WorldWideScience

Sample records for cheralite

  1. Hydrothermal alteration of monazite-(Ce) from the Santa Maria de Itabira pegmatite district (Minas Gerais, Brazil); Alteration hydrothermale des monazites-(Ce) des pegmatites du district de Santa Maria de Itabira (Minas Gerais, Bresil)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilal, E.; Arias Nalini, H.; Nasraoui, M. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines, 42 - Saint-Etienne (France). Dept. de Geochimie, Centre SPIN; Marciano, V.; Neves, J.M.C.; Fernandes, M.L. [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Inst. Geociencias; Fuzikawa, K. [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Centro de Desenvolvimento de Tecnologia Nuclear

    1998-05-01

    Monazite-(Ce) is found in granitic pegmatites in the Santa Maria de Itabira pegmatite district (Minas Gerais, Brazil). During the magmatic stage, monazite-(Ce) seems to have had higher contents of cheralite and buttonite in the solid solution. The Th content in primary monazite-(Ce) is high and characteristic for each pegmatite body. During the late stage (albitisation), the mean LREE content in the altered zone is slightly higher and Th content is very low. The accessory mineral assemblages changed; buttonite and cheralite crystallize together with Th-poor and La-rich monazite-(Ce) at the border of altered crystals. Nd/Sm and U/Pb ratios also changed during the hydrothermal stage. (authors) 13 refs.

  2. The high-temperature behaviour of PuPO{sub 4} monazite and some other related compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jardin, Regis [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Pavel, Claudiu C. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); ' Al.I. Cuza' University, Department of Chemistry, 11 - Carol I Boulevard, 700506 Iasi (Romania); Raison, Philippe E.; Bouexiere, Daniel; Santa-Cruz, Hernan; Konings, Rudy J.M. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Popa, Karin [' Al.I. Cuza' University, Department of Chemistry, 11 - Carol I Boulevard, 700506 Iasi (Romania)], E-mail: kpopa@uaic.ro

    2008-08-31

    Thermal behaviour and lattice parameters of monazites MPO{sub 4} (M{sup 3+} = Ce{sup 3+}, Nd{sup 3+} and Pu{sup 3+}) and cheralite CaTh(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} were studied using high-temperature X-ray diffraction. Heat treatment under inert atmosphere caused the decomposition of PuPO{sub 4} and CaTh(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} into the corresponding oxides above 1473 K. The influence of the cation type within the crystallographic structure on the thermal expansion coefficient and the possible cation substitutions are discussed in the frame of nuclear waste management.

  3. Monazite as a suitable actinide waste form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlenz, Hartmut; Heuser, Julia; Schmitz, Stephan; Bosbach, Dirk [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Energie und Klimaforschung (IEK), Nukleare Entsorgung und Reaktorsicherheit (IEK-6); Neumann, Andreas [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Energie und Klimaforschung (IEK), Nukleare Entsorgung und Reaktorsicherheit (IEK-6); RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Crystallography

    2013-03-01

    The conditioning of radioactive waste from nuclear power plants and in some countries even of weapons plutonium is an important issue for science and society. Therefore the research on appropriate matrices for the immobilization of fission products and actinides is of great interest. Beyond the widely used borosilicate glasses, ceramics are promising materials for the conditioning of actinides like U, Np, Pu, Am, and Cm. Monazite-type ceramics with general composition LnPO{sub 4} (Ln = La to Gd) and solid solutions of monazite with cheralite or huttonite represent important materials in this field. Monazite appears to be a promising candidate material, especially because of its outstanding properties regarding radiation resistance and chemical durability. This article summarizes the most recent results concerning the characterization of monazite and respective solid solutions and the study of their chemical, thermal, physical and structural properties. The aim is to demonstrate the suitability of monazite as a secure and reliable waste form for actinides. (orig.)

  4. Crystal chemistry of M{sup II}M′{sup IV}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} double monophosphates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bregiroux, Damien, E-mail: damien.bregiroux@upmc.fr [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, CNRS, Collège de France, Laboratoire de Chimie de la Matière Condensée de Paris, 11 place Marcelin Berthelot, 75005 Paris (France); Popa, Karin [“Al.I. Cuza” University, Department of Chemistry, 11-Carol I Blvd., 700506 Iasi (Romania); Wallez, Gilles [Institut de Recherche de Chimie Paris (IRCP), CNRS – Chimie ParisTech – Paris Sciences et Lettres PSL UMR8247, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06 (France)

    2015-10-15

    M{sup II}M′{sup IV}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} compounds have been extensively studied for several decades for their potential applications in the field of several domains such as matrices for actinides conditioning, phosphors etc. In this paper, the relationships between composition and crystal structure of these compounds are established. A review of the various processes used for the synthesis of these compounds is also proposed, as well as their most reported properties. M{sup II}M′{sup IV}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} structures stem from two different archetypes: the cheralite and the yavapaiite structures, with some exceptions that are also described in this article. The ratio of the cations radii appears to be the most relevant parameter. The high ratio between the ionic radii of the divalent and tetravalent cations in yavapaiite derivates results in the ordering of these cations into well-differentiated polyhedra whereas cheralite is the only non-ordered structure encountered for M{sup II}M′{sup IV}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} compounds. - Graphical abstract: In this paper, the relationships between composition and crystal structure of M{sup II}M′{sup IV}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} compounds are established. A review of the various processes used for the synthesis of these compounds is also proposed, as well as their most reported properties. - Highlights: • Crystal structure–composition relationships of MIIM′IV(PO4)2 compounds. • Review of the various processes used for the synthesis of these compounds. • Their most reported properties are described and discussed.

  5. Comparative behavior of britholites and monazite/brabantite solid solutions during leaching tests: a combined experimental and DFT approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veilly, E; du Fou de Kerdaniel, E; Roques, J; Dacheux, N; Clavier, N

    2008-12-01

    In the field of the specific immobilization of actinides, several phosphate-based ceramics have already been proposed as suitable candidates. Among them, britholite and monazite/brabantite (now called monazite/cheralite) solid solutions have been considered as serious candidates on the basis of several properties of interest. Although both matrices appear almost similar from a chemical point of view, their chemical behavior during leaching tests appear to be strongly different with normalized dissolution rates of typically (2.1 +/- 0.2) g.m(-2).day(-1) for Th-britholites (10(-1)M HNO(3), theta = 25 degrees C, dynamic conditions) and (2.2 +/- 0.2) 10(-5) g.m(-2).day(-1) for Th-brabantites (10(-1)M HNO(3), theta = 90 degrees C, dynamic conditions). To understand such difference from a crystallographic point of view, comparative leaching tests have been performed using either high or low renewal of the leachate. The results obtained clearly revealed a lower chemical durability of An-britholites compared to that of (Ln, Ca, An)-monazite/brabantite solid solutions. As a confirmation of this point, density functional theory calculations clearly showed some great differences in the cohesive energy of calcium in both crystal structures, which can explain this strong difference in the chemical durability of both materials.

  6. Comparative Behavior of Britholites and Monazite/Brabantite Solid Solutions during Leaching Tests: A Combined Experimental and DFT Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veilly, E.; Du Fou De Kerdaniel, E.; Roques, J.; Dacheux, N.; Clavier, N. [Univ Paris Sud 11, Inst Phys Nucl Orsay, CNRS, Grp Radiochim, UMR 8608, F-91406 Orsay, (France); Clavier, N. [Inst Chim Separat Marcoule, Ctr Marcoule, CEA - CNRS, UMR 5257, UM2/ENSCM, F-30207 Bagnols Sur Ceze, (France)

    2008-07-01

    In the field of the specific immobilization of actinides, several phosphate-based ceramics have already been proposed as suitable candidates. Among them, britholite and monazite/brabantite (now called monazite/cheralite) solid solutions have been considered as serious candidates on the basis of several properties of interest. Although both matrices appear almost similar from a chemical point of view, their chemical behavior during leaching tests appear to be strongly different with normalized dissolution rates of typically (2.1 {+-} 0.2) g.m{sup -2}.day{sup -1} for Th-britholites (10{sup -1} M HNO{sub 3}, {theta} = 25 degrees C, dynamic conditions) and (2.2 {+-} 0.2) 10{sup -5} g.m{sup -}2{sup .}day{sup -1} for Th-brabantites (10{sup -1} M HNO{sub 3}, {theta} = 90 degrees C, dynamic conditions). To understand such difference from a crystallographic point of view, comparative leaching tests have been performed using either high or low renewal of the leachate. The results obtained clearly revealed a lower chemical durability of An-britholites compared to that of (Ln, Ca, An)-monazite/brabantite solid solutions. As a confirmation of this point, density functional theory calculations clearly showed some great differences in the cohesive energy of calcium in both crystal structures, which can explain this strong difference in the chemical durability of both materials. (authors)

  7. Monazite-(Ce in Hercynian granites and pegmatites of the Bratislava massif, Western Carpathians: compositional variations and Th-U-Pb electron-microprobe dating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Uher

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Monazite-(Ce represents a characteristic magmatic accessory mineral of the Hercynian peraluminous S-type granites to granodiorites and related granitic pegmatites of the Bratislava Granitic Massif (BGM, Malé Karpaty Mountains, Central Western Carpathians, SW Slovakia. Monazite forms euhedral to subhedral crystals, up to 200 μm in size, usually it is unzoned in BSE, rarely it reveals oscillatory or sector zoning. Thorium concentrations of 2 to 9 wt. % ThO2 (≤0.09 apfu and local elevated uranium contents (≤4.3 wt. % UO2, ≤0.04 apfu are characteristic for the pegmatite monazites. Both huttonite ThSiREE-1P-1 and cheralite Ca(Th,UREE-2 substitutions took place in the studied monazite. Electron-microprobe Th-U-Pb monazite dating of the granites and pegmatites gave an isochron age of 353±2 Ma (MSWD = 0.88, n = 290, which confirmed the meso-Hercynian, Carboniferous, Lower Mississipian magmatic crystallization. An analogous age (359±11 Ma was obtained from monazite from adjacent paragneiss, corresponding to the age of the Hercynian contact thermal metamorphism related to the granite intrusion of BGM. Monazite in some granite shows also older clastic or authigenic grains or zones (~505 to 400 Ma, with maximum of 420±7 Ma which probably represents inherited material from the Lower Paleozoic metapelitic to metapsammitic protolith of BGM.

  8. Multi-stage evolution of xenotime-(Y) from Písek pegmatites, Czech Republic: an electron probe micro-analysis and Raman spectroscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Švecová, E.; Čopjaková, R.; Losos, Z.; Škoda, R.; Nasdala, L.; Cícha, J.

    2016-12-01

    The chemical variability, degree of radiation damage, and alteration of xenotime from the Písek granitic pegmatites (Czech Republic) were investigated by micro-chemical analysis and Raman spectroscopy. Dominant large xenotime-(Y) grains enriched in U, Th and Zr crystallized from a melt almost simultaneously with zircon, monazite and tourmaline. Xenotime is well to poorly crystalline depending on its U and Th contents. It shows complex secondary textures cutting magmatic growth zones as a result of its interaction with F,Ca,alkali-rich fluids during the hydrothermal stage of the pegmatite evolution. The magmatic xenotime underwent intense secondary alteration, from rims inwards, resulting in the formation of inclusion-rich well crystalline xenotime domains of near end-member composition. Two types of recrystallization were distinguished in relation to the type of inclusions: i) xenotime with coffinite-thorite, cheralite and monazite inclusions and ii) xenotime with zirconcheralite and zircon inclusions. Additionally, inner poorly crystalline U,Th-rich xenotime domains were locally altered, hydrated, depleted in P, Y, HREE, U, Si and radiogenic Pb, and enriched in fluid-borne cations (mainly Ca, F, Th, Zr, Fe). Interaction of radiation-damaged xenotime with hydrothermal fluids resulted in the disturbance of the U-Th-Pb system. Alteration of radiation-damaged xenotime was followed by intensive recrystallization indicating the presence of fluids >200 °C. Subsequently other types of xenotime formed as a consequence of fluid-driven alteration of magmatic monazite, and Y,REE,Ti,Nb-oxides or crystallized from hydrothermal fluids along cracks in magmatic monazite and xenotime.

  9. Magmatic (silicates/saline/sulfur-rich/CO2) immiscibility and zirconium and rare-earth element enrichment from alkaline magma chamber margins : Evidence from Ponza Island, Pontine Archipelago, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkin, H.E.; de Vivo, B.; Lima, A.; Torok, K.

    1996-01-01

    Fluid inclusions were measured from a feldspathoid-bearing syenite xenolith entrained in trachyte from Ponza, one of the islands of the Pontine Archipelago, located in the Gulf of Gaeta, Italy. The feldspathoid-bearing syenite consists mainly of potassium feldspar, clinopyroxene, amphibole, biotite, titanite, manganoan magnetite, apatite with minor nosean, Na-rich feldspar, pyrrhotite, and rare cheralite. Baddeleyite and zirkelite occur associated with manganoan magnetite. Detailed electron-microprobe analysis reveals enrichments in REE, Y, Nb, U, Th as well as Cl and F in appropriate phases. Fluid inclusions observed in potassium feldspar are either silicate-melt or aqueous inclusions. The aqueous inclusions can be further classified as. (1) one-phase vapor, (2) two-phase (V + L) inclusions, vapor-rich inclusions with a small amount of CO2 in most cases; homogenization of the inclusions always occurred in the vapor phase between 359 and 424??C, salinities vary from 2.9 to 8.5 wt. % NaCl equivalent; and. (3) three-phase and multiphase inclusions (hypersaline/sulfur-rich aqueous inclusions sometimes with up to 8 or more solid phases). Daughter minerals dissolve on heating before vapor/liquid homogenization. Standardless quantitative scanning electron microscope X-ray fluorescence analysis has tentatively identified the following chloride and sulfate daughter crystals; halite, sylvite, glauberite. arcanite, anhydrite, and thenardite. Melting of the daughter crystals occurs between 459 and 536??C (54 to 65 wt. % NaCI equivalent) whereas total homogenization is between 640 and 755??C. The occurrence of silicate-melt inclusions and high-temperature, solute-rich aqueous inclusions suggests that the druse or miarolitic texture of the xenolith is late-stage magmatic. The xenolith from Ponza represents a portion of the peripheral magma chamber wall that has recorded the magmatic/hydrothermal transition and the passage of high solute fluids enriched in chlorides, sulfur, and

  10. Sulphate incorporation in monazite lattice and dating the cycle of sulphur in metamorphic belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Antonin T.; Seydoux-Guillaume, Anne-Magali; Duchene, Stéphanie; Bingen, Bernard; Bosse, Valérie; Datas, Lucien

    2016-11-01

    Microgeochemical data and transmission electron microscope (TEM) imaging of S-rich monazite crystals demonstrate that S has been incorporated in the lattice of monazite as a clino-anhydrite component via the following exchange Ca2+ + S6+ = REE3+ + P5+, and that it is now partly exsolved in nanoclusters (5-10 nm) of CaSO4. The sample, an osumilite-bearing ultra-high-temperature granulite from Rogaland, Norway, is characterized by complexly patchy zoned monazite crystals. Three chemical domains are distinguished as (1) a sulphate-rich core (0.45-0.72 wt% SO2, Th incorporated as cheralite component), (2) secondary sulphate-bearing domains (SO2 >0.05 wt%, partly clouded with solid inclusions), and (3) late S-free, Y-rich domains (0.8-2.5 wt% Y2O3, Th accommodated as the huttonite component). These three domains yield distinct isotopic U-Pb ages of 1034 ± 6, 1005 ± 7, and 935 ± 7 Ma, respectively. Uranium-Th-Pb EPMA dating independently confirms these ages. This study illustrates that it is possible to discriminate different generations of monazite based on their S contents. From the petrological context, we propose that sulphate-rich monazite reflects high-temperature Fe-sulphide breakdown under oxidizing conditions, coeval with biotite dehydration melting. Monazite may therefore reveal the presence of S in anatectic melts from high-grade terrains at a specific point in time and date S mobilization from a reduced to an oxidized state. This property can be used to investigate the mineralization potential of a given geological event within a larger orogenic framework.

  11. Magmatic-hydrothermal fluid interaction and mineralization in alkali-syenite nodules from the Breccia Museo pyroclastic deposit, Naples, Italy: Chapter 7 in Volcanism in the Campania Plain — Vesuvius, Campi Flegrei and Ignimbrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedele, Luca; Tarzia, Maurizio; Belkin, Harvey E.; De Vivo, Benedetto; Lima, Annamaria; Lowenstern, Jacob

    2007-01-01

    The Breccia Museo, a pyroclastic flow that crops out in the Campi Flegrei volcanic complex (Naples, Italy), contains alkali-syenite (trachyte) nodules with enrichment in Cl and incompatible elements (e.g., U, Zr, Th, and rare-earth elements). Zircon was dated at ≈52 ka, by U-Th isotope systematics using a SHRIMP. Scanning electron microscope and electron microprobe analysis of the constituent phases have documented the mineralogical and textural evolution of the nodules of feldspar and mafic accumulations on the magma chamber margins. Detailed electron microprobe data are given for alkali and plagioclase feldspar, salite to ferrosalite clinopyroxene, pargasite, ferrogargasite, magnesio-hastingsite hornblende amphibole, biotite mica, Cl-rich scapolite, and a member (probable davyne-type) of the cancrinite group. Detailed whole rock, major and minor element data are also presented for selected nodules. A wide variety of common and uncommon accessory minerals were identified such as zircon, baddeleyite, zirconolite, pollucite, sodalite, titanite, monazite, cheralite, apatite, titanomagnetite and its alteration products, scheelite, ferberite, uraninite/thorianite, uranpyrochlore, thorite, pyrite, chalcopyrite, and galena. Scanning electron microscope analysis of opened fluid inclusions identified halite, sylvite, anhydrite, tungstates, carbonates, silicates, sulfides, and phosphates; most are probably daughter minerals. Microthermometric determinations on secondary fluid inclusions hosted by alkali feldspar define a temperature regime dominated by hypersaline aqueous fluids. Fluid-inclusion temperature data and mineral-pair geothermometers for coexisting feldspars and hornblende and plagioclase were used to construct a pressure-temperature scenario for the development and evolution of the nodules. We have compared the environment of porphyry copper formation and the petrogenetic environment constructed for the studied nodules. The suite of ore minerals observed in

  12. The Nolans Bore rare-earth element-phosphorus-uranium mineral system: geology, origin and post-depositional modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huston, David L.; Maas, Roland; Cross, Andrew; Hussey, Kelvin J.; Mernagh, Terrence P.; Fraser, Geoff; Champion, David C.

    2016-08-01

    Orogeny. Surface exposure and weathering of fluorapatite produced acidic fluids and intense, near-surface kaolinitised zones that include high-grade, supergene-enriched cheralite-rich ores.

  13. Heavy mineral concentrations in the sandstones of Amij Formation with particular emphasis on the mineral chemistry and petrographic characteristics of monazite, western desert of Iraq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettanah, Yawooz A.; Ismail, Sabah A.

    2016-11-01

    The heavy minerals in the clastic unit of the Lower Jurassic Amij Formation exposed in the western desert of Iraq were studied. The uppermost part of the clastic unit contains thin, placer-like black sandstone horizons that are radioactive and abnormally rich in heavy minerals (0.6-56%), dominated by opaque (65%) and transparent (35%) heavy minerals. The minerals, in the order of decreasing abundance are pseudorutile, goethite, zircon, hematite, magnetite, monazite, rutile, leucoxene, tourmaline, ilmenite, chromite, and few others. Electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), microscopic and autoradiographic observations and analysis showed that the monazite is monazite-(Ce) type with an average composition of (Ce0.39Nd0.16La0.19Pr0.04Sm0.02Gd0.02Eu0.01Y0·04Th0·06U0·01Ca0·05Fe0.01)(P0·98Si0.03)O4. Monazite consists predominantly of REE-oxides (57.93%) and P2O5 (29.31%), with minor amounts of ThO2 (6.60%), Y2O3 (1.92%), UO2 (0.76%), CaO (1.14%), SiO2 (0.69%), and FeOt (0.17%). The dominant compositional substitution operating between REE and P were a mixture of the complex cheralite type substitution ([REE]-2 [Th][Ca]) and the coupled huttonite type substitution ([REE]-1 [P]-1 [Th][Si]). The chondrite-normalized REE distribution patterns of monazite show enrichment in LREE with positive Eu- and Pr-anomalies of 1.46 and 9.13, respectively. The median values of (La/Sm)CN and (La/Nd)CN ratios are 4.35 and 1.97, respectively. Zircon which is the dominant transparent mineral is Hf-rich that is composed of 30.61% SiO2, 57.58% ZrO2, 7.03% HfO2, 2.04% Y2O3, 0.56% ThO2, 0.19% UO2, and 0.19% Al2O3 corresponding to a formula (Zr0.909Hf0.065Th0·004U0·001Y0.031)Σ1.011(Si3·966Al0.028)Σ0.999O4. Rutile and tourmaline form 7% and 4% of the heavy minerals. Ilmenite which is one of the predominant heavy minerals forms 2.5% of the opaques because it is pervasively altered to Ti-Fe oxides. In addition of zircon and monazite, the chemical compositions of most of the other heavy

  14. Experimental constraints on the relative stabilities of the two systems monazite-(Ce) - allanite-(Ce) - fluorapatite and xenotime-(Y) - (Y,HREE)-rich epidote - (Y,HREE)-rich fluorapatite, in high Ca and Na-Ca environments under P-T conditions of 200-1000 MPa and 450-750 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budzyń, Bartosz; Harlov, Daniel E.; Kozub-Budzyń, Gabriela A.; Majka, Jarosław

    2016-09-01

    The relative stabilities of phases within the two systems monazite-(Ce) - fluorapatite - allanite-(Ce) and xenotime-(Y) - (Y,HREE)-rich fluorapatite - (Y,HREE)-rich epidote have been tested experimentally as a function of pressure and temperature in systems roughly replicating granitic to pelitic composition with high and moderate bulk CaO/Na2O ratios over a wide range of P-T conditions from 200 to 1000 MPa and 450 to 750 °C via four sets of experiments. These included (1) monazite-(Ce), labradorite, sanidine, biotite, muscovite, SiO2, CaF2, and 2 M Ca(OH)2; (2) monazite-(Ce), albite, sanidine, biotite, muscovite, SiO2, CaF2, Na2Si2O5, and H2O; (3) xenotime-(Y), labradorite, sanidine, biotite, muscovite, garnet, SiO2, CaF2, and 2 M Ca(OH)2; and (4) xenotime-(Y), albite, sanidine, biotite, muscovite, garnet, SiO2, CaF2, Na2Si2O5, and H2O. Monazite-(Ce) breakdown was documented in experimental sets (1) and (2). In experimental set (1), the Ca high activity (estimated bulk CaO/Na2O ratio of 13.3) promoted the formation of REE-rich epidote, allanite-(Ce), REE-rich fluorapatite, and fluorcalciobritholite at the expense of monazite-(Ce). In contrast, a bulk CaO/Na2O ratio of ~1.0 in runs in set (2) prevented the formation of REE-rich epidote and allanite-(Ce). The reacted monazite-(Ce) was partially replaced by REE-rich fluorapatite-fluorcalciobritholite in all runs, REE-rich steacyite in experiments at 450 °C, 200-1000 MPa, and 550 °C, 200-600 MPa, and minor cheralite in runs at 650-750 °C, 200-1000 MPa. The experimental results support previous natural observations and thermodynamic modeling of phase equilibria, which demonstrate that an increased CaO bulk content expands the stability field of allanite-(Ce) relative to monazite-(Ce) at higher temperatures indicating that the relative stabilities of monazite-(Ce) and allanite-(Ce) depend on the bulk CaO/Na2O ratio. The experiments also provide new insights into the re-equilibration of monazite-(Ce) via fluid