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Sample records for chemistry material science

  1. Chemistry and Materials Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    Thrust areas of the weapons-supporting research are growth, structure, and reactivity of surfaces and thin films; uranium research; physics and processing of metals; energetic materials; etc. The laboratory-directed R and D include director's initiatives and individual projects, and transactinium institute studies

  2. Computer information resources of inorganic chemistry and materials science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiselyova, N N; Dudarev, V A; Zemskov, V S [A.A.Baikov Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-02-28

    Information systems used in inorganic chemistry and materials science are considered. The following basic trends in the development of modern information systems in these areas are highlighted: access to information via the Internet, merging of documental and factual databases, involvement of experts in the evaluation of the data reliability, supplementing databases with information analysis tools on the properties of inorganic substances and materials.

  3. Computer information resources of inorganic chemistry and materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiselyova, N N; Dudarev, V A; Zemskov, V S

    2010-01-01

    Information systems used in inorganic chemistry and materials science are considered. The following basic trends in the development of modern information systems in these areas are highlighted: access to information via the Internet, merging of documental and factual databases, involvement of experts in the evaluation of the data reliability, supplementing databases with information analysis tools on the properties of inorganic substances and materials.

  4. Analytical Chemistry at the Interface Between Materials Science and Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, Janese C. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2000-09-21

    Likedlessentid sciences, anal~cd chetis~continues toreinvent itself. Moving beyond its traditional roles of identification and quantification, analytical chemistry is now expanding its frontiers into areas previously reserved to other disciplines. This work describes several research efforts that lie at the new interfaces between analytical chemistry and two of these disciplines, namely materials science and biology. In the materials science realm, the search for new materials that may have useful or unique chromatographic properties motivated the synthesis and characterization of electrically conductive sol-gels. In the biology realm, the search for new surface fabrication schemes that would permit or even improve the detection of specific biological reactions motivated the design of miniaturized biological arrays. Collectively, this work represents some of analytical chemistry’s newest forays into these disciplines. The introduction section to this dissertation provides a literature review on several of the key aspects of this work. In advance of the materials science discussion, a brief introduction into electrochemically-modulated liquid chromatography (EMLC) and sol-gel chemistry is provided. In advance of the biological discussions, brief overviews of scanning force microscopy (SFM) and the oxidative chemistry used to construct our biological arrays are provided. This section is followed by four chapters, each of which is presented as a separate manuscript, and focuses on work that describes some of our cross-disciplinary efforts within materials science and biology. This dissertation concludes with a general summary and future prospectus.

  5. Materials science: Chemistry and physics happily wed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiete, Gregory A.

    2017-07-01

    A major advance in the quantum theory of solids allows materials to be identified whose electronic states have a non-trivial topology. Such materials could have many computing and electronics applications. See Article p.298

  6. Ultrafast electron microscopy in materials science, biology, and chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Wayne E.; Campbell, Geoffrey H.; Frank, Alan; Reed, Bryan; Schmerge, John F.; Siwick, Bradley J.; Stuart, Brent C.; Weber, Peter M.

    2005-01-01

    The use of pump-probe experiments to study complex transient events has been an area of significant interest in materials science, biology, and chemistry. While the emphasis has been on laser pump with laser probe and laser pump with x-ray probe experiments, there is a significant and growing interest in using electrons as probes. Early experiments used electrons for gas-phase diffraction of photostimulated chemical reactions. More recently, scientists are beginning to explore phenomena in the solid state such as phase transformations, twinning, solid-state chemical reactions, radiation damage, and shock propagation. This review focuses on the emerging area of ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM), which comprises ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) and dynamic transmission electron microscopy (DTEM). The topics that are treated include the following: (1) The physics of electrons as an ultrafast probe. This encompasses the propagation dynamics of the electrons (space-charge effect, Child's law, Boersch effect) and extends to relativistic effects. (2) The anatomy of UED and DTEM instruments. This includes discussions of the photoactivated electron gun (also known as photogun or photoelectron gun) at conventional energies (60-200 keV) and extends to MeV beams generated by rf guns. Another critical aspect of the systems is the electron detector. Charge-coupled device cameras and microchannel-plate-based cameras are compared and contrasted. The effect of various physical phenomena on detective quantum efficiency is discussed. (3) Practical aspects of operation. This includes determination of time zero, measurement of pulse-length, and strategies for pulse compression. (4) Current and potential applications in materials science, biology, and chemistry. UEM has the potential to make a significant impact in future science and technology. Understanding of reaction pathways of complex transient phenomena in materials science, biology, and chemistry will provide fundamental

  7. Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate 2005 Annual Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz De La Rubia, T; Fluss, M J; Rath, K; Rennie, G; Shang, S; Kitrinos, G

    2006-01-01

    In 1952, we began laboratory operations in the barracks building of the Naval Air Station with approximately 50 employees. Today, the Chemistry and Materials Science (CMS) Directorate is a major organization at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory with more than 500 employees who continue to contribute to our evolving national security mission. For more than half a century, the mission of the Laboratory revolved primarily around nuclear deterrence and associated defense technologies. Today, Livermore supports a broad-based national security mission, and our specialized capabilities increasingly support emerging missions in human health and energy security. In the future, CMS will play a significantly expanded role in science and technology at the intersection of national security, energy and environment, and health. Our world-class workforce will provide the science and technology base for radically innovative materials to our programs and sponsors. Our 2005 Annual Report describes how our successes and breakthroughs follow a path set forward by our strategic plan and four organizing research themes, each with key scientific accomplishments by our staff and collaborators. Organized into two major sections-research themes and dynamic teams, this report focuses on achievements arising from earlier investments that address future challenges. The research presented in this annual report gives substantive examples of how we are proceeding in each of these four theme areas and how they are aligned with our national security mission. Research Themes: (1) Materials Properties and Performance under Extreme Conditions--We are developing ultrahard nanocrystalline metals, exploring the properties of nanotubes when exposed to very high temperatures, and engineering stronger materials to meet future needs for materials that can withstand extreme conditions. (2) Chemistry under Extreme Conditions and Chemical Engineering to Support National-Security Programs--Our recent

  8. Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate 2005 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz De La Rubia, T; Fluss, M J; Rath, K; Rennie, G; Shang, S; Kitrinos, G

    2006-08-08

    In 1952, we began laboratory operations in the barracks building of the Naval Air Station with approximately 50 employees. Today, the Chemistry and Materials Science (CMS) Directorate is a major organization at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory with more than 500 employees who continue to contribute to our evolving national security mission. For more than half a century, the mission of the Laboratory revolved primarily around nuclear deterrence and associated defense technologies. Today, Livermore supports a broad-based national security mission, and our specialized capabilities increasingly support emerging missions in human health and energy security. In the future, CMS will play a significantly expanded role in science and technology at the intersection of national security, energy and environment, and health. Our world-class workforce will provide the science and technology base for radically innovative materials to our programs and sponsors. Our 2005 Annual Report describes how our successes and breakthroughs follow a path set forward by our strategic plan and four organizing research themes, each with key scientific accomplishments by our staff and collaborators. Organized into two major sections-research themes and dynamic teams, this report focuses on achievements arising from earlier investments that address future challenges. The research presented in this annual report gives substantive examples of how we are proceeding in each of these four theme areas and how they are aligned with our national security mission. Research Themes: (1) Materials Properties and Performance under Extreme Conditions--We are developing ultrahard nanocrystalline metals, exploring the properties of nanotubes when exposed to very high temperatures, and engineering stronger materials to meet future needs for materials that can withstand extreme conditions. (2) Chemistry under Extreme Conditions and Chemical Engineering to Support National-Security Programs--Our recent

  9. Bergman cyclization in polymer chemistry and material science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yuli; Hu, Aiguo

    2011-11-01

    Bergman cyclization of enediynes, regarded as a promising strategy for anticancer drugs, now finds its own niche in the area of polymer chemistry and material science. The highly reactive aromatic diradicals generated from Bergman cyclization can undergo polymerization acting as either monomers or initiators of other vinyl monomers. The former, namely homopolymerization, leads to polyphenylenes and polynaphthalenes with excellent thermal stability, good solubility, and processability. The many remarkable properties of these aromatic polymers have further endowed them to be manufactured into carbon-rich materials, e.g., glassy carbons and carbon nanotubes. Whereas used as initiators, enediynes provide a novel resource for high molecular weight polymers with narrow polydispersities. The aromatic diradicals are also useful for introducing oligomers or polymers onto pristine carbonous nanomaterials, such as carbon nano-onions and carbon nanotubes, to improve their dispersibility in organic solvents and polymer solutions. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Chemistry and Materials Science Department annual report, 1988--1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borg, R.J.; Sugihara, T.T.; Cherniak, J.C.; Corey, C.W. [eds.

    1989-12-31

    This is the first annual report of the Chemistry & Materials Science (C&MS) Department. The principal purpose of this report is to provide a concise summary of our scientific and technical accomplishments for fiscal years 1988 and 1989. The report is also tended to become part of the archival record of the Department`s activities. We plan to publish future editions annually. The activities of the Department can be divided into three broad categories. First, C&MS staff are assigned by the matrix system to work directly in a program. These programmatic assignments typically involve short deadlines and critical time schedules. A second category is longer-term research and development in technologies important to Laboratory programs. The focus and direction of this technology-base work are generally determined by programmatic needs. Finally, the Department manages its own research program, mostly long-range in outlook and basic in orientation. These three categories are not mutually exclusive but form a continuum of technical activities. Representative examples of all three are included in this report. The principal subject matter of this report has been divided into six sections: Innovations in Analysis and Characterization, Advanced Materials, Metallurgical Science and Technology, Surfaces and Interfaces, Energetic Materials and Chemical Synthesis, and Energy-Related Research and Development.

  11. Chemistry {ampersand} Materials Science progress report summary of selected research and development topics, FY97

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newkirk, L.

    1997-12-01

    This report contains summaries of research performed in the Chemistry and Materials Science division. Topics include Metals and Ceramics, High Explosives, Organic Synthesis, Instrument Development, and other topics.

  12. Materials Chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Fahlman, Bradley D

    2011-01-01

    The 2nd edition of Materials Chemistry builds on the strengths that were recognized by a 2008 Textbook Excellence Award from the Text and Academic Authors Association (TAA). Materials Chemistry addresses inorganic-, organic-, and nano-based materials from a structure vs. property treatment, providing a suitable breadth and depth coverage of the rapidly evolving materials field. The 2nd edition continues to offer innovative coverage and practical perspective throughout. After briefly defining materials chemistry and its history, seven chapters discuss solid-state chemistry, metals, semiconducting materials, organic "soft" materials, nanomaterials, and materials characterization. All chapters have been thoroughly updated and expanded with, for example, new sections on ‘soft lithographic’ patterning, ‘click chemistry’ polymerization, nanotoxicity, graphene, as well as many biomaterials applications. The polymer and ‘soft’ materials chapter represents the largest expansion for the 2nd edition. Each ch...

  13. Opportunities in chemistry and materials science for topological insulators and their nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Kong, Desheng; Cui, Yi

    2011-01-01

    of these exotic materials to use the metallic states in functional devices, and they present great opportunities for the chemistry and materials science research communities. © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  14. Chemistry and Materials Science, 1990--1991. [Second annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugihara, T.T.; Bruner, J.M.; McElroy, L.A. [eds.

    1991-12-31

    This 2-year (FY 1990-91) contains 49 technical articles in ten sections: research sampler, metals and alloys, energetic materials, chemistry and physics of advanced materials, bonding and reactions at surfaces and interfaces, superconductivity, energy R and D, waste processing and management, characterization and analysis, and facilities and instrumentation. Two more sections list department personnel, their publications etc., consultants, and summary of department budgets. The articles are processed separately for the data base. (DLC)

  15. Computational Materials Science and Chemistry: Accelerating Discovery and Innovation through Simulation-Based Engineering and Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crabtree, George [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Glotzer, Sharon [University of Michigan; McCurdy, Bill [University of California Davis; Roberto, Jim [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2010-07-26

    This report is based on a SC Workshop on Computational Materials Science and Chemistry for Innovation on July 26-27, 2010, to assess the potential of state-of-the-art computer simulations to accelerate understanding and discovery in materials science and chemistry, with a focus on potential impacts in energy technologies and innovation. The urgent demand for new energy technologies has greatly exceeded the capabilities of today's materials and chemical processes. To convert sunlight to fuel, efficiently store energy, or enable a new generation of energy production and utilization technologies requires the development of new materials and processes of unprecedented functionality and performance. New materials and processes are critical pacing elements for progress in advanced energy systems and virtually all industrial technologies. Over the past two decades, the United States has developed and deployed the world's most powerful collection of tools for the synthesis, processing, characterization, and simulation and modeling of materials and chemical systems at the nanoscale, dimensions of a few atoms to a few hundred atoms across. These tools, which include world-leading x-ray and neutron sources, nanoscale science facilities, and high-performance computers, provide an unprecedented view of the atomic-scale structure and dynamics of materials and the molecular-scale basis of chemical processes. For the first time in history, we are able to synthesize, characterize, and model materials and chemical behavior at the length scale where this behavior is controlled. This ability is transformational for the discovery process and, as a result, confers a significant competitive advantage. Perhaps the most spectacular increase in capability has been demonstrated in high performance computing. Over the past decade, computational power has increased by a factor of a million due to advances in hardware and software. This rate of improvement, which shows no sign of

  16. Chemistry and Materials Science progress report, first half FY 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    This report contains sections on: Fundamentals of the physics and processing of metals; interfaces, adhesion, and bonding; energetic materials; plutonium research; synchrotron radiation-based materials science; atomistic approach to the interaction of surfaces with the environment: actinide studies; properties of carbon fibers; buried layer formation using ion implantation; active coherent control of chemical reaction dynamics; inorganic and organic aerogels; synthesis and characterization of melamine-formaldehyde aerogels; structural transformation and precursor phenomena in advanced materials; magnetic ultrathin films, surfaces, and overlayers; ductile-phase toughening of refractory-metal intermetallics; particle-solid interactions; electronic structure evolution of metal clusters; and nanoscale lithography induced chemically or physically by modified scanned probe microscopy

  17. Quantum Chemistry; A concise introduction for students of physics, chemistry, biochemistry and materials science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, Ajit J.

    2017-09-01

    This book provides non-specialists with a basic understanding of the underlying concepts of quantum chemistry. It is both a text for second- or third-year undergraduates and a reference for researchers who need a quick introduction or refresher. All chemists and many biochemists, materials scientists, engineers, and physicists routinely use spectroscopic measurements and electronic structure computations in their work. The emphasis of Quantum Chemistry on explaining ideas rather than enumerating facts or presenting procedural details makes this an excellent foundation text/reference.

  18. Chemistry and Materials Science. Progress report, first half, FY 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    Thrust areas of the weapons-supporting research are growth, structure, and reactivity of surfaces and thin films; uranium research; physics and processing of metals; energetic materials; etc. The laboratory-directed R and D include director`s initiatives and individual projects, and transactinium institute studies.

  19. Radiation chemistry from basics to applications in material and life sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belloni, J.; Mostafavi, M.; Douki, Th.; Spotheim-Maurizot, M.

    2008-01-01

    This book gives a progress report on the many and original contributions of radiation chemistry to the fundamental knowledge of the vast domain of chemical reactions and its applications. Radiation chemistry techniques indeed make it possible to elucidate detailed physicochemical mechanisms in inorganic and organic chemistry (including in space) and in biochemistry. Moreover, this comprehension is applied in materials science to precisely control syntheses by radiation, such as radiopolymerization, radio-grafting, specific treatment of surfaces (textiles, paintings, inks,..), synthesis of complex nano-materials, degradation of environmental pollutants and radioresistance of materials for nuclear reactors. In life sciences, the study of the effects of radiation on bio-macromolecules (DNA, proteins, lipids) not only permits the comprehension of normal or pathological biological mechanisms, but also the improvement of our health. In particular, many advances in cancer radiotherapy, in the radioprotection of nuclear workers and the general population, as well as in the treatment of diseases and the radiosterilization of drugs, could be obtained thanks to this research. Abundantly illustrated and written in English by top international specialists who have taken care to render the subjects accessible, this work will greatly interest those curious about a scientific field that is new to them and students attracted by the original and multidisciplinary aspects of the field. At a time when radiation chemistry research is experiencing spectacular development in numerous countries, this book will attract newcomers to the field. (authors)

  20. Opportunities in chemistry and materials science for topological insulators and their nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Kong, Desheng

    2011-10-24

    Electrical charges on the boundaries of topological insulators favour forward motion over back-scattering at impurities, producing low-dissipation, metallic states that exist up to room temperature in ambient conditions. These states have the promise to impact a broad range of applications from electronics to the production of energy, which is one reason why topological insulators have become the rising star in condensed-matter physics. There are many challenges in the processing of these exotic materials to use the metallic states in functional devices, and they present great opportunities for the chemistry and materials science research communities. © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  1. Chemistry {ampersand} Materials Science program report, Weapons Resarch and Development and Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY96

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chase, L.

    1997-03-01

    This report is the annual progress report for the Chemistry Materials Science Program: Weapons Research and Development and Laboratory Directed Research and Development. Twenty-one projects are described separately by their principal investigators.

  2. Metallurgical electrochemistry: the interface between materials science and molten salt chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadoway, D.R.

    1991-01-01

    Even though molten salt electrolysis finds application in the primary extraction of metals (electrowinning), the purification and recycling of metals (electrorefining), and in the formation of metal coatings (electroplating), the technology remains in many respects underexploited. Electrolysis in molten salts as well as other nonaqueous media has enormous potential for materials processing. First, owing to the special attributes of nonaqueous electrolytes electrochemical processing in these media has an important role to play in the generation of advanced materials, i.e., materials with specialized chemistries or tailored microstructures (electrosynthesis). Secondly, as environmental quality standards rise beyond the capabilities of classical metals extraction technologies to comply, molten salt electrolysis may prove to be the only acceptable route from ore to metal. Growing public awareness of pollution from the metals industry could stimulate a renaissance in molten salt electrochemistry. Challenges facing metallurgical electrochemistry as relates to the environment fall into two categories: (1) improving existing electrochemical technology, and (2) developing clean electrochemical technology to displace current nonelectrochemical technology. In both instances success hinges upon the discovery of advanced materials and the ecologically sound extraction of metals, the close coupling between materials science and molten salt chemistry is manifest. (author) 6 refs

  3. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Chemical Instabilities : Applications in Chemistry, Engineering, Geology, and Materials Science

    CERN Document Server

    Baras, F

    1984-01-01

    On March 14-18, 1983 a workshop on "Chemical Instabilities: Applications in Chemistry, Engineering, Geology, and Materials Science" was held in Austin, Texas, U.S.A. It was organized jointly by the University of Texas at Austin and the Universite Libre de Bruxelles and sponsored qy NATO, NSF, the University of Texas at Austin, the International Solvay Institutes and the Ex­ xon Corporation. The present Volume includes most of the material of the in­ vited lectures delivered in the workshop as well as material from some posters, whose content was directly related to the themes of the invited lectures. In ,recent years, problems related to the stability and the nonlinear dynamics of nonequilibrium systems invaded a great num­ ber of fields ranging from abstract mathematics to biology. One of the most striking aspects of this development is that subjects reputed to be "classical" and "well-established" like chemistry, turned out to give rise to a rich variety of phenomena leading to multiple steady states and...

  4. Materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    The Materials Science Division is engaged in research on physical properties of materials and the effects of radiation upon them. This involves solid state materials undergoing phase transitions, energy storing materials, and biomaterials. The Division also offers research facilities for M.S. and Ph.D. thesis work in the fields of physics, chemistry, materials, and radiation sciences in cooperation with the various colleges and departments of the UPR Mayaguez Campus. It is anticipated that it will serve as a catalyst in starting energy-related research programs in cooperation with UPR faculty, especially programs involving solar energy. To encourage and promote cooperative efforts, contact is maintained with former graduate students and with visiting scientists from Latin American research institutions

  5. The physical chemistry and materials science behind sinter-resistant catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yunqian; Lu, Ping; Cao, Zhenming; Campbell, Charles T; Xia, Younan

    2018-06-18

    Catalyst sintering, a main cause of the loss of catalytic activity and/or selectivity at high reaction temperatures, is a major concern and grand challenge in the general area of heterogeneous catalysis. Although all heterogeneous catalysts are inevitably subjected to sintering during their operation, the immediate and drastic consequences can be mitigated by carefully engineering the catalytic particles and their interactions with the supports. In this tutorial review, we highlight recent progress in understanding the physical chemistry and materials science involved in sintering, including the discussion of advanced techniques, such as in situ microscopy and spectroscopy, for investigating the sintering process and its rate. We also discuss strategies for the design and rational fabrication of sinter-resistant catalysts. Finally, we showcase recent success in improving the thermal stability and thus sinter resistance of supported catalytic systems.

  6. Materials Science and Engineering |

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engineering? What Is Materials Science and Engineering? MSE combines engineering, physics and chemistry to solve problems in nanotechnology, biotechnology, information technology, energy, manufacturing, and more ,' which could replace steel. Materials Science and Mechanical Engineering Professors work together to

  7. Final results of the FY'78 chemistry and materials science research program review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frazer, J.W.

    1977-01-01

    18 projects which were selected to be sponsored by ''Chemistry Research Program'' are summarized. These include: lasers for chemical analysis; multi-element analysis systems; spectroscopic analysis of surface passivation; non-aqueous titrimetry; materials damage prediction for fiber composites; safe high energy explosives; single photon absorption reaction chemistry; reaction in shock waves; cryogenic heavy hydrogen technology; acoustic emission; metallic alloy glasses; basic study of toughness in steel; static equation-of-state at 100 GPa; transuranium element research; nuclear structure research; neutron capture gamma measurements; x-ray fluorescence analysis; and pyrochemical investigation

  8. Material Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, Dong Yeon; Kim, Heung

    1987-08-15

    This book introduces material science, which includes key of a high-tech industry, new materials of dream like new metal material and semiconductor, classification of materials, microstructure of materials and characteristic. It mentions magic new materials such as shape memory alloy, fine ceramics, engineering fine ceramics, electronic ceramics, engineering plastic, glass, silicone conductor, optical fiber mixed materials and integrated circuit, challenge for new material and development of new materials.

  9. Material Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Won, Dong Yeon; Kim, Heung

    1987-08-01

    This book introduces material science, which includes key of a high-tech industry, new materials of dream like new metal material and semiconductor, classification of materials, microstructure of materials and characteristic. It mentions magic new materials such as shape memory alloy, fine ceramics, engineering fine ceramics, electronic ceramics, engineering plastic, glass, silicone conductor, optical fiber mixed materials and integrated circuit, challenge for new material and development of new materials.

  10. Symposium on high temperature and materials chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-10-01

    This volume contains the written proceedings of the Symposium on High Temperature and Materials Chemistry held in Berkeley, California on October 24--25, 1989. The Symposium was sponsored by the Materials and Chemical Sciences Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and by the College of Chemistry of the University of California at Berkeley to discuss directions, trends, and accomplishments in the field of high temperature and materials chemistry. Its purpose was to provide a snapshot of high temperature and materials chemistry and, in so doing, to define status and directions

  11. Symposium on high temperature and materials chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-10-01

    This volume contains the written proceedings of the Symposium on High Temperature and Materials Chemistry held in Berkeley, California on October 24--25, 1989. The Symposium was sponsored by the Materials and Chemical Sciences Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and by the College of Chemistry of the University of California at Berkeley to discuss directions, trends, and accomplishments in the field of high temperature and materials chemistry. Its purpose was to provide a snapshot of high temperature and materials chemistry and, in so doing, to define status and directions.

  12. Solid-state quantum chemistry and materials science: Solid compounds of the d and f elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubanov, V.A.

    1989-01-01

    Methods have been developed for calculating electron structures for solid compounds of d and f elements and for simulating physicochemical properties of materials based on them. Cluster and band calculations are considered for refractory compounds of d metals formed with light elements. There are bond and property regularities in doping by meals and metalloids, and defects and impurities have certain effects, where studies have been made on the electron structures for disordered phases and solid solutions in relation to sublattice compositions. Quantum-chemical simulation methods have been developed for optically active and fluorescent materials based on d and f metal oxides, fluorides, and chalcogenides, and compositions have been proposed for new optically active composites and protective coatings. New approaches have been defined to the magnetic parameters of metals, alloys, and compounds; these can be applied in simulating new magnetic materials. Calculations are given on energy spectra for high-temperature oxide superconductors. There is interesting scope for quantum-chemical methods in application to many topics in materials science

  13. Molecular Environmental Science Using Synchrotron Radiation: Chemistry and Physics of Waste Form Materials. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindle, Dennis W.

    2011-01-01

    Production of defense-related nuclear materials has generated large volumes of complex chemical wastes containing a mixture of radionuclides. The disposition of these wastes requires conversion of the liquid and solid-phase components into durable, solid forms suitable for long-term immobilization. Specially formulated glass compositions and ceramics such as pyrochlores and apatites are the main candidates for these wastes. An important consideration linked to the durability of waste-form materials is the local structure around the waste components. Equally important is the local structure of constituents of the glass and ceramic host matrix. Knowledge of the structure in the waste-form host matrices is essential, prior to and subsequent to waste incorporation, to evaluate and develop improved waste-form compositions based on scientific considerations. This project used the soft-x-ray synchrotron-radiation-based technique of near-edge x-ray-absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) as a unique method for investigating oxidation states and structures of low-Z elemental constituents forming the backbones of glass and ceramic host matrices for waste-form materials. In addition, light metal ions in ceramic hosts, such as titanium, are also ideal for investigation by NEXAFS in the soft-x-ray region. Thus, one of the main objectives was to understand outstanding issues in waste-form science via NEXAFS investigations and to translate this understanding into better waste-form materials, followed by eventual capability to investigate 'real' waste-form materials by the same methodology. We conducted several detailed structural investigations of both pyrochlore ceramic and borosilicate-glass materials during the project and developed improved capabilities at Beamline 6.3.1 of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) to perform the studies.

  14. Molecular Environmental Science Using Synchrotron Radiation: Chemistry and Physics of Waste Form Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindle, Dennis W.

    2011-04-21

    Production of defense-related nuclear materials has generated large volumes of complex chemical wastes containing a mixture of radionuclides. The disposition of these wastes requires conversion of the liquid and solid-phase components into durable, solid forms suitable for long-term immobilization. Specially formulated glass compositions and ceramics such as pyrochlores and apatites are the main candidates for these wastes. An important consideration linked to the durability of waste-form materials is the local structure around the waste components. Equally important is the local structure of constituents of the glass and ceramic host matrix. Knowledge of the structure in the waste-form host matrices is essential, prior to and subsequent to waste incorporation, to evaluate and develop improved waste-form compositions based on scientific considerations. This project used the soft-x-ray synchrotron-radiation-based technique of near-edge x-ray-absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) as a unique method for investigating oxidation states and structures of low-Z elemental constituents forming the backbones of glass and ceramic host matrices for waste-form materials. In addition, light metal ions in ceramic hosts, such as titanium, are also ideal for investigation by NEXAFS in the soft-x-ray region. Thus, one of the main objectives was to understand outstanding issues in waste-form science via NEXAFS investigations and to translate this understanding into better waste-form materials, followed by eventual capability to investigate “real” waste-form materials by the same methodology. We conducted several detailed structural investigations of both pyrochlore ceramic and borosilicate-glass materials during the project and developed improved capabilities at Beamline 6.3.1 of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) to perform the studies.

  15. Philosophy of Science and Philosophy of Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Jaap van Brakel

    2014-01-01

    In this paper I assess the relation between philosophy of chemistry and (general) philosophy of science, focusing on those themes in the philosophy of chemistry that may bring about major revisions or extensions of current philosophy of science. Three themes can claim to make a unique contribution to philosophy of science: first, the variety of materials in the (natural and artificial) world; second, extending the world by making new stuff; and, third, specific features of the relations betwe...

  16. Material chemistry and process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-11-01

    The contents of this book are purpose of investigation, system of investigation, summary of investigation characteristic of this investigation, way to read the result table on prediction of investigation, object of investigation, important research and investigation fields, period of realizable prediction, cause of the obstacle for realization, propel way for studying and development, means of policy, comparison identical and similar task with the last time, illustration of future world in 2025 the result of investigation on material and the result of investigation on chemistry and process.

  17. Materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    the document is a collection of papers on different aspects of materials science. It discusses many items such as semiconductors, surface properties and interfaces, construction and civil engineering, metallic materials, polymers and composites, biology and biomaterials, metallurgy etc.. - 1 - Document1 Document1

  18. Science Education and the Material Culture of the Nineteenth-Century Classroom: Physics and Chemistry in Spanish Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Josep; Cuenca-Lorente, Mar

    2012-02-01

    Although a large number of Spanish secondary schools have preserved an important scientific heritage, including large scientific instrument collections, this heritage has never been officially protected. Their current state is very diverse, and although several research projects have attempted to initiate their recovery and use, their lack of coordination and wide range of methodological approaches has limited their impact. This paper presents a case-study integrated in a new project supported by the Catalan Scientific Instrument Commission (COMIC) whose final aim is the establishment of a research hub for the preservation, study and use of Spanish scientific instrument collections. Major aims in this project are promoting a better coordination of Spanish projects in this field, and furthering international research on science pedagogy and the material culture of science. The major focus of COMIC is currently the recovery of secondary school collections. This paper provides first, a historical account of the development of secondary education in Spain, and the contemporary establishment of physics and chemistry school collections. Second, we focus on a case-study of three Spanish schools (Valencia, Castellón, and Alicante). Finally, we provide a brief overview of current projects to preserve Spanish school collections, and discuss how COMIC can contribute to help to coordinate them, and to take a step forward interdisciplinary research in this context.

  19. Plutonium metallurgy: The materials science challenges bridging condensed-matter physics and chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, A.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)], E-mail: schwartz6@llnl.gov

    2007-10-11

    Although there exists evidence of metallurgical practices dating back over 6000 years, studies of Pu and Pu alloys have been conducted for barely 60 years. During the time of the Manhattan Project and extending for some time afterward, the priority to produce the metal took precedence over the fundamental understanding of the metallurgical principals. In the past decade or so, there has been a resurgence in the basic metallurgy, condensed-matter physics, and chemistry of Pu and Pu alloys. These communities have made substantial progress, both experimentally and theoretically in many areas; however, many challenges still remain. The intent of this brief overview is to highlight a number important challenges that we face in the metallurgy of Pu including phase transformations and phase stability, aging, and the connection between electronic structure and metallurgy.

  20. Materials science symposium 'materials science using accelerators'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Tetsuro; Asai, Masato; Chimi, Yasuhiro

    2005-07-01

    The facility of the JAERI-Tokai tandem accelerator and its booster has been contributing to advancing heavy-ion sciences in the fields of nuclear physics, nuclear chemistry, atomic and solid-state physics and materials science, taking advantage of its prominent performance of heavy-ion acceleration. This facility was recently upgraded by changing the acceleration tubes and installing an ECR ion-source at the terminal. The radioactive nuclear beam facility (Tokai Radioactive Ion Accelerator Complex, TRIAC) was also installed by the JAERI-KEK joint project. On this occasion, this meeting was held in order to provide a new step for the advancement of heavy-ion science, and to exchange information on recent activities and future plans using the tandem facility as well as on promising new experimental techniques. This meeting was held at Tokai site of JAERI on January 6th and 7th in 2005, having 24 oral presentations, and was successfully carried out with as many as 90 participants and lively discussions among scientists from all the fields of heavy-ion science, including solid-sate physics, nuclear physics and chemistry, and accelerator physics. This summary is the proceedings of this meeting. We would like to thank all the staffs of the accelerators section, participants and office workers in the Department of Materials Science for their support. The 24 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  1. Advances in imaging and electron physics time resolved electron diffraction for chemistry, biology and material science

    CERN Document Server

    Hawkes, Peter W

    2014-01-01

    Advances in Imaging & Electron Physics merges two long-running serials-Advances in Electronics & Electron Physics and Advances in Optical & Electron Microscopy. The series features extended articles on the physics of electron devices (especially semiconductor devices), particle optics at high and low energies, microlithography, image science and digital image processing, electromagnetic wave propagation, electron microscopy, and the computing methods used in all these domains. Contributions from leading authorities Informs and updates on all the latest developments in the field.

  2. Materials Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The Materials Science Program is structured so that NASA s headquarters is responsible for the program content and selection, through the Enterprise Scientist, and MSFC provides for implementation of ground and flight programs with a Discipline Scientist and Discipline Manager. The Discipline Working Group of eminent scientists from outside of NASA acts in an advisory capacity and writes the Discipline Document from which the NRA content is derived. The program is reviewed approximately every three years by groups such as the Committee on Microgravity Research, the National Materials Advisory Board, and the OBPR Maximization and Prioritization (ReMaP) Task Force. The flight program has had as many as twenty-six principal investigators (PIs) in flight or flight definition stage, with the numbers of PIs in the future dependent on the results of the ReMaP Task Force and internal reviews. Each project has a NASA-appointed Project Scientist, considered a half-time job, who assists the PI in understanding and preparing for internal reviews such as the Science Concept Review and Requirements Definition Review. The Project Scientist also insures that the PI gets the maximum science support from MSFC, represents the PI to the MSFC community, and collaborates with the Project Manager to insure the project is well-supported and remains vital. Currently available flight equipment includes the Materials Science Research Rack (MSRR-1) and Microgravity Science Glovebox. Ground based projects fall into one or more of several categories. Intellectual Underpinning of Flight Program projects include theoretical studies backed by modeling and computer simulations; bring to maturity new research, often by young researchers, and may include preliminary short duration low gravity experiments in the KC-135 aircraft or drop tube; enable characterization of data sets from previous flights; and provide thermophysical property determinations to aid PIs. Radiation Shielding and preliminary In

  3. Genetic algorithms and genetic programming for multiscale modeling: Applications in materials science and chemistry and advances in scalability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastry, Kumara Narasimha

    2007-03-01

    Effective and efficient rnultiscale modeling is essential to advance both the science and synthesis in a, wide array of fields such as physics, chemistry, materials science; biology, biotechnology and pharmacology. This study investigates the efficacy and potential of rising genetic algorithms for rnultiscale materials modeling and addresses some of the challenges involved in designing competent algorithms that solve hard problems quickly, reliably and accurately. In particular, this thesis demonstrates the use of genetic algorithms (GAs) and genetic programming (GP) in multiscale modeling with the help of two non-trivial case studies in materials science and chemistry. The first case study explores the utility of genetic programming (GP) in multi-timescaling alloy kinetics simulations. In essence, GP is used to bridge molecular dynamics and kinetic Monte Carlo methods to span orders-of-magnitude in simulation time. Specifically, GP is used to regress symbolically an inline barrier function from a limited set of molecular dynamics simulations to enable kinetic Monte Carlo that simulate seconds of real time. Results on a non-trivial example of vacancy-assisted migration on a surface of a face-centered cubic (fcc) Copper-Cobalt (CuxCo 1-x) alloy show that GP predicts all barriers with 0.1% error from calculations for less than 3% of active configurations, independent of type of potentials used to obtain the learning set of barriers via molecular dynamics. The resulting method enables 2--9 orders-of-magnitude increase in real-time dynamics simulations taking 4--7 orders-of-magnitude less CPU time. The second case study presents the application of multiobjective genetic algorithms (MOGAs) in multiscaling quantum chemistry simulations. Specifically, MOGAs are used to bridge high-level quantum chemistry and semiempirical methods to provide accurate representation of complex molecular excited-state and ground-state behavior. Results on ethylene and benzene---two common

  4. Interactions of Native Cyclodextrins with Metal Ions and Inorganic Nanoparticles: Fertile Landscape for Chemistry and Materials Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochowicz, Daniel; Kornowicz, Arkadiusz; Lewiński, Janusz

    2017-11-22

    Readily available cyclodextrins (CDs) with an inherent hydrophobic internal cavity and hydrophilic external surface are macrocyclic entities that display a combination of molecular recognition and complexation properties with vital implications for host-guest supramolecular chemistry. While the host-guest chemistry of CDs has been widely recognized and led to their exploitation in a variety of important functions over the last five decades, these naturally occurring macrocyclic systems have emerged only recently as promising macrocyclic molecules to fabricate environmentally benign functional nanomaterials. This review surveys the development in the field paying special attention to the synthesis and emerging uses of various unmodified CD-metal complexes and CD-inorganic nanoparticle systems and identifies possible future directions. The association of a hydrophobic cavity of CDs with metal ions or various inorganic nanoparticles is a very appealing strategy for controlling the inorganic subunits properties in the very competitive water environment. In this review we provide the most prominent examples of unmodified CDs' inclusion complexes with organometallic guests and update the research in this field from the past decade. We discuss also the coordination flexibility of native CDs to metal ions in CD-based metal complexes and summarize the progress in the synthesis and characterization of CD-metal complexes and their use in catalysis and sensing as well as construction of molecular magnets. Then we provide a comprehensive overview of emerging applications of native CDs in materials science and nanotechnology. Remarkably, in the past few years CDs have appeared as attractive building units for the synthesis of carbohydrate metal-organic frameworks (CD-MOFs) in a combination of alkali-metal cations. The preparation of this new class of highly porous materials and their applications in the separation of small molecules, the loading of drug molecules, as well as

  5. Physics and Chemistry of Earth Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navrotsky, Alexandra

    1994-11-01

    Stressing the fundamental solid state behavior of minerals, and emphasizing both theory and experiment, this text surveys the physics and chemistry of earth materials. The author begins with a systematic tour of crystal chemistry of both simple and complex structures (with completely new structural drawings) and discusses how to obtain structural and thermodynamic information experimentally. Dr. Navrotsky also reviews the quantitative concepts of chemical bonding--band theory, molecular orbit and ionic models. She then covers physical properties and relates microscopic features to macroscopic thermodynamic behavior and treats high pressure phase transitions, amorphous materials and solid state reactions. The author concludes with a look at the interface between mineral physics and materials science. Highly illustrated throughout, this book fills the gap between undergraduate texts and specialized review volumes and is appropriate for students and researchers in earth science and materials science.

  6. Molecular environmental science using synchrotron radiation: Chemistry and physics of waste form materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindle, Dennis W.; Shuh, David K.

    2005-01-01

    Production of defense-related nuclear materials has generated large volumes of complex chemical wastes containing a mixture of radionuclides. The disposition of these wastes requires conversion of the liquid and solid-phase components into durable, solid forms suitable for long-term immobilization [1]. Specially formulated glass compositions, many of which have been derived from glass developed for commercial purposes, and ceramics such as pyrochlores and apatites, will be the main recipients for these wastes. The performance characteristics of waste-form glasses and ceramics are largely determined by the loading capacity for the waste constituents (radioactive and non-radioactive) and the resultant chemical and radiation resistance of the waste-form package to leaching (durability). There are unique opportunities for the use of near-edge soft-x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy to investigate speciation of low-Z elements forming the backbone of waste-form glasses and ceramics. Although nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is the primary technique employed to obtain speciation information from low-Z elements in waste forms, NMR is incompatible with the metallic impurities contained in real waste and is thus limited to studies of idealized model systems. In contrast, NEXAFS can yield element-specific speciation information from glass constituents without sensitivity to paramagnetic species. Development and use of NEXAFS for eventual studies of real waste glasses has significant implications, especially for the low-Z elements comprising glass matrices [5-7]. The NEXAFS measurements were performed at Beamline 6.3.1, an entrance-slitless bend-magnet beamline operating from 200 eV to 2000 eV with a Hettrick-Underwood varied-line-space (VLS) grating monochromator, of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at LBNL. Complete characterization and optimization of this beamline was conducted to enable high-performance measurements

  7. Molecular environmental science using synchrotron radiation:Chemistry and physics of waste form materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindle, Dennis W.; Shuh, David K.

    2005-02-28

    Production of defense-related nuclear materials has generated large volumes of complex chemical wastes containing a mixture of radionuclides. The disposition of these wastes requires conversion of the liquid and solid-phase components into durable, solid forms suitable for long-term immobilization [1]. Specially formulated glass compositions, many of which have been derived from glass developed for commercial purposes, and ceramics such as pyrochlores and apatites, will be the main recipients for these wastes. The performance characteristics of waste-form glasses and ceramics are largely determined by the loading capacity for the waste constituents (radioactive and non-radioactive) and the resultant chemical and radiation resistance of the waste-form package to leaching (durability). There are unique opportunities for the use of near-edge soft-x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy to investigate speciation of low-Z elements forming the backbone of waste-form glasses and ceramics. Although nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is the primary technique employed to obtain speciation information from low-Z elements in waste forms, NMR is incompatible with the metallic impurities contained in real waste and is thus limited to studies of idealized model systems. In contrast, NEXAFS can yield element-specific speciation information from glass constituents without sensitivity to paramagnetic species. Development and use of NEXAFS for eventual studies of real waste glasses has significant implications, especially for the low-Z elements comprising glass matrices [5-7]. The NEXAFS measurements were performed at Beamline 6.3.1, an entrance-slitless bend-magnet beamline operating from 200 eV to 2000 eV with a Hettrick-Underwood varied-line-space (VLS) grating monochromator, of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at LBNL. Complete characterization and optimization of this beamline was conducted to enable high-performance measurements.

  8. Chemistry and materials science progress report. Weapons-supporting research and laboratory directed research and development: FY 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    This report covers different materials and chemistry research projects carried out a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory during 1995 in support of nuclear weapons programs and other programs. There are 16 papers supporting weapons research and 12 papers supporting laboratory directed research.

  9. Chemistry and materials science progress report. Weapons-supporting research and laboratory directed research and development: FY 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-04-01

    This report covers different materials and chemistry research projects carried out a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory during 1995 in support of nuclear weapons programs and other programs. There are 16 papers supporting weapons research and 12 papers supporting laboratory directed research

  10. Nanoscale materials in chemistry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Klabunde, Kenneth J; Richards, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    ...: Disordered, Porous Nanostructures Stephanie L. Brock 209 9 Ordered Microporous and Mesoporous Materials Freddy Kleitz 243 10 Applications of Microporous and Mesoporous Materials Anirban Ghosh,...

  11. Recent aspects of self-oscillating polymeric materials: designing self-oscillating polymers coupled with supramolecular chemistry and ionic liquid science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, Takeshi; Yoshida, Ryo

    2014-06-14

    Herein, we summarise the recent developments in self-oscillating polymeric materials based on the concepts of supramolecular chemistry, where aggregates of molecular building blocks with non-covalent bonds evolve the temporal or spatiotemporal structure. By utilising the rhythmic oscillation of the association/dissociation of molecular aggregates coupled with the redox oscillation by the BZ reaction, novel soft materials that express similar functions as those of living matter will be achieved. Further, from the viewpoint of materials science, our recent approach to prepare self-oscillating materials that operate long-term under mild conditions will be introduced.

  12. Teaching Triple Science: GCSE Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learning and Skills Network (NJ3), 2007

    2007-01-01

    The Department for Children, Schools and Families (DCSF) has contracted with the Learning and Skills Network to support awareness and take-up of Triple Science GCSEs through the Triple Science Support Programme. This publication provides an introduction to teaching and learning approaches for the extension topics within GCSE Chemistry. It…

  13. Bulletin of Materials Science | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The studies clearly indicate that the synthesized Y2O3 nanoparticle is a crystalline material with a particle size from 23 to 66 nm. Further analysis ... M Sundrarajan1. Advanced Green Chemistry Lab, Department of Industrial Chemistry, School of Chemical Sciences, Alagappa University, Karaikudi 630 003, Tamil Nadu, India ...

  14. Electronic Materials Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irene, Eugene A.

    2005-02-01

    A thorough introduction to fundamental principles and applications From its beginnings in metallurgy and ceramics, materials science now encompasses such high- tech fields as microelectronics, polymers, biomaterials, and nanotechnology. Electronic Materials Science presents the fundamentals of the subject in a detailed fashion for a multidisciplinary audience. Offering a higher-level treatment than an undergraduate textbook provides, this text benefits students and practitioners not only in electronics and optical materials science, but also in additional cutting-edge fields like polymers and biomaterials. Readers with a basic understanding of physical chemistry or physics will appreciate the text's sophisticated presentation of today's materials science. Instructive derivations of important formulae, usually omitted in an introductory text, are included here. This feature offers a useful glimpse into the foundations of how the discipline understands such topics as defects, phase equilibria, and mechanical properties. Additionally, concepts such as reciprocal space, electron energy band theory, and thermodynamics enter the discussion earlier and in a more robust fashion than in other texts. Electronic Materials Science also features: An orientation towards industry and academia drawn from the author's experience in both arenas Information on applications in semiconductors, optoelectronics, photocells, and nanoelectronics Problem sets and important references throughout Flexibility for various pedagogical needs Treating the subject with more depth than any other introductory text, Electronic Materials Science prepares graduate and upper-level undergraduate students for advanced topics in the discipline and gives scientists in associated disciplines a clear review of the field and its leading technologies.

  15. Many Body Methods from Chemistry to Physics: Novel Computational Techniques for Materials-Specific Modelling: A Computational Materials Science and Chemistry Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millis, Andrew [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2016-11-17

    Understanding the behavior of interacting electrons in molecules and solids so that one can predict new superconductors, catalysts, light harvesters, energy and battery materials and optimize existing ones is the ``quantum many-body problem’’. This is one of the scientific grand challenges of the 21st century. A complete solution to the problem has been proven to be exponentially hard, meaning that straightforward numerical approaches fail. New insights and new methods are needed to provide accurate yet feasible approximate solutions. This CMSCN project brought together chemists and physicists to combine insights from the two disciplines to develop innovative new approaches. Outcomes included the Density Matrix Embedding method, a new, computationally inexpensive and extremely accurate approach that may enable first principles treatment of superconducting and magnetic properties of strongly correlated materials, new techniques for existing methods including an Adaptively Truncated Hilbert Space approach that will vastly expand the capabilities of the dynamical mean field method, a self-energy embedding theory and a new memory-function based approach to the calculations of the behavior of driven systems. The methods developed under this project are now being applied to improve our understanding of superconductivity, to calculate novel topological properties of materials and to characterize and improve the properties of nanoscale devices.

  16. Materials Science Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    The Division of Materials Sciences is located within the Department of Energy in the Office of Basic Energy Sciences. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences reports to the Director of the Office of Energy Research. The Director of this office is appointed by the President with Senate consent. The Director advises the Secretary on the physical research program; monitors the Department's R ampersand D programs; advises the Secretary on management of the laboratories under the jurisdiction of the Department, excluding those that constitute part of the nuclear weapon complex; and advises the Secretary on basic and applied research activities of the Department. The research covers a spectrum of scientific and engineering areas of interest to the Department of Energy and is conducted generally by personnel trained in the disciplines of Solid State Physics, Metallurgy, Ceramics, Chemistry, Polymers and Materials Science. The Materials Sciences Division supports basic research on materials properties and phenomena important to all energy systems. The aim is to provide the necessary base of materials knowledge required to advance the nation's energy programs. This report contains a listing of research underway in FY 1989 together with a convenient index to the Division's programs

  17. Computational Materials Science | Materials Science | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Computational Materials Science Computational Materials Science An image of interconnecting, sphere science capabilities span many research fields and interests. Electronic, Optical, and Transport Properties of Photovoltaic Materials Material properties and defect physics of Si, CdTe, III-V, CIGS, CZTS

  18. Progress report, Chemistry and Materials Division, October 1 to December 31, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Interim research results are reported in solid state science (ion penetration, electron microscopy, radiation damage and metal physics, nuclear methods of analysis), general chemistry (analytical chemistry, hydrogen-water exchange, radioactivity measurements, electrochemistry), physical chemistry (radiation and isotope chemistry), materials science (surface chemistry and metal physics), and university research (deuterium exchange and zirconium alloy properties). (E.C.B.)

  19. Proceedings of the 3rd international symposium on material chemistry in nuclear environment (MATERIAL CHEMISTRY '02)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-03-01

    The volume contains all presented papers during the 3rd International Symposium on Material Chemistry in Nuclear Environment: MATERIAL CHEMISTRY 02 (MC'02), held March 13-15, 2002. The purpose of this symposium is to provide an international forum for the discussion of recent progress in the field of materials chemistry in nuclear environments. This symposium intends to build on the success of the previous symposiums held in Tsukuba in 1992 and 1996. The topics discussed in the symposium MC'02 are Chemical Reaction and Thermodynamics, Degradation Phenomena, New Characterization Technology, Fabrication and New Materials, Composite Materials, Surface Modification, and Computational Science. The 61 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  20. IMPROVING STUDENTS’ GENERIC SKILL IN SCIENCE THROUGH CHEMISTRY LEARNING USING ICT-BASED MEDIA ON REACTION RATE AND OSMOTIC PRESSURE MATERIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mulyani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The research aims to obtain information of improvement students’ generic skills in science through chemistry learning using ICT-based media on reaction rate and osmotic pressure material. This research was designed with quasi-experimental research method, with the design of non-equivalent control group pretest-posttest design. The research subjects were students of class XI and XII one of Madrasah Aliyah Negeri (State Islamic Senior High School in Bandung. Learning process in experiment group were conducted using ICT-based media, whereas in control group conducted by applying laboratory activities. Data were collected through multiple-choice test. The result shows that there was no significant difference of n- gain of students’ generic skill in science between experiment and control group. Therefore it can be concluded that the learning process using ICT-based media can improve students' generic skills in science as well as laboratory-based activities.

  1. Chemistry of high-energy materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klapoetke, Thomas M. [Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ., Muenchen (Germany). Dept. of Chemistry; Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (US). Center of Energetic Concepts Development (CECD)

    2011-07-01

    The graduate-level textbook Chemistry of High-Energy Materials provides an introduction to and an overview of primary and secondary (high) explosives as well as propellant charges, rocket propellants and pyrotechnics. After a brief historical overview, the main classes of energetic materials are discussed systematically. Thermodynamic aspects, as far as relevant to energetic materials, are discussed, as well as modern computational approaches to predict performance and sensitivity parameters. The most important performance criteria such as detonation velocity, detonation pressure and heat of explosion, as well as the relevant sensitivity parameters suc as impact and friction sensitivity and electrostatic discharge sensitivity are explored in detail. Modern aspects of chemical synthesis including lead-free primary explosives and high-nitrogen compounds are also included in this book together with a discussion of high-energy materials for future defense needs. The most important goal of this book, based on a lecture course which has now been held at LMU Munich for over 12 years, is to increase knowledge and know-how in the synthesis and safe handling of high-energy materials. Society needs now as much as ever advanced explosives, propellant charges, rocket propellants and pyrotechnics to meet the demands in defense and engineering. This book is first and foremost aimed at advanced students in chemistry, engineering and materials sciences. However, it is also intended to provide a good introduction to the chemistry of energetic materials and chemical defense technology for scientists in the defense industry and government-run defense organizations. (orig.)

  2. Materials Sciences Division 1990 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-31

    This report is the Materials Sciences Division`s annual report. It contains abstracts describing materials research at the National Center for Electron Microscopy, and for research groups in metallurgy, solid-state physics, materials chemistry, electrochemical energy storage, electronic materials, surface science and catalysis, ceramic science, high tc superconductivity, polymers, composites, and high performance metals.

  3. Materials Sciences Division 1990 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    This report is the Materials Sciences Division's annual report. It contains abstracts describing materials research at the National Center for Electron Microscopy, and for research groups in metallurgy, solid-state physics, materials chemistry, electrochemical energy storage, electronic materials, surface science and catalysis, ceramic science, high tc superconductivity, polymers, composites, and high performance metals.

  4. Materials Sciences Division 1990 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report is the Materials Sciences Division's annual report. It contains abstracts describing materials research at the National Center for Electron Microscopy, and for research groups in metallurgy, solid-state physics, materials chemistry, electrochemical energy storage, electronic materials, surface science and catalysis, ceramic science, high tc superconductivity, polymers, composites, and high performance metals

  5. Research on condensed matter and atomic physics using major experimental facilities and devices: Physics, chemistry, biology. Reports on results. Vol. 2. 3. Solid state physics and materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report in three volumes substantiates the contents of the programme survey published in September 1989. The progress reports cover the following research areas: Vol. I, (1). Atomic and molecular physics - free atoms, molecules, macromolecules, clusters, matrix-isolated atoms and molecules. (2) Physics and chemistry of surfaces and interfaces - epitaxy, surface structure, adsorption, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties, thin films, synthetic layer structure. Vol. II, (3). Solid-state physics, and materials science -structural research, lattice dynamics, magnetic structure and dynamics, electronic states; load; spin and pulse density fluctuations; diffusion and internal motion, defects, unordered systems and liquids. Vol. III, (4). Chemistry - bonding and structure, kinetics and reaction mechanisms, polymer research, analysis and synthesis. (5). Biology, - structure and dynamics of biological macromolecules, membrane and cell biology. (6) Development of methods and instruments - neutron sources, synchrotron sources, special accelerators, research with interlinked systems and devices. (orig.) [de

  6. Analytical chemistry of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1966-01-01

    The second panel on the Analytical Chemistry of Nuclear Materials was organized for two purposes: first, to advise the Seibersdorf Laboratory of the Agency on its future programme, and second, to review the results of the Second International Comparison of routine analysis of trace impurities in uranium and also the action taken as a result of the recommendations of the first panel in 1962. Refs, figs and tabs

  7. Materials Chemistry of Nanoultrasonic Biomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hailin; Zheng, Yuanyi; Chen, Yu

    2017-03-01

    As a special cross-disciplinary research frontier, nanoultrasonic biomedicine refers to the design and synthesis of nanomaterials to solve some critical issues of ultrasound (US)-based biomedicine. The concept of nanoultrasonic biomedicine can also overcome the drawbacks of traditional microbubbles and promote the generation of novel US-based contrast agents or synergistic agents for US theranostics. Here, we discuss the recent developments of material chemistry in advancing the nanoultrasonic biomedicine for diverse US-based bio-applications. We initially introduce the design principles of novel nanoplatforms for serving the nanoultrasonic biomedicine, from the viewpoint of synthetic material chemistry. Based on these principles and diverse US-based bio-application backgrounds, the representative proof-of-concept paradigms on this topic are clarified in detail, including nanodroplet vaporization for intelligent/responsive US imaging, multifunctional nano-contrast agents for US-based multi-modality imaging, activatable synergistic agents for US-based therapy, US-triggered on-demand drug releasing, US-enhanced gene transfection, US-based synergistic therapy on combating the cancer and potential toxicity issue of screening various nanosystems suitable for nanoultrasonic biomedicine. It is highly expected that this novel nanoultrasonic biomedicine and corresponding high performance in US imaging and therapy can significantly promote the generation of new sub-discipline of US-based biomedicine by rationally integrating material chemistry and theranostic nanomedicine with clinical US-based biomedicine. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Materials Science | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    microscopy and imaging science, interfacial and surface science, materials discovery, and thin-film material Science Materials Science Illustration with bottom row showing a ball-and-stick model and top row dense black band. State-of-the-art advances in materials science come from a combination of experiments

  9. Biomolecular Sciences: uniting Biology and Chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, Engel

    2017-01-01

    Biomolecular Sciences: uniting Biology and Chemistry www.rug.nl/research/gbb The scientific discoveries in biomolecular sciences have benefitted enormously from technological innovations. At the Groningen Biomolecular Science and Biotechnology Institute (GBB) we now sequence a genome in days,

  10. Dynamic Processes in Biology, Chemistry, and Materials Science: Opportunities for UltraFast Transmission Electron Microscopy - Workshop Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabius, Bernd C.; Browning, Nigel D.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Diehl, Barbara L.; Stach, Eric A.

    2012-07-25

    mission. This workshop built on previous workshops and included three breakout sessions identifying scientific challenges in biology, biogeochemistry, catalysis, and materials science frontier areas of fundamental science that underpin energy and environmental science that would significantly benefit from ultrafast transmission electron microscopy (UTEM). In addition, the current status of time-resolved electron microscopy was examined, and the technologies that will enable future advances in spatio-temporal resolution were identified in a fourth breakout session.

  11. Positronium chemistry in porous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Y.; Ito, K.; Oka, T.; Hirata, K.

    2007-01-01

    Porous materials have fascinated positron and positronium chemists for over decades. In the early 1970s it was already known that ortho-positronium (o-Ps) exhibits characteristic long lifetimes in silica gels, porous glass and zeolites. Since then, our understanding of Ps formation, diffusion and annihilation has been drastically deepened. Ps is now well recognized as a powerful porosimetric and chemical probe to study the average pore size, pore size distribution, pore connectivity and surface properties of various porous materials including thin films. In this paper, developments of Ps chemistry in porous materials undertaken in the past some 40 yr are surveyed and problems to be addressed in future are briefly discussed

  12. Bulletin of Materials Science | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. V V Deshpande1 M M Patil1 S C Navale2 V Ravi1. Physical and Materials Chemistry Division, National Chemical Laboratory, Pune 411 008, India; Polymer Science and Engineering Division, National Chemical Laboratory, Pune 411 008, India ...

  13. Teaching Chemistry in Primary Science: What Does the Research Suggest?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skamp, Keith

    2011-01-01

    The new Australian national science curriculum includes chemistry content at the primary level. Chemistry for young students is learning about changes in material stuff (matter) and, by implication, of what stuff is made. Pedagogy in this area needs to be guided by research if stepping stones to later learning of chemical ideas are to facilitate…

  14. Analytical chemistry of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1963-01-01

    The last two decades have witnessed an enormous development in chemical analysis. The rapid progress of nuclear energy, of solid-state physics and of other fields of modern industry has extended the concept of purity to limits previously unthought of, and to reach the new dimensions of these extreme demands, entirely new techniques have been invented and applied and old ones have been refined. Recognizing these facts, the International Atomic Energy Agency convened a Panel on Analytical Chemistry of Nuclear Materials to discuss the general problems facing the analytical chemist engaged in nuclear energy development, particularly in newly developing centre and countries, to analyse the represent situation and to advise as to the directions in which research and development appear to be most necessary. The Panel also discussed the analytical programme of the Agency's laboratory at Seibersdorf, where the Agency has already started a programme of international comparison of analytical methods which may lead to the establishment of international standards for many materials of interest. Refs and tabs

  15. A materials informatics approach for crystal chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Chang Sun

    This thesis addresses one of the fundamental questions in materials crystal chemistry, namely why do atoms arrange themselves in the way they do? The ability to broadly design and predict new phases [i.e. crystal structures] can be partly met using concepts that employ phase homologies. Homologous series of compounds are those that seem chemically diverse but can be expressed in terms of a mathematical formula that is capable of producing each chemical member in that crystal structure. A well-established strategy to help discover new compounds -- or at least to try to develop chemical design strategies for discovery -- is to search, organize and classify homologous compounds from known data. These classification schemes are developed with the hope that they can provide sufficient insight to help us forecast with some certainty, specific new phases or compounds. Yet, while the classification schemes (over a dozen have been reported in the last 50 years) have proved to be instructive, mostly in hindsight, but they have had limited impact, if at all, on the a priori design of materials chemistry. The aim of this research project is to develop a totally new approach to the study of chemical complexity in materials science using the tools of information theory and data science, which link diverse and high dimensional data derived from physical modeling and experiments. A very large scale binary AB2 crystallographic database is used as a data platform to develop a new data mining/informatics protocol based on high dimensional recursive partitioning schemes coupled to information theoretic measures to: (1) Identify which type of structure prototype is preferred over another for a given chemistry of compound; (2) discover new classification schemes of structure/chemistry/property relationships that classical homologies do not detect and finally we; (3) Extract and organize the underlying design rules for the formation of a given structure by quantitatively assessing the

  16. Popular Science Articles for Chemistry Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketevan Kupatadze

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The presented paper reviews popular science articles (these articles are published in online magazine “The Teacher” as one of the methods of chemistry teaching. It describes which didactic principles they are in line with and how this type of articles can be used in order to kindle the interest of pupils, students and generally, the readers of other specialties, in chemistry.  The articles review the main topics of inorganic/organic chemistry, biochemistry and ecological chemistry in a simple and entertaining manner. A part of the articles is about "household" chemistry. Chemical topics are related to poetry, literature, history of chemistry or simply, to fun news. The paper delineates the structure of popular science articles and the features of engaging students. It also reviews the teachers' and students' interview results about the usage of popular science articles in chemistry teaching process. The aforementioned pedagogical study revealed that the popular science articles contain useful information not only for the students of other specialties, but also for future biologists and ecologists (having chemistry as a mandatory subject at their universities. The articles are effectively used by teachers on chemistry lessons to kindle students' interest in this subject. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17807/orbital.v9i3.960 

  17. Progress report: Chemistry and Materials Division, 1983 January 1 - June 30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-08-01

    The research progams in solid state science, analytical and physical chemistry and materials science are outlined for the first half of 1983. Studies are being carried out in the areas of surface science, isotope separation and irradiation effects on zirconium

  18. Materials Informatics: Statistical Modeling in Material Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yosipof, Abraham; Shimanovich, Klimentiy; Senderowitz, Hanoch

    2016-12-01

    Material informatics is engaged with the application of informatic principles to materials science in order to assist in the discovery and development of new materials. Central to the field is the application of data mining techniques and in particular machine learning approaches, often referred to as Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship (QSAR) modeling, to derive predictive models for a variety of materials-related "activities". Such models can accelerate the development of new materials with favorable properties and provide insight into the factors governing these properties. Here we provide a comparison between medicinal chemistry/drug design and materials-related QSAR modeling and highlight the importance of developing new, materials-specific descriptors. We survey some of the most recent QSAR models developed in materials science with focus on energetic materials and on solar cells. Finally we present new examples of material-informatic analyses of solar cells libraries produced from metal oxides using combinatorial material synthesis. Different analyses lead to interesting physical insights as well as to the design of new cells with potentially improved photovoltaic parameters. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Science Academies' Refresher Course in Chemistry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-10-25

    Oct 25, 2017 ... Modern College of Arts, Science and Commerce. Ganeshkhind, Pune ... API scores for career advancement. Applications are invited from teachers experience in teaching undergraduate and postgraduate courses in chemistry ...

  20. Integrating UNESCO ICT-Based Instructional Materials in Chemistry Lessons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHARLIE P. NACARIO

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study determined the effectiveness of the lessons in Chemistry integrating UNESCO ICT-based instructional material on the achievement of Chemistry students at Central Bicol State University of Agriculture. It aimed to identify lessons that may be developed integrating UNESCO ICT-based instructional materials, determine the effect of the developed lessons using the material on: conceptual understanding; science process skills; and attitude towards chemistry and gather insights from the experiences of the students and teacher. The study used the single group pretest and posttest experimental design. Descriptive, quantitative and qualitative techniques were also utilized. Quantitative data were taken from the pretest-posttest results on the Test on Conceptual Understanding, Science Process Skills and Chemistry Attitudinaire. Qualitative data were drawn from the experts’ assessment of the developed lessons and research instruments, and the insights of students and teacher. The developed lessons integrating UNESCO ICT-based instructional materials were Atomic Model and Structure, Periodic Table of Elements, Chemical Bonding, and Balancing Chemical Equation. These lessons increased the conceptual understanding of the students by topic and skill from very low mastery to average mastery level. The students have slightly improved along the different science process skills. After teaching the lessons, the students’ attitude also improved. The students became more motivated and interested in Chemistry and the lessons were student centered and entailed teacher’s competence and flexibility in computer use.

  1. chemistry syllabus of the nigeria science curriculum

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    The senior secondary two chemistry course content of the Nigerian science curriculum was assessed ... of the students. In Nigeria, the need to re-examine both what to teach in science and how to teach it led ..... primary school. Our industries ...

  2. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Materials Chemistry Laboratory, Department of Materials Science, Gulbarga University, Gulbarga 585 106, India; Veeco-India Nanotechnology Laboratory, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur, Bangalore 560 064, India; R&D Centre Premier Explosives Pvt. Ltd., Hyderabad 500 015, India ...

  3. Materials Sciences Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    A compilation and index of the ERDA materials sciences program is presented. This compilation is intended for use by administrators, managers, and scientists to help coordinate research and as an aid in selecting new programs

  4. Materials Science Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Dionne

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Materials Science Laboratory (MSL) provides science and engineering services to NASA and Contractor customers at KSC, including those working for the Space Shuttle. International Space Station. and Launch Services Programs. These services include: (1) Independent/unbiased failure analysis (2) Support to Accident/Mishap Investigation Boards (3) Materials testing and evaluation (4) Materials and Processes (M&P) engineering consultation (5) Metrology (6) Chemical analysis (including ID of unknown materials) (7) Mechanical design and fabrication We provide unique solutions to unusual and urgent problems associated with aerospace flight hardware, ground support equipment and related facilities.

  5. Proceedings of the national conference on recent trends in materials chemistry and engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This national conference focuses on the latest trends in materials chemistry and engineering. Materials chemistry unites the diverse disciplines of science seamlessly and underlines the need for a collaborative research. In today's technologically advanced society, the need to extend the wealth of basic knowledge on materials to the solutions of engineering problems is great. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  6. Progress report, Chemistry and Materials Division, October 1 to December 31, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    A summary is given of research largely centering around radiation effects on materials, radiation and analytical chemistry, surface studies, and materials science, esp. zirconium base alloys and their problems and properties in nuclear service. (E.C.B.)

  7. Materials science and engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesuer, D.R.

    1997-02-01

    During FY-96, work within the Materials Science and Engineering Thrust Area was focused on material modeling. Our motivation for this work is to develop the capability to study the structural response of materials as well as material processing. These capabilities have been applied to a broad range of problems, in support of many programs at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. These studies are described in (1) Strength and Fracture Toughness of Material Interfaces; (2) Damage Evolution in Fiber Composite Materials; (3) Flashlamp Envelope Optical Properties and Failure Analysis; (4) Synthesis and Processing of Nanocrystalline Hydroxyapatite; and (5) Room Temperature Creep Compliance of Bulk Kel-E.

  8. Water chemistry and materials degradation in LWR'S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haenninen, H.; Toerroenen, K.; Aaltonen, P.

    1994-01-01

    Water chemistry plays a major role in corrosion, in erosion corrosion and in activity transport in NPPs; it impacts upon the operational safety of LWRs in two main ways: integrity of pressure boundary materials and activity transport and out-of-core radiation fields. A good control of water chemistry can significantly reduce these problems and improve plant safety, but economic pressures are leading to more rigorous operating conditions: fuel burnups are to be increased, higher efficiencies are to be achieved by running at higher temperatures and plant lifetimes are to be extended. Typical water chemistry specifications used in PWR and BWR plants are presented and the chemistry optimization is discussed. The complex interplay of metallurgical, mechanical and environmental factors in environmental sensitive cracking is shown, with details on studies for carbon steels, stainless steels and nickel base alloys. 20 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs

  9. Materials science and architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechthold, Martin; Weaver, James C.

    2017-12-01

    Materiality — the use of various materials in architecture — has been fundamental to the design and construction of buildings, and materials science has traditionally responded to needs formulated by design, engineering and construction professionals. Material properties and processes are shaping buildings and influencing how they perform. The advent of technologies such as digital fabrication, robotics and 3D printing have not only accelerated the development of new construction solutions, but have also led to a renewed interest in materials as a catalyst for novel architectural design. In parallel, materials science has transformed from a field that explains materials to one that designs materials from the bottom up. The conflation of these two trends is giving rise to materials-based design research in which architects, engineers and materials scientists work as partners in the conception of new materials systems and their applications. This Review surveys this development for different material classes (wood, ceramics, metals, concrete, glass, synthetic composites and polymers), with an emphasis on recent trends and innovations.

  10. Materials sciences programs, Fiscal year 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-10-01

    The Division of Materials Sciences is responsible for basic research and research facilities in materials science topics important to the mission of the Department of Energy. The programmatic divisions under the Office of Basic Energy Sciences are Chemical Sciences, Engineering and Geosciences, and Energy Biosciences. Materials Science is an enabling technology. The performance parameters, economics, environmental acceptability and safety of all energy generation, conversion, transmission and conservation technologies are limited by the properties and behavior of materials. The Materials Sciences programs develop scientific understanding of the synergistic relationship among synthesis, processing, structure, properties, behavior, performance and other characteristics of materials. Emphasis is placed on the development of the capability to discover technologically, economically, and environmentally desirable new materials and processes, and the instruments and national user facilities necessary for achieving such progress. Materials Sciences subfields include: physical metallurgy, ceramics, polymers, solid state and condensed matter physics, materials chemistry, surface science and related disciplines where the emphasis is on the science of materials. This report includes program descriptions for 517 research programs including 255 at 14 DOE National Laboratories, 262 research grants (233 of which are at universities), and 29 Small Business Innovation Research Grants. Five cross-cutting indices located at the rear of this book identify all 517 programs according to principal investigator(s), materials, techniques, phenomena, and environment.

  11. Radiation chemistry: basic, strategic or tactical science?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wardman, Peter

    1989-01-01

    The work of Weiss in the 1930s, particularly with Haber, has only recently been recognized to have implications in biology and medicine. Similarly, research in radiation chemistry and the application of the pulse radiolysis technique, for example, have implications far beyond traditional radiation chemistry. Some examples of such research are discussed against a background of categorization into 'basic', 'strategic' or 'tactical' science. Examples discussed include redox properties of free radicals, and the identification and characterization of nitro radicals as intermediates in drug metabolism. Radical reactions often take place in multicomponent systems, and the techniques of radiation chemistry can be used to probe, for example, events occurring at interfaces in micelles. Industrial processes involving radiation are attracting investment, particularly in Japan. (author)

  12. Supramolecular Pharmaceutical Sciences: A Novel Concept Combining Pharmaceutical Sciences and Supramolecular Chemistry with a Focus on Cyclodextrin-Based Supermolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Taishi; Iohara, Daisuke; Motoyama, Keiichi; Arima, Hidetoshi

    2018-01-01

    Supramolecular chemistry is an extremely useful and important domain for understanding pharmaceutical sciences because various physiological reactions and drug activities are based on supramolecular chemistry. However, it is not a major domain in the pharmaceutical field. In this review, we propose a new concept in pharmaceutical sciences termed "supramolecular pharmaceutical sciences," which combines pharmaceutical sciences and supramolecular chemistry. This concept could be useful for developing new ideas, methods, hypotheses, strategies, materials, and mechanisms in pharmaceutical sciences. Herein, we focus on cyclodextrin (CyD)-based supermolecules, because CyDs have been used not only as pharmaceutical excipients or active pharmaceutical ingredients but also as components of supermolecules.

  13. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    University of Mohammed V, Faculty of Sciences, Department of Chemistry, Laboratory of Composite Materials, Polymers and Environment, Avenue Ibn Batouta, P.O. Box 1014, Rabat–Agdal 10106, Morocco; Departamento de Ingeniería Química Industrial y del Medio Ambiente, E.T.S.I. Industriales, Universidad Politécnica ...

  14. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    College of Medicine and Dentistry, James Cook University, Cairns 4878, Australia; Key Laboratory of Applied Chemistry and Nanotechnology at Universities of Jilin Province, Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun 130022, China; Institute of Dental Materials, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou ...

  15. Where Is Earth Science? Mining for Opportunities in Chemistry, Physics, and Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Julie; Ivey, Toni; Puckette, Jim

    2013-01-01

    The Earth sciences are newly marginalized in K-12 classrooms. With few high schools offering Earth science courses, students' exposure to the Earth sciences relies on the teacher's ability to incorporate Earth science material into a biology, chemistry, or physics course. ''G.E.T. (Geoscience Experiences for Teachers) in the Field'' is an…

  16. Advances in materials science, metals and ceramics division. Triannual progress report, June-September 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truhan, J.J.; Hopper, R.W.; Gordon, K.M.

    1980-01-01

    Information is presented concerning the magnetic fusion energy program; the laser fusion energy program; geothermal research; nuclear waste management; Office of Basic Energy Sciences (OBES) research; diffusion in silicate minerals; chemistry research resources; and chemistry and materials science research

  17. Interfacial and Surface Science | Materials Science | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science group within the Material Science Center. He oversees research studies of surfaces and interfaces Interfacial and Surface Science Interfacial and Surface Science Image of irregular-outlined, light address a broad range of fundamental and applied issues in surface and interfacial science that are

  18. Lasers in materials science

    CERN Document Server

    Ossi, Paolo; Zhigilei, Leonid

    2014-01-01

    This book covers various aspects of lasers in materials science, including a comprehensive overview on basic principles of laser-materials interactions and applications enabled by pulsed laser systems.  The material is organized in a coherent way, providing the reader with a harmonic architecture. While systematically covering the major current and emerging areas of lasers processing applications, the Volume provides examples of targeted modification of material properties achieved through careful control of the processing conditions and laser irradiation parameters. Special emphasis is placed on specific strategies aimed at nanoscale control of material structure and properties to match the stringent requirements of modern applications.  Laser fabrication of novel nanomaterials, which expands to the domains of photonics, photovoltaics, sensing, and biomedical applications, is also discussed in the Volume. This book assembles chapters based on lectures delivered at the Venice International School on Lasers...

  19. Flow chemistry meets advanced functional materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Rebecca M; Fitzpatrick, Daniel E; Turner, Richard M; Ley, Steven V

    2014-09-22

    Flow chemistry and continuous processing techniques are beginning to have a profound impact on the production of functional materials ranging from quantum dots, nanoparticles and metal organic frameworks to polymers and dyes. These techniques provide robust procedures which not only enable accurate control of the product material's properties but they are also ideally suited to conducting experiments on scale. The modular nature of flow and continuous processing equipment rapidly facilitates reaction optimisation and variation in function of the products. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Material chemistry challenges in vitrification of high level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushik, C.P.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear technology with an affective environmental management plan and focused attention on safety measures is a much cleaner source of electricity generation as compared to other sources. With this perspective, India has undertaken nuclear energy program to share substantial part of future need of power. Safe containment and isolation of nuclear waste from human environment is an indispensable part of this programme. Majority of radioactivity in the entire nuclear fuel cycle is high level radioactive liquid waste (HLW), which is getting generated during reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels. A three stage strategy for management of HLW has been adopted in India. This involves (i) immobilization of waste oxides in stable and inert solid matrices, (ii) interim retrievable storage of the conditioned waste product under continuous cooling and (iii) disposal in deep geological formation. Borosilicate glass matrix has been adopted in India for immobilization of HLW. Material issue are very important during the entire process of waste immobilization. Performance of the materials used in nuclear waste management determines its safety/hazards. Material chemistry therefore has a significant bearing on immobilization science and its technological development for management of HLW. The choice of suitable waste form to deploy for nuclear waste immobilization is difficult decision and the durability of the conditioned product is not the sole criterion. In any immobilization process, where radioactive materials are involved, the process and operational conditions play an important role in final selection of a suitable glass formulation. In remotely operated vitrification process, study of chemistry of materials like glass, melter, materials of construction of other equipment under high temperature and hostile corrosive condition assume significance for safe and un-interrupted vitrification of radioactive to ensure its isolation waste from human environment. The present

  1. Materials Discovery | Materials Science | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Discovery Materials Discovery Images of red and yellow particles NREL's research in materials characterization of sample by incoming beam and measuring outgoing particles, with data being stored and analyzed Staff Scientist Dr. Zakutayev specializes in design of novel semiconductor materials for energy

  2. Russian science readings (chemistry, physics, biology)

    CERN Document Server

    Light, L

    1949-01-01

    Some years' experience in teaching Russian to working scientists who had already acquired the rudiments of the grammar convinced me of the need for a reader of the present type that would smooth the path of those wishing to study Russian scientific literature in the original. Although the subject matter comprises what I have described for convenience as chemistry, physics and biology, it could be read with equal profit by those engaged in any branch of pure or applied science. All the passages are taken from school textbooks, and acknowledgements are due to the authors of the works listed at the foot of the contents page.

  3. Shock-induced chemistry in organic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dattelbaum, Dana M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sheffield, Steve [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Engelke, Ray [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Manner, Virginia [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chellappa, Raja [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yoo, Choong - Shik [WASHINGTON STATE UNIV

    2011-01-20

    The combined 'extreme' environments of high pressure, temperature, and strain rates, encountered under shock loading, offer enormous potential for the discovery of new paradigms in chemical reactivity not possible under more benign conditions. All organic materials are expected to react under these conditions, yet we currently understand very little about the first bond-breaking steps behind the shock front, such as in the shock initiation of explosives, or shock-induced reactivity of other relevant materials. Here, I will present recent experimental results of shock-induced chemistry in a variety of organic materials under sustained shock conditions. A comparison between the reactivity of different structures is given, and a perspective on the kinetics of reaction completion under shock drives.

  4. Computational materials chemistry for carbon capture using porous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Abhishek; Malani, Ateeque; Huang, Runhong; Babarao, Ravichandar

    2017-01-01

    Control over carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) release is extremely important to decrease its hazardous effects on the environment such as global warming, ocean acidification, etc. For CO 2 capture and storage at industrial point sources, nanoporous materials offer an energetically viable and economically feasible approach compared to chemisorption in amines. There is a growing need to design and synthesize new nanoporous materials with enhanced capability for carbon capture. Computational materials chemistry offers tools to screen and design cost-effective materials for CO 2 separation and storage, and it is less time consuming compared to trial and error experimental synthesis. It also provides a guide to synthesize new materials with better properties for real world applications. In this review, we briefly highlight the various carbon capture technologies and the need of computational materials design for carbon capture. This review discusses the commonly used computational chemistry-based simulation methods for structural characterization and prediction of thermodynamic properties of adsorbed gases in porous materials. Finally, simulation studies reported on various potential porous materials, such as zeolites, porous carbon, metal organic frameworks (MOFs) and covalent organic frameworks (COFs), for CO 2 capture are discussed. (topical review)

  5. Materials sciences programs: Fiscal year 1994

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-04-01

    The Division of Materials Sciences is located within the DOE in the Office of Basic Energy Sciences. The Division of Materials Sciences is responsible for basic research and research facilities in strategic materials science topics of critical importance to the mission of the Department and its Strategic Plan. Materials Science is an enabling technology. The performance parameters, economics, environmental acceptability and safety of all energy generation, conversion, transmission and conservation technologies are limited by the properties and behavior of materials. The Materials Sciences programs develop scientific understanding of the synergistic relationship amongst the synthesis, processing, structure, properties, behavior, performance and other characteristics of materials. Emphasis is placed on the development of the capability to discover technologically, economically, and environmentally desirable new materials and processes, and the instruments and national user facilities necessary for achieving such progress. Materials Sciences sub-fields include physical metallurgy, ceramics, polymers, solid state and condensed matter physics, materials chemistry, surface science and related disciplines where the emphasis is on the science of materials. This report includes program descriptions for 458 research programs including 216 at 14 DOE National Laboratories, 242 research grants (233 for universities), and 9 Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Grants. The report is divided into eight sections. Section A contains all Laboratory projects, Section B has all contract research projects, Section C has projects funded under the SBIR Program, Section D describes the Center of Excellence for the Synthesis and Processing of Advanced Materials and E has information on major user facilities. F contains descriptions of other user facilities; G, a summary of funding levels; and H, indices characterizing research projects.

  6. Materials sciences programs, fiscal year 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    The Division of Materials Sciences is located within the DOE in the Office of Basic Energy Sciences. The Division of Materials Sciences is responsible for basic research and research facilities in strategic materials science topics of critical importance to the mission of the Department and its Strategic Plan. Materials Science is an enabling technology. The performance parameters, economics, environmental acceptability and safety of all energy generation, conversion, transmission and conservation technologies are limited by the properties and behavior of materials. The Materials Sciences programs develop scientific understanding of the synergistic relationship amongst the synthesis, processing, structure, properties, behavior, performance and other characteristics of materials. Emphasis is placed on the development of the capability to discover technologically, economically, and environmentally desirable new materials and processes, and the instruments and national user facilities necessary for achieving such progress. Materials Sciences sub-fields include physical metallurgy, ceramics, polymers, solid state and condensed matter physics, materials chemistry, surface science and related disciplines where the emphasis is on the science of materials. This report includes program descriptions for 458 research programs including 216 at 14 DOE National Laboratories, 242 research grants (233 for universities), and 9 Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Grants. The report is divided into eight sections. Section A contains all Laboratory projects, Section B has all contract research projects, Section C has projects funded under the SBIR Program, Section D describes the Center of Excellence for the Synthesis and Processing of Advanced Materials and E has information on major user facilities. F contains descriptions of other user facilities; G, a summary of funding levels; and H, indices characterizing research projects

  7. Materials sciences programs, fiscal year 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    The Division of Materials Sciences is located within the DOE in the Office of Basic Energy Sciences. The Division of Materials Sciences is responsible for basic research and research facilities in strategic materials science topics of critical importance to the mission of the Department and its Strategic Plan. Materials Science is an enabling technology. The performance parameters, economics, environmental acceptability and safety of all energy generation, conversion, transmission and conservation technologies are limited by the properties and behavior of materials. The Materials Sciences programs develop scientific understanding of the synergistic relationship amongst the synthesis, processing, structure, properties, behavior, performance and other characteristics of materials. Emphasis is placed on the development of the capability to discover technologically, economically, and environmentally desirable new materials and processes, and the instruments and national user facilities necessary for achieving such progress. Materials Sciences sub-fields include physical metallurgy, ceramics, polymers, solid state and condensed matter physics, materials chemistry, surface science and related disciplines where the emphasis is on the science of materials. This report includes program descriptions for 458 research programs including 216 at 14 DOE National Laboratories, 242 research grants (233 for universities), and 9 Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Grants. The report is divided into eight sections. Section A contains all Laboratory projects, Section B has all contract research projects, Section C has projects funded under the SBIR Program, Section D describes the Center of Excellence for the Synthesis and Processing of Advanced Materials and E has information on major user facilities. F contains descriptions of other user facilities; G, a summary of funding levels; and H, indices characterizing research projects.

  8. Feasibility of Integration of Selected Aspects of (CBA) Chemistry, (CHEMS) Chemistry and (PSSC) Physics into a Two Year Physical Science Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiasca, Michael Aldo

    Compared, for selected outcomes, were integrated chemistry-physics courses with chemistry and physics courses taught separately. Three classes studying integrated Physical Science Study Committee (PSSC)-Chemical Bond Approach (CBA), and three classes studying integrated Physical Science Study Committee-Chemical Education Materials Study (CHEMS)…

  9. Bend It, Stretch It, Hammer It, Break It: Materials Chemistry Applied

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, Grace A.; Retsek, Jennifer; Berber-Jimenez, Lola; Barber, Nicole; Coles, Monica; Fintikakis, Christina; Huigens, Brent

    2010-01-01

    Making chemistry both accessible and interesting to middle and high school students can be difficult. Convincing middle and high school teachers that they will learn something new and applicable from a professional development workshop in chemistry can be equally challenging. This paper describes the use of material science as a means to enhance…

  10. On the coordination chemistry of humic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grauer, R.

    1989-01-01

    Dissolved humic materials form ligands which can influence the speciation of certain radionuclides in natural waters and it is necessary to take account of this phenomenon in repository safety assessment model calculations. There are no models available which give a basic description of the wide range of complexation properties of humic materials with dissolved metals and which are based on a chemically meaningful background. All of these models make very drastic simplifications and, although capable of reproducing experimental data, they do not allow any extrapolation to ranges of concentration outside those covered by the experiments. Humic materials affect not only the solution chemistry of the metals but also their sorption onto minerals. The mineral surfaces are modified through adsorption of organic material which in turn alters their sorption properties. These processes are understood in qualitative terms. It is unlikely that a comprehensive predictive model of complexation by humic materials will be available in the foreseeable future. It is therefore suggested that experiments which provide an empirical description of the metal/humic material interaction using realistic pH values and metal/ligand ratios be carried out. Besides parameter studies and experiments in synthetic or formation waters, analogue studies could also serve as a useful tool. 132 refs., 51 figs., 12 tabs

  11. Application of Chemistry in Materials Research at NASA GRC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavandi, Janet L.

    2016-01-01

    Overview of NASA GRC Materials Development. New materials enabled by new chemistries offering unique properties and chemical processing techniques. Durability of materials in harsh environments requires understanding and modeling of chemical interaction of materials with the environment.

  12. 2002 Microgravity Materials Science Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Donald (Editor); Ramachandran, Narayanan (Editor); Murphy, Karen (Editor); McCauley, Dannah (Editor); Bennett, Nancy (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    The 2002 Microgravity Materials Science Conference was held June 25-26, 2002, at the Von Braun Center, Huntsville, Alabama. Organized by the Microgravity Materials Science Discipline Working Group, sponsored by the Physical Sciences Research Division, NASA Headquarters, and hosted by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and member institutions under the Cooperative Research in Biology and Materials Science (CORBAMS) agreement, the conference provided a forum to review the current research and activities in materials science, discuss the envisioned long-term goals, highlight new crosscutting research areas of particular interest to the Physical Sciences Research Division, and inform the materials science community of research opportunities in reduced gravity. An abstracts book was published and distributed at the conference to the approximately 240 people attending, who represented industry, academia, and other NASA Centers. This CD-ROM proceedings is comprised of the research reports submitted by the Principal Investigators in the Microgravity Materials Science program.

  13. Actinide separation chemistry in nuclear waste streams and materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-12-01

    The separation of actinide elements from various waste materials, produced either in nuclear fuel cycles or in past nuclear weapons production, represents a significant issue facing developed countries. Improvements in the efficiencies of the separation processes can be expected to occur as a result of better knowledge of the elements in these complex matrices. The Nuclear Science Committee of the OECD/NEA has established a task force of experts in actinide separation chemistry to review current and developing separation techniques and chemical processes. The report consist of eight chapters. In Chapter 1 the importance of actinide separation chemistry in the fields of waste management and its background are summarized.In Chapter 2 the types of waste streams are classified according to their relative importance, by physical form and by source of actinides. The basic data of actinide chemical thermodynamics, such as oxidation states, hydrolysis, complexation, sorption, Gibbs energies of formation, and volatility, were collected and are presented in Chapter 3. Actinide analyses related to separation processes are also mentioned in this chapter. The state of the art of actinide separation chemistry is classified in three groups, including hydrometallurgy, pyrochemical process and process based on fields, and is described in Chapter 4 along with the relationship of kinetics to separations. In Chapter 5 basic chemistry research needs and the inherent limitation on separation processes are discussed. Prioritization of research and development is discussed in Chapter 6 in the context of several attributes of waste management problems. These attributes include: mass or volume of waste; concentration of the actinide in the waste; expected difficulty of treating the wastes; short-term hazard of the waste; long-term hazard of the waste; projected cost of treatment; amount of secondary waste. Based on the priority, recommendations were made for the direction of future research

  14. Actinide separation chemistry in nuclear waste streams and materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    The separation of actinide elements from various waste materials, produced either in nuclear fuel cycles or in past nuclear weapons production, represents a significant issue facing developed countries. Improvements in the efficiencies of the separation processes can be expected to occur as a result of better knowledge of the elements in these complex matrices. The Nuclear Science Committee of the OECD/NEA has established a task force of experts in actinide separation chemistry to review current and developing separation techniques and chemical processes. The report consist of eight chapters. In Chapter 1 the importance of actinide separation chemistry in the fields of waste management and its background are summarized.In Chapter 2 the types of waste streams are classified according to their relative importance, by physical form and by source of actinides. The basic data of actinide chemical thermodynamics, such as oxidation states, hydrolysis, complexation, sorption, Gibbs energies of formation, and volatility, were collected and are presented in Chapter 3. Actinide analyses related to separation processes are also mentioned in this chapter. The state of the art of actinide separation chemistry is classified in three groups, including hydrometallurgy, pyrochemical process and process based on fields, and is described in Chapter 4 along with the relationship of kinetics to separations. In Chapter 5 basic chemistry research needs and the inherent limitation on separation processes are discussed. Prioritization of research and development is discussed in Chapter 6 in the context of several attributes of waste management problems. These attributes include: mass or volume of waste; concentration of the actinide in the waste; expected difficulty of treating the wastes; short-term hazard of the waste; long-term hazard of the waste; projected cost of treatment; amount of secondary waste. Based on the priority, recommendations were made for the direction of future research

  15. Annual review of materials science. Volume 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huggins, R.A.; Bube, R.H.; Roberts, R.W.

    1977-01-01

    A review is presented of recent materials science research. Topics covered include: point defects and their interaction; defect chemistry in crystalline solids; deep level impurities in semiconductors; structural aspects of one-dimensional conductors; structural transformations during aging of metal alloys; high rate thick film growth; metal forming, the application of limit analysis; kinetics and mechanisms of gas-metal interactions; erosion; reversible temper embrittlement; acoustic emission in brittle materials; capacitance transient spectroscopy; hot corrosion of high-temperature alloys; fundamental optical phenomena in infrared window materials; dental amalgam; and transparent conducting coatings

  16. Teacher's Guide to SERAPHIM Software V. Chemistry: The Central Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogner, Donna J.

    Designed to assist chemistry teachers in selecting appropriate software programs, this publication is the fifth in a series of six teacher's guides from Project SERAPHIM, a program sponsored by the National Science Foundation. This guide is keyed to the chapters of the text "Chemistry: The Central Science." Program suggestions are…

  17. Berkeley Lab - Materials Sciences Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    , which aims to showcase some of the latest material science and metallurgy content published in the Synthesis Condensed Matter and Materials Physics Scattering and Instrumentation Science Centers Center for intrinsically consist of atomic rotation Scientists Discover Material Ideal for Smart Photovoltaic Windows A

  18. Contribution of radiation chemistry to cluster science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belloni, J.

    2006-01-01

    Nanoclusters are small objects made of a few atoms, with a size of a few nanometers at most, which constitute a state of matter, named mesoscopic, intermediary between the atom and the bulk metal. In the 70's, radiation chemistry experiments have demonstrated that metal clusters exhibited indeed, due to their very small size, specific properties distinct from the bulk metal. The properties, physical and chemical, change with the number of atoms they contain. Their optical absorption spectrum, for example, as well as their redox potential, depends on the nuclearity, and also on the environment. Radiation chemistry methods have been proven to be of high potentiality to induce small and size-monodispersed metal clusters, as nanocolloids or supported on various materials. Pulse radiolysis provides the means to study the dynamics of nucleation and growth of clusters, monoand bi-metallic, from the monomers to the stable nanoparticle and to observe directly their reactivity, especially to determine during the growth their nuclearity-dependent properties, such as the redox potential. These are of crucial importance for the understanding of the mechanism of the cluster growth itself, in the radiation-induced as well as in the chemical or photochemical reduction processes, and also of the mechanism of certain catalytic reactions. (authors)

  19. Islam - Science Integration Approach in Developing Chemistry Individualized Education Program (IEP for Students with Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamil Suprihatiningrum

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper is based on a research which tries to explore, explain and describe Islam - science integration approach to develop an Individualized Education Program (IEP for students with disabilities in chemistry lesson. As a qualitative case study, this paper is aimed at investigating how Islam - science integration approach can be underpinned for developing the IEP for Chemistry. Participants were recruited purposively and data were collected by interviews; documents’ analysis; and experts’ assessment (i.e. material experts, inclusive education experts, media experts, chemistry teachers and support teachers, then analyzed using content-analysis. The result shows Islam - science integration approach can be a foundation to develop the chemistry IEP by seeking support for the verses of the Qur'an and corresponding hadiths. Even although almost all the subject matter in chemistry can be integrated with Islamic values, this study only developed two contents, namely Periodic System of Elements and Reaction Rate.

  20. Synthesis of a Self-Healing Polymer Based on Reversible Diels-Alder Reaction: An Advanced Undergraduate Laboratory at the Interface of Organic Chemistry and Materials Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weizman, Haim; Nielsen, Christian; Weizman, Or S.; Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    2011-01-01

    This laboratory experiment exposes students to the chemistry of self-healing polymers based on a Diels-Alder reaction. Students accomplish a multistep synthesis of a monomer building block and then polymerize it to form a cross-linked polymer. The healing capability of the polymer is verified by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) experiments.…

  1. Thin-Film Material Science and Processing | Materials Science | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thin-Film Material Science and Processing Thin-Film Material Science and Processing Photo of a , a prime example of this research is thin-film photovoltaics (PV). Thin films are important because cadmium telluride thin film, showing from top to bottom: glass, transparent conducting oxide (thin layer

  2. Progress report: Chemistry and Materials Division, 1982 April 1 - June 30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-08-01

    The work of the division in the areas of solid state studies, radiation chemistry, isotope separation, analytical chemistry and materials science is described. The solid state science group studied solute atom vacancy trapping in irradiated f.c.c. alloys as well as the rearrangement of atoms in solids bombarded by energetic heavy ions. In radiation chemistry, work was done on the pulse radiolysis of NO in argon. Isotope separation studies were done on fluoroform and uranium. Fuel burnup determination using 148 Nd and 139 La was investigated. Zirconium alloy studies included work on stress corrosion cracking and the Baushinger effect

  3. Social representations of nutrition: proposal production of teaching materials chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Ventura Fonseca

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present the stages of production of didactic material of Chemistry (thematic unit on nutrition, and the results of its application in a classroom of basic education. The research was developed in a public school in Rio Grande do Sul, where the researcher acted exploring their own teaching practice, with reference to the records held in his field journal and written productions of the learners. The work is focused on the research, through a questionnaire, social representations of the students, who guided the topics to be addressed in the thematic unit as well as the effects of this focus on the dynamics of teaching. In addition, other actions have been implemented, such as the analysis of the relationship between the subject of nutrition and chemical knowledge presented by textbooks of Chemistry, the research field of Education in Chemistry / Science and the guiding documents of high school. It was found that, considered to be the organization of representations of students in an educational environment problem-solving, the ability to interact with the same scientific concepts was enhanced, facilitating learning processes.

  4. Materials Science and Technology Teachers Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieda, Karen J.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Bliss, Mary; Pitman, Stan G.; Eschbach, Eugene A.

    2008-09-04

    The Materials Science and Technology (MST) Handbook was developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, in Richland, Washington, under support from the U.S. Department of Energy. Many individuals have been involved in writing and reviewing materials for this project since it began at Richland High School in 1986, including contributions from educators at the Northwest Regional Education Laboratory, Central Washington University, the University of Washington, teachers from Northwest Schools, and science and education personnel at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Support for its development was also provided by the U.S. Department of Education. This introductory course combines the academic disciplines of chemistry, physics, and engineering to create a materials science and technology curriculum. The course covers the fundamentals of ceramics, glass, metals, polymers and composites. Designed to appeal to a broad range of students, the course combines hands-on activities, demonstrations and long term student project descriptions. The basic philosophy of the course is for students to observe, experiment, record, question, seek additional information, and, through creative and insightful thinking, solve problems related to materials science and technology. The MST Teacher Handbook contains a course description, philosophy, student learning objectives, and instructional approach and processes. Science and technology teachers can collaborate to build the course from their own interests, strengths, and experience while incorporating existing school and community resources. The course is intended to meet local educational requirements for technology, vocational and science education.

  5. Application of cluster computing in materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzmin, A.

    2006-01-01

    Solution of many problems in materials science requires that high performance computing (HPC) be used. Therefore, a cluster computer, Latvian Super-cluster (LASC), was constructed at the Institute of Solid State Physics of the University of Latvia in 2002. The LASC is used for advanced research in the fields of quantum chemistry, solid state physics and nano materials. In this work we overview currently available computational technologies and exemplify their application by interpretation of x-ray absorption spectra for nano-sized ZnO. (author)

  6. Mathematical Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Trinajstić, Nenad; Gutman, Ivan

    2002-01-01

    A brief description is given of the historical development of mathematics and chemistry. A path leading to the meeting of these two sciences is described. An attempt is made to define mathematical chemistry, and journals containing the term mathematical chemistry in their titles are noted. In conclusion, the statement is made that although chemistry is an experimental science aimed at preparing new compounds and materials, mathematics is very useful in chemistry, among other things, to produc...

  7. Bayesian optimization for materials science

    CERN Document Server

    Packwood, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a short and concise introduction to Bayesian optimization specifically for experimental and computational materials scientists. After explaining the basic idea behind Bayesian optimization and some applications to materials science in Chapter 1, the mathematical theory of Bayesian optimization is outlined in Chapter 2. Finally, Chapter 3 discusses an application of Bayesian optimization to a complicated structure optimization problem in computational surface science. Bayesian optimization is a promising global optimization technique that originates in the field of machine learning and is starting to gain attention in materials science. For the purpose of materials design, Bayesian optimization can be used to predict new materials with novel properties without extensive screening of candidate materials. For the purpose of computational materials science, Bayesian optimization can be incorporated into first-principles calculations to perform efficient, global structure optimizations. While re...

  8. Bulletin of Materials Science | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050, China; School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Institute of Technology, Shanghai 200235, China; Department of Physics, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444, China; State Key Laboratory of Crystal Material, Shandong ...

  9. Teaching materials science and engineering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. This paper is written with the intention of simulating discussion on teaching materials science and engineering in the universities. The article illustrates the tasks, priorities, goals and means lying ahead in the teaching of materials science and engineering for a sustainable future.

  10. Bulletin of Materials Science | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. M K Rabinal. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 35 Issue 4 August 2012 pp 529-532. An optical tweezer-based study of antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles · Yogesha Sarbari Bhattacharya M K Rabinal Sharath Ananthamurthy · More Details Abstract ...

  11. development of low-cost educational materials for chemistry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    unesco

    development of low-cost Chemistry materials from locally available materials. It finally lists the ... According to the World Bank discussion paper (3) large investments have been made to improve the .... official language in Ethiopia) and English.

  12. Chemistry and Nanoscience Research | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemistry and Nanoscience Center at NREL investigates materials and processes for converting renewable and new technologies. NREL's primary research in the chemistry and nanoscience center includes the Electrochemical Engineering and Materials Chemistry Providing a knowledge base in materials science covering

  13. Synthetic Approach to biomolecular science by cyborg supramolecular chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Kensuke; Matsuo, Muneyuki; Yamaguchi, Takumi; Sato, Sota

    2018-02-01

    To imitate the essence of living systems via synthetic chemistry approaches has been attempted. With the progress in supramolecular chemistry, it has become possible to synthesize molecules of a size and complexity close to those of biomacromolecules. Recently, the combination of precisely designed supramolecules with biomolecules has generated structural platforms for designing and creating unique molecular systems. Bridging between synthetic chemistry and biomolecular science is also developing methodologies for the creation of artificial cellular systems. This paper provides an overview of the recently expanding interdisciplinary research to fuse artificial molecules with biomolecules, that can deepen our understanding of the dynamical ordering of biomolecules. Using bottom-up approaches based on the precise chemical design, synthesis and hybridization of artificial molecules with biological materials have been realizing the construction of sophisticated platforms having the fundamental functions of living systems. The effective hybrid, molecular cyborg, approaches enable not only the establishment of dynamic systems mimicking nature and thus well-defined models for biophysical understanding, but also the creation of those with highly advanced, integrated functions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Biophysical Exploration of Dynamical Ordering of Biomolecular Systems" edited by Dr. Koichi Kato. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Bulletin of Materials Science

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Low temperature preparation of some perovskites La2MM'O6 (M,M'=Cr,Mn,Fe ... Inorganic materials for optical data storage -- S K Date ... Dielectric and polarization studies on some organic materials -- B jagannadh and Lalitha Sirdeshmukh.

  15. Contributions to materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asbeck, O.W.; Matucha, K.H.

    1989-01-01

    The ten papers presented at a festive colloquium held on November 14, 1988 in Frankfurt to honour Prof. Peter Wincierz deal with the texture and mechanical anisotropy of zirconium alloys (by E. Tenckhoff), materials for cladding tubes (H. Boehm), aluminium materials achieved by near technology (W. Bunk), dispersion-strengthened materials (H. Fischmeister), materials for plain bearings (K.H. Matucha), and the archeometallurgy of copper (H.-G. Bachmann). (MM) [de

  16. New Pathways for Teaching Chemistry: Reflective Judgment in Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finster, David C.

    1992-01-01

    The reflective judgment model offers a rich context for analysis of science and science teaching. It provides deeper understanding of the scientific process and its critical thinking and reveals fundamental connections between science and the other liberal arts. Classroom techniques from a college chemistry course illustrate the utility of the…

  17. Building Bridges between Science Courses Using Honors Organic Chemistry Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Timothy; Pontrello, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Introductory undergraduate science courses are traditionally offered as distinct units without formalized student interaction between classes. To bridge science courses, the authors used three Honors Organic Chemistry projects paired with other science courses. The honors students delivered presentations to mainstream organic course students and…

  18. Prospective Chemistry and Science Teachers' Views and Metaphors about Chemistry and Chemical Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onen Ozturk, Fatma; Aglarci, Oya

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine the metaphors created by prospective chemistry and science teachers and their views about how the studies in the field of chemistry are carried out in relation to the grade level and department. Research Methods: Case study as a qualitative research design was used. Participants in the study included…

  19. Cathodoluminescence | Materials Science | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    shown on a computer screen; the image of a sample semiconductor material appears as a striated oval material sample shown above; the image is a high-contrast light and dark oval on a dark background and was top left of copper indium gallium selenide semiconductor material sample; the image is shown on a

  20. Chemistry----A Central Science.pdf

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    Chemistry is a big part of our everyday life. We can find chemistry in daily life, the foods we eat, the air we breathe, cleaning chemicals, our emotions and literally every object we can see or touch.  

  1. Materials science challenges in paintings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Philippe; de Viguerie, Laurence

    2018-01-23

    Through the paintings of the old masters, we showcase how materials science today provides us with a vision of the processes involved in the creation of a work of art: the choice of materials, the painter's skill in handling these materials, and the perception of the finished work.

  2. Materials science challenges in paintings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Philippe; de Viguerie, Laurence

    2018-02-01

    Through the paintings of the old masters, we showcase how materials science today provides us with a vision of the processes involved in the creation of a work of art: the choice of materials, the painter's skill in handling these materials, and the perception of the finished work.

  3. Materials science symposium 'heavy ion science in tandem energy region'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamoto, Akira; Yoshida, Tadashi; Takeuchi, Suehiro

    2001-11-01

    The facility of the JAERI tandem accelerator and its booster has been contributing to obtain plenty of fruitful results in the fields of nuclear physics, nuclear chemistry, atomic and solid state physics and materials science, taking an advantage of its prominent performances of heavy ion acceleration. The previous meeting held in 1999 also offered an opportunity to scientists from all over the heavy ion science fields, including nuclear physics, solid state physics and cross-field physics to have active discussions. This meeting included oral presentations with a new plan and with a new scope of fields expected from now on, as an occasion for opening the 21st century in heavy ion science. The 50 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  4. NASA Microgravity Materials Science Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, D. C. (Compiler); McCauley, D. E. (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    The Microgravity Materials Science Conference was held July 14-16, 1998 at the Von Braun Center in Huntsville, AL. It was organized by the Microgravity Materials Science Discipline Working Group, sponsored by the Microgravity Research Division at NASA Headquarters, and hosted by the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the Alliance for Microgravity Materials Science and Applications. It was the third NASA conference of this type in the microgravity materials science discipline. The microgravity science program sponsored approximately 125 investigations and 100 principal investigators in FY98, almost all of whom made oral or poster presentations at this conference. The conference's purpose was to inform the materials science community of research opportunities in reduced gravity in preparation for a NASA Research Announcement scheduled for release in late 1998 by the Microgravity Research Division at NASA Headquarters. The conference was aimed at materials science researchers from academia, industry, and government. A tour of the Marshall Space Flight Center microgravity research facilities was held on July 16, 1998. This volume is comprised of the research reports submitted by the principal investigators after the conference.

  5. Surface analysis methods in materials science

    CERN Document Server

    Sexton, Brett; Smart, Roger

    1992-01-01

    The idea for this book stemmed from a remark by Philip Jennings of Murdoch University in a discussion session following a regular meeting of the Australian Surface Science group. He observed that a text on surface analysis and applica­ tions to materials suitable for final year undergraduate and postgraduate science students was not currently available. Furthermore, the members of the Australian Surface Science group had the research experience and range of coverage of sur­ face analytical techniques and applications to provide a text for this purpose. A of techniques and applications to be included was agreed at that meeting. The list intended readership of the book has been broadened since the early discussions, particularly to encompass industrial users, but there has been no significant alter­ ation in content. The editors, in consultation with the contributors, have agreed that the book should be prepared for four major groups of readers: - senior undergraduate students in chemistry, physics, metallur...

  6. Bulletin of Materials Science | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 39; Issue 1 .... Na + /B 3 + phosphor has a potential application in white light-emitting diodes based ... College of Mathematics and Physics, Jinggangshan University, Ji'an 343009, China ...

  7. Bulletin of Materials Science | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 38; Issue 3 ... In this study, a modified model for the application of the thermionic and hopping current ... Departments of Mathematics and Physics, Arab American University, Jenin 240, ...

  8. Moessbauer Spectroscopy in Materials Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The publication in electronic form has been set up as proceedings of the conference dealing with applications of the Moessbauer spectroscopy in material science. Twenty-three abstracts and twenty-two presentations are included.

  9. Supramolecular chemistry - interdisciplinary branch of science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radecka-Paryzek, W.

    1997-01-01

    The scientific problems connected with supramolecular chemistry have been reviewed. The basic concepts have been defined as well as rules governed of macromolecules formation. The special emphasize has been put on present and possible in future application of such systems

  10. Bulletin of Materials Science | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 40; Issue 1 ... I D S – V b g branches in accordance with the SERS results and humidity responses. ... Ni˘gde University, Graduate School Natural and Applied Sciences, Ni˘gde 51240, ...

  11. Introduction Of Computational Materials Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jun Geun

    2006-08-01

    This book gives, descriptions of computer simulation, computational materials science, typical three ways of computational materials science, empirical methods ; molecular dynamics such as potential energy, Newton's equation of motion, data production and analysis of results, quantum mechanical methods like wave equation, approximation, Hartree method, and density functional theory, dealing of solid such as pseudopotential method, tight-binding methods embedded atom method, Car-Parrinello method and combination simulation.

  12. Chemistry of high-energy materials. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klapoetke, Thomas M. [Munich Univ. (Germany). Chair of Inorganic Chemistry; Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States). Center of Energetic Concepts Development (CECD)

    2012-07-01

    This graduate-level textbook treats the basic chemistry of high energy materials - primary and secondary explosives, propellants, rocket fuel and pyrotechnics - and provides a review of new research developments. Applications in both military and civil fields are discussed. The book also offers new insights into ''green'' chemistry requirements and strategies for military applications.

  13. Magic, science and masculinity: marketing toy chemistry sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Gailani, Salim

    2009-12-01

    At least since the late nineteenth century, toy chemistry sets have featured in standard scripts of the achievement of eminence in science, and they remain important in constructions of scientific identity. Using a selection of these toys manufactured in Britain and the United States, and with particular reference to the two dominant American brands, Gilbert and Chemcraft, this paper suggests that early twentieth-century chemistry sets were rooted in overlapping Victorian traditions of entertainment magic and scientific recreations. As chemistry set marketing copy gradually reoriented towards emphasising scientific modernity, citizenship, discipline and educational value, pre-twentieth-century traditions were subsumed within domestic-and specifically masculine-tropes. These developments in branding strategies point to transformations in both users' engagement with their chemistry sets and the role of scientific toys in domestic play. The chemistry set serves here as a useful tool for measuring cultural change and lay engagement with chemistry.

  14. Innovation Developments of Coal Chemistry Science in L.M. Litvinenko Institute of Physical-Organic Chemistry and Coal Chemistry of NAS of Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shendrik, T.G.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article presents short historical review and innovation developments of Coal Chemistry Department of L.M. Litvinenko Institute, NAS of Ukraine connected with coal mine exploitation problems, search for decisions toward prevention of spontaneous combustion, dust control in mines, establishing structural chemical features of coal with different genesis and stages of metamorphism with the aim to develop new methods of their modification and rational use. The methods of obtaining inexpensive sorbents from Ukrainian raw materials (including carbon containing waste are proposed. The problems of modern coal chemistry science in IPOCC of NAS of Ukraine are outlined.

  15. Water chemistry and behavior of materials in PWRs and BWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, P; Hanninen, H [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-09-01

    Water chemistry plays a major role in corrosion and in activity transport in NPP`s. Although a full understanding of all mechanisms involved in corrosion does not exist, controlling of the water chemistry has achieved good results in recent years. Water chemistry impacts upon the operational safety of LWR`s in two main ways: integrity of pressure boundary materials and, activity transport and out-of-core radiation fields. This paper will describe application of water chemistry control in operating reactors to prevent corrosion. Some problems experienced in LWR`s will be reviewed for the design of the nuclear heating reactors (NHR). (author). 18 refs, 10 figs, 5 tabs.

  16. Water chemistry and behavior of materials in PWRs and BWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaltonen, P.; Hanninen, H.

    1997-01-01

    Water chemistry plays a major role in corrosion and in activity transport in NPP's. Although a full understanding of all mechanisms involved in corrosion does not exist, controlling of the water chemistry has achieved good results in recent years. Water chemistry impacts upon the operational safety of LWR's in two main ways: integrity of pressure boundary materials and, activity transport and out-of-core radiation fields. This paper will describe application of water chemistry control in operating reactors to prevent corrosion. Some problems experienced in LWR's will be reviewed for the design of the nuclear heating reactors (NHR). (author). 18 refs, 10 figs, 5 tabs

  17. Physical foundations of materials science

    CERN Document Server

    Gottstein, Günter

    2004-01-01

    In this vivid and comprehensible introduction to materials science, the author expands the modern concepts of metal physics to formulate basic theory applicable to other engineering materials, such as ceramics and polymers. Written for engineering students and working engineers with little previous knowledge of solid-state physics, this textbook enables the reader to study more specialized and fundamental literature of materials science. Dozens of illustrative photographs, many of them Transmission Electron Microscopy images, plus line drawings, aid developing a firm appreciation of this complex topic. Hard-to-grasp terms such as "textures" are lucidly explained - not only the phenomenon itself, but also its consequences for the material properties. This excellent book makes materials science more transparent.

  18. Bulletin of Materials Science

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Influence of the presence of Fe2+ ion in nickel-zinc ferrite -- C M Srivastava, ... Investigation of hydrogenous materials using neutrons -- B A Dasannacharya and P S Goyal ... of potassium gold-cyanide -- Indira Rajagopal and S R Rajagopalan .... A novel method of RF powder sputtering -- K Solomon Harshavardhanan and ...

  19. Bulletin of Materials Science

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    -organic chemical vapour deposited (MOCVD) gamma iron oxide thin film for ... V2)5-Te)2 glasses using heterogeneous conductor model -- M Pal, S K Saha and ... The hardness-flow stress correlation in metallic materials -- G Soundararajan ...

  20. Weightless Materials Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Gravity affects everything we do. Only in very recent years have we been able to carry out experiments in orbit around the Earth and see for the first time how things behave in its absence. This has allowed us to understand fundamental processes better and to design new materials using this knowledge. (Contains 6 figures.)

  1. Bulletin of Materials Science | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 26; Issue 5. Issue front cover thumbnail. Volume 26, Issue 5. August 2003, pages 461-568. pp 461-464 Sensor Materials. Preparation, characterization and dielectric behaviour of some yttrium doped strontium stannates · P K Bajpai Kuldeep Ratre Mukul Pastor T P ...

  2. Bulletin of Materials Science | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 33; Issue 2 ... films deposited by rf magnetron sputtering using a high quality ceramic target ... Critical shear stress produced by interaction of edge dislocation with nanoscale inhomogeneity ... production cost limiting zircon usage as a raw material at an industrial scale.

  3. Current trends in chemistry of materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    materials) [7] inorganic-organic hybrid materials ... Keywords. Solid materials; dense; porous; energy; synthesis; theory. 21 ... its response to the applied field were important ..... for advanced engineering and utilisation of these solids.

  4. Forensic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Suzanne

    2009-07-01

    Forensic chemistry is unique among chemical sciences in that its research, practice, and presentation must meet the needs of both the scientific and the legal communities. As such, forensic chemistry research is applied and derivative by nature and design, and it emphasizes metrology (the science of measurement) and validation. Forensic chemistry has moved away from its analytical roots and is incorporating a broader spectrum of chemical sciences. Existing forensic practices are being revisited as the purview of forensic chemistry extends outward from drug analysis and toxicology into such diverse areas as combustion chemistry, materials science, and pattern evidence.

  5. Critical Science Education in a Suburban High School Chemistry Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, Patrick

    To improve students' scientific literacy and their general perceptions of chemistry, I enacted critical chemistry education (CCE) in two "regular level" chemistry classes with a group of 25 students in a suburban, private high school as part of this study. CCE combined the efforts of critical science educators (Fusco & Calabrese Barton, 2001; Gilbert 2013) with the performance expectations of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) (NGSS Lead States, 2013a) to critically transform the traditional chemistry curriculum at this setting. Essentially, CCE engages students in the critical exploration of socially situated chemistry content knowledge and requires them to demonstrate this knowledge through the practices of science. The purpose of this study was to gauge these students development of chemistry content knowledge, chemistry interest, and critical scientific literacy (CSL) as they engaged in CCE. CSL was a construct developed for this study that necessarily combined the National Research Center's (2012) definition of scientific literacy with a critical component. As such, CSL entailed demonstrating content knowledge through the practices of science as well as the ability to critically analyze the intersections between science content and socially relevant issues. A mixed methods, critical ethnographic approach framed the collection of data from open-ended questionnaires, focus group interviews, Likert surveys, pre- and post unit tests, and student artifacts. These data revealed three main findings: (1) students began to develop CSL in specific, significant ways working through the activities of CCE, (2) student participants of CCE developed a comparable level of chemistry content understanding to students who participated in a traditional chemistry curriculum, and (3) CCE developed a group of students' perceptions of interest in chemistry. In addition to being able to teach students discipline specific content knowledge, the implications of this study are

  6. Neutrons for materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Windsor, C.G.; Allen, A.J.; Hutchings, M.T.; Sayers, C.M.; Sinclair, R.N.; Schofield, P.; Wright, C.J.

    1984-12-01

    The discussion will be limited to applied materials research performed on a customer/contractor basis. The information obtained using neutrons must therefore compete both scientifically and financially with information obtained using other techniques, particularly electron microscopy, X-ray, NMR, infra-red and Raman spectroscopy. It will be argued that the unique nature of the information gained from neutrons often outweighs the undoubted difficulties of access to neutron beams. Examples are given. Small angle scattering has emerged as the neutron technique of widest application in applied materials research. The penetration of neutron beams through containment vessels, as well as through the sample, allows the measurement of 'in situ' time dependent experiments within a furnace, cryostat, pressure vessel or chemical reactor vessel. High resolution powder diffraction is another technique with wide applications. Structural studies are possible on increasing complex phases. The structure and volume fraction of minority phases can be measured at levels appreciably below that possible by X-ray diffraction. A rapidly growing field at present is the measurement of internal strains through the small shifts in lattice spacing. Inelastic scattering measurements exploit the unique property of neutrons to measure the orientations of vibrating molecules. (author)

  7. Material Science Smart Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubinstein, A. I. [Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States); Sabirianov, R. F. [Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States); Namavar, Fereydoon [Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The contribution of electrostatic interactions to the free energy of binding between model protein and a ceramic implant surface in the aqueous solvent, considered in the framework of the nonlocal electrostatic model, is calculated as a function of the implant low-frequency dielectric constant. We show that the existence of a dynamically ordered (low-dielectric) interfacial solvent layer at the protein-solvent and ceramic-solvent interface markedly increases charging energy of the protein and ceramic implant, and consequently makes the electrostatic contribution to the protein-ceramic binding energy more favorable (attractive). Our analysis shows that the corresponding electrostatic energy between protein and oxide ceramics depends nonmonotonically on the dielectric constant of ceramic, εC. Obtained results indicate that protein can attract electrostatically to the surface if ceramic material has a moderate εC below or about 35 (in particularly ZrO2 or Ta2O5). This is in contrast to classical (local) consideration of the solvent, which demonstrates an unfavorable electrostatic interaction of protein with typical metal oxide ceramic materialsC>10). Thus, a solid implant coated by combining oxide ceramic with a reduced dielectric constant can be beneficial to strengthen the electrostatic binding of the protein-implant complex.

  8. Biological materials: a materials science approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Marc A; Chen, Po-Yu; Lopez, Maria I; Seki, Yasuaki; Lin, Albert Y M

    2011-07-01

    The approach used by Materials Science and Engineering is revealing new aspects in the structure and properties of biological materials. The integration of advanced characterization, mechanical testing, and modeling methods can rationalize heretofore unexplained aspects of these structures. As an illustration of the power of this methodology, we apply it to biomineralized shells, avian beaks and feathers, and fish scales. We also present a few selected bioinspired applications: Velcro, an Al2O3-PMMA composite inspired by the abalone shell, and synthetic attachment devices inspired by gecko. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Emphasizing the process of science using demonstrations in conceptual chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Courtney A.

    The purpose of this project was to teach students a method for employing the process of science in a conceptual chemistry classroom when observing a demonstration of a discrepant event. Students observed six demonstrations throughout a trimester study of chemistry and responded to each demonstration by asking as many questions as they could think of, choosing one testable question to answer by making as many hypotheses as possible, and choosing one hypothesis to make predictions about observed results of this hypothesis when tested. Students were evaluated on their curiosity, confidence, knowledge of the process of science, and knowledge of the nature of science before and after the six demonstrations. Many students showed improvement in using or mastery of the process of science within the context of conceptual chemistry after six intensive experiences with it. Results of the study also showed students gained confidence in their scientific abilities after completing one trimester of conceptual chemistry. Curiosity and knowledge of the nature of science did not show statistically significant improvement according to the assessment tool. This may have been due to the scope of the demonstration and response activities, which focused on the process of science methodology instead of knowledge of the nature of science or the constraints of the assessment tool.

  10. Neutrons for materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Windsor, C.G.; Allen, A.J.; Hutchings, M.T.; Sayers, C.M.; Sinclair, R.N.; Schofield, P.; Wright, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    The discussion will be limited to applied materials research performed on a customer/contractor basis. The information obtained using neutrons must therefore compete both scientifically and financially with information obtained using other techniques, particular electron microscopy, X-ray, NMR, infra-red and Raman spectroscopy. It will be argued that the unique nature of the information gained from neutrons often outweighs the undoubted difficulties of access to neutron beams. Small-angle scattering has emerged as the neutron technique of widest application in applied materials research. The penetration of neutron beams through containment vessels, as well as through the sample, allows the measurement of in situ time-dependent experiments within a furnace, cryostat, pressure vessel or chemical reactor vessel. Examples will be given of small-angle scattering projects from the nuclear metallurgy, coal, oil, cement, detergent and plastics industries. High-resolution powder diffraction is another technique with wide applications. Structural studies are possible on increasingly complex phases. The structure and volume fraction of minority phase can be measured at levels appreciably below that possible by X-ray diffraction. A rapidly growing field at present is the measurement of internal strains through the small shifts in lattice spacing. Neutron diffraction is unique in being able to measure the full strain tensor from a specified volume within a bulk specimen. Inelastic scattering measurements exploit the unique property of neutrons to measure the orientations of vibrating molecules. Examples will be chosen from the field of catalysis where inelastic spectroscopy has revealed the nature of the bonding of hydrocarbon molecules. (author)

  11. Ethics in Science: The Unique Consequences of Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovac, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the ethical issues unique to the science and practice of chemistry. These issues arise from chemistry's position in the middle between the theoretical and the practical, a science concerned with molecules that are of the right size to directly affect human life. Many of the issues are raised by the central activity of chemistry--synthesis. Chemists make thousands of new substances each year. Many are beneficial, but others are threats. Since the development of the chemical industry in the nineteenth century, chemistry has contributed to the deterioration of the environment but has also helped to reduce pollution. Finally, we discuss the role of codes of ethics and whether the current codes of conduct for chemists are adequate for the challenges of today's world.

  12. Inventory of Innovative Learning Materials in Marine Science and Technology. UNESCO Reports in Marine Science 60.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Adrian F.; Richards, Efrosine A.

    The Inventory of Innovative Learning Materials in Marine Science and Technology includes 32 computer-, 148 video-, 16 film-, and 11 CD-ROM-based entries. They concern materials in biosciences (67), chemistry (5), geosciences (16), physics (23), technology (76) and other (20). This first, initial compilations is conceived as the basis for more…

  13. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-07-15

    dust and gas emissions from ferrous and nonferrous metallurgical facilities on vegetable crops of 42 collective farms within a 10-15 km radius...the dust and gas wastes were determined to have adverse effects on vegetable crops. Tables 3. 12172/12379 CSO: 1841/299 43 FERTILIZERS...academy’s Institute of physical-Organic Chemistry, head of the republic large-scale program " Membrana "] [Abstract] The author assesses progress in

  14. Progress report, Chemistry and Materials Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-02-01

    A marked asymmetry has been observed in the intensity of ions scattered from manganese atoms in a Mn-Al alloy as a function of incidence angle, under near-axial channeling conditions. Proton dechanneling has been used to discriminate between simple and cluster defects created by He-ion irradiation of an Al-Ag alloy crystal. An automated Langmuir surface has been constructed for study of the radiation chemistry of polyunsaturated compounds organized in molecular films. New information about reactions of nitric oxide (NO) has been obtained which suggests that the reaction of NO with O 2 in the gas phase is also an important reaction in the radiation chemistry of oxygenated nitrate and nitrite solutions. Development work on an ion-selective electrode for the determination of boron has been completed. Recent studies have resulted in improvements to the mass spectrometric determination of thorium, uranium and plutonium. Good agreement between the results of the determinations of atom percent fission by a stable isotope dilution Nd-148 and a uranium isotope ratio method was observed. Examination of a large number of iodine-induced crack initiation sites formed under conditions where the hydrides are in solution has shown no evidence for the involvement of any second phase particles, or any local segregation of impurities or alloying elements. Reproducible improvement in the purity of zirconium has been achieved by the electrotransport method. Doppler broadening studies of positron annihilation in electron irradiated Zr and Ti have been completed

  15. Materials science symposium 'heavy ion science in tandem energy region'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikezoe, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Tadashi; Takeuchi, Suehiro

    2003-10-01

    The facility of the JAERI tandem accelerator and its booster has been contributing to advancing heavy ion science researches in the fields of nuclear physics, nuclear chemistry, atomic and solid state physics and materials science, taking advantage of its prominent performances in providing various heavy ions. This meeting, as well as the previous ones held twice, offered scientists from the fields of heavy ion science, including nuclear physics, solid-state physics and cross-field physics, an opportunity to have active discussions among them, as well as to review their research accomplishments in the last two years. Oral presentations were selected from a wider scope of prospective fields, expecting a new step of advancing in heavy ion science. Main topics of the meeting were the status of the JAERI-KEK joint project of developing a radioactive nuclear beam (RNB) facility and research programs related to the RNB. This meeting was held at Advanced Science Research Center in JAERI-Tokai on January 8th and 9th in 2003, and successfully carried out with as many as 190 participants and a lot of sincere discussions. The proceedings are presented in this report. The 51 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  16. Analytical Chemistry in the Regulatory Science of Medical Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Guan, Allan; Wickramasekara, Samanthi; Phillips, K Scott

    2018-06-12

    In the United States, regulatory science is the science of developing new tools, standards, and approaches to assess the safety, efficacy, quality, and performance of all Food and Drug Administration-regulated products. Good regulatory science facilitates consumer access to innovative medical devices that are safe and effective throughout the Total Product Life Cycle (TPLC). Because the need to measure things is fundamental to the regulatory science of medical devices, analytical chemistry plays an important role, contributing to medical device technology in two ways: It can be an integral part of an innovative medical device (e.g., diagnostic devices), and it can be used to support medical device development throughout the TPLC. In this review, we focus on analytical chemistry as a tool for the regulatory science of medical devices. We highlight recent progress in companion diagnostics, medical devices on chips for preclinical testing, mass spectrometry for postmarket monitoring, and detection/characterization of bacterial biofilm to prevent infections.

  17. Materials Science with Ion Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Bernas, Harry

    2010-01-01

    This book introduces materials scientists and designers, physicists and chemists to the properties of materials that can be modified by ion irradiation or implantation. These techniques can help design new materials or to test modified properties; novel applications already show that ion-beam techniques are complementary to others, yielding previously unattainable properties. Also, ion-beam interactions modify materials at the nanoscale, avoiding the often detrimental results of lithographic or chemical techniques. Here, the effects are related to better-known quasi-equilibrium thermodynamics, and the consequences to materials are discussed with concepts that are familiar to materials science. Examples addressed concern semiconductor physics, crystal and nanocluster growth, optics, magnetism, and applications to geology and biology.

  18. Bulletin of Materials Science | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 23; Issue 5. Issue front cover thumbnail. Volume 23, Issue 5. October 2000, pages 341-452. pp 341-344 Synthesis. Preparation of Pt–Ru bimetallic catalyst supported on carbon nanotubes · B Rajesh K Ravindranathan Thampi J -M Bonard B Viswanathan · More Details ...

  19. Bulletin of Materials Science | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 39; Issue 5. Effects of size on mass density and its influence on mechanical and thermal properties of ZrO 2 nanoparticles in different structures. BOTAN JAWDAT ABDULLAH QING JIANG MUSTAFA SAEED OMAR. Volume 39 Issue 5 September 2016 pp 1295-1302 ...

  20. Bulletin of Materials Science | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 32; Issue 4. Issue front cover thumbnail. Volume 32, Issue 4. August 2009, pages 369-463. pp 369-373 Thin Films. Mobility activation in thermally deposited CdSe thin films · Kangkan Sarmah Ranjan Sarma · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. Effect of illumination on ...

  1. Bulletin of Materials Science | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 40; Issue 5. Structural, microstructural and optical properties of Cu 2 ZnSnS 4 thin films prepared by thermal evaporation: effect of substrate temperature and annealing. U CHALAPATHI S UTHANNA V SUNDARA RAJA. Volume 40 Issue 5 September 2017 pp 887-895 ...

  2. Bulletin of Materials Science | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 24; Issue 1. Issue front cover thumbnail. Volume 24, Issue 1. February 2001, pages 1-94. pp 1-21 Review---Phase Transitions. Kinetics of pressure induced structural phase transitions—A review · N V Chandra Shekar K Govinda Rajan · More Details Abstract Fulltext ...

  3. Bulletin of Materials Science | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 25; Issue 6. Issue front cover thumbnail. Volume 25, Issue 6. November 2002, pages 449-582. pp 449- .... Bi-layer functionally gradient thick film semiconducting methane sensors .... Thermal sensor properties of PANI(EB)–CSA ( = 0.4 ± 0.1 mol) polymer thin films.

  4. Bulletin of Materials Science | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 30; Issue 1. Issue front cover thumbnail. Volume 30, Issue 1. February 2007, pages 1-71. pp 1-3 Single Crystals. Thermoluminescence characteristics of Sm doped NaYF4 crystals · M V Ramana Reddy Ch Gopal Reddy K Narasimha Reddy · More Details Abstract ...

  5. Bulletin of Materials Science | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 36; Issue 6. Self-assembling behaviour of Pt nanoparticles onto surface of TiO2 and their resulting photocatalytic activity. M Qamar Ashok K Ganguli. Volume 36 Issue 6 November 2013 pp 945-951 ...

  6. Bulletin of Materials Science | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 32; Issue 3. Issue front cover thumbnail. Volume 32, Issue 3. June 2009, pages 215-367. pp 215-215. Foreword · S B Krupanidhi H L Bhat · More Details Fulltext PDF. pp 217-225. Molecule-based magnets · J V Yakhmi · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  7. Bulletin of Materials Science | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Layered LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 was synthesized by a citric acid assisted ... was investigated by the galvanostatic intermittent titration technique (GITT) ... The State Key Laboratory Base of Novel Functional Materials and Preparation Science; ...

  8. Bulletin of Materials Science | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 23; Issue 3. Issue front cover thumbnail. Volume 23, Issue 3. June 2000, pages 159-238. pp 159-163 Nanomaterials. A note on the use of ellipsometry for studying the kinetics of formation of self-assembled monolayers · Murali Sastry · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  9. Bulletin of Materials Science | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 32; Issue 2. Issue front cover thumbnail. Volume 32, Issue 2. April 2009, pages 117-214. pp 117-123 Thin Films and Nanomatter. Microstructural characteristics and mechanical properties of magnetron sputtered nanocrystalline TiN films on glass substrate.

  10. Bulletin of Materials Science | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 25; Issue 4 ... were synthesized by self-propagating high temperature synthesis (SHS) method. ... Structure determination at room temperature and phase transition studies above T c in .... Hyperfine field distributions in disordered Mn2CoSn and Mn2NiSn Heusler alloys.

  11. Bulletin of Materials Science | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 25; Issue 3 ... Sintering of nano crystalline silicon carbide by doping with boron carbide ... of these powders was achieved by addition of boron carbide of 0.5 wt% together with carbon of 1 wt% at 2050°C at vacuum (3 mbar) for 15 min. ... pp 213-217 Alloys and Steels.

  12. Bulletin of Materials Science | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 38; Issue 3 .... (EDX) and UV–vis spectroscopy were used to study the chemical composition and optical .... Enhanced microactuation with magnetic field curing of magnetorheological ... Structure, morphology and corrosion resistance of Ni–Mo+PTh composite coatings.

  13. Berkeley Lab - Materials Sciences Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    conjugation using genetically encoded aldehyde tags. Nature Protocols 7, 1052 (2012). abstract » J. Y. Shu, R . Onoe, R. A. Mathies and M. B. Francis. Direct Attachment of Microbial Organisms to Material Surfaces -modified proteins to their binding partners. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 109, 4834

  14. Bulletin of Materials Science | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 27; Issue 4. Issue front cover thumbnail. Volume 27, Issue 4. August 2004, pages 323-394. pp 323-325 Crystal Growth. Growth features of ammonium hydrogen -tartrate single crystals · G Sajeevkumar R Raveendran B S Remadevi Alexander Varghese Vaidyan.

  15. Bulletin of Materials Science | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 29; Issue 1. Issue front cover thumbnail. Volume 29, Issue 1. February 2006, pages 1-99. pp 1-5 Nanomaterials. A simple synthesis and characterization of CuS nanocrystals · Ujjal K Gautam Bratindranath Mukherjee · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. Water-soluble ...

  16. Analysis Science Process Skills Content in Chemistry Textbooks Grade XI at Solubility and Solubility Product Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayu Antrakusuma

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to determine the analysis of science process skills in textbooks of chemistry grade XI in SMA N 1 Teras, Boyolali. This research used the descriptive method. The instruments were developed based on 10 indicators of science process skills (observing, classifying, finding a conclusion, predicting, raising the question, hypothesizing, planning an experiment, manipulating materials, and equipment, Applying, and communicating. We analyzed 3 different chemistry textbooks that often used by teachers in teaching. The material analyzed in the book was solubility and solubility product concept in terms of concept explanation and student activity. The results of this research showed different science process skill criteria in 3 different chemistry textbooks. Book A appeared 50% of all aspects of science process skills, in Book B appeared 80% of all aspects of science process skills, and in Book C there was 40% of all aspects of the science process skills. The most common indicator in all books was observing (33.3%, followed by prediction (19.05%, classifying (11.90%, Applying (11.90% , planning experiments (9.52%, manipulating materials and equipment (7.14%, finding conclusion (4.76%, communicating (2.38%. Asking the question and hypothesizing did not appear in textbooks.

  17. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Nurullah Ateş2 Fatma Kiliç Dokan1 Ahmet Ülgen1 Şaban Patat1. Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri, Turkey; Northeastern University Center for Renewable Energy Technology, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, 317 Egan Center, 360 Huntington Avenue, Boston, ...

  18. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. Tanushree Choudhury1 Nirendra M Misra2. Department of Chemistry, School of Advanced Sciences, VIT University Chennai Campus, Vandalur- Kelambakkam Road, Chennai- 600048, India; Department of Applied Chemistry, Indian School of Mines University, Dhanbad 826 004, India ...

  19. Setting science free from materialism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldrake, Rupert

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary science is based on the claim that all reality is material or physical. There is no reality but material reality. Consciousness is a by-product of the physical activity of the brain. Matter is unconscious. Evolution is purposeless. This view is now undergoing a credibility crunch. The biggest problem of all for materialism is the existence of consciousness. Panpsychism provides a way forward. So does the recognition that minds are not confined to brains. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Proceedings of the DAE-BRNS fifth interdisciplinary symposium on materials chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jafar, Mohsin; Tyagi, Adish; Tyagi, Deepak

    2014-12-01

    The focus of the present symposium on materials chemistry was on research areas in materials chemistry like: nuclear materials; high purity materials; nanomaterials and clusters; carbon based materials; fuel cell materials and other electro-ceramics; biomaterials; polymers and soft condensed matter; materials for energy conversion; thin films and surface chemistry; magnetic materials; catalysis; chemical sensors; organic and organometallic compounds; computational material chemistry etc. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  1. Invited article: The fast readout low noise camera as a versatile x-ray detector for time resolved dispersive extended x-ray absorption fine structure and diffraction studies of dynamic problems in materials science, chemistry, and catalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labiche, Jean-Claude; Mathon, Olivier; Pascarelli, Sakura; Newton, Mark A.; Ferre, Gemma Guilera; Curfs, Caroline; Vaughan, Gavin; Homs, Alejandro; Carreiras, David Fernandez

    2007-01-01

    Originally conceived and developed at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) as an 'area' detector for rapid x-ray imaging studies, the fast readout low noise (FReLoN) detector of the ESRF [J.-C. Labiche, ESRF Newsletter 25, 41 (1996)] has been demonstrated to be a highly versatile and unique detector. Charge coupled device (CCD) cameras at present available on the public market offer either a high dynamic range or a high readout speed. A compromise between signal dynamic range and readout speed is always sought. The parameters of the commercial cameras can sometimes be tuned, in order to better fulfill the needs of specific experiments, but in general these cameras have a poor duty cycle (i.e., the signal integration time is much smaller than the readout time). In order to address scientific problems such as time resolved experiments at the ESRF, a FReLoN camera has been developed by the Instrument Support Group at ESRF. This camera is a low noise CCD camera that combines high dynamic range, high readout speed, accuracy, and improved duty cycle in a single image. In this paper, we show its application in a quasi-one-dimensional sense to dynamic problems in materials science, catalysis, and chemistry that require data acquisition on a time scale of milliseconds or a few tens of milliseconds. It is demonstrated that in this mode the FReLoN can be applied equally to the investigation of rapid changes in long range order (via diffraction) and local order (via energy dispersive extended x-ray absorption fine structure) and in situations of x-ray hardness and flux beyond the capacity of other detectors

  2. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. H B Muralidhara1 Y Arthoba Naik1 T V Venkatesha1. Department of PG Studies and Research in Chemistry, School of Chemical Sciences, Kuvempu University, Shankaraghatta 577 451, India ...

  3. Microfluidics and nanofluidics handbook chemistry, physics, and life science principles

    CERN Document Server

    Mitra, Sushanta K

    2011-01-01

    The Microfluidics and Nanofluidics Handbook: Two-Volume Set comprehensively captures the cross-disciplinary breadth of the fields of micro- and nanofluidics, which encompass the biological sciences, chemistry, physics and engineering applications. To fill the knowledge gap between engineering and the basic sciences, the editors pulled together key individuals, well known in their respective areas, to author chapters that help graduate students, scientists, and practicing engineers understand the overall area of microfluidics and nanofluidics. Topics covered include Cell Lysis Techniques in Lab-on-a-Chip Technology Electrodics in Electrochemical Energy Conversion Systems: Microstructure and Pore-Scale Transport Microscale Gas Flow Dynamics and Molecular Models for Gas Flow and Heat Transfer Microscopic Hemorheology and Hemodynamics Covering physics and transport phenomena along with life sciences and related applications, Volume One: Chemistry, Physics, and Life Science Principles provides readers with the fun...

  4. Selected scientific articles. (Investigations in the field of hydrides chemistry and mineral raw materials processing)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirsaidov, U.M.

    2013-01-01

    Articles, included in the present book are covering period 1977-2013 y. The main scientific articles in the field of power-consuming substances, mineral raw-materials and wastes reprocessing, including uranium industry wastes are collected. Scientific works on hydrogen chemistry which carried out basically bu U.M. Mirsaidov without co-authors are considered. These works are on aluminium hydrides and borohydrides lanthanides. Besides, author's popular-science articles on research carried out by Academy of Sciences during the period when he was the President of Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Tajikistan (1995-2005) are included. Mineral raw materials and wastes reprocessing results are given as well. The book is intended for engineer and technical staff, those working in the field of hydrogen chemistry, hydrometallurgy workers, engineering chemists as well as for PhD, post graduate students and students of appropriate profiles.

  5. Integrating the Liberal Arts and Chemistry: A Series of General Chemistry Assignments to Develop Science Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Diane M.; Chengelis Czegan, Demetra A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes assignments that have been implemented in a General Chemistry I course to promote science literacy. This course was chosen in particular because it reaches a broad audience, which includes nonscience majors. The assignment series begins with several discussions and tasks to develop information literacy, in which students find…

  6. Phase change materials science and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Raoux, Simone

    2009-01-01

    ""Phase Change Materials: Science and Applications"" provides a unique introduction of this rapidly developing field. This clearly written volume describes the material science of these fascinating materials from a theoretical and experimental perspective.

  7. Advances in the material science of concrete

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ideker, Jason H; Radlinska, Aleksandra

    2010-01-01

    ... Committee 236, Material Science of Concrete. The session focused on material science aspects of concrete with an emphasis placed on advances in understanding the fundamental scientific topics of cement-based materials, as well as the crucial...

  8. Chemistry Students' Challenges in Using MBL's in Science Laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atar, Hakan Yavuz

    Understanding students' challenges about using microcomputer based laboratories (MBLs) would provide important data in understanding the appropriateness of using MBLs in high school chemistry laboratories. Identifying students' concerns about this technology will in part help educators identify the obstacles to science learning when using this…

  9. The Sequencing of Basic Chemistry Topics by Physical Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibanda, Doras; Hobden, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find out teachers' preferred teaching sequence for basic chemistry topics in Physical Science in South Africa, to obtain their reasons underpinning their preferred sequence, and to compare these sequences with the prescribed sequences in the current curriculum. The study was located within a pragmatic paradigm and…

  10. weaving together climate science and chemistry education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    ... students, educators, and the general public, designed to help bridge the gap ... Design Principles of Visualizing and Understanding the Science of Climate ... The user is also able to examine simple models for these predictions ... Figure 6 illustrates the fluctuations in mean global temperature over an 800 ka span and.

  11. Heterogeneous catalytic materials solid state chemistry, surface chemistry and catalytic behaviour

    CERN Document Server

    Busca, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneous Catalytic Materials discusses experimental methods and the latest developments in three areas of research: heterogeneous catalysis; surface chemistry; and the chemistry of catalysts. Catalytic materials are those solids that allow the chemical reaction to occur efficiently and cost-effectively. This book provides you with all necessary information to synthesize, characterize, and relate the properties of a catalyst to its behavior, enabling you to select the appropriate catalyst for the process and reactor system. Oxides (used both as catalysts and as supports for cata

  12. Chemistry, the Central Science? The History of the High School Science Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Keith; Robbins, Dennis M.

    2005-01-01

    Chemistry became the ''central science'' not by design but by accident in the US high schools. The three important factors, which had their influence on the high school science, are sequenced and their impact on the development of US science education, are mentioned.

  13. Computational Chemistry Toolkit for Energetic Materials Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    industry are aggressively engaged in efforts to develop multiscale modeling and simulation methodologies to model and analyze complex phenomena across...energetic materials design. It is hoped that this toolkit will evolve into a collection of well-integrated multiscale modeling methodologies...Experimenta Theoreticala This Work 1-5-Diamino-4- methyl- tetrazolium nitrate 8.4 41.7 47.5 1-5-Diamino-4- methyl- tetrazolium azide 138.1 161.6

  14. Materials science experiments in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelles, S. H.; Giessen, B. C.; Glicksman, M. E.; Margrave, J. L.; Markovitz, H.; Nowick, A. S.; Verhoeven, J. D.; Witt, A. F.

    1978-01-01

    The criteria for the selection of the experimental areas and individual experiments were that the experiment or area must make a meaningful contribution to the field of material science and that the space environment was either an absolute requirement for the successful execution of the experiment or that the experiment can be more economically or more conveniently performed in space. A number of experimental areas and individual experiments were recommended for further consideration as space experiments. Areas not considered to be fruitful and others needing additional analysis in order to determine their suitability for conduct in space are also listed. Recommendations were made concerning the manner in which these materials science experiments are carried out and the related studies that should be pursued.

  15. Enhancing interdisciplinary, mathematics, and physical science in an undergraduate life science program through physical chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pursell, David P

    2009-01-01

    BIO2010 advocates enhancing the interdisciplinary, mathematics, and physical science components of the undergraduate biology curriculum. The Department of Chemistry and Life Science at West Point responded by developing a required physical chemistry course tailored to the interests of life science majors. To overcome student resistance to physical chemistry, students were enabled as long-term stakeholders who would shape the syllabus by selecting life science topics of interest to them. The initial 2 yr of assessment indicates that students have a positive view of the course, feel they have succeeded in achieving course outcome goals, and that the course is relevant to their professional future. Instructor assessment of student outcome goal achievement via performance on exams and labs is comparable to that of students in traditional physical chemistry courses. Perhaps more noteworthy, both student and instructor assessment indicate positive trends from year 1 to year 2, presumably due to the student stakeholder effect.

  16. Promotion of science among youngsters: chemistry outreach initiatives at EPFL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Farnaz

    2012-01-01

    At EPFL, a strategy for organising scientific outreach activities has been developed and a programme comprising various measures and actions elaborated to promote science and technology among youngsters, especially young girls. As part of this programme, workshops and chemistry camps are developed and carried out for children and youngsters aged from 7 to 16 years old. These workshops are adapted to the age of the participants and allow them to discover chemistry in a fascinating way and become familiar with this field, understand how useful it is to society and learn about the professions it opens up. Some of the workshops take place at EPFL and others are organised in schools in the French-speaking cantons of Switzerland during the touring campaign of a bus named 'Les sciences, ça m'intéresse !' ('Sciences Interest Me!').

  17. Materials Sciences Division long range plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-12-01

    The intent of this document is to provide a framework for programmatic guidance into the future for Materials Sciences. The Materials Sciences program is the basic research program for materials in the Department of Energy. It includes a wide variety of activities associated with the sciences related to materials. It also includes the support for developing, constructing, and operating major facilities which are used extensively but not exclusively by the materials sciences

  18. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-11

    Varnish Covers for Radiotechnical Components Made From Composite Materials (L, F, Makiyenko, I. G. Kalugin, et al.; KHIMICHESKAYA TEKHNOLOGIYA, No 3...Household Chemicals] Association, the Dnepropetrovsk Paint and Varnish Association imeni M. V. Lomonosov, the Cherkassk Chemical Reagents Association...separation of ballast macrocomponents) and converting phosphorus compounds into forms which can be assimilated by plants. With the exception of fluorine

  19. Applications of self-assembled monolayers in materials chemistry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Physical and Materials Chemistry Division, National Chemical Laboratory,. Pune 411 008, India e-mail: viji@ems.ncl.res.in. Abstract. Self-assembly provides a simple route to organise suitable organic molecules on noble metal and selected nanocluster surfaces by using monolayers of long chain organic molecules with ...

  20. Chemistry with Inexpensive Materials: Spray Bottles and Plastic Bags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoltewicz, Susan

    1993-01-01

    Presents eight chemistry activities that are interesting and involve simple, easily available materials. Topics include mystery writing, valentine hearts, flame tests, evaporation race, buoyancy versus mass, determination of relative masses of gases, mole sample container, and cold and hot packs. (DDR)

  1. Mathematics, chemistry and science connection as a basis of scientific thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Matúš

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Scientific thinking is a basic skill that can support problemsolving of interdisciplinary tasks in science. Our research is leading us to creation of materials and resources that will support this interdisciplinary approach to education. The research includes interviews with high-school teachers of mathematics, chemistry and science, item analysis of extensive testing of knowledge and skills of high school students in chemistry in Czech Republic, follow-up survey of students’ problem-solving processes in tasks requiring the use of combined knowledge of mathematics and chemistry and the creation of educational materials. The article contains a few examples of proposed educational materials. The effectiveness of created materials is verified in high-schools. Students have got the most difficulties applying algebraic calculations in chemistry, using proportions, solving equations, expressing the unknown, the spatial imagination, geometry and stereometry and the resulting arrangement of atoms and shapes of molecules, chemical analytical tasks with logical thinking, interpretation of information from graphs and tables, plotting measured values into graphs and statistical evaluation.

  2. Proceedings of DAE-BRNS national workshop on materials chemistry: functional materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-12-01

    Design and development of materials with tailored properties assumes great significance in our everyday life and are crucial to modern technologies. Chemistry has had a tremendous Convener role in developing several need based materials by integrating multiple functionalities. The year 2011, being recognised as the International Year of Chemistry by the UNESCO, assumes further significance for material chemists. In view of the renowned interest in advanced functional materials, the Society for Materials Chemistry, India together with Chemistry Division, BARC has taken an initiative to organise this National Workshop on Materials Chemistry (NWMC-2011) under the theme 'Functional Materials (FUN-MAT)'. NWMC- 2011 aims to provide a forum for young researchers to interact with experts involved in synthesis, processing and applications of various advanced functional materials. In particular, recent developments and future prospects of magnetic, electronic and optical materials, glasses, ceramics, soft materials, materials for sensors, materials for hydrogen production and storage etc. will be addressed in this workshop. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  3. Progress report, Chemistry and Materials Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-05-01

    Laser radiation has been used to anneal damage created by implantation of arsenic ions into silicon single-crystal wafers. The threshold for recovery of lattice order, as measured by ion channeling methods, appeared at an energy density of 1.2 J.cm -2 . Deuterium-enriched water has been recovered for the first time in visible amounts from a process based on laser photolysis. High performance liquid chromatography has been applied to the determination of U(VI) in ground water and urine. Results with low ground water concentrations were judged to be successful, while only limited success was achieved with urine. The first analyses in support of the production of (Th,Pu)O 2 fuel elements were completed successfully. Experiments performed during the quarter have shown that cracking of Zr-2.5 percent Nb alloy by gaseous hydrogen is inhibited by traces of oxygen. It was found that there was no inhibition by helium in the absence of trace oxygen. Excellent agreement has been obtained between the growth and creep constants derived from ion-irradiated cantilever beam specimens and those from reactor irradiation of the same materials. (O.T.)

  4. Very high temperature chemistry: Science justification for containerless experimentation in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeister, William H.; Nordine, Paul

    1990-01-01

    A summary is presented of the justification for application of containerless processing in space to high temperature science. Low earth orbit offers a gravitational environment that allows samples to be positioned in an experimental apparatus by very small forces. Well controlled experiments become possible on reactive materials at high temperatures in a reasonably quiescent state and without container contamination. This provides an opportunity to advance the science of high temperature chemistry that can only be realized with a commitment by NASA to provide advanced facilities for in-space containerless study of materials at very high temperature.

  5. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Screen printing; ferroelectricity; piezoelectricity; nonlinear property. .... Luoyang Institute of Science and Technology, Luoyang 471023, China; Functional Materials Research Laboratory, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092, China; Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, ...

  6. Synthesis and chemistry of elemental 2D materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mannix, Andrew J.; Kiraly, Brian; Hersam, Mark C.; Guisinger, Nathan P.

    2017-01-25

    2D materials have attracted considerable attention in the past decade for their superlative physical properties. These materials consist of atomically thin sheets exhibiting covalent in-plane bonding and weak interlayer and layer-substrate bonding. Following the example of graphene, most emerging 2D materials are derived from structures that can be isolated from bulk phases of layered materials, which form a limited library for new materials discovery. Entirely synthetic 2D materials provide access to a greater range of properties through the choice of constituent elements and substrates. Of particular interest are elemental 2D materials, because they provide the most chemically tractable case for synthetic exploration. In this Review, we explore the progress made in the synthesis and chemistry of synthetic elemental 2D materials, and offer perspectives and challenges for the future of this emerging field.

  7. The structural science of functional materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catlow, C Richard A

    2018-01-01

    The growing complexity of functional materials and the major challenges this poses to structural science are discussed. The diversity of structural materials science and the contributions that computation is making to the field are highlighted.

  8. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. Suvendu Padhi1 P Ganga Raju Achary1 Nimai C Nayak1. Micro and Nano Materials Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Institute of Technical Education and Research, Siksha 'O' Anusandhan University, Bhubaneswar, Odisha 751 030, India ...

  9. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    College of Materials Science and Engineering, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, Guilin 541004, China; Guangxi Key Laboratory of Information Materials, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, Guilin 541004, China; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Luoyang Institute of Science and ...

  10. Improved water chemistry controls for minimizing degradation of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawochka, S.G.

    1986-01-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute and the Steam Generator Owners Group have sponsored several efforts to develop secondary water chemistry guidelines to minimize pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubing degradation. To develop these guidelines, chemical species known to accelerate corrosion of Alloy 600 were identified, and values for normal and abnormal chemistry situations were established. For example, sodium hydroxide was known to accelerate Alloy 600 intergranular attack stress corrosion cracking; thus, guidelines were developed for blowdown sodium concentrations in recirculating steam generator systems. Similarly, formation of acidic solutions, particularly as a result of chloride ingress at seawater sites, was known to accelerate denting; thus, chloride guidelines were established. A blowdown cation conductivity limit was established to minimize concentrations of other anionic species. Guidelines also were developed for condensate and feedwater chemistry to minimize general corrosion of system materials, thereby minimizing sludge and deposit buildup in the steam generators

  11. Reinventing Material Science - Continuum Magazine | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    by Sandia National Laboratories Reinventing Material Science It's not often that scientists set out pursuing in the field of material science. The vision of the center is to revolutionize the discovery of new material science. "In the old days, if you wanted somebody to calculate the properties of a

  12. Engineering for Life Sciences: A Fruitful Collaboration Enabled by Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemeyer, Christof M

    2017-02-13

    "… The interaction of engineering and life sciences has a long history that is characterized by a mutual dependency. The role of chemistry in these developments is to connect the engineers' instrumentation with the life scientists' specimens. This very successful partnership will further continue to produce essential and innovative solutions for future challenges …" Read more in the Guest Editorial by Christof M. Niemeyer. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Phospholipid Vesicles in Materials Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granick, Steve [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States)

    2016-05-11

    The objective of this research was to develop the science basis needed to deploy phospholipid vesicles as functional materials in energy contexts. Specifically, we sought to: (1) Develop an integrated molecular-level understanding of what determines their dynamical shape, spatial organization, and responsiveness to complex, time-varying environments; and (2) Develop understanding of their active transportation in crowded environments, which our preliminary measurements in cells suggest may hold design principles for targeting improved energy efficiency in new materials systems. The methods to do this largely involved fluorescence imaging and other spectroscopy involving single particles, vesicles, particles, DNA, and endosomes. An unexpected importance outcome was a new method to image light-emitting diodes during actual operation using super-resolution spectroscopy.

  14. IONIC LIQUIDS MATERIAL AS MODERN CONTEXT OF CHEMISTRY IN SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernani Hernani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available One way to improve students’ chemistry literacy which is demanded in the modernization of modern technology-based chemistry learning is by studying ionic liquids. Low level of scientific literacy of students in Indonesia as revealed in the PISA in 2012 was the main reason of the research. Ionic liquids-based technology are necessary to be applied as a context for learning chemistry because: (1 the attention of the scientific an technology community in the use of ionic liquids as a new generation of green solvent, electrolyte material and fluidic engineering in recent years becomes larger, in line with the strong demands of the industry for the provision of new materials that are reliable, safe, and friendly for various purposes; (2 scientific explanations related to the context of the ionic liquid contains a lot of facts, concepts, principles, laws, models and theories can be used to reinforce the learning content as a media to develop thinking skill (process/competence as demanded by PISA; (3 The modern technology-based ionic liquid can also be used as a discourse to strengthen scientific attitude. The process of synthesis of ionic liquid involves fairly simple organic reagents, so it deserves to be included in the chemistry subject in school.

  15. Chemistry teachers’ understanding of science process skills in relation of science process skills assessment in chemistry learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikmah, N.; Yamtinah, S.; Ashadi; Indriyanti, N. Y.

    2018-05-01

    A Science process skill (SPS) is a fundamental scientific method to achieve good knowledge. SPS can be categorized into two levels: basic and integrated. Learning SPS helps children to grow as individuals who can access knowledge and know how to acquire it. The primary outcomes of the scientific process in learning are the application of scientific processes, scientific reasoning, accurate knowledge, problem-solving, and understanding of the relationship between science, technology, society, and everyday life’s events. Teachers’ understanding of SPS is central to the application of SPS in a learning process. Following this point, this study aims to investigate the high school chemistry teachers’ understanding of SPS pertains to their assessment of SPS in chemistry learning. The understanding of SPS is measured from the conceptual and operational aspects of SPS. This research uses qualitative analysis method, and the sample consists of eight chemistry teachers selected by random sampling. A semi-structured interview procedure is used to collect the data. The result of the analysis shows that teachers’ conceptual and operational understanding of SPS is weak. It affects the accuracy and appropriateness of the teacher’s selection of SPS assessment in chemistry learning.

  16. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 27; Issue 5 ... The electrical performances of thin film material can be improved largely by dopants. ... Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Jinan University, Jinan 250022, PR China; The State Key Laboratory of Material Composite and Advanced ...

  17. Proceedings of DAE-BRNS third international symposium on materials chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyagi, Deepak; Banerjee, Atindra Mohan; Nigam, Sandeep; Varma, Salil; Tripathi, Arvind Kumar; Bharadwaj, Shyamala Rajkumar; Das, Dasarathi

    2010-12-01

    The present volume consists of the proceedings of the DAE-BRNS Third International Symposium on Materials Chemistry. In order to keep pace with the advancements made in the area of materials chemistry, new topics like materials for energy conversion, biomaterials, carbon based materials, soft condensed materials, thin films, surface chemistry, polymer based materials, organic and organometallics, magnetic materials and high purity materials have been included in this symposium while topics like nuclear materials, nanomaterials and clusters, catalysis, chemical sensors, fuel cell materials and computational research in materials chemistry have been continued as important features of the symposium. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  18. Indoor Chemistry: Materials, Ventilation Systems, and Occupant Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, G.C.; Corsi, R.L.; Destaillats, H.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Wells, J.R.

    2006-05-01

    Chemical processes taking place in indoor environments can significantly alter the nature and concentrations of pollutants. Exposure to secondary contaminants generated in these reactions needs to be evaluated in association with many aspects of buildings to minimize their impact on occupant health and well-being. Focusing on indoor ozone chemistry, we describe alternatives for improving indoor air quality by controlling chemical changes related to building materials, ventilation systems, and occupant activities.

  19. Multiscale paradigms in integrated computational materials science and engineering materials theory, modeling, and simulation for predictive design

    CERN Document Server

    Runge, Keith; Muralidharan, Krishna

    2016-01-01

    This book presents cutting-edge concepts, paradigms, and research highlights in the field of computational materials science and engineering, and provides a fresh, up-to-date perspective on solving present and future materials challenges. The chapters are written by not only pioneers in the fields of computational materials chemistry and materials science, but also experts in multi-scale modeling and simulation as applied to materials engineering. Pedagogical introductions to the different topics and continuity between the chapters are provided to ensure the appeal to a broad audience and to address the applicability of integrated computational materials science and engineering for solving real-world problems.

  20. Nanostructured energetic materials derived from sol-gel chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, R L; Tillotson, T M; Hrubesh, L W; Gash, A E

    2000-01-01

    Initiation and detonation properties are dramatically affected by an energetic material's microstructural properties. Sol-gel chemistry allows intimacy of mixing to be controlled and dramatically improved over existing methodologies. One material goal is to create very high power energetic materials which also have high energy densities. Using sol-gel chemistry we have made a nanostructured composite energetic material. Here a solid skeleton of fuel, based on resorcinol-formaldehyde, has nanocrystalline ammonium perchlorate, the oxidizer, trapped within its pores. At optimum stoichiometry it has approximately the energy density of HMX. Transmission electron microscopy indicated no ammonium perchlorate crystallites larger than 20 nm while near-edge soft x-ray absorption microscopy showed that nitrogen was uniformly distributed, at least on the scale of less than 80 nm. Small-angle neutron scattering studies were conducted on the material. Those results were consistent with historical ones for this class of nanostructured materials. The average skeletal primary particle size was on the order of 2.7 nm, while the nanocomposite showed the growth of small 1 nm size crystals of ammonium perchlorate with some clustering to form particles greater than 10 nm

  1. FWP executive summaries: Basic energy sciences materials sciences programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samara, G.A.

    1996-02-01

    This report provides an Executive Summary of the various elements of the Materials Sciences Program which is funded by the Division of Materials Sciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico.

  2. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 29; Issue 5 ... Polyester urethane; scaffold; tensile strength; swelling; degradation; cell culture. ... Materials Science Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721 302, India; School of Medical Science and Technology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur ...

  3. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ming Kang1 2 Xiaoming Liao1 Guangfu Yin1 Xun Sun3 Xing Yin4 Lu Xie4 Jun Liu2. College of Materials Science and Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064, China; College of Material Science and Engineering, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010, China; Department of ...

  4. Nuclear science in the 20th century. Radiation chemistry and radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Tao; Xu Furong; Zheng Chunkai

    2003-01-01

    The application of nuclear science and technology to chemistry has led to two important subjects, radiation chemistry and radiation processing, which are playing important roles in many aspects of science and society. We review the development and major applications of radiation chemistry and radiation processing, including the basic physical and chemical mechanisms involved

  5. Physical Chemistry '98: Fourth International Conference on Fundamental and Applied Aspects of Physical Chemistry - Papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribnikar, S.; Anic, S.

    1998-01-01

    The proceedings has following chapters: Plenary lectures; Chemical Thermodynamics; Spectroscopy, Molecular Structures, Physical Chemistry of Plasma; Kinetics, Catalysis, Nonlinear Dynamics; Electrochemistry; Biophysical Chemistry, Photochemistry, Radiation Chemistry; Radiochemistry, Nuclear Chemistry; Solid State Physical Chemistry, Material Science; Macromolecular Physical Chemistry; Environmental Protection; Phase Boundaries; Complex Compounds; General Physical Chemistry. A separated abstract was prepared for each of the 20 papers selected from the three chapters: Biophysical Chemistry, Photochemistry, Radiation Chemistry; Radiochemistry, Nuclear Chemistry. and Environmental Protection. Refs and figs

  6. Materials Chemistry and Performance of Silicone-Based Replicating Compounds.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brumbach, Michael T.; Mirabal, Alex James; Kalan, Michael; Trujillo, Ana B; Hale, Kevin

    2014-11-01

    Replicating compounds are used to cast reproductions of surface features on a variety of materials. Replicas allow for quantitative measurements and recordkeeping on parts that may otherwise be difficult to measure or maintain. In this study, the chemistry and replicating capability of several replicating compounds was investigated. Additionally, the residue remaining on material surfaces upon removal of replicas was quantified. Cleaning practices were tested for several different replicating compounds. For all replicating compounds investigated, a thin silicone residue was left by the replica. For some compounds, additional inorganic species could be identified in the residue. Simple solvent cleaning could remove some residue.

  7. Progress report, Chemistry and Materials Division, October 1 to December 31, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Research results are reported on the interaction of ion beams with solids, radiation chemistry, hydrogen isotope exchange, surface science, analytical chemistry, and properties of zirconium and its alloys. (E.C.B.)

  8. Ionic liquid syntheses via click chemistry: expeditious routes toward versatile functional materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirjafari, Arsalan

    2018-03-25

    Since the introduction of click chemistry by K. B. Sharpless in 2001, its exploration and exploitation has occurred in countless fields of materials sciences in both academic and industrial spheres. Click chemistry is defined as an efficient, robust, and orthogonal synthetic platform for the facile formation of new carbon-heteroatom bonds, using readily available starting materials. Premier examples of click reactions are copper(i)-catalyzed azide-alkyne Huisgen cycloaddition (CuAAC) and the thiol-X (X = ene and yne) coupling reactions to form C-N and C-S bonds, respectively. The emphasis of this review is centered on the rapidly expanding area of click chemistry-mediated synthesis of functional ionic liquids via CuAAC, thiol-X and oxime formation, and selected examples of nucleophilic ring-opening reactions, while offering some thoughts on emerging challenges, opportunities and ultimately the evolution of this field. Click chemistry offers tremendous opportunities, and introduces intriguing perspectives for efficient and robust generation of tailored task-specific ionic liquids - an important class of soft materials.

  9. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... India; Department of Chemistry, University of Mysore, Manasagangotri, Mysore 570 006, India; Department of Physics, University of Mysore, Manasagangotri, Mysore 570 006, India; Materials Structures Laboratory, Centre for Materials Design, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259, Nagatsuta, Midori, Yokohama 226, Japan ...

  10. Domestic science: making chemistry your cup of tea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keene, Melanie

    2008-03-01

    In the early Victorian home, there were plenty of scientific lessons to be uncovered. With the appropriate interrogation, everyday objects could transform seemingly mundane activities such as eating breakfast, washing clothes or reading by candle-light into household lectures that gave children a familiar base from which to explore the hidden properties and marvellous histories of common commodities. Responding to an unprecedented hunger for scientific knowledge, a profusion of introductory texts appeared in the mid-nineteenth century that directed lessons into homes across Britain and beyond. In particular, the science of chemistry found its way into this domestic setting, as writers promoted its practice and practitioners as a source of authoritative expertise on everyday life. One of the most compelling illustrations of this encounter between the public and chemistry took place over a simple cup of tea.

  11. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. BALDEV RAJ. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 26 Issue 4 June 2003 pp 449-460 Instrumentation. Thermogravimetry-evolved gas analysis–mass spectrometry system for materials research · M Kamruddin P K Ajikumar S Dash A K Tyagi Baldev Raj.

  12. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. D S Prasad. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 25 Issue 2 April 2002 pp 79-83 Materials Synthesis. Preparation of high purity tellurium by zone refining · N R Munirathnam D S Prasad Ch Sudheer A J Singh T L Prakash · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  13. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. S R Dhage. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 27 Issue 1 February 2004 pp 43-45 Dielectric Materials. Nonlinear – characteristics study of doped SnO2 · S R Dhage V Ravi S K Date · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. When tin oxide is doped with ...

  14. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. U S Sajeev. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 27 Issue 2 April 2004 pp 155-161 Magnetic Materials. Magnetic field induced assembling of nanoparticles in ferrofluidic liquid thin films based on NiFe1-Fe2O4 · V S Abraham S Swapna Nair S Rajesh U S ...

  15. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. SARAVANA KUMAR JAGANATHAN. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 41 Issue 1 February 2018 pp 18. Advanced nanofibrous textile-based dressing material for treating chronic wounds · ISABEL HERRMANN EKO SUPRIYANTO SARAVANA KUMAR ...

  16. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. S Roy. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 25 Issue 6 November 2002 pp 513-515. Improved zinc oxide film for gas sensor applications · S Roy S Basu · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. Zinc oxide (ZnO) is a versatile material for different commercial ...

  17. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. DANUTA OLSZEWSKA. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 41 Issue 1 February 2018 pp 16. Influence of the conditions of a solid-state synthesis anode material Li 4 Ti 5 O 12 on its electrochemical properties of lithium cells · DANUTA OLSZEWSKA ANNA ...

  18. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. ISABEL HERRMANN. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 41 Issue 1 February 2018 pp 18. Advanced nanofibrous textile-based dressing material for treating chronic wounds · ISABEL HERRMANN EKO SUPRIYANTO SARAVANA KUMAR JAGANATHAN A ...

  19. S.E.A. Lab. Science Experiments and Activities. Marine Science for High School Students in Chemistry, Biology and Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Kathy, Ed.

    A series of science experiments and activities designed for secondary school students taking biology, chemistry, physics, physical science or marine science courses are outlined. Each of the three major sections--chemistry, biology, and physics--addresses concepts that are generally covered in those courses but incorporates aspects of marine…

  20. Normal Science Education and Its Dangers: The Case of School Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Berkel, Berry; De Vos, Wobbe; Verdonk, Adri H.; Pilot, Albert

    2000-01-01

    Attempts to solve the problem of hidden structure in school chemistry. Argues that normal chemistry education is isolated from common sense, everyday life and society, the history and philosophy of science, technology, school physics, and chemical research. (Author/CCM)

  1. Based on a True Story: Using Movies as Source Material for General Chemistry Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griep, Mark A.; Mikasen, Marjorie L.

    2005-10-01

    Research for chemical reports and case study analysis of chemical topics are two commonly used learning activities to engage and enrich student understanding of the content in introductory chemistry courses. Even though movies are excellent vehicles for exploring the human dimension of events, they have been used only sparingly as source material in introductory science courses. One reason for this sparing use has been the lack of a list of suitable movies. To fill this void, a list of one dozen highly rated movies is presented. The focus of these movies is either a scientist's chemical research or the societal impact of some chemical compound. The method by which two of these movies were used as source material for a written report in a general chemistry course is described. The student response to the exercise was enthusiastic.

  2. Vehicle exhaust treatment using electrical discharge and materials chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonkyn, R.G.; Balmer, M.L.; Barlow, S.E.; Orlando, T.M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Goulette, D.; Hoard, J. [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States). Scientific Research Lab.

    1997-12-31

    Current 3-way catalytic converters have proven quite effective at removing NO{sub x} from the exhaust of spark ignition vehicles operating near stoichiometric air-to-fuel ratios. However, diesel engines typically operate at very high air-to-fuel ratios. Under such lean burn conditions current catalytic converters are ineffective for NO{sub x} removal. As a result, considerable effort has been made to develop a viable lean NO{sub x} catalyst. Although some materials have been shown to reduce NO{sub x} under lean burn conditions, none exhibit the necessary activity and stability at the high temperatures and humidities found in typical engine exhaust,. As a result, alternative technologies are being explored in an effort to solve the so-called lean NO{sub x} problem. Packed-bed barrier discharge systems are well suited to take advantage of plasma-surface interactions due to the large number of contaminant surface collisions in the bed. The close proximity of the active surface to transient species produced by the plasma may lead to favorable chemistry at considerably lower temperatures than required by thermal catalysts. The authors present data in this paper illustrating that the identity and surface properties of the packing material can alter the discharge-driven chemistry in synthetic leanburn exhaust mixtures. Results using non-porous glass beads as the packing material suggest the limits of NO{sub x} reduction using purely gas phase discharge chemistry. By comparison, encouraging results are reported for several alternative packing materials.

  3. FWP executive summaries, Basic Energy Sciences Materials Sciences Programs (SNL/NM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samara, G.A.

    1997-05-01

    The BES Materials Sciences Program has the central theme of Scientifically Tailored Materials. The major objective of this program is to combine Sandia`s expertise and capabilities in the areas of solid state sciences, advanced atomic-level diagnostics and materials synthesis and processing science to produce new classes of tailored materials as well as to enhance the properties of existing materials for US energy applications and for critical defense needs. Current core research in this program includes the physics and chemistry of ceramics synthesis and processing, the use of energetic particles for the synthesis and study of materials, tailored surfaces and interfaces for materials applications, chemical vapor deposition sciences, artificially-structured semiconductor materials science, advanced growth techniques for improved semiconductor structures, transport in unconventional solids, atomic-level science of interfacial adhesion, high-temperature superconductors, and the synthesis and processing of nano-size clusters for energy applications. In addition, the program includes the following three smaller efforts initiated in the past two years: (1) Wetting and Flow of Liquid Metals and Amorphous Ceramics at Solid Interfaces, (2) Field-Structured Anisotropic Composites, and (3) Composition-Modulated Semiconductor Structures for Photovoltaic and Optical Technologies. The latter is a joint effort with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Separate summaries are given of individual research areas.

  4. [Applications of synthetic biology in materials science].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tianxin; Zhong, Chao

    2017-03-25

    Materials are the basis for human being survival and social development. To keep abreast with the increasing needs from all aspects of human society, there are huge needs in the development of advanced materials as well as high-efficiency but low-cost manufacturing strategies that are both sustainable and tunable. Synthetic biology, a new engineering principle taking gene regulation and engineering design as the core, greatly promotes the development of life sciences. This discipline has also contributed to the development of material sciences and will continuously bring new ideas to future new material design. In this paper, we review recent advances in applications of synthetic biology in material sciences, with the focus on how synthetic biology could enable synthesis of new polymeric biomaterials and inorganic materials, phage display and directed evolution of proteins relevant to materials development, living functional materials, engineered bacteria-regulated artificial photosynthesis system as well as applications of gene circuits for material sciences.

  5. PECASE - First Principles Modeling of Mechanics and Chemistry of Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-18

    22-25, 2010) cosponsored by National Academy of Engineering and the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation. Chinese Ministry of Education and Li Ka...Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang, China, July 18, 2011. Keynote presentation, ASME McMat2011, symposium...San Francisco, April 13-17, 2009. Invited talk, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics , March 10, 2009. Invited talk, TMS 2009 Annual Meeting & Exhibition

  6. Analytical chemistry in nuclear science and technology: a scientometric mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kademani, B.S.; Kumar, Anil; Kumar, Vijai

    2007-01-01

    This paper attempts to analyse quantitatively the growth and development of Analytical Chemistry research in Nuclear Science and Technology in terms of publication output as reflected in International Nuclear Information System (INIS) database (1970-2005). During 1970-2005 a total of 8224 papers were published. There were only seven papers published in 1970. Thereafter, a tremendous explosion of literature was observed in this area. The highest number of papers (636) were published in 1985. The average number of publications published per year was 228.44. United States topped the list with 1811 publications followed by USSR with 1688 publications, Germany with 777 publications, India with 730 publications and Hungary with 519 publications. Authorship and collaboration trend was towards multi-authored papers as 80.3 percent of the papers were collaborative is indicative of the multidisciplinary nature of research activity. The most prolific authors were: B. F. Myasoedov, AN SSSR Moscow Inst. Geokhimii I Analitisheskoi Khimii, Russian Federation with 84 publications, M. Sudersanan, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India with 67 publications, P.Vanura and V. Jedinakova Krizova both from Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague, Czech Republic with 54 publications each, S. Gangadharan, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India with 47 publications, V.M. Ivanova , M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Russian Federation with 45 publications and Yu. A Zolotov Lomonosov Moscow State University, Russian Federation with 40 publications. The journals most preferred by the scientists for publication of papers were : Zhurnal Analiticheskoj Khimii with 713 papers, Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry with 409 papers, Analytical Chemistry Washington with 364 papers, Fresenius' Journal of Analytical Chemistry with 324 papers, Indian Journal of Chemistry, Section A with 251 papers, and Journal of Analytical Chemistry of the USSR with 145 papers. The high

  7. Bulletin of Materials Science | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... nickel oxides, LiNi0.8M0.2O2 and LiCo0.8M0.2O2 (M = Mg2+, Ca2+, Ba2+), ... Department of Industrial Chemistry, Alagappa University, Karaikudi 630 003, India; Department of Chemical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seodaemun-Ku, ...

  8. Bulletin of Materials Science | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Enhanced antibacterial performance of Fe 3 O 4 –Ag and MnFe 2 O 4 –Ag ... Department of Chemistry, Fatih University, 34500 Buyukcekmece-Istanbul, Turkey ... Chemicals and Chemical Industry Trade Company, Saraçlar Industrial Zone, No.

  9. Students' Science Attitudes, Beliefs, and Context: Associations with Science and Chemistry Aspirations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujtaba, Tamjid; Sheldrake, Richard; Reiss, Michael J.; Simon, Shirley

    2018-01-01

    There is a widespread concern that relatively few students, especially those from disadvantaged backgrounds, continue to study chemistry and other science subjects after compulsory education. Yet it remains unclear how different aspects of students' background and home context, their own attitudes and beliefs, and their experiences of particular…

  10. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... India; Department of Physics, Sultan Qaboos University, Muscat, P.O. Box 36, Code 123, Oman; Department of Polymer Science andRubber Technology, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin 682022, India; Department of Materials Science and Nanoengineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005, USA ...

  11. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Editorial Board. Bulletin of Materials Science. Editor. Giridhar U. Kulkarni, Centre for Nano and Soft Matter Science, Bengaluru. Associate Editors. Ayan Datta, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Kolkata M. Eswaramoorthy, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bengaluru A.K. Ganguli ...

  12. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. T Mirza. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 23 Issue 5 October 2000 pp 377-382 Glass Ceramics. Preparation and characterization of magnesium–aluminium–silicate glass ceramics · Madhumita Goswami T Mirza A Sarkar Shobha Manikandan Sangeeta ...

  13. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. Murali Sastry. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 23 Issue 3 June 2000 pp 159-163 Nanomaterials. A note on the use of ellipsometry for studying the kinetics of formation of self-assembled monolayers · Murali Sastry · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  14. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. Rajeev Gupta. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 34 Issue 3 June 2011 pp 447-454. An investigation in InGaO3(ZnO)m pellets as cause of variability in thin film transistor characteristics · Sonachand Adhikari Rajeev Gupta Ashish Garg Deepak.

  15. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. Amit Sinha. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 24 Issue 6 December 2001 pp 653-657 Bioceramics. Development of calcium phosphate based bioceramics · Amit Sinha A Ingle K R Munim S N Vaidya B P Sharma A N Bhisey · More Details Abstract Fulltext ...

  16. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 31; Issue 3. Formation of InN nanoparticle and nanorod structures by nitrogen plasma annealing method ... Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110 016, India; Material Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, ...

  17. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. MURAT UYGUN. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 39 Issue 2 April 2016 pp 353-359. Hydrophobic nano-carrier for lysozyme adsorption · CANAN ALTUNBAS FULDEN ZEYNEP URAL MURAT UYGUN NESIBE AVCIBASI UGUR AVCIBASI DENIZ AKTAS ...

  18. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. Ch Sudheer. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 25 Issue 6 November 2002 pp 545-547. Tellurium purification: various techniques and limitations · D S Prasad Ch Sudheer N R Munirathnam T L Prakash · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. Limitations and ...

  19. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. B P Singh. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 23 Issue 1 February 2000 pp 11-16 Molecular Magnets. Synthesis and magnetic properties of one-dimensional metal oxalate networks as molecular-based magnets · B P Singh B Singh · More Details Abstract ...

  20. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. Zhanshuang Li. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 31 Issue 2 April 2008 pp 193-195 Nanomaterials. Mesoscale organization of CuO nanoslices: Formation of sphere · Jun Wang Shunxiao Zhang Zhanshuang Li Jia You Piaoping Yang Xiaoyan Jing Milin ...

  1. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. Shunxiao Zhang. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 31 Issue 2 April 2008 pp 193-195 Nanomaterials. Mesoscale organization of CuO nanoslices: Formation of sphere · Jun Wang Shunxiao Zhang Zhanshuang Li Jia You Piaoping Yang Xiaoyan Jing Milin ...

  2. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. Manoj Kumar. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 26 Issue 3 April 2003 pp 335-341 Glasses. Optical absorption and fluorescent behaviour of titanium ions in silicate glasses · Manoj Kumar Aman Uniyal A P S Chauhan S P Singh · More Details Abstract ...

  3. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. K Rajendra Babu. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 24 Issue 2 April 2001 pp 249-252 Crystal Growth. Thermal behaviour of strontium tartrate single crystals grown in gel · M H Rahimkutty K Rajendra Babu K Sreedharan Pillai M R Sudarsana Kumar C M K ...

  4. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. RITWIK SARKAR. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 33 Issue 3 June 2010 pp 293-298 Alloys and Steels. Utilization of steel melting electric arc furnace slag for development of vitreous ceramic tiles · Ritwik Sarkar Nar Singh Swapan Kumar Das.

  5. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. K Prasad. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 27 Issue 6 December 2004 pp 547-553 Glasses and Ceramics. Impedance analysis of Pb2Sb3LaTi5O18 ceramic · C K Suman K Prasad R N P Choudhary · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. Polycrystalline ...

  6. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. K Mondal. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 36 Issue 1 February 2013 pp 51-58. Electrochemical passivation behaviour of nanocrystalline Fe80Si20 coating in borate buffer solution · G Gupta A P Moon K Mondal · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  7. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. SABRI BAYLAV. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 41 Issue 2 April 2018 pp 49. Synthesis and characterization of metal ion-imprinted polymers · YASEMIN ISIKVER SABRI BAYLAV · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. In this study, ion-imprinted polymeric ...

  8. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. P M Raole. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 34 Issue 1 February 2011 pp 81-88. Effect of ion beam irradiation on metal particle doped polymer composites · N L Singh Sejal Shah Anjum Qureshi A Tripathi F Singh D K Avasthi P M Raole · More Details ...

  9. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. Anjum Qureshi. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 29 Issue 6 November 2006 pp 605-609. Analysis of organometallics dispersed polymer composite irradiated with oxygen ions · N L Singh Anjum Qureshi A K Rakshit D K Avasthi · More Details Abstract ...

  10. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. M Singh. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 28 Issue 7 December 2005 pp .... Swift heavy ion irradiation effect on Cu-doped CdS nanocrystals embedded in PMMA · Shweta Agrawal Subodh Srivastava Sumit Kumar S S Sharma B Tripathi M Singh Y K Vijay.

  11. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 31; Issue 1. Pressure induced graft-co-polymerization of acrylonitrile onto Saccharum cilliare fibre and ... Author Affiliations. A S Singha1 Anjali Shama1 Vijay Kumar Thakur1. Material Science Laboratory, National Institute of Technology, Hamirpur 177 005, India ...

  12. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    AGH-University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Ceramics, Department of Biomaterials, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow, Poland; The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Physics and Center for 2-Dimensional and Layered Materials, 104 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA ...

  13. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    School of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, Anhui Polytechnic University, Wuhu, Anhui 241000, P.R. China; Anhui Provincial Laboratory of High Performance Nonferrous Metals Material, Wuhu, Anhui 241000, P.R. China; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology of ...

  14. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. Y Arthoba Naik. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 28 Issue 5 August 2005 pp 495-501 Thin Films. A new condensation product for zinc plating from non-cyanide alkaline bath · Y Arthoba Naik T V Venkatesha · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  15. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. Dinesh Kumar. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 25 Issue 6 November 2002 pp 549-551. Semiconductor applications of plasma immersion ion implantation technology · Mukesh Kumar Rajkumar Dinesh Kumar P J George · More Details Abstract Fulltext ...

  16. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. R Murugesan. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 25 Issue 7 December 2002 pp 613-618 Polymers. Metal oxalate complexes as novel inorganic dopants: Studies on their effect on conducting polyaniline · R Murugesan E Subramanian · More Details ...

  17. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. S Gopalakrishnan. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 27 Issue 3 June 2004 pp 235-241 Polymers. Synthesis, mechanical, thermal and chemical properties of polyurethanes based on cardanol · C V Mythili A Malar Retna S Gopalakrishnan · More Details ...

  18. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. E Subramanian. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 25 Issue 7 December 2002 pp 613-618 Polymers. Metal oxalate complexes as novel inorganic dopants: Studies on their effect on conducting polyaniline · R Murugesan E Subramanian · More Details ...

  19. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. HUA WANG. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 36 Issue 3 June 2013 pp 389-393. Effects of Bi doping on dielectric and ferroelectric properties of PLBZT ferroelectric thin films synthesized by sol–gel processing · Hua Wang Li Liu Ji-Wen Xu Chang-Lai Yuan ...

  20. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. Raji George. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 30 Issue 2 April 2007 pp 183-185 Nanomaterials. Synthesis, characterization and gas sensitivity of MoO3 nanoparticles · Arnab Ganguly Raji George · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. Nanoparticles of ...

  1. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. V Vinmathi. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 38 Issue 3 June 2015 pp 625-628. A green and facile approach for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles using aqueous extract of Ailanthus excelsa leaves, evaluation of its antibacterial and anticancer efficacy.

  2. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. R Bajpai. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 25 Issue 1 February 2002 pp 21-23 Mechanical Properties. Surface modification on PMMA : PVDF polyblend: hardening under chemical environment · R Bajpai V Mishra Pragyesh Agrawal S C Datt · More Details ...

  3. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. A K Bajpai. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 28 Issue 6 October 2005 pp 529-534 Review—Polymers. Morphological, thermal and annealed microhardness characterization of gelatin based interpenetrating networks of polyacrylonitrile: A hard biopolymer.

  4. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. Nitai Debnath. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 37 Issue 2 April 2014 pp 199-206. Ciprofloxacin conjugated zinc oxide nanoparticle: A camouflage towards multidrug resistant bacteria · Prasun Patra Shouvik Mitra Nitai Debnath Panchanan Pramanik ...

  5. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. K B R Varma. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 30 Issue 6 December 2007 pp 567-570 Ceramics and Glasses. Microwave synthesis and sintering characteristics of CaCu3Ti4O12 · P Thomas L N Sathapathy K Dwarakanath K B R Varma · More Details ...

  6. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. Arunkumar Lagashetty. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 27 Issue 6 December 2004 pp 491-495 Nanomaterials. Adsorption study of Pb ions on nanosized SnO2, synthesized by self-propagating combustion reaction · Arunkumar Lagashetty A ...

  7. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. TRAN NGOC TUYEN. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 41 Issue 1 February 2018 pp 6. Lead ions removal from aqueous solution using modified carbon nanotubes · NGUYEN DUC VU QUYEN TRAN NGOC TUYEN DINH QUANG KHIEU HO VAN MINH ...

  8. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. N J KARALE. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 40 Issue 7 December 2017 pp 1335-1345. Chemical synthesis and characterization of nano-sized rare-earth ruthenium pyrochlore compounds Ln 2 Ru 2 O 7 (Ln = rare earth) · R A PAWAR A K NIKUMBH ...

  9. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. Manoj Komath. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 23 Issue 2 April 2000 pp 135-140 Biomaterials. On the development of an apatitic calcium phosphate bone cement · Manoj Komath H K Varma R Sivakumar · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  10. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. Le Minh Duc. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 36 Issue 5 October 2013 pp 779-788. Study on photocatalysis of TiO2 nanotubes prepared by methanol-thermal synthesis at low temperature · Chau Thanh Nam Wein-Duo Yang Le Minh Duc · More Details ...

  11. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. K Veera Brahmam. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 28 Issue 5 August 2005 pp 411-414 Single Crystals. Crystal growth and reflectivity studies of Zn1–MnTe crystals · K Veera Brahmam D Raja Reddy B K Reddy · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  12. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. Wein-Duo Yang. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 36 Issue 5 October 2013 pp 779-788. Study on photocatalysis of TiO2 nanotubes prepared by methanol-thermal synthesis at low temperature · Chau Thanh Nam Wein-Duo Yang Le Minh Duc.

  13. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. Neelotpal Sen Sarma. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 37 Issue 7 December 2014 pp 1613-1624. Enhancement of proton conductivity of sulfonated polystyrene membrane prepared by plasma polymerization process · Bhabesh Kumar Nath Aziz Khan ...

  14. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. Md HABIB. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 41 Issue 2 April 2018 pp 56. Tuning the BODIPY core for its potential use in DSSC: a quantum chemical approach · NARENDRA NATH GHOSH Md HABIB ANUP PRAMANIK PRANAB SARKAR SOUGATA PAL.

  15. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. Zhang Lei. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 34 Issue 1 February 2011 pp 161-167. Characterization on strength and toughness of welded joint for Q550 steel · Jiang Qinglei Li Yajiang Wang Juan Zhang Lei · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. Q550 high ...

  16. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. B L Kalsotra. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 34 Issue 4 July 2011 pp 843-851. Synthesis and characterization of composites of mixed oxides of iron and neodymium in polymer matrix of aniline–formaldehyde · Sajdha H N Sheikh B L Kalsotra N Kumar S ...

  17. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. B N Dev. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 29 Issue 2 April 2006 pp 101-105 Polymers. Proton microbeam irradiation effects on PtBA polymer · J Kamila S Roy K Bhattacharjee B Rout B N Dev R Guico J Wang A W Haberl P Ayyub P V Satyam.

  18. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. T Bhimasankaram. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 23 Issue 6 December 2000 pp 483-489 Oxide Ceramics. Effect of HIPing on conductivity and impedance measurements of DyBi5Fe2Ti3O18 ceramics · N V Prasad G Prasad Mahendra Kumar S V ...

  19. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. REGINA C SO. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 40 Issue 6 October 2017 pp 1179-1187. Preparation, characterization of chitosan/bamboo charcoal/poly(methacrylate) composite beads · DOROTHY CAMINOS-PERUELO WEI-CHIEH WANG ...

  20. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. F Wang. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 34 Issue 5 August 2011 pp 1033-1037. Synthesis of Mn-doped CeO2 nanorods and their application as humidity sensors · C H Hu C H Xia F Wang M Zhou P F Yin X Y Han · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  1. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. S Pal. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 24 Issue 4 August 2001 pp 415-420 Biomaterials. A novel bio-inorganic bone implant containing deglued bone, chitosan and gelatin · G Saraswathy S Pal C Rose T P Sastry · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  2. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. Thotapalli P Sastry. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 34 Issue 1 February 2011 pp 177-181. Preparation and characterization of a novel bone graft composite containing bone ash and egg shell powder · Gunasekaran Krithiga Thotapalli P Sastry.

  3. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. Annie John. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 25 Issue 2 April 2002 pp 141-154 Biomaterials. Bone growth response with porous hydroxyapatite granules in a critical sized lapine tibial-defect model · Annie John S Abiraman H K Varma T V Kumari P R ...

  4. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. LIFANG ZHANG. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 38 Issue 3 June 2015 pp 811-816. Fabrication and characterization of PDLLA/pyrite composite bone scaffold for osteoblast culture · Lifang Zhang Yanyan Zheng Chengdong Xiong · More Details Abstract ...

  5. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. S S Samal. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 30 Issue 4 August 2007 pp 379-386 Polymers. Carbon nanotube reinforced polymer composites—A state of the art · S Bal S S Samal · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. Because of their high mechanical ...

  6. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. N K PANDEY. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 40 Issue 2 April 2017 pp 253-262. Electrical and optical properties of ZnO–WO 3 nanocomposite and its application as a solid-state humidity sensor · VANDNA SHAKYA N K PANDEY SUNEET KUMAR ...

  7. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. P K Parhi. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 24 Issue 2 April 2001 pp 143-149. Failure analysis of multiple delaminated composite plates due to bending and impact · P K Parhi S K Bhattacharyya P K Sinha · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. The present ...

  8. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. Shweta Agrawal. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 32 Issue 6 December 2009 pp 569-573 Thin Films and Nanomatter. Swift heavy ion irradiation effect on Cu-doped CdS nanocrystals embedded in PMMA · Shweta Agrawal Subodh Srivastava Sumit ...

  9. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. Sandeep Arya. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 36 Issue 4 August 2013 pp 535-539. Synthesis of copper telluride nanowires using template-based electrodeposition method as chemical sensor · Sandeep Arya Saleem Khan Suresh Kumar Rajnikant ...

  10. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. SURESH KUMAR. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 35 Issue 5 October 2012 pp 787-794. Electrical transport and EPR investigations: A comparative study for d.c. conduction mechanism in monovalent and multivalent ions doped polyaniline.

  11. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. A S Prakash. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 29 Issue 4 August 2006 pp 339-345 Ceramics and Glasses. Solution-combustion synthesis of Bi1–LnO1.5 (Ln = Y and La–Yb) oxide ion conductors · Manjunath B Bellakki A S Prakash C Shivakumara M S ...

  12. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. Uma Maheswar Rao. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 24 Issue 6 December 2001 pp 587-593 Surface Studies. Investigation of surface modifications in ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) rubber due to tracking under a.c. and d.c. voltages.

  13. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. Jiuxing Zhang. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 34 Issue 4 July 2011 pp 825-828. Magnetocaloric effect of Gd5Si2Ge2 alloys in low magnetic field · Hong Zeng Chunjiang Kuang Jiuxing Zhang Ming Yue · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  14. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. H N Sheikh. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 34 Issue 4 July 2011 pp 843-851. Synthesis and characterization of composites of mixed oxides of iron and neodymium in polymer matrix of aniline–formaldehyde · Sajdha H N Sheikh B L Kalsotra N Kumar S ...

  15. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. P P PRADYUMNAN. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 40 Issue 5 September 2017 pp 1007-1011. Structural and magnetic studies on copper succinate dihydrate single crystals · M P BINITHA P P PRADYUMNAN · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  16. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. Rani Joseph. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 26 Issue 3 April 2003 pp 343-348 Thin Films. Optimization of pH and direct imaging conditions of complexed methylene blue sensitized poly(vinyl chloride) films · M Ushamani N G Leenadeenja K Sreekumar ...

  17. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. R AHMED. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 40 Issue 6 October 2017 pp 1105-1110. Structural, elastic, optoelectronic and magnetic properties of CdHo 2 S 4 spinel: a first-principle study · I HATRAF O MERABIHA T SEDDIK H BALTACHE R KHENATA R ...

  18. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. MONICA KATIYAR. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 36 Issue 4 August 2013 pp 653-660. Processing and performance of organic insulators as a gate layer in organic thin film transistors fabricated on polyethylene terephthalate substrate · Saumen Mandal ...

  19. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. K R Rajesh. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 37 Issue 1 February 2014 pp 95-99. High mobility polymer gated organic field effect transistor using zinc phthalocyanine · K R Rajesh V Kannan M R Kim Y S Chae J K Rhee · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  20. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. D K Avasthi. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 27 Issue 3 June 2004 pp 263-267 Polymers. Electrical properties of ion irradiated polypropylene films · N L Singh Anita Sharma V Shrinet A K Rakshit D K Avasthi · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. The effect ...

  1. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. V Shrinet. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 27 Issue 3 June 2004 pp 263-267 Polymers. Electrical properties of ion irradiated polypropylene films · N L Singh Anita Sharma V Shrinet A K Rakshit D K Avasthi · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. The effect of ...

  2. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. A K Rakshit. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 27 Issue 3 June 2004 pp 263-267 Polymers. Electrical properties of ion irradiated polypropylene films · N L Singh Anita Sharma V Shrinet A K Rakshit D K Avasthi · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. The effect ...

  3. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. K Chandra. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 30 Issue 4 August 2007 pp 309-314 Biomaterials. Characteristics of porous zirconia coated with hydroxyapatite as human bones · V V Narulkar S Prakash K Chandra · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  4. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Austrian Centre of Competence for Tribology, Viktor Kaplan-Straße 2, A 2700 Wiener Neustadt, Austria; Institute of Industrial Electronics and Material Science, Vienna University of Technology, A 1040 Vienna, Austria; Institute of Material Science and Testing, Vienna University of Technology, A 1040 Vienna, Austria; Institute ...

  5. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. XIAOWEN ZHANG. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 37 Issue 4 June 2014 pp 895-902. Structural evolution, electrical and optical properties of AZO films deposited by sputtering ultra-high density target · Jiwen Xu Zupei Yang Hua Wang Xiaowen Zhang.

  6. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. KANNAIYAN DINAKARAN. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 40 Issue 7 December 2017 pp 1455-1462. A sensitive optical sensor based on DNA-labelled Si@SiO 2 core–shell nanoparticle for the detection of Hg 2 + ions in environmental water samples.

  7. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. V Bhat. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 23 Issue 4 August 2000 pp 295-299 Alloys. A test for diffusional coherency strain hypothesis in the discontinuous precipitation in Mg–Al alloy · K T Kashyap C Ramachandra V Bhat B Chatterji · More Details Abstract ...

  8. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. AGNIESZKA SOBCZAK-KUPIEC. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 36 Issue 4 August 2013 pp 755-764. Effect of calcination conditions of pork bone sludge on behaviour of hydroxyapatite in simulated body fluid · Agnieszka Sobczak-Kupiec Zbigniew ...

  9. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. SUDHANSHU CHOUDHARY. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 35 Issue 5 October 2012 pp 713-718. Theoretical study on effect of radial and axial deformation on electron transport properties in a semiconducting Si–C nanotube · Sudhanshu Choudhary ...

  10. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. Amarnath. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 26 Issue 4 June 2003 pp 435-439 Biomaterials. Effect of heat treatments on the hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility of API X-65 grade line-pipe steel · G Ananta Nagu Amarnath T K G Namboodhiri.

  11. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. KADARKARAI MURUGAN. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 40 Issue 7 December 2017 pp 1455-1462. A sensitive optical sensor based on DNA-labelled Si@SiO 2 core–shell nanoparticle for the detection of Hg 2 + ions in environmental water samples.

  12. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. YONG J IANG. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 40 Issue 6 October 2017 pp 1255-1261. Molecular dynamics study on the relaxation properties of bilayered graphene with defects · WEI ZHANG JIU-REN YIN PING ZHANG YAN-HUAI DING YONG J IANG.

  13. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. B Swarna Latha. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 37 Issue 4 June 2014 pp 883-888. Structural, spectroscopic and electrochemical study of V substituted LiTi2(PO4)3 solid electrolyte for lithium-ion batteries · A Venkateswara Rao V Veeraiah A V Prasada ...

  14. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. B V Radhakrishna Bhat. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 23 Issue 2 April 2000 pp 109-117 Composites. Optimization of processing parameters for making alumina–partially stabilized zirconia laminated composites · S Deb B V Radhakrishna Bhat.

  15. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. S K Biswas. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 33 Issue 3 June 2010 pp 251-255 Polymers. Effect of substrate roughness on growth of diamond by hot filament CVD · Awadesh K Mallik S R Binu L N Satapathy Chandrabhas Narayana Md Motin Seikh S A ...

  16. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. Jadu Samuel. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 36 Issue 6 November 2013 pp 981-987. Green chemical incorporation of sulphate into polyoxoanions of molybdenum to nano level · Jadu Samuel S Hari Prasad M K Sreedhar · More Details Abstract Fulltext ...

  17. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. T K Bhattacharya. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 26 Issue 7 December 2003 pp 703-706 Cements. Solid state sintering of lime in presence of La2O3 and CeO2 · T K Bhattacharya A Ghosh H S Tripathi S K Das · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  18. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. Dong Zhang. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 34 Issue 1 February 2011 pp 25-28. Aqueous colloids of graphene oxide nanosheets by exfoliation of graphite oxide without ultrasonication · Tian-You Zhang Dong Zhang · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  19. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. V Ganesan. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 28 Issue 6 October 2005 pp 609-615 Thin Films. Structural morphology of amorphous conducting carbon film · P N Vishwakarma V Prasad S V Subramanyam V Ganesan · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  20. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. M Mandal. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 37 Issue 4 June 2014 pp 743-752. Porous copper template from partially spark plasma-sintered Cu–Zn aggregate via dezincification · M Mandal D Singh Gouthama B S Murty S Sangal K Mondal · More Details ...

  1. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. D K Kharat. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 28 Issue 5 August 2005 pp 453-455 Ceramics and Glasses. Characterization and microstructure of porous lead zirconate titanate ceramics · B Praveenkumar H H Kumar D K Kharat · More Details Abstract ...

  2. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. Hui Shen. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 30 Issue 2 April 2007 pp 101-104 Single Crystals. Piezoelectric properties of Sr3Ga2Ge4O14 single crystals · Anhua Wu Jiayue Xu Juan Zhou Hui Shen · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. A new piezoelectric ...

  3. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. Anhua Wu. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 27 Issue 4 August 2004 pp 333-336 Crystal Growth. Bridgman growth and defects of Nd : Sr3Ga2Ge4O14 laser crystals · Jiaxuan Ding Anhua Wu Jiayue Xu · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  4. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. G Prasad. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 23 Issue 5 October 2000 pp 431-437 High T c Superconductors. Studies on electrical properties of SrBi4Ti4–3Fe4O15 · N Venkat Ramulu G Prasad S V Suryanarayana T Bhima Sankaram · More Details ...

  5. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. S Muthulakshmi. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 37 Issue 7 December 2014 pp 1575-1582. Effect of temperature on the AC impedance of protein and carbohydrate biopolymers · S Muthulakshmi S Iyyapushpam D Pathinettam Padiyan · More Details ...

  6. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. A K Sahu. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 32 Issue 3 June 2009 pp 285-294. Nafion and modified-Nafion membranes for polymer electrolyte fuel cells: An overview · A K Sahu S Pitchumani P Sridhar A K Shukla · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  7. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. N L Singh. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 27 Issue 3 June 2004 pp 263-267 Polymers. Electrical properties of ion irradiated polypropylene films · N L Singh Anita Sharma V Shrinet A K Rakshit D K Avasthi · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. The effect ...

  8. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. Sejal Shah. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 30 Issue 5 October 2007 pp 477-480 Polymers. Study of microhardness and electrical properties of proton irradiated polyethersulfone (PES) · Nilam Shah Dolly Singh Sejal Shah Anjum Qureshi N L Singh K P ...

  9. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. S Prasannakumar. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 24 Issue 5 October 2001 pp 535-538 Polymers. Interpenetrating polymer networks based on polyol modified castor oil polyurethane and poly(2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate): Synthesis, chemical, ...

  10. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. K V Shah. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 26 Issue 7 December 2003 pp 715-720 Glasses and Ceramics. Preparation and studies of some thermal, mechanical and optical properties of Al2O3(1 – )NaPO3 glass system · K V Shah V Sudarsan M ...

  11. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. Ganesh Sanjeev. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 33 Issue 3 June 2010 pp 191-196 Thin Films and Nanomatter. Dielectric properties of electron irradiated PbZrO3 thin films · Shetty Aparna V M Jali Ganesh Sanjeev Jayanta Parui S B Krupanidhi.

  12. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. LING YANG. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 36 Issue 3 June 2013 pp 389-393. Effects of Bi doping on dielectric and ferroelectric properties of PLBZT ferroelectric thin films synthesized by sol–gel processing · Hua Wang Li Liu Ji-Wen Xu Chang-Lai Yuan ...

  13. Qi Liu - Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. QI LIU. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 34 Issue 2 April 2011 pp 183-189. Study of structural transformations and phases formation upon calcination of Zn–Ni–Al hydrotalcite nanosheets · Zhanshuang Li Yanchao Song Jun Wang Qi Liu Piaoping Yang ...

  14. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. A S Singha. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 31 Issue 1 February 2008 pp 7-13 Polymers. Pressure induced graft-co-polymerization of acrylonitrile onto Saccharum cilliare fibre and evaluation of some properties of grafted fibre · A S Singha Anjali Shama ...

  15. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. L C GUPTA. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 40 Issue 6 October 2017 pp 1121-1125. High-pressure studies of superconductivity in BiO 0.75 F 0.25 BiS 2 · ZEBA HAQUE GOHIL S THAKUR GANESAN KALAI SELVAN SONACHALAM ARUMUGAM L C ...

  16. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. H P Sachin. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 30 Issue 1 February 2007 pp 57-63 Electrochemistry. Polynitroaniline as brightener for zinc–nickel alloy plating from non-cyanide sulphate bath · H P Sachin Ganesha Achary Y Arthoba Naik T V Venkatesha.

  17. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. M Petrič. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 34 Issue 1 February 2011 pp 113-119. Performance of waterborne acrylic surface coatings on wood impregnated with Cu-ethanolamine preservatives · M Humar M Pavlič D Žlindra M Tomažič M Petrič.

  18. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. M Hafez. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 33 Issue 2 April 2010 pp 149-155 Polymers. Influence of granular strontium chloride as additives on some electrical and mechanical properties for pure polyvinyl alcohol · A B Elaydy M Hafez · More Details ...

  19. Perceptions of Crop Science Instructional Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, D. M.

    1994-01-01

    A number of crop science instructors have indicated that there is a shortage of quality, current crop/plant science teaching materials, particularly textbooks. A survey instrument was developed to solicit information from teachers about the use and adequacy of textbooks, laboratory manuals, and videotapes in crop/plant science instruction. (LZ)

  20. Development and Assessment of Green, Research-Based Instructional Materials for the General Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciatore, Kristen L.

    2010-01-01

    This research entails integrating two novel approaches for enriching student learning in chemistry into the context of the general chemistry laboratory. The first is a pedagogical approach based on research in cognitive science and the second is the green chemistry philosophy. Research has shown that inquiry-based approaches are effective in…

  1. Materials Science and the Problem of Garbage

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Materials science--the science of stuff--has made our lives better by making it possible for manufacturers to supply us with products. Students have misconceptions about materials use. Many may think using bottled water, for example, is harmless because they recycle the plastic empties, but they fail to consider the resources and energy used to…

  2. Engineering half-Heusler thermoelectric materials using Zintl chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeier, Wolfgang G.; Schmitt, Jennifer; Hautier, Geoffroy; Aydemir, Umut; Gibbs, Zachary M.; Felser, Claudia; Snyder, G. Jeffrey

    2016-06-01

    Half-Heusler compounds based on XNiSn and XCoSb (X = Ti, Zr or Hf) have rapidly become important thermoelectric materials for converting waste heat into electricity. In this Review, we provide an overview on the electronic properties of half-Heusler compounds in an attempt to understand their basic structural chemistry and physical properties, and to guide their further development. Half-Heusler compounds can exhibit semiconducting transport behaviour even though they are described as ‘intermetallic’ compounds. Therefore, it is most useful to consider these systems as rigid-band semiconductors within the framework of Zintl (or valence-precise) compounds. These considerations aid our understanding of their properties, such as the bandgap and low hole mobility because of interstitial Ni defects in XNiSn. Understanding the structural and bonding characteristics, including the presence of defects, will help to develop different strategies to improve and design better half-Heusler thermoelectric materials.

  3. Chemistry and technology of radiation processed composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czvikovszky, T.

    1985-01-01

    Composite materials of synthetics (based on monomers, oligomers and thermoplastics) and of natural polymers (wood and other fibrous cellulosics) prepared by radiation processing, offer valuable structural materials with enhanced coupling forces between the components. The applied polymer chemistry of such composites shows several common features with that of radiation grafting, e.g. the polymerization rate of oligomer-monomer mixtures in wood remains in most cases proportional to the square-root of the initiating dose-rate, just as in the simultaneous grafting, demonstrating that the chain termination kinetics remain regularly bimolecular in the corresponding dose-rate ranges. In the processing experiences of such composites, low dose requirement, easy process-control, and good technical feasibility have been found for composites of wood with oligomer-monomer mixtures, for coconut fibres with unsaturated polyesters and for pretreated wood fibre with polypropylene. (author)

  4. Developments in reactor materials science methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsykanov, V.A.; Ivanov, V.B.

    1987-01-01

    Problems related to organization of investigations into reactor materials science are considered. Currently the efficiency and reliability of nuclear power units are largely determined by the fact, how correctly and quickly conclusions concerning the parameters of designs and materials worked out for a long time in reactor cores, are made. To increase information value of materials science investigations it is necessary to create a uniform system, providing for solving methodical, technical and organizational problems. Peculiarities of the current state of reactor material science are analysed and recommendations on constructing an optimal scheme of investigations and data flow interconnection are given

  5. Perspectives on Materials Science in 3D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Jensen, Dorte

    2012-01-01

    Materials characterization in 3D has opened a new era in materials science, which is discussed in this paper. The original motivations and visions behind the development of one of the new 3D techniques, namely the three dimensional x-ray diffraction (3DXRD) method, are presented and the route...... to its implementation is described. The present status of materials science in 3D is illustrated by examples related to recrystallization. Finally, challenges and suggestions for the future success for 3D Materials Science relating to hardware evolution, data analysis, data exchange and modeling...

  6. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. G P Nayaka. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 37 Issue 3 May 2014 pp 705-711. Structural, electrical and electrochemical behaviours of LiNi0.4M0.1Mn1.5O4 ( = Al, Bi) as cathode material for Li-ion batteries · G P Nayaka J Manjanna K C Anjaneya P ...

  7. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. K C Anjaneya. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 37 Issue 3 May 2014 pp 705-711. Structural, electrical and electrochemical behaviours of LiNi0.4M0.1Mn1.5O4 ( = Al, Bi) as cathode material for Li-ion batteries · G P Nayaka J Manjanna K C Anjaneya P ...

  8. Design and Evaluation of a One-Semester General Chemistry Course for Undergraduate Life Science Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnoebelen, Carly; Towns, Marcy H.; Chmielewski, Jean; Hrycyna, Christine A.

    2018-01-01

    The chemistry curriculum for undergraduate life science majors at Purdue University has been transformed to better meet the needs of this student population and prepare them for future success. The curriculum, called the 1-2-1 curriculum, includes four consecutive and integrated semesters of instruction in general chemistry, organic chemistry, and…

  9. Students' science attitudes, beliefs, and context: associations with science and chemistry aspirations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujtaba, Tamjid; Sheldrake, Richard; Reiss, Michael J.; Simon, Shirley

    2018-04-01

    There is a widespread concern that relatively few students, especially those from disadvantaged backgrounds, continue to study chemistry and other science subjects after compulsory education. Yet it remains unclear how different aspects of students' background and home context, their own attitudes and beliefs, and their experiences of particular teaching approaches in school might limit or facilitate their studying aspirations; concurrently, less research has specifically focused on and surveyed disadvantaged students. In order to gain more insight, 4780 students were surveyed, covering those in Year 7 (age 11-12 years) and in Year 8 (age 12-13) from schools in England with high proportions of those from disadvantaged backgrounds. Predictive modelling highlighted that the students' aspirations to study non-compulsory science in the future, and to study the particular subject of chemistry, were strongly associated with their extrinsic motivation towards science (their perceived utility of science, considered as a means to gain particular careers or skills), their intrinsic interest in science, and their engagement in extra-curricular activities. Additionally, their self-concept beliefs (their confidence in their own abilities in science), some teaching approaches, and encouragement from teachers and family alongside family science capital had smaller but still relevant associations.

  10. The Science of Smart Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boohan, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Over the last few decades, smart materials have become increasingly important in the design of products. Essentially, a smart material is one that has been designed to respond to a stimulus, such as a change in temperature or magnetic field, in a particular and useful way. This article looks at a range of smart materials that are relatively…

  11. Radiation materials science. V. 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelenskij, V.F.

    1990-01-01

    This volume includes the papers of the international conference on radiation materials in Alushta, Ukraine in May 1990. The main topics are: basic research in radiation damage physics, a study of the structural materials for reactor cores; irradiation effect on reactor vessel, fuel, super- and semiconductor materials; investigation damage research methods

  12. Radiation materials science. V. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelenskij, V.F.

    1990-01-01

    This volume includes the papers of the international conference on radiation materials in Alushta, Ukraine in May 1990. The main topics are: basic research in radiation damage physics, a study of the structural materials for reactor cores; irradiation effect on reactor vessel, fuel, super- and semiconductor materials; investigation damage research methods

  13. Materials Science: A Spin-off in Research and Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aduda, B.O.

    2006-01-01

    The scope materials science is wide since it is a multi/trans-disciplinary subject, and is based on physics and chemistry of solid state. It embraces all aspects of engineering materials, from the most basic to the most novel, and is concerned with how a material is assembled from the basic units, can be used, can be modified or improved to perform specific tasks. Further, it is concerned with proper selection of materials for specific applications, and development of new and improved materials with unique properties for the ever increasing and more demanding applications, e.g., aerogels, ceramic membranes for fuel cells, bioceramics for hip bone replacements, nanostructured photoactive thin films for solar cell, sensors and photocatalysis applications etc

  14. DOE fundamentals handbook: Material science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors in providing operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of the structure and properties of metals. This volume contains the following modules: thermal shock (thermal stress, pressurized thermal shock), brittle fracture (mechanism, minimum pressurization-temperature curves, heatup/cooldown rate limits), and plant materials (properties considered when selecting materials, fuel materials, cladding and reflectors, control materials, nuclear reactor core problems, plant material problems, atomic displacement due to irradiation, thermal and displacement spikes due to irradiation, neutron capture effect, radiation effects in organic compounds, reactor use of aluminum)

  15. Application of radiation chemistry in materials modification and environmental protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmielewski, A.G.

    2007-01-01

    Radiation chemistry is a part of the physical chemistry similarly like photo-chemistry, plasma-chemistry, ultrasonic-chemistry etc. Ionizing radiation produces abundant secondary electrons. Following these primary events, the ions, secondary electrons and excited molecules undergo further transformations, exchanging charges and energy and reacting with surrounding molecules, thereby producing free radicals and other reactive species which finally evolve into new stable products. Three main sources of radiation are applied for radiation processing. These are electron accelerators, gamma sources and X-ray unit based on e-/X conversion process. Radiation processing was used early on for polymer modification. The intermediates formed during material irradiation can follow several reaction paths that result in disproportion, hydrogen abstraction, arrangements and/or the formation of new bonds. Nowadays, the modification of polymers covers radiation cross-linking, radiation-induced polymerization (graft polymerization and curing) and the degradation of polymers. Some polymers predominantly undergo crosslinking other degradation. However new techniques allow crosslinking of polymers which were considered to be degradable only, like PTFE and cellulose derivatives. Regarding natural polymers the biggest application concerns rubber pre-crosslinking in tire industry. The processing of natural polymers is also being developed to elaborate new biodegradable materials. The radiation crosslinked wires and cables show excellent heat resistance (long-term thermal stability and short-term thermal stability) as well as abrasion resistance. Other big application is crosslinking of XLPE type pipes which are widely used for hot water and floor heating [30]. Polybutelene terephthalate (PBT), which is a plastic for electronic industry, can be crosslinked by radiation and lead free soldering materials can be applied in such a case. This method of crosslinking is also applied to manufacture

  16. Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production Using New Combinatorial Chemistry Derived Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaramillo, Thomas F.; Baeck, Sung-Hyeon; Kleiman-Shwarsctein, Alan; Stucky, Galen D. (PI); McFarland, Eric W. (PI)

    2004-10-25

    Solar photoelectrochemical water-splitting has long been viewed as one of the “holy grails” of chemistry because of its potential impact as a clean, renewable method of fuel production. Several known photocatalytic semiconductors can be used; however, the fundamental mechanisms of the process remain poorly understood and no known material has the required properties for cost effective hydrogen production. In order to investigate morphological and compositional variations in metal oxides as they relate to opto-electrochemical properties, we have employed a combinatorial methodology using automated, high-throughput, electrochemical synthesis and screening together with conventional solid-state methods. This report discusses a number of novel, high-throughput instruments developed during this project for the expeditious discovery of improved materials for photoelectrochemical hydrogen production. Also described within this report are results from a variety of materials (primarily tungsten oxide, zinc oxide, molybdenum oxide, copper oxide and titanium dioxide) whose properties were modified and improved by either layering, inter-mixing, or doping with one or more transition metals. Furthermore, the morphologies of certain materials were also modified through the use of structure directing agents (SDA) during synthesis to create mesostructures (features 2-50 nm) that increased surface area and improved rates of hydrogen production.

  17. Anionic Redox Chemistry in Polysulfide Electrode Materials for Rechargeable Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayfer, Ekaterina D; Pazhetnov, Egor M; Kozlova, Mariia N; Artemkina, Sofya B; Fedorov, Vladimir E

    2017-12-22

    Classical Li-ion battery technology is based on the insertion of lithium ions into cathode materials involving metal (cationic) redox reactions. However, this vision is now being reconsidered, as many new-generation electrode materials with enhanced reversible capacities operate through combined cationic and anionic (non-metal) reversible redox processes or even exclusively through anionic redox transformations. Anionic participation in the redox reactions is observed in materials with more pronounced covalency, which is less typical for oxides, but quite common for phosphides or chalcogenides. In this Concept, we would like to draw the reader's attention to this new idea, especially, as it applies to transition-metal polychalcogenides, such as FeS 2 , VS 4 , TiS 3 , NbS 3 , TiS 4 , MoS 3 , etc., in which the key role is played by the (S-S) 2- /2 S 2- redox reaction. The exploration and better understanding of the anion-driven chemistry is important for designing advanced materials for battery and other energy-related applications. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 30; Issue 4 ... Microwave materials; ceramic dielectric resonators; polytitanates; co-precipitation. ... hypotheses viz. diffusion, high surface and nucleation energy, potential barrier, non-stoichiometry etc as critical factors limiting formation of 2 : 9 as single-phase material.

  19. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This generated great interest in the development of these heteroatom structured materials through different processing routes. ... of Materials Science, Sardar Patel University, Vallabh Vidyanagar 388 120, India; Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsuta, Yokohama 226, Japan ...

  20. Chemistry as the defining science: discipline and training in nineteenth-century chemical laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Catherine M

    2011-06-01

    The institutional revolution has become a major landmark of late-nineteenth century science, marking the rapid construction of large, institutional laboratories which transformed scientific training and practice. Although it has served historians of physics well, the institutional revolution has proved much more contentious in the case of chemistry. I use published sources, mainly written by chemists and largely focused on laboratories built in German-speaking lands between about 1865 and 1900, to show that chemical laboratory design was inextricably linked to productive practice, large-scale pedagogy and disciplinary management. I argue that effective management of the novel risks inherent in teaching and doing organic synthesis was significant in driving and shaping the construction of late-nineteenth century institutional chemical laboratories, and that these laboratories were essential to the disciplinary development of chemistry. Seen in this way, the laboratory necessarily becomes part of the material culture of late-nineteenth century chemistry, and I show how this view leads not only to a revision of what is usually known as the laboratory revolution in chemistry but also to a new interpretation of the institutional revolution in physics. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Proceedings of the DAE-BRNS fourth interdisciplinary symposium on materials chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyagi, D.; Banerjee, A.M.; Bhattacharyya, K.; Nigam, S.; Varma, S.; Tripathi, A.K.; Das, D.

    2012-12-01

    This symposium covers almost all the contemporary research areas of materials chemistry like materials for energy conversion, biomaterials, carbon based materials, chemical sensors, fuel cell materials and other electro-ceramics, polymers and soft condensed matters, thin films and surface chemistry, organic and organometallics, high purity materials, nanomaterials and clusters to acquaint ourselves with the advancement made in these emerging areas. Topics like nuclear materials, magnetic materials, catalysis and computational materials chemistry continue to be important facet of ISMC series of symposia. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  2. Crystal growth and computational materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayakumar, S.; Ravindran, P.; Arun Kumar, R.; Sudarshan, C.

    2012-01-01

    The proceedings of the international conference on advanced materials discusses the advances being made in the area of single crystals, their preparation and device development from these crystals and details of the progress that is taking place in the computational field relating to materials science. Computational materials science makes use of advanced simulation tools and computer interfaces to develop a virtual platform which can provide a model for real-time experiments. This book includes selected papers in topics of crystal growth and computational materials science. We are confident that the new concepts and results presented will stimulate and enhance progress of research on crystal growth and computational materials science. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  3. The materiality of materials and artefacts used in science classrooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cowie, Bronwen; Otrel-Cass, Kathrin; Moreland, Judy

    Material objects and artefacts receive limited attention in science education (Roehl, 2012) though they shape emerging interactions. This is surprising given science has material and a social dimensions (Pickering, 1995) whereby new knowledge develops as a consensus explanation of natural phenomena...... that is mediated significantly through materials and instruments used. Here we outline the ways teachers deployed material objects and artefacts by identifying their materiality to provide scenarios and resources (Roth, 2005) for interactions. Theoretical framework We use Ingold's (2011) distinction between...... materials as natural objects in this world and artefacts as manmade objects. We are aware that in a classroom material objects and artefacts shape, and are shaped by classroom practice through the way they selectively present scientific explanations. However, materials and artefacts have no intrinsic...

  4. Preservice Science Teachers' Attitudes towards Chemistry and Misconceptions about Chemical Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çam, Aylin; Topçu, Mustafa Sami; Sülün, Yusuf

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigates preservice science teachers' attitudes towards chemistry; their misconceptions about chemical kinetics; and relationships between pre-service science teachers' attitudes toward chemistry and misconceptions about chemical kinetics were examined. The sample of this study consisted of 81 freshman pre-service science…

  5. Materials Science of High-Temperature Superconducting Coated Conductor Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beasley, M. R

    2007-01-01

    This program was broadly focused on the materials science of high temperature superconducting coated conductors, which are of potential interest for application in electric power systems of interest to the Air Force...

  6. Student's Need Analysis for the Development of Chemistry Modules Based Guided Inquiry to Improve Science Process Skill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Arantika

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Science process skills (SPS are an important aspect of learning science. SPS help students to develop creativity in learning. Process skills such as observing, formulating questions, interpreting, experimenting, hypothesizing, applying concepts, and communicating. This study aims to analyze the need for development resources needs of science filled with science process skills. Requirement analysis of the development of teaching materials with the skill of the process of science needs to be done because the textbook is the reference a teacher in the class. The subjects matter of chemistry the study was three senior high schools in Sambas, West Borneo. Needs analysis conducted using a qualitative approach, in terms of needs in classroom learning and content of process skills on teaching materials. Data were collected by interviews and questionnaires were analyzed descriptively. The results showed that as many as 27 percents of students perceive the book used in learning has not yet trained the science process skills. As many as 73 percents of students perceive that they need instructional materials in the form of inquiry-based chemistry modules to improve science process skills. Modules are developed based guided inquiry for having guided inquiry learning stages that can practice students' science process skills.

  7. The Effect of Using 3E, 5E Learning Cycle in General Chemistry Laboratory to Prospective Science Teachers Attitude and Perceptions to the Science, Chemistry and Laboratory

    OpenAIRE

    Toprak, Fatih; Çelikler, Dilek

    2013-01-01

    The study aimed to investigate the emerging changes in prospective science teachers" attitudes and perceptions towards science, chemistry and laboratory resulting from the implementation of 3E. 5E learning cycles and traditional instruction in laboratory environment in which learning is achieved by doing and experiencing. The study included 74 first grade prospective science teachers from Ondokuz Mayıs University at the Department of Science Education. In the study, quasi-experimental pre-tes...

  8. Bulletin of Materials Science | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. Yasser B Saddeek1 Moenis A Azooz2 Amr Bakr Saddek3. Faculty of Science, Physics Department, Al-Azhar University, Assiut, Egypt; Glass Research Department, National Research Center, Dokki, Cairo, Egypt; Faculty of Engineering, Civil Engineering Department, Beni-Suef University, Beni-Suef, Egypt ...

  9. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. Ankur Jain1 R K Jain1 Shivani Agarwal1 I P Jain1. Material Science Laboratory, Centre for Non-Conventional Energy Resources, 14, Vigyan Bhawan, University of Rajasthan, Jaipur 302 004, India ...

  10. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 33; Issue 1. Structure, optical and thermal decomposition characters of LDPE graft copolymers synthesized by gamma irradiation ... Keywords. Gamma irradiation; graft copolymerization; spectroscopic analysis; XRD; kinetics of thermal decomposition; activation energy.

  11. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Bulletin of Materials Science began in the year 1979. ... one of the world's leading interactive databases of high quality STM journals, book series, books, reference works and online archives collection. ... Sadashivanagar, P.B. No. 8005 ...

  12. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    , Romania; 'Alexandru Ioan Cuza' University, Research Center on Advanced Materials and Technologies, Sciences Department, 11 Carol I Blvd., 700506 Iasi, Romania; Photonics Laboratory, Angers University, 2, Bd. Lavoisier, 49045 Angers, ...

  13. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. Xiaoming Liao1 Hongyang Zhu1 Guangfu Yin1 Zhongbing Huang1 Yadong Yao1 Xianchun Chen1. College of Materials Science and Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064, P.R. of China ...

  14. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 39; Issue 7 ... pulse electrodeposition with ultrasound agitation from nickelWatts-type bath. ... The results showed that wear resistance increased with increase in duty cycle and frequency.

  15. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 34; Issue 4 ... has a dielectric anomaly of ferroelectric to paraelectric type at 198°C, and exhibits ... that the compound has negative temperature coefficient of resistance (NTCR) behaviour.

  16. Materials irradiation research in neutron science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, Kenji; Oyama, Yukio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-11-01

    Materials irradiation researches are planned in Neutron Science Research Program. A materials irradiation facility has been conceived as one of facilities in the concept of Neutron Science Research Center at JAERI. The neutron irradiation field of the facility is characterized by high flux of spallation neutrons with very wide energy range up to several hundred MeV, good accessibility to the irradiation field, good controllability of irradiation conditions, etc. Extensive use of such a materials irradiation facility is expected for fundamental materials irradiation researches and R and D of nuclear energy systems such as accelerator-driven incineration plant for long-lifetime nuclear waste. In this paper, outline concept of the materials irradiation facility, characteristics of the irradiation field, preliminary technical evaluation of target to generate spallation neutrons, and materials researches expected for Neutron Science Research program are described. (author)

  17. Progress report, Chemistry and Materials Division, April 1 to June 30, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-07-01

    Research results are reported in such areas as ion penetration, electron microscopy, metal physics and radiation damage, nuclear methods of analysis, fuel analysis, and general analytical chemistry, electrochemistry, radiation chemistry, hydrogen-deuterium exchange, and surface chemistry of nuclear materials like zirconium base alloys. (E.C.B.)

  18. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Laboratory of Materials, Processes, Environment and Quality, Cady Ayyed University, National School of Applied Sciences, 63, 46000 Safi, Morocco; LMPHE (URAC 12), Faculty of Science, Mohammed V-Agdal University, Rabat, Morocco; Institut Néel, CNRS et Université Joseph Fourier, BP 166, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex ...

  19. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. U D Lanke1 2. Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science Department, Indian Institute of Technology, Mumbai 400 076, India; School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, P.O. Box 600, Wellington, New Zealand ...

  20. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. G KOROTCENKOV1 V BRINZARI2 B K CHO1. School of Material Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500712, Republic of Korea; Department of Theoretical Physics, State University of Moldova, Chisinau, Republic of Moldova ...

  1. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MOHAMMOD AMINUZZAMAN1 LIM POH YING1 WEE-SHENOG GOH1 AKIRA WATANABE2. Department of Chemical Science, Faculty of Science, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman (UTAR), Perak Campus, Jalan Universiti, Bandar Barat, 31900 Kampar, Malaysia; Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials ...

  2. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 23; Issue 6. Resistance to freezing and thawing of mortar specimens made from sulphoaluminate–belite cement ... Author Affiliations. I Janotka1 L' Krajèi1. Institute of Construction and Architecture of the Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava, Slovak Republic ...

  3. Nuclear technology and materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olander, D.R.

    1992-01-01

    Current and expected problems in the materials of nuclear technology are reviewed. In the fuel elements of LWRs, cladding waterside corrosion, secondary hydriding and pellet-cladding interaction may be significant impediments to extended burnup. In the fuel, fission gas release remains a key issue. Materials issues in the structural alloys of the primary system include stress-corrosion cracking of steel, corrosion of steam generator tubing and pressurized thermal shock of the reactor vessel. Prediction of core behavior in severe accidents requires basic data and models for fuel liquefaction, aerosol formation, fission product transport and core-concrete interaction. Materials questions in nuclear waste management and fusion technology are briefly reviewed. (author)

  4. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. LI-XIA YANG. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 34 Issue 2 April 2011 pp 233-237. Shape control synthesis of low-dimensional calcium sulfate · Li-Xia Yang Yan-Feng Meng Ping Yin Ying-Xia Yang Ying-Ying Tang Lai-Fen Qin · More Details Abstract ...

  5. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. S K Singh. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 25 Issue 6 November 2002 pp 561-563. Synthesis of SiC from rice husk in a plasma reactor · S K Singh B C Mohanty S Basu · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. A new route for production of SiC from rice husk ...

  6. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. C H Xia. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 34 Issue 5 August 2011 pp 1033-1037. Synthesis of Mn-doped CeO2 nanorods and their application as humidity sensors · C H Hu C H Xia F Wang M Zhou P F Yin X Y Han · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  7. Kant and the nature of matter: Mechanics, chemistry, and the life sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaukroger, Stephen

    2016-08-01

    Kant believed that the ultimate processes that regulate the behavior of material bodies can be characterized exclusively in terms of mechanics. In 1790, turning his attention to the life sciences, he raised a potential problem for his mechanically-based account, namely that many of the operations described in the life sciences seemed to operate teleologically. He argued that the life sciences do indeed require us to think in teleological terms, but that this is a fact about us, not about the processes themselves. Nevertheless, even were we to concede his account of the life sciences, this would not secure the credentials of mechanics as a general theory of matter. Hardly any material properties studied in the second half of the eighteenth century were, or could have been, conceived in mechanical terms. Kant's concern with teleology is tangential to the problems facing a general matter theory grounded in mechanics, for the most pressing issues have nothing to do with teleology. They derive rather from a lack of any connection between mechanical forces and material properties. This is evident in chemistry, which Kant dismisses as being unscientific on the grounds that it cannot be formulated in mechanical terms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Bulletin of Materials Science | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    scale grain growth of two nanocrystalline materials, Pd81Zr19 and RuAl. ... Structural, optical and electrical properties of chemically deposited copper selenide films .... Effect of substitution of titanium by magnesium and niobium on structure and ...

  9. Classroom Demonstrations in Materials Science/Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschhorn, J. S.; And Others

    Examples are given of demonstrations used at the University of Wisconsin in a materials science course for nontechnical students. Topics include crystal models, thermal properties, light, and corrosion. (MLH)

  10. Computational materials science: Nanoscale plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2002-01-01

    How does plastic deformation of polycrystalline materials with grain sizes less than 100 nm look at the atomic scale? A large-scale molecular dynamics simulation of nanocrystalline alluminium reveals some surprising behaviour.......How does plastic deformation of polycrystalline materials with grain sizes less than 100 nm look at the atomic scale? A large-scale molecular dynamics simulation of nanocrystalline alluminium reveals some surprising behaviour....

  11. Materials science for nuclear detection

    OpenAIRE

    Peurrung, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    The increasing importance of nuclear detection technology has led to a variety of research efforts that seek to accelerate the discovery and development of useful new radiation detection materials. These efforts aim to improve our understanding of how these materials perform, develop formalized discovery tools, and enable rapid and effective performance characterization. We provide an overview of these efforts along with an introduction to the history, physics, and taxonomy of radiation detec...

  12. The Impact of Nursing Students' Prior Chemistry Experience on Academic Performance and Perception of Relevance in a Health Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddey, Kerrie; de Berg, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Nursing students have typically found the study of chemistry to be one of their major challenges in a nursing course. This mixed method study was designed to explore how prior experiences in chemistry might impact chemistry achievement during a health science unit. Nursing students (N = 101) studying chemistry as part of a health science unit were…

  13. MSRR Rack Materials Science Research Rack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reagan, Shawn

    2017-01-01

    The Materials Science Research Rack (MSRR) is a research facility developed under a cooperative research agreement between NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA) for materials science investigations on the International Space Station (ISS). The MSRR is managed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, AL. The MSRR facility subsystems were manufactured by Teledyne Brown Engineering (TBE) and integrated with the ESA/EADS-Astrium developed Materials Science Laboratory (MSL) at the MSFC Space Station Integration and Test Facility (SSITF) as part of the Systems Development Operations Support (SDOS) contract. MSRR was launched on STS-128 in August 2009, and is currently installed in the U. S. Destiny Laboratory Module on the ISS. Materials science is an integral part of developing new, safer, stronger, more durable materials for use throughout everyday life. The goal of studying materials processing in space is to develop a better understanding of the chemical and physical mechanisms involved, and how they differ in the microgravity environment of space. To that end, the MSRR accommodates advanced investigations in the microgravity environment of the ISS for basic materials science research in areas such as solidification of metals and alloys. MSRR allows for the study of a variety of materials including metals, ceramics, semiconductor crystals, and glasses. Materials science research benefits from the microgravity environment of space, where the researcher can better isolate chemical and thermal properties of materials from the effects of gravity. With this knowledge, reliable predictions can be made about the conditions required on Earth to achieve improved materials. MSRR is a highly automated facility with a modular design capable of supporting multiple types of investigations. Currently the NASA-provided Rack Support Subsystem provides services (power, thermal control, vacuum access, and command and data handling) to the ESA developed Materials

  14. Materials Sciences programs, Fiscal Year 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-09-01

    The Materials Sciences Division constitutes one portion of a wide range of research supported by the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences. This report contains a listing of research underway in FY 1983 together with a convenient index to the program

  15. Progress report, Chemistry and Materials Division 1 July - 30 September, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-11-01

    The work of the division in the areas of solid state physics, chemistry and materials science over the quarter is described. The solid state science branch has worked on crystal defect formation after ion beam irradiation. Laser isotope separation methods have produced visible amounts of water enriched 2000-fold in deuterium. Work has been done on hydrogen isotope exchange in H 2 -methanol mixtures. Nitrogen impurities in Xe-133 can be determined down to the microgram level. A new apparatus for the determination of hydrogen in zirconium has been assembled. Coatings of stainless steels on zircaloy fuel cladding continue to offer protection against oxidation. Agreement has been obtained between computer-simulated and observed electron microscope images of irradiated titanium. Cold-worked zirconium has been studied under helium ion bombardment

  16. Materials of the yearly scientific assembly of the Polish Chemical Society - Torun'93: chemistry of new materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Scientific conference accompanied the assembly of Polish Chemical Society has been held in 1993 in Torun. The conference has been divided into 12 sections and 4 symposia covering the most important research fields in chemistry. The general view on scientific progress has been presented during the plenary session. Then proceedings have performed in specialist sessions on: contemporary methods in organic chemistry chemistry, chemistry and physico-chemistry of polymers, coordination chemistry state-of-the-art prospects, absorption and absorbents, new chemical technologies of organic compounds, new chemical technologies of inorganic compounds, environment protection, new methods in analytical chemistry, photochemistry and chemical kinetics, crystallochemistry, history of chemistry and didactics, new substances in health protection, membranes and membrane techniques, electroactive organic compounds, zeolites - material properties

  17. Interface chemistry of nanostructured materials: ion adsorption on mesoporous alumina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yifeng; Bryan, Charles; Xu, Huifang; Pohl, Phil; Yang, Yi; Brinker, C Jeffrey

    2002-10-01

    This paper presents a part of our work on understanding the effect of nanoscale pore space confinement on ion sorption by mesoporous materials. Acid-base titration experiments were performed on both mesoporous alumina and alumina particles under various ionic strengths. The point of zero charge (PZC) for mesoporous alumina was measured to be approximately 9.1, similar to that for nonmesoporous alumina materials, indicating that nanoscale pore space confinement does not have a significant effect on the PZC of pore surfaces. However, for a given pH deviation from the PZC, (pH-PZC), the surface charge per mass on mesoporous alumina was as much as 45 times higher than that on alumina particles. This difference cannot be fully explained by the surface area difference between the two materials. Our titration data have demonstrated that nanoscale confinement has a significant effect, most likely via the overlap of the electric double layer (EDL), on ion sorption onto mesopore surfaces. This effect cannot be adequately modeled by existing surface complexation models, which were developed mostly for an unconfined solid-water interface. Our titration data have also indicated that the rate of ion uptake by mesoporous alumina is relatively slow, probably due to diffusion into mesopores, and complete equilibration for sorption could take 4-5 min. A molecular simulation using a density functional theory was performed to calculate ion adsorption coefficients as a function of pore size. The calculation has shown that as pore size is reduced to nanoscales (<10 nm), the adsorption coefficients of ions can vary by more than two orders of magnitude relative to those for unconfined interfaces. The prediction is supported by our experimental data on Zn sorption onto mesoporous alumina. Owing to their unique surface chemistry, mesoporous materials can potentially be used as effective ion adsorbents for separation processes and environmental cleanup.

  18. Microgravity Materials Science Conference 2000. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Narayanan (Editor); Bennett, Nancy (Editor); McCauley, Dannah (Editor); Murphy, Karen (Editor); Poindexter, Samantha (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    This is Volume 1 of 3 of the 2000 Microgravity Material Science Conference that was held June 6-8 at the Von Braun Center, Huntsville, Alabama. It was organized by the Microgravity Materials Science Discipline Working Group, sponsored by the Microgravity Research Division (MRD) at NASA Headquarters, and hosted by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the Alliance for Microgravity Materials Science and Applications (AMMSA). It was the fourth NASA conference of this type in the microgravity materials science discipline. The microgravity science program sponsored approx. 200 investigators, all of whom made oral or poster presentations at this conference. In addition, posters and exhibits covering NASA microgravity facilities, advanced technology development projects sponsored by the NASA Microgravity Research Division at NASA Headquarters, and commercial interests were exhibited. The purpose of the conference was to inform the materials science community of research opportunities in reduced gravity and to highlight the Spring 2001 release of the NASA Research Announcement (NRA) to solicit proposals for future investigations. It also served to review the current research and activities in materials science, to discuss the envisioned long-term goals. and to highlight new crosscutting research areas of particular interest to MRD. The conference was aimed at materials science researchers from academia, industry, and government. A workshop on in situ resource utilization (ISRU) was held in conjunction with the conference with the goal of evaluating and prioritizing processing issues in Lunar and Martian type environments. The workshop participation included invited speakers and investigators currently funded in the material science program under the Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) initiative. The conference featured a plenary session every day with an invited speaker that was followed by three parallel breakout sessions in subdisciplines. Attendance was

  19. Microgravity Materials Science Conference 2000. Volume 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Narayanan; Bennett, Nancy; McCauley, Dannah; Murphy, Karen; Poindexter, Samantha

    2001-01-01

    This is Volume 3 of 3 of the 2000 Microgravity Materials Science Conference that was held June 6-8 at the Von Braun Center, Huntsville, Alabama. It was organized by the Microgravity Materials Science Discipline Working Group, sponsored by the Microgravity Research Division (MRD) at NASA Headquarters, and hosted by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the Alliance for Microgravity Materials Science and Applications (AMMSA). It was the fourth NASA conference of this type in the Microgravity materials science discipline. The microgravity science program sponsored 200 investigators, all of whom made oral or poster presentations at this conference- In addition, posters and exhibits covering NASA microgravity facilities, advanced technology development projects sponsored by the NASA Microgravity Research Division at NASA Headquarters, and commercial interests were exhibited. The purpose of the conference was to inform the materials science community of research opportunities in reduced gravity and to highlight the Spring 2001 release of the NASA Research Announcement (NRA) to solicit proposals for future investigations. It also served to review the current research and activities in material,, science, to discuss the envisioned long-term goals. and to highlight new crosscutting research areas of particular interest to MRD. The conference was aimed at materials science researchers from academia, industry, and government. A workshop on in situ resource utilization (ISRU) was held in conjunction with the conference with the goal of evaluating and prioritizing processing issues in Lunar and Martian type environments. The workshop participation included invited speakers and investigators currently funded in the material science program under the Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) initiative. The conference featured a plenary session every day with an invited speaker that was followed by three parallel breakout sessions in subdisciplines. Attendance was close

  20. Microgravity Materials Science Conference 2000. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Narayanan (Editor); Bennett, Nancy (Editor); McCauley, Dannah (Editor); Murphy, Karen (Editor); Poindexter, Samantha (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    This is Volume 2 of 3 of the 2000 Microgravity Materials Science Conference that was held June 6-8 at the Von Braun Center, Huntsville, Alabama. It was organized by the Microgravity Materials Science Discipline Working Group, sponsored by the Microgravity Research Division (MRD) at NASA Headquarters, and hosted by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the Alliance for Microgravity Materials Science and Applications (AMMSA). It was the fourth NASA conference of this type in the Microgravity materials science discipline. The microgravity science program sponsored approx. 200 investigators, all of whom made oral or poster presentations at this conference- In addition, posters and exhibits covering NASA microgravity facilities, advanced technology development projects sponsored by the NASA Microgravity Research Division at NASA Headquarters, and commercial interests were exhibited. The purpose of the conference %%,its to inform the materials science community of research opportunities in reduced gravity and to highlight the Spring 2001 release of the NASA Research Announcement (NRA) to solicit proposals for future investigations. It also served to review the current research and activities in material,, science, to discuss the envisioned long-term goals. and to highlight new crosscutting research areas of particular interest to MRD. The conference was aimed at materials science researchers from academia, industry, and government. A workshop on in situ resource utilization (ISRU) was held in conjunction with the conference with the goal of evaluating and prioritizing processing issues in Lunar and Martian type environments. The workshop participation included invited speakers and investigators currently funded in the material science program under the Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) initiative. The conference featured a plenary session every day with an invited speaker that was followed by three parallel breakout sessions in subdisciplines. Attendance

  1. Proceedings of computational methods in materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark, J.E. Glicksman, M.E.; Marsh, S.P.

    1992-01-01

    The Symposium on which this volume is based was conceived as a timely expression of some of the fast-paced developments occurring throughout materials science and engineering. It focuses particularly on those involving modern computational methods applied to model and predict the response of materials under a diverse range of physico-chemical conditions. The current easy access of many materials scientists in industry, government laboratories, and academe to high-performance computers has opened many new vistas for predicting the behavior of complex materials under realistic conditions. Some have even argued that modern computational methods in materials science and engineering are literally redefining the bounds of our knowledge from which we predict structure-property relationships, perhaps forever changing the historically descriptive character of the science and much of the engineering

  2. Editorial: Defining materials science: A vision from APL Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith MacManus-Driscoll

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available These are exciting times for materials science—a field which is growing more rapidly than any other physical science discipline. More than ever, the field is providing the vital link between science and engineering, between pure and applied. But what is the subject's definition and why is the field ballooning? I address these questions in the context of how APL Materials intends to play a role in advancing this important field. My introspective focus arises as we approach the first year anniversary of APL Materials.

  3. Statistical analysis and interpolation of compositional data in materials science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesenson, Misha Z; Suram, Santosh K; Gregoire, John M

    2015-02-09

    Compositional data are ubiquitous in chemistry and materials science: analysis of elements in multicomponent systems, combinatorial problems, etc., lead to data that are non-negative and sum to a constant (for example, atomic concentrations). The constant sum constraint restricts the sampling space to a simplex instead of the usual Euclidean space. Since statistical measures such as mean and standard deviation are defined for the Euclidean space, traditional correlation studies, multivariate analysis, and hypothesis testing may lead to erroneous dependencies and incorrect inferences when applied to compositional data. Furthermore, composition measurements that are used for data analytics may not include all of the elements contained in the material; that is, the measurements may be subcompositions of a higher-dimensional parent composition. Physically meaningful statistical analysis must yield results that are invariant under the number of composition elements, requiring the application of specialized statistical tools. We present specifics and subtleties of compositional data processing through discussion of illustrative examples. We introduce basic concepts, terminology, and methods required for the analysis of compositional data and utilize them for the spatial interpolation of composition in a sputtered thin film. The results demonstrate the importance of this mathematical framework for compositional data analysis (CDA) in the fields of materials science and chemistry.

  4. Bulletin of Materials Science | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    pp 235-241 Polymers. Synthesis, mechanical, thermal and chemical properties of ... pp 243-249 Polymers. Terpolymerization of 2-ethoxy ethylmethacrylate, styrene ... showed reduction in g value. pp 251-262 Polymers. Analysis of surface degradation of high density polyethylene (HDPE) insulation material due to tracking.

  5. Bulletin of Materials Science | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Synthesis and characterization of fluorophore attached silver nanoparticles ... by X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, Fourier ..... Infrared spectra, Raman laser, XRD, DSC/TGA and SEM investigations on the ..... composite materials based on polyaniline–polyethylene glycol–CdS system.

  6. Bulletin of Materials Science | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mullite retains the usual orthorhombic habit of sillimanite. Rounded to sub rounded zirconia dispersed within the mullite matrix of the sample ZA is noticed. pp 221-225 Sol-gel Materials. Role of binder in the synthesis of titania membrane · K S Seshadri M Selvaraj R Kesava Moorthy K Varatharajan M P Srinivasan K B Lal.

  7. Introduction into modern materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brostow, W.

    1984-01-01

    This book is divided into the following headings: Preliminary remarks on mathematics, statistical mechanics, intermolecular interactions; gases and fluids - general fundamentals, liquids and solutions, crystals, metals and alloys, non-metallic solids, composites; thermodynamic properties, mechanical properties, electric conductivity, dielectric and magnetic properties, surface effects, and materials testing - an outline. (orig./MM) With 128 figs., 21 tabs [de

  8. Bulletin of Materials Science | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Studies on relative catalytic efficiencies of zinc and aluminium on nucleation of ... Production of boron carbide powder by carbothermal synthesis of gel material .... Studies on CdIn2O4 derived from CdIn2S4 prepared by flux method ... and thermally stimulated discharge conductivity (TSDC) study in polymer thin films.

  9. Bulletin of Materials Science | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... metal oxides in the process of chloride induced corrosion of steel reinforcement ... Paper pulp waste—A new source of raw material for the synthesis of a porous .... Utilization of mixed pond ash in integrated steel plant for manufacturing ...

  10. Bulletin of Materials Science | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Department of Metal and Materials Engineering, Gangneung-Wonju National University, Gangneung 210 702, Korea; Graduate School of Green Energy Technology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305 764, Korea; Department of Civil Engineering, Gangneung-Wonju National University, Gangneung 210 702, ...

  11. Bulletin of Materials Science | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    deposition and annealing · G Ranga Rao .... Fine structure at the diffusion welded interface of Fe3Al/Q235 dissimilar materials · Wang Juan ... and Steels. Effect of zirconium addition on the recrystallization behaviour of a commercial Al–Cu–Mg alloy.

  12. Synchrotron radiation in material science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanotto, E.D.

    1983-01-01

    A brief review on the several experimental techniques (XRD, SAXS, EXAFS, IRRS, etc...) which, utilizing of synchrotron radiation can be applied in glass structural studies, is presented. The major part of these techniques can be also used for studies of other materials such as polymers, metals, etc... (L.C.) [pt

  13. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 32; Issue 5 ... of CdTe nanoparticles before and after transfer from liquid phase to polystyrene ... Catalytic synthesis of ZnO nanorods on patterned silicon wafer—An optimum material for gas .... Hot-rolled, warm-rolled and heat treated alloys were examined using optical ...

  14. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 40; Issue 5. Electro-optical properties, decomposition pathways and the hydrostatic pressure-dependent behaviours of a double-cation hydrogen storage material of Al 3 Li 4 (BH 4 ) 13. MEHMET SIMSEK. Volume 40 Issue 5 September 2017 pp 907-915 ...

  15. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 27 Issue 5 October 2004 pp 417-420 Nuclear Related Materials. Irradiation of large area Mylar membrane and characterization of ... Effect of ion beam irradiation on metal particle doped polymer composites · N L Singh Sejal Shah Anjum Qureshi A Tripathi F Singh D K ...

  16. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. Wang Juan1 Li Yajiang1 Wu Huiqiang1 Ren Jiangwei1. Key Lab of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061, P.R. China ...

  17. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Key Lab for Green Processing and Functionalization of New Textile Materials, Ministry of Education, Wuhan Textile University, Wuhan 430073, P.R. China; State Key Laboratory of Material Processing and Die and Mould Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074, P.R. China; Zhuxi ...

  18. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 33; Issue 4 ... Permittivity; polarization effects; strontium tartrate; thermal properties; dielectric properties. ... It is explained that crystallographic change due to polymorphic phase transition may be occurring in the material, besides the change due to loss of water ...

  19. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 23; Issue 3. Optimization of growth of InGaAs/InP quantum wells using photoluminescence and secondary ion mass spectrometry. S Bhunia P Banerji T K Chaudhuri A R Haldar D N Bose Y Aparna M B Chettri B R Chakraborty. Semiconducting Materials Volume 23 ...

  20. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 33; Issue 1. Dispersion and reinforcing mechanism of carbon nanotubes in epoxy nanocomposites. Smrutisikha Bal ... Author Affiliations. Smrutisikha Bal1. Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Rourkela 769 008, India ...

  1. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The crystallization, magnetic, mechanical and corrosion behaviour were studied for the prepared materials as a function of quenching rate from liquid to the solid state. Higher ... National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur 831 007, India; Materials Science Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721 302, India ...

  2. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. Sanjay Panwar1 D B Goel2 O P Pandey1. School of Physics and Materials Science, Thapar Institute of Engineering & Technology, Patiala 147 004, India; Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247 667, India ...

  3. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 39; Issue 1. Preparation of new thermoluminescent material ( 100 − x )B 2 O 3 –xLi 2 O: Cu 2 + for sensing and detection of radiation. Zeid A Alothman Tansir Ahamad Mu Naushad Saad M Alshehri. Volume 39 Issue 1 February 2016 pp 331-336 ...

  4. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 34; Issue 6 ... by microwave route and nature of anatase–rutile phase transition in nano TiO2 .... properties of AgPb10SbTe12 prepared by high pressure method .... the crystal field strength around Mn(V) such that a blue colour results for materials with small values of .

  5. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    School of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National University of Science and Technology, H/12 Islamabad, Pakistan; Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Advanced Materials & Aerospace Technologies, A-2444 Seibersdorf, Austria; Centre of Electrochemical Surface Technology, A-2700 Wiener Neustadt, Austria ...

  6. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 31; Issue 6 .... modified with 4–12% 3,3′-bis(maleimidophenyl) phenylphosphine oxide and cured ... Study of effect of composition, irradiation and quenching on ionic ... Application of magnetron sputtering for producing bioactive ceramic coatings on implant materials.

  7. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 35; Issue 4. CuO/TiO2 nanocrystals grown on graphene as visible-light responsive photocatalytic hybrid materials. Yuan Fang Rijing Wang Guohua Jiang He Jin Yin Wang Xinke Sun Sheng Wang Tao Wang. Volume 35 Issue 4 August 2012 pp 495-499 ...

  8. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 24; Issue 6. Tailoring magnetic and dielectric properties of rubber ferrite composites containing mixed ferrites. M R Anantharaman K A Malini S Sindhu E M Mohammed S K Date S D Kulkarni P A Joy Philip Kurian. Magnetic Materials Volume 24 Issue 6 December 2001 ...

  9. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. Xiuqiang Li1 Dong Zhang1 Peiying Zhu1 Chao Yang1. Key Laboratory of Advanced Civil Engineering Materials, Ministry of Education, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 4800 CaoAn Road, Shanghai 200092, China ...

  10. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 23; Issue 4. Phase analysis and dielectric properties of ceramics in PbO–MgO–ZnO–Nb2O5 system: A comparative study of materials obtained by ceramic and molten salt synthesis routes. M Thirumal A K Ganguli. Ceramics Volume 23 Issue 4 August 2000 pp 255-261 ...

  11. Material science and neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    Neutron scattering experiments complete and extend the condensed matter studies made with X and gamma rays. Then story show a permanent evolution of the instrumentation, methods and experimental techniques to improve the result quality. This is more especially important as neutron sources are weaker than photon and electron sources. Progress in this research domain is due, in most part, to discovery and development of materials for the different measurement device components [fr

  12. DOE fundamentals handbook: Material science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors in providing operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of the structure and properties of metals. This volume contains the two modules: structure of metals (bonding, common lattic types, grain structure/boundary, polymorphis, alloys, imperfections in metals) and properties of metals (stress, strain, Young modulus, stress-strain relation, physical properties, working of metals, corrosion, hydrogen embrittlement, tritium/material compatibility)

  13. An Interdisciplinary Program in Materials Science at James Madison University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Chris

    2008-03-01

    Over the past decade a core group of faculty at James Madison University has created an interdisciplinary program in materials science that provides our students with unique courses and research experiences that augment the existing, high-quality majors in physics and astronomy, chemistry and biochemistry, geology and environmental science, mathematics and statistics, and integrated science and technology. The university started this program by creating a Center for Materials Science whose budget is directly allocated by the provost. This source of funds acts as seed money for research, support for students, and a motivating factor for each of the academic units to support the participation of their faculty in the program. Courses were created at the introductory and intermediate level that are cross-listed by the departments to encourage students to enroll in them as electives toward their majors. Furthermore, the students are encouraged to participate in undergraduate research in materials since this is the most fundamental unifying theme across the disciplines. This talk will cover some of the curricular innovations that went into the design of the program to make it successful, examples of faculty and student research and how that feeds back into the classroom, and success stories of the interactions that have developed between departments because of this program. Student outcomes and future plans to improve the program will also be discussed.

  14. XIX Mendeleev Congress on general and applied chemistry. Abstract book in 4 volumes. Volume 4. Chemistry aspects of modern energy and alternative energy resources. Chemistry of fossil and renewable hydrocarbon raw materials. Analytical chemistry: novel methods and devices for chemical research and analysis. Chemical education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The abstracts of the XIX Mendeleev Congress on general and applied chemistry held 25-30 September 2011 in Volgograd are presented. The program includes the Congress plenary and section reports, poster presentations, symposia and round tables on key areas of chemical science and technology, and chemical education. The work of the Congress was held the following sections: 1. Fundamental problems of chemical sciences; 2. Chemistry and technology of materials, including nanomaterials; 3. Physicochemical basis of metallurgical processes; 4. Current issues of chemical production, technical risk assessment; 5. Chemical aspects of modern power and alternative energy sources; 6. Chemistry of fossil and renewable hydrocarbons; 7. Analytical chemistry: new methods and instruments for chemical research and analysis; 8. Chemical education. Volume 4 includes abstracts of oral and poster presentations and presentations of correspondent participants of the sections: Chemistry aspects of modern energy and alternative energy resources; Chemistry of fossil and renewable hydrocarbon raw materials; Analytical chemistry: novel methods and devices for chemical research and analysis; Chemical education, and author index [ru

  15. Overview of NASA's Microgravity Materials Science Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, James Patton

    2012-01-01

    The microgravity materials program was nearly eliminated in the middle of the aughts due to budget constraints. Hardware developments were eliminated. Some investigators with experiments that could be performed using ISS partner hardware received continued funding. Partnerships were established between US investigators and ESA science teams for several investigations. ESA conducted peer reviews on the proposals of various science teams as part of an ESA AO process. Assuming he or she was part of a science team that was selected by the ESA process, a US investigator would submit a proposal to NASA for grant funding to support their part of the science team effort. In a similar manner, a US materials investigator (Dr. Rohit Trivedi) is working as a part of a CNES selected science team. As funding began to increase another seven materials investigators were selected in 2010 through an NRA mechanism to perform research related to development of Materials Science Research Rack investigations. One of these has since been converted to a Glovebox investigation.

  16. Progress report, Chemistry and Materials Division: 1982 October 1 -December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-02-01

    Solid state studies included work on the trapping vacancies of Au atoms by the backscattering-channeling method, and investigation into mixing across interfaces resulting from heavy ion bombardment. In radiation chemistry, computer simulations of nitrogen atom yield from radiolysis of N 2 -O 2 mixtures were found to agree with experiment. Surface science research included studies of temporal oscillations in the kinetics of oxidation of carbon monoxide over the (100) face of single-crystal platinum. In analytical chemistry, research projects included the determination of thorium-230 in ores, use of a high specific activity methyl bromide tracer in commercial applications, determination of burnup in (Th,U)0 2 fuels using HPLC, and development of a simple and quick means to determine D 2 0 content of water grab samples at CANDU sites using a small soft-bulb hydrometer. Materials science studies included experiments on true incubation time for stress-corrosion cracking in iodine vapour, examination of hydrogen contents of fuel cladding from bundles with failed pins, and studies of initiation of ΣnodularΣ corrosion of fuel cladding in high-temperature steam

  17. Progress report, Chemistry and Materials Division: 1982 July 1 - September 30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-10-01

    During the third quarter of 1982, work in solid state studies included study of energy spectra of Auger electrons from a silicon single crystal, use of an excimer laser to anneal an aluminum crystal implanted with iron atoms, studies of defects created by helium ion irradiation of a dilute copper-indium alloy crystal, and computer simulations of ion channeling in a platinum crystal surface. Work in radiation chemistry on the enhancement of water calorimetry sensitivity continued. A surface science program to understand the temporal oscillations in the oxidation of carbon monoxide over platinum continued with the study of the interaction of oxygen with the (100) crystallographic face of platinum. Studies in analytical chemistry included a comparison of fuel burnup results using 145 Nd + 146 Nd and 148 Nd, and a preliminary investigation into methods of reduction of U(VI) to U(IV), particularly electrolytic reduction. Materials science work continued on the fracture surfaces of Exel alloys cracked in hydrogen gas, the true incubation time for stress corrosion cracking in cesium-cadmium vapour mixtures, evidence for a previously unknown hexagonal phase of germanium, growth experiments in the DIDO reactor on swaged single-crystals, and examination of the first zirconium specimen purified by electrotransport in the CRNL equipment

  18. Prospective Symbiosis of Green Chemistry and Energetic Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchurov, Ilya V; Zharkov, Mikhail N; Fershtat, Leonid L; Makhova, Nina N; Zlotin, Sergey G

    2017-10-23

    A global increase in environmental pollution demands the development of new "cleaner" chemical processes. Among urgent improvements, the replacement of traditional hydrocarbon-derived toxic organic solvents with neoteric solvents less harmful for the environment is one of the most vital issues. As a result of the favorable combination of their unique properties, ionic liquids (ILs), dense gases, and supercritical fluids (SCFs) have gained considerable attention as suitable green chemistry media for the preparation and modification of important chemical compounds and materials. In particular, they have a significant potential in a specific and very important area of research associated with the manufacture and processing of high-energy materials (HEMs). These large-scale manufacturing processes, in which hazardous chemicals and extreme conditions are used, produce a huge amount of hard-to-dispose-of waste. Furthermore, they are risky to staff, and any improvements that would reduce the fire and explosion risks of the corresponding processes are highly desirable. In this Review, useful applications of almost nonflammable ILs, dense gases, and SCFs (first of all, CO 2 ) for nitration and other reactions used for manufacturing HEMs are considered. Recent advances in the field of energetic (oxygen-balanced and hypergolic) ILs are summarized. Significant attention is paid to the SCF-based micronization techniques, which improve the energetic performance of HEMs through an efficient control of the morphology and particle size distribution of the HEM fine particles, and to useful applications of SCFs in HEM processing that makes them less hazardous. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Density functional theory in materials science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, Jörg; Hickel, Tilmann

    2013-09-01

    Materials science is a highly interdisciplinary field. It is devoted to the understanding of the relationship between (a) fundamental physical and chemical properties governing processes at the atomistic scale with (b) typically macroscopic properties required of materials in engineering applications. For many materials, this relationship is not only determined by chemical composition, but strongly governed by microstructure. The latter is a consequence of carefully selected process conditions (e.g., mechanical forming and annealing in metallurgy or epitaxial growth in semiconductor technology). A key task of computational materials science is to unravel the often hidden composition-structure-property relationships using computational techniques. The present paper does not aim to give a complete review of all aspects of materials science. Rather, we will present the key concepts underlying the computation of selected material properties and discuss the major classes of materials to which they are applied. Specifically, our focus will be on methods used to describe single or polycrystalline bulk materials of semiconductor, metal or ceramic form.

  20. Multicultural chemistry and the nature of science: but what about knowledge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Michael

    2012-09-01

    In response to Goff, Boesdorfer, and Hunter's article on the use of a multicultural approach to teaching chemistry and the nature of science, I forward this critical reflective essay to discuss more general curriculum aspects of the relationship between the nature of science and science education in school contexts. Taking a social realist perspective, I argue for a more nuanced understanding of the role of epistemology and ontology in science classrooms, and for a reconsideration of the role of knowledge in science classrooms.

  1. Material Science Experiments on Mir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroes, Roger L.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the microgravity materials experiments carried out on the Shuttle/Mir program. There were six experiments, all of which investigated some aspect of diffusivity in liquid melts. The Liquid Metal Diffusion (LMD) experiment investigated the diffusivity of molten Indium samples at 185 C using a radioactive tracer, In-114m. By monitoring two different gamma ray energies (190 keV and 24 keV) emitted by the samples it was possible to measure independently the diffusion rates in the bulk and at the surface of the samples. The Queens University Experiment in Liquid Diffusion (QUELD) was the furnace facility used to process 213 samples for the five other experiments. These experiments investigated the diffusion, ripening, crystal growth, and glass formation in metal, semiconductor, and glass samples. This facility had the capability to process samples in an isothermal or gradient configuration for varying periods of time at temperatures up to 900 C. Both the LMD and the QUELD furnaces were mounted on the Microgravity Isolation Mount (MIM) which provided isolation from g-jitter. All the microgravity experiments were supported by the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS); a three head three axes acceleration monitoring system which measured and recorded the acceleration environment.

  2. Recent trends in physics of material science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Shrivastava, Keshav; Akhtar, Jamil

    2015-01-01

    This book discusses in detail the recent trends in Computational Physics, Nano-physics and Devices Technology. Numerous modern devices with very high accuracy, are explored In conditions such as longevity and extended possibilities to work in wide temperature and pressure ranges, aggressive media, etc. This edited volume presents 32 selected papers  of the 2013 International Conference on Science & Engineering in Mathematics, Chemistry and Physics . The book is divided into three  scientific Sections: (i) Computational Physics, (ii) Nanophysics and Technology, (iii) Devices and Systems and is addressed to Professors, post-graduate students, scientists and engineers taking part in R&D of nano-materials, ferro-piezoelectrics, computational Physics and devices system, and also different devices based on broad applications in different areas of modern science and technology.

  3. Multicultural Chemistry and the Nature of Science: But What about Knowledge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Michael

    2012-01-01

    In response to Goff, Boesdorfer, and Hunter's article on the use of a multicultural approach to teaching chemistry and the nature of science, I forward this critical reflective essay to discuss more general curriculum aspects of the relationship between the nature of science and science education in school contexts. Taking a social realist…

  4. Teaching Chemistry in a Spiral Progression Approach: Lessons from Science Teachers in the Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbe, Joymie R.; Espinosa, Allen A.; Datukan, Janir T.

    2018-01-01

    As the Philippines moves towards implementing the K-12 curriculum, there has been a mismatch in teacher preparation in science. The present teacher education curriculum prepares science teachers to specialise in a specific field (e.g. integrated science, biology, chemistry, and physics). However, in the K-12 curriculum, they are required to teach…

  5. Materials science symposium 'heavy ion science in tandem energy region'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwamoto, Akira; Yoshida, Tadashi; Takeuchi, Suehiro (eds.) [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-11-01

    The facility of the JAERI tandem accelerator and its booster has been contributing to obtain plenty of fruitful results in the fields of nuclear physics, nuclear chemistry, atomic and solid state physics and materials science, taking an advantage of its prominent performances of heavy ion acceleration. The previous meeting held in 1999 also offered an opportunity to scientists from all over the heavy ion science fields, including nuclear physics, solid state physics and cross-field physics to have active discussions. This meeting included oral presentations with a new plan and with a new scope of fields expected from now on, as an occasion for opening the 21st century in heavy ion science. The 50 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  6. Integrated Lecture and Laboratory Chemistry Components of Science Education Program for Early and Middle Childhood Education Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunsford, S. K.

    2004-05-01

    Two new chemistry courses were developed for early childhood and middle childhood education majors. The results of a pre- and posttest in the courses indicate success in developing student content knowledge and ability to problem solve. In addition these courses are designed to develop preservice teachers' understanding of the National Science Education Standards and foster support for implementing these standards in their classrooms. These courses provide materials, resources, and guidance in implementing the standards in their future teaching careers.

  7. Green Chemistry and Sustainability: An Undergraduate Course for Science and Nonscience Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Erin M.

    2013-01-01

    An undergraduate lecture course in Green Chemistry and Sustainability has been developed and taught to a "multidisciplinary" group of science and nonscience majors. The course introduced students to the topics of green chemistry and sustainability and also immersed them in usage of the scientific literature. Through literature…

  8. Examining the Effects of Reflective Journals on Pre-Service Science Teachers' General Chemistry Laboratory Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengiz, Canan; Karatas, Faik Özgür

    2015-01-01

    The general chemistry laboratory is an appropriate place for learning chemistry well. It is also effective for stimulating higher-order thinking skills, including reflective thinking, a skill that is crucial for science teaching as well as learning. This study aims to examine the effects of feedback-supported reflective journal-keeping activities…

  9. A Cross-Age Study of Science Student Teachers' Chemistry Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çalik, Muammer; Ültay, Neslihan; Kolomuç, Ali; Aytar, Ayse

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of some variables (gender and year of study) on science student teachers' (SSTs) chemistry attitudes. An adapted version of Chemistry Attitudes and Experiences Questionnaire was administered to 983 SSTs drawn from four different universities in the region of Eastern Black Sea, Turkey. Significant…

  10. Preliminary Analysis of Assessment Instrument Design to Reveal Science Generic Skill and Chemistry Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumarni, Woro; Sudarmin; Supartono, Wiyanto

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to design assessment instrument to evaluate science generic skill (SGS) achievement and chemistry literacy in ethnoscience-integrated chemistry learning. The steps of tool designing refers to Plomp models including 1) Investigation Phase (Prelimenary Investigation); 2) Designing Phase (Design); 3)…

  11. Steels from materials science to structural engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Sha, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Steels and computer-based modelling are fast growing fields in materials science as well as structural engineering, demonstrated by the large amount of recent literature. Steels: From Materials Science to Structural Engineering combines steels research and model development, including the application of modelling techniques in steels.  The latest research includes structural engineering modelling, and novel, prototype alloy steels such as heat-resistant steel, nitride-strengthened ferritic/martensitic steel and low nickel maraging steel.  Researchers studying steels will find the topics vital to their work.  Materials experts will be able to learn about steels used in structural engineering as well as modelling and apply this increasingly important technique in their steel materials research and development. 

  12. Analytical chemistry methods for boron carbide absorber material. [Standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DELVIN WL

    1977-07-01

    This standard provides analytical chemistry methods for the analysis of boron carbide powder and pellets for the following: total C and B, B isotopic composition, soluble C and B, fluoride, chloride, metallic impurities, gas content, water, nitrogen, and oxygen. (DLC)

  13. Materials Sciences programs, Fiscal Year 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-02-01

    The Materials Sciences Division supports basic research on materials properties and phenomena important to all energy systems. This report contains a listing of research underway in FY 1992 together with an index to the Division's programs. Recent publications from Division-sponsored panel meetings and workshops are listed. The body of the report is arranged under the following section headings: laboratories, grant and contract research, small business innovation research, major user facilities, other user facilities, funding levels, and index

  14. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 36; Issue 1. Characterization and in vitro and in vivo evaluation of cross-linked chitosan films as implant for controlled release of citalopram. Patit P Kundu Santosh Kumar Jindal Manish Goswami. Volume 36 Issue 1 February 2013 pp 175-182 ...

  15. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 30; Issue 5. Influence of additives on electrodeposition of bright Zn–Ni alloy on mild steel from acid sulphate bath. S Shivakumara U Manohar Y Arthoba Naik T V Venkatesha. Alloys and Steels Volume 30 Issue 5 October 2007 pp 455-462 ...

  16. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 39; Issue 3. Structural investigation of V 2 O 5 –P 2 O 5 –K 2 O glass system with antibacterial potential. N S VEDEANU I B COZAR R STANESCU R STEFAN D VODNAR O COZAR. Volume 39 Issue 3 June 2016 pp 697-702 ...

  17. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 29 Issue 2 April 2006 pp 101-105 Polymers. Proton microbeam irradiation effects on PtBA polymer ... optical and secondary electron microscopic experimental methods. Volume 34 Issue 4 July 2011 pp 595-599. Thermal stability of gold-PS nanocomposites thin films.

  18. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 39; Issue 2. Efficiency of surface modified Ti coated with copper nanoparticles to control marine bacterial adhesion under laboratory simulated conditions. CHOKKALINGAM PRIYA GANESSIN ARAVIND WILSON RICHARD THILAGARAJ. Volume 39 Issue 2 April 2016 ...

  19. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 27; Issue 3. Comparative investigation on the effect of alkaline earth oxides on the intensity of absorption bands due to Cu2+, Mn3+ and Cr3+ ions in ternary silicate glasses. S P Singh Aman Anal Tarafder. Glasses Volume 27 Issue 3 June 2004 pp 281-287 ...

  20. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Ramachandran. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 25 Issue 4 August 2002 pp ... Volume 27 Issue 5 October 2004 pp 403-407 Phase Transitions. Phase transition in L-alaninium oxalate by ... Thermal and structural properties of spray pyrolysed CdS thin film · P Raji C Sanjeeviraja K Ramachandran.