on indication only, i.e., when there i

  13. Chest injury in victims of Bam earthquake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seyed Mohammad Ghodsi; Moosa Zargar; Ali Khaji; Mojgan Karbakhsh

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the data of trauma patients with thoracic injury in the earthquake of Bam admitted to hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Science (TUMS)for better understanding the type and consequence of thoracic injuries in a major earthquake.Methods: After Bam earthquake registering 6.5 on the Richter scale, 526 trauma patients were admitted to hospitals of TUMS. Among them, 53 patients sustained thoracic injury.Results: This group was composed of 21 females (39.6%) and 32 males (60.4%). Fifteen patients (28.3%) had isolated chest injuries. Rib fracture (36.4%) was the most common injury in our patients and haemo/pneumothorax (25.5%) followed. Superficial injury was the most common accompanying injury. Multipletrauma patients with chest injury had higher injury severity score (ISS) versus patients with isolated chest injury (P =0.003).Conclusions: Chest wall injuries and haemo/pneumothorax comprise a considerable number of injuries in survival victims of earthquakes. Consequently, the majority of these patients can be treated with observation or tube thoracostomy. We should train and equip the health workers and members of rescue teams to treat and manage these patients in the field.

  14. Cardiac injuries in blunt chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobon-Gomez Catalina

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Blunt chest traumas are a clinical challenge, both for diagnosis and treatment. The use of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance can play a major role in this setting. We present two cases: a 12-year-old boy and 45-year-old man. Late gadolinium enhancement imaging enabled visualization of myocardial damage resulting from the trauma.

  15. [Chest Wall Reconstruction Using Titanium Plates Sandwiched Between Sheets after Resection of Chest Wall Chondrosarcoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endoh, Makoto; Oizumi, Hiroyuki; Kato, Hirohisa; Suzuki, Jun; Watarai, Hikaru; Hamada, Akira; Suzuki, Katsuyuki; Takahashi, Ai; Nakahashi, Kenta; Sugawara, Masato; Tsuchiya, Takashi; Sadahiro, Mitsuaki

    2016-07-01

    Extensive chest wall resection carries the risk of difficult reconstruction and surgical complications. We report our experience on chest wall reconstruction using titanium plates for a wide thoracic defect after tumor resection. A 74-year-old man was diagnosed with chondrosarcoma of the 6th rib on the right. He needed extensive chest wall resection because of skip lesions on 4th rib noted on operative inspection, leaving a defect measuring 33 × 20 cm. Reconstruction using 5 transverse titanium plates sandwiched between an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene patch and a polypropylene mesh sheet stabilized the chest wall. This reconstruction allowed successful separation from ventilatory support after operation. The postoperative course was uneventful, and he was discharged on postoperative day 20. The advantages of this form of reconstruction over conventional prostheses are rigidity, and stability and usability.

  16. Quick identification of acute chest pain patients study (QICS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsen, Hendrik M.; de Jong, Gonda; Tio, Rene A.; Nieuwland, Wybe; Kema, Ido P.; van der Horst, Iwan C. C.; Oudkerk, Mattijs; Zijlstra, Felix

    2009-01-01

    Background: Patients with acute chest pain are often referred to the emergency ward and extensively investigated. Investigations are costly and could induce unnecessary complications, especially with invasive diagnostics. Nevertheless, chest pain patients have high mortalities. Fast identification o

  17. CNE article: pain after lung transplant: high-frequency chest wall oscillation vs chest physiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esguerra-Gonzalez, Angeli; Ilagan-Honorio, Monina; Fraschilla, Stephanie; Kehoe, Priscilla; Lee, Ai Jin; Marcarian, Taline; Mayol-Ngo, Kristina; Miller, Pamela S; Onga, Jay; Rodman, Betty; Ross, David; Sommer, Susan; Takayanagi, Sumiko; Toyama, Joy; Villamor, Filma; Weigt, S Samuel; Gawlinski, Anna

    2013-03-01

    Background Chest physiotherapy and high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) are routinely used after lung transplant to facilitate removal of secretions. To date, no studies have been done to investigate which therapy is more comfortable and preferred by lung transplant recipients. Patients who have less pain may mobilize secretions, heal, and recover faster. Objectives To compare effects of HFCWO versus chest physiotherapy on pain and preference in lung transplant recipients. Methods In a 2-group experimental, repeated-measures design, 45 lung transplant recipients (27 single lung, 18 bilateral) were randomized to chest physiotherapy (10 AM, 2 PM) followed by HFCWO (6 PM, 10 PM; group 1, n=22) or vice versa (group 2, n=23) on postoperative day 3. A verbal numeric rating scale was used to measure pain before and after treatment. At the end of the treatment sequence, a 4-item patient survey was administered to assess treatment preference, pain, and effectiveness. Data were analyzed with χ(2) and t tests and repeated-measures analysis of variance. Results A significant interaction was found between mean difference in pain scores from before to after treatment and treatment method; pain scores decreased more when HFCWO was done at 10 AM and 6 PM (P =.04). Bilateral transplant recipients showed a significant preference for HFCWO over chest physiotherapy (11 [85%] vs 2 [15%], P=.01). However, single lung recipients showed no significant difference in preference between the 2 treatments (11 [42%] vs 14 [54%]). Conclusions HFCWO seems to provide greater decreases in pain scores than does chest physiotherapy. Bilateral lung transplant recipients preferred HFCWO to chest physiotherapy. HFCWO may be an effective, feasible alternative to chest physiotherapy. (American Journal of Critical Care. 2013;22:115-125).

  18. 20 CFR 718.102 - Chest roentgenograms (X-rays).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chest roentgenograms (X-rays). 718.102... roentgenograms (X-rays). (a) A chest roentgenogram (X-ray) shall be of suitable quality for proper classification...-rays as described in Appendix A. (b) A chest X-ray to establish the existence of pneumoconiosis...

  19. 46 CFR 194.10-20 - Magazine chest construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Magazine chest construction. 194.10-20 Section 194.10-20... construction. (a) Magazine chests shall be of watertight metal construction with flush interior. The body and...) Chests shall be secured to the vessel's structure by means of permanently installed foundation clips...

  20. Chest radiographic manifestations of scrub typhus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KPP Abhilash

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Rationale: Respiratory system involvement in scrub typhus is seen in 20–72% of patients. In endemic areas, good understanding and familiarity with the various radiologic findings of scrub typhus are essential in identifying pulmonary complications. Materials and Methods: Patients admitted to a tertiary care center with scrub typhus between October 2012 and September 2013 and had a chest X ray done were included in the analysis. Details and radiographic findings were noted and factors associated with abnormal X-rays were analyzed. Results: The study cohort contained 398 patients. Common presenting complaints included fever (100%, generalized myalgia (83%, headache (65%, dyspnea (54%, cough (24.3%, and altered sensorium (14%. Almost half of the patients (49.4% had normal chest radiographs. Common radiological pulmonary abnormalities included pleural effusion (14.6%, acute respiratory distress syndrome (14%, airspace opacity (10.5%, reticulonodular opacities (10.3%, peribronchial thickening (5.8%, and pulmonary edema (2%. Cardiomegaly was noted in 3.5% of patients. Breathlessness, presence of an eschar, platelet counts of 2 mg/dL had the highest odds of having an abnormal chest radiograph. Patients with an abnormal chest X-ray had a higher requirement of noninvasive ventilation (odds ratio [OR]: 13.98; 95% confidence interval CI: 5.89–33.16, invasive ventilation (OR: 18.07; 95% CI: 6.42–50.88, inotropes (OR: 8.76; 95% CI: 4.35–17.62, higher involvement of other organ systems, longer duration of hospital stay (3.18 ± 3 vs. 7.27 ± 5.58 days; P< 0.001, and higher mortality (OR: 4.63; 95% CI: 1.54–13.85. Conclusion: Almost half of the patients with scrub typhus have abnormal chest radiographs. Chest radiography should be included as part of basic evaluation at presentation in patients with scrub typhus, especially in those with breathlessness, eschar, jaundice, and severe thrombocytopenia.

  1. CPDX (Chest Pain Diagnostic Program) - A Decision Support System for the Management of Acute Chest Pain (User’s Manual)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-02-25

    feu hours) when he has teen free of pain since the present episode started, this is intermittent. Otherwise assess as continuous. Beware the patient...assumed that crewmembers with chest pain have a physical etiology for chest pain. Disorders that present with epigastric pain such as gastritis , peptic...be assumed that crewmembers with chest pain have a physical etiology for chest pain. Disorders that present with epigastric pain such as gastritis

  2. Chest radiographic findings in acute paraquat poisoning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Gyeong Gyun; Lee, Mi Sook; Kim, Hee Jun; Sun, In O [Presbyterian Medical Center, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    To describe the chest radiographic findings of acute paraquat poisoning. 691 patients visited the emergency department of our hospital between January 2006 and October 2012 for paraquat poisoning. Of these 691, we identified 56 patients whose initial chest radiographs were normal but who developed radiographic abnormalities within one week. We evaluated their radiographic findings and the differences in imaging features based on mortality. The most common finding was diffuse consolidation (29/56, 52%), followed by consolidation with linear and nodular opacities (18/56, 32%), and combined consolidation and pneumomediastinum (7/56, 13%). Pleural effusion was noted in 17 patients (30%). The two survivors (4%) showed peripheral consolidations, while the 54 patients (96%) who died demonstrated bilateral (42/54, 78%) or unilateral (12/54, 22%) diffuse consolidations. Rapidly progressing diffuse pulmonary consolidation was observed within one week on follow-up radiographs after paraquat ingestion in the deceased, but the survivors demonstrated peripheral consolidation.

  3. An Atypical Cause of Atypical Chest Pain

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The present report describes a case involving a 57-year-old HIV-positive man who presented with acute retrosternal chest pain accompanied by 24 h of fever. Septic arthritis of the manubriosternal joint was diagnosed based on magnetic resonance imaging findings in addition to Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. To the authors’ knowledge, the present case is only the 12th reported case of manubriosternal septic arthritis, and the first in an HIV-positive patient. Early diagnosis and treatment can...

  4. Injuries of the chestFNx01

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deodhar S

    1979-01-01

    Full Text Available Thirty cases of chest injuries were admitted in the Department of Surgery, K.E.M. Hospital, Bombay. These injuries seem to be fairly common. Detailed examination at the time of admission is necessary to assess the clinical presentation and the presence of major complications. Institution of intra-peritoneal drainage, restoration of negative intra-pleural pressure and active respiratory physiotherapy constitute an important part of the treatment. The literature on this subject is briefly reviewed

  5. Chest pain associated with moderator band pacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goli, Anil K; Kaszala, Karoly; Osman, Mohammed N; Lucke, John; Carrillo, Roger

    2014-10-01

    A 65-year-old man was evaluated for chronic chest pain that had been present for 8 years after placement of a dual-chamber implantable cardioverter-defibrillator to treat inducible ventricular tachycardia. Previous coronary angiography had revealed nonobstructive coronary artery disease and a left ventricular ejection fraction of 0.45 to 0.50, consistent with mild idiopathic nonischemic cardiomyopathy. Evaluation with chest radiography and transthoracic echocardiography showed the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator lead to be embedded within the right ventricle at the moderator band, which had mild calcification. Treatment included extraction of the dual-coil lead and placement of a new single-coil right ventricular lead at the mid septum. The patient had complete relief of symptoms after the procedure. This case shows that chest pain can be associated with the placement of a right ventricular implantable cardioverter-defibrillator lead in the moderator band and that symptomatic relief can occur after percutaneous lead extraction and the implantation of a new right ventricular lead to the mid septal region.

  6. VAC® for external fixation of flail chest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rikke Winge

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A large anterior chest wall defect following tumor resection was reconstructed with a Gore- Tex® membrane and a combined musculocutaneous rectus femoris and tensor fasciae latae free flap. Subsequent paradoxical respiration impeded weaning from the ventilator. Appliance of Vacuum Assisted Closure® (VAC® resulted in immediate chest wall stability and a decrease in the patient’s need for respiratory support. Shortly thereafter, the VAC® was discontinued and the patient was discharged from the intensive care unit (ICU. This case report is the first to describe the successful use of VAC® as an adjuvant to a one-stage procedure for large thoracic wall reconstruction, allowing sufficient temporary external fixation to eliminate paradoxical respiration and plausibly shorten the stay in the ICU. No adverse effects on flap healing or haemodynamics were recorded. It is likely that external VAC® can improve thoracic stability and pulmonary function in a patient with flail chest and decrease the need for mechanical ventilation.

  7. [Isolated chest trauma in elderly patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yersin, Bertrand; Carron, Pierre-Nicolas; Pasquier, Mathieu; Zingg, Tobias

    2015-08-12

    In elderly patients, a blunt trauma of the chest is associated with a significant risk of complications and mortality. The number of ribs fractures (≥ 4), the presence of bilateral rib fractures, of a pulmonary contusion, of existent comorbidities or acute extra-thoracic traumatic lesions, and lastly the severity of thoracic pain, are indeed important risk factors of complications and mortality. Their presence may require hospitalization of the patient. When complications do occur, they are represented by alveolar hypoventilation, pulmonary atelectasia and broncho-pulmonary infections. When hospitalization is required, it may allow for the specific treatment of thoracic pain, including locoregional anesthesia techniques.

  8. Pitfalls and variants in pediatric chest imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Asensio, D; Fernández Martín, M

    2016-05-01

    Most pitfalls in the interpretation of pediatric chest imaging are closely related with the technique used and the characteristics of pediatric patients. To obtain a quality image that will enable the correct diagnosis, it is very important to use an appropriate technique. It is important to know how technical factors influence the image and to be aware of the possible artifacts that can result from poor patient cooperation. Moreover, radiologists need to be familiar with the normal anatomy in children, with the classic radiologic findings, and with the anatomic and developmental variants to avoid misinterpreting normal findings as pathological.

  9. Atrioventricular Dissociation following Blunt Chest Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salim Surani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Blunt chest trauma (BCT is a common clinical presentation seen in emergency departments. Few cases of cardiac conduction abnormalities due to BCT have been reported in the medical literature. This dysrhythmias may present as permanent conduction defects requiring permanent pacemaker or may have temporary conduction abnormalities requiring temporary pacemaker or supportive care. We present the case of a young woman who suffered from BCT after being kicked by a horse with the development of a significant substernal hematoma. She developed temporary atrioventricular block, which was completely resolved with the decrease in the size of the substernal hematoma suffered.

  10. Bacteriological research for the contamination of equipment in chest radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Seung Gu; Song, Woon Heung; Kweon, Dae Cheol [Shinhan University, Uijeongbu (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    The purpose is to determine the degree of contamination of the equipment for infection control in chest radiography of the radiology department. We confirmed by chemical and bacterial identification of bacteria of the equipment and established a preventive maintenance plan. Chest X-ray radiography contact area on the instrument patients shoulder, hand, chin, chest lateral radiography patient contact areas with a 70% isopropyl alcohol cotton swab were compared to identify the bacteria before and after sterilization on the patient contact area in the chest radiography equipment of the department. The gram positive Staphylococcus was isolated from side shoots handle before disinfection in the chest radiography equipment. For the final identification of antibiotic tested that it was determined by performing the nobobiocin to the sensitive Staphylococcus epidermidis. Chest radiography equipment before disinfecting the handle side of Staphylococcus epidermidis bacteria were detected using a disinfectant should be to prevent hospital infections.

  11. Lung Morphological Changes in Closed Chest Injury (an experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Golubev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study lung morphological changes in a closed chest injury model in laboratory animals. Material and methods. Experiments were carried out in 30 male albino nonbred rats weighing 350—380 g. Closed chest injury was simulated, by exposing the chest of anesthetized rats to a 300-g metal cylinder falling from a height of 30 cm. The observation periods were 1, 3, 6, and 24 hours. Results. The signs of evident perivenular edema that was uncharas-teristic to acute respiratory distress syndrome induced by other causes are an important peculiarity of lung morphological changes in this experimental model of closed chest injury. Conclusion. The experimental studies clarified the pattern of lung morphological changes in the early period after closed chest injury. Key words: closed chest injury, pulmonary edema.

  12. Scope and limitations of sonography of the chest during childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, K.; Mayr, B.; Fendel, H.

    1986-05-01

    The advantages and limitations of the sonographic examination of the chest in 16 children are described. Partial opacification of the chest has been found in nine, a total 'white' hemithorax in 7 children. Sonographic guided taps of the chest were performed in 3 children. Necessity, extent and yield of additional radiological examinations, especially computed tomography of the thorax, are discussed in detail.

  13. Chest physiotherapy in children with acute bacterial pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pneumonia is the single leading cause of death in children younger than 5 years of age. Chest physiotherapy is often prescribed as an additional therapy in children with pneumonia. Different chest physiotherapy techniques are available that aim to improve airway clearance, gas exchange and reduce the work of breathing. However, it is unclear if these techniques are effective in this population.Objective: The present review aimed to determine the efficacy of different chest physiot...

  14. Optical compensation device for chest film radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Robert G.; Hasegawa, Bruce H.; DeForest, Sherman E.; Schmidt, Gregory W.; Hier, Richard G.

    1990-07-01

    Although chest radiography is the most commonly performed radiographic examination and one of the most valuable and cost-effective studies in medicine it suffers from relatively high error rates in both missing pathology and false positive interpretations. Detectability of lung nodules and other structures in underpenetrated regions of the chest film can be improved by both exposure and optical compensation but current compensation systems require major capital cost or a significant change in normal clinical practice. A new optical compensation system called the " Intelligent X-Ray Illuminator" (IXI) automatically and virtually instantaneously generates a patient-specific optical unsharp mask that is projected directly on a radiograph. When a radiograph is placed on the IXI which looks much like a conventional viewbox it acquires a low-resolution electronic image of this film from which the film transmission is derived. The transmission information is inverted and blurred in an image processor to form an unsharp mask which is fed into a spatial light modulator (SLM) placed between a light source and the radiograph. The SLM tailors the viewbox luminance by decreasing illumination to underexposed (i. e. transmissive) areas of the radiograph presenting the observer with an optically unsharp-masked image. The IXI uses the original radiograph and will allow it to be viewed on demand with conventional (uniform illumination. Potentially the IXI could introduce the known beneficial aspects of optical unsharp masking into radiology at low capital

  15. Cross-chest liposuction in gynaecomastia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biju Murali

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gynaecomastia is usually treated with liposuction or liposuction with excision of the glandular tissue. The type of surgery chosen depends on the grade of the condition. Objective: Because gynaecomastia is treated primarily as a cosmetic procedure, we aimed at reducing the invasiveness of the surgery. Materials and Methods: The technique complies with all recommended protocols for different grades of gynaecomastia. It uses liposuction, gland excision, or both, leaving only minimal post-operative scars. The use of cross-chest liposuction through incisions on the edge of the areola helps to get rid of all the fat under the areola without an additional scar as in the conventional method. Results: This is a short series of 20 patients, all with bilateral gynaecomastia (i.e., 40 breasts, belonging to Simon′s Stage 1 and 2, studied over a period of 2 years. The average period of follow-up was 15 months. Post-operative complications were reported in only two cases, with none showing long-term complications or issues specifically due to the procedure. Conclusions : Cross-chest liposuction for gynaecomastia is a simple yet effective surgical tool in bilateral gynaecomastia treatment to decrease the post-operative scars. The use of techniques like incision line drain placement and post-drain removal suturing of wounds aid in decreasing the scar.

  16. Chest trauma in children: current imaging guidelines and techniques.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moore, Michael A

    2011-09-01

    Given the heterogeneous nature of pediatric chest trauma, the optimal imaging approach is tailored to the specific patient. Chest radiography remains the most important imaging modality for initial triage. The decision to perform a chest computed tomography scan should be based on the nature of the trauma, the child\\'s clinical condition, and the initial radiographic findings, taking the age-related pretest probabilities of serious injury into account. The principles of as low as reasonably achievable and Image Gently should be followed. The epidemiology and pathophysiology, imaging techniques, characteristic findings, and evidence-based algorithms for pediatric chest trauma are discussed.

  17. Multidetector Computer Tomography: Evaluation of Blunt Chest Trauma in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Palas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Imaging plays an essential part of chest trauma care. By definition, the employed imaging technique in the emergency setting should reach the correct diagnosis as fast as possible. In severe chest blunt trauma, multidetector computer tomography (MDCT has become part of the initial workup, mainly due to its high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of the technique for the detection and characterization of thoracic injuries and also due to its wide availability in tertiary care centers. The aim of this paper is to review and illustrate a spectrum of characteristic MDCT findings of blunt traumatic injuries of the chest including the lungs, mediastinum, pleural space, and chest wall.

  18. Staphylococcus aureus sternal osteomyelitis: a rare cause of chest pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaur M

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Chest pain is a common presenting symptom with a broad differential. Life-threatening cardiac and pulmonary etiologies of chest pain should be evaluated first. However, it is critical to perform a thorough assessment for other sources of chest pain in order to limit morbidity and mortality from less common causes. We present a rare case of a previously healthy 45 year old man who presented with focal, substernal, reproducible chest pain and Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia who was later found to have primary Staphylococcus aureus sternal osteomyelitis.

  19. Multidetector computer tomography: evaluation of blunt chest trauma in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palas, João; Matos, António P; Mascarenhas, Vasco; Herédia, Vasco; Ramalho, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Imaging plays an essential part of chest trauma care. By definition, the employed imaging technique in the emergency setting should reach the correct diagnosis as fast as possible. In severe chest blunt trauma, multidetector computer tomography (MDCT) has become part of the initial workup, mainly due to its high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of the technique for the detection and characterization of thoracic injuries and also due to its wide availability in tertiary care centers. The aim of this paper is to review and illustrate a spectrum of characteristic MDCT findings of blunt traumatic injuries of the chest including the lungs, mediastinum, pleural space, and chest wall.

  20. Measuring chest circumference change during respiration with an electromagnetic biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padasdao, Bryson; Shahhaidar, Ehsaneh; Boric-Lubecke, Olga

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, an off-the-shelf DC motor is modified into a chest belt and used to successfully measure circumference change on a mechanical chest model, while simultaneously harvesting significant power. Chest circumference change can provide information on tidal volume, which is vital in assessing lung function. The chest circumference change is calculated from the motor's voltage output. Calculated values are within 0.95mm of measured circumference changes, with a standard deviation of 0.37mm. The wearable motor can also harvest at least 29.4µW during normal breathing.

  1. An unusual cause for recurrent chest infections.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lobo, Ronstan

    2012-10-01

    We present a case of an elderly non-smoking gentleman who, since 2005, had been admitted multiple times for recurrent episodes of shortness of breath, wheeze, cough and sputum. The patient was treated as exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and\\/or lower respiratory tract infections. Bronchoscopy was done which revealed multiple hard nodules in the trachea and bronchi with posterior tracheal wall sparing. Biopsies confirmed this as tracheopathia osteochondroplastica (TO). He had increasing frequency of admission due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and pseudomonas infections, which failed to clear despite intravenous, prolonged oral and nebulised antibiotics. The patient developed increasing respiratory distress and respiratory failure. The patient died peacefully in 2012. This case report highlights the typical pathological and radiological findings of TO and the pitfalls of misdiagnosing patients with recurrent chest infections as COPD.

  2. Pleural fluids associated with chest infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadri, Amal; Thomson, Anne H

    2002-12-01

    Pleural effusions are commonly associated with pneumonias and a small number of these progress to empyema. An understanding of the physiology and pathophysiology of pleural fluid aids the clinician in the management of empyema. There remains much debate about the optimal treatment of empyema in children. Early recognition of the condition is important since delayed therapy may result in unnecessary morbidity. Conventional management with high dose parenteral antibiotics and chest tube drainage remains the mainstay of therapy. However, this treatment modality may fail if the pleural fluid becomes viscous and loculated and, therefore, a more aggressive approach is required. Intrapleural fibrinolytic therapy has been shown to decrease the length of hospital stay and may reduce the need for surgical intervention. The prognosis in children with parapneumonic empyema is excellent with the vast majority retaining normal lung function at long term follow-up.

  3. An atypical cause of atypical chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaheen, Ahmad; Siemieniuk, Reed A; Gudgeon, Patrick

    2014-09-01

    The present report describes a case involving a 57-year-old HIV-positive man who presented with acute retrosternal chest pain accompanied by 24 h of fever. Septic arthritis of the manubriosternal joint was diagnosed based on magnetic resonance imaging findings in addition to Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. To the authors' knowledge, the present case is only the 12th reported case of manubriosternal septic arthritis, and the first in an HIV-positive patient. Early diagnosis and treatment can circumvent the need for surgical intervention. Based on the present case report and review of the literature, the authors summarize the epidemiology, appropriate imaging and suggestions for antibiotic therapy for this rare presentation.

  4. An Atypical Cause of Atypical Chest Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Zaheen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present report describes a case involving a 57-year-old HIV-positive man who presented with acute retrosternal chest pain accompanied by 24 h of fever. Septic arthritis of the manubriosternal joint was diagnosed based on magnetic resonance imaging findings in addition to Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. To the authors’ knowledge, the present case is only the 12th reported case of manubriosternal septic arthritis, and the first in an HIV-positive patient. Early diagnosis and treatment can circumvent the need for surgical intervention. Based on the present case report and review of the literature, the authors summarize the epidemiology, appropriate imaging and suggestions for antibiotic therapy for this rare presentation.

  5. Diagnosing Myocardial Contusion after Blunt Chest Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Alborzi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A myocardial contusion refers to a bruise of the cardiac muscle, the severity of which can vary depending on the severity of the injury and when the injury occurs. It is a major cause of rapid death which happens after blunt chest trauma and should be suspected at triage in the emergency department. We demonstrated that suspected myocardial contusion patients who have normal electrocardiograms (ECGs and biomarker tests can be safely discharged. However, if the test results are abnormal, the next steps should be echocardiography and more advanced measures. Diagnosing myocardial contusion is very difficult because of its nonspecific symptoms. If a myocardial contusion happens, cardiogenic shock or arrhythmia must be anticipated, and the patient must be carefully monitored.

  6. Relevance of an incidental chest finding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Télles, Arturo; Mendoza, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Solitary pulmonary nodule represents 0.2% of incidental findings in routine chest X-ray images. One of the main diagnoses includes lung cancer in which small-cell subtype has a poor survival rate. Recently, a new classification has been proposed including the very limited disease stage (VLD stage) or T1-T2N0M0 with better survival rate, specifically in those patients who are treated with surgery. However, current recommendations postulate that surgery remains controversial as a first-line treatment in this stage. We present the case of a 46-year-old female referred to our hospital with a preoperative diagnosis of a solitary pulmonary nodule. On initial approach, a biopsy revealed a small cell lung cancer. She received multimodal therapy with surgery, chemotherapy, and prophylactic cranial irradiation and is currently alive without recurrence on a 2-year follow-up. PMID:22345914

  7. Tuberculosis abscess of the chest wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataño, Juan; Perez, Jefferson

    2014-10-01

    A 42-year-old male presented in June of 2011 with nocturnal fevers, night sweats, an 8-kg weight loss, and a cutaneous right chest wall mass. In March of 2013, a computed tomographic scan of the thorax showed a 54 × 18 × 26-mm right lower lobe mass with peripheral calcifications, and in May of 2013, he was admitted for a segmental lobectomy, in which histologic examination of the pulmonary tissue revealed granulomas with multinucleated giant cells. The tissue was negative for acid-fast bacillae on Ziehl-Neelsen stain, and culture grew Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Therefore, he was started on four first-line antituberculosis medications and showed rapid symptomatic improvement.

  8. Chest magnetic resonance imaging: a protocol suggestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Hochhegger

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the recent years, with the development of ultrafast sequences, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has been established as a valuable diagnostic modality in body imaging. Because of improvements in speed and image quality, MRI is now ready for routine clinical use also in the study of pulmonary diseases. The main advantage of MRI of the lungs is its unique combination of morphological and functional assessment in a single imaging session. In this article, the authors review most technical aspects and suggest a protocol for performing chest MRI. The authors also describe the three major clinical indications for MRI of the lungs: staging of lung tumors; evaluation of pulmonary vascular diseases; and investigation of pulmonary abnormalities in patients who should not be exposed to radiation.

  9. Chest magnetic resonance imaging: a protocol suggestion*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochhegger, Bruno; de Souza, Vinícius Valério Silveira; Marchiori, Edson; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Souza Jr., Arthur Soares; Elias Junior, Jorge; Rodrigues, Rosana Souza; Barreto, Miriam Menna; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Mançano, Alexandre Dias; Araujo Neto, César Augusto; Guimarães, Marcos Duarte; Nin, Carlos Schuler; Santos, Marcel Koenigkam; Silva, Jorge Luiz Pereira e

    2015-01-01

    In the recent years, with the development of ultrafast sequences, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been established as a valuable diagnostic modality in body imaging. Because of improvements in speed and image quality, MRI is now ready for routine clinical use also in the study of pulmonary diseases. The main advantage of MRI of the lungs is its unique combination of morphological and functional assessment in a single imaging session. In this article, the authors review most technical aspects and suggest a protocol for performing chest MRI. The authors also describe the three major clinical indications for MRI of the lungs: staging of lung tumors; evaluation of pulmonary vascular diseases; and investigation of pulmonary abnormalities in patients who should not be exposed to radiation. PMID:26811555

  10. Resuscitation, prolonged cardiac arrest, and an automated chest compression device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risom, Martin; Jørgensen, Henrik; Rasmussen, Lars S;

    2010-01-01

    The European Resuscitation Council's 2005 guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) emphasize the delivery of uninterrupted chest compressions of adequate depth during cardiac arrest.......The European Resuscitation Council's 2005 guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) emphasize the delivery of uninterrupted chest compressions of adequate depth during cardiac arrest....

  11. Automatic segmentation of pulmonary segments from volumetric chest CT scans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rikxoort, E.M. van; Hoop, B. de; Vorst, S. van de; Prokop, M.; Ginneken, B. van

    2009-01-01

    Automated extraction of pulmonary anatomy provides a foundation for computerized analysis of computed tomography (CT) scans of the chest. A completely automatic method is presented to segment the lungs, lobes and pulmonary segments from volumetric CT chest scans. The method starts with lung segmenta

  12. Low dose computed tomography of the chest : Applications and limitations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gietema, H.A.

    2007-01-01

    In areas with a high intrinsic contrast such as the chest, radiation dose can be reduced for specific indications. Low dose chest CT is feasible and cannot only be applied for lung cancer screening, but also in daily routine and for early detection of lung destruction. We showed in a small sample of

  13. Chest physical therapy in acute viral bronchiolitis: an updated review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postiaux, Guy; Zwaenepoel, Bruno; Louis, Jacques

    2013-09-01

    We describe the various therapies for infant acute viral bronchiolitis and the contradictory results obtained with chest physical therapy. The treatment target is bronchial obstruction, which is a multifactorial phenomenon that includes edema, bronchoconstriction, and increased mucus production, with a clinical grading defined as severe, moderate, or mild. Chest physical therapy is revisited in its various modalities, according to preliminary scoring of the disease.

  14. Postpartum Pneumomediastinum: An Uncommon Cause for Chest Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Revicky

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report refers to a 32-year-old primiparous woman with a mild asthma, who had a normal vaginal delivery in a birthing pool and developed an acute postpartum chest pain due to pneumomediastinum and subcutaneous chest emphysema. After 72 hours of observation, she was discharged home without any residual symptoms.

  15. Taking heartache to heart: Empirical psychological modelling of chest pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.W. Serlie (Alec)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThe chest pain of patients visiting a cardiology out-patient's clinic is most often caused by coronary atherosclerosis, which induces an oxygen shortage in the heartmuscle and thereby pain. However, in approximately 30% of the chest pain patients no clear somatic cause can be found. Cont

  16. Giant pericardial cyst mimicking dextrocardia on chest X-ray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, Hamad M; Galrinho, Ana; Abreu, João; Valente, Bruno; Bakero, Luis; Ferreira, Rui C

    2013-01-01

    Pericardial cysts are rare benign congenital malformations, usually small, asymptomatic and detected incidentally on chest X-ray as a mass located in the right costophrenic angle. Giant pericardial cysts are very uncommon and produce symptoms by compressing adjacent structures. In this report, the authors present a case of a symptomatic giant pericardial cyst incorrectly diagnosed as dextrocardia on chest X-ray.

  17. Measurement of characteristic leap interval between chest and falsetto registers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miller, DG; Svec, JG; Schutte, HK

    2002-01-01

    A markedly smaller time constant distinguishes a chest-falsetto leap from the more usual execution of a sung interval by muscular adjustments in the length and tension of the vocal folds. The features of such a chest-falsetto leap are examined in detail with respect to F-0, peak-to-peak amplitude of

  18. Effect of rib-cage structure on acoustic chest impedance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmermann, Niels Henrik; Møller, Henrik; Hansen, John;

    2011-01-01

    When a stethoscope is placed on the surface of the chest, the coupler picks up sound from heart and lungs transmitted through the tissues of the ribcage and from the surface of the skin. If the acoustic impedance of the chest surface is known, it is possible to optimize the coupler for picking up...

  19. Management of chest drainage tubes after lung surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Yukitoshi

    2016-06-01

    Since chest tubes have been routinely used to drain the pleural space, particularly after lung surgery, the management of chest tubes is considered to be essential for the thoracic surgeon. The pleural drainage system requires effective drainage, suction, and water-sealing. Another key point of chest tube management is that a water seal is considered to be superior to suction for most air leaks. Nowadays, the most common pleural drainage device attached to the chest tube is the three-bottle system. An electronic chest drainage system has been developed that is effective in standardizing the postoperative management of chest tubes. More liberal use of digital drainage devices in the postoperative management of the pleural space is warranted. The removal of chest tubes is a common procedure occurring almost daily in hospitals throughout the world. Extraction of the tube is usually done at the end of full inspiration or at the end of full expiration. The tube removal technique is not as important as how it is done and the preparation for the procedure. The management of chest tubes must be based on careful observation, the patient's characteristics, and the operative procedures that had been performed.

  20. Options for assessing and measuring chest wall motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddon, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Assessing chest wall motion is a basic and vital component in managing the child with respiratory problems, whether these are due to pathology in the lungs, airways, chest wall or muscles. Since the 1960s, clinical assessment has been supplemented with an ever-growing range of technological options for measuring chest wall motion, each with unique advantages and disadvantages. Measurements of chest wall motion can be used to: (1) Assess respiratory airflow and volume change, as a non-invasive alternative to measurement at the airway opening, (2) Monitor breathing over long periods of time, to identify apnoea and other types of sleep-disordered breathing, (3)Identify and quantify patterns of abnormal chest wall movement, whether between ribcage and abdominal components (thoracoabdominal asynchrony) or between different regions of the ribcage (eg in scoliosis and pectus excavatum). Measuring chest wall motion allows us to do things which simply cannot be done by more mainstream respiratory function techniques measuring flow at the airway opening: it allows respiratory airflow to be measured when it would otherwise be impossible, and it tells us how the different parts of the chest wall (eg ribcage vs abdomen, right vs left) are moving in order to generate that airflow. The basis of the different techniques available to assess and measure chest wall motion will be reviewed and compared, and their relevance to paediatric respiratory practice assessed.

  1. Segmentation of anatomical structures in chest CT scans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rikxoort, E.M.

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, methods are described for the automatic segmentation of anatomical structures from chest CT scans. First, a method to segment the lungs from chest CT scans is presented. Standard lung segmentation algorithms rely on large attenuation differences between the lungs and the surrounding

  2. Sexual, Physical, Verbal/Emotional Abuse and Unexplained Chest Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslick, Guy D.; Koloski, Natasha A.; Talley, Nicholas J.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Approximately one third of patients with non cardiac chest pain (NCCP) report a history of abuse, however no data exists on the prevalence of abuse among people with unexplained chest pain in the general population. We aimed to determine if there is a relationship between childhood sexual, physical, emotional abuse and unexplained…

  3. Chest wall reconstruction in a pediatric patient with ectopia cordis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Raja; Peralta, Mat; Perez, Ramiro; Rosenkranz, Eliot R; Panthaki, Zubin J

    2010-08-01

    Ectopia cordis is defined as a congenital malposition of the heart outside of the thoracic cavity. It is a rare condition, and complete ectopia cordis can be a fatal condition. Successful surgical reconstruction of this defect has been reported but is uncommon. The general approach to reconstructing the chest wall involves repositioning the heart and providing adequate coverage of the chest wall defect. We describe our experience with a patient who had complete thoracic ectopia cordis treated with staged chest wall reconstruction. The first stage involved temporary closure with synthetic material, and the second stage involved definitive reconstruction with autologous bone and cartilage grafts supported with plates. The patient has been active and without complaints since the second stage and is awaiting tracheal decannulation. There have been a few descriptions of how to approach chest wall reconstruction in patients with ectopia cordis. The 2 stage method described can be considered to repair the chest wall defect in complete thoracic ectopia cordis.

  4. Electronic versus traditional chest tube drainage following lobectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lijkendijk, Marike; Licht, Peter B; Neckelmann, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Electronic drainage systems have shown superiority compared with traditional (water seal) drainage systems following lung resections, but the number of studies is limited. As part of a medico-technical evaluation, before change of practice to electronic drainage systems for routine...... thoracic surgery, we conducted a randomized controlled trial (RCT) investigating chest tube duration and length of hospitalization. METHODS: Patients undergoing lobectomy were included in a prospective open label RCT. A strict algorithm was designed for early chest tube removal, and this decision...... time for chest tube removal, as well as length of hospitalization. RESULTS: A total of 105 patients were randomized. We found no significant difference between the electronic group and traditional group in optimal chest tube duration (HR = 0.83; 95% CI: 0.55-1.25; P = 0.367), actual chest tube duration...

  5. A Clinical Trial of a Computer Diagnosis Program for Chest Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-07

    infection, myocardial infarction, and non-specific chest pain. The category " Angina " included both stable and unstable angina . Chest infection was...is suitable for use by corpsmen at sea. THE FINDINGS 132 patients with confirmed diagnoses of chest pain (myocardial infarction, angina , chest ...sea with chest pain. The diagnostic accuracy of the program for three common and serious causes of chest pain -- myocardial infarction (MI), angina

  6. Primitive chest wall neuroectodermal tumor in a pediatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhengcheng; Zou, Wei; Ma, Guodong; Pan, Yanqing

    2011-10-01

    A 13-year-old boy with a primitive neuroectodermal tumor of the chest wall is presented. After four cycles of chemotherapy, a computed tomography scan of his chest showed a larger mass invading the left upper lobe of the lung. He underwent resection of the left chest wall from the left fourth to sixth ribs, including the tumor, combined with left upper lobectomy and lymph node dissection. A diagnosis of primitive neuroectodermal tumor was confirmed histopathologically and immunohistochemically. After surgery, four cycles of chemotherapy with ifosfamide and etoposide were given. One year after treatment, the patient is currently doing well without evidence of recurrence.

  7. Mesenchymal hamartoma of the chest wall: prenatal sonographic manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wie, Jeong ha; Kim, Ju Yeon; Kwon, Ji Young; Ko, Hyun Sun; Shin, Jong Chul; Park, In Yang

    2013-06-01

    Mesenchymal hamartoma of the chest wall is a rare, benign lesion that arises from one or more ribs, almost exclusively found in infants. Some cases that developed in the fetal period have been reported, but accurate diagnosis was usually possible only after birth, except in a few cases in which fetal magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography were performed. We present a case of a congenital mesenchymal hamartoma of the chest wall. Although the diagnosis was not confirmed until birth, the prenatal sonographic examination showed strongly suggestive findings. We review the published reports on this condition, and suggest the prenatal sonographic features. Prenatal sonography is valuable in the differential diagnosis of chest mass.

  8. The effects of chest expansion resistance exercise on chest expansion and maximal respiratory pressure in elderly with inspiratory muscle weakness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang-Beom; Yang, Jin-Mo; Choi, Jong-Duk

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the effect of chest expansion resistance exercises (CERE) on chest expansion, maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP), and maximal expiratory pressure (MEP) in elderly people with inspiratory muscle weakness. [Subjects] Thirty elderly people with inspiratory muscle weakness (MIP < 80% of the predicted value) were randomly and equally assigned to a chest expansion resistance exercise (CERE) group, core conditioning exercise (CCE) group, and control group. [Methods] The intervention was applied to the CERE group and CCE group five times per week, 30 minutes each time, for six weeks. A tapeline was used to measure upper and lower chest expansion. MIP and MEP before and after the intervention were measured and compared. [Results] There was significant improvement in upper and lower chest expansion and MIP after the intervention in both the CERE group and the CCE group, whereas the control group did not show any significant difference. MEP did not significantly change in any of the three groups after the intervention. [Conclusion] The CERE group underwent greater changes than the CCE group, which proves that the CERE is more effective for improving elderly people’s chest expansion capacity and MIP in elderly people. Therefore, application of the CERE by therapists is recommended if the environment and conditions are appropriate for enhancement of chest expansion capacity and MIP in elderly people. PMID:25995570

  9. Chest trauma: A case for single lung ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandharikar, Nagaraj; Sachdev, Anil; Gupta, Neeraj; Gupta, Suresh; Gupta, Dhiren

    2016-04-01

    Chest trauma is one of the important causes of mortality and morbidity in pediatric trauma patients. The complexity, magnitude, and type of lung injury make it extremely challenging to provide optimal oxygenation and ventilation while protecting the lung from further injury due to mechanical ventilation. Independent lung ventilation is used sporadically in these patients who do not respond to these conventional ventilatory strategies using double-lumen endotracheal tubes, bronchial blocker balloons, etc. However, this equipment may not be easily available in developing countries, especially for pediatric patients. Here, we present a case of severe chest trauma with pulmonary contusion, flail chest, and bronchopleural fistula, who did not respond to conventional lung protective strategies. She was successfully managed with bronchoscopy-guided unilateral placement of conventional endotracheal tube followed by single lung ventilation leading to resolution of a chest injury.

  10. Radiological chest manifestations in diffuse infiltrative lymphocytosis syndrome (DILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Ismail

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This report focuses on the radiological manifestations of diffuse interstitial lymphocytosis syndrome (DILS in the chest. Awareness of this entity and early diagnosis by radiologists will enable timeous intervention by clinicians.

  11. Anterior chest wall involvement in patients with pustulosis palmoplantaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurik, A G

    1990-01-01

    With the aim of determining the frequency and radiographic features of anterior chest wall involvement in patients with pustulosis palmoplantaris, a questionnaire was sent to 107 patients. Ninety-three patients returned the questionnaire, five of whom were excluded from further analysis due to the appearance of psoriatic lesions. Twenty-five (28%) of the remaining 88 patients reported pain and/or swelling of joints or bones in the anterior chest wall. All were examined radiographically, using tomography, and a group of 20 patients without anterior chest wall complaints were examined similarly. Sixteen of the patients with, but none of the patients without, complaints were found to have arthro-osteitis of the anterior chest wall, consisting of diffuse sclerosis of the manubrium sterni in one patient, localized sclerosis in seven patients, and sequelae of arthritis of the sternoclavicular, upper sternocostal and/or manubriosternal joint in eight patients.

  12. [Clinico-roentgenological semiotics of the chest damage in polytrauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamiatin, P N; Panchenko, E V; Grigor'ian, G O; Goloshchapova, E V

    2006-10-01

    There are presented the main clinico-roentgenological signs of the chest damage in the injured persons, suffering polytrauma, according to the data from the specialized department of traumatic shock and polytrauma.

  13. Thoracoscopic pulmonary wedge resection without post-operative chest drain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbek, Bo Laksáfoss; Hansen, Henrik Jessen; Kehlet, Henrik;

    2016-01-01

    effusion and coagulopathy. Chest X-rays were done twice on the day of surgery. 30-day complications were compiled from patient records. RESULTS: 49 patients underwent 51 unilateral VATS wedge resections without using a post-operative chest drain. No patient required reinsertion of a chest drain. 30 (59...... %) patients had a pneumothorax of mean size 12 ± 12 mm on supine 8-h post-operative X-ray for which the majority resolved spontaneously within 2-week control. There were no complications on 30-day follow-up. Median length of stay was 1 day. CONCLUSIONS: The results support that VATS wedge resection...... for pulmonary nodules without a post-operative chest drain may be safe in a selected group of patients....

  14. Chest trauma: A case for single lung ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraj Pandharikar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chest trauma is one of the important causes of mortality and morbidity in pediatric trauma patients. The complexity, magnitude, and type of lung injury make it extremely challenging to provide optimal oxygenation and ventilation while protecting the lung from further injury due to mechanical ventilation. Independent lung ventilation is used sporadically in these patients who do not respond to these conventional ventilatory strategies using double-lumen endotracheal tubes, bronchial blocker balloons, etc. However, this equipment may not be easily available in developing countries, especially for pediatric patients. Here, we present a case of severe chest trauma with pulmonary contusion, flail chest, and bronchopleural fistula, who did not respond to conventional lung protective strategies. She was successfully managed with bronchoscopy-guided unilateral placement of conventional endotracheal tube followed by single lung ventilation leading to resolution of a chest injury.

  15. Modified Seldinger technique for the insertion of standard chest tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, E; Ben-Nun, A; Curtis, W; Best, L A

    2001-04-01

    Closed tube thoracostomy is a standard procedure for the evacuation of air, blood, or other materials from the pleural space. This paper describes a modification of the Seldinger technique that facilitates chest tube insertion. Either a Nelaton or Thieman catheter is threaded into the side drainage hole and out the tip of a standard Argyle-type chest tube. After using the clamp to insert the catheter into the pleural space through a previously dissected tract, the catheter serves as a guide over which the chest tube is inserted. The technique is simple to use, effective, and safe. It employs standard, inexpensive materials to insert chest tubes in such a way as to minimize the potential traumatic complications inherent in other techniques.

  16. Part Ⅱ The Typical Cases of Chest Pain Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pan Xingfang; Shang Xiaohong

    2001-01-01

    @@ Case 1 Mr Wang, 47 years old. His first visit was on May 7th, 1995. Chief complaints: At the treatment time,chest distress and pain had attacked again and again for six years and worsened for ten days.

  17. Lung and chest wall mechanics in microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edyvean, J; Estenne, M; Paiva, M; Engel, L A

    1991-11-01

    We studied the effect of 15-20 s of weightlessness on lung, chest wall, and abdominal mechanics in five normal subjects inside an aircraft flying repeated parabolic trajectories. We measured flow at the mouth, thoracoabdominal and compartmental volume changes, and gastric pressure (Pga). In two subjects, esophageal pressures were measured as well, allowing for estimates of transdiaphragmatic pressure (Pdi). In all subjects functional residual capacity at 0 Gz decreased by 244 +/- 31 ml as a result of the inward displacement of the abdomen. End-expiratory Pga decreased from 6.8 +/- 0.8 cmH2O at 1 Gz to 2.5 +/- 0.3 cmH2O at Gz (P less than 0.005). Abdominal contribution to tidal volume increased from 0.33 +/- 0.05 to 0.51 +/- 0.04 at 0 Gz (P less than 0.001) but delta Pga showed no consistent change. Hence abdominal compliance increased from 43 +/- 9 to 70 +/- 10 ml/cmH2O (P less than 0.05). There was no consistent effect of Gz on tidal swings of Pdi, on pulmonary resistance and dynamic compliance, or on any of the timing parameters determining the temporal pattern of breathing. The results indicate that at 0 G respiratory mechanics are intermediate between those in the upright and supine postures at 1 G. In addition, analysis of end-expiratory pressures suggests that during weightlessness intra-abdominal pressure is zero, the diaphragm is passively tensed, and a residual small pleural pressure gradient may be present.

  18. Pulmonary embolism findings on chest radiographs and multislice spiral CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coche, Emmanuel; Goncette, Louis [Department of Radiology, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Avenue Hippocrate 10, 1200, Brussels (Belgium); Verschuren, Franck [Department of Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Avenue Hippocrate 10, 1200, Brussels (Belgium); Hainaut, Philippe [Department of Internal Medicine, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Avenue Hippocrate 10, 1200, Brussels (Belgium)

    2004-07-01

    Multislice spiral CT is becoming an increasingly important tool for diagnosing pulmonary embolism. However, in many instances, a chest radiograph is usually performed as a first-line examination. Many parenchymal, vascular, and other ancillary findings may be observed on both imaging modalities with a highly detailed depiction of abnormalities on multislice CT. A comprehensive review of chest radiograph findings is presented with side-by-side correlations of CT images reformatted mainly in the frontal plane. (orig.)

  19. Pulmonary embolism findings on chest radiographs and multislice spiral CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coche, Emmanuel; Verschuren, Franck; Hainaut, Philippe; Goncette, Louis

    2004-07-01

    Multislice spiral CT is becoming an increasingly important tool for diagnosing pulmonary embolism. However, in many instances, a chest radiograph is usually performed as a first-line examination. Many parenchymal, vascular, and other ancillary findings may be observed on both imaging modalities with a highly detailed depiction of abnormalities on multislice CT. A comprehensive review of chest radiograph findings is presented with side-by-side correlations of CT images reformatted mainly in the frontal plane.

  20. Comparison of Fentanyl with Sufentanil for Chest Tube Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Golmohammadi

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: After cardiac surgery, the chest tubes cause pain and their removal is painful and unpleasant forpatients. The aim of this research was to study and compare the analgesic effect of fentanyl and sufentanil on painrelief during chest tube removal in post-cardiac surgical patients.Patients and Methods: A total of 80 patients scheduled for elective cardiac surgery, were recruited in prospective,randomized and double-blind study. Patients received 1.5μg/kg fentanyl or 0.15μg/kg sufentanyl, intravenously10 minutes before removal of chest tube. Pain intensity was assessed by measuring visual analogscale (VAS pain score, 10 minutes before, during, and 5 and10 minutes after removing chest tubes. Level ofsedation, heart rate, arterial blood pressure, and oxygenation saturation were recorded at each stage by a blindedobserver.Results: Mean pain intensity scores 10 minutes before removal of chest tube in fentanyl, and sufentanil groupswere 29.5±12.1 and 31±11.2 respectively. Pain scores during chest tube removal were 38.5±11.6 in fentanylgroup and 44.7±12.8 in sufentanil group (P =0.02. In addition, pain scores during chest tube removal were significantly(P value=0.02 more reduced in fentanyl (17.21±7.5 than in sufentanil group (21.51±11.2. Sedationscores remained low in two groups. None of the patients showed any adverse side effects of opioids. No differenceswere seen in the heart rate or arterial blood pressure, but oxygenation saturation was significantly greaterin sufentanil group than in fentanyl group.Conclusion: Both fentanyl and sufentanil provide adequate analgesia for chest tube removal without increasinguntoward side effects.

  1. Young Woman with a Fever and Chest Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin H. Dwyer, MD, MPH

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A 26-year-old female presented to the emergency department with three days of subjective fevers, dry cough and pleuritic chest discomfort. On exam, her vital signs were significant for a heart rate of 106/minute and oxygen saturation of 95% on room air. Her lung exam revealed decreased breath sounds at the right base. A bedside lung ultrasound and a chest radiograph were performed (Figure 1a, Figure 2, and Video.

  2. Role of Cross Sectional Imaging in Isolated Chest Wall Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanyal, Shantiranjan; Sharma, Barun K.; Prakash, Arjun; Dhingani, Dhabal D.; Bora, Karobi

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Isolated chest wall tuberculosis though a rare entity, the incidence of it has been on rise among immunocompromised population making it an important challenging diagnosis for the physicians. Its clinical presentation may resemble pyogenic chest wall abscess or chest wall soft tissue tumour. Sometimes it is difficult to detect clinically or on plain radiograph. Aim The present study was conducted with an aim to evaluate the common sites and varying appearances of isolated chest wall tuberculosis. Materials and Methods A hospital based cross-sectional retrospective study was conducted in Assam Medical College and Hospital, a tertiary care centre in North East India. The study group comprise of 21 patients (n=15 male and n=6 females) with isolated chest wall tuberculosis without associated pulmonary or spinal involvement who were subjected to Computed Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging (CT/MRI) of the thorax following initial Ultrasonogram (USG) evaluation of the local site. Pathological correlation was done from imaging guided sampling of the aspirate or surgery. Results Variable sites of involvement were seen in the chest wall in our patients (n=21), with chest wall abscess formation being the most common presentation and rib being the most common bony site affected in the thoracic cage. Bony sclerosis was noted in 11 patients (52.4%), periosteal reaction in 10 patients (47.6%) and sequestration in five patients (23.8%). CT/MRI not only localized the exact site and extent of the abscesses which facilitated guided aspirations, but also helped in detecting typical bony lesions thereby, differentiating from pyogenic osteomyelitis besides ruling out associated pulmonary or pleural involvement in such patients. Conclusion Cross-sectional imaging plays an important role by giving a wholesome picture of both soft tissue and bony pathology. It is important to have adequate understanding of the radiologic manifestations of the chest wall involvement and

  3. High-Frequency Chest Compression: A Summary of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Dosman, Cara F; Jones, Richard L

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the present literature summary is to describe high-frequency chest compression (HFCC), summarize its history and outline study results on its effect on mucolysis, mucus transport, pulmonary function and quality of life. HFCC is a mechanical method of self-administered chest physiotherapy, which induces rapid air movement in and out of the lungs. This mean oscillated volume is an effective method of mucolysis and mucus clearance. HFCC can increase independence. Some studies have...

  4. Chest Pain Units: A Modern Way of Managing Patients with Chest Pain in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Bassan

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that 5 to 8 million individuals with chest pain or other symptoms suggestive of myocardial ischemia are seen each year in emergency departments (ED in the United States 1,2, which corresponds to 5 to 10% of all visits 3,4. Most of these patients are hospitalized for evaluation of possible acute coronary syndrome (ACS. This generates an estimated cost of 3 - 6 thousand dollars per patient 5,6. From this evaluation process, about 1.2 million patients receive the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI, and just about the same number have unstable angina. Therefore, about one half to two thirds of these patients with chest pain do not have a cardiac cause for their symptoms 2,3. Thus, the emergency physician is faced with the difficult challenge of identifying those with ACS - a life-threatening disease - to treat them properly, and to discharge the others to suitable outpatient investigation and management.

  5. Comparison of expectorated sputum after manual chest physical therapy and high-frequency chest compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warwick, Warren J; Wielinski, Catherine L; Hansen, Leland G

    2004-01-01

    This study is a quantitative comparison of the sputum produced by 12 subjects with cystic fibrosis (CF) who received high-frequency chest compression (HFCC) and standard chest physical therapy (CPT) in randomized order. Six subjects routinely used manual CPT and six routinely used the HFCC. None had acute infections or hospitalization in the six weeks before the study. Two certified respiratory therapists alternated subjects and CPT vs HFCC order during the two weeks of the matched study. For all sessions, the expectorated sputum was collected in preweighed cups, which were reweighed immediately after collection and again after evaporation to dryness. The wet and dry weights of the sputum produced as a result of the two techniques were significantly different, with HFCC having greater weight. Regardless of the mode of therapy, the sputum produced by the subjects who regularly received HFCC had greater water content than did the sputum produced by those subjects who regularly received CPT. No significant difference was found between the two therapists regarding sputum expectorated by the subjects during CPT. These results show that sputum production by subjects with CF who receive CPT by certified respiratory therapists can be as great as the sputum produced by the same subjects who receive HFCC. The results also suggest that unknown factors attributed to the therapists may produce different levels of effort from time to time that may decrease the respiratory therapists' effectiveness, whereas the HFCC therapy may be more consistently effective because it is entirely machine based.

  6. Chest wall segmentation in automated 3D breast ultrasound scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Tao; Platel, Bram; Mann, Ritse M; Huisman, Henkjan; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we present an automatic method to segment the chest wall in automated 3D breast ultrasound images. Determining the location of the chest wall in automated 3D breast ultrasound images is necessary in computer-aided detection systems to remove automatically detected cancer candidates beyond the chest wall and it can be of great help for inter- and intra-modal image registration. We show that the visible part of the chest wall in an automated 3D breast ultrasound image can be accurately modeled by a cylinder. We fit the surface of our cylinder model to a set of automatically detected rib-surface points. The detection of the rib-surface points is done by a classifier using features representing local image intensity patterns and presence of rib shadows. Due to attenuation of the ultrasound signal, a clear shadow is visible behind the ribs. Evaluation of our segmentation method is done by computing the distance of manually annotated rib points to the surface of the automatically detected chest wall. We examined the performance on images obtained with the two most common 3D breast ultrasound devices in the market. In a dataset of 142 images, the average mean distance of the annotated points to the segmented chest wall was 5.59 ± 3.08 mm.

  7. A new specifically designed forceps for chest drain insertion.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Andrews, Emmet

    2012-02-03

    Insertion of a chest drain can be associated with serious complications. It is recommended that the drain is inserted with blunt dissection through the chest wall but there is no specific instrument to aid this task. We describe a new reusable forceps that has been designed specifically to facilitate the insertion of chest drains.A feasibility study of its use in patients who required a chest drain as part of elective cardiothoracic operations was undertaken. The primary end-point was successful and accurate placement of the drain. The operators also completed a questionnaire rating defined aspects of the procedure. The new instrument was used to insert the chest drain in 30 patients (19 male, 11 female; median age 61.5 years (range 16-81 years)). The drain was inserted successfully without the trocar in all cases and there were no complications. Use of the instrument rated as significantly easier relative to experience of previous techniques in all specified aspects. The new device can be used to insert intercostal chest drains safely and efficiently without using the trocar or any other instrument.

  8. COMBINED EFFECT OF PNF STRETCHING WITH CHEST MOBILITY EXERCISES ON CHEST EXPANSION AND PULMONARY FUNCTIONS FOR ELDERLY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Babu .K

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: PNF stretching and chest mobility exercises found to be effective in elder patients, however the combined effectiveness of these techniques were unknown. The purpose of this study is to find the effect of Hold-relax PNF stretching technique for pectoralis muscle combined with chest mobility exercises on improvement of chest expansion and pulmonary function for elderly subjects. Method: An Experimental study design, 30 subjects with age group above 60 years were randomized 15 subjects each into Study and Control group. Control group received Supervised Active Assisted Exercise Program while Study group received Hold-relax PNF Stretching for pectoralis muscle, Chest Mobility Exercises Program and supervised Active Assisted Exercise Program for a period of one week. Outcome measures such as chest expansion at axilla and xiphisternum and pulmonary function test such as FEV1, FVC and FEV1/FVC were measured before and after one week of treatment. Results: Analysis using paired ‘t’ test within the group found that there is no statistically significant difference within control group where as there is a statistical significant difference within study group. Comparative analysis of pre-intervention means shown that there is no statistically significant difference between the groups. Comparative analysis of post-intervention means shown that there is a statistically significant difference in means of Chest expansion, FEV1/FVC and there is no statistical significant difference in FEV1 and FVC between study and control groups. Conclusion: It is concluded that one week of combined Hold-relax PNF stretching for pectoralis muscle with chest mobility exercises shown significant improvement in chest expansion and pulmonary function test such as forced expiratory volume and forced vital capacity than only active assisted exercise program for elderly subjects.

  9. Posterior diaphragmatic defect detected on chest CT: the incidence according to age and the lateral chest radiographic appearances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Son Youl; Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Seok Chol; Heo, Jeong Nam; Park, Choong Ki [College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    We wanted to investigate the incidence of posterior diaphragmatic defect on chest CT in various age groups and its lateral chest radiographic appearances. The chest CT scans of 78 patients of various ages with posterior diaphragmatic defect were selected among 1,991 patients, and they were analyzed for the incidence of defect in various age groups, the defect location and the herniated contents. Their lateral chest radiographs were analyzed for the shape of the posterior diaphragm and the posterior costophrenic sulcus. The patients' ages ranged from 34 to 87 with the tendency of a higher incidence in the older patients. The defect most frequently involved the medial two thirds (n = 49, 50.4%) and middle one third (n = 36, 37%) of the posterior diaphragm. The retroperitoneal fat was herniated into the thorax through the defect in all patients, and sometimes with the kidney (n = 8). Lateral chest radiography showed a normal diaphragmatic contour (n = 51, 49.5%), blunting of the posterior costophrenic sulcus (n = 41, 39.8%), focal humping of the posterior diaphragm (n = 7, 6.8%), or upward convexity (n = 4, 3.9%) of the posterior costophrenic sulcus on the affected side. The posterior diaphragmatic defect discovered in asymptomatic patients who are without a history of peridiaphragmatic disease is most likely acquired, and this malady increases in incidence according to age. An abnormal contour of the posterior diaphragm or the costophrenic sulcus on a lateral chest radiograph may be a finding of posterior diaphragmatic defect.

  10. [Chest pain - not always the heart! Clinical impact of gastrointestinal diseases in non-cardiac chest pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frieling, T; Bergdoldt, G; Allescher, H D; Riemann, J F

    2015-02-01

    Non cardiac chest pain (NCCP) are recurrent angina pectoris like pain without evidence of coronary heart disease in conventional diagnostic evaluation. The prevalence of NCCP is up to 70 % and may be detected in this order at all levels of the medical health care system (general practitioner, emergency department, chest pain unit, coronary care). Reduction of quality of life in NCCP is comparable, partially even higher compared to cardiac chest pain. Reasons for psychological strain are symptom recurrence in app. 50 %, nonspecific diagnosis with resulting uncertainty and insufficient integration of other medical disciplines in diagnostic work-up. Managing of patients with NCCP has to be interdisciplinary because non cardiac causes of chest pain may be found frequently. Especially gastroenterological expertise is required because in 50 - 60 % of cases gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), in 15 - 18 % hypercontractile esophageal motility disorders with nutcracker, jackhammer esophagus or distal esophageal spasmus or achalasia and in 32 - 35 % other esophageal alterations (e. g. infectious esophageal inflammation, drug-induced ulcer, rings, webs, eosinophilic esophagitis) as cause of chest pain may be detected. This implicates that regular interdisciplinary round wards and management of chest pain units are mandatory.

  11. Comparison of chest radiography, chest digital tomosynthesis and low dose MDCT to detect small ground-glass opacity nodules: an anthropomorphic chest phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doo, Kyung Won; Kang, Eun-Young; Yong, Hwan Seok [Korea University Guro Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ham, Soo-Youn [Korea University Anam Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ki Yeol; Choo, Ji Yung [Korea University Ansan Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of chest radiography (CXR), chest digital tomosynthesis (DT) and low dose multidetector computed tomography (LDCT) for the detection of small pulmonary ground-glass opacity (GGO) nodules, using an anthropomorphic chest phantom. Artificial pulmonary nodules were placed in a phantom and a total of 40 samples of different nodule settings underwent CXR, DT and LDCT. The images were randomly read by three experienced chest radiologists. Free-response receiver-operating characteristics (FROC) were used. The figures of merit for the FROC curves averaged for the three observers were 0.41, 0.37 and 0.76 for CXR, DT and LDCT, respectively. FROC analyses revealed significantly better performance of LDCT over CXR or DT for the detection of GGO nodules (P < 0.05). The difference in detectability between CXR and DT was not statistically significant (P = 0.73). The diagnostic performance of DT for the detection of pulmonary small GGO nodules was not significantly different from that of CXR, but LDCT performed significantly better than both CXR and DT. DT is not a suitable alternative to CT for small GGO nodule detection, and LDCT remains the method of choice for this purpose. (orig.)

  12. Chest wall syndrome among primary care patients: a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verdon François

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The epidemiology of chest pain differs strongly between outpatient and emergency settings. In general practice, the most frequent cause is the chest wall pain. However, there is a lack of information about the characteristics of this syndrome. The aims of the study are to describe the clinical aspects of chest wall syndrome (CWS. Methods Prospective, observational, cohort study of patients attending 58 private practices over a five-week period from March to May 2001 with undifferentiated chest pain. During a one-year follow-up, questionnaires including detailed history and physical exam, were filled out at initial consultation, 3 and 12 months. The outcomes were: clinical characteristics associated with the CWS diagnosis and clinical evolution of the syndrome. Results Among 24 620 consultations, we observed 672 cases of chest pain and 300 (44.6% patients had a diagnosis of chest wall syndrome. It affected all ages with a sex ratio of 1:1. History and sensibility to palpation were the keys for diagnosis. Pain was generally moderate, well localised, continuous or intermittent over a number of hours to days or weeks, and amplified by position or movement. The pain however, may be acute. Eighty-eight patients were affected at several painful sites, and 210 patients at a single site, most frequently in the midline or a left-sided site. Pain was a cause of anxiety and cardiac concern, especially when acute. CWS coexisted with coronary disease in 19 and neoplasm in 6. Outcome at one year was favourable even though CWS recurred in half of patients. Conclusion CWS is common and benign, but leads to anxiety and recurred frequently. Because the majority of chest wall pain is left-sided, the possibility of coexistence with coronary disease needs careful consideration.

  13. Pleural controversy: optimal chest tube size for drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, Richard W

    2011-02-01

    In recent years, a higher and higher percentage of patients with pleural effusions or pneumothorax are being treated with small-bore (10-14 F) chest tubes rather than large-bore (>20 F). However, there are very few randomized controlled studies comparing the efficacy and complication rates with the small- and large-bore catheters. Moreover, the randomized trials that are available have flaws in their design. The advantages of the small-bore catheters are that they are easier to insert and there is less pain with their insertion while they are in place. The placement of the small-bore catheters is probably more optimal when placement is done with ultrasound guidance. Small-bore chest tubes are recommended when pleurodesis is performed. The success of the small-bore indwelling tunnelled catheters that are left in place for weeks documents that the small-bore tubes do not commonly become obstructed with fibrin. Patients with complicated parapneumonic effusions are probably best managed with small-bore catheters even when the pleural fluid is purulent. Patients with haemothorax are best managed with large-bore catheters because of blood clots and the high volume of pleural fluid. Most patients with pneumothorax can be managed with aspiration or small-bore chest tubes. If these fail, a large-bore chest tube may be necessary. Patients on mechanical ventilation with barotrauma induced pneumothoraces are best managed with large-bore chest tubes.

  14. Chest X-ray imaging of patients with SARS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆普选; 周伯平; 陈心春; 袁明远; 龚小龙; 杨根东; 刘锦清; 袁本通; 郑广平; 杨桂林; 王火生

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the chest X-ray manifestations of SARS cases.Methods A retrospective study was conducted among 52 clinically confirmed SARS patients from February 9 to May 10, 2003. Chest X-ray scanning was performed at a interval of 1-3 days according to the requirements. The manifestations and special features of SARS in X-ray were analyzed. Results Small or large patchy shadows with intensive density in both lungs were observed in 31 cases, ground-glass like opacification in 16, small patchy shadows in one lung lobe or one lung segment in 18, nodular shadows in one lung segment in 1, and increased lung marking in lung interstitial tissues in 2. Rapidly changing consolidations revealed in chest X-ray images were found to be associated with SARS infections, and they were not affected by treatment with antibiotics.Conclusion Chest X-ray provides a sensitive and specific method for the diagnosis and treatment of SARS, and those present with symptoms and signs should undergo chest X-ray scanning every 1-3 days.

  15. Factors Associated with ICU Admission following Blunt Chest Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Bellone

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Blunt chest wall trauma accounts for over 10% of all trauma patients presenting to emergency departments worldwide. When the injury is not as severe, deciding which blunt chest wall trauma patients require a higher level of clinical input can be difficult. We hypothesized that patient factors, injury patterns, analgesia, postural condition, and positive airway pressure influence outcomes. Methods. The study population consisted of patients hospitalized with at least 3 rib fractures (RF and at least one pulmonary contusion and/or at least one pneumothorax lower than 2 cm. Results. A total of 140 patients were retrospectively analyzed. Ten patients (7.1% were admitted to intensive care unit (ICU within the first 72 hours, because of deterioration of the clinical conditions and gas exchange with worsening of chest X-ray/thoracic ultrasound/chest computed tomography. On univariable analysis and multivariable analysis, obliged orthopnea (p=0.0018 and the severity of trauma score (p<0.0002 were associated with admission to ICU. Conclusions. Obliged orthopnea was an independent predictor of ICU admission among patients incurring non-life-threatening blunt chest wall trauma. The main therapeutic approach associated with improved outcome is the prevention of pulmonary infections due to reduced tidal volume, namely, upright postural condition and positive airway pressure.

  16. CT chest under general anesthesia: pulmonary, anesthetic and radiologic dilemmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoud, Mohamed [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Anesthesiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Towe, Christopher [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Fleck, Robert J. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Today's practice of medicine involves ever more complex patients whose care is coordinated with multidisciplinary teams. Caring for these patients can challenge all members of the health care team. Sedation/anesthesia in infants/toddlers as well as uncooperative or intellectually or emotionally impaired children who require imaging studies of the chest are ongoing challenges. High-quality computed tomography (CT) chest imaging studies in children under general anesthesia are extremely important for accurate interpretation and subsequent medical decision-making. Anesthesia-induced atelectasis may obscure or mimic true pathology creating a significant quality issue. Obtaining a high-quality, motion-free chest imaging study in infants and children under general anesthesia remains a difficult task in many institutions. Meticulous attention to anesthesia and imaging techniques and specialized knowledge are required to properly perform and interpret chest imaging studies. In this commentary, we discuss the continuous struggle to obtain high-quality CT chest imaging under general anesthesia. We will also discuss the major concerns of the anesthesiologist, radiologist and pulmonologist and why cooperation and coordination among these providers are critical for an optimal quality study.

  17. Chest physiotherapy in children with acute bacterial pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lieselotte Corten

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pneumonia is the single leading cause of death in children younger than 5 years of age. Chest physiotherapy is often prescribed as an additional therapy in children with pneumonia. Different chest physiotherapy techniques are available that aim to improve airway clearance, gas exchange and reduce the work of breathing. However, it is unclear if these techniques are effective in this population.Objective: The present review aimed to determine the efficacy of different chest physiotherapy techniques compared with no physiotherapy or other chest physiotherapy treatments in hospitalised children with bacterial pneumonia.Method: Six electronic databases (PubMed, Medline, Cochrane Library, PEDro, CINAHL and Africa-wide information, clinicaltrials.gov and pactr.org were searched for eligible studies.Results: Two randomised controlled trials and one ongoing study were identified. Neither completed trial reported differences between the control and intervention groups, although one study reported a longer duration of coughing (p = 0.04 and rhonchi (p = 0.03 in the intervention group.Conclusion: Because of the limited number of included articles and different presentations of outcome measures, we could not reject or accept chest physiotherapy as either an effective or harmful treatment option in this population.

  18. Computer-aided diagnosis in chest radiography: Beyond nodules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginneken, Bram van [University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands)], E-mail: bram@isi.uu.nl; Hogeweg, Laurens; Prokop, Mathias [University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2009-11-15

    Chest radiographs are the most common exam in radiology. They are essential for the management of various diseases associated with high mortality and morbidity and display a wide range of findings, many of them subtle. In this survey we identify a number of areas beyond pulmonary nodules that could benefit from computer-aided detection and diagnosis (CAD) in chest radiography. These include interstitial infiltrates, catheter tip detection, size measurements, detection of pneumothorax and detection and quantification of emphysema. Recent work in these areas is surveyed, but we conclude that the amount of research devoted to these topics is modest. Reasons for the slow pace of CAD development in chest radiography beyond nodules are discussed.

  19. Sedation versus general anaesthesia in paediatric patients undergoing chest CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, W.W.M.; So, N.M.C.; Metreweli, C. [Chinese Univ. of Hong Kong, Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging (China); Chen, P.P. [Chinese Univ. of Hong Kong, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care (China)

    1998-05-01

    Objective: CT of the chest in paediatric patients often requires sedation or general anaesthesia to minimize motion artefacts. Both sedation and general anaesthesia are associated with atelectasis which obscures the underlying pulmonary pathology. We conducted a prospective study to compare these two methods with respect to degree of motion artefacts and extent of atelectasis. Material and Methods: Nineteen patients undergoing 22 chest CT examinations were randomly selected for either sedation or general anaesthesia. The total area of atelectasis and the degree of motion artefacts were measured. Results: The mean percentage of atelectasis was 6.67% for general anaesthesia and 0.01% for sedation (p=0.01). There was no significant difference in the quality of the images between the sedation patients and the general anaesthesia patients. Conclusion: Whenever the clinical condition permits it, sedation rather than general anaesthesia should be given to paediatric patients undergoing chest CT. (orig.).

  20. Palpation for muscular tenderness in the anterior chest wall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Wulff; Vach, Werner; Manniche, Claus;

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To asses the interobserver and intraobserver reliability (in terms of day-to-day and hour-to-hour reliability) of palpation for muscular tenderness in the anterior chest wall. DESIGN: A repeated measures designs was used. SETTING: Department of Nuclear Medicine, Odense University...... Hospital, Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: Two experienced chiropractors examined 29 patients and 27 subjects in the interobserver part, and 1 of the 2 chiropractors examined 14 patients and 15 subjects in the intraobserver studies. INTERVENTION: Palpation for muscular tenderness was done in 14 predetermined areas...... palpating for intercostal tenderness or tenderness in the minor and major pectoral muscles in a population of patients with and without chest pain. This may hamper the ability of clinicians to diagnose and classify the musculoskeletal component of chest pain if based exclusively on palpation of the anterior...

  1. Ventilation distribution and chest wall mechanics in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, M.; Wantier, M.; Verbanck, S.; Engel, L. A.; Prisk, G. K.; Guy, H. J. B.; West, J. B.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of gravity on lung ventilation distribution and the mechanisms of the chest wall were investigated. The following tests were performed with the respiratory monitoring system of the Anthorack, flown onboard Spacelab D2 mission: single breath washout (SBW), multiple breath washout (MBW) and argon rebreathing (ARB). In order to study chest wall mechanisms in microgravity, a respiratory inductive plethysmograph was used. The SBW tests did not reach statistical significance, while the ARB tests showed that gravity independent inhomogeneity of specific ventilation is larger than gravity dependent inhomogeneity. In which concerns the chest wall mechanisms, the analysis on the four astronauts during the normal respirations of the relaxation maneuver showed a 40 percent increase on the abdominal contribution to respiration.

  2. Mesenchymal hamartoma of the chest wall in an infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayadi-Kaddour, A; Mlika, M; Chaabouni, S; Kilani, T; El Mezni, F

    2007-12-01

    Mesenchymal hamartoma of the chest wall is a very rare, benign tumour with distinct clinical, radiological and histopathologic characteristics. The lesion develops during foetal life, and is present at or shortly after birth with an extrapleural mass arising from the rib cage with or without respiratory distress and marked rib deformity. Several imaging techniques have been used for diagnosis, but a definitive diagnosis is established only by histopathological examination. Such lesions are composed of a varying admixture of hyaline cartilage that has features resembling growth plate cartilage, along with fascicles of spindle cells, woven bone and hemorrhagic cysts. Accurate diagnosis of mesenchymal hamartoma is important since many chest wall masses in children are malignant. We report a case of mesenchymal hamartoma of the left posterior chest wall surgically resected in an infant who was found to have a palpable mass at birth. Two years after surgery, the patient is alive and well, with no evidence of recurrence.

  3. HRCT findings of chest complications in patients with leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Matsumoto, Tsuneo; Miura, Gouji; Emoto, Takuya; Matsunaga, Naofumi [Department of Radiology, Yamaguchi University School of Medicine (Japan)

    2002-06-01

    High-resolution CT (HRCT) findings of several chest complications occurring in leukemic patients were reviewed. Although most entities show non-specific HRCT findings including ground-glass opacity and air-space consolidation, characteristic findings are observed in several pulmonary complications including Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, fungal infections, miliary tuberculosis, leukemic infiltration, pulmonary edema, bronchiolitis obliterans, and bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia. A combination of these characteristic HRCT findings and the information obtained from the clinical setting may help in achieving a correct diagnosis of chest complications occurring in leukemic patients. (orig.)

  4. Computer Analysis Of ILO Standard Chest Radiographs Of Pneumoconiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C. C.; Shu, David B. C.; Tai, H. T.; Hou, W.; Kunkle, G. A.; Wang, Y.; Hoy, R. J.

    1982-11-01

    This paper presents study of computer analysis of the 1980 ILO standard chest radiographs of pneumoconiosis. Algorithms developed for detection of individual small rounded and irregular opacities have been experimented and evaluated on these standard radiographs. The density, shape, and size distribution of the detected objects in the lung field, in spite of false positives, can be used as indicators for the beginning of pneumoconiosis. This approach is potentially useful in computer-assisted screening and early detection process where the annual chest radiograph of each worker is compared with his (her) own normal radiograph obtained previously.

  5. Chest wall involvement as a manifestation of Brucellosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Rahmdel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Brucellosis continues to be a common infectious disease in some parts of the world. Although the disease has different presentations, but chest wall involvement, as a manifestation of brucellosis is rare. In this study, we report three cases of chest wall involvement as manifesting feature of Brucellosis in Iran. They presented with a history of parasternal masses revealed to a diagnosis of Brucellosis and responded well to the treatment. Brucellosis may present with strange and unpredictable manifestations and can be misdiagnosed with tuberculosis and malignancies, especially in endemic areas for both TB and brucellosis.

  6. Chest injuries in civilian practice (A study of 166 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandke N

    1979-01-01

    Full Text Available Chest injuries constitute a large number of patients admitted in our Intensive Trauma Care Unit. The maximum incidence is in the age group of 20-40 years. Contusions, fracture ribs, pneumo-haemothorax constitute major thoracic injuries. Visceral injuries were always kept in mind while treating these patients with critical condition. Most of the patients could be treated with only active conservativemanagement with proper use of respirators in selected patients. Surgical intervention was required in the patients mostly with visceral injuries. The mortality rate in pure chest injuries is very low. The as-sociated head injuries and abdominal injuries increased the overall mortality rate.

  7. Anthropometric characteristics of chest in youths of different somatic types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlobin O.O.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to identify patterns of individual and combined anatomic variability of the size characteristics of the chest in conjunction with somatic types of youths 17-19 years. The object of study: boys, students (n=162, Saratov State Medical University n.a. V.I. Razumovsky, are natives of the Saratov region. The results showed that most youths are mesomorphic normotrofnomu, brachymorphic normotrofnomu and mesomorphic somatotype gipotrofnomu. Studied anthropometric parameters of the chest are statistically significant differences in all the selected somatotype

  8. Melioidosis:a rare cause of anterior chest wall abscess

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rashidi Ahmad; Azhar Amir Hamzah; Ahmad Kasfi Abdul Rahman; Phee Kheng Cheah

    2010-01-01

    Melioidosis is an unusual tropical infectious disease caused by the gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei, which was formerly known asPseudomonas pseudomallei. Melioidosis is characterized by abscess formation and it may manifest in any part of the human body, however, musculoskeletel melioidosis is uncommon and chest wall melioidosis is very rare. To determine the exact organism based solely on clinical presentation poses a great challenge to the physician. Yet, delay administration of antibiotic may be harmful. We describe a diabetic patient who had anterior chest wall melioidosis that mimicsStaphylococcus aureus infection. A description of his presentation and management, along with a review of literature is presented.

  9. Acute diaphragmatic paralysis caused by chest-tube trauma to phrenic nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nahum, E.; Ben-Ari, J.; Schonfeld, T. [Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Schneider Children' s Medical Center of Israel, Petah Tiqva (Israel); Horev, G. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Schneider Children' s Medical Center of Israel, Petah Tiqva (Israel); Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2001-06-01

    A 3{sup 1}/{sub 2}-year-old child developed unilateral diaphragmatic paralysis after chest drain insertion. Plain chest X-ray demonstrated paravertebral positioning of the chest-tube tip, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed hematomas in the region of the chest-tube tip and the phrenic nerve fibers. The trauma to the phrenic nerve was apparently secondary to malposition of the chest tube. This is a rare complication and has been reported mainly in neonates. Radiologists should notify the treating physicians that the correct position of a chest drain tip is at least 2 cm distant from the vertebrae. (orig.)

  10. Comparison of high frequency chest compression and conventional chest physiotherapy in hospitalized patients with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arens, R; Gozal, D; Omlin, K J; Vega, J; Boyd, K P; Keens, T G; Woo, M S

    1994-10-01

    Clearance of bronchial secretions is essential in the management of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients admitted for acute pulmonary exacerbation. Conventional physiotherapy (CPT) is labor-intensive, time-consuming, expensive, and may not be available as frequently as desired during hospitalization. High frequency chest compression (HFCC), which uses an inflatable vest linked to an air-pulse delivery system, may offer an attractive alternative. To study this, we prospectively studied 50 CF patients admitted for acute pulmonary exacerbation who were randomly allocated to receive either HFCC or CPT three times a day. On admission, clinical status and pulmonary function tests (PFT) in the HFCC group were not significantly different from those measured in the CPT group. Significant improvements in clinical status and PFT were observed after 7 and 14 d of treatment, and were similar in the two study groups, leading to patient discharge after similar periods of hospitalization. We conclude that HFCC and CPT are equally safe and effective when used during acute pulmonary exacerbations in CF patients. We speculate that HFCC may provide an adequate alternative in management of CF patients in a hospital setting.

  11. Localized Fisher vector representation for pathology detection in chest radiographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geva, Ofer; Lieberman, Sivan; Konen, Eli; Greenspan, Hayit

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we present a novel framework for automatic detection of abnormalities in chest radiographs. The representation model is based on the Fisher Vector encoding method. In the representation process, we encode each chest radiograph using a set of extracted local descriptors. These include localized texture features that address typical local texture abnormalities as well as spatial features. Using a Gaussian Mixture Model, a rich image descriptor is generated for each chest radiograph. An improved representation is obtained by selection of features that correspond to the relevant region of interest for each pathology. Categorization of the X-ray images is conducted using supervised learning and the SVM classifier. The proposed system was tested on a dataset of 636 chest radiographs taken from a real clinical environment. We measured the performance in terms of area (AUC) under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Results show an AUC value of 0.878 for abnormal mediastinum detection, and AUC values of 0.827 and 0.817 for detection of right and left lung opacities, respectively. These results improve upon the state-of-the-art as compared with two alternative representation models.

  12. Lung contusion from focal low-moderate chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafen, G M; Massie, J

    2006-10-01

    Apparently minor chest trauma may result in localized pulmonary contusion. Complications of the contusion, particularly infection, may be delayed. The association between the infection and initial injury may not be appreciated due to the time frame between the injury and clinical presentation. We report two cases of low-moderate impact pulmonary trauma resulting in focal pulmonary contusion, complicated by infection.

  13. Galactorrhea and hyperprolactinemia associated with chest wall injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, J E; Dawson, M; Hodgkinson, H; Kalk, W J

    1977-11-01

    A 48 year old premenopausal woman presented with galactorrhea and amenorrhea associated with chest wall burns. Basal serum prolactin levels were raised, and were further elevated by the administration of L-dopa, chlorpromazine and TRH. Intercostal nerve block and bromocryptine treatment reduced prolactin levels to normal, but did not noticably reduce milk secretion.

  14. Diagnosis of chest pain with foregut symptoms in Chinese patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Deng; Ru-Wen Wang; Yao-Guang Jiang; Qun-You Tan; Xiang-Li Liao; Jing-Hai Zhou; Yun-Ping Zhao; Tai-Qian Gong; Zheng Ma

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the diagnosis of chest pain with foregut symptoms in Chinese patients. METHODS: Esophageal manomet r ic studies, 24-h introesophageal pH monitoring and 24-h electrocardiograms (Holter electrocardiography) were performed in 61 patients with chest pain. RESULTS: Thirty-nine patients were diagnosed with non-specific esophageal motility disorders (29 patients with abnormal gastroesophageal reflux and eight patients with myocardial ischemia). Five patients had diffuse spasm of the esophagus plus abnormal gastroesophageal reflux (two patients had concomitant myocardial ischemia), and one patient was diagnosed with nutcracker esophagus. CONCLUSION: The esophageal manometric studies, 24-h intra-esophageal pH monitoring and Holter electrocardiography are significant for the differential diagnosis of chest pain, particularly in patients with foregut symptoms. In cases of esophageal motility disorders, pathological gastroesophageal reflux may be a major cause of chest pain with non-specific esophageal motility disorders. Spasm of the esophageal smooth muscle might affect the heart-coronary smooth muscle, leading to myocardial ischemia.

  15. Factors Associated with ICU Admission following Blunt Chest Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etteri, Massimiliano; Cantaluppi, Francesca; Pina, Paolo; Guanziroli, Massimo; Bianchi, AnnaMaria; Casazza, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Background. Blunt chest wall trauma accounts for over 10% of all trauma patients presenting to emergency departments worldwide. When the injury is not as severe, deciding which blunt chest wall trauma patients require a higher level of clinical input can be difficult. We hypothesized that patient factors, injury patterns, analgesia, postural condition, and positive airway pressure influence outcomes. Methods. The study population consisted of patients hospitalized with at least 3 rib fractures (RF) and at least one pulmonary contusion and/or at least one pneumothorax lower than 2 cm. Results. A total of 140 patients were retrospectively analyzed. Ten patients (7.1%) were admitted to intensive care unit (ICU) within the first 72 hours, because of deterioration of the clinical conditions and gas exchange with worsening of chest X-ray/thoracic ultrasound/chest computed tomography. On univariable analysis and multivariable analysis, obliged orthopnea (p = 0.0018) and the severity of trauma score (p pulmonary infections due to reduced tidal volume, namely, upright postural condition and positive airway pressure. PMID:28044070

  16. Effect of rib-cage structure on acoustic chest impedance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmermann, Niels Henrik; Møller, Henrik; Hansen, John;

    2011-01-01

    When a stethoscope is placed on the surface of the chest, the coupler picks up sound from heart and lungs transmitted through the tissues of the ribcage and from the surface of the skin. If the acoustic impedance of the chest surface is known, it is possible to optimize the coupler for picking up...... even weak sounds originating from e.g. the heart. The acoustic impedance is influenced by the structure of the ribcage; hence the acoustic impedance will change depending on if the coupler has been placed on a top of a rib or between the ribs (the intercostal). The impedance of the chest is measured...... in the frequency range from 40 Hz to 5 kHz using an acoustic impedance tube made specifically for the purpose. The measurements are carried out in a grid pattern on the surface of the chest. The grid is aligned according to the ribs; hence the measurements are either on a top of the ribs or between the ribs...

  17. Radical resection of giant chondrosarcoma of the anterior chest wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanić Vojkan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Chondrosarcomas represent approximately 30% of primary malignant bone tumors, the most frequent of which is on anterior thoracic wall. Case report. We presented a case of 50-year-old man suffering from a slowgrowing, painless giant chondrosarcoma of the anterior chest wall. A wide resection was performed to excise the tumor including attached skin, right breast, ribs, sternum, soft tissues and parietal pleura. Mediastinum was not affected by the tumor. After resecting a 26 × 20 × 22 cm segment, the chest wall defect was reconstructed with a Marlex mesh and extensive latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap pedicled on the right thoracodorsal vessels. Histopatology diagnosis was chondrosarcoma G 2−3. The mechanics of ventilation was not altered and respiratory function was normal from the immediate postoperative period. Three years after the operation postoperative results showed no local recurrence and excellent functional and aesthetic results were evident. Respiratory function remained unaltered. Conclusion. According to the results it can be concluded that the use of Marlex mash and myocutaneous flap is good method for stabilization of the chest wall and enough to avoid paradoxical respiratory movements in managing giant chondrosarcoma of the anterior chest wall.

  18. Prehospital chest tube thoracostomy: effective treatment or additional trauma?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanjersberg, W.; Bergs, B.; Krijen, P.; Schipper, I.; Ringburg, A.; Steyerberg, E.W.; Edwards, M.J.R.; Schipper, I.B.; Vugt, A.B. van

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The use of prehospital chest tube thoracostomy (TT) remains controversial because of presumed increased complication risks. This study analyzed infectious complication rates for physician-performed prehospital and emergency department (ED) TT. METHODS: Over a 40-month period, all consecu

  19. A neonate with respiratory distress and a chest wall deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerrey, Benjamin; Reed, Jennifer

    2007-08-01

    Infants with respiratory distress commonly present to a pediatric emergency department. There are rare but serious conditions that need to be considered in the differential diagnosis. We report the history of an infant that presented to our institution with respiratory distress ultimately diagnosed with a mesenchymal hamartoma of the chest wall. The presentation, diagnosis, and treatment options for mesenchymal hamartoma are discussed.

  20. Imaging of blunt chest trauma; Bildgebung des stumpfen Thoraxtraumas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prosch, H. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Allgemeines Krankenhaus, Univ.-Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Wien (Austria); Negrin, L. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Allgemeines Krankenhaus, Univ.-Klinik fuer Unfallchirurgie, Wien (Austria)

    2014-09-15

    Blunt chest trauma is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Consequently, all patients should be evaluated radiologically after blunt chest trauma to allow timely and appropriate treatment. Conventional chest radiographs and computed tomography (CT) are proven modalities with which to evaluate patients after blunt chest trauma. Over the last several years extended focused assessment with sonography for trauma (eFAST) has gained increasing importance for the initial assessment of seriously injured patients. In the acute phase of severely injured patients eFAST examinations are helpful to exclude pneumothorax, hemothorax and hemopericardium. Chest radiographs may also be used to diagnose a pneumothorax or hemothorax; however, the sensitivity is limited and CT is the diagnostic modality of choice to evaluate severely injured patients. (orig.) [German] Stumpfe Thoraxtraumen gehen mit einer hohen Morbiditaet und Mortalitaet einher. Daher sollten Patienten mit Verdacht auf ein stumpfes Thoraxtrauma rasch radiologisch untersucht werden, damit die entsprechenden therapeutischen Schritte zeitgerecht eingeleitet werden koennen. Zur Abklaerung von Patienten nach einem stumpfen Thoraxtrauma sind seit Jahren das konventionelle Lungenroentgen und die Computertomographie bewaehrte Verfahren. In den letzten Jahren hat die fokussierte Ultraschalluntersuchung (eFAST, Extended Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma) von schwerverletzten Patienten vermehrt an Bedeutung gewonnen. Durch eine eFAST-Untersuchung kann in der Akutphase rasch geklaert werden, ob bei dem Patienten ein therapiebeduerftiger Pneumothorax, Haematoperikard oder Haematothorax vorliegen. Auch das Lungenroentgen wird zur Diagnose eines Pneumothorax oder Haematothorax eingesetzt, wenngleich seine Sensitivitaet deutlich eingeschraenkt ist. Die CT ist das diagnostische Verfahren der Wahl, um v. a. Patienten mit einem schweren Thoraxtrauma abzuklaeren. (orig.)

  1. An Official American Thoracic Society/American College of Chest Physicians Clinical Practice Guideline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Girard, Timothy D; Alhazzani, Waleed; Kress, John P

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Interventions that lead to earlier liberation from mechanical ventilation can improve patient outcomes. This guideline, a collaborative effort between the American Thoracic Society (ATS) and the American College of Chest Physicians (CHEST), provides evidence-based recommendations to o...

  2. A Computer-Aided Detection System for Digital Chest Radiographs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Carrillo-de-Gea

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Computer-aided detection systems aim at the automatic detection of diseases using different medical imaging modalities. In this paper, a novel approach to detecting normality/pathology in digital chest radiographs is proposed. The problem tackled is complicated since it is not focused on particular diseases but anything that differs from what is considered as normality. First, the areas of interest of the chest are found using template matching on the images. Then, a texture descriptor called local binary patterns (LBP is computed for those areas. After that, LBP histograms are applied in a classifier algorithm, which produces the final normality/pathology decision. Our experimental results show the feasibility of the proposal, with success rates above 87% in the best cases. Moreover, our technique is able to locate the possible areas of pathology in nonnormal radiographs. Strengths and limitations of the proposed approach are described in the Conclusions.

  3. Pectus excavatum in blunt chest trauma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liodakis Emmanouil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Blunt cardiac rupture is an exceedingly rare injury. Case presentation We report a case of blunt cardiac trauma in a 43-year-old Caucasian German mother with pectus excavatum who presented after a car accident in which she had been sitting in the front seat holding her two-year-old boy in her arms. The mother was awake and alert during the initial two hours after the accident but then proceeded to hemodynamically collapse. The child did not sustain any severe injuries. Intraoperatively, a combined one-cm laceration of the left atrium and right ventricle was found. Conclusion Patients with pectus excavatum have an increased risk for cardiac rupture after blunt chest trauma because of compression between the sternum and spine. Therefore, patients with pectus excavatum and blunt chest trauma should be admitted to a Level I Trauma Center with a high degree of suspicion.

  4. Rheumatoid arthritis: Skeletal manifestations observed on portable chest roentgenograms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levine, R.B.; Sullivan, K.L.

    1985-04-01

    This report describes the thoracic skeletal radiographic findings of rheumatoid arthritis, observed on portable chest examinations of 21 patients. The pathophysiology is reviewed and additional examples of a recently described finding are illustrated: erosion of the medial surface of the proximal humerus with subsequent pathologic fracture, associated with superior and medial migration of the humeral head. It has been proposed that erosion of the medial aspect of the proximal humerus is due to impingement wear, and that pathologic fracture results from the fulcrum effect of the inferior lip of the glenoid on the humerus. Rheumatoid arthritis is often diagnosed by the clinician rather than the radiologist. However, in acutely ill patients receiving portable chest radiographs, complete history and laboratory findings are often unavailable. Attention to the thoracic skeleton may clarify pleural and/or parenchymal lung disease in these patients.

  5. Chest roentgenology in the intensive care unit: an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maffessanti, M. [Istituto di Radiologia, Universita di Trieste, Ospedale di Cattinara, I-34 100 Trieste (Italy); Berlot, G. [Istituto di Anestesia e Rianimazione, Universita di Trieste, Ospedale di Cattinara, I-34 100 Trieste (Italy); Bortolotto, P. [Servizio di Radiologia, Ospedale Maggiore, I-34 100 Trieste (Italy)

    1998-02-01

    Chest roentgenology in the intensive care unit is a real challenge for the general radiologist. Beyond the basic disease, the critically ill is at risk for developing specific cardiopulmonary disorders, all presenting as chest opacities, their diagnosis often being impossible if based only on the radiological aspect. To make things harder, their appearance can vary with the subject`s position and the mechanical ventilation. Patients require a continuous monitoring of the vital functions and their mechanical and pharmacological support, for which they are connected to different instruments. The radiologist should know the normal position of these devices, and promptly recognize when they are misplaced or when complications from their insertion occurred. Our aim is to suggest for each of the above-mentioned conditions a guideline of interpretation based not only on the radiological aspect and distribution of the lesions, but also on the physiopathological and clinical grounds. (orig.) With 13 figs., 58 refs.

  6. Detection of tuberculosis using hybrid features from chest radiographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Ayesha; Akram, M. Usman; Akhtar, Mahmood; Shafique, Irrum

    2017-02-01

    Tuberculosis is an infectious disease and becomes a major threat all over the world but still diagnosis of tuberculosis is a challenging task. In literature, chest radiographs are considered as most commonly used medical images in under developed countries for the diagnosis of TB. Different methods have been proposed but they are not helpful for radiologists due to cost and accuracy issues. Our paper presents a methodology in which different combinations of features are extracted based on intensities, shape and texture of chest radiograph and given to classifier for the detection of TB. The performance of our methodology is evaluated using publically available standard dataset Montgomery Country (MC) which contains 138 CXRs among which 80 CXRs are normal and 58 CXRs are abnormal including effusion and miliary patterns etc. The accuracy of 81.16% was achieved and the results show that proposed method have outperformed existing state of the art methods on MC dataset.

  7. Chest radiography in acute traumatic rupture of the thoracic aorta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heystraten, F.M.; Rosenbusch, G.; Kingma, L.M.; Lacquet, L.K.; Boo, T. de; Lemmens, W.A.

    Of 123 patients who had suffered blunt trauma to the chest traumatic aortic rupture was eventually confirmed in 61 and absent in 62 patients. The chest radiographs of these patients were examined for 15 signs reported in the literature as being associated with traumatic aortic rupture. Although many individual signs were significantly more frequent in the aortic rupture group they were not useful in differentiating between patients with and those without rupture of the aorta. By using discriminant analysis combining 2 or 3 signs, patients were classified as having aortic rupture or not. The best discrimination between the two groups was obtained using the combined signs of a widened paratracheal stripe, and opacified pulmonary window, a widened right paraspinal interface and a displaced nasogastric tube.

  8. Thrombophlebitis of the lateral chest wall (Mondor′s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Crisan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mondor′s disease is a rare condition, which involves the thrombophlebitis of the superficial veins of the breast and anterior chest wall. A 37-year-old woman presented with sudden onset of local pain and edema on her right chest wall, accompanied by a longitudinal retraction of the skin during arm abduction in the area. Clinical, histological and ultrasonographic findings confirmed Mondor′s disease and the treatment was symptomatic, using pain relievers and warm compresses. The symptomatology remitted within 2 weeks of therapy. Mondor′s disease is a rare condition where ultrasound complements the clinical evaluation and allows the characterization of certain abnormalities, which correlated with functional biochemical data and other procedures may substitute the need of biopsy.

  9. Musculoskeletal problems of the chest wall in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Peter L; Biswas, Anita C; Batt, Mark E

    2002-01-01

    Chest pain in the athlete has a wide differential diagnosis. Pain may originate from structures within the thorax, such as the heart, lungs or oesophagus. However, musculoskeletal causes of chest pain must be considered. The aim of this review is to help the clinician to diagnose chest wall pain in athletes by identifying the possible causes, as reported in the literature. Musculoskeletal problems of the chest wall can occur in the ribs, sternum, articulations or myofascial structures. The cause is usually evident in the case of direct trauma. Additionally, athletes' bodies may be subjected to sudden large indirect forces or overuse, and stress fractures of the ribs caused by sporting activity have been extensively reported. These have been associated with golf, rowing and baseball pitching in particular. Stress fractures of the sternum reported in wrestlers cause pain and tenderness of the sternum, as expected. Diagnosis is by bone scan and limitation of activity usually allows healing to occur. The slipping rib syndrome causes intermittent costal margin pain related to posture or movement, and may be diagnosed by the 'hooking manoeuvre', which reproduces pain and sometimes a click. If reassurance and postural advice fail, good results are possible with resection of the mobile rib. The painful xiphoid syndrome is a rare condition that causes pain and tenderness of the xiphoid and is self-limiting. Costochondritis is a self-limiting condition of unknown aetiology that typically presents with pain around the second to fifth costochondral joints. It can be differentiated from Tietze's syndrome in which there is swelling and pain of the articulation. Both conditions eventually settle spontaneously although a corticosteroid injection may be useful in particularly troublesome cases. The intercostal muscles may be injured causing tenderness between the ribs. Other conditions that should be considered include epidemic myalgia, precordial catch syndrome and referred pain

  10. Clinical Implications High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO)

    OpenAIRE

    Mantellini E.; Perrero L.; Petrozzino S.; Gatta A.; Bona S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: patients with neuromuscular diseases presents an high incidence of respiratory infections favoured by stagnation of deep bronchial secretions and deficit of cough. The aim of the study is to evaluate the correct treatment of this condition and the role of High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO) in helping the removal of bronchial secretions and reduce the incidence of infections in patients with neuromuscular disease.Methods: analysis of the current bibliography related to resp...

  11. Computer Assisted Diagnosis of Chest Pain. Preliminary Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-04-27

    recent change In appetite) "NORMAL (57) DECREASED. BOWELS: [recent change in bowel habits ) NORMAL 159) CONSTIPATED fi60tf cough...irritation from food or drink, by reflux of gastric contents, or by infection (the latter is uncommon in healthy people). There is a good response to...have a physical etiology for chest pain. Disorders that present with epigastric pain such as gastritis , peptic ulcer, pancreatitis, and cholelithiasis

  12. Chest trauma nursing%胸部创伤护理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何海燕; 曾登芬; 张连阳; 郑志伟

    2014-01-01

    胸部创伤是导致创伤患者死亡的主要原因之一。胸部创伤护理的主要内容包括伤情评估、血流动力学等监测、胸腔引流和肺部治疗。面对胸部创伤患者,通过初期和再次评估,以及心肺功能和氧合状态的持续监测,及时发现和处理危及机生命的损伤及其并发症;通过管道护理、漏气观察,保持有效的胸腔引流;而胸部物理治疗、体位治疗、吸痰等措施有助于改善肺部通气和血流灌注,使患者达到最大程度的氧合。%Chest trauma is a leading cause of death in all age groups .The assessment of the injury and the change of hemodynamics ,management of the pleural space drainage systems ,and pulmonary treatment are essential components of chest trauma nursing .To survey and monitor the patients carefully and continuingly can help identify and intervene the life-threatening conditions .Chest tube care and air leak examination are the key points to keep the drainage effective.Furthermore,with chest physiotherapy,suctioning,and injury-specific positioning,the ventilation, perfusion and oxygenation of patients can be improved .

  13. Computer Assisted Diagnosis of Chest Pain. Adjunctive Treatment Protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-30

    If rales are not heard upon chest exam and peripheral edema is absent, the impairment is (at least temporarily) adequately compensated. USUAL...impressions. COMPLICATIONS AND THEIR MANAGEMENT - Uncontrolled dysrhythmias and cardiogenic shock are the complications of concern. Bursts of PVC’s (or...problem. The cardiac compromise due to M.I. may be manifested by minimal rales and dyspnea or massive pulmonary edema with shock. Lasix is

  14. Acute aortic and mitral valve regurgitation following blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabeu, Eduardo; Mestres, Carlos A; Loma-Osorio, Pablo; Josa, Miguel

    2004-03-01

    Traumatic rupture of intracardiac structures is an uncommon phenomenon although there are a number of reports with regards to rupture of the tricuspid, mitral and aortic valves. We report the case of a 25-year-old patient who presented with acute aortic and mitral valve regurgitation of traumatic origin. Both lesions were seen separated by 2 weeks. Pathophysiology is reviewed. The combination of both aortic and mitral lesions following blunt chest trauma is almost exceptional.

  15. Aspects of chest imaging in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascade, P N; Kazerooni, E A

    1994-04-01

    Timely performance and accurate interpretation of portable chest radiographs in the ICU setting are fundamental components of quality care. Teamwork between intensive care clinicians and radiologists is necessary to assure that the appropriate studies, of high technical quality, are obtained. By working together to integrate available clinical information with systematic comprehensive analysis of images, accurate diagnoses can be made, optimal treatment instituted, and successful outcomes optimized.

  16. LECTURES ON ACUPUNCTURE Part Ⅰ Clinical Acupuncture Lecture Twenty-Four "XIONGBI" (CHEST PAIN) SYNDROME

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Hongying; Guo Ling; Shang Xiukui

    2001-01-01

    @@ "Xiongbi" chest (or precordial) pain with stuffiness, or chest pain syndrome is referred to choking pain in the chest due to stagnation of chest -yang, failure of qi and blood in warming and nourishing the local meridians. It is usually caused by stagnation of dampness and phlegm in the interior, or by insufficiency of qi and blood stasis, leading to impeded flow of qi and blood in the heart vessels. Its pathological characteristics are deficiency (chest-yang) in origin and excess (i. e., qi stagnation) in superficiality. The therapeutic principles are promoting blood circulation to remove blood stasis, getting rid of blockage and dredging the passages of yang-qi.

  17. Zebrafish Caudal Haematopoietic Embryonic Stromal Tissue (CHEST) Cells Support Haematopoiesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Anja; Aggio, Julian; Campbell, Clyde; Wright, Francis; Marquez, Gabriel; Traver, David; Stachura, David L.

    2017-01-01

    Haematopoiesis is an essential process in early vertebrate development that occurs in different distinct spatial locations in the embryo that shift over time. These different sites have distinct functions: in some anatomical locations specific hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) are generated de novo. In others, HSPCs expand. HSPCs differentiate and renew in other locations, ensuring homeostatic maintenance. These niches primarily control haematopoiesis through a combination of cell-to-cell signalling and cytokine secretion that elicit unique biological effects in progenitors. To understand the molecular signals generated by these niches, we report the generation of caudal hematopoietic embryonic stromal tissue (CHEST) cells from 72-hours post fertilization (hpf) caudal hematopoietic tissue (CHT), the site of embryonic HSPC expansion in fish. CHEST cells are a primary cell line with perivascular endothelial properties that expand hematopoietic cells in vitro. Morphological and transcript analysis of these cultures indicates lymphoid, myeloid, and erythroid differentiation, indicating that CHEST cells are a useful tool for identifying molecular signals critical for HSPC proliferation and differentiation in the zebrafish. These findings permit comparison with other temporally and spatially distinct haematopoietic-supportive zebrafish niches, as well as with mammalian haematopoietic-supportive cells to further the understanding of the evolution of the vertebrate hematopoietic system. PMID:28300168

  18. [Psychosomatic medicine for non-cardiac chest pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funakoshi, Seiko; Hosoi, Masako; Tsuchida, Osamu

    2009-09-01

    Recently, it has become problematic that the number of noncardiac chest pain (NCCP) patients are increasing among those who come to the emergency room with chest pain as a chief complaint. They tend to come to hospitals often and over many years, even after cardiac-chest pain has been excluded from their diagnosis. Moreover, studies have shown that NCCP patients have a high prevalence of anxiety, depression and disability. However, most NCCP patients are usually treated by cardiologists or primary physicians. Ordinary biomedical approaches often fail to treat NCCP. NCCP is one of the most important functional somatic syndromes from the view of medical economics. The cause of NCCP includes gastroesophageal reflux disease, panic disorder and esophageal dysmotility. In this review article, we summarize the definition, epidemiology, pathology, and process of diagnosis of NCCP. Finally, we propose a pathological hypothesis from a psychosomatic view. We discuss the effects of anxiety, fear and hyperactive behavior induced by affective stressors on the dysmotility and the lowering of the pain threshold.

  19. Risks of Chest X-ray Examination for Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nohara,Takahiko

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available

    Chest X-ray (CXR examination is considered essential for health checkups of students;thus, it is important to objectively assess the CXR for a better understanding of the appropriate X-ray exposure dose, and the risks such an examination entails. Accordingly, we performed a multi-institutional study regarding students' CXR exposure, during a 6year-period from 2002 (partially including 2001 to 2007, with the collaboration of national, municipal, and private universities and colleges in Japan. A glass badge was worn by the students at the time of CXR screening examination. These glass badges were collected, and their X-ray exposure doses were measured. The results indicated a tendency of decreasing exposure dose over the 6 years, though the difference was not significant. In a comparison of the chest X-ray systems within institutions (own X-ray equipmentinside systems with those outside the institution (mobile X-ray equipmentoutside systems, the average exposure dose with the outside systems exceeded that of the inside systems. Both inside and outside systems included a few X-ray machines with which the exposure was more than 1mSv. Based on these facts, individuals in charge of student health checkups should be aware of the exposure dose of each chest fluorographic system at their institution.

  20. Chest Pain: The Need to Consider Less Frequent Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Anabela; Carvalho, Sofia; Cunha, Joana; Lima, Ana R.; Moreira, J. Ilídio; Faria, Trigo

    2016-01-01

    Chest pain is one of the most frequent patient's complaints. The commonest underlying causes are well known, but, sometimes, in some clinical scenarios, it is necessary to consider other diagnoses. We report a case of a 68-year-old Caucasian male, chronically hypertensive, who complained of recurrent episodes of chest pain and fever with elevated acute phase reactants. The first investigation was negative for some of the most likely diagnosis and he quickly improved with anti-inflammatory drugs. Over a few months, his symptoms continued to recur periodically, his hypertension was aggravated, and he developed headaches and lower limbs claudication. After a temporal artery biopsy that was negative for vasculitis, he underwent a positron emission tomography suggestive of Takayasu Arteritis. Takayasu Arteritis is a rare chronic granulomatous vasculitis of the aorta and its first-order branches affecting mostly females up to 50 years old. Chest pain is experienced by >40% of the patients and results from the inflammation of the aorta, pulmonary artery, or coronaries. PMID:27034853

  1. Initial clinical evaluation of stationary digital chest tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Allison E.; Shan, Jing; Wu, Gongting; Lee, Yueh Z.; Zhou, Otto; Lu, Jianping; Heath, Michael; Wang, Xiaohui; Foos, David

    2016-03-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) is the gold standard for image evaluation of lung disease, including lung cancer and cystic fibrosis. It provides detailed information of the lung anatomy and lesions, but at a relatively high cost and high dose of radiation. Chest radiography is a low dose imaging modality but it has low sensitivity. Digital chest tomosynthesis (DCT) is an imaging modality that produces 3D images by collecting x-ray projection images over a limited angle. DCT is less expensive than CT and requires about 1/10th the dose of radiation. Commercial DCT systems acquire the projection images by mechanically scanning an x-ray tube. The movement of the tube head limits acquisition speed. We recently demonstrated the feasibility of stationary digital chest tomosynthesis (s-DCT) using a carbon nanotube (CNT) x-ray source array in benchtop phantom studies. The stationary x-ray source allows for fast image acquisition. The objective of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of s-DCT for patient imaging. We have successfully imaged 31 patients. Preliminary evaluation by board certified radiologists suggests good depiction of thoracic anatomy and pathology.

  2. High-Frequency Chest Compression: A Summary of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cara F Dosman

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present literature summary is to describe high-frequency chest compression (HFCC, summarize its history and outline study results on its effect on mucolysis, mucus transport, pulmonary function and quality of life. HFCC is a mechanical method of self-administered chest physiotherapy, which induces rapid air movement in and out of the lungs. This mean oscillated volume is an effective method of mucolysis and mucus clearance. HFCC can increase independence. Some studies have shown that HFCC leads to more mucus clearance and better lung function compared with conventional chest physiotherapy. However, HFCC also decreases end-expiratory lung volume, which can lead to increased airway resistance and a decreased oscillated volume. Adding positive end-expiratory pressure to HFCC has been shown to prevent this decrease in end-expiratory lung volume and to increase the oscillated volume. It is possible that the HFCC-induced decrease in end-expiratory lung volume may result in more mucus clearance in airways that remain open by reducing airway size. Adjunctive methods, such as positive end-expiratory pressure, may not always be needed to make HFCC more effective.

  3. Chest Pain: The Need to Consider Less Frequent Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Magalhães

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chest pain is one of the most frequent patient’s complaints. The commonest underlying causes are well known, but, sometimes, in some clinical scenarios, it is necessary to consider other diagnoses. We report a case of a 68-year-old Caucasian male, chronically hypertensive, who complained of recurrent episodes of chest pain and fever with elevated acute phase reactants. The first investigation was negative for some of the most likely diagnosis and he quickly improved with anti-inflammatory drugs. Over a few months, his symptoms continued to recur periodically, his hypertension was aggravated, and he developed headaches and lower limbs claudication. After a temporal artery biopsy that was negative for vasculitis, he underwent a positron emission tomography suggestive of Takayasu Arteritis. Takayasu Arteritis is a rare chronic granulomatous vasculitis of the aorta and its first-order branches affecting mostly females up to 50 years old. Chest pain is experienced by >40% of the patients and results from the inflammation of the aorta, pulmonary artery, or coronaries.

  4. High-frequency chest compression: a summary of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosman, Cara F; Jones, Richard L

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the present literature summary is to describe high-frequency chest compression (HFCC), summarize its history and outline study results on its effect on mucolysis, mucus transport, pulmonary function and quality of life. HFCC is a mechanical method of self-administered chest physiotherapy, which induces rapid air movement in and out of the lungs. This mean oscillated volume is an effective method of mucolysis and mucus clearance. HFCC can increase independence. Some studies have shown that HFCC leads to more mucus clearance and better lung function compared with conventional chest physiotherapy. However, HFCC also decreases end-expiratory lung volume, which can lead to increased airway resistance and a decreased oscillated volume. Adding positive end-expiratory pressure to HFCC has been shown to prevent this decrease in end-expiratory lung volume and to increase the oscillated volume. It is possible that the HFCC-induced decrease in end-expiratory lung volume may result in more mucus clearance in airways that remain open by reducing airway size. Adjunctive methods, such as positive end-expiratory pressure, may not always be needed to make HFCC more effective.

  5. Clinical Implications High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantellini E.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: patients with neuromuscular diseases presents an high incidence of respiratory infections favoured by stagnation of deep bronchial secretions and deficit of cough. The aim of the study is to evaluate the correct treatment of this condition and the role of High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO in helping the removal of bronchial secretions and reduce the incidence of infections in patients with neuromuscular disease.Methods: analysis of the current bibliography related to respiratory infections and neuromuscular disease. PCEF (Peak Cough Expiratory Flow is used as a standardized indicator of efficiency of cough.Results: the High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO is useful, in cases of increased production of mucus and impairment of muco-ciliary clearance, to remove the tracheobronchial secretions and reduce the incidence of infections.Conclusions: the correct approach to patients with neuromuscular disease and frequent respiratory infections is focused on treatment of cough ineffective and management of bronchial secretions. High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO (VEST has a central role in treatment of cough ineffective and management of bronchial secretions reducing respiratory infections.

  6. Using "Rebar" to Stabilize Rigid Chest Wall Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Lary A; Grubbs, Deanna M

    2016-04-01

    After major chest wall resection, reconstruction of the bony defect with a rigid prosthesis is mandatory to protect the underlying thoracic organs, and to prevent flail chest physiology. Although many methods have been described for chest wall reconstruction, a commonly used technique employs a composite Marlex (polypropylene) mesh with methyl-methacrylate cement sandwiched between two layers of mesh (MMS), which is tailored to the defect size and shape. In building construction, steel "rebar" is used to strengthen and reinforce masonry structures. To avoid the initial residual motion of the rigid prosthesis used to reconstruct very large defects, particularly the sternum, we devised a simple technique of adding one or more Steinmann steel pins as "rebar" to strengthen and immediately stabilize the prosthesis to the surrounding ribs and sternum. For the very large defects, particularly over the heart and great vessels, titanium mesh may also be readily added into the sandwich construction for increased strength and to prevent late prosthetic fractures. Short- and long-term results of this inexpensive modification of the MMS reconstruction technique are excellent. This modified MMS tailor-made prosthesis is only one-third the cost of the recently popular prosthetic titanium systems, takes much less operative time to create and implant, and avoids the well-described complications of late titanium bar fracture and erosion/infection as well as loosening of screws and/or titanium bars.

  7. Noninvasive monitoring of chest wall movement in infants using laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Tsutomu; Minocchieri, Stefan; Baldwin, David N; Nelle, Mathias; Frey, Urs

    2006-10-01

    Traditionally, non-invasive monitoring of tidal volume in infants has been performed using impedance plethysmography analyzed using a one or two compartment model. We developed a new laser system for use in infants, which measures antero-posterior movement of the chest wall during quiet sleep. In 24 unsedated or sedated infants (11 healthy, 13 with respiratory disease), we examined whether the analysis of thoracoabdominal movement based on a three compartment model could more accurately estimate tidal volume in comparison to V(T) measured at the mouth. Using five laser signals, chest wall movements were measured at the right and left, upper and lower ribcage and the abdomen. Within the tidal volume range from 4.6 to 135.7 ml, a three compartment model showed good short term repeatability and the best agreement with tidal volume measured at mouth (r(2) = 0.86) compared to that of a single compartment model (r(2) = 0.62, P infants and potentially of regional differences of chest wall displacement in future studies.

  8. Differential points of mediastinal cystic lesion in chest computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Jin; Baek, Jang Mi; Song, Jang Hyeon; Seon, Hyun Ju [Dept. of Radiology, Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yun Hyeon [Dept. of Radiology, Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Hwasun (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    To find differential diagnostic imaging findings of mediastinal cystic lesions in chest computed tomography. We retrospectively reviewed imaging findings of 70 patients with histopathologically proven mediastinal cystic lesions. They were 33 male and 37 female patients. Among 70 cases, 49 cases were in the anterior mediastinum, 12 cases were in the middle mediastinum, and 9 cases were in the posterior mediastinum. 19 patients had symptoms. Chest discomfort was the most common symptom. When the cystic lesion was located in the anterior mediastinum, and unilocular, the possibility of thymic cyst was the most likely (p < 0.0027). When the cystic lesion was located in the anterior mediastinum and was multilocular with a relatively thick wall, the possibility of a mature cystic teratoma was the most likely (p < 0.001). When the lesion was a high attenuation cystic lesion located around the air-way, the possibility of a bronchogenic cyst was the most likely (p < 0.001). Chest CT gives information about the location, loculation, wall thickness and internal attenuation of mediastinal cystic lesions. And certain details seen on CT imaging can help with the correct diagnosis, especially in the cases of thymic cyst, mature cystic teratoma and bronchogenic cyst.

  9. Medic - Chest Pain: A Decision Support Program for the Management of Acute Chest Pain (User’s Manual)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-10-05

    push c) pulmonary edema (pinkish froth fron mouth and rales throughout lung fields) Lasix 40 mg IV push (consider rotating extremity tourniquets, if...varying degrees of impairment of myocardial function (pump failure). If rales are not heard upon chest exam and peripheral edema is absent, the...LIER M MEW Uncontrolled dysrhythmias and cardiogenic shock are the principal camplications of concern. PVC’s (more than 5 per minute) and V-tach (3 or

  10. Pediatric chest CT after trauma: impact on surgical and clinical management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Rina P. [Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States); Hernanz-Schulman, Marta; Hilmes, Melissa A.; Kan, J.H. [Vanderbilt University, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt Children' s Hospital, Nashville, TN (United States); Yu, Chang [Vanderbilt University, Department of Biostatistics, Nashville, TN (United States); Ray, Jackie [Vanderbilt University, Department of Pediatric Surgery, Vanderbilt Children' s Hospital, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Chest CT after pediatric trauma is frequently performed but its clinical impact, particularly with respect to surgical intervention, has not been adequately evaluated. To assess the impact of chest CT compared with chest radiography on pediatric trauma management. Two hundred thirty-five consecutive pediatric trauma patients who had both chest CT and radiography were identified. Images were reviewed and findings were categorized and correlated with subsequent chest interventions, blinded to final outcome and management. Of the 235 children, 38.3% (90/235) had an abnormal chest radiograph and 63.8% (150/235) had an abnormal chest CT (P < 0.0001). Chest interventions followed in 4.7% (11/235); of these, the findings could be made 1 cm above the dome of the liver in 91% (10/11). Findings requiring chest intervention included pneumothorax (PTX) and vertebral fractures. PTX was found on 2.1% (5/235) of chest radiographs and 20.0% (47/235) of chest CTs (P < 0.0001); 1.7% (4/235) of the children received a chest tube for PTX, 0.85% (2/235) seen on chest CT only. Vertebral fractures were present in 3.8% of the children (9/235) and 66.7% (6/9) of those cases were treated with spinal fusion or brace. There were no instances of mediastinal vascular injury. Most intrathoracic findings requiring surgical management in our population were identified in the lower chest and would be included in routine abdominopelvic CT exams; this information needs to be taken into consideration in the diagnostic algorithm of pediatric trauma patients. (orig.)

  11. The influence of chest tube size and position in primary spontaneous pneumothorax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riber, Lars P. S.; Olesen, Winnie H.; Licht, Peter B.

    2017-01-01

    Background Optimal chest tube position in the pleural cavity is largely unexplored for the treatment of primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP). We investigated whether type, size and position of chest tubes influenced duration of treatment for PSP. Methods A retrospective follow-up study of all patients admitted with PSP over a 5-year period. Traumatic, iatrogenic and secondary pneumothoraxes were excluded. Gender, age, smoking habits, type and size of chest tube used (pigtail catheter or surgical chest tube) were recorded from the patients’ charts. All chest X-rays upon admittance and immediately following chest tube placement were retrieved and re-evaluated for size of pneumothorax (categorized into five groups) and location of the chest tube tip (categorized as upper, middle or lower third of the pleural cavity). All data were analysed in a Cox proportional hazards regression model. Results We identified 134 patients with PSP. Baseline characteristics were similar for patients treated with surgical chest tubes and pigtail catheters. Chest tube duration was not significantly influenced by position of the chest tube tip, but was significantly longer in females (P<0.01), patients <30 years (P=0.01), larger pneumothoraxes (P<0.01), use of surgical chest tubes (P=0.03) and a history of previous pneumothorax (P=0.04). Conclusions Contrary to common belief and guidelines recommendation the position of a chest tube in the pleural cavity did not significantly influence chest tube duration, but it was significantly longer in patients who were treated with a surgical chest tube. PMID:28275481

  12. Evaluation of chest pain in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, R L; Kontos, M C

    1997-04-01

    The evaluation of chest pain in the emergency setting should be systematic, risk based, and goal driven. An effective program must be able to evaluate all patients with equal thoroughness under the assumption that any patient with chest pain could potentially be having an MI. The initial evaluation is based on the history, a focused physical examination, and the ECG. This information is sufficient to categorize patients into groups at high, moderate, and low risk. Table 14 is a template for a comprehensive chest-pain evaluation program. Patients at high risk need rapid initiation of appropriate therapy: thrombolytics or primary angioplasty for the patients with MIs or aspirin/heparin for the patients with unstable angina. Patients at moderate risk need to have an acute coronary syndrome ruled in or out expediently and additional comorbidities addressed before discharge. Patients at low risk also need to be evaluated, and once the likelihood of an unstable acute coronary syndrome is eliminated, they can be discharged with further evaluation performed as outpatients. Subsequent evaluation should attempt to assign a definitive diagnosis while also addressing issues specific to risk reduction, such as cholesterol lowering and smoking cessation. It is well documented that 4% to 5% of patients with MIs are inadvertently missed during the initial evaluation. This number is surprisingly consistent among many studies using various protocols and suggests that an initial evaluation limited to the history, physical examination, and ECG will fail to identify the small number of these patients who otherwise appear at low risk. The solution is to improve the sensitivity of the evaluation process to identify these patients. It appears that more than simple observation is required, and at the present time, no simple laboratory test can meet this need. However, success has been reported with a number of strategies including emergency imaging with either radionuclides such as

  13. Mucopolysaccharidosis: abnormal findings on abdomen and chest excluding musculoskeletal system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Jeung Hee; Yoon, Dae Young; Seo, Young Lan; Han, Dae Hee; Choi, Chul Soon; Bae, Sang Hoon; Yoon, Young Cheol; Park, Sang Joon [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim Han, Bok Yung; Yoon, Hye Kyung; Cho, Jae Min [Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-06-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) is a lysosomal storage disease that causes tissue distortion and dysfunction due to the infiltration of mucopolysaccharide in connective tissue. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the characteristic findings of abdominal CT and plain chest radiography in patients with MPS. Sixty-two children with MPS diagnosed by urine analysis were involved in this study; 24 of these underwent abdominal CT and the findings were reviewed by two radiologists, who reached a consensus. Organomegaly was classified as severe, moderate or mild. On chest PA radiographs of 42 of the children, the transverse diameter of the trachea was measured and compared with that of 42 normal controls. Student's t test was used for statistical analysis. At abdominal CT, hepatomegaly was observed in 22 patients (92%; 2 severe, 15 moderate and 5 mild); and splenomegaly was present in 18 (75%; 2 severe, 4 moderate and 12 mild). Among eight patients(33%) with pancreatic enlargement, one had a severly enlarged pancreas, while in the remaining seven, enlargement was mild. Also present were inguinal hernia (n=15), umbilical hernia (n=12), undulation with thickening of the diaphragmatic crura (n=10), abnormalities related to the male genitalia (n=5) and vascular anomaly (n=3). In MPS patients, the mid-point diameter of the trachea (range, 5.6-9 mm; mean, 6.9 mm) was significantly less than in normal controls (range, 8-14 mm; mean, 10.8 mm) (p<0.001). An awareness of the characteristic abnormalities observed at abdominal CT and chest PA radiography can lead to a better understanding of MPS in children.

  14. Mucopolysaccharidosis: abnormal findings on abdomen and chest excluding musculoskeletal system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KimHan, Bo Kyung; Yoon, Hye Kyung; Cho, Jae Min [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Jeung Hee; Yoon, Dae Young; Seo, Young Lan; Han, Dae Hee; Choi, Chul Soon; Bae, Sang Hoon; Yoon, Young Cheol; Park, Sang Joon [Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-06-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) is a lysosomal storage disease that causes tissue distortion and dysfunction due to the infiltration of mucopolysaccharide in connective tissue. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the characteristic findings of abdominal CT and plain chest radiography in patients with MPS. Sixty-two children with MPS diagnosed by urine analysis were involved in this study; 24 of these underwent abdominal CT and the findings were reviewed by two radiologists, who reached a consensus. Organomegaly was classified as severe, moderate or mild. On chest PA radiographs of 42 of the children, the transverse diameter of the trachea was measured and compared with that of 42 normal controls. Student's t test was used for statistical analysis. At abdominal CT, hepatomegaly was observed in 22 patients (92%; 2 severe, 15 moderate and 5 mild); and splenomegaly was present in 18 (75%; 2 severe, 4 moderate and 12 mild). Among eight patients (33%) with pancreatic enlargement, one had a severly enlarged pancreas, while in the remaining seven, enlargement was mild. Also present were inguinal hernia (n=15), umbilical hernia (n=12), undulation with thickening of the diaphragmatic crura (n=10). abnormalities related to the male genitalia (n=5) and vascular anomaly (n=3). In MPS patients, the mid-point diameter of the trachea (range, 5.6-9 mm; mean, 6.9 mm) was significantly less than in normal controls (range, 8-14 mm; mean, 10.8 mm)(p<0.001). An awareness of the characteristic abnormalities observed at abdominal CT and chest PA radiography can lead to a better understanding of MPS in children.

  15. Novel computed tomographic chest metrics to detect pulmonary hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Chin-Shang

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension (PH can potentially improve survival and quality of life. Detecting PH using echocardiography is often insensitive in subjects with lung fibrosis or hyperinflation. Right heart catheterization (RHC for the diagnosis of PH adds risk and expense due to its invasive nature. Pre-defined measurements utilizing computed tomography (CT of the chest may be an alternative non-invasive method of detecting PH. Methods This study retrospectively reviewed 101 acutely hospitalized inpatients with heterogeneous diagnoses, who consecutively underwent CT chest and RHC during the same admission. Two separate teams, each consisting of a radiologist and pulmonologist, blinded to clinical and RHC data, individually reviewed the chest CT's. Results Multiple regression analyses controlling for age, sex, ascending aortic diameter, body surface area, thoracic diameter and pulmonary wedge pressure showed that a main pulmonary artery (PA diameter ≥29 mm (odds ratio (OR = 4.8, right descending PA diameter ≥19 mm (OR = 7.0, true right descending PA diameter ≥ 16 mm (OR = 4.1, true left descending PA diameter ≥ 21 mm (OR = 15.5, right ventricular (RV free wall ≥ 6 mm (OR = 30.5, RV wall/left ventricular (LV wall ratio ≥0.32 (OR = 8.8, RV/LV lumen ratio ≥1.28 (OR = 28.8, main PA/ascending aorta ratio ≥0.84 (OR = 6.0 and main PA/descending aorta ratio ≥ 1.29 (OR = 5.7 were significant predictors of PH in this population of hospitalized patients. Conclusion This combination of easily measured CT-based metrics may, upon confirmatory studies, aid in the non-invasive detection of PH and hence in the determination of RHC candidacy in acutely hospitalized patients.

  16. Optimisation of computed radiography systems for chest imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alzimami, K. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)], E-mail: k.alzimami@surrey.ac.uk; Sassi, S. [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey SM2 5PT (United Kingdom); Alkhorayef, M. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Britten, A.J. [Department of Medical Physics, St George' s Hospital, London SW17 0QT (United Kingdom); Spyrou, N.M. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2009-03-01

    The main thrust of this study is to investigate methods of optimising the radiation dose-image quality relationship in computed radiography (CR) systems for chest imaging. Specifically, this study investigates the possibility of reducing the patient radiation exposure through an optimal selection of tube filtration, exposure parameters and air gap technique, in parallel with a study of the image quality, particularly low contrast detail detectability, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and scatter fraction (SF). The CDRAD phantom was used to assess the quality of the CR images. Tissue equivalent Polystyrene blocks were placed in the front of the phantom as scattering material with thicknesses of 5 and 15 cm to simulate an adult chest and heart/diaphragm regions, respectively. A series of exposure techniques were used, including Cu filtration with various thicknesses of Cu in the presence and absence of an air gap, whilst the exposure was kept as constant as possible throughout. The estimated patient effective dose and skin entrance dose were calculated using the NRPB-SR262 X-ray dose calculation software. The results have shown that the low contrast-detail detectability in the lung and the heart/diaphragm regions improves when using an air gap and no Cu filtration, particularly at low kilovoltage (kVp). However, there is no significant difference in low contrast-detail in the absence or presence of a 0.2 mm Cu filtration. SF values for the lung and heart regions decrease when using both, the air gap technique and a 0.2 mm Cu filtration, particularly at low kVp. SNR values for the lung and heart regions improve when using a small Cu thickness. In conclusion, this investigation has shown that the quality of chest CR images could be improved by using an air gap technique and a 0.2 mm Cu filtration at low kVp, particularly at 99 kVp.

  17. Laryngotracheobronchial papillomatosis: findings on computed tomography scans of the chest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchiori, Edson [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia; Araujo Neto, Cesar de [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia; Meirelles, Gustavo Souza Portes [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP-EPM), SP (Brazil); Irion, Klaus Loureiro [The Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Zanetti, Glaucia [Faculdade de Medicina de Petropolis (FMP), RJ (Brazil); Missrie, Israel [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP-EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem; Sato, Juliana [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP-EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia de Cabeca e Pescoco

    2008-12-15

    Objectives: To present the findings of computed tomography (CT) scans of the chest in patients with laryngotracheobronchial papillomatosis. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed CT scans of eight patients, five males and three females, ranging from 5 to 18 years of age with a mean age of 10.5 years. Images were independently reviewed by two radiologists. In discrepant cases, a consensus was reached. Results: The most common CT findings were intratracheal polypoid lesions and pulmonary nodules, many of which were cavitated. Conclusions: In patients with laryngotracheobronchial papillomatosis, the most common tomographic finding was the combination of intratracheal polypoid lesions and multiple pulmonary nodules, many of which were cavitated. (author)

  18. Image processing system for digital chest X-ray images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cocklin, M.; Gourlay, A.; Jackson, P.; Kaye, G.; Miessler, M. (I.B.M. U.K. Scientific Centre, Winchester (UK)); Kerr, I.; Lams, P. (Radiology Department, Brompton Hospital, London (UK))

    1984-01-01

    This paper investigates the requirements for image processing of digital chest X-ray images. These images are conventionally recorded on film and are characterised by large size, wide dynamic range and high resolution. X-ray detection systems are now becoming available for capturing these images directly in photoelectronic-digital form. The hardware and software facilities required for handling these images are described. These facilities include high resolution digital image displays, programmable video look up tables, image stores for image capture and processing and a full range of software tools for image manipulation. Examples are given of the applications of digital image processing techniques to this class of image.

  19. Pneumothorax, without chest wall fracture, following airbag deployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Parsons

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Air bags are an automatic crash protection system. They have been shown to reduce mortality from motor vehicle accidents by 31% following direct head-on impacts, by 19% following any frontal impact and by 11% overall. Despite obvious benefits there has been a corresponding increase in the number of injuries resulting from their deployment. We describe a case of a pneumothorax in the absence of chest wall pathology associated with airbag deployment, in a belted driver. There has been one previous description of pneumothorax associated with airbag deployment, in an unbelted driver.

  20. High frequency chest compression therapy: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, S; O'Neill, B

    1995-01-01

    A new device, the ThAIRapy Bronchial Drainage System, enables patients with cystic fibrosis to self-administer the technique of high frequency chest compression (HFCC) to assist with mucociliary clearance. We review the literature on HFCC and outline a case study of a patient currently using the ThAIRapy Bronchial Drainage System. While mucociliary clearance and lung function may be enhanced by HFCC therapy, more research is needed to determine its efficacy, cost benefits, and optimum treatment guidelines. Although our initial experience with the patient using this device has been positive, we were unable to accurately evaluate the ThAIRapy Bronchial Drainage System.

  1. Cutaneous metastasis of prostate carcinoma to neck and upper chest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Abrol

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate adenocarcinoma is the most common urologic malignant neoplasm in men. Metastasis to skin is rarely reported and usually occurs late. The incidence and appearance of cutaneous metastasis are not well established in patients with prostate adenocarcinoma and their recognition remains poor among practicing urologists. Their clinical appearance may mimic other common dermatologic disorders. Definitive diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion. Immunohistochemical staining helps in establishing the diagnosis. We report a case of prostate adenocarcinoma presenting with widespread metastasis, including those to dermis and subcutaneous tissue of neck and upper chest.

  2. Inappropriate mode switching clarified by using a chest radiograph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Brian; Jaiswal, Abhishek; Goldbarg, Seth

    2015-08-01

    An 80-year-old woman with a history of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and atrioventricular node disease status post-dual chamber pacemaker placement was noted to have abnormal pacing episodes during a percutaneous coronary intervention. Pacemaker interrogation revealed a high number of short duration mode switching episodes. Representative electrograms demonstrated high frequency nonphysiologic recordings predominantly in the atrial lead. Intrinsic pacemaker malfunction was excluded. A chest radiograph showed excess atrial and ventricular lead slack in the right ventricular inflow. It was suspected that lead-lead interaction resulted in artifacts and oversensing, causing frequent short episodes of inappropriate mode switching.

  3. Retroperitoneal Paraganglioma Presenting as a Chest Pain: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parag Brahmbhatt

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Paragangliomas are very rare tumors derived from neuroendocrine cells of autonomic nervous system. Extra-adrenal paragangliomas account for only 10 to 15% of all paragangliomas and may present incidentally as a mass. Typical triad of fluctuating hypertension, headache, and sweating is not always present which makes the diagnosis difficult sometimes. Definitive diagnosis is usually made with histologic findings and surgery is the treatment of choice. We report a case of a 53-year-old male who presented with chest pain and vomiting.

  4. Effect of metoprolol on chest pain in acute myocardial infarction.

    OpenAIRE

    Herlitz, J; Hjalmarson, A.; Holmberg, S.; Pennert, K; Swedberg, K; Vedin, A; Waagstein, F; Waldenström, A; Wedel, H.; Wilhelmsen, L

    1984-01-01

    A total of 1395 patients aged 40 to 74 years were included in a double blind trial with the beta 1 selective blocker metoprolol in suspected acute myocardial infarction. Metoprolol was given intravenously (15 mg) as soon as possible after admission to hospital followed by 200 mg daily for three months. A placebo was given in the same manner. The severity of chest pain in the acute phase was calculated by recording the number of injections of analgesics given and the time from the start of bli...

  5. Poor interpretation of chest X-rays by junior doctors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Janus Mølgaard; Gerke, Oke; Karstoft, Jens;

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Studies targeting medical students and junior doctors have shown that their radiological skills are insufficient. Despite the widespread use of chest X-ray; however, a study of Danish junior doctors' skills has not previously been performed. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 22...... diagnosis, the participant's confidence in the diagnosis was assessed on a five-point Likert scale. The diagnoses were divided into four groups: normal findings, chronic diseases, acute diseases and hyperacute diseases or conditions. RESULTS: A total of 22 doctors receiving basic clinical education (BCE...

  6. Esophageal Manometry in Patients with Chest Pain and Normal Coronary Arteriogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, S C; Hodges, K; Hersh, T; Jinich, H

    1981-02-01

    Evaluation of the esophagus is helpful in determining the source of chest pain. Eighteen per cent of 72 patients with a normal coronary angiogram had esophageal disease as a source of chest pain. Eight had diffuse esophageal spasm, four had reflux esophagitis and one had an esophageal ulcer. Five of eight patients with diffuse esophageal spasm had relief of symptoms with nitroglycerin. Despite normal coronary arteriogram and normal esophageal manometry 42 of 49 other patients had relief of chest pain with nitroglycerin.

  7. Sternal fractures and delayed cardiac tamponade due to a severe blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Huai-min; Chen, Qiu-lin; Zhang, Er-yong; Hu, Jia

    2016-04-01

    Sternal fractures caused by blunt chest trauma are associated with an increased incidence of cardiac injury. Reports of the incidence of cardiac injury associated with sternal fracture range from 18% to 62%. Delayed cardiac tamponade is a rare phenomenon that appears days or weeks after injury. Moreover, after nonpenetrating chest trauma, cardiac tamponade is very rare and occurs in less than 1 of 1000. This case describes a patient who had delayed cardiac tamponade 17 days after a severe blunt chest trauma.

  8. Chest physiotherapy techniques in neurological intensive care units of India: A survey

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Context: Neurological intensive care units (ICUs) are a rapidly developing sub-specialty of neurosciences. Chest physiotherapy techniques are of great value in neurological ICUs in preventing, halting, or reversing the impairments caused due to neurological disorder and ICU stay. However, chest physiotherapy techniques should be modified to a greater extent in the neurological ICU as compared with general ICUs. Aim: The aim of this study is to obtain data on current chest physiotherapy practi...

  9. Auscultation of the Chest and Abdomen by Athletic Trainers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McChesney, John A.; McChesney, John W.

    2001-06-01

    OBJECTIVE: To present a practical overview of the methods and techniques of auscultation of the chest and abdomen for use during the physical examination of athletes. Our intent is to provide information on this clinical technique to assist athletic trainers in recognizing and referring athletes presenting with potentially serious internal organ conditions. BACKGROUND: Use of the stethoscope is a clinical skill increasingly necessary for athletic trainers. Given the expanding breadth of both the assessment techniques used by athletic trainers and the populations they care for and the fact that clinical instruction guidelines have changed in the newly adopted National Athletic Trainers' Association Educational Competencies, our goal is to provide a framework upon which future instruction can be based. DESCRIPTION: This review covers the use of a stethoscope for auscultation of the chest and abdomen. Auscultation of the heart is covered first, followed by techniques for auscultating the breath sounds. Lastly, auscultation of the abdomen describes techniques for listening for bowel sounds and arterial bruits. CLINICAL ADVANTAGES: During the assessment of injuries to and illnesses of athletes, knowledge of auscultatory techniques is valuable and of increasing importance to athletic trainers. Athletic trainers who do not know how to perform auscultation may fail to recognize, and therefore fail to refer for further evaluation, athletes with potentially serious pathologic conditions.

  10. Estimation of cartilaginous region in noncontrast CT of the chest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qian; Safdar, Nabile; Yu, Glenna; Myers, Emmarie; Sandler, Anthony; Linguraru, Marius George

    2014-03-01

    Pectus excavatum is a posterior depression of the sternum and adjacent costal cartilages and is the most common congenital deformity of the anterior chest wall. Its surgical repair can be performed via minimally invasive procedures that involve sternum and cartilage relocation and benefit from adequate surgical planning. In this study, we propose a method to estimate the cartilage regions in thoracic CT scans, which is the first step of statistical modeling of the osseous and cartilaginous structures for the rib cage. The ribs and sternum are first segmented by using interactive region growing and removing the vertebral column with morphological operations. The entire chest wall is also segmented to estimate the skin surface. After the segmentation, surface meshes are generated from the volumetric data and the skeleton of the ribs is extracted using surface contraction method. Then the cartilage surface is approximated via contracting the skin surface to the osseous structure. The ribs' skeleton is projected to the cartilage surface and the cartilages are estimated using cubic interpolation given the joints with the sternum. The final cartilage regions are formed by the cartilage surface inside the convex hull of the estimated cartilages. The method was validated with the CT scans of two pectus excavatum patients and three healthy subjects. The average distance between the estimated cartilage surface and the ground truth is 2.89 mm. The promising results indicate the effectiveness of cartilage surface estimation using the skin surface.

  11. Evaluation of chest injury mechanisms in nearside oblique frontal impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iraeus, Johan; Lindquist, Mats; Wistrand, Sofie; Sibgård, Elin; Pipkorn, Bengt

    2013-01-01

    Despite the use of seat belts and modern safety systems, many automobile occupants are still seriously injured or killed in car crashes. Common configurations in these crashes are oblique and small overlap frontal impacts that often lead to chest injuries.To evaluate the injury mechanism in these oblique impacts, an investigation was carried out using mathematical human body model simulations. A model of a simplified vehicle interior was developed and validated by means of mechanical sled tests with the Hybrid III dummy. The interior model was then combined with the human body model THUMS and validated by means of mechanical PMHS sled tests. Occupant kinematics as well as rib fracture patterns were predicted with reasonable accuracy.The final model was updated to conform to modern cars and a simulation matrix was run. In this matrix the boundary conditions, ΔV and PDOF, were varied and rib fracture risk as a function of the boundary conditions was evaluated using a statistical framework.In oblique frontal impacts, two injury producing mechanisms were found; (i) diagonal belt load and (ii) side structure impact. The second injury mechanism was found for PDOFs of 25°-35°, depending on ΔV. This means that for larger PDOFs, less ΔV is needed to cause a serious chest injury.

  12. Herpes simplex virus 1 pneumonia: conventional chest radiograph pattern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umans, U.; Golding, R.P.; Duraku, S.; Manoliu, R.A. [Dept. of Radiology, Academic Hospital ' ' Vrije Universiteit' ' , Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2001-06-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the findings on plain chest radiographs in patients with herpes simplex virus pneumonia (HSVP). The study was based on 17 patients who at a retrospective search have been found to have a monoinfection with herpes simplex virus. The diagnosis was established by isolation of the virus from material obtained during fiberoptic bronchoscopy (FOB) which also included broncho-alveolar lavage and tissue sampling. Fourteen patients had a chest radiograph performed within 24 h of the date of the FOB. Two radiographs showed no abnormalities of the lung parenchyma. The radiographs of the other 12 patients showed lung opacification, predominantly lobar or more extensive and always bilateral. Most patients presented with a mixed airspace and interstitial pattern of opacities, but 11 of 14 showed at least an airspace consolidation. Lobar, segmental, or subsegmental atelectasis was present in 7 patients, and unilateral or bilateral pleural effusion in 8 patients, but only in 1 patient was it a large amount. In contradiction to the literature which reports a high correlation between HSVP and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), 11 of 14 patients did not meet the pathophysiological criteria for ARDS. The radiologist may suggest the diagnosis of HSVP when bilateral airspace consolidation or mixed opacities appear in a susceptible group of patients who are not thought to have ARDS or pulmonary edema. The definite diagnosis of HSV pneumonia can be established only on the basis of culture of material obtained by broncho-alveolar lavage. (orig.)

  13. Necrotizing Fasciitis of the Chest Wall: Report of Pediatric Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Monica; Meeks, Andrew; Kearl, Liza

    2015-09-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a soft tissue infection uncommonly described in children and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality if not treated early and aggressively. Reports of cases involving the upper torso are rare in general. In adults, necrotizing fasciitis is most commonly described in the abdomen, perineum, and extremities. For children, particularly neonates, necrotizing fasciitis most commonly involves the trunk presenting as omphalitis. In this report, we describe 2 pediatric cases of necrotizing fasciitis of the chest wall that presented within 6 months from each other at Los Angeles County Hospital/University of Southern California Pediatric Emergency Department. Both cases involved previously healthy children with above normal body mass indices of 36 and 25.6, respectively. These cases are noteworthy because of the rarity of necrotizing fasciitis among children especially in the chest wall, atypical presentation with nonspecific symptoms which made the diagnosis challenging, and suggestion that obesity may be a potential risk factor. Despite the rarity of this disease, the information presented in these cases may aid in raising the index of suspicion for diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis.

  14. Association of mechanical chest compression and prehospital thrombolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenaitia, Hichem; Fournier, Marc; Brun, Jean Paul; Michelet, Pierre; Auffray, Jean Pierre

    2012-07-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a common cause of sudden death; the use of prehospital thrombolysis is currently a last-resort option and requires a prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Novel mechanical devices have recently been introduced that provides automatic mechanical chest compression (AMCC) according to the guidelines and continually without decrease efficiency throughout prolonged resuscitation. A 54 year-old woman with a history of breast cancer experienced sudden chest pain and severe dyspnea. A mobile intensive care unit was dispatched to her home. During physical examination, she suddenly collapsed with pulseless electrical activity as the initial rhythm. Prehospital thrombolysis during CPR combined with use of AMCC was performed based on a strongly suspected diagnosis of massive PE. After 75 minutes of effective CPR, return of spontaneous circulation was attained. After admission to an intensive care unit, computed tomographic scan confirmed bilateral PE. The patient was discharged 3 weeks after CPR in good neurologic condition. To our knowledge, this is the first case describing combined use of thrombolysis and AMCC in out-ofhospital cardiac arrest. However, for the time being, prehospital thrombolysis in CPR continues to be a measure that should only be performed on a case-by-case basis based on informed decision. Further studies are needed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of AMCC with thrombolysis and thus prolonged CPR.

  15. A triceps musculocutaneous flap for chest-wall defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartrampf, C.R. Jr.; Elliott, L.F.; Feldman, S. (Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (USA))

    1990-09-01

    A posterior upper arm flap based on the profunda brachii vessels has been described to cover soft-tissue defects in the upper anterolateral chest. In our series, the posterior upper arm skin is elevated with the long head of the triceps muscle to cover seven chest-wall defects resulting from indolent postradiation open wounds following partial TRAM flap failure (n = 2), soft-tissue deficiencies following partial TRAM flap loss (n = 3), and primarily as an ancillary flap in TRAM flap breast reconstruction (n = 2). This flap also may be used to supply well-vascularized tissue in the regions of the shoulder, axilla, and posterolateral back. A prerequisite for this operation is redundant tissue of the upper arm often present in middle-aged women and in patients with lymphedema following mastectomy. In our series of seven patients, all donor sites were closed primarily, and there was no subjective functional deficit following transfer of the long head of the triceps muscle.

  16. Chest wall reconstruction in a patient with Cantrell syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsukawa, Nobuyuki; Yasunaga, Hiroshi; Tananari, Yoshifumi

    2009-06-01

    Cantrell syndrome is a very rare congenital anomaly with up to five features: a midline, upper abdominal wall abnormality, lower sternal defect, anterior diaphragmatic defect, diaphragmatic pericardial defect, and congenital abnormalities of the heart. This report describes our experience of performing a reconstruction of a chest wall defect in a Cantrell syndrome case with herniation of the heart. The patient was a 1-month-old female infant who received surgical patch repair of a ventricular septal defect (VSD) and atrial septal defect (ASD) at the Department of Cardiac Surgery. Subsequently, the patient underwent reconstruction at the second-stage surgery. A rhomboid skin flap with an inferior pedicle was used to close the defect. In this process the flap, including portions of the rectus abdominis muscles, was elevated and transferred into the defect. The sectioned ends of the divided pectoralis major muscles were sutured together to simultaneously reconstruct the muscles. It has been 2 years since the surgery, and the defect is covered with normal skin, and the protrusion of the heart from the chest wall and the externally visible pulsation have been resolved. The progress has been very good functionally and cosmetically.

  17. Acute chest pain in a patient with a non-strangulated hiatal hernia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alexander John Scumpia; Megan Elizabeth Dekok; Daniel Michael Aronovich; Gurpaul Bajwa; Randy Barros; Randy Katz; Jordan Ditchek

    2015-01-01

    Acute chest pain resulting in spontaneous idiopathic hemomediastinum is a rare, potentially life-threatening occurrence. Acute chest pain is a common chief complaint of patients, accounting for 2.4%-6% of adult emergency room visits. The clinician’s differential diagnoses for acute chest pain rarely include complications of hiatal hernias. An 83-year-old male presented with acute chest pain and was emergently diagnosed with hemomediastinum secondary to spontaneous gastric mesenteric vessel rupture due to a non-strangulated hiatal hernia after physical exertion.

  18. Plasmacytoma presenting as missing rib on chest film: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffery, Terrell; Foy, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    A 33-year-old man presented to the emergency department (ED) with chief complaint of chest pain, persisting for approximately one year. Chest X-ray revealed he was missing the right posterior fifth rib. Physical examination showed no surgical scars, and he reported no history of chest trauma. A CT of his chest demonstrated a mass involving the posterior aspect of the right fifth rib, and subsequent biopsy revealed plasma cells. Laboratory results indicated the tumor was a solitary plasmacytoma of the rib. He was referred to oncology and treated with radiation therapy. This case report illustrates an unusual presentation of a solitary plasmacytoma of the rib.

  19. Anterior mediastinal abscess diagnosed in a young sumo wrestler after closed blunt chest trauma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tatsuro Sassa; Ken-ichiro Kobayashi; Masayuki Ota; Takuya Washino; Mayu Hikone; Naoya Sakamoto; Sentaro Iwabuchi

    2015-01-01

    Most mediastinal abscesses result from infections after thoracotomy, esophageal perforation or penetrating chest trauma.This disease is rarely caused by closed blunt chest trauma.All previously reported such cases after closed blunt chest trauma presented with hematoma and sternal osteomyelitis resulting from sternal fracture.Here we report a 15-year-old sumo wrestler who presented with an anterior mediastinal abscess without any mediastinal fracture.The mediastinal abscess resulted from the hematogenous spread of Staphylococcus aureus to a hematoma that might have been caused by a closed blunt chest trauma incurred during sumo wrestling exercises.

  20. Chest Fat Quantification via CT Based on Standardized Anatomy Space in Adult Lung Transplant Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Torigian, Drew A.; Odhner, Dewey; Wu, Caiyun; Pednekar, Gargi; Palmer, Scott; Rozenshtein, Anna; Shirk, Melissa A.; Newell, John D.; Porteous, Mary; Diamond, Joshua M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Overweight and underweight conditions are considered relative contraindications to lung transplantation due to their association with excess mortality. Yet, recent work suggests that body mass index (BMI) does not accurately reflect adipose tissue mass in adults with advanced lung diseases. Alternative and more accurate measures of adiposity are needed. Chest fat estimation by routine computed tomography (CT) imaging may therefore be important for identifying high-risk lung transplant candidates. In this paper, an approach to chest fat quantification and quality assessment based on a recently formulated concept of standardized anatomic space (SAS) is presented. The goal of the paper is to seek answers to several key questions related to chest fat quantity and quality assessment based on a single slice CT (whether in the chest, abdomen, or thigh) versus a volumetric CT, which have not been addressed in the literature. Methods Unenhanced chest CT image data sets from 40 adult lung transplant candidates (age 58 ± 12 yrs and BMI 26.4 ± 4.3 kg/m2), 16 with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), 16 with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), and the remainder with other conditions were analyzed together with a single slice acquired for each patient at the L5 vertebral level and mid-thigh level. The thoracic body region and the interface between subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) in the chest were consistently defined in all patients and delineated using Live Wire tools. The SAT and VAT components of chest were then segmented guided by this interface. The SAS approach was used to identify the corresponding anatomic slices in each chest CT study, and SAT and VAT areas in each slice as well as their whole volumes were quantified. Similarly, the SAT and VAT components were segmented in the abdomen and thigh slices. Key parameters of the attenuation (Hounsfield unit (HU) distributions) were determined from each chest slice and

  1. Chest Traumas due to Bicycle accident in Childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ufuk Cobanoglu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim:Childhood injuries are the leading cause of death in children and result in significant healthcare utilization. Trauma is the second most common cause of mortality in children aged 1-4 years and leading cause of death in children older than 4 years. Thoracic injury is the second most leading cause of death in traumatized children. Multisystemic injury is found in more than 50% of children with thoracic injuries most of which are secondary to blunt traumas. We planned this study to evaluate thorax trauma cases secondary to bicycle driving in childhood and to draw attention to the importance of the regulation of traffic rules, the education of bicycle drivers.Material and Methods:  A retrospective evaluation was performed in 17 pediatric patients admitted to the Department of Thoracic Surgery during 2006-2010 with a diagnosis of chest trauma due to bicycle driving. For every patient, a pediatric trauma score (PTS was calculated. Descriptive statistics were performed for PTS. Results; Eleven (64.70% cases were injured due to the tricycle accidents and six cases 6 (35.29% were injured due to the two-wheeled bicycle accidents. The most frequent thoracic pathologies included pulmonary contusion (41.2% and chest wall contusion (29.41%. Extrathoracic injuries were seen in 35.29%, the extremities (17.64% and abdomino pelvic (11.76% being the most commonly involved. Treatment consisted of symptomatic treatment in 12 patients (70.58%, tube thoracostomy in 2 patients (11.76%, and thoracotomy in 1 patient (5.9%. The morbidity was seen in 3 patients (17.64%. The mortality rate was 5.9% (n:1. The mean PTS of the cases who had additional system injuries were significantly worse than the cases who had isolated chest traumas Conclusions: The pediatric thorax has a greater cartilage content and incomplete ossification of the ribs. Due to the pliability of the pediatric rib cage and mediastinal mobility, significant intrathoracic injury may exist in the

  2. The comparison of three high-frequency chest compression devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong W; Lee, Jongwon; Warwick, Warren J

    2008-01-01

    High-frequency chest compression (HFCC) is shown to enhance clearance of pulmonary airway secretions. Several HFCC devices have been designed to provide this therapy. Standard equipment consists of an air pulse generator attached by lengths of tubing to an adjustable, inflatable vest/jacket (V/J) garment. In this study, the V/Js were fitted over a mannequin. The three device air pulse generators produced characteristic waveform patterns. The variations in the frequency and pressure setting of devices were consistent with specific device design features. These studies suggest that a better understanding of the effects of different waveform, frequency, and pressure combinations may improve HFCC therapeutic efficacy of three different HFCC machines. The V/J component of HFCC devices delivers the compressive pulses to the chest wall to produce both airflow through and oscillatory effects in the airways. The V/J pressures of three HFCC machines were measured and analyzed to characterize the frequency, pressure, and waveform patterns generated by each of three device models. The dimensions of all V/Js were adjusted to a circumference of approximately 110% of the chest circumference. The V/J pressures were measured, and maximum, minimum, and mean pressure, pulse pressure, and root mean square of three pulse generators were calculated. Jacket pressures ranged between 2 and 34 mmHg. The 103 and 104 models' pulse pressures increased with the increase in HFCC frequency at constant dial pressure. With the ICS the pulse pressure decreased when the frequency increased. The waveforms of models 103 and 104 were symmetric sine wave and asymmetric sine wave patterns, respectively. The ICS had a triangular waveform. At 20 Hz, both the 103 and 104 were symmetric sine waveform but the ICS remained triangular. Maximum crest factors emerged in low-frequency and high-pressure settings for the ICS and in the high-frequency and low-pressure settings for models 103 and 104. Recognizing the

  3. Anatomical decomposition in dual energy chest digital tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Donghoon; Kim, Ye-seul; Choi, Sunghoon; Lee, Haenghwa; Choi, Seungyeon; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2016-03-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide and the early diagnosis of lung cancer has recently become more important. For early screening lung cancer, computed tomography (CT) has been used as a gold standard for early diagnosis of lung cancer [1]. The major advantage of CT is that it is not susceptible to the problem of misdiagnosis caused by anatomical overlapping while CT has extremely high radiation dose and cost compared to chest radiography. Chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) is a recently introduced new modality for lung cancer screening with relatively low radiation dose compared to CT [2] and also showing high sensitivity and specificity to prevent anatomical overlapping occurred in chest radiography. Dual energy material decomposition method has been proposed for better detection of pulmonary nodules as means of reducing the anatomical noise [3]. In this study, possibility of material decomposition in CDT was tested by simulation study and actual experiment using prototype CDT. Furthermore organ absorbed dose and effective dose were compared with single energy CDT. The Gate v6 (Geant4 application for tomographic emission), and TASMIP (Tungsten anode spectral model using the interpolating polynomial) code were used for simulation study and simulated cylinder shape phantom consisted of 4 inner beads which were filled with spine, rib, muscle and lung equivalent materials. The patient dose was estimated by PCXMC 1.5 Monte Carlo simulation tool [4]. The tomosynthesis scan was performed with a linear movement and 21 projection images were obtained over 30 degree of angular range with 1.5° degree of angular interval. The proto type CDT system has same geometry with simulation study and composed of E7869X (Toshiba, Japan) x-ray tube and FDX3543RPW (Toshiba, Japan) detector. The result images showed that reconstructed with dual energy clearly visualize lung filed by removing unnecessary bony structure. Furthermore, dual energy CDT could enhance

  4. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS): chest radiographic features in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babyn, Paul S.; Gahunia, Harpal K.; Manson, David [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chu, Winnie C.W.; Metreweli, Constantine [Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin (China); Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging, Chinese University of Hong Kong (China); Tsou, Ian Y.Y.; Wansaicheong, Gervais K.L.; Chee, Thomas S.G.; Kaw, Gregory J.L. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, 11 Jalan Tan Tock Seng (Singapore); Allen, Upton; Bitnun, Ari; Read, Stanley [Division of Infectious Diseases, Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Cheng, Frankie W.T.; Fok, Tai-Fai; Hon, Ellis K.L.; Li, Albert M.; Ng, Pak-Cheung [Department of Paediatrics, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, 30-32 Ngan Shing Street, Shatin, Hong Kong, SAR (China); Chiu, Man-Chun; Leung, Chi-Wai [Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Princess Margaret Hospital, Lai King Hill Road, Lai Chi Kok, Hong Kong, SAR (China); Khong, Pek L. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, The University of Hong Kong, Queen Mary Hospital, 102 Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong, SAR (China); Stringer, David A.

    2004-01-01

    We abstracted data (n=62) on the radiologic appearance and course of SARS in pediatric patients with suspect (n=25) or probable (n=37) SARS, diagnosed in five hospital sites located in three cities: Toronto, Singapore, and Hong Kong. Available chest radiographs and thoracic CTs were reviewed for the presence of the following radiographic findings: airspace disease, air bronchograms, airways inflammation and peribronchial thickening, interstitial disease, pleural effusion, and hilar adenopathy. A total of 62 patients (suspect=25, probable=37) were evaluated for SARS. Patient ages ranged from 5.5 months to 17 years and 11.5 months (average, 6 years and 10 months) with a female-to-male ratio of 32:30. Forty-one patients (66.1%) were in close contact with other probable, suspect, or quarantined cases; 10 patients (16.1%) had recently traveled to WHO-designated affected areas within 10 days; and 7 patients (11.2%) were transferred from other hospitals that had SARS patients. Three patients, who did not have close/hospital contact or travel history to affected areas, were classified as SARS cases based on their clinical signs and symptoms and on the fact that they were living in an endemic area. The most prominent clinical presentations were fever, with a temperature over 38 C (100%), cough (62.9%), rhinorrhea (22.6%), myalgia (17.7%), chills (14.5%), and headache (11.3%). Other findings included sore throat (9.7%), gastrointestinal symptoms (9.7%), rigor (8.1%), and lethargy (6.5%). In general, fever and cough were the most common clinical presentations amongst younger pediatric SARS cases (age<10 years), whereas, in addition to these symptoms, headache, myalgia, sore throat, chills, and/or rigor were common in older patients (age{>=}10 years). The chest radiographs of 35.5% of patients were normal. The most prominent radiological findings that were observed in the remaining patients were areas of consolidation (45.2%), often peripheral with multifocal lesions in 22

  5. Diagnostic modalities x-ray and CT chest differ in the management of thoracic injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Chapagain

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe difference in the management of blunt trauma to the chest on the basis of conventional xray and computerised tomography of the chest. Methods: This prospective study was conducted between December 2011 to October 2012 in COMS in Bharatpur,a tertiary referral centre in central Nepal . Clinically stable thoracic injury patients were first evaluated with chest x-ray and the management on this basis was recorded. The findings of the CT chest were assessed and the type of management on the basis of CT was also recorded. Outcome was assessed in terms of mortality, morbidity, hospital and ICU stay with respect to the management on the basis of chest x-ray and CT scan. Results: Of the 129 patients, 74.4% were male and 25.6% were female with the patients ranging in age from 7 to 87 years (mean = 40.41 years. The most common mechanism of trauma to the chest was as a result of a motor vehicle accident (69.8%, followed by fall injury (20.2%. X-ray chest diagnosed rib fracture in 62%, haemothorax in 37%, pneumothorax in 27%, lung contusion in 10% and haemopneumothorax in 21% patients. Similarly CT chest diagnosed rib fracture in 86%, haemothorax in 54%, pneumothorax in 36%, lung contusion in 30% and haemopneumothorax in 30% patients. Mean hospital stay was 9.5 days in the group of patients having management on the basis of x-ray chest relative to mean stay of 10.2 days in the CT- chest group. In the management on the basis of xray group, there was a mean ICU stay of 2.8days compared to mean stays of 3.2 days in CT chest group. Conclusion: Though CT scan of the chest is more informative and differs the management of the blunt chest trauma, one should not forget to advise the cost effective, easily available and initial guiding agent, xray chest for early management of the chest injury patient. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v10i1.12764 Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal, 2014, Vol.10(1; 22-31

  6. Effects of chest compressions on cardiorespiratory function in a non-arrested porcine model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CONG Lu-hong; LI Chun-sheng; GUO Zhi-jun; WANG Shuo; WU Jun-yuan; YUAN Wei

    2013-01-01

    Background The effects of chest compressions to hemodynamic and respiratory parameters during hands-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in a non-arrested patient who suddenly collapses are confusing.In this research,we investigated the effects of chest compressions in a non-arrested porcine model.Methods Fourteen male domestic pigs were randomized into sham control group (SHAM group,only anesthetized and instrumented without chest compression,n=6) or chest compression group (CC group,2 minutes of chest compressions,n=8).Continuous hemodynamic parameters,dynamic lung compliance (Cdyn),and blood gas analysis outcomes were recorded.Serum levels of catecholamine were measured at baseline and 2 minutes,30 minutes,4 hours,and 24 hours after chest compressions.Chest computed tomography (CT) was performed at 30 minutes and 24 hours.Conventional histopathology evaluation was performed.Results After two minutes of chest compressions in the CC group,heart rate and extravascular lung water increased significantly; mean arterial pressure,stroke volume,and global ejection fraction significantly decreased.Cdyn significantly decreased to valley levels at 30 minutes and slowly recovered.Compared with the baseline,serum levels of catecholamine significantly increased at 2 minutes and rapidly decreased 24 hours later.At 30 minutes after chest compressions,chest CT showed local exudation,which was absorbed 24 hours later.Conclusions This research showed that 2 minutes of chest compressions causes various heart and lung tissue damage in the normal a normal porcine model.It also impacts the hemodynamic and Cdyn.

  7. Sexual signalling in Propithecus verreauxi: male "chest badge" and female mate choice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Dall'Olio

    Full Text Available Communication, an essential prerequisite for sociality, involves the transmission of signals. A signal can be defined as any action or trait produced by one animal, the sender, that produces a change in the behaviour of another animal, the receiver. Secondary sexual signals are often used for mate choice because they may inform on a potential partner's quality. Verreaux's sifaka (Propithecus verreauxi is characterized by the presence of two different morphs of males (bimorphism, which can show either a stained or clean chest. The chest becomes stained by secretions of the sternal gland during throat marking (rubbing throat and chest on a vertical substrate while smearing the scent deposition. The role of the chest staining in guiding female mate choice was previously hypothesized but never demonstrated probably due to the difficulty of observing sifaka copulations in the wild. Here we report that stained-chested males had a higher throat marking activity than clean-chested males during the mating season, but not during the birth season. We found that females copulated more frequently with stained-chested males than the clean-chested males. Finally, in agreement with the biological market theory, we found that clean-chested males, with a lower scent-releasing potential, offered more grooming to females. This "grooming for sex" tactic was not completely unsuccessful; in fact, half of the clean-chested males copulated with females, even though at low frequency. In conclusion, the chest stain, possibly correlated with different cues targeted by females, could be one of the parameters which help females in selecting mates.

  8. Sexual signalling in Propithecus verreauxi: male "chest badge" and female mate choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Olio, Stefania; Norscia, Ivan; Antonacci, Daniela; Palagi, Elisabetta

    2012-01-01

    Communication, an essential prerequisite for sociality, involves the transmission of signals. A signal can be defined as any action or trait produced by one animal, the sender, that produces a change in the behaviour of another animal, the receiver. Secondary sexual signals are often used for mate choice because they may inform on a potential partner's quality. Verreaux's sifaka (Propithecus verreauxi) is characterized by the presence of two different morphs of males (bimorphism), which can show either a stained or clean chest. The chest becomes stained by secretions of the sternal gland during throat marking (rubbing throat and chest on a vertical substrate while smearing the scent deposition). The role of the chest staining in guiding female mate choice was previously hypothesized but never demonstrated probably due to the difficulty of observing sifaka copulations in the wild. Here we report that stained-chested males had a higher throat marking activity than clean-chested males during the mating season, but not during the birth season. We found that females copulated more frequently with stained-chested males than the clean-chested males. Finally, in agreement with the biological market theory, we found that clean-chested males, with a lower scent-releasing potential, offered more grooming to females. This "grooming for sex" tactic was not completely unsuccessful; in fact, half of the clean-chested males copulated with females, even though at low frequency. In conclusion, the chest stain, possibly correlated with different cues targeted by females, could be one of the parameters which help females in selecting mates.

  9. Photodynamic therapy for chest wall recurrence from breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, R R; Sibata, C; Mang, T S; Bagnato, V S; Downie, G H; Hu, X H; Cuenca, R

    2004-09-01

    Breast cancer is common with over 230,000 new cases diagnosed each year in North America alone. While great strides have been made to achieve excellent cancer control and survival, a significant minority of patients fail locally. While initial salvage to regain disease control is of the utmost importance, it is not universally successful. This leads to a therapeutic quagmire. Additional surgery, radiation and chemo-hormonal therapy are possible, but they are usually highly morbid with low success rates. Photodynamic therapy appears to be an underutilized salvage modality for this unfortunate patient population. This report analyzes and reviews the role of photodynamic therapy for patients with chest wall re-recurrence from breast cancer.

  10. Profile of chest trauma in Zaria Nigeria: A prelminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S A Edaigbini

    2011-01-01

    Materials and Methods A prospective study of trauma patients admitted to Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital through the Accident and Emergency units was commenced in January 2008.This preliminary report is for the period of 27months.The clinical history, physical examination and outcome of management recorded in a predesigned proforma, were analysed with SPSS 15 and the patients were followed up in the surgical outpatient department. Results A total of 4784 patients (3143 men and 1641 women were admitted during this period for trauma. There were a total of 628(13.13% deaths. Of the 42 consecutive patients identified with chest trauma35 (83.3% were males and 7(16.7% were females. The age range was from 5-75years and the mean age was 35.4years, while the most affected ages were in the range of 20 to 49years. Blunt injury constituted 71.4% and penetrating injury constituted 28.6%. Road traffic accident was responsible for 61.9%, stab injury 21.4%, falls 7.1%, gunshot injury 4.8%, impalement 2.4% and animal attack also 2.4%. The average time taken between accident and admission was 31hours,40minutes and 12seconds while the average duration of hospital stay was 16.10 days. The injury pattern included rib fracture(s (23.8%, hemopneumothorax (14.3%, hemothorax (7.1%, pneumothorax (4.8%, combinations of chest injuries (7.1%, chest laceration 7.1%, bruises 11.9%, lung contusion 4.8%, subcutaneous empyema 2.4%, flail chest 4.8% and no specific injury (11.9%. Associated injuries included head injury (63.6%, orthopaedic injury (27.3% and combinations (abdominal, head, orthopaedic (9.1%. The fatality of road traffic accident was 36.8%. No patient was attended to by paramedics at the scene of accident while 21.9% of the patients had pre-hospital resuscitation in peripheral clinics before admission. The transfusion requirement was 14.3%. One patient (2.4% required a median sternotomy and cardiopulmonary bypass, 54.8% required tube thoracostomy while 42.9% had general

  11. [The chest CT findings and pathologic findings of pulmonary tuberculosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Hideo

    2009-08-01

    The past research of the radiologic manifestations of pulmonary tuberculosis in Japan was based on morphological pathology of the untreated patient autopsy. I would like to show the chest CT scan of tuberculosis diseases with caseous granuloma at its exudative reaction, proliferative reaction, productive reaction, cirrhotic reaction until self cure. This progress reflects the normal cell mediated immunological responses. Also I would like to show the cavitation of granuloma, which results from liquefaction of caseous materials during the course and results in the formation of the source of infection. And finally I would like to show the morphological differences of acinous lesion, acino-nodular lesion and caseous lobular pneumonia. These differences reflect the amount of bacilli disseminated in the peripheral parts under the lobules. In this study, I do not show old age cases and HIV positive cases, who do not form typical granuloma due to the decreased cell mediated immnunity and whose X ray findings are atypical.

  12. Evaluation and Management of Patients with Noncardiac Chest Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Shekhar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Up to a third of patients undergoing coronary angiography for angina-like chest pain are found to have normal coronary arteries and a substantial proportion of these individuals continue to consult and even attend emergency departments. Initially, these patients are usually seen by cardiologists but with accumulating evidence that the pain might have a gastrointestinal origin, it may be more appropriate for them to be cared for by the gastroenterologist once a cardiological cause has been excluded. This review covers the assessment and management of this challenging condition, which includes a combination of education, reassurance, and pharmacotherapy. For the more refractory cases, behavioral treatments, such as cognitive behavioral therapy or hypnotherapy, may have to be considered.

  13. Clinical image: Hydatid disease of the chest wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, R.J.; Berlin, J.W.; Ghahremani, G.G. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Hydatid disease is rarely encountered among the population of the United States, but it affects several million people in sheep-raising regions of the world. Human infestation with Echinococcus granulosus begins following ingestion of its ova, which are excreted into the contaminated water during the usual dog-sheep cycle. Hydatid cysts will then develop most frequently in the liver (75% of cases) and lungs (15%) of the human host. Skeletal involvement has been reported to occur in only 0.5-4.0% of patients in the endemic areas. Because of the rarity and perplexing imaging features of hydatid disease involving the chest wall, we wish herein to present a case evaluated recently at our institution. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  14. A level crossing enhancement scheme for chest radiograph images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagesha; Kumar, G Hemantha

    2007-10-01

    A new approach for contrast enhancement of chest radiograph image data is presented. Existing methods for image enhancement focus mainly on the properties of the image to be processed while excluding any consideration of the observer characteristics. In several applications, particularly in the medical imaging area, effective contrast enhancement for diagnostic purposes can be achieved by including certain basic human visual properties. In this paper we shall present a novel (recursive) algorithm that tailors the required amount of contrast enhancement based on a combination of the optimal phase representation and the theory of projection onto a convex set. Constraints of maximum bandwidth of the image data, appropriate knowledge of the amplitude value of the image data, heuristic limitations and level crossing measurements serve to impose additional information. So that, the enhanced image data may better converge to the good quality image.

  15. Lung cancer screening: Computed tomography or chest radiographs?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Edwin; JR; van; Beek; Saeed; Mirsadraee; John; T; Murchison

    2015-01-01

    Worldwide, lung cancer is the leading cause of mortalitydue to malignancy. The vast majority of cases of lung cancer are smoking related and the most effective way of reducing lung cancer incidence and mortality is by smoking cessation. In the Western world, smoking cessation policies have met with limited success. The other major means of reducing lung cancer deaths is to diagnose cases at an earlier more treatable stage employing screening programmes using chest radiographs or low dose computed tomography. In many countries smoking is still on the increase, and the sheer scale of the problem limits the affordability of such screening programmes. This short review article will evaluate the current evidence and potential areas of research which may benefit policy making across the world.

  16. A system for automatic aorta sections measurements on chest CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeffer, Yitzchak; Mayer, Arnaldo; Zholkover, Adi; Konen, Eli

    2016-03-01

    A new method is proposed for caliber measurement of the ascending aorta (AA) and descending aorta (DA). A key component of the method is the automatic detection of the carina, as an anatomical landmark around which an axial volume of interest (VOI) can be defined to observe the aortic caliber. For each slice in the VOI, a linear profile line connecting the AA with the DA is found by pattern matching on the underlying intensity profile. Next, the aortic center position is found using Hough transform on the best linear segment candidate. Finally, region growing around the center provides an accurate segmentation and caliber measurement. We evaluated the algorithm on 113 sequential chest CT scans, slice thickness of 0.75 - 3.75mm, 90 with contrast agent injected. The algorithm success rates were computed as the percentage of scans in which the center of the AA was found. Automated measurements of AA caliber were compared with independent measurements of two experienced chest radiologists, comparing the absolute difference between the two radiologists with the absolute difference between the algorithm and each of the radiologists. The measurement stability was demonstrated by computing the STD of the absolute difference between the radiologists, and between the algorithm and the radiologists. Results: Success rates of 93% and 74% were achieved, for contrast injected cases and non-contrast cases, respectively. These results indicate that the algorithm can be robust in large variability of image quality, such as the cases in a realworld clinical setting. The average absolute difference between the algorithm and the radiologists was 1.85mm, lower than the average absolute difference between the radiologists, which was 2.1mm. The STD of the absolute difference between the algorithm and the radiologists was 1.5mm vs 1.6mm between the two radiologists. These results demonstrate the clinical relevance of the algorithm measurements.

  17. Reverse airflow in certain chest drains may be misinterpreted as prolonged air leakage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stouby, Anna; Neckelmann, Kirsten; Licht, Peter B

    2011-01-01

    Prolonged air leakage is common after lung resection. We observed that during deep inspiration some patients were able to empty the water-seal of commercial chest drainage systems and retract air back into the chest tube, which subsequently escaped during the following expiration, mimicking "true...

  18. Coronary calcium scores are systematically underestimated at a large chest size : A multivendor phantom study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemink, Martin J.; Abramiuc, Bronislaw; den Harder, Annemarie M.; van der Werf, Niels R.; de Jong, Pim A.; Budde, Ricardo P. J.; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Willems, Tineke P.; Greuter, Marcel J. W.; Leiner, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of chest size on coronary calcium score (CCS) as assessed with new-generation CT systems from 4 major vendors. Methods: An anthropomorphic, small-sized (300 x 200 mm) chest phantom containing 100 small calcifications (diameters, 0.5-2.0 mm) was evaluated with and wi

  19. Subperitoneal extension of disease processes between the chest, abdomen, and the pelvis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Sherif; Moshiri, Mariam; Robinson, Tracy J; Gunn, Martin; Lehnert, Bruce; Sundarkumar, Dinesh; Katz, Douglas S

    2015-08-01

    The subserous space is a large, anatomically continuous potential space that interconnects the chest, abdomen, and pelvis. The subserous space is formed from areolar and adipose tissue, and contains branches of the vascular, lymphatic, and nervous systems. As such, it provides one large continuous space in which many disease processes can spread between the chest, abdomen, and the pelvis.

  20. Scapular Fractures in Blunt Chest Trauma – Self-Experience Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabet A. Al-Sadek

    2016-11-01

    CONCLUSIONS:The study confirms the role of scapular fractures as a marker for the severity of the chest trauma (based on the number of associated thoracic injuries, but doesn’t present scapular fractures as an indicator for high mortality in blunt chest trauma patients.

  1. A case report of neck, chest and upper limb cutaneous metastasis from synchronous colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jian; SHI Yu-qian; WU Zhi-yong

    2009-01-01

    Cutaneous metastasis from colorectal carcinoma is uncommon, occurring in less than 4% of the whole patients.' The most frequently involved are incision scar or abdominal skin,24 while cutaneous metastasis to neck and chest is very rare. We hereby report a case of synchronous, postoperative cutaneous metastasis from colorectal carcinoma to neck, upper limb and chest skin, which were confirmed by biopsy.

  2. Delayed cardiac tamponade in a patient with previous minor blunt chest trauma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermens, Jeannine A.J.M.; Wajon, Elly M.C.J.; Grandjean, Jan G.; Haalebos, Max M.P.; Birgelen, von Clemens

    2009-01-01

    Hemopericardium with cardiac tamponade after non-penetrating chest trauma is a very rare but life-threatening condition. If this complication develops after an interval of several weeks following the non-penetrating chest trauma, the causal relation with the traumatic event is less evident, which ma

  3. Reconstruction of the decision-making process in assessing musculoskeletal chest pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochkendahl, Mette J; Vach, Werner; Hartvigsen, Jan;

    2012-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to identify the most important determinants from the patient history and clinical examination in diagnosing musculoskeletal chest pain (MSCP) in patients with acute noncardiac chest pain when supported by a structured protocol and to construct a decision tree...

  4. Patient-centered clinical impact of incidentally detected abnormalities on chest CT scans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherine G. Moftah

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: The clinically significant different incidental abnormalities on chest CT scans represented 10.4% of all incidental findings, 3.3% were due to malignancies. The clinical impact of incidental abnormalities on chest CT may be of utmost importance on patient care.

  5. Chest Wall Motion during Speech Production in Patients with Advanced Ankylosing Spondylitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalliakosta, Georgia; Mandros, Charalampos; Tzelepis, George E.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that ankylosing spondylitis (AS) alters the pattern of chest wall motion during speech production. Method: The pattern of chest wall motion during speech was measured with respiratory inductive plethysmography in 6 participants with advanced AS (5 men, 1 woman, age 45 plus or minus 8 years, Schober test 1.45 plus or…

  6. It's Not Your Heart: Group Treatment for Non-Cardiac Chest Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Sherry M.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a brief group psychoeducational treatment for non-cardiac chest pain, supplemented with a composite case study. Patients present to emergency rooms for chest pain they believe is a heart attack symptom. When cardiac testing is negative, this pain is usually a panic symptom, often occurring with a cluster of other panic…

  7. Psychological trauma of funnel chest in adolescents and the appropriate age for minimally invasive surgery repair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Jing; LUO Li; XIAO Li-jun; GU Ling-yun; SUN Tian-sheng

    2013-01-01

    Background Funnel chest has a negative effect on adolescents and it has a strong effect on adolescents' psychological and behavior.This study aimed to investigate the psychological characteristics and factors that affect adolescents with funnel chest and to evaluate the relationship between the patients' age and their physiological and psychological health.We aimed to establish an age model for maximum surgery benefits for funnel chest patients to provide an objective basis for choosing surgery.Methods The study adopted a general evaluation approach to assess the risk and benefits of minimally invasive surgery for funnel chest.The funnel chest index,the Symptom Checklist-90,and the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire were used as assessment tools to observe physiological and psychological features in funnel chest patients.A sample of 234adolescents with funnel chest was selected from a third-grade class-A hospital in Beijing.Age groups were adopted as an independent variable,and other factors in funnel chest patients were dependent variables.Results There was a significant difference in the relapse rate for funnel chest in the different age groups (x2=11.883,P=0.008).There was a higher relapse rate in patients of ≤10 or ≥19 years old than in patients of 11-18 years old.There was a significant difference in the SCL-90 total score in the different age groups (F=12.538,P=0.0001),the patients older than 13 years had a higher score than those younger than 13 years in the SCL-90.There was a significant difference in the standard score of E (introversion/extraversion) in the different age groups (F=10.06,P=0.0001).There was also a significance in the funnel chest index before surgery in the different psychological scales (P<0.01),with a higher funnel chest index score associated with more obvious psychological trauma.Age and the number of variables,including the relapse rate,SCL-90 score,standard score of E,and standard score of N in the EPQ were significantly

  8. Study of fractal dimension in chest images using normal and interstitial lung disease cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Douglas M.; Correa, Jose L.; Souto, Miguel; Malagari, Katerina S.

    1993-09-01

    A quantitative computerized method which provides accurate discrimination between chest radiographs with positive findings of interstitial disease patterns and normal chest radiographs may increase the efficacy of radiologic screening of the chest and the utility of digital radiographic systems. This report is a comparison of fractal dimension measured in normal chest radiographs and in radiographs with abnormal lungs having reticular, nodular, reticulonodular and linear patterns of interstitial disease. Six regions of interest (ROI's) from each of 33 normal chest radiographs and 33 radiographs with positive findings of interstitial disease were studied. Results indicate that there is a statistically significant difference between the distribution of the fractal dimension in normal radiographs and radiographs where disease is present.

  9. Two cases of Chest Heating Sensation treated by Hwangryunhaedok-tang Herbal-Acupuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwon-Il Cho

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical effect of Hwangryunhaedok-tang Herbal-Acupuncture. Hwangryunhaedok-tang is used in all heating diseases. Chest Heating Sensation is a unique concept in Oriental Medicine. So we applied Hwangryunhaedok-tang Herbal-Acupuncture to treat the Chest Heating Sensation. We used DITI(Digital Infrared Thermographic Imaging to estimate the temperatures of chest surface for the outcome assessment. We came to know that the chest surface temperatures were all reduced in both cases after Herbal-Acupuncture treatment. The reduced average temperature was 1.5℃ in case 1 and 0.9℃ in case 2. The above result indicates that Hwangryunhaedok-tang Herbal-Acupuncture treatment has an effect on Chest Heating Sensation, thus continuous Hwangryunhaedok-tang Herbal-Acupuncture study will be needed for more clinical applications.

  10. Image quality for five modern chest radiography techniques: a modified FROC study with an anthropomorphic chest phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Månsson, L G; Kheddache, S; Lanhede, B; Tylén, U

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the image quality for one conventional and four digital chest radiography techniques. Three storage phosphor systems, one selenium drum system, and one film-screen system were compared using a modified receiver-operating-characteristics method. Simulated pathology was randomly positioned over the parenchymal regions and the mediastinum of an anthropomorphic phantom. Eight observers (four chest radiologists, one specialist in general radiology, one hospital physicist, and two radiographers) evaluated 60 images for each technique. The selenium drum system (Philips, Eindhoven, The Netherlands) rated best for the detection of parenchymal nodules. Together with the storage phosphor system of generation IIIN (Philips/Fuji), the selenium drum system also rated best for detection of thin linear structures. The storage phosphor system of generation V (Fuji) rated best for the detection of mediastinal nodules. The first generation of the storage phosphor system from Agfa (Mortsel, Belgium) rated worst for the detection of parenchymal nodules and thin linear structures. These differences were significant (p drum system and the storage phosphor system of generation V were significantly better than the other systems tested. The film/screen system performed significantly better than the first-generation storage phosphor system from Agfa, equal to the generation IIIN storage phosphor system (Philips/Fuji) and significantly worse than the selenium drum system (Philips) and the generation-V storage phosphor system (Fuji). The conclusion is therefore that the image quality of selenium-based digital technique and of the more recent generations of storage phosphor systems is superior to both conventional technique and storage phosphor systems using image plates of older types.

  11. Chest radiography practice in critically ill patients: a postal survey in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korevaar Johanna C

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To ascertain current chest radiography practice in intensive care units (ICUs in the Netherlands. Methods Postal survey: a questionnaire was sent to all ICUs with > 5 beds suitable for mechanical ventilation; pediatric ICUs were excluded. When an ICU performed daily-routine chest radiographs in any group of patients it was considered to be a "daily-routine chest radiography" ICU. Results From the number of ICUs responding, 63% practice a daily-routine strategy, in which chest radiographs are obtained on a daily basis without any specific reason. A daily-routine chest radiography strategy is practiced less frequently in university-affiliated ICUs (50% as compared to other ICUs (68%, as well as in larger ICUs (> 20 beds, 50% as compared to smaller ICUs (P > 0.05. Remarkably, physicians that practice a daily-routine strategy consider daily-routine radiographs helpful in guiding daily practice in less than 30% of all performed radiographs. Chest radiographs are considered essential for verification of the position of invasive devices (81% and for diagnosing pneumothorax, pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome (82%, 74% and 69%, respectively. On demand chest radiographs are obtained after introduction of thoracic drains, central venous lines and endotracheal tubes in 98%, 84% and 75% of responding ICUs, respectively. Chest films are also obtained in case of ventilatory deterioration (49% of responding ICUs, and after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (59%, tracheotomy (58% and mini-tracheotomy (23%. Conclusion There is notable lack of consensus on chest radiography practice in the Netherlands. This survey suggests that a large number of intensivists may doubt the value of daily-routine chest radiography, but still practice a daily-routine strategy.

  12. Mucus transport mechanisms in relation to the effect of high frequency chest compression (HFCC) on mucus clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, L G; Warwick, W J; Hansen, K L

    1994-02-01

    High frequency chest compression (HFCC) appears promising as a form of chest physiotherapy. Studies published by several clinical centers support its efficacy, and further clinical data are expected to become available.

  13. Small-bore chest tubes seem to perform better than larger tubes in treatment of spontaneous pneumothorax

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iepsen, Ulrik Winning; Ringbæk, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and complications of surgical (large-bore) chest tube drainage with smaller and less invasive chest tubes in the treatment of non-traumatic pneumothorax (PT). ......The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and complications of surgical (large-bore) chest tube drainage with smaller and less invasive chest tubes in the treatment of non-traumatic pneumothorax (PT). ...

  14. Effects of high-frequency chest wall oscillation on pleural pressure and oscillated flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucker, Tal; Skjodt, Neil M; Jones, Richard L

    2008-01-01

    The effectiveness of high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HF-CWO) is directly related to the level of oscillated flow (osc) in the airways. We used the Vest system to investigate the effects of HFCWO on chest wall and pleural pressures and we correlated these pressures to the resultant osc. We also compared the latest HFCWO device with it predecessor. Different combinations of vest inflation pressure (background pressure) and oscillation frequency were randomly applied to 10 healthy volunteers. Chest wall pressure was determined using an air-filled bag under the vest and pleural pressure was estimated using an esophageal balloon. Reverse plethysmography was used to measure osc at the mouth and a spirometer was used to measure changes in end-expired lung volume. We found a significant correlation between chest wall and pleural pressure with approximately one-third of the chest wall pressure transmitted into the pleural space. Mean esophageal pressure remained negative at all background pressure/frequency combinations. There was a significant correlation (pHFCWO and since osc is dependent on esophageal pulse pressure, which in turn is dependent on chest wall pulse pressure, it follows that the effectiveness of HFCWO is influenced by the ability to generate an effective chest wall pulse pressure.

  15. Reconstruction with a patient-specific titanium implant after a wide anterior chest wall resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turna, Akif; Kavakli, Kuthan; Sapmaz, Ersin; Arslan, Hakan; Caylak, Hasan; Gokce, Hasan Suat; Demirkaya, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    The reconstruction of full-thickness chest wall defects is a challenging problem for thoracic surgeons, particularly after a wide resection of the chest wall that includes the sternum. The location and the size of the defect play a major role when selecting the method of reconstruction, while acceptable cosmetic and functional results remain the primary goal. Improvements in preoperative imaging techniques and reconstruction materials have an important role when planning and performing a wide chest wall resection with a low morbidity rate. In this report, we describe the reconstruction of a wide anterior chest wall defect with a patient-specific custom-made titanium implant. An infected mammary tumour recurrence in a 62-year old female, located at the anterior chest wall including the sternum, was resected, followed by a large custom-made titanium implant. Latissimus dorsi flap and split-thickness graft were also used for covering the implant successfully. A titanium custom-made chest wall implant could be a viable alternative for patients who had large chest wall tumours. PMID:24227881

  16. Chest radiography versus chest CT in the evaluation for pulmonary metastases in patients with Wilms' tumor: a retrospective review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wootton-Gorges, S.L.; Albano, E.A.; Riggs, J.M.; Ihrke, H.; Rumack, C.M.; Strain, J.D. [Colorado Univ., Denver, CO (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    2000-08-01

    Background. Determination of the presence of pulmonary metastases in children with Wilms' tumor is an important part of staging and treatment. We sought to compare the efficacy of chest radiography (CXR) and chest CT in the evaluation for pulmonary metastases in patients with Wilms' tumor. Materials and methods. This retrospective study included 83 children with Wilms' tumor diagnosed between 1980 and 1993. All patients with pulmonary nodules (n = 12) as well as 14 Wilms' tumor patients without pulmonary metastases (control group) had blinded review of the CXR and chest CTs by three pediatric radiologists. Presence, size, and certainty of metastatic diagnosis were recorded. Medical records were reviewed. The remaining 57 patients had review of their medical and imaging records to confirm the absence of pulmonary metastases. Results. Ten of the 12 with pulmonary masses had imaging available for review. Eight had both positive CXR and chest CT examinations. Two patients had pulmonary nodules seen by CT only: one had a right cardiophrenic angle mass and died as a result of liver metastases. The other had a solitary nodule, which proved to be a plasma-cell granuloma. Overall, the CXR and chest CT data concur in 79/81 (98 %). Conclusion. CXR alone appears adequate for the diagnosis or exclusion of pulmonary metastases in patients with Wilms' tumor. (orig.)

  17. Relationship between chest pain severity and physiological indexes in patients with coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Fakhr-Movahedi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Coronary artery disease is considered as main factor for patients’ hospitalization. Chest pain is the most common symptoms of patients and its assessment is an important factor in coronary artery disease. So, this study aimed to determine the relationship between the severity of chest pain with physiological indexes in patients with coronary artery disease. Methods: This study was a descriptive-analytical design that performed on 80 patients with that were hospitalized in coronary care unit of Shahid Mofatteh Hospital in Varamin city, Iran, from March to September, 2014. In this study, the relationship between the chest pain severity and blood pressure, pulse rate, respiratory rate, O2 saturation and ST segment alterations were assessed. Finally, the gathered data were analyzed by descriptive and inferential statistics. Results: The mean of chest pain severity was 6.51±2.14 in patients. Patients’ age was between 26 to 85 years old and the mean of age was 60.79±13.79 and there was no significant correlation between age and chest pain severity (P=0.985. Also male and female patients were equal. There was no significant difference between chest pain severity of men and women (P=0.471. The findings of study showed no correlation between chest pain severity and heart rate (r=-0.174 and P=0.122, respiratory rate (r=-0.013 and P=0.909, O2 saturation (r=0.051 and P=0.651, ST segment alterations (r=0.07 and P=0.539. Also, there was no significant difference between chest pain severity and systolic pressure (P=0.353, diastolic blood pressure (P=0.312 and body mass index (P=0.256 among patients. Conclusion: In this study, there were not enough evidences for relation between chest pain and physiological indexes in patients with coronary artery disease. So performing more studies in another settings and conditions recommended.

  18. Comparison of Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Between Mild and Severe Non-cardiac Chest Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahremand

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Physical and psychological factors affect one another in patients presenting with non-cardiac chest pain. Studying the psychological components of these patients may improve their treatment process. Objectives To compare depression, anxiety, and stress severity between mild and severe chest pain in patients with non-cardiac chest pain. Patients and Methods A cross-sectional design was used. The statistical population comprised patients with non-cardiac chest pain admitted to the Heart Emergency Center in Kermanshah, Iran. Using a matching method, 94 participants with mild and severe non-cardiac chest pain were selected and studied in two groups of 47. The instruments used in this study include the Comorbidity Index, the brief pain index (BPI, and the depression, anxiety, and stress scale (DASS. The multivariate analysis of variance, chi-squared test, and t-test were used for data analysis. Results After adjusting for the effects of age and comorbid conditions, results showed that there was a significant difference between the two groups in terms of depression, anxiety, and stress; the severity of these variables was exacerbated in patients with severe chest pain (P < 0.001. Conclusions Depression, anxiety, and stress are common psychological components in patients with non-cardiac chest pain especially those with severe chest pain and it is essential that health professionals pay attention to these factors. Therefore, paying attention to psychological factors could help experts to choose solutions that will decrease pain and side effects of the diseases. It may also facilitate treatment procedures among patients in severe pain. Further investigation to determine the association between these variables and non-cardiac chest pain should be considered.

  19. CT of the chest in suspected child abuse using submillisievert radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, Thomas R.; Seibert, J.A.; Stein-Wexler, Rebecca [Medical Center Children' s Hospital, Division of Pediatric Radiology, University of California-Davis, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lee, Justin S. [University of California-Davis, Department of Radiology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Coulter, Kevin P. [Medical Center Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, University of California-Davis, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2015-07-15

    The cornerstone of child abuse imaging is the skeletal survey, but initial imaging with radiographs may not demonstrate acute and non-displaced fractures, especially those involving the ribs. Given the high mortality of undiagnosed non-accidental trauma, timely diagnosis is crucial. CT is more sensitive in assessing rib fractures; however the effective radiation dose of a standard chest CT is high. We retrospectively identified four children (three boys, one girl; age range 1-4 months) admitted between January 2013 and February 2014 with high suspicion for non-accidental trauma from unexplained fractures of the long bones; these children all had CT of the chest when no rib fractures were evident on the skeletal survey. The absorbed radiation dose estimates for organs and tissue from the four-view chest radiographs and subsequent CT were determined using Monte Carlo photon transport software, and the effective dose was calculated using published tissue-weighting factors. In two children, CT showed multiple fractures of the ribs, scapula and vertebral body that were not evident on the initial skeletal survey. The average effective dose for a four-view chest radiograph across the four children was 0.29 mSv and the average effective dose for the chest CT was 0.56 mSv. Therefore the effective dose of a chest CT is on average less than twice that of a four-view chest radiograph. Our protocol thus shows that a reduced-dose chest CT may be useful in the evaluation of high specificity fractures of non-accidental trauma when the four-view chest radiographs are negative. (orig.)

  20. Novel Influenza A (H1N1) Virus Infection in Children: Chest Radiographic and CT Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Min Jeong; Lee, Young Seok; Lee, Jee Young; Lee, Kun Song [Dankook University College of Medicine, Dankook University Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the chest radiographic and CT findings of novel influenza A (H1N1) virus infection in children, the population that is more vulnerable to respiratory infection than adults. The study population comprised 410 children who were diagnosed with an H1N1 infection from August 24, 2009 to November 11, 2009 and underwent chest radiography at Dankook University Hospital in Korea. Six of these patients also underwent chest CT. The initial chest radiographs were classified as normal or abnormal. The abnormal chest radiographs and high resolution CT scans were assessed for the pattern and distribution of parenchymal lesions, and the presence of complications such as atelectasis, pleural effusion, and pneumomediastinum. The initial chest radiograph was normal in 384 of 410 (94%) patients and abnormal in 26 of 410 (6%) patients. Parenchymal abnormalities seen on the initial chest radiographs included prominent peribronchial marking (25 of 26, 96%), consolidation (22 of 26, 85%), and ground-glass opacities without consolidation (2 of 26, 8%). The involvement was usually bilateral (19 of 26, 73%) with the lower lung zone predominance (22 of 26, 85%). Atelectasis was observed in 12 (46%) and pleural effusion in 11 (42%) patients. CT (n = 6) scans showed peribronchovascular interstitial thickening (n = 6), ground-glass opacities (n = 5), centrilobular nodules (n = 4), consolidation (n = 3), mediastinal lymph node enlargement (n = 5), pleural effusion (n = 3), and pneumomediastinum (n = 3). Abnormal chest radiographs were uncommon in children with a swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus (S-OIV) infection. In children, H1N1 virus infection can be included in the differential diagnosis, when chest radiographs and CT scans show prominent peribronchial markings and ill-defined patchy consolidation with mediastinal lymph node enlargement, pleural effusion and pneumomediastinum

  1. Clinical assessment of chest pain and guidelines for imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruettner, J., E-mail: joachim.gruettner@umm.de [1st Department of Medicine (Cardiology), University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Henzler, T. [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Sueselbeck, T. [1st Department of Medicine (Cardiology), University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Fink, C. [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Borggrefe, M.; Walter, T. [1st Department of Medicine (Cardiology), University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    For many emergency facilities, risk assessment of patients with diffuse chest pain still poses a major challenge. In their currently valid recommendations, the international cardiological societies have defined a standardized assessment of the prognostically relevant cardiac risk criteria. Here the classic sequence of basic cardiac diagnostics including case history (cardiac risk factors), physical examination (haemodynamic and respiratory vital parameters), ECG (ST segment analysis) and laboratory risk markers (troponin levels) is paramount. The focus is, on the one hand, on timely indication for percutaneous catheterization, especially in patients at high cardiac risk with or without ST-segment elevation in the ECG, and, on the other hand, on the possibility of safely discharging patients with intermediate or low cardiac risk after non-invasive exclusion of a coronary syndrome. For patients in the intermediate or low risk group, physical or pharmacological stress testing in combination with scintigraphy, echocardiography or magnetic resonance imaging is recommended in addition to basic diagnostics. Moreover, the importance of non-invasive coronary imaging, primarily cardiac CT angiography (CCTA), is increasing. Current data show that in intermediate or low risk patients this method is suitable to reliably rule out coronary heart disease. In addition, attention is paid to the major differential diagnoses of acute coronary syndrome, particularly pulmonary embolism and aortic dissection. Here the diagnostic method of choice is thoracic CT, possibly also in combination with CCTA aiming at a triple rule-out.

  2. Chest Radiographs for Pediatric TB Diagnosis: Interrater Agreement and Utility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kaguthi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The chest radiograph (CXR is considered a key diagnostic tool for pediatric tuberculosis (TB in clinical management and endpoint determination in TB vaccine trials. We set out to compare interrater agreement for TB diagnosis in western Kenya. A pediatric pulmonologist and radiologist (experts, a medical officer (M.O, and four clinical officers (C.Os with basic training in pediatric CXR reading blindly assessed CXRs of infants who were TB suspects in a cohort study. C.Os had access to clinical findings for patient management. Weighted kappa scores summarized interrater agreement on lymphadenopathy and abnormalities consistent with TB. Sensitivity and specificity of raters were determined using microbiologically confirmed TB as the gold standard (n=8. A total of 691 radiographs were reviewed. Agreement on abnormalities consistent with TB was poor; k=0.14 (95% CI: 0.10–0.18 and on lymphadenopathy moderate k=0.26 (95% CI: 0.18–0.36. M.O [75% (95% CI: 34.9%–96.8%] and C.Os [63% (95% CI: 24.5%–91.5%] had high sensitivity for culture confirmed TB. TB vaccine trials utilizing expert agreement on CXR as a nonmicrobiologically confirmed endpoint will have reduced specificity and will underestimate vaccine efficacy. C.Os detected many of the bacteriologically confirmed cases; however, this must be interpreted cautiously as they were unblinded to clinical features.

  3. Detection of interstitial lung disease in PA chest radiographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loog, Marco; van Ginneken, Bram; Nielsen, Mads

    2004-05-01

    A computer-aided diagnosis scheme for the detection of interstitial disease in standard digital posteroanterior (PA) chest radiographs is presented. The detection technique is supervised-manually labelled data should be provided for training the algorithm-and fully automatic, and can be used as part of a computerized analysis scheme for X-ray lung images. Prior to the detection, a segmentation should be performed which delineates the lung field boundaries. Subsequently, a quadratic decision rule is employed for every pixel within the lung fields to associate with each pixel a probabilistic measure indicating interstitial disease. The locally obtained per-pixel probabilities are fused to a single global probability indicating to what extent there is interstitial disease present in the image. Finally, a threshold on this quantity classifies the image as containing interstitial disease or not. The probability combination scheme presented utilizes the quantiles of the local posterior probabilities to fuse the local probability into a global one. Using this nonparametric technique, reasonable results are obtained on the interstitial disease detection task. The area under the receiver operating characteristic equals 0.92 for the optimal setting.

  4. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: an overlooked cause of chest pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Hackbart Bermudes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC, also known as apical ballooning syndrome, broken heart syndrome, or stress-induced cardiomyopathy, is defined as a transient disturbance of the left ventricle, which is quite often associated with electrocardiographic abnormalities that may mimic acute myocardial infarction. The syndrome is also characterized by a mild alteration of cardiac biomarkers in absence of coronary blood flow obstruction on the coronariography. Clinical presentation is often manifested by angina, dyspnea, syncope, and arrhythmias. Peculiarly, the left ventricle takes the form of “tako-tsubo” (a Japanese word for “octopus trap” on the imaging workup. The authors report the case of a post-menopausal, hypertensive, dyslipidemic and type-II diabetic woman admitted at the emergency service with acute chest pain post physical exertion. Electrocardiogram showed signs of ischemia and myocardial necrosis markers were mildly increased. Echocardiography and ventriculography showed apical and mid-ventricular akinesia, with mild atherosclerotic coronary lesions. Thus diagnostic workup and the outcome followed the diagnostic criteria for TTC. The authors called attention to the potential of overlooking this diagnosis, since this syndrome is still not widely recognized.

  5. Outcome in patients with blunt chest trauma and pulmonary contusions

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    Vignesh T

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Severe pulmonary contusions occur in blunt chest trauma, especially with high velocity injuries. Pulmonary contusions following trauma may result in significant hypoxemia and decreased compliance which may progress over several days. Extensive contusions may result in respiratory difficulty or progress to adult respiratory distress syndrome, which increases mortality. We decided to review the cases of polytrauma with associated pulmonary contusions to determine the factors which influence outcome. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective chart review of all cases of trauma with pulmonary contusions on X-ray or CT scan. The cases were examined for age, type of injuries, admission APACHE II, SAPS II and SOFA scores, PaO2/FiO2 ratio, presence or absence of rib fractures, average positive fluid balance, average sedation dose, pulmonary haemorrhage, ventilator days, ICU days and hospital outcome. RESULTS: There were 18 cases of pulmonary contusions. All had associated injuries. 6 patients died, 4 in the ICU and 2 patients died 1 week after transfer to a high dependency unit, one due to sepsis and the other due to massive haemothorax. There was a significant difference in PaO2/FiO2 ratio at admission and throughout the ICU course, fluid balance and sedation dose, but not in ventilator days and ICU days between survivors and nonsurvivors. The incidence, frequency and amount of pulmonary haemorrhage were higher in the nonsurvivors. CONCLUSIONS: Close attention to improving gas exchange, and early management of hemoptysis might improve outcome in pulmonary contusions

  6. High frequency chest compression effects heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jongwon; Lee, Yong W; Warwick, Warren J

    2007-01-01

    High frequency chest compression (HFCC) supplies a sequence of air pulses through a jacket worn by a patient to remove excessive mucus for the treatment or prevention of lung disease patients. The air pulses produced from the pulse generator propagates over the thorax delivering the vibration and compression energy. A number of studies have demonstrated that the HFCC system increases the ability to clear mucus and improves lung function. Few studies have examined the change in instantaneous heart rate (iHR) and heart rate variability (HRV) during the HFCC therapy. The purpose of this study is to measure the change of HRV with four experimental protocols: (a) without HFCC, (b) during Inflated, (c)HFCC at 6Hz, and (d) HFCC at 21Hz. The nonlinearity and regularity of HRV was assessed by approximate entropy (ApEn), a method used to quantify the complexities and randomness. To compute the ApEn, we sectioned with a total of eight epochs and displayed the ApEn over the each epoch. Our results show significant differences in the both the iHR and HRV between the experimental protocols. The iHR was elevated at both the (c) 6Hz and (d) 21Hz condition from without HFCC (10%, 16%, respectively). We also found that the HFCC system tends to increase the HRV. Our study suggests that monitoring iHR and HRV are very important physiological indexes during HFCC therapy.

  7. Seamless insertion of real pulmonary nodules in chest CT exams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezeshk, Aria; Sahiner, Berkman; Zeng, Rongping; Wunderlich, Adam; Chen, Weijie; Petrick, Nicholas

    2014-03-01

    The availability of large medical image datasets is critical in many applications such as training and testing of computer aided diagnosis (CAD) systems, evaluation of segmentation algorithms, and conducting perceptual studies. However, collection of large repositories of clinical images is hindered by the high cost and difficulties associated with both the accumulation of data and establishment of the ground truth. To address this problem, we are developing an image blending tool that allows users to modify or supplement existing datasets by seamlessly inserting a real lesion extracted from a source image into a different location on a target image. In this study we focus on the application of this tool to pulmonary nodules in chest CT exams. We minimize the impact of user skill on the perceived quality of the blended image by limiting user involvement to two simple steps: the user first draws a casual boundary around the nodule of interest in the source, and then selects the center of desired insertion area in the target. We demonstrate examples of the performance of the proposed system on samples taken from the Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) dataset, and compare the noise power spectrum (NPS) of blended nodules versus that of native nodules in simulated phantoms.

  8. Chest wall and trunk muscle activity during inspiratory loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cala, S J; Edyvean, J; Engel, L A

    1992-12-01

    We measured the electromyographic (EMG) activity in four chest wall and trunk (CWT) muscles, the erector spinae, latissimus dorsi, pectoralis major, and trapezius, together with the parasternal, in four normal subjects during graded inspiratory efforts against an occlusion in both upright and seated postures. We also measured CWT EMGs in six seated subjects during inspiratory resistive loading at high and low tidal volumes [1,280 +/- 80 (SE) and 920 +/- 60 ml, respectively]. With one exception, CWT EMG increased as a function of inspiratory pressure generated (Pmus) at all lung volumes in both postures, with no systematic difference in recruitment between CWT and parasternal muscles as a function of Pmus. At any given lung volume there was no consistent difference in CWT EMG at a given Pmus between the two postures (P > 0.09). However, at a given Pmus during both graded inspiratory efforts and inspiratory resistive loading, EMGs of all muscles increased with lung volume, with greater volume dependence in the upright posture (P < 0.02). The results suggest that during inspiratory efforts, CWT muscles contribute to the generation of inspiratory pressure. The CWT muscles may act as fixators opposing deflationary forces transmitted to the vertebral column by rib cage articulations, a function that may be less effective at high lung volumes if the direction of the muscular insertions is altered disadvantageously.

  9. Stationary digital chest tomosynthesis for coronary artery calcium scoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Gongting; Wang, Jiong; Potuzko, Marci; Harman, Allison; Pearce, Caleb; Shan, Jing; Lee, Yueh Z.; Zhou, Otto; Lu, Jianping

    2016-03-01

    The coronary artery calcium score (CACS) measures the buildup of calcium on the coronary artery wall and has been shown to be an important predictor of the risk of coronary artery diseases (CAD). Currently CACS is measured using CT, though the relatively high cost and high radiation dose has limited its adoption as a routine screening procedure. Digital Chest Tomosynthesis (DCT), a low dose and low cost alternative to CT, and has been shown to achieve 90% of sensitivity of CT in lung disease screening. However commercial DCT requires long scanning time and cannot be adapted for high resolution gated cardiac imaging, necessary for CACS. The stationary DCT system (s- DCT), developed in our lab, has the potential to significantly shorten the scanning time and enables high resolution cardiac gated imaging. Here we report the preliminary results of using s-DCT to estimate the CACS. A phantom heart model was developed and scanned by the s-DCT system and a clinical CT in a phantom model with realistic coronary calcifications. The adapted fan-beam volume reconstruction (AFVR) method, developed specifically for stationary tomosynthesis systems, is used to obtain high resolution tomosynthesis images. A trained cardiologist segmented out the calcifications and the CACS was obtained. We observed a strong correlation between the tomosynthesis derived CACS and CT CACS (r2 = 0.88). Our results shows s-DCT imaging has the potential to estimate CACS, thus providing a possible low cost and low dose imaging protocol for screening and monitoring CAD.

  10. COMPUTER-AIDED DETECTION OF ACINAR SHADOWS IN CHEST RADIOGRAPHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Xu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite the technological advances in medical diagnosis, accurate detection of infectious tuberculosis (TB still poses challenges due to complex image features and thus infectious TB continues to be a public health problem of global proportions. Currently, the detection of TB is mainly conducted visually by radiologists examining chest radiographs (CXRs. To reduce the backlog of CXR examination and provide more precise quantitative assessment, computer-aided detection (CAD systems for potential lung lesions have been increasingly adopted and commercialized for clinical practice. CADs work as supporting tools to alert radiologists on suspected features that could have easily been neglected. In this paper, an effective CAD system aimed for acinar shadow regions detection in CXRs is proposed. This system exploits textural and photometric features analysis techniques which include local binary pattern (LBP, grey level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM and histogram of oriented gradients (HOG to analyze target regions in CXRs. Classification of acinar shadows using Adaboost is then deployed to verify the performance of a combination of these techniques. Comparative study in different image databases shows that the proposed CAD system delivers consistent high accuracy in detecting acinar shadows.

  11. Evaluation of entrance surface air kerma in pediatric chest radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porto, L.; Lunelli, N.; Paschuk, S.; Oliveira, A.; Ferreira, J. L.; Schelin, H.; Miguel, C.; Denyak, V.; Kmiecik, C.; Tilly, J.; Khoury, H.

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the entrance surface air kerma in pediatric chest radiography. An evaluation of 301 radiographical examinations in anterior-posterior (AP) and posterior-anterior (PA) (166 examinations) and lateral (LAT) (135 examinations) projections was performed. The analyses were performed on patients grouped by age; the groups included ages 0-1 y, 1-5 y, 5-10 y, and 10-15 y. The entrance surface air kerma was determined with DoseCal software (Radiological Protection Center of Saint George's Hospital, London) and thermoluminescent dosimeters. Two different exposure techniques were compared. The doses received by patients who had undergone LAT examinations were 40% higher, on average, those in AP/PA examinations because of the difference in tube voltage. A large high-dose “tail” was observed for children up to 5 y old. An increase in tube potential and corresponding decrease in current lead to a significant dose reduction. The difference between the average dose values for different age ranges was not practically observed, implying that the exposure techniques are still not optimal. Exposure doses received using the higher tube voltage and lower current-time product correspond to the international diagnostic reference levels.

  12. Utility of chest X-ray and abdominal ultrasound for stage III cutaneous malignant melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breitenbauch, M. T. W.; Holm, J.; Rødgaard, J. C.;

    2015-01-01

    . Patients were identified by procedure codes and cross-checked with the Danish National Pathology Database. Results: Ninety patients were included. All patients had chest X-ray and abdominal ultrasound performed. Five chest X-rays raised suspicion of lung metastases and four ultrasounds of liver metastases....... One patient had pleural metastases. Additional imaging and biopsies ruled out metastases in eight of nine cases. Eighty patients had normal imaging, and among these, two had metastases in the lungs and two in the liver at 1-year follow-up. For chest X-ray and abdominal ultrasound, sensitivity...

  13. Acute chest pain:what about the time before visiting to the physician?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Beuy Joob; Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2013-01-01

    Acute chest pain is an important medical complaint that needs proper management.The acute myocardial infarction, which is an emergency condition primarily presented with chest pain.The important concerns in management are early diagnosis and prompt treatment.An important factor determining the success of treatment is the time before visiting to the physicians.In this report, the authors summarize on the time before visiting to the physicians.It can be seen that the health education to general people on the danger of acute chest pain is required.

  14. Prior blunt chest trauma may be a cause of single vessel coronary disease; hypothesis and review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, Mette Damkjær; Nielsen, PE; Sleight, P

    2006-01-01

    Prompted by a case where a patient (with no risk factors, and single vessel disease) developed angina pectoris after previous blunt chest trauma, we searched Medline for blunt chest trauma and myocardial ischaemia. We found 77 cases describing AMI after blunt chest trauma, but only one reporting...... old, and only 2.5% more than 60 years old. The most common trauma was a road traffic accident, and the LAD was the vessel most often affected. Angiography revealed 12 cases with completely normal vessels, which might be due to spasm or recanalisation; 31 cases showed occlusion but no atherosclerosis...

  15. Chest X-ray in newborns and infants; Konventionelle Thoraxdiagnostik bei Neugeborenen und Kleinkindern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moritz, Joerg D. [Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany). Klinik fuer diagnostische Radiologie, Paediatrische Radiologie und Sonographie

    2012-12-15

    Chest X-ray in newborns and infants shows great differences to that in adults. Therefore all radiologists, who engage in X-rays in this age group, must be familiar with the special features. At the beginning specific items of examination methods are explained, which must be strictly followed due to radiological protection. Focus of the paper is the discussion of the important chest diseases in newborn and infants, which are mostly unknown in chest diagnosis in adults. Many of them can be life-threatening, thus their knowledge is essential. Pathophysiological explanations shall make the special radiological signs understandable. (orig.)

  16. Necrotizing Fasciitis of the Chest in a Neonate in Southern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwafemi Olasupo Awe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the successful saving of a male neonate with necrotizing fasciitis of the chest following a hot fomentation of the umbilicus with exposure of the ribs and the pleural space on the right side. He recovered 5 weeks after admission. We stressed the need to recognize necrotizing fasciitis extending from the upper anterior abdominal wall to the chest following hot fomentation of the umbilicus. The need for multidisciplinary cooperation for excellent outcome is very important, that is, neonatologist, medical microbiologist, and plastic and chest surgeons.

  17. Reconstruction of Chest Wall by Cryopreserved Sternal Allograft after Resection of Aneurysmal Bone Cyst of Sternum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kambiz Sheikhy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 20-year-old female was referred to our hospital due to deformity and bulging in anterior aspect of chest wall in sternal area. Chest X-ray and CT scan confirmed a large mass with destruction of sternum. Pathologic diagnosis after incisional biopsy was compatible with aneurysmal bone cyst. We resected sternum completely and reconstructed large anterior defect by a cryopreserved sternal allograft. In follow-up of patient there was no unstability of chest wall with good cosmetic result.

  18. Reconstruction of Chest Wall by Cryopreserved Sternal Allograft after Resection of Aneurysmal Bone Cyst of Sternum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhy, Kambiz; Abbasi Dezfouli, Azizollah

    2017-01-01

    A 20-year-old female was referred to our hospital due to deformity and bulging in anterior aspect of chest wall in sternal area. Chest X-ray and CT scan confirmed a large mass with destruction of sternum. Pathologic diagnosis after incisional biopsy was compatible with aneurysmal bone cyst. We resected sternum completely and reconstructed large anterior defect by a cryopreserved sternal allograft. In follow-up of patient there was no unstability of chest wall with good cosmetic result. PMID:28299230

  19. Multidetector computed tomography-spectrum of blunt chest wall and lung injuries in polytraumatized patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, S., E-mail: soeren.peters@rub.d [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, BG Universitaetsklinikum Bergmannsheil, Buerkle-de-la-Camp-Platz 1, 44789 Bochum (Germany); Nicolas, V.; Heyer, C.M. [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, BG Universitaetsklinikum Bergmannsheil, Buerkle-de-la-Camp-Platz 1, 44789 Bochum (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    Accidental injuries are the leading cause of death in the 15 to 44-year-old age group. Blunt chest trauma is often encountered in these patients and is associated with a mortality of up to 25%. Although conventional radiography still plays an important role in the initial emergency room setting, for follow-up in the intensive care unit, multidetector computed tomography has established itself as the standard imaging method for the evaluation of chest trauma patients. The following review presents salient radiological findings of the chest wall and shoulder girdle, thoracic spine, pleural space, and lung in polytraumatized patients.

  20. Diagnostic values of chest pain history, ECG, troponin and clinical gestalt in patients with chest pain and potential acute coronary syndrome assessed in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtari, Arash; Dryver, Eric; Söderholm, Martin; Ekelund, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    In the assessment of chest pain patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in the emergency department (ED), physicians rely on global diagnostic impressions ('gestalt'). The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic value of the ED physician's overall assessment of ACS likelihood, and the values of the main diagnostic modalities underlying this assessment, namely the chest pain history, the ECG and the initial troponin result. 1,151 consecutive ED chest pain patients were prospectively included. The ED physician's interpretation of the chest pain history, the ECG, and the global likelihood of ACS were recorded on special forms. The discharge diagnoses were retrieved from the medical records. A chart review was carried out to determine whether patients with a non-ACS diagnosis at the index visit had ACS or suffered cardiac death within 30 days. The gestalt was better than its components both at ruling in ("Obvious ACS", LR 29) and at ruling out ("No Suspicion of ACS", LR 0.01) ACS. In the "Strong suspicion of ACS" group, 60% of the patients did not have ACS. A positive TnT (LR 24.9) and an ischemic ECG (LR 8.3) were strong predictors of ACS and seemed superior to pain history for ruling in ACS. In patients with a normal TnT and non-ischemic ECG, chest pain history typical of AMI was not a significant predictor of AMI (LR 1.9) while pain history typical of unstable angina (UA) was a moderate predictor of UA (LR 4.7). Clinical gestalt was better than its components both at ruling in and at ruling out ACS, but overestimated the likelihood of ACS when cases were assessed as strong suspicion of ACS. Among the components of the gestalt, TnT and ECG were superior to the chest pain history for ruling in ACS, while pain history was superior for ruling out ACS.

  1. Emergency department evaluation and management of blunt chest and lung trauma (Trauma CME).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, Eric J; Johnson, Scott; Leibner, Evan; Shahid, Jawad

    2016-06-01

    The majority of blunt chest injuries are minor contusions or abrasions; however, life-threatening injuries, including tension pneumothorax, hemothorax, and aortic rupture can occur and must be recognized early. This review focuses on the diagnosis, management, and disposition of patients with blunt injuries to the ribs and lung. Utilization of decision rules for chest x-ray and computed tomography are discussed, along with the emerging role of bedside lung ultrasonography. Management controversies presented include the limitations of needle thoracostomy us¬ing standard needle, chest tube placement, and chest tube size. Finally, a discussion is provided related to airway and ventilation management to assist in the timing and type of interventions needed to maintain oxygenation.

  2. Reexpansion pulmonary edema after chest drainage for pneumothorax: A case report and literature overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Verhagen

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: RPE is characterized by rapidly progressive respiratory failure and tachycardia after intercostal chest drainage. Early recognition of signs and symptoms of RPE is important to initiate early management and allow for a favorable outcome.

  3. Unexplained Chest Pain and Physical Activity: Balancing Between Existential Uncertainty and Certainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Røysland, Ingrid Ølfarnes; Friberg, Febe

    2016-01-01

    Chest pain is one of the most common complaints in medical settings, but the majority of cases have no detectable cause. Physical activity is recommended, but is one of the major avoidance behaviors in patients with coronary heart disease. The article aims at achieving an understanding of the meaning of physical activity for people with unexplained chest pain. Fifteen people were interviewed using a phenomenological hermeneutic approach, with the results revealing four themes: "awareness of the influence of previous life experiences on the decision to be physically active," "unanswered questions related to physical activity and unexplained chest pain," "intertwinement of body and mind," and "physical activity as a source of personal growth." Comprehensive understanding was formulated as "Being physically active while living with unexplained chest pain means balancing between existential uncertainty and certainty." The results are discussed in relation to capability. It is suggested that health professionals adopt a person-centered approach.

  4. 20 percent lower lung cancer mortality with low-dose CT vs chest X-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists have found a 20 percent reduction in deaths from lung cancer among current or former heavy smokers who were screened with low-dose helical computed tomography (CT) versus those screened by chest X-ray.

  5. Subscapularis muscle flap for reconstruction of posterior chest wall skeletal defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuaki Sakai

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The use of a subscapularis muscle flap to repair chest wall defect is a simple and safe technique that can be conducted in the same surgical field as the initial reconstruction surgery and does not require plastic surgery support.

  6. Engineering-aided treatment of chest deformities to improve the process of breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gzik-Zroska, Bożena; Wolański, Wojciech; Gzik, Marek

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, the application of new visualization technologies in correction of funnel chest is presented. Often, such defects cause problems with breathing, and therefore, to improve the cardiorespiratory efficiency, a correction is required. The virtual model of chest was formulated to determine the strains and stresses after correction of deformation with using the stabilizing plate. From biomechanical point of view, the knowledge of the load-affecting stabilizer is necessary to select optimal parameters of the plate. The force-affecting plate that was used in the correction of chest deformation by Nuss method was determined on the basis of finite element model of funnel chest. The main aim of this work was to select the optimal thickness of plate. Calculations were conducted for three alternative constraints.

  7. Cardiac CT for the assessment of chest pain: Imaging techniques and clinical results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Hans-Christoph, E-mail: christoph.becker@med.uni-muenchen.de [Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Grosshadern Clinic, Department of Clinical Radiology, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Johnson, Thorsten [Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Grosshadern Clinic, Department of Clinical Radiology, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Immediate and efficient risk stratification and management of patients with acute chest pain in the emergency department is challenging. Traditional management of these patients includes serial ECG, laboratory tests and further on radionuclide perfusion imaging or ECG treadmill testing. Due to the advances of multi-detector CT technology, dedicated coronary CT angiography provides the potential to rapidly and reliably diagnose or exclude acute coronary artery disease. Life-threatening causes of chest pain, such as aortic dissection and pulmonary embolism can simultaneously be assessed with a single scan, sometimes referred to as “triple rule out” scan. With appropriate patient selection, cardiac CT can accurately diagnose heart disease or other sources of chest pain, markedly decrease health care costs, and reliably predict clinical outcomes. This article reviews imaging techniques and clinical results for CT been used to evaluate patients with chest pain entering the emergency department.

  8. A prehospital use of ITClamp for haemostatic control and fixation of a chest tube

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnung, S; Steinmetz, J

    2014-01-01

    We here present three cases in which a new device, the ITClamp Hemorrhage Control System (Innovative Trauma Care, Inc., Edmonton, Canada), was used for bleeding control and for securing a chest tube....

  9. Estimated Probabililty of Chest Injury During an International Space Station Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Beth E.; Milo, Eric A.; Brooker, John E.; Weaver, Aaron S.; Myers, Jerry G., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    The Integrated Medical Model (IMM) is a decision support tool that is useful to spaceflight mission planners and medical system designers when assessing risks and optimizing medical systems. The IMM project maintains a database of medical conditions that could occur during a spaceflight. The IMM project is in the process of assigning an incidence rate, the associated functional impairment, and a best and a worst case end state for each condition. The purpose of this work was to develop the IMM Chest Injury Module (CIM). The CIM calculates the incidence rate of chest injury per person-year of spaceflight on the International Space Station (ISS). The CIM was built so that the probability of chest injury during one year on ISS could be predicted. These results will be incorporated into the IMM Chest Injury Clinical Finding Form and used within the parent IMM model.

  10. Aspergillosis of bilateral breast and chest wall in an immunocompetent male masquerading as breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra G Nasit

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal species are not frequently encountered in an immunocompetent host. Invasive aspergillosis typically occurs in severely immunocompromised patient. Aspergillus infection of breast and chest wall are rarely encountered in an immunocompetent as well as in immunocompromised host. Till date only 13 cases of fungal infection of breast and chest wall have been reported in the literature. This report presents a case of aspergillosis of bilateral breast and chest wall in an immunocompetent male, clinically mimicking breast cancer. Diagnosis was achieved by fine-needle aspiration cytology and subsequently Aspergillus flavus was identified on fungal culture. The patient was successfully treated with voriconazole. Prompt diagnosis by cytology and appropriate treatment is necessary to prevent adverse outcome. Here, we present this rare case of fungal infection of breast and chest wall with relevant review of the literature.

  11. Fat segmentation on chest CT images via fuzzy models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Wu, Caiyun; Pednekar, Gargi; Subramanian, Janani Rajan; Lederer, David J.; Christie, Jason; Torigian, Drew A.

    2016-03-01

    Quantification of fat throughout the body is vital for the study of many diseases. In the thorax, it is important for lung transplant candidates since obesity and being underweight are contraindications to lung transplantation given their associations with increased mortality. Common approaches for thoracic fat segmentation are all interactive in nature, requiring significant manual effort to draw the interfaces between fat and muscle with low efficiency and questionable repeatability. The goal of this paper is to explore a practical way for the segmentation of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) components of chest fat based on a recently developed body-wide automatic anatomy recognition (AAR) methodology. The AAR approach involves 3 main steps: building a fuzzy anatomy model of the body region involving all its major representative objects, recognizing objects in any given test image, and delineating the objects. We made several modifications to these steps to develop an effective solution to delineate SAT/VAT components of fat. Two new objects representing interfaces of SAT and VAT regions with other tissues, SatIn and VatIn are defined, rather than using directly the SAT and VAT components as objects for constructing the models. A hierarchical arrangement of these new and other reference objects is built to facilitate their recognition in the hierarchical order. Subsequently, accurate delineations of the SAT/VAT components are derived from these objects. Unenhanced CT images from 40 lung transplant candidates were utilized in experimentally evaluating this new strategy. Mean object location error achieved was about 2 voxels and delineation error in terms of false positive and false negative volume fractions were, respectively, 0.07 and 0.1 for SAT and 0.04 and 0.2 for VAT.

  12. Chest physiotherapy in preterm infants with lung diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cota Francesco

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In neonatology the role of chest physiotherapy is still uncertain because of the controversial outcomes. Methods The aim of this study was to test the applicability in preterm infants of 'reflex rolling', from the Vojta method, in preterm neonates with lung pathology, with particular attention to the effects on blood gases and oxygen saturation, on the spontaneous breathing, on the onset of stress or pain. The study included 34 preterm newborns with mean gestational age of 30.5 (1.6 weeks - mean (DS - and birth weight of 1430 (423 g - mean (DS -, who suffered from hyaline membrane disease, under treatment with nasal CPAP (continuous positive airways pressure, or from pneumonia, under treatment with oxygen-therapy. The neonates underwent phase 1 of 'reflex rolling' according to Vojta method three times daily. Respiratory rate, SatO2, transcutaneous PtcCO2 e PtcO2 were monitored; in order to evaluate the onset of stress or pain following the stimulations, the NIPS score and the PIPP score were recorded; cerebral ultrasound scans were performed on postnatal days 1-3-5-7, and then weekly. Results In this population the first phase of Vojta's 'reflex rolling' caused an increase of PtcO2 and SatO2 values. No negative effects on PtcCO2 and respiratory rate were observed, NIPS and PIPP stress scores remained unmodified during the treatment; in no patient the intraventricular haemorrhage worsened in time and none of the infants developed periventricular leucomalacia. Conclusions Our experience, using the Vojta method, allows to affirm that this method is safe for preterm neonates, but further investigations are necessary to confirm its positive effects and to evaluate long-term respiratory outcomes.

  13. Abdominal compliance, parasternal activation, and chest wall motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cala, S J; Edyvean, J; Engel, L A

    1993-03-01

    We measured abdominal compliance (Cab) and rib cage displacement (delta Vrc) relative to abdominal displacement (delta Vab) during relaxation and tidal breathing in upright (U) and supine (S) postures in five normal subjects. In S, an abdominal binder was used to decrease Cab in two to five increments. We also measured the electrical activity of the parasternal muscle (EMGps) with the use of fine-wire intramuscular electrodes during CO2 rebreathing in U and in supine unbound (SU) and supine bound (SB) postures. During maximum binding (SB2), Cab decreased to 39 +/- 7% of the SU value (P = 0.01), matching Cab in U (P = 0.16). In the SB condition, the ratio of tidal delta Vrc/delta Vab to relaxation delta Vrc/delta Vab increased as Cab decreased, matching the data in U. For the group, this ratio decreased during SU to 47 +/- 10% (P = 0.02) but increased during SB2 to 86 +/- 7% (P = 0.18) of the value in U. During CO2 rebreathing, EMGps increased linearly with tidal volume (r > 0.727, P < 0.01). However, at any given tidal volume, the SU and SB2 EMGps were not significantly different (P = 0.12), and both were less than that in U (P < 0.02). The results suggest that the differences in chest wall motion between U and S may be due to the difference in Cab and not to different patterns of respiratory muscle recruitment. The mechanism may relate to changes in mechanical coupling between the diaphragm and the rib cage.

  14. Routine chest radiography after permanent pacemaker implantation: Is it necessary?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwards N

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Chest radiographs (CXRs are performed routinely after permanent pacemaker implantation to identify pacemaker lead position and exclude pneumothorax. We assessed the clinical value and need for this procedure. Design: Retrospective analysis of pacemaker data and CXRs following permanent pacemaker insertion between December 2002 and February 2004. Materials and Methods: Post-procedural CXRs were available in 125/126 consecutive patients after either first endocardial pacemaker implantation or insertion of at least one new lead. Subclavian vein puncture was used for venous access in all cases. CXRs were examined to establish the incidence of pneumothorax and assess pacing lead positions. The clinical records were examined in all patients who had subsequent CXRs or a further pacemaker procedure to identify the indication for these and to establish whether CXR had influenced patient management. Results: In total, 192 post-procedural CXRs were performed, either postero-anterior (PA and/or lateral views. Ventricular and/or atrial pacing lead contour and electrode position was considered radiographically appropriate in 86% CXRs. Fourteen per cent of post-procedural radiographs were considered to have radiologically sub-optimal pacemaker lead positioning. None of the patients with these "abnormal" radiographs experienced subsequent pacemaker complications or had further radiographs recorded at a later date. Later repeat CXRs were performed in 16 patients (13% but only 3 patients (2% had pacing abnormalities as the primary indication. All three had satisfactory pacing lead position on initial post-implantation and later radiographs, but required further procedures for lead re-positioning. Iatrogenic pneumothorax occurred in one patient (incidence 0.8% in our series. CXR confirmed the clinical diagnosis and allowed an assessment of size to guide treatment. Conclusion: Routine CXR after permanent pacemaker insertion is not necessary in

  15. Cash's textbook of chest, heart and vascular disorders for physiotherapists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downie, P.A.; Innocenti, D.M.; Jackson, S.E.

    1987-01-01

    This book includes a chapter on chest radiographs. A very high proportion of the patients treated by physiotherapy will have had a chest radiograph (x-ray) either because their primary disease is pulmonary or there is some long standing heart or lung illness which should be taken into account during the management of an acute problem. The chapter outlines the principles involved in reading the radiograph.

  16. Chronic pseudo-angina left precordial chest pain caused by a thoracic meningioma

    OpenAIRE

    Azabou, Eric; Kumako, Vincent; Moussawi, Mahmoud; Berger, Colette; André-Obadia, Nathalie; Kocher, Laurence; Gonnaud, Pierre-Marie

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Left precordial chest pain (LPCP) evokes above all angina. Eliminating a cardiac origin is then always the first priority. When cardiac causes are eliminated, non-cardiac causes are sought in order to avoid leaving patients with undiagnosed or undifferentiated chest pain. There is a myriad of non-cardiac causes ranging from heartburn, panic attacks, pleurisy, pulmonary embolism, pneumothorax, Tietze syndrome, bruises and fractures of the ribs, to spine meningioma, neur...

  17. Sternoclavicular joint septic arthritis with chest wall abscess in a healthy adult: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Yoshihito; Kato, Hisaaki; SHIRAI, Kunihiro; NAKAJIMA, Yasuhiro; YAMADA, Noriaki; Okada, Hideshi; Yoshida, Takahiro; Toyoda, Izumi; Ogura, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Background Septic arthritis of the sternoclavicular joint is rare. It can be associated with serious complications such as osteomyelitis, chest wall abscess, and mediastinitis. In this report, we describe a case of an otherwise healthy adult with septic arthritis of the sternoclavicular joint with chest wall abscess. Case presentation A 68-year-old Japanese man presented to our hospital complaining of pain and erythema near the right sternoclavicular joint. Despite 1 week of oral antibiotics,...

  18. A Rare Cause of Chest Pain in a Young Man: Primary Pneumomediastinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Ekiz

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous pneumomediastinum (SPM is described as the presence of air in the mediastinum. It is a rare clinical condition that often affects adult young men. Patients are rarely symptomatic and detected incidentally. Symptoms often resolve without need of treatment. Diagnosis is made by physical examination and chest X-ray, and further study is rarely needed. We aimed to highlight spontaneous pneumomedisatinum as the differential diagnosis of chest pain.

  19. Gastric Duplication: A Rare Cause of Massive Lower Gastrointestinal Haemorrhage, Chest Wall Mass, and Enterocutaneous Fistula

    OpenAIRE

    Emeka B. Kesieme; Dongo, Andrew E; Osime, Clement O.; Olomu, Sylvia C.; Awe, Oluwafemi O.; Gerald I Eze; Sylvester U. Eluehike

    2012-01-01

    Gastric duplications are uncommon developmental abnormality reported to present with different clinical scenarios. We present a 2-1/2-year-old Nigerian female who started having intermittent massive lower gastrointestinal haemorrhage at 5 months of age. She subsequently developed a lower chest wall mass and enterocutaneous fistula. She was found to have gastric duplication with fistulous communication with the descending colon, spleen, and lower chest wall. To the best of our knowledge, this...

  20. Predictors of Cardiogenic and Non-Cardiogenic Causes in Cases with Bilateral Chest Infiltrates

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Yeon Joo; Lee,Jinwoo; Park, Young Sik; Lee, Sang-min; Yim, Jae-Joon; Yoo, Chul-Gyu; Kim, Young Whan; Han, Sung Koo; Lee, Chang-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Background Differentiating cardiogenic pulmonary edema from other bilateral lung diseases such as pneumonia is frequently difficult. We conducted a retrospective study to identify predictors for cardiogenic pulmonary edema and non-cardiogenic causes of bilateral lung infiltrates in chest radiographs. Methods The study included patients who had newly developed bilateral lung infiltrates in chest radiographs and patients who underwent echocardiography. Cases were divided into two groups based o...

  1. Bilateral mesenchymal hamartoma of the chest wall in an infant boy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rong; Kelly, David; Siegal, Gene P

    2012-12-01

    Mesenchymal chest wall hamartoma is an extremely rare tumor striking neonates and infants. Histologically, the tumor is composed of islands of hyaline cartilage intermixed with mesenchymal-like stroma and hemorrhagic cysts. We present a case of a congenital bilateral mesenchymal chest wall hamartoma (MCWH) in an infant boy. This extremely rare benign entity may be misdiagnosed as malignant tumor and shares features with another tumor of childhood-fibrocartilagenous mesenchymoma of bone.

  2. Normalized mean shapes and reference index values for computerized quantitative assessment indices of chest wall deformities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ho Chul; Park, Man Sik; Lee, Seong Keon; Nam, Ki Chang; Park, Hyung Joo; Kim, Min Gi; Song, Jae-Jun; Choi, Hyuk

    2015-11-01

    We previously proposed a computerized index (eccentricity index [EI]) for chest-wall deformity measurements, such as pectus excavatum. We sought to define mean shapes based on normal chest walls and to propose for computerized index reference values of that are used in the quantitative analysis of the severity of chest-wall deformities. A total of 584 patients were classified into 18 groups, and a database of their chest-wall computed tomography (CT) scan images was constructed. The boundaries of the chest wall were extracted by using a segmentation algorithm, and the mean shapes were subsequently developed. The reference index values were calculated from the developed mean shapes. Reference index values for the EI were compared with a conventional index, the Haller index (HI). A close association has been shown between the two indices in multiple subjects (r = 0.974, P < 0.001). The newly developed mean shapes and reference index values supply both reliability and objectivity to the diagnosis, analysis, and treatment of chest-wall deformities. They promise to be highly useful in clinical settings.

  3. Use of resting myocardial scintigraphy during chest pain to exclude diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbirato, Gustavo Borges; Azevedo, Jader Cunha de; Felix, Renata Christian Martins; Correa, Patricia Lavatori; Volschan, Andre; Viegas, Monica; Pimenta, Lucia; Dohmann, Hans Fernando Rocha; Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Mesquita, Claudio Tinoco [Centro de Estudos do Hospital Pro-Cardiaco (Procep), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-04-15

    Background: Images of myocardial perfusion taken during an episode of chest pain have been used for patients in the emergency department. Objective: To evaluate the operating characteristics of {sup 99m}Tc-Tetrofosmin scintigraphy during an episode of chest pain to exclude the diagnosis of cute myocardial infarction. Methods: One hundred and eight patients admitted with chest pain, or up to four hours after the end of symptoms and non diagnostic electrocardiogram, underwent resting scintigraphy and measurement of troponin I concentrations. Patients with a history of myocardial infarction (MI) were not excluded (24 patients). Troponin I concentrations were determined at admission and 6 hours later. Nuclear physicians performed a blind analysis of the images, and myocardial infarction was confirmed whenever troponin I level increase was three times that of the control. Results: Resting perfusion image was abnormal in all 6 patients with MI. Only 1 patient had a normal image and increased troponin levels. Fifty-five patients had positive images without MI, and 46 patients had normal images and troponin levels. The prevalence of the disease was 6.5%. The sensitivity and specificity of the resting images during an episode of chest pain to diagnose MI was 85.7% and 45.5%, respectively. The negative predictive value was 97.7%. Conclusion: Patients undergoing chest pain protocol with SPECT showed an excellent negative predictive value to exclude diagnosis of myocardial infarction. These results suggest that resting perfusion image is an important tool at the chest pain unit. (author)

  4. Post-traumatic pulmonary pseudocyst with hemopneumothorax following blunt chest trauma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fagkrezos Dimitris

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Post-traumatic pulmonary pseudocyst is an uncommon cavitary lesion of the lung and develops after blunt chest trauma and even more rarely following penetrating injuries. It is generally seen in young adults presenting with cough, chest pain, hemoptysis, and dyspnea. Post-traumatic pulmonary pseudocyst should be included in the differential diagnosis of cavitary pulmonary lesions. We describe the case of a 60-year-old Caucasian Greek woman who sustained traumatic pulmonary pseudocyst with hemopneumothorax due to a blunt chest trauma after a traffic accident. Case presentation After a traffic accident, a 60-year-old Caucasian Greek woman sustained a hemopneumothorax due to a blunt chest trauma. There was evidence of an extensive contusion in the posterior and lateral segments of the right lower lobe, a finding that was attributed to an early sign of a cavitation, and the presence of a thin-walled air cavity was detected on the anterior segment of the right lower lobe in the control computed tomography taken 24 hours after admission. Our patient was treated by catheter aspiration, and the findings of computed tomography evaluation about one month later showed complete resolution of one of the two air-filled cavitary lesions. The second pseudocyst also disappeared completely, as shown by the control computed tomography scan performed six months later. Conclusions Traumatic pulmonary pseudocyst is a rare complication of blunt chest trauma, and computed tomography is a more valuable imaging technique than chest radiograph for early diagnosis.

  5. Bronchiolitis obliterans following exposure to sulfur mustard: chest high resolution computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghanei, Mostafa E-mail: m.ghanei@bmsu.ac.ir; Mokhtari, Majid; Mohammad, Mehdi Mir; Aslani, Jafar

    2004-11-01

    Background: Pulmonary complications are known to occur in over half of the patients exposed to sulfur mustard (SM). Chemical weapons of mass destruction (WMD) including SM were used by Iraq during Iran-Iraq war between 1983 and 1989. We undertook this study to evaluate the chest high resolution computerized tomography (HRCT) as a diagnostic tool in patients with documented exposure to SM and chronic respiratory symptoms. Method: The medical records of 155 patients exposed to SM during Iran-Iraq war and suffered respiratory complications were reviewed. Chest HRCTs of these patients were examined. Ten healthy controls with no history of exposure to HD were matched for age, gender, and chest HRCT protocol applied. Results: Fifty chest HRCTs of these patients were randomly selected for this study. The most frequent findings were; air trapping 38 (76%), bronchiectasis 37 (74%), mosaic parenchymal attenuation (MPA) 36 (72%), irregular and dilated major airways 33 (66%) bronchial wall thickening (BWT) 45 (90%), and interlobular septal wall thickening (SWT) 13 (26%), respectively. Air trapping in one patient (10%) was the only positive finding in the control group. Conclusions: Chest HRCT findings of bronchiectasis, air trapping, MPA, SWT, and BWT were seen in our patients 15 years after exposure to HD. These findings suggest the diagnosis of bronchiolitis obliterans (BO). We did not encounter chest HRCT features consistent with pulmonary fibrosis.

  6. Clinical Findings in Patients with Splenic Injuries: Are Injuries to the Left Lower Chest Important?

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    Schneir, Aaron

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical findings in patients with splenic injury and to determine if isolated left lower chest injury may be the single clinical indicator of splenic injury. The medical records of all adult blunt trauma patients with splenic injury over a 14 month period were reviewed. Significant left lower chest injury was considered present if the patient had left sided pleuritic chest pain with tenderness to ribs 7-12 or if these ribs were visualized as fractured on any imaging study. Patients were considered to have clinical findings suggestive of splenic injury if they had pre-hospital or emergency department hypotension, abdominal pain or tenderness, a Glasgow coma scale < 15, or gross hematuria. Ninety patients had splenic injury. Thirty-nine (43%. 95% CI 33, 54% patients had significant left lower chest injury. In five (6%. 95% CI 2, 12% patients, injury to this portion of the chest was the single indicator of splenic injury. Nearly half the patients with splenic injury will have significant injury to the left lower chest and this finding may be the only indicator of splenic injury.

  7. Effect of seawater immersion on plasma osmotic pressure and electrolyte balance following open chest trauma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李辉; 鹿尔驯; 虞积耀; 王大鹏; 马聪

    2002-01-01

    To explore the effect of seawater immersion on serum osmotic pressure and electrolytes balance following chest trauma in dogs. Methods: Twenty-five healthy adult dogs were used in the experiment. A canine model of right open pneumothorax was established by chest puncturing on all animals. Animals were divided into three groups: a control group (n = 10) with chest trauma without any immersion;a seawater group ( n = 10) immersed in seawater after chest trauma and a normal saline group ( n = 5 ) immersed in normal saline solution following chest trauma. Blood samples were taken at different time intervals to determine plasma osmotic pressure and electrolytes. The hemodynamic changes were also recorded. Results: Mortality in the seawater group was much higher than that of the control group and the normal saline group. The mean survival time in the seawater group lasted only 45 minutes, while in the control group and the normal saline group the average survival time was more than 4 hours (P < 0.01 ). One of the most important causes of death was hypernatremia and high osmolality. Severe electrolytes imbalance was observed in seawater group.Hypernatremia and high osmolality were the most significant factors of high mortality in the seawater group. Conclusions: Seawater immersion after chest trauma appears to be associated with severe electrolyte imbalance as well as high osmotic pressure, These may be the risk factors leading to fatal outcome.

  8. Impact of chest radiography for children with lower respiratory tract infection: a propensity score approach.

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    Emmanuelle Ecochard-Dugelay

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Management of acute respiratory tract infection varies substantially despite this being a condition frequently encountered in pediatric emergency departments. Previous studies have suggested that the use of antibiotics was higher when chest radiography was performed. However none of these analyses had considered the inherent indication bias of observational studies. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this work was to assess the relationship between performing chest radiography and prescribing antibiotics using a propensity score analysis to address the indication bias due to non-random radiography assignment. METHODS: We conducted a prospective study of 697 children younger than 2 years of age who presented during the winter months of 2006-2007 for suspicion of respiratory tract infection at the Pediatric Emergency Department of an urban general hospital in France (Paris suburb. We first determined the individual propensity score (probability of having a chest radiography according to baseline characteristics. Then we assessed the relation between radiography and antibiotic prescription using two methods: adjustment and matching on the propensity score. RESULTS: We found that performing a chest radiography lead to more frequent antibiotic prescription that may be expressed as OR = 2.3, CI [1.3-4.1], or as an increased use of antibiotics of 18.6% [0.08-0.29] in the group undergoing chest radiography. CONCLUSION: Chest radiography has a significant impact on the management of infants admitted for suspicion of respiratory tract infection in a pediatric emergency department and may lead to unnecessary administration of antibiotics.

  9. The Role of Chest Physiotherapy in Prevention of Postextubation Atelectasis in Pediatric Patients with Neuromuscular Diseases

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    Nemat BILAN

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Bilan N, Poorshiri B.The Role of Chest Physiotherapy in Prevention of Postextubation Atelectasis in Pediatric Patients with Neuromuscular Diseases. Iran J Child Neurol. 2013 Winter; 7 (1:21-24. ObjectiveThere are controversial findings in the literature on the effects of chest physiotherapy on postextubation lung collapse in pediatric age group. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the efficacy of chest physiotherapy in prevention of postextubation atelectasis in pediatric patients. Materials & Methods In a case-control study from March 2007 to March 2011, two groups of patients (35 patients in each group susceptible to lung collapse were enrolled in the study. The studied patients had neuromuscular diseases such as spinal muscular atrophy, Guillain-Barre syndrome, critical illness polyneuropathy/myopathy, and cerebral palsy. The patients were randomly divided into two groups (case and control; The case group underwent daily chest physiotherapy through vibrator and chest percussion and the control group was under supervision. In the latter group, the underlying disease was treated and the lung collapse was managed, if occurred. Results The frequency of atelectasis was lower in the case group who received prophylactic chest physiotherapy compared to the control group (16.6% vs. 40%. Conclusion Chest physiotherapy as well as appropriate and regular change of position can considerably reduce the rate of pulmonary collapse in pediatric patients.References Jorgensen J, Wei JL, Sykes KJ, Klem SA, Weatherly RA, Bruegger DE, Latz AD, Nicklaus PJ. Incidence of and risk factors for airway complications following endotracheal intubation for bronchiolitis. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2007;137(3:394-9.Flenady VJ, Gray PH. Chest physiotherapy for preventing morbidity in babies being extubated from mechanical ventilation. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2002;(2:CD000283.Odita JC, Kayyali M, Ammari A. Post-extubation atelectasis in ventilated

  10. Screening for chest disease in college students: policies of student health services regarding the use of routine screening chest radiographs and tuberculin skin tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fager, S.S.; Slap, G.B.; Kitz, D.S.; Eisenberg, J.M.

    1984-02-01

    A survey of college health services was conducted to determine their policies regarding the use of screening chest radiographs and tuberculin skin tests. Pre-enrollment chest radiographs are prescribed for all incoming students by 24% of the 531 respondents and for health professions students, foreign students, and intercollegiate athletes only by an additional 20%, 19%, and 6%, respectively. Periodic chest radiography is conducted for all students by 7% of the respondents and for health professions students, foreign students, and intercollegiate athletes only by an additional 22%, 16%, and 8%, respectively. Pre-enrollment tuberculin skin tests are prescribed for all incoming students by 52% of the respondents and for health professions students, foreign students, and intercollegiate athletes only by an additional 48%, 29%, and 9%, respectively. Periodic tuberculin skin testing is conducted for all students by 27% of the respondents and for health professions students, foreign students, and intercollegiate athletes only by an additional 48%, 23%, and 16%, respectively. It is estimated from these data that 723,000 incoming students in the United States received screening chest radiographs in 1979 with estimated charges totaling between $7 million and $27 million. There may be 0.05 to 0.33 induced cases of lung cancer, leukemia, thyroid cancer, and female breast cancer over a 20-year period among this group of students exposed to ionizing radiation.

  11. Chest CT findings in patients with non-cardiovascular causes of chest pain: Focusing on pulmonary tuberculosis in a tuberculosis endemic country

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, So Won; Shim, Sung Shine; Kim, Yoo Kyung; Ryu, Yon Ju [Mokdong Hospital, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    To review the common causes of non-cardiovascular chest pain (NCCP) according to the location and lesion type as seen on chest CT, and to evaluate CT findings in tuberculosis (TB) as a cause of NCCP. In the period 2009 to 2012, patients having NCCP without definitive evidence of acute myocardial infarction, pulmonary thromboembolism, and aortic dissection, were included. In total, 162 patients (60.5% male; 39.5% female), with a mean age of 51 years, were enrolled. CT images were evaluated by location and lesion type, for causes of NCCP. Chest CT revealed that the most common location for the cause of NCCP was the pleura (45.1%), followed by the subpleural lung parenchyma (30.2%). The most common lesion causing NCCP was TB (33.3%), followed by pneumonia (19.1%). Of the 54 TB cases, 40 (74.1%) were stable TB and 14 (25.9%) were active TB; among these 54 patients, NCCP was most commonly the result of fibrotic pleural thickening (55.6%), followed by subpleural stable pulmonary TB (14.8%). Results of chest CT revealed that TB was a major cause of NCCP in a TB endemic area. Among the TB patients, fibrotic pleural thickening in patients with stable TB was the most common cause of NCCP.

  12. Crossed Kirschner’s wires for the treatment of anterior flail chest: an extracortical rib fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felice Mucilli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Thoracic trauma may be a life-threatening condition. Flail chest is a severe chest injury with high mortality rates. Surgery is not frequently performed and, in Literature, data are controversial. The authors report their experience in the treatment of flail chest by an extracortical internal-external stabilization technique with Kirshner’s wires (K-wires. Methods: From 2010 to 2015, 137 trauma patients (109 males and 28 females with an average age of 58.89 ±19.74 years were observed. Seventeen (12.41% patients presented a flail chest and of these, 13 (9.49% with an anterior one. All flail chest patients underwent early chest wall surgical stabilization (within 48 hours from the injury. Results: In the general population, an overall morbidity of 21.9% (n = 30 of 137 and a 30-day mortality rate of 5.1% (n = 7 of 137 were observed. By clustering the population according to the treatment (medical or interventional vs surgical, significant statistically differences between the two cohorts were found in morbidity (12.65% vs. 34.48%, P = 0.002 and mortality rates (1.28% vs. 10.34%, P = 0.017. In patients undergoing chest wall surgical stabilization, with an average Injury Severity Score of 28.3 ± 5.2 and Abbreviated Injury Score (AIS of 8.4 ± 1.7, an overall morbidity rate of 52.9% (n = 9 and a mortality rate of 17.6% (n = 3 were found. Post-surgical device removal, in local anesthesia or mild sedation, was performed 42.8 ± 2.9 days after chest wall stabilization and no cases of wound infection, dislodgment of the wires or osteosynthesis failure were reported. Moreover, in these patients, an early postoperative improvement in pulmonary ventilation (ΔpaO2 and ΔpCO2: +9.49 and -5.05, respectively was reported. Conclusion: Surgical indication for the treatment of flail chest remains controversial and debated both due to an inadequate training and the absence of comparative prospective studies between various strategies. Our technique

  13. The early risk stratification of the patients with acute chest pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective:This investigation was designed to stratify patients with acute chest pain based on their symptoms,electrocardiogram (ECG),cardiac injury markers and the number of accompanying traditional risk factors(smoking,obesity,hyperlipemia,hypertension,diabetes),and to assess the effect of the above factors to obtain a risk stratification for patients with chest pain.Methods:We identified 139 patients with acute chest pain,including 45 myocardiac infarction patients,65 unstable angina patients and 29 chest pain patients without identified acute coronary syndrome(ACS)admitted to our Coronary Heart Center during December 2004 to February 2005.All patients accepted coronary angiography.All data was collected using questionnaires.Based on reported symptom,electrocardiogram (ECG),cardiac injury markers and the number of the accompanying traditional risk factors,we stratified all patients into four groups:Group l,patients with acute chest pain,ECG changes and abnormal cardiac injury biomarkers.Group 2,patients with acute chest pain and ECG changes(without abnormal cardiac injury biomarkers).Group 3,patients with acute chest pain,normal ECG,normal cardiac injury biomarkers and>2 traditional risk factors.Group 4,patients with acute chest pain,normal ECG and normal cardiac injury biomarkers.but only≤2 traditional risk factors.From this data we examined the difference of ACS incidence in the four groups.Results:After stratification the ACS incidence of the grouped patients in turn was 100%,84%,69.6%and 53.3%.The combination of early phase ECG and cardiac injury markers identified 70.9% patients with ACS(the specificity being 90.7%).The mortality of group 3 was higher compared with group 4(69.6% vs 53.3%),however the P value was more than 0.05 and didn't show significant statistical difference.The correlation analysis found the number of the traditional risk factors had a significant positive correlation(r=0.202,P=0.044)with the number of stenosis being more than 50% of

  14. [Vertebrogenic chest pain--"pseudoangina pectoris": etiopathogenesis, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, differential diagnosis and therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grgić, Vjekoslav

    2007-01-01

    Vertebrogenic pain localised in the anterior thorax can imitate anginal pain ("pseudoangina pectoris"). The most common causes of vertebrogenic chest pain are segmental dysfunction and degenerative changes at the level of the lower cervical and upper middle thoracic spine. Segmental dysfunction is a source of pseudoradicular pain, and degenerative changes, before all disc hernia and dorsal osteophytes which are compressing corresponding nerve roots, are the sources of radicular pain which irradiates in the chest. Because of its similarity with angina pectoris, the intense chest pain caused by the cervical radiculopathy which is often followed by heart rhythm disorders and nonspecific changes of the ST-T-segment in ECG, is called "cervicogenic angina". The attacks of vertebrogenic chest pain are not rare even in patients with angina pectoris. Because of superimposed vertebrogenic pain, the manifestation of pain in patients with angina pectoris can be considerably changed which can be misinterpreted as unstable angina. From therapeutic aspect it is very important to distinguish vertebrogenic from anginal pain. That is, the change of cardiological therapy will not eliminate possible attacks of vertebrogenic pain in patients with angina pectoris. From the aspect of most recent understandings, the article describes etiopathogenesis, characteristics, diagnosis and therapy of vertebrogenic chest pain, and also the differences between vertebrogenic and anginal pain.

  15. Chest radiological patterns predict the duration of mechanical ventilation in children with RSV infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prodhan, Parthak [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Division of Pediatric Critical Care and Cardiology, College of Medicine, Little Rock, AR (United States); Westra, Sjirk J. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Lin, James [Mattel Children' s Hospital at UCLA, Division of Pediatric Critical Care, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Karni-Sharoor, Sarit [Shaarei Tzedek Medical Center, Pediatric Critical Care Unit, Jerusalem (Israel); Regan, Susan [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Noviski, Natan [Massachusetts General Hospital, Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, Boston, MA (United States)

    2009-02-15

    RSV-infected children demonstrate various radiographic features, some of which are associated with worse clinical outcomes. To investigate whether specific chest radiological patterns in RSV-infected children with acute respiratory failure (ARF) in the peri-intubation period are associated with prolonged duration of mechanical ventilation. We included RSV-infected children <1 year of age admitted with ARF from 1996 through 2002 to the pediatric intensive care unit at Massachusetts General Hospital. Their chest radiographs were evaluated at three time-points: preintubation (day -1) and days 1 and 2 after intubation. Univariate and multiple logistic regressions models were utilized to investigate our objective. The study included 46 children. Using day 1 chest radiograph findings to predict duration of mechanical ventilation of >8 days, a backward stepwise regression arrived at a model that included age and right and left lung atelectasis. Using day 2 chest radiograph results, the best model included age and left lung atelectasis. A model combining the two days' findings yielded an area under the ROC curve of 0.92 with a satisfactory fit (P = 0.95). Chest radiological patterns around the time of intubation can identify children with RSV-associated ARF who would require prolonged mechanical ventilation. (orig.)

  16. [Application of new chest holder in the median sternotomy for open heart surgery in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, C Y; Feng, D G; Wang, J X; Cheng, Z Y; Wang, F; Lin, B; Xie, Z L; Suo, L N; Du, P

    2016-09-13

    Objective: To explore the application of new chest holder in the median sternotomy for open heart surgery in adults. Methods: Two hundred adult patients in Henan Provincial People's Hospital from May 2013 to May 2015 were enrolled in the study and randomly divided into two groups. Experimental group included 100 cases who accepted the new type of chest holder in the open heart surgery. Control group were also composed of 100 cases whose sternums were fixed with the pure steel wire cerclage. Sternal closure time was recorded since the sternum closing. All subjects were followed up to obtain the chest incision healing, the incidence of sternal dehiscence, infection and secondary thoracotomy, and thus to estimated the effect of new chest holder. Results: All patients in the experimental group reached the effect of firm closed chest surgery. Sternal closure time of experimental group was much shorter than that of control group[(10±2) vs (21±4) min, Pholder in the median sternotomy for open heart surgery is more convenient with small surgical trauma. It can also effectively reduce the incidence of sternal instability, dehiscence, infection and secondary thoracotomy.

  17. Diagnostic Utility of Chest X-rays in Neonatal Respiratory Distress: Determining the Sensitivity and Specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Mottaghi Moghadam shahri

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chest radiography is one of the most usual diagnostic tools for respiratory distress. Objective: The purpose of this study is to assess the specificity, sensitivity and clinical value of chest radiography of neonates with respiratory distress.Patients and Methods: A descriptive- analytical study was conducted on 102 neonates that were in neonatal intensive care unit of Imam Reza and 22 Bahman Hospitals because of respiratory distress. After confirming the neonate's respiratory distress and taking chest radiography, the radiography was described by a radiologist and final diagnosis was confirmed. Results: Most of the neonates (64.7% were born with caesarian section and were premature (78.4%. Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS was the most common reason for respiratory distress (38.2%. Chest radiography had the most sensitivity and specificity in pneumothorax and hernia (100%. For pneumosepsis, radiography had 73% sensitivity and 87% specificity, for RDS the sensitivity and specificity were 35% and 82% respectively, for congenital heart disease sensitivity of zero and specificity of 98% and for Transient tachypnea of neonates (TTN sensitivity of zero and specificity of 100%. The conformity of clinical and radiography was also calculated as 79.4% in respiratory distress Discussion and Conclusion: Although chest radiography is used as one of the most usual and accessible diagnostic tools in respiratory distress syndrome, but inaccurate specificity and sensitivity in some disease must be considered, especially in neonates.

  18. Airbag-related chest wall burn as a marker of underlying injury: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monkhouse Simon J

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction This case of a man who sustained an airbag-induced thoracic injury and burn, highlights the potential harm that can be caused by airbags. It also serves to illustrate that a surface burn which looks small and benign can actually be a surface marker of a more serious injury. Staff working in emergency departments need to be aware of the risk of possible airbag-associated injuries. Case presentation A 65-year-old man was the driver in a frontal collision. He was wearing a seatbelt. The airbag was activated and caused a superficial chest wall burn. Initial chest x-rays were unremarkable but following deterioration in his condition, a computed tomography scan revealed a serious sternal fracture. The location of the fracture was marked on the surface by the burn. Conclusion Airbags can cause significant chest wall injuries and burns. Surface burns at the point of impact should not be dismissed as trivial as the forces involved can cause significant injury. We recommend that all people with chest wall injuries and/or burns due to airbags should have more detailed chest imaging as initial emergency radiographs can be falsely reassuring.

  19. Tracheal rupture caused by blunt chest trauma: radiological and clinical features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunisch-Hoppe, M.; Rauber, K.; Rau, W.S. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Justus Liebig Univ., Giessen (Germany); Hoppe, M. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital, Philipps University, Marburg (Germany); Popella, C. [Dept. of ENT, Justus Liebig University, Giessen (Germany)

    2000-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess radiomorphologic and clinical features of tracheal rupture due to blunt chest trauma. From 1992 until 1998 the radiomorphologic and clinical key findings of all consecutive tracheal ruptures were retrospectively analyzed. The study included ten patients (7 men and 3 women; mean age 35 years); all had pneumothoraces which were persistent despite suction drainage. Seven patients developed a pneumomediastinum as well as a subcutaneous emphysema on conventional chest X-rays. In five patients, one major hint leading to the diagnosis was a cervical emphysema, discovered on the lateral cervical spine view. Contrast-media-enhanced thoracic CT was obtained in all ten cases and showed additional injuries (atelectasis n = 5; lung contusion n = 4; lung laceration n = 2; hematothorax n = 2 and hematomediastinum n = 4). The definite diagnosis of tracheal rupture was made by bronchoscopy, which was obtained in all patients. Tracheal rupture due to blunt chest trauma occurs rarely. Key findings were all provided by conventional chest X-ray. Tracheal rupture is suspected in front of a pneumothorax, a pneumomediastinum, or a subcutaneous emphysema on lateral cervical spine and chest films. Routine thoracic CT could also demonstrate these findings but could not confirm the definite diagnosis of an tracheal rupture except in one case; in the other 9 cases this was done by bronchoscopy. Thus, bronchoscopy should be mandatory in all suspicious cases of tracheal rupture and remains the gold standard. (orig.)

  20. A second defibrillator chest patch electrode will increase implantation rates for nonthoracotomy defibrillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, A J; Swartz, J F; Rodak, D J; Moore, H J; Hannan, R L; Tracy, C M; Fletcher, R D

    1996-09-01

    Nonthoracotomy defibrillator systems can be implanted with a lower morbidity and mortality, compared to epicardial systems. However, implantation may be unsuccessful in up to 15% of patients, using a monophasic waveform. It was the purpose of this study to prospectively examine the efficacy of a second chest patch electrode in a nonthoracotomy defibrillator system. Fourteen patients (mean age 62 +/- 11 years, ejection fraction = 0.29 +/- 0.12) with elevated defibrillation thresholds, defined as > or = 24 J, were studied. The initial lead system consisted of a right ventricular electrode (cathode), a left innominate vein, and subscapular chest patch electrode (anodes). If the initial defibrillation threshold was > or = 24 J, a second chest patch electrode was added. This was placed subcutaneously in the anterior chest (8 cases), or submuscularly in the subscapular space (6 cases). This resulted in a decrease in the system impedance at the defibrillation threshold, from 72.3 +/- 13.3 omega to 52.2 +/- 8.6 omega. Additionally, the defibrillation threshold decreased from > or = 24 J, with a single patch, to 16.6 +/- 2.8 J with two patches. These changes were associated with successful implantation of a nonthoracotomy defibrillator system in all cases. In conclusion, the addition of a second chest patch electrode (using a subscapular approach) will result in lower defibrillation thresholds in patients with high defibrillation thresholds, and will subsequently increase implantation rates for nonthoracotomy defibrillators.

  1. Mechanisms and Clinical Management of Ventricular Arrhythmias following Blunt Chest Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel H. Wolbrom

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonpenetrating, blunt chest trauma is a serious medical condition with varied clinical presentations and implications. This can be the result of a dense projectile during competitive and recreational sports but may also include other etiologies such as motor vehicle accidents or traumatic falls. In this setting, the manifestation of ventricular arrhythmias has been observed both acutely and chronically. This is based on two entirely separate mechanisms and etiologies requiring different treatments. Ventricular fibrillation can occur immediately after chest wall injury (commotio cordis and requires rapid defibrillation. Monomorphic ventricular tachycardia can develop in the chronic stage due to underlying structural heart disease long after blunt chest injury. The associated arrhythmogenic tissue may be complex and provides the necessary substrate to form a reentrant VT circuit. Ventricular tachycardia in the absence of overt structural heart disease appears to be focal in nature with rapid termination during ablation. Regardless of the VT mechanism, patients with recurrent episodes, despite antiarrhythmic medication in the chronic stage following blunt chest injury, are likely to require ablation to achieve VT control. This review article will describe the mechanisms, pathophysiology, and treatment of ventricular arrhythmias that occur in both the acute and chronic stages following blunt chest trauma.

  2. Evaluation of the safety of high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) therapy in blunt thoracic trauma patients

    OpenAIRE

    Becker Brian; Ney Arthur L; Palmer Cassandra A; Anderson Casandra A; Schaffel Steven D; Quickel Robert R

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Airway clearance is frequently needed by patients suffering from blunt chest wall trauma. High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO) has been shown to be effective in helping to clear secretions from the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis, bronchiectasis, asthma, primary ciliary dyskinesia, emphysema, COPD, and many others. Chest wall trauma patients are at increased risk for development of pulmonary complications related to airway clearance. These patients frequent...

  3. Triple Rule Out versus CT Angiogram Plus Stress Test for Evaluation of Chest Pain in the Emergency Department

    OpenAIRE

    Sawyer, Kelly N.; Payal Shah; Lihua Qu; Kurz, Michael C.; Clark, Carol L.; Swor, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Undifferentiated chest pain in the emergency department (ED) is a diagnostic challenge. One approach includes a dedicated chest computed tomography (CT) for pulmonary embolism or dissection followed by a cardiac stress test (TRAD). An alternative strategy is a coronary CT angiogram with concurrent chest CT (Triple Rule Out, TRO). The objective of this study was to describe the ED patient course and short-term safety for these evaluation methods. Methods: This was ...

  4. Comparison of the effects of removal of chest hair with not doing so before external defibrillation on transthoracic impedance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sado, Daniel M; Deakin, Charles D; Petley, Graham W; Clewlow, Frank

    2004-01-01

    Chest hair contributes significantly to transthoracic impedance (TTI) during defibrillation. The magnitude of this effect has not been established using external paddles. We compared TTI in 40 men before elective cardiac surgery, and before and after shaving their chests. Chest hair causes a significant increase in TTI during external defibrillation, the magnitude of the effect being related to both the quantity of hair and force applied to the defibrillation paddles. When the chests of nonhirsute patients were shaved, a decrease in TTI occurred, which was probably related to the creation of low-impedance pathways through skin abrasions.

  5. Complete cardiac rupture associated with closed chest cardiac massage: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattoli, Lucia; Maselli, Eloisa; Romanelli, Maria Carolina; Di Vella, Giancarlo; Solarino, Biagio

    2014-03-01

    Chest skeletal injuries are the most frequent complications of external chest massage (ECM) during cardiopulmonary resuscitation, but heart and great vessels lacerations that are indeed very rare. We report the case of a 35-year-old workman who collapsed and underwent ECM by his co-workers for almost 30 min. At autopsy, no external injuries, fractures or bruises of the ribs or sternum, were observed. A hemopericardium with a rupture of the heart was found, with no signs of pre-existent cardiac disease. Bruises of thoracic aortic wall, lung petechiae, a contusion of the liver, and bruises of lumbar muscles were found. The cause of death was due to sudden cardiac death with an extensive cardiac rupture. This is an unusual report of massive heart damage without any skeletal or muscle chest injuries, secondary to cardiopulmonary resuscitation. This kind of cardiac lesions may be considered when thoracic–abdominal trauma, or medical history, is unclear.

  6. Color structured light system of chest wall motion measurement for respiratory volume evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huijun; Cheng, Yuan; Liu, Dongdong; Zhang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Jue; Que, Chengli; Wang, Guangfa; Fang, Jing

    2010-01-01

    We present a structured light system to dynamically measure human chest wall motion for respiratory volume estimation. Based on a projection of an encoded color pattern and a few active markers attached to the trunk, respiratory volumes are obtained by evaluating the 3-D topographic changes of the chest wall in an anatomically consistent measuring region during respiration. Three measuring setups are established: a single-sided illuminating-recording setup for standing posture, an inclined single-sided setup for supine posture, and a double-sided setup for standing posture. Results are compared with the pneumotachography and show good agreement in volume estimations [correlation coefficient: R>0.99 (Pevaluation with high accuracy, but also regional pulmonary function assessment in different chest wall behaviors, with the advantage of whole-field measurement.

  7. A 34-Year-Old Woman With Recurrent Right-Sided Chest Pain and Dyspnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albores, Jeffrey; Fishbein, Gregory; Bando, Joanne

    2015-11-01

    A 34-year-old woman presented with her third episode of acute-onset right-sided chest pain and dyspnea. She had two prior similar occurrences of right-sided sharp, pleuritic chest pain with radiation to the back and dyspnea. Chest radiographs during these presentations revealed a small apical right-sided pneumothorax that was managed conservatively with high-flow oxygen. All three presentations were associated with vigorous exercise and the first day of her menses. She denied cough, hemoptysis, fever, smoking history, airplane travel, scuba diving, or trauma during these presentations. The patient has been trying to conceive for the past year but has been unsuccessful because of uterine fibroids but no history of endometriosis.

  8. [A case of postcardiac injury syndrome with repeated pleuritis after blunt chest trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namba, Ryoichi; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Nawa, Takeshi; Endo, Katuyuki

    2009-12-01

    A 59-year-old man suffered blunt injury to the left chest during a fall in August 2004. He had 5 repeated episodes of back and left chest pain in three years since August 2005. Since these symptoms were accompanied by left pleural effusion and serum inflammatory reaction, the tentative diagnosis was pleuritis. Although examinations of pleural effusion showed exudation with marked augmentation of inflammatory cells, there were no findings that suggested the cause of repetitive pleuritis. All symptoms were relieved within one or two weeks following administration of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs. Surgical thoracoscopy was carried out to investigate the cause of repeated pleuritis, and an acquired deficit of the left pericardium was noted. We considered this case to be postcardiac injury syndrome causing repeated pleuritis following blunt chest injury.

  9. Development of a training model for small animal thoracocentesis and chest tube thoracostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Julie A; Fio Rito, Robin M

    2014-06-01

    Training veterinary students to perform emergency procedures, such as thoracocentesis and chest tube thoracostomy, poses challenges in terms of providing adequate hands-on experience without compromising animal welfare. A small animal thoracocentesis and chest tube thoracostomy model has been developed, that allows repetitive practice in a safe, standardised environment. The model has been incorporated into a clinical skills laboratory, where students work through computerised case studies in small groups, performing thoracocentesis or chest tube thoracostomy where indicated during the case. Student feedback indicated a high degree of satisfaction with the model and the laboratory experience, high perceived value of the case studies in improving learning, and increased confidence to perform the procedures under supervision. This model can replace the use of live animals while students are practising these procedures, improving their technique, and learning the appropriate safeguards used to prevent injuries such as pulmonary trauma.

  10. Chest Pain and Costochondritis Associated with Vitamin D Deficiency: A Report of Two Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert C. Oh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D is integral for bone health, and severe deficiency can cause rickets in children and osteomalacia in adults. Although osteomalacia can cause severe generalized bone pain, there are only a few case reports of chest pain associated with vitamin D deficiency. We describe 2 patients with chest pain that were initially worked up for cardiac etiologies but were eventually diagnosed with costochondritis and vitamin D deficiency. Vitamin D deficiency is known to cause hypertrophic costochondral junctions in children (“rachitic rosaries” and sternal pain with adults diagnosed with osteomalacia. We propose that vitamin D deficiency may be related to the chest pain associated with costochondritis. In patients diagnosed with costochondritis, physicians should consider testing and treating for vitamin D deficiency.

  11. Interpretation of posterior wall of bronchus intermedius and subcarinal region in lateral chest radiographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Dong Wook; Oh, Joo Hyeong; Yoon, Yup [Kyunghee Univ. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-08-01

    a lateral chest radiograph is frequently useful and sometimes decisive in detecting chest pathology. Certain parts, such as the posterior wall of the branchus intermedius (PWBI) and subcarinal regions, can be evaluated only on lateral chest radiograph. The authors present and emphasize the findings of PWBI and subcarinal abnormalities. Abnormal PWBI, more than 3 mm thick, is seen in cases of minor degree of oblique position, pulmonary edema, inflammation, neoplasm and enlarged lymph nodes. It can also be seen in patients with subcarinal mass. The findings of subcarinal mass on lateral view are ill-defined increased opacity, fullness of the inferior hilar region, doughnut sign, extra-density and thickening of the PWBI. Detection of changes in the PWBI and subcarinal region may be the only diagnostic evidence of hilar and subcarinal disease and helps in its early detection prior to computed tomography.

  12. Imaging of non-cardiac, non-traumatic causes of acute chest pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kienzl, Daniela, E-mail: daniela.kienzl@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Prosch, Helmut; Töpker, Michael; Herold, Christian [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria)

    2012-12-15

    Non-traumatic chest pain is a common symptom in patients who present in the emergency department. From a clinical point of view, it is important to differentiate cardiac chest pain from non-cardiac chest pain (NCCP). Among the plethora of potential causes of NCCP, life-threatening diseases, such as aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism, tension pneumothorax, and esophageal rupture, must be differentiated from non-life threatening causes. The majority of NCCP, however, is reported to be benign in nature. The presentation of pain plays an important role in narrowing the differential diagnosis and initiating further diagnostic management and treatment. As the benign causes tend to recur, and may lead to patient anxiety and great costs, a meticulous evaluation of the patient is necessary to diagnose the underlying disorder or disease.

  13. Clinical evaluation of intravenous digital subtraction angiography in chest diseases in the elderly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Kazuhide; Adachi, Satoru; Suzuki, Kanzo and others

    1988-01-01

    To evaluate the image quality, we performed intravenous digital subtraction angiography for various chest diseases in 62 elderly subjects. In large vessel diseases in the chest, adequate imaging was possible in most cases, especially in the main, right and left pulmonary artery and the aorta. However, second order (subsegmental) and more distal order branches were sometimes judged unsatisfactory because of poor image quality. Five cases were evaluated as inadequate because of motion, i.e. respiratory or cardiac movement. The pulmonary circulating time was measured by the time density curve of the pulmonary artery and vein by digital subtraction angiography, and converse correlation between pulmonary circulating time and cardiac index was obtained. Thus it was possible to evaluate the pulmonary circulating dynamics. As mentioned above, intravenous digital subtraction angiography was a useful and safe method for chest diseases, especially in evaluation of large vessels in the elderly.

  14. Colon in the chest: an incidental dextrocardia: a case report study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd Elrazek, Abd Elrazek; Shehab, Abdullah; Elnour, Asim A; Al Nuaimi, Saif K; Baghdady, Shazly

    2015-02-01

    Diaphragmatic injury is an uncommon traumatic injury (Dextrocardia was an incidental finding, diagnosed by electrocardiography, chest radiograph, and CT chest. Parts of the colon, small intestine, and stomach were within the thorax in the left side due to left diaphragmatic hernia of a nontraumatic cause. Acquired incidental dextrocardia was the main problem due to displacement of the heart to contralateral side by the GI (gastrointestinal) viscera (left diaphragmatic hernia).The patient was prepared for the laparoscopic surgical repair, using a polyethylene mesh 20 cm to close the defect, and the patient recovered with accepted general condition. However, 5 days postoperative, the patient passed away suddenly due to unexplained cardiac arrest.Intrathoracic herniation of abdominal viscera should be considered in patients presented with sudden chest pain concomitant with a history of increased intra-abdominal pressure.

  15. Heart failure due to severe myocardial calcification; A rare complication after irradiation on the chest wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Shouichi; Maida, Kiyoshi; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Shigeo (Aomori Prefectural Central Hospital (Japan))

    1993-11-01

    A 28-year-old female who had had irradiation on the chest wall at the age of 5 as a remedy for keloid granulation after burn, recently developed congestive heart failure. Severe tricuspid regurgitation was demonstrated by echocardiography with a certain calcification in the cardiac shadow on chest radiogram. Calcified right ventricle and ventricular septum were noticed operatively, which disturbed ventricular motion and also caused tricuspid valve deformity. These calcified myocardium apparently corresponded with the irradiation field. After tricuspid valve replacement, she regained physical activity satisfactorily without congestive heart failure. Because she had no other known causes of cardiac calcification such as hypercalcemia, myocarditis, myocardial infarction or renal diseases, irradiation on the chest wall could be responsible for the severe myocardial calcification. (author).

  16. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance of myocardial infarction after blunt chest trauma: a heartbreaking soccer-shot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fogarassy Peter

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cardiac injury occasionally occurs as a result of blunt chest trauma. Most cardiac complications in chest trauma are due to myocardial contusion rather than direct damage to the coronary arteries. However, traumatic coronary injury has been reported, and a variety of underlying pathophysiological mechanisms have been proposed. We present a 26 year old patient presenting with an acute coronary syndrome as a consequence of a soccer-shot impact to the chest. CMR showed apical inferior infarction, as well as multiple small septal lesions which were presumed to have resulted from embolization. The culprit lesion was a proximal 75% LAD stenosis with a prominent plaque-rupture and thrombus-formation, and the distal LAD was occluded by thromboembolic material.

  17. Acute fatal coronary artery dissection following exercise-related blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbesier, Marie; Boval, Catherine; Desfeux, Jacques; Lebreton, Catherine; Léonetti, Georges; Piercecchi, Marie-Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Coronary artery injury such as acute coronary dissection is an uncommon and potentially life-threatening complication after blunt chest trauma. The authors report an unusual autopsy case of a 43-year-old healthy man who suddenly collapsed after receiving a punch to the chest during the practice of kung fu. The occurrence of the punch was supported by the presence of one recent contusion on the left lateral chest area at the external examination and by areas of hemorrhage next to the left lateral intercostal spaces at the internal examination. The histological examination revealed the presence of an acute dissection of the proximal segment of the left anterior descending coronary artery. Only few cases of coronary artery dissection have been reported due to trauma during sports activities such as rugby and soccer games, but never during the practice of martial arts, sports usually considered as safe and responsible for only minor trauma.

  18. Chest wall rigidity in two infants after low-dose fentanyl administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewhirst, Elisabeth; Naguib, Aymen; Tobias, Joseph D

    2012-05-01

    Since its introduction into clinical practice, it has been known that fentanyl and other synthetic opioids may cause skeletal muscle rigidity. Involvement of the respiratory musculature, laryngeal structures, or the chest wall may impair ventilation, resulting in hypercarbia and hypoxemia. Although most common with the rapid administration of large doses, this rare adverse effect may occur with small doses especially in neonates and infants. We present 2 infants who developed chest wall rigidity, requiring the administration of neuromuscular blocking agents and controlled ventilation after analgesic doses of fentanyl. Previous reports regarding chest wall rigidity after the administration of low-dose fentanyl in infants and children are reviewed, the pathogenesis of the disorder is discussed, and treatment options offered.

  19. Clinical Diagnosis and Treatment of Chest Pain%胸疼的临床诊治

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周凤鸣

    2014-01-01

    目的探讨胸疼病患者的病因和诊治办法。方法对我院收治的147胸疼病患者的临床资料进行回顾性分析。结果147例胸疼病患者中,不稳定型心绞痛36例,稳定型心绞痛24例;急性心肌梗死39例;呼吸系统疾病11例,骨骼肌肉疾病15例,消化系统疾病12例;高危非心源性胸痛10例。结论胸疼患者病因多样,心源性疾病在胸疼患者中占据很大比例,详细询问病史并结合现代仪器检查,就能快速识别出高危患者,及时有效进行救治。%Objective To investigate the cause of chest pain patients and treatment approaches. Methods The hospital admit ed 147 patients with chest pain clinical data were retrospectively analyzed. Results 147 cases of chest pain in patients with unstable angina in 36 cases, 24 cases of stable angina; acute myocardial infarction in 39 cases; respiratory system 11 cases, 15 cases of musculoskeletal disorders diseases, 12 cases of digestive diseases; risk 10 cases of non-cardiac chest pain. Conclusion The cause of chest pain in patients with various cardiac diseases account for a large proportion of patients with chest pain, a detailed history and examination combined with modern equipment, we can quickly identify high-risk patients, timely and ef ective for treatment.

  20. Acute chest pain in emergency room. Preliminary findings with 40-64-slice CT ECG-gated of the whole chest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coche, E

    2007-01-01

    ECG-gated MDCT of the entire chest represents the latest technical advance in the diagnostic work-up of atypical chest pain. The authors report their preliminary experience with the use of 40 and 64-slice CT in the emergency room and recommend to study only patients with moderate likelihood of coronary artery disease. ECG-gated MDCT of the entire chest will be preferentially performed on 64-slice MDCT rather than 40-slice MDCT because it enable to reduce the scan time (18 seconds versus 28 seconds acquisition time), the volume of contrast medium (82 mL + 15 mL versus 97 mL + 15 mL of highly concentrated contrast agent for a patient of 70 kgs) and radiation exposure (17 mSv versus 19 mSv). Approximately 1500 to 2000 of images are produced and need to be analysed on a dedicated workstation by a radiologist expert in cardiac and thoracic disorders. At the present time, only a few studies exist in the literature showing some promising results but further large clinical studies are needed before to implement such sophisticated protocol in emergency room.

  1. Use of Chest Computed Tomography in Stable Patients with Blunt Thoracic Trauma: Clinical and Forensic Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makbule Ergin

    2011-01-01

    fractures were the most common injury. Thorax computed tomography was significantly superior to chest radiography in detecting pneumothorax , hemothorax and lung contusion. Eightyone life threatening lesions were detected and 50 (61%; pneumothorax 13, hemothorax 24, lung contusion 9,and pneumomediastinum 4 of these lesions could not be detected with plain chest radiography. The clinical management [in 15 patients (30%], and the forensic assesment was changed [in 14 (28%] patients were changed.  Conclusion:We concluded that using Computed Tomography of the thorax in thoracic travmas prive meticulous assesment in management of patients and forens icissues.

  2. What is the effect of chest physiotherapy in hospitalized children with pneumonia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiani, Felipe; Adasme, Rodrigo

    2015-10-19

    Chest physiotherapy is applied in clinical practice for the treatment of pneumonia. However, its use is still controversial. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified one systematic review including two relevant randomized controlled trials. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded it is unclear whether chest physiotherapy increases or decreases the length of hospitalization, severity, or the time to clinical improvement in children with pneumonia because the certainty of the evidence is very low.

  3. Successful operative rib fixation of traumatic flail chest in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulaylat, Afif N; Chesnut, Charles H; Santos, Ariel P; Armen, Scott B

    2014-09-01

    Increasing attention has been directed towards operative rib fixation of traumatic flail chest; reported benefits include more rapid weaning from the ventilator, decreased intensive care unit stays, decreased complications and improved functional results. The outcomes of this surgical intervention in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta, a rare condition characterized by low bone density and bone fragility, are unknown. This case demonstrates that, in the management of traumatic flail chest in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta, surgical fixation can be successful and should be considered early.

  4. Metastatic breast cancer presenting as air-space consolidation on chest computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Hiroshi; Haruta, Yoshinori; Yokoyama, Akihito; Nakashima, Taku; Hattori, Noboru; Kohno, Nobuoki

    2009-01-01

    A 56-year-old woman suffered from hepatic and bone metastases of breast cancer. Two months after starting combination chemotherapy with trastuzumab and docetaxel, air-space consolidation was observed in the right lower lung lobe on a chest computed tomography (CT) and a high serum KL-6 level was detected. Drug-induced pneumonitis with organizing pneumonia type was suspected, however, a transbronchial lung biopsy and cytological examination of the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid provided evidence of metastatic breast cancer. While the lung is a frequently affected site from metastasis of breast cancer, we report a rare case presenting as air-space consolidation on a chest CT.

  5. Giant Anterior Chest Wall Basal Cell Carcinoma: An Approach to Palliative Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Joy F. Santos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Anterior chest wall giant basal cell carcinoma (GBCC is a rare skin malignancy that requires a multidisciplinary treatment approach. This case report demonstrates the challenges of anterior chest wall GBCC reconstruction for the purpose of palliative therapy in a 72-year-old female. Surgical resection of the lesion included the manubrium and upper four ribs. The defect was closed with bilateral pectoral advancement flaps, FlexHD, and pedicled VRAM. The palliative nature of this case made hybrid reconstruction more appropriate than rigid sternal reconstruction. In advanced metastatic cancers, the ultimate goals should be to avoid risk for infection and provide adequate coverage for the defect.

  6. The Beatles, the Nobel Prize, and CT scanning of the chest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Lawrence R

    2010-01-01

    From its first test scan on a mouse, in 1967, to current medical practice, the CT scanner has become a core imaging tool in thoracic diagnosis. Initially financed by money from Beatles' record sales, the first patient scan was performed in 1971. Only 8 years later, a Nobel Prize in Physics and Medicine was awarded to Hounsfield and Cormack for their discovery. This article traces the history of CT scanner development and how each technical advance expanded chest diagnostic frontiers. Chest imaging now accounts for 30% of all CT scanning.

  7. Novel use of hand fracture fixation plates in the surgical stabilisation of flail chest.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dunlop, Rebecca L E

    2010-01-01

    Plastic surgeons specialize in working closely with other surgical colleagues to help solve clinical problems. In this case, we performed surgical stabilisation of a large flail chest fragment in conjunction with the cardiothoracic surgical team, using the mini-plating set more commonly used for hand fracture fixation. The use of this fixation system for flail chest has not previously been described, but offers advantages over other reported methods, primarily by dispensing with the need for an extensive thoracotomy incision and by providing robust stabilisation without the presence of prominent hardware.

  8. Unilateral chest wall anomaly in a patient with Gardner' s syndrome: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Eun Hee; Lee, So Yeon; Park, Hee Jin; Kwon, Heon Ju; Kim, Mi Sung; Park, Hae Won; Kwang, Hyon Joo [Dept. of Radiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hye Jin [Dept. of Radiology, Eulji General Hospital, Eulji University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Gardner syndrome is a familial disease consisting of colonic polyposis, osteomas, and soft tissue tumors. We describe unilateral chest wall anomaly in a 32-year-old man with Gardner syndrome. A chest radiograph showed asymmetric hypertrophy of the right seventh to tenth ribs. CT images showed increased size of the medullary portions of these lesions, but relatively normal thickness of the cortex. Intercostal muscles along the right seventh to tenth ribs were hypertrophied as compared with the contralateral ribs. Both lungs were clear but the volume of right lung showed slightly smaller than left one.

  9. Lung ultrasound and chest x-ray for detecting pneumonia in an acute geriatric ward

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Our aim was to compare the accuracy of lung ultrasound (LUS) and standard chest x-ray (CXR) for diagnosing pneumonia in older patients with acute respiratory symptoms (dyspnea, cough, hemoptysis, and atypical chest pain) admitted to an acute-care geriatric ward. Methods: We enrolled 169 (80 M, 89 F) multimorbid patients aged 83.0 ± 9.2 years from January 1 to October 31, 2015. Each participant underwent CXR and bedside LUS within 6 hours from ward admission. LUS was perfo...

  10. Illness perceptions, negative emotions, and pain in patients with noncardiac chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, Jared I; White, Kamila S; Gervino, Ernest V

    2015-03-01

    Illness-specific cognitions are associated with outcomes in numerous health conditions, however, little is known about their role in noncardiac chest pain (NCCP). NCCP is prevalent, impairing, and associated with elevated health care utilization. Our objective was to investigate the relations between illness perceptions, emotion, and pain in a sample of 196 adult patients diagnosed with NCCP. We found that negative illness perceptions were associated with greater anxiety, depression, chest pain, and pain-related life interference while controlling for the effects of demographic and pain-related variables. These results expand current NCCP theory and may inform future treatment development.

  11. Radiographic, CT and MRI spectrum of hydatid disease of the chest: a pictorial essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinner, W.N. von [Dept. of Radiology MBC28, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    1993-01-01

    Thirty patients with thoracic hydatidosis (Echinococcus granulosus) were studied. The hydatid cysts were located in the lung parenchyma (70%), mediastinum (6.7%), inside the heart (10%), the pleurae (10%) and the chest wall (3.3%). Complications of thoracic hydatid cysts, such as rupture, infection, pleural involvement, spread and calcifications are presented. Computed tomography (CT) without and/or with contrast enhancement was performed in all patients (30). Findings from conventional chest radiographs were compared with CT and confirmed by pathology (30). In 10 cases (33.3%), magnetic resonance imaging was also performed. The diagnostic spectrum of hydatid cysts, including variations and developmental stages, is presented in this pictorial essay. (orig.)

  12. Chest Tube Insertion in the Delayed Esophageal Perforation Phenomenon: A Tragic or Beneficial Outcome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokouti, Mohsen; Ghaffari, Mohammad Reza; Sokouti, Masoud; Rahimi-Rad, Mohammad-Hossein

    2016-01-01

    A 53-year-old woman with foreign body esophageal perforation, was first misdiagnosed as pulmonary thromboembolism. In referral hospital her chest computed tomography was reported as giant hiatal hernia or giant pulmonary abscess. She was treated for abscess, after several days, right hemithorax tube thoracostomy was performed. After that, she developed necrotizing fasciitis on the chest wall. After a 19-day delay, we found a 5-cm mid-thoracic esophageal tearing during thoracotomy and repaired it. After 2 years follow up the patient condition is good. This report describes a unique case of mid-thoracic foreign body esophageal perforation and rupture with a delay in diagnosis with a tragic course.

  13. Chest X-ray Findings of Woodworkers, Epidemiological and Experimental Study

    OpenAIRE

    Okita, Isao; Nakanishi, Takashi; Asaeda, Genkichi

    1983-01-01

    Mass examination of the ladorers in wood and products industries was conducted. The workers showing abnormal chest x-ray findings were over 40years of age and had worked longer than 20 years in these industries. The abnormal x-ray findings were linear and small opacities. From these observation, it is likely that the abnormal findings of chest x-ray films were associated with wooden dust. The experimental studies by infusing paulowina dust into the lungs of rats showed the foreign body granul...

  14. Diagnosis and treatment of musculoskeletal chest pain: design of a multi-purpose trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Høilund-Carlsen Poul

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute chest pain is a major health problem all over the western world. Active approaches are directed towards diagnosis and treatment of potentially life threatening conditions, especially acute coronary syndrome/ischemic heart disease. However, according to the literature, chest pain may also be due to a variety of extra-cardiac disorders including dysfunction of muscles and joints of the chest wall or the cervical and thoracic part of the spine. The diagnostic approaches and treatment options for this group of patients are scarce and formal clinical studies addressing the effect of various treatments are lacking. Methods/Design We present an ongoing trial on the potential usefulness of chiropractic diagnosis and treatment in patients dismissed from an acute chest pain clinic without a diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome. The aims are to determine the proportion of patients in whom chest pain may be of musculoskeletal rather than cardiac origin and to investigate the decision process of a chiropractor in diagnosing these patients; further, to examine whether chiropractic treatment can reduce pain and improve physical function when compared to advice directed towards promoting self-management, and, finally, to estimate the cost-effectiveness of these procedures. This study will include 300 patients discharged from a university hospital acute chest pain clinic without a diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome or any other obvious cardiac or non-cardiac disease. After completion of the clinic's standard cardiovascular diagnostic procedures, trial patients will be examined according to a standardized protocol including a a self-report questionnaire; b a semi-structured interview; c a general health examination; and d a specific manual examination of the muscles and joints of the neck, thoracic spine, and thorax in order to determine whether the pain is likely to be of musculoskeletal origin. To describe the patients status with

  15. Volumetric measurement of pulmonary nodules at low-dose chest CT : effect of reconstruction setting on measurement variability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Y.; de Bock, G.H.; van Klaveren, R.J.; van Ooyen, P.; Tukker, W.; Zhao, Y.; Dorrius, M.D.; Proenca, R.V.; Post, W.J.; Oudkerk, M.

    2010-01-01

    To assess volumetric measurement variability in pulmonary nodules detected at low-dose chest CT with three reconstruction settings. The volume of 200 solid pulmonary nodules was measured three times using commercially available semi-automated software of low-dose chest CT data-sets reconstructed wit

  16. No Value for Routine Chest Radiography in the Work-Up of Early Stage Cervical Cancer Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogendam, Jacob P.; Zweemer, Ronald P.; Verkooijen, Helena M.; de Jong, Pim A.; van den Bosch, Maurice A. A. J.; Verheijen, Rene H. M.; Veldhuis, WB

    2015-01-01

    Aim Evidence supporting the recommendation to include chest radiography in the work-up of all cervical cancer patients is limited. We investigated the diagnostic value of routine chest radiography in cervical cancer staging. Methods All consecutive cervical cancer patients who presented at our terti

  17. Official Executive Summary of an American Thoracic Society/American College of Chest Physicians Clinical Practice Guideline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Gregory A; Girard, Timothy D; Kress, John P

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This clinical practice guideline addresses six questions related to liberation from mechanical ventilation in critically ill adults. It is the result of a collaborative effort between the American Thoracic Society (ATS) and American College of Chest Physicians (CHEST). METHODS: A mult...

  18. Diagnosis of vertebral fractures on lateral chest X-ray: Intraobserver agreement of semi-quantitative vertebral fracture assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagt-Willems, H.C. van der, E-mail: Hvanderjagt@spaarneziekenhuis.nl [Department of Geriatrics, Slotervaart Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Internal Medicine, Spaarne Hospital, Hoofddorp (Netherlands); Munster, B.C. van [Department of Internal Medicine, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Geriatrics, Gelre Hospitals, Apeldoorn (Netherlands); Leeflang, M. [Department of Geriatrics, Gelre Hospitals, Apeldoorn (Netherlands); Beuerle, E. [Department of Radiology, Slotervaart Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Tulner, C.R. [Department of Geriatrics, Slotervaart Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lems, W.F. [Department of Rheumatology, VU Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • (Lateral) chest X-ray's are often performed in older individuals for various reasons. • Vertebral fractures are visualized on lateral chest X-ray, but the diagnosis of vertebral fractures is until now only validated on (lateral) spine X-ray's. • This study shows that a (lateral) chest X-ray is sufficient for the diagnosis of vertebral fractures. • Older individuals with a vertebral fracture on a (lateral) chest X-ray do not need further radiography with thoracic spine X-ray or vertebral fracture assessment with DXA. - Abstract: Background: In clinical practice lateral images of the chest are performed for various reasons. As these lateral chest X rays show the vertebrae of the thoracic and thoraco-lumbar region, we wondered if these X-rays can be used for evaluation of vertebral fractures instead of separate thoracic spine X-rays. Methods: To evaluate the agreement and intraobserver reliability of the semi-quantitative method for vertebral fractures on the lateral chest X-ray (X-chest) in comparison to the lateral thoracic spine X-ray (X-Tspine), two observers scored vertebral fractures on X-Tspine and twice on X-chest, separately, blinded and in different time periods. Agreement and Cohens’ kappa were calculated for a diagnosis of any fracture on patient level and on vertebral body level. The study was done in patients visiting an outpatient geriatric day clinic, with a high prevalence of vertebral fractures. Results: 109 patients were included. The intraobserver agreement for X-chest versus X-Tspine was 95–98% for the two levels of fracturing, with a Cohen's kappa of 0.88–0.91. The intraobserver agreement and reliability of the re-test on the X-chest showed an agreement between 91 and 98% with a Cohen's kappa of 0.81–0.93. More vertebrae were visible on the X-chest, mean 10.2, SD 0.66 versus mean 9.8, SD 0.73 on the X-Tspine (p < 0.001). Conclusion: The results show good agreement and intraobserver reliability on

  19. Utility of CT scan for the diagnosis of chest wall tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalil, A.; Le Breton, C.; Tassart, M.; Korzec, J.; Bigot, J.M.; Carette, M.F. [Department of Radiology, Tenon Hospital, Paris (France)

    1999-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the utility of CT scan findings for the diagnosis of chest wall tuberculosis, excluding the spine. We reviewed 15 patients (13 Africans and 2 Indians) with chest wall tuberculosis, retrospectively. The radiologic examination consisted of a plain X-ray and a CT scan of the chest for each patient. The site of disease was the rib in 13 patients or the body of the sternum in 2 patients. One rib was involved in 11 patients, 2 contiguous ribs (one site) in 2 patients, and bilateral disease (two sites) was observed in the remaining patient. The 14 rib sites involved the posterior arc or costovertebral joint in 11 cases, the anterior arc in 2 cases, and the anterior and middle arc in 1 case. The CT scan findings were an abscess (n = 14) or a soft tissue mass (n = 2), osteolytic lesions (n = 13), periosteal reaction (n = 10), and sequestrum (n = 14). Bone sclerosis was observed only in 3 cases of rib involvement. The association of a soft tissue abscess, an osteolytic lesion, and sequestrum, especially in immigrants to France, suggests chest wall tuberculosis on CT scan. (orig.) With 5 figs., 2 tabs., 11 refs.

  20. Elevated troponin levels and typical chest pain: Is always acute coronary syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altug Osken

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aortic dissection is a fatal disease that must be considered in the differential diagnosis of chest pain. If the diagnosis cannot be made in early period, mortality is very high. Here, we present a case of aortic dissection, clinically mimicking acute coronary syndrome.

  1. Dynamic preload indicators fail to predict fluid responsiveness in open-chest conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Waal, Eric E. C.; Rex, Steffen; Kruitwagen, Cas L. J. J.; Kalkman, Cor J.; Buhre, Wolfgang F.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Dynamic preload indicators like pulse pressure variation (PPV) and stroke volume variation (SVV) are increasingly being used for optimizing cardiac preload since they have been demonstrated to predict fluid responsiveness in a variety of perioperative settings. However, in open-chest cond

  2. Scapular Fractures in Blunt Chest Trauma – Self-Experience Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sadek, Tabet A.; Niklev, Desislav; Al-Sadek, Ahmed; Al-Sadek, Lina

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this retrospective study was to report the scapular fractures in patients with blunt chest trauma and to present the type and the frequency of associated thoracic injuries. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Nine patients with fractures of the scapula were included in the study. The mechanisms of the injury, the type of scapular fractures and associated thoracic injuries were analysed. RESULTS: Scapular fractures were caused by high-energy blunt chest trauma. The body of the scapula was fractured in all scapular fractures. In all cases, scapular fractures were associated with other thoracic injuries (average 3.25/per case). Rib fractures were present in eight patients, fractured clavicula - in four cases, the affection of pleural cavity - in eight of the patients and pulmonary contusion in all nine cases. Eight patients were discharged from the hospital up to the 15th day. One patient had died on the 3rd day because of postconcussional lung oedema. CONCLUSIONS: The study confirms the role of scapular fractures as a marker for the severity of the chest trauma (based on the number of associated thoracic injuries), but doesn’t present scapular fractures as an indicator for high mortality in blunt chest trauma patients. PMID:28028415

  3. The value of clinical and laboratory diagnostics for chest pain patients at the emergency department

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jellema, Laurens-Jan C.; Backus, Barbra E.; Six, A. Jacob; Braam, Richard; Groenemeijer, Bjorn; van der Zaag-Loonen, Hester J.; Tio, Rene; van Suijlen, Jeroen D. E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The focus during the diagnostic process for patients with acute chest pain is to discriminate patients who can be safely discharged from those who are at risk for an acute coronary syndrome (ACS). In this study the diagnostic value of the clinical examination is compared with laboratory

  4. Acute chest syndrome of sickle cell disease: radiographic and clinical analysis of 70 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, L. [Department of Radiology, Children`s Hospital, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Buonomo, C. [Department of Radiology, Children`s Hospital, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Background. Acute chest syndrome (ACS) is a pulmonary illness with fever, chest pain, leukocytosis and new pulmonary opacity in a patient with sickle cell disease. It is a common reason for hospitalization in sickle cell patients, and a significant cause of mortality. The etiology of ACS is unclear. Lung or bone infarction and infection, among other possible causes, have been proposed. Objective. We reviewed the chest radiographs and medical records of 41 patients with 70 episodes of ACS and correlated the clinical and radiographic courses in an attempt to better characterize and understand the syndrome. Results. In 87 % of episodes, no identifiable etiology of ACS was found. This group of patients had a median age of 14 years and showed dramatic clinical and radiographic improvement within 24 h of therapy. In the remainder of episodes (13 %), an identifiable etiology was found, usually bacterial pneumonia. These patients were younger than the group without an identifiable etiology (median age 2 years) and had a prolonged radiographic course of illness. Conclusion. The chest radiographs of children with ACS without an identifiable etiology have an extremely typical appearance and evolution. Only in cases which do not have this typical pattern should infection be suspected as the underlying cause. (orig.). With 3 figs.

  5. Reconstruction of chest wall defects after resection of large neoplasms: ten-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoa, Nuria; Benito, Pablo; Jiménez, Marcelo F; de Juan, Ana; Luis Aranda, José; Varela, Gonzalo

    2005-06-01

    We review our experience in the treatment of complex large chest-wall defects needing a multidisciplinary approach due to primary or secondary neoplasms. Non-small cell lung cancer with chest-wall invasion cases are excluded. Fifteen patients underwent whole thickness resection of the chest wall due to lesions affecting at least three ribs, sternum, clavicle or thoracic spine and the surrounding soft tissue. Previously operated breast cancer and sarcoma were the most frequent diagnoses. Partial or total sternectomy plus rib resection was performed in 8 patients. Immediate closure of the defects was performed in all cases: 12 with single prosthesis placement and 3 with a rigid one of methylmethacrylate. Coverage was achieved using myocutaneous flaps in most cases and, in one case, using the greater omentum that supported a free split-thickness skin graft. No 30-days mortality was recorded. Three patients had a post-operative complication. Mean hospital stay was 11.7+/-9 days. All cases of primary tumours were alive at the time of review (range: 6-126 months). In conclusion, resection and immediate reconstruction of large chest wall defects can be accomplished without operative mortality and low morbidity whenever close cooperation between plastic and thoracic teams exists.

  6. Annual Screening with Chest X-Ray Does Not Reduce Lung Cancer Deaths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annual screening for lung cancer using a standard chest x-ray does not reduce the risk of dying from lung cancer when compared with no annual screening, according to findings from the NCI-led Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) screening trial.

  7. Cross-sectional imaging with CT and/or MRI of pediatric chest tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyttenbach, R.; Vock, P.; Tschaeppeler, H. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Division of Children`s Radiology, University Hospital, Bern (Switzerland)

    1998-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide an overview of the spectrum of pediatric chest masses, to present the results of cross-sectional imaging with CT and/or MRI, and to define diagnostic criteria to limit differential diagnosis. Seventy-eight children with thoracic mass lesions were retrospectively evaluated using CT (72 patients) and/or MR imaging (12 patients). All masses were evaluated for tissue characteristics (attenuation values or signal intensity, enhancement, and calcification) and were differentiated according to age, gender, location, and etiology. Twenty-eight of 38 (74 %) mediastinal masses were malignant (neuroblastoma, malignant lymphoma). Thirty of 38 (79 %) pulmonary masses were metastatic in origin, all with an already known primary tumor (osteosarcoma, Wilms tumor). With one exception, all remaining pulmonary lesions were benign. Seventeen of 21 (81 %) chest wall lesions were malignant (Ewing sarcoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumor). The majority of mediastinal and chest wall tumors in children is malignant. Lung lesions are usually benign, unless a known extrapulmonary tumor suggests pulmonary metastases. Cross-sectional imaging with CT and/or MRI allows narrowing of the differential diagnosis of pediatric chest masses substantially by defining the origin and tissue characteristics. Magnetic resonance imaging is preferred for posterior mediastinal lesions, whereas CT should be used for pulmonary lesions. For the residual locations both modalities are complementary. (orig.) With 5 figs., 3 tabs., 20 refs.

  8. Development and evaluation of a novel taekwondo chest protector to improve mobility when performing axe kicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, J H; Ko, J Y; Choi, E Y; Her, J G; O'Sullivan, D M

    2013-03-01

    The axe kick, in Olympic style taekwondo, has been identified as the most popular scoring technique aimed to the head during full contact competition. The first purpose of this study was to identify and investigate design issues with the current World Taekwondo Federation approved chest protector. A secondary purpose was to develop a novel chest protector addressing the identified design issues and to conduct a biomechanical analysis. Fifteen male elite Taekwondo players were selected to perform three different styles of the axe kick, i.e., front, in-out, and out-in axe kick five times each for a total of 45 kicks. Two-way repeated measures ANOVA showed significant differences between the novel and existing chest protector conditions for vertical height of the toe, downward kicking foot speed, hip flexion angle and ipsilateral shoulder flexion extension range of motion (ROM) (p 0.05). These results indicate that the novel chest protector interferes less with both the lower and upper limbs during the performance of the axe kick and provides a more natural, free-moving alternative to the current equipment used.

  9. Prevalence of Radiologic Findings in Patients with Blunt Chest Trauma in Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Haghighi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objective: Chest trauma due to its vital organs can be very dangerous and lethal. Our country has the first grade of accidents in the word, so rapid diagnosis and treatment in patients with chest trauma is necessary. One cost benefit and available imaging modality in each Region of our country is X-ray."nCXR interpretation needs to knowledge about prevalence of abnormal Radiologic findings and their accuracy. Therefore, it is necessary to perform a study about the rate of CXR abnormal findings in patients with blunt chest trauma."nPatients and Methods: In this descriptive and prospective study, CXR of patients with blunt chest trauma that admitted in Alzahra and Kashani hospitals studied and percent of vital radiologic findings prevalence determined."nResults: The final results were as below:"n1- Rib FX (18.5% (143, 2- Hemothorax (13.6% (105, 3- Pneumothorax (11.8% (91, 4- Sub cutaneous emphysema (10.2% (79, 5- Lung laceration (8.1% (63, 6- Mediastinal winding (6.4% (50, 7- Clavicular and sternal FX (5.8% (44, 8- Pneumo mediastinum (4.1% (32, 9- spinal FX (3.5% (27, 10- Great vessels injury signs (1.4% (11."nConclusion: According to above results, accurate investigation of CXR, helps physician and radiologist to find any threatened finding, so determination of next step as clinical follow up or spiral CT, angiography or surgery; accordingly.

  10. Atherosclerotic plaque burden in cocaine users with acute chest pain : Analysis by coronary computed tomography angiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ebersberger, Ullrich; Sudarski, Sonja; Schoepf, U. Joseph; Bamberg, Fabian; Tricarico, Francesco; Apfaltrer, Paul; Blanke, Philipp; Schindler, Andreas; Makowski, Marcus R.; Headden, Gary F.; Leber, Alexander W.; Hoffmann, Ellen; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn

    2013-01-01

    Chest pain associated with cocaine use represents an increasing problem in the emergency department (ED). Cocaine use has been linked to the acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and acute myocardial infarction (AMI). We used coronary computed tomography angiography (cCTA) to evaluate the prevalence, severi

  11. Willingness to Perform Chest Compression Only in Witnessed Cardiac Arrest Victims versus Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesreen Yaghmour

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Performing immediate bystander Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR is the most important factor that determines survival from cardiac arrest. Recommended mouth to mouth ventilation maneuver during CPR has led to lower rate of CPR performance in the population. Objectives: The present survey aimed to evaluate the willingness of nurses at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences for performing CPR versus chest-compression-only CPR. Patients and Methods: During a CPR course, we performed a survey on 25 nurses from Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Iran. This survey included age and gender of the participants. In the first question, they were asked about their willingness to perform CPR with mouth to mouth breathing for witnessed cardiac arrest victims. In the second question, they were asked about their willingness to perform chest compression only for cardiac arrest victims. Results: Among the participating nurses, 96% were female with a mean age of 31 years. Only 40% were willing to perform CPR that requires mouth to mouth ventilation. On the other hand, 92% were willing to perform chest compression only without mouth to mouth ventilation. The mean age of the nurses who would do CPR was lower compared to those who would not. Conclusions: In this survey, we demonstrated that eliminating mouth to mouth ventilation maneuver could lead to markedly higher willingness to perform CPR for witnessed cardiac arrest victims in CPR trained nursing personnel. Our study is in agreement with other studies advocating that chest-compression-only CPR could lead to higher bystander resuscitation efforts.

  12. Chest Pain and ST-Segment Elevation in an 18-Year-Old Man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawji, Mazen M; Glancy, David Luke

    2017-02-28

    An 18-year-old man came to the hospital because of 1 day of chest pain typical of pericarditis. He had had an upper respiratory infection 10 days earlier. His electrocardiograms indicated evolving pericarditis. His echocardiogram showed mild, diffuse left ventricular hypokinesia, and his troponin I level peaked at 47.5 ng/ml. Thus, he had myopericarditis.

  13. Endobronchial Ultrasound-Guided Transbronchial Needle Aspiration of Undiagnosed Chest Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckardt, Jens; Olsen, Karen E; Licht, Peter B

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A number of patients with radiologically suspicious chest tumors remain undiagnosed despite bronchoscopy or CT-guided fine-needle aspiration (CT-FNA). Such patients are often referred for mediastinoscopy, which is an invasive surgical procedure that poses a small but significant risk...

  14. Pneumomediastinum in Blunt Chest Trauma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Mansella

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Blunt trauma is the most common mechanism of injury in patients with pneumomediastinum and may occur in up to 10% of patients with severe blunt thoracic and cervical trauma. In this case report we present a 24-year-old man with pneumomediastinum due to blunt chest trauma after jumping from a bridge into a river. He complained of persistent retrosternal pain with exacerbation during deep inspiration. Physical examination showed only a slight tenderness of the sternum and the extended Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma (e-FAST was normal. Pneumomediastinum was suspected by chest X-ray and confirmed by computed tomography, which showed a lung contusion as probable cause of the pneumomediastinum due to the “Mackling effect.” Sonographic findings consistent with pneumomediastinum, like the “air gap” sign, are helpful for quick bedside diagnosis, but the diagnostic criteria are not yet as well established as for pneumothorax. This present case shows that despite minimal findings in physical examination and a normal e-FAST a pneumomediastinum is still possible in a patient with chest pain after blunt chest trauma. Therefore, pneumomediastinum should always be considered to prevent missing major aerodigestive injuries, which can be associated with a high mortality rate.

  15. Properties of novel composite meshes in chest wall reconstruction: A comparative animal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Zardo

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: We consider composite grafts a suitable alternative for chest wall reconstruction. They are characterized by good overall biointegration and limited perigraft-fibrosis, thus potentially facilitating redo-procedures, even though a hydrophilic coating per se does not appear to prevent intrathoracic adhesion formation.

  16. Ultrasonido de tórax en ninos Ultrasound of the pediatric's chest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Fuentealba T

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available El Ultrasonido es un examen complementario en el estudio por imágenes del tórax. En los últimos tiempos se ha ampliado su utilización especialmente en el estudio del tórax pediátrico ya que es una alternativa de imagen que no usa radiación y por otra parte, es considerado por algunos autores como el examen de primera línea en la evaluación de algunas patologías específicas como: aumento de volumen superficial de la pared torácica, movimiento diafragmático, timo y derrame pleural. El objetivo de este artículo es revisar las principales indicaciones en el estudio del tórax pediátrico por ultrasonido en patología no cardiológica.Ultrasound is an alternative technique for the examination of the chest. Recently chest ultrasound has expanded its use mainly on the study of pediatric patients, since it does not use radiation and it is considered by some authors as the first line test in the evaluation of some specific conditions like: superficial lumps and bumps of the chest wall, diaphragm motility, thymus characterization and pleural effusions. The purpose of this paper is to review the main indications for pediatric chest ultrasound in non-cardiac diseases.

  17. Computed and conventional chest radiography: a comparison of image quality and radiation dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramli, K; Abdullah, B J J; Ng, K-H; Mahmud, R; Hussain, A F

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the image quality and entrance skin dose (ESD) for film-screen and computed chest radiography. Analysis of the image quality and dose on chest radiography was carried out on a conventional X-ray unit using film-screen, storage phosphor plates and selenium drum direct chest radiography. For each receptor, ESD was measured in 60 patients using thermoluminescent dosemeters. Images were printed on 35 x 43 cm films. Image quality was assessed subjectively by evaluation of anatomic features and estimation of the image quality, following the guidelines established by the protocols of the Commission of the European Communities. There was no statistically significant difference noted between the computed and conventional images (Wilcoxon rank sum test, P > 0.05). Imaging of the mediastinum and peripheral lung structures were better visualized with the storage phosphor and selenium drum technique than with the film-screen combination. The patients' mean ESD for chest radiography using the storage phosphor, film-screen combination and selenium drum was 0.20, 0.20 and 0.25 mGy, respectively, with no statistically significant difference with P > 0.05 (chi(2) tests).

  18. Estimated risk of radiation-induced cancer from paediatric chest CT: two-year cohort study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niemann, Tilo [Cantonal Hospital Baden, Department of Radiology, Baden (Switzerland); University Lille Nord de France, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette, Lille (France); Colas, Lucie; Santangelo, Teresa; Faivre, Jean Baptiste; Remy, Jacques; Remy-Jardin, Martine [University Lille Nord de France, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette, Lille (France); Roser, Hans W.; Bremerich, Jens [University of Basel Hospital, Clinic of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Medical Physics, Basel (Switzerland)

    2015-03-01

    The increasing absolute number of paediatric CT scans raises concern about the safety and efficacy and the effects of consecutive diagnostic ionising radiation. To demonstrate a method to evaluate the lifetime attributable risk of cancer incidence/mortality due to a single low-dose helical chest CT in a two-year patient cohort. A two-year cohort of 522 paediatric helical chest CT scans acquired using a dedicated low-dose protocol were analysed retrospectively. Patient-specific estimations of radiation doses were modelled using three different mathematical phantoms. Per-organ attributable cancer risk was then estimated using epidemiological models. Additional comparison was provided for naturally occurring risks. Total lifetime attributable risk of cancer incidence remains low for all age and sex categories, being highest in female neonates (0.34%). Summation of all cancer sites analysed raised the relative lifetime attributable risk of organ cancer incidence up to 3.6% in female neonates and 2.1% in male neonates. Using dedicated scan protocols, total lifetime attributable risk of cancer incidence and mortality for chest CT is estimated low for paediatric chest CT, being highest for female neonates. (orig.)

  19. Multicentre chest computed tomography standardisation in children and adolescents with cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuo, Wieying; Kemner-van de Corput, Mariette P. C.; Perez-Rovira, Adria

    2016-01-01

    was found in CT protocols, image quality and radiation dose usage among the centres. However, the performance of all CT scanners was found to be very similar, when taking spatial resolution and radiation dose into account. We conclude that multicentre standardisation of chest CT in children and adolescents...

  20. 75 FR 15448 - Notice of Issuance of Final Determination Concerning a Wood Chest

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-29

    ... presented, the wood chest, assembled in the U.S. from parts made in Malaysia and the U.S., is substantially... granting waivers of certain ``Buy American'' restrictions in U.S. law or practice for products offered for...). Some of the components from Malaysia include the following: drawers, panels, drawer frame pieces,...

  1. Think twice – Diagnostic delay in a patient with acute chest pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Caecilie Larsen; Porsbjerg, Celeste

    2016-01-01

    Heart involvement is the most critical and potentially lethal systemic manifestation in eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA). We present a case of acute chest pain in a 58-year-old male with severe asthma, which regressed after sublingual administration of nitroglycerine. At the t...

  2. What did we learn from two decades of chest computed tomography in cystic fibrosis?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiddens, Harm A.W.M. [Erasmus MC-Sophia Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Pulmonology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus MC, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Rosenow, Tim [Erasmus MC-Sophia Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Pulmonology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); The University of Western Australia, Telethon Institute for Child Health Research, Perth (Australia); The University of Western Australia, School of Paediatrics and Child Health Research, Perth (Australia)

    2014-12-15

    Despite our current treatment, many cystic fibrosis (CF) patients still show progressive bronchiectasis and small airways disease. Adequate detection and monitoring of progression of these structural abnormalities is needed to personalize treatment to the severity of CF lung disease of the patient. Chest computed tomography (CT) is the gold standard to diagnose and monitor bronchiectasis. Many studies have been done to validate the role of chest CT in CF and to improve the protocols. From these studies it became clear that for correct interpretation of the severity of bronchiectasis and small airways disease standardization of lung volume for the inspiratory and expiratory CT scan acquisition is needed. The risk related to the radiation exposure of a chest CT scan every second year is considered low. Automated and quantitative image analysis systems are developed to improve the reliability and sensitivity of assessments of structural lung changes in CF, particularly in early life. In this paper an overview is given of the lessons learned from two decades of monitoring CF lung disease using chest CT. (orig.)

  3. Automatic coronary calcium scoring in low-dose chest computed tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Isgum, I.; Prokop, M.; Niemeijer, M.; Viergever, M.; Ginneken, B. van

    2012-01-01

    The calcium burden as estimated from non-ECGsynchronized CT exams acquired in screening of heavy smokers has been shown to be a strong predictor of cardiovascular events. We present a method for automatic coronary calcium scoring with low-dose, non-contrast-enhanced, non-ECG-synchronized chest CT. F

  4. Personality : Predictor of neurostimulation outcomes in patients with chest pain and normal coronary arteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, J; DeJongste, MJL; Versteegen, GJ; Durenkamp, A; Staal, MJ

    2006-01-01

    Objectives. To study the impact of personality traits on the effect of neurostimulation in patients with chest pain and normal coronary arteries. Materials and Methods. Using the Dutch personality questionnaire, we retrospectively studied the personality traits in 33 patients treated with neurostimu

  5. The low therapeutic efficacy of postoperative chest radiographs for surgical intensive care unit patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Kröner; E. van Iperen; J. Horn; J.M. Binnekade; P.E. Spronk; J. Stoker; M.J. Schultz

    2011-01-01

    Background. The clinical value of postoperative chest radiographs (CXRs) for surgical intensive care unit (ICU) patients is largely unknown. In the present study, we determined the diagnostic and therapeutic efficacy of postoperative CXRs for different surgical subgroups and related their efficacy t

  6. Association of Aortic Calcification on Plain Chest Radiography with Obstructive Coronary Artery Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Yeong Han; Chang, Jeong Ho [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Daegu Catholic University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jong Sam [Dept. of Radiologic Tecnology, Daegu Health College, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-03-15

    This study was conducted to determine an association between aortic calcification viewed on plain chest radiography and obstructive coronary artery disease. Retrospective review of all chest radiography obtained from consecutive patients undergoing coronary angiography. Chest PA images were reviewed by technical radiologist and radiologist. Considering the presence of aortic arch calcification, images were compared with the results of coronary angiography. In addition, the size of aortic arch calcification were divided into two groups - the smaller and the larger than 10 mm. Among the total 846 patients, the number of the patients with obstructive coronary artery disease is total 417 (88.3%) in males and 312 (83.4%) in females. Considering the presence of aortic arch calcification, the positive predictive value of relation between aortic arch calcification and obstructive coronary artery disease was 91.4% and the relative risk of the group with aortic arch calcification to the opposite group was 1.10. According to the size of aortic arch calcification and obstructive coronary artery disease, the positive predictive value was 91.9% and the relative risk between two groups was 1.04. This study shows that aortic calcification was closely associated with obstructive coronary artery disease. If the aortic calcification is notified on plain chest radiography, we strongly recommend to consult with doctor.

  7. An improved automatic computer aided tube detection and labeling system on chest radiographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishna, Bharath; Brown, Matthew; Goldin, Jonathan; Cagnon, Christopher; Enzmann, Dieter

    2012-03-01

    Tubes like Endotracheal (ET) tube used to maintain patient's airway and the Nasogastric (NG) tube used to feed the patient and drain contents of the stomach are very commonly used in Intensive Care Units (ICU). The placement of these tubes is critical for their proper functioning and improper tube placement can even be fatal. Bedside chest radiographs are considered the quickest and safest method to check the placement of these tubes. Tertiary ICU's typically generate over 250 chest radiographs per day to confirm tube placement. This paper develops a new fully automatic prototype computer-aided detection (CAD) system for tube detection on bedside chest radiographs. The core of the CAD system is the randomized algorithm which selects tubes based on their average repeatability from seed points. The CAD algorithm is designed as a 5 stage process: Preprocessing (removing borders, histogram equalization, anisotropic filtering), Anatomy Segmentation (to identify neck, esophagus, abdomen ROI's), Seed Generation, Region Growing and Tube Selection. The preliminary evaluation was carried out on 64 cases. The prototype CAD system was able to detect ET tubes with a True Positive Rate of 0.93 and False Positive Rate of 0.02/image and NG tubes with a True Positive Rate of 0.84 and False Positive Rate of 0.02/image respectively. The results from the prototype system show that it is feasible to automatically detect both tubes on chest radiographs, with the potential to significantly speed the delivery of imaging services while maintaining high accuracy.

  8. Morganella morganii causing abscess over the anterior chest wall- a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D, Vijaya; Jv, Sathish; Mk, Yashaswini; S, Sulaiman

    2014-09-01

    A 17-year-old female college student presented with recurrent abscess over the anterior chest wall since one and half year. Morganella morganii was isolated from the aspirated pus. Patient was started on oral ciprofloxacin and the lesion resolved in two weeks.

  9. Urgent resection of bleeding congenital mesenchymal chest wall hamartoma in an infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bieda, Jan-Christoph

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We report a case with prenatally diagnosed large cystic-solid mesenchymal chest wall hamartoma. An attempt of conservative management was made however repeated intralesional hemorrhage led to enlargement and severe anemia which required urgent resection at the age of 8 weeks. The infant had an unimpaired development over a follow-up of 4 years.

  10. Chest HRCT findings in acute transformation of adult T-cell lymphoma/leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Fumito; Sato, Haruka; Omeri, Ahmad Khalid; Ono, Asami; Tokuyama, Kouhei; Ando, Yumiko; Matsumoto, Akira; Mori, Hiromu [Oita University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Yufu, Oita (Japan); Ogata, Masao; Kohno, Kazuhiro; Takano, Kuniko [Oita University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Oncology and Hematology, Yufu, Oita (Japan)

    2015-06-01

    To assess chest high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) findings in patients with acute transformation of adult T cell leukaemia/lymphoma (ATLL). We retrospectively identified 72 consecutive patients at our institution with ATLL between October 2000 and March 2014. The cases included acute type (n = 20), lymphoma type (n = 21), smouldering type (n = 24) and chronic type (n = 7). Sixteen (7 men, 9 women; aged 36-85 years, mean 63.3 years) of 31 patients (24 with smouldering and seven with chronic type; 51.6 %) developed acute transformation of ATLL, and had undergone chest HRCT examinations. Parenchymal abnormalities, enlarged lymph nodes, pericardial effusion, pleural effusion and skin lesions were evaluated on HRCT. Chest HRCT of 15 of the 16 patients showed abnormal findings, including ground-glass opacity (GGO) (n = 8), consolidation (n = 5), interlobular septal thickening (n = 5) and nodules (n = 5). Pleural effusion was found in five patients, lymph node enlargement in 10 patients and multiple skin thickening in two patients. Almost all patients with acute transformation of ATLL had abnormal findings on chest HRCT, which consisted mainly of lymph node enlargement, GGO, interlobular septal thickening, nodules and bilateral pleural effusions. (orig.)

  11. Diaphragm motion characterization using chest motion data for biomechanics-based lung tumor tracking during EBRT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karami, Elham; Gaede, Stewart; Lee, Ting-Yim; Samani, Abbas

    2016-03-01

    Despite recent advances in image-guided interventions, lung cancer External Beam Radiation Therapy (EBRT) is still very challenging due to respiration induced tumor motion. Among various proposed methods of tumor motion compensation, real-time tumor tracking is known to be one of the most effective solutions as it allows for maximum normal tissue sparing, less overall radiation exposure and a shorter treatment session. As such, we propose a biomechanics-based real-time tumor tracking method for effective lung cancer radiotherapy. In the proposed algorithm, the required boundary conditions for the lung Finite Element model, including diaphragm motion, are obtained using the chest surface motion as a surrogate signal. The primary objective of this paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of developing a function which is capable of inputting the chest surface motion data and outputting the diaphragm motion in real-time. For this purpose, after quantifying the diaphragm motion with a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) model, correlation coefficient between the model parameters of diaphragm motion and chest motion data was obtained through Partial Least Squares Regression (PLSR). Preliminary results obtained in this study indicate that the PCA coefficients representing the diaphragm motion can be obtained through chest surface motion tracking with high accuracy.

  12. Evaluation of the image quality of chest CT scans: a phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins N, P. I.; Prata M, A., E-mail: priscillainglid@gmail.com [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais, Centro de Engenharia Biomedica, Av. Amazonas 5253, 30421-169 Nova Suica, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2016-10-15

    Computed tomography (CT) is considered one of the most important methods of medical imaging employed nowadays, due to its non-invasiveness and the high quality of the images it is able to generate. However, the diagnostic radiation dose received by an individual over the year often exceeds the dose received on account of background radiation. Therefore, it is important to know and to control the dose distribution in the patient by varying the image acquisition parameters. The aim of this study is to evaluate the variation of the image quality of chest CT scans performed by two phantoms. In this paper, a cylindrical Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA) chest phantom was used and a second PMMA phantom has been developed with the same volume but an oblong shape, based on the actual dimensions of a male human thorax, in the axillary region. Ten-centimeter scans of the central area of each phantom were performed by a 16-channel Toshiba CT scanner, model Alexion. The scanning protocol employed was the radiology service protocol for chest scans. The noise survey was conducted within the image of the center slice, in five regions: one central and four peripheral areas close to the edge of the object (anterior, posterior, left and right). The recorded values showed that the oblong phantom, with a shape that is more similar to the actual human chest, has a considerably smaller noise, especially in the anterior, posterior and central regions. (Author)

  13. Chest associated to motor physiotherapy improves cardiovascular variables in newborns with respiratory distress syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background We aimed to evaluate the effects of chest and motor physiotherapy treatment on hemodynamic variables in preterm newborns with respiratory distress syndrome. Methods We evaluated heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), systolic (SAP), mean (MAP) and diastolic arterial pressure (DAP), temperature and oxygen saturation (SO2%) in 44 newborns with re...

  14. Salivary gland choristoma (heterotopic salivary gland tissue) on the anterior chest wall of a newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aby, Janelle L; Patel, Mayha; Sundram, Uma; Benjamin, Latanya T

    2014-01-01

    Salivary gland choristoma (heterotopic salivary gland tissue) is a rare condition typically seen in the newborn period. This developmental heterotopia is generally nonprogressive, with little risk of malignant transformation. We present the second known reported case of a salivary gland choristoma located on the anterior chest wall. Knowledge of this rare entity will allow for accurate diagnosis and management of this benign anatomic variant.

  15. Cost-effectiveness of chiropractic care versus self-management in patients with musculoskeletal chest pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen; Sørensen, Jan; Vach, Werner;

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: To assess whether primary sector healthcare in the form of chiropractic care is cost-effective compared with self-management in patients with musculoskeletal chest pain, that is, a subgroup of patients with non-specific chest pain. METHODS AND RESULTS: 115 adults aged 18-75 years with acute......, non-specific chest pain of musculoskeletal origin were recruited from a cardiology department in Denmark. After ruling out acute coronary syndrome and receiving usual care, patients with musculoskeletal chest pain were randomised to 4 weeks of community-based chiropractic care (n=59) or to a single......-dimension questionnaire (EQ-5D) and Short Form 36-item Health Survey (SF-36)) were compared in cost-effectiveness analyses over 12 months from baseline. Mean costs were €2183 lower for the group with chiropractic care, but not statistically significant (95% CI -4410.5 to 43.0). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio...

  16. Fully automatic lung segmentation and rib suppression methods to improve nodule detection in chest radiographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleymanpour, Elaheh; Pourreza, Hamid Reza; Ansaripour, Emad; Yazdi, Mehri Sadooghi

    2011-07-01

    Computer-aided Diagnosis (CAD) systems can assist radiologists in several diagnostic tasks. Lung segmentation is one of the mandatory steps for initial detection of lung cancer in Posterior-Anterior chest radiographs. On the other hand, many CAD schemes in projection chest radiography may benefit from the suppression of the bony structures that overlay the lung fields, e.g. ribs. The original images are enhanced by an adaptive contrast equalization and non-linear filtering. Then an initial estimation of lung area is obtained based on morphological operations and then it is improved by growing this region to find the accurate final contour, then for rib suppression, we use oriented spatial Gabor filter. The proposed method was tested on a publicly available database of 247 chest radiographs. Results show that this method outperformed greatly with accuracy of 96.25% for lung segmentation, also we will show improving the conspicuity of lung nodules by rib suppression with local nodule contrast measures. Because there is no additional radiation exposure or specialized equipment required, it could also be applied to bedside portable chest x-rays. In addition to simplicity of these fully automatic methods, lung segmentation and rib suppression algorithms are performed accurately with low computation time and robustness to noise because of the suitable enhancement procedure.

  17. Severe chest pain in a pediatric ulcerative colitis patient after 5-aminosalicylic acid therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Severe reactions to mesalamine products are rarely seen in pediatric patients. We report a case of a 12-year-old boy who had a severe cardiac reaction to a mesalamine product Asacol. Past medical history is significant for ulcerative colitis (UC) diagnosed at 9 years of age. Colo- noscopy one week prior to admission revealed pancoli- tis. He was treated with Asacol 800 mg three times per day and prednisone 20 mg/d. He was subsequently ad- mitted to the hospital for an exacerbation of his UC and started on intravenous solumedrol. He had improvement of his abdominal pain and diarrhea. The patient com- plained of new onset of chest pain upon initiating Asacol therapy. Electrocardiogram (ECG) revealed non-specific ST-T wave changes with T-wave inversion in the lateral leads. Echocardiogram (ECHO) revealed low-normal to mildly depressed left ventricular systolic function. The left main coronary artery and left anterior descending artery were mildly prominent measuring 5 mm and 4.7 mm, respectively. His chest pain completely resolved within 24-36 h of discontinuing Asacol. A repeat echo- cardiogram performed two days later revealed normal left ventricular function with normal coronary arteries (< 3.5 mm). Onset of chest pain after Asacol and im- mediate improvement of chest pain, as well as improve- ment of echocardiogram and ECG findings after discon- tinuing Asacol suggests that our patient suffered from a rare drug-hypersensitivity reaction to Asacol.

  18. Chest wall thickness may limit adequate drainage of tension pneumothorax by needle thoracocentesis.

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    Tension pneumothorax in a large man was inadequately drained by needle thoracocentesis with a 4.5 cm cannula. Unsuccessful needle thoracocentesis of a clinical tension pneumothorax in a large patient should be followed immediately by chest drain insertion, without local anaesthetic, as dictated by clinical urgency. If the clinical situation is still not improved other diagnoses should be considered.

  19. Urgent resection of bleeding congenital mesenchymal chest wall hamartoma in an infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieda, Jan-Christoph; Tröbs, Ralf-Bodo; Roll, Claudia; Wunsch, Rainer; Neid, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    We report a case with prenatally diagnosed large cystic-solid mesenchymal chest wall hamartoma. An attempt of conservative management was made however repeated intralesional hemorrhage led to enlargement and severe anemia which required urgent resection at the age of 8 weeks. The infant had an unimpaired development over a follow-up of 4 years.

  20. Reporting instructions significantly impact false positive rates when reading chest radiographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, John W.; Brennan, Patrick C.; Mello-Thoms, Claudia; Lewis, Sarah J. [The University of Sydney, Medical Image Optimisation and Perception Group, Discipline of Medical Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Lidcombe, NSW (Australia)

    2016-10-15

    To determine the impact of specific reporting tasks on the performance of radiologists when reading chest radiographs. Ten experienced radiologists read a set of 40 postero-anterior (PA) chest radiographs: 21 nodule free and 19 with a proven solitary nodule. There were two reporting conditions: an unframed task (UFT) to report any abnormality and a framed task (FT) reporting only lung nodule/s. Jackknife free-response operating characteristic (JAFROC) figure of merit (FOM), specificity, location sensitivity and number of true positive (TP), false positive (FP), true negative (TN) and false negative (FN) decisions were used for analysis. JAFROC FOM for tasks showed a significant reduction in performance for framed tasks (P = 0.006) and an associated decrease in specificity (P = 0.011) but no alteration to the location sensitivity score. There was a significant increase in number of FP decisions made during framed versus unframed tasks for nodule-containing (P = 0.005) and nodule-free (P = 0.011) chest radiographs. No significant differences in TP were recorded. Radiologists report more FP decisions when given specific reporting instructions to search for nodules on chest radiographs. The relevance of clinical history supplied to radiologists is called into question and may induce a negative effect. (orig.)

  1. Long-Term Clinical Impact of Coronary CT Angiography in Patients With Recent Acute-Onset Chest Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde, Jesper J; Hove, Jens D; Sørgaard, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    was a composite of cardiac death, myocardial infarction (MI), hospitalization for unstable angina pectoris (UAP), late symptom-driven revascularizations, and readmission for chest pain. RESULTS: We randomized 299 patients to coronary CTA-guided strategy and 301 to standard care. After inclusion, 24 patients......OBJECTIVES: The aim of the CATCH (CArdiac cT in the treatment of acute CHest pain) trial was to investigate the long-term clinical impact of a coronary computed tomographic angiography (CTA)-guided treatment strategy in patients with recent acute-onset chest pain compared to standard care....... BACKGROUND: The prognostic implications of a coronary CTA-guided treatment strategy have not been compared in a randomized fashion to standard care in patients referred for acute-onset chest pain. METHODS: Patients with acute chest pain but normal electrocardiograms and troponin values were randomized...

  2. Neonatal chest wall suspension splint: a novel and noninvasive method for support of lung volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Thomas L; Palmer, Charles; Shaffer, Thomas H; Wolfson, Marla R

    2005-06-01

    Surfactant and musculoskeletal immaturity results in lower compliance of the lung relative to the chest wall, with clinical manifestations of low lung volume, marked chest wall retractions (CWR), and thoracoabdominal asynchrony. Inspiratory efforts are dissipated on distorting the chest wall inward rather than recruiting lung volumes. The current study tests the hypothesis that a novel neonatal chest wall suspension splint (SP), designed to provide stability to the compliant chest wall, would reduce inspiratory chest wall retractions and improve lung volumes. Nine preterm infants (29 +/- 1 SE weeks of gestation; 1.59 +/- 0.27 SE kg study weight) were studied at 16 +/- 5 SE days of life at baseline (BL) and following application of the front plate (FP) and the full SP (Hug n Snug Neonatal Chest Splint, Respironics, Inc.). Phase angle of thoracoabdominal motion, CWR, functional residual capacity (FRC), and pulmonary function were evaluated during spontaneous breathing. Compared to BL, there was a significant decrease in anterior CWR (2.21 +/- 0.91 SE vs. 0.25 +/- 0.09 SE mm; P < 0.05), an increase in FRC (16.6 +/- 2.8 SE vs. 27.8 +/- 5.5 SE ml/kg; P < 0.05) and tidal volume (4.8 +/- 1.5 SE vs. 7.3 +/- 1.4 SE ml/kg; P < 0.05), minimal effect on pulmonary compliance (1.98 +/- 0.50 SE vs. 1.72 +/- 0.30 SE ml/cmH2O/kg), and a trend for a decrease in phase angle (128.4 +/- 10.9 SE vs. 111.8 +/- 19.3 SE) with the application of the splint. FRC correlated inversely with severity of CWR across all conditions (P < 0.05, r = -0.68). Phase angle was directly correlated to anterior CWR (r = 0.72; P < 0.05) and correlated inversely with FRC (P < 0.005; r = -0.56). We speculate that by improving CW stability, the use of this splint may reduce the energetic requirements of breathing and, potentially, the need for more invasive ventilatory support in the neonate.

  3. A Simulation-based Randomized Controlled Study of Factors Influencing Chest Compression Depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsey P. Mayrand

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Current resuscitation guidelines emphasize a systems approach with a strong emphasis on quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR. Despite the American Heart Association (AHA emphasis on quality CPR for over 10 years, resuscitation teams do not consistently meet recommended CPR standards. The objective is to assess the impact on chest compression depth of factors including bed height, step stool utilization, position of the rescuer’s arms and shoulders relative to the point of chest compression, and rescuer characteristics including height, weight, and gender. Methods: Fifty-six eligible subjects, including physician assistant students and first-year emergency medicine residents, were enrolled and randomized to intervention (bed lowered and step stool readily available and control (bed raised and step stool accessible, but concealed groups. We instructed all subjects to complete all interventions on a high-fidelity mannequin per AHA guidelines. Secondary end points included subject arm angle, height, weight group, and gender. Results: Using an intention to treat analysis, the mean compression depths for the intervention and control groups were not significantly different. Subjects positioning their arms at a 90-degree angle relative to the sagittal plane of the mannequin’s chest achieved a mean compression depth significantly greater than those compressing at an angle less than 90 degrees. There was a significant correlation between using a step stool and achieving the correct shoulder position. Subject height, weight group, and gender were all independently associated with compression depth. Conclusion: Rescuer arm position relative to the patient’s chest and step stool utilization during CPR are modifiable factors facilitating improved chest compression depth.

  4. Computer-aided Detection Fidelity of Pulmonary Nodules in Chest Radiograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellios, Nikolaos; Teichgraeber, Ulf; Chelaru, Robert; Malich, Ansgar; Papageorgiou, Ismini E

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The most ubiquitous chest diagnostic method is the chest radiograph. A common radiographic finding, quite often incidental, is the nodular pulmonary lesion. The detection of small lesions out of complex parenchymal structure is a daily clinical challenge. In this study, we investigate the efficacy of the computer-aided detection (CAD) software package SoftView™ 2.4A for bone suppression and OnGuard™ 5.2 (Riverain Technologies, Miamisburg, OH, USA) for automated detection of pulmonary nodules in chest radiographs. Subjects and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated a dataset of 100 posteroanterior chest radiographs with pulmonary nodular lesions ranging from 5 to 85 mm. All nodules were confirmed with a consecutive computed tomography scan and histologically classified as 75% malignant. The number of detected lesions by observation in unprocessed images was compared to the number and dignity of CAD-detected lesions in bone-suppressed images (BSIs). Results: SoftView™ BSI does not affect the objective lesion-to-background contrast. OnGuard™ has a stand-alone sensitivity of 62% and specificity of 58% for nodular lesion detection in chest radiographs. The false positive rate is 0.88/image and the false negative (FN) rate is 0.35/image. From the true positive lesions, 20% were proven benign and 80% were malignant. FN lesions were 47% benign and 53% malignant. Conclusion: We conclude that CAD does not qualify for a stand-alone standard of diagnosis. The use of CAD accompanied with a critical radiological assessment of the software suggested pattern appears more realistic. Accordingly, it is essential to focus on studies assessing the quality-time-cost profile of real-time (as opposed to retrospective) CAD implementation in clinical diagnostics.

  5. Effect of multimodality chest physiotherapy in prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia: A randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pattanshetty Renu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite remarkable progress that has been achieved in the recent years in the diagnosis, prevention, and therapy for ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP, this disease continues to create complication during the course of treatment in a significant proportion of patients while receiving mechanical ventilation. Objective: This study was designed to evaluate the effect of multimodality chest physiotherapy in intubated and mechanically ventilated patients undergoing treatment in the intensive care units (ICUs for prevention of VAP. Patients and Methods: A total of 101 adult intubated and mechanically ventilated patients were included in this study. Manual hyperinflation (MH and suctioning were administered to patients in the control group (n = 51, and positioning and chest wall vibrations in addition to MH plus suctioning (multimodality chest physiotherapy were administered to patients in the study group (n = 50 till they were extubated. Both the groups were subjected to treatment twice a day. Standard care in the form of routine nursing care, pharmacological therapy, inhalation therapy, as advised by the concerned physician/surgeon was strictly implemented throughout the intervention period. Results: Data were analyzed using SPSS window version 9.0. The Clinical Pulmonary infection Score (CPIS Score showed significant decrease at the end of extubation/successful outcome or discharge in both the groups (P = 0.00. In addition, significant decrease in mortality rate was noted in the study group (24% as compared to the control group (49% (P = 0.007. Conclusions: It was observed in this study that twice-daily multimodality chest physiotherapy was associated with a significant decrease in the CPIS Scores in the study group as compared to the control group suggesting a decrease in the occurrence of VAP. There was also a significant reduction in the mortality rates with the use of multimodality chest physiotherapy in mechanically ventilated

  6. Gender bias revisited: new insights on the differential management of chest pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karatolios Konstantinos

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chest pain is a common complaint and reason for consultation in primary care. Few data exist from a primary care setting whether male patients are treated differently than female patients. We examined whether there are gender differences in general physicians' (GPs initial assessment and subsequent management of patients with chest pain, and how these differences can be explained Methods We conducted a prospective study with 1212 consecutive chest pain patients. The study was conducted in 74 primary care offices in Germany from October 2005 to July 2006. After a follow up period of 6 months, an independent interdisciplinary reference panel reviewed clinical data of every patient and decided about the etiology of chest pain at the time of patient recruitment (delayed type-reference standard. We adjusted gender differences of six process indicators for different models. Results GPs tended to assume that CHD is the cause of chest pain more often in male patients and referred more men for an exercise test (women 4.1%, men 7.3%, p = 0.02 and to the hospital (women 2.9%, men 6.6%, p Conclusions While observed gender differences can not be explained by differences in age, CHD prevalence, and underlying risk factors, the less typical symptom presentation in women might be an underlying factor. However this does not seem to result in suboptimal management in women but rather in overuse of services for men. We consider our conclusions rather hypothesis generating and larger studies will be necessary to prove our proposed model.

  7. Evaluation of anterior chest wall implanted port: technical aspects, results, and complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Young Hwan; Oh, Joo Hyeong; Yoon, Yup; Kim, Si Young [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-07-01

    To evaluate the technical aspects, results and complications of patients with implanted anterior chest wall port. Between April 1997 and June 1999, a total of 63 implanted ports were placed at the anterior chest wall of 63 consecutive patients by interventional radiologists. The indications were chemotherapy in 61 patients and total parenteral nutrition in two. The peripheral portion of the subclavian vein was punctured under fluoroscopic guidance via ipsilateral peripheral vein during venography. A central venous catheter was placed in the superior vena cava, and using the subcutaneous tunneling method, a connected infusion port was implanted at the anterior chest wall. Results and complications were reviewed, and by means of Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, the expected patency of the port was determined. The technical success rate for implanted port at the anterior chest wall was 100% (63/63 patients). In two patients, hematoma and oozing were treated by compression. The duration of port implantation ranged from 12 to 855 (mean, 187) days, and the port patency rate was 305.7{+-}47.6 days. In seven patients (completed chemotherapy (n=3D3), central venous thrombosis (n=3D3) catheter-related infection (n=3D1)), the port was removed. Catheter obstruction occurred in two patients, and in one, the use of urokinase led to successful recanalization. Sixteen patients died of an underlying malignancy, but no catheter-related death was noted. Implantation of an anterior chest wall port is a safe and useful procedure, with long patency, for patients requiring chemotherapy and long-term venous access. (author)

  8. Ruling out coronary heart disease in primary care patients with chest pain: a clinical prediction score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burnand Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chest pain raises concern for the possibility of coronary heart disease. Scoring methods have been developed to identify coronary heart disease in emergency settings, but not in primary care. Methods Data were collected from a multicenter Swiss clinical cohort study including 672 consecutive patients with chest pain, who had visited one of 59 family practitioners' offices. Using delayed diagnosis we derived a prediction rule to rule out coronary heart disease by means of a logistic regression model. Known cardiovascular risk factors, pain characteristics, and physical signs associated with coronary heart disease were explored to develop a clinical score. Patients diagnosed with angina or acute myocardial infarction within the year following their initial visit comprised the coronary heart disease group. Results The coronary heart disease score was derived from eight variables: age, gender, duration of chest pain from 1 to 60 minutes, substernal chest pain location, pain increasing with exertion, absence of tenderness point at palpation, cardiovascular risks factors, and personal history of cardiovascular disease. Area under the receiver operating characteristics curve was of 0.95 with a 95% confidence interval of 0.92; 0.97. From this score, 413 patients were considered as low risk for values of percentile 5 of the coronary heart disease patients. Internal validity was confirmed by bootstrapping. External validation using data from a German cohort (Marburg, n = 774 revealed a receiver operating characteristics curve of 0.75 (95% confidence interval, 0.72; 0.81 with a sensitivity of 85.6% and a specificity of 47.2%. Conclusions This score, based only on history and physical examination, is a complementary tool for ruling out coronary heart disease in primary care patients complaining of chest pain.

  9. An investigation of automatic exposure control calibration for chest imaging with a computed radiography system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, C S; Wood, T J; Avery, G; Balcam, S; Needler, L; Beavis, A W; Saunderson, J R

    2014-05-07

    The purpose of this study was to examine the use of three physical image quality metrics in the calibration of an automatic exposure control (AEC) device for chest radiography with a computed radiography (CR) imaging system. The metrics assessed were signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and mean effective noise equivalent quanta (eNEQm), all measured using a uniform chest phantom. Subsequent calibration curves were derived to ensure each metric was held constant across the tube voltage range. Each curve was assessed for its clinical appropriateness by generating computer simulated chest images with correct detector air kermas for each tube voltage, and grading these against reference images which were reconstructed at detector air kermas correct for the constant detector dose indicator (DDI) curve currently programmed into the AEC device. All simulated chest images contained clinically realistic projected anatomy and anatomical noise and were scored by experienced image evaluators. Constant DDI and CNR curves do not appear to provide optimized performance across the diagnostic energy range. Conversely, constant eNEQm and SNR do appear to provide optimized performance, with the latter being the preferred calibration metric given as it is easier to measure in practice. Medical physicists may use the SNR image quality metric described here when setting up and optimizing AEC devices for chest radiography CR systems with a degree of confidence that resulting clinical image quality will be adequate for the required clinical task. However, this must be done with close cooperation of expert image evaluators, to ensure appropriate levels of detector air kerma.

  10. Chest physiotherapy techniques in neurological intensive care units of India: A survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anup Bhat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Neurological intensive care units (ICUs are a rapidly developing sub-specialty of neurosciences. Chest physiotherapy techniques are of great value in neurological ICUs in preventing, halting, or reversing the impairments caused due to neurological disorder and ICU stay. However, chest physiotherapy techniques should be modified to a greater extent in the neurological ICU as compared with general ICUs. Aim: The aim of this study is to obtain data on current chest physiotherapy practices in neurological ICUs of India. Settings and Design: A tertiary care hospital in Karnataka, India, and cross-sectional survey. Subjects and Methods: A questionnaire was formulated and content validated to assess the current chest physiotherapy practices in neurological ICUs of India. The questionnaire was constructed online and a link was distributed via E-mail to 185 physiotherapists working in neurological ICUs across India. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive statistics. Results: The response rate was 44.3% (n = 82; 31% of the physiotherapists were specialized in cardiorespiratory physiotherapy and 30% were specialized in neurological physiotherapy. Clapping, vibration, postural drainage, aerosol therapy, humidification, and suctioning were used commonly used airway clearance (AC techniques by the majority of physiotherapists. However, devices for AC techniques such as Flutter, Acapella, and standard positive expiratory pressure devices were used less frequently for AC. Techniques such as autogenic drainage and active cycle of breathing technique are also frequently used when appropriate for the patients. Lung expansion therapy techniques such as breathing exercises, incentive spirometry exercises, and positioning, proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation of breathing are used by majority of physiotherapists. Conclusions: Physiotherapists in this study were using conventional chest physiotherapy techniques more frequently in comparison to the

  11. H1N1 influenza infection in children: Frequency, pattern, and outcome of chest radiographic abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, S.-Y. [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J.H., E-mail: jhkate@skku.ed [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Eo, H.; Jeon, T.Y.; Shin, K.E.; Shin, W.S.; Jung, H.N. [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Y.-J. [Department of Pediatrics, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    Aim: To describe the frequency, pattern, and outcome of chest radiographic abnormalities in children with H1N1 influenza infection. Materials and methods: Three hundred and fourteen paediatric patients with confirmed H1N1 influenza infection who underwent chest radiography at presentation at a single institution during the outbreak in 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. Abnormal chest radiographic findings related to acute infection were analysed in terms of frequency, pattern, and distribution. Medical records and follow-up radiographs were also reviewed to assess clinical features and outcomes. Results: Chest lesions suggesting acute infection were identified in 49 (16%) patients (mean age 8.2 years, range approximately 1.8-18.5 years). The most common finding was prominent peribronchial marking (71%), followed by air-space opacity (51%) with or without volume decrease, generalized hyperinflation (24%), and pleural effusion (20%). Other minor findings included pneumomediastinum (n = 2) and a nodule (n = 1). Distributions were bilateral (55%) or unilateral (45%) with frequent involvement of lower (78%), and middle (59%) lung zones. Thirty-nine patients (80%) were hospitalized and six (12%) required mechanical ventilation, followed by recovery. Thirty-one out of the 33 patients that underwent follow-up radiography showed marked resolution of all radiographic abnormalities. Conclusion: The frequency of a chest radiographic abnormality was found to be low in children with H1N1 influenza infection. Although typical radiographic findings of a viral lower respiratory infection were more common, unilateral involvement and air-space opacity were common, often with pleural effusion. Furthermore, pulmonary lesions showed near complete resolution on follow-up radiographs in the majority of patients.

  12. Routinely obtained chest X-rays after elective video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery can be omitted in most patients; a retrospective, observational study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Lars S; Jensen, Katrine; Petersen, René Horsleben;

    2015-01-01

    divided into three groups according to the degree of pulmonary resection. The chest X-rays (obtained anterior-posterior in one plane with the patient in the supine position) were categorized as abnormal if showing pneumothorax >5 cm, possible intra-thoracic bleeding and/or a displaced chest tube. Medical....... Proportions of abnormal chest X-rays were unequally distributed between groups (p pneumothorax >5 cm and one showed a kinked chest...

  13. Reconstrução da parede torácica nos defeitos adquiridos Chest wall reconstruction in acquired defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Vinicius H. de Carvalho

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Acquired chest wall defects present a challenging problem for thoracic surgeons. Many of such defects can be repaired with the use of local and regional musculocutaneous flaps, but larger defects compromising skeletal structure require increasingly sophisticated reconstructive techniques. The following discussion will review the options for repair acquired chest wall defects based in literature. The authors searched the Pubmed (www.pubmed.com and found citations from January 1996 to February 2008. By reading the titles and the abstracts most of the citations were discharged because they focused in congenital chest wall defects or were cases report. However, many papers were found describing the outcome of large series of patients with acquired chest wall deformities. A review of recent literature shows that the repair of chest wall defects with soft tissues, if possible, remains the treatment of choice. Large chest wall defects require skeletal reconstruction to prevent paradoxical respiration. The selection of the most appropriate flap is primary dictated by the location and the size of the defect. It is important to transfer tissue with good vitality, so understanding the vascular supply is imperative. Autogenous grafts have been used in the past for skeletal reconstruction but a combination of synthetic materials with musculocutaneous flaps has been used lately. Based in the literature, the use of prosthetic material in chest wall reconstruction does not significantly increases the risk of wound infection.

  14. COMPARISON OF TWO ANALGESIA TECHNIQUES FOR PAIN MANAGEMENT DURING CHEST TUBE REMOVAL AFTER CARDIAC SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study aims to compare of two analgesia techniques for pain management during chest tube removal (CTR after cardiac surgery. Two groups were compared in terms of pain, sedation levels, and hemodynamic response removal of chest tube. METHODS: The study was designed as a prospective, randomized, double - blinded study. Forty patients who underwent coronary artery bypass graft (CABG surgery were enrolled. In postoperative period intravenous fentanyl 1μg/kg was given five minutes prior to chest tube removal (CTR. Each patient was explained about CTR procedure and VAS scoring charts. The patients were randomized into two groups as study group ( G roup S and control group ( G roup C. All patients received either adrenaline free xylocaine 2% infiltration ( G roup S, 6 ml around each of three chest tube (2 mediastinal + 1 pleural or normal saline 0.9% ( G roup C in double blind manner. Severity of pa in was recorded by asking Visual analogue scale (VAS from the patients. Faces rating scale (FRS, Behavioral rating scale (BRS and Ramsay sedation score (RSS along with hemodynamic data were also recorded, blinding to group at four time intervals; at baseline (T base , 2min ( T2m, 5 min (T5m 10 min (T10mand 20 min (T 20m. after CTR. RESULTS : The demographic characteristics of the patients in both groups were similar. Before chest tubes removal (CTR, all the scores of pain intensity (VAS, pain distress (FRS, BRS and sedation levels (RSS were comparable, but they differ significantly at T2, T5, and T10. However, these scores were comparable at T20. Patients remained alert and comfortable after 20 CTR regardless of which group they were assigned . CONCLUSION : Intravenous fentanyl 1μg/kg along with local infiltration of 2% xylocaine can substa ntially reduce pain and better regime than Intravenous fentanyl 1μg/kg alone during chest tube removal in post - coronary artery bypass graft surgery patients. Both techniques are equally safe in terms

  15. The transverse diameter of the chest on routine radiographs reliably estimates gestational age and weight in premature infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietz, Kelly R. [University of Minnesota, Department of Radiology, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Zhang, Lei [University of Minnesota, Biostatistical Design and Analysis Center, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Seidel, Frank G. [Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Prior to digital radiography it was possible for a radiologist to easily estimate the size of a patient on an analog film. Because variable magnification may be applied at the time of processing an image, it is now more difficult to visually estimate an infant's size on the monitor. Since gestational age and weight significantly impact the differential diagnosis of neonatal diseases and determine the expected size of kidneys or appearance of the brain by MRI or US, this information is useful to a pediatric radiologist. Although this information may be present in the electronic medical record, it is frequently not readily available to the pediatric radiologist at the time of image interpretation. To determine if there was a correlation between gestational age and weight of a premature infant with their transverse chest diameter (rib to rib) on admission chest radiographs. This retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board, which waived informed consent. The maximum transverse chest diameter outer rib to outer rib was measured on admission portable chest radiographs of 464 patients admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) during the 2010 calendar year. Regression analysis was used to investigate the association between chest diameter and gestational age/birth weight. Quadratic term of chest diameter was used in the regression model. Chest diameter was statistically significantly associated with both gestational age (P < 0.0001) and birth weight (P < 0.0001). An infant's gestational age and birth weight can be reliably estimated by comparing a simple measurement of the transverse chest diameter on digital chest radiograph with the tables and graphs in our study. (orig.)

  16. Reduce chest pain using modified silicone fluted drain tube for chest drainage after video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) lung resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Hu, Bin; Miao, Jinbai

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility, efficacy and safety of a modified silicone fluted drain tube after video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) lung resection. Methods The prospective randomized study included 50 patients who underwent VATS lung resection between March 2015 and June 2015. Eligible patients were randomized into two groups: experimental group (using the silicone fluted drain tubes for chest drainage) and control group (using standard drain tubes for chest drainage). The volume and characteristics of drainage, postoperative (PO) pain scores and hospital stay were recorded. All patients received standard care during hospital admission. Results In accordance with the exit criteria, three patients were excluded from study. The remaining 47 patients included in the final analysis were divided into two groups: experiment group (N=24) and control group (N=23). There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of age, sex, height, weight, clinical diagnosis and type of surgical procedure. There was a trend toward less PO pain in experimental group on postoperative day (POD) 1, with a statistically significant difference. Patients in experimental group had a reduced occurrence of fever [temperature (T) >37.4 °C] compared to the control group. Conclusions The silicone fluted drain tube is feasible and safe and may relieve patient PO pain and reduce occurrence of fever without the added risk of PO complications. PMID:26941976

  17. Comparison of patient specific dose metrics between chest radiography, tomosynthesis, and CT for adult patients of wide ranging body habitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yakun [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Li, Xiang [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Department of Physics, Cleveland State University, Cleveland, Ohio 44115 (United States); Segars, W. Paul [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, and Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Samei, Ehsan, E-mail: samei@duke.edu [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Departments of Physics, Biomedical Engineering, and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Given the radiation concerns inherent to the x-ray modalities, accurately estimating the radiation doses that patients receive during different imaging modalities is crucial. This study estimated organ doses, effective doses, and risk indices for the three clinical chest x-ray imaging techniques (chest radiography, tomosynthesis, and CT) using 59 anatomically variable voxelized phantoms and Monte Carlo simulation methods. Methods: A total of 59 computational anthropomorphic male and female extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) adult phantoms were used in this study. Organ doses and effective doses were estimated for a clinical radiography system with the capability of conducting chest radiography and tomosynthesis (Definium 8000, VolumeRAD, GE Healthcare) and a clinical CT system (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare). A Monte Carlo dose simulation program (PENELOPE, version 2006, Universitat de Barcelona, Spain) was used to mimic these two clinical systems. The Duke University (Durham, NC) technique charts were used to determine the clinical techniques for the radiographic modalities. An exponential relationship between CTDI{sub vol} and patient diameter was used to determine the absolute dose values for CT. The simulations of the two clinical systems compute organ and tissue doses, which were then used to calculate effective dose and risk index. The calculation of the two dose metrics used the tissue weighting factors from ICRP Publication 103 and BEIR VII report. Results: The average effective dose of the chest posteroanterior examination was found to be 0.04 mSv, which was 1.3% that of the chest CT examination. The average effective dose of the chest tomosynthesis examination was found to be about ten times that of the chest posteroanterior examination and about 12% that of the chest CT examination. With increasing patient average chest diameter, both the effective dose and risk index for CT increased considerably in an exponential fashion, while these two dose

  18. Chest tubes, lung entrapment, and failure to wean from the ventilator. Report of three patients with quadriplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, W P; Whiteneck, G G; Gerhart, K A

    1994-04-01

    The cases of three patients with traumatic quadriplegia who had been treated with chest tubes are described. Each had been injured at a neurologic level that typically allows weaning from the ventilator, yet none was able to clear refractory atelectasis or become ventilator free. Each underwent surgery during which lung adhesions, entrapment, or deformation at the former chest tube site were identified and corrected. Subsequently, each patient cleared his atelectasis and weaned from the ventilator. These cases suggest the importance of ruling out lung deformity in individuals with ventilator-dependent quadriplegia who have had chest tubes and unexpectedly fail to wean.

  19. Chest ultrasonography in emergency Cesarean delivery in multi-valvular heart disease with pulmonary edema during spinal anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Sukhen; Samanta, Sujay; Ghatak, Tanmoy; Grover, V K

    2014-05-01

    Valvular heart disease in a parturient presenting for Cesarean section is challenging. A 25 year old primigravida parturient with severe mitral stenosis, mild mitral regurgitation, mild aortic regurgitation, and mild pulmonary arterial hypertension required Cesarean delivery after developing pulmonary edema. Low-dose spinal with hyperbaric bupivacine 0.5% 1.8 mL plus 25 μg of fentanyl was used for anesthesia. Chest ultrasonography (US) and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) were used for monitoring purposes. Spinal-induced preload reduction improved the pulmonary edema, as evidenced by chest US. Chest US and TTE helped in fluid management.

  20. The Characteristics and Dynamic Changes of X-Ray Chest Film in 50 Patients with Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马俊义; 李智岗; 赵增毅; 孙武装; 王颖

    2003-01-01

    @@ Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a new acute infectious disease which quickly spreads and develops, resulting in high mortality. Since there lacks any diagnostic method with high specificity and sensitivity, the X-ray chest film becomes an important measure for diagnosis for SARS. Therefore, to understand the characteristics of X-ray chest film in SARS patients and get to know the rule of its dynamic changes is meaningful for SARS diagnosing, treating and prognosing. The characteristics and dynamic changes of chest film in 50 SARS patients in Hebei Province were analysed by the authors and reported as follows.

  1. Chest pain with myocardial ischemia in a child: should we think about coronary slow flow phenomenon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocabaş, Abdullah; Kardelen, Fırat; Akçurin, Gayaz; Ertuğ, Halil

    2013-10-01

    The coronary slow flow phenomenon (CSFP) is an angiographic finding characterized by delayed opacification of epicardial coronary arteries in the absence of stenotic lesion. Herein, we present a 13-year-old boy with recurrent chest pain who was diagnosed with acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction associated with CSFP, which has not been reported previously in the pediatric age group. Coronary angiography revealed only the presence of slow flow in the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery. Myocardial perfusion scintigraphy revealed a reversible perfusion defect in the LAD territory, which regressed partially at rest and showed complete improvement after dipyridamole infusion. All the symptoms, electrocardiogram abnormalities and cardiac markers returned to normal after dipyridamole treatment during the follow-up. We conclude that CSFP should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of chest pain with myocardial ischemia in the pediatric age group.

  2. Recurrent Primary Spontaneous Pneumothorax is Common Following Chest Tube and Conservative Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Winnie Hedevang; Lindahl-Jacobsen, Rune; Katballe, Niels;

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Previous studies on primary spontaneous pneumothorax reported variable recurrence rates, but they were based on heterogeneous patient populations including secondary pneumothorax. We investigated young patients with primary spontaneous pneumothorax exclusively and used a national...... registry to track readmissions and calculate independent predictors of recurrence. METHODS: A prospective cohort study of consecutive young patients who were admitted over a 5-year period with their first episode of primary spontaneous pneumothorax and treated conservatively with a chest tube. Baseline...... characteristics were obtained from questionnaires presented on admittance. All patients were discharged with fully expanded lungs on chest radiography. Patient charts were identified in the national electronic patient registry for detailed information on readmissions due to recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax...

  3. Chest physiotherapy in preterm infants with RDS in the first 24 hours of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raval, D; Yeh, T F; Mora, A; Cuevas, D; Pyati, S; Pildes, R S

    1987-01-01

    To evaluate if chest physiotherapy is beneficial to premature infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) during the first 24 hours of life, 20 infants were randomly assigned to two groups; 10 infants in Group I received routine chest physiotherapy and suction, and 10 infants in Group II received suction only. The birth weight, gestational age, postnatal age, Apgar scores, blood gases, acid-base status, and ventilatory requirements prior to study were comparable between the two groups. There were no significant differences between the groups in the amount of endotracheal secretions removed, the PO2/FIO2 ratio, blood gases, and pH during the study. The incidence of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), Grade I and II intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH), and mortality was comparable. However, five of 10 Group I and zero of 10 Group II infants developed Grade III or IV IVH (P less than 0.05).

  4. CT coronary angiography: new risks for low-risk chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radecki, Ryan Patrick

    2013-10-01

    Widespread conservative management of low-risk chest pain has motivated the development of a rapid triage strategy based on CT coronary angiography (CTCA) in the Emergency Department (ED). Recently, three prominent trials using this technology in the ED setting have presented results in support of its routine use. However, these studies fail to show the incremental prognostic value of CTCA over clinical and biomarker-based risk-stratification strategies, demonstrate additional downstream costs and interventions, and result in multiple harms associated with radio-contrast and radiation exposure. Observing the widespread overdiagnosis of pulmonary embolism following availability of CT pulmonary angiogram as a practice pattern parallel, CTCA use for low-risk chest pain in the ED should be advanced only with caution.

  5. Osteoarthritis of the Manubriosternal Joint: An Uncommon Cause of Chest Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaishya, Raju; Vijay, Vipul; Rai, Bibek K

    2015-11-02

    Osteoarthritis of the manubriosternal joint is a rare cause of chest pain. The diagnosis is difficult, and other serious causes of chest pain have to be ruled out first. We report one case that was treated with fusion of the manubriosternal joint using an iliac crest bone graft with a cervical locking plate and screws with excellent results. Preoperative CT scan images were used to measure the screw length and the drill stop depth. In this case report, we have shown that arthrodesis can be an effective way of treating osteoarthritis of the manubriosternal joint when other measures fail. Furthermore, the use of a cervical locking plate with appropriate and careful preoperative planning affords a safe surgical technique, rapid pain relief, and ultimately, sound and asymptomatic union of the joint.

  6. Fifty years of computer analysis in chest imaging: rule-based, machine learning, deep learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ginneken, Bram

    2017-03-01

    Half a century ago, the term "computer-aided diagnosis" (CAD) was introduced in the scientific literature. Pulmonary imaging, with chest radiography and computed tomography, has always been one of the focus areas in this field. In this study, I describe how machine learning became the dominant technology for tackling CAD in the lungs, generally producing better results than do classical rule-based approaches, and how the field is now rapidly changing: in the last few years, we have seen how even better results can be obtained with deep learning. The key differences among rule-based processing, machine learning, and deep learning are summarized and illustrated for various applications of CAD in the chest.

  7. Segmentation of the central-chest lymph nodes in 3D MDCT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Kongkuo; Higgins, William E

    2011-09-01

    Central-chest lymph nodes play a vital role in lung-cancer staging. The definition of lymph nodes from three-dimensional (3D) multidetector computed-tomography (MDCT) images, however, remains an open problem. We propose two methods for computer-based segmentation of the central-chest lymph nodes from a 3D MDCT scan: the single-section live wire and the single-click live wire. For the single-section live wire, the user first applies the standard live wire to a single two-dimensional (2D) section after which automated analysis completes the segmentation process. The single-click live wire is similar but is almost completely automatic. Ground-truth studies involving human 3D MDCT scans demonstrate the robustness, efficiency, and intra-observer and inter-observer reproducibility of the methods.

  8. [Pulmonary contusion and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) as complications of blunt chest trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalska, Agata; Jurczyk, Agnieszka P; Machała, Waldemar; Szram, Stefan; Berent, Jarosław

    2009-01-01

    Blunt chest traumas are common nowadays due to development of motor transport. They are associated with high mortality rates because of serious injuries of internal organs. The mechanisms of injuries are complex and may cause damages ranging from small ones, such as bruises or abrasions, to life-threatening trauma. Among typical injuries there are rib fractures, sternal fractures, pneumothorax, hemothorax, diaphragm lacerations, pulmonary contusions, cardiac tamponade, cardiac rupture and many others. The authors of the article would like to emphasize the pathophysiology and diagnostic difficulties in such blunt chest trauma complications as pulmonary contusions and acute respiratory distress syndrome, for which no causal treatment is available and only early diagnosis and administration of symptomatic treatment may increase the patients' chances to survive. In Forensic Medicine Department, Medical University of Łódź, an opinion was issued on a case which illustrates the clinical problem.

  9. Immunohistochemical analyses of a case of extralobar pulmonary sequestration with chest pain in an adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Ohtsuki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Computed tomography of a Japanese man in his mid-forties with a complaint of right-side chest pain showed a dome-shaped smooth-surfaced mediastinal mass, which was extirpated. The cut surface was highly hemorrhagic and necrotic and not related to the original pulmonary tissues. Although routine sectioning detected bronchial cartilage, immunohistochemical analyses clearly showed the presence of alveolar type II cells; only the alveolar type II cells located at the periphery of this mass showed positive staining for cytokeratins, thyroid transcription factor 1, surfactant protein A, epithelial membrane antigen and Krebs von den Lungen-6. Thus, these analyses are useful for the detection of pulmonary components, even in severely hemorrhagic and necrotic tissues with marked sequestration. The clinical diagnosis was a rare, adult type of extralobar pulmonary sequestration accompanied by chest pain.

  10. The role of imaging for the surgeon in primary malignant bone tumors of the chest wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocca, M., E-mail: michele.rocca@ior.it [General and Thoracic Surgery, The Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Via Pupilli 1, 40136 Bologna (Italy); Salone, M. [General and Thoracic Surgery, The Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Via Pupilli 1, 40136 Bologna (Italy); Galletti, S. [Ultrasound Unit, The Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Bologna (Italy); Balladelli, A. [Laboratory of Experimental Oncology, The Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Bologna (Italy); Vanel, D. [Research in Imaging Musculo Skeletal Tumors, The Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Bologna (Italy); Briccoli, A. [General and Thoracic Surgery, The Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Via Pupilli 1, 40136 Bologna (Italy)

    2013-12-01

    Primary malignant chest wall tumors are rare. The most frequent primary malignant tumor of the chest wall is chondrosarcoma, less common are primary bone tumors belonging to the Ewing Family Bone Tumors (EFBT), or even rarer are osteosarcomas. They represent a challenging clinical entities for surgeons as the treatment of choice for these neoplasms is surgical resection, excluding EFBT which are normally treated by a multidisciplinary approach. Positive margins after surgical procedure are the principal risk factor of local recurrence, therefore to perform adequate surgery a correct preoperative staging is mandatory. Imaging techniques are used for diagnosis, to determine anatomic site and extension, to perform a guided biopsy, for local and general staging, to evaluate chemotherapy response, to detect the presence of a recurrence. This article will focus on the role of imaging in guiding this often difficult surgery and the different technical possibilities adopted in our department to restore the mechanics of the thoracic cage after wide resections.

  11. Teenager with chest pain and swollen neck: a leave-it-alone condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Pen-Yuan; Wang, Hung-Jung

    2015-07-01

    A 19-year-old boy with shortness of breath and chest pain after strenuous exercise presented to emergency department . On physical examination, the neck and shoulders appeared to be swollen. There was crepitus on skin palpation. Chest X-ray disclosed diffuse subcutaneous emphysema and pneumomediastinum. CT showed additional finding of air in epidural space. The patient was discharged after 2 days of hospitalisation with conservative treatment uneventfully. Pneumorrhachis is usually caused by abrupt increase in intrathoracic pressure in instance of forceful vomiting, cough or asthma attack in an otherwise healthy young adult. It is usually accompanied with pneumomediastinum. The management of epidural pneumatosis should be tailored according to its primary cause. For most patients with pneumorrhachis associated to a spontaneous pneumomediastinum without neurological symptoms, this condition is generally self-limited. For epidural free air of large volume that causes neurological deficits, surgical laminectomy may be indicated.

  12. Pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators, unknown to chest radiography: Review, complications and systematic reading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alandete Germán, Salvador Pascual, E-mail: salaiger@gmail.com; Isarria Vidal, Santiago, E-mail: isarria@comv.es; Domingo Montañana, María Luisa, E-mail: domingo.luimon@gmail.com; De la vía Oraá, Esperanza, E-mail: esviao82@gmail.com; Vilar Samper, José, E-mail: vilarsamper@gmail.com

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: •Radiologists have an important function in the evaluation of these devices. •We revise their radiological appearances and possible complications. •The knowledge in normal aspects and complications is important for radiologist. •To ensure an accurate reading of the chest x-ray, we present a systematic approach. -- Abstract: Chest X-ray is the imaging technique of choice for an initial study of pacemakers and implantable cardio-defibrillators (ICD). Radiologists have an important role in the evaluation of its initial placement and in the assessment during its follow-up. For this reason, it is necessary to know not only the different existing devices and its components but also the reasons of malfunction or possible complications. The purpose of this article is to do a systematic review of the different types of pacemakers and ICD. We review their usual radiological appearances, the possible complications which might take place and its causes of malfunctioning.

  13. [Chest pain with ischemic electrocardiographic changes: mitral valve prolapse in pediatrics. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matamala-Morillo, Miguel Ángel; Rodríguez-González, Moisés; Segado-Arenas, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Chest pain is rare and usually benign in pediatrics. Cardiac etiology is even rarer. However, it is a symptom associated with ischemic heart disease and it imposes great social alarm, even in health care workers. Therefore, it is necessary to know the most common causes of this symptom in children, as well as serious diseases that can cause it, which require prompt medical attention. We report a case of chest pain associated with ischemic electrocardiographic changes in a patient with mitral valve prolapse and MASS phenotype (mitral valve prolapse, aortic root enlargement, and skeletal and skin alterations), we review the mitral valve prolapse and stress the importance of knowing it in the pediatric setting.

  14. Effects of angular range on image quality of chest digital tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Haenghwa; Kim, Ye-seul; Choi, Sunghoon; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Choi, Seungyeon; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2016-03-01

    Chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) is a new 3D imaging technique that can be expected to improve clinical diagnosis over conventional chest radiography. We investigated the effect of the angular range of data acquisition on the image quality using newly developed CDT system. The four different acquisition sets were studied using +/-15°, +/-20°, +/-30°, and +/-35° angular ranges with 21 projection views (PVs). The point spread function (PSF), modulation transfer function (MTF), artifact spread function (ASF), and normalized contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were used to evaluate the image quality. We found that increasing angular ranges improved vertical resolution. The results indicated that there was the opposite relationship of the CNR with angular range for the two tissue types. While CNR for heart tissue increased with increasing angular range, CNR for spine bone decreased. The results showed that the angular range is an important parameter for the CDT exam.

  15. The effect of streptokinase on chest pain in acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, J H; Sørensen, H T; Rasmussen, S E;

    1991-01-01

    Treatment with intravenous streptokinase is known to restore blood flow to the ischaemic myocardium in patients with acute myocardial infarction. However, little is known about its effect on chest pain. In a retrospective cohort study, 76 patients treated with streptokinase were compared to 76...... patients not treated with streptokinase. All patients had acute myocardial infarction and less than 6 h of cardiac symptoms. Patients treated with streptokinase had a significantly lower need for nicomorphine (median 20 mg) than patients not treated with streptokinase (median 41 mg). Correspondingly......, the median duration (3.5 h) of pain was reduced significantly in patients treated with streptokinase compared to patients not treated (24 h). We conclude that intravenous streptokinase given in the acute phase of myocardial infarction is effective in reducing the duration of cardiac chest pain....

  16. Chest pain characteristics and gender in the early diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Garima; Bittner, Vera

    2015-02-01

    Acute myocardial infarction is one of the leading causes of cardiovascular disease mortality in both men and women. Chest pain, which is often described as chest pressure, tightness, or a squeezing sensation, is the most frequent symptom in patients presenting with acute myocardial infarction. Although the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction is often based on typical changes on a surface electrocardiogram and on changes in cardiac biomarkers, there is a need to better recognize and understand the impact of sex on symptoms among patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome or acute myocardial infarction. We briefly review the pathophysiology of ischemic symptoms, discuss potential mechanisms for variation in ischemic symptoms by sex, and summarize recent publications that have addressed sex differences in ischemic symptoms.

  17. Dynamic chest image analysis: model-based pulmonary perfusion analysis with pyramid images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jianming; Haapanen, Arto; Jaervi, Timo; Kiuru, Aaro J.; Kormano, Martti; Svedstrom, Erkki; Virkki, Raimo

    1998-07-01

    The aim of the study 'Dynamic Chest Image Analysis' is to develop computer analysis and visualization methods for showing focal and general abnormalities of lung ventilation and perfusion based on a sequence of digital chest fluoroscopy frames collected at different phases of the respiratory/cardiac cycles in a short period of time. We have proposed a framework for ventilation study with an explicit ventilation model based on pyramid images. In this paper, we extend the framework to pulmonary perfusion study. A perfusion model and the truncated pyramid are introduced. The perfusion model aims at extracting accurate, geographic perfusion parameters, and the truncated pyramid helps in understanding perfusion at multiple resolutions and speeding up the convergence process in optimization. Three cases are included to illustrate the experimental results.

  18. Novel method of lung area extraction in chest perfusion computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalicka, Renata; Lipiński, Seweryn; Browarczyk, Maciej

    2013-02-01

    Chest perfusion computed tomography (pCT) is a useful technique in the medical diagnosis of how organs function. Perfusion CT scans are used to calculate perfusion parameters. In the case of automated methods of lung perfusion parameters calculation, the prior extraction of the lung area is desired to avoid unnecessary calculation in an area outside the lung cross-section and to avoid wasting time on processing signals of no diagnostic importance. Our new method is designed to extract a lung cross-section from a whole series of chest pCT images. It uses a complete sequence of pCT scans to extract the rough lung contour. Next each scan is processed individually, within the rough contour, to obtain a detailed, individual outline of the lungs. The proposed method and obtained results are presented and compared with methods known in literature.

  19. Chest wall granuloma associated with BCG vaccination presenting as hot abscess in an immunocompetent infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Seung; Seo, Kyung Jin; Kim, Jae Jun

    2015-03-04

    Bacillus-Calmette-Gue´rin (BCG) vaccine is a live attenuated vaccine to prevent tuberculosis by cell mediated immune response and is routinely administered early after birth. Although it is considered to be a very safe vaccine, sometimes a variety of complications may develop. Herein we describe a clinically unusual case of chest wall granuloma considered to be induced by BCG, presenting as hot abscess, and developed 7 months after BCG vaccination in an immunocompetent infant. The diagnosis was made based on the history, histopathology and virological studies. We suggest, although very rare, a BCG disease should be considered as a differential diagnosis in case of chest wall abscess, even if this is presenting as a hot abscess and even in immunocompetent infants if their age is related to BCG vaccination complications.

  20. Analgesic efficacy of lidocaine and multimodal analgesia for chest tube removal: A randomized trial study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdecy Ferreira de Oliveira Pinheiro

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to assess the analgesic efficacy of subcutaneous lidocaine and multimodal analgesia for chest tube removal following heart surgery. Methods: sixty volunteers were randomly allocated in two groups; 30 participants in the experimental group were given 1% subcutaneous lidocaine, and 30 controls were given a multimodal analgesia regime comprising systemic anti-inflammatory agents and opioids. The intensity and quality of pain and trait and state anxiety were assessed. The association between independent variables and final outcome was assessed by means of the Chi-squared test with Yates' correction and Fisher's exact test. Results: the groups did not exhibit significant difference with respect to the intensity of pain upon chest tube removal (p= 0.47. The most frequent descriptors of pain reported by the participants were pressing, sharp, pricking, burning and unbearable. Conclusion: the present study suggests that the analgesic effect of the subcutaneous administration of 1% lidocaine combined with multimodal analgesia is most efficacious.

  1. Non-tuberculous mycobacterial lung disease: diagnosis based on computed tomography of the chest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Nakwon; Han, Sung Koo; Yim, Jae-Joon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, 101 Daehak-Ro, Jongno-Gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chang Hyun; Lee, Hyun-Ju [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Young Ae [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Division of Pulmonology, Department of Internal Medicine, Severance Hospital, Institute of Chest Diseases, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Ho [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Seongnam, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    To elucidate the accuracy and inter-observer agreement of non-tuberculous mycobacterial lung disease (NTM-LD) diagnosis based on chest CT findings. Two chest radiologists and two pulmonologists interpreted chest CTs of 66 patients with NTM-LD, 33 with pulmonary tuberculosis and 33 with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis. These observers selected one of these diagnoses for each case without knowing any clinical information except age and sex. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated according to degree of observer confidence. Inter-observer agreement was assessed using Fleiss' κ values. Multiple logistic regression was performed to elucidate which radiological features led to the correct diagnosis. The sensitivity of NTM-LD diagnosis was 56.4 % (95 % CI 47.9-64.7) and specificity 80.3 % (73.1-86.0). The specificity of NTM-LD diagnosis increased with confidence: 44.4 % (20.5-71.3) for possible, 77.4 % (67.4-85.0) for probable, 95.2 % (87.2-98.2) for definite (P < 0.001) diagnoses. Inter-observer agreement for NTM-LD diagnosis was moderate (κ = 0.453). Tree-in-bud pattern (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 6.24, P < 0.001), consolidation (aOR 1.92, P = 0.036) and atelectasis (aOR 3.73, P < 0.001) were associated with correct NTM-LD diagnoses, whereas presence of pleural effusion (aOR 0.05, P < 0.001) led to false diagnoses. NTM-LD diagnosis based on chest CT findings is specific but not sensitive. (orig.)

  2. Alternative diagnoses based on CT angiography of the chest in patients with suspected pulmonary thromboembolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Eleci Vaz; Gazzana, Marcelo Basso; Seligman, Renato; Knorst, Marli Maria, E-mail: mknorst@gmail.com [Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Guerra, Vinicius Andre [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Pneumologicas; Sarmento, Muriel Bossle; Guazzelli, Pedro Arends; Hoffmeister, Mariana Costa [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRS), Porto Alegre (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2016-01-15

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of alternative diagnoses based on chest CT angiography (CTA) in patients with suspected pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) who tested negative for PTE, as well as whether those alternative diagnoses had been considered prior to the CTA. Methods: This was a cross-sectional, retrospective study involving 191 adult patients undergoing CTA for suspected PTE between September of 2009 and May of 2012. Chest X-rays and CTAs were reviewed to determine whether the findings suggested an alternative diagnosis in the cases not diagnosed as PTE. Data on symptoms, risk factors, comorbidities, length of hospital stay, and mortality were collected. Results: On the basis of the CTA findings, PTE was diagnosed in 47 cases (24.6%). Among the 144 patients not diagnosed with PTE via CTA, the findings were abnormal in 120 (83.3%). Such findings were consistent with an alternative diagnosis that explained the symptoms in 75 patients (39.3%). Among those 75 cases, there were only 39 (20.4%) in which the same alterations had not been previously detected on chest X-rays. The most common alternative diagnosis, made solely on the basis of the CTA findings, was pneumonia (identified in 20 cases). Symptoms, risk factors, comorbidities, and the in-hospital mortality rate did not differ significantly between the patients with and without PTE. However, the median hospital stay was significantly longer in the patients with PTE than in those without (18.0 and 9.5 days, respectively; p = 0.001). Conclusions: Our results indicate that chest CTA is useful in cases of suspected PTE, because it can confirm the diagnosis and reveal findings consistent with an alternative diagnosis in a significant number of patients. (author)

  3. Chest X ray changes in severe acute respiratory syndrome cases after discontinuation of glucocorticosteroids treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚婉贞; 陈亚红; 张立强; 王筱宏; 孙永昌; 孙威; 韩江莉; 张福春; 郑亚安; 孙伯章; 贺蓓; 赵鸣武

    2004-01-01

    @@ Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a disease identified in Asia, North America and Europe. The drugs for treatment and prevention of and vaccine for the disease are in research.1,2 There is still no agreement on glucocorticosteroid treatment of SARS. In treatment of SARS patients with glucocorticosteroids, we found 5 cases whose chest X ray changes were different from what the literature reported.

  4. Pharmacological Attenuation of Myocardial Reperfusion Injury in a Closed-Chest Porcine Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekeløf, Sarah; Rosenberg, Jacob; Jensen, Jan Skov;

    2014-01-01

    Myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury is a clinical challenge in interventional cardiology, and at the moment, no pharmacological agent is universally accepted in the prevention. In order to prevent inappropriate clinical trials, a potential pharmacological agent should be proved reproducibly...... effective in clinically relevant experimental studies before initiation of human studies. The closed-chest porcine model is a promising experimental model of ischemia-reperfusion injury. The purpose of this systematic review was to describe the pharmacological treatments evaluated in the closed...

  5. Prospective gated chest tomosynthesis using CNT X-ray source array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Jing; Burk, Laurel; Wu, Gongting; Lee, Yueh Z.; Heath, Michael D.; Wang, Xiaohui; Foos, David; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2015-03-01

    Chest tomosynthesis is a low-dose 3-D imaging modality that has been shown to have comparable sensitivity as CT in detecting lung nodules and other lung pathologies. We have recently demonstrated the feasibility of stationary chest tomosynthesis (s-DCT) using a distributed CNT X-ray source array. The technology allows acquisition of tomographic projections without moving the X-ray source. The electronically controlled CNT x-ray source also enables physiologically gated imaging, which will minimize image blur due to the patient's respiration motion. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of prospective gated chest tomosynthesis using a bench-top s-DCT system with a CNT source array, a high- speed at panel detector and realistic patient respiratory signals captured using a pressure sensor. Tomosynthesis images of inflated pig lungs placed inside an anthropomorphic chest phantom were acquired at different respiration rate, with and without gating for image quality comparison. Metal beads of 2 mm diameter were placed on the pig lung for quantitative measure of the image quality. Without gating, the beads were blurred to 3:75 mm during a 3 s tomosynthesis acquisition. When gated to the end of the inhalation and exhalation phase the detected bead size reduced to 2:25 mm, much closer to the actual bead size. With gating the observed airway edges are sharper and there are more visible structural details in the lung. Our results demonstrated the feasibility of prospective gating in the s-DCT, which substantially reduces image blur associated with lung motion.

  6. Chest CT using spectral filtration: radiation dose, image quality, and spectrum of clinical utility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, Franziska M.; Johnson, Thorsten R.C.; Sommer, Wieland H.; Thierfelder, Kolja M.; Meinel, Felix G. [University Hospital Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2015-06-01

    To determine the radiation dose, image quality, and clinical utility of non-enhanced chest CT with spectral filtration. We retrospectively analysed 25 non-contrast chest CT examinations acquired with spectral filtration (tin-filtered Sn100 kVp spectrum) compared to 25 examinations acquired without spectral filtration (120 kV). Radiation metrics were compared. Image noise was measured. Contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR) and figure-of-merit (FOM) were calculated. Diagnostic confidence for the assessment of various thoracic pathologies was rated by two independent readers. Effective chest diameters were comparable between groups (P = 0.613). In spectral filtration CT, median CTDI{sub vol}, DLP, and size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) were reduced (0.46 vs. 4.3 mGy, 16 vs. 141 mGy*cm, and 0.65 vs. 5.9 mGy, all P < 0.001). Spectral filtration CT had higher image noise (21.3 vs. 13.2 HU, P < 0.001) and lower CNR (47.2 vs. 75.3, P < 0.001), but was more dose-efficient (FOM 10,659 vs. 2,231/mSv, P < 0.001). Diagnostic confidence for parenchymal lung disease and osseous pathologies was lower with spectral filtration CT, but no significant difference was found for pleural pathologies, pulmonary nodules, or pneumonia. Non-contrast chest CT using spectral filtration appears to be sufficient for the assessment of a considerable spectrum of thoracic pathologies, while providing superior dose efficiency, allowing for substantial radiation dose reduction. (orig.)

  7. Chest pain in the emergency room. Importance of a systematic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassan Roberto

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficiency of a systematic diagnostic approach in patients with chest pain in the emergency room in relation to the diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome (ACS and the rate of hospitalization in high-cost units. METHODS: One thousand and three consecutive patients with chest pain were screened according to a pre-established process of diagnostic investigation based on the pre-test probability of ACS determinate by chest pain type and ECG changes. RESULTS: Of the 1003 patients, 224 were immediately discharged home because of no suspicion of ACS (route 5 and 119 were immediately transferred to the coronary care united because of ST elevation or left bundle-branch block (LBBB (route 1 (74% of these had a final diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction [AMI]. Of the 660 patients that remained in the emergency room under observation, 77 (12% had AMI without ST segment elevation and 202 (31% had unstable angina (UA. In route 2 (high probability of ACS 17% of patients had AMI and 43% had UA, whereas in route 3 (low probability 2% had AMI and 7 % had UA. The admission ECG has been confirmed as a poor sensitivity test for the diagnosis of AMI ( 49%, with a positive predictive value considered only satisfactory (79%. CONCLUSION: A systematic diagnostic strategy, as used in this study, is essential in managing patients with chest pain in the emergency room in order to obtain high diagnostic accuracy, lower cost, and optimization of the use of coronary care unit beds.

  8. Acute chest pain fast track at the emergency department: who was misdiagnosed for acute coronary syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prachanukool, Thidathit; Aramvanitch, Kasamon; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak; Sitthichanbuncha, Yuwares

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is a commonly treated disease in the emergency department (ED). Acute chest pain is a common presenting symptom of ACS. Acute chest pain fast track (ACPFT) is a triage to cover patients presenting with chest pain with the aims of early detection and treatment for ACS. This study aimed to assess the quality of the ACPFT with the aim of improving the quality of care for ACS patients. Methods This study was conducted at the ED in Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand. The inclusion criterion was patients presenting with acute chest pain at the ED. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all eligible patients. The primary outcomes of this study were to determine time from door to electrocardiogram and time from door to treatment (coronary angiogram with percutaneous coronary intervention or thrombolytic therapy in the case of ST elevation myocardial infarction). The outcome was compared between those who were in and not in the ACPFT. Results During the study period, there were 616 eligible patients who were divided into ACPFT (n=352 patients; 57.1%) and non-ACPFT (n=264 patients; 42.9%) groups. In the ACPFT group (n=352), 315 patients (89.5%) received an electrocardiogram within 10 minutes. The final diagnosis of ACS was made in 80 patients (22.7%) in the ACPFT group and 13 patients (4.9%) in the non-ACPFT group (P-value <0.01). After adjustment using multivariate logistic regression analysis, only epigastric pain was independently associated with being in the ACPFT group (adjusted odds ratio of 0.11; 95% confidence interval of 0.02, 0.56). Conclusion The ACPFT at the ED facilitated the prompt work-ups and intervention for ACS. PMID:27980438

  9. Throat Infection, Neck and Chest Pain and Cardiac Response: A Persistent Infection-Related Clinical Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changqing ZHOU; Xiangning FU; Jiangtao YAN; Qiao FAN; Zhuoya LI; Katherine Cianflone; Daowen WANG

    2009-01-01

    Dizziness,chest discomfort,chest depression and dyspnea are a group of symptoms that are common complaints in clinical practice. Patients with these symptoms are usually informed that while neurosis consequent to coronary heart disease is excluded nonetheless they remain unhealthy with no rational explanation or treatment. 165 cases of these symptoms and 85 control subjects were reviewed and underwent further medical history inquiry,routine EKG test and cardiac ultrasound examination. Thirty-five patients received coronary artery angiography to exclude coronary heart disease. Serum myocardial autoantibodies against beta1-adrenoceptor,alpha-myosin heavy chain,M2-muscarinie receptor and adenine-nucleotide translocator were tested,and inflammatory cytokines and high sensitivity C-reaction protein were measured and lymphocyte subclass was assayed by flow cytometry. All patients had a complex of four symptoms or tetralogy: (1) persistent throat or upper respiratory tract infection,(2) neck pain,(3) chest pain and (4) chest depression or dyspnea,some of them with anxiety. Anti-myocardial autoantibodies (AMCAs) were present in all patients vs. 8% in and CD4-CD8+ lymphocytes were significantly higher and CD56+ lymphocytes lower in patients than those in controls (P<0.01). The ratio of serum pathogen antibodies positive against Coxsackie virus-B,cytomegalovirus,Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae were all markedly higher in patients. These data led to identification of a persistent respiratory infection-related clinical syndrome,including persistent throat infection,neck spinal lesion,fib cartilage inflammation,symptoms of car-diac depression and dyspnea with or without anxiety.

  10. SU-E-T-437: Dosimetric Assessment of Brass Mesh Bolus for Postmastectomy Chest Wall Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manger, R; Paxton, A; Cervino, L [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: It has been suggested that the use of a brass mesh bolus for chest wall irradiation sufficiently increases surface dose while having little effect on the dose at depth. This work quantified the increase in surface dose when using a brass mesh bolus in postmastectomy chest wall radiotherapy compared to tissue-equivalent bolus and assessed its effect on dose at depth. Methods: Percent depth doses with brass bolus, 5mm tissue-equivalent bolus, and no bolus were determined for a 6 MV photon beam in a solid water phantom using a parallel plate ionization chamber. Gafchromic film was used to determine the surface dose for the same three experimental setups. For comparison to a realistic treatment setup, gafchromic film and OSLDs were used to determine the surface dose over the irradiated area of a 6 MV chest wall plan with tangential beams delivered to a heterogeneous thorax phantom. The plan was generated using a CT of the phantom and delivered using brass mesh bolus, 5mm tissue-equivalent bolus, and no bolus. Results: For the en face beam, the central surface dose increased to 90% of maximum with the tissue-equivalent bolus, but to only 62% of maximum with the brass mesh. Using tangential beams on the thorax phantom, the surface dose increased from 40–72% to 75–110% of prescribed dose, with the brass mesh, and to 85–109% with the tissue-equivalent bolus. At depths beyond dmax in the plastic water phantom, the dose with and without brass mesh bolus differed by less than 0.5%. Conclusion: A brass mesh may be considered as a substitute for tissue-equivalent bolus to increase the superficial dose of 6 MV chest wall tangent plans. The brass mesh does not significantly change the dose at depth, so a non-bolus plan could be used for bolus and non-bolus treatments.

  11. Angina-like chest pain: a joint medical and psychiatric investigation.

    OpenAIRE

    Colgan, S M; Schofield, P.M.; Whorwell, P. J.; Bennett, D.H.; Brooks, N H; Jones, P. E.

    1988-01-01

    Sixty three patients with chest pain typical of angina and who had normal coronary angiograms were investigated for left ventricular, oesophageal and psychiatric abnormalities. An additional 21 patients, age and sex matched, who had angina and significant coronary artery disease were also studied. Eighty six per cent of the 63 patients without evidence of coronary artery disease could be demonstrated to have a physical abnormality (left ventricular dysfunction in 35%, oesophageal disorder 51%...

  12. Analysis of biological tissues in infant chest for the development of an equivalent radiographic phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pina, D. R.; Souza, Rafael T. F.; Duarte, Sergio B.; Alvarez, Matheus; Miranda, Jose R. A. [Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, Departamento de Doencas Tropicais e Diagnostico por Imagem, Universidade Estadual Paulista-UNESP, Distrito de Rubiao Junior S/N, Botucatu, 18618-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Instituto de Biociencias de Botucatu, Departamento de Fisica e Biofisica, Universidade Estadual Paulista-UNESP, Distrito de Rubiao Junior S/N, Botucatu, 18618-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas-CBPF/MCT, Rio de Janeiro 22290-180 (Brazil); Instituto de Biociencias de Botucatu, Departamento de Fisica e Biofisica, Universidade Estadual Paulista-UNESP, Distrito de Rubiao Junior S/N, Botucatu, 18618-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Instituto de Biociencias de Botucatu, Departamento de Fisica e Biofisica, Universidade Estadual Paulista-UNESP, Distrito de Rubiao Junior S/N, Botucatu, 18618-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: The main purpose of the present study was to determine the amounts of different tissues in the chest of the newborn patient (age {<=}1 year), with the aim of developing a homogeneous phantom chest equivalent. This type of phantom is indispensable in the development of optimization procedures for radiographic techniques, including dosimetric control, which is a crucial aspect of pediatric radiology. The authors present a systematic set of procedures, including a computational algorithm, to estimate the amounts of tissues and thicknesses of the corresponding simulator material plates used to construct the phantom. Methods: The Gaussian fit of computed tomographic (CT) analysis was applied to classify and quantify different biological tissues. The methodology is summarized with a computational algorithm, which was used to quantify tissues through automated CT analysis. The thicknesses of the equivalent homogeneous simulator material plates were determined to construct the phantom. Results: A total of 180 retrospective CT examinations with anterior-posterior diameter values ranging 8.5-13.0 cm were examined. The amounts of different tissues were evaluated. The results provided elements to construct a phantom to simulate the infant chest in the posterior-anterior or anterior-posterior (PA/AP) view. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this report represents the first demonstration of an infant chest phantom dedicated to the radiology of children younger than one year. This phantom is a key element in the development of clinical charts for optimizing radiographic technique in pediatric patients. Optimization procedures for nonstandard patients were reported previously [Pina et al., Phys. Med. Biol. 49, N215-N226 (2004) and Pina et al., Appl. Radiat. Isot. 67, 61-69 (2009)]. The constructed phantom represents a starting point to obtain radiologic protocols for the infant patient.

  13. Alternative diagnoses based on CT angiography of the chest in patients with suspected pulmonary thromboembolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Eleci Vaz; Gazzana, Marcelo Basso; Sarmento, Muriel Bossle; Guazzelli, Pedro Arends; Hoffmeister, Mariana Costa; Guerra, Vinicius André; Seligman, Renato; Knorst, Marli Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objective : To determine the prevalence of alternative diagnoses based on chest CT angiography (CTA) in patients with suspected pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) who tested negative for PTE, as well as whether those alternative diagnoses had been considered prior to the CTA. Methods : This was a cross-sectional, retrospective study involving 191 adult patients undergoing CTA for suspected PTE between September of 2009 and May of 2012. Chest X-rays and CTAs were reviewed to determine whether the findings suggested an alternative diagnosis in the cases not diagnosed as PTE. Data on symptoms, risk factors, comorbidities, length of hospital stay, and mortality were collected. Results : On the basis of the CTA findings, PTE was diagnosed in 47 cases (24.6%). Among the 144 patients not diagnosed with PTE via CTA, the findings were abnormal in 120 (83.3%). Such findings were consistent with an alternative diagnosis that explained the symptoms in 75 patients (39.3%). Among those 75 cases, there were only 39 (20.4%) in which the same alterations had not been previously detected on chest X-rays. The most common alternative diagnosis, made solely on the basis of the CTA findings, was pneumonia (identified in 20 cases). Symptoms, risk factors, comorbidities, and the in-hospital mortality rate did not differ significantly between the patients with and without PTE. However, the median hospital stay was significantly longer in the patients with PTE than in those without (18.0 and 9.5 days, respectively; p = 0.001). Conclusions : Our results indicate that chest CTA is useful in cases of suspected PTE, because it can confirm the diagnosis and reveal findings consistent with an alternative diagnosis in a significant number of patients. PMID:26982039

  14. Foreign object detection and removal to improve automated analysis of chest radiographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogeweg, Laurens; Sanchez, Clara I.; Melendez, Jaime; Maduskar, Pragnya; Ginneken, Bram van [Diagnostic Image Analysis Group, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen 6525 GA (Netherlands); Story, Alistair; Hayward, Andrew [University College London, Centre for Infectious Disease Epidemiology, London NW3 2PF (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: Chest radiographs commonly contain projections of foreign objects, such as buttons, brassier clips, jewellery, or pacemakers and wires. The presence of these structures can substantially affect the output of computer analysis of these images. An automated method is presented to detect, segment, and remove foreign objects from chest radiographs.Methods: Detection is performed using supervised pixel classification with a kNN classifier, resulting in a probability estimate per pixel to belong to a projected foreign object. Segmentation is performed by grouping and post-processing pixels with a probability above a certain threshold. Next, the objects are replaced by texture inpainting.Results: The method is evaluated in experiments on 257 chest radiographs. The detection at pixel level is evaluated with receiver operating characteristic analysis on pixels within the unobscured lung fields and an A{sub z} value of 0.949 is achieved. Free response operator characteristic analysis is performed at the object level, and 95.6% of objects are detected with on average 0.25 false positive detections per image. To investigate the effect of removing the detected objects through inpainting, a texture analysis system for tuberculosis detection is applied to images with and without pathology and with and without foreign object removal. Unprocessed, the texture analysis abnormality score of normal images with foreign objects is comparable to those with pathology. After removing foreign objects, the texture score of normal images with and without foreign objects is similar, while abnormal images, whether they contain foreign objects or not, achieve on average higher scores.Conclusions: The authors conclude that removal of foreign objects from chest radiographs is feasible and beneficial for automated image analysis.

  15. A New Variant of Connective Tissue Nevus with Elastorrhexis and Predilection for the Upper Chest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Derek H; Goldbach, Hayley; Wanat, Karolyn A; Rubin, Adam I; Yan, Albert C; Treat, James R

    2015-01-01

    Localized changes in cutaneous elastic tissue often manifest with flesh-colored, hypopigmented, or yellow papules, plaques, and nodules. We present five children with clinically similar cobblestone plaques composed of multiple hypopigmented, nonfollicular, pinpoint papules located unilaterally over the upper chest. All lesions first appeared at birth or during early infancy. No associated extracutaneous abnormalities have been identified. Histopathology was remarkable for many, thick elastic fibers with elastorrhexis. We believe that these cases represent a distinct and unique variant of connective tissue nevi.

  16. Chest Pain of Suspected Cardiac Origin: Current Evidence-based Recommendations for Prehospital Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Brian Savino

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the United States, emergency medical services (EMS protocols vary widely across jurisdictions. We sought to develop evidence-based recommendations for the prehospital evaluation and treatment of chest pain of suspected cardiac origin and to compare these recommendations against the current protocols used by the 33 EMS agencies in the state of California. Methods: We performed a literature review of the current evidence in the prehospital treatment of chest pain and augmented this review with guidelines from various national and international societies to create our evidence-based recommendations. We then compared the chest pain protocols of each of the 33 EMS agencies for consistency with these recommendations. The specific protocol components that we analyzed were use of supplemental oxygen, aspirin, nitrates, opiates, 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG, ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI regionalization systems, prehospital fibrinolysis and β-blockers. Results: The protocols varied widely in terms of medication and dosing choices, as well as listed contraindications to treatments. Every agency uses oxygen with 54% recommending titrated dosing. All agencies use aspirin (64% recommending 325mg, 24% recommending 162mg and 15% recommending either, as well as nitroglycerin and opiates (58% choosing morphine. Prehospital 12- Lead ECGs are used in 97% of agencies, and all but one agency has some form of regionalized care for their STEMI patients. No agency is currently employing prehospital fibrinolysis or β-blocker use. Conclusion: Protocols for chest pain of suspected cardiac origin vary widely across California. The evidence-based recommendations that we present for the prehospital diagnosis and treatment of this condition may be useful for EMS medical directors tasked with creating and revising these protocols.

  17. Investigation of non-uniform airflow signal oscillation during high frequency chest compression

    OpenAIRE

    Lee Jongwon; Lee Yong W; Warwick Warren J; Sohn Kiwon; Holte James E

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background High frequency chest compression (HFCC) is a useful and popular therapy for clearing bronchial airways of excessive or thicker mucus. Our observation of respiratory airflow of a subject during use of HFCC showed the airflow oscillation by HFCC was strongly influenced by the nonlinearity of the respiratory system. We used a computational model-based approach to analyse the respiratory airflow during use of HFCC. Methods The computational model, which is based on previous ph...

  18. X-ray tube current modulation and patient doses in chest CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wenjun; Huda, Walter; Magill, Dennise; Tavrides, Emily; Yao, Hai

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate how patient effective doses vary as a function of X-ray tube projection angle, as well as the patient long axis, and quantify how X-ray tube current modulation affects patient doses in chest CT examinations. Chest examinations were simulated for a gantry CT scanner geometry with projections acquired for a beam width of 4 cm. PCXMC 2.0.1 was used to calculate patient effective doses at 15° intervals around the patient's isocentre, and at nine locations along the patient long axis. Idealised tube current modulation schemes were modelled as a function of the X-ray tube angle and the patient long axis. Tube current modulations were characterised by the modulation amplitude R, which was allowed to vary between 1.5 and 5. Effective dose maxima occur for anteroposterior projections at the location of the (radiosensitive) breasts. The maximum to minimum ratio of effective doses as a function of the patient long axis was 4.9, and as a function of the X-ray tube angle was 2.1. Doubling the value of R reduces effective doses from longitudinal modulation alone by ∼4% and from angular modulation alone by ∼2%. In chest CT, tube current modulation schemes currently have longitudinal R values of ∼2.2, and angular R values that range between 1.5 and 3.4. Current X-ray tube current modulation schemes are expected to reduce patient effective doses in chest CT examinations by ∼10%, with longitudinal modulation accounting for two-thirds and angular modulation for the remaining one-third.

  19. Alternative diagnoses based on CT angiography of the chest in patients with suspected pulmonary thromboembolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleci Vaz Ferreira

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective : To determine the prevalence of alternative diagnoses based on chest CT angiography (CTA in patients with suspected pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE who tested negative for PTE, as well as whether those alternative diagnoses had been considered prior to the CTA. Methods : This was a cross-sectional, retrospective study involving 191 adult patients undergoing CTA for suspected PTE between September of 2009 and May of 2012. Chest X-rays and CTAs were reviewed to determine whether the findings suggested an alternative diagnosis in the cases not diagnosed as PTE. Data on symptoms, risk factors, comorbidities, length of hospital stay, and mortality were collected. Results : On the basis of the CTA findings, PTE was diagnosed in 47 cases (24.6%. Among the 144 patients not diagnosed with PTE via CTA, the findings were abnormal in 120 (83.3%. Such findings were consistent with an alternative diagnosis that explained the symptoms in 75 patients (39.3%. Among those 75 cases, there were only 39 (20.4% in which the same alterations had not been previously detected on chest X-rays. The most common alternative diagnosis, made solely on the basis of the CTA findings, was pneumonia (identified in 20 cases. Symptoms, risk factors, comorbidities, and the in-hospital mortality rate did not differ significantly between the patients with and without PTE. However, the median hospital stay was significantly longer in the patients with PTE than in those without (18.0 and 9.5 days, respectively; p = 0.001. Conclusions : Our results indicate that chest CTA is useful in cases of suspected PTE, because it can confirm the diagnosis and reveal findings consistent with an alternative diagnosis in a significant number of patients.

  20. Measurement of entrance skin dose and estimation of organ dose during pediatric chest radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaresan, M; Kumar, Rajesh; Biju, K; Choubey, Ajay; Kantharia, S

    2011-06-01

    Entrance skin dose (ESD) was measured to calculate the organ doses from the anteroposterior (AP) and posteroanterior (PA) chest x-ray projections for pediatric patients in an Indian hospital. High sensitivity tissue-equivalent thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD, LiF: Mg, Cu, P chips) were used for measuring entrance skin dose. The respective organ doses were calculated using the Monte Carlo method (MCNP 3.1) to simulate the examination set-up and a three-dimensional mathematical phantom for representing an average 5-y-old Indian child. Using this method, conversion coefficients were derived for translating the measured ESD to organ doses. The average measured ESDs for the chest AP and PA projections were 0.305 mGy and 0.171 mGy, respectively. The average calculated organ doses in the AP and the PA projections were 0.196 and 0.086 mSv for the thyroid, 0.167 and 0.045 mSv for the trachea, 0.078 and 0.043 mSv for the lungs, 0.110 and 0.013 mSv for the liver, 0.002 and 0.016 mSv for the bone marrow, 0.024 and 0.002 mSv for the kidneys, and 0.109 and 0.023 mSv for the heart, respectively. The ESD and organ doses can be reduced significantly with the proper radiological technique. According to these results, the chest PA projection should be preferred over the AP projection in pediatric patients. The estimated organ doses for the chest AP and PA projections can be used for the estimation of the associated risk.

  1. Proptosis, Micrognathia, Low Set Ear and Chest Deformity in a Patient with Extra Marker Chromosome 22

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    Asieh Mosallanejad

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available There is a number of syndromes, associated with proptosis, micrognathia, low-set ear and chest deformity. Herein, we report a 9-year-old female with such phenotype who was presented with a vaginal neuroma. The result of karyotype showed 47XX, with extra marker chromosome 22. Although such a manifestation had not been reported in the literature, it should be considered as a very rare manifestation of the disease.

  2. The knowledge level of chest physicians about the pulmonary rehabilitation topic

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    Hadice Selimoğlu Şen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The pulmonary rehabilitation (PR is multidisciplinary, evidence-based and personalized treatment approach for patients with a symptomatic chronic respiratory disease and reduced daily living activities. In this study, we aimed to determine the knowledge level of chest physicians about PR in our city. Methods: A standardized questionnaire consisting of 10 questions was conducted to a total of 40 chest diseases specialist and assistant doctors who are working at the university hospital, training and research hospital and a private hospital in Diyarbakir city and its purlieus. The questions about the definition of PR, goals, evaluation criteria, patient who candidate for rehabilitation and rehabilitation team, were asked in questionnaire. Ten points was given for each correct answer to closed-ended questions. The knowledge level were identified as low, moderate and high when points were <50, 50-79 and 80-100 respectively. Results: The mean age of participants was 36.1 ± 7.79 and working duration time in chest disease department was 5.57 ± 7.71 years. Seventy-eight point nine percent of university hospital doctors, 57.1% of training and research hospital doctors, 50% of private hospital doctors were answered correctly more than half of the questions. Conclusion: The knowledge of chest physicians about PR is substantially in low and moderate levels in our city. The creation of a curriculum about PR in medical schools, and postgraduate training of physicians in the field will raise awareness about this issue, and might increase the interest of physicians and patients to PR. J Clin Exp Invest 2014; 5 (3: 386-390

  3. Influence of the normal personality dimension of neuroticism on chest pain symptoms and coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, P T

    1987-12-28

    For at least the last 200 years it has been suspected that somatic manifestations of psychological distress play a role in the medical recognition and treatment of coronary artery disease (CAD). The cardiovascular system is intricately linked to the experience of emotion, and these links may explain how and when neuroticism can cloud the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease. A possible source of anginal symptoms in the absence of angiographically documented CAD is high standing on the personality dimension of neuroticism, which is a broad dimension of individual differences in the tendency to experience negative, distressing emotions and to possess associated behavioral and cognitive traits. A brief review of the clinical cardiologic literature on chest pain is presented, with special attention to distinguishing true angina pectoris from pseudoangina and related syndromes. After a brief description of the major dimensions of normal personality, especially the domain of neuroticism, empirical evidence is reviewed on 1,191 adult men and women who 10 years earlier had made chest pain or discomfort reports part of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The findings illustrate neuroticism's links to illness and disease. When the mean initial neuroticism levels of the chest pain groups were compared, significantly higher initial levels of neuroticism were found for those who reported any pain or discomfort. As hypothesized, logistic regression results on myocardial infarction death indicated no increased risk due to neuroticism. Neuroticism was related to increased somatic complaints, including chest pain or angina-like complaints, but was not causally or etiologically related to objective signs or pathophysiologic evidence of disease, especially CAD.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Ultrazvočno vodeno dreniranje plevralnega prostora: Ultrasound-guided chest tube thoracostomy:

    OpenAIRE

    Štupnik, Tomaž; Vidmar, Stanko

    2008-01-01

    Background Chest ultrasound (US) is well documented as a valuable tool for pleural diseases. US helps to clarify the cause of pleural opacities, estimatethe volume of pleural effusion and identify minimal or loculated pleural effusion. US characteristics of effusion provide helpful information regarding the nature of the effusion. Pleural diseases, such as pleural fibrosis, tumours and pneumothorax all display different diagnostic US features. Safe thoracentesis and drainage of effusion can b...

  5. Intramural oesophageal dissection as an unusual presentation of chest pain: A case report

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    Ryo Mizumoto

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: spontaneous IOD can occur in elderly patients who are anticoagulated. Fish oil has not been previously reported as having an association with IOD. This is the first known reported case of spontaneous IOD occurring in association with concurrent use of a bisphosphonate and fish oil. IOD is a rare disorder, and any anticoagulated patients presenting with severe chest pain may need careful investigation prior to definitive management.

  6. A Respiration Sensor for a Chest-Strap Based Wireless Body Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present a respiration sensor suitable for an integration into a wireless body sensor worn around the chest. The thorax expansion and contraction during in- and exhalation is captured using a force-sensing resistor. Based on the captured thoracic movements, the breaths are determined with a peak detection algorithm. For evaluation, a treadmill experiment with five subjects was conducted using an ergospirometry system as a reference. Overall, an average deviation of -0.32±0.68 ...

  7. Endoscopic thyroidectomy through anterior chest wall:a report of 28 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柯重伟; 郑成竹; 陈丹磊; 胡明根; 李际辉; 印慨

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively evaluate the feasibility and clinical value of endoscopic thyroidectomy through anterior chest wall. Methods: From December 2002 to May 2003, 28 patients with an average of age of 28 years old(rangeing from 20 to 45) were performed endoscopic thyroidectomy through anterior chest wall. The subcutaneous space in the anterior chest wall and the subplatysmal space in the neck were bluntly dissected through a 10-mm incision between the nipples, and CO2 was insufllated at 6 - 8 mmHg to create the operative space. Three trocars were inserted in the mammary regions; and dissection of the thyroid, division of the thyroid vessels and parenchyma were performed endoscopically using an ultrasonically activated scalpel. The recurrent laryngeal nerve, the superior laryngeal nerve, and the parathyroid glands were preserved properly. Results: There were 3 mass resections, 17 subtotal lobectomies, 2 total lobectomies, 6 subtotal lobectomies plus contralateral mass resections. The mean operative time was (87.1 ± 26.0) min; the mean blood loss during operation was (47.9 ± 19.6) ml; and the mean postoperative hospital stay was (3.4 ± 0.7) d. The drainage tubes were pulled out at 36 - 60 h postoperatively. There were no conversions to open surgery or complications. No scars can be found in the neck, and the patients were satisfied with the postoperative appearance. Conclusion: Endoscopic thyroidectomy through anterior chest wall combined with low-pressure subcutaneous CO2 insufflation is a feasible and safe procedure. It can bring satisfactory cosmetic results. It is believed that endoscopic thyroidectomy by such approach will find a role in the future.

  8. Radiological findings in megaesophagus secondary to Chagas disease: chest X-ray and esophagogram*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abud, Thiago Giansante; Abud, Lucas Giansante; Vilar, Vanessa Sales; Szejnfeld, Denis; Reibscheid, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify and classify the radiographic patterns of megaesophagus in Chagas disease, as seen on esophagograms and chest X-rays. Materials and Methods This was a prospective study of 35 patients diagnosed with esophageal disease via manometry. The changes found on esophagograms were stratified according to Rezende's classification, divided into four categories (grades I through IV) determined by the degree of dilatation and impairement of esophageal motility. We subsequently correlated that ranking with the chest X-ray findings: gastric air bubble; air-fluid level; and mediastinal widening. Results Among the 35 patients, the esophageal disease was classified as grade I in 9 (25.7%), grade II in 3 (8.6%), grade III in 19 (54.3%), and grade IV in 4 (11.4%). None of the patients with grade I esophageal disease showed changes on chest X-rays. In two of the three patients with grade II disease, there was no gastric air-bubble, although there were no other findings in any of the grade II patients. Of the 19 patients with grade III disease, 15 had abnormal findings on X-rays. All four patients with grade IV disease showed abnormalities. Conclusion The use of Rezende's classification is feasible, encompassing findings ranging from the subtle changes that characterize the initial phases of esophageal disease to the complete akinesia seen in dolicomegaesophagus. Chest X-ray findings are more common in patients with advanced stages of the disease and indicate the degree of esophageal involvement in Chagas disease. PMID:28100930

  9. Chest wall actinomycosis in association with the use of an intra-uterine device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, W J; Hill, D R; Gordon, D L

    1995-02-01

    A 31 year old woman presented with a chest wall abscess due to Actinomyces israellii and Porphyromonas asaccharolytica (previously Bacteroides asaccharolyticus). She was a long-term user of an intra-uterine device (IUD) and, although asymptomatic, had radiological evidence of pelvic infection. Actinomyces-like organisms were seen on cervico-vaginal smears. The abscess was surgically drained, the IUD removed, and a prolonged course of amoxycillin/clavulanic acid given.

  10. Severe neonatal hypercalcemia in 4-month-old, presented with respiratory distress and chest wall deformity

    OpenAIRE

    Akram Aljahdali

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism (NSHPT) is a rare disease affecting calcium metabolism and results in severe life-treating hypocalcemia of the neonates. Diagnosis can be challenging due to variable and nonspecific symptomatology. We are reporting on a 4-month-old female infant presenting with respiratory distress and chest wall deformity. We are trying to highlight different surgical options for this rare disease and importance of close collaboration with the pediatric endocrinologist in ...

  11. Case of chest-wall rigidity in a preterm infant caused by prenatal fentanyl administration

    OpenAIRE

    Eventov-Friedman, S; Rozin, I; Shinwell, E. S.

    2010-01-01

    The inability to appropriately ventilate neonates shortly after their birth could be related in rare cases to chest-wall rigidity caused by the placental transfer of fentanyl. Although this adverse effect is recognized when fentanyl is administered to neonates after their birth, the prenatal phenomenon is less known. Treatment with either naloxone or muscle relaxants reverses the fentanyl effect and may prevent unnecessary excessive ventilatory settings.

  12. Surgical treatment of a huge kaposiform hemangioendothelioma in the chest wall: A case study

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    Xiaonan Guo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Kaposiform hemangioendothelioma, a rare vascular pediatric tumor often associated with Kasabach–Merritt phenomenon, is characterized by severe thrombocytopenia and consumptive coagulopathy. Kaposiform hemangioendothelioma is a severe disease and may progress quickly, resulting in a high mortality. However, standard treatment regimens for Kasabach–Merritt phenomenon have not yet been established. We reported here an infant with a large congenital kaposiform hemangioendothelioma in his chest wall who responded extremely well to surgical excision.

  13. Chest wall granuloma associated with BCG vaccination presenting as hot abscess in an immunocompetent infant

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hyun Seung; Seo, Kyung Jin; Kim, Jae Jun

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus-Calmette-Gue´rin (BCG) vaccine is a live attenuated vaccine to prevent tuberculosis by cell mediated immune response and is routinely administered early after birth. Although it is considered to be a very safe vaccine, sometimes a variety of complications may develop. Herein we describe a clinically unusual case of chest wall granuloma considered to be induced by BCG, presenting as hot abscess, and developed 7 months after BCG vaccination in an immunocompetent infant. The diagnosis w...

  14. Urgent resection of bleeding congenital mesenchymal chest wall hamartoma in an infant

    OpenAIRE

    Bieda, Jan-Christoph; Tröbs, Ralf-Bodo; Roll, Claudia; Wunsch, Rainer; Neid, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    We report a case with prenatally diagnosed large cystic-solid mesenchymal chest wall hamartoma. An attempt of conservative management was made however repeated intralesional hemorrhage led to enlargement and severe anemia which required urgent resection at the age of 8 weeks. The infant had an unimpaired development over a follow-up of 4 years. Wir berichten über ein Neugeborenes mit einem bereits pränatal diagnostizierten, ausgedehnten Thoraxwand-Hamartom von zystisch-solider Beschaffen...

  15. Case of chest-wall rigidity in a preterm infant caused by prenatal fentanyl administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eventov-Friedman, S; Rozin, I; Shinwell, E S

    2010-02-01

    The inability to appropriately ventilate neonates shortly after their birth could be related in rare cases to chest-wall rigidity caused by the placental transfer of fentanyl. Although this adverse effect is recognized when fentanyl is administered to neonates after their birth, the prenatal phenomenon is less known. Treatment with either naloxone or muscle relaxants reverses the fentanyl effect and may prevent unnecessary excessive ventilatory settings.

  16. Severe neonatal hypercalcemia in 4-month-old, presented with respiratory distress and chest wall deformity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Aljahdali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism (NSHPT is a rare disease affecting calcium metabolism and results in severe life-treating hypocalcemia of the neonates. Diagnosis can be challenging due to variable and nonspecific symptomatology. We are reporting on a 4-month-old female infant presenting with respiratory distress and chest wall deformity. We are trying to highlight different surgical options for this rare disease and importance of close collaboration with the pediatric endocrinologist in the treatment plan for those patients.

  17. An old lady with anterior chest pain and unilateral facial flushing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shao Hwa; Chen, Chin I; Liu, Ching Chih; Du, Ming Hai; Lam, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Harlequin syndrome is rare and typically characterized by asymmetric flushing and sweating. Although it is usually considered idiopathic, literature review shows that it may be caused by lesion over lung apex or after central venous catheterization in the internal jugular vein. We present a 74-year-old woman who had been experiencing recurrent chest pain and right shoulder pain since 2 weeks ago. The tentative diagnosis was made by the emergency physician (EP) as acute coronary syndrome. The patient was given nitroglycerin treatment. Twelve hours later, the patient developed another episode of chest pain. The electrocardiogram and cardiac enzyme study results were, however, both normal. Further evaluation showed intermittent flushing over the left side of her face, as well as right-eye ptosis. A chest computed tomography (CT) was conducted, under the suspicion of Harlequin syndrome in combination with Horner syndrome, to derive the diagnosis of a right lung apex tumor. This case showed that history taking and physical examination are very important in the emergency department. It is particularly vital to observe the microchanges in the patient's symptoms and signs. It is also imperative to reassess the patient whose symptoms fail to improve under treatment, to look for other underlying lesions.

  18. A method to optimize the processing algorithm of a computed radiography system for chest radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, C S; Liney, G P; Beavis, A W; Saunderson, J R

    2007-09-01

    A test methodology using an anthropomorphic-equivalent chest phantom is described for the optimization of the Agfa computed radiography "MUSICA" processing algorithm for chest radiography. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the lung, heart and diaphragm regions of the phantom, and the "system modulation transfer function" (sMTF) in the lung region, were measured using test tools embedded in the phantom. Using these parameters the MUSICA processing algorithm was optimized with respect to low-contrast detectability and spatial resolution. Two optimum "MUSICA parameter sets" were derived respectively for maximizing the CNR and sMTF in each region of the phantom. Further work is required to find the relative importance of low-contrast detectability and spatial resolution in chest images, from which the definitive optimum MUSICA parameter set can then be derived. Prior to this further work, a compromised optimum MUSICA parameter set was applied to a range of clinical images. A group of experienced image evaluators scored these images alongside images produced from the same radiographs using the MUSICA parameter set in clinical use at the time. The compromised optimum MUSICA parameter set was shown to produce measurably better images.

  19. Chest radiographic characteristics of community-acquired Legionella pneumonia in the elderly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Zhigang; Liu Xinmin; Chen Luzeng; Qiu Jianxing

    2014-01-01

    Background Legionella is an important community-acquired pneumonia pathogen.Although the elderly are especially susceptible to Legionella,few studies have looked at comparative radiographic features of Legionella pneumonia in this population.The aim of this study was to explore the chest radiographic characteristics of community-acquired Legionella pneumonia in the elderly.Methods Serial chest radiographs obtained in 34 patients hospitalized with serologically proven Legionella pneumonia were retrospectively reviewed.Chest x-ray features of an aged group of ≥65 years were assessed and compared with a non-aged group of <65 years old with regard to initial patterns and distributions of pulmonary abnormalities,accompanying signs,and progression.Results The most common initial presentation was a patchy alveolar infiltrate involving a single lobe,most often the lower lobe.There was no middle or lingular lobe involvement in the aged group patients,but bilateral pleural effusion was significantly more common in this group.In the aged group patients,radiographic progression following adequate therapy,despite a clinical response,was more often noted and the radiographs were less likely to have returned to the premorbid state at discharge,but the differences were not significant between the two groups.Conclusion The discrepancy between imaging findings and clinical symptoms seems more prominent in community-acquired Legionella pneumonia in the elderly.

  20. Correlation between lipid profile and troponin I test results in patients with chest pain in Nepal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Arun Kumar; Brijesh Sathian

    2013-01-01

    To study the usefulness of traditional lipid profile levels in screening subjects who had developed chest pain due to cardiac event as indicated by a positive troponin I test. Methods: In this retrospective study data of the 430 patients presented to the emergency department with symptoms of cardiac ischemia who underwent both troponin and lipid profiles tests were compared with the lipid profiles of 165 normal healthy subjects (controls). The troponin was detected qualitatively when a specimen contains troponin I (cTnI) above the 99th percentile (TnI>0.5 ng/mL). The total cholesterol, high density lipoproteins cholesterol, very low density lipoproteins and triacyl glycerol levels were also analyzed and low density lipoprotein level was calculated using Friedewald’s formula. Results: Patients with chest pain and positive troponin test (with confirmed cardiac event) were found to have significantly elevated levels of total cholesterol, triacyl glycerol levels, low density lipoprotein level and significantly reduced high density lipoproteins cholesterol levels when compared to the patients who experienced only chest pain (negative troponin) and healthy controls. Conclusions: Traditional lipid profile levels is still can be used in screening populations to identify the subjects with high risk of developing cardiac event in case if the laboratory set up has not troponin test facilities.