WorldWideScience

Sample records for chemoradiation therapy surgery

  1. Oral surgery in patients undergoing chemoradiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demian, Nagi M; Shum, Jonathan W; Kessel, Ivan L; Eid, Ahmed

    2014-05-01

    Oral health care in patients undergoing chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy can be complex. Care delivered by a multidisciplinary approach is timely and streamlines the allocation of resources to provide prompt care and to attain favorable outcomes. A hospital dentist, oral and maxillofacial surgeon, and a maxillofacial prosthodontist must be involved early to prevent avoidable oral complications. Prevention and thorough preparation are vital before the start of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Oral complications must be addressed immediately and, even with the best management, can cause delays and interruption in treatment, with serious consequences for the outcome and prognosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy with gemcitabine/cisplatin and surgery versus immediate surgery in resectable pancreatic cancer. Results of the first prospective randomized phase II trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golcher, Henriette; Merkel, Susanne; Hohenberger, Werner [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Surgery, Erlangen (Germany); Brunner, Thomas B. [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); Witzigmann, Helmut [University Hospital Leipzig, Department of Surgery, Leipzig (Germany); Hospital Dresden-Friedrichstadt, General Surgery, Dresden (Germany); Marti, Lukas [Hospital of Kanton St. Gallen, General Surgery, St. Gallen (Switzerland); Bechstein, Wolf-Otto [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Surgery, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Bruns, Christiane [University Hospital Munich, Department of Surgery - Hospital Campus Grosshadern, Munich (Germany); University Hospital Magdeburg, Department of Surgery, Magdeburg (Germany); Jungnickel, Henry [Hospital Dresden-Friedrichstadt, General Surgery, Dresden (Germany); Schreiber, Stefan [University Hospital Leipzig, Department of Surgery, Leipzig (Germany); Grabenbauer, Gerhard G. [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); Hospital Coburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Coburg (Germany); Meyer, Thomas [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Surgery, Erlangen (Germany); Hospital Ansbach, General Surgery, Ansbach (Germany); Fietkau, Rainer [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-09-25

    In nonrandomized trials, neoadjuvant treatment was reported to prolong survival in patients with pancreatic cancer. As neoadjuvant chemoradiation is established for the treatment of rectal cancer we examined the value of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in pancreatic cancer in a randomized phase II trial. Radiological staging defining resectability was basic information prior to randomization in contrast to adjuvant therapy trials resting on pathological staging. Patients with resectable adenocarcinoma of the pancreatic head were randomized to primary surgery (Arm A) or neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery (Arm B), which was followed by adjuvant chemotherapy in both arms. A total of 254 patients were required to detect a 4.33-month improvement in median overall survival (mOS). The trial was stopped after 73 patients; 66 patients were eligible for analysis. Twenty nine of 33 allocated patients received chemoradiotherapy. Radiotherapy was completed in all patients. Chemotherapy was changed in 3 patients due to toxicity. Tumor resection was performed in 23 vs. 19 patients (A vs. B). The R0 resection rate was 48 % (A) and 52 % (B, P = 0.81) and (y)pN0 was 30 % (A) vs. 39 % (B, P = 0.44), respectively. Postoperative complications were comparable in both groups. mOS was 14.4 vs. 17.4 months (A vs. B; intention-to-treat analysis; P = 0.96). After tumor resection, mOS was 18.9 vs. 25.0 months (A vs. B; P = 0.79). This worldwide first randomized trial for neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in pancreatic cancer showed that neoadjuvant chemoradiation is safe with respect to toxicity, perioperative morbidity, and mortality. Nevertheless, the trial was terminated early due to slow recruiting and the results were not significant. ISRCTN78805636; NCT00335543. (orig.) [German] Mehrere nichtrandomisierte Studien zeigten, dass eine neoadjuvante Therapie das Ueberleben bei Patienten mit Pankreaskarzinom verlaengert. Beim lokal fortgeschrittenen Rektumkarzinom gehoert die

  3. Treatment of resectable distal rectal cancer with preoperative chemoradiation and sphincter saving surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omrani Pour R

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available To determine if pre-operative combined chemoradiation therapy increase sphincter preservation in the treatment of low-lying rectal cancer, 15 patients were treated with pre-operative chemoradiation: 5FU plus mitomycin C plus 4500-5000 Rad concurrent external beam radiotherapy between Jan 1997 and Jan 1999. There were 10 men and 5 women (Mean age: 49 y with the diagnosis of invasive resectable primary adenocarcinoma of distal rectum limited to pelvis. Median tumor distance from anal verge was 3.3 cm (Range 0-5 cm and half of the patients were absolute candidate for abdominoperineal resection. After 4-6 weeks, all patients were undergone proctectomy and eventually sphincter preservation surgery was done on 9 patients with colonal anastomosis. Function of sphincter was excellent in 6 of them (66% and good in 3 patients (33%. There was no case of incontinence. Complications of surgery were minimal: One case of stricture (10% and one case of partial rupture of anastomosis (10%. Complete pathologic response was achieved on one patient (6.6% and combined pre-operative chemoradiation has changed the plane of surgery from abdominoperineal resection to sphincter saving in 69.2% of patients.

  4. Results of surgical treatment versus chemoradiation therapy in oropharyngeal early tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chedid, Helma Maria

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The epidermoid carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract is diagnosed in approximately 40% of the cases of advanced clinical stages. Objective: To evaluate the disease-free interval in patients with clinical stages I and II epidermoid carcinoma who were submitted to surgery or chemoradiation. Method: Retrospective study of the records of 139 patients treated for oropharyngeal epidermoid carcinoma submitted to treatment with curative intent. Among those patients, 38 were classified with early tumors clinical stages I and II. Twenty-seven (71.1% underwent surgical treatment whereas eleven (28.9% were treated with chemoradiation. The mean age was 56.4 years; 31 cases (81.6% were in men and seven (18.4% were in women. Results: Among the eleven patients who were submitted to chemoradiation, 72.7% obtained locoregional control of the disease and their disease-free survival was of 42%. Among the 27 patients operated, 19 remained in Clinical Stages I and II in the histological report and six underwent postoperative radiation therapy. The disease-free interval for two years was of 70%. Conclusion: The patients submitted to the surgery had a better disease-free interval as compared to those submitted to chemoradiation treatment.

  5. A Phase 1/2 and Biomarker Study of Preoperative Short Course Chemoradiation With Proton Beam Therapy and Capecitabine Followed By Early Surgery for Resectable Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Theodore S., E-mail: tshong1@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Ryan, David P.; Borger, Darrell R.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Yeap, Beow Y. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Ancukiewicz, Marek [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Deshpande, Vikram; Shinagare, Shweta [Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wo, Jennifer Y.; Boucher, Yves [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wadlow, Raymond C.; Kwak, Eunice L.; Allen, Jill N.; Clark, Jeffrey W.; Zhu, Andrew X. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Ferrone, Cristina R. [Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Mamon, Harvey J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Adams, Judith; Winrich, Barbara; Grillo, Tarin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); and others

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety, efficacy and biomarkers of short-course proton beam radiation and capecitabine, followed by pancreaticoduodenectomy in a phase 1/2 study in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients. Methods and Materials: Patients with radiographically resectable, biopsy-proven PDAC were treated with neoadjuvant short-course (2-week) proton-based radiation with capecitabine, followed by surgery and adjuvant gemcitabine. The primary objective was to demonstrate a rate of toxicity grade ≥3 of <20%. Exploratory biomarker studies were performed using surgical specimen tissues and peripheral blood. Results: The phase 2 dose was established at 5 daily doses of 5 GyE. Fifty patients were enrolled, of whom 35 patients were treated in the phase 2 portion. There were no grade 4 or 5 toxicities, and only 2 of 35 patients (4.1%) experienced a grade 3 toxicity event (chest wall pain grade 1, colitis grade 1). Of 48 patients eligible for analysis, 37 underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy. Thirty of 37 (81%) had positive nodes. Locoregional failure occurred in 6 of 37 resected patients (16.2%), and distant recurrence occurred in 35 of 48 patients (72.9%). With median follow-up of 38 months, the median progression-free survival for the entire group was 10 months, and overall survival was 17 months. Biomarker studies showed significant associations between worse survival outcomes and the KRAS point mutation change from glycine to aspartic acid at position 12, stromal CXCR7 expression, and circulating biomarkers CEA, CA19-9, and HGF (all, P<.05). Conclusions: This study met the primary endpoint by showing a rate of 4.1% grade 3 toxicity for neoadjuvant short-course proton-based chemoradiation. Treatment was associated with favorable local control. In exploratory analyses, KRAS{sup G12D} status and high CXCR7 expression and circulating CEA, CA19-9, and HGF levels were associated with poor survival.

  6. Eluation of adjuvant chemoradiation therapy for ampullary adenocarcinoma: the Johns Hopkins Hospital - Mayo Clinic collaborative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jessica

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of adjuvant chemoradiation therapy for ampullary carcinoma is unknown. Previous literature suggests that certain populations with high risk factors for recurrence may benefit from adjuvant chemoradiation. We combined the experience of two institutions to better delineate which patients may benefit from adjuvant chemoradiation. Methods Patients who underwent curative surgery for ampullary carcinoma at the Johns Hopkins Hospital (n = 290; 1992-2007 and at the Mayo Clinic (n = 130; 1977-2005 were reviewed. Patients with Results Median overall-survival was 39.9 months with 2- and 5-year survival rates of 62.4% and 39.1%. On univariate analysis, adverse prognostic factors for overall survival included T3/T4 stage disease (RR = 1.86, p = 0.002, node positive status (RR = 3.18, p Conclusions Node-positive patients with resected ampullary adenocarcinoma may benefit from 5-FU based adjuvant chemoradiation. Since a significant proportion of patients develop metastatic disease, there is a need for more effective systemic treatment.

  7. Coordinated chemoradiation therapy with genital preservation for the treatment of primary invasive carcinoma of the male urethra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Michael S; Triaca, Veronica; Billmeyer, Brian; Hanley, Robert S; Girshovich, Lyubov; Shuster, Todd; Oberfield, Richard A; Zinman, Leonard

    2008-02-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of a combined chemoradiation therapy protocol for the primary treatment of primary invasive carcinoma of the male urethra. From January 1991 to December 2006, 18 patients with invasive carcinoma of the male urethra referred to our institution were treated with a chemoradiation therapy protocol, consisting of 2 cycles of 5-fluorouracil (1,000 mg/m(2)) on days 1 to 4 and days 29 to 32, and mitomycin-C (10 mg/m(2)) on days 1 and 29 with concurrent external beam radiation therapy (45 to 55 Gy in 25 fractions during 5 weeks) to the genitalia, perineum, and inguinal and external iliac lymph nodes. Kaplan-Meier curves were constructed to assess overall, disease specific and disease-free survival. The stage and node distribution was T2N0 in 2 patients (11%), T3N0 in 8 (44%), T4N0 in 2 (11%), TXN1 in 1(6%) and TXN2 in 5 (28%). The most prevalent histology was moderately (7 of 18 patients or 39%) or poorly (10 of 18 or 56%) differentiated squamous cell carcinoma (17 of 18 or 95%). Overall 83% (15 of 18) of the patients had a complete response to the primary chemoradiation therapy protocol, and the 5-year overall and disease specific survival rates were 60% and 83%, respectively. Five-year disease-free survival rates after chemoradiation therapy and after chemoradiation therapy with salvage surgery were 54% and 72%, respectively. The 3 nonresponders died of disease after undergoing salvage surgery and 5 of the 15 complete responders (30%) had recurrence. Complex urethral reconstruction was required in 3 of 10 patients (30%) who had prolonged disease-free survival. The chemoradiation therapy protocol is an alternative primary treatment modality for invasive urethral carcinoma. It enables an unprecedented potential for organ preservation.

  8. Pseudomembranous colitis within radiotherapy field following concurrent chemoradiation therapy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Bing-Jie; Lin, Shih-Chiang; Shueng, Pei-Wei; Chou, Yueh-Hung; Tseng, Li-Ming; Hsieh, Chen-Hsi

    2013-01-01

    Development of nonantibiotic-associated pseudomembranous colitis has been reported in patients receiving chemotherapy. Herein, we report a case of a 70-year-old man with diabetes mellitus and hypertension who received concurrent chemoradiation therapy after surgery for stage III pT3N1M0 rectal cancer. After completion of the therapy, the patient presented with a 2-week history of intermittent watery diarrhea (seven to nine times per day). However, the patient was afebrile and laboratory examination revealed no evidence of leukocytosis. Computed tomography disclosed inflammation of the sigmoid colon, infiltrative changes around the anastomotic site, and edematous changes straddling the serosal surface. Colonoscopic examination revealed multiple whitish patches within the radiation field, a finding suggestive of pseudomembranous colitis. No concomitant antibiotics were used during the period of concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Empirical oral metronidazole (500 mg every 8 hours) was administrated for 2 weeks. At the end of this treatment, stool culture was negative for Clostridium difficile. Physicians should be aware of the potential for the development of pseudomembranous colitis following concurrent chemoradiation therapy.

  9. Pseudomembranous colitis within radiotherapy field following concurrent chemoradiation therapy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen BJ

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bing-Jie Shen,1 Shih-Chiang Lin,2 Pei-Wei Shueng,1,3 Yueh-Hung Chou,4 Li-Ming Tseng,5 Chen-Hsi Hsieh1,6,71Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiology, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 2Division of Oncology and Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 3Department of Radiation Oncology, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan; 4Department of Anatomical Pathology, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 5Division of Colorectal Surgery, Department of Surgery, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 6Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 7Institute of Traditional Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, TaiwanAbstract: Development of nonantibiotic-associated pseudomembranous colitis has been reported in patients receiving chemotherapy. Herein, we report a case of a 70-year-old man with diabetes mellitus and hypertension who received concurrent chemoradiation therapy after surgery for stage III pT3N1M0 rectal cancer. After completion of the therapy, the patient presented with a 2-week history of intermittent watery diarrhea (seven to nine times per day. However, the patient was afebrile and laboratory examination revealed no evidence of leukocytosis. Computed tomography disclosed inflammation of the sigmoid colon, infiltrative changes around the anastomotic site, and edematous changes straddling the serosal surface. Colonoscopic examination revealed multiple whitish patches within the radiation field, a finding suggestive of pseudomembranous colitis. No concomitant antibiotics were used during the period of concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Empirical oral metronidazole (500 mg every 8 hours was administrated for 2 weeks. At the end of this treatment, stool culture was negative for Clostridium difficile. Physicians should be aware of the potential for the development of

  10. Induction chemoradiation therapy prior to esophagectomy is associated with superior long-term survival for esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speicher, P J; Wang, X; Englum, B R; Ganapathi, A M; Yerokun, B; Hartwig, M G; D'Amico, T A; Berry, M F

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the role of induction chemoradiation in the treatment of potentially resectable locally advanced (T2-3N0 and T1-3N+) esophageal cancer utilizing a large national database. The National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) was queried for all patients undergoing esophagectomy for clinical T2-3N0 and T1-3N+ esophageal cancer of the mid- or lower esophagus. Patients were stratified by the use of induction chemoradiation therapy versus surgery-first. Trends were assessed with the Cochran-Armitage test. Predictors of receiving induction therapy were evaluated with multivariable logistic regression. A propensity-matched analysis was conducted to compare outcomes between groups, and the Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate long-term survival. Within the NCDB, 7921 patients were identified, of which 6103 (77.0%) were treated with chemoradiation prior to esophagectomy, while the remaining 1818 (23.0%) were managed with surgery-first. Use of induction therapy increased over time, with an absolute increase of 11.8% from 2003-2011 (P induction therapy was associated with higher rates of negative margins and shorter hospital length of stay, but no differences in unplanned readmission and 30-day mortality rates. In unadjusted survival analysis, induction therapy was associated with better long-term survival compared to a strategy of surgery-first, with 5-year survival rates of 37.2% versus 28.6%, P induction therapy maintained a significant survival advantage over surgery-first (5-year survival: 37.9% vs. 28.7%, P induction chemoradiation therapy prior to surgical resection is associated with significant improvement in long-term survival, even after adjusting for confounders with a propensity model. Induction therapy should be considered in all medically appropriate patients with resectable cT2-3N0 and cT1-3N+ esophageal cancer, prior to esophagectomy.

  11. Failure of odontogenesis after chemo-radiation therapy for rhabdomyosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sun Young; Hong, Sung Woo; Koh, Kwang Joon [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Chonbuk National University, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-02-15

    This report details a case of 8-year-old girl showing failure of odontogenesis after chemo-radiation therapy for rhabdomysarcoma at the age of 4. The observed results were as follows: 1. Past history revealed that she had received for a total radiation dose od 4430 cGy, 29 fractions in 6 weeks and chemotherapy with vincristine, actinomycin D and cytoxan, followed as maintenance phase for 2 years. 2. The patient was symptom-free and appointed for the treatment of multiple dental caries. 3. Oral examination showed hypoplastic enamel on whole erupted permanent teeth and showed retarded eruption. 4. Conventional radiograms showed failure of root development including abrupt cessation of root formation and root agenesis, and microdobtia, missing teeth, irregular enamel, dislocation of the impacted teeth. Additional finding showed good healing bone pattern on the left mandibular ramus and angle area. 5. Cehalometric analysis revealed failure of bite raising due to incomplete eruption of all the first molars and made it possible to suspect entrapped mandibular growth and then Class II tendency growth. 6. There was correlation between the time of chemo-radiation therapy and the damage of the teeth.

  12. Chemoradiation, surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy versus induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation and surgery: long-term results of the Spanish GCR-3 phase II randomized trial†.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Martos, C; Garcia-Albeniz, X; Pericay, C; Maurel, J; Aparicio, J; Montagut, C; Safont, M J; Salud, A; Vera, R; Massuti, B; Escudero, P; Alonso, V; Bosch, C; Martin, M; Minsky, B D

    2015-08-01

    The primary results of our phase II randomized trial suggested that compared with conventional preoperative chemoradiation (CRT), the addition of chemotherapy (CT) before CRT and surgery allows most patients receive their planned treatment with a better toxicity profile without compromising the pathological complete response and complete resection rates. We now report the 5-year outcomes. Patients with distal or middle third, T3-T4 and/or N+ rectal adenocarcinoma selected by magnetic resonance imaging, were randomly assigned to arm A-preoperative CRT followed by surgery and four cycles of postoperative adjuvant capecitabine and oxaliplatin (CAPOX)-or arm B-four cycles of CAPOX followed by CRT and surgery. The following 5-year actuarial outcomes were assessed: the cumulative incidence of local relapse (LR) and distant metastases (DM), disease-free (DFS) and overall survival (OS). A total of 108 eligible patients were randomly assigned to arm A (n = 52) or arm B (n = 56). With a median follow-up of 69.5 months, 5-year DFS was 64% in arm A and 62% in arm B (P = 0.85) and 5-year OS was 78% in arm A and 75% in arm B (P = 0.64). The 5-year cumulative incidence of LR was 2% and 5% (P = 0.61) and 5-year cumulative incidence of DM was 21% and 23%; (P = 0.79) in arms A and B, respectively. Both treatment approaches yield similar outcomes. Given the lower acute toxicity and improved compliance with induction CT compared with adjuvant CT, integrating effective systemic therapy before CRT and surgery is a promising strategy and should be examined in phase III trials. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Radiation or chemoradiation: initial utility study of selected therapy for local advanced stadium cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramitasari, D. A.; Gondhowiardjo, S.; Nuranna, L.

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to compare radiation only or chemo radiation treatment of local advanced cervical cancers by examining the initial response of tumors and acute side effects. An initial assessment employed value based medicine (VBM) by obtaining utility values for both types of therapy. The incidences of acute lower gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and hematology side effects in patients undergoing chemoradiation did not differ significantly from those undergoing radiation alone. Utility values for patients who underwent radiation alone were higher compared to those who underwent chemoradiation. It was concluded that the complete response of patients who underwent chemoradiation did not differ significantly from those who underwent radiation alone.

  14. Complete pathologic response following preoperative chemoradiation therapy for middle to lower rectal cancer is not a prognostic factor for a better outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucciarelli, Salvatore; Toppan, Paola; Friso, Maria Luisa; Russo, Valentina; Pasetto, Lara; Urso, Emanuele; Marino, Filippo; Ambrosi, Alessandro; Lise, Mario

    2004-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate factors associated with pathologic tumor response following pre-operative chemoradiation therapy, and the prognostic impact of pathologic response on overall and disease-free survival. Between 1994 and 2002, 132 patients underwent chemoradiation therapy followed by surgery for middle to lower rectal cancer. After excluding 26 cases (metastatic cancer, n = 13; nonradical surgery, n = 6; local excision procedure, n = 4; non-5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy, n = 2; incomplete data on preoperative chemoradiation therapy regimen used, n = 1), the remaining 106 patients were included in the study. Variables considered were the following: age, gender, tumor location, pretreatment T and N stage, modality of 5-fluorouracil administration, total radiotherapy dose delivered, chemoradiation therapy regimen used (Regimen A: chemotherapy (bolus of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin, days 1-5 and 29-33) + radiotherapy (45 Gy/25 F/1.8 Gy/F); Regimen B: chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil continuous venous infusion +/- weekly bolus of carboplatin or oxaliplatin) + radiotherapy (50.4 Gy/28 F/1.8 Gy/F)), time interval between completion of chemoradiation therapy and surgery, postoperative chemotherapy administration, surgical procedures, pT, pN, and pTNM stage, and response to chemoradiation therapy defined as tumor regression grade, scored from 1 (no tumor on surgical specimen) to 5 (absence of regressive changes). Statistical analysis was performed by means of logistic regression analysis (Cox's model for overall and disease-free survival). Median age of the 106 patients was 60 (range, 31-79) years and the male:female ratio, 66:40. Median distance of tumor from the anal verge was 6 (range, 1-11) cm. Pretreatment TNM stage, available in 104 patients, was cT3T4N0, n = 41; cT2N1, n = 9; cT3N1, n = 39; and cT4N1, n = 17. The median radiotherapy dose delivered was 50.4 (range, 40-56) Gy; 58 patients received 5-fluorouracil by continuous venous infusion, and

  15. Symptomatic Pericardial Effusion After Chemoradiation Therapy in Esophageal Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukada, Junichi, E-mail: fukada@rad.med.keio.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo (Japan); Shigematsu, Naoyuki [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo (Japan); Takeuchi, Hiroya [Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo (Japan); Ohashi, Toshio [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo (Japan); Saikawa, Yoshiro [Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo (Japan); Takaishi, Hiromasa [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo (Japan); Hanada, Takashi; Shiraishi, Yutaka [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo (Japan); Kitagawa, Yuko [Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo (Japan); Fukuda, Keiichi [Department of Cardiology, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: We investigated clinical and treatment-related factors as predictors of symptomatic pericardial effusion in esophageal cancer patients after concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Methods and Materials: We reviewed 214 consecutive primary esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy between 2001 and 2010 in our institute. Pericardial effusion was detected on follow-up computed tomography. Symptomatic effusion was defined as effusion ≥grade 3 according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v4.0 criteria. Percent volume irradiated with 5 to 65 Gy (V5-V65) and mean dose to the pericardium were evaluated employing dose-volume histograms. To evaluate dosimetry for patients treated with two-dimensional planning in the earlier period (2001-2005), computed tomography data at diagnosis were transferred to a treatment planning system to reconstruct three-dimensional plans without modification. Optimal dosimetric thresholds for symptomatic pericardial effusion were calculated by receiver operating characteristic curves. Associating clinical and treatment-related risk factors for symptomatic pericardial effusion were detected by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: The median follow-up was 29 (range, 6-121) months for eligible 167 patients. Symptomatic pericardial effusion was observed in 14 (8.4%) patients. Dosimetric analyses revealed average values of V30 to V45 for the pericardium and mean pericardial doses were significantly higher in patients with symptomatic pericardial effusion than in those with asymptomatic pericardial effusion (P<.05). Pericardial V5 to V55 and mean pericardial doses were significantly higher in patients with symptomatic pericardial effusion than in those without pericardial effusion (P<.001). Mean pericardial doses of 36.5 Gy and V45 of 58% were selected as optimal cutoff values for predicting symptomatic pericardial effusion. Multivariate analysis identified mean pericardial dose as the

  16. The CARTS study: Chemoradiation therapy for rectal cancer in the distal rectum followed by organ-sparing transanal endoscopic microsurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bökkerink Guus MJ

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The CARTS study is a multicenter feasibility study, investigating the role of rectum saving surgery for distal rectal cancer. Methods/Design Patients with a clinical T1-3 N0 M0 rectal adenocarcinoma below 10 cm from the anal verge will receive neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (25 fractions of 2 Gy with concurrent capecitabine. Transanal Endoscopic Microsurgery (TEM will be performed 8 - 10 weeks after the end of the preoperative treatment depending on the clinical response. Primary objective is to determine the number of patients with a (near complete pathological response after chemoradiation therapy and TEM. Secondary objectives are the local recurrence rate and quality of life after this combined therapeutic modality. A three-step analysis will be performed after 20, 33 and 55 patients to ensure the feasibility of this treatment protocol. Discussion The CARTS-study is one of the first prospective multicentre trials to investigate the role of a rectum saving treatment modality using chemoradiation therapy and local excision. The CARTS study is registered at clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01273051

  17. [Syndrome of inappropriate secretion of ADH following chemoradiation therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Norihiro; Masuda, Michiko; Tamura, Tomohiro; Nakazawa, Kensuke; Kanemoto, Koji; Iijima, Hiroaki; Ishikawa, Hirokazu; Sato, Shinya; Ishii, Yukio

    2012-11-01

    We report a 69-year-old female patient with pulmonary adenocarcinoma complicated by the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone(SIADH)following systemic chemotherapy with cisplatin(CDDP)and vinorelbine(VNR). She was admitted to our hospital for chemo-radiotherapy for advanced lung cancer, and became restless 4 hours after the administration of CDDP and VNR. Symptoms such as restlessness and incontinence were worsening despite the massive infusion that was completed. Laboratory examinations on day 6 after chemotherapy showed severe hyponatremia(107mEq/L)with decreased serum osmolarity(227mOsm/L)and increased urine osmolarity(452mOsm/L). The serum anti-diuretic hormone(ADH)level was elevated to 16. 7 pg/mL despite severe hyponatremia. She was diagnosed with SIADH and was treated with hypertonic saline infusion and fluid restriction. Her restlessness and other psychiatric symptoms were improved. The use of carboplatin and VNR in the subsequent course did not develop SIADH, indicating that the SIADH was induced by CDDP. Although SIADH following CDDP administration is rare, the electrolyte balance should be carefully monitored throughout the clinical course of chemo-radiation therapy, when psychiatric symptoms are found in patients with lung cancer.

  18. 17-Week Delay Surgery after Chemoradiation in Rectal Cancer with Complete Pathological Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa D. Santos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT followed by curative surgery still remains the standard of care for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC. The main purpose of this multimodal treatment is to achieve a complete pathological tumor response (ypCR, with better survival. The surgery delay after CRT completion seems to increase tumor response and ypCR rate. Usually, time intervals range from 8 to 12 weeks, but the maximum tumor regression may not be seen in rectal adenocarcinomas until several months after CRT. About this issue, we report a case of a 52-year-old man with LARC treated with neoadjuvant CRT who developed, one month after RT completion, an acute myocardial infarction. The need to increase the interval between CRT and surgery for 17 weeks allowed a curative surgery without morbidity and an unexpected complete tumor response in the resected specimen (given the parameters presented in pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI performed 11 weeks after radiotherapy completion.

  19. Does Extending the Waiting Time of Low-Rectal Cancer Surgery after Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Increase the Perioperative Complications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timudom, Kittinut; Phothong, Natthawut; Akaraviputh, Thawatchai; Chinswangwatanakul, Vitoon; Pongpaibul, Ananya; Petsuksiri, Janjira; Ithimakin, Suthinee

    2016-01-01

    Background. Traditionally, rectal cancer surgery is recommended 6 to 8 weeks after completing neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Extending the waiting time may increase the tumor response rate. However, the perioperative complication rate may increase. The purpose of this study was to determine the association between extending the waiting time of surgery after neoadjuvant chemoradiation and perioperative outcomes. Methods. Sixty patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiation followed by radical resection at Siriraj hospital between June 2012 and January 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. Demographic data and perioperative outcomes were compared between the two groups. Results. The two groups were comparable in term of demographic parameters. The mean time interval from neoadjuvant chemoradiation to surgery was 6.4 weeks in Group A and 11.7 weeks in Group B. The perioperative outcomes were not significantly different between Groups A and B. Pathologic examination showed a significantly higher rate of circumferential margin positivity in Group A than in Group B (30% versus 9.3%, resp.; P = 0.04). Conclusions. Extending the waiting to >8 weeks from neoadjuvant chemoradiation to surgery did not increase perioperative complications, whereas the rate of circumferential margin positivity decreased.

  20. Statin therapy is associated with improved pathologic response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation in rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mace, Adam G; Gantt, Gerald A; Skacel, Marek; Pai, Rish; Hammel, Jeff P; Kalady, Matthew F

    2013-11-01

    Achieving a pathologic complete response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation improves prognosis in rectal cancer. Statin therapy has been shown to enhance the impact of treatment in several malignancies, but little is known regarding the impact on rectal cancer response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The purpose of this study was to determine whether statin use during neoadjuvant chemoradiation improves pathologic response in rectal cancer. This was a retrospective cohort study based on data from a prospectively maintained colorectal cancer database. The 2 cohorts were defined by statin use during neoadjuvant chemoradiation. This study was performed at a single tertiary referral center. Four hundred seven patients with primary rectal adenocarcinoma who underwent neoadjuvant therapy then proctectomy between 2000 and 2012 were included. Ninety-nine patients (24.3%) took a statin throughout the entire course of neoadjuvant therapy. The primary outcome measure was pathologic response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy as defined by the American Joint Committee on Cancer tumor regression grading system, grades 0 to 3. Patients in the statin cohort had a lower median regression grade (1 vs 2, p = 0.01) and were more likely to have a better response (grades 0-1 vs 2-3) than those not taking a statin (65.7% vs 48.7%, p = 0.004). Statin use remained a significant predictor of an American Joint Committee on Cancer grade 0 to 1 (OR, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.33-3.82) in multivariate analyses. Although statin use itself did not significantly improve oncologic outcomes, an American Joint Committee on Cancer grade 0 to 1 response was associated with statistically significant improvements in overall survival, disease-free survival, cancer-specific mortality, and local recurrence. This was a retrospective study and subject to nonrandomization of patients and incorporated patients on variable statin agents and doses. Statin therapy is associated with an improved response of rectal cancer to

  1. Adjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy for Cervical Cancer and Effect of Timing and Duration on Treatment Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhawar, Sachin; Hathout, Lara; Elshaikh, Mohamed A; Beriwal, Sushil; Small, William; Mahmoud, Omar

    2017-08-01

    Worse treatment outcomes can be expected with prolongation of the overall treatment time (OTT) during definitive chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for cervical cancer. In the adjuvant setting, data on the relative importance of the OTT and the importance of RT and chemotherapy synchronization are scarce. Using the National Cancer Database, we evaluated the effect of these treatment variables on overall survival in the adjuvant CRT setting. The present analysis included nonmetastatic cervical cancer patients undergoing hysterectomy followed by adjuvant CRT. The proportional hazard model was used to estimate the effect of prognostic factors (age, comorbidity, race, tumor size, tumor grade, tumor histologic type, number of high-risk pathologic factors) and time-related variables (surgery to RT start interval [SR], OTT [RT start to end dates], package time [from diagnosis date to CRT end date] and optimum CRT synchronization [whether chemotherapy and RT start dates coincided]) on survival. Of 3051 patients, 60% finished RT within 7 weeks and 85% received optimum CRT. Among other factors, univariate analysis identified longer OTT (hazards ratio [HR] 1.33; P7 weeks remained a significant factor even after propensity score matching (P=.04). The results of our analysis suggest that prolongation of the adjuvant CRT duration >7 weeks is associated with poor survival and SR of <8 weeks should be attempted whenever clinically feasible. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy in Combination With Panitumumab for Patients With Resectable Esophageal Cancer: The PACT Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kordes, Sil, E-mail: s.kordes@amc.uva.nl [Department of Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Berge Henegouwen, Mark I. van [Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hulshof, Maarten C. [Department of Radiotherapy, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bergman, Jacques J.G.H.M. [Department of Gastroenterology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vliet, Hans J. van der [Department of Medical Oncology, Vrije Universiteit Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kapiteijn, Ellen [Department of Medical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Laarhoven, Hanneke W.M. van; Richel, Dick J. [Department of Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Klinkenbijl, Jean H.G. [Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Meijer, Sybren L. [Department of Pathology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Wilmink, Johanna W. [Department of Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) has become the standard treatment strategy for patients with resectable esophageal cancer. This multicenter phase 2 study investigated the efficacy of the addition of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor panitumumab to a preoperative CRT regimen with carboplatin, paclitaxel, and radiation therapy in patients with resectable esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with resectable cT1N1M0 or cT2-3N0 to -2M0 tumors received preoperative CRT consisting of panitumumab (6 mg/kg) on days 1, 15, and 29, weekly administrations of carboplatin (area under the curve [AUC] = 2), and paclitaxel (50 mg/m{sup 2}) for 5 weeks and concurrent radiation therapy (41.4 Gy in 23 fractions, 5 days per week), followed by surgery. Primary endpoint was pathologic complete response (pCR) rate. We aimed at a pCR rate of more than 40%. Furthermore, we explored the predictive value of biomarkers (EGFR, HER 2, and P53) for pCR. Results: From January 2010 until December 2011, 90 patients were enrolled. Patients were diagnosed predominantly with adenocarcinoma (AC) (80%), T3 disease (89%), and were node positive (81%). Three patients were not resected due to progressive disease. The primary aim was unmet, with a pCR rate of 22%. Patients with AC and squamous cell carcinoma reached a pCR of 14% and 47%, respectively. R0 resection was achieved in 95% of the patients. Main grade 3 toxicities were rash (12%), fatigue (11%), and nonfebrile neutropenia (11%). None of the biomarkers was predictive for response. Conclusions: The addition of panitumumab to CRT with carboplatin and paclitaxel was safe and well tolerated but could not improve pCR rate to the preset criterion of 40%.

  3. Variable uterine uptake of FDG in adenomyosis during concurrent chemoradiation therapy for cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Jeong Il; Huh, Seung Jae; Kim, Young Il; Kim, Tae Joong; Park, Byung Kwan [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    To avoid improper tumor volume contouring in radiation therapy (RT) and other invasive procedures, we report a case of uterine adenomyosis showing increased 18F-fl uorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake on positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) mimicking malignant tumor in a 44-year-old woman during concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) for uterine cervical cancer. The adenomyosis was not associated with her menstrual cycle or with normal endometrium uptake, and it resolved one month after completion of RT. This case indicates that uterine adenomyosis in a premenopausal woman may show false positive uptake of 18FDG-PET/CT associated with CCRT.

  4. Adjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy in Gastric Cancer: Critically Reviewing the Past and Visualizing the Next Step Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, Konstantinos; Antoniou, Georgios; Bronte, Giuseppe; Vassiliou, Vassilios; Papamichael, Demetris; Peeters, Marc; Kountourakis, Panteleimon

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains one of the most common malignancies worldwide. Despite the significant advances in surgical treatment and multimodality strategies, prognosis has modestly improved over the last two decades. Locoregional relapse remains one of the main issues and the combined chemoradiation treatment seems to be one of the preferred approaches. However, more than ten years after the hallmark INT-0116 trial, minimal progress has been made both in terms of effectiveness and toxicity. Moreover, new regimens added to combined therapy failed to prove favourable results. Herein, we attempt a thorough literature review comparing pros and cons of all relative studies and potential bias, targeting well-designed future approaches. PMID:26101524

  5. Adjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy in Gastric Cancer: Critically Reviewing the Past and Visualizing the Next Step Forward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Papadimitriou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer remains one of the most common malignancies worldwide. Despite the significant advances in surgical treatment and multimodality strategies, prognosis has modestly improved over the last two decades. Locoregional relapse remains one of the main issues and the combined chemoradiation treatment seems to be one of the preferred approaches. However, more than ten years after the hallmark INT-0116 trial, minimal progress has been made both in terms of effectiveness and toxicity. Moreover, new regimens added to combined therapy failed to prove favourable results. Herein, we attempt a thorough literature review comparing pros and cons of all relative studies and potential bias, targeting well-designed future approaches.

  6. The prognostic value of tumour regression grade following neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy for rectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Abdul-Jalil, K I

    2014-01-01

    To date, there is no uniform consensus on whether tumour regression grade (TRG) is predictive of outcome in rectal cancer. Furthermore, the lack of standardization of TRG grading is a major source of variability in published studies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic impact of TRG in a cohort of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT). In addition to the Mandard TRG, we utilized four TRG systems modified from the Mandard TRG system and applied them to the cohort to assess which TRG system is most informative.

  7. Radiation Dose-Response Model for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer After Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, A. L.; Ploen, J.; Vogelius, I. R.

    2013-01-01

    of external-beam radiation therapy and brachytherapy. Response at the time of operation was evaluated from the histopathologic specimen and graded on a 5-point scale (TRG1-5). The probability of achieving complete, major, and partial response was analyzed by ordinal logistic regression, and the effect......Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) is part of the standard treatment of locally advanced rectal cancers. Tumor regression at the time of operation is desirable, but not much is known about the relationship between radiation dose and tumor regression. In the present study we...... estimated radiation dose-response curves for various grades of tumor regression after preoperative CRT. Methods and Materials: A total of 222 patients, treated with consistent chemotherapy and radiation therapy techniques, were considered for the analysis. Radiation therapy consisted of a combination...

  8. Physical Therapy and Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Valle-Onate, Rafael; Ward, Michael M.; Kerr, Gail S.

    2012-01-01

    Physical therapy and orthopedic surgery are important components in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Supervised physical therapy is more effective that individual or unsupervised exercise in improving symptoms, but controlled trials suggest than combined inpatient and outpatient therapy provides the greatest improvement. Recommendations for exercise are universal, but the best types and sequence of therapies are not known. Total hip replacement is the surgery most commonly perfor...

  9. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy first, followed by chemoradiation and then surgery, in the management of locally advanced rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cercek, Andrea; Goodman, Karyn A; Hajj, Carla; Weisberger, Emily; Segal, Neil H; Reidy-Lagunes, Diane L; Stadler, Zsofia K; Wu, Abraham J; Weiser, Martin R; Paty, Philip B; Guillem, Jose G; Nash, Garrett M; Temple, Larissa K; Garcia-Aguilar, Julio; Saltz, Leonard B

    2014-04-01

    Standard therapy for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) is preoperative chemoradiotherapy and postoperative chemotherapy. At Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) the authors began offering FOLFOX (5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin) as initial treatment for patients with high-risk LARC to target micrometastases while treating the primary tumor. The purpose of this study is to report the safety and efficacy of initial FOLFOX given before chemoradiotherapy on tumor downsizing and pathologic complete response (pathCR) in LARC. The records of patients with stage II/III rectal cancer treated at MSKCC between 2007 and 2012 were reviewed. Of approximately 300 patients with LARC treated at MSKCC, 61 received FOLFOX as initial therapy. Of these 61 patients, 57 received induction FOLFOX (median 7 cycles) followed by chemoradiation, and 4 experienced an excellent response, declined chemoradiation, and underwent total mesorectal excision (TME). Twelve of the 61 patients did not undergo TME: 9 had a complete clinical response (CCR), 1 declined despite persistent tumor, 1 declined because of comorbidities, and 1 developed metastatic disease. Among the 61 patients receiving initial FOLFOX, 22 (36%) had either a pathCR (n=13) or a CCR (n=9). Of the 49 patients who underwent TME, all had R0 resections and 23 (47%) had tumor response greater than 90%, including 13 (27%) who experienced a pathCR. Of the 28 patients who received all 8 cycles of FOLFOX, 8 experienced a pathCR (29%) and 3 a CCR (11%). No serious adverse events occurred that required a delay in treatment during FOLFOX or chemoradiation. FOLFOX and chemoradiation before planned TME results in tumor regression, a high rate of delivery of planned therapy, and a substantial rate of pathCRs, and offers a good platform for nonoperative management in select patients.

  10. Physical Therapy and Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle-Onate, Rafael; Ward, Michael M.; Kerr, Gail S.

    2012-01-01

    Physical therapy and orthopedic surgery are important components in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Supervised physical therapy is more effective that individual or unsupervised exercise in improving symptoms, but controlled trials suggest than combined inpatient and outpatient therapy provides the greatest improvement. Recommendations for exercise are universal, but the best types and sequence of therapies are not known. Total hip replacement is the surgery most commonly performed for AS, with good long-term implant survival. Heterotopic ossification may occur no more frequently after hip replacement in patients with AS than in patients with other diseases. Corrective spinal surgery is rarely performed and requires specialized centers and experienced surgeons. PMID:22543536

  11. Nanoparticle-Based Brachytherapy Spacers for Delivery of Localized Combined Chemoradiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Rajiv, E-mail: r.kumar@neu.edu [Nanomedicine Science and Technology Center, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Belz, Jodi [Nanomedicine Science and Technology Center, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Markovic, Stacey [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Jadhav, Tej; Fowle, William [Nanomedicine Science and Technology Center, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Niedre, Mark [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Cormack, Robert; Makrigiorgos, Mike G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Sridhar, Srinivas [Nanomedicine Science and Technology Center, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: In radiation therapy (RT), brachytherapy-inert source spacers are commonly used in clinical practice to achieve high spatial accuracy. These implanted devices are critical technical components of precise radiation delivery but provide no direct therapeutic benefits. Methods and Materials: Here we have fabricated implantable nanoplatforms or chemoradiation therapy (INCeRT) spacers loaded with silica nanoparticles (SNPs) conjugated containing a drug, to act as a slow-release drug depot for simultaneous localized chemoradiation therapy. The spacers are made of poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) as matrix and are physically identical in size to the commercially available brachytherapy spacers (5 mm × 0.8 mm). The silica nanoparticles, 250 nm in diameter, were conjugated with near infrared fluorophore Cy7.5 as a model drug, and the INCeRT spacers were characterized in terms of size, morphology, and composition using different instrumentation techniques. The spacers were further doped with an anticancer drug, docetaxel. We evaluated the in vivo stability, biocompatibility, and biodegradation of these spacers in live mouse tissues. Results: The electron microscopy studies showed that nanoparticles were distributed throughout the spacers. These INCeRT spacers remained stable and can be tracked by the use of optical fluorescence. In vivo optical imaging studies showed a slow diffusion of nanoparticles from the spacer to the adjacent tissue in contrast to the control Cy7.5-PLGA spacer, which showed rapid disintegration in a few days with a burst release of Cy7.5. The docetaxel spacers showed suppression of tumor growth in contrast to control mice over 16 days. Conclusions: The imaging with the Cy7.5 spacer and therapeutic efficacy with docetaxel spacers supports the hypothesis that INCeRT spacers can be used for delivering the drugs in a slow, sustained manner in conjunction with brachytherapy, in contrast to the rapid clearance of the drugs when

  12. Completion surgery after concomitant chemoradiation in obese women with locally advanced cervical cancer: Evaluation of toxicity and outcome measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legge, Francesco; Margariti, Pasquale A; Lucidi, Alessandro; Macchia, Gabriella; Petrillo, Marco; Iannone, Vito; Carone, Vito; Morganti, Alessio G; Scambia, Giovanni; Ferrandina, Gabriella

    2013-01-01

    This study aims at comparing the morbidity and oncologic outcomes in normal weight, overweight, and obese women with locally advanced cervical cancers (LACC) submitted to radical surgery after chemoradiation. A review of LACC patients with body mass index (BMI) ≥ 18.5 kg/m(2) who underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiation followed by radical surgery between January 1996 and December 2010 was performed. BMI categories were created according to the World Health Organization (WHO) classification. Two hundred sixty-eight women met the inclusion criteria: 118 (44.0%) were normal weight, 100 (37.3%) overweight and 50 (18.7%) obese. The median follow-up was 42 months. Higher BMI was associated with older age (p = 0.0041), while there were no differences among the three groups in Charlson comorbidity score, tumor characteristics, radiotherapy dosing, type of surgery, and pathological response. There were no differences among the three groups in the intraoperative and postoperative complications as well as rate of patients requiring adjuvant treatments: 21 (7.8%) patients experienced grade 3-4 toxicity, including six normal weight, 12 overweight and three obese patients (p = 0.14). Only the rate of grade 1-2 skin toxicity was higher in obese (14%) with respect to overweight (1%) and normal women (0%) (p = 0.00001). There were no differences in the five-year DFS (74%, 77%, and 84% for normal weight, overweight, and obese women, respectively, p = n.s.), and five-year OS (76%, 78%, and 78% for normal weight, overweight, and obese women, respectively, p = n.s.). The role of obesity should not be overestimated when evaluating the chance of enrolment of LACC patients into preoperative chemoradiation protocols.

  13. Impact of neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy on the postoperative complication rate in rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kruschewski M

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The impact of neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT on the postoperative complication rate is discussed controversially. Thus the aim of this study was to evaluate the postoperative complication rate in our patient population. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed to examine all patients documented online who had undergone conventionally fractionated adjuvant or neoadjuvant CRT from 2001 to 2009 in conjunction with curative resection (R0 for sporadic primary colorectal cancer in the middle or lower third. A total of 246 patients were included and analyzed. Two groups were formed: Group I, 2001-2004, adjuvant CRT, n=108, and Group II, 2005-2009, neoadjuvant CRT, n=138. Results: The two groups had comparable patient-, tumor- and therapy-related characteristics. No difference was found in the anastomotic leak rate (Group I vs. II: 10% vs. 11%. The rate of perineal wound healing problems differed significantly (Group I vs. II: 5% vs. 36%, p=0.016. While no patient died in Group I, lethality amounted to 1.5% (2/138 in Group II. Conclusions: Neoadjuvant CRT does not lead to a higher anastomotic leak rate or lethality in comparison to patients who were primarily operated and received adjuvant CRT in the further course. The rate of perineal wound healing problems is significantly increased.

  14. Diffuse optical measurements of head and neck tumor hemodynamics for early prediction of chemoradiation therapy outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Lixin; Kudrimoti, Mahesh; Irwin, Daniel; Chen, Li; Kumar, Sameera; Shang, Yu; Huang, Chong; Johnson, Ellis L.; Stevens, Scott D.; Shelton, Brent J.; Yu, Guoqiang

    2016-08-01

    This study used a hybrid near-infrared diffuse optical instrument to monitor tumor hemodynamic responses to chemoradiation therapy for early prediction of treatment outcomes in patients with head and neck cancer. Forty-seven patients were measured once per week to evaluate the hemodynamic status of clinically involved cervical lymph nodes as surrogates for the primary tumor response. Patients were classified into two groups: complete response (CR) (n=29) and incomplete response (IR) (n=18). Tumor hemodynamic responses were found to be associated with clinical outcomes (CR/IR), wherein the associations differed depending on human papillomavirus (HPV-16) status. In HPV-16 positive patients, significantly lower levels in tumor oxygenated hemoglobin concentration ([HbO2]) at weeks 1 to 3, total hemoglobin concentration at week 3, and blood oxygen saturation (StO2) at week 3 were found in the IR group. In HPV-16 negative patients, significantly higher levels in tumor blood flow index and reduced scattering coefficient (μs‧) at week 3 were observed in the IR group. These hemodynamic parameters exhibited significantly high accuracy for early prediction of clinical outcomes, within the first three weeks of therapy, with the areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) ranging from 0.83 to 0.96.

  15. Gastroduodenal Complications After Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy in Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Endoscopic Findings and Risk Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chon, Young Eun [Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seong, Jinsil [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Beom Kyung [Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Jihye [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seung Up; Park, Jun Yong; Ahn, Sang Hoon; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Chon, Chae Yoon [Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Gastroenterology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Liver Cirrhosis Clinical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Sung Kwan, E-mail: kaarma@yuhs.ac [Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Gastroenterology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Do Young, E-mail: dyk1025@yuhs.ac [Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Gastroenterology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Liver Cirrhosis Clinical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) is useful in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but little is known about radiation-induced gastroduodenal complications following therapy. To determine risk factors, we investigated the prevalence and patterns of gastroduodenal complications following CCRT using endoscopy. Methods and Materials: Enrolled in the study were 123 patients treated with CCRT for unresectable HCC between January 1998 and December 2005. Radiation-induced gastroduodenal complications were defined as radiation gastritis/duodenitis, radiation gastric/duodenal ulcer, or other gastroduodenal toxicity associated with radiation, based on Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE 3.0). Serious gastroduodenal complications were defined as events occurring within 12 months from completion of CCRT, those requiring prompt therapeutic intervention, or symptoms equivalent to Grade 3 or 4 radiation-related gastroduodenal toxicity, including nausea or vomiting, based on CTCAE 3.0. Results: A month after completion of CCRT, 65 (52.8%) patients displayed endoscopic evidence of radiation-induced gastroduodenal complications. Radiation gastric and duodenal ulcers were found in 32 (26.0%) and 20 (16.3%) patients, respectively; radiation gastritis and duodenitis were found in 50 (40.7%) and 42 (34.1%) patients, respectively. Radiation-related bleeding was observed in 13 patients (10.6%). Serious gastroduodenal complications occurred in 18 patients (14.6%) and were significantly more frequent in patients with liver cirrhosis than in those without cirrhosis (p = 0.043). There were no radiation-related deaths. Conclusions: Endoscopically detectable radiation-induced gastroduodenal complications were common in HCC following CCRT. Although serious complications were uncommon, the frequency was higher in patients with liver cirrhosis; thus, these patients should be closely monitored when receiving CCRT.

  16. Complete Response of Isolated Para-aortic Lymph Node Recurrence from Rectosigmoid Cancer Treated by Chemoradiation Therapy with Capecitabine/Oxaliplatin plus Bevacizumab: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, Tomonori; Ebe, Kazuyu; Koide, Norihiko; Fujita, Nobuhiro

    2012-05-01

    Para-aortic lymph node recurrence is a rare type of metastasis from colorectal cancer, and no treatment has yet been established. Here, we report on a case of isolated para-aortic lymph node metastasis from rectosigmoid cancer that showed complete response to chemoradiation therapy with capecitabine/oxaliplatin plus bevacizumab. A 58-year-old woman underwent high anterior resection for rectosigmoid cancer in 2009. Para-aortic lymph node recurrence occurred in 2011. She underwent radiation therapy (50 Gy) and 8 courses of capecitabine/oxaliplatin plus bevacizumab. Abdominal computed tomography and positron emission tomography with 18-fluorodeoxyglucose did not reveal any para-aortic lymph node recurrence after chemoradiation therapy. Hence, this case was interpreted as a complete response. No recurrence was noted 6 months after the complete response. Chemoradiation therapy with capecitabine/oxaliplatin plus bevacizumab is likely to be effective in treating patients with para-aortic lymph node recurrence.

  17. Complete Response of Isolated Para-aortic Lymph Node Recurrence from Rectosigmoid Cancer Treated by Chemoradiation Therapy with Capecitabine/Oxaliplatin plus Bevacizumab: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomonori Miyazawa

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Para-aortic lymph node recurrence is a rare type of metastasis from colorectal cancer, and no treatment has yet been established. Here, we report on a case of isolated para-aortic lymph node metastasis from rectosigmoid cancer that showed complete response to chemoradiation therapy with capecitabine/oxaliplatin plus bevacizumab. A 58-year-old woman underwent high anterior resection for rectosigmoid cancer in 2009. Para-aortic lymph node recurrence occurred in 2011. She underwent radiation therapy (50 Gy and 8 courses of capecitabine/oxaliplatin plus bevacizumab. Abdominal computed tomography and positron emission tomography with 18-fluorodeoxyglucose did not reveal any para-aortic lymph node recurrence after chemoradiation therapy. Hence, this case was interpreted as a complete response. No recurrence was noted 6 months after the complete response. Chemoradiation therapy with capecitabine/oxaliplatin plus bevacizumab is likely to be effective in treating patients with para-aortic lymph node recurrence.

  18. Chemoradiation With Concomitant Boosts Followed by Radical Surgery in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer: Long-term Results of the ROMA-2 Prospective Phase 2 Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrandina, Gabriella, E-mail: gabriella.ferrandina@libero.it [Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy); Gambacorta, Antonietta [Division of Radiotherapy, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy); Gallotta, Valerio [Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy); Smaniotto, Daniela [Division of Radiotherapy, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy); Fagotti, Anna [Gynecologic Surgery, University of Perugia, Terni (Italy); Tagliaferri, Luca [Division of Radiotherapy, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy); Foti, Elvira; Fanfani, Francesco [Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy); Autorino, Rosa [Division of Radiotherapy, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy); Scambia, Giovanni [Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy); Valentini, Vincenzo [Division of Radiotherapy, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy)

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: This prospective, phase 2 study aimed at assessing the efficacy of accelerated fractionation radiation therapy by concomitant boosts (CBs) associated with chemoradiation therapy (CRT) of the whole pelvis, in improving the rate of pathological complete response (pCR) to treatment in patients with International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IB2-IVA locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Neoadjuvant CRT included conformal irradiation of the whole pelvis with a total dose of 39.6 Gy (1.8 cGy/fraction, 22 fractions), plus additional irradiation of primary tumor and parametria with 10.8 Gy administered with CBs (0.9 cGy/fraction, 12 fractions, every other day). Concomitant chemotherapy included cisplatin (20 mg/m{sup 2}, days 1-4 and 26-30 of treatment), and capecitabine (1300 mg/m{sup 2}/daily, orally) during the first 2 and the last 2 weeks of treatment. Radical hysterectomy plus pelvic with or without aortic lymphadenectomy was performed within 6 to 8 weeks from CRT. Toxicity was recorded according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group toxicity criteria and Chassagne grading system. Based on the Simon design, 103 cases were required, and the regimen would be considered active if >45 pCR were registered (α error = 0.05; β error = 0.1). Results: pCR was documented in 51 cases (50.5%), and the regimen was considered active, according to the planned statistical assumptions. At median follow-up of 36 months (range: 7-85 months), the 3-year local failure rate was 7%, whereas the 3-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 73.0% and 86.1%, respectively. Grade 3 leukopenia and neutropenia were reported in only 1 and 2 cases, respectively. Gastrointestinal toxicity was always grade 1 or 2. Conclusions: Addition of CBs in the accelerated fractionation modality to the whole pelvis chemoradiation followed by radical surgery results in a high rate of pathologically assessed complete response to CRT and a very

  19. PET/CT and Histopathologic Response to Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Charlotte; Loft, Annika; Berthelsen, Anne K

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: The objective of this study was to investigate the possibility of using positron emission tomography/computer tomography to predict the histopathologic response in locally advanced rectal cancer treated with preoperative chemoradiation. METHODS: The study included 30 patients with locally...... advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with a combination of radiotherapy and concurrent Uftoral(R) (uracil, tegafur) and leucovorine. All patients were evaluated by positron emission tomography/computer tomography scan seven weeks after end of chemoradiation, and the results were compared...... of chemoradiation is not able to predict the histopathologic response in locally advanced rectal cancer. There is an obvious need for other complementary methods especially with respect to the low sensitivity of positron emission tomography/computer tomography....

  20. Radiobiological Determination of Dose Escalation and Normal Tissue Toxicity in Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy for Esophageal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Samantha, E-mail: Samantha.warren@oncology.ox.ac.uk [Department of Oncology, Gray Institute of Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Partridge, Mike [Department of Oncology, Gray Institute of Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Carrington, Rhys [Velindre Cancer Centre, Velindre Hospital, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Hurt, Chris [Wales Cancer Trials Unit, School of Medicine, Heath Park, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Crosby, Thomas [Velindre Cancer Centre, Velindre Hospital, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Hawkins, Maria A. [Department of Oncology, Gray Institute of Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the trade-off in tumor coverage and organ-at-risk sparing when applying dose escalation for concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT) of mid-esophageal cancer, using radiobiological modeling to estimate local control and normal tissue toxicity. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with mid-esophageal cancer were selected from the SCOPE1 database (International Standard Randomised Controlled Trials number 47718479), with a mean planning target volume (PTV) of 327 cm{sup 3}. A boost volume, PTV2 (GTV + 0.5 cm margin), was created. Radiobiological modeling of tumor control probability (TCP) estimated the dose required for a clinically significant (+20%) increase in local control as 62.5 Gy/25 fractions. A RapidArc (RA) plan with a simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) to PTV2 (RA{sub 62.5}) was compared to a standard dose plan of 50 Gy/25 fractions (RA{sub 50}). Dose-volume metrics and estimates of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for heart and lungs were compared. Results: Clinically acceptable dose escalation was feasible for 16 of 21 patients, with significant gains (>18%) in tumor control from 38.2% (RA{sub 50}) to 56.3% (RA{sub 62.5}), and only a small increase in predicted toxicity: median heart NTCP 4.4% (RA{sub 50}) versus 5.6% (RA{sub 62.5}) P<.001 and median lung NTCP 6.5% (RA{sub 50}) versus 7.5% (RA{sub 62.5}) P<.001. Conclusions: Dose escalation to the GTV to improve local control is possible when overlap between PTV and organ-at-risk (<8% heart volume and <2.5% lung volume overlap for this study) generates only negligible increase in lung or heart toxicity. These predictions from radiobiological modeling should be tested in future clinical trials.

  1. NRG Oncology Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0822: A Phase 2 Study of Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy Using Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Combination With Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin for Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Theodore S., E-mail: tshong1@mgh.harvard.edu [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Moughan, Jennifer [NRG Oncology Statistics and Data Management Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Garofalo, Michael C. [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Bendell, Johanna [Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Berger, Adam C. [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Oldenburg, Nicklas B.E. [North Main Radiation Oncology, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Anne, Pramila Rani [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Perera, Francisco [London Regional Cancer Program/Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Lee, R. Jeffrey [Intermountain Medical Center, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Jabbour, Salma K. [Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Nowlan, Adam [Piedmont Hospital, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); DeNittis, Albert [Main Line Community Clinical Oncology Program, Wynnewood, Pennsylvania (United States); Crane, Christopher [University of Texas-MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the rate of gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity of neoadjuvant chemoradiation with capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in cT3-4 rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with localized, nonmetastatic T3 or T4 rectal cancer <12 cm from the anal verge were enrolled in a prospective, multi-institutional, single-arm study of preoperative chemoradiation. Patients received 45 Gy with IMRT in 25 fractions, followed by a 3-dimensional conformal boost of 5.4 Gy in 3 fractions with concurrent capecitabine/oxaliplatin (CAPOX). Surgery was performed 4 to 8 weeks after the completion of therapy. Patients were recommended to receive FOLFOX chemotherapy after surgery. The primary endpoint of the study was acute grade 2 to 5 GI toxicity. Seventy-one patients provided 80% probability to detect at least a 12% reduction in the specified GI toxicity with the treatment of CAPOX and IMRT, at a significance level of .10 (1-sided). Results: Seventy-nine patients were accrued, of whom 68 were evaluable. Sixty-one patients (89.7%) had cT3 disease, and 37 (54.4%) had cN (+) disease. Postoperative chemotherapy was given to 42 of 68 patients. Fifty-eight patients had target contours drawn per protocol, 5 patients with acceptable variation, and 5 patients with unacceptable variations. Thirty-five patients (51.5%) experienced grade ≥2 GI toxicity, 12 patients (17.6%) experienced grade 3 or 4 diarrhea, and pCR was achieved in 10 patients (14.7%). With a median follow-up time of 3.98 years, the 4-year rate of locoregional failure was 7.4% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.0%-13.7%). The 4-year rates of OS and DFS were 82.9% (95% CI: 70.1%-90.6%) and 60.6% (95% CI: 47.5%-71.4%), respectively. Conclusion: The use of IMRT in neoadjuvant chemoradiation for rectal cancer did not reduce the rate of GI toxicity.

  2. PET/CT and histopathologic response to preoperative chemoradiation therapy in locally advanced rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, C.; Loft, A.; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil;

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: The objective of this study was to investigate the possibility of using positron emission tomography/computer tomography to predict the histopathologic response in locally advanced rectal cancer treated with preoperative chemoradiation. METHODS: The study included 30 patients with locall...

  3. Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy Following Surgical Resection or Radiosurgery Plus Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients With Synchronous Solitary Brain Metastasis: A Curative Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parlak, Cem, E-mail: cemparlak@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Baskent University, Adana Medical Faculty, Adana (Turkey); Mertsoylu, Hüseyin [Department of Medical Oncology, Baskent University, Adana Medical Faculty, Adana (Turkey); Güler, Ozan Cem; Onal, Cem; Topkan, Erkan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Baskent University, Adana Medical Faculty, Adana (Turkey)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose/Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of definitive thoracic chemoradiation therapy following surgery or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) on the outcomes of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with synchronous solitary brain metastasis (SSBM). Methods and Materials: A total of 63 NSCLC patients with SSBM were retrospectively evaluated. Patients were staged using positron emission tomography-computed tomography in addition to conventional staging tools. Thoracic radiation therapy (TRT) with a total dose of 66 Gy in 2 Gy fractions was delivered along with 2 cycles of cisplatin-based chemotherapy following either surgery plus 30 Gy of WBRT (n=33) or SRS plus 30 Gy of WBRT (n=30) for BM. Results: Overall, the treatment was well tolerated. All patients received planned TRT, and 57 patients (90.5%) were also able to receive 2 cycles of chemotherapy. At a median follow-up of 25.3 months (7.1-52.1 months), the median months of overall, locoregional progression-free, neurological progression-free, and progression-free survival were 28.6, 17.7, 26.4, and 14.6, respectively. Both univariate and multivariate analyses revealed that patients with a T1-T2 thoracic disease burden (P=.001), a nodal stage of N0-N1 (P=.003), and no weight loss (P=.008) exhibited superior survival. Conclusions: In the present series, surgical and radiosurgical treatments directed toward SSBM in NSCLC patients were equally effective. The similarities between the present survival outcomes and those reported in other studies for locally advanced NSCLC patients indicate the potentially curative role of definitive chemoradiation therapy for highly selected patients with SSBM.

  4. Health-Related Quality of Life in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer Patients After Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy Including Image Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy: An Analysis From the EMBRACE Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirchheiner, Kathrin; Pötter, Richard; Tanderup, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study analyzed functioning and symptom scores for longitudinal quality of life (QoL) from patients with locally advanced cervical cancer who underwent definitive chemoradiation therapy with image guided adaptive brachytherapy in the EMBRACE study. Methods and Materials In total, 744 ...

  5. The role of surgery in locally advanced carcinoma of cervix after sub-optimal chemoradiation: Indian scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajshekar S Kundargi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Standard treatment of advanced cervical cancer is concurrent chemoradiation. Radical radiotherapy for carcinoma cervix includes pelvic external beam radiotherapy (EBRT with the concomitant platinum based chemotherapy followed by intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT to boost central disease. Management of patients who are suboptimally treated, especially, after unsuccessful ICBT insertion is not well-defined. This study explores the role of hysterectomy in these patients. Materials and Methods: From January 2006 to December 2011, 38 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, in whom ICBT insertion was unsuccessful, were analyzed retrospectively. Operable patients with no parametrial involvement underwent hysterectomy and outcomes (recurrence free and overall survival were noted. Results: The major complications in post operative period were wound infection, paralytic ileus and bladder atony all of which were conservatively managed with no mortality. At median follow-up of 36 months (range 12-60 months there was no recurrence in patients with stage 1B2 and stage IIA, 25 out of 38 (65.8% were event free and the overall survival was 71%. Conclusion: Many patients in Indian scenario receive suboptimal therapy in locally advanced cervical cancer. EBRT with chemotherapy followed by type 1 extra-fascial hysterectomy can be a good alternative for these patients.

  6. SU-E-J-268: Change of CT Number During the Course of Chemoradiation Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, X; Dalah, E; Liu, F; Li, X [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Zhang, J [Department of Radiation Oncology, Qianfoshan Hospital Affiliated to Shandon, Jinan, Shandong (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: It has been observed radiation can induce changes in CT number (CTN) inside tumor during the course of radiation therapy (RT) for several tumor sites including lung and head and neck, suggesting that the CTN change may be potentially used to assess RT response. In this study, we investigate the CTN changes inside tumor during the course of chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for pancreatic cancer. Methods: Daily diagnostic-quality CT data acquired during IGRT for 17 pancreatic head cancer patients using an in-room CT (CTVision, Siemens) were analyzed. All patients were treated with a radiation dose of 50.4 in 1.8 Gy per fraction. On each daily CT set, The contour of the pancreatic head, included in the treatment target, was generated by populating the pancreatic head contour from the planning CT or MRI using an auto-segmentation tool based on deformable registration (ABAS, Elekta) with manual editing if necessary. The CTN at each voxel in the pancreatic head contour was extracted and the 3D distribution of the CTNs was processed using MATLAB. The mean value of CTN distribution was used to quantify the daily CTN change in the pancreatic head. Results: Reduction of CTN in pancreatic head was observed during the CRT delivery in 14 out the 17 (82%) patients studied. Although the average reduction is only 3.5 Houncefield Unit (HU), this change is significant (p<0.01). Among them, there are 7 patients who had a CTN drop larger than 5 HU, ranging from 6.0 to 11.8 HU. In contrast to this trend, CTN was increased in 3 patients. Conclusion: Measurable changes in the CT number in tumor target were observed during the course of chemoradiation therapy for the pancreas cancer patients, indicating this radiation-induced CTN change may be used to assess treatment response.

  7. Intensity modulated radiation therapy with simultaneous integrated boost based dose escalation on neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy for locally advanced distal esophageal adenocarcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Zeng; Fernando N Aguila; Taral Patel; Mark Knapp; XueQiang Zhu; XiLin Chen; Phillip D Price

    2016-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate impact of radiation therapy dose escalation through intensity modulated radiation therapy with simultaneous integrated boost(IMRT-SIB).METHODS:We retrospectively reviewed the patients who underwent four-dimensional-based IMRT-SIBbased neoadjuvant chemoradiation protocol.During the concurrent chemoradiation therapy,radiation therapy was through IMRT-SIB delivered in 28 consecutive daily fractions with total radiation doses of 56 Gy to tumor and 5040 Gy dose-painted to clinical tumor volume,with a regimen at the discretion of the treating medical oncologist.This was followed by surgical tumor resection.We analyzed pathological completion response(p CR) rates its relationship with overall survival and event-freesurvival.RESULTS:Seventeen patients underwent dose escalation with the IMRT-SIB protocol between 2007 and 2014 and their records were available for analysis.Among the IMRT-SIB-treated patients,the toxicity appeared mild,the most common side effects were grade 1-3 esophagitis(46%) and pneumonitis(11.7%).There were no cardiac events.The Ro resection rate was 94%(n = 16),the p CR rate was 47%(n = 8),and the postoperative morbidity was zero.There was one mediastinal failure found,one patient had local failure at the anastomosis site,and the majority of failures were distant in the lung or bone.The 3-year diseasefree survival and overall survival rates were 41%(n = 7) and 53%(n = 9),respectively.CONCLUSION:The dose escalation through IMRT-SIB in the chemoradiation regimen seems responsible for down-staging the distal esophageal with well-tolerated complications.

  8. Chemoradiation May Help Some Patients with Bladder Cancer Avoid Radical Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers in the United Kingdom have found that adding chemotherapy to radiation therapy as a treatment for bladder cancer may reduce the risk of a recurrence more than radiation alone, without causing a substantial increase in side effects.

  9. [Laser therapy in orthognatic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura-Fujikami, Takao; Cabrera-Muñóz, Maria Lourdes; Del Valle-Espinoza, Alejandro

    2005-01-01

    This study describes the prevalence of patients with dentofacial deformities attended in the Maxillofacial Surgery Department of Hospital de Especialidades del Centro Medico Nacional Siglo XXI of the IMSS, during January to December 2002. Twenty-six patients received postoperative laser therapy in the right area of the mandible ramus, after bilateral sagittal modified osteotomy (BSMKSO). The results with laser therapy showed less pain and edema in comparison other patients without this therapy. The results were carried out after 24 hours, 3 days, 8 days and 15 days, and after 10 treatments of laser therapy. The X-Ray and biopsy showed bone healing 30 days, six and eight weeks after orthognatic surgery procedures.

  10. Spatial-Temporal [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET Features for Predicting Pathologic Response of Esophageal Cancer to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Shan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Department of Control Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Kligerman, Seth; Chen, Wengen; Lu, Minh [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Kim, Grace; Feigenberg, Steven; D' Souza, Warren D.; Suntharalingam, Mohan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Lu, Wei, E-mail: wlu@umm.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To extract and study comprehensive spatial-temporal {sup 18}F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose ([{sup 18}F]FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) features for the prediction of pathologic tumor response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients with esophageal cancer were treated with trimodal therapy (CRT plus surgery) and underwent [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET/CT scans both before (pre-CRT) and after (post-CRT) CRT. The 2 scans were rigidly registered. A tumor volume was semiautomatically delineated using a threshold standardized uptake value (SUV) of ≥2.5, followed by manual editing. Comprehensive features were extracted to characterize SUV intensity distribution, spatial patterns (texture), tumor geometry, and associated changes resulting from CRT. The usefulness of each feature in predicting pathologic tumor response to CRT was evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) value. Results: The best traditional response measure was decline in maximum SUV (SUV{sub max}; AUC, 0.76). Two new intensity features, decline in mean SUV (SUV{sub mean}) and skewness, and 3 texture features (inertia, correlation, and cluster prominence) were found to be significant predictors with AUC values ≥0.76. According to these features, a tumor was more likely to be a responder when the SUV{sub mean} decline was larger, when there were relatively fewer voxels with higher SUV values pre-CRT, or when [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake post-CRT was relatively homogeneous. All of the most accurate predictive features were extracted from the entire tumor rather than from the most active part of the tumor. For SUV intensity features and tumor size features, changes were more predictive than pre- or post-CRT assessment alone. Conclusion: Spatial-temporal [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET features were found to be useful predictors of pathologic tumor response to neoadjuvant CRT in esophageal cancer.

  11. Inflammatory cytokines are associated with the development of symptom burden in patients with NSCLC undergoing concurrent chemoradiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin Shelley; Shi, Qiuling; Williams, Loretta A; Mao, Li; Cleeland, Charles S; Komaki, Ritsuko R; Mobley, Gary M; Liao, Zhongxing

    2010-08-01

    Elevations in cancer treatment-induced circulating inflammatory cytokines may be partially responsible for the development of significant symptom burden (e.g., pain, fatigue, distress, disturbed sleep) during concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CXRT). Sixty-two patients undergoing CXRT for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) reported symptoms weekly for 15 weeks via the M. D. Anderson Symptom Inventory (MDASI). Serum inflammatory cytokines were assessed weekly during therapy via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Dynamic changes in cytokines and associated symptom profiles were estimated using mixed-effect models. MDASI symptom severity increased gradually as CXRT dose accumulated and peaked at week 8. Serum concentrations of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, and serum soluble receptor 1 for tumor necrosis factor (sTNF-R1) increased significantly by week 8 (all ptreatment status, total radiotherapy dose, and CXRT delivery technique, an increase in sTNF-R1 was significantly related to an increase in the mean score for all 15 MDASI symptoms (estimate, 1.74; SE, 0.69; pcytokines in significant worsening of symptoms in NSCLC patients undergoing CXRT, and warrant further study to identify biological targets for ameliorating treatment-related symptom burden.

  12. Role of Genetic Polymorphisms in NFKB-Mediated Inflammatory Pathways in Response to Primary Chemoradiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzhugashvili, Maia [Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, University Hospital Morales Meseguer, Murcia (Spain); Department of Radiation Oncology, Madrid Oncology Institute (Group IMO), Murcia (Spain); Luengo-Gil, Ginés; García, Teresa; González-Conejero, Rocío [Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, University Hospital Morales Meseguer, Murcia (Spain); Conesa-Zamora, Pablo [Department of Pathology, University Hospital Santa Lucía, Cartagena (Spain); Escolar, Pedro Pablo [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Santa Lucía, Cartagena (Spain); Calvo, Felipe [Department of Radiation Oncology, University General Hospital Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (Spain); Vicente, Vicente [Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, University Hospital Morales Meseguer, Murcia (Spain); Ayala de la Peña, Francisco, E-mail: frayala@um.es [Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, University Hospital Morales Meseguer, Murcia (Spain)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether polymorphisms of genes related to inflammation are associated with pathologic response (primary endpoint) in patients with rectal cancer treated with primary chemoradiation therapy (PCRT). Methods and Materials: Genomic DNA of 159 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer treated with PCRT was genotyped for polymorphisms rs28362491 (NFKB1), rs1213266/rs5789 (PTGS1), rs5275 (PTGS2), and rs16944/rs1143627 (IL1B) using TaqMan single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping assays. The association between each genotype and pathologic response (poor response vs complete or partial response) was analyzed using logistic regression models. Results: The NFKB1 DEL/DEL genotype was associated with pathologic response (odds ratio [OR], 6.39; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.78-52.65; P=.03) after PCRT. No statistically significant associations between other polymorphisms and response to PCRT were observed. Patients with the NFKB1 DEL/DEL genotype showed a trend for longer disease-free survival (log-rank test, P=.096) and overall survival (P=.049), which was not significant in a multivariate analysis that included pathologic response. Analysis for 6 polymorphisms showed that patients carrying the haplotype rs28362491-DEL/rs1143627-A/rs1213266-G/rs5789-C/rs5275-A/rs16944-G (13.7% of cases) had a higher response rate to PCRT (OR, 8.86; 95% CI, 1.21-64.98; P=.034) than the reference group (rs28362491-INS/rs1143627-A/rs1213266-G/rs5789-C/rs5275-A/rs16944-G). Clinically significant (grade ≥2) acute organ toxicity was also more frequent in patients with that same haplotype (OR, 4.12; 95% CI, 1.11-15.36; P=.037). Conclusions: Our results suggest that genetic variation in NFKB-related inflammatory pathways might influence sensitivity to primary chemoradiation for rectal cancer. If confirmed, an inflammation-related radiogenetic profile might be used to select patients with rectal cancer for preoperative combined-modality treatment.

  13. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Expression As Prognostic Marker in Patients With Anal Carcinoma Treated With Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraunholz, Ingeborg, E-mail: inge.fraunholz@kgu.de [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Goethe University, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Rödel, Franz; Kohler, Daniela [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Goethe University, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Diallo-Georgiopoulou, Margarita [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Goethe University, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach/Main (Germany); Distel, Luitpold [Department of Radiation Oncology, Friedrich Alexander University, Erlangen (Germany); Falk, Stefan [Pathology Associates, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Rödel, Claus [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Goethe University, Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic value of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression in pretreatment tumor biopsy specimens of patients with anal cancer treated with concurrent 5-fluorouracil and mitomycin C-based chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Immunohistochemical staining for EGFR was performed in pretreatment biopsy specimens of 103 patients with anal carcinoma. EGFR expression was correlated with clinical and histopathologic characteristics and with clinical endpoints, including local failure-free survival (LFFS), colostomy-free survival (CFS), distant metastases-free survival (DMFS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS). Results: EGFR staining intensity was absent in 3%, weak in 23%, intermediate in 36% and intense in 38% of the patients. In univariate analysis, the level of EGFR staining was significantly correlated with CSS (absent/weak vs intermediate/intense expression: 5-year CSS, 70% vs 86%, P=.03). As a trend, this was also observed for DMFS (70% vs 86%, P=.06) and LFFS (70% vs 87%, P=.16). In multivariate analysis, N stage, tumor differentiation, and patients’ sex were independent prognostic factors for CSS, whereas EGFR expression only reached borderline significance (hazard ratio 2.75; P=.08). Conclusion: Our results suggest that elevated levels of pretreatment EGFR expression could be correlated with favorable clinical outcome in anal cancer patients treated with CRT. Further studies are warranted to elucidate how EGFR is involved in the response to CRT.

  14. Long-term results of preoperative 5-fluorouracil-oxaliplatin chemoradiation therapy in locally advanced rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Elisa; Pucci, Francesca; Camisa, Roberta; Bui, Simona; Galdy, Salvatore; Leonardi, Francesco; Negri, Francesca Virginia; Anselmi, Elisa; Losardo, Pier Luigi; Roncoroni, Luigi; Dell'abate, Paolo; Crafa, Pellegrino; Cascinu, Stefano; Ardizzoni, Andrea

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate the activity, safety and long-term survival of patients after preoperative oxaliplatin and 5-fluorouracil chemoradiation therapy in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Patients with resectable, T3-4 and/or nodal involvement rectal adenocarcinoma were treated with oxaliplatin 60 mg/m(2) weekly and 5-fluorouracil 200 mg/m(2)/d infused continuously for five days, over a period of five weeks, and radiotherapy (45 Gy/25 fractions). The primary end-point was pathological complete response (ypCR). Safety, overall survival (OS) and relapse-free survival (RFS) were secondary end-points. Sixty-six patients were treated. Grade 1-2 diarrhea was the most common adverse event. The ypCR rate was 16.7% (95% confidence interval=7.7-25.7%). After a median follow-up of 73.5 months, 23 patients (34.8%) had experienced relapse. Five-year actuarial RFS and OS rates were 64% and 73%, respectively. Five-year actuarial RFS was 91.7% in the ypCR group versus 57.8% in non-ypCR cases. Long-term local control and survival after this very well-tolerated regimen appear encouraging.

  15. Enteral Feeding Tubes in Patients Undergoing Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Critical Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyfman, Shlomo A., E-mail: koyfmas@ccf.org [Departments of Radiation and Solid Tumor Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Adelstein, David J. [Departments of Radiation and Solid Tumor Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Definitive chemoradiation therapy has evolved as the preferred organ preservation strategy in the treatment of locally advanced head-and-neck cancer (LA-HNC). Dry mouth and dysphagia are among the most common and most debilitating treatment-related toxicities that frequently necessitate the placement of enteral feeding tubes (FT) in these patients to help them meet their nutritional requirements. The use of either a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube or a nasogastric tube, the choice of using a prophylactic vs a reactive approach, and the effects of FTs on weight loss, hospitalization, quality of life, and long-term functional outcomes are areas of continued controversy. Considerable variations in practice patterns exist in the United States and abroad. This critical review synthesizes the current data for the use of enteral FTs in this patient population and clarifies the relative advantages of different types of FTs and the timing of their use. Recent developments in the biologic understanding and treatment approaches for LA-HNC appear to be favorably impacting the frequency and severity of treatment-related dysphagia and may reduce the need for enteral tube feeding in the future.

  16. Phase 1 Trial of Bevacizumab With Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck With Exploratory Functional Imaging of Tumor Hypoxia, Proliferation, and Perfusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyflot, Matthew J., E-mail: nyflot@uw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Kruser, Tim J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cadence Cancer Center at Delnor Hospital, Geneva, Illinois (United States); Traynor, Anne M. [Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center and School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Khuntia, Deepak [Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, California (United States); Yang, David T. [Departments of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center and School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Hartig, Gregory K.; McCulloch, Timothy M. [Department of Surgery-Otolaryngology, H& N Surgery Division, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center and School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Wiederholt, Peggy A. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center and School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Gentry, Lindell R. [Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center and School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Hoang, Tien [Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center and School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Jeraj, Robert [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center and School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center and School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center and School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); and others

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: A phase 1 trial was completed to examine the safety and feasibility of combining bevacizumab with radiation and cisplatin in patients with locoregionally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) treated with curative intent. Additionally, we assessed the capacity of bevacizumab to induce an early tumor response as measured by a series of biological imaging studies. Methods and Materials: All patients received a single induction dose of bevacizumab (15 mg/kg) delivered 3 weeks (±3 days) before the initiation of chemoradiation therapy. After the initial dose of bevacizumab, comprehensive head and neck chemoradiation therapy was delivered with curative intent to 70 Gy in 33 fractions with concurrent weekly cisplatin at 30 mg/m{sup 2} and bevacizumab every 3 weeks (weeks 1, 4, 7) with dose escalation from 5 to 10 to 15 mg/kg. All patients underwent experimental imaging with [{sup 18}F]fluorothymidine positron emission tomography (FLT-PET) (proliferation), [{sup 61}Cu]Cu-diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) PET (Cu-ATSM-PET) (hypoxia), and dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) (perfusion) at 3 time points: before bevacizumab monotherapy, after bevacizumab monotherapy, and during the combined therapy course. Results: Ten patients were enrolled. All had stage IV HNSCC, all achieved a complete response to treatment, and 9 of 10 remain alive, with a mean survival time of 61.3 months. All patients experienced grade 3 toxicity, but no dose-limiting toxicities or significant bleeding episodes were observed. Significant reductions were noted in tumor proliferation (FLT-PET), tumor hypoxia (Cu-ATSM-PET), and DCE-CT contrast enhancement after bevacizumab monotherapy, with further decreases in FLT-PET and Cu-ATSM-PET during the combined therapy course. Conclusions: The incorporation of bevacizumab into comprehensive chemoradiation therapy regimens for patients with HNSCC appears safe and feasible. Experimental imaging

  17. Novel Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism Markers Predictive of Pathologic Response to Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy in Rectal Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin C., E-mail: jckim@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Surgery, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Innovative Cancer Research and Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Ye J.; Roh, Seon A. [Department of Surgery, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Innovative Cancer Research and Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Dong H. [Institute of Innovative Cancer Research and Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Graduate School of East-West Medical Science, Kyung Hee University, Gyeoggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eun Y. [Department of Surgery, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Innovative Cancer Research and Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae W. [Institute of Innovative Cancer Research and Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Internal Medicine, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Tae W. [Medical Genomics Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seon Y. [Institute of Innovative Cancer Research and Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Medical Genomics Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong S., E-mail: yongsung@kribb.re.kr [Institute of Innovative Cancer Research and Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Medical Genomics Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: Studies aimed at predicting individual responsiveness to preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) are urgently needed, especially considering the risks associated with poorly responsive patients. Methods and Materials: A 3-step strategy for the determination of CRT sensitivity is proposed based on (1) the screening of a human genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array in correlation with histopathologic tumor regression grade (TRG); (2) clinical association analysis of 113 patients treated with preoperative CRT; and (3) a cell-based functional assay for biological validation. Results: Genome-wide screening identified 9 SNPs associated with preoperative CRT responses. Positive responses (TRG 1-3) were obtained more frequently in patients carrying the reference allele (C) of the SNP CORO2A rs1985859 than in those with the substitution allele (T) (P=.01). Downregulation of CORO2A was significantly associated with reduced early apoptosis by 27% (P=.048) and 39% (P=.023) in RKO and COLO320DM colorectal cancer cells, respectively, as determined by flow cytometry. Reduced radiosensitivity was confirmed by colony-forming assays in the 2 colorectal cancer cells (P=.034 and .015, respectively). The SNP FAM101A rs7955740 was not associated with radiosensitivity in the clinical association analysis. However, downregulation of FAM101A significantly reduced early apoptosis by 29% in RKO cells (P=.047), and it enhanced colony formation in RKO cells (P=.001) and COLO320DM cells (P=.002). Conclusion: CRT-sensitive SNP markers were identified using a novel 3-step process. The candidate marker CORO2A rs1985859 and the putative marker FAM101A rs7955740 may be of value for the prediction of radiosensitivity to preoperative CRT, although further validation is needed in large cohorts.

  18. Pre-operative chemoradiation therapy with 5-fluorouracil and low-dose daily cisplatin for esophageal cancer. A preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimoyama, Shouji; Konishi, Toshiro; Kawahara, Masaki; Ito, Akihiko; Hoji, Keiichi; Takeda, Yuichi; Oba, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Seiichiro [Showa General Hospital, Kodaira, Tokyo (Japan); Kaminishi, Michio

    1999-03-01

    A combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy (chemoradiation therapy; CRT) has recently been developed to improve the survival of esophageal cancer patients. However, the optimal choice of chemotherapeutic agents and their doses, as well as chemotherapy and radiotherapy regimens, remain unclear. Based on recent advances in knowledge on the radiosensitizing and biochemical modulation effects of chemotherapeutic agents, we have recently developed concurrent CRT which consisted of continuous 5-fluorouracil (5FU) administration (600 mg/m{sup 2}/day, days 1-5) combined with a low dose of daily cisplatin administration (10 mg/m{sup 2}/day, days 1-5, and 5 or 10 mg/m{sup 2}/day, days 8-12 and 15-19) before each fraction of radiation (2 Gy each). To evaluate the efficacy and safety of our concurrent CRT, 10 esophageal cancer patients received one or one and a half courses of the CRT. All patients tolerated and completed a full course of the CRT. The effectiveness of the CRT on the primary tumor included pathologically or endoscopically complete responses in three patients (30%), partial response in five (50%), no response in two (20%) and tumoral downstaging (T-classification) in five (50%). Grade 2 and Grade 3 toxicity, seen in six patients, did not affect surgical operation. No patients showed CRT-related deaths. Eight patients (80%) underwent resection with no operative mortality. Of these, two patients (25%) showed pathologically or endoscopically complete responses, and four (50%) showed partial response. Three patients died of cancer after resection. The two inoperable patients showed a pathologically complete response and partial response, respectively. They were relieved of their cancer-related complaints and were living without hospitalization at the time of this analysis. These results suggest that the concurrent CRT based on the theoretical backgrounds is effective and has acceptable toxicities with maintaining its efficacy for the treatment of esophageal

  19. Treatment Outcomes, Growth Height, and Neuroendocrine Functions in Patients With Intracranial Germ Cell Tumors Treated With Chemoradiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odagiri, Kazumasa, E-mail: t086016a@yokohama-cu.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama (Japan); Department of Radiology, Kanagawa Children' s Medical Center, Yokohama (Japan); Omura, Motoko [Department of Radiology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama (Japan); Department of Radiology, Kanagawa Children' s Medical Center, Yokohama (Japan); Hata, Masaharu [Department of Radiology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama (Japan); Aida, Noriko; Niwa, Tetsu [Department of Radiology, Kanagawa Children' s Medical Center, Yokohama (Japan); Ogino, Ichiro [Department of Radiology, Yokohama City University Medical Center, Yokohama (Japan); Kigasawa, Hisato [Division of Hemato-oncology/Regeneration Medicine, Kanagawa Children' s Medical Center, Yokohama (Japan); Ito, Susumu [Department of Neurosurgery, Kanagawa Children' s Medical Center, Yokohama (Japan); Adachi, Masataka [Department of Endocrinology, Kanagawa Children' s Medical Center, Yokohama (Japan); Inoue, Tomio [Department of Radiology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama (Japan)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: We carried out a retrospective review of patients receiving chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for intracranial germ cell tumor (GCT) using a lower dose than those previously reported. To identify an optimal GCT treatment strategy, we evaluated treatment outcomes, growth height, and neuroendocrine functions. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two patients with GCT, including 4 patients with nongerminomatous GCT (NGGCT) were treated with CRT. The median age at initial diagnosis was 11.5 years (range, 6-19 years). Seventeen patients initially received whole brain irradiation (median dose, 19.8 Gy), and 5 patients, including 4 with NGGCT, received craniospinal irradiation (median dose, 30.6 Gy). The median radiation doses delivered to the primary site were 36 Gy for pure germinoma and 45 Gy for NGGCT. Seventeen patients had tumors adjacent to the hypothalamic-pituitary axis (HPA), and 5 had tumors away from the HPA. Results: The median follow-up time was 72 months (range, 18-203 months). The rates of both disease-free survival and overall survival were 100%. The standard deviation scores (SDSs) of final heights recorded at the last assessment tended to be lower than those at initial diagnosis. Even in all 5 patients with tumors located away from the HPA, final height SDSs decreased (p = 0.018). In 16 patients with tumors adjacent to the HPA, 8 showed metabolic changes suggestive of hypothalamic obesity and/or growth hormone deficiency, and 13 had other pituitary hormone deficiencies. In contrast, 4 of 5 patients with tumors away from the HPA did not show any neuroendocrine dysfunctions except for a tendency to short stature. Conclusions: CRT for GCT using limited radiation doses resulted in excellent treatment outcomes. Even after limited radiation doses, insufficient growth height was often observed that was independent of tumor location. Our study suggests that close follow-up of neuroendocrine functions, including growth hormone, is essential for all patients with

  20. Epigenetic Regulation of KLHL34 Predictive of Pathologic Response to Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy in Rectal Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Ye J. [Department of Surgery, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Innovative Cancer Research and Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chan W. [Department of Surgery, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Roh, Seon A. [Department of Surgery, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Innovative Cancer Research and Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Dong H. [Institute of Innovative Cancer Research and Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Graduate School of East-West Medical Science, Kyung Hee University, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jong L.; Kim, Seon Y. [Medical Genomics Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience & Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eun K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Innovative Cancer Research and Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong S., E-mail: yongsung@kribb.re.kr [Medical Genomics Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience & Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Innovative Cancer Research and Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin C., E-mail: jckim@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Surgery, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Innovative Cancer Research and Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Prediction of individual responsiveness to preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) is urgently needed in patients with poorly responsive locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods and Materials: Candidate methylation genes associated with radiosensitivity were identified using a 3-step process. In the first step, genome-wide screening of methylation genes was performed in correlation with histopathologic tumor regression grade in 45 patients with LARC. In the second step, the methylation status of selected sites was analyzed by pyrosequencing in 67 LARC patients, including 24 patients analyzed in the first step. Finally, colorectal cancer cell clones with stable KLHL34 knockdown were generated and tested for cellular sensitivity to radiation. Results: Genome-wide screening identified 7 hypermethylated CpG sites (DZIP1 cg24107021, DZIP1 cg26886381, ZEB1 cg04430381, DKK3 cg041006961, STL cg00991794, KLHL34 cg01828474, and ARHGAP6 cg07828380) associated with preoperative CRT responses. Radiosensitivity in patients with hypermethylated KLHL34 cg14232291 was confirmed by pyrosequencing in additional cohorts. Knockdown of KLHL34 significantly reduced colony formation (KLHL34 sh#1: 20.1%, P=.0001 and KLHL34 sh#2: 15.8%, P=.0002), increased the cytotoxicity (KLHL34 sh#1: 14.8%, P=.019 and KLHL34 sh#2: 17.9%, P=.007) in LoVo cells, and increased radiation-induced caspase-3 activity and the sub-G1 population of cells. Conclusions: The methylation status of KLHL34 cg14232291 may be a predictive candidate of sensitivity to preoperative CRT, although further validation is needed in large cohorts using various cell types.

  1. Performance of a Nomogram Predicting Disease-Specific Survival After an R0 Resection for Gastric Cancer in Patients Receiving Postoperative Chemoradiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dikken, Johan L. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Surgery, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Coit, Daniel G. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Baser, Raymond E.; Gönen, Mithat [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Goodman, Karyn A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Brennan, Murray F. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Jansen, Edwin P.M. [Department of Radiotherapy, The Netherlands Cancer Institute–Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Boot, Henk [Department of Gastroenterology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute–Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Velde, Cornelis J.H. van de [Department of Surgery, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Cats, Annemieke [Department of Gastroenterology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute–Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Verheij, Marcel, E-mail: m.verheij@nki.nl [Department of Radiotherapy, The Netherlands Cancer Institute–Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: The internationally validated Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) gastric carcinoma nomogram was based on patients who underwent curative (R0) gastrectomy, without any other therapy. The purpose of the current study was to assess the performance of this gastric cancer nomogram in patients who received chemoradiation therapy after an R0 resection for gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: In a combined dataset of 76 patients from the Netherlands Cancer Institute (NKI), and 63 patients from MSKCC, who received postoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) after an R0 gastrectomy, the nomogram was validated by means of the concordance index (CI) and a calibration plot. Results: The concordance index for the nomogram was 0.64, which was lower than the CI of the nomogram for patients who received no adjuvant therapy (0.80). In the calibration plot, observed survival was approximately 20% higher than the nomogram-predicted survival for patients receiving postoperative CRT. Conclusions: The MSKCC gastric carcinoma nomogram significantly underpredicted survival for patients in the current study, suggesting an impact of postoperative CRT on survival in patients who underwent an R0 resection for gastric cancer, which has been demonstrated by randomized controlled trials. This analysis stresses the need for updating nomograms with the incorporation of multimodal strategies.

  2. Sequential FDG-PET/CT reliably predicts response of locally advanced rectal cancer to neo-adjuvant chemo-radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capirci, Carlo [Hospital, Division of Radiotherapy, Rovigo (Italy); Rampin, Lucia; Banti, Elena [Hospital, Nuclear Medicine and PET Service, Rovigo (Italy); Erba, Paola A.; Mariani, Giuliano [Regional Center of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. Pisa (Italy); Galeotti, Fabrizio [Hospital, Division of Surgery, Rovigo (Italy); Crepaldi, Giorgio [Hospital, Division of Oncology, Rovigo (Italy); Gava, Marcello [Hospital, Medical Physics Service, Rovigo (Italy); Fanti, Stefano [Politecnico Bologna (Italy). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Muzzio, Pier C. [Dept. of Radiology, Ist. Oncologico, Padova (Italy); Rubello, Domenico [Rovigo Hospital, Istituto Oncologico Veneto (IOV)-IRCCS, Nuclear Medicine Service, PET Unit, Rovigo (Italy)

    2007-10-15

    Prediction of rectal cancer response to preoperative, neo-adjuvant chemo-radiation therapy (CRT) provides the opportunity to identify patients in whom a major response is expected and who may therefore benefit from alternative surgical approaches. Traditional morphological imaging techniques are effective in defining tumour extension in the initial diagnostic and staging work-up, but perform poorly in distinguishing residual neoplastic tissue from scarring post CRT, when restaging the patient before surgery. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) is a promising tool for monitoring the effect of anti-tumour therapy. The aim of this study was to prospectively assess the value of sequential FDG-PET scans in predicting the response of locally advanced rectal cancer to neo-adjuvant CRT. Forty-four consecutive patients with locally advanced (cT3-4) primary rectal cancer and four patients with pelvic recurrence of rectal cancer were enrolled in this prospective study. Treatment consisted of external beam intensified radiotherapy, chemotherapy and, 8-10 weeks later, surgery with curative intent. All patients underwent FDG-PET/CT both before CRT and 5-6 weeks after completing CRT. One patient died before surgery because of acute myocardial infarction, and was therefore excluded from further analysis. Semi-quantitative measurements of FDG uptake (SUV{sub max}), absolute difference ({delta}SUV{sub max}) and percent SUV{sub max} difference (Response Index, RI) between pre- and post-CRT PET scans were considered. Results were correlated with pathological response, assessed both by histopathological staging of the surgical specimens (pTNM) and by the tumour regression grade (TRG) according to Mandard's criteria (patients with TRG1-2 being defined as responders and patients with TRG3-5 as non-responders). Following neo-adjuvant CRT, of the 45 patients submitted to surgery, 23 (51.1%) were classified as responders according to Mandard

  3. Acute toxicity and surgical complications after preoperative (chemo)radiation therapy for rectal cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, S.L.; Rooijen, S.J. van; Bökkerink, G.M.J.; Braam, H.J.; Derikx, L.A.A.P.; Poortmans, P.M.P.; Marijnen, C.A.; Nagtegaal, I.D.; Wilt, J.H.W. de

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Preoperative therapy reduces local recurrences and may facilitate surgery in rectal cancer patients. However, in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) this treatment is often withheld due to the perceived risk of excessive side-effects, even though evidence is limited. The purpose

  4. Predicting Esophagitis After Chemoradiation Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: An Individual Patient Data Meta-Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palma, David A., E-mail: david.palma@uwo.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Senan, Suresh [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Oberije, Cary [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO Clinic), GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Belderbos, Jose [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute – Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dios, Núria Rodríguez de [Department of Radiation Oncology, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona, Universidad Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Bradley, Jeffrey D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Barriger, R. Bryan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Moreno-Jiménez, Marta [Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology Division, Clínica Universidad de Navarra, University of Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Kim, Tae Hyun [Center for Proton Therapy, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Ramella, Sara [Division of Radiation Oncology, Campus Bio-Medico University, Rome (Italy); Everitt, Sarah [Radiation Therapy Services, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Australia and Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University (Australia); Rengan, Ramesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Marks, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); De Ruyck, Kim [Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); and others

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) improves survival compared with sequential treatment for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer, but it increases toxicity, particularly radiation esophagitis (RE). Validated predictors of RE for clinical use are lacking. We performed an individual-patient-data meta-analysis to determine factors predictive of clinically significant RE. Methods and Materials: After a systematic review of the literature, data were obtained on 1082 patients who underwent CCRT, including patients from Europe, North America, Asia, and Australia. Patients were randomly divided into training and validation sets (2/3 vs 1/3 of patients). Factors predictive of RE (grade ≥2 and grade ≥3) were assessed using logistic modeling, with the concordance statistic (c statistic) used to evaluate the performance of each model. Results: The median radiation therapy dose delivered was 65 Gy, and the median follow-up time was 2.1 years. Most patients (91%) received platinum-containing CCRT regimens. The development of RE was common, scored as grade 2 in 348 patients (32.2%), grade 3 in 185 (17.1%), and grade 4 in 10 (0.9%). There were no RE-related deaths. On univariable analysis using the training set, several baseline factors were statistically predictive of RE (P<.05), but only dosimetric factors had good discrimination scores (c > .60). On multivariable analysis, the esophageal volume receiving ≥60 Gy (V60) alone emerged as the best predictor of grade ≥2 and grade ≥3 RE, with good calibration and discrimination. Recursive partitioning identified 3 risk groups: low (V60 <0.07%), intermediate (V60 0.07% to 16.99%), and high (V60 ≥17%). With use of the validation set, the predictive model performed inferiorly for the grade ≥2 endpoint (c = .58) but performed well for the grade ≥3 endpoint (c = .66). Conclusions: Clinically significant RE is common, but life-threatening complications occur in <1% of patients. Although several factors

  5. Neoadjuvant chemoradiation compared to neoadjuvant radiation alone and surgery alone for Stage II and III soft tissue sarcoma of the extremities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dueck Amylou C

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neoadjuvant chemoradiation (NCR prior to resection of extremity soft tissue sarcoma (STS has been studied, but data are limited. We present outcomes with NCR using a variety of chemotherapy regimens compared to neoadjuvant radiation without chemotherapy (NR and surgery alone (SA. Methods We conducted a retrospective chart review of 112 cases. Results Treatments included SA (36 patients, NCR (39 patients, and NR (37 patients. NCR did not improve the rate of margin-negative resections over SA or NR. Loco-regional relapse-free survival, distant metastases-free survival, and overall survival (OS were not different among the treatment groups. Patients with relapsed disease (OR 11.6; p = 0.01, and tumor size greater than 5 cm (OR 9.4; p = 0.01 were more likely to have a loco-regional recurrence on logistic regression analysis. Significantly increased OS was found among NCR-treated patients with tumors greater than 5 cm compared to SA (3 year OS 69 vs. 40%; p = 0.03. Wound complication rates were higher after NCR compared to SA (50 vs. 11%; p = 0.003 but not compared to NR (p = 0.36. Wet desquamation was the most common adverse event of NCR. Conclusions NCR and NR are acceptable strategies for patients with STS. NCR is well-tolerated, but not clearly superior to NR.

  6. Antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapy in microlaryngeal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, David O; Dang, Jennifer H; Fritz, Mark A; Garrett, C Gaelyn

    2014-04-01

    Indications for antiplatelet and anticoagulation use are expanding. There is no evidence to direct therapeutic management in patients undergoing microlaryngeal surgeries. Our aim was to compare bleeding complications between microlaryngeal surgeries performed for patients preoperatively taken off and maintained on antiplatelet and/or anticoagulation therapy. Retrospective cohort study. Patients undergoing microlaryngeal surgeries (2008-2009) on baseline antiplatelet and/or anticoagulation therapy were identified. Records were reviewed to determine whether therapy was stopped preoperatively. The primary outcome, bleeding complication, was compared between those taken off and maintained on therapy. Patient characteristics, surgical data, and outcomes were assessed. Of 287 microlaryngeal surgeries, 26% were performed for patients on antiplatelet (23%) and/or anticoagulation (3%) therapy. There was no difference in bleeding complications between patients' naïve to and on baseline antiplatelet or anticoagulation therapy [naïve: 3.8% vs. on: 5.3%, P = 0.58] and no thromboembolic events. Among surgeries performed for patients on baseline antiplatelet therapy, 35% preoperatively stopped therapy. No observed difference in bleeding complications was observed between those taken off or maintained on therapy [off: 8.0% vs. on: 4.9%, P = 0.63]. Of 3% of surgeries performed for patients on warfarin, no bleeding complications occurred, even among the 8/10 with therapeutic international normalized ratios. Perioperative management decisions regarding antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapy are becoming more common. Results suggest that antiplatelet therapy can be maintained during microlaryngeal surgery without increasing bleeding risk. Further prospective research is required to confirm findings and rigorously investigate the safety of continuing warfarin and other anticoagulation therapy in these surgeries. 4. © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and

  7. CELECOXIB - Chemoradiation therapy for reducing mucositis and other acute side effects in advance head and neck carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izadi Sh

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Chemo-radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis represents a therapeutic challenge frequently encountered in cancer patients. This side effect causes significant morbidity and may delay or interruption of treatment plan, cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX2 is an inducible enzyme primarily expressed in inflamed and tumoral tissues. COX-2 inhibitors have shown promise to reduce chemoradiation induce toxicities. We conducted a phase III, randomized double blind clinical trial to evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of celecoxib, a selective COX2 inhibitor, administered concurrently with chemoradiation for locally advanced head and neck cancer. Here in we report the first report about the role of COX-2 inhibitor in acute toxicicities. "nMethods: Patients with stage III/IV (locally advance head and neck carcinoma who referred to department of radiation-oncology were eligible. Patients were treated with chemotherapy with cisplatin concurrently with radiation (60-70Gy. Celecoxib (100mg qid was started at the first day of radiotherapy and was given for a total of 8 weeks. Acute toxicities were evaluated every week by WHO scale. "nResults: One hundred twenty two patients were enrolled into the study, (61 patients for each group. In repeated mesurment analysis of variance there is a significant difference in the time of onset of grade II acute toxicities between the two groups; The mucositis, dysphagia, epidermitis and oral pain score changed significantly over the typical five weeks in two groups but these changes were more sever in placebo group (p=0.0001. In the analysis of the overall changes in the following laboratory parame-ters: WBC, hemoglobin and platelet showed that these parameters decreased over time in both groups without a significant difference between groups. "nConclusion: The results of these study showed that the use of a COX-2 inhibitor (celecoxib that is a safe and inexpensive drug may reduce acute toxicities of chemoradiation specially

  8. Dose-Volume Effects on Patient-Reported Acute Gastrointestinal Symptoms During Chemoradiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ronald C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Mamon, Harvey J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Ancukiewicz, Marek [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Killoran, Joseph H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Crowley, Elizabeth M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wo, Jennifer Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Ryan, David P. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hong, Theodore S., E-mail: tshong1@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Research on patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in rectal cancer is limited. We examined whether dose-volume parameters of the small bowel and large bowel were associated with patient-reported gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms during 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemoradiation treatment for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: 66 patients treated at the Brigham and Women's Hospital or Massachusetts General Hospital between 2006 and 2008 were included. Weekly during treatment, patients completed a questionnaire assessing severity of diarrhea, urgency, pain, cramping, mucus, and tenesmus. The association between dosimetric parameters and changes in overall GI symptoms from baseline through treatment was examined by using Spearman's correlation. Potential associations between these parameters and individual GI symptoms were also explored. Results: The amount of small bowel receiving at least 15 Gy (V15) was significantly associated with acute symptoms (p = 0.01), and other dosimetric parameters ranging from V5 to V45 also trended toward association. For the large bowel, correlations between dosimetric parameters and overall GI symptoms at the higher dose levels from V25 to V45 did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.1), and a significant association was seen with rectal pain from V15 to V45 (p < 0.01). Other individual symptoms did not correlate with small bowel or large bowel dosimetric parameters. Conclusions: The results of this study using PROs are consistent with prior studies with physician-assessed acute toxicity, and they identify small bowel V15 as an important predictor of acute GI symptoms during 5-FU-based chemoradiation treatment. A better understanding of the relationship between radiation dosimetric parameters and PROs may allow physicians to improve radiation planning to optimize patient outcomes.

  9. Assessment of peri- and postoperative complications and Karnofsky-performance status in head and neck cancer patients after radiation or chemoradiation that underwent surgery with regional or free-flap reconstruction for salvage, palliation, or to improve function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sertel Serkan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgery after (chemoradiation (RCTX/RTX is felt to be plagued with a high incidence of wound healing complications reported to be as high as 70%. The additional use of vascularized flaps may help to decrease this high rate of complications. Therefore, we examined within a retrospective single-institutional study the peri--and postoperative complications in patients who underwent surgery for salvage, palliation or functional rehabilitation after (chemoradiation with regional and free flaps. As a second study end point the Karnofsky performance status (KPS was determined preoperatively and 3 months postoperatively to assess the impact of such extensive procedures on the overall performance status of this heavily pretreated patient population. Findings 21 patients were treated between 2005 and 2010 in a single institution (17 male, 4 female for salvage (10/21, palliation (4/21, or functional rehabilitation (7/21. Overall 23 flaps were performed of which 8 were free flaps. Major recipient site complications were observed in only 4 pts. (19% (1 postoperative haemorrhage, 1 partial flap loss, 2 fistulas and major donor site complications in 1 pt (wound dehiscence. Also 2 minor donor site complications were observed. The overall complication rate was 33%. There was no free flap loss. Assessment of pre- and postoperative KPS revealed improvement in 13 out of 21 patients (62%. A decline of KPS was noted in only one patient. Conclusions We conclude that within this (chemoradiated patient population surgical interventions for salvage, palliation or improve function can be safely performed once vascularised grafts are used.

  10. Surgery in current therapy for infective endocarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Stuart J; Mokhles, M Mostafa; Osnabrugge, Ruben LJ; Bogers, Ad JJC; Kappetein, A Pieter

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of the Duke criteria and transesophageal echocardiography has improved early recognition of infective endocarditis but patients are still at high risk for severe morbidity or death. Whether an exclusively antibiotic regimen is superior to surgical intervention is subject to ongoing debate. Current guidelines indicate when surgery is the preferred treatment, but decisions are often based on physician preferences. Surgery has shown to decrease the risk of short-term mortality in patients who present with specific symptoms or microorganisms; nevertheless even then it often remains unclear when surgery should be performed. In this review we i) systematically reviewed the current literature comparing medical to surgical therapy to evaluate if surgery is the preferred option, ii) performed a meta-analysis of studies reporting propensity matched analyses, and iii), briefly summarized the current indications for surgery. PMID:21603594

  11. Adjuvant chemo-radiation for gastric adenocarcinoma: an institutional experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosn Marwan G

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies have shown that surgery alone is less than satisfactory in the management of early gastric cancer, with cure rates approaching 40%. The role of adjuvant therapy was indefinite until three large, randomized controlled trials showed the survival benefit of adjuvant therapy over surgery alone. Chemoradiation therapy has been criticized for its high toxicity. Methods 24 patients diagnosed between September 2001 and July 2007 were treated with adjuvant chemoradiation. 18 patients had the classical MacDonald regimen of 4500 cGy of XRT and chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil (5FU and leucovorin, while chemotherapy consisted of 5FU/Cisplatin for 6 patients. Results This series consisted of non-metastatic patients, 17 females and 7 males with a median age of 62.5 years. 23 patients (96% had a performance status of 0 or 1. The full course of radiation therapy (4500 cGy was completed by 22 patients (91.7%. Only 7 patients (36.8% completed the total planned courses of chemotherapy. 2 local relapses (10%, 2 regional relapses (10% and 2 distant relapses (10% were recorded. Time to progression has not been reached. 9 patients (37.5% died during follow-up with a median overall survival of 75 months. Patients lost a mean of 4 Kgs during radiation therapy. We recorded 6 episodes of febrile neutropenia and the most frequent toxicity was gastro-intestinal in 17 patients (70.8% with 9 (36% patients suffering grade 3 or 4 toxicity and 5 patients (20% suffering from grade 3 or 4 neutropenia. 4 (17% patients required total parenteral nutrition for a mean duration of 20 days. 4 patients suffered septic shock (17% and 1 patient developed a deep venous thrombosis and a pulmonary embolus. Conclusions Adjuvant chemo-radiation for gastric cancer is a standard at our institution and has resulted in few relapses and an interesting median survival. Toxicity rates were serious and this remains a harsh regimen with only 36.8% of patients completing the

  12. Sphincter-preserving RO total mesorectal excision with resection of internal genitalia combined with pre- or postoperative chemoradiation for T4 rectal cancer in females

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bartlomiej Szynglarewicz; Rafal Matkowski; Piotr Kasprzak; Daniel Sydor; Jozef Forgacz; Marek Pudelko; Jan Kornafel

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the impact of chemoradiation administered pre- or postoperatively on prognosis in females following RO extended resection with sphincterpreserving total mesorectal excision (TME) for locally advanced rectal cancer and to assess the association between chemoradiation and intra- and postoperative variables.METHODS: Twenty-one females were treated for locally advanced but preoperatively assessed as primarily resectable rectal cancer involving reproductive organs. Anterior resection with TME and excision of internal genitalia was combined with neo- or adjuvant chemoradiation. Two-year disease-free survival analysis was performed with the Kaplan-Meier method and logrank test. The association between chemoradiation and other variables was evaluated with the Fisher's exact test and Mann-Whitney test.RESULTS: Survival rate decreased in anaemic females (51.5% vs 57.4%), in patients older than 60 years (41.8% vs 66.7%) with poorly differentiated cancers (50.0% vs 55.6%) and tumors located ≤ 7 cm from the anal verge (42.9% vs 68.1%) but with the lack of importance. Patients with negative lymph nodes and women chemoradiated preoperatively had significantly favourable prognosis (85.7% vs 35.7%; P= 0.03 and 80.0% vs 27.3%; P = 0.01, respectively). Preoperative chemoradiation compared to adjuvant radiochemotherapy was not significantly associated with the duration of surgery, incidence of intraoperative bowel perforation and blood loss ≥ 1 L, rate of postoperative bladder and anorectal dysfunction, and minimal distal resection margin. It significantly influenced minimal radial margin (mean 4.2 mm vs 1.1 mm; P < 0.01).CONCLUSION: Despite involving internal genitalia, long-term disease-free survival and sphincter preservation may be achieved with combined-modality therapy for females with T4 locally advanced rectal carcinoma. Neoadjuvant chemoradiation does not compromise functional results and may significantly improve oncological outcomes probably due to

  13. Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy Using Concurrent S-1 and Irinotecan in Rectal Cancer: Impact on Long-Term Clinical Outcomes and Prognostic Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Takatoshi; Yamashita, Keishi; Sato, Takeo; Ema, Akira; Naito, Masanori; Watanabe, Masahiko, E-mail: midoris@med.kitasato-u.ac.jp

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To assess the long-term outcomes of patients with rectal cancer who received neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (NCRT) with concurrent S-1 and irinotecan (S-1/irinotecan) therapy. Methods and Materials: The study group consisted of 115 patients with clinical stage T3 or T4 rectal cancer. Patients received pelvic radiation therapy (45 Gy) plus concurrent oral S-1/irinotecan. The median follow-up was 60 months. Results: Grade 3 adverse effects occurred in 7 patients (6%), and the completion rate of NCRT was 87%. All 115 patients (100%) were able to undergo R0 surgical resection. Twenty-eight patients (24%) had a pathological complete response (ypCR). At 60 months, the local recurrence-free survival was 93%, disease-free survival (DFS) was 79%, and overall survival (OS) was 80%. On multivariate analysis with a proportional hazards model, ypN2 was the only independent prognostic factor for DFS (P=.0019) and OS (P=.0064) in the study group as a whole. Multivariate analysis was additionally performed for the subgroup of 106 patients with ypN0/1 disease, who had a DFS rate of 85.3%. Both ypT (P=.0065) and tumor location (P=.003) were independent predictors of DFS. A combination of these factors was very strongly related to high risk of recurrence (P<.0001), which occurred most commonly in the lung. Conclusions: NCRT with concurrent S-1/irinotecan produced high response rates and excellent long-term survival, with acceptable adverse effects in patients with rectal cancer. ypN2 is a strong predictor of dismal outcomes, and a combination of ypT and tumor location can identify high-risk patients among those with ypN0/1 disease.

  14. Clinical Usefulness of {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Planned to Undergo Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Jee Suk; Choi, Seo Hee; Lee, Youngin; Kim, Kyung Hwan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jeong Youp; Song, Si Young [Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Arthur; Yun, Mijin; Lee, Jong Doo [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seong, Jinsil, E-mail: jsseong@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To assess the role of coregistered {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in detecting radiographically occult distant metastasis (DM) at staging in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) and to study whether FDG-PET parameters can predict relatively long-term survival in patients who are more likely to benefit from chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: From our institutional database, we identified 388 LAPC patients with M0 on conventional computed tomography (CT) who were planned to undergo CRT. Coregistered FDG-PET staging was offered to all patients, and follow-up FDG-PET was used at the clinical discretion of the physician. Results: FDG-PET detected unsuspected CT-occult DM in 33% of all 388 patients and allowed them to receive systemic therapy immediately. The remaining 260 patients (PET-M0) underwent CRT selectively as an initial treatment. Early DM arose in 13.1% of 260 patients, and the 1-year estimated locoregional recurrence rate was 5.4%. Median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were 14.6 and 9.3 months, respectively, at a median follow-up time of 32.3 months (range, 10-99.1 months). Patients with a baseline standardized uptake value (SUV) <3.5 and/or SUV decline ≥60% had significantly better OS and PFS than those having none, even after adjustment for all potential confounding variables (all P<.001). Conclusions: FDG-PET can detect radiographically occult DM at staging in one-third of patients and spare them from the potentially toxic therapy. Additionally, FDG-PET parameters including baseline SUV and SUV changes may serve as useful clinical markers for predicting the prognosis in LAPC patients.

  15. A Pilot Study of Diffusion-Weighted MRI in Patients Undergoing Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation for Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle C. Cuneo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: In the current study we examined the ability of diffusion MRI (dMRI to predict pathologic response in pancreatic cancer patients receiving neoadjuvant chemoradiation. METHODS: We performed a prospective pilot study of dMRI in patients with resectable pancreatic cancer. Patients underwent dMRI prior to neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Surgical specimens were graded according to the percent tumor cell destruction. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC maps were used to generate whole-tumor derived ADC histogram distributions and mean ADC values. The primary objective of the study was to correlate ADC parameters with pathologic and CT response. RESULTS: Ten of the 12 patients enrolled on the study completed chemoradiation and had surgery. Three were found to be unresectable at the time of surgery and no specimen was obtained. Out of the 7 patients who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy, 3 had a grade III histopathologic response (>90% tumor cell destruction, 2 had a grade IIB response (51% to 90% tumor cell destruction, 1 had a grade IIA response (11% to 50% tumor cell destruction, and 1 had a grade I response (>90% viable tumor. Median survival for patients with a grade III response, grade I-II response, and unresectable disease were 25.6, 18.7, and 6.1 months, respectively. There was a significant correlation between pre-treatment mean tumor ADC values and the amount of tumor cell destruction after chemoradiation with a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.94 (P = .001. Mean pre-treatment ADC was 161 × 10−5 mm2/s (n = 3 in responding patients (>90% tumor cell destruction compared to 125 × 10−5 mm2/s (n = 4 in non-responding patients (>10% viable tumor. CT imaging showed no significant change in tumor size in responders or non-responders. CONCLUSIONS: dMRI may be useful to predict response to chemoradiation in pancreatic cancer. In our study, tumors with a low ADC mean value at baseline responded poorly to standard chemoradiation and

  16. A Phase 1/2 Study of Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy Using Docetaxel, Nedaplatin, and 5-Fluorouracil (DNF-R) for Esophageal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnuma, Hiroyuki; Sato, Yasushi; Hirakawa, Masahiro; Okagawa, Yutaka; Osuga, Takahiro; Hayashi, Tsuyoshi; Sato, Tsutomu; Miyanishi, Koji; Kobune, Masayoshi; Takimoto, Rishu [Department of Medical Oncology and Hematology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Sagawa, Tamotsu [Division of Gastroenterology, Hokkaido Cancer Center, Sapporo (Japan); Hori, Masakazu; Someya, Masanori; Nakata, Kensei; Sakata, Koh-ichi [Department of Radiology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Takayama, Tetsuji [Department of Gastroenterology and Oncology, University of Tokushima, Tokushima (Japan); Kato, Junji, E-mail: jkato@sapmed.ac.jp [Department of Medical Oncology and Hematology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: Patient survival in esophageal cancer (EC) remains poor. The purpose of this study was to investigate a regimen of definitive chemoradiation therapy (CRT) that exerts good local control of EC. We performed a phase 1/2 study to assess the safety and efficacy of CRT with docetaxel, nedaplatin, and 5-fluorouracil (DNF-R). Methods and Materials: Eligible patients presented with stage IB to IV EC. Patients received 2 cycles of docetaxel (20, 30, or 40 mg/m{sup 2}) and nedaplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2}) on days 1 and 8 and a continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil (400 mg/m{sup 2}/day) on days 1 to 5 and 8 to 12, every 5 weeks, with concurrent radiation therapy (59.4 Gy/33 fractions). The recommended dose (RD) was determined using a 3 + 3 design. Results: In the phase 1 study, the dose-limiting toxicities were neutropenia and thrombocytopenia. The RD of docetaxel was determined to be 20 mg/m{sup 2}. In the phase 2 study, grade 3 to 4 acute toxicities included neutropenia (42.8%), febrile neutropenia (7.14%), thrombocytopenia (17.9%), and esophagitis (21.4%). Grade 3 to 4 late radiation toxicity included esophagostenosis (10.7%). The complete response rate was 82.1% (95% confidence interval: 67.9-96.3%). Both the median progression-free survival and overall survival were 41.2 months. Conclusions: DNF-R showed good tolerability and strong antitumor activity, suggesting that it is a potentially effective therapeutic regimen for EC.

  17. Nuclear NF-κB Expression Correlates With Outcome Among Patients With Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Treated With Primary Chemoradiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balermpas, Panagiotis [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, J. W. Goethe – University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany); Michel, Yvonne [Senckenberg Institute of Pathology, J. W. Goethe – University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany); Wagenblast, Jens [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, J. W. Goethe – University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany); Seitz, Oliver [Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, J. W. Goethe – University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany); Sipek, Florian; Rödel, Franz; Rödel, Claus [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, J. W. Goethe – University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany); Fokas, Emmanouil, E-mail: emmanouil.fokas@kgu.de [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, J. W. Goethe – University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    Background: To examine whether nuclear NF-κB expression correlates with outcome in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated with primary chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Between 2007 and 2010, 101 patients with locally advanced primary HNSCC were treated with definitive simultaneous CRT. Pretreatment biopsy specimens were analyzed for NF-κB p65 (RelA) nuclear immunoreactivity. A sample was assigned to be positive with more than 5% positive nuclear expression. The predictive relevance of NF-κB and clinicopathologic factors for overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), local progression-free survival (LPFS), and metastasis-free survival (DMFS) was examined by univariate and multivariate analysis. Results: No significant differences between the groups were observed with regard to age, sex, total radiation dose, fractionation mode, total chemotherapy applied, T stage or grading. Patients with p65 nuclear positive biopsy specimens showed significantly a higher rate of lymph node metastasis (cN2c or cN3 status, P=.034). Within a mean follow-up time of 25 months (range, 2.33-62.96 months) OS, PFS, and DMFS were significantly poorer in the p65 nuclear positive group (P=.008, P=.027, and P=.008, respectively). These correlations remained significant in multivariate analysis. Conclusion: NF-κB/p65 nuclear expression is associated with increased lymphatic and hematogenous tumor dissemination and decreased survival in HNSCC patients treated with primary CRT. Our results may foster further investigation of a predictive relevance of NF-κB/p65 and its role as a suitable target for a molecular-based targeted therapy in HNSCC cancer.

  18. Music therapy for patients receiving spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Pi-Chu; Lin, Man-Ling; Huang, Li-Ching; Hsu, Hsiu-Chu; Lin, Chiong-Chu

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of music therapy on anxiety, postoperative pain and physiological reactions to emotional and physical distress in patients undergoing spinal surgery. Surgery-related anxiety and pain are the greatest concern of surgical patients, especially for those undergoing major procedures. A quasi-experimental study design was conducted in a medical centre in Taiwan from April-July 2006. Sixty patients were recruited. The study group listened to selected music from the evening before surgery to the second day after surgery. The control group did not listen to music. Patients' levels of anxiety and pain were measured with visual analogue scales (VAS). Physiological measures, including heart rate, blood pressure and 24-hour urinalysis, were performed. The average age of the 60 patients was 62·18 (SD 18·76) years. The mean VAS score for degree of anxiety in the study group was 0·8-2·0, compared with 2·1-5·1 in the control group. The mean VAS score for degree of pain in the study group was 1·7-3·0, compared with 4·4-6·0 in the control group. The differences between the two groups in VAS scores for both anxiety (p = 0·018-0·001) and pain (p = 0·001) were statistically significant. One hour after surgery, the mean blood pressure was significantly lower in the study group than in the control group (p = 0·014), but no significant differences were found between the two groups in urine cortisol (p = 0·145-0·495), norepinephrine (p = 0·228-0·626) or epinephrine values (p = 0·074-0·619). Music therapy has some positive effects on levels of anxiety and pain in patients undergoing spinal surgery. Complementary music therapy can alleviate pain and anxiety in patients before and after spinal surgery. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Role of Adjuvant Chemotherapy in ypT0-2N0 Patients Treated with Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy and Radical Resection for Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, In Ja [Department of Colon and Rectal Surgery, University of Ulsan College of Medicine and Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Yong [Center for Colorectal Cancer, National Cancer Center, Goyang-si (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee Cheol [Department of Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Nam Kyu [Section of Colon and Rectal Surgery, Department of Surgery, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyeong-Rok [Department of Surgery, Chonnam National University Hwansun Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Sung-Bum [Department of Surgery, Seoul National University Bungdang Hospital, Bundang (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Gyu-Seog [Division of Colorectal Cancer Center, Kyungpook National University Medical Center, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kang Young [Department of Surgery, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seon-Hahn [Department of Surgery, Korea University Anam Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Seung Taek [Department of Surgery, Seoul St. Mary Hospital, Catholic University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Seok-Byung; Kim, Jin Cheon [Department of Colon and Rectal Surgery, University of Ulsan College of Medicine and Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Sun Young [Center for Colorectal Cancer, National Cancer Center, Goyang-si (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Woo Yong [Department of Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung Bok [Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Ulsan College of Medicine and Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Chang Sik, E-mail: csyu@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Colon and Rectal Surgery, University of Ulsan College of Medicine and Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-01

    Objective: To explore the role of adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with ypT0-2N0 rectal cancer treated by preoperative chemoradiation therapy (PCRT) and radical resection. Patients and Methods: A national consortium of 10 institutions was formed, and patients with ypT0-2N0 mid- and low-rectal cancer after PCRT and radical resection from 2004 to 2009 were included. Patients were categorized into 2 groups according to receipt of additional adjuvant chemotherapy: Adj CTx (+) versus Adj CTx (−). Propensity scores were calculated and used to perform matched and adjusted analyses comparing relapse-free survival (RFS) between treatment groups while controlling for potential confounding. Results: A total of 1016 patients, who met the selection criteria, were evaluated. Of these, 106 (10.4%) did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. There was no overall improvement in 5-year RFS as a result of adjuvant chemotherapy [91.6% for Adj CTx (+) vs 87.5% for Adj CTx (−), P=.18]. There were no differences in 5-year local recurrence and distant metastasis rate between the 2 groups. In patients who show moderate, minimal, or no regression in tumor regression grade, however, possible association of adjuvant chemotherapy with RFS would be considered (hazard ratio 0.35; 95% confidence interval 0.14-0.88; P=.03). Cox regression analysis after propensity score matching failed to show that addition of adjuvant chemotherapy was associated with improved RFS (hazard ratio 0.81; 95% confidence interval 0.39-1.70; P=.58). Conclusions: Adjuvant chemotherapy seemed to not influence the RFS of patients with ypT0-2N0 rectal cancer after PCRT followed by radical resection. Thus, the addition of adjuvant chemotherapy needs to be weighed against its oncologic benefits.

  20. Antibiotic therapy in impacted third molar surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaco, G; Staffolani, C; Gatto, M R; Checchi, L

    1999-12-01

    The use of routine antibiotic therapy in patients undergoing surgical third molar extraction is controversial. The efficacy of antibiotic therapy in preventing postoperative complications following surgical third molar extractions was evaluated in 141 patients. In the test group (66 patients), the protocol utilized a regimen of 2 g of amoxicillin orally daily for 5 d postoperatively, starting at the completion of surgery. In the control group (75 patients), no antibiotic therapy was given. No significant difference was found between the test group and the control group in the incidence of postoperative sequelae, i.e. fever, pain, swelling and alveolar osteitis. A statistically significant association between smoking, habitual drinking and increased postoperative pain and fever was found. Patient age > or = 18 yr was positively correlated with an increased incidence of alveolar osteitis. Swelling was found to be gender-related, in that female patients experienced more swelling than male patients. No correlation was found between the time required for surgery or difficulty of extraction and post-operative pain. In conclusion, no difference was found between patients receiving postoperative amoxicillin and the control group in the incidence of postoperative sequelae.

  1. A Phase II Study of a Paclitaxel-Based Chemoradiation Regimen With Selective Surgical Salvage for Resectable Locoregionally Advanced Esophageal Cancer: Initial Reporting of RTOG 0246

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swisher, Stephen G., E-mail: sswisher@mdanderson.org [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Winter, Kathryn A. [Headquarters, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Komaki, Ritsuko U. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Ajani, Jaffer A. [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wu, Tsung T. [Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Hofstetter, Wayne L. [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Konski, Andre A. [Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Willett, Christopher G. [Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: The strategy of definitive chemoradiation with selective surgical salvage in locoregionally advanced esophageal cancer was evaluated in a Phase II trial in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)-affiliated sites. Methods and Materials: The study was designed to detect an improvement in 1-year survival from 60% to 77.5% ({alpha} = 0.05; power = 80%). Definitive chemoradiation involved induction chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) (650 mg/mg{sup 2}/day), cisplatin (15 mg/mg{sup 2}/day), and paclitaxel (200 mg/mg{sup 2}/day) for two cycles, followed by concurrent chemoradiation with 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/fraction) and daily 5-FU (300 mg/mg{sup 2}/day) with cisplatin (15 mg/mg{sup 2}/day) over the first 5 days. Salvage surgical resection was considered for patients with residual or recurrent esophageal cancer who did not have systemic disease. Results: Forty-three patients with nonmetastatic resectable esophageal cancer were entered from Sept 2003 to March 2006. Forty-one patients were eligible for analysis. Clinical stage was {>=}T3 in 31 patients (76%) and N1 in 29 patients (71%), with adenocarcinoma histology in 30 patients (73%). Thirty-seven patients (90%) completed induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemoradiation. Twenty-eight patients (68%) experienced Grade 3+ nonhematologic toxicity. Four treatment-related deaths were noted. Twenty-one patients underwent surgery following definitive chemoradiation because of residual (17 patients) or recurrent (3 patients) esophageal cancer,and 1 patient because of choice. Median follow-up of live patients was 22 months, with an estimated 1-year survival of 71%. Conclusions: In this Phase II trial (RTOG 0246) evaluating selective surgical salvage after definitive chemoradiation in locoregionally advanced esophageal cancer, the hypothesized 1-year RTOG survival rate (77.5%) was not achieved (1 year, 71%; 95% confidence interval< 54%-82%).

  2. Reduction in Tumor Volume by Cone Beam Computed Tomography Predicts Overall Survival in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Chemoradiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jabbour, Salma K., E-mail: jabbousk@cinj.rutgers.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Kim, Sinae [Division of Biometrics, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Haider, Syed A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Xu, Xiaoting [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Soochow (China); Wu, Alson [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Surakanti, Sujani; Aisner, Joseph [Division of Medical Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Langenfeld, John [Division of Surgery, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Yue, Ning J.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Zou, Wei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: We sought to evaluate whether tumor response using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) performed as part of the routine care during chemoradiation therapy (CRT) could forecast the outcome of unresectable, locally advanced, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: We manually delineated primary tumor volumes (TV) of patients with NSCLC who were treated with radical CRT on days 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, 36, and 43 on CBCTs obtained as part of the standard radiation treatment course. Percentage reductions in TV were calculated and then correlated to survival and pattern of recurrence using Cox proportional hazard models. Clinical information including histologic subtype was also considered in the study of such associations. Results: We evaluated 38 patients with a median follow-up time of 23.4 months. The median TV reduction was 39.3% (range, 7.3%-69.3%) from day 1 (D1) to day 43 (D43) CBCTs. Overall survival was associated with TV reduction from D1 to D43 (hazard ratio [HR] 0.557, 95% CI 0.39-0.79, P=.0009). For every 10% decrease in TV from D1 to D43, the risk of death decreased by 44.3%. For patients whose TV decreased ≥39.3 or <39.3%, log-rank test demonstrated a separation in survival (P=.02), with median survivals of 31 months versus 10 months, respectively. Neither local recurrence (HR 0.791, 95% CI 0.51-1.23, P=.29), nor distant recurrence (HR 0.78, 95% CI 0.57-1.08, P=.137) correlated with TV decrease from D1 to D43. Histologic subtype showed no impact on our findings. Conclusions: TV reduction as determined by CBCT during CRT as part of routine care predicts post-CRT survival. Such knowledge may justify intensification of RT or application of additional therapies. Assessment of genomic characteristics of these tumors may permit a better understanding of behavior or prediction of therapeutic outcomes.

  3. Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy With Docetaxel, Cisplatin, and 5-Fluorouracil (DCF-R) in Advanced Esophageal Cancer: A Phase 2 Trial (KDOG 0501-P2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higuchi, Katsuhiko, E-mail: k.higu@kitasato-u.ac.jp [Department of Gastroenterology, Kitasato University East Hospital, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Komori, Shouko [Department of Radiology and Radiation Oncology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Tanabe, Satoshi [Department of Gastroenterology, Kitasato University East Hospital, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Katada, Chikatoshi [Department of Gastroenterology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Azuma, Mizutomo [Department of Gastroenterology, Kitasato University East Hospital, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Ishiyama, Hiromichi [Department of Radiology and Radiation Oncology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Sasaki, Tohru; Ishido, Kenji [Department of Gastroenterology, Kitasato University East Hospital, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Katada, Natsuya [Department of Surgery, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Hayakawa, Kazushige [Department of Radiology and Radiation Oncology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Koizumi, Wasaburo [Department of Gastroenterology, Kitasato University East Hospital, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: A previous phase 1 study suggested that definitive chemoradiation therapy with docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil (DCF-R) is tolerable and active in patients with advanced esophageal cancer (AEC). This phase 2 study was designed to confirm the efficacy and toxicity of DCF-R in AEC. Methods and Materials: Patients with previously untreated thoracic AEC who had T4 tumors or M1 lymph node metastasis (M1 LYM), or both, received intravenous infusions of docetaxel (35 mg/m{sup 2}) and cisplatin (40 mg/m{sup 2}) on day 1 and a continuous intravenous infusion of 5-fluorouracil (400 mg/m{sup 2}/day) on days 1 to 5, every 2 weeks, plus concurrent radiation. The total radiation dose was initially 61.2 Gy but was lowered to multiple-field irradiation with 50.4 Gy to decrease esophagitis and late toxicity. Consequently, the number of cycles of DCF administered during radiation therapy was reduced from 4 to 3. The primary endpoint was the clinical complete response (cCR) rate. Results: Characteristics of the 42 subjects were: median age, 62 years; performance status, 0 in 14, 1 in 25, 2 in 3; TNM classification, T4M0 in 20, non-T4M1LYM in 12, T4M1LYM in 10; total scheduled radiation dose: 61.2 Gy in 12, 50.4 Gy in 30. The cCR rate was 52.4% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 37.3%-67.5%) overall, 33.3% in the 61.2-Gy group, and 60.0% in the 50.4-Gy group. The median progression-free survival was 11.1 months, and the median survival was 29.0 months with a survival rate of 43.9% at 3 years. Grade 3 or higher major toxicity consisted of leukopenia (71.4%), neutropenia (57.2%), anemia (16.7%), febrile neutropenia (38.1%), anorexia (31.0%), and esophagitis (28.6%). Conclusions: DCF-R frequently caused myelosuppression and esophagitis but was highly active and suggested to be a promising regimen in AEC. On the basis of efficacy and safety, a radiation dose of 50.4 Gy is recommended for further studies of DCF-R.

  4. Management of advanced esophageal carcinoma potentially infiltrating to the adjacent organs. Usefulness of preoperative concurrent chemo-radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsujinaka, Toshimasa; Shiozaki, Hitoshi; Murata, Atsuo; Nishijima, Junichi; Inoue, Masatoshi; Tamura, Shigeyuki; Monden, Morito [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1995-06-01

    A retrospective analysis was conducted to evaluate the prognostic benefit of various treatments for advanced esophageal carcinoma potentially infiltrating to the adjacent organs. In 77 enrolled patients, primary resection (11 cases, median survival time, MST: 281 days) and concurrent chemo (5FU CDDP)-radiation (FPRT) (23 cases, MST: 238 days) had prognostic advantages in comparison with palliative treatment (11 cases, MST: 94 days), but radiation therapy with daily rectal futraful administration (5 FURT) had no benefit (11 cases, MST: 169 days). In the primary resected cases, sufficient postoperative adjuvant therapies were feasible in 52%, and local and/or nodal recurrence was found in 61%. In FPRT cases, the local response rate was 79%, whereas the general response rate was 66% due to the association of distant metastasis in 5 cases. The resection rate after FPRT was 52%. Operative curability was superior in cases preceded by FPRT to those undergoing primary resection, and two year survival rates were 33% and 12%, respectively. FPRT is useful as a neoadjuvant therapy and subsequent curative resection may increase the chance for a long-term survival. (author).

  5. Pretreatment nutritional status and locoregional failure of patients with head and neck cancer undergoing definitive concurrent chemoradiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platek, Mary E; Reid, Mary E; Wilding, Gregory E; Jaggernauth, Wainwright; Rigual, Nestor R; Hicks, Wesley L; Popat, Saurin R; Warren, Graham W; Sullivan, Maureen; Thorstad, Wade L; Khan, Mohamed K; Loree, Thom R; Singh, Anurag K

    2011-11-01

    This study was carried out to determine if markers of nutritional status predict for locoregional failure following intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). We performed a retrospective chart review of 78 patients with SCCHN who received definitive CCRT. We compared patient factors, tumor characteristics, and nutritional status indicators between patients with and without locoregional failure. Fifteen of 78 patients (19%) experienced locoregional failure. Median follow-up for live patients was 38 months. On univariate analysis, pretreatment percentage of ideal body weight (%IBW) (p cancer undergoing definitive CCRT based on pretreatment %IBW should be examined further. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. PRETREATMENT NUTRITIONAL STATUS AND LOCOREGIONAL FAILURE IN PATIENTS WITH HEAD AND NECK CANCER UNDERGOING DEFINITIVE CONCURRENT CHEMORADIATION THERAPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platek, Mary E.; Reid, Mary E.; Wilding, Gregory E.; Jaggernauth, Wainwright; Rigual, Nestor R.; Hicks, Wesley L.; Popat, Saurin R.; Warren, Graham W.; Sullivan, Maureen; Thorstad, Wade L.; Khan, Mohamed K.; Loree, Thom R.; Singh, Anurag K.

    2015-01-01

    Background This study was carried out to determine if markers of nutritional status predict for locoregional failure following intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Methods We performed a retrospective chart review of 78 patients with SCCHN who received definitive CCRT. We compared patient factors, tumor characteristics, and nutritional status indicators between patients with and without locoregional failure. Results Fifteen of 78 patients (19%) experienced locoregional failure. Median follow-up for live patients was 38 months. On univariate analysis, pretreatment percentage of ideal body weight (%IBW) (p cancer undergoing definitive CCRT based on pre-treatment %IBW should be examined further. PMID:21990220

  7. SU-C-BRA-04: Use of Esophageal Wall Thickness in Evaluation of the Response to Chemoradiation Therapy for Esophageal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J; Kligerman, S; Lu, W [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Kang, M [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Yeungnam University Medical Center, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To quantitatively evaluate the esophageal cancer response to chemoradiation therapy (CRT) by measuring the esophageal wall thickness in CT. Method: Two datasets were used in this study. The first dataset is composed of CT scans of 15 esophageal cancer patients and 15 normal controls. The second dataset is composed of 20 esophageal cancer patients who underwent PET/CT scans before (Pre-CRT) and after CRT (Post-CRT). We first segmented the esophagus using a multi-atlas-based algorithm. The esophageal wall thickness was then computed, on each slice, as the equivalent circle radius of the segmented esophagus excluding the lumen. To evaluate the changes of wall thickness, we computed the standard deviation (SD), coefficient of variation (COV, SD/Mean), and flatness [(Max–Min)/Mean] of wall thickness along the entire esophagus. Results: For the first dataset, the mean wall thickness of cancer patients and normal controls were 6.35 mm and 6.03 mm, respectively. The mean SD, COV, and flatness of the wall thickness were 2.59, 0.21, and 1.27 for the cancer patients and 1.99, 0.16, and 1.13 for normal controls. Statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) were identified in SD and flatness. For the second dataset, the mean wall thickness of pre-CRT and post-CRT patients was 7.13 mm and 6.84 mm, respectively. The mean SD, COV, and flatness were 1.81, 0.26, and 1.06 for pre-CRT and 1.69, 0.26, and 1.06 for post-CRT. Statistically significant difference was not identified for these measurements. Current results are based on the entire esophagus. We believe significant differences between pre- and post-CRT scans could be obtained, if we conduct the measurements at tumor sites. Conclusion: Results show thicker wall thickness in pre-CRT scans and differences in wall thickness changes between normal and abnormal esophagus. This demonstrated the potential of esophageal wall thickness as a marker in the tumor CRT response evaluation. This work was supported in part by

  8. Prognostic Significance of Tumor Response as Assessed by Sequential {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography During Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy for Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Dongryul [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong Eun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Huh, Seung Jae, E-mail: sj5201.huh@samsung.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Won [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Heerim [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Joon Young; Kim, Byung-Tae [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic role of metabolic response by the use of serial sets of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in patients with cervical cancer who were treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 60 patients who were treated with CCRT between February 2009 and December 2010 were analyzed. Three sequential PET/CT images were acquired for each patient: pre-CCRT, during-CCRT at 4 weeks of CCRT, and 1 month post-CCRT PET/CT. Metabolic responses were assessed qualitatively. The percentage changes in the maximum values of standardized uptake value (ΔSUV{sub max}%) from the PET/CT images acquired pre-CCRT and during-CCRT were calculated. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to evaluate whether ΔSUV{sub max}% could predict complete response (CR) on the post-CCRT PET/CT and to identify the best cutoff value. Prognostic factors of progression-free survival (PFS) were analyzed. Results: During-CCRT PET/CT showed that 8 patients (13%) had CR, and the other 52 patients (87%) had partial response (PR). On the post-CCRT PET/CT, 43 patients (73%) had CR, 12 patients (20%) had PR, and 4 patients (7%) had progressive disease. The average SUV{sub max} in primary tumors was 16.3 (range, 6.4-53.0) on the pre-CCRT PET/CT images and 5.3 (range, 0-19.4) on the during-CCRT PET/CT images. According to ROC curve analysis, ΔSUV{sub max}% could predict CR response on post-CCRT PET/CT (P<.001, cutoff value of 59.7%). In all patients, the PFS rate was 71.9% at 2 years. Multivariate analysis showed that ΔSUV{sub max}% ≥60% (P=.045) and CR response on the post-CCRT PET/CT (P=.012) were statistically significant predictors of PFS. Conclusion: Metabolic responses on the during-CCRT images at 4 weeks of treatment and 1-month post-CCRT PET/CT images may predict treatment outcomes in patients with cervical cancer. ΔSUV{sub max}% ≥60% at 4 weeks of CCRT may predict CR response

  9. Preoperative physical therapy for elective cardiac surgery patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulzebos, E.H.J.; Smit, Y.; Helders, P.P.J.M.; Meeteren, N.L.U. van

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: After cardiac surgery, physical therapy is a routine procedure delivered with the aim of preventing postoperative pulmonary complications. OBJECTIVES: To determine if preoperative physical therapy with an exercise component can prevent postoperative pulmonary complications in cardiac sur

  10. Comparison of chemoradiation combined with hyperthermia therapy and chemoradiation therapy alone in invasive cervical cancer:a perspective randomized controlled study%深部热疗联合放化疗与单纯放化疗治疗中晚期子宫颈癌的随机对照研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石兴源; 周同冲; 林晓丹; 张伟军

    2012-01-01

    目的 比较深部热疗加同步放化疗与单纯放化疗治疗中晚期子宫颈癌的临床疗效及不良反应.方法 80例Ⅱb~Ⅳa期子宫颈癌患者,随机均分为深部热疗加放化疗组(综合组)和放化疗组(对照组).对照组行适形放疗配合同期化疗,顺铂( DDP)40 mg/m2单药每周化疗,共6次,放疗结束后再行TP方案辅助化疗2周期,即多西他赛75 mg/m2 d1,DDP 35 mg/m2 d1-2,每4周为1周期.综合组放化疗方法同对照组,深部热疗每次治疗60分钟,每周1~2次,共8 ~12次.结果 综合组和对照组治疗结束后肿瘤完全缓解率、1年及2年无瘤生存率比较,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).在Ⅲ~Ⅳa期患者中综合组治疗完全缓解率及1、2年无瘤生存率分别为80.0%、66.7%和60.0%,较对照组的35.3%、23.5%和17.6%明显增高,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05),两组不良反应比较,差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 深部热疗联合放化疗治疗中晚期尤其是Ⅲ期以上子宫颈癌的疗效优于单纯放化疗,且无严重不良反应,值得临床进一步推广.%Objective To compare the short-term effect and acute toxicity of chemoradiation combined with hyperthermia therapy versus chemoradiation therapy alone in invasive cervical cancer. Methods Eighty women with invasive squamous cell carcinoma or adenocarcinoma of the cervix of stage Ⅱb, Ⅲ or Ⅳa were enrolled in the study. Patients were randomly assigned to receive hyperthermic chemoradiotherapy (HCRT) and chemoradiotherapy (CRT). The regimen for concurrent chemoradiotherapy:DDP 40 mg/ m2 dl/week for 6 cycles within radiotherapy; the regimen for adjuvant chemotherapy:Taxotere 75 mg/m2 dl, DDP 35 mg/m2 dl-2, every 4 weeks,2 cycles. In HCRT group patients also received 8 ~ 12 courses of radiofrequency hyperthermia therapy. Results The complete remission and 1- and 2-y disease-free survival rate was higher in HCRT group than that in CRT group (P<0.05) ; the difference was

  11. Renal replacement therapy after cardiac surgery; renal function recovers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinthorsdottir, Kristin Julia; Kandler, Kristian; Agerlin Windeløv, Nis

    2013-01-01

    To assess renal outcome in patients discharged from hospital following cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury (CSA-AKI) with need for renal replacement therapy.......To assess renal outcome in patients discharged from hospital following cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury (CSA-AKI) with need for renal replacement therapy....

  12. Relapse of herpes encephalitis induced by temozolomide-based chemoradiation in a patient with malignant glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Masaki; Miyake, Keisuke; Shinomiya, Aya; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Tamiya, Takashi

    2013-02-01

    The authors report on a case of concurrent herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) and malignant glioma. The co-occurrence of HSE and malignant glioma is very rare, but it can occur during glioma treatment. Both radiotherapy and chemoradiation with temozolomide can induce viral reactivation, leading to HSE relapse. Careful observation for HSE is necessary when administering chemoradiation to patients with a history of HSE. Antiviral therapy for HSE must be initiated immediately, and the chemoradiation for glioma should be stopped; however, it is not clear what antitumor therapy is optimal when HSE co-occurs during the treatment of glioma.

  13. Neoadjuvant therapy and risk of bronchopleural fistula after lung cancer surgery: a systematic meta-analysis of 14 912 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuangjiang; Fan, Jun; Liu, Jing; Zhou, Jian; Ren, Yutao; Shen, Cheng; Che, Guowei

    2016-06-01

    Neoadjuvant therapy has been extensively analyzed in studies addressing the risk factors of bronchopleural fistula, but their results vary hugely. Therefore, we conducted this meta-analysis to determine the association between neoadjuvant therapy and risk of bronchopleural fistula in patients undergoing lung cancer surgery. We searched PubMed and EMBASE to identify the full-text literatures that met our eligibility criteria. Odds ratio with 95% confidence interval served as the summarized statistics. Heterogeneity within this meta-analysis was evaluated by Q-test and I (2) statistic. Sensitivity analysis was performed for further assessments of robustness. Publication bias was detected by Begg's test and Egger's test. Thirty studies enrolling 14 912 lung cancer cases were included into this meta-analysis. The incidence of bronchopleural fistula was 2.4% (354/14 912) in the large scale. Overall, neoadjuvant therapy significantly increased the risk of bronchopleural fistula after pulmonary resections (odds ratio: 2.166; 95% confidence interval: 1.398-3.357; P = 0.001). In subgroup analysis, neoadjuvant radiotherapy (odds ratio: 3.914; 95% confidence interval: 1.401-10.935; P = 0.009) and chemo-radiation (odds ratio: 2.533; 95% confidence interval: 1.353-4.741; P = 0.004) were significantly associated with the bronchopleural fistula risk but neoadjuvant chemotherapy was not (odds ratio: 1.857; 95% confidence interval: 0.881-3.911; P = 0.104). The impact of neoadjuvant therapy on bronchopleural fistula occurrence remains statistically prominent in the other subgroups. Neoadjuvant therapy is significantly associated with the occurrence of bronchopleural fistula after lung cancer surgery. Both neoadjuvant radiotherapy and chemo-radiation significantly increase the bronchopleural fistula risk but neoadjuvant chemotherapy does not. Some limitations still exist in this meta-analysis. The updated high-quality studies can help to further confirm and enrich our discoveries in

  14. Safety and efficacy of quadrapeutics versus chemoradiation in head and neck carcinoma xenograft model

    OpenAIRE

    Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina Y; Kim, Yoo-Shin; Aryasomayajula, Bhawani; Boulikas, Teni; Phan, Jack; Hung, Mien-Chie; Torchilin, Vladimir P.; O’Neill, Brian E.; Lapotko, Dmitri O.

    2015-01-01

    Chemoradiation is the strongest anti-tumor therapy but in resistant unresectable cancers it often lacks safety and efficacy. We compared our recently developed cell-level combination approach, quadrapeutics, to chemoradiation therapy to establish pre-clinical data for its biodistribution, safety and efficacy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), as a clinically challenging aggressive and resistant cancer. In vitro and in vivo models of four carcinomas were treated with standard ch...

  15. Supplemental oxygen therapy: Important considerations in oral and maxillofacial surgery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Singh, Virendra; Gupta, Pranav; Khatana, Shruti; Bhagol, Amrish

    2011-01-01

    ...; crossing different medical and surgical specialities. The present review summarizes the role of supportive oxygen therapy in various clinical conditions encountered in our day-to-day practice in the speciality of oral and maxillofacial surgery...

  16. Low-level laser therapy/photobiomodulation in the management of side effects of chemoradiation therapy in head and neck cancer: part 2 : proposed applications and treatment protocols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zecha, J.A.E.M.; Raber-Durlacher, J.E.; Nair, R.G.; Epstein, J.B.; Elad, S.; Hamblin, M.R.; Barasch, A.; Migliorati, C.A.; Milstein, D.M.J.; Genot, M.T.; Lansaat, L.; van der Brink, R.; Arnabat-Dominguez, J.; van der Molen, L.; Jacobi, I.; van Diessen, J.; de Lange, J.; Smeele, L.E.; Schubert, M.M.; Bensadoun, R.J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose There is a large body of evidence supporting the efficacy of low-level laser therapy (LLLT), more recently termed photobiomodulation (PBM) for the management of oral mucositis (OM) in patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer (HNC). Recent advances in PBM technology, together

  17. Low-level laser therapy/photobiomodulation in the management of side effects of chemoradiation therapy in head and neck cancer: part 2 : proposed applications and treatment protocols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zecha, J.A.E.M.; Raber-Durlacher, J.E.; Nair, R.G.; Epstein, J.B.; Elad, S.; Hamblin, M.R.; Barasch, A.; Migliorati, C.A.; Milstein, D.M.J.; Genot, M.T.; Lansaat, L.; van der Brink, R.; Arnabat-Dominguez, J.; van der Molen, L.; Jacobi, I.; van Diessen, J.; de Lange, J.; Smeele, L.E.; Schubert, M.M.; Bensadoun, R.J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose There is a large body of evidence supporting the efficacy of low-level laser therapy (LLLT), more recently termed photobiomodulation (PBM) for the management of oral mucositis (OM) in patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer (HNC). Recent advances in PBM technology, together

  18. Preoperative statin therapy and infectious complications in cardiac surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartholt, N L; Rettig, T C D; Schijffelen, M; Morshuis, W J; van de Garde, E M W; Noordzij, P G

    AIM: To assess whether preoperative statin therapy is associated with the risk of postoperative infection in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. METHODS: 520 patients undergoing cardiac surgery in 2010 were retrospectively examined. Data regarding statin and antibiotic use prior to and after

  19. Long-term Follow-up Results of a Multi-institutional Phase 2 Study of Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy for Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer in East and Southeast Asia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Shingo, E-mail: s_kato@saitama-med.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, International Medical Center, Saitama Medical University, Saitama (Japan); National Institute of Radiological Sciences of Japan, Chiba (Japan); Ohno, Tatsuya [Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center, Gunma University, Gunma (Japan); Thephamongkhol, Kullathorn; Chansilpa, Yaowalak [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiology, Siriraj Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Cao, Jianping [School of Radiation Medicine and Public Health, Soochow University, Soochow (China); Xu, Xiaoting [Department of Radiation Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Soochow (China); Devi, C. R. Beena; Swee, Tang Tieng [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Hospital Umum Sarawak, Kuching (Malaysia); Calaguas, Miriam J.C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke' s Medical Center, Quezon City, the Philippines (Philippines); Reyes, Rey H. de los [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Dr Jose R. Reyes Memorial Medical Center, Manila, the Philippines (Philippines); Cho, Chul-Koo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Dung, To Anh [Department of Breast and Gynecology Radiotherapy, National Cancer Institute, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Supriana, Nana [Department of Radiation Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Indonesia, Dr Cipto Mangunkusumo General Hospital, Jakarta (Indonesia); Erawati, Dyah [Division of Radiotherapy, Dr Soetomo General Hospital, Surabaya (Indonesia); Mizuno, Hideyuki [National Institute of Radiological Sciences of Japan, Chiba (Japan); Nakano, Takashi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Gunma (Japan); Tsujii, Hirohiko [National Institute of Radiological Sciences of Japan, Chiba (Japan)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To report the long-term survival and toxicity of a multi-institutional phase 2 study of concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) for locally advanced cervical cancer in east and southeast Asia. Methods and Materials: Ten institutions from 8 Asian countries participated in the study. Between April 2003 and March 2006, 120 patients (60 with bulky stage IIB and 60 with stage IIIB) were treated with CCRT. Radiation therapy consisted of pelvic external beam radiation therapy and either high-dose-rate or low-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy. Five cycles of weekly cisplatin (40 mg/m{sup 2}) were administered during the course of radiation therapy. Treatment results were evaluated by the rates of local control, overall survival, and late toxicities. Results: Median follow-up was 63.7 months, and the follow-up rate at 5 years was 98%. The 5-year local control and overall survival rates for all patients were 76.8% and 55.1%, respectively. The 5-year rates of major late toxicities of the rectum and bladder were 7.9% and 0%, respectively. Conclusions: The long-term results have suggested that CCRT is safe and effective for patients with locally advanced cervical cancer in east and southeast Asia. However, further efforts are needed to improve overall survival.

  20. Medical leech therapy in plastic reconstructive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houschyar, Khosrow S; Momeni, Arash; Maan, Zeshaan N; Pyles, Malcolm N; Jew, Olivia S; Strathe, Marion; Michalsen, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    The use of Hirudo medicinalis in clinical practice has increased in recent years. The primary indication in plastic surgery has traditionally been venous congestion. However, other reported clinical applications were in varicose veins, thrombophlebitis, and osteoarthritis. In this review, we summarize recent data elucidating the role that medicinal leeches play in the field of plastic surgery.

  1. Preoperative respiratory physical therapy in cardiac surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulzebos, H.J.

    2006-01-01

    Cardiac surgery is one of the most common surgical procedures and accounts for more resources expended in cardiovascular medicine than any other single procedure. Because cardiac surgery involves sternal incision and cardiopulmonary bypass, patients usually have a restricted respiratory function in

  2. Complete Response after Treatment with Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation with Prolonged Chemotherapy for Locally Advanced, Unresectable Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany A. Pompa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgery is the only chance for cure in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. In unresectable, locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN suggests chemotherapy and consideration for radiation in cases of unresectable LAPC. Here we present a rare case of unresectable LAPC with a complete histopathological response after chemoradiation followed by surgical resection. A 54-year-old female presented to our clinic in December 2013 with complaints of abdominal pain and 30-pound weight loss. An MRI demonstrated a mass in the pancreatic body measuring 6.2×3.2 cm; biopsy revealed proven ductal adenocarcinoma. Due to splenic vein/artery and contiguous celiac artery encasement, she was deemed surgically unresectable. She was started on FOLFIRINOX therapy (three cycles, intensity modulated radiation to a dose of 54 Gy in 30 fractions concurrent with capecitabine, followed by FOLFIRI, and finally XELIRI. After 8 cycles of ongoing XELIRI completed in March 2015, restaging showed a remarkable decrease in tumor size, along with PET-CT revealing no FDG-avid uptake. She was reevaluated by surgery and taken for definitive resection. Histopathological evaluation demonstrated a complete R0 resection and no residual tumor. Based on this patient and literature review, this strategy demonstrates potential efficacy of neoadjuvant chemoradiation with prolonged chemotherapy, followed by surgery, which may improve outcomes in patients deemed previously unresectable.

  3. Concurrent chemoradiation for vaginal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David T Miyamoto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is not known whether the addition of chemotherapy to radiation therapy improves outcomes in primary vaginal cancer. Here, we review clinical outcomes in patients with primary vaginal cancer treated with radiation therapy (RT or concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT. METHODS: Seventy-one patients with primary vaginal cancer treated with definitive RT with or without concurrent chemotherapy at a single institution were identified and their records reviewed. A total of 51 patients were treated with RT alone; 20 patients were treated with CRT. Recurrences were analyzed. Overall survival (OS and disease-free survival (DFS rates were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox regression analysis was performed. RESULTS: The median age at diagnosis was 61 years (range, 18-92 years and the median follow-up time among survivors was 3.0 years. Kaplan-Meier estimates for OS and DFS differed significantly between the RT and CRT groups (3-yr OS = 56% vs. 79%, log-rank p = 0.037; 3-yr DFS = 43% vs. 73%, log-rank p = 0.011. Twenty-three patients (45% in the RT group had a relapse at any site compared to 3 (15% in the CRT group (p = 0.027. With regard to the sites of first relapse, 10 patients (14% had local only, 4 (6% had local and regional, 9 (13% had regional only, 1 (1% had regional and distant, and 2 (3% had distant only relapse. On univariate analysis, the use of concurrent chemotherapy, FIGO stage, tumor size, and date of diagnosis were significant predictors of DFS. On multivariate analysis, the use of concurrent chemotherapy remained a significant predictor of DFS (hazard ratio 0.31 (95% CI, 0.10-0.97; p = 0.04. CONCLUSIONS: Vaginal cancer results in poor outcomes. Adequate radiation dose is essential to ensure curative management. Concurrent chemotherapy should be considered for vaginal cancer patients.

  4. Phase 2 Study of Temozolomide-Based Chemoradiation Therapy for High-Risk Low-Grade Gliomas: Preliminary Results of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0424

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, Barbara J., E-mail: barbara.fisher@lhsc.on.ca [London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Hu, Chen [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group-Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Macdonald, David R. [London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Lesser, Glenn J. [Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Coons, Stephen W. [Barrow Neurological Institute, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Brachman, David G. [Arizona Oncology Services Foundation, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Ryu, Samuel [Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Werner-Wasik, Maria [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Bahary, Jean-Paul [Centre Hospitalier de l' Université de Montréal-Notre Dame, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Liu, Junfeng [GCE Solutions, Inc., Bloomington, Illinois (United States); Chakravarti, Arnab [The Ohio State University, The James, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Mehta, Minesh [University of Maryland Medical Systems, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0424 was a phase 2 study of a high-risk low-grade glioma (LGG) population who were treated with temozolomide (TMZ) and radiation therapy (RT), and outcomes were compared to those of historical controls. This study was designed to detect a 43% increase in median survival time (MST) from 40.5 to 57.9 months and a 20% improvement in 3-year overall survival (OS) rate from 54% to 65% at a 10% significance level (1-sided) and 96% power. Methods and Materials: Patients with LGGs with 3 or more risk factors for recurrence (age ≥40 years, astrocytoma histology, bihemispherical tumor, preoperative tumor diameter of ≥6 cm, or a preoperative neurological function status of >1) were treated with RT (54 Gy in 30 fractions) and concurrent and adjuvant TMZ. Results: From 2005 to 2009, 129 evaluable patients (75 males and 54 females) were accrued. Median age was 49 years; 91% had a Zubrod score of 0 or 1; and 69%, 25%, and 6% of patients had 3, 4, and 5 risk factors, respectively. Patients had median and minimum follow-up examinations of 4.1 years and 3 years, respectively. The 3-year OS rate was 73.1% (95% confidence interval: 65.3%-80.8%), which was significantly improved compared to that of prespecified historical control values (P<.001). Median survival time has not yet been reached. Three-year progression-free survival was 59.2%. Grades 3 and 4 adverse events occurred in 43% and 10% of patients, respectively. One patient died of herpes encephalitis. Conclusions: The 3-year OS rate of 73.1% for RTOG 0424 high-risk LGG patients is higher than that reported for historical controls (P<.001) and the study-hypothesized rate of 65%.

  5. Anorectal Function and Quality of Life in Patients With Early Stage Rectal Cancer Treated With Chemoradiation and Local Excision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Patricio B; Renfro, Lindsay A; Carrero, Xiomara W; Shi, Qian; Strombom, Paul L; Chow, Oliver; Garcia-Aguilar, Julio

    2017-05-01

    Little is known about anorectal function and quality of life after chemoradiation followed by local excision, which is an alternative to total mesorectal excision for selected patients with early rectal cancer. The purpose of this study was to prospectively assess anorectal function and health-related quality of life of patients with T2N0 rectal cancer who were treated with an alternative approach. This was a prospective, phase II trial. The study was multicentric (American College of Surgeons Oncology Group trial Z6041). Patients with stage cT2N0 rectal adenocarcinomas were treated with an oxaliplatin/capecitabine-based chemoradiation regimen followed by local excision. Anorectal function and quality of life were assessed at enrollment and 1 year postoperatively with the Fecal Incontinence Severity Index, Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life scale, and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Colorectal Questionnaire. Results were compared, and multivariable analysis was performed to identify predictors of outcome. Seventy-one patients (98%) were evaluated at enrollment and 66 (92%) at 1 year. Compared with baseline, no significant differences were found on Fecal Incontinence Severity Index scores at 1 year. Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life results were significantly worse in the lifestyle (p embarrassment (p = 0.002) domains. There were no differences in the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy overall score, but the physical well-being subscale was significantly worse and emotional well-being was improved after surgery. Treatment with the original chemoradiation regimen predicted worse depression/self-perception and embarrassment scores in the Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life, and male sex was predictive of worse scores in the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy overall score and trial outcome index. Small sample size, relatively short follow-up, and absence of information before cancer diagnosis were study limitations. Chemoradiation followed by local

  6. Molecular Imaging to Identify Tumor Recurrence following Chemoradiation in a Hostile Surgical Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olugbenga T. Okusanya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical biopsy of potential tumor recurrence is a common challenge facing oncologists, surgeons, and cancer patients. Imaging modalities have limited ability to accurately detect recurrent cancer in fields affected by previous surgery, chemotherapy, or radiation. However, definitive tissue diagnosis is often needed to initiate treatment and to direct therapy. We sought to determine if a targeted fluorescent intraoperative molecular imaging technique could be applied in a clinical setting to assist a surgical biopsy in a “hostile” field. We describe the use of a folate-fluorescein conjugate to direct the biopsy of a suspected recurrent lung adenocarcinoma invading the mediastinum that had been previously treated with chemoradiation. We found that intraoperative imaging allowed the identification of small viable tumor deposits that were otherwise indistinguishable from scar and necrosis. Our operative observations were confirmed by histology, fluorescence microscopy, and immunohistochemistry. Our results demonstrate one possible application and clinical value of intraoperative molecular imaging.

  7. The Role of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in Assessing Therapy Response in Cervix Cancer after Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jiyoun; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Jeong, Yong Hyu; Lee, Jaehoon; Cho, Arthur; Yun, Mijin; Lee, Jong Doo; Kim, Yong Bae; Kim, Young Tae; Kang, Won Jun [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    To determine whether persisting cervical fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake after concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for cervical cancer can reflect residual malignancy. F-FDG PET/CT was performed before and after CCRT in 136 patients with cervical cancer. The maximum and mean standardized uptake values (SUVmax and SUVmean) were recorded from PET/CT scans performed pre- and post-treatment. SUVs were correlated with treatment response after CCRT. Final treatment response was determined by MRI and further follow-up PET/CT. One hundred four of 136 patients underwent pelvic MRI, and 32 of 136 patients underwent further follow-up PET/CT. Patients were classified into two categories: patients with residual tumor or patients without residual tumor (complete responder). Preand post-treatment serum squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC) levels were also recorded for comparison. The optimal cutoff value of SUVmax for predicting residual cervical tumor was determined using receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Of 136 patients, 124 showed complete response on further follow-up studies and 12 were confirmed to have residual tumor. The post-treatment SUVmax and pre-/posttreatment SUVmean of complete responders were significantly lower than those of patients with residual tumor: 2.5±0.8 and 7.2±4.2/1.9±0.7 for complete responders and 5.7±2.6 and 12.8±6.9/3.7±0.7 for patients with residual tumor (p < 0.05). The pre-treatment SUVmax and pre-/post-treatment serum SCC levels of the complete responders tended to be lower than those of patients with residual tumor, but this did not have statistical significance. Using ROC analysis, an optimal cutoff SUVmax of 4.0 on the post-treatment PET/CT yielded a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of 92 %, 94 %, 61 %, and 99 %, respectively (p <0.001). Persistent cervical FDG uptake in {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT after CCRT for cervical cancer may be caused by residual tumor or post-therapy

  8. Fibrinogen Concentrate Therapy in Complex Cardiac Surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bilecen, Suleyman; Peelen, Linda M.; Kalkman, Cor J.; Spanjersberg, Alexander J.; Moons, Karel G. M.; Nierich, Arno P.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Fibrinogen concentrate increasingly is used to treat coagulopathic bleeding in cardiac surgery although its effectiveness and safety have not been shown. The authors conducted a cohort study to quantify the effects of fibrinogen concentrate on postoperative blood loss and transfusion and

  9. Neoadjuvant therapy and surgical resection for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meko, J; Rusch, V W

    2000-10-01

    During the past 15 years, treatment of stage IIIA (N2) non-small cell lung cancer has evolved considerably because of improvements in patients selection, staging, and combined modality therapy. Results of several clinical trials suggest that induction chemotherapy or chemoradiation and surgical resection is superior to surgery alone. However, the optimal induction regimen has not been defined. An intergroup trial is also underway to determine whether chemoradiation and surgical resection leads to better survival than chemotherapy and radiation alone. Future studies will assess ways to combine radiation and novel chemotherapeutic agents, and will identify molecular abnormalities that predict response to induction therapy.

  10. FUNCTIONAL PHYSICAL THERAPY PRACTICE DERMATO POSTOPERATIVELY OF PLASTIC SURGERIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Severo Migotto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The surgery is a tissue damage that even well directed, can impair tissue function Physiotherapist Dermato Functional fitting to act with all available resources to minimize these changes being a strong contributor both pre and postoperatively. The study included 16 Doctors Plastic Surgeons working in Florianópolis - SC, Brazil, to which was applied a questionnaire to identify theincidence of plastic surgery, knowledge and recognition of dermato functional physical therapy postoperatively. It was found that, as in literature surgeries to enlarge breasts lead the ranking of plastic surgery. Furthermore, it was concluded that physicians not only understand the importance of physiotherapy dermato functional, but also refer their patients to treat postoperative physical therapy valuing employees and recognizing them as important in the rehabilitation process of his patients.

  11. Compression therapy after ankle fracture surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winge, R; Bayer, L; Gottlieb, H

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: The main purpose of this systematic review was to investigate the effect of compression treatment on the perioperative course of ankle fractures and describe its effect on edema, pain, ankle joint mobility, wound healing complication, length of stay (LOS) and time to surgery (TTS). The aim...... undergoing surgery, testing either intermittent pneumatic compression, compression bandage and/or compression stocking and reporting its effect on edema, pain, ankle joint mobility, wound healing complication, LOS and TTS. To conclude on data a narrative synthesis was performed. RESULTS: The review included...... eight studies (451 patients). Seven studies found a significant effect on edema, two studies described a significant reduction in pain, one a positive effect on ankle movement, two a positive effect on wound healing, one a reduction in LOS and finally two studies reported reduction in TTS. A systematic...

  12. Surgery versus physical therapy for a meniscal tear and osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Jeffrey N; Brophy, Robert H; Chaisson, Christine E; de Chaves, Leigh; Cole, Brian J; Dahm, Diane L; Donnell-Fink, Laurel A; Guermazi, Ali; Haas, Amanda K; Jones, Morgan H; Levy, Bruce A; Mandl, Lisa A; Martin, Scott D; Marx, Robert G; Miniaci, Anthony; Matava, Matthew J; Palmisano, Joseph; Reinke, Emily K; Richardson, Brian E; Rome, Benjamin N; Safran-Norton, Clare E; Skoniecki, Debra J; Solomon, Daniel H; Smith, Matthew V; Spindler, Kurt P; Stuart, Michael J; Wright, John; Wright, Rick W; Losina, Elena

    2013-05-02

    Whether arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for symptomatic patients with a meniscal tear and knee osteoarthritis results in better functional outcomes than nonoperative therapy is uncertain. We conducted a multicenter, randomized, controlled trial involving symptomatic patients 45 years of age or older with a meniscal tear and evidence of mild-to-moderate osteoarthritis on imaging. We randomly assigned 351 patients to surgery and postoperative physical therapy or to a standardized physical-therapy regimen (with the option to cross over to surgery at the discretion of the patient and surgeon). The patients were evaluated at 6 and 12 months. The primary outcome was the difference between the groups with respect to the change in the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) physical-function score (ranging from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more severe symptoms) 6 months after randomization. In the intention-to-treat analysis, the mean improvement in the WOMAC score after 6 months was 20.9 points (95% confidence interval [CI], 17.9 to 23.9) in the surgical group and 18.5 (95% CI, 15.6 to 21.5) in the physical-therapy group (mean difference, 2.4 points; 95% CI, -1.8 to 6.5). At 6 months, 51 active participants in the study who were assigned to physical therapy alone (30%) had undergone surgery, and 9 patients assigned to surgery (6%) had not undergone surgery. The results at 12 months were similar to those at 6 months. The frequency of adverse events did not differ significantly between the groups. In the intention-to-treat analysis, we did not find significant differences between the study groups in functional improvement 6 months after randomization; however, 30% of the patients who were assigned to physical therapy alone underwent surgery within 6 months. (Funded by the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; METEOR ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00597012.).

  13. Combined Chemoradiation Therapy With Twice-Weekly Gemcitabine and Cisplatin for Organ Preservation in Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: Long-Term Results of a Phase 1 Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azria, David, E-mail: david.azria@icm.unicancer.fr [Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiophysics Unit, Montpellier Cancer Institute (ICM), Montpellier (France); INSERM, U896, IRCM, Montpellier (France); Riou, Olivier [Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiophysics Unit, Montpellier Cancer Institute (ICM), Montpellier (France); Rebillard, Xavier [Department of Urology, Clinique Beausoleil, Montpellier (France); Thezenas, Simon [Biostatistics Unit, Montpellier Cancer Institute, Montpellier (France); Thuret, Rodolphe [Department of Urology, Montpellier University Hospital, Montpellier (France); Fenoglietto, Pascal [Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiophysics Unit, Montpellier Cancer Institute (ICM), Montpellier (France); Pouessel, Damien; Culine, Stephane [Department of Medical Oncology, AP-HP Saint-Louis, Paris (France)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Concomitant treatment with radiation therapy and cisplatin (CDDP) remains the gold standard for bladder preservation in the treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). We present the long-term results of a phase 1 clinical trial to assess the association of twice-weekly gemcitabine with CDDP and radiation therapy in this setting. Methods and Materials: Patients with pT2-pT4N0M0 MIBC without hydronephrosis or diffuse carcinoma in situ were enrolled in this study. After maximal transurethral resection of the bladder tumor, patients received concomitant radiation therapy (63 Gy in 1.8 fractions) and chemotherapy (CDDP 20 mg/m²/day over 4 days every 21 days and gemcitabine twice a week). The starting dose of gemcitabine was 15 mg/m² with dose escalation to 20, 25, and 30 mg/m². The primary endpoint was the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Secondary endpoints included toxicity and tumor control. Results: Fourteen patients were enrolled. Dose-limiting toxicity occurred in 2 patients treated with 30 mg/m² gemcitabine (grade 4 thrombocytopenia and severe impairment of World Health Organization performance status, respectively). Nine patients received the complete chemoradiation therapy protocol. The recommended dose of gemcitabine was 25 mg/m². The median follow-up time was 53 months, and the overall and disease-specific 5-year survival rates were 62% and 77%, respectively. Among the patients who received the complete treatment, bladder-intact survival was 76% at 5 years, and the median overall survival was 69.6 months. Conclusions: This regimen was well tolerated. The gemcitabine MTD was 25 mg/m². Bladder preservation and disease control were promising. A multicenter phase 2 randomized trial is ongoing.

  14. Neo-adjuvant chemo-radiation of rectal cancer with Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy: summary of technical and dosimetric features and early clinical experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salati Emanuela

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To report about initial technical and clinical experience in preoperative radiation treatment of rectal cancer with volumetric modulated arcs with the RapidArc® (RA technology. Methods Twenty-five consecutive patients (pts were treated with RA. All showed locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma with stage T2-T4, N0-1. Dose prescription was 44 Gy in 22 fractions (or 45 Gy in 25 fractions. Delivery was performed with single arc with a 6 MV photon beam. Twenty patients were treated preoperatively, five did not receive surgery. Twenty-three patients received concomitant chemotherapy with oral capecitabine. A comparison with a cohort of twenty patients with similar characteristics treated with conformal therapy (3DC is presented as well. Results From a dosimetric point of view, RA improved conformality of doses (CI95% = 1.1 vs. 1.4 for RA and 3DC, presented similar target coverage with lower maximum doses, significant sparing of femurs and significant reduction of integral and mean dose to healthy tissue. From the clinical point of view, surgical reports resulted in a down-staging in 41% of cases. Acute toxicity was limited to Grade 1-2 diarrhoea in 40% and Grade 3 in 8% of RA pts, 45% and 5% of 3DC pts, compatible with known effects of concomitant chemotherapy. RA treatments were performed with an average of 2.0 vs. 3.4 min of 3DC. Conclusion RA proved to be a safe, qualitatively advantageous treatment modality for rectal cancer, showing some improved results in dosimetric aspects.

  15. Creation of a Bariatric Surgery Medication Therapy Management Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuh, Michael J

    2015-07-01

    To describe how pharmacist-provided medication therapy management (MTM) services can be applied to bariatric surgery. A pharmacy MTM consult service located in a multispecialty medical clinic with a bariatric department attached to a hospital where bariatric surgeries are performed. MTM bariatric surgery office practice where patients are seen before surgery by a pharmacist to identify medication problems and determine how best to administer alternative dosage forms post-operatively to patients. Practice innovations are a creation of a specialized service and accompanying specialized medication database within a pharmacotherapy practice. Outcome measures are number of patients referred per month and polypharmacy consults scheduled downstream from the bariatric surgery. Improved patient outcomes and prescribing efficiency from usage of the newly developed database of drugs that can be crushed. All bariatric patients are now referred to the pharmacist MTM pharmacotherapy service for medication review before bariatric surgery. Bariatric surgery is a source of another useful MTM practice model. Utilizing MTM pharmacists to consult with bariatric patients presurgery helps ease the physician burden of writing alternative dose prescriptions and helps identify medication problems with patients before their surgery.

  16. Apolipoprotein C-II Is a Potential Serum Biomarker as a Prognostic Factor of Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer After Chemoradiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harima, Yoko, E-mail: harima@takii.kmu.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Takii Hospital, Kansai Medical University, Moriguchi, Osaka (Japan); Ikeda, Koshi; Utsunomiya, Keita; Komemushi, Atsushi; Kanno, Shohei; Shiga, Toshiko [Department of Radiology, Takii Hospital, Kansai Medical University, Moriguchi, Osaka (Japan); Tanigawa, Noboru [Department of Radiology, Hirakata Hospital, Kansai Medical University, Hirakata, Osaka (Japan)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To determine pretreatment serum protein levels for generally applicable measurement to predict chemoradiation treatment outcomes in patients with locally advanced squamous cell cervical carcinoma (CC). Methods and Materials: In a screening study, measurements were conducted twice. At first, 6 serum samples from CC patients (3 with no evidence of disease [NED] and 3 with cancer-caused death [CD]) and 2 from healthy controls were tested. Next, 12 serum samples from different CC patients (8 NED, 4 CD) and 4 from healthy controls were examined. Subsequently, 28 different CC patients (18 NED, 10 CD) and 9 controls were analyzed in the validation study. Protein chips were treated with the sample sera, and the serum protein pattern was detected by surface-enhanced laser desorption and ionization–time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF MS). Then, single MS-based peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) and tandem MS (MS/MS)-based peptide/protein identification methods, were used to identify protein corresponding to the detected peak. And then, turbidimetric assay was used to measure the levels of a protein that indicated the best match with this peptide peak. Results: The same peak 8918 m/z was identified in both screening studies. Neither the screening study nor the validation study had significant differences in the appearance of this peak in the controls and NED. However, the intensity of the peak in CD was significantly lower than that of controls and NED in both pilot studies (P=.02, P=.04) and validation study (P=.01, P=.001). The protein indicated the best match with this peptide peak at 8918 m/z was identified as apolipoprotein C-II (ApoC-II) using PMF and MS/MS methods. Turbidimetric assay showed that the mean serum levels of ApoC-II tended to decrease in CD group when compared with NED group (P=.078). Conclusion: ApoC-II could be used as a biomarker for detection in predicting and estimating the radiation treatment outcome of patients with CC.

  17. Physical Therapy to Treat Torn Meniscus Comparable to Surgery for Many Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1999 Spotlight on Research 2013 August 2013 (historical) Physical Therapy to Treat Torn Meniscus Comparable to Surgery for ... to avoid surgery and achieve comparable relief from physical therapy, according to a recent, multisite study funded by ...

  18. [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET Standard Uptake Value as a Metabolic Predictor of Bone Marrow Response to Radiation: Impact on Acute and Late Hematological Toxicity in Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Chemoradiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elicin, Olgun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne (Switzerland); Callaway, Sharon [Velocity Medical Solutions, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Prior, John O. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne (Switzerland); Bourhis, Jean [Department of Radiation Oncology, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne (Switzerland); Ozsahin, Mahmut, E-mail: mahmut.ozsahin@chuv.ch [Department of Radiation Oncology, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne (Switzerland); Herrera, Fernanda G., E-mail: fernanda.herrera@chuv.ch [Department of Radiation Oncology, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To quantify the relationship between bone marrow (BM) response to radiation and radiation dose by using {sup 18}F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET standard uptake values (SUV) and to correlate these findings with hematological toxicity (HT) in cervical cancer (CC) patients treated with chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Seventeen women with a diagnosis of CC were treated with standard doses of CRT. All patients underwent pre- and post-therapy [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET/computed tomography (CT). Hemograms were obtained before and during treatment and 3 months after treatment and at last follow-up. Pelvic bone was autosegmented as total bone marrow (BM{sub TOT}). Active bone marrow (BM{sub ACT}) was contoured based on SUV greater than the mean SUV of BM{sub TOT}. The volumes (V) of each region receiving 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy (V{sub 10}, V{sub 20}, V{sub 30}, and V{sub 40}, respectively) were calculated. Metabolic volume histograms and voxel SUV map response graphs were created. Relative changes in SUV before and after therapy were calculated by separating SUV voxels into radiation therapy dose ranges of 5 Gy. The relationships among SUV decrease, radiation dose, and HT were investigated using multiple regression models. Results: Mean relative pre-post-therapy SUV reductions in BM{sub TOT} and BM{sub ACT} were 27% and 38%, respectively. BM{sub ACT} volume was significantly reduced after treatment (from 651.5 to 231.6 cm{sup 3}, respectively; P<.0001). BM{sub ACT} V{sub 30} was significantly correlated with a reduction in BM{sub ACT} SUV (R{sup 2}, 0.14; P<.001). The reduction in BM{sub ACT} SUV significantly correlated with reduction in white blood cells (WBCs) at 3 months post-treatment (R{sup 2}, 0.27; P=.04) and at last follow-up (R{sup 2}, 0.25; P=.04). Different dosimetric parameters of BM{sub TOT} and BM{sub ACT} correlated with long-term hematological outcome. Conclusions: The volumes of BM

  19. Reduction of heart volume during neoadjuvant chemoradiation in patients with resectable esophageal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haj Mohammad, Nadia; Kamphuis, Martijn; Hulshof, Maarten C C M; Lutkenhaus, Lotte J; Gisbertz, Suzanne S; Bergman, Jacques J G H M; de Bruin-Bon, H A C M Rianne; Geijsen, Elisabeth D; Bel, Arjan; Boekholdt, S Mathijs; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Neoadjuvant chemoradiation (nCRT) followed by surgery is considered curative intent treatment for patients with resectable esophageal cancer. The aim was to establish hemodynamic aspects of changes in heart volume and to explore whether changes in heart volume resulted in cli

  20. [Multimodal therapy concepts for failed back surgery syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casser, Hans-Raimund

    2016-09-01

    Failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) is a frequent complication (15-40 %) of lumbar disc surgery and is rarely successfully treated by surgery with the exception of a re-prolapse associated with radicular pain. Multimodal pain treatment, however, is indicated by a lack of pathoanatomical correlates, unclear cause and psychosocial risk factors.This review describes a standardized non-operative treatment starting with broad interdisciplinary clarification by medical, psychological and physiotherapeutic means (assessment).If the conditions for multimodal pain therapy are met, the OPS 8‑918-procedure can be applied to avoid chronic developing pain. In doing so, the already issued quality standards and guidelines for documentation should be respected.

  1. Poetry and narrative therapy for anxiety about spinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Thirusha; Shabangu, Sifiso

    2015-01-01

    This case study presents the use of poetry in psychotherapy with an adolescent girl, Buhle (a pseudonym), who needed surgery to correct a curvature of her spine due to adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. She experienced anxiety which prevented surgeons from doing the procedure. Psychotherapists used narrative therapy to explore issues associated with and contributing to her anxiety and encouraged her to document her experiences through poetry, after learning that she was a keen poet. During psychotherapy Buhle's poems were used to track and narrate her experiences and as an empowering method allowing her to make personal sense of challenging experiences. Buhle's poems are presented within an account of the psychotherapy leading up to the surgery. Her poetry reveals a juxtaposition of regular adolescent identity issues in the face of coping with a demanding medical condition and the prospect of invasive surgery.

  2. Hormone therapy in hypospadias surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netto, Jose Murillo B; Ferrarez, Carlos Eduardo P F; Schindler Leal, Anucha Andrade; Tucci, Silvio; Gomes, Carlos Augusto; Barroso, Ubirajara

    2013-12-01

    Surgical correction of hypospadias is proposed to improve the aesthetic and functional quality of the penis. Hormone therapy preceding surgical correction is indicated to obtain better surgical conditions. However, there is divergence in the literature regarding the hormone therapy of choice, time of its use before surgery, appropriate dose, and route of application. To try to elucidate this matter, an electronic survey of the databases PubMed and Cochrane Central Library was conducted, limited to articles in English published since 1980. Search strategy identified 14 clinical trials that matched the inclusion criteria. Analysis was made in terms of study design, classification of hypospadias, association with chordee and cryptorchidism, type of hormone, route of application, dose and duration of treatment, penile length before and after hormone therapy, glans circumference before and after hormone therapy, adverse effects, and surgical complications. From the trials evaluated it was not possible to determine the ideal neoadjuvant treatment. A preference for use of testosterone was observed. Intramuscular administration seems to have fewer adverse effects than topical treatment. Side effects were seldom described, and treated patients were not followed on a long-term basis. The scarcity of randomized and controlled clinical trials regarding the topic impairs the establishment of a protocol. In conclusion, although preoperative hormone therapy is currently used before hypospadias surgery, its real benefit in terms of improvement of the penis and surgical results has not been defined.

  3. Reconstructive surgery in immunocompromised patients: evaluation and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunda, Sebastian E.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: An increasing number of patients undergoing reconstructive surgery are immunocompromised due to different reasons and different medical treatments. Some of the used immunosuppressive drugs may affect the process of wound healing and thereby, impair the long-term success of surgical treatment. Therefore, this retrospective analysis aimed at the evaluation of the perioperative treatment and surgical outcome of immunocompromised patients undergoing different reconstructive procedures.Methods: A retrospective review was performed of 8 immunocompromised patients with different primary diseases who needed reconstructive surgery: 2 patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, 1 patient with an acute myeloid leukemia, 1 patient with colitis ulcerosa, 1 patient with liver cirrhosis, 1 patient with chronic polyarthritis, and 2 patients with malignant melanoma.Results: In 7 of our 8 presented cases, multiple operations with wound debridements have been necessary to optimize the granulation of the wound bed before reconstructive surgery. 3 out of these 7 patients required further operations due to wound dehiscence or necrosis, with 2 of them as a result of increased immunosuppressive therapy. 5 out of 8 patients needed no further surgical treatment.Conclusions: Both the perioperative drug therapy and the reconstructive surgery concept need to be determined carefully in each individual case of the immunocompromised patients. Thus, the appropriate point in time of operation to achieve the best possible wound healing as well as the complexity of the procedure will require the consideration of a ‘less is more’ strategy in selected cases.

  4. Safety and Palliative Efficacy of Single-Dose 8-Gy Reirradiation for Painful Local Failure in Patients With Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Previously Treated With Radical Chemoradiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Topkan, Erkan, E-mail: docdretopkan@gmail.com [Baskent Department of Radiation Oncology, University Adana Medical Faculty, Adana (Turkey); Yildirim, Berna Akkus; Guler, Ozan Cem; Parlak, Cem [Baskent Department of Radiation Oncology, University Adana Medical Faculty, Adana (Turkey); Pehlivan, Berrin [Koc University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Istanbul, and American Hospital, University of Texas MD Anderson Radiation Treatment Center, Istanbul (Turkey); Selek, Ugur [Medstar Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Antalya (Turkey)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the safety and efficacy of single-dose 8-Gy palliative chest reirradiation (CRI) in metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (M-NSCLC) patients with painful thoracic failures (TF) within the previous radiation portal. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of 78 M-NSCLC patients who received single-dose 8-Gy CRI for painful TF after concurrent chemoradiation therapy to a total radiation dose of 52 to 66 Gy between 2007 and 2012. Primary endpoints included significant pain relief (SPR) defined as a ≥2 point decrement in the Visual Analogue Scale for Pain inventory (VAS-P), time to pain relief, and duration of pain control. Secondary objectives were survival and prognostic factors. Results: Treatment was well tolerated, with only 5.1% grade 3 pneumonitis and 1.3% grade 2 esophagitis. Pre-CRI median and post-CRI minimum VAS-P were 7 and 3 (P<.001), respectively. SPR was noted in 67 (85.9%) patients, and only 3 (3.9%) scored progressive pain. Median time to lowest VAS-P and duration of pain control were 27 days and 6.1 months, respectively. Median overall survival (OS) was 7.7 months, and the 1-year OS rate was 26.5%. On multivariate analyses, lower Eastern Cooperative Oncology group score (1-2; P<.001), absence of anemia (P=.001), and fewer metastatic sites (1-2; P<.001) were found to be associated with longer OS. Conclusions: Single-dose 8-Gy CRI provides safe, effective, and durable pain palliation for TF in radically irradiated M-NSCLC patients. Because of its convenience, lower cost, and higher comfort, the present protocol can be considered an appropriate option for patients with limited life spans.

  5. Endosonographic radial tumor thickness after neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy to predict response and survival in patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer: a prospective multicenter phase ll study by the Swiss Group for Clinical Cancer Research (SAKK 75/02).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, Christian; Binek, Janek; Schuller, Jan C; Bauerfeind, Peter; Metzger, Urs; Werth, Baseli; Knuchel, Juerg; Frossard, Jean-Louis; Bertschinger, Philipp; Brauchli, Peter; Meyenberger, Christa; Ruhstaller, Thomas

    2010-06-01

    EUS response assessment in patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer undergoing neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) is limited by disintegration of the involved anatomic structures. Predictive and prognostic values of a prospectively defined maximum tumor thickness (MTT). Prospective open-label phase ll study (SAKK 75/02). Multicenter, nationwide. Of 66 patients with primary CRT, 56 underwent en bloc esophagectomy. EUS-measured MTT before and 2-5 weeks after CRT (yMTT). Cutoffs: (1) absolute thickness (yMTT) after CRT < or = 6 mm; (2) relative reduction compared with baseline (ratio yMTT/MTT) < or = 50%. Correlation between EUS measurements and histopathologic tumor regression grade (TRG) and overall survival (OS). Sixteen of 56 patients were not included for EUS evaluation (10 severe stenosis, 5 MTT not measured, 1 intolerance to second EUS). Characteristics (n = 40) were as follow: median age, 60 years; squamous cell carcinoma, 42%; and adenocarcinoma (AC), 58%. Initial stage was: 10 T2N1, 3 T3N0, 26 T3N1, 1 T3Nx; 14 of 23 AC Siewert type 1. Wilcoxon rank sum test showed significant correlation of TRG1 with yMTT < or = 6 mm (P = .008) and yMTT/MTT < or = 50% (P = .003). The effect of yMTT on TRG1 was significant (P = .0193; odds ratio, 0.687 [95% CI, 0.502-0.941]). The predefined cutoff of < or = 6 mm for yMTT was predictive for TRG1 (P = .0037; Fisher exact test). After a median follow-up of 28.6 months, there was a clear trend for benefit in OS with yMTT < or = 6 mm and yMTT/MTT < or = 50%. Small sample size. In a multicenter setting, MTT measured by EUS after CRT was highly predictive for response and showed a clear trend for predicting survival. Copyright 2010 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of induction docetaxel, platinum, and fluorouracil chemotherapy in patients with stage III or IVA/B nasopharyngeal cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy: Final results of 2 parallel phase 2 clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lin; Zhang, Youwang; Hu, Chaosu; Guo, Ye; Lu, Jiade J

    2017-06-15

    The effects of docetaxel, platinum, and fluorouracil (TPF) induction chemotherapy plus concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) on locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) are unclear. This study examined the long-term outcomes of the addition of this regimen to CCRT for stage III and IVA/B NPC. Two parallel, single-arm phase 2 trials were performed synchronously to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of TPF-based induction chemotherapy in patients with stage III or IVA/B NPC. The induction chemotherapy, which preceded standard intensity-modulated radiation therapy/platinum-based chemoradiation, consisted of 3 cycles of docetaxel (75 mg/m(2) on day 1), cisplatin (75 mg/m(2) on day 1), and a continuous infusion of fluorouracil (500 mg/m(2) /d on days 1-5) every 4 weeks. The primary endpoint for both trials was 5-year overall survival (OS). Between January 2007 and July 2010, 52 eligible patients with stage III NPC and 64 eligible patients with nonmetastatic stage IV NPC were accrued to the 2 trials. With a median follow-up of 67 months, the 5-year OS, progression-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, and local progression-free survival (LPFS) rates were all improved in comparison with historical benchmarks for patients with stage III or IVA/IVB NPC. Multivariate analyses indicated that T and N classifications (T1/T2 vs T3/T4 and N3 vs N0-N2) were the only significant prognosticators for OS. The number of induction chemotherapy cycles was the only significant prognostic factor for predicting LPFS. TPF-based induction chemotherapy appears to significantly improve outcomes in comparison with historical data when it is administered before CCRT for locoregionally advanced NPC. A phase 3 trial is currently being performed to confirm this benefit. Cancer 2017;123:2258-2267. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  7. Vacuum-assisted closure therapy in reconstructive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benech, A; Arcuri, F; Poglio, G; Brucoli, M; Guglielmetti, R; Crespi, M C; Pia, F

    2012-06-01

    In 1997, supported by experimental work, Argenta published a clinical report describing a variety of complicated wounds whose treatment responded successfully to negative pressure dressings using a vacuum-assisted closure system (VAC) (Kinetic Concepts Inc., San Antonio, TX). This system has been successfully used in the fields of orthopaedics and traumatology, general surgery, plastic and reconstructive surgery and gynaecology/obstetrics for a large variety of complicated wounds located in several regions, particularly in the torso and extremities. To the best of our knowledge, the use of the VAC therapy in treating free flaps surgical wounds has not been discussed in the literature. Since 2009 at the Novara Major Hospital, we have been using the VAC therapy in selected cases for difficult and complicated wounds of the maxillofacial region. The purpose of this study is to describe and discuss three cases undergoing VAC therapy followed by loco-regional flaps in the management of exposed bone after fibular free flap. The advantages and disadvantages of VAC therapy in treating complicated wounds have been reported by several studies; compared with conventional wet-to-dry dressings, this system eliminates interstitial oedema, exudates and debrides while increasing blood perfusion leading to a more rapid promotion of wound healing with less bacterial loading. Although surgical debridement, wet-to-dry dressing changes and antibiotic treatment are the mainstay in managing maxillofacial wounds, VAC therapy can be used to obtain primary closure or to prepare the wound bed until definitive reconstruction is carried out. In our opinion, the VAC technique is an innovative therapy, and at our institution represents the standard of care for the majority of complicated wounds.

  8. Prevalence of swallowing and speech problems in daily life after chemoradiation for head and neck cancer based on cut-off scores of the patient-reported outcome measures SWAL-QOL and SHI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinkel, Rico N; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M; Doornaert, Patricia; Buter, Jan; de Bree, Remco; Langendijk, Johannes A; Aaronson, Neil K; Leemans, C René

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study is to assess swallowing and speech outcome after chemoradiation therapy for head and neck cancer, based on the patient-reported outcome measures Swallowing Quality of Life Questionnaire (SWAL-QOL) and Speech Handicap Index (SHI), both provided with cut-off scores. This is a cross-sectional study. Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery of a University Medical Center. Sixty patients, 6 months to 5 years after chemoradiation for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Swallowing Quality of Life Questionnaire (SWAL-QOL) and SHI, both validated in Dutch and provided with cut-off scores. Associations were tested between the outcome measures and independent variables (age, gender, tumor stage and site, and radiotherapy technique, time since treatment, comorbidity and food intake). Fifty-two patients returned the SWAL-QOL and 47 the SHI (response rate 87 and 78 %, respectively). Swallowing and speech problems were present in 79 and 55 %, respectively. Normal food intake was noticed in 45, 35 % had a soft diet and 20 % tube feeding. Patients with soft diet and tube feeding reported more swallowing problems compared to patients with normal oral intake. Tumor subsite was significantly associated with swallowing outcome (less problems in larynx/hypopharynx compared to oral/oropharynx). Radiation technique was significantly associated with psychosocial speech problems (less problems in patients treated with IMRT). Swallowing and (to a lesser extent) speech problems in daily life are frequently present after chemoradiation therapy for head and neck cancer. Future prospective studies will give more insight into the course of speech and swallowing problems after chemoradiation and into efficacy of new radiation techniques and swallowing and speech rehabilitation programs.

  9. Physical therapy in postoperative cardiac surgery: patient's perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Paula Monique Barbosa; Cavalcante, Hermanny Evanio Freitas; Rocha, Angelo Roncalli Miranda; Brito, Rebeca Taciana Fernandes de

    2011-01-01

    Many strategies to improve services provided by for physiotherapy are based on patients satisfaction. Listen and observe the behavior of patients in a hospital is crucial to understanding and improvement of service and the hospital. This study aimed to identify the patient's perception undergoing cardiac surgery on the physiotherapy service provided to wards of hospitals for heart surgery reference in the city of Maceió, AL, Brazil, and from that information detect what actions are perceived as priorities for which are noteworthy plans for improvements in quality of care. Cross-sectional study, conducted in quality and quantity of reference hospitals in cardiac surgery in the city of Maceio, AL, Brazil, in the period from September to November 2008. The study included 30 users of the Sistema Único de Saúde, of which 12 (40%) female and 18 (60%) males. The average age of this sample was 49.2 ± 11.9 years and most belonged to socioeconomic class D (36.7%). It was found that only 16.7% had contact with the physiotherapist before surgery. Regarding educational guidelines about postoperative period, only 2.9% patients reported having received them. However, 56.8% rated the care as good and 100% of patients reported believing that physiotherapy could improve their health status. We suggest the implementation of preoperative physical therapy protocols with preventive measures and educational as well as new researchs that may characterize the population of users of health plans/private.

  10. Timed Get Up and Go Test and Geriatric 8 Scores and the Association With (Chemo-)Radiation Therapy Noncompliance and Acute Toxicity in Elderly Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middelburg, Judith G; Mast, Mirjam E; de Kroon, Maaike; Jobsen, Jan J; Rozema, Tom; Maas, Huub; Baartman, Elizabet A; Geijsen, Debby; van der Leest, Annija H; van den Bongard, Desirée J; van Loon, Judith; Budiharto, Tom; Coebergh, Jan Willem; Aarts, Mieke J; Struikmans, Henk

    2017-07-15

    To investigate whether the Geriatric 8 (G8) and the Timed Get Up and Go Test (TGUGT) and clinical and demographic patient characteristics were associated with acute toxicity of radiation therapy and noncompliance in elderly cancer patients being irradiated with curative intent. Patients were eligible if aged ≥65 years and diagnosed with breast, non-small cell lung, prostate, head and neck, rectal, or esophageal cancer, and were referred for curative radiation therapy. We recorded acute toxicity and noncompliance and identified potential predictors, including the G8 and TGUGT. We investigated 402 patients with a median age of 72 years (range, 65-96 years). According to the G8, 44.4% of the patients were frail. Toxicity grade ≥3 was observed in 22% of patients who were frail according to the G8 and 9.1% of patients who were not frail. The difference was 13% (confidence interval 5.2%-20%; P=.0006). According to the TGUGT 18.8% of the patients were frail; 21% of the frail according to the TGUGT developed toxicity grade ≥3, compared with 13% who were not frail. The difference was 7.3% (confidence interval -2.7% to 17%; P=.11). Overall compliance was 95%. Toxicity was most strongly associated with type of primary tumor, chemotherapy, age, and World Health Organization performance status. Compliance was associated with type of primary tumor and age. The usefulness of the TGUGT and G8 score in daily practice seems to be limited. Type of primary tumor, chemoradiotherapy, age, and World Health Organization performance status were more strongly associated with acute toxicity. Only chemoradiotherapy and age were associated with noncompliance. Overall the compliance was very high. To allow better-informed treatment decisions, a more accurate prediction of toxicity is desirable. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Brachytherapy versus radical hysterectomy after external beam chemoradiation: a non-randomized matched comparison in IB2-IIB cervical cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flores Vladimir

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A current paradigm in the treatment of cervical cancer with radiation therapy is that intracavitary brachytherapy is an essential component of radical treatment. This is a matched retrospective comparison of the results of treatment in patients treated with external beam chemoradiation (EBRT-CT and radical hysterectomy versus those treated with identical chemoradiation followed by brachytherapy. Methods In this non-randomized comparison EBRT-CT protocol was the same in both groups of 40 patients. In the standard treated patients, EBRT-CT was followed by one or two intracavitary Cesium (low-dose rate applications within 2 weeks of finishing external radiation to reach a point A dose of at least 85 Gy. In the surgically treated patients, radical hysterectomy with bilateral pelvic lymph node dissection and para-aortic lymph node sampling were performed within 7 weeks after EBRT-CT. Response, toxicity and survival were evaluated. Results A total of 80 patients were analyzed. The patients receiving EBRT-CT and surgery were matched with the standard treated cases. There were no differences in the clinicopathological characteristics between groups or in the delivery of EBRT-CT. The pattern of acute and late toxicity differed. Standard treated patients had more chronic proctitis while the surgically treated had acute complications of surgery and hydronephrosis. At a maximum follow-up of 60 months, median follow-up 26 (2–31 and 22 (3–27 months for the surgery and standard therapy respectively, eight patients per group have recurred and died. The progression free and overall survival are the same in both groups. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that radical hysterectomy can be used after EBRT-CT without compromising survival in FIGO stage IB2-IIB cervical cancer patients in settings were brachytherapy is not available. A randomized study is needed to uncover the value of surgery after EBRT-CT.

  12. Higher Biologically Effective Dose of Radiotherapy Is Associated With Improved Outcomes for Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma Treated With Chemoradiation: An Analysis of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machtay, Mitchell, E-mail: Mitchell.machtay@uhhospitals.org [University Hospitals/Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States); Bae, Kyounghwa [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) Department of Statistics, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Movsas, Benjamin [Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI (United States); Paulus, Rebecca [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) Department of Statistics, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Gore, Elizabeth M. [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Komaki, Ritsuko [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Albain, Kathy [Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine, Maywood, IL (United States); Sause, William T. [LDS Hospital, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Curran, Walter J. [Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Patients treated with chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced non-small-cell lung carcinoma (LA-NSCLC) were analyzed for local-regional failure (LRF) and overall survival (OS) with respect to radiotherapy dose intensity. Methods and Materials: This study combined data from seven Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials in which chemoradiotherapy was used for LA-NSCLC: RTOG 88-08 (chemoradiation arm only), 90-15, 91-06, 92-04, 93-09 (nonoperative arm only), 94-10, and 98-01. The radiotherapeutic biologically effective dose (BED) received by each individual patient was calculated, as was the overall treatment time-adjusted BED (tBED) using standard formulae. Heterogeneity testing was done with chi-squared statistics, and weighted pooled hazard ratio estimates were used. Cox and Fine and Gray's proportional hazard models were used for OS and LRF, respectively, to test the associations between BED and tBED adjusted for other covariates. Results: A total of 1,356 patients were analyzed for BED (1,348 for tBED). The 2-year and 5-year OS rates were 38% and 15%, respectively. The 2-year and 5-year LRF rates were 46% and 52%, respectively. The BED (and tBED) were highly significantly associated with both OS and LRF, with or without adjustment for other covariates on multivariate analysis (p < 0.0001). A 1-Gy BED increase in radiotherapy dose intensity was statistically significantly associated with approximately 4% relative improvement in survival; this is another way of expressing the finding that the pool-adjusted hazard ratio for survival as a function of BED was 0.96. Similarly, a 1-Gy tBED increase in radiotherapy dose intensity was statistically significantly associated with approximately 3% relative improvement in local-regional control; this is another way of expressing the finding that the pool-adjusted hazard ratio as a function of tBED was 0.97. Conclusions: Higher radiotherapy dose intensity is associated with improved local-regional control

  13. Physical therapy after total mastectomy surgery in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia Cismaş

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer among women in the whole world. It is caused by the development of malignant cells in the breast. In cancer patients, physical therapy has resulted in improved physical functioning, cardiovascular fitness, sleep, quality of life, psychological and social well-being, and self esteem, and significant decreases in fatigue, anxiety and depression. Aim: The aim of this study is to underline the importance of physical therapy in the rehabilitation of patients after total mastectomy surgery in breast cancer. Material and methods: We investigated 14 women aged between 45 and 75 years old, diagnosed with breast cancer (stages I–III, having a total mastectomy surgery 6 months ago. At the beginning and after 2 weeks of intervention, the subject`s evaluations consisted in: each patient was evaluated in regard to shoulder flexibility (from Test 1 to Test 8; on the other hand, we measured the upper limb circumferences on the surgery side. The physical therapy programme consisted in 10 sessions of 20 minutes lymphatic drainage and 10 minutes individualized physical therapy programmes. Results: At the end of intervention, it was observed a score improvement at Test 2 (from 1.28±0.99 to 1.85±0.53, p=0.041, Test 3 (from 0.42±0.85 to 1.57±0.85, p=0.001, Test 7 (from 0.5±0.51 to 0.85±0.36, p=0.019 and Test 8 (from 1.28±0.99 to 1.85±0.53, p=0.041. In terms of total score (Total, the improvement was also significant increased (from 13.25±9.08 to 18.13±10.12, p=0.044. Circumference values significantly improved at arm (from 30.36±4.25 to 29.79±4.41, p=0.001, forearm (from 23±2.18 to 22.04±2.26, p=0.001 and wrist level (from 17.46±1.74 to 17.11±1.67, p=0.012. Despite the intervention, elbow circumference didn`t reached the statistical significance (p<0.05. Conclusions: After 2 weeks of intervention we noticed a significant improvement at most of the parameters which means a life quality increase in

  14. Pilot study of postoperative adjuvant chemoradiation for advanced gastric cancer: Adjuvant 5-FU/cisplatin and chemoradiation with capecitabine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hyung-Sik Lee; Min-Chan Kim; Youngmin Choi; Won-Joo Hur; Hyo-Jin Kim; Hyuk-Chan Kwon; Sung-Hyun Kim; Jae-Seok Kim; Jong-Hoon Lee; Ghap-Joong Jung

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of postoperative chemoradiation using FP chemotherapy and oral capecitabine during radiation for advanced gastric cancer following curative resection.METHODS: Thirty-one patients who had underwent a potentially curative resection for Stage Ⅲ and Ⅳ (MO) gastric cancer were enrolled. Therapy consists of one cycle of FP (continuous infusion of 5-FU 1000 mg/m2 on d 1 to 5 and cisplatin 60 mg/m2 on d 1) followed by 4500 cGy (180 cGy/d) with capecitabine (1650 mg/m2 daily throughout radiotherapy). Four wk after completion of the radiotherapy, patients received three additional cycles of FP every three wk. The median follow-up duration was 22.2 mo.RESULTS: The 3-year disease free and overall survival in this study were 82.7% and 83.4%, respectively. Four patients (12.9%) showed relapse during follow-up. Eight patients did not complete all planned adjuvant therapy.Grade 3/4 toxicities included neutropenia in 50.2%, anemia in 12.9%, thrombocytopenia in 3.2% and nausea/vomiting in 3.2%. Neither grade 3/4 hand foot syndrome nor treatment related febrile neutropenia or death were observed.CONCLUSION: These preliminary results suggest that this postoperative adjuvant chemoradiation regimen of FP before and after capecitabine and concurrent radiotherapy appears well tolerated and offers a comparable toxicity profile to the chemoradiation regimen utilized in INT-0116. This treatment modality allowed successful loco-regional control rate and 3-year overall survival.

  15. Concurrent chemoradiation in patients with cancer of the esophagus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kang Kyoo; Park, Kyung Ran; Lee, Jong Young; Shin, Hyun Soo; Lee, Chong In; Chang, Woo Ick; Shim, Young Hak [Yonsei Univ. Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-03-01

    To evaluate survival rate and prognostic factors affecting survival of patients with esophageal cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiation. Eligibility included biopsy proven invasive carcinoma of the cerivical or thoracic esophagus, confined to esophagus and mediastinum with or without regional lymph node and supraclavicular lymph node, and ECOG performance status H{sub 0}-H{sub 2}. Patients received radiation therapy with 5940cGy over 7 weeks and chemotherapy, consisted of 5-FU(1000mg/m{sup 2}/day in continuous infusion for 5 days, days 1 to 5 and days 29 to 33) and mitomycin C(8mg/m{sup 2} intravenous bolus at day 1). After concurrent chemoradiation, maintenance chemotherapy was followed with 5-FU(1000mg/m{sup 2}/day in continuous infusion for 5 days at 9th, 13th, and 17th weeks)and cisplatin(80mg/m{sup 2} intravenous bolus at the first day of each cycle). From November 1989 to November 1995, 44 patients were entered in this study. After treatment, complete response rate and partial response rate were 59% and 41%. Overall 1, 2, and 5-year survivals were 59%, 38%, and 9.6%(median 17 months). Prognostic factors affecting survival were response to treatment and T-stage. Among 26 complete responders, there were 6 local recurrences, 3 distant recurrences, 1 local and distant recurrence, and 2 unknown site recurrences. Acute and chronic complication rates with grade 3 or more were 20% and 13.6% and there was no treatment-related mortality. Concurrent chemoradiation, compared with historical control groups that treated with radiation alone, improved median survival and did not significantly increase treatment-related complications. Complete responders had longer survival duration than partial responders. Predominant failure pattern was local failure. So, efforts to improve local control should be proposed.

  16. ACCOMPANYING THERAPY IN PATIENTS AFTER ENDOSCOPIC LARYNGEAL SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Novozhilova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the experience with accompanying therapy in patients after endoscopic laryngeal surgery, which has been gained at the Unit of Head and Neck Tumors, Moscow City Cancer Hospital Sixty-Two. Endolaryngeal operations have been performed using robotic CO2 laser and alternative modes of mechanical ventilation. Methods for abolishing laser-induced reactive tissue changes with different groups of pharmaceuticals are considered. Both the possible side effects of some drugs and their potential interaction are taken into account. The high efficacy of current inhalation systems (PARI delivering the required doses of medicaments over a short period of time and with minimal losses and regulating their dispersion in relation to the drug used is noted.

  17. Safety and efficacy of quadrapeutics versus chemoradiation in head and neck carcinoma xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina Y; Kim, Yoo-Shin; Aryasomayajula, Bhawani; Boulikas, Teni; Phan, Jack; Hung, Mien-Chie; Torchilin, Vladimir P; O'Neill, Brian E; Lapotko, Dmitri O

    2015-01-01

    Chemoradiation is the strongest anti-tumor therapy but in resistant unresectable cancers it often lacks safety and efficacy. We compared our recently developed cell-level combination approach, quadrapeutics, to chemoradiation therapy to establish pre-clinical data for its biodistribution, safety and efficacy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), as a clinically challenging aggressive and resistant cancer. In vitro and in vivo models of four carcinomas were treated with standard chemoradiation and quadrapeutics using identical drug and radiation doses. We applied liposomal cisplatin or doxorubicin, colloidal gold, near-infrared laser pulses and radiation, all at low safe doses. The final evaluation used a xenograft model of HNSCC. Quadrapeutics enhanced standard chemoradiation in vitro by reducing head and neck cancer cell proliferation by 1000-fold, inhibiting tumor growth in vivo by 34-fold and improving animal survival by 5-fold, and reducing the side effects to a negligible level. In quadrapeutics, we observed an "inversion" of the drug efficacy of two standard drugs: doxorubicin, a low efficacy drug for the cancers studied, was two times more efficient than cisplatin, the first choice drug in clinic for HNSCC. The radical therapeutic gain of quadrapeutics resulted from the intracellular synergy of the four components employed which we administered in a specific sequence, while the reduction in the toxicity was due to the low doses of all four components. The biodistribution, safety and efficacy data for quadrapeutics in HNSCC ensure its high translational potential and justify the possibility of clinical trials.

  18. Insulin pump therapy in patients with diabetes undergoing surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassar, Adrienne A; Boyle, Mary E; Seifert, Karen M; Beer, Karen A; Apsey, Heidi A; Schlinkert, Richard T; Stearns, Joshua D; Cook, Curtiss B

    2012-01-01

    To assess perioperative management of patients with diabetes mellitus who were being treated with insulin pump therapy. We reviewed records for documentation of insulin pump status and glucose monitoring during preoperative, intraoperative, and postanesthesia care unit (PACU) phases of surgery. Thirty-five patients (21 men) with insulin pumps underwent surgical procedures between January 1, 2006, and December 31, 2010. Mean age was 56 years, mean diabetes duration was 31 years, and mean duration of insulin pump therapy was 7 years. All patients were white, and 29 had type 1 diabetes mellitus. Of the 50 surgical procedures performed during the study period, 16 were orthopedic, 9 were general surgical, 7 were urologic, and 7 were kidney transplant operations; the remaining 11 procedures were in other surgical specialties. The mean (± standard deviation) time in the preoperative area was 118 ± 75 minutes, mean intraoperative time was 177 ± 102 minutes, and mean PACU time was 170 ± 78 minutes. Of the 50 procedures, status of pump use was documented in 32 cases in the preoperative area, 14 cases intraoperatively, and 30 cases in the PACU. Glucose values were recorded in 47 cases preoperatively, 30 cases intraoperatively, and 48 cases in the PACU. Results showed inconsistent documentation of pump use and glucose monitoring throughout the perioperative period, even for patients with prolonged anesthesia and recovery times. It was often unclear whether the pump was in place and operational during the intraoperative period. Guidelines should be developed for management of insulin pump-treated patients who are to undergo surgery.

  19. Postoperative hormonal therapy prevents recovery of neurological damage after surgery in patients with breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Sato, Chiho; Matsudaira, Izumi; Kotozaki, Yuka; Nouchi, Rui; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Kawai, Masaaki; Tada, Hiroshi; Ishida, Takanori; Taki, Yasuyuki; Ohuchi, Noriaki; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2016-01-01

    Cancer survivors are exposed to several risk factors for cognitive dysfunction, such as general anesthesia, surgical trauma, and adjuvant therapies. In our recent study we showed that thalamic volume reduction and attentional dysfunction occurred shortly after surgery. Here, we examined the 6-month prognosis of the 20 patients with breast cancer who underwent surgery. Seven patients did not receive any adjuvant therapy after the surgery and 13 patients received a hormonal therapy after the surgery. We assessed their attentional functions, and thalamic volumes shortly after and 6 months after surgery. We found a significant group x time interaction in the attentional functions (p = 0.033) and the right thalamus (p <  0.05, small volume correction), suggesting the thalamic volume reduction and attentional dysfunction recovered in patients without adjuvant therapy. Our findings provide a better understanding of the potential role of hormonal therapy in relation to the cognitive dysfunction of cancer survivors. PMID:27708377

  20. Pretreatment performance status and nutrition are associated with early mortality of locally advanced head and neck cancer patients undergoing concurrent chemoradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Pei-Hung; Yeh, Kun-Yun; Huang, Jen-Seng; Lai, Chien-Hong; Wu, Tsung-Han; Lan, Yii-Jenq; Tsai, Jason Chien-Sheng; Chen, Eric Yen-Chao; Yang, Shih-Wei; Wang, Cheng-Hsu

    2013-05-01

    Unexpected fatal events in patients with head and neck cancers undergoing concurrent chemoradiation therapy are a clinical concern. Malnutrition, which is reported frequently in head and neck cancer patients, are associated with immunity derangement. The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors for early death of patients undergoing chemoradiation. We retrospectively analyzed the records of 194 stage III, IVA, and IVB head and neck cancer patients who were treated with chemoradiation between 2007 and 2009. We defined early death as death while receiving chemoradiation or within 60 days of treatment completion. Risk factors for early death were tested using univariate and multivariate analyses. Fourteen patients (7.2 %) experienced early death, 78.6 % of whom died of infection. Univariate analysis revealed significant correlations between early death and several pretreatment variables, including Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (PS) >1, hemoglobin total lymphocyte count 1, BMI total lymphocyte count malnutrition before chemoradiation independently predict early death in locally advanced head and neck cancer patients undergoing chemoradiation. Cautious management of head and neck cancer patients with these risk factors is required throughout chemoradiation period.

  1. Antiplatelet therapy and outcome in patients undergoing surgery following coronary stenting: Results of the surgery after stenting registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossini, Roberta; Angiolillo, Dominick J; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Capodanno, Davide; Lettino, Maddalena; Trabattoni, Daniela; Pilleri, Annarita; Calabria, Paolo; Colombo, Paola; Bernabò, Paola; Ferlini, Marco; Ferri, Marco; Tarantini, Giuseppe; De Servi, Stefano; Savonitto, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to define the feasibility and clinical impact of complying with national consensus recommendations on perioperative management of antiplatelet therapy in patients with coronary stents undergoing cardiac and noncardiac surgery. There are limited evidence-based recommendations on the perioperative management of antiplatelet therapy in stented patients undergoing surgery. The recommendations provided by the national consensus document were applied in a multicenter, prospective registry of consecutive patients with prior coronary stenting undergoing any type of surgery at 19 hospitals in Italy. The primary end-point was in-hospital net adverse clinical events (NACE) represented by the composite of all-cause death, myocardial infarction, probable/definite stent thrombosis and Bleeding Academic Research Consortium (BARC) grade ≥3 bleeding. Patients were followed for 30 days. A total of 1,082 patients were enrolled. Adherence to consensus recommendations occurred in 85% of the cases. Perioperative aspirin and dual antiplatelet therapy were maintained in 69.7 and 10.5% of the cases, respectively. In-hospital NACE rate was 12.7%, being significantly higher in patients undergoing cardiac surgery (36.3% vs. 7.3%, P antiplatelet therapy in stented patients undergoing surgery. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. [Evaluation of practices of excisional therapies for CIN: An audit of surgery rooms from Marseilles' area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einaudi, L; Boubli, L; Carcopino, X

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate what is the proportion of surgery rooms from Marseilles' area that do perform excisional therapies for CIN without any use of colposcopic guidance. From November 2012 to January 2013, a survey was conducted among all surgery rooms from Marseilles' area practicing excisional therapies for CIN. In addition, answers from gynecologists from Marseilles' area who participated to a national survey that evaluated practices of excisional therapies in France were specifically analyzed. Among the 55 surgery rooms from Marseilles' area practicing excisional therapies, 52 (94.1%) participated to the current survey. A colposcope was available in only 19 (36.5%) surgery rooms and was systematically used for the guidance of excisional therapies in only 4 (21%) of these surgery rooms. Finally, 36 (69.2%) surgery rooms answered performing excisional therapies without any use of colposcopic guidance. Colposcopy was occasionally and systematically used in 12 (23.1%) and 4 (7.7%) surgery rooms, respectively. Among the 116 gynecologists from Marseilles' area who answered to the national survey, 88 (75.9%) answered not using colposcopy when performing excision for CIN. Only 6% answered performing excision systematically under direct colposcopic vision and 18.1% occasionally. No colposcopic guidance is used when performing excision for CIN in the majority of surgery rooms from Marseilles' area. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. A comparison of multimodal therapy and surgery for esophageal adenocarcinoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, T N

    1996-08-15

    Uncontrolled studies suggest that a combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy improves the survival of patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma. We conducted a prospective, randomized trial comparing surgery alone with combined chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and surgery.

  4. Effect of massage therapy on pain, anxiety, and tension after cardiac surgery: a randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Brent A; Cutshall, Susanne M; Wentworth, Laura J; Engen, Deborah; Messner, Penny K; Wood, Christina M; Brekke, Karen M; Kelly, Ryan F; Sundt, Thoralf M

    2010-05-01

    Integrative therapies such as massage have gained support as interventions that improve the overall patient experience during hospitalization. Cardiac surgery patients undergo long procedures and commonly have postoperative back and shoulder pain, anxiety, and tension. Given the promising effects of massage therapy for alleviation of pain, tension, and anxiety, we studied the efficacy and feasibility of massage therapy delivered in the postoperative cardiovascular surgery setting. Patients were randomized to receive a massage or to have quiet relaxation time (control). In total, 113 patients completed the study (massage, n=62; control, n=51). Patients receiving massage therapy had significantly decreased pain, anxiety, and tension. Patients were highly satisfied with the intervention, and no major barriers to implementing massage therapy were identified. Massage therapy may be an important component of the healing experience for patients after cardiovascular surgery.

  5. Effects of Surgery and Proton Therapy on Cerebral White Matter of Craniopharyngioma Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uh, Jinsoo, E-mail: jinsoo.uh@stjude.org [Department of Radiological Sciences, St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Merchant, Thomas E. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Li, Yimei; Li, Xingyu [Department of Biostatistics, St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Sabin, Noah D. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Indelicato, Daniel J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Ogg, Robert J. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Boop, Frederick A. [Semmes-Murphey Neurologic and Spine Institute, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Jane, John A. [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Hua, Chiaho [Department of Radiological Sciences, St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine radiation dose effect on the structural integrity of cerebral white matter in craniopharyngioma patients receiving surgery and proton therapy. Methods and Materials: Fifty-one patients (2.1-19.3 years of age) with craniopharyngioma underwent surgery and proton therapy in a prospective therapeutic trial. Anatomical magnetic resonance images acquired after surgery but before proton therapy were inspected to identify white matter structures intersected by surgical corridors and catheter tracks. Longitudinal diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was performed to measure microstructural integrity changes in cerebral white matter. Fractional anisotropy (FA) derived from DTI was statistically analyzed for 51 atlas-based white matter structures of the brain to determine radiation dose effect. FA in surgery-affected regions in the corpus callosum was compared to that in its intact counterpart to determine whether surgical defects affect radiation dose effect. Results: Surgical defects were seen most frequently in the corpus callosum because of transcallosal resection of tumors and insertion of ventricular or cyst catheters. Longitudinal DTI data indicated reductions in FA 3 months after therapy, which was followed by a recovery in most white matter structures. A greater FA reduction was correlated with a higher radiation dose in 20 white matter structures, indicating a radiation dose effect. The average FA in the surgery-affected regions before proton therapy was smaller (P=.0001) than that in their non–surgery-affected counterparts with more intensified subsequent reduction of FA (P=.0083) after therapy, suggesting that surgery accentuated the radiation dose effect. Conclusions: DTI data suggest that mild radiation dose effects occur in patients with craniopharyngioma receiving surgery and proton therapy. Surgical defects present at the time of proton therapy appear to accentuate the radiation dose effect longitudinally

  6. Use of acid-suppressive therapy before anti-reflux surgery in 2922 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lødrup, A; Pottegård, A; Hallas, J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Guidelines recommend that patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease are adequately treated with acid-suppressive therapy before undergoing anti-reflux surgery. Little is known of the use of acid-suppressive drugs before anti-reflux surgery. AIM: To determine the use of proton pump...

  7. Duodenal Toxicity After Fractionated Chemoradiation for Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, Patrick; Das, Prajnan; Pinnix, Chelsea C.; Beddar, Sam; Briere, Tina; Pham, Mary; Krishnan, Sunil; Delclos, Marc E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Crane, Christopher H., E-mail: ccrane@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Improving local control is critical to improving survival and quality of life for patients with locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer (LAPC). However, previous attempts at radiation dose escalation have been limited by duodenal toxicity. In order to guide future studies, we analyzed the clinical and dosimetric factors associated with duodenal toxicity in patients undergoing fractionated chemoradiation for LAPC. Methods and Materials: Medical records and treatment plans of 106 patients with LAPC who were treated with chemoradiation between July 2005 and June 2010 at our institution were reviewed. All patients received neoadjuvant and concurrent chemotherapy. Seventy-eight patients were treated with conventional radiation to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions; 28 patients received dose-escalated radiation therapy (range, 57.5-75.4 Gy in 28-39 fractions). Treatment-related toxicity was graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to assess prognostic influence of clinical, pathologic, and treatment-related factors by using Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression methods. Results: Twenty patients had treatment-related duodenal toxicity events, such as duodenal inflammation, ulceration, and bleeding. Four patients had grade 1 events, 8 had grade 2, 6 had grade 3, 1 had grade 4, and 1 had grade 5. On univariate analysis, a toxicity grade ≥2 was associated with tumor location, low platelet count, an absolute volume (cm{sup 3}) receiving a dose of at least 55 Gy (V{sub 55} {sub Gy} > 1 cm{sup 3}), and a maximum point dose >60 Gy. Of these factors, only V{sub 55} {sub Gy} ≥1 cm{sup 3} was associated with duodenal toxicity on multivariate analysis (hazard ratio, 6.7; range, 2.0-18.8; P=.002). Conclusions: This study demonstrates that a duodenal V{sub 55} {sub Gy} >1 cm{sup 3} is an important dosimetric predictor of grade 2 or greater duodenal toxicity and establishes it as a

  8. Multi-institutional Pooled Analysis on Adjuvant Chemoradiation in Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morganti, Alessio G. [Department of Radiotherapy, Università Cattolica S. Cuore, Rome (Italy); Unit of Radiotherapy, Unit of General Oncology, Fondazione Giovanni Paolo II, Campobasso (Italy); Falconi, Massimo [Department of Surgery, University of Verona, Verona (Italy); Stiphout, Ruud G.P.M. van [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW, University Medical Centre Maastricht (Netherlands); Mattiucci, Gian-Carlo, E-mail: gcmattiucci@rm.unicatt.it [Department of Radiotherapy, Università Cattolica S. Cuore, Rome (Italy); Alfieri, Sergio [Department of Surgery, Università Cattolica S. Cuore, Rome (Italy); Calvo, Felipe A. [Department of Oncology, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Complutense University, Madrid (Spain); Dubois, Jean-Bernard [Département de Radiothérapie, CRLC, Montpellier Cedex (France); Fastner, Gerd [Department of Radiotherapy, PMU, Salzburg (Austria); Herman, Joseph M. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Maidment, Bert W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Miller, Robert C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Regine, William F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Reni, Michele [Department of Oncology, S. Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Sharma, Navesh K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Ippolito, Edy [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Campus Biomedico, Roma (Italy); and others

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: To determine the impact of chemoradiation therapy (CRT) on overall survival (OS) after resection of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: A multicenter retrospective review of 955 consecutive patients who underwent complete resection with macroscopically negative margins (R0-1) for invasive carcinoma (T1-4; N0-1; M0) of the pancreas was performed. Exclusion criteria included metastatic or unresectable disease at surgery, macroscopic residual disease (R2), treatment with intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT), and a histological diagnosis of no ductal carcinoma, or postoperative death (within 60 days of surgery). In all, 623 patients received postoperative radiation therapy (RT), 575 patients received concurrent chemotherapy (CT), and 462 patients received adjuvant CT. Results: Median follow-up was 21.0 months. Median OS after adjuvant CRT was 39.9 versus 24.8 months after no adjuvant CRT (P<.001) and 27.8 months after CT alone (P<.001). Five-year OS was 41.2% versus 24.8% with and without postoperative CRT, respectively. The positive impact of CRT was confirmed by multivariate analysis (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.72; confidence interval [CI], 0.60-0.87; P=.001). Adverse prognostic factors identified by multivariate analysis included the following: R1 resection (HR = 1.17; CI = 1.07-1.28; P<.001), higher pT stage (HR = 1.23; CI = 1.11-1.37; P<.001), positive lymph nodes (HR = 1.27; CI = 1.15-1.41; P<.001), and tumor diameter >20 mm (HR = 1.14; CI = 1.05-1.23; P=.002). Multivariate analysis also showed a better prognosis in patients treated in centers with >10 pancreatic resections per year (HR = 0.87; CI = 0.78-0.97; P=.014) Conclusion: This study represents the largest comparative study on adjuvant therapy in patients after resection of carcinoma of the pancreas. Overall survival was better in patients who received adjuvant CRT.

  9. New perspectives and recommendations for anticoagulant therapy post orthopedic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Kropf

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Anticoagulant therapy is essential for the prevention of risks associated with the formation of thrombus in patients after surgery, especially in orthopedics. Recently, new oral anticoagulants were introduced in the therapeutic arsenal. This fact is important, because the current drug of choice in clinical practice is enoxaparin, a low molecular weight heparin. As all injecting drugs, enoxaparin may reduce patients' adherence to treatment by dissatisfaction with and resistance to the administration. This article reviews the available literature on the overall utility of these innovative medicines, approaching the pharmacology, the compared efficacy in relation to current agents, and the potential targets for new agents, as well as points to new trends in research and development. The article also contributes with a practical guide for use and recommendations to health professionals, especially focusing on the reversibility of hemorrhagic events, and discusses the importance of convenience/satisfaction of use, the cost of treatment, and the risk-benefit profile for patients.A terapia anticoagulante é fundamental para a prevenção de riscos associados à formação de trombos em pacientes pós-cirúrgicos, principalmente em ortopedia. Recentemente, novos anticoagulantes orais foram introduzidos no arsenal terapêutico. Tal fato é importantíssimo, visto que o atual medicamento de primeira escolha na prática clínica é a enoxaparina, uma heparina de baixo peso molecular. Por ser de uso injetável, a enoxaparina pode diminuir a adesão do paciente ao tratamento, devido à insatisfação e à resistência quanto à via de administração. Este artigo revisa a literatura disponível sobre a utilidade total desses medicamentos inovadores ao abordar a farmacologia, a eficácia em comparação com os agentes atuais e os alvos potenciais para novos agentes, bem como aponta as novas tendências em pesquisa e desenvolvimento. O artigo também contribui

  10. An Assessment of Infection in Third Molar Surgery without Antibiotic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramezanian M

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Mandibular impacted third molar surgery is one of the most common surgeries in dental"noffice. Also, antibiotic therapy is one of the most common post-operative procedures after this surgery."nHowever, this is yet controversial. 25 patients were entered in a double blind clinical research. The"npatients divided into two groups. Group A were received 500 mg Ampicillin (34 patients and group B"n(II patients were given placebo. The package of both groups was similar. In order to consider the"ninfection, trismus, inflammation, were recorded before and after surgery. The data was analyzed. Our"nresults showed that antibiotic therapy before surgery does not seem necessary, if the non-traumatic"nsurgery will be in an aseptic condition.

  11. Laser therapy in plastic surgery: decolorization in port wine stains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peszynski-Drews, Cezary; Wolf, Leszek

    1996-03-01

    For the first time laserotherapy is described as a method of port wine stain decolorization in plastic surgery. The authors present their 20-year experience in the treatment of port wine stains with the argon laser and dye laser.

  12. Primary transoral robotic surgery with concurrent neck dissection for early stage oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma implemented at a Danish head and neck cancer center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubek, Niclas; Channir, Hani Ibrahim; Charabi, Birgitte Wittenborg

    2017-01-01

    (RT) with or without concomitant chemotherapy. This is the first study in Scandinavia from a head and neck cancer centre that aims to demonstrate the feasibility of performing primary transoral robotic surgery (TORS) and concurrent neck dissection for patients with early stage OPSCC. Between September...... bilateral neck dissection. Due to an upstaging following surgery, 13 patients were referred to adjuvant therapy. Four of these patients received RT and two patients received concomitant chemo-radiation (CCR) therapy. Seven patients declined the recommended adjuvant therapy one of whom later developed an N......-site recurrence and received salvage surgery with postoperative RT. In summary, 43% of the patients were referred to adjuvant therapy following primary surgery which was mainly due to N-site stage migration and ECE. Primary TORS and concurrent neck dissection is a safe and feasible procedure that may...

  13. Oral surgery in patients under antithrombotic therapy. Narrative review.

    OpenAIRE

    Anggelo Carrizo; David Carrasco

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aging population and increase of cardiovascular diseases have raised the number of patients receiving antithrombotic therapy in elective or emergency dental care, including surgical procedures. The aim of this article is to review the evidence and clinical guidelines published in the past five years for dental management of patients on antithrombotic therapy. The American Antithrombotic Therapy Guideline - 2012 - generally recommends not to suspend antiplatelet or anticoagulant trea...

  14. Excisional surgery for cancer cure: therapy at a cost.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Coffey, J C

    2012-02-03

    Excisional surgery is one of the primary treatment modalities for cancer. Minimal residual disease (MRD) is the occult neoplastic disease that remains in situ after curative surgery. There is increasing evidence that tumour removal alters the growth of MRD, leading to perioperative tumour growth. Because neoplasia is a systemic disease, this phenomenon may be relevant to all patients undergoing surgery for cancer. In this review we discuss the published work that addresses the effects of tumour removal on subsequent tumour growth and the mechanisms by which tumour excision may alter residual tumour growth. In addition, we describe therapeutic approaches that may protect patients against any oncologically adverse effects of tumour removal. On the basis of the evidence presented, we propose a novel therapeutic paradigm; that the postoperative period represents a window of opportunity during which the patient may be further protected against the oncological effects of tumour removal.

  15. Peri-operative management of anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy in gastrointestinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degirmenci, S-E; Steib, A

    2014-04-01

    Peri-operative management of the risks of hemorrhage and thrombosis related to gastrointestinal surgery tailored to patient characteristics are part of daily multidisciplinary practice tasks. The goal of this update is to discuss current practices concerning antithrombosis prophylaxis and the management of recently developed anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents. The duration of prophylaxis is 1 month for oncological surgery. The recommended doses in bariatric surgery are twice daily injections of low-molecular weight heparin without exceeding a total dose of 10,000 IU/day. Dual antiplatelet therapy is necessary for 6 weeks after placement of bare-metal stents, from 6-12 months for drug-eluting stents, and 12 months after an acute coronary artery syndrome. Abrupt discontinuation of antiplatelet therapy exposes the patient to an increased risk of thrombosis. Data are insufficient to make specific recommendations for antiplatelet therapy in gastrointestinal surgery. For major digestive surgery, prescription of daily aspirin should be discussed case by case. If discontinuation of treatment is absolutely necessary, this should be as short as possible (aspirin: 3 days, ticagrelor and clopidogrel: 5 days, prasugrel: 7 days). The modalities for elective management of new oral anticoagulants are similar to those for classical vitamin K antagonists (VKA) therapy, except that any overlapping with heparin administration must be avoided. In the emergency setting, an algorithm can be proposed depending on the drug, the available coagulation tests and the interval before performing surgery.

  16. The peri-operative management of anti-platelet therapy in elective, non-cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcock, Richard F; Naoum, Chris; Aliprandi-Costa, Bernadette; Hillis, Graham S; Brieger, David B

    2013-07-31

    Cardiovascular complications are important causes of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing elective non-cardiac surgery, with adverse cardiac outcomes estimated to occur in approximately 4% of all patients. Anti-platelet therapy withdrawal may precede up to 10% of acute cardiovascular syndromes, with withdrawal in the peri-operative setting incompletely appraised. The aims of our study were to determine the proportion of patients undergoing elective non-cardiac surgery currently prescribed anti-platelet therapy, and identify current practice in peri-operative management. In addition, the relationship between management of anti-platelet therapy and peri-operative cardiac risk was assessed. We evaluated consecutive patients attending elective non-cardiac surgery at a major tertiary referral centre. Clinical and biochemical data were collected and analysed on patients currently prescribed anti-platelet therapy. Peri-operative management of anti-platelet therapy was compared with estimated peri-operative cardiac risk. Included were 2950 consecutive patients, with 516 (17%) prescribed anti-platelet therapy, primarily for ischaemic heart disease. Two hundred and eighty nine (56%) patients had all anti-platelet therapy ceased in the peri-operative period, including 49% of patients with ischaemic heart disease and 46% of patients with previous coronary stenting. Peri-operative cardiac risk score did not influence anti-platelet therapy management. Approximately 17% of patients undergoing elective non-cardiac surgery are prescribed anti-platelet therapy, the predominant indication being for ischaemic heart disease. Almost half of all patients with previous coronary stenting had no anti-platelet therapy during the peri-operative period. The decision to cease anti-platelet therapy, which occurred commonly, did not appear to be guided by peri-operative cardiac risk stratification. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Therapy of acute and delayed spinal infections after spinal surgery treated with negative pressure wound therapy in adult patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Zwolak

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of the treatment of infected primary or delayed spine wounds after spinal surgery using negative pressure wound therapy. In our institution (University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland nine patients (three women and six men; mean age 68.6, range 43- 87 years were treated in the period between January to December 2011 for non-healing spinal wounds. The treatment consisted of repeated debridements, irrigation and temporary closure with negative pressure wound therapy system. Three patients were admitted with a spinal epidural abscess; two with osteoporotic lumbar fracture; two with pathologic vertebra fracture and spinal cord compression, and two with vertebra fracture after trauma. All nine patients have been treated with antibiotic therapy. In one case the hardware has been removed, in three patients laminectomy was performed without instrumentation, in five patients there was no need to remove the hardware. The average hospital stay was 16.6 days (range 11-30. The average follow-up was 3.8, range 0.5-14 months. The average number of negative pressure wound therapy procedures was three, with the range 1-11. Our retrospective study focuses on the clinical problems faced by the spinal surgeon, clinical outcomes after spinal surgery followed by wound infection, and negative pressure wound therapy. Moreover, we would like to emphasize the importance for the patients and their relatives to be fully informed about the increased complications of surgery and about the limitations of treatment of these wounds with negative pressure wound therapy.

  18. Hirudotherapy /Leech therapy: Applications and Indications in Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swaid Abdullah

    2012-06-01

    More recently, HT has found new applications in cancer therapy, hypersensitivity conditions, like asthma, male/female sterility and diabetes. Taking into consideration all the facts, HT efforts should be made in optimizing the success of medicinal leech therapy in clinical and private practice. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2012; 1(3.000: 172-180

  19. Physical Therapy as Good as Surgery for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the March issue of the Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy . SOURCES: Cesar Fernandez de las Penas, P.T., ... New York City; March 2017, Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy HealthDay Copyright (c) 2017 HealthDay . All rights reserved. ...

  20. Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation for Distal Rectal Cancer: 5-Year Updated Results of a Randomized Phase 2 Study of Neoadjuvant Combined Modality Chemoradiation for Distal Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohiuddin, Mohammed, E-mail: asemuddin@gmail.com [King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Paulus, Rebecca [RTOG Statistical Department, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Mitchell, Edith [Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Hanna, Nader [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Yuen, Albert [Reading Hospital and Medical Center, Reading, Pennsylvania (United States); Nichols, Romaine [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Yalavarthi, Salochna [Ingalls Memorial Hospital, Harvey, Illinois (United States); Hayostek, Cherie [Santa Fe Cancer Center, Santa Fe, New Mexico (United States); Willett, Christopher [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of 2 different approaches to neoadjuvant chemoradiation for distal rectal cancers. Methods and Materials: One hundred six patients with T3/T4 distal rectal cancers were randomized in a phase 2 study. Patients received either continuous venous infusion (CVI) of 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU), 225 mg/m{sup 2} per day, 7 days per week plus pelvic hyperfractionated radiation (HRT), 45.6 Gy at 1.2 Gy twice daily plus a boost of 9.6 to 14.4 Gy for T3 or T4 cancers (Arm 1), or CVI of 5-FU, 225 mg/m{sup 2} per day, Monday to Friday, plus irinotecan, 50 mg/m{sup 2} once weekly × 4, plus pelvic radiation therapy (RT), 45 Gy at 1.8 Gy per day and a boost of 5.4 Gy for T3 and 9 Gy for T4 cancers (Arm 2). Surgery was performed 4 to 10 weeks later. Results: All eligible patients (n=103) are included in this analysis; 2 ineligible patients were excluded, and 1 patient withdrew consent. Ninety-eight of 103 patients (95%) underwent resection. Four patients did not undergo surgery for either disease progression or patient refusal, and 1 patient died during induction chemotherapy. The median time of follow-up was 6.4 years in Arm 1 and 7.0 years in Arm 2. The pathological complete response (pCR) rates were 30% in Arm 1 and 26% in Arm 2. Locoregional recurrence rates were 16% in Arm 1 and 17% in Arm 2. Five-year survival rates were 61% and 75% and Disease-specific survival rates were 78% and 85% for Arm1 and Arm 2, respectively. Five second primaries occurred in patients on Arm 1, and 1 second primary occurred in Arm 2. Conclusions: High rates of disease-specific survival were seen in each arm. Overall survival appears affected by the development of unrelated second cancers. The high pCR rates with 5-FU and higher dose radiation in T4 cancers provide opportunity for increased R0 resections and improved survival.

  1. Pulsed electromagnetic energy therapy in third molar surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, D; Witt, S; Fairpo, C G

    1978-12-01

    Pulsed electromagnetic energy is being increasingly employed to reduced symptoms and enhance the healing process following tissue injury. A double-blind placebo-controlled trial has been carried out to assess the value of electromagnetic energy in third molar surgery, but no significant benefit has been found.

  2. Oncoplastic breast surgery in the setting of breast-conserving therapy: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer J. Yoon, BA

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Breast-conserving therapy (BCT, or breast-conserving surgery with adjuvant radiation therapy, has become a standard treatment alternative to mastectomy for women with early-stage breast cancer after many long-term studies have reported comparable rates of overall survival and local control. Oncoplastic breast surgery in the setting of BCT consists of various techniques that allow for an excision with a wider margin and a simultaneous enhancement of cosmetic sequelae, making it an ideal breast cancer surgery. Because of the parenchymal rearrangement that is routinely involved in oncoplastic techniques, however, the targeted tissue can be relocated, thus posing a challenge to localize the tumor bed for radiation planning. The goals of this systematic review are to address the challenges, outcomes, and cosmesis of oncoplastic breast surgery in the setting of BCT.

  3. Clinical outcomes for gastric cancer following adjuvant chemoradiation utilizing intensity modulated versus three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gene-Fu F Liu

    Full Text Available PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To determine if intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT in the post-operative setting for gastric cancer was associated with reduced toxicity compared to 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT. MATERIALS/METHODS: This retrospective study includes 24 patients with stage IB-IIIB gastric cancer consecutively treated from 2001-2010. All underwent surgery followed by adjuvant chemoradiation. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of 5-FU/leucovorin (n = 21, epirubicin/cisplatin/5FU (n = 1, or none (n = 2. IMRT was utilized in 12 patients and 3DCRT in 12 patients. For both groups, the target volume included the tumor bed, anastomosis, gastric stump, and regional lymphatics. RESULTS: Median follow-up for the entire cohort was 19 months (range 0.4-8.5 years, and 49 months (0.5-8.5 years in surviving patients. The 3DCRT group received a median dose of 45 Gy, and the IMRT group received a median dose of 50.4 Gy (p = 0.0004. For the entire cohort, 3-year overall survival (OS was 40% and 3-year disease free survival (DFS was 41%. OS and DFS did not differ significantly between the groups. Acute toxicity was similar. Between 3DCRT and IMRT groups, during radiotherapy, median weight lost (3.2 vs. 3.3 kg, respectively; p = 0.47 and median percent weight loss were similar (5.0% vs. 4.3%, respectively; p = 0.43. Acute grade 2 toxicity was experienced by 8 patients receiving 3DCRT and 11 receiving IMRT (p = 0.32; acute grade 3 toxicity occurred in 1 patient receiving 3DCRT and none receiving IMRT (p = 1.0. No patients in either cohort experienced late grade 3 toxicity, including renal or gastrointestinal toxicity. At last follow up, the median increase in creatinine was 0.1 mg/dL in the IMRT group and 0.1 mg/dL in the 3DCRT group (p = 0.78. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that adjuvant chemoradiation for gastric cancer with IMRT to 50.4 Gy was well-tolerated and compared similarly in toxicity with 3DCRT to

  4. Effects of massage therapy on sleep quality after coronary artery bypass graft surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Baggio Nerbass

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Having poor sleep quality is common among patients following cardiopulmonary artery bypass graft surgery. Pain, stress, anxiety and poor sleep quality may be improved by massage therapy. OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated whether massage therapy is an effective technique for improving sleep quality in patients following cardiopulmonary artery bypass graft surgery. METHOD: Participants included cardiopulmonary artery bypass graft surgery patients who were randomized into a control group and a massage therapy group following discharge from the intensive care unit (Day 0, during the postoperative period. The control group and the massage therapy group comprised participants who were subjected to three nights without massage and three nights with massage therapy, respectively. The patients were evaluated on the following mornings (i.e., Day 1 to Day 3 using a visual analogue scale for pain in the chest, back and shoulders, in addition to fatigue and sleep. Participants kept a sleep diary during the study period. RESULTS: Fifty-seven cardiopulmonary artery bypass graft surgery patients were enrolled in the study during the preoperative period, 17 of whom were excluded due to postoperative complications. The remaining 40 participants (male: 67.5%, age: 61.9 years ± 8.9 years, body mass index: 27.2 kg/m² ± 3.7 kg/m² were randomized into control (n = 20 and massage therapy (n = 20 groups. Pain in the chest, shoulders, and back decreased significantly in both groups from Day 1 to Day 3. The participants in the massage therapy group had fewer complaints of fatigue on Day 1 (p=0.006 and Day 2 (p=0.028 in addition, they reported a more effective sleep during all three days (p=0.019 when compared with the participants in the control group. CONCLUSION: Massage therapy is an effective technique for improving patient recovery from cardiopulmonary artery bypass graft surgery because it reduces fatigue and improves sleep.

  5. Diffusion-weighted imaging in predicting and monitoring the response of uterine cervical cancer to combined chemoradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Y. [Department of Radiology, General Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin (China); Bai, R., E-mail: tjbairenju@yahoo.com.c [Department of Radiology, General Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin (China); Sun, H. [Department of Radiology, General Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin (China); Liu, H. [Department of Radiology, Tianjin Central Hospital of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Tianjin (China); Zhao, X.; Li, Y. [Department of Radiology, General Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin (China)

    2009-11-15

    Aim: To investigate the ability of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) to predict and monitor the response of uterine cervical cancer to combined chemoradiation using apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs). Materials and methods: Seventeen women (mean age 48.5 years) with uterine cervical cancer received conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and DWI prior to chemoradiation and after 1 and 2 months of therapy. A subgroup of eight also had MRI and DWI repeated after 15 days of therapy. Treatment response was determined according to changes in tumour size after 2 months of therapy and was classified as complete response (CR), partial response (PR), stable disease (SD), or progressive disease (PD). Pretreatment ADCs were compared between the different disease response groups, and dynamic changes of ADCs in each group were observed. Pearson's correlation test was calculated between those ADC parameters and tumour response. Results: Pretreatment ADCs for CR were significantly lower than those of PR (p = 0.005). Negative correlation was found between pretreatment ADCs and percentage size reduction after 2 months of chemoradiation (p = 0.016). The percentage ADC change after 1 month correlated positively with percentage size reduction after 2 months of therapy (p = 0.021). ADCs after 15 days of therapy increased significantly compared with pretreatment ones (p = 0.001); however, the longest tumour diameter showed no statistically significant change (p = 0.078). Conclusion: ADCs may have the potential to be used to predict and monitor the response of uterine cervical cancer to therapy.

  6. Complications in skin grafts when continuing antithrombotic therapy prior to cutaneous surgery requiring skin grafting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jarjis, Reem Dina; Jørgensen, Lone; Finnerup, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The risk of postoperative bleeding and wound healing complications in skin grafts among anticoagulated patients undergoing cutaneous surgery has not been firmly established. The objective was to examine the literature and assess the risk of postoperative bleeding or wound healing...... studies were of prospective and retrospective design. Most of the reviewed studies suggest that the use of antithrombotic therapy can increase the risk of bleeding complications in skin grafts. These complications are only wound threatening and not life threatening. Therefore, this is of concern mostly...... complications in skin grafts among anticoagulated patients, compared with patients who discontinue or patients who are not receiving antithrombotic therapy prior to cutaneous surgery requiring skin grafting. A systematic review examining the effect of antithrombotic therapy on cutaneous surgery was performed...

  7. Retiform hemangioendothelioma over forehead: A rare tumor treated with chemoradiation and a review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anup Sunil Tamhankar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Retiform hemangioendothelioma (RH is low grade tumor of skin and subcutaneous tissue. It needs to be differentiated from angiosarcoma as RH has excellent prognosis. It is usually seen in young adults on extremities. Sometimes it may mimic benign conditions and can delay treatment. Surgery has been mainstay of its treatment with or without adjuvant radiation. We present first case of RH on face. This is only second case being treated with definitive chemoradiation. So it′s important to distinguish RH from angiosarcoma due to treatment implications as well.

  8. Value of Prophylactic Postoperative Antibiotic Therapy after Bimaxillary Orthognathic Surgery: A Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshghpour, Majid; Khajavi, Amin; Bagheri, Mahmoud; Banihashemi, Elham

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Antibiotic therapy before or after orthognathic surgery is commonly recommended by surgeons to minimize the risk of wound infection. This article evaluates the value of Prophylactic antibiotic therapy in order to diminish the incidence of postoperative wound infection after orthognathic surgery. Materials and Methods: Fifty candidates for bimaxillary orthognathic surgery were divided into cases and controls. Cefazolin (1g) was administered intravenously to all participants 30 mins prior to surgery followed by a similar dose 4 hours later. Case-group patients ingested amoxicillin (500 mg) orally for 7 days after surgery. Postoperative wound infection was assessed using clinical features, and the P-value significance was set at P<0.05. Results: Both groups were similar according to gender, age, and operating time. During the follow-up period no infection was observed in either the case or control group. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that long-term postoperative antibiotic therapy is not essential for the prevention of postoperative infection, and that application of aseptic surgical technique and hygiene instruction after surgery are sufficient. PMID:25320697

  9. Value of Prophylactic Postoperative Antibiotic Therapy after Bimaxillary Orthognathic Surgery: A Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Eshghpour

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Antibiotic therapy before or after orthognathic surgery is commonly recommended by surgeons to minimize the risk of wound infection. This article evaluates the value of Prophylactic antibiotic therapy in order to diminish the incidence of postoperative wound infection after orthognathic surgery.   Materials and Methods: Fifty candidates for bimaxillary orthognathic surgery were divided into cases and controls. Cefazolin (1g was administered intravenously to all participants 30 mins prior to surgery followed by a similar dose 4 hours later. Case-group patients ingested amoxicillin (500 mg orally for 7 days after surgery. Postoperative wound infection was assessed using clinical features, and the P-value significance was set at P  Results: Both groups were similar according to gender, age, and operating time. During the follow-up period no infection was observed in either the case or control group.   Conclusion:  The results of this study suggest that long-term postoperative antibiotic therapy is not essential for the prevention of postoperative infection, and that application of aseptic surgical technique and hygiene instruction after surgery are sufficient.

  10. Value of Prophylactic Postoperative Antibiotic Therapy after Bimaxillary Orthognathic Surgery: A Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Eshghpour

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Antibiotic therapy before or after orthognathic surgery is commonly recommended by surgeons to minimize the risk of wound infection. This article evaluates the value of Prophylactic antibiotic therapy in order to diminish the incidence of postoperative wound infection after orthognathic surgery.   Materials and Methods: Fifty candidates for bimaxillary orthognathic surgery were divided into cases and controls. Cefazolin (1g was administered intravenously to all participants 30 mins prior to surgery followed by a similar dose 4 hours later. Case-group patients ingested amoxicillin (500 mg orally for 7 days after surgery. Postoperative wound infection was assessed using clinical features, and the P-value significance was set at P  Results: Both groups were similar according to gender, age, and operating time. During the follow-up period no infection was observed in either the case or control group.   Conclusion:  The results of this study suggest that long-term postoperative antibiotic therapy is not essential for the prevention of postoperative infection, and that application of aseptic surgical technique and hygiene instruction after surgery are sufficient. 

  11. Oral anticoagulant therapy related to oral surgery procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Knežević Milan; Petrović Dragan; Jović Nebojša; Bosch Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Today there must be established protocol in oral surgery treatment for the patients which are under anticoagulant treatment via oral (ATO). This is due to danger of the possible complications and also for increased demand for hospital treatment of these patients, which can be estimated now days as high as 8%. In the present study, the authors intent to define all the parameters for creation of one acting protocol applicable to this group of patients and concluding that there is no necessary n...

  12. Prediction of Survival by [18F]Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography in Patients With Locally Advanced Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer Undergoing Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy: Results of the ACRIN 6668/RTOG 0235 Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machtay, Mitchell; Duan, Fenghai; Siegel, Barry A.; Snyder, Bradley S.; Gorelick, Jeremy J.; Reddin, Janet S.; Munden, Reginald; Johnson, Douglas W.; Wilf, Larry H.; DeNittis, Albert; Sherwin, Nancy; Cho, Kwan Ho; Kim, Seok-ki; Videtic, Gregory; Neumann, Donald R.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Macapinlac, Homer; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Alavi, Abass

    2013-01-01

    Purpose In this prospective National Cancer Institute–funded American College of Radiology Imaging Network/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group cooperative group trial, we hypothesized that standardized uptake value (SUV) on post-treatment [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) correlates with survival in stage III non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods Patients received conventional concurrent platinum-based chemoradiotherapy without surgery; postradiotherapy consolidation chemotherapy was allowed. Post-treatment FDG-PET was performed at approximately 14 weeks after radiotherapy. SUVs were analyzed both as peak SUV (SUVpeak) and maximum SUV (SUVmax; both institutional and central review readings), with institutional SUVpeak as the primary end point. Relationships between the continuous and categorical (cutoff) SUVs and survival were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards multivariate models. Results Of 250 enrolled patients (226 were evaluable for pretreatment SUV), 173 patients were evaluable for post-treatment SUV analyses. The 2-year survival rate for the entire population was 42.5%. Pretreatment SUVpeak and SUVmax (mean, 10.3 and 13.1, respectively) were not associated with survival. Mean post-treatment SUVpeak and SUVmax were 3.2 and 4.0, respectively. Post-treatment SUVpeak was associated with survival in a continuous variable model (hazard ratio, 1.087; 95% CI, 1.014 to 1.166; P = .020). When analyzed as a prespecified binary value (≤ v > 3.5), there was no association with survival. However, in exploratory analyses, significant results for survival were found using an SUVpeak cutoff of 5.0 (P = .041) or 7.0 (P < .001). All results were similar when SUVmax was used in univariate and multivariate models in place of SUVpeak. Conclusion Higher post-treatment tumor SUV (SUVpeak or SUVmax) is associated with worse survival in stage III NSCLC, although a clear cutoff value for routine clinical use as a prognostic

  13. Administration of Coagulation-Altering Therapy in the Patient Presenting for Oral Health and Maxillofacial Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halaszynski, Thomas M

    2016-11-01

    Oral health care providers are concerned with how to manage patients prescribed coagulation-altering therapy during the perioperative/periprocedural period for dental and oral surgery interventions. Management and recommendation can be based on medication pharmacology and the clinical relevance of coagulation factor levels/deficiencies. Caution should be used with concurrent use of medications that affect other components of the clotting mechanisms; prompt diagnosis and any necessary intervention to optimize outcome is warranted. However, evidence-based data on management of anticoagulation therapy during oral and maxillofacial surgery/interventions is lacking. Therefore, clinical understanding and judgment are needed along with appropriate guidelines matching patient- and intervention-specific recommendations.

  14. Meningeal hemangiopericytoma treated with surgery and radiation therapy -case report-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Ji Young; Oh, Yoon Kyeong [College of Medicine, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    Meningeal hemangiopericytoma (HPC) is an uncommon dura-based tumor and can recur not only locally but also distantly in the neural axis or extraneural sites. We report our experience of radiation therapy, one preoperative and one elective postoperative, in two patients with meningeal HPC and reviewed the role of radiation therapy. A 41-year-old man (Case 1) presented with a 3-month history of headache and right hemiparesis. The mass was nearly unresectable at the first and second operation and diagnosed as meningeal HPC. Preoperative radiation therapy was given with a total dose of 55.8 Gy/31 fractions to the large residual mass of left frontoparietal area. Follow-up computerized tomography (CT) showed marked regression of tumor after radiation therapy. The third operation was performed to remove the residual tumor at 6 months after the radiation therapy and a 2 x 2 cm sized tumor was encountered. The mass was totally removed. The serial follow-up CT showed no evidence of recurrence and he is alive without distant metastasis for 4 years and 10 months after the first operation. A 45-year-old woman (Case 2) presented with suddenly developed headache and visual impairment. Tumor mass occupying right frontal lobe was removed with the preoperative diagnosis of meningioma. It was totally removed with attached sagittal sinus and diagnosed as meningeal HPC. Elective postoperative radiation therapy was performed to reduce local recurrence with a total dose of 54 Gy/30 fractions to the involved area of right frontal lobe. She is alive for 5 years maintaining normal activity without local recurrence and distant metastasis.

  15. Clinical significance of radiation therapy in breast recurrence and prognosis in breast-conserving surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Reiki; Nagao, Kazuharu; Miyayama, Haruhiko [Kumamoto City Hospital (Japan)] [and others

    1999-03-01

    Significant risk factors for recurrence of breast cancer after breast-conserving therapy, which has become a standard treatment for breast cancer, are positive surgical margins and the failure to perform radiation therapy. In this study, we evaluated the clinical significance of radiation therapy after primary surgery or breast recurrence. In 344 cases of breast-conserving surgery, disease recurred in 43 cases (12.5%), which were classified as follows: 17 cases of breast recurrence, 13 cases of breast and distant metastasis, and 13 cases of distant metastasis. Sixty-two patients (16.7%) received radiation therapy. A positive surgical margin and younger age were significant risk factors for breast recurrence in patients not receiving postoperative radiation therapy but not in patients receiving radiation therapy. Radiation therapy may be beneficial for younger patients with positive surgical margins. Furthermore, radiation therapy after recurrence was effective in the cases not treated with postoperative radiation but not in cases with inflammatory recurrence. Patients with breast recurrence alone had significantly higher survival rates than did patients with distant metastases regardless of breast recurrence. These findings suggest that the adaptation criteria of radiation therapy for local control must be clarified. (author)

  16. Thiamine as an adjunctive therapy in cardiac surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiuff Andersen, Lars; Holmberg, Mathias J; Berg, KM;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Thiamine is a vitamin that is essential for adequate aerobic metabolism. The objective of this study was to determine if thiamine administration prior to coronary artery bypass grafting would decrease post-operative lactate levels as a measure of increased aerobic metabolism. METHODS......: We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. Patients were randomized to receive either intravenous thiamine (200 mg) or placebo both immediately before and again after the surgery. Our primary endpoint was post...

  17. Oral surgery in patients under antithrombotic therapy. Narrative review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anggelo Carrizo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Population aging and the increasing rates of cardiovascular diseases have raised the number of patients receiving antithrombotic therapy in elective or emergency dental care, including surgical procedures. The aim of this article is to review the evidence and clinical guidelines for management of patients on antithrombotic therapy published in the past five years. The American Antithrombotic Therapy Guideline - 2012 - generally recommends not to suspend antiplatelet or anticoagulant treatment in dental procedures since they are considered to have low bleeding risk and easy resolution. In the dental field, there is ample published evidence regarding oral surgical procedure management, especially by maxillofacial surgeons, showing a low number of complications associated with extractions or other minor oral surgical procedures without suspending antithrombotic drugs and only taking some minimum safeguards, such as healing by first intention or the use of some local hemostatic agents. In general, patients under chronic antithrombotic therapy should keep their medication when undergoing low and medium complexity dental procedures, since complications are minor and easy to handle. Due to interactions between them, particular care should be taken with patients using more than one drug.

  18. Significance of Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Assessed Tumor Response for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Treated With Preoperative Long-Course Chemoradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayaz, Mohamed Salah; Demian, Gerges Attia; Fathallah, Wael Moftah; Eissa, Heba El-Sayed; El-Sherify, Mustafa Shawki; Abozlouf, Sadeq; George, Thomas; Samir, Suzanne Mona

    2016-08-01

    To study the predictive and prognostic value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-assessed tumor response after long-course neoadjuvant therapy for locally advanced rectal cancer. This study included 79 patients who had T3 or T4 and/or N+ rectal cancer treated with long-course neoadjuvant chemoradiation. MRI-assessed tumor regression grade (mrTRG) was assessed in 64 patients. MRIs were reviewed by the study radiologist. Surgical and pathologic reports for those who underwent surgery were reviewed. Disease-free survival (DFS) was estimated. Progression during therapy, local relapse, metastasis, and death resulting from the tumor were classified as events. Statistical significance was calculated. In 11 patients, the tumor completely disappeared on MRI; that is, it had an mrTRG of 1. All but one patient, who chose deferred surgery, had a complete pathologic response (pCR), with a positive predictive value of nearly 100%. Of the 20 patients who had an mrTRG of 2 on MRI, six had a pCR. mrTRG 3, mrTRG 4, and mrTRG 5 were detected in 24, six, and three patients, respectively, of whom only one patient had a pCR. The 2-year DFS was 77%. The mrTRG was significant for DFS. The 2-year DFS was 88% for patients with a good response versus 66% for those with a poor response (P = .046). MRI-assessed complete tumor response was strongly correlated with pCR and, therefore, can be used as a surrogate marker to predict absence of viable tumor cells. Our results can be used to implement use of mrTRGs in larger prospective correlative studies as a tool to select patients for whom deferred surgery may be appropriate. Also, those with a poor response may be offered further treatment options before definitive surgery.

  19. Significance of Magnetic Resonance Imaging–Assessed Tumor Response for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Treated With Preoperative Long-Course Chemoradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayaz, Mohamed Salah; Demian, Gerges Attia; Fathallah, Wael Moftah; Eissa, Heba El-Sayed; Abozlouf, Sadeq; George, Thomas; Samir, Suzanne Mona

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To study the predictive and prognostic value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)–assessed tumor response after long-course neoadjuvant therapy for locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods This study included 79 patients who had T3 or T4 and/or N+ rectal cancer treated with long-course neoadjuvant chemoradiation. MRI-assessed tumor regression grade (mrTRG) was assessed in 64 patients. MRIs were reviewed by the study radiologist. Surgical and pathologic reports for those who underwent surgery were reviewed. Disease-free survival (DFS) was estimated. Progression during therapy, local relapse, metastasis, and death resulting from the tumor were classified as events. Statistical significance was calculated. Results In 11 patients, the tumor completely disappeared on MRI; that is, it had an mrTRG of 1. All but one patient, who chose deferred surgery, had a complete pathologic response (pCR), with a positive predictive value of nearly 100%. Of the 20 patients who had an mrTRG of 2 on MRI, six had a pCR. mrTRG 3, mrTRG 4, and mrTRG 5 were detected in 24, six, and three patients, respectively, of whom only one patient had a pCR. The 2-year DFS was 77%. The mrTRG was significant for DFS. The 2-year DFS was 88% for patients with a good response versus 66% for those with a poor response (P = .046). Conclusion MRI-assessed complete tumor response was strongly correlated with pCR and, therefore, can be used as a surrogate marker to predict absence of viable tumor cells. Our results can be used to implement use of mrTRGs in larger prospective correlative studies as a tool to select patients for whom deferred surgery may be appropriate. Also, those with a poor response may be offered further treatment options before definitive surgery. PMID:28717704

  20. The Progress of Perioperative Therapy with Integrative Medicine in the Field of Cardiac Surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ In the 1960s,a number of integrative Chinese and Western medicine (ICWM)surgeons (such as Prof.WU Xian-zhong) first started the application of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in acute abdominal surgery,and thus they became the pioneers of perioperative therapy with ICWM.

  1. [Methylene blue therapy for vasoplegia after cardiac surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skuza, Katarzyna; Chmielniak, Sergiusz; Dziuk, Wojciech; Kucewicz, Ewa; Pawlak, Szymon; Knapik, Piotr

    2009-01-01

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) may be associated with critically decreased vascular resistance (vasoplegia syndrome) and become resistant to noradrenaline. Such a condition may be successfully treated with intravenous methylene blue. A 73-year-old patient with acute myocardial infarction and cardiogenic shock was admitted to our centre after failed percutaneous coronary interventions to the left anterior descending coronary artery and underwent emergency coronary revascularisation. After surgery, his ejection fraction was 25%. X-ray revealed pulmonary oedema. The patient became severely hypotensive with marked vasoplegia and metabolic acidosis, despite incremental doses of adrenaline and noradrenaline. 2 mg kg(-1) of methylene blue was administered, which quickly stabilized the patient's general condition. Methylene blue applied to vasoplegic patients can effectively increase systemic vascular resistance and restore satisfactory organ perfusion.

  2. Improved Outcomes with Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Combined with Temozolomide for Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel J. Aherne

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is optimally treated by maximal debulking followed by combined chemoradiation. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT is gaining widespread acceptance in other tumour sites, although evidence to support its use over three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT in the treatment of gliomas is currently lacking. We examined the survival outcomes for patients with GBM treated with IMRT and Temozolomide. Methods and Materials. In all, 31 patients with GBM were treated with IMRT and 23 of these received chemoradiation with Temozolomide. We correlated survival outcomes with patient functional status, extent of surgery, radiation dose, and use of chemotherapy. Results. Median survival for all patients was 11.3 months, with a median survival of 7.2 months for patients receiving 40.05 Gray (Gy and a median survival of 17.4 months for patients receiving 60 Gy. Conclusions. We report one of the few series of IMRT in patients with GBM. In our group, median survival for those receiving 60 Gy with Temozolomide compared favourably to the combined therapy arm of the largest randomised trial of chemoradiation versus radiation to date (17.4 months versus 14.6 months. We propose that IMRT should be considered as an alternative to 3DCRT for patients with GBM.

  3. Intraoperative goal directed hemodynamic therapy in noncardiac surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Ripollés

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: The goal directed hemodynamic therapy is an approach focused on the use of cardiac output and related parameters as end-points for fluids and drugs to optimize tissue perfusion and oxygen delivery. Primary aim: To determine the effects of intraoperative goal directed hemodynamic therapy on postoperative complications rates. Methods: A meta-analysis was carried out of the effects of goal directed hemodynamic therapy in adult noncardiac surgery on postoperative complications and mortality using Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses methodology. A systematic search was performed in Medline PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library (last update, October 2014. Inclusion criteria were randomized clinical trials in which intraoperative goal directed hemodynamic therapy was compared to conventional fluid management in noncardiac surgery. Exclusion criteria were trauma and pediatric surgery studies and that using pulmonary artery catheter. End-points were postoperative complications (primary and mortality (secondary. Those studies that fulfilled the entry criteria were examined in full and subjected to quantifiable analysis, predefined subgroup analysis (stratified by type of monitor, therapy, and hemodynamic goal, and predefined sensitivity analysis. Results: 51 RCTs were initially identified, 24 fulfilling the inclusion criteria. 5 randomized clinical trials were added by manual search, resulting in 29 randomized clinical trials in the final analysis, including 2654 patients. A significant reduction in complications for goal directed hemodynamic therapy was observed (RR: 0.70, 95% CI: 0.62-0.79, p < 0.001. No significant decrease in mortality was achieved (RR: 0.76, 95% CI: 0.45-1.28, p = 0.30. Quality sensitive analyses confirmed the main overall results. Conclusions: Intraoperative goal directed hemodynamic therapy with minimally invasive monitoring decreases postoperative complications in noncardiac

  4. Common complementary and alternative therapies with potential use in dermatologic surgery: risks and benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Kavitha K; Grossman, Lauri; Rogers, Gary S

    2013-04-01

    Ambulatory surgery patients often use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies. CAM therapies may create beneficial and detrimental perioperative conditions. We sought to improve knowledge of CAM effects in dermatologic surgery, allowing dermatologists to potentially capitalize on therapeutic actions and to mitigate complications. PubMed literature search of CAM therapies in dermatologic and surgical settings was performed. Common CAM therapies with possible effects on dermatologic surgery were selected. Beneficial and detri-mental effects were reviewed. A myriad of products may be used perioperatively by the patient. Therapies appearing to have some evidence for potential benefit include bromelain, honey, propolis, arnica, vitamin C and bioflavonoids, chamomile, aloe vera gel, grape seed extract, zinc, turmeric, calendula, chlorella, lavender oil, and gotu kola. Potential complications vary according to product and include platelet inhibition, contact dermatitis and, in rare cases, systemic toxicity. This review focuses on CAM having significant published studies evaluating efficacy for wound healing, anti-inflammatory, antipurpuric, or perioperative-related use. Most published studies have been small and often have design flaws. The scope of CAM is large and not all therapies are discussed. Selected CAM therapies have been reported to promote wound healing, reduce edema or purpura, and provide anti-inflammatory effects. Because of high rates of CAM use, surgeons should familiarize themselves with common uses, potential benefits, and complications. Further study of effects in the dermatologic surgery setting may improve the patient-doctor relationship and enhance outcomes. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Antiplatelet Therapy in Carotid Artery Stenting and Carotid Endarterectomy in the Asymptomatic Carotid Surgery Trial-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huibers, A; Halliday, A; Bulbulia, R; Coppi, G; de Borst, G J

    2016-03-01

    Strokes are infrequent but potentially serious complications following carotid intervention, but antiplatelet therapy can reduce these risks. There are currently no specific guidelines on dose or duration of peri-procedural antiplatelet treatment for patients undergoing carotid intervention. Within the ongoing Asymptomatic Carotid Surgery Trial-2 (ACST-2), this study aimed at assessing the current use of antiplatelet therapy before, during, and after CEA and CAS in patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis. Questionnaires were sent to ACST-2 collaborators seeking information about the use of antiplatelet therapy during the pre-, peri-, and post-operative periods in patients undergoing carotid intervention at 77 participating sites and also whether sites tested for antiplatelet therapy resistance. The response rate was 68/77 (88%). For CAS, 82% of sites used dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) pre-operatively and 86% post-operatively with a mean post-procedural duration of 3 months (range 1-12), while 9% continued DAPT life-long. For CEA only 31% used DAPT pre-operatively, 24% post-operatively with a mean post-procedural duration of 3 months (range 1-5), while 10% continued DAPT life-long. For those prescribing post-procedural mono antiplatelet (MAPT) therapy (76%), aspirin was more commonly prescribed (59%) than clopidogrel (6%) and 11% of centres did not show a preference for either aspirin or clopidogrel. Eleven centres (16%) tested for antiplatelet therapy resistance. There appears to be broad agreement on the use of antiplatelet therapy in ACST-2 patients undergoing carotid artery stenting and surgery. Although evidence to help guide the duration of peri-procedural antiplatelet therapy is limited, long-term treatment with DAPT appears similar between both treatment arms. Copyright © 2015 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Antiviral therapy for hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma after surgery: A comment for moving forward

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Hong; Zhong; Tian; Yang; Bang-De; Xiang; Le-Qun; Li; Liang; Ma

    2016-01-01

    Recurrence rate of hepatocellular carcinoma remains quite high even after surgery,and no postoperative therapies have been definitively shown to prevent hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence.A previous study showed that therapy with nucleos(t)ide analogues given to such patients after surgery significantly improved survival.However,many questions still exist about the usage of nucleos(t)ide analogues for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma after surgery.

  7. Adjuvant chemoradiation after laparoscopically assisted radical vaginal hysterectomy (LARVH) in patients with cervical cancer. Oncologic outcome and morbidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruen, Arne; Musik, Thabea; Stromberger, Carmen; Budach, Volker; Marnitz, Simone [Charite Univ. Medicine Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Radiooncology; Koehler, Christhardt; Schneider, Achim [Charite Univ. Medicine Berlin, Campus Mitte- und Benjamim Franklin, Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Gynaecology; Fueller, Juergen; Wendt, Thomas [Jena Univ. Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Radiooncology

    2011-06-15

    Compared to laparotomic surgery, laparoscopically assisted radical vaginal hysterectomy (LARVH) offers decreased blood loss during surgery and faster convalescence of the patient postoperatively, while at the same time delivering similar oncologic results. However, there is no data on outcome and toxicity of LARVH followed by (chemo)radiation. A total of 55 patients (range 28-78 years) with cervical cancer on FIGO stages IB1-IIIA (Tables 1 and 2) with risk factors were submitted to either external beam radiotherapy alone [EBRT, n = 8 (14%), including paraaortic irradiation, n = 4 (2.2%); EBRT and brachytherapy (BT), n = 33 (60%); BT alone, n = 14 (25.5%)] or chemoradiation after LARVH. At a median follow-up of 4.4 years, the 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) was 81.8% with 84.5% overall survival (OS). Acute grade 3 side effects were seen in 4 patients. These were mainly gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) symptoms. Grade 4 side effects were not observed. With similar oncologic outcome data and mostly mild side effects, LARVH followed by (chemo)radiation is a valid alternative in the treatment of cervical cancer patients. (orig.)

  8. Role of chemoradiation in advanced cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh T

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A prospective randomized study was conducted in our department of Radiotherapy, Regional Institute of Medical Sciences, Imphal to evaluating the role of chemoradiation in the management of advanced inoperable cervical cancer (stage IIB-IIIB taking only radiation treatment as control spanning the period 1996-1999. Of the fifty patients accumulated in the study group, three patients did not complete treatment, one expired due to other causes and three were lost to follow up. Likewise, of the forty-six patients in the control group, one patient did not complete treatment and 4 were lost to follow up. Thus only 43 and 41 patients were available for the result analysis for the study and control groups respectively. The early treatment response as assessed after two months of treatment conclusion were 79.1%, 13.9%, 93.0% and 58.5%, 31.7%, 90.2% as complete response (CR, partial response (PR, and total response (TR respectively for the study and control groups. Our patients included in this study had a median follow up of 35 months and 33 months for study and control groups respectively. For this follow up, the disease-free survival, survival with disease and overall survival were 67.4%, 7.0%, 74.4% and 43.9%, 12.2%, 56.1% for study and control groups respectively. There was an increase in early side-effects in the chemoradiation group but the difference was not significant. Because of the early side effects, treatment delays ensued in 7 patients (16.3% and in 3 patients (7.3% in the study and control groups respectively. There was no significant increase in the late treatment toxicities in both the groups.

  9. Omeprazole maintenance therapy prevents recurrent ulcer bleeding after surgery for duodenal ulcer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Konstantinos Demertzis; Dimitrios Polymeros; Theodoros Emmanuel; Konstantinos Triantafyllou; Pericles Tassios; Spiros D Ladas

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the omeprazole maintenance therapy in patients with recurrent ulcer bleeding after surgery for duodenal ulcer.METHODS: We studied 15 consecutive patients with recurrent ulcer bleeding after surgery for duodenal ulcer.Omeprazole (20 mg/d) maintenance therapy was given after ulcer healing. In addition to clinical follow-up, ambulatory 24-h gastric pH assay was performed before and during omeprazole therapy in those patients and controls with previous duodenal ulcer surgery but no ulcer recurrence.RESULTS: All the 15 ulcers were healed after being treated with omeprazole (40 mg/d) for 2 mo. Eleven patients with two (1-9) episodes of recurrent ulcer bleeding completed the follow-up (43, 12-72 mo). None of them had a bleeding episode while on omeprazole. One patient discontinued the therapy and had recurrent bleeding. The median 24-h fraction time of gastric pH <4 in patients was 80, 46-95% , and was reduced to 32, 13-70% by omeprazole (P = 0.002).CONCLUSION: Long-term maintenance therapy with omeprazole (20 mg/day) is effective in preventing recurrent ulcer bleeding.

  10. Preliminary analysis of a clinical trial for threedimensional conformal radiation therapy after conservative surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Yao; Jinlan Gong; Li Li; Yun Wang; Xiaofeng Wu; Kezhu Hou

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy, complications and cosmetic results of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for early breast cancer after conservative surgery. Methods: Among 80 patients, 44 were treated by modified radical mastectomy followed by adjuvant radiotherapy (modified radical mastectomy, MMT), 36 were treated with breast conservative surgery with adjuvant irradiation [breast-conservation therapy (BCT)]. Tangential fields were used to deliver 6 MV X-ray beams to a total dose of 50 Gy. Another 16 Gy was added to the tumor bed with 6-9 MeV electron beams for BCT. Results: In MMT group, the local control, metastasis-free and death were 41, 41 and 1 respectively; in BCT group, the local control, metastasis-free and death were 35, 35 and 0. The difference of the above two indicators between the two groups showeed no statistical insignificance (P > 0. 05). In MMT group, 32 patients suffer radiation dermatitis above 2-level, 12 patients suffer radiation pneumonia, and 10 patients suffer edema of illness-side upper extremity; in BCT group, the above indicators were only 6, 2 and 1 respectively. Three months, six months and one year after radiation therapy, 90%, 92% and 95% patients were assessed as excellence in fine cosmetic state in BCT group. Conclusion: The effects of threedimensional conformal radiation therapy after conservative surgery are the same as that of modified radical mastectomy, while the former has better cosmetic results and lower radiation therapy induced complications.

  11. Cosmetic outcome 1-5 years after breast conservative surgery, irradiation and systemic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelemen, Gyöngyi; Varga, Zoltán; Lázár, György; Thurzó, László; Kahán, Zsuzsanna

    2012-04-01

    The late side-effects of the local therapy of early breast cancer depend on many patient- and therapy-related parameters. We aimed at investigating the factors that influence the cosmetic and functional outcomes among our breast cancer patients after breast-conserving surgery and conformal radiotherapy, with or without adjuvant systemic therapy. A study was made of the association of the cosmetic outcome after a median follow-up time of 2.4 years and the clinical data on 198 patients extracted from a prospectively compiled database. Breast tenderness occurred more frequently among patients ≤50 years old (p cosmetic outcome after breast-conserving surgery and postoperative radiotherapy.

  12. Progress of Neoadjuvant Therapy Combined with Surgery in Non-small Cell
Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaqi WANG

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Lung cancer is the leading form of cancer in terms of both incidence and cancer-related deaths. For patients with resectable IIIa/N2 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, guidelines in and abroad recommend multidisciplinary team treatment, including surgery and chemotherapy, radiotherapy or other comprehensive treatment. Newly published evidences prove that neoadjuvant therapy can improve outcomes of NSCLC patients significantly, with advangtages in tolerability and compliance medication. Neoadjuvant therapy has been adopted mainly in locally advanced NSCLC, especially in stages IIIa/N2 patients, and chemotherapy of 2-4 cycles has become the basic pattern. Neoadjuvant therapy does not increase the concomitant complications of chemotherapy and surgery. However, challenges still exist in determining subsequent surgical timing, approach and extent of resection.

  13. Unusual computed tomography findings of radionecrosis after chemoradiation of stage IV hypopharyngeal cancer: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baba Yuh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Radionecrosis (post-radiotherapy laryngeal submucosal inflammation and necrosis is a complication of (chemo radiotherapy for hypopharyngeal cancer that is difficult to differentiate from tumor recurrence. Case presentation A 67-year-old Japanese man presented with a condition extremely difficult to diagnose differentially as radionecrosis or tumor recurrence after radiotherapy for hypopharyngeal cancer. Although tumor recurrence was suspected from clinical conditions and computed tomography findings, pathologic analysis revealed no evidence of tumor recurrence, and successful therapy with steroids and antibiotics reduced the mucosal edema. Conclusion Our findings emphasize the wide spectrum of radiographic presentation of radionecrosis after chemoradiation of stage IV hypopharyngeal cancer.

  14. Clinical evolution of mediastinitis in patients undergoing adjuvant hyperbaric oxygen therapy after coronary artery bypass surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Egito, Julyana Galvão Tabosa; Abboud, Cely Saad; de Oliveira, Aline Pâmela Vieira; Máximo, Carlos Alberto Gonçalves; Montenegro, Carolina Moreira; Amato, Vivian Lerner; Bammann, Roberto; Farsky, Pedro Silvio

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy as an adjunctive treatment in mediastinitis after coronary artery bypass surgery. Methods: This is a retrospective descriptive study, performed between October 2010 and February 2012. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy was indicated in difficult clinical management cases despite antibiotic therapy. Results: We identified 18 patients with mediastinitis during the study period. Thirty three microorganisms were isolated, and polymicrobial infection was present in 11 cases. Enterobacteriaceae were the most prevalent pathogens and six were multi-resistant agents. There was only 1 hospital death, 7 months after the oxygen therapy caused by sepsis, unrelated to hyperbaric oxygen therapy. This treatment was well-tolerated. Conclusion: The initial data showed favorable clinical outcomes. PMID:24136762

  15. Inpatient cardiac rehabilitation programs' exercise therapy for patients undergoing cardiac surgery: National Korean Questionnaire Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yong Gon; Jang, Mi Ja; Park, Won Hah; Hong, Kyung Pyo; Sung, Jidong

    2017-02-01

    Inpatient cardiac rehabilitation (ICR) has been commonly conducted after cardiac surgery in many countries, and has been reported a lots of results. However, until now, there is inadequacy of data on the status of ICR in Korea. This study described the current status of exercise therapy in ICR that is performed after cardiac surgery in Korean hospitals. Questionnaires modified by previous studies were sent to the departments of thoracic surgery of 10 hospitals in Korea. Nine replies (response rate 90%) were received. Eight nurses and one physiotherapist completed the questionnaire. Most of the education on wards after cardiac surgery was conducted by nurses. On postoperative day 1, four sites performed sitting on the edge of bed, sit to stand, up to chair, and walking in the ward. Only one site performed that exercise on postoperative day 2. One activity (stairs up and down) was performed on different days at only two sites. Patients received education preoperatively and predischarge for preventing complications and reducing muscle weakness through physical inactivity. The results of the study demonstrate that there are small variations in the general care provided by nurses after cardiac surgery. Based on the results of this research, we recommended that exercise therapy programs have to conduct by exercise specialists like exercise physiologists or physiotherapists for patients in hospitalization period.

  16. Tumor regrowth between surgery and initiation of adjuvant therapy in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirzkall, Andrea; McGue, Colleen; Saraswathy, Suja; Cha, Soonmee; Liu, Raymond; Vandenberg, Scott; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Berger, Mitchel S.; Chang, Susan M.; Nelson, Sarah J.

    2009-01-01

    To assess incidence and degree of regrowth in glioblastoma between surgery and radiation therapy (RT) and to correlate regrowth with presurgical imaging and survival, we examined images of 32 patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma who underwent MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI), and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) prior to surgery, after surgery, and prior to RT/temozolomide. Contrast enhancement (CE) in the pre-RT MR image was compared with postsurgical DWI to differentiate tumor growth from postsurgical infarct. MRSI and PWI parameters were analyzed prior to surgery and pre-RT. Postsurgical MRI indicated that 18 patients had gross total and 14 subtotal resections. Twenty-one patients showed reduced diffusion, and 25 patients showed new or increased CE. In eight patients (25%), the new CE was confined to areas of postsurgical reduced diffusion. In the other 17 patients (53%), new CE was found to be indicative of tumor growth or a combination of tumor growth and surgical injury. Higher perfusion and creatine within nonenhancing tumor in the presurgery MR were associated with subsequent tumor growth. High levels of choline and reduced diffusion in pre-RT CE suggested active metabolism and tumor cell proliferation. Median survival was 14.6 months in patients with interim tumor growth and 24 months in patients with no growth. Increased volume or new onset of CE between surgery and RT was attributed to tumor growth in 53% of patients and was associated with shorter survival. This suggests that reducing the time between surgery and adjuvant therapy may be important. The acquisition of metabolic and physiologic imaging data prior to adjuvant therapy may also be valuable in assessing regions of new CE and nonenhancing tumor. PMID:19229057

  17. Long-term Results of Breast-conserving Surgery and Radiation Therapy in Early Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Hee; Byun, Sang Jun [Dongsan Medical Center, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-09-15

    To evaluate the long-term results after breast-conserving surgery and radiation therapy in early breast cancer in terms of failure, survival, and cosmesis. One hundred fifty-four patients with stage I and II breast cancer were treated with conservative surgery plus radiotherapy between January 1992 and December 2002 at the Keimyung University Dongsan Medical Center. According to TNM stage, 93 patients were stage I, 50 were IIa, and 11 were IIb. The affected breasts were irradiated with 6 MV photons to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions over 5.5 weeks with a boost irradiation dose of 10{approx}16 Gy to the excision site. Chemotherapy was administered in 75 patients and hormonal therapy in 92 patients with tamoxifen. Follow-up periods were 13{approx}179 months, with a median of 92.5 months. The 5- and 10-year overall survival rates were 97.3% and 94.5%, respectively. The 5- and 10-year disease-free survival (5YDFS and 10YDFS, respectively) rates were 92.5% and 88.9%, respectively; the ultimate 5YDFS and 10YDFS rates after salvage treatment were 93.9% and 90.2%, respectively. Based on multivariate analysis, only the interval between surgery and radiation therapy ({<=}6 weeks vs. >6 weeks, p=0.017) was a statistically significant prognostic factor for DFS. The major type of treatment failure was distant failure (78.5%) and the most common distant metastatic site was the lungs. The cosmetic results were good-to-excellent in 96 patients (80.7%). Conservative surgery and radiation for early stage invasive breast cancer yielded excellent survival and cosmetic results. Radiation therapy should be started as soon as possible after breast-conserving surgery in patients with early breast cancer, ideally within 6 weeks.

  18. Medical therapy versus bariatric surgery of obese patients with Type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Maria Saur; Bojsen-Møller, Kirstine Nyvold; Madsbad, Sten

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric surgery induces large and sustainable weight loss in obese patients and improves glycaemic control in patients with Type 2 diabetes. Eleven randomized controlled trials have shown superior glycaemic outcomes after bariatric procedures vs. medical therapy/intensive lifestyle interventions...... in obese patients with Type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, many patients experience remission of Type 2 diabetes after surgery but relapse may occur during follow-up. Data from observational studies show reduced incidence of micro- and macrovascular complications in addition to reduced cardiovascular and total...

  19. Pancreatic cancer-Neoadjuvant therapy%胰腺癌:新辅助治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R. Krempien; M. W. Munter; W. Harms; J. Debus

    2007-01-01

    In spite of the high mortality in pancreatic cancer, significant progress is being made. This review discusses multimodality therapy for patients with pancreatic cancer. Surgical therapy currently offers the only potential monomodal cure for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. However only 10%-20% of patients present with tumors that are amenable to resection,and even after resection of localized cancers, long term survival is rare. The addition of chemoradiation therapy significantly increases median survival. To achieve long-term success in treating this disease it is therefore increasingly important to identify effective neoadjuvant/adjuvant multimodality therapies. Preoperative chemoradiation for potentially resectable pancreatic cancer has the following advantages:(1) neoadjuvant treatment would eliminate the delay of adjuvant treatment due to postoperative complications; (2) neoadjuvant treatment could avoid unnecessary surgery for patients with metastatic disease evident on restaging after neoadjuvant therapy; (3) downstaging after neoadjuvant therapy may increase the likelihood for negative surgical margins; and (4) neoadjuvant treatment could prevent peritoneal tumor cell implantation and dissemination caused during surgery. This review systematically summarizes the current status, controversies, and prospects of neoadjuvant treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  20. [Physical therapy performance in respiratory and motor involvement during postoperative in children submitted to abdominal surgeries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santo, Caroline C; Gonçalves, Marcela T; Piccolo, Mariana M; Lima, Simone; Rosa, George J da; Paulin, Elaine; Schivinski, Camila S

    2011-01-01

    to verify the physiotherapy performance in the respiratory and motor affections during postoperative period in pediatric patients undergoing abdominal surgery. was a literature review of articles published in the databases Lilacs, Medline and SciELO in the period 1983 to 2010 as well as books, papers presented at scientific meetings and journals of the area, who approached the post-therapy of abdominal surgery in children. The keywords used were: abdominal surgery, children and physiotherapy. 28 articles, one book chapter and one dissertation had been selected that examined the question and proposed that contained all, or at least two of the descriptors listed. Most of the material included covers the incidence of respiratory complications after surgery for pediatric abdominal surgery due to immaturity of the respiratory system of this population, abdominal manipulation of surgical period, the prolonged time in bed, pain at the incision site and waste anesthetic. Some authors also discuss the musculoskeletal and connective tissue arising from the inaction and delay of psychomotor development consequent to periods of hospitalization in early childhood, taking on the role of physiotherapy to prevent motor and respiratory involvement. there are few publications addressing this topic, but the positive aspects of physiotherapy have been described, especially in relation to the prevention of respiratory complications and motor, recognized the constraints and consequences of hospitalizations and surgeries cause in children.

  1. Understanding molecular markers in recurrent oral squamous cell carcinoma treated with chemoradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seema Gupta

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: Our results signifies that tumors over expressing Cyclin D1, EGFR and p53 are resistant to chemoradiation and are associated with increased risk of locoregional recurrence and metastasis in OSCC patients undergoing chemoradiation.

  2. Underutilization of antiplatelet and statin therapy after postoperative myocardial infarction following vascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steely, Andrea M; Callas, Peter W; Hohl, Patrick K; Schneider, David J; De Martino, Randall R; Bertges, Daniel J

    2017-08-19

    The objective of this study was to investigate adherence to practice guidelines for antiplatelet and statin use after postoperative myocardial infarction (POMI) and its effect on late mortality following vascular surgery in a multicenter registry. Antiplatelet and statin use was examined in 1749 vascular surgery procedures with POMI within the Vascular Quality Initiative (VQI) from 2005 to 2015. Our primary aim was to assess cardiac medication (CM) use at discharge, defined as (1) single antiplatelet therapy (SAPT; aspirin or P2Y12 inhibitor) or dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT; aspirin and P2Y12 inhibitor) and (2) statin therapy. Long-term mortality in patients with POMI was analyzed on the basis of discharge CM. A proportional hazards model was developed to control for factors associated with mortality. Regional differences in CM use at discharge after POMI were compared. Overall discharge CM use after POMI included aspirin (81%), P2Y12 inhibitor (38%), statin therapy (76%), and combined antiplatelet and statin (74%). At discharge, 26% of patients were not receiving combined antiplatelet and statin therapy. SAPT (50%) was more common than DAPT (35%; P therapy had improved survival (79%) compared with those receiving noncombination or no therapy (69%) with mean follow-up of 5.5 years and 4.9 years, respectively (log-rank, P = .001). After adjustment for covariates including preoperative medications, treatment with SAPT or DAPT plus statin at discharge was associated with lower late mortality compared with noncombination or no therapy (hazard ratio, 0.72; 95% confidence interval, 0.56-0.93; P = .01). Regional variation in CM at discharge following POMI was also observed with a range of 33% to 100% (P = .05). Within the VQI, regional and procedure-specific variation exists in CM regimen after POMI following vascular surgery. Absence of combined antiplatelet and statin therapy at discharge after POMI was associated with higher late mortality and represents an

  3. Comparative analysis of late functional outcome following preoperative radiation therapy or chemoradiotherapy and surgery or surgery alone in rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contin, Pietro; Kulu, Yakup; Bruckner, Thomas; Sturm, Martin; Welsch, Thilo; Müller-Stich, Beat P; Huber, Johannes; Büchler, Markus W; Ulrich, Alexis

    2014-02-01

    This study evaluates the anorectal and genitourinary function of patients treated by preoperative short-term radiotherapy (RT) or chemoradiotherapy (CRT) followed by surgery and surgery alone for rectal cancer. For this study, a total of 613 patients, who were identified from a prospective rectal cancer database, underwent anterior resection of the rectum between October 2001 and December 2007. Standardized questionnaires were used to determine fecal incontinence, urinary, and sexual function. Relevant clinical variables were evaluated using univariate and multivariate analyses. Independent predictors of functional outcome were identified by a binary logistic regression analysis. The data of 263 (43 %) patients were available for analysis. On multivariate analysis, neoadjuvant RT (P < 0.01) and low anterior resection (LAR) (P = 0.049) were associated with fecal incontinence. In univariate analysis, fecal incontinence was linked to preoperative neoadjuvant treatment (RT and/or CRT vs. LAR) (P < 0.01). The hazard ratio for developing fecal incontinence was 3.3 (1.6-6.8) for patients who received RT. One hundred twenty-five patients (51.2 %) experienced urinary incontinence following surgery, the majority of whom were female (P < 0.01). On univariate analysis, male sexual function was associated with age (P < 0.01), ASA class (P = 0.01) and LAR (P = 0.01). Multimodal therapy of low rectal cancer increases the incidence of fecal incontinence and negatively affects sexual function. The potential benefits of RT or CRT need to be balanced against the risk of increased bowel dysfunction when determining the appropriate treatment for individual patients with rectal cancer.

  4. Hemodynamic effects of peri-operative statin therapy in on-pump cardiac surgery patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinz Jose

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peri-operative statin therapy in cardiac surgery cases is reported to reduce the rate of mortality, stroke, postoperative atrial fibrillation, and systemic inflammation. Systemic inflammation could affect the hemodynamic parameters and stability. We set out to study the effect of statin therapy on perioperative hemodynamic parameters and its clinical outcome. Methods In a single center study from 2006 to 2007, peri-operative hemodynamic parameters of 478 patients, who underwent cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass, were measured. Patients were divided into those who received perioperative statin therapy (n = 276; statin group and those who did not receive statin therapy (n = 202; no-statin group. The two groups were compared together using Kolmogorov-Smirnov-Test, Fisher’s-Exact-Test, and Student’s-T-test. A p value  Results There was no significant difference in the preoperative risk factors. Onset of postoperative atrial fibrillation was not affected by statin therapy. Extended hemodynamic measurements revealed no significant difference between the two groups, apart from Systemic Vascular Resistance Index (SVRI . The no-statin group had a significantly higher SVRI (882 ± 206 vs. 1050 ± 501 dyn s/cm5/m2, p = 0.022. Inotropic support was the same in both groups and no significant difference in the mortality rate was noticed. Also, hemodynamic parameters were not affected by different types and doses of statins. Conclusions Perioperative statin therapy for patients undergoing on-pump coronary bypass grafting or valvular surgery, does not affect the hemodynamic parameters and its clinical outcome.

  5. Catecholamine and volume therapy for cardiac surgery in Germany--results from a postal survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Sponholz

    Full Text Available Management of cardiac surgery patients is a very standardized procedure in respective local institutions. Yet only very limited evidence exists concerning optimal indication, safety and efficacy of hemodynamic monitoring catecholamine and fluid therapy.Between April and May 2013, all 81 German anaesthesia departments involved in cardiac surgery care were asked to participate in a questionnaire addressing the institutional specific current practice in hemodynamic monitoring, catecholamine and volume therapy.51 (63% questionnaires were completed and returned. All participating centers used basic hemodynamic monitoring (i.e. invasive arterial blood pressure and central venous pressure, supplemented by transesophageal echocardiography. Pulmonary arterial catheter and calibrated trend monitoring devices were also routinely available. In contrast, non-calibrated trend monitoring and esophageal doppler ultrasound devices were not commonly in use. Cerebral oximetry is increasingly emerging, but lacks clear indications. The majority of patients undergoing cardiac surgery, especially in university hospitals, required catecholamines during perioperative care, In case of low cardiac output syndrome, dobutamine (32%, epinephrine (30% or phosphodiesterase inhibitors (8% were first choice. In case of hypotension following vasoplegia, norepinephrine (96% represented the most common catecholamine. 88% of the participating centers reported regular use of colloid fluids, with hydroxyethyl starches (HES being first choice (64%.Choice of hemodynamic monitoring is homogenous throughout German centers treating cardiac surgery patients. Norepinephrine is the first line catecholamine in cases of decrease in peripheral vascular resistance. However, catecholamine choice for low cardiac output syndrome varies considerably. HES was the primary colloid used for fluid resuscitation. After conduct of this survey, HES use was restricted by European regulatory authorities in

  6. The MITK image guided therapy toolkit and its application for augmented reality in laparoscopic prostate surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumhauer, Matthias; Neuhaus, Jochen; Fritzsche, Klaus; Meinzer, Hans-Peter

    2010-02-01

    Image Guided Therapy (IGT) faces researchers with high demands and efforts in system design, prototype implementation, and evaluation. The lack of standardized software tools, like algorithm implementations, tracking device and tool setups, and data processing methods escalate the labor for system development and sustainable system evaluation. In this paper, a new toolkit component of the Medical Imaging and Interaction Toolkit (MITK), the MITK-IGT, and its exemplary application for computer-assisted prostate surgery are presented. MITK-IGT aims at integrating software tools, algorithms and tracking device interfaces into the MITK toolkit to provide a comprehensive software framework for computer aided diagnosis support, therapy planning, treatment support, and radiological follow-up. An exemplary application of the MITK-IGT framework is introduced with a surgical navigation system for laparos-copic prostate surgery. It illustrates the broad range of application possibilities provided by the framework, as well as its simple extensibility with custom algorithms and other software modules.

  7. The safety and efficacy of antifibrinolytic therapy in neonatal cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chih-Yuan; Shuhaiber, Jeffery H; Loyola, Hugo; Liu, Hua; Del Nido, Pedro; DiNardo, James A; Pigula, Frank A

    2015-01-01

    Neonates undergoing open-heart surgery are particularly at risk of postoperative bleeding requiring blood transfusion. Aprotinin has attained high efficacy in reducing the requirement for a blood transfusion following a cardiopulmonary bypass, but is seldom studied in the neonatal age group. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and adverse effects of aprotinin and tranexamic acid in neonates undergoing open-heart surgery at a single centre. Between October 2003 and March 2008, perioperative data of 552 consecutive neonatal patients undergoing open-heart surgery in Children's Hospital Boston were reviewed. Among them, 177 did not receive antifibrinolytic therapy (Group A); 100 were treated with tranexamic acid only (Group B); and 275 patients received aprotinin with or without tranexamic acid (Group C). Except for antifibrinolytic therapy, the anaesthesiological and surgical protocols remained identical. Postoperative complications and in-hospital mortality were the primary study endpoints. Body weight and Risk Adjustment for Congenital Heart Surgery (RACHS-1) scores were statistically comparable among the three groups. No statistically significant differences were observed between the duration of hospitalization, chest tube drainage, reexploration for bleeding, and kidney function impairment. In Group C, less blood was transfused within 24 hours than in GroupB. Operative mortality was similar among the three groups. No further risk and kidney injury were observed in the use of aprotinin in neonatal cardiac surgery, aprotinin demonstrated a reduced requirement for blood transfusion compared with tranexamic acid. Our data provide reasonable evidence that aprotinin and tranexamic acid are safe and efficacious as antifibrinolytic modalities in neonatal patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

  8. Combined endodontic therapy and surgery in the treatment of dens invaginatus Type 3: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Neto, Ulisses Xavier; Hirai, Vinício Hidemitsu Goto; Papalexiou, Vula; Gonçalves, Silvana Beltrami; Westphalen, Vânia Portela Ditzel; Bramante, Clovis Monteiro; Martins, Wilson Denis

    2005-12-01

    An accurate understanding of the morphology of the root canal system is a prerequisite for successful root canal treatment. Invaginated teeth have a complex root canal configuration that cannot be instrumented effectively and should be treated by both endodontic therapy and surgery. A case of dens invaginatus Type 3 in a maxillary lateral incisor with a periapical lesion and its successful treatment by these combined methods is reported.

  9. Is it possible to prevent morbidity on post cardiovascular surgery applying low level laser therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Nathali C.; Baptista, Ivany Machado d. C.; Pereira, Mara Helena C.; Serrão, Nelson F.; Pomerantzeff, Pablo M. A.; Chavantes, Maria Cristina

    2014-03-01

    Background and Objective: Complications following cardiovascular surgery incision are common in mediastinitis and wound dehiscence form, a 47% mortality rate remaining. Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) has been employed mainly to its effectiveness analgesic and anti-inflammatory actions, aiding the tissue repair process. The aim of this study was to evaluate infrared LLLT onto surgical incision in patients submitted to cardiovascular surgery. Materials and Methods: 40 patients were divided in two groups: Placebo Group (G1) - conventional therapy + "Laser pointer" and Laser Group (G2) - conventional therapy + Infrared Laser irradiation on surgical incision. Diode Laser was employed, C.W. mode, around the surgical wound bed, on immediate Post Operative (PO), 1st PO and 3rd PO with the following parameters: wavelength (λ): 830nm, P=35mW, E=0,75J. Results: G2 didn't present any complication and 5% of patients in G1 developed incision dehiscence and infection. On 7thPO, still a large amount of G1 patients showed pain and unquestionable inflammatory signs surrounding the surgical wound, when compared to G2. Besides, hospital stay in Laser Group was 2 times shorter than in Placebo Group (p-value=0.001). Conclusion: Infrared Laser denoted to be safe and exceptionally valuable tools in preventing morbidities on post cardiovascular surgeries.

  10. Impact of concomitant chemoradiation on survival for patients with T1-2N1 head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumsteg, Zachary S; Kim, Sungjin; David, John M; Yoshida, Emi J; Tighiouart, Mourad; Shiao, Stephen L; Scher, Kevin; Mita, Alain; Sherman, Eric J; Lee, Nancy Y; Ho, Allen S

    2017-05-01

    Single-modality radiotherapy is considered a standard-of-care option for certain stage III, T1-2N1 head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs). The role of concomitant chemoradiation is not well established because there have been no studies comparing chemoradiation with radiation alone in this population. This study analyzed patients in the National Cancer Data Base with cT1-2N1M0 invasive squamous cell carcinomas of the oropharynx, larynx, and hypopharynx who were diagnosed between 2004 and 2012 and were undergoing definitive radiation. Patients who were undergoing surgery before radiation with unknown follow-up or for whom either the receipt or timing of chemotherapy was unknown were excluded. In all, 5030 patients with T1-2N1 oropharyngeal, laryngeal, or hypopharyngeal cancer were included. The median follow-up was 56.8 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 55.7-58.6 months). Overall, 68% of the patients received concomitant chemoradiation (CCRT). The use of CCRT significantly increased during the time period of this study from 53% in 2004 to 78% in 2012 (P cancer (HR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.65-0.85; P Cancer 2017;123:1555-1565. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  11. The Influence of Total Nodes Examined, Number of Positive Nodes, and Lymph Node Ratio on Survival After Surgical Resection and Adjuvant Chemoradiation for Pancreatic Cancer: A Secondary Analysis of RTOG 9704

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Showalter, Timothy N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Winter, Kathryn A. [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, RTOG Statistical Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Berger, Adam C., E-mail: adam.berger@jefferson.edu [Department of Surgery, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Regine, William F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Abrams, Ross A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Safran, Howard [Department of Medicine, Miriam Hospital, Brown University Oncology Group, Providence, RI (United States); Hoffman, John P. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Benson, Al B. [Division of Hematology-Oncology, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); MacDonald, John S. [St. Vincent' s Cancer Care Center, New York, NY (United States); Willett, Christopher G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Lymph node status is an important predictor of survival in pancreatic cancer. We performed a secondary analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 9704, an adjuvant chemotherapy and chemoradiation trial, to determine the influence of lymph node factors-number of positive nodes (NPN), total nodes examined (TNE), and lymph node ratio (LNR ratio of NPN to TNE)-on OS and disease-free survival (DFS). Patient and Methods: Eligible patients from RTOG 9704 form the basis of this secondary analysis of lymph node parameters. Actuarial estimates for OS and DFS were calculated using Kaplan-Meier methods. Cox proportional hazards models were performed to evaluate associations of NPN, TNE, and LNR with OS and DFS. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were also performed. Results: There were 538 patients enrolled in the RTOG 9704 trial. Of these, 445 patients were eligible with lymph nodes removed. Overall median NPN was 1 (min-max, 0-18). Increased NPN was associated with worse OS (HR = 1.06, p = 0.001) and DFS (HR = 1.05, p = 0.01). In multivariate analyses, both NPN and TNE were associated with OS and DFS. TNE > 12, and >15 were associated with increased OS for all patients, but not for node-negative patients (n = 142). Increased LNR was associated with worse OS (HR = 1.01, p < 0.0001) and DFS (HR = 1.006, p = 0.002). Conclusion: In patients who undergo surgical resection followed by adjuvant chemoradiation, TNE, NPN, and LNR are associated with OS and DFS. This secondary analysis of a prospective, cooperative group trial supports the influence of these lymph node parameters on outcomes after surgery and adjuvant therapy using contemporary techniques.

  12. Does low-level laser therapy decrease swelling and pain resulting from orthognathic surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasperini, G; Rodrigues de Siqueira, I C; Rezende Costa, L

    2014-07-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) could be an alternative for the treatment of swelling and pain after orthognathic surgery, but there is a paucity of data in the literature on the effects of its use. This study verified the efficacy of an LLLT protocol to reduce swelling and pain after orthognathic surgery. Ten healthy patients who underwent a bilateral sagittal split with Le Fort I osteotomy were randomly selected for this study. The LLLT protocol consisted of intraoral and extraoral application to one side of the face after surgery (irradiated side); application to the other side was simulated (non-irradiated side). The irradiated and non-irradiated sides were compared regarding the swelling coefficient and were assessed for pain using a visual analogue scale. There were no significant differences between the irradiated and non-irradiated sides regarding swelling and pain in the immediate postoperative assessment. Swelling decreased significantly on the irradiated side in the postoperative assessments on days 3, 7, 15, and 30. Self-reported pain was less intense on the irradiated side at the 24-h (1.2 vs. 3.4) and 3-day (0.6 vs. 2.1) assessments, but at 7 days after surgery neither side showed pain. This LLLT protocol can improve the tissue response and reduce the pain and swelling resulting from orthognathic surgery.

  13. The impact of anaemia and intravenous iron replacement therapy on outcomes in cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Maurice; Klein, Andrew A; Richards, Toby

    2015-02-01

    Anaemia is common in patients with cardiac disease and also in those undergoing cardiac surgery. There is increasing evidence that preoperative anaemia is associated with increased patient morbidity and mortality following surgery. We performed a systematic literature review to assess the impact of anaemia and intravenous (IV) iron supplementation on outcomes in cardiac surgery. Sixteen studies examined preoperative anaemia in detail. One study examined the role of preoperative IV iron administration and a further three, the effect of postoperative iron supplementation on haemoglobin (Hb) levels and the need for transfusion. Preoperative anaemia was associated with higher mortality, more postoperative blood transfusions, longer intensive care unit (ICU) and total hospital stay and also a greater incidence of postoperative cardiovascular events. In the single study that examined preoperative IV iron in combination with erythropoietin treatment, there was decreased blood transfusion, shorter hospital stay and an increase in patient survival. However, this was a small retrospective cohort study, with the observation and treatment groups analysed over different time periods. Postoperative administration of IV iron therapy, either alone or in combination with erythropoietin, was not effective in raising Hb levels or reducing red cell concentrate transfusion. On the basis of currently available evidence, the effect of perioperative administration of IV iron to cardiac surgery patients, alone or in combination with erythropoietin, remains unproven. Well-designed and appropriately powered prospective randomized controlled trials are needed to evaluate perioperative iron supplementation in the context of cardiac surgery.

  14. Strabismus surgery before versus after completion of amblyopia therapy in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korah, Sanita; Philip, Swetha; Jasper, Smitha; Antonio-Santos, Aileen; Braganza, Andrew

    2014-10-15

    Normal visual development occurs when the brain is able to integrate the visual input from each of the two eyes to form a single three-dimensional image. The process of development of complete three-dimensional vision begins at birth and is almost complete by 24 months of age. The development of this binocular vision is hindered by any abnormality that prevents the brain from receiving a clear, similar image from each eye, due to decreased vision (e.g. amblyopia), or due to misalignment of the two eyes (strabismus or squint) in infancy and early childhood. Currently, practice patterns for management of a child with both strabismus and amblyopia are not standardized. To study the functional and anatomic (ocular alignment) outcomes of strabismus surgery before completion of amblyopia therapy as compared with surgery after completion of amblyopia therapy in children under seven years of age. We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2014, Issue 6), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to July 2014), EMBASE (January 1980 to July 2014), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (January 1982 to July 2014), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 24 July 2014. A manual search for articles from a review of the references of the selected publications and conference abstracts was completed to identify any additional relevant studies. We searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that provided data on strabismus surgery in children less than seven years of age, performed after

  15. A new model to predict acute kidney injury requiring renal replacement therapy after cardiac surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannu, Neesh; Graham, Michelle; Klarenbach, Scott; Meyer, Steven; Kieser, Teresa; Hemmelgarn, Brenda; Ye, Feng; James, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acute kidney injury after cardiac surgery is associated with adverse in-hospital and long-term outcomes. Novel risk factors for acute kidney injury have been identified, but it is unknown whether their incorporation into risk models substantially improves prediction of postoperative acute kidney injury requiring renal replacement therapy. Methods: We developed and validated a risk prediction model for acute kidney injury requiring renal replacement therapy within 14 days after cardiac surgery. We used demographic, and preoperative clinical and laboratory data from 2 independent cohorts of adults who underwent cardiac surgery (excluding transplantation) between Jan. 1, 2004, and Mar. 31, 2009. We developed the risk prediction model using multivariable logistic regression and compared it with existing models based on the C statistic, Hosmer–Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test and Net Reclassification Improvement index. Results: We identified 8 independent predictors of acute kidney injury requiring renal replacement therapy in the derivation model (adjusted odds ratio, 95% confidence interval [CI]): congestive heart failure (3.03, 2.00–4.58), Canadian Cardiovascular Society angina class III or higher (1.66, 1.15–2.40), diabetes mellitus (1.61, 1.12–2.31), baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate (0.96, 0.95–0.97), increasing hemoglobin concentration (0.85, 0.77–0.93), proteinuria (1.65, 1.07–2.54), coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) plus valve surgery (v. CABG only, 1.25, 0.64–2.43), other cardiac procedure (v. CABG only, 3.11, 2.12–4.58) and emergent status for surgery booking (4.63, 2.61–8.21). The 8-variable risk prediction model had excellent performance characteristics in the validation cohort (C statistic 0.83, 95% CI 0.79–0.86). The net reclassification improvement with the prediction model was 13.9% (p < 0.001) compared with the best existing risk prediction model (Cleveland Clinic Score). Interpretation: We have developed

  16. Clinical and treatment factors associated with vaginal stenosis after definitive chemoradiation for anal canal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabeau-Beale, Kristina; Hong, Theodore S; Niemierko, Andrzej; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S; Crowley, Elizabeth M; Cusack, James C; Drapek, Lorraine C; Kovalchuk, Nataliya; Markowski, Meghan; Napolitano, Brian; Nyamwanda, Jacqueline; Ryan, David P; Wolfgang, John; Kachnic, Lisa A; Wo, Jennifer Y

    2015-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the incidence of vaginal stenosis (VS) and identify clinical and treatment factors that predict for VS in female patients with anal cancer treated with definitive chemoradiation. The cohort included 95 consecutive women receiving definitive chemoradiation between 2003 and 2012. All but 1 received intensity modulated radiation therapy; median primary tumor dose 50.4 Gy (range, 41.4-60). A modified National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4 was used to score VS based on the medical record description of dyspareunia, pain with dilator use, vaginal dryness, or difficult pelvic examination. Ordered logistic regression was performed to assess VS predictors. Median age was 60.4 years (range, 19-97). With median follow-up of 2.5 years, 70 women (74%) had adequate information to assess VS. Of these, VS grade distribution was 21.4% grade 0, 14.3% grade 1, 27.1% grade 2, and 37.1% grade 3. By multivariable ordered logistic regression, younger age (P = .02), higher tumor dose (P = .06), and earlier treatment year (P = .04) were associated with higher grade of VS. VS is a common late complication in women treated definitively with chemoradiation for anal canal cancer. Younger age, higher tumor dose, and earlier year of treatment were associated with a higher grade of stenosis. Prospective investigation into patient reported outcomes is warranted, including sexual function and VS prevention strategies to better understand its effect on long-term survivorship. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Predictive Biomarkers to Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Conde-Muíño

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been a high local recurrence rate in rectal cancer. Besides improvements in surgical techniques, both neoadjuvant short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiation improve oncological results. Approximately 40–60% of rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation achieve some degree of pathologic response. However, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond to neoadjuvant treatment. Recent studies have evaluated the potential of genetic biomarkers to predict outcome in locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The articles produced by the PubMed search were reviewed for those specifically addressing a genetic profile’s ability to predict response to neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer. Although tissue gene microarray profiling has led to promising data in cancer, to date, none of the identified signatures or molecular markers in locally advanced rectal cancer has been successfully validated as a diagnostic or prognostic tool applicable to routine clinical practice.

  18. Predictive Biomarkers to Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde-Muíño, Raquel; Cuadros, Marta; Zambudio, Natalia; Segura-Jiménez, Inmaculada; Cano, Carlos; Palma, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    There has been a high local recurrence rate in rectal cancer. Besides improvements in surgical techniques, both neoadjuvant short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiation improve oncological results. Approximately 40-60% of rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation achieve some degree of pathologic response. However, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond to neoadjuvant treatment. Recent studies have evaluated the potential of genetic biomarkers to predict outcome in locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The articles produced by the PubMed search were reviewed for those specifically addressing a genetic profile's ability to predict response to neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer. Although tissue gene microarray profiling has led to promising data in cancer, to date, none of the identified signatures or molecular markers in locally advanced rectal cancer has been successfully validated as a diagnostic or prognostic tool applicable to routine clinical practice.

  19. Current status of radiation therapy. Evidence-based medicine (EBM) of radiation therapy. Current management of patients with esophageal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemoto, Kenji [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-03-01

    The best management for small mucosal esophageal cancer is generally endoscopic mucosal resection. However, for submucosal cancer and extensive mucosal caner, either radical surgery or radiation seems to be an equally efficacious option. Radiation therapy concurrent with chemotherapy is more effective than radiation therapy alone for patients with unresectable esophageal cancer. The key drugs are cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil. However, for patients with poor performance status or for aged patients, radiation therapy alone is still a choice of treatment. Surgery has generally been indicated for patients with resectable esophageal cancer. However, outcomes of concurrent chemoradiation therapy may be comparable with those of surgery. Therefore, a prospective randomized study should be performed to determine the best management for patients with resectable esophageal cancer. The usefulness of intra-cavitary irradiation for esophageal cancer has not been clarified. A prospective randomized trial with a large number of patients is necessary to determine the effectiveness of intra-cavitary irradiation. The best management for patients with loco-regionally recurrent esophageal cancer after surgery has not been determined. Intensive therapy should be considered if the site of recurrence is limited and the time interval from surgery to recurrence is long. Chemotherapy is essential in the management of patients with small cell esophageal cancer. However, the best local therapy has not been determined. (author)

  20. The effect of movement therapy on quality of life of patients after lumbar disc herniation surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alimohammadi N

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Patients after lumbar disc herniation surgery experience chronic pain and disability and can impact on their quality of life. This study aimed to determine the effect of movement therapy on quality of life of patients after lumbar disc herniation surgery. Materials and Method: The current clinical trial study with before and after design in three stages was done on patients with lumbar disc herniation surgery in one of the hospitals in Isfahan in 2013. Patients were selected through convenience sampling and then were randomly allocated into two intervention and control groups (32 patients in each group. The movement program was implemented 4 weeks after surgery for 2 weeks. Data were collected through demographic questionnaire and SF-36 quality of life questionnaire. Data were analyzed by SPSS-18 using independent t-test and repeated measures ANOVA. Results: There has been a significant increase in the mean of overall quality of life score in intervention group 6 weeks (65.2 ± 7.45 and 3 months after intervention (70.9 ± 8.2, in compare with before the intervention (31.5 ± 6.05 (p < 0.001. Also the mean of overall quality of life score showed the significant difference in two groups (p < 0.001. Physical and psychological aspects increased significantly in both groups in the period of 6 weeks and 3 months after intervention, the increase was greater in intervention group than control group. (p<0.001. Conclusion: Movement therapy promotes the quality of life of patients after lumbar disc herniation surgery. Thus, using this program by health care professionals in improving the quality of life of patients is recommended.

  1. Results of endoscopic surgery and intralesional steroid therapy for airway compromise due to tracheobronchial Wegener's granulomatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. R. Nouraei

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Upper airway compromise due to tracheobronchial stenosis commonly occurs in patients with Wegener's Granulomatosis (WG. There is at present no consensus on the optimal management of this life-threatening condition. Objective: To assess the results of laryngo-tracheo-bronchoscopy, intralesional steroid therapy, laser surgery, and dilatation in managing obstructive tracheobronchial WG. Methods: Records of eighteen previously-untreated stridulous patients with obstructive tracheobronchial WG, treated between 2004 and 2006 were prospectively recorded on an airway database and retrospectively reviewed. Information about patient and lesion characteristics and treatment details were recorded. Treatment progress was illustrated using a timeline plot, and intervention-free intervals were calculated with actuarial analysis. Results: There were nine males and the average age at presentation was 40 (16 years [range 13–74]. There were thirteen patients with tracheal, and five patients with tracheal and bronchial lesions. The average tracheal lesion height was 8 (3 mm, located 23 (9 mm below the glottis. There were 1, 10 and 7 Myer-Cotton grade I, II and III lesions respectively. Mean intervention-free interval following minimally-invasive treatment was 26 (2.8 months. Following endobronchial therapy the median intervention-free interval was 22 months (p>0.8 vs. tracheal lesions. No patient required a tracheostomy or endoluminal stenting. Conclusions: Intralesional steroid therapy and conservative endoluminal surgery is an effective strategy for treating airway compromise due to active tracheal and bronchial WG, obviating the need for airway bypass or stenting. We recommend the combination of endotracheal dilatation, conservative laser surgery and steroid therapy as the standard of care for treating airway compromise due to obstructive tracheobronchial WG.

  2. [Innovation in Surgery for Advanced Lung Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Tomoyuki; Yasunori, Sohara; Endo, Shunsuke

    2016-07-01

    Thoracoscopic surgery can be one of less invasive surgical interventions for early stage lung cancer. Locally advanced lung cancer, however, cannot avoid aggressive procedures including pneumonectomy and/or extended combined resection of chest wall, aorta, esophagus, etc. for complete resection. Surgical approach even for advanced lung cancer can be less invasive by benefit from new anti-cancer treatment, innovated manipulations of bronchoplasty and angioplasty, and bench surgery( lung autotransplantation technique). We herein reviewed the strategy to minimize invasive interventions for locally advanced lung cancer, introducing 2 successful cases with advanced lung cancer. The 1st patient is a 62-year old man with centrally advanced lung cancer invading to mediastinum. Right upper sleeve lobectomy with one-stoma carinoplasty following induction chemoradiation therapy was successful. The operation time was 241 minutes. The performance status is good with no recurrence for 60 months after surgery. The 2nd is a 79-year old man with advanced lung cancer invading to the distal aortic arch. Left upper segmentectomy following thoracic endovascular aortic repair with stentgraft was successful with no extracorporeal circulation. The operation time was 170 minutes. The performance status is good with no recurrence for 30 months after surgery. The invasiveness of surgical interventions for local advanced lung cancer can be minimized by innovated device and new anti-cancer drugs.

  3. Radiation therapy in recurrence of carcinoma of the uterine cervix after primary surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Ok Bae [College of Medicine, Keimyung Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate treatment results in terms of the survival and failure patterns subsequent to radiation therapy in recurrent cervical cancer, following primary surgery. Between January 1990 and December 1999, 27 patients, with recurrent cervical cancer following primary surgery, were subsequently treated with radiation in the Department of Radiation Oncology, at the Keimyung University Dongsan Medical Center. Their median age was 48, ranging from 31 to 70 years old. With regard to the initial FIGO stage on presentation, 20 and 7 patients were stages I and II, respectively. Twenty three patients had squamous ceH carcinomas and 4 had adenocarcinomas. The time interval from the primary surgery to the recurrence ranged from 2 to 90 months with a median of 29 months. The recurrent sites were the vaginal cuff alone, the pelvic cavity and combined recurrence in 14, 9 and 4 patients, respectively. Radiation was performed, with external and vaginal intracavitary radiation in 13 patients, external radiation alone in 13 and vaginal intracavitary radiation alone in another one. The median follow-up period was 55 months, ranging from 6 to 128 months. The five year disease free survival (5y DFS) and five year overall survival (5y OS) rates were 68.2 and 71.9%, respectively. There was a marginal statistically significant difference in the 5y DFS in relation to the recurrent site (5y DFS, 85.7% in vaginal cuff recurrence alone, 53.3% in pelvic cavity recurrence, p=0.09). There was no difference in the survival according to the time interval between the primary surgery and a recurrence. There was only a 7% local failure rate in the patients with a vaginal cuff recurrence. The major failure patterns were local failure in the patients with pelvic cavity recurrence, and distant failure in the patients with a combined recurrence. There were no complications above grade 3 after the radiation therapy. Radiation therapy was safe and effective treatment for a

  4. Survival After Chemoradiation in Resected Pancreatic Cancer: The Impact of Adjuvant Gemcitabine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baschnagel, Andrew; Shah, Chirag [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Margolis, Jeffrey; Nadeau, Laura [Department of Medical Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Stein, Julie; Jury, Robert [Department of Surgery, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Robertson, John M., E-mail: jrobertson@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate survival in patients with resected pancreatic cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiation with or without adjuvant gemcitabine (Gem). Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2010, 86 patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma who underwent resection were treated with adjuvant concurrent chemoradiation. Thirty-four patients received concurrent 5-fluorouracil-based chemoradiation (5-FU/RT) with traditional field radiation (range, 45-61.2 Gy; median, 50.4 Gy) without further adjuvant therapy. Thirty patients received traditional field 5-FU/RT (range, 45-60.4 Gy; median, 50.4 Gy) with Gem (1,000 mg/m{sup 2} weekly) either before and after radiotherapy or only after radiotherapy. Twenty-two patients received concurrent full-dose Gem (1,000 mg/m{sup 2} weekly)-based chemoradiation (Gem/RT), consisting of involved-field radiation (range, 27-38 Gy; median, 36 Gy) followed by further adjuvant Gem. Results: The median age of the cohort was 65 years (range, 40-80 years). Of the patients, 58 had T3 tumors (67%), 22 had T2 tumors (26%), and 6 had T1 tumors (7%). N1 disease was present in 61 patients (71%), whereas 18 patients (21%) had R1 resections. Performance status, lymph node status, and margin status were all similar among the treatment groups. Median follow-up was 19.0 months. Median overall survival (OS) (19.2 months, 19.0 months, and 21.0 months) and 3-year OS rates (26.5%, 27.2%, and 32.1%) were similar among patients with 5-FU/RT with no adjuvant Gem, those with 5-FU/RT with adjuvant Gem, and those with Gem/RT with adjuvant Gem, respectively (p = 0.88). Patients who received adjuvant Gem had a similar median OS (22.1 months) and 3-year OS rate (29%) compared to patients who did not (19.2 months and 26.5%, respectively) (p = 0.62). There was a trend for improved 3-year OS rates in patients with R0 vs. R1 resections (28.1% vs. 14.2%, p = 0.06) and in patients with T1 and T2 vs. T3 tumors (38% vs. 20%, p = 0.09). Node-negative patients had an improved 3

  5. Binocular Vision Problems in Refractive Surgery Patients: Vision Therapy Case Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina Day, OD

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Some post-LASIK patients complain of blurry distance vision months after refractive surgery, despite good corneal healing and negligible refractive error. We postulated that perceiving blur in the absence of refractive error or significant monocular aberrations might result from poor binocular control. Binocular vision testing in a series of such patients revealed convergence problems in 83% of cases. Case Reports: We report on 8 patients (average age 37.4 yrs who completed up to 40 sessions of vision therapy (VT, either completely via computer or in a combination of computer orthoptics and office vision therapy. Seven patients had received LASIK; one had PRK. Optometric measurements and symptoms were recorded before and after VT treatment, starting at least 3 months after refractive surgery. Near point of convergence improved in 7 cases following VT, and convergence break and/or recovery improved in 6 cases. Six cases reported symptom reduction, and pre-presbyopic cases tended to improve accommodative facility. The number of binocular functions showing improvement per case correlated with the number of VT sessions completed. Convergence changes were statistically significant when pre-/post-VT data were compared for these cases as a group. Conclusion: Patients complaining of distance blur following refractive surgery may have undiagnosed binocular vision problems. VT incorporating an internet orthoptics component improved convergence ability in the cases reported here, and most patients reported symptomatic relief.

  6. Surgery combined with topical photodynamic therapy for the treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the lip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Yang, Yadong; Yang, Yunchuan; Lu, Yuangang

    2016-06-01

    Due to the unique location of the squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the lip, using a single method such as extended resection or radiotherapy probably causes morphological and functional defects. So we used surgery combined with topical photodynamic therapy (PDT) to treat SCC of the lip. Under local anesthesia with 5% lidocaine, the hyperplastic and ulcerative SCC of the lip were curetted and assisted by topical PDTs after surgery. The 20% 5-aminolevulinic acid cream was used as a photosensitizer and applied evenly to the surface of the tumor lesion for 4h. Then the lesion site was irradiated with a 635-nm laser at 120J/cm(2). A total of five PDTs were performed postoperatively at an interval of 2 weeks. Photos were taken before and after every PDT to compare the skin lesions, treatment effects, and side effects. A long-term follow-up was undertaken to observe tumor recurrence. After surgery combined with five topical PDTs, the SCC of the lip disappeared without the compromised morphology of the lip, significant side effects, or tumor recurrence in one-year follow-up. Surgery combined with topical PDT can reduce the excision size of tumors and play a positive role in the treatment of tumors of special locations.

  7. Acute cholecystitis – early laparoskopic surgery versus antibiotic therapy and delayed elective cholecystectomy: ACDC-study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Büchler Markus W

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute cholecystitis occurs frequently in the elderly and in patients with gall stones. Most cases of severe or recurrent cholecystitis eventually require surgery, usually laparoscopic cholecystectomy in the Western World. It is unclear whether an initial, conservative approach with antibiotic and symptomatic therapy followed by delayed elective surgery would result in better morbidity and outcome than immediate surgery. At present, treatment is generally determined by whether the patient first sees a surgeon or a gastroenterologist. We wish to investigate whether both approaches are equivalent. The primary endpoint is the morbidity until day 75 after inclusion into the study. Design A multicenter, prospective, randomized non-blinded study to compare treatment outcome, complications and 75-day morbidity in patients with acute cholecystitis randomized to laparoscopic cholecystectomy within 24 hours of symptom onset or antibiotic treatment with moxifloxacin and subsequent elective cholecystectomy. For consistency in both arms moxifloxacin, a fluorquinolone with broad spectrum of activity and high bile concentration is used as antibiotic. Duration: October 2006 – November 2008 Organisation/Responsibility The trial was planned and is being conducted and analysed by the Departments of Gastroenterology and General Surgery at the University Hospital of Heidelberg according to the ethical, regulatory and scientific principles governing clinical research as set out in the Declaration of Helsinki (1989 and the Good Clinical Practice guideline (GCP. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00447304

  8. Complete Remission of Metastatic Neuroendocrine Paragastric Carcinoma After "Neoadjuvant" Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy and Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Matthias C; Uhrhan, Klara; Fischer, Thomas; Schmitz, Stephan; Markiefka, Birgid; Drzezga, Alexander; Stippel, Dirk

    2015-08-01

    A 48-year-old man presenting with upper abdominal pain was diagnosed with neuroendocrine tumor after biopsy of a paragastric mass with multiple liver metastases. (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT showed intense uptake in the paragastric tumor and in multiple liver metastases not allowing primary surgery. Two cycles with cumulative 14.6 GBq (177)Lu-DOTATATE were given resulting in a considerable improvement. Subsequent surgery resulted in a complete remission as demonstrated by (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT. Usually, peptide receptor radionuclide (PRRT) therapy is considered a palliative treatment. Few patients demonstrate a very favorable response allowing resection of the primary tumor after downstaging metastatic disease burden.

  9. Prognostic significance of changes of tumor epidermal growth factor receptor expression after neoadjuvant chemoradiation in patients with rectal adenocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dvorak, J.; Sirak, I.; Petera, J. [Charles Univ. Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic). Dept. of Oncology and Radiotherapy; Sitorova, V.; Ryska, A.; Hatlova, J. [Charles Univ. Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic). Dept. of Pathology; Richter, I. [Regional Hospital Liberec, Liberec (Czech Republic); Charles Univ. Medical School, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Ferko, A. [Charles Univ. Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic). Dept. of Surgery; Melichar, B. [Palacky Univ. Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Olomouc (Czech Republic). Dept. of Oncology

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of neoadjuvant chemoradiation on tumor epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression in patients with locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma. Patients and methods: A total of 53 patients with rectal adenocarcinoma (clinical stages II and III) were studied. Neoadjuvant treatment consisted of 50.4 Gy/28 fractions external radiation with concomitant continuous 5-fluorouracil. Surgical resection was performed 4-6 weeks after the chemoradiation. EGFR expression in the pretreatment biopsies and in the resected specimens was assessed with immunohistochemistry. Results: Patients with an increase of EGFR expression during chemoradiation had significantly shorter disease-free survival (DFS; p = 0.003) and overall survival (OS; p = 0.005) compared to patients with either no change or decrease in EGFR expression. The 5-year DFS in patients with increased EGFR expression was only 29% compared to 61% in patients without an increase of EGFR expression. Similarly, the 5-year OS of the patients with increased EGFR expression was 29% compared to 66% in patients without an increase of EGFR expression. All recurrences in patients who had an increase of EGFR expression occurred within the first 2 years after the treatment. The increase in EGFR expression was the only significant predictor of DFS (p = 0.007) and OS (p = 0.04) using multivariate Cox regression analysis. Conclusion: An increase of EGFR expression during chemoradiation may be associated with significantly shorter DFS and OS. The increase of EGFR could identify a population of patients in whom the effect of the treatment with anti-EGFR therapy should be studied. (orig.)

  10. SURGERY AND MULTIMODAL THERAPY IN COLON-ANG IN RECTAL CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.H.Link; T.A.Sagban; Z.L.Ji

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1 Summary The 5-year-survival rates of surgically treated patients are varying and depend on UICC stages/substages with remarkable variations in between published reports, surgical hospital units, individual surgeons, and continents. These variations may be due to surgical techniques, training status, hospital and individual case volume, but also on referral patterns, and statistical evaluation methods. Survival time and cure rates are significantly improved by modern adjuvant chemotherapy in colon cancers UICC Ⅲ and in substages of UICC Ⅱ (e.g. UICC Ⅱ B) by 5%-16%, and adjuvant radiochemotherapy in rectal cancer by 10%-14% when compared to surgical controls. In three modern colon cancer trials standard adjuvant chemotherapy was further improved by increasing the survival rates, e.g. from 59% to 71% in stage Ⅲ and IIB patients. In rectal cancer neoadjuvant radio(chemo)therapy decreases local relapse rates vs. postoperative adjuvant radio(chemo)therapy. Since surgery in rectal cancer has also been significantly improved by total mesorectal excision (TME) and better surgical training, the indications and methods for multimodal therapy have changed from UICC Ⅱ+Ⅲ to more individual criteria. Molecular and genetic factors, such as thymidylate synthase (TS), microsatellite instability (MSI) or loss of chromosome 18q/DCC might have an independent impact on prognosis in the spontaneous course, but could also help to individually select colon and rectal cancer patients and treatment protocols for multimodal therapy. Thus, surgery and multimodal therapy has become very complex, needs regularly be updated in competent reviews, and should be conducted in specialized centers of multi-and interdisciplinary excellence.

  11. Effects of music therapy under general anesthesia in patients undergoing abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahloul, Mohamed; Mhamdi, Salah; Nakhli, Mohamed Said; Sfeyhi, Ahmed Nadhir; Azzaza, Mohamed; Chaouch, Ajmi; Naija, Walid

    2017-12-01

    Music therapy, an innovative approach that has proven effectiveness in many medical conditions, seems beneficial also in managing surgical patients. The aim of this study is to evaluate its effects, under general anesthesia, on perioperative patient satisfaction, stress, pain, and awareness. This is a prospective, randomized, double-blind study conducted in the operating theatre of visceral surgery at Sahloul Teaching Hospital over a period of 4 months. Patients aged more than 18 undergoing a scheduled surgery under general anesthesia were included. Patients undergoing urgent surgery or presenting hearing or cognitive disorders were excluded. Before induction, patients wore headphones linked to an MP3 player. They were randomly allocated into 2 groups: Group M (with music during surgery) and group C (without music). Hemodynamic parameters, quality of arousal, pain experienced, patient's satisfaction, and awareness incidence during anesthesia were recorded. One hundred and forty patients were included and allocated into 2 groups that were comparable in demographic characteristics, surgical intervention type and anesthesia duration. Comparison of these two groups regarding the hemodynamic profile found more stability in group M for systolic arterial blood pressure. A calm recovery was more often noted in group M (77.1% versus 44%, p < 10(-3)). The average Visual Analog Scale (VAS) score was lower in the intervention group (33.8 ± 13.63 versus 45.1 ± 16.2; p < 10(-3)). The satisfaction rate was significantly higher among the experimental group (81.4% versus 51.4%; p < 10(-3)). The incidence of intraoperative awareness was higher in group C (8 cases versus 3 cases) but the difference was not statistically significant. Music therapy is a non-pharmacological, inexpensive, and non-invasive technique that can significantly enhance patient satisfaction and decrease patients' embarrassing experiences related to perioperative stress, pain, and awareness.

  12. Effects of music therapy under general anesthesia in patients undergoing abdominal surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahloul, Mohamed; Mhamdi, Salah; Nakhli, Mohamed Said; Sfeyhi, Ahmed Nadhir; Azzaza, Mohamed; Chaouch, Ajmi; Naija, Walid

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Music therapy, an innovative approach that has proven effectiveness in many medical conditions, seems beneficial also in managing surgical patients. The aim of this study is to evaluate its effects, under general anesthesia, on perioperative patient satisfaction, stress, pain, and awareness. Methods: This is a prospective, randomized, double-blind study conducted in the operating theatre of visceral surgery at Sahloul Teaching Hospital over a period of 4 months. Patients aged more than 18 undergoing a scheduled surgery under general anesthesia were included. Patients undergoing urgent surgery or presenting hearing or cognitive disorders were excluded. Before induction, patients wore headphones linked to an MP3 player. They were randomly allocated into 2 groups: Group M (with music during surgery) and group C (without music). Hemodynamic parameters, quality of arousal, pain experienced, patient’s satisfaction, and awareness incidence during anesthesia were recorded. Results: One hundred and forty patients were included and allocated into 2 groups that were comparable in demographic characteristics, surgical intervention type and anesthesia duration. Comparison of these two groups regarding the hemodynamic profile found more stability in group M for systolic arterial blood pressure. A calm recovery was more often noted in group M (77.1% versus 44%, p < 10–3). The average Visual Analog Scale (VAS) score was lower in the intervention group (33.8 ± 13.63 versus 45.1 ± 16.2; p < 10–3). The satisfaction rate was significantly higher among the experimental group (81.4% versus 51.4%; p < 10–3). The incidence of intraoperative awareness was higher in group C (8 cases versus 3 cases) but the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion: Music therapy is a non-pharmacological, inexpensive, and non-invasive technique that can significantly enhance patient satisfaction and decrease patients’ embarrassing experiences related

  13. Postoperative bleeding risk for cutaneous surgery in the head and neck region with continued phenprocoumon therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichhorn, Wolfgang; Barsukov, Evgeny; Al-Dam, Ahmed; Gröbe, Alexander; Smeets, Ralf; Eichhorn, Marc; Heiland, Max; Kluwe, Lan; Blessmann, Marco

    2014-07-01

    In a total of 171 surgical procedures for lesions in the head and neck region in patients in whom phenprocoumon therapy was not stopped, 16 (9%) postoperative bleeding events were observed over a follow-up period of two weeks. Local measures were sufficient in all cases except one severe case where blood transfusion was needed and anticoagulant treatment was stopped for 7 days. The bleeding risk was significantly higher for the surgical procedures of the nose than those in other areas (21% versus 6%, P = 0.014), but was not influenced by the international normalized ratio (INR) of blood coagulation, size, site and type of the lesion, surgical procedure, and sex and age of the patients. The bleeding rate in patients not on any anticoagulation therapy was significantly lower (6/211 = 3%). Across both groups, just over 80% of the bleeding episodes were within the first two days (55% on the same day and 32% on the next day) of the surgery. No bleeding was recorded after 5 days. Our data suggest that cutaneous surgery in the head and neck region can be safely performed with continued phenprocoumon therapy in most cases in an INR range of 1.3-3.4, but rarely severe bleeding does occur and can be managed with a close-contact follow-up and with 24-h on call services during the first two days postoperatively. Copyright © 2013 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Dermatofibrosarcoma Protuberans: Long-term Outcomes of 53 Patients Treated With Conservative Surgery and Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castle, Katherine O. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Guadagnolo, B. Ashleigh, E-mail: aguadagn@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Tsai, C. Jillian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Feig, Barry W. [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zagars, Gunar K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate outcomes of conservative surgery and radiation therapy (RT) treatment in patients with dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 53 consecutive dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans patients treated with surgery and preoperative or postoperative radiation therapy between 1972 and 2010. Median tumor size was 4 cm (range, 1-25 cm). Seven patients (13%) were treated with preoperative RT (50-50.4 Gy) and 46 patients (87%) with postoperative RT (60-66 Gy). Of the 46 patients receiving postoperative radiation, 3 (7%) had gross disease, 14 (30%) positive margins, 26 (57%) negative margins, and 3 (7%) uncertain margin status. Radiation dose ranged from 50 to 66 Gy (median dose, 60 Gy). Results: At a median follow-up time of 6.5 years (range, 0.5 months-23.5 years), 2 patients (4%) had disease recurrence, and 3 patients (6%) had died. Actuarial overall survival was 98% at both 5 and 10 years. Local control was 98% and 93% at 5 and 10 years, respectively. Disease-free survival was 98% and 93% at 5 and 10 years, respectively. The presence of fibrosarcomatous change was not associated with increased risk of local or distant relapse (P=.43). One of the patients with a local recurrence had gross residual disease at the time of RT and despite RT to 65 Gy developed both an in-field recurrence and a nodal and distant recurrence 3 months after RT. The other patient with local recurrence was found to have in-field recurrence 10 years after initial treatment. Thirteen percent of patients had an RT complication at 5 and 10 years, and 9% had a moderate or severe complication at 5 and 10 years. Conclusions: Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans is a radioresponsive disease with excellent local control after conservative surgery and radiation therapy. Adjuvant RT should be considered for patients with large or recurrent tumors or when attempts at wide surgical margins would result in significant morbidity.

  15. Effectiveness of massage therapy on post-operative outcomes among patients undergoing cardiac surgery: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Ramesh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD are increasing rapidly in developing countries. Most patients with CVD do not respond to medical treatment and have to undergo cardiac surgery. This highly stressful experience results in increased levels of anxiety for patients. The objective of this review was to evaluate the efficacy of massage therapy on postoperative outcomes among patients undergoing cardiac surgery. A comprehensive literature search was made on PubMed-Medline, CINAHL, Science Direct, Scopus, Web of Science and the Cochrane library databases for original research articles published between 2000 and 2015. Original articles that reported the efficacy of massage therapy in patients undergoing cardiac surgery were included. The Cochrane data extraction form was used to extract data. A total of 297 studies were identified in the literature search. However, only seven studies were eligible for analysis. Of the seven studies, six studies demonstrated the effects of massage therapy on improving post-operative outcomes of patients, while one study found no evidence of improvement. Although the methods varied considerably, most of the studies included in this review reported positive results. Therefore, there is some evidence that massage therapy can lead to positive postoperative outcomes. Evidence of the effectiveness of massage therapy in patients undergoing cardiac surgery remains inconclusive. Additional research is needed to provide a strong evidence base for the use of massage therapy to improve post-operative outcomes and recovery among cardiac surgery patients

  16. An Eye Popping Case of Orbital Necrotizing Fasciitis Treated with Antibiotics, Surgery, and Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singam, Narayanasarma V; Rusia, Deepam; Prakash, Rajan

    2017-04-01

    BACKGROUND Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) of the orbit is a rare and deadly condition that requires prompt surgical and medical management to decrease morbidity and mortality.  CASE REPORT Here we present an interesting case of an individual who developed fulminant NF of the left orbit requiring emergent surgical intervention, antibiotics, and subsequent hyperbaric oxygen therapy in an attempt to save the eye.  CONCLUSIONS With an early and aggressive multifaceted approach using antibiotics, surgery, and hyperbaric oxygen it may be possible to preserve eye structure and function. Without treatment NF is a rapidly progressive condition and can result in significant morbidity.

  17. Oral surgery for patients on anticoagulant therapy: current thoughts on patient management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doonquah, Ladi; Mitchell, Anika D

    2012-01-01

    Minor oral surgical procedures make up a significant part of the daily practice of dentistry. With the increased sophistication of medical technology and medications there is increased likelihood of performing surgery on patients who are being treated for conditions that require some type of anticoagulant therapy. These patients are at an increased risk for perioperative bleeding or thrombotic complications if anticoagulation is discontinued or the dosage is adjusted. Therefore, a fine balance needs to be obtained and adequate preparation of these patients is the key to establishing this balance. This article reviews suggested approaches to the management of such patients.

  18. [The effect of postoperative cold therapy in joint surgery using a new cooling device].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münst, P; Bonnaire, F; Kuner, E H

    1988-08-01

    The effect of continuous cold therapy with a new cooling device in post-operative treatment after knee surgery has been proved. Ten patients with different operations of the knee joint participated in this study. Eight out of ten patients reported no or poor pain, whereas in the control group especially after arthrotomy considerable or violent pain was reported. After arthroscopic operations we found more an decrease of swelling and effusion, after arthrotomy more pain reduction. The subjective feeling of all patients was very good and they were generally very receptive to it.

  19. Left video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery esophagectomy in a patient with situs inversus totalis and Kartagener syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peel, John; Darling, Gail

    2014-08-01

    A 67-year-old man with situs inversus totalis and Kartagener syndrome was diagnosed with esophageal adenocarcinoma after presenting with chronic gastroesophageal reflux. Resection of the tumor was done by minimally invasive Ivor-Lewis esophagectomy using a left video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery approach, rather than the typical right video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery. Patients with situs inversus totalis may be considered for fully minimally invasive esophagectomy with laparoscopic gastric mobilization and video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery esophagectomy with an intrathoracic anastomosis using a similarly opposite-sided approach. Patients with Kartagener syndrome are also at increased risk for respiratory tract infections. This should be considered in the perioperative period, as well as when considering induction chemoradiation therapy.

  20. The influence of total nodes examined, number of positive nodes, and lymph node ratio on survival after surgical resection and adjuvant chemoradiation for pancreatic cancer: A secondary analysis of RTOG 9704

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showalter, Timothy N.; Winter, Kathryn A.; Berger, Adam C.; Regine, William F.; Abrams, Ross A.; Safran, Howard; Hoffman, John P.; Benson, Al B.; MacDonald, John S.; Willett, Christopher G.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Lymph node status is an important predictor of survival in pancreatic cancer. We performed a secondary analysis of RTOG 9704, an adjuvant chemotherapy and chemoradiation trial, to determine the influence of lymph node factors-number of positive nodes (NPN), total nodes examined (TNE), and lymph node ratio (LNR-ratio of NPN to TNE)-on OS and disease-free survival (DFS). Patient and Methods Eligible patients from RTOG 9704 form the basis of this secondary analysis of lymph node parameters. Actuarial estimates for OS and DFS were calculated using Kaplan-Meier methods. Cox proportional hazards models were performed to evaluate associations of NPN, TNE, and LNR with OS and DFS. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were also performed. Results There were 538 patients enrolled in the RTOG 9704 trial. Of these, 445 patients were eligible with lymph nodes removed. Overall median NPN was 1 (min-max, 0-18). Increased NPN was associated with worse OS (HR=1.06, p=0.001) and DFS (HR=1.05, p=0.01). In multivariate analyses, both NPN and TNE were associated with OS and DFS. TNE > 12, and >15, were associated with increased OS for all patients, but not for node-negative patients (n =142). Increased LNR was associated with worse OS (HR=1.01, p<0.0001) and DFS (HR=1.006, p=0.002). Conclusion In patients who undergo surgical resection followed by adjuvant chemoradiation, TNE, NPN, and LNR are associated with OS and DFS. This secondary analysis of a prospective, cooperative group trial supports the influence of these lymph node parameters on outcomes after surgery and adjuvant therapy using contemporary techniques. PMID:20934270

  1. CONTEMPORARY APPROACHES TO LEVOTHYROXINE THERAPY AFTER SURGERY IN PATIENTS WITH WELL-DIFFERENTIATED THYROID CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. O. Rumyantsev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Levothyroxine therapy with purpose to suppress thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH after surgery in patients with well-differentiated thyroid cancer is implemented since 1937. Accumulated results of levothyroxine suppressive therapy (LST application are attesting its heterogeneous efficacy in various risk groups of tumor recurrence: low, medium and high. Similar risk groups are emphasized towards adverse effect risk due to LST. The more intensivity and duration of TSH suppression the higher risk of adverse effects. First, they include osteopenia or osteoporosis and atrial fibrillation. Contemporary approaches to intensivity and duration of LTS are based on accounting of its potential efficiency into various clinical risk groups of tumor recurrence as well as adverse effects risk groups.

  2. [Endobronchial surgery and photodynamic therapy for the treatment of multiple primary lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, V V; Telegina, L V; Trakhtenberg, A Kh; Kolbanov, K I; Pikin, O V; Frank, G A

    2010-01-01

    Endoluminal endoscopic surgery and fotodynamic therapy were used in treatment of 104 patients with multiple primary lung cancer (MPLC), or more exactly, of trachea and lobar and segmental bronchi. Diagnostic division included videobronchoscopy of high resolution in with light and NBI-regimen; autoflourescent and 5-ALA-induced fluorescent videobronchoscopy, endosonography, computed tompgraphy or magnetic resonance imaging of the thorax and epithelial mucine (MUC-1) immunohistochemical analysis of scarificates. Result of treatment strongly depended on the size of primary tumor. Complete regression of cancer was observed for all tumors less then 1 sm in diameter. Endoscopic treatment, including fotodynamic therapy and argon coagulation, proved to be a method of choice in treatment early synchronous or metachronous multiple primary lung cancer in incurable patients.

  3. Analysis of risk factors for chronic subdural haematoma recurrence after burr hole surgery: optimal management of patients on antiplatelet therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okano, Atsushi; Oya, Soichi; Fujisawa, Naoaki; Tsuchiya, Tsukasa; Indo, Masahiro; Nakamura, Takumi; Chang, Han Soo; Matsui, Toru

    2014-04-01

    OBJECTIVE. Not much is known about surgical management of patients with chronic subdural haematoma (CSDH) treated with antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy. The aims of this study were to review the surgical outcomes of patients with CSDH and assess the risks of antiplatelet in their surgical management. METHODS. We retrospectively analysed 448 consecutive patients with CSDH treated by one burr hole surgery at our institution. Among them, 58 patients had been on antiplatelet therapy. We discontinued the antiplatelet agents before surgery for all 58 patients. For 51 of these 58 patients (87.9%), early surgery was performed within 0-2 days from admission. We analysed the association between recurrence and patient characteristics, including history of antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy; age (therapy; and previous medical history of head trauma, infarction, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, haemodialysis, seizure, cancer, or liver cirrhosis. RESULTS. Recurrence occurred in 40 patients (8.9%), which was one of the lowest rates in the literature. Univariate analysis showed that only the presence of bilateral haematomas was associated with increased recurrence rate while antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy did not significantly increase recurrence risk. Also, the recurrence rate from early surgery (0-2 days from drug cessation) for patients on antiplatelet therapy was not significantly higher than that from elective surgery (5 days or more after drug cessation). However, multivariate analysis revealed that previous history of cerebral infarction was an independent risk factor for CSDH recurrence. CONCLUSIOns. Our overall data support the safety of early surgery for patients on the preoperative antiplatelet therapy without drug cessation or platelet infusion. Patients with a previous history of infarction may need to be closely followed regardless of antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy.

  4. Effects of music therapy on pain, anxiety, and vital signs in patients after thoracic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Petrini, Marcia A

    2015-10-01

    To examine the effectiveness of music listening on pain, anxiety, and vital signs among patients after thoracic surgery in China. A randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted in the thoracic surgery department of two tertiary hospitals in Wuhan, China. 112 patients were recruited and randomly assigned to either experimental (n=56) or control (n=56) group respectively. The experimental group received standard care and a 30-min soft music intervention for 3 days, while the control group received only standard care. Measures include pain, anxiety, vital signs (blood pressure, heart rate and respiratory rate), patient controlled analgesia, and diclofenac sodium suppository use. The experimental group showed statistically significant decrease in pain, anxiety, systolic blood pressure and heart rate over time compared to the control group, but no significant difference were identified in diastolic blood pressure, respiratory rate, patient controlled analgesia and diclofenac sodium suppository use. The findings provide further evidence to support the practice of music therapy to reduce postoperative pain and anxiety, and lower systolic blood pressure and heart rate in patients after thoracic surgery in China. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [Brain metastases: Focal treatment (surgery and radiation therapy) and cognitive consequences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reygagne, Emmanuelle; Du Boisgueheneuc, Foucaud; Berger, Antoine

    2017-04-01

    Brain metastases represent the first cause of malignant brain tumor. Without radiation therapy, prognosis was poor with fast neurological deterioration, and a median overall survival of one month. Nowadays, therapeutic options depend on brain metastases presentation, extra brain disease, performance status and estimated prognostic (DS GPA). Therefore, for oligometastatic brain patients with a better prognosis, this therapeutic modality is controversial. In fact, whole-brain radiation therapy improves neurological outcomes, but it can also induce late neuro-cognitive sequelae for long-term survivors of brain metastases. Thus, in this strategy for preserving good cognitive functions, stereotactic radiation therapy is a promising treatment. Delivering precisely targeted radiation in few high-doses in one to four brain metastases, allows to reduce radiation damage to normal tissues and it should allow to decrease radiation-induced cognitive decline. In this paper, we will discuss about therapeutic strategies (radiation therapy and surgery) with their neuro-cognitive consequences for brain metastases patients and future concerning preservation of cognitive functions. Copyright © 2016 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Postoperative Bleeding Risk for Oral Surgery under Continued Clopidogrel Antiplatelet Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Gröbe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Object. To determine the incidence of postoperative bleeding for oral osteotomy carried out under continued monoantiplatelet therapy with clopidogrel and dual therapy with clopidogrel/aspirin. Design. Retrospective single center observatory study of two study groups and a control group. Methods. A total of 64 and 60 oral osteotomy procedures carried out under continued monoclopidogrel therapy and dual clopidogrel/aspirin therapy, respectively, were followed for two weeks for postoperative bleeding. Another 281 similar procedures were also followed as a control group. All oral osteotomy procedures were carried out on an outpatient basis. Results. We observed postoperative bleeding in 2/281 (0.7% cases in the control group, in 1/64 (1.6% cases in the clopidogrel group, and in 2/60 (3.3% cases in the dual clopidogrel/aspirin group. The corresponding 95% confidence intervals are 0–1.7%, 0–4.7%, and 0–7.8%, respectively, and the incidences did not differ significantly among the three groups (P>0.09. Postoperative hemorrhage was treated successfully in all cases with local measures. No changes of antiplatelet medication, transfusion, nor hospitalisation were necessary. No major cardiovascular events were recorded. Conclusions. Our results indicate that minor oral surgery can be performed safely under continued monoantiplatelet medication with clopidogrel or dual antiplatelet medication with clopidogrel/aspirin.

  7. Retrospective study on therapy options of brain metastases surgery versus stereotactic radiotherapy with the linear accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Fortunati, M K S

    2001-01-01

    Background: in the therapy of brain metastases there has been a great progress in the last years. It was shown, that more aggressive therapies can not only extend the survival of the patients, but also improve quality of life. The major question of this study was, whether surgery or stereotactic radiotherapy with the linear accelerator show better results in behalf of the survival. Beside this major question many parameters regarding the patient or his primary cancer were examined. Methods: from the 1st of January 1995 until the 30th of June 2000 233 patients with one or more brain metastases have been treated in the Wagner Jauregg Landesnervenkrankenhaus Oberoesterreich (WJ LNKH OeO). The LINAC has been established on the 1st of July 1997. The patients have been distributed in three groups: 1. LINAC-group: 81 patients have been treated from the 1st of July 1997 until the 30th of June 2000 with the LINAC. 2. Surgery-group: 81 patients have been operated from the 1st of July 1997 until the 30th June 2000. 3 Co...

  8. Comparison possibilities of ultrasound and its combination with laser in surgery and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zharov, Vladimir P.; Menyaev, Yulian A.; Kabisov, Ruslan K.; Alkov, Sergey V.; Nesterov, A. V.; Loshchilov, Vladimir I.; Suen, James Y.

    2000-05-01

    This article presents the further developments of combined laser-ultrasound medical technologies with paying attention the possibility ultrasound in surgery and therapy. The analyses of main effects at the low frequency ultrasonic treatment of biotissues including cavitation, acoustic streams, acoustic pressure, mechanical influence etc are analyzed. The main promising areas of application of low frequency ultrasound are considered including bactericidal treatment of infections wounds, spray treatment of wounds in head and neck surgery, tumor treatment etc. In particular the clinical result of using ultrasonic devices based on imposing ultrasonic oscillations in a range of 22-66 kHz on a cutting instrument with a special form, radiation intensity up to 10 W/cm2 and oscillation amplitude up to 40-60 micrometers with respect to oncology for halt bleeding from a tumor, liquidating pain, acoustic denervation are presented. Some limitation of medical application of ultrasound are discussed and perspective combination with laser for increasing efficiency of new combined technologies are found. Among them: combination photodynamic therapy and ultrasonic treatment of tumors, laser-ultrasonic treatment of infections wounds including using spray, laser-ultrasonic drug delivery. The preliminary result of experimental study of some of above-mentioned technologies are presented.

  9. Music Therapy Increases Comfort and Reduces Pain in Patients Recovering From Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondanaro, John F; Homel, Peter; Lonner, Baron; Shepp, Jennifer; Lichtensztein, Marcela; Loewy, Joanne V

    The treatment of pain continues to gain in saliency as a component of defining best practice in medical care. Music therapy is an integrative treatment modality that impacts patient outcomes in the treatment of spinal pain. At Mount Sinai Beth Israel, we conducted a mixed-methods study addressing the effects of music therapy interventions on the recovery of patients after spine surgery. The study combined standard medical approaches and integrative music therapy. Sixty patients (35 female, 25 male) ranging in age from 40 to 55 years underwent anterior, posterior, or anterior-posterior spinal fusion and were randomly assigned to either music therapy plus standard care (medical and nursing care with scheduled pharmacologic pain intervention) or standard care only. Measurements for both groups were completed before and after the intervention. Music therapy involved the use of patient-preferred live music that supported tension release/relaxation through incentive-based clinical improvisation, singing, and/or rhythmic drumming or through active visualization supported by live music that encompasses tension resolution. The control and music groups showed significant differences in degree and direction of change in the visual analog scale (VAS) pain ratings from before to after intervention (P = .01). VAS pain levels increased slightly in the control group (to 5.87 from 5.20) but decreased by more than 1 point in the music group (to 5.09 from 6.20). The control and music therapy groups did not differ in the rate of change in scores on Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) Anxiety (P = .62), HADS Depression (P = .85), or Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia (P = .93). Both groups had slight increases in HADS Anxiety, comparable decreases in HADS Depression, and minimal changes in fear-related movement (Tampa scale).

  10. Use of the guidelines directed medical therapy after coronary artery bypass graft surgery in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid A. Alburikan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: incidence of cardiovascular diseases in Saudi Arabia is growing and more patients are expected to have cardiac revascularization surgery. Optimal pharmacotherapy management with Guideline Directed Medical Therapy (GDMT post coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG plays an important role in the prevention of adverse cardiovascular outcomes. The objective of this study was to assess the utilization of GDMT for secondary prevention in CABG patients and determine whether specific patients' characteristics can influence GDMT utilization. Method: A retrospective chart review of patients discharged from the hospital after CABG surgery from April 2015 to April 2016. The primary outcome was the utilization of secondary prevention GDMT after CABG surgery - aspirin, B-blockers, statin and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI (or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB in ACEI-intolerant patients. The proportions of eligible and ideal patients who received treatment were calculated, and mixed-effects logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR for the association of age, gender or patient nationality with the use of GDMT. Results: A total number of 119 patients included in the analysis. The median age of the cohort was 57.3 ± 11 years, and 83% were male (83.2%. Nearly 69.7% of patients had diabetes, and 82% had a previous diagnosis of hypertension. Nearly 91% received aspirin therapy and the rate was lower for B-blocker and statin. The rate of GDMT utilization did not change with the change in patient’s age, gender or nationality. Conclusion: Despite adjustments for contraindications to GDMT, the rate of GDMT utilization was suboptimal.

  11. Shock wave therapy versus conventional surgery in the treatment of calcifying tendinitis of the shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rompe, J D; Zoellner, J; Nafe, B

    2001-06-01

    A prospective quasirandomized study was performed to compare the effects of surgical extirpation (Group I, 29 patients) with the outcome after high-energy extracorporeal shock wave therapy (Group II, 50 patients; 3,000 impulses of an energy flux density of 0.6 mJ/mm2) in patients with a chronic calcifying tendinitis in the supraspinatus tendon. Symptoms and demographic data of the two groups were comparable. According to the University of California Los Angeles Rating System, the mean score in Group I was 30 points with 75% good or excellent results after 12 months, and 32 points with 90% good or excellent results after 24 months. Radiologically, there was no calcific deposit in 85% of the patients after 1 year. In Group II, the mean score was 28 points with 60% good or excellent results after 12 months, and 29 points with 64% good or excellent results after 2 years. Radiologically, complete elimination of the deposit was observed in 47% of the patients after 1 year. Clinically, according to the University of California Los Angeles score, there was no significant difference between both groups at 1 year. At 2 years, there was a significantly better result in Group II. Both groups then were subdivided into patients who had a homogenous deposit as seen on radiographs and patients who had an inhomogenous deposit before treatment. Surgery was superior compared with high-energy shock wave therapy for patients with homogenous deposits. For patients with inhomogenous deposits, high-energy extracorporeal shock wave therapy was equivalent to surgery and should be given priority because of its noninvasiveness.

  12. KRAS Mutation Status and Clinical Outcome of Preoperative Chemoradiation With Cetuximab in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: A Pooled Analysis of 2 Phase II Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sun Young; Shim, Eun Kyung [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Yeo, Hyun Yang [Division of Translational and Clinical Research I, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Ji Yeon [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Yong Sang [Department of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Yong [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Division of Translational and Clinical Research I, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Won [Department of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jee Hyun [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Im, Seock-Ah [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Kyung Hae [Department of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Hee Jin, E-mail: heejincmd@yahoo.com [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Division of Translational and Clinical Research I, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Cetuximab-containing chemotherapy is known to be effective for KRAS wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer; however, it is not clear whether cetuximab-based preoperative chemoradiation confers an additional benefit compared with chemoradiation without cetuximab in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: We analyzed EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA mutation status with direct sequencing and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression status with immunohistochemistry in tumor samples of 82 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who were enrolled in the IRIX trial (preoperative chemoradiation with irinotecan and capecitabine; n=44) or the ERBIRIX trial (preoperative chemoradiation with irinotecan and capecitabine plus cetuximab; n=38). Both trials were similarly designed except for the administration of cetuximab; radiation therapy was administered at a dose of 50.4 Gy/28 fractions and irinotecan and capecitabine were given at doses of 40 mg/m{sup 2} weekly and 1650 mg/m{sup 2}/day, respectively, for 5 days per week. In the ERBIRIX trial, cetuximab was additionally given with a loading dose of 400 mg/m{sup 2} on 1 week before radiation, and 250 mg/m{sup 2} weekly thereafter. Results: Baseline characteristics before chemoradiation were similar between the 2 trial cohorts. A KRAS mutation in codon 12, 13, and 61 was noted in 15 (34%) patients in the IRIX cohort and 5 (13%) in the ERBIRIX cohort (P=.028). Among 62 KRAS wild-type cancer patients, major pathologic response rate, disease-free survival and pathologic stage did not differ significantly between the 2 cohorts. No mutations were detected in BRAF exon 11 and 15, PIK3CA exon 9 and 20, or EGFR exon 18-24 in any of the 82 patients, and PTEN and EGFR expression were not predictive of clinical outcome. Conclusions: In patients with KRAS wild-type locally advanced rectal cancer, the addition of cetuximab to the chemoradiation with

  13. Localized Gastric or Gastroesophageal Cancer – Chemoradiation Is a Pertinent Component of Adjuvant Treatment for Patients at High Risk of Relapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callister, Matthew D.; Jaroszewski, Dawn E.; Ross, Helen J.; Borad, Mitesh J.; Gray, Richard J.; Lanza, Louis A.; Harold, Kristi L.; Pockaj, Barbara A.; Trastek, Victor F.

    2009-01-01

    The standard of care for resectable gastric or gastroesophageal (GE) junction cancer for patients who can tolerate a surgical procedure is surgical resection, but surgery alone is not optimal treatment for patients at high risk for relapse. For patients with lower-risk lesions (confined to gastric wall, nodes negative; T1-2N0M0), local-regional relapse risks are low, and adjuvant radiotherapy is usually not recommended, except in select instances. Since both local-regional and systemic relapses are common after resection of high-risk gastric or GE junction cancers (beyond wall, nodes positive, or both; T3-4N0, TanyN+), adjuvant treatment is indicated for these patients. The results of phase III trials that demonstrate a survival benefit for adjuvant preoperative radiotherapy, postoperative chemoradiation, or preoperative chemoradiation vs. surgery alone will be presented and compared with the results of adjuvant perioperative chemotherapy. Results of Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) analyses and meta-analyses that support the role of adjuvant radiotherapy or chemoradiation will be summarized. PMID:19461920

  14. Associations of ATM Polymorphisms With Survival in Advanced Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Zhongli [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Department of Etiology and Carcinogenesis (Beijing Key Laboratory for Carcinogenesis and Cancer Prevention), Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Zhang, Wencheng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Zhou, Yuling; Yu, Dianke; Chen, Xiabin; Chang, Jiang; Qiao, Yan; Zhang, Meng; Huang, Ying; Wu, Chen [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Department of Etiology and Carcinogenesis (Beijing Key Laboratory for Carcinogenesis and Cancer Prevention), Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Xiao, Zefen, E-mail: xiaozefen@sina.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Tan, Wen, E-mail: tanwen@cicams.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Department of Etiology and Carcinogenesis (Beijing Key Laboratory for Carcinogenesis and Cancer Prevention), Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); and others

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene are associated with survival in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) receiving radiation therapy or chemoradiation therapy or surgery only. Methods and Materials: Four tagSNPs of ATM were genotyped in 412 individuals with clinical stage III or IV ESCC receiving radiation therapy or chemoradiation therapy, and in 388 individuals with stage I, II, or III ESCC treated with surgery only. Overall survival time of ESCC among different genotypes was estimated by Kaplan-Meier plot, and the significance was examined by log-rank test. The hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for death from ESCC among different genotypes were computed by a Cox proportional regression model. Results: We found 2 SNPs, rs664143 and rs664677, associated with survival time of ESCC patients receiving radiation therapy. Individuals with the rs664143A allele had poorer median survival time compared with the rs664143G allele (14.0 vs 20.0 months), with the HR for death being 1.45 (95% CI 1.12-1.89). Individuals with the rs664677C allele also had worse median survival time than those with the rs664677T allele (14.0 vs 23.5 months), with the HR of 1.57 (95% CI 1.18-2.08). Stratified analysis showed that these associations were present in both stage III and IV cancer and different radiation therapy techniques. Significant associations were also found between the SNPs and locosregional progression or progression-free survival. No association between these SNPs and survival time was detected in ESCC patients treated with surgery only. Conclusion: These results suggest that the ATM polymorphisms might serve as independent biomarkers for predicting prognosis in ESCC patients receiving radiation therapy.

  15. Post-operative benefits of animal-assisted therapy in pediatric surgery: a randomised study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Calcaterra

    Full Text Available Interest in animal-assisted therapy has been fuelled by studies supporting the many health benefits. The purpose of this study was to better understand the impact of an animal-assisted therapy program on children response to stress and pain in the immediate post-surgical period.Forty children (3-17 years were enrolled in the randomised open-label, controlled, pilot study. Patients were randomly assigned to the animal-assisted therapy-group (n = 20, who underwent a 20 min session with an animal-assisted therapy dog, after surgery or the standard-group (n = 20, standard postoperative care. The study variables were determined in each patient, independently of the assigned group, by a researcher unblinded to the patient's group. The outcomes of the study were to define the neurological, cardiovascular and endocrinological impact of animal-assisted therapy in response to stress and pain. Electroencephalogram activity, heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, cerebral prefrontal oxygenation, salivary cortisol levels and the faces pain scale were considered as outcome measures.After entrance of the dog faster electroencephalogram diffuse beta-activity (> 14 Hz was reported in all children of the animal-assisted therapy group; in the standard-group no beta-activity was recorded (100% vs 0%, p<0.001. During observation, some differences in the time profile between groups were observed for heart rate (test for interaction p = 0.018, oxygen saturation (test for interaction p = 0.06 and cerebral oxygenation (test for interaction p = 0.09. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure were influenced by animal-assisted therapy, though a higher variability in diastolic pressure was observed. Salivary cortisol levels did not show different behaviours over time between groups (p=0.70. Lower pain perception was noted in the animal-assisted group in comparison with the standard-group (p = 0.01.Animal-assisted therapy facilitated rapid recovery in vigilance and

  16. Predictors and Outcomes of Crossover to Surgery from Physical Therapy for Meniscal Tear and Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Trial Comparing Physical Therapy and Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Jeffrey N; Wright, John; Spindler, Kurt P; Mandl, Lisa A; Safran-Norton, Clare E; Reinke, Emily K; Levy, Bruce A; Wright, Rick W; Jones, Morgan H; Martin, Scott D; Marx, Robert G; Losina, Elena

    2016-11-16

    Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy (APM) combined with physical therapy (PT) have yielded pain relief similar to that provided by PT alone in randomized trials of subjects with a degenerative meniscal tear. However, many patients randomized to PT received APM before assessment of the primary outcome. We sought to identify factors associated with crossing over to APM and to compare pain relief between patients who had crossed over to APM and those who had been randomized to APM. We used data from the MeTeOR (Meniscal Tear in Osteoarthritis Research) Trial of APM with PT versus PT alone in subjects ≥45 years old who had mild-to-moderate osteoarthritis and a degenerative meniscal tear. We assessed independent predictors of crossover to APM among those randomized to PT. We also compared pain relief at 6 months among those randomized to PT who crossed over to APM, those who did not cross over, and those originally randomized to APM. One hundred and sixty-four subjects were randomized to and received APM and 177 were randomized to PT, of whom 48 (27%) crossed over to receive APM in the first 140 days after randomization. In multivariate analyses, factors associated with a higher likelihood of crossing over to APM among those who had originally been randomized to PT included a baseline Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) Pain Score of ≥40 (risk ratio [RR] = 1.99; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.00, 3.93) and symptom duration of <1 year (RR = 1.74; 95% CI = 0.98, 3.08). Eighty-one percent of subjects who crossed over to APM and 82% of those randomized to APM had an improvement of ≥10 points in their pain score at 6 months, as did 73% of those who were randomized to and received only PT. Subjects who crossed over to APM had presented with a shorter symptom duration and greater baseline pain than those who did not cross over from PT. Subjects who crossed over had rates of surgical success similar to those of the patients who had been

  17. Early goal-directed therapy in moderate to high-risk cardiac surgery patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapoor Poonam

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Early goal-directed therapy is a term used to describe the guidance of intravenous fluid and vasopressor/inotropic therapy by using cardiac output or similar parameters in the immediate post-cardiopulmonary bypass in cardiac surgery patients. Early recognition and therapy during this period may result in better outcome. In keeping with this aim in the cardiac surgery patients, we conducted the present study. The study included 30 patients of both sexes, with EuroSCORE ≥3 undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass. The patients were randomly divided into two groups, namely, control and early goal-directed therapy (EGDT groups. All the subjects received standardized care; arterial pressure was monitored through radial artery, central venous pressure through a triple lumen in the right internal jugular vein, electrocardiogram, oxygen saturation, temperature, urine output per hour and frequent arterial blood gas analysis. In addition, cardiac index monitoring using FloTrac™ and continuous central venous oxygen saturation using PreSep™ was used in patients in the EGTD group. Our aim was to maintain the cardiac index at 2.5-4.2 l/min/m 2 , stroke volume index 30-65 ml/beat/m 2 , systemic vascular resistance index 1500-2500 dynes/s/cm 5 /m 2 , oxygen delivery index 450-600 ml/min/m 2 , continuous central venous oximetry more than 70%, stroke volume variation less than 10%; in addition to the control group parameters such as central venous pressure 6-8 mmHg, mean arterial pressure 90-105 mmHg, normal arterial blood gas analysis values, pulse oximetry, hematocrit value above 30% and urine output more than 1 ml/kg/h. The aims were achieved by altering the administration of intravenous fluids and doses of inotropic or vasodilator agents. Three patients were excluded from the study and the data of 27 patients analyzed. The extra volume used (330 ± 160 v/s 80 ± 80 ml, P = 0.043 number of adjustments of inotropic agents (3

  18. VAC therapy for the treatment of complex wounds after cardio-thoracic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Caridi, Giovanni; Serra, Raffaele; Massara, Mafalda; Barone, Mario; Grande, Raffaele; Butrico, Lucia; Mastroroberto, Pasquale; de Franciscis, Stefano; Monaco, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study is to report our experience about the treatment of complex sternal and thoracic wounds following cardiothoracic surgery, using vacuum-assisted closure (VAC therapy. Twelve patients presenting with sternal (five cases) and thoracic (seven cases) wounds that were difficult to heal were treated through VAC therapy after the first surgical debridement. The duration of VAC application ranged from 12 to 36 days with an average hospital stay of 24·6 ± 11·4 days. During a mean follow-up of 12 months, we observed complete wound healing in seven cases (58·3%), in an average period of 25·5 ± 14·3 days; one patient died during follow-up, two patients were lost to follow-up and two patients required definitive surgical closure of the wound cavity. In conclusion, VAC therapy promotes faster wound healing, with shorter hospital stay and subsequent lesser in-hospital cost, reducing the mortality rate in the long run. It also promotes early rehabilitation and alleviates the need for a second procedure, thus improving patient satisfaction, with minimal discomfort or inconvenience.

  19. Prevalence of swallowing and speech problems in daily life after chemoradiation for head and neck cancer based on cut-off scores of the patient-reported outcome measures SWAL-QOL and SHI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinkel, Rico N.; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M.; Doornaert, Patricia; Buter, Jan; de Bree, Remco; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Aaronson, Neil K.; Leemans, C. Rene

    The objective of this study is to assess swallowing and speech outcome after chemoradiation therapy for head and neck cancer, based on the patient-reported outcome measures Swallowing Quality of Life Questionnaire (SWAL-QOL) and Speech Handicap Index (SHI), both provided with cut-off scores. This is

  20. Prevalence of swallowing and speech problems in daily life after chemoradiation for head and neck cancer based on cut-off scores of the patient-reported outcome measures SWAL-QOL and SHI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinkel, R.N.; Verdonck-de Leeuw, I.M.; Doornaert, P.; Buter, J.; de Bree, R.; Langendijk, J.A.; Aaronson, N.K.; Leemans, C.R.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess swallowing and speech outcome after chemoradiation therapy for head and neck cancer, based on the patient-reported outcome measures Swallowing Quality of Life Questionnaire (SWAL-QOL) and Speech Handicap Index (SHI), both provided with cut-off scores. This is

  1. Chemoradiation in patients with unresectable extrahepatic and hilar cholangiocarcinoma or at high risk for disease recurrence after resection.. Analysis of treatment efficacy and failure in patients receiving postoperative or primary chemoradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habermehl, D.; Lindel, K.; Rieken, S.; Haase, K.; Welzel, T.; Debus, J.; Combs, S.E. [University Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Goeppert, B.; Schirmacher, P. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Pathology; Buechler, M.W. [University Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Visceral Surgery

    2012-09-15

    Background: The purpose of this work was to determine efficacy, toxicity, and patterns of recurrence after concurrent chemoradiation (CRT) in patients with extrahepatic bile duct cancer (EHBDC) and hilar cholangiocarcinoma (Klatskin tumours) in case of incomplete resection or unresectable disease. Patients and methods: From 2003-2010, 25 patients with nonmetastasized EHBDC and hilar cholangiocarcinoma were treated with radiotherapy and CRT at our institution in an postoperative setting (10 patients, 9 patients with R1 resections) or in case of unresectable disease (15 patients). Median age was 63 years (range 38-80 years) and there were 20 men and 5 women. Median applied dose was 45 Gy in both patient groups. Results: Patients at high risk (9 times R1 resection, 1 pathologically confirmed lymphangiosis) for tumour recurrence after curative surgery had a median time to disease progression of 8.7 months and an estimated mean overall survival of 23.2 months (6 of 10 patients are still under observation). Patients undergoing combined chemoradiation in case of unresectable primary tumours are still having a poor prognosis with a progression-free survival of 7.1 months and a median overall survival of 12.0 months. The main site of progression was systemic (liver, peritoneum) in both patient groups. Conclusion: Chemoradiation with gemcitabine is safe and can be applied safely in either patients with EHBDC or Klatskin tumours at high risk for tumour recurrence after resection and patients with unresectable tumours. Escalation of systemic and local treatment should be investigated in future clinical trials. (orig.)

  2. Intravenous zinc therapy for acquired zinc deficiency secondary to gastric bypass surgery: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vick, Garrett; Mahmoudizad, Rod; Fiala, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Zinc deficiency may result from either a congenitally inherited defect of zinc absorption or is acquired secondarily from a variety of factors affecting dietary zinc intake, absorption, or loss. We report a case of acquired zinc deficiency secondary to gastric bypass surgery that resulted in vulvar cutaneous manifestations of delayed onset, with failure to clear after oral supplementation with zinc. The patient experienced improvement of symptoms only after administration of intravenous zinc supplementation. Upon review of the current literature, it is thought that the patient's original suboptimal response to oral supplementation and improvement after receiving intravenous zinc were related to the intentional surgical alteration and bypass of the absorptive capacity of the duodenum and jejunum. With the current prevalence of obesity and availability of surgical weight loss therapies, it is important to be mindful of the resulting nutritional deficiencies, their clinical manifestations, and factors affecting the efficacy of therapeutic approaches as seen in this case.

  3. An Eye Popping Case of Orbital Necrotizing Fasciitis Treated with Antibiotics, Surgery, and Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singam, Narayanasarma V.; Rusia, Deepam; Prakash, Rajan

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Female, 60 Final Diagnosis: Necrotizing fasciitis of the eye Symptoms: Eye pain Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) of the orbit is a rare and deadly condition that requires prompt surgical and medical management to decrease morbidity and mortality. Case Report: Here we present an interesting case of an individual who developed fulminant NF of the left orbit requiring emergent surgical intervention, antibiotics, and subsequent hyperbaric oxygen therapy in an attempt to save the eye. Conclusions: With an early and aggressive multifaceted approach using antibiotics, surgery, and hyperbaric oxygen it may be possible to preserve eye structure and function. Without treatment NF is a rapidly progressive condition and can result in significant morbidity. PMID:28364115

  4. Beneficial Effects of Applying Low-Level Laser Therapy to Surgical Wounds After Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojea, Alecsander R; Madi, Otavio; Neto, Rafael Melillo L; Lima, Sizenando E; de Carvalho, Bruno T; Ojea, Maria Juliana M R; Marcos, Rodrigo L; da Silva, Fabricio S; Zamuner, Stella R; Chavantes, Maria Cristina

    2016-11-01

    Bariatric surgery is a successful method for weight loss in cases of morbid obesity; however, as an invasive procedure, surgical complications may occur. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been increasingly used due to its effectiveness in controlling the inflammatory response, accelerating tissue repair, and reducing pain. The objective of this study was to investigate photobiomodulation effects after bariatric surgery and determine the laser actions during the inflammatory process, wound healing (clinical observation), and analgesia. This study was a randomized, placebo-controlled, clinical trial in which 85 patients underwent Roux en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) by conventional techniques (i.e., open surgery). Patients were divided into two groups and were irradiated with LLLT at 10 different points through the surgical scar in three sessions of applications: the laser group (laser-on) consisted of 43 patients who received the CW diode laser (MMOptics), while the placebo group (laser-off) consisted of 42 patients who were treated by the same protocol but with a disabled laser. Temperature was measured by a digital thermometer in both groups, and pain was evaluated using the visual analogue scale for pain. Biochemical analysis and digital images were used to document and evaluate the inflammatory response as well as tissue repair process at the surgical wound site. Patients in the laser group demonstrated diminished wound temperature as erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) compared with the placebo group, indicating better inflammatory process control as well as improved wound healing and reduced pain. LLLT applied with the described protocol led to a decrease by biochemical markers and wound temperature compared with the placebo, which indicated that LLLT was able to control the inflammatory process; in addition, seroma and pain were reduced and cicatrization was improved by this preventive procedure.

  5. Randomized clinical trial of surgery versus conservative therapy for carpal tunnel syndrome [ISRCTN84286481

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turner Judith A

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conservative treatment remains the standard of care for treating mild to moderate carpal tunnel syndrome despite a small number of well-controlled studies and limited objective evidence to support current treatment options. There is an increasing interest in the usefulness of wrist magnetic resonance imaging could play in predicting who will benefit for various treatments. Method and design Two hundred patients with mild to moderate symptoms will be recruited over 3 1/2 years from neurological surgery, primary care, electrodiagnostic clinics. We will exclude patients with clinical or electrodiagnostic evidence of denervation or thenar muscle atrophy. We will randomly assign patients to either a well-defined conservative care protocol or surgery. The conservative care treatment will include visits with a hand therapist, exercises, a self-care booklet, work modification/ activity restriction, B6 therapy, ultrasound and possible steroid injections. The surgical care would be left up to the surgeon (endoscopic vs. open with usual and customary follow-up. All patients will receive a wrist MRI at baseline. Patients will be contacted at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after randomization to complete the Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Assessment Questionnaire (CTSAQ. In addition, we will compare disability (activity and work days lost and general well being as measured by the SF-36 version II. We will control for demographics and use psychological measures (SCL-90 somatization and depression scales as well as EDS and MRI predictors of outcomes. Discussion We have designed a randomized controlled trial which will assess the effectiveness of surgery for patients with mild to moderate carpal tunnel syndrome. An important secondary goal is to study the ability of MRI to predict patient outcomes.

  6. Risk factors for brain metastases after definitive chemoradiation for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Marina

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. As therapy for locally advanced nonsmall cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC improves, brain metastases (BM still remain a great problem. The aim of the study was to analyze risk factors for BM in patients with locally advanced NSCLC after chemoradiation therapy. Methods. Records for 150 patients with non-resectable stage IIIA/IIIB NSCLC treated with combined chemoradiation therapy were analyzed. All of them had negative brain metastases imaging result before the treatment. Incidence of BM was examined in relation to age, sex, histological type, stage, performance status scale of wellbeing of cancer patients, weight loss, chemotherapy regimen and chemotherapy timing. Results. One- and 2-year incidence rates of BM were 19 and 31%, respectively. Among pretreatment parameters, stage IIIB was associated with a higher risk of BM (p < 0.004 vs stage IIIA. Histologically, the patients with nonsquamous tumors had an exceptionally high 2-year BM risk rate of 32% (p < 0.02. Examining treatment-related parameters, 1-year and 2-year actuarial risk of BM were 27 and 39%, respectively, in the patients receiving chemotherapy before radiotherapy and 15 and 20%, respectively, when radiotherapy was not delayed (p < 0.03. On multivariate analysis, timing of chemotherapy (p < 0.05 and stage IIIA vs IIIB (p < 0.01 remained statistically significant. Conclusion. Patients with IIIB stage, nonsquamous NSCLC, particularly those receiving sequential chemotherapy, had significantly high BM rates.

  7. [Combined crown lengthening surgery with restorative therapy for inducing papilla growth: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Di; Hu, Wen-jie; Zhang, Hao

    2013-04-18

    A young lady with unsatisfied restorations of upper anterior teeth and swollen gum wanted to improve aesthetics. Oral examination showed that 12-22 were provisional crowns with normal occlusion, poorly gingival contour and gummy smile. The gingiva was red, light swollen and bleeding on probing. X-ray showed the roots of 11, 21 were short and the alveolar bone absorbed. After the periodontal initial treatment, an ideal location of gingival margin was determined. Then, an esthetic periodontal surgery was performed to recover the biology width and the gingival margin was fitted with the anterior teeth. The temporary restorations were made twice to guide the gingiva growth by changing the shape of the restorations and moving up the contact points of the restorations. The ceramic crowns were completed 3 months after the operation. The gummy smile disappeared and the gingival margin was filled well with the upper anterior ceramic crowns. The 14-month follow-up presented a satisfied effect. Crown lengthening surgery combined restorative therapy could lead papilla to grow well. This process is beneficial for the future treatment plan and clinical esthetic evaluation.

  8. WE-G-12A-01: High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Surgery and Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farahani, K [National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD (United States); O' Neill, B [The Methodist Hospital Research Institute, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-15

    More and more emphasis is being made on alternatives to invasive surgery and the use of ionizing radiation to treat various diseases including cancer. Novel screening, diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of response to treatment are also hot areas of research and new clinical technologies. Ultrasound(US) has gained traction in all of the aforementioned areas of focus. Especially with recent advances in the use of ultrasound to noninvasively treat various diseases/organ systems. This session will focus on covering MR-guided focused ultrasound and the state of the art clinical applications, and the second speaker will survey the more cutting edge technologies e.g. Focused Ultrasound (FUS) mediated drug delivery, principles of cavitation and US guided FUS. Learning Objectives: Fundamental physics and physical limitations of US interaction with tissue and nanoparticles The alteration of tissue transport using focused ultrasound US control of nanoparticle drug carriers for targeted release The basic principles of MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) surgery and therapy the current state of the art clinical applications of MRgFUS requirements for quality assurance and treatment planning.

  9. Preoperative tranilast as adjunctive therapy to primary pterygium surgery with a 1-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gildásio C. Almeida Junior

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To determine the efficacy of tranilast as an adjunctive therapy in conjunctival autograft. Methods: Twenty-nine patients were randomly allocated to the Tranilast Group (n=15 or the Control Group (n=14. The Tranilast Group received a subconjunctival injection of 0.5% tranilast 30 days prior to surgery. Conjunctival autograft was performed in both groups using fibrin sealant and 0.02% subconjunctival mitomycin C at the end of the surgery. After the resection of the pterygium, immunohistochemistry was performed with 100 cells to identify epithelial cells positive for transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β. Subjective symptoms were evaluated using a 5-point scale, and the recurrence rate was assessed. Results: Both groups showed improvements in their symptoms and similar clinical results. Compared with the Control Group, the Tranilast Group failed to show a decreased recurrence rate (p=0.59. However, the number of epithelial cells expressing TGF-β was lower in the Tranilast Group (5 cells; 95% CI: 2.56-13.15; Control Group, 16 cells, 95% CI: 11.53-24.76; p=0.01. Minimal but reversible complications, including glaucoma secondary to corticosteroids and granuloma, occurred during the study. Conclusion: Tranilast was effective in decreasing the number of pterygium epithelial cells expressing TGF-β.

  10. A hemisphere array for non-invasive ultrasound brain therapy and surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, G. T.; Sun, Jie; Giesecke, Tonia; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2000-12-01

    Ultrasound phased arrays may offer a method for non-invasive deep brain surgery through the skull. In this study a hemispherical phased array system is developed to test the feasibility of trans-skull surgery. The hemispherical shape is incorporated to maximize the penetration area on the skull surface, thus minimizing unwanted heating. Simulations of a 15 cm radius hemisphere divided into 11, 64, 228 and 512 elements are presented. It is determined that 64 elements are sufficient for correcting scattering and reflection caused by trans-skull propagation. An optimal operating frequency near 0.7 MHz is chosen for the array from numerical and experimental thermal gain measurements comparing the power between the transducer focus and the skull surface. A 0.665 MHz air-backed PZT array is constructed and evaluated. The array is used to focus ultrasound through an ex vivo human skull and the resulting fields are measured before and after phase correction of the transducer elements. Finally, to demonstrate the feasibility of trans-skull therapy, thermally induced lesions are produced through a human skull in fresh tissue placed at the ultrasound focus inside the skull.

  11. Prospective study of use of perioperative antimicrobial therapy in general surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fennessy, Brendan G

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Perioperative antimicrobial therapy has demonstrated efficacy in reducing the rate of surgical site infections in clinical trials. With the emergence of antibiotic resistance, the risk of reaction, and the inevitable financial repercussions, use of prophylactic antibiotics is not a panacea, and their misuse may have considerable implications. The aim of this study was to assess the use of antibiotics in the perioperative period in both general and vascular surgery procedures. METHODS: A prospective study was undertaken of 131 patients with a mean age of 43 years (range one month-88 years), of whom 68 (51%) were male, who underwent twenty-seven different general or vascular surgery procedures over a four-week period. Each patient was evaluated from the time of antibiotic commencement through their operative procedure until the treatment was discontinued. RESULTS: A total of 73 patients (54%) received ten antibiotics, with 71 (97%) of these uses being prophylactic. Of the 15 appendectomies performed for uncomplicated appendicitis, the mean number of prophylactic antibiotic doses was 5.3 (range 1-12). Where they were documented, written postoperative directives were not adhered to in 18\\/27 prescriptions (66%). CONCLUSION: This study has demonstrated a lack of adherence to guidelines in the perioperative administration of antimicrobial agents. In addition, it calls attention to the economic implications of unnecessary prophylaxis.

  12. Sensitization of Pancreatic Cancers to Gemcitabine Chemoradiation by WEE1 Kinase Inhibition Depends on Homologous Recombination Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasneem Kausar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available To improve the efficacy of chemoradiation therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer and begin to establish patient selection criteria, we investigated the combination of the WEE1 inhibitor AZD1775 with gemcitabine-radiation in homologous recombination (HR repair proficient and deficient pancreatic cancers. Sensitization to gemcitabine-radiation by AZD1775 was assessed in pancreatic cancer cells by clonogenic survival and in patient-derived xenografts by tumor growth. The contributions of HR repair inhibition and G2 checkpoint abrogation to sensitization were assessed by γH2AX, BRCA2 manipulation, and RAD51 focus formation and pHistone H3 flow cytometry, respectively. We found that AZD1775 sensitized to gemcitabine-radiation in BRCA2 wild-type but not BRCA2 mutant pancreatic cancer cells. In all cells, AZD1775 caused inhibition of CDK1 phosphorylation and G2 checkpoint abrogation. However, sensitization by AZD1775 was associated with persistent γH2AX and inhibition of RAD51 focus formation. In HR-proficient (BRCA2 wild-type or -deficient (BRAC2 null isogenic cells, AZD1775 sensitized to gemcitabine-radiation in BRCA2 wild-type, but not in BRCA2 null cells, despite significant G2 checkpoint abrogation. In patient-derived pancreatic tumor xenografts, AZD1775 significantly inhibited tumor growth and impaired RAD51 focus formation in response to gemcitabine-radiation. In conclusion, WEE1 inhibition by AZD1775 is an effective strategy for sensitizing pancreatic cancers to gemcitabine chemoradiation. Although this sensitization is accompanied by inhibition of CDK1 phosphorylation and G2 checkpoint abrogation, this mechanism is not sufficient for sensitization. Our findings demonstrate that sensitization to chemoradiation by WEE1 inhibition results from inhibition of HR repair and suggest that patient tumors without underlying HR defects would benefit most from this therapy.

  13. A comparative effectiveness trial of postoperative management for lumbar spine surgery: changing behavior through physical therapy (CBPT) study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Kristin R; Coronado, Rogelio A; Haug, Christine M; Vanston, Susan W; Devin, Clinton J; Fonnesbeck, Christopher J; Aaronson, Oran S; Cheng, Joseph S; Skolasky, Richard L; Riley, Lee H; Wegener, Stephen T

    2014-10-01

    The United States has the highest rate of lumbar spine surgery in the world, with rates increasing over 200% since 1990. Medicare spends over $1 billion annually on lumbar spine surgery. Despite surgical advances, up to 40% of patients report chronic pain and disability following surgery. Our work has demonstrated that fear of movement is a risk factor for increased pain and disability and decreased physical function in patients following lumbar spine surgery for degenerative conditions. Cognitive-behavioral therapy and self-management treatments have the potential to address psychosocial risk factors and improve outcomes after spine surgery, but are unavailable or insufficiently adapted for postoperative care. Our research team developed a cognitive-behavioral based self-management approach to postoperative rehabilitation (Changing Behavior through Physical Therapy (CBPT)). Pilot testing of the CBPT program demonstrated greater improvement in pain, disability, physical and mental health, and physical performance compared to education. The current study compares which of two treatments provided by telephone - a CBPT Program or an Education Program about postoperative recovery - are more effective for improving patient-centered outcomes in adults following lumbar spine surgery for degenerative conditions. A multi-center, comparative effectiveness trial will be conducted. Two hundred and sixty patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery for degenerative conditions will be recruited from two medical centers and community surgical practices. Participants will be randomly assigned to CBPT or Education at 6 weeks following surgery. Treatments consist of six weekly telephone sessions with a trained physical therapist. The primary outcome will be disability and secondary outcomes include pain, general health, and physical activity. Outcomes will be assessed preoperatively and at 6 weeks, 6 months and 12 months after surgery by an assessor masked to group allocation

  14. Clinical Outcome after Breast Conserving Surgery and Radiation Therapy for Early Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Heung Lae; Kim, Cheo Ljin; Park, Sung Kwang; Oh, Min Kyung; Lee, Jin Yong; Ahn, Ki Jung [Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    This study was performed to evaluate the disease-free survival and risk factors of recurrence in early breast cancer patients who have undergone breast conserving surgery and radiation therapy. Materials and Methods: From March 1997 to December 2002, 77 breast cancer patients who underwent breast conserving surgery and radiation therapy were reviewed retrospectively. The median follow-up time was 58.4 months (range 43.8-129.4 months) and the mean subject age was 41 years. The frequency distribution of the different T stages, based on the tumor characteristics was 38 (49.3%) for T1, 28 (36.3%) for T2, 3 for T3, 7 for Tis and 1 for an unidentified sized tumor. In addition, 52 patients (67.5%) did not have axillary lymph metastasis, whereas 14 patients (18.1%) had 1-3 lymph node metastases and 3 (0.03%) had more than 4 lymph node metastases. The resection margin was negative in 59 patients, close ({<=}2 mm) in 15, and positive in 4. All patients received radiation therapy at the intact breast using tangential fields with a subsequent electron beam boost to the tumor bed at a total dose ranging from 59.4 Gy to 66.4 Gy. Patients with more than four positive axillary lymph nodes received radiation therapy (41.4-60.4 Gy) at the axillary and supraclavicular area. Chemotherapy was administered in 59 patients and tamoxifen or fareston was administered in 29 patients. Results: The 5 year overall survival and disease-free survival rates were 98.08% and 93.49%, respectively. Of the 77 patients, a total of 4 relapses (5.2%), including 1 isolated supraclavicular relapse, 1 supraclavicular relapse with synchronous multiple distant relapses, and 2 distant relapses were observed. No cases of local breast relapses were observed. Lymph node metastasis or number of metastatic lymph nodes was not found to be statistically related with a relapse (p=0.3289) nor disease-free survival (p=0.1430). Patients with positive margins had a significantly shorter disease-free survival period (p<0

  15. Vascular Endothelial-Targeted Therapy Combined with Cytotoxic Chemotherapy Induces Inflammatory Intratumoral Infiltrates and Inhibits Tumor Relapses after Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan F. Judy

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Surgery is the most effective therapy for cancer in the United States, but disease still recurs in more than 40% of patients within 5 years after resection. Chemotherapy is given postoperatively to prevent relapses; however, this approach has had marginal success. After surgery, recurrent tumors depend on rapid neovascular proliferation to deliver nutrients and oxygen. Phosphatidylserine (PS is exposed on the vascular endothelial cells in the tumor microenvironment but is notably absent on blood vessels in normal tissues. Thus, PS is an attractive target for cancer therapy after surgery. Syngeneic mice bearing TC1 lung cancer tumors were treated with mch1N11 (a novel mouse chimeric monoclonal antibody that targets PS, cisplatin (cis, or combination after surgery. Tumor relapses and disease progression were decreased 90% by combination therapy compared with a 50% response rate for cis alone (P = .02. Mice receiving postoperative mch1N11 had no wound-related complications or added systemic toxicity in comparison to control animals. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that the effects of mch1N11 were associated with a dense infiltration of inflammatory cells, particularly granulocytes. This strategy was independent of the adaptive immune system. Together, these data suggest that vascular-targeted strategies directed against exposed PS may be a powerful adjunct to postoperative chemotherapy in preventing relapses after cancer surgery.

  16. Crystalloids versus colloids for goal-directed fluid therapy in major surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiltebrand, Luzius B; Kimberger, Oliver; Arnberger, Michael; Brandt, Sebastian; Kurz, Andrea; Sigurdsson, Gisli H

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Perioperative hypovolemia arises frequently and contributes to intestinal hypoperfusion and subsequent postoperative complications. Goal-directed fluid therapy might reduce these complications. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of goal-directed administration of crystalloids and colloids on the distribution of systemic, hepatosplanchnic, and microcirculatory (small intestine) blood flow after major abdominal surgery in a clinically relevant pig model. Methods Twenty-seven pigs were anesthetized and mechanically ventilated and underwent open laparotomy. They were randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups: the restricted Ringer lactate (R-RL) group (n = 9) received 3 mL/kg per hour of RL, the goal-directed RL (GD-RL) group (n = 9) received 3 mL/kg per hour of RL and intermittent boluses of 250 mL of RL, and the goal-directed colloid (GD-C) group (n = 9) received 3 mL/kg per hour of RL and boluses of 250 mL of 6% hydroxyethyl starch (130/0.4). The latter two groups received a bolus infusion when mixed venous oxygen saturation was below 60% ('lockout' time of 30 minutes). Regional blood flow was measured in the superior mesenteric artery and the celiac trunk. In the small bowel, microcirculatory blood flow was measured using laser Doppler flowmetry. Intestinal tissue oxygen tension was measured with intramural Clark-type electrodes. Results After 4 hours of treatment, arterial blood pressure, cardiac output, mesenteric artery flow, and mixed oxygen saturation were significantly higher in the GD-C and GD-RL groups than in the R-RL group. Microcirculatory flow in the intestinal mucosa increased by 50% in the GD-C group but remained unchanged in the other two groups. Likewise, tissue oxygen tension in the intestine increased by 30% in the GD-C group but remained unchanged in the GD-RL group and decreased by 18% in the R-RL group. Mesenteric venous glucose concentrations were higher and lactate levels were lower in the GD-C group

  17. PET/CT Response Criteria (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer) Predict Survival Better Than Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer Treated With Chemoradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jung Won; Kim, Sunghoon; Kim, Sang Wun; Kim, Young Tae; Kang, Won Jun; Nam, Eun Ji

    2016-09-01

    To investigate whether the ratio of SUVs measured with F-FDG PET/CT between pretreatment and posttreatment has prognostic value in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated with primary chemoradiation therapy. Cases of locally advanced cervical cancer (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages IB1 to IVA) treated with a nonsurgical curative modality (172 cases including chemoradiation or radiation therapy) were reviewed. F-FDG PET/CT parameters, including SUVmax and SUVmean, were evaluated by F-FDG PET/CT performed prior to treatment and 6 weeks after the end of treatment. Metabolic response was evaluated according to the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer guidelines and was compared with radiologic response measured according to the Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumours (RECIST). In total, 142 patients receiving chemoradiation showed radiologic responses (median 56% decrease in maximal diameter), whereas 160 and 146 patients showed metabolic responses measured with SUVmax and SUVmean, respectively (73% decrease in SUVmax; 48% decrease in SUVmean). Radiologic response and metabolic response were significantly correlated for SUVmax and SUVmean (P = 0.0009; P = 0.0457, respectively). Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed significant differences in overall survival and progression-free survival between the responder and nonresponder groups, based on the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria (both P cervical cancer patients to concurrent chemoradiation therapy, as compared with the RECIST criteria.

  18. Incidence, causative mechanisms, and anatomic localization of stroke in pituitary adenoma patients treated with postoperative radiation therapy versus surgery alone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sattler, Margriet; Vroomen, Patrick; Sluiter, Wim J.; Schers, Henk J.; van den Berg, Gerrit; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; van den Bergh, Alphons C. M.; van Beek, Andre P.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess and compare the incidence of stroke and stroke subtype in pituitary adenoma patients treated with postoperative radiation therapy (RT) and surgery alone. METHODS AND MATERIALS: A cohort of 462 pituitary adenoma patients treated between 1959 and 2008 at the University Medical Cente

  19. The influence of simultaneous integrated boost, hypofractionation and oncoplastic surgery on cosmetic outcome and PROMs after breast conserving therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lansu, J.T.; Essers, M.; Voogd, A.C.; Luiten, E.J.; Buijs, C.; Groenendaal, N.; Poortmans, P.M.P.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We retrospectively investigated the possible influence of a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB), hypofractionation and oncoplastic surgery on cosmetic outcome in 125 patients with stage I-II breast cancer treated with breast conserving therapy (BCT). PATIENTS AND METHODS: The boost was

  20. [Security of the medicinal therapy: Cartography of risks a priori within service of orthopaedic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razurel, A; Bertrand, É; Deranlot, J; Benhamou, F; Tritz, T; Le Mercier, F; Hardy, P

    2015-11-01

    Security and quality of the Medicinal Therapy are one of the most important objectives of the April 6th, 2011 order. The objective is to realize this study of the risks incurred by patients related to management and security of medicinal therapy in order to establish a plan to reduce the risks of drug's dispensation. The method of the Preliminary Risk Analysis (PRA) has been implemented by a multidisciplinary group in a hospital service of orthopaedic surgery. The study focused on the dispensation phase of medicinal circuit. This analysis revealed 148 scenarii, 35 were criticality unacceptable. Fifty-four initial risk control actions were proposed and their stress levels to put them in place were evaluated. The main measures of risk management are: training, information, communication, computerization, automation, dual control, updating the documentation system, drug reconciliation and respect for Best Practices Hospitallers (BPH). Risk management requires a significant human and financial investment as well as, material resources and multidisciplinary expertise in order to offer the best solutions. Copyright © 2015 Académie Nationale de Pharmacie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Multifunctional gold nanorods for image-guided surgery and photothermal therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriere, Clement; Qi, Ji; Garcia-Allende, P. Beatriz; Newton, Richard; Elson, Daniel S.

    2012-03-01

    Nanoparticles are viewed as a promising tool for numerous medical applications, for instance imaging and photothermal therapy (PTT) has been proposed using gold nanorods. We are developing multi-functional gold nanorods (m-GNRs) which have potential for image guided endoscopic surgery of tumour tissue with a modified laparoscope system. A new synthesis method potentially allows any useful acid functionalised molecules to be bonded at the surface. We have created fluorescent m-GNRs which can be used for therapy as they absorb light in the infrared, which may penetrate deep into the tissue and produce localised heating. We have performed a tissue based experiment to demonstrate the feasibility of fluorescence guided PTT using m- GNRs. Ex vivo tests were performed using sheep heart. This measurement, correlated with the fluorescence signal of the m-GNRs measured by the laparoscope allows the clear discrimination of the artery system containing m-GNRs. A laser diode was used to heat the m-GNRs and a thermal camera was able to record the heat distribution. These images were compared to the fluorescence images for validation.

  2. Gene therapy during cardiac surgery: role of surgical technique to minimize collateral organ gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Michael G; Swain, JaBaris D; Fargnoli, Anthony S; Bridges, Charles R

    2010-12-01

    Effective gene therapy for heart failure has not yet been achieved clinically. The aim of this study is to quantitatively assess the cardiac isolation efficiency of the molecular cardiac surgery with recirculating delivery (MCARD™) and to evaluate its efficacy as a means to limit collateral organ gene expression. 10(14) genome copies (GC) of recombinant adeno-associated viral vector 6 encoding green fluorescent protein under control of the cytomegalovirus promoter was delivered to the nine arrested sheep hearts. Blood samples were assessed using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT QPCR). Collateral organ gene expression was assessed at four-weeks using immunohistochemical staining. The blood vector GC concentration in the cardiac circuit during complete isolation trended from 9.59±0.73 to 9.05±0.65 (log GC/cm(3)), and no GC were detectable in the systemic circuit (P800-fold (P99% isolation efficiency. Conversely, incomplete isolation resulted in equalization of vector GC concentration in the circuits, leading to robust collateral organ gene expression. MCARD™ is an efficient, clinically translatable myocardial delivery platform for cardiac specific gene therapy. The cardiac surgical techniques utilized are critically important to limit collateral organ gene expression.

  3. Methodologies in the modeling of combined chemo-radiation treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassberger, C.; Paganetti, H.

    2016-11-01

    The variety of treatment options for cancer patients has increased significantly in recent years. Not only do we combine radiation with surgery and chemotherapy, new therapeutic approaches such as immunotherapy and targeted therapies are starting to play a bigger role. Physics has made significant contributions to radiation therapy treatment planning and delivery. In particular, treatment plan optimization using inverse planning techniques has improved dose conformity considerably. Furthermore, medical physics is often the driving force behind tumor control and normal tissue complication modeling. While treatment optimization and outcome modeling does focus mainly on the effects of radiation, treatment modalities such as chemotherapy are treated independently or are even neglected entirely. This review summarizes the published efforts to model combined modality treatments combining radiation and chemotherapy. These models will play an increasing role in optimizing cancer therapy not only from a radiation and drug dosage standpoint, but also in terms of spatial and temporal optimization of treatment schedules.

  4. Culture-inappropriate antibiotic therapy decreases quality of life improvement after sinus surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zi; Palmer, James N; Morales, Knashawn H; Howland, Timothy J; Doghramji, Laurel J; Adappa, Nithin D; Chiu, Alexander G; Cohen, Noam A; Lautenbach, Ebbing

    2014-05-01

    Despite their widespread use, antibiotics have not been shown to improve chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) outcomes. We aimed to determine whether culture-inappropriate postoperative antibiotic therapy was associated with less quality-of-life (QOL) improvement following functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS). This retrospective cohort study recruited 376 adult CRS patients undergoing FESS between October 1, 2007 to December 31, 2011. Patient demographics, comorbidities and medications were collected at baseline. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and clindamycin were administered for 2 weeks postoperatively. The antibiotic appropriateness was determined based on bacterial resistance profile of organisms identified during intraoperative culture. The QOL outcome was defined as change of 22-item Sinonasal Outcome Test scores from preoperative visit to 1-month, 3-month, and 6-month post-FESS. Clinically significant difference was defined as at least 0.5 standard deviations (SD) of baseline QOL score in the reference group. Mixed-effects regression models were performed. Seven percent of patients (n = 27) had culture-inappropriate antibiotic therapy, and additional 5% (n = 19) had culture-specific antibiotic adjustment. Compared to patients with culture-appropriate antibiotics, patients with culture-inappropriate antibiotics had significantly less improvement of QOL from baseline to postoperative 1-month and 3-month follow-up where the difference became clinically significant; patients with antibiotic adjustment had more QOL improvement from baseline to 1-month follow-up, but their QOL worsened at 3-month follow-up, and these changes were not clinically significant. However, all effects washed out at 6-month follow-up with no significant differences. Culture-inappropriate postoperative antibiotic therapy decreased short-term QOL improvement to a clinically meaningful level after FESS. Culture guided selection of antibiotics may improve short-term FESS outcome. © 2014 ARS

  5. Is stopping of anticoagulant therapy really required in a minor dental surgery? - How about in an endodontic microsurgery?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Wook Cho

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, oral anticoagulants are commonly prescribed to numerous patients for preventing cardiovascular accident such as thromboembolism. An important side effect of anticoagulant is anti-hemostasis. In a major surgery, the oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT regimen must be changed before the surgery for proper post-operative bleeding control. However, in a minor dental surgery and endodontic surgery, the necessity for changing or discontinuing the OAT is open to debate. In this study, risks of the consequences were weighed and analyzed. In patients who stop the OAT, the occurrence of thromboembolic complication is rare but the result is fatal. In patients who continuing the OAT, post-operative bleeding can be controlled well with the local hemostatic measures. In the endodontic surgery, there are almost no studies about this issue. The intra-operative bleeding control is particularly important in the endodontic surgery because of its delicate and sensitive procedures such as inspection of resected root surface using dental microscope and retrograde filling. Further studies are necessary about this issue in the viewpoint of endodontic surgery.

  6. Is stopping of anticoagulant therapy really required in a minor dental surgery? - How about in an endodontic microsurgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yong-Wook; Kim, Euiseong

    2013-08-01

    Nowadays, oral anticoagulants are commonly prescribed to numerous patients for preventing cardiovascular accident such as thromboembolism. An important side effect of anticoagulant is anti-hemostasis. In a major surgery, the oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT) regimen must be changed before the surgery for proper post-operative bleeding control. However, in a minor dental surgery and endodontic surgery, the necessity for changing or discontinuing the OAT is open to debate. In this study, risks of the consequences were weighed and analyzed. In patients who stop the OAT, the occurrence of thromboembolic complication is rare but the result is fatal. In patients who continuing the OAT, post-operative bleeding can be controlled well with the local hemostatic measures. In the endodontic surgery, there are almost no studies about this issue. The intra-operative bleeding control is particularly important in the endodontic surgery because of its delicate and sensitive procedures such as inspection of resected root surface using dental microscope and retrograde filling. Further studies are necessary about this issue in the viewpoint of endodontic surgery.

  7. Celiac Node Failure Patterns After Definitive Chemoradiation for Esophageal Cancer in the Modern Era

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amini, Arya [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); UC Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine, California (United States); Xiao Lianchun [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Allen, Pamela K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Suzuki, Akihiro; Hayashi, Yuki [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hofstetter, Wayne [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Crane, Christopher; Komaki, Ritsuko [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Bhutani, Manoop S.; Lee, Jeffrey H.; Ajani, Jaffer A. [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Welsh, James, E-mail: jwelsh@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: The celiac lymph node axis acts as a gateway for metastatic systemic spread. The need for prophylactic celiac nodal coverage in chemoradiation therapy for esophageal cancer is controversial. Given the improved ability to evaluate lymph node status before treatment via positron emission tomography (PET) and endoscopic ultrasound, we hypothesized that prophylactic celiac node irradiation may not be needed for patients with localized esophageal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the radiation treatment volumes for 131 patients who underwent definitive chemoradiation for esophageal cancer. Patients with celiac lymph node involvement at baseline were excluded. Median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy. The location of all celiac node failures was compared with the radiation treatment plan to determine whether the failures occurred within or outside the radiation treatment field. Results: At a median follow-up time of 52.6 months (95% CI 46.1-56.7 months), 6 of 60 patients (10%) without celiac node coverage had celiac nodal failure; in 5 of these patients, the failures represented the first site of recurrence. Of the 71 patients who had celiac coverage, only 5 patients (7%) had celiac region relapse. In multivariate analyses, having a pretreatment-to-post-treatment change in standardized uptake value on PET >52% (odds ratio [OR] 0.198, p = 0.0327) and having failure in the clinical target volume (OR 10.72, p = 0.001) were associated with risk of celiac region relapse. Of those without celiac coverage, the 6 patients that later developed celiac failure had a worse median overall survival time compared with the other 54 patients who did not fail (median overall survival time: 16.5 months vs. 31.5 months, p = 0.041). Acute and late toxicities were similar in both groups. Conclusions: Although celiac lymph node failures occur in approximately 1 of 10 patients, the lack of effective salvage treatments and subsequent low morbidity may justify prophylactic treatment

  8. The Daily Practice of Pancreatic Enzyme Replacement Therapy After Pancreatic Surgery: A Northern European Survey: Enzyme Replacement After Surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.C.M. Sikkens (Edmée); D.L. Cahen (Djuna); C.H.J. van Eijck (Casper); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); M.J. Bruno (Marco)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: After pancreatic surgery, up to 80 % of patients will develop exocrine insufficiency. For enzyme supplementation to be effective, prescribing an adequate dose of pancreatic enzymes is mandatory but challenging because the required dose varies. Data on the practice of enzyme

  9. The Daily Practice of Pancreatic Enzyme Replacement Therapy After Pancreatic Surgery: A Northern European Survey: Enzyme Replacement After Surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.C.M. Sikkens (Edmée); D.L. Cahen; C.H.J. van Eijck (Casper); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); M.J. Bruno (Marco)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: After pancreatic surgery, up to 80 % of patients will develop exocrine insufficiency. For enzyme supplementation to be effective, prescribing an adequate dose of pancreatic enzymes is mandatory but challenging because the required dose varies. Data on the practice of enzyme

  10. Cardiovascular morbidity after radiotherapy or chemoradiation in patients with cervical cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maduro, John; den Dekker, Heleen; Pras, Elisabeth; de Vries, E.G.; van der Zee, A.G.; Klokman, W.J.; Reyners, A.K.; van Leeuwen, F.E.; Langendijk, J.A.; de Bock, G.H.; Gietema, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the risk of cardiovascular events (CVE) in patients with cervical cancer treated with radiotherapy or chemoradiation. METHODS AND MATERIALS: The incidence of CVE in patients treated between 1989 and 2002 by radiotherapy or chemoradiation was compared with a Dutch reference popul

  11. Voice Quality After Treatment of Early Vocal Cord Cancer: A Randomized Trial Comparing Laser Surgery With Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, Leena-Maija, E-mail: leena-maija.aaltonen@hus.fi [Department of Otorhinolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Helsinki University Central Hospital, and University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Rautiainen, Noora; Sellman, Jaana [Institute of Behavioural Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Saarilahti, Kauko [Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, and University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Mäkitie, Antti; Rihkanen, Heikki [Department of Otorhinolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Helsinki University Central Hospital, and University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Laranne, Jussi; Kleemola, Leenamaija [Department of Otorhinolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Tampere University Hospital, and University of Tampere, Tampere (Finland); Wigren, Tuija [Department of Oncology, Tampere University Hospital, and University of Tampere, Tampere (Finland); Sala, Eeva [Department of Otorhinolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Turku University Hospital, and University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Lindholm, Paula [Department of Oncology, Turku University Hospital, and University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Grenman, Reidar [Department of Otorhinolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Turku University Hospital, and University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Joensuu, Heikki [Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, and University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland)

    2014-10-01

    Objective: Early laryngeal cancer is usually treated with either transoral laser surgery or radiation therapy. The quality of voice achieved with these treatments has not been compared in a randomized trial. Methods and Materials: Male patients with carcinoma limited to 1 mobile vocal cord (T1aN0M0) were randomly assigned to receive either laser surgery (n=32) or external beam radiation therapy (n=28). Surgery consisted of tumor excision with a CO{sub 2} laser with the patient under general anaesthesia. External beam radiation therapy to the larynx was delivered to a cumulative dose of 66 Gy in 2-Gy daily fractions over 6.5 weeks. Voice quality was assessed at baseline and 6 and 24 months after treatment. The main outcome measures were expert-rated voice quality on a grade, roughness, breathiness, asthenia, and strain (GRBAS) scale, videolaryngostroboscopic findings, and the patients' self-rated voice quality and its impact on activities of daily living. Results: Overall voice quality between the groups was rated similar, but voice was more breathy and the glottal gap was wider in patients treated with laser surgery than in those who received radiation therapy. Patients treated with radiation therapy reported less hoarseness-related inconvenience in daily living 2 years after treatment. Three patients in each group had local cancer recurrence within 2 years from randomization. Conclusions: Radiation therapy may be the treatment of choice for patients whose requirements for voice quality are demanding. Overall voice quality was similar in both treatment groups, however, indicating a need for careful consideration of patient-related factors in the choice of a treatment option.

  12. Challenges in optimizing chemoradiation in locally advanced non small-cell lung cancers in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushma Agrawal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Data supporting use of concurrent chemoradiation in locally advanced lung cancers comes from clinical trials from developed countries. Applicability and outcomes of such schedules in developing countries is not widely reported. There are various challenges in delivering chemoradiation in locally advanced non small cell lung cancer in developing countries which is highlighted by an audit of patients treated with chemoradiation in our center. This article deals with the challenges in the context of a developing country. We conclude that sequential chemoradiotherapy is better tolerated than concurrent chemoradiation in Indian patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancers. Patients with stage IIIa, normal weight or overweight, and adequate baseline pulmonary function should be offered concurrent chemoradiation.

  13. Effect of chemotherapy after radical surgery of colon cancer combined with cascade primed immune cell therapy on patients’ prognosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-Cheng Shu; Ping Gao; Xin-Jua Zuo

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the effect of chemotherapy after radical surgery of colon cancer combined with cascade primed immune cell therapy on patients' prognosis.Methods:A total of78 cases of patients with colon cancer who received radical surgery of colon cancer assisted by postoperative chemotherapy in our hospital from May 2012 to December 2014 were selected for treatment and randomly divided into two groups, combined treatment group received chemotherapy combined with cascade primed immune cell therapy, simple chemotherapy group received FOLFOX chemotherapy, and then serum tumor marker contents and angiogenesis molecule contents as well as red blood cell immune function indicators in peripheral blood were detected.Results:Serum tumor markers CCSA-2, CCSA-3, CCSA-4, PTN, NGAL and sMICA as well as angiogenesis molecules VEGF, FGF10, sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, Musashi1 and Dkk1 contents of combined treatment group were lower than those of conventional chemotherapy group; the proportion of CR1, CR3, CD58 and CD59 as well as the rosette formation rates of red blood cell C3b receptor and immune complex in peripheral blood of combined treatment group were significantly higher than those of conventional chemotherapy group.Conclusions:Chemotherapy after radical surgery of colon cancer combined with cascade primed immune cell therapy helps to kill tumor cells and inhibit angiogenesis while enhance red blood cell immune function, and it can improve the prognosis of radical surgery of colon cancer.

  14. The prognosis factor of adjuvant radiation therapy after surgery in uterine sarcomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou HL

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hai-Ling Hou, Mao-Bin Meng, Xiu-Li Chen, Lu-Jun Zhao, Li Zhu, Bai-Lin Zhang, Ping Wang Department of Radiation Oncology, CyberKnife Center, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center for Cancer, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China Objective: This retrospective study evaluated the role of adjuvant radiotherapy (AR after surgery in patients with uterine sarcoma and analyzed the prognostic factors of local-regional failure-free survival (LRFFS and overall survival (OS.Patients and methods: A study of a total of 182 patients with uterine sarcoma was conducted between June 1994 and October 2014. Adjuvant radiotherapy was defined as postoperative external beam radiation to the pelvis (30–50 Gray/10–25 fractions at five fractions/week. The primary end point was LRFFS, and the secondary end point was OS. Kaplan–Meier curves were compared using the log-rank test. Cox regression analyses were used to determine prognosticators for LRFFS and OS.Results: The median follow-up time of all patients was 75 months, with a 5-year LRFFS of 62.1%. The 2-year and 5-year LRFFS rates were longer for those who received AR than for those who did not receive AR (83.4% vs 70.3%; 78% vs 55.3%; P=0.013. The 5-year OS of all patients was 56.2%, and no significant differences were observed in the 2-year and 5-year OS rates between these two groups (82.7% vs 71.4%; 64.1% vs 51.7%; P=0.067. Importantly, in patients with leiomyosarcoma, the 2-year and 5-year LRFFS and OS rates were longer for those who received AR than for those who did not receive AR (P=0.04 and P=0.02 for the 2-year and 5-year LRFFS, respectively.Conclusion: Patients with uterine sarcoma who were treated with AR after surgery demonstrated an improved LRFFS compared with those who were treated with surgery alone, especially those patients with leiomyosarcoma. Therefore, the role of personalized adjuvant

  15. Oncological outcomes from trimodality therapy receiving definitive doses of neoadjuvant chemoradiation (≥60 Gy and factors influencing consideration for surgery in stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa A.L. Vyfhuis, MD PhD

    2017-07-01

    Conclusions: Trimodality treatment significantly improves survival and FFR in patients with LA-NSCLC when definitive doses of radiation with neoadjuvant chemotherapy are employed. We identified important demographic features that predict the use of surgical intervention in patients with stage III NSCLC.

  16. The effect of complementary therapies on post-operative pain control in ambulatory knee surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Timothy; Downham, Christopher; Barlow, David

    2013-10-01

    Ambulatory knee surgery is a common procedure with over 100,000 knee arthroscopies performed in the U.K. in 2010-2011. Pain after surgery can decrease patient satisfaction, delay discharge, and decrease cost effectiveness. Multi-modal therapies, including complementary therapies, to improve pain control after surgery have been recommended. However, a comprehensive review of the literature regarding the use of complementary therapies to enhance pain control after ambulatory knee surgery is lacking, and this article aims to address this deficit. CINHAL, EMBASE, MEDLINE, AMED and CENTRAL databases were searched. Only Randomised Controlled Trials were included. All eligible papers were quality assessed using the Jadad system, and data was extracted using piloted forms. Two independent reviewers performed each stage of the review. Full details of the study methodology can be found on Prospero, a systematic review register. Five studies satisfied our eligibility criteria: three reporting on acupuncture, one on homeopathy, and one on acupoints. Acupoint pressure was the only study that demonstrated reduced pain compared with placebo. This study was the least methodologically robust. Arnica, although demonstrating a significant reduction in swelling, did not affect post-operative pain. Acupuncture did not affect post-operative pain; however, a reduction in ibuprofen use was demonstrated in two studies. Before recommending complementary therapy for routine use in ambulatory knee surgery, further work is required. Two areas of future research likely to bear fruit are demonstrating robust evidence for the effect of acupoint pressure on post-operative pain, and quantifying the positive effect of homeopathic arnica on post-operative swelling.

  17. Comparison of Ice Packs Application and Relaxation Therapy in Pain Reduction during Chest Tube Removal Following Cardiac Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background: Usually the chest tube removal (CTR) has been described as one of the worst experiences by patients in the intensive care unit. Aim: This study aimed to compare the effects of cold therapy and relaxation on pain of CTR among the patients undergoes coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Materials and Methods: This single-blinded clinical trial was done on 80 post-cardiac surgery patients in the heart hospital of Sari-Iran. The patients were assigned to three randomized groups that i...

  18. Patients experiences of negative pressure wound therapy at home for the treatment of deep perivascular groin infection after vascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsen, Christina; Acosta, Stefan; Kumlien, Christine

    2017-05-01

    To explore experiences of negative pressure wound therapy at home, in patients with deep perivascular groin infection after vascular surgery and management in daily life. Deep surgical site infection after vascular surgery with exposed vessels often requires long-term treatment with negative pressure wound therapy, and continued therapy at home has become routine. An explorative qualitative study. Nine men and six women with a deep surgical site infection in the groin after vascular surgery, treated in their home with negative pressure wound therapy, were interviewed. The interviews were analysed using manifest and latent content analysis. Undergoing negative pressure wound therapy at home meant a transition from being a dependent patient to a person who must have self-care competence and be involved in their own care. A need to feel prepared for this before discharge from hospital was expressed. Lack of information and feelings of uncertainty prolonged the time before feeling confident in managing the treatment. The informants gradually accepted the need to be tied up to a machine, became competent in its management and found solutions to perform everyday tasks. Overall, it was a relief to be treated at home. Several benefits of negative pressure wound therapy at home were expressed. However, unnecessary stress and anxiety were experienced due to a lack of information on the treatment and instruction concerning the equipment. Adequate information and education must therefore be provided to facilitate the transition from a patient to a person with self-care competence and ability to manage this treatment at home. The findings revealed a need for more support and knowledge in their transition from hospital care to home care with negative pressure wound therapy. Routines must be established that ensure patient safety and security in treatment at home. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Radiobiological mechanisms of stereotactic body radiation therapy and stereotactic radiation surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mi Sook; Kim, Won Woo; Park, In Hwan; Kim, Hee Jong; Lee, Eun Jin; Jung, Jae Hoon [Research Center for Radiotherapy, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Lawrence Chin Soo; Song, Chang W. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Despite the increasing use of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and stereotactic radiation surgery (SRS) in recent years, the biological base of these high-dose hypo-fractionated radiotherapy modalities has been elusive. Given that most human tumors contain radioresistant hypoxic tumor cells, the radiobiological principles for the conventional multiple-fractionated radiotherapy cannot account for the high efficacy of SBRT and SRS. Recent emerging evidence strongly indicates that SBRT and SRS not only directly kill tumor cells, but also destroy the tumor vascular beds, thereby deteriorating intratumor microenvironment leading to indirect tumor cell death. Furthermore, indications are that the massive release of tumor antigens from the tumor cells directly and indirectly killed by SBRT and SRS stimulate anti-tumor immunity, thereby suppressing recurrence and metastatic tumor growth. The reoxygenation, repair, repopulation, and redistribution, which are important components in the response of tumors to conventional fractionated radiotherapy, play relatively little role in SBRT and SRS. The linear-quadratic model, which accounts for only direct cell death has been suggested to overestimate the cell death by high dose per fraction irradiation. However, the model may in some clinical cases incidentally do not overestimate total cell death because high-dose irradiation causes additional cell death through indirect mechanisms. For the improvement of the efficacy of SBRT and SRS, further investigation is warranted to gain detailed insights into the mechanisms underlying the SBRT and SRS.

  20. Virtual reality as a method for evaluation and therapy after traumatic hand surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nica, Adriana Sarah; Brailescu, Consuela Monica; Scarlet, Rodica Gabriela

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, Virtual Reality has encountered a continuous development concerning medical purposes and there are a lot of devices based on the classic "cyberglove" concept that are used as new therapeutic method for upper limb pathology, especially neurologic problems [1;2;3]. One of the VR devices is Pablo (Tyromotion), with very sensitive sensors that can measure the hand grip strenght and the pinch force, also the ROM (range of motion) for all the joints of the upper limb (shoulder, elbow, wrist) and offering the possibility of interactive games based on Virtual Reality concept with application in occupational therapy programs. We used Pablo in our study on patients with hand surgery as an objective tool for assessment and as additional therapeutic method to the classic Rehabilitation program [4;5]. The results of the study proved that Pablo represents a modern option for evaluation of hand deficits and dysfunctions, with objective measurement replacement of classic goniometry and dynamometry, with computerized data base of patients with monitoring of parameters during the recovery program and with better muscular and neuro-cognitive feedback during the interactive therapeutic modules.

  1. Role of Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy in Deep Sternal Wound Infection After Open Heart Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemalettin Aydın

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Mediastinitis is a devastating complication in open heart surgery. The most common treatments after debridement are rewiring with antibiotic irrigation. Vacuum assisted closure therapy is a recently introduced technique that promotes the healing of difficult wounds, including post-sternotomy mediastinitis.Patients and Methods: Forty one patients with deep sternal wound infection were divided into two groups based on the treatment method used. Twenty two patients with post-cardio to my deep sternal wound infection were treated primarily by vacuum assisted closure method (group A and 19 patients with deep sternal wound infection who received closed mediastinal irrigation were treated with antibiotics (group B between January 2006 and January 2010.Results: The two groups were compared. Three patients died during treatment in group B. The median healing time was significantly shorter in group A (mean, 13.5 ± 3.2 days compared to 18 days (mean, 21.2 ± 16.4 days in group B (p< 0.001. Deep sternal wound infection showed no recurrences after the vacuum treatment, while 7 (24% patients in group B suffered recurrences. Hospital stay was significantly shorter in group A (median, 30.5 days; mean, 32.2 ± 11.3 days vs. median, 45 days; mean, 49.2 ± 19.3 days (p= 0.001.Conclusion: A significantly shorter healing time was confirmed with vacuum assisted closure. Hospital stay remained significantly shorter in group A (35 vs. 46 days.

  2. Microarray profiling of mononuclear peripheral blood cells identifies novel candidate genes related to chemoradiation response in rectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Palma

    Full Text Available Preoperative chemoradiation significantly improves oncological outcome in locally advanced rectal cancer. However there is no effective method of predicting tumor response to chemoradiation in these patients. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells have emerged recently as pathology markers of cancer and other diseases, making possible their use as therapy predictors. Furthermore, the importance of the immune response in radiosensivity of solid organs led us to hypothesized that microarray gene expression profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells could identify patients with response to chemoradiation in rectal cancer. Thirty five 35 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer were recruited initially to perform the study. Peripheral blood samples were obtained before neaodjuvant treatment. RNA was extracted and purified to obtain cDNA and cRNA for hybridization of microarrays included in Human WG CodeLink bioarrays. Quantitative real time PCR was used to validate microarray experiment data. Results were correlated with pathological response, according to Mandard´s criteria and final UICC Stage (patients with tumor regression grade 1-2 and downstaging being defined as responders and patients with grade 3-5 and no downstaging as non-responders. Twenty seven out of 35 patients were finally included in the study. We performed a multiple t-test using Significance Analysis of Microarrays, to find those genes differing significantly in expression, between responders (n = 11 and non-responders (n = 16 to CRT. The differently expressed genes were: BC 035656.1, CIR, PRDM2, CAPG, FALZ, HLA-DPB2, NUPL2, and ZFP36. The measurement of FALZ (p = 0.029 gene expression level determined by qRT-PCR, showed statistically significant differences between the two groups. Gene expression profiling reveals novel genes in peripheral blood samples of mononuclear cells that could predict responders and non-responders to chemoradiation in patients with

  3. The tear substitutive therapy for prophylaxis and treatment of dry eye after cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Trubilin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To study the efficiency of tear substitutes based on hyaluronic acid at the patients after phacoemulsification for prophylaxis and postoperative therapy of dry eye syndrome.Methods: 168 patients (168 eyes were examined before cataract surgery. The average age was 69.2±5.7 years old. Patients were divided into four groups according to the presence of eye dry syndrome and following tear substitutive therapy. 55 patients with a mild case of DES (the first group were treated with Vismed® eye drops 1 drop given 3 times a day for 1 week before surgery and postoperatively. 10 patients with a moderate case of DES (second group were treated with Vismed gel® to use with the same periodicity. Patients without DES were divided into two groups: 50 of them (third group were treated to use Vismed® 1 drop 3 times a day postoperatively, the rest 53 didn’t undergo the course of treatment — «checkout group». The observation period was 45 days after operation. The study of tear secretion and osmolarity of tear fluid was performed before and after operative period.Results: 65 patients were first diagnosed a mild or moderate case of DES. On the third day after operation every group showed the increase of tear osmolarity, it was especially noticable among the patients of «checkout group» from 294 to 314 mOsm / l at the average. On the seventh day after operation all groups showed further negative dynamics, and in the «checkout» group comparing to initial indices was registered noticable worsening of the studied parameters (р≤0.05. By the 14th day after phacoemulsification patients from the 1st and the 3rd groups displayed the tendency to restoration of indices to the preoperative values. Indices of osmolarity and tear secretion restored among the patients from the 1st and the 2nd groups by the 21st day and even improved in comparison to the preoperative values of group 3. Meanwhile, «checkout» group’s indices fell to a level

  4. Clinical efficacy of low level laser therapy in reducing pain and swelling after periapical surgery. A preliminary report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilia Escalante-Macías

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the low level laser therapy (LLLT in postoperative pain and swelling associated with periapical surgery. A double-blind, randomized, controlled clinical trial was carried out in 2 groups of 10 patients each, undergoing periapical surgery. The experimental group was treated with an intraoral application of an 810 nm-GaAsAl-laser, having an output power of 100 mW, with overlapping movements over the wound. In the control group, the same procedure was carried out, without therapeutic laser activation. Postoperative pain, swelling, and rescue medication were registered. The experimental group exhibited a decrease in pain intensity after periapical surgery compared with control group (p

  5. The use of platelet reactivity testing in patients on antiplatelet therapy for prediction of bleeding events after cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leunissen, Tesse C; Janssen, Paul W A; Ten Berg, Jurriën M; Moll, Frans L; Korporaal, Suzanne J A; de Borst, Gert Jan; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Urbanus, Rolf T

    2016-02-01

    Many patients are treated with platelet inhibitors such as aspirin and clopidogrel for prevention of thrombotic cardiovascular events. However, the inhibitory effect of antiplatelet therapy is variable between patients; in some, the platelets are hardly inhibited, while in others, the platelets are excessively inhibited. The newer and more potent platelet inhibitors, prasugrel and ticagrelor, often lead to low platelet reactivity, which potentially leads to bleeding events. Preoperative measurement of platelet reactivity in patients receiving platelet inhibitors who undergo cardiac surgery, could be useful to identify those with low platelet reactivity and thus have an increased risk of bleeding during or after surgery. In this review, we discuss the most commonly used platelet inhibitors and platelet function tests. Furthermore, we will provide an overview of the evidence for the prediction of post-operative bleeding at the operation site with preoperative platelet reactivity testing in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A Phase 2 Trial of Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Paclitaxel Chemotherapy After Surgery in Patients With High-Risk Endometrial Cancer: A Korean Gynecologic Oncologic Group Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Hanbyoul [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Women' s Life Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Byung-Ho [Cancer Biostatistics Branch, Research Institute for National Cancer Control and Evaluation, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seok Mo [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Chonnam National University School of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Chi-Heum [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byoung Gie [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Hee-Sug [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Soon Beom [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae-Hoon, E-mail: jaehoonkim@yuhs.ac [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Women' s Life Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: A phase 2 study was completed by the Korean Gynecologic Oncologic Group to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of concurrent chemoradiation with weekly paclitaxel in patients with high-risk endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: Pathologic requirements included endometrial endometrioid adenocarcinoma stages III and IV. Radiation therapy consisted of a total dose of 4500 to 5040 cGy in 5 fractions per week for 6 weeks. Paclitaxel 60 mg/m{sup 2} was administered once weekly for 5 weeks during radiation therapy. Results: Fifty-seven patients were enrolled between January 2006 and March 2008. The median follow-up time was 60.0 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 51.0-58.2). All grade 3/4 toxicities were hematologic and usually self-limited. There was no life-threatening toxicity. The cumulative incidence of intrapelvic recurrence sites was 1.9% (1/52), and the cumulative incidence of extrapelvic recurrence sites was 34.6% (18/52). The estimated 5-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 63.5% (95% CI, 50.4-76.5) and 82.7% (95% CI, 72.4-92.9), respectively. Conclusions: Concurrent chemoradiation with weekly paclitaxel is well tolerated and seems to be effective for high-risk endometrioid endometrial cancers. This approach appears reasonable to be tested for efficacy in a prospective, randomized controlled study.

  7. A Meta-analysis of Randomized Trials Comparing Surgery versus Endovascular Therapy for Thrombosed Arteriovenous Fistulas and Grafts in Hemodialysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhan, G., E-mail: gkuhan@nhs.net; Antoniou, G. A. [Central Manchester University Hospital Foundation Trust, Regional Vascular and Endovascular Unit (United Kingdom); Nikam, M.; Mitra, S. [Central Manchester University Hospital Foundation Trust, Department of Renal Medicine (United Kingdom); Farquharson, F. [Central Manchester University Hospital Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Brittenden, J. [University of Aberdeen (United Kingdom); Chalmers, N. [Central Manchester University Hospital Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To carry out a systematic review of randomized trials comparing surgery vs. endovascular therapy for occluded fistulas and grafts. Methods. All randomized trials which compared surgery and endovascular therapy for occluded fistulas and grafts were retrieved from 1990 onwards. The following search terms were used: 'haemodialysis,' 'thrombosis,' 'arteriovenous fistula,' 'arteriovenous shunt,' 'end stage renal failure' on Medline and PubMed. The results of the pooled data were analysed by a fixed-effect model. Results. There were no randomized trials comparing surgery vs. endovascular therapy for native fistulas and vein grafts. Six randomized studies reporting on 573 occluded grafts were identified. Technical success, need for access line and primary patency at 30 days were similar between the two groups (odds ratio [OR] 1.40, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 0.91-2.14; OR 0.77, 95 % CI 0.44-1.34; and OR 1.15, 95 % CI 0.79-1.68, respectively). There was no significant difference in morbidity at 30 days between groups (OR 1.12, 95 % CI 0.67-1.86). There were no statistical difference between the two groups for 1 year primary patency (OR 2.08, 95 % CI 0.97-4.45). Primary assisted patency at 1 year was better with surgery (OR 3.03, 95 % CI 1.12-8.18) in a single study. Conclusion. Comparable results to surgery have been achieved with endovascular techniques for occluded prosthetic grafts for dialysis access. Long-term data comparing the two groups were lacking. Further trials designed to encompass variation in methods are warranted in order to obtain the best available evidence particularly for native fistulas.

  8. Comparison of laboratory and immediate diagnosis of coagulation for patients under oral anticoagulation therapy before dental surgery

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Dental surgery can be carried out on patients under oral anticoagulation therapy by using haemostyptic measures. The aim of the study was a comparative analysis of coagulation by laboratory methods and immediate patient diagnosis on the day of the planned procedure. Methods On the planned day of treatment, diagnoses were carried out on 298 patients for Prothrombin Time (PT), the International Normalised Ratio (INR), and Partial Thromboplastin Time (PTT). The decision to pr...

  9. Patient factors may predict anastomotic complications after rectal cancer surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana M. Hayden

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion: Our study identifies preoperative anemia as possible risk factor for anastomotic leak and neoadjuvant chemoradiation may lead to increased risk of complications overall. Further prospective studies will help to elucidate these findings as well as identify amenable factors that may decrease risk of anastomotic complications after rectal cancer surgery.

  10. Efficacy of low level laser therapy in reducing postoperative pain after endodontic surgery-- a randomized double blind clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreisler, M B; Haj, H Al; Noroozi, N; Willershausen, B d'Hoedt

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of low level laser application on postoperative pain after endodontic surgery in a double blind, randomized clinical study. Fifty-two healthy adults undergoing endodontic surgery were included into the study. Subsequently to suturing, 26 patients had the operation site treated with an 809 nm-GaAlAs-laser (oralaser voxx, Oralia GmbH, Konstanz, Germany) at a power output of 50 mW and an irradiation time of 150 s. Laser treatment was simulated in further 26 patients. Patients were instructed to evaluate their postoperative pain on 7 days after surgery by means of a visual analogue scale (VAS). The results revealed that the pain level in the laser group was lower than in the placebo group throughout the 7 day follow-up period. The differences, however, were significant only on the first postoperative day (Mann-Whitney U-test, p<0.05). Low level laser therapy can be beneficial for the reduction of postoperative pain. Its clinical efficiency and applicability with regard to endodontic surgery, however require further investigation. This is in particular true for the optimal energy dosage and the number of laser treatments needed after surgery.

  11. Goal-directed hemostatic therapy using the rotational thromboelastometry in patients requiring emergent cardiovascular surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danièle Sartorius

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: We assessed the clinical impact of goal-directed coagulation management based on rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM in patients undergoing emergent cardiovascular surgical procedures. Materials and Methods: Over a 2-year period, data from 71 patients were collected prospectively and blood samples were obtained for coagulation testing. Administration of packed red blood cells (PRBC and hemostatic products were guided by an algorithm using ROTEM-derived information and hemoglobin level. Based on the amount of PRBC transfused, two groups were considered: High bleeders (≥5 PRBC; HB and low bleeders (<5 PRBC; LB. Data were analyzed using Chi-square test, unpaired t-test and analysis of variance as appropriate. Results: Pre-operatively, the HB group (n = 31 was characterized by lower blood fibrinogen and decreased clot amplitude at ROTEM compared with the LB group (n = 40. Intraoperatively, larger amounts of fibrinogen, fresh frozen plasma and platelets were required to normalize the coagulation parameters in the HB group. Post-operatively, the incidence of major thromboembolic and ischemic events did not differ between the two groups (<10% and the observed in-hospital mortality was significantly less than expected by the Physiological and Operative Severity Score for the enumeration of Mortality and Morbidity (POSSUM score, 22% vs. 35% in HB and 5% vs. 13% in LB group. Conclusions: ROTEM-derived information is helpful to detect early coagulation abnormalities and to monitor the response to hemostatic therapy. Early goal-directed management of coagulopathy may improve outcome after cardiovascular surgery.

  12. Organ preservation with neoadjuvant chemoradiation in patients with orbit invasive sinonasal cancer otherwise requiring extenteration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amsbaugh, Mark J.; Yusuf, Mehran; Silverman, Craig; Bumpous, Jeffery; Perez, Cesar A.; Potts, Keven; Tennant, Paul; Redman, Rebecca; Dunlap, Neal [University of Louisville, Louisville (United States)

    2016-09-15

    We sought to determine if organ preservation (OP) with neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT) was feasible in patients with sinonasal cancer determined to require exenteration. Twenty patients were determined to require exenteration for definitive treatment from 2005 to 2014. Fourteen patients underwent OP and 6 patients received exenteration with adjuvant CRT. Exenteration free survival (EFS), locoregional control (LRC), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) were estimated. Five patients (36%) receiving OP had complete disease response at time of surgery. With a median follow-up of 18.8 months, EFS was 62% at 2 years for patients undergoing OP. At 2 years, there were no significant differences in LRC, PFS or OS (all all p > 0.050) between the groups. Less grade 3 or greater toxicity was seen in patients undergoing OP (p = 0.003). Visual function was preserved in all patients undergoing OP. For patients with sinonasal cancer, OP may avoid exenteration, offering similar disease control and improved toxicity.

  13. Perioperative management of oral antiplatelet therapy and clinical outcomes in coronary stent patients undergoing surgery. Results of a multicentre registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossini, Roberta; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Capodanno, Davide; Lettieri, Corrado; Limbruno, Ugo; Tarantini, Giuseppe; Russo, Nicolina; Calabria, Paolo; Romano, Michele; Inashvili, Ana; Sirbu, Vasile; Guagliumi, Giulio; Valsecchi, Orazio; Senni, Michele; Gavazzi, Antonello; Angiolillo, Dominick J

    2015-02-01

    The aim was to investigate the perioperative risk of ischaemic and bleeding events in patients with coronary stents undergoing cardiac and non-cardiac surgery and how these outcomes are affected by the perioperative use of oral antiplatelet therapy. This was a multicentre, retrospective, observational study conducted in patients with coronary stent(s) undergoing cardiac or non-cardiac surgery. The primary efficacy endpoint was the 30-day incidence of major adverse cardiac events (MACE), defined as the composite of cardiac death, myocardial infarction (MI) or stroke. The primary safety endpoint was the 30-day incidence of Bleeding Academic Research Consortium (BARC) bleeding ≥ 2. A total of 666 patients were included. Of these, 371 (55.7 %) discontinued their antiplatelet medication(s) (all or partly) before undergoing surgery. At 30 days, patients with perioperative discontinuation of antiplatelet therapy experienced a significantly higher incidence of MACE (7.5 % vs 0.3 %, pantiplatelet discontinuation was the strongest independent predictor of 30-day MACE (odds ratio [OR]=25.8, confidence interval [CI]=3.37-198, p=0.002). Perioperative aspirin (adjusted OR 0.27, 95 % CI 0.11-0.71, p=0.008) was significantly associated with a lower risk of MACE. The overall incidence of BARC ≥ 2 bleeding events at 30-days was significantly higher in patients who discontinued oral antiplatelet therapy (25.6 % vs 13.9 %, pantiplatelet discontinuation was not independently associated with BARC ≥ 2 bleeding. In conclusion antiplatelet discontinuation increases the 30-day risk of MACE, in patients with coronary stents undergoing cardiac and non-cardiac surgery, while not offering significant protection from BARC≥ 2 bleeding.

  14. Complete pathological responses in locally advanced rectal cancer after preoperative IMRT and integrated-boost chemoradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernando-Requejo, Ovidio [Hospital Universitario Sanchinarro, Department of Radiation Oncology, Madrid (Spain); Hospital Universitario Sanchinarro, CEU San Pablo University, Madrid (Spain); HM Universitario Sanchinarro, Centro Integral Oncologico Clara Campal, Madrid (Spain); Lopez, Mercedes; Rodriguez, Almudena; Ciervide, Raquel; Valero, Jeannette; Sanchez, Emilio; Garcia-Aranda, Mariola; Potdevin, Guillermo [Hospital Universitario Sanchinarro, Department of Radiation Oncology, Madrid (Spain); Cubillo, Antonio; Rodriguez, Jesus [Hospital Universitario Sanchinarro, Department of Medical Oncology, Madrid (Spain); Hospital Universitario Sanchinarro, CEU San Pablo University, Madrid (Spain); Rubio, Carmen [Hospital Universitario Sanchinarro, Department of Radiation Oncology, Madrid (Spain); Hospital Universitario Sanchinarro, CEU San Pablo University, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-06-15

    To analyze the efficacy and safety of a new preoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and integrated-boost chemoradiation scheme. In all, 74 patients were treated with IMRT and concurrent standard dose capecitabine. The dose of the planning target volume (PTV) encompassing the tumor, mesorectum, and pelvic lymph nodes was 46 Gy in 23 fractions; the boost PTV, at a dose of 57.5 Gy in 23 fractions, included the macroscopic primary tumor and pathological lymph nodes. The patients underwent surgery 6-8 weeks after chemoradiation. The complete treatment data of 72 patients were analyzed. Tumor downstaging was achieved in 55 patients (76.38 %) and node downstaging in 34 (47.2 %). In 22 patients (30.6 %), there was complete pathological response (ypCR). The circumferential resection margin was free of tumor in 70 patients (97.2 %). The 3-year estimated overall survival and disease-free survival rates were 95.4 and 85.9 % respectively, and no local relapse was found; however, ten patients (13.8 %) developed distant metastases. High pathologic tumor (pT) downstaging was shown as a favorable prognostic factor for disease-free survival. No grade 4 acute radiotherapy-related toxicity was found. The IMRT and integrated-boost chemoradiation scheme offered higher rates of ypCR and pT downstaging, without a significant increase in toxicity. The circumferential margins were free of tumors in the majority of patients. Primary tumor regression was associated with better disease-free survival. (orig.) [German] Analyse von Wirksamkeit und Sicherheit eines neuen praeoperativen intensitaetsmodulierten Bestrahlungsschemas (IMRT) mit integriertem Boost. Insgesamt 74 Patienten wurden simultan mit IMRT und Capecitabin (Standarddosis) behandelt. Die Dosis des Planungszielvolumens (PTV) umfasste den Tumor, das Mesorektum sowie die Beckenlymphknoten und betrug 46 Gy in 23 Fraktionen. Das Boost-PTV betrug 57,5 Gy in 23 Fraktionen und umfasste den makroskopischen Primaertumor und die

  15. TransOral Robotic Photodynamic Therapy for the Oropharynx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quon, Harry; Finlay, Jarod; Cengel, Keith; Zhu, Timothy; O’Malley, Bert; Weinstein, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been used for head and neck carcinomas with little experience in the oropharynx due to technical challenges in achieving adequate exposure. We present the case of a patient with a second right tonsil carcinoma following previous treatment with transoral robotic surgery (TORS) and postoperative chemoradiation for a left tonsil carcinoma. Repeat TORS for the right tonsil carcinoma reviewed multiple positive surgical margins. The power output from the robotic camera was modified to facilitate safe intraoperative three dimensional visualization of the tumor bed. The robotic arms facilitated clear exposure of the tonsil and tongue base with stable administration of the fluence. Real-time measurements confirmed stable photobleaching with augmentation of the prescribed light fluence secondary to light scatter in the oropharynx. We report a potential new role using TORS for exposure and accurate PDT in the oropharynx. PMID:21333937

  16. Comparison of the influence of ozone and laser therapies on pain, swelling, and trismus following impacted third-molar surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazancioglu, Hakki Oguz; Ezirganli, Seref; Demirtas, Nihat

    2014-07-01

    This study aims to evaluate the efficacy of the ozone and laser application in the management of pain, swelling, and trismus after third-molar surgery. Sixty consecutive patients with asymptomatic impacted mandibular third molars were recruited into the study. Patients were randomized into three treatment groups of 20 patients each: two study groups (group 1 = low-level laser therapy (LLLT), group 2 = ozone therapy) and a control group (no-LLLT or ozone therapy). Twenty teeth extractions were performed in each group. Evaluations of postoperative pain, the number of analgesics tablets taken, trismus, swelling, and quality of life (Oral Health Impact Profile-14 questionnaire) were made. The sample consisted of 28 female and 32 male patients, whose total mean age was 23.5 ± 3.4 (range, 18-25) years. The pain level and the number of analgesics tablets taken were lower in the ozonated and LLLT applied groups than in the control group. This study showed that ozone and low power laser therapies had a positive effect on the patients' quality of life. Trismus in the LLLT group was significantly less than in the ozonated and control groups (p = 0.033). Ozone application showed no superiority in regards of postoperative swelling; however, LLLT group had significantly lower postoperative swelling. This study demonstrates that ozone and laser therapies are useful for the reduction of postoperative pain and they increase quality of life after third-molar surgery. Although the ozone therapy had no effect on postoperative swelling and trismus after surgical removal of impacted lower third molars, LLLT had a positive effect.

  17. Tumor microcirculation during a course of combined chemoradiation in patients with primary rectal carcinoma measured with dynamic T1 mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremser, Christian; Judmaier, Werner; De Vries, Alexander

    2003-05-01

    A recently introduced dynamic T1 mapping technique was used to investigate changes of tumor microcirculatory parameters in 16 patients with clinically staged T3) primary rectal carcinoma during a course of preoperative combined chemoradiation. For dynamic T1 mapping an ultra-fast snapshot FLASH T1 mapping sequence was implemented on a 1.5T whole body MR scanner. Acquiring a series of T1 maps contrast media (CM) uptake and washout over an examination time of 40 min was monitored. From the obtained series of T1-maps perfusion-indices (PI) were calculated as the ratio of maximum slope of the tumor CM curve and the maximum of the arterial CM curve. Using pathologic classification of the resected tumors after therapy the patient group could be divided into patients with and without response to therapy. It was found that mean pre-therapy PI values of tumors showing therapy-response were significantly lower than for tumors without no therapy-response. In addition a different behavior of PI distributions within tumors for both groups was observed. The presented study indicates that PI values and their distributions within a tumor seem to be of predictive value for therapy outcome of preoperative therapy in patients with primary rectal carcinoma.

  18. Stage III Melanoma in the Axilla: Patterns of Regional Recurrence After Surgery With and Without Adjuvant Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinkham, Mark B., E-mail: mark.pinkham@health.qld.gov.au [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane (Australia); University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Foote, Matthew C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane (Australia); Queensland Melanoma Project, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane (Australia); Diamantina Institute, Brisbane (Australia); University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Burmeister, Elizabeth [Nursing Practice Development Unit, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane (Australia); Research Centre for Clinical and Community Practice, Griffith University, Brisbane (Australia); Thomas, Janine [Queensland Melanoma Project, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane (Australia); Meakin, Janelle [Clinical Trials Research Unit, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane (Australia); Smithers, B. Mark [Queensland Melanoma Project, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane (Australia); University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Burmeister, Bryan H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane (Australia); Queensland Melanoma Project, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane (Australia); University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To describe the anatomic distribution of regionally recurrent disease in patients with stage III melanoma in the axilla after curative-intent surgery with and without adjuvant radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A single-institution, retrospective analysis of a prospective database of 277 patients undergoing curative-intent treatment for stage III melanoma in the axilla between 1992 and 2012 was completed. For patients who received radiation therapy and those who did not, patterns of regional recurrence were analyzed, and univariate analyses were performed to assess for potential factors associated with location of recurrence. Results: There were 121 patients who received adjuvant radiation therapy because their clinicopathologic features conferred a greater risk of regional recurrence. There were 156 patients who received no radiation therapy. The overall axillary control rate was 87%. There were 37 patients with regional recurrence; 17 patients had received adjuvant radiation therapy (14%), and 20 patients (13%) had not. The likelihood of in-field nodal recurrence was significantly less in the adjuvant radiation therapy group (P=.01) and significantly greater in sites adjacent to the axilla (P=.02). Patients with high-risk clinicopathologic features who did not receive adjuvant radiation therapy also tended to experience in-field failure rather than adjacent-field failure. Conclusions: Patients who received adjuvant radiation therapy were more likely to experience recurrence in the adjacent-field regions rather than in the in-field regions. This may not simply reflect higher-risk pathology. Using this data, it may be possible to improve outcomes by reducing the number of adjacent-field recurrences after adjuvant radiation therapy.

  19. Cardiac-surgery associated acute kidney injury requiring renal replacement therapy. A Spanish retrospective case-cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia-Fernandez Nuria

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute kidney injury is among the most serious complications after cardiac surgery and is associated with an impaired outcome. Multiple factors may concur in the development of this disease. Moreover, severe renal failure requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT presents a high mortality rate. Consequently, we studied a Spanish cohort of patients to assess the risk factors for RRT in cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury (CSA-AKI. Methods A retrospective case-cohort study in 24 Spanish hospitals. All cases of RRT after cardiac surgery in 2007 were matched in a crude ratio of 1:4 consecutive patients based on age, sex, treated in the same year, at the same hospital and by the same group of surgeons. Results We analyzed the data from 864 patients enrolled in 2007. In multivariate analysis, severe acute kidney injury requiring postoperative RRT was significantly associated with the following variables: lower glomerular filtration rates, less basal haemoglobin, lower left ventricular ejection fraction, diabetes, prior diuretic treatment, urgent surgery, longer aortic cross clamp times, intraoperative administration of aprotinin, and increased number of packed red blood cells (PRBC transfused. When we conducted a propensity analysis using best-matched of 137 available pairs of patients, prior diuretic treatment, longer aortic cross clamp times and number of PRBC transfused were significantly associated with CSA-AKI. Patients requiring RRT needed longer hospital stays, and suffered higher mortality rates. Conclusion Cardiac-surgery associated acute kidney injury requiring RRT is associated with worse outcomes. For this reason, modifiable risk factors should be optimised and higher risk patients for acute kidney injury should be identified before undertaking cardiac surgery.

  20. Dysphagia severity following chemoradiation and postoperative radiation for head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Nam P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, VA North Texas Health Care System, Radiation Oncology Service (140), 4500 S, Lancaster Road, Dallas, TX 72516 (United States)]. E-mail: NamPhong.Nguyen@med.va.gov; Moltz, Candace C. [Audiology and Speech Pathology Service (126), VA North Texas Health Care System, Dallas, TX 75216 (United States); Frank, Cheryl [Audiology and Speech Pathology Service (126), VA North Texas Health Care System, Dallas, TX 75216 (United States); Karlsson, Ulf [Department of Radiation Oncology, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27858 (United States); Nguyen, Phuc D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, VA North Texas Health Care System, Radiation Oncology Service (140), 4500 S, Lancaster Road, Dallas, TX 72516 (United States); Vos, Paul [Department of Biostatistics, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27858 (United States); Smith, Herbert J. [Radiology Service, VA North Texas Health Care System, Dallas, TX 75216 (United States); Dutta, Suresh [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); Nguyen, Ly M. [Public Health School, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Lemanski, Claire [Department of Radiation Oncology, Val D' Aurelle, Montpellier (France); Chan, Wayne [Radiation Oncology Service, VAMC, Jackson, MS 39216 (United States); Sallah, Sabah [Division of Hematology/Oncology Research, Novo Nordisk, Athens (Greece)

    2006-09-15

    Objective: The purpose of the study is to evaluate dysphagia severity following chemoradiation and postoperative radiation for head and neck cancer, and particularly the aspiration risk because of its potential life-threatening consequence. Materials and methods: We reviewed retrospectively the modified barium swallow (MBS) results in 110 patients who complained of dysphagia following chemoradiation (57) and postoperative radiation (53) of their head and neck cancer. Patients were selected if they were cancer free at the time of the swallowing study. Dysphagia severity was graded on a scale of 1-7. Patients were grouped according to the dysphagia severity: mild (grades 2-3), moderate (grades 4-5), and severe (grades 6-7). Results: Mean and median dysphagia grades were 4.84/5 and 4.12/4 for chemoradiation and postoperative radiation respectively. The mean difference between the two groups is statistically significant (p = 0.02). Mild dysphagia occurred in 13 patients (22%) of the chemoradiation group and 17 (32%) of the postoperative group. Corresponding number for the moderate group was 25 (43%) and 25 (48%), respectively. Severe dysphagia was significant in the chemoradiation group (34%) compared to the postoperative group (19%). However, the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.29). There was a higher proportion of patients with large tumor (T3-T4) in the chemoradiation group who developed severe dysphagia. Conclusion: Dysphagia remained a significant morbidity of chemoradiation and postoperative radiation for head and neck cancer. Dysphagia may be more severe in the chemoradiation group because of the higher proportion of patients with large tumor, the high radiation dose, and a high number of oropharyngeal tumors. Aspiration occurred in both groups. Diagnostic studies such as MBS should be part of future head and neck cancer prospective studies to assess the prevalence of aspiration, as it may be silent.

  1. Surgery Should Complement Endocrine Therapy for Elderly Postmenopausal Women with Hormone Receptor-Positive Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Nguyen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Endocrine therapy (ET is an integral part of breast cancer (BC treatment with surgical resection remaining the cornerstone of curative treatment. The objective of this study is to compare the survival of elderly postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive early-stage BC treated with ET alone, without radiation or chemotherapy, versus ET plus surgery. Materials and Methods. This is a retrospective study based on a prospective database. The medical records of postmenopausal BC patients referred to the surgical oncology service of two hospitals during an 8-year period were reviewed. All patients were to receive ET for a minimum of four months before undergoing any surgery. Results. Fifty-one patients were included and divided in two groups, ET alone and ET plus surgery. At last follow-up in exclusive ET patients (n=28, 39% had stable disease or complete response, 22% had progressive disease, of which 18% died of breast cancer, and 39% died of other causes. In surgical patients (n=23, 78% were disease-free, 9% died of recurrent breast cancer, and 13% died of other causes. Conclusions. These results suggest that surgical resection is beneficial in this group and should be considered, even for patients previously deemed ineligible for surgery.

  2. Impact of respiratory therapy in vital capacity and functionality of patients undergoing abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Shanlley Cristina da Silva; Santos, Rafaella Souza Dos; Giovanetti, Erica Albanez; Taniguchi, Corinne; Silva, Cilene Saghabi de Medeiros; Eid, Raquel Afonso Caserta; Timenetsky, Karina Tavares; Carnieli-Cazati, Denise

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the vital capacity after two chest therapy techniques in patients undergoing abdominal surgical. A prospective randomized study carried out with patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit after abdominal surgery. We checked vital capacity, muscular strength using the Medical Research Council scale, and functionality with the Functional Independence Measure the first time the patient was breathing spontaneously (D1), and also upon discharge from the Intensive Care Unit (Ddis). Between D1 and Ddis, respiratory therapy was carried out according to the randomized group. We included 38 patients, 20 randomized to Positive Intermittent Pressure Group and 18 to Volumetric Incentive Spirometer Group. There was no significant gain related to vital capacity of D1 and Ddis of Positive Intermittent Pressure Group (mean 1,410mL±547.2 versus 1,809mL±692.3; p=0.979), as in the Volumetric Incentive Spirometer Group (1,408.3mL±419.1 versus 1,838.8mL±621.3; p=0.889). We observed a significant improvement in vital capacity in D1 (pfisioterapia respiratória em pacientes submetidos à cirurgia abdominal. Estudo prospectivo e randomizado realizado com pacientes admitidos em Unidade de Terapia Intensiva após cirurgia abdominal. Verificamos a capacidade vital, a força muscular por meio da escala do Medical Research Council e funcionalidade pela Medida de Independência Funcional no primeiro momento em que o paciente encontrava-se em respiração espontânea (D1) e na alta da Unidade de Terapia Intensiva (Dalta). Entre D1 e Dalta, foi realizada a fisioterapia respiratória, conforme o grupo randomizado. Foram incluídos 38 pacientes, sendo 20 randomizados para Grupo Pressão Positiva Intermitente e 18 para o Grupo Incentivador Inspiratório a Volume. A capacidade vital entre o D1 e Dalta do Grupo Pressão Positiva Intermitente não teve ganho significativo (média de 1.410mL±547,2 versus 1.809mL±692,3; p=0,979), assim como no Grupo Incentivador Inspiratório a Volume

  3. Desmoplastic small round cell tumor: review of therapy including surgery followed by continuous hyperthermic peritoneal perfusion of chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Hayes-Jordan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT is a very rare disease of children, adolescents, and young adults and involves the abdominal cavity. DSRCT has characteristic fusion gene involving EWS1 and WT1 translocation, t(11;22(p13;q12. Unlike Ewing’s sarcoma of bone, DSRCT usually presents with diffuse peritoneal implants that are prone to recur. The primary organ of origin of DSRCT is mesenchyme of the peritoneum. This makes it a very unique tumor that is difficult to treat because of the infiltrative and diffuse nature of the peritoneum. The challenge of local control is to remove dozens to hundreds of tumors studding the peritoneal cavity, and then eliminate microscopic disease. We review a sequential multimodality strategy to reduce macroscopic and microscopic disease including neoadjuvant chemotherapy, aggressive surgery including an emerging new therapy to use after surgery to treat microscopic residual disease: continuous hyperthermic peritoneal chemotherapy,

  4. Comparison of ice packs application and relaxation therapy in pain reduction during chest tube removal following cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M A Heidari Gorji

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Usually the chest tube removal (CTR has been described as one of the worst experiences by patients in the intensive care unit. Aim: This study aimed to compare the effects of cold therapy and relaxation on pain of CTR among the patients undergoes coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Materials and Methods: This single-blinded clinical trial was done on 80 post-cardiac surgery patients in the heart hospital of Sari-Iran. The patients were assigned to three randomized groups that included cold therapy, relaxation, and control groups. Data analysis was done by T-test, Chi-square, generalized estimating equations and repeated measures analysis variance tests. Results: The groups had no significant differences in pain intensity before CTR (P = 0.84, but immediately after CTR there was a significant difference between the treatment (cold application and relaxation groups and control groups (P = 0.001. There was no significant difference between relaxation and cold therapy groups. Conclusion: Regarding the relaxation and cold application methods showed relatively equal effects on reducing the pain owing to CTR. Thus, the use of relaxation because of economics, without side effects, easy to use and effective is recommended by the authors to the practitioners.

  5. A STUDY OF COX-2 INHIBITOR CELECOXIB AND CHEMORADIATION IN PATIENTS WITH LOCALLY ADVANCED CERVICAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuppa Prakash

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available AIMS AND OBJECTIVES To evaluate efficacy of concurrent oral Cox-2 Inhibitor (celecoxib and chemoradiation in locoregional control, distant control, disease free survival and/or overall survival in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer. To determine treatment related toxicity rates in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated by oral celecoxib, intravenous cisplatin and concurrent pelvic radiation therapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS Study was done for a period of 2 years in a tertiary care cancer hospital which caters to the cancer patients. Advanced squamous, adenocarcinoma or adenosquamous carcinoma of uterine cervix, Patients with age <70 years, ECOG performance status 0-2, Normal haematological investigations, Normal renal function test, Normal liver function test, No disease outside of pelvis. RESULTS This prospective study consisted 30 patients, 15 patients on either arm. Overall pooled mean age for both study and comparison group was 50.3 years with a probability value P=0.91 for age. 14 patients (93.33% in both the arms had a performance status of ECOG 0 or 1 and 1 patient in both arms had ECOG PS-2. Stage distribution of the patients in study arm was 3 in IB2, 2 in IIA, 5 in IIB, 4 in III and 1 in stage IVA. In control arm, out of the 15 patients 2 are in IB2, 2 in IIA, 5 in IIB, 5 in III and 1 in stage IVA. The mean probability value was P=0.65 for stage distribution. 15 patients in arm-A (study arm received pelvic RT 50Gy 2Gy/Fr 5#/week followed by HDR –ICR 3 Fr. 700 cGy/Fr after pelvic RT on an average of 1 week along with weekly cisplatin 40 mg/m2 (50 mg (D1, D8, D15, D22 and Cox-2 inhibitor oral celecoxib 400 mg twice daily (800 mg/d starting from day 1 to throughout the duration of the chemoradiation. 15 patients in arm-B (Control arm received pelvic RT 50Gy 2Gy/Fr 5#/week followed by HDR –ICR 3 Fr. 700 cGy/Fr on an average of 1 week after pelvic RT along with weekly cisplatin 40 mg/m2 (50 mg (D1, D8, D15, D22

  6. Antioxidant therapy reduces oxidative and inflammatory tissue damage in patients subjected to cardiac surgery with extracorporeal circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Rodrigo; Rodrigo, Ramón; Perez, Felipe; Cereceda, Mauricio; Asenjo, René; Zamorano, Jaime; Navarrete, Roberto; Villalabeitia, Eli; Sanz, Juan; Baeza, Cristián; Aguayo, Rubén

    2011-04-01

    Ischaemia reperfusion injury is a pathophysiological event that occurs after cardiac surgery with extracorporeal circulation. This clinical event has been associated with the induction of oxidative and inflammatory damage in atrial tissue. Here, we tested whether combined omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA)-antioxidant vitamin protocol therapy reduces oxidative and inflammatory cardiac tissue damage. This trial assigned 95 either-sex patients to supplementation with n-3 PUFA (2 g/day), or matching placebo groups, 7 days before on-pump surgery. Antioxidant vitamins C (1 g/day) and E (400 IU/day) or placebo were added from 2 days before surgery until discharge. Blood and atrial tissue samples were obtained during the intervention. Reduced/oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG) ratio, malondialdehyde (MDA) and protein carbonylation were determined in atrial tissue. Leucocyte count and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in blood plus nuclear factor (NF)-κappaB activation in atrial tissue served for inflammation assessment. Lipid peroxidation and protein carbonylation were 27.5 and 24% lower in supplemented patients (p < 0.01). GSH/GSSG ratio was 38.1% higher in supplemented patients compared with placebo (p < 0.01). Leucocyte count and serum hs-CRP levels were markedly lower throughout the protocol in supplemented patients (p < 0.01). Atrial tissue NF-κB DNA activation in supplemented patients was 22.5% lower than that in placebo patients (p < 0.05). The combined n-3 PUFA-antioxidant vitamin protocol therapy here proposed reduced the oxidative stress and inflammation biomarkers, in patients undergoing on-pump cardiac surgery.

  7. Radiotherapy With or Without Surgery for Patients With Idiopathic Sclerosing Orbital Inflammation Refractory or Intolerant to Steroid Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Hoon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yeon-Sil, E-mail: yeonkim7@catholic.ac.kr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Suk Woo; Cho, Won-Kyung [Department of Ophthalmology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Nam [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyung Ji [Department of Hospital Pathology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Mi-Ryeong; Jang, Hong Seok [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes of patients with idiopathic sclerosing orbital inflammation (ISOI) treated with radiotherapy with or without surgery. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 22 patients with histopathologically confirmed ISOI who had been refractory or intolerant to steroid therapy and treated with radiation with or without surgery. The radiation dose ranged from 20 to 40 Gy (median, 20 Gy) at 2 Gy per fraction. Presenting signs and treatment outcomes were assessed. Results: Proptosis was the most common sign at presentation, seen in 19 (86.3%) patients, followed by restriction of extraocular movements in 10 (45.4%) patients. Response to radiotherapy was complete in 15 (68.1%) patients, partial in 3 (13.6%) patients, and none in 4 (18.2%) patients. At the median follow-up of 34 months, 14 (63.6%) patients had progression-free state of symptoms and signs, with the progression-free duration ranging from 3 to 75 months (median, 41.5 months), whereas 8 (36.4%) patients had recurrent or persistent disease although they had received radiotherapy. Of the 14 progression-free patients, 6 underwent a bimodality treatment of debulking surgery of ocular disease and radiotherapy. They had had no recurrent disease. Cataract was the most common late complications, and 2 patients experienced a Grade 3 cataract. Conclusion: Our study suggests that for patients with ISOI who are refractory or intolerant to steroid therapy, 20 Gy of radiotherapy appears to be effective for the control of disease with acceptable complications, especially when it is combined with surgery.

  8. Novel strategies in glioblastoma surgery aim at safe, supra-maximum resection in conjunction with local therapies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John G. Wolbers

    2014-01-01

    The biggest challenge in neuro-oncology is the treatment of glioblastoma, which exhibits poor prognosis and is increasing in incidence in an increasing aging population. Diverse treatment strategies aim at maximum cytoreduction and ensuring good quality of life. We discuss multimodal neuronavigation, supra-maximum tumor resection, and the postoperative treatment gap. Multimodal neuronavigation al ows the integration of preoperative anatomic and functional data with intraoperative information. This approach includes functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor imaging in preplanning and ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), MRI and direct (sub)cortical stimulation during surgery. The practice of awake craniotomy decreases postoperative neurologic deficits, and an extensive supra-maximum resection appears to be feasible, even in eloquent areas of the brain. Intraoperative MRI- and fluorescence-guided surgery assist in achieving this goal of supra-maximum resection and have been the subject of an increasing number of reports. Photodynamic therapy and local chemotherapy are properly positioned to bridge the gap between surgery and chemoradiotherapy. The photosensitizer used in fluorescence-guided surgery persists in the remaining peripheral tumor extensions. Additionally, blinded randomized clinical trials showed firm evidence of extra cytoreduction by local chemotherapy in the tumor cavity. The cutting-edge promise is gene therapy although both the delivery and efficacy of the numerous transgenes remain under investigation. Issues such as the choice of (cell) vector, the choice of therapeutic transgene, the optimal route of administration, and biosafety need to be addressed in a systematic way. In this selective review, we present various evidence and promises to improve survival of glioblastoma patients by supra-maximum cytoreduction via local procedures while minimizing the risk of new neurologic deficit.

  9. Role of concurrent chemoradiation in inoperable carcinoma esophagus: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virendra Bhandari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The treatment of choice in cancer esophagus is controversial. Radiation therapy oncology group, Eastern cooperative oncology group and Cochrane studies have shown superiority of concurrent chemoradiation in inoperable carcinoma esophagus. In these studies full dose cisplatin was given every 3 weeks along with radiotherapy and hence had some toxicity. So, we started treating inoperable carcinoma esophagus patients with low dose weekly cisplatin given concurrently with radiotherapy aiming at low toxicity and similar results. Materials and Methods: A total of 31 cases of inoperable cases of carcinoma esophagus were treated with once weekly cisplatin 30 mg/m 2 along with radiotherapy 60 Gy in 30 fractions in 6 weeks on Telecobalt/Linear accelerator. Results : w0 e could achieve lower toxicity with 80%, 35% and 19% with 1, 2, and 3 year′s survival with a median survival of 18 months. So, we conclude that this regimen is better than 3 weekly chemotherapy regimen as is better tolerated with less toxicity and similar outcome.

  10. Recurrence of paraneoplastic membranous glomerulonephritis following chemoradiation in a man with non-small-cell lung carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kara Leonard

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Membranous glomerulonephritis can occur as a rare paraneoplastic complication of human cancers. In this case report, we describe a patient who presented acutely with symptoms of the nephrotic syndrome including heavy proteinuria and anasarca. He was subsequently diagnosed with membranous glomerulonephritis, and soon afterwards was found to have stage IIIB non-small cell lung cancer. Following chemoradiation therapy, both the patient’s cancer and membranous glomerulonephritis dramatically improved. However, approximately 14 months following his initial presentation, the patient was found to have a recurrence of his nephrotic-range proteinuria which corresponded temporally with recurrence of his cancer. We present details of the case and a review of the relevant scientific literature.

  11. Primary metastatic breast cancer in the era of targeted therapy - Prognostic impact and the role of breast tumour surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barinoff, Jana; Schmidt, Marcus; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Schoenegg, Winfried; Thill, Marc; Keitel, Stella; Lattrich, Claus R; Hinke, Axel; Kutscheidt, Andreas; Jackisch, Christian

    2017-09-01

    Except for meeting the individual palliative need, the benefit of breast surgery in primary metastatic breast cancer (PMBC), also known as de novo metastatic breast cancer, on long-term outcomes remains controversial. Twenty-four hundred and one patients with metastatic breast cancer, enrolled between 2000 and 2011 in two prospective non-interventional studies on targeted therapy, were screened with respect to this question. One study investigated trastuzumab therapy for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive metastatic breast cancer in addition to mainly first-line chemotherapy. The other observed bevacizumab added to chemotherapy as first-line treatment for mostly HER2-negative disease. Five-hundred and seventy (24%) patients presented with PMBC, and valid information on resection of the primary tumour was available for 568 women. Out of these, 426 (75%) underwent local resection. The latter group was characterised by less overall metastatic burden and a lower proportion of T4 tumours. No major differences were observed with respect to age, hormone receptor and HER2 status, visceral disease and performance status. Numerically, the surgery group showed a slightly favourable progression-free survival (PFS, medians: 13.6 versus 11.8 months; P = 0.18) and overall survival (OS, 34.1 versus 31.7; P = 0.23). However, in multivariable analysis, including all other univariably significant parameters, no trend for better outcome after surgery remained detectable, neither for PFS (hazard ratio 0.99; P = 0.92) nor for OS (0.95; P = 0.71). Our findings suggest no major survival benefit for local resection in the overall PMBC population treated with modern targeted therapies. However, further analyses are warranted to define specific risk groups, which may benefit from surgical removal of the primary. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Risk of Cerebrovascular Events in Elderly Patients After Radiation Therapy Versus Surgery for Early-Stage Glottic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Julian C.; Kruser, Tim J. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Gondi, Vinai [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Central Dupage Hospital Cancer Center, Warrenville, Illinois (United States); Mohindra, Pranshu; Cannon, Donald M.; Harari, Paul M. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Bentzen, Søren M., E-mail: bentzen@humonc.wisc.edu [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: Comprehensive neck radiation therapy (RT) has been shown to increase cerebrovascular disease (CVD) risk in advanced-stage head-and-neck cancer. We assessed whether more limited neck RT used for early-stage (T1-T2 N0) glottic cancer is associated with increased CVD risk, using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database. Methods and Materials: We identified patients ≥66 years of age with early-stage glottic laryngeal cancer from SEER diagnosed from 1992 to 2007. Patients treated with combined surgery and RT were excluded. Medicare CPT codes for carotid interventions, Medicare ICD-9 codes for cerebrovascular events, and SEER data for stroke as the cause of death were collected. Similarly, Medicare CPT and ICD-9 codes for peripheral vascular disease (PVD) were assessed to serve as an internal control between treatment groups. Results: A total of 1413 assessable patients (RT, n=1055; surgery, n=358) were analyzed. The actuarial 10-year risk of CVD was 56.5% (95% confidence interval 51.5%-61.5%) for the RT cohort versus 48.7% (41.1%-56.3%) in the surgery cohort (P=.27). The actuarial 10-year risk of PVD did not differ between the RT (52.7% [48.1%-57.3%]) and surgery cohorts (52.6% [45.2%-60.0%]) (P=.89). Univariate analysis showed an increased association of CVD with more recent diagnosis (P=.001) and increasing age (P=.001). On multivariate Cox analysis, increasing age (P<.001) and recent diagnosis (P=.002) remained significantly associated with a higher CVD risk, whereas the association of RT and CVD remained not statistically significant (HR=1.11 [0.91-1.37,] P=.31). Conclusions: Elderly patients with early-stage laryngeal cancer have a high burden of cerebrovascular events after surgical management or RT. RT and surgery are associated with comparable risk for subsequent CVD development after treatment in elderly patients.

  13. The Quality-of-Life Effects of Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman, Joseph M., E-mail: jherma15@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Narang, Amol K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Griffith, Kent A. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Zalupski, Mark M. [Department of Hematology Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Reese, Jennifer B. [Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Gearhart, Susan L. [Department of Medical Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Azad, Nolifer S. [Department of Medical Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Chan, June; Olsen, Leah [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Efron, Jonathan E. [Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Lawrence, Theodore S.; Ben-Josef, Edgar [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Existing studies that examine the effect of neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer on patient quality of life (QOL) are limited. Our goals were to prospectively explore acute changes in patient-reported QOL endpoints during and after treatment and to establish a distribution of scores that could be used for comparison as new treatment modalities emerge. Methods and Materials: Fifty patients with locally advanced rectal cancer were prospectively enrolled at 2 institutions. Validated cancer-specific European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC QLQ-CR30) and colorectal cancer-specific (EORTC QLQ-CR38 and EORTC QLQ-CR 29) QOL questionnaires were administered to patients 1 month before they began CRT, at week 4 of CRT, and 1 month after they had finished CRT. The questionnaires included multiple symptom scales, functional domains, and a composite global QOL score. Additionally, a toxicity scale was completed by providers 1 month before the beginning of CRT, weekly during treatment, and 1 month after the end of CRT. Results: Global QOL showed a statistically significant and borderline clinically significant decrease during CRT (-9.50, P=.0024) but returned to baseline 1 month after the end of treatment (-0.33, P=.9205). Symptoms during treatment were mostly gastrointestinal (nausea/vomiting +9.94, P<.0001; and diarrhea +16.67, P=.0022), urinary (dysuria +13.33, P<.0001; and frequency +11.82, P=.0006) or fatigue (+16.22, P<.0001). These symptoms returned to baseline after therapy. However, sexual enjoyment (P=.0236) and sexual function (P=.0047) remained persistently diminished after therapy. Conclusions: Rectal cancer patients undergoing neoadjuvant CRT may experience a reduction in global QOL along with significant gastrointestinal and genitourinary symptoms during treatment. Moreover, provider-rated toxicity scales may not fully capture this decrease in patient-reported QOL. Although most symptoms are transient

  14. Patient considerations in cataract surgery – the role of combined therapy using phenylephrine and ketorolac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Salinas, Roberto; Guarnieri, Adriano; Guirao Navarro, María Concepción; Saenz-de-Viteri, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Cataract, a degradation of the optical quality of the crystalline lens, progressive and age-related, is the leading cause of treatable blindness worldwide. Cataract surgery is the most common surgical procedure performed by ophthalmologists and is the only effective treatment for cataracts. Advances in the surgical techniques and better postoperative visual outcomes have progressively changed the primary concern of cataract surgery to become a procedure refined to yield the best possible refractive results. Sufficient mydriasis during cataract removal is critical to a successful surgical outcome. Poor pupil dilation can lead to serious sight-threatening complications that significantly increase the cost of surgery and decrease patients comfort. Mydriasis is obtained using anticholinergic and sympathomimetic drugs. Phenylephrine, an α1-adrenergic receptor agonist, can efficiently dilate the pupil when administered by intracameral injection. Additionally, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like ketorolac, which inhibit the synthesis of prostaglandins, are used to decrease intraoperative miosis, control pain and inflammation associated with cataract surgery, and to prevent the development of cystoid macular edema following surgery. Recently, a new combination of phenylephrine and ketorolac (Omidria®) has been approved by United States Food and Drug Administration for use during cataract surgery to maintain intraoperative mydriasis, prevent miosis, and reduce postoperative pain and inflammation. Clinical trials have shown that this new combination is effective, combining the positive effects of both drugs with a good safety profile and patient tolerability. Moreover, recent reports suggest that this combination is also effective in patients with high risk of poor pupil dilation. In conclusion, cataract is a global problem that significantly affects patients’ quality of life. However, they can be managed with a safe and minimally invasive surgery

  15. Postoperative versus definitive chemoradiation in early-stage anal cancer. Results of a matched-pair analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, B.; Menzel, M.; Bamberg, M.; Weinmann, M. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Breucha, G. [Kreiskrankenhaus Hechingen, Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Surgery

    2012-07-15

    Background and purpose: The goal of the present study was to comparatively assess the results of definitive chemoradiation (CRT) with or without previous macroscopically complete resection in patients with early-stage node-negative (T1-2 N0) anal carcinoma. Patients and methods: A total of 20 patients with T1-2 N0 anal carcinoma who received radiotherapy (RT) with or without chemotherapy following incidental R0/1 tumor resection (S/CRT group) were selected. These were matched to 20 comparable patients who underwent definitive chemoradiation without previous surgery (CRT group). Major objectives of this analysis were treatment outcomes in terms of locoregional tumor control (LRC), overall survival (OS), colostomy-free survival, and toxicity. Results: Patients treated postoperatively received significantly lower RT doses (median 54.0 Gy vs. 59.7 Gy; p < 0.001) and less frequently concomitant chemotherapy than those treated definitely. The 5-year LRC and 5-year OS rates were 97.5% and 90.0%, respectively, without significant differences between the S/CRT and the CRT groups. The distribution of acute and late toxicities was comparable, and the 5-year colostomy-free survival was 95% in both groups. Conclusion: This matched-pair comparison of incidental R0/1 resection plus dose-reduced CRT with standard definitive CRT of early-stage anal cancer shows similar treatment results. Thus, dose-reduced RT with or without chemotherapy may be considered in R0/1 resected patients with T1-2 N0 anal carcinoma. (orig.)

  16. Combination antifungal therapy and surgery for the treatment of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana Toffolutti

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available An 8-year old boy, affected by severe aplastic anemia, developed a probable pulmonary invasive aspergillosis (IA early after a second unrelated allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT. He was treated promptly with the combination of liposomal amphotericin B and caspofungin. Despite the initial stabilization, the patient deteriorated and the antifungal therapy was switched to voriconazole and caspofungin. The patient gradually improved and was discharged home on day +29 post-HSCT on oral voriconazole. On day +119, a sudden episode of hemoptysis occurred and a right superior lobectomy was decided to remove the residual aspergilloma. The patient is now alive and well more than 24 months from HSCT. This case demonstrated that antifungal combination therapy and surgery are valid options to cure pulmonary IA even in patients at high-risk and severely immunosuppressed.

  17. Using clinical parameters to guide fluid therapy in high-risk thoracic surgery. A retrospective, observational study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Lars Stryhn; Møller-Sørensen, Hasse; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite extensive research, the debate continues as to the optimal way of guiding intraoperative and postoperative fluid therapy. In 2009 we changed our institutional guideline for perioperative fluid therapy in patients undergoing extrapleural pneumonectomy (EPP) and implemented...... surgery after the changes. Data were collected from patient files and from institutional databases. Outcome measures included: Volumes of administered fluids, fluid balances, length of stays and postoperative complications. Dichotomous variables were compared with Fisher's exact test, whereas continuous...... variables were compared with Student's unpaired t-test or the Wilcoxon Two-Sample Test depending on the distribution of data. RESULTS: The applied changes significantly reduced the volumes of administered fluids, both in the intraoperative (p = 0.01) and the postoperative period (p = 0.04), without...

  18. Current role of endovascular therapy in Marfan patients with previous aortic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Akin

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Ibrahim Akin, Stephan Kische, Tim C Rehders, Tushar Chatterjee, Henrik Schneider, Thomas Körber, Christoph A Nienaber, Hüseyin InceDepartment of Medicine, Division of Cardiology at the University Hospital Rostock, Rostock School of Medicine, Ernst-Heydemann-Str. 6, 18057 Rostock, GermanyAbstract: The Marfan syndrome is a heritable disorder of the connective tissue which affects the cardiovascular, ocular, and skeletal system. The cardiovascular manifestation with aortic root dilatation, aortic valve regurgitation, and aortic dissection has a prevalence of 60% to 90% and determines the premature death of these patients. Thirty-four percent of the patients with Marfan syndrome will have serious cardiovascular complications requiring surgery in the first 10 years after diagnosis. Before aortic surgery became available, the majority of the patients died by the age of 32 years. Introduction in the aortic surgery techniques caused an increase of the 10 year survival rate up to 97%. The purpose of this article is to give an overview about the feasibility and outcome of stent-graft placement in the descending thoracic aorta in Marfan patients with previous aortic surgery.Keywords: Marfan syndrome, aortic dissection, root replacement, stent-graft, previous aortic surgery

  19. Evaluation of Tumor Response after Short-Course Radiotherapy and Delayed Surgery for Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rega, Daniela; Pecori, Biagio; Scala, Dario; Avallone, Antonio; Pace, Ugo; Petrillo, Antonella; Aloj, Luigi; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Delrio, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Neoadjuvant therapy is able to reduce local recurrence in rectal cancer. Immediate surgery after short course radiotherapy allows only for minimal downstaging. We investigated the effect of delayed surgery after short-course radiotherapy at different time intervals before surgery, in patients affected by rectal cancer. Methods From January 2003 to December 2013 sixty-seven patients with the following characteristics have been selected: clinical (c) stage T3N0 ≤ 12 cm from the anal verge and with circumferential resection margin > 5 mm (by magnetic resonance imaging); cT2, any N, CRM+ve who resulted unfit for chemo-radiation, were also included. Patients underwent preoperative short-course radiotherapy with different interval to surgery were divided in three groups: A (within 6 weeks), B (between 6 and 8 weeks) and C (after more than 8 weeks). Hystopatolgical response to radiotherapy was measured by Mandard’s modified tumor regression grade (TRG). Results All patients completed the scheduled treatment. Sixty-six patients underwent surgery. Fifty-three of which (80.3%) received a sphincter saving procedure. Downstaging occurred in 41 cases (62.1%). The analysis of subgroups showed an increasing prevalence of TRG 1–2 prolonging the interval to surgery (group A—16.7%, group B—36.8% and 54.3% in group C; p value 0.023). Conclusions Preoperative short-course radiotherapy is able to downstage rectal cancer if surgery is delayed. A higher rate of TRG 1–2 can be obtained if interval to surgery is prolonged to more than 8 weeks. PMID:27548058

  20. Effect of Kushen injection in combined with continuing nursing on the patients with instillation therapy after bladder cancer surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui-Xia Han; Rui-Min Han; Li-Kun Chen; Ming-Juan Liu; Hai-Ming Du; Zhi-Qian Tang; Lian-Xia Geng

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effect of Kushen injection in combined with continuing nursing on the patients with instillation therapy after bladder cancer surgery. Methods:A total of 60 patients with bladder cancer who were admitted in our hospital from January, 2013 to January, 2015 for instillation therapy were included in the study and were randomized into the observation group and the control group. The patients in the two groups were given routine THP instillation therapy. On this basis, the patients in the observation group were given additional Kushen injection in combined with continuing nursing. The occurrence rate of adverse reactions during the chemotherapy period and the improvement of immunological indicators in the two groups were compared. SF-36 health survey scale was used to evaluate the living qualities. Results:After treatment, CD4+and NK cell level in the observation group were significantly elevated, but CD8+level was significantly reduced when compared with before treatment. CD4+, CD8+, and NK cell levels after treatment in the control group were not significantly different from those before treatment. The bladder irritation symptoms during the chemotherapy period in the observation group were significantly lighter than those in the control group. The occurrence rate of main adverse reactions during the chemotherapy period in the observation group was significantly lower than that in the control group. The living quality scores in the observation group were significantly higher than those in the control group. Conclusions:Kushen injection in combined with continuing nursing can effectively regulate the immunological function in patients with instillation therapy after bladder cancer surgery, reduce the occurrence rate of adverse reactions, and enhance the living qualities.

  1. SU-E-J-122: Detecting Treatment-Induced Metabolic Abnormalities in Craniopharyngioma Patients Undergoing Surgery and Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, C; Shulkin, B; Li, Y; LI, X; Merchant, T [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Indelicato, D [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Boop, F [Semmes-Murphey Neurologic and Spine Institute, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To identify treatment-induced defects in the brain of children with craniopharyngioma receiving surgery and proton therapy using fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET). Methods: Forty seven patients were enrolled on a clinical trial for craniopharyngioma with serial imaging and functional evaluations. Proton therapy was delivered using the double-scattered beams with a prescribed dose of 54 Cobalt Gray Equivalent. FDG tracer uptake in each of 63 anatomical regions was computed after warping PET images to a 3D reference template in Talairach coordinates. Regional uptake was deemed significantly low or high if exceeding two standard deviations of normal population from the mean. For establishing the normal ranges, 132 children aged 1–20 years with noncentral nervous system related diseases and normal-appearing cerebral PET scans were analyzed. Age- and gender-dependent regional uptake models were developed by linear regression and confidence intervals were calculated. Results: Most common PET abnormality before proton therapy was significantly low uptake in the frontal lobe, the occipital lobe (particularly in cuneus), the medial and ventral temporal lobe, cingulate gyrus, caudate nuclei, and thalamus. They were related to injury from surgical corridors, tumor mass effect, insertion of a ventricular catheter, and the placement of an Ommaya reservoir. Surprisingly a significantly high uptake was observed in temporal gyri and the parietal lobe. In 13 patients who already completed 18-month PET scans, metabolic abnormalities improved in 11 patients from baseline. One patient had persistent abnormalities. Only one revealed new uptake abnormalities in thalamus, brainstem, cerebellum, and insula. Conclusion: Postoperative FDG PET of craniopharyngioma patients revealed metabolic abnormalities in specific regions of the brain. Proton therapy did not appear to exacerbate these surgery- and tumor-induced defects. In patients with persistent and

  2. Hospital Admissions, Biological Therapy, and Surgery in Familial and Sporadic Cases of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier Moller, Frederik; Andersen, Vibeke; Andersson, Mikael;

    2015-01-01

    -related hospitalization, biological treatment, and surgery in familial versus sporadic cases of IBD. RESULTS: A total of 27,886 IBD cases, including 1006 IBD-relative pairs, were followed-up for up to 16 years, totaling 164,979 person-years. We observed no difference in risk of hospital admissions between familial...... and sporadic cases of IBD. However, patients with familial CD had significantly higher risk of major surgery than sporadic CD cases after 2 years of disease duration (hazard ratio, 1.62; 95% confidence interval, 1.26-2.07). Also, sensitivity analysis suggested a slightly reduced time from diagnosis to first...... tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitor treatment among familial CD and UC cases as compared with sporadic cases. CONCLUSION: We found only minor differences in surgery rates and tumor necrosis factor exposure, between familial and sporadic cases of IBD. These findings may represent purely social rather than...

  3. Radiation therapy and chemotherapy after breast conserving surgery for invasive breast cancer: an intermediate result

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seok Ho; Lee, Kyu Chan; Choi, Jin Ho; Lee, Young Don; Park, Heoung Kyu; Kim, Hyun Young; Park, Se Hoon [Gachon Medical School, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    Breast conserving surgery (BCS) followed by chemotherapy (CT{sub x}.) and radiation therapy (RT) is widely performed for the treatment of early breast cancer. This retrospective study was undertaken to evaluate our interim results in terms of failure patterns, survival and relative risk factors. From January 1999 through December 2003, 129 patients diagnosed with invasive breast cancer and treated with BCS followed by RT were subject to retrospective review. The median age of the patients was 45 years (age distribution, 27 {approx} 76 years). The proportions of patients according to their tumor, nodes, and metastases (TNM) stage were 65 (50.4%) in stage I, 41 (31.7%) in stage IIa, 13 (10.1%) in stage IIb, 9 (7.0%) in stage III, and 1 patient (0.8%) in stage IIIc. For 32 patients (24.8%), axillary node metastasis was found after dissection, BCS consisted of quadrantectomy in 115 patients (89.1%) and lumpectomy in 14 patients (10.6%). Axillary node dissection at axillary level I and II was performed for 120 patients (93%). For 7 patients (5.4%), only sentinel node dissection was performed with BCS. For 2 patients (1.6%) axillary dissection of any type was not performed. Postoperative RT was given with 6 MV X-rays. A tumor dose of 50.4 Gy was delivered to the entire breast area using a tangential field with a wedge compensator. An additional dose of 9 {approx} 16 Gy was given to the primary tumor bed areas with electron beams. In 30 patients (23.3%), RT was delivered to the supraclavicular node. Most patients had adjuvant CT{sub x}. with 4 {approx} 6 cycles of CMF (cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, 5-fluorouracil) regimens. The median follow-up period was 50 months (range: 17 {approx} 93 months). The actuarial 5 year survival rate (5Y-OSR) was 96.9%, and the 5 year disease free survival rate (5Y-DFSR) was 93.7%. Local recurrences were noted in 2 patients (true: 2, regional node: 1) as the first sign of recurrence at a mean time of 29.3 months after surgery. Five

  4. The Effect of Neoadjuvant Therapy on Early Complications of Esophageal Cancer Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadtaghi Rajabi Mashhadi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment is required in esophageal cancer due to its invasive nature. The aim of this study was to evaluate early post-esophagectomy complications in patients with esophageal cancer who received neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (NACR.   Materials and Methods: This randomized clinical trial was carried out between 2009 and 2011. Patients with lower-third esophageal cancer were randomly assigned to one of two groups. The first group consisted of 50 patients receiving standard chemoradiotherapy (Group A and then undergoing surgery, and the second group consisted of 50 patients undergoing surgery only (Group B. Patients were evaluated with respect to age, gender, clinical symptoms, type of pathology, time of surgery, perioperative blood loss, and number of lymph nodes resected as well as early post-operative complicate including leakage at the anastomosis site, chylothorax and pulmonary complications, hospitalization period, and mortality rate within the first 30 days after surgery.   Results: The mean age of patients was 55 years. Seventy-two patients had squamous cell carcinoma (SCC and 28 patients had adenocarcinoma (ACC. There was no significant difference between the two groups with respect to age, gender, time of surgery, complications including anastomotic leakage, chylothorax, pulmonary complications, cardiac complications, deep venous thrombosis (DVT, or mortality. However, there was a significant difference between the two groups regarding hospital stay, time of surgery, perioperative blood loss, and number of lymph nodes resected.   Conclusion:  The use of NACR did not increase early post-operative complications or mortality among patients with esophageal cancer.

  5. Using a clinical protocol for orthognathic surgery and assessing a 3-dimensional virtual approach: current therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quevedo, Luis A; Ruiz, Jessica V; Quevedo, Cristobal A

    2011-03-01

    Oral and maxillofacial surgeons who perform orthognathic surgery face major changes in their practices, and these challenges will increase in the near future, because the extraordinary advances in technology applied to our profession are not only amazing but are becoming the standard of care as they promote improved outcomes for our patients. Orthognathic surgery is one of the favorite areas of practicing within the scope of practice of an oral and maxillofacial surgeon. Our own practice in orthognathic surgery has completed over 1,000 surgeries of this type. Success is directly related to the consistency and capability of the surgical-orthodontic team to achieve predictable, stable results, and our hypothesis is that a successful result is directly related to the way we take our records and perform diagnosis and treatment planning following basic general principles. Now that we have the opportunity to plan and treat 3-dimensional (3D) problems with 3D technology, we should enter into this new era with appropriate standards to ensure better results, instead of simply enjoying these new tools, which will clearly show not only us but everyone what we do when we perform orthognathic surgery. Appropriate principles need to be taken into account when implementing this new technology. In other words, new technology is welcome, but we do not have to reinvent the wheel. The purpose of this article is to review the current protocol that we use for orthognathic surgery and compare it with published protocols that incorporate new 3D and virtual technology. This report also describes our approach to this new technology.

  6. Patient considerations in cataract surgery – the role of combined therapy using phenylephrine and ketorolac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez-Salinas R

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Roberto Gonzalez-Salinas,1,2 Adriano Guarnieri,3 María Concepción Guirao Navarro,3 Manuel Saenz-de-Viteri3 1Department of Biomedical Research, Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro, Querétaro, Mexico; 2Department of Research, Asociación para Evitar la Ceguera en México, Mexico City, Mexico; 3Department of Ophthalmology, Clínica Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona, Spain Abstract: Cataract, a degradation of the optical quality of the crystalline lens, progressive and age-related, is the leading cause of treatable blindness worldwide. Cataract surgery is the most common surgical procedure performed by ophthalmologists and is the only effective treatment for cataracts. Advances in the surgical techniques and better postoperative visual outcomes have progressively changed the primary concern of cataract surgery to become a procedure refined to yield the best possible refractive results. Sufficient mydriasis during cataract removal is critical to a successful surgical outcome. Poor pupil dilation can lead to serious sight-threatening complications that significantly increase the cost of surgery and decrease patients comfort. Mydriasis is obtained using anticholinergic and sympathomimetic drugs. Phenylephrine, an α1-adrenergic receptor agonist, can efficiently dilate the pupil when administered by intracameral injection. Additionally, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs like ketorolac, which inhibit the synthesis of prostaglandins, are used to decrease intraoperative miosis, control pain and inflammation associated with cataract surgery, and to prevent the development of cystoid macular edema following surgery. Recently, a new combination of phenylephrine and ketorolac (Omidria® has been approved by United States Food and Drug Administration for use during cataract surgery to maintain intraoperative mydriasis, prevent miosis, and reduce postoperative pain and inflammation. Clinical trials have shown that this new combination is effective

  7. Transforaminal epidural steroid injections followed by mechanical diagnosis and therapy to prevent surgery for lumbar disc herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Helvoirt, Hans; Apeldoorn, Adri T; Ostelo, Raymond W; Knol, Dirk L; Arts, Mark P; Kamper, Steven J; van Tulder, Maurits W

    2014-07-01

    Prospective cohort study. To report the clinical course of patients with MRI-confirmed lumbar disc herniation-related radicular noncentralizing pain who received transforaminal epidural steroid injections (TESIs) and mechanical diagnosis and therapy (MDT). Noncentralizing symptoms in patients with lumbar disc herniation are associated with poor outcome. Commonly used treatments for these patients include TESIs and MDT. No study has evaluated the outcome of combining both strategies. Consecutive candidates for herniated lumbar disc surgery with noncentralizing chronic pain were eligible. Patients received TESIs followed by MDT. The primary outcomes were pain severity in the leg, disability (Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire for Sciatica), and global perceived effect (GPE). Outcomes were measured at baseline, discharge, and 12 months. Linear mixed-models and McNemar's tests were used to analyze outcome data. Sixty-nine patients receive TESIs. After TESIs, symptoms were resolved completely in 11 patients (16%). In these patients, symptom resolution was maintained at 12 months. A second subgroup of 32 patients (46%) reported significantly less pain after TESIs and showed centralization with MDT reassessment (significant reductions in leg pain and disability [P TESIs but still showed noncentralization with MDT reassessment (significant reductions in leg pain and disability [P TESIs and received an operative intervention. The results indicate that a course of TESIs followed by MDT may be able to avoid surgery in a substantial proportion of candidates for herniated lumbar disc surgery. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Warfarin dosing after bariatric surgery: a retrospective study of 10 patients previously stable on chronic warfarin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schullo-Feulner, A M; Stoecker, Z; Brown, G A; Schneider, J; Jones, T A; Burnett, B

    2014-04-01

    Many changes associated with bariatric surgery have the potential to affect warfarin dosing; yet current literature includes little data describing this phenomenon. Investigating this relationship may allow for determination of post-bariatric surgery warfarin dosing using stable pre-operative dosing levels. A retrospective chart review was completed for 10 patients stabilized on chronic warfarin therapy who underwent bariatric surgery. Data collection consisted of the following: warfarin requirement in mg/week, time in target range (TTR), creatinine, liver function, diarrhoea, medication changes, diet, and signs of bleeding and/or thrombosis. Three study patients underwent laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding procedures and seven patients underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. The average (standard deviation) weekly warfarin dose required in the immediate post-operative interval was 64% (25%) of baseline dosing, corresponding to a TTR of 48%. At 6 months, patients required 85% (19%) of baseline weekly dosing, with TTR of 53.4%. At 1 year, dosing was 90% (16%) of baseline with TTR of 63.5%. Patients underwent medication changes as well as transient bouts of diarrhoea. Two patients suffered unspecified haemorrhages of the gastrointestinal tract (international normalized ratio [INR] = 2.3 and 9.8). This patient set demonstrated an initial drop in warfarin requirement, followed by escalating dosing trends that became more predictable as patients were farther out from procedure.

  9. Radiation therapy for breast cancer patients who undergo oncoplastic surgery: localization of the tumor bed for the local boost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezner, Richard D; Tan, Mark C; Clancy, Sharon L; Chen, Yi-Jen; Joseph, Thomas; Vora, Nayana L

    2013-12-01

    Oncoplastic reconstructive surgery is performed in select patients with breast cancer to allow conservation treatment when the lumpectomy would be expected to have a poor cosmetic outcome. These techniques not only rearrange the breast tissue but may also shift the position of the tumor bed. The oncoplastic incision may have no relationship to the tumor bed. Although use of whole-breast radiation therapy (RT) is straightforward, difficulties in localization of the tumor bed for the local RT boost have not been investigated. A retrospective review was performed of 25 patients with 26 cancers who received RT after breast conservation surgery with oncoplastic reconstruction. Among 11 patients with a minimum of 4 surgical clips placed at tumor resection, 8 (73%) had the final tumor bed extend beyond the original breast quadrant or be completely relocated into a different region. In 3 (27%) cases, the clinical treatment volume was 2 to 3 separated regions within the breast. For breast cancer patients who have had oncoplastic surgery, the tumor bed is frequently more extensive and possibly relocated compared with original presentation. Placement of surgical clips after tumor resection and before oncoplastic reconstruction may be the most accurate method to localize the RT local boost field.

  10. Transforaminal epidural steroid injections influence Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy (MDT) pain response classification in candidates for lumbar herniated disc surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Helvoirt, Hans; Apeldoorn, Adri T; Knol, Dirk L; Arts, Mark P; Kamper, Steven J; van Tulder, Maurits W; Ostelo, Raymond W

    2016-04-27

    Prospective cohort study. Although lumbar radiculopathy is regarded as a specific diagnosis, the most effective treatment strategy is unclear. Commonly used treatments include transforaminal epidural steroid injections (TESIs) and Mechanical Diagnosis & Therapy (MDT), but no studies have investigated the effectiveness of this combination. MDT differentiates pain centralization (C) from non-centralization (NC), which indicates good vs. poor prognostic validity respectively. The main aims were 1) to determine changes in Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy (MDT) pain response classifications after transforaminal epidural steroid injections (TESIs) in candidates for lumbar herniated disc surgery and 2) to evaluate differences in short and long term outcomes for patients with different pain response classifications. Candidates for lumbar herniated disc surgery were assessed with a MDT protocol and their pain response classified as centralizing or peripheralizing. For this study,only patients were eligible who showed a peripheralizing pain response at intake. All patients then received TESIs and were reassessed and classified using the MDT protocol, into groups according to pain response (resolved, centralizing, peripheralizing with less pain and peripheralising with severe pain). After receiving targeted treatment based on pain response after TESIs, ranging from advice, MDT or surgery, follow-up assessments were completed at discharge and at 12 months. The primary outcomes were disability (Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire [RMDQ] for Sciatica), pain severity in leg (visual analogue scale [VAS], 0-100) and global perceived effect (GPE). Linear mixed-models were used to determine between-groups differences in outcome. A total of 77 patients with lumbar disc herniation and peripheralizing symptoms were included. Patients received an average of 2 (SD 0.7) TESIs. After TESIs, 17 patients (22%) were classified as peripheralizing with continuing severe pain.These patients

  11. Survival Comparisons for Breast Conserving Surgery and Mastectomy Revisited: Community Experience and the Role of Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onitilo, Adedayo A.; Engel, Jessica M.; Stankowski, Rachel V.; Doi, Suhail A.R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Evidence suggests superiority of breast conserving surgery (BCS) plus radiation over mastectomy alone for treatment of early stage breast cancer. Whether the superiority of BCS plus radiation is related to the surgical approach itself or to the addition of adjuvant radiation therapy following BCS remains unclear. Materials and Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study of women with breast cancer diagnosed from 1994–2012. Data regarding patient and tumor characteristics and treatment specifics were captured electronically. Kaplan-Meier survival analyses were performed with inverse probability of treatment weighting to reduce selection bias effects in surgical assignment. Results Data from 5335 women were included, of which two-thirds had BCS and one-third had mastectomy. Surgical decision trends changed over time with more women undergoing mastectomy in recent years. Women who underwent BCS versus mastectomy differed significantly regarding age, cancer stage/grade, adjuvant radiation, chemotherapy, and endocrine treatment. Overall survival was similar for BCS and mastectomy. When BCS plus radiation was compared to mastectomy alone, 3-, 5-, and 10-year overall survival was 96.5% vs 93.4%, 92.9% vs 88.3% and 80.9% vs 67.2%, respectively. Conclusion These analyses suggest that survival benefit is not related only to the surgery itself, but that the prognostic advantage of BCS plus radiation over mastectomy may also be related to the addition of adjuvant radiation therapy. This conclusion requires prospective confirmation in randomized trials. PMID:25487237

  12. Impact of surgery, radiation and systemic therapy on the outcomes of patients with dendritic cell and histiocytic sarcomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gounder, Mrinal; Desai, Ved; Kuk, Deborah; Agaram, Narasimhan; Arcila, Maria; Durham, Benjamin; Keohan, Mary L.; Dickson, Mark A.; D’Angelo, Sandra P.; Shukla, Neerav; Moskowitz, Craig; Noy, Ariela; Maki, Robert G.; Herrera, Diego Adrianzen; Sanchez, Armando; Krishnan, Anita; Pourmoussa, Andrew; Qin, Li-Xuan; Tap, William D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Neoplasms of histiocytic and dendritic cell origin, including follicular dendritic cell sarcoma (FDCS), histiocytic sarcoma (HS) and interdigitating dendritic cell sarcoma (IDCS), are extremely rare, and data on their natural history and treatment outcomes are sparse. We evaluated the impact of surgery, radiation and systemic therapies on overall survival (OS). Methods We conducted a retrospective chart review of patients with FDCS, IDCS and HS treated at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center between 1995 and 2014. Results We identified 31, 15 and 7 patients with FDCS, HS and IDCS, respectively. Median age was 48.7, 42.3 and 58.8 years for FDCS, HS and IDCS, respectively. Only a slight disparity in gender distribution existed for FDCS and HS; however, IDCS predominantly affected males (6:1). The most common sites of presentation were abdomen and pelvis (42%), extremities (33%) and head and neck (57%) for FDCS, HS and IDCS, respectively. At diagnosis, 74%, 40% and 86% of patients presented with localised disease in FDCS, HS and IDCS, respectively. Patients with localised disease had significantly improved OS than those with metastatic disease in FDCS (P = 0.04) and IDCS (P = 0.014) but not in HS (P = 0.95). In FDCS and HS, adjuvant or neo-adjuvant therapy was not associated with improved OS compared with observation. In IDCS, surgery alone provided a 5-year overall survival rate of 71%. Conclusions Adjuvant or neo-adjuvant treatment in FDCS and HS did not affect OS. Patients with IDCS had an excellent outcome with surgery. In the metastatic setting, chemotherapy and small molecule inhibitors may provide benefit. PMID:26298731

  13. Risk assessment by myocardial perfusion imaging for coronary revascularization, medical therapy, and noncardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaioannou, Georgios I; Heller, Gary V

    2003-01-01

    Stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) has become an important tool in risk stratification of patients with known coronary artery disease. A normal myocardial perfusion scan has a high negative predictive value and is associated with low annual mortality rate ( 20% of the left ventricle), defects in more than 1 coronary vascular territory, transient or persistent left ventricular cavity dilation, and ejection fraction less than 45% have a high annual mortality rate (> 3%). Those patients should undergo coronary revascularization whenever feasible, as the cardiac event rate increases in proportion to the magnitude of the jeopardized myocardium. Stress MPI can be used to demonstrate ischemia in patients with symptoms early after coronary artery bypass surgery (/= 5 years) after coronary artery bypass surgery. With respect to patients who underwent percutaneous interventions, stress MPI can help detect in-stent restenosis early after the intervention (3-6 months) or assess the progression of native coronary disease afterward. Since preliminary data suggest that a reduction in the perfusion defect size may translate to a reduction of coronary events, stress MPI can help assess the efficacy of medical management of coronary disease. Finally, stress MPI is indicated for perioperative cardiac risk stratification for noncardiac surgery in patients with intermediate risk predictors (mild angina, prior myocardial infarction or heart failure symptoms, diabetes mellitus, renal insufficiency) and poor functional capacity or in those who undergo high-risk surgery with significant implications in further preoperative management.

  14. Health outcomes with and without use of inotropic therapy in cardiac surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Dorthe Viemose; Hansen, Malene Kærslund; Johnsen, Søren Paaske;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inotropes used to obtain short-term hemodynamic benefits in cardiac surgery may carry a risk of increased myocardial ischemia and adverse outcomes. This study investigated the association between intra- and postoperative use of inotropes and mortality and postoperative complications. ...

  15. Effectiveness of Chemoradiation for Head and Neck Cancer in an Older Patient Population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VanderWalde, Noam A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Meyer, Anne Marie; Deal, Allison M. [Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Layton, J. Bradley [Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Liu, Huan [Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Carpenter, William R. [Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Department of Health Policy and Management, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Weissler, Mark C. [Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Hayes, David N. [Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology and Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Fleming, Mary E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); and others

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare chemoradiation therapy (CRT) with radiation therapy (RT) only in an older patient population with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database (1992-2007), we identified a retrospective cohort of nonmetastatic HNSCC patients and divided them into treatment groups. Comparisons were made between CRT and RT cohorts. Propensity scores for CRT were estimated from covariates associated with receipt of treatment using multivariable logistic regression. Standardized mortality ratio weights (SMRW) were created from the propensity scores and used to balance groups on measured confounders. Multivariable and SMR-weighted Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) of death for receipt of CRT versus RT among the whole group and for separate patient and tumor categories. Results: The final cohort of 10,599 patients was 68% male and 89% white. Median age was 74 years. Seventy-four percent were treated with RT, 26% were treated with CRT. Median follow-up points for CRT and RT survivors were 4.6 and 6.3 years, respectively. On multivariable analysis, HR for death with CRT was 1.13 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.07-1.20; P<.01). Using the SMRW model, the HR for death with CRT was 1.08 (95% CI: 1.02-1.15; P=.01). Conclusions: Although the addition of chemotherapy to radiation has proven efficacious in many randomized controlled trials, it may be less effective in an older patient population treated outside of a controlled trial setting.

  16. Post-Operative Benefits of Animal-Assisted Therapy in Pediatric Surgery: A Randomised Study

    OpenAIRE

    Valeria Calcaterra; Pierangelo Veggiotti; Clara Palestrini; Valentina De Giorgis; Roberto Raschetti; Massimiliano Tumminelli; Simonetta Mencherini; Francesca Papotti; Catherine Klersy; Riccardo Albertini; Selene Ostuni; Gloria Pelizzo

    2015-01-01

    Background Interest in animal-assisted therapy has been fuelled by studies supporting the many health benefits. The purpose of this study was to better understand the impact of an animal-assisted therapy program on children response to stress and pain in the immediate post-surgical period. Patients and Methods Forty children (3–17 years) were enrolled in the randomised open-label, controlled, pilot study. Patients were randomly assigned to the animal-assisted therapy-group (n = 20, who underw...

  17. Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Treatment Time Impacts Overall Survival in Gastric Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMillan, Matthew T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Surgery, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Ojerholm, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Roses, Robert E., E-mail: Robert.Roses@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Plastaras, John P.; Metz, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Mamtani, Ronac [Department of Hematology/Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Karakousis, Giorgos C.; Fraker, Douglas L.; Drebin, Jeffrey A. [Department of Surgery, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Stripp, Diana; Ben-Josef, Edgar [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Datta, Jashodeep [Department of Surgery, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: Prolonged radiation therapy treatment time (RTT) is associated with worse survival in several tumor types. This study investigated whether delays during adjuvant radiation therapy impact overall survival (OS) in gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: The National Cancer Data Base was queried for patients with resected gastric cancer who received adjuvant radiation therapy with National Comprehensive Cancer Network–recommended doses (45 or 50.4 Gy) between 1998 and 2006. RTT was classified as standard (45 Gy: 33-36 days, 50.4 Gy: 38-41 days) or prolonged (45 Gy: >36 days, 50.4 Gy: >41 days). Cox proportional hazards models evaluated the association between the following factors and OS: RTT, interval from surgery to radiation therapy initiation, interval from surgery to radiation therapy completion, radiation therapy dose, demographic/pathologic and operative factors, and other elements of adjuvant multimodality therapy. Results: Of 1591 patients, RTT was delayed in 732 (46%). Factors associated with prolonged RTT were non-private health insurance (OR 1.3, P=.005) and treatment at non-academic facilities (OR 1.2, P=.045). Median OS and 5-year actuarial survival were significantly worse in patients with prolonged RTT compared with standard RTT (36 vs 51 months, P=.001; 39 vs 47%, P=.005); OS worsened with each cumulative week of delay (P<.0004). On multivariable analysis, prolonged RTT was associated with inferior OS (hazard ratio 1.2, P=.002); the intervals from surgery to radiation therapy initiation or completion were not. Prolonged RTT was particularly detrimental in patients with node positivity, inadequate nodal staging (<15 nodes examined), and those undergoing a cycle of chemotherapy before chemoradiation therapy. Conclusions: Delays during adjuvant radiation therapy appear to negatively impact survival in gastric cancer. Efforts to minimize cumulative interruptions to <7 days should be considered.

  18. [Development and evaluation of individualized fluid therapy in the elderly patients with coronary heart disease undergoing gastrointestinal surgery: a randomized, controlled trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hong; Guo, Hai; Ye, Jian-rong; Chen, Lin

    2012-06-01

    To develop and evaluate an individualized fluid therapy in the elderly patients with coronary heart disease undergoing gastrointestinal surgery. In this prospective study, 60 coronary heart disease patients undergoing gastrointestinal surgery were included in the First Affiliated Hospital of Xinjiang Medical University from March 2009 to March 2012. Patients were randomized into the intervention group and the control group with 30 patients in each group. Individualized fluid therapy was used during surgery and postoperative period in the ICU, which was determined based on target controlled fluid therapy according to cardiac index, stroke volume, and stroke volume variation. Traditional fluid therapy was used in the control group in the intraoperative and postoperative period. The two groups were compared in terms of postoperative hemodynamic parameters, total fluid volume, incidence of adverse cardiac events, and recovery of bowel function. Compared with the control group, mean arterial pressure was significantly increased at the commencement of the surgery. The cardiac index was significantly elevated during surgery and at the end of the surgery. Stroke volume was significantly increased after induction of anesthesia, during the surgery, and at the early stay of ICU period(all Pfluid volume, crystal usage, and urine were significantly less, while colloidal fluid use was significantly more in the intervention group as compared to the control group(all P0.05). In the intervention group, defecation time, time to first flatus, resumption of liquid intake, length of ICU stay and hospital stay were significantly less compared with the control group(Pfluid therapy can effectively decrease adverse cardiac events, improve postoperative gastrointestinal function, and reduce length of hospital stay.

  19. Thrombelastographic haemostatic status and antiplatelet therapy after coronary artery bypass surgery (TEG-CABG trial)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafiq, Sulman; Johansson, Pär I; Zacho, Mette;

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Hypercoagulability, assessed by the thrombelastography (TEG) assay, has in several observational studies been associated with an increased risk of post-procedural thromboembolic complications. We hypothesize that intensified antiplatelet therapy with clopidogrel and aspirin,...

  20. Antiplatelet Therapy in Carotid Artery Stenting and Carotid Endarterectomy in the Asymptomatic Carotid Surgery Trial-2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huibers, A; Halliday, A; Bulbulia, R; Coppi, G; de Borst, G J

    OBJECTIVE: Strokes are infrequent but potentially serious complications following carotid intervention, but antiplatelet therapy can reduce these risks. There are currently no specific guidelines on dose or duration of peri-procedural antiplatelet treatment for patients undergoing carotid

  1. Neoadjuvant irinotecan, cisplatin, and concurrent radiation therapy with celecoxib for patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Cleary, James M.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Szymonifka, Jackie; Bueno, Raphael; Choi, Noah; Donahue, Dean M.; Fidias, Panos M.; Gaissert, Henning A.; Jaklitsch, Michael T.; Kulke, Matthew H.; Lynch, Thomas P.; Mentzer, Steven J.; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.; Swanson, Richard S.; Wain, John

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer who are treated with trimodality therapy have a high recurrence rate. Preclinical evidence suggests that inhibition of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) increases the effectiveness of chemoradiation, and observational studies in humans suggest that COX-2 inhibition may reduce esophageal cancer risk. This trial tested the safety and efficacy of combining a COX2 inhibitor, celecoxib, with neoadjuvant irinotecan/cisplatin chemoradiation. Methods...

  2. Effect of massage therapy on pain, anxiety, relaxation, and tension after colorectal surgery: A randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, Nikol E; Cutshall, Susanne M; Huebner, Marianne; Foss, Diane M; Lovely, Jenna K; Bauer, Brent A; Cima, Robert R

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to evaluate the effect of postoperative massage in patients undergoing abdominal colorectal surgery. One hundred twenty-seven patients were randomized to receive a 20-min massage (n = 61) or social visit and relaxation session (no massage; n = 66) on postoperative days 2 and 3. Vital signs and psychological well-being (pain, tension, anxiety, satisfaction with care, relaxation) were assessed before and after each intervention. The study results indicated that postoperative massage significantly improved the patients' perception of pain, tension, and anxiety, but overall satisfaction was unchanged. In conclusion, massage may be beneficial during postoperative recovery for patients undergoing abdominal colorectal surgery. Further studies are warranted to optimize timing and duration and to determine other benefits in this clinical setting.

  3. Could the mechanisms of bariatric surgery hold the key for novel therapies?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tam, C S; Berthoud, H-R; Bueter, M;

    2011-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is the most effective method for promoting dramatic and durable weight loss in morbidly obese subjects. Furthermore, type 2 diabetes is resolved in over 80% of patients. The mechanisms behind the amelioration in metabolic abnormalities are largely unknown but may be due to chang...... of obesity and diabetes. Promising data on energy metabolism, gastrointestinal physiology, hedonic response and food intake were reviewed and discussed....

  4. The role of postoperative radiation and chemoradiation in Merkel Cell Carcinoma: A systematic review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaakir eHasan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: A systematic review of the literature was undertaken to investigate whether adjuvant radiotherapy and/or chemotherapeutics offered any additional benefit than surgery alone in the treatment of Merkel Cell Carcinoma (MCC. Methods: A PubMed, MEDLINE search was conducted between 1995-2013, to identify reported cases of surgically treated MCC followed by either observation, radiation, or chemoradiation. Patient demographics and outcomes were recorded and compared in a systematic fashion. Results: Thirty-four studies (n = 4475 were included. The median age was 73 years, median follow-up was 36 months and there was a 1.5:1 ratio of men to women. All 4475 patients had surgery, 1975 had no further treatment, 1689 received postoperative RT, and 301 received postoperative chemoRT. The most common site was face/head/neck, 47.8%. Stage 1 was the most common clinical stage at diagnosis (57%. Three-year LC was 20% [median 10%] in the observation cohort, compared to 65% [62%] with postoperative RT and 67% [75%] with postoperative chemoRT; these findings were statistically significant (P

  5. Can medical therapy mimic the clinical efficacy or physiological effects of bariatric surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miras, A D; le Roux, C W

    2014-03-01

    The number of bariatric surgical procedures performed has increased dramatically. This review discusses the clinical and physiological changes, and in particular, the mechanisms behind weight loss and glycaemic improvements, observed following the gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy and gastric banding bariatric procedures. The review then examines how close we are to mimicking the clinical or physiological effects of surgery through less invasive and safer modern interventions that are currently available for clinical use. These include dietary interventions, orlistat, lorcaserin, phentermine/topiramate, glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, pramlintide, dapagliflozin, the duodenal-jejunal bypass liner, gastric pacemakers and gastric balloons. We conclude that, based on the most recent trials, we cannot fully mimic the clinical or physiological effects of surgery; however, we are getting closer. A 'medical bypass' may not be as far in the future as we previously thought, as the physician's armamentarium against obesity and type 2 diabetes has recently got stronger through the use of specific dietary modifications, novel medical devices and pharmacotherapy. Novel therapeutic targets include not only appetite but also taste/food preferences, energy expenditure, gut microbiota, bile acid signalling, inflammation, preservation of β-cell function and hepatic glucose output, among others. Although there are no magic bullets, an integrated multimodal approach may yield success. Non-surgical interventions that mimic the metabolic benefits of bariatric surgery, with a reduced morbidity and mortality burden, remain tenable alternatives for patients and health-care professionals.

  6. Successful therapy of progressive rhino-orbital mucormycosis caused by Rhizopus arrhizus with combined and sequential antifungal therapy, surgery and hyperbaric therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrián Imbernón

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of rhino-orbitary mucormycosis which progressed despite liposomal amphotericin and early surgical debridement. Combined echinocandin and high dose liposomal amphotericin, repeated debridement, prolonged therapy with hyperbaric oxygen and continued therapy with posaconazole, along with strict diabetic control, allowed cure without disfigurement.

  7. The influence of number of high risk factors on clinical outcomes in patients with early-stage cervical cancer after radical hysterectomy and adjuvant chemoradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Soyi; Lee, Seok-Ho; Park, Chan-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prognosis according to the number of high risk factors in patients with high risk factors after radical hysterectomy and adjuvant chemoradiation therapy for early stage cervical cancer. Methods Clinicopathological variables and clinical outcomes of patients with FIGO (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics) stage IB1 to IIA cervical cancer who had one or more high risk factors after radical hysterectomy and adjuvant chemoradiation therapy were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were divided into two groups according to the number of high risk factors (group 1, single high risk factor; group 2, two or more high risk factors). Results A total of 93 patients were enrolled in the present study. Forty nine out of 93 (52.7%) patients had a single high risk factor, and 44 (47.3%) had two or more high risk factors. Statistically significant differences in stage and stromal invasion were observed between group 1 and group 2. However, age, histology, tumor size, and lymphovascular space invasion did not differ significantly between the groups. Distant recurrence occurred more frequently in group 2, and the probability of recurrence and death was higher in group 2. Conclusion Patients with two or more high risk factors had worse prognosis in early stage cervical cancer. For these patients, consideration of new strategies to improve survival may be worthwhile. Conduct of further clinical trials is warranted for development of adjuvant treatment strategies individualized to each risk group. PMID:27200308

  8. Medicinal therapy for interventional surgery of the peripheral vascular system; Medikamentoese Therapie bei interventionellen Eingriffen am peripheren Gefaesssystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tacke, J. [Klinikum Passau, Institut fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie/Neuroradiologie, Passau (Germany); Lindhoff-Last, E. [Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe-Universitaetsklinik Frankfurt, Schwerpunkt Angiologie/Haemostaseologie, Medizinische Klinik III, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2010-01-15

    The aim of medicinal treatment, during and after femoral and crural interventions is to prevent early or late onset arterial thrombosis of the treated vascular segments. Therefore, unfractionated heparin is administered during the intervention by an intra-arterial or intravenous approach. To avoid late onset thrombosis, administration of platelet function inhibitors is recommended. However, valid data are only available for acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). Therefore, ASA is recommended for long term medication. In several cardiological studies on stent implantation in coronary vessels the combination of ASA and clopidogrel for dual platelet inhibition has been proven to be effective. These results have been transferred to antithrombotic therapy of the lower extremities despite the lack of dedicated studies. There is no evidence for the use of vitamin K antagonists after peripheral interventions. (orig.) [German] Die medikamentoese Therapie waehrend und nach Interventionen am peripheren Gefaesssystem hat das Ziel, Frueh- und Spaetthrombosen im behandelten Gefaesssegment zu verhindern. Dies erfolgt waehrend der Intervention durch intravenoese oder -arterielle Gabe unfraktionierter Heparine. Zur Prophylaxe sekundaerer Thrombosen werden Thrombozytenaggregationshemmer empfohlen, von denen nur fuer ASS validierte Daten vorliegen. ASS wird daher als Dauertherapie empfohlen. Aus kardiologischen Studien haben sich Vorteile fuer eine duale Plaettchenhemmung nach koronarer Stentimplantation (ASS plus Clopidogrel) ergeben, die trotz fehlender Studien auf die Nachsorge nach Stentung/PTA im femoropoplitealen und kruralen Gefaessgebiet uebertragen werden. Orale Antikoagulanzien haben keinen Stellenwert zur postinterventionellen Nachsorge. (orig.)

  9. Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy and Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Cardias Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Kolesnikov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to analyze the combined use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO and continuous renal replacement therapy with switching into the ECMO circuit in cardiac surgical patients over 18 years of age and to reveal predictors of a fatal outcome in this combination of auxiliary organ support techniques. Materials and methods. The retrospective cohort study postoperatively used a combination of ECMO and continuous renal replacement therapy in 27 cardiac surgical patients aged over 18 years with severe cardiopulmonary insufficiency concurrent with acute kidney lesion. In all cases, the continuous renal replacement therapy circuit was switched into the line after an ECMO pump. The end points of the study were the duration of dialysis-dependent acute renal failure, the frequency of complications, and hospital mortality. Results. In all cases with a favorable outcome, the duration of continuous renal replacement therapy was 3 days longer than that of ECMO. There were no cases of recovery if the duration of continuous renal replacement therapy was shorter than that of ECMO and the duration of the latter was more than 10 days. The duration of sympathomimetic support (>3.5 days was shown to be an independent and significant predictor of death (AUC 0.99; CI 99.9%, 0.96—1.0 in the patients receiving continuous renal replacement therapy and ECMO. It was established that the number of inotrophic drugs (>2 and the highest lactate level (>1.99 mmol/l could be used to predict hospital mortality in patients with acute kidney injury and severe cardiopulmonary insufficiency (AUC 0.85 and 0.86; sensitivity/specificity 0.83/0.67 and 0.86/0.67, respectively.Conclusion. The concurrent use of ECMO and continuous renal replacement therapy in severe cardiac surgical patients with potentially reversible cardiopulmonary insufficiency and acute kidney injury is a sound and complementary combination of auxiliary organ support techniques.  

  10. [Clinico-morphological assessment of early and late results of laser therapy of the anastomosis area after radical surgeries for stomach cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyrianov, B N; Vusik, M V; Kritskaia, N G

    2003-01-01

    The study included 52 patients after gastrectomy for carcinoma of the proximal part of the stomach. Endoscopic laser therapy was made in 32 patients to reduce inflammation in the anastomosis zone 2-3 weeks after surgery. Drug therapy was made in 20 patients within the same time period. Histochemical study of the biopsy material of esophageal and intestinal part of the anastomosis was carried out. It is revealed that application of copper vapor laser early after surgery reduces edema and inflammation in the anastomosis zone for 2 weeks as well as accelerates the growth of granulation tissue forming a delicate scar thus preventing formation of scar stenosis.

  11. [Can Topical Negative Pressure Therapy be Performed as a Cost-Effective General Surgery Procedure in the German DRG System?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirche, Z; Xiong, L; Hirche, C; Willis, S

    2016-04-01

    Topical negative pressure therapy (TNPT) has been established for surgical wound therapy with different indications. Nevertheless, there is only sparse evidence regarding its therapeutic superiority or cost-effectiveness in the German DRG system (G-DRG). This study was designed to analyse the cost-effectiveness of TNPT in the G-DRG system with a focus on daily treatment costs and reimbursement in a general surgery care setting. In this retrospective study, we included 176 patients, who underwent TNPT between 2007 and 2011 for general surgery indications. Analysis of the cost-effectiveness involved 149 patients who underwent a simulation to calculate the reimbursement with or without TNPT by a virtual control group in which the TNP procedure was withdrawn for DRG calculation. This was followed by a calculation of costs for wound dressings and TNPT rent and material costs. Comparison between the "true" and the virtual group enabled calculation of the effective remaining surplus per case. Total reimbursement by included TNPT cases was 2,323 ,70.04 €. Costs for wound dressings and TNPT rent were 102,669.20 €. In 41 cases there was a cost-effectiveness (27.5%) with 607,422.03 € with TNP treatment, while the control group without TNP generated revenues of 442,015.10 €. Costs for wound dressings and TNPT rent were 47,376.68 €. In the final account we could generate a cost-effectiveness of 6759 € in 5 years per 149 patients by TNPT. In 108 cases there was no cost-effectiveness (72.5%). TNPT applied in a representative general surgery setting allows for wound therapy without a major financial burden. Based on the costs for wound dressings and TNPT rent, a primarily medically based decision when to use TNPT can be performed in a balanced product cost accounting. This study does not analyse the superiority of TNPT in wound care, so further prospective studies are required which focus on therapeutic superiority and cost-effectiveness. Georg Thieme

  12. Surgical treatment of locally advanced anal cancer after male-to-female sex reassignment surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marco Caricato; Fabio Ausania; Giovanni Francesco Marangi; Ilaria Cipollone; Gerardo Flammia; Paolo Persichetti; Lucio Trodella; Roberto Coppola

    2009-01-01

    We present a case of a transsexual patient who underwent a partial pelvectomy and genital reconstruction for anal cancer after chemoradiation. This is the first case in literature reporting on the occurrence of anal cancer after male-to-female sex reassignment surgery. We describe the surgical approach presenting our technique to avoid postoperative complications and preserve the sexual reassignment.

  13. Effects of ozone therapy on pain, swelling, and trismus following third molar surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazancioglu, H O; Kurklu, E; Ezirganli, S

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of therapeutic ozone application in the management of pain, swelling, and trismus associated with the surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molars. Sixty consecutive patients with asymptomatic bilateral impacted mandibular third molars were recruited into the study. Randomly, by use of envelops, the molar on one side was extracted and ozone therapy was given (study side); the molar on the other side was extracted 2 weeks later and sham ozone therapy was given (negative control side). The mean age of the 60 patients was 22.6±2.3 years (range 18-25 years). No differences were found between the two sides for mouth opening or swelling. The degree of pain and the number of analgesic tablets taken was significantly lower for the study side. This study showed ozone therapy to have a positive effect on OHIP-14 questionnaire results.

  14. Persistent Hypotony Associated with Immunosuppressive Therapy in Glaucoma Drainage Implant Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duch, Susana; Milla, Elena; Stirbu, Oana; Andreu, David

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To describe the histopathology of non-valved implant capsules in three cases of persistent postoperative hypotony after the restrictive tube ligature was released in patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy. Observations The macroscopic appearance of the capsules 3 and 4 months postoperatively was immature and loose. Microscopic examination disclosed extremely irregular thin tissue, with thicknesses ranging from 0.02 to 0.6 mm, depending on the capsular location studied. Withdrawal of immunosuppressive therapy did not facilitate rebuilding of new capsules. Replacement with a valved implant device was necessary in two cases; the third case recovered with tapering of prednisone. Conclusions and Importance The use of chronic systemic immunosuppressive therapy might interfere with capsular formation around the plates of drainage devices inducing persistent hypotony. In these cases, the use of valved implants might be safer.

  15. Improving breast cancer outcome by preoperative systemic therapy and image-guided surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mieog, Jan Sven David

    2011-01-01

    This thesis consists of two parts. In part I, we have demonstrated that preoperatively administrated systemic (neoadjuvant) therapy is a feasible treatment strategy in early stage breast cancer to achieve improved surgical options and to assess tumor response. We also demonstrated that overexpressio

  16. Outcome of Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy for Open Abdomen Treatment After Nontraumatic Lower Gastrointestinal Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Claus Anders; Fabricius, Rasmus; Kleif, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have focused on the risk factors for failure to achieve fascial closure after use of negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) in an open abdomen (OA). We aimed at analyzing possible risk factors for failure of fascial closure and the risk of fistulas after nontrauma lower gastrointestinal...

  17. Comparison of outcomes twelve years after antireflux surgery or omeprazole maintenance therapy for reflux esophagitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundell, Lars; Miettinen, Pekka; Myrvold, Helge E

    2009-01-01

    . Heartburn and regurgitation were significantly more common in patients given omeprazole, whereas dysphagia, rectal flatulence, and the inability to belch or vomit were significantly more common in surgical patients. The therapies were otherwise well-tolerated. CONCLUSIONS: As long-term therapeutic...

  18. Effectiveness of a Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Dysfunctional Eating among Patients Admitted for Bariatric Surgery: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hege Gade

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To examine whether cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT alleviates dysfunctional eating (DE patterns and symptoms of anxiety and depression in morbidly obese patients planned for bariatric surgery. Design and Methods. A total of 98 (68 females patients with a mean (SD age of 43 (10 years and BMI 43.5 (4.9 kg/m2 were randomly assigned to a CBT-group or a control group receiving usual care (i.e., nutritional support and education. The CBT-group received ten weekly intervention sessions. DE, anxiety, and depression were assessed by the TFEQ R-21 and HADS, respectively. Results. Compared with controls, the CBT-patients showed significantly less DE, affective symptoms, and a larger weight loss at follow-up. The effect sizes were large (DE-cognitive restraint, g=-.92, P≤.001; DE-uncontrolled eating, g=-.90, P≤.001, moderate (HADS-depression, g=-.73, P≤.001; DE-emotional eating, g=-.67, P≤.001; HADS-anxiety, g=-.62, P=.003, and low (BMI, g=-.24, P=.004. Conclusion. This study supports the use of CBT in helping patients preparing for bariatric surgery to reduce DE and to improve mental health. This clinical trial is registered with NCT01403558.

  19. Role of surgery in severe ulcerative colitis in the era of medical rescue therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bosmat Dayan; Dan Turner

    2012-01-01

    Despite the growing use of medical salvage therapy,colectomy has remained a cornerstone in managing acute severe ulcerative colitis (ASC) both in children and in adults.Colectomy should be regarded as a life saving procedure in ASC,and must be seriously considered in any steroid-refractory patient.However,colectomy is not a cure for the disease but rather the substitution of a large problem with smaller problems,including fecal incontinence,pouchitis,irritable pouch syndrome,cuffitis,anastomotic ulcer and stenosis,missed or de-novo Crohn's disease and,in young females,reduced fecundity.This notion has led to the widespread practice of offering medical salvage therapy before colectomy in most patients without surgical abdomen or toxic megacolon.Medical salvage therapies which have proved effective in the clinical trial setting include cyclosporine,tacrolimus and infliximab,which seem equally effective in the short term.Validated predictive rules can identify a subset of patients who will eventually fail corticosteroid therapy after only 3-5 d of steroid therapy with an accuracy of 85%-95%.This accuracy is sufficiently high for initiating medical therapy,but usually not colectomy,early in the admission without delaying colectomy if required.This approach has reduced the colectomy rate in ASC from 30%-70% in the past to 10%-20% nowadays,and the mortality rate from over 70% in the 1930s to about 1%.In general,restorative proctocolectomy (ileoanal pouch or ileal pouch-anal anastomosis),especially the J-pouch,is preferred over straight pullthrough (ileo-anal) or ileo-rectal anastomosis,which may still be considered in young females concerned about infertility.Colectomy in the acute severe colitis setting,is usually performed in three steps due to the severity of the inflammation,concurrent steroid treatment and the generally reduced clinical condition.The first surgical step involves colectomy and constructing an ileal stoma,the second-constructing the

  20. Preoperative chemoradiation and IOERT for unresectable or borderline resectable pancreas cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Adyr A.; Rule, William G.; Callister, Matthew G.; Reddy, K. Sudhakar; Mulligan, David C.; Collins, Joseph M.; De Petris, Giovanni; Gunderson, Leonard L.; Borad, Mitesh

    2013-01-01

    Background and objectives Pre-operative chemoradiation (preop CRT) plus intraoperative electron irradiation (IOERT) has been used in the multidisciplinary treatment for patients with locally advanced unresectable or borderline resectable pancreas cancer. This review was performed to evaluate survival, relapse patterns and prognostic factors in patients treated with curative intent. Methods Between January 2002 and December 2010, 48 patients with locally advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma received preop CRT prior to an attempt at resection and IOERT. 31/48 (65%) patients proceeded to curative-intent surgical resection. Resection status prior to preop CRT was locally unresectable (20 patients) and borderline resectable (11 patients). Preop CRT (45-50.4 Gy/25-28 Fx in 27/31) was delivered with concurrent 5FU or gemcitabine-based regimens. Subsequent gross total resection was achieved in 16 patients (R0, 11; R1, 5). IOERT was delivered in 28 patients (dose, 10-20 Gy). 16 patients also received adjuvant post-operative systemic chemotherapy. Outcomes evaluated include survival, local failure in the EBRT field (LF), central failure in the IOERT field (CF), and distant metastases. Results Resection status was predictive for survival and for patterns of relapse. For patients with at least a gross total resection after preop CRT (R0/R1; n=16) vs. no resection (n=15), both median and overall survival were improved (median 23 vs. 10 months; 2-year, 40% vs. 17%; 3-year, 40% vs. 0%; P=0.002). Liver or peritoneal relapse was documented in 22/31 patients (71%); LF/CF in 5/26 (16%). Conclusions Long term survival and disease control are achievable in select patients with borderline resectable or locally unresectable pancreas cancer when gross total surgical resection is achieved after preop CRT. Continued evaluation of curative-intent combined modality therapy is warranted in this high risk population, but additional strategies are needed to improve resectability and disease

  1. THERAPY OF ENDOCRINE DISEASE: Surgery in microprolactinomas: effectiveness and risks based on contemporary literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tampourlou, Metaxia; Trifanescu, Raluca; Paluzzi, Alessandro; Ahmed, Shahzada K; Karavitaki, Niki

    2016-09-01

    Microprolactinomas are the most common pituitary adenomas. In symptomatic patients, dopamine agonists are the first-line treatment of choice; when cabergoline is used, biochemical control rates between 85 and 93% have been reported. Long-term treatment is needed in most of the cases with compliance, patient convenience, and potential adverse effects representing areas requiring attention. Based on the literature published in the past 15 years, transsphenoidal surgery can lead to normal prolactin in the postoperative period in usually 71-100% of the cases with very low postoperative complication rates. Surgical expertise is the major determinant of the outcomes, and it may be a cost-effective option in young patients with life expectancy greater than 10 years (provided it is performed by experienced surgeons at high volume centers with confirmed optimal outcomes). Larger series of patients with adequate follow-up could further validate the place of transsphenoidal surgery (particularly through the endoscopic approach for which long-term results are currently limited) in the management algorithm of patients with microprolactinoma.

  2. Adjuvant therapy in pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paula Ghaneh; John Slavin; Robert Sutton; Mark Hartley; John P Neoptolemos

    2001-01-01

    The outlook for patients with pancreatic cancer has been grim. There have been major advances in the surgical treatment of pancreatic csncer, leading to a drsmatic reduction in post-operative mortality from the development of high volume specialized centres. This stimulated the study of adjuvant and neoadjuvant treatments in pancreatic cancer including chemoradiotherapy and chemotherapy. Initial protocols have been based on the original but rather small GITSG study first reported in 1985. There have been two large European trials totalling over 600 patients (EORTC and ESPAC-1) that do not support the use of chemoradiation as adjuvant therapy. A second major finding from the ESPAC-1 trial (541 patients randomized) was some but not conclusive evidence for a survival benefit associated with chemotherapy. A third major finding from the ESPAC-1 trial was that the quality of life was not affected by the use of adjuvant treatments compared to surgery alone.The ESPAC-3 trial aims to assess the definitive use of adjuvant chemotherapy in a randomized controlled trial of 990 patients.

  3. Current therapy of hilar cholangiocarcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stephanie HiuYan Lau; WanYee Lau

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hilar cholangiocarcinoma (HC) is an adeno-carcinoma of the extrahepatic biliary tree arising from the main left or right hepatic ducts or their confluence. This tumor is still considered to be difficult to treat or to cure. DATA SOURCES: We reviewed the medical literature on HC. Relevant and updated information on this tumor was analyzed in a concise and easy-to-read manner. The article is not intended to be a systematic review, but an extensive search was conducted on PubMed and MEDLINE using the keywords "hilar cholangiocarcinoma" and "Klatskin tumor" until July 2011. RESULTS: The selection and the timing of management options for patients with HC are determined by the degree of certainty of the diagnosis, the general condition of the patients, the underlying liver function and the stage of the disease. Current treatment of HC can be divided into curative and palliative treatment. For the curative treatment, local excision should only be used on small tumors which are confined to the bile duct wall and Bismuth I papillary carcinoma. Partial hepatectomy should be combined with caudate lobe resection and porta-hepatis lymph node dissection. The results of these major resections can be improved with portal vein embolization, and staging laparoscopy and laparoscopic ultrasound. The role of preoperative biliary drainage is controversial. Autotransplantation for HC gave disappointing results while the Mayo Protocol of chemoradiation for selecting patients with unresectable HC for orthotopic liver transplantation has been widely accepted. Palliative treatment included bypass surgery, endoscopic or percutaneous stenting, photodynamic therapy, intraluminal brachytherapy, and external radiation and systemic therapy. CONCLUSIONS: Adequate surgery with R0 resection should be the main goal of treatment. For patients with unresectable HC, treatment aims to improve the quality and quantity of their survival.

  4. Long-term follow-up results of combination therapy of surgery and gamma knife on pituitary tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Hidetoshi; Yoshimoto, Takashi; Shirokura, Hideshi [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). School of Medicine

    1997-01-01

    Usefulness of the combination therapy for invasive pituitary tumor with surgery and gamma knife (GK) was evaluated on 17 cases followed for >2 years. Tumors involved ACTH cell adenoma, GH cell adenoma, mixed GH and PRL, purihormonal adenoma, gonadotrophic cell adenoma, GH cell adenoma and null cell adenoma, which were divided into I and II group since adverse effects by GK on the normal pituitary tissues could be evaluated according to tumor growth and abnormal hormone secretion. Irradiation was carried out to make the marginal dose of around 30 (15-35) Gy and center dose of 25-70 Gy on the gland, and marginal dose of <10 Gy on optic nerve. After GK, follow-up was done by pituitary hormone values, tests for sight and visual field and MRI examination. Hypopituitarism was seen in 67% with 100% remission of Cushing`s disease. MRI revealed that the adenoma changed to fibrosis (type 1) with increasing Gd-enhancement or to cystic necrosis (type 2) without Gd-enhancement. Values for GH, cortisol and ACTH turned to normal ones. Thus the combination therapy was found useful. (K.H.)

  5. Cosmetic Outcome and Seroma Formation After Breast-Conserving Surgery With Intraoperative Radiation Therapy Boost for Early Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senthi, Sashendra, E-mail: sashasenthi@msn.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Link, Emma [Centre for Biostatistics and Clinical Trials, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Chua, Boon H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate cosmetic outcome and its association with breast wound seroma after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) with targeted intraoperative radiation therapy (tIORT) boost for early breast cancer. Methods and Materials: An analysis of a single-arm prospective study of 55 patients with early breast cancer treated with BCS and tIORT boost followed by conventional whole breast radiation therapy (WBRT) between August 2003 and January 2006 was performed. A seroma was defined as a fluid collection at the primary tumor resection site identified clinically or radiologically. Cosmetic assessments using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer rating system were performed at baseline before BCS and 30 months after WBRT was completed. Results: Twenty-eight patients (51%) developed a seroma, with 18 patients (33%) requiring at least 1 aspiration. Tumor location was significantly associated with seroma formation (P=.001). Ten of 11 patients with an upper inner quadrant tumor developed a seroma. Excellent or good overall cosmetic outcome at 30 months was observed in 34 patients (62%, 95% confidence interval 53%-80%). Seroma formation was not associated with the overall cosmetic result (P=.54). Conclusion: BCS with tIORT boost followed by WBRT was associated with an acceptable cosmetic outcome. Seroma formation was not significantly associated with an adverse cosmetic outcome.

  6. Desmoplasia Influenced Recurrence of Disease and Mortality in Stage III Colorectal Cancer within Five Years after Surgery and Adjuvant Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zippi, Maddalena; De Toma, Giorgio; Minervini, Giovanni; Cassieri, Claudio; Pica, Roberta; Colarusso, Diodoro; Stock, Simon; Crispino, Pietro

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims: In patients with colon cancer who undergo resection for potential cure, 40–60% have advanced locoregional disease (stage III). Those who are suitable for adjuvant treatment had a definite disease-free-survival benefit. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate whether the presence of desmoplasia influenced the mortality rate of stage III colorectal cancer (CRC) within 5 years from the surgery and adjuvant therapy. Patients and Methods: Sixty-five patients with stage III CRC underwent resection and adjuvant therapy. Qualitative categorization of desmoplasia was obtained using Ueno's stromal CRC classification. Desmoplasia was related to mortality using Spearman correlation and stratified with other histological variables (inflammation, grading) that concurred to the major determinant of malignancy (venous invasion and lymph nodes) using the Chi-square test. Result: The 5-year survival rate was 65% and the relapse rate was 37%. The mortality rate in patients with immature desmoplasia was 86%, 27% in intermediate desmoplasia, and 0% in mature desmoplasia (Spearman correlation coefficient: −0.572, P = 0.05). Conclusion: Immature desmoplasia appears to be associated with disease recurrence and mortality in stage III CRC patients. PMID:28139499

  7. Desmoplasia influenced recurrence of disease and mortality in stage III colorectal cancer within five years after surgery and adjuvant therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maddalena Zippi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: In patients with colon cancer who undergo resection for potential cure, 40–60% have advanced locoregional disease (stage III. Those who are suitable for adjuvant treatment had a definite disease-free-survival benefit. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate whether the presence of desmoplasia influenced the mortality rate of stage III colorectal cancer (CRC within 5 years from the surgery and adjuvant therapy. Patients and Methods: Sixty-five patients with stage III CRC underwent resection and adjuvant therapy. Qualitative categorization of desmoplasia was obtained using Ueno's stromal CRC classification. Desmoplasia was related to mortality using Spearman correlation and stratified with other histological variables (inflammation, grading that concurred to the major determinant of malignancy (venous invasion and lymph nodes using the Chi-square test. Result: The 5-year survival rate was 65% and the relapse rate was 37%. The mortality rate in patients with immature desmoplasia was 86%, 27% in intermediate desmoplasia, and 0% in mature desmoplasia (Spearman correlation coefficient: −0.572,P= 0.05. Conclusion: Immature desmoplasia appears to be associated with disease recurrence and mortality in stage III CRC patients.

  8. Desmoplasia influenced recurrence of disease and mortality in stage III colorectal cancer within five years after surgery and adjuvant therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zippi, Maddalena; De Toma, Giorgio; Minervini, Giovanni; Cassieri, Claudio; Pica, Roberta; Colarusso, Diodoro; Stock, Simon; Crispino, Pietro

    2017-01-01

    In patients with colon cancer who undergo resection for potential cure, 40-60% have advanced locoregional disease (stage III). Those who are suitable for adjuvant treatment had a definite disease-free-survival benefit. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate whether the presence of desmoplasia influenced the mortality rate of stage III colorectal cancer (CRC) within 5 years from the surgery and adjuvant therapy. Sixty-five patients with stage III CRC underwent resection and adjuvant therapy. Qualitative categorization of desmoplasia was obtained using Ueno's stromal CRC classification. Desmoplasia was related to mortality using Spearman correlation and stratified with other histological variables (inflammation, grading) that concurred to the major determinant of malignancy (venous invasion and lymph nodes) using the Chi-square test. The 5-year survival rate was 65% and the relapse rate was 37%. The mortality rate in patients with immature desmoplasia was 86%, 27% in intermediate desmoplasia, and 0% in mature desmoplasia (Spearman correlation coefficient: -0.572,P= 0.05). Immature desmoplasia appears to be associated with disease recurrence and mortality in stage III CRC patients.

  9. The effect of insulin therapy algorithms on blood glucose levels in patients following cardiac surgery: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgs, Megan; Fernandez, Ritin

    2015-06-12

    A number of insulin infusion algorithms, with varying methods and effects, have been developed to guide the management of postoperative hyperglycemia in critically ill patients. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of insulin therapy algorithms on blood glucose levels in patients in critical care environments following cardiac surgery. Types of participants: Adult patients aged 18 or older who were admitted to a critical care environment after cardiac surgery and who received insulin therapy for glycemic control during the acute postoperative phase of their admission. Types of intervention: The intervention of interest was continuous intravenous insulin therapy. Types of studies: Experimental study designs including randomized controlled trials, non-randomized controlled trials and controlled before and after studies published in the English language were included in this review. Types of outcomes: Primary outcomes of interest included objective measures of glycemic control and secondary outcomes of interest included the incidence of adverse events. The search aimed to find both published and unpublished studies through electronic databases, reference lists, key reports and the World Wide Web. An extensive search was undertaken for the following databases: Medline, CINAHL, PubMed, Embase, Scopus, the Cochrane Library, Dare, Social Science Index, ProQuest, and MedNar. Databases were searched up to March 2014. All studies selected were assessed by two reviewers independently for methodological quality prior to inclusion in the review using the standardized Joanna Briggs Institute Meta-Analysis of Statistics Assessment and Review Instrument critical appraisal tool. Any disagreements that arose between the reviewers were resolved through discussion. Quantitative data was extracted from papers included in the review using the standardized data extraction tool from Joanna Briggs Institute Meta-Analysis of Statistics Assessment and Review Instrument

  10. Wendler glottoplasty and voice-therapy in male-to-female transsexuals: results in pre and post-surgery assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casado, Juan C; O'Connor, Carlos; Angulo, María S; Adrián, José A

    2016-01-01

    With the development of new ENT techniques, many male transsexuals who wish to become women usually request a surgical procedure to raise the fundamental frequency of the voice (feminization). The ENT specialist and the voice-therapist have to use an interdisciplinary approach to this growing social demand. The aim of this study was to show the results in a group of transsexual patients after Wendler's anterior synechiae, with additional voice-therapy treatment. Ten male transexulas who wish to become women patients who had Wendler glottoplasty and voice-therapy were assessed. The surgical procedure consisted of a de-epithelialization of the anterior third of both vocal folds; this area was sutured and the surface of both vocal folds was vaporised with laser diode. Pre- and postsurgery voice assessment consisted of measuring fundamental frequency (Fo) and maximum phonation time, administering the transgender self-assessment questionnaire (TSEQ) and obtaining perceptual voice assessment by inter-rater agreement. All the male transsexuals who wish to become women patients significantly increased their Fo (106 Hz on average) after the treatment. Furthermore, significant improvements were shown in self-reported satisfaction and in the degree of voice feminization. No improvements in the maximum phonation time were observed. Wendler glottoplasty is a surgical procedure to contribute to feminising the voice, with good medium-term results and without noteworthy medical complications. The increase in vocal tone was observed using several pre- and post-surgery control measures and voice therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Patología Cérvico-Facial. All rights reserved.

  11. Development and controversies of adjuvant therapy for pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wan-Yee Lau; Eric C. H. Lai

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy with a dismal prognosis. Radical surgery provides the only chance for a cure with a 5-year survival rate of 7%-25%. An effective adjuvant therapy is urgently needed to improve the surgical outcome. This review describes the current status of adjuvant therapy for pancreatic cancer, and highlights its controversies. DATA SOURCES:A Medline database search was performed to identify relevant articles using the keywords"pancreatic neoplasm", and"adjuvant therapy". Additional papers were identiifed by a manual search of the references from the key articles. RESULTS:Eight prospective randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the use of adjuvant chemotherapy and chemoradiation for pancreatic cancer could be identiifed. The results for adjuvant regimens based on systemic 5-lfuorouracil with or without external radiotherapy were conlficting. The recent two RCTs on gemcitabine based regimen gave promising results. CONCLUSIONS:Based on the available data, no standard adjuvant therapy for pancreatic cancer can be established yet. The best adjuvant regimen remains to be determined in large-scale RCTs. Future trials should use a gemcitabine based regimen.

  12. Other primary malignancies in breast cancer patients treated with breast conserving surgery and radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Min; Cormier, Janice N; Xing, Yan; Giordano, Sharon Hermes; Chai, Christy; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Vlastos, Georges; Kuerer, Henry M; Mirza, Nadeem Q; Buchholz, Thomas A; Hunt, Kelly K

    2013-05-01

    Our purpose was to examine the incidence and impact on survival of other primary malignancies (OPM) outside of the breast in breast cancer patients and to identify risk factors associated with OPM. Patients with stage 0-III breast cancer treated with breast conserving therapy at our center from 1979 to 2007 were included. Risk factors were compared between patients with/without OPM. Logistic regression was used to identify factors that were associated with OPM. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated. Among 4,198 patients in this study, 276 (6.6 %) developed an OPM after breast cancer treatment. Patients with OPM were older and had a higher proportion of stage 0/I disease and contralateral breast cancer compared with those without OPM. In a multivariate analysis, older patients, those with contralateral breast cancer, and those who did not receive chemotherapy or hormone therapy were more likely to develop OPM after breast cancer. Patients without OPM had better overall survival. The SIR for all OPM sites combined after a first primary breast cancer was 2.91 (95 % confidence interval: 2.57-3.24). Significantly elevated risks were seen for numerous cancer sites, with SIRs ranging from 1.84 for lung cancer to 5.69 for ovarian cancer. Our study shows that breast cancer patients have an increased risk of developing OPM over the general population. The use of systemic therapy was not associated with increased risk of OPM. In addition to screening for a contralateral breast cancer and recurrences, breast cancer survivors should undergo screening for other malignancies.

  13. Molecular surgery for the treatment of malignant tumors: bioincompatible material apheresis for cancer therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosé, Yukihiko; Ohta, Kazuhide; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Takaba, Junji; Natsume, Kuniaki

    2011-03-01

    Controlled immunological shock, induced by bioincompatible material apheresis for cancer (BIC MAC) therapy, produces an immunoactive status in experimental subjects. However, in order to provide a safe, painless, effective, and reproducible BIC MAC therapy, it is mandatory to provide general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation not only during apheresis procedures of 1-h duration but also for an additional 5 h. Using this procedure, there was no mortality experienced during animal experiments. Also, there were no procedurally related physical or sensory abnormalities demonstrated. This general anesthesia of 6 h covered not only the initial 30 min of the hypotension and hypoxic stages but also the recovery stages to hemodynamically normalize the experimental animals. After 6 h, the accumulated leukocytes in the lung are released back to the systemic circulation. In general, granulocytes decreased almost 100% while lymphocytes decreased only 40-50%. During these 6 h, increases of cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, etc.) sometimes up to 1000 times occurred. After the 6-h procedure, leukocytes returned nearly to preoperative levels but tended to be continuously increased. After the fourth day, leukocyte counts more than doubled. These cellular and humoral activations were normalized after 2 weeks. These studies were conducted on six normal mongrel dogs. Currently, similar studies are planned to be conducted on tumor-bearing experimental animals. This procedurally induced immunoactivation by apheresis may be able to produce effective apoptosis in malignant tumor cells.

  14. Endoscopic surgery and photodynamic therapy for behign and malignant neoplasms of colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. А. Razzhivina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The review of literature for current methods of endoscopic treatment for colon epithelial neoplasms is represented. Such types of endoscopic interventions as loop electroresection, submucosal dissection, coagulation and destruction of tumors and combination of several options depending on efficiency of previous therapy is analyzed. Limitations of every method, its special aspects and possible complications are described. Special focus is on specifics of neoplasms for which selected methods may be the most effective. Thus, hot biopsy and destruction using high-energy laser is efficient for small flat neoplasms, endoscopic electroexcision – far small pedunculated lesions, and fragmentation is adequate for exophytic tumors more than 2.0 cm. Long-term results of endoscopic treatment, recurrence rates after different options are represented. The literature for photodynamic therapy consists mostly articles about development (on pre-clenecal stage of new photosensitizers which are effective for colon cancer, new methods of treatment including combination with hyperthermia in low-dose light irradiation etc. The literature data shows the prospectivity of subsequent developments in this field. 

  15. A COX-2 inhibitor combined with chemoradiation of locally advanced rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Anders; Mortensen, John Pløen; Bisgaard, Claus;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: The aim of this study was to investigate the possible effect of a COX-2 inhibitor in addition to chemoradiation of locally advanced rectal cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study included 35 patients with rectal adenocarcinoma. All patients had a tumor localised....

  16. Voice and speech outcomes of chemoradiation for advanced head and neck cancer: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobi, I.; van der Molen, L.; Huiskens, H.; van Rossum, M.A.; Hilgers, F.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of this review is to systematically assess the effects on voice and speech of advanced head and neck cancer and its treatment by means of chemoradiotherapy (CRT). The databases Medline, Embase and Cochrane were searched (1991-2009) for terms head and neck cancer, chemoradiation, voice and

  17. Rituximab therapy for flare-up of rheumatoid arthritis after total knee replacement surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Rabeea; Ishaq, Saliha; Khan, Muhammad Owais; Memon, Adil

    2012-10-01

    A variety of drug types are used alone or in combination to manage Rheumatoid Arthritis along with physiotherapy. We report herein the case of a 51 year old female patient with a history of Rheumatoid Arthritis whose disease remained active despite being on routinely used multiple disease modifying antirheumatic drugs. The patient underwent bilateral total knee arthroplasty with subtotal synovectomy due to the severe pain caused by her concomitant age related osteoarthritis which was only aggravated by her active rheumatoid arthritis disease. Three months following surgery, the patient's knee pain with typical rheumatoid flare and swelling reappeared for which a B cell monoclonal antibody, rituximab, was given. Her number of tender and swollen joints reduced to less than three and her C-reactive protein levels and erythrocyte sedimentation rate reduced significantly along with considerable improvement in her Global Assessment score. Her severity of pain also decreased to 3 from an initial score of 8 on the Visual Analog Scale. Thus, Rituximab helped improve our patient's symptoms from recurrence of synovitis after total knee replacement.

  18. Gamma knife surgery for craniopharyngioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, D; Steiner, M; Steiner, L

    1995-01-01

    We present our results of Gamma Knife surgery for craniopharyngioma in nine patients. The current status of surgery, radiation therapy, intracavitary instillation of radionucleides and Gamma Knife surgery in the management of craniopharyngiomas is discussed.

  19. Perioperative management of antiplatelet therapy in patients with coronary stents undergoing cardiac and non-cardiac surgery: a consensus document from Italian cardiological, surgical and anaesthesiological societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossini, Roberta; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Visconti, Luigi Oltrona; Bramucci, Ezio; Castiglioni, Battistina; De Servi, Stefano; Lettieri, Corrado; Lettino, Maddalena; Piccaluga, Emanuela; Savonitto, Stefano; Trabattoni, Daniela; Capodanno, Davide; Buffoli, Francesca; Parolari, Alessandro; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Boni, Luigi; Biglioli, Federico; Valdatta, Luigi; Droghetti, Andrea; Bozzani, Antonio; Setacci, Carlo; Ravelli, Paolo; Crescini, Claudio; Staurenghi, Giovanni; Scarone, Pietro; Francetti, Luca; D'Angelo, Fabio; Gadda, Franco; Comel, Andrea; Salvi, Luca; Lorini, Luca; Antonelli, Massimo; Bovenzi, Francesco; Cremonesi, Alberto; Angiolillo, Dominick J; Guagliumi, Giulio

    2014-05-01

    Optimal perioperative antiplatelet therapy in patients with coronary stents undergoing surgery still remains poorly defined and a matter of debate among cardiologists, surgeons and anaesthesiologists. Surgery represents one of the most common reasons for premature antiplatelet therapy discontinuation, which is associated with a significant increase in mortality and major adverse cardiac events, in particular stent thrombosis. Clinical practice guidelines provide little support with regard to managing antiplatelet therapy in the perioperative phase in the case of patients with non-deferrable surgical interventions and/or high haemorrhagic risk. Moreover, a standard definition of ischaemic and haemorrhagic risk has never been determined. Finally, recommendations shared by cardiologists, surgeons and anaesthesiologists are lacking. The present consensus document provides practical recommendations on the perioperative management of antiplatelet therapy in patients with coronary stents undergoing surgery. Cardiologists, surgeons and anaesthesiologists have contributed equally to its creation. On the basis of clinical and angiographic data, the individual thrombotic risk has been defined. All surgical interventions have been classified according to their inherent haemorrhagic risk. A consensus on the optimal antiplatelet regimen in the perioperative phase has been reached on the basis of the ischaemic and haemorrhagic risk. Aspirin should be continued perioperatively in the majority of surgical operations, whereas dual antiplatelet therapy should not be withdrawn for surgery in the case of low bleeding risk. In selected patients at high risk for both bleeding and ischaemic events, when oral antiplatelet therapy withdrawal is required, perioperative treatment with short-acting intravenous glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors (tirofiban or eptifibatide) should be taken into consideration.

  20. Cetuximab and chemoradiation for rectal cancer - is the water getting muddy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glynne-Jones, Rob; Mawdsley, Suzy; Harrison, Mark (Mount Vernon Cancer Centre, Northwood, Middlesex (United Kingdom)), E-mail: Rob.glynnejones@nhs.net

    2010-04-15

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor cetuximab has been successfully combined with radical radiotherapy in head and neck cancer. In colorectal cancer, increased response rates are achieved by cetuximab and panitumumab within standard chemotherapy schedules, but not in chemoradiation regimens. This review examines the clinical evidence and potential mechanisms for an interaction when EGFR inhibitors are added to fluoropyrimidine-based chemoradiation in rectal adenocarcinoma. Methods. This review was compiled by searching PubMed and Medline for English language articles published until 2009 with established search strategies, supplemented by hand searching of abstracts from the proceedings of relevant international meetings. The primary outcome measure was pathological complete response (pCR). Results. Only 13 publications and three presentations in abstract of 13 phase I/II trials of preoperative chemoradiation with cetuximab in rectal cancer were identified. A total of 316 patients were identified who received cetuximab in combination with radiotherapy and 5-fluorouracil or capecitabine preoperatively. One hundred and thirty eight of these patients received either additional irinotecan or oxaliplatin. One study with panitumumab with safety but no efficacy results was identified, and two studies with gefinitib. The pCR rate ranged from 0-20%. The overall pooled pCR for cetuximab based chemoradiation was 9.1% (29/316). The rate of G3/G4 gastrointestinal toxicity, in terms of diarrhoea, varied from 5-30%, with an overall pooled rate of 47/313 (15%). Discussion. Potential reasons for the disappointing results of EGFR inhibition with fluoropyrimidine-based preoperative chemoradiation include a less critical role of repopulation in rectal adenocarcinoma using a non-curative radiation dose; or antagonistic effects on 5FU-based chemoradiation and oxaliplatin, if some cells arrest in G1 or G2-M and fail to pass through S phase. Conclusion. Cetuximab

  1. The role of physical therapy and rehabilitation after lumbar fusion surgery for degenerative disease: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madera, Marcella; Brady, Jeremy; Deily, Sylvia; McGinty, Trent; Moroz, Lee; Singh, Devender; Tipton, George; Truumees, Eeric

    2017-06-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to provide a systematic and comprehensive review of the existing literature regarding postfusion rehabilitation. METHODS Using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, the authors conducted an exhaustive review of multiple electronic databases. Potential articles were screened using inclusion/exclusion criteria. Two authors independently analyzed these studies using predefined data fields, including study quality indicators such as level of evidence and availability of accepted patient-reported outcomes measures. These findings were synthesized in a narrative format. A third author resolved disagreements regarding the inclusion of a study. RESULTS Twenty-one articles with I or II levels of evidence were included in the review. The authors divided the findings of the literature review into several groups: rehabilitation terminology, timing and duration of postfusion rehabilitation, the need for rehabilitation relative to surgery-related morbidity, rehabilitation's relationship to outcomes, and cognitive and psychosocial aspects of postsurgical rehabilitation. Current evidence generally supports formal rehabilitation after lumbar fusion surgery. Starting physical therapy at the 12-week postoperative mark results in better outcomes at lower cost than an earlier, 6-week start. Where available, psychosocial support improves outcomes. However, a number of the questions could not be answered with high-grade evidence. In these cases, the authors used "best evidence available" to make recommendations. There are many cases in which different types of caregivers use clinical terminology differently. The data supporting an optimal protocol for postfusion rehabilitation remains elusive but, using the data available, the authors have crafted recommendations and a model protocol, which is currently undergoing prospective study. CONCLUSIONS Rehabilitation has long been a common feature in

  2. [Circumscribed and diffuse peritonitis: severe complications in bariatric and metabolic surgery; specifics related to their diagnosis and therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Špička, P; Vaverka, P; Gryga, A; Malý, T

    Cases of localized and diffuse peritonitis are severe surgical conditions. Despite expanding possibilities for the diagnosis and therapy, patients with peritonitis, its diffuse form in particular, still suffer from high morbidity and mortality. The management of this condition, both in the healthy and especially seriously ill population, is not satisfactory. Recently, we have witnessed an increase in bariatric and metabolic surgery in response to an ever rising number of extremely obese patients worldwide. Bariatric patients belong to a group of seriously ill patients with a significant risk of post-operative complications due to an infection. Although their treatment is identical to that of the normal population, a great emphasis is put on early recognition of complications, and the decision on any potential surgical revision should be actively approached, often necessitating the absence of frequently lengthy paraclinical assessments. We conducted a retrospective analysis of 346 obese bariatric patients undergoing surgical treatment for morbid obesity between August 2011 and August 2015. A total of 6 patients experienced severe complications including two cases of diffuse peritonitis, two cases of localized peritonitis and two cases of intraperitoneal bleeding. One patient died after her discharge from hospital due to toxic shock caused by stomach perforation. We describe two case reports in greater detail to highlight the importance of early detection of complications and a timely surgical intervention. In principle, bariatric patients are a severely ill population where standard diagnostic procedures for post-operative complications often fail. Clinical findings and the surgeons experience are commonly the only diagnostic signs that trigger a surgical revision. In contrast, surgical treatment of post-operative complications in obese patients with peritonitis is virtually identical to that in patients with normal or slightly increased BMI. It involves thorough

  3. Assessment of the effect of bariatric surgery on severe obstructive sleep apnea patients not tolerating CPAP therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Shaarawy

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is increasingly prevalent worldwide and is associated with morbidity and mortality, the main line of treatment is CPAP but the compliance is doubtful, as obesity is highly linked to OSA weight loss can help in treatment. The aim of the present study: was to assess the effect of bariatric surgery on severe obstructive sleep apnea patients not tolerating CPAP therapy. Patients and methods: the study was done on 22 patients documented to have morbid obesity (BMI > 40 and severe OSA with Apnea Hypopnea Index (AHI >30/h and not tolerating CPAP therapy, patients were offered sleeve gastrectomy then were followed up for 12 months before another polysomnography was done to assess the presence of OSA and need for CPAP. Results: 22 patients completed the study. The mean age of the patients was 37.2 ± 17.3 years, 13 males and 9 females. After sleeve gastrectomy and follow up for 12 months the body weight decreased from 135.6 ± 17.8 to 101.3 ± 7.6 kg m (p = 0.001, BMI dropped from 48.2 ± 7.3 to 35.9 ± 4.8 kg m/m2 (p = 0.001, mean AHI decreased from 55.8 ± 8.3 to 12.8 ± 11.3 attacks/hour of sleep (p = 0.001 and CPAP pressure needed to control OSA was decreased from 13.2 ± 2.3 to 8.2 ± 3.9 cm H2O (p = 0.001. Conclusion: sleeve gastrectomy can be an alternate option of treatment for severe OSA patients who are not tolerating CPAP and surgery may cure the disease or at least improve compliance to CPAP by decreasing the needed pressure to control OSA.

  4. [Cone-beam computed tomography evaluation of short- and long-term airway changes in patients with skeletal Class Ⅲ malocclusion treated by orthodontic therapy and bimaxillary surgery with or without mandibular setback surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Wei; Li, Li-Yan; Qi, Su-Qing; Yan, Ming

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the short-term and long-term effects of pharyngeal airway in skeletal Class Ⅲ malocclusion patients who underwent bimaxillary surgery or isolated mandibular setback-orthodontic treatment. The sample included 54 patients (28 males, 26 females) who were diagnosed with skeletal Class Ⅲ malocclusion. Patents in group A (n=28) underwent mandibular setback surgery and orthodontic treatment. Cone-beam CT (CBCT) was taken at one week before treatment (T0), 6 months (T1) and 3 years after surgery (T2).Patents in group B(n=26) underwent Le Fort I procedures with bilateral split ramus osteotomies-orthodontic treatment; The raw data reconstructed into 3D model. Sagittal and transversal measurements, cross sectional areas, partial and total volumes were evaluated. The data were statistically analyzed using SPSS 17.0 software package to determine the changes in each group. Six months after surgery, the sagittal diameters and cross sectional areas of each section in group A were significantly decreased (P0.05, T2-T1: P<0.05). In group B, the sagittal diameters and cross sectional areas of each section (except CV1 plane) were significantly decreased(P<0.05) 3 years after surgery, but most measurements returned to the original levels. Pharyngeal airway space decreased after combined therapy in the short term; however, relapse occurred and not to its original position in the long term.

  5. Radiation Therapy without Surgery for Spinal Metastases: Clinical Outcome and Prognostic Factors Analysis for Pain Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Akira; Hoshi, Manabu; Takami, Masatsugu; Tashiro, Takahiko; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of radiation therapy (RT) for patients with spinal metastases is pain relief and control of paralysis. The aim of the present study was to assess pain relief using RT and to evaluate prognostic factors for pain control. We evaluated 97 consecutive patients, of mean age 62.7 years (range 28 to 86), with spinal metastases that had been treated by RT. We evaluated the effects of RT using pain level assessed using a drug grading scale based on the World Health Organization standards. The following potential prognostic factors for pain control of RT were evaluated using multivariate logistic regression analysis: age, gender, tumor type, performance status (PS), number of spinal metastases, and a history of chemotherapy. Among the 97 patients who underwent RT for pain relief, 68 patients (70.1%) presented with pain reduction. PS (odds ratio: 1.931; 95% confidence interval: 1.244 to 2.980) was revealed by multivariate logistic regression analysis to be the most important prognostic factor for pain control using RT. In conclusion, we found that RT was more effective for patients with spinal metastases while they maintained their PS.

  6. Comparison of health utility weights among elderly patients receiving breast-conserving surgery plus hormonal therapy with or without radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Askal Ayalew; Xiao, Hong; Tawk, Rima; Campbell, Ellen; Semykina, Anastasia; Montero, Alberto J.; Diaby, Vakaramoko

    2017-01-01

    Background The selection of the most appropriate treatment combinations requires the balancing of benefits and harms of these treatment options as well as the patients’ preferences for the resulting outcomes. Objective This research aimed at estimating and comparing the utility weights between elderly women with early stage hormone receptor positive (HR+) breast cancer receiving a combination of radiotherapy and hormonal therapy after breast conserving surgery (BCS) and those receiving a combination of BCS and hormonal therapy. Methods The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) linked with Medicare Health Outcomes Survey (MHOS) was used as the data source. Health utility weights were derived from the VR-12 health-related quality of life instrument using a mapping algorithm. Descriptive statistics of the sample were provided. Two sample t-tests were performed to determine potential differences in mean health utility weights between the two groups after propensity score matching. Results The average age at diagnosis was 72 vs. 76 years for the treated and the untreated groups, respectively. The results showed an inverse relationship between the receipt of radiotherapy and age. Patients who received radiotherapy had, on average, a higher health utility weight (0.70; SD = 0.123) compared with those who did not receive radiotherapy (0.676; SD = 0.130). Only treated patients who had more than two comorbid conditions had significantly higher health utility weights compared with patients who were not treated. Conclusions The mean health utility weights estimated for the radiotherapy and no radiotherapy groups can be used to inform a comparative cost-effectiveness analysis of the treatment options. However, the results of this study may not be generalizable to those who are outside a managed care plan because MHOS data is collected on managed care beneficiaries. PMID:27819160

  7. Biofeedback Therapy Before Ileostomy Closure in Patients Undergoing Sphincter-Saving Surgery for Rectal Cancer: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong-Ki; Jeon, Byeong Geon; Song, Yoon Suk; Seo, Mi Sun; Kwon, Yoon-Hye; Park, JI Won; Ryoo, Seung-Bum; Jeong, Seung-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study prospectively investigated the effects of biofeedback therapy on objective anorectal function and subjective bowel function in patients after sphincter-saving surgery for rectal cancer. Methods Sixteen patients who underwent an ileostomy were randomized into two groups, one receiving conservative management with the Kegel maneuver and the other receiving active biofeedback before ileostomy closure. Among them, 12 patients (mean age, 57.5 years; range, 38 to 69 years; 6 patients in each group) completed the study. Conservative management included lifestyle modifications, Kegel exercises, and medication. Patients were evaluated at baseline and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after ileostomy closure by using anal manometry, modified Wexner Incontinence Scores (WISs), and fecal incontinence quality of life (FI-QoL) scores. Results Before the ileostomy closure, the groups did not differ in baseline clinical characteristics or resting manometric parameters. After 12 months of follow-up, the biofeedback group demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in the mean maximum squeezing pressure (from 146.3 to 178.9, P = 0.002). However, no beneficial effect on the WIS was noted for biofeedback compared to conservative management alone. Overall, the FI-QoL scores were increased significantly in both groups after ileostomy closure (P = 0.006), but did not differ significantly between the two groups. Conclusion Although the biofeedback therapy group demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in the maximum squeezing pressure, significant improvements in the WISs and the FI-QoL scores over time were noted in both groups. The study was terminated early because no therapeutic benefit of biofeedback had been demonstrated. PMID:26361615

  8. Topical negative pressure therapy Recent experience of the department of plastic surgery at Ibn Sina University Hospital, Rabat, Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelmoughit Echchaoui

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThe topical negative pressure therapy (TNP is a non-invasive method to treat chronic and acute wounds locally, using a continuous or intermittent negative pressure.The objective of this study is to present the first experience of this type of treatment used in clinical cases in our department. By presenting these cases, we highlight indication and efficiency of this new technique applied in relatively complicated situations, at the same time it also allows a significant improvement in treating injuries and chronic wounds.Materials and methodsIn this study, we present the recent experience of the Department of Reconstructive and Plastic Surgery of the University Hospital Center of Avicenne in Rabat. This therapy was used for the first time this year (in 2014, in three young patients who presented with chronic wounds associated with local and general factors that are unfavorable for the healing process.ResultsIn all three of our cases we obtained highly satisfactory clinical results.TNP allows wounds to bud in a shorter time, as well as a fast healing by second intention due to controlled wound healing or split-skin graft without using flaps. This enables to decrease the margin of error, the time and the number of dressing replacements, and to reduce the length of hospital stay.ConclusionThis is an expensive and specific equipment. However, the cost-benefit ratio analysis shows that it is an essential method that should be part of our therapeutic strategies.Keywords: loss of substance, negative pressure, budding, healing.  

  9. Orthotopic liver transplantation after the combined use of locoregional therapy and sorafenib for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoo EJ

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Eun Jin Yoo,1,* Hye Sun Shin,1,* Seung Up Kim,1,2,7 Dong Jin Joo,3,4 Jun Yong Park,1,2,7 Gi Hong Choi,3 Do Young Kim,1,2,7 Sang Hoon Ahn,1,2,7 Jinsil Seong,5 Myung Joo Koh,6 Kwang-Hyub Han,1,2,7 Chae Yoon Chon1,2,7 1Department of Internal Medicine, 2Institute of Gastroenterology, 3Department of Surgery, 4Research Institute for Transplantation, 5Department of Radiation Oncology, 6Department of Pathology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea; 7Liver Cirrhosis Clinical Research Center, Seoul, South Korea *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: We herein report a patient with advanced hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC beyond the Milan criteria. He underwent orthotopic liver transplantation after successful HCC downstaging that satisfied the University of California, San Francisco criteria, using concurrent chemoradiation therapy with a combination of repeated hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC and sorafenib. A 52-year-old male was diagnosed with advanced hepatitis B virus-related HCC beyond the Milan criteria. He underwent concurrent chemoradiation therapy (50 Gy with 20 fractions over 5 weeks with HAIC using 5-fluorouracil at a dose of 500 mg/day, which was administered during the first and fifth weeks of radiation therapy as an initial treatment modality. This was followed by the combined use of HAIC using 5-fluorouracil (500 mg/m2 for 5 hours on days 1–3 and cisplatin (60 mg/m2 for 2 hours on day 2 every 4 weeks (twelve cycles and sorafenib (from the third to the twelfth cycle of HAIC to treat the remaining HCC. Because a remarkable decrease in the tumor burden that satisfied the University of California, San Francisco criteria was observed after these combination treatments, the patient underwent orthotopic liver transplantation with curative aim and survived for 11 months without evidence of HCC recurrence. Keywords: hepatocellular carcinoma, liver transplantation

  10. Relationship Between Low Hemoglobin Levels and Outcomes After Treatment With Radiation or Chemoradiation in Patients With Cervical Cancer: Has the Impact of Anemia Been Overstated?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, Andrew J.; Allen, Pamela K.; Klopp, Ann H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Meyer, Larissa A. [Department of Gynecologic Oncology and Reproductive Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Eifel, Patricia J., E-mail: peifel@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Previous reports have suggested that anemia increases rates of recurrence after radiation therapy for cervical cancer. However, these studies may not have fully corrected for confounding risk factors. Using a well-characterized cohort of cervical cancer patients, we examined the association between anemia and outcomes before and after the introduction of chemoradiation as standard of care. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of 2454 patients who underwent definitive radiation therapy from 1980 through 2011. Minimum hemoglobin level (Hgb{sub min}) was recorded for 2359 patients (96%). Endpoints included freedom from central recurrence (FFCR), freedom from distant metastasis (FFDM), and disease-specific survival (DSS). Results: For the entire cohort, hemoglobin concentrations of 9, 10, and 12 g/dL before and during radiation were all significantly associated with FFCR, FFDM, and DSS (all P<.001) on univariate analysis. However, on multivariate analysis, only Hgb{sub min} less than 10 g/dL during RT (RT-Hgb{sub <10}) remained significant, and it was correlated with lower DSS (P=.02, hazard ratio [HR] = 1.28) and FFDM (P=.03, HR = 1.33) but not with FFCR. In a subset analysis of patients receiving chemoradiation (n=678), RT-Hgb{sub <10} was associated only with DSS (P=.008, HR = 1.49), not with FFCR or FFDM. In this subgroup, despite an association between RT-Hgb{sub <10} and DSS, the use of transfusion was not correlated with benefit. Conclusions: No evidence was found supporting anemia as an independent predictor of central recurrence in patients treated with definitive radiation therapy with or without chemotherapy. Less emphasis on correcting anemia in cervical cancer patients may be warranted.

  11. Effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy in morbidity obese candidates for bariatric surgery with and without binge eating disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Abilés

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To analyze changes in the general and specific psychopathology of morbidly obese bariatric surgery (BS candidates after cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT and assess differences between patients with and without binge eating disorder (BED and between patients with obesity grades III and IV, studying their influence on weight loss. Methods: 110 consecutive morbidly obese BS candidates [77 females; aged 41 ± 9 yrs; body mass index 49.1 ± 9.0 kg/m²] entered a three-month CBT program (12 two-hour sessions before BS. Participants were assessed with general and specific psychopathology tests pre-and post-CBT. Data were analyzed according to the degree of obesity and presence/absence of BED. Results: At baseline, BED patients were more anxious and depressive with lower self-esteem and quality of life versus non-BED patients (p 10% in 61%, with no intergroup differences. Conclusions: CBT is effective to treat psychological comorbidity in BS candidates, regardless of the presence of BED and degree of obesity.

  12. Oncologic safety of breast conserving surgery after tumour downsizing by neoadjuvant therapy: a retrospective single centre cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzal, F; Riedl, O; Mittlböck, M; Dubsky, P; Bartsch, R; Steger, G; Jakesz, R; Gnant, M

    2011-05-01

    The objective of this study is to analyse local recurrence rates in patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy (nCT) comparing mastecomized (MX) patients with those undergoing breast conserving therapy (BCT). Patients undergoing breast cancer surgery after nCT (3xCMF or 3-6xED) between 1995 and 2007 at our department were retrospectively analysed. The median follow up was 60 months for 308 patients. Patients who were downsized from MX to BCT with partial or complete response (n = 104) had a similar local recurrence free survival (LRFS) compared to patients who did not experience successful downsizing (n = 67) and finally undergoing MX (LRFS MX-BCT 81% vs. MX-MX 91%; P = 0.79). Uni- and multivariate analyses demonstrated that BCT itself was not an independent prognostic factor for a worse LRFS (P = 0.07 and 0.14). After no pathologic change or progressive disease the risk of local recurrence was increased in patients undergoing BCT (MX-BCT; n = 6 LRFS 66%) compared with MX (n = 44; LRFS 90%; P = 0.04). Overall survival in general was better for the BCT group (n = 197) compared with MX group (n = 111) regardless of clinical response (92% vs. 72%; P downsizing by nCT in patients primarily scheduled for mastectomy. These patients, however, should not be treated with breast conservation in the absence of any proven response after nCT.

  13. Postmastectomy radiation therapy and immediate autologous breast reconstruction: integrating perspectives from surgical oncology, radiation oncology, and plastic and reconstructive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochlin, Danielle H; Jeong, Ah-Reum; Goldberg, Leah; Harris, Timothy; Mohan, Kriti; Seal, Stella; Canner, Joe; Sacks, Justin M

    2015-03-01

    The effect of postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) on immediately reconstructed abdominal wall-based tissue remains imprecisely defined. We evaluated evidence from all fields involved in care of the breast cancer patient in order to advance a unified recommendation regarding this therapeutic sequence. We performed a MEDLINE and manual reference search to identify studies of PMRT with immediate autologous breast reconstruction. Inclusion criteria required studies to describe patients, flaps, and complication rates. Analyses were based on a random effects model. Surgical and radiation oncology literature was reviewed. Eleven retrospective studies of 337 patients with an average follow-up of 18-60 months (out of 268 patients) were selected for inclusion. Overall rates of fat necrosis, revisional surgery, volume loss, and fibrosis/contracture ranged from 16.9% to 35.4%. One out of 260 patients experienced total flap loss. There was an increased probability of fat necrosis in the irradiated breast (OR = 3.13, 95% CI = 1.42-6.89, P = 0.005) among three studies with non-irradiated controls. Five studies evaluated aesthetics with variable outcomes. There is mixed evidence for the utility of PMRT with immediate autologous abdominal wall breast reconstruction. Further investigation requires prospective studies with collaboration among surgical oncologists, radiation oncologists, and plastic surgeons. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Effect of early postextubation high-flow nasal cannula vs conventional oxygen therapy on hypoxaemia in patients after major abdominal surgery: a French multicentre randomised controlled trial (OPERA).

    Science.gov (United S