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Sample records for chemistry biocatalytic oxidation

  1. Bioorganometallic chemistry: biocatalytic oxidation reactions with biomimetic nad+/nadh co-factors and [cp*rh(bpy)h]+ for selective organic synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutz, Jochen; Hollman, Frank; Ho, The Vinh; Schnyder, Adrian; Fish, Richard H.; Schmid, Andreas

    2004-03-09

    The biocatalytic, regioselective hydroxylation of 2-hydroxybiphenyl to the corresponding catechol was accomplished utilizing the monooxygenase 2-hydroxybiphenyl 3-monooxygenase (HbpA). The necessary natural nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}) co-factor for this biocatalytic process was replaced by a biomimetic co-factor, N-benzylnicotinamide bromide, 1a. The interaction between the flavin (FAD) containing HbpA enzyme and the corresponding biomimetic NADH compound, N-benzyl-1,4-dihdronicotinamide, 1b, for hydride transfers, was shown to readily occur. The in situ recycling of the reduced NADH biomimic 1b from 1a was accomplished with [Cp*Rh(bpy)H](Cl); however, productive coupling of this regeneration reaction to the enzymatic hydroxylation reaction was not totally successful, due to a deactivation process concerning the HbpA enzyme peripheral groups; i.e., -SH or -NH{sub 2} possibly reacting with the precatalyst, [Cp*Rh(bpy)(H{sub 2}O)](Cl){sub 2}, and thus inhibiting the co-factor regeneration process. The deactivation mechanism was studied, and a promising strategy of derivatizing these peripheral -SH or -NH{sub 2} groups with a polymer containing epoxide was successful in circumventing the undesired interaction between HbpA and the precatalyst. This latter strategy allowed tandem co-factor regeneration using 1a or 2a, [Cp*Rh(bpy)(H2O)](Cl){sub 2}, and formate ion, in conjunction with the polymer bound, FAD containing HbpA enzyme to provide the catechol product.

  2. Biocatalytic anode for glucose oxidation utilizing carbon nanotubes for direct electron transfer with glucose oxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaze, Abhay; Hussain, Nighat; Tang, Chi [Department of Chemistry, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269-3060 (United States); Leech, Donal [School of Chemistry, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland); Rusling, James [Department of Chemistry, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269-3060 (United States); Department of Cell Biology, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT 06032 (United States); School of Chemistry, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland)

    2009-10-15

    Covalently linked layers of glucose oxidase, single-wall carbon nanotubes and poly-L-lysine on pyrolytic graphite resulted in a stable biofuel cell anode featuring direct electron transfer from the enzyme. Catalytic response observed upon addition of glucose was due to electrochemical oxidation of FADH{sub 2} under aerobic conditions. The electrode potential depended on glucose concentration. This system has essential attributes of an anode in a mediator-free biocatalytic fuel cell. (author)

  3. A novel system combining biocatalytic dephosphorylation of L-ascorbic acid 2-phosphate and electrochemical oxidation of resulting ascorbic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahara, Takashi; Homma, Toshimasa; Kondo, Mizuki; Shimomura, Masato

    2011-03-15

    An enzyme electrode was prepared with acid phosphatase (ACP) for development of a new electric power generation system using ascorbic acid 2-phosphate (AA2P) as a fuel. The properties of the electrode were investigated with respect to biocatalytic dephosphorylation of AA2P and electrochemical oxidation of resulting ascorbic acid (AA). The enzyme electrode was fabricated by immobilization of ACP through amide linkage onto a self-assembled monolayer of 3-mercaptopropionic acid on a gold electrode. AA2P was not oxidized on a bare gold electrode in the potential sweep range from -0.1 to +0.5 V vs. Ag/AgCl. However, the enzyme electrode gave an oxidation current in citric buffer solution of pH 5 containing 10 mM of AA2P. The oxidation current began to increase at +0.2V, and reached to 5.0 μA cm(-2) at +0.5 V. The potential +0.2 V corresponded to the onset of oxidation of ascorbic acid (AA). These results suggest that the oxidation current observed with the enzyme electrode is due to AA resulting from dephosphorylation of AA2P. The oxidation current increased with increasing concentration of AA2P and almost leveled off at around the concentration of 5mM. Thus the enzyme electrode brought about biocatalytic conversion of AA2P to AA, followed by electrochemical oxidation of the AA. The oxidation current is likely to be controlled by the biocatalytic reaction. PMID:21247749

  4. Peroxidase-active cell free extract from onion solid wastes: biocatalytic properties and putative pathway of ferulic acid oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Agha, Ayman; Makris, Dimitris P; Kefalas, Panagiotis

    2008-09-01

    The exploitation of food residuals can be a major contribution in reducing the polluting load of food industry waste and in developing novel added-value products. Plant food residues including trimmings and peels might contain a range of enzymes capable of transforming bioorganic molecules, and thus they may have potential uses in several biocatalytic processes, including green organic synthesis, modification of food physicochemical properties, bioremediation, etc. Although the use of bacterial and fungal enzymes has gained attention in studies pertaining to biocatalytic applications, plant enzymes have been given less consideration or even disregarded. Therefore, we investigated the use of a crude peroxidase preparation from solid onion by-products for oxidizing ferulic acid, a widespread phenolic acid, various derivatives of which may occur in food wastes. The highest enzyme activity was observed at a pH value of 4, but considerable activity was retained up to a pH value of 6. Favorable temperatures for increased activity varied between 20-40 degrees C, 30 degrees C being the optimal. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of a homogenate/H(2)O(2)-treated ferulic acid solution showed the formation of a dimer as a major oxidation product. PMID:18930006

  5. Biocatalytic Properties and Structural Analysis of Eugenol Oxidase from Rhodococcus jostii RHA1: A Versatile Oxidative Biocatalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quoc-Thai; de Gonzalo, Gonzalo; Binda, Claudia; Rioz-Martínez, Ana; Mattevi, Andrea; Fraaije, Marco W

    2016-07-15

    Eugenol oxidase (EUGO) from Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 had previously been shown to convert only a limited set of phenolic compounds. In this study, we have explored the biocatalytic potential of this flavoprotein oxidase, resulting in a broadened substrate scope and a deeper insight into its structural properties. In addition to the oxidation of vanillyl alcohol and the hydroxylation of eugenol, EUGO can efficiently catalyze the dehydrogenation of various phenolic ketones and the selective oxidation of a racemic secondary alcohol-4-(1-hydroxyethyl)-2-methoxyphenol. EUGO was also found to perform the kinetic resolution of a racemic secondary alcohol. Crystal structures of the enzyme in complexes with isoeugenol, coniferyl alcohol, vanillin, and benzoate have been determined. The catalytic center is a remarkable solvent-inaccessible cavity on the si side of the flavin cofactor. Structural comparison with vanillyl alcohol oxidase from Penicillium simplicissimum highlights a few localized changes that correlate with the selectivity of EUGO for phenolic substrates bearing relatively small p-substituents while tolerating o-methoxy substituents. PMID:27123962

  6. Enhanced biocatalytic esterification with lipase-immobilized chitosan/graphene oxide beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Siaw Cheng; Lim, Hong Ngee; Basri, Mahiran; Fard Masoumi, Hamid Reza; Ahmad Tajudin, Asilah; Huang, Nay Ming; Pandikumar, Alagarsamy; Chia, Chin Hua; Chia, Chi Hua; Andou, Yoshito

    2014-01-01

    In this work, lipase from Candida rugosa was immobilized onto chitosan/graphene oxide beads. This was to provide an enzyme-immobilizing carrier with excellent enzyme immobilization activity for an enzyme group requiring hydrophilicity on the immobilizing carrier. In addition, this work involved a process for the preparation of an enzymatically active product insoluble in a reaction medium consisting of lauric acid and oleyl alcohol as reactants and hexane as a solvent. This product enabled the stability of the enzyme under the working conditions and allowed the enzyme to be readily isolated from the support. In particular, this meant that an enzymatic reaction could be stopped by the simple mechanical separation of the "insoluble" enzyme from the reaction medium. Chitosan was incorporated with graphene oxide because the latter was able to enhance the physical strength of the chitosan beads by its superior mechanical integrity and low thermal conductivity. The X-ray diffraction pattern showed that the graphene oxide was successfully embedded within the structure of the chitosan. Further, the lipase incorporation on the beads was confirmed by a thermo-gravimetric analysis. The lipase immobilization on the beads involved the functionalization with coupling agents, N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide sodium (NHS) and 1-ethyl-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC), and it possessed a high enzyme activity of 64 U. The overall esterification conversion of the prepared product was 78% at 60 °C, and it attained conversions of 98% and 88% with commercially available lipozyme and novozyme, respectively, under similar experimental conditions. PMID:25127038

  7. Enhanced biocatalytic esterification with lipase-immobilized chitosan/graphene oxide beads.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siaw Cheng Lau

    Full Text Available In this work, lipase from Candida rugosa was immobilized onto chitosan/graphene oxide beads. This was to provide an enzyme-immobilizing carrier with excellent enzyme immobilization activity for an enzyme group requiring hydrophilicity on the immobilizing carrier. In addition, this work involved a process for the preparation of an enzymatically active product insoluble in a reaction medium consisting of lauric acid and oleyl alcohol as reactants and hexane as a solvent. This product enabled the stability of the enzyme under the working conditions and allowed the enzyme to be readily isolated from the support. In particular, this meant that an enzymatic reaction could be stopped by the simple mechanical separation of the "insoluble" enzyme from the reaction medium. Chitosan was incorporated with graphene oxide because the latter was able to enhance the physical strength of the chitosan beads by its superior mechanical integrity and low thermal conductivity. The X-ray diffraction pattern showed that the graphene oxide was successfully embedded within the structure of the chitosan. Further, the lipase incorporation on the beads was confirmed by a thermo-gravimetric analysis. The lipase immobilization on the beads involved the functionalization with coupling agents, N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide sodium (NHS and 1-ethyl-(3-dimethylaminopropyl carbodiimide (EDC, and it possessed a high enzyme activity of 64 U. The overall esterification conversion of the prepared product was 78% at 60 °C, and it attained conversions of 98% and 88% with commercially available lipozyme and novozyme, respectively, under similar experimental conditions.

  8. Biocatalytic conversion of epoxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Erik; Janssen, DB

    2003-01-01

    Epoxides are attractive intermediates for producing chiral compounds. Important biocatalytic reactions involving epoxides include epoxide hydrolase mediated kinetic resolution, leading to the formation of diols and enantiopure remaining substrates, and enantioconvergent enzymatic hydrolysis, which g

  9. Catalytic Chemistry on Oxide Nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asthagiri, Aravind; Dixon, David A.; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Kay, Bruce D.; Rodriquez, Jose A.; Rousseau, Roger J.; Stacchiola, Dario; Weaver, Jason F.

    2016-05-29

    Metal oxides represent one of the most important and widely employed materials in catalysis. Extreme variability of their chemistry provides a unique opportunity to tune their properties and to utilize them for the design of highly active and selective catalysts. For bulk oxides, this can be achieved by varying their stoichiometry, phase, exposed surface facets, defect, dopant densities and numerous other ways. Further, distinct properties from those of bulk oxides can be attained by restricting the oxide dimensionality and preparing them in the form of ultrathin films and nanoclusters as discussed throughout this book. In this chapter we focus on demonstrating such unique catalytic properties brought by the oxide nanoscaling. In the highlighted studies planar models are carefully designed to achieve minimal dispersion of structural motifs and to attain detailed mechanistic understanding of targeted chemical transformations. Detailed level of morphological and structural characterization necessary to achieve this goal is accomplished by employing both high-resolution imaging via scanning probe methods and ensemble-averaged surface sensitive spectroscopic methods. Three prototypical examples illustrating different properties of nanoscaled oxides in different classes of reactions are selected.

  10. Sustainable Biocatalytic Biodiesel Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Güzel, Günduz

    As part of his PhD studies, Gündüz Güzel examined the thermodynamics of reactions involved in biocatalytic biodiesel production processes, with a specific focus on phase equilibria of reactive systems. He carried out the thermodynamic analyses of biocatalytic processes in terms of phase and chemi......As part of his PhD studies, Gündüz Güzel examined the thermodynamics of reactions involved in biocatalytic biodiesel production processes, with a specific focus on phase equilibria of reactive systems. He carried out the thermodynamic analyses of biocatalytic processes in terms of phase...... and chemical equilibria as part of his main sustainable biodiesel project. The transesterification reaction of vegetable oils or fats with an aliphatic alcohol – in most cases methanol or ethanol – yields biodiesel (long-chain fatty acid alkyl esters – FAAE) as the main product in the presence of alkaline....../acid catalysts or biocatalysts (free or immobilised lipase enzymes). The reaction by-product glycerol is immiscible with the ester products (FAAE and oils/fats) in addition to the partial miscibility problem of methanol or ethanol with oils/fats. The insoluble parts of alcohol feeds or by-products form emulsion...

  11. Wet Chemistry of Spinel Iron oxide Particles

    OpenAIRE

    Jolivet, J.; Chanéac, C.; Prené, P.; Vayssières, L.; Tronc, E.

    1997-01-01

    Various properties of spinel iron oxide nanograins are reviewed, illustrating the broad possibilities of wet chemistry for tailoring materials for a wide range of utilizations, from catalysis and sensors to cast magnetic materials.

  12. Biocatalytic portfolio of Basidiomycota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Dannert, Claudia

    2016-04-01

    Basidiomycota fungi have received little attention for applications in biocatalysis and biotechnology and remain greatly understudied despite their importance for carbon recycling, ecosystem functioning and medicinal properties. The steady influx of genome data has facilitated detailed studies aimed at understanding the evolution and function of fungal lignocellulose degradation. These studies and recent explorations into the secondary metabolomes have uncovered large portfolios of enzymes useful for biocatalysis and biosynthesis. This review will provide an overview of the biocatalytic repertoires of Basidiomycota characterized to date with the hope of motivation more research into the chemical toolkits of this diverse group of fungi. PMID:26812494

  13. Aromatic-radical oxidation chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glassman, I.; Brezinsky, K. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The research effort has focussed on discovering an explanation for the anomalously high CO{sub 2} concentrations observed early in the reaction sequence of the oxidation of cyclopentadiene. To explain this observation, a number of plausible mechanisms have been developed which now await experimental verification. One experimental technique for verifying mechanisms is to probe the reacting system by perturbing the radical concentrations. Two forms of chemical perturbation of the oxidation of cyclopentadiene were begun during this past year--the addition of NO{sub 2} and CO to the reacting mixture.

  14. Oxidase-based biocatalytic processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramesh, Hemalata; Woodley, John; Krühne, Ulrich

    Biocatalytic processes are gaining significant focus in frontiers where they offer unique advantages(selectivity and mild operating conditions) over chemical catalysts. It is therefore not surprising that therehave been many industrial biocatalytic processes implemented.Despite past successes, the...... implementation of a new biocatalytic process still presents some challenges (demands placed on the biocatalyst) in terms of the requirements to make a viable industrial process. Inorder for a biocatalytic process to be economically successful, it is necessary that certain a set of targetmetrics (product titre...... reaction species (substrate and product volatility for example) and the process (such as oxygen supply, ability to control pH) and are classified as reaction-related and process-related constraintsrespectively. Although the development of biocatalyst and process engineering tools offers a number...

  15. Biocatalytic material comprising multilayer enzyme coated fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungbae [Richland, WA; Kwak, Ja Hun [Richland, WA; Grate, Jay W [West Richland, WA

    2009-11-03

    The present invention relates generally to high stability, high activity biocatalytic materials and processes for using the same. The materials comprise enzyme aggregate coatings having high biocatalytic activity and stability useful in heterogeneous environment. These new materials provide a new biocatalytic immobilized enzyme system with applications in bioconversion, bioremediation, biosensors, and biofuel cells.

  16. Biocatalytic properties of a peroxidase-active cell-free extract from onion solid wastes: caffeic acid oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Agha, Ayman; Abbeddou, Souheila; Makris, Dimitris P; Kefalas, Panagiotis

    2009-04-01

    The exploitation of food residual sources consists of a major factor in reducing the polluting load of food industry wastes and developing novel added-value products. Plant food residues including trimmings and peels might contain a range of enzymes capable of transforming bio-organic molecules with potential phytotoxicity, including hydrolases, peroxidases and polyphenoloxidases. Although the use of bacterial and fungal enzymes has gained interest in studies pertaining to bioremediation applications, plant enzymes have been given less attention or even disregarded. In this view, this study aimed at the investigating the use of a crude peroxidase preparation from onion solid by-products for oxidising caffeic acid, a widespread o-diphenol, whose various derivatives may occur in food industry wastes, such as olive mill waste waters. Increased enzyme activity was observed at a pH value of 5, but considerable activity was also retained for pH up to 7. Favourable temperatures for increased activity varied between 20 degrees C and 40 degrees C, 30 degrees C being the optimal. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of a homogenate/H(2)O(2)-treated caffeic acid solution revealed the existence of a tetramer as major oxidation product. Based on the data generated, a putative pathway for the formation of the peroxidase-mediated caffeic acid tetramer was proposed. PMID:18670892

  17. Surface Chemistry and Spectroscopy of Chromium in Inorganic Oxides

    OpenAIRE

    Weckhuysen, B. M.; Wachs, I.E.; Schoonheydt, R. A.

    1996-01-01

    Focuses on the surface chemistry and spectroscopy of chromium in inorganic oxides. Characterization of the molecular structures of chromium; Mechanics of hydrogenation-dehydrogenation reactions; Mobility and reactivity on oxidic surfaces.

  18. Application of environmental and economic metrics to guide the development of biocatalytic processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lima Ramos, Joana; Tufvesson, Pär; Woodley, John

    2014-01-01

    The increasing industrial interest in biocatalytic processes is predominantly driven by the need for selective chemistry, with high reaction yield (Y-reaction) and few side reactions, as well as the need for optically pure chiral molecules (in particularly in the pharmaceutical industry). Interes......The increasing industrial interest in biocatalytic processes is predominantly driven by the need for selective chemistry, with high reaction yield (Y-reaction) and few side reactions, as well as the need for optically pure chiral molecules (in particularly in the pharmaceutical industry...

  19. Sulfur Oxidation and Contrail Precursor Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, Kenneth J.

    2003-01-01

    Sulfuric acid (H2SO4), formed in commercial aircraft operations via fuel-S (goes to) SO2 (goes to) SO3 (goes to) H2SO4 plays an important role in the formation of contrails. It is believed that the first step occurs inside the combustor, the second step in the engine exit nozzle, and the third step in the exhaust plume. Thus, measurements of the sulfur oxidation rates are critical to the understanding of contrail formation. Field measurements of contrails formed behind commercial aircraft indicate that significantly greater conversion of fuel-bound sulfur to sulfate aerosol occurs than can be explained by our current knowledge of contrail physics and chemistry. The conversion of sulfur from S(IV) to S(VI) oxidation state, required for sulfate aerosol formation, is thermodynamically favored for the conditions that exist within jet engines but is kinetically disfavored. The principal reaction pathway is O+SO2+M (goes to) SO3+M. The rates of this reaction have never been measured in the temperature and pressure regimes available to aircraft operation. In the first year (FY02) of this project, we performed a series of experiments to elucidate the rate information for the O+SO2+M (goes to) SO3+M reaction. The work performed is described following the proposed work plan. Because we used the H2/O2 system for an O-atom source and rate coefficients were obtained via computer simulation, construction of a reaction mechanism and either recalculation or estimation of thermodynamic properties of H(x)SO(y) species are described first.

  20. Model visualization for evaluation of biocatalytic processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Law, HEM; Lewis, DJ; McRobbie, I;

    2008-01-01

    Biocatalysis offers great potential as an additional, and in some cases as an alternative, synthetic tool for organic chemists, especially as a route to introduce chirality. However, the implementation of scalable biocatalytic processes nearly always requires the introduction of process and....../or biocatalyst enhancements to ensure effective scale-up. This paper describes a paradigm for the purpose of evaluating biocatalytic processes in order to provide guidance on process and biocatalyst modification. The paradigm is illustrated with the biocatalytic synthesis of S,S-ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid (S......,S-EDDS), a biodegradable chelant, and is characterised by the use of model visualization using `windows of operation"....

  1. The Biocatalytic Desulfurization Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Nunn; James Boltz; Philip M. DiGrazia; Larry Nace

    2006-03-03

    The material in this report summarizes the Diversa technical effort in development of a biocatalyst for the biodesulfurization of Petro Star diesel as well as an economic report of standalone and combined desulfurization options, prepared by Pelorus and Anvil, to support and inform the development of a commercially viable process. We will discuss goals of the projected as originally stated and their modification as guided by parallel efforts to evaluate commercialization economics and process parameters. We describe efforts to identify novel genes and hosts for the generation of an optimal biocatalyst, analysis of diesel fuels (untreated, chemically oxidized and hydrotreated) for organosulfur compound composition and directed evolution of enzymes central to the biodesulfurization pathway to optimize properties important for their use in a biocatalyst. Finally we will summarize the challenges and issues that are central to successful development of a viable biodesulfurization process.

  2. The renaissance of palladium(II)-catalyzed oxidation chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Sigman, Matthew S.; Schultz, Mitchell J.

    2004-01-01

    Palladium(II)-catalyzed oxidations constitute a paramount reaction class but have remained immature over the past few decades. Recently, this field has reappeared at the forefront of organometallic catalysis. This emerging area article outlines recent developments in palladium(II)-catalyzed oxidation chemistry with discussion of potential future growth.

  3. THE BIOCATALYTIC DESULFURIZATION PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven E. Bonde; David Nunn

    2003-01-01

    During the first quarter of the Biological Desulfurization project several activities were pursued. A project kickoff meeting was held at the Diversa facility in San Diego, CA. Activities that were in process before the meeting and begun afterwards by Diversa Corporation and Petro Star Inc. include: Technology transfer in the form of information generated by Enchira to Diversa, the purchase and installation of equipment by Diversa, development of synthetic methods and preparation of organo-sulfur substrates for use in determining enzyme activities, production of extract via Petro Star's CED process, detailed analysis of Petro Star Inc. diesel and CED extract, and several activities in molecular biology. Diversa Corporation, in the area of molecular biology, engaged in several activities in support of the task list of the contract. These included: construction of a genomic library; development and utilization of a sequence-based gene discovery effort; a parallel discovery approach based on functional expression of enzymes with the ability to oxidize organosulfur compounds. Biodesulfurization genes have already been identified and are being sequenced and subcloned for expression in heterologous biological hosts. Diversa has evaluated and adapted assays developed by Enchira used to assess the activities of DBT and DBTO{sub 2} monooxygenases. Finally, Diversa personnel have developed two novel selection/screen strategies for the improvement of biocatalyst strains by directed evolution.

  4. Oxidation-state maxima in plutonium chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxima in the fractions of the trivalent and hexavalent oxidation states of plutonium are inherent in the algebra of its disproportionation reactions. The maxima do not support overall disproportionation equations as satisfactory representations of aqueous plutonium. (author)

  5. Grafting of Polycaprolactone on Oxidized Nanocelluloses by Click Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Claude Daneault; Sylvain Robert; Khalil Jradi; Abdelhaq Benkaddour

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this work is the grafting of polycaprolactone diol (PCL) on the surface of oxidized nanocelluloses (ONC) in order to enhance the compatibility between the hydrophilic cellulose nanofibres and the hydrophobic polymer matrix. This grafting was successfully realized with a new strategy known as click chemistry. In this context, the oxidized nanocelluloses bearing alkyl groups (ONC-PR) were prepared by reacting amino groups of propargylamine (PR) with carboxyl groups of ONC....

  6. Chemistry, Technology and Aplications of Oxidized Celluloses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Havelka, P.; Sopuch, T.; Hnatowicz, Vladimír; Suchý, P.; Masteikova, R.; Bajerová, M.; Gajdziok, J.; Milichovský, M.; Švorčík, V.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 2010, C (2010), s. 205-245. ISBN 978-1-608-76-388-7 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : oxidation * cellulose * in-vitro Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics https://www.novapublishers.com/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=14049

  7. Immobilization of manganese peroxidase from Lentinula edodes and its biocatalytic generation of MnIII-chelate as a chemical oxidant of chlorophenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabski, A C; Grimek, H J; Burgess, R R

    1998-10-20

    Manganese peroxidase (MnP) purified from commercial cultures of Lentinula edodes was covalently immobilized through its carboxyl groups using an azlactone-functional copolymer derivatized with ethylenediamine and 2-ethoxy-1-ethoxycarbonyl-1,2-dihydroquinoline (EEDQ) as a coupling reagent. The tethered enzyme was employed in a two-stage immobilized MnP bioreactor for catalytic generation of chelated MnIII and subsequent oxidation of chlorophenols. Manganese peroxidase immobilized in the enzyme reactor (reactor 1) produced MnIII-chelate, which was pumped into another chemical reaction vessel (reactor 2) containing the organopollutant. Reactor 1-generated MnIII-chelates oxidized 2,4-dichlorophenol and 2,4, 6-trichlorophenol in reactor 2, demonstrating a two-stage enzyme and chemical system. H2O2 and oxalate chelator concentrations were varied to optimize the immobilized MnP's oxidation of MnII to MnIII. Oxidation of 1.0 mM MnII to MnIII was initially measured at 78% efficiency under optimized conditions. After 24 h of continuous operation under optimized reaction conditions, the reactor still oxidized 1.0 mM MnII to MnIII with approximately 69% efficiency, corresponding to 88% of the initial MnP activity. PMID:10099422

  8. Computational Chemistry of Cyclopentane Low Temperature Oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    El Rachidi, Mariam

    2015-03-30

    Cycloalkanes are significant constituents of conventional fossil fuels, but little is known concerning their combustion chemistry and kinetics, particularly at low temperatures. This study investigates the pressure dependent kinetics of several reactions occurring during low-temperature cyclopentane combustion using theoretical chemical kinetics. The reaction pathways of the cyclopentyl + O2 adduct is traced to alkylhydroperoxide, cyclic ether, β-scission and HO2 elimination products. The calculations are carried out at the UCCSD(T)-F12b/cc-pVTZ-F12//M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. The barrierless entrance channel is treated using variable-reaction-coordinate transition state theory (VRC-TST) at the CASPT2(7e,6o) level of theory, including basis set, geometry relaxation and ZPE corrections. 1-D time-dependent multiwell master equation analysis is used to determine pressure-and temperature-dependent rate parameters of all investigated reactions. Tunneling corrections are included using Eckart barriers. Comparison with cyclohexane is used to elucidate the effect of ring size on the low temperature reactivity of naphthenes. The rate coefficients reported herein are suitable for use in cyclopentane and methylcyclopentane combustion models, even below ~900 K, where ignition is particularly sensitive to these pressure-dependent values.

  9. Recent developments in Zinc oxide target chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinc oxide targets irradiated with high energy protons at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) contain a number of radioactive spallation products in quantities large enough to warrant recovery. This paper describes methods for recovering 7Be, 46 Sc, and 48V from such targets and offers suggestions on possible ways to recover additional isotopes. The proposed methods are based on traditional precipitation and ion exchange techniques, are readily adaptable to hot cell use, and produce no hazardous waste components. The products are obtained in moderate to high yields and have excellent radionuclidic purity. (author). 14 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  10. Sources and chemistry of nitrogen oxides over the tropical Pacific

    OpenAIRE

    Staudt, A. C.; Jacob, Daniel James; Ravetta, F; Logan, Jennifer A.; Bachiochi, D; Krishnamurti, T.; Sandholm, S; Ridley, B.; Singh, H; Talbot, B

    2003-01-01

    We examine the sources and chemistry affecting nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) over the tropical Pacific (30°S–20°N) using observations from the Pacific Exploratory Mission to the Tropics B (PEM-Tropics B) aircraft mission conducted in March–April 1999. A global model of tropospheric chemistry driven by assimilated meteorological data is used to interpret the observations. Median concentrations observed over the South Pacific during PEM-Tropics B were 7 pptv NO, 16 pptv peroxyacetyl nitrate ...

  11. Physical chemistry of the interface between oxide and aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behavior and properties of small oxide particles in aqueous suspension are dominated by the physico-chemistry of their surface. It is electrostatically charged and strongly solvated. The origin of the surface charge is discussed through the MUSIC model [Hiemstra 1996], allowing to estimate the acid-base behavior of surface oxygen atoms. The stability of aqueous dispersions of particles is analysed following the DLVO model, with a special attention on the hydration layers allowing the peptization of flocs. Different adsorption mechanisms of metal cations are presented in terms of coordination chemistry (outer- and inner-sphere complexes) emphasizing the coordinating ability of the surface towards metal complexes in solution. The anion adsorption is also studied in relation with some interesting consequences on spinel iron oxide nano-particles. (author)

  12. Pentavalent Uranium Chemistry - Synthetic Pursuit Of A Rare Oxidation State

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graves, Christopher R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kiplinger, Jaqueline L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    This feature article presents a comprehensive overview of pentavalent uranium systems in non-aqueous solution with a focus on the various synthetic avenues employed to access this unusual and very important oxidation state. Selected characterization data and theoretical aspects are also included. The purpose is to provide a perspective on this rapidly evolving field and identify new possibilities for future developments in pentavalent uranium chemistry.

  13. Biocatalytic process development using microfluidic miniaturized systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krühne, Ulrich; Heintz, Søren; Ringborg, Rolf Hoffmeyer;

    2014-01-01

    The increasing interest in biocatalytic processes means there is a clear need for a new systematic development paradigm which encompasses both protein engineering and process engineering. This paper argues that through the use of a new microfluidic platform, data can be collected more rapidly and...

  14. Biocatalysts for selective oxidations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, M. [Department of Chemistry, Chemical Technology, TU Kaiserslautern (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    Selective oxidations using oxygen (or air) and hydrogen peroxide (or tert.-butyl hydroperoxide) are important transformations in synthetic organic chemistry as well as in industrial chemistry. However, these reactions are rarely regio- or stereo-selective and the selective oxidation of non-activated C-H-bonds is a still challenging problem. In contrast, enzyme-catalyzed reactions offer mild and selective routes to oxidation products which are important intermediates for the production of fine chemicals, pharmaceuticals or even bulk chemicals. However, a productive role of biocatalysts in basic chemical processing is not obvious. For decades, it was believed that enzymes might be suitable catalysts only for specialty applications. Such beliefs were guided by the assumption that enzymes in general are expensive and thus not suitable for processes to basic chemicals. Given sufficiently good stability and acceptable space time yields, enzymes have been proven to be catalysts of choice for quite a number of applications. New technologies such as protein engineering directed evolution and metabolic engineering are likely to open up further opportunities for biocatalytic routes, provided that they can meet the stringent productivity and cost criteria set by processes to basic chemicals. This review will discuss some general features of selective biocatalytic oxidations as well as some already implanted processes. An outlook of remaining challenges and the future potential of biocatalysts in selective oxidations will also be provided. (orig.)

  15. Biocatalytic oxidation of phenolic compounds by bovine methemoglobin in the presence of H2O2: Quantitative structure–activity relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The kinetics of metHb-catalyzed oxidation of a group of phenols were analyzed. ► Unusual kinetic behaviour was observed for the phenols here tested. ► QSAR equations for a number of physicochemical parameters were established. ► A relationship between the peroxidase and catalase activities of metHb was found. ► Bovine metHb might represent a good economical alternative to other peroxidases. - Abstract: In the present work, 13 p-substituted phenols with different functional groups have been systematically evaluated as metHb substrates by means of HPLC analysis. Non-hyperbolic kinetics were observed and Hill coefficients in the 0.37–1.00 range were obtained. The catalytic constants and the Hill coefficients were found to be quantitatively correlated with two independent variables: the energy level of the highest-occupied molecular orbital (EHOMO), which describes the intrinsic redox activity of the substrates and the pKa-values, which are related to substrate ionization. Oxygen evolution in the presence of each phenol derivative was also measured, and good correlation between peroxidase-like and catalase-like activities of the protein was observed. It is also shown that bovine metHb, although less active than other peroxidases, may represent a good alternative from an economical point of view for phenol removal processes. The equations here obtained may serve as a basis to further explore the potential use of metHb-mediated reactions in the treatment of phenols in wastewaters and to predict which phenol will be removed most efficiently under this treatment with satisfactory reliability.

  16. Biocatalytic oxidation of phenolic compounds by bovine methemoglobin in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}: Quantitative structure-activity relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Prior, M. Teresa, E-mail: MariaTeresa.Perez@uclm.es [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Castilla-La Mancha, Campus Universitario, E-02071 Albacete (Spain); Gomez-Bombarelli, Rafael, E-mail: R.GomezBombarelli@hw.ac.uk [Department of Physics, Heriot-Watt University, David Brewster Building G.45, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Gonzalez-Sanchez, M. Isabel, E-mail: MIsabel.Gonzalez@uclm.es [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Castilla-La Mancha, Campus Universitario, E-02071 Albacete (Spain); Valero, Edelmira, E-mail: Edelmira.Valero@uclm.es [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Castilla-La Mancha, Campus Universitario, E-02071 Albacete (Spain)

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The kinetics of metHb-catalyzed oxidation of a group of phenols were analyzed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unusual kinetic behaviour was observed for the phenols here tested. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer QSAR equations for a number of physicochemical parameters were established. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A relationship between the peroxidase and catalase activities of metHb was found. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bovine metHb might represent a good economical alternative to other peroxidases. - Abstract: In the present work, 13 p-substituted phenols with different functional groups have been systematically evaluated as metHb substrates by means of HPLC analysis. Non-hyperbolic kinetics were observed and Hill coefficients in the 0.37-1.00 range were obtained. The catalytic constants and the Hill coefficients were found to be quantitatively correlated with two independent variables: the energy level of the highest-occupied molecular orbital (E{sub HOMO}), which describes the intrinsic redox activity of the substrates and the pK{sub a}-values, which are related to substrate ionization. Oxygen evolution in the presence of each phenol derivative was also measured, and good correlation between peroxidase-like and catalase-like activities of the protein was observed. It is also shown that bovine metHb, although less active than other peroxidases, may represent a good alternative from an economical point of view for phenol removal processes. The equations here obtained may serve as a basis to further explore the potential use of metHb-mediated reactions in the treatment of phenols in wastewaters and to predict which phenol will be removed most efficiently under this treatment with satisfactory reliability.

  17. Chemistry and electronics of oxides from carbon dioxide to perovskite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxides are thermodynamic stable form of materials in terrestrial conditions to exist as final products of energy consumption proceeding in nature as well as in civilization. The accumulation of heat capacitive CO2 in atmosphere is becoming a serious environmental problem. Solid oxides as minerals in the earth shell had been used mainly for heat resistant structural materials as well as for raw materials of metals, but recent advanced chemistry and physics have been manifesting new electronic and chemical potentials hidden in oxides. Current interest and studies on oxides are directed towards two main areas: (1) prevention of CO2 increase in atmosphere by its fixation and/or by saving the consumption of fossil fuels and (2) discovery and utilization of superfunctionality in oxides. Triggered by Bednorz and Muller's discovery of high Tc superconductor, the latter topics have been attracting rapidly growing interest from viewpoints of both fundamental research and practical application. In commemoration of WOE homecoming to the place of inauguration, a founder of WOE appreciates much to the program committee for providing him with this opportunity of briefing the workshop motivation and of reviewing his research career on oxide materials

  18. Interface chemistry between complex oxides and semiconductors: where chemistry and physics meet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchiori, Chiara

    2010-03-01

    Even though heavily based on semiconductors, microelectronics CMOS technology would not exist without the integration of thin oxide films which enable the exploitation of the semiconductor properties. Indeed, working principle of the metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor, the main building block of such a technology, is the modulation of charges at the oxide/semiconductor interface. The quality of this interface is of fundamental importance for device performance. For over four decades, SiO2 was the gate dielectric of choice and device scaling meant improving performance while lowering production costs. However, as scaling is approaching fundamental limits, direct tunneling across the dielectric becomes unacceptable. At this point, the integration of more complex and higher dielectric constant oxides - ``high-K dielectrics''- with Si or even more complex semiconductors (Ge, III-V) is the key enabler of performance gain. I will review critical issues related to the oxide/semiconductor interfaces, starting with SiO2/Si. Then, I will discuss how the level of complexity increases with the introduction of high-K dielectrics and other semiconductors in the stack. Among the issues to be addressed to fabricate high-performance devices, I will discuss the role played by: 1) interfacial chemistry and thermodynamical stability, 2) band alignment and surface band bending, 3) presence of defects at the interface and in the oxide bulk, 4) evolution of the gate stack properties upon post-deposition treatments. The impact of these parameters on electrical performance of devices will be discussed in detail. Finally, epitaxial oxide on Si will be explored as a promising approach for ultimate EOT scaling and the parameters governing the epitaxial growth of complex crystalline oxides on Si will be addressed. I will show that the development performed in this area might enable the integration of epitaxial oxides for monolithic integration, paving the way to technological

  19. Grafting of Polycaprolactone on Oxidized Nanocelluloses by Click Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Daneault

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this work is the grafting of polycaprolactone diol (PCL on the surface of oxidized nanocelluloses (ONC in order to enhance the compatibility between the hydrophilic cellulose nanofibres and the hydrophobic polymer matrix. This grafting was successfully realized with a new strategy known as click chemistry. In this context, the oxidized nanocelluloses bearing alkyl groups (ONC-PR were prepared by reacting amino groups of propargylamine (PR with carboxyl groups of ONC. In parallel, PCL was converted into azido-polycaprolactone (PCL-N3 in two steps: (i tosylation of polycaprolactone (PCL-OTs and (ii conversion of PCL-OTs into PCL-N3 by nucleophilic displacement using sodium azide. Finally, ONC-PR was reacted with PCL-N3 in heterogeneous conditions through click chemistry in order to prepare polycaprolactone grafted oxidized nanocellulose (ONC-g-PCL, which could be suitable for improving the interfacial adhesion in the composite materials. The grafted samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (13C-NMR spectroscopic techniques.

  20. Green chemistry synthesis of nano-cuprous oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceja-Romero, L R; Ortega-Arroyo, L; Ortega Rueda de León, J M; López-Andrade, X; Narayanan, J; Aguilar-Méndez, M A; Castaño, V M

    2016-04-01

    Green chemistry and a central composite design, to evaluate the effect of reducing agent, temperature and pH of the reaction, were employed to produce controlled cuprous oxide (Cu2O) nanoparticles. Response surface method of the ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy is allowed to determine the most relevant factors for the size distribution of the nanoCu2O. X-ray diffraction reflections correspond to a cubic structure, with sizes from 31.9 to 104.3 nm. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy reveals that the different shapes depend strongly on the conditions of the green synthesis. PMID:27074852

  1. Efficient Biocatalytic Synthesis of Chiral Chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Jun; Pan, Jiang; Ma, Bao-Di; Xu, Jian-He

    2016-01-01

    Chiral chemicals are a group of important chiral synthons for the synthesis of a series of pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and fine chemicals. In past decades, a number of biocatalytic approaches have been developed for the green and effective synthesis of various chiral chemicals. However, the practical application of these biocatalytic processes is still hindered by the lack of highly efficient and robust biocatalysts, which usually results in the low volumetric productivity and high cost of the bioprocesses. Further step forward of biocatalysis in industrial application strongly requires the development of versatile and highly efficient biocatalysts, aiming to increase the process efficiency and facilitate the downstream processing. Recently, the fast growth of genome sequences in the database in post-genomic era offers great opportunities for accessing numerous biocatalysts with practical application potential, and the so-called genome mining approach provides time-effective and highly specific strategy for the fast identification of target enzymes with desired properties and outperforms the traditional screening of soil samples for microbial enzyme producers of interest. A number of biocatalytic processes with industrial application potential were developed thereafter. Further development of protein engineering strategies, process optimization, and cooperative work between biologists, organic chemists, and engineers is expected to make biocatalysis technology the first choice approach for the eco-friendly, highly efficient, and cost-effective synthesis of chiral chemicals in the near future. PMID:25537446

  2. The chemistry and physics of zinc oxide surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wöll, Christof

    Metal oxides are virtually everywhere - only gold has the property not to form an oxide on its surface when exposed to the ambient. As a result, understanding the physics and chemistry of oxide surfaces is a topic of pronounced general interest and, of course, also a necessary prerequisite for many technical applications. The most important of these is certainly heterogeneous catalysis, but one has to realize that - under ambient conditions - virtually all phenomena occurring at liquid/metal and gas/metal interfaces are determined by the corresponding oxide. This applies in particular to friction phenomena, adhesion and corrosion. A necessary - but not necessarily sufficient - condition for unravelling the fundamentals governing this complex field is to analyze in some detail elementary chemical and physical processes at oxide surfaces. Although the Surface Science of metal surfaces has seen a major progress in the past decades, for oxides detailed experimental investigations for well-defined single crystal surfaces still represent a formidable challenge - mostly because of technical difficulties (charging), but to some extent also due to fundamental problems related to the stabilization of polar surfaces. As a result, the amount of information available for this class of materials is - compared to that at hand for metals - clearly not satisfactory. A particular disturbing lack of information is that about the presence of hydrogen at oxide surfaces - either as hydroxy-species or in form of metal hydrides. In the present review we will summarize recent experimental and theoretical information which has become available from single crystal studies on ZnO surfaces. While the number of papers dealing with another oxide, rutile TiO 2, is significantly larger (although titania does not exhibit a polar surface), also for zinc oxide a basis of experimental and theoretical knowledge as been accumulated, which - at least for the non-polar surfaces - allows to understand

  3. From solution to oxide. Cations condensation in aqueous solution. Surface chemistry of oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    How is formed a solid from a solution? What are the properties of a dispersion of particles? The aim of this book is to answer to these questions. From an overview of the condensation processes of the cations in aqueous solution and the revealing of the structural relationships between species in solution and the formed solids, this book gives a logic in the phenomenon of oxides precipitation. The relationship that is established between the solutions chemistry and the solid chemistry allows to rationalize the behaviour of cations and to discuss the various factors whose structure, morphology and particles size are depending. It is from basic concepts relative to the oxide - aqueous solution interface that is presented the surface chemistry of oxides nano-particles. This one establishes the properties and the behaviour of the dispersions. Different phenomena bound to adsorption (arranged aggregation, control of particles size, interfacial electronic transfer, magnetic interactions between particles...) are studied. This book develops some aspects of the chemistry of metallic cations which is very important in a fundamental and technological point of view (synthesis of nano-materials, ceramics powders, catalysts, geochemical processes, biological phenomena, sol-gel techniques...). It is intended for university or engineers students and industrial searchers. (O.M.)

  4. Ethylene oxidation chemistry in a well-stirred reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinov, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Malte, P. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1994-09-01

    Ethylene is an important intermediate in the combustion of methane, larger aliphatic hydrocarbons, and aromatics. Detailed fuel-lean C{sub 2}H{sub 4}H{sub 2}O/air well-stirred reactor data by Thornton were used to analyze reported combustion chemistry mechanisms and the development of this study`s ethylene oxidation mechanism. The data set had been obtained for the temperature range 1,003 to 1,253 K and ethylene-oxygen equivalence ratio range 0.086 to 0.103, at atmospheric pressure. Mechanisms were derived from reaction sets of Westbrook and Pitz, and Dagaut, Cathonnet and Boettner. Examination of each reported mechanism indicated unusually large kinetic rates for the vinyl decomposition reaction were used in order to obtain agreement with the Thornton data set. An ethylene oxidation model was developed in order to address the mechanistic problems of the previous models. This study`s mechanism well simulated the overall rate of ethylene oxidation and concentration profiles of CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, CH{sub 2}O, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, CH{sub 3}OH, CH{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 6}. Successful predictions by the model were dependent on a new high temperature vinyl oxidation reaction route, C{sub 2}H{sub 3} + O{sub 2} = CH{sub 2}CHO + O with a branching ratio of 1.19--1.21 at 1,053 K to 1.63--2.47 at 1,253 K. The branching ratio values were dependent upon the extent of fall-off for the C{sub 2}H{sub 3} + O{sub 2} = CH{sub 2}O + HCO reaction. 132 refs.

  5. Photosynthetic water oxidation: insights from manganese model chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Karin J; Brennan, Bradley J; Tagore, Ranitendranath; Brudvig, Gary W

    2015-03-17

    Catalysts for light-driven water oxidation are a critical component for development of solar fuels technology. The multielectron redox chemistry required for this process has been successfully deployed on a global scale in natural photosynthesis by green plants and cyanobacteria using photosystem II (PSII). PSII employs a conserved, cuboidal Mn4CaOX cluster called the O2-evolving complex (OEC) that offers inspiration for artificial O2-evolution catalysts. In this Account, we describe our work on manganese model chemistry relevant to PSII, particularly the functional model [Mn(III/IV)2(terpy)2(μ-O)2(OH2)2](NO3)3 complex (terpy = 2,2';6',2″-terpyridine), a mixed-valent di-μ-oxo Mn dimer with two terminal aqua ligands. In the presence of oxo-donor oxidants such as HSO5(-), this complex evolves O2 by two pathways, one of which incorporates solvent water in an O-O bond-forming reaction. Deactivation pathways of this catalyst include comproportionation to form an inactive Mn(IV)Mn(IV) dimer and also degradation to MnO2, a consequence of ligand loss when the oxidation state of the complex is reduced to labile Mn(II) upon release of O2. The catalyst's versatility has been shown by its continued catalytic activity after direct binding to the semiconductor titanium dioxide. In addition, after binding to the surface of TiO2 via a chromophoric linker, the catalyst can be oxidized by a photoinduced electron-transfer mechanism, mimicking the natural PSII process. Model oxomanganese complexes have also aided in interpreting biophysical and computational studies on PSII. In particular, the μ-oxo exchange rates of the Mn-terpy dimer have been instrumental in establishing that the time scale for μ-oxo exchange of high-valent oxomanganese complexes with terminal water ligands is slower than O2 evolution in the natural photosynthetic system. Furthermore, computational studies on the Mn-terpy dimer and the OEC point to similar Mn(IV)-oxyl intermediates in the O-O bond

  6. The radiation chemistry of some poly(arylene phosphene oxide)s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The poly(arylene phosphene oxide)s are a class of thermoplastics with high glass transition temperature, high modulus and inherent flame retardancy. These properties make them good candidates for use in high energy radiation environments, such as occur in space and in the nuclear industry. In this paper the high energy radiation chemistry of a series of these polymers will be discussed, including studies of the radicals formed, the molecular weight changes and the changes in chemical structure evident through NMR spectroscopy. The radiation sensitivity of the polymers will be compared with that of the related poly(arylene sulfone)s and poly(arylene ether ether ketone)s

  7. Metalloporphyrins as Oxidation Catalysts: Moving toward "Greener" Chemistry in the Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Rose A.; Stock, Anne E.; Zovinka, Edward P.

    2012-01-01

    Training future chemists to be aware of the environmental impact of their work is of fundamental importance to global society. To convince chemists to embrace sustainability, the integration of green chemistry across the entire chemistry curriculum is a necessary step. This experiment expands the reach of green chemistry techniques into the…

  8. Sustainable Biocatalytic Biodiesel Production:A Thermodynamic Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Güzel, Günduz

    2012-01-01

    As part of his PhD studies, Gündüz Güzel examined the thermodynamics of reactions involved in biocatalytic biodiesel production processes, with a specific focus on phase equilibria of reactive systems. He carried out the thermodynamic analyses of biocatalytic processes in terms of phase and chemical equilibria as part of his main sustainable biodiesel project. The transesterification reaction of vegetable oils or fats with an aliphatic alcohol – in most cases methanol or ethanol – yields biod...

  9. A methodology for development of biocatalytic processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lima Ramos, Joana

    , is also the source of the greatest opportunities. Indeed, recombinant DNA technology offers a superb complement to process technologies. Potentially this is one of the biggest advantages of biocatalysis when compared with conventional chemical catalysis, where all the reaction boundaries are fixed...... and their relationship with the overall process is not clear.The work described in this thesis presents a methodological approach for early stage development of biocatalytic processes, understanding and dealing with the reaction, biocatalyst and process constraints. When applied, this methodology has a decisive role...... tools, the number of options can be much reduced and the current process bottlenecks identified. By applying a priori this methodology, the Laboratory experts are better able to understand the most favourable operating conditions at fullscale and thus be able to collect information at these relevant...

  10. Biocatalytic Self-Cleaning Polymer Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Schulze

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Polymer membrane surfaces have been equipped with the digestive enzyme trypsin. Enzyme immobilization was performed by electron beam irradiation in aqueous media within a one-step method. Using this method, trypsin was covalently and side-unspecific attached to the membrane surface. Thus, the use of preceding polymer functionalization and the use of toxic solvents or reagents can be avoided. The resulting membranes showed significantly improved antifouling properties as demonstrated by repeated filtration of protein solutions. Furthermore, the biocatalytic membrane can be simply “switched on” to actively degrade a fouling layer on the membrane surface and regain the initial permeability. The membrane pore structure (pore size and porosity was neither damaged by the electron beam treatment nor blocked by the enzyme loading, ensuring a stable membrane performance.

  11. Biocatalytic Pathway Selection in Transient Tripeptide Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Charalampos G; Sasselli, Ivan R; Ulijn, Rein V

    2015-07-01

    Structural adaption in living systems is achieved by competing catalytic pathways that drive assembly and disassembly of molecular components under the influence of chemical fuels. We report on a simple mimic of such a system that displays transient, sequence-dependent formation of supramolecular nanostructures based on biocatalytic formation and hydrolysis of self-assembling tripeptides. The systems are catalyzed by α-chymotrypsin and driven by hydrolysis of dipeptide aspartyl-phenylalanine-methyl ester (the sweetener aspartame, DF-OMe). We observed switch-like pathway selection, with the kinetics and consequent lifetime of transient nanostructures controlled by the peptide sequence. In direct competition, kinetic (rather than thermodynamic) component selection is observed. PMID:26014441

  12. Steam assisted oxide growth on aluminium alloys using oxidative chemistries: Part II corrosion performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2015-01-01

    Surface treatment of aluminium alloys using steam with oxidative chemistries, namely KMnO4 and HNO3 resulted in accelerated growth of oxide on aluminium alloys. Detailed investigation of the corrosion performance of the treated surfaces was carried out using potentiodynamic polarisation and...... standard industrial test methods such as acetic acid salt spray (AASS) and filiform corrosion on commercial AA6060 alloy. Barrier properties of the film including adhesion were evaluated using tape test under wet and dry conditions. Electrochemical results showed reduced cathodic and anodic activity, while...... the protection provided by steam treatment with HNO3was a function of the concentration of NO3−ions. The coating generated by inclusion of KMnO4showed highest resistance to filiform corrosion. Overall, the performance of the steam treated surfaces under filiform corrosion and AASS test was a result of...

  13. Tin Oxide Chemistry from Macquer (1758) to Mendeleeff (1891) as Revealed in the Textbooks and Other Literature of the Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Berg, Kevin C.

    2008-01-01

    Eight chemistry textbooks written from 1758 to 1891 have been analyzed for the way they present the chemistry of the oxides of tin. This analysis gives insight into the foundation of a number of chemical ideas such as nomenclature and composition used in modern chemistry. Four major preparation techniques for the production of tin oxides emerge…

  14. Nitrogen oxide air pollution: atmospheric chemistry. 1964-1978 (citations from the NTIS data base). Report for 1964-78

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavagnaro, D.M.

    1980-10-01

    Research reports on photochemical air pollution models, smog chemistry and reactivity, and SSt exhaust effects are cited in the bibliography. Auroral and upper atmospheric in chemistry, and photochemistry of naturally occurring nitrogen oxides are excluded. (Contains 247 citations)

  15. The oxidation of hydrogen cyanide and related chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dagaut, Philippe; Glarborg, Peter; Alzueta, Maria U.

    2008-01-01

    For modeling the formation of nitrogen oxides in combustion via both the prompt-NO and the fuel-NO mechanisms, as well as for modeling the reduction of nitrogen oxides via reburning, a good knowledge of the kinetics of oxidation of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) is required. The formation routes to HCN a...

  16. Biocatalytic desulfurization of petroleum and middle distillates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biocatalytic Desulfurization (BDS) represents an alternative approach to the reduction of sulfur in fossil fuels. The objective is to use bacteria to selectively remove sulfur from petroleum and middle distillate fractions, without the concomitant release of carbon. Recently, bacteria have been developed which have the ability to desulfurize dibenzothiophene (DBT) and other organosulfur molecules. These bacteria are being developed for use in a biocatalyst-based desulfurization process. Analysis of preliminary conceptual engineering designs has shown that this process has the potential to complement conventional technology as a method to temper the sulfur levels in crude oil, or remove the recalcitrant sulfur in middle distillates to achieve the deep desulfurization mandated by State and Federal regulations. This paper describes the results of initial feasibility studies, sensitivity analyses and conceptual design work. Feasibility studies with various crude oils and middle distillates achieved unoptimized desulfurization levels of 40-80%. Sensitivity analyses indicate that total desulfurization costs of about $3.00 per barrel for crude oil and less than $2.00 per barrel for diesel are possible. Key criteria for commercial success of the process include the cost and half-life of the biocatalyst, residence time in the reactor, oil/water ratios required to extract the sulfur and the disposition of the separated sulfur products. 9 refs., 3 figs

  17. Biocatalytic potential of laccase-like multicopper oxidases from Aspergillus niger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamayo-Ramos Juan Antonio

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Laccase-like multicopper oxidases have been reported in several Aspergillus species but they remain uncharacterized. The biocatalytic potential of the Aspergillus niger fungal pigment multicopper oxidases McoA and McoB and ascomycete laccase McoG was investigated. Results The laccase-like multicopper oxidases McoA, McoB and McoG from the commonly used cell factory Aspergillus niger were homologously expressed, purified and analyzed for their biocatalytic potential. All three recombinant enzymes were monomers with apparent molecular masses ranging from 80 to 110 kDa. McoA and McoG resulted to be blue, whereas McoB was yellow. The newly obtained oxidases displayed strongly different activities towards aromatic compounds and synthetic dyes. McoB exhibited high catalytic efficiency with N,N-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine (DMPPDA and 2,2-azino-di(3-ethylbenzthiazoline sulfonic acid (ABTS, and appeared to be a promising biocatalyst. Besides oxidizing a variety of phenolic compounds, McoB catalyzed successfully the decolorization and detoxification of the widely used textile dye malachite green. Conclusions The A. niger McoA, McoB, and McoG enzymes showed clearly different catalytic properties. Yellow McoB showed broad substrate specificity, catalyzing the oxidation of several phenolic compounds commonly present in different industrial effluents. It also harbored high decolorization and detoxification activity with the synthetic dye malachite green, showing to have an interesting potential as a new industrial biocatalyst.

  18. Effect of water chemistry on oxide morphologies of Zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To understand the degradation behavior of corrosion resistance in LiOH aqueous solution for Zircaloy-4, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Scanning Probe Microscope (SPM) are performed to observe the inside and outside surface morphologies of the oxide. Based on the results, it is suggested that there exists compressive stress parallel to oxide/matrix interface in the oxide film because of volume expanding during the oxidation of Zircaloy-4. The oxide film heaves due to compressive stress, which brings strain stress perpendicular to interface, the strain stress leads oxide film break and results in accelerating corrosion rate. The higher the concentration of LiOH aqueous solution is, the quicker the process is. (authors)

  19. Sustainable biocatalytic biodiesel production : A thermodynamic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guezel, G.

    2012-09-15

    In the present thesis it was aimed at achieving thermodynamic analysis of reactions involved in enzymatic biodiesel production with specific focus on chemical and phase equilibria of reactive systems. Lipase-catalyzed biodiesel production (biocatalytic ethanolysis) presents significant advantages: Easy recovery of glycerol, no complex down-processing operations for elimination of catalyst and salt, and requires less organic solvent and lower energy consumption compared with conventional chemical methods. In overall, the major aims of this thesis were evaluating and subsequently finding feasible solutions to the questions emerged during the corresponding studies that have been performed worldwide. Some of the questions that were answered as appropriate as possible can be listed as follows: 1) What is the solubility of EtOH in vegetable oils and in FAEE blends and how does it change with temperature? 2) Is it possible to prevent denaturing impact of EtOH on biocatalysts? 3) What are the feedstock content (water and FFA) impacts on glycerol and EtOH miscibility with ester species? 4) Is it necessary removing glycerol by-product simultaneously? 5) Is it feasible providing monophasic or homogeneous reaction media that procure lower external mass transfer resistance? 6) What are the moisture absorption limits of FAAE species? 7) How are the interactions of reactive species in terms of miscibility/immiscibility phenomena? 8) Is it thermodynamically feasible providing monophasic reaction media? 9) How can LLE and VLE phase behaviors help to determine optimum reaction conditions? 10) How can the results of LLE and VLE studies be used so as to determine appropriate refining operations? (LN)

  20. Angular dependence of silicon oxide etching yield in fluorocarbon chemistries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High density fluorocarbon plasma for silicon oxide etching has various ion and neutral species. Profile evolution modeling can provide understanding of many difficulties caused by the complexity of the plasma in etching. In this research we have measured etching and deposition rates as functions of ion impinging angle, sample temperature, which are necessary for profile evolution modeling of silicon oxide etching in inductively coupled plasma. Angular dependence of etching yield of oxide in fluorocarbon plasma shows very unique behavior unlike typical ion-induced chemical etching or physical sputtering. Ion-induced deposition model is suggested and tested

  1. Modeling chemistry in and above snow at Summit, Greenland – Part 2: Impact of snowpack chemistry on the oxidation capacity of the boundary layer

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, J.L.; Dibb, J. E.; L. G. Huey; Liao, J; Tanner, D.; Lefer, B; Glasow, R.; Stutz, J.

    2012-01-01

    The chemical composition of the boundary layer in snow covered regions is impacted by chemistry in the snowpack via uptake, processing, and emission of atmospheric trace gases. We use the coupled one-dimensional (1-D) snow chemistry and atmospheric boundary layer model MISTRA-SNOW to study the impact of snowpack chemistry on the oxidation capacity of the boundary layer. The model includes gas phase photochemistry and chemical reactions both in the interstitial air and the at...

  2. Modeling chemistry in and above snow at Summit, Greenland − Part 2: Impact of snowpack chemistry on the oxidation capacity of the boundary layer

    OpenAIRE

    Lefer, B; von Glasow, R.; Tanner, D.; Liao, J; L. G. Huey; Dibb, J. E.; Thomas, J.L.; Stutz, J.

    2012-01-01

    The chemical composition of the boundary layer in snow covered regions is impacted by chemistry in the snowpack via uptake, processing, and emission of atmospheric trace gases. We use the coupled one-dimensional (1-D) snow chemistry and atmospheric boundary layer model MISTRA-SNOW to study the impact of snowpack chemistry on the oxidation capacity of the boundary layer. The model includes gas phase photochemistry and chemical reactions both in the interstitial air and the atmosphere. Chemistr...

  3. Biocatalytic Separation of N-7/N-9 Guanine Nucleosides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Sunil K; Sharma, Vivek K; Olsen, Carl Erik;

    2010-01-01

    Vorbrüggen coupling of trimethylsilylated 2-N-isobutanoylguanine with peracetylated pentofuranose derivatives generally gives inseparable N-7/N-9 glycosyl mixtures. We have shown that the two isomers can be separated biocatalytically by Novozyme-435-mediated selective deacetylation of the 5'-O...

  4. Crystal chemistry of the perovskite based superconducting oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystal chemistry of K2NiF4 and Ba2YCu3O7 type compounds is discussed. The composition dependence of the lattice parameters for the Ba2-xLaxYCu3O7+δ solid solution and of the oxygen stoichiometry in Ba2-xLaxYCu3O7+δ annealed in O2 at 500 C, as well as a tentative partial phase equilibria diagram for ABO3-x perovskites in the (Ba, La, Y) CuO3-x chemical system are given. 19 refs, 4 figs

  5. CHEMISTRY OF SO2 AND DESOX PROCESSES ON OXIDE NANOPARTICLES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RODRIGUEZ, J.A.

    2006-06-30

    On bulk stoichiometric oxides, SO{sub 2} mainly reacts with the O centers to form SO{sub 3} or SO{sub 4} species that decompose at elevated temperatures. Adsorption on the metal cations occurs below 300 K and does not lead to cleavage of the S-O bonds. In bulk oxides, the occupied cation bands are too stable for effective bonding interactions with the LUMO of SO{sub 2}. The effects of quantum confinement on the electronic properties of oxide nanoparticles and the structural defects that usually accompany these systems in general favor the bonding and dissociation of SO{sub 2}. Thus, nanoparticles of MgO, CaO, SrO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CeO{sub 2} are all more efficient for sequestering SO{sub 2} than the corresponding bulk oxides. Structural imperfections in pure or metal-doped ceria nanoparticles accelerate the reduction of SO{sub 2} by CO by facilitating the formation and migration of O vacancies in the oxide surface.

  6. Mercury oxidation from bromine chemistry in the free troposphere over the southeastern US

    OpenAIRE

    S. Coburn; Dix, B.; Edgerton, E.; Holmes, C. D; Kinnison, D.; Liang, Q; A. ter Schure; Wang, S.; R. Volkamer

    2015-01-01

    The elevated deposition of atmospheric mercury over the Southeastern United States is currently not well understood. Here we measure partial columns and vertical profiles of bromine monoxide (BrO) radicals, a key component of mercury oxidation chemistry, to better understand the processes and altitudes at which mercury is being oxidized in the atmosphere. We use the data from a ground-based MAX-DOAS instrument located at a coastal site ~ 1 km from the Gulf o...

  7. Improvement of shutdown chemistry for outer oxide layer removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the plant shutdown of PWRs, Ni and radioactive Co increase in concentration in the coolant because the coolant conditions become favourable for crud dissolution. From the relation between the dissolved hydrogen and the dissolution behaviors of Ni and NixFe3-xO4 which are thought to be the main constituents of crud, it was found that Ni and radioactive Co were mainly dissolved from the metallic Ni existing in the crud and also that Ni dissolution was increased at lower dissolved hydrogen concentrations. Base on the above results, the shutdown chemistry which keeps the dissolved hydrogen concentration lower, called low dissolved hydrogen control, has been applied to the plant shutdown by adding hydrogen peroxide, and the increases of Ni and radioactive Co concentrations have been ascertained. This shutdown chemistry could be assessed as being one of the effective ways for reducing radiation source because it can not only remove the radioactive Co but also produces less generation of radioactive corrosion products in the next cycle. (author)

  8. Aerobic Alcohol Oxidation Using a Copper(I)/TEMPO Catalyst System: A Green, Catalytic Oxidation Reaction for the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Nicholas J.; Hoover, Jessica M.; Stahl, Shannon S.

    2013-01-01

    Modern undergraduate organic chemistry textbooks provide detailed discussion of stoichiometric Cr- and Mn-based reagents for the oxidation of alcohols, yet the use of such oxidants in instructional and research laboratories, as well as industrial chemistry, is increasingly avoided. This work describes a laboratory exercise that uses ambient air as…

  9. Study on the solid state chemistry of ternary uranium oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the increase of burnup of uranium oxide fuels, various kinds of fission products are formed, and the oxygen atoms combined with the consumed heavy atoms are freed. The solid state chemical and/or thermodynamic properties of these elements at high temperatures are complex, and have not been well clarified. In the present report, an approach was taken that the chemical interactions between UO2 and these fission products can be regarded as causing overlapped effects of composing ternary uranium oxides, and formation reactions and phase behavior were studied for several ternary uranium oxides with typical fission product elements such as alkaline earth metals and rare earth elements. Precise determination methods for the composition of ternary uranium oxides were developed. The estimated accuracies for x and y values in MyU1-yO2+x were ± 0.006 and ± 0.004, respectively. The thermodynamic properties and the lattice parameters of the phases in the Ca-U-O and Pr-U-O systems were discussed in relation to the composition determined by the methods. Crystal structure analyses of cadmium monouranates were made with X-ray diffraction method. (author) 197 refs

  10. Synthesis and lanthanide coordination chemistry of trifluoromethyl derivatives of phosphinoylmethyl pyridine N-oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pailloux, Sylvie [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Shirima, Cornel Edicome [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Duesler, Eileen N. [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Smith, Karen Ann [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Paine, Robert T. [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Klaehn, John D. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); McIlwain, Michael E [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Hay, Benjamin [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    A synthetic route for the formation of 2-[bis-(2-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-phosphinoylmethyl]-pyridine N-oxide (1c) and 2-[bis-(3,5-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-phosphinoylmethyl]-pyridine N-oxide (1d) was developed and the new ligands characterized by spectroscopic methods and single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. The coordination chemistry of the ligands was examined with early and late lanthanide ions. The molecular structure of one complex, [Yb(1c)(NO3)3(DMF)](DMF)(H2O)0.5, was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction methods and the ligand found to coordinate in a bidentate fashion. This coordination chemistry is compared against lanthanide coordination chemistry observed for the related ligand, [Ph2P(O)CH2] C5H4NO.

  11. Genotoxicity of copper oxide nanoparticles with different surface chemistry on rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wenjing; Jiang, Pengfei; Chen, Wei;

    2016-01-01

    The surface chemistry of nanoparticles (NPs) is one of the critical factors determining their cellular responses. In this study, the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of copper oxide (CuO) NPs with a similar size but different surface chemistry to rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were...... chemistry had influence on the toxicity to some extent too. The intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level of MSCs was then quantified. Finally, the genotoxicity of the CuO NPs was studied by comet assay. The results suggest that the genotoxicity of CuO NPs was mainly dependent on NPs concentration......, and was only slightly influenced by their surface chemistry. The osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation abilities of the MSCs exposed to different CuO NPs were studied by Alizarin Res S and Oil Red O staining. The preliminary results showed that the exposure to 10 μg/mL CuO NPs will not lead to...

  12. A detailed approach to model transport, heterogeneous chemistry, and electrochemistry in solid-oxide fuel cells

    OpenAIRE

    Janardhanan, Vinod

    2007-01-01

    This book lays out a numerical framework for the detailed description of heterogeneous chemistry, electrochemistry and porous media transport in solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFC). Assuming hydrogen as the only electrochemically active species, a modified Butler-Volmer equation is used to model the electrochemical charge transfer.

  13. Studies on Oxidative Couplings in H-Phosphonate Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Johan

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis oxidative coupling of H-phosphonate and H phosphonothioate diesters with different alcohols and amines are presented. Since the reactions with alcohols previously have been particularly unfavourable due to competing side reactions, a modified protocol leading to high coupling yields of structurally diverse hydroxylic components was developed. The phosphorylation reaction was studied using 31P NMR spectroscopy and for the first time the previously only postulated reactive interm...

  14. Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical research and development efforts related to the design and ultimate operation of molten-salt breeder reactor systems are concentrated on fuel- and coolant-salt chemistry, including the development of analytical methods for use in these systems. The chemistry of tellurium in fuel salt is being studied to help elucidate the role of this element in the intergranular cracking of Hastelloy N. Studies were continued of the effect of oxygen-containing species on the equilibrium between dissolved UF3 and dissolved UF4, and, in some cases, between the dissolved uranium fluorides and graphite, and the UC2. Several aspects of coolant-salt chemistry are under investigation. Hydroxy and oxy compounds that could be formed in molten NaBF4 are being synthesized and characterized. Studies of the chemistry of chromium (III) compounds in fluoroborate melts were continued as part of a systematic investigation of the corrosion of structural alloys by coolant salt. An in-line voltammetric method for determining U4+/U3+ ratios in fuel salt was tested in a forced-convection loop over a six-month period. (LK)

  15. Flotation and flocculation chemistry of coal and oxidized coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somasundaran, P.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this research project is to understand the fundamentals involved in the flotation and flocculation of coal and oxidized coals and elucidate mechanisms by which surface interactions between coal and various reagents enhance coal beneficiation. An understanding of the nature of the heterogeneity of coal surfaces arising from the intrinsic distribution of chemical moieties is fundamental to the elucidation of mechanism of coal surface modification and its role in interfacial processes such as flotation, flocculation and agglomeration. A new approach for determining the distribution in surface properties of coal particles was developed in this study and various techniques capable of providing such information were identified. Distributions in surface energy, contact angle and wettability were obtained using novel techniques such as centrifugal immersion and film flotation. Changes in these distributions upon oxidation and surface modifications were monitored and discussed. An approach to the modelling of coal surface site distributions based on thermodynamic information obtained from gas adsorption and immersion calorimetry is proposed. Polyacrylamide and dodecane was used to alter the coal surface. Methanol adsorption was also studied. 62 figs.

  16. Biocatalytic membranes for ultrafiltration treatment of wastewater containing dyes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konovalova, V.V.; Bryk, M.T.; Nigmatullin, R.R.; Gvozdyak, P.I.; Udilova, O.F. [Dept. of Chemistry, Univ. of ' ' Kyiv-Mohyla Academy' ' , Kyiv (Ukraine)

    2000-12-01

    A possibility to prepare the biofunctional membranes showing the biocatalytic properties and use those in post-treatment of wastewater containing synthetic dyes have been established. Selected Pseudomonas mendocina and Bacillus subtilis cultures were used as biocatalysts for dye destruction. It has been established that cells in spore form are able to survive in N-methylpyrrolidone that allow to use method of polymer solution casting for membrane preparation. The optimal conditions for entrapping of whole cells of microorganisms into the polymer matrix have been determined. Membrane biocatalytic activity has been studied depending on method of casting solution preparation, biocatalyst loading and operating parameters. Dye destruction occurs both in membrane pores and on membrane surface. Membrane obtained provide discolouring of treated solutions (permeate). The dye concentration in retentate depends on the trans-membrane fluxes. The concentration in retentate need not be observed at relatively low fluxes (up to 20 l/m{sup 2} h). (orig.)

  17. Physical chemistry and modelling of the sintering of actinide oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report gives a synthesis of the work I have carried out or to which I have numerically contributed to from 1996 up to 2012 in the Department of Plutonium Uranium and minor Actinides in Cadarache CEA Center. Their main goal is the study and the modeling of the sintering process of nuclear fuels which is the unifying thread of this document. Both in order to take into account the physical and chemical features of the actinide bearing oxide material and in order to combine the different transport phenomena leading to sintering, a sub-granular scale model is under development. Extension to a varying chemical composition as well as exchanges with the gaseous phase are foreseen. A simulation on a larger scale (pellet scale) is ongoing in the framework of a PhD thesis. Validation means have been tested with (U,Pu)O2 material on the scale of the pellet (Small Angle Neutron Diffusion), on the scale of powder granules (X-Ray High Resolution Micro-Tomography) and with CeO2 at the 'Institut de Chimie Separative' in Marcoule on a single crystal scale (Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope). The required microstructure homogeneity for nuclear fuels has led to a campaign of experimental studies about the role of Cr2O3 as a sintering aid. Whole of these studies improve our understanding of fuel sintering and hence leads to an improved mastering of this process. (author)

  18. Biocatalytic synthesis of highly ordered degradable dextran-based hydrogels

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Lino; Gil, Maria H.; Cabrita, António M. S.; Dordick, Jonathan S.

    2005-01-01

    We have prepared unique macroporous and ordered dextran-based hydrogels using a single-step biocatalytic transesterification reaction between dextran and divinyladipate in neat dimethylsulfoxide. These hydrogels show a unimodal distribution of interconnected pores with average diameters from 0.4 to 2.0 [mu]m depending on the degree of substitution. In addition, the hydrogels show a higher elastic modulus for a given swelling ratio than chemically synthesized dextran-based hydrogels. In vivo s...

  19. Non-OH chemistry in oxidation flow reactors for the study of atmospheric chemistry systematically examined by modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Peng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Oxidation flow reactors (OFRs using low-pressure Hg lamp emission at 185 and 254 nm produce OH radicals efficiently and are widely used in atmospheric chemistry and other fields. However, knowledge of detailed OFR chemistry is limited, allowing speculation in the literature about whether some non-OH reactants, including several not relevant for tropospheric chemistry, may play an important role in these OFRs. These non-OH reactants are UV radiation, O(1D, O(3P, and O3. In this study, we investigate the relative importance of other reactants to OH for the fate of reactant species in OFR under a wide range of conditions via box modeling. The relative importance of non-OH species is less sensitive to UV light intensity than to relative humidity (RH and external OH reactivity (OHRext, as both non-OH reactants and OH scale roughly proportional to UV intensity. We show that for field studies in forested regions and also the urban area of Los Angeles, reactants of atmospheric interest are predominantly consumed by OH. We find that O(1D, O(3P, and O3 have relative contributions to VOC consumption that are similar or lower than in the troposphere. The impact of O atoms can be neglected under most conditions in both OFR and troposphere. Under "pathological OFR conditions" of low RH and/or high OHRext, the importance of non-OH reactants is enhanced because OH is suppressed. Some biogenics can have substantial destructions by O3, and photolysis at non-tropospheric wavelengths (185 and 254 nm may also play a significant role in the degradation of some aromatics under pathological conditions. Working under low O2 with the OFR185 mode allows OH to completely dominate over O3 reactions even for the biogenic species most reactive with O3. Non-tropospheric VOC photolysis may have been a problem in some laboratory and source studies, but can be avoided or lessened in future studies by diluting source emissions and working at lower precursor concentrations in lab

  20. Non-OH chemistry in oxidation flow reactors for the study of atmospheric chemistry systematically examined by modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Z.; Day, D. A.; Ortega, A. M.; Palm, B. B.; Hu, W. W.; Stark, H.; Li, R.; Tsigaridis, K.; Brune, W. H.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2015-09-01

    Oxidation flow reactors (OFRs) using low-pressure Hg lamp emission at 185 and 254 nm produce OH radicals efficiently and are widely used in atmospheric chemistry and other fields. However, knowledge of detailed OFR chemistry is limited, allowing speculation in the literature about whether some non-OH reactants, including several not relevant for tropospheric chemistry, may play an important role in these OFRs. These non-OH reactants are UV radiation, O(1D), O(3P), and O3. In this study, we investigate the relative importance of other reactants to OH for the fate of reactant species in OFR under a wide range of conditions via box modeling. The relative importance of non-OH species is less sensitive to UV light intensity than to relative humidity (RH) and external OH reactivity (OHRext), as both non-OH reactants and OH scale roughly proportional to UV intensity. We show that for field studies in forested regions and also the urban area of Los Angeles, reactants of atmospheric interest are predominantly consumed by OH. We find that O(1D), O(3P), and O3 have relative contributions to VOC consumption that are similar or lower than in the troposphere. The impact of O atoms can be neglected under most conditions in both OFR and troposphere. Under "pathological OFR conditions" of low RH and/or high OHRext, the importance of non-OH reactants is enhanced because OH is suppressed. Some biogenics can have substantial destructions by O3, and photolysis at non-tropospheric wavelengths (185 and 254 nm) may also play a significant role in the degradation of some aromatics under pathological conditions. Working under low O2 with the OFR185 mode allows OH to completely dominate over O3 reactions even for the biogenic species most reactive with O3. Non-tropospheric VOC photolysis may have been a problem in some laboratory and source studies, but can be avoided or lessened in future studies by diluting source emissions and working at lower precursor concentrations in lab studies, and

  1. Chemistry Rocks: Redox Chemistry as a Geologic Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Mary Sue

    2001-01-01

    Applies chemistry to earth science, uses rocks in chemistry laboratories, and teaches about transition metal chemistry, oxidation states, and oxidation-reduction reactions from firsthand experiences. (YDS)

  2. The Solubility of metal oxides in molten carbonates - why the acid-basic chemistry fails?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Niels; Qingfeng, Li; Borup, Flemming;

    1999-01-01

    shows opposite effects, i.e., decreasing CO2 pressure leads to more negative emf values but increasing lithium content gives more positive emf values. This contradiction is explained by means of a complex formation model. The possible species for lead are proposed to be [Pb(CO3)2]-2 and/or [Pb(CO3) 3......]-4. A similar complex chemistry for nickel oxide dissolution might be expected....

  3. Kinetic and photochemical data for atmospheric chemistry reactions of the nitrogen oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, R. F., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Data sheets for thermal and photochemical reactions of importance in the atmospheric chemistry of the nitrogen oxides are presented. For each reaction the available experimental data are summarized and critically evaluated, and a preferred value of the rate coefficient is given. The selection of the preferred value is discussed and an estimate of its accuracy is given. For the photochemical process, the data are summarized, and preferred for the photoabsorption cross section and primary quantum yields are given.

  4. Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research progress is reported in programs on fuel-salt chemistry, properties of compounds in the Li--Te system, Te spectroscopy UF4--H equilibria, porous electrode studies of molten salts, fuel salt-coolant salt reactions, thermodynamic properties of transition-metal fluorides, and properties of sodium fluoroborate. Developmental work on analytical methods is summarized including in-line analysis of molten MSBR fuel, analysis of coolant-salts for tritium, analysis of molten LiF--BeF2--ThF4 for Fe and analysis of LiF--BeF--ThF4 for Te

  5. Atomic Scale Structure-Chemistry Relationships at Oxide Catalyst Surfaces and Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBriarty, Martin E.

    Oxide catalysts are integral to chemical production, fuel refining, and the removal of environmental pollutants. However, the atomic-scale phenomena which lead to the useful reactive properties of catalyst materials are not sufficiently understood. In this work, the tools of surface and interface science and electronic structure theory are applied to investigate the structure and chemical properties of catalytically active particles and ultrathin films supported on oxide single crystals. These studies focus on structure-property relationships in vanadium oxide, tungsten oxide, and mixed V-W oxides on the surfaces of alpha-Al2O3 and alpha-Fe2O 3 (0001)-oriented single crystal substrates, two materials with nearly identical crystal structures but drastically different chemical properties. In situ synchrotron X-ray standing wave (XSW) measurements are sensitive to changes in the atomic-scale geometry of single crystal model catalyst surfaces through chemical reaction cycles, while X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveals corresponding chemical changes. Experimental results agree with theoretical calculations of surface structures, allowing for detailed electronic structure investigations and predictions of surface chemical phenomena. The surface configurations and oxidation states of V and W are found to depend on the coverage of each, and reversible structural shifts accompany chemical state changes through reduction-oxidation cycles. Substrate-dependent effects suggest how the choice of oxide support material may affect catalytic behavior. Additionally, the structure and chemistry of W deposited on alpha-Fe 2O3 nanopowders is studied using X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements in an attempt to bridge single crystal surface studies with real catalysts. These investigations of catalytically active material surfaces can inform the rational design of new catalysts for more efficient and sustainable chemistry.

  6. Nitrogen oxide air pollution: atmospheric chemistry. 1979-August, 1980 (citations from the NTIS data base). Report for 1979-Aug 80

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavagnaro, D.M.

    1980-10-01

    Photochemical air pollution models, smog chemistry and reactivity, and SSt exhaust effects are covered in the bibliography. Auroral and upper atmospheric chemistry, and photochemistry of naturally occurring nitrogen oxides are excluded. (This updated bibliography contains 63 citations, 40 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  7. DNA Sequence Context as a Determinant of the Quantity and Chemistry of Guanine Oxidation Produced by Hydroxyl Radicals and One-electron Oxidants*S⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Margolin, Yelena; Shafirovich, Vladimir; Geacintov, Nicholas E.; DeMott, Michael S.; Dedon, Peter C.

    2008-01-01

    DNA sequence context has emerged as a critical determinant of the location and quantity of nucleobase damage caused by many oxidizing agents. However, the complexity of nucleobase and 2-deoxyribose damage caused by strong oxidants such as ionizing radiation and the Fenton chemistry of Fe2+-EDTA/H2O2 poses a challenge to defining the location of nucleobase damage and the effects of sequence context on damage chemistry in DNA. To address this problem, we developed a gel-...

  8. Complexes and clusters of water relevant to atmospheric chemistry: H2O complexes with oxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sennikov, Petr G; Ignatov, Stanislav K; Schrems, Otto

    2005-03-01

    Experimental observations and data from quantum chemical calculations on complexes between water molecules and small, oxygen-containing inorganic species that play an important role as oxidants in the atmosphere (O(1D), O(3P), O2(X3sigmag), O2(b1sigmag+), O3, HO, HOO, HOOO, and H2O2) are reviewed, with emphasis on their structure, hydrogen bonding, interaction energies, thermodynamic parameters, and infrared spectra. In recent years, weakly bound complexes containing water have increasingly attracted scientific attention. Water in all its phases is a major player in the absorption of solar and terrestrial radiation. Thus, complexes between water and other atmospheric species may have a perceivable influence on the radiative balance and contribute to the greenhouse effect, even though their concentrations are low. In addition, they can play an important role in the chemistry of the Earth's atmosphere, particularly in the oxidation of trace gases. Apart from gas-phase complexes, the interactions of oxidants with ice surfaces have also received considerable advertency lately due to their importance in the chemistry of snow, ice clouds, and ice surfaces (e.g., ice shields in polar regions). In paleoclimate--respectively paleoenvironmental--studies, it is essential to understand the transfer processes from the atmosphere to the ice surface. Consequently, special attention is being paid here to the intercomparison of the properties of binary complexes and the complexes and clusters of more complicated compositions, including oxidants adsorbed on ice surfaces, where ice is considered a kind of large water cluster. Various facts concerning the chemistry of the Earth's atmosphere (concentration profiles and possible influence on radical reactions in the atmosphere) are discussed. PMID:15799459

  9. Bioinspired heme, heme/nonheme diiron, heme/copper, and inorganic NOx chemistry: *NO((g)) oxidation, peroxynitrite-metal chemistry, and *NO((g)) reductive coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopfer, Mark P; Wang, Jun; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2010-07-19

    The focus of this Forum Article highlights work from our own laboratories and those of others in the area of biochemical and biologically inspired inorganic chemistry dealing with nitric oxide [nitrogen monoxide, *NO((g))] and its biological roles and reactions. The latter focus is on (i) oxidation of *NO((g)) to nitrate by nitric oxide dioxygenases (NODs) and (ii) reductive coupling of two molecules of *NO((g)) to give N(2)O(g). In the former case, NODs are described, and the highlighting of possible peroxynitrite/heme intermediates and the consequences of this are given by a discussion of recent works with myoglobin and a synthetic heme model system for NOD action. Summaries of recent copper complex chemistries with *NO((g)) and O(2)(g), leading to peroxynitrite species, are given. The coverage of biological reductive coupling of *NO((g)) deals with bacterial nitric oxide reductases (NORs) with heme/nonheme diiron active sites and on heme/copper oxidases such as cytochrome c oxidase, which can mediate the same chemistry. Recently designed protein and synthetic model compounds (heme/nonheme/diiron or heme/copper) as functional mimics are discussed in some detail. We also highlight examples from the chemical literature, not necessarily involving biologically relevant metal ions, that describe the oxidation of *NO((g)) to nitrate (or nitrite) and possible peroxynitrite intermediates or reductive coupling of *NO((g)) to give nitrous oxide. PMID:20666386

  10. Non-OH chemistry in oxidation flow reactors for the study of atmospheric chemistry systematically examined by modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhe; Day, Douglas A.; Ortega, Amber M.; Palm, Brett B.; Hu, Weiwei; Stark, Harald; Li, Rui; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Brune, William H.; Jimenez, Jose L.

    2016-04-01

    Oxidation flow reactors (OFRs) using low-pressure Hg lamp emission at 185 and 254 nm produce OH radicals efficiently and are widely used in atmospheric chemistry and other fields. However, knowledge of detailed OFR chemistry is limited, allowing speculation in the literature about whether some non-OH reactants, including several not relevant for tropospheric chemistry, may play an important role in these OFRs. These non-OH reactants are UV radiation, O(1D), O(3P), and O3. In this study, we investigate the relative importance of other reactants to OH for the fate of reactant species in OFR under a wide range of conditions via box modeling. The relative importance of non-OH species is less sensitive to UV light intensity than to water vapor mixing ratio (H2O) and external OH reactivity (OHRext), as both non-OH reactants and OH scale roughly proportionally to UV intensity. We show that for field studies in forested regions and also the urban area of Los Angeles, reactants of atmospheric interest are predominantly consumed by OH. We find that O(1D), O(3P), and O3 have relative contributions to volatile organic compound (VOC) consumption that are similar or lower than in the troposphere. The impact of O atoms can be neglected under most conditions in both OFR and troposphere. We define "riskier OFR conditions" as those with either low H2O ( 200 s-1 in OFR254). We strongly suggest avoiding such conditions as the importance of non-OH reactants can be substantial for the most sensitive species, although OH may still dominate under some riskier conditions, depending on the species present. Photolysis at non-tropospheric wavelengths (185 and 254 nm) may play a significant (> 20 %) role in the degradation of some aromatics, as well as some oxidation intermediates, under riskier reactor conditions, if the quantum yields are high. Under riskier conditions, some biogenics can have substantial destructions by O3, similarly to the troposphere. Working under low O2 (volume mixing

  11. Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research and development activities dealing with the chemical problems related to design and ultimate operation of molten-salt reactor systems are described. An experimental test stand was constructed to expose metallurgical test specimens to Te2 vapor at defined temperatures and deposition rates. To better define the chemistry of fluoroborate coolant, several aspects are being investigated. The behavior of hydroxy and oxy compounds in molten NaBF4 is being investigated to define reactions and compounds that may be involved in corrosion and/or could be involved in methods for trapping tritium. Two corrosion products of Hastelloy N, Na3CrF6 and Na5Cr3F14, were identified from fluoroborate systems. The evaluation of fluoroborate and alternate coolants continued. Research on the behavior of hydrogen and its isotopes is summarized. The solubilities of hydrogen, deuterium, and helium in Li2BeF4 are very low. The sorption of tritium on graphite was found to be significant (a few milligrams of tritium per kilogram of graphite), possibly providing a means of sequestering a portion of the tritium produced. Development of analytical methods continued with emphasis on voltammetric and spectrophotometric techniques for the in-line analysis of corrosion products such as Fe2+ and Cr3+ and the determination of the U3+/U4+ ratio in MSBR fuel salt. Similar studies were conducted with the NaBF4--NaF coolant salt. Information developed during the previous operation of the CSTF has been assessed and used to formulate plans for evaluation of in-line analytical methods in future CSTF operations. Electroanalytical and spectrophotometric research suggests that an electroactive protonic species is present in molten NaBF4--NaF, and that this species rapidly equilibrates with a volatile proton-containing species. Data obtained from the CSTF indicated that tritium was concentrated in the volatile species. (JGB)

  12. Ion sorption onto hydrous ferric oxides: Effect on major element fluid chemistry at Aespoe, Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The observed variability of fluid chemistry at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory is not fully described by conservative fluid mixing models. Ion exchange may account for some of the observed discrepancies. It is also possible that variably charged solids such as oxyhydroxides of Fe can serve as sources and sinks of anions and cations through surface complexation. Surface complexation reactions on hydrous ferric oxides involve sorption of both cations and anions. Geochemical modeling of the surface chemistry of hydrous ferric oxides (HFOs) in equilibrium with shallow HBH02 and deep KA0483A waters shows that HFOs can serve as significant, pH-sensitive sources and sinks for cations and anions. Carbonate sorption is favored especially at below-neutral pH. A greater mass of carbonate is sorbed onto HFO surfaces than is contained in the fluid when 10 g goethite, used as a proxy for HFOs, is in contact with 1 kg H2O. The masses of sorbent required to significantly impact fluid chemistry through sorption/desorption reactions seem to be reasonable when compared to the occurrences of HFOs at Aespoe. Thus, it is possible that small changes in fluid chemistry can cause significant releases of cations or anions from HFOs into the fluid phase or, alternately, result in uptake of aqueous species onto HFO surfaces. Simulations of the mixing of shallow HBH02 and native KA0483A waters in the presence of a fixed mass of goethite show that surface complexation does not cause the concentrations of Ca, Sr, and SO4 to deviate from those that are predicted using conservative mixing models. Results for HCO3 are more difficult to interpret and cannot be addressed adequately at this time

  13. Green chemistry perspectives of methane conversion via oxidative methylation of aromatics over zeolite catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adebajo, M.O. [University of Queensland, St Lucia, Qld. (Australia)

    2007-06-15

    This paper provides a general overview of the recent work that we and other researchers have done on the utilisation of methane for catalytic methylation of aromatic compounds and for direct coal liquefaction for the production of liquid hydrocarbons. In particular, the paper presents a detailed description of more recent substantial experimental evidence that we have provided for the requirement of oxygen as a stoichiometry reactant for benzene methylation with methane over moderately acidic zeolite catalysts. The reaction, which has been termed 'oxidative methylation', was thus postulated to involve a two-step mechanism involving intermediate methanol formation by methane partial oxidation, followed by benzene methylation with methanol in the second step. However, strongly acidic zeolites can cause cracking of benzene to yield methylated products in the absence of oxygen. The participation of methane and oxygen, and the effective use of zeolite catalysts in this methylation reaction definitely have some positive green chemistry implications. Thus, the results of these previous studies are also discussed in this review in light of the principles and tools of green chemistry. Various metrics were used to evaluate the greenness, cost-effectiveness, and material and energy efficiency of the oxidative methylation reaction.

  14. Steam assisted oxide growth on aluminium alloys using oxidative chemistries: Part I Microstructural investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Piotrowska, Kamila; Gudla, Visweswara Chakravarthy;

    2015-01-01

    The surface treatment of aluminium alloys under steam containing KMnO4 and HNO3resulted in the formation of an oxide layer having a thickness of up to 825 nm. The use of KMnO4 and HNO3 in the steam resulted in incorporation of the respective chemical species into the oxide layer. Steam treatment ...... particles resulting in poor coverage by the steam generated oxide layer compared to the coating formed using MnO4−ions. Further, increase in the concentration of NO3−ions in the solution retards precipitation of the steam generated aluminium hydroxide layer.......The surface treatment of aluminium alloys under steam containing KMnO4 and HNO3resulted in the formation of an oxide layer having a thickness of up to 825 nm. The use of KMnO4 and HNO3 in the steam resulted in incorporation of the respective chemical species into the oxide layer. Steam treatment...

  15. Optimum EDTA solvent chemistry for iron oxide removal at 150 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of hydrazine, pH and inhibitor concentration were evaluated with respect to the dissolution effectiveness and material corrosion when using the iron oxide removal solvent composed of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), N2H4, NH4OH and the corrosion inhibitor CCI-801 at 150 deg. C. The optimum EDTA solvent chemistry at 150 deg. C was found to be 1% N2H4, pH 7 and 1% corrosion inhibitor. This formula is quite similar to the conventional 200 deg. F (93 deg. C) process

  16. Evaluating evidence for Cl sources and oxidation chemistry in a coastal, urban environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Young

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The role of chlorine atoms (Cl in atmospheric oxidation was traditionally thought to be limited to the marine boundary layer, where they are produced through heterogeneous reactions involving sea salt. However, recent observation of photolytic Cl precursors (ClNO2 and Cl2 formed from anthropogenic pollution has expanded the potential importance of Cl to include coastal and continental urban areas. Measurements of ClNO2 in Los Angeles during CalNex showed it to be an important primary (first generation radical source. Ratios of volatile organic compounds (VOCs have been proposed as a sensitive method to quantify Cl oxidation, but have shown little evidence for a significant role of Cl outside of the Arctic. We used a box model with the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM v3.2 chemistry scheme, constrained by observations in Los Angeles, to examine the Cl-sensitivity of the most commonly used VOC ratios (i-butane, n-butane, and propane as a function of NOx and secondary radical production. Model results indicated these and faster reacting VOC tracer ratios could not detect the influence of Cl unless the sustained ratio of OH to Cl was below 200. However, the model results also show that secondary (second generation OH production resulting from Cl oxidation of VOCs is strongly influenced by NOx, and that this effect can obscure the importance of Cl as a primary oxidant. Calculated concentrations of Cl showed a maximum in mid-morning due to a photolytic source from ClNO2 and loss primarily to reactions with VOCs. The OH to Cl ratio was below 200 for approximately three hours in the morning, but Cl oxidation was not evident from the measured ratios of VOCs. Instead, model simulations show that secondary OH production causes VOC ratios to follow the values expected for OH oxidation despite the significant input of primary Cl from ClNO2 photolysis in the morning. Despite the prevalence of secondary OH as an oxidant in Los Angeles, Cl may play an important

  17. Chemical solution deposited lanthanum zirconium oxide thin films: Synthesis and chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyrochlore lanthanum zirconium oxide (LZO) thin films textured along are synthesized using lanthanum acetate hydrate, zirconium propoxide, propionic acid, acetic acid glacial, and methanol as precursors. The materials growth and chemistry are investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The formation of inkjet printed LZO films on Ni-5%W tape is found to be based on the decomposition of the LZO precursor solution. In the annealing process, Zr metal-oxides bonds are first eliminated between 150 and 250 deg. C, while carboxylates from precursors remain in LZO after the annealing carried out at 900 oC for an hour. Annealed LZO films have dense and smooth structure that are composed of nanoparticles sizing 10-15 nm and some pinholes sizing 25-35 nm accounted for less than 0.1% of the area are observed.

  18. Surface chemistry and cytotoxicity of reactively sputtered tantalum oxide films on NiTi plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NiTi, an equiatomic alloy containing nickel and titanium, exhibits unique properties such as shape memory effect and superelasticity. NiTi also forms a spontaneous protective titanium dioxide (TiO2) layer that allows its use in biomedical applications. Despite the widely perceived biocompatibility there remain some concerns about the sustainability of the alloy's biocompatibility due to the defects in the TiO2 protective layer and the presence of high amount of sub-surface Ni, which can give allergic reactions. Many surface treatments have been investigated to try to improve both the corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of this layer. For such purposes, we have sputter deposited tantalum (Ta) oxide thin films onto the surface of the NiTi alloy. Despite being one of the promising metals for biomedical applications, Ta, and its various oxides and their interactions with cells have received relatively less attention. The oxidation chemistry, crystal structure, morphology and biocompatibility of these films have been investigated. In general, reactive sputtering especially in the presence of a low oxygen mixture yields a thicker film with better control of the film quality. The sputtering power influenced the surface oxidation states of Ta. Both microscopic and quantitative cytotoxicity measurements show that Ta films on NiTi are biocompatible with little to no variation in cytotoxic response when the surface oxidation state of Ta changes. - Highlights: • Reactive sputtering in low oxygen mixture yields thicker better quality films. • Sputtering power influenced surface oxidation states of Ta. • Cytotoxicity measurements show Ta films on NiTi are biocompatible. • Little to no variation in cytotoxic response when oxidation state changes

  19. Surface chemistry and cytotoxicity of reactively sputtered tantalum oxide films on NiTi plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNamara, K. [Materials and Surface Science Institute, University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland); Department of Physics & Energy, University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland); Kolaj-Robin, O.; Belochapkine, S.; Laffir, F. [Materials and Surface Science Institute, University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland); Gandhi, A.A. [Materials and Surface Science Institute, University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland); Department of Physics & Energy, University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland); Tofail, S.A.M., E-mail: tofail.syed@ul.ie [Materials and Surface Science Institute, University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland); Department of Physics & Energy, University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland)

    2015-08-31

    NiTi, an equiatomic alloy containing nickel and titanium, exhibits unique properties such as shape memory effect and superelasticity. NiTi also forms a spontaneous protective titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) layer that allows its use in biomedical applications. Despite the widely perceived biocompatibility there remain some concerns about the sustainability of the alloy's biocompatibility due to the defects in the TiO{sub 2} protective layer and the presence of high amount of sub-surface Ni, which can give allergic reactions. Many surface treatments have been investigated to try to improve both the corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of this layer. For such purposes, we have sputter deposited tantalum (Ta) oxide thin films onto the surface of the NiTi alloy. Despite being one of the promising metals for biomedical applications, Ta, and its various oxides and their interactions with cells have received relatively less attention. The oxidation chemistry, crystal structure, morphology and biocompatibility of these films have been investigated. In general, reactive sputtering especially in the presence of a low oxygen mixture yields a thicker film with better control of the film quality. The sputtering power influenced the surface oxidation states of Ta. Both microscopic and quantitative cytotoxicity measurements show that Ta films on NiTi are biocompatible with little to no variation in cytotoxic response when the surface oxidation state of Ta changes. - Highlights: • Reactive sputtering in low oxygen mixture yields thicker better quality films. • Sputtering power influenced surface oxidation states of Ta. • Cytotoxicity measurements show Ta films on NiTi are biocompatible. • Little to no variation in cytotoxic response when oxidation state changes.

  20. Enzyme-polymer composites with high biocatalytic activity and stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jungbae; Kosto, Timothy J.; Manimala, Joseph C.; Nauman, E B.; Dordick, Jonathan S.

    2004-08-22

    We have applied vacuum-spraying and electrospinning to incorporate an enzyme into a polymer matrix, creating a novel and highly active biocatalytic composite. As a unique technical approach, enzymes were co-dissolved in toluene with polymers, and the solvent was then rapidly removed by injecting the mixture into a vacuum chamber or by electrospinning. Subsequent crosslinking of the enzyme with glutaraldehyde resulted in stable entrapped enzyme within the polymeric matrices. For example, an amorphous composite of alpha-chymotrypsin and polyethylene showed no significant loss of enzymatic activity in aqueous buffer for one month. Nanofibers of alpha-chymotrypsin and polystyrene also showed no decrease in activity for more than two weeks. The normalized activity of amorphous composite in organic solvents was 3-13 times higher than that of native alpha-chymotrypsin. The activity of nanofibers was 5-7 times higher than that of amorphous composite in aqueous buffer solution. The composites of alpha-chymotrypsin and polymers demonstrate the feasibility of obtaining a wide variety of active and stable biocatalytic materials with many combinations of enzymes and polymers.

  1. Thermal chemistry of copper acetamidinate atomic layer deposition precursors on silicon oxide surfaces studied by XPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal surface chemistry of copper(I)-N,N′-di-sec-butylacetamidinate, [Cu(sBu-amd)]2, a metalorganic complex recently proposed for the chemical-based deposition of copper films, has been characterized on SiO2 films under ultrahigh vacuum conditions by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Initial adsorption at cryogenic temperatures results in the oxidation of the copper centers with Cu 2p3/2 XPS binding energies close to those seen for a +2 oxidation state, an observation that the authors interpret as the result of the additional coordination of oxygen atoms from the surface to the Cu atoms of the molecular acetamidinate dimer. Either heating to 300 K or dosing the precursor directly at that temperature leads to the loss of one of its two ligands, presumably via hydrogenation/protonation with a hydrogen/proton from a silanol group, or following a similar reaction on a defect site. By approximately 500 K the Cu 2p3/2, C 1s, and N 1s XPS data suggest that the remaining acetamidinate ligand is displaced from the copper center and bonds to the silicon oxide directly, after which temperatures above 900 K need to be reached to promote further (and only partial) decomposition of those organic moieties. It was also shown that the uptake of the Cu precursor is self-limiting at either 300 or 500 K, although the initial chemistry is somewhat different at the two temperatures, and that the nature of the substrate also defines reactivity, with the thin native silicon oxide layer always present on Si(100) surfaces being less reactive than thicker films grown by evaporation, presumably because of the lower density of surface nucleation sites

  2. Thermal chemistry of copper acetamidinate atomic layer deposition precursors on silicon oxide surfaces studied by XPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Yunxi; Zaera, Francisco, E-mail: zaera@ucr.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    The thermal surface chemistry of copper(I)-N,N′-di-sec-butylacetamidinate, [Cu({sup s}Bu-amd)]{sub 2}, a metalorganic complex recently proposed for the chemical-based deposition of copper films, has been characterized on SiO{sub 2} films under ultrahigh vacuum conditions by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Initial adsorption at cryogenic temperatures results in the oxidation of the copper centers with Cu 2p{sub 3/2} XPS binding energies close to those seen for a +2 oxidation state, an observation that the authors interpret as the result of the additional coordination of oxygen atoms from the surface to the Cu atoms of the molecular acetamidinate dimer. Either heating to 300 K or dosing the precursor directly at that temperature leads to the loss of one of its two ligands, presumably via hydrogenation/protonation with a hydrogen/proton from a silanol group, or following a similar reaction on a defect site. By approximately 500 K the Cu 2p{sub 3/2}, C 1s, and N 1s XPS data suggest that the remaining acetamidinate ligand is displaced from the copper center and bonds to the silicon oxide directly, after which temperatures above 900 K need to be reached to promote further (and only partial) decomposition of those organic moieties. It was also shown that the uptake of the Cu precursor is self-limiting at either 300 or 500 K, although the initial chemistry is somewhat different at the two temperatures, and that the nature of the substrate also defines reactivity, with the thin native silicon oxide layer always present on Si(100) surfaces being less reactive than thicker films grown by evaporation, presumably because of the lower density of surface nucleation sites.

  3. The radiation chemistry of poly(arylene ether phosphine oxide)s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron spin resonance spectroscopy has been used to study the radicals which are formed on the gamma radiolysis of selected poly(arylene ether phosphene oxide)s which have been irradiated either at 77 or 303 K. At 77 K both neutral and anionic radicals are formed, but the anionic radicals are unstable above 200 K. Two types of neutral radicals were observed. They were the phenyl and phenoxyl radicals formed by homolytic scission of the backbone ether bonds. 31P NMR spectroscopy showed that no new structures involving phosphorus were formed, but there was an indication that crosslinking may take place at aromatic rings adjacent to phosphorus atoms. Solution viscosity measurements indicated that the polymers undergo nett chain scission on irradiation, but the nett scission yield is very small. (author)

  4. The radiation chemistry of poly(arylene ether phosphine oxide)s

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, D.J.T.; Hopewell, J.L.; O`Donnell, J.H.; Pomery, P.J. [Queensland Univ., Brisbane, QLD (Australia)

    1995-03-01

    Electron spin resonance spectroscopy has been used to study the radicals which are formed on the gamma radiolysis of selected poly(arylene ether phosphene oxide)s which have been irradiated either at 77 or 303 K. At 77 K both neutral and anionic radicals are formed, but the anionic radicals are unstable above 200 K. Two types of neutral radicals were observed. They were the phenyl and phenoxyl radicals formed by homolytic scission of the backbone ether bonds. {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy showed that no new structures involving phosphorus were formed, but there was an indication that crosslinking may take place at aromatic rings adjacent to phosphorus atoms. Solution viscosity measurements indicated that the polymers undergo nett chain scission on irradiation, but the nett scission yield is very small. (author).

  5. Oxidation of a new Biogenic VOC: Chamber Studies of the Atmospheric Chemistry of Methyl Chavicol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloss, William; Alam, Mohammed; Adbul Raheem, Modinah; Rickard, Andrew; Hamilton, Jacqui; Pereira, Kelly; Camredon, Marie; Munoz, Amalia; Vazquez, Monica; Vera, Teresa; Rodenas, Mila

    2013-04-01

    The oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) leads to formation of ozone and SOA, with consequences for air quality, health, crop yields, atmospheric chemistry and radiative transfer. Recent observations have identified Methyl Chavicol ("MC": Estragole; 1-allyl-4-methoxybenzene, C10H12O) as a major BVOC above pine forests in the USA, and oil palm plantations in Malaysian Borneo. Palm oil cultivation, and hence MC emissions, may be expected to increase with societal food and bio fuel demand. We present the results of a series of simulation chamber experiments to assess the atmospheric fate of MC. Experiments were performed in the EUPHORE facility, monitoring stable product species, radical intermediates, and aerosol production and composition. We determine rate constants for reaction of MC with OH and O3, and ozonolysis radical yields. Stable product measurements (FTIR, PTRMS, GC-SPME) are used to determine the yields of stable products formed from OH- and O3- initiated oxidation, and to develop an understanding of the initial stages of the MC degradation chemistry. A surrogate mechanism approach is used to simulate MC degradation within the MCM, evaluated in terms of ozone production measured in the chamber experiments, and applied to quantify the role of MC in the real atmosphere.

  6. Plutonium chemistry: a synthesis of experimental data and a quantitative model for plutonium oxide solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemistry of plutonium is important for assessing potential behavior of radioactive waste under conditions of geologic disposal. This paper reviews experimental data on dissolution of plutonium oxide solids, describes a hybrid kinetic-equilibrium model for predicting steady-state Pu concentrations, and compares laboratory results with predicted Pu concentrations and oxidation-state distributions. The model is based on oxidation of PuO2 by water to produce PuO2+x, an oxide that can release Pu(V) to solution. Kinetic relationships between formation of PuO2+x, dissolution of Pu(V), disproportionation of Pu(V) to Pu(IV) and Pu(VI), and reduction of Pu(VI) are given and used in model calculations. Data from tests of pyrochemical salt wastes in brines are discussed and interpreted using the conceptual model. Essential data for quantitative modeling at conditions relevant to nuclear waste repositories are identified and laboratory experiments to determine rate constants for use in the model are discussed

  7. Radical Chemistry and Cytotoxicity of Bioreductive 3-Substituted Quinoxaline Di-N-Oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Robert F; Yadav, Pooja; Shinde, Sujata S; Hong, Cho R; Pullen, Susan M; Reynisson, Jóhannes; Wilson, William R; Hay, Michael P

    2016-08-15

    The radical chemistry and cytotoxicity of a series of quinoxaline di-N-oxide (QDO) compounds has been investigated to explore the mechanism of action of this class of bioreductive drugs. A series of water-soluble 3-trifluoromethyl (4-10), 3-phenyl (11-19), and 3-methyl (20-21) substituted QDO compounds were designed to span a range of electron affinities consistent with bioreduction. The stoichiometry of loss of QDOs by steady-state radiolysis of anaerobic aqueous formate buffer indicated that one-electron reduction of QDOs generates radicals able to initiate chain reactions by oxidation of formate. The 3-trifluoromethyl analogues exhibited long chain reactions consistent with the release of the HO(•), as identified in EPR spin trapping experiments. Several carbon-centered radical intermediates, produced by anaerobic incubation of the QDO compounds with N-terminal truncated cytochrome P450 reductase (POR), were characterized using N-tert-butyl-α-phenylnitrone (PBN) and 5-(diethoxyphosphoryl)-5-methyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DEPMPO) spin traps and were observed by EPR. Experimental data were well simulated for the production of strongly oxidizing radicals, capable of H atom abstraction from methyl groups. The kinetics of formation and decay of the radicals produced following one-electron reduction of the parent compounds, both in oxic and anoxic solutions, were determined using pulse radiolysis. Back oxidation of the initially formed radical anions by molecular oxygen did not compete effectively with the breakdown of the radical anions to form oxidizing radicals. The QDO compounds displayed low hypoxic selectivity when tested against oxic and hypoxic cancer cell lines in vitro. The results from this study form a kinetic description and explanation of the low hypoxia-selective cytotoxicity of QDOs against cancer cells compared to the related benzotriazine 1,4-dioxide (BTO) class of compounds. PMID:27380897

  8. The basic chemistry of exercise-induced DNA oxidation: oxidative damage, redox signalling and their interplay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Nathan Cobley

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute exercise increases reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generation. This phenomenon is associated with two major outcomes: (1 redox signalling and (2 macromolecule damage. Mechanistic knowledge of how exercise-induced redox signalling and macromolecule damage are interlinked is limited. This review focuses on the interplay between exercise-induced redox signalling and DNA damage, using hydroxyl radical (·OH and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 as exemplars. It is postulated that the biological fate of H2O2 links the two processes and thus represents a bifurcation point between redox signalling and damage. Indeed, H2O2 can participate in two electron signalling reactions but its diffusion and chemical properties permit DNA oxidation following reaction with transition metals and ·OH generation. It is also considered that the sensing of DNA oxidation by repair proteins constitutes a non-canonical redox signalling mechanism. Further layers of interaction are provided by the redox regulation of DNA repair proteins and their capacity to modulate intracellular H2O2 levels. Overall, exercise-induced redox signalling and DNA damage may be interlinked to a greater extent than was previously thought but this requires further investigation.

  9. Ab Initio Studies of Chlorine Oxide and Nitrogen Oxide Species of Interest in Stratospheric Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The ability of modern state-of-the art ab initio quantum chemical techniques to characterize reliably the gas-phase molecular structure, vibrational spectrum, electronic spectrum, and thermal stability of chlorine oxide and nitrogen oxide species will be demonstrated by presentation of some example studies. In particular the geometrical structures, vibrational spectra, and heats of formation Of ClNO2, CisClONO, and trans-ClONO are shown to be in excellent agreement with the available experimental data, and where the experimental data are either not known or are inconclusive, the ab initio results are shown to fill in the gaps and to resolve the experimental controversy. In addition, ab initio studies in which the electronic spectra and the characterization of excited electronic states of ClONO2, HONO2, ClOOC17 ClOOH, and HOOH will also be presented. Again where available, the ab initio results are compared to experimental observations, and are used to aid in the interpretation of the experimental studies.

  10. Improved simulation of isoprene oxidation chemistry with the ECHAM5/MESSy chemistry-climate model: lessons from the GABRIEL airborne field campaign

    OpenAIRE

    Butler, T M; Taraborrelli, D.; C. Brühl; H. Fischer; Harder, H.; Martinez, M.; Williams, J; Lawrence, M. G.; Lelieveld, J.

    2008-01-01

    The GABRIEL airborne field measurement campaign, conducted over the Guyanas in October 2005, produced measurements of hydroxyl radical (OH) concentration which are significantly higher than can be simulated using current generation models of atmospheric chemistry. Based on the hypothesis that this "missing OH" is due to an as-yet undiscovered mechanism for recycling OH during the oxidation chain of isoprene, we determine that an OH recycling of about 40–50% (compared with ...

  11. The Effect of Learning Cycle Model on Preservice Chemistry Teachers’ Understanding of Oxidation Reduction Topic and Thinking Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senar Temel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In the study, it was aimed to examine preservice chemistry teachers’ understanding level of oxidation and reduction topic before and after the learning cycle model application and to determine the effect of this model on their understanding level of this topic and lower and higher order thinking skills. In the study, it was aimed to examine preservice chemistry teachers’ understanding level of oxidation and reduction topic before and after the learning cycle model application and to determine the effect of this model on their understanding level of this topic and lower and higher order thinking skills. Thirty preservice chemistry teachers from Hacettepe University, Faculty of Education, Department of Chemistry Education participated in the study. Data were obtained by Oxidation Reduction Achievement Test which is consisted of twelve open ended questions prepared according to Bloom Taxonomy. At the end of the study, it was determined that preservice chemistry teachers’ understanding level of oxidation reduction topic is low before the learning cycle model application but a significant increase in their understanding level of this topic was determined after the application. It was concluded that the learning cycle model provides a significant increase in their higher and lower order thinking skills via paired sample t-tests.

  12. Assembly of linear nano-chains from iron oxide nanospheres with asymmetric surface chemistry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pubudu M Peiris

    Full Text Available Besides the multifunctionality, another equally important aspect of nanoparticles is their engineerability to control the geometrical and chemical properties during fabrication. In this work, we exploited this aspect to define asymmetric surface chemistry of an iron oxide nanosphere by controlling the topology of ligand expression on its surface resulting in a particle with two faces, one displaying only amines and the other only thiols. Specifically, amine-functionalized iron oxide nanospheres were attached on a solid support via a crosslinker containing a disulfide bridge. Liberation of the nanosphere using thiolytic cleavage created thiols on the portion of the particle's surface that interacted with the solid support. Employing a solid-phase strategy and a step-by-step addition of particles, the two unique faces on the same nanosphere served as fittings to assemble them into linear nano-chains. Assembly of chains with various lengths and aspect ratios was controlled by the size and number of the added nanospheres. The characteristics of those chains showed a high degree of uniformity indicating the exceptional control of the synthetic process. Notably, one of the unique properties of the iron oxide nano-chains was an increased magnetic relaxivity, indicating their potential use as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

  13. Investigating Differences in Isoprene Oxidation Chemistry Between Gas-Phase Mechanisms Using a Constrained Chemical Box Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvin, M. R.; Wolfe, G. M.; Salawitch, R. J.; Canty, T. P.; Hanisco, T. F.; Kaiser, J.; Keutsch, F. N.; Graus, M.; Warneke, C.; De Gouw, J. A.; Gilman, J.; Lerner, B. M.; Peischl, J.; Veres, P. R.; Min, K. E.; Holloway, J. S.; Aikin, K. C.; Ryerson, T. B.; Roberts, J. M.; Brown, S. S.; Pollack, I. B.; Hatch, C. D.; Lee, B. H.; Lopez-Hilfiker, F.; Thornton, J. A.; Diskin, G. S.; Sachse, G. W.; Huey, L. G.; Liu, X.; Wisthaler, A.; Mikoviny, T.; Wennberg, P. O.; St Clair, J.; Crounse, J.; Teng, A.

    2015-12-01

    Oxidation of isoprene by OH can significantly influence concentrations of important atmospheric pollutants such as ozone and secondary organic aerosols, but the chemistry that describes the relationships between these species is complex and not fully understood. Debate on the topic has led to differences in the isoprene oxidation schemes of several gas-phase chemical mechanisms currently applied in air chemistry models. We use the University of Washington Chemical Model (UWCMv3) to evaluate these mechanisms with respect to isoprene chemistry based on observations from the SENEX and SEAC4RS aircraft campaigns. The campaigns provide constraints on compounds measured over the Southeast United States, where isoprene concentrations are high and other conditions (e.g., NOx levels) vary widely. The payloads for both missions include observations of a wide range of isoprene oxidation products, which can provide insight into specific oxidation pathways. Analysis will focus on the characterization and comparison of isoprene oxidation chemistry for established gas-phase mechanisms that are prevalent in atmospheric modeling today, including the Carbon Bond mechanism (CB05 and CB6r2) and the Master Chemical Mechanism (versions 3.2 and 3.3).

  14. Multi-step biocatalytic strategies for chiral amino alcohol synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas-Torres, Maria F; Martinez-Torres, R Julio; Cázares-Körner, Armando; Hailes, Helen; Baganz, Frank; Ward, John

    2015-12-01

    Chiral amino alcohols are structural motifs present in sphingolipids, antibiotics, and antiviral glycosidase inhibitors. Their chemical synthesis presents several challenges in establishing at least two chiral centres. Here a de novo metabolic pathway using a transketolase enzyme coupled with a transaminase enzyme has been assembled. To synthesise this motif one of the strategies to obtain high conversions from the transaminase/transketolase cascade is the use of hydroxypyruvate (HPA) as a two-carbon donor for the transketolase reaction; although commercially available it is relatively expensive limiting application of the pathway on an industrial scale. Alternately, HPA can be synthesised but this introduces a further synthetic step. In this study two different biocatalytic strategies were developed for the synthesis of (2S,3R)-2-amino-1,3,4-butanetriol (ABT) without adding HPA into the reaction. Firstly, a sequential cascade of three enzymatic steps (two transaminases and one transketolase) for the synthesis of ABT from serine, pyruvate and glycolaldehyde as substrates. Secondly, a two-step recycling cascade where serine is used as donor to aminate erythrulose (catalysed by a transketolase) for the simultaneous synthesis of ABT and HPA. In order to test the novel pathways, three new transaminases are described, two ω-transaminases able to accept a broad range of amine acceptors with serine as amine donor; and an α-transaminase, which showed high affinity towards serine (KM: 18mM) using pyruvate as amine acceptor. After implementation of the above enzymes in the biocatalytic pathways proposed in this paper, the two-step recycling pathway was found to be the most promising for its integration with E. coli metabolism. It was more efficient (10-fold higher conversion), more sustainable and cost-effective (use of low cost natural substrates and only two enzymes), and the reaction could be performed in a one-pot system. PMID:26453469

  15. New vistas in the molecular chemistry of thorium: low oxidation state complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortu, Fabrizio; Formanuik, Alasdair; Innes, James R; Mills, David P

    2016-05-01

    Although the molecular chemistry of thorium is dominated by the +4 oxidation state accounts of Th(iii) complexes have continued to increase in frequency since the first structurally characterised example was reported thirty years ago. The isolation of the first Th(ii) complexes in 2015 and exciting recent Th(iii) and Th(ii) reactivity studies both indicate that this long-neglected area is set to undergo a rapid expansion in research activity over the next decade, as previously seen since the turn of the millennium for analogous U(iii) small molecule activation chemistry. In this perspective article, we review synthetic routes to Th(iii) and Th(ii) complexes and summarise their distinctive physical properties. We provide a near-chronological discussion of these systems, focusing on structurally characterised examples, and cover complementary theoretical studies that rationalise electronic structures. All reactivity studies of Th(iii) and Th(ii) complexes that have been reported to date are described in detail. PMID:27094204

  16. Modeling chemistry in and above snow at Summit, Greenland − Part 2: Impact of snowpack chemistry on the oxidation capacity of the boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Lefer

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The chemical composition of the boundary layer in snow covered regions is impacted by chemistry in the snowpack via uptake, processing, and emission of atmospheric trace gases. We use the coupled one-dimensional (1-D snow chemistry and atmospheric boundary layer model MISTRA-SNOW to study the impact of snowpack chemistry on the oxidation capacity of the boundary layer. The model includes gas phase photochemistry and chemical reactions both in the interstitial air and the atmosphere. Chemistry on snow grains is simulated assuming a liquid-like layer (LLL, treated as an aqueous layer on the snow grain surface. The model has been recently compared with BrO and NO data taken on 10 June–13 June 2008 as part of the Greenland Summit Halogen-HOx experiment (GSHOX. In the present study, we use the same focus period to investigate the influence of snowpack derived chemistry on OH and HOx + RO2 in the boundary layer. We compare model results with chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS measurements of the hydroxyl radical (OH and of the hydroperoxyl radical (HO2 plus the sum of all organic peroxy radicals (RO2 taken at Summit during summer 2008. Using sensitivity runs we show that snowpack influenced nitrogen cycling and bromine chemistry both increase the oxidation capacity of the boundary layer and that together they increase the mid-day OH concentrations by approximately a factor of 2. We show for the first time, using an unconstrained coupled one-dimensional snowpack-boundary layer model, that air-snow interactions impact the oxidation capacity of the boundary layer and that it is not possible to match measured OH levels without snowpack NOx and halogen emissions. Model predicted HONO compared with mistchamber measurements suggests there may be an unknown HONO source at Summit. Other model predicted HOx precursors, H2O2 and HCHO, compare well with measurements taken in summer 2000. Over 3 days, snow sourced NOx contributes an additional 2 ppb to

  17. A Computational Approach to Understanding Aerosol Formation and Oxidant Chemistry in the Troposphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francisco, Joseph S.; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Schenter, Gregory K.; Dang, Liem X.; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Garrett, Bruce C.; Du, Shiyu; Dixon, David A.; Bianco, Roberto; Wang, Shuzhi; Hynes, James T.; Morita, Akihiro; Peterson, Kirk A.

    2006-04-18

    An understanding of the mechanisms and kinetics of aerosol formation and ozone production in the troposphere is currently a high priority because these phenomena are recognized as two major effects of energy-related air pollution. Atmospheric aerosols are of concern because of their effect on visibility, climate, and human health. Equally important, aerosols can change the chemistry of the atmosphere, in dramatic fashion, by providing new chemical pathways (in the condensed phase) unavailable in the gas phase. The oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and inorganic compounds (e.g., sulfuric acid, ammonia, nitric acid, ions, and mineral) can produce precursor molecules that act as nucleation seeds. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP) has identified the need to evaluate the causes of variations in tropospheric aerosol chemical composition and concentrations, including determining the sources of aerosol particles and the fraction of such that are of primary and secondary origin. In particular, the ACP has called for a deeper understanding into aerosol formation because nucleation creates substantial concentrations of fresh particles that, via growth and coagulation, influence the Earth's radiation budget. Tropospheric ozone is also of concern primarily because of its impact on human health. Ozone levels are controlled by NOx and by VOCs in the lower troposphere. The VOCs can be either from natural emissions from such sources as vegetation and phytoplankton or from anthropogenic sources such as automobiles and oil-fueled power production plants. The major oxidant for VOCs in the atmosphere is the OH radical. With the increase in VOC emissions, there is rising concern regarding the available abundance of HOx species needed to initiate oxidation. Over the last five years, there have been four field studies aimed at initial measurements of HOx species (OH and HO? radicals). These measurements revealed HOx levels that are

  18. Two-Input Enzymatic Logic Gates Made Sigmoid by Modifications of the Biocatalytic Reaction Cascades

    CERN Document Server

    Zavalov, Oleksandr; Halamek, Jan; Halamkova, Lenka; Korkmaz, Sevim; Arugula, Mary A; Chinnapareddy, Soujanya; Katz, Evgeny; Privman, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Computing based on biochemical processes is a newest rapidly developing field of unconventional information and signal processing. In this paper we present results of our research in the field of biochemical computing and summarize the obtained numerical and experimental data for implementations of the standard two-input OR and AND gates with double-sigmoid shape of the output signal. This form of response was obtained as a function of the two inputs in each of the realized biochemical systems. The enzymatic gate processes in the first system were activated with two chemical inputs and resulted in optically detected chromogen oxidation, which happens when either one or both of the inputs are present. In this case, the biochemical system is functioning as the OR gate. We demonstrate that the addition of a "filtering" biocatalytic process leads to a considerable reduction of the noise transmission factor and the resulting gate response has sigmoid shape in both inputs. The second system was developed for functi...

  19. Synthetic modeling chemistry of iron-sulfur clusters in nitric oxide signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Jessica; Kim, Eunsuk

    2015-08-18

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important signaling molecule that is involved in many physiological and pathological functions. Iron-sulfur proteins are one of the main reaction targets for NO, and the [Fe-S] clusters within these proteins are converted to various iron nitrosyl species upon reaction with NO, of which dinitrosyl iron complexes (DNICs) are the most prevalent. Much progress has been made in identifying the origin of cellular DNIC generation. However, it is not well-understood which other products besides DNICs may form during [Fe-S] cluster degradation nor what effects DNICs and other degradation products can have once they are generated in cells. Even more elusive is an understanding of the manner by which cells cope with unwanted [Fe-S] modifications by NO. This Account describes our synthetic modeling efforts to identify cluster degradation products derived from the [2Fe-2S]/NO reaction in order to establish their chemical reactivity and repair chemistry. Our intent is to use the chemical knowledge that we generate to provide insight into the unknown biological consequences of cluster modification. Our recent advances in three different areas are described. First, new reaction conditions that lead to the formation of previously unrecognized products during the reaction of [Fe-S] clusters with NO are identified. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a gaseous signaling molecule, can be generated from the reaction between [2Fe-2S] clusters and NO in the presence of acid or formal H• (e(-)/H(+)) donors. In the presence of acid, a mononitrosyl iron complex (MNIC) can be produced as the major iron-containing product. Second, cysteine analogues can efficiently convert MNICs back to [2Fe-2S] clusters without the need for any other reagents. This reaction is possible for cysteine analogues because of their ability to labilize NO from MNICs and their capacity to undergo C-S bond cleavage, providing the necessary sulfide for [2Fe-2S] cluster formation. Lastly, unique dioxygen

  20. Nocturnal chemistry of iodine and nitrogen oxides - results from the iNOCHES campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venables, Dean; Zetzsch, Cornelius; Wilson, Eoin; Varma, Ravi; Kleinschmitt, Christoph; Pöhler, Denis; Schmitt, Stefan; Platt, Ulrich; Bleicher, Sergej; Wittmer, Julian

    2014-05-01

    Recent field observations have led to suggestions that nitrogen oxide processes, and particularly the formation of IONO2, are critical to the nocturnal fate of atmospheric iodine. IONO2 decomposes on a timescale of several minutes to IO and NO2 and is an important tropospheric reservoir for iodine, but large uncertainties remain concerning both the rate coefficients of its formation and decomposition, and of its absorption cross-section and photolysis rate. To better constrain these uncertainties, a series of chamber experiments was carried out to investigate these reactions and molecular properties. The iodine-Nitrogen Oxides CHamber ExperimentS (iNOCHES) campaign involved groups from Bayreuth, Cork, and Heidelberg and early results from the campaign are presented here. Instrumentation included an unusually high number of broadband optical cavity spectrometers, providing direct measurements of NO2, IO, OIO, I2, NO3, and IONO2 in the near-UV, blue, green, and red spectral regions. Most reactions were carried out under dark conditions and at different temperatures. Because different reaction pathways dominate in the absence of light, the iNOCHES study complements other investigations of some of the same reactions via photolytically-initiated chemistry.

  1. Photon and Water Mediated Sulfur Oxide and Acid Chemistry in the Atmosphere of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Jay A.; Vaida, Veronica

    2014-06-01

    Sulfur compounds have been observed in the atmospheres of a number of planetary bodies in our solar system including Venus, Earth, Mars, Io, Europa, and Callisto. The global cloud cover on Venus located at an altitude between 50 and 80 kilometers is composed primarily of sulfuric acid (H_2SO_4) and water. Planetary photochemical models have attempted to explain observations of sulfuric acid and sulfur oxides with significant discrepancies remaining between models and observation. In particular, high SO_2 mixing ratios are observed above 90 km which exceed model predictions by orders of magnitude. Work recently done in the Vaida lab has shown red light can drive photochemistry through overtone pumping for acids like H_2SO_4 and has been successful in explaining much of the sulfur chemistry in Earth's atmosphere. Water can have a number of interesting effects such as catalysis, suppression, and anti-catalysis of thermal and photochemical processes. We investigate the role of water complexes in the hydration of sulfur oxides and dehydration of sulfur acids and present spectroscopic studies to document such effects. We investigate these reactions using FTIR and UV/Vis spectroscopy and will report on our findings.

  2. Kinetics and Mechanistic Chemistry of Oxidation of Butacaine Sulfate by Chloramine-B in Acid Medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shubha, Jayachamarajapura Pranesh; Kotabagi, Vinutha [Bosco Institute of Technology, Bangalore (India); Puttaswamy [Bangalore Univ., Bangalore (India)

    2012-11-15

    Butacaine sulfate is an ester of p-aminobenzoic acid which has been widely used as a local anaesthetic and it is a long standing agent particularly for spinal anaesthesia. For this reason, a kinetic study of oxidation of butacaine sulfate by sodium N-chlorobenzenesulfonamide (chloramine-B or CAB) has been carried out in HClO{sub 4} medium at 303 K in order to explore this redox system mechanistic chemistry. The rate shows a first-order dependence on both [CAB]{sub o}, and [substrate]{sub o}, and a fractional-order dependence on acid concentration. Decrease of dielectric constant of the medium, by adding methanol, increases the rate of the reaction. Variation of ionic strength and addition of benzenesulfonamide or NaCl have no significant effect on the rate. The reaction was studied at different temperatures and the activation parameters have been evaluated. The stoichiometry of the reaction has been found to be 1:2 and the oxidation products have been identified by spectral analysis. The observed results have been explained by plausible mechanism and the related rate law has been deduced.

  3. Mercury oxidation from bromine chemistry in the free troposphere over the southeastern US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coburn, Sean; Dix, Barbara; Edgerton, Eric; Holmes, Christopher D.; Kinnison, Douglas; Liang, Qing; ter Schure, Arnout; Wang, Siyuan; Volkamer, Rainer

    2016-03-01

    The elevated deposition of atmospheric mercury over the southeastern United States is currently not well understood. Here we measure partial columns and vertical profiles of bromine monoxide (BrO) radicals, a key component of mercury oxidation chemistry, to better understand the processes and altitudes at which mercury is being oxidized in the atmosphere. We use data from a ground-based MAX-DOAS instrument located at a coastal site ˜ 1 km from the Gulf of Mexico in Gulf Breeze, FL, where we had previously detected tropospheric BrO (Coburn et al., 2011). Our profile retrieval assimilates information about stratospheric BrO from the WACCM chemical transport model (CTM), and uses only measurements at moderately low solar zenith angles (SZAs) to estimate the BrO slant column density contained in the reference spectrum (SCDRef). The approach has 2.6 degrees of freedom, and avoids spectroscopic complications that arise at high SZA; knowledge about SCDRef further helps to maximize sensitivity in the free troposphere (FT). A cloud-free case study day with low aerosol load (9 April 2010) provided optimal conditions for distinguishing marine boundary layer (MBL: 0-1 km) and free-tropospheric (FT: 1-15 km) BrO from the ground. The average daytime tropospheric BrO vertical column density (VCD) of ˜ 2.3 × 1013 molec cm-2 (SZA vertical profile locates essentially all tropospheric BrO above 4 km, and shows no evidence for BrO inside the MBL (detection limit rates are about 3.6 × 105 molec cm-2 s-1 for bromine, while the contribution from ozone (O3) is 0.8 × 105 molec cm-2 s-1. Chlorine-induced oxidation is estimated to add rates. The GOM formation rate is sensitive to recently proposed atmospheric scavenging reactions of the HgBr adduct by nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and to a lesser extent also HO2 radicals. Using a 3-D CTM, we find that surface GOM variations are also typical of other days, and are mainly derived from the FT. Bromine chemistry is active in the FT over Gulf

  4. Advancing the Chemistry of CuWO4 for Photoelectrochemical Water Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhermitte, Charles R; Bartlett, Bart M

    2016-06-21

    Photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells are an ongoing area of exploration that provide a means of converting solar energy into a storable chemical form (molecular bonds). In particular, using PEC cells to drive the water splitting reaction to obtain H2 could provide a clean and sustainable route to convert solar energy into chemical fuels. Since the discovery of catalytic water splitting on TiO2 photoelectrodes by Fujishima and Honda, significant efforts have been directed toward developing high efficiency metal oxides to use as photocatalysts for this reaction. Improving the efficiency of PEC cells requires developing chemically stable, and highly catalytic anodes for the oxygen-evolution reaction (OER). This water oxidation half reaction requires four protons and four electrons coupling in two bond making steps to form O2, which limits the rate. Our group has accelerated efforts in CuWO4 as a candidate for PEC OER chemistry. Its small band gap of 2.3 eV allows for using visible light to drive OER, and the reaction proceeds with a high degree of chemoselectivity, even in the presence of more kinetically accessible anions such as chloride, which is common to seawater. Furthermore, CuWO4 is a chemically robust material when subjected to the highly oxidizing conditions of PEC OER. The next steps for accelerating research using this (and other), ternary phase oxides, is to move beyond reporting the basic PEC measurements to understanding fundamental chemical reaction mechanisms operative during OER on semiconductor surfaces. In this Account, we outline the process for PEC OER on CuWO4 thin films with emphasis on the chemistry of this reaction, the reaction rate and selectivity (determined by controlled-potential coulometry and oxygen-detection experiments). We discuss key challenges with CuWO4 such as slow kinetics and the presence of an OER-mediating mid-gap state, probed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. We propose that this mid-gap state imparts the observed

  5. Surface kinetics modeling of silicon and silicon oxide plasma etching. III. Modeling of silicon oxide etching in fluorocarbon chemistry using translating mixed-layer representation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicon oxide etching was modeled using a translating mixed-layer model, a novel surface kinetic modeling technique, and the model showed good agreement with measured data. Carbon and fluorine were identified as the primary contributors to deposition and etching, respectively. Atomic fluorine flux is a major factor that determines the etching behavior. With a chemistry having a small amount of atomic fluorine (such as the C4F8 chemistry), etching yield shows stronger dependence on the composition change in the gas flux

  6. Mercury oxidation from bromine chemistry in the free troposphere over the southeastern US

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Coburn

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The elevated deposition of atmospheric mercury over the Southeastern United States is currently not well understood. Here we measure partial columns and vertical profiles of bromine monoxide (BrO radicals, a key component of mercury oxidation chemistry, to better understand the processes and altitudes at which mercury is being oxidized in the atmosphere. We use the data from a ground-based MAX-DOAS instrument located at a coastal site ~ 1 km from the Gulf of Mexico in Gulf Breeze, FL, where we had previously detected tropospheric BrO (Coburn et al., 2011. Our profile retrieval assimilates information about stratospheric BrO from the WACCM chemical transport model, and uses only measurements at moderately low solar zenith angles (SZA to estimate the BrO slant column density contained in the reference spectrum (SCDRef. The approach has 2.6 degrees of freedom, and avoids spectroscopic complications that arise at high SZA; knowledge about SCDRef helps to maximize sensitivity in the free troposphere (FT. A cloud-free case study day with low aerosol load (9 April 2010 provided optimal conditions for distinguishing marine boundary layer (MBL: 0–1 km and free tropospheric (FT: 1–15 km BrO from the ground. The average daytime tropospheric BrO vertical column density (VCD of ~ 2.3 × 1013 molec cm−2 (SZA 5 molec cm−2 s−1 for bromine, while contributions from ozone (O3 and chlorine (Cl were 0.9 × 105 and 0.2 × 105 molec cm−2 s−1, respectively. The GOM formation rate is sensitive to recently proposed atmospheric scavenging reactions of the HgBr adduct by nitrogen dioxide (NO2, and to a lesser extent also HO2 radicals. Using a 3-D chemical transport model, we find that surface GOM variations are typical also of other days, and are mainly derived from the free troposphere. Bromine chemistry is active in the FT over Gulf Breeze, where it forms water-soluble GOM that is subsequently available for wet scavenging by thunderstorms or transport to

  7. Tunneling of redox enzymes to design nano-probes for monitoring NAD(+) dependent bio-catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akshath, Uchangi Satyaprasad; Bhatt, Praveena

    2016-11-15

    Monitoring of bio-catalytic events by using nano-probes is of immense interest due to unique optical properties of metal nanoparticles. In the present study, tunneling of enzyme activity was achieved using redox cofactors namely oxidized cytochrome-c (Cyt-c) and Co-enzyme-Q (Co-Q) immobilized on Quantum dots (QDs) which acted as a bio-probe for NAD(+) dependent dehydrogenase catalyzed reaction. We studied how electron transfer from substrate to non-native electron acceptors can differentially modify photoluminescence properties of CdTe QDs. Two probes were designed, QD-Ox-Cyt-c and QD-Ox-Co-Q, which were found to quench the fluorescence of QDs. However, formaldehyde dehydrogenase (FDH) catalyzed reduction of Cyt-c and Co-Q on the surface of QDs lead to fluorescence turn-on of CdTe QDs. This phenomenon was successfully used for the detection of HCHO in the range of 0.01-100,000ng/mL (LOD of 0.01ng/mL) using both QD-Ox-Cyt-c (R(2)=0.93) and QD-Ox-Co-Q (R(2)=0.96). Further probe performance and stability in samples like milk, wine and fruit juice matrix were studied and we could detect HCHO in range of 0.001-100,000ng/mL (LOD of 0.001ng/mL) with good stability and sensitivity of probe in real samples (R(2)=0.97). Appreciable recovery and detection sensitivity in the presence of metal ions suggests that the developed nano-probes can be used successfully for monitoring dehydrogenase based bio-catalytic events even in the absence of NAD(+). Proposed method is advantageous over classical methods as clean up/ derivatization of samples is not required for formaldehyde detection. PMID:27179565

  8. The impact of zirconium oxide nanoparticles on the hydration chemistry and biocompatibility of white Portland cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiu; Deacon, Andrew D; Coleman, Nichola J

    2013-01-01

    Zirconium oxide (ZrO2) has been nominated as a radiopacifying agent for use in MTA-like Portland cement-based root-filling materials. This research examines the impact of 20 wt% ZrO2 nanoparticles in the size range 50 to 75 nm on the early hydration chemistry of white Portland cement. Nano-ZrO2 was found to accelerate the degree of hydration by 26% within the first 24 h by presenting efficient nucleation sites for the precipitation and growth of the early C-S-H gel products. The presence of nano-ZrO2 was also found to divert the fate of the aluminium-bearing reaction products by lowering the ettringite to monosulphate ratio, reducing the size of the ettringite crystals and by increasing the Al:Si ratio of the C-S-H gel phase. The chemical and microstructural changes conferred upon the cement matrix by the nano-ZrO2 particles had a positive impact on in vitro biocompatibility with respect to MG63 osteosarcoma cells (via MTT assay). PMID:24088838

  9. Exploring Atmospheric Aqueous Chemistry (and Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation) through OH Radical Oxidation Experiments, Droplet Evaporation and Chemical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turpin, B. J.; Kirkland, J. R.; Lim, Y. B.; Ortiz-Montalvo, D. L.; Sullivan, A.; Häkkinen, S.; Schwier, A. N.; Tan, Y.; McNeill, V. F.; Collett, J. L.; Skog, K.; Keutsch, F. N.; Sareen, N.; Carlton, A. G.; Decesari, S.; Facchini, C.

    2013-12-01

    Gas phase photochemistry fragments and oxidizes organic emissions, making water-soluble organics ubiquitous in the atmosphere. My group and others have found that several water-soluble compounds react further in the aqueous phase forming low volatility products under atmospherically-relevant conditions (i.e., in clouds, fogs and wet aerosols). Thus, secondary organic aerosol can form as a result of gas followed by aqueous chemistry (aqSOA). We have used aqueous OH radical oxidation experiments coupled with product analysis and chemical modeling to validate and refine the aqueous chemistry of glyoxal, methylglyoxal, glycolaldehyde, and acetic acid. The resulting chemical model has provided insights into the differences between oxidation chemistry in clouds and in wet aerosols. Further, we conducted droplet evaporation experiments to characterize the volatility of the products. Most recently, we have conducted aqueous OH radical oxidation experiments with ambient mixtures of water-soluble gases to identify additional atmospherically-important precursors and products. Specifically, we scrubbed water-soluble gases from the ambient air in the Po Valley, Italy using four mist chambers in parallel, operating at 25-30 L min-1. Aqueous OH radical oxidation experiments and control experiments were conducted with these mixtures (total organic carbon ≈ 100 μM-C). OH radicals (3.5E-2 μM [OH] s-1) were generated by photolyzing H2O2. Precursors and products were characterized using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), ion chromatography (IC), IC-ESI-MS, and ultra high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS). Chemical modeling suggests that organic acids (e.g., oxalate, pyruvate, glycolate) are major products of OH radical oxidation at cloud-relevant concentrations, whereas organic radical - radical reactions result in the formation of oligomers in wet aerosols. Products of cloud chemistry and droplet evaporation have

  10. A Study and Application of Biocatalytic Synthesis of (S-N-Boc-3-hydroxypiperidine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Ying

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper first uses the environmental friendly whole cell of biocatalyst pichia pastoris SIT2014 to asymmetrically synthesized anti-tumor drug of chiral intermediate (S-N-Boc-3-hydroxypiperidine.. Improve the final biocatalytic reduction yield to 85.4% based on the study of fermentation optimization and biocatalytic asymmetrical reduction system for pichia pastoris. The ee value of obtained reduction product (S-N-Boc-3-hydroxypiperidine hits over 99%. The study of this article is a successful case where the biocatalyst is applied to the green synthesis of chiral intermediate of anti-tumor drug.

  11. Effects of surface chemistry and microstructure of electrolyte on oxygen reduction kinetics of solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joong Sun; An, Jihwan; Lee, Min Hwan; Prinz, Fritz B.; Lee, Wonyoung

    2015-11-01

    We report systematic investigation of the surface properties of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolytes with the control of the grain boundary (GB) density at the surface, and its effects on electrochemical activities. The GB density of thin surface layers deposited on single crystal YSZ substrates is controlled by changing the annealing temperature (750-1450 °C). Higher oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) kinetics is observed in samples annealed at lower temperatures. The higher ORR activity is ascribed to the higher GB density at the YSZ surface where 'mobile' oxide ion vacancies are more populated. Meanwhile, oxide ion vacancies concurrently created with yttrium segregation at the surface at the higher annealing temperature are considered inactive to oxygen incorporation reactions. Our results provide additional insight into the interplay between the surface chemistry, microstructures, and electrochemical activity. They potentially provide important guidelines for engineering the electrolyte-electrode interfaces of solid oxide fuel cells for higher electrochemical performance.

  12. The physical chemistry of nucleation of sub-micrometer non-oxide ceramic powders via sub-oxide vapor-phase reduction reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fine ceramic powders (< 500 nm) exhibit exceptional physical and mechanical properties in engineered structural ceramics. The production of fine powders, in particular the non-oxide ceramics, via a cheaper route than the organic solvent route has been rather elusive. This paper examines the physical chemistry of sub-oxide vapor-phase reduction reaction for the nucleation of non-oxide ceramic phase. Well known vapor species eg SiO and BO in the production of technical ceramic powders (SiC, BN) are particularly discussed for understanding the nucleation process of SiC and BN ceramic phases respectively. The regimes of partial pressures and temperatures are particularly identified. The calculated nucleation rate as a function of the temperature is compared with the experimental results on powder morphology. The production of amorphous and nanocrystalline h-BN powders is discussed in the context of substrate structure and thermodynamic parameters

  13. Measurements and Simulation of Hydroxyl and Hydroperoxy Radical Chemistry From Isoprene Oxidation in the Purdue Photochemical Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vimal, D.; Dusanter, S.; Stevens, P. S.; Shepson, P. B.; Hill, K. A.; Lockwood, A.; Mielke, L. H.; Moffat, C.; Cohen, R.; Perring, A.; Wisthaler, A.; Graus, M.

    2006-12-01

    The chemical mechanism for the oxidation of isoprene is a subject of considerable interest in atmospheric chemistry. Isoprene, the dominant natural hydrocarbon emitted into the atmosphere by deciduous trees, can contribute significantly to the production of ozone, organic nitrates, and secondary VOCs in the troposphere because of its high reactivity with the hydroxyl radical (OH). The accuracy of urban and regional air quality models depends on a complete understanding of the mechanism of isoprene oxidation and the product branching ratios under atmospheric conditions. Recent measurements of OH and HO2 radicals in forest environments show serious discrepancies with modeled concentrations of these radicals, bringing into question our understanding of the atmospheric chemistry of isoprene and other reactive biogenic emissions. Measurements of OH and HO2 radicals (HOX) were made during isoprene irradiation experiments in the Purdue University photochemical reaction chamber using the Laser Induced Fluorescence/ Fluorescence Assay by Gas Expansion technique (LIF/FAGE). Mixtures of isoprene and NOX (and H2O in air) were irradiated and the concentrations of HOX, isoprene, ozone, NOX, as well as a number of reaction products such as methyl vinyl ketone, methacrolein, HNO3, PAN, and organic nitrates were measured as a function of time. The measured HOX concentrations were compared to results of model simulations in order to test the ability of current models of isoprene chemistry to reproduce the observed radical concentrations.

  14. Dominance of interface chemistry over the bulk properties in determining the electronic structure of epitaxial metal/perovskite oxide heterojunctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, Scott A.; Du, Yingge; Gu, Meng; Droubay, Timothy C.; Hepplestone, Steven; Sushko, Petr

    2015-06-09

    We show that despite very similar crystallographic properties and work function values in the bulk, epitaxial Fe and Cr metallizations on Nb:SrTiO3(001) generate completely different heterojunction electronic properties. Cr is Ohmic whereas Fe forms a Schottky barrier with a barrier height of 0.50 eV. This contrast arises because of differences in interface chemistry. In contrast to Cr [Chambers, S. A. et al., Adv. Mater. 2013, 25, 4001.], Fe exhibits a +2 oxidation state and occupies Ti sites in the perovskite lattice, resulting in negligible charge transfer to Ti, upward band bending, and Schottky barrier formation. The differences between Cr and Fe are understood by performing first-principles calculations of the energetics of defect formation which corroborate the observed interface chemistry and structure.

  15. Improved simulation of isoprene oxidation chemistry with the ECHAM5/MESSy chemistry-climate model: lessons from the GABRIEL airborne field campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Butler

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The GABRIEL airborne field measurement campaign, conducted over the Guyanas in October 2005, produced measurements of hydroxyl radical (OH concentration which are significantly higher than can be simulated using current generation models of atmospheric chemistry. Based on the hypothesis that this "missing OH" is due to an as-yet undiscovered mechanism for recycling OH during the oxidation chain of isoprene, we determine that an OH recycling of about 40–50% (compared with 5–10% in current generation isoprene oxidation mechanisms is necessary in order for our modelled OH to approach the lower error bounds of the OH observed during GABRIEL. Such a large amount of OH in our model leads to unrealistically low mixing ratios of isoprene. In order for our modelled isoprene mixing ratios to match those observed during the campaign, we also require that the effective rate constant for the reaction of isoprene with OH be reduced by about 50% compared with the lower bound of the range recommended by IUPAC. We show that a reasonable explanation for this lower effective rate constant could be the segregation of isoprene and OH in the mixed layer. Our modelling results are consistent with a global, annual isoprene source of about 500 Tg(C yr−1, allowing experimentally derived and established isoprene flux rates to be reconciled with global models.

  16. Improved simulation of isoprene oxidation chemistry with the ECHAM5/MESSy chemistry-climate model: lessons from the GABRIEL airborne field campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Butler

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The GABRIEL airborne field measurement campaign, conducted over the Guyanas in October 2005, produced measurements of hydroxyl radical (OH concentration which are significantly higher than can be simulated using current generation models of atmospheric chemistry. Based on the hypothesis that this "missing OH" is due to an as-yet undiscovered mechanism for recycling OH during the oxidation chain of isoprene, we determine that an OH recycling of about 40–50% (compared with 5–10% in current generation isoprene oxidation mechanisms is necessary in order for our modelled OH to approach the lower error bounds of the OH observed during GABRIEL. Such a large amount of OH in our model leads to unrealistically low mixing ratios of isoprene. In order for our modelled isoprene mixing ratios to match those observed during the campaign, we also require that the effective rate constant for the reaction of isoprene with OH be reduced by about 50% compared with the lower bound of the range recommended by IUPAC. We show that a reasonable explanation for this lower effective rate constant could be the segregation of isoprene and OH in the mixed layer. Our modelling results are consistent with a global, annual isoprene source of about 500 Tg(C yr−1, allowing experimentally derived and established isoprene flux rates to be reconciled with global models.

  17. A First Principles Investigation of Proton Chemistry in Perovskite-Type Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauer, Tania Allison

    Certain acceptor-doped perovskite-type oxides show significant promise for deployment into a number of electrochemical device applications, including fuel cells, batteries, and electrolyzers, owing to their rapid proton conductivities at high temperatures. However, limitations in bulk material hydration and slow grain boundary conductivities have reduced the viability of these materials in intermediate temperatures applications. This thesis work uses density functional theory to gain a fundamental understanding of proton and defect chemistry within various perovskite environments in order to identify strategies to increase proton concentration and improve overall proton conductivity. First, material hydration was probed within yttrium-doped barium cerate (BCY) to examine how the thermodynamics of material hydration are influenced by dopant concentration. A model was derived from solely first principle techniques to describe hydration within BCY as a function of dopant concentration, temperature, and partial pressure of water. The resulting model can be used to screen for favorable perovskite-dopant combinations with enhanced hydration capabilities. Next, defect segregation was investigated in the more complex interfacial environment to probe the origin of low proton conductivity across perovskite grain boundaries (GB). The results of this study suggest that screening for perovskite-dopant combinations with strong dopant-oxygen bond strengths may reduce the segregation of dopant ions and oxygen vacancies to the GB interface, mitigating the development of a positive GB core and enhancing proton conduction across the GB. Finally, proton stability was assessed at various interfacial regions within the perovskite material. An examination of proton adsorption at the BaZrO3-vacuum interface reveals a destabilization of protons in the first subsurface layer of the perovskite, yielding a potential barrier for proton diffusion into and out of the perovskite membrane. An

  18. THE EFFECT OF SEVERAL NON-OXIDIZING BIOCIDES ON FINE PAPER WET-END CHEMISTRY

    OpenAIRE

    Patrick Huber; Bruno Carré; Elisa Zeno

    2010-01-01

    Biocide programs have become necessary in most fine paper manufacturing circuits, as drastic reduction of fresh water consumption in the industry enhances microbial development. Depending on their chemical nature, biocides may interfere with typical wet-end chemistry additives and furnish. A reference wet-end chemistry was set (including fixing aid, dry strength aid, sizing agent, and retention system), then biocides were added to the furnish (bleached virgin fibres + mineral filler) prior to...

  19. Rational Improvement of Simvastatin Synthase Solubility in Escherichia coli Leads to Higher Whole-cell Biocatalytic Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Xinkai; Pashkov, Inna; Gao, Xue; Guerrero, Jennifer L.; Yeates, Todd O; Tang, Yi

    2009-01-01

    Simvastatin is the active pharmaceutical ingredient of the blockbuster cholesterol lowering drug Zocor. We have previously developed an Escherichia coli based whole-cell biocatalytic platform towards the synthesis of simvastatin sodium salt (SS) starting from the precursor monacolin J sodium salt (MJSS). The centerpiece of the biocatalytic approach is the simvastatin synthase LovD, which is highly prone to misfolding and aggregation when overexpressed from E. coli. Increasing the solubility o...

  20. Aqueous stabilization of carbon nanotubes: effects of surface oxidization and solution chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yingchen; Wu, Fengchang; Lin, Daohui; Xing, Baoshan

    2014-03-01

    Surface oxygen functional groups can affect the morphological characteristics, aggregation kinetics, and adsorption capacity of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). However, little is known about the quantitative relationship between oxygen content and the dispersion stability of MWCNTs. To investigate the effects of surface oxidization, MWCNTs were oxidized using concentrated H2SO4/HNO3 acids for 0, 1, 2, 4, and 8 h, respectively. Experimental results showed that the oxygen content of MWCNTs increased with surface oxidization time. Linear correlations were found to exist between the oxygen content, critical coagulation concentration (CCC) for NaCl, and critical coagulation pH values of MWCNTs detected by optical density at 800 nm. The CCC values for CaCl2 increased with oxygen contents for unmodified MWCNTs and lowly oxidized MWCNTs, while which decreased after further increasing the surface oxidization. CCC ratios in the presence of Ca(2+) to Na(+) were consistent with the empirical Schulze-Hardy rule for unmodified MWCNTs and lowly oxidized MWCNTs; however, which were much lower than the expected values for highly oxidized MWCNTs. Fulvic acid can clearly increase the stability of MWCNT suspension with unmodified MWCNTs and lowly oxidized MWCNTs, while it cannot affect the dispersion of highly oxidized MWCNTs. This study implied that the oxidation and presence of fulvic acid will possibly increase the mobility, exposure, bioavailability, and toxicity of MWCNTs. PMID:24323322

  1. Study on technetium-99m labeling of graphene oxide nanosheets through click chemistry-99mTc labeling of graphene oxide nanosheets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江大卫; 彭程; 孙艳红; 贾丽娜; 李剑波; 张岚

    2015-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets possess several advantages, such as a large surface, outstanding bio-compatibility, and straightforward chemical modification capability. They also have great potential as a drug-carrier. In this article, we radiolabeled GO nanosheets with 99mTc, which satisfies the potential needs of micro-SPECT imaging probes in pre-clinical and clinical research. GO nanosheets were synthesized through the modified Hummers’ method, then GO nanosheets with azide group covalently functionalized in two steps were conjugated to DOTA (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N0,N00,N000-tetraacetic acid) and functionalized with an alkynyl group by means of click chemistry. Then through the addition and reduction of technetium-99m, the 99mTc-DOTA-GO were attained. DOTA-conjugated GOs with lateral dimensions of 500–600 nm were synthe-sized. Both atomic force microscopy (AFM) and FT-IR were performed to characterize the GO-DOTA. Labeling efficiency of GO-DOTA with 99mTc was>90%and radiochemical purities were>96%with purification. We successfully synthesized graphene oxide derivatives, DOTA-conjugated GOs, via Click Chemistry, and it was labeled with 99mTc for SPECT imaging. High radiolabeling efficiency makes GO nanosheets suitable platforms for future molecular imaging research.

  2. Green Oxidation of Menthol Enantiomers and Analysis by Circular Dichroism Spectroscopy: An Advanced Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, H. Cristina; Donohoe, James S.

    2012-01-01

    Green chemistry addresses environmental concerns associated with chemical processes and increases awareness of possible harmful effects of chemical reagents. Efficient reactions that eliminate or reduce the use of organic solvents or toxic reagents are increasingly available. A two-week experiment is reported that entails the calcium hypochlorite…

  3. Study of Heterogeneouse Processes Related to the Chemistry of Tropospheric Oxidants and Aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidovits, Paul; Worsnop, D R; Jayne, J T; Colb, C E

    2013-02-13

    The objective of the studies was to elucidate the heterogeneous chemistry of tropospheric aerosols. Experiments were designed to measure both specifically needed parameters, and to obtain systematic data required to build a fundamental understanding of the nature of gas-surface physical and chemical interactions

  4. Understanding the Chemistry of Uncommon Americium Oxidation States for Application to Actinide/Lanthanide Separations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leigh Martin; Bruce J. Mincher; Nicholas C. Schmitt

    2007-09-01

    A spectroscopic study of the stability of Am(V) and Am(VI) produced by oxidizing Am(III) with sodium bismuthate is presented, varying the initial americium concentration, temperature and length of the oxidation was seen to have profound effects on the resultant solutions.

  5. Ab Initio Studies of Fluorine and Chlorine Oxide and Nitrogen Oxide Species of Interest in Stratospheric Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The quality of fundamental vibrational frequencies determined using the CCSD(T) method (singles and doubles coupled-cluster theory plus a perturbational estimate of the effects of connected triple excitations) is shown to be very good, usually predicting band centers to within plus or minus 8 per centimeter. This approach is applied to several molecules of interest in atmospheric chemistry, such as HNO, cis-FONO, cis-ClONO, and ClOOH. The HNO molecule displays a large and unusual anharmonicity in the H-N stretch. For the calculation of ultraviolet (UV) spectra, the linear response CCSD (LRCCSD) approach (which is equivalent to EOM-CCSD) has been shown to yield vertical excitation energies that are accurate to approximately equal to 0.1 eV for singly excited electronic states. This method together with more approximate methods is used to examine the UV spectra of several molecules important in stratospheric chemistry, including HOCl, Cl2O, ClONO2, HONO2, ClOOCl, ClOOH, and HOOH.

  6. Uniform lab-scale biocatalytic nanoporous latex coatings for reactive microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosse, Jimmy L; Flickinger, Michael C

    2011-01-01

    This chapter describes a method for generating uniform lab-scale biocatalytic nanoporous latex coatings. Nearly everything we come into contact with on a daily basis has been coated with some polymer material. High-speed waterborne polymer coating and ink-jet printing techniques are mature technologies. Methods for immobilizing microorganisms in lab-scale waterborne latex biocatalytic coatings draw on existing coating technologies for generating precision industrial paint and paper coatings and would therefore be amenable to scale up in future applications. An inherent problem for many lab-scale techniques is coating uniformity. The method described here has been developed to dramatically increase the uniformity of multiple individual small surface area coatings derived from a single coating template by minimizing edge effects due to emulsion drying adjacent to the edge of the mask. PMID:21553194

  7. Biocatalytic Synthesis of Chiral Alcohols and Amino Acids for Development of Pharmaceuticals

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Ramesh N.

    2013-01-01

    Chirality is a key factor in the safety and efficacy of many drug products and thus the production of single enantiomers of drug intermediates and drugs has become increasingly important in the pharmaceutical industry. There has been an increasing awareness of the enormous potential of microorganisms and enzymes derived there from for the transformation of synthetic chemicals with high chemo-, regio- and enatioselectivities. In this article, biocatalytic processes are described for the synthe...

  8. Biocatalytic synthesis of acrylates in supercritical fluids: tuning enzyme activity by changing pressure.

    OpenAIRE

    Kamat, S.V.; Iwaskewycz, B; Beckman, E J; Russell, A.J.

    1993-01-01

    Supercritical fluids are a unique class of nonaqueous media in which biocatalytic reactions can occur. The physical properties of supercritical fluids, which include gas-like diffusivities and liquid-like densities, can be predictably controlled with changing pressure. This paper describes how adjustment of pressure, with the subsequent predictable changes of the dielectric constant and Hildebrand solubility parameter for fluoroform, ethane, sulfur hexafluoride, and propane, can be used to ma...

  9. Actinobase: Database on molecular diversity, phylogeny and biocatalytic potential of salt tolerant alkaliphilic actinomycetes

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Amit K; Gohel, Sangeeta; Singh, Satya P.

    2012-01-01

    Actinobase is a relational database of molecular diversity, phylogeny and biocatalytic potential of haloalkaliphilic actinomycetes. The main objective of this data base is to provide easy access to range of information, data storage, comparison and analysis apart from reduced data redundancy, data entry, storage, retrieval costs and improve data security. Information related to habitat, cell morphology, Gram reaction, biochemical characterization and molecular features would allow researchers...

  10. Surface chemistry and catalytic properties of VOX/Ti-MCM-41 catalysts for dibenzothiophene oxidation in a biphasic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, J.; Chen, L. F.; Wang, J. A.; Manríquez, Ma.; Limas, R.; Schachat, P.; Navarrete, J.; Contreras, J. L.

    2016-08-01

    A series of vanadium oxide supported on Ti-MCM-41 catalysts was synthesized via the incipient impregnation method by varying the vanadia loading from 5 wt% to 10, 15, 20 and 25 wt%. These catalysts were characterized by a variety of advanced techniques for investigating their crystalline structure, textural properties, and surface chemistry information including surface acidity, reducibility, vanadium oxidation states, and morphological features. The catalytic activities of the catalysts were evaluated in a biphasic reaction system for oxidative desulfurization (ODS) of a model diesel containing 300 ppm of dibenzothiophene (DBT) where acetonitrile was used as extraction solvent and H2O2 as oxidant. ODS activity was found to be proportional to the V5+/(V4+ + V5+) values of the catalysts, indicating that the surface vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) was the active phase. Reaction temperature would influence significantly the ODS efficiency; high temperature, i.e., 80 °C, would lead to low ODS reaction due to the partial decomposition of oxidant. All the catalysts contained both Lewis and Brønsted acid sites but the former was predominant. The catalysts with low vanadia loading (5 or 10 wt%V2O5) had many Lewis acid sites and could strongly adsorb DBT molecule via the electron donation/acceptance action which resulted in an inhibition for the reaction of DBT with the surface peroxometallic species. The catalyst with high vanadia loading (25wt%V2O5/Ti-MCM-41) showed the highest catalytic activity and could remove 99.9% of DBT at 60 °C within 60 min.

  11. In situ Investigation of Oxide Films on Zirconium Alloy in PWR Primary Water Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Taeho; Choi, Kyoung Joon; Yoo, Seung Chang; Kim, Ji Hyun [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Zirconium alloys are used as fuel cladding materials in nuclear power reactors, because these materials have a very low thermal neutron capture cross section as well as desirable mechanical properties. However, the Fukushima accident shows that the oxidation behavior of zirconium alloy is an important issue because the zirconium alloy functions as a shield of nuclear material (i.e., uranium, fission gas), and the degradation on zirconium cladding directly causes severe accident on nuclear power plant. Therefore, to ensure the safety of nuclear power reactors, the performance and sustainability of nuclear fuel should be understood. Currently, the water-metal interface is regarded as the rate-controlling site governing the rapid oxidation transition in high-burn-up fuels. Zirconium oxide is formed at the water-metal interface, and its structure and phase play an important role in determining its mechanical properties. In the early stage of the oxidation process, zirconium oxide with both tetragonal and monoclinic phases is formed. With an increase in the oxidation time to 150 h, the unstable tetragonal phase disappears and the monoclinic phase is dominant and possibly because of the stress relaxation according to previous and present results.

  12. In situ Investigation of Oxide Films on Zirconium Alloy in PWR Primary Water Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zirconium alloys are used as fuel cladding materials in nuclear power reactors, because these materials have a very low thermal neutron capture cross section as well as desirable mechanical properties. However, the Fukushima accident shows that the oxidation behavior of zirconium alloy is an important issue because the zirconium alloy functions as a shield of nuclear material (i.e., uranium, fission gas), and the degradation on zirconium cladding directly causes severe accident on nuclear power plant. Therefore, to ensure the safety of nuclear power reactors, the performance and sustainability of nuclear fuel should be understood. Currently, the water-metal interface is regarded as the rate-controlling site governing the rapid oxidation transition in high-burn-up fuels. Zirconium oxide is formed at the water-metal interface, and its structure and phase play an important role in determining its mechanical properties. In the early stage of the oxidation process, zirconium oxide with both tetragonal and monoclinic phases is formed. With an increase in the oxidation time to 150 h, the unstable tetragonal phase disappears and the monoclinic phase is dominant and possibly because of the stress relaxation according to previous and present results

  13. Effect of water chemistry on the oxide film on Alloy 690 during simulated hot functional testing of a pressurised water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Influence of hot functional test chemistry on Alloy 690 oxidation studied by EIS/XPS. ► Increase in LiOH concentration leads to a higher dissolution rate of the oxide. ► Higher boric acid content leads to more efficient passivation of the surface. ► Oxidation parameters estimated by comparison of results to the Mixed-Conduction Model. - Abstract: Electrochemical impedance spectroscopic measurements to follow the oxidation of Alloy 690 in high-temperature water environments simulating hot functional test (HFT) chemistries are presented and discussed. The thickness and in-depth composition of the formed oxides is estimated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Kinetic and transport parameters of the oxidation process are estimated by quantitative comparison of the results with the mixed-conduction model for oxide films. Based on the influence of LiOH and H3BO3 concentrations on the parameter values, conclusions for the relationship between HFT water chemistry and the electrical and electrochemical properties of the passive layer on reactor coolant circuit surfaces are drawn.

  14. Tin Oxide Chemistry from the Last Decade of the Nineteenth Century to the First Decade of the Twenty-First Century: Towards the Development of a Big-Picture Approach to the Teaching and Learning of Chemistry while Focussing on a Specific Compound or Class of Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Berg, Kevin C.

    2010-01-01

    The discovery of the electron in 1897 deeply impacted the nature of chemistry in the twentieth century. A revolution in the theoretical structure of chemistry as well as in the instrumental tools used in chemical analysis occurred as a result of this discovery. The impact of this revolution on tin oxide chemistry over approximately a 100 year…

  15. Dry deposition parameterization of sulfur oxides in a chemistry and general circulation

    OpenAIRE

    Ganzeveld, L.N.; Lelieveld, J.; Roelofs, G.J.

    1998-01-01

    A dry deposition scheme, originally developed to calculate the deposition velocities for the trace gases O3, NO2, NO, and HNO3 in the chemistry and general circulation European Centre Hamburg Model (ECHAM), is extended to sulfur dioxide (SO2) and sulfate (SO42-). In order to reduce some of the shortcomings of the previous model version a local surface roughness and a more realistic leaf area index (LAI), derived from a high-resolution ecosystem database are introduced. The current model calcu...

  16. Iron(III Fluorinated Porphyrins: Greener Chemistry from Synthesis to Oxidative Catalysis Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana L. H. Rebelo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Iron(III fluorinated porphyrins play a central role in the biomimetics of heme enzymes and enable cleaner routes to the oxidation of organic compounds. The present work reports significant improvements in the eco-compatibility of the synthesis of 5,10,15,20-tetrakis-pentafluorophenylporphyrin (H2TPFPP and the corresponding iron complex [Fe(TPFPPCl], and the use of [Fe(TPFPPCl] as an oxidation catalyst in green conditions. The preparations of H2TPFPP and [Fe(TPFPPCl] typically use toxic solvents and can be made significantly greener and simpler using microwave heating and optimization of the reaction conditions. In the optimized procedure it was possible to eliminate nitrobenzene from the porphyrin synthesis and replace DMF by acetonitrile in the metalation reaction, concomitant with a significant reduction of reaction time and simplification of the purification procedure. The Fe(IIIporphyrin is then tested as catalyst in the selective oxidation of aromatics at room temperature using a green oxidant (hydrogen peroxide and green solvent (ethanol. Efficient epoxidation of indene and selective oxidation of 3,5-dimethylphenol and naphthalene to the corresponding quinones is observed.

  17. Iron(III) Fluorinated Porphyrins: Greener Chemistry from Synthesis to Oxidative Catalysis Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebelo, Susana L H; Silva, André M N; Medforth, Craig J; Freire, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Iron(III) fluorinated porphyrins play a central role in the biomimetics of heme enzymes and enable cleaner routes to the oxidation of organic compounds. The present work reports significant improvements in the eco-compatibility of the synthesis of 5,10,15,20-tetrakis-pentafluorophenylporphyrin (H₂TPFPP) and the corresponding iron complex [Fe(TPFPP)Cl], and the use of [Fe(TPFPP)Cl] as an oxidation catalyst in green conditions. The preparations of H₂TPFPP and [Fe(TPFPP)Cl] typically use toxic solvents and can be made significantly greener and simpler using microwave heating and optimization of the reaction conditions. In the optimized procedure it was possible to eliminate nitrobenzene from the porphyrin synthesis and replace DMF by acetonitrile in the metalation reaction, concomitant with a significant reduction of reaction time and simplification of the purification procedure. The Fe(III)porphyrin is then tested as catalyst in the selective oxidation of aromatics at room temperature using a green oxidant (hydrogen peroxide) and green solvent (ethanol). Efficient epoxidation of indene and selective oxidation of 3,5-dimethylphenol and naphthalene to the corresponding quinones is observed. PMID:27077840

  18. SCC crack growth of cold-worked type 316 SS in simulated BWR oxidizing and hydrogen water chemistry conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is considerable interest in the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels in low electrochemical potential (ECP), light water reactor (LWR) environments. Crack growth measurements are presented for ∼20% cold-worked, 316 and 316L stainless steels tested in 288oC high-purity water under oxidizing (2000 ppb O2) and hydrogen water chemistry (74-1560 ppb H2) conditions. High SCC crack-growth rates of ∼1x10-7 mm/s at constant K were observed in one heat at low ECP, hydrogen water chemistry conditions. Crack morphologies for this heat were mixed intergranular (IG) and transgranular (TG) for all environments but with less TG cracking at the lowest K level tested. Comparisons made to a larger set of data on cold-worked stainless steels indicate that the SCC crack-growth rates from PNNL on this heat are at the high end of test data under low ECP, LWR conditions. Possible reasons for the higher observed SCC propagation rates in the cold-worked 316LSS heat are discussed. (author)

  19. Synthesis and Lanthanide Coordination Chemistry of Phosphine Oxide Decorated Dibenzothiophene and Dibenzothiophene Sulfone Platforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosario-Amorin, Daniel [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Ouizem, Sabrina [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Dickie, D. A. [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Paine, Robert T. [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Cramer, Roger E. [University of Hawaii; Hay, Benjamin [ORNL; Podair, Julien [ORNL; Delmau, Laetitia Helene [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Syntheses for new ligands based upon dibenzothiophene and dibenzothiophene sulfone platforms, decorated with phosphine oxide and methylphosphine oxide donor groups, are described. Coordination chem. of 4, 6- bis(diphenylphosphinoylmethyl) dibenzothiophene (8) , 4, 6- bis(diphenylphosphinoylmethyl) dibenzothiophene- 5, 5- dioxide (9) and 4, 6- bis(diphenylphosphinoyl) dibenzothiophene- 5, 5- dioxide (10) with lanthanide nitrates, Ln(NO3) 3 (H2O) n is outlined, and crystal structure detns. reveal a range of chelation interactions on Ln(III) ions. The HNO3 dependence of the solvent extn. performance of 9 and 10 in 1, 2- dichloroethane for Eu(III) and Am(III) is described and compared against the extn. behavior of related dibenzofuran ligands (2, 3; R = Ph) and n- octyl(phenyl) - N, N- diisobutylcarbamoylmethyl phosphine oxide (4) measured under identical conditions.

  20. Carbon oxidation state as a metric for describing the chemistry of atmospheric organic aerosol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Kroll, Jesse H.; Donahue, Neil M.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Kessler, Sean H.; Canagaratna, Manjula R.; Wilson, Kevin R.; Altieri, Katye E.; Mazzoleni, Lynn R.; Wozniak, Andrew S.; Bluhm, Hendrik; Mysak, Erin R.; Smith, Jared D.; Kolb, Charles E.; Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2010-11-05

    A detailed understanding of the sources, transformations, and fates of organic species in the environment is crucial because of the central roles that organics play in human health, biogeochemical cycles, and Earth's climate. However, such an understanding is hindered by the immense chemical complexity of environmental mixtures of organics; for example, atmospheric organic aerosol consists of at least thousands of individual compounds, all of which likely evolve chemically over their atmospheric lifetimes. Here we demonstrate the utility of describing organic aerosol (and other complex organic mixtures) in terms of average carbon oxidation state (OSC), a quantity that always increases with oxidation, and is readily measured using state-of-the-art analytical techniques. Field and laboratory measurements of OSC , using several such techniques, constrain the chemical properties of the organics and demonstrate that the formation and evolution of organic aerosol involves simultaneous changes to both carbon oxidation state and carbon number (nC).

  1. Selection of crucible oxides in molten titanium and titanium aluminum alloys by thermo-chemistry calculations

    OpenAIRE

    Kostov A.; Friedrich B

    2005-01-01

    Titanium and its alloys interstitially dissolve a large amount of impurities such as oxygen and nitrogen, which degrade the mechanical and physical properties of alloys. On the other hand crucible oxides based on CaO, ZrO2 Y2O3, etc., and their spinels (combination of two or more oxides) can be used for melting titanium and its alloys. However, the thermodynamic behavior of calcium, zirconium, yttrium on the one side, and oxygen on the other side, in molten Ti and Ti-Al alloys have not been m...

  2. Structural chemistry and the local charge picture of copper oxide superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cava, R.J. (AT and T Bell Labs., Murray Hill, NJ (USA))

    1990-02-09

    The crystal structures of the known copper oxide superconductors are described, with particular emphasis on the manner in which they fall into structural families. The local charge picture, a framework for understanding the influence of chemical composition, stoichiometry, and doping on the electrical properties of complex structures, is also described. 42 refs., 7 figs.

  3. Effect of alloy chemistry and exposure conditions on the oxidation of titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unnam, J.; Shenoy, R. N.; Clark, R. K.

    1984-01-01

    Multiwall is a new thermal protection system concept for advanced space transportation vehicles. The system consists of discrete panels made up of multiple layers of foil gage metal. Titanium is the proposed candidate metal for multiwall panels in the reentry temperature range up to 675 C. Oxidation and embrittlement are the principal concerns related to the use of Ti in heat shield applications. The results of a broad study on the oxidation kinetics of several titanium alloys subjected to different exposure conditions are described. The alloys include commercially pure titanium, Ti-6Al-4V, and Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo. Oxidation studies were performed on these alloys exposed at 704 C in 5-760 torr air pressure and 0 to 50% relative humidity. The resulting weight gains were correlated with oxide thickness and substrate contamination. The contamination depth and weight gains due to solid solutioning were obtained from microhardness depth profiles and hardness versus weight percent oxygen calibration data.

  4. SERUM CHEMISTRIES OF COTURNIX JAPONICA GIVEN DIETARY MANGANESE OXIDE (MN3O4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plasma creatinine and inorganic phosphorus were increased in manganese oxide (Mn3O4)-treated adult male Coturnix quail, but BUN, BUN/creatinine ratio, uric acid, and total calcium were decreased. 2. Serum enzymes (alkaline phosphatase glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, glutamic p...

  5. Present-day knowledge of chemistry of iodine, rhenium, technetium and manganese of highest oxidation state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phenomenon of intramolecular reduction of perrhenic acid in crystal-phase and liquid-phase states is analyzed. On the basis of analysis the mechanism of the process is proposed as a tetraelectron in the coordination sphere of a multinuclear complex in the system with an oscillatory process of hydration-hydrolisis and oxidation-reduction

  6. IMPACT OF WATER CHEMISTRY ON MANGANESE REMOVAL DURING OXIDATION/FILTRATION TREATMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a poster showing the purpose and setup of our pilot plant experiments with manganese filtration. The focus is on the differences, effectiveness, and problems with using chlorine and potassium permanganate in oxidation/filtration. The poster will show the results and findi...

  7. Reaction Chemistry of W-Mn/SiO2 Catalyst for the Oxidative Coupling of Methane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuben Li

    2003-01-01

    Reaction chemistry of the OCM reaction on W-Mn/SiO2 catalyst has been reviewed in thisaccount. Initial activity and selectivity, stability in a long-term reaction, reaction at elevated pressures anda modelling test in a stainless-steel fluidized-bed reactor show that W-Mn/SiO2 has promising performancefor the development of an OCM process that directly produces ethylene from natural gas. A study onsurface catalytic reaction kinetics and used catalyst structure characterization revealed a possible reasonwhy C2 and COx selectivity changed during the long-term reaction. Further improvement of the catalystcomposition and preparation method should be a future direction of study on OCM reaction over W-Mn/SiO2 catalyst.

  8. OH and HO2 chemistry during NAMBLEX: roles of oxygenates, halogen oxides and heterogeneous uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sommariva

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Several zero-dimensional box-models with different levels of chemical complexity, based on the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM, have been used to study the chemistry of OH and HO2 in a coastal environment in the Northern Hemisphere. The models were constrained to and compared with measurements made during the NAMBLEX campaign (Mace Head, Ireland in summer 2002. The base models, which were constrained to measured CO, CH4 and NMHCs, were able to reproduce [OH] within 25%, but overestimated [HO2] by about a factor of 2. Agreement was improved when the models were constrained to oxygenated compounds (acetaldehyde, methanol and acetone, highlighting their importance for the radical budget. When the models were constrained to measured halogen monoxides (IO, BrO and used a more detailed, measurements-based, treatment to describe the heterogeneous uptake, modelled [OH] increased by up to 15% and [HO2] decreased by up to 30%. The actual impact of halogen monoxides on the modelled concentrations of HOx was dependant on the uptake coefficients used for HOI, HOBr and HO2. Better agreement, within the combined uncertainties of the measurements and of the model, was achieved when using high uptake coefficients for HO2 and HOI (γHO2=1, γHOI=0.6. A rate of production and destruction analysis of the models allowed a detailed study of OH and HO2 chemistry under the conditions encountered during NAMBLEX, showing the importance of oxygenates and of XO (where X=I, Br as co-reactants for OH and HO2 and of HOX photolysis as a source for OH.

  9. Modeling and experimental validation of CO heterogeneous chemistry and electrochemistry in solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yurkiv, Vitaly

    2010-12-17

    In the present work experimental and numerical modeling studies of the heterogeneously catalyzed and electrochemical oxidation of CO at Nickel/yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode systems were performed to evaluate elementary charge-transfer reaction mechanisms taking place at the three-phase boundary of CO/CO{sub 2} gas-phase, Ni electrode, and YSZ electrolyte. Temperature-programmed desorption and reaction experiments along with density functional theory calculations were performed to determine adsorption/desorption and surface diffusion kinetics as well as thermodynamic data for the CO/CO{sub 2}/Ni and CO/CO{sub 2}/YSZ systems. Based on these data elementary reaction based models with four different charge transfer mechanisms for the electrochemical CO oxidation were developed and applied in numerical simulations of literature experimental electrochemical data such as polarization curves and impedance spectra. Comparison between simulation and experiment demonstrated that only one of the four charge transfer mechanisms can consistently reproduce the electrochemical data over a wide range of operating temperatures and CO/CO{sub 2} gas compositions. (orig.) [German] In der vorliegenden Arbeit wurden experimentelle und numerische Untersuchungen zur heterogen katalysierten und elektrochemischen Oxidation von CO an Anodensystemen (bestehend aus Nickel und yttriumdotiertem Zirkoniumdioxid, YSZ) von Festoxidbrennstoffzellen (engl. Solid Oxide Fuel Cells, SOFCs) ausgefuehrt, um den mikroskopischen Mechanismus der an der CO/CO{sub 2}-Gasphase/Ni-Elektrode/YSZ-Elektrolyt- Dreiphasen-Grenzflaeche ablaufenden Ladungsuebertragungsreaktion aufzuklaeren. Temperaturprogrammierte Desorptionsmessungen (TPD) und Temperaturprogrammierte Reaktionsmessungen (TPR) sowie Dichtefunktionaltheorierechnungen wurden ausgefuehrt, um adsorptions-, desorptions- und reaktionskinetische sowie thermodynamische Daten fuer die CO/CO{sub 2}/Ni- und CO/CO{sub 2}/YSZ

  10. Versatile redox chemistry complicates antioxidant capacity assessment: flavonoids as milieu-dependent anti- and pro-oxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chobot, Vladimir; Kubicova, Lenka; Bachmann, Gert; Hadacek, Franz

    2013-01-01

    Some antioxidants have been shown to possess additional pro-oxidant effects. Diverse methodologies exist for studying redox properties of synthetic and natural chemicals. The latter are substantial components of our diet. Exploration of their contribution to life-extending or -compromising effects is mandatory. Among reactive oxygen species (ROS), hydroxyl radical (•OH) is the most damaging species. Due to its short half-life, the assay has to contain a specific generation system. Plants synthesize flavonoids, phenolic compounds recognized as counter-agents to coronary heart disease. Their antioxidant activities are affected by their hydroxylation patterns. Moreover, in the plant, they mainly occur as glycosides. We chose three derivatives, quercetin, luteolin, and rutin, in attempts to explore their redox chemistry in contrasting hydrogen peroxide environments. Initial addition of hydrogen peroxide in high concentration or gradual development constituted a main factor affecting their redox chemical properties, especially in case of quercetin. Our study exemplifies that a combination of a chemical assay (deoxyribose degradation) with an electrochemical method (square-wave voltammetry) provides insightful data. The ambiguity of the tested flavonoids to act either as anti- or pro-oxidant may complicate categorization, but probably contributed to their evolution as components of a successful metabolic system that benefits both producer and consumer. PMID:23736691

  11. Versatile Redox Chemistry Complicates Antioxidant Capacity Assessment: Flavonoids as Milieu-Dependent Anti- and Pro-Oxidants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gert Bachmann

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Some antioxidants have been shown to possess additional pro-oxidant effects. Diverse methodologies exist for studying redox properties of synthetic and natural chemicals. The latter are substantial components of our diet. Exploration of their contribution to life-extending or -compromising effects is mandatory. Among reactive oxygen species (ROS, hydroxyl radical (•OH is the most damaging species. Due to its short half-life, the assay has to contain a specific generation system. Plants synthesize flavonoids, phenolic compounds recognized as counter-agents to coronary heart disease. Their antioxidant activities are affected by their hydroxylation patterns. Moreover, in the plant, they mainly occur as glycosides. We chose three derivatives, quercetin, luteolin, and rutin, in attempts to explore their redox chemistry in contrasting hydrogen peroxide environments. Initial addition of hydrogen peroxide in high concentration or gradual development constituted a main factor affecting their redox chemical properties, especially in case of quercetin. Our study exemplifies that a combination of a chemical assay (deoxyribose degradation with an electrochemical method (square-wave voltammetry provides insightful data. The ambiguity of the tested flavonoids to act either as anti- or pro-oxidant may complicate categorization, but probably contributed to their evolution as components of a successful metabolic system that benefits both producer and consumer.

  12. Surface chemistry of carbon removal from indium tin oxide by base and plasma treatment, with implications on hydroxyl termination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The surface chemistry of carbon removal from indium tin oxide (ITO) has been investigated with Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS), and high-resolution energy loss spectroscopy (HR-ELS). A vibrating Kelvin probe (KP) was used to monitor the work function (PHI) of ITO after cleaning, either by base-cleaning with alcoholic-KOH or by O2 plasma-cleaning. Base-cleaning lowered PHIITO as seen in the KP analysis, whereas plasma-cleaning slightly increased PHIITO by an oxidative process. The degree of PHIITO depression by base-cleaning was seen to depend on the initial surface, but the PHI depression itself was nonreductive to the ITO, as seen in the In-MNN AES lineshape. The nonreductive depression of PHIITO by base-cleaning was further supported by a constant charge carrier density, as estimated from the HR-ELS. Base-cleaning was slightly more effective than the oxygen plasma in removing carbon from the ITO surface. However, base-cleaning preferentially removed graphitic carbon while leaving significant hydrocarbon contaminants, as determined by vibrational analysis with HREELS. All other ITO surfaces retained a significant carbon and hydrocarbon contamination as evidenced by AES and HREELS. There was little evidence of the formation of surface hydroxyl species, as expected for such an inherently contaminated surface as ITO

  13. Transport of two metal oxide nanoparticles in saturated granular porous media: role of water chemistry and particle coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petosa, Adamo Riccardo; Brennan, Spencer John; Rajput, Faraz; Tufenkji, Nathalie

    2012-03-15

    The growing use of nanosized titanium dioxide (nTiO2) and zinc oxide (nZnO) in a large number of commercial products raises concerns regarding their release and subsequent mobility in natural aquatic environments. Laboratory-scale sand-packed column experiments were conducted with bare and polymer-coated nTiO2 and nZnO to improve our understanding of the mobility of these nanoparticles in natural or engineered water saturated granular systems. The nanoparticles are characterized over a range of environmentally relevant water chemistries using multiple complimentary techniques: dynamic light scattering, nanoparticle tracking analysis, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Overall, bare (uncoated) nanoparticles exhibit high retention within the water saturated granular matrix at solution ionic strengths (IS) as low as 0.1 mM NaNO3 for bare nTiO2 and 0.01 mM NaNO3 for bare nZnO. Bare nTiO2 and nZnO also display dynamic (time-dependent) deposition behaviors under selected conditions. In contrast, the polymer-coated nanoparticles are much less likely to aggregate and exhibit significant transport potential at IS as high as 100 mM NaNO3 or 3 mM CaCl2. These findings illustrate the importance of considering the extent and type of surface modification when evaluating metal oxide contamination potential in granular aquatic environments. PMID:22236555

  14. Spatial atomic layer deposition: Performance of low temperature H2O and O3 oxidant chemistry for flexible electronics encapsulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water and oxygen were compared as oxidizing agents for the Al2O3 atomic layer deposition process using spatial atomic layer deposition reactor. The influence of the precursor dose on the deposition rate and refractive index, which was used as a proxy for film density, was measured as a function of residence time, defined as the time which the moving substrate spent within one precursor gas zone. The effect of temperature on the growth characteristics was also measured. The water-based process gave faster deposition rates and higher refractive indices but the ozone process allowed deposition to take place at lower temperatures while still maintaining good film quality. In general, processes based on both oxidation chemistries were able to produce excellent moisture barrier films with water vapor transmission rate levels of 10−4 g/m2 day measured at 38 °C and 90% of relative humidity on polyethylene naphthalate substrates. However, the best result of <5 × 10−5 was obtained at 100 °C process temperature with water as precursor

  15. Modeling the oxidative coupling of methane:Heterogeneous chemistry coupled with 3D flow field simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaghobi Nakisa; Ghoreishy Mir Hamid Reza

    2009-01-01

    The oxidative coupling of methane (OCM) over titanate perovskite catalyst has been developed by three-dimensional numerical simulations of flow field coupled with heat transfer as well as heterogeneous kinetic model.The reaction was assumed to take place both in the gas phase and on the catalytic surface.Kinetic rate constants were experimentally obtained using a ten step kinetic model.The simulation results agree quite well with the data of OCM experiments,which were used to investigate the effect of temperature on the selectivity and conversion obtained in the methane oxidative coupling process.The conversion of methane linearly increased with temperature and the selectivity of C2 was practically constant in the temperature range of 973-1073 K.The study shows that CFD tools make it possible to implement the heterogeneous kinetic model even for high exothermic reaction such as OCM.

  16. Ab Initio Studies of Halogen and Nitrogen Oxide Species of Interest in Stratospheric Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The ability of modern state-of-the art ab initio quantum chemical techniques to characterize reliably the gas-phase molecular structure, vibrational spectrum, electronic spectrum, and thermal stability of fluorine, chlorine, bromine and nitrogen oxide species will be demonstrated by presentation of some example studies. The ab initio results are shown to be in excellent agreement with the available experimental data, and where the experimental data are either not known or are inconclusive, the theoretical results are shown to fill in the gaps and to resolve experimental controversies. In addition, ab initio studies in which the electronic spectra and the characterization of excited electronic states of halogen oxide species will also be presented. Again where available, the ab initio results are compared to experimental observations, and are used to aid in the interpretation of experimental studies.

  17. Formaldehyde and Glyoxal Measurements as Tracers of Oxidation Chemistry in the Amazon Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, M. P.; Dorris, M. R.; Keutsch, F. N.; Springston, S. R.; Jimenez, J. L.; Palm, B. B.; Seco, R.; Kim, S.; Yee, L.; Wernis, R. A.; Goldstein, A. H.; Isaacman-VanWertz, G. A.; Liu, Y.; Martin, S. T.

    2015-12-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) and glyoxal (CHOCHO) are important tracers for oxidative processes in the atmosphere such as oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and production of HO2 radicals by photolysis or reaction with OH. Products of VOC oxidation and radical cycling, such as aerosols and tropospheric ozone, have direct impacts on human health. During the Green Ocean Amazon campaign (GoAmazon2014/5), HCHO and CHOCHO measurements were obtained together with OH, RO2+HO2, CO, CO2, O3, NOx, (o)VOCs, and aerosol particle size distribution. HCHO concentration was measured by the Madison FIber Laser-Induced Fluorescence (FILIF) instrument, while CHOCHO concentrations were collected by the Madison Laser-Induced Phosphorescence (Mad-LIP) instrument. Here we present data collected during 2014 at the T3 field site, 60 km to the west of Manaus, Brazil (3°12'47.82"S, 60°35'55.32"W). The T3 GoAmazon site varies between sampling strictly pristine (biogenic) emissions and influence from anthropogenic emissions from Manaus, depending on meteorological conditions. Here we present overall trends and regimes observed during the campaign, with a focus on HCHO, CHOCHO, and related species within the context of VOC oxidation and secondary pollutant production. We acknowledge the support from the Central Office of the Large Scale Biosphere Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA), the Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazonia (INPA), and the Universidade do Estado do Amazonia (UEA). The work was conducted under 001030/2012-4 of the Brazilian National Council for Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq). Data were collected from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science user facility sponsored by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research. Additionally, we acknowledge logistical support from the ARM Climate Research Facility. Additional funding from: NSF GRFP DGE-1256259, and NSF AGS-1051338

  18. Versatile Redox Chemistry Complicates Antioxidant Capacity Assessment: Flavonoids as Milieu-Dependent Antiand Pro-Oxidants

    OpenAIRE

    Gert Bachmann; Lenka Kubicova; Vladimir Chobot; Franz Hadacek

    2013-01-01

    Some antioxidants have been shown to possess additional pro-oxidant effects. Diverse methodologies exist for studying redox properties of synthetic and natural chemicals. The latter are substantial components of our diet. Exploration of their contribution to life-extending or -compromising effects is mandatory. Among reactive oxygen species (ROS), hydroxyl radical (•OH) is the most damaging species. Due to its short half-life, the assay has to contain a specific generation system. Plants synt...

  19. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathodes. Unraveling the Relationship Between Structure, Surface Chemistry and Oxygen Reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopalan, Srikanth [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    2013-03-31

    In this work we have considered oxygen reduction reaction on LSM and LSCF cathode materials. In particular we have used various spectroscopic techniques to explore the surface composition, transition metal oxidation state, and the bonding environment of oxygen to understand the changes that occur to the surface during the oxygen reduction process. In a parallel study we have employed patterned cathodes of both LSM and LSCF cathodes to extract transport and kinetic parameters associated with the oxygen reduction process.

  20. The gas phase oxide and oxyhydroxide chemistry of trace amounts of rhenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In preparation of experiments to investigate the chemical properties of bohrium (Bh, element 107) the behaviour of Re, its lighter homologue in group 7, was studied in different oxidizing chemical systems. The adsorption data of Re oxide and oxyhydroxide compounds on quartz surfaces were evaluated from results of thermochromatography experiments and confirmed in isothermal gas chromatography experiments applying 1 cm as standard state for the simple gas adsorption process: X(g) ↔ X(ads) (X = ReO3, HReO4) ΔHads(ReO3) = -190 ± 10 kJ/mol; ΔSads(ReO3) = -179±30 J/mol K; ΔHads(HReO4) = -77 ± 5 kJ/mol; ΔSads(HReO4) = -187±50 J/mol K. An on-line separation method for oxides and oxyhydroxides of short lived Re isotopes using isothermal high temperature gas-solid adsorption chromatography was developed. Separation yields and times of group 7 elements from lanthanides (model for actinides), polonium and bismuth were determined using the model isotopes 169,170,174,176Re, 152-155Er, 151-154Ho, 218Po, and 214Bi. An updated correlation function between the microscopic adsorption enthalpy and the macroscopic sublimation enthalpy was calculated from the experimental adsorption data of this work and literature data. (orig.)

  1. The gas phase oxide and oxyhydroxide chemistry of trace amounts of rhenium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichler, R. [Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Univ. of Bern (Switzerland); Eichler, B.; Jost, D.T.; Dressler, R.; Tuerler, A. [Paul-Scherrer-Inst., Villigen (Switzerland); Gaeggeler, H.W. [Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Univ. of Bern (Switzerland); Paul-Scherrer-Inst., Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-07-01

    In preparation of experiments to investigate the chemical properties of bohrium (Bh, element 107) the behaviour of Re, its lighter homologue in group 7, was studied in different oxidizing chemical systems. The adsorption data of Re oxide and oxyhydroxide compounds on quartz surfaces were evaluated from results of thermochromatography experiments and confirmed in isothermal gas chromatography experiments applying 1 cm as standard state for the simple gas adsorption process: X(g) {r_reversible} X(ads) (X = ReO{sub 3}, HReO{sub 4}) {delta}H{sub ads}(ReO{sub 3}) = -190 {+-} 10 kJ/mol; {delta}S{sub ads}(ReO{sub 3}) = -179{+-}30 J/mol K; {delta}H{sub ads}(HReO{sub 4}) = -77 {+-} 5 kJ/mol; {delta}S{sub ads}(HReO{sub 4}) = -187{+-}50 J/mol K. An on-line separation method for oxides and oxyhydroxides of short lived Re isotopes using isothermal high temperature gas-solid adsorption chromatography was developed. Separation yields and times of group 7 elements from lanthanides (model for actinides), polonium and bismuth were determined using the model isotopes {sup 169,170,174,176}Re, {sup 152-155}Er, {sup 151-154}Ho, {sup 218}Po, and {sup 214}Bi. An updated correlation function between the microscopic adsorption enthalpy and the macroscopic sublimation enthalpy was calculated from the experimental adsorption data of this work and literature data. (orig.)

  2. Terpyridine Molybdenum Dinitrogen Chemistry: Synthesis of Dinitrogen Complexes That Vary by Five Oxidation States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezdek, Máté J; Guo, Sheng; Chirik, Paul J

    2016-03-21

    A bimetallic molybdenum complex bridged by an activated dinitrogen ligand and supported by phosphine and terpyridine ligands, [{((Ph)Tpy)(PPh2Me)2Mo}2(μ2-N2)][BArF(24)]2 [(Ph)Tpy = 4'-Ph-2,2',6',2″-terpyridine; ArF(24) = (C6H3-3,5-(CF3)2)4], was synthesized and structurally characterized, and its electronic structure was determined using a combination of experimental and density functional theory computational methods. Each molybdenum atom is best described as molybdenum(II) bridged by a modestly activated [N2](2-) ligand. The cyclic voltammogram of [{((Ph)Tpy)(PPh2Me)2Mo}2(μ2-N2)](2+) displays two reversible reductive and two reversible oxidative features, prompting the preparation and characterization of a series of molybdenum dinitrogen compounds spanning five oxidation states ([{((Ph)Tpy)(PPh2Me)2Mo}2(μ2-N2)][BArF(24)]n, where n = 4, 3, 2, 1, 0). Raman and (15)N NMR spectroscopic data establish that the bridging nitrogen ligand remains intact across the redox series. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to probe the nature of the unpaired electron in the mixed-valent electronic oxidized and reduced products. The singly occupied molecular orbital is principally metal-based in [{((Ph)Tpy)(PPh2Me)2Mo}2(μ2-N2)](3+) and ligand-localized in [{((Ph)Tpy)(PPh2Me)2Mo}2(μ2-N2)](+). PMID:26959702

  3. Complexes and Clusters of Water Relevant to Atmospheric Chemistry: H2O Complexes with Oxidants

    OpenAIRE

    Sennikov, Peter; Ignatov, Stanislav; Schrems, Otto

    2005-01-01

    Experimental observations and data from quantum chemical calculations related to the complexes between water molecules and small oxygen containing inorganic species which are playing an important role as oxidants (O(1D), O(3P), O2(X3Σg), O2(b1Σg+), O3, HO, HOO, HOOO, and H2O2) in the atmosphere are reviewed with emphasis on their structure, hydrogen bonding, interaction energies, thermodynamic parameters and IR spectra. In recent years, weakly bound complexes containing water have i...

  4. Nitrogen Oxides in the Nocturnal Boundary Layer: Chemistry of Nitrous Acid (HONO) and the Nitrate Radical (N03)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jochen Stutz

    2005-05-24

    Summary Chemical processes occurring at night in the lowest part of the urban atmosphere, the so called nocturnal boundary layer (NBL), can influence the composition of the atmosphere during the night as well as the following day. They may impact the budgets of some of the most important pollutants, such as ozone and nitrogen oxides, as well as influence size and composition of particular matter. Few studies have thus far concentrated on the nocturnal chemistry of the urban NBL, most likely due to the strong influence of vertical transport and mixing, which requires the measurement of trace gas profiles instead of simple point observations. Motivated by our lack of observations and understanding of nocturnal chemistry, the focus of this project was the study of the vertical distribution of trace gases and the altitude dependence of nocturnal chemistry under polluted conditions through field observations and modeling studies. The analysis of three field experiments (TEXAQS, Houston, 2000; Phoenix Sunrise Ozone Experiment, 2001; NAPOX, Boston, 2002), two of which were performed in this project, showed that ozone concentrations typically increase with height in the lowest 150m, while NO2 typically decreases. NO3, the dominant nocturnal radical species, showed much higher concentrations in the upper part of the NBL, and was often not present at the ground. With the help of a one-dimensional chemical transport model, developed in this project, we found that the interaction of ground emissions of NOx and hydrocarbons, together with their vertical transport, is responsible for the vertical profiles. The dominant chemical reactions influencing ozone, NO2 and NO3 are the reaction of ozone and NO3 with freshly emitted NO. Sensitivity studies with our model showed that the magnitude of the trace gas gradients depend both on the emission rates and the vertical stability of the NBL. Observations and model analysis clearly show that nocturnal chemistry in urban areas is altitude

  5. Comparison of control of Listeria by nitric oxide redox chemistry from murine macrophages and NO donors: insights into listeriocidal activity of oxidative and nitrosative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, R; Pacelli, R; Espey, M G; Miranda, K M; Friedman, N; Kim, S M; Cox, G; Mitchell, J B; Wink, D A; Russo, A

    2001-02-01

    The physiological function of nitric oxide (NO) in the defense against pathogens is multifaceted. The exact chemistry by which NO combats intracellular pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes is yet unresolved. We examined the effects of NO exposure, either delivered by NO donors or generated in situ within ANA-1 murine macrophages, on L. monocytogenes growth. Production of NO by the two NONOate compounds PAPA/NO (NH2(C3H6)(N[N(O)NO]C3H7) and DEA/NO (Na(C2H5)2N[N(O)NO]) resulted in L. monocytogenes cytostasis with minimal cytotoxicity. Reactive oxygen species generated from xanthine oxidase/hypoxanthine were neither bactericidal nor cytostatic and did not alter the action of NO. L. monocytogenes growth was also suppressed upon internalization into ANA-1 murine macrophages primed with interferon-gamma (INF-gamma) + tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha or INF-gamma + lipid polysaccharide (LPS). Growth suppression correlated with nitrite formation and nitrosation of 2,3-diaminonaphthalene elicited by stimulated murine macrophages. This nitrosative chemistry was not dependent upon nor mediated by interaction with reactive oxygen species (ROS), but resulted solely from NO and intermediates related to nitrosative stress. The role of nitrosation in controlling L. monocytogenes was further examined by monitoring the effects of exposure to NO on an important virulence factor, Listeriolysin O, which was inhibited under nitrosative conditions. These results suggest that nitrosative stress mediated by macrophages is an important component of the immunological arsenal in controlling L. monocytogenes infections. PMID:11165873

  6. Crystal-chemistry guidelines for noncentrosymmetric A2BO4 Ruddlesden-Popper oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, Prasanna V; Puggioni, Danilo; Rondinelli, James M

    2014-01-01

    Noncentrosymmetric (NCS) phases are seldom seen in layered A2BO4 Ruddlesden-Popper (214 RP) oxides. In this work, we uncover the underlying crystallographic symmetry restrictions that enforce the spatial parity operation of inversion and then subsequently show how to lift them to achieve NCS structures. Simple octahedral distortions alone, while impacting the electronic and magnetic properties, are insufficient. We show using group theory that the condensation of two distortion modes, which describe suitable symmetry unique octahedral distortions or a combination of a single octahedral distortion with a "compositional" A or B cation ordering mode, is able to transform the centrosymmetric aristotype into a NCS structure. With these symmetry guidelines, we formulate a data-driven model founded on Bayesian inference that allows us to rationally search for combinations of A- and B-site elements satisfying the inversion symmetry lifting criterion. We describe the general methodology and apply it to 214 iridates with A(2+) cations, identifying RP-structured Ca2IrO4 as a potential NCS oxide, which we evaluate with density functional theory. We find a strong energetic competition between two closely related polar and nonpolar low-energy crystal structures in Ca2IrO4 and suggest pathways to stabilize the NCS structure. PMID:24320755

  7. Fundamental chemistry and thermodynamics of hydrothermal oxidation processes. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'The objective of this research program is to provide fundamental scientific information on the physical and chemical properties of solutes in aqueous solutions at high temperatures needed to assess and enhance the applicability of hydrothermal oxidation (HTO) to the remediation of DOE hazardous and mixed wastes. Potential limitations to the use of HTO technology include formation of deposits (scale) from precipitation of inorganic solutes in the waste, corrosion arising from formation of strong acids on oxidation of some organic compounds (e.g., chlorinated hydrocarbons), and unknown effects of fluid density and phase behavior at high temperatures. Focus areas for this project include measurements of the solubility and speciation of actinides and surrogates in model HTO process streams at high temperatures, and the experimental and theoretical development of equations of state for aqueous mixtures under HTO process conditions ranging above the critical temperature of water. A predictive level of understanding of the chemical and physical properties of HTO process streams is being developed through molecular-level simulations of aqueous solutions at high temperatures. Advances in fundamental understanding of phase behavior, density, and solute speciation at high temperatures and pressures contribute directly to the ultimate applicability of this process for the treatment of DOE hazardous and mixed wastes. Research in this project has been divided into individual tasks, with each contributing to a unified understanding of HTO processing problems related to the treatment of DOE wastes. This report summarizes progress attained after slightly less than two years of this three-year project.'

  8. Peroxy radical chemistry and OH radical production during the NO3-initiated oxidation of isoprene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. O. Wennberg

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxy radical reactions (RO2 + RO2 from the NO3-initiated oxidation of isoprene are studied with both gas chromatography and a chemical ionization mass spectrometry technique that allows for more specific speciation of products than in previous studies of this system. We find high nitrate yields (>~80%, consistent with other studies. We further see evidence of significant hydroxyl radical (OH formation in this system, which we propose comes from RO2 + HO2 reactions with a yield of ~42–62%. An additional OH source is the second generation oxidation of the nitrooxyhydroperoxide, which produces OH and a dinitrooxyepoxide with a yield of ~35%. The branching ratio of the radical propagating, carbonyl- and alcohol-forming, and dimer-forming channels of the RO2 + RO2 reaction are found to be ~18–38%, ~59–77%, and ~3–4%, respectively. HO2 formation in this system is lower than has been previously assumed. Addition of RO2 to isoprene is suggested as a possible route to the formation of several isoprene dimer compounds (ROOR. The nitrooxy, allylic, and C5 peroxy radicals present in this system exhibit different behavior than the limited suite of peroxy radicals that have been studied to date.

  9. Microbial reduction of graphene oxide by Escherichia coli: a green chemistry approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi; Han, Jae Woong; Eppakayala, Vasuki; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2013-02-01

    Graphene and graphene related materials are an important area of research in recent years due to their unique properties. The extensive industrial application of graphene and related compounds has led researchers to devise novel and simple methods for the synthesis of high quality graphene. In this paper, we developed an environment friendly, cost effective, simple method and green approaches for the reduction of graphene oxide (GO) using Escherichia coli biomass. In biological method, we can avoid use of toxic and environmentally harmful reducing agents commonly used in the chemical reduction of GO to obtain graphene. The biomass of E. coli reduces exfoliated GO to graphene at 37°C in an aqueous medium. The E. coli reduced graphene oxide (ERGO) was characterized with UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, particle analyzer, high resolution X-ray diffractometer, scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Besides the reduction potential, the biomass could also play an important role as stabilizing agent, in which synthesized graphene exhibited good stability in water. This method can open up the new avenue for preparing graphene in cost effective and large scale production. Our findings suggest that GO can be reduced by simple eco-friendly method by using E. coli biomass to produce water dispersible graphene. PMID:23107955

  10. Application of Enzyme Coupling Reactions to Shift Thermodynamically Limited Biocatalytic Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abu, Rohana; Woodley, John M.

    2015-01-01

    , it can be challenging to combine several engineered enzymes in vitro for the conversion of non-natural substrates. In this mini-review we focus on enzyme coupling reactions as a tool to alleviate thermodynamic constraints in synthetically useful biocatalytic reactions. The implications of...... shift the equilibrium of otherwise thermodynamically unfavourable reactions to give a higher conversion of the target product. By coupling an energetically unfavourable reaction with a more favourable one, the multi-enzyme cascade mimics the approach taken in nature in metabolic pathways. Nevertheless...

  11. Probing and tuning the size, morphology, chemistry and structure of nanoscale cerium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchibhatla, Satyanarayana Vnt

    Cerium oxide (ceria)-based materials in the nanoscale regime are of significant fundamental and technological interest. Nanoceria in pure and doped forms has current and potential use in solid oxide fuel cells, catalysis, UV-screening, chemical mechanical planarization, oxygen sensors, and bio-medical applications. The characteristic feature of Ce to switch between the +3 and +4 oxidation states renders oxygen buffering capability to ceria. The ease of this transformation was expected to be enhanced in the nanoceria. In most the practical scenarios, it is necessary to have a stable suspension of ceria nanoparticles (CNPs) over longer periods of time. However, the existing literature is confined to short term studies pertaining to synthesis and property evaluation. Having understood the need for a comprehensive understanding of the CNP suspensions, this dissertation is primarily aimed at understanding the behavior of CNPs in various chemical and physical environments. We have synthesized CNPs in the absence of any surfactants at room temperature and studied the aging characteristics. After gaining some understanding about the behavior of this functional oxide, the synthesis environment and aging temperature were varied, and their affects were carefully analyzed using various materials analysis techniques such as high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), UV-Visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). When the CNPs were aged at room temperature in as-synthesized condition, they were observed to spontaneously assemble and evolve as fractal superoctahedral structures. The reasons for this unique polycrystalline morphology were attributed to the symmetry driven assembly of the individual truncated octahedral and octahedral seed of the ceria. HRTEM and Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analyses were used to explain the agglomeration behavior and evolution of the octahedral morphology. Some of the observations were supported by

  12. Structure, Raman spectra and defect chemistry modelling of conductive pyrochlore oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, F.W.; Glerup, M.; Holtappels, P.

    2000-01-01

    Mixed ionic-electronic conducting pyrochlore structure oxides, with Pr and Gd on the A site and Zr, Mn, Ce, Sn, In, Mo, and Ti on the B site, were characterised by X-ray powder diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Mn and In have a solubility around x = 0.1-0.2 in Pr2Zr2-xMnxO7 and Pr2Sn2-xInxO7......-O(x) and V-O on the O site, interstitial oxygens O-i", and delocalised electrons and electron holes. Four mass action law expressions govern such a model. The defect model can rationalise why home-valent doping, i.e. substitution of Zr(4+) by Ce(4+), can lead to an increase in ionic conductivity...

  13. Trehalose Analogues: Latest Insights in Properties and Biocatalytic Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten Walmagh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Trehalose (α-d-glucopyranosyl α-d-glucopyranoside is a non-reducing sugar with unique stabilizing properties due to its symmetrical, low energy structure consisting of two 1,1-anomerically bound glucose moieties. Many applications of this beneficial sugar have been reported in the novel food (nutricals, medical, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. Trehalose analogues, like lactotrehalose (α-d-glucopyranosyl α-d-galactopyranoside or galactotrehalose (α-d-galactopyranosyl α-d-galactopyranoside, offer similar benefits as trehalose, but show additional features such as prebiotic or low-calorie sweetener due to their resistance against hydrolysis during digestion. Unfortunately, large-scale chemical production processes for trehalose analogues are not readily available at the moment due to the lack of efficient synthesis methods. Most of the procedures reported in literature suffer from low yields, elevated costs and are far from environmentally friendly. “Greener” alternatives found in the biocatalysis field, including galactosidases, trehalose phosphorylases and TreT-type trehalose synthases are suggested as primary candidates for trehalose analogue production instead. Significant progress has been made in the last decade to turn these into highly efficient biocatalysts and to broaden the variety of useful donor and acceptor sugars. In this review, we aim to provide an overview of the latest insights and future perspectives in trehalose analogue chemistry, applications and production pathways with emphasis on biocatalysis.

  14. Thermal chemistry of Mn2(CO)10 during deposition of thin manganese films on silicon oxide and on copper surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The surface chemistry of dimanganese decacarbonyl on the native oxide of Si(100) wafers was characterized with the aid of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Initial experiments in a small stainless-steel reactor identified a narrow range of temperatures, between approximately 445 and 465 K, in which the deposition of manganese could be achieved in a self-limiting fashion, as is desirable for atomic layer deposition. Deposition at higher temperatures leads to multilayer growth, but the extent of this Mn deposition reverses at even higher temperatures (about 625 K), and also ifhydrogen is added to the reaction mixture. Extensive decarbonylation takes place below room temperature, but limited C-O bond dissociation and carbon deposition are still seen after high exposures at 625 K. The films deposited at low (∼450 K) temperatures are mostly in the form of MnO, but at 625 K that converts to a manganese silicate, and upon higher doses a manganese silicide forms at the SiO2/Si(100) interface as well. No metallic manganese could be deposited with this precursor on either silicon dioxide or copper surfaces.

  15. Soft chemistry routes for synthesis of rare earth oxide nanoparticles with well defined morphological and structural characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phosphors of (Y0.75Gd0.25)2O3:Eu3+ (5 at.%) have been prepared through soft chemistry routes. Conversion of the starting nitrates mixture into oxide is performed through two approaches: (a) hydrothermal treatment (HT) at 200 °C/3 h of an ammonium hydrogen carbonate precipitated mixture and (b) by thermally decomposition of pure nitrate precursor solution at 900 °C in dispersed phase (aerosol) within a tubular flow reactor by spray pyrolysis process (SP). The powders are additionally thermally treated at different temperatures: 600, 1000, and 1100 °C for either 3 or 12 h. HT—derived particles present exclusively one-dimensional morphology (nanorods) up to the temperatures of 600 °C, while the leaf-like particles start to grow afterward. SP—derived particles maintain their spherical shape up to the temperatures of 1100 °C. These submicron sized spheres were actually composed of randomly aggregated nanoparticles. All powders exhibits cubic Ia-3 structure (Y0.75Gd0.25)2O3:Eu and have improved optical characteristics due to their nanocrystalline nature. The detailed study of the influence of structural and morphological powder characteristics on their emission properties is performed based on the results of X-ray powder diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and photoluminescence measurements.

  16. Nitrogen Oxides in the Nocturnal Boundary Layer: Chemistry of Nitrous Acid (HONO) and the Nitrate Radical (N03)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jochen Stutz

    2005-05-24

    Summary Chemical processes occurring at night in the lowest part of the urban atmosphere, the so called nocturnal boundary layer (NBL), can influence the composition of the atmosphere during the night as well as the following day. They may impact the budgets of some of the most important pollutants, such as ozone and nitrogen oxides, as well as influence size and composition of particular matter. Few studies have thus far concentrated on the nocturnal chemistry of the urban NBL, most likely due to the strong influence of vertical transport and mixing, which requires the measurement of trace gas profiles instead of simple point observations. Motivated by our lack of observations and understanding of nocturnal chemistry, the focus of this project was the study of the vertical distribution of trace gases and the altitude dependence of nocturnal chemistry under polluted conditions through field observations and modeling studies. The analysis of three field experiments (TEXAQS, Houston, 2000; Phoenix Sunrise Ozone Experiment, 2001; NAPOX, Boston, 2002), two of which were performed in this project, showed that ozone concentrations typically increase with height in the lowest 150m, while NO2 typically decreases. NO3, the dominant nocturnal radical species, showed much higher concentrations in the upper part of the NBL, and was often not present at the ground. With the help of a one-dimensional chemical transport model, developed in this project, we found that the interaction of ground emissions of NOx and hydrocarbons, together with their vertical transport, is responsible for the vertical profiles. The dominant chemical reactions influencing ozone, NO2 and NO3 are the reaction of ozone and NO3 with freshly emitted NO. Sensitivity studies with our model showed that the magnitude of the trace gas gradients depend both on the emission rates and the vertical stability of the NBL. Observations and model analysis clearly show that nocturnal chemistry in urban areas is altitude

  17. Visualization of custom-tailored iron oxide nanoparticles chemistry, uptake, and toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Kai; Ekstrand-Hammarström, Barbro; Ahlinder, Linnea; Guldevall, Karolin; Pazik, Robert; Kępiński, Leszek; Kvashnina, Kristina O.; Butorin, Sergei M.; Brismar, Hjalmar; Önfelt, Björn; Österlund, Lars; Seisenbaeva, Gulaim A.; Kessler, Vadim G.

    2012-11-01

    Nanoparticles of iron oxide generated by wearing of vehicles have been modelled with a tailored solution of size-uniform engineered magnetite particles produced by the Bradley reaction, a solvothermal metal-organic approach rendering hydrophilic particles. The latter does not bear any pronounced surface charge in analogy with that originating from anthropogenic sources in the environment. Physicochemical properties of the nanoparticles were thoroughly characterized by a wide range of methods, including XPD, TEM, SEM, DLS and spectroscopic techniques. The magnetite nanoparticles were found to be sensitive for transformation into maghemite under ambient conditions. This process was clearly revealed by Raman spectroscopy for high surface energy magnetite particles containing minor impurities of the hydromaghemite phase and was followed by quantitative measurements with EXAFS spectroscopy. In order to assess the toxicological effects of the produced nanoparticles in humans, with and without surface modification with ATP (a model of bio-corona formed in alveolar liquid), a pathway of potential uptake and clearance was modelled with a sequence of in vitro studies using A549 lung epithelial cells, lymphocyte 221-B cells, and 293T embryonal kidney cells, respectively. Raman microscopy unambiguously showed that magnetite nanoparticles are internalized within the A549 cells after 24 h co-incubation, and that the ATP ligand is retained on the nanoparticles throughout the uptake process. The toxicity of the nanoparticles was estimated using confocal fluorescence microscopy and indicated no principal difference for unmodified and modified particles, but revealed considerably different biochemical responses. The IL-8 cytokine response was found to be significantly lower for the magnetite nanoparticles compared to TiO2, while an enhancement of ROS was observed, which was further increased for the ATP-modified nanoparticles, implicating involvement of the ATP signalling pathway in

  18. Recent advances on halohydrin dehalogenases-from enzyme identification to novel biocatalytic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schallmey, Anett; Schallmey, Marcus

    2016-09-01

    Halohydrin dehalogenases are industrially relevant enzymes that catalyze the reversible dehalogenation of vicinal haloalcohols with formation of the corresponding epoxides. In the reverse reaction, also other negatively charged nucleophiles such as azide, cyanide, or nitrite are accepted besides halides to open the epoxide ring. Thus, novel C-N, C-C, or C-O bonds can be formed by halohydrin dehalogenases, which makes them attractive biocatalysts for the production of various β-substituted alcohols. Despite the fact that only five individual halohydrin dehalogenase enzyme sequences have been known until recently enabling their heterologous production, a large number of different biocatalytic applications have been reported using these enzymes. The recent characterization of specific sequence motifs has facilitated the identification of novel halohydrin dehalogenase sequences available in public databases and has largely increased the number of recombinantly available enzymes. These will help to extend the biocatalytic repertoire of this enzyme family and to foster novel biotechnological applications and developments in the future. This review gives a general overview on the halohydrin dehalogenase enzyme family and their biochemical properties and further focuses on recent developments in halohydrin dehalogenase biocatalysis and protein engineering. PMID:27502414

  19. Physical chemistry of the interface between oxide and aqueous solution; Quelques aspects de la chimie a l'interface oxyde - solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jolivet, J.P. [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Chimie de la Matiere Condensee, URA CNRS 1466, 75 - Paris (France)

    1997-07-01

    The behavior and properties of small oxide particles in aqueous suspension are dominated by the physico-chemistry of their surface. It is electrostatically charged and strongly solvated. The origin of the surface charge is discussed through the MUSIC model [Hiemstra 1996], allowing to estimate the acid-base behavior of surface oxygen atoms. The stability of aqueous dispersions of particles is analysed following the DLVO model, with a special attention on the hydration layers allowing the peptization of flocs. Different adsorption mechanisms of metal cations are presented in terms of coordination chemistry (outer- and inner-sphere complexes) emphasizing the coordinating ability of the surface towards metal complexes in solution. The anion adsorption is also studied in relation with some interesting consequences on spinel iron oxide nano-particles. (author)

  20. Fundamental chemistry and thermodynamics of hydrothermal oxidation processes. 1997 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'The objective of this research program is to provide fundamental scientific information on the physical and chemical properties of solutes in aqueous solutions at high temperatures needed to assess and improve the applicability of hydrothermal oxidation (HTO) to the remediation of US Department of Energy (DOE) hazardous and mixed wastes. Investigators in two divisions at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Chemical and Analytical Sciences, and Chemical Technology) and at the University of Tennessee are focused on the solubility and speciation of actinides and surrogates in model HTO process streams at high temperatures, on the experimental and theoretical development of equations of state for aqueous mixtures containing noncondensible gases under HTO process conditions ranging above the critical temperature of water, and on achieving a predictive level of understanding of the chemical and physical properties of HTO process streams through molecular-level simulations of aqueous solutions at high temperatures. Specific tasks in these three efforts over the past year include measurements of solubility and identification of stable solid phases for UO3 in aqueous carbonate solutions at temperatures above 100 C, measurements of fluid-phase coexistence boundaries and densities of mixtures in (H2O + N2 + CO2) mixtures at high temperatures and pressures, and molecular dynamics simulations of water and aqueous solutions addressing the speciation of simple ionic solutes and the structure of water and aqueous solutions as functions of temperature and density. Research in this project has been divided into individual tasks, each addressing a particular scientific question and each contributing to a unified understanding of HTO processing problems related to the treatment of DOE hazardous and mixed wastes. The three primary tasks are (1) the determination of solubilities of inorganic compounds including actinides and surrogates to determine their likely fate during HTO processing

  1. Study of the Effect of Grafting Method on Surface Polarity of Tempo-Oxidized Nanocellulose Using Polycaprolactone as the Modifying Compound: Esterification versus Click-Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Abdelhaq Benkaddour; Khalil Jradi; Sylvain Robert; Claude Daneault

    2013-01-01

    Esterification and click-chemistry were evaluated as surface modification treatments for TEMPO-oxidized nanocelluloses (TONC) using Polycaprolactone-diol (PCL) as modifying compound in order to improve the dispersion of nanofibers in organic media. These two grafting strategies were analyzed and compared. The first consists of grafting directly the PCL onto TONC, and was carried out by esterification between hydroxyl groups of PCL and carboxyl groups of TONC. The second strategy known as clic...

  2. On the Defect Chemistry, Electrical Properties and Electrochemical Performances As Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathode Materials of New La-(Sr/Vac)-Co-Ti-O Perovskites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    García-Alvarado, Flaviano; Gómez-Pérez, Alejandro; Pérez-Flores, Juan Carlos;

    2015-01-01

    Perovskite-type oxides are well known materials that have been proposed as electrodes and electrolytes for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The structure, which is referred to the ABO3 stoichiometry, can accommodate many different transition metal ions in the B-site; its electronic conductivity will...... materials with valuable properties for SOFCs. We have analysed the effect of La3+ by Sr2+ substitution and vacancies creation in several double perovskites, La2MTiO6 (M = Co, Ni, Cu). Defect chemistry and electrical behavior have been investigated in order to unveil the nature of charge carriers...

  3. Biocatalytic CO2 sequestration based on shell regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.

    2012-04-01

    Carbon dioxide, CO2, is one of the green gases, being uniformly distributed over the earth's surface. Recently, a variety of methods exists or has been proposed for pre- or post-emission capture and sequestration of CO2. However, CCS (carbon capture & storage) do not quarntee permanent treatment of CO2 and could ingenerate environment risks. Some organisms convert CO2 into exoskeleton (e.g., mollusks) or energy sources (e.g., plants) during metabolism under atmospheric conditions. One of representative biomaterials in ocean is bivalve shell to be composed of CaCO3. Calcium carbonate is not only abundant material in the world but also thermodynamically stable mineral in the capture of CO2. Bivalve has produced CaCO3 under seawater condition, in other word, near atmospheric conditions (1 atm. and around 20-25 oC). At the inorganic point, the synthesis of CaCO3 is as followed. Ca2+ + CO32- -> CaCO3 The bivalve shell plays an important role to protect bivalve's internal organs from prodetor. What will be happened if the shell is damaged and a hole is made? Bivalve must cover the hole to prevent the oxidation of internal organs as fast as possible. From in vitro crystallization test of a notched shell, rapid CaCO3 production was identified at the damaged area. The biocatalyst related to shell regeneration was purified and named as SPSR (Soluble Protein related to Shell Regeneration) that is obtained from the oyster, Crassostrea gigas. And in vitro CaCO3 crystallization test was used to calculate the crystal growth rate of SPSR on CaCO3 crystallization. The characteristics of SPRR are discussed at the point of CO2 hydration and rapid CaCO3 synthesis. To develop the bioinspired process based on shell regeneration concept, the analysis of protein structure has been studied and the immobilization has been carried out for easy recovery of SPSR.

  4. The influence of modified water chemistries on metal oxide films, activity build-up and stress corrosion cracking of structural materials in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary coolant oxidises the surfaces of construction materials in nuclear power plants. The properties of the oxide films influence significantly the extent of incorporation of actuated corrosion products into the primary circuit surfaces, which may cause additional occupational doses for the maintenance personnel. The physical and chemical properties of the oxide films play also an important role in different forms of corrosion observed in power plants. This report gives a short overview of the factors influencing activity build-up and corrosion phenomena in nuclear power plants. Furthermore, the most recent modifications in the water chemistry to decrease these risks are discussed. A special focus is put on zinc water chemistry, and a preliminary discussion on the mechanism via which zinc influences activity build-up is presented. Even though the exact mechanisms by which zinc acts are not yet known, it is assumed that Zn may block the diffusion paths within the oxide film. This reduces ion transport through the oxide films leading to a reduced rate of oxide growth. Simultaneously the number of available adsorption sites for 60Co is also reduced. The current models for stress corrosion cracking assume that the anodic and the respective cathodic reactions contributing to crack growth occur partly on or in the oxide films. The rates of these reactions may control the crack propagation rate and therefore, the properties of the oxide films play a crucial role in determining the susceptibility of the material to stress corrosion cracking. Finally, attention is paid also on the novel techniques which can be used to mitigate the susceptibility of construction materials to stress corrosion cracking. (orig.)

  5. The influence of modified water chemistries on metal oxide films, activity build-up and stress corrosion cracking of structural materials in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekelae, K.; Laitinen, T.; Bojinov, M. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-03-01

    The primary coolant oxidises the surfaces of construction materials in nuclear power plants. The properties of the oxide films influence significantly the extent of incorporation of actuated corrosion products into the primary circuit surfaces, which may cause additional occupational doses for the maintenance personnel. The physical and chemical properties of the oxide films play also an important role in different forms of corrosion observed in power plants. This report gives a short overview of the factors influencing activity build-up and corrosion phenomena in nuclear power plants. Furthermore, the most recent modifications in the water chemistry to decrease these risks are discussed. A special focus is put on zinc water chemistry, and a preliminary discussion on the mechanism via which zinc influences activity build-up is presented. Even though the exact mechanisms by which zinc acts are not yet known, it is assumed that Zn may block the diffusion paths within the oxide film. This reduces ion transport through the oxide films leading to a reduced rate of oxide growth. Simultaneously the number of available adsorption sites for {sup 60}Co is also reduced. The current models for stress corrosion cracking assume that the anodic and the respective cathodic reactions contributing to crack growth occur partly on or in the oxide films. The rates of these reactions may control the crack propagation rate and therefore, the properties of the oxide films play a crucial role in determining the susceptibility of the material to stress corrosion cracking. Finally, attention is paid also on the novel techniques which can be used to mitigate the susceptibility of construction materials to stress corrosion cracking. (orig.) 127 refs.

  6. Introduction to Homogenous Catalysis with Ruthenium-Catalyzed Oxidation of Alcohols: An Experiment for Undergraduate Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miecznikowski, John R.; Caradonna, John P.; Foley, Kathleen M.; Kwiecien, Daniel J.; Lisi, George P.; Martinez, Anthony M.

    2011-01-01

    A three-week laboratory experiment, which introduces students in an advanced inorganic chemistry course to air-sensitive chemistry and catalysis, is described. During the first week, the students synthesize RuCl[subscript 2](PPh[subscript 3])[subscript 3]. During the second and third weeks, the students characterize the formed coordination…

  7. Oxidative capacity and radical chemistry in the polluted atmosphere of Hong Kong and Pearl River Delta region: analysis of a severe photochemical smog episode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Likun; Gu, Rongrong; Wang, Tao; Wang, Xinfeng; Saunders, Sandra; Blake, Donald; Louie, Peter K. K.; Luk, Connie W. Y.; Simpson, Isobel; Xu, Zheng; Wang, Zhe; Gao, Yuan; Lee, Shuncheng; Mellouki, Abdelwahid; Wang, Wenxing

    2016-08-01

    We analyze a photochemical smog episode to understand the oxidative capacity and radical chemistry of the polluted atmosphere in Hong Kong and the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region. A photochemical box model based on the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM v3.2) is constrained by an intensive set of field observations to elucidate the budgets of ROx (ROx = OH+HO2+RO2) and NO3 radicals. Highly abundant radical precursors (i.e. O3, HONO and carbonyls), nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) facilitate strong production and efficient recycling of ROx radicals. The OH reactivity is dominated by oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs), followed by aromatics, alkenes and alkanes. Photolysis of OVOCs (except for formaldehyde) is the dominant primary source of ROx with average daytime contributions of 34-47 %. HONO photolysis is the largest contributor to OH and the second-most significant source (19-22 %) of ROx. Other considerable ROx sources include O3 photolysis (11-20 %), formaldehyde photolysis (10-16 %), and ozonolysis reactions of unsaturated VOCs (3.9-6.2 %). In one case when solar irradiation was attenuated, possibly by the high aerosol loadings, NO3 became an important oxidant and the NO3-initiated VOC oxidation presented another significant ROx source (6.2 %) even during daytime. This study suggests the possible impacts of daytime NO3 chemistry in the polluted atmospheres under conditions with the co-existence of abundant O3, NO2, VOCs and aerosols, and also provides new insights into the radical chemistry that essentially drives the formation of photochemical smog in the high-NOx environment of Hong Kong and the PRD region.

  8. HOx radical chemistry in oxidation flow reactors with low-pressure mercury lamps systematically examined by modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Z.; Day, D. A.; Stark, H.; Li, R.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Palm, B. B.; Brune, W. H.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2015-11-01

    Oxidation flow reactors (OFRs) using OH produced from low-pressure Hg lamps at 254 nm (OFR254) or both 185 and 254 nm (OFR185) are commonly used in atmospheric chemistry and other fields. OFR254 requires the addition of externally formed O3 since OH is formed from O3 photolysis, while OFR185 does not since O2 can be photolyzed to produce O3, and OH can also be formed from H2O photolysis. In this study, we use a plug-flow kinetic model to investigate OFR properties under a very wide range of conditions applicable to both field and laboratory studies. We show that the radical chemistry in OFRs can be characterized as a function of UV light intensity, H2O concentration, and total external OH reactivity (OHRext, e.g., from volatile organic compounds (VOCs), NOx, and SO2). OH exposure is decreased by added external OH reactivity. OFR185 is especially sensitive to this effect at low UV intensity due to low primary OH production. OFR254 can be more resilient against OH suppression at high injected O3 (e.g., 70 ppm), as a larger primary OH source from O3, as well as enhanced recycling of HO2 to OH, make external perturbations to the radical chemistry less significant. However if the external OH reactivity in OFR254 is much larger than OH reactivity from injected O3, OH suppression can reach 2 orders of magnitude. For a typical input of 7 ppm O3 (OHRO3 = 10 s-1), 10-fold OH suppression is observed at OHRext ~ 100 s-1, which is similar or lower than used in many laboratory studies. The range of modeled OH suppression for literature experiments is consistent with the measured values except for those with isoprene. The finding on OH suppression may have important implications for the interpretation of past laboratory studies, as applying OHexp measurements acquired under different conditions could lead to over a 1-order-of-magnitude error in the estimated OHexp. The uncertainties of key model outputs due to uncertainty in all rate constants and absorption cross-sections in the

  9. A process optimization for bio-catalytic production of substituted catechols (3-nitrocatechol and 3-methylcatechol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiwary Bhupendra N

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Substituted catechols are important precursors for large-scale synthesis of pharmaceuticals and other industrial products. Most of the reported chemical synthesis methods are expensive and insufficient at industrial level. However, biological processes for production of substituted catechols could be highly selective and suitable for industrial purposes. Results We have optimized a process for bio-catalytic production of 3-substituted catechols viz. 3-nitrocatechol (3-NC and 3-methylcatechol (3-MC at pilot scale. Amongst the screened strains, two strains viz. Pseudomonas putida strain (F1 and recombinant Escherichia coli expression clone (pDTG602 harboring first two genes of toluene degradation pathway were found to accumulate 3-NC and 3-MC respectively. Various parameters such as amount of nutrients, pH, temperature, substrate concentration, aeration, inoculums size, culture volume, toxicity of substrate and product, down stream extraction, single step and two-step biotransformation were optimized at laboratory scale to obtain high yields of 3-substituted catechols. Subsequently, pilot scale studies were performed in 2.5 liter bioreactor. The rate of product accumulation at pilot scale significantly increased up to ~90-95% with time and high yields of 3-NC (10 mM and 3-MC (12 mM were obtained. Conclusion The biocatalytic production of 3-substituted catechols viz. 3-NC and 3-MC depend on some crucial parameters to obtain maximum yields of the product at pilot scale. The process optimized for production of 3-substituted catechols by using the organisms P. putida (F1 and recombinant E. coli expression clone (pDTG602 may be useful for industrial application.

  10. Calculated ionisation potentials to determine the oxidation of vanillin precursors by lignin peroxidase.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Have, R.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Hartmans, S.; Swarts, H.J.; Field, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    In view of the biocatalytic production of vanillin, this research focused on the lignin peroxidase (LiP) catalysed oxidation of naturally occurring phenolic derivatives: O-methyl ethers, O-acetyl esters, and O-glucosyl ethers. The ionisation potential (IP) of a series of model compounds was calculat

  11. Enzyme immobilization by fouling in ultrafiltration membranes: Impact of membrane configuration and type on flux behavior and biocatalytic conversion efficacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Jianquan; Meyer, Anne S.; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil;

    2014-01-01

    and PLGC regenerated cellulose membranes. With these two highly hydrophilic membranes, the ADH enzyme activity was fully retained even after 24h of storage of the membrane. Filtration blocking and resistance models were used to analyze the fouling/immobilization mechanisms and give explanations......Enzyme-immobilization in membranes accomplished by fostering membrane fouling was evaluated. Four different membrane configurations and five membranes were compared for immobilization of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) in terms of enzyme loading, permeate flux and final biocatalytic conversion....... The membrane configuration impacted the efficiency of the enzyme-immobilization as well as the biocatalytic-membrane reaction, and the “sandwich mode”, with an extra polypropylene support above the membrane skin layer, worked best due to its high flux and stable conversion. Among the membranes, a GR51PP...

  12. Nitrogen oxide chemistry in an urban plume: investigation of the chemistry of peroxy and multifunctional organic nitrates with a Lagrangian model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Pérez

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Air quality in the outflow from urban centers affects millions of people, as well as, natural and managed ecosystems downwind. In locations where there are large sources of biogenic VOCs downwind of urban centers, the outflow is characterized by a high VOC reactivity due to biogenic emissions and low NOx. However most field and chamber studies have focused on limiting cases of high NOx or of near zero NOx. Recent measurements of a wide suite of VOCs, O3 and meteorological parameters at several locations within the Sacramento urban plume have provided a detailed benchmark for testing our understanding of chemistry in a plume transitioning from high NOx to low NOx and high VOC reactivity. As an additional simplification, the strong mountain valley circulation in the region makes this urban plume a physical realization of a nearly idealized Lagrangian plume. Here, we describe a model of this plume. We use a Lagrangian model representing chemistry based on the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM v3.1 along with mixing and deposition. We discuss the effects of entrainment of background air, the branching ratio for the production of isoprene nitrates and the effects of soil NOx emissions on the composition of the evolving plume. The model predicts that after 2–3 h of chemical processing only 45% of the peroxynitrates (ΣPNs are PAN and that most (69% RONO2 are secondary alkyl nitrate products of the reaction of OH with RONO2. We find the model is more consistent with the observations if: a the yield of ΣPNs from large and multi-functional aldehydes is close to zero; and b the reaction between OH and RONO2 produces multifunctional nitrates as opposed to either HNO3 or NO2 as is typical in most currently adopted reaction mechanisms. Model results also show that adding NOx emissions throughout the transect increases

  13. Layer-by-layer assembly of graphene oxide on polypropylene macroporous membranes via click chemistry to improve antibacterial and antifouling performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhen-Bei, E-mail: 1021453457@qq.com [The Key Laboratory of Functional Molecular Solids, Ministry of Education, Anhui Key Laboratory of Molecular-Based Materials, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Anhui Normal University, East Beijing Rd. 1, Wuhu, Anhui 241000 (China); Wu, Jing-Jing, E-mail: 957522275@qq.com [The Key Laboratory of Functional Molecular Solids, Ministry of Education, Anhui Key Laboratory of Molecular-Based Materials, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Anhui Normal University, East Beijing Rd. 1, Wuhu, Anhui 241000 (China); Su, Yu, E-mail: 819388710@qq.com [The Key Laboratory of Functional Molecular Solids, Ministry of Education, Anhui Key Laboratory of Molecular-Based Materials, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Anhui Normal University, East Beijing Rd. 1, Wuhu, Anhui 241000 (China); Zhou, Jin, E-mail: zhoujin_ah@163.com [Department of Materials and Chemical Engineering, Chizhou University, Muzhi Rd. 199, Chizhou, Anhui 247000 (China); Gao, Yong, E-mail: 154682180@qq.com [School of Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Jiangsu University of Technology, Changzhou 213001 (China); Yu, Hai-Yin, E-mail: yhy456@mail.ahnu.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Functional Molecular Solids, Ministry of Education, Anhui Key Laboratory of Molecular-Based Materials, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Anhui Normal University, East Beijing Rd. 1, Wuhu, Anhui 241000 (China); Gu, Jia-Shan, E-mail: jiashanG@mail.ahnu.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Functional Molecular Solids, Ministry of Education, Anhui Key Laboratory of Molecular-Based Materials, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Anhui Normal University, East Beijing Rd. 1, Wuhu, Anhui 241000 (China)

    2015-03-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Clickable membrane prepared by photo bromination and S{sub N}2 nucleophilic substitution. • Azide graphene oxide prepared by ring-opening reaction. • Alkyne graphene oxide was prepared via esterification reaction. • Layer-by-layer assembly of graphene oxide on membrane by click chemistry. • Antibacterial and antifouling characteristics were enhanced greatly. - Abstract: Polypropylene is an extensively used membrane material; yet, polypropylene membranes exhibit extremely poor resistance to protein fouling. To ameliorate this issue, graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets were used to modify macroporous polypropylene membrane (MPPM) via layer-by-layer assembly technique through click reaction. First, alkyne-terminated GO was prepared through esterification between carboxyl groups in GO and amide groups in propargylamine; azide-terminated GO was synthesized by the ring-opening reaction of epoxy groups in GO with sodium azide. Second, GO was introduced to the membrane by click chemistry. Characterizations of infrared spectra and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the modification. The sharply decreasing of static water contact angle indicated the improvement of the surface hydrophilicity for GO modified membrane. Introducing GO to the membrane results in a dramatic increase of water flux, improvements in the antifouling characteristics and antibacterial property for the membranes. The pure water flux through the 5-layered GO modified membrane is 1.82 times that through the unmodified one. The water flux restores to 43.0% for the unmodified membrane while to 79.8% for the modified membrane. The relative flux reduction decreases by 32.1% due to GO modification. The antibacterial property was also enhanced by two-thirds. These results demonstrate that the antifouling and antibacterial characteristics can be raised by tethering GO to the membrane surface.

  14. Surface analytical and electrochemical characterization of oxide films formed on Incoloy-800 and carbon steel in simulated secondary water chemistry conditions of PHWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The water chemistry in the Steam Generator (SG) Circuits of Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs) is controlled by the all volatile treatment (AVT) procedure, wherein volatile amines are used to maintain the alkaline pH required for minimizing the corrosion of the structural materials. Earlier, Monel and morpholine were used as the Steam Generator material and the alkalizing agent respectively. However, currently they are replaced by Incoloy-800 and Ethanolamine (ETA). ETA was chosen because of its beneficial effects due to low pKb and Kd values, loading behaviour on condensate polishing unit (CPU) and also on cost comparison with other amines. Since we have Incoloy-800 on the tube side and Carbon steel(CS) on the shell side in the SG circuits, efforts were taken to study the nature of the oxide films formed on these surfaces and to evaluate the corrosion resistance and electrochemical properties of the same, under simulated secondary water chemistry conditions of PHWRs containing different dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration. In this context, experiments were carried out by exposing finely polished CS and Incoloy -800 coupons to ETA based medium in the presence and absence of Hydrazine (pH: 9.2) at 240 oC under two different DO conditions (< 10 ppb and 200 ppb) for 24 hours. Oxide films formed under these conditions were characterized using SEM, Raman spectroscopy, electrochemical impedance, polarization and Mott-Schottky techniques. Further, studies at a controlled DO level ( < 10 ppb) were carried out for different time durations viz., 7- and 30- days. The composition, surface morphology, oxide thickness, resistance, type of semi-conductivity and defect density of the oxide films were evaluated and correlated with the DO levels and discussed elaborately in this paper. (author)

  15. Surface analytical and electrochemical characterization of oxide film layers formed on Incoloy 800 and carbon steel in simulated secondary water chemistry conditions of PHWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangarajan, Srinivasan; Chandran, Sinu; Balaji, Vadivelu; Narasimhan, Sevilmedu V. [BARC Facilities, Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu (India). Water and Steam Chemistry Div.

    2011-06-15

    The water chemistry in the steam generator (SG) circuits of Indian pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs) is controlled by the all-volatile treatment (AVT) procedure, wherein volatile amines are used to maintain the alkaline pH required for minimizing the corrosion of the structural materials. Earlier, Monel and morpholine were used as the steam generator material and the alkalizing agent respectively. However, currently they have been replaced by Incoloy 800 and ethanolamine (ETA). ETA was chosen because of its beneficial effects due to low pKb and Kd values, loading behavior on the condensate polishing unit (CPU), and also based on cost comparison with other amines. Since we have Incoloy 800 on the tube side and carbon steel (CS) on the shell side in the SG circuits, efforts were taken to study the nature of the oxide films formed on these surfaces and to evaluate the corrosion resistance and electrochemical properties of the same under simulated secondary water chemistry conditions of PHWRs containing different dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations. In this context, experiments were carried out by exposing finely polished CS and Incoloy 800 coupons to ETA-based medium in the presence and absence of hydrazine (pH: 9.2) at 240 C under two different DO conditions (< 10 {mu}g . L{sup -1} and 300 {mu}g . L{sup -1}) for 24 hours. Oxide films formed under these conditions were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, electrochemical impedance, polarization and Mott-Schottky techniques. Further, studies at a controlled DO level (< 10 {mu}g . L{sup -1}) were carried out for different time durations, viz., 7 and 30 days. The composition, surface morphology, oxide thickness, resistance, type of semiconductivity and defect density of the oxide films were evaluated and correlated with the DO levels and are discussed elaborately in this paper. (orig.)

  16. Surface analytical and electrochemical characterization of oxide film layers formed on Incoloy 800 and carbon steel in simulated secondary water chemistry conditions of PHWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The water chemistry in the steam generator (SG) circuits of Indian pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs) is controlled by the all-volatile treatment (AVT) procedure, wherein volatile amines are used to maintain the alkaline pH required for minimizing the corrosion of the structural materials. Earlier, Monel and morpholine were used as the steam generator material and the alkalizing agent respectively. However, currently they have been replaced by Incoloy 800 and ethanolamine (ETA). ETA was chosen because of its beneficial effects due to low pKb and Kd values, loading behavior on the condensate polishing unit (CPU), and also based on cost comparison with other amines. Since we have Incoloy 800 on the tube side and carbon steel (CS) on the shell side in the SG circuits, efforts were taken to study the nature of the oxide films formed on these surfaces and to evaluate the corrosion resistance and electrochemical properties of the same under simulated secondary water chemistry conditions of PHWRs containing different dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations. In this context, experiments were carried out by exposing finely polished CS and Incoloy 800 coupons to ETA-based medium in the presence and absence of hydrazine (pH: 9.2) at 240 C under two different DO conditions (-1 and 300 μg . L-1) for 24 hours. Oxide films formed under these conditions were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, electrochemical impedance, polarization and Mott-Schottky techniques. Further, studies at a controlled DO level (-1) were carried out for different time durations, viz., 7 and 30 days. The composition, surface morphology, oxide thickness, resistance, type of semiconductivity and defect density of the oxide films were evaluated and correlated with the DO levels and are discussed elaborately in this paper. (orig.)

  17. Layer-by-layer assembly of graphene oxide on polypropylene macroporous membranes via click chemistry to improve antibacterial and antifouling performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Clickable membrane prepared by photo bromination and SN2 nucleophilic substitution. • Azide graphene oxide prepared by ring-opening reaction. • Alkyne graphene oxide was prepared via esterification reaction. • Layer-by-layer assembly of graphene oxide on membrane by click chemistry. • Antibacterial and antifouling characteristics were enhanced greatly. - Abstract: Polypropylene is an extensively used membrane material; yet, polypropylene membranes exhibit extremely poor resistance to protein fouling. To ameliorate this issue, graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets were used to modify macroporous polypropylene membrane (MPPM) via layer-by-layer assembly technique through click reaction. First, alkyne-terminated GO was prepared through esterification between carboxyl groups in GO and amide groups in propargylamine; azide-terminated GO was synthesized by the ring-opening reaction of epoxy groups in GO with sodium azide. Second, GO was introduced to the membrane by click chemistry. Characterizations of infrared spectra and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the modification. The sharply decreasing of static water contact angle indicated the improvement of the surface hydrophilicity for GO modified membrane. Introducing GO to the membrane results in a dramatic increase of water flux, improvements in the antifouling characteristics and antibacterial property for the membranes. The pure water flux through the 5-layered GO modified membrane is 1.82 times that through the unmodified one. The water flux restores to 43.0% for the unmodified membrane while to 79.8% for the modified membrane. The relative flux reduction decreases by 32.1% due to GO modification. The antibacterial property was also enhanced by two-thirds. These results demonstrate that the antifouling and antibacterial characteristics can be raised by tethering GO to the membrane surface

  18. Conceptual chemistry approach towards the support effect in supported vanadium oxides : Valence bond calculations on the ionicity of vanadium catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fievez, Tim; De Proft, Frank; Geerlings, Paul; Weckhuysen, Bert M.; Havenith, Remco W. A.

    2011-01-01

    The concept of bond ionicity, obtained via a valence bond analysis, is invoked in the interpretation of the catalytic activity of supported vanadium oxides, in analogy with previous work conducted within the framework of conceptual DFT. For a set of model clusters representing the vanadium oxide sup

  19. Mechanistic chemistry of oxidation of balsalazide with acidic chloramine-T and bromamine-T: A comparative spectrophotometric kinetic study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Puttaswamy; S Dakshayani

    2014-11-01

    Balsalazide (BSZ) belongs to a class of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of BSZ with sodium N-halo-p-toluenesulfonamides viz., chloramine-T(CAT) and bromamine-T(BAT) in HClO4 medium have been spectrophotometrically investigated (max =357nm) at 303 K. Under comparable experimental conditions, reactions with both the oxidants follow a first-order dependence of rate on [BSZ] and fractional-order dependence on each [oxidant] and [HClO4]. Activation parameters and reaction constants have been computed. 2-hydroxy-5-nitroso-benzoic acid and 3-(4-nitroso-benzoylamino)-propionic acid are identified as the oxidation products of BSZ with both CAT and BAT. The rate of oxidation of BSZ is about five-fold faster with BAT than with CAT. Plausible mechanism and related rate law have been deduced for the observed kinetics.

  20. Carbon mineralization and pyrite oxidation in groundwater: Importance for silicate weathering in boreal forest soils and stream base-flow chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Organic compounds is mineralized during later transport in deep groundwater aquifers. → Carbonic acid generated by this process stimulates dissolution of silicate minerals. → Protons derived from pyrite oxidation also affects weathering in deep groundwater. → The identified weathering mechanisms affect base-flow chemistry in boreal streams. - Abstract: What role does mineralized organic C and sulfide oxidation play in weathering of silicate minerals in deep groundwater aquifers? In this study, how H2CO3, produced as a result of mineralization of organic matter during groundwater transport, affects silicate weathering in the saturated zone of the mineral soil along a 70 m-long boreal hillslope is demonstrated. Stream water measurements of base cations and δ18O are included to determine the importance of the deep groundwater system for downstream surface water. The results suggest that H2CO3 generated from organic compounds being mineralized during the lateral transport stimulates weathering at depths between 0.5 and 3 m in the soil. This finding is indicated by progressively increasing concentrations of base cations-, silica- and inorganic C (IC) in the groundwater along the hillslope that co-occur with decreasing organic C (OC) concentrations. Protons derived from sulfide oxidation appear to be an additional driver of the weathering process as indicated by a build-up of SO42- in the groundwater during lateral transport and a δ34S per mille value of +0.26-3.76 per mille in the deep groundwater indicating S inputs from pyrite. The two identified active acids in the deep groundwater are likely to control the base-flow chemistry of streams draining larger catchments (>1 km2) as evident by δ18O signatures and base cation concentrations that overlap with that of the groundwater.

  1. Cellulose Digestion and Metabolism Induced Biocatalytic Transitions in Anaerobic Microbial Ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Yamazawa

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic digestion of highly polymerized biomass by microbial communities present in diverse microbial ecosystems is an indispensable metabolic process for biogeochemical cycling in nature and for industrial activities required to maintain a sustainable society. Therefore, the evaluation of the complicated microbial metabolomics presents a significant challenge. We here describe a comprehensive strategy for characterizing the degradation of highly crystallized bacterial cellulose (BC that is accompanied by metabolite production for identifying the responsible biocatalysts, including microorganisms and their metabolic functions. To this end, we employed two-dimensional solid- and one-dimensional solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR profiling combined with a metagenomic approach using stable isotope labeling. The key components of biocatalytic reactions determined using a metagenomic approach were correlated with cellulose degradation and metabolic products. The results indicate that BC degradation was mediated by cellulases that contain carbohydrate-binding modules and that belong to structural type A. The degradation reactions induced the metabolic dynamics of the microbial community and produced organic compounds, such as acetic acid and propionic acid, mainly metabolized by clostridial species. This combinatorial, functional and structural metagenomic approach is useful for the comprehensive characterization of biomass degradation, metabolic dynamics and their key components in diverse ecosystems.

  2. Expedient synthesis of C-aryl carbohydrates by consecutive biocatalytic benzoin and aldol reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Karel; Parella, Teodor; Joglar, Jesús; Bujons, Jordi; Pohl, Martina; Clapés, Pere

    2015-02-16

    The introduction of aromatic residues connected by a C-C bond into the non-reducing end of carbohydrates is highly significant for the development of innovative structures with improved binding affinity and selectivity (e.g., C-aril-sLex). In this work, an expedient asymmetric "de novo" synthetic route to new aryl carbohydrate derivatives based on two sequential stereoselectively biocatalytic carboligation reactions is presented. First, the benzoin reaction of aromatic aldehydes to dimethoxyacetaldehyde is conducted, catalyzed by benzaldehyde lyase from Pseudomonas fluorescens biovar I. Then, the α-hydroxyketones formed are reduced by using NaBH4 yielding the anti diol. After acetal hydrolysis, the aldol addition of dihydroxyacetone, hydroxyacetone, or glycolaldehyde catalyzed by the stereocomplementary D-fructose-6-phosphate aldolase and L-rhamnulose-1-phosphate aldolase is performed. Both aldolases accept unphosphorylated donor substrates, avoiding the need of handling the phosphate group that the dihydroxyacetone phosphate-dependent aldolases require. In this way, 6-C-aryl-L-sorbose, 6-C-aryl-L-fructose, 6-C-aryl-L-tagatose, and 5-C-aryl-L-xylose derivatives are prepared by using this methodology. PMID:25640727

  3. Microbiome and Biocatalytic Bacteria in Monkey Cup (Nepenthes Pitcher) Digestive Fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Xin-Yue; Hong, Kar-Wai; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2016-01-01

    Tropical carnivorous plant, Nepenthes, locally known as "monkey cup", utilises its pitcher as a passive trap to capture insects. It then secretes enzymes into the pitcher fluid to digest the insects for nutrients acquisition. However, little is known about the microbiota and their activity in its pitcher fluid. Eighteen bacteria phyla were detected from the metagenome study in the Nepenthes pitcher fluid. Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria are the dominant phyla in the Nepenthes pitcher fluid. We also performed culturomics approach by isolating 18 bacteria from the Nepenthes pitcher fluid. Most of the bacterial isolates possess chitinolytic, proteolytic, amylolytic, and cellulolytic and xylanolytic activities. Fifteen putative chitinase genes were identified from the whole genome analysis on the genomes of the 18 bacteria isolated from Nepenthes pitcher fluid and expressed for chitinase assay. Of these, six clones possessed chitinase activity. In conclusion, our metagenome result shows that the Nepenthes pitcher fluid contains vast bacterial diversity and the culturomic studies confirmed the presence of biocatalytic bacteria within the Nepenthes pitcher juice which may act in symbiosis for the turn over of insects trapped in the Nepenthes pitcher fluid. PMID:26817720

  4. Silver Iodide-Chitosan Nanotag Induced Biocatalytic Precipitation for Self-Enhanced Ultrasensitive Photocathodic Immunosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Lingshan; Dai, Hong; Zhang, Shupei; Lin, Yanyu

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we first exposed that the application of p-type semiconductor, silver iodide-chitosan nanoparticle (SICNP), acted as peroxidase mimetic to catalyze the bioprecipitation reaction for signal-amplification photocathodic immunosensing of human interleukin-6 (IL-6). After immobilization of captured antibody onto a polyethylenimine-functionalized carbon nitride (CN) matrix, SICNPs as photoactive tags and peroxidase mimetics were labeled on secondary antibodies, which were subsequently introduced onto the sensing interface to construct sandwich immunoassay platform through antigen-antibody specific recognition. Due to the matched energy levels between CN and AgI, the photocurrent intensity and photostability of SICNP were dramatically improved with rapid separation and transportation of photogenerated carriers. Moreover, the insoluble product in effective biocatalytic precipitation reaction served as electron acceptor to scavenge the photoexcited electron, leading to great amplification of the photocurrent signal of SICNP again. With the help of multiamplification processes, this photocathodic immunosensor presented a turn-on photoelectrochemical performance for IL-6, which showed wide linear dynamic range from 10(-6) to 10 pg/mL with the ultralow detection limit of 0.737 ag/mL. This work also performed the promising application of SICNP in developing an ultrasensitive, cost-effective, and enzyme-free photocathodic immunosensor for biomarkers. PMID:27180822

  5. Discovery and molecular and biocatalytic properties of hydroxynitrile lyase from an invasive millipede, Chamberlinius hualienensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadashipour, Mohammad; Ishida, Yuko; Yamamoto, Kazunori; Asano, Yasuhisa

    2015-08-25

    Hydroxynitrile lyase (HNL) catalyzes the degradation of cyanohydrins and causes the release of hydrogen cyanide (cyanogenesis). HNL can enantioselectively produce cyanohydrins, which are valuable building blocks for the synthesis of fine chemicals and pharmaceuticals, and is used as an important biocatalyst in industrial biotechnology. Currently, HNLs are isolated from plants and bacteria. Because industrial biotechnology requires more efficient and stable enzymes for sustainable development, we must continuously explore other potential enzyme sources for the desired HNLs. Despite the abundance of cyanogenic millipedes in the world, there has been no precise study of the HNLs from these arthropods. Here we report the isolation of HNL from the cyanide-emitting invasive millipede Chamberlinius hualienensis, along with its molecular properties and application in biocatalysis. The purified enzyme displays a very high specific activity in the synthesis of mandelonitrile. It is a glycosylated homodimer protein and shows no apparent sequence identity or homology with proteins in the known databases. It shows biocatalytic activity for the condensation of various aromatic aldehydes with potassium cyanide to produce cyanohydrins and has high stability over a wide range of temperatures and pH values. It catalyzes the synthesis of (R)-mandelonitrile from benzaldehyde with a 99% enantiomeric excess, without using any organic solvents. Arthropod fauna comprise 80% of terrestrial animals. We propose that these animals can be valuable resources for exploring not only HNLs but also diverse, efficient, and stable biocatalysts in industrial biotechnology. PMID:26261304

  6. Life Cycle Assessment as a tool for green Chemistry: Application to different advanced oxidation processes for wastewater treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz Ortiz, I.; Domenech Antunez, X.; Malato Rodriguez, S.

    2006-07-01

    The development of chemistry during the twentieth century has changed our lives. In fact, chemistry and chemicals surrounds US in our daily activities, due to the huge supply of products aimed at improving our quality of life. Chemistry has resulted in the medical revolution of the past century, in which drugs as antibiotics have been used to cure diseases that affected mankind for centuries. These advances have led to the rise in the average life expectancy from 47 in 1900, to 75 years in the 1990s (Breslow 1997). On the other hand, the world's food supply has seen an explosive expansion because of the development of pesticides as well as fertilisers that protect crops and improve their productivity. Other common chemicals are those related to hygiene, such as soaps, detergents, disinfectants, toothpaste, etc. Therefore, there is practically no facet in material life-transportation communication, clothing, shelter, office- in which chemistry does not play an important role, either to supply consumer products or to improve services addressed to society in general (Domenech 2005). In spite of all these clear benefits, the chemical industry is often viewed by the general public as causing more harm than good (Lancaster 2002). A major reason for this is that the industry is perceived as being polluting and causing significant environmental damage. Indeed, the manufacture, use and disposal of chemicals consume large amounts of resources, and originates emissions of pollutants to all environmental compartments, not to mention the numerous accidents and disasters in which the chemical industry has been involved in the recent past. (Author)

  7. Bad chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Petsko, Gregory A

    2004-01-01

    General chemistry courses haven't changed significantly in forty years. Because most basic chemistry students are premedical students, medical schools have enormous influence and could help us start all over again to create undergraduate chemistry education that works.

  8. Chemistry & Biology Article A Stereospecific Pathway Diverts b-Oxidation Intermediates to the Biosynthesis of Rhamnolipid Biosurfactants

    OpenAIRE

    Abdel-Mawgoud, Ahmad Mohammad; Lépine, François; Déziel, Eric

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Rhamnolipids are multipurpose surface-active molecules produced by the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa from L-rhamnose and R-3-hydroxyalka-noate (C 10±2) precursors. R-3-hydroxyalkanoate precursor is believed to be synthesized de novo. We demonstrate, however, that b-oxidation is the predominant source of this precursor. Inhibition of b-oxidation sharply decreases rhamnolipids production , even when using a nonfatty acid carbon source (glycerol). Isotope tracing shows that b-oxidatio...

  9. Green chemistry at work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frost, J. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The 1.7 billion pounds of benzene produced each year in the US provide one measure of its utility. At the same time, there are a number of environmental reasons for avoiding the use of benzene in chemical manufacture. Perhaps most compelling: benzene is a potent carcinogen. Scrutiny of many of the chemicals derived from benzene reveals that each molecule contains at least one oxygen atom while benzene completely lacks oxygen atoms. Introduction of oxygen to make up for this lack can require processes that are environmentally problematic. One of the steps used to introduce oxygen atoms during manufacture of adipic acid, a component of Nylon 66, is responsible for 10% of the annual global increase in atmospheric nitrous oxide. This by-product is a causative agent of atmospheric ozone depletion and has been implicated in global warming. With support from EPA and the National Science Foundation, alternative manufacturing processes are being explored. By these new methods, chemicals usually created from benzene are made instead from nontoxic glucose, a component of table sugar. Unlike benzene, glucose is obtained from such renewable resources as plant starch and cellulose. ``Green`` manufacturing routes ideally should lead to chemicals that are economically competitive with chemicals produced by traditional methods. For two chemicals of roughly comparable cost, the consumer or producer can then be realistically expected to choose in favor of the chemical produced by a ``green`` process. Projections indicate that catechol and hydroquinone can be biocatalytically produced from glucose at a cost competitive with current market prices. Synthesis of chemicals from glucose using biocatalysis offers the premise of achieving fundamental environmental improvement while increasing the demand for agricultural products. In the final analysis, what is good for the environment can also be good for American agriculture.

  10. Oxidizing dissolution of spent MOX47 fuel subjected to water radiolysis: Solution chemistry and surface characterization by Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jégou, C.; Caraballo, R.; De Bonfils, J.; Broudic, V.; Peuget, S.; Vercouter, T.; Roudil, D.

    2010-04-01

    The mechanisms of oxidizing dissolution of spent MOX fuel (MIMAS TU2®) subjected to water radiolysis were investigated experimentally by leaching spent MOX47 fuel samples in pure water at 25 °C under different oxidizing conditions (with and without external gamma irradiation); the leached surfaces were characterized by Raman spectroscopy. The highly oxidizing conditions resulting from external gamma irradiation significantly increased the concentration of plutonium (Pu(V)) and uranium (U(VI)) compared with a benchmark experiment (without external irradiation). The oxidation behavior of the plutonium-enriched aggregates differed significantly from that of the UO 2 matrix after several months of leaching in water under gamma irradiation. The plutonium in the aggregates appears to limit fuel oxidation. The only secondary phases formed and identified to date by Raman spectroscopy are uranium peroxides that generally precipitate on the surface of the UO 2 grains. Concerning the behavior of plutonium, solution analysis results appear to be compatible with a conventional explanation based on an equilibrium with a Pu(OH) 4(am) phase. The fission product release - considered as a general indicator of matrix alteration - from MOX47 fuel also increases under external gamma irradiation and a change in the leaching mode is observed. Diffusive leaching was clearly identified, coinciding with the rapid onset of steady-state actinide concentrations in the bulk solution.

  11. Discovery of carboxyethylpyrroles (CEPs): critical insights into AMD, autism, cancer, and wound healing from basic research on the chemistry of oxidized phospholipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, Robert G; Hong, Li; Hollyfield, Joe G

    2011-11-21

    Basic research, exploring the hypothesis that 2-(ω-carboxyethyl)pyrrole (CEP) modifications of proteins are generated nonenzymatically in vivo is delivering a bonanza of molecular mechanistic insights into age-related macular degeneration, autism, cancer, and wound healing. CEPs are produced through covalent modification of protein lysyl ε-amino groups by γ-hydroxyalkenal phospholipids that are formed by oxidative cleavage of docosahexaenate-containing phospholipids. Chemical synthesis of CEP-modified proteins and the production of highly specific antibodies that recognize them preceded and facilitated their detection in vivo and enabled exploration of their biological occurrence and activities. This investigational approach, from the chemistry of biomolecules to disease phenotype, is proving to be remarkably productive. PMID:21875030

  12. Study of the Effect of Grafting Method on Surface Polarity of Tempo-Oxidized Nanocellulose Using Polycaprolactone as the Modifying Compound: Esterification versus Click-Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelhaq Benkaddour

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Esterification and click-chemistry were evaluated as surface modification treatments for TEMPO-oxidized nanocelluloses (TONC using Polycaprolactone-diol (PCL as modifying compound in order to improve the dispersion of nanofibers in organic media. These two grafting strategies were analyzed and compared. The first consists of grafting directly the PCL onto TONC, and was carried out by esterification between hydroxyl groups of PCL and carboxyl groups of TONC. The second strategy known as click-chemistry is based on the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction between azides and alkyne terminated moieties to form the triazole ring between PCL and TONC. The grafted samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and Thermogravimetry analysis (TGA. Further, the effects of the two treatments on the surface hydrophobization of TONC were investigated by contact angle measurements. The results show that both methods confirm the success of such a modification and the click reaction was significantly more effective than esterification.

  13. Atmospheric Chemistry and Air Pollution

    OpenAIRE

    Gaffney, Jeffrey S.; Marley, Nancy A.

    2003-01-01

    Atmospheric chemistry is an important discipline for understanding air pollution and its impacts. This mini-review gives a brief history of air pollution and presents an overview of some of the basic photochemistry involved in the production of ozone and other oxidants in the atmosphere. Urban air quality issues are reviewed with a specific focus on ozone and other oxidants, primary and secondary aerosols, alternative fuels, and the potential for chlorine releases to amplify oxidant chemistry...

  14. Sensitivity to grid resolution in the ability of a chemical transport model to simulate observed oxidant chemistry under high-isoprene conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Karen; Jacob, Daniel J.; Fisher, Jenny A.; Kim, Patrick S.; Marais, Eloise A.; Miller, Christopher C.; Travis, Katherine R.; Zhu, Lei; Yantosca, Robert M.; Sulprizio, Melissa P.; Cohen, Ron C.; Dibb, Jack E.; Fried, Alan; Mikoviny, Tomas; Ryerson, Thomas B.; Wennberg, Paul O.; Wisthaler, Armin

    2016-04-01

    Formation of ozone and organic aerosol in continental atmospheres depends on whether isoprene emitted by vegetation is oxidized by the high-NOx pathway (where peroxy radicals react with NO) or by low-NOx pathways (where peroxy radicals react by alternate channels, mostly with HO2). We used mixed layer observations from the SEAC4RS aircraft campaign over the Southeast US to test the ability of the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model at different grid resolutions (0.25° × 0.3125°, 2° × 2.5°, 4° × 5°) to simulate this chemistry under high-isoprene, variable-NOx conditions. Observations of isoprene and NOx over the Southeast US show a negative correlation, reflecting the spatial segregation of emissions; this negative correlation is captured in the model at 0.25° × 0.3125° resolution but not at coarser resolutions. As a result, less isoprene oxidation takes place by the high-NOx pathway in the model at 0.25° × 0.3125° resolution (54 %) than at coarser resolution (59 %). The cumulative probability distribution functions (CDFs) of NOx, isoprene, and ozone concentrations show little difference across model resolutions and good agreement with observations, while formaldehyde is overestimated at coarse resolution because excessive isoprene oxidation takes place by the high-NOx pathway with high formaldehyde yield. The good agreement of simulated and observed concentration variances implies that smaller-scale non-linearities (urban and power plant plumes) are not important on the regional scale. Correlations of simulated vs. observed concentrations do not improve with grid resolution because finer modes of variability are intrinsically more difficult to capture. Higher model resolution leads to decreased conversion of NOx to organic nitrates and increased conversion to nitric acid, with total reactive nitrogen oxides (NOy) changing little across model resolutions. Model concentrations in the lower free troposphere are also insensitive to grid resolution. The

  15. Synthesis, characterization, and reaction chemistry of a bis(iodosylbenzene)-metalloporphyrin complex, (PhI(OAc)O)/sub 2/Mn/sup IV/TPP. A complex possessing a five-electron oxidation capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smegal, J.A.; Hill, C.L.

    1983-05-04

    The synthesis, characterization, and reaction chemistry of a new type of manganese(IV) complex, (PhI(OAc)O)/sub 2/Mn/sup IV/TPP, which hydroxylates alkanes and epoxidizes olefins is reported. This complex contains both a transition metal (Mn) and a nonmetal ion (I) in unusual oxidation states. The high-valent iodine and manganese atoms provide this complex with a five-electron oxidation capability.

  16. Solar thermal energy storage via exploitation and rational combination of porous ceramic structures and redox oxides chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Agrafiotis, Christos; Becker, Andreas; Roeb, Martin; Sattler, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The current state-of-the-art solar heat storage concept in air-operated Solar Tower Power Plants is to store the solar energy provided during on-sun operation as sensible heat in porous solid materials that operate as recuperators during off-sun operation. This storage concept can be rendered from “purely” sensible to “hybrid” sensible/thermochemical one, via coating the chemically inert porous heat exchange modules with oxides of multivalent metals for which their reduction/oxidation reactio...

  17. Quantitative analysis chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is about quantitative analysis chemistry. It is divided into ten chapters, which deal with the basic conception of material with the meaning of analysis chemistry and SI units, chemical equilibrium, basic preparation for quantitative analysis, introduction of volumetric analysis, acid-base titration of outline and experiment examples, chelate titration, oxidation-reduction titration with introduction, titration curve, and diazotization titration, precipitation titration, electrometric titration and quantitative analysis.

  18. Measurement and modelling of the defect chemistry and transport properties of ceramic oxide mixed ionic and electronic conductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalslet, Bjarke Thomas

    2008-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is ceramic mixed ionic and electronic conductors (MIECs). MIECs have potential uses, such as solid oxygen permeation membranes, as catalysts, and as components in fuel cells. The MIECs examined in this thesis are all oxide ion conducting materials. This thesis describes...

  19. Oxidation of Borneol to Camphor Using Oxone and Catalytic Sodium Chloride: A Green Experiment for the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Patrick T.; Harned, Andrew M.; Wissinger, Jane E.

    2011-01-01

    A new green oxidation procedure was developed for the undergraduate organic teaching laboratories using Oxone and a catalytic quantity of sodium chloride for the conversion of borneol to camphor. This simple 1 h, room temperature reaction afforded high quality and yield of product, was environmentally friendly, and produced negligible quantities…

  20. Radiation chemistry of higher oxidation states of iron (Fe(VI), Fe(V), and Fe(IV))

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High oxidation states of iron, Fe(VI), Fe(V), and Fe(IV) (ferrate), are involved in oxidation and hydroxylation reactions of biological, industrial, and environmental importance. Despite the proposed involvement of these oxidations states in numerous reactions, limited information is available on the fundamental properties of Fe(VI) (FeO42-), Fe(V) (FeO43-), and Fe(IV) (FeO44-) in the absence of a specialized ligand system in aqueous solution. Progress has been made in characterizing the spectral and kinetic properties of these oxidation states in aqueous solution. Both Fe(V) and Fe(IV) were generated in aqueous solution by pulse radiolysis in which Fe(VI) reduces to Fe(V) by radicals at near diffusion-controlled rates. For the last few years, we have started the studies on the ferrate reactions with nitrogen- and sulfur-containing substrates to understand the kinetics and mechanisms of the interaction of ferrate species with these substrates

  1. Surface layer ozone and nitric oxides in the Arctic: The inuence of boundary layer dynamics, snowpack chemistry, surface exchanges, and seasonality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dam, Brie A.

    The snowpack is a region of active chemistry. Aqueous chemistry in a quasi-liquid layer on snow grains and gas-phase chemical reactions in snow interstitial air can lead to the production or destruction of important trace gases. Physical transport parameters such as wind pumping and diffusion affect the vertical distribution of gases within the snowpack. The resulting emission or uptake of trace gases at the atmosphere-snowpack interface can have significant in uence on the chemistry of the lower atmosphere. In this work the dynamic interactions between the snowpack and atmosphere are examined from multiple perspectives. The primary focus is on ozone (O3) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) in the Arctic, a region undergoing widespread environmental change. To investigate an ice-sheet location with year round snow cover, data from a two-year campaign at Summit, Greenland are implemented. At Summit this study examines (1) the processes contributing to vigorous chemistry in snow interstitial air, and (2) the role of the boundary layer over snow in determining surface layer NOx. Physical and chemical processes are shown to contribute to distinct seasonal and diurnal cycles of O3, NO, and NO2 in the snowpack. Boundary layer depths estimated from sonic anemometer turbulence quantities are used alongside sodar-derived values to show that the depth of the stable to weakly stable boundary layer at Summit was not a primary factor in determining NO x in early summer. Motivated by observations of an increase in the length of the snow-free season in the Arctic in recent decades, data from a one-year experiment at the seasonally-snow covered location of Toolik Lake, AK are also incorporated. This study shows the first observations of springtime ozone depletion events at a location over 200 km from the coast in the Arctic. FLEXPART analysis is used to illustrate that these inland events are linked to transport conditions. Lastly at this location, eddy-covariance O3 uxes were calculated to

  2. Chemistry of plutonium revealed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1941 one goal of the Manhattan Project was to unravel the chemistry of the synthetic element plutonium as rapidly as possible. In this paper the work carried out at Berkeley from the spring of 1942 to the summer of 1945 is described briefly. The aqueous chemistry of plutonium is quite remarkable. Important insights were obtained from tracer experiments, but the full complexity was not revealed until macroscopic amounts (milligrams) became available. Because processes for separation from fission products were based on aqueous solutions, such solution chemistry was emphasized, particularly precipitation and oxidation-reduction behavior. The latter turned out to be unusually intricate when it was discovered that two more oxidation states existed in aqueous solution than had previously been suspected. Further, an equilibrium was rapidly established among the four aqueous oxidation states, while at the same time any three were not in equilibrium. These and other observations made while doing a crash study of a previously unknown element are reported

  3. Complex chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bong Gon; Kim, Jae Sang; Kim, Jin Eun; Lee, Boo Yeon

    2006-06-15

    This book introduces complex chemistry with ten chapters, which include development of complex chemistry on history coordination theory and Warner's coordination theory and new development of complex chemistry, nomenclature on complex with conception and define, chemical formula on coordination compound, symbol of stereochemistry, stereo structure and isomerism, electron structure and bond theory on complex, structure of complex like NMR and XAFS, balance and reaction on solution, an organo-metallic chemistry, biology inorganic chemistry, material chemistry of complex, design of complex and calculation chemistry.

  4. Complex chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book introduces complex chemistry with ten chapters, which include development of complex chemistry on history coordination theory and Warner's coordination theory and new development of complex chemistry, nomenclature on complex with conception and define, chemical formula on coordination compound, symbol of stereochemistry, stereo structure and isomerism, electron structure and bond theory on complex, structure of complex like NMR and XAFS, balance and reaction on solution, an organo-metallic chemistry, biology inorganic chemistry, material chemistry of complex, design of complex and calculation chemistry.

  5. Synthesis, lanthanide coordination chemistry, and liquid-liquid extraction performance of CMPO-decorated pyridine and pyridine N-oxide platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario-Amorin, Daniel; Ouizem, Sabrina; Dickie, Diane A; Wen, Yufeng; Paine, Robert T; Gao, Jian; Grey, John K; de Bettencourt-Dias, Ana; Hay, Benjamin P; Delmau, Lætitia H

    2013-03-18

    Syntheses for a set of new ligands containing one or two carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) fragments appended to pyridine and pyridine N-oxide platforms are described. Molecular mechanics analyses for gas phase lanthanide-ligand interactions for the pyridine N-oxides indicate that the trifunctional NOPOCO molecules, 2-{[Ph2P(O)][C(O)NEt2]C(H)}C5H4NO (7) and 2-{[Ph2P(O)][C(O)NEt2]CHCH2}C5H4NO (8), and pentafunctional NOPOP'O'COC'O' molecules, 2,6-{[Ph2P(O)][C(O)NEt2]C(H)}2C5H3NO (9) and 2,6-{[Ph2P(O)][C(O)NEt2]CHCH2}2C5H3NO (10), should be able to adopt, with minimal strain, tridentate and pentadentate chelate structures, respectively. As a test of these predictions, selected lanthanide coordination chemistry of the N-oxide derivatives was explored. Crystal structure analyses reveal the formation of a tridentate NOPOCO chelate structure for a 1:1 Pr(III) complex containing 7 while 8 adopts a mixed bidentate/bridging monodentate POCO/NO binding mode with Pr(III). Tridentate and tetradentate chelate structures are obtained for several 1:1 complexes of 9 while a pentadentate chelate structure is observed with 10. Emission spectroscopy for one complex, [Eu(9)(NO3)3], in methanol, shows that the Eu(III) ion resides in a low-symmetry site. Lifetime measurements for methanol and deuterated methanol solutions indicate the presence of four methanol molecules in the inner coordination sphere of the metal ion, in addition to the ligand, with the nitrate anions most likely dissociated. The solvent extraction performance of 7-10 in 1,2-dichloroethane for Eu(III) and Am(III) in nitric acid solutions was analyzed and compared with the performance of 2,6-bis(di-n-octylphosphinoylmethyl)pyridine N-oxide (TONOPOP'O') and n-octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (OPhDiBCMPO) measured under identical conditions. PMID:23461540

  6. Mathematical Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Trinajstić, Nenad; Gutman, Ivan

    2002-01-01

    A brief description is given of the historical development of mathematics and chemistry. A path leading to the meeting of these two sciences is described. An attempt is made to define mathematical chemistry, and journals containing the term mathematical chemistry in their titles are noted. In conclusion, the statement is made that although chemistry is an experimental science aimed at preparing new compounds and materials, mathematics is very useful in chemistry, among other things, to produc...

  7. Spatial atomic layer deposition: Performance of low temperature H{sub 2}O and O{sub 3} oxidant chemistry for flexible electronics encapsulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maydannik, Philipp S., E-mail: philipp.maydannik@lut.fi; Plyushch, Alexander; Sillanpää, Mika [Advanced Surface Technology Research Laboratory Team (ASTRaL), Laboratory of Green Chemistry, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Sammonkatu 12, Mikkeli 50130 (Finland); Cameron, David C. [R and D Center for Low-Cost Plasma and Nanotechnology Surface Modification, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2015-05-15

    Water and oxygen were compared as oxidizing agents for the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} atomic layer deposition process using spatial atomic layer deposition reactor. The influence of the precursor dose on the deposition rate and refractive index, which was used as a proxy for film density, was measured as a function of residence time, defined as the time which the moving substrate spent within one precursor gas zone. The effect of temperature on the growth characteristics was also measured. The water-based process gave faster deposition rates and higher refractive indices but the ozone process allowed deposition to take place at lower temperatures while still maintaining good film quality. In general, processes based on both oxidation chemistries were able to produce excellent moisture barrier films with water vapor transmission rate levels of 10{sup −4} g/m{sup 2} day measured at 38 °C and 90% of relative humidity on polyethylene naphthalate substrates. However, the best result of <5 × 10{sup −5} was obtained at 100 °C process temperature with water as precursor.

  8. Large-scale calculations of solid oxide fuel cell cermet anode by tight-binding quantum chemistry method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Improvement of anode characteristics of solid oxide fuel cells is important for the better cell performance and especially the direct use of hydrocarbons. A mixture of ceramics and metal is generally used as anode, and different combinations of ceramics and metals lead to different electrode characteristics. We performed large-scale calculations to investigate the characteristics of Ni/CeO2 and Cu/CeO2 anodes at the electronic level using our tight-binding quantum chemical molecular dynamics program. Charge distribution analysis clarified the electron transfer from metal to oxide in both anodes. The calculations of density of states clarified different contributions of Ni and Cu orbitals to the energy levels at around Fermi level in each cermet. Based on the obtained results, we made considerations to explain different characteristics of both cermet anodes. The effectiveness of our approach for the investigation of complex cermet system was proved

  9. Dynamics of ozone and nitrogen oxides at Summit, Greenland. II. Simulating snowpack chemistry during a spring high ozone event with a 1-D process-scale model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Keenan A.; Kramer, Louisa J.; Doskey, Paul V.; Ganzeveld, Laurens; Seok, Brian; Van Dam, Brie; Helmig, Detlev

    2015-09-01

    Observed depth profiles of nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and ozone (O3) in snowpack interstitial air at Summit, Greenland were best replicated by a 1-D process-scale model, which included (1) geometrical representation of snow grains as spheres, (2) aqueous-phase chemistry confined to a quasi-liquid layer (QLL) on the surface of snow grains, and (3) initialization of the species concentrations in the QLL through equilibrium partitioning with mixing ratios in snowpack interstitial air. A comprehensive suite of measurements in and above snowpack during a high O3 event facilitated analysis of the relationship between the chemistry of snowpack and the overlying atmosphere. The model successfully reproduced 2 maxima (i.e., a peak near the surface of the snowpack at solar noon and a larger peak occurring in the evening that extended down from 0.5 to 2 m) in the diurnal profile of NO2 within snowpack interstitial air. The maximum production rate of NO2 by photolysis of nitrate (NO3-) was approximately 108 molec cm-3 s-1, which explained daily observations of maxima in NO2 mixing ratios near solar noon. Mixing ratios of NO2 in snowpack interstitial air were greatest in the deepest layers of the snowpack at night and were attributed to thermal decomposition of peroxynitric acid, which produced up to 106 molec NO2 cm-3 s-1. Highest levels of NO in snowpack interstitial air were confined to upper layers of the snowpack and observed profiles were consistent with photolysis of NO2. Production of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from NO3- photolysis was estimated to be two orders of magnitude larger than NO production and supports the hypothesis that NO3- photolysis is the primary source of NOx within sunlit snowpack in the Arctic. Aqueous-phase oxidation of formic acid by O3 resulted in a maximum consumption rate of ∼106-107 molec cm-3 s-1 and was the primary removal mechanism for O3.

  10. A Review of Aspects of Oxidative Hair Dye Chemistry with Special Reference to N-Nitrosamine Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Jamie Hawkes; John Mama; David Lewis

    2013-01-01

    This review discusses a new aspect to the safety profile of oxidative hair dyes using data already in the public domain. These dyes contain secondary amines that are capable of forming potentially carcinogenic nitrosamine derivatives when exposed to atmospheric pollution. Numerous scientific articles confirm the existence of secondary amines in hair dyes (and their intermediates), the possibility of nitrosation by atmospheric NOx of secondary amines to give the N-nitrosamines, and the signifi...

  11. The crystal chemistry and structural analysis of uranium oxide hydrates. Final report, May 15, 1995--December 31, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this research program was to develop a thorough understanding of the crystal-chemical and crystal-structural systematics of uranyl oxide hydrates which are the initial corrosion products of the UO2 in spent nuclear fuel and the principal phases in which actinides occur in the near surface environment. The scope of this program has been expanded to include all inorganic phases in which U6+ plays a significant structural role; currently 183 phases with known crystal structures

  12. Atmospheric chemistry of (CF3)2C=CH2: OH radicals, Cl atoms and O3 rate coefficients, oxidation end-products and IR spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, Vassileios C; Spitieri, Christina S; Papagiannakopoulos, Panos; Cazaunau, Mathieu; Lendar, Maria; Daële, Véronique; Mellouki, Abdelwahid

    2015-10-14

    The rate coefficients for the gas phase reactions of OH radicals, k1, Cl atoms, k2, and O3, k3, with 3,3,3-trifluoro-2(trifluoromethyl)-1-propene ((CF3)2C=CH2, hexafluoroisobutylene, HFIB) were determined at room temperature and atmospheric pressure employing the relative rate method and using two atmospheric simulation chambers and a static photochemical reactor. OH and Cl rate coefficients obtained by both techniques were indistinguishable, within experimental precision, and the average values were k1 = (7.82 ± 0.55) × 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) and k2 = (3.45 ± 0.24) × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), respectively. The quoted uncertainties are at 95% level of confidence and include the estimated systematic uncertainties. An upper limit for the O3 rate coefficient was determined to be k3 global warming potential (GWP) calculations, radiative efficiency (RE) was determined from the measured IR absorption cross-sections and treating HFIB both as long (LLC) and short (SLC) lived compounds, including estimated lifetime dependent factors in the SLC case. The HFIB lifetime was estimated from kinetic measurements considering merely the OH reaction, τOH = 14.8 days and including both OH and Cl chemistry, τeff = 10.3 days. Therefore, GWP(HFIB,OH) and GWP(HFIB,eff) were estimated to be 4.1 (LLC) and 0.6 (SLC), as well as 2.8 (LLC) and 0.3 (SLC) for a hundred year time horizon. Moreover, the estimated photochemical ozone creation potential (ε(POCP)) of HFIB was calculated to be 4.60. Finally, HCHO and (CF3)2C(O) were identified as final oxidation products in both OH- and Cl-initiated oxidation, while HC(O)Cl was additionally observed in the Cl-initiated oxidation. PMID:26372403

  13. Influence of turbulence-chemistry interaction for n-heptane spray combustion under diesel engine conditions with emphasis on soot formation and oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolla, Michele; Farrace, Daniele; Wright, Yuri M.; Boulouchos, Konstantinos; Mastorakos, Epaminondas

    2014-03-01

    The influence of the turbulence-chemistry interaction (TCI) for n-heptane sprays under diesel engine conditions has been investigated by means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. The conditional moment closure approach, which has been previously validated thoroughly for such flows, and the homogeneous reactor (i.e. no turbulent combustion model) approach have been compared, in view of the recent resurgence of the latter approaches for diesel engine CFD. Experimental data available from a constant-volume combustion chamber have been used for model validation purposes for a broad range of conditions including variations in ambient oxygen (8‑21% by vol.), ambient temperature (900 and 1000 K) and ambient density (14.8 and 30 kg/m3). The results from both numerical approaches have been compared to the experimental values of ignition delay (ID), flame lift-off length (LOL), and soot volume fraction distributions. TCI was found to have a weak influence on ignition delay for the conditions simulated, attributed to the low values of the scalar dissipation relative to the critical value above which auto-ignition does not occur. In contrast, the flame LOL was considerably affected, in particular at low oxygen concentrations. Quasi-steady soot formation was similar; however, pronounced differences in soot oxidation behaviour are reported. The differences were further emphasised for a case with short injection duration: in such conditions, TCI was found to play a major role concerning the soot oxidation behaviour because of the importance of soot-oxidiser structure in mixture fraction space. Neglecting TCI leads to a strong over-estimation of soot oxidation after the end of injection. The results suggest that for some engines, and for some phenomena, the neglect of turbulent fluctuations may lead to predictions of acceptable engineering accuracy, but that a proper turbulent combustion model is needed for more reliable results.

  14. Sulphate chemistry under pressurized oxidizing, reducing and fluctuating conditions; Sulfatkemi under trycksatta oxiderande, reducerande och fluktuerande foerhaallanden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hupa, M.; Yrjas, P.; Backman, P. [Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland). Combustion Chemistry Research Group

    1997-10-01

    In the literature it has been reported that sulfur capture with limestone (CaCO{sub 3}) under atmospheric fluidized bed combustion conditions reaches a maximum at about 850 deg C. Previously, the maximum has been attributed to the sintering of sorbent particles which decreases the reactive surface area. Lately, also another explanation has been reported. In this case the sulfur capture decrease at higher temperatures was concluded to be due to fluctuating oxidizing/reducing conditions in the atmospheric combustor. In this work the influence of alternating oxidizing/reducing conditions on SO{sub 2} capture at atmospheric and elevated pressure (15 bar) has been studied. In the pressurized case, the CO{sub 2} partial pressure was kept high enough to prevent CaCO{sub 3} from calcining and therefore the CaSO{sub 4} would not form CaO but CaCO{sub 3} under reducing conditions. The experiments were done with a pressurized TGA by periodically changing the gas environment between oxidizing (O{sub 2}. SO{sub 2}, CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}) and slightly reducing (CO, SO{sub 2}, CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}) gas mixtures at different temperatures. The results from the experiments showed that under normal pressure and slightly reducing conditions CaO formation from CaSO{sub 4} increased with temperature as expected. However, no significant amounts of CaCO{sub 3} were formed from CaSO{sub 4} at elevated pressure. It was also concluded that since the formation of CaO from CaSO{sub 4} was relatively slow it could not explain the sharp sulfur capture maximum at about 850 deg C. Therefore, it was assumed that the strongly reducing zones, where CaS thermodynamically is the stable compound, play a more important role concerning the sulfur capture in fluidized bed combustors. (orig.)

  15. A Review of Aspects of Oxidative Hair Dye Chemistry with Special Reference to N-Nitrosamine Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie Hawkes

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This review discusses a new aspect to the safety profile of oxidative hair dyes using data already in the public domain. These dyes contain secondary amines that are capable of forming potentially carcinogenic nitrosamine derivatives when exposed to atmospheric pollution. Numerous scientific articles confirm the existence of secondary amines in hair dyes (and their intermediates, the possibility of nitrosation by atmospheric NOx of secondary amines to give the N-nitrosamines, and the significant safety risks on N-nitrosamines. It is believed that such nitrosamine derivatives should be investigated more fully in the interests of consumer safety.

  16. Zinc oxide nanocubes as a destructive nanoadsorbent for the neutralization chemistry of 2-chloroethyl phenyl sulfide: A sulfur mustard simulant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiani, Armin; Dastafkan, Kamran

    2016-09-15

    Zinc oxide nanocubes were surveyed for their destructive turn-over to decontaminate 2-chloro ethyl phenyl sulfide, a sulfur mustard simulant. Prior to the reaction, nanocubes were prepared through sol-gel method using monoethanolamine, diethylene glycol, and anhydrous citric acid as the stabilizing, cross linking/structure directing agents, respectively. The formation of nanoscale ZnO, the cubic morphology, crystalline structure, and chemical-adsorptive characteristics were certified by FESEM-EDS, TEM-SAED, XRD, FTIR, BET-BJH, H2-TPR, and ESR techniques. Adsorption and destruction reactions were tracked by GC-FID analysis in which the effects of polarity of the media, reaction time, and temperature on the destructive capability of the surface of nanocubes were investigated and discussed. Results demonstrated that maximum neutralization occurred in n-heptane solvent after 1/2h at 55°C. Kinetic study construed that the neutralization reaction followed the pseudo-second order model with a squared correlation coefficient and rate constant of 0.9904 and 0.00004gmg(-1)s(-1), respectively. Furthermore, GC-MS measurement confirmed the formation of 2-hydroxy ethyl phenyl sulfide (2-HEPS) and phenyl vinyl sulfide (PVS) as neutralization products that together with Bronsted and Lewis acid/base approaches exemplify the role of hydrolysis and elimination mechanisms on the surface of zinc oxide nanocubes. PMID:27309947

  17. Probabilistic estimation of future emissions of isoprene and surface oxidant chemistry associated with land use change in response to growing food needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Hardacre

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We quantify the impact of land use change, determined by our growing need for food and biofuel production, on isoprene emissions and subsequent atmospheric oxidant chemistry in 2015 and 2030, relative to 1990, ignoring compound climate change effects over that period. We estimate isoprene emissions from an ensemble (n = 1000 of land use change realizations from 1990–2050, broadly guided by the IPCC AR4/SRES scenarios A1 and B1. We also superimpose land use change required to address projected biofuel usage using two scenarios: (1 assuming that world governments make no changes to biofuel policy after 2009, and (2 assuming that world governments develop biofuel policy with the aim of keeping equivalent atmospheric CO2 at 450 ppm. We present the median and interquartile range (IQR statistics of the ensemble and show that land use change between −1.50 × 1012 m2 to +6.06 × 1012 m2 was found to drive changes in the global isoprene burden of −3.5 to +2.8 Tg yr−1 in 2015 and −7.7 to +6.4 Tg yr−1 in 2030. We use land use change realizations corresponding to the median and IQR of these emission estimates to drive the GEOS-Chem global 3-D chemistry transport model to investigate the perturbation to global and regional surface concentrations of isoprene, nitrogen oxides (NO+NO2, and the atmospheric concentration and deposition of ozone (O3. We show that across sub-continental regions the monthly surface O3 increases by 0.1–0.8 ppb, relative to a zero land-use change calculation, driven by increases (decreases in surface isoprene in high (low NOx environments. At the local scale (4° × 5° we find that surface O3 increases by 5–12 ppb over temperate North America, China and Boreal Eurasia, driven by large increases in isoprene emissions from short-rotation coppice crop cultivation for biofuel

  18. Probabilistic estimation of future emissions of isoprene and surface oxidant chemistry associated with land-use change in response to growing food needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Hardacre

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We quantify the impact of land-use change, determined by our growing demand for food and biofuel production, on isoprene emissions and subsequent atmospheric oxidant chemistry in 2015 and 2030, relative to 1990, ignoring compound climate change effects over that period. We estimate isoprene emissions from an ensemble (n = 1000 of land-use change realizations from 1990–2050, broadly guided by the IPCC AR4/SRES scenarios A1 and B1. We also superimpose land-use change required to address projected biofuel usage using two scenarios: (1 assuming that world governments make no changes to biofuel policy after 2009, and (2 assuming that world governments develop biofuel policy with the aim of keeping equivalent atmospheric CO2 at 450 ppm. We present the median and interquartile range (IQR statistics of the ensemble and show that land-use change between −1.50 × 1012 m2 to +6.06 × 1012 m2 was found to drive changes in the global isoprene burden of −3.5 to +2.8 Tg yr−1 in 2015 and −7.7 to +6.4 Tg yr−1 in 2030. We use land-use change realizations corresponding to the median and IQR of these emission estimates to drive the GEOS-Chem global 3-D chemistry transport model to investigate the perturbation to global and regional surface concentrations of isoprene, nitrogen oxides (NO+NO2, and the atmospheric concentration and deposition of ozone (O3. We show that across subcontinental regions the monthly surface O3 increases by 0.1–0.8 ppb, relative to a zero land-use change calculation, driven by increases (decreases in surface isoprene in high (low NOx environments. At the local scale (4° × 5° we find that surface O3 increases by 5–12 ppb over temperate North America, China and boreal Eurasia, driven by large increases in isoprene emissions from short-rotation coppice crop cultivation for biofuel production.

  19. Combinatorial chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, John

    1994-01-01

    An overview of combinatorial chemistry is presented. Combinatorial chemistry, sometimes referred to as `irrational drug design,' involves the generation of molecular diversity. The resulting chemical library is then screened for biologically active compounds.......An overview of combinatorial chemistry is presented. Combinatorial chemistry, sometimes referred to as `irrational drug design,' involves the generation of molecular diversity. The resulting chemical library is then screened for biologically active compounds....

  20. Positronium chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Green, James

    1964-01-01

    Positronium Chemistry focuses on the methodologies, reactions, processes, and transformations involved in positronium chemistry. The publication first offers information on positrons and positronium and experimental methods, including mesonic atoms, angular correlation measurements, annihilation spectra, and statistical errors in delayed coincidence measurements. The text then ponders on positrons in gases and solids. The manuscript takes a look at the theoretical chemistry of positronium and positronium chemistry in gases. Topics include quenching, annihilation spectrum, delayed coincidence

  1. The effect of ethylene oxide sterilization on the surface chemistry and in vitro cytotoxicity of several kinds of chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    França, Rodrigo; Mbeh, Doris A; Samani, Taraneh Djavanbakht; Le Tien, Canh; Mateescu, Mircea A; Yahia, L'Hocine; Sacher, Edward

    2013-11-01

    The surfaces of three chitosan samples, differing only in their degrees of deacetylation and of carboxyethyl chitosan were chemically characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared, both before and after sterilization with ethylene oxide. Unexpected elemental ratios suggest that surface chemical modification occurred during the processing of the original chitin, with further surface modification on subsequent sterilization, despite previous reports to the contrary. Cell viability was evaluated by direct contact methyl thiazole tetrazolium and lactate dehydrogenase assays between the chitosan particles and A549 human epithelial cells, which demonstrated that the modifications incurred on sterilization are reflected in biocompatibility changes. All the samples were found to be biocompatible and nontoxic before sterilization and remained so subsequently. PMID:24591223

  2. Quantum chemistry of the oxygen evolution reaction on cobalt(ii,iii) oxide - implications for designing the optimal catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaisance, Craig P; Reuter, Karsten; van Santen, Rutger A

    2016-07-01

    Density functional theory is used to examine the changes in electronic structure that occur during the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) catalyzed by active sites on three different surface terminations of Co3O4. These three active sites have reactive oxo species with differing degrees of coordination by Co cations - a μ(3)-oxo on the (311) surface, a μ(2)-oxo on the (110)-A surface, and an η-oxo on the (110)-B surface. The kinetically relevant step on all surfaces over a wide range of applied potentials is the nucleophilic addition of water to the oxo, which is responsible for formation of the O-O bond. The intrinsic reactivity of a site for this step is found to increase as the coordination of the oxo decreases with the μ(3)-oxo on the (311) surface being the least reactive and the η-oxo on the (110)-B surface being the most reactive. A detailed analysis of the electronic changes occurring during water addition on the three sites reveals that this trend is due to both a decrease in the attractive local Madelung potential on the oxo and a decrease in electron withdrawal from the oxo by Co neighbors. Applying a similar electronic structure analysis to the oxidation steps preceding water addition in the catalytic cycle shows that analogous electronic changes occur during this process, explaining a correlation observed between the oxidation potential of a site and its intrinsic reactivity for water addition. This concept is then used to specify criteria for the design of an optimal OER catalyst at a given applied potential. PMID:27108887

  3. The Discovery-Oriented Approach to Organic Chemistry. 7. Rearrangement of "trans"-Stilbene Oxide with Bismuth Trifluoromethanesulfonate and Other Metal Triflates: A Microscale Green Organic Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, James E.; Huddle, Matthew G.; Rogers, Jamie L.; Yung, Herbie; Mohan, Ram S.

    2008-01-01

    Although green chemistry principles are increasingly stressed in the undergraduate curriculum, there are only a few lab experiments wherein the toxicity of reagents is taken into consideration in the design of the experiment. We report a microscale green organic chemistry laboratory experiment that illustrates the utility of metal triflates,…

  4. The true nature of the Di-iron(III) gamma-Keggin structure in water: catalytic aerobic oxidation and chemistry of an unsymmetrical trimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botar, Bogdan; Geletii, Yurii V; Kögerler, Paul; Musaev, Djamaladdin G; Morokuma, Keiji; Weinstock, Ira A; Hill, Craig L

    2006-08-30

    The complex [gamma(1,2)-SiW(10){Fe(OH(2))}(2)O(38)](6)(-) (1) has been reported to catalyze the much sought reductant-free selective O(2)-based epoxidation of alkenes (Nishiyama, Y.; Nakagawa, Y.; Mizuno, N. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2001, 40, 3639-3641) in chlorocarbon-acetonitrile solution. The challenge of reproducing catalysis by 1 led us to examine this chemistry in detail. In H(2)O, a desirable solvent for catalysis, 1, does not exist in the proposed organic-medium form in which the two iron atoms are in the binding pocket defined by the equatorial oxygens and, importantly, by two oxygens bound to the central Si heteroatom. Instead, 1 in H(2)O initially forms an unusual trimer [{Fe(2)(OH)(3)(H(2)O)(2)}(3)(gamma-SiW(10)O(36))(3)](15)(-) (2). The X-ray structure of 2 shows that the Fe-O(Si) bonds are cleaved and new bonds (mu-hydroxo bridges) form between these Fe centers and those of the neighboring [gamma(1,2)-SiW(10)Fe(2)] units. Structural, physical, and computational evidence indicate that if the bonds between the d-electron center, M (Fe in the case of 1 and 2), and the terminal ligands on M are stronger than the M-O(x)() bonds, then the out-of-pocket form is more stable and is the one observed. Significantly, 2 in H(2)O forms an intermediate that catalyzes the effective aerobic oxidation of sulfur compounds (mercaptoethanol is oxidized to the corresponding disulfide by O(2) at ambient pressure and temperature). All experimental findings are consistent with dissociation of a gamma-SiW(10) Keggin unit from the trimer, 2, to form the catalytically active species. PMID:16925446

  5. Design and synthesis of magnetic binary metal oxides nanocomposites through dopamine chemistry for highly selective enrichment of phosphopeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mengyi; Sun, Xueni; Li, Yan; Deng, Chunhui

    2016-03-01

    In this work, for the first time, magnetic binary metal oxides nanocomposites which integrated Zr and Ti into one entity on an atomic scale on polydopamine coated magnetic graphene (magG/PD/(Zr-Ti)O4 ) was designed and synthesized, and applied to the enrichment of phosphopeptides. The newly prepared magG/PD/(Zr-Ti)O4 composites gathered the advantages of large surface area, superparamagnetism, biocompatibility and the enhanced affinity properties to phosphopeptides. MagG/PD/ZrO2 , magG/PD/TiO2 , as well as the simple physical mixture of them were introduced to compare with magG/PD/(Zr-Ti)O4 composites. High sensitivity (1 pg/μL or 4.0 × 10(-11) M) and selectivity (weight ratio of β-casein and BSA reached up to 1:8000) toward phosphopeptides were also presented for magG/PD/(Zr-Ti)O4 composites. Additionally, mouse brain tissue was chose as the real samples to further investigate the phosphopeptides enrichment ability of this new material. PMID:26702589

  6. Covalent functionalization of reduced graphene oxide with porphyrin by means of diazonium chemistry for nonlinear optical performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Aijian; Yu, Wang; Huang, Zhipeng; Zhou, Feng; Song, Jingbao; Song, Yinglin; Long, Lingliang; Cifuentes, Marie P.; Humphrey, Mark G.; Zhang, Long; Shao, Jianda; Zhang, Chi

    2016-01-01

    Reduced graphene oxide (RGO)-porphyrin (TPP) nanohybrids (RGO-TPP 1 and RGO-TPP 2) were prepared by two synthetic routes that involve functionalization of the RGO using diazonium salts. The microscopic structures, morphology, photophysical properties and nonlinear optical performance of the resultant RGO-TPP nanohybrids were investigated. The covalent bonding of the porphyrin-functionalized-RGO nanohybrid materials was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. Attachment of the porphyrin units to the surface of the RGO by diazotization significantly improves the solubility and ease of processing of these RGO-based nanohybrid materials. Ultraviolet/visible absorption and steady-state fluorescence studies indicate considerable π-π interactions and effective photo-induced electron and/or energy transfer between the porphyrin moieties and the extended π-system of RGO. The nonlinear optical properties of RGO-TPP 1 and RGO-TPP 2 were investigated by open-aperture Z-scan measurements at 532 nm with both 4 ns and 21 ps laser pulses, the results showing that the chemical nanohybrids exhibit improved nonlinear optical properties compared to those of the benchmark material C60, and the constituent RGO or porphyrins. PMID:27011265

  7. Covalent functionalization of reduced graphene oxide with porphyrin by means of diazonium chemistry for nonlinear optical performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Aijian; Yu, Wang; Huang, Zhipeng; Zhou, Feng; Song, Jingbao; Song, Yinglin; Long, Lingliang; Cifuentes, Marie P.; Humphrey, Mark G.; Zhang, Long; Shao, Jianda; Zhang, Chi

    2016-03-01

    Reduced graphene oxide (RGO)-porphyrin (TPP) nanohybrids (RGO-TPP 1 and RGO-TPP 2) were prepared by two synthetic routes that involve functionalization of the RGO using diazonium salts. The microscopic structures, morphology, photophysical properties and nonlinear optical performance of the resultant RGO-TPP nanohybrids were investigated. The covalent bonding of the porphyrin-functionalized-RGO nanohybrid materials was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. Attachment of the porphyrin units to the surface of the RGO by diazotization significantly improves the solubility and ease of processing of these RGO-based nanohybrid materials. Ultraviolet/visible absorption and steady-state fluorescence studies indicate considerable π-π interactions and effective photo-induced electron and/or energy transfer between the porphyrin moieties and the extended π-system of RGO. The nonlinear optical properties of RGO-TPP 1 and RGO-TPP 2 were investigated by open-aperture Z-scan measurements at 532 nm with both 4 ns and 21 ps laser pulses, the results showing that the chemical nanohybrids exhibit improved nonlinear optical properties compared to those of the benchmark material C60, and the constituent RGO or porphyrins.

  8. Covalent functionalization of reduced graphene oxide with porphyrin by means of diazonium chemistry for nonlinear optical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Aijian; Yu, Wang; Huang, Zhipeng; Zhou, Feng; Song, Jingbao; Song, Yinglin; Long, Lingliang; Cifuentes, Marie P; Humphrey, Mark G; Zhang, Long; Shao, Jianda; Zhang, Chi

    2016-01-01

    Reduced graphene oxide (RGO)-porphyrin (TPP) nanohybrids (RGO-TPP 1 and RGO-TPP 2) were prepared by two synthetic routes that involve functionalization of the RGO using diazonium salts. The microscopic structures, morphology, photophysical properties and nonlinear optical performance of the resultant RGO-TPP nanohybrids were investigated. The covalent bonding of the porphyrin-functionalized-RGO nanohybrid materials was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. Attachment of the porphyrin units to the surface of the RGO by diazotization significantly improves the solubility and ease of processing of these RGO-based nanohybrid materials. Ultraviolet/visible absorption and steady-state fluorescence studies indicate considerable π-π interactions and effective photo-induced electron and/or energy transfer between the porphyrin moieties and the extended π-system of RGO. The nonlinear optical properties of RGO-TPP 1 and RGO-TPP 2 were investigated by open-aperture Z-scan measurements at 532 nm with both 4 ns and 21 ps laser pulses, the results showing that the chemical nanohybrids exhibit improved nonlinear optical properties compared to those of the benchmark material C60, and the constituent RGO or porphyrins. PMID:27011265

  9. Chemistry, phase formation, and catalytic activity of thin palladium-containing oxide films synthesized by plasma-assisted physical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre

    2010-11-26

    The chemistry, microstructure, and catalytic activity of thin films incorporating palladium were studied using scanning and transmission electron microscopies, X-ray diffraction, spectrophotometry, 4-point probe and catalytic tests. The films were synthesized using pulsed filtered cathodic arc and magnetron sputter deposition, i.e. techniques far from thermodynamic equilibrium. Catalytic particles were formed by thermally cycling thin films of the Pd-Pt-O system. The evolution and phase formation in such films as a function of temperature were discussed in terms of the stability of PdO and PtO2 in air. The catalytic efficiency was found to be strongly affected by the chemical composition, with oxidized palladium definitely playing a major role in the combustion of methane. Reactive sputter deposition of thin films in the Pd-Zr-Y-O system allowed us forming microstructures ranging from nanocrystalline zirconia to palladium nanoparticles embedded in a (Zr,Y)4Pd2O matrix. The sequence of phase formation is put in relation to simple thermodynamic considerations.

  10. Synthesis of P-stereogenic diarylphosphinic amides by directed lithiation: transformation into tertiary phosphine oxides via methanolysis, aryne chemistry and complexation behaviour toward zinc(ii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Águila-Sánchez, Miguel A; Navarro, Yolanda; García López, Jesús; Guedes, Guilherme P; López Ortiz, Fernando

    2016-02-01

    The highly diastereoselective synthesis of P-stereogenic phosphinic amides via directed ortho lithiation (DoLi) of (SC)-P,P-diphenylphosphinic amides with t-BuLi followed by electrophilic quench reactions is described. Functionalised derivatives containing a wide variety of ortho substituents (Cl, Br, I, OH, N3, SiMe3, SnMe3, P(O)Ph2, Me, allyl, (t)BuOCO) have been prepared in high yields with diastereomeric ratios up to 98 : 2. The X-ray diffraction structure of the ortho-stannylated and ortho-iodo compounds showed that the pro-S P-phenyl ring was stereoselectively ortho-deprotonated by the organolithium base. The usefulness of the method is supported by two key transformations, the synthesis of P-stereogenic methyl phosphinates through replacement of the chiral auxiliary by a methoxy group and the first example of the insertion of benzyne into the P-N bond of a P-stereogenic phosphinic amide. A DFT study of this reaction showed that the insertion proceeds through a [2 + 2] cycloaddition and a subsequent ring-opening with retention of the P-configuration. Explorative coordination chemistry of the new P-stereogenic ligands provided access to a chiral phosphinic amide-phosphine oxide Zn(ii) complex, the crystal structure of which is reported. PMID:26370566

  11. Biocatalytic desulfurization of diesel oil in an air-lift reactor with immobilized Gordonia nitida CYKS1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, In Su; Bae, Hee-Sung; Ryu, Hee Wook; Cho, Kyung-Suk; Chang, Yong Keun

    2005-01-01

    A new type of air-lift reactor with immobilized Gordonia nitida CYKS1 cells on a fibrous support was designed and used for the biocatalytic desulfurization (BDS) of diesel oil. Its performance was evaluated at different phase ratios of the oil to the aqueous medium (or oil phase fractions) and different sucrose concentrations. When the reaction mixture contained 10% diesel oil (v/v), 61-67% of sulfur was removed as the sulfur content decreased from 202-250 to 76-90 mg L(-1) in 72 h. The sulfur content did not decrease any further because the remaining sulfur compounds were recalcitrant to BDS. During the desulfurization, the strain CYKS1 consumed hydrocarbons in the diesel oil, mainly n-alkanes with 10-26 carbons, as carbon source even though an easily available carbon source, sucrose, was supplied. PMID:15932256

  12. Biocatalytic self-assembly of supramolecular charge-transfer nanostructures based on n-type semiconductor-appended peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalluri, Siva Krishna Mohan; Berdugo, Cristina; Javid, Nadeem; Frederix, Pim W J M; Ulijn, Rein V

    2014-06-01

    The reversible in situ formation of a self-assembly building block (naphthalenediimide (NDI)-dipeptide conjugate) by enzymatic condensation of NDI-functionalized tyrosine (NDI-Y) and phenylalanine-amide (F-NH2) to form NDI-YF-NH2 is described. This coupled biocatalytic condensation/assembly approach is thermodynamically driven and gives rise to nanostructures with optimized supramolecular interactions as evidenced by substantial aggregation induced emission upon assembly. Furthermore, in the presence of di-hydroxy/alkoxy naphthalene donors, efficient charge-transfer complexes are produced. The dynamic formation of NDI-YF-NH2 and electronic and H-bonding interactions are analyzed and characterized by different methods. Microscopy (TEM and AFM) and rheology are used to characterize the formed nanostructures. Dynamic nanostructures, whose formation and function are driven by free-energy minimization, are inherently self-healing and provide opportunities for the development of aqueous adaptive nanotechnology. PMID:24788665

  13. Trace Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Whitefield, Philip

    1999-01-01

    , in addition, of the pressure, temperature, and velocity. A near term goal of the experimental program should be to confirm the nonlinear effects of sulfur speciation, and if present, to provide an explanation for them. It is also desirable to examine if the particulate matter retains any sulfur. The recommendation is to examine the effects on SOx production of variations in fuel-bound sulfur and aromatic content (which may affect the amount of particulates formed). These experiments should help us to understand if there is a coupling between particulate formation and SO, concentration. Similarly, any coupling with NOx can be examined either by introducing NOx into the combustion air or by using fuel-bound nitrogen. Also of immediate urgency is the need to establish and validate a detailed mechanism for sulfur oxidation/aerosol formation, whose chemistry is concluded to be homogeneous, because there is not enough surface area for heterogeneous effects. It is envisaged that this work will involve both experimental and theoretical programs. The experimental work will require, in addition to the measurements described above, fundamental studies in devices such as flow reactors and shock tubes. Complementing this effort should be modeling and theoretical activities. One impediment to the successful modeling of sulfur oxidation is the lack of reliable data for thermodynamic and transport properties for several species, such as aqueous nitric acid, sulfur oxides, and sulfuric acid. Quantum mechanical calculations are recommended as a convenient means of deriving values for these properties. Such calculations would also help establish rate constants for several important reactions for which experimental measurements are inherently fraught with uncertainty. Efforts to implement sufficiently detailed chemistry into computational fluid dynamic codes should be continued. Zero- and one-dimensional flow models are also useful vehicles for elucidating the minimal set of species and

  14. Social Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Lichtfouse, Eric; Schwarzbauer, Jan; Robert, Didier

    2012-01-01

    International audience This article is both an essay to propose social chemistry as a new scientific discipline, and a preface of the book Environmental Chemistry for a Sustainable World. Environmental chemistry is a fast emerging discipline aiming at the understanding the fate of pollutants in ecosystems and at designing novel processes that are safe for ecosystems. Past pollution should be cleaned, future pollution should be predicted and avoided (Lichtfouse et al., 2005a). Such advices ...

  15. Computational chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Truhlar, Donald G.; McKoy, Vincent

    2000-01-01

    Computational chemistry has come of age. With significant strides in computer hardware and software over the last few decades, computational chemistry has achieved full partnership with theory and experiment as a tool for understanding and predicting the behavior of a broad range of chemical, physical, and biological phenomena. The Nobel Prize award to John Pople and Walter Kohn in 1998 highlighted the importance of these advances in computational chemistry. With massively parallel computers ...

  16. Bioinorganic Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Bertini, Ivano; Gray, Harry B.; Lippard, Stephen J.; Valentine, Joan Selverstone

    1994-01-01

    This book covers material that could be included in a one-quarter or one-semester course in bioinorganic chemistry for graduate students and advanced undergraduate students in chemistry or biochemistry. We believe that such a course should provide students with the background required to follow the research literature in the field. The topics were chosen to represent those areas of bioinorganic chemistry that are mature enough for textbook presentation. Although each chapter presents material...

  17. Technetium chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technetium chemistry is a young and developing field. Despite the limited knowledge of its chemistry, technetium is the workhorse for nuclear medicine. Technetium is also a significant environmental concern because it is formed as a byproduct of nuclear weapons production and fission-power generators. Development of new technetium radio-pharmaceuticals and effective environmental control depends strongly upon knowledge of basic technetium chemistry. The authors performed research into the basic coordination and organometallic chemistry of technetium and used this knowledge to address nuclear medicine and environmental applications. This is the final report of a three-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

  18. Hybrid membrane with TiO2 based bio-catalytic nanoparticle suspension system for the degradation of bisphenol-A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jingwei; Dong, Guangxi; Luu, Belinda; Sengpiel, Robert G; Ye, Yun; Wessling, Matthias; Chen, Vicki

    2014-10-01

    The removal of micropollutant in wastewater treatment has become a key environmental challenge for many industrialized countries. One approach is to use enzymes such as laccase for the degradation of micropollutants such as bisphenol-A. In this work, laccase was covalently immobilized on APTES modified TiO2 nanoparticles, and the effects of particle modification on the bio-catalytic performance were examined and optimized. These bio-catalytic particles were then suspended in a hybrid membrane reactor for BPA removal with good BPA degradation efficiency observed. Substantial improvement in laccase stability was achieved in the hybrid system compared with free laccase under simulated harsh industrial wastewater treatment conditions (such as a wide range of pH and presence of inhibitors). Kinetic study provided insight of the effect of immobilization on the bio-degradation reaction. PMID:25084046

  19. A handbook of nuclear water chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This contents is divided three parts. The first part deals with chemistry which is related water nuclear energy. So it explains the role of water in atomic reactor including the basic properties of water, the oxide chemistry electricity chemistry, radiochemistry and measuring techniques of the quality of water in nuclear plant and radiation. The second part introduces technique of nuclear water chemistry, which explains purpose, definition and speciality of water chemistry in light-water reactor. The third part indicates application technology of water chemistry in nuclear energy including putting zinc in light-water reactor and technology of surveillance of leakage in steam generator.

  20. Selective recovery of pure copper nanopowder from indium-tin-oxide etching wastewater by various wet chemical reduction process: Understanding their chemistry and comparisons of sustainable valorization processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Basudev; Mishra, Chinmayee; Hong, Hyun Seon; Cho, Sung-Soo

    2016-05-01

    Sustainable valorization processes for selective recovery of pure copper nanopowder from Indium-Tin-Oxide (ITO) etching wastewater by various wet chemical reduction processes, their chemistry has been investigated and compared. After the indium recovery by solvent extraction from ITO etching wastewater, the same is also an environmental challenge, needs to be treated before disposal. After the indium recovery, ITO etching wastewater contains 6.11kg/m(3) of copper and 1.35kg/m(3) of aluminum, pH of the solution is very low converging to 0 and contain a significant amount of chlorine in the media. In this study, pure copper nanopowder was recovered using various reducing reagents by wet chemical reduction and characterized. Different reducing agents like a metallic, an inorganic acid and an organic acid were used to understand reduction behavior of copper in the presence of aluminum in a strong chloride medium of the ITO etching wastewater. The effect of a polymer surfactant Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), which was included to prevent aggregation, to provide dispersion stability and control the size of copper nanopowder was investigated and compared. The developed copper nanopowder recovery techniques are techno-economical feasible processes for commercial production of copper nanopowder in the range of 100-500nm size from the reported facilities through a one-pot synthesis. By all the process reported pure copper nanopowder can be recovered with>99% efficiency. After the copper recovery, copper concentration in the wastewater reduced to acceptable limit recommended by WHO for wastewater disposal. The process is not only beneficial for recycling of copper, but also helps to address environment challenged posed by ITO etching wastewater. From a complex wastewater, synthesis of pure copper nanopowder using various wet chemical reduction route and their comparison is the novelty of this recovery process. PMID:26918838

  1. Development of a two separate phase submerged biocatalytic membrane reactor for the production of fatty acids and glycerol from residual vegetable oil streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enzymatic membrane bioreactors (MBR) have been studied for very different applications since many years. Submerged MBR has also been successfully used for treatment of wastewater. In the existing submerged configuration, the membrane works as the separation unit operation while the bioconversion is carried out by microorganisms suspended in the tank reactor. In the present work, a novel approach that combines the concept of biocatalytic membranes and submerged modules is proposed for the treatment of biomass. Lipase enzyme from Candida rugosa has been immobilized in polyethersulphone hollow fiber (PES HF) membrane in order to develop a two separate phase biocatalytic submerged membrane reactor in which the membrane works as both catalytic and separation unit. Furthermore, the submerged biocatalytic membrane reactor is intended for production of valuable components from waste biomass, and different physical, chemical and fluid dynamics has been optimized. Response surface methodology (RSM) has been used to model the operating parameters and Box-Behnken method has been applied to maximize the fatty acids production and optimization. At TMP 80 ± 2 kPa, pH 7.40 ± 0.1, temperature 35 ± 0.5 °C with an axial velocity of 0.07 ± 0.01 ms−1 and organic stirring 89.01 rad s−1 the system showed the global examined value within the experimental scope. The proof of principle using fried cooked oils has been performed in later period. -- Highlights: Catalytic activity of enzyme in submerged condition has been studied. ► Optimization of submerged biocatalytic membrane reactor for production of value added components. ► Waste valorization by membrane reactor in order to minimization of waste. ► Three different waste oil (as waste biomass) has been studied in respect to product generation and different results obtained.

  2. Biocatalytic synthesis of flavones and hydroxyl-small molecules by recombinant Escherichia coli cells expressing the cyanobacterial CYP110E1 gene

    OpenAIRE

    Makino Takuya; Otomatsu Toshihiko; Shindo Kazutoshi; Kitamura Emi; Sandmann Gerhard; Harada Hisashi; Misawa Norihiko

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Cyanobacteria possess several cytochrome P450s, but very little is known about their catalytic functions. CYP110 genes unique to cyanaobacteria are widely distributed in heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria including nitrogen-fixing genera Nostoc and Anabaena. We screened the biocatalytic functions of all P450s from three cyanobacterial strains of genus Nostoc or Anabaena using a series of small molecules that contain flavonoids, sesquiterpenes, low-molecular-weight drugs, and...

  3. Biocatalytic Conversion of Avermectin to 4″-Oxo-Avermectin: Improvement of Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenase Specificity by Directed Evolution▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trefzer, Axel; Jungmann, Volker; Molnár, István; Botejue, Ajit; Buckel, Dagmar; Frey, Gerhard; Hill, D. Steven; Jörg, Mario; Ligon, James M.; Mason, Dylan; Moore, David; Pachlatko, J. Paul; Richardson, Toby H.; Spangenberg, Petra; Wall, Mark A.; Zirkle, Ross; Stege, Justin T.

    2007-01-01

    Discovery of the CYP107Z subfamily of cytochrome P450 oxidases (CYPs) led to an alternative biocatalytic synthesis of 4″-oxo-avermectin, a key intermediate for the commercial production of the semisynthetic insecticide emamectin. However, under industrial process conditions, these wild-type CYPs showed lower yields due to side product formation. Molecular evolution employing GeneReassembly was used to improve the regiospecificity of these enzymes by a combination of random mutagenesis, protein structure-guided site-directed mutagenesis, and recombination of multiple natural and synthetic CYP107Z gene fragments. To assess the specificity of CYP mutants, a miniaturized, whole-cell biocatalytic reaction system that allowed high-throughput screening of large numbers of variants was developed. In an iterative process consisting of four successive rounds of GeneReassembly evolution, enzyme variants with significantly improved specificity for the production of 4″-oxo-avermectin were identified; these variants could be employed for a more economical industrial biocatalytic process to manufacture emamectin. PMID:17483257

  4. Good chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Petsko, Gregory A

    2004-01-01

    The subject matter in chemistry courses reflects almost nothing of the issues that chemists are interested in. It is important to formulate a set of topics - and a Medical College Admissions Test reflecting them - that would leave chemistry departments no choice but to change their teaching.

  5. Reaction chemistry of cerium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    It is truly ironic that a synthetic organic chemist likely has far greater knowledge of the reaction chemistry of cerium(IV) than an inorganic colleague. Cerium(IV) reagents have long since been employed as oxidants in effecting a wide variety of organic transformations. Conversely, prior to the late 1980s, the number of well characterized cerium(IV) complexes did not extend past a handful of known species. Though in many other areas, interest in the molecular chemistry of the 4f-elements has undergone an explosive growth over the last twenty years, the chemistry of cerium(IV) has for the most part been overlooked. This report describes reactions of cerium complexes and structure.

  6. Heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schryer, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    The present conference on heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry considers such topics concerning clusters, particles and microparticles as common problems in nucleation and growth, chemical kinetics, and catalysis, chemical reactions with aerosols, electron beam studies of natural and anthropogenic microparticles, and structural studies employing molecular beam techniques, as well as such gas-solid interaction topics as photoassisted reactions, catalyzed photolysis, and heterogeneous catalysis. Also discussed are sulfur dioxide absorption, oxidation, and oxidation inhibition in falling drops, sulfur dioxide/water equilibria, the evidence for heterogeneous catalysis in the atmosphere, the importance of heterogeneous processes to tropospheric chemistry, soot-catalyzed atmospheric reactions, and the concentrations and mechanisms of formation of sulfate in the atmospheric boundary layer.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of biocatalytic γ-Fe2O3@SiO2 particles as recoverable bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, A M; Serrano-Ruiz, D; Laurenti, M; Alonso-Cristobal, P; Lopez-Cabarcos, E; Rubio-Retama, J

    2014-02-01

    In this work, we present a suitable methodology to produce magnetically recoverable bioreactors based on enzymes, which are covalently attached on the surface of iron oxide@silica nanoparticles. In order to produce this system, iron oxide clusters with a mean diameter of 68 nm were covered with silica. This strategy yields spherical γ-Fe2O3@SiO2 cluster@shell nanoparticles with a mean diameter of 200 nm which present magnetic responsiveness and enhanced stability. The surface of these nanoparticles was modified into two steps with the aim to obtain carboxylic functional groups, which were activated to react with the enzyme glucose oxidase (GOx) that was thus immobilized on the surface of the nanoparticles. The objective of this chemistry at the nanoparticles interface is to produce magnetic-responsive bioreactors. The enzymatic activity was evaluated by using the recoverable bioreactors as part of an amperometric biosensor. These measurements allowed determining the stability, catalytic activity and the amount of enzyme immobilized on the surface of the nanoparticles. Furthermore, the functionalized nanoparticles can be recovered by applying an external magnetic field, which allows them to be employed in chemical processes where the recovery of the biocatalyst is important. PMID:24161502

  8. Quantum chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Lowe, John P

    1993-01-01

    Praised for its appealing writing style and clear pedagogy, Lowe's Quantum Chemistry is now available in its Second Edition as a text for senior undergraduate- and graduate-level chemistry students. The book assumes little mathematical or physical sophistication and emphasizes an understanding of the techniques and results of quantum chemistry, thus enabling students to comprehend much of the current chemical literature in which quantum chemical methods or concepts are used as tools. The book begins with a six-chapter introduction of standard one-dimensional systems, the hydrogen atom,

  9. Wet oxidation of ordered mesoporous carbon FDU-15 by using (NH4)2S2O8 for fast adsorption of Sr(II): An investigation on surface chemistry and adsorption mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yang; Ye, Gang; Chen, Jing; Lv, Dachao; Wang, Jianchen

    2015-12-01

    Surface modification of ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) by wet oxidation provides an oxygen-enriched platform for complexation of metal ions. Here, we present a comprehensive study on the surface chemistry and textual property of OMC FDU-15 modified by wet oxidation using (NH4)2S2O8 as a benign oxidant. And, for the first time, the adsorption behavior and mechanism of wet-oxidized OMC FDU-15 toward Sr(II) in aqueous solutions were investigated. The mesostructural regularity of the OMC FDU-15 was well-reserved under wet oxidation. Compared to OMC CMK-type counterparts prepared via nanocasting, the OMC FDU-15 by soft template method showed much-enhanced structural stability. Due to the introduction of abundant oxygen-containing species, the oxidized OMC FDU-15 exhibited excellent hydrophilicity and dispersibility in aqueous solutions. The adsorption behavior toward Sr(II) was fully investigated, showing a super-fast adsorption kinetics (equilibrium) and a Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Moreover, an in-depth X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis through deconvolution of high resolution C1s and O1s spectra was implemented to identify the chemical species of the surface functional groups, while probing the adsorption mechanism. The results suggested that oxygen donor atoms in Csbnd O single bonds mainly contribute to the adsorption of Sr(II) via formation of metal-ligand complexation.

  10. Materials Chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Fahlman, Bradley D

    2011-01-01

    The 2nd edition of Materials Chemistry builds on the strengths that were recognized by a 2008 Textbook Excellence Award from the Text and Academic Authors Association (TAA). Materials Chemistry addresses inorganic-, organic-, and nano-based materials from a structure vs. property treatment, providing a suitable breadth and depth coverage of the rapidly evolving materials field. The 2nd edition continues to offer innovative coverage and practical perspective throughout. After briefly defining materials chemistry and its history, seven chapters discuss solid-state chemistry, metals, semiconducting materials, organic "soft" materials, nanomaterials, and materials characterization. All chapters have been thoroughly updated and expanded with, for example, new sections on ‘soft lithographic’ patterning, ‘click chemistry’ polymerization, nanotoxicity, graphene, as well as many biomaterials applications. The polymer and ‘soft’ materials chapter represents the largest expansion for the 2nd edition. Each ch...

  11. Introductory Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Baron, Mark; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, Jose; Stevens, Gary; Gray, Nathan; Atherton, Thomas; Winn, Joss

    2010-01-01

    Teaching and Learning resources for the 1st Year Introductory Chemistry course (Forensic Science). 30 credits. These are Open Educational Resources (OER), made available for re-use under a Creative Commons license.

  12. Analytical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is comprised of nineteen chapters, which describes introduction of analytical chemistry, experimental error and statistics, chemistry equilibrium and solubility, gravimetric analysis with mechanism of precipitation, range and calculation of the result, volume analysis on general principle, sedimentation method on types and titration curve, acid base balance, acid base titration curve, complex and firing reaction, introduction of chemical electro analysis, acid-base titration curve, electrode and potentiometry, electrolysis and conductometry, voltammetry and polarographic spectrophotometry, atomic spectrometry, solvent extraction, chromatograph and experiments.

  13. Cluster Chemistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ Cansisting of eight scientists from the State Key Laboratory of Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces and Xiamen University, this creative research group is devoted to the research of cluster chemistry and creation of nanomaterials.After three-year hard work, the group scored a series of encouraging progresses in synthesis of clusters with special structures, including novel fullerenes, fullerene-like metal cluster compounds as well as other related nanomaterials, and their properties study.

  14. Green Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collison, Melanie

    2011-05-15

    Green chemistry is the science of chemistry used in a way that will not use or create hazardous substances. Dr. Rui Resendes is working in this field at GreenCentre Canada, an offshoot of PARTEQ Innovations in Kingston, Ontario. GreenCentre's preliminary findings suggest their licensed product {sup S}witchable Solutions{sup ,} featuring 3 classes of solvents and a surfactant, may be useful in bitumen oil sands extraction.

  15. Assessment of the reduction methods used to develop chemical schemes: building of a new chemical scheme for VOC oxidation suited to three-dimensional multiscale HOx-NOx-VOC chemistry simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Szopa

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to develop and assess an automatic procedure to generate reduced chemical schemes for the atmospheric photooxidation of volatile organic carbon (VOC compounds. The procedure is based on (i the development of a tool for writing the fully explicit schemes for VOC oxidation (see companion paper Aumont et al., 2005, (ii the application of several commonly used reduction methods to the fully explicit scheme, and (iii the assessment of resulting errors based on direct comparison between the reduced and full schemes. The reference scheme included seventy emitted VOCs chosen to be representative of both anthropogenic and biogenic emissions, and their atmospheric degradation chemistry required more than two million reactions among 350000 species. Three methods were applied to reduce the size of the reference chemical scheme: (i use of operators, based on the redundancy of the reaction sequences involved in the VOC oxidation, (ii grouping of primary species having similar reactivities into surrogate species and (iii grouping of some secondary products into surrogate species. The number of species in the final reduced scheme is 147, this being small enough for practical inclusion in current three-dimensional models. Comparisons between the fully explicit and reduced schemes, carried out with a box model for several typical tropospheric conditions, showed that the reduced chemical scheme accurately predicts ozone concentrations and some other aspects of oxidant chemistry for both polluted and clean tropospheric conditions.

  16. The migration chemistry of neptunium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemistry of neptunium, including redox properties, complex chemistry and chemistry of neptunium in its five oxidation states, III, IV, V, VI and VII has been reviewed with special emphasis on factors, which may be of importance in controlling the environmental behaviour of this element. Under environmental conditions neptunium should exist predominantly in oxidation state V in the form NpO2+ and to some extent also as Np (IV) in the form of Np4+ and Np (VI) in the form of NpO22+, whereas the other oxidation states Np (III) and Np (VII) can not exist in the environment. However, experimental evidence is lacking as is any knowledge about the mobility of neptunium in the environment. (author) 15 tabs., 2 ills., 37 refs

  17. Atmospheric Chemistry and Air Pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey S. Gaffney

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric chemistry is an important discipline for understanding air pollution and its impacts. This mini-review gives a brief history of air pollution and presents an overview of some of the basic photochemistry involved in the production of ozone and other oxidants in the atmosphere. Urban air quality issues are reviewed with a specific focus on ozone and other oxidants, primary and secondary aerosols, alternative fuels, and the potential for chlorine releases to amplify oxidant chemistry in industrial areas. Regional air pollution issues such as acid rain, long-range transport of aerosols and visibility loss, and the connections of aerosols to ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate chemistry are examined. Finally, the potential impacts of air pollutants on the global-scale radiative balances of gases and aerosols are discussed briefly.

  18. The chemistry of plutonium revealed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1941 one goal of the Manhattan Project was to unravel the chemistry of the synthetic element plutonium as rapidly as possible. Important insights were obtained from tracer experiments, but the full complexity of plutonium chemistry was not revealed until macroscopic amounts (milligrams) became available. Because processes for separation from fission products were aqueous solution based, such solution chemistry was emphasized, particularly precipitation and oxidation-reduction behavior. The latter turned out to be unusually intricate when it was discovered that two more oxidation states existed in aqueous solution than had previously been suspected. Further, it was found that an equilibrium was rapidly established among the four aqueous oxidation states while at the same time any three were not in equilibrium. These and other observations made while doing a crash study of a previously unknown element will be reported

  19. The radiation chemistry of macromolecules

    CERN Document Server

    1973-01-01

    The Radiation Chemistry of Macromolecules, Volume II is a collection of papers that discusses radiation chemistry of specific systems. Part 1 deals with radiation chemistry of substituted vinyl polymers, particularly polypropylene (PP) as its structure is intermediate between polyethylene and polyisobutylene. This part also discusses polypropylene oxide (PPOx) for it can be prepared in the atactic, isotactic, and optically active forms. One paper focuses on the fundamental chemical processes and the changes in physical properties that give rise to many different applications of polystyrene. An

  20. Radiation Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojnárovits, L.

    Ionizing radiation causes chemical changes in the molecules of the interacting medium. The initial molecules change to new molecules, resulting in changes of the physical, chemical, and eventually biological properties of the material. For instance, water decomposes to its elements H2 and O2. In polymers, degradation and crosslinking take place. In biopolymers, e.g., DNS strand breaks and other alterations occur. Such changes are to be avoided in some cases (radiation protection), however, in other cases they are used for technological purposes (radiation processing). This chapter introduces radiation chemistry by discussing the sources of ionizing radiation (radionuclide sources, machine sources), absorption of radiation energy, techniques used in radiation chemistry research, and methods of absorbed energy (absorbed dose) measurements. Radiation chemistry of different classes of inorganic (water and aqueous solutions, inorganic solids, ionic liquids (ILs)) and organic substances (hydrocarbons, halogenated compounds, polymers, and biomolecules) is discussed in concise form together with theoretical and experimental backgrounds. An essential part of the chapter is the introduction of radiation processing technologies in the fields of polymer chemistry, food processing, and sterilization. The application of radiation chemistry to nuclear technology and to protection of environment (flue gas treatment, wastewater treatment) is also discussed.

  1. Quantum chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Lowe, John P

    2006-01-01

    Lowe's new edition assumes little mathematical or physical sophistication and emphasizes an understanding of the techniques and results of quantum chemistry. It can serve as a primary text in quantum chemistry courses, and enables students and researchers to comprehend the current literature. This third edition has been thoroughly updated and includes numerous new exercises to facilitate self-study and solutions to selected exercises.* Assumes little initial mathematical or physical sophistication, developing insights and abilities in the context of actual problems* Provides thorough treatment

  2. Polymer Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Martha; Roberson, Luke; Caraccio, Anne

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes new technologies in polymer and material chemistry that benefits NASA programs and missions. The topics include: 1) What are Polymers?; 2) History of Polymer Chemistry; 3) Composites/Materials Development at KSC; 4) Why Wiring; 5) Next Generation Wiring Materials; 6) Wire System Materials and Integration; 7) Self-Healing Wire Repair; 8) Smart Wiring Summary; 9) Fire and Polymers; 10) Aerogel Technology; 11) Aerogel Composites; 12) Aerogels for Oil Remediation; 13) KSC's Solution; 14) Chemochromic Hydrogen Sensors; 15) STS-130 and 131 Operations; 16) HyperPigment; 17) Antimicrobial Materials; 18) Conductive Inks Formulations for Multiple Applications; and 19) Testing and Processing Equipment.

  3. Ni-doped (CeO2−δ)–YSZ mesoarchitectured with nanocrystalline framework: the effect of thermal treatment on structure, surface chemistry and catalytic properties in the partial oxidation of methane (CPOM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni-doped (CeO2−δ)–YSZ (5 mol% Ni oxide, 10 mol% ceria) mesoarchitectures (MA) with nanocrystalline framework have been synthesized by an original, facile and cheap approach based on Triton X100 nonionic surfactant as template and water as solvent at a strong basic pH value. Following the hydrothermal treatment under autogenous pressure (∼18 bars), Ni, Ce, Y, and Zr were well ordered as MA with nanocrystalline framework, assuring thermal stability. A comprehensive investigation of structure, texture, morphology, and surface chemistry was performed by means of a variety of complementary techniques (X-Ray Diffraction, XRD; Raman Spectroscopy, RS; Brunauer—Emmett—Teller, BET; Temperature—Programmed Reduction, TPR; Transmission Electron Microscopy, TEM and DF-STEM; X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, XPS; Catalytic activity and selectivity). N2 sorption measurements highlighted that the mesoporous structure is formed at 600 °C and remains stable at 800 °C. At 900 °C, the MA collapses, favoring the formation of macropores. The XRD and Raman Spectroscopy of all samples showed the presence of a pure, single phase with fluorite-type structure. At 900 °C, an increased tetragonal distortion of the cubic lattice was observed. The surface chemistry probed by XPS exhibits a mixture of oxidation states (Ce3+ + Ce4+) with high percentage of Ce3+ valence state ∼35 % and (Ni3+ and Ni2+) oxidation states induced by the thermal treatment. These nanoparticles assembled into MA show high stability and selectivity over time in catalytic partial oxidation of methane (CPOM). These promising performances suggest an interesting prospect for introduction as anode within IT-SOFC assemblies.Graphical Abstract

  4. Ni-doped (CeO{sub 2−δ})–YSZ mesoarchitectured with nanocrystalline framework: the effect of thermal treatment on structure, surface chemistry and catalytic properties in the partial oxidation of methane (CPOM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somacescu, Simona, E-mail: ssimona@icf.ro [Romanian Academy, “Ilie Murgulescu” Institute of Physical Chemistry (Romania); Florea, Mihaela [University of Bucharest, Department of Organic Chemistry, Biochemistry and Catalysis, Faculty of Chemistry (Romania); Osiceanu, Petre; Calderon-Moreno, Jose Maria [Romanian Academy, “Ilie Murgulescu” Institute of Physical Chemistry (Romania); Ghica, Corneliu [National Institute of Materials Physics (Romania); Serra, Jose Manuel [Universidad Politécnica de Valencia - Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Instituto de Tecnología Química (Spain)

    2015-11-15

    Ni-doped (CeO{sub 2−δ})–YSZ (5 mol% Ni oxide, 10 mol% ceria) mesoarchitectures (MA) with nanocrystalline framework have been synthesized by an original, facile and cheap approach based on Triton X100 nonionic surfactant as template and water as solvent at a strong basic pH value. Following the hydrothermal treatment under autogenous pressure (∼18 bars), Ni, Ce, Y, and Zr were well ordered as MA with nanocrystalline framework, assuring thermal stability. A comprehensive investigation of structure, texture, morphology, and surface chemistry was performed by means of a variety of complementary techniques (X-Ray Diffraction, XRD; Raman Spectroscopy, RS; Brunauer—Emmett—Teller, BET; Temperature—Programmed Reduction, TPR; Transmission Electron Microscopy, TEM and DF-STEM; X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, XPS; Catalytic activity and selectivity). N{sub 2} sorption measurements highlighted that the mesoporous structure is formed at 600 °C and remains stable at 800 °C. At 900 °C, the MA collapses, favoring the formation of macropores. The XRD and Raman Spectroscopy of all samples showed the presence of a pure, single phase with fluorite-type structure. At 900 °C, an increased tetragonal distortion of the cubic lattice was observed. The surface chemistry probed by XPS exhibits a mixture of oxidation states (Ce{sup 3+} + Ce{sup 4+}) with high percentage of Ce{sup 3+} valence state ∼35 % and (Ni{sup 3+} and Ni{sup 2+}) oxidation states induced by the thermal treatment. These nanoparticles assembled into MA show high stability and selectivity over time in catalytic partial oxidation of methane (CPOM). These promising performances suggest an interesting prospect for introduction as anode within IT-SOFC assemblies.Graphical Abstract.

  5. Alkene Cleavage Catalysed by Heme and Nonheme Enzymes: Reaction Mechanisms and Biocatalytic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco G. Mutti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The oxidative cleavage of alkenes is classically performed by chemical methods, although they display several drawbacks. Ozonolysis requires harsh conditions (−78°C, for a safe process and reducing reagents in a molar amount, whereas the use of poisonous heavy metals such as Cr, Os, or Ru as catalysts is additionally plagued by low yield and selectivity. Conversely, heme and nonheme enzymes can catalyse the oxidative alkene cleavage at ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure in an aqueous buffer, showing excellent chemo- and regioselectivities in certain cases. This paper focuses on the alkene cleavage catalysed by iron cofactor-dependent enzymes encompassing the reaction mechanisms (in case where it is known and the application of these enzymes in biocatalysis.

  6. Amination of ω-Functionalized Aliphatic Primary Alcohols by a Biocatalytic Oxidation–Transamination Cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickl, Mathias; Fuchs, Michael; Glueck, Silvia M; Faber, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    Amination of non-activated aliphatic fatty alcohols to the corresponding primary amines was achieved through a five-enzyme cascade reaction by coupling a long-chain alcohol oxidase from Aspergillus fumigatus (LCAO_Af) with a ω-transaminase from Chromobacterium violaceum (ω-TA_Cv). The alcohol was oxidized at the expense of molecular oxygen to yield the corresponding aldehyde, which was subsequently aminated by the PLP-dependent ω-TA to yield the final primary amine product. The overall cascade was optimized with respect to pH, O2 pressure, substrate concentration, decomposition of H2O2 (derived from alcohol oxidation), NADH regeneration, and biocatalyst ratio. The substrate scope of this concept was investigated under optimized conditions by using terminally functionalized C4–C11 fatty primary alcohols bearing halogen, alkyne, amino, hydroxy, thiol, and nitrile groups. PMID:26583050

  7. Markedly improving asymmetric oxidation of 1-(4-methoxyphenyl) ethanol with Acetobacter sp. CCTCC M209061 cells by adding deep eutectic solvent in a two-phase system

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Ping; LIANG, JING; Cheng, Jing; Zong, Min-Hua; Lou, Wen-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background Enantiopure (S)-1-(4-methoxyphenyl) ethanol {(S)-MOPE} can be employed as an important synthon for the synthesis of cycloalkyl [b] indoles with the treatment function for general allergic response. To date, the biocatalytic resolution of racemic MOPE through asymmetric oxidation in the biphasic system has remained largely unexplored. Additionally, deep eutectic solvents (DESs), as a new class of promising green solvents, have recently gained increasing attention in biocatalysis for...

  8. Organic chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activities of the mycotoxin research group are discussed. This includes the isolation and structure determination of mycotoxins, plant products, the biosyntheris of mycotoxins, the synthesis and characteristics of steroids, the synthesis and mechanistic aspects of heterocyclic chemistry and the functionality of steroids over long distances. Nmr spectra and mass spectroscopy are some of the techniques used

  9. Reinventing Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Whitesides, George McClelland

    2015-01-01

    Chemistry is in a period of change, from an era focused on molecules and reactions, to one in which manipulations of systems of molecules and reactions will be essential parts of controlling larger systems. This Essay traces paths from the past to possible futures.

  10. Chemistry Notes

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Short articles on the kinetics of the hydrogen peroxide-iodide ion reaction, simulation of fluidization catalysis, the use of Newman projection diagrams to represent steric relationships in organic chemistry, the use of synthetic substrates for proteolytic enzyme reactions, and two simple clock reactions"--hydrolysis of halogenoalkanes and…

  11. Chemistry and Emissions of Nitrogen Oxides (NO, NO2, N2O) in Combustion of Solid Fuels. II. Heterogeneous Reactions - N2O

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svoboda, Karel; Čermák, Jiří; Trnka, Otakar

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 2 (2000), s. 118-130. ISSN 0366-6352 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4072801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921 Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 0.154, year: 2000

  12. Supramolecular chemistry and technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HENRIQUE E. TOMA

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Supramolecular chemistry deals with the association of several chemical species, in an organized way and according to well defined purposes. Based on a molecular engineering approach, supramolecular structures can be designed from pre-formed building blocks, providing a promising route from chemistry to molecular nanotechnology. New supramolecular systems have been assembled in our laboratory with the use of bridging unities such as tetrapyridylporphyrins, porphyrazines and polypyrazines, connecting transition metal complexes and clusters. These systems display a very exciting electrochemical and catalytic behavior, and interact with DNA, generating ¹O2 and leading to efficient oxidative clivage for photodynamic terapy applications. Molecular interfaces have been developed, exhibiting photocurrent response in the presence of visible-UV light, and rectifying properties in the presence of electroactive species. Successful applications of the supramolecular species in chemical and bio-sensors have been developed.

  13. Understanding the molecular-level chemistry of water plasmas and the effects of surface modification and deposition on a selection of oxide substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevino, Kristina J.

    2011-12-01

    This dissertation first examines electrical discharges used to study wastewater samples for contaminant detection and abatement. Two different water samples contaminated with differing concentrations of either methanol (MeOH) or methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) were used to follow breakdown mechanisms. Emission from CO* was used to monitor the contaminant and for molecular breakdown confirmation through actinometric OES as it can only arise from the carbon-based contaminant in either system. Detection was achieved at concentrations as low as 0.01 ppm, and molecular decomposition was seen at a variety of plasma parameters. This dissertation also explores the vibrational (thetaV), rotational (thetaR) and translational (thetaT) temperatures for a range of diatomic species in different plasma systems. For the majority of the plasma species studied, thetaV are much higher than thetaR and thetaT. This suggests that more energy is partitioned into the vibrational degrees of freedom in our plasmas. The thetaR reported are significantly lower in all the plasma systems studied and this is a result of radical equilibration to the plasma gas temperature. thetaT values show two characteristics; (1) they are less than the thetaV and higher than the theta R and (2) show varying trends with plasma parameters. Radical energetics were examined through comparison of thetaR, thetaT, and thetaV, yielding significant insight on the partitioning of internal and kinetic energies in plasmas. Correlations between energy partitioning results and corresponding radical surface scattering coefficients obtained using our imaging of radicals interacting with surfaces (IRIS) technique are also presented. Another aspect of plasma process chemistry, namely surface modification via plasma treatment, was investigated through characterization of metal oxides (SiOxNy, nat-SiO2, and dep-SiO2) following their exposure to a range of plasma discharges. Here, emphasis was placed on the surface wettability

  14. Amination of ω-Functionalized Aliphatic Primary Alcohols by a Biocatalytic Oxidation–Transamination Cascade

    OpenAIRE

    Pickl, Mathias; Fuchs, Michael; Glueck, Silvia. M.; Faber, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    Amination of non-activated aliphatic fatty alcohols to the corresponding primary amines was achieved through a five-enzyme cascade reaction by coupling a long-chain alcohol oxidase from Aspergillus fumigatus (LCAO_Af) with a ω-transaminase from Chromobacterium violaceum (ω-TA_Cv). The alcohol was oxidized at the expense of molecular oxygen to yield the corresponding aldehyde, which was subsequently aminated by the PLP-dependent ω-TA to yield the final primary amine product. The overall cascad...

  15. Visualizing Chemistry: Investigations for Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ealy, Julie B.; Ealy, James L., Jr.

    This book contains 101 investigations for chemistry classrooms. Topics include: (1) Physical Properties; (2) Reactions of Some Elements; (3) Reactions Involving Gases; (4) Energy Changes; (5) Solutions and Solubility; (6) Transition Metals and Complex Ions; (7) Kinetics and Equilibrium; (8) Acids and Bases; (9) Oxidation-Reduction; (10)…

  16. Chemistry of high temperature superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    1991-01-01

    This review volume contains the most up-to-date articles on the chemical aspects of high temperature oxide superconductors. These articles are written by some of the leading scientists in the field and includes a comprehensive list of references. This is an essential volume for researchers working in the fields of ceramics, materials science and chemistry.

  17. Impact of Amazonian deforestation on atmospheric chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Ganzeveld, L.N.; Lelieveld, J.

    2004-01-01

    A single-column chemistry and climate model has been used to study the impact of deforestation in the Amazon Basin on atmospheric chemistry. Over deforested areas, daytime ozone deposition generally decreases strongly except when surface wetness decreases through reduced precipitation, whereas nocturnal soil deposition increases. The isoprene and soil nitric oxide emissions decrease although nitrogen oxide release to the atmosphere increases due to reduced canopy deposition. Deforestation als...

  18. Chemistry of fast electrons

    OpenAIRE

    Maximoff, Sergey N.; Head-Gordon, Martin P.

    2009-01-01

    A chemicurrent is a flux of fast (kinetic energy ≳ 0.5−1.3 eV) metal electrons caused by moderately exothermic (1−3 eV) chemical reactions over high work function (4−6 eV) metal surfaces. In this report, the relation between chemicurrent and surface chemistry is elucidated with a combination of top-down phenomenology and bottom-up atomic-scale modeling. Examination of catalytic CO oxidation, an example which exhibits a chemicurrent, reveals 3 constituents of this relation: The localization of...

  19. Fine chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1988 progress report of the Fine Chemistry laboratory (Polytechnic School, France) is presented. The research programs are centered on the renewal of the organic chemistry most important reactions and on the invention of new, highly efficient and highly selective reactions, by applying low cost reagents and solvents. An important research domain concerns the study and fabrication of new catalysts. They are obtained by means of the reactive sputtering of the metals and metal oxydes thin films. The Monte Carlo simulations of the long-range electrostatic interaction in a clay and the obtention of acrylamides from anhydrous or acrylic ester are summarized. Moreover, the results obtained in the field of catalysis are also given. The published papers and the congress communications are included

  20. Organometallic chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Bashkin, James K.; M.L.H. Green; Dr. M. L. H. Green

    1982-01-01

    Transition metal organometallic chemistry is a rapidly expanding field, which has an important relationship to industrial problems of petrochemical catalysis. This thesis describes studies of fundamental organometallic reaction processes, such as C-H and C-C bond formation and cleavage, and investigations of the structure and bonding of organometallic compounds. A number of techniques were used to pursue these studies, including synthesis, X-ray crystallography, and semi-em...

  1. Disk Chemistry*

    OpenAIRE

    Thi Wing-Fai

    2015-01-01

    The chemical species in protoplanetary disks react with each other. The chemical species control part of the thermal balance in those disks. How the chemistry proceeds in the varied conditions encountered in disks relies on detailed microscopic understanding of the reactions through experiments or theoretical studies. This chapter strives to summarize and explain in simple terms the different types of chemical reactions that can lead to complex species. The first part of the chapter deals wit...

  2. Interstellar chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Klemperer, William

    2006-01-01

    In the past half century, radioastronomy has changed our perception and understanding of the universe. In this issue of PNAS, the molecular chemistry directly observed within the galaxy is discussed. For the most part, the description of the molecular transformations requires specific kinetic schemes rather than chemical thermodynamics. Ionization of the very abundant molecular hydrogen and atomic helium followed by their secondary reactions is discussed. The rich variety of organic species o...

  3. Analytical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The division for Analytical Chemistry continued to try and develope an accurate method for the separation of trace amounts from mixtures which, contain various other elements. Ion exchange chromatography is of special importance in this regard. New separation techniques were tried on certain trace amounts in South African standard rock materials and special ceramics. Methods were also tested for the separation of carrier-free radioisotopes from irradiated cyclotron discs

  4. Computational chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, J. O.

    1987-01-01

    With the advent of supercomputers, modern computational chemistry algorithms and codes, a powerful tool was created to help fill NASA's continuing need for information on the properties of matter in hostile or unusual environments. Computational resources provided under the National Aerodynamics Simulator (NAS) program were a cornerstone for recent advancements in this field. Properties of gases, materials, and their interactions can be determined from solutions of the governing equations. In the case of gases, for example, radiative transition probabilites per particle, bond-dissociation energies, and rates of simple chemical reactions can be determined computationally as reliably as from experiment. The data are proving to be quite valuable in providing inputs to real-gas flow simulation codes used to compute aerothermodynamic loads on NASA's aeroassist orbital transfer vehicles and a host of problems related to the National Aerospace Plane Program. Although more approximate, similar solutions can be obtained for ensembles of atoms simulating small particles of materials with and without the presence of gases. Computational chemistry has application in studying catalysis, properties of polymers, all of interest to various NASA missions, including those previously mentioned. In addition to discussing these applications of computational chemistry within NASA, the governing equations and the need for supercomputers for their solution is outlined.

  5. Green chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A grand challenge facing government, industry, and academia in the relationship of our technological society to the environment is reinventing the use of materials. To address this challenge, collaboration from an interdisciplinary group of stakeholders will be necessary. Traditionally, the approach to risk management of materials and chemicals has been through inerventions intended to reduce exposure to materials that are hazardous to health and the environment. In 1990, the Pollution Prevention Act encouraged a new tact-elimination of hazards at the source. An emerging approach to this grand challenge seeks to embed the diverse set of environmental perspectives and interests in the everyday practice of the people most responsible for using and creating new materials--chemists. The approach, which has come to be known as Green Chemistry, intends to eliminate intrinsic hazard itself, rather than focusing on reducing risk by minimizing exposure. This chapter addresses the representation of downstream environmental stakeholder interests in the upstream everyday practice that is reinventing chemistry and its material inputs, products, and waste as described in the '12 Principles of Green Chemistry'

  6. Green chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The depletion of world fossil fuel reserves and the involvement of greenhouse gases in the global warming has led to change the industrial and energy policies of most developed countries. The goal is now to reserve petroleum to the uses where it cannot be substituted, to implement renewable raw materials obtained from plants cultivation, and to consider the biodegradability of molecules and of manufactured objects by integrating the lifetime concept in their expected cycle of use. The green chemistry includes the design, development and elaboration of chemical products and processes with the aim of reducing or eliminating the use and generation of harmful compounds for the health and the environment, by adapting the present day operation modes of the chemical industry to the larger framework of the sustainable development. In addition to biofuels, this book reviews the applications of green chemistry in the different industrial processes in concern. Part 1 presents the diversity of the molecules coming from renewable carbon, in particular lignocellulose and the biotechnological processes. Part 2 is devoted to materials and treats of the overall available technological solutions. Part 3 focusses on functional molecules and chemical intermediates, in particular in sugar- and fats-chemistry. Part 4 treats of biofuels under the aspects of their production and use in today's technologies. The last part deals with the global approaches at the environmental and agricultural levels. (J.S.)

  7. Chemistry of Technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precise and reliable thermodynamic constants for the oxidation/reduction relationships of the technetium ions in various environments are necessary to model the transport behaviour of 99 Tc from the nuclear waste repositories to the bio and geosphere. The current knowledge of the Tc chemistry indicates that the most important oxidation states of Tc in natural environment would be VII in oxidant conditions and IV, in an-oxidant media. However, even the value of the formal oxidation potential of the Tc O4-/Tc (IV) couple in simple media is questionable, because it relies only upon one kind of data: the values of the potential of the half electrochemical cell Tc O4-/Tc O2. These potentials are reversible, but sparingly soluble Tc O2 is not in fast equilibrium with other Tc (IV) complexes. The measured potentials are surely Tc O4-/Tc O2 potentials, but not the Tc O4-/Tc(IV) potentials if Tc O2 is not the thermodynamically stable form of Tc (IV). Quantitative data for the Tc O2 equilibria with Tc (IV) complexes are difficult to obtain because of the slowness of the ligand exchange reactions and the general lack of knowledge of the chemistry of the VIIb group tetravalent ions. The present investigation deals with a new approach for the determination of the formal oxidation potential of the Tc O4-/Tc (IV) couple. Tc was used at trace level, in order to avoid the kinetic and thermodynamic sinks made by insoluble Tc O2. Oxidation and reduction of Tc were governed by controlling the ion concentration of a fast electron exchanger couple of which the formal potential has been measured carefully, presently Fe (III)/Fe (II). Distribution ratios of Tc between aqueous and immiscible organic solution of tetra-phenyl arsenic chloride (TPA.Cl) into chloroform served as the probe for the advancement of oxidation and reduction reaction. In these solvent, only Tc (VII) as Tc O4- anions is extracted. (authors)

  8. The Discovery-Oriented Approach to Organic Chemistry. 2. Selectivity in Alcohol Oxidation. An Exercise in 1H NMR Spectroscopy for Sophomore Organic Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadwick, Steven R.; Mohan, Ram S.

    1999-08-01

    We have developed a simple oxidation experiment that presents the student with a puzzle and is a good exercise in 1H NMR spectroscopy. The experiment, which illustrates the important concept of selectivity in organic synthesis, involves selective oxidation of a mixture of 1-heptanol and 2-heptanol using commercial swimming pool chlorine. 1H NMR analysis of the product mixture allows the student to determine the selectivity exhibited by the reagent.

  9. Beryllium chemistry and processing

    CERN Document Server

    Walsh, Kenneth A

    2009-01-01

    This book introduces beryllium; its history, its chemical, mechanical, and physical properties including nuclear properties. The 29 chapters include the mineralogy of beryllium and the preferred global sources of ore bodies. The identification and specifics of the industrial metallurgical processes used to form oxide from the ore and then metal from the oxide are thoroughly described. The special features of beryllium chemistry are introduced, including analytical chemical practices. Beryllium compounds of industrial interest are identified and discussed. Alloying, casting, powder processing, forming, metal removal, joining and other manufacturing processes are covered. The effect of composition and process on the mechanical and physical properties of beryllium alloys assists the reader in material selection. The physical metallurgy chapter brings conformity between chemical and physical metallurgical processing of beryllium, metal, alloys, and compounds. The environmental degradation of beryllium and its all...

  10. Effect of the chemistry and structure of the native oxide surface film on the corrosion properties of commercial AZ31 and AZ61 alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feliu, Sebastian, E-mail: sfeliu@cenim.csic.es [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas CSIC, Avda. Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Maffiotte, C. [CIEMAT-DT edificio 30, Avda. Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Samaniego, A.; Galvan, Juan Carlos [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas CSIC, Avda. Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Barranco, Violeta [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas CSIC, Avda. Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Ciencias de Materiales de Madrid, ICMM, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, CSIC, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, 3, Cantoblanco, 28049, Madrid (Spain)

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study has been to advance in knowledge of the chemical composition, structure and thickness of the thin native oxide film formed spontaneously in contact with the laboratory atmosphere on the surface of freshly polished commercial AZ31 and AZ61 alloys with a view to furthering the understanding of protection mechanisms. For comparative purposes, and to more fully describe the behaviour of the native oxide film, the external oxide films formed as a result of the manufacturing process (as-received condition) have been characterised. The technique applied in this research to study the thin oxide films (thickness of just a few nanometres) present on the surface of the alloys has basically been XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) in combination with ion sputtering. Corrosion properties of the alloys were studied in 0.6 M NaCl by measuring charge transfer resistance values, which are deduced from EIS (electrochemical impedance spectroscopy) measurements after 1 h of exposure. Alloy AZ61 generally showed better corrosion resistance than AZ31, and the freshly polished alloys showed better corrosion resistance than the alloys in as-received condition. This is attributed to a combination of (1) higher thickness of the native oxide film on the AZ61 alloy and (2) greater uniformity of the oxide film in the polished condition. The formation of an additional oxide layer composed by a mixture of spinel (MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) and MgO seems to diminish the protective properties of the passive layer on the surface of the alloys in as-received condition.

  11. Surface chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Desai, KR

    2008-01-01

    The surface Chemistry of a material as a whole is crucially dependent upon the Nature and type of surfaces exposed on crystallites. It is therefore vitally important to independently Study different, well - defined surfaces through surface analytical techniques. In addition to composition and structure of surface, the subject also provides information on dynamic light scattering, micro emulsions, colloid Stability control and nanostructures. The present book endeavour to bring before the reader that the understanding and exploitation of Solid state phenomena depended largely on the ability to

  12. Hypercarbon chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This text points out the emerging significance of higher-valent carbon compounds. It describes the compounds of carbon with coordination numbers greater than four and explores the delocalized bonds of π aromatic molecules as a basis for rational description of orbitals; localized multicentered orbitals; the interactions of metallic ions with other atoms and molecules; the skeletal electron counts as a guide for synthesis; and the isolobal concept. Illustrated are the ways in which these subjects bring together structure and reactivity in the great diversity of novel carbon chemistry and its relationship to that of boron, lithium, hydrogen, the metals, and others

  13. A coordination chemistry study of hydrated and solvated cationic vanadium ions in oxidation states +III, +IV, and +V in solution and solid state

    OpenAIRE

    Krakowiak, Joanna; Lundberg, Daniel; Persson, Ingmar

    2012-01-01

    The coordination chemistry of hydrated and solvated vanadium(III), oxovanadium(IV), and dioxovanadium(V) ions in the oxygen donor solvents water, dimethylsulfoxide (dmso) and N,N′-dimethylpropyleneurea (dmpu) has been studied in solution by EXAFS and large angle X-ray scattering (LAXS) and in solid state by single crystal X-ray diffraction and EXAFS. The hydrated vanadium(III) ion has a regular octahedral configuration with a mean V-O bond distance of 1.99 Å. In the hydrated and dimethylsulfo...

  14. Theoretical chemistry periodicities in chemistry and biology

    CERN Document Server

    Eyring, Henry

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical Chemistry: Periodicities in Chemistry and Biology, Volume 4 covers the aspects of theoretical chemistry. The book discusses the stably rotating patterns of reaction and diffusion; the chemistry of inorganic systems exhibiting nonmonotonic behavior; and population cycles. The text also describes the mathematical modeling of excitable media in neurobiology and chemistry; oscillating enzyme reactions; and oscillatory properties and excitability of the heart cell membrane. Selected topics from the theory of physico-chemical instabilities are also encompassed. Chemists, mechanical engin

  15. Drastic changes of electronic structure and crystal chemistry upon oxidation of SnII2TiO4E2 into SnIV2TiO6: An ab initio study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matar, Samir F.; Maglione, Mario; Nakhl, Michel; Kfoury, Charbel N.; Etourneau, Jean

    2016-09-01

    From DFT based calculations establishing energy-volume equations of state and electron localization mapping, the electronic structure and crystal chemistry changes from Sn2TiO4 to Sn2TiO6 by oxidation are rationalized; the key effect being the destabilization of divalent tin SnII towards tetravalent state SnIV leading to rutile Sn2TiO6 as experimentally observed. The subsequent electronic structure change is highlighted in the relative change of the electronic band gap which increases from ∼1 eV up to 2.2 eV and the 1.5 times increase of the bulk modulus assigned to the change from covalently SnII based compound to the more ionic SnIV one. Such trends are also confronted with the relevant properties of black SnIIO.

  16. Atmospheric pseudohalogen chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. Lary

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available There are at least three reasons why hydrogen cyanide is likely to be significant for atmospheric chemistry. The first is well known, HCN is a product and marker of biomass burning. However, if a detailed ion chemistry of lightning is considered then it is almost certain than in addition to lightning producing NOx, it also produces HOx and HCN. Unlike NOx and HOx, HCN is long-lived and could therefore be a useful marker of lightning activity. Observational evidence is considered to support this view. Thirdly, the chemical decomposition of HCN leads to the production of small amounts of CN and NCO. NCO can be photolyzed in the visible portion of the spectrum yielding N atoms. The production of N atoms is significant as it leads to the titration of nitrogen from the atmosphere via N+N→N2. Normally the only modelled source of N atoms is NO photolysis which happens largely in the UV Schumann-Runge bands. However, NCO photolysis occurs in the visible and so could be involved in titration of atmospheric nitrogen in the lower stratosphere and troposphere. HCN emission inventories are worthy of attention. The CN and NCO radicals have been termed pseudohalogens since the 1920s. They are strongly bound, univalent, radicals with an extensive and varied chemistry. The products of the atmospheric oxidation of HCN are NO, CO and O3. N+CH4 and N+CH3OH are found to be important sources of HCN. Including the pseudohalogen chemistry gives a small increase in ozone and total reactive nitrogen (NOy.

  17. Accelerated growth of oxide film on aluminium alloys under steam: Part II: Effects of alloy chemistry and steam vapour pressure on corrosion and adhesion performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Bordo, Kirill; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl;

    2015-01-01

    The steam treatment of aluminium alloys with varying vapour pressure of steamresulted in the growth of aluminium oxyhydroxide films of thickness range between 450 - 825nm. The surface composition, corrosion resistance, and adhesion of the produced films was characterised by XPS, potentiodynamic...... polarization, acetic acid salt spray, filiform corrosion test, and tape test. The oxide films formed by steam treatment showed good corrosion resistance in NaCl solution by significantly reducing anodic and cathodic activities. The pitting potential of the surface treated with steam was a function of the...... vapour pressure of the steam. The accelerated corrosion and adhesion tests on steam generated oxide films with commercial powder coating verified that the performance of the oxide coating is highly dependent on the vapour pressure of the steam....

  18. Oxidação do borneol à cânfora com água sanitária - um experimento simples, de baixo custo e limpo Oxidation of borneol to camphor with bleach: a simple, green chemistry and inexpensive experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Bernardo dos Santos

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory pressure is increasingly focusing on the use and disposal of substances hazardous to human health and environment. In the last years efforts have also been made to introduce green chemistry concepts in undergraduate courses. In this paper we present an experiment on the oxidation reaction of borneol to camphor with bleach in acetone. This experiment is important to show undergraduate students that a cheap and non hazardous commercial product can be a useful oxidation agent of alcohols.

  19. Effects of operating parameters on nitrogen oxides emissions for a natural gas fueled homogeneous charged compression ignition engine (HCCI): Results from a thermodynamic model with detailed chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Nitrogen oxides emissions were determined for a natural gas fueled HCCI engine. ► The thermal NO mechanism accounts for the most of the NOx (around 70%). ► Among the parameters examined, equivalence ratio had the greatest effect on NOx. ► Reduction of NOx was due to decreased times at high temperatures. ► The nitrogen oxides emissions were reduced with increasing EGR level. -- Abstract: Past numerical studies on natural gas HCCI engines have provided few thorough analyses of the effects of operating parameters on nitrogen oxides (referring to the mixture of nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide). A single zone thermodynamic model with detailed chemical kinetics was used to determine the effect of operating parameters on nitrogen oxides emissions. The model employed Chemkin and used chemical kinetics for natural gas with 53 species and 325 reactions. The simulation was conducted for a modified 0.4 l single cylinder engine, which possessed a compression ratio of 21.5:1, and had a bore and stroke of 86 and 75 mm, respectively. Several sets of parametric studies were completed to investigate the effect of engine load (imep = 200–600 kPa), speed (600–3000 RPM), equivalence ratio (0.3–1.0), EGR level (0–40%), temperature at IVC (390–460 K), and fuel compositions (0–10% C2H6) on nitrogen oxides emissions. Contributions of different NOx mechanisms have been examined, and the thermal mechanism accounts for over 70% of the total NOx at most of the conditions. The results show significant changes in nitrogen oxides concentrations with varying engine operating conditions. These changes are shown to be strongly dependent on the chemical kinetics and the resulting differences in gas temperature profiles. For this particular study, 50% reduction in nitrogen oxides emissions could result from a load (imep) decrease from 300 kPa to 200 kPa, or an EGR level increase from 0% to 20%.

  20. Atmospheric chemistry of 4 : 2 fluorotelomer alcohol (CF3(CF2)(3)CH2CH2OH): Products and mechanism of Cl atom initiated oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurley, MD; Ball, JC; Wallington, TJ;

    2004-01-01

    Smog chamber/FTIR techniques were used to study the products and mechanism of the Cl atom initiated oxidation of 4:2 fluorotelomer alcohol (CF3(CF2)(3)CH2CH2OH) in 700 Torr of N-2/O-2 diluent at 296 K. CF3(CF2)(3)CH2CHO is the sole primary oxidation product. CF3(CF2)(3)CHO, CF3(CF2)(3)CH2COOH, and...... CF3(CF2)(3)CH2C(O)OOH are secondary oxidation products. Further irradiation results in the formation of CF3(CF2)(3)COOH, COF2, and CF3OH. CF3(CF2)(3)CHO, CF3(CF2)(3)CH2COOH, and CF3(CF2)(3)CH2C(O)OOH are formed from CF3(CF2)(3)CH2CHO oxidation in yields of 46 27 and less than or equal to 27...... respectively. Using relative rate techniques, a value of k(Cl + CF3(CF2)(3)CH2CHO) = (1.84 +/- 0.30) x 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) was determined. The yield of the perfluorinated acid, CF3(CF2)(3)COOH, from the 4:2 fluorotelomer alcohol increased with the diluent gas oxygen concentration. For the...

  1. Energy, atmospheric chemistry, and global climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Joel S.

    1991-01-01

    Global atmospheric changes due to ozone destruction and the greenhouse effect are discussed. The work of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change is reviewed, including its judgements regarding global warming and its recommendations for improving predictive capability. The chemistry of ozone destruction and the global atmospheric budget of nitrous oxide are reviewed, and the global sources of nitrous oxide are described.

  2. A coordination chemistry study of hydrated and solvated cationic vanadium ions in oxidation states +III, +IV, and +V in solution and solid state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakowiak, Joanna; Lundberg, Daniel; Persson, Ingmar

    2012-09-17

    The coordination chemistry of hydrated and solvated vanadium(III), oxovanadium(IV), and dioxovanadium(V) ions in the oxygen-donor solvents water, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), and N,N'-dimethylpropyleneurea (DMPU) has been studied in solution by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and large-angle X-ray scattering (LAXS) and in the solid state by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and EXAFS. The hydrated vanadium(III) ion has a regular octahedral configuration with a mean V-O bond distance of 1.99 Å. In the hydrated and DMSO-solvated oxovanadium(IV) ions, vanadium binds strongly to an oxo group at ca. 1.6 Å. The solvent molecule trans to the oxo group is very weakly bound, at ca. 2.2 Å, while the remaining four solvent molecules, with a mean V-O bond distance of 2.0 Å, form a plane slightly below the vanadium atom; the mean O═V-O(perp) bond angle is ca. 98°. In the DMPU-solvated oxovanadium(IV) ion, the space-demanding properties of the DMPU molecule leave no solvent molecule in the trans position to the oxo group, which reduces the coordination number to 5. The O═V-O bond angle is consequently much larger, 107°, and the mean V═O and V-O bond distances decrease to 1.58 and 1.97 Å, respectively. The hydrated and DMSO-solvated dioxovanadium(V) ions display a very distorted octahedral configuration with the oxo groups in the cis position with a mean V═O bond distance of 1.6 Å and a O═V═O bond angle of ca. 105°. The solvent molecules trans to the oxo groups are weakly bound, at ca. 2.2 Å, while the remaining two have bond distances of 2.02 Å. The experimental studies of the coordination chemistry of hydrated and solvated vanadium(III,IV,V) ions are complemented by summarizing previously reported crystal structures to yield a comprehensive description of the coordination chemistry of vanadium with oxygen-donor ligands. PMID:22950803

  3. Tropospheric Halogen Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Glasow, R.; Crutzen, P. J.

    2003-12-01

    Halogens are very reactive chemicals that are known to play an important role in anthropogenic stratospheric ozone depletion chemistry, first recognized by Molina and Rowland (1974). However, they also affect the chemistry of the troposphere. They are of special interest because they are involved in many reaction cycles that can affect the oxidation power of the atmosphere indirectly by influencing the main oxidants O3 and its photolysis product OH and directly, e.g., by reactions of the Cl radical with hydrocarbons (e.g., CH4).Already by the middle of the nineteenth century, Marchand (1852) reported the presence of bromine and iodine in rain and other natural waters. He also mentions the benefits of iodine in drinking water through the prevention of goitres and cretinism. In a prophetic monograph "Air and Rain: The Beginnings of a Chemical Climatology," Smith (1872) describes measurements of chloride in rain water, which he states to originate partly from the oceans by a process that he compares with the bursting of "soap bubbles" which produces "small vehicles" that transfer small spray droplets of seawater to the air. From deviations of the sulfate-to-chloride ratio in coastal rain compared to seawater, Smith concluded that chemical processes occur once the particles are airborne.For almost a century thereafter, however, atmospheric halogens received little attention. One exception was the work by Cauer (1939), who reported that iodine pollution has been significant in Western and Central Europe due to the inefficient burning of seaweed, causing mean gas phase atmospheric concentrations as high as or greater than 0.5 μg m-3. In his classical textbook Air Chemistry and Radioactivity, Junge (1963) devoted less than three pages to halogen gas phase chemistry, discussing chlorine and iodine. As reviewed by Eriksson (1959a, b), the main atmospheric source of halogens is sea salt, derived from the bursting of bubbles of air which are produced by ocean waves and other

  4. Combustion chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, N.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research is concerned with the development and use of sensitivity analysis tools to probe the response of dependent variables to model input variables. Sensitivity analysis is important at all levels of combustion modeling. This group`s research continues to be focused on elucidating the interrelationship between features in the underlying potential energy surface (obtained from ab initio quantum chemistry calculations) and their responses in the quantum dynamics, e.g., reactive transition probabilities, cross sections, and thermal rate coefficients. The goals of this research are: (i) to provide feedback information to quantum chemists in their potential surface refinement efforts, and (ii) to gain a better understanding of how various regions in the potential influence the dynamics. These investigations are carried out with the methodology of quantum functional sensitivity analysis (QFSA).

  5. Cyclodextrin chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemistry of cyclodextrins was studied. This study included synthesising some cyclodextrin derivatives, preparing selected inclusion complexes with cyclodextrin and investigating the effects of gamma irradiation on cyclodextrins and certain linear oligosaccharides. This report presents a brief review of the structure and properties of cyclodextrins, the synthesis of cyclodextrin derivatives, their complexation and applications. This is followed by a description of the synthesis of some cyclodextrin derivatives and the preparation of inclusion complexes of cyclodextrin with some organic compounds. Finally, the effects of gamma irradiation on cyclodextrins, some of their derivatives and certain structurally related carbohydrates are discussed. The gamma irradiation studies were carried out for two reasons: to study the effects of gamma irradiation on cyclodextrins and their derivatives; and to investigate selectivity during the gamma irradiation of cyclodextrin derivatives

  6. Coupling aerosol surface and bulk chemistry with a kinetic double layer model (K2-SUB: oxidation of oleic acid by ozone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Pfrang

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a kinetic double layer model coupling aerosol surface and bulk chemistry (K2-SUB based on the PRA framework of gas-particle interactions (Pöschl-Rudich-Ammann, 2007. K2-SUB is applied to a popular model system of atmospheric heterogeneous chemistry: the interaction of ozone with oleic acid. We show that our modelling approach allows de-convoluting surface and bulk processes, which has been a controversial topic and remains an important challenge for the understanding and description of atmospheric aerosol transformation. In particular, we demonstrate how a detailed treatment of adsorption and reaction at the surface can be coupled to a description of bulk reaction and transport that is consistent with traditional resistor model formulations.

    From literature data we have derived a consistent set of kinetic parameters that characterise mass transport and chemical reaction of ozone at the surface and in the bulk of oleic acid droplets. Due to the wide range of rate coefficients reported from different experimental studies, the exact proportions between surface and bulk reaction rates remain uncertain. Nevertheless, the model results suggest an important role of chemical reaction in the bulk and an approximate upper limit of ~10−11 cm2 s−1 for the surface reaction rate coefficient. Sensitivity studies show that the surface accommodation coefficient of the gas-phase reactant has a strong non-linear influence on both surface and bulk chemical reactions. We suggest that K2-SUB may be used to design, interpret and analyse future experiments for better discrimination between surface and bulk processes in the oleic acid-ozone system as well as in other heterogeneous reaction systems of atmospheric relevance.

  7. Radiation chemistry research using PULAF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The details of the recently installed 7 MeV Pune University LINAC Facility (PULAF) coupled with the optical absorption technique for pulse radiolysis studies at the National Centre for Free Radical Research, Department of Chemistry, University of Pune, Pune, India are described. The facility has a selection of electron pulse widths in the range 10 ns-3 μs with corresponding doses of about 5-144 Gy per pulse. The operation of the machine and the detection system are fully automated. Several researchers from various Indian universities and national laboratories use the PULAF and some of the projects that are currently undertaken by our group and others include the radiation chemistry of indole and chalcone derivatives, herbal antioxidants, structure-reactivity studies in cinnamates, redox chemistry of inorganic metal complexes, studies on oxidation of pyrimidine analogues and aromatic sulphur compounds. Some of them are briefly discussed here

  8. Radiation chemistry research using PULAF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaikwad, Parimal; Priyadarsini, K. I.; Rao, B. S. M.

    2008-10-01

    The details of the recently installed 7 MeV Pune University LINAC Facility (PULAF) coupled with the optical absorption technique for pulse radiolysis studies at the National Centre for Free Radical Research, Department of Chemistry, University of Pune, Pune, India are described. The facility has a selection of electron pulse widths in the range 10 ns-3 μs with corresponding doses of about 5-144 Gy per pulse. The operation of the machine and the detection system are fully automated. Several researchers from various Indian universities and national laboratories use the PULAF and some of the projects that are currently undertaken by our group and others include the radiation chemistry of indole and chalcone derivatives, herbal antioxidants, structure-reactivity studies in cinnamates, redox chemistry of inorganic metal complexes, studies on oxidation of pyrimidine analogues and aromatic sulphur compounds. Some of them are briefly discussed here.

  9. Radiation chemistry research using PULAF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaikwad, Parimal [National Centre for Free Radical Research, Department of Chemistry, University of Pune, Pune 411 007 (India); Priyadarsini, K.I. [Radiation and Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Rao, B.S.M. [National Centre for Free Radical Research, Department of Chemistry, University of Pune, Pune 411 007 (India)], E-mail: bsmr@chem.unipune.ernet.in

    2008-10-15

    The details of the recently installed 7 MeV Pune University LINAC Facility (PULAF) coupled with the optical absorption technique for pulse radiolysis studies at the National Centre for Free Radical Research, Department of Chemistry, University of Pune, Pune, India are described. The facility has a selection of electron pulse widths in the range 10 ns-3 {mu}s with corresponding doses of about 5-144 Gy per pulse. The operation of the machine and the detection system are fully automated. Several researchers from various Indian universities and national laboratories use the PULAF and some of the projects that are currently undertaken by our group and others include the radiation chemistry of indole and chalcone derivatives, herbal antioxidants, structure-reactivity studies in cinnamates, redox chemistry of inorganic metal complexes, studies on oxidation of pyrimidine analogues and aromatic sulphur compounds. Some of them are briefly discussed here.

  10. Separations chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of studies on the photochemistry of aqueous Pu solutions and the stability of iodine in liquid and gaseous CO2 are reported. Progress is reported in studies on: the preparation of macroporous bodies filled with oxides and sulfides to be used as adsorbents; the beneficiation of photographic wastes; the anion exchange adsorption of transition elements from thiosulfate solutions; advanced filtration applications of energy significance; high-resolution separations; and, the examination of the separation agents, octylphenylphosphoric acid (OPPA) and trihexyl phosphate (THP)

  11. Modofications to the surface chemistry of Low-rank Coal-Based carbon Catalysts to improve flue gas nitric oxide removal

    OpenAIRE

    Izquierdo Pantoja, María Teresa; Rubio Villa, Begoña

    2001-01-01

    The effectiveness of carbons as low temperatures SCR catalyst will depend upon their physical and chemical properties. Surface functional groups containing oxygen are closely related to the catalytic activity of carbons. These groups are expected to change the interaction between the carbon surface and the reactants through a variation in adsorption and reaction characteristics. This paper presents a more detailed study of the effects of either gas-phase sulfuric acid or oxygen oxidation tre...

  12. Thimerosal-Derived Ethylmercury Is a Mitochondrial Toxin in Human Astrocytes: Possible Role of Fenton Chemistry in the Oxidation and Breakage of mtDNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martyn A. Sharpe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Thimerosal generates ethylmercury in aqueous solution and is widely used as preservative. We have investigated the toxicology of Thimerosal in normal human astrocytes, paying particular attention to mitochondrial function and the generation of specific oxidants. We find that ethylmercury not only inhibits mitochondrial respiration leading to a drop in the steady state membrane potential, but also concurrent with these phenomena increases the formation of superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and Fenton/Haber-Weiss generated hydroxyl radical. These oxidants increase the levels of cellular aldehyde/ketones. Additionally, we find a five-fold increase in the levels of oxidant damaged mitochondrial DNA bases and increases in the levels of mtDNA nicks and blunt-ended breaks. Highly damaged mitochondria are characterized by having very low membrane potentials, increased superoxide/hydrogen peroxide production, and extensively damaged mtDNA and proteins. These mitochondria appear to have undergone a permeability transition, an observation supported by the five-fold increase in Caspase-3 activity observed after Thimerosal treatment.

  13. Coordination chemistry of Co complexes containing tridentate SNS ligands and their application as catalysts for the oxidation of n-octane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soobramoney, Lynette; Bala, Muhammad D; Friedrich, Holger B

    2014-11-14

    The selective oxidation of saturated hydrocarbons to terminal oxygenates under mild catalytic conditions has remained a centuries long challenge in chemical catalysis. In an attempt to address this challenge, two series of tridentate donor ligands {2,6-bis(RSCH2)pyridine and bis(RSCH2CH2)amine [R = alkyl, aryl]} and their respective cobalt complexes {Co[2,6-bis(RSCH2)pyridine]Cl2 and Co[bis(RSCH2CH2)amine]Cl2} were synthesized and characterized. Crystal structures of Co[2,6-bis(RSCH2)pyridine]Cl2 [R = -CH3 (), -CH2CH3 (), -CH2CH2CH2CH3 () and -C6H5 ()] are reported in which crystallized as a homo-bimetallic dimer that incorporated two bridging chloride atoms in an octahedral geometry around each cobalt center, while , and crystallized as mono-metallic species characterized by trigonal bipyramidal arrangement of ligands around each cobalt center. As catalysts for the homogeneous selective oxidation of n-octane, the catalysts yielded ketones as the dominant products with a selectivity of ca. 90% for the most active catalyst Co[bis(CH2CH2SCH2CH2)amine]Cl2 () at a total n-octane conversion of 23%. Using tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) as an oxidant, optimization of reaction conditions is also reported. PMID:25233287

  14. Science Update: Inorganic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1978-01-01

    This first in a series of articles describing the state of the art of various branches of chemistry reviews inorganic chemistry, including bioinorganic, photochemistry, organometallic, and solid state chemistries. (SL)

  15. Why Teach Environmental Chemistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Marjorie H.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the importance of teaching environmental chemistry in secondary school science classes, and outlines five examples of environmental chemistry problems that focus on major concepts of chemistry and have critical implications for human survival and well-being. (JR)

  16. Public perception of chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Stražar, Alenka

    2015-01-01

    The thesis deals with the perception of chemistry among the public, which reflects the stereotypes that people have about chemistry. It presents the existing classification of stereotypes about chemistry and their upgrade. An analysis of movies that reflect the existing perception of chemistry in the public is written. Literature on selected aspects of the application of chemistry in movies is collected and analyzed. A qualification of perception of chemistry in the movies is presented based ...

  17. 基于量子化学的汞的动力学研究%Kinetic Simulation Study on Mercury Oxidation Base on Quantum Chemistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王擎; 赵天亮; 柏静儒; 杨博文

    2012-01-01

    近年来,关于汞的污染控制问题越来越引起人们的重视,早期学者也对此做出了积极探索,关于汞的动力学模型的构建逐步完善,取得了与实验符合较好的结果。由于动力学参数的获得极其困难,直到量子化学的引入才有所改观。反应动力学参数的精确掌握对准确描述汞元素在燃烧中的迁移规律有重要作用,并且可以为实践提供切实可依据的参考。本文在前人的研究基础上,结合量子化学软件对部分基元反应的动力学参数重新进行了详细的分析计算,加入了逆反应方向的动力学参数并在新的动力学参数下对汞的迁移规律做出了分析,与先前学者的研究结果比较,取得了较为满意的结果。%Nowadays, mercury pollution control has drawn increasing attention. Previous scholars have made actively exploration on it. The kinetic model of mercury is gradually improved and the experimental results proved its accuracy. Dynamics parameters are very difficult to obtain and this situation has improved until quantum chemistry takes part in it. The kinetic parameters play an important role in representing the migration regularity of Hg in combustion, and provide a practical reference for further applications.. The present work use quantum chemistry software to recalculate the response dynamic parameters more accurately base on previous works. This paper adds the parameters of inverse direction and analyzed the migration regularity of the mercury again using new parameters. The results contrasts with other documents are satisfactory.

  18. Science Update: Inorganic Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1981-01-01

    Describes areas of inorganic chemistry which have changed dramatically in the past year or two, including photochemistry, electrochemistry, organometallic complexes, inorganic reaction theory, and solid state chemistry. (DS)

  19. Migration chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migration chemistry, the influence of chemical -, biochemical - and physico-chemical reactions on the migration behaviour of pollutants in the environment, is an interplay between the actual natur of the pollutant and the characteristics of the environment, such as pH, redox conditions and organic matter content. The wide selection of possible pollutants in combination with varying geological media, as well as the operation of different chemical -, biochemical - and physico-chemical reactions compleactes the prediction of the influence of these processes on the mobility of pollutants. The report summarizes a wide range of potential pollutants in the terrestrial environment as well as a variety of chemical -, biochemical - and physico-chemical reactions, which can be expected to influence the migration behaviour, comprising diffusion, dispersion, convection, sorption/desorption, precipitation/dissolution, transformations/degradations, biochemical reactions and complex formation. The latter comprises the complexation of metal ions as well as non-polar organics to naturally occurring organic macromolecules. The influence of the single types of processes on the migration process is elucidated based on theoretical studies. The influence of chemical -, biochemical - and physico-chemical reactions on the migration behaviour is unambiguous, as the processes apparently control the transport of pollutants in the terrestrial environment. As the simple, conventional KD concept breaks down, it is suggested that the migration process should be described in terms of the alternative concepts chemical dispersion, average-elution-time and effective retention. (AB) (134 refs.)

  20. Reactive oxygen species at the oxide/water interface: Formation mechanisms and implications for prebiotic chemistry and the origin of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jie; Sahai, Nita; Eggleston, Carrick M.; Schoonen, Martin A. A.

    2013-02-01

    The goal of our study is to identify free radical formation pathways on mineral surfaces. Organic molecules on early Earth might have been modified or decomposed by such pathways, thus affecting the total organic inventory for prebiotic synthesis reactions. Specifically, we evaluated several common oxide minerals under a range of environmental conditions and combinations of conditions (pH, O2 level, UV-wavelength, and particle loading), for formation of highly reactive oxygen species (ROS) at the oxide surfaces by quantifying the generated [OHrad ] and [H2O2]. We identified anatase/rutile (β-TiO2/α-TiO2) and hematite (α-Fe2O3) as active in ROS production and, importantly, found different dominant pathways for ROS formation on anatase/rutile versus hematite. Hydroxyl radicals (OHrad ) in anatase and rutile suspensions were generated mainly through the oxidation of OH- by photo-generated holes and H2O2 was generated through the combination of an OHrad radical with an OH- and a hole. This pathway for the TiO2 phases did not require the presence of O2, and was not shut down under anaerobic conditions. In contrast, formation of H2O2 and OHrad in hematite suspensions involved reduction of O2 by electrons, which was inhibited under anaerobic conditions. The surface ROS as well as free radicals formed by reactions with other gases on early Earth atmosphere were capable of destroying molecules such as lipids and pre-RNA or RNA essential to assembly of protocells and survival of the earliest cells. At the same time, surface associated ROS and other free radicals may also have promoted aminoamide formation. Thus, the surface ROS would have affected prebiotic organic compound inventory and protocell/early life evolution.

  1. Synthesis, chemistry, and catalytic activity of complexes of lanthanide and actinide metals in unusual oxidation states and coordination environments. Progress report, February 1, 1981-January 31, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of this research project are: (1) to demonstrate experimentally that the lanthanide and actinide metals have a more extensive chemistry than is presently known; (2) to develop a better understanding of the special features of the f orbital elements which will allow the design of f orbital complexes possessing unique chemical and physical properties; (3) to provide a basis for seeking unusual catalytic transformations involving these elements; and (4) to synthesize and explore the chemical and physical properties of mixed metal complexes which contain both lanthanide and transition metals. During the past year progress was made in each area. Some of the specific results are: (1) the first activation of CO by an organolanthanide complex was demonstrated; (2) the first, crystallograhically characterized, molecular lanthanide hydride complexes, the bridged dimers, [(C5H4R)2LnH(THF)]2 (R=H, CH3; Ln=Lu, Er, Y), were synthesized by hydrogenolysis of the appropriate (C5H4R)2Ln(C(CH3)3)(THF) complex; (3) [(C5H5)2(THF)ErH]2 was found to catalyze the homogeneous hydrogenation of alkynes; (4) the first trimetallic organolanthanide complex was synthesized; (5) the first polyhydridic organolanthanide complex was synthesized; (6) U(III) hydride was found to catalytically activate molecular hydrogen in alkene and alkyne hydrogenation reactions

  2. Atmospheric Chemistry of cis-CF3CH=CHF: Kinetics of reactions with OH radicals and O3 and products of OH radical initiated oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Elna Johanna Kristina; Nielsen, Ole John; Johnson, Matthew Stanley;

    2009-01-01

    Long path length FTIR-smog chamber techniques were used to measure k(OH + cis-CF3CH@CHF) = (1.20 ± 0.14) 1012 and k(O3 + cis-CF3CH@CHF) = (1.65 ± 0.16) 1021 cm3 molecule 1 s1 in 700 Torr of N2/O2 diluent at 296 K. The OH initiated oxidation of cis-CF3CH@CHF gives CF3CHO and HCOF in molar yields w...

  3. Calculated ionisation potentials to determine the oxidation of vanillin precursors by lignin peroxidase.

    OpenAIRE

    R Ten Have; I.M.C.M. Rietjens; Hartmans, S; Swarts, H.J.; Field, J. A.

    1998-01-01

    In view of the biocatalytic production of vanillin, this research focused on the lignin peroxidase (LiP) catalysed oxidation of naturally occurring phenolic derivatives: O-methyl ethers, O-acetyl esters, and O-glucosyl ethers. The ionisation potential (IP) of a series of model compounds was calculated and compared to their experimental conversion by LiP, defining a relative IP threshold of approximately 9.0 eV. Based on this threshold value only the O-acetyl esters and glucosides of isoeugeno...

  4. Prebiotic phosphorus chemistry reconsidered

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, A. W.; Orgel, L. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    The available evidence indicates that the origin of life on Earth certainly occurred earlier than 3.5 billion years ago and perhaps substantially earlier. The time available for the chemical evolution which must have preceded this event is more difficult to estimate. Both endogenic and exogenic contributions to chemical evolution have been considered; i.e., from chemical reactions in a primitive atmosphere, or by introduction in the interiors of comets and/or meteorites. It is argued, however, that the phosphorus chemistry of Earth's earliest hydrosphere, whether primarily exogenic or endogenic in origin, was most likely dominated by compounds less oxidized than phosphoric acid and its esters. A scenario is presented for the early production of a suite of reactive phosphonic acid derivatives, the properties of which may have foreshadowed the later appearance of biophosphates.

  5. Mechanistic Insights into Radical-Mediated Oxidation of Tryptophan from ab Initio Quantum Chemistry Calculations and QM/MM Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Geoffrey P F; Sreedhara, Alavattam; Moore, Jamie M; Wang, John; Trout, Bernhardt L

    2016-05-12

    An assessment of the mechanisms of (•)OH and (•)OOH radical-mediated oxidation of tryptophan was performed using density functional theory calculations and ab initio plane-wave Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM) molecular dynamics simulations. For the (•)OH reactions, addition to the pyrrole ring at position 2 is the most favored site with a barrierless reaction in the gas phase. The subsequent degradation of this adduct through a H atom transfer to water was intermittently observed in aqueous-phase molecular dynamics simulations. For the (•)OOH reactions, addition to the pyrrole ring at position 2 is the most favored pathway, in contrast to the situation in the model system ethylene, where concerted addition to the double bond is preferred. From the (•)OOH position 2 adduct QM/MM simulations show that formation of oxy-3-indolanaline occurs readily in an aqueous environment. The observed transformation starts from an initial rupture of the O-O bond followed by a H atom transfer with the accompanying loss of an (•)OH radical to solution. Finally, classical molecular dynamics simulations were performed to equate observed differential oxidation rates of various tryptophan residues in monoclonal antibody fragments. It was found that simple parameters derived from simulation correlate well with the experimental data. PMID:27082439

  6. Biocatalytic Synthesis of Vanillin

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Tao; Rosazza, John P. N.

    2000-01-01

    The conversions of vanillic acid and O-benzylvanillic acid to vanillin were examined by using whole cells and enzyme preparations of Nocardia sp. strain NRRL 5646. With growing cultures, vanillic acid was decarboxylated (69% yield) to guaiacol and reduced (11% yield) to vanillyl alcohol. In resting Nocardia cells in buffer, 4-O-benzylvanillic acid was converted to the corresponding alcohol product without decarboxylation. Purified Nocardia carboxylic acid reductase, an ATP and NADPH-dependent...

  7. Biocatalytic weapons against micropollutants

    OpenAIRE

    Agathos, Spiros N.; Environmental Microbiology and Biotechnology in the frame of the Knowledge-Based Bio and Green Economy (EMB2012)

    2012-01-01

    Emerging organic contaminants (EOCs) such as pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) are present in areas of significant urbanization and affect treated and untreated wastewater, groundwater, drinking water as well as associated environmental matrices like sludges and sediments. The occurrence of these compounds at very low but environmentally relevant concentrations has earned them the collective term “micropollutants” while an important subgroup is causing concern because of t...

  8. Impact of nonadiabatic charge transfer on the rate of redox chemistry of carbon oxides on rutile TiO2 (110) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Yeohoon; Wang, Yanggang; Rousseau, Roger J.; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra

    2015-03-06

    We present the results of a density functional theory (DFT) within the LDA+U approximation on large models of partially reduced TiO2 (110) rutile surface to investigate the nature of charge transfer and the role of non-adiabatic effects on three prototypical redox reactions: (i) O2 adsorption (ii) CO oxidation and (iii) CO2 reduction. Charge-constrained DFT (cDFT) is used to estimate kinetic parameters for a Marcus theory rate law that accounts for adiabatic coupling effects on reaction rates. We find that for O2 adsorption, the coupling between adiabatic states is strong, leading to fast charge transfer rates. The lowest energy structures at high coverage consist of two chemisorbed O2-, one adsorbed at a VO site and the other adsorbed at an adjacent Ti5C site. For CO oxidation, however, all reactions are kinetically hindered on the ground state due to the weak adiabatic coupling at the state crossing, such that one has to overcome two kinetically unfavorable charge transfer events to drive the process (non-adiabatically) on the thermal ground state. The process can be driven by photochemical means but would result in an adsorbed radical [OCOO-] intermediate species. Similarly, CO2 reduction also proceeds via a non-adiabatic charge transfer to form an adsorbed CO2- species followed by a second non-adiabatic charge transfer to produce CO. Our analysis provides important computational guidelines for modeling these types of processes. We thank Z. Dohnalek, M. Hendersen, G. Kimmel, H. Metieu, and N. Petrik for invaluable discussions. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences and performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is a multi-program national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. Computational resources were provided at W. R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the

  9. Industrial Chemistry and School Chemistry: Making Chemistry Studies More Relevant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstein, Avi; Kesner, Miri

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we present the development and implementation over the period of more than 15 years of learning materials focusing on industrial chemistry as the main theme. The work was conducted in the Department of Science Teaching at the Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel. The project's general goal was to teach chemistry concepts in the…

  10. Computational Chemistry and Lubrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehe, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    Members of NASA Lewis Research Center's Tribology and Surface Science Branch are applying high-level computational chemistry techniques to the development of new lubrication systems for space applications and for future advanced aircraft engines. The next generation of gas turbine engines will require a liquid lubricant to function at temperatures in excess of 350 C in oxidizing environments. Conventional hydrocarbon-based lubricants are incapable of operating in these extreme environments, but a class of compounds known as the perfluoropolyether (PFAE) liquids (see the preceding illustration) shows promise for such applications. These commercially available products are already being used as lubricants in conditions where low vapor pressure and chemical stability are crucial, such as in satellite bearings and composite disk platters. At higher temperatures, however, these compounds undergo a decomposition process that is assisted (catalyzed) by metal and metal oxide bearing surfaces. This decomposition process severely limits the applicability of PFAE's at higher temperatures. A great deal of laboratory experimentation has revealed that the extent of fluid degradation depends on the chemical properties of the bearing surface materials. Lubrication engineers would like to understand the chemical breakdown mechanism to design a less vulnerable PFAE or to develop a chemical additive to block this degradation.

  11. Atmospheric chemistry of 4 : 2 fluorotelomer alcohol (n-C4F9CH2CH2OH): Products and mechanism of Cl atom initiated oxidation in the presence of NOx

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Peter Sulbæk; Nielsen, OJ; Hurley, MD; Ball, JC; Wallington, TJ; Ellis, DA; Martin, JW; Mabury, SA

    2005-01-01

    Smog chamber/FTIR techniques were used to study the Cl atom initiated oxidation of 4:2 fluorotelomer alcohol (C4F9CH2CH2OH, 4:2 FTOH) in the presence of NOx in 700 Torr of N-2/O-2 diluent at 296 K. Chemical activation effects play an important role in the atmospheric chemistry of the peroxy, and...... possibly the alkoxy, radicals derived from 4:2 FTOH. Cl atoms react with C4F9CH2CH2OH to give C4F9CH2C.HOH radicals which add O-2 to give chemically activated alpha-hydroxyperoxy radicals, [C4F9CH2C(OO.)HOH]*. In 700 Torr of N-2/ O-2 at 296 K, approximately 50% of the [C4F9CH2C(OO.)HOH]* radicals decompose...... ``promptly'' to give HO2 radicals and C4F9CH2CHO, the remaining [C4F9CH2C(OO.)HOH]* radicals undergo collisional deactivation to give thermalized peroxy radicals, C4F9CH2C(OO.)HOH. Decomposition to HO2 and C4F9CH2CHO is the dominant atmospheric fate of the thermalized peroxy radicals. In the presence of...

  12. The chemistry of the fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a review of chemistry of some chemical elements in fission products. The elements mentioned are krypton, xenon, rubidium, caesium, silver, strontium, barium, cadmium, rare earth elements, zirconium, niobium, antimony, molybdenum, tellurium, technetium, bromine, iodine, ruthenium, rhodium and palladium. The chemistry of elements and their oxides is briefly given together with the chemical species in aqueous solution. The report also contains tables of the physical properties of the elements and their oxides, of fission products nuclides with their half-life and fission yields and of the permissible concentrations. (author)

  13. From Matter to Life:Chemistry?Chemistry!

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jean-Marie; LEHN

    2007-01-01

    1 Results Animate as well as inanimate matter,living organisms as well as materials,are formed of molecules and of the organized entities resulting from the interaction of molecules with each other.Chemistry provides the bridge between the molecules of inanimate matter and the highly complex molecular architectures and systems which make up living organisms. Synthetic chemistry has developed a very powerful set of methods for constructing ever more complex molecules.Supramolecular chemistry seeks to con...

  14. Green chemistry: A tool in Pharmaceutical Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Smita Talaviya; Falguni Majumdar

    2012-01-01

    Green chemistry expresses an area of research developing from scientific discoveries about pollution awareness and it utilizes a set of principles that reduces or eliminates the use or generation of hazardous substances in all steps of particular synthesis or process. Chemists and medicinal scientists can greatly reduce the risk to human health and the environment by following all the valuable principles of green chemistry. The most simple and direct way to apply green chemistry in pharmaceut...

  15. Sol-gel chemistry applied to the synthesis of polymetallic oxides including actinides reactivity and structure from solution to solid state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minor actinides transmutation is studied at present in order to reduce the radiotoxicity of nuclear waste and the assessment of its technical feasibility requires specific designed materials. When considering americium, yttria stabilized zirconia (AmIII YII Zriv)Orx is among the ceramic phases that one which presents the required physico-chemical properties. An innovative synthesis of this mixed oxide by sol-gel process is reported in this manuscript. The main aim of this work is to adjust the reactivity of the different metallic cations in aqueous media using complexing agent, in order to initiate a favourable interaction for a homogeneous elements repartition in the forming solid phase. The originality of the settled synthesis lies on an in-situ formation of a stable and monodisperse nano-particles dispersion in the presence of acetylacetone. The main reaction mechanisms have been identified: the sol stabilisation results from an original interaction between the three compounds (Zrly, trivalent cations and acetylacetone). The sol corresponds to a structured system at the nanometer scale for which zirconium and trivalent cations are homogeneously dispersed, preliminary to the sol-gel transition. Furthermore, preliminary studies were carried out with a view to developing materials. They have demonstrated that numerous innovative and potential applications can be developed by taking advantage of the direct and controlled formation of the sol and by adapting the sol-gel transition. The most illustrating result is the preparation of a sintered pellet with the composition Am0,13Zro,73Yo,0901,89 using this approach. (author)

  16. Atmospheric chemistry in volcanic plumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Glasow, Roland

    2010-04-13

    Recent field observations have shown that the atmospheric plumes of quiescently degassing volcanoes are chemically very active, pointing to the role of chemical cycles involving halogen species and heterogeneous reactions on aerosol particles that have previously been unexplored for this type of volcanic plumes. Key features of these measurements can be reproduced by numerical models such as the one employed in this study. The model shows sustained high levels of reactive bromine in the plume, leading to extensive ozone destruction, that, depending on plume dispersal, can be maintained for several days. The very high concentrations of sulfur dioxide in the volcanic plume reduces the lifetime of the OH radical drastically, so that it is virtually absent in the volcanic plume. This would imply an increased lifetime of methane in volcanic plumes, unless reactive chlorine chemistry in the plume is strong enough to offset the lack of OH chemistry. A further effect of bromine chemistry in addition to ozone destruction shown by the model studies presented here, is the oxidation of mercury. This relates to mercury that has been coemitted with bromine from the volcano but also to background atmospheric mercury. The rapid oxidation of mercury implies a drastically reduced atmospheric lifetime of mercury so that the contribution of volcanic mercury to the atmospheric background might be less than previously thought. However, the implications, especially health and environmental effects due to deposition, might be substantial and warrant further studies, especially field measurements to test this hypothesis. PMID:20368458

  17. Diverse applications of radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation chemistry began as early radiotherapists needed a reliable and appropriate dosimeter. The iron sulphate dosimeter, using ferrous iron in sulphuric acid and oxidation by irradiation, was a nasty brew of chemicals but it was sensitive, reliable and conveniently had the same density as human tissue. Water irradiation chemistry studies were driven by the need to understand the fundamental processes in radiotherapy; to control the corrosion problems in the cooling/ heat exchange systems of nuclear reactors and to find stable solvents and reagents for use in spent fuel element processing. The electrical and mechanical stability of materials in high radiation fields stimulated the attention of radiation chemists to the study of defects in solids. The coupled use of radiation and Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) enabled the identity of defect structures to be probed. This research led to the development of the sensitive Thermoluminescent Dosimeters, TLD's and a technique for dating of archaeological pottery artefacts. Radiation chemistry in the area of medicine is very active with fundamental studies of the mechanism of DNA strand breakage and the development of radiation sensitisers and protectors for therapeutic purposes. The major area of polymer radiation chemistry is one which Australia commands great international respect

  18. Modelling electric discharge chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemistry occurring in a electric discharge was modelled to predict how it would be influenced by discharge conditions. The discharge was characterized by a calculated Boltzmann electron-energy distribution, from which rate constants for electron-molecule processes in air were determined. These rate constants were used in a chemical kinetics calculation that also included reactions between neutral molecules, ions, free radicals and electronically excited species. The model describes how the discharge chemistry was influenced by humidity, electric field, electron number density, and concentrations of key reagents identified in the study. The use of an electric discharge to destroy airborne contaminant molecules was appraised, the targeted contaminants being CF2Cl2, HCN, and SO2. The modelling results indicate that an electric discharge should be able to remove HCN and CF2Cl2 effectively, especially if the discharge conditions have been optimized. Effective destruction is achieved with a moderate electric field (over 1 x 10-15 V.cm2), a substantial electron number density (over 1 x 1012 cm-3), and the presence of H20 in the process air. The residence time in the discharge was also shown to be important in contaminant destruction. An attempt was made to explain the results of the electric discharge abatement of SO2, a component of a simulated flue-gas mixture. Results from the model indicate that the discharge parameters that increase the concentration of hydroxyl radical also increase the rate of decomposition of SO2. An objective of the study was to explain the apparent enhancement of SO2 destruction by the presence of a small amount of NO2. It was thought that a likely explanation would be the stabilization of HOSO2, an important intermediate in the oxidation of SO2 by NO2. (49 figs., 14 tabs., 75 refs.)

  19. Crevice chemistry estimation from bulk water chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the first PWR plant in Japan started commercial operation in 1970, 22 plants are running in Japan as of the end of 1994. The main purpose of secondary water chemistry control is to minimize the corrosion possibility of the secondary system equipment, especially steam generators (SG). To achieve this objective, much effort has been concentrated on improving secondary water chemistry control. As a result of this effort, the recent secondary water chemistry in Japanese plants is well maintained in every stage of operation. However, to ensure and improve the reliability of SG, it is necessary to control crevice environments, which are located at tube/tube support plate intersections and under the sludge pile on the tube sheet. According to recent crevice monitoring examination results, the concentration behavior impurities in SG bulk water at the crevice is different for each species, and SG bulk water and crevice chemical compositions are not always equal. From these results, to control the crevice chemistry, improving bulk water chemistry control methods and a new type of molar ratio control index is needed. This paper introduces a brief summary of a recent crevice chemistry evaluation technique and bulk water chemistry control method, which is employed for crevice chemistry control, based on crevice monitoring examination results

  20. Actinide chemistry in ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takao, Koichiro; Bell, Thomas James; Ikeda, Yasuhisa

    2013-04-01

    This Forum Article provides an overview of the reported studies on the actinide chemistry in ionic liquids (ILs) with a particular focus on several fundamental chemical aspects: (i) complex formation, (ii) electrochemistry, and (iii) extraction behavior. The majority of investigations have been dedicated to uranium, especially for the 6+ oxidation state (UO2(2+)), because the chemistry of uranium in ordinary solvents has been well investigated and uranium is the most abundant element in the actual nuclear fuel cycles. Other actinides such as thorium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curiumm, although less studied, are also of importance in fully understanding the nuclear fuel engineering process and the safe geological disposal of radioactive wastes. PMID:22873132

  1. Concept Maps in Chemistry Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regis, Alberto; Albertazzi, Pier Giorgio; Roletto, Ezio

    1996-11-01

    This article presents and illustrates a proposed application of concept maps in chemistry teaching in high schools. The students were provided with the "concept lables" necessary for map building in three different ways. The analysis of the students' maps at different stages of the learning process led to the recognition of the three types of cognitive events which seem to correspond to the same number of restructuring stages in the conceptual organization. This can enable the teacher to characterize the changes produced in the learners' conceptions by teaching / learning activities. Three examples of the use of concept maps in chemistry teaching are reported and discussed with reference to: atomic structure, oxidation-reduction and thermodynamics.

  2. Green chemistry: A tool in Pharmaceutical Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smita Talaviya

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Green chemistry expresses an area of research developing from scientific discoveries about pollution awareness and it utilizes a set of principles that reduces or eliminates the use or generation of hazardous substances in all steps of particular synthesis or process. Chemists and medicinal scientists can greatly reduce the risk to human health and the environment by following all the valuable principles of green chemistry. The most simple and direct way to apply green chemistry in pharmaceuticals is to utilize eco-friendly, non-hazardous, reproducible and efficient solvents and catalysts in synthesis of drug molecules, drug intermediates and in researches involving synthetic chemistry. Microwave synthesis is also an important tool of green chemistry by being an energy efficient process.

  3. Combustion chemistry - activities in the CHEK research programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dam-Johansen, K.; Johnsson, J.E.; Glarborg, P.; Frandsen, F.; Jensen, A.; Oestberg, M. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1997-10-01

    The combustion chemistry in the oxidation of fossil fuels and biofuels determines together with mixing and heat transfer the required size of a furnace, the emission of gaseous pollutants, and the formation of ash and deposits on surfaces. This presentation describes technologies for solid fuels combustion and gives a summary of the fuels, the pollutant chemistry and the inorganic chemistry in combustion processes. Emphasis is put on the work carried out in the CHEC (Combustion and Harmful Emission Control) Research Programme. (orig.)

  4. Organometallic Chemistry of Molybdenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, C. Robert; Walsh, Kelly A.

    1987-01-01

    Suggests ways to avoid some of the problems students have learning the principles of organometallic chemistry. Provides a description of an experiment used in a third-year college chemistry laboratory on molybdenum. (TW)

  5. CHINESE JOURNAL OF CHEMISTRY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@Chinese Journal of Chemistry is an international journal published in English by the Chinese Chemical Society with its editorial office hosted by Shanghai Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  6. Environmental chemistry: Volume A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yen, T.F.

    1999-08-01

    This is an extensive introduction to environmental chemistry for engineering and chemical professionals. The contents of Volume A include a brief review of basic chemistry prior to coverage of litho, atmo, hydro, pedo, and biospheres.

  7. Alcohol combustion chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Sarathy, Mani

    2014-10-01

    Alternative transportation fuels, preferably from renewable sources, include alcohols with up to five or even more carbon atoms. They are considered promising because they can be derived from biological matter via established and new processes. In addition, many of their physical-chemical properties are compatible with the requirements of modern engines, which make them attractive either as replacements for fossil fuels or as fuel additives. Indeed, alcohol fuels have been used since the early years of automobile production, particularly in Brazil, where ethanol has a long history of use as an automobile fuel. Recently, increasing attention has been paid to the use of non-petroleum-based fuels made from biological sources, including alcohols (predominantly ethanol), as important liquid biofuels. Today, the ethanol fuel that is offered in the market is mainly made from sugar cane or corn. Its production as a first-generation biofuel, especially in North America, has been associated with publicly discussed drawbacks, such as reduction in the food supply, need for fertilization, extensive water usage, and other ecological concerns. More environmentally friendly processes are being considered to produce alcohols from inedible plants or plant parts on wasteland. While biofuel production and its use (especially ethanol and biodiesel) in internal combustion engines have been the focus of several recent reviews, a dedicated overview and summary of research on alcohol combustion chemistry is still lacking. Besides ethanol, many linear and branched members of the alcohol family, from methanol to hexanols, have been studied, with a particular emphasis on butanols. These fuels and their combustion properties, including their ignition, flame propagation, and extinction characteristics, their pyrolysis and oxidation reactions, and their potential to produce pollutant emissions have been intensively investigated in dedicated experiments on the laboratory and the engine scale

  8. Frontiers in Gold Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed, Ahmed A.

    2015-01-01

    Basic chemistry of gold tells us that it can bond to sulfur, phosphorous, nitrogen, and oxygen donor ligands. The Frontiers in Gold Chemistry Special Issue covers gold complexes bonded to the different donors and their fascinating applications. This issue covers both basic chemistry studies of gold complexes and their contemporary applications in medicine, materials chemistry, and optical sensors. There is a strong belief that aurophilicity plays a major role in the unending applications of g...

  9. Role of acidic chemistries in steam treatment of aluminium alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2015-01-01

    The effect of acidic chemistry on the accelerated growth of oxide on aluminium alloys Peraluman 706TM and AA6060 under exposure to high temperature steam was investigated. Studied chemistries were based on citrates and phosphates. Results showed that the presence of citrate and phosphate anions...

  10. Green Chemistry and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjeresen, Dennis L.; Schutt, David L.; Boese, Janet M.

    2000-01-01

    Many students today are profoundly interested in the sustainability of their world. Introduces Green Chemistry and its principles with teaching materials. Green Chemistry is the use of chemistry for pollution prevention and the design of chemical products and processes that are environmentally benign. (ASK)

  11. Environmental Chemistry Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackland, Thomas; And Others

    The authors of this curriculum supplement believe in a laboratory approach to chemistry and express the feeling that environmental chemistry provides the students an opportunity to apply theoretical chemistry to important practical problems. There are eighteen activities presented, each accompanied with behavioral objectives, one or more suggested…

  12. Facets of coordination chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwala, BV

    1993-01-01

    A concise account of coordination chemistry since its inception is given here together with some of the newer significant facets. This book covers a broad spectrum of various topics on Environment, Cyclic Voltammetry, Chromatography, Metal Complexes of biological interest, Alkoxides, NMR spectroscopy and others. These are useful to the scientific community engaged in the field of Inorganic Chemistry and Analytical Chemistry.

  13. Nitrogen Compounds in Radiation Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water radiolysis in presence of N2 is probably the topic the most controversy in the field of water radiolysis. It still exists a strong discrepancy between the different reports of ammonia formation by water radiolysis in presence of N2 and moreover in absence of oxygen there is no agreement on the formation or not of nitrogen oxide like NO2- and NO3-. These discrepancies come from multiple sources: - the complexity of the reaction mechanisms where nitrogen is involved - the experimental difficulties - and, the irradiation conditions. The aim of the workshop is to capitalize the knowledge needed to go further in simulations and understanding the problems caused (or not) by the presence of nitrogen / water in the environment of radioactive materials. Implications are evident in terms of corrosion, understanding of biological systems and atmospheric chemistry under radiation. Topics covered include experimental and theoretical approaches, application and fundamental researches: - Nitrate and Ammonia in radiation chemistry in nuclear cycle; - NOx in biological systems and atmospheric chemistry; - Formation of Nitrogen compounds in Nuclear installations; - Nitrogen in future power plant projects (Gen4, ITER...) and large particle accelerators. This document gathers the transparencies available for 7 of the presentations given at this workshop. These are: - H.E SIMS: 'Radiation Chemistry of Nitrogen Compounds in Nuclear Power Plant'; - G.R. DEY: 'Nitrogen Compounds Formation in the Radiolysis of Aqueous Solutions'; - C.E. VAUDEY et al.: 'Radiolytic corrosion of nuclear graphite studied with the dedicated gas irradiation cell of IPNL'; - J.L. BOUCHER: 'Roles and biosynthesis of NO in eukaryotes and prokaryotes'; - W.H. KOPPENOL: 'Chemistry of NOx'; - E. JANATA: 'Yield of OH in N2O saturated aqueous solution'; - V. DAUVOIS: 'Analytical strategy for the study of radiolysis gases'

  14. Biocatalytic Synthesis of Flavor Ester “Pentyl Valerate” Using Candida rugosa Lipase Immobilized in Microemulsion Based Organogels: Effect of Parameters and Reusability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripti Raghavendra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pentyl valerate was synthesized biocatalytically using Candida rugosa lipase (CRL immobilized in microemulsion based organogels (MBGs. The optimum conditions were found to be pH 7.0, temperature of 37°C, ratio of concentration of water to surfactant (Wo of 60, and the surfactant sodium bis-2-(ethylhexylsulfosuccinate (AOT for MBG preparation. Although kinetic studies revealed that the enzyme in free form had high affinity towards substrates (Km = 23.2 mM for pentanol and 76.92 mM for valeric acid whereas, after immobilization, the Km values increased considerably (74.07 mM for pentanol and 83.3 mM for valeric acid resulting in a slower reaction rate, the maximum conversion was much higher in case of immobilized enzyme (~99% as compared to free enzyme (~19%. Simultaneous effects of important parameters were studied using response surface methodology (RSM conjugated with Box-Behnken design (BBD with five variables (process parameters, namely, enzyme concentration, initial water content (Wo, solvent used for MBG preparation, substrate ratio and time, and response as the final product formation, that is, pentyl valerate (%. The MBGs were reused for 10 consecutive cycles for ester synthesis. Efficacy of AOT/isooctane as dehydrating agent for extracting excess water from MBGs was found to exert a positive effect on the esterification reaction.

  15. Combination of deep eutectic solvent and ionic liquid to improve biocatalytic reduction of 2-octanone with Acetobacter pasteurianus GIM1.158 cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Pei; Du, Peng-Xuan; Zong, Min-Hua; Li, Ning; Lou, Wen-Yong

    2016-01-01

    The efficient anti-Prelog asymmetric reduction of 2-octanone with Acetobacter pasteurianus GIM1.158 cells was successfully performed in a biphasic system consisting of deep eutectic solvent (DES) and water-immiscible ionic liquid (IL). Various DESs exerted different effects on the synthesis of (R)-2-octanol. Choline chloride/ethylene glycol (ChCl/EG) exhibited good biocompatibility and could moderately increase the cell membrane permeability thus leading to the better results. Adding ChCl/EG increased the optimal substrate concentration from 40 mM to 60 mM and the product e.e. kept above 99.9%. To further improve the reaction efficiency, water-immiscible ILs were introduced to the reaction system and an enhanced substrate concentration (1.5 M) was observed with C4MIM·PF6. Additionally, the cells manifested good operational stability in the reaction system. Thus, the efficient biocatalytic process with ChCl/EG and C4MIM·PF6 was promising for efficient synthesis of (R)-2-octanol. PMID:27185089

  16. American Association for Clinical Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... indispensable patient care tool. Learn more IN CLINICAL CHEMISTRY ddPCR Quantification of Lymphoma Mutations Researchers have developed ... Online Harmonization.net Commission on Accreditation in Clinical Chemistry American Board of Clinical Chemistry Clinical Chemistry Trainee ...

  17. The New Color of Chemistry: Green Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuhal GERÇEK

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Green chemistry which is the new application of chemistry rules provides solutions to problems that mankind is faced with climate changes, sustainable agriculture, energy, toxics, depletion of natural sources e.g. designing new chemicals and processes that production and utilization of hazardous matters. So, it is the indispensible tool for sustainable development. Current and future chemists should consider the human health and ecological issues in their professional life. In order to provide a solution for this requirement, green chemistry rules and under standings should be primarily taken in the university curriculum and at all educational levels.

  18. Sulfur Chemistry in Combustion I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsson, Jan Erik; Glarborg, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Most fossil fuels contain sulphur and also biofuels and household waste have a sulphur content. As a consequence sulphur species will often be present in combustion processes. In this paper the fate and influence of fuel sulphur species in combustion will be treated. First a description of the...... sulphur compounds in fossil fuels and the possibilities to remove them will be given. Then the combustion of sulphur species and their influence on the combustion chemistry and especially on the CO oxidation and the NOx formation will be described. Finally the in-situ removal of sulphur in the combustion...

  19. Surface chemistry essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Birdi, K S

    2013-01-01

    Surface chemistry plays an important role in everyday life, as the basis for many phenomena as well as technological applications. Common examples range from soap bubbles, foam, and raindrops to cosmetics, paint, adhesives, and pharmaceuticals. Additional areas that rely on surface chemistry include modern nanotechnology, medical diagnostics, and drug delivery. There is extensive literature on this subject, but most chemistry books only devote one or two chapters to it. Surface Chemistry Essentials fills a need for a reference that brings together the fundamental aspects of surface chemistry w

  20. Fundamentals of reactor chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Nuclear Engineering School of JAERI, many courses are presented for the people working in and around the nuclear reactors. The curricula of the courses contain also the subject material of chemistry. With reference to the foreign curricula, a plan of educational subject material of chemistry in the Nuclear Engineering School of JAERI was considered, and the fundamental part of reactor chemistry was reviewed in this report. Since the students of the Nuclear Engineering School are not chemists, the knowledge necessary in and around the nuclear reactors was emphasized in order to familiarize the students with the reactor chemistry. The teaching experience of the fundamentals of reactor chemistry is also given. (author)

  1. Atmospheric and aerosol chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This series presents critical reviews of the present position and future trends in modern chemical research. Short and concise reports on chemistry, each written by the world renowned experts. Still valid and useful after 5 or 10 years. More information as well as the electronic version of the whole content available at: springerlink.com. Christian George, Barbara D'Anna, Hartmut Herrmann, Christian Weller, Veronica Vaida, D. J. Donaldson, Thorsten Bartels-Rausch, Markus Ammann Emerging Areas in Atmospheric Photochemistry. Lisa Whalley, Daniel Stone, Dwayne Heard New Insights into the Tropospheric Oxidation of Isoprene: Combining Field Measurements, Laboratory Studies, Chemical Modelling and Quantum Theory. Neil M. Donahue, Allen L. Robinson, Erica R. Trump, Ilona Riipinen, Jesse H. Kroll Volatility and Aging of Atmospheric Organic Aerosol. P. A. Ariya, G. Kos, R. Mortazavi, E. D. Hudson, V. Kanthasamy, N. Eltouny, J. Sun, C. Wilde Bio-Organic Materials in the Atmosphere and Snow: Measurement and Characterization V. Faye McNeill, Neha Sareen, Allison N. Schwier Surface-Active Organics in Atmospheric Aerosols.

  2. Annual report 1985 Chemistry Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains a brief survey of the main activities in the Chemistry Department. All particles and reports published and lectures given in 1985 are presented. The facilities and equipment are mentioned briefly. The activities are divided into the following groups: radioisotope chemistry, analytical- and organic chemistry, environmental chemistry, polymer chemistry, geochemistry and waste disposal, radical chemistry, positron annihilation, mineral processing, and general. (author)

  3. Annual report 1984 Chemistry Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains a brief survey of the main activities in the Chemistry Department. All articles and reports published and lectures given in 1984 are presented. The facilities and equipment are mentioned briefly. The activities are divided into the following groups: radioisotope chemistry, analytical- and organic chemistry , environmental chemistry, polymer chemistry, geochemistry and waste disposal, radical chemistry, positron annihilation, mineral processing, and general. (author)

  4. Annual Report 1984. Chemistry Department

    OpenAIRE

    Funck, Jytte; Nielsen, Ole John

    1985-01-01

    This report contains a brief survey of the main activities in the Chemistry Department. All articles and reports published and lectures given in 1984 are presented. The facilities and equipment are mentioned briefly. The activities are divided into the following groups: radioisotope chemistry, analytical- and organic chemistry, environmental chemistry, polymer chemistry, geochemistry and waste disposal, radical chemistry, positron annihilation, mineral processing, and general.

  5. The New Color of Chemistry: Green Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Zuhal GERÇEK

    2012-01-01

    Green chemistry which is the new application of chemistry rules provides solutions to problems that mankind is faced with climate changes, sustainable agriculture, energy, toxics, depletion of natural sources e.g. designing new chemicals and processes that production and utilization of hazardous matters. So, it is the indispensible tool for sustainable development. Current and future chemists should consider the human health and ecological issues in their professional life. In order to provid...

  6. Philosophy of Chemistry or Philosophy with Chemistry?

    OpenAIRE

    Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Chemistry deserves more philosophical attention not so much to do justice to a long-neglected science or to enhance its cultural prestige, but to undermine a number of taken-for-granted assumptions about scientific rationality and more importantly to diversify our metaphysical views of nature and reality. In brief, this paper does not make the case for a philosophy of chemistry. It rather urges philosophers of science to listen to chemists and discuss what they learn from them. Because over t...

  7. A Click Chemistry Approach towards Flavin-Cyclodextrin Conjugates-Bioinspired Sulfoxidation Catalysts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomanová, P.; Šturala, J.; Buděšínský, Miloš; Cibulka, R.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 11 (2015), s. 19837-19848. ISSN 1420-3049 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : click chemistry * cyclodextrin * flavin * monooxygenase * oxidation * sulfoxides * green chemistry Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.416, year: 2014 http://www.mdpi.com/1420-3049/20/11/19667/htm

  8. Progress report 1981-1982. Reactor Chemistry Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Review of the activities performed by the Reactor Chemistry Department of the National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina during 1981-1982. This Department provides services and assistance in all matters related to water chemistry and nuclear reactors chemistry, in all their phases: design, construction, commissioning and decommissioning. During this period, the following tasks were performed: study of the metallic oxide-water interphases; determination of the goethite and magnetite surficial charges; synthesis of the monodispersed nickel ferrites; study of the iron oxides dissolution mechanism in presence of different complexing agents; chemical decontamination of structural metals; thermodynamics of the water-nitrogen system; physico-chemical studies of aqueous solutions at high temperatures; hydrothermal decomposition of ionic exchange resines and study of the equilibria of the anionic exchange for the chemistry of pressurized reactor's primary loops. The appendix includes information on the Reactor Chemistry Department staff, its publications, services, seminars, courses and conferences performed during 1981-1982. (R.J.S.)

  9. Biosensors in clinical chemistry: An overview

    OpenAIRE

    Sathish Babu Murugaiyan; Ramesh Ramasamy; Niranjan Gopal; Kuzhandaivelu, V.

    2014-01-01

    Biosensors are small devices that employ biological/biochemical reactions for detecting target analytes. Basically, the device consists of a biocatalyst and a transducer. The biocatalyst may be a cell, tissue, enzyme or even an oligonucleotide. The transducers are mainly amperometric, potentiometric or optical. The classification of biosensors is based on (a) the nature of the recognition event or (b) the intimacy between the biocatalyst and the transducer. Bioaffinity and biocatalytic device...

  10. Research Advances: Nitric Oxide Synthase Reduces Cr(VI); The Chemistry of Popcorn: It's All About "Pop-Ability"; Nanotubes May Help Heal Broken Bones; New Method Unites Organic Materials and Nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Angela G.

    2005-12-01

    An enzyme can reduce chromium ions and increase toxicity. Chemistry may reduce the number of unpopped kernels. Nanotubes provide scaffolding for bone growth. A new method will aid fabrication of drug-delivery agents.

  11. Journal of Business Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The Journal of Business Chemistry examines issues associated with leadership and management for chemists and managers working in chemical research or industry. This journal is devoted to improving and developing the field of Business Chemistry. The Journal of Business Chemistry publishes peer-reviewed papers (including case studies) and essays. Areas for possible publication in include: leadership issues in the chemical and biochemical industry, such as teamwork, team building, mentoring, coa...

  12. Mathematical Thinking in Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    José L. Villaveces; Guillermo Restrepo

    2012-01-01

    Mathematical chemistry is often thought to be a 20th-century subdiscipline of chemistry, but in this paper we discuss several early chemical ideas and some landmarks of chemistry as instances of the mathematical way of thinking; many of them before 1900. By the mathematical way of thinking, we follow Weyl's description of it in terms of functional thinking, i.e. setting up variables, symbolizing them, and seeking for functions relating them. The cases we discuss are Plato's triangles, Geoffro...

  13. Elementary physical chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Linder, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    This book is designed for a one-semester course, for undergraduates, not necessarily chemistry majors, who need to know something about physical chemistry. The emphasis is not on mathematical rigor, but subtleties and conceptual difficulties are not hidden. It covers the essential topics in physical chemistry, including the state of matter, thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, phase and chemical equilibria, introduction to quantum theory, and molecular spectroscopy.

  14. Orbital interactions in chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Albright, Thomas A; Whangbo, Myung-Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Explains the underlying structure that unites all disciplines in chemistry Now in its second edition, this book explores organic, organometallic, inorganic, solid state, and materials chemistry, demonstrating how common molecular orbital situations arise throughout the whole chemical spectrum. The authors explore the relationships that enable readers to grasp the theory that underlies and connects traditional fields of study within chemistry, thereby providing a conceptual framework with which to think about chemical structure and reactivity problems. Orbital Interactions

  15. Actinide chemistry in the far field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The environmental chemistry of the actinides is complicated due both to the extensive redox and coordination chemistry of the elements and also to the complexity of the reactive phases encountered in natural environments. In the far field, interactions with reactive surfaces, coatings and colloidal particles will play a crucial role in controlling actinide mobility. By virtue of both their abundance and reactivity; clays and other layer aluminosilicate minerals, hydrous oxides and organic matter (humic substances) are all identified as having the potential to react with actinide ions and some possible modes of interaction are described, together with experimental evidence for their occurrence. (author)

  16. The Chemistry Institute

    OpenAIRE

    Fontecave, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Chemistry at the Collège de France has received particular attention over the last few years. After the departures of Profs Jean-Marie Lehn and Jacques Livage, new ambition for developing this discipline has led to the creation of several Chairs: Prof. Marc Fontecave’s Chair of Chemistry of Biological Processes in 2008, Prof. Clément Sanchez’ Chair of Chemistry of Hybrid Materials in 2011, and the Chair of Chemistry of Materials and Energy, which Prof. Jean-Marie Tarascon has held since 2014....

  17. Advances in quantum chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Sabin, John R

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Quantum Chemistry presents surveys of current topics in this rapidly developing field that has emerged at the cross section of the historically established areas of mathematics, physics, chemistry, and biology. It features detailed reviews written by leading international researchers. This volume focuses on the theory of heavy ion physics in medicine.Advances in Quantum Chemistry presents surveys of current topics in this rapidly developing field that has emerged at the cross section of the historically established areas of mathematics, physics, chemistry, and biology. It features

  18. DOE fundamentals handbook: Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors in providing operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of chemistry. This volume contains the following modules: reactor water chemistry (effects of radiation on water chemistry, chemistry parameters), principles of water treatment (purpose; treatment processes [ion exchange]; dissolved gases, suspended solids, and pH control; water purity), and hazards of chemicals and gases (corrosives [acids, alkalies], toxic compounds, compressed gases, flammable/combustible liquids)

  19. Group theory and chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Bishop, David M

    1993-01-01

    Group theoretical principles are an integral part of modern chemistry. Not only do they help account for a wide variety of chemical phenomena, they simplify quantum chemical calculations. Indeed, knowledge of their application to chemical problems is essential for students of chemistry. This complete, self-contained study, written for advanced undergraduate-level and graduate-level chemistry students, clearly and concisely introduces the subject of group theory and demonstrates its application to chemical problems.To assist chemistry students with the mathematics involved, Professor Bishop ha

  20. Biocatalytic synthesis of flavones and hydroxyl-small molecules by recombinant Escherichia coli cells expressing the cyanobacterial CYP110E1 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makino Takuya

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyanobacteria possess several cytochrome P450s, but very little is known about their catalytic functions. CYP110 genes unique to cyanaobacteria are widely distributed in heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria including nitrogen-fixing genera Nostoc and Anabaena. We screened the biocatalytic functions of all P450s from three cyanobacterial strains of genus Nostoc or Anabaena using a series of small molecules that contain flavonoids, sesquiterpenes, low-molecular-weight drugs, and other aromatic compounds. Results Escherichia coli cells carrying each P450 gene that was inserted into the pRED vector, containing the RhFRed reductase domain sequence from Rhodococcus sp. NCIMB 9784 P450RhF (CYP116B2, were co-cultured with substrates and products were identified when bioconversion reactions proceeded. Consequently, CYP110E1 of Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120, located in close proximity to the first branch point in the phylogenetic tree of the CYP110 family, was found to be promiscuous for the substrate range mediating the biotransformation of various small molecules. Naringenin and (hydroxyl flavanones were respectively converted to apigenin and (hydroxyl flavones, by functioning as a flavone synthase. Such an activity is reported for the first time in prokaryotic P450s. Additionally, CYP110E1 biotransformed the notable sesquiterpene zerumbone, anti-inflammatory drugs ibuprofen and flurbiprofen (methylester forms, and some aryl compounds such as 1-methoxy and 1-ethoxy naphthalene to produce hydroxylated compounds that are difficult to synthesize chemically, including novel compounds. Conclusion We elucidated that the CYP110E1 gene, C-terminally fused to the P450RhF RhFRed reductase domain sequence, is functionally expressed in E. coli to synthesize a robust monooxygenase, which shows promiscuous substrate specificity (affinity for various small molecules, allowing the biosynthesis of not only flavones (from flavanones but also a variety of

  1. Generation of Mn oxides nanoparticles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikuška, Pavel; Večeřa, Zbyněk; Dočekal, Bohumil; Moravec, Pavel

    Prague : Czech Aerosol Society, 2013. B143. ISBN N. [European Aerosol Conference (EAC 2013). 01.09.2013-06.09.2013, Prague] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP503/11/2315 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 ; RVO:67985858 Keywords : inhalation * manganese oxides nanoparticles * chemical composition * synthesis Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation; CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry (UCHP-M)

  2. Generation of Mn oxides nanoparticles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikuška, Pavel; Večeřa, Zbyněk; Dočekal, Bohumil; Moravec, Pavel

    Prague : Czech Aerosol Society, 2013. B143. ISBN N. [European Aerosol Conference (EAC 2013). 01.09.2013-06.09.2013, Prague] Institutional support: RVO:68081715 ; RVO:67985858 Keywords : manganese oxides nanoparticles * inhalation * synthesis Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation; CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry (UCHP-M) http://eac2013.cz/index.php

  3. Exploring NOy chemistry in levitated aqueous aerosol droplets

    OpenAIRE

    Pfrang, Christian; King, M. D.; Hunt, O.R.

    2009-01-01

    Chemistry of reactive nitrogen oxides, NOy, is crucial for our understanding of composition and properties of the Earth’s atmosphere. The proof-of-principle experiments demonstrated that we are able to study the atmospheric fate of nitrogen oxides that has significant impact on global climate and hydrological cycle, thus affecting the likelihood of local floods and acid rain.

  4. Pigments base on kaolinite coated with the metal oxides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bludská, Jana; Černý, Zbyněk; Štengl, Václav

    Playa del Carmen : -, 2009. s. 24. [Solid State Chemistry Conference. 25.02.2009-28.02.2009, Playa del Carmen] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : metal oxides Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry

  5. The oxidation of aniline with inorganic oxidants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bláha, Michal; Bober, Patrycja; Stejskal, Jaroslav; Trchová, Miroslava; Prokeš, J.

    Turku: University of Turku, 2014. P3.012, s. 145. [International Conference on Synthetic Metals - ICSM 2014. 30.06.2014-05.07.2014, Turku] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/12/0911 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : anilin e oxidation * conductivity * morphology Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  6. Open access and medicinal chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Swain Chris

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Chemistry Central is a new open access website for chemists publishing peer-reviewed research in chemistry from a range of open access journals. A new addition, Chemistry Central Journal, will cover all of chemistry and will be broken down into discipline-specific sections, and Im delighted that Medicinal Chemistry will be a key discipline in this new journal.

  7. Annual report 1988 Chemistry Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains a brief survey of the main activities in the Chemistry Department. The names and abstracts of all articles and reports published and lectures given in 1988 are presented. The facilities and equipment are mentioned briefly. The activities are divided into the following groups: radioisotope chemistry, analytical- and organic chemistry, environmental chemistry, polymer chemistry, chemical reactivity, mineral processing, and general. (author)

  8. Annual report 1986 chemistry department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains a brief survey of the main activities in the Chemistry Department. All articles and reports published and lectures given in 1986 are presented. The facilities and equipment are mentioned briefly. The activities are divided into the following groups: radioisotope chemistry, analytical- and organic chemistry, environmental chemistry, polymer chemistry, radical chemistral, mineral processing, and general. (author)

  9. Annual report 1989 Chemistry Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains a brief survey of the main activities in the Chemistry Department. The names and abstracts of all articles and reports published and lectures given in 1989 are presented. The facilities and equipment are mentioned briefly. The activities are divided into the following groups: radioisotope chemistry, analytical- and organic chemistry, environmental chemistry, polymer chemistry, chemical reactivity, mineral processing, and general. (author)

  10. The Breath of Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Josephsen, Jens

    The present preliminary text is a short thematic presentation in biological inorganic chemistry meant to illustrate general and inorganic (especially coordination) chemistry in biochemistry. The emphasis is on molecular models to explain features of the complicated mechanisms essential to breathing...

  11. Movies in Chemistry Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekdag, Bulent; Le Marechal, Jean-Francois

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews numerous studies on chemistry movies. Movies, or moving pictures, are important elements of multimedia and signify a privileged or motivating means of presenting knowledge. Studies on chemistry movies show that the first movie productions in this field were devoted to university lectures or documentaries. Shorter movies were…

  12. Physical Chemistry of Molecular

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ Established in 2009, the group consists of six researchers and more than 70 research assistants and graduate students from the CAS Key Laboratory of Molecular Nanostructures and Nanotechnologies at the CAS Institute of Chemistry.Its research focuses on the physical chemistry involved in molecular assembly, molecular nanostructures, functional nanomaterials and conceptual nano-devices.

  13. Chemistry of americium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, W.W.

    1976-01-01

    Essential features of the descriptive chemistry of americium are reviewed. Chapter titles are: discovery, atomic and nuclear properties, collateral reading, production and uses, chemistry in aqueous solution, metal, alloys, and compounds, and, recovery, separation, purification. Author and subject indexes are included. (JCB)

  14. Exercises in Computational Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanget-Larsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    A selection of HyperChem© PC-exercises in computational chemistry. Answers to most questions are appended (Roskilde University 2014-16).......A selection of HyperChem© PC-exercises in computational chemistry. Answers to most questions are appended (Roskilde University 2014-16)....

  15. Titanocene sulfide chemistry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horáček, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 314, MAY 2016 (2016), s. 83-102. ISSN 0010-8545 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/12/2368 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : titanocene sulfide chemistry * photolysis * titanocene hydrosulfides Ti-(SH)n Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 12.239, year: 2014

  16. Chemistry in Microfluidic Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Matthew C.; Sweeney, Christina M.; Odom, Teri W.

    2011-01-01

    General chemistry introduces principles such as acid-base chemistry, mixing, and precipitation that are usually demonstrated in bulk solutions. In this laboratory experiment, we describe how chemical reactions can be performed in a microfluidic channel to show advanced concepts such as laminar fluid flow and controlled precipitation. Three sets of…

  17. Mathematical Thinking in Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L. Villaveces

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical chemistry is often thought to be a 20th-century subdiscipline of chemistry, but in this paper we discuss several early chemical ideas and some landmarks of chemistry as instances of the mathematical way of thinking; many of them before 1900. By the mathematical way of thinking, we follow Weyl's description of it in terms of functional thinking, i.e. setting up variables, symbolizing them, and seeking for functions relating them. The cases we discuss are Plato's triangles, Geoffroy's affinity table, Lavoisier's classification of substances and their relationships, Mendeleev's periodic table, Cayley's enumeration of alkanes, Sylvester's association of algebra and chemistry, and Wiener's relationship between molecular structure and boiling points. These examples show that mathematical chemistry has much more than a century of history.

  18. Influences of operating conditions on biocatalytic activity and reusability of Novozym 435 for esterification of free fatty acids with short-chain alcohols:A case study of palm fatty acid distillate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sawittree Mulalee; Pongrumpa Srisuwan; Muenduen Phisalaphong

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the effects of operating conditions on biocatalytic activity and stability of Novozym 435 for repeated-batch biodiesel production from free fatty acid (FFA) were investigated. Thermal deactivation caused by increased operating temperature from 45 to 50 °C could seriously affect the reusability of Novozym 435. The deactivation of Novozym 435 during the esterification of oleic acid with ethanol tended to be stronger than that in the system with methanol. Under the optimal conditions, considering both biocatalytic activity and stability of the enzyme, Novozym 435 could be reused for 13 cycles for biodiesel productions from oleic acid and absolute alcohols (methanol and ethanol) with FFA conversions of at least 90%. The presence of 4%–5%water in ethanol significantly affected the reusability of Novozym 435. Changes in the surface morphology of Novozym 435 during the esterification with various conditions were observed. It was revealed that the reduc-tion in catalytic activity was related to the swel ing degree of the catalyst surface. Additionally, biodiesel produc-tion from low cost renewable feedstocks, such as palm fatty acid distillate (PFAD) and 95%ethanol was examined. The esterification of PFAD with 95%ethanol catalyzed by Novozym 435 in 10-repeated batch operation showed the similar results in FFA conversion as compared to those using oleic acid. Novozym 435 remained active and could maintain 97.6%of its initial conversion after being used for 10 batches.

  19. Oxidized Corrugated Al Foils as Supports of Catalysts Containing Co Oxides for VOC Oxidation.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jirátová, Květa; Balabánová, Jana; Klempa, Jan; Kovanda, F.

    Prague : J Heyrovský Institute of Physical Chemistry of the ASCR, v. v. i, 2015, P10. ISBN 978-80-87351-37-6. [Symposium on Catalysis /47./. Prague (CZ), 02.11.2015-04.11.2015] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-13750S Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : Al monoliths * ethanol oxidation * Co oxides Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  20. Oxidized Corrugated Al Foils as Supports of Catalysts Containing Co Oxides for VOC Oxidation.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jirátová, Květa; Balabánová, Jana; Klempa, Jan; Kovanda, F.

    Prague : J Heyrovský Institute of Physical Chemistry of the ASCR, v. v. i, 2015, P10. ISBN 978-80-87351-37-6. [ Symposium on Catalysis /47./. Prague (CZ), 02.11.2015-04.11.2015] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-13750S Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : Al monoliths * ethanol oxidation * Co oxides Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  1. Korean Kimchi Chemistry: A Multicultural Chemistry Connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murfin, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Connecting science with different cultures is one way to interest students in science, to relate science to their lives, and at the same time to broaden their horizons in a variety of ways. In the lesson described here, students make kimchi, a delicious and popular Korean dish that can be used to explore many important chemistry concepts,…

  2. Radiation chemistry research education in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation chemistry techniques may be used to solve research problems in other fields of chemistry and biology particularly when free radicals, excited states or reduction-oxidation reactions are involved. Using pulse radiolysis, absolute kinetic rate constants can be measured. The Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering is an organization jointly funded by universities, ANSTO and CSIRO. Over the past several years it has provided fares, accommodation and specialized supplementary equipment to enable PhD students and post doctoral fellows to make use of the unique electron beam and gamma irradiation facilities at the Lucas Heights Research Laboratories. It also arranges biennial conferences at which this work is presented and discussed. This talk will discuss the contribution made to the education of students in the undergraduate final year and in physical, metal-organic, organic, polymer and enzyme chemistry research

  3. Advanced fuel chemistry for advanced engines.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taatjes, Craig A.; Jusinski, Leonard E.; Zador, Judit; Fernandes, Ravi X.; Miller, James A.

    2009-09-01

    Autoignition chemistry is central to predictive modeling of many advanced engine designs that combine high efficiency and low inherent pollutant emissions. This chemistry, and especially its pressure dependence, is poorly known for fuels derived from heavy petroleum and for biofuels, both of which are becoming increasingly prominent in the nation's fuel stream. We have investigated the pressure dependence of key ignition reactions for a series of molecules representative of non-traditional and alternative fuels. These investigations combined experimental characterization of hydroxyl radical production in well-controlled photolytically initiated oxidation and a hybrid modeling strategy that linked detailed quantum chemistry and computational kinetics of critical reactions with rate-equation models of the global chemical system. Comprehensive mechanisms for autoignition generally ignore the pressure dependence of branching fractions in the important alkyl + O{sub 2} reaction systems; however we have demonstrated that pressure-dependent 'formally direct' pathways persist at in-cylinder pressures.

  4. Bioinspired catecholic chemistry for surface modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Qian; Zhou, Feng; Liu, Weimin

    2011-07-01

    The attachment strategy based on catecholic chemistry has been arousing renewed interest since the work on polymerized catecholic amine (polydopamine) (Messersmith et al., Science, 2007, 318, 426) was published. Catechols and their derived compounds can self-assemble on various inorganic and organic materials, including noble metals, metals, metal oxides, mica, silica, ceramics and even polymers. It opens a new route to the modification of various substrates and the preparation of functional composite materials by simple chemistry. However, there is still not a full review so far about the attachment chemistry despite the dramatically increasing number of publications. This critical review describes the state-of-the-art research in the area: the design and synthesis of catecholic molecules, their adsorption mechanisms and the stability of assemblies in solution, and their applications etc. Some perspectives on future development are raised (195 references). PMID:21603689

  5. Third Chemistry Conference on Recent Trends in Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The third chemistry conference 2011 on recent trends in chemistry was held from October 17-19, 2001 at Islamabad, Pakistan. More than 65 papers and oral presentation. The scope of the conference was wide open and provides and opportunity for participation of broad spectrum of chemists. This forum provided a platform for the dissemination of the latest research followed by discussion pertaining to new trends in chemistry. This con fence covered different aspects of subjects including analytical chemistry, environmental chemistry, polymer chemistry, industrial chemistry, biochemistry and nano chemistry etc. (A.B.)

  6. System approach to chemistry course

    OpenAIRE

    Lorina E. Kruglova; Valentina G. Derendyaeva

    2010-01-01

    The article considers the raise of chemistry profile for engineers and constructors training, discloses the system approach to chemistry course and singles out the most important modules from the course of general chemistry for construction industry.

  7. Annual report 1987 Chemistry Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains a brief survey of the main activities in the Chemistry Department. The names and abstracts of all articles and reports published and lectures given in 1987 are presented. The facilities and equipment are mentioned briefly. The activities are divided into the following groups: radioisotope chemistry, analytical- and organic chemistry, environmental chemistry, polymer chemistry, radical chemistry, mineral processing, and general. 13 ills., (author)

  8. Annual report 1982 chemistry department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work going on in the Risoe National Laboratory, Chemistry Department is briefly surveyed by a presentation of all articles and reports published in 1982. The facilities and equipment are barely mentioned. The papers are divided into eight activities: 1. neutron activation analysis 2. analytical- and organic chemistry 3. environmental chemistry 4. polymer chemistry 5. geochemistry 6. radical chemistry 7. poitron annihilation 8. uranium process chemistry. (author)

  9. Hot functional test chemistry - long term experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vonkova, K.; Kysela, J., E-mail: von@ujv.cz [Nuclear Research Inst. Rez plc, Husinec-Rez (Czech Republic); Marcinsky, M. [ENEL-SE, NPP Mochovce, Mochovce (Slovakia); Martykan, M. [CEZ-ETE, NPP Temelin, Temelin (Czech Republic)

    2010-07-01

    Primary circuit materials undergo general corrosion in high temperature, deoxygenated, neutral or mildly alkaline solutions to form thin oxide films. These oxide layers (films) serve as protective film and mitigate the further corrosion of primary materials. Inner chromium-rich oxide layer has low cation diffusion coefficients and thus control iron and nickel transport from the metal surface to the outer layer and their dissolution into the coolant. Much less corrosion products are generated by the compact, integral and stable oxide (passivation) layer. For the latest Czech and Slovak stations commissioned (Temelin and Mochovce) a modified Hot Functional Test (HFT) chemistry was developed in the NRI Rez. Chromium rich surface layer formatted due to modified HTF chemistry ensures lower corrosion rates and radiation field formation and thus also mitigates crud formation during operation. This procedure was also designed to prepare the commissioned unit for the further proper water chemistry practise. Mochovce 1 (SK) was the first station commissioned using these recommendations in 1998. Mochovce 2 (1999) and Temelin 1 and 2 (CZ - 2000 and 2002) were subsequently commissioned using these guidelines too. The main principles of the controlled primary water chemistry applied during the hot functional tests are reviewed and importance of the water chemistry, technological and other relevant parameters is stressed regarding to the quality of the passive layer formed on the primary system surfaces. Samples from Mochovce indicated that duplex oxide layers up to 20 μm thick were produced, which were mainly magnetite substituted with nickel and chromium (e.g. 60-65% Fe, 18-28% Cr, 9-12% Ni, <1% Mn and 1-2% Si on a stainless steel primary circuit sample). Long term operation experience from both nuclear power plants are discussed in this paper. Radiation field, occupational radiation exposure and corrosion layers evolution during the first c. ten years of operation are

  10. Hot functional test chemistry - long term experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary circuit materials undergo general corrosion in high temperature, deoxygenated, neutral or mildly alkaline solutions to form thin oxide films. These oxide layers (films) serve as protective film and mitigate the further corrosion of primary materials. Inner chromium-rich oxide layer has low cation diffusion coefficients and thus control iron and nickel transport from the metal surface to the outer layer and their dissolution into the coolant. Much less corrosion products are generated by the compact, integral and stable oxide (passivation) layer. For the latest Czech and Slovak stations commissioned (Temelin and Mochovce) a modified Hot Functional Test (HFT) chemistry was developed in the NRI Rez. Chromium rich surface layer formatted due to modified HTF chemistry ensures lower corrosion rates and radiation field formation and thus also mitigates crud formation during operation. This procedure was also designed to prepare the commissioned unit for the further proper water chemistry practise. Mochovce 1 (SK) was the first station commissioned using these recommendations in 1998. Mochovce 2 (1999) and Temelin 1 and 2 (CZ - 2000 and 2002) were subsequently commissioned using these guidelines too. The main principles of the controlled primary water chemistry applied during the hot functional tests are reviewed and importance of the water chemistry, technological and other relevant parameters is stressed regarding to the quality of the passive layer formed on the primary system surfaces. Samples from Mochovce indicated that duplex oxide layers up to 20 μm thick were produced, which were mainly magnetite substituted with nickel and chromium (e.g. 60-65% Fe, 18-28% Cr, 9-12% Ni, <1% Mn and 1-2% Si on a stainless steel primary circuit sample). Long term operation experience from both nuclear power plants are discussed in this paper. Radiation field, occupational radiation exposure and corrosion layers evolution during the first c. ten years of operation are

  11. Radiation chemistry applied to drug design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation chemistry can contribute to drug design by quantifying redox properties of drugs and where free radicals are suspected intermediates in drug action, radiation can be used to generate these putative species and help characterise relevant reactions. Steady radiolysis produces radicals at a readily-varied but quantified rate; pulse radiolysis with fast spectrophotometric and/or conductimetric detection enables the kinetic properties of radicals to be monitored directly. Using these methods, radical intermediates from drugs with specific cytotoxicity towards hypoxic cells have been shown to react rapidly with oxygen. Radical oxidants from activated neutrophils include superoxide and hydroxyl radicals, and radiation-chemical methods have an important role to play in rational drug design to exploit such oxidative chemistry. Antioxidants can also be evaluated quantitatively by radiolysis methods; the conjugation reactions of thiyl radicals with thiolate and oxygen are now recognised to be major contributions of pulse radiolysis to thiol biochemistry. (author)

  12. Radiation chemistry applied to drug design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wardman, P.; Candeias, L.P.; Everett, S.A. (Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood (United Kingdom). Cancer Research Campaign Gray Lab.); Tracy, M. (SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States))

    1994-01-01

    Radiation chemistry can contribute to drug design by quantifying redox properties of drugs and where free radicals are suspected intermediates in drug action, radiation can be used to generate these putative species and help characterise relevant reactions. Steady radiolysis produces radicals at a readily-varied but quantified rate; pulse radiolysis with fast spectrophotometric and/or conductimetric detection enables the kinetic properties of radicals to be monitored directly. Using these methods, radical intermediates from drugs with specific cytotoxicity towards hypoxic cells have been shown to react rapidly with oxygen. Radical oxidants from activated neutrophils include superoxide and hydroxyl radicals, and radiation-chemical methods have an important role to play in rational drug design to exploit such oxidative chemistry. Antioxidants can also be evaluated quantitatively by radiolysis methods; the conjugation reactions of thiyl radicals with thiolate and oxygen are now recognised to be major contributions of pulse radiolysis to thiol biochemistry. (author).

  13. Moderator Chemistry Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past fifteen months, the Systems Chemistry Group of the Reactor Engineering Department has undertaken a comprehensive study of the Department's moderator chemistry program at Savannah River Site (SRS). An internal review was developed to formalize and document this program. Objectives were as outlined in a mission statement and action plan. In addition to the mission statement and action plan, nine separate task reports have been issued during the course of this study. Each of these task reports is included in this document as a chapter. This document is an organized compilation of the individual reports issued by the Systems Chemistry Group in assessment of SRS moderator chemistry to determine if there were significant gaps in the program as ft existed in October, 1989. While these reviews found no significant gaps in that mode of operation, or any items that adversely affected safety, items were identified that could be improved. Many of the items have already been dear with or are in the process of completion under this Moderator Chemistry Program and other Reactor Restart programs. A complete list of the items of improvement found under this assessment is found in Chapter 9, along with a proposed time table for correcting remaining items that can be improved for the chemistry program of SRS reactors. An additional external review of the moderator chemistry processes, recommendations, and responses to/from the Reactor Corrosion Mitigation Committee is included as Appendix to this compilation

  14. Moderator Chemistry Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewitt, L.V.; Gibbs, A.; Lambert, D.P.; Bohrer, S.R.; Fanning, R.L.; Houston, M.W.; Stinson, S.L.; Deible, R.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.

    1990-11-01

    Over the past fifteen months, the Systems Chemistry Group of the Reactor Engineering Department has undertaken a comprehensive study of the Department's moderator chemistry program at Savannah River Site (SRS). An internal review was developed to formalize and document this program. Objectives were as outlined in a mission statement and action plan. In addition to the mission statement and action plan, nine separate task reports have been issued during the course of this study. Each of these task reports is included in this document as a chapter. This document is an organized compilation of the individual reports issued by the Systems Chemistry Group in assessment of SRS moderator chemistry to determine if there were significant gaps in the program as ft existed in October, 1989. While these reviews found no significant gaps in that mode of operation, or any items that adversely affected safety, items were identified that could be improved. Many of the items have already been dear with or are in the process of completion under this Moderator Chemistry Program and other Reactor Restart programs. A complete list of the items of improvement found under this assessment is found in Chapter 9, along with a proposed time table for correcting remaining items that can be improved for the chemistry program of SRS reactors. An additional external review of the moderator chemistry processes, recommendations, and responses to/from the Reactor Corrosion Mitigation Committee is included as Appendix to this compilation.

  15. Moderator Chemistry Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewitt, L.V.; Gibbs, A.; Lambert, D.P.; Bohrer, S.R.; Fanning, R.L.; Houston, M.W.; Stinson, S.L.; Deible, R.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.

    1990-11-01

    Over the past fifteen months, the Systems Chemistry Group of the Reactor Engineering Department has undertaken a comprehensive study of the Department`s moderator chemistry program at Savannah River Site (SRS). An internal review was developed to formalize and document this program. Objectives were as outlined in a mission statement and action plan. In addition to the mission statement and action plan, nine separate task reports have been issued during the course of this study. Each of these task reports is included in this document as a chapter. This document is an organized compilation of the individual reports issued by the Systems Chemistry Group in assessment of SRS moderator chemistry to determine if there were significant gaps in the program as ft existed in October, 1989. While these reviews found no significant gaps in that mode of operation, or any items that adversely affected safety, items were identified that could be improved. Many of the items have already been dear with or are in the process of completion under this Moderator Chemistry Program and other Reactor Restart programs. A complete list of the items of improvement found under this assessment is found in Chapter 9, along with a proposed time table for correcting remaining items that can be improved for the chemistry program of SRS reactors. An additional external review of the moderator chemistry processes, recommendations, and responses to/from the Reactor Corrosion Mitigation Committee is included as Appendix to this compilation.

  16. Annual Report 1984. Chemistry Department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funck, Jytte; Nielsen, Ole John

    This report contains a brief survey of the main activities in the Chemistry Department. All articles and reports published and lectures given in 1984 are presented. The facilities and equipment are mentioned briefly. The activities are divided into the following groups: radioisotope chemistry, an......, analytical- and organic chemistry, environmental chemistry, polymer chemistry, geochemistry and waste disposal, radical chemistry, positron annihilation, mineral processing, and general.......This report contains a brief survey of the main activities in the Chemistry Department. All articles and reports published and lectures given in 1984 are presented. The facilities and equipment are mentioned briefly. The activities are divided into the following groups: radioisotope chemistry...

  17. Chemistry in water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The international conference Chemistry in Water Reactors was arranged in Nice 24-27/04/1994 by the French Nuclear Energy Society. Examples of technical program areas were primary chemistry, operational experience, fundamental studies and new technology. Furthermore there were sessions about radiation field build-up, hydrogen chemistry, electro-chemistry, condensate polishing, decontamination and chemical cleaning. The conference gave the impression that there are some areas that are going to be more important than others during the next few years to come. Cladding integrity: Professor Ishigure from Japan emphasized that cladding integrity is a subject of great concern, especially with respect to waterside corrosion, deposition and release of crud. Chemistry control: The control of the iron/nickel concentration quotient seems to be not as important as previously considered. The future operation of a nuclear power plant is going to require a better control of the water chemistry than achievable today. One example of this is solubility control via regulation in BWR. Trends in USA: means an increasing use of hydrogen, minimization of SCC/IASCC, minimization of radiation fields by thorough chemistry control, guarding fuel integrity by minimization of cladding corrosion and minimization of flow assisted corrosion. Stellite replacement: The search for replacement materials will continue. Secondary side crevice chemistry: Modeling and practical studies are required to increase knowledge about the crevice chemistry and how it develops under plant operation conditions. Inhibitors: Inhibitors for IGSCC and IGA as well for the primary- (zinc) as for the secondary side (Ti) should be studied. The effects and mode of operation of the inhibitors should be documented. Chemical cleaning: of heat transfer surfaces will be an important subject. Prophylactic cleaning at regular intervals could be one mode of operation

  18. Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinolic acid synthase: The application of a plant secondary metabolite enzyme in biocatalytic chemical synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Kerstin; Schmid, Andreas; Julsing, Mattijs K

    2016-09-10

    Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinolic acid synthase (THCAS) from the secondary metabolism of Cannabis sativa L. catalyzes the oxidative formation of an intramolecular CC bond in cannabigerolic acid (CBGA) to synthesize Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA), which is the direct precursor of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC). Aiming on a biotechnological production of cannabinoids, we investigated the potential of the heterologously produced plant oxidase in a cell-free system on preparative scale. THCAS was characterized in an aqueous/organic two-liquid phase setup in order to solubilize the hydrophobic substrate and to allow in situ product removal. Compared to the single phase aqueous setup the specific activity decreased by a factor of approximately 2 pointing to a substrate limitation of CBGA in the two-liquid phase system. However, the specific activity remained stable for at least 3h illustrating the benefit of the two-liquid phase setup. In a repeated-batch setup, THCAS showed only a minor loss of specific activity in the third batch pointing to a high intrinsic stability and high solvent tolerance of the enzyme. Maximal space-time-yields of 0.121gL(-1)h(-1) were reached proving the two-liquid phase concept suitable for biotechnological production of cannabinoids. PMID:27369551

  19. Biocatalytic reduction of racemic 2-arenoxycycloalkanones by yeasts P. glucozyma and C. glabrata: one way of achieving chiral 2-arenoxycycloalcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu, Cecilia; Peña, Miguel; Del Olmo, Marcel Lí

    2016-06-01

    Chiral β-aryloxy alcohols are interesting building blocks that form part of drugs like β adrenergic antagonists. Acquiring cyclic rigid analogs to obtain more selective drugs is interesting. Thus, we used whole cells of yeast strains Pichia glucozyma and Candida glabrata to catalyze the reduction of several 2-arenoxycycloalkanones to produce chiral 2-arenoxycycloalcohols with good/excellent enantioselectivity. In both cases, the alcohol configuration that resulted from the carbonyl group reduction was S. Yeast P. glucozyma allowed the conversion of both enantiomers of the starting material to produce 2-arenoxycycloalcohols with configuration (1S, 2R) and (1S, 2S). The reaction with C. glabrata nearly always allowed the kinetic resolution of the starting ketone, recovering 2-arenoxycycloalkanone with configuration S and (1S, 2R)-2-arenoxycycloalcohol.All the four possible stereoisomers of 2-phenoxycyclohexanol and the two enantiomers of 2-phenoxycyclohexanone were obtained by combining the biocatalyzed reaction with the oxidation/reduction of the chiral compounds with standard reagents. This is a simple approach for the synthesis of the rigid chiral moiety 2-arenoxycycloalcohols contained in putative β-blockers 2-arenoxycycloalkanepropanolamines. PMID:26754816

  20. Chemistry management of generator stator water system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemistry management of water cooled turbine generators with hollow copper conductors is very essential to avoid possible re-deposition of released copper oxides on stator windings, which otherwise may cause flow restrictions by partial plugging of copper hollow conductors and impair cooling. The phenomenon which is of more concern is not strictly of corrosion failure, but the consequences caused by the re-deposition of copper oxides that were formed by reaction of copper with oxygen. There were also some Operating experiences (OE) related to Copper oxide fouling in the system resulting shut down/off-line of plants. In Madras Atomic Power Station (MAPS), the turbine generator stator windings are of Copper material and cooled by demineralized water passing through the hollow conductors. The heated water from the stator is cooled by process water. A part of the stator water is continuously passed through a mixed bed polisher to remove any soluble ionic contaminants to maintain the purity of system water and also maintain copper content as low as possible to avoid possible re-deposition of released copper oxides on stator windings. The chemistry regime employed is neutral water with dissolved oxygen content between 1000-2000 ppb. Chemistry management of Stator water system was reviewed to know its effectiveness. Detailed chemical analyses of the spent resins from the polishing unit were carried out in various campaigns which indicated only part exhaustion of the polishing unit resins and reasonably low levels of copper entrapment in the resins, thus highlighting the effectiveness of the in-practice chemistry regime. (author)

  1. Aqueous chemistry of neptunium and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief historical survey of studies on the chemistry of neptunium and plutonium in the USSR is given. In this paper topics discussed are reduction-oxidation reactions of these elements, compositions of the species formed, their behavior in extraction, and sorption processes. Special attention is paid to accurate and sensitive determination methods (including coulometry, luminescence, and radiometry) for microgram amounts of neptunium and nanogram amounts of plutonium in complex solutions. Methods of detecting plutonium is natural objects are also described

  2. Mathematics for physical chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Mortimer, Robert G

    2013-01-01

    Mathematics for Physical Chemistry is the ideal supplementary text for practicing chemists and students who want to sharpen their mathematics skills while enrolled in general through physical chemistry courses. This book specifically emphasizes the use of mathematics in the context of physical chemistry, as opposed to being simply a mathematics text. This 4e includes new exercises in each chapter that provide practice in a technique immediately after discussion or example and encourage self-study. The early chapters are constructed around a sequence of mathematical topics, wit

  3. Computational quantum chemistry website

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains the contents of a web page related to research on the development of quantum chemistry methods for computational thermochemistry and the application of quantum chemistry methods to problems in material chemistry and chemical sciences. Research programs highlighted include: Gaussian-2 theory; Density functional theory; Molecular sieve materials; Diamond thin-film growth from buckyball precursors; Electronic structure calculations on lithium polymer electrolytes; Long-distance electronic coupling in donor/acceptor molecules; and Computational studies of NOx reactions in radioactive waste storage

  4. Gas phase ion chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Bowers, Michael T

    1979-01-01

    Gas Phase Ion Chemistry, Volume 1 covers papers on the advances of gas phase ion chemistry. The book discusses the advances in flow tubes and the measurement of ion-molecule rate coefficients and product distributions; the ion chemistry of the earth's atmosphere; and the classical ion-molecule collision theory. The text also describes statistical methods in reaction dynamics; the state selection by photoion-photoelectron coincidence; and the effects of temperature and pressure in the kinetics of ion-molecule reactions. The energy distribution in the unimolecular decomposition of ions, as well

  5. Experiments in physical chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, J M; Denaro, A R

    1968-01-01

    Experiments in Physical Chemistry, Second Edition provides a compilation of experiments concerning physical chemistry. This book illustrates the link between the theory and practice of physical chemistry. Organized into three parts, this edition begins with an overview of those experiments that generally have a simple theoretical background. Part II contains experiments that are associated with more advanced theory or more developed techniques, or which require a greater degree of experimental skill. Part III consists of experiments that are in the nature of investigations wherein these invest

  6. DOE fundamentals handbook: Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chemistry Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors in providing operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of chemistry. The handbook includes information on the atomic structure of matter; chemical bonding; chemical equations; chemical interactions involved with corrosion processes; water chemistry control, including the principles of water treatment; the hazards of chemicals and gases, and basic gaseous diffusion processes. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the chemical properties of materials and the way these properties can impose limitations on the operation of equipment and systems

  7. Green chemistry of carbon nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basiuk, Elena V; Basiuk, Vladimir A

    2014-01-01

    The global trend of looking for more ecologically friendly, "green" techniques manifested itself in the chemistry of carbon nanomaterials. The main principles of green chemistry emphasize how important it is to avoid the use, or at least to reduce the consumption, of organic solvents for a chemical process. And it is precisely this aspect that was systematically addressed and emphasized by our research group since the very beginning of our work on the chemistry of carbon nanomaterials in early 2000s. The present review focuses on the results obtained to date on solvent-free techniques for (mainly covalent) functionalization of fullerene C60, single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs and MWNTs, respectively), as well as nanodiamonds (NDs). We designed a series of simple and fast functionalization protocols based on thermally activated reactions with chemical compounds stable and volatile at 150-200 degrees C under reduced pressure, when not only the reactions take place at a high rate, but also excess reagents are spontaneously removed from the functionalized material, thus making its purification unnecessary. The main two classes of reagents are organic amines and thiols, including bifunctional ones, which can be used in conjunction with different forms of nanocarbons. The resulting chemical processes comprise nucleophilic addition of amines and thiols to fullerene C60 and to defect sites of pristine MWNTs, as well as direct amidation of carboxylic groups of oxidized nanotubes (mainly SWNTs) and ND. In the case of bifunctional amines and thiols, reactions of the second functional group can give rise to cross-linking effects, or be employed for further derivatization steps. PMID:24730288

  8. Two-step biocatalytic route to biobased functional polyesters from omega-carboxy fatty acids and diols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yixin; Lu, Wenhua; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Xie, Wenchun; Cai, Minmin; Gross, Richard A

    2010-01-11

    Biobased omega-carboxy fatty acid monomers 1,18-cis-9-octadecenedioic, 1,22-cis-9-docosenedioic, and 1,18-cis-9,10-epoxy-octadecanedioic acids were synthesized in high conversion yields from oleic, erucic and epoxy stearic acids by whole-cell biotransformations catalyzed by C. tropicalis ATCC20962. Maximum volumetric yields in shake-flasks were 17.3, 14.2, and 19.1 g/L after 48 h conversion for oleic acid and 72 h conversions for erucic and epoxy stearic acids, respectively. Studies in fermentor with better control of pH and glucose feeding revealed that conversion of oleic acid to 1,18-cis-9-octadecenedioic acid by C. tropicalis ATCC20962 occurred with productivities up to 0.5 g/L/h. The conversion of omega-carboxy fatty acid monomers to polyesters was then studied using immobilized Candida antarctica Lipase B (N435) as catalyst. Polycondensations with diols were performed in bulk as well as in diphenyl ether. The retension of functionality from fatty acid, to omega-carboxy fatty acid monomer and to corresponding polyesters resulted in polymers with with unsaturated and epoxidized repeat units and M(w) values ranging from 25000 to 57000 g/mol. These functional groups along chains disrupted crystallization giving materials that are low melting (23-40 degrees C). In contrast, saturated polyesters prepared from 1,18-octadecanedioic acid and 1,8-octanediol have correspondingly higher melting transitions (88 degrees C). TGA results indicated that all synthesized polyesters showed high thermal stabilities. Thus, the preparation of functional monomers from C. tropicalis omega-oxidation of fatty acids provides a wide range of new monomer building blocks to construct functional polymers. PMID:20000460

  9. Chemistry at large

    OpenAIRE

    Sanders, Jeremy K. M.

    2007-01-01

    A new book introduces young researchers to supramolecular chemistry, starting from the basics and working up to the more complicated aspects of the topic. While the text is inspiring for new graduates, it lacks a critical view.

  10. General Chemistry for Engineers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kybett, B. D.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the relationship between molecular structure, intermolecular forces, and tensile strengths of a polymer and suggests that this is a logical way to introduce polymers into a general chemistry course. (Author/JN)

  11. Bringing chemistry to life

    OpenAIRE

    Boyce, Michael; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2011-01-01

    Bioorthogonal chemistry allows a wide variety of biomolecules to be specifically labeled and probed in living cells and whole organisms. Here we discuss the history of bioorthogonal reactions and some of the most interesting and important advances in the field.

  12. Supplemental instruction in chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundeberg, Mary A.

    This study was designed to measure some effects of supplemental instruction in chemistry. Supplemental instruction is a peer-led cooperative learning program that encourages students to develop conceptual understanding by articulating both understandings and misconceptions in a think-aloud fashion. Supplemental instruction was offered three hours weekly outside of class and lab time for students in four classes of General Organic and Biological Chemistry. Over a two-year period 108 students volunteered to participate in this program; 45 students did not participate. As measured by final grades in chemistry and responses to a questionnaire, supplemental instruction was effective in increasing students' achievement in chemistry. Further research is needed to determine the in-depth effects of supplemental instruction on students' learning, problem solving, and self-esteem.

  13. Beauty in chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Atkins

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Though hard going for the general reader and highly personal in its selectivity, Elegant Solutions: Ten Beautiful Experiments in Chemistry provides reflections of a thoughtful author that will delight chemists

  14. Beauty in chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Atkins

    2006-01-01

    Though hard going for the general reader and highly personal in its selectivity, Elegant Solutions: Ten Beautiful Experiments in Chemistry provides reflections of a thoughtful author that will delight chemists

  15. Magnetism in Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookes, R. W.; McFadyen, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the technical aspects of paramagnetism and an electrostatic model called Crystal Field Theory (CFT), very often used in the case of transition metal compounds. Suggests that this discussion be included as an option for college chemistry courses. (MLH)

  16. Enzymes in Analytical Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Myer M.

    1980-01-01

    Presents tabular information concerning recent research in the field of enzymes in analytic chemistry, with methods, substrate or reaction catalyzed, assay, comments and references listed. The table refers to 128 references. Also listed are 13 general citations. (CS)

  17. Radiolytic oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work under the Radiolytic Oxidation Contract from 1986 until April 1989 is reported. The effects of alpha- and gamma-irradiation on the chemistries of plutonium, neptunium and technetium, under conditions representative of the near fields of intermediate and high level waste repositories, were investigated. Gamma-radiolysis of Np (IV) results in oxidation in solutions below pH 12. Solutions of Tc (VII) are reduced to Tc (IV) by gamma-irradiation in contact with blast furnace slag/ordinary Portland cement under an inert atmosphere but not when in contact with pulverized fuel ash/ordinary Portland cement. Tc (IV) is shown to be susceptible to oxidation by the products of the alpha-radiolysis of water. The results of 'overall effects' experiments, which combined representative components of typical ILW or HLW near fields, supported these observations and also showed enhanced plutonium concentrations in alpha-irradiated, HLW simulations. Mathematical models of the behaviour of plutonium and neptunium during gamma-radiolysis have been developed and indicate that oxidation to Pu (VI) is possible at dose rates typical of those expected for HLW. Simulations at ILW dose rates have indicated some effect upon the speciation of neptunium. Laboratory studies of the gamma-irradiation of Np (IV) in bentonite-equilibrated water have also been modelled. Computer code used: PHREEQE, 8 Figs.; 48 Tabs.; 38 refs

  18. Forensic Chemistry Training

    OpenAIRE

    Zuhal GERÇEK

    2012-01-01

    Increasing the types of terrorism and crime nowadays, the importance of the forensic sciences can be bett er understood. Forensic science is the application of the wide spectrum of science to answer the question of legal system. It contains the application of the principles, techniques and methods of basic sciences and its main aim is the determination of the physical facts which are important in legal situations. Forensic chemistry is the branch of chemistry which performs the chemical analy...

  19. Applications of supramolecular chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, Hans-Jörg

    2012-01-01

    ""The time is ripe for the present volume, which gathers thorough presentations of the numerous actually realized or potentially accessible applications of supramolecular chemistry by a number of the leading figures in the field. The variety of topics covered is witness to the diversity of the approaches and the areas of implementation…a broad and timely panorama of the field assembling an eminent roster of contributors.""-Jean-Marie Lehn, 1987 Noble Prize Winner in Chemistry

  20. Fundamentals of quantum chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    House, J E

    2004-01-01

    An introduction to the principles of quantum mechanics needed in physical chemistry. Mathematical tools are presented and developed as needed and only basic calculus, chemistry, and physics is assumed. Applications include atomic and molecular structure, spectroscopy, alpha decay, tunneling, and superconductivity. New edition includes sections on perturbation theory, orbital symmetry of diatomic molecules, the Huckel MO method and Woodward/Hoffman rules as well as a new chapter on SCF and Hartree-Fock methods. * This revised text clearly presents basic q

  1. Impact of surface chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Li, Yimin

    2010-01-01

    The applications of molecular surface chemistry in heterogeneous catalyst technology, semiconductor-based technology, medical technology, anticorrosion and lubricant technology, and nanotechnology are highlighted in this perspective. The evolution of surface chemistry at the molecular level is reviewed, and the key roles of surface instrumentation developments for in situ studies of the gas–solid, liquid–solid, and solid–solid interfaces under reaction conditions are emphasized.

  2. Gas phase ion chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Bowers, Michael T

    1979-01-01

    Gas Phase Ion Chemistry, Volume 2 covers the advances in gas phase ion chemistry. The book discusses the stabilities of positive ions from equilibrium gas-phase basicity measurements; the experimental methods used to determine molecular electron affinities, specifically photoelectron spectroscopy, photodetachment spectroscopy, charge transfer, and collisional ionization; and the gas-phase acidity scale. The text also describes the basis of the technique of chemical ionization mass spectrometry; the energetics and mechanisms of unimolecular reactions of positive ions; and the photodissociation

  3. EPA Environmental Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Chemistry Laboratory (ECL) is a national program laboratory specializing in residue chemistry analysis under the jurisdiction of the EPA's Office of Pesticide Programs in Washington, D.C. At Stennis Space Center, the laboratory's work supports many federal anti-pollution laws. The laboratory analyzes environmental and human samples to determine the presence and amount of agricultural chemicals and related substances. Pictured, ECL chemists analyze environmental and human samples for the presence of pesticides and other pollutants.

  4. Chemistry and nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The underlying principles of nuclear sciece and technology as based on the two basic phenomena, namely, radioactivity and nuclear reactions, with their relatively large associated energy changes, are outlined. The most important contributions by chemists in the overall historical development are mentioned and the strong position chemistry has attained in these fields is indicated. It is concluded that chemistry as well as many other scientific discplines (apart from general benefits) have largely benefitted from these nuclear developments

  5. Heterogeneous catalytic materials solid state chemistry, surface chemistry and catalytic behaviour

    CERN Document Server

    Busca, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneous Catalytic Materials discusses experimental methods and the latest developments in three areas of research: heterogeneous catalysis; surface chemistry; and the chemistry of catalysts. Catalytic materials are those solids that allow the chemical reaction to occur efficiently and cost-effectively. This book provides you with all necessary information to synthesize, characterize, and relate the properties of a catalyst to its behavior, enabling you to select the appropriate catalyst for the process and reactor system. Oxides (used both as catalysts and as supports for cata

  6. Research for the advancement of green chemistry practice: Studies in atmospheric and educational chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullipher, Steven Gene

    Green chemistry is a philosophy of chemistry that emphasizes a decreasing dependence on limited non-renewable resources and an increasing focus on preventing pollution byproducts of the chemical industry. In short, it is the discipline of chemistry practiced through the lens of environmental stewardship. In an effort to advance the practice of green chemistry, three studies will be described that have ramifications for the practice. The first study examines the atmospheric oxidation of a hydrofluorinated ether, a third-generation CFC replacement compound with primarily unknown atmospheric degradation products. Determination of these products has the potential to impact decisions on refrigerant usage in the future. The second study examines chemistry students' development of understanding benefits-costs-risks analysis when presented with two real-world scenarios: refrigerant choice and fuel choice. By studying how benefits-costs-risks thinking develops, curricular materials and instructional approaches can be designed to better foster the development of an ability that is both necessary for green chemists and important in daily decision-making for non-chemists. The final study uses eye tracking technology to examine students' abilities to interpret molecular properties from structural information in the context of global warming. Such abilities are fundamental if chemists are to appropriately assess risks and hazards of chemistry practice.

  7. Continuous cyclohexane oxidation to cyclohexanol using a novel cytochrome P450 monooxygenase from Acidovorax sp. CHX100 in recombinant P. taiwanensis VLB120 biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karande, Rohan; Debor, Linde; Salamanca, Diego; Bogdahn, Fabian; Engesser, Karl-Heinrich; Buehler, Katja; Schmid, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The applications of biocatalysts in chemical industries are characterized by activity, selectivity, and stability. One key strategy to achieve high biocatalytic activity is the identification of novel enzymes with kinetics optimized for organic synthesis by Nature. The isolation of novel cytochrome P450 monooxygenase genes from Acidovorax sp. CHX100 and their functional expression in recombinant Pseudomonas taiwanensis VLB120 enabled efficient oxidation of cyclohexane to cyclohexanol. Although initial resting cell activities of 20 U gCDW (-1) were achieved, the rapid decrease in catalytic activity due to the toxicity of cyclohexane prevented synthetic applications. Cyclohexane toxicity was reduced and cellular activities stabilized over the reaction time by delivering the toxic substrate through the vapor phase and by balancing the aqueous phase mass transfer with the cellular conversion rate. The potential of this novel CYP enzyme was exploited by transferring the shake flask reaction to an aqueous-air segmented flow biofilm membrane reactor for maximizing productivity. Cyclohexane was continuously delivered via the silicone membrane. This ensured lower reactant toxicity and continuous product formation at an average volumetric productivity of 0.4 g L tube (-1) h(-1) for several days. This highlights the potential of combining a powerful catalyst with a beneficial reactor design to overcome critical issues of cyclohexane oxidation to cyclohexanol. It opens new opportunities for biocatalytic transformations of compounds which are toxic, volatile, and have low solubility in water. PMID:26153144

  8. Combustion chemistry. Activities in the CHEC research programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dam-Johansen, K.; Johnsson, J.E.; Glarborg, P.; Frandsen, F.; Jensen, A.; Oestberg, M. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Lyngby (Denmark)

    1996-12-01

    The combustion chemistry in the oxidation of fossil fuels and biofuels determines together with mixing and heat transfer the required size of a furnace, the emission of gaseous pollutants, and the formation of ash and deposits on surfaces. This paper describes technologies for solid fuels combustion and gives a summary of the fuels, the pollutant chemistry and the inorganic chemistry in combustion processes. Emphasis is put on the work carried out in the CHEC (Combustion and Harmful Emission Control Research Programme). (au) 173 refs.

  9. Mathematical problems for chemistry students

    CERN Document Server

    Pota, Gyorgy

    2006-01-01

    Mathematical Problems for Chemistry Students has been compiled and written (a) to help chemistry students in their mathematical studies by providing them with mathematical problems really occurring in chemistry (b) to help practising chemists to activate their applied mathematical skills and (c) to introduce students and specialists of the chemistry-related fields (physicists, mathematicians, biologists, etc.) into the world of the chemical applications. Some problems of the collection are mathematical reformulations of those in the standard textbooks of chemistry, other

  10. Annual report 1983 Chemistry Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains a brief survey of the main activities in the Chemistry Department. All articles and reports published and lectures given in 1983 are presented. The facilities and equipment are barely mentioned. The activities are divided into nine groups: 1. radioisotope chemistry 2. analytical- and organic chemistry 3. environmental chemistry 4. polymer chemistry 5. geochemistry and waste disposal 6. radical chemstry 7. positron annihilation 8. mineral processing 9. general. (author)

  11. Copper Nanoparticles in Click Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Francisco; Moglie, Yanina; Radivoy, Gabriel

    2015-09-15

    The challenges of the 21st century demand scientific and technological achievements that must be developed under sustainable and environmentally benign practices. In this vein, click chemistry and green chemistry walk hand in hand on a pathway of rigorous principles that help to safeguard the health of our planet against negligent and uncontrolled production. Copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC), the paradigm of a click reaction, is one of the most reliable and widespread synthetic transformations in organic chemistry, with multidisciplinary applications. Nanocatalysis is a green chemistry tool that can increase the inherent effectiveness of CuAAC because of the enhanced catalytic activity of nanostructured metals and their plausible reutilization capability as heterogeneous catalysts. This Account describes our contribution to click chemistry using unsupported and supported copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) as catalysts prepared by chemical reduction. Cu(0)NPs (3.0 ± 1.5 nm) in tetrahydrofuran were found to catalyze the reaction of terminal alkynes and organic azides in the presence of triethylamine at rates comparable to those achieved under microwave heating (10-30 min in most cases). Unfortunately, the CuNPs underwent dissolution under the reaction conditions and consequently could not be recovered. Compelling experimental evidence on the in situ generation of highly reactive copper(I) chloride and the participation of copper(I) acetylides was provided. The supported CuNPs were found to be more robust and efficient catalyst than the unsupported counterpart in the following terms: (a) the multicomponent variant of CuAAC could be applied; (b) the metal loading could be substantially decreased; (c) reactions could be conducted in neat water; and (d) the catalyst could be recovered easily and reutilized. In particular, the catalyst composed of oxidized CuNPs (Cu2O/CuO, 6.0 ± 2.0 nm) supported on carbon (CuNPs/C) was shown to be highly versatile and very

  12. EPRI BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BWRVIP-190: BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines – 2008 Revision has been revised. The revision committee consisted of U.S. and non-U.S. utilities (members of the BWR Vessel and Internals Protection (BWRVIP) Mitigation Committee), reactor system manufacturers, fuel suppliers, and EPRI and industry experts. The revised document, BWRVIP-190 Revision 1, was completely reformatted into two volumes, with a simplified presentation of water chemistry control, diagnostic and good practice parameters in Volume 1 and the technical bases in Volume 2, to facilitate use. The revision was developed in parallel and in coordination with preparation of the Fuel Reliability Guidelines Revision 1: BWR Fuel Cladding Crud and Corrosion. Guidance is included for plants operating under normal water chemistry (NWC), moderate hydrogen water chemistry (HWC-M), and noble metal application (GE-Hitachi NobleChem™) plus hydrogen injection. Volume 1 includes significant changes to BWR feedwater and reactor water chemistry control parameters to provide increased assurance of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) mitigation of reactor materials and fuel reliability during all plant conditions, including cold shutdown (≤200°F (93°C)), startup/hot standby (>200°F (93°C) and ≤ 10%) and power operation (>10% power). Action Level values for chloride and sulfate have been tightened to minimize environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of all wetted surfaces, including those not protected by hydrogen injection, with or without noble metals. Chemistry control guidance has been enhanced to minimize shutdown radiation fields by clarifying targets for depleted zinc oxide (DZO) injection while meeting requirements for fuel reliability. Improved tabular presentations of parameter values explicitly indicate levels at which actions are to be taken and required sampling frequencies. Volume 2 provides the technical bases for BWR water chemistry control for control of EAC, flow accelerated corrosion

  13. Chemistry beyond positivism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Werner W

    2003-05-01

    Chemistry is often thought to be quite factual, and therefore might be considered close to the "positivist" ideal of a value-free science. A closer look, however, reveals that the field is coupled to the invisible realm of values, meanings, and purpose in various ways, and chemists interact with that realm loosely and unevenly. Tacit knowledge is one important locus of such interactions. We are concerned in this essay with two questions. What is the nature of the knowledge when we are in the early stages of discovery? and In what ways does the hidden reality we are seeking affect our search for an understanding of it? The first question is partly answered by Polanyi's theory of tacit knowledge, while the second one leads us to realize the limitations of our language when discussing "reality"-or certain chemical experimental results. A strictly positivist approach is of little use, but so is the opposite, the complete disregard of facts. The contrast between positivism and non-formulable aspects of scientific reasoning amounts to a paradox that needs to be analyzed and can lead to a "connected" chemistry. This in turn resembles networks described by Schweber and is more concerned than the chemistry "as it is" with aspects such as the image of chemistry, the challenges chemists face as citizens, and chemistry in liberal education. PMID:12796119

  14. Titan: a laboratory for prebiological organic chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagan, C.; Thompson, W. R.; Khare, B. N.

    1992-01-01

    When we examine the atmospheres of the Jovian planets (Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune), the satellites in the outer solar system, comets, and even--through microwave and infrared spectroscopy--the cold dilute gas and grains between the stars, we find a rich organic chemistry, presumably abiological, not only in most of the solar system but throughout the Milky Way galaxy. In part because the composition and surface pressure of the Earth's atmosphere 4 x 10(9) years ago are unknown, laboratory experiments on prebiological organic chemistry are at best suggestive; but we can test our understanding by looking more closely at the observed extraterrestrial organic chemistry. The present Account is restricted to atmospheric organic chemistry, primarily on the large moon of Saturn. Titan is a test of our understanding of the organic chemistry of planetary atmospheres. Its atmospheric bulk composition (N2/CH4) is intermediate between the highly reducing (H2/He/CH4/NH3/H2O) atmospheres of the Jovian planets and the more oxidized (N2/CO2/H2O) atmospheres of the terrestrial planets Mars and Venus. It has long been recognized that Titan's organic chemistry may have some relevance to the events that led to the origin of life on Earth. But with Titan surface temperatures approximately equal to 94 K and pressures approximately equal to 1.6 bar, the oceans of the early Earth have no ready analogue on Titan. Nevertheless, tectonic events in the water ice-rich interior or impact melting and slow re-freezing may lead to an episodic availability of liquid water. Indeed, the latter process is the equivalent of a approximately 10(3)-year-duration shallow aqueous sea over the entire surface of Titan.

  15. The chemistry of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparative study has been made between various arsine oxide and phosphine oxide complexes of uranium tetrahalides both in acetone solution and in the solid state. Conductimetric, potentiometric, and spectrophotometric methods have been used in solution, spectroscopic and structural methods on solids. The significantly greater ionising power of arsine oxide ligands is indicated and is discussed together with the structural differences between arsine oxide and phosphine oxide complexes of the type UCl4.2L and UX4.6L[X = Cl and Br; L = AsR3O, PR3O, or P(NMe2)3O; R = Me, Et, or Ph]. (author)

  16. Suitability assessment of a continuous process combining thermo-mechano-chemical and bio-catalytic action in a single pilot-scale twin-screw extruder for six different biomass sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbossche, Virginie; Brault, Julien; Hernandez-Melendez, Oscar; Evon, Philippe; Barzana, Eduardo; Vilarem, Gérard; Rigal, Luc

    2016-07-01

    A process has been validated for the deconstruction of lignocellulose on a pilot scale installation using six types of biomass selected for their sustainability, accessibility, worldwide availability, and differences of chemical composition and physical structure. The process combines thermo-mechano-chemical and bio-catalytic action in a single twin-screw extruder. Three treatment phases were sequentially performed: an alkaline pretreatment, a neutralization step coupled with an extraction-separation phase and a bioextrusion treatment. Alkaline pretreatment destructured the wall polymers after just a few minutes and allowed the initial extraction of 18-54% of the hemicelluloses and 9-41% of the lignin. The bioextrusion step induced the start of enzymatic hydrolysis and increased the proportion of soluble organic matter. Extension of saccharification for 24h at high consistency (20%) and without the addition of new enzyme resulted in the production of 39-84% of the potential glucose. PMID:27015021

  17. Biocatalytic ammonolysis of (5S)-4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrrole-1,5-dicarboxylic acid, 1-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-5-ethyl ester: preparation of an intermediate to the dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor Saxagliptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Iqbal; Patel, Ramesh

    2006-02-01

    An efficient biocatalytic method has been developed for the conversion of (5S)-4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrrole-1,5-dicarboxylic acid, 1-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-5-ethyl ester (1) into the corresponding amide (5S)-5-aminocarbonyl-4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrrole-1-carboxylic acid, 1-(1,1-dimethylethyl)ester (2), which is a critical intermediate in the synthesis of the dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP4) inhibitor Saxagliptin (3). Candida antartica lipase B mediates ammonolysis of the ester with ammonium carbamate as ammonia donor to yield up to 71% of the amide. The inclusion of Ascarite and calcium chloride as adsorbents for carbon dioxide and ethanol byproducts, respectively, increases the yield to 98%, thereby offering an efficient and practical alternative to chemical routes which yield 57-64%. PMID:16257208

  18. Collaborative Physical Chemistry Projects Involving Computational Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whisnant, David M.; Howe, Jerry J.; Lever, Lisa S.

    2000-02-01

    The physical chemistry classes from three colleges have collaborated on two computational chemistry projects using Quantum CAChe 3.0 and Gaussian 94W running on Pentium II PCs. Online communication by email and the World Wide Web was an important part of the collaboration. In the first project, students used molecular modeling to predict benzene derivatives that might be possible hair dyes. They used PM3 and ZINDO calculations to predict the electronic spectra of the molecules and tested the predicted spectra by comparing some with experimental measurements. They also did literature searches for real hair dyes and possible health effects. In the final phase of the project they proposed a synthetic pathway for one compound. In the second project the students were asked to predict which isomer of a small carbon cluster (C3, C4, or C5) was responsible for a series of IR lines observed in the spectrum of a carbon star. After preliminary PM3 calculations, they used ab initio calculations at the HF/6-31G(d) and MP2/6-31G(d) level to model the molecules and predict their vibrational frequencies and rotational constants. A comparison of the predictions with the experimental spectra suggested that the linear isomer of the C5 molecule was responsible for the lines.

  19. Principles of Chemistry (by Michael Munowitz)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovac, Reviewed By Jeffrey

    2000-05-01

    principles. This is a very conceptual book. Each chapter has two parts, which are distinguished by having different-colored pages: white and gray. The first part of every chapter is a lovely conceptual development of the "big picture". In these white pages, there are no sample problems, no tables of data, just elegant prose liberally illustrated with graphs and diagrams. Mathematical and chemical equations and chemical structures are presented as needed, but the goal is to provide the reader with a conceptual understanding. I found these introductory "lectures", as Munowitz terms them, to be enchanting. The second part of each chapter is a review and guide to problems, what Munowitz calls the "recitation" section. These pages are gray. This second section gives a brief summary of the material, which is followed by a series of worked examples that apply the concepts to practical problems. This structure reflects the author's pedagogical philosophy--begin with the general and move to the specific--and his view of chemistry as a combination of "lofty principles and gritty practicality". Following the worked examples, of course, are exercises for the student, ranging from simple drill problems to more sophisticated applications of the principles. I was a little disappointed, however, that there were so few conceptual exercises. Although Munowitz describes the second part of each chapter as a review and applications, he does put new material into the sample problems. For example, in Chapter 3 the concept of oxidation numbers is introduced and sample problems on the assignment of oxidation numbers are presented. Then, in example 3-3, the concept of formal charge is presented as a contrast to the oxidation number even though this idea had not been previously introduced. The dual structure of white and gray pages makes this book unique but also very long. The combined length of the white sections is about 800 pages, but an approximately 25-page conceptual section is always followed

  20. Introductory quantum chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book on quantum chemistry is primarily intended for university students at the senior undergraduate level. It serves as an aid to the basic understanding of the important concepts of quantum mechanics introduced in the field of chemistry. Various chapters of the book are devoted to the following : (i) Waves and quanta, (ii) Operator concept in quantum chemistry, (iii) Wave mechanics of some simple systems, (iv) Perturbation theory, (v) Many-electron atoms and angular momenta (vi) Molecular orbital theory and its application to the electronic structure of diatomic molecules, (vii) Chemical bonding in polyatomic molecules and (viii) Chemical applications of Hellmann-Feynman theorem. At the end of each chapter, a set of problems is given and the answers to these problems are given at the end of the book. (A.K.)