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Sample records for chest wall thickness

  1. The gender-specific chest wall thickness prediction equations for routine measurements of {sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Am within the lungs using HPGE detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vickers, L.R. [Pantex Plant, Amarillo, TX (United States)

    1996-03-01

    The current chest wall thickness prediction equation is not applicable to use in routine lung counting measurements for detection of low energy photons (17-60 keV) within the lungs of male and female subjects. The current chest wall thickness prediction equation was derived for the NaI-CsI {open_quotes}phoswich{close_quotes} detection system, which is not the routine detection system in use; the subject position was supine, which is not the routine position; the equation did not account for the intercostal tissue thicknesses of muscle and adipose which significantly attenuate low energy photons (17-60 keV); it was derived from male subjects only and is used to predict the chest wall thickness of female subjects for whom it is not applicable. The current chest wall thickness prediction equation yields unacceptable percent errors in the HPGe detection efficiency calibration for {sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Am (17- and 59.5-keV photons, respectively) relative to the gender-specific HPGe chest wall thickness prediction equations of this paper (+284% to -73% for {sup 239}Pu; +42% to -39% for {sup 241}Am). As a result, use of the current chest wall thickness prediction equation yields unacceptable percent errors (proportional in magnitude to the percent errors in the detection efficiency calibration) in the calculation of the minimum detectable activity (Bq) or in an initial assessment of a radioactive contamination exposure detected by a routine lung count measurement. 17 refs., 6 figs., 12 tabs.

  2. Determination of the chest wall thickness as calibration parameter for dosimetric partial-body counting; Bestimmung der Brustwandstaerke als Kalibrierparameter fuer dosimetrische Teilkoerpermessungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guen, H. [Fachhochschule Giessen-Friedberg, Giessen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz; Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenforschung; Hegenbart, L. [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenforschung; Breckow, J. [Fachhochschule Giessen-Friedberg, Giessen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz

    2010-05-15

    The authors describe actual partial body measurements with Phoswich detectors in the in-vivo laboratory of the Institute for Technology in Karlsruhe. The chest wall thickness is estimated from the radio of body weight to body length. This formula includes several uncertainties. The aim of the project was the reduction of the uncertainties of the empirical formula using ultrasonography. This method allows an accuracy of plus or minus 1.1 mm for the determined chest wall thickness. Besides the experimental study several voxel models were used to determine the efficiency of modeled measuring systems. The voxel models reach the same accuracy as the ultrasound method.

  3. Chest wall thickness may limit adequate drainage of tension pneumothorax by needle thoracocentesis.

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    Tension pneumothorax in a large man was inadequately drained by needle thoracocentesis with a 4.5 cm cannula. Unsuccessful needle thoracocentesis of a clinical tension pneumothorax in a large patient should be followed immediately by chest drain insertion, without local anaesthetic, as dictated by clinical urgency. If the clinical situation is still not improved other diagnoses should be considered.

  4. Association of aortic wall thickness on contrast-enhanced chest CT with major cerebro-cardiac events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresoldi, Silvia; Di Leo, Giovanni; Zoffoli, Elena; Munari, Alice; Primolevo, Alessandra; Cornalba, Gianpaolo; Sardanelli, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    There is a significant association between aortic atherosclerosis and previous major cardiovascular events. Particularly, thoracic aortic atherosclerosis is closely related to the degree of coronary and carotid artery disease. Thus, there is a rationale for screening the thoracic aorta in patients who undergo a chest computed tomography (CT) for any clinical question, in order to detect patients at increased risk of cerebro-cardiovascular (CCV) events. To estimate the association between either thoracic aortic wall thickness (AWT) or aortic total calcium score (ATCS) and CCV events. One hundred and forty-eight non-cardiac patients (78 men; 67 ± 12 years) underwent chest contrast-enhanced multidetector CT (MDCT). The AWT was measured at the level of the left atrium (AWTref) and at the maximum AWT (AWTmax). Correlation with clinical CCV patients' history was estimated. The value of AWTmax and of a semi-quantitative ATCS as a marker for CCV events was assessed using receiver-operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis and multivariate regression analysis. Out of 148 patients, 59% reported sedentary lifestyle, 44% hypertension, 32% smoking, 23% hypercholesterolemia, 13% family history of cardiac disease, 12% diabetes, and 10% BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2); 9% reported myocardial infarction, 8% aortic aneurism, 8% myocardial revascularization, and 2% ischemic stroke. Twenty-six percent of patients had a medium-to-high ATCS. Both AWTmax and AWTref correlated with hypertension and age (P < 0.002). At the ROC analysis, a 4.8 mm threshold was associated to a 90% specificity and an odds ratio of 6.3 (AUC = 0.735). Assuming as threshold the AWTmax median value (4.3 mm) of patients who suffered from at least one CCV event in their history, a negative predictive value of 90%, a RR of 3.6 and an OR of 6.3 were found. At the multivariate regression analysis, AWTmax was the only independent variable associated to the frequency of CCV events. Patients with increased thoracic

  5. Chest wall thickness and decompression failure: A systematic review and meta-analysis comparing anatomic locations in needle thoracostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laan, Danuel V; Vu, Trang Diem N; Thiels, Cornelius A; Pandian, T K; Schiller, Henry J; Murad, M Hassan; Aho, Johnathon M

    2016-04-01

    Current Advanced Trauma Life Support guidelines recommend decompression for thoracic tension physiology using a 5-cm angiocatheter at the second intercostal space (ICS) on the midclavicular line (MCL). High failure rates occur. Through systematic review and meta-analysis, we aimed to determine the chest wall thickness (CWT) of the 2nd ICS-MCL, the 4th/5th ICS at the anterior axillary line (AAL), the 4th/5th ICS mid axillary line (MAL) and needle thoracostomy failure rates using the currently recommended 5-cm angiocatheter. A comprehensive search of several databases from their inception to July 24, 2014 was conducted. The search was limited to the English language, and all study populations were included. Studies were appraised by two independent reviewers according to a priori defined PRISMA inclusion and exclusion criteria. Continuous outcomes (CWT) were evaluated using weighted mean difference and binary outcomes (failure with 5-cm needle) were assessed using incidence rate. Outcomes were pooled using the random-effects model. The search resulted in 34,652 studies of which 15 were included for CWT analysis, 13 for NT effectiveness. Mean CWT was 42.79 mm (95% CI, 38.78-46.81) at 2nd ICS-MCL, 39.85 mm (95% CI, 28.70-51.00) at MAL, and 34.33 mm (95% CI, 28.20-40.47) at AAL (P=.08). Mean failure rate was 38% (95% CI, 24-54) at 2nd ICS-MCL, 31% (95% CI, 10-64) at MAL, and 13% (95% CI, 8-22) at AAL (P=.01). Evidence from observational studies suggests that the 4th/5th ICS-AAL has the lowest predicted failure rate of needle decompression in multiple populations. Level 3 SR/MA with up to two negative criteria. Therapeutic. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. CHEST WALL HAMARTOMA : Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Gülden DİNİZ; Ortaç, Ragıp; Aktaş, Safiye; TEMİR, Günyüz; HOŞGÖR, Münevver; Karaca, İrfan

    2005-01-01

    A case of four-month – old girl diagnosed as chest wall hamartoma is presented. This entity is an extremely rare but characteristic lesion of the ribs usually presenting in the neonate or infant with a mass or respiratory symptoms. Complete sponraneous regression of the lesion has been reported. Recently conservative management of asymptomatic childiren was recommended. Although rare, this condition ought to be kept in mind while dealing with infantile chest wall masses to avoid an errone...

  7. CHEST WALL HAMARTOMA : Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Gülden DİNİZ; Ortaç, Ragıp; Aktaş, Safiye; HOŞGÖR, Günyüz TEMİR2Münevver; Karaca, İrfan

    2005-01-01

    A case of four-month – old girl diagnosed as chest wall hamartoma is presented. This entity is an extremely rare but characteristic lesion of the ribs usually presenting in the neonate or infant with a mass or respiratory symptoms. Complete sponraneous regression of the lesion has been reported. Recently conservative management of asymptomatic childiren was recommended. Although rare, this condition ought to be kept in mind while dealing with infantile chest wall masses to avoid...

  8. Neonatal Chest Wall Rhabdomyosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Michael; Steiner, Zvi; Groisman, Gabriel; Nadir, Erez

    2015-06-01

    An infant was born at term with a huge chest mass diagnosed as rhabdomyosarcoma. Treatment consisted of surgical resection and chemotherapy. We describe this very rare congenital mass and the problematic therapeutic management of such a tumor in a newborn.

  9. Neonatal Chest Wall Rhabdomyosarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Feldman, Michael; Steiner, Zvi; Groisman, Gabriel; Nadir, Erez

    2015-01-01

    An infant was born at term with a huge chest mass diagnosed as rhabdomyosarcoma. Treatment consisted of surgical resection and chemotherapy. We describe this very rare congenital mass and the problematic therapeutic management of such a tumor in a newborn.

  10. Actinomycosis - Left Post Chest Wall

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    Kafil Akhtar, M. Naim, S. Shamshad Ahmad, Nazoora Khan, Uroos Abedi, A.H. Khan*

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A forty year old female of weak body built presented with recurring small hard lumps in let posteriorchest wall for 3 years and discharging ulcers for 3 months duration. Clinically, the provisional diagnosiswas malignancy with secondary infection. FNAC showed features suggestive of dysplasia buthistopathology confirmed the diagnosis as actinomycosis. The present case is reported due to rare incidenceof actinomycosis at post chest wall with muscle involvement.

  11. Anterior chest wall examination reviewed

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    F. Trotta

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Anterior chest wall involvement is not infrequently observed within inflammatory arthropaties, particularly if one considers seronegative spondiloarthritides and SAPHO syndrome. Physical examination is unreliable and conventional X-rays analysis is an unsatisfactory tool during diagnostic work-up of this region. Scintigraphic techniques yield informations both on the activity and on the anatomical extent of the disease while computerized tomography visualize the elementary lesions, such as erosions, which characterize the process. Moreover, when available, magnetic resonance imaging couple the ability to finely visualize such lesions with the possibility to show early alterations and to characterize the “activity” of the disease, presenting itself as a powerful tool both for diagnosis and follow-up. This review briefly shows the applications of imaging techniques for the evaluation of the anterior chest wall focusing on what has been done in the SAPHO syndrome which can be considered prototypical for this regional involvement since it is the osteo-articular target mainly affected by the disease.

  12. Relevant surgical anatomy of the chest wall.

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    Naidu, Babu V; Rajesh, Pala B

    2010-11-01

    The chest wall, like other regional anatomy, is a remarkable fusion of form and function. Principal functions are the protection of internal viscera and an expandable cylinder facilitating variable gas flow into the lungs. Knowledge of the anatomy of the whole cylinder (ribs, sternum, vertebra, diaphragm, intercostal spaces, and extrathoracic muscles) is therefore not only important in the local environment of a specific chest wall resection but also in its relation to overall function. An understanding of chest wall kinematics might help define the loss of function after resection and the effects of various chest wall substitutes. Therefore, this article is not an exhaustive anatomic description but a focused summary and discussion.

  13. Chest wall, lung, and pleural space trauma.

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    Miller, Lisa A

    2006-03-01

    Chest radiographs frequently underestimate the severity and extent of chest trauma and, in some cases, fail to detect the presence of injury. CT is more sensitive than chest radiography in the detection of pulmonary, pleural, and osseous abnormalities in the patient who has chest trauma. With the advent of multidetector CT (MDCT), high-quality multiplanar reformations are obtained easily and add to the diagnostic capabilities of MDCT. This article reviews the radiographic and CT findings of chest wall, pleural, and pulmonary injuries that are seen in the patient who has experienced blunt thoracic trauma.

  14. Solitary Plasmacytoma of the Chest Wall

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    Servet Kayhan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A previously healthy 55-year-old man with right sided lateral chest pain admitted to clinic. It was found a solid and painful mass at the right 4th rib in physical examination. Chest X-ray and thoracic computarized tomography showed an opacity measured 60x33 mm within the right chest wall destructing the 4th rib. Needle aspiration was performed from tumor and cytologic examination showed atypic plasma cell infiltration. The patient was scheduled for a chest wall resection and reconstructive surgery. Examination of a permanent section showed that the chest wall tumor was solitary plasmacytoma. There was no evidence of multiple myeloma recurrence after two years from the operation.

  15. Relevant surgical anatomy of the chest wall

    OpenAIRE

    Rajesh, Pala Babu; Naidu, Babu V.

    2010-01-01

    The chest wall, like other regional anatomy, is a remarkable fusion of form and function. Principal functions are the protection of internal viscera and an expandable cylinder facilitating variable gas flow into the lungs. Knowledge of the anatomy of the whole cylinder (ribs, sternum, vertebra, diaphragm, intercostal spaces, and extrathoracic muscles) is therefore not only important in the local environment of a specific chest wall resection but also in its relation to overall function. An un...

  16. Determination of the chest wall thicknesses and needle thoracostomy success rates at second and fifth intercostal spaces: a cadaver-based study.

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    Ozen, Can; Akoglu, Haldun; Ozdemirel, Rifat Ozgur; Omeroglu, Elif; Ozpolat, Cigdem Ulubay; Onur, Ozge; Buyuk, Yalcin; Denizbasi, Arzu

    2016-12-01

    The purposes of this study were to measure the chest wall thicknesses (CWTs) at second intercostal space (ICS) mid-clavicular line (MCL) and fifth ICS MAL directly, and compare the actual success rates of needle thoracostomies (NTs) by inserting a 5-cm-long syringe needle. Predictive values of weight, body mass index (BMI) and CWT were also analyzed. This study included 199 measurements of 50 adult fresh cadavers from both hemithoraces. Five-centimeter-long syringe needles were inserted and secured. Penetration into the pleural cavity was assessed, and CWTs at 4 locations were measured. Achieved power of this study for the primary aim of CWT comparison from 2(nd) and 5(th) ICSs was .94. Overall mean CWTs at 2(nd) ICS MCL and 5(th) ICS MAL were measured as 2.46 ± 0.78 and 2.89 ± 1.09, respectively, and 5(th) ICS MAL was found to be statistically thicker (P = .002). The success rate of NT at 2(nd) ICS MCL was 87% (95% CI, 80-94), and that at 5(th) ICS MAL was 78% (95% CI, 70-86; P = .3570). Only 6 (17.1%) of 35 failed NTs had a CWT greater than 5-cm. Needle thoracostomy has failed in 29 (14.9%) of 194 locations, despite a CWT less than 5-cm. Below a weight of 72 kg, BMI of 23 kg/m(2), or CWT of 2.4 cm, all NTs were successful. In this report, we present the largest cadaver-based cohort to date to the best of our knowledge, and we observed a statistically nonsignificant 9% more NT success rate at 2(nd) ICS at a power of 88% and statistically significant more success rate in males at 5(th) ICS was (47.7%). We also observed thinner CWTs and higher success rates than previous imaging-based studies. A BMI of 23 kg/m(2) or less and weight of 72 kg or less seem to accurately rule-out NT failure in cadavers, and they seem to be better predictors at the bedside. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Radiation induced osteosarcoma of the chest wall

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    Sugimoto, Tsutomu; Yuki, Yoshihiro; Oizumi, Hiroyuki; Iijima, Yoshiyuki; Fujishima, Tsukasa; Shimazaki, Yasuhisa [Yamagata Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-11-01

    We report a successful resection of an osteosarcoma in the chest wall developed 25 years after irradiation. A 74-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for her swelling in the left chest wall at August 24, 1995. At 49-year-old, she had undergone an operation and postoperative irradiation for left breast cancer. A computed tomography demonstrated a mass in the left chest wall that destructed the first rib, extending into the pleural space and invaded into the left common carotid and subclavian arteries. We planned a radical resection of the mass after repeated CT scannings, since it was histopathologically diagnosed as a chondrosarcoma and showed a rapid growth. The tumor was completely removed with radical transmediastinal forequarter amputation of the partial chest wall and total left upper extremity. The left common carotid artery was partially replaced with 6 mm EPTFE vascular prosthesis. The chest wall was reconstructed with Marlex-mesh prosthesis and a myocutaneous flap. She was discharged uneventfully and has not shown any evidence of recurrence. (author)

  18. Prephonatory chest wall posturing in stutterers.

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    Baken, R J; McManus, D A; Cavallo, S A

    1983-09-01

    The possibility that prephonatory chest wall posturing is abnormal in stutterers was explored by observing rib cage and abdominal hemicircumference changes during the interval between the presentation of a stimulus and the production of/alpha/by a group of stutterers (N = 5). It was found that the patterns of chest wall adjustment for phonation were qualitatively identical in the stutterers and in a comparable group of normal men studied previously. There was, however, a significant difference in the way in which lung volume changed during the execution of the chest wall adjustment. This was considered to be indicative of delayed glottal closure among the stutterers rather than representative of a primary ventilatory disturbance.

  19. Imaging of Chest Wall Lesions in Children

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    A. Hekmatnia

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Chest wall lesions in childhood include a wide range of pathologies; Benign lesions include lipoma, neurofibroma, lymphangioma, hemangioma, and mesenchymal hamartoma."nMalignant lesions include Neuroblastoma, Rhabdo-myosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, and Askin tumor."nSystemic diseases such as leukemia, lymphoma, Langerhans cell histiocytosis, and also infections such as tuberculosis, and actinomycosis may also cause chest wall lesions."nThe imaging characteristics of these lesions are re-viewed, but only a minority of the lesions shows diagnostic imaging features, and most of lesions re-quire biopsy and histopathological examination for "ndefinitive diagnosis."nThe role of different modalities is discussed with an emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging for demonstrating lesion morphology and local spread. Computed tomography and neuclear medicine being used mainly to assess remote disease."nIn this lecture, we discuss about imaging of chest wall lesions in children.

  20. [Chest wall mesenchymal hamartoma: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Olga Lucía; Valencia, María de la Luz; Gómez, Carolina; Pérez, María del Pilar; Sanín, Emilio; Vásquez, Luz Marina

    2010-01-01

    Chest wall mesenchymal hamartoma is an extremely rare benign tumor. Approximately 80 cases have been reported in the literature. Most tumors are manifested at birth with a painless palpable mass of the chest wall, usually unilateral. Respiratory symptoms result from extrinsic compression of the pulmonary parenchyma, and the severity of the symptoms will depend on the size and location of the lesion. Imaging features are characteristic, but definitive diagnosis is histological. Herein, a case is described of a four month old infant with diagnosis of chest wall mesenchymal hamartoma, manifested at birth. Different treatment options are described, including expectations from tumor management, the possibility of spontaneous regression, and the morbidity associated with the surgical option.

  1. Chest wall abscess due to Prevotella bivia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gwo-jong HSU; Cheng-ren CHEN; Mei-chu LAI; Shi-ping LUH

    2009-01-01

    Prevotella bivia is associated with pelvic inflammatory disease. A 77-year-old man developed a rapidly growing chest wall abscess due to P. Bivia within days. He underwent surgical resection of the infected area; his postoperative course was un-eventful. This is the first case of chest wall abscess due to P. Bivia infection. Its correct diagnosis cannot be underestimated be-cause fulminam infections can occur in aged or immunocompromised patients if treated incorrectly. Prompt, appropriate surgical management, and antibiotic therapy affect treatment outcome.

  2. [Chest Wall Reconstruction Using Titanium Plates Sandwiched Between Sheets after Resection of Chest Wall Chondrosarcoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endoh, Makoto; Oizumi, Hiroyuki; Kato, Hirohisa; Suzuki, Jun; Watarai, Hikaru; Hamada, Akira; Suzuki, Katsuyuki; Takahashi, Ai; Nakahashi, Kenta; Sugawara, Masato; Tsuchiya, Takashi; Sadahiro, Mitsuaki

    2016-07-01

    Extensive chest wall resection carries the risk of difficult reconstruction and surgical complications. We report our experience on chest wall reconstruction using titanium plates for a wide thoracic defect after tumor resection. A 74-year-old man was diagnosed with chondrosarcoma of the 6th rib on the right. He needed extensive chest wall resection because of skip lesions on 4th rib noted on operative inspection, leaving a defect measuring 33 × 20 cm. Reconstruction using 5 transverse titanium plates sandwiched between an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene patch and a polypropylene mesh sheet stabilized the chest wall. This reconstruction allowed successful separation from ventilatory support after operation. The postoperative course was uneventful, and he was discharged on postoperative day 20. The advantages of this form of reconstruction over conventional prostheses are rigidity, and stability and usability.

  3. Reconstruction with a patient-specific titanium implant after a wide anterior chest wall resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turna, Akif; Kavakli, Kuthan; Sapmaz, Ersin; Arslan, Hakan; Caylak, Hasan; Gokce, Hasan Suat; Demirkaya, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    The reconstruction of full-thickness chest wall defects is a challenging problem for thoracic surgeons, particularly after a wide resection of the chest wall that includes the sternum. The location and the size of the defect play a major role when selecting the method of reconstruction, while acceptable cosmetic and functional results remain the primary goal. Improvements in preoperative imaging techniques and reconstruction materials have an important role when planning and performing a wide chest wall resection with a low morbidity rate. In this report, we describe the reconstruction of a wide anterior chest wall defect with a patient-specific custom-made titanium implant. An infected mammary tumour recurrence in a 62-year old female, located at the anterior chest wall including the sternum, was resected, followed by a large custom-made titanium implant. Latissimus dorsi flap and split-thickness graft were also used for covering the implant successfully. A titanium custom-made chest wall implant could be a viable alternative for patients who had large chest wall tumours. PMID:24227881

  4. Tuberculosis abscess of the chest wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataño, Juan; Perez, Jefferson

    2014-10-01

    A 42-year-old male presented in June of 2011 with nocturnal fevers, night sweats, an 8-kg weight loss, and a cutaneous right chest wall mass. In March of 2013, a computed tomographic scan of the thorax showed a 54 × 18 × 26-mm right lower lobe mass with peripheral calcifications, and in May of 2013, he was admitted for a segmental lobectomy, in which histologic examination of the pulmonary tissue revealed granulomas with multinucleated giant cells. The tissue was negative for acid-fast bacillae on Ziehl-Neelsen stain, and culture grew Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Therefore, he was started on four first-line antituberculosis medications and showed rapid symptomatic improvement.

  5. Tube wall thickness measurement apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagasse, P.R.

    1985-06-21

    An apparatus for measuring the thickness of a tube's wall for the tube's entire length and radius by determining the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the known thickness of a selected standard item. The apparatus comprises a base and a first support member having first and second ends. The first end is connected to the base and the second end is connected to a spherical element. A second support member is connected to the base and spaced apart from the first support member. A positioning element is connected to and movable relative to the second support member. An indicator is connected to the positioning element and is movable to a location proximate the spherical element. The indicator includes a contact ball for first contacting the selected standard item and holding it against the spherical element. The contact ball then contacts the tube when the tube is disposed about the spherical element. The indicator includes a dial having a rotatable needle for indicating the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the thickness of the selected standard item.

  6. Tube wall thickness measurement apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagasse, P.R.

    1985-06-21

    An apparatus for measuring the thickness of a tube's wall for the tube's entire length and radius by determining the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the known thickness of a selected standard item. The apparatus comprises a base and a first support member having first and second ends. The first end is connected to the base and the second end is connected to a spherical element. A second support member is connected to the base and spaced apart from the first support member. A positioning element is connected to and movable relative to the second support member. An indicator is connected to the positioning element and is movable to a location proximate the spherical element. The indicator includes a contact ball for first contacting the selected standard item and holding it against the spherical element. The contact ball then contacts the tube when the tube is disposed about the spherical element. The indicator includes a dial having a rotatable needle for indicating the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the thickness of the selected standard item.

  7. Tube wall thickness measurement apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagasse, Paul R. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1987-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring the thickness of a tube's wall for the tube's entire length and circumference by determining the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the known thickness of a selected standard item. The apparatus comprises a base and a first support member having first and second ends. The first end is connected to the base and the second end is connected to a spherical element. A second support member is connected to the base and spaced apart from the first support member. A positioning element is connected to and movable relative to the second support member. An indicator is connected to the positioning element and is movable to a location proximate the spherical element. The indicator includes a contact ball for first contacting the selected standard item and holding it against the spherical element. The contact ball then contacts the tube when the tube is disposed about the spherical element. The indicator includes a dial having a rotatable needle for indicating the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the thickness of the selected standard item.

  8. Electron arc irradiation of the postmastectomy chest wall: clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffney, D K; Prows, J; Leavitt, D D; Egger, M J; Morgan, J G; Stewart, J R

    1997-01-01

    Since 1980 electron arc irradiation of the postmastectomy chest wall has been the preferred technique for patients with advanced breast cancer at our institution. Here we report the results of this technique in 140 consecutive patients treated from 1980 to 1993. Thoracic computerized tomography was used to determine internal mammary lymph node depth and chest wall thickness, and for computerized dosimetry calculations. Total doses of 45-50 Gy in 5 to 5 1/2 weeks were delivered to the chest wall and internal mammary lymph nodes via electron arc and, in most cases, supraclavicular and axillary nodes were treated with a matching photon field. Patients were assessed for acute and late radiation changes, local and distant control of disease, and survival. Patients had a minimum follow-up of 1 year after completion of radiation treatment, and a mean follow up interval of 49 months and a median of 33 months. All patients had advanced disease: T stages 1, 2, 3, and 4 represented 21%, 39%, 21% and 19% of the study population, with a mean number of positive axillary lymph nodes of 6.5 (range, 0-29). Analysis was performed according to adjuvant status (no residual disease, n = 90), residual disease (positive margin, n = 15, and primary radiation, n = 2), or recurrent disease (n = 33). Acute radiation reactions were generally mild and self limiting. A total of 26% of patients developed moist desquamation, and 32% had brisk erythema. Actuarial 5 year local-regional control, freedom from distant failure, and cause-specific survival was 91%, 64%, and 75% in the adjuvant group; 84%, 50%, and 53% in the residual disease group; and 63%, 34%, and 32% in the recurrent disease group, respectively. In univariate Cox regressions, the number of positive lymph nodes was predictive for local failure in the adjuvant group (P = 0.037). Chronic complications were minimal with 11% of patients having arm edema, 17% hyperpigmentation, and 13% telangectasia formation. These data demonstrate that

  9. Options for assessing and measuring chest wall motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddon, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Assessing chest wall motion is a basic and vital component in managing the child with respiratory problems, whether these are due to pathology in the lungs, airways, chest wall or muscles. Since the 1960s, clinical assessment has been supplemented with an ever-growing range of technological options for measuring chest wall motion, each with unique advantages and disadvantages. Measurements of chest wall motion can be used to: (1) Assess respiratory airflow and volume change, as a non-invasive alternative to measurement at the airway opening, (2) Monitor breathing over long periods of time, to identify apnoea and other types of sleep-disordered breathing, (3)Identify and quantify patterns of abnormal chest wall movement, whether between ribcage and abdominal components (thoracoabdominal asynchrony) or between different regions of the ribcage (eg in scoliosis and pectus excavatum). Measuring chest wall motion allows us to do things which simply cannot be done by more mainstream respiratory function techniques measuring flow at the airway opening: it allows respiratory airflow to be measured when it would otherwise be impossible, and it tells us how the different parts of the chest wall (eg ribcage vs abdomen, right vs left) are moving in order to generate that airflow. The basis of the different techniques available to assess and measure chest wall motion will be reviewed and compared, and their relevance to paediatric respiratory practice assessed.

  10. Chest Wall Segmentation in Automated 3D Breast Ultrasound Scans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, T.; Platel, B.; Mann, R.M.; Huisman, H.; Karssemeijer, N.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present an automatic method to segment the chest wall in automated 3D breast ultrasound images. Determining the location of the chest wall in automated 3D breast ultrasound images is necessary in computer-aided detection systems to remove automatically detected cancer candidates be

  11. Plastic surgery in chest wall reconstruction: relevant aspects - case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Franco

    Full Text Available Objective: to discuss the participation of Plastic Surgery in the reconstruction of the chest wall, highlighting relevant aspects of interdisciplinaryness. Methods: we analyzed charts from 20 patients who underwent extensive resection of the thoracic integument, between 2000 and 2014, recording the indication of resection, the extent and depth of the raw areas, types of reconstructions performed and complications. Results: among the 20 patients, averaging 55 years old, five were males and 15 females. They resections were: one squamous cell carcinoma, two basal cell carcinomas, five chondrosarcomas and 12 breast tumors. The extent of the bloody areas ranged from 4x9 cm to 25x40 cm. In 12 patients the resection included the muscular plane. In the remaining eight, the tumor removal achieved a total wall thickness. For reconstruction we used: one muscular flap associated with skin grafting, nine flaps and ten regional fasciocutaneous flaps. Two patients undergoing reconstruction with fasciocutaneous flaps had partially suffering of the flap, solved with employment of a myocutaneous flap. The other patients displayed no complications with the techniques used, requiring only one surgery. Conclusion: the proper assessment of local tissues and flaps available for reconstruction, in addition to the successful integration of Plastic Surgery with the specialties involved in the treatment, enable extensive resections of the chest wall and reconstructions that provide patient recovery.

  12. Chest wall reconstruction in a pediatric patient with ectopia cordis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Raja; Peralta, Mat; Perez, Ramiro; Rosenkranz, Eliot R; Panthaki, Zubin J

    2010-08-01

    Ectopia cordis is defined as a congenital malposition of the heart outside of the thoracic cavity. It is a rare condition, and complete ectopia cordis can be a fatal condition. Successful surgical reconstruction of this defect has been reported but is uncommon. The general approach to reconstructing the chest wall involves repositioning the heart and providing adequate coverage of the chest wall defect. We describe our experience with a patient who had complete thoracic ectopia cordis treated with staged chest wall reconstruction. The first stage involved temporary closure with synthetic material, and the second stage involved definitive reconstruction with autologous bone and cartilage grafts supported with plates. The patient has been active and without complaints since the second stage and is awaiting tracheal decannulation. There have been a few descriptions of how to approach chest wall reconstruction in patients with ectopia cordis. The 2 stage method described can be considered to repair the chest wall defect in complete thoracic ectopia cordis.

  13. Tube wall thickness measurement apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagasse, P.R.

    1987-01-06

    An apparatus is described for measuring the thickness of a tube's wall for the tube's entire length and circumference by determining the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the known thickness of a selected standard item, the apparatus comprising: a. a base; b. a first support member having first and second ends, the first end being connected to the base, the first support member having a sufficiently small circumference that the tube can be slid over the first support member; c. a spherical element, the spherical element being connected to the second end of the first support member. The spherical element has a sufficiently small circumference at its equator that the tube can be slid over the spherical element, the spherical element having at its equator a larger circumference than the first support member; d. a second support member having first and second ends, the first end being connected to the base, the second support member being spaced apart form the first support member; e. a positioning element connected to and moveable relative to the second support member; and f. an indicator connected to the positioning element and being moveable thereby to a location proximate the spherical element. The indicator includes a contact ball for contacting the selected standard item and holding it against the spherical element, the contact ball contacting the tube when the tube is disposed about the spherical element. The indicator includes a dial having a rotatable needle for indicating the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the thickness of the selected standard item, the rotatable needle being operatively connected to and responsive to the position of the contact ball.

  14. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Sonographic gallbladder wall thickness in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    gallbladder wall thickness and the subjects' age, sex, height and weight .... sex distributions and mean height and weights were calculated. Results were expressed .... establishing of a population-based US gallbladder wall thickness so that.

  15. Creating universes with thick walls

    CERN Document Server

    Ulvestad, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    We study the dynamics of a spherically symmetric false vacuum bubble embedded in a true vacuum region separated by a "thick wall", which is generated by a scalar field in a quartic potential. We study the "Farhi-Guth-Guven" (FGG) quantum tunneling process by constructing numerical solutions relevant to this process. The ADM mass of the spacetime is calculated, and we show that there is a lower bound that is a significant fraction of the scalar field mass. We argue that the zero mass solutions used to by some to argue against the physicality of the FGG process are artifacts of the thin wall approximation used in earlier work. We argue that the zero mass solutions should not be used to question the viability of the FGG process.

  16. Lung and chest wall mechanics in microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edyvean, J; Estenne, M; Paiva, M; Engel, L A

    1991-11-01

    We studied the effect of 15-20 s of weightlessness on lung, chest wall, and abdominal mechanics in five normal subjects inside an aircraft flying repeated parabolic trajectories. We measured flow at the mouth, thoracoabdominal and compartmental volume changes, and gastric pressure (Pga). In two subjects, esophageal pressures were measured as well, allowing for estimates of transdiaphragmatic pressure (Pdi). In all subjects functional residual capacity at 0 Gz decreased by 244 +/- 31 ml as a result of the inward displacement of the abdomen. End-expiratory Pga decreased from 6.8 +/- 0.8 cmH2O at 1 Gz to 2.5 +/- 0.3 cmH2O at Gz (P less than 0.005). Abdominal contribution to tidal volume increased from 0.33 +/- 0.05 to 0.51 +/- 0.04 at 0 Gz (P less than 0.001) but delta Pga showed no consistent change. Hence abdominal compliance increased from 43 +/- 9 to 70 +/- 10 ml/cmH2O (P less than 0.05). There was no consistent effect of Gz on tidal swings of Pdi, on pulmonary resistance and dynamic compliance, or on any of the timing parameters determining the temporal pattern of breathing. The results indicate that at 0 G respiratory mechanics are intermediate between those in the upright and supine postures at 1 G. In addition, analysis of end-expiratory pressures suggests that during weightlessness intra-abdominal pressure is zero, the diaphragm is passively tensed, and a residual small pleural pressure gradient may be present.

  17. Acute posteroinferior wall myocardial infarction secondary to football chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, R; Badui, E; Castaño, R; Madrid, R

    1985-12-01

    Myocardial infarction secondary to nonpenetrating chest trauma is rare. We present the case of a sportsman who developed an acute transmural posteroinferior wall myocardial infarction due to chest trauma by a football. The angiographic study revealed total obstruction of the proximal right coronary artery.

  18. Melioidosis of Chest Wall Masquerading as a Tubercular Cold ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    involvement, and is highly fatal if not appropriately treated.[2]. There is a paucity of reports of .... lung disease, thalassemia, malignancies, steroid therapy, ... incision and drainage); (b) Abscess over the left lower chest wall after incision and ...

  19. Anterior chest wall involvement in patients with pustulosis palmoplantaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurik, A G

    1990-01-01

    With the aim of determining the frequency and radiographic features of anterior chest wall involvement in patients with pustulosis palmoplantaris, a questionnaire was sent to 107 patients. Ninety-three patients returned the questionnaire, five of whom were excluded from further analysis due to the appearance of psoriatic lesions. Twenty-five (28%) of the remaining 88 patients reported pain and/or swelling of joints or bones in the anterior chest wall. All were examined radiographically, using tomography, and a group of 20 patients without anterior chest wall complaints were examined similarly. Sixteen of the patients with, but none of the patients without, complaints were found to have arthro-osteitis of the anterior chest wall, consisting of diffuse sclerosis of the manubrium sterni in one patient, localized sclerosis in seven patients, and sequelae of arthritis of the sternoclavicular, upper sternocostal and/or manubriosternal joint in eight patients.

  20. Reconstrucción de defectos torácicos de espesor total: Presentación de 8 casos de especial complejidad Reconstruction of full thickness defects on the chest wall: Presentation of 8 complex cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Lasso

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Las lesiones de gran tamaño en el tórax, requieren casi siempre para su reparación plastias complejas, que en algunos casos han de combinar el uso de tejidos autólogos y/o materiales sintéticos. Por tanto, la reconstrucción de la pared torácica supone un desafío desde el punto de vista reconstructivo en el que es fundamental el papel de los cirujanos plásticos. Los grandes defectos torácicos suelen ser secundarios a exéresis tumoral (tumores parietales de origen primario o secundario, infecciones, radionecrosis, traumatismos y malformaciones congénitas. Si bien los principios de la reconstrucción del tórax exigen una escisión amplia de la lesión, desbridamiento de los tejidos desvitalizados o irradiados y control de la infección local, dichas actuaciones no podrían abordarse con seguridad si no dispusiéramos de un amplio arsenal de técnicas reconstructivas, capaces de aportar tejidos sanos y bien vascularizados o voluminosos y amplios en superficie, junto con soportes rígidos mediante materiales aloplásticos. Gracias a estos avances, en la mayoría de los casos conseguimos el objetivo con sólo una intervención, cuando hace unos años necesitábamos varios procedimientos quirúrgicos. Presentamos una muestra variada de la experiencia de nuestro Servicio en el tratamiento de grandes defectos del tórax, en el que resumimos las distintas posibilidades que podemos encontrar en la práctica clínica diaria, y las soluciones que mejor se adaptan a las mismas.Reconstruction of full thickness defects on the chest wall is controversial and require the use of complex techniques that combine autologous tissue and/or alloplastic materials. Thus it is a challenge for plastic surgeons since it needs a suitable and functional reconstruction. The aethiology for these defects include tumoral surgery (primary wall tumors, or recurrences or metastasis, infections, radiation injury, trauma and congenital defects. Otherwise, first surgical

  1. Role of Cross Sectional Imaging in Isolated Chest Wall Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanyal, Shantiranjan; Sharma, Barun K.; Prakash, Arjun; Dhingani, Dhabal D.; Bora, Karobi

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Isolated chest wall tuberculosis though a rare entity, the incidence of it has been on rise among immunocompromised population making it an important challenging diagnosis for the physicians. Its clinical presentation may resemble pyogenic chest wall abscess or chest wall soft tissue tumour. Sometimes it is difficult to detect clinically or on plain radiograph. Aim The present study was conducted with an aim to evaluate the common sites and varying appearances of isolated chest wall tuberculosis. Materials and Methods A hospital based cross-sectional retrospective study was conducted in Assam Medical College and Hospital, a tertiary care centre in North East India. The study group comprise of 21 patients (n=15 male and n=6 females) with isolated chest wall tuberculosis without associated pulmonary or spinal involvement who were subjected to Computed Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging (CT/MRI) of the thorax following initial Ultrasonogram (USG) evaluation of the local site. Pathological correlation was done from imaging guided sampling of the aspirate or surgery. Results Variable sites of involvement were seen in the chest wall in our patients (n=21), with chest wall abscess formation being the most common presentation and rib being the most common bony site affected in the thoracic cage. Bony sclerosis was noted in 11 patients (52.4%), periosteal reaction in 10 patients (47.6%) and sequestration in five patients (23.8%). CT/MRI not only localized the exact site and extent of the abscesses which facilitated guided aspirations, but also helped in detecting typical bony lesions thereby, differentiating from pyogenic osteomyelitis besides ruling out associated pulmonary or pleural involvement in such patients. Conclusion Cross-sectional imaging plays an important role by giving a wholesome picture of both soft tissue and bony pathology. It is important to have adequate understanding of the radiologic manifestations of the chest wall involvement and

  2. Chest wall volumes during inspiratory loaded breathing in COPD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho Myrrha, Mariana Alves; Vieira, Danielle Soares Rocha; Moraes, Karoline Simões; Lage, Susan Martins; Parreira, Verônica Franco; Britto, Raquel Rodrigues

    2013-08-01

    Chest wall volumes and breathing patterns of 13 male COPD patients were evaluated at rest and during inspiratory loaded breathing (ILB). The sternocleidomastoid (SMM) and abdominal muscle activity was also evaluated. The main compartment responsible for the tidal volume at rest and during ILB was the abdomen. During ILB patients exhibited, in addition to increases in the ratio of inspiratory time to total time of the respiratory cycle and minute ventilation, increases (p<0.05) in the chest wall tidal volume by an increase in abdomen tidal volume as a result of improvement of end chest wall inspiratory volume without changing on end chest wall expiratory volume. The SMM and abdominal muscle activity increased 63.84% and 1.94% during ILB. Overall, to overcome the load imposed by ILB, COPD patients improve the tidal volume by changing the inspiratory chest wall volume without modifying the predominant mobility of the abdomen at rest and without affecting the end chest wall expiratory volume. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Chest wall segmentation in automated 3D breast ultrasound scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Tao; Platel, Bram; Mann, Ritse M; Huisman, Henkjan; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we present an automatic method to segment the chest wall in automated 3D breast ultrasound images. Determining the location of the chest wall in automated 3D breast ultrasound images is necessary in computer-aided detection systems to remove automatically detected cancer candidates beyond the chest wall and it can be of great help for inter- and intra-modal image registration. We show that the visible part of the chest wall in an automated 3D breast ultrasound image can be accurately modeled by a cylinder. We fit the surface of our cylinder model to a set of automatically detected rib-surface points. The detection of the rib-surface points is done by a classifier using features representing local image intensity patterns and presence of rib shadows. Due to attenuation of the ultrasound signal, a clear shadow is visible behind the ribs. Evaluation of our segmentation method is done by computing the distance of manually annotated rib points to the surface of the automatically detected chest wall. We examined the performance on images obtained with the two most common 3D breast ultrasound devices in the market. In a dataset of 142 images, the average mean distance of the annotated points to the segmented chest wall was 5.59 ± 3.08 mm.

  4. Primitive chest wall neuroectodermal tumor in a pediatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhengcheng; Zou, Wei; Ma, Guodong; Pan, Yanqing

    2011-10-01

    A 13-year-old boy with a primitive neuroectodermal tumor of the chest wall is presented. After four cycles of chemotherapy, a computed tomography scan of his chest showed a larger mass invading the left upper lobe of the lung. He underwent resection of the left chest wall from the left fourth to sixth ribs, including the tumor, combined with left upper lobectomy and lymph node dissection. A diagnosis of primitive neuroectodermal tumor was confirmed histopathologically and immunohistochemically. After surgery, four cycles of chemotherapy with ifosfamide and etoposide were given. One year after treatment, the patient is currently doing well without evidence of recurrence.

  5. Mesenchymal hamartoma of the chest wall: prenatal sonographic manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wie, Jeong ha; Kim, Ju Yeon; Kwon, Ji Young; Ko, Hyun Sun; Shin, Jong Chul; Park, In Yang

    2013-06-01

    Mesenchymal hamartoma of the chest wall is a rare, benign lesion that arises from one or more ribs, almost exclusively found in infants. Some cases that developed in the fetal period have been reported, but accurate diagnosis was usually possible only after birth, except in a few cases in which fetal magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography were performed. We present a case of a congenital mesenchymal hamartoma of the chest wall. Although the diagnosis was not confirmed until birth, the prenatal sonographic examination showed strongly suggestive findings. We review the published reports on this condition, and suggest the prenatal sonographic features. Prenatal sonography is valuable in the differential diagnosis of chest mass.

  6. Chest wall resection and reconstruction for locally advanced primary breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hille, Ursula; Soergel, Philipp; Zardo, Patrick; Pertschy, Stefanie; Busch, Kai; Fischer, Stefan

    2013-06-01

    We sought to evaluate clinical and oncologic outcomes of selected patients with locally advanced breast cancer undergoing full thickness chest wall resection (FTCWR) and reconstruction in a multidisciplinary setting. Between 2008 and 2010, five women underwent FTCWR followed by chest wall repair for locally advanced primary breast cancer. In all cases, chest wall repair was performed with a Peri-Guard Repair Patch (Synovis, St. Paul, MN, USA). At follow-up (7-12 months) quality of life, respiratory function and oncologic status were assessed. Successful chest wall resection and repair were achieved in all patients. Plastic reconstruction of post-mastectomy tissue defects was necessary in one case. One patient was treated by breast conserving therapy. Chest ultrasound imaging confirmed absence of adhesions, haematoma or seroma and normal expansion and respiratory movement of the underlying lung in all patients. On follow-up all patients reported good quality of life. Multidisciplinary surgical approaches to chest wall resection and reconstruction in selected patients with locally advanced primary breast cancer are feasible, safe, associated with short operation time and hospital stay and negligible morbidity.

  7. Creating universes with thick walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulvestad, Andrew; Albrecht, Andreas

    2012-05-01

    We study the dynamics of a spherically symmetric false vacuum bubble embedded in a true vacuum region separated by a “thick wall”, which is generated by a scalar field in a quartic potential. We study the “Farhi-Guth-Guven” (FGG) quantum tunneling process by constructing numerical solutions relevant to this process. The Arnowitt-Deser-Misner mass of the spacetime is calculated, and we show that there is a lower bound that is a significant fraction of the scalar field mass. We argue that the zero mass solutions used to by some to argue against the physicality of the FGG process are artifacts of the thin wall approximation used in earlier work. We argue that the zero mass solutions should not be used to question the viability of the FGG process.

  8. [Malignant fibrous histiocytoma of the chest wall in a nonagenarian].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, K; Igase, M; Kazatani, Y; Matsuzaki, K; Murakami, E; Kokubu, T

    1995-01-01

    We report a case of malignant fibrous histiocytoma of the chest wall observed in a 94-year-old woman. She noticed appetite loss and general edema a week before admission. The patient was diagnosed as having congestive heart failure due to valvular heart disease on the basis of echocardiographic findings and became symptom-free by treatment with vasodilators and diuretics. However, chest roentgenogram disclosed a extrapleural mass in the left mid-lateral chest. About 2 months after admission, she experienced left lateral chest pain for the first time. The chest CT scan revealed a 5 x 5 x 2 cm mass, adjacent to the lateral-posterior chest wall and projecting into the thoracic cavity and rib osteolysis. Gallium-67 citrate scintigram showed abnormal isotope accumulation in the left middle chest. Biopsy was not done. The therapeutic approach was mainly pain relief, and no tumor resection, chemotherapy, or radiotherapy was performed. The mass increased in size, and increasingly extended into the thoracic cavity on follow-up CT scans. Furthermore, marked invasion of the tumor to subcutis and subscapula was found. She died of cachexia and respiratory failure 34 weeks after admission. Histologic examination revealed malignant fibrous histiocytoma.

  9. Ventilation distribution and chest wall mechanics in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, M.; Wantier, M.; Verbanck, S.; Engel, L. A.; Prisk, G. K.; Guy, H. J. B.; West, J. B.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of gravity on lung ventilation distribution and the mechanisms of the chest wall were investigated. The following tests were performed with the respiratory monitoring system of the Anthorack, flown onboard Spacelab D2 mission: single breath washout (SBW), multiple breath washout (MBW) and argon rebreathing (ARB). In order to study chest wall mechanisms in microgravity, a respiratory inductive plethysmograph was used. The SBW tests did not reach statistical significance, while the ARB tests showed that gravity independent inhomogeneity of specific ventilation is larger than gravity dependent inhomogeneity. In which concerns the chest wall mechanisms, the analysis on the four astronauts during the normal respirations of the relaxation maneuver showed a 40 percent increase on the abdominal contribution to respiration.

  10. Mesenchymal hamartoma of the chest wall in an infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayadi-Kaddour, A; Mlika, M; Chaabouni, S; Kilani, T; El Mezni, F

    2007-12-01

    Mesenchymal hamartoma of the chest wall is a very rare, benign tumour with distinct clinical, radiological and histopathologic characteristics. The lesion develops during foetal life, and is present at or shortly after birth with an extrapleural mass arising from the rib cage with or without respiratory distress and marked rib deformity. Several imaging techniques have been used for diagnosis, but a definitive diagnosis is established only by histopathological examination. Such lesions are composed of a varying admixture of hyaline cartilage that has features resembling growth plate cartilage, along with fascicles of spindle cells, woven bone and hemorrhagic cysts. Accurate diagnosis of mesenchymal hamartoma is important since many chest wall masses in children are malignant. We report a case of mesenchymal hamartoma of the left posterior chest wall surgically resected in an infant who was found to have a palpable mass at birth. Two years after surgery, the patient is alive and well, with no evidence of recurrence.

  11. Chest wall involvement as a manifestation of Brucellosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Rahmdel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Brucellosis continues to be a common infectious disease in some parts of the world. Although the disease has different presentations, but chest wall involvement, as a manifestation of brucellosis is rare. In this study, we report three cases of chest wall involvement as manifesting feature of Brucellosis in Iran. They presented with a history of parasternal masses revealed to a diagnosis of Brucellosis and responded well to the treatment. Brucellosis may present with strange and unpredictable manifestations and can be misdiagnosed with tuberculosis and malignancies, especially in endemic areas for both TB and brucellosis.

  12. Melioidosis:a rare cause of anterior chest wall abscess

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rashidi Ahmad; Azhar Amir Hamzah; Ahmad Kasfi Abdul Rahman; Phee Kheng Cheah

    2010-01-01

    Melioidosis is an unusual tropical infectious disease caused by the gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei, which was formerly known asPseudomonas pseudomallei. Melioidosis is characterized by abscess formation and it may manifest in any part of the human body, however, musculoskeletel melioidosis is uncommon and chest wall melioidosis is very rare. To determine the exact organism based solely on clinical presentation poses a great challenge to the physician. Yet, delay administration of antibiotic may be harmful. We describe a diabetic patient who had anterior chest wall melioidosis that mimicsStaphylococcus aureus infection. A description of his presentation and management, along with a review of literature is presented.

  13. Chest wall syndrome among primary care patients: a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verdon François

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The epidemiology of chest pain differs strongly between outpatient and emergency settings. In general practice, the most frequent cause is the chest wall pain. However, there is a lack of information about the characteristics of this syndrome. The aims of the study are to describe the clinical aspects of chest wall syndrome (CWS. Methods Prospective, observational, cohort study of patients attending 58 private practices over a five-week period from March to May 2001 with undifferentiated chest pain. During a one-year follow-up, questionnaires including detailed history and physical exam, were filled out at initial consultation, 3 and 12 months. The outcomes were: clinical characteristics associated with the CWS diagnosis and clinical evolution of the syndrome. Results Among 24 620 consultations, we observed 672 cases of chest pain and 300 (44.6% patients had a diagnosis of chest wall syndrome. It affected all ages with a sex ratio of 1:1. History and sensibility to palpation were the keys for diagnosis. Pain was generally moderate, well localised, continuous or intermittent over a number of hours to days or weeks, and amplified by position or movement. The pain however, may be acute. Eighty-eight patients were affected at several painful sites, and 210 patients at a single site, most frequently in the midline or a left-sided site. Pain was a cause of anxiety and cardiac concern, especially when acute. CWS coexisted with coronary disease in 19 and neoplasm in 6. Outcome at one year was favourable even though CWS recurred in half of patients. Conclusion CWS is common and benign, but leads to anxiety and recurred frequently. Because the majority of chest wall pain is left-sided, the possibility of coexistence with coronary disease needs careful consideration.

  14. Radical resection of giant chondrosarcoma of the anterior chest wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanić Vojkan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Chondrosarcomas represent approximately 30% of primary malignant bone tumors, the most frequent of which is on anterior thoracic wall. Case report. We presented a case of 50-year-old man suffering from a slowgrowing, painless giant chondrosarcoma of the anterior chest wall. A wide resection was performed to excise the tumor including attached skin, right breast, ribs, sternum, soft tissues and parietal pleura. Mediastinum was not affected by the tumor. After resecting a 26 × 20 × 22 cm segment, the chest wall defect was reconstructed with a Marlex mesh and extensive latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap pedicled on the right thoracodorsal vessels. Histopatology diagnosis was chondrosarcoma G 2−3. The mechanics of ventilation was not altered and respiratory function was normal from the immediate postoperative period. Three years after the operation postoperative results showed no local recurrence and excellent functional and aesthetic results were evident. Respiratory function remained unaltered. Conclusion. According to the results it can be concluded that the use of Marlex mash and myocutaneous flap is good method for stabilization of the chest wall and enough to avoid paradoxical respiratory movements in managing giant chondrosarcoma of the anterior chest wall.

  15. Reconstruction of chest wall defects after resection of large neoplasms: ten-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoa, Nuria; Benito, Pablo; Jiménez, Marcelo F; de Juan, Ana; Luis Aranda, José; Varela, Gonzalo

    2005-06-01

    We review our experience in the treatment of complex large chest-wall defects needing a multidisciplinary approach due to primary or secondary neoplasms. Non-small cell lung cancer with chest-wall invasion cases are excluded. Fifteen patients underwent whole thickness resection of the chest wall due to lesions affecting at least three ribs, sternum, clavicle or thoracic spine and the surrounding soft tissue. Previously operated breast cancer and sarcoma were the most frequent diagnoses. Partial or total sternectomy plus rib resection was performed in 8 patients. Immediate closure of the defects was performed in all cases: 12 with single prosthesis placement and 3 with a rigid one of methylmethacrylate. Coverage was achieved using myocutaneous flaps in most cases and, in one case, using the greater omentum that supported a free split-thickness skin graft. No 30-days mortality was recorded. Three patients had a post-operative complication. Mean hospital stay was 11.7+/-9 days. All cases of primary tumours were alive at the time of review (range: 6-126 months). In conclusion, resection and immediate reconstruction of large chest wall defects can be accomplished without operative mortality and low morbidity whenever close cooperation between plastic and thoracic teams exists.

  16. Galactorrhea and hyperprolactinemia associated with chest wall injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, J E; Dawson, M; Hodgkinson, H; Kalk, W J

    1977-11-01

    A 48 year old premenopausal woman presented with galactorrhea and amenorrhea associated with chest wall burns. Basal serum prolactin levels were raised, and were further elevated by the administration of L-dopa, chlorpromazine and TRH. Intercostal nerve block and bromocryptine treatment reduced prolactin levels to normal, but did not noticably reduce milk secretion.

  17. Chest wall tuberculosis; CT findings in 14 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Young Min; Lee, Sang Yong; Lee, Dong Won; Kim, Chong Soo; Chung, Gyung Ho; Sohn, Myung Hee; Choi, Ki Chul [Chonbuk National Univ. School of Medicine, Chonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Woo [Daejoen Eulji Hospital, Daejon (Korea, Republic of); Juhng, Seon Kwan [Wonkwang Univ. Medical School, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-01-01

    To present CT findings of chest wall tuberculosis. CT scans were obtained in 14 patients with proven chest wall tuberculosis. Diagnosis was confirmed by means of right open thoracostomy with abscess evacuation (n=1), excision and curettage (n=11) or excision and curettage along with resection of the involved lung (n=2). The images were assessed with emphasis for the extrapleural, pleural, and pulmonary lesions. All patients showed juxtacostal soft tissue mass with central low attenuation and peripheral rim enhancement. The lesions were located in the left hemithorax in eight patients and in the right in six. Multiple lesions were found in three patients (two in one and three in two). Rib destruction was observed in four patients. Intercostal muscle involvement of thickening and enhancement were shown in all patients. Thirteen patients (93%) had evidence of pulmonary tuberculosis: active pulmonary tuberculosis in nine and stable tuberculosis in four. Pleural lesions, including empyema necessitatis in six, were observed in eleven (79%). On CT scan, chest wall tuberculosis is characterized by juxtacostal soft tissue lesion with central low attenuation and peripheral rim enhancement. Rib destruction may be associated. Additionally, enhancing intercostal muscle suggest direct inflammatory process of tuberculosis and spread channel to the chest wall involvement of pleuropulmonary tuberculosis.

  18. A neonate with respiratory distress and a chest wall deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerrey, Benjamin; Reed, Jennifer

    2007-08-01

    Infants with respiratory distress commonly present to a pediatric emergency department. There are rare but serious conditions that need to be considered in the differential diagnosis. We report the history of an infant that presented to our institution with respiratory distress ultimately diagnosed with a mesenchymal hamartoma of the chest wall. The presentation, diagnosis, and treatment options for mesenchymal hamartoma are discussed.

  19. Unilateral chest wall anomaly in a patient with Gardner' s syndrome: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Eun Hee; Lee, So Yeon; Park, Hee Jin; Kwon, Heon Ju; Kim, Mi Sung; Park, Hae Won; Kwang, Hyon Joo [Dept. of Radiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hye Jin [Dept. of Radiology, Eulji General Hospital, Eulji University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Gardner syndrome is a familial disease consisting of colonic polyposis, osteomas, and soft tissue tumors. We describe unilateral chest wall anomaly in a 32-year-old man with Gardner syndrome. A chest radiograph showed asymmetric hypertrophy of the right seventh to tenth ribs. CT images showed increased size of the medullary portions of these lesions, but relatively normal thickness of the cortex. Intercostal muscles along the right seventh to tenth ribs were hypertrophied as compared with the contralateral ribs. Both lungs were clear but the volume of right lung showed slightly smaller than left one.

  20. CNE article: pain after lung transplant: high-frequency chest wall oscillation vs chest physiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esguerra-Gonzalez, Angeli; Ilagan-Honorio, Monina; Fraschilla, Stephanie; Kehoe, Priscilla; Lee, Ai Jin; Marcarian, Taline; Mayol-Ngo, Kristina; Miller, Pamela S; Onga, Jay; Rodman, Betty; Ross, David; Sommer, Susan; Takayanagi, Sumiko; Toyama, Joy; Villamor, Filma; Weigt, S Samuel; Gawlinski, Anna

    2013-03-01

    Background Chest physiotherapy and high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) are routinely used after lung transplant to facilitate removal of secretions. To date, no studies have been done to investigate which therapy is more comfortable and preferred by lung transplant recipients. Patients who have less pain may mobilize secretions, heal, and recover faster. Objectives To compare effects of HFCWO versus chest physiotherapy on pain and preference in lung transplant recipients. Methods In a 2-group experimental, repeated-measures design, 45 lung transplant recipients (27 single lung, 18 bilateral) were randomized to chest physiotherapy (10 AM, 2 PM) followed by HFCWO (6 PM, 10 PM; group 1, n=22) or vice versa (group 2, n=23) on postoperative day 3. A verbal numeric rating scale was used to measure pain before and after treatment. At the end of the treatment sequence, a 4-item patient survey was administered to assess treatment preference, pain, and effectiveness. Data were analyzed with χ(2) and t tests and repeated-measures analysis of variance. Results A significant interaction was found between mean difference in pain scores from before to after treatment and treatment method; pain scores decreased more when HFCWO was done at 10 AM and 6 PM (P =.04). Bilateral transplant recipients showed a significant preference for HFCWO over chest physiotherapy (11 [85%] vs 2 [15%], P=.01). However, single lung recipients showed no significant difference in preference between the 2 treatments (11 [42%] vs 14 [54%]). Conclusions HFCWO seems to provide greater decreases in pain scores than does chest physiotherapy. Bilateral lung transplant recipients preferred HFCWO to chest physiotherapy. HFCWO may be an effective, feasible alternative to chest physiotherapy. (American Journal of Critical Care. 2013;22:115-125).

  1. [Primary hydatidosis of the chest wall. Report of 5 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braham, Emna; Ayadi-Kaddour, Aïda; Abid, Leïla; Ismail, Olfa; Smati, Belhassen; Fénniche, Sourraya; Djilani, Habiba; Megdiche, Lamine; Kilani, Tarek; El Mezni, Faouzi

    2007-08-01

    Hydatidosis is an endemic affection in Tunisia. Bone echinococcosis is a relatively rare entity accounting for only 0.5-2% of all hydatid cysts in humans and chest wall is an uncommon site for the disease. Report of a new case We report about this talk 5 cases concerning 2 men and 3 women (mean of age 35.4 years) explored for parietal mass (4 cases), or chest pain (1 case). Diagnosis was suspected on radiologic findings in all cases. All patients underwent surgery. Medical treatment was associated in 2 cases. Histopathology of resected specimen confirmed diagnosis of echinococcosis. No recurrence was observed during follow-up period.

  2. Thrombophlebitis of the lateral chest wall (Mondor′s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Crisan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mondor′s disease is a rare condition, which involves the thrombophlebitis of the superficial veins of the breast and anterior chest wall. A 37-year-old woman presented with sudden onset of local pain and edema on her right chest wall, accompanied by a longitudinal retraction of the skin during arm abduction in the area. Clinical, histological and ultrasonographic findings confirmed Mondor′s disease and the treatment was symptomatic, using pain relievers and warm compresses. The symptomatology remitted within 2 weeks of therapy. Mondor′s disease is a rare condition where ultrasound complements the clinical evaluation and allows the characterization of certain abnormalities, which correlated with functional biochemical data and other procedures may substitute the need of biopsy.

  3. Clinical Implications High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO)

    OpenAIRE

    Mantellini E.; Perrero L.; Petrozzino S.; Gatta A.; Bona S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: patients with neuromuscular diseases presents an high incidence of respiratory infections favoured by stagnation of deep bronchial secretions and deficit of cough. The aim of the study is to evaluate the correct treatment of this condition and the role of High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO) in helping the removal of bronchial secretions and reduce the incidence of infections in patients with neuromuscular disease.Methods: analysis of the current bibliography related to resp...

  4. Clinical Implications High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantellini E.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: patients with neuromuscular diseases presents an high incidence of respiratory infections favoured by stagnation of deep bronchial secretions and deficit of cough. The aim of the study is to evaluate the correct treatment of this condition and the role of High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO in helping the removal of bronchial secretions and reduce the incidence of infections in patients with neuromuscular disease.Methods: analysis of the current bibliography related to respiratory infections and neuromuscular disease. PCEF (Peak Cough Expiratory Flow is used as a standardized indicator of efficiency of cough.Results: the High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO is useful, in cases of increased production of mucus and impairment of muco-ciliary clearance, to remove the tracheobronchial secretions and reduce the incidence of infections.Conclusions: the correct approach to patients with neuromuscular disease and frequent respiratory infections is focused on treatment of cough ineffective and management of bronchial secretions. High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO (VEST has a central role in treatment of cough ineffective and management of bronchial secretions reducing respiratory infections.

  5. Oscillation of the lung by chest-wall vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binks, A P; Bloch-Salisbury, E; Banzett, R B; Schwartzstein, R M

    2001-07-01

    Vibration of the thoracic surface has been shown to modify the drive to breathe and the sensation of dyspnea. It has been suggested that respiratory muscle afferents generate these effects. The possibility that the consequences of chest-wall vibration also involve intra-pulmonary afferents led us to investigate whether such vibration reaches the airways. Two vibratory stimuli were independently applied to four chest-wall sites and two control sites on eight healthy subjects. During separate breath holds, the vibrator was held on each site while subjects periodically opened and closed the pharynx. Airway pressure (P(AW)) was measured at the mouth. Spectral analysis of P(AW) showed pressure oscillations occurred at the same frequency as that of the vibrators when the pharynx was open; oscillation amplitude was vastly reduced when the pharynx was closed. Oscillation amplitude was also significantly larger during vibration at greater amplitude. These data demonstrate that vibration over the chest-wall vibrates the lung and could potentially excite intrapulmonary receptors.

  6. Noninvasive monitoring of chest wall movement in infants using laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Tsutomu; Minocchieri, Stefan; Baldwin, David N; Nelle, Mathias; Frey, Urs

    2006-10-01

    Traditionally, non-invasive monitoring of tidal volume in infants has been performed using impedance plethysmography analyzed using a one or two compartment model. We developed a new laser system for use in infants, which measures antero-posterior movement of the chest wall during quiet sleep. In 24 unsedated or sedated infants (11 healthy, 13 with respiratory disease), we examined whether the analysis of thoracoabdominal movement based on a three compartment model could more accurately estimate tidal volume in comparison to V(T) measured at the mouth. Using five laser signals, chest wall movements were measured at the right and left, upper and lower ribcage and the abdomen. Within the tidal volume range from 4.6 to 135.7 ml, a three compartment model showed good short term repeatability and the best agreement with tidal volume measured at mouth (r(2) = 0.86) compared to that of a single compartment model (r(2) = 0.62, P infants and potentially of regional differences of chest wall displacement in future studies.

  7. Using "Rebar" to Stabilize Rigid Chest Wall Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Lary A; Grubbs, Deanna M

    2016-04-01

    After major chest wall resection, reconstruction of the bony defect with a rigid prosthesis is mandatory to protect the underlying thoracic organs, and to prevent flail chest physiology. Although many methods have been described for chest wall reconstruction, a commonly used technique employs a composite Marlex (polypropylene) mesh with methyl-methacrylate cement sandwiched between two layers of mesh (MMS), which is tailored to the defect size and shape. In building construction, steel "rebar" is used to strengthen and reinforce masonry structures. To avoid the initial residual motion of the rigid prosthesis used to reconstruct very large defects, particularly the sternum, we devised a simple technique of adding one or more Steinmann steel pins as "rebar" to strengthen and immediately stabilize the prosthesis to the surrounding ribs and sternum. For the very large defects, particularly over the heart and great vessels, titanium mesh may also be readily added into the sandwich construction for increased strength and to prevent late prosthetic fractures. Short- and long-term results of this inexpensive modification of the MMS reconstruction technique are excellent. This modified MMS tailor-made prosthesis is only one-third the cost of the recently popular prosthetic titanium systems, takes much less operative time to create and implant, and avoids the well-described complications of late titanium bar fracture and erosion/infection as well as loosening of screws and/or titanium bars.

  8. Fibrous dysplasia of the rib presenting as a huge chest wall tumor: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, B S; Lee, S C; Harn, H J

    1994-07-01

    Fibrous dysplasia of the rib is not uncommon, but is rarely demonstrated as a huge chest wall mass with severe clinical symptoms. A 59-year-old patient, presenting with a huge, rapidly expanding chest wall tumor compressing the lung, liver and heart accompanied by chest pain and dyspnea, is reported. The tumor was success-fully excised by local radical resection.

  9. Musculoskeletal problems of the chest wall in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Peter L; Biswas, Anita C; Batt, Mark E

    2002-01-01

    Chest pain in the athlete has a wide differential diagnosis. Pain may originate from structures within the thorax, such as the heart, lungs or oesophagus. However, musculoskeletal causes of chest pain must be considered. The aim of this review is to help the clinician to diagnose chest wall pain in athletes by identifying the possible causes, as reported in the literature. Musculoskeletal problems of the chest wall can occur in the ribs, sternum, articulations or myofascial structures. The cause is usually evident in the case of direct trauma. Additionally, athletes' bodies may be subjected to sudden large indirect forces or overuse, and stress fractures of the ribs caused by sporting activity have been extensively reported. These have been associated with golf, rowing and baseball pitching in particular. Stress fractures of the sternum reported in wrestlers cause pain and tenderness of the sternum, as expected. Diagnosis is by bone scan and limitation of activity usually allows healing to occur. The slipping rib syndrome causes intermittent costal margin pain related to posture or movement, and may be diagnosed by the 'hooking manoeuvre', which reproduces pain and sometimes a click. If reassurance and postural advice fail, good results are possible with resection of the mobile rib. The painful xiphoid syndrome is a rare condition that causes pain and tenderness of the xiphoid and is self-limiting. Costochondritis is a self-limiting condition of unknown aetiology that typically presents with pain around the second to fifth costochondral joints. It can be differentiated from Tietze's syndrome in which there is swelling and pain of the articulation. Both conditions eventually settle spontaneously although a corticosteroid injection may be useful in particularly troublesome cases. The intercostal muscles may be injured causing tenderness between the ribs. Other conditions that should be considered include epidemic myalgia, precordial catch syndrome and referred pain

  10. Chest wall reconstruction in a patient with Cantrell syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsukawa, Nobuyuki; Yasunaga, Hiroshi; Tananari, Yoshifumi

    2009-06-01

    Cantrell syndrome is a very rare congenital anomaly with up to five features: a midline, upper abdominal wall abnormality, lower sternal defect, anterior diaphragmatic defect, diaphragmatic pericardial defect, and congenital abnormalities of the heart. This report describes our experience of performing a reconstruction of a chest wall defect in a Cantrell syndrome case with herniation of the heart. The patient was a 1-month-old female infant who received surgical patch repair of a ventricular septal defect (VSD) and atrial septal defect (ASD) at the Department of Cardiac Surgery. Subsequently, the patient underwent reconstruction at the second-stage surgery. A rhomboid skin flap with an inferior pedicle was used to close the defect. In this process the flap, including portions of the rectus abdominis muscles, was elevated and transferred into the defect. The sectioned ends of the divided pectoralis major muscles were sutured together to simultaneously reconstruct the muscles. It has been 2 years since the surgery, and the defect is covered with normal skin, and the protrusion of the heart from the chest wall and the externally visible pulsation have been resolved. The progress has been very good functionally and cosmetically.

  11. Measurements of ultrasonic pulse distortion produced by human chest wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkelman, L M; Szabo, T L; Waag, R C

    1997-04-01

    Ultrasonic wavefront distortion produced by transmission through human chest wall specimens was measured over a two-dimensional aperture. Measured pulse wavefronts were sometimes disrupted by secondary wavefronts produced by interaction between the transmitted pulses and the bone and cartilage structures of the rib cage. The secondary wavefronts produced large distortions in the received waveforms and interfered with the determination of the wavefront distortion caused by soft-tissue inhomogeneities. The effects of secondary wavefronts were minimized by reducing the region of analysis. Differences in arrival time and energy level between these restricted regions and references that account for geometric delay and spreading were computed. Spectral changes were assessed by calculating a waveform similarity factor that is decreased from 1.0 by changes in waveform shape. For 16 different intercostal spaces, the arrival time fluctuations of the measured waveforms had an average (+/-s.d.) rms value of 21.3 (+/-8.4) ns and an average correlation length of 2.50 (+/-0.62) mm. The energy level fluctuations had an average rms value of 1.57 (+/-0.45) dB and an average correlation length of 1.98 (+/-0.33) mm, and the average waveform similarity factor was 0.964 (+/-0.012). For soft-tissue inhomogeneities in chest wall specimens, the average rms arrival time and energy level fluctuations were less than half those measured for the abdominal wall. However, although the average correlation length of the arrival time fluctuations was less than half that found for the abdominal wall, the average correlation length of the energy level fluctuations was similar to that of the abdominal wall.

  12. Pneumothorax, without chest wall fracture, following airbag deployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Parsons

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Air bags are an automatic crash protection system. They have been shown to reduce mortality from motor vehicle accidents by 31% following direct head-on impacts, by 19% following any frontal impact and by 11% overall. Despite obvious benefits there has been a corresponding increase in the number of injuries resulting from their deployment. We describe a case of a pneumothorax in the absence of chest wall pathology associated with airbag deployment, in a belted driver. There has been one previous description of pneumothorax associated with airbag deployment, in an unbelted driver.

  13. On thick domain walls in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Guenter; Noetzold, Dirk

    1989-01-01

    Planar scalar field configurations in general relativity differ considerably from those in flat space. It is shown that static domain walls of finite thickness in curved space-time do not possess a reflection symmetry. At infinity, the space-time tends to the Taub vacuum on one side of the wall and to the Minkowski vacuum (Rindler space-time) on the other. Massive test particles are always accelerated towards the Minkowski side, i.e., domain walls are attractive on the Taub side, but repulsive on the Minkowski side (Taub-vacuum cleaner). It is also proved that the pressure in all directions is always negative. Finally, a brief comment is made concerning the possibility of infinite, i.e., bigger than horizon size, domain walls in our universe. All of the results are independent of the form of the potential V(phi) greater than or equal to 0 of the scalar field phi.

  14. Chest wall tuberculosis - A clinical and imaging experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabnam Bhandari Grover

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Tuberculous infection of the thoracic cage is rare and is difficult to discern clinically or on radiographs. This study aims to describe the common sites and the imaging appearances of chest wall tuberculosis. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of the clinical and imaging records of 12 confirmed cases of thoracic cage tuberculosis (excluding that of the spine, seen over the last 7 years, was performed. Imaging studies available included radiographs, ultrasonographies (USGs, and computed tomography (CT scans. Pathological confirmation was obtained in all cases. Results: All patients had clinical signs and symptoms localized to the site of involvement, whether it was the sternum, sternoclavicular joints, or ribs. CT scan revealed sternal destruction in three patients and osteolytic lesions with sclerosis of the articular surfaces of the sternoclavicular joints in two patients. In five patients with rib lesions, USG elegantly demonstrated the bone destruction underlying the cold abscess. All cases were confirmed to be of tuberculous origin by pathology studies of the aspirated/curetted material, obtained by CT / USG guidance. Conclusions: Tuberculous etiology should be considered for patients presenting with atypical sites of skeletal inflammation. CT scan plays an important role in the evaluation of these patients. However, the use of USG for demonstrating rib destruction in a chest wall cold abscess has so far been under-emphasized, as has been the role of CT and USG guided aspiration in confirming the aetiology.

  15. Necrotizing Fasciitis of the Chest Wall: Report of Pediatric Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Monica; Meeks, Andrew; Kearl, Liza

    2015-09-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a soft tissue infection uncommonly described in children and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality if not treated early and aggressively. Reports of cases involving the upper torso are rare in general. In adults, necrotizing fasciitis is most commonly described in the abdomen, perineum, and extremities. For children, particularly neonates, necrotizing fasciitis most commonly involves the trunk presenting as omphalitis. In this report, we describe 2 pediatric cases of necrotizing fasciitis of the chest wall that presented within 6 months from each other at Los Angeles County Hospital/University of Southern California Pediatric Emergency Department. Both cases involved previously healthy children with above normal body mass indices of 36 and 25.6, respectively. These cases are noteworthy because of the rarity of necrotizing fasciitis among children especially in the chest wall, atypical presentation with nonspecific symptoms which made the diagnosis challenging, and suggestion that obesity may be a potential risk factor. Despite the rarity of this disease, the information presented in these cases may aid in raising the index of suspicion for diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis.

  16. Anterior chest wall tuberculous abscess: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papavramidis Theodossis S

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The granulomatous inflammation of tuberculosis usually involves the lungs and the hilar lymph nodes. Musculoskeletal tuberculosis (TB occurs in 1–3% of patients with TB, while TB of the chest wall constitutes 1% to 5% of all cases of musculoskeletal TB. Furthermore, nowadays it is rarer to find extrapulmonary TB in immunocompetent rather that non-immunocompetent patients. The present case reports a fifty-six-year-old immunocompetent man with an anterior chest wall tuberculous abscess. The rarity of the present case relates both to the localization of the tuberculous abscess, and to the fact that the patient was immunocompetent. The diagnosis of musculoskeletal tuberculous infection remains a challenge for clinicians and requires a high index of suspicion. The combination of indolent onset of symptoms, positive tuberculin skin test, and compatible radiographic findings, strongly suggests the diagnosis. TB, however, must be confirmed by positive culture or histologic proof. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are important to prevent serious bone and joint destruction.

  17. Perioperative brachytherapy for pretreated chest wall recurrence of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, A.; Naszaly, A.; Patyanik, M. [Municipal Center of Oncoradiology, Budapest (Hungary)

    2002-11-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the technical aspects of high-dose-rate afterloading (HDR-AL) brachytherapy for isolated local chest wall recurrence of breast cancer pretreated with mastectomy and axillary node dissection plus postoperative radiotherapy. Case Report: A 63-year-old female patient with left ductal breast cancer, pT2pN1biMO, was reoperated for an isolated local chest wall recurrence 13 years after primary treatment (mastectomy, axillary dissection, and 50 Gy postoperative irradiation). Radical surgery would have involved extreme multilation. Reoperative surgical margins of 3 mm width were involved, and four parallel afterloading catheters were placed intraoperatively in this histologically positive margin site. Perioperative HDR-AL (Ir-192 stepping source, 370 GBq activity, dose rate: reference air kerma rate at 1 m 40.84 mGy/h kg) was performed. Dose per fraction: 6 Gy to the reference line, two fractions per week, total dose 30 Gy. Follow-up after secondary treatment: 5 years. Results: Firm local control and 5-year disease-free survival were obtained with perioperative HDR-AL therapy; staging procedures (clinical exam, MRI, abdominal ultrasound, and bone scan) showed no evidence of disease. The development of radiodermatitis did not exceed grade 2 level and healed spontaneously within 6 weeks. Conclusions: Isolated local chest all relapse can be effectively controlled by wide surgical excision and perioperative reirradiation with HDR-AL. This technique may represent a treatment alternative to ultraradical surgery, with equal healing probability and a better quality of life. Small-volume irradiation of the postoperative scar can be performed with HDR-AL brachytherapy, and long-term local control can be achieved with a total dose of 30 Gy. (orig.)

  18. Late results following flap reconstruction for chest wall recurrent breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindford, A J; Jahkola, T A; Tukiainen, E

    2013-02-01

    Locally extensive recurrent breast cancer usually portends a poor prognosis but certain cases can be treated surgically by wide soft-tissue resection as well as full-thickness chest wall resection (FTCWR). The resulting defect usually necessitates immediate flap coverage. The aim of this study was to assess local control, morbidity, choice of flap reconstruction, patient selection and overall long-term survival following surgical salvage of patients with chest wall recurrent breast cancer. Forty patients were treated with wide soft-tissue resection and immediate flap reconstruction from 1984 to 2011 in a single institution. Demographic, treatment and mortality data were obtained from patients' files. Mean age at surgery was 54 years. FTCWR was performed in 19 cases including three extended forequarter amputations. Chest wall stabilisation involved a synthetic mesh in 12 patients, fascia lata in two patients, free rib grafts in one patient and synthetic mesh and free rib graft in one patient. Soft-tissue reconstruction consisted of microvascular free flaps in seven patients and pedicled flaps in 33 patients. In-hospital mortality was 0%, 30-day mortality was 5%; there were two re-operations, six minor wound complications and one pulmonary embolism. There were no flap losses. In patients operated on with curative intent (n=31) median disease-free interval was 31 months and median survival was 52 months. In selected cases wide resections for extensive chest wall recurrent breast cancer can result in reasonable local control and survival. Several flap options exist for soft-tissue reconstruction. Copyright © 2012 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Polylactide bioabsorbable struts for chest wall reconstruction in a pediatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarawo, Tafadzwa P; Reynolds, Richard A; Cullen, Marc L

    2015-02-01

    Chest wall reconstruction after pediatric tumor resection is challenging. Children have unique characteristics related to growth and prosthetic material for reconstruction must be chosen carefully. Poly-L-Lactide (PLA), a bioabsorbable prosthetic material, has been used in the plate form for reconstruction after tumor resection in children. Recently developed PLA struts have been successfully used to reconstruct pediatric chest wall deformities. This is the first description of the use of PLA rib struts to reconstruct chest wall defects after a pediatric chest wall tumor resection. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A triceps musculocutaneous flap for chest-wall defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartrampf, C.R. Jr.; Elliott, L.F.; Feldman, S. (Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (USA))

    1990-09-01

    A posterior upper arm flap based on the profunda brachii vessels has been described to cover soft-tissue defects in the upper anterolateral chest. In our series, the posterior upper arm skin is elevated with the long head of the triceps muscle to cover seven chest-wall defects resulting from indolent postradiation open wounds following partial TRAM flap failure (n = 2), soft-tissue deficiencies following partial TRAM flap loss (n = 3), and primarily as an ancillary flap in TRAM flap breast reconstruction (n = 2). This flap also may be used to supply well-vascularized tissue in the regions of the shoulder, axilla, and posterolateral back. A prerequisite for this operation is redundant tissue of the upper arm often present in middle-aged women and in patients with lymphedema following mastectomy. In our series of seven patients, all donor sites were closed primarily, and there was no subjective functional deficit following transfer of the long head of the triceps muscle.

  1. Photodynamic therapy for chest wall recurrence from breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, R R; Sibata, C; Mang, T S; Bagnato, V S; Downie, G H; Hu, X H; Cuenca, R

    2004-09-01

    Breast cancer is common with over 230,000 new cases diagnosed each year in North America alone. While great strides have been made to achieve excellent cancer control and survival, a significant minority of patients fail locally. While initial salvage to regain disease control is of the utmost importance, it is not universally successful. This leads to a therapeutic quagmire. Additional surgery, radiation and chemo-hormonal therapy are possible, but they are usually highly morbid with low success rates. Photodynamic therapy appears to be an underutilized salvage modality for this unfortunate patient population. This report analyzes and reviews the role of photodynamic therapy for patients with chest wall re-recurrence from breast cancer.

  2. Clinical image: Hydatid disease of the chest wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, R.J.; Berlin, J.W.; Ghahremani, G.G. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Hydatid disease is rarely encountered among the population of the United States, but it affects several million people in sheep-raising regions of the world. Human infestation with Echinococcus granulosus begins following ingestion of its ova, which are excreted into the contaminated water during the usual dog-sheep cycle. Hydatid cysts will then develop most frequently in the liver (75% of cases) and lungs (15%) of the human host. Skeletal involvement has been reported to occur in only 0.5-4.0% of patients in the endemic areas. Because of the rarity and perplexing imaging features of hydatid disease involving the chest wall, we wish herein to present a case evaluated recently at our institution. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  3. Modulation of chest wall intermuscular coherence: effects of lung volume excursion and transcranial direct current stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomczak, Corey R; Greidanus, Krista R; Boliek, Carol A

    2013-08-01

    Chest wall muscle recruitment varies as a function of the breathing task performed. However, the cortical control of the chest wall muscles during different breathing tasks is not known. We studied chest wall intermuscular coherence during various task-related lung volume excursions in 10 healthy adults (34 ± 15 yr; 2 men, 8 women) and determined if transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) could modulate chest wall intermuscular coherence during these tasks. Simultaneous assessment of regional intercostal and oblique electromyographic activity was measured while participants performed standardized tidal breathing, speech, maximum phonation, and vital capacity tasks. Lung volume and chest wall kinematics were determined using variable inductance plethysmography. We found that chest wall area of intermuscular coherence was greater during tidal and speech breathing compared with phonation and vital capacity (all P < 0.05) and between tidal breathing compared with speech breathing (P < 0.05). Anodal tDCS increased chest wall area of intermuscular coherence from 0.04 ± 0.09 prestimulation to 0.18 ± 0.19 poststimulation for vital capacity (P < 0.05). Sham tDCS and cathodal tDCS had no effect on coherence during lung volume excursions. Chest wall kinematics were not affected by tDCS. Our findings indicate that lung volume excursions about the midrange of vital capacity elicit a greater area of chest wall intermuscular coherence compared with lung volume excursions spanning the entire range of vital capacity in healthy adults. Our findings also demonstrate that brief tDCS may modulate the cortical control of the chest wall muscles in a stimulation- and lung volume excursion task-dependent manner but does not affect chest wall kinematics in healthy adults.

  4. Chest Wall Motion during Speech Production in Patients with Advanced Ankylosing Spondylitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalliakosta, Georgia; Mandros, Charalampos; Tzelepis, George E.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that ankylosing spondylitis (AS) alters the pattern of chest wall motion during speech production. Method: The pattern of chest wall motion during speech was measured with respiratory inductive plethysmography in 6 participants with advanced AS (5 men, 1 woman, age 45 plus or minus 8 years, Schober test 1.45 plus or…

  5. Chest wall and trunk muscle activity during inspiratory loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cala, S J; Edyvean, J; Engel, L A

    1992-12-01

    We measured the electromyographic (EMG) activity in four chest wall and trunk (CWT) muscles, the erector spinae, latissimus dorsi, pectoralis major, and trapezius, together with the parasternal, in four normal subjects during graded inspiratory efforts against an occlusion in both upright and seated postures. We also measured CWT EMGs in six seated subjects during inspiratory resistive loading at high and low tidal volumes [1,280 +/- 80 (SE) and 920 +/- 60 ml, respectively]. With one exception, CWT EMG increased as a function of inspiratory pressure generated (Pmus) at all lung volumes in both postures, with no systematic difference in recruitment between CWT and parasternal muscles as a function of Pmus. At any given lung volume there was no consistent difference in CWT EMG at a given Pmus between the two postures (P > 0.09). However, at a given Pmus during both graded inspiratory efforts and inspiratory resistive loading, EMGs of all muscles increased with lung volume, with greater volume dependence in the upright posture (P < 0.02). The results suggest that during inspiratory efforts, CWT muscles contribute to the generation of inspiratory pressure. The CWT muscles may act as fixators opposing deflationary forces transmitted to the vertebral column by rib cage articulations, a function that may be less effective at high lung volumes if the direction of the muscular insertions is altered disadvantageously.

  6. Effects of high-frequency chest wall oscillation on pleural pressure and oscillated flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucker, Tal; Skjodt, Neil M; Jones, Richard L

    2008-01-01

    The effectiveness of high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HF-CWO) is directly related to the level of oscillated flow (osc) in the airways. We used the Vest system to investigate the effects of HFCWO on chest wall and pleural pressures and we correlated these pressures to the resultant osc. We also compared the latest HFCWO device with it predecessor. Different combinations of vest inflation pressure (background pressure) and oscillation frequency were randomly applied to 10 healthy volunteers. Chest wall pressure was determined using an air-filled bag under the vest and pleural pressure was estimated using an esophageal balloon. Reverse plethysmography was used to measure osc at the mouth and a spirometer was used to measure changes in end-expired lung volume. We found a significant correlation between chest wall and pleural pressure with approximately one-third of the chest wall pressure transmitted into the pleural space. Mean esophageal pressure remained negative at all background pressure/frequency combinations. There was a significant correlation (pHFCWO and since osc is dependent on esophageal pulse pressure, which in turn is dependent on chest wall pulse pressure, it follows that the effectiveness of HFCWO is influenced by the ability to generate an effective chest wall pulse pressure.

  7. Palpation for muscular tenderness in the anterior chest wall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, H.W.; Vach, W.; Manniche, C.

    2003-01-01

    palpating for intercostal tenderness or tenderness in the minor and major pectoral muscles in a population of patients with and without chest pain. This may hamper the ability of clinicians to diagnose and classify the musculoskeletal component of chest pain if based exclusively on palpation of the anterior...

  8. Abdominal compliance, parasternal activation, and chest wall motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cala, S J; Edyvean, J; Engel, L A

    1993-03-01

    We measured abdominal compliance (Cab) and rib cage displacement (delta Vrc) relative to abdominal displacement (delta Vab) during relaxation and tidal breathing in upright (U) and supine (S) postures in five normal subjects. In S, an abdominal binder was used to decrease Cab in two to five increments. We also measured the electrical activity of the parasternal muscle (EMGps) with the use of fine-wire intramuscular electrodes during CO2 rebreathing in U and in supine unbound (SU) and supine bound (SB) postures. During maximum binding (SB2), Cab decreased to 39 +/- 7% of the SU value (P = 0.01), matching Cab in U (P = 0.16). In the SB condition, the ratio of tidal delta Vrc/delta Vab to relaxation delta Vrc/delta Vab increased as Cab decreased, matching the data in U. For the group, this ratio decreased during SU to 47 +/- 10% (P = 0.02) but increased during SB2 to 86 +/- 7% (P = 0.18) of the value in U. During CO2 rebreathing, EMGps increased linearly with tidal volume (r > 0.727, P < 0.01). However, at any given tidal volume, the SU and SB2 EMGps were not significantly different (P = 0.12), and both were less than that in U (P < 0.02). The results suggest that the differences in chest wall motion between U and S may be due to the difference in Cab and not to different patterns of respiratory muscle recruitment. The mechanism may relate to changes in mechanical coupling between the diaphragm and the rib cage.

  9. Biphasic pulmonary blastoma: An unusual presentation with chest wall, rib, and pleural involvement

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dixit, Ramakant; Joshi, Nalin; Dave, Lokendra

    2014-01-01

    ... such as cough, hemoptysis, dyspnea, and chest pain. About 40% of cases are asymptomatic and found coincidentally. The usual radiological appearance consists of a well-circumscribed mass measuring 2.5-25 cm in diameter. [3] Pleural effusion occurs very occasionally and chest wall with rib involvement in adult BPB is probably not reported...

  10. Subscapularis muscle flap for reconstruction of posterior chest wall skeletal defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuaki Sakai

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The use of a subscapularis muscle flap to repair chest wall defect is a simple and safe technique that can be conducted in the same surgical field as the initial reconstruction surgery and does not require plastic surgery support.

  11. Aspergillosis of bilateral breast and chest wall in an immunocompetent male masquerading as breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra G Nasit

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal species are not frequently encountered in an immunocompetent host. Invasive aspergillosis typically occurs in severely immunocompromised patient. Aspergillus infection of breast and chest wall are rarely encountered in an immunocompetent as well as in immunocompromised host. Till date only 13 cases of fungal infection of breast and chest wall have been reported in the literature. This report presents a case of aspergillosis of bilateral breast and chest wall in an immunocompetent male, clinically mimicking breast cancer. Diagnosis was achieved by fine-needle aspiration cytology and subsequently Aspergillus flavus was identified on fungal culture. The patient was successfully treated with voriconazole. Prompt diagnosis by cytology and appropriate treatment is necessary to prevent adverse outcome. Here, we present this rare case of fungal infection of breast and chest wall with relevant review of the literature.

  12. Prediction of Chest Wall Toxicity From Lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephans, Kevin L., E-mail: stephak@ccf.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Djemil, Toufik; Tendulkar, Rahul D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Robinson, Cliff G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University, St Louis, MO (United States); Reddy, Chandana A.; Videtic, Gregory M.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To determine patient, tumor, and treatment factors related to the development of late chest wall toxicity after lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: We reviewed a registry of 134 patients treated with lung SBRT to 60 Gy in 3 fractions who had greater than 1 year of clinical follow-up and no history of multiple treatments to the same lobe (n = 48). Patients were treated as per Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 0236 without specific chest wall avoidance criteria. The chest wall was retrospectively contoured. Thirty-two lesions measured less than 3 cm, and sixteen measured 3 to 5 cm. The median planning target volume was 29 cm{sup 3}. Results: With a median follow-up of 18.8 months, 10 patients had late symptomatic chest wall toxicity (4 Grade 1 and 6 Grade 2) at a median of 8.8 months after SBRT. No patient characteristics (age, diabetes, hypertension, peripheral vascular disease, or body mass index) were predictive for toxicity, whereas there was a trend for continued smoking (p = 0.066; odds ratio [OR], 4.4). Greatest single tumor dimension (p = 0.047; OR, 2.63) and planning target volume (p = 0.040; OR, 1.04) were correlated with toxicity, whereas distance from tumor edge to chest wall and gross tumor volume did not reach statistical significance. Volumes of chest wall receiving 30 Gy (V30) through 70 Gy (V70) were all highly significant, although this correlation weakened for V65 and V70 and maximum chest wall point dose only trended to significance (p = 0.06). On multivariate analysis, tumor volume was no longer correlated with toxicity and only V30 through V60 remained statistically significant. Conclusions: Tumor size and chest wall dosimetry are correlated to late chest wall toxicity. Only chest wall V30 through V60 remained significant on multivariate analysis. Restricting V30 to 30 cm{sup 3} or less and V60 to 3 cm{sup 3} or less should result in a 10% to 15% risk of late chest wall toxicity or lower.

  13. Sternoclavicular joint septic arthritis with chest wall abscess in a healthy adult: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Yoshihito; Kato, Hisaaki; SHIRAI, Kunihiro; NAKAJIMA, Yasuhiro; YAMADA, Noriaki; Okada, Hideshi; Yoshida, Takahiro; Toyoda, Izumi; Ogura, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Background Septic arthritis of the sternoclavicular joint is rare. It can be associated with serious complications such as osteomyelitis, chest wall abscess, and mediastinitis. In this report, we describe a case of an otherwise healthy adult with septic arthritis of the sternoclavicular joint with chest wall abscess. Case presentation A 68-year-old Japanese man presented to our hospital complaining of pain and erythema near the right sternoclavicular joint. Despite 1 week of oral antibiotics,...

  14. Gastric Duplication: A Rare Cause of Massive Lower Gastrointestinal Haemorrhage, Chest Wall Mass, and Enterocutaneous Fistula

    OpenAIRE

    Emeka B. Kesieme; Dongo, Andrew E; Osime, Clement O.; Olomu, Sylvia C.; Awe, Oluwafemi O.; Gerald I Eze; Sylvester U. Eluehike

    2012-01-01

    Gastric duplications are uncommon developmental abnormality reported to present with different clinical scenarios. We present a 2-1/2-year-old Nigerian female who started having intermittent massive lower gastrointestinal haemorrhage at 5 months of age. She subsequently developed a lower chest wall mass and enterocutaneous fistula. She was found to have gastric duplication with fistulous communication with the descending colon, spleen, and lower chest wall. To the best of our knowledge, this...

  15. Bilateral mesenchymal hamartoma of the chest wall in an infant boy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rong; Kelly, David; Siegal, Gene P

    2012-12-01

    Mesenchymal chest wall hamartoma is an extremely rare tumor striking neonates and infants. Histologically, the tumor is composed of islands of hyaline cartilage intermixed with mesenchymal-like stroma and hemorrhagic cysts. We present a case of a congenital bilateral mesenchymal chest wall hamartoma (MCWH) in an infant boy. This extremely rare benign entity may be misdiagnosed as malignant tumor and shares features with another tumor of childhood-fibrocartilagenous mesenchymoma of bone.

  16. Normalized mean shapes and reference index values for computerized quantitative assessment indices of chest wall deformities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ho Chul; Park, Man Sik; Lee, Seong Keon; Nam, Ki Chang; Park, Hyung Joo; Kim, Min Gi; Song, Jae-Jun; Choi, Hyuk

    2015-11-01

    We previously proposed a computerized index (eccentricity index [EI]) for chest-wall deformity measurements, such as pectus excavatum. We sought to define mean shapes based on normal chest walls and to propose for computerized index reference values of that are used in the quantitative analysis of the severity of chest-wall deformities. A total of 584 patients were classified into 18 groups, and a database of their chest-wall computed tomography (CT) scan images was constructed. The boundaries of the chest wall were extracted by using a segmentation algorithm, and the mean shapes were subsequently developed. The reference index values were calculated from the developed mean shapes. Reference index values for the EI were compared with a conventional index, the Haller index (HI). A close association has been shown between the two indices in multiple subjects (r = 0.974, P < 0.001). The newly developed mean shapes and reference index values supply both reliability and objectivity to the diagnosis, analysis, and treatment of chest-wall deformities. They promise to be highly useful in clinical settings.

  17. Reconstruction of Chest Wall by Cryopreserved Sternal Allograft after Resection of Aneurysmal Bone Cyst of Sternum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kambiz Sheikhy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 20-year-old female was referred to our hospital due to deformity and bulging in anterior aspect of chest wall in sternal area. Chest X-ray and CT scan confirmed a large mass with destruction of sternum. Pathologic diagnosis after incisional biopsy was compatible with aneurysmal bone cyst. We resected sternum completely and reconstructed large anterior defect by a cryopreserved sternal allograft. In follow-up of patient there was no unstability of chest wall with good cosmetic result.

  18. Reconstruction of Chest Wall by Cryopreserved Sternal Allograft after Resection of Aneurysmal Bone Cyst of Sternum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhy, Kambiz; Abbasi Dezfouli, Azizollah

    2017-01-01

    A 20-year-old female was referred to our hospital due to deformity and bulging in anterior aspect of chest wall in sternal area. Chest X-ray and CT scan confirmed a large mass with destruction of sternum. Pathologic diagnosis after incisional biopsy was compatible with aneurysmal bone cyst. We resected sternum completely and reconstructed large anterior defect by a cryopreserved sternal allograft. In follow-up of patient there was no unstability of chest wall with good cosmetic result. PMID:28299230

  19. Mortality by Level of Emphysema and Airway Wall Thickness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Ane; Skorge, Trude Duelien; Bottai, Matteo;

    2013-01-01

    There is limited knowledge of the prognostic value of quantitative computed tomography (CT) measures of emphysema and airway wall thickness (AWT) on mortality.......There is limited knowledge of the prognostic value of quantitative computed tomography (CT) measures of emphysema and airway wall thickness (AWT) on mortality....

  20. [A case of locally advanced breast cancer successfully treated with wide resection and reconstruction of chest wall with A-O metallic plates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, H; Tatsuta, M; Masuda, N; Miya, A; Ezumi, K; Shimizu, J; Ikeda, M; Ishida, H; Masutani, S; Kawasaki, T; Furukawa, H; Satomi, T

    2001-10-01

    A 63-year-old female with locally advanced breast cancer was treated with preoperative chemotherapy using docetaxel. The therapeutic regimen was comprised of four cycles at 3-week intervals. One cycle consisted of 80 mg of docetaxel which was administered on day 1. A remarkable response was confirmed. The side effects such as leukopenia, general fatigue and alopecia were moderate and had no influence on the patient's QOL. After preoperative chemotherapy, a full thickness chest wall resection was performed. Chest wall defect was reconstructed with orthopedic A-O metallic plates, Marlex mesh and rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap. These metal plates were very useful because it was easy to bend and twist them manually to fit the defect at the time of operation. Moreover, the curved metal plates preserved the cone form of the chest cage. The postoperative course was favourable without frail chest or wound infection.

  1. Reverse Abdominoplasty Flap in Reconstruction of Post-Bilateral Mastectomies Anterior Chest Wall Defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William HC Tiong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reverse abdominoplasty was originally described for epigastric lift. Since the work by Baroudi and Huger in the 1970s, it has become clear that reverse abdominoplasty application can be extended beyond just aesthetic procedure. Through the knowledge of anterior abdominal wall vascularity, its application had included reconstructive prospect in the coverage of various chest wall defects. To date, reverse abdominoplasty flap has been used to reconstruct unilateral anterior chest wall defect or for larger defect but only in combination with other reconstructive techniques. Here, we presented a case where it is used as a standalone flap to reconstruct bilateral anterior chest wall soft tissue defect post-bilateral mastectomies in oncological resection. In conclusion, reverse abdominoplasty flap provided us with a simple, faster, and satisfactory reconstructive outcome.

  2. Anterior chest wall resection and reconstruction for locally advanced breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Hide Elfrida; Akbar, Fazuludeen Ali; Rajapaksha, Keerthi; Aneez, Dokev Basheer Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    With breast cancer awareness, the incidence of large invasive tumours is rare. We present a video of locally advanced breast cancer invading the anterior chest wall requiring en bloc resection that resulted in a large chest wall defect with exposed pleural and pericardial surface. Skeletal reconstruction and provision of adequate soft tissue coverage in order to avoid respiratory failure was challenging. A 58-year-old female presented with a 3-year history of locally invasive breast carcinoma with contiguous spread to sternum, clavicles, sternoclavicular joints and bilateral second to fifth ribs. She underwent total sternectomy, bilateral second to fifth ribs and chest wall resection resulting in a 21 × 18 cm chest wall defect. Reconstruction of her sternum was with methyl-methacrylate cement prosthesis. Ribs were reconstructed with titanium plates. Soft tissue coverage was achieved with left vertical rectus abdominis pedicle flap, right external oblique transposition flap and a right latissimus dorsi free flap. Flap failure necessitated a right vastus lateralis free flap. She was discharged ambulant without respiratory compromise. Resection and reconstruction of large chest wall defects is possible due to new bioprosthetic materials and is possible with acceptable morbidity and mortality. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of the safety of high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) therapy in blunt thoracic trauma patients

    OpenAIRE

    Becker Brian; Ney Arthur L; Palmer Cassandra A; Anderson Casandra A; Schaffel Steven D; Quickel Robert R

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Airway clearance is frequently needed by patients suffering from blunt chest wall trauma. High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO) has been shown to be effective in helping to clear secretions from the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis, bronchiectasis, asthma, primary ciliary dyskinesia, emphysema, COPD, and many others. Chest wall trauma patients are at increased risk for development of pulmonary complications related to airway clearance. These patients frequent...

  4. Multidetector computed tomography-spectrum of blunt chest wall and lung injuries in polytraumatized patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, S., E-mail: soeren.peters@rub.d [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, BG Universitaetsklinikum Bergmannsheil, Buerkle-de-la-Camp-Platz 1, 44789 Bochum (Germany); Nicolas, V.; Heyer, C.M. [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, BG Universitaetsklinikum Bergmannsheil, Buerkle-de-la-Camp-Platz 1, 44789 Bochum (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    Accidental injuries are the leading cause of death in the 15 to 44-year-old age group. Blunt chest trauma is often encountered in these patients and is associated with a mortality of up to 25%. Although conventional radiography still plays an important role in the initial emergency room setting, for follow-up in the intensive care unit, multidetector computed tomography has established itself as the standard imaging method for the evaluation of chest trauma patients. The following review presents salient radiological findings of the chest wall and shoulder girdle, thoracic spine, pleural space, and lung in polytraumatized patients.

  5. Functional Chest Wall Reconstruction With a Biomechanical Three-Dimensionally Printed Implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradiellos, Javier; Amor, Sergio; Córdoba, Mar; Rocco, Gaetano; Vidal, Mercedes; Varela, Andrés

    2017-04-01

    Chest wall resection and reconstruction for neoplastic diseases has unique oncologic, structural, and functional challenges. In a young and fit patient with a mediastinal mass and extensive anterior chest wall invasion, purely structural solutions were deemed insufficient. We hereby present a novel three-dimensionally printed patient-specific titanium implant of sternum and ribs. This osteointegrable implant was designed with biomechanical capabilities using a unique "Greek wave" folding pattern. Postoperative dynamic computed tomography showed that the implant allowed for controlled flexing during the respiratory cycle. Three-dimensional printing with biocompatible materials could enable a new generation of chest wall implants strongly focused on functional reconstruction. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Color structured light system of chest wall motion measurement for respiratory volume evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huijun; Cheng, Yuan; Liu, Dongdong; Zhang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Jue; Que, Chengli; Wang, Guangfa; Fang, Jing

    2010-01-01

    We present a structured light system to dynamically measure human chest wall motion for respiratory volume estimation. Based on a projection of an encoded color pattern and a few active markers attached to the trunk, respiratory volumes are obtained by evaluating the 3-D topographic changes of the chest wall in an anatomically consistent measuring region during respiration. Three measuring setups are established: a single-sided illuminating-recording setup for standing posture, an inclined single-sided setup for supine posture, and a double-sided setup for standing posture. Results are compared with the pneumotachography and show good agreement in volume estimations [correlation coefficient: R>0.99 (Pevaluation with high accuracy, but also regional pulmonary function assessment in different chest wall behaviors, with the advantage of whole-field measurement.

  7. Chest wall rigidity in two infants after low-dose fentanyl administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewhirst, Elisabeth; Naguib, Aymen; Tobias, Joseph D

    2012-05-01

    Since its introduction into clinical practice, it has been known that fentanyl and other synthetic opioids may cause skeletal muscle rigidity. Involvement of the respiratory musculature, laryngeal structures, or the chest wall may impair ventilation, resulting in hypercarbia and hypoxemia. Although most common with the rapid administration of large doses, this rare adverse effect may occur with small doses especially in neonates and infants. We present 2 infants who developed chest wall rigidity, requiring the administration of neuromuscular blocking agents and controlled ventilation after analgesic doses of fentanyl. Previous reports regarding chest wall rigidity after the administration of low-dose fentanyl in infants and children are reviewed, the pathogenesis of the disorder is discussed, and treatment options offered.

  8. Giant Anterior Chest Wall Basal Cell Carcinoma: An Approach to Palliative Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Joy F. Santos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Anterior chest wall giant basal cell carcinoma (GBCC is a rare skin malignancy that requires a multidisciplinary treatment approach. This case report demonstrates the challenges of anterior chest wall GBCC reconstruction for the purpose of palliative therapy in a 72-year-old female. Surgical resection of the lesion included the manubrium and upper four ribs. The defect was closed with bilateral pectoral advancement flaps, FlexHD, and pedicled VRAM. The palliative nature of this case made hybrid reconstruction more appropriate than rigid sternal reconstruction. In advanced metastatic cancers, the ultimate goals should be to avoid risk for infection and provide adequate coverage for the defect.

  9. Evaluation of Tube Wall Thickness of Feed Water Heater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchikura, Takahisa; Morisaki, Koichi; Hamada, Seiichi

    With regard to the high pressure (HP) feed water heater of thermal power plant at Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) sites, inspection of feed water (FW) tubes wall thickness are conducted whenever required such that frequent tube leak occurs. As a standard inspection methodology, FW heater is disassembled during planned outage, tube wall thickness is measured by the ultrasonic pulse techique (UT), then plugs are installed at the both ends of FW tube if its measured wall thickness is found below calculated threshold. However, the root causes of wall thinning of FW tube are various such as erosion and corrosion, based on wall thinning condition, the above threshold is not applied but utilizing the other technically well-grounded evaluation method is sometimes more rational. Therefore, TEPCO classified wall-thinning condition based on inspection data and established technically well-grounded and rational evaluation methodologies of FW tube wall thickness to suite each wall thinning condition. Moreover, with recent improvement of inspection technique, technology enabled faster, larger amount, and more accurate data acquisition, TEPCO has developed the systematized evaluation methodology that can transact data acquisition and evaluation simultaneously. This article introduces the logic of evaluation methods and examined algorithms to make them systematized.

  10. Airbag-related chest wall burn as a marker of underlying injury: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monkhouse Simon J

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction This case of a man who sustained an airbag-induced thoracic injury and burn, highlights the potential harm that can be caused by airbags. It also serves to illustrate that a surface burn which looks small and benign can actually be a surface marker of a more serious injury. Staff working in emergency departments need to be aware of the risk of possible airbag-associated injuries. Case presentation A 65-year-old man was the driver in a frontal collision. He was wearing a seatbelt. The airbag was activated and caused a superficial chest wall burn. Initial chest x-rays were unremarkable but following deterioration in his condition, a computed tomography scan revealed a serious sternal fracture. The location of the fracture was marked on the surface by the burn. Conclusion Airbags can cause significant chest wall injuries and burns. Surface burns at the point of impact should not be dismissed as trivial as the forces involved can cause significant injury. We recommend that all people with chest wall injuries and/or burns due to airbags should have more detailed chest imaging as initial emergency radiographs can be falsely reassuring.

  11. Parametric Investigation of Optimum Thermal Insulation Thickness for External Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Kaynakli

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have estimated the optimum thickness of thermal insulation materials used in building walls for different climate conditions. The economic parameters (inflation rate, discount rate, lifetime and energy costs, the heating/cooling loads of the building, the wall structure and the properties of the insulation material all affect the optimum insulation thickness. This study focused on the investigation of these parameters that affect the optimum thermal insulation thickness for building walls. To determine the optimum thickness and payback period, an economic model based on life-cycle cost analysis was used. As a result, the optimum thermal insulation thickness increased with increasing the heating and cooling energy requirements, the lifetime of the building, the inflation rate, energy costs and thermal conductivity of insulation. However, the thickness decreased with increasing the discount rate, the insulation material cost, the total wall resistance, the coefficient of performance (COP of the cooling system and the solar radiation incident on a wall. In addition, the effects of these parameters on the total life-cycle cost, payback periods and energy savings were also investigated.

  12. Heart failure due to severe myocardial calcification; A rare complication after irradiation on the chest wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Shouichi; Maida, Kiyoshi; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Shigeo (Aomori Prefectural Central Hospital (Japan))

    1993-11-01

    A 28-year-old female who had had irradiation on the chest wall at the age of 5 as a remedy for keloid granulation after burn, recently developed congestive heart failure. Severe tricuspid regurgitation was demonstrated by echocardiography with a certain calcification in the cardiac shadow on chest radiogram. Calcified right ventricle and ventricular septum were noticed operatively, which disturbed ventricular motion and also caused tricuspid valve deformity. These calcified myocardium apparently corresponded with the irradiation field. After tricuspid valve replacement, she regained physical activity satisfactorily without congestive heart failure. Because she had no other known causes of cardiac calcification such as hypercalcemia, myocarditis, myocardial infarction or renal diseases, irradiation on the chest wall could be responsible for the severe myocardial calcification. (author).

  13. Thick domain wall spacetimes with and without reflection symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Melfo, A; Skirzewski, A; Melfo, Alejandra; Pantoja, Nelson; Skirzewski, Aureliano

    2003-01-01

    We show that the spacetimes of domain wall solutions to the coupled Einstein-scalar field equations with a given scalar field potential fall into two classes, depending on whether or not reflection symmetry on the wall is imposed. Solutions with reflection symmetry are dynamic, while the asymmetric ones are static. Asymmetric walls are asymptotically flat on one side and reduce to the Taub spacetime on the other. Examples of asymmetric thick walls in D-dimensional spacetimes are given, and results on the thin-wall limit of the dynamic, symmetric walls are extended to the asymmetric case. The particular case of symmetric, static spacetimes is considered and a new family of solutions, including previously known BPS walls, is presented.

  14. Results of chest wall resection for recurrent or locally advanced breast malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronesi, Giulia; Scanagatta, Paolo; Goldhirsch, Aron; Rietjens, Mario; Colleoni, Marco; Pelosi, Giuseppe; Spaggiari, Lorenzo

    2007-06-01

    Between 1998 and 2003 we observed 15 women who underwent full thickness chest wall resection (FTCWR) followed by plastic reconstruction for locally recurrent or primary breast cancer. Preoperative symptoms were: pain (5 patients), malodorous ulceration (3 patients), presence of tumour mass (4 patients) and thoracic deformity (2 patients). One patient was asymptomatic. Surgery was partial sternectomy with rib resection in 9 patients, rib resection alone in 5, and total sternectomy in one. No perioperative mortality or major morbidity occurred; minor complications occurred in 3 patients (20%). Five of the six surviving patients reported a positive overall outcome in a telephonic interview. Median overall and disease-free survival were 23.4 and 17.5 months, respectively. In conclusion, FTCWR is a safe procedure with low morbidity and mortality that can provide good symptoms palliation in patients with locally advanced breast malignancies, so it should be considered more often by interdisciplinary care providers in those patients who fail to respond to classic multimodality treatment.

  15. Salivary gland choristoma (heterotopic salivary gland tissue) on the anterior chest wall of a newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aby, Janelle L; Patel, Mayha; Sundram, Uma; Benjamin, Latanya T

    2014-01-01

    Salivary gland choristoma (heterotopic salivary gland tissue) is a rare condition typically seen in the newborn period. This developmental heterotopia is generally nonprogressive, with little risk of malignant transformation. We present the second known reported case of a salivary gland choristoma located on the anterior chest wall. Knowledge of this rare entity will allow for accurate diagnosis and management of this benign anatomic variant.

  16. Urgent resection of bleeding congenital mesenchymal chest wall hamartoma in an infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bieda, Jan-Christoph

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We report a case with prenatally diagnosed large cystic-solid mesenchymal chest wall hamartoma. An attempt of conservative management was made however repeated intralesional hemorrhage led to enlargement and severe anemia which required urgent resection at the age of 8 weeks. The infant had an unimpaired development over a follow-up of 4 years.

  17. Poland's anomaly. Natural history and long-term results of chest wall reconstruction in 33 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfer, A E; Icochea, R; Graeber, G M

    1988-01-01

    Poland's anomaly is an uncommon congenital aberration of the chest wall characterized by absence of the pectoralis major muscle and other nearby musculoskeletal components. In this series, a wide spectrum of thoracic deformities was associated with the Poland anomaly, ranging from segmental agenesis of the ribs, sternum, and nearby muscles, to simple aplasia of the pectoralis major muscle. Although little disability was associated with the syndrome, the patients primarily sought operative correction due to the asymmetry and their perception of adverse cosmesis. Over a 10-year period, 53 operations were performed on 27 individuals with the goal of correcting the abnormal contour of the chest wall. The most successful reconstructions involved the use of the latissimus dorsi muscle, which was detached and transferred to the anterior chest wall while preserving the neurovascular pedicle. In women, this was accompanied by insertion of a mammary prosthesis. Reconstruction of the so-called "herniation" of the lung with rib grafts or alloplastic materials was found to be unnecessary, and the use of custom-made chest wall prostheses is not recommended, since four of five of these devices had to be removed due to migration, erosion of local tissues, and adverse cosmesis. Images Fig. 1. Figs. 2A-C. Figs. 2A-C. Figs. 3A-C. Figs. 3A-C. Figs. 4A-C. Figs. 4A-C. PMID:2848462

  18. Properties of novel composite meshes in chest wall reconstruction: A comparative animal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Zardo

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: We consider composite grafts a suitable alternative for chest wall reconstruction. They are characterized by good overall biointegration and limited perigraft-fibrosis, thus potentially facilitating redo-procedures, even though a hydrophilic coating per se does not appear to prevent intrathoracic adhesion formation.

  19. Urgent resection of bleeding congenital mesenchymal chest wall hamartoma in an infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieda, Jan-Christoph; Tröbs, Ralf-Bodo; Roll, Claudia; Wunsch, Rainer; Neid, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    We report a case with prenatally diagnosed large cystic-solid mesenchymal chest wall hamartoma. An attempt of conservative management was made however repeated intralesional hemorrhage led to enlargement and severe anemia which required urgent resection at the age of 8 weeks. The infant had an unimpaired development over a follow-up of 4 years.

  20. Morganella morganii causing abscess over the anterior chest wall- a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D, Vijaya; Jv, Sathish; Mk, Yashaswini; S, Sulaiman

    2014-09-01

    A 17-year-old female college student presented with recurrent abscess over the anterior chest wall since one and half year. Morganella morganii was isolated from the aspirated pus. Patient was started on oral ciprofloxacin and the lesion resolved in two weeks.

  1. Evolution of thick domain walls in de Sitter universe

    CERN Document Server

    Dolgov, A D; Rudenko, A S

    2016-01-01

    We consider thick domain walls in a de Sitter universe following paper by Basu and Vilenkin. However, we are interested not only in stationary solutions found therein, but also investigate the general case of domain wall evolution with time. When the wall thickness parameter, $\\delta_0$, is smaller than $H^{-1}/\\sqrt{2}$, where $H$ is the Hubble parameter in de Sitter space-time, then the stationary solutions exist, and initial field configurations tend with time to the stationary ones. However, there are no stationary solutions for $\\delta_0 \\geq H^{-1}/\\sqrt{2}$. We have calculated numerically the rate of the wall expansion in this case and have found that the width of the wall grows exponentially fast for $\\delta_0 \\gg H^{-1}$. An explanation for the critical value $\\delta_{0c} = H^{-1}/\\sqrt{2}$ is also proposed.

  2. Evolution of thick domain walls in de Sitter universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolgov, A. D.; Godunov, S. I.; Rudenko, A. S.

    2016-10-01

    We consider thick domain walls in a de Sitter universe following paper by Basu and Vilenkin. However, we are interested not only in stationary solutions found therein, but also investigate the general case of domain wall evolution with time. When the wall thickness parameter, δ0, is smaller than H‑1/√2, where H is the Hubble parameter in de Sitter space-time, then the stationary solutions exist, and initial field configurations tend with time to the stationary ones. However, there are no stationary solutions for δ0 >= H‑1/√2. We have calculated numerically the rate of the wall expansion in this case and have found that the width of the wall grows exponentially fast for δ0 gg H‑1. An explanation for the critical value δ0c = H‑1/√2 is also proposed.

  3. Bilateral Multifocal Hamartoma of the Chest Wall in an Infant

    OpenAIRE

    Yilmaz, Erdem; Erol, Oguz Bulent; Pekcan, Melih; Gundogdu, Gokcen; Bilgic, Bilge; Gun, Feryal; Yekeler, Ensar

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Hamartoma of the thoracic wall is a rare benign tumor that occurs in infancy and can be mistaken for a malignancy due to its clinical and imaging features. Hamartomas are extrapleural soft tissue lesions that cause rib expansion and destruction and appear on imaging as cystic areas with fluid levels and calcification. They can cause scoliosis, pressure on the neighboring lung parenchyma and mediastinal displacement. While conservative treatment is recommended in asymptomati...

  4. Evaluation of anterior chest wall implanted port: technical aspects, results, and complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Young Hwan; Oh, Joo Hyeong; Yoon, Yup; Kim, Si Young [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-07-01

    To evaluate the technical aspects, results and complications of patients with implanted anterior chest wall port. Between April 1997 and June 1999, a total of 63 implanted ports were placed at the anterior chest wall of 63 consecutive patients by interventional radiologists. The indications were chemotherapy in 61 patients and total parenteral nutrition in two. The peripheral portion of the subclavian vein was punctured under fluoroscopic guidance via ipsilateral peripheral vein during venography. A central venous catheter was placed in the superior vena cava, and using the subcutaneous tunneling method, a connected infusion port was implanted at the anterior chest wall. Results and complications were reviewed, and by means of Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, the expected patency of the port was determined. The technical success rate for implanted port at the anterior chest wall was 100% (63/63 patients). In two patients, hematoma and oozing were treated by compression. The duration of port implantation ranged from 12 to 855 (mean, 187) days, and the port patency rate was 305.7{+-}47.6 days. In seven patients (completed chemotherapy (n=3D3), central venous thrombosis (n=3D3) catheter-related infection (n=3D1)), the port was removed. Catheter obstruction occurred in two patients, and in one, the use of urokinase led to successful recanalization. Sixteen patients died of an underlying malignancy, but no catheter-related death was noted. Implantation of an anterior chest wall port is a safe and useful procedure, with long patency, for patients requiring chemotherapy and long-term venous access. (author)

  5. Occlusion-free Blood Flow Animation with Wall Thickness Visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawonn, Kai; Glaßer, Sylvia; Vilanova, Anna; Preim, Bernhard; Isenberg, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    We present the first visualization tool that combines pathlines from blood flow and wall thickness information. Our method uses illustrative techniques to provide occlusion-free visualization of the flow. We thus offer medical researchers an effective visual analysis tool for aneurysm treatment risk assessment. Such aneurysms bear a high risk of rupture and significant treatment-related risks. Therefore, to get a fully informed decision it is essential to both investigate the vessel morphology and the hemodynamic data. Ongoing research emphasizes the importance of analyzing the wall thickness in risk assessment. Our combination of blood flow visualization and wall thickness representation is a significant improvement for the exploration and analysis of aneurysms. As all presented information is spatially intertwined, occlusion problems occur. We solve these occlusion problems by dynamic cutaway surfaces. We combine this approach with a glyph-based blood flow representation and a visual mapping of wall thickness onto the vessel surface. We developed a GPU-based implementation of our visualizations which facilitates wall thickness analysis through real-time rendering and flexible interactive data exploration mechanisms. We designed our techniques in collaboration with domain experts, and we provide details about the evaluation of the technique and tool.

  6. Neonatal chest wall suspension splint: a novel and noninvasive method for support of lung volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Thomas L; Palmer, Charles; Shaffer, Thomas H; Wolfson, Marla R

    2005-06-01

    Surfactant and musculoskeletal immaturity results in lower compliance of the lung relative to the chest wall, with clinical manifestations of low lung volume, marked chest wall retractions (CWR), and thoracoabdominal asynchrony. Inspiratory efforts are dissipated on distorting the chest wall inward rather than recruiting lung volumes. The current study tests the hypothesis that a novel neonatal chest wall suspension splint (SP), designed to provide stability to the compliant chest wall, would reduce inspiratory chest wall retractions and improve lung volumes. Nine preterm infants (29 +/- 1 SE weeks of gestation; 1.59 +/- 0.27 SE kg study weight) were studied at 16 +/- 5 SE days of life at baseline (BL) and following application of the front plate (FP) and the full SP (Hug n Snug Neonatal Chest Splint, Respironics, Inc.). Phase angle of thoracoabdominal motion, CWR, functional residual capacity (FRC), and pulmonary function were evaluated during spontaneous breathing. Compared to BL, there was a significant decrease in anterior CWR (2.21 +/- 0.91 SE vs. 0.25 +/- 0.09 SE mm; P < 0.05), an increase in FRC (16.6 +/- 2.8 SE vs. 27.8 +/- 5.5 SE ml/kg; P < 0.05) and tidal volume (4.8 +/- 1.5 SE vs. 7.3 +/- 1.4 SE ml/kg; P < 0.05), minimal effect on pulmonary compliance (1.98 +/- 0.50 SE vs. 1.72 +/- 0.30 SE ml/cmH2O/kg), and a trend for a decrease in phase angle (128.4 +/- 10.9 SE vs. 111.8 +/- 19.3 SE) with the application of the splint. FRC correlated inversely with severity of CWR across all conditions (P < 0.05, r = -0.68). Phase angle was directly correlated to anterior CWR (r = 0.72; P < 0.05) and correlated inversely with FRC (P < 0.005; r = -0.56). We speculate that by improving CW stability, the use of this splint may reduce the energetic requirements of breathing and, potentially, the need for more invasive ventilatory support in the neonate.

  7. Utility of CT scan for the diagnosis of chest wall tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalil, A.; Le Breton, C.; Tassart, M.; Korzec, J.; Bigot, J.M.; Carette, M.F. [Department of Radiology, Tenon Hospital, Paris (France)

    1999-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the utility of CT scan findings for the diagnosis of chest wall tuberculosis, excluding the spine. We reviewed 15 patients (13 Africans and 2 Indians) with chest wall tuberculosis, retrospectively. The radiologic examination consisted of a plain X-ray and a CT scan of the chest for each patient. The site of disease was the rib in 13 patients or the body of the sternum in 2 patients. One rib was involved in 11 patients, 2 contiguous ribs (one site) in 2 patients, and bilateral disease (two sites) was observed in the remaining patient. The 14 rib sites involved the posterior arc or costovertebral joint in 11 cases, the anterior arc in 2 cases, and the anterior and middle arc in 1 case. The CT scan findings were an abscess (n = 14) or a soft tissue mass (n = 2), osteolytic lesions (n = 13), periosteal reaction (n = 10), and sequestrum (n = 14). Bone sclerosis was observed only in 3 cases of rib involvement. The association of a soft tissue abscess, an osteolytic lesion, and sequestrum, especially in immigrants to France, suggests chest wall tuberculosis on CT scan. (orig.) With 5 figs., 2 tabs., 11 refs.

  8. Elastofibroma dorsi – differential diagnosis in chest wall tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steinau Hans-Ulrich

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elastofibromas are benign soft tissue tumours mostly of the infrascapular region between the thoracic wall, the serratus anterior and the latissimus dorsi muscle with a prevalence of up to 24% in the elderly. The pathogenesis of the lesion is still unclear, but repetitive microtrauma by friction between the scapula and the thoracic wall may cause the reactive hyperproliferation of fibroelastic tissue. Methods We present a series of seven cases with elastofibroma dorsi with reference to clinical findings, further clinical course and functional results after resection, as well as recurrence. Data were obtained retrospectively by clinical examination, phone calls to the patients' general practitioners and charts review. Follow-up time ranged from four months to nine years and averaged 53 months. Results The patients presented with swelling of the infrascapular region or snapping scapula. In three cases, the lesion was painful. The ratio men/women was 2/5 with a mean age of 64 years. The tumor sizes ranged from 3 to 13 cm. The typical macroscopic aspect was characterized as poorly defined fibroelastic soft tissue lesion with a white and yellow cut surface caused by intermingled remnants of fatty tissue. Microscopically, the lesions consisted of broad collagenous strands and densely packed enlarged and fragmented elastic fibres with mostly round shapes. In all patients but one, postoperative seroma (which had to be punctuated occurred after resection; however, at follow-up time, no patient reported any decrease of function or sensation at the shoulder or the arm of the operated side. None of the patients experienced a relapse. Conclusion In differential diagnosis of soft tissue tumors located at this specific site, elastofibroma should be considered as likely diagnosis. Due to its benign behaviour, the tumor should be resected only in symptomatic patients.

  9. Polarizabilities of an Annular Cut in the Thick Wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurennoy, Sergey S.

    1996-05-01

    The electric and magnetic polarizabilities of an aperture are its important characteristics used in the theory of aperture coupling and diffraction of EM waves. The polarizabilities of the aperture having a form of a ring-shaped cut in the plane wall of an arbitrary thickness are calculated by solving corresponding electrostatic or magnetostatic problems using a combination of analytical, variational and numerical methods. The dependences of the polarizabilities on the aperture parameters and on the wall thickness are presented. The results are applied to estimate the beam coupling impedances of button-type beam position monitors.

  10. A Case of “en bloc” Excision of a Chest Wall Leiomyosarcoma and Closure of the Defect with Non-Cross-Linked Collagen Matrix (Egis®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Rastrelli

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Sarcomas arising from the chest wall account for less than 20% of all soft tissue sarcomas, and at this site, primitive tumors are the most frequent to occur. Leiomyosarcoma is a malignant smooth muscle tumor and the best outcomes are achieved with wide surgical excision. Although advancements have been made in treatment protocols, leiomyosarcoma remains one of the more difficult soft tissue sarcoma to treat. Currently, general local control is obtained with surgical treatment with wide negative margins. We describe the case of a 50-year-old man who underwent a chest wall resection involving a wide portion of the pectoralis major and minor muscle, the serratus and part of the second, third and fourth ribs of the left side. The full-thickness chest wall defect of 10 × 8 cm was closed using a non-cross-linked acellular dermal matrix (Egis® placed in two layers, beneath the rib plane and over it. A successful repair was achieved with no incisional herniation and with complete tissue regeneration, allowing natural respiratory movements. No complications were observed in the postoperative course. Biological non-cross-linked matrix, derived from porcine dermis, behaves like a scaffold supporting tissue regeneration; it can be successfully used as an alternative to synthetic mesh for chest wall reconstruction.

  11. Weekly doxorubicin increases coronary arteriolar wall and adventitial thickness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delrae M Eckman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Doxorubicin (DOX is associated with premature cardiovascular events including myocardial infarction. This study was performed to determine if the weekly administration of DOX influenced coronary arteriolar medial and/or adventitial wall thickening. METHODS: Thirty-two male Sprague-Dawley rats aged 25.1± 2.4 weeks were randomly divided into three groups and received weekly intraperitoneal injections of normal saline (saline, n = 7, or low (1.5 mg/kg to 1.75 mg/kg, n = 14 or high (2.5 mg/kg, n = 11 doses of DOX. The animals were treated for 2-12 weeks, and euthanized at pre-specified intervals (2, 4, 7, or 10+ weeks to obtain histopathologic assessments of coronary arteriolar lumen diameter, medial wall thickness, adventitial wall thickness, and total wall thickness (medial thickness + adventitial thickness. RESULTS: Lumen diameter was similar across all groups (saline: 315±34 µm, low DOX: 286±24 µm, high DOX: 242±27 µm; p = 0.22. In comparison to animals receiving weekly saline, animals receiving weekly injections of 2.5 mg/kg of DOX experienced an increase in medial (23±2 µm vs. 13±3 µm; p = 0.005, and total wall thickness (51±4 µm vs. 36±5 µm; p = 0.022, respectively. These increases, as well as adventitial thickening became more prominent after normalizing for lumen diameter (p<0.05 to p<0.001 and after adjusting for age, weight, and total cumulative DOX dose (p = 0.02 to p = 0.01. Animals receiving low dose DOX trended toward increases in adventitial and total wall thickness after normalization to lumen diameter and accounting for age, weight, and total cumulative DOX dose (p = 0.06 and 0.09, respectively. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, these data demonstrate that weekly treatment of rats with higher doses of DOX increases coronary arteriolar medial, adventitial, and total wall thickness. Future studies are warranted to determine if DOX related coronary arteriolar effects are

  12. Reconstrução da parede torácica nos defeitos adquiridos Chest wall reconstruction in acquired defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Vinicius H. de Carvalho

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Acquired chest wall defects present a challenging problem for thoracic surgeons. Many of such defects can be repaired with the use of local and regional musculocutaneous flaps, but larger defects compromising skeletal structure require increasingly sophisticated reconstructive techniques. The following discussion will review the options for repair acquired chest wall defects based in literature. The authors searched the Pubmed (www.pubmed.com and found citations from January 1996 to February 2008. By reading the titles and the abstracts most of the citations were discharged because they focused in congenital chest wall defects or were cases report. However, many papers were found describing the outcome of large series of patients with acquired chest wall deformities. A review of recent literature shows that the repair of chest wall defects with soft tissues, if possible, remains the treatment of choice. Large chest wall defects require skeletal reconstruction to prevent paradoxical respiration. The selection of the most appropriate flap is primary dictated by the location and the size of the defect. It is important to transfer tissue with good vitality, so understanding the vascular supply is imperative. Autogenous grafts have been used in the past for skeletal reconstruction but a combination of synthetic materials with musculocutaneous flaps has been used lately. Based in the literature, the use of prosthetic material in chest wall reconstruction does not significantly increases the risk of wound infection.

  13. Combined Visualization of Wall Thickness and Wall Shear Stress for the Evaluation of Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaßer, Sylvia; Lawonn, Kai; Hoffmann, Thomas; Skalej, Martin; Preim, Bernhard

    2014-12-01

    For an individual rupture risk assessment of aneurysms, the aneurysm's wall morphology and hemodynamics provide valuable information. Hemodynamic information is usually extracted via computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulation on a previously extracted 3D aneurysm surface mesh or directly measured with 4D phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging. In contrast, a noninvasive imaging technique that depicts the aneurysm wall in vivo is still not available. Our approach comprises an experiment, where intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) is employed to probe a dissected saccular aneurysm phantom, which we modeled from a porcine kidney artery. Then, we extracted a 3D surface mesh to gain the vessel wall thickness and hemodynamic information from a CFD simulation. Building on this, we developed a framework that depicts the inner and outer aneurysm wall with dedicated information about local thickness via distance ribbons. For both walls, a shading is adapted such that the inner wall as well as its distance to the outer wall is always perceivable. The exploration of the wall is further improved by combining it with hemodynamic information from the CFD simulation. Hence, the visual analysis comprises a brushing and linking concept for individual highlighting of pathologic areas. Also, a surface clustering is integrated to provide an automatic division of different aneurysm parts combined with a risk score depending on wall thickness and hemodynamic information. In general, our approach can be employed for vessel visualization purposes where an inner and outer wall has to be adequately represented.

  14. Evaluation of Average Wall Thickness of Organically Modified Mesoporous Silica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Jun GONG; Zhi Hong LI; Bao Zhong DONG

    2005-01-01

    The small angle X-ray scattering of organically modified MSU-X silica prepared by co-condensation of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) and methyltriethoxysilane (MTES) show negative deviation from Debye's theory due to the existence of the organic interface layer. By exerting correction of the scattering negative deviation, Debye relation may be recovered, and the average wall thickness of the material may be evaluated.

  15. Chronic cutaneous chest wall fistula and gallstone empyema due to retained gallstones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaster, Richard S; Berger, Aaron J; Ahmadi-Kashani, Mastaneh; Shrager, Joseph B; Lee, Gordon K

    2014-08-14

    We report a case of a 72-year-old man who presented with a persistent pleural effusion and painful abscess in the right lower chest wall 6 months following a laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The patient subsequently developed a chronic cutaneous chest wall fistula requiring a large resection and complex closure. The complication was likely secondary to intraoperative spillage of gallstones. While previous reports describe gallstone spillage in the abdominal cavity as benign, this case illustrates that stones left in the abdominal cavity can potentially lead to significant morbidity. Therefore, stones should be diligently removed from the abdominal cavity when spillage occurs. In addition, it is important that operative notes reflect the occurrence of stone spillage so stones may be suspected when a patient presents with an abdominal or thoracic infection following a cholecystectomy. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  16. The role of imaging for the surgeon in primary malignant bone tumors of the chest wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocca, M., E-mail: michele.rocca@ior.it [General and Thoracic Surgery, The Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Via Pupilli 1, 40136 Bologna (Italy); Salone, M. [General and Thoracic Surgery, The Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Via Pupilli 1, 40136 Bologna (Italy); Galletti, S. [Ultrasound Unit, The Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Bologna (Italy); Balladelli, A. [Laboratory of Experimental Oncology, The Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Bologna (Italy); Vanel, D. [Research in Imaging Musculo Skeletal Tumors, The Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Bologna (Italy); Briccoli, A. [General and Thoracic Surgery, The Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Via Pupilli 1, 40136 Bologna (Italy)

    2013-12-01

    Primary malignant chest wall tumors are rare. The most frequent primary malignant tumor of the chest wall is chondrosarcoma, less common are primary bone tumors belonging to the Ewing Family Bone Tumors (EFBT), or even rarer are osteosarcomas. They represent a challenging clinical entities for surgeons as the treatment of choice for these neoplasms is surgical resection, excluding EFBT which are normally treated by a multidisciplinary approach. Positive margins after surgical procedure are the principal risk factor of local recurrence, therefore to perform adequate surgery a correct preoperative staging is mandatory. Imaging techniques are used for diagnosis, to determine anatomic site and extension, to perform a guided biopsy, for local and general staging, to evaluate chemotherapy response, to detect the presence of a recurrence. This article will focus on the role of imaging in guiding this often difficult surgery and the different technical possibilities adopted in our department to restore the mechanics of the thoracic cage after wide resections.

  17. Chest wall granuloma associated with BCG vaccination presenting as hot abscess in an immunocompetent infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Seung; Seo, Kyung Jin; Kim, Jae Jun

    2015-03-04

    Bacillus-Calmette-Gue´rin (BCG) vaccine is a live attenuated vaccine to prevent tuberculosis by cell mediated immune response and is routinely administered early after birth. Although it is considered to be a very safe vaccine, sometimes a variety of complications may develop. Herein we describe a clinically unusual case of chest wall granuloma considered to be induced by BCG, presenting as hot abscess, and developed 7 months after BCG vaccination in an immunocompetent infant. The diagnosis was made based on the history, histopathology and virological studies. We suggest, although very rare, a BCG disease should be considered as a differential diagnosis in case of chest wall abscess, even if this is presenting as a hot abscess and even in immunocompetent infants if their age is related to BCG vaccination complications.

  18. Development of thick wall welding and cutting tools for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakahira, Masataka; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Akou, Kentaro; Koizumi, Koichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-04-01

    The Vacuum Vessel, which is a core component of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), is required to be exchanged remotely in a case of accident such as superconducting coil failure. The in-vessel components such as blanket and divertor are planned to be exchanged or fixed. In these exchange or maintenance operations, the thick wall welding and cutting are inevitable and remote handling tools are necessary. The thick wall welding and cutting tools for blanket are under developing in the ITER R and D program. The design requirement is to weld or cut the stainless steel of 70 mm thickness in the narrow space. Tungsten inert gas (TIG) arc welding, plasma cutting and iodine laser welding/cutting are selected as primary option. Element welding and cutting tests, design of small tools to satisfy space requirement, test fabrication and performance tests were performed. This paper reports the tool design and overview of welding and cutting tests. (author)

  19. Endoscopic thyroidectomy through anterior chest wall:a report of 28 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柯重伟; 郑成竹; 陈丹磊; 胡明根; 李际辉; 印慨

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively evaluate the feasibility and clinical value of endoscopic thyroidectomy through anterior chest wall. Methods: From December 2002 to May 2003, 28 patients with an average of age of 28 years old(rangeing from 20 to 45) were performed endoscopic thyroidectomy through anterior chest wall. The subcutaneous space in the anterior chest wall and the subplatysmal space in the neck were bluntly dissected through a 10-mm incision between the nipples, and CO2 was insufllated at 6 - 8 mmHg to create the operative space. Three trocars were inserted in the mammary regions; and dissection of the thyroid, division of the thyroid vessels and parenchyma were performed endoscopically using an ultrasonically activated scalpel. The recurrent laryngeal nerve, the superior laryngeal nerve, and the parathyroid glands were preserved properly. Results: There were 3 mass resections, 17 subtotal lobectomies, 2 total lobectomies, 6 subtotal lobectomies plus contralateral mass resections. The mean operative time was (87.1 ± 26.0) min; the mean blood loss during operation was (47.9 ± 19.6) ml; and the mean postoperative hospital stay was (3.4 ± 0.7) d. The drainage tubes were pulled out at 36 - 60 h postoperatively. There were no conversions to open surgery or complications. No scars can be found in the neck, and the patients were satisfied with the postoperative appearance. Conclusion: Endoscopic thyroidectomy through anterior chest wall combined with low-pressure subcutaneous CO2 insufflation is a feasible and safe procedure. It can bring satisfactory cosmetic results. It is believed that endoscopic thyroidectomy by such approach will find a role in the future.

  20. SU-E-T-437: Dosimetric Assessment of Brass Mesh Bolus for Postmastectomy Chest Wall Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manger, R; Paxton, A; Cervino, L [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: It has been suggested that the use of a brass mesh bolus for chest wall irradiation sufficiently increases surface dose while having little effect on the dose at depth. This work quantified the increase in surface dose when using a brass mesh bolus in postmastectomy chest wall radiotherapy compared to tissue-equivalent bolus and assessed its effect on dose at depth. Methods: Percent depth doses with brass bolus, 5mm tissue-equivalent bolus, and no bolus were determined for a 6 MV photon beam in a solid water phantom using a parallel plate ionization chamber. Gafchromic film was used to determine the surface dose for the same three experimental setups. For comparison to a realistic treatment setup, gafchromic film and OSLDs were used to determine the surface dose over the irradiated area of a 6 MV chest wall plan with tangential beams delivered to a heterogeneous thorax phantom. The plan was generated using a CT of the phantom and delivered using brass mesh bolus, 5mm tissue-equivalent bolus, and no bolus. Results: For the en face beam, the central surface dose increased to 90% of maximum with the tissue-equivalent bolus, but to only 62% of maximum with the brass mesh. Using tangential beams on the thorax phantom, the surface dose increased from 40–72% to 75–110% of prescribed dose, with the brass mesh, and to 85–109% with the tissue-equivalent bolus. At depths beyond dmax in the plastic water phantom, the dose with and without brass mesh bolus differed by less than 0.5%. Conclusion: A brass mesh may be considered as a substitute for tissue-equivalent bolus to increase the superficial dose of 6 MV chest wall tangent plans. The brass mesh does not significantly change the dose at depth, so a non-bolus plan could be used for bolus and non-bolus treatments.

  1. Chest wall actinomycosis in association with the use of an intra-uterine device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, W J; Hill, D R; Gordon, D L

    1995-02-01

    A 31 year old woman presented with a chest wall abscess due to Actinomyces israellii and Porphyromonas asaccharolytica (previously Bacteroides asaccharolyticus). She was a long-term user of an intra-uterine device (IUD) and, although asymptomatic, had radiological evidence of pelvic infection. Actinomyces-like organisms were seen on cervico-vaginal smears. The abscess was surgically drained, the IUD removed, and a prolonged course of amoxycillin/clavulanic acid given.

  2. Severe neonatal hypercalcemia in 4-month-old, presented with respiratory distress and chest wall deformity

    OpenAIRE

    Akram Aljahdali

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism (NSHPT) is a rare disease affecting calcium metabolism and results in severe life-treating hypocalcemia of the neonates. Diagnosis can be challenging due to variable and nonspecific symptomatology. We are reporting on a 4-month-old female infant presenting with respiratory distress and chest wall deformity. We are trying to highlight different surgical options for this rare disease and importance of close collaboration with the pediatric endocrinologist in ...

  3. Case of chest-wall rigidity in a preterm infant caused by prenatal fentanyl administration

    OpenAIRE

    Eventov-Friedman, S; Rozin, I; Shinwell, E. S.

    2010-01-01

    The inability to appropriately ventilate neonates shortly after their birth could be related in rare cases to chest-wall rigidity caused by the placental transfer of fentanyl. Although this adverse effect is recognized when fentanyl is administered to neonates after their birth, the prenatal phenomenon is less known. Treatment with either naloxone or muscle relaxants reverses the fentanyl effect and may prevent unnecessary excessive ventilatory settings.

  4. Surgical treatment of a huge kaposiform hemangioendothelioma in the chest wall: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaonan Guo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Kaposiform hemangioendothelioma, a rare vascular pediatric tumor often associated with Kasabach–Merritt phenomenon, is characterized by severe thrombocytopenia and consumptive coagulopathy. Kaposiform hemangioendothelioma is a severe disease and may progress quickly, resulting in a high mortality. However, standard treatment regimens for Kasabach–Merritt phenomenon have not yet been established. We reported here an infant with a large congenital kaposiform hemangioendothelioma in his chest wall who responded extremely well to surgical excision.

  5. Chest wall granuloma associated with BCG vaccination presenting as hot abscess in an immunocompetent infant

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hyun Seung; Seo, Kyung Jin; Kim, Jae Jun

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus-Calmette-Gue´rin (BCG) vaccine is a live attenuated vaccine to prevent tuberculosis by cell mediated immune response and is routinely administered early after birth. Although it is considered to be a very safe vaccine, sometimes a variety of complications may develop. Herein we describe a clinically unusual case of chest wall granuloma considered to be induced by BCG, presenting as hot abscess, and developed 7 months after BCG vaccination in an immunocompetent infant. The diagnosis w...

  6. Urgent resection of bleeding congenital mesenchymal chest wall hamartoma in an infant

    OpenAIRE

    Bieda, Jan-Christoph; Tröbs, Ralf-Bodo; Roll, Claudia; Wunsch, Rainer; Neid, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    We report a case with prenatally diagnosed large cystic-solid mesenchymal chest wall hamartoma. An attempt of conservative management was made however repeated intralesional hemorrhage led to enlargement and severe anemia which required urgent resection at the age of 8 weeks. The infant had an unimpaired development over a follow-up of 4 years. Wir berichten über ein Neugeborenes mit einem bereits pränatal diagnostizierten, ausgedehnten Thoraxwand-Hamartom von zystisch-solider Beschaffen...

  7. Case of chest-wall rigidity in a preterm infant caused by prenatal fentanyl administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eventov-Friedman, S; Rozin, I; Shinwell, E S

    2010-02-01

    The inability to appropriately ventilate neonates shortly after their birth could be related in rare cases to chest-wall rigidity caused by the placental transfer of fentanyl. Although this adverse effect is recognized when fentanyl is administered to neonates after their birth, the prenatal phenomenon is less known. Treatment with either naloxone or muscle relaxants reverses the fentanyl effect and may prevent unnecessary excessive ventilatory settings.

  8. Severe neonatal hypercalcemia in 4-month-old, presented with respiratory distress and chest wall deformity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Aljahdali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism (NSHPT is a rare disease affecting calcium metabolism and results in severe life-treating hypocalcemia of the neonates. Diagnosis can be challenging due to variable and nonspecific symptomatology. We are reporting on a 4-month-old female infant presenting with respiratory distress and chest wall deformity. We are trying to highlight different surgical options for this rare disease and importance of close collaboration with the pediatric endocrinologist in the treatment plan for those patients.

  9. EFFECT OF WALL THICKNESS ON THE SOLAR GAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KEREKES A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Utilized passive solar gain covers considerable part of heat losses, especially in well insulated buildings. At the same time the thermal insulation of the wall in such a building, e.g. approaching the “Passivhaus” standard is about 20 cm thick. Unless a light weight building is spoken of further 20-30 cm loadbearing layer and the surface finishing should be added resulting in a total thickness of 45-60 cm. The thick wall narrows the cross section through which the direct solar beam may enter the room thus decreases the solar gain. The movement of the solar beam during the day and season can be followed on the base of the sun path diagram. One could say that on the other hand a massive loadbearing layer - especially if it is on the inner side - increases the heat storage capacity, thus increases the utilized part of the solar gain. Series of thermal simulation proves that the effect of heat storage capacity is less important in comparison with the cross section through which the solar beam enters the room. In other terms a light weight building with thin walls performs better than a massive one with thick wall providing the U-value is the same in both cases. In this paper the results of simulation will be presented. Certainly the wall should fulfill many requirements including load, weather-proofness, thermal insulation, building technology. Solar beam is only one of the many aspects. Nevertheless simple geometric tricks may lead to a good compromise, e.g. bevel edge reveal which is not perpendicular to the façade. No doubt in this case the thermal bridge losses around the window perimeter will be higher however this will be compensated by the solar gain.

  10. Post mastectomy chest wall irradiation using mixed electron-photon beams with or without isocentric technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdy, H K; Zikry, M S

    2008-01-01

    To describe our technique in delivering post mastectomy radiotherapy to chest wall using electron-photon mixed beam with or without isocentric application of the tangential photon portals, and to evaluate the associated acute and delayed morbidities. Twenty-two females with invasive breast cancer were subjected to modified radical mastectomy with adequate axillary dissection. All the patients have either tumour > or = 5 cm and/ or positive axillary nodes > 3. Chest wall was irradiated by a mixed beam of 6-Mev electrons (10Gy) and opposed tangential fields using 6 Mev-photons (36 Gy) followed by 6-Mev electrons boost to the scar of mastectomy for 4 Gy/2 fractions. We randomly allocated our patients to receive the photon beam with or without the isocentric technique. The mean dose to the planned target volume (PTV) by mixed beam was 44 Gy (96%) with a mean dose of 42 Gy (91%) to the overlying skin for the whole study group. In cases with right breast disease (17 cases), the mean right lung tissue volume within the PTV was 220 ml (15%). It was relatively higher with the non-iscocentric technique, 281 ml (19%), compared to the isocentric technique of 159 ml (10.5%). In cases with left breast disease (5 cases), the mean left lung volume within the PTV was 175 ml (14%). Larger volume of the lung tissue was included with the non-isocentric technique, 197 ml (16%) compared to the isocentric technique of 153 ml (12%). The mean scattered doses to the rest of the lung tissue, the rest of the heart in left breast cases, and the contra-lateral breast for the whole study group were 2.8 Gy, 1.8 Gy, and 1.4 Gy respectively and was comparable in both treatment arms. None of the cases developed any element of acute radiation related pneumonitis. Delayed radiation induced pneumonitis was seen in 2 cases (18%), with the chest wall treated with radiation with the non-isocentric technique. This study clearly demonstrated the utility of mixed beam in irradiating the chest wall after

  11. Effects of Changes in Lung Volume on Oscillatory Flow Rate During High-Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott J Butcher

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The effectiveness of high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO in mucolysis and mucous clearance is thought to be dependant on oscillatory flow rate (Fosc. Therefore, increasing Fosc during HFCWO may have a clinical benefit.

  12. Noninvasive Stiffness Sensing of Ventricular Wall Based on a Thick-walled Cylinder Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashimori, Mitsuru; Ojio, Takeshi; Takeda, Yasuharu; Sakata, Yasushi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Kaneko, Makoto

    This paper discusses a concept of a noninvasive sensing method that can estimate a left ventricular wall stiffness towards a medical diagnosis. Focusing on not only the strain of ventricular wall but also the displacements of epicardium during diastole of heart beat, we propose an index of ventricular wall stiffness based on a thick-walled cylinder model. Applying the proposed method to the echocardiography, we show statistical results where normal and HFpEF (Heart Failure with preserved Ejection Fraction) can be separated towards a medical diagnosis.

  13. Time course for arm and chest muscle thickness changes following bench press training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, Riki; Thiebaud, Robert S.; Loenneke, Jeremy P.; Loftin, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the time course of hypertrophic adaptations in both the upper arm and trunk muscles following high-intensity bench press training. Seven previously untrained young men (aged 25 ± 3 years) performed free-weight bench press training 3 days (Monday, Wednesday and Friday) per week for 24 weeks. Training intensity and volume were set at 75% of one repetition maximum (1-RM) and 30 repetitions (3 sets of 10 repetitions, with 2−3 min of rest between sets), respectively. Muscle thickness (MTH) was measured using B-mode ultrasound at three sites: the biceps and triceps brachii and the pectoralis major. Measurements were taken a week prior to the start of training, before the training session on every Monday and 3 days after the final training session. Pairwise comparisons from baseline revealed that pectoralis major MTH significantly increased after week-1 (p = 0.002), triceps MTH increased after week-5 (p = 0.001) and 1-RM strength increased after week-3 (p = 0.001) while no changes were observed in the biceps MTH from baseline. Significant muscle hypertrophy was observed earlier in the chest compared to that of the triceps. Our results indicate that the time course of the muscle hypertrophic response differs between the upper arm and chest. PMID:24265879

  14. Chest wall resection and reconstruction using titanium micromesh covered with Marlex mesh for metastatic follicular thyroid carcinoma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suganuma Nobuyasu

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The distant metastases from differentiated thyroid carcinomas are often untreatable. In particular, bone metastasis is significantly related to poor prognosis since radioactive iodine therapy is generally less effective. Therefore, surgical resection is considered one of the treatments for patients with bone metastases. We report chest wall resection and reconstruction using titanium micromesh covered with polypropylene mesh (Marlex mesh for metastatic rib bones as a result of follicular thyroid carcinoma. Case presentation A 51-year-old man was referred to our institution with a painful chest wall tumor. He presented with a 15 × 10 cm bony swelling on the left chest wall and multiple small lung nodules from follicular thyroid carcinoma. Completion total thyroidectomy, chest wall resection and reconstruction using titanium micromesh covered with Marlex mesh were performed. There were no critical complications associated with surgical treatments and tumor pain disappeared during the postoperative period. Then, he received radioactive iodine therapy and the uptake of radioactive iodine was well observed in bilateral lung fields. Conclusion Reconstruction using titanium micromesh covered with Marlex mesh is possible for repairing the wide chest wall resection required for thyroid carcinoma metastasis. This technique would help to enhance treatment efficacy in the combination therapy of radioactive iodine and surgery in patients with large thyroid carcinoma metastasis in the chest wall.

  15. Extensive chest wall tissue loss and its management by vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandip Kanti Basu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive electric burn around the chest in children is rare and this type of injury always poses a great challenge for its management. A 12-year-old male child with extensive electric burn of the chest wall was admitted to hospital. It was a neglected case of 9 days old burn; the young boy was in critical condition having systemic features of toxemia with widespread necrosis of the skin, subcutaneous tissues, and muscles along with exposed bones (ribs and sternum with the risk of impending rupture of pleura through the exposed intercostal spaces. After initial resuscitation, a thorough debridement of all necrotic tissues was done. Thereafter, a superiorly based vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap was harvested to cover the exposed bones and intercostal spaces. The remaining raw areas were skin grafted. The child made an excellent recovery with good outcome.

  16. Chest wall infiltration by lung cancer: value of thin-sectional CT with different reconstruction algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhrmeister, P.; Allmann, K.H.; Altehoefer, C.; Laubenberger, J.; Langer, M. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Wertzel, H.; Hasse, J. [Department of Thoracic Surgery, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany)

    1999-09-01

    The aim of this investigation was to evaluate whether thin-sectional CT with different reconstruction algorithms can improve the diagnostic accuracy with regard to chest wall invasion in patients with peripheral bronchogenic carcinoma. Forty-one patients with intrapulmonary lesions and tumor contact to the thoracic wall as seen on CT staging underwent additional 1-mm CT slices with reconstruction in a high-resolution (HR) and an edge blurring, soft detail (SD) algorithm. Five criteria were applied and validated by histological findings. Using the criteria of the intact fat layer, HRCT had a sensitivity of 81 % and a specificity of 79 %, SD CT had a sensitivity of 96 % and a specificity of 78 %, and standard CT technique had a sensitivity of 50 % and a specificity of 71 %, respectively. Regarding changes of intercostal soft tissue, HRCT achieved a sensitivity of 71 % and a specificity of 96 %, SD CT had a sensitivity of 94 % and a specificity of 96 % (standard CT technique: sensitivity 50 % and specificity 96 %). For the other criteria, such as pleural contact area, angle, and osseous destruction, no significant differences were found. Diagnostic accuracy of chest wall infiltration can be improved by using thin sectional CT. Especially the application of an edge-blurring (SD) algorithm increases sensitivity and specificity without additional costs. (orig.) With 4 figs., 1 tab., 26 refs.

  17. Ultrasound settings significantly alter arterial lumen and wall thickness measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Green Daniel J

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Flow-mediated dilation (FMD and carotid intima-medial thickness (CIMT, measured by ultrasound, are widely used to test the efficacy of cardioprotective interventions. Although assessment methods vary, automated edge-detecting image analysis software is routinely used to measure changes in FMD and CIMT. We aimed to quantify the effect that commonly adjusted ultrasound settings have on arterial lumen and wall thickness measurements made with CIMT measurement software. Methods We constructed phantom arteries from a tissue-mimicking agar compound and scanned them in a water bath with a 10 MHz multi-frequency linear-array probe attached to a high-resolution ultrasound machine. B-mode images of the phantoms were recorded with dynamic range (DR and gain set at five decibel (dB increments from 40 dB to 60 dB and -10 dB to +10 dB respectively. Lumen diameter and wall-thickness were measured off-line using CIMT measurement software. Results Lumen measurements: there was a strong linear relationship between DR and gain and measured lumen diameter. For a given gain level, a 5 dB increase in DR reduced the measured lumen diameter by 0.02 ± 0.004 mm (p CIMT measurements: For a fixed gain level, a 5 dB increase in DR increased measured wall thickness by 0.003 ± 0.002 mm (p Conclusion DR, gain and probe distance significantly alter lumen diameter and CIMT measurements made using image analysis software. When CIMT and FMD are used to test the efficacy of cardioprotective interventions, the DR, gain and probe position used to record baseline scans should be documented and replicated in post-treatment scans in individual trial subjects. If more than one sonographer or imaging centre is used to collect data, the study protocol should document specific DR and gain settings to be used in all subjects.

  18. Pectoralis Muscle Flap Repair Reduces Paradoxical Motion of the Chest Wall in Complex Sternal Wound Dehiscence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitani, Jacob; Russo, Marco; Pompeo, Eugenio; Sergiacomi, Gian Luigi; Chiariello, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that in patients with chronic complex sternum dehiscence, the use of muscle flap repair minimizes the occurrence of paradoxical motion of the chest wall (CWPM) when compared to sternal rewiring, eventually leading to better respiratory function and clinical outcomes during follow-up. Methods In a propensity score matching analysis, out of 94 patients who underwent sternal reconstruction, 20 patients were selected: 10 patients underwent sternal reconstruction with bilateral pectoralis muscle flaps (group 1) and 10 underwent sternal rewiring (group 2). Eligibility criteria included the presence of hemisternum diastases associated with multiple (≥3) bone fractures and radiologic evidence of synchronous chest wall motion (CWSM). We compared radiologically assessed (volumetric computed tomography) ventilatory mechanic indices such as single lung and global vital capacity (VC), diaphragm excursion, synchronous and paradoxical chest wall motion. Results Follow-up was 100% complete (mean 85±24 months). CWPM was inversely correlated with single lung VC (Spearman R=−0.72, p=0.0003), global VC (R=−0.51, p=0.02) and diaphragm excursion (R=−0.80, p=0.0003), whereas it proved directly correlated with dyspnea grade (Spearman R=0.51, p=0.02) and pain (R=0.59, p=0.005). Mean CWPM and single lung VC were both better in group 1, whereas there was no difference in CWSM, diaphragm excursion and global VC. Conclusion Our study suggests that in patients with complex chronic sternal dehiscence, pectoralis muscle flap reconstruction guarantees lower CWPM and greater single-lung VC when compared with sternal rewiring and it is associated with better clinical outcomes with less pain and dyspnea. PMID:27733997

  19. Chemo-thermotherapy for radiation-induced squamous cell carcinoma in anterior chest wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kodama, Ken; Doi, Osamu; Higashiyama, Masahiko; Yokouchi, Hideki; Noguchi, Shinzaburo; Koyama, Hiroki (Osaka Prefectural Center for Adult Diseases (Japan))

    1992-09-01

    A 62 years-old woman had visited our hospital with the large and deep ulcer formation on the left anterior chest wall. A biopsy of the ulcerous lesion established the diagnosis of a squamous cell carcinoma which might be induced by the irradiation after mastectomy. Although a wide resection of the chest wall including left arm was performed, it was impossible to resect completely. After then, she had operations for local recurrence three times in three years. However, cure was not obtained, and residual lesions gradually enlarged and all layers of the anterior chest wall were replaced with tumor tissues. Conventional chemotherapy using futraful and mytomycin C was not effective. Therefore, we tried combined therapy with intravenous administration of cisplatin (CDDP) and vindesine (VDS), and local hyperthermia using radiofrequency (RF) wave. A total number of 11 courses of this treatment modality was carried out at once a week intervals. The tumor-temperature was maintained at the range of 40-43degC for 40 min in each treatment session. Chemotherapeutic agents were administered simultaneously with hyperthermia. After these treatment, the recurrent tumor was markedly reduced, and epithelization of the ulcer was recognized from the surrounding normal skin. The residual tumor was then resected completely. The operative wound was successfully closed by surrounding normal tissue mobilization. She is in good postoperative condition. We concluded that the chemo-thermotherapy is safe and promising therapeutic modality for such invasive squamous cell carcinoma, and the normal tissues are not affected. Furthermore, this approach will expand the scope of radical resection for such an uncontrollable tumor. (author).

  20. [Chemo-thermotherapy of radiation-induced squamous cell carcinoma in anterior chest wall].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, K; Doi, O; Higashiyama, M; Yokouchi, H; Noguchi, S; Koyama, H

    1992-09-01

    A 62-year-old woman had visited our hospital with the large and deep ulcer formation on the left anterior chest wall. A biopsy of the ulcerous lesion established the diagnosis of a squamous cell carcinoma which might be induced by the irradiation after mastectomy. Although a wide resection of the chest wall including left arm was performed, it was impossible to resect completely. After then, she had operations for local recurrence for three times in three years. However, cure was not obtained, and residual lesions gradually enlarged and all layers of the anterior chest wall was replaced with tumor tissues. Conventional chemotherapy using ftorafur and mitomycin C was not effective. Therefore, we tried combined therapy with intravenous administration of cisplatin (CDDP) and vindesine (VDS), and local hyperthermia using radiofrequency (RF) wave. A total number of 11 courses of this treatment modality was carried out at once a week intervals. The tumor-temperature was maintained at the range of 40-43 degrees C for 40 min in each treatment session. Chemotherapeutic agents were administered simultaneously with hyperthermia. After these treatments, the recurrent tumor was markedly reduced, and epithelization of the ulcer was recognized from the surrounding normal skin. The residual tumor was then resected completely. The operative wound was successfully closed by surrounding normal tissue mobilization. She is in good postoperative condition. We concluded that the chemo-thermotherapy is safe and promising therapeutic modality for such invasive squamous cell carcinoma, and the normal tissues are not affected. Furthermore, this approach will expand the scope of radical resection for such an uncontrollable tumor.

  1. Superficial microwave-induced hyperthermia in the treatment of chest wall recurrences in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBois, J B; Hay, M; Bordure, G

    1990-09-01

    Our study concerns 42 patients with chest wall recurrences from breast cancer: 17 Stage 1 (less than 4 cm in diameter), 11 Stage 2 (more than 4 cm), seven Stage 3 (skin ulceration whatever tumor size), and seven Stage 4 (neoplastic lymphangitis and/or skin nodules covering chest wall beyond midline). All the patients were treated with 2450 MHz microwaves by means of a generator with 4 magnetrons (250 to 300 W) and arterial applicators delivering 5 to 10 W/cm2. Each applicator is coupled with an infrared thermometer allowing an atraumatic temperature control processed by a PC-compatible computer using a Turbo Pascal program. A temperature of 41.5 degrees C to 42.5 degrees C was maintained for 45 minutes from the skin surface to a 2.5-cm depth within tissues. Hyperthermia alone was done in four patients; hyperthermia was combined with chemotherapy in four patients, and with electrontherapy (2 X 450 cGy or 3 X 350 cGy/week) in 34 patients: tumor dose under 3000 cGy in seven patients and over 3000 cGy in 27 patients. We observed a complete response in 22 patients (52.3%), a partial response (greater than 50%) in 11 patients (26.1%), and no response in nine patients (21.4%). No complete response was observed in patients treated with hyperthermia alone or in conjunction with chemotherapy. The local control was demonstrated to be improved only in patients treated with hyperthermia and radiotherapy. The results were correlated with tumor stage: ten complete responses out of 12 Stage 1, and one complete response out of four Stage 4. We noted nine side effects completely reversible within a month with no late skin reaction. Our results show that hyperthermia can give improved local control without any morbidity in treating chest wall recurrences of breast cancer.

  2. Reconstruction after Anterior Chest Wall Keloid Resection Using Internal Mammary Artery Perforator Propeller Flaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Rei; Ono, Shimpei; Akaishi, Satoshi; Dohi, Teruyuki; Iimura, Takeshi; Nakao, Junichi

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is difficult to completely resect huge anterior chest wall keloids and then close the wound directly. We report here our retrospective analysis of our case series of patients with such keloids who underwent reconstruction with internal mammary artery perforator (IMAP) pedicled propeller flaps and then received postoperative high-dose-rate superficial brachytherapy. Methods: All consecutive patients with large/severe keloids on the anterior chest wall who underwent keloid resection followed by reconstruction with IMAP-pedicled propeller flaps and then high-dose-rate superficial brachytherapy in our academic hospital were identified. All cases were followed for >18 months. Donor site position, perforator pedicle, flap size, angle of flap rotation, complications, and recurrence were documented. Results: There were nine men and one woman. The average age was 37.9 years. The average follow-up duration was 28.7 months. The largest flap was 16 × 4 cm. The dominant perforators of the internal mammary artery were located in the sixth (n = 2), seventh (n = 5), eighth (n = 1), and ninth (n = 2) intercostal spaces. Twelve months after surgery, patients reported marked relief from keloid-associated pain and itching, except in two patients who underwent partial keloid resection; their remaining keloids were still troublesome but after conservative therapies, including steroid ointments/plasters, the keloids gradually ameliorated. Eighteen months after surgery, there was no keloid recurrence or new development of keloids on the donor site. Conclusions: IMAP-pedicled propeller flaps transfer skin tension from the anterior chest wall to the abdomen. Our series suggests that this approach combined with radiation therapy can control keloid recurrence.

  3. Center-blocked field technique for treatment of extensive chest wall disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podgorsak, E.B.; Pla, M.; Kim, T.H.; Freeman, C.R.

    1981-10-01

    Our treatment technique for patients with extensive chest wall disese is presented. A rotational center-blocked radiation field is used to cover the large tumor volume to a dose with +/- 10% while sparing the lungs and the spinal cord. The center block is tapered to match both the patient's mediastinal slope in the sagittal plane and the outline of the lungs in the coronal plane. Ten patients treated with this technique to a tumor dose of 50 Gy tolerated the treatment well, despite a high integral dose. The local responses were excellent, particularly in view of the initial extent of the disease.

  4. Necrotizing fasciitis involving the chest and abdominal wall caused by Raoultella planticola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Si-Hyun

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Raoultella planticola was originally considered to be a member of environmental Klebsiella. The clinical significance of R. planticola is still not well known. Case presentation We describe the first case of necrotizing fasciitis involving the chest and abdominal wall caused by R. planticola. The identity of the organism was confirmed using 16S rRNA sequencing. The patient was successfully treated with the appropriate antibiotics combined with operative drainage and debridement. Conclusions R. planticola had been described as environmental species, but should be suspected in extensive necrotizing fasciitis after minor trauma in mild to moderate immunocompromised patients.

  5. Giant congenital intercostal arteriovenous malformation with extensive involvement of chest wall and ribs: surgical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parashi, Hrishikesh Sukhadeo; Bhosle, Krishnarao Narayan; Thakare, Nitin Dashrath; Sharma, Ajay; Potwar, Sushrut Suhas

    2013-06-01

    Intercostal arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are rare lesions. Review of literature shows that most reported cases are secondary to trauma or iatrogenic in origin. Congenital intercostal AVMs are extremely rare. We believe that only 1 case report of congenital intercostal arteriovenous malformation has been reported previously in the literature. We present an exceedingly rare case of giant congenital intercostal AVM in a young patient diagnosed on contrast-enhanced computed tomography of the thorax and treated by surgical resection of the involved chest wall and ribs with reconstruction of the surgical defect. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Dosimetric evaluation of integrated IMRT treatment of the chest wall and supraclavicular region for breast cancer after modified radical mastectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Wei, Xian-Ding; Zhao, Yu-Tian; Ma, Chang-Ming

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the dosimetric characteristics of irradiation of the chest wall and supraclavicular region as an integrated volume with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) after modified radical mastectomy. This study included 246 patients who received modified radical mastectomy. The patients were scanned with computed tomography, and the chest wall (with or without the internal mammary lymph nodes) and supraclavicular region were delineated. For 143 patients, the chest wall and supraclavicular region were combined as an integrated planning volume and treated with IMRT. For 103 patients, conventional treatments were employed with 2 tangential fields for the chest wall, abutting a mixed field of 6-MV x-rays (16Gy) and 9-MeV electrons (34Gy) for the upper supraclavicular region. The common prescription dose was 50Gy/25Fx/5W to 90% of the target volume. The dosimetric characteristics of the chest wall, the supraclavicular region, and normal organs were compared. For the chest wall target, compared with conventional treatments, the integrated IMRT plans lowered the maximum dose, increased the minimum dose, and resulted in better conformity and uniformity of the target volume. There was an increase in minimum, average, and 95% prescription dose for the integrated IMRT plans in the supraclavicular region, and conformity and uniformity were improved. The V30 of the ipsilateral lung and V10, V30, and mean dose of the heart on the integrated IMRT plans were lower than those of the conventional plans. The V5 and V10 of the ipsilateral lung and V5 of the heart were higher on the integrated IMRT plans (p supraclavicular region and showed better dose conformity and uniformity of the integrated target volume of the chest wall and supraclavicular region. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Factors Associated With Chest Wall Toxicity After Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Sheree, E-mail: shereedst32@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, WellStar Kennestone Hospital, Marietta, Georgia (United States); Vicini, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Vanapalli, Jyotsna R.; Whitaker, Thomas J.; Pope, D. Keith [Department of Radiation Oncology, WellStar Kennestone Hospital, Marietta, Georgia (United States); Lyden, Maureen [BioStat International, Inc., Tampa, Florida (United States); Bruggeman, Lisa; Haile, Kenneth L.; McLaughlin, Mark P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, WellStar Kennestone Hospital, Marietta, Georgia (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this analysis was to evaluate dose-volume relationships associated with a higher probability for developing chest wall toxicity (pain) after accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) by using both single-lumen and multilumen brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Rib dose data were available for 89 patients treated with APBI and were correlated with the development of chest wall/rib pain at any point after treatment. Ribs were contoured on computed tomography planning scans, and rib dose-volume histograms (DVH) along with histograms for other structures were constructed. Rib DVH data for all patients were sampled at all volumes {>=}0.008 cubic centimeter (cc) (for maximum dose related to pain) and at volumes of 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 cc for analysis. Rib pain was evaluated at each follow-up visit. Patient responses were marked as yes or no. No attempt was made to grade responses. Eighty-nine responses were available for this analysis. Results: Nineteen patients (21.3%) complained of transient chest wall/rib pain at any point in follow-up. Analysis showed a direct correlation between total dose received and volume of rib irradiated with the probability of developing rib/chest wall pain at any point after follow-up. The median maximum dose at volumes {>=}0.008 cc of rib in patients who experienced chest wall pain was 132% of the prescribed dose versus 95% of the prescribed dose in those patients who did not experience pain (p = 0.0035). Conclusions: Although the incidence of chest wall/rib pain is quite low with APBI brachytherapy, attempts should be made to keep the volume of rib irradiated at a minimum and the maximum dose received by the chest wall as low as reasonably achievable.

  8. Number of Ribs Resected is Associated with Respiratory Complications Following Lobectomy with en bloc Chest Wall Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissen, Nicole M; Medairos, Robert; Davila, Edgar; Basu, Sanjib; Warren, William H; Chmielewski, Gary W; Liptay, Michael J; Arndt, Andrew T; Seder, Christopher W

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary lobectomy with en bloc chest wall resection is a common strategy for treating lung cancers invading the chest wall. We hypothesized a direct relationship exists between number of ribs resected and postoperative respiratory complications. An institutional database was queried for patients with non-small cell lung cancer that underwent lobectomy with en bloc chest wall resection between 2003 and 2014. Propensity matching was used to identify a cohort of patients who underwent lobectomy via thoracotomy without chest wall resection. Patients were propensity matched on age, gender, smoking history, FEV1, and DLCO. The relationship between number of ribs resected and postoperative respiratory complications (bronchoscopy, re-intubation, pneumonia, or tracheostomy) was examined. Sixty-eight patients (34 chest wall resections; 34 without chest wall resection) were divided into 3 cohorts: cohort A = 0 ribs resected (n = 34), cohort B = 1-3 ribs resected (n = 24), and cohort C = 4-6 ribs resected (n = 10). Patient demographics were similar between cohorts. The 90-day mortality rate was 2.9 % (2/68) and did not vary between cohorts. On multivariate analysis, having 1-3 ribs resected (OR 19.29, 95 % CI (1.33, 280.72); p = 0.03), 4-6 ribs resected [OR 26.66, (1.48, 481.86); p = 0.03), and a lower DLCO (OR 0.91, (0.84, 0.99); p = 0.02) were associated with postoperative respiratory complications. In patients undergoing lobectomy with en bloc chest wall resection for non-small cell lung cancer, the number of ribs resected is directly associated with incidence of postoperative respiratory complications.

  9. Dosimetric evaluation of integrated IMRT treatment of the chest wall and supraclavicular region for breast cancer after modified radical mastectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Bo; Wei, Xian-ding; Zhao, Yu-tian [Department of Radiation Oncology, the Fourth Affiliated Hospital of Suzhou University, Wuxi (China); Ma, Chang-Ming, E-mail: charlie.ma@fccc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the dosimetric characteristics of irradiation of the chest wall and supraclavicular region as an integrated volume with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) after modified radical mastectomy. This study included 246 patients who received modified radical mastectomy. The patients were scanned with computed tomography, and the chest wall (with or without the internal mammary lymph nodes) and supraclavicular region were delineated. For 143 patients, the chest wall and supraclavicular region were combined as an integrated planning volume and treated with IMRT. For 103 patients, conventional treatments were employed with 2 tangential fields for the chest wall, abutting a mixed field of 6-MV x-rays (16 Gy) and 9-MeV electrons (34 Gy) for the upper supraclavicular region. The common prescription dose was 50 Gy/25 Fx/5 W to 90% of the target volume. The dosimetric characteristics of the chest wall, the supraclavicular region, and normal organs were compared. For the chest wall target, compared with conventional treatments, the integrated IMRT plans lowered the maximum dose, increased the minimum dose, and resulted in better conformity and uniformity of the target volume. There was an increase in minimum, average, and 95% prescription dose for the integrated IMRT plans in the supraclavicular region, and conformity and uniformity were improved. The V{sub 30} of the ipsilateral lung and V{sub 10}, V{sub 30}, and mean dose of the heart on the integrated IMRT plans were lower than those of the conventional plans. The V{sub 5} and V{sub 10} of the ipsilateral lung and V{sub 5} of the heart were higher on the integrated IMRT plans (p < 0.05) than on conventional plans. Without an increase in the radiation dose to organs at risk, the integrated IMRT treatment plans improved the dose distribution of the supraclavicular region and showed better dose conformity and uniformity of the integrated target volume of the chest wall and supraclavicular region.

  10. [Reconstruction of the anterior chest wall by a sandwich-type combination of a synthetic support and a muscle flap from the latissimus dorsi. Apropos of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanfrey, E; Grolleau, J L; Glock, Y; Chavoin, J P; Costagliola, M

    1996-04-01

    Reconstruction of the chest wall after balistic or other trauma requires good and muscle cover and creation of a new, stable and airtight wall. The authors present a case of balistic trauma of the right anterolateral chest wall which was urgently debrided and subsequently reconstructed by sandwich combination of a latissimus dorsi muscle flap and synthetic material composed of a sheet of PTFE and creation of two methylmethylacrylate ribs. The advantage of this technique is that it avoids the use of autologous tissue from an already weakened chest wall and confers a new chest stability in several sites corresponding to the wall defect with easily available and easy-to-use materials.

  11. Automated quantification of bronchiectasis, airway wall thickening and lumen tapering in chest CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez-Rovira, Adria; Kuo, Wieying; Petersen, Jens

    were obtained using a fully automatic, in-house developed, segmentation method. Subsequently, for each detected airway branch, the Airway-Artery Ratio (AAR, ratio between airway outer wall and accompanying artery radius, a bronchiectasis measurement), Wall-Artery Ratio (WAR, ratio between airway wall...... thickness and accompanying artery radius), and inter-branch Lumen-Ratio (LR, ratio between a branch's lumen and its parent branch lumen radius, a tapering measurement) were computed. Because CF-related structural abnormalities only affect a portion of branches, the 75th percentile was used as summarising...

  12. Shape optimization of a thick-walled power boiler component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duda Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a methodology and successful application of structural optimization of a T-pipe under transient thermal and mechanical loads. In order to find the optimal shape of a thick-walled power boiler component, a parametric FE model and the evolutionary algorithm (EA are applied. The power boiler start-up and shutdown curves are based on the TRD 301 guidelines. Maximum total stresses are assumed as optimization constraints. The obtained geometry is by about 18.6% lighter than the original one due to thinning of the walls. Maximum tensile and compressive stresses in the modified geometry are smaller than in the original one during the whole cycle. Additionally, lower total stress values are recorded during heating and cooling processes. Therefore, these transient processes can be accelerated and the shutdown and start-up losses can be reduced.

  13. Velocity Field and Variation of Wall Thickness During Tube Dieless Upsetting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王忠堂; 栾瑰馥; 张士宏

    2004-01-01

    Theoretical analyses show that the variation of wall thickness is in direct proportion to outer-diameter, inter-diameter, and (√1 + Rs) (Rs is sectional increase ratio of tube), the theoretical calculated results of wall thickness during tube dieless upsetting are very approximate to the experimental one. As the width of deformation field increases, both the variation of wall thickness and the derivative of wall thickness variation to width of deformation field (tf/to) reduce.

  14. RLC model of visco-elastic properties of the chest wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliverti, Andrea; Ferrigno, Giancarlo

    1996-04-01

    The quantification of the visco-elastic properties (resistance (R), inertia (L) and compliance (C)) of the different chest wall compartments (pulmonary rib cage,diaphragmatic rib cage and abdomen) is important to study the status of the passive components of the respiratory system, particularly in selected pathologies. Applying the viscoelastic-electrical analogy to the chest wall, we used an identification method in order to estimate the R, L and C parameters of the different parts of the chest, basing on different models; the input and output measured data were constituted by the volume variations of the different chest wall compartments and by the nasal pressure during controlled intermittent positive pressure ventilation by nasal mask, while the parameters of the system (R, L and C of the different compartments) were to be estimated. Volumes were measured with a new method, recently validated, based on an opto-electronic motion analyzer, able to compute with high accuracy and null invasivity the absolute values and the time variations of the volumes of each of the three compartments. The estimation of the R, L and C parameters has been based on a least-squared criterion, and the minimization has been based on a robustified iterative Gauss-Newton algorithm. The validation of the estimation procedure (fitting) has ben performed computing the percentage root mean square value of the error between the output real data and the output estimated data. The method has been applied to 2 healthy subjects. Also preliminary results have been obtained from 20 subjects affected by neuromuscular diseases (Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) and Spinal Muscle Atrophy (SMA)). The results show that: (a) the best-fitting electrical models of the respiratory system are made up by one or three parallel RLC branches supplied by a voltage generator (so considering inertial properties, particularly in the abdominal compartment, and not considering patient/machine connection); (b) there

  15. Proportional assist ventilation decreases thoracoabdominal asynchrony and chest wall distortion in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musante, G; Schulze, A; Gerhardt, T; Everett, R; Claure, N; Schaller, P; Bancalari, E

    2001-02-01

    Thoracoabdominal asynchrony (TAA) and chest wall distortion (CWD) are commonly seen in preterm infants secondary to a highly compliant rib cage and poor compensation of distorting forces by inspiratory rib cage muscles. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) reduces TAA and CWD by stenting the chest wall. We hypothesized that application of positive airway pressure only during inspiration and in proportion to an infant's inspiratory effort should have a similar but more pronounced effect than CPAP alone. A ventilator providing airway pressure changes in proportion to flow and volume generated by an infant (proportional assist ventilation) was used to unload the respiratory pump during inspiration. Ten preterm infants were studied [birth weight, 745 (635-1175) g; gestational age, 26.5 (24-31) wk; postnatal age 3 (1-7) d; medium (range)]. TAA and CWD were determined by respiratory inductive plethysmography. TAA was expressed as the phase angle between the rib cage and abdominal motion and CWD as the total compartmental displacement ratio. In addition, we measured tidal volume with a pneumotachograph and esophageal and airway pressure deflections with pressure transducers. Measurements were obtained during alternating periods of CPAP and two different degrees of support (Gain 1 = 1.09 +/- 0.68, Gain 2 = 1.84 +/- 0.84 cm H(2)O/mL) that were provided by a proportional assist ventilator. Phase angle and the total compartmental displacement ratio decreased with increasing gain compared with CPAP alone. Peak airway pressure increased from 0.6 to 3.8 to 7.6 cm H(2)O above positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) with CPAP, Gain 1, and Gain 2, respectively, as tidal volume increased from 2.8 to 4.1 to 4.7 mL/kg. Esophageal pressure changes decreased only little with increasing gain. Chest wall excursion increased and abdominal movement decreased, indicating a redistribution of tidal volume between chest and abdomen. We conclude that proportional assist ventilation reduces

  16. A hybrid method for airway segmentation and automated measurement of bronchial wall thickness on CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ziyue; Bagci, Ulas; Foster, Brent; Mansoor, Awais; Udupa, Jayaram K; Mollura, Daniel J

    2015-08-01

    Inflammatory and infectious lung diseases commonly involve bronchial airway structures and morphology, and these abnormalities are often analyzed non-invasively through high resolution computed tomography (CT) scans. Assessing airway wall surfaces and the lumen are of great importance for diagnosing pulmonary diseases. However, obtaining high accuracy from a complete 3-D airway tree structure can be quite challenging. The airway tree structure has spiculated shapes with multiple branches and bifurcation points as opposed to solid single organ or tumor segmentation tasks in other applications, hence, it is complex for manual segmentation as compared with other tasks. For computerized methods, a fundamental challenge in airway tree segmentation is the highly variable intensity levels in the lumen area, which often causes a segmentation method to leak into adjacent lung parenchyma through blurred airway walls or soft boundaries. Moreover, outer wall definition can be difficult due to similar intensities of the airway walls and nearby structures such as vessels. In this paper, we propose a computational framework to accurately quantify airways through (i) a novel hybrid approach for precise segmentation of the lumen, and (ii) two novel methods (a spatially constrained Markov random walk method (pseudo 3-D) and a relative fuzzy connectedness method (3-D)) to estimate the airway wall thickness. We evaluate the performance of our proposed methods in comparison with mostly used algorithms using human chest CT images. Our results demonstrate that, on publicly available data sets and using standard evaluation criteria, the proposed airway segmentation method is accurate and efficient as compared with the state-of-the-art methods, and the airway wall estimation algorithms identified the inner and outer airway surfaces more accurately than the most widely applied methods, namely full width at half maximum and phase congruency.

  17. Radiation induced skin cancer the chest wall 30 years later from breast cancer operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, Kouji; Togawa, Tamotsu; Hasegawa, Takeshi; Matsunami, Hidetoshi; Ikeda, Tsuneko [Matsunami General Hospital, Kasamatsu, Gifu (Japan); Matsuo, Youichi

    1998-10-01

    This paper describes the skin cancer on the frontal chest wall induced by postoperative irradiation 30 years later from mastectomy. The patients was a 62-year-old woman, who received mastectomy of the right breast cancer (invasive ductal carcinoma, comedo type) at 31 years old, and received the postoperative radiotherapy of total 11,628 rad over 38 times. On the first medical examination in author`s hospital, the patient had an ulcer of about 10 cm diameter and was diagnosed the radiation induced skin cancer (well differentiated squamous cell carcinoma) in the biopsy. Because of the general condition of the patient was extremely bad and the skin cancer had highly developed, the excision was thought to be impossible. The radiotherapy (16 Gy) and combined local chemotherapy by OK 432 and Bleomycin were performed. In spite of the short term treatment, these therapies were effective on the reduction of the tumor size and the hemostasis, and brought the patient the improvement of QOL. The general condition of the patient improved to be stable and she recovered enough to go out from the hospital for 6 months. After 10 months, she showed anorexia and dyspnea and died after about 1 year from the admission. The present case is extremely rare, and it is required the radical therapy like the excision of chest wall at early stage. (K.H.)

  18. Human chest wall function while awake and during halothane anesthesia. II. Carbon dioxide rebreathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, D O; Warner, M A

    1995-01-01

    Changes in the distribution of respiratory drive to different respiratory muscles may contribute to respiratory depression produced by halothane. The aim of this study was to examine factors that are responsible for halothane-induced depression of the ventilatory response to carbon dioxide rebreathing. In six human subjects, respiratory muscle activity in the parasternal intercostal, abdominal, and diaphragm muscles was measured using fine-wire electromyography electrodes. Chest wall motion was determined by respiratory impedance plethysmography. Electromyography activities and chest wall motion were measured during hyperpnea produced by carbon dioxide rebreathing while the subjects were awake and during 1 MAC halothane anesthesia. Halothane anesthesia significantly reduced the slope of the response of expiratory minute ventilation to carbon dioxide (from 2.88 +/- 0.73 (mean +/- SE) to 2.01 +/- 0.45 l.min-1.mmHg-1). During the rebreathing period, breathing frequency significantly increased while awake (from 10.3 +/- 1.4 to 19.7 +/- 2.6 min-1, P awake and anesthetized in four of the six subjects. Halothane anesthesia enhances the rebreathing response of neural drive to the primary respiratory muscle, the diaphragm. These findings provide direct evidence that, at the dose examined in this study, halothane-induced respiratory depression is caused by alterations in the distribution and timing of neural drive to the respiratory muscles, rather than a global depression of respiratory motoneuron drive.

  19. Using Local Flaps in a Chest Wall Reconstruction after Mastectomy for Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joo Seok Park

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSurgical ablation for locally advanced breast cancer results in large chest wall defects, which can then be managed with local flaps or skin grafts. The purpose of this article is to evaluate the outcomes of three types of local skin flaps.MethodsAmong 25 local flaps in 24 patients, 6 were bilateral advancement (BA flaps, 9 were thoracoabdominal (TA flaps, and 10 were thoracoepigastric (TE flaps. Clinical outcomes were compared including complications, the need for a secondary surgical intervention, and the timing of adjuvant therapy.ResultsThe mean defect size was 436.2 cm2. Two patients with TA flaps and 6 patients with TE flaps developed distal flap necrosis, and skin grafts were needed to treat 2 patients with TE flaps. Radiation was administered to the BA, TA, and TE patients after average postoperative durations of 28, 30, or 41 days, respectively. The incidence of flap necrosis tended to be higher in TE patients, which lead to significant delays in adjuvant radiation therapy (P=0.02.ConclusionsThree types of local skin flaps can be used to treat large chest wall defects after the excision of locally advanced breast cancer. Each flap has its own merits and demerits, and selecting flaps should be based on strict indications based on the dimensions and locations of the defects.

  20. Low-grade extraskeletal osteosarcoma of the chest wall: case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chetaille Bruno

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low-grade extraskeletal osteosarcomas (ESOS are extremely rare. Case presentation We present the first case of low-grade ESOS of the chest wall, which occurred in a 30-year-old man. Because of initial misdiagnosis and patient's refusal of surgery, the diagnosis was done after a 4-year history of a slowly growing mass in soft tissues, leading to a huge (30-cm diameter calcified mass locally extended over the left chest wall. Final diagnosis was helped by molecular analysis of MDM2 and CDK4 oncogenes. Unfortunately, at this time, no surgical treatment was possible due to loco-regional extension, and despite chemotherapy, the patient died one year after diagnosis, five years after the first symptoms. Conclusion We describe the clinical, radiological and bio-pathological features of this unique case, and review the literature concerning low-grade ESOS. Our case highlights the diagnostic difficulties for such very rare tumours and the interest of molecular analysis in ambiguous cases.

  1. Improving breast cancer diagnosis by reducing chest wall effect in diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Feifei; Mostafa, Atahar; Zhu, Quing

    2017-03-01

    We have developed the ultrasound (US)-guided diffuse optical tomography technique to assist US diagnosis of breast cancer and to predict neoadjuvant chemotherapy response of patients with breast cancer. The technique was implemented using a hand-held hybrid probe consisting of a coregistered US transducer and optical source and detector fibers which couple the light illumination from laser diodes and photon detection to the photomultiplier tube detectors. With the US guidance, diffused light measurements were made at the breast lesion site and the normal contralateral reference site which was used to estimate the background tissue optical properties for imaging reconstruction. However, background optical properties were affected by the chest wall underneath the breast tissue. We have analyzed data from 297 female patients, and results have shown statistically significant correlation between the fitted optical properties (μa and μs‧) and the chest wall depth. After subtracting the background μa at each wavelength, the difference of computed total hemoglobin (tHb) between malignant and benign lesion groups has improved. For early stage malignant lesions, the area-under-the-receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC) has improved from 88.5% to 91.5%. For all malignant lesions, the AUC has improved from 85.3% to 88.1%. Statistical test has revealed the significant difference of the AUC improvements after subtracting background tHb values.

  2. 49 CFR 192.109 - Nominal wall thickness (t) for steel pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nominal wall thickness (t) for steel pipe. 192.109... TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Pipe Design § 192.109 Nominal wall thickness (t) for steel pipe. (a) If the nominal wall thickness for steel pipe is not known...

  3. Passive mechanics of lung and chest wall in patients who failed or succeeded in trials of weaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubran, A; Tobin, M J

    1997-03-01

    In an accompanying article (Jubran, et al., Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med. 155:906-915), we report that patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who failed a trial of weaning from mechanical ventilation developed worsening of pulmonary mechanics compared with patients who tolerated the trial and were extubated. We wondered whether the greater derangements in pulmonary mechanics in the weaning failure patients are evident ever before undertaking the weaning trial. We measured mechanics of the respiratory system, lung, and chest wall during passive ventilation at usual ventilator settings in 12 patients who went on to fail a weaning trial and in 12 patients who were successfully weaned. No differences in the resistances of the respiratory system, lung, and chest wall were observed between the two groups or when the resistances were separated into the components derived from ohmic resistance and viscoelastic behavior/time-constant inhomogeneities. Likewise, the groups did not differ in terms of static elastance and dynamic intrinsic positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEPi) of the respiratory system and the respective lung and chest wall components or in terms of dynamic elastances of the respiratory system and chest wall. The failure group had a higher dynamic elastance of the lung than the success group (p chest wall components during passive ventilation did not satisfactorily discriminate between patients who failed a weaning trial and those successfully weaned, and, thus, are unlikely to be useful in signaling a patient's ability to tolerate the discontinuation of mechanical ventilation.

  4. Chest wall and rib irradiation and toxicities of early-stage lung cancer patients treated with CyberKnife stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podder, Tarun; Biswas, Tithi; Yao, Min; Zhang, Yuxia; Kim, Ellen; Ellis, Rodney J; Lo, Simon S; Machtay, Mitchell

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the chest wall and rib toxicities in primary lung cancer patients treated with CyberKnife-based stereotactic body radiotherapy. In this study, data were collected from the 118 patients, of which 25 patients who had longer follow-up (mean: 21.9 months) were considered. Studied parameters were maximum point dose, doses to 1-100 cm(3) of chest wall and 1-10 cm(3) of ribs. Three patients developed chest wall pain (grade I). 25 studied patients, on average, received 27.7 Gy to 30 cm(3) of chest wall and 50.4 Gy to 1 cm(3) of rib. Nine patients had more than 30 Gy dose to 30 cm(3) of chest wall. No rib bone fracture was found. No correlations of chest wall pain and volume of irradiation were found.

  5. Evaluation of the safety of high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO therapy in blunt thoracic trauma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becker Brian

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Airway clearance is frequently needed by patients suffering from blunt chest wall trauma. High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO has been shown to be effective in helping to clear secretions from the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis, bronchiectasis, asthma, primary ciliary dyskinesia, emphysema, COPD, and many others. Chest wall trauma patients are at increased risk for development of pulmonary complications related to airway clearance. These patients frequently have chest tubes, drains, catheters, etc. which could become dislodged during HFCWO. This prospective observational study was conducted to determine if HFCWO treatment, as provided by The Vest™ Airway Clearance System (Hill-Rom, Saint Paul, MN, was safe and well tolerated by these patients. Methods Twenty-five blunt thoracic trauma patients were entered into the study. These patients were consented. Each patient was prescribed 2, 15 minute HFCWO treatments per day using The Vest® Airway Clearance System (Hill-Rom, Inc., St Paul, MN. The Vest® system was set to a frequency of 10–12 Hz and a pressure of 2–3 (arbitrary unit. Physiological parameters were measured before, during, and after treatment. Patients were free to refuse or terminate a treatment early for any reason. Results No chest tubes, lines, drains or catheters were dislodged as a result of treatment. One patient with flail chest had a chest tube placed after one treatment due to increasing serous effusion. No treatments were missed and continued without further incident. Post treatment survey showed 76% experienced mild or no pain and more productive cough. Thirty days after discharge there were no deaths or hospital re-admissions. Conclusion This study suggests that HFCWO treatment is safe for trauma patients with lung and chest wall injuries. These findings support further work to demonstrate the airway clearance benefits of HFCWO treatment.

  6. Human chest wall function while awake and during halothane anesthesia. I. Quiet breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, D O; Warner, M A; Ritman, E L

    1995-01-01

    Data concerning chest wall configuration and the activities of the major respiratory muscles that determine this configuration during anesthesia in humans are limited. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of halothane anesthesia on respiratory muscle activity and chest wall shape and motion during spontaneous breathing. Six human subjects were studied while awake and during 1 MAC halothane anesthesia. Respiratory muscle activity was measured using fine-wire electromyography electrodes. Chest wall configuration was determined using images of the thorax obtained by three-dimensional fast computed tomography. Tidal changes in gas volume were measured by integrating respiratory gas flow, and the functional residual capacity was measured by a nitrogen dilution technique. While awake, ribcage expansion was responsible for 25 +/- 4% (mean +/- SE) of the total change in thoracic volume (delta Vth) during inspiration. Phasic inspiratory activity was regularly present in the diaphragm and parasternal intercostal muscles. Halothane anesthesia (1 MAC) abolished activity in the parasternal intercostal muscles and increased phasic expiratory activity in the abdominal muscles and lateral ribcage muscles. However, halothane did not significantly change the ribcage contribution to delta Vth (18 +/- 4%). Intrathoracic blood volume, measured by comparing changes in total thoracic volume and gas volume, increased significantly during inspiration both while awake and while anesthetized (by approximately 20% of delta Vth, P < 0.05). Halothane anesthesia significantly reduced the functional residual capacity (by 258 +/- 78 ml), primarily via an inward motion of the end-expiratory position of the ribcage. Although the diaphragm consistently changed shape, with a cephalad displacement of posterior regions and a caudad displacement of anterior regions, the diaphragm did not consistently contribute to the reduction in the functional residual capacity. Halothane anesthesia

  7. Volume Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT for pulmonary Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT in patients with lesions in close approximation to the chest wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J. FitzGerald

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Chest wall pain and discomfort has been recognized as a significant late effect of radiation therapy in historical and modern treatment models. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT is becoming an important treatment tool in oncology care for patients with intrathoracic lesions. For lesions in close approximation to the chest wall including lesions requiring motion management, SBRT techniques can deliver high dose to the chest wall. As an unintended target of consequence, there is possibility of generating significant chest wall pain and discomfort as a late effect of therapy. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the potential role of Volume Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT technologies in decreasing chest wall dose in SBRT treatment of pulmonary lesions in close approximation to the chest wall.Ten patients with pulmonary lesions of various sizes and topography in close approximation to the chest wall were selected for retrospective review. All volumes including target, chest wall, ribs, and lung were contoured with maximal intensity projection maps and four-dimensional computer tomography planning. Radiation therapy planning consisted of static techniques including Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy compared to VMAT therapy to a dose of 60Gy in 12Gy fractions. Dose volume histogram to rib, chest wall, and lung were compared between plans with statistical analysis.In all patients dose and volume were improved to ribs and chest wall using VMAT technologies compared to static field techniques. On average, volume receiving 30Gy to the chest wall was improved by 72%;the ribs by 60%. In only one patient did the VMAT treatment technique increase pulmonary volume receiving 20Gy (V20.VMAT technology has potential of limiting radiation dose to sensitive chest wall regions in patients with lesions in close approximation to this structure. This would also have potential value to lesions treated with SBRT in other body regions where targets abut critical

  8. Initial single-port thoracoscopy to reduce surgical trauma during open en bloc chest wall and pulmonary resection for locally invasive cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayarri, Clara I.; de Guevara, Antonio Cueto Ladron; Martin-Ucar, Antonio E.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES En bloc pulmonary and chest wall resection is the preferred method of treatment for locally invasive lung carcinoma. However, it carries major trauma to the chest wall, especially in cases with chest wall involvement distant to the potential location of ‘traditional’ thoracotomies. We describe an alternative method of estimating the boundaries of chest wall resection employing video assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) and hypodermic needles. METHODS VATS delineation of boundaries of chest wall involvement by lung cancer has been performed in six patients who gave written consent. In one case the single–port thoracoscopic examination revealed unexpected distant pleural metastases thus preventing from resection. The other 5 patients, three males and two females [median age of 60.5 (range 39 to 75) years] underwent en bloc anatomical lung resection in addition to chest wall excision and reconstruction for T3N0 lung cancer. RESULTS In these five cases the chest wall opening was restricted to the extent of the rib excision, and the pulmonary resection was performed via the existing chest wall opening without requiring extension of the thoracotomy or any rib spreading. DISCUSSION Minimally invasive techniques aid to delineate the boundaries of chest wall involvement of lung cancer and intraoperative staging. This helped tailoring the surgical approach and location of the thoracotomy, and prevented rib-spreading or additional thoracotomies in our cases. PMID:23592724

  9. Nodular Fasciitis of the Chest Wall as seen on Breast Sonography: This Clinically Simulated Palpable Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Woo Jeong; Lee, Jin Hwa; Kang, Eun Ju; Kim, Dae Cheol; Cho, Se Heon; Nam, Kyung Jin [Dong-A University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    Nodular fasciitis is a rapidly growing benign soft tissue tumor that is related to the fascia and this tumor is generally seen in young and middle aged adults. It is often seen as a subcutaneous solitary nodule in an upper extremity. Clinically, it is often mistaken for a malignancy. We present here a rare case of nodular fasciitis of the chest wall and that was observed on breast sonography (US) and this lesion clinically simulated palpable breast cancer. US may be helpful for evaluating a chest wall lesion that is misunderstood to be a breast lump. So, if the lesion's location is vague, US can reveal the exact location and characteristics of the mass. Although the incidence of nodular fasciitis is rare, nodular fasciitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis when a lesion is located in the chest wall

  10. Negative-pressure wound therapy and early pedicle flap reconstruction of the chest wall after epirubicin extravasation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Marios; Rahmanian-Schwarz, Afshin; Bednarek, Marzena; Arafkas, Mohamed; Holschneider, Philipp; Hübner, Gunnar

    2017-05-15

    Accidental extravasation is a serious iatrogenic injury among patients receiving anthracycline-containing chemotherapy. The aim of this work is to present a combination therapy for chest wall reconstruction following epirubicin extravasation. Herein, we report a 68-year-old woman with massive soft tissue necrosis of the anterolateral chest wall after epirubicin extravasation from a port implanted in the subclavicular area. The necrotic tissue was resected, the port was removed, and negative-pressure wound therapy was applied. Three weeks later, a latissimus dorsi pedicle flap was successfully used to cover the defect. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of a strategy comprising the combination of negative-pressure wound therapy and a latissimus pedicle flap for reconstruction of the chest wall after soft tissue necrosis following epirubicin extravasation.

  11. Effectiveness of treatment with high-frequency chest wall oscillation in patients with bronchiectasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolini, Antonello; Cardini, Federica; Landucci, Norma; Lanata, Sergio; Ferrari-Bravo, Maura; Barlascini, Cornelius

    2013-04-04

    High-frequency airway clearance (HFCWC) assist devices generate either positive or negative trans-respiratory pressure excursions to produce high-frequency, small-volume oscillations in the airways.HFCWC can lead to changes in volume of 15-57 ml and in flow up to 1.6 L/s, which generate minimal coughing to mobilize secretions. The typical treatment lasts 20-30 minutes, and consists of short periods of compression at different frequencies, separated by coughing.The aim of this study was to find the more efficacious treatment in patients with bronchiectasis: traditional techniques of chest physiotherapy (CPT) versus high frequency oscillation of the chest wall in patients with bronchiectasis. 37 patients were enrolled. Seven of them were excluded. Computer randomization divided the patients into three groups: - 10 patients treated with HFCWO by using the Vest® Airway Clearance System; - 10 patients treated with traditional techniques of air way clearance (PEP bottle, PEP mask, ELTGOL, vibratory positive expiratory pressure); - 10 patients received medical therapy only (control group). To be eligible for enrollment, participants had to be between 18 and 85 years old and have a diagnosis of bronchiectasis, confirmed on high resolution computed tomography. lack of informed consent, signs of exacerbation, cystic fibrosis. Before the treatment, each patient had blood tests, sputum volume and cell count, pulmonary function tests and on the quality of life inventories (MMRC, CAT, BCSS). The results were processed through the covariance analysis, performed with the R-Project statistical program. It has been considered a positive result p airway clearance, this treatment should be included among the principal options in chest physiotherapy. The study was registered as ChiCTR-TRC-12002134 at http://www.chictr.org.

  12. Low incidence of chest wall pain with a risk-adapted lung stereotactic body radiation therapy approach using three or five fractions based on chest wall dosimetry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thibaud P Coroller

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To examine the frequency and potential of dose-volume predictors for chest wall (CW toxicity (pain and/or rib fracture for patients receiving lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT using treatment planning methods to minimize CW dose and a risk-adapted fractionation scheme. METHODS: We reviewed data from 72 treatment plans, from 69 lung SBRT patients with at least one year of follow-up or CW toxicity, who were treated at our center between 2010 and 2013. Treatment plans were optimized to reduce CW dose and patients received a risk-adapted fractionation of 18 Gy×3 fractions (54 Gy total if the CW V30 was less than 30 mL or 10-12 Gy×5 fractions (50-60 Gy total otherwise. The association between CW toxicity and patient characteristics, treatment parameters and dose metrics, including biologically equivalent dose, were analyzed using logistic regression. RESULTS: With a median follow-up of 20 months, 6 (8.3% patients developed CW pain including three (4.2% grade 1, two (2.8% grade 2 and one (1.4% grade 3. Five (6.9% patients developed rib fractures, one of which was symptomatic. No significant associations between CW toxicity and patient and dosimetric variables were identified on univariate nor multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Optimization of treatment plans to reduce CW dose and a risk-adapted fractionation strategy of three or five fractions based on the CW V30 resulted in a low incidence of CW toxicity. Under these conditions, none of the patient characteristics or dose metrics we examined appeared to be predictive of CW pain.

  13. Influence of slice thickness on the determination of left ventricular wall thickness and dimension by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnishi, Shusaku; Fukui, Sugao; Atsumi, Chisato and others

    1989-02-01

    Wall thickness of the ventricular septum and left ventricle, and left ventricular cavity dimension were determined on magnetic resonance (MR) images with slices 5 mm and 10 mm in thickness. Subjects were 3 healthy volunteers and 7 patients with hypertension (4), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (one) or valvular heart disease (2). In visualizing the cardiac structures such as left ventricular papillary muscle and right and left ventricles, 5 mm-thick images were better than 10 mm-thick images. Edges of ventricular septum and left ventricular wall were more clearly visualized on 5 mm-thick images than 10 mm-thick images. Two mm-thick MR images obtained from 2 patients yielded the most excellent visualization in end-systole, but failed to reveal cardiac structures in detail in end-diastole. Phantom studies revealed no significant differences in image quality of 10 mm and 5 mm in thickness in the axial view 80 degree to the long axis. In the axial view 45 degree to the long axis, 10 mm-thick images were inferior to 5 mm-thick images in detecting the edge of the septum and the left ventricular wall. These results indicate that the selection of slice thickness is one of the most important determinant factors in the measurement of left ventricular wall thickness and cavity dimension. (Namekawa, K).

  14. Plasma Cell Leukemia Presenting as a Chest Wall Mass: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Ali

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasma cell leukemia (PCL is an uncommon neoplasm of plasma cells, with an aggressive clinical course and poor outcome, even with current standard of care. It can occur either de novo (primary PCL or as a progression of multiple myeloma (MM. This disease has unique diagnostic criteria but certain genetic markers and clinical features may overlap with MM. Due to the low prevalence of PCL, guidelines on its management are extrapolated from the management of MM and based on small retrospective studies and cases reports/series. We present an interesting case of PCL in a middle-aged African-American male, who was diagnosed incidentally after chest wall imaging for an unrelated complaint. The diagnostic approach, management and outcomes of PCL are discussed.

  15. Plasma Cell Leukemia Presenting as a Chest Wall Mass: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ahmed; Paul, Yonette; Nwabudike, Stanley Madu; Ogbonna, Onyekachi; Grantham, Mica; Taddesse-Heath, Lekidelu

    2016-01-01

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is an uncommon neoplasm of plasma cells, with an aggressive clinical course and poor outcome, even with current standard of care. It can occur either de novo (primary PCL) or as a progression of multiple myeloma (MM). This disease has unique diagnostic criteria but certain genetic markers and clinical features may overlap with MM. Due to the low prevalence of PCL, guidelines on its management are extrapolated from the management of MM and based on small retrospective studies and cases reports/series. We present an interesting case of PCL in a middle-aged African-American male, who was diagnosed incidentally after chest wall imaging for an unrelated complaint. The diagnostic approach, management and outcomes of PCL are discussed. PMID:27462235

  16. Late-onset chest wall abscess due to a biodegradable rib pin infection after lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goda, Yasufumi; Chen-Yoshikawa, Toyofumi F; Kusunose, Masaaki; Hamaji, Masatsugu; Motoyama, Hideki; Hijiya, Kyoko; Aoyama, Akihiro; Date, Hiroshi

    2017-03-17

    A 55-year-old man with end-stage emphysema underwent a right single-lung transplantation through a posterolateral thoracotomy. The fifth rib was divided and fused back using a biodegradable pin made of polylactide acid and hydroxyapatite. Two weeks postoperatively, he suffered from central vein catheter-related sepsis due to methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. After being successfully treated for sepsis, he was discharged. However, 3 months later, computed tomography revealed multiple loculated abscesses in the chest wall and the right pleural space. Reoperative thoracotomy revealed abscesses mainly located around the fifth rib, where the pin was inserted. Both cultures of the abscess and the fifth rib were positive for methicillin-sensitive S. aureus, which suggested that the rib pin was the cause of the secondary infection. This case suggests the rib pins, even if they are biodegradable, could have a risk of infections side effect especially for the immunosuppressed patients.

  17. Complex regional pain syndrome with associated chest wall dystonia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwartzman Robert J

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS often suffer from an array of associated movement disorders, including dystonia of an affected limb. We present a case of a patient with long standing CRPS after a brachial plexus injury, who after displaying several features of the movement disorder previously, developed painful dystonia of chest wall musculature. Detailed neurologic examination found palpable sustained contractions of the pectoral and intercostal muscles in addition to surface allodynia. Needle electromyography of the intercostal and paraspinal muscles supported the diagnosis of dystonia. In addition, pulmonary function testing showed both restrictive and obstructive features in the absence of a clear cardiopulmonary etiology. Treatment was initiated with intrathecal baclofen and the patient had symptomatic relief and improvement of dystonia. This case illustrates a novel form of the movement disorder associated with CRPS with response to intrathecal baclofen treatment.

  18. Chest wall reconstruction in thoracoabdominal ectopia cordis: using the pedicled osteomuscular latissimus dorsi composite flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampert, Joshua A; Harmaty, Marco; Thompson, Elizabeth Chabner; Sett, Suvro; Koch, R Michael

    2010-11-01

    Ectopia cordis is a rare congenital defect characterized by complete or partial displacement of the heart outside the thoracic cavity. Repair of ectopia cordis can present a reconstructive challenge often requiring a staged approach. Ideally, structural integrity and protection of the heart are restored using autologous tissues capable of growth. In addition, reconstruction of the thorax must proceed without compromise to pulmonary or cardiovascular stability. The following article describes repair of thoracoabdominal ectopia cordis in a patient with pentalogy of Cantrell. Reconstruction of the chest wall was accomplished using a musculoosseus composite flap involving segments of the 9th and 10th ribs and overlying pedicled latissimus dorsi muscle. This is the first report known to the authors of such a repair.

  19. A rare case of staphylococcal cold abscess of anterior chest wall in an immunocompetent adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibes Kumar Das

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is an important causative organism for skin and soft tissue infection, which presents with the classical local signs of acute inflammation. Staphylococcal abscess without signs of inflammation (staphylococcal cold abscess is a very rare entity, sometimes seen in immunocompromised host. Here, we report a case of a 50-year-old male patient who presented with bilateral asymptomatic cold abscess of staphylococcal origin over the anterior chest wall. The patient had no immunodeficiency and there was no distant/underlying source of staphylococcal infection. Smear and culture of pus proved the staphylococcal etiology and excluded tuberculosis, its close differential diagnosis. The patient was treated with antistaphylococcal antibiotics and local drainage of pus with complete recovery.

  20. [Fulminant isolated necrotizing fasciitis of the chest wall, complicating thoracic empyema].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Ottó; Szántó, Zoltán; Krasznai, Géza

    2016-03-01

    Authors introduce the case of a 64-year-old male patient with fulminant isolated necrotizing fasciitis of the chest wall, complicating empyema thoracis of unknown origin. The patient's co-morbidities were hypertension, ischaemic heart disease, atrial fibrillation with oral anticoagulation. The real etiology was revealed post mortem, due to the rapid progression. The autopsy demonstrated that the fasciitis was caused by a small blunt thoracic trauma (haematoma), not emerged from patient's history and was not visible during physical examination. Authors review diagnostic pitfalls, leading to delayed recognition in addition to this very case. After quick diagnosis surgical debridement, targeted wide spectrum antibiotics and maximal intensive care are the basic pillars of the management of necrotizing fasciitis.

  1. Thick Liquid-Walled, Field-Reversed Configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moir, R W; Bulmer, R H; Gulec, K; Fogarty, P; Nelson, B; Ohnishi, M; Rensink, M; Rognlien, T D; Santarious, J F; Sze, D K

    2000-09-22

    A thick flowing layer of liquid (e.g., flibe--a molten salt, or Sn{sub 80}Li{sub 20}--a liquid metal) protects the structural walls of the field-reversed configuration (FRC) so that they can last the life of the plant even with intense 14 MeV neutron bombardment from the D-T fusion reaction. The surface temperature of the liquid rises as it passes from the inlet nozzles to the exit or receiver nozzles due to absorption of line and bremsstrahlung radiation, and neutrons. The surface temperature can be reduced by enhancement of convection near the surface to transport hot surface liquid into the cooler interior. This surface temperature must be compatible with a practical heat transport and energy recovery system. The evaporative flux from the wall driven by the surface temperature must also result in an acceptable impurity level in the core plasma. The shielding of the core by the edge plasma is modeled with a 2D transport code for the resulting impurity ions; these ions are either swept out to the distant end tanks, or diffuse to the hot plasma core. An auxiliary plasma between the edge plasma and the liquid wall can further attenuate evaporating flux of atoms and molecules by ionization. The current in this auxiliary plasma might serve as the antenna for the current drive method, which produces a rotating magnetic field. Another method of current drive uses small spheromaks injected along the magnetic fields, which additionally provide fueling along with pellet fueling if necessary.

  2. Development and validation of a clinical prediction rule for chest wall syndrome in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronga Alexandre

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chest wall syndrome (CWS, the main cause of chest pain in primary care practice, is most often an exclusion diagnosis. We developed and evaluated a clinical prediction rule for CWS. Methods Data from a multicenter clinical cohort of consecutive primary care patients with chest pain were used (59 general practitioners, 672 patients. A final diagnosis was determined after 12 months of follow-up. We used the literature and bivariate analyses to identify candidate predictors, and multivariate logistic regression was used to develop a clinical prediction rule for CWS. We used data from a German cohort (n = 1212 for external validation. Results From bivariate analyses, we identified six variables characterizing CWS: thoracic pain (neither retrosternal nor oppressive, stabbing, well localized pain, no history of coronary heart disease, absence of general practitioner’s concern, and pain reproducible by palpation. This last variable accounted for 2 points in the clinical prediction rule, the others for 1 point each; the total score ranged from 0 to 7 points. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve was 0.80 (95% confidence interval 0.76-0.83 in the derivation cohort (specificity: 89%; sensitivity: 45%; cut-off set at 6 points. Among all patients presenting CWS (n = 284, 71% (n = 201 had a pain reproducible by palpation and 45% (n = 127 were correctly diagnosed. For a subset (n = 43 of these correctly classified CWS patients, 65 additional investigations (30 electrocardiograms, 16 thoracic radiographies, 10 laboratory tests, eight specialist referrals, one thoracic computed tomography had been performed to achieve diagnosis. False positives (n = 41 included three patients with stable angina (1.8% of all positives. External validation revealed the ROC curve to be 0.76 (95% confidence interval 0.73-0.79 with a sensitivity of 22% and a specificity of 93%. Conclusions This CWS score offers

  3. Exact solution of eddy current losses produced by a domain wall with nonzero thickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Real, R.P. del [Laboratorio de Optoelectronica, Area de Cargas Utiles e Instrumentacion, Departamento de Ciencias del Espacio y Tecnologias Electronicas, Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial (INTA), Torrejon de Ardoz 28850 (Spain)]. E-mail: perezrr@inta.es

    2006-08-15

    The influence of the domain wall thickness on eddy current losses has been calculated. It is shown that, for samples with low magnetic anisotropy and small thickness, the reduction of magnetic losses with respect to the zero thickness domain wall must be seriously taken into account.

  4. Volume-Targeted Versus Pressure-Targeted Noninvasive Ventilation in Patients With Chest-Wall Deformity : A Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struik, Fransien M.; Duiverman, Marieke L.; Meijer, Petra M.; Nieuwenhuis, Jellie A.; Kerstjens, Huib A. M.; Wijkstra, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long-term noninvasive ventilation (NIV) is an effective treatment for patients with chronic respiratory failure due to chest-wall deformity, but it is unknown if the time required for the patient to adjust to long-term NIV depends on whether the NIV is volume-targeted or

  5. An increase in the threshold of citric acid-induced cough during chest wall vibration in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, T; Kobayashi, I; Hayama, N; Ohta, Y

    1998-10-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that the afferent input from the respiratory muscles may be involved in the neural mechanisms inducing cough responses. Coughing was evoked in conscious healthy humans by the inhalation of citric acid aerosol of several concentrations either during or not during chest wall vibration (100 Hz) at the right second intercostal space or during vibration of the right thigh. The mean threshold citric acid concentration to induce coughing was significantly higher during chest wall vibration (geometric mean, 131.8 mg/ml) than without vibration (75.9 mg/ml). Vibration after topical anesthesia of the chest wall skin did not significantly change the threshold concentration of citric acid. The threshold citric acid concentration during vibration of the right thigh did not significantly differ from that without vibration. We concluded that inputs from the chest wall afferent, presumably from the intercostal muscle or costovertebral joint, may have an inhibitory effect on the initiation of coughing at the higher neural structure in conscious humans.

  6. Short-term effect of volume recruitment-derecruitment manoeuvre on chest-wall motion in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meric, Henri; Falaize, Line; Pradon, Didier; Lacombe, Matthieu; Petitjean, Michel; Orlikowski, David; Prigent, Hélène; Lofaso, Frédéric

    2017-05-01

    Because progressive respiratory muscle weakness leads to decreased chest-wall motion with eventual ribcage stiffening, the purpose was to compare vital capacity (VC) and contributions of chest-wall compartments before and after volume recruitment-derecruitment manoeuvres (VRDM) in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). We studied nine patients with DMD and VC lower than 30% of predicted. VRDM was performed using 15 insufflations-exsufflations of +30 to -30 cmH2O. VC and three-dimensional chest-wall motion were measured, as well as oxygen saturation, transcutaneous partial pressure of carbon dioxide and the rapid shallow breathing index (respiratory rate/tidal volume) before (baseline) and immediately and 1 hour after VRDM. VC increased significantly immediately after VRDM (108% ± 7% of baseline, p = 0.018) but returned to baseline within 1 hour, and the rapid shallow breathing index increased significantly. The non-dominant side systematically increased immediately after VRDM ( p = 0.0077), and in the six patients with abnormal breathing asymmetry (difference >10% of VC) at baseline, this asymmetry was corrected immediately and/or 1 hour after VRDM. VRDM improved VC and reduced chest-wall motion asymmetry, but this beneficial effect waned rapidly with respiratory muscle fatigue, suggesting that VRDM may need to be repeated during the day to produce lasting benefits.

  7. Synchronous development of breast cancer and chest wall fibrosarcoma after previous mantle radiation for Hodgkin's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patlas, Michael [Hamilton General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Hamilton, ON (Canada); McCready, David [University Health Network and Mount Sinai Hospital, Department of Surgery, Toronto, ON (Canada); Kulkarni, Supriya; Dill-Macky, Marcus J. [University Health Network and Mount Sinai Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2005-09-01

    Survivors of Hodgkin's disease are at increased risk of developing a second malignant neoplasm, including breast carcinoma and sarcoma. We report the first case of synchronous development of chest wall fibrosarcoma and breast carcinoma after mantle radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease. Mammographic, sonographic and MR features are demonstrated. (orig.)

  8. Do mannequin chests provide an accurate representation of a human chest for simulated decompression of tension pneumothoraxes?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Malcolm J Boyle; Brett Williams; Simon Dousek

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Tension pneumothorax(TPX) is an uncommon but life-threatening condition.It is important that this uncommon presentation,managed by needle decompression,is practised by paramedics using a range of educationally sound and realistic mannequins.The objective of this study is to identify if the chest wall thickness(CWT) of training mannequins used for chest decompression is an anatomically accurate representation of a human chest.METHODS:This is a two-part study.A review of the literature was conducted to identify chest wall thickness in humans and measurement of chest wall thickness on two commonly used mannequins.The literature search was conducted using the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials,MEDLINE,CINAHL,and EMBASE databases from their beginning until the end of May 2012.Key words included chest wall thickness,tension pneumothorax,pneumothorax,thoracostomy,needle thoracostomy,decompression,and needle test.Studies were included if they reported chest wall thickness.RESULTS:For the literature review,4 461 articles were located with 9 meeting the inclusion criteria.Chest wall thickness in adults varied between 1.3 cm and 9.3 cm at the area of the second intercostal space mid clavicular line.The Laerdal? manikin in the area of the second intercostal space mid clavicular line,right side of the chest was 1.1 cm thick with the left 1.5 cm.The MPL manikin in the same area or on the right side of the chest was 1.4 cm thick but on the left 1.0 cm.CONCLUSION:Mannequin chests are not an accurate representation of the human chest when used for decompressing a tension pneumothorax and therefore may not provide a realistic experience.

  9. Etonogestrel implant migration to the vasculature, chest wall, and distant body sites: cases from a pharmacovigilance database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sarah; Niak, Ali; Gada, Neha; Brinker, Allen; Jones, S Christopher

    2017-09-01

    To describe clinical outcomes of etonogestrel implant patients with migration to the vasculature, chest wall and other distant body sites spontaneously reported to the US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) database. We performed a standardized Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA) query in the FAERS database (through November 15, 2015), with reports coded with one or more MedDRA preferred terms that indicate complications with device placement or migration of the device from the original site of insertion to the vasculature, chest wall and other distant body sites. We excluded any cases previously described in the medical literature. We identified 38 cases of pronounced etonogestrel implant migration. Migration locations included the lung/pulmonary artery (n=9), chest wall (n=1), vasculature at locations other than the lung/pulmonary artery (n=14) and extravascular migrations (n=14) to other body sites (e.g., the axilla and clavicle/neck line/shoulder). The majority of cases were asymptomatic and detected when the patient desired implant removal; however, seven cases reported symptoms such as pain, discomfort and dyspnea in association with implant migration. Three cases also describe pulmonary fibrosis and skin reactions as a result of implant migration to the vasculature, chest wall and other distant body sites. Sixteen cases reported surgical removal in an operating room setting. Our FAERS case series demonstrates etonogestrel implant migration to the vasculature, chest wall and other body sites distant from the site of original insertion. As noted by the sponsor in current prescribing information, a key determinant in the risk for etonogestrel contraceptive implant migration appears to be improper insertion technique. Although migration of etonogestrel implants to the vasculature is rare, awareness of migration and education on proper insertion technique may reduce the risk. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Lung pressures and gas transport during high-frequency airway and chest wall oscillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, M C; Ye, T H; Tran, N H

    1989-09-01

    The major goal of this study was to compare gas exchange, tidal volume (VT), and dynamic lung pressures resulting from high-frequency airway oscillation (HFAO) with the corresponding effects in high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO). Eight anesthetized paralyzed dogs were maintained eucapnic with HFAO and HFCWO at frequencies ranging from 1 to 16 Hz in the former and 0.5 to 8 Hz in the latter. Tracheal (delta Ptr) and esophageal (delta Pes) pressure swings, VT, and arterial blood gases were measured in addition to respiratory impedance and static pressure-volume curves. Mean positive pressure (25-30 cmH2O) in the chest cuff associated with HFCWO generation decreased lung volume by approximately 200 ml and increased pulmonary impedance significantly. Aside from this decrease in functional residual capacity (FRC), no change in lung volume occurred as a result of dynamic factors during the course of HFCWO application. With HFAO, a small degree of hyperinflation occurred only at 16 Hz. Arterial PO2 decreased by 5 Torr on average during HFCWO. VT decreased with increasing frequency in both cases, but VT during HFCWO was smaller over the range of frequencies compared with HFAO. delta Pes and delta Ptr between 1 and 8 Hz were lower than the corresponding pressure swings obtained with conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV) applied at 0.25 Hz. delta Pes was minimized at 1 Hz during HFCWO; however, delta Ptr decreased continuously with decreasing frequency and, below 2 Hz, became progressively smaller than the corresponding values obtained with HFAO and CMV.

  11. Transient decrease in PaCO(2) and asymmetric chest wall dynamics in early progressing pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waisman, Dan; Faingersh, Anna; Levy, Carmit; Colman-Klotzman, Ifat; Rotschild, Avi; Lichtenstein, Oscar; Landesberg, Amir

    2013-01-01

    Diagnosis of pneumothorax (PTX) in newborn infants has been reported as late. To explore diagnostic indices for early detection of progressing PTX, and offer explanations for delayed diagnoses. Progressing PTX was created in rabbits (2.3 ± 0.5 kg, n = 7) by injecting 1 ml/min of air into the pleural space. Hemodynamic parameters, tidal volume, EtCO(2), SpO(2), blood gas analyses and chest wall tidal displacements (TDi) on both sides of the chest were recorded. (Mean ± SD): A decrease in SpO(2) below 90 % was detected only after 46.6 ± 11.3 min in six experiments. In contrary to the expected gradual increase of CO(2), there was a prolonged transient decrease of 14.2 ± 4.5 % in EtCO(2) (p decrease in PaCO(2) (p decrease in CO(2) was a mirror image of the 14.6 ± 5.3 % increase in tidal volume. The analysis of endotracheal flow and pressure dynamics revealed a paradoxical transient increase in the apparent compliance. Significant decrease in mean arterial blood pressure was observed after 46.2 ± 40.1 min. TDi provided the most sensitive and earliest sign of PTX, decreasing on the PTX side after 16.1 ± 7.2 min. The TDi progressively decreased faster and lower on the PTX side, thus enabling detection of asymmetric ventilation. The counterintuitive transient prolonged decrease in CO(2) without changes in SpO(2) may explain the delay in diagnosis of PTX encountered in the clinical environment. An earlier indication of asymmetrically decreased ventilation on the affected side was achieved by monitoring the TDi.

  12. Bone and bone marrow function of reconstructed chest wall after surgical correction of pectus excavatum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Yoh; Magara, Tatsuo; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Ichihashi, Takumi; Hikishima, Hiroshi (Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1984-03-01

    Bone and bone marrow functions of the reconstructed chest wall after surgical correction of the funnel chest deformities were evaluated by scanning method. In our series, three kinds of operative procedures were employed; strut method for adult cases, sternal turnover method with and without muscle pedicle for infant cases. Bone function was scanned by sup(99m)Tc-methylene-diphosphonate and bone marrow function was evaluated by sup(99m)Tc-sulfur-colloid. For the cases undergone each surgical procedure, bone and bone marrow scan were done at short term after surgery (within 30 days), at intermediate stage (one month to 12 months), and at long term stage (beyond one year). The results were as follows: By the evaluation at the long term stage of the cases undergoing strut method, bone as well as bone marrow scan visualized normal view of the reconstructed sternum. Regarding the cases undergone sternal turnover method without muscle pedicle, or free graft implantation of the plastron, the bone scan at the long term follow-up stage showed abnormal finding, i.e. hypo-, or defect-visualization of the inverted sternum, in 11.5% of the cases. Furthermore, bone marrow scan showed abnormality in 33.3% of the cases. On the other hand, the cases undergone sternal turnover method with muscle pedicle, in which blood supply to the plastron were preserved by the connection from superior epigastric artery to internal mammary artery, showed no abnormality as far as at the long term follow-up study neither in bone scan nor bone marrow scan. However, in the evaluation at short term after surgery, 50% of the cases undergoing bone scan showed abnormality. In addition, in this stage 85.7% of the bone marrow scan showed abnormal finding. These abnormality, however, normalized within 6 months for bone scan and 12 months for bone marrow scan, in contrast to the results of the cases undergone sternal turnover without pedicle.

  13. Actinomicose pulmonar com envolvimento da parede torácica Lung actinomycosis with chest wall involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Cunha Fatureto

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available A Actinomicose é uma infecção rara, crônica, supurativa e granulomatosa que pode envolver diversos órgãos. A infecção pulmonar geralmente está relacionada à imunodepressão e à saúde bucal precária. O envolvimento torácico é incomum (10 - 20%, a parede torácica é acometida em apenas 12% destes casos. No presente trabalho, é descrito o caso de um paciente de 26 anos, não HIV e sem co-morbidades, assintomático respiratório, com massa infra-escapular, de crescimento progressivo, muito dolorosa, com sinais locais flogísticos, sem trauma local, apresentando febre persistente, com três meses de evolução. O diagnóstico inicial foi de neoplasia de partes moles de parede torácica. À biopsia incisional da referida massa, houve saída de secreção gelatinosa vinhosa com grânulos amarelados, sugestivos de actinomicose, sendo confirmado por exame anatomopatológico. Empiricamente foi instituída ciprofloxacina devido alergia à cefalosporina. Houve excelente resposta clínica à drenagem externa e à medicação prescrita. Não houve recaída da doença em 18 meses de seguimento.Actinomycosis is an uncommon suppurative granulomatous chronic infection that may involve several organs. Lung infection is usually related to immunodepression and poor oral hygiene. Cases of thoracic involvement are rare (10 - 20% and only 12% of such cases affect the chest wall. This report describes the case of a 26-year-old HIV-negative patient without comorbidities or respiratory complaints who presented a very painful, progressively growing infrascapular mass, with local phlogistic signs and no local trauma, and persistent fever. It had been progressing for three months. The initial diagnosis was neoplasia of chest wall soft tissue. However, incision biopsy in this mass produced a red wine-colored gelatinous secretion containing yellowish granules suggestive of actinomycosis, which was later confirmed by anatomopathological examination

  14. Effects of chest wall compression on expiratory flow rates in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masafumi Nozoe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Manual chest wall compression (CWC during expiration is a technique for removing airway secretions in patients with respiratory disorders. However, there have been no reports about the physiological effects of CWC in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Objective: To compare the effects of CWC on expiratory flow rates in patients with COPD and asymptomatic controls. Method: Fourteen subjects were recruited from among patients with COPD who were receiving pulmonary rehabilitation at the University Hospital (COPD group. Fourteen age-matched healthy subjects were also consecutively recruited from the local community (Healthy control group. Airflow and lung volume changes were measured continuously with the subjects lying in supine position during 1 minute of quiet breathing (QB and during 1 minute of CWC by a physical therapist. Results: During CWC, both the COPD group and the healthy control group showed significantly higher peak expiratory flow rates (PEFRs than during QB (mean difference for COPD group 0.14 L/sec, 95% confidence interval (CI 0.04 to 0.24, p<0.01, mean difference for healthy control group 0.39 L/sec, 95% CI 0.25 to 0.57, p<0.01. In the between-group comparisons, PEFR was significantly higher in the healthy control group than in the COPD group (-0.25 L/sec, 95% CI -0.43 to -0.07, p<0.01. However, the expiratory flow rates at the lung volume at the PEFR during QB and at 50% and 25% of tidal volume during QB increased in the healthy control group (mean difference for healthy control group 0.31 L/sec, 95% CI 0.15 to 0.47, p<0.01: 0.31 L/sec, 95% CI 0.15 to 0.47, p<0.01: 0.27 L/sec, 95% CI 0.13 to 0.41, p<0.01, respectively but not in the COPD group (0.05 L/sec, 95% CI -0.01 to 0.12: -0.01 L/sec, 95% CI -0.11 to 0.08: 0.02 L/sec, 95% CI -0.05 to 0.90 with the application of CWC. Conclusion: The effects of chest wall compression on expiratory flow rates was different between COPD patients and

  15. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... chest. assess disorders of the chest bones (vertebrae, ribs and sternum) and chest wall soft tissue (muscles ... from the contrast material, including nausea, headache and pain at the site of injection. Similarly, patients are ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... chest. assess disorders of the chest bones (vertebrae, ribs and sternum) and chest wall soft tissue (muscles and fat). assess for pericardial (thin sac around the heart) disease. characterize mediastinal or pleural lesions seen by ...

  17. Three-dimensional collapse and steady flow in thick-walled flexible tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzo, A.; Luo, X. Y.; Bertram, C. D.

    2005-08-01

    Three-dimensional collapse of and steady flow through finite-length elastic tubes are studied numerically. The Navier-Stokes equations coupled with large, nonlinear deformation of the elastic wall are solved by using the finite-element software, FIDAP. Three-dimensional solid elements are used for the elastic wall, allowing us to specify any wall thickness required. Plane-strain results for the cross-sectional shape of thinner-walled tubes are validated by comparison with published numerical data. Three-dimensional results for flow through finite-thickness tubes are in excellent agreement with published numerical results based on thin-shell elements, and are used to show the effects of varying wall thickness. Finally, the computational predictions are compared with experimental pressure area relationships for thick-walled tubes. The simulations confirm a previously neglected experimental finding, that the Young wavespeed can be lower between buckling and osculation for thick tubes than for thinner ones.

  18. Effect of Mould Wall Thickness on Rate of Solidification of Centrifugal Casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhusudhan

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In Centrifugal Casting process the centrifugal force presses the metal against the inner wall of the metal mould, resulting in rapid solidification of the molten metal. However the solidification structures like structural uniformity and structural character of the solidified metal of centrifugal casting is of great importance, regarding to its mechanical properties. The solidification time of the casting is dependent upon the various parameters like speed ofrotation of the mold, mould wall temperature, heat transfer coefficient at the metal-mold interface, mould wall thickness, material of the mould and so on. In this paper experimental study of effect of mould wall thickness on solidification of the centrifugal casting has been discussed. As the mould wall thickness increases, due to the chilling effect, the solidification time decreases. Fine grains are observed in castings produced in thick walled mould and coarse grains are observed in thin walled moulds. Brinel Hardness of the casting was measured.

  19. Wall thickness variation effect on tank’s shape behaviour under critical harmonic settlement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Shamel Fahmy

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of wall thickness variation on tank’s wall buckling mode under the effect of critical harmonic settlement for open top tanks. The study was performed on four tanks which have the same geometric and material properties except wall thickness, for each case the tank was subjected to several settlement waves which has the same settlement amplitude, and the buckling mode and critical vertical settlement results were compared. For buckling mode, the results show that tanks with wall thickness at a close range have similar buckling mode behaviour and in case using too thick wall the buckling mode starts to change. And for the effect on critical vertical settlement, the results show that vertical settlement is sensitive to any variation in wall thickness beside that settlement value changes with the effected wave number and this variation could change the whole behaviour of the tanks. The study recommended that in case of performing analysis for a tank with neglecting the variation in wall thickness values, the value of chosen wall thickness should be the average of wall thickness values obtained from the designed equation.

  20. Revision breast and chest wall reconstruction in Poland and pectus excavatum following implant complication using free deep inferior epigastric perforator flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionyssiou, Dimitrios; Demiri, Efterpi; Batsis, Georgios; Pavlidis, Leonidas

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to present the case of a female patient with Poland's syndrome and pectus excavatum deformity who underwent breast and chest wall reconstruction with a pre-shaped free deep inferior epigastric perforator flap. A 57-year-old female patient with Poland's syndrome and pectus excavatum presented with a Baker III capsular contracture following a previously performed implant-based right breast reconstruction. After a chest and abdominal CT angiography, she was staged as 2A1 chest wall deformity according to Park's classification and underwent implant removal and capsulectomy, followed by a pre-shaped free abdominal flap transfer, providing both breast reconstruction and chest wall deformity correction in a single stage operation. Post-operative course was uneventful, and the aesthetic result remains highly satisfactory 24 months after surgery. Deep inferior epigastric free flap represents an interesting reconstructive solution when treating Poland's syndrome female patients with chest wall and breast deformities.

  1. Chest-wall segmentation in automated 3D breast ultrasound images using thoracic volume classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Tao; van Zelst, Jan; Zhang, Wei; Mann, Ritse M.; Platel, Bram; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2014-03-01

    Computer-aided detection (CAD) systems are expected to improve effectiveness and efficiency of radiologists in reading automated 3D breast ultrasound (ABUS) images. One challenging task on developing CAD is to reduce a large number of false positives. A large amount of false positives originate from acoustic shadowing caused by ribs. Therefore determining the location of the chestwall in ABUS is necessary in CAD systems to remove these false positives. Additionally it can be used as an anatomical landmark for inter- and intra-modal image registration. In this work, we extended our previous developed chestwall segmentation method that fits a cylinder to automated detected rib-surface points and we fit the cylinder model by minimizing a cost function which adopted a term of region cost computed from a thoracic volume classifier to improve segmentation accuracy. We examined the performance on a dataset of 52 images where our previous developed method fails. Using region-based cost, the average mean distance of the annotated points to the segmented chest wall decreased from 7.57±2.76 mm to 6.22±2.86 mm.art.

  2. High-frequency chest wall oscillation. Assistance to ventilation in spontaneously breathing subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calverley, P M; Chang, H K; Vartian, V; Zidulka, A

    1986-02-01

    In five supine normal subjects breathing spontaneously, we studied the effects of high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO), which was achieved by oscillating the pressure in an air-filled cuff wrapped around the lower thorax. Oscillations of 3.5 and 8 Hz (in randomized order) were applied for 15 minutes each at both maximal (mean of 90 to 102 cm H2O) and half-maximal peak tolerable cuff pressures. Fifteen minutes of control spontaneous ventilation preceded each HFCWO maneuver. The HFCWO resulted in a significant decrease in spontaneous minute ventilation (VES) at maximal and half-maximal pressures by 35 and 40 percent, respectively, at 3 Hz and by 26 and 35 percent, respectively, at 5 Hz, with little change in VES at 8 Hz. This occurred despite an unchanging arterial carbon dioxide tension at all frequencies. Arterial oxygen pressure increased at 3 Hz at maximal pressure but remained statistically unchanged at 3 Hz at half-maximal pressure and at 5 Hz and 8 Hz both at maximal and half-maximal pressures. We conclude that HFCWO may potentially assist ventilation in spontaneously breathing man without requiring an endotracheal tube.

  3. Simple isocentric technique for irradiation of the breast, chest wall and peripheral lymphatics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podgorsak, E.B.; Gosselin, M.; Pla, M.; Kim, T.H.; Freeman, C.R. (McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Dept. of Radiation Oncology)

    1984-01-01

    The major problem with the standard technique for irradiation of the breast or chest wall and peripheral lymphatics is field matching at the junction between the supraclavicular and tangential fields. Overdosing or underdosing across the junctions is unavoidable because of beam divergence. Various techniques using a half-blocked supraclavicular field in conjunction with special tangential fields have been introduced recently to eliminate the junction problem; they are, however, complicated, involving couch motions and machine isocentre repositioning when changing from the supraclavicular to the tangential fields. The breast treatment technique used by the authors over the past twelve months utilises a supraclavicular half-blocked field, two tangential half-blocked fields and an optional posterior axillary field. The technique is simple and easy to set up since the same machine isocentre is used for all treatment fields and no couch movement or patient repositioning is required. The same half-block collimator used to define the caudad border of the supraclavicular field is used to define the cephalad edges of the two tangential fields. The margin of error of treatment is reduced and the dose measurements demonstrate excellent dose homogeneity through the entire treatment volume with no overdose or underdose at the field junction.

  4. Mesenchymal Hamartoma of Chest Wall in an Infant: Mimicking Persistent Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amitabh; Seth, Rachna; Pai, Gautham; Dawman, Lesa; Satapathy, Amit

    2015-09-01

    Mesenchymal Hamartoma of the chest wall (MHCW) is a very rare benign tumour. They are usually discovered in infancy. Spontaneous regression is known to occur in this benign condition. Management is surgical removal of mass if respiratory compromise is present. Conservative management is preferred modality in asymptomatic children as malignant transformation is not reported. Herein, we present a case of MHCW in a 5 month old infant presenting with acute respiratory distress with history of respiratory problem at 3 months of age. Child was suspected to have persistent pneumonia in view of radiological findings. Child's respiratory distress improved with antibiotics and bronchodilators. Respiratory symptoms in MHCW are due to extrinsic compression of lung parenchyma. Present case had respiratory symptoms with persistent radiological findings leading to suspicion of persistent pneumonia. His respiratory symptoms and exacerbation on follow up was attributed to hyper reactive airway disease and MHCW was managed conservatively. The non-neoplastic nature, characteristic presentation, histopathology, imaging modality and management options of MHCW are discussed.

  5. Continuous remission in an infant with chest wall malignant rhabdoid tumor after relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoi, Hajime; Iehara, T; Tsuchiya, K; Misawa, A; Miyaji, M; Yagyu, S; Koizumi, M; Nishimura, T; Tokiwa, K; Iwai, N; Yanagisawa, A; Sugimoto, T

    2007-10-01

    Malignant rhabdoid tumor (MRT) is a highly aggressive tumor that occurs in infancy or childhood. The prognosis, especially in infants, is very poor. Here we report the long-term survival of a 5-month-old boy with MRT that arose from the chest wall. After total resection of the tumor, the patient was given 4 cycles of doxorubicin, vincristine, and cyclophosphamide, alternating with ifosfamide and etoposide. After 18 months off therapy, he had a local recurrence at the same site. After a second total resection, he was given additional chemotherapy with 30.6-Gy local irradiation. No further recurrence has been observed for 5 years since the second complete remission. Currently, he is alive and well at 7.5 years post-onset. Our experience in this case suggests a fundamental strategy of successful treatment of this highly malignant pediatric tumor: (1) complete resection of the localized tumor, (2) intensive multiagent chemotherapy for the minimal disseminated disease, and (3) radiotherapy for local control of the disease.

  6. Quantitative computed tomography measures of emphysema and airway wall thickness are related to respiratory symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grydeland, Thomas B; Dirksen, Asger; Coxson, Harvey O

    2010-01-01

    There is limited knowledge about the relationship between respiratory symptoms and quantitative high-resolution computed tomography measures of emphysema and airway wall thickness.......There is limited knowledge about the relationship between respiratory symptoms and quantitative high-resolution computed tomography measures of emphysema and airway wall thickness....

  7. Quantitative computed tomography measures of emphysema and airway wall thickness are related to respiratory symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grydeland, Thomas B; Dirksen, Asger; Coxson, Harvey O

    2010-01-01

    There is limited knowledge about the relationship between respiratory symptoms and quantitative high-resolution computed tomography measures of emphysema and airway wall thickness.......There is limited knowledge about the relationship between respiratory symptoms and quantitative high-resolution computed tomography measures of emphysema and airway wall thickness....

  8. Fluid-Structure Simulations of a Ruptured Intracranial Aneurysm: Constant versus Patient-Specific Wall Thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voß, S; Glaßer, S; Hoffmann, T; Beuing, O; Weigand, S; Jachau, K; Preim, B; Thévenin, D; Janiga, G; Berg, P

    2016-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics is intensively used to deepen the understanding of aneurysm growth and rupture in order to support physicians during therapy planning. However, numerous studies considering only the hemodynamics within the vessel lumen found no satisfactory criteria for rupture risk assessment. To improve available simulation models, the rigid vessel wall assumption has been discarded in this work and patient-specific wall thickness is considered within the simulation. For this purpose, a ruptured intracranial aneurysm was prepared ex vivo, followed by the acquisition of local wall thickness using μCT. The segmented inner and outer vessel surfaces served as solid domain for the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) simulation. To compare wall stress distributions within the aneurysm wall and at the rupture site, FSI computations are repeated in a virtual model using a constant wall thickness approach. Although the wall stresses obtained by the two approaches-when averaged over the complete aneurysm sac-are in very good agreement, strong differences occur in their distribution. Accounting for the real wall thickness distribution, the rupture site exhibits much higher stress values compared to the configuration with constant wall thickness. The study reveals the importance of geometry reconstruction and accurate description of wall thickness in FSI simulations.

  9. Revisited the mathematical derivation wall thickness measurement of pipe for radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamzah, A.R.; Amir, S.M.M. [Non Destructive Testing(NDT) Group, Industrial Technology Div., Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2007-07-01

    Wall thickness measurement of pipe is very important of the structural integrity of the industrial plant. However, the radiography method has an advantage because the ability of penetrating the insulated pipe. This will have economic benefit for industry. Moreover, the era of digital radiography has more advantages because the speed of radiographic work, less exposure time and no chemical used for film development. Either the conventional radiography or digital radiology, the wall thickness measurement is using the tangential radiography technique (TRT). In case, of a large diameter, pipe (more than inches) the determination maximum penetration wall thickness must be taken into the consideration. This paper is revisited the mathematical derivation of the determination of wall thickness measurement based on tangential radiography technique (TRT). The mathematical approach used in this derivation is the Pythagoras theorem and geometrical principles. In order to derive the maximum penetration wall thickness a similar approach is used. (authors)

  10. Effects of Antimony and Wall Thickness on Graphite Morphology in Ductile Iron Castings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavas, Zoran; Strkalj, Anita; Maldini, Kresimir

    2016-08-01

    Effects of Sb additions on the graphite morphology of ductile iron castings in different wall thicknesses (3, 12, 25, 38, 50, 75, and 100 mm) were analyzed in this paper. In the wall thicknesses of 3, 12, and 25 mm, low contents of rare earth (RE) elements showed a beneficial effect on nodule count and nodularity. Nodularity >80 pct and a high nodule count were achieved without the addition of Sb. In the wall thicknesses of 38, 50, 75, and 100 mm, nodularity >80 pct was not achieved without the use of the chill or proper content of Sb. Excess of RE elements was neutralized with the addition of proper amount of Sb to the wall thickness. Addition of 0.01 wt pct Sb (ratio of RE/Sb = 0.34, ratio of RE/SE = 0.105) was sufficient to achieve nodularity >80 pct in the wall thicknesses of 38, 50, 75, and 100 mm.

  11. Chest Wall Hydatidosis as the Unique Location of the Disease: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophoros N Foroulis

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The chest wall is a rare location of secondary hydatidosis, but secondary hydatidosis may occur from the rupture of a lung cyst, from a liver cyst invading the diaphragm into the pleural cavity, following previous thoracic surgery for hydatidosis, or by hematogenous spread. This report describes a case of chest wall hydatidosis, which was the primary disease site in the patient, who had no previous history or current disease (hydatidosis at other sites. The cyst invaded and partially destroyed the 9th and 10th ribs and the 10th thoracic vertebra, and protruded outside the pleural cavity through the 9th intercostal space. Preoperative albendazole administration for 10 days, surgical resection of the disease through a posterolateral thoracotomy incision, and postoperative albendazole treatment resulted in a cure with no evidence of local recurrence or disease at other sites in four years of follow-up.

  12. Extrinsic tracheal compression caused by scoliosis of the thoracic spine and chest wall degormity: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Kyong min Sarah; Lee, Bae Young; Kim, Hyeon Sook; Song, Kyung Sup; Kang, Hyeon Hul; Lee, Sang Haak; Moon, Hwa Sik [St. Paul' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Extrinsic airway compression due to chest wall deformity is not commonly observed. Although this condition can be diagnosed more easily with the help of multidetector CT, the standard treatment method has not yet been definitely established. We report a case of an eighteen-year-old male who suffered from severe extrinsic tracheal compression due to scoliosis and straightening of the thoracic spine, confirmed on CT and bronchoscopy. The patient underwent successful placement of tracheal stent but later died of bleeding from the tracheostomy site probably due to tracheo-brachiocephalic artery fistula. We describe the CT and bronchoscopic findings of extrinsic airway compression due to chest wall deformity as well as the optimal treatment method, and discuss the possible explanation for bleeding in the patient along with review of the literature.

  13. Effects of changes in lung volume on oscillatory flow rate during high-frequency chest wall oscillation

    OpenAIRE

    Scott J Butcher; Pasiorowski, Michal P; Jones, Richard L

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The effectiveness of high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) in mucolysis and mucous clearance is thought to be dependant on oscillatory flow rate (Fosc). Therefore, increasing Fosc during HFCWO may have a clinical benefit.OBJECTIVES: To examine effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on Fosc at two oscillation frequencies in healthy subjects and patients with airway obstruction.METHODS: Five healthy subjects and six patients with airway obstruction underwent 1...

  14. High frequency chest wall oscillation for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations: a randomized sham-controlled clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis Stephanie; Badlani Sameer; Dalapathi Vijay; Harris Vanessa; Ridge Alana; Bilderback Andrew; Hatipoğlu Umur; Diette Gregory B; Mahajan Amit K; Charbeneau Jeff T; Naureckas Edward T; Krishnan Jerry A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background High frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) is used for airway mucus clearance. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of HFCWO early in the treatment of adults hospitalized for acute asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods Randomized, multi-center, double-masked phase II clinical trial of active or sham treatment initiated within 24 hours of hospital admission for acute asthma or COPD at four academic medical centers. Patients receiv...

  15. SU-E-T-18: A Comparison of Planning Techniques for Bilateral Reconstructed Chest Wall Patients Undergoing Whole Breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volpe, T; Margiasso, R; Saleh, Z; Kuo, L; Hong, L; Ballangrud, A; Gelblum, D; Zinovoy, M; Deasy, J; Tang, X [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: As we continuously see more bilateral reconstructed chest wall cases, new challenges are being presented to deliver left-sided breast irradiation. We herein compare three Deep Inspiration Breath Hold (DIBH) planning techniques (tangents, VMAT, and IMRT) and two free breathing techniques (VMAT and IMRT). Methods: Three left-sided chest wall patients with bilateral implants were studied. Tangents, VMAT, and IMRT plans were created for DIBH scans. VMAT and IMRT plans were created for free breathing scans. All plans were normalized so that 95% of the prescription dose was delivered to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV). The maximum point dose was constrained to less than 120% of the prescription dose. Since the success of DIBH delivery largely depends on patient’s ability to perform consistent breath hold during beam on time, smaller number of Monitor Units (MU) is in general desired. For each patient, the following information was collected to compare the planning techniques: heart mean dose, left and right lung V20 Gy, contra-lateral (right) breast mean dose, cord max dose, and MU. Results: The average heart mean dose over all patients are 1561, 692, 985, 1245, and 1121 cGy, for DIBH tangents, VMAT, IMRT, free breathing VMAT and IMRT, respectively. For left lung V20 are 60%, 28%, 26%, 30%, and 29%. For contra-lateral breast mean dose are 244, 687, 616, 783, 438 cGy. MU are 253, 853, 2048, 1035, and 1874 MUs. Conclusion: In the setting of bilateral chest wall reconstruction, opposed tangent beams cannot consistently achieve desired heart and left lung sparing. DIBH consistently achieves better healthy tissue sparing. VMAT appears to be preferential to IMRT for planning and delivering radiation to patients with bilaterally reconstructed chest walls being treated with DIBH.

  16. Rib cage deformities alter respiratory muscle action and chest wall function in patients with severe osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella LoMauro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI is an inherited connective tissue disorder characterized by bone fragility, multiple fractures and significant chest wall deformities. Cardiopulmonary insufficiency is the leading cause of death in these patients. METHODS: Seven patients with severe OI type III, 15 with moderate OI type IV and 26 healthy subjects were studied. In addition to standard spirometry, rib cage geometry, breathing pattern and regional chest wall volume changes at rest in seated and supine position were assessed by opto-electronic plethysmography to investigate if structural modifications of the rib cage in OI have consequences on ventilatory pattern. One-way or two-way analysis of variance was performed to compare the results between the three groups and the two postures. RESULTS: Both OI type III and IV patients showed reduced FVC and FEV(1 compared to predicted values, on condition that updated reference equations are considered. In both positions, ventilation was lower in OI patients than control because of lower tidal volume (p<0.01. In contrast to OI type IV patients, whose chest wall geometry and function was normal, OI type III patients were characterized by reduced (p<0.01 angle at the sternum (pectus carinatum, paradoxical inspiratory inward motion of the pulmonary rib cage, significant thoraco-abdominal asynchronies and rib cage distortions in supine position (p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, the restrictive respiratory pattern of Osteogenesis Imperfecta is closely related to the severity of the disease and to the sternal deformities. Pectus carinatum characterizes OI type III patients and alters respiratory muscles coordination, leading to chest wall and rib cage distortions and an inefficient ventilator pattern. OI type IV is characterized by lower alterations in the respiratory function. These findings suggest that functional assessment and treatment of OI should be differentiated in these two forms of the

  17. Poland’s Anomaly: Natural History and Long-Term-Results of Chest Wall Reconstruction in 33 Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-01

    Poland’s anomaly is an uncommon congenital aberration of the chest wall characterized by absence of the pectoralis major muscle and other nearby muscu...loskeletal components. In this series, a wide spectrum of thoracic deformities was associated with the Poland anomaly, ranging from segmental agenesis ...of the ribs, sternum, and nearby muscles , to simple aplasia of the pectoralis major muscle . Although little disability was associated with the

  18. [Thoracodorsal pedicled perforator flap for chest wall and breast reconstruction in children: Illustration with two clinical cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minetti, C; Colson, T; Gisquet, H; Pujo, J; Brix, M; Simon, E

    2014-02-01

    Perforator flaps represent a new approach in reconstructive surgery including the thoracodorsal perforator flap. It can be used as a free or pedicled tissue transfer. By exposing two clinical cases, we demonstrate that this flap is an interesting option for children and adolescents chest wall skin coverage with less morbidity compared to myocutaneous latissimus dorsi flap. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. A pilot study on bladder wall thickness at different filling stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xi; Liu, Yang; Li, Baojuan; Zhang, Guopeng; Liang, Zhengrong; Lu, Hongbing

    2015-03-01

    The ever-growing death rate and the high recurrence of bladder cancer make the early detection and appropriate followup procedure of bladder cancer attract more attention. Compare to optical cystoscopy, image-based studies have revealed its potentials in non-invasive observations of the abnormities of bladder recently, in which MR imaging turns out to be a better choice for bladder evaluation due to its non-ionizing and high contrast between urine and wall tissue. Recent studies indicate that bladder wall thickness tends to be a good indicator for detecting bladder wall abnormalities. However, it is difficult to quantitatively compare wall thickness of the same subject at different filling stages or among different subjects. In order to explore thickness variations at different bladder filling stages, in this study, we preliminarily investigate the relationship between bladder wall thickness and bladder volume based on a MRI database composed of 40 datasets acquired from 10 subjects at different filling stages, using a pipeline for thickness measurement and analysis proposed in our previous work. The Student's t-test indicated that there was no significant different on wall thickness between the male group and the female group. The Pearson correlation analysis result indicated that negative correlation with a correlation coefficient of -0.8517 existed between the wall thickness and bladder volume, and the correlation was significant(p score of wall thickness would be more appropriate to reflect the thickness variations. For possible abnormality detection of a bladder based on wall thickness, the intra-subject and inter-subject thickness variation should be considered.

  20. Chest wall TB and low 25-hidroxy-vitamin D levels in a 15-month-old girl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonsenso, Danilo; Focarelli, Benedetta; Scalzone, Maria; Chiaretti, Antonio; Gioè, Claudia; Ceccarelli, Manuela; Valentini, Piero

    2012-04-17

    Parietal chest wall tuberculosis is an extremely rare manifestation of tuberculosis (TB) in children. We present the case of a 15 month-old girl presenting with a chest wall lesion initially thought to be of neoplastic origin and eventually diagnosed as chest wall TB, which was treated with surgical debridement and specific antitubercular therapy. The girl had not-measurable 25-hidroxy-vitamin D levels, an increasingly recognized risk factor for the development of active TB. To our knowledge, in the English literature there are no similar described cases in such young infants. This case highlight the possibility of dealing with TB and its different manifestations also in low TB burden countries, due to continuously increasing migration flows. A detailed history is a key point to reach the diagnosis. Moreover, our case confirm the possible non casual relationship between TB and low 25-hidroxy-vitamin D levels, pointing out the importance of measuring its levels in all TB patients and considering its supplementation in addition to specific antitubercular therapy.

  1. Analysis of Thick-Walled Cylinder Temperature Field based on the Thermal-Fluid-Solid Coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghai Wu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The barrel is a special thick-walled cylinder. It is significance to study the temperature distribution of thick-walled cylinder under liquid-cooled state to weapon launch safety and effectiveness. Taking a naval gun barrel as research objective, a unified thermal-fluid-solid coupling model is put forward including barrel solid wall, the cooling water and the water jacket solid wall. The unsteady coupled temperature field of the barrel is calculated at the time of single and continuous firing and some influencing factors such as cooling water flow velocity, barrel wall thickness and so on, are analyzed to the barrel temperature field. The results show that the water cooling effect of the barrel outer is closely related to the wall thickness and the cooling water flow velocity. When the barrel wall thickness is small, increasing the flow velocity increase heat dissipation and reduce barrel wall temperature obviously. When the barrel wall thickness is large, the water cooling effect depends on the total cooling time and small correlation with the velocity of cooling water flow.

  2. Nitrogen washout during tidal breathing with superimposed high-frequency chest wall oscillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harf, A; Zidulka, A; Chang, H K

    1985-08-01

    In order to assess the efficacy of high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) superimposed on tidal ventilation, multiple-breath nitrogen washout curves were obtained in 7 normal seated subjects. To maintain a regular breathing pattern throughout the study, the subjects breathed synchronously with a Harvard ventilator set at a constant tidal volume and frequency for each subject during a trial period. Washout curves were obtained during 3 different maneuvers performed in random order. Series A was the control condition with no superimposed HFCWO. In Series B and C, HFCWO at 5 Hz was superimposed on the regulated tidal breathing; the magnitude of the oscillatory tidal volume measured at the airway opening was 20 ml for Series B and 40 ml for Series C. The nitrogen washout was clearly faster in Series C than in Series A for each subject. In Series B, there was an interindividual variability, with a washout rate either equal to that in Maneuver A or in Maneuver C, or intermediate between the two. When these washout curves were analyzed in terms of a simple monocompartment model, the time constant of the washout was found to decrease by 16 +/- 11% in Series B, and 25 +/- 7% in Series C compared with that in Series A. In this group of normal subjects, the correction of any inhomogeneity in the distribution of the ventilation is unlikely to explain these results because of the close fit of all washout curves to a monoexponential model. It is postulated that during inspiration HFCWO enhances gas mixing in the lung periphery and that during expiration it improves gas mixing in the airways.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Effects of high-frequency chest wall oscillation on respiratory control in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, M C; Gelmont, D; Howell, S; Johnson, R; Yang, F; Chang, H K

    1989-05-01

    We studied the spontaneous breathing patterns of 10 normal adult volunteers during high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO), accomplished by inflating and deflating a vest worn around each subject's thorax at 2.5 Hz. Tidal volumes generated by HFCWO averaged 100 ml. Mean vest pressure was maintained at approximately 35 cm H2O throughout each experiment, even when HFCWO was not applied. During HFCWO, subjects were instructed occasionally to exhale deeply to obtain end-tidal samples representative of PACO2. HFCWO increased the breath-to-breath variability of spontaneous respiration in all subjects, prolonging expiratory pauses and producing short apneas in some cases. PACO2 decreased significantly (p less than 0.05). The effects on minute ventilation, tidal volume, and inspiratory and expiratory durations remained variable across subjects, even when differences in PACO2 between control and HFCWO states were reduced through inhalation of a low CO2 mixture. None of the changes were statistically significant, although average expiratory duration increased by 29%. Ventilatory responses to CO2 with and without HFCWO were also measured. Normocapnic (PACO2 = 40 mm Hg) ventilatory drive increased significantly (p less than 0.05) in six subjects (Type 1 response) and decreased substantially in the others (Type 2 response); with hypercapnia, the changes in drive were attenuated in both groups. Consequently, CO2 sensitivity decreased in Type 1 subjects and increased in Type 2 subjects. A simple analysis based on this result shows that with HFCWO, Type 2 subjects breathing air will tend to have a lower spontaneous minute ventilation and become hypercapnic. Type 1 subjects will become hypocapnic, but minute ventilation may be higher or lower than control.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. High frequency chest wall oscillation in patients with chronic air-flow obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piquet, J; Brochard, L; Isabey, D; de Cremoux, H; Chang, H K; Bignon, J; Harf, A

    1987-12-01

    In order to assess high frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) as a way to assist spontaneous breathing in obstructive lung disease, we studied 12 patients with severe and stable COPD. HFCWO at 5 Hz were applied by means of an inflatable vest. In order to avoid any discomfort, oscillations were applied only during the expiratory phase of the spontaneous breathing cycle. We compared gas exchange and pattern of breathing during control and HFCWO periods, each lasting 15 min. Minute ventilation did not change, but the pattern of breathing was markedly altered during HFCWO: breathing frequency decreased (p less than 0.001) from 18 +/- 6/min during control to 14 +/- 5/min, whereas tidal volume increased (p less than 0.01) from 600 +/- 200 ml during control to 860 +/- 400 ml. Secondary to this change in the pattern of breathing, arterial PO2 increased slightly (p less than 0.01) from 54 +/- 7 mm Hg during control to 57 +/- 8 mm Hg during HFCWO, and arterial PCO2 significantly (p less than 0.01) decreased from 46 +/- 6 mm Hg during control to 43 +/- 7 mm Hg during HFCWO. In addition, duty cycle (Ti/Ttot) decreased (p less than 0.001) from 0.37 +/- 0.03 s during control to 0.29 +/- 0.05 s during HFCWO. Such a decrease in duty cycle suggest that inspiratory muscle work was facilitated under HFCWO. In 8 patients, we obtained the tension-time index (TTdi), or the product of duty cycle and Pdi/Pdimax, and found that this index significantly decreased (p less than 0.05) from 0.06 +/- 0.03 during control to 0.04 +/- 0.02 during HFCWO.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Response of the canine inspiratory intercostal muscles to chest wall vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leduc, D; Brunko, E; De Troyer, A

    2000-02-01

    High-frequency mechanical vibration of the rib cage reduces dyspnea, but the effect of this procedure on the respiratory muscles is largely unknown. In the present studies, we have initially assessed the electrical and mechanical response to vibration (40 Hz) of the canine parasternal and external intercostal muscles (third interspace) during hyperventilation-induced apnea. When the vibrator was applied to the segment investigated, prominent external intercostal activity was recorded in the seven animals studied, whereas low-amplitude parasternal intercostal activity was recorded in only four animals. Similarly, when the vibrator was applied to more rostral and more caudal interspaces, activity was recorded commonly from the external intercostal but only occasionally from the parasternal. The two muscles, however, showed similar changes in length. We next examined the response to vibration of the muscles in seven spontaneously breathing animals. Vibrating the rib cage during inspiration (in-phase) had no effect on parasternal intercostal inspiratory activity but induced a marked increase in neural drive to the external intercostals. For the animal group, peak external intercostal activity during the control, nonvibrated breaths averaged (mean +/- SE) 43.1 +/- 3.7% of the activity recorded during the vibrated breaths (p vibration also occurred earlier at the onset of inspiration and commonly carried on after the cessation of parasternal intercostal activity. Yet tidal volume was unchanged. Vibrating the rib cage during expiration (out-of-phase) did not elicit any parasternal or external intercostal activity in six animals. These observations thus indicate that the external intercostals, with their larger spindle density, are much more sensitive to chest wall vibration than the parasternal intercostals. They also suggest that the impact of this procedure on the mechanical behavior of the respiratory system is relatively small.

  6. FLAIL CHEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Crnjac

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Major thoracic trauma is consistent with high mortality rate because of associated injuries of vital thoracic organs and dangerous complications. The flail chest occurs after disruption of the skeletal continuity of chest wall and demands because of its pathophysiological complexity rapid and accurate diagnosis and treatment.Conclusions. Basic pathophysiological mechanism of the flail chest is respiratory distress, which is provoked by pulmonary contusions and paradoxical chest wall motion. The treatment should be pointed to improvement and support of respiratory functions and include aggressive pain control, pulmonary physiotherapy and selective mechanical ventilation. Views about operative fixation of the flail chest are still controversial. Neither mortality rate neither long-term disability are improved after operative fixation.

  7. On the linear dependence of a carbon nanofiber thermal conductivity on wall thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandros Askounis

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Thermal transport in carbon nanofibers (CNFs was thoroughly investigated. In particular, individual CNFs were suspended on T-type heat nanosensors and their thermal conductivity was measured over a range of temperatures. Unexpectedly, thermal conductivity was found to be dependent on CNF wall thickness and ranging between ca. 28 and 43 W/(m⋅K. Further investigation of the CNF walls with high resolution electron microscopy allowed us to propose a tentative description of how wall structure affects phonon heat transport inside CNFs. The lower thermal conductivities, compared to other CNTs, was attributed to unique CNF wall structure. Additionally, wall thickness is related to the conducting lattice length of each constituent graphene cone and comparable to the Umklapp length. Hence, as the wall thickness and thus lattice length increases there is a higher probability for phonon scattering to the next layer.

  8. The Bulging Behavior of Thick-Walled 6063 Aluminum Alloy Tubes Under Double-Sided Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiao-Lei; Wang, Xiao-Song; Yuan, Shi-Jian

    2015-05-01

    To make further exploration on the deformation behavior of tube under double-sided pressures, the thick-walled 6063 aluminum alloy tubes with an outer diameter of 65 mm and an average thickness of 7.86 mm have been used to be bulged under the combined action of internal and external pressures. In the experiment, two ends of the thick-walled tubes were fixed using the tooth and groove match. Three levels of external pressure (0 MPa, 40 MPa, and 80 MPa), in conjunction with the internal pressure, were applied on the tube outside and inside simultaneously. The effect of external pressure on the bulging behavior of the thick-walled tubes, such as the limiting expansion ratio, the bulging zone profile, and the thickness distribution, has been investigated. It is shown that the limiting expansion ratio, the bulging zone profile, and the thickness distribution in the homogeneous bulging area are all insensitive to the external pressure. However, the external pressure can make the thick-walled tube achieve a thinner wall at the fracture area. It reveals that the external pressure can only improve the fracture limit of the thick-walled 6063 tubes, but it has very little effect on their homogeneous bulging behavior. It might be because the external pressure can only increase the magnitude of the hydrostatic pressure for the tube but has no effect on the Lode parameter.

  9. Solitary metastatic adenocarcinoma of the sternum treated by total sternectomy and chest wall reconstruction using a Gore-Tex patch and myocutaneous flap: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korfer Reiner

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The consequences of bone metastasis are often devastating. Although the exact incidence of bone metastasis is unknown, it is estimated that 350,000 people die of bone metastasis annually in the United States. The incidence of local recurrences after mastectomy and breast-conserving therapy varies between 5% and 40% depending on the risk factors and primary therapy utilized. So far, a standard therapy of local recurrence has not been defined, while indications of resection and reconstruction considerations have been infrequently described. This case report reviews the use of sternectomy for breast cancer recurrence, highlights the need for thorough clinical and radiologic evaluation to ensure the absence of other systemic diseases, and suggests the use of serratus anterior muscle flap as a pedicle graft to cover full-thickness defects of the anterior chest wall. Case presentation We report the case of a 70-year-old Caucasian woman who was referred to our hospital for the management of a retrosternal mediastinal mass. She had undergone radical mastectomy in 1999. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a 74.23 × 37.7 × 133.6-mm mass in the anterior mediastinum adjacent to the main pulmonary artery, the right ventricle and the ascending aorta. We performed total sternectomy at all layers encompassing the skin, the subcutaneous tissues, the right pectoralis major muscle, all the costal cartilages, and the anterior part of the pericardium. The defect was immediately closed using a 0.6 mm Gore-Tex cardiovascular patch combined with a serratus anterior muscle flap. Our patient had remained asymptomatic during her follow-up examination after 18 months. Conclusion Chest wall resection has become a critical component of the thoracic surgeon's armamentarium. It may be performed to treat either benign conditions (osteoradionecrosis, osteomyelitis or malignant diseases. There are, however, very few reports on the

  10. Comparison of conventional inserts and an add-on electron MLC for chest wall irradiation of left-sided breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vatanen, Tero; Lahtinen, Tapani (Dept. of Oncology, Kuopio Univ. Hospital, Kuopio (Finland)); Traneus, Erik (Nucletron Scandinavia AB, Uppsala (Sweden))

    2009-04-15

    Background. Collimation of irregularly shaped clinical electron beams is currently based on electron inserts made of low melting point alloys. The present investigation compares a conventional electron applicator with insert and add-on eMLC-based dose distributions in the postoperative chest wall irradiation of left-sided breast cancer. Material and methods. Voxel Monte Carlo++ (VMC++) calculated dose distributions related to electron fields were compared with 10 left-sided breast cancer patients after radical mastectomy. The prescription dose was 50 Gy at a build-up maximum. The same dose was prescribed for the ipsilateral axillary, parasternal and supraclavicular lymph nodes that were treated with photons and calculated with a pencil beam algorithm. The insert beams were shaped with 1.5 cm thick Wood's metal electron inserts in an electron applicator of a Varian 2100 C/D linac. Doses for the eMLC-shaped beams were calculated for an eMLC prototype with 2 cm thick and 5 mm wide steel leaves. The same collimator-to-surface distance (CSD) of 5.8 cm was used for both collimators. Results. The mean PTV dose was slightly higher for the eMLC plans (50.7 vs 49.5 Gy, p<0.001, respectively). The maximum doses assessed by D5% for the eMLC and insert were 60.9 and 59.1 Gy (p<0.001). The difference was due to the slightly higher doses near the field edges for the eMLC. The left lung V20 volumes were 34.5% and 34.0% (p<0.001). There was only a marginal difference in heart doses. Discussion: Despite a slight increase of maximum dose in PTV the add-on electron MLC for chest wall irradiation results in practically no differences in dose distributions compared with the present insert-based collimation.

  11. Highly sensitive monitoring of chest wall dynamics and acoustics provides diverse valuable information for evaluating ventilation and diagnosing pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesin, Jimy; Faingersh, Anna; Waisman, Dan; Landesberg, Amir

    2014-06-15

    Current practice of monitoring lung ventilation in neonatal intensive care units, utilizing endotracheal tube pressure and flow, end-tidal CO2, arterial O2 saturation from pulse oximetry, and hemodynamic indexes, fails to account for asymmetric pathologies and to allow for early detection of deteriorating ventilation. This study investigated the utility of bilateral measurements of chest wall dynamics and sounds, in providing early detection of changes in the mechanics and distribution of lung ventilation. Nine healthy New Zealand rabbits were ventilated at a constant pressure, while miniature accelerometers were attached to each side of the chest. Slowly progressing pneumothorax was induced by injecting 1 ml/min air into the pleural space on either side of the chest. The end of the experiment (tPTX) was defined when arterial O2 saturation from pulse oximetry dropped ventilation was attained for all animals. Side identification of the pneumothorax was achieved at 50% tPTX, within a 95% confidence interval. Diagnosis was, on average, 34.1 ± 18.8 min before tPTX. In conclusion, bilateral monitoring of the chest dynamics and acoustics provide novel information that is sensitive to asymmetric changes in ventilation, enabling early detection and localization of pneumothorax.

  12. Domain walls in Fe(001) bicrystals-thickness dependence and field-induced transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, M. [Department of Applied physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden)]. E-mail: maj.hanson@fy.chalmers.se; Brucas, R. [Department of Applied physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2007-03-15

    Magnetic domain walls (DW's) formed at the grain boundary (GB) of epitaxial bicrystal Fe(001) films, thickness t=50 and 70nm, were studied by magnetic force microscopy. The 'as-grown' samples displayed DW's with different magnetic contrast profiles yielding a single peak for t=50nm and a double peak with a change of sign at the centre of the wall for t=70nm. For t=50nm the wall is characterised as an asymmetric Bloch wall. The double peak of the 70nm thick film transformed into a single peak characteristic for a charged wall, when a field of 30mT was applied along the GB. At remanence this domain wall relaxed to a regular Bloch wall divided into segments of alternating signs.

  13. MRI-based Determination of Reference Values of Thoracic Aortic Wall Thickness in a General Population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mensel, Birger; Quadrat, Alexander; Schneider, Tobias; Kuehn, Jens-Peter; Hegenscheid, Katrin [University Medicine Greifswald, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology and Neuroradiology, Greifswald (Germany); Doerr, Marcus [University Medicine Greifswald, Department of Internal Medicine, Greifswald (Germany); DZHK (German Center for Cardiovascular Research), Greifswald (Germany); Voelzke, Henry [University Medicine Greifswald, Institute for Community Medicine, Greifswald (Germany); DZHK (German Center for Cardiovascular Research), Greifswald (Germany); Lieb, Wolfgang [Christian Albrechts University, Institute of Epidemiology, Kiel (Germany); Lorbeer, Roberto [University Medicine Greifswald, Institute for Community Medicine, Greifswald (Germany)

    2014-09-15

    To provide age- and sex-specific reference values for MRI-derived wall thickness of the ascending and descending aorta in the general population. Data of 753 subjects (311 females) aged 21-81 years were analysed. MRI was used to determine the aortic wall thickness (AWT). Equations for reference value calculation according to age were established for females and males. Median wall thickness of the ascending aorta was 1.46 mm (5th-95th range: 1.15-1.88 mm) for females and 1.56 mm (1.22-1.99 mm) for males. Median wall thickness of the descending aorta was 1.26 mm (0.97-1.58 mm) in females and 1.36 mm (1.04-1.75 mm) in males. While median and 5th and 95th percentiles for the ascending and descending aorta increased with age in both sexes, the association between age and median AWT was stronger in males than in females for both the ascending and descending aorta. Reference values for the ascending and descending AWT are provided. In a healthy sample from the general population, the wall of the ascending aorta is thicker than the wall of the descending aorta, and both walls are thicker in males than females. The increase in wall thickness with age is greater in males. (orig.)

  14. Evaluating proton stereotactic body radiotherapy to reduce chest wall dose in the treatment of lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welsh, James, E-mail: jwelsh@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Amini, Arya [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); UC Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine, CA (United States); Ciura, Katherine; Nguyen, Ngoc; Palmer, Matt [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Soh, Hendrick [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Allen, Pamela K.; Paolini, Michael; Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Bluett, Jaques; Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Gomez, Daniel; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Chang, Joe Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) can produce excellent local control of several types of solid tumor; however, toxicity to nearby critical structures is a concern. We found previously that in SBRT for lung cancer, the chest wall (CW) volume receiving 20, 30, or 40 Gy (V{sub 20}, V{sub 30}, or V{sub 40}) was linked with the development of neuropathy. Here we sought to determine whether the dosimetric advantages of protons could produce lower CW doses than traditional photon-based SBRT. We searched an institutional database to identify patients treated with photon SBRT for lung cancer with tumors within < 2.5 cm of the CW. We found 260 cases; of these, chronic grade ≥ 2 CW pain was identified in 23 patients. We then selected 10 representative patients from this group and generated proton SBRT treatment plans, using the identical dose of 50 Gy in 4 fractions, and assessed potential differences in CW dose between the 2 plans. The proton SBRT plans reduced the CW doses at all dose levels measured. The median CW V{sub 20} was 364.0 cm{sup 3} and 160.0 cm{sup 3} (p < 0.0001), V{sub 30} was 144.6 cm{sup 3}vs 77.0 cm{sup 3} (p = 0.0012), V{sub 35} was 93.9 cm{sup 3}vs 57.9 cm{sup 3} (p = 0.005), V{sub 40} was 66.5 cm{sup 3}vs 45.4 cm{sup 3} (p = 0.0112), and mean lung dose was 5.9 Gy vs 3.8 Gy (p = 0.0001) for photons and protons, respectively. Coverage of the planning target volume (PTV) was comparable between the 2 sets of plans (96.4% for photons and 97% for protons). From a dosimetric standpoint, proton SBRT can achieve the same coverage of the PTV while significantly reducing the dose to the CW and lung relative to photon SBRT and therefore may be beneficial for the treatment of lesions closer to critical structures.

  15. Automated chest wall line detection for whole-breast segmentation in sagittal breast MR images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shandong; Weinstein, Susan P; Conant, Emily F; Schnall, Mitchell D; Kontos, Despina

    2013-04-01

    Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays an important role in the clinical management of breast cancer. Computerized analysis is increasingly used to quantify breast MRI features in applications such as computer-aided lesion detection and fibroglandular tissue estimation for breast cancer risk assessment. Automated segmentation of the whole-breast as an organ from the other parts imaged is an important step in aiding lesion localization and fibroglandular tissue quantification. For this task, identifying the chest wall line (CWL) is most challenging due to image contrast variations, intensity discontinuity, and bias field. In this work, the authors develop and validate a fully automated image processing algorithm for accurate delineation of the CWL in sagittal breast MRI. The CWL detection is based on an integrated scheme of edge extraction and CWL candidate evaluation. The edge extraction consists of applying edge-enhancing filters and an edge linking algorithm. Increased accuracy is achieved by the synergistic use of multiple image inputs for edge extraction, where multiple CWL candidates are evaluated by the dynamic time warping algorithm coupled with the construction of a CWL reference. Their method is quantitatively validated by a dataset of 60 3D bilateral sagittal breast MRI scans (in total 3360 2D MR slices) that span the full American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) breast density range. Agreement with manual segmentation obtained by an experienced breast imaging radiologist is assessed by both volumetric and boundary-based metrics, including four quantitative measures. In terms of breast volume agreement with manual segmentation, the overlay percentage expressed by the Dice's similarity coefficient is 95.0% and the difference percentage is 10.1%. More specifically, for the segmentation accuracy of the CWL boundary, the CWL overlay percentage is 92.7% and averaged deviation distance is 2.3 mm. Their method

  16. Reconstruction of massive full-thickness abdominal wall defect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aydin, Dogu; Paulsen, Ida Felbo; Bentzen, Vibeke Egerup

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that it is possible to use a nonabsorbable mesh for abdominal wall reconstruction after total wound rupture and successfully split-skin graft directly on the mesh. Sufficient granulation tissue formation prior to skin grafting was obtained with long-term use of negative pressure...

  17. Impact of exercise training on arterial wall thickness in humans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijssen, D.H.J.; Cable, N.T.; Green, D.J.

    2012-01-01

    Thickening of the carotid artery wall has been adopted as a surrogate marker of pre-clinical atherosclerosis, which is strongly related to increased cardiovascular risk. The cardioprotective effects of exercise training, including direct effects on vascular function and lumen dimension, have been co

  18. Space-resolved Resistive Measurement of Liquid Metal Wall Thickness

    CERN Document Server

    Mirhoseini, S M H

    2016-01-01

    In a fusion reactor internally coated with liquid metal, it will be important to diagnose the thickness of the liquid at various locations in the vessel, as a function of time, and possibly respond to counteract undesired bulging or depletion. The electrical conductance between electrodes immersed in the liquid metal can be used as a simple proxy for the local thickness. Here a matrix of electrodes is shown to provide spatially resolved measurements of liquid metal thickness in the absence of plasma. First a theory is developed for mxn electrodes, and then it is experimentally demonstrated for 3x1 electrodes. The experiments were carried out with Galinstan, but are easily extended to Lithium or other liquid metals.

  19. Thermal variations of domain wall thickness and number of domains in magnetic rectangular grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Song; Merrill, Ronald T.

    1990-12-01

    Equilibrium domain wall thickness and number of domains in rectangular magnetic grains are determined by using a modified Amar model. It is shown that domain structure, particularly domain wall thickness, in a magnetized grain depends strongly on grain shape and orientation. These dependencies are attributed to the existence of two competing self-magnetostatic interactions, one from the ends of the grain and the other from the sides. One of the consequences of this is that the thermal variation of domain wall thickness in an elongated grain is greater (smaller) than predicted by classical theory when the grain is magnetized along the shortest (longest) dimension. For magnetite, classical theory provides a good approximation in predicting both domain wall thickness and number of domains in equal-dimensional grains larger than about 4 μm.

  20. Reconstruction of full thickness abdominal wall defect following tumor resection: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovačević Predrag

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Reconstruction of a full thickness abdominal wall defect is a demanding procedure for general and also for plastic surgeons, requiring vigorous planning and reconstruction of three layers. Case Outline. We present a case of a 70-year-old patient with a huge abdominal wall tumor with 40 years evolution. Surgery was performed under general anesthesia. Full thickness abdominal defect appeared after the tumor resection. Reconstruction followed in the same act. The defect was reconstructed using a combination of techniques, including omental flap, fascia lata graft, local skin flaps and skin grafts. After surgery no major complications were noted, only a partial skin flap loss, which was repaired using partial thickness skin grafts. The final result was described by the patient as very good, without hernia formation. Conclusion. Omenthoplasty, abdominal wall reconstruction in combination with free fascia lata graft and skin grafts can be one of good options for the reconstruction of full thickness abdominal wall defects.

  1. Quantitative CT measures of emphysema and airway wall thickness are related to D(L)CO

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grydeland, Thomas B; Thorsen, Einar; Dirksen, Asger

    2011-01-01

    There is limited knowledge on the relationship between diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (D(L)CO) and quantitative computed tomography (CT) measures of emphysema and airway wall thickness.......There is limited knowledge on the relationship between diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (D(L)CO) and quantitative computed tomography (CT) measures of emphysema and airway wall thickness....

  2. Quantitative CT measures of emphysema and airway wall thickness are related to D(L)CO

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grydeland, Thomas B; Thorsen, Einar; Dirksen, Asger;

    2011-01-01

    There is limited knowledge on the relationship between diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (D(L)CO) and quantitative computed tomography (CT) measures of emphysema and airway wall thickness.......There is limited knowledge on the relationship between diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (D(L)CO) and quantitative computed tomography (CT) measures of emphysema and airway wall thickness....

  3. High-dose melphalan followed by radical radiotherapy for the treatment of massive plasmacytoma of the chest wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das-Gupta, E P; Sidra, G M; Bessell, E M; Lush, R J; Byrne, J L; Russell, N H

    2003-10-01

    We report three cases of massive chest wall plasmacytoma, each greater than 10 cm in diameter, without evidence of overt myeloma, whom we treated with a combination of VAD chemotherapy consolidated by high-dose melphalan and autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation and radical radiotherapy. All three patients completed all components of their therapy without experiencing any major side effects and one patient has had a durable remission. The other two patients have had disease progression but at sites other than the original tumour.

  4. Near-infrared optical monitoring of cardiac oxygen sufficiency through thoracic wall without open-chest surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakihana, Yasuyuki; Tamura, Mamoru

    1991-05-01

    The cardiac function is exquisitely sensitive to oxygen, because its energy production mainly depends on the oxidative phosphorylation at mitochondria. Thus, oxygenation state of the tissue is critical. Cytochrome a,a3, hemoglobin and myoglobin, which play indispensable role in the oxygen metabolism, have the broad absorption band in near infrared (NIR) region and the light in this region easily penetrates biological tissues. Using NIR spectrophotometry, we attempted to measure the redox state of the copper in cytochrome a,a3 in rat heart through thoracic wall without open chest. The result is given in this paper.

  5. Antracyclin toxicity in a child with primitive neuroectodermal tumor of the chest wall with and brain metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atas, Erman; Kesik, Vural

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy regimens, including doxorubicin used in primitive neuroectodermal tumor's (PNET) treatment can cause life-threatening disorders in cardiac functions. Follow-up of cardiac functions in the clinical course is very important during treatment with ejection fraction (EF) and shortening fraction (SF). However, sometimes the detection of cardiac failure with EF and SF cannot be possible. In this condition, we may need new evaluation test. Herein, we wanted to present a child with PNET of the chest wall suffered from antracycline toxicity and indicate that close monitoring of cardiac function could be important.

  6. Multimodal therapy in the treatment of a venolymphatic malformation of the axilla and chest wall in an infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gits, Colton C; Nelson, Stephen C; Feltis, Brad A; Alexander, Jason Q

    2014-10-01

    We report our staged multimodal treatment of a female infant with a very large complex venolymphatic malformation of the axilla and chest wall. We successfully managed the patient's severely restricted arm mobility and consumptive coagulopathy with surgical debulking followed by medical therapy with the mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor sirolimus. The diseased burden reduced in size throughout therapy, and hematologic parameters reached and maintained normal levels. Normal health and limb functionality were restored with no observed adverse side effects of medical therapy. This case presents a previously unreported and potentially promising method to treat severe vascular malformations.

  7. Control on mine pressure of thick and strong roof stratum movement in long wall thick coal caving face

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Guang-zhe; ZHANG dian-chang; HE Tao

    2008-01-01

    The caving of thick and strong roof stratum causes tremendous rock pressurein mine. The results of the analysis on dynamic natures of actual measurements of somefields, of which the roof pressure can be caused by thick and strong stratum in long wallthick coal caving face, could present the relation between the collapse and movement ofthick and strong roof strata and surrounding rock pressure. In order to control the roofpressure effectively, the thick and strong roof strata, can be fractured and softened previ-ously by hydraulic fracturing and low-high pressure water infusion, fracturing and softeningmethod. The results of study can provide basis for strata control and safe management inlong wall thick coal caving face.

  8. Study of Individual Characteristic Abdominal Wall Thickness Based on Magnetic Anchored Surgical Instruments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ding-Hui Dong; Wen-Yan Liu; Hai-Bo Feng; Yi-Li Fu; Shi Huang; Jun-Xi Xiang; Yi Lyu

    2015-01-01

    Background:Magnetic anchored surgical instruments (MASI),relying on magnetic force,can break through the limitations of the single port approach in dexterity.Individual characteristic abdominal wall thickness (ICAWT) deeply influences magnetic force that determines the safety of MASI.The purpose of this study was to research the abdominal wall characteristics in MASI applied environment to find ICAWT,and then construct an artful method to predict ICAWT,resulting in better safety and feasibility for MASI.Methods:For MASI,ICAWT is referred to the thickness of thickest point in the applied environment.We determined ICAWT through finding the thickest point in computed tomography scans.We also investigated the traits of abdominal wall thickness to discover the factor that can be used to predict ICAWT.Results:Abdominal wall at C point in the middle third lumbar vertebra plane (L3) is the thickest during chosen points.Fat layer thickness plays a more important role in abdominal wall thickness than muscle layer thickness."BMI-ICAWT" curve was obtained based on abdominal wall thickness of C point in L3 plane,and the expression was as follow:f(x) =P1 × x2 + P2 x x + P3,where P1 =0.03916 (0.01776,0.06056),P2 =1.098 (0.03197,2.164),P3 =-18.52 (-31.64,-5.412),R-square:0.99.Conclusions:Abdominal wall thickness of C point at L3 could be regarded as ICAWT.BMI could be a reliable predictor of ICAWT.In the light of "BMI-ICAWT" curve,we may conveniently predict ICAWT by BMI,resulting a better safety and feasibility for MASI.

  9. Study of Individual Characteristic Abdominal Wall Thickness Based on Magnetic Anchored Surgical Instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding-Hui Dong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Magnetic anchored surgical instruments (MASI, relying on magnetic force, can break through the limitations of the single port approach in dexterity. Individual characteristic abdominal wall thickness (ICAWT deeply influences magnetic force that determines the safety of MASI. The purpose of this study was to research the abdominal wall characteristics in MASI applied environment to find ICAWT, and then construct an artful method to predict ICAWT, resulting in better safety and feasibility for MASI. Methods: For MASI, ICAWT is referred to the thickness of thickest point in the applied environment. We determined ICAWT through finding the thickest point in computed tomography scans. We also investigated the traits of abdominal wall thickness to discover the factor that can be used to predict ICAWT. Results: Abdominal wall at C point in the middle third lumbar vertebra plane (L3 is the thickest during chosen points. Fat layer thickness plays a more important role in abdominal wall thickness than muscle layer thickness. "BMI-ICAWT" curve was obtained based on abdominal wall thickness of C point in L3 plane, and the expression was as follow: f(x = P1 × x 2 + P2 × x + P3, where P1 = 0.03916 (0.01776, 0.06056, P2 = 1.098 (0.03197, 2.164, P3 = −18.52 (−31.64, −5.412, R-square: 0.99. Conclusions: Abdominal wall thickness of C point at L3 could be regarded as ICAWT. BMI could be a reliable predictor of ICAWT. In the light of "BMI-ICAWT" curve, we may conveniently predict ICAWT by BMI, resulting a better safety and feasibility for MASI.

  10. Method for Improving Transverse Wall Thickness Precision of Seamless Steel Tube Based on Tube Rotation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-zheng JIANG; Hua-ping TANG

    2015-01-01

    The tube rotation method (TRM) refers to the rotational movement of steel tube about its axis as well as translation in rolling direction in stretch reducing rolling process. The inlfuence of the TRM on transverse wall thickness precision of seamless steel tube was studied. Thickness distribution of the TRM was obtained by superimposing the thickened amount of single pass roll-ing. Results show that the TRM can effectively improve the evenness of thickness distribution. In order to analyze the inlfuence mechanism of the TRM, the ifnite element method was adopted to simulate the thickness distribution in stretch reduction process. Results show that the TRM changes the roundtrip lfow between two ifx places of conventional stretch reducing and inhibits the directional accumulation of metal. In addition, the TRM has a correction effect on thickness cusp. All these advantages of the TRM help to improve the transverse wall thickness precision of seamless steel tube.

  11. Acute effects of different inspiratory efforts on ventilatory pattern and chest wall compartmental distribution in elderly women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniz de Souza, Helga; Rocha, Taciano; Campos, Shirley Lima; Brandão, Daniella Cunha; Fink, James B; Aliverti, Andrea; de Andrade, Armele Dornelas

    2016-06-15

    It is not completely described how aging affect ventilatory kinematics and what are the mechanisms adopted by the elderly population to overcome these structural modifications. Given this, the aim was to evaluate the acute effects of different inspiratory efforts on ventilatory pattern and chest wall compartmental distribution in elderly women. Variables assessed included: tidal volume (Vt), total chest wall volume (Vcw), pulmonary rib cage (Vrcp%), abdominal rib cage (Vrca%) and abdominal compartment (Vab%) relative contributions to tidal volume. These variables were assessed during quiet breathing, maximal inspiratory pressure maneuver (MIP), and moderate inspiratory resistance (MIR; i.e., 40% of MIP). 22 young women (age: 23.9 ± 2.5 years) and 22 elderly women (age: 68.2 ± 5.0 years) participated to this study. It was possible to show that during quiet breathing, Vab% was predominant in elderly (pelderly (p=0.249). When MIP was imposed, both groups presented a predominance of Vrcp%. In conclusion, there are differences in abdominal kinematics between young and elderly women during different inspiratory efforts. In elderly, during moderate inspiratory resistance, the pattern is beneficial, deep, and slow. Although, during maximal inspiratory resistance, the ventilatory pattern seems to predict imminent muscle fatigue.

  12. The influence of supine posture on chest wall volume changes is higher in obese than in normal weight children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Letícia; Barcelar, Jacqueline de Melo; Rattes, Catarina Souza; Sayão, Larissa Bouwman; Reinaux, Cyda Albuquerque; Campos, Shirley L; Brandão, Daniella Cunha; Fregonezi, Guilherme; Aliverti, Andrea; Dornelas de Andrade, Armèle

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze thoraco-abdominal kinematics in obese children in seated and supine positions during spontaneous quiet breathing. An observational study of pulmonary function and chest wall volume assessed by optoelectronic plethysmography was conducted on 35 children aged 8-12 years that were divided into 2 groups according to weight/height ratio percentiles: there were 18 obese children with percentiles greater than 95 and 17 normal weight children with percentiles of 5-85. Pulmonary function (forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1); forced vital capacity (FVC); and FEV1/FVC ratio), ventilatory pattern, total and compartment chest wall volume variations, and thoraco-abdominal asynchronies were evaluated. Tidal volume was greater in seated position. Pulmonary and abdominal rib cage tidal volume and their percentage contribution to tidal volume were smaller in supine position in both obese and control children, while abdominal tidal volume and its percentage contribution was greater in the supine position only in obese children and not in controls. No statistically significant differences were found between obese and control children and between supine and seated positions regarding thoraco-abdominal asynchronies. We conclude that in obese children thoraco-abdominal kinematics is influenced by supine posture, with an increase of the abdominal and a decreased rib cage contribution to ventilation, suggesting that in this posture areas of hypoventilation can occur in the lung.

  13. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... chest x-ray is used to evaluate the lungs, heart and chest wall and may be used ... diagnose and monitor treatment for a variety of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to assess the anatomy and function of the heart and its blood flow. Tell your doctor about ... chest cavity, including the mediastinum , chest wall, pleura, heart and vessels, from almost any angle. MRI also ...

  15. Multimodal optical measurement in vitro of surface deformations and wall thickness of the pressurized aortic arch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genovese, Katia; Humphrey, Jay D

    2015-04-01

    Computational modeling of arterial mechanics continues to progress, even to the point of allowing the study of complex regions such as the aortic arch. Nevertheless, most prior studies assign homogeneous and isotropic material properties and constant wall thickness even when implementing patient-specific luminal geometries obtained from medical imaging. These assumptions are not due to computational limitations, but rather to the lack of spatially dense sets of experimental data that describe regional variations in mechanical properties and wall thickness in such complex arterial regions. In this work, we addressed technical challenges associated with in vitro measurement of overall geometry, full-field surface deformations, and regional wall thickness of the porcine aortic arch in its native anatomical configuration. Specifically, we combined two digital image correlation-based approaches, standard and panoramic, to track surface geometry and finite deformations during pressurization, with a 360-deg fringe projection system to contour the outer and inner geometry. The latter provided, for the first time, information on heterogeneous distributions of wall thickness of the arch and associated branches in the unloaded state. Results showed that mechanical responses vary significantly with orientation and location (e.g., less extensible in the circumferential direction and with increasing distance from the heart) and that the arch exhibits a nearly linear increase in pressure-induced strain up to 40%, consistent with other findings on proximal porcine aortas. Thickness measurements revealed strong regional differences, thus emphasizing the need to include nonuniform thicknesses in theoretical and computational studies of complex arterial geometries.

  16. WEIGHT FUNCTION FOR STRESS INTENSITY FACTORS IN ROTATING THICK-WALLED CYLINDER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ai-jun; ZENG Wen-ji

    2006-01-01

    The equation of stress intensity factors(SIF) of internally pressurized thickwalled cylinder was used as the reference case. SIF equation of rotating thick-walled cylinder containing a radial crack along the internal bore was presented in weight function method. The weight function formulas were worked out and can be used for all kinds of depth of cracks, rotating speed, material, size of thick-walled cylinder to calculate the stress intensity factors. The results indicated the validity and effectiveness of these formulas. Meanwhile, the rules of the stress intensity factors in rotating thick-walled cylinder with the change of crack depths and the ratio of outer radius to inner radius were studied. The studies are valuable to engineering application.

  17. Revision breast and chest wall reconstruction in Poland and pectus excavatum following implant complication using free deep inferior epigastric perforator flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Dionyssiou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to present the case of a female patient with Poland′s syndrome and pectus excavatum deformity who underwent breast and chest wall reconstruction with a pre-shaped free deep inferior epigastric perforator flap. A 57-year-old female patient with Poland′s syndrome and pectus excavatum presented with a Baker III capsular contracture following a previously performed implant-based right breast reconstruction. After a chest and abdominal CT angiography, she was staged as 2A1 chest wall deformity according to Park′s classification and underwent implant removal and capsulectomy, followed by a pre-shaped free abdominal flap transfer, providing both breast reconstruction and chest wall deformity correction in a single stage operation. Post-operative course was uneventful, and the aesthetic result remains highly satisfactory 24 months after surgery. Deep inferior epigastric free flap represents an interesting reconstructive solution when treating Poland′s syndrome female patients with chest wall and breast deformities.

  18. Effects of positive expiratory pressure on chest wall volumes in subjects with stroke compared to healthy controls: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Elis E A; Resqueti, Vanessa R; Lima, Illia N D F; Gualdi, Lucien P; Aliverti, Andrea; Fregonezi, Guilherme A F

    2017-07-08

    Alterations in respiratory system kinematics in stroke lead to restrictive pattern associated with decreased lung volumes. Chest physical therapy, such as positive expiratory pressure, may be useful in the treatment of these patients; however, the optimum intensity to promote volume and motion changes of the chest wall remains unclear. To assess the effect of different intensities of positive expiratory pressure on chest wall kinematics in subjects with stroke compared to healthy controls. 16 subjects with chronic stroke and 16 healthy controls matched for age, gender, and body mass index were recruited. Chest wall volumes were assessed using optoelectronic plethysmography during quiet breathing, 5 minutes, and recovery. Three different intensities of positive expiratory pressure (10, 15, and 20cmH2O) were administered in a random order with a 30 minutes rest interval between intensities. During positive expiratory pressure, tidal chest wall expansion increased in both groups compared to quiet breathing; however, this increase was not significant in the subjects with stroke (0.41 vs. 1.32L, 0.56 vs. 1.54L, 0.52 vs. 1.8L, at 10, 15, 20cmH2O positive expiratory pressure, for stroke and control groups; pFisioterapia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. [Effect of wall thickness of left ventricle on 201Tl myocardial SPECT images: myocardial phantom study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koto, M; Namura, H; Kawase, O; Yamasaki, K; Kono, M

    1996-07-01

    201Tl myocardial SPECT is known for better sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy than planar images in detecting coronary artery disease and diagnosing myocardial viability. SPECT images are also superior to planar images in diagnostic sensitivity and anatomical orientation. However, as limitation of the spatial resolution of the machine, we often encounter poor SPECT plower image quality in patients with decreased wall thickness. To test the accuracy of SPECT images in patients with marked thinning of the left ventricular wall, as occurs in dilated cardiomyopathy, we performed a experimental study using myocardial phantom with 7 mm wall thickness. Tomographic image of the phantom images were rather heterogeneous, though no artificial defect was located. Dilated cardiomyopathy is thought to be characterized by patchy defects in the left ventricle. Careful attention should be given to elucidating myocardial perfusion in patients with a thin left ventricle wall, as there are technical limitations in addition to clinical features.

  20. Micromagnetic simulation of thickness variation of Neel cap in hybrid Bloch-Neel domain wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Mai [Key Lab. of Opto-Electronic Technology and Intelligent Control, Lanzhou Jiaotong University, Ministry of Education, P.O. Box 73, 118 West Anning Road, Lanzhou 730070, Gansu (China) and Department of Signals and Systems, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96, Gothenburg (Sweden)]. E-mail: m.lu@mail.edu.cn; Leonard, Paul J. [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom)

    2005-08-01

    The hybrid Bloch-Neel domain wall in iron film has been investigated using three-dimensional micromagnetic calculations. Magnetization distributions in the film plane and cross-section are presented. In the film plane the rotation of magnetization in the 180 deg domain wall takes two different patterns from the bottom layer to the top layer. In cross-section the C-shaped magnetization distribution with hybrid Bloch-Neel domain wall has been found. The thickness of the top Neel cap changes from its largest value as the C-shaped magnetization distribution appears, and becomes thinner as the C-shaped magnetization distribution gradually moves and grows up. The thickness variation of the bottom Neel cap changes in a similar way, but with a reversal pattern. The results in this paper will enrich our knowledge of magnetic domain and domain wall patterns in magnetic materials.

  1. Effect of the chest wall on the measurement of hemoglobin concentrations by near-infrared time-resolved spectroscopy in normal breast and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizawa, Nobuko; Ueda, Yukio; Nasu, Hatsuko; Ogura, Hiroyuki; Ohmae, Etsuko; Yoshimoto, Kenji; Takehara, Yasuo; Yamashita, Yutaka; Sakahara, Harumi

    2016-11-01

    Optical imaging and spectroscopy using near-infrared light have great potential in the assessment of tumor vasculature. We previously measured hemoglobin concentrations in breast cancer using a near-infrared time-resolved spectroscopy system. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of the chest wall on the measurement of hemoglobin concentrations in normal breast tissue and cancer. We measured total hemoglobin (tHb) concentration in both cancer and contralateral normal breast using a near-infrared time-resolved spectroscopy system in 24 female patients with breast cancer. Patients were divided into two groups based on menopausal state. The skin-to-chest wall distance was determined using ultrasound images obtained with an ultrasound probe attached to the spectroscopy probe. The apparent tHb concentration of normal breast increased when the skin-to-chest wall distance was less than 20 mm. The tHb concentration in pre-menopausal patients was higher than that in post-menopausal patients. Although the concentration of tHb in cancer tissue was statistically higher than that in normal breast, the contralateral normal breast showed higher tHb concentration than cancer in 9 of 46 datasets. When the curves of tHb concentrations as a function of the skin-to-chest wall distance in normal breast were applied for pre- and post-menopausal patients separately, all the cancer lesions plotted above the curves. The skin-to-chest wall distance affected the measurement of tHb concentration of breast tissue by near-infrared time-resolved spectroscopy. The tHb concentration of breast cancer tissue was more precisely evaluated by considering the skin-to-chest wall distance.

  2. Spontaneous massive hemothorax secondary to chest wall chondrosarcoma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rad, Mohammad Ghasemi; Mahmodlou, Rahim; Mohammadi, Afshin; Mladkova, Nikol; Noorozinia, Farahnaz

    2011-01-01

    We present the case of a 30-year-old man with no past history of disease or recent trauma, who was seen in the emergency room after developing sharp pain in the left hemithorax. Chest roentgenogram showed costopherenic angle blunting and an oval mass in the left mediastinum. A computed tomographic scan showed extrapleural mass with coarse calcifications and pleural effusion, confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. The tumor was biopsied and removed during thoracotomy. The pathology reported revealed chondrosarcoma, which is a rare cause for a spontaneous massive hemothorax. Invasion of the intercostals vessels by the tumor was the probable cause of hemothorax in this patient.

  3. Scapulothoracic bursitis as a significant cause of breast and chest wall pain: underrecognized and undertreated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boneti, Cristiano; Arentz, Candy; Klimberg, V Suzanne

    2010-10-01

    Pain is one of the most commonly reported breast complaints. Referred pain from inflammation of the shoulder bursa is often overlooked as a cause of breast pain. The objective of this study is to evaluate the role of shoulder bursitis as a cause of breast/chest pain. An IRB-approved retrospective review from July 2005 to September 2009 identified 461 patients presenting with breast/chest pain. Cases identified with a trigger point in the medial aspect of the ipsilateral scapula were treated with a bursitis injection at the point of maximum tenderness. The bursitis injection contains a mixture of local anesthetic and corticosteroid. Presenting complaint, clinical response and associated factors were recorded and treated with descriptive statistics. Average age of the study group was 53.4 ± 12.7 years, and average BMI was 30.4 ± 7.4. One hundred and three patients were diagnosed with shoulder bursitis as the cause of breast pain and received the bursitis injection. Most cases (81/103 or 78.6%) presented with the breast/chest as the site of most significant discomfort, where 8.7% (9/103) had the most severe pain at the shoulder, 3.9% (4/103) at the axilla and 3.9% (4/103) at the medial scapular border. Of the treated patients, 83.5% (86/103) had complete relief of the pain, 12.6% (13/103) had improvement of symptoms with some degree of residual pain, and only 3.9%(4/103) did not respond at all to the treatment. The most commonly associated factor to the diagnosis of bursitis was the history of a previous mastectomy, present in 27.2% (28/103) of the cases. Shoulder bursitis represents a significant cause of breast/chest pain (22.3% or 103/461) and can be successfully treated with a local injection at site of maximum tenderness in the medial scapular border.

  4. Colonic wall thickness measured by ultrasound: striking differences in patients with cystic fibrosis versus healthy controls.

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Colonic strictures represent an advanced stage of fibrosing colonopathy in patients with cystic fibrosis. AIMS: To clarify whether ultrasonography can identify patients with an early stage of fibrosing colonopathy and to determine clinical factors that influence bowel wall thickening. PATIENTS: Ninety patients with cystic fibrosis, median age 10 years, and 46 healthy controls, median age 13 years, were investigated. METHODS: Bowel wall thickness was measured by ultrasound in a pro...

  5. Room temperature synthesis of indium tin oxide nanotubes with high precision wall thickness by electroless deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Mario Boehme; Emanuel Ionescu; Ganhua Fu; Wolfgang Ensinger

    2011-01-01

    Conductive nanotubes consisting of indium tin oxide (ITO) were fabricated by electroless deposition using ion track etched polycarbonate templates. To produce nanotubes (NTs) with thin walls and small surface roughness, the tubes were generated by a multi-step procedure under aqueous conditions. The approach reported below yields open end nanotubes with well defined outer diameter and wall thickness. In the past, zinc oxide films were mostly preferred and were synthesized using electroless de...

  6. Influences of Randomly Distributed Wall THickness of Beverage Can on Its Strength and Stiffness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XuJing-jing; WANGZhi-ling; 等

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the research undertaken on the strength and stiffness of fluctuation on the wall thickness of steel beverage cans using the Monte-Carlo stochastic finite element method.Sample distributions were firestly assumed and then proven using the data observations of the wall thickness.the APDL language was then applied,and the stresses and displacements of the can were calculated by using the ANSYS software.It is concluded that the structureal reliability of a steel-making beverage can be estimated accurately.

  7. Design on curves of wall-thickness for Blow Molding Machine based on HMI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Yayun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Properly control of blow molding machine’s wall-thickness relates to the quality of plastic products,design on curves is the key technology of blow molding machine’s wall-thickness control.Adopted cubic spline curve as a fitting prototype,used advanced HMI as a design platform,by cooperation with HMI configuration function and macro code,an interface of curves was designed,a good performance of human-computer interaction and core data’s transmission in the whole machine were realized.By using this method,the integration of the system was increased and costs was reduced dramatically.

  8. Thickness measuring of electroconductive pipe walls using the dual-frequency eddy-current method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakimov, Evgeny; Galtseva, Olga; Ustyugov, Daniil

    2017-01-01

    The paper describes a dual-frequency method for reducing the impact of changes in the gap size between the eddy-current transducer and the pipe, as well as the pipe electrical conductivity on the eddy-current thickness gauge readings. A block-diagram of the dual-frequency eddy-current thickness gauge is proposed for light-alloy drill pipes. The amplitude and signal phase dependencies on the wall thickness in the range from 6 to 17 mm and the gap in the range from 0 to 13.5 mm were studied, the results are presented. The digital signal processing algorithms based on the piecewise-linear approximation of low-frequency and high-frequency signal phase dependencies on the wall thickness are proposed. It is shown that the proposed correction algorithms can reduce the error caused by variations of electrical conductivity and the gap between the transducer and the pipe.

  9. Quantitative evaluation of correlation of dose and FDG-PET uptake value with clinical chest wall complications in patients with lung cancer treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algan, O; Confer, M; Algan, S; Matthiesen, C; Herman, T; Ahmad, S; Ali, I

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate quantitatively the dosimetric factors that increase the risk of clinical complications of rib fractures or chest wall pain after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to the lung. The correlations of clinical complications with standard-uptake values (SUV) and FDG-PET activity distributions from post-treatment PET-imaging were studied. Mean and maximum doses from treatment plans, FDG-PET activity values on post-SBRT PET scans and the presence of clinical complications were determined in fifteen patients undergoing 16 SBRT treatments for lung cancer. SBRT treatments were delivered in 3 to 5 fractions using 5 to 7 fields to prescription doses in the range from 39.0 to 60.0 Gy. The dose and FDG-PET activity values were extracted from regions of interest in the chest wall that matched anatomically. Quantitative evaluation of the correlation between dose deposition and FDG-PET activity was performed by calculating the Pearson correlation coefficient using pixel-by-pixel analysis of dose and FDG-PET activity maps in selected regions of interest associated with clinical complications. Overall, three of fifteen patients developed rib fractures with chest wall pain, and two patients developed pain symptoms without fracture. The mean dose to the rib cage in patients with fractures was 37.53 Gy compared to 33.35 Gy in patients without fractures. Increased chest wall activity as determined by FDG-uptake was noted in patients who developed rib fractures. Enhanced activity from PET-images correlated strongly with high doses deposited to the chest wall which could be predicted by a linear relationship. The local enhanced activity was associated with the development of clinical complications such as chest wall inflammation and rib fracture. This study demonstrates that rib fractures and chest wall pain can occur after SBRT treatments to the lung and is associated with increased activity on subsequent PET scans. The FDG-PET activity

  10. The effect of pre-injury anti-platelet therapy on the development of complications in isolated blunt chest wall trauma: a retrospective study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceri Battle

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The difficulties in the management of the blunt chest wall trauma patient in the Emergency Department due to the development of late complications are well recognised in the literature. Pre-injury anti-platelet therapy has been previously investigated as a risk factor for poor outcomes following traumatic head injury, but not in the blunt chest wall trauma patient cohort. The aim of this study was to investigate pre-injury anti-platelet therapy as a risk factor for the development of complications in the recovery phase following blunt chest wall trauma. METHODS: A retrospective study was completed in which the medical notes were analysed of all blunt chest wall trauma patients presenting to a large trauma centre in Wales in 2012 and 2013. Using univariate and multivariable logistic regression analysis, pre-injury platelet therapy was investigated as a risk factor for the development of complications following blunt chest wall trauma. Previously identified risk factors were included in the analysis to address the influence of confounding. RESULTS: A total of 1303 isolated blunt chest wall trauma patients presented to the ED in Morriston Hospital in 2012 and 2013 with complications recorded in 144 patients (11%. On multi-variable analysis, pre-injury anti-platelet therapy was found to be a significant risk factor for the development of complications following isolated blunt chest wall trauma (odds ratio: 16.9; 95% confidence intervals: 8.2-35.2. As in previous studies patient age, number of rib fractures, chronic lung disease and pre-injury anti-coagulant use were also found to be significant risk factors. CONCLUSIONS: Pre-injury anti-platelet therapy is being increasingly used as a first line treatment for a number of conditions and there is a concurrent increase in trauma in the elderly population. Pre-injury anti-platelet therapy should be considered as a risk factor for the development of complications by clinicians managing

  11. Simultaneous seeding of follicular thyroid adenoma both around the operative bed and along the subcutaneous tunnel of the upper chest wall after endoscopic thyroidectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Jo Sung; Kim, Shin Young; Jung, Hae Yeon; Han, Seon Wook; Lee, Jong Eun [Soonchunhyang University Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Deuk Young [Dept. of Surgery, YonseiAngelot Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Endoscopic thyroidectomy is considered appropriate for follicular neoplasms, but on occasion, it leads to unexpected complications such as seeding along the port insertion site. Only 4 cases of operative track seeding after endoscopic thyroidectomy have been reported. Furthermore, simultaneous seeding at both operative track of upper chest wall and operative bed is also very rare. We present a case of thyroid follicular adenoma seeding at both the subcutaneous tunnel of the upper chest wall and the operative bed after endoscopic thyroidectomy, with an emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography with pathologic correlations.

  12. Unsteady natural convection in an anisotropic porous medium sandwiched between finite thickness walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harzallah, H.S.; Zegnani, A.; Slimi, K.; Mhimid, A. [Ecole Nationale D' Ingenieurs de Monastir, Monastir (Tunisia)

    2009-07-01

    Natural convection through anisotropic porous media is of significant interest in a wide variety of applications such as in geophysics, hydrology, oil extraction, and reservoir engineering. Anisotropy is basically a consequence of a preferential orientation and/or asymmetric geometry of the grains or fibres. Despite its broad range of applications, natural problems involving anisotropic effects in the presence of porous materials coupled with the effect of the bounding walls have received relatively little attention. This paper examined the effects of both thermal and mechanical anisotropies, as well as the effect of the conductive walls on the unsteady heat transfer and fluid flow through a porous material sandwiched between two vertical finite thickness walls maintained at constant but different temperatures. The remaining two horizontal walls were thermally insulated. The influencing non-dimensional parameters governing heat and fluid flow in the presented system were the wall thickness, wall-to-porous medium thermal conductivity ratio, wall-to-porous medium heat capacity ratio, anisotropic thermal conductivity ratio and anisotropic permeability ratio according to x-axis, and Rayleigh number. The purpose of the study was to demonstrate the effects of heat conduction within solid boundaries as well as both thermal and mechanical anisotropies on flow and heat transfer rates. It was concluded that as the anisotropic thermal conductivity ratio along the x-axis increases, the conductive mode becomes stronger than the convective one. 13 refs., 7 figs.

  13. Tissue heterogeneity in the anterior chest wall and its influence on radiation therapy of the internal mammary lymph nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindskoug, B; Hultborn, A

    1976-04-01

    The density (g cm-3) and electron density (cm-3) of material from the anterior chest wall was determined. On the average, the difference in density between rib bone and intercostal soft tissue amounted to 17 per cent, while the difference in electron density was 7 per cent. The attenuation of high-energy electrons in specimens of rib bone, costal cartilage and sternum was determined by an experimental technique, using dosimeters of TLD material. The results of determinations of attenuation of 10 and 13 MeV electrons in fresh specimens are presented. It is concluded that electron radiation in the energy range of 10 to 13 MeV can be utilized for irradiation of lymph glands along the internal thoracic vessels without risk of underdosage.

  14. High-frequency chest-wall oscillation in a noninvasive-ventilation-dependent patient with type 1 spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Joanna M; Collins, Nicola; Bush, Andrew; Chatwin, Michelle

    2011-11-01

    With the recent increased use of noninvasive ventilation, the prognoses of children with neuromuscular disease has improved significantly. However, children with muscle weakness remain at risk for recurrent respiratory infection and atelectasis. We report the case of a young girl with type 1 spinal muscular atrophy who was dependent on noninvasive ventilation, and in whom conventional secretion-clearance physiotherapy became insufficient to clear secretions. We initiated high-frequency chest-wall oscillation (HFCWO) as a rescue therapy, and she had improved self-ventilation time. This is the first case report of HFCWO for secretion clearance in a severely weak child with type 1 spinal muscular atrophy. In a patient with neuromuscular disease and severe respiratory infection and compromise, HFCWO can be used safely in combination with conventional secretion-clearance physiotherapy.

  15. Dynamics of chest wall volume regulation during constant work rate exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takara, L.S.; Cunha, T.M.; Barbosa, P.; Rodrigues, M.K.; Oliveira, M.F.; Nery, L.E. [Setor de Função Pulmonar e Fisiologia Clínica do Exercício, Disciplina de Pneumologia, Departamento de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Neder, J.A. [Setor de Função Pulmonar e Fisiologia Clínica do Exercício, Disciplina de Pneumologia, Departamento de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Division of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON (Canada)

    2012-10-15

    This study evaluated the dynamic behavior of total and compartmental chest wall volumes [(V{sub CW}) = rib cage (V{sub RC}) + abdomen (V{sub AB})] as measured breath-by-breath by optoelectronic plethysmography during constant-load exercise in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Thirty males (GOLD stages II-III) underwent a cardiopulmonary exercise test to the limit of tolerance (Tlim) at 75% of peak work rate on an electronically braked cycle ergometer. Exercise-induced dynamic hyperinflation was considered to be present when end-expiratory (EE) V{sub CW} increased in relation to resting values. There was a noticeable heterogeneity in the patterns of V{sub CW} regulation as EEV{sub CW} increased non-linearly in 17/30 “hyperinflators” and decreased in 13/30 “non-hyperinflators” (P < 0.05). EEV{sub AB} decreased slightly in 8 of the “hyperinflators”, thereby reducing and slowing the rate of increase in end-inspiratory (EI) V{sub CW} (P < 0.05). In contrast, decreases in EEV{sub CW} in the “non-hyperinflators” were due to the combination of stable EEV{sub RC} with marked reductions in EEV{sub AB}. These patients showed lower EIV{sub CW} and end-exercise dyspnea scores but longer Tlim than their counterparts (P < 0.05). Dyspnea increased and Tlim decreased non-linearly with a faster rate of increase in EIV{sub CW} regardless of the presence or absence of dynamic hyperinflation (P < 0.001). However, no significant between-group differences were observed in metabolic, pulmonary gas exchange and cardiovascular responses to exercise. Chest wall volumes are continuously regulated during exercise in order to postpone (or even avoid) their migration to higher operating volumes in patients with COPD, a dynamic process that is strongly dependent on the behavior of the abdominal compartment.

  16. Dynamics of chest wall volume regulation during constant work rate exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.S. Takara

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the dynamic behavior of total and compartmental chest wall volumes [(V CW = rib cage (V RC + abdomen (V AB] as measured breath-by-breath by optoelectronic plethysmography during constant-load exercise in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Thirty males (GOLD stages II-III underwent a cardiopulmonary exercise test to the limit of tolerance (Tlim at 75% of peak work rate on an electronically braked cycle ergometer. Exercise-induced dynamic hyperinflation was considered to be present when end-expiratory (EE V CW increased in relation to resting values. There was a noticeable heterogeneity in the patterns of V CW regulation as EEV CW increased non-linearly in 17/30 "hyperinflators" and decreased in 13/30 "non-hyperinflators" (P < 0.05. EEV AB decreased slightly in 8 of the "hyperinflators", thereby reducing and slowing the rate of increase in end-inspiratory (EI V CW (P < 0.05. In contrast, decreases in EEV CW in the "non-hyperinflators" were due to the combination of stable EEV RC with marked reductions in EEV AB. These patients showed lower EIV CW and end-exercise dyspnea scores but longer Tlim than their counterparts (P < 0.05. Dyspnea increased and Tlim decreased non-linearly with a faster rate of increase in EIV CW regardless of the presence or absence of dynamic hyperinflation (P < 0.001. However, no significant between-group differences were observed in metabolic, pulmonary gas exchange and cardiovascular responses to exercise. Chest wall volumes are continuously regulated during exercise in order to postpone (or even avoid their migration to higher operating volumes in patients with COPD, a dynamic process that is strongly dependent on the behavior of the abdominal compartment.

  17. A case of parachordoma on the chest wall and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Parachordoma is an extremely uncommon soft-tissue tumor, which mainly occurs in the deep soft-tissue of the distal parts of the limbs, such as deep fascia, muscle tendon, synovial or soft-tissue closed to the bone. Nevertheless, the literature reports about parachordoma on the thoracic wall were scarce. The clinical and imaging manifestation has a non-specific appearance. In this article, we reported one case of parachordoma of the thoracic wall that we met in clinical works and reviewed the literature.

  18. Quantitative CT: Associations between Emphysema, Airway Wall Thickness and Body Composition in COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rutten, Erica P A; Grydeland, Thomas B; Pillai, Sreekumar G

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the association between CT phenotypes-emphysema by low attenuation area and bronchitis by airway wall thickness-and body composition parameters in a large cohort of subjects with and without COPD. In 452 COPD subjects and 459 subjects without COPD...

  19. Discrimination of Cylinders with Different Wall Thicknesses using Neural Networks and Simulated Dolphin Sonar Signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Nonboe; Au, Whitlow; Larsen, Jan;

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes a method integrating neural networks into a system for recognizing underwater objects. The system is based on a combination of simulated dolphin sonar signals, simulated auditory filters and artificial neural networks. The system is tested on a cylinder wall thickness...

  20. Magnet Fall inside a Conductive Pipe: Motion and the Role of the Pipe Wall Thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoso, G.; Ladera, C. L.; Martin, P.

    2009-01-01

    Theoretical models and experimental results are presented for the retarded fall of a strong magnet inside a vertical conductive non-magnetic tube. Predictions and experimental results are in good agreement modelling the magnet as a simple magnetic dipole. The effect of varying the pipe wall thickness on the retarding magnetic drag is studied for…

  1. Endoluminal compression clip : full-thickness resection of the mesenteric bowel wall in a porcine model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kopelman, Yael; Siersema, Peter D.; Nir, Yael; Szold, Amir; Bapaye, Amol; Segol, Ori; Willenz, Ehud P.; Lelcuk, Shlomo; Geller, Alexander; Kopelman, Doron

    2009-01-01

    Background: Performing a full-thickness intestinal wall resection Of a sessile polyp located on the mesenteric side with a compression clip may lead to compression of mesenteric vessels. The application of such a clip may therefore cause a compromised blood supply in the particular bowel segment, le

  2. Quantitative computed tomography: emphysema and airway wall thickness by sex, age and smoking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grydeland, T B; Dirksen, A; Coxson, H O;

    2009-01-01

    We investigated how quantitative high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) measures of emphysema and airway wall thickness (AWT) vary with sex, age and smoking history. We included 463 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) cases and 431 controls. All included subjects were current or ex...

  3. The influence of clinical and genetic factors on left ventricular wall thickness in Ragdoll cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgeat, Kieran; Stern, Joshua; Meurs, Kathryn M; Fuentes, Virginia Luis; Connolly, David J

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the effect of various genetic and environmental modifiers on left ventricular (LV) wall thickness in a cohort of cats genotyped for the myosin binding protein C3 mutation (MYBPC3). Sixty-four Ragdoll cats. All cats were screened for HCM with echocardiography and genotyping for the HCM-associated MYBPC3:R820W mutation. Cats were also genotyped for previously identified variant polymorphisms of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and cardiac beta-adrenergic receptor (ADRB1) genes. Plasma N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide and cardiac troponin I were also measured. Associations were evaluated between genotype (MYBPC3 negative/positive, and ACE and ADRB1 negative/heterozygous/homozygous), patient factors (body weight, age and sex) and echocardiographic measurements of LV wall thickness. Male cats had greater maximum wall thickness (LVmax; 5.8 mm, IQR 5.1-6.4 mm) than females (4.7 mm, IQR 4.4-5.3 mm, p = 0.002). Body weight positively correlated with LVmax (ρ = 0.604, p cats had a greater LVmax (5.44 mm, IQR 4.83-6.28 mm) than the negative cats (4.76 mm, IQR 4.36-5.32 mm, p = 0.001). Also, the ACE polymorphism genotype was associated with LVmax: the homozygous cats (5.37 mm, IQR 5.14-6.4 mm) had greater LVmax than the heterozygous cats (4.73 mm, IQR 4.41-5.55 mm, p = 0.014). Only the MYBPC3 genotype and body weight were independently associated with wall thickness in multivariable analysis. This study provides evidence that the MYBPC3:R820W mutation is independently associated with LV wall thickness in Ragdoll cats. Body weight is also independently associated with maximum LV wall thickness, but is not currently accounted for in HCM screening. In addition, other genetic modifiers may be associated with variation in LV wall thickness in Ragdolls. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Room temperature synthesis of indium tin oxide nanotubes with high precision wall thickness by electroless deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehme, Mario; Ionescu, Emanuel; Fu, Ganhua; Ensinger, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Conductive nanotubes consisting of indium tin oxide (ITO) were fabricated by electroless deposition using ion track etched polycarbonate templates. To produce nanotubes (NTs) with thin walls and small surface roughness, the tubes were generated by a multi-step procedure under aqueous conditions. The approach reported below yields open end nanotubes with well defined outer diameter and wall thickness. In the past, zinc oxide films were mostly preferred and were synthesized using electroless deposition based on aqueous solutions. All these methods previously developed, are not adaptable in the case of ITO nanotubes, even with modifications. In the present work, therefore, we investigated the necessary conditions for the growth of ITO-NTs to achieve a wall thickness of around 10 nm. In addition, the effects of pH and reductive concentrations for the formation of ITO-NTs are also discussed.

  5. Room temperature synthesis of indium tin oxide nanotubes with high precision wall thickness by electroless deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Boehme

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Conductive nanotubes consisting of indium tin oxide (ITO were fabricated by electroless deposition using ion track etched polycarbonate templates. To produce nanotubes (NTs with thin walls and small surface roughness, the tubes were generated by a multi-step procedure under aqueous conditions. The approach reported below yields open end nanotubes with well defined outer diameter and wall thickness. In the past, zinc oxide films were mostly preferred and were synthesized using electroless deposition based on aqueous solutions. All these methods previously developed, are not adaptable in the case of ITO nanotubes, even with modifications. In the present work, therefore, we investigated the necessary conditions for the growth of ITO-NTs to achieve a wall thickness of around 10 nm. In addition, the effects of pH and reductive concentrations for the formation of ITO-NTs are also discussed.

  6. Real-time dielectric-film thickness measurement system for plasma processing chamber wall monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Yong; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-12-01

    An in-situ real-time processing chamber wall monitoring system was developed. In order to measure the thickness of the dielectric film, two frequencies of small sinusoidal voltage (∼1 V) signals were applied to an electrically floated planar type probe, which is positioned at chamber wall surface, and the amplitudes of the currents and the phase differences between the voltage and current were measured. By using an equivalent sheath circuit model including a sheath capacitance, the dielectric thickness can be obtained. Experiments were performed in various plasma condition, and reliable dielectric film thickness was obtained regardless of the plasma properties. In addition, availability in commercial chamber for plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition was verified. This study is expected to contribute to the control of etching and deposition processes and optimization of periodic maintenance in semiconductor manufacturing process.

  7. Management of a chest-wall soft-tissue tumor caused by an infection with the larval tapeworm pathogen Taenia crassiceps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesel, Christian; Welter, Stefan; Stamatis, Georgios; Theegarten, Dirk; Tappe, Dennis

    2014-09-01

    A chest-wall lesion of an immunocompetent patient was initially suspicious for a malignant tumor. Histopathological and polymerase chain reaction examinations revealed an infection with the larval stage of the tapeworm Taenia crassiceps. Curative resection of the tumorous lesion was performed. Treatment options for immunocompromised patients and patients without known immune defect are discussed, because most of the infections occur in immunocompromised individuals.

  8. Effects of non-invasive ventilation and posture on chest wall volumes and motion in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana M. Magalhães

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background The effects of non-invasive ventilation (NIV on the breathing pattern and thoracoabdominal motion of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS are unknown. Objectives 1 To analyze the influence of NIV on chest wall volumes and motion assessed by optoelectronic plethysmography in ALS patients and 2 to compare these parameters in the supine and sitting positions to those of healthy individuals (without NIV. Method Nine ALS patients were evaluated in the supine position using NIV. In addition, the ALS patients and nine healthy individuals were evaluated in both sitting and supine positions. Statistical analysis was performed using the paired Student t-test or Wilcoxon test and the Student t-test for independent samples or Mann-Whitney U test. Results Chest wall volume increased significantly with NIV, mean volume=0.43 (SD=0.16L versus 0.57 (SD=0.19L (p=0.04. No significant changes were observed for the pulmonary rib cage, abdominal rib cage, or abdominal contribution. The index of the shortening velocity of the diaphragmatic muscle, mean=0.15 (SD=0.05L/s versus 0.21 (SD=0.05L/s (p<0.01, and abdominal muscles, mean=0.09 (SD=0.02L/s versus 0.14 (SD=0.06L/s (p<0.01, increased during NIV. Comparisons between the supine and sitting positions showed similar changes in chest wall motion in both groups. However, the ALS patients presented a significantly lower contribution of the abdomen in the supine position compared with the controls, mean=56 (SD=13 versus 69 (SD=10 (p=0.02. Conclusions NIV improved chest wall volumes without changing the contribution of the chest wall compartment in ALS patients. In the supine position, ALS patients had a lower contribution of the abdomen, which may indicate early diaphragmatic dysfunction.

  9. The thick left ventricular wall of the giraffe heart normalises wall tension, but limits stroke volume and cardiac output

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smerup, Morten Holdgaard; Damkjær, Mads; Brøndum, Emil

    2016-01-01

    cavity and a relatively thick ventricular wall, allowing for generation of high arterial pressures at normal left ventricular wall tension. In nine anaesthetized giraffes (495±38 kg), we determined in vivo ventricular dimensions using echocardiography along with intraventricular and aortic pressures......Giraffes--the tallest extant animals on Earth--are renowned for their high central arterial blood pressure, which is necessary to secure brain perfusion. Arterial pressure may exceed 300 mmHg and has historically been attributed to an exceptionally large heart. Recently, this has been refuted...... by several studies demonstrating that the mass of giraffe heart is similar to that of other mammals when expressed relative to body mass. It thus remains unexplained how the normal-sized giraffe heart generates such massive arterial pressures. We hypothesized that giraffe hearts have a small intraventricular...

  10. Instantaneous responses to high-frequency chest wall oscillation in patients with acute pneumonic respiratory failure receiving mechanical ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Ming-Lung; Chou, Yi-Ling; Lee, Chai-Yuan; Huang, Shih-Feng

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Endotracheal intubation and prolonged immobilization of patients receiving mechanical ventilation may reduce expectoration function. High-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) may ameliorate airway secretion movement; however, the instantaneous changes in patients’ cardiopulmonary responses are unknown. Moreover, HFCWO may influence ventilator settings by the vigorous oscillation. The aim of this study was to investigate these issues. Methods: Seventy-three patients (52 men) aged 71.5 ± 13.4 years who were intubated with mechanical ventilation for pneumonic respiratory failure were recruited and randomly classified into 2 groups (HFCWO group, n = 36; and control group who received conventional chest physical therapy (CCPT, n = 37). HFCWO was applied with a fixed protocol, whereas CCPT was conducted using standard protocols. Both groups received sputum suction after the procedure. Changes in ventilator settings and the subjects’ responses were measured at preset intervals and compared within groups and between groups. Results: Oscillation did not affect the ventilator settings (all P > 0.05). The mean airway pressure, breathing frequency, and rapid shallow breathing index increased, and the tidal volume and SpO2 decreased (all P < 0.05). After sputum suction, the peak airway pressure (Ppeak) and minute ventilation decreased (all P < 0.05). The HFCWO group had a lower tidal volume and SpO2 at the end of oscillation, and lower Ppeak and tidal volume after sputum suction than the CCPT group. Conclusions: HFCWO affects breathing pattern and SpO2 but not ventilator settings, whereas CCPT maintains a steadier condition. After sputum suction, HFCWO slightly improved Ppeak compared to CCPT, suggesting that the study extends the indications of HFCWO for these patients in intensive care unit. (ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT02758106, retrospectively registered.) PMID:28248854

  11. High Power Laser Beam Welding of Thick-walled Ferromagnetic Steels with Electromagnetic Weld Pool Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsche, André; Avilov, Vjaceslav; Gumenyuk, Andrey; Hilgenberg, Kai; Rethmeier, Michael

    The development of modern high power laser systems allows single pass welding of thick-walled components with minimal distortion. Besides the high demands on the joint preparation, the hydrostatic pressure in the melt pool increases with higher plate thicknesses. Reaching or exceeding the Laplace pressure, drop-out or melt sagging are caused. A contactless electromagnetic weld support system was used for laser beam welding of thick ferromagnetic steel plates compensating these effects. An oscillating magnetic field induces eddy currents in the weld pool which generate Lorentz forces counteracting the gravity forces. Hysteresis effects of ferromagnetic steels are considered as well as the loss of magnetization in zones exceeding the Curie temperature. These phenomena reduce the effective Lorentz forces within the weld pool. The successful compensation of the hydrostatic pressure was demonstrated on up to 20 mm thick plates of duplex and mild steel by a variation of the electromagnetic power level and the oscillation frequency.

  12. Effect of wall thickness and helium cooling channels on duct magnetohydrodynamic flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Qingyun; Feng, Jingchao; Chen, Hongli, E-mail: hlchen1@ustc.edu.cn

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • MHD flows in ducts of different wall thickness compared with wall uniform. • Study of velocity, pressure distribution in ducts MHD flows with single pass of helium cooling channels. • Comparison of three types of dual helium cooling channels and acquisition of an option for minimum pressure drop. • A single short duct MHD flow in blanket without FCI has been simulated for pressure gradient analysis. - Abstract: The concept of dual coolant liquid metal (LM) blanket has been proposed in different countries to demonstrate the technical feasibility of DEMO reactor. In the system, helium gas and PbLi eutectic, separated by structure grid, are used to cool main structure materials and to be self-cooled, respectively. The non-uniform wall thickness of structure materials gives rise to wall non-homogeneous conductance ratio. It will lead to electric current distribution changes, resulting in significant changes in the velocity distribution and pressure drop of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows. In order to investigate the effect of helium channels on MHD flows, different methods of numerical simulations cases are carried out including the cases of different wall thicknesses, single pass of helium cooling channels, and three types of dual helium cooling channels. The results showed that helium tubes are able to affect the velocity distribution in the boundary layer by forming wave sharp which transfers from Hartmann boundary layer to the core area. In addition, the potential profile and pressure drop in the cases have been compared to these in the case of walls without cooling channel, and the pressure gradient of a simplified single short duct MHD flow in blanket shows small waver along the central axis in the helium channel position.

  13. All- Ceramic Crown Preparation and the Remained wall Thickness of the Pulp Chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadzadeh Akhlaghi N.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available tatement of Problem: A minimally invasive method of preparation is essential to prevent tooth structure weakening and pulp irritation; especially for mandibular anterior single-tooth all-ceramic crowns. According to many investigations, one of the most important reasons of pulp injury caused by tooth preparation for different restorative procedures is reduced “remained wall thickness” (RWT. In order to protect the pulp from irritation, it is necessary to maintain a 0.5 mm of RWT.Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of all-ceramic crown preparation on pulp chamber RWT of mandibular incisors.Materials and Method: Mesiodistal and buccolingual initial images of 24 ex-tracted mandibular incisors were provided. The pulp chamber initial wall thick-nesses of buccal, lingual and proximal surfaces of cervical, 1and 2 mm above the cervical areas and also the incisal surfaces of incisal sections were measured using digital radiography and Photoshop software. After all-ceramic crown preparation, images were provided at the same initial positions. The initial and remained pulp chamber wall thicknesses were statistically evaluated and analyzed by ANOVA, paired t-test and a post hoc Tukey test.Results: Repeated measures ANOVA showed that the mean of pre- or post-preparation wall thicknesses were not significantly different for each surface at the three horizontal levels (p> 0.05. However, there were significant differences between the surfaces for each section. Comparison of pre- and post-preparation wall thicknesses revealed significant differences (p< 0.05. Proximal surfaces of cervical sections had the least RWT (0.42±0.12.Conclusion: According to the results of the present study, the least amount of initial and remained wall thicknesses of pulp chamber were related to the proximal surfaces, particularly in cervical areas. Therefore a reduction of preparation to 0.7 mm is suggested to prevent future pulp injury for

  14. Contributions towards a monograph of Phoma (Coelomycetes) — VII. Section Sclerophomella: Taxa with thick-walled pseudoparenchymatous pycnidia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerema, G.H.; Gruyter, de J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper deals with ten species of Phoma, characterized by thick-walled pseudoparenchymatous pycnidia. They superficially resemble the thick-walled pycnidial phenotype in species of Phoma sect. Plenodomus, but scleroplectenchyma is lacking and teleomorphs belong to Didymella, not Leptosphaeria. Ke

  15. Combined aerobic and resistance exercise training decreases peripheral but not central artery wall thickness in subjects with type 2 diabetes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, T.H.A.; Munckhof, I.C.L. van den; Poelkens, F.; Hopman, M.T.; Thijssen, D.H.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Little is known about the impact of exercise training on conduit artery wall thickness in type 2 diabetes. We examined the local and systemic impact of exercise training on superficial femoral (SFA), brachial (BA), and carotid artery (CA) wall thickness in type 2 diabetes patients and con

  16. Ultrasound Estimated Bladder Weight and Measurement of Bladder Wall Thickness-Useful Noninvasive Methods for Assessing the Lower Urinary Tract?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Bright; M. Oelke; A. Tubaro; P. Abrams

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In the last decade interest has arisen in the use of ultrasound derived measurements of bladder wall thickness, detrusor wall thickness and ultrasound estimated bladder weight as potential diagnostic tools for conditions known to induce detrusor hypertrophy. However, to date such measuremen

  17. Combined aerobic and resistance exercise training decreases peripheral but not central artery wall thickness in subjects with type 2 diabetes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, T.H.A.; Munckhof, I.C.L. van den; Poelkens, F.; Hopman, M.T.; Thijssen, D.H.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Little is known about the impact of exercise training on conduit artery wall thickness in type 2 diabetes. We examined the local and systemic impact of exercise training on superficial femoral (SFA), brachial (BA), and carotid artery (CA) wall thickness in type 2 diabetes patients and

  18. Re-irradiation of the chest wall for local breast cancer recurrence. Results of salvage brachytherapy with hyperthermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auoragh, A. [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); Hospital Fuerth, Department of Radiation Oncology, Fuerth (Germany); Strnad, V.; Ott, O.J.; Fietkau, R. [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); Beckmann, M.W. [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-09-15

    Following mastectomy and adjuvant external beam radiation therapy in patients with breast cancer, the incidence of local or locoregional recurrence is approximately 9 % (2-20 %). Alongside the often limited possibilities of surgical treatment, radiation therapy combined with superficial hyperthermia is the most effective local therapy. In the present work, a retrospective analysis of salvage brachytherapy combined with superficial hyperthermia for chest wall recurrences is presented. Between 2004 and 2011, 18 patients with a total of 23 target volumes resulting from chest wall recurrences after previously mastectomy and external beam radiation therapy (median 56 Gy, range 50-68 Gy) were treated with superficial brachytherapy as salvage treatment: 8 patients (44 %) had macroscopic tumor, 3 (17 %) had microscopic tumor (R1), and 7 (39 %) had undergone R0 resection and were treated due to risk factors. A dose of 50 Gy was given (high-dose rate [HDR] and pulsed-dose rate [PDR] procedures). In all, 5 of 23 patients (22 %) received additional concurrent chemotherapy, and in 20 of 23 (87 %) target volumes additional superficial hyperthermia was carried out twice weekly. The 5-year local recurrence-free survival was 56 %, the disease-free survival was 28 %, and a 5-year overall survival was 22 %. Late side effects Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) grade 3 were reported in 17 % of the patients: 2 of 18 (11 %) had CTC grade 3 fibrosis, and 1 of 18 (6 %) had a chronic wound healing disorder. Re-irradiation as salvage brachytherapy with superficial hyperthermia for chest wall recurrences is a feasible and safe treatment with good local control results and acceptable late side effects. (orig.) [German] Nach einer Mastektomie und adjuvanter Strahlentherapie bei Patientinnen mit Mammakarzinom kommt es bei 9 % (2-20 %) zum lokalen bzw. lokoregionaeren Rezidiv. Neben den oft limitierten operativen Behandlungsmoeglichkeiten ist die Strahlentherapie mit Oberflaechenhyperthermie die

  19. Correlation between capillary oxygen saturation and small intestinal wall thickness in the equine colic patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirle, Elisabeth; Wogatzki, Anna; Kunzmann, Robert; Schoenfelder, Axel M; Litzke, Lutz F

    2017-01-01

    The surgical evaluation of haemorrhagic infarcted intestine and the decision for or against bowel resection require a lot of experience and are subjective. The aim of this prospective, clinical study was to examine the correlation between oxygen saturation and small intestinal wall (IW) thickness, using two objective methods. In 22 colicky horses, the blood flow, oxygen saturation and relative amount of haemoglobin were measured intraoperatively via laser Doppler and white light spectroscopy (O2C, oxygen to see, LEA Medizintechnik) at six measuring points (MPs) in small and large intestines. Furthermore, the IW thickness was measured ultrasonographically. Nine of 22 horses had an increased small IW thickness greater than 4 mm (Freeman 2002, Scharner and others 2002, le Jeune and Whitcomb 2014) at measuring point 1 (MP1) (strangulated segment), four horses had a thickened bowel wall at measuring point 3 (MP3) (poststenotic) and one at measuring point 2 (MP2). The oxygen saturation was 0 at MP1 in six horses, at MP3 in two horses and at MP2 (prestenotic) in one. Oxygen saturation and small IW thickness were independent of each other at MP1 and MP2. At MP3, the two parameters were negatively correlated. In summary, it is not possible to draw conclusions about oxygen saturation based on IW thickness.

  20. Characteristics Of Congenital Chest Wall Deformities In Referred Patients To Tehran Imam Khomeini And Kashan Shahid Beheshti Hospital During 1991-2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davoodabadi A

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infants and children present with a wide range of congenital chest wall deformities which have both physiologic psychologic consequences and are often associated with other abnormalities. Surgical intervention offers excellent cosmetic results with minimal morbidity and mortality. In order to investigation of chest wall deformities, and surgical results, this study was performed. Materials and Methods: A descriptive study on existing data on 60 consecutive patients with chest wall deformity during 10 years carried out. Patient's characteristics such as age, gender, signs and symptoms type of operation, associated disorder, syndrome, and surgical complications were considered. Results: Pectus excavatum 60% and pectus carinatum 30% Poland syn 6.7% 9 sternal cleft 3.2. Inpectus, M/F: Was 3/1 and others were 1:1. Age of admission 4 to 27 years 13.4±6.82 and association syndromes were, turner, Morgue and marfan, most patients were operated in delayed time (75 and hence, scoliosis was common than others. Conclusion: Pectus excavatum was the most common deformity and if scoliosis was prominent and most operation was done in old age but surgical result was excellent no anyone expired and complication was a little. So we recommended that all of the chest deformities must be operated in anytime.

  1. Modelling the solidification of ductile cast iron parts with varying wall thicknesses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Mathias Karsten; Tiedje, Niels Skat; Thorborg, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    ] with a 2D FE solution of the heat conduction equation is developed in an in-house code and model parameters are calibrated using experimental data from representative castings made of ductile cast iron. The main focus is on the influence of casting thickness and resulting local cooling conditions......In the present paper modelling the solidification of cast iron parts is considered. Common for previous efforts in this field is that they have mainly considered thin walled to medium thickness castings. Hence, a numerical model combining the solidification model presented by Lesoultet al. [1...

  2. Impact of Fractionation and Dose in a Multivariate Model for Radiation-Induced Chest Wall Pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Din, Shaun U. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Williams, Eric L.; Jackson, Andrew [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Rosenzweig, Kenneth E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Wu, Abraham J.; Foster, Amanda [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Yorke, Ellen D. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Rimner, Andreas, E-mail: rimnera@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the role of patient/tumor characteristics, radiation dose, and fractionation using the linear-quadratic (LQ) model to predict stereotactic body radiation therapy–induced grade ≥2 chest wall pain (CWP2) in a larger series and develop clinically useful constraints for patients treated with different fraction numbers. Methods and Materials: A total of 316 lung tumors in 295 patients were treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy in 3 to 5 fractions to 39 to 60 Gy. Absolute dose–absolute volume chest wall (CW) histograms were acquired. The raw dose-volume histograms (α/β = ∞ Gy) were converted via the LQ model to equivalent doses in 2-Gy fractions (normalized total dose, NTD) with α/β from 0 to 25 Gy in 0.1-Gy steps. The Cox proportional hazards (CPH) model was used in univariate and multivariate models to identify and assess CWP2 exposed to a given physical and NTD. Results: The median follow-up was 15.4 months, and the median time to development of CWP2 was 7.4 months. On a univariate CPH model, prescription dose, prescription dose per fraction, number of fractions, D83cc, distance of tumor to CW, and body mass index were all statistically significant for the development of CWP2. Linear-quadratic correction improved the CPH model significance over the physical dose. The best-fit α/β was 2.1 Gy, and the physical dose (α/β = ∞ Gy) was outside the upper 95% confidence limit. With α/β = 2.1 Gy, V{sub NTD99Gy} was most significant, with median V{sub NTD99Gy} = 31.5 cm{sup 3} (hazard ratio 3.87, P<.001). Conclusion: There were several predictive factors for the development of CWP2. The LQ-adjusted doses using the best-fit α/β = 2.1 Gy is a better predictor of CWP2 than the physical dose. To aid dosimetrists, we have calculated the physical dose equivalent corresponding to V{sub NTD99Gy} = 31.5 cm{sup 3} for the 3- to 5-fraction groups.

  3. Chest wall radiotherapy with volumetric modulated arcs and the potential role of flattening filter free photon beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subramaniam, S.; Thirumalaiswamy, S.; Srinivas, C. [Yashoda Super Specialty Hospital, Hyderabad (IN)] (and others)

    2012-06-15

    The goal of the work was to assess the role of RapidArc treatments in chest wall irradiation after mastectomy and determine the potential benefit of flattening filter free beams. Planning CT scans of 10 women requiring post-mastectomy chest wall radiotherapy were included in the study. A dose of 50 Gy in 2 Gy fractions was prescribed. Organs at risk (OARs) delineated were heart, lungs, contralateral breast, and spinal cord. Dose-volume metrics were defined to quantify the quality of concurrent treatment plans assessing target coverage and sparing of OARs. Plans were designed for conformal 3D therapy (3DCRT) or for RapidArc with double partial arcs (RA). RapidArc plans were optimized for both conventional beams as well as for unflattened beams (RAF). The goal for this planning effort was to cover 100% of the planning target volume (PTV) with {>=} 90% of the prescribed dose and to minimize the volume inside the PTV receiving > 105% of the dose. The mean ipsilateral lung dose was required to be lower than 15 Gy and V{sub 20} {sub Gy} < 22%. Contralateral organ irradiation was required to be kept as low as possible. All techniques met planning objectives for PTV and for lung (3DCRT marginally failed for V{sub 20} {sub Gy}). RA plans showed superiority compared to 3DCRT in the medium to high dose region for the ipsilateral lung. Heart irradiation was minimized by RAF plans with {proportional_to} 4.5 Gy and {proportional_to} 15 Gy reduction in maximum dose compared to RA and 3DCRT, respectively. RAF resulted in superior plans compared to RA with respect to contralateral breast and lung with a reduction of {proportional_to} 1.7 Gy and 1.0 Gy in the respective mean doses. RapidArc treatment resulted in acceptable plan quality with superior ipsilateral tissue sparing compared to traditional techniques. Flattening filter free beams, recently made available for clinical use, might provide further healthy tissue sparing, particularly in contralateral organs, suggesting their

  4. The thick left ventricular wall of the giraffe heart normalises wall tension, but limits stroke volume and cardiac output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smerup, Morten; Damkjær, Mads; Brøndum, Emil; Baandrup, Ulrik T; Kristiansen, Steen Buus; Nygaard, Hans; Funder, Jonas; Aalkjær, Christian; Sauer, Cathrine; Buchanan, Rasmus; Bertelsen, Mads Frost; Østergaard, Kristine; Grøndahl, Carsten; Candy, Geoffrey; Hasenkam, J Michael; Secher, Niels H; Bie, Peter; Wang, Tobias

    2016-02-01

    Giraffes--the tallest extant animals on Earth--are renowned for their high central arterial blood pressure, which is necessary to secure brain perfusion. Arterial pressure may exceed 300 mmHg and has historically been attributed to an exceptionally large heart. Recently, this has been refuted by several studies demonstrating that the mass of giraffe heart is similar to that of other mammals when expressed relative to body mass. It thus remains unexplained how the normal-sized giraffe heart generates such massive arterial pressures. We hypothesized that giraffe hearts have a small intraventricular cavity and a relatively thick ventricular wall, allowing for generation of high arterial pressures at normal left ventricular wall tension. In nine anaesthetized giraffes (495±38 kg), we determined in vivo ventricular dimensions using echocardiography along with intraventricular and aortic pressures to calculate left ventricular wall stress. Cardiac output was also determined by inert gas rebreathing to provide an additional and independent estimate of stroke volume. Echocardiography and inert gas-rebreathing yielded similar cardiac outputs of 16.1±2.5 and 16.4±1.4 l min(-1), respectively. End-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were 521±61 ml and 228±42 ml, respectively, yielding an ejection fraction of 56±4% and a stroke volume of 0.59 ml kg(-1). Left ventricular circumferential wall stress was 7.83±1.76 kPa. We conclude that, relative to body mass, a small left ventricular cavity and a low stroke volume characterizes the giraffe heart. The adaptations result in typical mammalian left ventricular wall tensions, but produce a lowered cardiac output.

  5. Standard guide for mutual inductance bridge applications for wall thickness determinations in boiler tubing

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This guide describes a procedure for obtaining relative wall thickness indications in ferromagnetic and non-ferromagnetic steels using the mutual inductance bridge method. The procedure is intended for use with instruments capable of inducing two substantially identical magnetic fields and noting the change in inductance resulting from differing amounts of steel. It is used to distinguish acceptable wall thickness conditions from those which could place tubular vessels or piping at risk of bursting under high temperature and pressure conditions. 1.2 This guide is intended to satisfy two general needs for users of industrial Mutual Inductance Bridge (MIB) equipment: (1) the need for a tutorial guide addressing the general principles of Mutual Inductance Bridges as they apply to industrial piping; and (2) the need for a consistent set of MIB performance parameter definitions, including how these performance parameters relate to MIB system specifications. Potential users and buyers, as well as experienced M...

  6. Effective coarse-grained simulations of super-thick multi-walled carbon nanotubes under torsion

    OpenAIRE

    Jian, Zou; Huang, Xu; Arroyo Balaguer, Marino; Zhang, Sulin

    2009-01-01

    Under torsion and beyond the buckling point, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) develop a periodic wave-like rippling morphology. Here, we show that torsional rippling deformations can be accurately described by a simple sinusoidal shape function. Combining this observation with the geometry optimization, we develop an effective coarse-grained model that reproduces the complex nonlinear mechanical responses of thick MWCNTs under torsion predicted by large-scale atomistic simulations. Furt...

  7. Influence of surrounding wall thickness on the fatigue resistance of molars restored with ceramic inlay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shizuma Shibata

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of buccal and lingual wall thickness on the fatigue resistance of molars restored with CAD/CAM ceramic inlays. Forty human third molars were selected and divided into 4 groups, according to the remaining surrounding wall thickness chosen for inlay preparation (n = 10: G1, 2.0 mm; G2, 1.5 mm; G3, 1.0 mm; G4, 0.5 mm. All inlays were made from feldspathic ceramic blocks by a CAD/CAM system, and cemented adhesively. After 1 week stored in distilled water at 37 °C, the specimens were subjected to fatigue testing under the following protocol: 5Hz; pre-load of 200 N for 5,000 cycles, followed by increasing loads of 400, 600, 800, 1000, 1200 and 1400 N for 30,000 cycles each. The specimens were cycled until failure or completion of 185,000 cycles. The survival rate of the groups was compared using the Kaplan-Meier survival curves (p > 0.05. All specimens withstood the fatigue protocol (185,000 cycles, representing a 100% survival rate. The Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed no difference between groups. It can be concluded that the remaining tooth wall thickness did not influence the fatigue resistance of molars restored with CAD/CAM ceramic inlays.

  8. Elastic-plastic Transition of Transversely Isotropic Thick-walled Rotating Cylinder under Internal Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Sharma

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Elastic-plastic stresses for a transversely isotropic thick-walled rotating cylinder under internal pressure have been obtained by using Seth’s transition theory. It has been observed that a thick-walled circular cylinder made of isotropic material yields at the internal surface at a high pressure as compared to cylinder made of transversely isotropic material. With the increase in angular speed, much less pressure is required for initial yielding at the internal surface for transversely isotropic material as compared to isotropic material. For fullyplastic state, circumferential stress is maximum at the external surface. Thick-walled circular cylinder made of transversely isotropic material requires high percentage increase in pressure to become fully plastic as compared to isotropic cylinder. Therefore, circular cylinder made of transversely isotropic material is on the safer side of the design as compared to cylinder made of  isotropic material.Defence Science Journal, 2009, 59(3, pp.260-264, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.59.1519

  9. Increased left ventricular torsion in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutation carriers with normal wall thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Tim J

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased left ventricular (LV torsion has been observed in patients with manifest familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM, and is thought to be caused by subendocardial dysfunction. We hypothesize that increased LV torsion is already present in healthy mutation carriers with normal wall thickness. Methods Seventeen carriers with an LV wall thickness Results LV volumes, mass and circumferential strain were comparable between groups, whereas LV ejection fraction, torsion and TECS-ratio were increased in carriers compared to controls (63 ± 3% vs. 60 ± 3%, p = 0.04, 10.1 ± 2.5° vs. 7.7 ± 1.2°, p = 0.001, and 0.52 ± 0.14°/% vs. 0.42 ± 0.10°/%, p = 0.02, respectively. Conclusions Carriers with normal wall thickness display increased LV torsion and TECS-ratio with respect to controls, which might be due to subendocardial myocardial dysfunction. As similar abnormalities are observed in patients with manifest HCM, the changes in healthy carriers may be target for clinical intervention to delay or prevent the onset of hypertrophy.

  10. Design and analysis of Stress on Thick Walled Cylinder with and with out Holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.Raju

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The conventional elastic analysis of thick walled cylinders to final radial & hoop stresses is applicable for the internal pressures up to yield strength of material. The stress is directly proportional to strain up to yield point Beyond elastic point, particularly in thick walled cylinders. The operating pressures are reduced or the material properties are strengthened. There is no such existing theory for the stress distributions around radial holes under impact of varying internal pressure. Present work puts thrust on this area and relation between pressure and stress distribution is plotted graphically based on observations. Here focus is on pure mechanical analysis & hence thermal, effects are not considered. The thick walled cylinders with a radial cross-hole ANSYS Macro program employed to evaluate the fatigue life of vessel. Stresses that remain in material even after removing applied loads are known as residual stresses. These stresses occur only when material begins to yield plastically. Residual stresses can be present in any mechanical structure because of many causes. Residual stresses may be due to the technological process used to make the component. Manufacturing processes lead to plastic deformation. Elasto plastic analysis with bilinear kinematic hardening material is performed to know the effect of hole sizes. It is observed that there are several factors which influence stress intensity factors. The Finite element analysis is conducted using commercial solvers ANSYS & CATIA. Theoretical formulae based results are obtained from MATLAB programs. The results are presented in form of graphs and tables.

  11. Influence of surrounding wall thickness on the fatigue resistance of molars restored with ceramic inlay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Shizuma; Gondo, Renata; Araújo, Élito; Mello Roesler, Carlos Rodrigo de; Baratieri, Luiz Narciso

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of buccal and lingual wall thickness on the fatigue resistance of molars restored with CAD/CAM ceramic inlays. Forty human third molars were selected and divided into 4 groups, according to the remaining surrounding wall thickness chosen for inlay preparation (n=10): G1, 2.0 mm; G2, 1.5 mm; G3, 1.0 mm; G4, 0.5 mm. All inlays were made from feldspathic ceramic blocks by a CAD/CAM system, and cemented adhesively. After 1 week stored in distilled water at 37 °C, the specimens were subjected to fatigue testing under the following protocol: 5Hz; pre-load of 200 N for 5,000 cycles, followed by increasing loads of 400, 600, 800, 1000, 1200 and 1400 N for 30,000 cycles each. The specimens were cycled until failure or completion of 185,000 cycles. The survival rate of the groups was compared using the Kaplan-Meier survival curves (p>0.05). All specimens withstood the fatigue protocol (185,000 cycles), representing a 100% survival rate. The Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed no difference between groups. It can be concluded that the remaining tooth wall thickness did not influence the fatigue resistance of molars restored with CAD/CAM ceramic inlays.

  12. Polarizabilities of an annular cut in the wall of an arbitrary thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurennoy, S. S.

    1996-07-01

    The electric and magnetic polarizabilities of an aperture are its important characteristics in the theory of aperture coupling and diffraction of EM waves. The beam coupling impedances due to a small discontinuity on the chamber wall of an accelerator can also be expressed in terms of the polarizabilities of the discontinuity. The polarizabilities are geometrical factors which can be found by solving a static (electric or magnetic) problem. However, they are known in an explicit analytical form only for a few simple-shaped discontinuities, such as an elliptic hole in a thin wall. In the present paper the polarizabilities of a ring-shaped cut in the wall of an arbitrary thickness are studied using a combination of analytical, variational and numerical methods. The results are applied to estimate the coupling impedances of button-type beam position monitors.

  13. Polarizabilities of an annular cut in the wall of an arbitrary thickness

    CERN Document Server

    Kurennoy, S S

    1995-01-01

    The electric and magnetic polarizabilities of an aperture are its important characteristics in the theory of aperture coupling and diffraction of EM waves. The beam coupling impedances due to a small discontinuity on the chamber wall of an accelerator can also be expressed in terms of the polarizabilities of the discontinuity. The polarizabilities are geometrical factors which can be found by solving a static (electric or magnetic) problem. However, they are known in an explicit analytical form only for a few simple-shaped discontinuities, such as an elliptic hole in a thin wall. In the present paper the polarizabilities of a ring-shaped cut in the wall of an arbitrary thickness are studied using a combination of analytical, variational and numerical methods. The results are applied to estimate the coupling impedances of button-type beam position monitors.

  14. Seasonal distribution of processes responsible for radial diameter and wall thickness of Scots pine tracheids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. F. Antonova

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The timeframes of processes responsible for the number of cells, their radial diameters and wall thickness in annual wood increment of Scots pine in the course of season vegetation were studied. The number of cells produced by cambium, cell radial diameters in the cell growth expansion zone and the thickness/wall tracheid cross-sectional area in the secondary wall thickening zone were estimated at the transverse sections of samples taken from the stems in 10 days. The data obtained were used for the calculation of the development durations of tracheids in the zones of differentiation and the dependence of these characteristics of the processes on air temperature. Throughout the season, the processes of the production by cambium of early and late tracheids, their radial growth and secondary wall thickening occurs at different times and may overlap each with another in time. In the conditions of Middle Siberia (Russia, the production of cambium cells was observed in June and July. Radial diameter growth of earlywood tracheids occurred mainly in June, latewood tracheids – in July. The development of secondary wall thickening of earlywood cells occurred in June-July, latewood ones – in August to the first half of September. Hydrothermal conditions of these months affect considerably the morphological parameters of the tracheids. Each of the processes reacted to environmental factors independently and had their own optimum temperatures causing the differences in cell wall biomass deposited in separate periods of the season. The data should be considered in addressing the problem of productivity and quality of wood produced in different climate conditions.

  15. Transabdominal ultrasound for standardized measurement of bowel wall thickness in normal children and those with Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiorean, Liliana; Schreiber-Dietrich, Dagmar; Braden, Barbara; Cui, XinWu; Dietrich, Christoph F

    2014-12-01

    The intestinal wall can be visualized using high resolution transabdominal ultrasound (TUS). TTUS measurement of the bowel wall thickness has been described in adults but data are lacking in children. The purpose of this prospective study was to sonographically investigate bowel wall thickness in healthy children and children with Crohn's disease. TUS (5-15 MHz) of the intestine was performed in 58 healthy children (age range 3 to 16 years) and in 30 children with Crohn's disease (age range 8 to 17 years). The following regions were assessed and bowel wall thickness measured: terminal ileum, cecum, right flexure, and sigmoid colon. In patients with Crohn's disease, the involved region was additionally assessed regarding length of involved segment and sonographic signs of transmural inflammation and fistula. TUS allowed adequate measurement of bowel wall thickness in all 58 healthy children (100%) and in all 30 Crohn's disease patients (100%). The bowel wall thickness significantly differed between groups. Bowel wall thickness (mean +/- SD) in all segments was less then 2 mm in all healthy children (1.0+/-0.1 mm terminal ileum, 1.1+/-0.1 mm cecum, 1.1+/-0.1 mm right flexure, and 1.3+/-0.1 mm sigmoid colon). In Crohn's disease patients, bowel wall thickness was ≥ 3 mm in the ileocecal region and was significantly increased (5.1+/-1.9 mm) compared to the healthy children. The mean length of involved segment was 15+/-6.5 cm [5 - 30 cm]. Additional findings in Crohn's disease patients were: transmural inflamation (3/30), interenteric fistula (3/30), gastrocolic fistula (1/30) and vesicoenteric fistula (1/30). Similar to adults, normal bowel wall thickness in children is always less than 2 mm. In all patients with Crohn's disease, increased bowel wall thickness could be detected. TUS is a helpful tool in the diagnosis and assessment of activity and complications in Crohn's disease.

  16. An unusual case of isolated, serial metastases of gallbladder carcinoma involving the chest wall, axilla, breast and lung parenchyma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Iott

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In the English literature, only 9 cases of adenocarcinoma of the gallbladder with cutaneous metastasis have been reported so far. One case of multiple cutaneous metastases along with deposits in the breast tissue has been reported. We present a case of incidental metastatic gallbladder carcinoma with no intra-abdominal disease presenting as a series of four isolated cutaneous right chest wall, axillary nodal, breast and pulmonary metastases following resection and adjuvant chemoradiation for her primary tumor. In spite of the metastatic disease coupled with the aggressive nature of the cancer, this patient reported that her energy level had returned to baseline with a good appetite and a stable weight indicating a good performance status and now is alive at 25 months since diagnosis. Her serially-presented, oligometastatic diseases were well-controlled by concurrent chemoradiation and stereotactic radiation therapy. We report this case study because of its rarity and for the purpose of complementing current literature with an additional example of cutaneous metastasis from adenocarcinoma of the gallbladder.

  17. Treatment techniques for 3D conformal radiation to breast and chest wall including the internal mammary chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnik, Deborah; Selvaraj, Raj N; Faul, Clare; Gerszten, Kristina; Heron, Dwight E; King, Gwendolyn C

    2007-01-01

    Breast, chest wall, and regional nodal irradiation have been associated with an improved outcome in high-risk breast cancer patients. Complex treatment planning is often utilized to ensure complete coverage of the target volume while minimizing the dose to surrounding normal tissues. The 2 techniques evaluated in this report are the partially wide tangent fields (PWTFs) and the 4-field photon/electron combination (the modified "Kuske Technique"). These 2 techniques were evaluated in 10 consecutive breast cancer patients. All patients had computerized tomographic (CT) scans for 3D planning supine on a breast board. The breast was defined clinically by the physician and confirmed radiographically with radiopaque bebes. The resulting dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of normal and target tissues were then compared. The deep tangent field with blocks resulted in optimal coverage of the target and the upper internal mammary chain (IMC) while sparing of critical and nontarget tissues. The wide tangent technique required less treatment planning and delivery time. We compared the 2 techniques and their resultant DVHs and feasibility in a busy clinic.

  18. Immediate chest wall reconstruction during pregnancy: surgical management after extended surgical resection due to primary sarcoma of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruda, Eduardo Gustavo; Munhoz, Alexandre Mendonça; Montag, Eduardo; Filassi, José Roberto; Gemperli, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Breast sarcoma during pregnancy is an extremely rare event and represents a complex problem because of a more advanced stage at presentation. This report presents the first case of a 24-year-old woman with a gestational age of 20 weeks with a fast growing tumour in her left breast (29 × 19 × 15 cm) and infiltrating the skin/pectoralis muscles. Radical mastectomy was performed with a gestational age of 22 weeks and a different design was planned for the latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap (LDMF) with primary closure in the V-Y pattern. Satisfactory chest wall coverage and contour were achieved. Final histopathological findings allowed a diagnosis of undifferentiated sarcoma. With a gestational age of 37 weeks, a healthy infant was delivered by means of a caesarean section. The patient is currently in the second postoperative year and no recurrence has been observed. Management of a large breast sarcoma in a pregnant patient presents unique challenges in consideration of the potential risks to the foetus and the possible maternal benefit. The results of this study demonstrate that the VY-LDMF is a reliable technique and should be considered in cases of immediate large thoracic wound reconstruction. Copyright © 2013 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Accurate measurement of respiratory airway wall thickness in CT images using a signal restoration technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang Joon; Kim, Tae Jung; Kim, Kwang Gi; Lee, Sang Ho; Goo, Jin Mo; Kim, Jong Hyo

    2008-03-01

    Airway wall thickness (AWT) is an important bio-marker for evaluation of pulmonary diseases such as chronic bronchitis, bronchiectasis. While an image-based analysis of the airway tree can provide precise and valuable airway size information, quantitative measurement of AWT in Multidetector-Row Computed Tomography (MDCT) images involves various sources of error and uncertainty. So we have developed an accurate AWT measurement technique for small airways with three-dimensional (3-D) approach. To evaluate performance of these techniques, we used a set of acryl tube phantom was made to mimic small airways to have three different sizes of wall diameter (4.20, 1.79, 1.24 mm) and wall thickness (1.84, 1.22, 0.67 mm). The phantom was imaged with MDCT using standard reconstruction kernel (Sensation 16, Siemens, Erlangen). The pixel size was 0.488 mm × 0.488 mm × 0.75 mm in x, y, and z direction respectively. The images were magnified in 5 times using cubic B-spline interpolation, and line profiles were obtained for each tube. To recover faithful line profile from the blurred images, the line profiles were deconvolved with a point spread kernel of the MDCT which was estimated using the ideal tube profile and image line profile. The inner diameter, outer diameter, and wall thickness of each tube were obtained with full-width-half-maximum (FWHM) method for the line profiles before and after deconvolution processing. Results show that significant improvement was achieved over the conventional FWHM method in the measurement of AWT.

  20. Chest wall segmentation in automated 3D breast ultrasound using rib shadow enhancement and multi-plane cumulative probability enhanced map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyeonjin; Kim, Hannah; Hong, Helen

    2015-03-01

    We propose an automatic segmentation method of chest wall in 3D ABUS images using rib shadow enhancement and multi-planar cumulative probability enhanced map. For the identification of individual dark rib shadows, each rib shadow is enhanced using intensity transfer function and 3D sheet-like enhancement filtering. Then, wrongly enhanced intercostal regions and small fatty tissues are removed using coronal and sagittal cumulative probability enhanced maps. The large fatty tissues with globular and sheet-like shapes at the top of rib shadow are removed using shape and orientation analysis based on moment matrix. Detected chest walls are connected with cubic B-spline interpolation. Experimental results show that the Dice similarity coefficient of proposed method as comparison with two manually outlining results provides over 90% in average.

  1. Radiologic images of an aggressive implant-associated fibromatosis of the breast and chest wall: case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourdes Alanis, MD, MPH

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Fibromatosis of the breast is a rare benign disease compromising <0.2% of all primary breast tumors. Although the chest wall is a common location, occurrences of implant-associated fibromatosis of the breast are extremely rare; only 33 cases have been reported. We present a case of a 42-year-old female who underwent breast augmentation with silicone breast implants, and 2 years later developed an aggressive implant-associated fibromatosis of the breast and chest wall. On imaging studies, the tumor mimicked breast carcinoma, and despite chemotherapy, the fibromatosis rapidly enlarged and was locally invasive requiring wide surgical excision. Unlike previously reported imaging findings, magnetic resonance imaging revealed an oval circumscribed mass with fringe-like internal architecture. We provide a review of the literature and discuss the imaging features of implant-associated fibromatosis of the breast.

  2. Short-term comparative study of high frequency chest wall oscillation and European airway clearance techniques in patients with cystic fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Osman, Leyla P; Roughton, Michael; Hodson, Margaret E; Pryor, Jennifer A

    2009-01-01

    Background High frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) is standard treatment for airway clearance in the USA and has recently been introduced in the UK and Europe. There is little published research comparing HFCWO with airway clearance techniques (ACTs) frequently used in the UK and Europe. The aim of this study was to compare the short-term effects of HFCWO with usual ACTs in patients with cystic fibrosis hospitalised with an infective pulmonary exacerbation. Methods A 4-day randomised cr...

  3. A pilot study of the impact of high-frequency chest wall oscillation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients with mucus hypersecretion

    OpenAIRE

    Chakravorty I; Chahal K; Austin G

    2011-01-01

    Indranil Chakravorty1, Kamaljit Chahal2, Gillian Austin21St George's Hospital, London, 2East and North Hertfordshire NHS Trust, Lister Hospital and Primary Care Trust, Stevenage, Hertfordshire, UKIntroduction: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients with mucus hypersecretion tend to demonstrate increased frequency of infective exacerbations and a steeper slope of decline in lung function. Enhanced mucociliary clearance with high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) d...

  4. Inverse Transient Analysis for Classification of Wall Thickness Variations in Pipelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Tuck

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of transient fluid pressure signals has been investigated as an alternative method of fault detection in pipeline systems and has shown promise in both laboratory and field trials. The advantage of the method is that it can potentially provide a fast and cost effective means of locating faults such as leaks, blockages and pipeline wall degradation within a pipeline while the system remains fully operational. The only requirement is that high speed pressure sensors are placed in contact with the fluid. Further development of the method requires detailed numerical models and enhanced understanding of transient flow within a pipeline where variations in pipeline condition and geometry occur. One such variation commonly encountered is the degradation or thinning of pipe walls, which can increase the susceptible of a pipeline to leak development. This paper aims to improve transient-based fault detection methods by investigating how changes in pipe wall thickness will affect the transient behaviour of a system; this is done through the analysis of laboratory experiments. The laboratory experiments are carried out on a stainless steel pipeline of constant outside diameter, into which a pipe section of variable wall thickness is inserted. In order to detect the location and severity of these changes in wall conditions within the laboratory system an inverse transient analysis procedure is employed which considers independent variations in wavespeed and diameter. Inverse transient analyses are carried out using a genetic algorithm optimisation routine to match the response from a one-dimensional method of characteristics transient model to the experimental time domain pressure responses. The accuracy of the detection technique is evaluated and benefits associated with various simplifying assumptions and simulation run times are investigated. It is found that for the case investigated, changes in the wavespeed and nominal diameter of the

  5. Inverse Transient Analysis for Classification of Wall Thickness Variations in Pipelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuck, Jeffrey; Lee, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of transient fluid pressure signals has been investigated as an alternative method of fault detection in pipeline systems and has shown promise in both laboratory and field trials. The advantage of the method is that it can potentially provide a fast and cost effective means of locating faults such as leaks, blockages and pipeline wall degradation within a pipeline while the system remains fully operational. The only requirement is that high speed pressure sensors are placed in contact with the fluid. Further development of the method requires detailed numerical models and enhanced understanding of transient flow within a pipeline where variations in pipeline condition and geometry occur. One such variation commonly encountered is the degradation or thinning of pipe walls, which can increase the susceptible of a pipeline to leak development. This paper aims to improve transient-based fault detection methods by investigating how changes in pipe wall thickness will affect the transient behaviour of a system; this is done through the analysis of laboratory experiments. The laboratory experiments are carried out on a stainless steel pipeline of constant outside diameter, into which a pipe section of variable wall thickness is inserted. In order to detect the location and severity of these changes in wall conditions within the laboratory system an inverse transient analysis procedure is employed which considers independent variations in wavespeed and diameter. Inverse transient analyses are carried out using a genetic algorithm optimisation routine to match the response from a one-dimensional method of characteristics transient model to the experimental time domain pressure responses. The accuracy of the detection technique is evaluated and benefits associated with various simplifying assumptions and simulation run times are investigated. It is found that for the case investigated, changes in the wavespeed and nominal diameter of the pipeline are both important

  6. The Boiler Tube Wall Thickness Quantitative Evaluation Fusing the Magnetic and Ultrasonic Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Xiaochun; HUANG Songling; ZHAO Daxing

    2006-01-01

    Wall thickness is always a key index for boiler tube inspection in power plant, in order to improve the inspection efficiency and accuracy, a new method fusing the magnetic and ultrasonic technique was proposed. The magnetic technique was used to do full inspection and locate the flaws, and the ultrasonic was employed to implement further quantitative inspection accurately. After comparing the precision of the polynomial, exponential and logarithmic function, the polynomial model was selected to fit the relations between the wall thickness and the peak value of magnetic signals, and the data measured by ultrasonic thickness meter was used to calibrate the model parameters online, the defect depth can be sized quickly. The experimental results demonstrate that the model used in this system has better accuracy than the statistics relation model clearly, and it is also suitable for defect evaluation real-time. Moreover, it is unnecessary to have much more experimental data for the curve fitting technology, so it has better practicability than the other methods.

  7. HIGH-INTENSITY FOCUSED ULTRASOUND FOR TREATMENT OF UNRESECTABLE TUMORS LOCATED IN THE WALLS OF CHEST AND ABDOMEN IN 10 PATIENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑国强; 郭峰; 霍苓; 李正

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To present our results of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment in 10 patients with unresectable tumors involved in the walls of chest and abdomen. Methods: Tumors located in the walls of the chest and abdomen in 10 patients were treated by HIFU, including local recurrence of fibrosarcoma in 1 case and local invasion or metastases in 9 cases. All of the 10 patients had received anti-cancer treatments before HIFU, 3 patients were complicated with intercostal neuralgia. Results: Partial responses were obtained in 2 patients, minor response in 1 patient, stable disease in 4, progressive disease in 2 after HIFU treatments. All the intercostal neuralgia in 3 patients was disappeared after HIFU. Bone scan showed that site of rib metastasis before HIFU became normal after HIFU in one patient. Conclusion: Our preliminary results showed that HIFU could get good results for patients with malignant tumors located in the walls of chest and abdomen if they are focal tumors, even if they are complicated with rib metastasis.

  8. Injection-moulded models of major and minor arteries: the variability of model wall thickness owing to casting technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, T; Morris, L; O'Donnell, M; Walsh, M; McGloughlin, T

    2005-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease of major and minor arteries is a common cause of death in Western society. The wall mechanics and haemodynamics within the arteries are considered to be important factors in the disease formation process. This paper is concerned with the development of an efficient computer-integrated technique to manufacture idealized and realistic models of diseased major and minor arteries from radiological images and to address the issue of model wall thickness variability. Variations in wall thickness from the original computer models to the final castings are quantified using a CCD camera. The results found that wall thickness variation from the major and minor idealized artery models to design specification were insignificant, up to a maximum of 16 per cent. In realistic models, however, differences were up to 23 per cent in the major arterial models and 58 per cent in the minor arterial models, but the wall thickness variability remained within the limits of previously reported wall thickness results. It is concluded that the described injection moulding procedure yields idealized and realistic castings suitable for use in experimental investigations, with idealized models giving better agreement with design. Wall thickness is variable and should be assessed after the models are manufactured.

  9. Ultraviolet and infrared studies of the single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotube films with different thickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abouelsayed, A., E-mail: a_sobhi77@yahoo.com [Spectroscopy Department, Physics Division, National Research Centre, 33 El Bohouth st. (Former El Tahrir st.), Dokki, Giza P.O. 12622 (Egypt); Eisa, Wael H. [Spectroscopy Department, Physics Division, National Research Centre, 33 El Bohouth st. (Former El Tahrir st.), Dokki, Giza P.O. 12622 (Egypt); Dawy, M. [Physical Chemistry Department, Inorganic Chemical Industries and Mineral Resources Division National Research Centre, 33 El Bohouth st. (former El Tahrir st.), Dokki, Giza P.O. 12622 (Egypt); Shabaka, A. [Spectroscopy Department, Physics Division, National Research Centre, 33 El Bohouth st. (Former El Tahrir st.), Dokki, Giza P.O. 12622 (Egypt)

    2016-02-15

    Ultraviolet and infrared transmission measurements on an unoriented single-wall (SWCNTs) and multi-wall (MWCNTs) carbon nanotubes films were performed over a frequency range 190–2500 nm for the four different films. A clear change in the fine structure of the infrared spectrum for different films. The higher-energy optical absorption bands, which correspond to transitions across the Van Hove singularities, are not observed in the measured frequency range in the case of MWCNTs films. The broad excitation in the low-energy range below 0.025 eV (Drude peak (E{sub M0})) are attributed to the contributions from metallic carriers localized in a finite length. This Drude peak (E{sub M0}) at low-energies is decreased in in case of MWCNTs, which suggests a progressive transition of metallic tubes to insulating state. The unoriented MWCNTs films have an average thickness of about 200–400 nm. The scanning electron microscope pictures of the SWCNTs and the MWCNTs films illustrate the morphological differences between the four studied samples. The volume fraction of the carbon nanotubes in all films appears to be the same, although there is a difference for particles other than nanotubes in the films.

  10. A clinical pilot study: high frequency chest wall oscillation airway clearance in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaisson, Kathleen Marya; Walsh, Susan; Simmons, Zachary; Vender, Robert L

    2006-06-01

    Respiratory complications are common in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) with respiratory failure representing the most common cause of death. Ineffective airway clearance resultant from deficient cough frequently contributes to these abnormalities. We sought to evaluate the effectiveness of high frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) administered through the Vest Airway Clearance System when added to standard care in preventing pulmonary complications and prolonging the time to death in patients with ALS. This is a single center study performed at the Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center (HMC). Nine patients with a diagnosis of ALS and concurrently receiving non-invasive ventilatory support with bi-level positive airway pressure (BiPAP) were recruited from the outpatient clinic at HMC. Four patients were randomized to receive standard care and five patients to receive standard care plus the addition of HFCWO administered twice-daily for 15 min duration. Longitudinal assessments of oxyhemoglobin saturation, forced vital capacity (FVC), and adverse events were obtained until time of death. Pulmonary complications of atelectasis, pneumonia, hospitalization for a respiratory-related abnormality, and tracheostomy with mechanical ventilation were monitored throughout the study duration. No differences were observed between treatment groups in relation to the rate of decline in FVC. The addition of HFCWO airway clearance failed to improve time to death compared to standard treatment alone (340 days +/- 247 vs. 470 days +/- 241; p = 0.26). The random allocation of HFCWO airway clearance to patients with ALS concomitantly receiving BiPAP failed to attain any significant clinical benefits in relation to either loss of lung function or mortality. This study does not exclude the potential benefit of HFCWO in select patients with ALS who have coexistent pulmonary diseases, pre-existent mucus-related pulmonary complications, or less severe levels of

  11. High frequency chest wall oscillation for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations: a randomized sham-controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis Stephanie

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO is used for airway mucus clearance. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of HFCWO early in the treatment of adults hospitalized for acute asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Methods Randomized, multi-center, double-masked phase II clinical trial of active or sham treatment initiated within 24 hours of hospital admission for acute asthma or COPD at four academic medical centers. Patients received active or sham treatment for 15 minutes three times a day for four treatments. Medical management was standardized across groups. The primary outcomes were patient adherence to therapy after four treatments (minutes used/60 minutes prescribed and satisfaction. Secondary outcomes included change in Borg dyspnea score (≥ 1 unit indicates a clinically significant change, spontaneously expectorated sputum volume, and forced expired volume in 1 second. Results Fifty-two participants were randomized to active (n = 25 or sham (n = 27 treatment. Patient adherence was similarly high in both groups (91% vs. 93%; p = 0.70. Patient satisfaction was also similarly high in both groups. After four treatments, a higher proportion of patients in the active treatment group had a clinically significant improvement in dyspnea (70.8% vs. 42.3%, p = 0.04. There were no significant differences in other secondary outcomes. Conclusions HFCWO is well tolerated in adults hospitalized for acute asthma or COPD and significantly improves dyspnea. The high levels of patient satisfaction in both treatment groups justify the need for sham controls when evaluating the use of HFCWO on patient-reported outcomes. Additional studies are needed to more fully evaluate the role of HFCWO in improving in-hospital and post-discharge outcomes in this population. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00181285

  12. Lung function tests in neonates and infants with chronic lung disease: lung and chest-wall mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gappa, Monika; Pillow, J Jane; Allen, Julian; Mayer, Oscar; Stocks, Janet

    2006-04-01

    This is the fifth paper in a review series that summarizes available data and critically discusses the potential role of lung function testing in infants and young children with acute neonatal respiratory disorders and chronic lung disease of infancy (CLDI). This review focuses on respiratory mechanics, including chest-wall and tissue mechanics, obtained in the intensive care setting and in infants during unassisted breathing. Following orientation of the reader to the subject area, we focused comments on areas of enquiry proposed in the introductory paper to this series. The quality of the published literature is reviewed critically with respect to relevant methods, equipment and study design, limitations and strengths of different techniques, and availability and appropriateness of reference data. Recommendations to guide future investigations in this field are provided. Numerous different methods have been used to assess respiratory mechanics with the aims of describing pulmonary status in preterm infants and assessing the effect of therapeutic interventions such as surfactant treatment, antenatal or postnatal steroids, or bronchodilator treatment. Interpretation of many of these studies is limited because lung volume was not measured simultaneously. In addition, populations are not comparable, and the number of infants studied has generally been small. Nevertheless, results appear to support the pathophysiological concept that immaturity of the lung leads to impaired lung function, which may improve with growth and development, irrespective of the diagnosis of chronic lung disease. To fully understand the impact of immaturity on the developing lung, it is unlikely that a single parameter such as respiratory compliance or resistance will accurately describe underlying changes. Assessment of respiratory mechanics will have to be supplemented by assessment of lung volume and airway function. New methods such as the low-frequency forced oscillation technique, which

  13. Structure and Properties of Thick-Walled Joints of Alloy 1570s Prepared by Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velichko, O. V.; Ivanov, S. Yu.; Karkhin, V. A.; Lopota, V. A.; Makhin, I. D.

    2016-09-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of thick-walled joints of Al - Mg - Sc alloy 1570S, prepared by friction stir welding are studied. Joint microstructural and mechanical inhomogeneity are revealed.

  14. Investigation of torsional vibrations in thick walled hollow poroelastic cylinder using Biot's extension theory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Malla Reddy Perati; Rajitha Gurijala

    2015-09-01

    This paper deals with the study of torsional vibrations of thick walled hollow poroelastic cylinder using Biot's extension theory. Considering the boundaries to be stress free, the frequency equation is obtained in the presence of dissipation which is transcendental and complex valued in nature. In the special case of poroelastic thin shell, frequency equation is separated into two real valued equations giving propagation velocity and attenuation coefficient. From the numerical results in the case of sandy sediment, it is clear that the values of propagation velocity are, in general, less than that of attenuation coefficient.

  15. Increased wall thickness using ultrasonography is associated with inflammation in an animal model of experimental colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lied GA

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Gülen Arslan Lied,1 Anne Marita Milde,2 Kim Nylund,1,3 Maja Mujic,1 Tore Grimstad,1,4 Trygve Hausken,1,3 Odd Helge Gilja1,31Institute of Medicine, University of Bergen, Norway; 2Department of Biological and Medical Psychology, University of Bergen, Norway; 3National Centre for Ultrasound in Gastroenterology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway; 4Division of Gastroenterology, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, NorwayAbstract: Experimentally induced colitis is used in animals to investigate pathophysiological mechanisms in inflammatory bowel disease. When following disease course and treatment effects, it should be possible to perform repeated measurements without harming the animals. This pilot study was performed to investigate whether transabdominal ultrasound using a clinical scanner could be used on rats to demonstrate bowel inflammation in an experimental colitis model. Colitis was induced by either 5% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS in drinking water for 7 days or a single dose of intracolonic trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS. Using ultrasonography, wall thickness of distal colon, cecum, and small bowel was recorded prior to and after DSS, and prior to, 2, and 7 days after TNBS. Blood (tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-alpha and fecal samples (HemoFEC occult blood were taken from each group on the same days as sonography. Thereafter, rats were killed and specimens for histology were taken. Wall thickness of distal colon, not of cecum or small bowel, increased significantly after 7 days of DSS, and wall thickness of both distal colon and small bowel increased on day 2 and 7 after TNBS. TNF-alpha increased after 7 days in the latter group only. There was a significant correlation between ultrasonographic measurements and combined histology score of distal colon in the DSS group. HemoFEC was also positive in accordance with sonographic and histological features. Increased intestinal wall thickness in response to both DSS- and TNBS

  16. IFE thick liquid wall chamber dynamics: Governing mechanisms andmodeling and experimental capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raffray, A.R.; Meier, W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.; Bonazza, R.; Calderoni, P.; Debonnel, C.S.; Dragojlovic, Z.; El-Guebaly, L.; Haynes,D.; Latkowski, J.; Olson, C.; Peterson, P.F.; Reyes, S.; Sharpe, P.; Tillack, M.S.; Zaghloul, M.

    2005-01-24

    For thick liquid wall concepts, it is important to understand the different mechanisms affecting the chamber dynamics and the state of the chamber prior to each shot a compared with requirements from the driver and target. These include ablation mechanisms, vapor transport and control, possible aerosol formation, as well as protective jet behavior. This paper was motivated by a town meeting on this subject which helped identify the major issues, assess the latest results, review the capabilities of existing modeling and experimental facilities with respect to addressing remaining issues, and helping guide future analysis and R&D efforts; the paper covers these exact points.

  17. Exact and numerical elastodynamic solutions for thick-walled functionally graded cylinders subjected to pressure shocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shariyat, M., E-mail: m_shariyat@yahoo.co [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, K.N. Toosi University of Technology, Pardis Street, Molla-Sadra Avenue, Vanak Square, P.O. Box: 19395-1999, Tehran 19991 43344 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nikkhah, M.; Kazemi, R. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, K.N. Toosi University of Technology, Pardis Street, Molla-Sadra Avenue, Vanak Square, P.O. Box: 19395-1999, Tehran 19991 43344 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    In the present paper, analytical and numerical elastodynamic solutions are developed for long thick-walled functionally graded cylinders subjected to arbitrary dynamic and shock pressures. Both transient dynamic response and elastic wave propagation characteristics are studied in these non-homogeneous structures. Variations of the material properties across the thickness are described according to both polynomial and power law functions. A numerically consistent transfinite element formulation is presented for both functions whereas the exact solution is presented for the power law function. The FGM cylinder is not divided into isotropic sub-cylinders. An approach associated with dividing the dynamic radial displacement expression into quasi-static and dynamic parts and expansion of the transient wave functions in terms of a series of the eigenfunctions is employed to propose the exact solution. Results are obtained for various exponents of the functions of the material properties distributions, various radius ratios, and various dynamic and shock loads.

  18. An analytical method for calculating stresses and strains of ATF cladding based on thick walled theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Hyun; Kim, Hak Sung [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyo Chan; Yang, Yong Sik; In, Wang kee [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In this paper, an analytical method based on thick walled theory has been studied to calculate stress and strain of ATF cladding. In order to prescribe boundary conditions of the analytical method, two algorithms were employed which are called subroutine 'Cladf' and 'Couple' of FRACAS, respectively. To evaluate the developed method, equivalent model using finite element method was established and stress components of the method were compared with those of equivalent FE model. One of promising ATF concepts is the coated cladding, which take advantages such as high melting point, a high neutron economy, and low tritium permeation rate. To evaluate the mechanical behavior and performance of the coated cladding, we need to develop the specified model to simulate the ATF behaviors in the reactor. In particular, the model for simulation of stress and strain for the coated cladding should be developed because the previous model, which is 'FRACAS', is for one body model. The FRACAS module employs the analytical method based on thin walled theory. According to thin-walled theory, radial stress is defined as zero but this assumption is not suitable for ATF cladding because value of the radial stress is not negligible in the case of ATF cladding. Recently, a structural model for multi-layered ceramic cylinders based on thick-walled theory was developed. Also, FE-based numerical simulation such as BISON has been developed to evaluate fuel performance. An analytical method that calculates stress components of ATF cladding was developed in this study. Thick-walled theory was used to derive equations for calculating stress and strain. To solve for these equations, boundary and loading conditions were obtained by subroutine 'Cladf' and 'Couple' and applied to the analytical method. To evaluate the developed method, equivalent FE model was established and its results were compared to those of analytical model. Based on the

  19. Determination of optimum insulation thicknesses using economical analyse for exterior walls of buildings with different masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okan Kon

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, five different cities were selected from the five climatic zones according to Turkish standard TS 825, and insulation thicknesses of exterior walls of sample buildings were calculated by using optimization. Vertical perforated bricks with density of 550 kg/m3 and 1000 kg/m3 were chosen within the study content. Glass wool, expanded polystyrene (XPS, extruded polystyrene (EPS were considered as insulation materials. Additionally, natural gas, coal, fuel oil and LPG were utilized as fuel for heating process while electricity was used for cooling.  Life cycle cost (LCC analysis and degree-day method were the approaches for optimum insulation thickness calculations. As a result, in case of usage vertical perforated bricks with density of 550 kg/m3 and 1000 kg/m3 resulted different values in between 0.005-0.007 m (5-7 mm in the optimum insulation thickness calculations under different insulation materials.  Minimum optimum insulation thickness was calculated in case XPS was preferred as insulation material, and the maximum one was calculated in case of using glass wool.

  20. Positive association between increased popliteal artery vessel wall thickness and generalized osteoarthritis: is OA also part of the metabolic syndrome?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kornaat, Peter R.; Sharma, Ruby; Geest, Rob J. van der; Lamb, Hildo J.; Bloem, Johan L.; Watt, Iain [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Kloppenburg, Margreet [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Rheumatology, Leiden (Netherlands); Hellio le Graverand, Marie-Pierre [Pfizer Global Research and Development, New London, CT (United States)

    2009-12-15

    The purpose of the study was to determine if a positive association exists between arterial vessel wall thickness and generalized osteoarthritis (OA). Our hypothesis is that generalized OA is another facet of the metabolic syndrome. The medical ethical review board of our institution approved the study. Written informed consent was obtained from each patient prior to the study. Magnetic resonance (MR) images of the knee were obtained in 42 patients who had been diagnosed with generalized OA at multiple joint sites. Another 27 MR images of the knee were obtained from a matched normal (non-OA) reference population. Vessel wall thickness of the popliteal artery was quantitatively measured by dedicated software. Linear regression models were used to investigate the association between vessel wall thickness and generalized OA. Adjustments were made for age, sex, and body mass index (BMI). Confidence intervals (CI) were computed at the 95% level and a significance level of {alpha} = 0.05 was used. Patients in the generalized OA population had a significant higher average vessel wall thickness than persons from the normal reference population (p {<=} {alpha}), even when correction was made for sex, age, and BMI. The average vessel wall thickness of the popliteal artery was 1.09 mm in patients with generalized OA, and 0.96 mm in the matched normal reference population. The association found between increased popliteal artery vessel wall thickness and generalized osteoarthritis suggests that generalized OA might be another facet of the metabolic syndrome. (orig.)

  1. Quantification of progression and regression of descending thoracic aortic wall thickness by enhanced computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, Kenichi; Takasu, Junichiro; Yamamoto, Rie; Taguchi, Rie; Itani, Yasutaka; Ito, Yuichi; Watanabe, Shigeru; Masuda, Yoshiaki [Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2001-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to verify the usefulness of the quantification of aortic wall involvement by enhanced computed tomography (CT). One-hundred thirteen Japanese patients underwent two enhanced CT of the descending thoracic aorta at intervals. We sliced the descending thoracic aorta continuously from the level of the tracheal bifurcation with 1 cm intervals, and we defined aortic wall volume (AWV) (cm{sup 3}) as the sum of a 7-slice area of aortic wall involving calcification. The average of AWV increased from 7.95{+-}2.92 cm{sup 3} to 8.70{+-}2.98 cm{sup 3}. The developmental rate of AWV ({delta}AWV) was 0.270{+-}0.281 cm{sup 3}/year. {delta}AWV did not have a significant correlation with any risk factor at the baseline. {delta}AWV had significant correlation with total cholesterol, (LDL-C) low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and LDL-C/(HDL-C) high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio at the follow-up, and by multivariate analysis with only the LDL-C/HDL-C ratio. {delta}AWV was not correlated with the intake status of hypoglycemic, antihypertensive or lipid-lowering drugs. The cut-off level of total cholesterol with the most significant odds ratio for progression of aortic wall was 190 mg/dl, and that of LDL-C was 130 mg/dl. This method proved to be useful for the non-invasive assessment of aortic wall thickness. (author)

  2. Effect of subcooling and wall thickness on pool boiling from downward-facing curved surfaces in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Genk, M.S.; Glebov, A.G. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Quenching experiments were performed to investigate the effects of water subcooling and wall thickness on pool boiling from a downward-facing curved surface. Experiments used three copper sections of the same diameter (50.8 mm) and surface radius (148 mm), but different thickness (12.8, 20 and 30 mm). Local and average pool boiling curves were obtained at saturation and 5 K, 10 K, and 14 K subcooling. Water subcooling increased the maximum heat flux, but decreased the corresponding wall superheat. The minimum film boiling heat flux and the corresponding wall superheat, however, increased with increased subcooling. The maximum and minimum film boiling heat fluxes were independent of wall thickness above 20 mm and Biot Number > 0.8, indicating that boiling curves for the 20 and 30 thick sections were representative of quasi steady-state, but not those for the 12.8 mm thick section. When compared with that for a flat surface section of the same thickness, the data for the 12.8 mm thick section showed significant increases in both the maximum heat flux (from 0.21 to 0.41 MW/m{sup 2}) and the minimum film boiling heat flux (from 2 to 13 kW/m{sup 2}) and about 11.5 K and 60 K increase in the corresponding wall superheats, respectively.

  3. The effects of slice thickness and radiation dose level variations on computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) nodule detection performance in pediatric chest CT scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emaminejad, Nastaran; Lo, Pechin; Ghahremani, Shahnaz; Kim, Grace H.; Brown, Matthew S.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.

    2017-03-01

    For pediatric oncology patients, CT scans are performed to assess treatment response and disease progression. CAD may be used to detect lung nodules which would reflect metastatic disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of reducing radiation dose and varying slice thickness on CAD performance in the detection of solid lung nodules in pediatric patients. The dataset consisted of CT scans of 58 pediatric chest cases, from which 7 cases had lung nodules detected by radiologist, and a total of 28 nodules were marked. For each case, the original raw data (sinogram data) was collected and a noise addition model was used to simulate reduced-dose scans of 50%, 25% and 10% of the original dose. In addition, the original and reduced-dose raw data were reconstructed at slice thicknesses of 1.5 and 3 mm using a medium sharp (B45) kernel; the result was eight datasets (4 dose levels x 2 thicknesses) for each case An in-house CAD tool was applied on all reconstructed scans, and results were compared with the radiologist's markings. Patient level mean sensitivities at 3mm thickness were 24%, 26%, 25%, 27%, and at 1.5 mm thickness were 23%, 29%, 35%, 36% for 10%, 25%, 50%, and 100% dose level, respectively. Mean FP numbers were 1.5, 0.9, 0.8, 0.7 at 3 mm and 11.4, 3.5, 2.8, 2.8 at 1.5 mm thickness for 10%, 25%, 50%, and 100% dose level respectively. CAD sensitivity did not change with dose level for 3mm thickness, but did change with dose for 1.5 mm. False Positives increased at low dose levels where noise values were high.

  4. On what controls the spacing of spontaneous adiabatic shear bands in collapsing thick-walled cylinders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovinger Zev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Shear bands formation in collapsing thick walled cylinders occurs in a spontaneous manner. The advantage of examining spontaneous, as opposed to forced shear localization, is that it highlights the inherent susceptibility of the material to adiabatic shear banding without prescribed geometrical constraints. The Thick-Walled Cylinder technique (TWC provides a controllable and repeatable technique to create and study multiple adiabatic shear bands. The technique, reported in the literature uses an explosive cylinder to create the driving force, collapsing the cylindrical sample. Recently, we developed an electro-magnetic set-up using a pulsed current generator to provide the collapsing force, replacing the use of explosives. Using this platform we examined the shear band evolution at different stages of formation in 7 metallic alloys, spanning a wide range of strength and failure properties. We examined the number of shear bands and spacing between them for the different materials to try and figure out what controls these parameters. The examination of the different materials enabled us to better comprehend the mechanisms which control the spatial distribution of multiple shear bands in this geometry. The results of these tests are discussed and compared to explosively driven collapsing TWC results in the literature and to existing analytical models for spontaneous adiabatic shear localization.

  5. Maxillary sinus lateral wall thickness and morphologic patterns in the atrophic posterior maxilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monje, Alberto; Catena, Andrés; Monje, Florencio; Gonzalez-García, Raúl; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; Suarez, Fernando; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the present study is to examine the sinus lateral wall thickness (LWT) of atrophic posterior maxilla (maxillary LWT. Four hundred fourteen measures were taken from 140 consecutive patients that met the inclusion criteria. On the selected sagittal section, a built-in digital caliper recorded in millimeters the RH and LWT (a perpendicular line at 3, 5, 7, 10, 13, and 15 mm from the lowest point of the sinus floor). Edentulous spans were further classified as complete edentulous atrophic maxilla (CEM) and partial edentulous atrophic maxilla (PEM). The mixed linear model was used to test the effects of sex, type of edentulism, edentulous span, and RH on the measurement of the LWT of the sinus. Mean LWT for PEM was 1.71 ± 0.12 mm, and for CEM, 1.57 ± 0.07 mm (P = 0.01). The mixed model yielded significant effect of edentulous span (P = 0.048) and interactions among type of edentulism and edentulous span (P maxillary sinus lateral wall tends to increase in thickness from the second premolar to the second molar and from 5 mm up to 15 mm. In addition, RH, presence of teeth adjacent to the edentulous atrophic ridge, and age were shown to influence maxillary sinus LWT.

  6. Dissipative particle dynamics study of relationship between wall thickness and size in polymer vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Mengying; Wang, Rong; Xie, Daiqian

    2012-02-01

    Vesicles and membrane properties have long been thought to be essential for reproducing the natural environment of living cells. By using dissipative particle dynamics method, we have studied the relationship between wall thickness and size of vesicles obtained from A1BnA1 block copolymers, where block A is hydrophilic and block B is hydrophobic. Our findings suggest that, the wall thickness is sensitive to the size of vesicles at a low block length ratio of B/A, but insensitive to the size at a large ratio. It shows both weak and strong effects with a crossover point in between. These behaviors are consistent with the experimental results of Eisenberg and co-workers. Besides, an additional crossover point also has been observed. With the B/A ratio increases, the relationship goes from strong to weak behavior, and this transformation first appears to affect the outer area for large sized vesicles, and then to the inner area for small sized vesicles. These results may also be useful in delivery applications through controlling the hydrophobic membrane and the hydrophilic coronas.

  7. Resección tumoral en bloque y reconstrucción de pared torácica In-bloc tumor resection and chest wall reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Palafox

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available La resección de una neoplasia pulmonar o mediastínica que afecta simultáneamente a la pared torácica y la reconstrucción del defecto originado por la misma, son procedimientos quirúrgicos que se pueden realizar en un mismo tiempo operatorio. Con la reconstrucción primaria se busca preservar la función respiratoria y la integridad de la caja torácica, permitiendo al paciente una buena mecánica respiratoria, a la vez que un resultado estético satisfactorio y evitando la necesidad de una nueva intervención quirúrgica. Existen diversas técnicas y disponemos de diferentes materiales protésicos para su realización. Presentamos a continuación el caso de un paciente al que se le realizó satisfactoriamente una resección tumoral en bloque y reconstrucción de la pared torácica.Resection of a pulmonary or mediastinic neoplasm which simultaneously affects chest wall and reconstruction of the defect, are surgical proceedings that can be performed in the same surgical time. The objectives of reconstructing primarily the chest wall are to preserve the respiratory function and the thoracic wall integrity, therefore offering the patient appropriate respiratory mechanics, satisfactory aesthetic result and avoiding the needding for a second surgical intervention. There are several techniques and materials available for the surgery performance. We present the case of a patient who underwent successfully tumoral resection in-bloc and chest wall reconstruction.

  8. Optimum Insulation Thickness for Walls and Roofs for Reducing Peak Cooling Loads in Residential Buildings in Lahore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SIBGHA SIDDIQUE SIDDIQUE

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Thermal insulation is the most effective energy saving measure for cooling in buildings. Therefore, the main subject of many engineering investigations is the selection and determination of the optimum insulation thickness. In the present study, the optimum insulation thickness on external walls and roofs is determined based on the peak cooling loads for an existing residential building in Lahore, Pakistan. Autodesk® Revit 2013 is used for the analysis of the building and determination of the peak cooling loads. The analysis shows that the optimum insulation thickness to reduce peak cooling loads up to 40.1% is 1 inch for external walls and roof respectively.

  9. Crack growth in the through-thickness direction of hydrided thin-wall Zircaloy sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynaud, Patrick A.; Koss, Donald A.; Motta, Arthur T.

    2012-01-01

    In a reactivity-initiated accident, cladding failure may occur by crack initiation within a defect such as a hydride rim or blister and subsequent crack propagation through the thickness of the thin-wall cladding. In such a circumstance, determining the cladding resistance to crack propagation in the through-thickness direction is crucial to predicting cladding failure. To address this issue, through-thickness crack propagation in hydrided Zircaloy-4 sheet was analyzed at 25 °C, 300 °C, and 375 °C. At 25 °C, the fracture toughness decreased with increasing hydrogen content and with an increasing fraction of radial hydrides. Hydride particles fractured ahead of the crack tip, creating a path for crack growth. At both 300 °C and 375 °C, the resistance to crack-growth initiation was sufficiently high that crack extension was often caused by crack-tip blunting. There was no evidence of hydride particles fracturing near the crack tip, and no significant effect of hydrogen content on fracture toughness was observed at these elevated temperatures.

  10. Computed tomography (CT)-guided interstitial permanent implantation of (125)I seeds for refractory chest wall metastasis or recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ping; Liu, Chen; Wang, Junjie; Yang, Ruijie; Jiang, Yuliang; Tian, Suqing

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of 125I seeds implantation for refractory chest wall (CW) metastasis or recurrence under CT guidance. In addition we assessed initial data obtained on the therapeutic response for refractory CW metastasis or recurrence. Twenty consecutive patients underwent permanent implantation of 125I seeds (from Jul. 2004 to Jan. 2011) under computed tomography (CT) guidance. Postoperative dosimetry was routinely performed for all patients. The actuarial D90 of the implanted 125I seeds ranged from 100 Gy to 160 Gy (median: 130 Gy). The activity of 125I seeds ranged from 0.5 mCi to 0.78 mCi (median: 0.71 mCi). The total number of seeds implanted ranged from 8 to 269 (median: 53). The follow-up period ranged from 3 to 54 months (median: 11.5 months). The survival and local control probabilities were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Among all the 20 patients, 3 patients had complete remission CR (15%), 12 patients had partial remission PR (60%), 5 patients had stable disease SD. The 1-, 2-, 3- and 4-year tumor control rates were all 88.7% respectively. The 1- and 2-, 3-, 4-year cancer specific survival rates were 56.5% and 47.1%, 47.1%, 47.1% respectively. The 1- and 2-, 3-, 4-year overall survival rates were 53.3% and 35.6%, 35.6%, 35.6% respectively, with a median survival of 15 months (95% CI, 7.0-22.9). Mild brachial plexus injury was seen in one patient; grade 1 or 2 skin reactions were seen in 6 patients (30%) who had received external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) before. No grade 3 and 4 skin side effects were found. Rib fracture, ulceration, pneumothorax or hemopneumothorax were not seen. Interstitial permanent implantation of 125I seeds under CT guidance is feasible, efficacious and safe for refractory CW metastasis or recurrence.

  11. Analytical and experimental investigations into the controlled energy absorption characteristics of thick-walled tubes with circumferential grooves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darvizeh, Abolfazl [Islamic Azad University, Bandar-e Anzali (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Darvizeh, Mansour; Ansari, Reza; Meshkinzar, Ata [University of Guilan, Rasht (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    In this paper, the energy absorption characteristics of grooved circular tubes are investigated under quasi-static loading condition. For experiments, thick-walled tubes with circumferential grooves are prepared. The grooves divide the thick-walled tube into several shorter thin-walled portions. Specimens are subjected to axial crushing load to observe the effect of distribution of circular grooves on the deformation mechanism and energy absorption capacity. Geometrical parameters of the specimens are designed utilizing the Taguchi method to cover a reasonably wide range of groove length-to-wall thickness ratios. An analytical approach based on the concept of energy dissipation through the plastic hinges is applied. Taking the effect of strain hardening into account, the obtained analytical results are in good agreement with the experimental ones. The agreement between analytical and experimental results may indicate the validity of the proposed analytical approach. Desirable mechanism of deformation observed justifies the pre-forming method for obtaining favorable energy absorption characteristics.

  12. Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy for refractory bilateral breast cancer in a patient with extensive cutaneous metastasis in the chest and abdominal walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu YF

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Yueh-Feng Lu,1 Yu-Chin Lin,2 Kuo-Hsin Chen,3,4 Pei-Wei Shueng,1 Hsin-Pei Yeh,1 Chen-Hsi Hsieh1,5,6 1Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiology, 2Division of Oncology and Hematology, Department of Medicine, 3Department of Surgery, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, New Taipei City, 4Department of Electrical Engineering, Yuan-Ze University, Taoyuan, 5Department of Medicine, 6Institute of Traditional Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan Abstract: Treatment for bilateral breast cancer with chest wall and abdominal skin invasion normally involves conventional radiotherapy (RT; however, conventional RT provides inadequate target volume coverage and excessive treatment of large volumes of normal tissue. Helical tomotherapy (HT has the ability to deliver continuous craniocaudal irradiation that suppresses junction problems and provides good conformity of dose distribution. A 47-year-old female with stage IV bilateral breast cancer with chest wall and pectoralis major muscle invasion, lymphadenopathy, bilateral pleural effusion, and multiple bone metastases received chemotherapy and target therapy beginning in January 2014; 4 months after the initiation of chemotherapy, computed tomography revealed progression of chest and abdominal wall invasion. A total dose of 70.2 Gy was delivered to both breasts, the chest wall, the abdominal wall, and the bilateral supraclavicular nodal areas in 39 fractions via HT. The total planning target volume was 4,533.29 cm3. The percent of lung volume receiving at least 20 Gy (V20 was 28%, 22%, and 25% for the right lung, left lung, and whole lung, respectively. The mean dose to the heart was 8.6 Gy. Follow-up computed tomography revealed complete response after the RT course. Grade 1 dysphagia, weight loss, grade 2 neutropenia, and grade 3 dermatitis were noted during the RT course. Pain score decreased from 6 to 1. No cardiac, pulmonary, liver, or intestinal toxicity

  13. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... heart) and myocardial infarct (scar in the heart muscle due to prior obstruction of blood flow). determine ... ribs and sternum) and chest wall soft tissue (muscles and fat). assess for pericardial (thin sac around ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ribs and sternum) and chest wall soft tissue (muscles and fat). assess for pericardial (thin sac around the heart) disease. characterize mediastinal or pleural lesions seen by other ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... heart) and myocardial infarct (scar in the heart muscle due to prior obstruction of blood flow). determine ... ribs and sternum) and chest wall soft tissue (muscles and fat). assess for pericardial (thin sac around ...

  16. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CT Angiography Video: Myelography Video: CT of the Heart Video: Radioiodine I-131 Therapy Radiology and You ... x-ray is used to evaluate the lungs, heart and chest wall and may be used to ...

  17. A method of computing the transient temperature of thick walls from arbitrary variation of adiabatic-wall temperature and heat-transfer coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, P R

    1958-01-01

    A method of calculating the temperature of thick walls has been developed in which the time series and the response to a unit triangle variation of surface temperature concepts are used, together with essentially standard formulas for transient temperature and heat flow into thick walls. The method can be used without knowledge of the mathematical tools of its development. The method is particularly suitable for determining the wall temperature in one-dimensional thermal problems in aeronautics where there is a continuous variation of the heat-transfer coefficient and adiabatic-wall temperature. The method also offers a convenient means for solving the inverse problem of determining the heat-flow history when temperature history is known.

  18. Development of eddy current testing probe for thick-walled metal plate and quantitative evaluation of cracks

    CERN Document Server

    Sato, K; Uchimoto, T; Takagi, T

    2003-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the crack detection of thick-walled non-magnetic metal plates by eddy current testing, which is difficult because of Kelvin skin effect generally. The purpose of this research is the development of an new eddy current testing probe for cracks in thick-walled plates and crack shapes quantitative evaluation. The probe was designed, based on the numerical computation using 3D fast eddy current code. The advantages of this new probe are strong eddy current on the back of specimens and gentle decrement of eddy current in the thickness direction. Through experiments, we confirmed that this probe can detect the back artificial defect with 0.5 mm thickness on IN-CONEL 718 specimen with 7.0 mm thickness. Reconstruction of crack shapes was performed based on the experimental results with the inverse problem code developed by authors. The length and depth of reconstructed defects approximately agree with those of real crack. (author)

  19. Facilitating protein crystal cryoprotection in thick-walled plastic capillaries by high-pressure cryocooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Fan; Tate, Mark W; Gruner, Sol M

    2009-06-01

    Many steps in the X-ray crystallographic solution of protein structures have been automated. However, the harvesting and cryocooling of crystals still rely primarily on manual handling, frequently with consequent mechanical damage. An attractive alternative is to grow crystals directly inside robust plastic capillaries that may be cryocooled and mounted on the beamline goniometer. In this case, it is still desirable to devise a way to cryoprotect the crystals, which is difficult owing to the poor thermal conductivity of thick plastic capillary walls and the large thermal mass of the capillary and internal mother liquor. A method is described to circumvent these difficulties. It is shown that high-pressure cryocooling substantially reduced the minimal concentrations of cryoprotectants required to cryocool water inside capillaries without formation of ice crystals. The minimal concentrations of PEG 200, PEG 400 and glycerol necessary for complete vitrification under pressure cryocooling were determined.

  20. Unified solution of limit loads of thick wall cylinder subject to external pressure considering strain softening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Changfu; XIAO Shujun; YANG Yu

    2007-01-01

    Based on the unified strength theory [1],a unified strength criterion for strain softening materials,such as concrete or rock,was derived,and the elastic and plastic limit loads of a thick-walled cylinder made of these materials subject to external pressure were also given.In addition,the influence of some factors on the limit loads of such cylinders as the ratio of the external radius to intemal radius,rb/ra,the coefficient b,which reflects the effect of medium principal stress and the normal stress of the relevant surface on the material destroy degree,the ratio of tensile strength to compressed strength of the material,α,and the damage variable β were discussed in detail.Some examples were given and some meaningful results were obtained.

  1. Thick-walled anisotropic elliptic tube analyzed via curvilinear tensor calculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mareš T.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available After a brief introduction into the tensor calculus, the thick-walled anisotropic elliptic tube is analyzed. A procedure of the analysis is described in a stepwise manner. A choice of the appropriate coordinate systems is the first step. The second step consists of the determination of corresponding metric tensors. Then the elasticity tensor of a local orthotropy is transformed into a global computational coordinate system. Next the appropriate Christoffel symbols of the second kind are determined and the total potential energy of the system is expressed. At the end the solution is approximated by a Fourier series and for given geometrical values and loading the numerical results are obtained and graphically represented.It must be said that throughout the calculation the free software only was used and for the numerical operations an old laptop is sufficient. The author regards both the former and the latter as a great advantage of the demonstrated method.

  2. Anterior chest wall inflammation by whole body MRI in patients with spondyloarthritis: lack of association between clinical and imaging findings in a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Inflammatory involvement of the anterior chest wall (ACW) affects the quality of life of patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA), although involvement of the ACW is often neglected on clinical and imaging evaluation. Whole-body (WB) MRI is an imaging method used to assess the ACW in addition to the sacroiliac joints and spine without inconvenience for patients. Our goals in this study were to describe the distribution of ACW inflammation by WB MRI in both early and established SpA ...

  3. Postmastectomy radiotherapy of the chest wall. Comparison of electron-rotation technique and common tangential photon fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hehr, T.; Classen, J.; Huth, M.; Durst, I.; Bamberg, M.; Budach, W. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Christ, G. [Dept. of Medical Physics, Univ. of Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2004-10-01

    Background and purpose: different radiotherapy techniques are being used for postmastectomy irradiation. A retrospective analysis of patterns of locoregional failure (LRF) after modified radical mastectomy and axillary lymph node dissection followed by locoregional radiotherapy with or without systemic treatment was performed. Main emphasis was focused on the comparison of two postmastectomy radiotherapy techniques. Patients and methods: 287 evaluable patients with locally advanced disease and/or adverse pathologic features (pT3 17% of patients, pT4 35%, multicentricity 25%, pN more than three positive nodes and/or pN1biii 70%, ''close margins'' 29%, infiltration of pectoral fascia 20%) with or without adjuvant chemo-hormonal treatment were included between 1989 and 2000. Median age was 61 years (range 24-88 years). All patients had modified radical mastectomy and axillary lymphonodectomy level I-II(III) for primary breast cancer. Median total dose of conventionally fractionated radiotherapy to the chest wall was 50 Gy (range 46-56 Gy). A local boost to the tumor bed of 10 Gy was applied in 72 patients. 80% of the patients received supraclavicular and 60% ipsilateral internal mammary lymph node irradiation of 50 Gy. 19% of the patients received adjuvant chemo-hormonal therapy, 38% hormonal therapy, and 27% chemotherapy. The median follow-up of patients at risk was 43 months (average 54 months). Results: the 5-year locoregional tumor control (LRC), LRC first event, disease-free, and overall survival were 85%, 91%, 61%, and 70% (Kaplan-Meier analysis), respectively. Cox regression analysis showed that stage III (relative risk [RR] 1.7), more than three involved axillary lymph nodes (RR 5.1), and infiltration of the pectoral fascia (RR 3.2) increased the risk of locoregional failure, while positive estrogen receptor status (RR 0.3) was associated with a reduced risk. No statistically significant differences in LRC were observed for patients treated

  4. Effect of wall thickness of left ventricle on {sup 201}Tl myocardial SPECT images. Myocardial phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koto, Masanobu; Kawase, Osami [Kobe Univ. (Japan). Hospital; Namura, Hiroyuki; Yamasaki, Katsuhito; Kono, Michio

    1996-07-01

    {sup 201}Tl myocardial SPECT is known for better sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy than planar images in detecting coronary artery disease and diagnosing myocardial viability. SPECT images arc also superior to planar images in diagnostic sensitivity and anatomical orientation. However, as limitation of the spatial resolution of the machine, we often encounter poor SPECT plower image quality in patients with decreased wall thickness. To test the accuracy of SPECT images in patients with marked thinning of the left ventricular wall, as occurs in dilated cardiomyopathy, we performed a experimental study using myocardial phantom with 7 mm wall thickness. Tomographic image of the phantom images were rather heterogeneous, though no artificial defect was located Dilated cardiomyopathy is thought to be characterized by patchy defects in the left ventricle. Careful attention should be given to elucidating myocardial perfusion in patients with a thin left ventricle wall, as there are technical limitations in addition to clinical features. (author)

  5. Imaging of osteo-articular disorders of the anterior chest wall; Imagerie des affections osteo-articulaires de la paroi thoracique anterieure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grignon, B.; Prost-Rio, D.; Walter, F.; Rubini, B.; Roland, J. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 54 - Nancy (France); Jan, C.; Gaucher, A.; Regent, D. [Hopital de Brabois-Vandoeuvre, 54 - Nancy (France); Bresson, A. [Centre Hospitalier Regional, 54 - Briey (France)

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a pictorial display of osseous and articular lesions of the anterior chest wall. The role of CT and MR imaging in such disorders is emphasized. Imaging of the anterior thoracic wall by plain films is particularly difficult. However numerous disorders may be encountered. They include inflammatory hyperostosis and sclerosis of the clavicle and the sternum, condensing osteitis and post-traumatic osteolysis of the clavicle, radiation osteitis of the sternum and the ribs, septic arthritis of the sterno-clavicular joint, primary and secondary tumors of the sternum and the ribs. We illustrate a spectrum of such lesions in which CT and MR imaging provides acute evaluation of both soft tissue and bone details. (authors). 31 refs.

  6. Chest MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclear magnetic resonance - chest; Magnetic resonance imaging - chest; NMR - chest; MRI of the thorax; Thoracic MRI ... healthy enough to filter the contrast. During the MRI, the person who operates the machine will watch ...

  7. Exertional dyspnea associated with chest wall strapping is reduced when external dead space substitutes for part of the exercise stimulus to ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garske, Luke Albert; Lal, Ravin; Stewart, Ian Braidwood; Morris, Norman R; Cross, Troy James; Adams, Lewis

    2017-02-02

    Chest wall strapping has been used to assess mechanisms of dyspnea with restrictive lung disease. This study examined the hypothesis that dyspnea with restriction depends principally on the degree of reflex ventilatory stimulation. We compared dyspnea at the same (iso-)ventilation when added dead space provided a component of the ventilatory stimulus during constant work exercise. Eleven healthy males undertook a randomized controlled cross-over trial which compared four constant work exercise conditions (i) CTRL: unrestricted breathing at 90% Gas Exchange Threshold (GET), (ii) CTRL+DS: unrestricted breathing with 0.6 L dead space, at iso-ventilation to CTRL, (iii) CWS: chest strapping at 90% GET, (iv) CWS+DS: chest strapping with 0.6 L dead space, at iso-ventilation to CWS. Dead space was associated with reduced exercise intensity, and chest strapping reduced FVC by 30.4±2.2% (mean ± SE). Dyspnea at iso-ventilation was unchanged with CTRL+DS compared to CTRL (1.93±0.49 and 2.17±0.43, 0-10 numeric rating scale, respectively, P=0.244). Dyspnea was lower with CWS+DS compared to CWS (3.40±0.52 and 4.51±0.53 respectively, P=0.003). Perceived leg fatigue was reduced with CTRL+DS compared to CTRL (2.36±0.48 and 2.86±0.59 respectively, P=0.049) and lower with CWS+DS compared to CWS (1.86±0.30 and 4.00±0.79 respectively, P=0.006). With unrestricted breathing, dead space did not change dyspnea at iso-ventilation, inferring that dyspnea does not depend on the mode of reflex ventilatory stimulation in healthy individuals. With chest strapping, dead space presented a less potent stimulus to dyspnea. This suggests that dyspnea associated with chest strapping depends on the contribution of leg muscle work to ventilatory stimulation.

  8. Relation of aortic calcification, wall thickness, and distensibility with severity of coronary artery disease: evaluation with coronary CT angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Seonah; Yong, Hwan Seok; Doo, Kyung Won; Kang, Eun-Young; Woo, Ok Hee; Choi, Eun Jung [Dept. of Radiology, Korea Univ. Guro Hospital, Korea Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)], e-mail: yhwanseok@naver.com

    2012-10-15

    Background Three known risk factors for aortic atherosclerosis predict the severity of coronary artery disease (CAD): aortic calcification (AC), aortic wall thickness (AWT), and aortic distensibility (AD). Purpose To determine the relationship of AC, AWT, and AD with the severity of CAD. Material and Methods A total of 104 patients who underwent both coronary CT angiography (CCTA) and invasive coronary angiography were enrolled. The severity of CAD was assessed by three methods: the segment involvement score (SIS), the segment stenosis score (SSS), and the modified Gensini score (mG). We quantified AC using the Agatston method on low-dose ungated chest CT (LDCT). We measured AWT at the thickest portion of the descending thoracic aorta on CCTA. AD was calculated as the difference between the maximum and minimum areas of the ascending aorta and the pulse pressure. The relationships between the severity of CAD and the three aortic factors were assessed. Results The AC and AWT of the thoracic aorta were significantly higher in the occlusive CAD (OCAD) group (1984.21 {+-} 2986.10 vs. 733.00 {+-} 1648.71, P = 0.01; 4.13 {+-} 1.48 vs. 3.40 {+-} 1.01, P = 0.22). Patients with OCAD had more than one epicardial coronary artery with >50% luminal stenosis. The AC (r = 0.453 with SIS; r = 0.454 with SSS; r = 0.427 with mG) and the AWT (r = 0.279 with SIS; r = 0.324 with SSS; r = 0.304 with mG) were significantly correlated with all three methods, and the AD was negatively correlated with the SIS (r = - 0.221, P < 0.05, respectively) in the unadjusted model. After adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors, only the correlations between AC and all three methods assessing CAD remained significant. Conclusion There are significant relationships between AC, AWT and AD and severity of CAD. In particular, AC measured on LDCT is the most consistent predictor of severity of CAD.

  9. Simulation of the development and interaction of instabilities in a relativistic electron beam under variation of the beam wall thickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badarin, A. A.; Kurkin, S. A. [Saratov State University (Russian Federation); Koronovskii, A. A. [Yuri Gagarin State Technical University (Russian Federation); Rak, A. O. [Belorussian State University of Informatics and Radioelectronics (Belarus); Hramov, A. E., E-mail: hramovae@gmail.com [Saratov State University (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    The development and interaction of Bursian and diocotron instabilities in an annular relativistic electron beam propagating in a cylindrical drift chamber are investigated analytically and numerically as functions of the beam wall thickness and the magnitude of the external uniform magnetic field. It is found that the interaction of instabilities results in the formation of a virtual cathode with a complicated rotating helical structure and several reflection regions (electron bunches) in the azimuthal direction. It is shown that the number of electron bunches in the azimuthal direction increases with decreasing beam wall thickness and depends in a complicated manner on the magnitude of the external magnetic field.

  10. Development of Wall-Thinning Evaluation Procedure for Nuclear Power Plant Piping—Part 1: Quantification of Thickness Measurement Deviation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hun Yun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Pipe wall thinning by flow-accelerated corrosion and various types of erosion is a significant and costly damage phenomenon in secondary piping systems of nuclear power plants (NPPs. Most NPPs have management programs to ensure pipe integrity due to wall thinning that includes periodic measurements for pipe wall thicknesses using nondestructive evaluation techniques. Numerous measurements using ultrasonic tests (UTs; one of the nondestructive evaluation technologies have been performed during scheduled outages in NPPs. Using the thickness measurement data, wall thinning rates of each component are determined conservatively according to several evaluation methods developed by the United States Electric Power Research Institute. However, little is known about the conservativeness or reliability of the evaluation methods because of a lack of understanding of the measurement error. In this study, quantitative models for UT thickness measurement deviations of nuclear pipes and fittings were developed as the first step for establishing an optimized thinning evaluation procedure considering measurement error. In order to understand the characteristics of UT thickness measurement errors of nuclear pipes and fittings, round robin test results, which were obtained by previous researchers under laboratory conditions, were analyzed. Then, based on a large dataset of actual plant data from four NPPs, a quantitative model for UT thickness measurement deviation is proposed for plant conditions.

  11. Development of wall-thinning evaluation procedure for nuclear power plant piping-part 1: Quantification of thickness measurement deviation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Hun; Moon, Seung Jae [Dept. of Material Engineering, KEPCO Engineering and Construction, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Young Jin [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Pipe wall thinning by flow-accelerated corrosion and various types of erosion is a significant and costly damage phenomenon in secondary piping systems of nuclear power plants (NPPs). Most NPPs have management programs to ensure pipe integrity due to wall thinning that includes periodic measurements for pipe wall thicknesses using nondestructive evaluation techniques. Numerous measurements using ultrasonic tests (UTs; one of the nondestructive evaluation technologies) have been performed during scheduled outages in NPPs. Using the thickness measurement data, wall thinning rates of each component are determined conservatively according to several evaluation methods developed by the United States Electric Power Research Institute. However, little is known about the conservativeness or reliability of the evaluation methods because of a lack of understanding of the measurement error. In this study, quantitative models for UT thickness measurement deviations of nuclear pipes and fittings were developed as the first step for establishing an optimized thinning evaluation procedure considering measurement error. In order to understand the characteristics of UT thickness measurement errors of nuclear pipes and fittings, round robin test results, which were obtained by previous researchers under laboratory conditions, were analyzed. Then, based on a large dataset of actual plant data from four NPPs, a quantitative model for UT thickness measurement deviation is proposed for plant conditions.

  12. Computed Radiography and Computed Tomography of Chest Wall Diseases%胸壁病变的计算机X线摄影和CT检查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪庆坚; 李惠民; 肖湘生; 王晨光; 胡爱妹

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze computed radiography (CR) and computed tomography (CT) findings of diseases of chest wall and to investigate the value of CR and CT in diagnosis of these diseases. Materials and Methods: The findings and diagnoses of 39 cases with proved (by fina needle biopsy, or surgory and/or pathology, of clinical follow up) chest wall disease were analysed retrospectively. Resulte: In 12 infective lesions, including purulent infection (4 cases) and tuberculosis (8 cases), the correct dignosis was made in 4cases by CR and in 11 cases by CT. In 16 soft tissue tumors, including lipoma (7 cases), fibrosarcoma (4 cases), hemangioma (1 case), neurofibroma (1 case), malignant fibrous histocytoma (1case), aggressive fibromatosis (1 case) and liposarcoma (1 case), the correct diagnosis was made in 3cases by CR and in 14 cases by CT. In 11 bone lesions, including fibrous dysplasia (7 cases), chondroma (2 cases), myeloma (lcase) and cosinophilic granuloma (1 case), the correct diagnosis was made in 8cases by CR and in 10 cases by CT. Conclusion: CR is useful in the dignosis of chest wall bone diseases. CT is obviously superior to CR for demonstration of all chest wall diseases espacially for soft tissue lesions. CT has definite value for the differentiation of malignant from benign tumore of chest wall, but still has certain limit.%目的:探讨胸壁病变的计算机X线摄影(CR)和CT表现及其诊断价值,提高对胸壁病变的认识。材料和方法:回顾分析经手术病理、穿刺细胞学检查或临床随访资料证实的39例CR和CT资料。结果:感染组12例中(包括化脓性感染4例,胸壁结核8例),CR准确诊断4例,CT诊断11例;软组织肿瘤组16例中(包括脂肪瘤7例,纤维肉瘤4例,血管瘤、神经纤维瘤、恶性纤维组织细胞瘤、侵袭性纤维瘤病和脂肪肉瘤各l例),CR准确诊断3例,CT诊断14例;骨肿瘤和肿瘤样病变组11例中(包括骨纤维异常增殖症7例,软骨瘤2

  13. A comparative study on optimum insulation thickness of walls and energy savings in equatorial and tropical climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Modeste Kameni Nematchoua

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The increase outdoor temperature acts directly on the indoor climate of buildings. In Cameroon, the energy consumption demand in the buildings sector has been rapidly increasing in recent years; so well that energy supply does not always satisfy demand. Thermal insulation technology can be one of the leading methods for reducing energy consumption in these new buildings. However, choosing the thickness of the insulation material often causes high insulation costs. In the present study, the optimum insulation thickness, energy saving and payback period were calculated for buildings in Yaoundé and Garoua cities, located in two climatic regions in Cameroon. The economic model including the cost of insulation material and the present value of energy consumption and the cost over a life time of 22 years of the building, were used to find the optimum insulation thickness, energy saving, and payback period. Materials that extruded polystyrene were chosen and used for two typical wall structures (concrete block (HCB and compressed stabilized earth block wall (CSEB. The early cooling transmission loads, according to wall orientations and percentage of radiation blocked were calculated using the explicit finite-difference method under steady periodic conditions. As a result, it was found that the west- and east-facing walls are the least favourite in the cooling season, whereas the south and north orientations are the most economical. Although wall orientation had a significant effect on the optimum insulation thickness, it had a more significant effect on energy savings. In equatorial region (Yaoundé, for south orientation, the optimum insulation thickness was 0.08 m for an energy savings of 51.69 $/m2. Meanwhile, in tropical region (Garoua, for north orientation, the optimum insulation thickness was 0.11 m for an energy savings of 97.82 $/m2.

  14. Novel MRI Technique Enables Non-Invasive Measurement of Atrial Wall Thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Marta; Morgan, Ross; Theron, Adeline; Dillon-Murphy, Desmond; Chubb, Henry; Whitaker, John; Henningsson, Markus; Aljabar, Paul; Schaeffter, Tobias; Kolbitsch, Christoph; Aslanidi, Oleg V

    2017-08-01

    Knowledge of atrial wall thickness (AWT) has the potential to provide important information for patient stratification and the planning of interventions in atrial arrhythmias. To date, information about AWT has only been acquired in post-mortem or poor-contrast computed tomography (CT) studies, providing limited coverage and highly variable estimates of AWT. We present a novel contrast agent-free MRI sequence for imaging AWT and use it to create personalized AWT maps and a biatrial atlas. A novel black-blood phase-sensitive inversion recovery protocol was used to image ten volunteers and, as proof of concept, two atrial fibrillation patients. Both atria were manually segmented to create subject-specific AWT maps using an average of nearest neighbors approach. These were then registered non-linearly to generate an AWT atlas. AWT was 2.4 ± 0.7 and 2.7 ± 0.7 mm in the left and right atria, respectively, in good agreement with post-mortem and CT data, where available. AWT was 2.6 ± 0.7 mm in the left atrium of a patient without structural heart disease, similar to that of volunteers. In a patient with structural heart disease, the AWT was increased to 3.1 ± 1.3 mm. We successfully designed an MRI protocol to non-invasively measure AWT and create the first whole-atria AWT atlas. The atlas can be used as a reference to study alterations in thickness caused by atrial pathology. The protocol can be used to acquire personalized AWT maps in a clinical setting and assist in the treatment of atrial arrhythmias.

  15. Utilization of a global data grid repository in CAD assessment of carotid wall thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Marco A.; Lee, Jasper; Zhou, Zheng; Pilon, Paulo E.; Lage, Silvia G.

    2007-03-01

    A CAD method of calculating wall thickness of carotid vessels addresses the time-consuming issue of using B-mode ultrasound as well as inter- and intra-observer variability in results. Upon selection of a region-of-interest and filtering of a series of ultrasound carotid images, the CAD is able to measure the geometry of the lumen and plaque surfaces using a least-square fitting of the active contours during systole and diastole. To evaluate the approach, ultrasound image sequences from 30 patients were submitted to the procedure. The images were stored on an international data grid repository that consists of three international sites: Image Processing and Informatics (IPI) Laboratory at University of Southern California, USA; InCor (Heart Institute) at Sao Paulo, Brazil, and Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong. The three chosen sites are connected with high speed international networks including the Internet2, and the Brazilian National Research and Education Network (RNP2). The Data Grid was used to store, backup, and share the ultrasound images and analysis results, which provided a large-scale and a virtual data system. In order to study the variability between the automatic and manual definition of artery boundaries, the pooled mean and the standard deviation for the difference between measurements of lumen diameter were computed. The coefficient of variation and correlation were also calculated. For the studied population the difference between manual and automatic measurement of the lumen diameter (LD) and intima-media-thickness (IMT) were 0.12 +/-0.10 and 0.09+/- 0.06, respectively.

  16. Gastric Wall Thickness and the Choice of Linear Staples in Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy: Challenging Conventional Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Ghanem, Yasmin; Meydan, Chanan; Segev, Lior; Rubin, Moshe; Blumenfeld, Orit; Spivak, Hadar

    2017-03-01

    Little evidence is available on the choice of linear staple reloads in laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG). Previous literature recommends matching closed staple height (CSH) to tissue-thickness (TT) to avoid ischemia. Our objective was to examine feasibility and safety of "tight" hemostatic (CSH/TT <1) stapling and map the entire gastric wall TT in LSG patients. Prospectively collected outcomes on 202 consecutive patients who underwent LSG with tight order of staples (Ethicon Endosurgery) in this order: pre-pylorus-black (CSH = 2.3 mm), antrum-green (CSH = 2.0 mm), antrum/body-blue (CSH = 1.5 mm), and white (CSH = 1.0 mm) on the body and fundus. Measurements of entire gastric wall TT were made on the first 100 patients' gastric specimens with an electronic-dogmatic indicator. Study included 147 females and 55 males with a mean age of 41.5 ± 11.9 years and body mass index of 41.5 ± 3.8 kg/m(2). Gastric wall measurements revealed mean CSH/TT ratio <1, decreasing from 0.7 ± 0.1 at pre-pylorus to 0.5 ± 0.1 at the fundus. There were 3.1% mechanical failures, mainly (68%) at pre-pylorus-black reloads. Post-operative bleeding occurred in 5 (2.5%) patients. There were no leaks or clinical evidence of sleeve ischemia. Stepwise regression analysis revealed that body mass index (P < 0.001), hypertension (P < 0.01), and male gender (P < 0.001) were associated with increased gastric TT. Our study suggests that reloads with CSH/TT <1 in LSG including staples with CSH of 1 mm on body and fundus are safe. The results challenge the concept that tight stapling cause's ischemia. Since tight reloads are designed to improve hemostasis, their application could have clinical benefit.

  17. Parachordoma of the chest waII: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Seung Hyun; Sung, Nak Kwan; Jung, Kyung Jae; Lee, Young Hwan; Park, Young Chan; Kim, Ho Kyun; Park, So Yoon; Park, Ki Sung [School of Medicine, The Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Sung Min [School of Medicine, Keimyoung Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-09-01

    We report radiologic findings in a case of chest wall parachordoma in a 32-year-old maIe with right upper back pain. The plain radiograph and CT scan of the chest revealed a soft tissue mass in the right lateral chest wall with rib erosion. En-bloc surgical resection with chest wall reconstruction was performed.

  18. Wall thickness measurement using resonant phenomena of circumferential Lamb waves generated by plural transducer elements located evenly on girth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Hideo; Iwata, Kodai; Ishikawa, Masashi

    2016-07-01

    We present a novel method of measuring the pipe wall thickness using the resonance of the circumferential (C-) Lamb wave generated by a piezoelectric ring-shaped sensor (PS). The PS is a special device for an axially propagating torsional wave; however, the C-Lamb waves are generated simultaneously as spurious signals owing to the structure of the PS. Particularly under resonant conditions, the C-Lamb waves are dominantly generated, distorting the axially propagating wave. In this method, these troublesome spurious signals are used effectively for the measurement of the wall thickness under the PS location that is a dead zone of the PS itself. The method can compensate for its drawback, namely, the dead zone problem, without using additional instruments. In this study, the mechanisms of the generation and resonance of the C-Lamb waves were first explained. Secondly, the principle of the wall thickness estimation utilizing the resonance of the C-Lamb waves was proposed. Finally, experimental verifications were carried out. The estimated wall thicknesses agreed very well (maximum 1.5% error) with those measured by a micrometer caliper under suitable resonant conditions.

  19. A Comparison of American, Norwegian, and Russian Standards in Calculating the Wall Thickness of Submarine Gas Pipeline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy Dianita

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the key issues in the pipeline design is wall thickness calculation. This paper highlights a comparison of wall thickness calculation methods of submarine gas pipeline based on Norwegian Standard (DNV-OS-F101, Indonesian Standard SNI 3474 which refers to American Standard(ASME B31.8, and Russian Standard (VN39-1.9-005-98. A calculation of wall thickness for a submarine gas pipeline in Indonesia (pressure 12 MPa, external diameter 668 mm gives the results of 18.2 mm (VN39-1.9-005-98, 16 mm (ASME B31.8, and 13.5 mm (DNV-OS-F101.The design formula of hoop stress due to internal pressure is interpreted in different ways for every standard. Only Norwegian Standard requires calculating hoop stresses in the inner surface, which leads to a decreased value of the wall thickness. Furthermore, the calculation of collapse factor dueto external pressure is only regulated in Americanand Norwegian Standards while Russian Standard uses that factor as an intermediate parameter in calculating local buckling. For propagation buckling, either Russian or American Standard explains empirical formula of critical hydrostatics pressure as the input in propagation buckling calculation. This formula is almost similar to the empirical formula of Norwegian Standard. From the comparison of these standards, DNV OS-F101 gives more stringent requirements than others

  20. Development of on-line wall thickness gauge for small size seamless tube. Shokei seamless netsukan nikuatsukei no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okumura, T.; Konya, N.; Oka, H.; Kasuya, T. (Kawasaki Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-03-01

    In order to heighten the accuracy of small size seamless tube wall thickness, hot wall thickness gauge was developed to be installed, immediately behind the finishing/rolling mill, for the on-line measurement, of which the method was by the parallel-beam transmissivity of gamma-ray. The measurement unit, aiming at flexible manufacturing system (FMS), is completely automated in correcting the accuracy, changing the sizes, etc. The damping characteristics of gamma-ray beam can be expressed by a characteristic function, taking the outside diameter and wall thickness of subject tube as parameters. The functional calculation, as based on measurement of transmitted quantity of gamma-ray through the three-dimensional steel material, changes, depending upon the outside diameter, wall thickness and material specification of subject tube. System was so applied as to calculate it therefore on a case-by-case basis. Though in the vicinity of tube end, the transmitted quantity of gamma-ray is largely influenced by the horizontal dislocation, that influence is slack in the middle part of tube. Therefore, the cross sectional division was made dense and sparse in the end part and middle part, respectively of tube, which division could diminish the error from several percent to less than 0.1%. The static noise was compressed by the optimized digital filter. That gauge is presently applied for the operational administration of small size seamless tube rolling. 2 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. A borehole stability study by newly designed laboratory tests on thick-walled hollow cylinders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.S. Hashemi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available At several mineral exploration drilling sites in Australia, weakly consolidated formations mainly consist of sand particles that are poorly bonded by cementing agents such as clay, iron oxide cement or calcite. These formations are being encountered when drilling boreholes to the depth of up to 200 m. To study the behaviour of these materials, thick-walled hollow cylinder (TWHC and solid cylindrical synthetic specimens were designed and prepared by adding Portland cement and water to sand grains. The effects of different parameters such as water and cement contents, grain size distribution and mixture curing time on the characteristics of the samples were studied to identify the mixture closely resembling the formation at the drilling site. The Hoek triaxial cell was modified to allow the visual monitoring of grain debonding and borehole breakout processes during the laboratory tests. The results showed the significance of real-time visual monitoring in determining the initiation of the borehole breakout. The size-scale effect study on TWHC specimens revealed that with the increasing borehole size, the ductility of the specimen decreases, however, the axial and lateral stiffnesses of the TWHC specimen remain unchanged. Under different confining pressures the lateral strain at the initiation point of borehole breakout is considerably lower in a larger size borehole (20 mm compared to that in a smaller one (10 mm. Also, it was observed that the level of peak strength increment in TWHC specimens decreases with the increasing confining pressure.

  2. Reduction of the residual stresses in cold expanded thick-walled cylinders by plastic compression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    V.F. SKVORTSOV; A.O. BOZNAK; A.B. KIM; A. Yu ARLYAPOV; A.I. DMITRIEV

    2016-01-01

    We suppose that in order to maintain high accuracy of holes and to lower residual stresses after cold expansion of thick-walled cylinders, which undergo cross-section plastic deformation, it is necessary to perform axial plastic compression and subsequent cold expansion with small interferences. To test this hypothesis, we studied hoop, radial and axial residual stresses in cylinders made of carbon steel AISI 1050 with hole diameter of 5 mm, outer diameter of 15 mm and length of 30 mm by Sachs method as well as accuracy of expanded holes. It is found that double cold expansion with total interference equal to 5.1%generates hoop residual stresses with largest absolute value equal to 284 MPa and ensures high holes accuracy (IT7). After plastic compression with strain equal to 0.5 and 1%the mentioned stresses reduced to 120 and 75 MPa respectively, and accuracy of the holes reduced as well. Subsequent cold expansion with small interference equal to 0.9%helps to restore holes accuracy (IT7) gained by double cold expansion and ensure that absolute value of hoop residual stresses (177 MPa) is lower compared to double cold expansion.

  3. ELASTOPLASTIC ANALYSIS OF THICK-WALL CYLINDER CONSIDERING THE MATERIAL'S DILATANCY CHARACTER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江崎哲郎; 张铭; 竹下昭博; 三谷泰浩

    1995-01-01

    Impermeable bentonite or its mixtures have been proposed as candidate materials to be used in the geotechnical disposal of radioactive nuclear waste. These materials are filled in the space between a canister containing radioactive nuclear waste and an underground chamber to absorb the radionuclide emitting from the canister and simultaneously retard its migration accompanying the permeation of underground water to prevent the surrounding environment from pollution. On the basis of the established elastoplastic strain-hardening mechanical model considering the material's dilatancy character, the authors carry out the stress-strain analysis of a thick-wall cylinder in a plane strain state subjected to a pressure difference between internal and external pressures. The analysis may be expected to be a theoretical basis for developing a coupled shear and permeability test apparatus for conducting a permeability test along a sheared plane in a specimen. The apparatus will be used to study the effects of shear strain on the variation of geotechnical materials′ permeability coefficient in order to evaluate the influence of shear strain caused by nonuniform deformation and/or earthquake on the long-term safety of the disposal system of radioactive nuclear waste. The theoretical analysis methods in this paper can be directly spread to the analysis of the deformation and stability of tunnels or roadways driven in soft soils or high moisture-bearing soft rocks.

  4. STATIONARY PROBLEM OF MOISTURE-INDUCED ELASTICITY OF HETEROGENEOUS THICK-WALLED CYLINDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreev Vladimir Igorevich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Many problems of identification of the stress-strain state against the background of the heat and mass transfer are solved through the application of constant (averaged values of mechanical properties (elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio and derivation of differential equations with constant coefficients. Due to irregular distribution of temperature and other factors of impact, including the moisture content, mechanical properties of many materials change significantly; therefore, the problems in question are solved within the framework of mechanics of heterogeneous bodies. In this paper, the authors solve the classical problem of the steady-state moisture-induced elasticity of a thick-walled cylinder by taking account of the changes in the value of the elastic modulus caused by the influence of moisture. In this case, the problem is reduced to a differential equation with variable coefficients, which makes the solution more complicated though more accurate. It is proven that due regard for the heterogeneity leads to a significant increase in stresses, if compared to the solution based on the mean values of the modulus of elasticity.

  5. Optimum heating of thick-walled pressure components assuming a quasi-steady state of temperature distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzierwa, Piotr; Trojan, Marcin; Taler, Dawid; Kamińska, Katarzyna; Taler, Jan

    2016-08-01

    As a result of the development of wind farms, the gas — steam blocks, which shall quickly ensure energy supply in case the wind velocity is too low, are introduced to the energy system. To shorten the start-up time of the gas — steam and conventional blocks, the structure of the basic components of the blocks are changed, e.g. by reducing the diameter of the boiler, the thickness of its wall is also reduced. The attempts were also made to revise the currently binding TRD 301 regulations, replacing them by the EN 12952-3 European Standard, to reduce the allowable heating and cooling rates of thick walled boiler components. The basic assumption, on which the boiler regulations allowing to calculate the allowable temperature change rates of pressure components were based, was the quasi — steady state of the temperature field in the simple shaped component, such as a slab, cylindrical or spherical wall.

  6. Current-induced domain wall motion in Co/Ni nano-wires with different Co and Ni thicknesses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, K; Chiba, D; Koyama, T; Yamada, G; Ono, T [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto, 611-0011 (Japan); Tanigawa, H; Fukami, S; Suzuki, T; Ohshima, N; Ishiwata, N [NEC Corporation, 1120 Shimokuzawa, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5298 (Japan); Nakatani, Y, E-mail: ono@scl.kyoto-u.ac.jp [University of Electro-communications, Chofu, Tokyo, 182-8585 (Japan)

    2011-01-01

    The authors have investigated magnetic domain wall motion induced by electric currents in ferromagnetic nano-wires made of Co/Ni multilayers. The thicknesses of Co and Ni layers were changed, whereas the numbers of layer stacks of Co and Ni were the same in all samples. The sample with thinner total Co/Ni thickness showed the lower threshold current density for the domain wall motion as an overall trend, which is qualitatively in agreement with the expectation by the theory based on the adiabatic spin-transfer model. The lowest threshold current density was 2.9x10{sup 11} A/m{sup 2} obtained in the sample with the total Co/Ni thickness of 3.4 nm and the wire width of 110 nm.

  7. Evaluation of ECG changes after Radiotherapy of left chest wall by Electron in patients with left breast cancer who receive Anthracycline based chemotherapy following mastectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Emami

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiovascular damage after Radiotherapy of left chest wall for left breast cancer is a potential fear, therefore studing both the possible causes of radiation-induced heart damage and preventive measures are crucial issues in radiation therapy of breast cancer. The present study investigates noninvasively the possible acute and chronic ECG changes and their incidences after Radiotherapy in patients with left sided breast cancer who have received 6-8 courses of Anthracycline based chemotherapy following mastectomy. Methods: 56 patients with breast cancer (invasive ductal carcinoma who had been undergone modified radical mastectomy, adjuvant Anthracycline based chemotherapy, and left sided chest wall electron therapy with direct field, have been evaluated. All patients investigated with physical examination and standard 12 leads ECG before, and immediately after completion of radiation therapy, and 6 months afterward. Results: New electrocardiographic changes after therapy were seen in 3 patients (5.35% and reduced to 2 cases (3.57% after 6 months. there was no significant difference in T wave findings before and after radiation therapy(P=0.521.Also there wasn’t any correlation between stage of cancer and any changes in ECG findings after radiation therapy (P=0.56. Conclusion: There were no clinical cardiac symptoms or signs after Radiotherapy. Most affected leads in ECG were V1-V4 and the main abnormality was Inverted T wave. This findings suggest that the most acute and chronic electrocardiographic effect of irradiation on heart is repolarization abnormality. This study suggests that there are no significant ECG changes after Radiotherapy of left chest wall by electron beam in patients with left sided breast cancer who has received Anthracycline based chemotherapy following mastectomy. Also Radiotherapy by electron doesn't induce any clinical cardiac symptoms and signs in these patients. Therefore, we recommend

  8. Pulmonary hyperinflation and respiratory distress following solvent aspiration in a patient with asthma: expectoration of bronchial casts and clinical improvement with high-frequency chest wall oscillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Toshihiko; Kawazu, Taketoshi; Iwashita, Kazuo; Yahata, Ritsuko

    2004-11-01

    An 18-year-old student with a history of asthma accidentally inhaled organic solvent during a class, with immediate cough and dyspnea that worsened over several hours. He presented in severe respiratory distress, with hypoxemia and marked pulmonary hyperinflation. Administration of inhaled bronchodilator was ineffective because of agitation, and the patient could not be positioned for chest physiotherapy to treat presumed widespread mucus plugging. High-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) in the sitting position initially caused increased distress but was subsequently tolerated when noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation (NPPV) via nasal mask was initiated. Almost immediately, the patient began expectorating bronchial mucus casts, with concomitant clinical improvement. Endotracheal intubation was avoided, and with aggressive pharmacologic treatment for acute severe asthma and continuation of intermittent HFCWO-NPPV, the patient made a full recovery over the next several days. This case suggests that the combination of HFCWO and NPPV may be helpful in the presence of mucus plugging as a complication of acute inhalation injury or acute severe asthma.

  9. Malign Recurrence of Primary Chest Wall Hemangiopericytoma in the Lung after Four Years: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulay Akman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemangiopericytoma (HPC may develop in every site where the endothelial tissue exits and primarily develops in the skeletal-muscular system or the skin. Adult cases of HPC generally exhibit a benign course. 20–30% of the cases may show a malign course. The tumors that show more than four mitoses, a focal area of necrosis, and increased cellularity on a magnification ×10 are considered as malign. In our paper, we presented our case who showed a lung metastasis at the end of 4 years and who developed a pathological fracture of the right humerus at the end of approximately 2 years, because hemangiopericytoma is rarely seen in the chest wall as a primary tumor.

  10. Radio-guided occult lesion localisation using iodine 125 Seeds “ROLLIS” to guide surgical removal of an impalpable posterior chest wall melanoma metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dissanayake, Shashini [Western Hospital, Footscray, Victoria (Australia); Dissanayake, Deepthi [Royal Perth Hospital Perth, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Taylor, Donna B [Royal Perth Hospital Perth, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); School of Surgery, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia (Australia); Western Hospital, Footscray, Victoria (Australia)

    2015-09-15

    Cancer screening and surveillance programmes and the use of sophisticated imaging tools such as positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) have increased the detection of impalpable lesions requiring imaging guidance for excision. A new technique involves intra-lesional insertion of a low-activity iodine-125 ({sup 125}I) seed and detection of the radioactive signal in theatre using a hand-held gamma probe to guide surgery. Whilst several studies describe using this method to guide the removal of impalpable breast lesions, only a handful of publications report its use to guide excision of lesions outside the breast. We describe a case in which radio-guided occult lesion localisation using an iodine 125 seed was used to guide excision of an impalpable posterior chest wall metastasis detected on PET-CT.

  11. Isolated implant metastasis in chest wall due to seeding of transpleurally placed PTBD catheter tract in a case of hilar cholangiocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukder, Shibojit; Behera, Arunanshu; Tandup, Cherring; Mitra, Suvradeep

    2017-04-18

    Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) catheter site metastasis in cases of cholangiocarcinoma is reported sporadically. But it is unusual to see left-sided tumour metastasising to the right PTBD catheter site. Metastasis, in general, has a poor prognosis, but recurrence along the catheter tract in the absence of other systemic diseases can be a different scenario altogether. To date, there is no consensus on the management of this form of metastasis. But carefully selected patients can benefit from aggressive surgical resection. We report a case of a young patient with isolated chest wall metastasis 1 year after resection of left-sided hilar cholangiocarcinoma. The metastasis was resected and, on pathological analysis, was confirmed to be due to implantation of malignant cells along the tract of the PTBD catheter placed via a transpleural route. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. Pressure-induced wall thickness variations in multi-layered wall of a pollen tube and Fourier decomposition of growth oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietruszka, Mariusz; Haduch-Sendecka, Aleksandra

    2015-04-01

    The augmented growth equation introduced by Ortega is solved for the apical portion of the pollen tube as an oscillating volume, which we approach in the framework of a two-fluid model in which the two fluids represent the constant pressure and the fluctuating features of the system. Based on routine Fourier analysis, we calculate the energy spectrum of the oscillating pollen tube, and discuss the resonant frequency problem of growth rate oscillations. We also outline a descriptive model for cell wall thickness fluctuations associated with small, yet regular variations (~ 0.01 MPa) observed in turgor pressure. We propose that pressure changes must lead to the sliding of wall layers, indirectly resulting in a wave of polarization of interlayer bonds. We conclude that pollen tube wall thickness may oscillate due to local variations in cell wall properties and relaxation processes. These oscillations become evident because of low amplitude/high frequency pressure fluctuations δP being superimposed on turgor pressure P. We also show that experimentally determined turgor pressure oscillates in a strict periodical manner. A solitary frequency f0 ≈ 0.066 Hz of these (~ 0.01 MPa in magnitude) oscillations for lily pollen tubes was established by the discrete Fourier transform and Lorentz fit.

  13. Reproducibility of Gadolinium Enhancement Patterns and Wall Thickness in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Granillo, Gaston A., E-mail: grodriguezgranillo@gmail.com; Deviggiano, Alejandro; Capunay, Carlos; Zan, Macarena C. De; Carrascosa, Patricia [Department of Cardiovascular Imaging - Diagnóstico Maipú, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2016-07-15

    Reproducibility data of the extent and patterns of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is limited. To explore the reproducibility of regional wall thickness (WT), LGE extent, and LGE patterns in patients with HCM assessed with cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). The extent of LGE was assessed by the number of segments with LGE, and by the total LV mass with LGE (% LGE); and the pattern of LGE-CMR was defined for each segment. A total of 42 patients (672 segments) with HCM constituted the study population. The mean WT measurements showed a mean difference between observers of -0.62 ± 1.0 mm (6.1%), with limits of agreement of 1.36 mm; -2.60 mm and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of 0.95 (95% CI 0.93-0.96). Maximum WT measurements showed a mean difference between observers of -0.19 ± 0.8 mm (0.9%), with limits of agreement of 1.32 mm; -1.70 mm, and an ICC of 0.95 (95% CI 0.91-0.98). The % LGE showed a mean difference between observers of -1.17 ± 1.2 % (21%), with limits of agreement of 1.16%; -3.49%, and an ICC of 0.94 (95% CI 0.88-0.97). The mean difference between observers regarding the number of segments with LGE was -0.40 ± 0.45 segments (11%), with limits of agreement of 0.50 segments; -1.31 segments, and an ICC of 0.97 (95% CI 0.94-0.99). The number of segments with LGE might be more reproducible than the percent of the LV mass with LGE.

  14. Reproducibility of Gadolinium Enhancement Patterns and Wall Thickness in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Granillo, Gaston A.; Deviggiano, Alejandro; Capunay, Carlos; Zan, Macarena C. De; Carrascosa, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Background Reproducibility data of the extent and patterns of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is limited. Objective To explore the reproducibility of regional wall thickness (WT), LGE extent, and LGE patterns in patients with HCM assessed with cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). Methods The extent of LGE was assessed by the number of segments with LGE, and by the total LV mass with LGE (% LGE); and the pattern of LGE-CMR was defined for each segment. Results A total of 42 patients (672 segments) with HCM constituted the study population. The mean WT measurements showed a mean difference between observers of -0.62 ± 1.0 mm (6.1%), with limits of agreement of 1.36 mm; -2.60 mm and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of 0.95 (95% CI 0.93-0.96). Maximum WT measurements showed a mean difference between observers of -0.19 ± 0.8 mm (0.9%), with limits of agreement of 1.32 mm; -1.70 mm, and an ICC of 0.95 (95% CI 0.91-0.98). The % LGE showed a mean difference between observers of -1.17 ± 1.2 % (21%), with limits of agreement of 1.16%; -3.49%, and an ICC of 0.94 (95% CI 0.88-0.97). The mean difference between observers regarding the number of segments with LGE was -0.40 ± 0.45 segments (11%), with limits of agreement of 0.50 segments; -1.31 segments, and an ICC of 0.97 (95% CI 0.94-0.99). Conclusions The number of segments with LGE might be more reproducible than the percent of the LV mass with LGE. PMID:27305110

  15. Reproducibility of Gadolinium Enhancement Patterns and Wall Thickness in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaston A. Rodriguez-Granillo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Reproducibility data of the extent and patterns of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM is limited. Objective: To explore the reproducibility of regional wall thickness (WT, LGE extent, and LGE patterns in patients with HCM assessed with cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR. Methods: The extent of LGE was assessed by the number of segments with LGE, and by the total LV mass with LGE (% LGE; and the pattern of LGE-CMR was defined for each segment. Results: A total of 42 patients (672 segments with HCM constituted the study population. The mean WT measurements showed a mean difference between observers of -0.62 ± 1.0 mm (6.1%, with limits of agreement of 1.36 mm; -2.60 mm and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC of 0.95 (95% CI 0.93-0.96. Maximum WT measurements showed a mean difference between observers of -0.19 ± 0.8 mm (0.9%, with limits of agreement of 1.32 mm; -1.70 mm, and an ICC of 0.95 (95% CI 0.91-0.98. The % LGE showed a mean difference between observers of -1.17 ± 1.2 % (21%, with limits of agreement of 1.16%; -3.49%, and an ICC of 0.94 (95% CI 0.88-0.97. The mean difference between observers regarding the number of segments with LGE was -0.40 ± 0.45 segments (11%, with limits of agreement of 0.50 segments; -1.31 segments, and an ICC of 0.97 (95% CI 0.94-0.99. Conclusions: The number of segments with LGE might be more reproducible than the percent of the LV mass with LGE.

  16. Effect of Heat Flux on Creep Stresses of Thick-Walled Cylindrical Pressure Vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosayeb Davoudi Kashkoli

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Assuming that the thermo-creep response of the material is governed by Norton’s law, an analytical solution is presented for the calculation of time-dependent creep stresses and displacements of homogeneous thick-walled cylindrical pressure vessels. For the stress analysis in a homogeneous pressure vessel, having material creep behavior, the solutions of the stresses at a time equal to zero (i.e. the initial stress state are needed. This corresponds to the solution of materials with linear elastic behavior. Therefore, using equations of equilibrium, stress-strain and strain-displacement, a differential equation for displacement is obtained and then the stresses at a time equal to zero are calculated. Using Norton’s law in the multi-axial form in conjunction with the above-mentioned equations in the rate form, the radial displacement rate is obtained and then the radial, circumferential and axial creep stress rates are calculated. When the stress rates are known, the stresses at any time are calculated iteratively. The analytical solution is obtained for the conditions of plane strain and plane stress. The thermal loading is as follows: inner surface is exposed to a uniform heat flux, and the outer surface is exposed to an airstream. The heat conduction equation for the one-dimensional problem in polar coordinates is used to obtain temperature distribution in the cylinder. The pressure, inner radius and outer radius are considered constant. Material properties are considered as constant. Following this, profiles are plotted for the radial displacements, radial stress, circumferential stress and axial stress as a function of radial direction and time.

  17. A Study on the Void Formation in Residual Wall Thickness of Fluid-Assisted Injection Molding Parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung-Pil Park

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In fluid-assisted injection molding, the distribution of the residual wall thickness on the inside and outside of the curved area is different, and void is formed due to the effect of the shrinkage on the outside where the residual wall thickness is thicker. The shrinkage that takes place in the residual wall is affected by the rheological changes in the polymer caused by temperature change and also by the thermal properties of the penetration fluid. In this study, the different effects on void formation in residual wall during fluid-assisted injection molding were analyzed, and water and silicone oil that had different thermal properties were used for the fluids. For this, heat transfer analysis and injection molding analysis were conducted. The void formation occurred due to the different temperature distribution and volumetric shrinkage in the direction of the residual wall in the curved area with a hollow section. It was also found that the void formation in the curved area decreased in the case of silicone oil compared to the case of water from simulation and experiments.

  18. Contribution of CT Quantified Emphysema, Air Trapping and Airway Wall Thickness on Pulmonary Function in Male Smokers With and Without COPD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoesein, Firdaus A. A. Mohamed; de Jong, Pim A.; Lammers, Jan-Willem J.; Mali, Willem P. Th. M.; Mets, Onno M.; Schmidt, Michael; de Koning, Harry J.; van der Aalst, Carlijn; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; van Ginneken, Bram; van Rikxoort, Eva M.; Zanen, Pieter

    Emphysema, airway wall thickening and air trapping are associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). All three can be quantified by computed tomography (CT) of the chest. The goal of the current study is to determine the relative contribution of CT derived parameters on spirometry,

  19. Bobbin-Tool Friction-Stir Welding of Thick-Walled Aluminum Alloy Pressure Vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalder, E C; Pastrnak, J W; Engel, J; Forrest, R S; Kokko, E; Ternan, K M; Waldron, D

    2007-06-06

    It was desired to assemble thick-walled Al alloy 2219 pressure vessels by bobbin-tool friction-stir welding. To develop the welding-process, mechanical-property, and fitness-for-service information to support this effort, extensive friction-stir welding-parameter studies were conducted on 2.5 cm. and 3.8 cm. thick 2219 Al alloy plate. Starting conditions of the plate were the fully-heat-treated (-T62) and in the annealed (-O) conditions. The former condition was chosen with the intent of using the welds in either the 'as welded' condition or after a simple low-temperature aging treatment. Since preliminary stress-analyses showed that stresses in and near the welds would probably exceed the yield-strength of both 'as welded' and welded and aged weld-joints, a post-weld solution-treatment, quenching, and aging treatment was also examined. Once a suitable set of welding and post-weld heat-treatment parameters was established, the project divided into two parts. The first part concentrated on developing the necessary process information to be able to make defect-free friction-stir welds in 3.8 cm. thick Al alloy 2219 in the form of circumferential welds that would join two hemispherical forgings with a 102 cm. inside diameter. This necessitated going to a bobbin-tool welding-technique to simplify the tooling needed to react the large forces generated in friction-stir welding. The bobbin-tool technique was demonstrated on both flat-plates and plates that were bent to the curvature of the actual vessel. An additional issue was termination of the weld, i.e. closing out the hole left at the end of the weld by withdrawal of the friction-stir welding tool. This was accomplished by friction-plug welding a slightly-oversized Al alloy 2219 plug into the termination-hole, followed by machining the plug flush with both the inside and outside surfaces of the vessel. The second part of the project involved demonstrating that the welds were fit for the intended

  20. Effect of mortar joint thickness on deformability in medieval stone walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassinello, M. J.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of the stone walls in Gothic cathedrals revealed that Medieval master builders varied mortar joint thicknesses from one structural member to another. This fact, which has gone largely unnoticed to date, has a considerable impact on the structural behavior of cathedrals,due to its direct effect on two fundamental parameters,deformability and strength. In the absence offield data, an experimental test program was conducted at the INTEMAC Central Laboratory to determine the possible variations in deformability of Medieval masonry with changes in joint mortar thickness in the range found in the structural members of Spanish Gothic cathedrals. The results obtained show —further to an observation by Eduardo Torroja— that mortar joints are a determinant in the structural behavior of masonry. The modulus of deformation varied from 169.7 to 5,632.7 N/mm2at joint thicknesses ranging from 17.00 to 5.50 mm. Structural models should be adapted to accommodate this behavior pattern via parametric sensitivity analysis to obtain a clearer understanding of structural behaviour in Gothic cathedrals.El análisis desarrollado sobre las fábricas pétreas de las catedrales góticas revela que los maestros medievales utilizaron diferentes espesores de juntas de mortero en cada uno de sus elementos estructurales. Este hecho —no tenido en cuenta hasta la fecha— tiene una gran repercusión en el comportamiento estructural de la catedral,ya que influye directamente en sus parámetros fundamentales: deformabilidad y resistencia. Dada la inexistencia de datos, realizamos un programa experimental de ensayos en el laboratorio central de INTEMAC, para establecerlos posibles rangos de variabilidad de la deformabilidad de las fábricas medievales en función de la variabilidad del espesor del mortero de juntas que detectamos en los diferentes elementos estructurales de las catedrales góticas españolas. Los resultados obtenidos demuestran

  1. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (HR-MRI) of the pleura and chest wall: Normal findings and pathological changes; Hochaufloesende Magnetresonanztomographie (HR-MRT) von Pleura und Thoraxwand: Normalbefund und pathologische Veraenderungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bittner, R.C. [Strahlen- und Poliklinik, Universtaetsklinikum Rudolf Virchow, Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany); Schnoy, N. [Pathologie, UKRV, FU Berlin (Germany); Schoenfeld, N. [Pneumologie 2, Lungenklinik Heckeshorn, Berlin (Germany); Grassot, A. [Radiologie, Lungenklinik Heckeshorn, Berlin (Germany); Loddenkemper, R. [Pneumologie 2, Lungenklinik Heckeshorn, Berlin (Germany); Lode, H. [Pneumologie 1, Lungenklinik Heckeshorn, Berlin (Germany); Kaiser, D. [Thoraxchirurgie, Lungenklinik Heckeshorn, Berlin (Germany); Krumhaar, D. [Abt. fuer Lungenkranke, Lungenklinik Havelhoehe, Berlin (Germany); Felix, R. [Strahlen- und Poliklinik, Universtaetsklinikum Rudolf Virchow, Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany)

    1995-04-01

    To determine the value of high-resolution MRI in pleural and chest wall diseases, the normal and pathologic costal pleura and adjacent chest wall between paravertebral and the axillar region were examined with contrast enhanced high-resolution T{sub 1}-weighted MRI images using a surface coil. Normal anatomy was evaluated in 5 healthy volunteers and a normal specimen of the thoracic wall, and correlation was made with corresponding HR-CT and histologic sections. CT-proved focal and diffuse changes of the pleura and the chest wall in 36 patients underwent HR-MRI, and visual comparison of MRI and CT was done retrospectively. Especially sagittal T{sub 1}-weighted HR-MRI images allowed accurate delineation of the peripleural fat layer (PFL) and the innermost intercostal muscle (IIM), which served as landmarks of the intact inner chest wall. PFL and IIM were well delineated in 3/4 patients with tuberculous pleuritis, and in all 7 patients with non-specific pleuritis, as opposed to impairment of the PFL and/or the IIM, which was detected in 15/18 malignancies as a pattern of malignant chest wall involvement. In one case of tuberculous pleural empyema with edema of the inner chest wall HR-MRI produced false positive diagnosis of malignant disease. HR-MRI images improved non-invasive evaluation of pleural and chest wall diseases, and allowed for differentiation of bengin and malignant changes. (orig./MG) [Deutsch] Um den Stellenwert der hochaufloesenden MRT bei Pleura- und Thoraxwanderkrankungen zu bestimmen, wurden normale und pathologisch veraenderte kostale Pleura (paravertebral bis axillaer) und angrenzende Thoraxwand mit Hilfe einer Oberflaechenspule und kontrastmittelunterstuetzen T{sub 1}-gewichteten HR-MRT-Aufnahmen untersucht. Die normale Anatomie wurde bei 5 gesunden Probanden sowie einem normalen Thoraxwandpraeparat dargestellt und mit korrespondierenden hochaufloesenden CT- sowie histologischen Aufnahmen verglichen. CT-dokumentierte fokale und diffuse Pleura

  2. Finite-element modelling of low-temperature autofrettage of thick-walled tubes of the austenitic stainless steel AISI 304 L: Part II. Thick-walled tube with cross-bore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, H.; Donth, B.; Mughrabi, H.

    1998-01-01

    In part I, the autofrettage of a smooth thick-walled tube of the austenitic stainless steel AISI 304 L was studied by finite-element (FE) modelling. It was shown that low- temperature autofrettage is more efficient than autofrettage at room temperature, since it produces a larger beneficial compressive residual tangential (hoop) stress at the inner bore of the tube and hence permits a more significant enhancement of the fatigue resistance against pulsating internal pressure. The objective of the present study (part II) was to investigate the technically more relevant case of a thick-walled tube with a cross-bore made of the same steel. For this purpose, three-dimensional FE calculations were performed in order to characterize the influences of the autofrettage pressure and temperature on the stress and strain changes, in particular at the site of the cross-bore, also taking into account the effects of work hardening and reverse yielding. The results indicate that low-temperature autofrettage can also be applied advantageously in the case of thick-walled tubes with a cross-bore by virtue of the significantly larger residual compressive stresses, compared to room temperature autofrettage. From the quantitative FE calculations, the optimal combination of autofrettage temperature and pressure were concluded to lie in the range of 0965-0393/6/1/007/img1 to 0965-0393/6/1/007/img2, respectively. The calculated results were found to be in fair agreement with the measured values.

  3. The thick left ventricular wall of the giraffe heart normalises wall tension, but limits stroke volume and cardiac output

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smerup, Morten Holdgaard; Damkjær, Mads; Brøndum, Emil

    2016-01-01

    to calculate left ventricular wall stress. Cardiac output was also determined by inert gas rebreathing to provide an additional and independent estimate of stroke volume. Echocardiography and inert gas-rebreathing yielded similar cardiac outputs of 16.1±2.5 and 16.4±1.4 l min(-1), respectively. End......-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were 521±61 ml and 228±42 ml, respectively, yielding an ejection fraction of 56±4% and a stroke volume of 0.59 ml kg(-1). Left ventricular circumferential wall stress was 7.83±1.76 kPa. We conclude that, relative to body mass, a small left ventricular cavity and a low stroke...

  4. 乳腺癌改良根治术后胸壁放射治疗的研究进展%Research Progression in Chest Wall Radiotherapy after Modified Radical Mastectomy for Breast Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林菲; 谢作飘; 张芬(综述); 杨毅(审校)

    2016-01-01

    乳腺癌改良根治术后有较高的胸壁复发率,术后胸壁放疗是进一步减少局部复发最直接和最有效的方法。随着放疗设备更新和放疗技术的不断进步,乳腺癌改良根治术后胸壁的放射治疗技术也日趋完善。文章就近年来乳腺癌改良根治术后胸壁的放射治疗进展作综述。%There is a high chest wall recurrence rate after the modified radical mastectomy for breast cancer.Postoperative chest wall radiotherapy is considered to be the most direct and effec-tive method for further reducing the local recurrence.With the renewal of radiotherapy equipment and the continuous progress of radiotherapy technique,the chest wall radiotherapy after the modi-fied radical mastectomy has been increasingly improved.This paper reviews the research progress in chest wall radiotherapy after the modified radical mastectomy for breast cancer.

  5. Quantification of myocardial delayed enhancement and wall thickness in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: Multidetector computed tomography versus magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Lei [Department of Radiology, Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Capital Medical University, No. 2 Anzhen Rd Beijing (China); Ma, Xiaohai, E-mail: maxi8238@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Capital Medical University, No. 2 Anzhen Rd Beijing (China); Feuchtner, Gudrun Maria [Department of Radiology II, Innsbruck Medical University, Innsbruck (Austria); Zhang, Chen; Fan, Zhanming [Department of Radiology, Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Capital Medical University, No. 2 Anzhen Rd Beijing (China)

    2014-10-15

    Objectives: To evaluate the accuracy of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in assessing myocardial delayed enhancement and left ventricle wall thickness in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) compared with cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) as the reference standard. Materials and methods: Eighty consecutive patients (59 male; 53.2 ± 13.0 years) were examined with MDCT, followed by CMR 1 day later. Cardiac CT angiography and a delayed CT were performed. CMR was performed according to a standardized protocol. Left ventricle wall thickness and positions of myocardial delayed enhancement were identified in both CMR and CT images according to the American Heart Association left ventricle 17-segment model. Myocardial delayed enhancement was characterized as “dense” (areas with clear defined borders) or “diffuse” and then quantified using both techniques. Results: Left ventricle wall thickness determined by MDCT was significantly correlated with CMR (R = 0.88, P < 0.01). Compared with CMR, MDCT accurately diagnosed 74 of 78 (94.9%) patients and 1243 of 1326 (93.7%) segments. For dense myocardial delayed enhancement, MDCT significantly correlated with CMR (R = 0.88, P < 0.01) and slightly underestimated myocardial delayed enhancement (mean, −3.85%; lower and upper limits of agreement, −13.40% and 5.70%, respectively). Conclusions: MDCT provides reliable quantification of myocardial delayed enhancement and evaluation of left ventricle wall thickness and has a good correlation with CMR in patients with HCM when a comprehensive cardiac CT protocol is used and can be applied for intervention planning.

  6. Exact and Numerical Elastic Analysis for the FGM Thick-Walled Cylindrical Pressure Vessels with Exponentially-Varying Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nejad M. Zamani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Assuming exponential-varying properties in the radial direction and based on the elasticity theory, an exact closed-form analytical solution is obtained to elastic analysis of FGM thick-walled cylindrical pressure vessels in the plane strain condition. Following this, radial distribution of radial displacement, radial stress, and circumferential stress are plotted for different values of material inhomogeneity constant. The displacements and stresses distributions are compared with the solutions of the finite element method (FEM.

  7. Using The Descending Aortic Wall Thickness Measured In Transesophageal Echocardiography As A Risk Marker For Aortic Dissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaher Fanari

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study is to estimate whether aortic wall thickness is increased in patients with Aortic dissection (AD compared to low risk control group and can be used in addition to aortic diameter as a risk marker of AD. Background: AD occurs due to pathologies that may increase thickness of the aortic wall. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE has the ability to visualise both the thoracic aortic wall and lumen. Aortic diameter has been used to predict aortic dissection and timing of surgery, but it is not always predictive of that risk. Methods: In 48 patients with AD who underwent TEE were examined retrospectively and compared to 48 control patients with patent foramen ovale (PFO. We measured aortic diameter at different levels, intimal/medial thickness (IMT and complete wall thickness (CMT. Demographic data and cardiovascular risk factors were reviewed. The data was analysed using ANOVA and student t test. Results: (AD patients were older [mean age 66 AD vs. 51 PFO], had more hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia and Coronary artery disease. Both IMT and CMT in the descending aorta were increased in AD group [(1.85 vs. 1.43 mm; P=0.03 and 2.93 vs. 2.46 mm; p=0.01. As expected the diameter of ascending aorta was also greater in AD (4.61 vs. 2.92 cm; P=0.004. Conclusions: CMT and IMT in the descending aorta detected by TEE is greater in patients with AD when compared to control and may add prognostic data to that of aortic diameter

  8. Airway wall thickness of allergic asthma caused by weed pollen or house dust mite assessed by computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liping; Li, Guangrun; Sun, Yuemei; Li, Jian; Tang, Ningbo; Dong, Liang

    2015-03-01

    Little was known about Airway wall thickness of asthma patients with different allergen allergy. So we explored the possible difference of Airway wall thickness of asthma patients mono-sensitized to weed pollen or HDM using high-resolution computed tomography. 85 severe asthma patients were divided into weed pollen group and HDM group according to relevant allergen. 20 healthy donors served as controls. Airway wall area, percentage wall area and luminal area at the trunk of the apical bronchus of the right upper lobe were quantified using HRCT and compared. The values of pulmonary function were assessed as well. There were differences between HDM group and weed pollen group in WA/BSA,WA% and FEF25-75% pred, and no significant difference in FEV1%pred, FEV1/FVC and LA/BSA. In weed pollen group, WA/BSA was observed to correlate with the duration of rhinitis, whereas in HDM group, WA/BSA and LA/BSA was observed to correlate with the duration of asthma. In weed pollen group, FEV1/FVC showed a weak but significant negative correlation with WA%, but in HDM group FEV1/FVC showed a significant positive correlation with WA% and a statistical negative correlation with LA/BSA. FEV1/FVC and FEF25-75% pred were higher and WA/BSA and LA/BSA were lower in healthy control group than asthma group. FEV1%pred and WA% was no significant difference between asthma patients and healthy subjects. There are differences between HDM mono-sensitized subjects and weed pollen mono-sensitized subjects, not only in airway wall thickness, but also small airway obstruction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Stoichiometry, Length, and Wall Thickness Optimization of TiO2 Nanotube Array for Efficient Alcohol Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazra, A; Bhowmik, B; Dutta, K; Chattopadhyay, P P; Bhattacharyya, P

    2015-05-13

    The present study concerns development of an efficient alcohol sensor by controlling the stoichiometry, length, and wall thickness of electrochemically grown TiO2 nanotube array for its use as the sensing layer. Judicious variation of H2O content (0, 2, 10 and 100% by volume) in the mixed electrolyte comprising ethylene glycol and NH4F resulted into the desired variation of stoichiometry. The sensor study was performed within the temperature range of 27 to 250 °C for detecting the alcohols in the concentration range of 10-1000 ppm. The nanotubes grown with the electrolyte containing 2 vol % H2O offered the maximum response magnitude. For this stoichiometry, variation of corresponding length (1.25-2.4 μm) and wall thickness (19.8-9 nm) of the nanotubes was achieved by varying the anodization time (4-16 h) and temperatures (42-87 °C), respectively. While the variation of length influenced the sensing parameters insignificantly, the best response magnitude was achieved for ∼13 nm wall thickness. The underlying sensing mechanism was correlated with the experimental findings on the basis of structural parameters of the nanotubes.

  10. Determination of Optimum Thermal Insulation Thicknesses for External Walls Considering the Heating, Cooling and Annual Energy Requirement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer KAYNAKLI

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, optimization of thermal insulation thickness applied to the external walls of buildings has been carried out comparatively based on the seasonal (space-heating and cooling and the annual energy requirements considering solar radiation effect. This study has been performed for four degree-day regions of Turkey, namely, Iskenderun (in the first region, Istanbul (in the second region, Ankara (in the third region and Ardahan (in the fourth region. By determining the sol-air temperatures for each region and maximizing the present worth value of seasonal and annual energy savings, the optimum thermal insulation thicknesses have been calculated. The effects of solar radiation on heating-cooling energy requirements, the variation of optimum insulation thicknesses and payback periods with respect to degree-day regions, the differences between the analyses based on seasonal and annual have been presented in tabular and graphical form.

  11. Immediate locally advanced breast cancer and chest wall reconstruction: surgical planning and reconstruction strategies with extended V-Y latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munhoz, Alexandre Mendonça; Montag, Eduardo; Arruda, Eduardo; Okada, Alberto; Brasil, José Augusto; Gemperli, Rolf; Filassi, José Roberto; Ferreira, Marcus Castro

    2011-06-01

    Surgical resection in locally advanced breast cancer produces large defects that may not be suitable for primary closure. Immediate reconstruction is controversial and presents a complicated scenario for breast surgeons and plastic surgeons. In this study, a different design was planned for the latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap with primary closure in V-Y for the correction of major lesions in the anterior chest wall. Twenty-five patients underwent immediate locally advanced breast cancer reconstruction with a V-Y latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap. This flap was raised from adjacent tissue located on the lateral and posterior thoracic region and presented a triangular shape whose base was the lateral aspect of the mastectomy wound. The technique was indicated in patients with large thoracic wounds. Mean follow-up time was 16 months. Closure was obtained in the donor and recipient sites without the use of skin grafts or other more major procedures. Complications occurred in nine patients (36 percent), including dorsal wound dehiscence in five patients and seroma in three. All cases except one were treated by a conservative approach with a good result. No total flap loss was reported. All patients achieved a satisfactory thoracic reconstruction and adequate wound care. The V-Y latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap is a reliable technique for immediate locally advanced breast cancer reconstruction. The technique is advantageous because the V-Y design allows primary closure of the chest wound and donor defect. Success depends on patient selection, coordinated planning with the breast cancer surgeon, and careful intraoperative management.

  12. Detailed Dynamic Heat Transfer in Thick Brick Walls Typical of Lille Metropolis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antczak E.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The study of thermal transfer in old houses massive walls offers a big interest permitting the understanding of their specificities and the choice of a suitable material for their eventual insulation. We propose to study the thermal transfer in massive brick walls that characterize the Northern Europe old houses. To do so, we will begin by defining the thermal transfer mode: we proved that the transfer mode can be reduced to a unidirectional transfer. Then, an experimental wall is built and submitted to two different solicitation types (constant temperature in steady state mode and sinusoidal temperature through a wooden insulated box containing a radiator. The interest of these solicitations is to determine the thermal properties of the wall: the steady-state regime permits to determine the thermal resistances of the system when the harmonic regime permits to determine the thermal capacities of the system.

  13. Filled and empty states of carbon nanotubes in water: Dependence on nanotube diameter, wall thickness and dispersion interactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Malay Rana; Amalendu Chandra

    2007-09-01

    We have carried out a series of molecular dynamics simulations of water containing a narrow carbon nanotube as a solute to investigate the filling and emptying of the nanotube and also the modifications of the density and hydrogen bond distributions of water inside and also in the vicinity of the outer surfaces of the nanotube. Our primary goal is to look at the effects of varying nanotube diameter, wall thickness and also solute-solvent interactions on the solvent structure in the confined region also near the outer surfaces of the solute. The thickness of the walls is varied by considering single and multi-walled nanotubes and the interaction potential is varied by tuning the attractive strength of the 12-6 pair interaction potential between a carbon atom of the nanotubes and a water molecule. The calculations are done for many different values of the tuning parameter ranging from fully Lennard-Jones to pure repulsive pair interactions. It is found that both the solvation characteristics and hydrogen bond distributions can depend rather strongly on the strength of the attractive part of the solute-water interaction potential. The thickness of the nanotube wall, however, is found to have only minor effects on the density profiles, hydrogen bond network and the wetting characteristics. This indicates that the long range electrostatic interactions between water molecules inside and on the outer side of the nanotube do not make any significant contribution to the overall solvation structure of these hydrophobic solutes. The solvation characteristics are primarily determined by the balance between the loss of energy due to hydrogen bond network disruption, cavity repulsion potential and offset of the same by attractive component of the solute-water interactions. Our studies with different system sizes show that the essential features of wetting and dewetting characteristics of narrow nanotubes for different diameter and interaction potentials are also present in

  14. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... vertebrae, ribs and sternum) and chest wall soft tissue (muscles and fat). assess for pericardial (thin sac around the heart) disease. characterize mediastinal or pleural lesions seen by other ... chemical changes in the tissues. As the hydrogen atoms return to their usual ...

  15. Large-scale, thick, self-assembled, nacre-mimetic brick-walls as fire barrier coatings on textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Paramita; Thomas, Helga; Moeller, Martin; Walther, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Highly loaded polymer/clay nanocomposites with layered structures are emerging as robust fire retardant surface coatings. However, time-intensive sequential deposition processes, e.g. layer-by-layer strategies, hinders obtaining large coating thicknesses and complicates an implementation into existing technologies. Here, we demonstrate a single-step, water-borne approach to prepare thick, self-assembling, hybrid fire barrier coatings of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)/montmorillonite (MTM) with well-defined, bioinspired brick-wall nanostructure, and showcase their application on textile. The coating thickness on the textile is tailored using different concentrations of CMC/MTM (1–5 wt%) in the coating bath. While lower concentrations impart conformal coatings of fibers, thicker continuous coatings are obtained on the textile surface from highest concentration. Comprehensive fire barrier and fire retardancy tests elucidate the increasing fire barrier and retardancy properties with increasing coating thickness. The materials are free of halogen and heavy metal atoms, and are sourced from sustainable and partly even renewable building blocks. We further introduce an amphiphobic surface modification on the coating to impart oil and water repellency, as well as self-cleaning features. Hence, our study presents a generic, environmentally friendly, scalable, and one-pot coating approach that can be introduced into existing technologies to prepare bioinspired, thick, fire barrier nanocomposite coatings on diverse surfaces.

  16. Automatic airway wall segmentation and thickness measurement for long-range optical coherence tomography images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Li; Huang, Shenghai; Heidari, Andrew E; Dai, Cuixia; Zhu, Jiang; Zhang, Xuping; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-12-28

    We present an automatic segmentation method for the delineation and quantitative thickness measurement of multiple layers in endoscopic airway optical coherence tomography (OCT) images. The boundaries of the mucosa and the sub-mucosa layers are accurately extracted using a graph-theory-based dynamic programming algorithm. The algorithm was tested with sheep airway OCT images. Quantitative thicknesses of the mucosal layers are obtained automatically for smoke inhalation injury experiments.

  17. Assessment of maxillary sinus wall thickness with paranasal sinus digital tomosynthesis and CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Ji Eun; Shim, Sung Shine; Kim, Yoo Kyung; Kong, Kyoung Ae [Mokdong Hospital, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    This study was performed to compare paranasal sinus tomosynthesis with computed tomography (CT) imaging as a radiologic tool to evaluate the paranasal sinuses, using measurement of the soft tissue thickness of the maxillary sinus. A total of 114 patients with sinusitis who underwent both paranasal sinus digital tomosynthesis (DT) and CT were enrolled in this retrospective study. Two observers independently assessed soft tissue thickness in both maxillary sinus chambers using both DT and CT images. The mean difference in soft tissue thickness measured by each observer was −0.31 mm on CT and 0.15 mm on DT. The mean differences in soft tissue thickness measured with DT and CT were −0.15 by observer 1 and −0.31 by observer 2. Evaluation of the agreement in measurement of soft tissue thickness in the maxillary sinus using DT and CT showed a high intraclass correlation, with the 95% limit of agreement ranging from −3.36 mm to 3.06 mm [intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), 0.994: p<0.01] for observer 1 and from −5.56 mm to 4.95 mm (ICC, 0.984: p<0.01) for observer 2. As an imaging tool, DT is comparable to CT for assessing the soft tissue thickness of maxillary sinuses in patients with sinusitis.

  18. A tale of two neglected systems - structure and function of the thin- and thick-walled sieve tubes in monocotyledonous leaves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted eBotha

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available There is a large body of information relating to the ontogeny, development and the vasculature of eudicotyledonous leaves. However there is less information available concerning the vascular anatomy of monocotyledonous leaves. This is surprising, given that there are two uniquely different phloem systems present in large groups such as grasses and sedges. Monocotyledonous leaves contain marginal, large, intermediate and small longitudinal veins that are interconnected by numerous transverse veins. The longitudinal veins contain two metaphloem sieve tube types, which, based upon their ontogeny and position within the phloem, are termed early (thin-walled and late (thick-walled sieve tubes. Early metaphloem comprises sieve tubes, companion cells and vascular parenchyma cells, whilst the late metaphloem, contains thick-walled sieve tubes that lack companion cells. Thick-walled sieve tubes are generally adjacent to, or no more than one cell removed from the metaxylem. Unlike thin-walled sieve tube-companion cell complexes, thick-walled sieve tubes are connected to parenchyma by pore-plasmodesma units and are generally symplasmically isolated from the thin walled sieve tubes. This paper addresses key structural and functional differences between thin- and thick-walled sieve tubes and explores the unique advantages of alternate transport strategies that this 5 to 7 million year old dual system may offer. It would seem that these two systems may enhance, add to, or play a significant role in increasing the efficiency of solute retrieval as well as of assimilate transfer.

  19. Dual stack black blood carotid artery CMR at 3T: Application to wall thickness visualization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marx Nikolaus

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increasing understanding of atherosclerosis as an important risk factor for the development of acute ischemic events like ischemic stroke has stimulated increasing interest in non-invasive assessment of the structure, composition and burden of plaque depositions in the carotid artery wall. Vessel wall imaging by means of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR is conventionally done by 2D dual inversion recovery (DIR techniques, which often fail in covering large volumes of interest as required in plaque burden assessment. Although the technique has been extended to 2D multislice imaging, its straight extension to 3D protocols is still limited by the prolonged acquisition times and incomplete blood suppression. A novel approach for rapid overview imaging of large sections of the carotid artery wall at isotropic spatial resolutions is presented, which omits excitation of the epiglottis. By the interleaved acquisition of two 3D stacks with the proposed motion sensitized segmented steady-state black-blood gradient echo technique (MSDS the coverage of the carotid artery trees on both sides in reasonable scan times is enabled. Results 10 patients were investigated with the proposed technique and compared to conventional transversal DIR turbo spin and gradient echo approaches centered at the height of the carotid bifurcation. In all MSDS experiments sufficient black-blood contrast could be obtained over the entire covered volumes. The contrast to noise ratio between vessel and suppressed blood was improved by 73% applying the motion sensitizing technique. In all patients the suspicious areas of vessel wall thickening could be clearly identified and validated by the conventional local imaging approach. The average assessable vessel wall segment length was evaluated to be 18 cm. While in 50% of the cases motion artifacts could be appreciated in the conventional images, none were detected for the MSDS technique. Conclusion The

  20. Measure Guideline: Incorporating Thick Layers of Exterior Rigid Insulation on Walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lstiburek, Joseph [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States); Baker, Peter [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States)

    2015-04-01

    This measure guideline provides information about the design and construction of wall assemblies that use layers of rigid exterior insulation thicker than 1-½ inches and that require a secondary cladding attachment location exterior to the insulation. The guideline is separated into several distinct sections that cover: fundamental building science principles relating to the use of exterior insulation on wall assemblies; design principles for tailoring this use to the specific project goals and requirements; and construction detailing to increase understanding about implementing the various design elements.

  1. Measure Guideline. Incorporating Thick Layers of Exterior Rigid Insulation on Walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lstiburek, Joseph [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States); Baker, Peter [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States)

    2015-04-09

    This measure guideline, written by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Building America team Building Science Corporation, provides information about the design and construction of wall assemblies that use layers of rigid exterior insulation thicker than 1-½ in. and that require a secondary cladding attachment location exterior to the insulation. The guideline is separated into several distinct sections that cover: (1) fundamental building science principles relating to the use of exterior insulation on wall assemblies; (2) design principles for tailoring this use to the specific project goals and requirements; and (3) construction detailing to increase understanding about implementing the various design elements.

  2. Estimation of emission cone wall thickness of Jupiter's decametric radio emission using stereoscopic STEREO/WAVES observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchenko, M.; Rucker, H. O.

    2016-11-01

    Aims: Stereoscopic observations by the WAVES instrument onboard two STEREO spacecraft have been used with the aim of estimating wall thickness of an emission cone of Jovian decametric radio emission (DAM). Methods: Stereoscopic observations provided by STEREO-A and -B facilitate unambiguous recognition of the Jovian DAM in observed dynamic spectra as well as identification of its components (Io DAM or non-Io DAM). The dynamic spectra of radio emissions recorded by STEREO/WAVES have been analyzed using the method of cross-correlation of the radio dynamic spectra. Results: Altogether, 139 radio events, in particular 91 Io- and 48 non-Io-related radio events were observed. The averaged width of the emission cone wall for Io-DAM as well as for non-Io DAM is about 1.1° ± 0.2°. These results are in agreement with previous findings.

  3. Dystrophic calcinosis with both a huge calcified mass in the cervical spine and calcification in the chest wall in a patient with rheumatoid overlap syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Tadashi; Hirakawa, Kei; Takaoka, Hirokazu; Iyama, Ken-Ichi

    2016-05-01

    Dystrophic calcinosis in soft tissue occurs in damaged or devitalized tissues in the presence of normal calcium and phosphorous metabolism. It is often noted in subcutaneous tissues in patients with collagen vascular diseases and may involve a relatively localized area or be widespread. A 74-year-old Japanese woman with an overlap of rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren's syndrome, and systemic sclerosis developed a huge tumor-like mass at the atlanto-axial vertebral joint region that caused severe cervical pain and difficulty in activities of daily living. She also had subcutaneous dystrophic calcification in the soft tissue of the chest wall. Calcinosis associated with systemic sclerosis is a well-recognized phenomenon, but a destructive paraspinal tumor in the cervical spine associated with overlap syndrome is extremely unique. Because calcinosis in spinal locations can be complicated by neurological involvement, patients with progressive symptoms may require surgical intervention. Surgical resection and biological therapy improved this patient's life and activities of daily living. Calcinosis is common in the conditions reviewed here, and different agents have been used for treatment. However, calcinosis management is poorly organized and lacks an accepted classification, systematic studies, and clinical therapeutic trials. The association of calcinosis and collagen vascular diseases is clinically and etiologically important. Although a combination of calcinosis and rheumatoid overlap syndrome is rare, various collagen vascular diseases may occur simultaneously. A perceptive diagnostic approach toward these diseases is critical, and early diagnosis and treatment are needed to prevent dystrophic calcinosis.

  4. Continuous monitoring of the wall thickness of pipelines with ultrasonic waves; Dauerueberwachung der Wanddicke von Rohrleitungen mit Ultraschall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueck, Andreas [SONOTEC Ultraschallsensorik Halle GmbH, Halle (Saale) (Germany); Imhof, Dietmar [TUeV NORD MPA GmbH und Co.KG, Leuna (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Pipelines in industrial plants must be constantly monitored due to occurring erosion and corrosion. The determination of the residual wall thickness is generally carried out with ultrasound. Often, the critical points are difficult to access and the pipes insulated. The preparation and evaluation of a measurement is therefore very costly. The measuring system SONOWALL S ultrasonic probes are firmly attached to the pipeline and installed into isolation. The number and position of the probes can be freely selected. Often, the load is not known exactly why the monitoring of the pipe wall thickness over the entire circumference is necessary. The acoustic coupling to the pipe is done with proven adhesives that do not lose their adhesive strength even under changing ambient temperatures. The connecting cables are housed away up to 20 m in an easily accessible place in a terminal box. There can be done a wall thickness measurement with conventional ultrasonic testing devices. By using standardized components, the measuring system meets the requirements of DIN EN 12668 and DIN EN 14127. [German] Rohrleitungen in industriellen Anlagen muessen aufgrund der auftretenden Erosion und Korrosion permanent ueberwacht werden. Die Bestimmung der Restwanddicke erfolgt in der Regel mit Ultraschall. Oftmals sind die kritischen Stellen schwer zugaenglich und die Rohrleitungen isoliert. Die Vor- und Nachbereitung einer Messung ist dadurch sehr aufwendig. Beim Messsystem SONOWALL S werden Ultraschallpruefkoepfe fest an der Rohrleitung angebracht und in die Isolation eingebaut. Die Anzahl und Position der Pruefkoepfe ist dabei frei waehlbar. Oft ist die Belastung nicht genau bekannt, weshalb eine Ueberwachung der Rohrwanddicke ueber den gesamten Umfang notwendig ist. Die akustische Ankopplung an das Rohr erfolgt mit erprobten Klebstoffen, die auch bei wechselnden Umgebungstemperaturen ihre Haftfestigkeit nicht verlieren. Die Anschlusskabel werden bis zu 20m entfernt an einer gut

  5. Free and Forced Vibrations of Thick-Walled Anisotropic Cylindrical Shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchuk, A. V.; Gnedash, S. V.; Levkovskii, S. A.

    2017-03-01

    Two approaches to studying the free and forced axisymmetric vibrations of cylindrical shell are proposed. They are based on the three-dimensional theory of elasticity and division of the original cylindrical shell with concentric cross-sectional circles into several coaxial cylindrical shells. One approach uses linear polynomials to approximate functions defined in plan and across the thickness. The other approach also uses linear polynomials to approximate functions defined in plan, but their variation with thickness is described by the analytical solution of a system of differential equations. Both approaches have approximation and arithmetic errors. When determining the natural frequencies by the semi-analytical finite-element method in combination with the divide and conqure method, it is convenient to find the initial frequencies by the finite-element method. The behavior of the shell during free and forced vibrations is analyzed in the case where the loading area is half the shell thickness

  6. Development of automated welding process for field fabrication of thick walled pressure vessels. Fourth quarter technical progress report for period ending September 30, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-01-01

    Progress in developing an automated welding process for the field fabrication of thick walled pressure vessels is reported. Plans for the demonstration facility, for nondestructive testing, and for the procurement of materials are discussed. (LCL)

  7. The importance of ultrasonographic measurement of peritoneal wall thickness in pediatric chronic peritoneal dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavaşcan, Önder; Aksu, Nejat; Alparslan, Caner; Sarıtaş, Serdar; Elmas, Cengiz Han; Eraslan, Ali Nihat; Duman, Soner; Mir, Sevgi

    2015-04-01

    Loss of peritoneal function due to peritoneal fibrosing syndrome (PFS) is a major factor leading to treatment failure in chronic peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. Although the precise biologic mechanisms responsible for these changes have not been defined, the general assumption is that alterations in peritoneal function are related to structural changes in the peritoneal membrane. Studies of the peritoneal membrane by non-invasive ultrasonography (US) in chronic PD patients are limited. The aim of the present study is to assess the relationship between functional parameters of peritoneum and peritoneal thickness measured by US in children treated by chronic PD. We recruited two groups of patients: 23 subjects (13 females, 10 males) on chronic PD (patient group) and 26 (7 females, 19 males) on predialysis out-patient follow-up (creatinine clearance: 20-60 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) (control group). Age, sex, weight, height, body mass index (BMI), chronic PD duration, episodes of peritonitis and the results of peritoneal equilibration test (PET) were recorded. Hemoglobin (Hb), blood pressure (BP), left ventricular mass index (LVMI) and renal osteodystrophy (ROD) parameters were also obtained. The thickness of the parietal peritoneum was measured by trans-abdominal US in all children. Statistical analyses were performed by using Student's t and Pearson's correlation tests. Mean peritoneal thickness in chronic PD patients (1028.26 ± 157.26 μm) was significantly higher than control patients (786.52 ± 132.33). Mean peritoneal thickness was significantly correlated with mean body height (R(2) = 0.93, p thickness and Hb, BP, LVMI and ROD parameters. In conclusion, ultrasonographic measurement of peritoneal membrane thickness is a simple and non-invasive method in chronic PD children. This diagnostic tool likely enables to assess peritoneal structure and function in these patients.

  8. INVESTIGATION OF THE INFLUENCE OF MOLD ROTATIONAL SPEED ON THE CAST WALL THICKNESS IN THE ROTATIONAL MOLDING PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Jachowicz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the rotational molding process. The general principles of this polymer processing technology have been described. The main applications have been introduced and leading advantages and typical disadvantages of rotational molding process have been discussed. Based on the conducted experimental tests, the influence of changing one selected technological parameter, which characterized rotational molding process, on selected geometrical features of the polymer cast has been determined. Rotational mold’s speed around axes was changed and a thickness of cast walls has been measured. Laboratory test stand, processing properties of polymer, also test program and experimental test methodology have been described.

  9. IMPROVED LOCALLY CONFORMAL FINITE-DIFFERENCE TIME-DOMAIN METHOD FOR EDGE INCLINED SLOTS IN A FINITE WALL THICKNESS WAVEGUIDE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Long; Zhang Yu; Liang Changhong

    2004-01-01

    An Improved Locally Conformal Finite-Difference Time-Domain (ILC-FDTD) method is presented in this paper, which is used to analyze the edge inclined slots penetrating adjacent broadwalls of a finite wall thickness waveguide. ILC-FDTD not only removes the instability of the original locally conformal FDTD algorithm, but also improves the computational accuracy by locally modifying magnetic field update equations and the virtual iterative electric fields according to the complexity of the slot fringe fields. The mutual coupling between two edge inclined slots can also be analyzed by ILC-FDTD effectively.

  10. Limit analysis of viscoplastic thick-walled cylinder and spherical shell under internal pressure using a strain gradient plasticity theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Plastic limit load of viscoplastic thick-walled cylinder and spherical shell subjected to internal pressure is investigated analytically using a strain gradient plastic-itv theory. As a result, the current solutions can capture the size effect at the micron scale. Numerical results show that the smaller the inner radius of the cylinder or spherical shell, the more significant the scale effects. Results also show that the size effect is more evident with increasing strain or strain-rate sensitivity index. The classical plastic-based solutions of the same problems are shown to be a special case of the present solution.

  11. The treatment of spine and chest wall deformities with fused ribs by expansion thoracostomy and insertion of vertical expandable prosthetic titanium rib: growth of thoracic spine and improvement of lung volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emans, John B; Caubet, Jean François; Ordonez, Claudia L; Lee, Edward Y; Ciarlo, Michelle

    2005-09-01

    Prospective clinical trial of vertical expandable prosthetic titanium rib (VEPTR) in patients with combined spine and chest wall deformity with scoliosis and fused ribs. Report the efficacy and safety of expansion thoracostomy and VEPTR surgery in the treatment of thoracic insufficiency syndrome (TIS) associated with fused ribs. Traditional attitudes toward early-onset combined chest and spine deformity assume that thoracic deformity is best controlled by treatment directed at spine deformity, often involving early spinal arthrodesis. Campbell and others have heightened awareness of the interrelationship between lung, chest, and spine development during growth and characterized TIS as the inability of the thorax to support normal respiration or lung growth. Expansion thoracostomy and VEPTR insertion was developed to directly control both spine and chest wall deformity during growth, while permitting continued vertebral column and chest growth at an early stage. Multidisciplinary evaluation of children with combined spine and chest wall deformity included pediatric pulmonologist, thoracic, and orthopedic surgeon evaluations. One or more opening wedge expansion thoracostomies and placement of VEPTR devices were performed as described by Campbell, with repeated device lengthenings during growth. Parameters measured included Cobb angle, length of thoracic spine, CT-derived lung volumes, and in older children pulmonary function tests. Thirty-one patients with fused ribs and TIS were treated, 4 of whom had undergone prior spinal arthrodesis at other institutions with continued progression of deformity. In 30 patients, the spinal deformity was controlled and growth continued in the thoracic spine during treatment at rates similar to normals. Increased volume of the constricted hemithorax and total lung volumes obtained during expansion thoracostomy were maintained at follow-up. Complications included device migration, infection, and brachial plexus palsy. Expansion

  12. Measurement of arterial wall thickness as a surrogate marker for atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, E; Hovingh, GK; Wiegman, A; Duriez, P; Smit, AJ; Fruchart, JC; Kastelein, JJP

    2004-01-01

    Large observational studies and atherosclerosis regression trials of lipid-modifying pharmacotherapy have established that intima-media thickness of the carotid and femoral arteries, as measured noninvasively by B-mode ultrasound, is a valid surrogate marker for the progression of atherosclerotic di

  13. [Chest pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Benedikt

    2015-01-01

    Chest pain in ambulatory setting is predominantly not heart-associated. Most patients suffer from muskuloskeletal or functional (psychogenic) chest pain. Differential diagnosis covers aortic dissection, rib-fracture, shingles, GERD, Tietze-Syndrome, pulmonary embolism, pleuritis, pneumothorax, pleurodynia and metastatic disease. In most cases history, symptoms and signs allow a clinical diagnosis of high pretest-probability.

  14. Thick growing multilayer nanobrick wall thin films: super gas barrier with very few layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guin, Tyler; Krecker, Michelle; Hagen, David Austin; Grunlan, Jaime C

    2014-06-24

    Recent work with multilayer nanocoatings composed of polyelectrolytes and clay has demonstrated the ability to prepare super gas barrier layers from water that rival inorganic CVD-based films (e.g., SiOx). In an effort to reduce the number of layers required to achieve a very low oxygen transmission rate (OTR (layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly. Buffering the chitosan solution and its rinse with 50 mM Trizma base increased the thickness of these films by an order of magnitude. The OTR of a 1.6-μm-thick, six-bilayer film was 0.009 cc/m(2)·day·atm, making this the best gas barrier reported for such a small number of layers. This simple modification to the LbL process could likely be applied more universally to produce films with the desired properties much more quickly.

  15. Instrumented thick-walled tube method for measuring thermal pressure in fluids and isotropic stresses in thermosetting resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merzlyakov, Mikhail; Simon, Sindee L.; McKenna, Gregory B.

    2005-06-01

    We have developed a method for measuring the thermal pressure coefficient and cure-induced and thermally induced stresses based on an instrumented thick-walled tube vessel. The device has been demonstrated at pressures up to 330 MPa and temperatures to 300 °C. The method uses a sealed stainless steel thick-walled tube to impose three-dimensional isotropic constraints. The tube is instrumented with strain gauges in hoop and in axial directions and can be used in open or closed configurations. By making measurements of the isotropic stresses as a function of temperature, the method allows determination of the thermal pressure coefficient in both the glassy and rubbery (or liquid) states. The method also can be used to measure isotropic stress development in thermosetting resins during cure and subsequent thermal cycling. Experimental results are presented for sucrose benzoate, di-2-ethylhexylsebacate, and an epoxy resin. The current report shows that the method provides reliable estimates for the thermal pressure coefficient. The thermal pressure coefficient is determined with resolution on the order of 10kPa/K. Among advantages of the method is that the tubes are reusable, even when measurements are made for cure response of thermosetting resins.

  16. Thermoelastic Analysis of a Functionally Graded Rotating Thick-Walled Tube Subjected to Mechanical and Thermal Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Libiao; Yang, Shengyou; Ma, Baoyu; Dui, Guansuo

    2015-11-01

    A thermoelastic solution for the functionally graded rotating thick-walled tube subjected to axisymmetric mechanical and thermal loads is given in terms of volume fractions of constituents. We assume that the tube consists of two linear elastic constituents and the volume fraction of one phase is a power function varied in the radial direction. By using the assumption of a uniform strain field within the representative volume element, the theoretical solutions of the displacement and the stresses are presented. Based on the relation of the volume average stresses of constituents and the macroscopic stresses of the composite material in micromechanics, the present method can avoid the assumption of the distribution regularities of unknown overall material parameters appeared in existing papers, such as Young's modulus, thermal expansion coefficient, thermal conductivity, and density. The effects of the angular velocity, the volume fraction, the ratio of two thermal expansion coefficients, the ratio of two thermal conductivities, and the ratio of two densities on the displacement and stresses are systematically studied, which should help structural engineers and material scientists optimally design thick-walled tube comprised inhomogeneous materials.

  17. Analytical Solution for Interference Fit for Multi-Layer Thick-Walled Cylinders and the Application in Crankshaft Bearing Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Qiu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Interference fit is an important contact mode used for torque transmission existing widely in engineering design. To prevent trackslip, a certain magnitude of interference has to be ensured; meanwhile, the interference needs to be controlled to avoid failure of the mechanical components caused by high assembly stress. The finite element method (FEM can be used to analyze the stress, while the computational cost of FEM involving nonlinear contact algorithm is relatively high, and likely to come across low precision and convergence problems. Therefore, a rapid and accurate analytical method for estimation is of vital need, especially for the initial design stage when the parameters vary in a large range. In this study, an analytical method to calculate the contact pressure and stress between multi-layer thick-walled cylinders (MLTWC with multi-contact pairs and temperature-raising effect is proposed, and evaluated by FEM. The analytical solution of the interference for tri-layer thick-walled cylinders is applied to the design of engine crankshaft bearing. The results indicate that the analytical method presented in this study can reduce complexity of MLTWC problems and improve the computational efficiency. It is well suited to be used for the calculation model of parameter optimization in early design.

  18. Collapse Pressure Analysis of Transversely Isotropic Thick-Walled Cylinder Using Lebesgue Strain Measure and Transition Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Aggarwal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to provide guidance for the design of the thick-walled cylinder made up of transversely isotropic material so that collapse of cylinder due to influence of internal and external pressure can be avoided. The concept of transition theory based on Lebesgue strain measure has been used to simplify the constitutive equations. Results have been analyzed theoretically and discussed numerically. From this analysis, it has been concluded that, under the influence of internal and external pressure, circular cylinder made up of transversely isotropic material (beryl is on the safer side of the design as compared to the cylinders made up of isotropic material (steel. This is because of the reason that percentage increase in effective pressure required for initial yielding to become fully plastic is high for beryl as compared to steel which leads to the idea of “stress saving” that reduces the possibility of collapse of thick-walled cylinder due to internal and external pressure.

  19. SU-E-T-95: An Alternative Option for Reducing Lung Dose for Electron Scar Boost Irradiation in Post-Mastectomy Breast Cancer Patients with a Thin Chest Wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y; Kumar, P; Mitchell, M [University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Breast cancer patients who undergo a mastectomy often require post-mastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) due to high risk disease characteristics. PMRT usually accompanies scar boost irradiation (10–16Gy in 5–8 fractions) using en face electrons, which often results in increased dose to the underlying lungs, thereby potentially increasing the risk of radiation pneumonitis. Hence, this study evaluated water-equivalent phantoms as energy degraders and as an alternative to a bolus to reduce radiation dose to the underlying lungs for electron scar boost irradiation. Methods: Percent depth dose (PDD) profiles of 6 MeV (the lowest electron energy available in most clinics) were obtained without and with commercial solid water phantoms (1 to 5mm by 1mm increments) placed on top of electron cones. Phantom attenuation was measured by taking a ratio of outputs with to without the phantoms in 10×10cm2 cone size for monitor unit (MU) calculation. In addition, scatter dose to contralateral breast was measured on a human-like phantom using two selected scar (short and long) boost patient setups. Results: The PDD plots showed that the solid water phantoms and the bolus had similar dosimetric effects for the same thickness. Lower skin dose (up to 3%) to ipsilateral breast was observed with a 5mm phantom compared with a 5mm bolus (up to 10%) for all electron cones. Phantom attenuation was increased by 50% with about a 4.5mm phantom. Also, the energy degraders caused scatter dose to contralateral breast by a factor of 3 with a 5mm phantom. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using water-equivalent phantoms to reduce lung dose using en face electrons in patients with a thin chest wall undergoing PMRT. The disadvantages of this treatment approach (i.e., the increase in MUs and treatment time, and clinically insignificant scatter dose to the contralateral breast given usually 10Gy) are outweighed by its above clinical benefits.

  20. SU-E-T-632: A Dosimetric Comparison of the 3D-CRT Planning of Chest Wall in Post-Mastectomy Breast Cancer Patients, with and Without Breast Board Setup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muzaffar, Ambreen; Masood, Asif; Ullah, Haseeb; Mehmood, Kashif; Qasim, Uzma; Afridi, M. Ali; Khan, Salim; Hameed, Abdul [Radiation Oncology Department, Shifa International Hospitals Ltd. Sector H-8/4 Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Breast boards are used in breast radiation which increases normal lung and heart doses, when supraclavicular field is included. Therefore, in this study through dose volume histogram (DVHs), lung and heart doses comparison was done between two different setups i.e. with and without breast board, for the treatment of left chest wall and supraclavicular fossa in postmastectomy left breast cancer. Methods: In this study, CT-Simulation scans of ten breast cancer patients were done with and without breast board, at Shifa International Hospitals Islamabad, to investigate the differences between the two different setups of the irradiation of left chest wall in terms of lung and heart doses. For immobilization, support under the neck, shoulders and arms was used. Precise PLAN 2.15 treatment planning system (TPS) was used for 3D-CRT planning. The total prescribed dose for both the plans was 5000 cGy/25 fractions. The chest wall was treated with a pair of tangential photon fields and the upper supraclavicular nodal regions were treated with an anterior photon field. A mono-isocentric technique was used to match the tangential fields with the anterior field at the isocentre. The dose volume histogram was used to compare the doses of heart and ipsilateral lung. Results: Both the plans of each patient were generated and compared. DVH results showed that for the same PTV dose coverage, plans without breast board resulted in a reduction of lung and heart doses compared with the plans with breast board. There was significant reductions in V20, V<25 and mean doses for lung and V<9 and mean doses for heart. Conclusion: In comparison of both the plans, setup without breast board significantly reduced the dose-volume of the ipsilateral lung and heart in left chest wall patients. Waived registration request has been submitted.

  1. Dermatologic surgery on the chest wall in patients with a cardiac surgery history: a review of material that may be encountered intraoperatively, including potential complications and suggestions for proceeding safely

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Foley Bucher, MD

    2016-03-01

    Results & Conclusion: Dermatologic surgeons should particularly be aware that temporary epicardial pacing wires and pacemaker leads are not uncommonly abandoned in the chest wall of many patients. All patients with a cardiac surgery history should be questioned about possible retained wires. If wire material is encountered intraoperatively, immediately stop the procedure and do not attempt further manipulation of the wire until suggested steps are taken to ascertain the wire type.

  2. Portal venous arterialization resulting in increased portal inflow and portal vein wall thickness in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Gang Li; Yong-Liang Chen; Jing-Xi Chen; Lei Qu; Bin-Dang Xue; Zhi-Hai Peng; Zhi-Qiang Huang

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To explore the influence of portal vein hemodynamic changes after portal venous arterialization(PVA) on peribiliary vascular plexus (PVP)morphological structure and hepatic pathology,and to establish a theoretical basis for the clinical application of PVA.METHODS:Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into control and PVA groups.After PVA,hemodynamic changes of the portal vein and morphological structure of hepatohilar PVP were observed using Doppler ultrasound,liver function tests,ink perfusion transparency management and three-dimensional reconstruction of computer microvisualization,and pathological examination was performed on tissue from the bile duct wall and the liver.RESULTS:After PVA,the cross-sectional area and blood flow of the portal vein were increased,and the increase became more significant over time,in a certain range.If the measure to limit the flow in PVA was not adopted,the high blood flow would lead to dilatation of intrahepatic portal vein and its branches,increase in collagen and fiber degeneration in tunica intima.Except glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT),other liver function tests were normal.CONCLUSION:Blood with a certain flow and oxygen content is important for filling the PVP and meeting the oxygen requirement of the bile duct wall.After PVA,It is the anatomic basis to maintain normal morphology of hepatohilar bile duct wall that the blood with high oxygen content and high flow in arterialized portal vein may fill PVP by collateral vessel reflux.A adequate measure to limit blood flow is necessary in PVA.

  3. Analytical solution for the pseudoelastic response of a shape memory alloy thick-walled cylinder under internal pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabesh, M.; Liu, B.; Boyd, J. G.; Lagoudas, D. C.

    2013-09-01

    Analytical solutions are derived for the isothermal pseudoelastic response of a shape memory alloy (SMA) thick-walled cylinder subjected to internal pressure. The Tresca transformation criterion and linear hardening are used. Equations are given for the radial and circumferential stresses, transformation strains and radial displacement at various steps of loading and unloading. A structural pressure-temperature phase diagram is provided for the cylinder, analogous to the stress-temperature phase diagram of SMA materials. Pressurization of an initially 100% austenitic cylinder causes the martensite to initially form at the inner radius. For a relatively thin-walled cylinder the transformation front reaches the outer radius before the transformation has completed at the inner radius, whereas for a thick-walled cylinder the transformation completes at the inner radius while there is still an outer ring of 100% austenite. For a given OD/ID ratio, a critical temperature is derived that stipulates which of these two cases occurs. An analytical result is provided for the pressure that will cause the transformation to complete at the inner radius. During unloading, the reverse transformation can start at either the inner or the outer surface of the cylinder and can propagate outward and then reverse its direction and propagate back to the inner surface. The effect of martensitic transformation on the structural yield strength due to plasticity is also investigated and it is shown that the pressure required to initiate yielding can be substantially decreased or increased depending on the temperature and the state of transformation achieved, even though the yield stress of the material is independent of temperature. Finally, the effectiveness of the Tresca transformation criterion to derive closed-form solutions for this problem is demonstrated by comparing with finite element solutions using the von Mises theory.

  4. SU-C-BRA-04: Use of Esophageal Wall Thickness in Evaluation of the Response to Chemoradiation Therapy for Esophageal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J; Kligerman, S; Lu, W [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Kang, M [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Yeungnam University Medical Center, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To quantitatively evaluate the esophageal cancer response to chemoradiation therapy (CRT) by measuring the esophageal wall thickness in CT. Method: Two datasets were used in this study. The first dataset is composed of CT scans of 15 esophageal cancer patients and 15 normal controls. The second dataset is composed of 20 esophageal cancer patients who underwent PET/CT scans before (Pre-CRT) and after CRT (Post-CRT). We first segmented the esophagus using a multi-atlas-based algorithm. The esophageal wall thickness was then computed, on each slice, as the equivalent circle radius of the segmented esophagus excluding the lumen. To evaluate the changes of wall thickness, we computed the standard deviation (SD), coefficient of variation (COV, SD/Mean), and flatness [(Max–Min)/Mean] of wall thickness along the entire esophagus. Results: For the first dataset, the mean wall thickness of cancer patients and normal controls were 6.35 mm and 6.03 mm, respectively. The mean SD, COV, and flatness of the wall thickness were 2.59, 0.21, and 1.27 for the cancer patients and 1.99, 0.16, and 1.13 for normal controls. Statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) were identified in SD and flatness. For the second dataset, the mean wall thickness of pre-CRT and post-CRT patients was 7.13 mm and 6.84 mm, respectively. The mean SD, COV, and flatness were 1.81, 0.26, and 1.06 for pre-CRT and 1.69, 0.26, and 1.06 for post-CRT. Statistically significant difference was not identified for these measurements. Current results are based on the entire esophagus. We believe significant differences between pre- and post-CRT scans could be obtained, if we conduct the measurements at tumor sites. Conclusion: Results show thicker wall thickness in pre-CRT scans and differences in wall thickness changes between normal and abnormal esophagus. This demonstrated the potential of esophageal wall thickness as a marker in the tumor CRT response evaluation. This work was supported in part by

  5. Impact of Nuss procedure on chest wall%Nuss手术治疗漏斗胸对胸廓的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈诚豪; 曾骐; 张北叶; 彭芸; 张娜; 于洁; 孙记航; 潘岳松

    2013-01-01

    Objective To introduce a new measurement that can be used to evaluate the improvement of the chest wall after Nuss procedure.Methods From April 2004 to March 2008,449 pectus excavatum(PE) patients received Nuss procedure in Hospital,and according to the inclusion criteria,there were 80 cases enrolled our group at last,then divided the cases into two groups,one group of pre-operative of Nuss surgery,and the other group of post-bar removal.All the cases had examination of posterio-anterior chest radiographs before Nuss procedure and after Nuss bar removal.The maximal distance of the outer boundary of each rib pairs (C,from the 1 st pair to the 9th),the distance between lung apex to the costophrenic angle(H)and the distance between the two costophrenic angles (W),were measured.Results All the 80 cases completed the Nuss procedure and Nuss bar removal safely and effectively.All the patients were followed up from 30 to 36 months,and no recurrence or long-term complications occurred.The measured values of post-bar removal group showed significantly increased compare to the group of pre-Nuss procedure.The measured values (rib of 5 th,6th,7th) of post-bar removal group showed statistically significant compare to the group of normal children of the same age group.Conclusion The chest wall of post-bar removal was significantly increased compare to the cases of pre-Nuss procedure.Compare to the group of normal children of the same age group,there may be some restrictions on the thoracic by the pectus bar in the group of pectus,but whether there are still thorax limited,we need further more follow-up and measurement of chest X-ray to clear.%目的 应用简易的胸部X线片测量法评价漏斗胸术后胸廓改善情况,探讨Nuss手术对胸廓的影响及其程度.方法 对我院2004年4月至2008年3月共449例漏斗胸行Nuss手术的患儿进行回顾性分析.根据一定的入选标准,最终人选学龄前期漏斗胸患儿共80例,分成Nuss术前和取出支架

  6. SU-E-T-583: Operated Left Breast and Chest Wall Radiotherapy: A Dosimetric Comparison Between 3DCRT, IMRT and VMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, B [AMRI Cancer Centre and GLA university, Mathura, Kolkata, West bengal (India); Roy, S [AMRI Cancer Centre, Kolkata, Kolkata, West bengal (India); Munshi, A [Fortis Memorial Research Institute, Gurgon, haryana (India); Pradhan, A [GLA University, Mathura, Uttar Pradesh (India)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the comparative dosimetric efficacy between field and field 3DCRT(FnF), multiple field Intensity modulated radiotherapy (SnS IMRT) and, partial arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in case of post operative left side breast and chest wall irradiation. Methods: CT study set of fifteen post-operative left breast and chest wall patient was tested for a treatment plan of 50Gy in 25 fraction using partial arc VMAT, SnSIMRT and tangential beam 3DCRT . 3DCRT FnF gantry angle was ranging for left medial tangential 290±17{sup 0} and Lt lateral tangential l14°±12{sup 0}. For IMRT four fixed beam at gantry angle G130{sup 0} G110{sup 0} G300{sup 0} and G330{sup 0} was used, in case of insufficient dose another beam G150{sup 0} was added. In case of partial arc VMAT, lateral tangential arc G130{sup 0}-G100{sup 0} and medial tangential arc G280{sup 0}-G310{sup 0}. Inverse optimization was opted to cover at least 95%PTV by 95% prescription dose (RxD) and a strong weightage on reduction of heart and lung dose. PTV coverage was evaluated for it’s clinically acceptability depending on the tumor spatial location and its quadrant. Out of the three plans, any one was used for the actual patient treatment. Results: Dosimetric analysis done for breast PTV, left lung, heart and the opposite breast. PTV mean dose and maximum dose was 5129.8±214.8cGy, 4749.0±329.7cGy, 5024.6±73.4cGy and 5855.2±510.7cGy, 5340.7±146.1cGy, 5347.2±196.8cGy for FnF, VMAT and IMRT respectively. Ipsilateral lung volume receiving 20Gy and 5Gy was 23.6±9.5cGy and 32.7±10.3cGy for FnF, 18.6±8.7cGy and 38.8±15.2cGy for VMAT and 25.7±9.6cGy and 50.7±8.4cGy for IMRT respectively. Heart mean and 2cc dose was 867.9±456.7cGy and 5038.5±184.3cGy for FnF, 532.6±263cGy and 3632.1±990.6 for VMAT, 711±229.9cGy and 4421±463.7cGy for IMRT respectively. VMAT shows minimum contralateral breast dose 168±113.8cGy. Conclusion: VMAT shows a better tumor conformity, minimum heart

  7. Enhanced washout of {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: quantitative comparisons with regional {sup 123}I-BMIPP uptake and wall thickness determined by MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thet-Thet-Lwin, Tohoru; Takeda, Jin; Wu, Yuko; Fumikura, Keiji; Iida, Satoru; Kawano, Iwao; Yamaguchi, Yuji; Itai [Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tennodai 1-1-1, 305-8575, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    2003-07-01

    The diagnostic value of technetium-99m tetrofosmin (TF) washout in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) was examined by investigating its relation to the metabolic abnormality depicted by iodine-123 {beta}-methyl-p-iodophenylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) uptake and the left ventricular (LV) myocardial wall thickness as measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). TF washout was evaluated in 31 patients with HCM and 23 normal control subjects using 30-min (early) and 3-h (delayed) TF single-photon emission tomography images. The LV myocardial wall was divided into 19 segments and the percentage TF washout, regional BMIPP uptake and LV wall thickness were measured in each segment. Mean TF washout in the patients with HCM was significantly faster than that in normal control subjects (23.7{+-}5.7 vs 13.4{+-}4.1, P<0.0001). In the patients with HCM, TF washout showed an excellent correlation with MRI wall thickness (r=0.82, P<0.0001) and a good inverse correlation with regional BMIPP uptake (r=-0.72, P<0.0001). In addition, a good linear correlation was observed between TF uptake and MRI wall thickness in the 19 regional segments. In conclusion, the degree of TF washout corresponds well with the severity of myocardial wall thickness and the degree of metabolic abnormality in patients with HCM. These results suggest that enhanced TF washout might provide additional clinical information regarding metabolic alterations in HCM. (orig.)

  8. Short-term comparative study of high frequency chest wall oscillation and European airway clearance techniques in patients with cystic fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roughton, Michael; Hodson, Margaret E; Pryor, Jennifer A

    2009-01-01

    Background High frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) is standard treatment for airway clearance in the USA and has recently been introduced in the UK and Europe. There is little published research comparing HFCWO with airway clearance techniques (ACTs) frequently used in the UK and Europe. The aim of this study was to compare the short-term effects of HFCWO with usual ACTs in patients with cystic fibrosis hospitalised with an infective pulmonary exacerbation. Methods A 4-day randomised crossover design was used. Patients received either HFCWO on days 1 and 3 and usual ACTs on days 2 and 4 or vice versa. Wet weight of sputum, spirometry and oxygen saturation were measured. Perceived efficacy, comfort, incidence of urinary leakage and preference were assessed. Data were analysed by mixed model analysis. Results 29 patients (72% male) of mean (SD) age 29.4 (8.4) years and mean (SD) forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) percentage predicted (FEV1%) 38 (16.7) completed the study. Significantly more sputum was expectorated during a single treatment session and over a 24 h period (mean difference 4.4 g and 6.9 g, respectively) with usual ACTs than with HFCWO (p<0.001). No statistically significant change in FEV1% or oxygen saturation was observed after either HFCWO or usual ACTs compared with baseline. 17 patients (55%) expressed a preference for their usual ACT. Conclusions During both a finite treatment period and over 24 h, less sputum was cleared using HFCWO than usual ACT. HFCWO does not appear to cause any adverse physiological effects and may influence adherence. PMID:19703826

  9. Chest wall volume receiving >30 Gy predicts risk of severe pain and/or rib fracture after lung stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, Neal E; Cai, Jing; Biedermann, Gregory B; Yang, Wensha; Benedict, Stanley H; Sheng, Ke; Schefter, Tracey E; Kavanagh, Brian D; Larner, James M

    2010-03-01

    To identify the dose-volume parameters that predict the risk of chest wall (CW) pain and/or rib fracture after lung stereotactic body radiotherapy. From a combined, larger multi-institution experience, 60 consecutive patients treated with three to five fractions of stereotactic body radiotherapy for primary or metastatic peripheral lung lesions were reviewed. CW pain was assessed using the Common Toxicity Criteria for pain. Peripheral lung lesions were defined as those located within 2.5 cm of the CW. A minimal point dose of 20 Gy to the CW was required. The CW volume receiving >or=20, >or=30, >or=40, >or=50, and >or=60 Gy was determined and related to the risk of CW toxicity. Of the 60 patients, 17 experienced Grade 3 CW pain and five rib fractures. The median interval to the onset of severe pain and/or fracture was 7.1 months. The risk of CW toxicity was fitted to the median effective concentration dose-response model. The CW volume receiving 30 Gy best predicted the risk of severe CW pain and/or rib fracture (R(2) = 0.9552). A volume threshold of 30 cm(3) was observed before severe pain and/or rib fracture was reported. A 30% risk of developing severe CW toxicity correlated with a CW volume of 35 cm(3) receiving 30 Gy. The development of CW toxicity is clinically relevant, and the CW should be considered an organ at risk in treatment planning. The CW volume receiving 30 Gy in three to five fractions should be limited to <30 cm(3), if possible, to reduce the risk of toxicity without compromising tumor coverage. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of noninvasive ventilation on treadmill 6-min walk distance and regional chest wall volumes in cystic fibrosis: randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Cibelle Andrade; Andrade, Armèle de Fátima Dornelas de; Campos, Shirley Lima; Brandão, Daniella Cunha; Fregonezi, Guilherme; Mourato, Ianny Pereira; Aliverti, Andrea; Britto, Murilo Carlos Amorim de

    2014-10-01

    Dyspnea and exercise intolerance are the symptoms that most affect the quality of life of children and adolescents with respiratory disorders resulting from cystic fibrosis (CF). To evaluate the effect of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) on treadmill 6-min walk distance and regional chest wall volumes in cystic fibrosis patients. Crossover clinical trial, randomized, controlled and open with 13 children and adolescents with CF, aged 7-16 years, with pulmonary impairment (NTC01987271). The patients performed a treadmill walking test (TWT) during 6 min, with and without NIV on a BiLEVEL mode, an interval of 24-48 h between tests. Before and after each test, patients were assessed by spirometry and optoelectronic plethysmography. Walking distance in TWT with NIV was significantly higher that without ventilatory support (mean ± sd: 0.41 ± 0.08 vs. 0.39 ± 0.85 km, p = 0.039). TWT with NIV increase forced expiratory volume on 1 s (FEV1; p = 0.036), tidal volume (Vt; p = 0.005), minute ventilation (MV; p = 0.013), pulmonary rib cage volume (Vrcp; p = 0.011), and decrease the abdominal volume (Vab; p = 0.013) after test. There was a significant reduction in oxygen saturation (p = 0.018) and permanent increase in respiratory rate after 5 min (p = 0.021) after the end test without NIV. During the walking test on the treadmill, the NIV change thoracoabdominal kinematics and lung function in order to optimized ventilation and tissue oxygenation, with improvement of walk distance. Consequently, NIV is an effective tool to increase functional capacity in children and adolescents with cystic fibrosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparison of high-frequency chest wall oscillation and oscillating positive expiratory pressure in the home management of cystic fibrosis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oermann, C M; Sockrider, M M; Giles, D; Sontag, M K; Accurso, F J; Castile, R G

    2001-11-01

    Enhanced airway clearance is thought to result in better-maintained pulmonary function in cystic fibrosis (CF). Postural drainage, percussion, and vibration (PDPV) have been the primary airway clearance technique (ACT) employed in CF for over 40 years. Two new airway clearance modalities are high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) and oscillating positive expiratory pressure (OPEP). This pilot study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of these techniques during home use, assess patient satisfaction with them as compared to PDPV, and assess the feasibility of performing a definitive comparative trial. The prospective, randomized, multicenter crossover trial was conducted at three urban academic CF Care Centers. Twenty-nine CF patients, 9-39 years of age, participated. Subjects performed 4 weeks each of HFCWO and OPEP following 2-week lead-in/washout periods. Spirometry, lung volumes, National Institutes of Health and Petty Scores, and a satisfaction survey were performed at baseline and after each treatment period. An ACT preference survey was completed at the conclusion of the study. Twenty-four subjects completed both therapies. There were no statistically significant differences between therapies for spirometry, lung volumes, or clinical scores. No significant safety issues arose during the study period. Compliance between therapies was similar. Significant differences among therapies existed in patient satisfaction. Given a choice of therapy, 50% of subjects chose HFCWO, 37% OPEP, and 13% PDPV. This study suggests that HFCWO and OPEP are safe and as effective as patients' routine therapies when used for airway clearance in a home setting. Patient satisfaction and preference differ among ACTs and should be considered when prescribing home therapy. A definitive, multi-center, comparative study evaluating long-term efficacy of these techniques is feasible.

  12. Effect of a combined surgery, re-irradiation and hyperthermia therapy on local control rate in radio-induced angiosarcoma of the chest wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linthorst, M.; Rhoon, G.C. van; Zee, J. van der [Erasmus MC-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Geel, A.N. van [Erasmus MC-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Surgical Oncology; Baartman, E.A. [Erasmus MC-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Oei, S.B. [Bernard Verbeeten Institute, Tilburg (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Ghidey, W. [Erasmus MC-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Trial and Medical Statistics

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: Radiation-induced angiosarcoma (RAS) of the chest wall/breast has a poor prognosis due to the high percentage of local failures. The efficacy and side effects of re-irradiation plus hyperthermia (reRT + HT) treatment alone or in combination with surgery were assessed in RAS patients. Patients and methods: RAS was diagnosed in 23 breast cancer patients and 1 patient with melanoma. These patients had previously undergone breast conserving therapy (BCT, n = 18), mastectomy with irradiation (n=5) or axillary lymph node dissection with irradiation (n = 1). Treatment consisted of surgery followed by reRT + HT (n = 8), reRT + HT followed by surgery (n = 3) or reRT + HT alone (n = 13). Patients received a mean radiation dose of 35 Gy (32-54 Gy) and 3-6 hyperthermia treatments (mean 4). Hyperthermia was given once or twice a week following radiotherapy (RT). Results: The median latency interval between previous radiation and diagnosis of RAS was 106 months (range 45-212 months). Following reRT + HT, the complete response (CR) rate was 56 %. In the subgroup of patients receiving surgery, the 3-month, 1- and 3-year actuarial local control (LC) rates were 91, 46 and 46 %, respectively. In the subgroup of patients without surgery, the rates were 54, 32 and 22 %, respectively. Late grade 4 RT toxicity was seen in 2 patients. Conclusion: The present study shows that reRT + HT treatment - either alone or combined with surgery - improves LC rates in patients with RAS. (orig.)

  13. Different Transition Mechanisms and Tunable Wall Thicknesses of Block Copolymer Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Mengying; Wang, Rong; Xie, Daiqian

    2013-03-01

    By using dissipative particle dynamics, we studied how to control the two pathways for vesicle-formation mechanism considering the hydrophobic/hydrophilic block ratio, polymer-solvent interaction, and polymer concentration. A crucial balance between the segregation of inner-hydrophobic beads and the attraction of outer-hydrophilic beads drastically affects the self-assembly pathways of amphiphilic block copolymer into vesicles from one mechanism over the other. And during the transition period between these two pathways, vesicles are formed through an in-between pathway. In addition, we have evaluated the thickness of the hydrophobic layer and observed two types of dependence on the vesicle size. Our results indicate that as the degree of hydrophobicity of the blocks increases, from the whole strong behavior to the whole weak behavior relationship, the transformation is observed in large sized vesicles first and then in small sized vesicles. Two characteristics, the chain compaction of the vesicles and the area densities of inner corona, are thought to be important in controlling the membrane thickness. Acknowledgments.This work has been supported by NNSFC (Nos. 20874046, 21074053 and 21133006) and NBRPC (No. 2010CB923303).

  14. Using of CT in diagnosis and operation instruction for chest wall tuberculosis%胸壁结核的CT诊断及其对手术治疗的指导价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王钧; 张捷; 吴万鹏

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨CT对胸壁结核的诊断价值和对手术的指导意义.方法 本组120例病人均经手术、病理证实为胸壁结核,术前均行胸部常规CT扫描.结果 120例病人胸部CT表现,其中病变局限于胸壁软组织者44例,占36.67%;肋间肌里外各形成一脓腔,中间有窦道相通呈哑铃形病变者76例,占63.33%;有72例液化区周围及脓腔壁可见钙化,占60%;肋骨呈骨质破坏者42例,占35%,78例CT未发现肋骨破坏者中有34例手术中发现存在不同程度的肋骨骨膜破坏;并发活动性或陈旧性肺及胸膜结核病灶者88例,占73.33%.全组病人术后伤口均一期愈合,随访半年至5年无1例复发.结论 胸部CT可以同时观察肺内病变、胸膜病变、肋骨病变和胸壁软组织病变,及其相互关系,指导手术治疗;病灶的液化与钙化并存,哑铃形病变对胸壁结核的诊断有一定特异性;CT对肋骨骨质破坏较敏感,但不易发现单纯骨膜破坏.%Objective To discuss the using of CT in diagnosis and operation instruction for chest wall tuberculosis.Methods All the 120 patients were confirmed by surgery and pathology, preoperative for chest wall tuberculosis were performed conventional chest CT scans.Results Chest CT manifestations of 120 patients, one of the lesions limited to 44 cases of soft organizers of chest wall, accounting for 36.67%; formation an abscess inside and outside of the intercostal muscles, dumbbell-shaped sinus in the middle of lesion was in 76 cases, accounting for 63.33%; calcification can be seen around liquefied area and the abscess wall in 72 cases, accounting for 60%; db bone destroyed was in 42 cases, accounting for 35%, 34 cases in 78 patients CT found no spoilers in the ribs, surgery found there are different degrees of rib periosteum damage; concurrent active or obsolete pulmonary tuberculosis and pleural tuberculosis in 88 cases, accounting for 73.33%.After surgery all patients achieve the primary wound

  15. [Chest trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freixinet Gilart, Jorge; Ramírez Gil, María Elena; Gallardo Valera, Gregorio; Moreno Casado, Paula

    2011-01-01

    Chest trauma is a frequent problem arising from lesions caused by domestic and occupational activities and especially road traffic accidents. These injuries can be analyzed from distinct points of view, ranging from consideration of the most severe injuries, especially in the context of multiple trauma, to the specific characteristics of blunt and open trauma. In the present article, these injuries are discussed according to the involvement of the various thoracic structures. Rib fractures are the most frequent chest injuries and their diagnosis and treatment is straightforward, although these injuries can be severe if more than three ribs are affected and when there is major associated morbidity. Lung contusion is the most common visceral lesion. These injuries are usually found in severe chest trauma and are often associated with other thoracic and intrathoracic lesions. Treatment is based on general support measures. Pleural complications, such as hemothorax and pneumothorax, are also frequent. Their diagnosis is also straightforward and treatment is based on pleural drainage. This article also analyzes other complex situations, notably airway trauma, which is usually very severe in blunt chest trauma and less severe and even suitable for conservative treatment in iatrogenic injury due to tracheal intubation. Rupture of the diaphragm usually causes a diaphragmatic hernia. Treatment is always surgical. Myocardial contusions should be suspected in anterior chest trauma and in sternal fractures. Treatment is conservative. Other chest injuries, such as those of the great thoracic and esophageal vessels, are less frequent but are especially severe.

  16. Experiencia con la reconstrucción quirúrgica de las deformidades de la pared torácica Surgical Experience with Reconstruction of Chest Wall Deformities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose A Mainieri-Hidalgo

    2010-12-01

    de tórax por neumotórax trans- operatorio. No se documentaron otras complicaciones. Conclusiones: Las deformidades del Pectus Excavatum y Pectus Carinatum que presentan síntomas restrictivos o afección sicológica por la deformidad estética, se pueden reparar con baja morbilidad y salvo los casos que desarrollan cicatriz queloide, resultados estéticos muy aceptables. La técnica de utilizar una malla en lugar de la barra de metal, funciona igual con el beneficio de que se evitan las potenciales complicaciones por el desplazamiento del metal y no requiere la reintervención para retirarla.Aim: To analyze the clinical data, the indications and results for the surgical reconstruction of the chest wall deformities. Methods: With the purpose of assessing the information, clinical data of 45 patients treated with surgical procedures for Pectus Excavatum (PE and Pectus Carinatutm (PC in the Thoracic Surgery Department of the Hospital Calderón Guardia during the period of January 1998 to January 2010, was analyzed. Results: During this period 29 patients were surgically treated for PE and 16 for Pectus Carinatum, 37 male and 8 female. Ages started from 13 to 24 with a median of 16 years. In 28 patients the surgical indication was the emotional stress caused by the deformity, 17 had in addition to that, symptoms like dyspnea during exercise, chest pain or palpitations. In 26 of the 29 patients operated for PE a metal bar was utilized to hold the sternum in position and removed 6 months later and in the last 3 patients a polypropylene mesh was used with the same function with no need of reintervention to remove it. The results were subjectively evaluated according to the patient’s satisfaction and the medical notes. In one patient with PE the deformity recurred but not the symptoms. In forty four patients the symptoms disappeared and there was a cosmetic satisfaction but 3 developed hypertrophic scars. One patient, five months after the surgery, had a dislodged

  17. Numerical Simulation of Transient 3-D Turbulent Heated Jet into Crossflow in a Thick-Wall T-Junction Pipe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Hailing; Chen Tingkuan; Luo Yushan; Wang Haijun

    2001-01-01

    The present work is to investigate the transient three-dimensional heated turbulent jet into crossflow in a thick wall T-junction pipe using CFD package. Two cases with the jet-to-crossflow velocity ratio of 0.05 and 0.5 are computed, with a finite-volume method utilizing k-ε turbulent model. Comparison of the steady-state computations with measured data shows good qualitative agreement. Transient process of injection is simulated to examine the thermal shock on the T-junction component. Temporal temperature of the component is acquired by thermal coupling with the fluid. Via analysis of the flow and thermal characteristics, factors causing the thermal shock are studied. Optimal flow rates are discussed to reduce the thermal shock.

  18. Transient Response of a Fluid-Filled, Thick-Walled Spherical Shell Embedded in an Elastic Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahari Ako

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper addresses the problem of transient elastodynamics analysis of a thick-walled, fluid-filled spherical shell embedded in an elastic medium with an analytical approach. This configuration is investigated at first step for a full-space case. Different constitutive relations for the elastic medium, shell material and filling fluid can be considered, as well as different excitation sources (including S/P wave or plane/spherical incident wave at different locations. With mapmaking visualisation, the wave propagation phenomena can be described and better understood. The methodology is going to be applied to analysis of the tunnels or other shell like structures under the effect of nearby underground explosion.

  19. APPLICATION OF TITANIUM PLATE AND Teflon PATCH IN CHEST WALL RECONSTRUCTION AFTER STERNAL TUMOR RESECTION%钛板联合Teflon补片重建胸骨肿瘤切除后胸廓

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴显宁; 陈名久; 喻风雷

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study the reconstruction method and effectiveness of titanium plate and Teflon patch for the chest wall after resection of sternal tumors. Methods Between October 2006 and November 2009, 4 patients with sternal tumors were treated and the thoracic cages were reconstructed. There were 2 males and 2 females, aged 30-55 years. The patients were admitted because of chest lump or pain. The sizes of palpable lump ranged from 4 cm×3 cm to 10 cm×8 cm. CT examination showed bone destruction. After sternal tumor resection, defect size ranged from 10 cm x 8 cm to 18 cm×4 cm, and titanium plate and Teflon patch were used to repair and reconstruct the chest wall defect. Results The operations of the tumor resection and reconstruction of chest wall defect were successfully performed in 4 cases. Incisions healed by first intention with no abnormal breath, subcutaneous emphysema, pneumothorax, and infection. One case failed to be followed up after 6 months; 1 case died of intracranial hemorrhage; and 2 cases were followed up 1 and 4 years respectively without tumor recurrence. The chest wall had good remodeling. No loosening and exposure of titanium plate, difficulty in breathing, chest distress, and chest pain were observed during follow-up. Conclusion Surgical resection of sternal tumors will cause large chest wall defect which can be repaired by titanium plate and Teflon patch because it had the advantages of easy operation, satisfactory remodeling, and less complication.%目的 探讨胸骨肿瘤切除术后采用钛板联合Teflon补片重建胸廓的方法及疗效.方法 2006年10月-2009年11月,收治4例胸骨肿瘤患者.男2例,女2例;年龄30~55岁.以胸部肿块、疼痛1~6个月后入院.检查见胸前区范围为4cm×3em~10cm×8cm的肿块,质硬.CT检查见骨质破坏.采用胸骨肿瘤扩大切除术,切除范围为10cm×8cm~18em×14cm,采用钛板联合Teflon补片重建胸廓.结果 患者手术均顺利完成.术后切口Ⅰ期

  20. How do hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutations affect myocardial function in carriers with normal wall thickness? Assessment with cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinto Yigal M

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical data on myocardial function in HCM mutation carriers (carriers is sparse but suggests that subtle functional abnormalities can be measured with tissue Doppler imaging before the development of overt hypertrophy. We aimed to confirm the presence of functional abnormalities using cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR, and to investigate if sensitive functional assessment could be employed to identify carriers. Results 28 carriers and 28 controls were studied. Global left atrial (LA and left ventricular (LV dimensions, segmental peak systolic circumferential strain (SCS and peak diastolic circumferential strain rate (DCSR, as well as the presence of late Gadolinium enhancement (LGE were determined with CMR. Septal and lateral myocardial velocities were measured with echocardiographic tissue Doppler imaging. lv mass and volumes were comparable between groups. Maximal septal to lateral wall thickness ratio (SL ratio was larger in carriers than in controls (1.3 ± 0.2 versus 1.1 ± 0.1, p 1.2 and a peak DCSR -1 was present in 45% of carriers and in none of the controls, yielding a positive predictive value of 100%. Two carriers and 18 controls had a SL ratio 105%.s-1, yielding a negative predictive value of 90%. With multivariate analysis, HCM mutation carriership was an independent determinant of reduced peak SCS and peak DCSR. Conclusions HCM mutation carriership is an independent determinant of reduced peak SCS and peak DCSR when LV wall thickness is within normal limits, and is associated with increased LA volumes and SL ratio. Using SL ratio and peak DCSR has a high accuracy to identify carriers. However, since carriers also display structural abnormalities and focal LGE, we advocate to also evaluate morphology and presence of LGE when screening for carriers.

  1. Fracture behavior of shallow cracks in full-thickness clad beams from an RPV wall section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeney, J. A.; Bass, B. R.; McAfee, W. J.

    A testing program is described that utilizes full-thickness clad beam specimens to quantify fracture toughness for shallow cracks in weld material for which metallurgical conditions are prototypic of those found in reactor pressure vessels (RPV's). The beam specimens are fabricated from an RPV shell segment that includes weld, plate and clad material. Metallurgical factors potentially influencing fracture toughness for shallow cracks in the beam specimens include material gradients and material inhomogeneities in welded regions. The shallow-crack clad beam specimens showed a significant loss of constraint similar to that of other shallow-crack single-edge notch bend (SENB) specimens. The stress-based Dodds-Anderson scaling model appears to be effective in adjusting the test data to account for in-plane loss of constraint for uniaxially tested beams, but cannot predict the observed effects of out-of-plane biaxial loading on shallow-crack fracture toughness. A strain-based dual-parameter fracture toughness correlation (based on plastic zone width) performed acceptably when applied to the uniaxial and biaxial shallow-crack fracture toughness data.

  2. Wall irregularity rather than intima-media thickness is associated with nearby atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Iulia M; Schreuder, Floris H B M; Hameleers, Jeroen M; Mess, Werner H; Reneman, Robert S; Hoeks, Arnold P G

    2009-06-01

    In addition to intima-media thickness (IMT), IMT inhomogeneity may carry information about atherosclerosis progression. In 147 vascular diseased patients (mean 66 y, 48% male), we determined the carotid bulb stenosis degree based on local Doppler blood flow velocities. Common carotid artery (CCA) morphologic characteristics, i.e. IMT, IMT-inhomogeneity (intraregistration variation) and IMT uni- and bilateral intrasubject variation (DeltaIMT), were measured using multiple M-mode. Associations of morphologic characteristics, stenosis degree and Framingham score were evaluated with Pearson correlation (r) and multiple regression analysis. The IMT distributions for subjects without and with stenosis were not similar. The stenosis degree score correlated significantly to unilateral (r=0.68) and bilateral DeltaIMT (r=0.62), IMT (r=0.41) and IMT-inhomogeneity (r=0.45). The averaged IMT and IMT-inhomogeneity increased slightly for singular stenosis and abruptly for multiple stenoses. Mean uni- and bilateral DeltaIMT per stenosis degree increased linearly with this degree, reaching a correlation close to 1 (r=0.98 and r=0.97). Interestingly, the majority of the subjects with a moderate to severe bulb stenosis exhibited a carotid IMT lower than the considered critical threshold of 0.9 mm. In conclusion, although CCA is not prone to plaques, its morphologic characteristics are positively correlated with stenosis degree score and other risk scores. DeltaIMT can be more reliable derived from inter-registration rather than from intra-registration variation. In the CCA, DeltaIMT substantiates vascular alteration better than IMT.

  3. Endothelial wall thickness, cardiorespiratory fitness and inflammatory markers in obese and non-obese adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa R. Silva

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Increased carotid intima-media thickness (c-IMT is considered a marker of early-onset atherosclerosis and it has been found in obese children and adolescents, but the risk factors associated with this population remain to be elucidated. Objective : To compare and verify the relationship between c-IMT, metabolic profile, inflammatory markers, and cardiorespiratory fitness in obese and non-obese children and adolescents. Method : Thirty-five obese subjects (19 boys and 18 non-obese subjects (9 boys, aged 10-16 years, were included. Anthropometry, body composition, blood pressure, maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max, and basal metabolic rate were evaluated. Serum glucose, insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR, blood lipids, C-reactive protein (CRP, and adiponectin were assessed. c-IMT was measured by ultrasound. Results: The results showed that c-IMT, triglycerides, insulin, HOMA-IR, and CRP values were significantly higher in the obese group than in the non-obese group, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c, adiponectin, and VO2max values were significantly lower in the obese group than in the non-obese group. The c-IMT was directly correlated with body weight, waist circumference, % body fat, and HOMA-IR and inversely correlated with % free fat mass, HDL-c, and VO2max. Conclusions : Our findings show that c-IMT correlates not only with body composition, lipids, insulin resistance, and inflammation but also with low VO2max values in children and adolescents.

  4. Evaluation of bolus electron conformal therapy compared with conventional techniques for the treatment of left chest wall postmastectomy in patients with breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opp, Dan, E-mail: Daniel.Opp@moffitt.org; Forster, Kenneth; Li, Weiqi; Zhang, Geoffrey; Harris, Eleanor E.

    2013-01-01

    Postmastectomy radiation (PMRT) lowers local-regional recurrence risk and improves survival in selected patients with breast cancer. The chest wall and lower axilla are technically challenging areas to treat with homogenous doses and normal tissue sparing. This study compares several techniques for PMRT to provide data to guide selection of optimal treatment techniques. Twenty-five consecutive left-sided patients treated postmastectomy were contoured using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) atlas guidelines then planned using 4 different PMRT techniques: opposed tangents with wedges (3-dimensional [3D] wedges), opposed tangents with field-in-field (FiF) modulation, 8-field intensity modulation radiotherapy (IMRT), and custom bolus electron conformal therapy (BolusECT, .decimal, Inc., Sanford, FL). Required planning target volume (PTV) coverage was held constant, and then dose homogeneity and normal tissue dose parameters were compared among the 4 techniques. BolusECT achieved clincally acceptable PTV coverage for 22 out of 25 cases. Compared with either tangential technique, IMRT and BolusECT provided the lowest heart V{sub 25} doses (3.3% ± 0.9% and 6.6% ± 3.2%, respectively with p < 0.0001). FiF had the lowest mean total lung dose (7.3 ± 1.1 Gy, with p = 0.0013), IMRT had the lowest total lung V{sub 20} (10.3% ± 1.6%, p < 0.0001), and BolusECT had the lowest mean heart dose (7.3 ± 2.0 Gy, p = 0.0002). IMRT provided the optimal dose homogeneity and normal tissue sparing compared with all other techniques for the cases in which BolusECT could not achieve acceptable PTV coverage. IMRT generally exposes contralateral breast and lung to slightly higher doses. Optimal PMRT technique depends upon patient anatomy. Patients whose maximal target volume depth is about 5.7 cm or less can be treated with BolusECT-assisted 12 or 15 MeV electron beams. At these energies, BolusECT has comparable dose-volume statistics as IMRT and lower heart V{sub 25} than opposed

  5. A pilot study of the impact of high-frequency chest wall oscillation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients with mucus hypersecretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakravorty I

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Indranil Chakravorty1, Kamaljit Chahal2, Gillian Austin21St George's Hospital, London, 2East and North Hertfordshire NHS Trust, Lister Hospital and Primary Care Trust, Stevenage, Hertfordshire, UKIntroduction: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients with mucus hypersecretion tend to demonstrate increased frequency of infective exacerbations and a steeper slope of decline in lung function. Enhanced mucociliary clearance with high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO devices previously used in cystic fibrosis and bronchiectasis patients may offer the opportunity for community-based, self-managed therapy to improve quality of life and lung function.Study design and methods: A randomized controlled crossover pilot study of HFCWO compared with conventional treatment was conducted in 22 patients with moderate to severe COPD and mucus hypersecretion. Patients spent 4 weeks using an HFCWO (SmartVest® device and 4 weeks in a conventional phase with a 2-week washout. Eleven patients started with HFCWO and changed to conventional treatment, whereas the other eleven patients started conventional treatment and crossed over to HFCWO.Results: The patients were elderly with a mean age of 71 (standard deviation [SD] 10 years and were at the upper end of the normal range of body mass index (25 [SD 4.2] kg/m2. The majority of patients had moderate to severe COPD with a mean percentage predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second of 41 (SD 15.6 and percentage predicted forced vital capacity of 73 (SD 17.7. Baseline sputum production was negatively correlated to lung function and positively to St George's Respiratory Questionnaire. Symptom scores and St George's Respiratory Questionnaire symptom dimension improved significantly (-8, P < 0.05. Sputum production showed a declining trend in the HFCWO phase, although not reaching statistical significance. The HFCWO device was well tolerated with good reported compliance.Conclusion: This pilot study

  6. To Estimate the Axial Elastic Modulus of Eye and Posterior Wall Thickness in Healthy Human Eye by Ultrasound Images and their Relation with Age and Gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Shahbazi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Based on the invasive studies it has been shown that factors such as age, the progress of eye disorders, lens fibers compression and the biochemical changes of ocular matrix alter the physical characteristics and elastic properties of eye. In this study, a noninvasive method of estimating human eye elasticityis proposed and its relation with age and gender is evaluated using ultrasound images. Materials and Methods: To estimate eye elasticity, an especial loading system was designed and an external stress of 2614 ± 146 Pa which is less than the intraocular pressure of eye was applied to 20 eyes in an in vivo study. The pressure was measured using digital force gauge. The ultrasound images of B-mode were acquired prior to and post applying the stress. For the offline study throughout the loading process, the ultrasound images were saved as multi-frames into the computer by video grabber board. Monitoring, saving and further study of images were provided for the extraction of eye axial length and posterior wall thickness (PWT. The elasticity was estimated by measuring the relative changes of the axial length of eye, the posterior wall thickness and the applied stress. The statistical correlation of elastic modulus was analyzed based on age and gender. Results: The elastic modulus of the eye and the posterior wall thickness was estimated to be 51,777 ± 27304 and 14603 ± 4636 Pa, respectively. The obtained results indicated that there was no significant difference between the elastic parameters of the eye and the posterior wall thickness based on gender in both male and female group. The correlation analysis of the elastic parameter showed that there was significant difference between the eye and the posterior wall thickness based on age with a 95% confidence interval. Discussion and Conclusion: Based on the results obtained in this study the ultrasonic instruments might be used to estimate the hardness of eye lesions as well as eye

  7. STUDY ON EFFECTS TO SHAFT WALL DEFORMATIONS AND FAILURES INDUCED BY LAYER'S CONSOLIDATION DUE TO WATER WTI~HDRAWAL OF EXTRA-THICK UNCONSOLIDATED AQUIFERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GENGDeyong; XUYanchun; SHENBaohong

    1995-01-01

    Accordance with more than 10 shaft wall deformation and failure events in Huang-Huai regions in the east of China, this paper discusses effects to shaft wall deformations and failures induced by layer's consolidation due to water withdrawal of extra-thick unconsolidated aquifers and its further deformation or damage trends, based on data obtained from simultaneous monitoring of both damaged and undamaged shafts, their correspondent unconsolidated layers and atmospheric precipitation etc.for more then 3 years.

  8. Effects of finite wall thickness and sinusoidal heating on convection in nanofluid-saturated local thermal non-equilibrium porous cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsabery, A. I.; Chamkha, A. J.; Saleh, H.; Hashim, I.; Chanane, B.

    2017-03-01

    The effects of finite wall thickness and sinusoidal heating on convection in a nanofluid-saturated local thermal non-equilibrium (LTNE) porous cavity are studied numerically using the finite difference method. The finite thickness vertical wall of the cavity is maintained at a constant temperature and the right wall is heated sinusoidally. The horizontal insulated walls allow no heat transfer to the surrounding. The Darcy law is used along with the Boussinesq approximation for the flow. Water-based nanofluids with Cu nanoparticles are chosen for investigation. The results of this study are obtained for various parameters such as the Rayleigh number, periodicity parameter, nanoparticles volume fraction, thermal conductivity ratio, ratio of wall thickness to its height and the modified conductivity ratio. Explanation for the influence of the various above-mentioned parameters on the streamlines, isotherms, local Nusselt number and the weighted average heat transfer is provided with regards to the thermal conductivities of nanoparticles suspended in the pure fluid and the porous medium. It is shown that the overall heat transfer is significantly increased with the relative non-uniform heating. Further, the convection heat transfer is shown to be inhibited by the presence of the solid wall. The results have possible applications in the heat-storage fluid-saturated porous systems and the applications of the high power heat transfer.

  9. Numerical study of the coupling of two identification methods - thermal and electromagnetic - for the reconstruction of inclusions in thick walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Touz, Nicolas; Dumoulin, Jean; Soldovieri, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    In this numerical study we present an approach allowing introducing a priori information in an identification method of internal thermal properties field for a thick wall using infrared thermography measurements. This method is based on a coupling with an electromagnetic reconstructing method which data are obtained from measurements of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) ([1], [2]). This new method aims at improving the accuracy of reconstructions performed by using only the thermal reconstruction method under quasi-periodic natural solicitation ([3], [4]). Indeed, these thermal reconstructions, without a priori information, have the disadvantage of being performed on the entire studied wall. Through the intake of information from GPR, it becomes possible to focus on the internal zones that may contain defects. These areas are obtained by defining subdomains around remarkable points identified with the GPR reconstruction and considered as belonging to a discontinuity. For thermal reconstruction without providing a priori information, we need to minimize a functional equal to a quadratic residue issued from the difference between the measurements and the results of the direct model. By defining search fields around these potential defects, and thus by forcing the thermal parameters further thereof, we provide information to the data to reconstruct. The minimization of the functional is then modified through the contribution of these constraints. We do not seek only to minimize a residue, but to minimize the overall residue and constraints, what changes the direction followed by the optimization algorithm in the space of thermal parameters to reconstruct. Providing a priori information may then allow to obtain reconstruction with higher residues but whose thermal parameters are better estimated, whether for locating potential defects or for the reconstructed values of these parameters. In particular, it is the case for air defects or more generally for defects having a

  10. Differential points of mediastinal cystic lesion in chest computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Jin; Baek, Jang Mi; Song, Jang Hyeon; Seon, Hyun Ju [Dept. of Radiology, Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yun Hyeon [Dept. of Radiology, Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Hwasun (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    To find differential diagnostic imaging findings of mediastinal cystic lesions in chest computed tomography. We retrospectively reviewed imaging findings of 70 patients with histopathologically proven mediastinal cystic lesions. They were 33 male and 37 female patients. Among 70 cases, 49 cases were in the anterior mediastinum, 12 cases were in the middle mediastinum, and 9 cases were in the posterior mediastinum. 19 patients had symptoms. Chest discomfort was the most common symptom. When the cystic lesion was located in the anterior mediastinum, and unilocular, the possibility of thymic cyst was the most likely (p < 0.0027). When the cystic lesion was located in the anterior mediastinum and was multilocular with a relatively thick wall, the possibility of a mature cystic teratoma was the most likely (p < 0.001). When the lesion was a high attenuation cystic lesion located around the air-way, the possibility o