WorldWideScience

Sample records for chest wall reconstruction

  1. Reconstruction of chest, abdominal walls and perineum

    OpenAIRE

    Vijaykumar D; Vijayaraghavan Sundeep

    2007-01-01

    The structural integrity of the chest and abdominal walls and perineum is frequently altered by cancer extirpation. Advances in reconstructive surgery and the availability of innovative techniques have helped the cancer surgeon to proceed with radical excisions with minimum morbidity. The ability to harvest flaps from distant sites and the availability of good prosthetic materials have now become part of the routine armamentarium of the plastic surgeon engaged in reconstructive surgery of the...

  2. Massive chest wall resection and reconstruction for malignant disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroulis, Christophoros N; Kleontas, Athanassios D; Tagarakis, George; Nana, Chryssoula; Alexiou, Ioannis; Grosomanidis, Vasilis; Tossios, Paschalis; Papadaki, Elena; Kioumis, Ioannis; Baka, Sofia; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Anastasiadis, Kyriakos

    2016-01-01

    Objective Malignant chest wall tumors are rare neoplasms. Resection with wide-free margins is an important prognostic factor, and massive chest wall resection and reconstruction are often necessary. A recent case series of 20 consecutive patients is reported in order to find any possible correlation between tumor histology, extent of resection, type of reconstruction, and adjuvant treatment with short- and long-term outcomes. Methods Twenty patients were submitted to chest wall resection and reconstruction for malignant chest wall neoplasms between 2006 and 2014. The mean age (ten males) was 59±4 years. The size and histology of the tumor, the technique of reconstruction, and the short- and long-term follow-up records were noted. Results The median maximum diameter of tumors was 10 cm (5.4–32 cm). Subtotal sternal resection was performed in nine cases, and the resection of multiple ribs was performed in eleven cases. The median area of chest wall defect was 108 cm2 (60–340 cm2). Histology revealed soft tissue, bone, and cartilage sarcomas in 16 cases (80%), most of them chondrosarcomas. The rest of the tumors was metastatic tumors in two cases and localized malignant pleural mesothelioma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma in one case. The chest wall defect was reconstructed by using the “sandwich technique” (propylene mesh/methyl methacrylate/propylene mesh) in nine cases of large anterior defects or by using a 2 mm polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE) mesh in nine cases of lateral or posterior defects. Support from a plastic surgeon was necessary to cover the full-thickness chest wall defects in seven cases. Adjuvant oncologic treatment was administered in 13 patients. Local recurrences were observed in five cases where surgical reintervention was finally necessary in two cases. Recurrences were associated with larger tumors, histology of malignant fibrous histiocytoma, and initial incomplete resection or misdiagnosis made by nonthoracic surgeons. Three patients died

  3. Massive chest wall resection and reconstruction for malignant disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foroulis CN

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Christophoros N Foroulis,1 Athanassios D Kleontas,1 George Tagarakis,1 Chryssoula Nana,1 Ioannis Alexiou,1 Vasilis Grosomanidis,1 Paschalis Tossios,1 Elena Papadaki,2 Ioannis Kioumis,2 Sofia Baka,3 Paul Zarogoulidis,2 Kyriakos Anastasiadis11Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Aristotle University School of Medicine, AHEPA University Hospital, 2Pulmonary Department-Oncology Unit, “G. Papanikolaou” General Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 3Oncology Department, European Interbalkan Medical Center, Thessaloniki, GreeceObjective: Malignant chest wall tumors are rare neoplasms. Resection with wide-free margins is an important prognostic factor, and massive chest wall resection and reconstruction are often necessary. A recent case series of 20 consecutive patients is reported in order to find any possible correlation between tumor histology, extent of resection, type of reconstruction, and adjuvant treatment with short- and long-term outcomes.Methods: Twenty patients were submitted to chest wall resection and reconstruction for malignant chest wall neoplasms between 2006 and 2014. The mean age (ten males was 59±4 years. The size and histology of the tumor, the technique of reconstruction, and the short- and long-term follow-up records were noted.Results: The median maximum diameter of tumors was 10 cm (5.4–32 cm. Subtotal sternal resection was performed in nine cases, and the resection of multiple ribs was performed in eleven cases. The median area of chest wall defect was 108 cm2 (60–340 cm2. Histology revealed soft tissue, bone, and cartilage sarcomas in 16 cases (80%, most of them chondrosarcomas. The rest of the tumors was metastatic tumors in two cases and localized malignant pleural mesothelioma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma in one case. The chest wall defect was reconstructed by using the “sandwich technique” (propylene mesh/methyl methacrylate/propylene mesh in nine cases of large anterior defects or by using a 2

  4. Plastic surgery in chest wall reconstruction: relevant aspects - case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Franco

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to discuss the participation of Plastic Surgery in the reconstruction of the chest wall, highlighting relevant aspects of interdisciplinaryness. Methods: we analyzed charts from 20 patients who underwent extensive resection of the thoracic integument, between 2000 and 2014, recording the indication of resection, the extent and depth of the raw areas, types of reconstructions performed and complications. Results: among the 20 patients, averaging 55 years old, five were males and 15 females. They resections were: one squamous cell carcinoma, two basal cell carcinomas, five chondrosarcomas and 12 breast tumors. The extent of the bloody areas ranged from 4x9 cm to 25x40 cm. In 12 patients the resection included the muscular plane. In the remaining eight, the tumor removal achieved a total wall thickness. For reconstruction we used: one muscular flap associated with skin grafting, nine flaps and ten regional fasciocutaneous flaps. Two patients undergoing reconstruction with fasciocutaneous flaps had partially suffering of the flap, solved with employment of a myocutaneous flap. The other patients displayed no complications with the techniques used, requiring only one surgery. Conclusion: the proper assessment of local tissues and flaps available for reconstruction, in addition to the successful integration of Plastic Surgery with the specialties involved in the treatment, enable extensive resections of the chest wall and reconstructions that provide patient recovery.

  5. Reconstruction with a patient-specific titanium implant after a wide anterior chest wall resection

    OpenAIRE

    Turna, Akif; KAVAKLI, Kuthan; SAPMAZ, Ersin; Arslan, Hakan; Caylak, Hasan; Gokce, Hasan Suat; Demirkaya, Ahmet

    2013-01-01

    The reconstruction of full-thickness chest wall defects is a challenging problem for thoracic surgeons, particularly after a wide resection of the chest wall that includes the sternum. The location and the size of the defect play a major role when selecting the method of reconstruction, while acceptable cosmetic and functional results remain the primary goal. Improvements in preoperative imaging techniques and reconstruction materials have an important role when planning and performing a wide...

  6. Chest wall reconstruction with acellular dermal matrix (Strattice™) and a TRAM flap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunbjerg, Mette Eline; Juhl, Alexander Andersen; Damsgaard, Tine Engberg

    2014-01-01

    Mette Eline Brunbjerg, Alexander Andersen Juhl, Tine E. Damsgaard. "Chest wall reconstruction with acellular dermal matrix (Strattice™) and a TRAM flap.” Acta Oncol. 2013 Jun;52(5):1052-4. Epub 2012 Oct 24. PMID: 23095144......Mette Eline Brunbjerg, Alexander Andersen Juhl, Tine E. Damsgaard. "Chest wall reconstruction with acellular dermal matrix (Strattice™) and a TRAM flap.” Acta Oncol. 2013 Jun;52(5):1052-4. Epub 2012 Oct 24. PMID: 23095144...

  7. Reconstruction with a patient-specific titanium implant after a wide anterior chest wall resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turna, Akif; Kavakli, Kuthan; Sapmaz, Ersin; Arslan, Hakan; Caylak, Hasan; Gokce, Hasan Suat; Demirkaya, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    The reconstruction of full-thickness chest wall defects is a challenging problem for thoracic surgeons, particularly after a wide resection of the chest wall that includes the sternum. The location and the size of the defect play a major role when selecting the method of reconstruction, while acceptable cosmetic and functional results remain the primary goal. Improvements in preoperative imaging techniques and reconstruction materials have an important role when planning and performing a wide chest wall resection with a low morbidity rate. In this report, we describe the reconstruction of a wide anterior chest wall defect with a patient-specific custom-made titanium implant. An infected mammary tumour recurrence in a 62-year old female, located at the anterior chest wall including the sternum, was resected, followed by a large custom-made titanium implant. Latissimus dorsi flap and split-thickness graft were also used for covering the implant successfully. A titanium custom-made chest wall implant could be a viable alternative for patients who had large chest wall tumours. PMID:24227881

  8. Customized Titanium Implant for Chest Wall Reconstruction in Complex Poland Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan E. Rodriguez

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Summary: This report describes a new method for the surgical repair of the chest wall deformity encountered in complex Poland’s syndrome. In this report, we describe the use of a customized titanium implant that was used to replace the missing second through fifth ribs and to provide chest wall stabilization before breast reconstruction. This approach might be considered an alternative to autologous rib grafting in patients who have reached skeletal maturity. It avoids the morbidity and risk associated with rib grafts and improves chest wall symmetry.

  9. Free Tensor Fascia Lata Flap and Synthetic Mesh Reconstruction for Full-Thickness Chest Wall Defect

    OpenAIRE

    Jumpei Ono; Akira Takeda; Minekatsu Akimoto; Akira Iyoda; Yoshio Matsui; Yukitoshi Satoh; Eiju Uchinuma

    2013-01-01

    A large full-thickness chest wall defect over 10 cm in diameter requires skeletal reconstruction and soft tissue coverage. Use of various flaps for soft tissue coverage was previously reported, but en bloc resection in each case affects these flap pedicles and sizes. We present a case of a 74-year-old man with a soft tissue tumor involving the left lateral chest wall. We performed an en block resection and skeletal reconstruction using a mesh, free tensor fascia lata (TFL) flap for soft tissu...

  10. Resection and debridement of chest-wall tumors and general aspects of reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main criterion for adequate local control of a chest-wall malignancy remains wide excision. With the available techniques of skeletal and soft-tissue reconstruction, even large lesions can be resected with safe margins. The primary purpose is to achieve a curative resection, although a significant number of symptomatic patients can benefit from palliative resection provided by such procedures. A key element in the success in treating chest-wall tumors is a multidisciplinary approach by all participating physicians, namely the thoracic surgeon, the plastic and reconstructive surgeon, the radiotherapist, and the medical oncologist. 70 references

  11. Properties of novel composite meshes in chest wall reconstruction: A comparative animal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Zardo

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: We consider composite grafts a suitable alternative for chest wall reconstruction. They are characterized by good overall biointegration and limited perigraft-fibrosis, thus potentially facilitating redo-procedures, even though a hydrophilic coating per se does not appear to prevent intrathoracic adhesion formation.

  12. Extended Resection of Chest Wall Tumors with Reconstruction Using Poly Methyl Methacrylate-Mesh Prosthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This prospective study evaluates the early result of patients with massive chest wall tumors treated by extended resection and reconstruction using Prolene or Marlex mesh-enforced with Poly Methyl Methacrylate Bone Cement (PMMC) prosthesis. Material and Methods: This surgery was performed on 40 patients with a mean age of 45±18 (12-62) at the Department of Surgery, National Cancer Institute, Cairo University between 1998-2001. Primary chest wall tumors were the indications of surgery in 42.5%, while secondary involvement extending from other sites principally breast cancer were the indications for 57.5%. In 85% of patients more than 3 ribs were involved by tumors and lesions were more than 10 cm in the greatest dimension in 50% of cases. Resection involved sternum in 15 (37.5%) cases and in 45% of cases complete extensive rib resections extended between costovertebral junctions and the costochondral junctions were performed. Additional resections of nearby organs were needed in 20 (50%) of cases including partial lung resection in 14 cases, partial vertebral resection in 3 cases and diaphragm resection for 3 cases. Immediate bony reconstruction by inserting Prolene or Marlex mesh-enforced with Poly Methyl Methacrylate Bone Cement (PMMC) prosthesis to the resulting chest wall defect was performed in 36 cases, whereas, 4 cases had delayed reconstruction. Primary simple soft tissue closure was sufficient for 37.5% of patients; whereas 35% were covered by local rotational flap and 27.5% needed myocutaneous flaps. No patient with this immediate reconstruction needed ventilatory support or tracheostomy and flail chest was not noticed ICU stay was markedly reduced; whereas 85% required less than 7 days. Immediate post operative (40 days) complications were found in 14 patients (35%) and cases with additional lung resection had more complication rate than others (64% vs 19%). Infection occurred in 3 patients and conservative treatment for 3-4 weeks using frequent

  13. Long-term survival after chest-wall reconstruction with musculocutaneous flaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reconstruction of chest-wall defects with musculocutaneous flaps permits resection of advanced chest-wall tumors and of tissues severely damaged by radiotherapy in patients who in a previous era were not surgically treatable. To determine the long-term outcome from this surgery, the records of 96 patients who had undergone chest-wall resection with musculocutaneous flap reconstruction were reviewed. Median survival for the entire group was 20.5 months, but a more accurate prediction of outcome could be obtained by dividing the patients into three groups. In group I, patients free of known malignancy and undergoing resection of radionecrotic tissues, median survival was 60.0 months. In group II, patients with resectable disease and free of tumor following surgery, median survival was 31.1 months. In group III, patients incompletely resected or known to have metastatic disease following surgery, median survival was only 12.5 months. Even in group III, however, some individuals achieved prolonged survival and lasting benefits from the surgery, so these data should not be used to exclude patients from undergoing necessary palliative procedures

  14. Reconstrução da parede torácica nos defeitos adquiridos Chest wall reconstruction in acquired defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Vinicius H. de Carvalho

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Acquired chest wall defects present a challenging problem for thoracic surgeons. Many of such defects can be repaired with the use of local and regional musculocutaneous flaps, but larger defects compromising skeletal structure require increasingly sophisticated reconstructive techniques. The following discussion will review the options for repair acquired chest wall defects based in literature. The authors searched the Pubmed (www.pubmed.com and found citations from January 1996 to February 2008. By reading the titles and the abstracts most of the citations were discharged because they focused in congenital chest wall defects or were cases report. However, many papers were found describing the outcome of large series of patients with acquired chest wall deformities. A review of recent literature shows that the repair of chest wall defects with soft tissues, if possible, remains the treatment of choice. Large chest wall defects require skeletal reconstruction to prevent paradoxical respiration. The selection of the most appropriate flap is primary dictated by the location and the size of the defect. It is important to transfer tissue with good vitality, so understanding the vascular supply is imperative. Autogenous grafts have been used in the past for skeletal reconstruction but a combination of synthetic materials with musculocutaneous flaps has been used lately. Based in the literature, the use of prosthetic material in chest wall reconstruction does not significantly increases the risk of wound infection.

  15. Chest wall resection and reconstruction using titanium micromesh covered with Marlex mesh for metastatic follicular thyroid carcinoma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suganuma Nobuyasu

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The distant metastases from differentiated thyroid carcinomas are often untreatable. In particular, bone metastasis is significantly related to poor prognosis since radioactive iodine therapy is generally less effective. Therefore, surgical resection is considered one of the treatments for patients with bone metastases. We report chest wall resection and reconstruction using titanium micromesh covered with polypropylene mesh (Marlex mesh for metastatic rib bones as a result of follicular thyroid carcinoma. Case presentation A 51-year-old man was referred to our institution with a painful chest wall tumor. He presented with a 15 × 10 cm bony swelling on the left chest wall and multiple small lung nodules from follicular thyroid carcinoma. Completion total thyroidectomy, chest wall resection and reconstruction using titanium micromesh covered with Marlex mesh were performed. There were no critical complications associated with surgical treatments and tumor pain disappeared during the postoperative period. Then, he received radioactive iodine therapy and the uptake of radioactive iodine was well observed in bilateral lung fields. Conclusion Reconstruction using titanium micromesh covered with Marlex mesh is possible for repairing the wide chest wall resection required for thyroid carcinoma metastasis. This technique would help to enhance treatment efficacy in the combination therapy of radioactive iodine and surgery in patients with large thyroid carcinoma metastasis in the chest wall.

  16. Dynamic 3D printed titanium copy prosthesis: a novel design for large chest wall resection and reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragón, Javier; Pérez Méndez, Itzell

    2016-06-01

    Due to high rates of complications, chest wall resection and reconstruction is a high risk procedure when large size of resection is required. Many different prosthetic materials have been used with similar results. Recently, thanks to the new advances in technology, personalized reconstruction have been possible with specific custom-made prosthesis. Nevertheless, they all generate certain amount of stiffness in thoracic motion because of his rigidity. In this report, we present a forward step in prosthesis design based on tridimensional titanium-printed technology. An exact copy of the resected chest wall was made, even endowing simulated sternochondral articulations, to achieve the most exact adaptation and best functional results, with a view to minimize postoperative complications. This novel design, may constitute an important step towards the improvement of the functional postoperative outcomes compared to the other prosthesis, on the hope, to reduce postoperative complications. PMID:27293863

  17. Chest wall resection and reconstruction using titanium micromesh covered with Marlex mesh for metastatic follicular thyroid carcinoma: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Suganuma Nobuyasu; Wada Nobuyuki; Arai Hiromasa; Nakayama Hirotaka; Fujii Keita; Masudo Katsuhiko; Yukawa Norio; Rino Yasushi; Masuda Munetaka; Imada Toshio

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Introduction The distant metastases from differentiated thyroid carcinomas are often untreatable. In particular, bone metastasis is significantly related to poor prognosis since radioactive iodine therapy is generally less effective. Therefore, surgical resection is considered one of the treatments for patients with bone metastases. We report chest wall resection and reconstruction using titanium micromesh covered with polypropylene mesh (Marlex mesh) for metastatic rib bones as a re...

  18. [Reconstruction of the anterior chest wall by a sandwich-type combination of a synthetic support and a muscle flap from the latissimus dorsi. Apropos of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanfrey, E; Grolleau, J L; Glock, Y; Chavoin, J P; Costagliola, M

    1996-04-01

    Reconstruction of the chest wall after balistic or other trauma requires good and muscle cover and creation of a new, stable and airtight wall. The authors present a case of balistic trauma of the right anterolateral chest wall which was urgently debrided and subsequently reconstructed by sandwich combination of a latissimus dorsi muscle flap and synthetic material composed of a sheet of PTFE and creation of two methylmethylacrylate ribs. The advantage of this technique is that it avoids the use of autologous tissue from an already weakened chest wall and confers a new chest stability in several sites corresponding to the wall defect with easily available and easy-to-use materials. PMID:8761064

  19. Solitary Plasmacytoma of the Chest Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Servet Kayhan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A previously healthy 55-year-old man with right sided lateral chest pain admitted to clinic. It was found a solid and painful mass at the right 4th rib in physical examination. Chest X-ray and thoracic computarized tomography showed an opacity measured 60x33 mm within the right chest wall destructing the 4th rib. Needle aspiration was performed from tumor and cytologic examination showed atypic plasma cell infiltration. The patient was scheduled for a chest wall resection and reconstructive surgery. Examination of a permanent section showed that the chest wall tumor was solitary plasmacytoma. There was no evidence of multiple myeloma recurrence after two years from the operation.

  20. Cutaneous reinnervation of the rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap after chest wall reconstruction: development of herpes zoster in the transplanted musculocutaneous flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, K; Inoue, K

    1998-08-01

    We report a patient in whom herpes zoster developed in the transplanted rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap 14 months after a chest wall reconstruction for recurrent breast cancer. Based on the distribution of the varicella zoster virus spreading along the sensory nerve fibers, we concluded that the virus spread along the reinnervated sensory nerves from the dorsal ganglia, through the intercostal nerves, and into the flap skin. It is suggested that this finding demonstrates the pathway of reinnervation into the transferred musculocutaneous flap on the chest wall. PMID:9718154

  1. Selected Methods of the Chest Wall Reconstruction for Sternal Dehiscence after Median Sternotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewandowicz Edward

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Dehiscence of a median sternotomy wound is a potentially devastating and life-threatening complication of cardiac procedures.Depending on the localization, extensiveness, and profoundness of the defect a variety of muscle flaps may be used to cover the frontal mediastinum, in particular: pectoralis major, rectus abdominisor latissimus dorsi. In spite of several options for restoration of sternal integrity we cannot avoid following serious local complications increasing patients morbidity. The aim of this paper is to report a method of sternal dehiscence management. Surgical technique and its results are presented on the example of two patients treated in Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery Clinic, Medical University in Łódź because of sternal dehiscence after cardiovascular procedure with sternotomy. Our experience indicates that modified bilateral pectoralis major flap seems to be effective surgical method of sternal dehiscence treatment. Also it is worth to remember that surgical procedure in this complication should be performed as soon as possible to decrease patient’s disability and to avoid following complications

  2. Lymphomas presenting as chest wall tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Witte, Biruta; Hürtgen, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Four cases of thoracic lymphoma mimicking chest wall tumors are presented. As resection is not the treatment of first choice in lymphomas, pretherapeutical evaluation of chest wall tumors should include a thoroughly staging and a biopsy for histopathological diagnosis. Chest wall destruction due to an anterior mediastinal mass, or a chest wall tumor associated with mediastinal lymph node enlargement, could be suspicious of thoracic lymphoma. Lymphoma with chest wall involvement mostly turns o...

  3. Chest Wall tumor: combined management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer is relatively rare disease among children and adolescents. The incidence of solid tumors other than CNS is less than 2/100,000. Tumors of the chest wall can arise either from the somatic tissue or ribs. These are rare, so either institutional reviews or multi institutional studies should determine optimal therapeutic management. Of the bony chest wall, Ewing's sarcoma or the family of tumor (peripheral neuro epithelioma, Askin tumor), are the most common. These lesions are lytic and have associated large extra pleural component. This large extra pleural component often necessitates major chest wall resection (3 or more ribs), and when lower ribs are involved, this entails resection of portion of diaphragm. Despite this resection, survival in the early 1970 was 10-20%. Since 1970 multi agent chemotherapy has increased survival rates. of importance, however, is these regimens have caused significant reduction of these extra pleural components so that major chest wall resections have become a rarity. With improved survival and decreased morbidity preoperative chemotherapy followed by surgery is now the accepted modality of treatment. Another major advantage of this regimen is that potential radiation therapy may be obviated. The most common chest wall lesion is rhabdomyosarcoma. In the IRS study of 1620 RMS patients, in 141 (9%) the primary lesion was in the chest wall. these are primarily alveolar histology. when lesions were superficial, wide local excision with supplemental radiation therapy was associated with low morbidity and good overall survival. however, a majority have significant intra- thoracic components. in these circumstances the resectability rate is less than 30% and the survival poor. Other lesions include non rhabdomyosarcomas, eosinophilic granuloma, chondrosarcoma, and osteomyelitis. The management of these lesions varies according to extent, histology, and patient characteristics

  4. Sonographic Findings of Variable Chest Wall Disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Mi Suk; Kim, Ji Young; Cho, Woo Ho; Kim, Joung Sook; Jeong, Myeong Ja; Kim, Soung Hee; Kim, Jae Hyung; Kim, Soo Hyun; Jun, Woo Sun [Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-06-15

    Variable chest wall disorders include hemorrhage, inflammation and a tumor on the chest wall. Especially in females, abnormal anterior chest wall findings can appear as breast lesions due to the anatomic relationship between the chest wall and the breast. Sonography is the first diagnostic tool to utilize for chest wall disorders and has an important role for the differential diagnosis. In this study, we introduce sonographic findings of the various chest wall disorders that are discovered incidentally during an examination for a palpable mass or pain in the breast. We also describe sonographic findings that additionally performed of sonography-guided core needle biopsy

  5. Resección tumoral en bloque y reconstrucción de pared torácica In-bloc tumor resection and chest wall reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Palafox

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available La resección de una neoplasia pulmonar o mediastínica que afecta simultáneamente a la pared torácica y la reconstrucción del defecto originado por la misma, son procedimientos quirúrgicos que se pueden realizar en un mismo tiempo operatorio. Con la reconstrucción primaria se busca preservar la función respiratoria y la integridad de la caja torácica, permitiendo al paciente una buena mecánica respiratoria, a la vez que un resultado estético satisfactorio y evitando la necesidad de una nueva intervención quirúrgica. Existen diversas técnicas y disponemos de diferentes materiales protésicos para su realización. Presentamos a continuación el caso de un paciente al que se le realizó satisfactoriamente una resección tumoral en bloque y reconstrucción de la pared torácica.Resection of a pulmonary or mediastinic neoplasm which simultaneously affects chest wall and reconstruction of the defect, are surgical proceedings that can be performed in the same surgical time. The objectives of reconstructing primarily the chest wall are to preserve the respiratory function and the thoracic wall integrity, therefore offering the patient appropriate respiratory mechanics, satisfactory aesthetic result and avoiding the needding for a second surgical intervention. There are several techniques and materials available for the surgery performance. We present the case of a patient who underwent successfully tumoral resection in-bloc and chest wall reconstruction.

  6. Actinomycosis involving the chest wall: CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two cases of pulmonary actinomycosis with extension to involve the chest wall that were evaluated using computerized tomography are reported. In both cases, the relation of pulmonary and chest wall disease was best shown using CT

  7. Chest wall stabilization and reconstruction: short and long-term results 5 years after the introduction of a new titanium plates system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollitto, Francesco; Loizzi, Domenico; Di Gennaro, Francesco; Scarascia, Daniele; Carlucci, Annalisa; Giudice, Giuseppe; Armenio, Andrea; Ludovico, Rossana; Loizzi, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Background We report short and long-term results with the dedicated Synthes® titanium plates system, introduced 5 years ago, for chest wall stabilization and reconstruction. Methods We retrospectively analyzed (January 2010 to December 2014) 27 consecutive patients (22 males, 5 females; range 16–83 years, median age 60 years), treated with this system: primary [3] and secondary [8] chest wall tumor; flail chest [5]; multiple ribs fractures [5]; sternal dehiscence-diastasis [3]; sternal fracture [1]; sternoclavicular joint dislocation [1]; Poland syndrome [1]. Short-term results were evaluated as: operating time, post-operative morbidity, mortality, hospital stay; long-term results as: survival, plates-related morbidity, spirometric values, chest pain [measured with Verbal Rating Scale (VRS) and SF12 standard V1 questionnaire]. Results Each patient received from 1 to 10 (median 2) titanium plates/splints; median operating time was 150 min (range: 115–430 min). Post-operative course: 15 patients (55.6%) uneventful, 10 (37%) minor complications, 2 (7.4%) major complications; no post-operative mortality. Median post-operative hospital stay was 13 days (range: 5–129 days). At a median follow-up of 20 months (range: 1–59 months), 21 patients (78%) were alive, 6 (22%) died. Three patients presented long-term plates-related morbidity: plates rupture [2], pin plate dislodgment [1]; two required a second surgical look. One-year from surgery median spirometric values were: FVC 3.31 L (90%), FEV1 2.46 L (78%), DLCO 20.9 mL/mmHg/min (76%). On 21 alive patients, 7 (33.3%) reported no pain (VRS score 0), 10 (47.6%) mild (score 2), 4 (19.1%) moderate (score 4), no-one severe (score >4); 15 (71.5%) reported none or mild, 6 (28.5%) moderate pain influencing quality of life. Conclusions An optimal chest wall stabilization and reconstruction was achieved with the Synthes® titanium plates system, with minimal morbidity, no post-operative mortality, acceptable operating time

  8. Surgery of chest wall deformities

    OpenAIRE

    Matos, AC; Bernardo, JE; Fernandes, LE; Antunes, MJ

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the medium-term results of 77 surgical corrections in patients with chest wall deformities, 53 (68.8%) with pectus excavatum and 24 with pectus carinatum, operated upon from 1985 to 1994. METHODS: The mean age of the patients was 14.7 years (4-39 years) and 77% were younger than 15 years of age. There were 59 male (76.7%) and 18 female patients. Only four had a family history of the malformation. Seven patients (9.1%) presented with asthma-like symptoms, and 13 (16....

  9. Anterior chest wall examination reviewed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Trotta

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Anterior chest wall involvement is not infrequently observed within inflammatory arthropaties, particularly if one considers seronegative spondiloarthritides and SAPHO syndrome. Physical examination is unreliable and conventional X-rays analysis is an unsatisfactory tool during diagnostic work-up of this region. Scintigraphic techniques yield informations both on the activity and on the anatomical extent of the disease while computerized tomography visualize the elementary lesions, such as erosions, which characterize the process. Moreover, when available, magnetic resonance imaging couple the ability to finely visualize such lesions with the possibility to show early alterations and to characterize the “activity” of the disease, presenting itself as a powerful tool both for diagnosis and follow-up. This review briefly shows the applications of imaging techniques for the evaluation of the anterior chest wall focusing on what has been done in the SAPHO syndrome which can be considered prototypical for this regional involvement since it is the osteo-articular target mainly affected by the disease.

  10. Solitary metastatic adenocarcinoma of the sternum treated by total sternectomy and chest wall reconstruction using a Gore-Tex patch and myocutaneous flap: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korfer Reiner

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The consequences of bone metastasis are often devastating. Although the exact incidence of bone metastasis is unknown, it is estimated that 350,000 people die of bone metastasis annually in the United States. The incidence of local recurrences after mastectomy and breast-conserving therapy varies between 5% and 40% depending on the risk factors and primary therapy utilized. So far, a standard therapy of local recurrence has not been defined, while indications of resection and reconstruction considerations have been infrequently described. This case report reviews the use of sternectomy for breast cancer recurrence, highlights the need for thorough clinical and radiologic evaluation to ensure the absence of other systemic diseases, and suggests the use of serratus anterior muscle flap as a pedicle graft to cover full-thickness defects of the anterior chest wall. Case presentation We report the case of a 70-year-old Caucasian woman who was referred to our hospital for the management of a retrosternal mediastinal mass. She had undergone radical mastectomy in 1999. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a 74.23 × 37.7 × 133.6-mm mass in the anterior mediastinum adjacent to the main pulmonary artery, the right ventricle and the ascending aorta. We performed total sternectomy at all layers encompassing the skin, the subcutaneous tissues, the right pectoralis major muscle, all the costal cartilages, and the anterior part of the pericardium. The defect was immediately closed using a 0.6 mm Gore-Tex cardiovascular patch combined with a serratus anterior muscle flap. Our patient had remained asymptomatic during her follow-up examination after 18 months. Conclusion Chest wall resection has become a critical component of the thoracic surgeon's armamentarium. It may be performed to treat either benign conditions (osteoradionecrosis, osteomyelitis or malignant diseases. There are, however, very few reports on the

  11. Classification of chest wall diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzi, E; Gulotta, C

    1993-01-01

    Several disorders of the thoracic cage are known to cause respiratory failure, by means of relatively simple mechanisms, such as the increased work of breathing, which results in alveolar hypoventilation. A variety of pathogenic mechanisms may be considered, as functions of the types of thoracic disorders present. As causes of these additional potential mechanisms, we considered the following: 1) ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) inhomogeneity; 2) inability to cough; 3) malformation or acquired defect of the respiratory centres; and 4) excess blood volume and fluid retention, which aggravate work of breathing and V/Q inhomogeneity. All of these disorders can be grouped into two major categories (which nevertheless have some of the pathophysiology in common): the mechanical syndrome and the neuromuscular or paralytic syndrome. In this paper we discuss chest wall diseases falling into the first category; namely, kyphoscoliosis, fibrothorax, thoracoplasty, ankylosing spondylitis and obesity-hypoventilation. Congenital deformities of the thoracic cage, which do not have important effects on ventilatory apparatus (e.g. pectus excavatum and pectus carinatum), were also considered. PMID:8472068

  12. Imaging of Chest Wall Lesions in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hekmatnia

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Chest wall lesions in childhood include a wide range of pathologies; Benign lesions include lipoma, neurofibroma, lymphangioma, hemangioma, and mesenchymal hamartoma."nMalignant lesions include Neuroblastoma, Rhabdo-myosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, and Askin tumor."nSystemic diseases such as leukemia, lymphoma, Langerhans cell histiocytosis, and also infections such as tuberculosis, and actinomycosis may also cause chest wall lesions."nThe imaging characteristics of these lesions are re-viewed, but only a minority of the lesions shows diagnostic imaging features, and most of lesions re-quire biopsy and histopathological examination for "ndefinitive diagnosis."nThe role of different modalities is discussed with an emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging for demonstrating lesion morphology and local spread. Computed tomography and neuclear medicine being used mainly to assess remote disease."nIn this lecture, we discuss about imaging of chest wall lesions in children.

  13. Dedifferentiated Chondrosarcoma of the Rib Masquerading as a Giant Chest Wall Tumor in a Teenage Girl: An Unusual Presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Abraham, Viju Joseph; Devgarha, Sanjeev; Mathur, Rajendra Mohan; Sisodia, Anula; Yadav, Amita

    2014-01-01

    Chondrosarcoma of the chest wall is a rare primary neoplasm found to occur in elderly men. Patients present with an enlarging, painful, anterior chest wall mass arising from either the vicinity of the costochondral junction or the sternum. Treatment includes wide resection with appropriate chest wall reconstruction. We report an unusual presentation of this uncommon tumor occurring as a huge chest wall mass in a young teenage girl.

  14. [Dedifferentiated Chondrosarcoma of the Chest Wall].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitoh, Genkichi; Yoneshima, Yasuto; Nakamura, Toshihiko; Kitagawa, Dai; Kinjo, Nao; Ohgaki, Kippei; Maehara, Shinichiro; Teramoto, Seiichi; Adachi, Eisuke; Ikeda, Yoichi; Mine, Mari

    2016-08-01

    A 79-year-old man complaining of an anterior chest mass with pain had an abnormal shadow on chest X-ray. A mass, 7 cm in size, with destruction of the right 4th rib was found on chest computed tomography. A F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) corresponding to the lesion showed an abnormal accumulation of FDG with the standardized uptake value(SUV) max=16.19. A malignant tumor of the chest wall origin was suspected and the tumor was resected with the 3th, 4th, and 5th ribs. Histologically, the tumor was diagnosed as dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma. He died of local recurrence about 5 months after the operation. PMID:27476566

  15. Algorithm of chest wall keloid treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Xiao; Zhang, Mingzi; Wang, Yang; Zhao, Ru; Wang, Youbin; Wang, Xiaojun

    2016-08-01

    Keloids are common in the Asian population. Multiple or huge keloids can appear on the chest wall because of its tendency to develop acne, sebaceous cyst, etc. It is difficult to find an ideal treatment for keloids in this area due to the limit of local soft tissues and higher recurrence rate. This study aims at establishing an individualized protocol that could be easily applied according to the size and number of chest wall keloids.A total of 445 patients received various methods (4 protocols) of treatment in our department from September 2006 to September 2012 according to the size and number of their chest wall keloids. All of the patients received adjuvant radiotherapy in our hospital. Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS) was used to assess the treatment effect by both doctors and patients. With mean follow-up time of 13 months (range: 6-18 months), 362 patients participated in the assessment of POSAS with doctors.Both the doctors and the patients themselves used POSAS to evaluate the treatment effect. The recurrence rate was 0.83%. There was an obvious significant difference (P keloids. This algorithm could play a guiding role for surgeons when dealing with chest wall keloid treatment. PMID:27583896

  16. Primary Burkitt Lymphoma of the Chest Wall

    OpenAIRE

    Rommel Lu

    2012-01-01

    Burkitt lymphoma (BL) originating in the skin and soft tissue at any site is exceedingly rare. This paper is about a case of primary sporadic BL that presented as an isolated, rapidly enlarging chest wall mass arising from skin and/or soft tissue in an adult. As with other BL presentations, this patient was treated with aggressive chemotherapy with central nervous system (CNS) chemoprophylaxis, but he later died because of sepsis.

  17. Primary Burkitt Lymphoma of the Chest Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rommel Lu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Burkitt lymphoma (BL originating in the skin and soft tissue at any site is exceedingly rare. This paper is about a case of primary sporadic BL that presented as an isolated, rapidly enlarging chest wall mass arising from skin and/or soft tissue in an adult. As with other BL presentations, this patient was treated with aggressive chemotherapy with central nervous system (CNS chemoprophylaxis, but he later died because of sepsis.

  18. Salmonella typhimurium abscess of the chest wall

    OpenAIRE

    Tonziello, Gilda; Valentinotti, Romina; Arbore, Enrico; Cassetti, Paolo; Luzzati, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Male, 73 Final Diagnosis: Salmonella typhimurium abscess of the chest wall Symptoms: — Medication: Ciprofloxacin Clinical Procedure:— Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Non-typhoid Salmonella extra-intestinal infections usually develop in infants and in adult patients with pre-existing predisposing conditions. Blood stream infections and urinary tract infections are the most common clinical presentations, but other sites of infection may be ...

  19. [NECROTIZING FASCIITIS OF THE CHEST WALL].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, Raymond; Asla, Husam

    2016-04-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a bacterial dermo-hypodermitis affecting the soft tissue and muscular fascia. It is an uncommon and severe infection caused by microorganisms called 'flesh eating bacteria', mainly represented by group A beta-haemolytic streptococcus. NF remains a life-threatening condition associated with a high mortality rate. Its location on the chest wall is extremely rare. The few reported cases are subsequent to thoracic drainage, lung surgery or esophageal resection. This is a case report of an 80-year old female with comorbidity of heart disease, a past history of coronary artery by-pass and diabetes. She was admitted to the emergency room with acute NF of the chest and shortly after diagnosis, the patient died. Due to the fast decline observed in this disease, we would like to emphasize the importance of early recognition and diagnosis. PMID:27323534

  20. Dosimetric Comparison of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy, Static Field Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy, and 3D Conformal Planning for the Treatment of a Right-Sided Reconstructed Chest Wall and Regional Nodal Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishruta A. Dumane

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We compared 3D conformal planning, static field intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT, and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT to investigate the suitable treatment plan and delivery method for a right-sided reconstructed chest wall and nodal case. The dose prescribed for the reconstructed chest wall and regional nodes was 50.4 Gy. Plans were compared for target coverage and doses of the lungs, heart, contralateral breast, and healthy tissue. All plans achieved acceptable coverage of the target and IMNs. The best right lung sparing achieved with 3D was a V20 Gy of 31.09%. Compared to it, VMAT reduced the same by 10.85% and improved the CI and HI over 3D by 18.75% and 2%, respectively. The ipsilateral lung V5 Gy to V20 Gy decreased with VMAT over IMRT by as high as 17.1%. The contralateral lung V5 Gy was also lowered with VMAT compared to IMRT by 16.22%. The MU and treatment beams were lowered with VMAT over IMRT by 30% and 10, respectively, decreasing the treatment time by >50%. VMAT was the treatment plan and delivery method of choice for this case due to a combination of improved lung sparing and reduced treatment time without compromising target coverage.

  1. Canal Wall Reconstruction Mastoidectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective To investigate the advantages of canal wall reconstruction (CWR) mastoidectomy, a single-stage technique for cholesteatoma removal and posterior external canal wall reconstruction, over the open and closed procedures in terms of cholesteatoma recurrence. Methods: Between June 2002 and December 2005, 38 patients (40 ears) with cholesteatoma were admited to Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital and received surgical treatments. Of these patients, 25 were male with ages ranging between 11 and 60 years (mean = 31.6 years) and 13 were female with ages ranging between 20 and 65 years (mean = 38.8 years). Canal wall reconstruction (CWR)mastoidectomy was performed in 31 ears and canal wall down (CWD) mastoidectomy in 9 ears. Concha cartilage was used for ear canal wall reconstruction in 22 of the 31 CWR procedures and cortical mastoid bone was used in the remaining 9 cases. Results At 0.5 to 4 years follow up, all but one patients remained free of signs of cholesteatoma recurrence, i.e., no retraction pocket or cholesteatoma matrix. One patient, a smoker, needed revision surgery due to cholesteatoma recurrence 1.5 year after the initial operation. The recurrence rate was therefore 3.2% (1/31). Cholesteatoma recurrence was monitored using postoperative CT scans whenever possible. In the case that needed a revision procedure, a retraction pocket was identified by otoendoscopy in the pars flacida area that eventually evolved into a cholesteatoma. A pocket extending to the epitympanum filled with cholesteatoma matrix was confirmed during the revision operation, A decision to perform a modified mastoidectomy was made as the patient refused to quit smoking. The mean air-bone gap in pure tone threshold was 45 dB before surgery and 25 dB after (p < 0.05). There was no difference between using concha cartilage and cortical mastoid bone for the reconstruction regarding air-bone gap improvement, CT findings and otoendoscopic results. Conclusion CWR mastoidectomy can be used for

  2. Spectral characteristics of chest wall breath sounds in normal subjects.

    OpenAIRE

    Gavriely, N; Nissan, M.; Rubin, A. H.; Cugell, D. W.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--This study was carried out to establish a reliable bank of information on the spectral characteristics of chest wall breath sounds from healthy men and women, both non-smokers and smokers. METHODS--Chest wall breath sounds from 272 men and 81 women were measured using contact acoustic sensors, amplifiers, and fast Fourier transform (FFT) based spectral analysis software. Inspiratory and expiratory sounds were picked up at three standard locations on the chest wall during breathing...

  3. Biometric estimation of chest wall thickness of females

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optimal use of whole-body counting data to estimate pulmonary deposition of many of the actinides is dependent upon accurate measurement of the thickness of the chest wall because of severe attenuation of low-energy x rays and photons associated with the decay of these radionuclides. An algorithm for estimation of female chest wall thicknesses, verified by real-time ultrasonic measurements, has been derived based on the correlation of measured chest wall thickness and other common biometric quantities. Use of this algorithm will reduce the error generally associated with estimation of internal actinide deposition previously resulting from assuming an average chest wall thickness for all female subjects

  4. Management of radiation necrosis and advanced cancer of the chest wall in patients with breast malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggressive resection, with individualized reconstruction by several methods, is of value in many patients with radiation necrosis and/or advanced breast cancer of the chest wall. Although this does not always significantly lengthen survival, it can improve the quality of life markedly in many instances. Remarkably large defects can be reconstructed with single-stage procedures

  5. A case of radiation ulcer of chest wall with osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a case of anterior chest skin ulcer with rib and sternum osteomyelitis following radiation therapy for post operative mammary carcinoma. Operation was performed six times including debridement with sternum and rib resection reconstruction and skin grafting. It took about one and a half years after first operation to heal the ulcer with osteomyelitis. Principle of treatment for radiation ulcer accompanied by osteomyelitis is complete resection of the damaged lesion. However, it is difficult to evaluate the exact area of the damaged lesion. Therefore it is not rare to repeat its recurrence and have trouble with its treatment. In this case, it was considered that the resected area was insufficient on the initial operation. In order to treat for radiation ulcers accompanied by osteomyelitis, enough resection of the damaged lesion in the initial operation is necessary. Ultimately, in our case, the resection of all sternum, part of the right second to fifth rib and part of left second to seventh rib was necessary. It is generally said that reconstructing bone structure is required in the case of wide defect of chest wall. Though, we did not perform reconstruction of the bone structures, there is no problem in the condition of respiratory system. The surrounding soft tissues changed to hard enough to avoid paradoxical breathing. (author)

  6. Measurement of chest wall displacement based on terahertz wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Lv, Hao; Jiao, Teng; Lu, Guohua; Li, Sheng; Li, Zhao; Liu, Miao; Jing, Xijing; Wang, Jianqi

    2015-02-01

    Measurement of chest wall displacement is an important approach for measuring mechanics of chest wall, which has considerable significance for assessing respiratory system and diagnosing pulmonary diseases. However, existing optical methods for measuring chest wall displacement are inconvenient for some specific patients such as the female patients and the patients with bandaged chest. In this letter, we proposed a method for measuring chest wall displacement based on terahertz wave and established corresponding mathematic model and set up a terahertz measurement system. The main advantages of this method are that it can measure the chest wall displacement of the subjects without taking off clothes or arranging any markers. To validate this method and assess the performance of the terahertz system, in vitro, the displacement of a water module driven by a linear guide rail was measured by the terahertz system and compared with the actual displacement of the water module. The results showed that the waveforms measured with two methods have a good agreement, and the relative error is less than 5% and sufficiently good for measurement demands. In vivo, the synchronous experiment was performed on five human volunteers with the terahertz system and a respiratory belt transducer. The results demonstrate that this method has good performance and promising prospects for measuring chest wall displacement.

  7. A triceps musculocutaneous flap for chest-wall defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartrampf, C.R. Jr.; Elliott, L.F.; Feldman, S. (Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (USA))

    1990-09-01

    A posterior upper arm flap based on the profunda brachii vessels has been described to cover soft-tissue defects in the upper anterolateral chest. In our series, the posterior upper arm skin is elevated with the long head of the triceps muscle to cover seven chest-wall defects resulting from indolent postradiation open wounds following partial TRAM flap failure (n = 2), soft-tissue deficiencies following partial TRAM flap loss (n = 3), and primarily as an ancillary flap in TRAM flap breast reconstruction (n = 2). This flap also may be used to supply well-vascularized tissue in the regions of the shoulder, axilla, and posterolateral back. A prerequisite for this operation is redundant tissue of the upper arm often present in middle-aged women and in patients with lymphedema following mastectomy. In our series of seven patients, all donor sites were closed primarily, and there was no subjective functional deficit following transfer of the long head of the triceps muscle.

  8. A triceps musculocutaneous flap for chest-wall defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A posterior upper arm flap based on the profunda brachii vessels has been described to cover soft-tissue defects in the upper anterolateral chest. In our series, the posterior upper arm skin is elevated with the long head of the triceps muscle to cover seven chest-wall defects resulting from indolent postradiation open wounds following partial TRAM flap failure (n = 2), soft-tissue deficiencies following partial TRAM flap loss (n = 3), and primarily as an ancillary flap in TRAM flap breast reconstruction (n = 2). This flap also may be used to supply well-vascularized tissue in the regions of the shoulder, axilla, and posterolateral back. A prerequisite for this operation is redundant tissue of the upper arm often present in middle-aged women and in patients with lymphedema following mastectomy. In our series of seven patients, all donor sites were closed primarily, and there was no subjective functional deficit following transfer of the long head of the triceps muscle

  9. Chest Wall Involvement as a Manifestation of Brucellosis

    OpenAIRE

    K Rahmdel; R Golsha; Golshah, E; R Rezaie Shirazi; N Sadre Momtaz

    2011-01-01

    Brucellosis continues to be a common infectious disease in some parts of the world. Although the disease has different presentations, but chest wall involvement, as a manifestation of brucellosis is rare. In this study, we report three cases of chest wall involvement as manifesting feature of Brucellosis in Iran. They presented with a history of parasternal masses revealed to a diagnosis of Brucellosis and responded well to the treatment. Brucellosis may present with strange and unpredictable...

  10. Chest wall segmentation in automated 3D breast ultrasound scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Tao; Platel, Bram; Mann, Ritse M; Huisman, Henkjan; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we present an automatic method to segment the chest wall in automated 3D breast ultrasound images. Determining the location of the chest wall in automated 3D breast ultrasound images is necessary in computer-aided detection systems to remove automatically detected cancer candidates beyond the chest wall and it can be of great help for inter- and intra-modal image registration. We show that the visible part of the chest wall in an automated 3D breast ultrasound image can be accurately modeled by a cylinder. We fit the surface of our cylinder model to a set of automatically detected rib-surface points. The detection of the rib-surface points is done by a classifier using features representing local image intensity patterns and presence of rib shadows. Due to attenuation of the ultrasound signal, a clear shadow is visible behind the ribs. Evaluation of our segmentation method is done by computing the distance of manually annotated rib points to the surface of the automatically detected chest wall. We examined the performance on images obtained with the two most common 3D breast ultrasound devices in the market. In a dataset of 142 images, the average mean distance of the annotated points to the segmented chest wall was 5.59 ± 3.08 mm. PMID:23273891

  11. Incidence of severe capsular contracture following implant-based immediate breast reconstruction with or without postoperative chest wall radiotherapy using 40 Gray in 15 fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of capsular contracture (CC) requiring revisional surgery in patients receiving postoperative radiotherapy (RT) or no RT following mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction. Material and methods: One hundred and seventy-eight immediate breast reconstructions performed at the Cambridge Breast Unit between 1.1.2001 and 31.12.2005 were identified. RT was delivered using a standard UK scheme of 40 Gray in 15 fractions over 3 weeks. The influence of hormones and chemotherapy as well as postoperative RT on time to development of severe CC after implant-based reconstruction was explored in univariate and multivariate analysis. Results: One hundred and ten patients had implant-based reconstructions with a median follow-up of 51 months. In the RT group (41 patients), there were 8 patients with severe CC requiring revisional surgery, a crude rate of 19.5%, with actuarial rates of 0%, 5%, 5%, 21%, 30% and 30% at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 years follow-up. In the unirradiated group, there were no cases of severe CC. This difference is highly significant (p < 0.001). Hormones and chemotherapy were not significantly associated with severe CC. Conclusions: This series showed a significantly higher rate of severe CC with postoperative RT. This finding has important clinical implications, when counselling patients for immediate breast reconstruction

  12. Ineffective Ventilation During Conscious Sedation Due to Chest Wall Rigidity After Intravenous Midazolam and Fentanyl

    OpenAIRE

    Ackerman, William E.; Phero, James C; Theodore, Gregg T.

    1990-01-01

    Chest wall rigidity has been reported after the administration of high-dose intravenous fentanyl. This case report supports the observation that low-dose intravenous fentanyl may also cause chest wall rigidity. The treatment of chest wall rigidity with naloxone or neuromuscular blocking agents is controversial. A discussion of the management of fentanyl-induced chest wall rigidity is presented.

  13. RECURRENT SALMONELLA TYPHI CHEST WALL ABSCESSES IN A DIABETIC LADY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayasri Helen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available : Salmonella enterica serovar typhi causing typhoid fever is common in many parts of the world particularly in developing countries. Extra intestinal manifestations are uncommon and occur in immunocompromised individuals such as patients with diabetes, HIV infection, chronic steroid use, chemotherapy and malignancy. We report a case of Salmonella typhi causing recurrent chest wall abscesses in a lady with uncontrolled diabetes. She was admitted with high grade fever, left sided chest wall abscess and a previous history of two similar chest wall abscesses. After hospitalization prompt incision and drainage was done and aerobic culture of pus grew moderate growth of Salmonella typhi resistant to ciprofloxacin and sensitive to cephalosporins. Based on culture report our patient was treated with oral azithromycin for ten days and parenteral ceftriaxone for six weeks. There was rapid and full recovery and six months follow up revealed no recurrence.

  14. CYSTIC HYGROMA OF CHEST WALL- 2 Reported Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapan Shah

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Hygromas arise in the sites of primitive lymphatic lakes, on the floor of the mouth, under the jaw, in the neck and in the axillae, but they can occur virtually anywhere in the body. Their occurrence on the chest wall is very rare and they progressively grow with age infiltrating into the local tissues, insinuating lymphatic pseudopods and form cysts in and around muscle fibers and nerves, making them difficult and hazardous to remove. Here, we have reported 2 cases of cystic hygroma of chest wall in children

  15. Economics of abdominal wall reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Curtis; Roth, J Scott

    2013-10-01

    The economic aspects of abdominal wall reconstruction are frequently overlooked, although understandings of the financial implications are essential in providing cost-efficient health care. Ventral hernia repairs are frequently performed surgical procedures with significant economic ramifications for employers, insurers, providers, and patients because of the volume of procedures, complication rates, the significant rate of recurrence, and escalating costs. Because biological mesh materials add significant expense to the costs of treating complex abdominal wall hernias, the role of such costly materials needs to be better defined to ensure the most cost-efficient and effective treatments for ventral abdominal wall hernias. PMID:24035086

  16. Palpation for muscular tenderness in the anterior chest wall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Wulff; Vach, Werner; Manniche, Claus; Haghfelt, Torben; Hartvigsen, Lisbeth; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To asses the interobserver and intraobserver reliability (in terms of day-to-day and hour-to-hour reliability) of palpation for muscular tenderness in the anterior chest wall. DESIGN: A repeated measures designs was used. SETTING: Department of Nuclear Medicine, Odense University...... Hospital, Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: Two experienced chiropractors examined 29 patients and 27 subjects in the interobserver part, and 1 of the 2 chiropractors examined 14 patients and 15 subjects in the intraobserver studies. INTERVENTION: Palpation for muscular tenderness was done in 14 predetermined areas...... of the anterior chest wall with all subjects sitting. Each dimension was rated as absent or present for tenderness or pain for each location. All examinations were carried out according to a standard written procedure. RESULTS: Based on a pooled analysis of data from palpation of the anterior chest...

  17. Pattern of dose prescription in chest wall irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method described, in this paper, gives a solution to obtain dose uniformity in chest wall. This method can be followed for routine clinical practice. The distribution with the new technique can still be improved with the use of wedge along with breast cone provided the machine is equipped with asymmetric wedge

  18. Chest wall tuberculosis; CT findings in 14 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To present CT findings of chest wall tuberculosis. CT scans were obtained in 14 patients with proven chest wall tuberculosis. Diagnosis was confirmed by means of right open thoracostomy with abscess evacuation (n=1), excision and curettage (n=11) or excision and curettage along with resection of the involved lung (n=2). The images were assessed with emphasis for the extrapleural, pleural, and pulmonary lesions. All patients showed juxtacostal soft tissue mass with central low attenuation and peripheral rim enhancement. The lesions were located in the left hemithorax in eight patients and in the right in six. Multiple lesions were found in three patients (two in one and three in two). Rib destruction was observed in four patients. Intercostal muscle involvement of thickening and enhancement were shown in all patients. Thirteen patients (93%) had evidence of pulmonary tuberculosis: active pulmonary tuberculosis in nine and stable tuberculosis in four. Pleural lesions, including empyema necessitatis in six, were observed in eleven (79%). On CT scan, chest wall tuberculosis is characterized by juxtacostal soft tissue lesion with central low attenuation and peripheral rim enhancement. Rib destruction may be associated. Additionally, enhancing intercostal muscle suggest direct inflammatory process of tuberculosis and spread channel to the chest wall involvement of pleuropulmonary tuberculosis

  19. CYSTIC HYGROMA OF CHEST WALL- 2 Reported Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Tapan Shah; Dipen Patel; Yash Vaidhya; Jigar Jadeja; Sharad Patel; Asit Patel

    2012-01-01

    Hygromas arise in the sites of primitive lymphatic lakes, on the floor of the mouth, under the jaw, in the neck and in the axillae, but they can occur virtually anywhere in the body. Their occurrence on the chest wall is very rare and they progressively grow with age infiltrating into the local tissues, insinuating lymphatic pseudopods and form cysts in and around muscle fibers and nerves, making them difficult and hazardous to remove. Here, we have reported 2 cases of cystic hygroma of chest...

  20. Ultrasonic measurements of chest wall thickness and realistic chest phantom for calibration of Pu lung counting facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are four important problems for the measurements of chest wall thickness using ultrasonic device: (1) selection of optimum position of transducer and the number of measured points on the chest covered with detector, (2) estimation of adipose-to-muscle ratio in the chest wall, especially for dispersed adipose like 'marbled beef', (3) determination of regression equations for the prediction of chest wall thickness, derived from groups of different body shape, i.e. corpulent and lean, and (4) estimation of effective chest wall thickness involved self-absorption layer of lung tissue, which changes with distribution of activity in the lungs. This quantity can not be measured with ultrasonic device. Realistic chest phantom was developed. The phantom contains removable model organs (lungs, liver, kidneys and heart), model trachea and artificial rib cage, and also includes chest plates that can be placed over the chest to simulate wide range adipose-to-muscle ratio in the chest wall. Various soft tissue substitutes were made of polyurethane with different concentrations of additive, and the rib cage were made of epoxy resin with calcium carbonate. The experimental data have shown that the phantom can be used as a standard phantom for the calibration. (author)

  1. Brown fat distribution in the chest wall of infants - normal appearance, distribution and evolution on CT scans of the chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While reviewing chest CT scans of infants, we repeatedly observed hyperdense enhancing tissue in the chest wall that is not well described in radiology literature. This study was undertaken to describe the imaging features of this tissue in chest walls of infants. CT scans of the chest conducted on all infants between April 2008 and October 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. CT studies with any deviation from normal radiation or contrast dose or those with chest wall anatomical distortion were excluded. One hundred eighty-eight infants were scanned, with 202 MDCTs, of which 180 (89.1%) received contrast agent. Fifty-four of 180 (30%) cases revealed focal areas of hyperdensity in various locations. All positive cases ranged between 2 days and 9 months of age. The areas of distribution of hyperdensity had excellent correlation with known areas of brown fat in the chest wall, known from nuclear medicine studies, and hence we concluded these to represent the same. Brown fat in the chest wall can be seen as enhancing tissue on contrast CT scans done on infants. This is a normal morphological component with the brown fat converting to normal fat. It is important to recognize it in the chest wall of infants to avoid misinterpretation. (orig.)

  2. Brown fat distribution in the chest wall of infants - normal appearance, distribution and evolution on CT scans of the chest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Priya; Babyn, Paul S.; Shammas, Amer; Miller, Stephen F. [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada)

    2011-08-15

    While reviewing chest CT scans of infants, we repeatedly observed hyperdense enhancing tissue in the chest wall that is not well described in radiology literature. This study was undertaken to describe the imaging features of this tissue in chest walls of infants. CT scans of the chest conducted on all infants between April 2008 and October 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. CT studies with any deviation from normal radiation or contrast dose or those with chest wall anatomical distortion were excluded. One hundred eighty-eight infants were scanned, with 202 MDCTs, of which 180 (89.1%) received contrast agent. Fifty-four of 180 (30%) cases revealed focal areas of hyperdensity in various locations. All positive cases ranged between 2 days and 9 months of age. The areas of distribution of hyperdensity had excellent correlation with known areas of brown fat in the chest wall, known from nuclear medicine studies, and hence we concluded these to represent the same. Brown fat in the chest wall can be seen as enhancing tissue on contrast CT scans done on infants. This is a normal morphological component with the brown fat converting to normal fat. It is important to recognize it in the chest wall of infants to avoid misinterpretation. (orig.)

  3. Electron arc irradiation of the postmastectomy chest wall: clinical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: Since 1980 electron arc irradiation of the postmastectomy chest wall has been the preferred technique for patients with advanced breast cancer at the our institution. Here we report the results of this technique in 150 consecutive patients from 1980 to 1994. Materials and Methods: Thoracic computerized tomography was used to determine internal mammary lymph node depth and chest wall thickness, and for computerized dosimetry calculations in all patients. Total doses of 45-50 Gy in 5 to 5 (1(2)) weeks were delivered to the chest wall and internal mammary lymph nodes via electron arc and, in most cases, supraclavicular and axillary nodes were treated with a matching photon field. Patients were assessed for acute and late radiation changes, local and distant control of disease, and survival. The 10 most recently treated patients were censored for disease progression, survival, and late effects calculations, thus giving a mean follow up of 49 months and a median of 33 months. All patients had advanced disease: T stages 1, 2, 3, and 4 represented 21%, 39%, 21% and 19% of the study population, with a mean number of positive axillary lymph nodes of 6.5 (0-29). Analysis was performed according to adjuvant status (no residual disease, n = 90), residual disease (positive margin, n = 15, and primary radiation, n = 2), or recurrent disease (n = 33). Results: Acute radiation reactions were generally mild and self limiting. 27% of patients developed moist desquamation, and 32% had brisk erythema. Actuarial 5 year local control, freedom from distant failure and overall survival was 91%, 64%, and 67% in the adjuvant group; 84%, 50%, and 53% in the residual disease group; and 63%, 34%, and 30% in the recurrent disease group, respectively. In univariate cox regressions, the number of positive lymph nodes was predictive for local failure in the adjuvant group (p<0.037). Chronic complications were minimal with 10% of patients having arm edema, 15% hyperpigmentation

  4. Electron arc irradiation of the postmastectomy chest wall: clinical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Since 1980 electron arc irradiation of the postmastectomy chest wall has been the preferred technique for patients with advanced breast cancer at our institution. Here we report the results of this technique in 140 consecutive patients treated from 1980 to 1993. Materials and Methods: Thoracic computerized tomography was used to determine internal mammary lymph node depth and chest wall thickness, and for computerized dosimetry calculations. Total doses of 45-50 Gy in 5 to 5 (1(2)) weeks were delivered to the chest wall and internal mammary lymph nodes via electron arc and, in most cases, supraclavicular and axillary nodes were treated with a matching photon field. Patients were assessed for acute and late radiation changes, local and distant control of disease, and survival. Patients had a minimum follow-up of 1 year after completion of radiation treatment, and a mean follow up interval of 49 months and a median of 33 months. All patients had advanced disease: T stages 1, 2, 3, and 4 represented 21%, 39%, 21% and 19% of the study population, with a mean number of positive axillary lymph nodes of 6.5 (range, 0-29). Analysis was performed according to adjuvant status (no residual disease, n=90), residual disease (positive margin, n=15, and primary radiation, n=2), or recurrent disease (n=33). Results: Acute radiation reactions were generally mild and self limiting. A total of 26% of patients developed moist desquamation, and 32% had brisk erythema. Actuarial 5 year local-regional control, freedom from distant failure, and cause-specific survival was 91%, 64%, and 75% in the adjuvant group; 84%, 50%, and 53% in the residual disease group; and 63%, 34%, and 32% in the recurrent disease group, respectively. In univariate Cox regressions, the number of positive lymph nodes was predictive for local failure in the adjuvant group (P=0.037). Chronic complications were minimal with 11% of patients having arm edema, 17% hyperpigmentation, and 13

  5. Chest wall involvement by lung cancer. Thin-section computed tomography based on radiologic-pathologic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Kouzo; Katou, Yuji; Oshita, Fumihiro [Kanagawa Cancer Center, Yokohama (Japan)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the role of conventional computed tomography (CT) findings and thin-section CT findings in predicting chest wall invasion by lung cancer, and the results of surgery according to the depth of chest wall involvement. We reviewed 33 patients with lung cancer adjacent to the pleural surface who underwent conventional CT scanning and subsequent thoracotomy. All the patients were examined with a TCT-900S, HELIX scanner (Toshiba, Tokyo) following bolus intravenous contrast medium administration (conventional: 60 ml; thin-section: 40 ml). The conventional CT images (taken at 10 mm intervals with 10 mm collimation) and thin-section CT images (taken at 2 mm intervals with 2 mm collimation) were reconstructed employing an extended scale (window level: 40; window width: 400) using standard images. A comparison of the diagnoses based on the thin-section CT findings and pathological examination findings showed thin-section CT to be 82% accurate for chest wall invasion compared to 48% for conventional CT. We conclude that thin-section CT is useful for the accurate evaluation of chest wall invasion in lung cancer, especially for patients in whom findings by conventional CT suggest possible tumor invasion of the chest wall. (author)

  6. Chest wall tuberculosis - A clinical and imaging experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuberculous infection of the thoracic cage is rare and is difficult to discern clinically or on radiographs. This study aims to describe the common sites and the imaging appearances of chest wall tuberculosis. A retrospective review of the clinical and imaging records of 12 confirmed cases of thoracic cage tuberculosis (excluding that of the spine), seen over the last 7 years, was performed. Imaging studies available included radiographs, ultrasonographies (USGs), and computed tomography (CT) scans. Pathological confirmation was obtained in all cases. All patients had clinical signs and symptoms localized to the site of involvement, whether it was the sternum, sternoclavicular joints, or ribs. CT scan revealed sternal destruction in three patients and osteolytic lesions with sclerosis of the articular surfaces of the sternoclavicular joints in two patients. In five patients with rib lesions, USG elegantly demonstrated the bone destruction underlying the cold abscess. All cases were confirmed to be of tuberculous origin by pathology studies of the aspirated/curetted material, obtained by CT / USG guidance. Tuberculous etiology should be considered for patients presenting with atypical sites of skeletal inflammation. CT scan plays an important role in the evaluation of these patients. However, the use of USG for demonstrating rib destruction in a chest wall cold abscess has so far been under-emphasized, as has been the role of CT and USG guided aspiration in confirming the aetiology

  7. Anterior chest wall tuberculous abscess: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papavramidis Theodossis S

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The granulomatous inflammation of tuberculosis usually involves the lungs and the hilar lymph nodes. Musculoskeletal tuberculosis (TB occurs in 1–3% of patients with TB, while TB of the chest wall constitutes 1% to 5% of all cases of musculoskeletal TB. Furthermore, nowadays it is rarer to find extrapulmonary TB in immunocompetent rather that non-immunocompetent patients. The present case reports a fifty-six-year-old immunocompetent man with an anterior chest wall tuberculous abscess. The rarity of the present case relates both to the localization of the tuberculous abscess, and to the fact that the patient was immunocompetent. The diagnosis of musculoskeletal tuberculous infection remains a challenge for clinicians and requires a high index of suspicion. The combination of indolent onset of symptoms, positive tuberculin skin test, and compatible radiographic findings, strongly suggests the diagnosis. TB, however, must be confirmed by positive culture or histologic proof. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are important to prevent serious bone and joint destruction.

  8. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available COMPONENT SEPARATION FOR COMPLEX ABDOMINAL WALL RECONSTRUCTION ALBANY MEDICAL CENTER ALBANY, NY April 30, 2008 00:00:07 ANNOUNCER: This event is being ... the premiere webcast of a component separation for complex abdominal-wall reconstruction, performed by Dr. Jerome D. ...

  9. Measurements of the human anterior chest wall by ultrasound and estimates of chest wall thickness for use in determination of transuranic nuclides in the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The low energy photons on which the in vivo detection of plutonium isotopes and americium 241 is based are severely attenuated in body tissues. To assess the activity of these radionuclides in the lungs by external measurement it is necessary to estimate or measure the thickness of tissues overlying the lungs. It is also desirable to distinguish between muscle and adipose tissues in the chest wall because of the difference in their attenuation properties. Diagnostic ultrasound machines developed for medical use are suitable for this purpose. Experience gained since 1978 in ultrasonic measurements of chest wall thickness and the current measurement procedure are described. The concept of ''equivalent muscle chest wall thickness'' is introduced and a method for calculating the parameter is given. Both chest wall thickness and equivalent muscle chest wall thickness have been found to correlate well with Quetelets Index (weight divided by height squared). Residual correlations with other parameters have been examined. Empirical formulae are given that can be used to predict the chest wall thickness and equivalent muscle chest wall thickness of a subject of given weight, height and age. (author)

  10. HUGE SYNOVIAL SARCOMA ARISING FROM CHEST WALL: A RARE CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waddi Sudhakar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Synovial sarcomas are the fourth most common malignant soft - tissue tumors, and typically develop in para - articular locations of the extremities. However, the occurrence of these tumors in the chest wall is rare. In this article, we report the interesting case of a 27 - year - old male with spindle cell variant of synovial sarcoma arising in the anterior chest wall with a brief review of the literature. KEYWORDS:Synovial sarcoma;chest wall;spindle cell variant

  11. Predicting Chest Wall Pain From Lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Different Fractionation Schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Recent studies with two fractionation schemes predicted that the volume of chest wall receiving >30 Gy (V30) correlated with chest wall pain after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to the lung. This study developed a predictive model of chest wall pain incorporating radiobiologic effects, using clinical data from four distinct SBRT fractionation schemes. Methods and Materials: 102 SBRT patients were treated with four different fractionations: 60 Gy in three fractions, 50 Gy in five fractions, 48 Gy in four fractions, and 50 Gy in 10 fractions. To account for radiobiologic effects, a modified equivalent uniform dose (mEUD) model calculated the dose to the chest wall with volume weighting. For comparison, V30 and maximum point dose were also reported. Using univariable logistic regression, the association of radiation dose and clinical variables with chest wall pain was assessed by uncertainty coefficient (U) and C statistic (C) of receiver operator curve. The significant associations from the univariable model were verified with a multivariable model. Results: 106 lesions in 102 patients with a mean age of 72 were included, with a mean of 25.5 (range, 12–55) months of follow-up. Twenty patients reported chest wall pain at a mean time of 8.1 (95% confidence interval, 6.3–9.8) months after treatment. The mEUD models, V30, and maximum point dose were significant predictors of chest wall pain (p < 0.0005). mEUD improved prediction of chest wall pain compared with V30 (C = 0.79 vs. 0.77 and U = 0.16 vs. 0.11). The mEUD with moderate weighting (a = 5) better predicted chest wall pain than did mEUD without weighting (a = 1) (C = 0.79 vs. 0.77 and U = 0.16 vs. 0.14). Body mass index (BMI) was significantly associated with chest wall pain (p = 0.008). On multivariable analysis, mEUD and BMI remained significant predictors of chest wall pain (p = 0.0003 and 0.03, respectively). Conclusion: mEUD with moderate weighting better predicted chest wall pain

  12. Involvement of the chest and abdominal wall as a rave manifestation in Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiological findings of chest and abdominal wall involvement in Hodgkin's disease are reported. This manifestation was diagnosed in one patient in the primary staging and in two patients during the course of the disease. Typical radiological findings are soft tissue masses in the chest and abdominal wall, in two cases with continous tumor growth of enlarged mediastinal lymphnodes into the anterior chest wall. The axial computed tomography is the best method to evaluate the extent of chest and abdominal wall involvement in Hodgkin's disease. (orig.)

  13. Thoracic Wall Reconstruction after Tumor Resection

    OpenAIRE

    HARATI, KAMRAN; Kolbenschlag, Jonas; Behr, Björn; Goertz, Ole; Hirsch, Tobias; Kapalschinski, Nicolai; Ring, Andrej; Lehnhardt, Marcus; Daigeler, Adrien

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Surgical treatment of malignant thoracic wall tumors represents a formidable challenge. In particular, locally advanced tumors that have already infiltrated critical anatomic structures are associated with a high surgical morbidity and can result in full-thickness defects of the thoracic wall. Plastic surgery can reduce this surgical morbidity by reconstructing the thoracic wall through various tissue transfer techniques. Sufficient soft-tissue reconstruction of the thoracic w...

  14. Mechanical properties of lungs and chest wall during spontaneous breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagels, J; Làndsér, F J; van der Linden, L; Clément, J; Van de Woestijne, K P

    1980-09-01

    Using a forced oscillation technique, we measured the resistance (Rrs) and reactance (Xrs) of the respiratory system between 2 and 32 Hz at three different lung volumes in 15 healthy subjects and 7 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Rrs and Xrs were partitioned, by means of a pressure recording in the esophagus, into the resistance and reactance of lung and airways (L) and the chest wall. The measurements were validated by checking the adequacy of the frequency response of the esophagus, by the lack of difference between thoracic and mouth flow, by an estimation of the error introduced by the shunt impedance of the cheeks, and by comparisons with the values of pulmonary compliance and resistance determined in the same subjects with classical techniques. In both healthy subjects and patients, the chest wall has a low resistance that increases somewhat at low lung volumes and behaves functionally as a two-compartment system, with low capacitance at frequencies exceeding 4 Hz. Rrs varies with lung volume and is markedly frequency dependent in patients; both phenomena are due primarily to corresponding variations of RL. In healthy subjects, at and above functional residual capacity (FRC) level, the lungs behave as a one-compartment system, the reactance of which is mainly determined by the gaseous inertance, at least beyond 2 Hz. In patients and in healthy subjects breathing below FRC, the observed frequency dependence of resistance and the simultaneous increase in resonant frequency can be simulated satisfactorily by Mead's two-compartment model, assuming a large increase in peripheral airways resistance. PMID:7204163

  15. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available COMPONENT SEPARATION FOR COMPLEX ABDOMINAL WALL RECONSTRUCTION ALBANY MEDICAL CENTER ALBANY, NY April 30, 2008 00:00: ... Koumanis. The surgery comes to you from Albany Medical Center in Albany, New York. In just moments, ...

  16. Preoperative steroid in abdominal wall reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian Kiim; Brøndum, Tina Lee; Belhage, Bo;

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Preoperative administration of high-dose glucocorticoid leads to improved recovery and decreased length of stay after abdominal surgery. Even so, studies on administration of glucocorticoids for patients undergoing abdominal wall reconstruction (AWR) for giant ventral hernia repair ...

  17. Anesthetic Considerations for Abdominal Wall Reconstructive Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Slabach, Rachel; Suyderhoud, Johan P.

    2012-01-01

    Anesthesia considerations for abdominal wall reconstruction (AWR) are numerous and depend upon the medical status of the patient and the projected procedure. Obesity, sleep apnea, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease are not uncommon in patients with abdominal wall defects; pulmonary functions and cardiac output can be affected by the surgical procedure. Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are also at a higher risk of coughing during the postoperative awakening process, wh...

  18. Aspergillosis of bilateral breast and chest wall in an immunocompetent male masquerading as breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra G Nasit

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal species are not frequently encountered in an immunocompetent host. Invasive aspergillosis typically occurs in severely immunocompromised patient. Aspergillus infection of breast and chest wall are rarely encountered in an immunocompetent as well as in immunocompromised host. Till date only 13 cases of fungal infection of breast and chest wall have been reported in the literature. This report presents a case of aspergillosis of bilateral breast and chest wall in an immunocompetent male, clinically mimicking breast cancer. Diagnosis was achieved by fine-needle aspiration cytology and subsequently Aspergillus flavus was identified on fungal culture. The patient was successfully treated with voriconazole. Prompt diagnosis by cytology and appropriate treatment is necessary to prevent adverse outcome. Here, we present this rare case of fungal infection of breast and chest wall with relevant review of the literature.

  19. Obesity Increases the Risk of Chest Wall Pain From Thoracic Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is increasingly being used to treat thoracic tumors. We attempted here to identify dose-volume parameters that predict chest wall toxicity (pain and skin reactions) in patients receiving thoracic SBRT. Patients and Methods: We screened a database of patients treated with SBRT between August 2004 and August 2008 to find patients with pulmonary tumors within 2.5 cm of the chest wall. All patients received a total dose of 50 Gy in four daily 12.5-Gy fractions. Toxicity was scored according to the NCI-CTCAE V3.0. Results: Of 360 patients in the database, 265 (268 tumors) had tumors within 30, or volume of the chest wall receiving 30 Gy. Body mass index (BMI) was also strongly associated with the development of chest pain: patients with BMI ≥29 had almost twice the risk of chronic pain (p = 0.03). Among patients with BMI >29, diabetes mellitus was a significant contributing factor to the development of chest pain. Conclusion: Safe use of SBRT with 50 Gy in four fractions for lesions close to the chest wall requires consideration of the chest wall volume receiving 30 Gy and the patient's BMI and diabetic state.

  20. Prediction of Chest Wall Toxicity From Lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine patient, tumor, and treatment factors related to the development of late chest wall toxicity after lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: We reviewed a registry of 134 patients treated with lung SBRT to 60 Gy in 3 fractions who had greater than 1 year of clinical follow-up and no history of multiple treatments to the same lobe (n = 48). Patients were treated as per Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 0236 without specific chest wall avoidance criteria. The chest wall was retrospectively contoured. Thirty-two lesions measured less than 3 cm, and sixteen measured 3 to 5 cm. The median planning target volume was 29 cm3. Results: With a median follow-up of 18.8 months, 10 patients had late symptomatic chest wall toxicity (4 Grade 1 and 6 Grade 2) at a median of 8.8 months after SBRT. No patient characteristics (age, diabetes, hypertension, peripheral vascular disease, or body mass index) were predictive for toxicity, whereas there was a trend for continued smoking (p = 0.066; odds ratio [OR], 4.4). Greatest single tumor dimension (p = 0.047; OR, 2.63) and planning target volume (p = 0.040; OR, 1.04) were correlated with toxicity, whereas distance from tumor edge to chest wall and gross tumor volume did not reach statistical significance. Volumes of chest wall receiving 30 Gy (V30) through 70 Gy (V70) were all highly significant, although this correlation weakened for V65 and V70 and maximum chest wall point dose only trended to significance (p = 0.06). On multivariate analysis, tumor volume was no longer correlated with toxicity and only V30 through V60 remained statistically significant. Conclusions: Tumor size and chest wall dosimetry are correlated to late chest wall toxicity. Only chest wall V30 through V60 remained significant on multivariate analysis. Restricting V30 to 30 cm3 or less and V60 to 3 cm3 or less should result in a 10% to 15% risk of late chest wall toxicity or lower.

  1. Pulmonary Aspergillus chest wall involvement in chronic granulomatous disease: CT and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulmonary Aspergillus infection in patients with chronic granulomatous disease tends to involve the chest wall and consequently carries a high mortality rate. We report the findings of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in three such cases. We suggest that CT and MRI have a complementary role in evaluating chest wall invasion by pulmonary Aspergillus infection in chronic granulomatous disease. (orig./GDG)

  2. Treatment of chest wall tuberculosis with transdermal ultrasound-mediated drug delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Yi; ZHAO, QIUYUE; YU, DAPING; LIU, ZHIDONG

    2015-01-01

    Chest wall tuberculosis (TB) is an endemic disease with a large number of variants. The condition affects numerous parts of the body and can penetrate the skin to form chronic open ulcers. Current treatment methods include oral anti-TB drugs and surgery. However, conventional drug treatments are not effective due to the difficulty in achieving an effective local concentration, and certain patients are unable to tolerate surgery. The recurrence rate for chest wall TB is high following surgery,...

  3. Chondrosarcoma of chest wall metastasising to the larynx: Case report and review of literature

    OpenAIRE

    Ashish Singhal; Charu Mahajan; Rahat Hadi; Namrata P Awasthi

    2015-01-01

    Chondrosarcoma is the most common malignant tumor of the chest wall. Most patients present with painful progressive swelling in the anterior chest wall arising from the costochondrosternal junction. CT scan with intravenous contrast is the investigation of choice. Wide excision with adequate margins is the standard treatment for localized disease after image guided biopsy. The role of chemotherapy and radiotherapy is limited. Lung is the most common site for metastasis. Metastasis to the lary...

  4. Estimating adipose tissue in the chest wall using ultrasonic and alternate 40K and biometric measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The percentage of adipose (fat) tissue in the chest wall must be known to accurately measure Pu in the human lung. Correction factors of 100% or more in x-ray detection efficiency are common. Methods using simple 40K and biometric measurement techniques were investigated to determine the adipose content in the human chest wall. These methods predict adipose content to within 15% of the absolute ultrasonic value. These new methods are discussed and compared with conventional ultrasonic measurement techniques

  5. Normalized mean shapes and reference index values for computerized quantitative assessment indices of chest wall deformities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ho Chul; Park, Man Sik; Lee, Seong Keon; Nam, Ki Chang; Park, Hyung Joo; Kim, Min Gi; Song, Jae-Jun; Choi, Hyuk

    2015-11-01

    We previously proposed a computerized index (eccentricity index [EI]) for chest-wall deformity measurements, such as pectus excavatum. We sought to define mean shapes based on normal chest walls and to propose for computerized index reference values of that are used in the quantitative analysis of the severity of chest-wall deformities. A total of 584 patients were classified into 18 groups, and a database of their chest-wall computed tomography (CT) scan images was constructed. The boundaries of the chest wall were extracted by using a segmentation algorithm, and the mean shapes were subsequently developed. The reference index values were calculated from the developed mean shapes. Reference index values for the EI were compared with a conventional index, the Haller index (HI). A close association has been shown between the two indices in multiple subjects (r = 0.974, P < 0.001). The newly developed mean shapes and reference index values supply both reliability and objectivity to the diagnosis, analysis, and treatment of chest-wall deformities. They promise to be highly useful in clinical settings.

  6. Multidetector computed tomography-spectrum of blunt chest wall and lung injuries in polytraumatized patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, S., E-mail: soeren.peters@rub.d [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, BG Universitaetsklinikum Bergmannsheil, Buerkle-de-la-Camp-Platz 1, 44789 Bochum (Germany); Nicolas, V.; Heyer, C.M. [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, BG Universitaetsklinikum Bergmannsheil, Buerkle-de-la-Camp-Platz 1, 44789 Bochum (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    Accidental injuries are the leading cause of death in the 15 to 44-year-old age group. Blunt chest trauma is often encountered in these patients and is associated with a mortality of up to 25%. Although conventional radiography still plays an important role in the initial emergency room setting, for follow-up in the intensive care unit, multidetector computed tomography has established itself as the standard imaging method for the evaluation of chest trauma patients. The following review presents salient radiological findings of the chest wall and shoulder girdle, thoracic spine, pleural space, and lung in polytraumatized patients.

  7. Chondrosarcoma of chest wall metastasising to the larynx: Case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Singhal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chondrosarcoma is the most common malignant tumor of the chest wall. Most patients present with painful progressive swelling in the anterior chest wall arising from the costochondrosternal junction. CT scan with intravenous contrast is the investigation of choice. Wide excision with adequate margins is the standard treatment for localized disease after image guided biopsy. The role of chemotherapy and radiotherapy is limited. Lung is the most common site for metastasis. Metastasis to the larynx from chondrosarcoma has not been reported in the literature though primary chondrosarcoma can occur in the larynx. We hereby report a case of laryngeal metastasis from chondrosarcoma of the chest wall as a part of disease failure.

  8. Use of omental pedicle flap for radiation induced chest wall ulcer. A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 79-year-old female with breast carcinoma undergoing a classical Halsted radical mastectomy followed by irradiation (total; 180 Gy) 20 years before developed a left anterior chest wall ulcer. The ulcer was 10.0 x 8.0 cm in size with osteolysis of 3rd, 4th and 5th ribs, exposed pericardium, and parietal pleura with a pleuro-cutaneous fistula. After thorough debridement, an omental pedicle flap was transposed onto the chest wall defect and subsequently covered using a split-skin graft. The omental pedicle flap was 90% effective in covering the pericardial defect and resulted in a complete closure of the pleuro-cutaneous fistula. This report emphasises that an omental pedicle flap is effective in the treatment of radio-necrosis of the chest wall and also stresses the importance of judging the extent of debridement of radio-necrotic tissue. (author)

  9. Severe Chest Wall Toxicity From Cryoablation in the Setting of Prior Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Aadel A; Binkley, Michael S; Aggarwal, Sonya; Qian, Yushen; Carter, Justin N; Shah, Rajesh; Loo, Billy W

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 42-year-old woman with metastatic synovial sarcoma of parotid origin, treated definitively with chemoradiation, who subsequently developed oligometastatic disease limited to the lungs. She underwent multiple left and right lung wedge resections and left lower lobectomy, followed by right lower lobe stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), 54 Gy in three fractions to a right lower lobe lesion abutting the chest wall. Two years later, she was treated with cryoablation for a separate right upper lobe nodule abutting the chest wall. Two months later, she presented with acute shortness of breath, pleuritic chest pain, decreased peripheral blood O2 saturation, and productive cough. A computed tomography (CT) scan demonstrated severe chest wall necrosis in the area of recent cryoablation that, in retrospect, also received a significant radiation dose from her prior SABR. This case demonstrates that clinicians should exercise caution in using cryoablation when treating lung tumors abutting a previously irradiated chest wall. Note: Drs. Loo and Shah contributed equally as co-senior authors. PMID:27004154

  10. Predicting outcomes after blunt chest wall trauma: development and external validation of a new prognostic model

    OpenAIRE

    Battle, Ceri Elisabeth; Hutchings, Hayley; Lovett, Simon; Bouamra, Omar; Jones, Sally; Sen, Aruni; Gagg, James; Robinson, David; Hartford-Beynon, Jake; Williams, Jeremy; Evans, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Blunt chest wall trauma accounts for over 15% of all trauma admissions to Emergency Departments worldwide. Reported mortality rates vary between 4 and 60%. Management of this patient group is challenging as a result of the delayed on-set of complications. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a prognostic model that can be used to assist in the management of blunt chest wall trauma. Methods There were two distinct phases to the overall study; the development and the v...

  11. Determination of the chest wall thickness as calibration parameter for dosimetric partial-body counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors describe actual partial body measurements with Phoswich detectors in the in-vivo laboratory of the Institute for Technology in Karlsruhe. The chest wall thickness is estimated from the radio of body weight to body length. This formula includes several uncertainties. The aim of the project was the reduction of the uncertainties of the empirical formula using ultrasonography. This method allows an accuracy of plus or minus 1.1 mm for the determined chest wall thickness. Besides the experimental study several voxel models were used to determine the efficiency of modeled measuring systems. The voxel models reach the same accuracy as the ultrasound method.

  12. Volumetric measurement of pulmonary nodules at low-dose chest CT : effect of reconstruction setting on measurement variability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Y.; de Bock, G.H.; van Klaveren, R.J.; van Ooyen, P.; Tukker, W.; Zhao, Y.; Dorrius, M.D.; Proenca, R.V.; Post, W.J.; Oudkerk, M.

    2010-01-01

    To assess volumetric measurement variability in pulmonary nodules detected at low-dose chest CT with three reconstruction settings. The volume of 200 solid pulmonary nodules was measured three times using commercially available semi-automated software of low-dose chest CT data-sets reconstructed wit

  13. Estimating adipose tissue in the chest wall using ultrasonic and alternate 40K and biometric measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The percentage of adipose (fat) tissue in the chest wall must be known to accurately measure Pu in the human lung. Correction factors of 100% or more in X-ray detection efficiency are common in a normal population of individuals of differing body composition and have been determined in the past by means of elaborate and costly ultrasonic measurements of the subject's chest. Methods using simple 40K and biometric measurement techniques have been investigated to determine the adipose content in the human chest wall. These methods compare favorably with ultrasonic measurements and allow laboratories not possessing ultrasonic equipment to make appropriate corrections for x-ray detection efficiency. These methods predict adipose content to within 15% of the absolute ultrasonic value. (author)

  14. Heart failure due to severe myocardial calcification; A rare complication after irradiation on the chest wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Shouichi; Maida, Kiyoshi; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Shigeo (Aomori Prefectural Central Hospital (Japan))

    1993-11-01

    A 28-year-old female who had had irradiation on the chest wall at the age of 5 as a remedy for keloid granulation after burn, recently developed congestive heart failure. Severe tricuspid regurgitation was demonstrated by echocardiography with a certain calcification in the cardiac shadow on chest radiogram. Calcified right ventricle and ventricular septum were noticed operatively, which disturbed ventricular motion and also caused tricuspid valve deformity. These calcified myocardium apparently corresponded with the irradiation field. After tricuspid valve replacement, she regained physical activity satisfactorily without congestive heart failure. Because she had no other known causes of cardiac calcification such as hypercalcemia, myocarditis, myocardial infarction or renal diseases, irradiation on the chest wall could be responsible for the severe myocardial calcification. (author).

  15. Intravascular Papillary Endothelial Hyperplasia(Masson's Tumor) of the Chest Wall: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ga Ram [Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Joo, Seung Ho; Kie, Jeong Hae; Hong, Ki Pyo; Shim, Joo Eun [NHIC Ilsan Hospital, Ilsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    Intravascular papillary endothelial hyperplasia is a rare tumor-like lesion caused by hyperplastic proliferation of endothlial cells that is usually an incidental findings within thrombosed dilated blood vessels or vascular tumor. We report the sonographic appearance and pathological correlation of intravascular papillary endothelial hyperplasia that presented as an intramuscular solitary mass in chest wall

  16. Urgent resection of bleeding congenital mesenchymal chest wall hamartoma in an infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bieda, Jan-Christoph

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We report a case with prenatally diagnosed large cystic-solid mesenchymal chest wall hamartoma. An attempt of conservative management was made however repeated intralesional hemorrhage led to enlargement and severe anemia which required urgent resection at the age of 8 weeks. The infant had an unimpaired development over a follow-up of 4 years.

  17. Chest Wall Thickness Measurements and the Dosimetric Implications for Male Radiation Workers at the KAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using ultrasound techniques, the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute has measured chest wall thicknesses of a group of male workers at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. A site-specific biometric equation has been developed for these workers. Chest wall thickness is an important modifier on lung counting efficiency. These data have been put into the perspective of the ICRP recommended dose limits for occupationally exposed workers:100 mSv in a 5-year period with a maximum of 50 mSv in any one year. For measured chest wall thicknesses of 1.9 cm to 4.1 cm and a 30 min counting time, the achievable MDAs for natural uranium in the KAERI lung counter vary from 5.75 mg to 11.28 mg. These values are close to, or even exceed, the predicted amounts of natural uranium that will remain in the lung (absorption type M and S) after an intake equal to the Annual Limit on Intake corresponding to a committed dose of 20 mSv. This paper shows that the KAERI lung counter probably cannot detect an intake of Type S natural uranium in a worker with a chest wall thickness equal to the average value (2.7 cm) under routine counting conditions

  18. Post mastectomy linac IMRT irradiation of chest wall and regional nodes: dosimetry data and acute toxicities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conventional post-mastectomy radiation therapy is delivered with tangential fields for chest wall and separate fields for regional nodes. Although chest wall and regional nodes delineation has been discussed with RTOG contouring atlas, CT-based planning to treat chest wall and regional nodes as a whole target has not been widely accepted. We herein discuss the dosimetric characteristics of a linac IMRT technique for treating chest wall and regional nodes as a whole PTV after modified radical mastectomy, and observe acute toxicities following irradiation. Patients indicated for PMRT were eligible. Chest wall and supra/infraclavicular region +/−internal mammary nodes were contoured as a whole PTV on planning CT. A simplified linac IMRT plan was designed using either integrated full beams or two segments of half beams split at caudal edge of clavicle head. DVHs were used to evaluate plans. The acute toxicities were followed up regularly. Totally, 85 patients were enrolled. Of these, 45 had left-sided lesions, and 35 received IMN irradiation. Planning designs yielded 55 integrated and 30 segmented plans, with median number of beams of 8 (6–12). The integrated and segmented plans had similar conformity (1.41±0.14 vs. 1.47±0.15, p=0.053) and homogeneity indexes (0.13±0.01 vs. 0.14±0.02, p=0.069). The percent volume of PTV receiving >110% prescription dose was <5%. As compared to segmented plans, integrated plans typically increased V5 of ipsilateral lung (p=0.005), and heart (p=0.001) in patients with left-sided lesions. Similarly, integrated plans had higher spinal cord Dmax (p=0.009), ipsilateral humeral head (p<0.001), and contralateral lung Dmean (p=0.019). During follow-up, 36 (42%) were identified to have ≥ grade 2 radiation dermatitis (RD). Of these, 35 developed moist desquamation. The median time to onset of moist desquamation was 6 (4–7) weeks from start of RT. The sites of moist desquamation were most frequently occurred in anterior axillary fold

  19. Evaluation of anterior chest wall implanted port: technical aspects, results, and complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the technical aspects, results and complications of patients with implanted anterior chest wall port. Between April 1997 and June 1999, a total of 63 implanted ports were placed at the anterior chest wall of 63 consecutive patients by interventional radiologists. The indications were chemotherapy in 61 patients and total parenteral nutrition in two. The peripheral portion of the subclavian vein was punctured under fluoroscopic guidance via ipsilateral peripheral vein during venography. A central venous catheter was placed in the superior vena cava, and using the subcutaneous tunneling method, a connected infusion port was implanted at the anterior chest wall. Results and complications were reviewed, and by means of Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, the expected patency of the port was determined. The technical success rate for implanted port at the anterior chest wall was 100% (63/63 patients). In two patients, hematoma and oozing were treated by compression. The duration of port implantation ranged from 12 to 855 (mean, 187) days, and the port patency rate was 305.7±47.6 days. In seven patients (completed chemotherapy (n=3D3), central venous thrombosis (n=3D3) catheter-related infection (n=3D1)), the port was removed. Catheter obstruction occurred in two patients, and in one, the use of urokinase led to successful recanalization. Sixteen patients died of an underlying malignancy, but no catheter-related death was noted. Implantation of an anterior chest wall port is a safe and useful procedure, with long patency, for patients requiring chemotherapy and long-term venous access. (author)

  20. Short TI inversion-recovery MR imaging of chest wall malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Short-T1 inversion-recovery (STIR) sequences have greater constant, less motion sensitivity, and require shorter imaging times than conventional T2-weighted spin-echo (SE) sequences and are therefore particularly useful for staging chest wall malignancies. MR studies of 49 patients with possible chest wall malignancies were reviewed. Images were produced at 0.15 T with a variety of SE sequences. Forty-five also had STIR (repetition time, 1,400 - 2,100; echo time, 36 or 40; inversion time, 100 or 125). MR studies indicated chest wall involvement in 39 of 49 patients; 12 had obvious rib encasement, the most definitive finding. IN 13, lesions detected on STIR were either not visible or seen only in retrospect on T1 SE images. In five of five, STIR was clearly superior to T2 SE for delineation of tumor margins. The authors have discontinued using T2 SE sequences for chest neoplasms in favor of the higher contrast and sensitivity of STIR

  1. Unusual chest wall pain caused by thoracic disc herniation in a professional baseball pitcher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Kinshi; Yabuki, Shoji; Otani, Koji; Nikaido, Takuya; Otoshi, Ken-Ichi; Watanabe, Kazuyuki; Kikuchi, Shin-Ichi; Konno, Shin-Ichi

    2016-06-01

    Symptomatic thoracic disc herniation is clinically rare. There are few cases of disc herniation of the thoracic spine in top athletes described in the literature. We herein present a rare case of chest wall pain due to thoracic disc herniation in a professional baseball pitcher. A 30-year-old, left-handed pitcher complained of left-sided chest wall pain in the region of his lower ribs during a game. Neurological examination revealed hypoesthesia of the left side of the chest at the level of the lower thoracic spine. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the thoracic spine showed a left-sided paramedian disc herniation at the T9-T10 level. The player was initially prescribed rest, administration of pregabalin (150 mg twice a day), and subsequent physical rehabilitation. He was able to resume full training and pitching without medication 6 months after the onset. A follow-up MRI of the thoracic spine showed a reduction in the size of the herniated disc compared to the initial findings. Though relatively rare, thoracic disc herniation should be considered in cases of chest wall pain in athletes. PMID:26983590

  2. Synovial sarcoma of the chest wall: a case report and literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Braham, Emna; Aloui, Slim; Aouadi, Samira; Drira, Ikram; Kilani, Tarek; El Mezni, Faouzi

    2013-01-01

    Synovial sarcoma is a malignant soft-tissue tumor that most commonly occurs in the extremities of young adults. Synovial sarcoma arising from the chest wall is rare and only some cases had been reported in the literature. We present a 57-year-old woman who presented with chest pain. Radiologic evaluation revealed a right parietal tumor destructing the mid-portion of the 8th rib, with heterogeneous enhancement and invasion of the pectoral muscle and extra pleural fat. A surgical resection cons...

  3. Unilateral chest wall anomaly in a patient with Gardner' s syndrome: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Eun Hee; Lee, So Yeon; Park, Hee Jin; Kwon, Heon Ju; Kim, Mi Sung; Park, Hae Won; Kwang, Hyon Joo [Dept. of Radiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hye Jin [Dept. of Radiology, Eulji General Hospital, Eulji University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Gardner syndrome is a familial disease consisting of colonic polyposis, osteomas, and soft tissue tumors. We describe unilateral chest wall anomaly in a 32-year-old man with Gardner syndrome. A chest radiograph showed asymmetric hypertrophy of the right seventh to tenth ribs. CT images showed increased size of the medullary portions of these lesions, but relatively normal thickness of the cortex. Intercostal muscles along the right seventh to tenth ribs were hypertrophied as compared with the contralateral ribs. Both lungs were clear but the volume of right lung showed slightly smaller than left one.

  4. Malignant Mesothelioma Presenting as a Giant Chest, Abdominal and Pelvic Wall Mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Zhi Hong; Gao, Xiao Long; Yi, Xiang Hua; Wang, Pei Jun [Tongji Hospital of Tongji University, Shanghai (China)

    2011-11-15

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is a relatively rare carcinoma of the mesothelial cells, and it is usually located in the pleural or peritoneal cavity. Here we report on a unique case of MM that developed in the chest, abdominal and pelvic walls in a 77-year-old female patient. CT and MRI revealed mesothelioma that manifested as a giant mass in the right flank and bilateral pelvic walls. The diagnosis was confirmed by the pathology and immunohistochemistry. Though rare, accurate investigation of the radiological features of a body wall MM may help make an exact diagnosis.

  5. Elastofibroma dorsi – differential diagnosis in chest wall tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steinau Hans-Ulrich

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elastofibromas are benign soft tissue tumours mostly of the infrascapular region between the thoracic wall, the serratus anterior and the latissimus dorsi muscle with a prevalence of up to 24% in the elderly. The pathogenesis of the lesion is still unclear, but repetitive microtrauma by friction between the scapula and the thoracic wall may cause the reactive hyperproliferation of fibroelastic tissue. Methods We present a series of seven cases with elastofibroma dorsi with reference to clinical findings, further clinical course and functional results after resection, as well as recurrence. Data were obtained retrospectively by clinical examination, phone calls to the patients' general practitioners and charts review. Follow-up time ranged from four months to nine years and averaged 53 months. Results The patients presented with swelling of the infrascapular region or snapping scapula. In three cases, the lesion was painful. The ratio men/women was 2/5 with a mean age of 64 years. The tumor sizes ranged from 3 to 13 cm. The typical macroscopic aspect was characterized as poorly defined fibroelastic soft tissue lesion with a white and yellow cut surface caused by intermingled remnants of fatty tissue. Microscopically, the lesions consisted of broad collagenous strands and densely packed enlarged and fragmented elastic fibres with mostly round shapes. In all patients but one, postoperative seroma (which had to be punctuated occurred after resection; however, at follow-up time, no patient reported any decrease of function or sensation at the shoulder or the arm of the operated side. None of the patients experienced a relapse. Conclusion In differential diagnosis of soft tissue tumors located at this specific site, elastofibroma should be considered as likely diagnosis. Due to its benign behaviour, the tumor should be resected only in symptomatic patients.

  6. Chest wall thickness measurements and the dosimetric implications for male workers in the uranium industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Human Monitoring Laboratory has measured the chest wall thickness and adipose mass fraction of a group of workers at three Canadian uranium refinery, conversion plant, and fuel fabrication sites using ultrasound. A site specific biometric equation has been developed for these workers, who seem to be somewhat larger than other workers reported in the literature. The average chest wall thickness of the seated persons measured at the uranium conversion plant and refinery was about 3.8 cm, and at the fuel fabrication facility was 3.4 cm. These values are not statistically different. Persons measured in a seated geometry had a thinner chest wall thickness than persons measured in a supine geometry - the decrease was in the range of 0.3 cm to 0.5 cm. It follows that a seated geometry will give a lower MDA (or decision level) than a supine geometry. Chest wall thickness is a very important modifier for lung counting efficiency and this data has been put into the perspective of the impending Canadian dose limits that will reduce the limit of occupationally exposed workers to essentially 20 mSv per year. Natural uranium must be measured based on the 235U emissions at these type of facilities. The refining and conversion process removes 234Th and the equilibrium is disturbed. This is unfortunate as the MDA values for this nuclide are approximately a factor of three lower than the values quoted below. The sensitivity of the germanium and phoswich based lung counting system has been compared. Achievable MDA's (30 minute counting time) with a four-phoswich-detector array lie in the range of 4.7 mg to 13.5 mg of natural uranium based on the 235U emissions over a range of chest wall thicknesses of 1.6 cm to 6.0 cm. The average achievable MDA is about 8.5 mg which can be reduced to about 6.2 mg by doubling the counting time. Similarly, MDA's (30 minute counting time) obtainable with a germanium lung counting system will lie in the range of 3 mg to 28 mg of natural uranium

  7. Tensor fascia lata musculocutaneous flap for abdominal wall reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a case of abdominal wall reconstruction following excision of irradiated skin and a ventral hernia. A very large tensor fascia lata musculocutaneous flap was used with good results. The anatomical features of this flap make it an excellent method of abdominal wall reconstruction

  8. The role of imaging for the surgeon in primary malignant bone tumors of the chest wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary malignant chest wall tumors are rare. The most frequent primary malignant tumor of the chest wall is chondrosarcoma, less common are primary bone tumors belonging to the Ewing Family Bone Tumors (EFBT), or even rarer are osteosarcomas. They represent a challenging clinical entities for surgeons as the treatment of choice for these neoplasms is surgical resection, excluding EFBT which are normally treated by a multidisciplinary approach. Positive margins after surgical procedure are the principal risk factor of local recurrence, therefore to perform adequate surgery a correct preoperative staging is mandatory. Imaging techniques are used for diagnosis, to determine anatomic site and extension, to perform a guided biopsy, for local and general staging, to evaluate chemotherapy response, to detect the presence of a recurrence. This article will focus on the role of imaging in guiding this often difficult surgery and the different technical possibilities adopted in our department to restore the mechanics of the thoracic cage after wide resections

  9. Chest wall granuloma associated with BCG vaccination presenting as hot abscess in an immunocompetent infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Seung; Seo, Kyung Jin; Kim, Jae Jun

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus-Calmette-Gue´rin (BCG) vaccine is a live attenuated vaccine to prevent tuberculosis by cell mediated immune response and is routinely administered early after birth. Although it is considered to be a very safe vaccine, sometimes a variety of complications may develop. Herein we describe a clinically unusual case of chest wall granuloma considered to be induced by BCG, presenting as hot abscess, and developed 7 months after BCG vaccination in an immunocompetent infant. The diagnosis was made based on the history, histopathology and virological studies. We suggest, although very rare, a BCG disease should be considered as a differential diagnosis in case of chest wall abscess, even if this is presenting as a hot abscess and even in immunocompetent infants if their age is related to BCG vaccination complications. PMID:25887440

  10. Case of chest-wall rigidity in a preterm infant caused by prenatal fentanyl administration

    OpenAIRE

    Eventov-Friedman, S; Rozin, I; Shinwell, E S

    2010-01-01

    The inability to appropriately ventilate neonates shortly after their birth could be related in rare cases to chest-wall rigidity caused by the placental transfer of fentanyl. Although this adverse effect is recognized when fentanyl is administered to neonates after their birth, the prenatal phenomenon is less known. Treatment with either naloxone or muscle relaxants reverses the fentanyl effect and may prevent unnecessary excessive ventilatory settings.

  11. Multidisciplinary approach to treatment of radiation-induced chest wall sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, H Volkan; Gandolfi, Brad M; Williams, Judson B; D'Amico, Thomas A; Zenn, Michael R

    2016-08-01

    Radiation-induced sarcoma (RIS) is a rare complication following therapeutic external irradiation for lung cancer patients. Patients with RIS may develop recurrence or metastasis of the previous disease and also at high risk for early chest wall complications following operation, which requires close follow-up and multidisciplinary approach. We present a challenging case of RIS with a multidisciplinary teamwork in the decision-making and successful management. PMID:25663293

  12. Endoscopic thyroidectomy through anterior chest wall:a report of 28 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柯重伟; 郑成竹; 陈丹磊; 胡明根; 李际辉; 印慨

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively evaluate the feasibility and clinical value of endoscopic thyroidectomy through anterior chest wall. Methods: From December 2002 to May 2003, 28 patients with an average of age of 28 years old(rangeing from 20 to 45) were performed endoscopic thyroidectomy through anterior chest wall. The subcutaneous space in the anterior chest wall and the subplatysmal space in the neck were bluntly dissected through a 10-mm incision between the nipples, and CO2 was insufllated at 6 - 8 mmHg to create the operative space. Three trocars were inserted in the mammary regions; and dissection of the thyroid, division of the thyroid vessels and parenchyma were performed endoscopically using an ultrasonically activated scalpel. The recurrent laryngeal nerve, the superior laryngeal nerve, and the parathyroid glands were preserved properly. Results: There were 3 mass resections, 17 subtotal lobectomies, 2 total lobectomies, 6 subtotal lobectomies plus contralateral mass resections. The mean operative time was (87.1 ± 26.0) min; the mean blood loss during operation was (47.9 ± 19.6) ml; and the mean postoperative hospital stay was (3.4 ± 0.7) d. The drainage tubes were pulled out at 36 - 60 h postoperatively. There were no conversions to open surgery or complications. No scars can be found in the neck, and the patients were satisfied with the postoperative appearance. Conclusion: Endoscopic thyroidectomy through anterior chest wall combined with low-pressure subcutaneous CO2 insufflation is a feasible and safe procedure. It can bring satisfactory cosmetic results. It is believed that endoscopic thyroidectomy by such approach will find a role in the future.

  13. Individualized chest wall compensating bolus for electron irradiation following mastectomy: an ultrasound approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A-mode ultrasound is used in a procedure to construct individualized tissue compensating bolus for electron beam irradiation of the chest wall, where the thickness of tissues over the lung may vary by as much as 3 cm. Electron energies corresponding to the thickest tissues in the field would normally cause lung tissues beneath the thinner regions to receive the full tumor dose. The problem is made more serious by the fact that electron ranges in lung are 2-3 times greater than in muscle. We feel that some form of individualized compensation is necessary for patients with large variations in chest wall thickness within a given electron treatment field. The A-Scan procedure is particularly suited to deliniation of the pleura-lung interface because of the strong identifiable reflection from this discontinuity. In the first approach, a moldable gelatanous bolus material, mixed to transmit ultrasound at 5 MHz with a velocity equal to the speed of sound in muscle, is placed on the chest wall covering the entire field. The thickness of the compensating material is then reduced at each point in the field so that the total thickness (muscle plus compensator) indicated by the A-scan is everywhere the same as the chosen maximum treatment depth. Because the compensator has nearly the same electron stopping power as muscle, the compensated chest wall is now uniform in thickness over the entire field. In the second approach, we sacrifice the one-step advantages of using sonically transparent compensator material in order to obtain a more rugged and rapid setting compensator. Four patients have been treated with no evidence of pneumonitis. The more elegant combination of these two approaches awaits the development of rugged materials which are both quick setting and sonically transparent

  14. Severe neonatal hypercalcemia in 4-month-old, presented with respiratory distress and chest wall deformity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Aljahdali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism (NSHPT is a rare disease affecting calcium metabolism and results in severe life-treating hypocalcemia of the neonates. Diagnosis can be challenging due to variable and nonspecific symptomatology. We are reporting on a 4-month-old female infant presenting with respiratory distress and chest wall deformity. We are trying to highlight different surgical options for this rare disease and importance of close collaboration with the pediatric endocrinologist in the treatment plan for those patients.

  15. Computed tomography of the chest with model-based iterative reconstruction using a radiation exposure similar to chest X-ray examination: preliminary observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neroladaki, Angeliki; Botsikas, Diomidis; Boudabbous, Sana; Becker, Christoph D.; Montet, Xavier [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Geneva 4 (Switzerland)

    2013-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic image quality of ultra-low-dose chest computed tomography (ULD-CT) obtained with a radiation dose comparable to chest radiography and reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP), adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) in comparison with standard dose diagnostic CT (SDD-CT) or low-dose diagnostic CT (LDD-CT) reconstructed with FBP alone. Unenhanced chest CT images of 42 patients acquired with ULD-CT were compared with images obtained with SDD-CT or LDD-CT in the same examination. Noise measurements and image quality, based on conspicuity of chest lesions on all CT data sets were assessed on a five-point scale. The radiation dose of ULD-CT was 0.16 {+-} 0.006 mSv compared with 11.2 {+-} 2.7 mSv for SDD-CT (P < 0.0001) and 2.7 {+-} 0.9 mSv for LDD-CT. Image quality of ULD-CT increased significantly when using MBIR compared with FBP or ASIR (P < 0.001). ULD-CT reconstructed with MBIR enabled to detect as many non-calcified pulmonary nodules as seen on SDD-CT or LDD-CT. However, image quality of ULD-CT was clearly inferior for characterisation of ground glass opacities or emphysema. Model-based iterative reconstruction allows detection of pulmonary nodules with ULD-CT with radiation exposure in the range of a posterior to anterior (PA) and lateral chest X-ray. (orig.)

  16. Thermoplastic patient fixation. Influence on chest wall and target motion during radiotherapy of lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovacs, A.; Hadjiev, J.; Lakosi, F.; Vallyon, M.; Cselik, Z.; Bogner, P.; Repa, I. [Kaposvar Univ. (Hungary). Health Science Center; Horvath, A. [Debrecen Univ. (Hungary). Dept. of Radiotherapy

    2007-05-15

    Background and Purpose: Several methods have been developed to reduce tumor motions and patient movements during radiotherapy of lung cancer. In this study, a multislice CT-based analysis was performed to examine the effect of a thermoplastic patient immobilization system on the chest wall and tumor motions. Patients and Methods: Ten patients with stage II-IV lung cancer were enrolled into the study. According to tumor localization, five patients had peripheral, and five patients central lung cancer (T2-T4). In total, six series of measurements were made with a multislice CT scanner, both with and without mask fixation, in normal breathing, at maximal tidal volume inhalation, and at maximal tidal volume exhalation. Results: Movements of chest wall, diaphragm and tumor, with and without mask, under different breathing conditions were registered. With the use of the immobilization system, no significant difference was found in diaphragmatic movements (mean deviation of diaphragm: 41.7-40.5 mm to the right, and 40.5-36.8 mm to the left side) and in tumor motions (mean deviation of tumor: 15.3-12.4 mm in craniocaudal, and 11.5-8.8 mm in posterolateral direction, mean medial deviation: 4.6-4.1 mm, mean lateral deviation: 7.2-5 mm). Significant differences were observed concerning tumor motions in anteroposterior direction (mean: 8.9-6.3 mm) and transverse chest movements in anteroposterior direction. Conclusion: Besides the advantage of optimal patient positioning, the movements of the bony chest wall can be considerably reduced by using the immobilization system. However, this fixation system has limitations concerning its suitability for minimizing tumor motions. (orig.)

  17. Biologic mesh for abdominal wall reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King KS

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Kathryn S King,1 Frank P Albino,2 Parag Bhanot3 1School of Medicine, Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, DC, USA; 2Department of Plastic Surgery, 3Department of General Surgery, Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, DC, USA Background: Mesh reinforcement significantly decreases rates of recurrence following ventral hernia repair. Historically, biologic mesh was touted as superior in the setting of infection; however, selecting the appropriate mesh for a given clinical scenario is often a matter of debate. The purpose of this review is to highlight a number of the more commonly used biologic mesh products with a review of outcomes from the current literature. Methods: Outcomes following abdominal wall reconstruction using biologic mesh were reviewed for acellular cadaveric human dermis, cross-linked porcine dermis, non-cross-linked porcine dermis, porcine small intestine submucosa, acellular bovine pericardial, and acellular bovine dermal mesh. Studies with rigorous methods, adequate patient samples, and sufficient follow-up were selected for review. Results: Hernia recurrence rates following biologic mesh reinforcement vary widely. Porcine small intestine submucosa and bovine pericardium were associated with the lowest hernia recurrence rates. Porcine cross-linked dermal mesh products resulted in higher rates of adhesion formation and lower rates of tissue incorporation compared to non-cross-linked porcine mesh. Conclusion: Successful ventral hernia repair can be achieved with acceptable complications rates for each of the reviewed mesh products. Biologic meshes have an advantage over synthetic mesh in contaminated wounds but their use may not be cost-effective in all patient populations. Those with and/or at high risk for wound complications may also undergo repair with biologic mesh. Keywords: biologic mesh, ventral hernia repair, acellular dermal matrix 

  18. What Is Chest MRI?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Chest MRI? Chest MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) is a safe, noninvasive test. "Noninvasive" means that ... your chest wall, heart, and blood vessels. Chest MRI uses radio waves, magnets, and a computer to ...

  19. Full-thickness chest wall resection for locally recurrent breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedel, Godehard

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In spite of available recommendations, therapeutic procedures of locally recurrent breast cancer are very different. In a retrospective study, the possibilities and results of complete, full-thickness chest wall resection are presented.Methods: Between 1985 and 2004, 51 women underwent complete, full-thickness chest wall resection with primary coverage. Primary surgical therapy of breast cancer had been mastectomy in 88%. Median age of patients undergoing surgery for a local recurrence was 57 (29 - 81 years. The median interval between surgery of the primary tumour and of the local recurrence was 70.3 (10.7 - 327.2 months; median follow-up was 29.4 (1.8 - 230.9 months. 40 (78.4% patients required rib resections, 15 (29.4% of them in combination with partial sternal resection. In 4 (7.8% patients complete and in 7 (13.7% patients partial sternal resection without additional rib resection were performed.Coverage was mainly realized using latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flaps (n=44; 86.3%. Survival rates were calculated by means of the Kaplan-Meier method, the relative risk using univariate and multivariate Cox-regression analysis.Results: In the total collective, cumulative 5-, 10- and 15-year survival (YS rates were 39%, 31% and 23%, respectively, median survival 46.4 months. R0 resection was associated with a 5-YS of 42%. Prognostic factors were age at the time of primary surgery, disease-free interval and tumour invasion of bony structures. Mortality was 2%, morbidity 35%.Conclusion: Full-thickness chest wall resection of locally recurrent breast cancer is possible in almost any patient when performed by a team of thoracic and plastic surgeons. Only radical resection provides good long-term results with low mortality and morbidity.

  20. Management of radiation necrosis of the chest wall following mastectomy: a new treatment option

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique for covering areas of osteoradionecrosis in the medial aspect of the chest wall has been described. Utilizing a tissue expander, the skin was stretched sufficiently to obtain a suitable length whereby the medial defect could be covered and the donor site closed primarily. Such an operative approach should be considered when the patient presents with a medially located ulcer of small to moderate size and when nonirradiated skin is regionally available. Using this technique, long myocutaneous flaps that require extensive dissection, loss of functioning muscle, and resulting donor defects are avoided

  1. Numerical simulation on dynamic response of the chest wall loaded by the blast wave

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Jianyi; Yu, Chunxiang; Li, Huimin; Chen, Jing; Liu, Hai

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a three-dimensional finite element model of the human thorax was constructed using Mimics software and Icem CFD software. This model was loaded with a 100-kPa blast wave and constructed to analyze the dynamic response of the chest wall. The simulation results have shown that a blast wave can cause stress concentration on the ribs and ribs inward movement. The third, fourth, and fifth ribs have the maximum inward moving velocity of 1.6 m / s without any injury for the human body...

  2. Dosimetric evaluation of integrated IMRT treatment of the chest wall and supraclavicular region for breast cancer after modified radical mastectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Bo; Wei, Xian-ding; Zhao, Yu-tian [Department of Radiation Oncology, the Fourth Affiliated Hospital of Suzhou University, Wuxi (China); Ma, Chang-Ming, E-mail: charlie.ma@fccc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the dosimetric characteristics of irradiation of the chest wall and supraclavicular region as an integrated volume with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) after modified radical mastectomy. This study included 246 patients who received modified radical mastectomy. The patients were scanned with computed tomography, and the chest wall (with or without the internal mammary lymph nodes) and supraclavicular region were delineated. For 143 patients, the chest wall and supraclavicular region were combined as an integrated planning volume and treated with IMRT. For 103 patients, conventional treatments were employed with 2 tangential fields for the chest wall, abutting a mixed field of 6-MV x-rays (16 Gy) and 9-MeV electrons (34 Gy) for the upper supraclavicular region. The common prescription dose was 50 Gy/25 Fx/5 W to 90% of the target volume. The dosimetric characteristics of the chest wall, the supraclavicular region, and normal organs were compared. For the chest wall target, compared with conventional treatments, the integrated IMRT plans lowered the maximum dose, increased the minimum dose, and resulted in better conformity and uniformity of the target volume. There was an increase in minimum, average, and 95% prescription dose for the integrated IMRT plans in the supraclavicular region, and conformity and uniformity were improved. The V{sub 30} of the ipsilateral lung and V{sub 10}, V{sub 30}, and mean dose of the heart on the integrated IMRT plans were lower than those of the conventional plans. The V{sub 5} and V{sub 10} of the ipsilateral lung and V{sub 5} of the heart were higher on the integrated IMRT plans (p < 0.05) than on conventional plans. Without an increase in the radiation dose to organs at risk, the integrated IMRT treatment plans improved the dose distribution of the supraclavicular region and showed better dose conformity and uniformity of the integrated target volume of the chest wall and supraclavicular region.

  3. Factors Associated With Chest Wall Toxicity After Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this analysis was to evaluate dose-volume relationships associated with a higher probability for developing chest wall toxicity (pain) after accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) by using both single-lumen and multilumen brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Rib dose data were available for 89 patients treated with APBI and were correlated with the development of chest wall/rib pain at any point after treatment. Ribs were contoured on computed tomography planning scans, and rib dose-volume histograms (DVH) along with histograms for other structures were constructed. Rib DVH data for all patients were sampled at all volumes ≥0.008 cubic centimeter (cc) (for maximum dose related to pain) and at volumes of 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 cc for analysis. Rib pain was evaluated at each follow-up visit. Patient responses were marked as yes or no. No attempt was made to grade responses. Eighty-nine responses were available for this analysis. Results: Nineteen patients (21.3%) complained of transient chest wall/rib pain at any point in follow-up. Analysis showed a direct correlation between total dose received and volume of rib irradiated with the probability of developing rib/chest wall pain at any point after follow-up. The median maximum dose at volumes ≥0.008 cc of rib in patients who experienced chest wall pain was 132% of the prescribed dose versus 95% of the prescribed dose in those patients who did not experience pain (p = 0.0035). Conclusions: Although the incidence of chest wall/rib pain is quite low with APBI brachytherapy, attempts should be made to keep the volume of rib irradiated at a minimum and the maximum dose received by the chest wall as low as reasonably achievable.

  4. Low-grade extraskeletal osteosarcoma of the chest wall: case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chetaille Bruno

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low-grade extraskeletal osteosarcomas (ESOS are extremely rare. Case presentation We present the first case of low-grade ESOS of the chest wall, which occurred in a 30-year-old man. Because of initial misdiagnosis and patient's refusal of surgery, the diagnosis was done after a 4-year history of a slowly growing mass in soft tissues, leading to a huge (30-cm diameter calcified mass locally extended over the left chest wall. Final diagnosis was helped by molecular analysis of MDM2 and CDK4 oncogenes. Unfortunately, at this time, no surgical treatment was possible due to loco-regional extension, and despite chemotherapy, the patient died one year after diagnosis, five years after the first symptoms. Conclusion We describe the clinical, radiological and bio-pathological features of this unique case, and review the literature concerning low-grade ESOS. Our case highlights the diagnostic difficulties for such very rare tumours and the interest of molecular analysis in ambiguous cases.

  5. Radiation induced skin cancer the chest wall 30 years later from breast cancer operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, Kouji; Togawa, Tamotsu; Hasegawa, Takeshi; Matsunami, Hidetoshi; Ikeda, Tsuneko [Matsunami General Hospital, Kasamatsu, Gifu (Japan); Matsuo, Youichi

    1998-10-01

    This paper describes the skin cancer on the frontal chest wall induced by postoperative irradiation 30 years later from mastectomy. The patients was a 62-year-old woman, who received mastectomy of the right breast cancer (invasive ductal carcinoma, comedo type) at 31 years old, and received the postoperative radiotherapy of total 11,628 rad over 38 times. On the first medical examination in author`s hospital, the patient had an ulcer of about 10 cm diameter and was diagnosed the radiation induced skin cancer (well differentiated squamous cell carcinoma) in the biopsy. Because of the general condition of the patient was extremely bad and the skin cancer had highly developed, the excision was thought to be impossible. The radiotherapy (16 Gy) and combined local chemotherapy by OK 432 and Bleomycin were performed. In spite of the short term treatment, these therapies were effective on the reduction of the tumor size and the hemostasis, and brought the patient the improvement of QOL. The general condition of the patient improved to be stable and she recovered enough to go out from the hospital for 6 months. After 10 months, she showed anorexia and dyspnea and died after about 1 year from the admission. The present case is extremely rare, and it is required the radical therapy like the excision of chest wall at early stage. (K.H.)

  6. Evaluation of the safety of high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO therapy in blunt thoracic trauma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becker Brian

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Airway clearance is frequently needed by patients suffering from blunt chest wall trauma. High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO has been shown to be effective in helping to clear secretions from the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis, bronchiectasis, asthma, primary ciliary dyskinesia, emphysema, COPD, and many others. Chest wall trauma patients are at increased risk for development of pulmonary complications related to airway clearance. These patients frequently have chest tubes, drains, catheters, etc. which could become dislodged during HFCWO. This prospective observational study was conducted to determine if HFCWO treatment, as provided by The Vest™ Airway Clearance System (Hill-Rom, Saint Paul, MN, was safe and well tolerated by these patients. Methods Twenty-five blunt thoracic trauma patients were entered into the study. These patients were consented. Each patient was prescribed 2, 15 minute HFCWO treatments per day using The Vest® Airway Clearance System (Hill-Rom, Inc., St Paul, MN. The Vest® system was set to a frequency of 10–12 Hz and a pressure of 2–3 (arbitrary unit. Physiological parameters were measured before, during, and after treatment. Patients were free to refuse or terminate a treatment early for any reason. Results No chest tubes, lines, drains or catheters were dislodged as a result of treatment. One patient with flail chest had a chest tube placed after one treatment due to increasing serous effusion. No treatments were missed and continued without further incident. Post treatment survey showed 76% experienced mild or no pain and more productive cough. Thirty days after discharge there were no deaths or hospital re-admissions. Conclusion This study suggests that HFCWO treatment is safe for trauma patients with lung and chest wall injuries. These findings support further work to demonstrate the airway clearance benefits of HFCWO treatment.

  7. Nodular Fasciitis of the Chest Wall as seen on Breast Sonography: This Clinically Simulated Palpable Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Woo Jeong; Lee, Jin Hwa; Kang, Eun Ju; Kim, Dae Cheol; Cho, Se Heon; Nam, Kyung Jin [Dong-A University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    Nodular fasciitis is a rapidly growing benign soft tissue tumor that is related to the fascia and this tumor is generally seen in young and middle aged adults. It is often seen as a subcutaneous solitary nodule in an upper extremity. Clinically, it is often mistaken for a malignancy. We present here a rare case of nodular fasciitis of the chest wall and that was observed on breast sonography (US) and this lesion clinically simulated palpable breast cancer. US may be helpful for evaluating a chest wall lesion that is misunderstood to be a breast lump. So, if the lesion's location is vague, US can reveal the exact location and characteristics of the mass. Although the incidence of nodular fasciitis is rare, nodular fasciitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis when a lesion is located in the chest wall

  8. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to you from Albany Medical Center in Albany, New York. In just moments, you'll learn how ... what we'll do is we'll take new 2-0s, and if we can kind of ... reconstruction performed from Albany Medical Center in Albany, New York. OR-Live makes it easy for you ...

  9. Image quality of thickened slabs in multislice CT chest examinations: postprocessing vs. direct reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Postprocessing offers the possibility of real-time creation of thickened slabs from a set of thin slices. This allows the interactive change from thick to thin slices for better evaluation of unclear lesions. As a result the clinical workflow of MSCT evaluation can be improved. However, to be able to apply this postprocessing software in the clinical routine, degradations in the image quality (compared to standard original reconstructed images) have to be avoided. The purpose of this study was to compare the image quality of thickened slabs from MSCT chest examinations that have either been directly reconstructed from the raw data or have been retrospectively generated via postprocessing. Materials and Methods: Chest MSCT examinations of 20 patients (mean age: 56 years) were performed on a 16-slice MSCT scanner (Mx8000IDT16, Philips, Best, Netherlands) using the following scan parameters: 120 kV, 94 effective mAs, 16 x 1.5 mm collimation, 512 x 512 matrix, field of view 371 x 371 mm, (CTDI-vol 6.3 mGy, DLP = 210 mGyxcm). Slices with a thickness of 3 and 5 mm were generated for each examination both directly from the raw data and via postprocessing. Corresponding images from postprocessing and direct reconstruction (lung/soft tissue window) were evaluated by two radiologists with respect to 5 criteria on the basis of a five-point scale: organ structure, contour of small objects, contrast, image noise and artifacts. Differences between both data sets regarding image quality were assessed for each of the 5 criteria using a Wilcoxon test with Bonferroni correction. In addition, image noise was analyzed quantitatively in a region of interest in the aorta. Results: For the lung and soft tissue window, both reviewers and all criteria, no differences in image quality were detected between the thickened slices obtained via direct reconstruction and the postprocessing method. In 96 % and 95 % of the cases images of the two reconstruction methods were graded

  10. Low incidence of chest wall pain with a risk-adapted lung stereotactic body radiation therapy approach using three or five fractions based on chest wall dosimetry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thibaud P Coroller

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To examine the frequency and potential of dose-volume predictors for chest wall (CW toxicity (pain and/or rib fracture for patients receiving lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT using treatment planning methods to minimize CW dose and a risk-adapted fractionation scheme. METHODS: We reviewed data from 72 treatment plans, from 69 lung SBRT patients with at least one year of follow-up or CW toxicity, who were treated at our center between 2010 and 2013. Treatment plans were optimized to reduce CW dose and patients received a risk-adapted fractionation of 18 Gy×3 fractions (54 Gy total if the CW V30 was less than 30 mL or 10-12 Gy×5 fractions (50-60 Gy total otherwise. The association between CW toxicity and patient characteristics, treatment parameters and dose metrics, including biologically equivalent dose, were analyzed using logistic regression. RESULTS: With a median follow-up of 20 months, 6 (8.3% patients developed CW pain including three (4.2% grade 1, two (2.8% grade 2 and one (1.4% grade 3. Five (6.9% patients developed rib fractures, one of which was symptomatic. No significant associations between CW toxicity and patient and dosimetric variables were identified on univariate nor multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Optimization of treatment plans to reduce CW dose and a risk-adapted fractionation strategy of three or five fractions based on the CW V30 resulted in a low incidence of CW toxicity. Under these conditions, none of the patient characteristics or dose metrics we examined appeared to be predictive of CW pain.

  11. Practical Approaches to Definitive Reconstruction of Complex Abdominal Wall Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latifi, Rifat

    2016-04-01

    With advances in abdominal surgery and the management of major trauma, complex abdominal wall defects have become the new surgical disease, and the need for abdominal wall reconstruction has increased dramatically. Subsequently, how to reconstruct these large defects has become a new surgical question. While most surgeons use native abdominal wall whenever possible, evidence suggests that synthetic or biologic mesh needs to be added to large ventral hernia repairs. One particular group of patients who exemplify "complex" are those with contaminated wounds, enterocutaneous fistulas, enteroatmospheric fistulas, and/or stoma(s), where synthetic mesh is to be avoided if at all possible. Most recently, biologic mesh has become the new standard in high-risk patients with contaminated and dirty-infected wounds. While biologic mesh is the most common tissue engineered used in this field of surgery, level I evidence is needed on its indication and long-term outcomes. Various techniques for reconstructing the abdominal wall have been described, however the long-term outcomes for most of these studies, are rarely reported. In this article, I outline current practical approaches to perioperative management and definitive abdominal reconstruction in patients with complex abdominal wall defects, with or without fistulas, as well as those who have lost abdominal domain. PMID:26585951

  12. Complex regional pain syndrome with associated chest wall dystonia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwartzman Robert J

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS often suffer from an array of associated movement disorders, including dystonia of an affected limb. We present a case of a patient with long standing CRPS after a brachial plexus injury, who after displaying several features of the movement disorder previously, developed painful dystonia of chest wall musculature. Detailed neurologic examination found palpable sustained contractions of the pectoral and intercostal muscles in addition to surface allodynia. Needle electromyography of the intercostal and paraspinal muscles supported the diagnosis of dystonia. In addition, pulmonary function testing showed both restrictive and obstructive features in the absence of a clear cardiopulmonary etiology. Treatment was initiated with intrathecal baclofen and the patient had symptomatic relief and improvement of dystonia. This case illustrates a novel form of the movement disorder associated with CRPS with response to intrathecal baclofen treatment.

  13. Biometric estimation of chest wall thickness in female nonradiation workers of a monazite processing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chest wall thickness (CWT) was estimated in fifty four female nonradiation workers of a monazite processing plant by biometric measurements. The CWT ranged from 4.12 cm to 6.94 cm giving an average of 5.19 ± 0.76 cm. CWT was found to have very good correlation with percent Body Fat and abdominal circumference but poor correlation with Body Mass Index, Body Build Index, Slenderness, age etc. CWT increases with age especially in the upper middle-aged group (> 35 years). A single measurement of abdominal circumference can be used to estimate CWT with 94 % accuracy. A factor of 0.0587 was derived to estimate CWT from abdominal circumference. The study also showed that about 11 % of the subjects were obese. The results obtained will be very useful for the accurate measurement of Low Energy Photons like 239Pu and 241Am deposited in the lung. (author)

  14. Volumetric measurement of pulmonary nodules at low-dose chest CT: Effect of reconstruction setting on measurement variability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Wang (Cathy); G.H. de Bock (Geertruida); R.J. van Klaveren (Rob); P. van Ooyen (Peter); W. Tukker (Wim); Y. Zhao (Yingru); M.D. Dorrius (Monique); R.V. Proença; W.J. Post (Wendy); M. Oudkerk (Matthijs)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To assess volumetric measurement variability in pulmonary nodules detected at low-dose chest CT with three reconstruction settings. Methods: The volume of 200 solid pulmonary nodules was measured three times using commercially available semi-automated software of low-dose ches

  15. Bioprosthetic Tissue Matrices in Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin M. Broyles, MD

    2013-12-01

    Conclusions: Although bioprosthetic matrix has a multitude of indications within the growing field of abdominal wall reconstruction, the functionality, regenerative capacity, and long-term fate of these products have yet to be fully established. Furthermore, the clinical performance, indications, and contraindications for each type of matrix need to be fully evaluated in long-term outcome studies.

  16. Chest Wall Thickness Measurements and the Dosimetric Implications for Male Workers in the South Korean Uranium Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using ultrasound techniques, the Human Monitoring Laboratory has measured chest wall thicknesses of a group of male workers at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. A site-specific biometric equation has been developed for these workers, who are somewhat smaller than other workers reported in the literature. Chest wall thickness is an important modifier on lung counting efficiency. These data have been put into the perspective of the ICRP recommended dose limits for occupationally exposed workers: 100 mSv in a 5-year period with a maximum of 50 mSv in any one year. For measured chest wall thicknesses of 1.9 cm to 4.1 cm and a 30 min counting time, the achievable MDAs for natural uranium in the KAERI lung counter vary from 6.6 mg to 13.2 mg. These values are close to, or even exceed, the predicted amounts of natural uranium that will remain in the lung (absorption type M and S) after an intake equal to the Annual Limit on Intake corresponding to a committed dose of 20 mSv. This paper shows that the KAERI lung counter probably cannot detect an intake of Type S natural uranium in a worker with a chest wall thickness equal to the average value (2.7 cm) under routine counting conditions. (author)

  17. Biometric estimation of chest wall thickness of female radiation workers as an aid in in-vivo detection of the actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An equation was derived to estimate female chest wall thickness from a series of biometric measurements. This technique will result in improved performance for actinide detection in females by accounting for variations in chest wall thickness in derivation of calibration factors

  18. VAC® for external fixation of flail chest

    OpenAIRE

    Rikke Winge; Berg, Jais O.; Rikke Albret; Christen Krag

    2012-01-01

    A large anterior chest wall defect following tumor resection was reconstructed with a Gore- Tex® membrane and a combined musculocutaneous rectus femoris and tensor fasciae latae free flap. Subsequent paradoxical respiration impeded weaning from the ventilator. Appliance of Vacuum Assisted Closure® (VAC®) resulted in immediate chest wall stability and a decrease in the patient’s need for respiratory support. Shortly thereafter, the VAC® was discontinued and the patient was discharged from the ...

  19. Dose reduction with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction for paediatric CT: phantom study and clinical experience on chest and abdomen CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the benefit and limits of iterative reconstruction of paediatric chest and abdominal computed tomography (CT). The study compared adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) with filtered back projection (FBP) on 64-channel MDCT. A phantom study was first performed using variable tube potential, tube current and ASIR settings. The assessed image quality indices were the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), the noise power spectrum, low contrast detectability (LCD) and spatial resolution. A clinical retrospective study of 26 children (M:F = 14/12, mean age: 4 years, range: 1-9 years) was secondarily performed allowing comparison of 18 chest and 14 abdominal CT pairs, one with a routine CT dose and FBP reconstruction, and the other with 30 % lower dose and 40 % ASIR reconstruction. Two radiologists independently compared the images for overall image quality, noise, sharpness and artefacts, and measured image noise. The phantom study demonstrated a significant increase in SNR without impairment of the LCD or spatial resolution, except for tube current values below 30-50 mA. On clinical images, no significant difference was observed between FBP and reduced dose ASIR images. Iterative reconstruction allows at least 30 % dose reduction in paediatric chest and abdominal CT, without impairment of image quality. (orig.)

  20. 2D image reconstruction of a human chest by using Calderon's method and the adjacent current pattern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, Calderon's method is applied to a chest-like sensing region, as monitored by electrical impedance tomography. This method provides a direct algorithm for image reconstruction, where the gray value at any pixel of the reconstructed image is computed using a direct and independent approach. The major calculations of image reconstruction in Calderon's method are implemented for a circular boundary and, as a result, the complicated calculations of the scattering transform, as required by non-circular boundaries, are avoided. A unique conformal transformation is used to map a unit disk onto a sensing region with a non-circular boundary, such as a chest-like region. A new method to calculate the Dirichlet-to-Neumann map is also introduced, which is used to compute the scattering transform. The feasibility of the proposed method has been validated by testing the construction of phantoms with chest-like boundaries. Data collected from the chest of a male subject has been used to visualize lung movement, as monitored by the electrical impedance tomography system.

  1. Von Reckling-hausen disease associated to thyroid carcinoma and malignant schwannoma of the chest wall. A case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The multiple neurofibromatosis is an autosomal dominant hereditary disease associated to malignant schwannoma in about 3% of the cases and very rarely to others cancers. The study provides information on the case of a 32 year-old woman who suffers from this disease and presented two synchronous cancers: a papillary carcinoma of thyroid and a malignant schwannoma of the chest wall. The thyroid tumour was managed with hemithyroidectomy, hormonotherapy and radiotherapy, and the lesion of the thoracic wall was treated with local radical resection application of Marlex mesh and rotation of a musculocutaneous flap of the dorsal muscle. A review of the literature on the clinical aspects of this association and the surgical techniques employed to cover the defect of the chest wall is presented. (authors)

  2. Cine magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and ultrasonography in the evaluation of chest wall invasion of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the usefulness of cine-magnetic resonance imaging (cine-MRI) in the evaluation of chest wall invasion, we compared the results of cine-MRI with those of computed tomography (CT) and ultrasonography (US). Eleven patients were examined who had no pain and who were difficult to diagnose by routine examinations. MRI was performed with a Magnetom SP/4000, 1.5T unit (Siemens, Germany). For cine imaging, continuous turbo-FLUSH (ultra fast low angle shot) images were obtained at an orthogonal section to the chest wall during slow deep breathing. A CT scan was performed using a TCT 900S or Super Helix (Toshiba, Japan) at 1 cm intervals, with section thicknesses of 1 cm throughout the entire chest. US was performed with a model SSA-270A (Toshiba, Japan) with 7.5-MHz linear array scanners (PLF-705S; Toshiba, Japan). Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 67%, 75% and 73% for cine MRI, 67%, 63% and 64% for CT, 33%, 75% and 64% for US, respectively. These results indicate that cine MRI is potentially useful for the diagnosis of chest wall invasion of lung cancer. (author)

  3. Actinomicose pulmonar com envolvimento da parede torácica Lung actinomycosis with chest wall involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Cunha Fatureto

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available A Actinomicose é uma infecção rara, crônica, supurativa e granulomatosa que pode envolver diversos órgãos. A infecção pulmonar geralmente está relacionada à imunodepressão e à saúde bucal precária. O envolvimento torácico é incomum (10 - 20%, a parede torácica é acometida em apenas 12% destes casos. No presente trabalho, é descrito o caso de um paciente de 26 anos, não HIV e sem co-morbidades, assintomático respiratório, com massa infra-escapular, de crescimento progressivo, muito dolorosa, com sinais locais flogísticos, sem trauma local, apresentando febre persistente, com três meses de evolução. O diagnóstico inicial foi de neoplasia de partes moles de parede torácica. À biopsia incisional da referida massa, houve saída de secreção gelatinosa vinhosa com grânulos amarelados, sugestivos de actinomicose, sendo confirmado por exame anatomopatológico. Empiricamente foi instituída ciprofloxacina devido alergia à cefalosporina. Houve excelente resposta clínica à drenagem externa e à medicação prescrita. Não houve recaída da doença em 18 meses de seguimento.Actinomycosis is an uncommon suppurative granulomatous chronic infection that may involve several organs. Lung infection is usually related to immunodepression and poor oral hygiene. Cases of thoracic involvement are rare (10 - 20% and only 12% of such cases affect the chest wall. This report describes the case of a 26-year-old HIV-negative patient without comorbidities or respiratory complaints who presented a very painful, progressively growing infrascapular mass, with local phlogistic signs and no local trauma, and persistent fever. It had been progressing for three months. The initial diagnosis was neoplasia of chest wall soft tissue. However, incision biopsy in this mass produced a red wine-colored gelatinous secretion containing yellowish granules suggestive of actinomycosis, which was later confirmed by anatomopathological examination

  4. Effects of chest wall compression on expiratory flow rates in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masafumi Nozoe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Manual chest wall compression (CWC during expiration is a technique for removing airway secretions in patients with respiratory disorders. However, there have been no reports about the physiological effects of CWC in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Objective: To compare the effects of CWC on expiratory flow rates in patients with COPD and asymptomatic controls. Method: Fourteen subjects were recruited from among patients with COPD who were receiving pulmonary rehabilitation at the University Hospital (COPD group. Fourteen age-matched healthy subjects were also consecutively recruited from the local community (Healthy control group. Airflow and lung volume changes were measured continuously with the subjects lying in supine position during 1 minute of quiet breathing (QB and during 1 minute of CWC by a physical therapist. Results: During CWC, both the COPD group and the healthy control group showed significantly higher peak expiratory flow rates (PEFRs than during QB (mean difference for COPD group 0.14 L/sec, 95% confidence interval (CI 0.04 to 0.24, p<0.01, mean difference for healthy control group 0.39 L/sec, 95% CI 0.25 to 0.57, p<0.01. In the between-group comparisons, PEFR was significantly higher in the healthy control group than in the COPD group (-0.25 L/sec, 95% CI -0.43 to -0.07, p<0.01. However, the expiratory flow rates at the lung volume at the PEFR during QB and at 50% and 25% of tidal volume during QB increased in the healthy control group (mean difference for healthy control group 0.31 L/sec, 95% CI 0.15 to 0.47, p<0.01: 0.31 L/sec, 95% CI 0.15 to 0.47, p<0.01: 0.27 L/sec, 95% CI 0.13 to 0.41, p<0.01, respectively but not in the COPD group (0.05 L/sec, 95% CI -0.01 to 0.12: -0.01 L/sec, 95% CI -0.11 to 0.08: 0.02 L/sec, 95% CI -0.05 to 0.90 with the application of CWC. Conclusion: The effects of chest wall compression on expiratory flow rates was different between COPD patients and

  5. Evaluating proton stereotactic body radiotherapy to reduce chest wall dose in the treatment of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) can produce excellent local control of several types of solid tumor; however, toxicity to nearby critical structures is a concern. We found previously that in SBRT for lung cancer, the chest wall (CW) volume receiving 20, 30, or 40 Gy (V20, V30, or V40) was linked with the development of neuropathy. Here we sought to determine whether the dosimetric advantages of protons could produce lower CW doses than traditional photon-based SBRT. We searched an institutional database to identify patients treated with photon SBRT for lung cancer with tumors within 20 was 364.0 cm3 and 160.0 cm3 (p 30 was 144.6 cm3vs 77.0 cm3 (p = 0.0012), V35 was 93.9 cm3vs 57.9 cm3 (p = 0.005), V40 was 66.5 cm3vs 45.4 cm3 (p = 0.0112), and mean lung dose was 5.9 Gy vs 3.8 Gy (p = 0.0001) for photons and protons, respectively. Coverage of the planning target volume (PTV) was comparable between the 2 sets of plans (96.4% for photons and 97% for protons). From a dosimetric standpoint, proton SBRT can achieve the same coverage of the PTV while significantly reducing the dose to the CW and lung relative to photon SBRT and therefore may be beneficial for the treatment of lesions closer to critical structures

  6. Total and local impedances of the chest wall up to 10 Hz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnas, G M; Yoshino, K; Fredberg, J; Kikuchi, Y; Loring, S H; Mead, J

    1990-04-01

    To understand how bical mechanical chest wall (CW) properties are related to those of the CW as a whole, we measured esophageal and gastric pressures, CW volume changes (measured with a head-out body plethysmograph), and anteroposterior and transverse CW diameter changes (measured with magnetometers attached to the surface) during sinusoidal forcing at the mouth (2.5% vital capacity, 0.5-10 Hz) in four healthy subjects. Total CW resistance decreased sharply as frequency rose to 3-4 Hz and remained relatively constant at higher frequencies. Total CW reactance became less negative with increasing frequency but showed no tendency to change sign. Above 2 Hz, diameters measured at different locations changed asynchronously between and within the rib cage and abdomen. "Local pathway impedances" (ratios of esophageal or gastric pressure to a rate of diameter change) showed frequency dependence similar to that of the total CW less than 3 Hz. Local pathway impedances increased during contraction of respiratory muscles acting on the pathway. We conclude that 1) total CW behavior is mainly a reflection of its individual local properties at less than or equal to 3 Hz, 2) local impedances within the rib cage or within the abdomen can change independently in some situations, and 3) asynchronies that develop within the CW during forcing greater than 3 Hz suggest that two compartments may be insufficient to describe CW properties from impedance measurements. PMID:2140827

  7. A rare chest wall localized soft tissue sarcoma: Clear cell sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulaş Alabalık

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The clear cell sarcomas of soft tissue are rare tumorsoriginating from neural crest cells and presenting withpoor prognosis. By the reason of the resemblance ofhistological properties to malign melanoma (eg. the immunoreactivityto S100 and HMB45, the presence of melanosomesultrastructurally, these tumors are also definedas malign melanomas of soft tissue. But distinctivelyfrom cutaneous melanoma, clear cell sarcoma is almostalways deeply localized and the biological behaviour ofthe last one is also different. The differential diagnosisbetween clear cell sarcoma and desmoplastic or spindlecell malign melanoma may be more difficult because ofthe dermal localization of the last ones. In our case, itwas observed an infiltrative tumor composed of uniformseeming cells with vesicular nuclei, distinct nucleoli, paleeosinophilic and sometimes clear, scant cytoplasms, inaddition to necrotic areas. On immunohistochemical examination,the tumoral cells showed a positive immunoreactivityto vimentin, S100, HMB45, and SMA, while showingnegative immunoreactivity with CD34, PanCK, EMA,LCA, CD99 and desmin. Ki-67 proliferation index was determinedas approximately 50%. Because of deep localizationand different morphological-immunohistochemicalfindings of the tumor, the case was diagnosed as “clearcell sarcoma”. It was observed a tumor with similar morphologyin the biopsy sample taken from vertebra of thepatient one month later than the first material and this wascommented as the metastasis of the tumor to vertebra.Key words: Clear cell sarcoma, chest wall, metastasis,vertebral, HMB-45, S-100

  8. Aortic wall low density on chest CT: atheromatous plaque vs. thrombosed false lumen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A curvilinear or thick band-like low density on aortic wall on CT scan is sometimes problematic. The point is whether its represents atheromatous plaque of thrombosed false lumen of the dissecting aneurysm. We reviewed 212 randomly selected chest CT cases with regard to low density on the thoracic aorta. Thirty two patients showed visible low density on the aorta. Seven patients had dissecting aneurysm confirmed by aortography and/or CT scan. Atheromatous palque did not exceed 4mm in its maximum thickness and appeared as curvilinear rim, while thrombosed false lumen of the dissecting aneurysm exceeded 10mm in its maximum thickness in all cases with the shape of crescent, half-moon or thick band. Maximum transverse diameter of thoracic aorta was more than 4cm in all cases of dissecting aneurysm while none of the atheromatous plaque cases showed more than 4cm. Thrombosed false lumen of the dissecting aneurysm can reliably be distinguished from atheroma by its thicker low density region and larger size of the aorta.

  9. Surgical treatment of T3 lung cancer invading the chest wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrami, V; Bezzi, M; Illuminati, G; Forte, A; Angelici, A; Bertagni, A; Ciulli, A; Gallinaro, L; Lorenzotti, A; Montesano, G; Palumbo, P G; Prece, V

    1999-01-01

    Lung tumors invading the chest wall are classed as belonging to the T3 group and are considered potentially resectable. Their management, however, is controversial, and extrapleural resection, when possible, is preferred to en bloc resection which is regarded as a far more invasive and dangerous operation. Five year survival rates for completely resected cases range in the literature from 25 to 35%, but survival rates are much worse if lymph node metastases are present. These poor outcomes have prompted the development of combined surgical approaches: preoperative radiation therapy, with or without chemotherapy, has been used with an improvement in resectability rates, but only modest results in terms of median survival; in a number of case series, increased operative morbidity and mortality have been reported with this approach. The present report relates to 122 patients treated by en bloc (20 cases) or extrapleural (102 cases) resection, 31 of whom also received neoadjuvant treatment. The operative mortality was 4.6%. Median survival was 17 months after en bloc resection and 19 months after extrapleural resection. Though no statistically significant difference was found, extrapleural resection would appear to yield better results than the en bloc procedure. PMID:10742890

  10. Modulated electron radiotherapy treatment planning using a photon multileaf collimator for post-mastectomized chest walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of using a photon MLC (xMLC) for modulated electron radiotherapy treatment (MERT) as an alternative to conventional post-mastectomy chest wall (CW) irradiation. A Monte Carlo (MC) based planning system was developed to overcome the inaccuracy of the 'pencil beam' algorithm. MC techniques are known to accurately calculate the dose distributions of electron beams, allowing the explicit simulation of electron interactions within the MLC. Materials and methods: Four real clinical CW cases were planned using MERT which were compared with the conventional electron treatments based on blocks and by a straightforward approach using the MLC, and not the blocks (as an intermediate step to MERT) to shape the same segments with SSD between 60 and 70 cm depending on PTV size. MC calculations were verified with an array of ionization chambers and radiochromic films in a solid water phantom. Results: Tests based on gamma analysis between MC dose distributions and radiochromic film measurements showed an excellent agreement. Differences in the absolute dose measured with a plane-parallel chamber at a reference point were below 3% for all cases. MERT solution showed a better PTV coverage and a significant reduction of the doses to the organs at risk (OARs). Conclusion: MERT can effectively improve the current electron treatments by obtaining a better PTV coverage and sparing healthy tissues. More directly, block-shaped treatments could be replaced by MLC-shaped non-modulated segments providing similar results.

  11. Extrinsic tracheal compression caused by scoliosis of the thoracic spine and chest wall degormity: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Kyong min Sarah; Lee, Bae Young; Kim, Hyeon Sook; Song, Kyung Sup; Kang, Hyeon Hul; Lee, Sang Haak; Moon, Hwa Sik [St. Paul' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Extrinsic airway compression due to chest wall deformity is not commonly observed. Although this condition can be diagnosed more easily with the help of multidetector CT, the standard treatment method has not yet been definitely established. We report a case of an eighteen-year-old male who suffered from severe extrinsic tracheal compression due to scoliosis and straightening of the thoracic spine, confirmed on CT and bronchoscopy. The patient underwent successful placement of tracheal stent but later died of bleeding from the tracheostomy site probably due to tracheo-brachiocephalic artery fistula. We describe the CT and bronchoscopic findings of extrinsic airway compression due to chest wall deformity as well as the optimal treatment method, and discuss the possible explanation for bleeding in the patient along with review of the literature.

  12. Bone scan findings of chest wall pain syndrome after stereotactic body radiation therapy: implications for the pathophysiology of the syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Lloyd, Shane; Decker, Roy H.; Evans, Suzanne B.

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of a 72-year-old woman treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for peripherally located stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). After treatment she developed ipsilateral grade II chest wall pain. A bone scan showed nonspecific and heterogeneous increased radiotracer uptake in the volume of ribs receiving 30% of the prescription dose of radiation (V30). We present a color wash image demonstrating excellent concordance between the V30 and the area of scinti...

  13. A study of the first heart sound spectra in normal anesthetized cats: possible origins and chest wall influences.

    OpenAIRE

    Fazzalari, N L; Mazumdar, J; Ghista, D. N.; Allen, D G; de Bruin, H

    1984-01-01

    Heart sound recordings were taken from cats. The heart sounds were recorded directly from the chest wall and through an esophageal tube. The phono transducer and the esophageal tube were both placed over the base of the heart. Ultrasound M-mode, or motion-mode, recordings were taken to study the mitral valve dynamics. After analogue to digital conversion, electrocardiogram gated first heart sounds of each phono record were analyzed by the fast Fourier transform to obtain a frequency spectrum....

  14. Rib cage deformities alter respiratory muscle action and chest wall function in patients with severe osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella LoMauro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI is an inherited connective tissue disorder characterized by bone fragility, multiple fractures and significant chest wall deformities. Cardiopulmonary insufficiency is the leading cause of death in these patients. METHODS: Seven patients with severe OI type III, 15 with moderate OI type IV and 26 healthy subjects were studied. In addition to standard spirometry, rib cage geometry, breathing pattern and regional chest wall volume changes at rest in seated and supine position were assessed by opto-electronic plethysmography to investigate if structural modifications of the rib cage in OI have consequences on ventilatory pattern. One-way or two-way analysis of variance was performed to compare the results between the three groups and the two postures. RESULTS: Both OI type III and IV patients showed reduced FVC and FEV(1 compared to predicted values, on condition that updated reference equations are considered. In both positions, ventilation was lower in OI patients than control because of lower tidal volume (p<0.01. In contrast to OI type IV patients, whose chest wall geometry and function was normal, OI type III patients were characterized by reduced (p<0.01 angle at the sternum (pectus carinatum, paradoxical inspiratory inward motion of the pulmonary rib cage, significant thoraco-abdominal asynchronies and rib cage distortions in supine position (p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, the restrictive respiratory pattern of Osteogenesis Imperfecta is closely related to the severity of the disease and to the sternal deformities. Pectus carinatum characterizes OI type III patients and alters respiratory muscles coordination, leading to chest wall and rib cage distortions and an inefficient ventilator pattern. OI type IV is characterized by lower alterations in the respiratory function. These findings suggest that functional assessment and treatment of OI should be differentiated in these two forms of the

  15. Dynamics of chest wall volume regulation during constant work rate exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    OpenAIRE

    Takara, L.S.; Cunha, T M; Barbosa, P.; M.K. Rodrigues; Oliveira, M. F.; Nery, L E; J.A. Neder

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the dynamic behavior of total and compartmental chest wall volumes [(VCW) = rib cage (VRC) + abdomen (VAB)] as measured breath-by-breath by optoelectronic plethysmography during constant-load exercise in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Thirty males (GOLD stages II-III) underwent a cardiopulmonary exercise test to the limit of tolerance (Tlim) at 75% of peak work rate on an electronically braked cycle ergometer. Exercise-induced dynamic hyperinf...

  16. Dynamics of chest wall volume regulation during constant work rate exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    OpenAIRE

    Takara, L.S.; Cunha, T M; Barbosa, P.; M.K. Rodrigues; Oliveira, M. F.; Nery, L E; J.A. Neder

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the dynamic behavior of total and compartmental chest wall volumes [(V CW) = rib cage (V RC) + abdomen (V AB)] as measured breath-by-breath by optoelectronic plethysmography during constant-load exercise in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Thirty males (GOLD stages II-III) underwent a cardiopulmonary exercise test to the limit of tolerance (Tlim) at 75% of peak work rate on an electronically braked cycle ergometer. Exercise-induced dynamic hyper...

  17. Hyperthermia combined with radiation therapy for superficial breast cancer and chest wall recurrence: A review of the randomised data

    OpenAIRE

    Zagar, Timothy M.; OLESON, JAMES R.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Craciunescu, Oana I; BLACKWELL, KIMBERLY L.; Prosnitz, Leonard R.; Jones, Ellen L.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperthermia has long been used in combination with radiation for the treatment of superficial malignancies, in part due to its radiosensitising capabilities. Patients who suffer superficial recurrences of breast cancer, be it in their chest wall following mastectomy, or in their breast after breast conservation, typically have poor clinical outcomes. They often develop distant metastatic disease, but one must not overlook the problems associated with an uncontrolled local failure. Morbidity ...

  18. Chest-wall thickness and percent thoracic fat estimation by B-mode ultrasound: system and procedure review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accurate measurement of chest wall thickness is necessary for estimation of lung burden of transuranic elements in humans. To achieve tis capability, the ORNL Whole Body Counter has acquired a B-mode ultrasonic imaging system for defining the structure within the thorax of the body. This report contains a review of the ultrasound system in use at the ORNL Whole Body Counter, including its theory of operation, and te procedure for use of the system. Future developmental plans are also presented

  19. Image quality in children with low-radiation chest CT using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction and model-based iterative reconstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihang Sun

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate noise reduction and image quality improvement in low-radiation dose chest CT images in children using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR and a full model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR algorithm. METHODS: Forty-five children (age ranging from 28 days to 6 years, median of 1.8 years who received low-dose chest CT scans were included. Age-dependent noise index (NI was used for acquisition. Images were retrospectively reconstructed using three methods: MBIR, 60% of ASIR and 40% of conventional filtered back-projection (FBP, and FBP. The subjective quality of the images was independently evaluated by two radiologists. Objective noises in the left ventricle (LV, muscle, fat, descending aorta and lung field at the layer with the largest cross-section area of LV were measured, with the region of interest about one fourth to half of the area of descending aorta. Optimized signal-to-noise ratio (SNR was calculated. RESULT: In terms of subjective quality, MBIR images were significantly better than ASIR and FBP in image noise and visibility of tiny structures, but blurred edges were observed. In terms of objective noise, MBIR and ASIR reconstruction decreased the image noise by 55.2% and 31.8%, respectively, for LV compared with FBP. Similarly, MBIR and ASIR reconstruction increased the SNR by 124.0% and 46.2%, respectively, compared with FBP. CONCLUSION: Compared with FBP and ASIR, overall image quality and noise reduction were significantly improved by MBIR. MBIR image could reconstruct eligible chest CT images in children with lower radiation dose.

  20. 3D analysis of the chest wall motion for monitoring late-onset Pompe disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meric, Henri; Falaize, Line; Pradon, Didier; Orlikowski, David; Prigent, Hélène; Lofaso, Frédéric

    2016-02-01

    Late-onset Pompe disease, for which enzyme replacement therapy is available, induces progressive diaphragmatic weakness. Monitoring diaphragmatic function is therefore crucial but is hindered by the need to insert esophageal and gastric probes. Vital capacity (VC), inspiratory capacity, maximal inspiratory pressure, and sniff nasal pressure are noninvasive measurements but reflect only global inspiratory-muscle function. Diaphragmatic function may be assessable noninvasively based on abdominal contribution to breathing and abdominal volume change during the VC maneuver (AVC-VC), obtained by 3-dimensional chest-wall analysis. In 11 patients, we assessed the relationships between the above-listed noninvasive variables and the invasively measured Gilbert index reflecting the diaphragmatic contribution to breathing (ratio of gastric pressure over transdiaphragmatic pressure swings during spontaneous breathing). Only abdominal contribution to breathing and AVC-VC correlated significantly with the Gilbert index (R = 0.977, P = 0.0001; and R = 0.944, P = 0.001 respectively). AVC-VC correlated significantly with transdiaphragmatic pressure swing during the sniff maneuver (R = 0.743, P = 0.0009) and with phrenic magnetic stimulation (R = 0.610, P = 0.046). Repeat testing 1 year later in the first 6 patients showed concordant changes in abdominal contribution to breathing, Gilbert index, and VC. Abdominal contribution to breathing and AVC-VC are reliable and noninvasive indices of diaphragmatic function in Pompe disease, and therefore hold promise as clinical monitoring tools. PMID:26711305

  1. Radiation dose and image quality in pediatric chest CT: effects of iterative reconstruction in normal weight and overweight children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New CT reconstruction techniques may help reduce the burden of ionizing radiation. To quantify radiation dose reduction when performing pediatric chest CT using a low-dose protocol and 50% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) compared with age/gender-matched chest CT using a conventional dose protocol and reconstructed with filtered back projection (control group) and to determine its effect on image quality in normal weight and overweight children. We retrospectively reviewed 40 pediatric chest CT (M:F = 21:19; range: 0.1-17 years) in both groups. Radiation dose was compared between the two groups using paired Student's t-test. Image quality including noise, sharpness, artifacts and diagnostic acceptability was subjectively assessed by three pediatric radiologists using a four-point scale (superior, average, suboptimal, unacceptable). Eight children in the ASIR group and seven in the control group were overweight. All radiation dose parameters were significantly lower in the ASIR group (P < 0.01) with a greater than 57% dose reduction in overweight children. Image noise was higher in the ASIR group in both normal weight and overweight children. Only one scan in the ASIR group (1/40, 2.5%) was rated as diagnostically suboptimal and there was no unacceptable study. In both normal weight and overweight children, the ASIR technique is associated with a greater than 57% mean dose reduction, without significantly impacting diagnostic image quality in pediatric chest CT examinations. However, CT scans in overweight children may have a greater noise level, even when using the ASIR technique. (orig.)

  2. Chest computed tomography using iterative reconstruction vs filtered back projection (Part 1): evaluation of image noise reduction in 32 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pontana, Francois; Pagniez, Julien; Faivre, Jean-Baptiste; Remy, Jacques [Univ. Lille Nord de France, Department of Thoracic Imaging Hospital Calmette (EA 2694), Lille (France); Flohr, Thomas [Siemens HealthCare, Computed Tomography Division, Forchheim (Germany); Duhamel, Alain [Univ. Lille Nord de France, Department of Medical Statistics, Lille (France); Remy-Jardin, Martine [Univ. Lille Nord de France, Department of Thoracic Imaging Hospital Calmette (EA 2694), Lille (France); Hospital Calmette, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Lille cedex (France)

    2011-03-15

    To assess noise reduction achievable with an iterative reconstruction algorithm. 32 consecutive chest CT angiograms were reconstructed with regular filtered back projection (FBP) (Group 1) and an iterative reconstruction technique (IRIS) with 3 (Group 2a) and 5 (Group 2b) iterations. Objective image noise was significantly reduced in Group 2a and Group 2b compared with FBP (p < 0.0001). There was a significant reduction in the level of subjective image noise in Group 2a compared with Group 1 images (p < 0.003), further reinforced on Group 2b images (Group 2b vs Group 1; p < 0.0001) (Group 2b vs Group 2a; p = 0.0006). The overall image quality scores significantly improved on Group 2a images compared with Group 1 images (p = 0.0081) and on Group 2b images compared with Group 2a images (p < 0.0001). Comparative analysis of individual CT features of mild lung infiltration showed improved conspicuity of ground glass attenuation (p < 0.0001), ill-defined micronodules (p = 0.0351) and emphysematous lesions (p < 0.0001) on Group 2a images, further improved on Group 2b images for ground glass attenuation (p < 0.0001), and emphysematous lesions (p = 0.0087). Compared with regular FBP, iterative reconstructions enable significant reduction of image noise without loss of diagnostic information, thus having the potential to decrease radiation dose during chest CT examinations. (orig.)

  3. Tangential beam IMRT versus tangential beam 3D-CRT of the chest wall in postmastectomy breast cancer patients: A dosimetric comparison

    OpenAIRE

    AI-Yahya Khaled; Mohamed Adel; Aziz Alaradi Abdul; Rudat Volker; Altuwaijri Saleh

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background This study evaluates the dose distribution of reversed planned tangential beam intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) compared to standard wedged tangential beam three-dimensionally planned conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) of the chest wall in unselected postmastectomy breast cancer patients Methods For 20 unselected subsequent postmastectomy breast cancer patients tangential beam IMRT and tangential beam 3D-CRT plans were generated for the radiotherapy of the chest wall. ...

  4. Chest wall desmoid tumours treated with definitive radiotherapy: a plan comparison of 3D conformal radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy and volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jia; Ng, Diana; Lee, James; Stalley, Paul; Hong, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Definitive radiotherapy is often used for chest wall desmoid tumours due to size or anatomical location. The delivery of radiotherapy is challenging due to the large size and constraints of normal surrounding structures. We compared the dosimetry of 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) to evaluate the best treatment option. Methods and materials Ten consecutive patients with inoperable chest wall de...

  5. An unusual case of flail chest: surgical repair using Marlex mesh

    OpenAIRE

    Heriot, A G; Wells, F C

    1997-01-01

    The case history is presented of a patient with neurofibromatosis with a chest wall defect present from birth. Abnormal rib development had resulted in a flail segment with painful paradoxical movement and unsightly costal cartilage protrusion. Chest wall reconstruction using Marlex mesh resulted in an excellent cosmetic and functional repair. 




  6. A study of the first heart sound spectra in normal anesthetized cats: possible origins and chest wall influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazzalari, N L; Mazumdar, J; Ghista, D N; Allen, D G; de Bruin, H

    1984-01-01

    Heart sound recordings were taken from cats. The heart sounds were recorded directly from the chest wall and through an esophageal tube. The phono transducer and the esophageal tube were both placed over the base of the heart. Ultrasound M-mode, or motion-mode, recordings were taken to study the mitral valve dynamics. After analogue to digital conversion, electrocardiogram gated first heart sounds of each phono record were analyzed by the fast Fourier transform to obtain a frequency spectrum. Relative energies in 15 Hz bandwidths up to 150 Hz were correlated with the mitral valve closing velocity of the anterior mitral leaflet, obtained from the M-mode echocardiograms. The closing velocity correlated best with the energy in the 30-45 Hz bandwidth and 60-75 Hz bandwidth for the externally and internally monitored phonocardiogram respectively. The chest wall acted as a low pass filter, that is, the wall favoured the transmission of low frequencies and the energy transmitted decreased as wall thickness increased. PMID:6713253

  7. Model-based iterative reconstruction technique for radiation dose reduction in chest CT: comparison with the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To prospectively evaluate dose reduction and image quality characteristics of chest CT reconstructed with model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) compared with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR). One hundred patients underwent reference-dose and low-dose unenhanced chest CT with 64-row multidetector CT. Images were reconstructed with 50 % ASIR-filtered back projection blending (ASIR50) for reference-dose CT, and with ASIR50 and MBIR for low-dose CT. Two radiologists assessed the images in a blinded manner for subjective image noise, artefacts and diagnostic acceptability. Objective image noise was measured in the lung parenchyma. Data were analysed using the sign test and pair-wise Student's t-test. Compared with reference-dose CT, there was a 79.0 % decrease in dose-length product with low-dose CT. Low-dose MBIR images had significantly lower objective image noise (16.93 ± 3.00) than low-dose ASIR (49.24 ± 9.11, P < 0.01) and reference-dose ASIR images (24.93 ± 4.65, P < 0.01). Low-dose MBIR images were all diagnostically acceptable. Unique features of low-dose MBIR images included motion artefacts and pixellated blotchy appearances, which did not adversely affect diagnostic acceptability. Diagnostically acceptable chest CT images acquired with nearly 80 % less radiation can be obtained using MBIR. MBIR shows greater potential than ASIR for providing diagnostically acceptable low-dose CT images without severely compromising image quality. (orig.)

  8. Evaluation of image quality and radiation dose by adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction technique level for chest CT examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this research is to determine the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) level that enables optimal image quality and dose reduction in the chest computed tomography (CT) protocol with ASIR. A chest phantom with 0-50 % ASIR levels was scanned and then noise power spectrum (NPS), signal and noise and the degree of distortion of peak signal-to noise ratio (PSNR) and the root-mean-square error (RMSE) were measured. In addition, the objectivity of the experiment was measured using the American College of Radiology (ACR) phantom. Moreover, on a qualitative basis, five lesions' resolution, latitude and distortion degree of chest phantom and their compiled statistics were evaluated. The NPS value decreased as the frequency increased. The lowest noise and deviation were at the 20 % ASIR level, mean 126.15±22.21. As a result of the degree of distortion, signal-to-noise ratio and PSNR at 20 % ASIR level were at the highest value as 31.0 and 41.52. However, maximum absolute error and RMSE showed the lowest deviation value as 11.2 and 16. In the ACR phantom study, all ASIR levels were within acceptable allowance of guidelines. The 20 % ASIR level performed best in qualitative evaluation at five lesions of chest phantom as resolution score 4.3, latitude 3.47 and the degree of distortion 4.25. The 20 % ASIR level was proved to be the best in all experiments, noise, distortion evaluation using ImageJ and qualitative evaluation of five lesions of a chest phantom. Therefore, optimal images as well as reduce radiation dose would be acquired when 20 % ASIR level in thoracic CT is applied. (authors)

  9. Precise two-dimensional D-bar reconstructions of human chest and phantom tank via sinc-convolution algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbasi Mahdi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT is used as a fast clinical imaging technique for monitoring the health of the human organs such as lungs, heart, brain and breast. Each practical EIT reconstruction algorithm should be efficient enough in terms of convergence rate, and accuracy. The main objective of this study is to investigate the feasibility of precise empirical conductivity imaging using a sinc-convolution algorithm in D-bar framework. Methods At the first step, synthetic and experimental data were used to compute an intermediate object named scattering transform. Next, this object was used in a two-dimensional integral equation which was precisely and rapidly solved via sinc-convolution algorithm to find the square root of the conductivity for each pixel of image. For the purpose of comparison, multigrid and NOSER algorithms were implemented under a similar setting. Quality of reconstructions of synthetic models was tested against GREIT approved quality measures. To validate the simulation results, reconstructions of a phantom chest and a human lung were used. Results Evaluation of synthetic reconstructions shows that the quality of sinc-convolution reconstructions is considerably better than that of each of its competitors in terms of amplitude response, position error, ringing, resolution and shape-deformation. In addition, the results confirm near-exponential and linear convergence rates for sinc-convolution and multigrid, respectively. Moreover, the least degree of relative errors and the most degree of truth were found in sinc-convolution reconstructions from experimental phantom data. Reconstructions of clinical lung data show that the related physiological effect is well recovered by sinc-convolution algorithm. Conclusions Parametric evaluation demonstrates the efficiency of sinc-convolution to reconstruct accurate conductivity images from experimental data. Excellent results in phantom and clinical

  10. VAC® for external fixation of flail chest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winge, Rikke; Berg, Jais O; Albret, Rikke; Krag, Christen

    2012-05-29

    A large aterior chest wall defect following tumor resection was reconstructed with a Gore-Tex® membrane and a combined musculocutaneous rectus femoris and tensor fasciae latae free flap. Subsequent paradoxical respiration impeded weaning from the ventilator. Appliance of Vacuum Assisted Closure® (VAC®) resulted in immediate chest wall stability and a decrease in the patient's need for respiratory support. Shortly thereafter, the VAC® was discontinued and the patient was discharged from the intensive care unit (ICU). This case report is the first to describe the successful use of VAC® as an adjuvant to a one-stage procedure for large thoracic wall reconstruction, allowing sufficient temporary external fixation to eliminate paradoxical respiration and plausibly shorten the stay in the ICU. No adverse effects on flap healing or haemodynamics were recorded. It is likely that external VAC® can improve thoracic stability and pulmonary function in a patient with flail chest and decrease the need for mechanical ventilation. PMID:24765464

  11. Soft tissue mass of the chest wall as the sole manifestation of brucellosis in a 7-year-old boy

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of a child who presented with a subcutaneous mass on the left side of the chest wall of one month's duration. The mass was painful and increasing in size over time. He had a history of weight loss and a decrease in appetite, but no history of fever or trauma. He had ingested raw camel milk, but had no history of contact with animals. He was diagnosed by the standard tube agglutination titer and tissue culture for brucellosis, treated with surgery and three months of antibru...

  12. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... chest x-ray is used to evaluate the lungs, heart and chest wall and may be used ... diagnose and monitor treatment for a variety of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A ...

  13. VAC® for external fixation of flail chest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winge, Rikke; Berg, Jais O; Albret, Rikke;

    2012-01-01

    A large aterior chest wall defect following tumor resection was reconstructed with a Gore-Tex® membrane and a combined musculocutaneous rectus femoris and tensor fasciae latae free flap. Subsequent paradoxical respiration impeded weaning from the ventilator. Appliance of Vacuum Assisted Closure...

  14. Statistical methods for analysis of coordination of chest wall motion using optical reflectance imaging of multiple markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, C. M.; Ghezzo, R. H.; Cala, S. J.; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Pedotti, Antonio; Macklem, P. T.; Rochester, D. F.

    1994-07-01

    To analyze coordination of chest wall motion we have used principle component analysis (PCA) and multiple regression analysis (MRA) with respect to spirometry on the displacements of 93 optical reflective markers placed upon the chest wall (CW). Each marker is tracked at 10 Hz with an accuracy of 0.2 mm in each spatial dimension using the ELITE system (IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 11:943-949, 1985). PCA enables the degree of linear coordination between all of the markers to be assessed using the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the covariance of the matrix of marker displacements in each dimension against time. Thus the number of linear degrees of freedom (DOF) which contribute more than a particular amount to the total variance can be determined and analyzed. MRA with respect to spirometrically measured lung volume changes enables identification of the CW points whose movement correlates best with lung volume. We have used this analysis to compare a quiet breathing sequence with one where tidal volume was increased fourfold involuntarily and show that the number of DOF with eigenvalues accounting for >5% of the covariance increased from 2 to 3. Also the point whose movement correlated best with lung volume changed from halfway down the lower costal margin to a more lateral point at the level of the bottom of the sternum. This quantification of CW coordination may be useful in analysis and staging of many respiratory disorders and is applicable to any nonrigid body motion where points can be tracked.

  15. Acute effects of different inspiratory efforts on ventilatory pattern and chest wall compartmental distribution in elderly women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniz de Souza, Helga; Rocha, Taciano; Campos, Shirley Lima; Brandão, Daniella Cunha; Fink, James B; Aliverti, Andrea; de Andrade, Armele Dornelas

    2016-06-15

    It is not completely described how aging affect ventilatory kinematics and what are the mechanisms adopted by the elderly population to overcome these structural modifications. Given this, the aim was to evaluate the acute effects of different inspiratory efforts on ventilatory pattern and chest wall compartmental distribution in elderly women. Variables assessed included: tidal volume (Vt), total chest wall volume (Vcw), pulmonary rib cage (Vrcp%), abdominal rib cage (Vrca%) and abdominal compartment (Vab%) relative contributions to tidal volume. These variables were assessed during quiet breathing, maximal inspiratory pressure maneuver (MIP), and moderate inspiratory resistance (MIR; i.e., 40% of MIP). 22 young women (age: 23.9±2.5 years) and 22 elderly women (age: 68.2±5.0 years) participated to this study. It was possible to show that during quiet breathing, Vab% was predominant in elderly (p<0.001), in young, however, Vab% was similar to Vrcp% (p=0.095). During MIR, Vrcp% was predominant in young (p<0.001) and comparable to Vab% in elderly (p=0.249). When MIP was imposed, both groups presented a predominance of Vrcp%. In conclusion, there are differences in abdominal kinematics between young and elderly women during different inspiratory efforts. In elderly, during moderate inspiratory resistance, the pattern is beneficial, deep, and slow. Although, during maximal inspiratory resistance, the ventilatory pattern seems to predict imminent muscle fatigue. PMID:26900004

  16. Uncertainty induced by chest wall thickness assessment methods on lung activity estimation for plutonium and americium: a large population-based study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vivo lung counting aims at assessing the retained activity in the lungs. The calibration factor relating the measured counts to the worker’s specific retained lung activity can be obtained by several means and strongly depends on the chest wall thickness. Here we compare, for 374 male nuclear workers, the activity assessed with a reference protocol, where the material equivalent chest wall thickness is known from ultrasound measurements, with two other protocols. The counting system is an array of four germanium detectors. It is found that non site-specific equations for the assessment of the chest wall thickness induce large biases in the assessment of activity. For plutonium isotopes or 241Am the proportion of workers for whom the retained activity is within ± 10% of the reference one is smaller than 10%. The use of site-specific equations raises this proportion to 20% and 58% for plutonium and 241Am, respectively. Finally, for the studied population, when site-specific equations are used for the chest wall thickness, the standard uncertainties for the lung activity are 42% and 12.5%, for plutonium and 241Am, respectively. Due to the relatively large size of the studied population, these values are a relatively robust estimate of the uncertainties due to the assessment of the chest wall thickness for the current practice at this site. (paper)

  17. Reconstruction of full thickness abdominal wall defect following tumor resection: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovačević Predrag

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Reconstruction of a full thickness abdominal wall defect is a demanding procedure for general and also for plastic surgeons, requiring vigorous planning and reconstruction of three layers. Case Outline. We present a case of a 70-year-old patient with a huge abdominal wall tumor with 40 years evolution. Surgery was performed under general anesthesia. Full thickness abdominal defect appeared after the tumor resection. Reconstruction followed in the same act. The defect was reconstructed using a combination of techniques, including omental flap, fascia lata graft, local skin flaps and skin grafts. After surgery no major complications were noted, only a partial skin flap loss, which was repaired using partial thickness skin grafts. The final result was described by the patient as very good, without hernia formation. Conclusion. Omenthoplasty, abdominal wall reconstruction in combination with free fascia lata graft and skin grafts can be one of good options for the reconstruction of full thickness abdominal wall defects.

  18. The Effect of Pre-Injury Anti-Platelet Therapy on the Development of Complications in Isolated Blunt Chest Wall Trauma: A Retrospective Study

    OpenAIRE

    Battle, Ceri; Hutchings, Hayley; Bouamra, Omar; Phillip A Evans

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The difficulties in the management of the blunt chest wall trauma patient in the Emergency Department due to the development of late complications are well recognised in the literature. Pre-injury anti-platelet therapy has been previously investigated as a risk factor for poor outcomes following traumatic head injury, but not in the blunt chest wall trauma patient cohort. The aim of this study was to investigate pre-injury anti-platelet therapy as a risk factor for the developmen...

  19. Determination of the chest wall thickness as calibration parameter for dosimetric partial-body counting; Bestimmung der Brustwandstaerke als Kalibrierparameter fuer dosimetrische Teilkoerpermessungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guen, H. [Fachhochschule Giessen-Friedberg, Giessen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz; Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenforschung; Hegenbart, L. [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenforschung; Breckow, J. [Fachhochschule Giessen-Friedberg, Giessen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz

    2010-05-15

    The authors describe actual partial body measurements with Phoswich detectors in the in-vivo laboratory of the Institute for Technology in Karlsruhe. The chest wall thickness is estimated from the radio of body weight to body length. This formula includes several uncertainties. The aim of the project was the reduction of the uncertainties of the empirical formula using ultrasonography. This method allows an accuracy of plus or minus 1.1 mm for the determined chest wall thickness. Besides the experimental study several voxel models were used to determine the efficiency of modeled measuring systems. The voxel models reach the same accuracy as the ultrasound method.

  20. Dynamics of chest wall volume regulation during constant work rate exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.S. Takara

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the dynamic behavior of total and compartmental chest wall volumes [(V CW = rib cage (V RC + abdomen (V AB] as measured breath-by-breath by optoelectronic plethysmography during constant-load exercise in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Thirty males (GOLD stages II-III underwent a cardiopulmonary exercise test to the limit of tolerance (Tlim at 75% of peak work rate on an electronically braked cycle ergometer. Exercise-induced dynamic hyperinflation was considered to be present when end-expiratory (EE V CW increased in relation to resting values. There was a noticeable heterogeneity in the patterns of V CW regulation as EEV CW increased non-linearly in 17/30 "hyperinflators" and decreased in 13/30 "non-hyperinflators" (P < 0.05. EEV AB decreased slightly in 8 of the "hyperinflators", thereby reducing and slowing the rate of increase in end-inspiratory (EI V CW (P < 0.05. In contrast, decreases in EEV CW in the "non-hyperinflators" were due to the combination of stable EEV RC with marked reductions in EEV AB. These patients showed lower EIV CW and end-exercise dyspnea scores but longer Tlim than their counterparts (P < 0.05. Dyspnea increased and Tlim decreased non-linearly with a faster rate of increase in EIV CW regardless of the presence or absence of dynamic hyperinflation (P < 0.001. However, no significant between-group differences were observed in metabolic, pulmonary gas exchange and cardiovascular responses to exercise. Chest wall volumes are continuously regulated during exercise in order to postpone (or even avoid their migration to higher operating volumes in patients with COPD, a dynamic process that is strongly dependent on the behavior of the abdominal compartment.

  1. Dynamics of chest wall volume regulation during constant work rate exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takara, L.S.; Cunha, T.M.; Barbosa, P.; Rodrigues, M.K.; Oliveira, M.F.; Nery, L.E. [Setor de Função Pulmonar e Fisiologia Clínica do Exercício, Disciplina de Pneumologia, Departamento de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Neder, J.A. [Setor de Função Pulmonar e Fisiologia Clínica do Exercício, Disciplina de Pneumologia, Departamento de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Division of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON (Canada)

    2012-10-15

    This study evaluated the dynamic behavior of total and compartmental chest wall volumes [(V{sub CW}) = rib cage (V{sub RC}) + abdomen (V{sub AB})] as measured breath-by-breath by optoelectronic plethysmography during constant-load exercise in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Thirty males (GOLD stages II-III) underwent a cardiopulmonary exercise test to the limit of tolerance (Tlim) at 75% of peak work rate on an electronically braked cycle ergometer. Exercise-induced dynamic hyperinflation was considered to be present when end-expiratory (EE) V{sub CW} increased in relation to resting values. There was a noticeable heterogeneity in the patterns of V{sub CW} regulation as EEV{sub CW} increased non-linearly in 17/30 “hyperinflators” and decreased in 13/30 “non-hyperinflators” (P < 0.05). EEV{sub AB} decreased slightly in 8 of the “hyperinflators”, thereby reducing and slowing the rate of increase in end-inspiratory (EI) V{sub CW} (P < 0.05). In contrast, decreases in EEV{sub CW} in the “non-hyperinflators” were due to the combination of stable EEV{sub RC} with marked reductions in EEV{sub AB}. These patients showed lower EIV{sub CW} and end-exercise dyspnea scores but longer Tlim than their counterparts (P < 0.05). Dyspnea increased and Tlim decreased non-linearly with a faster rate of increase in EIV{sub CW} regardless of the presence or absence of dynamic hyperinflation (P < 0.001). However, no significant between-group differences were observed in metabolic, pulmonary gas exchange and cardiovascular responses to exercise. Chest wall volumes are continuously regulated during exercise in order to postpone (or even avoid) their migration to higher operating volumes in patients with COPD, a dynamic process that is strongly dependent on the behavior of the abdominal compartment.

  2. Dynamics of chest wall volume regulation during constant work rate exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study evaluated the dynamic behavior of total and compartmental chest wall volumes [(VCW) = rib cage (VRC) + abdomen (VAB)] as measured breath-by-breath by optoelectronic plethysmography during constant-load exercise in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Thirty males (GOLD stages II-III) underwent a cardiopulmonary exercise test to the limit of tolerance (Tlim) at 75% of peak work rate on an electronically braked cycle ergometer. Exercise-induced dynamic hyperinflation was considered to be present when end-expiratory (EE) VCW increased in relation to resting values. There was a noticeable heterogeneity in the patterns of VCW regulation as EEVCW increased non-linearly in 17/30 “hyperinflators” and decreased in 13/30 “non-hyperinflators” (P < 0.05). EEVAB decreased slightly in 8 of the “hyperinflators”, thereby reducing and slowing the rate of increase in end-inspiratory (EI) VCW (P < 0.05). In contrast, decreases in EEVCW in the “non-hyperinflators” were due to the combination of stable EEVRC with marked reductions in EEVAB. These patients showed lower EIVCW and end-exercise dyspnea scores but longer Tlim than their counterparts (P < 0.05). Dyspnea increased and Tlim decreased non-linearly with a faster rate of increase in EIVCW regardless of the presence or absence of dynamic hyperinflation (P < 0.001). However, no significant between-group differences were observed in metabolic, pulmonary gas exchange and cardiovascular responses to exercise. Chest wall volumes are continuously regulated during exercise in order to postpone (or even avoid) their migration to higher operating volumes in patients with COPD, a dynamic process that is strongly dependent on the behavior of the abdominal compartment

  3. A case of parachordoma on the chest wall and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Parachordoma is an extremely uncommon soft-tissue tumor, which mainly occurs in the deep soft-tissue of the distal parts of the limbs, such as deep fascia, muscle tendon, synovial or soft-tissue closed to the bone. Nevertheless, the literature reports about parachordoma on the thoracic wall were scarce. The clinical and imaging manifestation has a non-specific appearance. In this article, we reported one case of parachordoma of the thoracic wall that we met in clinical works and reviewed the literature.

  4. Volume Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT for pulmonary Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT in patients with lesions in close approximation to the chest wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ThomasJ.FitzGerald

    2013-02-01

    VMAT technology has potential of limiting radiation dose to sensitive chest wall regions in patients with lesions in close approximation to this structure. This would also have potential value to lesions treated with SBRT in other body regions where targets abut critical structures.

  5. Automated Reconstruction of Walls from Airborne LIDAR Data for Complete 3d Building Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Y.; Zhang, C.; Awrangjeb, M.; Fraser, C. S.

    2012-07-01

    Automated 3D building model generation continues to attract research interests in photogrammetry and computer vision. Airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) data with increasing point density and accuracy has been recognized as a valuable source for automated 3D building reconstruction. While considerable achievements have been made in roof extraction, limited research has been carried out in modelling and reconstruction of walls, which constitute important components of a full building model. Low point density and irregular point distribution of LIDAR observations on vertical walls render this task complex. This paper develops a novel approach for wall reconstruction from airborne LIDAR data. The developed method commences with point cloud segmentation using a region growing approach. Seed points for planar segments are selected through principle component analysis, and points in the neighbourhood are collected and examined to form planar segments. Afterwards, segment-based classification is performed to identify roofs, walls and planar ground surfaces. For walls with sparse LIDAR observations, a search is conducted in the neighbourhood of each individual roof segment to collect wall points, and the walls are then reconstructed using geometrical and topological constraints. Finally, walls which were not illuminated by the LIDAR sensor are determined via both reconstructed roof data and neighbouring walls. This leads to the generation of topologically consistent and geometrically accurate and complete 3D building models. Experiments have been conducted in two test sites in the Netherlands and Australia to evaluate the performance of the proposed method. Results show that planar segments can be reliably extracted in the two reported test sites, which have different point density, and the building walls can be correctly reconstructed if the walls are illuminated by the LIDAR sensor.

  6. Chest computed tomography using iterative reconstruction vs filtered back projection (Part 2): image quality of low-dose CT examinations in 80 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pontana, Francois; Pagniez, Julien; Faivre, Jean-Baptiste; Hachulla, Anne-Lise; Remy, Jacques [University Lille Nord de France, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette (EA 2694), Lille (France); Duhamel, Alain [University Lille Nord de France, Department of Medical Statistics, Lille (France); Flohr, Thomas [Computed Tomography Division, Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim (Germany); Remy-Jardin, Martine [University Lille Nord de France, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette (EA 2694), Lille (France); Hospital Calmette, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Lille cedex (France)

    2011-03-15

    To evaluate the image quality of an iterative reconstruction algorithm (IRIS) in low-dose chest CT in comparison with standard-dose filtered back projection (FBP) CT. Eighty consecutive patients referred for a follow-up chest CT examination of the chest, underwent a low-dose CT examination (Group 2) in similar technical conditions to those of the initial examination, (Group 1) except for the milliamperage selection and the replacement of regular FBP reconstruction by iterative reconstructions using three (Group 2a) and five iterations (Group 2b). Despite a mean decrease of 35.5% in the dose-length-product, there was no statistically significant difference between Group 2a and Group 1 in the objective noise, signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratios and distribution of the overall image quality scores. Compared to Group 1, objective image noise in Group 2b was significantly reduced with increased SNR and CNR and a trend towards improved image quality. Iterative reconstructions using three iterations provide similar image quality compared with the conventionally used FBP reconstruction at 35% less dose, thus enabling dose reduction without loss of diagnostic information. According to our preliminary results, even higher dose reductions than 35% may be feasible by using more than three iterations. (orig.)

  7. Fluoroscopy dose reduction of computed tomography guided chest interventional radiology using real-time iterative reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiation dose reduction to patients and radiologists in computed tomography (CT) guided examinations for the thoracic region using CT fluoroscopy. Image quality evaluation of the real-time filtered back-projection (RT-FBP) images and the real-time adaptive dose reduction (RT-AIDR) image was carried out on noise and artifacts that were considered to affect the CT fluoroscopy. The image standard deviation was improved in the fluoroscopy setting with less than 30 mA on 120 kV. With regard to the evaluation of artifact visibility and the amount generated by the needle attached to the chest phantom, there was no significant difference between the RT-FBP images with 120 kV, 20 mA and the RT-AIDR image with low-dose conditions (greater than 80 kV, 30 mA and less than 120 kV, 20 mA). The results suggest that it is possible to reduce the radiation dose by approximately 34% at the maximum using RT-AIDR while maintaining image quality equivalent to the RT-FBP image with 120 V, 20 mA. (author)

  8. Instant Abdominal Wall Reconstruction with Biologic Mesh following Resection of Locally Advanced Colonic Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Oskay Kaya; Engin Olcucuoglu; Gaye Seker; Hakan Kulacoglu

    2012-01-01

    We present a case of immediate abdominal wall reconstruction with biologic mesh following the resection of locally advanced colonic cancer. The tumor in the right colon did not respond to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Surgical enbloc excision, including excision of the invasion in the abdominal wall, was achieved, and the defect was reconstructed with porcine dermal collagen mesh. The patient was discharged with no complication, and adaptation of the mesh was excellent at the six-month followup.

  9. Reproducibility of The Abdominal and Chest Wall Position by Voluntary Breath-Hold Technique Using a Laser-Based Monitoring and Visual Feedback System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The voluntary breath-hold (BH) technique is a simple method to control the respiration-related motion of a tumor during irradiation. However, the abdominal and chest wall position may not be accurately reproduced using the BH technique. The purpose of this study was to examine whether visual feedback can reduce the fluctuation in wall motion during BH using a new respiratory monitoring device. Methods and Materials: We developed a laser-based BH monitoring and visual feedback system. For this study, five healthy volunteers were enrolled. The volunteers, practicing abdominal breathing, performed shallow end-expiration BH (SEBH), shallow end-inspiration BH (SIBH), and deep end-inspiration BH (DIBH) with or without visual feedback. The abdominal and chest wall positions were measured at 80-ms intervals during BHs. Results: The fluctuation in the chest wall position was smaller than that of the abdominal wall position. The reproducibility of the wall position was improved by visual feedback. With a monitoring device, visual feedback reduced the mean deviation of the abdominal wall from 2.1 ± 1.3 mm to 1.5 ± 0.5 mm, 2.5 ± 1.9 mm to 1.1 ± 0.4 mm, and 6.6 ± 2.4 mm to 2.6 ± 1.4 mm in SEBH, SIBH, and DIBH, respectively. Conclusions: Volunteers can perform the BH maneuver in a highly reproducible fashion when informed about the position of the wall, although in the case of DIBH, the deviation in the wall position remained substantial

  10. Characteristics Of Congenital Chest Wall Deformities In Referred Patients To Tehran Imam Khomeini And Kashan Shahid Beheshti Hospital During 1991-2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davoodabadi A

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infants and children present with a wide range of congenital chest wall deformities which have both physiologic psychologic consequences and are often associated with other abnormalities. Surgical intervention offers excellent cosmetic results with minimal morbidity and mortality. In order to investigation of chest wall deformities, and surgical results, this study was performed. Materials and Methods: A descriptive study on existing data on 60 consecutive patients with chest wall deformity during 10 years carried out. Patient's characteristics such as age, gender, signs and symptoms type of operation, associated disorder, syndrome, and surgical complications were considered. Results: Pectus excavatum 60% and pectus carinatum 30% Poland syn 6.7% 9 sternal cleft 3.2. Inpectus, M/F: Was 3/1 and others were 1:1. Age of admission 4 to 27 years 13.4±6.82 and association syndromes were, turner, Morgue and marfan, most patients were operated in delayed time (75 and hence, scoliosis was common than others. Conclusion: Pectus excavatum was the most common deformity and if scoliosis was prominent and most operation was done in old age but surgical result was excellent no anyone expired and complication was a little. So we recommended that all of the chest deformities must be operated in anytime.

  11. Sternal Cleft and Pectus Excavatum: A Combined Approach for the Correction of a Complex Anterior Chest Wall Malformation in a Teenager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tocchioni, Francesca; Ghionzoli, Marco; Lo Piccolo, Roberto; Deaconu, Diana E; Facchini, Flavio; Milanez De Campos, Jose R; Messineo, Antonio

    2015-06-01

    Congenital sternal cleft is a rare chest wall malformation. Because of the flexibility of the chest in infants, surgical repair should be performed by primary closure in the neonatal period. In adolescents and adults, different techniques have been suggested to overcome the lack of sternal bone tissue. We describe a very rare case of an 18-year-old woman with a complete bifid sternum associated with pectus excavatum for whom a satisfactory cosmetic and functional result was obtained by adequate surgical planning, which entailed a combination of two standardized surgical techniques. PMID:26046903

  12. Impact of Fractionation and Dose in a Multivariate Model for Radiation-Induced Chest Wall Pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Din, Shaun U. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Williams, Eric L.; Jackson, Andrew [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Rosenzweig, Kenneth E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Wu, Abraham J.; Foster, Amanda [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Yorke, Ellen D. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Rimner, Andreas, E-mail: rimnera@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the role of patient/tumor characteristics, radiation dose, and fractionation using the linear-quadratic (LQ) model to predict stereotactic body radiation therapy–induced grade ≥2 chest wall pain (CWP2) in a larger series and develop clinically useful constraints for patients treated with different fraction numbers. Methods and Materials: A total of 316 lung tumors in 295 patients were treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy in 3 to 5 fractions to 39 to 60 Gy. Absolute dose–absolute volume chest wall (CW) histograms were acquired. The raw dose-volume histograms (α/β = ∞ Gy) were converted via the LQ model to equivalent doses in 2-Gy fractions (normalized total dose, NTD) with α/β from 0 to 25 Gy in 0.1-Gy steps. The Cox proportional hazards (CPH) model was used in univariate and multivariate models to identify and assess CWP2 exposed to a given physical and NTD. Results: The median follow-up was 15.4 months, and the median time to development of CWP2 was 7.4 months. On a univariate CPH model, prescription dose, prescription dose per fraction, number of fractions, D83cc, distance of tumor to CW, and body mass index were all statistically significant for the development of CWP2. Linear-quadratic correction improved the CPH model significance over the physical dose. The best-fit α/β was 2.1 Gy, and the physical dose (α/β = ∞ Gy) was outside the upper 95% confidence limit. With α/β = 2.1 Gy, V{sub NTD99Gy} was most significant, with median V{sub NTD99Gy} = 31.5 cm{sup 3} (hazard ratio 3.87, P<.001). Conclusion: There were several predictive factors for the development of CWP2. The LQ-adjusted doses using the best-fit α/β = 2.1 Gy is a better predictor of CWP2 than the physical dose. To aid dosimetrists, we have calculated the physical dose equivalent corresponding to V{sub NTD99Gy} = 31.5 cm{sup 3} for the 3- to 5-fraction groups.

  13. Impact of Fractionation and Dose in a Multivariate Model for Radiation-Induced Chest Wall Pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the role of patient/tumor characteristics, radiation dose, and fractionation using the linear-quadratic (LQ) model to predict stereotactic body radiation therapy–induced grade ≥2 chest wall pain (CWP2) in a larger series and develop clinically useful constraints for patients treated with different fraction numbers. Methods and Materials: A total of 316 lung tumors in 295 patients were treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy in 3 to 5 fractions to 39 to 60 Gy. Absolute dose–absolute volume chest wall (CW) histograms were acquired. The raw dose-volume histograms (α/β = ∞ Gy) were converted via the LQ model to equivalent doses in 2-Gy fractions (normalized total dose, NTD) with α/β from 0 to 25 Gy in 0.1-Gy steps. The Cox proportional hazards (CPH) model was used in univariate and multivariate models to identify and assess CWP2 exposed to a given physical and NTD. Results: The median follow-up was 15.4 months, and the median time to development of CWP2 was 7.4 months. On a univariate CPH model, prescription dose, prescription dose per fraction, number of fractions, D83cc, distance of tumor to CW, and body mass index were all statistically significant for the development of CWP2. Linear-quadratic correction improved the CPH model significance over the physical dose. The best-fit α/β was 2.1 Gy, and the physical dose (α/β = ∞ Gy) was outside the upper 95% confidence limit. With α/β = 2.1 Gy, VNTD99Gy was most significant, with median VNTD99Gy = 31.5 cm3 (hazard ratio 3.87, P<.001). Conclusion: There were several predictive factors for the development of CWP2. The LQ-adjusted doses using the best-fit α/β = 2.1 Gy is a better predictor of CWP2 than the physical dose. To aid dosimetrists, we have calculated the physical dose equivalent corresponding to VNTD99Gy = 31.5 cm3 for the 3- to 5-fraction groups

  14. Image quality assessment of ultra low-dose chest CT using sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, So Won; Shim, Sung Shine; Lee, Jeong Kyong [School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yookyung [School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ewha Womans University Mokdong Hospital, Department of Radiology, 1071, Anyangcheon-ro, Yangcheon-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seok Jeong; Ryu, Yon Ju; Chang, Jung Hyun [School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Division of Pulmonology in the Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    To assess the image quality of ultra-low-dose computed tomography (ULDCT) using sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) compared to reduced dose CT (RDCT). Eighty-one consecutive patients underwent non-enhanced ULDCT using 80 kVp and 30 mAs and contrast-enhanced RDCT using automated tube potential selection and tube current modulation. CT images were reconstructed with SAFIRE. Image noise and subjective image quality of normal structures and various pulmonary lesions were assessed. The mean effective doses were 0.29 ± 0.03 and 2.88 ± 1.11 mSv for ULDCT and RDCT, respectively. ULDCT had significantly higher noise (p < 0.001). Image quality of five normal structures was diagnostic in 91.1 % of ULDCT and 100 % of RDCT. With ULDCT, the frequencies of non-diagnostic image quality were 2.0 (1/50), 4.6 (13/280), 25.5 (14/55), and 40.0 (8/20)% for BMIs of < 20, 20-25, 25-30, and >30. In the assessment of pulmonary lesions, non-diagnostic image quality was observed for 11.2 % of all lesions, 60.9 % of decreased attenuation (significantly more frequent for upper lung lesions), and 23.5 % of ground-glass nodules. ULDCT generates diagnostic images in patients with a BMI ≤25, but is of limited use for lesions with decreased attenuation, ground-glass nodules, or those located in the upper lobe. (orig.)

  15. Occurrence of Breast Cancer After Chest Wall Irradiation for Pediatric Cancer, as Detected by a Multimodal Screening Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terenziani, Monica [Pediatric Oncology Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy); Casalini, Patrizia [Molecular Biology Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy); Scaperrotta, Gianfranco; Gandola, Lorenza; Trecate, Giovanna [Radiology and Radiotherapy Departments, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy); Catania, Serena; Cefalo, Graziella [Pediatric Oncology Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy); Conti, Alberto [Breast Surgery Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy); Massimino, Maura; Meazza, Cristina; Podda, Marta; Spreafico, Filippo [Pediatric Oncology Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy); Suman, Laura [Radiology and Radiotherapy Departments, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy); Gennaro, Massimiliano, E-mail: gennaromassimiliano@istitutotumori.mi.it [Breast Surgery Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the occurrence of breast cancer (BC) after exposure to ionizing radiation for pediatric cancer, by means of a multimodal screening program. Patients and Methods: We identified 86 patients who had received chest wall radiation therapy for pediatric cancer. Clinical breast examination (CBE), ultrasound (US), and mammography (MX) were performed yearly. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was added as of October 2007. We calculated the risk of developing BC by radiation therapy dose, patient age, and menarche before or after primary treatment. Results: Eleven women developed a BC from July 2002-February 2010. The sensitivity of the screening methods was 36% for CBE, 73% for MX, 55% for US, and 100% for MRI; the specificity was 91%, 99%, 95%, and 80% for CBE, MX, US, and MRI, respectively. The annual BC detection rate was 2.9%. The median age at BC diagnosis was 33 years. Although age had no influence, menarche before as opposed to after radiation therapy correlated significantly with BC (P=.027): the annual BC detection rate in the former subgroup was 5.3%. Conclusions: Mammography proved more sensitive and specific in our cohort of young women than CBE or US. Magnetic resonance imaging proved 100% sensitive (but this preliminary finding needs to be confirmed). Our cohort of patients carries a 10-fold BC risk at an age more than 20 years younger than in the general population.

  16. Occurrence of Breast Cancer After Chest Wall Irradiation for Pediatric Cancer, as Detected by a Multimodal Screening Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the occurrence of breast cancer (BC) after exposure to ionizing radiation for pediatric cancer, by means of a multimodal screening program. Patients and Methods: We identified 86 patients who had received chest wall radiation therapy for pediatric cancer. Clinical breast examination (CBE), ultrasound (US), and mammography (MX) were performed yearly. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was added as of October 2007. We calculated the risk of developing BC by radiation therapy dose, patient age, and menarche before or after primary treatment. Results: Eleven women developed a BC from July 2002-February 2010. The sensitivity of the screening methods was 36% for CBE, 73% for MX, 55% for US, and 100% for MRI; the specificity was 91%, 99%, 95%, and 80% for CBE, MX, US, and MRI, respectively. The annual BC detection rate was 2.9%. The median age at BC diagnosis was 33 years. Although age had no influence, menarche before as opposed to after radiation therapy correlated significantly with BC (P=.027): the annual BC detection rate in the former subgroup was 5.3%. Conclusions: Mammography proved more sensitive and specific in our cohort of young women than CBE or US. Magnetic resonance imaging proved 100% sensitive (but this preliminary finding needs to be confirmed). Our cohort of patients carries a 10-fold BC risk at an age more than 20 years younger than in the general population.

  17. An unusual case of isolated, serial metastases of gallbladder carcinoma involving the chest wall, axilla, breast and lung parenchyma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Iott

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In the English literature, only 9 cases of adenocarcinoma of the gallbladder with cutaneous metastasis have been reported so far. One case of multiple cutaneous metastases along with deposits in the breast tissue has been reported. We present a case of incidental metastatic gallbladder carcinoma with no intra-abdominal disease presenting as a series of four isolated cutaneous right chest wall, axillary nodal, breast and pulmonary metastases following resection and adjuvant chemoradiation for her primary tumor. In spite of the metastatic disease coupled with the aggressive nature of the cancer, this patient reported that her energy level had returned to baseline with a good appetite and a stable weight indicating a good performance status and now is alive at 25 months since diagnosis. Her serially-presented, oligometastatic diseases were well-controlled by concurrent chemoradiation and stereotactic radiation therapy. We report this case study because of its rarity and for the purpose of complementing current literature with an additional example of cutaneous metastasis from adenocarcinoma of the gallbladder.

  18. SU-D-BRA-06: Dual-Energy Chest CT: The Effects of Virtual Monochromatic Reconstructions On Texture Analysis Features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorensen, J; Duran, C; Stingo, F; Wei, W; Rao, A; Zhang, L; Court, L; Erasmus, J; Godoy, M [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To characterize the effect of virtual monochromatic reconstructions on several commonly used texture analysis features in DECT of the chest. Further, to assess the effect of monochromatic energy levels on the ability of these textural features to identify tissue types. Methods: 20 consecutive patients underwent chest CTs for evaluation of lung nodules using Siemens Somatom Definition Flash DECT. Virtual monochromatic images were constructed at 10keV intervals from 40–190keV. For each patient, an ROI delineated the lesion under investigation, and cylindrical ROI’s were placed within 5 different healthy tissues (blood, fat, muscle, lung, and liver). Several histogram- and Grey Level Cooccurrence Matrix (GLCM)-based texture features were then evaluated in each ROI at each energy level. As a means of validation, these feature values were then used in a random forest classifier to attempt to identify the tissue types present within each ROI. Their predictive accuracy at each energy level was recorded. Results: All textural features changed considerably with virtual monochromatic energy, particularly below 70keV. Most features exhibited a global minimum or maximum around 80keV, and while feature values changed with energy above this, patient ranking was generally unaffected. As expected, blood demonstrated the lowest inter-patient variability, for all features, while lung lesions (encompassing many different pathologies) exhibited the highest. The accuracy of these features in identifying tissues (76% accuracy) was highest at 80keV, but no clear relationship between energy and classification accuracy was found. Two common misclassifications (blood vs liver and muscle vs fat) accounted for the majority (24 of the 28) errors observed. Conclusion: All textural features were highly dependent on virtual monochromatic energy level, especially below 80keV, and were more stable above this energy. However, in a random forest model, these commonly used features were

  19. Radiation exposure of children in pediatric radiology. Pt. 3. Conversion coefficients for reconstruction of organ doses achieved during chest X-ray examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: calculation of conversion coefficients for the reconstruction of organ doses from entrance doses for chest radiographs of 0, 1, 5, 10, 15, and 30-year-old patients in conventional pediatric radiology for the radiographic settings recommended by the German and European guidelines for quality management in diagnostic radiology. Materials und methods: the conversion coefficients for pediatric chest radiographs were calculated using the commercially available personal computer program PCXMC developed by the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (Saeteilyturvakeskus STUK). PCXMC is a Monte Carlo program for computing organ and effective doses in about 40 organs of mathematical hermaphrodite phantom models describing patients of different ages. The possible clinical variation of beam collimation was taken into consideration by defining optimal and suboptimal radiation fields on the phantoms' surfaces. Results: conversion coefficients for the reconstruction of organ doses from measured entrance doses during chest radiographs for 0, 1, 5, 10, 15, and 30-year-old pediatric patients were presented. Conversion coefficients were calculated for the standard sagittal and lateral beam projections and the standard focus film distances of 100 cm, 115 cm, and 150 cm using the standard radiation qualities according to the recommendations of the German and European guidelines for quality management in diagnostic radiology. These conversion coefficients allow the reconstruction of the absorbed dose in about 40 organs and tissues of the human body for optimal and suboptimal radiation field collimations. (orig.)

  20. Low-dose Photofrin-induced PDT offers excellent clinical response with minimal morbidity in chest wall recurrence of breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Ron; Mang, Thomas S.

    2000-03-01

    Limited therapeutic options exist when chest wall recurrence form breast cancer progresses despite standard salvage treatment. As photodynamic therapy offers excellent response for cutaneous lesions this may be a possible indication for PDT. A total of 102 treatment fields were illuminated on 9 women with biopsy proven chest wall recurrence of breast cancer which was progressing despite salvage surgery, radiation, and chemi-hormonal therapy. PDT consisted of outpatient IV infusion of Photofrin at 0.8 mg/kg followed 48 hours laser by illumination at 140-170 J/cm2 via a KTP Yag laser coupled to a dye unit. No patient was lost to follow up. At 6 months post PDT; complete response, defined as total lesion elimination was 89 percent, partial response 8 percent, and no response 3 percent. No photosensitivity was seen and no patient developed scarring, fibrosis, or healing difficulties. Low dose Photofrin induced PDT is very active against chest wall lesions. Despite fragile and heavily pre-treated tissues, excellent clinical and cosmetic outcome was obtained. PDT is an underutilized modality for this indication.

  1. Dose–Volume Parameters Predict for the Development of Chest Wall Pain After Stereotactic Body Radiation for Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Chest wall (CW) pain has recently been recognized as an important adverse effect of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We developed a dose–volume model to predict the development of this toxicity. Methods and Materials: A total of 126 patients with primary, clinically node-negative NSCLC received three to five fractions of SBRT to doses of 40–60 Gy and were prospectively followed. The dose–absolute volume histograms of two different definitions of the CW as an organ at risk (CW3cm and CW2cm) were examined for all 126 patients. Results: With a median follow-up of 16 months, the 2-year estimated actuarial incidence of Grade ≥ 2 CW pain was 39%. The median time to onset of Grade ≥ 2 CW pain (National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, Version 3.0) was 9 months. There was no predictive advantage for biologically corrected dose over physical dose. Neither fraction number (p = 0.07) nor prescription dose (p = 0.07) were significantly correlated with the development of Grade ≥ 2 CW pain. Cox Proportional Hazards analysis identified significant correlation with a broad range of dose-volume combinations, with the CW volume receiving 30 Gy (V30) as one of the strongest predictors (p 3 of CW2cm, there was a significant correlation with Grade ≥ 2 CW pain (p = 0.004). Conclusions: CW toxicity after SBRT is common and long-term follow-up is needed to identify affected patients. A volume of CW ≥ 70 cm3 receiving 30 Gy is significantly correlated with Grade ≥ 2 CW pain. We are currently applying this constraint at our institution for patients receiving thoracic SBRT. An actuarial atlas of our data is provided as an electronic supplement to facilitate data-sharing and meta-analysis relating to CW pain.

  2. Reducing the radiation dose with the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction technique for chest CT in adults: a parameter study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Wenyun; Ding Xiaobo; Kong Boyu; Fan Baoyan; Chen Liang

    2014-01-01

    Background Currently there is a trend towards reducing radiation dose while maintaining image quality during computer tomography (CT) examination.This results from the concerns about radiation exposure from CT and the potential increase in the incidence of radiation induced carcinogenesis.This study aimed to investigate the lowest radiation dose for maintaining good image quality in adult chest scanning using GE CT equipment.Methods Seventy-two adult patients were examined by Gemstone Spectral CT.They were randomly divided into six groups.We set up a different value of noise index (NI) when evaluating each group every other number from 13.0 to 23.0.The original images were acquired with a slice of 5 mm thickness.For each group,several image series were reconstructed using different levels of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) (30%,50%,and 70%).We got a total of 18 image sequences of different combinations of NI and ASIR percentage.On one hand,quantitative indicators,such as CT value and standard deviation (SD),were assessed at the region of interest.The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated.The volume CT dose index (CTDI) and dose length product (DLP) were recorded.On the other hand,two radiologists with >5 years of experience blindly reviewed the subjective image quality using the standards we had previously set.Results The different combinations of noise index and ASIR were assessed.There was no significant difference in CT values among the 18 image sequences.The SD value was reduced with the noise index's reduction or ASIR's increase.There was a trend towards gradually lower SNR and CNR with an NI increase.The CTDI and DLP were diminishing as the NI increased.The scores from subjective image quality evaluation were reduced in all groups as the ASIR increased.Conclusions Increasing NI can reduce radiation dose.With the premise of maintaining the same image quality,using a suitable percentage of

  3. Radiation Dose Reduction of Chest CT with Iterative Reconstruction in Image Space - Part II: Assessment of Radiologists' Preferences Using Dual Source CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the impact of radiation dose and reconstruction algorithms on radiologists' preferences, and whether an iterative reconstruction in image space (IRIS) can be used for dose reduction in chest CT. Standard dose chest CT (SDCT) in 50 patients and low dose chest CT (LDCT) in another 50 patients were performed, using a dual-source CT, with 120 kVp and same reference mAs (50 mAs for SDCT and 25 mAs for LDCT) employed to both tubes by modifying the dual-energy scan mode. Full-dose data were obtained by combining the data from both tubes and half-dose data were separated from one tube. These were reconstructed by using a filtered back projection (FBP) and IRIS: full-dose FBP (F-FBP); full-dose IRIS (F-IRIS); half-dose FBP (H-FBP) and half-dose IRIS (H-IRIS). Ten H-IRIS/F-IRIS, 10 H-FBP/H-IRIS, 40 F-FBP/F-IRIS and 40 F-FBP/H-IRIS pairs of each SDCT and LDCT were randomized. The preference for clinical usage was determined by two radiologists with a 5-point-scale system for the followings: noise, contrast, and sharpness of mediastinum and lung. Radiologists preferred IRIS over FBP images in the same radiation dose for the evaluation of the lungs in both SDCT (p = 0.035) and LDCT (p < 0.001). When comparing between H-IRIS and F-IRIS, decreased radiation resulted in decreased preference. Observers preferred H-IRIS over F-FBP for the lungs in both SDCT and LDCT, even with reduced radiation dose by half in IRIS image (p < 0.05). Radiologists' preference may be influenced by both radiation dose and reconstruction algorithm. According to our preliminary results, dose reduction at 50% with IRIS may be feasible for lung parenchymal evaluation.

  4. Doxifluridine, medroxyprogesterone acetate and cyclophosphamide (DMpC) combination therapy found effective for case of chest wall recurrent breast cancer with bone and pleural metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 67-year-old woman in poor general condition consulted my clinic with complaints of dyspnea and right chest wall pain. There was a huge and moist ulcer, caused by recurrence and post-radiation, on her right anterior to posterior chest wall. A chest X-ray demonstrated massive pleural effusion. Bone scinti gram showed multiple metastases in the spine, femur and pelvis. Her general condition was so poor that standard chemotherapy was unsuitable. Therefore, the patient was orally administered DMpC (doxifluridine, medroxyprogesterone acetate and cyclophosphamide) combination therapy. The pleural effusion had completely disappeared after 11 weeks, and the elevated serum CA15-3 and CEA value returned to a normal range 13 weeks later. No side effects were observed from this therapy. The patient clinically achieved good quality of life (QOL) in 6 months form this therapy with zoredronic acid administration. DMpC therapy appears to have few side effects and might be an effective treatment option for recurrent breast cancer patients with a poor general health condition. (author)

  5. Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy for refractory bilateral breast cancer in a patient with extensive cutaneous metastasis in the chest and abdominal walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu YF

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Yueh-Feng Lu,1 Yu-Chin Lin,2 Kuo-Hsin Chen,3,4 Pei-Wei Shueng,1 Hsin-Pei Yeh,1 Chen-Hsi Hsieh1,5,6 1Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiology, 2Division of Oncology and Hematology, Department of Medicine, 3Department of Surgery, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, New Taipei City, 4Department of Electrical Engineering, Yuan-Ze University, Taoyuan, 5Department of Medicine, 6Institute of Traditional Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan Abstract: Treatment for bilateral breast cancer with chest wall and abdominal skin invasion normally involves conventional radiotherapy (RT; however, conventional RT provides inadequate target volume coverage and excessive treatment of large volumes of normal tissue. Helical tomotherapy (HT has the ability to deliver continuous craniocaudal irradiation that suppresses junction problems and provides good conformity of dose distribution. A 47-year-old female with stage IV bilateral breast cancer with chest wall and pectoralis major muscle invasion, lymphadenopathy, bilateral pleural effusion, and multiple bone metastases received chemotherapy and target therapy beginning in January 2014; 4 months after the initiation of chemotherapy, computed tomography revealed progression of chest and abdominal wall invasion. A total dose of 70.2 Gy was delivered to both breasts, the chest wall, the abdominal wall, and the bilateral supraclavicular nodal areas in 39 fractions via HT. The total planning target volume was 4,533.29 cm3. The percent of lung volume receiving at least 20 Gy (V20 was 28%, 22%, and 25% for the right lung, left lung, and whole lung, respectively. The mean dose to the heart was 8.6 Gy. Follow-up computed tomography revealed complete response after the RT course. Grade 1 dysphagia, weight loss, grade 2 neutropenia, and grade 3 dermatitis were noted during the RT course. Pain score decreased from 6 to 1. No cardiac, pulmonary, liver, or intestinal toxicity

  6. Impact of a 4th generation iterative reconstruction technique on image quality in low-dose computed tomography of the chest in immunocompromised patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the image quality of an iterative reconstruction (IR) technique in low-dose MDCT (LDCT) of the chest of immunocompromised patients in an intraindividual comparison to filtered back projection (FBP) and to evaluate the dose reduction capability. Materials and Methods: 30 chest LDCT scans were performed in immunocompromised patients (Brilliance iCT; 20 - 40 mAs; mean CTDIvol: 1.7 mGy). The raw data were reconstructed using FBP and the IR technique (iDose4 trademark, Philips, Best, The Netherlands) set to seven iteration levels. 30 routine-dose MDCT (RDCT) reconstructed with FBP served as controls (mean exposure: 116 mAs; mean CDTIvol: 7.6 mGy). Three blinded radiologists scored subjective image quality and lesion conspicuity. Quantitative parameters including CT attenuation and objective image noise (OIN) were determined. Results: In LDCT high iDose4 trademark levels lead to a significant decrease in OIN (FBP vs. iDose7: subscapular muscle 139.4 vs. 40.6 HU). The high iDose4 trademark levels provided significant improvements in image quality and artifact and noise reduction compared to LDCT FBP images. The conspicuity of subtle lesions was limited in LDCT FBP images. It significantly improved with high iDose4 trademark levels (> iDose4). LDCT with iDose4 trademark level 6 was determined to be of equivalent image quality as RDCT with FBP. Conclusion: iDose4 trademark substantially improves image quality and lesion conspicuity and reduces noise in low-dose chest CT. Compared to RDCT, high iDose4 trademark levels provide equivalent image quality in LDCT, hence suggesting a potential dose reduction of almost 80%. (orig.)

  7. Impact of a 4th generation iterative reconstruction technique on image quality in low-dose computed tomography of the chest in immunocompromised patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laqmani, A.; Hennes, F.O.; Klink, T.; Schultzendorff, H.C. von; Hammerle, D.; Adam, G.; Regier, M. [Univ. Medical Center, Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Buhk, J.H. [Univ. Medical Center, Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology; Sehner, S. [Univ. Medical Center, Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Dept. of Medical Biometry and Epidemiology; Nagel, H.D. [Dr. HD Nagel, Science and Technology for Radiology, Buchholz (Germany)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: To determine the image quality of an iterative reconstruction (IR) technique in low-dose MDCT (LDCT) of the chest of immunocompromised patients in an intraindividual comparison to filtered back projection (FBP) and to evaluate the dose reduction capability. Materials and Methods: 30 chest LDCT scans were performed in immunocompromised patients (Brilliance iCT; 20 - 40 mAs; mean CTDIvol: 1.7 mGy). The raw data were reconstructed using FBP and the IR technique (iDose4 trademark, Philips, Best, The Netherlands) set to seven iteration levels. 30 routine-dose MDCT (RDCT) reconstructed with FBP served as controls (mean exposure: 116 mAs; mean CDTIvol: 7.6 mGy). Three blinded radiologists scored subjective image quality and lesion conspicuity. Quantitative parameters including CT attenuation and objective image noise (OIN) were determined. Results: In LDCT high iDose4 trademark levels lead to a significant decrease in OIN (FBP vs. iDose7: subscapular muscle 139.4 vs. 40.6 HU). The high iDose4 trademark levels provided significant improvements in image quality and artifact and noise reduction compared to LDCT FBP images. The conspicuity of subtle lesions was limited in LDCT FBP images. It significantly improved with high iDose4 trademark levels (> iDose4). LDCT with iDose4 trademark level 6 was determined to be of equivalent image quality as RDCT with FBP. Conclusion: iDose4 trademark substantially improves image quality and lesion conspicuity and reduces noise in low-dose chest CT. Compared to RDCT, high iDose4 trademark levels provide equivalent image quality in LDCT, hence suggesting a potential dose reduction of almost 80%. (orig.)

  8. Chest MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclear magnetic resonance - chest; Magnetic resonance imaging - chest; NMR - chest; MRI of the thorax; Thoracic MRI ... healthy enough to filter the contrast. During the MRI, the person who operates the machine will watch ...

  9. VAC® for external fixation of flail chest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rikke Winge

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A large anterior chest wall defect following tumor resection was reconstructed with a Gore- Tex® membrane and a combined musculocutaneous rectus femoris and tensor fasciae latae free flap. Subsequent paradoxical respiration impeded weaning from the ventilator. Appliance of Vacuum Assisted Closure® (VAC® resulted in immediate chest wall stability and a decrease in the patient’s need for respiratory support. Shortly thereafter, the VAC® was discontinued and the patient was discharged from the intensive care unit (ICU. This case report is the first to describe the successful use of VAC® as an adjuvant to a one-stage procedure for large thoracic wall reconstruction, allowing sufficient temporary external fixation to eliminate paradoxical respiration and plausibly shorten the stay in the ICU. No adverse effects on flap healing or haemodynamics were recorded. It is likely that external VAC® can improve thoracic stability and pulmonary function in a patient with flail chest and decrease the need for mechanical ventilation.

  10. Chest wall deformity and respiratory distress in a 17-year-old patient with achondroplasia: CT and MRI evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A marked thoracic deformity associated with intrathoracic tracheal narrowing was seen in a 17-year old with achondroplasia and dyspnea. The role of chest deformity and its evaluation by CT and MRI in achondroplastic patients with respiratory symptoms are considered. (orig.)

  11. Chest wall deformity and respiratory distress in a 17-year-old patient with achondroplasia: CT and MRI evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman, T.E.; Siegel, M.J.; McAlister, W.H. (Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States). Mallinckrodt Inst. of Radiology)

    1992-06-01

    A marked thoracic deformity associated with intrathoracic tracheal narrowing was seen in a 17-year old with achondroplasia and dyspnea. The role of chest deformity and its evaluation by CT and MRI in achondroplastic patients with respiratory symptoms are considered. (orig.).

  12. Radiation dose reduction with the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) technique for chest CT in children: An intra-individual comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To retrospectively compare radiation dose and image quality of pediatric chest CT using a routine dose protocol reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) (the Routine study) and a low-dose protocol with 50% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) (the ASIR study). Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed chest CT performed in pediatric patients who underwent both the Routine study and the ASIR study on different days between January 2010 and August 2011. Volume CT dose indices (CTDIvol), dose length products (DLP), and effective doses were obtained to estimate radiation dose. The image quality was evaluated objectively as noise measured in the descending aorta and paraspinal muscle, and subjectively by three radiologists for noise, sharpness, artifacts, and diagnostic acceptability using a four-point scale. The paired Student's t-test and the Wilcoxon signed-rank test were used for statistical analysis. Results: Twenty-six patients (M:F = 13:13, mean age 11.7) were enrolled. The ASIR studies showed 60.3%, 56.2%, and 55.2% reductions in CTDIvol (from 18.73 to 7.43 mGy, P < 0.001), DLP (from 307.42 to 134.51 mGy × cm, P < 0.001), and effective dose (from 4.12 to 1.84 mSv, P < 0.001), respectively, compared with the Routine studies. The objective noise was higher in the paraspinal muscle of the ASIR studies (20.81 vs. 16.67, P = 0.004), but was not different in the aorta (18.23 vs. 18.72, P = 0.726). The subjective image quality demonstrated no difference between the two studies. Conclusion: A low-dose protocol with 50% ASIR allows radiation dose reduction in pediatric chest CT by more than 55% while maintaining image quality

  13. Use of biological meshes for abdominal wall reconstruction in highly contaminated fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrea; Cavallaro; Emanuele; Lo; Menzo; Maria; Di; Vita; Antonio; Zanghì; Vincenzo; Cavallaro; Pier; Francesco; Veroux; Alessandro; Cappellani

    2010-01-01

    Abdominal wall defects and incisional hernias represent a challenging problem. In particular, when a synthetic mesh is applied to contaminated wounds, its removal is required in 50%-90% of cases. Biosynthetic meshes are the newest tool available to surgeons and they could have a role in ventral hernia repair in a potential-ly contaminated field. We describe the use of a sheet of bovine pericardium graft in the reconstruction of abdominal wall defect in two patients. Bovine pericardium graft was placed in th...

  14. Tangential beam IMRT versus tangential beam 3D-CRT of the chest wall in postmastectomy breast cancer patients: A dosimetric comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AI-Yahya Khaled

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study evaluates the dose distribution of reversed planned tangential beam intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT compared to standard wedged tangential beam three-dimensionally planned conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT of the chest wall in unselected postmastectomy breast cancer patients Methods For 20 unselected subsequent postmastectomy breast cancer patients tangential beam IMRT and tangential beam 3D-CRT plans were generated for the radiotherapy of the chest wall. The prescribed dose was 50 Gy in 25 fractions. Dose-volume histograms were evaluated for the PTV and organs at risk. Parameters of the dose distribution were compared using the Wilcoxon matched pairs test. Results Tangential beam IMRT statistically significantly reduced the ipsilateral mean lung dose by an average of 21% (1129 cGy versus 1437 cGy. In all patients treated on the left side, the heart volume encompassed by the 70% isodose line (V70%; 35 Gy was reduced by an average of 43% (5.7% versus 10.6%, and the mean heart dose by an average of 20% (704 cGy versus 877 cGy. The PTV showed a significantly better conformity index with IMRT; the homogeneity index was not significantly different. Conclusions Tangential beam IMRT significantly reduced the dose-volume of the ipsilateral lung and heart in unselected postmastectomy breast cancer patients.

  15. Radiofrequency ablation and percutaneous permanent iodine-125 implantation as salvage therapy for giant recurrent sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma of the chest wall: A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    KE, SHAN; DING, XUE-MEI; GAO, JUN; WANG, SHAO-HONG; ZHANG, JUN; KONG, JIAN; SUN, WEN-BING

    2015-01-01

    Sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma (SEF) is a rare soft-tissue sarcoma for which there is no standardized treatment regimen available. The current treatment options for SEF are resection, radiation and chemotherapy. Surgical resection remains the mainstay of therapy for SEF. However, SEF is an aggressive tumor that is prone to repeated local recurrence if not widely excised. Radiation and chemotherapy are less commonly used due to the insensitivity of SEF to these therapies. The treatment of recurrent SEF is even more challenging. The present study describes a patient who presented with a giant recurrent SEF arising from the chest wall that was accompanied by emergent bleeding. The patient was a 70-year-old male who had multiple comorbid diseases, including hypertension and chronic cardiac dysfunction. A computed tomography (CT) scan indicated the involvement of the sternum and anterior mediastinum. However, the patient refused any further surgery. Subsequent to careful discussion and consideration, radiofrequency (RF) ablation and percutaneous iodine-125 implantation was administered. The emergent bleeding was successfully stopped and the tumor was eliminated using RF ablation. Percutaneous iodine-125 implantation under CT guidance established effective control on the growth of the tumor involving the mediastinum. Despite this, the tumor recurred 6 months after treatment. The patient refused any further treatment and was discharged. In conclusion, RF ablation and percutaneous permanent iodine-125 implantation is a feasible and safe salvage therapy for patients with recurrent SEF of the chest wall. PMID:26137032

  16. Aesthetic aspects of abdominal wall and external genital reconstructive surgery in bladder exstrophy-epispadias complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderBrink, Brian A; Stock, Jeffrey A; Hanna, Moneer K

    2006-03-01

    Long-term follow-up of patients born with classical bladder exstrophy-epispadias complex (EEC) reveals that many of them suffer from poor self-image, and the aesthetic aspects of the genitalia and lower abdomen acquire greater significance with age. In this article, we review the aesthetic outcomes in performing puboplasty, umbilicoplasty, and genitoplasty in patients born with EEC. Retrospective review of the cosmetic and functional outcomes in 116 patients born with EEC treated by puboplasty, umbilicoplasty, or genitoplasty was performed. Satisfaction with the cosmetic and functional outcomes of these three reconstructive surgeries was high following initial reconstructive efforts (> 90%). Attention to cosmesis during abdominal wall and genital reconstruction for EEC helps to improve a patient's perception of body image and self-esteem. Our experience with these procedures over the past 25 years demonstrated that the efforts directed toward aesthetics have been well worthwhile. PMID:16527001

  17. Effect of reconstruction algorithm on image quality and identification of ground-glass opacities and partly solid nodules on low-dose thin-section CT: Experimental study using chest phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of reconstruction algorithm on identification and image quality of ground-glass opacities (GGOs) and partly solid nodules on low-dose thin-section CT. Materials and methods: A chest CT phantom including simulated GGOs and partly solid nodules was scanned with five different tube currents and reconstructed by using standard (A) and newly developed (B) high-resolution reconstruction algorithms, followed by visually assessment of identification and image quality of GGOs and partly solid nodules by two chest radiologists. Inter-observer agreement, ROC analysis and ANOVA were performed to compare identification and image quality of each data set with those of the standard reference. The standard reference used 120 mA s in conjunction with reconstruction algorithm A. Results: Kappa values (κ) of overall identification and image qualities were substantial or almost perfect (0.60 < κ). Assessment of identification showed that area under the curve of 25 mA reconstructed with reconstruction algorithm A was significantly lower than that of standard reference (p < 0.05), while assessment of image quality indicated that 50 mA s reconstructed with reconstruction algorithm A and 25 mA s reconstructed with both reconstruction algorithms were significantly lower than standard reference (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Reconstruction algorithm may be an important factor for identification and image quality of ground-glass opacities and partly solid nodules on low-dose CT examination.

  18. Clinical Effect of a Mixed Solution of Sodium Hyaluronate and Sodium Carboxymethylcellulose During the Transconjunctival Approach for Orbital Wall Reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Byung Wan; Lee, Hyo Seok; Oh, Han Jin; Yoon, Kyung Chul

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the anti-adhesive effect of a mixed solution of sodium hyaluronate and sodium carboxymethylcellulose (HACMC, Guardix-sol®) during the transconjunctival approach to orbital wall reconstruction. Eighty-seven patients who underwent orbital wall reconstruction by the transconjunctival approach were enrolled in this prospective study. We applied HACMC between the orbicularis oculi muscle and the orbital septum after surgery in 47 patients and did not use it in 40 patie...

  19. Orbital Wall Reconstruction with Two-Piece Puzzle 3D Printed Implants: Technical Note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mommaerts, Maurice Y; Büttner, Michael; Vercruysse, Herman; Wauters, Lauri; Beerens, Maikel

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a technique for secondary reconstruction of traumatic orbital wall defects using titanium implants that act as three-dimensional (3D) puzzle pieces. We present three cases of large defect reconstruction using implants produced by Xilloc Medical B.V. (Maastricht, the Netherlands) with a 3D printer manufactured by LayerWise (3D Systems; Heverlee, Belgium), and designed using the biomedical engineering software programs ProPlan and 3-Matic (Materialise, Heverlee, Belgium). The smaller size of the implants allowed sequential implantation for the reconstruction of extensive two-wall defects via a limited transconjunctival incision. The precise fit of the implants with regard to the surrounding ledges and each other was confirmed by intraoperative 3D imaging (Mobile C-arm Systems B.V. Pulsera, Philips Medical Systems, Eindhoven, the Netherlands). The patients showed near-complete restoration of orbital volume and ocular motility. However, challenges remain, including traumatic fat atrophy and fibrosis. PMID:26889349

  20. Radio-guided occult lesion localisation using iodine 125 Seeds “ROLLIS” to guide surgical removal of an impalpable posterior chest wall melanoma metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dissanayake, Shashini [Western Hospital, Footscray, Victoria (Australia); Dissanayake, Deepthi [Royal Perth Hospital Perth, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Taylor, Donna B [Royal Perth Hospital Perth, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); School of Surgery, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia (Australia); Western Hospital, Footscray, Victoria (Australia)

    2015-09-15

    Cancer screening and surveillance programmes and the use of sophisticated imaging tools such as positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) have increased the detection of impalpable lesions requiring imaging guidance for excision. A new technique involves intra-lesional insertion of a low-activity iodine-125 ({sup 125}I) seed and detection of the radioactive signal in theatre using a hand-held gamma probe to guide surgery. Whilst several studies describe using this method to guide the removal of impalpable breast lesions, only a handful of publications report its use to guide excision of lesions outside the breast. We describe a case in which radio-guided occult lesion localisation using an iodine 125 seed was used to guide excision of an impalpable posterior chest wall metastasis detected on PET-CT.

  1. Description of GTV and CTV for radiation therapy of breast carcinomas: breast and chest wall; La radiotherapie du sein et de la paroi thoracique: les volumes a traiter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilhuydy, J.M. [Institut Bergonie, Service de Radiotherapie, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Bussieres, E. [Insitut Bergonie, Service de Chirurgie, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Romestaing, P. [Centre Hospitalier Lyon-Sud, Service de Radiotherapie, 69 - Pierre Benite (France)

    2001-10-01

    The radiotherapy of the breast or the chest wall is a complex technique. The definition of the gross tumour volume and the clinical target volume depends on clinical, anatomical and histological criteria. The volumes are located by physical examination, mammography, echography and tomodensitometry. The implantation of surgical clips in the lumpectomy cavity is useful for the boost field. The planning target volume takes into consideration movements of tissues during respiration and variations in beam geometry characteristics. The organs at risk (heart, lung) must be considered systematically. Technical contrivances are necessary to modify and homogenize dose distribution. Conformational irradiation allows an individually design treatment planning. Intensity modulated radiotherapy technique is a future advantageous technique still under evaluation. (authors)

  2. Radio-guided occult lesion localisation using iodine 125 Seeds “ROLLIS” to guide surgical removal of an impalpable posterior chest wall melanoma metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer screening and surveillance programmes and the use of sophisticated imaging tools such as positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) have increased the detection of impalpable lesions requiring imaging guidance for excision. A new technique involves intra-lesional insertion of a low-activity iodine-125 (125I) seed and detection of the radioactive signal in theatre using a hand-held gamma probe to guide surgery. Whilst several studies describe using this method to guide the removal of impalpable breast lesions, only a handful of publications report its use to guide excision of lesions outside the breast. We describe a case in which radio-guided occult lesion localisation using an iodine 125 seed was used to guide excision of an impalpable posterior chest wall metastasis detected on PET-CT

  3. Impact of iterative reconstruction on the diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism (PE) on reduced-dose chest CT angiograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the impact of iterative reconstruction on the detectability of clots. Fifty-three patients were enrolled in a study comparing reduced-dose and full-dose images, available from the same dual-source data set. From each acquisition, three series of images were generated: (1) full-dose images (from both tubes), reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) (group 1; standard of reference), (2) reduced-dose images (from tube A only; 60 % dose reduction) reconstructed with FBP (group 2) and iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) (group 3). In group 1 (mean DLP: 264.6 mGy.cm), (1) PE was diagnosed in 8 patients (15 %) with 82 clots in the central (n = 5), segmental (n = 39) and subsegmental (n = 38) arteries and (2) mean level of noise was 30.56 ± 5.07. In group 2 (mean DLP: 105.8 mGy.cm), a significant increase in noise (44.56 ± 6.24; p < 0.0001) (1) hampered detection of PE in one patient and (2) altered detection of peripheral clots (12 false-negative and 2 false-positive results). In group 3, image noise was not significantly different from that in group 1 (p = 0.1525; effect size: 0.2683), with a similar detection of PE compared to group 1 (p = 1). Reconstruction of reduced-dose images (60 % dose reduction) with SAFIRE provided image quality and diagnostic value comparable to those of full-dose FBP images. (orig.)

  4. Impact of iterative reconstruction on the diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism (PE) on reduced-dose chest CT angiograms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pontana, Francois; Henry, Simon; Faivre, Jean-Baptiste; Tacelli, Nunzia; Pagniez, Julien; Remy, Jacques; Remy-Jardin, Martine [CHRU et Universite de Lille 2 Nord de France, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette (EA 2694), Lille (France); Duhamel, Alain [CHRU et Universite de Lille 2 Nord de France, Department of Biostatistics (EA 2694), Lille (France)

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the impact of iterative reconstruction on the detectability of clots. Fifty-three patients were enrolled in a study comparing reduced-dose and full-dose images, available from the same dual-source data set. From each acquisition, three series of images were generated: (1) full-dose images (from both tubes), reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) (group 1; standard of reference), (2) reduced-dose images (from tube A only; 60 % dose reduction) reconstructed with FBP (group 2) and iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) (group 3). In group 1 (mean DLP: 264.6 mGy.cm), (1) PE was diagnosed in 8 patients (15 %) with 82 clots in the central (n = 5), segmental (n = 39) and subsegmental (n = 38) arteries and (2) mean level of noise was 30.56 ± 5.07. In group 2 (mean DLP: 105.8 mGy.cm), a significant increase in noise (44.56 ± 6.24; p < 0.0001) (1) hampered detection of PE in one patient and (2) altered detection of peripheral clots (12 false-negative and 2 false-positive results). In group 3, image noise was not significantly different from that in group 1 (p = 0.1525; effect size: 0.2683), with a similar detection of PE compared to group 1 (p = 1). Reconstruction of reduced-dose images (60 % dose reduction) with SAFIRE provided image quality and diagnostic value comparable to those of full-dose FBP images. (orig.)

  5. Model-based iterative reconstruction in pediatric chest CT: assessment of image quality in a prospective study of children with cystic fibrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mieville, Frederic A.; Bochud, Francois O.; Verdun, Francis R. [Lausanne University Hospital, Institute of Radiation Physics, Lausanne (Switzerland); Berteloot, Laureline; Brunelle, Francis [Necker Children' s Hospital of Paris and University of Paris Descartes, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Paris (France); Grandjean, Albane; Ayestaran, Paul [General Electric Medical Systems Europe, Paris (France); Gudinchet, Francois; Schmidt, Sabine [Lausanne University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2013-03-15

    The potential effects of ionizing radiation are of particular concern in children. The model-based iterative reconstruction VEO trademark is a technique commercialized to improve image quality and reduce noise compared with the filtered back-projection (FBP) method. To evaluate the potential of VEO trademark on diagnostic image quality and dose reduction in pediatric chest CT examinations. Twenty children (mean 11.4 years) with cystic fibrosis underwent either a standard CT or a moderately reduced-dose CT plus a minimum-dose CT performed at 100 kVp. Reduced-dose CT examinations consisted of two consecutive acquisitions: one moderately reduced-dose CT with increased noise index (NI = 70) and one minimum-dose CT at CTDI{sub vol} 0.14 mGy. Standard CTs were reconstructed using the FBP method while low-dose CTs were reconstructed using FBP and VEO. Two senior radiologists evaluated diagnostic image quality independently by scoring anatomical structures using a four-point scale (1 = excellent, 2 = clear, 3 = diminished, 4 = non-diagnostic). Standard deviation (SD) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were also computed. At moderately reduced doses, VEO images had significantly lower SD (P < 0.001) and higher SNR (P < 0.05) in comparison to filtered back-projection images. Further improvements were obtained at minimum-dose CT. The best diagnostic image quality was obtained with VEO at minimum-dose CT for the small structures (subpleural vessels and lung fissures) (P < 0.001). The potential for dose reduction was dependent on the diagnostic task because of the modification of the image texture produced by this reconstruction. At minimum-dose CT, VEO enables important dose reduction depending on the clinical indication and makes visible certain small structures that were not perceptible with filtered back-projection. (orig.)

  6. Model-based iterative reconstruction in pediatric chest CT: assessment of image quality in a prospective study of children with cystic fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential effects of ionizing radiation are of particular concern in children. The model-based iterative reconstruction VEO trademark is a technique commercialized to improve image quality and reduce noise compared with the filtered back-projection (FBP) method. To evaluate the potential of VEO trademark on diagnostic image quality and dose reduction in pediatric chest CT examinations. Twenty children (mean 11.4 years) with cystic fibrosis underwent either a standard CT or a moderately reduced-dose CT plus a minimum-dose CT performed at 100 kVp. Reduced-dose CT examinations consisted of two consecutive acquisitions: one moderately reduced-dose CT with increased noise index (NI = 70) and one minimum-dose CT at CTDIvol 0.14 mGy. Standard CTs were reconstructed using the FBP method while low-dose CTs were reconstructed using FBP and VEO. Two senior radiologists evaluated diagnostic image quality independently by scoring anatomical structures using a four-point scale (1 = excellent, 2 = clear, 3 = diminished, 4 = non-diagnostic). Standard deviation (SD) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were also computed. At moderately reduced doses, VEO images had significantly lower SD (P < 0.001) and higher SNR (P < 0.05) in comparison to filtered back-projection images. Further improvements were obtained at minimum-dose CT. The best diagnostic image quality was obtained with VEO at minimum-dose CT for the small structures (subpleural vessels and lung fissures) (P < 0.001). The potential for dose reduction was dependent on the diagnostic task because of the modification of the image texture produced by this reconstruction. At minimum-dose CT, VEO enables important dose reduction depending on the clinical indication and makes visible certain small structures that were not perceptible with filtered back-projection. (orig.)

  7. Electronic modulations in a single wall carbon nanotube induced by the Au(111) surface reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structural and electronic structure of single wall carbon nanotubes adsorbed on Au(111) has been investigated by low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. The nanotubes were dry deposited in situ in ultrahigh vacuum onto a perfectly clean substrate. In some cases, the native herringbone reconstruction of the Au(111) surface interacted directly with adsorbed nanotubes and produced long-range periodic oscillations in their local density of states, corresponding to charge transfer modulations along the tube axis. This effect, however, was observed not systematically for all tubes and only for semiconducting tubes

  8. Third-generation dual-source 70-kVp chest CT angiography with advanced iterative reconstruction in young children: image quality and radiation dose reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rompel, Oliver; Janka, Rolf; Lell, Michael M.; Uder, Michael; Hammon, Matthias [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiology, Erlangen (Germany); Gloeckler, Martin; Dittrich, Sven [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Erlangen (Germany); Cesnjevar, Robert [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Pediatric Cardiac Surgery, Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-04-15

    Many technical updates have been made in multi-detector CT. To evaluate image quality and radiation dose of high-pitch second- and third-generation dual-source chest CT angiography and to assess the effects of different levels of advanced modeled iterative reconstruction (ADMIRE) in newborns and children. Chest CT angiography (70 kVp) was performed in 42 children (age 158 ± 267 days, range 1-1,194 days). We evaluated subjective and objective image quality, and radiation dose with filtered back projection (FBP) and different strength levels of ADMIRE. For comparison were 42 matched controls examined with a second-generation 128-slice dual-source CT-scanner (80 kVp). ADMIRE demonstrated improved objective and subjective image quality (P <.01). Mean signal/noise, contrast/noise and subjective image quality were 11.9, 10.0 and 1.9, respectively, for the 80 kVp mode and 11.2, 10.0 and 1.9 for the 70 kVp mode. With ADMIRE, the corresponding values for the 70 kVp mode were 13.7, 12.1 and 1.4 at strength level 2 and 17.6, 15.6 and 1.2 at strength level 4. Mean CTDI{sub vol}, DLP and effective dose were significantly lower with the 70-kVp mode (0.31 mGy, 5.33 mGy*cm, 0.36 mSv) compared to the 80-kVp mode (0.46 mGy, 9.17 mGy*cm, 0.62 mSv; P <.01). The third-generation dual-source CT at 70 kVp provided good objective and subjective image quality at lower radiation exposure. ADMIRE improved objective and subjective image quality. (orig.)

  9. Third-generation dual-source 70-kVp chest CT angiography with advanced iterative reconstruction in young children: image quality and radiation dose reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many technical updates have been made in multi-detector CT. To evaluate image quality and radiation dose of high-pitch second- and third-generation dual-source chest CT angiography and to assess the effects of different levels of advanced modeled iterative reconstruction (ADMIRE) in newborns and children. Chest CT angiography (70 kVp) was performed in 42 children (age 158 ± 267 days, range 1-1,194 days). We evaluated subjective and objective image quality, and radiation dose with filtered back projection (FBP) and different strength levels of ADMIRE. For comparison were 42 matched controls examined with a second-generation 128-slice dual-source CT-scanner (80 kVp). ADMIRE demonstrated improved objective and subjective image quality (P <.01). Mean signal/noise, contrast/noise and subjective image quality were 11.9, 10.0 and 1.9, respectively, for the 80 kVp mode and 11.2, 10.0 and 1.9 for the 70 kVp mode. With ADMIRE, the corresponding values for the 70 kVp mode were 13.7, 12.1 and 1.4 at strength level 2 and 17.6, 15.6 and 1.2 at strength level 4. Mean CTDIvol, DLP and effective dose were significantly lower with the 70-kVp mode (0.31 mGy, 5.33 mGy*cm, 0.36 mSv) compared to the 80-kVp mode (0.46 mGy, 9.17 mGy*cm, 0.62 mSv; P <.01). The third-generation dual-source CT at 70 kVp provided good objective and subjective image quality at lower radiation exposure. ADMIRE improved objective and subjective image quality. (orig.)

  10. Pediatric chest HRCT using the iDose4 Hybrid Iterative Reconstruction Algorithm: Which iDose level to choose?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smarda, M.; Alexopoulou, E.; Mazioti, A.; Kordolaimi, S.; Ploussi, A.; Priftis, K.; Efstathopoulos, E.

    2015-09-01

    Purpose of the study is to determine the appropriate iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithm level that combines image quality and diagnostic confidence, for pediatric patients undergoing high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). During the last 2 years, a total number of 20 children up to 10 years old with a clinical presentation of chronic bronchitis underwent HRCT in our department's 64-detector row CT scanner using the iDose IR algorithm, with almost similar image settings (80kVp, 40-50 mAs). CT images were reconstructed with all iDose levels (level 1 to 7) as well as with filtered-back projection (FBP) algorithm. Subjective image quality was evaluated by 2 experienced radiologists in terms of image noise, sharpness, contrast and diagnostic acceptability using a 5-point scale (1=excellent image, 5=non-acceptable image). Artifacts existance was also pointed out. All mean scores from both radiologists corresponded to satisfactory image quality (score ≤3), even with the FBP algorithm use. Almost excellent (score <2) overall image quality was achieved with iDose levels 5 to 7, but oversmoothing artifacts appearing with iDose levels 6 and 7 affected the diagnostic confidence. In conclusion, the use of iDose level 5 enables almost excellent image quality without considerable artifacts affecting the diagnosis. Further evaluation is needed in order to draw more precise conclusions.

  11. Surgical treatment with sternal and rib resection for patients with post-irradiation ulcer of the chest wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postoperative radiotherapy is widely performed in the treatment of patients with lymph node metastases from carcinoma of the breast, however, depending on the dose, cases are seen in which radiation ulcers develop and require surgical management. In the present paper we report a patient in whom postoperative radiotherapy was performed because parasternal lymph node metastasis was discovered at the time of surgery and who 15 months later experienced thoracic wall recurrence. Since metastasis to the contralateral lung was observed at that time, reoperation was not attempted, and when radiotherapy was again administered, an extensive radiation ulcer developed in association with sternal and costal necrosis. The skin and subcutaneous tissue together with the sternum and ribs were widely resected followed by the thoracoplasty using a latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap. Since there was no postoperative infection, the skin flap was accepted well, and the outcome was satisfactory from the standpoint of quality of life, we have reported the case. (author)

  12. Dystrophic calcinosis with both a huge calcified mass in the cervical spine and calcification in the chest wall in a patient with rheumatoid overlap syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Tadashi; Hirakawa, Kei; Takaoka, Hirokazu; Iyama, Ken-Ichi

    2016-05-01

    Dystrophic calcinosis in soft tissue occurs in damaged or devitalized tissues in the presence of normal calcium and phosphorous metabolism. It is often noted in subcutaneous tissues in patients with collagen vascular diseases and may involve a relatively localized area or be widespread. A 74-year-old Japanese woman with an overlap of rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren's syndrome, and systemic sclerosis developed a huge tumor-like mass at the atlanto-axial vertebral joint region that caused severe cervical pain and difficulty in activities of daily living. She also had subcutaneous dystrophic calcification in the soft tissue of the chest wall. Calcinosis associated with systemic sclerosis is a well-recognized phenomenon, but a destructive paraspinal tumor in the cervical spine associated with overlap syndrome is extremely unique. Because calcinosis in spinal locations can be complicated by neurological involvement, patients with progressive symptoms may require surgical intervention. Surgical resection and biological therapy improved this patient's life and activities of daily living. Calcinosis is common in the conditions reviewed here, and different agents have been used for treatment. However, calcinosis management is poorly organized and lacks an accepted classification, systematic studies, and clinical therapeutic trials. The association of calcinosis and collagen vascular diseases is clinically and etiologically important. Although a combination of calcinosis and rheumatoid overlap syndrome is rare, various collagen vascular diseases may occur simultaneously. A perceptive diagnostic approach toward these diseases is critical, and early diagnosis and treatment are needed to prevent dystrophic calcinosis. PMID:24894107

  13. Extravascular chest wall technetium 99m diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid: Implications for the measurement of renal function during renography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement of individual kidney glomerular filtration rate (IKGFR) from the gamma-camera technetium 99m diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid (99mTc-DTPA) renogram requires a continuous measurement of arterial activity. This is usually based on a region of interest (ROI) placed over the cardiac blood pool on the posterior view, with the assumption of negligible contamination from activity in the extravascular space of the chest wall. By injecting a small dose of technetium 99m human serum albumin (HSA) before the 99mTc-DTPA in 12 patients undergoing routine renography, the contribution of extravascular activity to the total signal recorded over the cardiac blood pool was calculated to be 11.0% (SE 2.1%) 1.5 min after DTPA injection, rising to 35.1% (SE 2.5%) at 15 min. Subtraction of the time-activity curve recorded from a ROI of the same size over the right lung generated a 'pure' blood signal as shown by almost identical HSA/DTPA signal ratios recorded in blood samples taken 5 min after HSA and 15 min after DTPA and from the gamma-camera at the corresponding times. The effect of using a cardiac blood pool time-activity curve uncorrected for extravascular activity was to overestimate IKGFR by an average factor of 1.17 (SE 0.03). (orig.)

  14. Contrast enhanced chest-MDCT in oncologic patients. Prospective evaluation of the prevalence of incidental pulmonary embolism and added value of thin reconstructions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tresoldi, Silvia; Flor, Nicola [Azienda Ospedaliera San Paolo, Dipartimento di Radiologia Diagnostica ed Interventistica, Milano (Italy); Luciani, Andrea [Azienda Ospedaliera San Paolo, Oncologia, Dipartimento di Medicina, Milano (Italy); Lombardi, Maria Antonietta; Colombo, Bernardo [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Facolta di Medicina e Chirurgia, Milano (Italy); Cornalba, Gianpaolo [Azienda Ospedaliera San Paolo, Dipartimento di Radiologia Diagnostica ed Interventistica, Milano (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Scienze della Salute, Milano (Italy)

    2015-11-15

    To prospectively assess prevalence/characteristics of clinically unsuspected pulmonary embolism (PE) in cancer patients undergoing follow-up chest MDCT and investigate MDCT protocol. We evaluated 1013 oncologic patients. MDCT images at 5 and 1.25 mm thickness were independently evaluated. Pulmonary artery opacification degree was assessed. Presence, level, and site of PE were reported. Type of malignancy and metastases were reported for PE-positive patients. After excluding 1.4 % (14/1013) of examinations due to inadequate vessel opacification, 999 patients (572 male; mean age:68 ± 12 years; range:26-93 years) entered the study. Prevalence of PE was 5 %. There was significant improvement in the sensitivity for both readers in the evaluation of 1.25 mm compared to 5 mm images (46-50 % to 82-92 %). 30 % (15/51) PE were not described by the radiologist in the prospectively issued report; 53 % (27/51) of PE were segmental, 72.5 % (37/51) unilateral. The right lower lobe was the most involved (59 %). 27 % patients had colon cancer, 18 % lung cancer. Among PE-positive patients (25 male; mean age 70 ± 10 years; range:44-87 years), 25 % (13/51) had lung cancer, 15 % (8/51) colon cancer. Thin reconstructions are essential for PE diagnosis, regardless of reader experience. Regarding oncologic patients, incidental PE diagnosis influences anticoagulation therapy. (orig.)

  15. Patient radiation exposure and image quality evaluation with the use of iDose4 iterative reconstruction algorithm in chest-abdomen-pelvis CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of iDose4 iterative reconstruction algorithm on radiation dose and imaging quality at chest-abdomen-pelvis (CAP) CT examinations. Seventeen patients were considered; all patients had a previous CT scan with the standard filter back-projection (FBP) protocol and a follow-up scan with the iDose4 protocol at the same scanner. Image noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were objectively calculated. Two radiologists evaluated noise, sharpness, contrast, diagnostic confidence and artefacts. Radiation exposure quantities were calculated. iDose4 resulted in 46 % dose reduction combined with significantly lower noise and higher SNR and CNR compared with FBP. iDose4 images had significantly lower subjective image noise and enhanced sharpness and contrast. Diagnostic confidence was high and image artefacts were minor for both algorithms. iDose4 provides great potential for reducing patient radiation burden while improving imaging quality in CAP CT examinations. (authors)

  16. Contrast enhanced chest-MDCT in oncologic patients. Prospective evaluation of the prevalence of incidental pulmonary embolism and added value of thin reconstructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To prospectively assess prevalence/characteristics of clinically unsuspected pulmonary embolism (PE) in cancer patients undergoing follow-up chest MDCT and investigate MDCT protocol. We evaluated 1013 oncologic patients. MDCT images at 5 and 1.25 mm thickness were independently evaluated. Pulmonary artery opacification degree was assessed. Presence, level, and site of PE were reported. Type of malignancy and metastases were reported for PE-positive patients. After excluding 1.4 % (14/1013) of examinations due to inadequate vessel opacification, 999 patients (572 male; mean age:68 ± 12 years; range:26-93 years) entered the study. Prevalence of PE was 5 %. There was significant improvement in the sensitivity for both readers in the evaluation of 1.25 mm compared to 5 mm images (46-50 % to 82-92 %). 30 % (15/51) PE were not described by the radiologist in the prospectively issued report; 53 % (27/51) of PE were segmental, 72.5 % (37/51) unilateral. The right lower lobe was the most involved (59 %). 27 % patients had colon cancer, 18 % lung cancer. Among PE-positive patients (25 male; mean age 70 ± 10 years; range:44-87 years), 25 % (13/51) had lung cancer, 15 % (8/51) colon cancer. Thin reconstructions are essential for PE diagnosis, regardless of reader experience. Regarding oncologic patients, incidental PE diagnosis influences anticoagulation therapy. (orig.)

  17. Evaluation of Three Cases Using a Novel Titanium Mesh System-Skull-Fit with Orbital Wall (Skull-Fit WOW)-For Cranial Base Reconstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Noriko; Nakajima, Hideo; Tamada, Ikkei; Sakamoto, Yoshiaki; Ohira, Takayuki; Yoshida, Kazunari; Kawase, Takeshi; Kishi, Kazuo

    2011-09-01

    Cranial base reconstructions associated with tumor resections around the orbital wall often require that both the upper and lateral orbital walls be reconstructed during a single procedure. Previously, we used titanium mesh plates that were preoperatively fabricated based on three-dimensional models. Although these plates are precise and do not increase the probability of infection, we still had to use autologous bones to reconstruct the orbital walls. Recently, we developed a new titanium mesh plate-called Skull-Fit(®)-with orbital wall (Skull-Fit WOW(®)), enabling us to reconstruct the cranial base and orbital walls without bone grafts. Here, we report on three reconstruction cases in which the novel titanium mesh-orbital wall system was used. In all three cases, the customized titanium mesh system performed satisfactorily with little, if any, complications. PMID:22451827

  18. Chest drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Chris

    2014-07-15

    As an intensive care nurse with experience of caring for critically ill patients in the UK and on deployed operations overseas, I found the CPD article useful in reviewing the pathophysiology of a pneumothorax, use of intrapleural chest drains, observations that should be recorded, and nursing care and management of a patient with an intrapleural chest drain. Reflecting on the time out activities in the CPD article was valuable. PMID:25005418

  19. Dosimetric comparison for volumetric modulated arc therapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy on the left-sided chest wall and internal mammary nodes irradiation in treating post-mastectomy breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qian; Yu, Xiao Li; Hu, Wei Gang; Chen, Jia Yi; Wang, Jia Zhou; Ye, Jin Song; Guo, Xiao Mao

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to evaluate the dosimetric benefit of applying volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) on the post-mastectomy left-sided breast cancer patients, with the involvement of internal mammary nodes (IMN). Patients and methods The prescription dose was 50 Gy delivered in 25 fractions, and the clinical target volume included the left chest wall (CW) and IMN. VMAT plans were created and compared with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans on Pinnacle treatmen...

  20. Reversibility of stress-echo induced ST-segment depression by long-term oral n-3 PUFA supplementation in subjects with chest pain syndrome, normal wall motion at stress-echo and normal coronary angiogram

    OpenAIRE

    Ziacchi Vigilio; Gaibazzi Nicola

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background Normal coronary arteries may coexist with abnormal coronary and systemic endothelial function in patients with chest pain. Recent work by the renowned Pisa echo-group elegantly suggests that isolated ST-segment depression during stress-echo (SE) can be used as a marker of coronary endothelial dysfunction, in the absence of stress-inducible wall motion abnormalities and in the absence of angiographically-significant coronary artery disease (CAD). The long chain n-3 polyunsa...

  1. SU-E-T-583: Operated Left Breast and Chest Wall Radiotherapy: A Dosimetric Comparison Between 3DCRT, IMRT and VMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, B [AMRI Cancer Centre and GLA university, Mathura, Kolkata, West bengal (India); Roy, S [AMRI Cancer Centre, Kolkata, Kolkata, West bengal (India); Munshi, A [Fortis Memorial Research Institute, Gurgon, haryana (India); Pradhan, A [GLA University, Mathura, Uttar Pradesh (India)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the comparative dosimetric efficacy between field and field 3DCRT(FnF), multiple field Intensity modulated radiotherapy (SnS IMRT) and, partial arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in case of post operative left side breast and chest wall irradiation. Methods: CT study set of fifteen post-operative left breast and chest wall patient was tested for a treatment plan of 50Gy in 25 fraction using partial arc VMAT, SnSIMRT and tangential beam 3DCRT . 3DCRT FnF gantry angle was ranging for left medial tangential 290±17{sup 0} and Lt lateral tangential l14°±12{sup 0}. For IMRT four fixed beam at gantry angle G130{sup 0} G110{sup 0} G300{sup 0} and G330{sup 0} was used, in case of insufficient dose another beam G150{sup 0} was added. In case of partial arc VMAT, lateral tangential arc G130{sup 0}-G100{sup 0} and medial tangential arc G280{sup 0}-G310{sup 0}. Inverse optimization was opted to cover at least 95%PTV by 95% prescription dose (RxD) and a strong weightage on reduction of heart and lung dose. PTV coverage was evaluated for it’s clinically acceptability depending on the tumor spatial location and its quadrant. Out of the three plans, any one was used for the actual patient treatment. Results: Dosimetric analysis done for breast PTV, left lung, heart and the opposite breast. PTV mean dose and maximum dose was 5129.8±214.8cGy, 4749.0±329.7cGy, 5024.6±73.4cGy and 5855.2±510.7cGy, 5340.7±146.1cGy, 5347.2±196.8cGy for FnF, VMAT and IMRT respectively. Ipsilateral lung volume receiving 20Gy and 5Gy was 23.6±9.5cGy and 32.7±10.3cGy for FnF, 18.6±8.7cGy and 38.8±15.2cGy for VMAT and 25.7±9.6cGy and 50.7±8.4cGy for IMRT respectively. Heart mean and 2cc dose was 867.9±456.7cGy and 5038.5±184.3cGy for FnF, 532.6±263cGy and 3632.1±990.6 for VMAT, 711±229.9cGy and 4421±463.7cGy for IMRT respectively. VMAT shows minimum contralateral breast dose 168±113.8cGy. Conclusion: VMAT shows a better tumor conformity, minimum heart

  2. SPECT Analysis of Cardiac Perfusion Changes After Whole-Breast/Chest Wall Radiation Therapy With or Without Active Breathing Coordinator: Results of a Randomized Phase 3 Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zellars, Richard, E-mail: zellari@jhmi.edu [Johns Hopkins Medical Institution, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Bravo, Paco E. [University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington (United States); Tryggestad, Erik [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Hopfer, Kari [Hahnemann University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Myers, Lee; Tahari, Abdel; Asrari, Fariba; Ziessman, Harvey [Johns Hopkins Medical Institution, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth [Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Cardiac muscle perfusion, as determined by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), decreases after breast and/or chest wall (BCW) irradiation. The active breathing coordinator (ABC) enables radiation delivery when the BCW is farther from the heart, thereby decreasing cardiac exposure. We hypothesized that ABC would prevent radiation-induced cardiac toxicity and conducted a randomized controlled trial evaluating myocardial perfusion changes after radiation for left-sided breast cancer with or without ABC. Methods and Materials: Stages I to III left breast cancer patients requiring adjuvant radiation therapy (XRT) were randomized to ABC or No-ABC. Myocardial perfusion was evaluated by SPECT scans (before and 6 months after BCW radiation) using 2 methods: (1) fully automated quantitative polar mapping; and (2) semiquantitative visual assessment. The left ventricle was divided into 20 segments for the polar map and 17 segments for the visual method. Segments were grouped by anatomical rings (apical, mid, basal) or by coronary artery distribution. For the visual method, 2 nuclear medicine physicians, blinded to treatment groups, scored each segment's perfusion. Scores were analyzed with nonparametric tests and linear regression. Results: Between 2006 and 2010, 57 patients were enrolled and 43 were available for analysis. The cohorts were well matched. The apical and left anterior descending coronary artery segments had significant decreases in perfusion on SPECT scans in both ABC and No-ABC cohorts. In unadjusted and adjusted analyses, controlling for pretreatment perfusion score, age, and chemotherapy, ABC was not significantly associated with prevention of perfusion deficits. Conclusions: In this randomized controlled trial, ABC does not appear to prevent radiation-induced cardiac perfusion deficits.

  3. SPECT Analysis of Cardiac Perfusion Changes After Whole-Breast/Chest Wall Radiation Therapy With or Without Active Breathing Coordinator: Results of a Randomized Phase 3 Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Cardiac muscle perfusion, as determined by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), decreases after breast and/or chest wall (BCW) irradiation. The active breathing coordinator (ABC) enables radiation delivery when the BCW is farther from the heart, thereby decreasing cardiac exposure. We hypothesized that ABC would prevent radiation-induced cardiac toxicity and conducted a randomized controlled trial evaluating myocardial perfusion changes after radiation for left-sided breast cancer with or without ABC. Methods and Materials: Stages I to III left breast cancer patients requiring adjuvant radiation therapy (XRT) were randomized to ABC or No-ABC. Myocardial perfusion was evaluated by SPECT scans (before and 6 months after BCW radiation) using 2 methods: (1) fully automated quantitative polar mapping; and (2) semiquantitative visual assessment. The left ventricle was divided into 20 segments for the polar map and 17 segments for the visual method. Segments were grouped by anatomical rings (apical, mid, basal) or by coronary artery distribution. For the visual method, 2 nuclear medicine physicians, blinded to treatment groups, scored each segment's perfusion. Scores were analyzed with nonparametric tests and linear regression. Results: Between 2006 and 2010, 57 patients were enrolled and 43 were available for analysis. The cohorts were well matched. The apical and left anterior descending coronary artery segments had significant decreases in perfusion on SPECT scans in both ABC and No-ABC cohorts. In unadjusted and adjusted analyses, controlling for pretreatment perfusion score, age, and chemotherapy, ABC was not significantly associated with prevention of perfusion deficits. Conclusions: In this randomized controlled trial, ABC does not appear to prevent radiation-induced cardiac perfusion deficits

  4. Mechanical properties of non-reconstructed defective single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarpa, F [Advanced Composites Centre for Innovation and Science, University of Bristol, BS8 1TR Bristol (United Kingdom); Adhikari, S; Wang, C Y, E-mail: f.scarpa@bris.ac.u, E-mail: scarpa.fabrizio@gmail.co [School of Engineering, Swansea University, Swansea (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-21

    This paper describes the equivalent homogeneous uniaxial mechanical properties of defective single-wall carbon nanotubes. In particular, non-reconstructed defects that can be produced by ion or electronic irradiation have been considered. A discrete nonlinear finite-element approach based on the mechanical properties of individual carbon-carbon (C-C) bonds has been used. The individual C-C bonds in turn were simulated as beam structural elements. Extensive Monte Carlo based numerical simulation has been reported in the paper. The results show that the homogeneous elastic properties of the defective nanotubes can be qualitatively and quantitatively different from the pristine configurations. The defective nanotubes show a slight reduction in axial stiffness (Young's modulus), but large variations of Poisson's ratio outside the elastic bounds for isotropic materials, depending on the locations of the vacancies. The large fluctuations of Poisson's ratio can lead to extreme positive transversal contractions or to auxetic behaviour when the nanotubes are subjected to tensile loading. (fast track communication)

  5. Numerical study of the coupling of two identification methods - thermal and electromagnetic - for the reconstruction of inclusions in thick walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Touz, Nicolas; Dumoulin, Jean; Soldovieri, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    In this numerical study we present an approach allowing introducing a priori information in an identification method of internal thermal properties field for a thick wall using infrared thermography measurements. This method is based on a coupling with an electromagnetic reconstructing method which data are obtained from measurements of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) ([1], [2]). This new method aims at improving the accuracy of reconstructions performed by using only the thermal reconstruction method under quasi-periodic natural solicitation ([3], [4]). Indeed, these thermal reconstructions, without a priori information, have the disadvantage of being performed on the entire studied wall. Through the intake of information from GPR, it becomes possible to focus on the internal zones that may contain defects. These areas are obtained by defining subdomains around remarkable points identified with the GPR reconstruction and considered as belonging to a discontinuity. For thermal reconstruction without providing a priori information, we need to minimize a functional equal to a quadratic residue issued from the difference between the measurements and the results of the direct model. By defining search fields around these potential defects, and thus by forcing the thermal parameters further thereof, we provide information to the data to reconstruct. The minimization of the functional is then modified through the contribution of these constraints. We do not seek only to minimize a residue, but to minimize the overall residue and constraints, what changes the direction followed by the optimization algorithm in the space of thermal parameters to reconstruct. Providing a priori information may then allow to obtain reconstruction with higher residues but whose thermal parameters are better estimated, whether for locating potential defects or for the reconstructed values of these parameters. In particular, it is the case for air defects or more generally for defects having a

  6. Anteroposterior chest radiograph vs. chest CT scan in early detection of pneumothorax in trauma patients

    OpenAIRE

    Omar, Hesham R.; Mangar, Devanand; Khetarpal, Suneel; Shapiro, David H; Kolla, Jaya; Rashad, Rania; Helal, Engy; Camporesi, Enrico M

    2011-01-01

    Pneumothorax is a common complication following blunt chest wall trauma. In these patients, because of the restrictions regarding immobilization of the cervical spine, Anteroposterior (AP) chest radiograph is usually the most feasible initial study which is not as sensitive as the erect chest X-ray or CT chest for detection of a pneumothorax. We will present 3 case reports which serve for better understanding of the entity of occult pneumothorax. The first case is an example of a true occult ...

  7. A pilot study of the impact of high-frequency chest wall oscillation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients with mucus hypersecretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakravorty I

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Indranil Chakravorty1, Kamaljit Chahal2, Gillian Austin21St George's Hospital, London, 2East and North Hertfordshire NHS Trust, Lister Hospital and Primary Care Trust, Stevenage, Hertfordshire, UKIntroduction: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients with mucus hypersecretion tend to demonstrate increased frequency of infective exacerbations and a steeper slope of decline in lung function. Enhanced mucociliary clearance with high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO devices previously used in cystic fibrosis and bronchiectasis patients may offer the opportunity for community-based, self-managed therapy to improve quality of life and lung function.Study design and methods: A randomized controlled crossover pilot study of HFCWO compared with conventional treatment was conducted in 22 patients with moderate to severe COPD and mucus hypersecretion. Patients spent 4 weeks using an HFCWO (SmartVest® device and 4 weeks in a conventional phase with a 2-week washout. Eleven patients started with HFCWO and changed to conventional treatment, whereas the other eleven patients started conventional treatment and crossed over to HFCWO.Results: The patients were elderly with a mean age of 71 (standard deviation [SD] 10 years and were at the upper end of the normal range of body mass index (25 [SD 4.2] kg/m2. The majority of patients had moderate to severe COPD with a mean percentage predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second of 41 (SD 15.6 and percentage predicted forced vital capacity of 73 (SD 17.7. Baseline sputum production was negatively correlated to lung function and positively to St George's Respiratory Questionnaire. Symptom scores and St George's Respiratory Questionnaire symptom dimension improved significantly (-8, P < 0.05. Sputum production showed a declining trend in the HFCWO phase, although not reaching statistical significance. The HFCWO device was well tolerated with good reported compliance.Conclusion: This pilot study

  8. Clinical effect of a mixed solution of sodium hyaluronate and sodium carboxymethylcellulose during the transconjunctival approach for orbital wall reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Byung Wan; Lee, Hyo Seok; Oh, Han Jin; Yoon, Kyung Chul

    2012-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the anti-adhesive effect of a mixed solution of sodium hyaluronate and sodium carboxymethylcellulose (HACMC, Guardix-sol®) during the transconjunctival approach to orbital wall reconstruction. Eighty-seven patients who underwent orbital wall reconstruction by the transconjunctival approach were enrolled in this prospective study. We applied HACMC between the orbicularis oculi muscle and the orbital septum after surgery in 47 patients and did not use it in 40 patients. Lower lid retraction and marginal reflex distance 2 (MRD(2)) were measured to analyze the degree of postoperative adhesion at 1 week and 1, 3, and 6 months. The degree of MRD(2) showed clinically significant differences at postoperative 1 week and 1 month between the HACMC and control groups (p<0.05). Lower lid ectropion developed in two patients (5.0%) in the control group but did not occur in the HACMC group. In orbital wall reconstruction by the transconjunctival approach, the HACMC mixture solution is effective for preventing adhesion and lower lid ectropion during the early postoperative period. PMID:22977754

  9. Evaluation of reconstructed orbital wall fractures: high-resolution MRI using a microscopy surface coil versus 16-slice MSCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiener, E.; Settles, M.; Rummeny, E. [Institut fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Kolk, A.; Neff, A. [Klinik fuer Mund-Kiefer-Gesichtschirurgie, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany)

    2005-06-01

    We evaluated high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MR) using a 47-mm microscopy surface coil in comparison to 16-slice multislice CT (MSCT) for postsurgical imaging of reconstructed orbital walls. Twenty-five patients with 27 internal orbital wall fractures were imaged prospectively after reconstruction with resorbable polydioxanone sulfate (PDS) sheets. Coronal high-quality T1- and T2-weighted MR images were obtained with an in-plane resolution of 350 {mu}m within a measure time of 6-7 min for each sequence. Nineteen symptomatic patients underwent MSCT as the current gold standard. In MRI the PDS foil appears in T1- and T2-weighted images as a thin, low-signal-intensity linear structure. In CT it appears hyperdense in comparison to soft tissue and slightly hypodense in comparison to cortical bone. PDS foils could be clearly depicted in 20 out of 25 patients (80%) with MRI and in 13 out of 19 patients (68%) with MSCT. An inadequate foil position or size could be diagnosed in eight patients with MRI and in only three patients with MSCT. In ten symptomatic patients secondary surgery could be avoided because of regular MRI findings except mild hematoma and muscle edema. High-resolution MRI of the orbit using a 47-mm microscopy coil is a promising method to accurately demonstrate normal and pathologic conditions in symptomatic patients after orbital wall reconstruction with PDS foils. (orig.)

  10. 经胸骨前径路三孔法内镜甲状腺切除术的体会%Three-port endoscopic thyroidectomy via anterior chest wall approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张勇; 吴永红

    2012-01-01

    目的:探讨经胸骨前径路三孔法内镜甲状腺切除术的临床疗效及应用价值.方法:回顾分析为17例患者经胸骨前径路行三孔法内镜甲状腺切除术的临床资料.结果:17例手术均获成功,无一例中转开放手术,未损伤喉上神经、喉返神经及甲状旁腺.手术时间100~ 150 min,平均134 min;术中出血量30 ~50ml,平均42ml.患者对术后美容效果均非常满意.结论:选择合适的手术病例,经胸骨前径路行三孔法内镜甲状腺切除术是安全可行的,疗效确切,具有很好的美容效果.%Objective; To discuss the clinical efficacy and application value of three-port endoscopic thyroidectomy through anterior chest wall. Methods;The clinical data of 17 patients who underwent three-port endoscopic thyroidectoroy through anterior chest wall were analyzed retrospectively. Results;Seventeen operations were all successful,without conversions to open procedures. No injuries of the superior laryngeal nerve, recurrent laryngeal nerve, or parathyroid occurred. The average operating time was 134 min(100-150 min) .average blood loss was 42 ml(30-50 ml). All the patients were very satisfied with the cosmetic results. Conclusions;Three-port endoscopic thyroidectomy through anterior chest wall is safe and feasible for selected appropriate cases, with the advantages of excellent cosmetic results and definite therapeutic effect.

  11. Reconstruction of defects of maxillary sinus wall after removal of a huge odontogenic lesion using prebended 3D titanium-mesh and CAD/CAM technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    A 63 year-old male with a huge odontogenic lesion of sinus maxillaris was treated with computer-assisted surgery. After resection of the odontogenic lesion, the sinus wall was reconstructed with a prebended 3D titanium-mesh using CAD/CAM technique. This work provides a new treatment device for maxillary reconstruction via rapid prototyping procedures. PMID:22070833

  12. Reconstruction of defects of maxillary sinus wall after removal of a huge odontogenic lesion using prebended 3D titanium-mesh and CAD/CAM technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoetzer Marcus

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A 63 year-old male with a huge odontogenic lesion of sinus maxillaris was treated with computer-assisted surgery. After resection of the odontogenic lesion, the sinus wall was reconstructed with a prebended 3D titanium-mesh using CAD/CAM technique. This work provides a new treatment device for maxillary reconstruction via rapid prototyping procedures.

  13. [Large abdominal wall reconstruction by free flap after recurrence of a dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Fourn, B; Lejeune, F; Sartre, J Y; Loirat, Y; Pannier, M

    1996-12-01

    Based on a case of recurrence of a dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans of the abdominal wall, the authors discuss the need for initial wide resection of this type of skin tumour and the possibilities of repair of extensive full thickness defects of the abdominal wall by means of a latissimus dorsi myocutaneous free flap. PMID:9768175

  14. Diastolic timed Vibro-Percussion at 50 Hz delivered across a chest wall sized meat barrier enhances clot dissolution and remotely administered Streptokinase effectiveness in an in-vitro model of acute coronary thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffmann Andrew

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low Frequency Vibro-Percussion (LFVP assists clearance of thrombi in catheter systems and when applied to the heart and timed to diastole is known to enhance coronary flow. However LFVP on a clotted coronary like vessel given engagement over a chest wall sized barrier (to resemble non-invasive heart attack therapy requires study. Methods One hour old clots (n=16 were dispensed within a flexible segment of Soft-Flo catheter (4 mm lumen, weighted, interfaced with Heparinized Saline (HS, secured atop a curved dampening base, and photographed. A ~4 cm meat slab was placed over the segment and randomized to receive intermittent LFVP (engaged, - disengaged at 1 second intervals, or no LFVP for 20 minutes. HS was pulsed (~120/80 mmHg, with the diastolic phase coordinated to match LFVP delivery. The segment was then re-photographed and aspirated of fluid to determine post clot weight. The trial was then repeated with 0.5 mls of Streptokinase (15,000 IU/100 microlitre delivered ~ 2 cm upstream from the clot. Results LFVP - HS only samples (vs. controls showed; a development of clot length fluid channels absent in the control group (p Conclusion Diastolic timed LFVP (50 Hz engaged across a chest wall sized barrier enhances clot disruptive effects to an underlying coronary like system.

  15. Chest pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... back. A tear in the wall of the aorta, the large blood vessel that takes blood from ... You have high cholesterol, high blood pressure, or diabetes You already have heart disease Call your doctor ...

  16. Evaluation of a Porcine Dermal Collagen (Permacol Implant for Abdominal Wall Reconstruction in a Pediatric Multitrauma Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idit Melnik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of a contaminated surgical field in abdominal wall defects caused by trauma presents a challenge for surgeons. Both primary suture and synthetic meshes are strongly discouraged as surgical treatments in such cases. We describe the use of a porcine dermal collagen (Permacol implant in an eight-year-old patient with multiple injuries. Three months after discharge, the child remains well with good cosmetic results. He is free of pain and has returned to full activity levels with complete wound closure and without any evidence of residual hernia. In conclusion, our experience indicates that the use of Permacol can be considered an efficient technique for reconstructing an infected abdominal wall defect of a pediatric multitrauma patient.

  17. Potential of ultrasound in the pediatric chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultrasound (US) of chest, even with inherent limitations of the US beam and air, has been useful in many pediatric chest conditions. It has extended its role and is now widely used by many subspecialists in medicine. This review article will cover techniques, indications, and applications of chest US in neonates, infants and children, including also different common as well as some rare and modern aspects and applications, such as pleural effusion, pneumothorax, pulmonary lesions, mediastinum, diaphragm, and chest wall. Other related imaging modalities are also briefly discussed

  18. Potential of ultrasound in the pediatric chest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trinavarat, Panruethai, E-mail: pantrinavarat@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Rama IV Road, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Riccabona, Michael, E-mail: michael.riccabona@klinikum-graz.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Pediatric Radiology, University Hospital Graz (Austria)

    2014-09-15

    Ultrasound (US) of chest, even with inherent limitations of the US beam and air, has been useful in many pediatric chest conditions. It has extended its role and is now widely used by many subspecialists in medicine. This review article will cover techniques, indications, and applications of chest US in neonates, infants and children, including also different common as well as some rare and modern aspects and applications, such as pleural effusion, pneumothorax, pulmonary lesions, mediastinum, diaphragm, and chest wall. Other related imaging modalities are also briefly discussed.

  19. Feasible Dose Reduction in Routine Chest Computed Tomography Maintaining Constant Image Quality Using the Last Three Scanner Generations: From Filtered Back Projection to Sinogram-affirmed Iterative Reconstruction and Impact of the Novel Fully Integrated Detector Design Minimizing Electronic Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Ebner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective:The aim of the present study was to evaluate a dose reduction in contrast-enhanced chest computed tomography (CT by comparing the three latest generations of Siemens CT scanners used in clinical practice. We analyzed the amount of radiation used with filtered back projection (FBP and an iterative reconstruction (IR algorithm to yield the same image quality. Furthermore, the influence on the radiation dose of the most recent integrated circuit detector (ICD; Stellar detector, Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany was investigated. Materials and Methods: 136 Patients were included. Scan parameters were set to a thorax routine: SOMATOM Sensation 64 (FBP, SOMATOM Definition Flash (IR, and SOMATOM Definition Edge (ICD and IR. Tube current was set constantly to the reference level of 100 mA automated tube current modulation using reference milliamperes. Care kV was used on the Flash and Edge scanner, while tube potential was individually selected between 100 and 140 kVp by the medical technologists at the SOMATOM Sensation. Quality assessment was performed on soft-tissue kernel reconstruction. Dose was represented by the dose length product. Results: Dose-length product (DLP with FBP for the average chest CT was 308 mGycm ± 99.6. In contrast, the DLP for the chest CT with IR algorithm was 196.8 mGycm ± 68.8 (P = 0.0001. Further decline in dose can be noted with IR and the ICD: DLP: 166.4 mGycm ± 54.5 (P = 0.033. The dose reduction compared to FBP was 36.1% with IR and 45.6% with IR/ICD. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR was favorable in the aorta, bone, and soft tissue for IR/ICD in combination compared to FBP (the P values ranged from 0.003 to 0.048. Overall contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR improved with declining DLP. Conclusion: The most recent technical developments, namely IR in combination with integrated circuit detectors, can significantly lower radiation dose in chest CT examinations.

  20. Reconstruction of Abdominal Wall of a Chronically Infected Postoperative Wound with a Rectus Abdominis Myofascial Splitting Flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Kyu Bae

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background If a chronically infected abdominal wound develops, complications such asperitonitis and an abdominal wall defect could occur. This could prolong the patient’s hospitalstay and increase the possibility of re-operation or another infection as well. For this reason,a solution for infection control is necessary. In this study, surgery using a rectus abdominismuscle myofascial splitting flap was performed on an abdominal wall defect.Methods From 2009 to 2012, 5 patients who underwent surgery due to ovarian rupture,cesarean section, or uterine myoma were chosen. In each case, during the first week afteroperation, the wound showed signs of infection. Surgery was chosen because the wounds didnot resolve with dressing. Debridement was performed along the previous operation woundand dissection of the skin was performed to separate the skin and subcutaneous tissue fromthe attenuated rectus muscle and Scarpa’s fascial layers. Once the anterior rectus sheath andmuscle were adequately mobilized, the fascia and muscle flap were advanced medially sothat the skin defect could be covered for reconstruction.Results Upon 3-week follow-up after a rectus abdominis myofascial splitting flap operation,no major complication occurred. In addition, all of the patients showed satisfaction in termsof function and esthetics at 3 to 6 months post-surgery.Conclusions Using a rectus abdominis myofascial splitting flap has many esthetic andfunctional benefits over previous methods of abdominal defect treatment, and notably, itenabled infection control by reconstruction using muscle.

  1. Histological Observation of Regions around Bone Tunnels after Compression of the Bone Tunnel Wall in Ligament Reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the time-course of influence of compression of bone tunnel wall in ligament reconstruction on tissue around the bone tunnel and to histologically examine the mechanism of preventing the complication of bone tunnel dilation, using rabbit tibia. A model in which the femoral origin of the extensor digitorum longus tendon was cut and inserted into a bone tunnel made proximal to the tibia was prepared in the bilateral hind legs of 20 Japanese white rabbits. In each animal, a tunnel was made using a drill only in the right leg, while an undersized bone tunnel was made by drilling and then dilated by compression using a dilator to the same tunnel size as that in the right leg. Animals were sacrificed at 0, 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks after surgery (4 animals at each time point). Observation of bone tunnels by X-ray radiography showed osteosclerosis in the 2- and 4-week dilation groups. Osteosclerosis appeared as white lines around the bone tunnel on X-ray radiography. This suggests that dilation promotes callus formation in the bone tunnel wall and prevents the complication of bone tunnel enlargement after ligament reconstruction

  2. Hyaluronic acid biodegradable material for reconstruction of vascular wall: a preliminary study in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandis, Laura; Zavan, Barbara; Bassetto, Franco; Ferroni, Letizia; Iacobellis, Laura; Abatangelo, Giovanni; Lepidi, Sandro; Cortivo, Roberta; Vindigni, Vincenzo

    2011-02-01

    The objective of this preliminary study was to develop a reabsorbable vascular patch that did not require in vitro cell or biochemical preconditioning for vascular wall repair. Patches were composed only of hyaluronic acid (HA). Twenty male Wistar rats weighing 250-350 g were used. The abdominal aorta was exposed and isolated. A rectangular breach (1 mm × 5 mm) was made on vessel wall and arterial defect was repaired with HA made patch. Performance was assessed at 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 weeks after surgery by histology and immunohistochemistry. Extracellular matrix components were evaluated by molecular biological methods. After 16 weeks, the biomaterial was almost completely degraded and replaced by a neoartery wall composed of endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, collagen, and elastin fibers organized in layers. In conclusion, HA patches provide a provisional three-dimensional support to interact with cells for the control of their function, guiding the spatially and temporally multicellular processes of artery regeneration. PMID:21268111

  3. Influence of radiation dose and reconstruction algorithm in MDCT assessment of airway wall thickness: A phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Cardona, Daniel [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Nagle, Scott K. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States); Department of Pediatrics, University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States); Li, Ke; Chen, Guang-Hong, E-mail: gchen7@wisc.edu [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States); Robinson, Terry E. [Department of Pediatrics, Stanford School of Medicine, 770 Welch Road, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Wall thickness (WT) is an airway feature of great interest for the assessment of morphological changes in the lung parenchyma. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) has recently been used to evaluate airway WT, but the potential risk of radiation-induced carcinogenesis—particularly in younger patients—might limit a wider use of this imaging method in clinical practice. The recent commercial implementation of the statistical model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) algorithm, instead of the conventional filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm, has enabled considerable radiation dose reduction in many other clinical applications of MDCT. The purpose of this work was to study the impact of radiation dose and MBIR in the MDCT assessment of airway WT. Methods: An airway phantom was scanned using a clinical MDCT system (Discovery CT750 HD, GE Healthcare) at 4 kV levels and 5 mAs levels. Both FBP and a commercial implementation of MBIR (Veo{sup TM}, GE Healthcare) were used to reconstruct CT images of the airways. For each kV–mAs combination and each reconstruction algorithm, the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the airways was measured, and the WT of each airway was measured and compared with the nominal value; the relative bias and the angular standard deviation in the measured WT were calculated. For each airway and reconstruction algorithm, the overall performance of WT quantification across all of the 20 kV–mAs combinations was quantified by the sum of squares (SSQs) of the difference between the measured and nominal WT values. Finally, the particular kV–mAs combination and reconstruction algorithm that minimized radiation dose while still achieving a reference WT quantification accuracy level was chosen as the optimal acquisition and reconstruction settings. Results: The wall thicknesses of seven airways of different sizes were analyzed in the study. Compared with FBP, MBIR improved the CNR of the airways, particularly at low radiation dose

  4. Influence of radiation dose and reconstruction algorithm in MDCT assessment of airway wall thickness: A phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Wall thickness (WT) is an airway feature of great interest for the assessment of morphological changes in the lung parenchyma. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) has recently been used to evaluate airway WT, but the potential risk of radiation-induced carcinogenesis—particularly in younger patients—might limit a wider use of this imaging method in clinical practice. The recent commercial implementation of the statistical model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) algorithm, instead of the conventional filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm, has enabled considerable radiation dose reduction in many other clinical applications of MDCT. The purpose of this work was to study the impact of radiation dose and MBIR in the MDCT assessment of airway WT. Methods: An airway phantom was scanned using a clinical MDCT system (Discovery CT750 HD, GE Healthcare) at 4 kV levels and 5 mAs levels. Both FBP and a commercial implementation of MBIR (VeoTM, GE Healthcare) were used to reconstruct CT images of the airways. For each kV–mAs combination and each reconstruction algorithm, the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the airways was measured, and the WT of each airway was measured and compared with the nominal value; the relative bias and the angular standard deviation in the measured WT were calculated. For each airway and reconstruction algorithm, the overall performance of WT quantification across all of the 20 kV–mAs combinations was quantified by the sum of squares (SSQs) of the difference between the measured and nominal WT values. Finally, the particular kV–mAs combination and reconstruction algorithm that minimized radiation dose while still achieving a reference WT quantification accuracy level was chosen as the optimal acquisition and reconstruction settings. Results: The wall thicknesses of seven airways of different sizes were analyzed in the study. Compared with FBP, MBIR improved the CNR of the airways, particularly at low radiation dose

  5. The chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiographic interpretation of chest films of newborns in respiratory distress remains one of the most difficult aspects of pediatric radiology. Complex pulmonary and cardiac adjustments to extrauterine life are rapidly taking place. The small, fluid-filled fetal lung must rid itself of fluid and fill with air. The high vascular resistance of the fetal pulmonary bed and the open ductus arteriosus allow shunting of blood in both directions. Films taken in this period of time may show lungs that resemble those seen in congestive heart failure or fluid overload. When these findings are observed in infants who may appear dusky or even cyanotic, the result may be the diagnosis of disease in normal infants passing through a stormy transition period. To make things worse, the films are taken as portable surpine films, usually in an isolette in the intensive care unit (ICU). The phase of respiration is difficult, if not impossible, to control, and lateral films are usually not obtained. Many of the infants are on assisted ventilation either by tube or nasal prongs-nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP)-and lungs can appear over-inflated or whited out, depending on the pressures used and the phase of the respiratory cycle. Prolonged crying itself can make lungs appear semiopaque; the next breath may show such a dramatic reinflation that it is hard to believe the two films are of the same infant, made only seconds apart. Is the heart large? Or is it the thymus? Are the lungs ''wet''? Is there infection? Is there pulmonary vascular engorgement? Why are these films so hard to interpret? They have no easy answers. The radiologist must realize that the neonatal intensive care personnel, armed though they may be with blood gas values, are no better at interpreting films. If anything, they read into them what they wish to see

  6. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by: Image/Video Gallery Your radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, ... you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most commonly performed ...

  7. Imaging of blunt chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In western European countries most blunt chest traumas are associated with motor vehicle and sport-related accidents. In Switzerland, 39 of 10,000 inhabitants were involved and severely injured in road accidents in 1998. Fifty two percent of them suffered from blunt chest trauma. According to the Swiss Federal Office of Statistics, traumas represented in men the fourth major cause of death (4 %) after cardiovascular disease (38 %), cancer (28 %), and respiratory disease (7 %) in 1998. The outcome of chest trauma patients is determined mainly by the severity of the lesions, the prompt appropriate treatment delivered on the scene of the accident, the time needed to transport the patient to a trauma center, and the immediate recognition of the lesions by a trained emergency team. Other determining factors include age as well as coexisting cardiac, pulmonary, and renal diseases. Our purpose was to review the wide spectrum of pathologies related to blunt chest trauma involving the chest wall, pleura, lungs, trachea and bronchi, aorta, aortic arch vessels, and diaphragm. A particular focus on the diagnostic impact of CT is demonstrated. (orig.)

  8. Imaging of blunt chest trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wicky, S.; Wintermark, M.; Schnyder, P.; Capasso, P.; Denys, A. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland). Dept. of Radiology

    2000-10-01

    In western European countries most blunt chest traumas are associated with motor vehicle and sport-related accidents. In Switzerland, 39 of 10,000 inhabitants were involved and severely injured in road accidents in 1998. Fifty two percent of them suffered from blunt chest trauma. According to the Swiss Federal Office of Statistics, traumas represented in men the fourth major cause of death (4 %) after cardiovascular disease (38 %), cancer (28 %), and respiratory disease (7 %) in 1998. The outcome of chest trauma patients is determined mainly by the severity of the lesions, the prompt appropriate treatment delivered on the scene of the accident, the time needed to transport the patient to a trauma center, and the immediate recognition of the lesions by a trained emergency team. Other determining factors include age as well as coexisting cardiac, pulmonary, and renal diseases. Our purpose was to review the wide spectrum of pathologies related to blunt chest trauma involving the chest wall, pleura, lungs, trachea and bronchi, aorta, aortic arch vessels, and diaphragm. A particular focus on the diagnostic impact of CT is demonstrated. (orig.)

  9. Breast reconstruction: State of the arts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radical mastectomy is still required in many cases, such as inflammatory breast cancer, multicentric breast cancer, large tumour volume and small breast size. In this setting, immediate breast reconstruction is more and more offered for breast cancer patients. But such plastic surgery is still debated, owing to risks of implant complications when postoperative radiotherapy of chest wall is mandatory in locoregional breast cancer management. Here, the review is focused on different type of immediate breast reconstruction and on risk of implants complications with or without postoperative radiotherapy. (authors)

  10. Autologous reconstruction of a complex form of Poland syndrome using 2 abdominal perforator free flaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masia, Jaume; Pons, Gemma; Loschi, Pietro; Sanchez Porro-Gil, Lidia; Nardulli, Maria Luisa; Olivares, Leyre

    2015-05-01

    Poland syndrome is the most frequent cause of congenital breast aplasia and hypoplasia. Breast and possible chest wall deformities can be treated with several surgical techniques, including implants, and pedicled or free flaps.We describe the case of a young patient with severe Poland syndrome with amastia, athelia, and deformity of the chest wall, and aplasia of 2 ribs. Marked hypoplasia of the ipsilateral latissimus dorsi muscle ruled out a reliable reconstructive option.Two perforator flaps were performed in a single-stage operation. A hemi-deep inferior epigastric perforator flap was harvested to correct the chest deformity, whereas the contralateral superficial inferior epigastric artery flap allowed breast reconstruction.No complications occurred and a subjectively and objectively pleasing cosmetic result was maintained at 3-year follow-up. PMID:24322640

  11. About Modern Graphic Reconstruction Wall Painting Of The Throne -Room Of Afrasiab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultanova Dilshoda

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In article are considered bases scientifically-creative reconstruction of pre-Islamic paintings hall of ambassadors of Afrasiab executed in interior foyer of institute of Archaeology RUZ.As a result of benchmark analysis modern painting with original museum of Afrasiab possible to define not before our days of a part and fragments in holistic type that is to say in beginning what looked before destruction arabic conqueror. Afrasiab paintings as specific facility more than 16 centuries is studied in our republic and has a questions which wait their own decisions.The author presents for the first time in picturesque manner to your attention its interpretation painting coming from its scientifically-creative experience.Given exploratory work possible consider as significant contribution to science on archaeology architecture and art.

  12. wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irshad Kashif

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining indoor climatic conditions of buildings compatible with the occupant comfort by consuming minimum energy, especially in a tropical climate becomes a challenging problem for researchers. This paper aims to investigate this problem by evaluating the effect of different kind of Photovoltaic Trombe wall system (PV-TW on thermal comfort, energy consumption and CO2 emission. A detailed simulation model of a single room building integrated with PV-TW was modelled using TRNSYS software. Results show that 14-35% PMV index and 26-38% PPD index reduces as system shifted from SPV-TW to DGPV-TW as compared to normal buildings. Thermal comfort indexes (PMV and PPD lie in the recommended range of ASHARE for both DPV-TW and DGPV-TW except for the few months when RH%, solar radiation intensity and ambient temperature were high. Moreover PVTW system significantly reduces energy consumption and CO2 emission of the building and also 2-4.8 °C of temperature differences between indoor and outdoor climate of building was examined.

  13. Chest x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chest radiography; Serial chest x-ray; X-ray - chest ... You stand in front of the x-ray machine. You will be told to hold your breath when the x-ray is taken. Two images are usually taken. You will ...

  14. The Use of Tensor Fascia Lata Pedicled Flap in Reconstructing Full Thickness Abdominal Wall Defects and Groin Defects Following Tumor Ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tensor fascia lata is a versatile flap with many uses in reconstructive plastic surgery. As a pedicled flap its reach to the lower abdomen and groin made it an attractive option for reconstructing soft tissue defects after tumor ablation. However, debate exists on the safe dimension of the flap, as distal tip necrosis is common. Also, the adequacy of the fascia lata as a sole substitute for abdominal wall muscles has been disputable. The aim of the current study is to report our experience and clinical observations with this flap in reconstructing those challenging defects and to discuss the possible options to minimize the latter disputable issues. Patients and Methods: From April 2001 to April 2004, 12 pedicled TFL flaps were used to reconstruct 5 central abdominal wall full thickness defects and 6 groin soft tissue defects following tumor resection. ]n one case, bilateral flaps were used to reconstruct a large central abdominal wall defect. There were 4 males and 7 females. Their age ranged from 19 to 60. From the abdominal wall defects group, all repairs were enforced primarily with a prolene mesh except for one patient who was the first in this study. Patients presenting with groin defects required coverage of exposed vessels following tumor resection. All patients in the current study underwent immediate reconstruction. The resulting soft tissue defects in this study were due to resection of 4 abdominal wall desmoid tumors, a colonic carcinoma infiltrating the abdominal wall, 4 primary groin soft developed in a flap used to cover a groin defect. In the former 3 cases, The flap was simply transposed without complete islanding of the flap. In the latter case, a very large flap was harvested beyond the safe limits with its distal edge just above the knee. In addition, wound dehiscence of the flap occurred in 2 other cases from the groin group. Nevertheless, all the wounds healed spontaneously with repeated dressings. Out of the 5 cases that underwent

  15. Characterisation of manual chest physiotherapy and respiratory response in mechanically ventilated children

    OpenAIRE

    Gregson, Rachael Kathleen

    2008-01-01

    Chest physiotherapy is integral to the management of mechanically ventilated children and previous research has confirmed that chest wall vibrations are the manual techniques used most frequently by physiotherapists in this population. Chest wall vibrations involve the application of a compressive force to the chest during expiration, with the aim of removing accumulated secretions and improving lung aeration. However, these techniques are largely unquantified and may vary grea...

  16. Evaluation of Medial Acetabular Wall Bone Stock in Patients with Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip Using a Helical Computed Tomography Multiplanar Reconstruction Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rui Yu Liu; Kun Zheng Wang; Chun Sheng Wang; Xiao Qian Dang; Zhi Qin Tong (Second Hospital Affiliated to the Medical College of Xi' an Jiaotong Univ., Xi' an Shaanxi (China))

    2009-08-15

    Background: The technique of medialization has been used to reconstruct acetabula at the level of true acetabula in total hip arthroplasty (THA) in patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). Appreciation of the bone stock in the medial acetabular wall is significant for making an optimal acetabular reconstruction plan and avoiding complications. Purpose: To evaluate the bone stock of the medial acetabular wall and its relation to the degree of subluxation in patients with DDH using computed tomography (CT). Material and Methods: Helical CT scans of 27 hips were obtained from 21 patients with osteoarthritis secondary to DDH who were scheduled for total hip arthroplasty. Eleven hips belonged to Crowe class I, while 16 hips belonged to Crowe class II/III. The raw CT data were reprocessed in various planes by scrolling multiplanar reformation (MPR). Acetabular opening, depth, and medial bone stock, as indicated by the minimum thickness of the medial acetabular wall, were measured in the transverse reformed MPR plane. Results: The minimum thicknesses of the medial acetabular wall in Crowe-I and Crowe-II/III hips were 3.8+-2.1 mm and 7.1+-3.1 mm, respectively, with statistically significant differences between the groups (P<0.05). Furthermore, the bone stock in the medial acetabular wall correlated with the degree of subluxation (R=0.69) and the acetabular depth (R= ;- ;0.71). Conclusion: There was significantly more bone stock in the medial acetabular wall in patients with higher-degree subluxation than there was in the less-severe class. This difference should be taken into consideration when reconstructing acetabula in THA in patients with DDH using the technique of medialization

  17. Reconstruction with a pectoralis major myocutaneous flap after left first rib and clavicular chest wall resection for a metastasis from laryngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caronia, Francesco Paolo; Fiorelli, Alfonso; Zanchini, Fabio; Santini, Mario; Lo Monte, Attilio Ignazio; Castorina, Sergio

    2016-05-01

    We presented a case of recurrent metastasis from epidermoid cancer that occurred in the left clavicle of a patient with a history of laryngeal cancer treated on April 2005 with extended hemilaryngectomy, neck dissection and chemoradiation therapy. On September 2008, he developed a left clavicular metastasis. The disease was initially well controlled by chemoradiotherapy but it recurred 17 months later. The optimal treatment plan was established by several multidisciplinary meetings and the patient subsequently underwent an en bloc resection of the left clavicle, first rib and all the other involved structures. Coverage of the thoracic defect was achieved using pectoralis major myocutaneous flap. The patient had a successful surgical outcome. At 1-year follow-up, he had no evidence of disease, a good cosmetic result and returned to normal daily activity. He died for bone metastasis with an overall 21 months post-surgical survival. PMID:25319560

  18. Experiencia con la reconstrucción quirúrgica de las deformidades de la pared torácica Surgical Experience with Reconstruction of Chest Wall Deformities

    OpenAIRE

    Jose A Mainieri-Hidalgo; Mauricio Rivera-Cerdas

    2010-01-01

    Objetivo: Analizar las características clínicas, indicación para realizar la intervención y los resultados de la cirugía de pacientes con deformidades de la pared torácica. Métodos: Con el fin de obtener la información, se analizaron 32 expedientes clínicos que pudieron ser ubicados y la información incluida en la base de datos del Servicio de otros 13 pacientes operados en el servicio de Cirugía de Tórax del Hospital Rafael Ángel Calderón Guardia por Pectus Excavatum o Pectus Carinatum, desd...

  19. Severe Pulmonary Valve Regurgitation 40 Years After Blunt Chest Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuglsang, Simon; Heiberg, Johan; Hjortdal, Vibeke Elisabeth

    2015-10-01

    Severe pulmonary valve regurgitation caused by a pulmonary valve tear is a rare complication to a blunt chest trauma. In this case report, we present a patient with pulmonary regurgitation originating from a chest trauma 40 years ago. Possible mechanisms are osseous pinch of the pulmonary valve between the anterior chest wall and the vertebral column, and retrograde blowout from severe compression of the lungs. PMID:26434447

  20. CT of blunt chest trauma in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While trauma is still the leading cause of death in the pediatric age range, it is surprising how little the CT appearances of pediatric chest injury have been investigated in the literature. We have reviewed the CT findings of blunt chest trauma in 44 children for whom chest CT examinations were requested to investigate the extent of intrathoracic injury. We noted a propensity for pulmonary contusions to be located posteriorly or posteromedially, and for them to be anatomically nonsegmental and crescentic in shape. This is possibly attributable to the relatively compliant anterior chest wall in children. The CT appearances of other major thoracic injuries are described, including pulmonary lacerations, pneumothoraces, malpositioned chest tubes, mediastinal hematomas, aortic injury, tracheobronchial injury, hemopericardium, and spinal injuries with paraspinal fluid collections. Children demonstrating findings incidental to the actual injury yet important to the subsequent therapy are also presented. We conclude that, in the event of clinically significant blunt chest trauma, the single supine chest examination in the trauma room is insufficient to adequately identify the extent of intrathoracic injury. With the exception of concern for aortic injury for which aortography is indicated, a dynamically enhanced CT scan of the thorax should be performed as clinically significant findings may result in altered therapy. (orig.)

  1. Chest CT in infants and children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed tomography (CT) is a powerful and irreplaceable imaging technique in the evaluation of thoracic disease in infants and children. Recent advances in CT technology, with multi-detector equipment now widely available in most institutions, allowing a highly detailed evaluation of the chest in a short time period has resulted in expanding indications of chest CT in paediatric patients. Its improved diagnostic yield along with a widespread availability has also resulted in an increased number of CT examinations in children, not always with beneficial impact on patient management and outcome. Accordingly with the ALARA concept, a judicious and correct use of CT is strongly advisable in order to reduce unnecessary high dose radiation exposure. The objective of this paper is to review the use of chest CT in paediatric patients focused mainly on basic technical aspects and clinical applications in the evaluation of the lungs, mediastinum and chest wall

  2. 体表膈肌肌电对睡眠呼吸暂停事件的鉴别作用%Distinguishing central from obstructive sleep apnea with chest wall surface electrodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱慧儿; 王玮; 罗远明

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine whether or not diaphragm electromyography recorded from chest wall surface electrodes (EMGsur) can be used to distinguish central from obstructive sleep apnea.Methods Ten patients ( age (44±10) years,body mass index (25.9±1.8) kg/m2 ) with suspected obstructive sleep apnea referred from Guangzhou Institute of Respiratory Disease were studied between January and September 2009. EMGsur and diaphragm electromyography from esophageal electrode (EMGeso) were recorded during conventional overnight full polysomnography. And chest-abdominal movement was measured with chest and abdominal bands.Results High-quality EMGsur and EMGeso were recorded in all subjects except for one who could not tolerate a multipair esophageal electrode.Excellent correlation was found between EMGsur and EMGeso during sleep including apnea events ( r=0.81±0.06,P<0.05 ).The central sleep apnea events diagnosed by EMGeso were exactly the same as those diagnosed by EMGsur.However,the central sleep apnea events diagnosed by EMGsur were less than those diagnosed by conventional thoracic-abdominal bands ( 7±11 vs 28±31,P<0.05 ).Conclusion EMGsur may be used to distinguish central from obstructive sleep apnea events.%目的 探讨体表电极记录膈肌肌电是否有助于准确区分阻塞性睡眠呼吸暂停(OSA)与中枢性睡眠呼吸暂停(CSA)事件.方法 选择2009年1-9月广州呼吸疾病研究所就诊并疑有睡眠呼吸暂停综合征的10例患者,其中男8例,女2例;年龄(44±10)岁,体质指数(25.9±1.8) kg/m2.对患者进行整夜常规多导睡眠监测的同时记录体表膈肌肌电信号、食管膈肌肌电信号,分析体表膈肌肌电与食管膈肌肌电的相关性,并比较胸腹带、体表膈肌肌电和食管膈肌肌电在判断CSA事件方面的差异.结果 除1例患者外,其他9例患者均能耐受多导食管电极检查,并可记录到高质量的食管膈肌肌电信号和体表膈肌肌电信号.食管膈肌肌电和

  3. Pediatric chest imaging. Chest imaging in infants and children. 2. rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaging of the pediatric chest continues to evolve rapidly. All chapters in this 2nd edition of Pediatric Chest Imaging have been extensively updated, with additional disease-specific information and numerous new illustrations. The book thus presents the state of the art in the diagnosis of pediatric chest disorders, highlighting the role played by advanced technology. As the conventional features of most of these disorders are extremely well known, special attention is devoted to the technical aspects of the modern imaging modalities, their indications, and the diagnostic information that they supply. Individual chapters focus on chest ultrasound, nuclear medicine imaging, high-resolution chest CT, helical CT, and pediatric cardiac CT and pediatric cardiacMRI. Others are directed towards specific disorders, including congenital malformations of the chest, chest tumors, pulmonary infection, trauma, the lung in systemic diseases, the pediatric airway, foreign bodies, the thymus, and the chest wall. Without exception, the authors of this book are internationally known specialists with great expertise in the field. This book will serve as a handy, superbly illustrated reference for all who routinely image children, as well as for those who need access to information on how best to image them. (orig.)

  4. Multidetector Computer Tomography: Evaluation of Blunt Chest Trauma in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Palas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Imaging plays an essential part of chest trauma care. By definition, the employed imaging technique in the emergency setting should reach the correct diagnosis as fast as possible. In severe chest blunt trauma, multidetector computer tomography (MDCT has become part of the initial workup, mainly due to its high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of the technique for the detection and characterization of thoracic injuries and also due to its wide availability in tertiary care centers. The aim of this paper is to review and illustrate a spectrum of characteristic MDCT findings of blunt traumatic injuries of the chest including the lungs, mediastinum, pleural space, and chest wall.

  5. Multidetector Computer Tomography: Evaluation of Blunt Chest Trauma in Adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaging plays an essential part of chest trauma care. By definition, the employed imaging technique in the emergency setting should reach the correct diagnosis as fast as possible. In severe chest blunt trauma, multidetector computer tomography (MDCT) has become part of the initial workup, mainly due to its high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of the technique for the detection and characterization of thoracic injuries and also due to its wide availability in tertiary care centers. The aim of this paper is to review and illustrate a spectrum of characteristic MDCT findings of blunt traumatic injuries of the chest including the lungs, mediastinum, pleural space, and chest wall.

  6. Surgical Ventricular Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to take the internal mammary artery, which we harvest from the chest wall. Sometimes referred to as ... those cases we need to resort to alternative strategies such as this procedure. 00:34:07 ROBERT ...

  7. Chest computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loeve, Martine; Krestin, Gabriel P.; Rosenfeld, Margaret;

    2013-01-01

    are not suitable to study CF lung disease in young children. Chest computed tomography (CT) holds great promise for use as a sensitive surrogate endpoint in CF. A large body of evidence has been produced to validate the use of chest CT as primary endpoint to study CF lung disease. However, before...

  8. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... this Site RadiologyInfo.org is produced by: Image/Video Gallery Your radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript ... time! Spotlight Recently posted: Pediatric MRI Intravascular Ultrasound Video: Chest CT Video:Thyroid Ultrasound Video: Head CT ...

  9. Quantifying the Impact of Immediate Reconstruction in Postmastectomy Radiation: A Large, Dose-Volume Histogram-Based Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohri, Nisha [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Cordeiro, Peter G. [Department of Plastic Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Keam, Jennifer [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Ballangrud, Ase [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Shi Weiji; Zhang Zhigang [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Nerbun, Claire T.; Woch, Katherine M.; Stein, Nicholas F.; Zhou Ying [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); McCormick, Beryl; Powell, Simon N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Ho, Alice Y., E-mail: HoA1234@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of immediate breast reconstruction on postmastectomy radiation (PMRT) using dose-volume histogram (DVH) data. Methods and Materials: Two hundred forty-seven women underwent PMRT at our center, 196 with implant reconstruction and 51 without reconstruction. Patients with reconstruction were treated with tangential photons, and patients without reconstruction were treated with en-face electron fields and customized bolus. Twenty percent of patients received internal mammary node (IMN) treatment. The DVH data were compared between groups. Ipsilateral lung parameters included V20 (% volume receiving 20 Gy), V40 (% volume receiving 40 Gy), mean dose, and maximum dose. Heart parameters included V25 (% volume receiving 25 Gy), mean dose, and maximum dose. IMN coverage was assessed when applicable. Chest wall coverage was assessed in patients with reconstruction. Propensity-matched analysis adjusted for potential confounders of laterality and IMN treatment. Results: Reconstruction was associated with lower lung V20, mean dose, and maximum dose compared with no reconstruction (all P<.0001). These associations persisted on propensity-matched analysis (all P<.0001). Heart doses were similar between groups (P=NS). Ninety percent of patients with reconstruction had excellent chest wall coverage (D95 >98%). IMN coverage was superior in patients with reconstruction (D95 >92.0 vs 75.7%, P<.001). IMN treatment significantly increased lung and heart parameters in patients with reconstruction (all P<.05) but minimally affected those without reconstruction (all P>.05). Among IMN-treated patients, only lower lung V20 in those without reconstruction persisted (P=.022), and mean and maximum heart doses were higher than in patients without reconstruction (P=.006, P=.015, respectively). Conclusions: Implant reconstruction does not compromise the technical quality of PMRT when the IMNs are untreated. Treatment technique, not reconstruction, is the primary

  10. Effectiveness of chest physiotherapy in the management of bronchiectasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronchiectasis is a chronic disease in which clearance of sputum is disturbed because bronchi dilated permanently. So for the clearance of sputum we have to use physiotherapy techniques such as postural drainage percussion and vibration (PDPY), active cycle of breathing technique (ACBT), autogenic drainage, positive expiratory pressure, high frequency chest wall oscillation. Objective: To determine the role of Chest Physical therapy intervention in the management of Bronchi ectasis. To compare the prognosis of bronchiectasis with and without chest physiotherapy. Methodology: Data was collected from Gulab Devi Chest Hospital, Lahore. A Randomized Control Trial (RCT) study method was used and 60 patients are studied. In this study, they were divided into 03 groups 1- Antibiotics Therapy 2-Chest Physical therapy 3-Antibiotics and Chest Physical therapy. Each group consistant. (author)

  11. Efeitos de duas técnicas de incentivo respiratório na mobilidade toracoabdominal após cirurgia abdominal alta Effects of two respiratory incentive techniques on chest wall mobility after upper abdominal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Elaine Trevisan

    2010-12-01

    with the Voldyne device, and group 2 (n=6, submitted to a split-inspiration pattern training. Chest wall expansion was rated by measuring thorax circumferences before surgery and on the 1st, 3rd, and 5th post-operative (PO days. In both groups a significant decrease was found in circumference values on the 1st PO day, which gradually recovered, until on the 5th PO day no significant differences were found as compared to pre-operative measures. Group 1 showed significantly better thoracic-abdominal expansion rates than group 2's, as well as higher recovery time rates all through. Though both breathing techniques used were effective, inspiratory incentive using the Voldyne device showed better results in recovering chest mobility after upper abdominal surgery.

  12. Technical innovations in ear reconstruction using a skin expander with autogenous cartilage grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashan, Yu; Haiyue, Jiang; Qinghua, Yang; Bo, Pan; Lin, Lin; Tailing, Wang; Yanmei, Wang; Xiao, Qin; Hongxing, Zhuang

    2008-01-01

    Pioneers such as Tanzer and Brent have established the foundations of microtia reconstruction using an autogenous costal cartilage framework. The framework and its skin coverage are the two limiting factors in ear reconstruction. At the present time autogenous rib cartilage and mastoid skin are still first choice materials for most surgeons. They have the combined advantages of well-matched texture and colour. To reconstruct a symmetrical, accurate, prominent auricle and minimise as much as possible the chest wall deformity caused by rib cartilage harvesting, we set out to improve our techniques for cartilaginous framework definition and to use the remnant ear to enhance the projection of the reconstructed ear. Since 2000, 342 cases (366 ears) were treated using our current techniques. Data pertaining to complications were recorded. Final results were assessed a minimum of 1 year postoperatively. The follow-up period ranged from 1 to 6 years. Most of the patients with microtia were satisfied with the results of their ear reconstruction. In conclusion, our techniques help to reduce the quantity of rib cartilage needed to fabricate ear framework and minimise chest wall deformity. The frameworks are accurate, prominent and stable. Reconstructed ears are similar in colour and appearance to the normal side. Our innovations are practical and reliable for microtia reconstruction using skin expanders in combination with a sculpted autogenous rib cartilage framework. PMID:18849209

  13. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the most commonly performed x-ray exams and use a very small dose of ionizing radiation to ... to your health. While a chest x-ray use a tiny dose of ionizing radiation, the benefit ...

  14. Learning chest imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedrozo Pupo, John C. (ed.) [Magdalena Univ., Santa Maria (Colombia). Respire - Inst. for Respiratory Care

    2013-03-01

    Useful learning tool for practitioners and students. Overview of the imaging techniques used in chest radiology. Aid to the correct interpretation of chest X-ray images. Radiology of the thorax forms an indispensable element of the basic diagnostic process for many conditions and is of key importance in a variety of medical disciplines. This user-friendly book provides an overview of the imaging techniques used in chest radiology and presents numerous instructive case-based images with accompanying explanatory text. A wide range of clinical conditions and circumstances are covered with the aim of enabling the reader to confidently interpret chest images by correctly identifying structures of interest and the causes of abnormalities. This book, which will be an invaluable learning tool, forms part of the Learning Imaging series for medical students, residents, less experienced radiologists, and other medical staff. Learning Imaging is a unique case-based series for those in professional education in general and for physicians in prarticular.

  15. Digital chest radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debess, Jeanne Elisabeth; Vejle-Sørensen, Jens Kristian; Thomsen, Henrik;

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Quality improvement of basic radiography focusing on collimation and dose reduction in digital chest radiography Methods and Materials:A retrospective study of digital chest radiography is performed to evaluate the primary x-ray tube collimation of the PA and lateral radiographs. Data from...... one hundred fifty self-reliant female patients between 15 and 55 years of age are included in the study. The clinical research is performed between September and November 2014 where 3rd year Radiography students collect data on four Danish x-ray departments using identical procedures under guidance of...... conference. Conclusion: Collimation improvement in basic chest radiography can reduce the radiation to female patients at chest x-ray examinations....

  16. Digital chest radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debess, Jeanne Elisabeth; Johnsen, Karen Kirstine; Thomsen, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chest radiography is one of the most common examinations in radiology departments. In 2013 approximately 80,000 chest x-rays were performed on women in the fertile age. Even low dose for the examinationCorrect collimation Purpose: Quality improvement of basic radiography focusing on...... collimation and dose reduction in digital chest radiography Methods and Materials A retrospective study of digital chest radiography is performed to evaluate the primary x-ray tube collimation of the PA and lateral radiographs. Data from one hundred fifty self-reliant female patients between 15 and 55 years...... of age are included in the study. The clinical research is performed between September and November 2014 where 3rd year Radiography students collect data on four Danish x-ray departments using identical procedures under guidance of clinical supervisors. Optimal collimation is determined by European...

  17. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also be useful to help diagnose and monitor treatment for a variety of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray requires no special preparation. ...

  18. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... However, it’s important to consider the likelihood of benefit to your health. While a chest x-ray use a tiny dose of ionizing radiation, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs any risk. ...

  19. Management of chest keloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim June Kyu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Keloid formation is one of the most challenging clinical problems in wound healing. With increasing frequency of open heart surgery, chest keloid formations are not infrequent in the clinical practice. The numerous treatment methods including surgical excision, intralesional steroid injection, radiation therapy, laser therapy, silicone gel sheeting, and pressure therapy underscore how little is understood about keloids. Keloids have a tendency to recur after surgical excision as a single treatment. Stretching tension is clearly associated with keloid generation, as keloids tend to occur on high tension sites such as chest region. The authors treated 58 chest keloid patients with surgical excision followed by intraoperative and postoperative intralesional steroid injection. Even with minor complications and recurrences, our protocol results in excellent outcomes in cases of chest keloids.

  20. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Angioplasty & vascular stenting Video: Arthrography Video: Contrast Material Radiology and You Take our survey About this Site ... radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, I’m Dr. Geoffrey ...

  1. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of ionizing radiation, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs any risk. For more information about chest x-rays, visit Radiology Info dot org. Thank you for your time! ...

  2. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Site Index A-Z Spotlight June is Men's Health Month Recently posted: Focused Ultrasound for Uterine Fibroids ... to consider the likelihood of benefit to your health. While a chest x-ray use a tiny ...

  3. Reconstruction of Abdominal Wall of a Chronically Infected Postoperative Wound with a Rectus Abdominis Myofascial Splitting Flap

    OpenAIRE

    Sung Kyu Bae; Seok Joo Kang; Jin Woo Kim; Young Hwan Kim; Hook Sun

    2013-01-01

    Background If a chronically infected abdominal wound develops, complications such as peritonitis and an abdominal wall defect could occur. This could prolong the patient's hospital stay and increase the possibility of re-operation or another infection as well. For this reason, a solution for infection control is necessary. In this study, surgery using a rectus abdominis muscle myofascial splitting flap was performed on an abdominal wall defect. Methods From 2009 to 2012, 5 patients who underw...

  4. Chest injuries associated with head injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfred Chukwuemeka Mezue

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although there have been significant advances in the management of traumatic brain injury (TBI, associated severe injuries, in particular chest injuries, remain a major challenge. This paper analyses the contribution of chest injuries to the outcome of head injuries in the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital (UNTH and the Memfys Hospital for Neurosurgery (MHN in Enugu, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective review of the medical records, operative notes, and radiological findings of all patients admitted for head injury who had associated significant chest injuries in the MHN from 2002 to 2009 and the UNTH between 2007 and 2010. Patients with only head injury and other extracranial injury not affecting the chest were excluded. Patients who were inadequately investigated were also excluded. Results: Nineteen patients from the MHN and 11 patients from the UNTH were analyzed. Ages ranged from 9 to 65 years and the male:female ratio was 3:1. Injuries were most common between 30 and 50 years and road traffic accident accounted for 60%. Barotrauma from ventilation was documented in 2 patients. The commonest types of intrathoracic injuries are pneumothorax and hemothorax. Chest wall injuries are more common but carry less morbidity and mortality. Only 20% of patients presented within 48 hours of injury. Management of the associated chest trauma commenced in the referring hospitals only in 26.4% of the patients. All patients with hemo-pneumothorax had tube thoracostomy as did 96% of patients with pneumothorax. 10% of patients with haemothorax needed thoracotomy. Mortality is 43%, which is higher than for patients with only TBI with comparable Glasgow coma scale. Outcome is influenced by the time to admission and the GCS on admission. Conclusion: Associated chest injuries result in higher mortality from head injuries. This association is more likely in the young and more productive. All patients presenting with head and

  5. Influence of floating thoracic wall on dogs pulmonary function and curative effect of pressure dressing on chest%浮动胸壁对犬呼吸功能的影响及加压包扎治疗效果观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周志明; 陈拥; 王泽学; 孙颢洁; 梁磊

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the inlfuence of lfoating thoracic wall on dogs pulmonary function and the curative effect of pressure dressing on chest.Methods Floating thoracic wall models of large areas(20 cm2/kg ) and small areas(10 cm2/kg ) were established in 18 hybrid dogs. the intrpleural pressure(iPP), partial pressure of oxygen in artery(Pao2), partial pressure of carbon dioxide in artery(Paco2) and arterial oxygen saturation(sao2) were measured with blood gas analysis and intrathoracic cannula. and the curative effect of pressure dressing on chest on pulmonary function was studied, too.Results Pao2 and sao2 decreased(P <0.05), but Paco2 increased (P <0.05) in large areas group. Pao2 and sao2 decreased(P <0.05) in small areas group. Compared with the lfoating thoracic wall models, after treatment of pressure dressing on chest, pulmonary function data had no statistical signiifcance in large areas group. PaO2 and SaO2 increased (P <0.05), Paco2 decreased(P <0.05) in small areas group after treatment of pressure dressing on chest.Conclusion The lfail chest of large areas group had a great effect on pulmonary function, but the pressure dressing on chest did not show the therapeutic efifcacy. The pressure dressing on chest was an effective way for improvement of pulmonary function in lfail chest of small areas.%目的:观察浮动胸壁对犬呼吸功能的影响以及胸壁加压包扎的疗效。方法实验用杂交犬18只建立大面积(20cm2/kg)和小面积(10cm2/kg)两组胸壁浮动动物模型,用胸腔置管和血气分析等观察胸膜腔内压(iPP)、动脉血氧分压(Pao2)、动脉血二氧化碳分压(Paco2)及动脉血氧饱和度(sao2)变化和加压包扎治疗的效果。结果大面积组Pao2和sao2下降(P<0.05),Paco2升高(P<0.05);小面积组Pao2和sao2下降(P<0.05)。同模型制作后比较,加压包扎治疗后,大面积组呼吸功能指标差异无显著性意义;小面积

  6. CHEST PHYSIOTHERAPY FOR INFANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti S. Christian (M.P.T Cardiopulmonary Conditions

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In the normal lung, secretions are removed by Mucociliary activity, normal breathing cycles, and cough. In disease, increased secretion viscosity and volume, dyskinesia of the cilia, and ineffective cough combine to reduce the ability to clear secretions, and may increase exacerbations and infections. Many chest physiotherapy techniques like postural drainage, percussion and vibration are used since many years. These techniques are derived from adult studies but these techniques are quite stressful for the infants as the infant respiratory system is different from the adult respiratory system. Advance chest physiotherapy techniques were developed specifically for infants; in accordance with their physiological characteristics. So this review is to introduce some new chest physiotherapy helpful for newborn infants.

  7. Reconstrucción de las secuelas de la pared abdominal en pacientes con extrofia de cloaca Reconstruction of abdominal wall sequelae in patients with cloacal extrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Iwanyk

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Los defectos abdominales congénitos de la línea media inferior, como la extrofia cloacal, se producen por fallos en el mesodermo entre la región umbilical y la membrana cloacal provocando severos defectos viscerales, musculares y óseos. Los reiterados intentos para la reconstrucción de los tractos intestinal y génitourinario en este tipo de malformaciones, pueden ocasionar secuelas graves en la pared malformada. La complejidad de esta malformación y los numerosos procedimientos a los que deben ser sometidos estos pacientes, requieren de un abordaje interdisciplinario desde el inicio del tratamiento y en cada una de las etapas reconstructivas a fin de evitar, al máximo, las lesiones de los tejidos abdominales para lograr, al final, una pared adecuada. Presentamos 2 casos de reconstrucción de la pared abdominal en sendos pacientes de sexo femenino con secuelas importantes de extrofia cloacal, utilizando tejidos expandidos, colgajos musculares y complementando el tratamiento en una de las pacientes con una malla protésica. En ambos casos, y a pesar de la falta de tejido provocada por la malformación y las secuelas de múltiples cirugías, obtuvimos un buen resultado funcional y estético.Abdominal congenital defects of the middle line have their origin in developmental faults of mesoderm between the umbilical region and the cloacal membrane, originating visceral, muscular and osseous defects in the abdominal wall. Repeated attempts to reconstruct the intestinal and genitourinary tract here and in other malformations, can cause serious sequeals in the previously deformed abdominal wall. We present 2 cases of abdominal wall reconstruction in patients with serious sequelae of cloacal extrophy. Complexity of this malformation calls for an interdisciplinary treatment to avoid the severe damage that may be caused during reconstructive attempts. In spite of lack of tissue because of the malformation and the sequelae of multiple surgeries we

  8. Non-Newtonian models for molecular viscosity and wall shear stress in a 3D reconstructed human left coronary artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulis, Johannes V; Giannoglou, George D; Chatzizisis, Yiannis S; Seralidou, Kypriani V; Parcharidis, George E; Louridas, George E

    2008-01-01

    The capabilities and limitations of various molecular viscosity models, in the left coronary arterial tree, were analyzed via: molecular viscosity, local and global non-Newtonian importance factors, wall shear stress (WSS) and wall shear stress gradient (WSSG). The vessel geometry was acquired using geometrically correct 3D intravascular ultrasound (3D IVUS). Seven non-Newtonian molecular viscosity models, plus the Newtonian one, were compared. The WSS distribution yielded a consistent LCA pattern for nearly all non-Newtonian models. High molecular viscosity, low WSS and low WSSG values occurred at the outer walls of the major bifurcation in proximal LCA regions. The Newtonian blood flow was found to be a good approximation at mid- and high-strain rates. The non-Newtonian Power Law, Generalized Power Law, Carreau and Casson and Modified Cross blood viscosity models gave comparable molecular viscosity, WSS and WSSG values. The Power Law and Walburn-Schneck models over-estimated the non-Newtonian global importance factor I(G) and under-estimated the area averaged WSS and WSSG values. The non-Newtonian Power Law and the Generalized Power Law blood viscosity models were found to approximate the molecular viscosity and WSS calculations in a more satisfactory way. PMID:17412633

  9. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pediatric Ultrasound Video: Angioplasty & vascular stenting Video: Arthrography Radiology and You About this Site RadiologyInfo.org is ... radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, I’m Dr. Geoffrey ...

  10. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... this Site RadiologyInfo.org is produced by: Image/Video Gallery Your radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript ... Recently posted: Focused Ultrasound for Uterine Fibroids Dementia Video: General Ultrasound Video: Pediatric Nuclear Medicine Radiology and ...

  11. Obesidad mórbida: caso excepcional de reconstrucción de pared abdominal Morbid obesity: an exceptional patient. Apronectomy and new abdominal wall reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.J. Gabilondo Zubizarreta

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Presentamos una nueva técnica para la reconstrucción de la pared abdominal, con material sintético en una paciente que padeciendo un cuadro de obesidad mórbida sin cirugía ni traumatismo previo, sufre una diástasis de músculos rectos de su pared abdominal por la que se produce una evisceración intestinal que al alojarse en el faldón abdominal y añadirse un proceso de acumulación de líquidos en el intersticio semejante al linfedema, supuso como tratamiento una resección superior a los 60 Kg. entre sólidos y líquidos y una estrategia y técnica nuevas de reconstrucción del defecto de la pared abdominal.The aim of this work is to show a new technique for reconstruction of the abdominal wall with synthetic matherial in a patient with morbid obesity. The disease has no relation with antecedents of previous surgery or trauma and is asociated with a dyasthasis of the rectus abdomini muscles which has conditionated a intestinal evisceration.This evisceration is accommodated in the abdominal apron and is associated with a great accumulation of fluid (liquid in the interstitium, which seems a linphedema. Taking account the combination of liquid and soft tissues the resection is larger than 60 Kg. and this has forced us to develop new strategies for the menagement of the patient and techniques for the reconstruction of the abdominal wall defect.

  12. Chest injury in victims of Bam earthquake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seyed Mohammad Ghodsi; Moosa Zargar; Ali Khaji; Mojgan Karbakhsh

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the data of trauma patients with thoracic injury in the earthquake of Bam admitted to hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Science (TUMS)for better understanding the type and consequence of thoracic injuries in a major earthquake.Methods: After Bam earthquake registering 6.5 on the Richter scale, 526 trauma patients were admitted to hospitals of TUMS. Among them, 53 patients sustained thoracic injury.Results: This group was composed of 21 females (39.6%) and 32 males (60.4%). Fifteen patients (28.3%) had isolated chest injuries. Rib fracture (36.4%) was the most common injury in our patients and haemo/pneumothorax (25.5%) followed. Superficial injury was the most common accompanying injury. Multipletrauma patients with chest injury had higher injury severity score (ISS) versus patients with isolated chest injury (P =0.003).Conclusions: Chest wall injuries and haemo/pneumothorax comprise a considerable number of injuries in survival victims of earthquakes. Consequently, the majority of these patients can be treated with observation or tube thoracostomy. We should train and equip the health workers and members of rescue teams to treat and manage these patients in the field.

  13. Conservative treatment for breast cancer. Complications requiring reconstructive surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Women who select conservative treatment for carcinoma of the breast (tumor excision followed by supervoltage radiation therapy) place a premium on breast preservation and aesthetics. When local control fails and they require a mastectomy, or when the aesthetic appearance is unacceptable, they may request breast reconstruction. The goal of this study is to evaluate a series of 10 patients who required reconstructive breast surgery after complications of conservative treatment. Patient classification: I. Breast or chest wall necrosis (3). II. Breast fibrosis and gross asymmetry (3). III. Local recurrence of breast cancer (5). IV. Positive margins after the initial lumpectomy (1). The mean age was 34 years. Radiation dosage average was 5252 rads with two patients receiving iridium-192 implant boosts. The reconstructive management was complex and usually required a major musculocutaneous flap because of the radiation effects

  14. Breast Reconstruction with Tissue Expansion

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the flaps here and go underneath the pectoralis muscle and do tissue expanders and today we are ... lift the skin flap and the pectoralis major muscle off the chest wall without separating the two. ...

  15. Breast Reconstruction with Tissue Expansion

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you by Synovis Life Technologies. During the program, it's easy for you to learn more about the ... chest wall and also she was given chemotherapy. It was ER positive, but she opted not to ...

  16. Quantifying the Impact of Immediate Reconstruction in Postmastectomy Radiation: A Large, Dose-Volume Histogram-Based Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the impact of immediate breast reconstruction on postmastectomy radiation (PMRT) using dose-volume histogram (DVH) data. Methods and Materials: Two hundred forty-seven women underwent PMRT at our center, 196 with implant reconstruction and 51 without reconstruction. Patients with reconstruction were treated with tangential photons, and patients without reconstruction were treated with en-face electron fields and customized bolus. Twenty percent of patients received internal mammary node (IMN) treatment. The DVH data were compared between groups. Ipsilateral lung parameters included V20 (% volume receiving 20 Gy), V40 (% volume receiving 40 Gy), mean dose, and maximum dose. Heart parameters included V25 (% volume receiving 25 Gy), mean dose, and maximum dose. IMN coverage was assessed when applicable. Chest wall coverage was assessed in patients with reconstruction. Propensity-matched analysis adjusted for potential confounders of laterality and IMN treatment. Results: Reconstruction was associated with lower lung V20, mean dose, and maximum dose compared with no reconstruction (all P98%). IMN coverage was superior in patients with reconstruction (D95 >92.0 vs 75.7%, P.05). Among IMN-treated patients, only lower lung V20 in those without reconstruction persisted (P=.022), and mean and maximum heart doses were higher than in patients without reconstruction (P=.006, P=.015, respectively). Conclusions: Implant reconstruction does not compromise the technical quality of PMRT when the IMNs are untreated. Treatment technique, not reconstruction, is the primary determinant of target coverage and normal tissue doses.

  17. Pediatric digital chest imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Philips Computed Radiography system performs well with pediatric portable chest radiographs, handling the throughout of a busy intensive care service 24 hours a day. Images are excellent and routinely provide a conventional (unenhanced) image and an edge-enhanced image. Radiation dose is decreased by the lowered frequency of repeat examinations and the ability of the plates to respond to a much lower dose and still provide an adequate image. The high quality and uniform density of serial PCR portable radiographs greatly enhances diagnostic content of the films. Decreased resolution has not been a problem clinically. Image manipulation and electronic transfer to remote viewing stations appear to be helpful and are currently being evaluated further. The PCR system provides a marked improvement in pediatric portable chest radiology

  18. Sandstorm in the chest?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talluri MR

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A 32 year old female presented with dry cough and progressive breathlessness of one year duration. There was no history suggestive of collagen vascular disease, lung parenchymal infection or allergic airway disease. Clinical evaluation showed basal fine inspiratory crepitations. Radiographic examination of the chest revealed a black pleura line and lung parenchymal calcification. CT scan of the chest demonstrated nodular calcification of lung parenchyma with a “crazy pavement” pattern, which is suggestive of alveolar calcification. Pulmonary function test showed a severe restrictive defect. On transbronchial lung biopsy calcific spherules suggestive of the alveolar microlithiasis were seen. Diagnosis of pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis was made and symptomatic treatment was given, as there is no specific therapy available. The case illustrates an unusual cause of shortness of breath in a young female with striking radiographic features.

  19. CHEST PHYSIOTHERAPY FOR INFANTS

    OpenAIRE

    Preeti S. Christian (M.P.T Cardiopulmonary Conditions)

    2014-01-01

    In the normal lung, secretions are removed by Mucociliary activity, normal breathing cycles, and cough. In disease, increased secretion viscosity and volume, dyskinesia of the cilia, and ineffective cough combine to reduce the ability to clear secretions, and may increase exacerbations and infections. Many chest physiotherapy techniques like postural drainage, percussion and vibration are used since many years. These techniques are derived from adult studies but these techniques are quite str...

  20. Radical cystectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy with ileal conduit urinary diversion and abdominal wall reconstruction: an interesting case of multidisciplinary management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofos SS

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stratos S Sofos,1 Ciaran Walsh,2 Nigel J Parr,2 Kevin Hancock11Whiston Hospital, Prescot, 2Arrowe Park Hospital, Wirral, Merseyside, UKAbstract: The ileal conduit for urinary diversion after radical cystectomy is a well-described procedure. Furthermore, parastomal hernias, prolapse, stenosis, and retraction of the stoma have been reported as some of the more common complications of this procedure. The subsequent repair of parastomal hernias with a biological mesh and the potential of the conduit to “tunnel” through it has also been described. In this case report, we present a combined repair of a large incisional hernia with a cystectomy and a pelvic lymphadenectomy for invasive bladder cancer, with the use of a biological mesh for posterior component abdominal wall primary repair as well as for support to the ileal conduit used for urinary diversion.Keywords: incisional hernia, posterior component separation, biological mesh 

  1. Stationary digital chest tomosynthesis for coronary artery calcium scoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Gongting; Wang, Jiong; Potuzko, Marci; Harman, Allison; Pearce, Caleb; Shan, Jing; Lee, Yueh Z.; Zhou, Otto; Lu, Jianping

    2016-03-01

    The coronary artery calcium score (CACS) measures the buildup of calcium on the coronary artery wall and has been shown to be an important predictor of the risk of coronary artery diseases (CAD). Currently CACS is measured using CT, though the relatively high cost and high radiation dose has limited its adoption as a routine screening procedure. Digital Chest Tomosynthesis (DCT), a low dose and low cost alternative to CT, and has been shown to achieve 90% of sensitivity of CT in lung disease screening. However commercial DCT requires long scanning time and cannot be adapted for high resolution gated cardiac imaging, necessary for CACS. The stationary DCT system (s- DCT), developed in our lab, has the potential to significantly shorten the scanning time and enables high resolution cardiac gated imaging. Here we report the preliminary results of using s-DCT to estimate the CACS. A phantom heart model was developed and scanned by the s-DCT system and a clinical CT in a phantom model with realistic coronary calcifications. The adapted fan-beam volume reconstruction (AFVR) method, developed specifically for stationary tomosynthesis systems, is used to obtain high resolution tomosynthesis images. A trained cardiologist segmented out the calcifications and the CACS was obtained. We observed a strong correlation between the tomosynthesis derived CACS and CT CACS (r2 = 0.88). Our results shows s-DCT imaging has the potential to estimate CACS, thus providing a possible low cost and low dose imaging protocol for screening and monitoring CAD.

  2. The impact of immediate breast reconstruction on the technical delivery of postmastectomy radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To quantify the impact of immediate breast reconstruction on postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) planning. Methods: A total of 110 patients (112 treatment plans) who had mastectomy with immediate reconstruction followed by radiotherapy were compared with contemporaneous stage-matched patients who had undergone mastectomy without intervening reconstruction. A scoring system was used to assess optimal radiotherapy planning using four parameters: breadth of chest wall coverage, treatment of the ipsilateral internal mammary chain, minimization of lung, and avoidance of heart. An 'optimal' plan achieved all objectives or a minor 0.5 point deduction; 'moderately' compromised treatment plans had 1.0 or 1.5 point deductions; and 'major' compromised plans had ≥2.0 point deductions. Results: Of the 112 PMRT plans scored after reconstruction, 52% had compromises compared with 7% of matched controls (p < 0.0001). Of the compromised plans after reconstruction, 33% were considered to be moderately compromised plans and 19% were major compromised treatment plans. Optimal chest wall coverage, treatment of the ipsilateral internal mammary chain, lung minimization, and heart avoidance was achieved in 79%, 45%, 84%, and 84% of the plans in the group undergoing immediate reconstruction, compared respectively with 100%, 93%, 97%, and 92% of the plans in the control group (p < 0.0001, p < 0.0001, p = 0.0015, and p = 0.1435). In patients with reconstructions, 67% of the 'major' compromised radiotherapy plans were left-sided (p < 0.16). Conclusions: Radiation treatment planning after immediate breast reconstruction was compromised in more than half of the patients (52%), with the largest compromises observed in those with left-sided cancers. For patients with locally advanced breast cancer, the potential for compromised PMRT planning should be considered when deciding between immediate and delayed reconstruction

  3. Can the Physicians or Surgions Do without Chest Radiograph?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Bakhshayeshkaram

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available   "nThe question is how much information is there in chest radiographs ? "nWe can consider the approximate heart size. Rough quantification of heart failure, very basic anatomy of the heart. The chest radiograph is widely available, cheap and very low long term risk of radiation. Chest radiographs are required in the initial consultation of heart or lung diseases. Follow-up radiographs are only required in certain situations. Chest radiographs contain significant information. But nowadays we look less critically, because it is easy to order echo, CT or MRI. Examples of frequently encountered abnormalities seen in our daily practice: "n-Change in hilar size or adenopathy "n-Alteration in hilar contour "n-Bronchial wall thickening "n-Obscuration of normal hilar structures "n   

  4. Reconstruction of St. Petersburg roofs based on light steel thin-walled structures and de-icing system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.I. Vatin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Insecurity of applied coatings and low service lives of St. Petersburg roofs generate the development of new technological solutions. Necessity of roof protection from the ice dams is a special factor in selecting technological solutions of the roof structure.The aim is selection of an optimal design solution for the roof and the device against the ice based on the parameters of efficiency and effectiveness. After completion of research as a design of the roof system was chosen light steel thin-walled structures (LSTC. As the device against the ice is proposed a constructive adaptation of drainage, which includes the transfer of the gutter from the roof edge closer to Snow barriers. Herewith downspouts must finish in the system and urban runoff.Efficiency of this method is confirmed by mathematical calculations and trial operation of such existing systems in the Nordic countries. The combination of the device against the ice with modern technology LSTC solve the problem of icicles, and generally can guarantee continuous and reliable operation of the roof.

  5. Bone Anchor Fixation in Abdominal Wall Reconstruction: A Useful Adjunct in Suprapubic and Para-iliac Hernia Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Laurel J; Cox, Tiffany C; Huntington, Ciara R; Ross, Samuel W; Kneisl, Jeffrey S; Augenstein, Vedra A; Heniford, B Todd

    2015-07-01

    Suprapubic hernias, parailiac or flank hernias, and lumbar hernias are difficult to repair and are associated with high-recurrence rates owing to difficulty in obtaining substantive overlap and especially mesh fixation due to bone being a margin of the hernia. Orthopedic suture anchors used for ligament reconstruction have been used to attach prosthetic material to bony surfaces and can be used in the repair of these hernias where suture fixation was impossible. A prospective, single institution study of ventral hernia repairs involving bone anchor mesh fixation was performed. Demographics, operative details, and outcomes data were collected. Twenty patients were identified, with a mean age 53 (range: 35-70 years) and mean body mass index 28.4 kg/m(2) (range 21-38). Ten lumbar, seven suprapubic, and three parailiac hernias were studied. The majority were recurrent hernias (n = 13), with one to seven previously failed repairs. The mean hernia defect size was very large (270 cm(2); range: 56-832 cm(2)) with average mesh size of 1090 cm(2) (range 224-3640 cm(2)). Both Mitek GII (Depuy, Raynham, MA) and JuggerKnot 2.9-mm (Biomet, Biomedical Instruments, Warsaw, IN) anchors were used, with an average of four anchors/case (range: 1-16). Mean operative time was 218 minutes (120-495). There were three minor complications, no operative mortality, and no recurrences during an average follow-up of 24 months. Pelvic bone anchors permit mesh fixation in high-recurrence areas not amenable to traditional suture fixation. The ability to safely and effectively use bone anchor fixation is an essential tool in complex open ventral hernia repair. PMID:26140889

  6. The neonatal chest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobo, Luisa [Servico de Imagiologia Geral do Hospital de Santa Maria, Av. Prof. Egas Moniz, 1649-035 Lisbon (Portugal)]. E-mail: mluisalobo@gmail.com

    2006-11-15

    Lung diseases represent one of the most life threatening conditions in the newborn. Important progresses in modern perinatal care has resulted in a significantly improved survival and decreased morbidity, in both term and preterm infants. Most of these improvements are directly related to the better management of neonatal lung conditions, and infants of very low gestational ages are now surviving. This article reviews the common spectrum of diseases of the neonatal lung, including medical and surgical conditions, with emphasis to the radiological contribution in the evaluation and management of these infants. Imaging evaluation of the neonatal chest, including the assessment of catheters, lines and tubes are presented.

  7. The neonatal chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung diseases represent one of the most life threatening conditions in the newborn. Important progresses in modern perinatal care has resulted in a significantly improved survival and decreased morbidity, in both term and preterm infants. Most of these improvements are directly related to the better management of neonatal lung conditions, and infants of very low gestational ages are now surviving. This article reviews the common spectrum of diseases of the neonatal lung, including medical and surgical conditions, with emphasis to the radiological contribution in the evaluation and management of these infants. Imaging evaluation of the neonatal chest, including the assessment of catheters, lines and tubes are presented

  8. Picture quiz: a case of sudden severe chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabia, Mustafa Abu; Sullivan, P; Stivaros, Stavros M

    2007-01-01

    An 18-year-old male with no previous medical history presented to hospital with sudden onset of acute epigastric pain radiating to the anterior chest wall and both shoulders. There was no history of recent trauma and he had not been vomiting. PMID:21611610

  9. 乳腺癌术后胸壁和锁骨上区整体调强剂量学探讨%Irradiation of the chest wall and regional nodes as an integrated volume with IMRT for breast cancer after mastectomy:from dosimetry to clinical observation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹勤舟; 魏贤顶; 赵于天; 张福正; 杨波

    2012-01-01

    Objective To discuss dosimetric characteristics of integrated volume for chest wall target and supraclavicular target with IMRT for breast cancer after mastectomy, and observe a-cute side - effects following irradiation. Methods It was plan for breast cancer after mastectomy of 146cases, the plan for integrated volume with IMRT for breast cancer in 43 cases choice3 fields for chest wall target area and 2 fields for supraclavicular target area and 1 field for the total target area, the general plan in 103 cases was 3D - CRT for chest wall target joining plan of mixed irradiation by 6 MV X — ray and 9 MeV electronic line for supraclavicular target. prescription dose was 50 Gy/25 times, to meet the requirements of 90 % prescription dose for target area; and dosimetry characteristics on the chest wall target and supraclavicular target area and normal organ are compared. Results The plan of integrated volume with IMRT for breast cancer for the chest wall target area compared with general plan reduces the maximum dose and enhance the minimum dose and a better target conformal and uniformity. The plan of integrated volume with IMRT for breast cancer for Supraclavicular target area compared with general plan, the minimum dose and the average dose of prescription dose and 95% contains the target volume, and conformal and uniformity for the target region was increased obviously. The plan of integrated volume with IMRT for breast cancer for the normal organ compared with general plan, the V30 and V10 and V30 and Dmean of the ipsilateral lung and heart were lowed, while the V5 and V10 of the ipsilateral lung and heart were increased, it were no statistical difference of V20 of the ipsilateral lung and Dmean of the contralateral lung and Dmean of the contralateral breast, ≥grade 2 radiational dermatitis was identified in 38% patients, no patient developed radiation pneumonitis. Conclusion The plan for integrated volume with IMRT for breast cancer can improve the dose of

  10. A new specifically designed forceps for chest drain insertion.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Andrews, Emmet

    2012-02-03

    Insertion of a chest drain can be associated with serious complications. It is recommended that the drain is inserted with blunt dissection through the chest wall but there is no specific instrument to aid this task. We describe a new reusable forceps that has been designed specifically to facilitate the insertion of chest drains.A feasibility study of its use in patients who required a chest drain as part of elective cardiothoracic operations was undertaken. The primary end-point was successful and accurate placement of the drain. The operators also completed a questionnaire rating defined aspects of the procedure. The new instrument was used to insert the chest drain in 30 patients (19 male, 11 female; median age 61.5 years (range 16-81 years)). The drain was inserted successfully without the trocar in all cases and there were no complications. Use of the instrument rated as significantly easier relative to experience of previous techniques in all specified aspects. The new device can be used to insert intercostal chest drains safely and efficiently without using the trocar or any other instrument.

  11. MR imaging of the reconstructed breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The etiology of pain is difficult to evaluate in a reconstructed breast because of capsular contracture and compression of tissue. MR images were obtained in 45 patients with a variety of pulse techniques. In hands, STIR (short inversion recovery) imaging was the most sensitive sequence. Suppression of the fat signal and increased contrast between normal and pathologic tissue, coupled with the synergistic effects of prolonged T1 and T2, were a major practical advantage. MR imaging can demonstrate recurrent tumor involving the chest wall, internal mammary nodes and rupture of the implant bag. The authors believe MR imaging can play a strong supplementary role in determining the etiology of pain in a postmastectomy patient

  12. Imaging of blunt chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blunt chest trauma is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Consequently, all patients should be evaluated radiologically after blunt chest trauma to allow timely and appropriate treatment. Conventional chest radiographs and computed tomography (CT) are proven modalities with which to evaluate patients after blunt chest trauma. Over the last several years extended focused assessment with sonography for trauma (eFAST) has gained increasing importance for the initial assessment of seriously injured patients. In the acute phase of severely injured patients eFAST examinations are helpful to exclude pneumothorax, hemothorax and hemopericardium. Chest radiographs may also be used to diagnose a pneumothorax or hemothorax; however, the sensitivity is limited and CT is the diagnostic modality of choice to evaluate severely injured patients. (orig.)

  13. Endobronchial Tuberculosis and Chest Radiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Sasani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Endobronchial tuberculosis and chest radiography I read, with interest, the article entitled “Clinical and Para-clinical Presentations of Endobronchial Tuberculosis” by Ahmadi Hoseini H. S. et al. (1 published in this journal. I would like to focus on some details about the chest X-ray of patients as elaborated by the authors in the results section. Accordingly, the findings of chest radiography in the available patients were as follows: pulmonary consolidation (75%, reduced pulmonary volume (20%, and hilar adenopathy (10%. This is an incomplete statement because the authors did not explain whether there was any normal chest radiography in the study population. In addition, it is not clear whether the X-ray examinations of the patients were normal, how many abnormal plain films yielded the presented data. On the other hand, the fact that the studied patients had no normal chest radiography is  controversial since in the literature, 10-20% of the patients with endobronchial tuberculosis are reported to have normal chest X-ray (2, 3. In fact, this is one of the problems in the diagnosis of the disease, as well as a potential cause of delayed diagnosis and treatment of the patients. Therefore, the absence of normal chest radiographs is in contrast to the available literature, and if not an error, it could be a subject of further investigation.

  14. Chest radiographic findings of leptospirosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1. A study on chest radiographic findings of 54 cases with pneumonia like symptoms was performed. Of 54 cases, 8 cases were confirmed to be leptospirosis and 7 cases were leptospirosis combined with Korean hemorrhagic fever. 2. Of 8 cases of leptospirosis, 4 cases showed abnormal chest radiographic findings: acinar nodular type 2, massive confluent consolidation type 2. Of 7 cases of leptospirosis combined with Korean hemorrhagic fever: acinar nodular type 3, massive confluent consolidation type 1, and increased interstitial markings type 1 respectively. 3. It was considered to be difficult to diagnose the leptospirosis on chest radiographic findings alone, especially the case combined with Korean hemorrhagic fever.

  15. Chest radiographic findings of leptospirosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mee Hyun; Jung, Hee Tae; Lee, Young Joong; Yoon, Jong Sup [Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-04-15

    1. A study on chest radiographic findings of 54 cases with pneumonia like symptoms was performed. Of 54 cases, 8 cases were confirmed to be leptospirosis and 7 cases were leptospirosis combined with Korean hemorrhagic fever. 2. Of 8 cases of leptospirosis, 4 cases showed abnormal chest radiographic findings: acinar nodular type 2, massive confluent consolidation type 2. Of 7 cases of leptospirosis combined with Korean hemorrhagic fever: acinar nodular type 3, massive confluent consolidation type 1, and increased interstitial markings type 1 respectively. 3. It was considered to be difficult to diagnose the leptospirosis on chest radiographic findings alone, especially the case combined with Korean hemorrhagic fever.

  16. Radiology illustrated. Chest radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung Soo [Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology; Han, Joungho [Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Pathology; Chung, Man Pyo [Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Medicine; Jeong, Yeon Joo [Pusan National Univ. Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology

    2014-04-01

    Pattern approach to the diagnosis of lung diseases based on CT scan appearances. Guide to quick and reliable differential diagnosis. CT-pathology correlation. Emphasis on state-of-the-art MDCT. The purpose of this atlas is to illustrate how to achieve reliable diagnoses when confronted by the different abnormalities, or ''disease patterns'', that may be visualized on CT scans of the chest. The task of pattern recognition has been greatly facilitated by the advent of multidetector CT (MDCT), and the focus of the book is very much on the role of state-of-the-art MDCT. A wide range of disease patterns and distributions are covered, with emphasis on the typical imaging characteristics of the various focal and diffuse lung diseases. In addition, clinical information relevant to differential diagnosis is provided and the underlying gross and microscopic pathology is depicted, permitting CT-pathology correlation. The entire information relevant to each disease pattern is also tabulated for ease of reference. This book will be an invaluable handy tool that will enable the reader to quickly and easily reach a diagnosis appropriate to the pattern of lung abnormality identified on CT scans.

  17. 乳腺癌术后胸壁大体积复发二野和六野调强放疗剂量学比较%A dosimetric comparison of the tangential beams IMRT with multifield beams IMRT of the chest wall in postmastectomy breast cancer recurrent patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李永武; 孙晓南; 王奇; 刘海; 施国治

    2013-01-01

    目的 比较乳腺癌术后胸壁大体积复发2野和6野调强放疗的计划差异.方法 对8例乳腺切除术后胸壁大体积复发病例,Pinnacle计划系统上分别对PTV进行2野调强和6野调强放疗计划设计,PTV处方剂量为50 Gy/25次(GTV后续计划补量至66~70 Gy),比较2种计划95%处方剂量PTV适形指数(CI)、均匀性指数(HI)及心脏、同侧肺剂量.结果 6野IMRT计划的CI和HI均优于2野IMRT计划,6野和2野的CI分别为(0.66±0.08)和(0.53±0.10)(t=7.99,P<0.05),HI分别为(1.36±0.08)和(2.19±0.78)(t=9.04,P<0.05).2个计划中肺V5、V10、V20、V35和心脏Dmax、V35、Dmean值比较差异无统计学意义.结论 乳腺癌切除术后胸壁大体积复发患者行放疗,6野静态逆向调强放疗计划靶区覆盖优于2野,而心肺受量方面无明显差异.%Objective To compare the dose distribution of reserved planned tangential beam IMRT(2-field IMRT) with multifields beams IMRT(6-field IMRT) of the bulk-recurrent chest wall in postmastectomy breast cancer patients.Methods For 8 patients with chest wall in postmastectomy breast cancer bulk-recurrence,2-field IMRT and 6-field IMRT plans were generated on PTV in Pinnacle Planning System.The prescribed dose of PTV was 50 Gy in 25 fractions and GTV was 66-70 Gy which irradiated incrementally by subsequent plan in 8-10 fractions.The conformal index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI) of 95% of prescribed dose over PTV were compared,while the dose distribution on ipsilateral lung and heart were evaluated.Results The CI of PTV by 6-field IMRT (0.66 ± 0.08) was higher than that of the2-field IMRT (0.53±0.10)(t=7.99,P<0.05).The HI ofPTV by6-field IMRT (1.36±0.08)waslower than that of 2-field IMRT (2.19 ±0.78) (t =9.04,P <0.05).There was no statistical difference in V5,V10,V20 and V35 for ipsilateral lung and in D V35 and D for heart between two plans.Conclusions Compared with 2-field IMRT,6-field IMRT might have a better dose distribution on

  18. The effects of ultrashortwave irradiation and chest-wall vibration therapy on serum eosinophil cationic protein and the percentage of eosinophil in the sputum of children with asthma%超短波和胸壁振动辅助治疗对轻、中度儿童哮喘诱导痰EOS及血清ECP的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵飞; 乔艳红; 刘丰; 王一彪

    2008-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of ultrashortwave irradiation and chest-wall vibration therapy on serum eosinophil cationic protein(ECP)and percentage of eosinophil(EOS%)in the sputum of children with mild to moderate asthma. Methods A total of 68 children with asthma were divided into a control group and a treatment group.The control group WaS treated with conventional treatment only,while the treatment group was given ultrashortwave irradiation and chest-wall vibration therapy in addition to the conventional treatment.The serum ECP,EOS% in induced sputum,FEV1.0%,and PEF% were measured before and after treatment.The relationships among ECP,EOS%,FEV1.0% and PEF% were analyzed.Results FEV1.0% and PEF% were negatively correlated with serum ECP and EOS% in children with asthma.Compared with the control group,ECP and EOS% were significantly reduced after treatment,while FEV1.0% and PEF% were significantly elevated. Conclusion Uhrashortwave irradiation and chest-wall vibration therapy can improve ventilation by ameliorating airway inflammation and obstruction.%目的 探讨超短波和胸壁振动辅助治疗儿童哮喘对诱导痰嗜酸粒细胞百分数(EOS%)、血清嗜酸粒细胞阳离子蛋白(ECP)及肺通气功能的影响.方法 68例哮喘儿童随机分为对照组和治疗组,对照组采用常规治疗,治疗组除常规治疗外,先后行超短波和胸壁振动辅助治疗,并分别于治疗前、后采血测ECP,行肺通气功能检查及诱导痰EOS%分类.结果 哮喘儿童诱导痰EOS%、血清ECP与肺通气功能指标第1秒最大呼气量占预计值的百分数(FEV1.0%)及呼气峰流速占预计值的百分数(PEF%)均呈显著负相关(P<0.01);与对照组比较,治疗后治疗组血清ECP、诱导痰EOS%均显著降低,FEV1.0%、PEF%显著升高(P<0.05或0.01).结论 超短波和胸壁振动辅助治疗儿童哮喘具有减轻气道炎症和气道受阻、提高肺通气功能的作用.

  19. Ewing sarcoma of the thoracic wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewing's sarcomas in the chest wall have in common the facts that the ribs are mainly changed asteolytically; sclerosing is initially seen very seldom, it usually occurs after the therapy; and periosteal detachment with stratification or spicula formation was not observed. All our children had considerably larger intrathoracic tumors than tumors palpable at the chest wall and a notably low number of symptoms in regard of the partially gigantic tumors. (orig.)

  20. Chest Pain (Beyond the Basics)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... number of problems related to the stomach and intestines can cause pain that spreads to or even begins in the chest, including ulcers, gallbladder disease, pancreatitis, and irritable bowel syndrome. (See "Patient information: Peptic ulcer disease (Beyond the ...

  1. Titanium internal fixation system used for sternum reconstruction after resection of chondrosarcoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zheng-cheng; ZHAO Heng

    2010-01-01

    @@ Chondrosarcoma is the most common malignant primary ches t wall tumor, only 20% of these cases involve sternum.1 Current therapy for chondrosarcoma requires adequate surgical excision and radiation therapy,2chemotherapy have not been yet proved to be effective.However, reconstruction of the defect is difficult, the problems of providing soft tissue coverage additionally complicating the surgery and even potentially limit the ability to achieve clear margin. Titanium internal fixation system can provide proper chest stability, ensure wide surgical margin and reduce hurts.

  2. An unusual cause for recurrent chest infections.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lobo, Ronstan

    2012-10-01

    We present a case of an elderly non-smoking gentleman who, since 2005, had been admitted multiple times for recurrent episodes of shortness of breath, wheeze, cough and sputum. The patient was treated as exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and\\/or lower respiratory tract infections. Bronchoscopy was done which revealed multiple hard nodules in the trachea and bronchi with posterior tracheal wall sparing. Biopsies confirmed this as tracheopathia osteochondroplastica (TO). He had increasing frequency of admission due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and pseudomonas infections, which failed to clear despite intravenous, prolonged oral and nebulised antibiotics. The patient developed increasing respiratory distress and respiratory failure. The patient died peacefully in 2012. This case report highlights the typical pathological and radiological findings of TO and the pitfalls of misdiagnosing patients with recurrent chest infections as COPD.

  3. L-positioned Perforator Propeller Flap for Partial Breast Reconstruction with Axillary Dead Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Mao; Shimizu, Daisuke; Yokoyama, Akiko; Ito, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Partial breast reconstruction using perforator flaps harvested from the lateral chest wall has become a well-established surgical technique recently. In the case of a partial mastectomy with an axillary lymph node dissection, there are 2 main defects; one is a partial breast defect and the other is an axillary dead space. To reconstruct the 2 separate defects with local flaps, basically 2 different flaps are needed, and usually, it is rather difficult to harvest 2 different local flaps in the adjacent area. To resolve this problem, we introduce the L-positioned perforator propeller flap (PPF). We used an L-positioned PPF on 2 female patients, aged 46 and 47 years old, who were suffering from breast cancer in the upper outer quadrant. The concept of this flap design is as follows: the partial breast defect is reconstructed with the longer lobe of the L-positioned PPF and the axillary defect is filled with the smaller lobe of the L-positioned PPF at the same time. The reconstruction time was 2 hours and 0 minutes and 1 hour and 46 minutes in each case. The patients were successfully provided with aesthetically acceptable breast reconstruction without postoperative complications. Moreover, both patients had consecutive postoperative radiotherapy on the reconstructed area without complications. With this flap design, it is possible for patients to have safe and aesthetic reconstruction with only 1 local flap and fewer invasive procedures.

  4. L-positioned Perforator Propeller Flap for Partial Breast Reconstruction with Axillary Dead Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Mao; Yano, Tomoyuki; Shimizu, Daisuke; Yokoyama, Akiko; Ito, Osamu

    2016-06-01

    Partial breast reconstruction using perforator flaps harvested from the lateral chest wall has become a well-established surgical technique recently. In the case of a partial mastectomy with an axillary lymph node dissection, there are 2 main defects; one is a partial breast defect and the other is an axillary dead space. To reconstruct the 2 separate defects with local flaps, basically 2 different flaps are needed, and usually, it is rather difficult to harvest 2 different local flaps in the adjacent area. To resolve this problem, we introduce the L-positioned perforator propeller flap (PPF). We used an L-positioned PPF on 2 female patients, aged 46 and 47 years old, who were suffering from breast cancer in the upper outer quadrant. The concept of this flap design is as follows: the partial breast defect is reconstructed with the longer lobe of the L-positioned PPF and the axillary defect is filled with the smaller lobe of the L-positioned PPF at the same time. The reconstruction time was 2 hours and 0 minutes and 1 hour and 46 minutes in each case. The patients were successfully provided with aesthetically acceptable breast reconstruction without postoperative complications. Moreover, both patients had consecutive postoperative radiotherapy on the reconstructed area without complications. With this flap design, it is possible for patients to have safe and aesthetic reconstruction with only 1 local flap and fewer invasive procedures. PMID:27482501

  5. Uso de placas de ácido poli-L-láctico en reconstrucción de pared torácica Use of poly-L-lactic plates in chest wall reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    J. Vilà Poyatos; F. Fullana Sastre; E. Peluffo; P. López de Castro Alujes; M. Mestre Martínez; V. Gónzalez Mestre

    2011-01-01

    La reconstrucción de la pared torácica exige un amplio conocimiento de las técnicas reconstructivas y un buen plan operatorio. Por una parte es necesario mantener la estabilidad de la caja torácica y por otro proporcionar una buena base para la cobertura dérmica o musculocutánea que confiera buenos resultados funcionales y plásticos. En este trabajo describimos 2 casos clínicos en los que la reconstrucción de la pared torácica anterior se realizó con placas de ácido poli-L-láctico sobre las q...

  6. [Experience with thoracoscopy for rifle gunshot penetrating trauma of the chest; report of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambayashi, T; Moriuchi, T; Noguchi, T; Kamakari, K; Terada, T

    2005-10-01

    A 57-year-old man came to our hospital by ambulance for a chest injury by a rifle gunshot. He had a penetrating injury of the chest wall, hemopneumothorax and pulmonary laceration. He was managed with chest drainage, oxygen inhalation. His respiratory and cardiac status was stable. However, for the purpose to prevent the development of empyema or pneumonia, and to check the existence of damage of intrathoracic structures by the gunshot injury, thoracoscopy was performed next day. He discharged without postoperative complications 17 days after the injury. Open thoracotomy is reported to be required in only about 10-15% of patients with chest injuries. However, operative indication of the chest injuries may spread in the future with the spread of thoracoscopy and its low invasiveness. PMID:16235855

  7. Airway hyperresponsiveness with chest strapping: A matter of heterogeneity or reduced lung volume?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrino, Riccardo; Pompilio, Pasquale P; Bruni, Giulia Innocenti; Scano, Giorgio; Crimi, Claudia; Biasco, Luigi; Coletta, Giuseppe; Cornara, Giuseppe; Torchio, Roberto; Brusasco, Vito; Dellacà, Raffaele L

    2009-03-31

    Chest wall strapping has been recently shown to be associated with an increase in airway responsiveness to methacholine. To investigate whether this is the result of the decreased lung volume or an increased heterogeneity due to chest wall distortion, ten healthy volunteers underwent a methacholine challenge at control conditions and after selective strapping of the rib cage, the abdomen or the whole chest wall resulting in similar decrements of functional residual capacity and total lung capacity but causing different distribution of the bronchoconstrictor. Methacholine during strapping reduced forced expiratory flow, dynamic compliance, and reactance at 5Hz and increased pulmonary resistance and respiratory resistance at 5Hz that were significantly greater than at control and associated with a blunted bronchodilator effect of the deep breath. However, no significant differences were observed between selective and total chest wall strapping, suggesting that the major mechanism for increasing airway responsiveness with chest wall strapping is the breathing at low lung volume rather than regional heterogeneities. PMID:19429518

  8. Contemporary management of flail chest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vana, P Geoff; Neubauer, Daniel C; Luchette, Fred A

    2014-06-01

    Thoracic injury is currently the second leading cause of trauma-related death and rib fractures are the most common of these injuries. Flail chest, as defined by fracture of three or more ribs in two or more places, continues to be a clinically challenging problem. The underlying pulmonary contusion with subsequent inflammatory reaction and right-to-left shunting leading to hypoxia continues to result in high mortality for these patients. Surgical stabilization of the fractured ribs remains controversial. We review the history of management for flail chest alone and when combined with pulmonary contusion. Finally, we propose an algorithm for nonoperative and surgical management. PMID:24887787

  9. Gunshot wounds to the chest

    OpenAIRE

    Holmen, Lillian Beate

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: This is a review of gunshot wounds to the chest. Although uncommon in Norway, they represent a big health problem in other parts of the world and in war situations. Method: A systematic literature search using PubMed and McMaster+. Results: Gunshot wounds to the chest can be highly lethal. Depending on the injured organ, a large percentage of the patients die before reaching the hospital. There is a big difference between low-velocity and high-velocity weapons. Low velocity inju...

  10. Inflation and deflation pressure-volume loops in anesthetized pinnipeds confirms compliant chest and lungs

    OpenAIRE

    Fahlman, Andreas; Loring, Stephen H.; Johnson, Shawn P.; Haulena, Martin; Trites, Andrew W.; Fravel, Vanessa A.; Van Bonn, William G.

    2014-01-01

    We examined structural properties of the marine mammal respiratory system, and tested Scholander's hypothesis that the chest is highly compliant by measuring the mechanical properties of the respiratory system in five species of pinniped under anesthesia (Pacific harbor seal, Phoca vitulina; northern elephant seal, Mirounga angustirostris; northern fur seal Callorhinus ursinus; California sea lion, Zalophus californianus; and Steller sea lion, Eumetopias jubatus). We found that the chest wall...

  11. [Influences of chest deformation by upper abdominal retractor on respiratory system impedance during abdominal surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, T; Ozawa, Y; Sato, J

    1999-02-01

    The present study was carried out to clarify the effects of chest deformation by upper abdominal retractor on respiratory system impedance during abdominal surgery. We measured the impedances of respiratory system (RS), lung, and chest wall (CW) in nine anesthetized paralyzed subjects employing a pseudorandom noise forced volume oscillation technique. These measurements were performed before and after the lifting chest wall by upper abdominal retractor. The effects of chest deformation was significant on the impedances of RS, lung, while no discernible effect was found in CW impedance. Lifting chest wall decreased RS resistance which was totally accounted for by the decrease in lung resistance, whereas the lifting did not affect reactance in either RS or lung. The mathematical modeling showed the significant lifting effect on the resistance of the parenchyma. In conclusion, change in RS mechanics produced by chest deformation by upper abdominal retractor is dominated in lung but not in CW. Among the lung mechanical components, parenchyma is the primary site of the lifting effect. PMID:10087819

  12. Use of a porcine dermal collagen implant for contaminated abdominal wall reconstruction in a 105-year-old woman: a case report and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Melnik, Idit; Goldstein, Dimitry; Yoffe, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Repair of contaminated abdominal wall defect in a geriatric patient is a challenge for the surgeon. We present the case of the oldest patient (105-years old) to successfully undergo a single-stage repair of a contaminated abdominal wall defect with a Permacol™ implant. Case presentation A 105-year-old Caucasian woman presented to our emergency room with a clinical and radiological diagnosis of small bowel obstruction due to prior operative adhesions. She underwent laparotomy with...

  13. Surgical management for large chest keloids with internal mammary artery perforator flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Dan; Qian, Huan

    2016-01-01

    Therapy for large symptomatic keloids is often plagued with complicated reconstruction manner and recurrence. This article reports a rare treatment combination for a chest keloid with internal mammary artery perforator flap reconstruction and radiation therapy. We excised the keloid and covered the defect with an internal mammary artery perforator flap. Immediate electron-beam irradiation therapy was applied on the second postoperative day. There was no sign of recurrence over the follow-up period of 18 months. The combination of internal mammary artery perforator flap and immediate radiation therapy is useful when faced with chest keloids of similar magnitude and intractability. PMID:26982790

  14. New developments in ultrasonic imaging of the chest and other body organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accurate measurement of transuranic elements deposited in the lung is a complex task. One of the problems is measuring uranium-L x-rays associated with plutonium passing through the chest of an accidentally exposed subject. Because the normal human chest-wall thickness varies from about 1 to 4.5 cm, it is important that an accurate determination be made for every person counted for plutonium or for other heavy elements with similar emissions. An ultrasonic B-scanning system (brightness modulated time-base) was developed for defining the structure within the body. Computer programs were written to determine the distance between the lung and chest-wall interface and the outer surface of the chest wall at several points on each scan. These points are exponentially averaged to obtain an average chest-wall thickness that is used, with other information, to derive a calibration factor for plutonium in the subject. It is also combined with the counting data to obtain the plutonium lung burden. Since photon transmission characteristics differ in fat and soft tissue, assessing the fat content is important and can provide a correction factor for counter sensitivity when viewing various organs. The main advantage of the B-scanning and three-dimensional systems are discussed

  15. Sternal resection and reconstruction for local recurrence of breast cancer using the sternal allograft transplantation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'amore, Andrea; Nizar, Asadi; Dolci, Giampiero; Cassanelli, Nicola; Caroli, Guido; Luciano, Giulia; Greco, Domenico; Bini, Alessandro; Stella, Franco

    2013-03-01

    Sternal involvement in patients with breast cancer is relatively rare and its treatment is still controversial. Surgery is usually indicated in cases of single metastases in a multimodality protocol. Partial or complete sternectomy associated or not with the resection of surrounding tissues is the technique of choice to obtain safety margins and radical treatment of the disease. The most challenging part of the operation is the reconstruction of the anterior chest wall in order to avoid secondary complications and respiratory failure. In the last few years, different techniques and materials have been used to reconstruct the sternum. We report our experience in two patients with recurrent breast cancer using the sternal allograft technique to replace the sternum after partial sternectomy. The use of a sternal-allograft provides excellent functional and cosmetic results without complications during the follow-up period. The implantation technique is simple and reproducible. PMID:22884436

  16. Chest Wall Pain as the Presenting Symptom of Leptomeningeal Carcinomatosis

    OpenAIRE

    Sim, Kyoung Bo; Nam, Ki Yeun; Lee, Ho Jun; Park, Jin-Woo; Ryu, Gi Hyeong; Chang, Jihea; Kwon, Bum Sun

    2014-01-01

    Leptomeningeal metastasis (LMM), also referred to as leptomeningeal carcinomatosis, results from diffuse infiltration of the leptomeninges by malignant cells originating from extra-meningeal primary tumors. It occurs in approximately 5%-10% of patients with solid tumor. Among solid tumors, the most common types leading to infiltration of the leptomeninges are breast cancer, lung cancer, and melanoma. Patients with LMM may present various signs and symptoms. Herein, we report a rare case with ...

  17. Nuclear imaging of the chest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahk, Y.W. [Samsung Cheil General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology; Kim, E.E. [Texas Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Cancer Center; Isawa, T. [Yokohama Higashi National Hospital (Japan)

    1998-01-01

    This book provides up-to-the minute information on the diagnostic nuclear imaging of chest disorders. The authors have endeavored to integrate and consolidate the many different subspecialities in order to enable a holistic understanding of chest diseases from the nuclear medicine standpoint. Highlights of the book include in addition to the cardiac scan the description of aerosol lung imaging in COPD and other important pulmonary diseases and the updates on breast and lung cancer imaging, as well as imaging of the bony thorax and esophagus. It is required reading not only for nuclear medicine practitioners and researchers but also for all interested radiologists, traumatologists, pulmonologists, oncologists and cardiologists. (orig.) 217 figs., 25 tabs.

  18. Chest shape in preterm newborn infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The suggestion that thoracic shape of anteroposterior radiographs reflects lung compliance was examined in 62 preterm newborn infants (none with pulmonary hypoplasia) by measuring ratios of upper to lower chest widths. Chest shape did not vary significantly with the presence of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) or with gender, Apgar score, endotracheal intubation, radiographic severity of RDS, or age at radiography. However, decreased maturity was associated with a relatively wide upper chest and narrow lower chest. Developmental factors may be more important than lung compliance (and the other factors noted) in determining the radiographic configuration of the infantile chest

  19. Radiology of occupational chest disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiologic manifestations of occupational lung disease are summarized and classified in this book according to the ILO system. The interpretation of chest roentgenograms outlines the progression of each disease and is accompanied with clinically-oriented explanations. Some of the specific diseases covered include asbestosis, coal worker's pneumoconiosis, silicosis, non-mining inhalation of silica and silicates, beryllium induced disease, inhalation of organics and metallics, and occupationally induced asthma

  20. X-ray face mask and chest shield device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A protective face mask is designed to shield an x-ray technician or machine operator primarily from random secondary or scatter x-rays deflected towards his face, head and neck by the table, walls, equipment and other reflecting elements in an x-ray room or chamber. The face mask and chest shield device can be mounted on a patient's shoulders in reverse attitude to protect the back of a patient's head and neck from the x-ray beam. The face mask is relatively or substantially transparent and contains lead in combination with a plastic ionomer or comonomer, which to a degree absorbs or resists penetration of the random deflected secondary or scatter x-rays or the x-ray beam through the mask. The face mask is removably attachable to the chest shield for easy application of the device to and support upon the shoulders of the technician or the patient. (author)

  1. Gastric tumors on chest radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastric neoplasms of three patients protruded into their gas-containing fornices and were first visualized on plain chest radiographs. Endoscopy and/or surgery confirmed these to be a polyp, a leiomyoma, and an adenocarcinoma. The polyp, 1.3 cm in diameter, was the smallest of these three, but smaller lesions may be detectable under suitable conditions. Adequate technique and positioning, sufficiently large lesions in the upper portion of the stomach, a central beam tangential to the tumor, sufficient gas in the stomach, and careful scrutiny by the observer are required. Lesions may be more readily visualized during chest radiography when oral sodium bicarbonate is used to distend the stomach. In chest radiography, exposure limited to the lung fields has been advocated for economy and dose reduction. However, too small an exposure field may result in loss of information potentially beneficial to the patient. Using the smaller of two popular film sizes (35 x 43 cm and 35 x 35 cm), the saving in surface and bone marrow doses is negligible, and the saving in gonad dose may be nil over that when shielding is used. The interest of the observer may be absorbed by a concomitant cardiac or pulmonary lesion. Careful scrutiny of the entire radiograph is therefore essential. (author)

  2. Active breathing control (ABC): Determination and reduction of breathing-induced organ motion in the chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Extensive radiotherapy volumes for tumors of the chest are partly caused by interfractional organ motion. We evaluated the feasibility of respiratory observation tools using the active breathing control (ABC) system and the effect on breathing cycle regularity and reproducibility. Methods and Materials: Thirty-six patients with unresectable tumors of the chest were selected for evaluation of the ABC system. Computed tomography scans were performed at various respiratory phases starting at the same couch position without patient movement. Threshold levels were set at minimum and maximum volume during normal breathing cycles and at a volume defined as shallow breathing, reflecting the subjective maximal tolerable reduction of breath volume. To evaluate the extent of organ movement, 13 landmarks were considering using commercial software for image coregistration. In 4 patients, second examinations were performed during therapy. Results: Investigating the differences in a normal breathing cycle versus shallow breathing, a statistically significant reduction of respiratory motion in the upper, middle, and lower regions of the chest could be detected, representing potential movement reduction achieved through reduced breath volume. Evaluating interfraction reproducibility, the mean displacement ranged between 0.24 mm (chest wall/tracheal bifurcation) to 3.5 mm (diaphragm) for expiration and shallow breathing and 0.24 mm (chest wall) to 5.25 mm (diaphragm) for normal inspiration. Conclusions: By modifying regularity of the respiratory cycle through reduction of breath volume, a significant and reproducible reduction of chest and diaphragm motion is possible, enabling reduction of treatment planning margins

  3. New developments in ultrasonic imaging of the chest and other body organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ultrasonic imaging system described herein was developed to measure chest-wall thickness and the percentage of fat in the chest and around other body organs. The system uses pulse-echo techniques to transmit and detect sound waves reflected from the interfaces of body organs and adjacent tissue. A computer draws these interfaces on colour scans, and a code is used to exponentially average data from several points on each scan to find the average thicknesses of the chest wall and fat layers. These average thicknesses are then used to adjust X-ray calibration factors for plutonium lung counters. The correction factor for three subjects measured for fat content ranging from 12.6% to 22.2% was 18% to 41%. The ultrasonic system also defines the shape and position of the kidneys and liver, so we are able to place detectors on the body more accurately during in-vivo radiation measurements. A technique was also developed for displaying the interfaces from a series of ultrasonic chest scans to produce a topographical map that enables one to understand the shape and contour of the lung and chest-wall interface better. (author)

  4. New developments in ultrasonic imaging of the chest and other body organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ultrasonic imaging system described herein was developed to measure chest-wall thickness and the percentage of fat in the chest and around other body organs. The system uses pulse-echo techniques to transmit and detect sound waves reflected from the interfaces of body organs and adjacent tissue. A computer draws these interfaces on color scans, and a code is used to exponentially average data from several points on each scan to find the average thicknesses of the chest wall and fat layers. These average thicknesses are then used to adjust x-ray calibration factors for plutonium lung counters. The correction factor for three subjects measured for fat content ranging from 12.6 to 22.2% was 18 to 41%. The ultrasonic system also defines the shape and position of the kidneys and liver so we are able to more accurately place detectors on the body during in-vivo radiation measurements. We have also developed a technique for displaying the interfaces from a series of ultrasonic chest scans to produce a topographical map that enables us to better understand the shape and contour of the lung and chest-wall interface

  5. Novel computed tomographic chest metrics to detect pulmonary hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Chin-Shang

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension (PH can potentially improve survival and quality of life. Detecting PH using echocardiography is often insensitive in subjects with lung fibrosis or hyperinflation. Right heart catheterization (RHC for the diagnosis of PH adds risk and expense due to its invasive nature. Pre-defined measurements utilizing computed tomography (CT of the chest may be an alternative non-invasive method of detecting PH. Methods This study retrospectively reviewed 101 acutely hospitalized inpatients with heterogeneous diagnoses, who consecutively underwent CT chest and RHC during the same admission. Two separate teams, each consisting of a radiologist and pulmonologist, blinded to clinical and RHC data, individually reviewed the chest CT's. Results Multiple regression analyses controlling for age, sex, ascending aortic diameter, body surface area, thoracic diameter and pulmonary wedge pressure showed that a main pulmonary artery (PA diameter ≥29 mm (odds ratio (OR = 4.8, right descending PA diameter ≥19 mm (OR = 7.0, true right descending PA diameter ≥ 16 mm (OR = 4.1, true left descending PA diameter ≥ 21 mm (OR = 15.5, right ventricular (RV free wall ≥ 6 mm (OR = 30.5, RV wall/left ventricular (LV wall ratio ≥0.32 (OR = 8.8, RV/LV lumen ratio ≥1.28 (OR = 28.8, main PA/ascending aorta ratio ≥0.84 (OR = 6.0 and main PA/descending aorta ratio ≥ 1.29 (OR = 5.7 were significant predictors of PH in this population of hospitalized patients. Conclusion This combination of easily measured CT-based metrics may, upon confirmatory studies, aid in the non-invasive detection of PH and hence in the determination of RHC candidacy in acutely hospitalized patients.

  6. Novel computed tomographic chest metrics to detect pulmonary hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension (PH) can potentially improve survival and quality of life. Detecting PH using echocardiography is often insensitive in subjects with lung fibrosis or hyperinflation. Right heart catheterization (RHC) for the diagnosis of PH adds risk and expense due to its invasive nature. Pre-defined measurements utilizing computed tomography (CT) of the chest may be an alternative non-invasive method of detecting PH. This study retrospectively reviewed 101 acutely hospitalized inpatients with heterogeneous diagnoses, who consecutively underwent CT chest and RHC during the same admission. Two separate teams, each consisting of a radiologist and pulmonologist, blinded to clinical and RHC data, individually reviewed the chest CT's. Multiple regression analyses controlling for age, sex, ascending aortic diameter, body surface area, thoracic diameter and pulmonary wedge pressure showed that a main pulmonary artery (PA) diameter ≥29 mm (odds ratio (OR) = 4.8), right descending PA diameter ≥19 mm (OR = 7.0), true right descending PA diameter ≥ 16 mm (OR = 4.1), true left descending PA diameter ≥ 21 mm (OR = 15.5), right ventricular (RV) free wall ≥ 6 mm (OR = 30.5), RV wall/left ventricular (LV) wall ratio ≥0.32 (OR = 8.8), RV/LV lumen ratio ≥1.28 (OR = 28.8), main PA/ascending aorta ratio ≥0.84 (OR = 6.0) and main PA/descending aorta ratio ≥ 1.29 (OR = 5.7) were significant predictors of PH in this population of hospitalized patients. This combination of easily measured CT-based metrics may, upon confirmatory studies, aid in the non-invasive detection of PH and hence in the determination of RHC candidacy in acutely hospitalized patients

  7. Imaging of fetal chest masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barth, Richard A. [Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Prenatal imaging with high-resolution US and rapid acquisition MRI plays a key role in the accurate diagnosis of congenital chest masses. Imaging has enhanced our understanding of the natural history of fetal lung masses, allowing for accurate prediction of outcome, parental counseling, and planning of pregnancy and newborn management. This paper will focus on congenital bronchopulmonary malformations, which account for the vast majority of primary lung masses in the fetus. In addition, anomalies that mimic masses and less common causes of lung masses will be discussed. (orig.)

  8. Impalement Injuries of the Chest

    OpenAIRE

    Edwin, F; Tettey, M; Sereboe, L; Aniteye, E; Kotei, D; Tamatey, M; Entsuamensah, K; Delia, I; Frimpong-Boateng, K

    2009-01-01

    Impalement injuries of the chest are uncommon in civilian practice with few reports in the literature. We report three cases of thoracic impalement seen over a 5 year period with unusual underlying mechanisms. In two of the cases, the impalement was obvious; in the third, the impalement was concealed having occurred 5 months earlier. In Case 1, the underlying mechanism was a high-speed road traffic accident. The patient was impaled by a metallic square pipe piled by the roadside. In Case 2, t...

  9. Chest dynamics asymmetry facilitates earlier detection of pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waisman, D; Landesberg, A; Kohn, S; Faingersh, A; Klotzman, I C; Gover, A; Kessel, I; Rotschild, A

    2016-02-01

    Pneumothorax is usually diagnosed when signs of life-threatening tension pneumothorax develop. The case report describes novel data derived from miniature superficial sensors that continuously monitored the amplitude and symmetry of the chest wall tidal displacement (TDi) in a premature infant that suffered from pneumothorax. Off-line analysis of the TDi revealed slowly progressing asymmetric ventilation that could be detected 38 min before the diagnosis was made. The TDi provides novel and valuable information that can assist in early detection and decision making. PMID:26814803

  10. SU-E-T-280: Reconstructed Rectal Wall Dose Map-Based Verification of Rectal Dose Sparing Effect According to Rectum Definition Methods and Dose Perturbation by Air Cavity in Endo-Rectal Balloon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Dosimetric effect and discrepancy according to the rectum definition methods and dose perturbation by air cavity in an endo-rectal balloon (ERB) were verified using rectal-wall (Rwall) dose maps considering systematic errors in dose optimization and calculation accuracy in intensity-modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) for prostate cancer patients. Methods: When the inflated ERB having average diameter of 4.5 cm and air volume of 100 cc is used for patient, Rwall doses were predicted by pencil-beam convolution (PBC), anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA), and AcurosXB (AXB) with material assignment function. The errors of dose optimization and calculation by separating air cavity from the whole rectum (Rwhole) were verified with measured rectal doses. The Rwall doses affected by the dose perturbation of air cavity were evaluated using a featured rectal phantom allowing insert of rolled-up gafchromic films and glass rod detectors placed along the rectum perimeter. Inner and outer Rwall doses were verified with reconstructed predicted rectal wall dose maps. Dose errors and extent at dose levels were evaluated with estimated rectal toxicity. Results: While AXB showed insignificant difference of target dose coverage, Rwall doses underestimated by up to 20% in dose optimization for the Rwhole than Rwall at all dose range except for the maximum dose. As dose optimization for Rwall was applied, the Rwall doses presented dose error less than 3% between dose calculation algorithm except for overestimation of maximum rectal dose up to 5% in PBC. Dose optimization for Rwhole caused dose difference of Rwall especially at intermediate doses. Conclusion: Dose optimization for Rwall could be suggested for more accurate prediction of rectal wall dose prediction and dose perturbation effect by air cavity in IMRT for prostate cancer. This research was supported by the Leading Foreign Research Institute Recruitment Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea

  11. 应用4DCT研究乳腺癌根治术后胸壁IMRT的放射物理学优势%The radiation physics advantages of 4DCT on intensity-modulated radiotherapy of chest wall after radical mastectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王文岩; 肖志清; 王艳强; 张玉峰; 郭晗; 薛晓英

    2014-01-01

    Objective To invesigate the influence of breathing motion on intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) of chest wall after radical mastectomy,and explore clinical value of accurately determined target volume.Methods A total of 17 radical mastectomy patients underwent 3DCT simulation scans sequentially followed by 4DCT simulation scans during free breathing.The targets and normal organs was determined based on CT images respectively.Three sets of radiotherapy plan were designed for each patient:plan 3D,plan 4D and plan 3D-A.The Plan 3D and plan 4D was designed based on 3D and 4D targets respectively.Plan 3D was copied to 4D target with the same isocenter coordinates.The dose distribution was calculated separately to evaluate the dose-volume histograms parameters for PTV,ipsilateral lung and heart,respectively.Two planning parameters was compared with paired t-test or Wilcoxon sign-rank test.Results The average volume of PTV4D was (10.35 ± 4.80) % larger than PTV3D (P =0.000).Compared with plan 3D,the V100,V95,V90,D95,D90,Dmin of plan 3D-A were reduced,that were (0.78 -18.0)% (P=0.000),(0.01-3.90)% (P=0.000),(0-2.12)% (P=0.000),(13-222) cGy (P=0.000),(1-118) cGy (P=0.000),(6-1 910) cGy (P=0.000).However,the V20,V10,V5,Dmean of the ipsilateral lung and V30 of heart were same between 3D plan and 4D plan (P =0.288,0.407,0.435,0.758,0.575).Conclusions The respiratory motion may reduce the target dose and its coverage in chest wall treatments,so 4DCT plan could accurately define target volume without increasing the exposure dose of normal tissues.%目的 探讨根治术后乳腺癌胸壁IMRT时为克服呼吸运动影响应用4DCT确定靶区的临床价值.方法 对入组的17例乳腺癌根治术后患者序贯进行常规CT和4DCT扫描并采集图像,分别勾画靶区和正常组织.根据每位患者的3D、4D靶区分别制定3D计划和4D计划,并将3D计划按等中心坐标直接复制到4D靶区上比较差异及OAR剂量学变化,并行配对t

  12. COMPLETE LEFT MAIN BRONCHUS DISRUPTION DUE TO BLUNT CHEST TRAUMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Nasser Aldahmashi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Isolated tracheobronchial disruption is an uncommon injury usually associated with severe blunt thoracic trauma. We report a 14 year-old female case with avulsion of the left main bronchus occurring after blunt chest trauma due to a down fallen wall. A successful surgical repair of the totally avulsed left main bronchus was carried out. The postoperative course was uneventful with improvement in the respiratory status. The patient regained wellness within days in the intensive care unit, and the diagnosis of traumatic rupture of the left main bronchus was approved by bonchoscopy and the computerized tomography (CT scan of the chest. Surgical repair of the disrupted left main bronchus was accomplished 10 days from the admission and the bronchoscopic evaluation of the anastomosis and patency was achieved. The patient was discharged with her lung fully expanded on chest X-ray. The diagnosis and preoperative management of this uncommon post traumatic condition is discussed. We conclude that, in a patient with sustained severe blunt thoracic trauma, a high index of suspicion for trachea-bronchial disruptions must be maintained to detect these rare lesions. Skilful and early surgical treatment is required for proper management of such cases.

  13. X-ray face mask and chest shield device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A protective face mask is disclosed that is designed to shield an x-ray technician or machine operator primarily from random secondary or scatter x-rays deflected toward his face, head and neck by the table, walls, equipment and other reflecting elements in an x-ray room or chamber, during the period of exposure while adjacent the object or person being exposed to the x-ray beam. The face mask and chest shield device can be mounted on a patient's shoulders in reverse attitude to protect the back of a patient's head and neck from the x-ray beam while being exposed to such beam for chest or upper body portion study and examination. The face mask is relatively or substantially transparent and contains lead in combination with a plastic ionomer or comonomer, which absorbs or resists penetration, to a degree, of the random deflected secondary or scatter x-rays or the x-ray beam through the mask. The face mask is removably attachable to the chest shield for facile application of the device to and support upon the shoulders of the technician or the patient

  14. Why x-ray chests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to assess the validity of screening chest radiography at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories, the yield of occult major disease and its significance to the afflicted employees have been examined over a ten year period. The study suggests that the incidence rate of occult disease which in retrospect proved to have been of major or life-threatening importance to the afflicted employee approximates 1 per 1000 population per annum. Major benefit accrued only to about 1 in 3 of these employees, the remainder gaining little more than that which would have followed treatment had their diseases presented symptomatically. These results are considered in relation to the health surveillance needs of a population generally and selectively exposed to diverse health hazards within the nuclear industry. (auth)

  15. Chest pain in focal musculoskeletal disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen; Christensen, Henrik Wulff

    2010-01-01

    The musculoskeletal system is a recognized source of chest pain. However, despite the apparently benign origin, patients with musculoskeletal chest pain remain under-diagnosed, untreated, and potentially continuously disabled in terms of anxiety, depression, and activities of daily living. Several...

  16. Frequency of anomalies associated with chest deformity in physically fit male candidates reporting for military recruitment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To identify the frequency of anomalies associated with chest deformity in physical fit male candidates reporting for military recruitment. Study Design: Observational. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Thoracic Surgery, CMH Rawalpindi from 1st Jan 2008 to 31 Dec 2011. Patients and Methods: Normal healthy physically fit young adolescents being recruited for army were scrolled and those exhibiting chest deformity were isolated and subjected to evaluation. Convenience sampling was carried out. All candidates of chest wall deformity thereafter underwent a thorough physical checkup, pulmonary function tests and echocardiography. Results: A total of 3735 candidates of chest deformity reported at our center for evaluation over this duration. Single deformity patients 3380 (90.5%), mixed deformity patients 355 (9.5%). We found that none of the candidates had any derangement of the lung function tests or electrocardiographic abnormality despite their deformity. However echocardiography detected an abnormality in 161 (4.3%) individuals who were otherwise asymptomatic. Conclusion: Chest deformity should be excluded before physical tests, in all the male candidates reporting for enrolment. If slightest of doubt exists that a candidate has chest deformity then he should be evaluated with echocardiography to exclude cardiac abnormality. Although the associated frequency is only 4.3% but this can subsequently result in a grave event like death. (author)

  17. Estimation of cartilaginous region in noncontrast CT of the chest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qian; Safdar, Nabile; Yu, Glenna; Myers, Emmarie; Sandler, Anthony; Linguraru, Marius George

    2014-03-01

    Pectus excavatum is a posterior depression of the sternum and adjacent costal cartilages and is the most common congenital deformity of the anterior chest wall. Its surgical repair can be performed via minimally invasive procedures that involve sternum and cartilage relocation and benefit from adequate surgical planning. In this study, we propose a method to estimate the cartilage regions in thoracic CT scans, which is the first step of statistical modeling of the osseous and cartilaginous structures for the rib cage. The ribs and sternum are first segmented by using interactive region growing and removing the vertebral column with morphological operations. The entire chest wall is also segmented to estimate the skin surface. After the segmentation, surface meshes are generated from the volumetric data and the skeleton of the ribs is extracted using surface contraction method. Then the cartilage surface is approximated via contracting the skin surface to the osseous structure. The ribs' skeleton is projected to the cartilage surface and the cartilages are estimated using cubic interpolation given the joints with the sternum. The final cartilage regions are formed by the cartilage surface inside the convex hull of the estimated cartilages. The method was validated with the CT scans of two pectus excavatum patients and three healthy subjects. The average distance between the estimated cartilage surface and the ground truth is 2.89 mm. The promising results indicate the effectiveness of cartilage surface estimation using the skin surface.

  18. [How to do - the chest tube drainage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopp, Michael; Hoffmann, Hans; Dienemann, Hendrik

    2015-03-01

    A chest tube is used to drain the contents of the pleural space to reconstitute the physiologic pressures within the pleural space and to allow the lungs to fully expand. Indications for chest tube placement include pneumothorax, hemothorax, pleural effusion, pleural empyema, and major thoracic surgery. The most appropriate site for chest tube placement is the 4th or 5th intercostal space in the mid- or anterior- axillary line. Attention to technique in placing the chest tube is vital to avoid complications from the procedure. Applying the step-by-step technique presented, placement of a chest tube is a quick and safe procedure. Complications - frequently occurring when the tube is inserted with a steel trocar - include hemothorax, dislocation, lung lacerations, and injury to organs in the thoracic or abdominal cavity." PMID:25734676

  19. In search of optimum chest radiography techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nation-wide study of chest radiography in Sweden previously revealed a large variation in the physical and technical factors involved, in particular radiation dose. In this study image quality could not be assessed unambiguously. The aim was to try to establish correlation between visual grading of radiographs and physical and technical factors in order to find the optimum chest X-ray system. The physical and technical performance of 24 chest units was evaluated. Radiographs were taken of an anthropomorphic chest phantom supplied with test structures simulating various pathologies. Image quality was assessed by visual grading analysis of the radiographs. The physical and technical parameters of the units rated best were used to exemplify good radiographic practice. Results were in agreement with the recommendations issued by the Commission of the European Communities (CEC). It was also shown that low radiation dose is compatible with high-quality radiographic imaging of the chest. (Author)

  20. Radiographic, CT and MRI spectrum of hydatid disease of the chest: a pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty patients with thoracic hydatidosis (Echinococcus granulosus) were studied. The hydatid cysts were located in the lung parenchyma (70%), mediastinum (6.7%), inside the heart (10%), the pleurae (10%) and the chest wall (3.3%). Complications of thoracic hydatid cysts, such as rupture, infection, pleural involvement, spread and calcifications are presented. Computed tomography (CT) without and/or with contrast enhancement was performed in all patients (30). Findings from conventional chest radiographs were compared with CT and confirmed by pathology (30). In 10 cases (33.3%), magnetic resonance imaging was also performed. The diagnostic spectrum of hydatid cysts, including variations and developmental stages, is presented in this pictorial essay. (orig.)

  1. Chest CT in children: anesthesia and atelectasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, Beverley; Gawande, Rakhee [Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Krane, Elliot J. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Holmes, Tyson H. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford, CA (United States); Robinson, Terry E. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Pulmonary Medicine and Cystic Fibrosis Center for Excellence in Pulmonary Biology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2014-02-15

    There has been an increasing tendency for anesthesiologists to be responsible for providing sedation or anesthesia during chest CT imaging in young children. Anesthesia-related atelectasis noted on chest CT imaging has proven to be a common and troublesome problem, affecting image quality and diagnostic sensitivity. To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a standardized anesthesia, lung recruitment, controlled-ventilation technique developed at our institution to prevent atelectasis for chest CT imaging in young children. Fifty-six chest CT scans were obtained in 42 children using a research-based intubation, lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation CT scanning protocol. These studies were compared with 70 non-protocolized chest CT scans under anesthesia taken from 18 of the same children, who were tested at different times, without the specific lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation technique. Two radiology readers scored all inspiratory chest CT scans for overall CT quality and atelectasis. Detailed cardiorespiratory parameters were evaluated at baseline, and during recruitment and inspiratory imaging on 21 controlled-ventilation cases and 8 control cases. Significant differences were noted between groups for both quality and atelectasis scores with optimal scoring demonstrated in the controlled-ventilation cases where 70% were rated very good to excellent quality scans compared with only 24% of non-protocol cases. There was no or minimal atelectasis in 48% of the controlled ventilation cases compared to 51% of non-protocol cases with segmental, multisegmental or lobar atelectasis present. No significant difference in cardiorespiratory parameters was found between controlled ventilation and other chest CT cases and no procedure-related adverse events occurred. Controlled-ventilation infant CT scanning under general anesthesia, utilizing intubation and recruitment maneuvers followed by chest CT scans, appears to be a safe and effective method to obtain

  2. Chest CT in children: anesthesia and atelectasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There has been an increasing tendency for anesthesiologists to be responsible for providing sedation or anesthesia during chest CT imaging in young children. Anesthesia-related atelectasis noted on chest CT imaging has proven to be a common and troublesome problem, affecting image quality and diagnostic sensitivity. To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a standardized anesthesia, lung recruitment, controlled-ventilation technique developed at our institution to prevent atelectasis for chest CT imaging in young children. Fifty-six chest CT scans were obtained in 42 children using a research-based intubation, lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation CT scanning protocol. These studies were compared with 70 non-protocolized chest CT scans under anesthesia taken from 18 of the same children, who were tested at different times, without the specific lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation technique. Two radiology readers scored all inspiratory chest CT scans for overall CT quality and atelectasis. Detailed cardiorespiratory parameters were evaluated at baseline, and during recruitment and inspiratory imaging on 21 controlled-ventilation cases and 8 control cases. Significant differences were noted between groups for both quality and atelectasis scores with optimal scoring demonstrated in the controlled-ventilation cases where 70% were rated very good to excellent quality scans compared with only 24% of non-protocol cases. There was no or minimal atelectasis in 48% of the controlled ventilation cases compared to 51% of non-protocol cases with segmental, multisegmental or lobar atelectasis present. No significant difference in cardiorespiratory parameters was found between controlled ventilation and other chest CT cases and no procedure-related adverse events occurred. Controlled-ventilation infant CT scanning under general anesthesia, utilizing intubation and recruitment maneuvers followed by chest CT scans, appears to be a safe and effective method to obtain

  3. Impacts to the chest of PMHSs - Influence of impact location and load distribution on chest response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmqvist, Kristian; Svensson, Mats Y; Davidsson, Johan; Gutsche, Andreas; Tomasch, Ernst; Darok, Mario; Ravnik, Dean

    2016-02-01

    The chest response of the human body has been studied for several load conditions, but is not well known in the case of steering wheel rim-to-chest impact in heavy goods vehicle frontal collisions. The aim of this study was to determine the response of the human chest in a set of simulated steering wheel impacts. PMHS tests were carried out and analysed. The steering wheel load pattern was represented by a rigid pendulum with a straight bar-shaped front. A crash test dummy chest calibration pendulum was utilised for comparison. In this study, a set of rigid bar impacts were directed at various heights of the chest, spanning approximately 120mm around the fourth intercostal space. The impact energy was set below a level estimated to cause rib fracture. The analysed results consist of responses, evaluated with respect to differences in the impacting shape and impact heights on compression and viscous criteria chest injury responses. The results showed that the bar impacts consistently produced lesser scaled chest compressions than the hub; the Middle bar responses were around 90% of the hub responses. A superior bar impact provided lesser chest compression; the average response was 86% of the Middle bar response. For inferior bar impacts, the chest compression response was 116% of the chest compression in the middle. The damping properties of the chest caused the compression to decrease in the high speed bar impacts to 88% of that in low speed impacts. From the analysis it could be concluded that the bar impact shape provides lower chest criteria responses compared to the hub. Further, the bar responses are dependent on the impact location of the chest. Inertial and viscous effects of the upper body affect the responses. The results can be used to assess the responses of human substitutes such as anthropomorphic test devices and finite element human body models, which will benefit the development process of heavy goods vehicle safety systems. PMID:26687541

  4. Technique for chest radiography for pneumoconiosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Routine radiographic chest examinations have been performed using a variety of techniques. Although chest radiography is one of the most commonly performed radiographic examinations, it is often difficult to obtain consistently good quality roentgenograms. This publication provides a simple guide and relatively easy solution to the many problems that radiologic technologists might encounter. The language is purposely relatively simple and care has been taken to avoid difficult mathematical and physical explanations. The intent is to provide an easily referrable text for those who may encounter difficulties in producing acceptable chest radiographs

  5. Chest pain of cardiac and noncardiac origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenfant, Claude

    2010-10-01

    Chest pain is one of the most common symptoms driving patients to a physician's office or the hospital's emergency department. In approximately half of the cases, chest pain is of cardiac origin, either ischemic cardiac or nonischemic cardiac disease. The other half is due to noncardiac causes, primarily esophageal disorder. Pain from either origin may occur in the same patient. In addition, psychological and psychiatric factors play a significant role in the perception and severity of the chest pain, irrespective of its cause. Chest pain of ischemic cardiac disease is called angina pectoris. Stable angina may be the prelude of ischemic cardiac disease; and for this reason, it is essential to ensure a correct diagnosis. In most cases, further testing, such as exercise testing and angiography, should be considered. The more severe form of chest pain, unstable angina, also requires a firm diagnosis because it indicates severe coronary disease and is the earliest manifestation of acute myocardial infarction. Once a diagnosis of stable or unstable angina is established, and if a decision is made not to use invasive therapy, such as coronary bypass, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, or stent insertion, effective medical treatment of associated cardiac risk factors is a must. Acute myocardial infarction occurring after a diagnosis of angina greatly increases the risk of subsequent death. Chest pain in women warrants added attention because women underestimate their likelihood to have coronary heart disease. A factor that complicates the clinical assessment of patients with chest pain (both cardiac and noncardiac in origin) is the relatively common presence of psychological and psychiatric conditions such as depression or panic disorder. These factors have been found to cause or worsen chest pain; but unfortunately, they may not be easily detected. Noncardiac chest pain represents the remaining half of all cases of chest pain. Although there are a number of

  6. High precision Compton backscatter maps of myocardial wall dynamics. Theory and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInerney, J J; Copenhaver, G L; Herr, M D; Morris, D L; Zelis, R

    1989-09-01

    Compton backscatter imaging (CBI) is a technique that uses x-rays scattered from the closed-chest surface of the heart to obtain high frequency (5 msec) and high precision (+/- 0.1 mm SD) measurements of regional surface displacements and velocities. These measurements are acquired in a three-dimensional format that allows the reconstruction of the epicardial surface and the creation of color coded displacement and velocity maps at many time points during the cardiac cycle. Applications of the technique are shown to characterize detailed regional normal wall displacement and velocity patterns, and the significant alteration of those patterns after coronary embolization. The technique is also applied to the characterization of early diastolic wall dynamics. CBI measurements show that a brief and somewhat paradoxical inward displacement of the anterior ventricular wall occurs during early diastole in normal canines. The wall dynamics associated with this inward displacement suggest a brief collapse of the ventricle subsequent to aortic valve closure. Diastolic collapse velocities and displacements are significantly altered subsequent to coronary occlusion with mean and maximum collapse velocities decreasing by 50% and concomitant inward displacements decreasing by 40%. Data acquisition with CBI is non-invasive, does not require contrast agents or radioisotopes, and uses low irradiation levels (125 kVp, 3-5 ma). The average radiation dose to the heart for a typical study is 250 mrem, significantly lower than that of other radiation based imaging techniques. PMID:2807818

  7. Evaluation of immediate breast reconstruction and radiotherapy: Factors associated with complications; Reconstruction mammaire immediate apres mastectomie suivie de radiotherapie: facteurs de risque de complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, E.; Cowen, D. [Departement de radiotherapie, hopital de la Timone, 13 - Marseille (France); Hannoun-Levi, J.M. [Departement de radiotherapie, centre Antoine-Lacassagne, 06 - Nice (France); Rouanet, P. [Departement de chirurgie, centre Val-d' Aurelle-Paul-Lamarque, 34 - Montpellier (France); Houvenaeghel, G. [Departement de chirurgie, institut Paoli-Calmettes, 13 - Marseille (France); Teissier, E. [Centre azureen de cancerologie, 06 - Mougins (France); Ellis, S. [Centre catalan d' oncologie, 66 - Perpignan (France); Resbeut, M. [Centre de radiotherapie Saint-Louis, 83 - Toulon (France); Tallet, A. [Departement de radiotherapie, institut Paoli-Calmettes, 13 - Marseille (France); Vaini Cowen, V. [Departement de chirurgie gynecologique, polyclinique du Parc-Rambot, 13 - Aix-en-Provence (France); Azria, D. [Departement de radiotherapie, centre Val-d' Aurelle-Paul-Lamarque, 34 - Montpellier (France)

    2010-12-15

    Objectives: To determine prospectively the factors associated with reconstruction failure (i.e. requiring expander removal) and capsular contracture in patients undergoing mastectomy and immediate two-stage breast reconstruction with a tissue expander and implant, and radiotherapy for breast cancer. This is a multi-institutional prospective non-randomized trial. Patients and Methods: Between 2/1998 and 9/2006, we prospectively evaluated 141 consecutive patients who received 141 implants after mastectomy and underwent chest wall radiotherapy (46 to 50 Gy in 23 to 25 fractions). Patients were evaluated after 24 to 36 months by two senior physicians (radiation oncologist and surgeon). Results: Medical follow-up was 37 months. Baker 1 and 2 capsular contracture was observed in 67.5% of patients, Baker 3 and 4 in 32.5%. There were 32 reconstruction failures. In a univariate analysis, the following factors were associated with Baker 3 and 4 capsular contracture: surgeon, use of hormonotherapy and smoking, of which only one remained in the multivariate analysis: surgeon. In a univariate analysis, the following factors were associated with reconstruction failure: tumor size T3 or T4, smoking, pN+ axilla. Three factors remained associated with reconstruction failure in a multiple logistic regression: large tumors T3/T4, smoking and pN+ axilla. Conclusions: Mastectomy, radiotherapy and immediate breast reconstruction with a tissue expander and implant should be considered when breast conserving surgery has been denied. Adequate patients can be easily selected by using three factors of favourable outcome. (authors)

  8. Cell Wall

    OpenAIRE

    Jamet, Elisabeth; Canut, Hervé; Boudart, Georges; Albenne, Cécile; Pont-Lezica, Rafael F

    2008-01-01

    This chapter covers our present knowledge of cell wall proteomics highlighting the distinctive features of cell walls and cell wall proteins in relation to problems encountered for protein extraction, separation and identification. It provides clues to design strategies for efficient cell wall proteomic studies. It gives an overview of the kinds of proteins that have yet been identified: the expected proteins vs the identified proteins. Finally, the new vision of the cell wall proteome, and t...

  9. Learning aspects and potential pitfalls regarding detection of pulmonary nodules in chest tomosynthesis and proposed related quality criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background In chest tomosynthesis, low-dose projections collected over a limited angular range are used for reconstruction of an arbitrary number of section images of the chest, resulting in a moderately increased radiation dose compared to chest radiography. Purpose To investigate the effects of learning with feedback on the detection of pulmonary nodules for observers with varying experience of chest tomosynthesis, to identify pitfalls regarding detection of pulmonary nodules, and present suggestions for how to avoid them, and to adapt the European quality criteria for chest radiography and computed tomography (CT) to chest tomosynthesis. Material and Methods Six observers analyzed tomosynthesis cases for presence of nodules in a jackknife alternative free-response receiver-operating characteristics (JAFROC) study. CT was used as reference. The same tomosynthesis cases were analyzed before and after learning with feedback, which included a collective learning session. The difference in performance between the two readings was calculated using the JAFROC figure of merit as principal measure of detectability. Results Significant improvement in performance after learning with feedback was found only for observers inexperienced in tomosynthesis. At the collective learning session, localization of pleural and sub pleural nodules or structures was identified as the main difficulty in analyzing tomosynthesis images. Conclusion The results indicate that inexperienced observers can reach a high level of performance regarding nodule detection in tomosynthesis after learning with feedback and that the main problem with chest tomosynthesis is related to the limited depth resolution

  10. Digital chest radiography: collimation and dose reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debess, Jeanne; Johnsen, Karen Kirstine; Vejle-Sørensen, Jens Kristian;

    Purpose: Quality improvement of basic radiography focusing on collimation and dose reduction in digital chest radiography Methods and Materials:A retrospective study of digital chest radiography is performed to evaluate the primary x-ray tube collimation of the PA and lateral radiographs. Data from...... one hundred fifty self-reliant female patients between 15 and 55 years of age are included in the study. The clinical research is performed between September and November 2014 where 3rd year Radiography students collect data on four Danish x-ray departments using identical procedures under guidance of...... conference. Conclusion: Collimation improvement in basic chest radiography can reduce the radiation to female patients at chest x-ray examinations....

  11. Common Acupoints in Chest and Abdomen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Journal of Acupuncture and Tuina Science Editor; CUI Xue-jun

    2003-01-01

    @@ Tiantu (CV 21) Location: In the center of the suprasternal fossa(Fig. l ). Indications: Cough, dyspnea, chest pain, pharyngolaryngeal swelling and pains, sudden hoarseness of the voice, goiter, globus hystericus, and dysphagia.

  12. Angina - when you have chest pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or having sex. How to treat your chest pain Sit, stay calm, and rest. Your symptoms will often go away soon after you stop activity. If you are lying down, sit up in bed. Try deep breathing to ...

  13. Open-Chest Management after Heart Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Takayama, Hiroo; Leone, Richard J.; Aldea, Gabriel S.; Fishbein, Daniel P.; Verrier, Edward D.; Salerno, Christopher T.

    2006-01-01

    Postcardiotomy open-chest management has been widely used in cardiac surgery. Although this strategy can be applied to heart transplantation, the use of immunosuppressants in transplant recipients raises particular concerns about sternal wound infection and impaired healing.

  14. Aspergillosis - chest x-ray (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... usually occurs in immunocompromised individuals. Here, a chest x-ray shows that the fungus has invaded the lung ... are usually seen as black areas on an x-ray. The cloudiness on the left side of this ...

  15. Thymic carcinoma presenting as atypical chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Sadiq; Connelly, Tara; Keita, Luther; Blazkova, Sylvie; Veerasingam, Dave

    2015-01-01

    A 58-year-old woman with a 2-month history of atypical chest pain was referred to the chest pain clinic by the general practitioner. Exercise stress test was positive and subsequent coronary angiogram revealed significant triple vessel disease with left ventricular impairment requiring a coronary artery bypass graft (CABG). The patient had a chest X-ray as part of the preoperative work up. Chest X-ray revealed a large anterior mediastinal mass. Subsequent thorax CT revealed a 7.2 cm anterior mediastinal mass. CT-guided biopsy of the mass revealed the diagnosis of a poorly differentiated thymic basaloid carcinoma. The patient was successfully treated with concomitant surgery involving complete resection of the mass and a CABG procedure. PMID:26607199

  16. Tuberculosis, advanced - chest x-rays (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis is an infectious disease that causes inflammation, the formation of tubercules and other growths within tissue, ... death. These chest x-rays show advanced pulmonary tuberculosis. There are multiple light areas (opacities) of varying ...

  17. Computerized tomography of chest in emphysema and interstitial diseases diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the effect of increasing the spatial resolution on thin section (1.5 mm) computed tomography (CT) of the chest, we compared images reconstructed with the standard algorithm (SA) to three other images obtained with 1) a high spatial frequency algorithm, 2) retrospective targeting to a small field of view (FOV) reconstructed with the high spatial frequency algorithm, and 3) the same high spatial frequency algorithm with images acquired with the small (0.6 mm) rather the large (0.9 mm) focal spot. Examinations were performed on a phantom, on normal subjects, and on patients with emphysema and other diffuse lung diseases. Modulation transfer function (MTF) calculations revealed that higher resolution was achieved on the small focal spot and high spatial frequency algorithm than on the standard algorithm. Evaluation of the four images from 25 normal subjects, 16 patients with emphysema and 9 with interstitial disease was performed by means of an ROC study. Results from the areas under the ROC curves, sensitivity and specificity have shown that images reconstructed with the high spatial frequency algorithm were preferred. We conclude that the use of a high spatial frequency algorithm increases spatial resolution and improves visibility of lung parenchyma. Although more evaluation is needed, the potential of increasing spatial resolution further by using a smaller focal spot is currently limited by the mas Available per slice and the associated increased level of quantum noise. (Author)

  18. Surface Chest Motion Decomposition for Cardiovascular Monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Ghufran Shafiq; Kalyana C. Veluvolu

    2014-01-01

    Surface chest motion can be easily monitored with a wide variety of sensors such as pressure belts, fiber Bragg gratings and inertial sensors, etc. The current applications of these sensors are mainly restricted to respiratory motion monitoring/analysis due to the technical challenges involved in separation of the cardiac motion from the dominant respiratory motion. The contribution of heart to the surface chest motion is relatively very small as compared to the respiratory motion. Further, t...

  19. Tuberculous spondylitis presenting as severe chest pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha A. Kaeser

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes a 32-year-old male who presented to an emergency department with severe chest pain and a history of cough, fever, night sweats, loss of appetite and weight. Chest radiography revealed a left upper lobe consolidation and multiple compression deformities in the thoracic spine. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated significant kyphosis and vertebral plana at two thoracic levels. Anterior compression of the spinal cord and adjacent soft tissue masses were also noted.

  20. Psychiatric syndromes associated with atypical chest pain

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolić Gordana; Tasić Ivan; Manojlović Snežana; Samardžić Ljiljana; Tošić Suzana; Ćirić Zoran

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aim. Chest pain often indicates coronary disease, but in 25% of patients there is no evidence of ischemic heart disease using standard diagnostic tests. Beside that, cardiologic examinations are repeated several times for months. If other medical causes could not be found, there is a possibility that chest pain is a symptom of psychiatric disorder. The aim of this study was to determine the presence of psychiatric syndromes, increased somatization, anxiety, stress life events expos...

  1. Misdiagnosed Chest Pain: Spontaneous Esophageal Rupture

    OpenAIRE

    Inci, Sinan; Gundogdu, Fuat; Gungor, Hasan; Arslan, Sakir; Turkyilmaz, Atila; Eroglu, Atila

    2013-01-01

    Chest pain is one of themost common complaints expressed by patients presenting to the emergency department, and any initial evaluation should always consider life-threatening causes. Esophageal rupture is a serious condition with a highmortality rate. If diagnosed, successful therapy depends on the size of the rupture and the time elapsed between rupture and diagnosis.We report on a 41-year-old woman who presented to the emergency department complaining of left-sided chest pain for two hours.

  2. Results of Thoracotomy in Penetrating Chest Trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmood Aghaei-Afshar; Foroogh Mangeli; Sara Farifteh

    2012-01-01

    Background: Thoracotomy is a surgical procedure to access the chest components, which is often performed after severe bleeding caused by heart damage, lung laceration and other similar injuries.Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study which was conducted on all patients with penetrating chest trauma during April 2000 to October 2008.Results: In 5% of cases, thoracotomy was used for treatment in which severe bleeding was the main surgical indication. It was the most common findin...

  3. Treatment of 336 cases of chest trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Jing ZHANG; Xiang-yang CHU; Liu, Yi; Wang, Yun-Xi

    2012-01-01

    【Abstract】Objective: To summarize the clinical features, diagnosis and treatment of chest trauma. Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted among 336 cases of chest trauma admitted to our hospital from January 2009 to May 2011. Results: Out of all cases, 325 were cured, accounting for 96.7%; 11 died, accounting for 3.3%. Among the dead cases, one died of hemorrhagic shock, three of acute respi-ratory distress syndrome, three of multiple organ failure, and ...

  4. Late clotted haemothorax after blunt chest trauma.

    OpenAIRE

    Sinha, P; Sarkar, P

    1998-01-01

    A clotted haemothorax can develop any time after blunt chest trauma. Two cases are described in which late clotted haemothoraces developed which were treated by limited thoracotomy and evacuation of clots. Late clotted haemothorax may occur even in the absence of any abnormal initial clinical findings. Early detection and treatment is important to avoid the complications of fibrothorax and empyema with permanent pulmonary dysfunction. After blunt chest trauma patients should be advised to ret...

  5. How to remove a chest drain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allibone, Elizabeth

    2015-10-01

    RATIONALE AND KEY POINTS: This article aims to help nurses to undertake the removal of a chest drain in a safe, effective and patient-centred manner. This procedure requires two practitioners. The chest drain will have been inserted aseptically to remove air, blood, fluid or pus from the pleural cavity. ▶ Chest drains may be small or wide bore depending on the underlying condition and clinical setting. They may be secured with a mattress suture and/or an anchor suture. ▶ Chest drains are usually removed under medical instructions when the patient's lung has inflated, the underlying condition has resolved, there is no evidence of respiratory compromise or failure, and their anticoagulation status has been assessed as satisfactory. ▶ Chest drains secured with a mattress suture should be removed by two practitioners. One practitioner is required to remove the tube and the other to tie the mattress suture (if present) and secure the site. REFLECTIVE ACTIVITY: Clinical skills articles can help update your practice and ensure it remains evidence based. Apply this article to your practice. Reflect on and write a short account of: 1. How reading this article will change your practice. 2. How this article could be used to educate patients with chest drains. Subscribers can upload their reflective accounts at: rcni.com/portfolio . PMID:26443174

  6. Management of chest trauma: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebonojo, S A

    1993-01-01

    The incidence of chest trauma has increased significantly since the turn of the century especially in developed countries where rapid means of transportation has become part of daily life. Although gunshot wounds (GSWs) were the commonest causes of chest trauma in wartime, road traffic accidents (RTAs) have become the scourge of peacetime and modern civilization. Chest trauma is more common in males during the 2nd to the 5th decades of life with an average age of 40 years reducing their life expectancy by another 40 years at the most productive and active period of their lives. Despite improvement in ambulance service and rapid mobilization of victims from the scene of accident, about 10% of chest injured patients will die on the spot and another 5% die within an hour of reaching the hospital. Of the remaining 85%, five percent will require emergency thoracotomy for various reasons while 80% will respond to resuscitative measures and tube thoracostomy drainage alone. The primary aims in the management of chest trauma are prompt restoration of normal cardiorespiratory functions, control of haemorrhage, treatment of associated injuries and prevention of sepsis. Although the overall survival rate of trauma has improved in recent years, deaths are often due to airway obstruction, exsanguinating haemorrhage, flail chest, tension pneumothorax, cardiac tamponade and associated intracranial, intraabdominal and skeletal injuries. PMID:8398932

  7. Cardiac pathologies incidentally detected with non-gated chest CT; Inzidentelle Pathologien des Herzens im Thorax-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherer, Axel; Kroepil, P.; Lanzman, R.S.; Moedder, U. [Inst. fuer Radiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Duesseldorf, Heinrich-Heine-Univ. (Germany); Choy, G.; Abbara, S. [Cardiovascular Imaging Section, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School (United States)

    2009-12-15

    Cardiac imaging using electrocardiogram-gated multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) permits noninvasive diagnosis of congenital and acquired cardiac pathologies and has thus become increasingly important in the last years. Several studies investigated the incidence and relevance of incidental extracardiac structures within the lungs, mediastinum, chest wall, and abdomen with gated coronary CT. This resulted in the general acceptance of the review of extracardiac structures as a routine component of coronary CT interpretation. On the other hand radiologists tend to neglect pericardial and cardiac pathologies in non-gated chest CT, which is primarily performed for the evaluation of the respiratory system or for tumor staging. Since the introduction of multi-detector spiral CT technology, the incidental detection of cardiac and pericardial findings has become possible using non-gated chest CT. This article reviews the imaging appearances and differential diagnostic considerations of incidental cardiac entities that may be encountered in non-gated chest CT. (orig.)

  8. Mechanisms and Clinical Management of Ventricular Arrhythmias following Blunt Chest Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel H. Wolbrom

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonpenetrating, blunt chest trauma is a serious medical condition with varied clinical presentations and implications. This can be the result of a dense projectile during competitive and recreational sports but may also include other etiologies such as motor vehicle accidents or traumatic falls. In this setting, the manifestation of ventricular arrhythmias has been observed both acutely and chronically. This is based on two entirely separate mechanisms and etiologies requiring different treatments. Ventricular fibrillation can occur immediately after chest wall injury (commotio cordis and requires rapid defibrillation. Monomorphic ventricular tachycardia can develop in the chronic stage due to underlying structural heart disease long after blunt chest injury. The associated arrhythmogenic tissue may be complex and provides the necessary substrate to form a reentrant VT circuit. Ventricular tachycardia in the absence of overt structural heart disease appears to be focal in nature with rapid termination during ablation. Regardless of the VT mechanism, patients with recurrent episodes, despite antiarrhythmic medication in the chronic stage following blunt chest injury, are likely to require ablation to achieve VT control. This review article will describe the mechanisms, pathophysiology, and treatment of ventricular arrhythmias that occur in both the acute and chronic stages following blunt chest trauma.

  9. Psychiatric syndromes associated with atypical chest pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Gordana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Chest pain often indicates coronary disease, but in 25% of patients there is no evidence of ischemic heart disease using standard diagnostic tests. Beside that, cardiologic examinations are repeated several times for months. If other medical causes could not be found, there is a possibility that chest pain is a symptom of psychiatric disorder. The aim of this study was to determine the presence of psychiatric syndromes, increased somatization, anxiety, stress life events exposure and characteristic of chest pain expression in persons with atypical chest pain and coronary patients, as well as to define predictive parameters for atypical chest pain. Method. We compared 30 patients with atypical chest pain (E group to 30 coronary patients (K group, after cardiological and psychiatric evaluation. We have applied: Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI, The Symptom Checklist 90-R (SCL-90 R, Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI, Holms-Rahe Scale of stress life events (H-R, Questionnaire for pain expression Pain-O-Meter (POM. Significant differences between groups and predictive value of the parameters for atypical chest pain were determined. Results. The E group participants compared to the group K were younger (33.4 ± 5.4 : 48.3 ± 6,4 years, p < 0.001, had a moderate anxiety level (20.4 ± 11.9 : 9.6 ± 3.8, p < 0.001, panic and somatiform disorders were present in the half of the E group, as well as eleveted somatization score (SOM ≥ 63 -50% : 10%, p < 0.01 and a higher H-R score level (102.0 ± 52.2 : 46.5 ± 55.0, p < 0.001. Pain was mild, accompanied with panic. The half of the E group subjects had somatoform and panic disorders. Conclusion. Somatoform and panic disorders are associated with atypical chest pain. Pain expression is mild, accompained with panic. Predictive factors for atypical chest pain are: age under 40, anxiety level > 20, somatization ≥ 63, presence of panic and somatoform disorders, H-R score > 102

  10. Impact of the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction technique on image quality in ultra-low-dose CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To evaluate the relationship between different noise indices (NIs) and radiation dose and to compare the effect of different reconstruction algorithm applications for ultra-low-dose chest computed tomography (CT) on image quality improvement and the accuracy of volumetric measurement of ground-glass opacity (GGO) nodules using a phantom study. Materials and methods: A 11 cm thick transverse phantom section with a chest wall, mediastinum, and 14 artificial GGO nodules with known volumes (919.93 ± 64.05 mm3) was constructed. The phantom was scanned on a Discovery CT 750HD scanner with five different NIs (NIs = 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60). All data were reconstructed with a 0.625 mm section thickness using the filtered back-projection (FBP), 50% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR), and Veo model-base iterative reconstruction algorithms. Image noise was measured in six regions of interest (ROIs). Nodule volumes were measured using a commercial volumetric software package. The image quality and the volume measurement errors were analysed. Results: Image noise increased dramatically from 30.7 HU at NI 20 to 122.4 HU at NI 60, with FBP reconstruction. Conversely, Veo reconstruction effectively controlled the noise increase, with an increase from 9.97 HU at NI 20 to only 15.1 HU at NI 60. Image noise at NI 60 with Veo was even lower (50.8%) than that at NI 20 with FBP. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of Veo at NI 40 was similar to that of FBP at NI 20. All artificial GGO nodules were successfully identified and measured with an average relative volume measurement error with Veo at NI 60 of 4.24%, comparable to a value of 10.41% with FBP at NI 20. At NI 60, the radiation dose was only one-tenth that at NI 20. Conclusion: The Veo reconstruction algorithms very effectively reduced image noise compared with the conventional FBP reconstructions. Using ultra-low-dose CT scanning and Veo reconstruction, GGOs can be detected and quantified with an acceptable

  11. Utility of chest CT for differentiating primary and secondary achalasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To determine the computed tomography (CT) findings of primary and secondary achalasia and to assess the utility of CT for differentiating these conditions. Methods: A computerized search revealed 13 patients with primary achalasia and 15 with secondary achalasia who underwent chest CT during a 10-year period. The images were reviewed to determine whether there was distal oesophageal narrowing (including the length/contour of narrowing), oesophageal dilation, oesophageal wall thickening (including degree/symmetry/pattern of thickening), a soft-tissue mass at the gastro-oesophageal junction, mediastinal adenopathy, or other findings of malignant tumour. Results: Eleven (85%) of 13 patients with primary achalasia had distal oesophageal narrowing at CT that was smooth in all patients; four (31%) had oesophageal wall thickening that was smooth and symmetric in all patients; none had a soft-tissue mass at the gastro-oesophageal junction or mediastinal lymphadenopathy; and two (15%) had pulmonary metastases from unrelated lung cancers. In contrast, 12 (80%) of 15 patients with secondary achalasia had distal oesophageal narrowing at CT; 11 (73%) had distal oesophageal wall thickening that was nodular/lobulate and asymmetric in seven (64%) and smooth and symmetric in four (36%); six (40%) had a soft-tissue mass at the gastro-oesophageal junction; seven (47%) had mediastinal lymphadenopathy; and all 15 had other findings of malignant tumour. Conclusion: CT is a useful technique for differentiating primary and secondary achalasia. Distal oesophageal wall thickening that is nodular/lobulate and asymmetric, a soft-tissue mass at the gastro-oesophageal junction, mediastinal lymphadenopathy, and pulmonary, hepatic, or osseous metastases are findings that favour secondary achalasia. - Highlights: • CT is a useful technique for differentiating primary and secondary achalasia. • Nodular/lobulated distal oesophageal wall thickening favors secondary achalasia. • A soft

  12. Evaluation of immediate breast reconstruction and radiotherapy: Factors associated with complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: To determine prospectively the factors associated with reconstruction failure (i.e. requiring expander removal) and capsular contracture in patients undergoing mastectomy and immediate two-stage breast reconstruction with a tissue expander and implant, and radiotherapy for breast cancer. This is a multi-institutional prospective non-randomized trial. Patients and Methods: Between 2/1998 and 9/2006, we prospectively evaluated 141 consecutive patients who received 141 implants after mastectomy and underwent chest wall radiotherapy (46 to 50 Gy in 23 to 25 fractions). Patients were evaluated after 24 to 36 months by two senior physicians (radiation oncologist and surgeon). Results: Medical follow-up was 37 months. Baker 1 and 2 capsular contracture was observed in 67.5% of patients, Baker 3 and 4 in 32.5%. There were 32 reconstruction failures. In a univariate analysis, the following factors were associated with Baker 3 and 4 capsular contracture: surgeon, use of hormonotherapy and smoking, of which only one remained in the multivariate analysis: surgeon. In a univariate analysis, the following factors were associated with reconstruction failure: tumor size T3 or T4, smoking, pN+ axilla. Three factors remained associated with reconstruction failure in a multiple logistic regression: large tumors T3/T4, smoking and pN+ axilla. Conclusions: Mastectomy, radiotherapy and immediate breast reconstruction with a tissue expander and implant should be considered when breast conserving surgery has been denied. Adequate patients can be easily selected by using three factors of favourable outcome. (authors)

  13. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... DIMITRI KOUMANIS, MD: Watch the scar. Here we go. Okay. Now we can keep working down. Let me just reorganize here. And Dr. Chao is showing me the plain here, because it's quite evident where I need to go. So we get into a good plane again. ...

  14. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... screen and open the door to informed medical care. Now let's join the doctors. 00:01:03 ... the muscle, but that's going to be taken care of by our sutures. And sometimes you just ...

  15. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... them, which is a known problem, is seroma formation. And it really, in my hands and in ... easy to use with the white or the black sponge over top of the vac machine, which ...

  16. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... them, which is a known problem, is seroma formation. And it really, in my hands and in ... were having with the other products was the formation of seroma underneath this, and so what we' ...

  17. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... been proven yet. Now, when you have to bridge the gap, we recommend underlaying and parachuting like ... and irrigate now. I have a preference of type of irrigation. This is a betadine-tinged irrigation. ...

  18. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can get increased chance of skin breakdown and soft-tissue breakdown. But he's got a pretty thin subcutaneous ... That's what we were talking about before, a soft-tissue breakdown, which occurs often enough that it's a ...

  19. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... across. If you do have a large fat pad or subcutaneous, I think that's the type of ... bit of [ indistinct ], just put some wet lap pads for a few minutes, and that can usually ...

  20. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you need to get extra tissue at the superior portion, and I'm not certain that we ... use Veritas versus a lot of the other products that are out there. You probably noticed that ...

  1. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... need to be reconstituted, it came off the shelf -- alloderm, you have to sometimes wait because we ... it's in a box which is on our shelf. We keep it on the shelf here, so ...

  2. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Watch the needle. Watch you don't jab yourself with the needle there. 00:44:38 JEROME ... what Dr. Koumanis had mentioned about trying things yourself. The only reason we settled -- not settled, but ...

  3. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... easy to use with the white or the black sponge over top of the vac machine, which ... DIMITRI KOUMANIS, MD: Ultimately at this point in time, it does take a surgeon to behave the ...

  4. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... placed dual mesh as a parachute underneath using number two Monosoft. Shortly thereafter, he did develop a ... use permanent sutures. If we can have a number two Monosoft, that'd be great. Number two ...

  5. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... doing each suture under direct vision, no blind shots. 00:45:18 JEROME CHAO, MD: Sometimes people ... bacteria. Okay. So once again, a wide view shot, let's see what we've stirred up with ...

  6. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... now just showing you the abdomen of this patient, J.P. J.P. is a 47-year- ... for us down either gutter to prepare the patient, and we'll proceed with the component separation ...

  7. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it's a very long one. Also, there's an indicator strip on the outside. That's a heat indicator, and we always take a look at that, ... the pain that they have. And some high-risk patients want the surgery at any cost, including ...

  8. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... seeing in terms of the fascia and the quality of the tissues. You kind of sweep across ... the surgery at any cost, including loss of life, which is an interesting concept. Obviously there are ...

  9. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... idea of why. So each of these patients should have a reservation for an ICU just in ... attenuated skin. But that's delayed skin, so it should have a good blood supply. We'll take ...

  10. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... glistening white fascia under there, that's the good stuff. Always make sure you get these. DeBakey. All ... and then we'll come back after. This stuff here is pretty ratty. A little less on ...

  11. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... them on these and basically have created the team approach in dealing with these complex recurrent hernias. And I can't emphasize more the team approach, which some people forget, also includes your ...

  12. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with the Bovie, but you're creating thermal injury, and I'd rather cut it and then ... number of these. We are a level-one trauma center, and like this patient, they're not ...

  13. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... They also have a similar product from a porcine source. And this particular product is a calf ... the first products we looked at was the porcine product. And that had with it its own ...

  14. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to learn more. Just click on the "Request Information" button on your webcast screen and open the ... to learn more. Just click on the "Request Information" button on your webcast screen and open the ...

  15. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to learn more. Just click on the "Request Information" button on your webcast screen and open the door to informed medical care. This event was sponsored by Synovis Life Technologies. 01:24:53 [ end of webcast

  16. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the pain that they have. And some high-risk patients want the surgery at any cost, including ... do not operate on because of the high risk that they have medically. Okay, so we'll ...

  17. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... develop a hernia, which was repaired at the time by the surgeon who had performed the distal ... proceed with the component separation operation at this time. So if you see, we have the -- a ...

  18. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... please. And all the while, making sure we protect the bowel. In this situation, you can see ... necessary. And so what we do is we protect the bowel beneath and we come up high. ...

  19. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... not going to be augmenting. But in our experience here as well, that's where we are ending ... point, we did feel very strongly, clinically our experience did change. And we hope to get that ...

  20. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... was yes, it did -- right here -- it did cause seromas as well. Another thing was that the ... is two things: one is it's going to cause more adherence of the Veritas to the abdominal ...

  1. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... staff: the anesthesiologists who know what kind of issues are going to go on here and also ... try to avoid that because of blood supply issues towards our midline. So here, we don't ...

  2. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to informed medical care. Now let's join the doctors. 00:01:03 JEROME CHAO, MD: Good morning, ... patient and also is a problem for the physician as well and may result in additional surgeries. ...

  3. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a low percentage of betadine irrigation will not affect our wound healing and will not kill the ... terms of the muscle, but that will not affect our repair. I think we have good tissue ...

  4. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... KOUMANIS, MD: Also quite important -- this may be something simple but not to overlook -- is always come ... CHAO, MD: It's much easier. We do add something to our overlay which we'll show you. ...

  5. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... m cutting through now. Dr. Dumani at Northwestern University does advocate leaving these periumbilical perforators in this ... we'll try to just grab the fascia only in these cases as best as we can. ...

  6. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... several years ago. He has a history of COPD, pancreat-- he had some pancreotitis. He also has ... now? Which is 26. The patient does have COPD, and now that we're closing him -- actually, ...

  7. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an innovative biologic material which remodels into the tissue it is used to repair. Veritas is a ... postoperatively. We like to excise all the scar tissue or any sort of rind or capsules that ...

  8. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in dealing with these complex recurrent hernias. And I can't emphasize more the team approach, which ... we have some Kochers, please? The first thing I'm going to do is we take large ...

  9. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... They have a number of sizes that are available for us, and what the representative will do is get you -- these cards, these sizers that are on a ring, and that'll allow you to pick which size is most appropriate for you. And so we ...

  10. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Request Information" button on your webcast screen and open the door to informed medical care. Now let's ... traction. You see how it's just popping right open. Now, if you've done this wrong, you' ...

  11. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... surgery, that the patient's coughing, some of that stress can be relieved by the Veritas instead of ... anecdotal. Nobody has done a prospective randomized control study of any of these products that definitively gives ...

  12. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... other side. It's at least an 8 centimeter gap. And if you try to imagine the amount ... yet. Now, when you have to bridge the gap, we recommend underlaying and parachuting like Dr. Chao ...

  13. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is the fish, so our counts are correct. Standard protocol in terms of counts. Don't want ... see the foil that she has. And using standard technique, she's going to peel that. And Brian ...

  14. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... surgery, that the patient's coughing, some of that stress can be relieved by the Veritas instead of ... so we're going to make a fresh injury out of this, get these growth factors going. ...

  15. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... fact -- 00:45:52 DIMITRI KOUMANIS, MD: We work very close with them, and we are part ... it, it's really the product that's doing the work for us. We basically use it like we ...

  16. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ANNOUNCER: This event is being sponsored by Synovis Life Technologies. Over the next hour, you'll see ... the surgery at any cost, including loss of life, which is an interesting concept. Obviously there are ...

  17. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an indicator strip on the outside. That's a heat indicator, and we always take a look at ... it's been subjected to extreme in terms of heat, and we don't want that. And then ...

  18. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 00:21:04 DIMITRI KOUMANIS, MD: And good counter-traction obviously, with any surgery, is important. 00:21:07 JEROME CHAO, MD: Good counter-traction. You see how it's just popping right ...

  19. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the situation. But it's clearly a very good concept if you're not going to be augmenting. ... 00:45:58 JEROME CHAO, MD: That team concept is very important. And right now the general ...

  20. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... get all these clots off. It all harbors bacteria. Okay. So once again, a wide view shot, ... ve prepped the patient, the skin does have bacteria that will regrow. And so you see how ...

  1. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the fascia that I'm grabbing on either side with this -- with this stitch. The other thing is that we have, as you guys say, a very big omentum underneath this, and that's also a good reason to keep that omentum, because it provides ...

  2. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the fascia that I'm grabbing on either side with this -- with this stitch. The other thing is that we have, as you guys say, a very big omentum underneath this, and that's also a good reason to keep that omentum, because it provides ...

  3. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... quite a bit of fat here, and in these cases, we might do an omentectomy to help ... general surgeons and very closely with them on these and basically have created the team approach in ...

  4. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... fact -- 00:45:52 DIMITRI KOUMANIS, MD: We work very close with them, and we are part of the same department. 00:45:58 JEROME CHAO, MD: That team concept is very important. And right now the ...

  5. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Albany, New York. In just moments, you'll learn how the component separation is reinforced using Veritas ... OR-Live makes it easy for you to learn more. Just click on the "Request Information" button ...

  6. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... one is the dermis -- acellular dermis from a human. They also have a similar product from a porcine source. And this particular product is a calf pericardium source. The reason we ultimately chose this ... in fact. The human product, though a very good product, was causing ...

  7. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... But that's okay, because we're going to be doing that as well. But just make sure you grab on to that anterior fascia so that the proper dissection can be performed. 00:10:29 DIMITRI KOUMANIS, MD: This ...

  8. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A little less on that one. 00:28:51 JEROME CHAO, MD: Yep. All right. And we' ... start nutrition as soon as possible. 00:50:51 DIMITRI KOUMANIS, MD: And preoperatively, make sure that ...

  9. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the pain that they have. And some high-risk patients want the surgery at any cost, including loss of life, which is an interesting concept. Obviously there are patients that we do not ...

  10. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... JEROME CHAO, MD: So what was that peak airway, 26, right? Yep. And it was 23 pre- ... this was going to go up, that peak airway pressure. 00:52:04 DIMITRI KOUMANIS, MD: Since ...

  11. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... This event is being sponsored by Synovis Life Technologies. Over the next hour, you'll see the ... care. This event was sponsored by Synovis Life Technologies. 01:24:53 [ end of webcast

  12. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pancreotitis. He also has hepatitis C and HIV disease. After his distal pancreotectomy, he did develop a ... 23, and we're going to keep an eye on that. Can we have some Kochers, please? ...

  13. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have the Bovie, please? And always keep in mind of that bowel. It likes to poke in ... Let's move them over here. Always keep a mind on your bowel, always wants to sneak up ...

  14. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... JEROME CHAO, MD: So 1 centimeter/1 centimeter rule. And we know it's good tissue and that ... revascularized by tissue. And we have those on slides when we give a tour of talks. 00: ...

  15. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... supply to your skin flap and will also increase the problems that you're going to have ... on the end of a vessel. Once he increases his pressures, he's going to knock those clots ...

  16. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... distal pancreotectomy several years ago. He has a history of COPD, pancreat-- he had some pancreotitis. He ... the surgery at any cost, including loss of life, which is an interesting concept. Obviously there are ...

  17. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you can see here the edge of the muscle, the rectus muscles, that are clearly separated. On the other side, ... m going to grab the edge of the muscle. And you can see it twitch. Hopefully we' ...

  18. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is reinforced using Veritas Collagen Matrix, an innovative biologic material which remodels into the tissue it is ... and exciting alternative to currently available synthetic and biologic meshes. OR-Live makes it easy for you ...

  19. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the bottom of the umbilicus sitting at the base of the wound, kind of the bottom of ... right here. Okay. Hold it right there to give the Kocher? 00:36:17 DIMITRI KOUMANIS, MD: ...

  20. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... down low because you don't want to leave epithelial cells to create a cyst underneath there. ... with the Bovie, but you're creating thermal injury, and I'd rather cut it and then ...

  1. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of subcutaneous tissue, so I think he bodes well for this type of method where we're ... be augmenting. But in our experience here as well, that's where we are ending up with tissue ...

  2. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... one is the dermis -- acellular dermis from a human. They also have a similar product from a ... was through trial and error, in fact. The human product, though a very good product, was causing ...

  3. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 29:37 JEROME CHAO, MD: DeBakeys. 00:29:40 DIMITRI KOUMANIS, MD: There it is. JEROME CHAO, ... Veritas was very easy and very fast. 00:40:50 DIMITRI KOUMANIS, MD: The granulation tissue, it ...

  4. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... do now... We probably do a component every week at this institution, and so it's been very important for us to have an implant, so to speak, that does the work that we needed it to do. So now ...

  5. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to use that particular one. We checked the expiration date. 00:53:28 DIMITRI KOUMANIS, MD: Another ... of talks. 00:53:49 JEROME CHAO, MD: Expiration date's 4/2010, and you see the foil ...

  6. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of these patients can be smokers, some have asthma, et cetera. When the bowel goes back in, ... fresh injury out of this, get these growth factors going. Rev things up again so that the ...

  7. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... they're not getting the quote-unquote "good" nutrition, you know. And if that kind of situation ... I would recommend, if it's possible, to start nutrition as soon as possible. 00:50:51 DIMITRI ...

  8. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... doesn't have as much stretch as the human dermis version, which is also a bonus. And ... Koumanis and I use and also for Albany Medical Center for also giving us permission. And at ...

  9. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... exact thing has been done. We've been working very hard with the general surgeons and very closely with them on these and basically have created the team approach in dealing with these complex recurrent hernias. ...

  10. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with tissue loss. So this is just a preference. I like going all the way up and ... be great. Number two nylons, or whatever your preference is, and that's his range. And then Kochers ...

  11. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... surgery, that the patient's coughing, some of that stress can be relieved by the Veritas instead of ... it, it's really the product that's doing the work for us. We basically use it like we ...

  12. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Dr. Koumanis is going to hold the skin. And I like using the Bovie on this ... you might want to consider not undermining this skin, because you can get increased chance of skin ...

  13. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pancreotitis. He also has hepatitis C and HIV disease. After his distal pancreotectomy, he did develop a ... JEROME CHAO, MD: Another thing you can use, bipolar. All right. So you see the edge. The ...

  14. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... because you don't want to leave epithelial cells to create a cyst underneath there. I've ... our wound healing and will not kill the cells necessary for wound healing but will decrease your ...

  15. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... innovative biologic material which remodels into the tissue it is used to repair. Veritas is a tested, ... available synthetic and biologic meshes. OR-Live makes it easy for you to learn more. Just click ...

  16. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... seeing in terms of the fascia and the quality of the tissues. You kind of sweep across ... their product is better. And one of the first products we looked at -- and I just messed ...

  17. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... on the shelf here, so it's no phone call to -- no phone call to the blood bank, no phone call to anybody. It's just on the shelf, and ... decrease your bacterial counts probably mostly what we call voodoo in surgery, but it's working for me ...

  18. A Review of Esophageal Chest Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coss-Adame, Enrique; Rao, Satish S C

    2015-11-01

    Noncardiac chest pain is a term that encompasses all causes of chest pain after a cardiac source has been excluded. This article focuses on esophageal sources for chest pain. Esophageal chest pain (ECP) is common, affects quality of life, and carries a substantial health care burden. The lack of a systematic approach toward the diagnosis and treatment of ECP has led to significant disability and increased health care costs for this condition. Identifying the underlying cause(s) or mechanism(s) for chest pain is key for its successful management. Common etiologies include gastroesophageal reflux disease, esophageal hypersensitivity, dysmotility, and psychological conditions, including panic disorder and anxiety. However, the pathophysiology of this condition is not yet fully understood. Randomized controlled trials have shown that proton pump inhibitor therapy (either omeprazole, lansoprazole, or rabeprazole) can be effective. Evidence for the use of antidepressants and the adenosine receptor antagonist theophylline is fair. Psychological treatments, notably cognitive behavioral therapy, may be useful in select patients. Surgery is not recommended. There remains a large unmet need for identifying the phenotype and prevalence of pathophysiologic mechanisms of ECP as well as for well-designed multicenter clinical trials of current and novel therapies. PMID:27134590

  19. Drop attack during chest radiography: Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chest radiography is the first line of thoracic imaging performed in patients with thoracic diseases. It is probably the most frequently performed type of X-ray examination. It is recommended to be performed in the full upright position except where the patient's condition will not permit. This is because the erect technique allows full expansion of the lungs, prevents engorgement of pulmonary vessels and also helps in fluid level evaluation. However, little is reported on the negative effects associated with erect radiography. Herein, we present a case of drop attack during erect chest radiography. - Highlights: • Radiographers should be aware of the possibilities of drop attach during erect chest radiography. • A patient's determination to stand for chest radiograph may not always relate with the ability. • The causes of some drop attacks may be unknown. • Watching patients during radiographic exposure is essential. • Being alert and working very fast during erect chest examinations is important

  20. Chest trauma in children: A local experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chest trauma in childhood is relatively uncommon in clinical practice andhas been the subject of few reports in literature. This study was undertakento examine our experience in dealing with chest trauma in children. This wasa retrospective study of 74 children who sustained chest trauma and werereferred to King Fahd Hospital in Medina over a two-year period. The age,cause of injury, severity of injury, associated extrathoracic injuries,treatment and outcome were analyzed. The median age of patients was nineyears. Fifty-nine of them (80%) sustained blunt trauma in 62% of thechildren, gun shot wounds were seen in five and stab wounds in 10 children.Head injury was the most common injury associated with thoracic trauma andwas seen in 14 patients (19%) and associated intra-abdominal injuries wereseen in nine patients. Chest x-ray of the blunt trauma patients revealedfractured ribs in 24 children, pneumothorax in six, hemothorax in four,hemoneumothorax in three, and pulmonary contusions in 22 patients. Fifty onepercent of children were managed conservatively, 37% required tubethoracostomy, 8% were mechanically ventilated and 4% underwent thoractomy.The prevalence of chest trauma in children due to road traffic accidents ishigh in Saudi Arabia. Head injury is thought to be the most common associatedextrathoracic injuries, however, most of these patients can be managedconservatively. (author)