WorldWideScience

Sample records for chemical state image

  1. Chemical imaging and solid state analysis at compact surfaces using UV imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Jian X.; Rehder, Sönke; van den Berg, Frans;

    2014-01-01

    Fast non-destructive multi-wavelength UV imaging together with multivariate image analysis was utilized to visualize distribution of chemical components and their solid state form at compact surfaces. Amorphous and crystalline solid forms of the antidiabetic compound glibenclamide, and...... excipients in a non-invasive way, as well as mapping the glibenclamide solid state form. An exploratory data analysis supported the critical evaluation of the mapping results and the selection of model parameters for the chemical mapping. The present study demonstrated that the multi-wavelength UV imaging is...... microcrystalline cellulose together with magnesium stearate as excipients were used as model materials in the compacts. The UV imaging based drug and excipient distribution was in good agreement with hyperspectral NIR imaging. The UV wavelength region can be utilized in distinguishing between glibenclamide and...

  2. Characterization of Surface Chemical States of a Thick Insulator: Chemical State Imaging on MgO Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Yeonjin; Cho, Sangwan; Noh, Myungkeun; Whang, Chung-Nam; Jeong, Kwangho; Shin, Hyun-Joon

    2005-02-01

    We report a surface characterization tool that can be effectively used to investigate the chemical state and subtle radiation damage on a thick insulator surface. It has been used to examine the MgO surface of a plasma display panel (PDP) consisting of a stack of insulator layers of approximately 51 μm thickness on a 2-mm-thick glass plate. The scanning photoelectron microscopy (SPEM) image of the insulating MgO surface was obtained by using the difference in Au 4f peak shift due to the surface charging at each pixel, where a Au adlayer of approximately 15 {\\AA} thickness was formed on the surface to overcome the serious charging shift of the peak position and the spectral deterioration in the photoelectron spectra. The observed contrast in the SPEM image reveals the chemical modification of the underlying MgO surface induced by the plasma discharge damage. The chemical state analysis of the MgO surface was carried out by comparing the Mg 2p, C 1s and O 1s photoemission spectra collected at each pixel of the SPEM image. We assigned four suboxide phases, MgO, MgCO3, Mg(OH)2 and Mg1+, on the initial MgO surface, where the Mg(OH)2 and Mg1+ phases vanished rapidly as the discharge-induced surface damage began.

  3. Chemical-state imaging of Li using scanning Auger electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Scanning Auger electron microscopy is used to image chemical states of Li. •The combined use of AES and EELS signals for the elemental mapping is powerful. •Distribution corresponding to metallic and oxidized states of Li can be imaged. -- Abstract: The demand for measurement tools to detect Li with high spatial resolution and precise chemical sensitivity is increasing with the spread of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) for use in a wide range of applications. In this work, scanning Auger electron microscopy (SAM) is used to image chemical states of a partially oxidized Li surface on the basis of the Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) data obtained during an oxidation process of a metal Li. We show that distribution of metallic and oxidized states of Li is clearly imaged by mapping the intensity of the corresponding AES and EELS peaks. Furthermore, a tiny difference in the extent of oxidation can be distinguished by comparing the elemental map of an AES peak with that of an EELS peak owing to the different behaviors of those signals to the chemical states of Li

  4. Chemical Imaging of Ambient Aerosol Particles: Observational Constraints on Mixing State Parameterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, Rachel; Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander; Riemer, Nicole; West, Matthew; Zhang, Qi; Sun, Yele; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Alpert, Peter A.; Knopf, Daniel A.; Gilles, Mary K.; Moffet, Ryan

    2015-09-28

    A new parameterization for quantifying the mixing state of aerosol populations has been applied for the first time to samples of ambient particles analyzed using spectro-microscopy techniques. Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy/near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (STXM/NEXAFS) and computer controlled scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (CCSEM/EDX) were used to probe the composition of the organic and inorganic fraction of individual particles collected on June 27th and 28th during the 2010 Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects (CARES) study in the Central Valley, California. The first field site, T0, was located in downtown Sacramento, while T1 was located near the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Mass estimates of the aerosol particle components were used to calculate mixing state metrics, such as the particle-specific diversity, bulk population diversity, and mixing state index, for each sample. Both microscopy imaging techniques showed more changes over these two days in the mixing state at the T0 site than at the T1 site. The STXM data showed evidence of changes in the mixing state associated with a build-up of organic matter confirmed by collocated measurements and the largest impact on the mixing state was due to an increase in soot dominant particles during this build-up. The CCSEM/EDX analysis showed the presence of two types of particle populations; the first was dominated by aged sea salt particles and had a higher mixing state index (indicating a more homogeneous population), the second was dominated by carbonaceous particles and had a lower mixing state index.

  5. Chemical imaging of ambient aerosol particles: Observational constraints on mixing state parameterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Rachel E.; Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander; Riemer, Nicole; West, Matthew; Zhang, Qi; Sun, Yele; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Alpert, Peter; Knopf, Daniel A.; Gilles, Mary K.; Moffet, Ryan C.

    2015-09-01

    A new parameterization for quantifying the mixing state of aerosol populations has been applied for the first time to samples of ambient particles analyzed using spectro-microscopy techniques. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy/near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (STXM/NEXAFS) and computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (CCSEM/EDX) were used to probe the composition of the organic and inorganic fraction of individual particles collected on 27 and 28 June during the 2010 Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects study in the Central Valley, California. The first field site, T0, was located in downtown Sacramento, while T1 was located near the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Mass estimates of the aerosol particle components were used to calculate mixing state metrics, such as the particle-specific diversity, bulk population diversity, and mixing state index, for each sample. The STXM data showed evidence of changes in the mixing state associated with a buildup of organic matter confirmed by collocated measurements, and the largest impact on the mixing state was due to an increase in soot dominant particles during this buildup. The mixing state from STXM was similar between T0 and T1, indicating that the increased organic fraction at T1 had a small effect on the mixing state of the population. The CCSEM/EDX analysis showed the presence of two types of particle populations: the first was dominated by aged sea-salt particles and had a higher mixing state index (indicating a more homogeneous population); the second was dominated by carbonaceous particles and had a lower mixing state index.

  6. Outpatient Imaging Efficiency - State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Use of medical imaging - state data. These measures give you information about hospitals' use of medical imaging tests for outpatients. Examples of medical imaging...

  7. Tobacco and chemicals (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Some of the chemicals associated with tobacco smoke include ammonia, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, propane, methane, acetone, hydrogen cyanide and various carcinogens. Other chemicals that are associated with chewing ...

  8. Islamic State and Chemical Weapons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukáš Rafay

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with topic of Islamic State and chemical weapons. The issue is analysed in three dimensions: origin of used chemical weapons and possibility of independent production; known chemical attacks and tactical regularities in their execution; and traits of future chemical terrorist attacks. By providing a thorough examination of the problem, the article aims at predicting the future development of the group’s chemical program as well as describing any prospective chemical terrorist attacks in Europe

  9. Multivariate Chemical Image Fusion of Vibrational Spectroscopic Imaging Modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowen, Aoife A; Dorrepaal, Ronan M

    2016-01-01

    Chemical image fusion refers to the combination of chemical images from different modalities for improved characterisation of a sample. Challenges associated with existing approaches include: difficulties with imaging the same sample area or having identical pixels across microscopic modalities, lack of prior knowledge of sample composition and lack of knowledge regarding correlation between modalities for a given sample. In addition, the multivariate structure of chemical images is often overlooked when fusion is carried out. We address these challenges by proposing a framework for multivariate chemical image fusion of vibrational spectroscopic imaging modalities, demonstrating the approach for image registration, fusion and resolution enhancement of chemical images obtained with IR and Raman microscopy. PMID:27384549

  10. Chemical sensing and imaging with metallic nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Catherine J; Gole, Anand M; Hunyadi, Simona E; Stone, John W; Sisco, Patrick N; Alkilany, Alaaldin; Kinard, Brian E; Hankins, Patrick

    2008-02-01

    In this Feature Article, we examine recent advances in chemical analyte detection and optical imaging applications using gold and silver nanoparticles, with a primary focus on our own work. Noble metal nanoparticles have exciting physical and chemical properties that are entirely different from the bulk. For chemical sensing and imaging, the optical properties of metallic nanoparticles provide a wide range of opportunities, all of which ultimately arise from the collective oscillations of conduction band electrons ("plasmons") in response to external electromagnetic radiation. Nanorods have multiple plasmon bands compared to nanospheres. We identify four optical sensing and imaging modalities for metallic nanoparticles: (1) aggregation-dependent shifts in plasmon frequency; (2) local refractive index-dependent shifts in plasmon frequency; (3) inelastic (surface-enhanced Raman) light scattering; and (4) elastic (Rayleigh) light scattering. The surface chemistry of the nanoparticles must be tunable to create chemical specificity, and is a key requirement for successful sensing and imaging platforms. PMID:18209787

  11. Soft X-ray imaging and spectromicroscopy: new insights in chemical state and morphology of the key components in operating fuel-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzini, Benedetto; Abyaneh, Majid Kazemian; Amati, Matteo; Gianoncelli, Alessandra; Gregoratti, Luca; Kaulich, Burkhard; Kiskinova, Maya

    2012-08-13

    Fuel cells are one of the most appealing environmentally friendly devices for the effective conversion of chemical energy into electricity and heat, but still there are key barriers to their broad commercialization. In addition to efficiency, a major challenge of fuel-cell technology is the durability of the key components (interconnects, electrodes, and electrolytes) that can be subject to corrosion or undesired morphology and chemical changes occurring under operating conditions. The complementary capabilities of synchrotron-based soft X-ray microscopes in terms of imaging, spectroscopy, spatial and time resolution, and variable probing depths are opening unique opportunities to shed light on the multiple processes occurring in these complex systems at microscopic length scales. This type of information is prerequisite for understanding and controlling the performance and durability of such devices. This paper reviews the most recent efforts in the implementation of these methods for exploring the evolving structure and chemical composition of some key fuel cell components. Recent achievements are illustrated by selected results obtained with simplified versions of proton-exchange fuel-cells (PEFC) and solid-oxide fuel-cells (SOFC), which allow in situ monitoring of the redox reactions resulting in: 1) undesired deposits at interconnects and electrodes (PEFC); 2) material interactions at the electrode-electrolyte interface (PEFC); 3) release of corrosion products to the electrolyte phase (PEFC, and 4) mass-transport processes and structural changes occurring at the high operation temperatures of SOFC and promoted by the polarization. PMID:22836392

  12. Chemical Implementation of Finite-State Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjelmfelt, Allen; Weinberger, Edward D.; Ross, John

    1992-01-01

    With methods developed in a prior article on the chemical kinetic implementation of a McCulloch-Pitts neuron, connections among neurons, logic gates, and a clocking mechanism, we construct examples of clocked finite-state machines. These machines include a binary decoder, a binary adder, and a stack memory. An example of the operation of the binary adder is given, and the chemical concentrations corresponding to the state of each chemical neuron are followed in time. Using these methods, we can, in principle, construct a universal Turing machine, and these chemical networks inherit the halting problem

  13. Visualizing Chemistry: The Progess and Promise of Advanced Chemical Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Committee on Revealing Chemistry Through Advanced Chemical Imaging

    2006-09-01

    The field of chemical imaging can provide detailed structural, functional, and applicable information about chemistry and chemical engineering phenomena that have enormous impacts on medicine, materials, and technology. In recognizing the potential for more research development in the field of chemical imaging, the National Academies was asked by the National Science Foundation, Department of Energy, U.S. Army, and National Cancer Institute to complete a study that would review the current state of molecular imaging technology, point to promising future developments and their applications, and suggest a research and educational agenda to enable breakthrough improvements in the ability to image molecular processes simultaneously in multiple physical dimensions as well as time. The study resulted in a consensus report that provides guidance for a focused research and development program in chemical imaging and identifies research needs and possible applications of imaging technologies that can provide the breakthrough knowledge in chemistry, materials science, biology, and engineering for which we should strive. Public release of this report is expected in early October.

  14. Chemical reaction systems with toric steady states

    CERN Document Server

    Millan, Mercedes Perez; Shiu, Anne; Conradi, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    Mass-action chemical reaction systems are frequently used in Computational Biology. The corresponding polynomial dynamical systems are often large, consisting of tens or even hundreds of ordinary differential equations, and poorly parameterized (due to noisy measurement data and a small number of data points and repetitions). Therefore, it is often difficult to establish the existence of (positive) steady states or to determine whether more complicated phenomena such as multistationarity exist. If, however, the steady state ideal of the system is a binomial ideal, then we show that these questions can be answered easily. The focus of this work is on systems with this property, and we say that such systems have toric steady states. Our main result gives sufficient conditions for a chemical reaction system to have toric steady states. Furthermore, we analyze the capacity of such a system to exhibit positive steady states and multistationarity. Examples of systems with toric steady states include weakly-reversib...

  15. Nanoscale chemical imaging by photoinduced force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Derek; Morrison, William; Wickramasinghe, H. Kumar; Jahng, Junghoon; Potma, Eric; Wan, Lei; Ruiz, Ricardo; Albrecht, Thomas R.; Schmidt, Kristin; Frommer, Jane; Sanders, Daniel P.; Park, Sung

    2016-01-01

    Correlating spatial chemical information with the morphology of closely packed nanostructures remains a challenge for the scientific community. For example, supramolecular self-assembly, which provides a powerful and low-cost way to create nanoscale patterns and engineered nanostructures, is not easily interrogated in real space via existing nondestructive techniques based on optics or electrons. A novel scanning probe technique called infrared photoinduced force microscopy (IR PiFM) directly measures the photoinduced polarizability of the sample in the near field by detecting the time-integrated force between the tip and the sample. By imaging at multiple IR wavelengths corresponding to absorption peaks of different chemical species, PiFM has demonstrated the ability to spatially map nm-scale patterns of the individual chemical components of two different types of self-assembled block copolymer films. With chemical-specific nanometer-scale imaging, PiFM provides a powerful new analytical method for deepening our understanding of nanomaterials. PMID:27051870

  16. X-ray photon-in/photon-out methods for chemical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcus, Matthew A.

    2010-03-24

    Most interesting materials in nature are heterogeneous, so it is useful to have analytical techniques with spatial resolution sufficient to resolve these heterogeneities.This article presents the basics of X-ray photon-in/photon-out chemical imaging. This family of methods allows one to derive images reflectingthe chemical state of a given element in a complex sample, at micron or deep sub-micron scale. X-ray chemical imaging is relatively non-destructiveand element-selective, and requires minimal sample preparation. The article presents the basic concepts and some considerations of data takingand data analysis, along with some examples.

  17. Nonlinear optical imaging: toward chemical imaging during neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Tobias; Dietzek, Benjamin; Krafft, Christoph; Romeike, Bernd F. M.; Reichart, Rupert; Kalff, Rolf; Popp, Jürgen

    2011-03-01

    Tumor recognition and precise tumor margin detection presents a central challenge during neurosurgery. In this contribution we present our recent all-optical approach to tackle this problem. We introduce various nonlinear optical techniques, such as coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), second-harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon fluorescence (TPEF), to study the morphology and chemical composition of (ex vivo) brain tissue. As the experimental techniques presented are contact-free all-optical techniques, which do not rely on the administration of external (fluorescence) labels, we anticipate that their implementation into surgical microscopes will provide significant advantages of intraoperative tumor diagnosis. In this contribution an introduction to the different optical spectroscopic methods will be presented and their implementation into a multimodal microscopic setup will be discussed. Furthermore, we will exemplify their application to brain tissue, i.e. both pig brain as a model for healthy brain tissue and human brain samples taken from surgical procedures. The data to be discussed show the capability of a joint CARS/SHG/TPEF multimodal imaging approach in highlighting various aspects of tissue morphochemistry. The consequences of this microspectroscopic potential, when combined with the existing technology of surgical microscopes, will be discussed.

  18. Imaging chemical extraction by polymer inclusion membranes using fluorescence microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polymer inclusion membranes (PIMs) transport chemicals between bodies of liquid by simultaneously performing chemical extraction and back-extraction. The internal chemical and physical mechanisms by which this transport occurs are, however, poorly understood. Also, some PIMs, which are otherwise optimal for their task, age and lose function after only days, limiting their feasibility for industrial upscaling. Through the application of fluorescence imaging methods we are able for the first time to see where chemical extraction occurs in the membrane. Extraction of fluorescein from solution by PIMs demonstrates inhomogeneities that do not correlate to surface morphology. Fluorescence lifetime imaging demonstrates that regions of increased extraction have distinctly different fluorescence lifetimes to that of the surrounding PIM indicating localized chemical environments, and this is observed to change with membrane age. Fluorescence imaging is shown to allow probing and novel understanding of PIM internal chemical morphology. (paper)

  19. Imaging chemical extraction by polymer inclusion membranes using fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Clare A.; Nagul, Edward A.; Cattrall, Robert W.; Kolev, Spas D.; Smith, Trevor A.

    2014-06-01

    Polymer inclusion membranes (PIMs) transport chemicals between bodies of liquid by simultaneously performing chemical extraction and back-extraction. The internal chemical and physical mechanisms by which this transport occurs are, however, poorly understood. Also, some PIMs, which are otherwise optimal for their task, age and lose function after only days, limiting their feasibility for industrial upscaling. Through the application of fluorescence imaging methods we are able for the first time to see where chemical extraction occurs in the membrane. Extraction of fluorescein from solution by PIMs demonstrates inhomogeneities that do not correlate to surface morphology. Fluorescence lifetime imaging demonstrates that regions of increased extraction have distinctly different fluorescence lifetimes to that of the surrounding PIM indicating localized chemical environments, and this is observed to change with membrane age. Fluorescence imaging is shown to allow probing and novel understanding of PIM internal chemical morphology.

  20. Computational chemical imaging for cardiovascular pathology: chemical microscopic imaging accurately determines cardiac transplant rejection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saumya Tiwari

    Full Text Available Rejection is a common problem after cardiac transplants leading to significant number of adverse events and deaths, particularly in the first year of transplantation. The gold standard to identify rejection is endomyocardial biopsy. This technique is complex, cumbersome and requires a lot of expertise in the correct interpretation of stained biopsy sections. Traditional histopathology cannot be used actively or quickly during cardiac interventions or surgery. Our objective was to develop a stain-less approach using an emerging technology, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopic imaging to identify different components of cardiac tissue by their chemical and molecular basis aided by computer recognition, rather than by visual examination using optical microscopy. We studied this technique in assessment of cardiac transplant rejection to evaluate efficacy in an example of complex cardiovascular pathology. We recorded data from human cardiac transplant patients' biopsies, used a Bayesian classification protocol and developed a visualization scheme to observe chemical differences without the need of stains or human supervision. Using receiver operating characteristic curves, we observed probabilities of detection greater than 95% for four out of five histological classes at 10% probability of false alarm at the cellular level while correctly identifying samples with the hallmarks of the immune response in all cases. The efficacy of manual examination can be significantly increased by observing the inherent biochemical changes in tissues, which enables us to achieve greater diagnostic confidence in an automated, label-free manner. We developed a computational pathology system that gives high contrast images and seems superior to traditional staining procedures. This study is a prelude to the development of real time in situ imaging systems, which can assist interventionists and surgeons actively during procedures.

  1. Predictive spectroscopy and chemical imaging based on novel optical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Matthew Paul

    1998-10-01

    This thesis describes two futuristic optical systems designed to surpass contemporary spectroscopic methods for predictive spectroscopy and chemical imaging. These systems are advantageous to current techniques in a number of ways including lower cost, enhanced portability, shorter analysis time, and improved S/N. First, a novel optical approach to predicting chemical and physical properties based on principal component analysis (PCA) is proposed and evaluated. A regression vector produced by PCA is designed into the structure of a set of paired optical filters. Light passing through the paired filters produces an analog detector signal directly proportional to the chemical/physical property for which the regression vector was designed. Second, a novel optical system is described which takes a single-shot approach to chemical imaging with high spectroscopic resolution using a dimension-reduction fiber-optic array. Images are focused onto a two- dimensional matrix of optical fibers which are drawn into a linear distal array with specific ordering. The distal end is imaged with a spectrograph equipped with an ICCD camera for spectral analysis. Software is used to extract the spatial/spectral information contained in the ICCD images and deconvolute them into wave length-specific reconstructed images or position-specific spectra which span a multi-wavelength space. This thesis includes a description of the fabrication of two dimension-reduction arrays as well as an evaluation of the system for spatial and spectral resolution, throughput, image brightness, resolving power, depth of focus, and channel cross-talk. PCA is performed on the images by treating rows of the ICCD images as spectra and plotting the scores of each PC as a function of reconstruction position. In addition, iterative target transformation factor analysis (ITTFA) is performed on the spectroscopic images to generate ``true'' chemical maps of samples. Univariate zero-order images, univariate first

  2. The Galileo Solid-State Imaging experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belton, Michael J. S.; Klaasen, Kenneth P.; Clary, Maurice C.; Anderson, James L.; Anger, Clifford D.; Carr, Michael H.; Chapman, Clark R.; Davies, Merton E.; Greeley, Ronald; Anderson, Donald

    1992-01-01

    The Galileo Orbiter's Solid-State Imaging (SSI) experiment uses a 1.5-m focal length TV camera with 800 x 800 pixel, virtual-phase CCD detector in order to obtain images of Jupiter and its satellites which possess a combination of sensitivity levels, spatial resolutions, geometric fidelity, and spectral range that are unmatched by earlier imaging data. After describing the performance of this equipment on the basis of ground calibrations, attention is given to the SSI experiment's Jupiter system observation objectives; these encompass atmospheric science, satellite surfaces, ring structure, and 'darkside' experiments.

  3. Automated extraction of chemical structure information from digital raster images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shedden Kerby A

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To search for chemical structures in research articles, diagrams or text representing molecules need to be translated to a standard chemical file format compatible with cheminformatic search engines. Nevertheless, chemical information contained in research articles is often referenced as analog diagrams of chemical structures embedded in digital raster images. To automate analog-to-digital conversion of chemical structure diagrams in scientific research articles, several software systems have been developed. But their algorithmic performance and utility in cheminformatic research have not been investigated. Results This paper aims to provide critical reviews for these systems and also report our recent development of ChemReader – a fully automated tool for extracting chemical structure diagrams in research articles and converting them into standard, searchable chemical file formats. Basic algorithms for recognizing lines and letters representing bonds and atoms in chemical structure diagrams can be independently run in sequence from a graphical user interface-and the algorithm parameters can be readily changed-to facilitate additional development specifically tailored to a chemical database annotation scheme. Compared with existing software programs such as OSRA, Kekule, and CLiDE, our results indicate that ChemReader outperforms other software systems on several sets of sample images from diverse sources in terms of the rate of correct outputs and the accuracy on extracting molecular substructure patterns. Conclusion The availability of ChemReader as a cheminformatic tool for extracting chemical structure information from digital raster images allows research and development groups to enrich their chemical structure databases by annotating the entries with published research articles. Based on its stable performance and high accuracy, ChemReader may be sufficiently accurate for annotating the chemical database with links

  4. Chemically Sensitive Imaging of MgP with STM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Arthur; Li, Shaowei; Czap, Greg; Ho, Wilson

    2014-03-01

    Since its invention, the STM has been limited by its lack of sensitivity to chemical structures in molecules. Recent advances in scanning probe microscopy techniques, such as non-contact AFM and scanning tunneling hydrogen microscopy have enabled imaging of the internal structure and bonding of aromatic molecules such as pentacene and PTCDA. Here, we present a novel method of using the STM to image magnesium porphyrin molecules adsorbed on Au(110) with chemical sensitivity. In our previous study, we have shown that hydrogen molecules weakly adsorb on Au(110), exhibiting both vibrational and rotational IETS spectra. Exploiting the sensitivity of the vibrational and rotational mode energies to the local chemical environment, we perform dI/dV and d2I/dV2 imaging at different bias voltages, highlighting the various parts of the MgP molecule. In particular, we are able to image the positions of the nitrogen atoms in MgP. d2I/dV2 spectral mapping reveals that the origin of the chemical sensitivity comes from an energy shift of the rotational peak as the tip is scanned across the molecule, indicating a changing potential landscape for the H2. Similar d2I/dV2 imaging with a CO terminated tip reveals no chemical sensitivity to nitrogen.

  5. Chemically Specific Cellular Imaging of Biofilm Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herberg, J L; Schaldach, C; Horn, J; Gjersing, E; Maxwell, R

    2006-02-09

    complicated organism, we needed to first turn our attention to a well understood organism. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is a well-studied organism and will be used to compare our results with others. Then, we will turn our attention to TD. It is expected that the research performed will provide key data to validate biochemical studies of TD and result in high profile publications in leading journals. For this project, our ultimate goal was to combine both Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experimental analysis with computer simulations to provide unique 3D molecular structural, dynamics, and functional information on the order of microns for this DOE mission relevant microorganism, T. denitrificans. For FY05, our goals were to: (1) Determine proper media for optimal growth of PA; growth rate measurements in that media and characterization of metabolite signatures during growth via {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR, (2) Determine and build mineral, metal, and implant material surfaces to support growth of PA, (3) Implementing new MRI sequences to image biofilms more efficiently and increase resolution with new hardware design, (4) Develop further diffusion and flow MRI measurements of biofilms and biofilm formation with different MRI pulse sequences and different hardware design, and (5) Develop a zero dimension model of the rate of growth and the metabolite profiles of PA. Our major accomplishments are discussed in the following text. However, the bulk of this work is described in the attached manuscript entitled, ''NMR Metabolomics of Planktonic and Biofilm Modes of Growth in Pseudomonas aeruginosa''. This paper will be submitted to the Journal of Bacteriology in coming weeks. In addition, this one-year effort has lead to our incorporation into the Enhanced Surveillance Campaign during FY05 for some proof-of-principle MRI measurements on polymers. We are currently using similar methods to evaluate these polymers. In addition

  6. Chemically Specific Cellular Imaging of Biofilm Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herberg, J L; Schaldach, C; Horn, J; Gjersing, E; Maxwell, R

    2006-02-09

    complicated organism, we needed to first turn our attention to a well understood organism. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is a well-studied organism and will be used to compare our results with others. Then, we will turn our attention to TD. It is expected that the research performed will provide key data to validate biochemical studies of TD and result in high profile publications in leading journals. For this project, our ultimate goal was to combine both Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experimental analysis with computer simulations to provide unique 3D molecular structural, dynamics, and functional information on the order of microns for this DOE mission relevant microorganism, T. denitrificans. For FY05, our goals were to: (1) Determine proper media for optimal growth of PA; growth rate measurements in that media and characterization of metabolite signatures during growth via {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR, (2) Determine and build mineral, metal, and implant material surfaces to support growth of PA, (3) Implementing new MRI sequences to image biofilms more efficiently and increase resolution with new hardware design, (4) Develop further diffusion and flow MRI measurements of biofilms and biofilm formation with different MRI pulse sequences and different hardware design, and (5) Develop a zero dimension model of the rate of growth and the metabolite profiles of PA. Our major accomplishments are discussed in the following text. However, the bulk of this work is described in the attached manuscript entitled, ''NMR Metabolomics of Planktonic and Biofilm Modes of Growth in Pseudomonas aeruginosa''. This paper will be submitted to the Journal of Bacteriology in coming weeks. In addition, this one-year effort has lead to our incorporation into the Enhanced Surveillance Campaign during FY05 for some proof-of-principle MRI measurements on polymers. We are currently using similar methods to evaluate these polymers. In addition

  7. The State of Chemical Pollution in Kenya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The review draws attention to natural or biological sources of chemical release into the atmosphere. The magnitude of such a release may sometimes be higher than chemicals released into the environment by man's activities. Measurements of CO2, CH4, SO4=,Cl-, pH and O3 (please note that, the numerals are supposed to be under the alphabet formulas) concentrations in the Kenyan atmosphere reveal that the first two and last compounds are at the globally accepted concentration levels. The rest are below the world accepted levels. However more research is needed in measurement of atmospheric constituents. The determination of heavy metals concentrations in water, sediments, plants and fish reveal that sediments have the highest level of any concentration followed by plants, fish and water. The source of the metals in water and fish is mainly geological. However, higher concentrations of these metals in and around industrial centres have been noted. In all cases the concentration of metals Mn,Fe,Cu,Zn,Cd, Hg and Pb in water and fish are below the FAO/WHO recommended maxium units. Measurement of fluoride content in borehole water, rivers and lakes in Kenya show that, 21% of 865 borholes have a high concentration of fluorides. Kerio River also has a high content of fluoride and all lakes except for Naivasha and Victoria have nitrate content between 6.1 and 6.6. ppm. The nitrite content was undetected in all rivers and only 2 boreholes waters had nitrate content above 62 ppm (Author)

  8. The chemical state of complex uranium oxides

    OpenAIRE

    Kvashnina, K. O.; Butorin, S. M.; Martin, P.; P. Glatzel

    2013-01-01

    We report here the first direct observation of U(V) in uranium binary oxides and analyze the gradual conversion of the U oxidation state in the mixed uranium systems. Our finding clarifies previous contradicting results and provides important input for the geological disposal of spent fuel, recycling applications and chemistry of uranium species.

  9. Imaging Acute Appendicitis: State of the Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Gaitini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this review is to present the state of the art in imaging tests for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Relevant publications regarding performance and advantages/disadvantages of imaging modalities for the diagnosis of appendicitis in different clinical situations were reviewed. Articles were extracted from a computerized database (MEDLINE with the following activated limits: Humans, English, core clinical journals, and published in the last five years. Reference lists of relevant studies were checked manually to identify additional, related articles. Ultrasound (US examination should be the first imaging test performed, particularly among the pediatric and young adult populations, who represent the main targets for appendicitis, as well as in pregnant patients. A positive US examination for appendicitis or an alternative diagnosis of possible gastrointestinal or urological origin, or a negative US, either showing a normal appendix or presenting low clinical suspicion of appendicitis, should lead to a final diagnosis. A negative or indeterminate examination with a strong clinical suspicion of appendicitis should be followed by a computed tomography (CT scan or alternatively, a magnetic resonanace imaging (MRI scan in a pregnant patient. A second US examination in a patient with persistent symptoms, especially if the first one was performed by a less experienced imaging professional, is a valid alternative to a CT.

  10. Simultaneous imaging of MR angiographic image and brain surface image using steady-state free precession

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takane, Atsushi; Tsuda, Munetaka (Hitachi Ltd., Katsuta, Ibaraki (Japan)); Koizumi, Hideaki; Koyama, Susumu; Yoshida, Takeyuki

    1993-09-01

    Synthesis of a brain surface image and an angiographic image representing brain surface vasculatures can be useful for pre-operational contemplation of brain surgery. Both brain surface images and brain surface vasculature images were successfully acquired simultaneously utilizing both FID signals and time-reversed FID signals created under steady-state free precession (SSFP). This simultaneous imaging method has several advantages. No positional discrepancies between both images and prolongation of scan time are anticipated because of concurrent acquisition of the two kinds of image data. Superimposition and stereo-display of both images enable understanding of their spatial relationship, and therefore afford a useful means for pre-operational simulation of brain surgery. (author).

  11. Quantitative Chemical Imaging with Multiplex Stimulated Raman Scattering Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Dan; Lu, Fake; Zhang, Xu; Freudiger, Christian Wilhelm; Pernik, Douglas R.; Holtom, Gary; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney

    2012-01-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy is a newly developed label-free chemical imaging technique that overcomes the speed limitation of confocal Raman microscopy while avoiding the nonresonant background problem of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. Previous demonstrations have been limited to single Raman band measurements. We present a novel modulation multiplexing approach that allows real-time detection of multiple species using the fast Fourier transform. ...

  12. Fast infrared chemical imaging with a quantum cascade laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Kevin; Kenkel, Seth; Liu, Jui-Nung; Bhargava, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopic imaging systems are a powerful tool for visualizing molecular microstructure of a sample without the need for dyes or stains. Table-top Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) imaging spectrometers, the current established technology, can record broadband spectral data efficiently but requires scanning the entire spectrum with a low throughput source. The advent of high-intensity, broadly tunable quantum cascade lasers (QCL) has now accelerated IR imaging but results in a fundamentally different type of instrument and approach, namely, discrete frequency IR (DF-IR) spectral imaging. While the higher intensity of the source provides a higher signal per channel, the absence of spectral multiplexing also provides new opportunities and challenges. Here, we couple a rapidly tunable QCL with a high performance microscope equipped with a cooled focal plane array (FPA) detector. Our optical system is conceptualized to provide optimal performance based on recent theory and design rules for high-definition (HD) IR imaging. Multiple QCL units are multiplexed together to provide spectral coverage across the fingerprint region (776.9 to 1904.4 cm(-1)) in our DF-IR microscope capable of broad spectral coverage, wide-field detection, and diffraction-limited spectral imaging. We demonstrate that the spectral and spatial fidelity of this system is at least as good as the best FT-IR imaging systems. Our configuration provides a speedup for equivalent spectral signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) compared to the best spectral quality from a high-performance linear array system that has 10-fold larger pixels. Compared to the fastest available HD FT-IR imaging system, we demonstrate scanning of large tissue microarrays (TMA) in 3-orders of magnitude smaller time per essential spectral frequency. These advances offer new opportunities for high throughput IR chemical imaging, especially for the measurement of cells and tissues. PMID:25474546

  13. Spectrum multiplexing and coherent-state decomposition in Fourier ptychographic imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Siyuan; Nanda, Pariksheet; Zheng, Guoan

    2014-01-01

    Information multiplexing is important for biomedical imaging and chemical sensing. In this paper, we report a microscopy imaging technique, termed state-multiplexed Fourier ptychography (FP), for information multiplexing and coherent-state decomposition. Similar to a typical Fourier ptychographic setting, we use an array of light sources to illuminate the sample from different incident angles and acquire corresponding low-resolution images using a monochromatic camera. In the reported technique, however, multiple light sources are lit up simultaneously for information multiplexing, and the acquired images thus represent incoherent summations of the sample transmission profiles corresponding to different coherent states. We show that, by using the state-multiplexed FP recovery routine, we can decompose the incoherent mixture of the FP acquisitions to recover a high-resolution sample image. We also show that, color-multiplexed imaging can be performed by simultaneously turning on R/G/B LEDs for data acquisition...

  14. The Galileo Solid-State Imaging experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belton, M.J.S.; Klaasen, K.P.; Clary, M.C.; Anderson, J.L.; Anger, C.D.; Carr, M.H.; Chapman, C.R.; Davies, M.E.; Greeley, R.; Anderson, D.; Bolef, L.K.; Townsend, T.E.; Greenberg, R.; Head, J. W.; Neukum, G.; Pilcher, C.B.; Veverka, J.; Gierasch, P.J.; Fanale, F.P.; Ingersoll, A.P.; Masursky, H.; Morrison, D.; Pollack, James B.

    1992-01-01

    The Solid State Imaging (SSI) experiment on the Galileo Orbiter spacecraft utilizes a high-resolution (1500 mm focal length) television camera with an 800 ?? 800 pixel virtual-phase, charge-coupled detector. It is designed to return images of Jupiter and its satellites that are characterized by a combination of sensitivity levels, spatial resolution, geometric fiedelity, and spectral range unmatched by imaging data obtained previously. The spectral range extends from approximately 375 to 1100 nm and only in the near ultra-violet region (??? 350 nm) is the spectral coverage reduced from previous missions. The camera is approximately 100 times more sensitive than those used in the Voyager mission, and, because of the nature of the satellite encounters, will produce images with approximately 100 times the ground resolution (i.e., ??? 50 m lp-1) on the Galilean satellites. We describe aspects of the detector including its sensitivity to energetic particle radiation and how the requirements for a large full-well capacity and long-term stability in operating voltages led to the choice of the virtual phase chip. The F/8.5 camera system can reach point sources of V(mag) ??? 11 with S/N ??? 10 and extended sources with surface brightness as low as 20 kR in its highest gain state and longest exposure mode. We describe the performance of the system as determined by ground calibration and the improvements that have been made to the telescope (same basic catadioptric design that was used in Mariner 10 and the Voyager high-resolution cameras) to reduce the scattered light reaching the detector. The images are linearly digitized 8-bits deep and, after flat-fielding, are cosmetically clean. Information 'preserving' and 'non-preserving' on-board data compression capabilities are outlined. A special "summation" mode, designed for use deep in the Jovian radiation belts, near Io, is also described. The detector is 'preflashed' before each exposure to ensure the photometric linearity

  15. Quantum-State Controlled Chemical Reactions of Ultracold KRb Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Ospelkaus, S; Wang, D; de Miranda, M H G; Neyenhuis, B; Quéméner, G; Julienne, P S; Bohn, J L; Jin, D S; Ye, J

    2009-01-01

    How does a chemical reaction proceed at ultralow temperatures? Can simple quantum mechanical rules such as quantum statistics, single scattering partial waves, and quantum threshold laws provide a clear understanding for the molecular reactivity under a vanishing collision energy? Starting with an optically trapped near quantum degenerate gas of polar $^{40}$K$^{87}$Rb molecules prepared in their absolute ground state, we report experimental evidence for exothermic atom-exchange chemical reactions. When these fermionic molecules are prepared in a single quantum state at a temperature of a few hundreds of nanoKelvins, we observe p-wave-dominated quantum threshold collisions arising from tunneling through an angular momentum barrier followed by a near-unity probability short-range chemical reaction. When these molecules are prepared in two different internal states or when molecules and atoms are brought together, the reaction rates are enhanced by a factor of 10 to 100 due to s-wave scattering, which does not ...

  16. Reaction diffusion and solid state chemical kinetics handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Dybkov, V I

    2010-01-01

    This monograph deals with a physico-chemical approach to the problem of the solid-state growth of chemical compound layers and reaction-diffusion in binary heterogeneous systems formed by two solids; as well as a solid with a liquid or a gas. It is explained why the number of compound layers growing at the interface between the original phases is usually much lower than the number of chemical compounds in the phase diagram of a given binary system. For example, of the eight intermetallic compounds which exist in the aluminium-zirconium binary system, only ZrAl3 was found to grow as a separate

  17. Atomic Resolution Imaging and Quantification of Chemical Functionality of Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Udo [Yale University

    2014-12-10

    The work carried out from 2006-2014 under DoE support was targeted at developing new approaches to the atomic-scale characterization of surfaces that include species-selective imaging and an ability to quantify chemical surface interactions with site-specific accuracy. The newly established methods were subsequently applied to gain insight into the local chemical interactions that govern the catalytic properties of model catalysts of interest to DoE. The foundation of our work was the development of three-dimensional atomic force microscopy (3D-AFM), a new measurement mode that allows the mapping of the complete surface force and energy fields with picometer resolution in space (x, y, and z) and piconewton/millielectron volts in force/energy. From this experimental platform, we further expanded by adding the simultaneous recording of tunneling current (3D-AFM/STM) using chemically well-defined tips. Through comparison with simulations, we were able to achieve precise quantification and assignment of local chemical interactions to exact positions within the lattice. During the course of the project, the novel techniques were applied to surface-oxidized copper, titanium dioxide, and silicon oxide. On these materials, defect-induced changes to the chemical surface reactivity and electronic charge density were characterized with site-specific accuracy.

  18. High-resolution chemical imaging of gold nanoparticles using hard x-ray ptychography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We combine resonant scattering with (ptychographic) scanning coherent diffraction microscopy to determine the chemical state of gold nanoparticles with high spatial resolution. Ptychographic images of the sample are recorded for a series of energies around the gold L3 absorption edge. From these data, chemical information in the form of absorption and resonant scattering spectra is reconstructed at each location in the sample. For gold nanoparticles of about 100 nm diameter, a spatial resolution of about 20–30 nm is obtained. In the future, this microscopy approach will open the way to operando studies of heterogeneous catalysts on the nanometer scale.

  19. High-resolution chemical imaging of gold nanoparticles using hard x-ray ptychography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoppe, R.; Reinhardt, J.; Hofmann, G.;

    2013-01-01

    We combine resonant scattering with (ptychographic) scanning coherent diffraction microscopy to determine the chemical state of gold nanoparticles with high spatial resolution. Ptychographic images of the sample are recorded for a series of energies around the gold L3 absorption edge. From these...... data, chemical information in the form of absorption and resonant scattering spectra is reconstructed at each location in the sample. For gold nanoparticles of about 100 nm diameter, a spatial resolution of about 20-30 nm is obtained. In the future, this microscopy approach will open the way to...

  20. Chemical states of molybdenum in radioactive waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to confirm an expectation that the chemical state of molybdenum in glass reflects the phase separation tendency of the yellow solid from the melt of borosilicate glass, simulated waste glasses were prepared, and ESCA analysis was performed using a commercially available electron spectrometer (PHI550 E) with an excitation source consisting of Mg Kα-ray. The effects of the concentration of Mo and FE2O3 and the melting atmosphere (oxidizing or reducing) in which the samples were prepared on the chemical state of Mo and the solubility of MoO3 were examined. From the observation of Mo spectra, it was shown that Mo in waste glass had several valencies, e.g., Mo(3), Mo(4), Mo(5) and Mo(6), while Mo in the yellow solid separated from the melts exhibited hexa-valent state, the peak intensity of higher valencies increased relatively with the increase of MoO3 concentration, but the chemical state of Mo did not change remarkably around the solubility limit of MoO3, the melting atmosphere influenced on the Mo state in the waste glass, the peak intensity of Mo(6) increased relatively with the increasing Fe2O3 concentration, and Mo in devitrified glass exhibited hexa-valent state. (Yoshitake, I.)

  1. Detection of chemical pollutants by passive LWIR hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, Hugo; Thériault, Jean-Marc; Bouffard, François; Puckrin, Eldon; Dubé, Denis

    2012-09-01

    Toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) represent a major threat to public health and security. Their detection constitutes a real challenge to security and first responder's communities. One promising detection method is based on the passive standoff identification of chemical vapors emanating from the laboratory under surveillance. To investigate this method, the Department of National Defense and Public Safety Canada have mandated Defense Research and Development Canada (DRDC) - Valcartier to develop and test passive Long Wave Infrared (LWIR) hyperspectral imaging (HSI) sensors for standoff detection. The initial effort was focused to address the standoff detection and identification of toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) and precursors. Sensors such as the Multi-option Differential Detection and Imaging Fourier Spectrometer (MoDDIFS) and the Improved Compact ATmospheric Sounding Interferometer (iCATSI) were developed for this application. This paper describes the sensor developments and presents initial results of standoff detection and identification of TICs and precursors. The standoff sensors are based on the differential Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) radiometric technology and are able to detect, spectrally resolve and identify small leak plumes at ranges in excess of 1 km. Results from a series of trials in asymmetric threat type scenarios will be presented. These results will serve to establish the potential of the method for standoff detection of TICs precursors and surrogates.

  2. LWIR hyperspectral imaging application and detection of chemical precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, Hugo; Thériault, Jean-Marc; Bouffard, François; Puckrin, Eldon; Dubé, Denis

    2012-10-01

    Detection and identification of Toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) represent a major challenge to protect and sustain first responder and public security. In this context, passive Hyperspectral Imaging (HSI) is a promising technology for the standoff detection and identification of chemical vapors emanating from a distant location. To investigate this method, the Department of National Defense and Public Safety Canada have mandated Defense Research and Development Canada (DRDC) - Valcartier to develop and test Very Long Wave Infrared (VLWIR) HSI sensors for standoff detection. The initial effort was focused to address the standoff detection and identification of toxic industrial chemicals (TICs), surrogates and precursors. Sensors such as the Improved Compact ATmospheric Sounding Interferometer (iCATSI) and the Multi-option Differential Detection and Imaging Fourier Spectrometer (MoDDIFS) were developed for this application. This paper presents the sensor developments and preliminary results of standoff detection and identification of TICs and precursors. The iCATSI and MoDDIFS sensors are based on the optical differential Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) radiometric technology and are able to detect, spectrally resolve and identify small leak at ranges in excess of 1 km. Results from a series of trials in asymmetric threat type scenarios are reported. These results serve to establish the potential of passive standoff HSI detection of TICs, precursors and surrogates.

  3. On the steady states of weakly reversible chemical reaction networks

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Jian; Jones, Christopher; Feinberg, Martin; Nachman, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    A natural condition on the structure of the underlying chemical reaction network, namely weak reversibility, is shown to guarantee the existence of an equilibrium (steady state) in each positive stoichiometric compatibility class for the associated mass-action system. Furthermore, an index formula is given for the set of equilibria in a given stoichiometric compatibility class.

  4. Tabletop imaging of structural evolutions in chemical reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Ibrahim, Heide; Beaulieu, Samuel; Schmidt, Bruno E; Thiré, Nicolas; Bisson, Éric; Hebeisen, Christoph T; Wanie, Vincent; Giguére, Mathieu; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Sanderson, Joseph; Schuurman, Michael S; Légaré, François

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of femto-chemistry has made it a primary goal to follow the nuclear and electronic evolution of a molecule in time and space as it undergoes a chemical reaction. Using Coulomb Explosion Imaging we have shot the first high-resolution molecular movie of a to and fro isomerization process in the acetylene cation. So far, this kind of phenomenon could only be observed using VUV light from a Free Electron Laser [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 263002 (2010)]. Here we show that 266 nm ultrashort laser pulses are capable of initiating rich dynamics through multiphoton ionization. With our generally applicable tabletop approach that can be used for other small organic molecules, we have investigated two basic chemical reactions simultaneously: proton migration and C=C bond-breaking, triggered by multiphoton ionization. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with the timescales and relaxation pathways predicted by new and definitively quantitative ab initio trajectory simulations.

  5. Water-fat imaging and general chemical shift imaging with spectrum modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Li

    Water-fat chemical shift imaging (CSI) has been an active research area in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) since the early 1980's. There are two main reasons for water- fat imaging. First, water-fat imaging can serve as a fat- suppression method. Removing the usually bright fatty signals not only extends the useful dynamic range of an image, but also allows better visualization of lesions or injected contrast, and removes chemical shift artifacts, which may contribute to improved diagnosis. Second, quantification of water and fat provides useful chemical information for characterizing tissues such as bone marrow, liver, and adrenal masses. A milestone in water- fat imaging is the Dixon method that can produce separate water and fat images with only two data acquisitions. In practice, however, the Dixon method is not always successful due to field inhomogeneity problems. In recent years, many variations of the Dixon method have been proposed to overcome the field inhomogeneity problem. In general, these methods can at best separate water and fat without identifying the two because the water and fat magnetization vectors are sampled symmetrically, only parallel and anti-parallel. Furthermore, these methods usually depend on two-dimensional phase unwrapping which itself is sensitive to noise and artifacts, and becomes unreliable when the images have disconnected tissues in the field-of-view (FOV). We will first introduce the basic principles of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in chapter 1, and briefly review the existing water-fat imaging techniques in chapter 2. In chapter 3, we will introduce a new method for water-fat imaging. With three image acquisitions, a general direct phase encoding (DPE) of the chemical shift information is achieved, which allows an unambiguous determination of water and fat on a pixel by pixel basis. Details of specific implementations and noise performance will be discussed. Representative results

  6. Live-Cell Bioorthogonal Chemical Imaging: Stimulated Raman Scattering Microscopy of Vibrational Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lu; Hu, Fanghao; Chen, Zhixing; Shen, Yihui; Zhang, Luyuan; Min, Wei

    2016-08-16

    Innovations in light microscopy have tremendously revolutionized the way researchers study biological systems with subcellular resolution. In particular, fluorescence microscopy with the expanding choices of fluorescent probes has provided a comprehensive toolkit to tag and visualize various molecules of interest with exquisite specificity and high sensitivity. Although fluorescence microscopy is currently the method of choice for cellular imaging, it faces fundamental limitations for studying the vast number of small biomolecules. This is because common fluorescent labels, which are relatively bulky, could introduce considerable perturbation to or even completely alter the native functions of vital small biomolecules. Hence, despite their immense functional importance, these small biomolecules remain largely undetectable by fluorescence microscopy. To address this challenge, a bioorthogonal chemical imaging platform has recently been introduced. By coupling stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, an emerging nonlinear Raman microscopy technique, with tiny and Raman-active vibrational probes (e.g., alkynes and stable isotopes), bioorthogonal chemical imaging exhibits superb sensitivity, specificity, and biocompatibility for imaging small biomolecules in live systems. In this Account, we review recent technical achievements for visualizing a broad spectrum of small biomolecules, including ribonucleosides and deoxyribonucleosides, amino acids, fatty acids, choline, glucose, cholesterol, and small-molecule drugs in live biological systems ranging from individual cells to animal tissues and model organisms. Importantly, this platform is compatible with live-cell biology, thus allowing real-time imaging of small-molecule dynamics. Moreover, we discuss further chemical and spectroscopic strategies for multicolor bioorthogonal chemical imaging, a valuable technique in the era of "omics". As a unique tool for biological discovery, this platform has been applied to

  7. Pitfalls of adrenal imaging with chemical shift MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical shift (CS) MRI of the adrenal glands exploits the different precessional frequencies of fat and water protons to differentiate the intracytoplasmic lipid-containing adrenal adenoma from other adrenal lesions. The purpose of this review is to illustrate both technical and interpretive pitfalls of adrenal imaging with CS MRI and emphasize the importance of adherence to strict technical specifications and errors that may occur when other imaging features and clinical factors are not incorporated into the diagnosis. When performed properly, the specificity of CS MRI for the diagnosis of adrenal adenoma is over 90%. Sampling the in-phase and opposed-phase echoes in the correct order and during the same breath-hold are essential requirements, and using the first echo pair is preferred, if possible. CS MRI characterizes more adrenal adenomas then unenhanced CT but may be non-diagnostic in a proportion of lipid-poor adenomas; CT washout studies may be able to diagnose these lipid-poor adenomas. Other primary and secondary adrenal tumours and supra-renal disease entities may contain lipid or gross fat and mimic adenoma or myelolipoma. Heterogeneity within an adrenal lesion that contains intracytoplasmic lipid could be due to myelolipoma, lipomatous metaplasia of adenoma, or collision tumour. Correlation with previous imaging, other imaging features, clinical history, and laboratory investigations can minimize interpretive errors

  8. NEXAFS Chemical State and Bond Lengths of p-Aminobenzoic Acid in Solution and Solid State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, J. S.; Gainar, A.; Suljoti, E.; Xiao, J.; Golnak, R.; Aziz, E. F.; Schroeder, S. L. M.

    2016-05-01

    Solid-state and solution pH-dependent NEXAFS studies allow direct observation of the electronic state of para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) as a function of its chemical environment, revealing the chemical state and bonding of the chemical species. Variations in the ionization potential (IP) and 1s→π* resonances unequivocally identify the chemical species (neutral, cationic, or anionic) present and the varying local environment. Shifts in σ* shape resonances relative to the IP in the NEXAFS spectra vary with C-N bond length, and the important effect of minor alterations in bond length is confirmed with nitrogen FEFF calculations, leading to the possibility of bond length determination in solution.

  9. Physico-chemical studies on samarium soaps in solid state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physico-chemical characteristics of samarium soaps (caproate and caprate) in solid state were investigated by IR, X-ray diffraction and TGA measurements. The IR results revealed that the fatty acids exist in dimeric state through hydrogen bonding and samarium soaps possess partial ionic character. The X-ray diffraction measurements were used to calculate the long spacings and the results confirmed the double layer structure of samarium soaps. The decomposition reaction was found kinetically of zero order and the values of energy of activation for the decomposition process for caproate and caprate were found to be 8,0 and 7,8 kcal mol-1, respectively. (Authors)

  10. Chemical protective clothing - State of the art and the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clothing used to protect the skin from exposure to chemicals (CPC) is an integral part of many work-places. Only 10-15 years ago the strategy behind selecting CPC to afford this protection was to find a type of CPC which was essentially liquid-proof and would therefore protect the skin from exposure to a liquid chemical. However, in the last 10 years there has been an explosion of data in the industrial hygiene field related to the permeation of chemical protective clothing by liquid chemicals. These data indicate clearly that when CPC is exposed to a chemical, it may not disintegrate or degrade, but nevertheless, will be permeated by the chemical and the skin will be exposed. This has led to a new strategy for selecting CPC which essentially assumes that any exposure of the skin is harmful. Consequently, a worst-case scenario is assumed when selecting CPC and often the garment with the best permeation properties is selected regardless of cost. This philosophy is prompted by a lack of knowledge concerning the skin and how it is permeated by industrial chemicals in their liquid and vapor states. The interests in the last 10 years in CPC has led to new developments and an exciting future for protective clothing. Several new laminated polymeric materials are now being used in both gloves and full-body suits. These polymers are plastic rather than elastomeric and therefore do not afford good dexterity properties. However, their permeability properties are extremely good. In addition, further research on dermal penetration should give the industrial hygienist the necessary information to perform risk assessments for skin exposure. These new risk assessment strategies should negate the current need to overprotect workers. Overprotection often leads to unnecessary costs and can lead to increased stress on the worker in the form of heat stress

  11. State estimation of chemical engineering systems tending to multiple solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. P. G. Salau

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A well-evaluated state covariance matrix avoids error propagation due to divergence issues and, thereby, it is crucial for a successful state estimator design. In this paper we investigate the performance of the state covariance matrices used in three unconstrained Extended Kalman Filter (EKF formulations and one constrained EKF formulation (CEKF. As benchmark case studies we have chosen: a a batch chemical reactor with reversible reactions whose system model and measurement are such that multiple states satisfy the equilibrium condition and b a CSTR with exothermic irreversible reactions and cooling jacket energy balance whose nonlinear behavior includes multiple steady-states and limit cycles. The results have shown that CEKF is in general the best choice of EKF formulations (even if they are constrained with an ad hoc clipping strategy which avoids undesired states for such case studies. Contrary to a clipped EKF formulation, CEKF incorporates constraints into an optimization problem, which minimizes the noise in a least square sense preventing a bad noise distribution. It is also shown that, although the Moving Horizon Estimation (MHE provides greater robustness to a poor guess of the initial state, converging in less steps to the actual states, it is not justified for our examples due to the high additional computational effort.

  12. Magnetic Doppler imaging of the chemically peculiar star HD 125248

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusomarov, N.; Kochukhov, O.; Ryabchikova, T.; Ilyin, I.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Intermediate-mass, chemically peculiar stars with strong magnetic fields provide an excellent opportunity to study the topology of their surface magnetic fields and the interplay between magnetic geometries and abundance inhomogeneities in the atmospheres of these stars. Aims: We reconstruct detailed maps of the surface magnetic field and abundance distributions for the magnetic Ap star HD 125248. Methods: We performed the analysis based on phase-resolved, four Stokes parameter spectropolarimetric observations obtained with the HARPSpol instrument. These data were interpreted with the help of magnetic Doppler imaging techniques and model atmospheres taking the effects of strong magnetic fields and nonsolar chemical composition into account. Results: We improved the atmospheric parameters of the star, Teff = 9850 ± 250 K and log g = 4.05 ± 0.10. We performed detailed abundance analysis, which confirmed that HD 125248 has abundances typical of other Ap stars, and discovered significant vertical stratification effects for the Fe ii and Cr ii ions. We computed LSD Stokes profiles using several line masks corresponding to Fe-peak and rare earth elements, and studied their behavior with rotational phase. Combining previous longitudinal field measurements with our own observations, we improved the rotational period of the star Prot = 9.29558 ± 0.00006 d. Magnetic Doppler imaging of HD 125248 showed that its magnetic field is mostly poloidal and quasi-dipolar with two large spots of different polarity and field strength. The chemical maps of Fe, Cr, Ce, Nd, Gd, and Ti show abundance contrasts of 0.9-3.5 dex. Among these elements, the Fe abundance map does not show high-contrast features. Cr is overabundant around the negative magnetic pole and has 3.5 dex abundance range. The rare earth elements and Ti are overabundant near the positive magnetic pole. Conclusions: The magnetic field of HD 125248 has strong deviations from the classical oblique dipole field

  13. Development of a Raman chemical imaging detection method for authenticating skim milk powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    This research demonstrated that Raman chemical imaging coupled with a simple image classification algorithm can be used to detect multiple chemical adulterants in skim milk powder. Ammonium sulfate, dicyandiamide, melamine, and urea were mixed into the milk powder as chemical adulterants in the conc...

  14. State waste discharge permit application, 200-E chemical drain field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations (Ecology et al. 1994), the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affect groundwater or have the potential to affect ground would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173-216 (or 173-218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. As a result of this decision, the Washington State Department of Ecology and the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office entered into Consent Order No. DE 91NM-177, (Ecology and DOE-RL 1991). The Consent Order No. DE 91NM-177 requires a series of permitting activities for liquid effluent discharges. This document presents the State Waste Discharge Permit (SWDP) application for the 200-E Chemical Drain Field. Waste water from the 272-E Building enters the process sewer line directly through a floor drain, while waste water from the 2703-E Building is collected in two floor drains, (north and south) that act as sumps and are discharged periodically. The 272-E and 2703-E Buildings constitute the only discharges to the process sewer line and the 200-E Chemical Drain Field.

  15. Magnetic Doppler imaging of the chemically peculiar star HD 125248

    CERN Document Server

    Rusomarov, N; Ryabchikova, T; Ilyin, I

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate-mass, chemically peculiar stars with strong magnetic fields give us an excellent opportunity to study the topology of their surface magnetic fields and the interplay between magnetic geometries and abundance inhomogeneities in their atmospheres. We reconstruct detailed maps of the surface magnetic field and abundance distributions for the magnetic Ap star HD 125248. We performed the analysis based on phase-resolved, four Stokes parameter spectropolarimetric observations obtained with the HARPSpol instrument. These data were interpreted with the magnetic Doppler imaging technique. We improved the atmospheric parameters of the star, T_eff = 9850K +/- 250K and logg = 4.05 +/- 0.10. We performed detailed abundance analysis and discovered vertical stratification effects for the FeII and CrII ions. We computed LSD Stokes profiles and studied their behavior with rotational phase. We improved the rotational period of the star P_rot = 9.29558(6)d. Magnetic Doppler imaging of HD 125248 showed that its magn...

  16. Applications of Chemical Shift Imaging to Marine Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haakil Lee

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The successful applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in medicine are mostly due to the non-invasive and non-destructive nature of MRI techniques. Longitudinal studies of humans and animals are easily accomplished, taking advantage of the fact that MRI does not use harmful radiation that would be needed for plain film radiographic, computerized tomography (CT or positron emission (PET scans. Routine anatomic and functional studies using the strong signal from the most abundant magnetic nucleus, the proton, can also provide metabolic information when combined with in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS. MRS can be performed using either protons or hetero-nuclei (meaning any magnetic nuclei other than protons or 1H including carbon (13C or phosphorus (31P. In vivo MR spectra can be obtained from single region ofinterest (ROI or voxel or multiple ROIs simultaneously using the technique typically called chemical shift imaging (CSI. Here we report applications of CSI to marine samples and describe a technique to study in vivo glycine metabolism in oysters using 13C MRS 12 h after immersion in a sea water chamber dosed with [2-13C]-glycine. This is the first report of 13C CSI in a marine organism.

  17. Applicability of federal and state hazardous waste regulatory programs to waste chemical weapons and chemical warfare agents.; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report reviews federal and state hazardous waste regulatory programs that govern the management of chemical weapons or chemical warfare agents. It addresses state programs in the eight states with chemical weapon storage facilities managed by the U.S. Army: Alabama, Arkansas, Colorado, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Oregon, and Utah. It also includes discussions on 32 additional states or jurisdictions with known or suspected chemical weapons or chemical warfare agent presence (e.g., disposal sites containing chemical agent identification sets): Alaska, Arizona, California, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Virginia, Washington, Washington, D.C., and Wyoming. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous waste programs are reviewed to determine whether chemical weapons or chemical warfare agents are listed hazardous wastes or otherwise defined or identified as hazardous wastes. Because the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) military munitions rule specifically addresses the management of chemical munitions, this report also indicates whether a state has adopted the rule and whether the resulting state regulations have been authorized by EPA. Many states have adopted parts or all of the EPA munitions rule but have not yet received authorization from EPA to implement the rule. In these cases, the states may enforce the adopted munitions rule provisions under state law, but these provisions are not federally enforceable

  18. Chemical Imaging of the Cell Membrane by NanoSIMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, P K; Kraft, M L; Frisz, J F; Carpenter, K J; Hutcheon, I D

    2010-02-23

    The existence of lipid microdomains and their role in cell membrane organization are currently topics of great interest and controversy. The cell membrane is composed of a lipid bilayer with embedded proteins that can flow along the two-dimensional surface defined by the membrane. Microdomains, known as lipid rafts, are believed to play a central role in organizing this fluid system, enabling the cell membrane to carry out essential cellular processes, including protein recruitment and signal transduction. Lipid rafts are also implicated in cell invasion by pathogens, as in the case of the HIV. Therefore, understanding the role of lipid rafts in cell membrane organization not only has broad scientific implications, but also has practical implications for medical therapies. One of the major limitations on lipid organization research has been the inability to directly analyze lipid composition without introducing artifacts and at the relevant length-scales of tens to hundreds of nanometers. Fluorescence microscopy is widely used due to its sensitivity and specificity to the labeled species, but only the labeled components can be observed, fluorophores can alter the behavior of the lipids they label, and the length scales relevant to imaging cell membrane domains are between that probed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging (<10 nm) and the diffraction limit of light. Topographical features can be imaged on this length scale by atomic force microscopy (AFM), but the chemical composition of the observed structures cannot be determined. Immuno-labeling can be used to study the distribution of membrane proteins at high resolution, but not lipid composition. We are using imaging mass spectrometry by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) in concert with other high resolution imaging methods to overcome these limitations. The experimental approach of this project is to combine molecule-specific stable isotope labeling with high-resolution SIMS using a

  19. Chemical Imaging of Heterogeneous Muscle Foods Using Near-Infrared Hyperspectral Imaging in Transmission Mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wold, Jens Petter; Kermit, Martin; Segtnan, Vegard Herman

    2016-06-01

    Foods and biomaterials are, in general, heterogeneous and it is often a challenge to obtain spectral data which are representative for the chemical composition and distribution. This paper presents a setup for near-infrared (NIR) transmission imaging where the samples are completely trans-illuminated, probing the entire sample. The system measures falling samples at high speed and consists of an NIR imaging scanner covering the spectral range 760-1040 nm and a powerful line light source. The investigated samples were rather big: whole pork bellies of thickness up to 5 cm, salmon fillets with skin, and 3 cm thick model samples of ground pork meat. Partial least square regression models for fat were developed for ground pork and salmon fillet with high correlations (R = 0.98 and R = 0.95, respectively). The regression models were applied at pixel level in the hyperspectral transmission images and resulted in images of fat distribution where also deeply embedded fat clearly contributed to the result. The results suggest that it is possible to use transmission imaging for rapid, nondestructive, and representative sampling of very heterogeneous foods. The proposed system is suitable for industrial use. PMID:27257302

  20. A Learning State-Space Model for Image Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Greg C

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an approach based on a state-space model for learning the user concepts in image retrieval. We first design a scheme of region-based image representation based on concept units, which are integrated with different types of feature spaces and with different region scales of image segmentation. The design of the concept units aims at describing similar characteristics at a certain perspective among relevant images. We present the details of our proposed approach based on a state-space model for interactive image retrieval, including likelihood and transition models, and we also describe some experiments that show the efficacy of our proposed model. This work demonstrates the feasibility of using a state-space model to estimate the user intuition in image retrieval.

  1. Homemade chemical bomb incidents - 15 states, 2003-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-21

    Homemade chemical bombs (HCBs) are made from commonly found chemicals. The volume of news reports of HCB explosions suggests they are not uncommon. To determine the number of events involving HCBs in the United States and describe the factors associated with them, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) analyzed data from its surveillance system that tracks spills and leaks of hazardous substances. This report describes the results of that analysis, which indicated that, during 2003-2011, a total of 134 events involving HCBs were reported from 15 states. Among those events, 21 (16%) resulted in adverse health effects (i.e., respiratory symptoms, burns, and skin irritation) for 53 persons. The majority (35 [66%]) of these persons were youths.HCBs are hazardous and especially dangerous if detonated in public areas. Increasing awareness of HCBs and their dangers (particularly during summer months) among first-responders, parents, school staff members and others who work with youths might help reduce injuries associated with HCBs. PMID:23784014

  2. Imaging Atherosclerosis in Diabetes: Current State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Sina; Nakanishi, Rine; Budoff, Matthew J

    2016-11-01

    Cardiovascular events, including myocardial infarction and stroke, are the primary causes of mortality in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Affected patients frequently have asymptomatic coronary artery disease. Studies have shown heterogeneity in cardiovascular risk among patients with diabetes. Imaging can help categorize risk of future cardiovascular events by identifying those patients with atherosclerosis, rather than relying on risk prediction based on population-based studies. In this article, we will review the evidence regarding use of atherosclerosis imaging in patients with diabetes to predict risk of coronary heart disease and mortality. PMID:27658933

  3. Control of multiple excited image states around segmented carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knörzer, J., E-mail: johannes.knoerzer@physnet.uni-hamburg.de; Fey, C., E-mail: christian.fey@physnet.uni-hamburg.de [Zentrum für Optische Quantentechnologien, Universität Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, Hamburg 22761 (Germany); Sadeghpour, H. R. [ITAMP, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Schmelcher, P. [Zentrum für Optische Quantentechnologien, Universität Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, Hamburg 22761 (Germany); The Hamburg Centre for Ultrafast Imaging, Luruper Chaussee 149, Hamburg 22761 (Germany)

    2015-11-28

    Electronic image states around segmented carbon nanotubes can be confined and shaped along the nanotube axis by engineering the image potential. We show how several such image states can be prepared simultaneously along the same nanotube. The inter-electronic distance can be controlled a priori by engineering tubes of specific geometries. High sensitivity to external electric and magnetic fields can be exploited to manipulate these states and their mutual long-range interactions. These building blocks provide access to a new kind of tailored interacting quantum systems.

  4. Chemically modified STM tips for atomic-resolution imaging of ultrathin NaCI films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhe Li[1; Koen Schouteden[1; Violeta lancu[1; Ewald Janssens[1; Peter Lievens[1; Chris Van Haesendonck[1; Jorge I. Cerda[2

    2015-01-01

    Cl-functionalized scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tips are fabricated by modifying a tungsten STM tip in situ on islands of ultrathin NaCI(100) films on Au(111) surfaces. The functionalized tips are used to achieve clear atomic- resolution imaging of NaCI(100) islands. In comparison with bare metal tips, the chemically modified tips yield drastically enhanced spatial resolution as well as contrast reversal in STM topographs, implying that Na atoms, rather than C1 atoms, are imaged as protrusions. STM simulations based on a Green's function formalism reveal that the experimentally observed contrast reversal in the STM topographs is due to the highly localized character of the Cl-pz states at the tip apex. An additional remarkable characteristic of the modified tips is that in dI/dV maps, a Na atom appears as a ring with a diameter that depends crucially on the tip-sample distance.

  5. Electronic aperture control devised for solid state imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, R. A.; Callahan, D. E.; Mc Cann, D. H.

    1968-01-01

    Electronic means of performing the equivalent of automatic aperture control has been devised for the new class of television cameras that incorporates a solid state imaging device in the form of phototransistor mosaic sensors.

  6. A Raman chemical imaging system for detection of contaminants in food

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study presented a preliminary investigation into the use of macro-scale Raman chemical imaging for the screening of dry milk powder for the prescence of chemical contaminants. Melamine was mixed into dry milk at concentrations (w/w) of 0.2%, 0.5%, 1.0%, 2.0%, 5.0%, and 10.0% and images of the ...

  7. Development of a Raman chemical image detection algorithm for authenticating dry milk

    Science.gov (United States)

    This research developed a Raman chemical imaging method for detecting multiple adulterants in skim milk powder. Ammonium sulfate, dicyandiamide, melamine, and urea were mixed into the milk powder as chemical adulterants in the concentration range of 0.1–5.0%. A Raman imaging system using a 785-nm la...

  8. Zirconia-based solid state chemical gas sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Zhuiykov, S

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of chemical gas sensors, based on solid state technology, that are sensitive to environmental gases, such as O sub 2 , SO sub x , NO sub x , CO sub 2 and hydrocarbons. The paper is focussed on performance of electrochemical gas sensors that are based on zirconia as a solid electrolyte. The paper considers sensor structures and selection of electrode materials. Impact of interfaces on sensor performance is discussed. This paper also provides a brief overview of electrochemical properties of zirconia and their effect on sensor performance. Impact of auxiliary materials on sensors performance characteristics, such as sensitivity, selectivity, response time and recovery time, is also discussed. Dual gas sensors that can be applied for simultaneous monitoring of the concentration of both oxygen and other gas phase components, are briefly considered

  9. Reflective ghost imaging with classical Gaussian-state light

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deyang Duan; Yunjie Xia

    2012-01-01

    In this letter, we use quantum description and the Gaussian state to study reflective ghost imaging with two classical sources, and to provide their expressions. We find that the reflective ghost imaging of a rough-surfaced object, using Gaussian-state phase-insensitive or classically correlated phase-sensitive light, can be expressed in terms of the phase-insensitive or phase-sensitive cross-correlations between the two detected fields, including a background term. Moreover, reflective ghost imaging with two classical Gaussian-state lights is shown to have similar features as spatial resolution and field of view.%In this letter,we use quantum description and the Gaussian state to study reflective ghost imaging with two classical sources,and to provide their expressions.We find that the reflective ghost imaging of a rough-surfaced object,using Gaussian-state phase-insensitive or classically correlated phase-sensitive light,can be expressed in terms of the phase-insensitive or phase-sensitive cross-correlations between the two detected fields,including a background term.Moreover,reflective ghost imaging with two classical Gaussian-state lights is shown to have similar features as spatial resolution and field of view.

  10. Image potential states at metal-dielectric interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merry, W.R. Jr.

    1992-04-01

    Angle-resolved two-photon laser photoemission was used to observe the image potential electronic states on the (111) face of a silver single crystal. The transient image potential states were excited from the occupied bulk bands with photons whose energy was tunable around 4 eV. Photoemission of the image potential states was accomplished with photons of energy tunable around 2 eV. Image potential states were found to persist in the presence of physisorbed adlayers of xenon and cyclohexane. On clean Ag(111), the effective mass of the n=1 image potential state was found to be 1.4{plus_minus}0.1 times the mass of a free electron (m{sub e}). A binding energy of 0.77 eV, measured by earlier workers, was assumed in analysis of the data for the clean surface. On Ag(111), at 75 K covered by one monolayer of xenon, the binding energy of the n=1 image potential state was unchanged relative to its value on the clean surface. An effective mass of (1.00{plus_minus}0.05) {center_dot} m{sub e} was obtained. On Ag(111) at 167 K, covered by one monolayer of cyclohexane, the binding energy of the n=2 member of the image potential series was 0.30{plus_minus}0.05 eV. The energy of the n=1 state was again unchanged by deposition of the adsorbate. The effective masses of both states were (0.90{plus_minus}0.1) {center_dot} m{sub e}.

  11. Image potential states at metal-dielectric interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merry, W.R. Jr.

    1992-04-01

    Angle-resolved two-photon laser photoemission was used to observe the image potential electronic states on the (111) face of a silver single crystal. The transient image potential states were excited from the occupied bulk bands with photons whose energy was tunable around 4 eV. Photoemission of the image potential states was accomplished with photons of energy tunable around 2 eV. Image potential states were found to persist in the presence of physisorbed adlayers of xenon and cyclohexane. On clean Ag(111), the effective mass of the n=1 image potential state was found to be 1.4{plus minus}0.1 times the mass of a free electron (m{sub e}). A binding energy of 0.77 eV, measured by earlier workers, was assumed in analysis of the data for the clean surface. On Ag(111), at 75 K covered by one monolayer of xenon, the binding energy of the n=1 image potential state was unchanged relative to its value on the clean surface. An effective mass of (1.00{plus minus}0.05) {center dot} m{sub e} was obtained. On Ag(111) at 167 K, covered by one monolayer of cyclohexane, the binding energy of the n=2 member of the image potential series was 0.30{plus minus}0.05 eV. The energy of the n=1 state was again unchanged by deposition of the adsorbate. The effective masses of both states were (0.90{plus minus}0.1) {center dot} m{sub e}.

  12. Strongly Localized Image States of Spherical Graphitic Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godfrey Gumbs

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the localization of charged particles by the image potential of spherical shells, such as fullerene buckyballs. These spherical image states exist within surface potentials formed by the competition between the attractive image potential and the repulsive centripetal force arising from the angular motion. The image potential has a power law rather than a logarithmic behavior. This leads to fundamental differences in the nature of the effective potential for the two geometries. Our calculations have shown that the captured charge is more strongly localized closest to the surface for fullerenes than for cylindrical nanotube.

  13. Testing fundamentals: The chemical state of geochemical tracers in biominerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branson, O.; Redfern, S. A. T.; Read, E.; Elderfield, H.

    2015-12-01

    The use of many carbonate-derived geochemical proxies is underpinned by the assumption that tracer elements are incorporated 'ideally' as impurities the mineral lattice, following relatively straightforward kinetic and thermodynamic drives. This allows comparison to inorganic precipitation experiments, and provides a systematic starting point from which to translate geochemical tracers to environmental records. Biomineral carbonates are a prominent source of geochemical proxy material, and are far from an ideal inorganic system. They are structurally and compositionally heterogeneous mineral-organic composites, produced in tightly controlled biological environments, possibly via non-classical crystal growth mechanisms. Biominerals offer numerous opportunities for tracers to be incorporated in a 'non-ideal' state. For instance, tracers could be hosted within the organic component of the structure, in interstitial micro-domains of a separate mineral phase, or in localized high-impurity clusters. If a proxy element is hosted in a non-ideal state, our understanding of its incorporation and preservation is flawed, and the theoretical basis behind the proxies derived from it must be reevaluated. Thus far, the assumption of ideal tracer incorporation has remained largely untested, owing to the spatial resolution and sensitivity limits of available techniques. Developments in high-resolution, high-sensitivity X-ray spectroscopy at Scanning Transmission X-Ray Microscopes (STXMs) have allowed us to measure trace element coordination in foraminiferal calcite, at length-scales relevant to biomineralisation processes and tracer incorporation. This instrument has allowed us to test the fundamental assumptions behind several geochemical proxy elements. We present a summary of four STXM studies, assessing the chemical state and distribution of Mg (Branson et al, 2014), B (Branson et al, 2015), S and Na (unpub.), and highlight the implications of these data for the use of these

  14. Imaging of lumbar degenerative disk disease: history and current state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emch, Todd M. [Cleveland Clinic, Division of Neuroradiology, Imaging Institute, Neuroradiology L-10, Cleveland, OH (United States); Modic, Michael T. [Cleveland Clinic, Division of Neuroradiology, Imaging Institute, Neurological Institute T-13, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2011-09-15

    One of the most common indications for performing magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the lumbar spine is the symptom complex thought to originate as a result of degenerative disk disease. MR imaging, which has emerged as perhaps the modality of choice for imaging degenerative disk disease, can readily demonstrate disk pathology, degenerative endplate changes, facet and ligamentous hypertrophic changes, and the sequelae of instability. Its role in terms of predicting natural history of low back pain, identifying causality, or offering prognostic information is unclear. As available modalities for imaging the spine have progressed from radiography, myelography, and computed tomography to MR imaging, there have also been advances in spine surgery for degenerative disk disease. These advances are described in a temporal context for historical purposes with a focus on MR imaging's history and current state. (orig.)

  15. Effect of the Temperature-Emissivity Contrast on the Chemical Signal for Gas Plume Detection Using Thermal Image Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Stephen; Chilton, Larry; Tardiff, Mark; Metoyer, Candace

    2008-01-01

    Detecting and identifying weak gaseous plumes using thermal imaging data is complicated by many factors. These include variability due to atmosphere, ground and plume temperature, and background clutter. This paper presents an analysis of one formulation of the physics-based radiance model, which describes at-sensor observed radiance. The background emissivity and plume/ground temperatures are isolated, and their effects on chemical signal are described. This analysis shows that the plume's physical state, emission or absorption, is directly dependent on the background emissivity and plume/ground temperatures. It then describes what conditions on the background emissivity and plume/ground temperatures have inhibiting or amplifying effects on the chemical signal. These claims are illustrated by analyzing synthetic hyperspectral imaging data with the adaptive matched filter using two chemicals and three distinct background emissivities.

  16. Effect of the Temperature-Emissivity Contrast on the Chemical Signal for Gas Plume Detection Using Thermal Image Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, Stephen; Chilton, Lawrence; Tardiff, Mark F.; Metoyer, Candace N.

    2008-10-21

    Detecting and identifying weak gaseous plumes using thermal imaging data is complicated by many factors. These include variability due to atmosphere, ground and plume temperature, and background clutter. This paper presents an analysis of one formulation of the physics-based radiance model, which describes at-sensor observed radiance. The background emissivity and plume/ground temperatures are isolated, and their effects on net chemical signal are described. This analysis shows that the plume’s physical state, emission or absorption, is directly dependent on that background emissivity. It then describes what conditions on the background emissivity have inhibiting effects on the net chemical signal. These claims are illustrated by analyzing synthetic hyperspectral imaging data with the Adaptive Matched Filter using two chemicals and three distinct background emissivities.

  17. Effect of the Temperature-Emissivity Contrast on the Chemical Signal for Gas Plume Detection Using Thermal Image Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candace Metoyer

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Detecting and identifying weak gaseous plumes using thermal imaging data is complicated by many factors. These include variability due to atmosphere, ground and plume temperature, and background clutter. This paper presents an analysis of one formulation of the physics-based radiance model, which describes at-sensor observed radiance. The background emissivity and plume/ground temperatures are isolated, and their effects on chemical signal are described. This analysis shows that the plume’s physical state, emission or absorption, is directly dependent on the background emissivity and plume/ground temperatures. It then describes what conditions on the background emissivity and plume/ground temperatures have inhibiting or amplifying effects on the chemical signal. These claims are illustrated by analyzing synthetic hyperspectral imaging data with the adaptive matched filter using two chemicals and three distinct background emissivities.

  18. Accumulation and chemical states of radiocesium by fungus Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Sakamoto, Fuminori; Kozai, Naofumi; Yamasaki, Shinya; Yu, Qianqian

    2014-05-01

    After accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, the fall-out radiocesium was deposited on the ground. Filamentous fungus is known to accumulate radiocesium in environment, even though many minerals are involved in soil. These facts suggest that fungus affect the migration behavior of radiocesium in the environment. However, accumulation mechanism of radiocesium by fungus is not understood. In the present study, accumulation and chemical states change of Cs by unicellular fungus of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been studied to elucidate the role of microorganisms in the migration of radiocesium in the environment. Two different experimental conditions were employed; one is the accumulation experiments of radiocesium by S. cerevisiae from the agar medium containing 137Cs and a mineral of zeolite, vermiculite, smectite, mica, or illite. The other is the experiments using stable cesium to examine the chemical states change of Cs. In the former experiment, the cells were grown on membrane filter of 0.45 μm installed on the agar medium. After the grown cells were weighed, radioactivity in the cells was measured by an autoradiography technique. The mineral weight contents were changed from 0.1% to 1% of the medium. In the latter experiment, the cells were grown in the medium containing stable Cs between 1 mM and 10mM. The Cs accumulated cells were analyzed by SEM-EDS and EXAFS. The adsorption experiments of cesium by the cells under resting condition were also conducted to test the effect of cells metabolic activity. Without mineral in the medium, cells of S. cerevisiae accumulated 1.5x103 Bq/g from the medium containing 137Cs of 2.6x102 Bq/g. When mineral was added in the medium, concentration of 137Cs in the cells decreased. The concentration of 137Cs in the cells from the medium containing different minerals were in the following order; smectite, illite, mica > vermiculite > zeolite. This order was nearly the same as the inverse of distribution coefficient of

  19. Return to sender - American Images of the Nordic Welfare States and Nordic Welfare State Branding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marklund, C.; Petersen, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    argues that these American images, narratives, and stereotypes did not only fulfill a function in the American debate, but were also relayed back to Norden, and affected debate, nation-branding strategies, and self-understandings there. During the Cold War, furthermore, the Nordic welfare state image......In this article, we study the relationship between the United States of America and Norden, first showing how images of the Nordic model were constructed and reproduced in the United States from the 1920s until the 1960s. We find both utopias and dystopias in these narratives. Second, the article...

  20. Fourth-Order Vibrational Transition State Theory and Chemical Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, John F.; Matthews, Devin A.; Gong, Justin Z.

    2015-06-01

    Second-order vibrational perturbation theory (VPT2) is an enormously successful and well-established theory for treating anharmonic effects on the vibrational levels of semi-rigid molecules. Partially as a consequence of the fact that the theory is exact for the Morse potential (which provides an appropriate qualitative model for stretching anharmonicity), VPT2 calculations for such systems with appropriate ab initio potential functions tend to give fundamental and overtone levels that fall within a handful of wavenumbers of experimentally measured positions. As a consequence, the next non-vanishing level of perturbation theory -- VPT4 -- offers only slight improvements over VPT2 and is not practical for most calculations since it requires information about force constants up through sextic. However, VPT4 (as well as VPT2) can be used for other applications such as the next vibrational correction to rotational constants (the ``gammas'') and other spectroscopic parameters. In addition, the marriage of VPT with the semi-classical transition state theory of Miller (SCTST) has recently proven to be a powerful and accurate treatment for chemical kinetics. In this talk, VPT4-based SCTST tunneling probabilities and cumulative reaction probabilities are give for the first time for selected low-dimensional model systems. The prospects for VPT4, both practical and intrinsic, will also be discussed.

  1. Chemical imaging of surfaces with the scanning electrochemical microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bard, A J; Fan, F R; Pierce, D T; Unwin, P R; Wipf, D O; Zhou, F

    1991-10-01

    Scanning electrochemical microscopy is a scanning probe technique that is based on faradaic current changes as a small electrode is moved across the surface of a sample. The images obtained depend on the sample topography and surface reactivity. The response of the scanning electrochemical microscope is sensitive to the presence of conducting and electroactive species, which makes it useful for imaging heterogeneous surfaces. The principles and instrumentation used to obtain images and surface reaction-kinetic information are discussed, and examples of applications to the study of electrodes, minerals, and biological samples are given. PMID:17739954

  2. Applications of Aptamers in Targeted Imaging: State of the Art

    OpenAIRE

    Dougherty, Casey A.; Cai, Weibo; Hong, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Aptamers are single-stranded oligonucleotides with high affinity and specificity to the target molecules or cells, thus they can serve as an important category of molecular targeting ligand. Since their discove1y, aptamers have been rapidly translated into clinical practice. The strong target affinity/selectivity, cost-effectivity, chemical versatility and safety of aptamers are superior to traditional peptides- or proteins-based ligands which make them unique choices for molecular imaging. T...

  3. Radiochemistry, PET Imaging, and the Internet of Chemical Things.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Stephen; Kilbourn, Michael R; Scott, Peter J H

    2016-08-24

    The Internet of Chemical Things (IoCT), a growing network of computers, mobile devices, online resources, software suites, laboratory equipment, synthesis apparatus, analytical devices, and a host of other machines, all interconnected to users, manufacturers, and others through the infrastructure of the Internet, is changing how we do chemistry. While in its infancy across many chemistry laboratories and departments, it became apparent when considering our own work synthesizing radiopharmaceuticals for positron emission tomography (PET) that a more mature incarnation of the IoCT already exists. How does the IoCT impact our lives today, and what does it hold for the smart (radio)chemical laboratories of the future?

  4. Chemical Composition of Polymer Surfaces Imaged by Atomic Force Microscopy and Complementary Approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vancso, G. Julius; Hillborg, Henrik; Schönherr, Holger

    2005-01-01

    In this article we review the recent developments in the field of high resolution lateral mapping of the surface chemical composition of polymers by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and other complementary imaging techniques. The different AFM approaches toward nanometer scale mapping with chemical sen

  5. Reinforcement learning with raw image pixels as input state

    OpenAIRE

    Ernst, Damien; Marée, Raphaël; Wehenkel, Louis

    2006-01-01

    We report in this paper some positive simulation results obtained when image pixels are directly used as input state of a reinforcement learning algorithm. The reinforcement learning algorithm chosen to carry out the simulation is a batch-mode algorithm known as fitted Q iteration. Peer reviewed

  6. Quasi-Optical Terahertz Microfluidic Devices for Chemical Sensing and Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Lei Liu; Zhenguo Jiang; Syed (Shawon) Rahman; Md. Itrat Bin Shams; Benxin Jing; Akash Kannegulla; Li-Jing Cheng

    2016-01-01

    We first review the development of a frequency domain quasi-optical terahertz (THz) chemical sensing and imaging platform consisting of a quartz-based microfluidic subsystem in our previous work. We then report the application of this platform to sensing and characterizing of several selected liquid chemical samples from 570–630 GHz. THz sensing of chemical mixtures including isopropylalcohol-water (IPA-H2O) mixtures and acetonitrile-water (ACN-H2O) mixtures have been successfully demonstrate...

  7. Application of magnetic resonance imaging in transgenic and chemical mouse models of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liedtke Christian

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is one of the most common cancers worldwide. The molecular mechanisms underlying hepatocarcinogenesis are still poorly understood. Genetically modified mice are powerful tools to further investigate the mechanisms of HCC development. However, this approach is limited due to the lack of non-invasive detection methods in small rodents. The aim of this study was to establish a protocol for the non-invasive analysis of hepatocarcinogenesis in transgenic mice using a clinical 1.5 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging scanner. Results As a model system we used hepatocyte-specific c-myc transgenic mice developing hepatocellular carcinoma at the age of 12-15 months. The scans of the murine livers included axial T2-weighted turbo-spin echo (TSE images, axial T1-weighted and contrast enhanced T1-weighted gradient echo (fast field echo, FFE and sagittal true Fast Imaging with Steady state Precession (true-FISP images. Application of contrast agent was performed via tail vein-catheter and confirmed by evaluation of the altered longitudinal relaxation T1 time before and after application. Through technical adaptation and optimization we could detect murine liver lesions with a minimum diameter of approximately 2 mm and provided histopathological evidence that these MR findings correspond to hepatocellular carcinoma. Tumor growth was repeatedly measured using sequential MRI with intervals of 5 weeks and subsequent volumetric analysis facilitating direct comparison of tumor progression between individual animals. We finally demonstrated that our protocol is also applicable in the widely- used chemical model of N-nitrosodiethylamine-induced hepatocarcinogenesis. Conclusion Our protocol allows the non-invasive, early detection of HCC and the subsequent continuous monitoring of liver tumorgenesis in transgenic mice thereby facilitating future investigations of transgenic tumor mouse models of the liver.

  8. Recent Applications of Chemical Imaging to Pharmaceutical Process Monitoring and Quality Control

    OpenAIRE

    Gowen, A.A.; O' Donnell, Colm; Cullen, Patrick; Bell, S

    2008-01-01

    Chemical Imaging (CI) is an emerging platform technology that integrates conventional imaging and spectroscopy to attain both spatial and spectral information from an object. Vibrational spectroscopic methods, such as Near Infrared (NIR) and Raman spectroscopy, combined with imaging are particularly useful for analysis of biological/pharmaceutical forms. The rapid, non-destructive and non-invasive features of CI mark its potential suitability as a process analytical tool for the pharmaceutica...

  9. Radiochemistry, PET Imaging, and the Internet of Chemical Things.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Stephen; Kilbourn, Michael R; Scott, Peter J H

    2016-08-24

    The Internet of Chemical Things (IoCT), a growing network of computers, mobile devices, online resources, software suites, laboratory equipment, synthesis apparatus, analytical devices, and a host of other machines, all interconnected to users, manufacturers, and others through the infrastructure of the Internet, is changing how we do chemistry. While in its infancy across many chemistry laboratories and departments, it became apparent when considering our own work synthesizing radiopharmaceuticals for positron emission tomography (PET) that a more mature incarnation of the IoCT already exists. How does the IoCT impact our lives today, and what does it hold for the smart (radio)chemical laboratories of the future? PMID:27610410

  10. Radiochemistry, PET Imaging, and the Internet of Chemical Things

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The Internet of Chemical Things (IoCT), a growing network of computers, mobile devices, online resources, software suites, laboratory equipment, synthesis apparatus, analytical devices, and a host of other machines, all interconnected to users, manufacturers, and others through the infrastructure of the Internet, is changing how we do chemistry. While in its infancy across many chemistry laboratories and departments, it became apparent when considering our own work synthesizing radiopharmaceuticals for positron emission tomography (PET) that a more mature incarnation of the IoCT already exists. How does the IoCT impact our lives today, and what does it hold for the smart (radio)chemical laboratories of the future? PMID:27610410

  11. NMR imaging: A 'chemical' microscope for coal analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a new three-dimensional (3-D) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging technique for spatially mapping proton distributions in whole coals and solvent-swollen coal samples. The technique is based on a 3-D back-projection protocol for data acquisition, and a reconstruction technique based on 3-D Radon transform inversion. In principle, the 3-D methodology provides higher spatial resolution of solid materials than is possible with conventional slice-selection protocols. The applicability of 3-D NMR imaging has been demonstrated by mapping the maceral phases in Utah Blind Canyon (APCS number-sign 6) coal and the distribution of mobile phases in Utah coal swollen with deuterated and protic pyridine. 7 refs., 5 figs

  12. PET Imaging and biodistribution of chemically modified bacteriophage MS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Michelle E; Aanei, Ioana L; Behrens, Christopher R; Tong, Gary J; Murphy, Stephanie T; O'Neil, James P; Francis, Matthew B

    2013-01-01

    The fields of nanotechnology and medicine have merged in the development of new imaging and drug delivery agents based on nanoparticle platforms. As one example, a mutant of bacteriophage MS2 can be differentially modified on the exterior and interior surfaces for the concurrent display of targeting functionalities and payloads, respectively. In order to realize their potential for use in in vivo applications, the biodistribution and circulation properties of this class of agents must first be investigated. A means of modulating and potentially improving the characteristics of nanoparticle agents is the appendage of PEG chains. Both MS2 and MS2-PEG capsids possessing interior DOTA chelators were labeled with (64)Cu and injected intravenously into mice possessing tumor xenografts. Dynamic imaging of the agents was performed using PET-CT on a single animal per sample, and the biodistribution at the terminal time point (24 h) was assessed by gamma counting of the organs ex vivo for 3 animals per agent. Compared to other viral capsids of similar size, the MS2 agents showed longer circulation times. Both MS2 and MS2-PEG bacteriophage behaved similarly, although the latter agent showed significantly less uptake in the spleen. This effect may be attributed to the ability of the PEG chains to mask the capsid charge. Although the tumor uptake of the agents may result from the enhanced permeation and retention (EPR) effect, selective tumor imaging may be achieved in the future by using exterior targeting groups. PMID:23214968

  13. Vortex Images, q-Calculus and Entangled Coherent States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashaev, Oktay K.

    2012-02-01

    The two circles theorem for hydrodynamic flow in annular domain bounded by two concentric circles is derived. Complex potential and velocity of the flow are represented as q-periodic functions and rewritten in terms of the Jackson q-integral. This theorem generalizes the Milne-Thomson one circle theorem and reduces to the last on in the limit q → ∞. By this theorem problem of vortex images in annular domain between coaxial cylinders is solved in terms of q-elementary functions. An infinite set of images, as symmetric points under two circles, is determined completely by poles of the q-logarithmic function, where dimensionless parameter q = r22/r21 is given by square ratio of the cylinder radii. Motivated by Möbius transformation for symmetrical points under generalized circle in complex plain, the system of symmetric spin coherent states corresponding to antipodal qubit states is introduced. By these states we construct the maximally entangled orthonormal two qubit spin coherent state basis, in the limiting case reducible to the Bell basis. Average energy of XYZ model in these states, describing finite localized structure with characteristic extremum points, appears as an energy surface in maximally entangled two qubit space. Generalizations to three and higher multiple qubits are found. We show that our entangled N qubit states are determined by set of complex Fibonacci and Lucas polynomials and corresponding Binet-Fibonacci q-calculus.

  14. Ultrasound imaging of oxidative stress in vivo with chemically-generated gas microbubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perng, John Kangchun; Lee, Seungjun; Kundu, Kousik; Caskey, Charles F; Knight, Sarah F; Satir, Sarp; Ferrara, Katherine W; Taylor, W Robert; Degertekin, F Levent; Sorescu, Daniel; Murthy, Niren

    2012-09-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) have tremendous potential for in vivo molecular imaging because of their high sensitivity. However, the diagnostic potential of UCAs has been difficult to exploit because current UCAs are based on pre-formed microbubbles, which can only detect cell surface receptors. Here, we demonstrate that chemical reactions that generate gas forming molecules can be used to perform molecular imaging by ultrasound in vivo. This new approach was demonstrated by imaging reactive oxygen species in vivo with allylhydrazine, a liquid compound that is converted into nitrogen and propylene gas after reacting with radical oxidants. We demonstrate that allylhydrazine encapsulated within liposomes can detect a 10 micromolar concentration of radical oxidants by ultrasound, and can image oxidative stress in mice, induced by lipopolysaccharide, using a clinical ultrasound system. We anticipate numerous applications of chemically-generated microbubbles for molecular imaging by ultrasound, given ultrasound's ability to detect small increments above the gas saturation limit, its spatial resolution and widespread clinical use.

  15. Shallow nitrogen ion implantation: Evolution of chemical state and defect structure in titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manojkumar, P. A.; Chirayath, V. A.; Balamurugan, A. K.; Krishna, Nanda Gopala; Ilango, S.; Kamruddin, M.; Amarendra, G.; Tyagi, A. K.; Raj, Baldev

    2016-09-01

    Evolution of chemical states and defect structure in titanium during low energy nitrogen ion implantation by Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) process is studied. The underlying process of chemical state evolution is investigated using secondary ion mass spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The implantation induced defect structure evolution as a function of dose is elucidated using variable energy positron annihilation Doppler broadening spectroscopy (PAS) and the results were corroborated with chemical state. Formation of 3 layers of defect state was modeled to fit PAS results.

  16. Large area super-resolution chemical imaging via rapid dithering of a nanoprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Languirand, Eric R.; Cullum, Brian M.

    2015-05-01

    Super-resolution chemical imaging via Raman spectroscopy provides a significant ability to simultaneously or pseudosimultaneously monitor numerous label-free analytes while elucidating their spatial distribution on the surface of the sample. However, spontaneous Raman is an inherently weak phenomenon making trace detection and thus superresolution imaging extremely difficult, if not impossible. To circumvent this and allow for trace detection of the few chemical species present in any sub-diffraction limited resolution element of an image, we have developed a surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) coherent fiber-optic imaging bundle probe consisting of 30,000 individual fiber elements. When the probes are tapered, etched and coated with metal, they provide circular Raman chemical images of a sample with a field of view of approximately 20μm (i.e. diameter) via the array of 30,000 individual 50 nm fiber elements. An acousto-optic tunable filter is used to rapidly scan or select discrete frequencies for multi- or hyperspectral analysis. Although the 50nm fiber element dimensions of this probe inherently provide spatial resolutions of approximately 100nm, further increases in the spatial resolution can be achieved by using a rapid dithering process. Using this process, additional images are obtained one-half fiber diameter translations in the x- and y- planes. A piezostage drives the movement, providing the accurate and reproducible shifts required for dithering. Optimal probability algorithms are then used to deconvolute the related images producing a final image with a three-fold increase in spatial resolution. This paper describes super-resolution chemical imaging using these probes and the dithering method as well as its potential applications in label-free imaging of lipid rafts and other applications within biology and forensics.

  17. State and tendencies of chemical protection against ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papers published in 1978 in the field of chemical protection against ionizing radiation are reviewed. Protection studies in in-vivo and model systems, the biochemical, pharmacological and toxic effects, and modes of action of radioprotective agents are described and the trends in this field of research appreciated. (author)

  18. State and tendencies of chemical protection against ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papers published in 1979 and 1980 in the field of chemical protection against ionizing radiation are reviewed. Protection studies in in-vivo and model systems, the biochemical, pharmacological and toxic effects, and modes of action of radioprotective agents are described and the trends in this field of research estimated. (author)

  19. Some Chemical and Electronic Considerations of Solid State Semiconductor Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinitz, Herman J.

    1986-01-01

    Describes the trend toward the use of electronic instrumentation to monitor and measure various parameters in chemical reactions. Stresses that a knowledge of the operational relationships involved in such instruments is essential for students beginning in science. Discusses electrostatic charges, semiconductor crystals, electronic conductors,…

  20. The Determination Of Titan's Rotational State From Cassini SAR Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persi Del Marmo, P.; Iess, L.; Picardi, G.; Seu, R.; Bertotti, B.

    2007-12-01

    SAR images acquired by the spacecraft Cassini in overlapping strips have been used to determine the vectorial angular velocity of Titan. The method entails the tracking of surface landmarks at different times (and mean anomalies). Cassini radar observations have provided so far 14 high resolution image pairs of the same portion of Titan surface, spanning a period from 2004 to 2007. Each image is referenced both in an inertial frame and in the IAU, Titan-centric, body-fixed reference frame. This referencing is quite precise, as the position of Cassini relative to Titan is known with an accuracy smaller than 100 m during each flyby. The IAU body-fixed frame assumes a spin axis different from the actual one. Therefore, in this putative frame a landmark appears at different geographic coordinates in the two observations. By correlating the two images of the same surface region, one gets a two-dimensional vector, which retains information about the true spin axis. This vector provides the magnitude and direction of the displacement to be applied to a reference point of each image in order to produce maximum correlation. The correlation results therefore in a new Titan-centric, inertial referencing of the images, R(t1) and R(t2). The spin axis s is then obtained by requiring that [R(t2) - R(t1)] s = 0 for each overlapping image pairs. Due to experimental errors (dominated by image correlation errors and inaccuracies in the spacecraft orbit relative to Titan) the left hand sides cannot be simultaneously zeroed and the spin axis must be determined by means of a least square procedure. The magnitude of the angular velocity is then derived from the angle between the vectors R(t1) and R(t2) and the known time difference between the two observations. Our analysis indicates that the Titan pole coordinates are consistent with the occupancy of the fourth Cassini state. The uncertainties are obtained assuming a realistic error of 250 m in the reconstruction of the inertially

  1. Attainable entanglement of unitary transformed thermal states in liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance with the chemical shift

    CERN Document Server

    Ota, Y; Ohba, I; Yoshida, N; Mikami, Shuji; Ohba, Ichiro; Ota, Yukihiro; Yoshida, Noriyuki

    2006-01-01

    Recently, Yu, Brown, and Chuang [Phys. Rev. A {\\bf 71}, 032341 (2005)] investigated the entanglement attainable from unitary transformed thermal states in liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Their research gave an insight into the role of the entanglement in a liquid-state NMR quantum computer. Moreover, they attempted to reveal the role of mixed-state entanglement in quantum computing. However, they assumed that the Zeeman energy of each nuclear spin which corresponds to a qubit takes a common value for all; there is no chemical shift. In this paper, we research a model with the chemical shifts and analytically derive the physical parameter region where unitary transformed thermal states are entangled, by the positive partial transposition (PPT) criterion with respect to any bipartition. We examine the effect of the chemical shifts on the boundary between the separability and the nonseparability, and find it is negligible.

  2. Imaging the neural circuitry and chemical control of aggressive motivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanchard D Caroline

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the advent of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI in awake animals it is possible to resolve patterns of neuronal activity across the entire brain with high spatial and temporal resolution. Synchronized changes in neuronal activity across multiple brain areas can be viewed as functional neuroanatomical circuits coordinating the thoughts, memories and emotions for particular behaviors. To this end, fMRI in conscious rats combined with 3D computational analysis was used to identifying the putative distributed neural circuit involved in aggressive motivation and how this circuit is affected by drugs that block aggressive behavior. Results To trigger aggressive motivation, male rats were presented with their female cage mate plus a novel male intruder in the bore of the magnet during image acquisition. As expected, brain areas previously identified as critical in the organization and expression of aggressive behavior were activated, e.g., lateral hypothalamus, medial basal amygdala. Unexpected was the intense activation of the forebrain cortex and anterior thalamic nuclei. Oral administration of a selective vasopressin V1a receptor antagonist SRX251 or the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine, drugs that block aggressive behavior, both caused a general suppression of the distributed neural circuit involved in aggressive motivation. However, the effect of SRX251, but not fluoxetine, was specific to aggression as brain activation in response to a novel sexually receptive female was unaffected. Conclusion The putative neural circuit of aggressive motivation identified with fMRI includes neural substrates contributing to emotional expression (i.e. cortical and medial amygdala, BNST, lateral hypothalamus, emotional experience (i.e. hippocampus, forebrain cortex, anterior cingulate, retrosplenial cortex and the anterior thalamic nuclei that bridge the motor and cognitive components of aggressive responding

  3. Clinical imaging centers: The role of state radiation control programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation Protection is mandated in all 50 states. Regulatory control over naturally occurring and accelerator produced radioactive materials use is exclusively by state government. Although states are independent bodies there are many similarities in their regulatory approaches. Differences in the degree of regulatory control are minimized through use of the Suggested State Regulations for the Control of Radiation and other guidance documents provided by the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors, Inc. This paper discusses the general requirements to obtain a license and/or registration to produce radioactive material in an accelerator, prepare an imaging agent and/or operate an imaging clinic. These requirements include minimum standards for training and experience of all principal users, equipment specifications, facilities design and construction, specific operating and emergency procedures, radiation protection surveys and monitoring of personnel exposures, ongoing training of staff, and a commitment to ALARA (the philosophy of keeping radiation exposures as low as reasonably achievable). The nature and frequency of routine inspections to ensure adequate protection of workers and the public is also covered

  4. Chemical reaction rates and non-equilibrium pressure of reacting gas mixtures in the state-to-state approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kustova, Elena V., E-mail: e.kustova@spbu.ru [Department of Mathematics and Mechanics, Saint Petersburg State University, 198504 Universitetskiy pr. 28, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Kremer, Gilberto M., E-mail: kremer@fisica.ufpr.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Caixa Postal 19044, 81531-980 Curitiba (Brazil)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • State-to-state approach for coupled vibrational relaxation and chemical reactions. • Self-consistent model for rates of non-equilibrium reactions and energy transitions. • In viscous flows mass action law is violated. • Cross coupling between reaction rates and non-equilibrium pressure in viscous flow. • Results allow implementing the state-to-state approach for viscous flow simulations. - Abstract: Viscous gas flows with vibrational relaxation and chemical reactions in the state-to-state approach are analyzed. A modified Chapman–Enskog method is used for the determination of chemical reaction and vibrational transition rates and non-equilibrium pressure. Constitutive equations depend on the thermodynamic forces: velocity divergence and chemical reaction/transition affinity. As an application, N{sub 2} flow with vibrational relaxation across a shock wave is investigated. Two distinct processes occur behind the shock: for small values of the distance the affinity is large and vibrational relaxation is in its initial stage; for large distances the affinity is small and the chemical reaction is in its final stage. The affinity contributes more to the transition rate than the velocity divergence and the effect of these two contributions are more important for small distances from the shock front. For the non-equilibrium pressure, the term associated with the bulk viscosity increases by a small amount the hydrostatic pressure.

  5. Molecular perspectives on solid-state phase transformation and chemical reactivity of drugs: metoclopramide as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shan-Yang

    2015-02-01

    Here, I provide an overview of the solid-state characteristics, phase transformations and chemical reactions of metoclopramide hydrochloride monohydrate (MCP HCl H2O). Three unique techniques, including thermoanalytical methods, one-step simultaneous differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy, and hot-stage microscopic (HSM) imaging, have been applied to study the solid-state phase transitions of MCP HCl H2O in continuous dehydration, amorphization and recrystallization processes. I also review the effects of grinding or heating on ion-exchange reactions, milling, compression or colyophilization on Maillard reactions, and γ-ray irradiation or electron beams on radiolysis in the solid state. I also report the exposure of MCP HCl H2O in solution to light, irradiation, oxidants or π-acceptors. This review will serve as a useful keynote for the evolving realm of solid-state chemistry research.

  6. Imaging of Coulomb-Driven Quantum Hall Edge States

    KAUST Repository

    Lai, Keji

    2011-10-01

    The edges of a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in the quantum Hall effect (QHE) regime are divided into alternating metallic and insulating strips, with their widths determined by the energy gaps of the QHE states and the electrostatic Coulomb interaction. Local probing of these submicrometer features, however, is challenging due to the buried 2DEG structures. Using a newly developed microwave impedance microscope, we demonstrate the real-space conductivity mapping of the edge and bulk states. The sizes, positions, and field dependence of the edge strips around the sample perimeter agree quantitatively with the self-consistent electrostatic picture. The evolution of microwave images as a function of magnetic fields provides rich microscopic information around the ν=2 QHE state. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  7. Interaction-Enhanced Imaging of Rydberg P states

    CERN Document Server

    Gavryusev, Vladislav; Kekić, Armin; Zürn, Gerhard; Signoles, Adrien

    2016-01-01

    The Interaction Enhanced Imaging technique allows to detect the spatial distribution of strongly interacting impurities embedded within a gas of background atoms used as a contrast medium. Here we present a detailed study of this technique, applied to detect Rydberg $P$ states. We experimentally realize fast and efficient three-photon excitation of $P$ states, optimized according to the results of a theoretical effective two-level model. Few Rydberg $P$-state atoms, prepared in a small cloud with dimensions comparable to the blockade radius, are detected with a good sensitivity by averaging over 50 shots. The main aspects of the technique are described with a hard-sphere model, finding good agreement with experimental data. This work paves the way to a non-destructive optical detection of single Rydberg atoms with high spatial and temporal resolution.

  8. The equation of state of QCD at finite chemical potential

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Sourendu; Majumdar, Pushan

    2014-01-01

    We obtain the baryon number density, n, and the excess contribution to the pressure, Delta P, at finite chemical potential, mu_B, and temperature, T, by resumming the Taylor series expansion in a lattice computation with lattice spacing of 1/(4T) and two flavours of quarks at three different quark masses. The method proceeds by giving a critical mu_B and limits on the critical exponent, and permits reliable estimations of the errors in resummed quantities. We find that n and Delta P are insensitive to the quark mass. We also report the bulk isothermal compressibility, kappa, over a range of T and mu_B.

  9. Standoff chemical D and Id with extended LWIR hyperspectral imaging spectroradiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prel, Florent; Moreau, Louis; Lavoie, Hugo; Bouffard, François; Thériault, Jean-Marc; Vallieres, Christian; Roy, Claude; Dubé, Denis

    2013-05-01

    Standoff detection and identification (D and Id) of unknown volatile chemicals such as chemical pollutants and consequences of industrial incidents has been increasingly desired for first responders and for environmental monitoring. On site gas detection sensors are commercially available and several of them can even detect more than one chemical species, however only few of them have the capabilities of detecting a wide variety of gases at long and safe distances. The ABB Hyperspectral Imaging Spectroradiometer (MR-i), configured for gas detection detects and identifies a wide variety of chemical species including toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) and surrogates several kilometers away from the sensor. This configuration is called iCATSI for improved Compact Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer. iCATSI is a standoff passive system. The modularity of the MR-i platform allows optimization of the detection configuration with a 256 x 256 Focal Plane Array imager or a line scanning imager both covering the long wave IR atmospheric window up to 14 μm. The uniqueness of its extended LWIR cut off enables to detect more chemicals as well as provide higher probability of detection than usual LWIR sensors.

  10. Multiport solid-state imager characterization at variable pixel rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yates, G.J.; Albright, K.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Turko, B.T. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-08-01

    The imaging performance of an 8-port Full Frame Transfer Charge Coupled Device (FFT CCD) as a function of several parameters including pixel clock rate is presented. The device, model CCD- 13, manufactured by English Electric Valve (EEV) is a 512 {times} 512 pixel array designed with four individual programmable bidirectional serial registers and eight output amplifiers permitting simultaneous readout of eight segments (128 horizontal {times} 256 vertical pixels) of the array. The imager was evaluated in Los Alamos National Laboratory`s High-Speed Solid-State Imager Test Station at true pixel rates as high as 50 MHz for effective imager pixel rates approaching 400 MHz from multiporting. Key response characteristics measured include absolute responsivity, Charge-Transfer-Efficiency (CTE), dynamic range, resolution, signal-to-noise ratio, and electronic and optical crosstalk among the eight video channels. Preliminary test results and data obtained from the CCD-13 will be presented and the versatility/capabilities of the test station will be reviewed.

  11. Brain imaging of pain: state of the art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Debbie L; Sandhu, Javin S; Jones, Anthony KP

    2016-01-01

    Pain is a complex sensory and emotional experience that is heavily influenced by prior experience and expectations of pain. Before the development of noninvasive human brain imaging, our grasp of the brain’s role in pain processing was limited to data from postmortem studies, direct recording of brain activity, patient experience and stimulation during neurosurgical procedures, and animal models of pain. Advances made in neuroimaging have bridged the gap between brain activity and the subjective experience of pain and allowed us to better understand the changes in the brain that are associated with both acute and chronic pain. Additionally, cognitive influences on pain such as attention, anticipation, and fear can now be directly observed, allowing for the interpretation of the neural basis of the psychological modulation of pain. The use of functional brain imaging to measure changes in endogenous neurochemistry has increased our understanding of how states of increased resilience and vulnerability to pain are maintained. PMID:27660488

  12. Cyanobactins from Cyanobacteria: Current Genetic and Chemical State of Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Joana; Vasconcelos, Vitor

    2015-11-01

    Cyanobacteria are considered to be one of the most promising sources of new, natural products. Apart from non-ribosomal peptides and polyketides, ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs) are one of the leading groups of bioactive compounds produced by cyanobacteria. Among these, cyanobactins have sparked attention due to their interesting bioactivities and for their potential to be prospective candidates in the development of drugs. It is assumed that the primary source of cyanobactins is cyanobacteria, although these compounds have also been isolated from marine animals such as ascidians, sponges and mollusks. The aim of this review is to update the current knowledge of cyanobactins, recognized as being produced by cyanobacteria, and to emphasize their genetic clusters and chemical structures as well as their bioactivities, ecological roles and biotechnological potential.

  13. Investigation of drug distribution in tablets using surface enhanced Raman chemical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firkala, Tamás; Farkas, Attila; Vajna, Balázs; Farkas, István; Marosi, György

    2013-03-25

    This paper reports the first application of surface enhanced Raman chemical imaging on pharmaceutical tablets containing the active ingredient (API) in very low concentrations. Taking advantage of the extremely intensive Raman signals in the presence of silver colloids, image aquisition time was radically decreased. Moreover, the investigation of drug distribution below the detection limit of regular micro-Raman spectrometry was made feasible. The characteristics of different manufacturing technologies could be revealed at very low API concentrations by using chemometric methods for processing and evaluating the large number of varying spectra provided with this imaging method.

  14. Particle Filter with State Permutations for Solving Image Jigsaw Puzzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xingwei; Adluru, Nagesh; Latecki, Longin Jan

    2016-01-01

    We deal with an image jigsaw puzzle problem, which is defined as reconstructing an image from a set of square and non-overlapping image patches. It is known that a general instance of this problem is NP-complete, and it is also challenging for humans, since in the considered setting the original image is not given. Recently a graphical model has been proposed to solve this and related problems. The target label probability function is then maximized using loopy belief propagation. We also formulate the problem as maximizing a label probability function and use exactly the same pairwise potentials. Our main contribution is a novel inference approach in the sampling framework of Particle Filter (PF). Usually in the PF framework it is assumed that the observations arrive sequentially, e.g., the observations are naturally ordered by their time stamps in the tracking scenario. Based on this assumption, the posterior density over the corresponding hidden states is estimated. In the jigsaw puzzle problem all observations (puzzle pieces) are given at once without any particular order. Therefore, we relax the assumption of having ordered observations and extend the PF framework to estimate the posterior density by exploring different orders of observations and selecting the most informative permutations of observations. This significantly broadens the scope of applications of the PF inference. Our experimental results demonstrate that the proposed inference framework significantly outperforms the loopy belief propagation in solving the image jigsaw puzzle problem. In particular, the extended PF inference triples the accuracy of the label assignment compared to that using loopy belief propagation.

  15. Research Institute for Physical Chemical Problems of the Belarusian State University

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Edition contains information about the history of Research Institute for Physical Chemical Problems of the Belarusian State University, contact data and institute`s structure. The main developments of the institute are described also.Edition contains information about the history of Research Institute for Physical Chemical Problems of the Belarusian State University, contact data and institute`s structure. The main developments of the institute are described also.

  16. Chemical imaging of cotton fibers using an infrared microscope and a focal-plane array detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this presentation, the chemical imaging of cotton fibers with an infrared microscope and a Focal-Plane Array (FPA) detector will be discussed. Infrared spectroscopy can provide us with information on the structure and quality of cotton fibers. In addition, FPA detectors allow for simultaneous spe...

  17. High-throughput Raman chemical imaging for rapid evaluation of food safety and quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    High-throughput macro-scale Raman chemical imaging was realized on a newly developed line-scan hyperspectral system. The system utilizes a custom-designed 785 nm line laser with maximum power of 5 W as an excitation source. A 24 cm × 1 mm excitation line is normally projected on the sample surface u...

  18. Visualization and prediction of porosity in roller compacted ribbonswith near infrared chemical imaging (NIR-CI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khorasani, Milad Rouhi; Amigo Rubio, Jose Manuel; Sonnergaard, Jørn;

    2015-01-01

    The porosity of roller compacted ribbon is recognized as an important critical quality attribute which has a huge impact on the final product quality. The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of near-infrared chemical imaging (NIR-CI) for porosity estimation of ribbons produced...

  19. Chemically selective NMR imaging of a 3-component (solid-solid-liquid) sedimenting system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyea, Steven D; Altobelli, Stephen A; Mondy, Lisa A

    2003-04-01

    A novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique which resolves the separate components of the evolving vertical concentration profiles of 3-component non-colloidal suspensions is described. This method exploits the sensitivity of MRI to chemical differences between the three phases to directly image the fluid phase and one of the solid phases, with the third phase obtained by subtraction. 19F spin-echo imaging of a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) oil was interlaced with 1H SPRITE imaging of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) particles. The third phase was comprised of borosilicate glass spheres, which were not visible while imaging the PTFE or LDPE phases. The method is demonstrated by performing measurements on 2-phase materials containing only the floating (LDPE) particles, with the results contrasted to the experimental behaviour of the individual phases in the full 3-phase system. All experiments were performed using nearly monodisperse particles, with initial suspension volume fractions, phi(i), of 0.1. PMID:12713970

  20. Quantitative Chemically-Specific Coherent Diffractive Imaging of Buried Interfaces using a Tabletop EUV Nanoscope

    CERN Document Server

    Shanblatt, Elisabeth R; Gardner, Dennis F; Mancini, Giulia F; Karl, Robert M; Tanksalvala, Michael D; Bevis, Charles S; Vartanian, Victor H; Kapteyn, Henry C; Adams, Daniel E; Murnane, Margaret M

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing buried layers and interfaces is critical for a host of applications in nanoscience and nano-manufacturing. Here we demonstrate non-invasive, non-destructive imaging of buried interfaces using a tabletop, extreme ultraviolet (EUV), coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) nanoscope. Copper nanostructures inlaid in SiO2 are coated with 100 nm of aluminum, which is opaque to visible light and thick enough that neither optical microscopy nor atomic force microscopy can image the buried interfaces. Short wavelength (29 nm) high harmonic light can penetrate the aluminum layer, yielding high-contrast images of the buried structures. Moreover, differences in the absolute reflectivity of the interfaces before and after coating reveal the formation of interstitial diffusion and oxidation layers at the Al-Cu and Al-SiO2 boundaries. Finally, we show that EUV CDI provides a unique capability for quantitative, chemically-specific imaging of buried structures, and the material evolution that occurs at these buried ...

  1. Time-Domain Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Techniques Suitable for Solid-State Imaging Sensor Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K. Henderson

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We have successfully demonstrated video-rate CMOS single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD-based cameras for fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM by applying innovative FLIM algorithms. We also review and compare several time-domain techniques and solid-state FLIM systems, and adapt the proposed algorithms for massive CMOS SPAD-based arrays and hardware implementations. The theoretical error equations are derived and their performances are demonstrated on the data obtained from 0.13 μm CMOS SPAD arrays and the multiple-decay data obtained from scanning PMT systems. In vivo two photon fluorescence lifetime imaging data of FITC-albumin labeled vasculature of a P22 rat carcinosarcoma (BD9 rat window chamber are used to test how different algorithms perform on bi-decay data. The proposed techniques are capable of producing lifetime images with enough contrast.

  2. Present state of the combined treatment with radiation and chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Of malignancies in which the results have been markedly improved by combined treatment with radiation and chemicals for the past decade, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma localized in head and neck and intra-oral carcinoma are presented. In the management of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, the authors stressed the following: 1) Rappaport's classification has been a help to evaluate the prognosis; 2) lymphoma of the Waldeyer's ring should not be included in nodal lymphoma, and also it should be separated from extranodal lymphoma as well, because of different prognosis; 3) It seems that some kinds of chemotherapy would have a role in improving the results of radiotherapy in the management of radiotherapy, even in localized cases. In some types of intra-oral carcinomas, bleomycin was found to be useful in the combined treatment with radiation as follows: 1) A minimum required dose for local control of intra-oral carcinomas could be a combination of 30Gy in 3 weeks and 100mg bleomycin during the same period. 2) Although the end results of patients with carcinoma of tongue or floor of mouth have not been improved by this approach, there was marked improvement in patients with carcinoma of the lower gum. 3) For the treatment, the side effect as limiting factor was mucositis, and none of the cases of the series developed pulmonary complication. In the cases controlled by initial combined treatment, no one developed troubles of the mandible, in the follow-up study for the past 10 years. (author)

  3. Recent advances in chemical imaging technology for the detection of contaminants for food safety and security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priore, Ryan J.; Olkhovyk, Oksana; Drauch, Amy; Treado, Patrick; Kim, Moon; Chao, Kaunglin

    2009-05-01

    The need for routine, non-destructive chemical screening of agricultural products is increasing due to the health hazards to animals and humans associated with intentional and unintentional contamination of foods. Melamine, an industrial additive used to increase flame retardation in the resin industry, has recently been used to increase the apparent protein content of animal feed, of infant formula, as well as powdered and liquid milk in the dairy industry. Such contaminants, even at regulated levels, pose serious health risks. Chemical imaging technology provides the ability to evaluate large volumes of agricultural products before reaching the consumer. In this presentation, recent advances in chemical imaging technology that exploit Raman, fluorescence and near-infrared (NIR) are presented for the detection of contaminants in agricultural products.

  4. Evaluation of C60 secondary ion mass spectrometry for the chemical analysis and imaging of fingerprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisco, Edward; Demoranville, Leonard T; Gillen, Greg

    2013-09-10

    The feasibility of using C60(+) cluster primary ion bombardment secondary ion mass spectrometry (C60(+) SIMS) for the analysis of the chemical composition of fingerprints is evaluated. It was found that C60(+) SIMS could be used to detect and image the spatial localization of a number of sebaceous and eccrine components in fingerprints. These analyses were also found to not be hindered by the use of common latent print powder development techniques. Finally, the ability to monitor the depth distribution of fingerprint constituents was found to be possible - a capability which has not been shown using other chemical imaging techniques. This paper illustrates a number of strengths and potential weaknesses of C60(+) SIMS as an additional or complimentary technique for the chemical analysis of fingerprints.

  5. Chemical imaging with combined fast-scan cyclic voltammetry-scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrock, Daniel S; Baur, John E

    2007-09-15

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is applied to the tip of a scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM) for imaging the distribution of chemical species near a substrate. This approach was used to image the diffusion layer of both a large substrate electrode (3-mm-diameter glassy carbon) and a microelectrode substrate (10-microm-diameter Pt). Additionally, oxygen depletion near living cells was measured and correlated to respiratory activity. Finally, oxygen and hydrogen peroxide were simultaneously detected during the oxidative burst of a zymosan-stimulated macrophage cell. These results demonstrate the utility of FSCV-SECM for chemical imaging when conditions are chosen such that feedback interactions with the substrate are minimal. PMID:17705555

  6. The United States experience in patient dose and image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the United States the Nationwide Evaluation of X-ray Trends (NEXT), a cooperative federal-state survey programme, measures the average radiation air kerma associated with several specific diagnostic X-ray examinations. Chest radiography was surveyed in 1984 and 1986, the abdomen-L/S spine in 1987 and 1989, computed tomography in 1990, and dental radiography in 1993. Since 1984, patient exposure equivalent phantoms have been used for each annual survey. Three examinations, mammography (1985, 1988, 1992); fluoroscopy (1991), and dental radiography (1993) have incorporated image quality test objects. The surveys are comprehensive, collecting data such as screen and film type, whether a grid is used, selected X-ray tube potential, measured beam quality, the measurement of processing speed, and entrance air kerma. The trend in mammography, which has been observed for three separate surveys, shows an overall decrease in the average examination dose during this period of time, while image quality has improved. The main reason for the reduction in dose is the elimination of xerography relative to screen-film mammography. Within screen-film mammography an improvement has been observed in film processing, an improvement in beam quality, and an increase in mean glandular dose for screen-film systems. The fluoroscopy survey showed an average air kerma of 43 Gy.min-1. The image quality evaluation showed 87% of surveyed facilities able to resolve at least the 20 wire mesh (equivalent to 0.8 1p.mm-1); while 51% of facilities had a per cent contrast sensitivity greater than 4%. (Author)

  7. Screening of adulterants in powdered foods and ingredients using line-scan Raman chemical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jianwei; Chao, Kuanglin; Kim, Moon S.

    2015-05-01

    A newly developed line-scan Raman imaging system using a 785 nm line laser was used to authenticate powdered foods and ingredients. The system was used to collect hyperspectral Raman images in a wavenumber range of 102-2865 cm-1 from three representative food powders mixed with selected adulterants with a concentration of 0.5%, including milk and melamine, flour and benzoyl peroxide, and starch and maleic anhydride. An acoustic mixer was used to create food adulterant mixtures. All the mixed samples were placed in sample holders with a surface area of 50 mm×50 mm. Spectral and image processing algorithms were developed based on single-band images at unique Raman peaks of the individual adulterants. Chemical images were created to show identification, spatial distribution, and morphological features of the adulterant particles mixed in the food powders. The potential of estimating mass concentrations of the adulterants using the percentages of the adulterant pixels in the chemical images was also demonstrated.

  8. Moessbauer study of the chemical state of gold in gold ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information on the chemical state of gold in gold ores has been obtained by 197Au Moessbauer spectroscopy in cases where the state of this element cannot be determined by such standard methods as optical or electron microscopy. Ore concentrates consisting mainly of pyrite or arsenopyrite and roasted ore and matte samples were studied. The results yielded directly the respective amounts of metallic and chemically bound gold. Unless the gold is metallic, its chemical state in the ores turns out to be different from that in the minerals studied so far as reference materials. The chemical processes taking place during various treatments of the ores, such as roasting or leaching, can also be followed by Moessbauer spectroscopy. It is hoped that Moessbauer spectroscopy will eventually facilitate the development of more efficient methods of gold extraction

  9. Chemical reactions of ultracold alkali dimers in the lowest-energy $^3\\Sigma$ state

    CERN Document Server

    Tomza, Michał; Moszynski, Robert; Krems, Roman V

    2013-01-01

    We show that the interaction of polar alkali dimers in the quintet spin state leads to the formation of a deeply bound reaction complex. The reaction complex can decompose adiabatically into homonuclear alkali dimers (for all molecules except KRb) and into alkali trimers (for all molecules). We show that there are no barriers for these chemical reactions. This means that all alkali dimers in the $a^3\\Sigma^+$ state are chemically unstable at ultracold temperature, and the use of an optical lattice to segregate the molecules and suppress losses may be necessary. In addition, we calculate the minimum energy path for the chemical reactions of alkali hydrides. We find that the reaction of two molecules is accelerated by a strong attraction between the alkali atoms, leading to a barrierless process that produces hydrogen atoms with large kinetic energy. We discuss the unique features of the chemical reactions of ultracold alkali dimers in the $a^3\\Sigma^+$ electronic state.

  10. Quantitative super-resolution imaging of Bruchpilot distinguishes active zone states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehmann, Nadine; van de Linde, Sebastian; Alon, Amit; Ljaschenko, Dmitrij; Keung, Xi Zhen; Holm, Thorge; Rings, Annika; DiAntonio, Aaron; Hallermann, Stefan; Ashery, Uri; Heckmann, Manfred; Sauer, Markus; Kittel, Robert J

    2014-08-18

    The precise molecular architecture of synaptic active zones (AZs) gives rise to different structural and functional AZ states that fundamentally shape chemical neurotransmission. However, elucidating the nanoscopic protein arrangement at AZs is impeded by the diffraction-limited resolution of conventional light microscopy. Here we introduce new approaches to quantify endogenous protein organization at single-molecule resolution in situ with super-resolution imaging by direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM). Focusing on the Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ), we find that the AZ cytomatrix (CAZ) is composed of units containing ~137 Bruchpilot (Brp) proteins, three quarters of which are organized into about 15 heptameric clusters. We test for a quantitative relationship between CAZ ultrastructure and neurotransmitter release properties by engaging Drosophila mutants and electrophysiology. Our results indicate that the precise nanoscopic organization of Brp distinguishes different physiological AZ states and link functional diversification to a heretofore unrecognized neuronal gradient of the CAZ ultrastructure.

  11. Steady-state properties of a finite system driven by a chemical-potential gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jørgen Vitting; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    1990-01-01

    A two-dimensional lattice-gas model with repulsive interactions periodically infinite in one dimension and finite in the other is driven into a mass-transporting steady state by asymmetric chemical potentials applied at the open edges. By computer-simulation techniques the steady-state current...

  12. Analysis of pharmaceutical pellets: An approach using near-infrared chemical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabin, Guilherme P.; Breitkreitz, Marcia C.; Souza, Andre M. de [Institute of Chemistry, University of Campinas, P.O. Box 6154, 13084-971 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Fonseca, Patricia da; Calefe, Lupercio; Moffa, Mario [Zelus Servicos para Industria Farmaceutica Ltda., Av. Professor Lineu Prestes n. 2242, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Poppi, Ronei J., E-mail: ronei@iqm.unicamp.br [Institute of Chemistry, University of Campinas, P.O. Box 6154, 13084-971 Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2011-11-07

    Highlights: {yields} Near-Infrared Chemical Imaging was used for pellets analysis. {yields} Distribution of the components throughout the coatings layers and core of the pellets was estimated. {yields} Classical Least Squares (CLS) was used for calculation of the concentration maps. - Abstract: Pharmaceutical pellets are spherical or nearly spherical multi-unit dosage forms designed to optimize pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics features of drug release. The distribution of the pharmaceutical ingredients in the layers and core is a very important parameter for appropriate drug release, especially for pellets manufactured by the process of layer gain. Physical aspects of the sample are normally evaluated by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), but it is in many cases unsuitable to provide conclusive chemical information about the distribution of the pharmaceutical ingredients in both layers and core. On the other hand, methods based on spectroscopic imaging can be very promising for this purpose. In this work, a Near-Infrared Chemical Imaging (NIR-CI) method was developed and applied to the analysis of diclophenac sodium pellets. Since all the compounds present in the sample were known in advance, Classical Least Squares (CLS) was used for calculations. The results have shown that the method was capable of providing chemical information about the distribution of the active ingredient and excipients in the core and coating layers and therefore can be complementary to SEM for the pharmaceutical development of pellets.

  13. A Raman chemical imaging system for detection of contaminants in food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Kaunglin; Qin, Jianwei; Kim, Moon S.; Mo, Chang Yeon

    2011-06-01

    This study presented a preliminary investigation into the use of macro-scale Raman chemical imaging for the screening of dry milk powder for the presence of chemical contaminants. Melamine was mixed into dry milk at concentrations (w/w) of 0.2%, 0.5%, 1.0%, 2.0%, 5.0%, and 10.0% and images of the mixtures were analyzed by a spectral information divergence algorithm. Ammonium sulfate, dicyandiamide, and urea were each separately mixed into dry milk at concentrations of (w/w) of 0.5%, 1.0%, and 5.0%, and an algorithm based on self-modeling mixture analysis was applied to these sample images. The contaminants were successfully detected and the spatial distribution of the contaminants within the sample mixtures was visualized using these algorithms. Although further studies are necessary, macro-scale Raman chemical imaging shows promise for use in detecting contaminants in food ingredients and may also be useful for authentication of food ingredients.

  14. Investigation of the composition of anabolic tablets using near infrared spectroscopy and Raman chemical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebiere, Hervé; Ghyselinck, Céline; Lempereur, Laurent; Brenier, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    The use of performance enhancing drugs is a widespread phenomenon in professional and leisure sports. A spectroscopic study was carried out on anabolic tablets labelled as 5 mg methandienone tablets provided by police departments. The analytical approach was based on a two-step methodology: a fast analysis of tablets using near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy to assess sample homogeneity based on their global composition, followed by Raman chemical imaging of one sample per NIR profile to obtain information on sample formulation. NIR spectroscopy assisted by a principal components analysis (PCA) enabled fast discrimination of different profiles based on the excipient formulation. Raman hyperspectral imaging and multivariate curve resolution - alternating least square (MCR-ALS) provided chemical images of the distribution of the active substance and excipients within tablets and facilitated identification of the active compounds. The combination of NIR spectroscopy and Raman chemical imaging highlighted dose-to-dose variations and succeeded in the discrimination of four different formulations out of eight similar samples of anabolic tablets. Some samples contained either methandienone or methyltestosterone whereas one sample did not contain an active substance. Other ingredients were sucrose, lactose, starch or talc. Both techniques were fast and non-destructive and therefore can be carried out as exploratory methods prior to destructive screening methods. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Investigation of the composition of anabolic tablets using near infrared spectroscopy and Raman chemical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebiere, Hervé; Ghyselinck, Céline; Lempereur, Laurent; Brenier, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    The use of performance enhancing drugs is a widespread phenomenon in professional and leisure sports. A spectroscopic study was carried out on anabolic tablets labelled as 5 mg methandienone tablets provided by police departments. The analytical approach was based on a two-step methodology: a fast analysis of tablets using near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy to assess sample homogeneity based on their global composition, followed by Raman chemical imaging of one sample per NIR profile to obtain information on sample formulation. NIR spectroscopy assisted by a principal components analysis (PCA) enabled fast discrimination of different profiles based on the excipient formulation. Raman hyperspectral imaging and multivariate curve resolution - alternating least square (MCR-ALS) provided chemical images of the distribution of the active substance and excipients within tablets and facilitated identification of the active compounds. The combination of NIR spectroscopy and Raman chemical imaging highlighted dose-to-dose variations and succeeded in the discrimination of four different formulations out of eight similar samples of anabolic tablets. Some samples contained either methandienone or methyltestosterone whereas one sample did not contain an active substance. Other ingredients were sucrose, lactose, starch or talc. Both techniques were fast and non-destructive and therefore can be carried out as exploratory methods prior to destructive screening methods. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26198290

  16. Shock-induced solid-state chemical reactivity studies using time-resolved radiation pyrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time-resolved radiation pyrometry has been used to study materials which undergo solid-state chemical reactions due to shock loading. Shock-induced chemical reactivity in solids is fundamentally different than that in high explosives and other energetic materials because, if no volatiles are present, the reaction products end up in the condensed, rather than the vapor, state. Bulk property changes accompanying the solid-state reactions may therefore be too small to be observable with wave profile or shock-velocity measurements. However, some solid-state reactions, such as that between metallic nickel and aluminum, are exothermic enough to give rise to a measurable increase in temperature, so pyrometry can be used to detect the reactions. Unfortunately, these measurements are complicated by the large temperature increases generated by other sources. Possible mechanisms for generation of these high temperatures, and their effect on the chemical reaction, are suggested

  17. Application and further development of diffusion based 2D chemical imaging techniques in the rhizosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefer, Christoph; Santner, Jakob; Borisov, Sergey; Kreuzeder, Andreas; Wenzel, Walter; Puschenreiter, Markus

    2015-04-01

    Two dimensional chemical imaging of root processes refers to novel in situ methods to investigate and map solutes at a high spatial resolution (sub-mm). The visualization of these solutes reveals new insights in soil biogeochemistry and root processes. We derive chemical images by using data from DGT-LA-ICP-MS (Diffusive Gradients in Thin Films and Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry) and POS (Planar Optode Sensors). Both technologies have shown promising results when applied in aqueous environment but need to be refined and improved for imaging at the soil-plant interface. Co-localized mapping using combined DGT and POS technologies and the development of new gel combinations are in our focus. DGTs are smart and thin (resin for the targeted analytes (e.g. trace metals, phosphate, sulphide or radionuclides). The measurement principle is passive and diffusion based. The present analytes are diffusing into the gel and are bound by the resin. Thereby, the resin acts as zero sink. After application, DGTs are retrieved, dried, and analysed using LA-ICP-MS. The data is then normalized by an internal standard (e.g. 13C), calibrated using in-house standards and chemical images of the target area are plotted using imaging software. POS are, similar to DGT, thin sensor foils containing a fluorophore coating depending on the target analyte. The measurement principle is based on excitation of the flourophore by a specific wavelength and emission of the fluorophore depending on the presence of the analyte. The emitted signal is captured using optical filters and a DSLR camera. While DGT analysis is destructive, POS measurements can be performed continuously during the application. Both semi-quantitative techniques allow an in situ application to visualize chemical processes directly at the soil-plant interface. Here, we present a summary of results from rhizotron experiments with different plants in metal contaminated and agricultural soils.

  18. Hierarchy of Electronic Properties of Chemically Derived and Pristine Graphene Probed by Microwave Imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Kundhikanjana, Worasom

    2009-11-11

    Local electrical imaging using microwave impedance microscope is performed on graphene in different modalities, yielding a rich hierarchy of the local conductivity. The low-conductivity graphite oxide and its derivatives show significant electronic inhomogeneity. For the conductive chemical graphene, the residual defects lead to a systematic reduction of the microwave signals. In contrast, the signals on pristine graphene agree well with a lumped-element circuit model. The local impedance information can also be used to verify the electrical contact between overlapped graphene pieces. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  19. Time-resolved imaging of purely valence-electron dynamics during a chemical reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hockett, Paul; Bisgaard, Christer Z.; Clarkin, Owen J.;

    2011-01-01

    Chemical reactions are manifestations of the dynamics of molecular valence electrons and their couplings to atomic motions. Emerging methods in attosecond science can probe purely electronic dynamics in atomic and molecular systems(1-6). By contrast, time-resolved structural-dynamics methods......,17): in both cases, this sensitivity derives from the ionization-matrix element(18,19). Here we demonstrate a time-resolved molecular-frame photoelectron-angular-distribution (TRMFPAD) method for imaging the purely valence-electron dynamics during a chemical reaction. Specifically, the TRMFPADs measured during...

  20. Infrared chemical imaging: Spatial resolution evaluation and super-resolution concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Offroy, Marc [Laboratoire de Spectrochimie Infrarouge et Raman, LASIR, CNRS UMR 8516, Bat. C5, Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Roggo, Yves [F. Hoffmann-La Roche A.G., Basel (Switzerland); Milanfar, Peyman [Multi-Dimensional Signal Processing Laboratory, Electrical Engineering Department, Baskin School of Engineering, University of California, 1156 High Street, Mailcode SOE2, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Duponchel, Ludovic, E-mail: ludovic.duponchel@univ-lille1.fr [Laboratoire de Spectrochimie Infrarouge et Raman, LASIR, CNRS UMR 8516, Bat. C5, Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)

    2010-08-03

    Chemical imaging systems help to solve many challenges in various scientific fields. Able to deliver rapid spatial and chemical information, modern infrared spectrometers using Focal Plane Array detectors (FPA) are of great interest. Considering conventional infrared spectrometers with a single element detector, we can consider that the diffraction-limited spatial resolution is more or less equal to the wavelength of the light (i.e. 2.5-25 {mu}m). Unfortunately, the spatial resolution of FPA spectroscopic setup is even lower due to the detector pixel size. This becomes a real constraint when micron-sized samples are analysed. New chemometrics methods are thus of great interest to overcome such resolution drawback, while keeping our far-field infrared imaging spectrometers. The aim of the present work is to evaluate the super-resolution concept in order to increase the spatial resolution of infrared imaging spectrometers using FPA detectors. The main idea of super-resolution is the fusion of several low-resolution images of the same sample to obtain a higher-resolution image. Applying the super-resolution concept on a relatively low number of FPA acquisitions, it was possible to observe a 30% decrease in spatial resolution.

  1. Estimation and characterization of physical and inorganic chemical indicators of water quality by using SAR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shareef, Muntadher A.; Toumi, Abdelmalek; Khenchaf, Ali

    2015-10-01

    Recently, remote sensing is considering one of the most important tools in studies of water scattering and water characterization. Traditional methods for monitoring pollutants depended on optical satellite rather than Radar data. Thus, many of Water Quality Parameters (WQP) from optical imagery are still limited. In this paper, a new approach based on the TerraSAR-X images has been presented which it is used to map the region of interest and to estimate physical and chemical WQPs. This approach based on a Small Perturbation Model (SPM) for the electromagnetic scattering is applied by using the Elfouhaily spectrum. A series of inversions have been included in this model started by finding the reflectivity from backscattering coefficients which are calculated from SAR images. Another inversion has been applied to find dielectric constant from the calculation models of the reflectivity (in HH and VV polarizations). Then, a Stogryn Debye formulation has been used to estimate temperature and salinity of water surface from SAR images. After many derivations we got a new model able to estimate temperature and salinity directly from backscattering coefficients obtained from radar images. Inorganic chemical parameters which are represented by Total Dissolved Salts (TDS) and the Electrical Conductivity (EC) are estimated directly from salinity. A tow dataset of instu data have been used to validate this work. The validation included a comparison between parameters measured in situ and those estimated from Terra SAR-X image.

  2. Visualization of electrochemically driven solid-state phase transformations using operando hard X-ray spectro-imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Linsen; Chen-Wiegart, Yu-chen Karen; Wang, Jiajun; Gao, Peng; Ding, Qi; Yu, Young-Sang; Wang, Feng; Cabana, Jordi; Wang, Jun; Jin, Song

    2015-01-01

    In situ techniques with high temporal, spatial and chemical resolution are key to understand ubiquitous solid-state phase transformations, which are crucial to many technological applications. Hard X-ray spectro-imaging can visualize electrochemically driven phase transformations but demands considerably large samples with strong absorption signal so far. Here we show a conceptually new data analysis method to enable operando visualization of mechanistically relevant weakly absorbing samples ...

  3. Image potential states mediated STM imaging of cobalt phthalocyanine on NaCl/Cu(100)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qinmin, Guo; Zhihui, Qin; Min, Huang; Vladimir, N. Mantsevich; Gengyu, Cao

    2016-03-01

    The adsorption and electronic properties of isolated cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPc) molecule on an ultrathin layer of NaCl have been investigated. High-resolution STM images give a detailed picture of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of an isolated CoPc. It is shown that the NaCl ultrathin layer efficiently decouples the interaction of the molecules from the underneath metal substrate, which makes it an ideal substrate for studying the properties of single molecules. Moreover, strong dependence of the appearance of the molecules on the sample bias in the region of relatively high bias (> 3.1 V) is ascribed to the image potential states (IPSs) of NaCl/Cu(100), which may provide us with a possible method to fabricate quantum storage devices. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 21203239 and 21311120059) and RFBR (Grant No. 13-02-91180).

  4. The state of the art of fetal magnetic resonance imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Yuan; LUO Bo-ning

    2006-01-01

    Objective To assess the state of the art of fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in China.Data sources Both Chinese and English language literatures were searched in the databases of PUBMED(1998-2005) and CNKI (1998-2005), 41 published articles about fetal MRI were selected.Results Fetal MRI can serve as an adjunct tool for ultrasonography because of its excellent soft tissue contrast,high spatial resolution, multiplanar capabilities, large field of view and simultaneous visualization of fetal andmaternal structures. Since the development of ultrafast MRI sequences provides faster scan time and avoidsmotion artifacts, it is widely applied in detecting normal or abnormal fetal development, including the centralnervous system, thoracic region, abdomen and others. In China, experience in fetal MRI has been scanty, but thetechnique will be extensively used in the near future because of its multi-faceted advantages.Conclusions Compared with ultrasonography, MRI as a complementary imaging for fetal screening isprospective in China or other parts of the world because of its multiple superiorities.

  5. DPABI: Data Processing & Analysis for (Resting-State) Brain Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chao-Gan; Wang, Xin-Di; Zuo, Xi-Nian; Zang, Yu-Feng

    2016-07-01

    Brain imaging efforts are being increasingly devoted to decode the functioning of the human brain. Among neuroimaging techniques, resting-state fMRI (R-fMRI) is currently expanding exponentially. Beyond the general neuroimaging analysis packages (e.g., SPM, AFNI and FSL), REST and DPARSF were developed to meet the increasing need of user-friendly toolboxes for R-fMRI data processing. To address recently identified methodological challenges of R-fMRI, we introduce the newly developed toolbox, DPABI, which was evolved from REST and DPARSF. DPABI incorporates recent research advances on head motion control and measurement standardization, thus allowing users to evaluate results using stringent control strategies. DPABI also emphasizes test-retest reliability and quality control of data processing. Furthermore, DPABI provides a user-friendly pipeline analysis toolkit for rat/monkey R-fMRI data analysis to reflect the rapid advances in animal imaging. In addition, DPABI includes preprocessing modules for task-based fMRI, voxel-based morphometry analysis, statistical analysis and results viewing. DPABI is designed to make data analysis require fewer manual operations, be less time-consuming, have a lower skill requirement, a smaller risk of inadvertent mistakes, and be more comparable across studies. We anticipate this open-source toolbox will assist novices and expert users alike and continue to support advancing R-fMRI methodology and its application to clinical translational studies.

  6. Biochemical imaging of cervical intervertebral discs with glycosaminoglycan chemical exchange saturation transfer magnetic resonance imaging: feasibility and initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleich, Christoph; Mueller-Lutz, Anja; Zimmermann, Lisa; Boos, Johannes; Wittsack, Hans-Joerg; Antoch, Gerald; Miese, Falk [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Dusseldorf (Germany); Schmitt, Benjamin [Siemens Ltd. Australia, Healthcare Sector, Macquarie Park, NSW (Australia)

    2016-01-15

    To evaluate glycosaminoglycan chemical exchange saturation transfer (gagCEST) imaging at 3T in the assessment of the GAG content of cervical IVDs in healthy volunteers. Forty-two cervical intervertebral discs of seven healthy volunteers (four females, three males; mean age: 21.4 ± 1.4 years; range: 19-24 years) were examined at a 3T MRI scanner in this prospective study. The MRI protocol comprised standard morphological, sagittal T2 weighted (T2w) images to assess the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based grading system for cervical intervertebral disc degeneration (IVD) and biochemical imaging with gagCEST to calculate a region-of-interest analysis of nucleus pulposus (NP) and annulus fibrosus (AF). GagCEST of cervical IVDs was technically successful at 3T with significant higher gagCEST values in NP compared to AF (1.17 % ± 1.03 % vs. 0.79 % ± 1.75 %; p = 0.005). We found topological differences of gagCEST values of the cervical spine with significant higher gagCEST effects in lower IVDs (r = 1; p = 0). We could demonstrate a significant, negative correlation between gagCEST values and cervical disc degeneration of NP (r = -0.360; p = 0.019). Non-degenerated IVDs had significantly higher gagCEST effects compared to degenerated IVDs in NP (1.76 % ± 0.92 % vs. 0.52 % ± 1.17 %; p < 0.001). Biochemical imaging of cervical IVDs is feasible at 3T. GagCEST analysis demonstrated a topological GAG distribution of the cervical spine. The depletion of GAG in the NP with increasing level of morphological degeneration can be assessed using gagCEST imaging. (orig.)

  7. Stimulated Raman scattering detection for chemically specific time-resolved imaging of gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, Eynas; Gren, Per; Edenharder, Stefan; Sjödahl, Mikael

    2016-05-01

    A stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) imaging technique based on spatial modulation of the pump beam has been used to study gases. The SRS gain signal was separated from the Stokes beam background in the spatial frequency domain. The SRS signal shows linear behaviour with the gas pressure at a range from 1.0 to 8.0 bars. The signal is linearly proportional to the pump beam intensity while it is enhanced with increasing the Stokes beam intensity to a certain limit than it saturates. Further, the chemical specificity of the technique has been investigated. Two sharp peaks with line width at half maximum of about 0.30 nm have been obtained at Stokes beam wavelengths of 629.93 nm and 634.05 nm corresponding to the methane and ethylene gases, respectively. The results show that SRS imaging is a promising technique to provide chemical specificity as well as spatial and temporal information of gaseous species. PMID:27137608

  8. A versatile toolbox for posttranscriptional chemical labeling and imaging of RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Anupam A.; Tanpure, Arun A.; Mukherjee, Progya P.; Athavale, Soumitra; Kelkar, Ashwin; Galande, Sanjeev; Srivatsan, Seergazhi G.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular RNA labeling strategies based on bioorthogonal chemical reactions are much less developed in comparison to glycan, protein and DNA due to its inherent instability and lack of effective methods to introduce bioorthogonal reactive functionalities (e.g. azide) into RNA. Here we report the development of a simple and modular posttranscriptional chemical labeling and imaging technique for RNA by using a novel toolbox comprised of azide-modified UTP analogs. These analogs facilitate the enzymatic incorporation of azide groups into RNA, which can be posttranscriptionally labeled with a variety of probes by click and Staudinger reactions. Importantly, we show for the first time the specific incorporation of azide groups into cellular RNA by endogenous RNA polymerases, which enabled the imaging of newly transcribing RNA in fixed and in live cells by click reactions. This labeling method is practical and provides a new platform to study RNA in vitro and in cells. PMID:26384420

  9. Soft x-ray spectroscopy for probing electronic and chemical states of battery materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanli, Yang; Ruimin, Qiao

    2016-01-01

    The formidable challenge of developing high-performance battery system stems from the complication of battery operations, both mechanically and electronically. In the electrodes and at the electrode-electrolyte interfaces, chemical reactions take place with evolving electron states. In addition to the extensive studies of material synthesis, electrochemical, structural, and mechanical properties, soft x-ray spectroscopy provides unique opportunities for revealing the critical electron states in batteries. This review discusses some of the recent soft x-ray spectroscopic results on battery binder, transition-metal based positive electrodes, and the solid-electrolyte-interphase. By virtue of soft x-ray’s sensitivity to electron states, the electronic property, the redox during electrochemical operations, and the chemical species of the interphases could be fingerprinted by soft x-ray spectroscopy. Understanding and innovating battery technologies need a multimodal approach, and soft x-ray spectroscopy is one of the incisive tools to probe the chemical and physical evolutions in batteries.

  10. [Relationship among soil enzyme activities, vegetation state, and soil chemical properties of coal cinder yard].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Youbao; Zhang, Li; Liu, Dengyi

    2003-01-01

    From field investigation and laboratory analysis, the relationships among soil enzyme activities, vegetation state and soil chemical properties of coal cinder yard in thermal power station were studied. The results showed that vegetation on coal cinder yard was distributed in scattered patch mainly with single species of plant, and herbs were the dominant species. At the same time, the activity of three soil enzymes had a stronger relativity to environment conditions, such as vegetation state and soil chemical properties. The sensitivity of three soil enzymes to environmental stress was in order of urease > sucrase > catalase. The relativity of three soil enzymes to environmental factor was in order of sucrase > urease > catalase. Because of urease being the most susceptible enzyme to environmental conditions, and it was marked or utmost marked interrelated with vegetation state and soil chemical properties, urease activity could be used as an indicator for the reclamation of wasteland.

  11. Real time chemical imaging of a working catalytic membrane reactor during oxidative coupling of methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vamvakeros, A; Jacques, S D M; Middelkoop, V; Di Michiel, M; Egan, C K; Ismagilov, I Z; Vaughan, G B M; Gallucci, F; van Sint Annaland, M; Shearing, P R; Cernik, R J; Beale, A M

    2015-08-18

    We report the results from an operando XRD-CT study of a working catalytic membrane reactor for the oxidative coupling of methane. These results reveal the importance of the evolving solid state chemistry during catalytic reaction, particularly the chemical interaction between the catalyst and the oxygen transport membrane.

  12. Image optimization for chemical species tomography with an irregular and sparse beam array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-speed tomographic imaging of hostile engineering processes using absorption-based measurements presents a number of difficulties. In some cases, these challenges include severe limitations on the number of available measurement paths through the subject and the process of designing the geometrical arrangement of these paths for best imaging performance. This paper considers the case of a chemical species tomography system based on near-IR spectroscopic absorption measurements, intended for application to one cylinder of a multi-cylinder production engine. Some of the results, however, are also applicable to other hard-field tomographic modalities in applications where similar constraints may be encountered. A hitherto unreported design criterion is presented for optimal beam geometry for imaging performance, resulting in an irregular array with only 27 measurement paths through the subject for the engine application. Image reconstruction for this severely limited geometry is considered at length, using both simulated and experimental phantom data. Novel methods are presented for the practical generation of gaseous phantoms for calibration and testing of the system. The propane absorption coefficient at 1700 nm is measured. Quantitative imaging of propane plumes in air is demonstrated, showing good localization of circular plumes with diameter as small as 1/5 of the subject diameter and excellent imaging of multiple plumes

  13. Raman imaging to study structural and chemical features of the dentin enamel junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alebrahim, M. Anwar; Krafft, C.; Popp, J.

    2015-10-01

    The structure and chemical features of the human dentin enamel junction (DEJ) were characterized using Raman spectroscopic imaging. Slices were prepared from 10 German, and 10 Turkish teeth. Raman images were collected at 785 nm excitation and the average Raman spectra were calculated for analysis. Univariate and multivariate spectral analysis were applied for investigation. Raman images were obtained based on the intensity ratios of CH at 1450 cm-1 (matrix) to phosphate at 960 cm-1 (mineral), and carbonate to phosphate (1070/960) ratios. Different algorithms (HCA, K-means cluster and VCA) also used to study the DEJ. The obtained results showed that the width of DEJ is about 5 pm related to univariate method while it varies from 6 to 12 μm based on multivariate spectral technique. Both spectral analyses showed increasing in carbonate content inside the DEJ compared to the dentin, and the amide I (collagen) peak in dentin spectra is higher than DEJ spectra peak.

  14. Two decades of chemical imaging of solutes in sediments and soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santner, Jakob; Larsen, Morten; Kreuzeder, Andreas;

    2015-01-01

    The increasing appreciation of the small-scale (sub-mm) heterogeneity of biogeochemical processes in sediments, wetlands and soils has led to the development of several methods for high-resolution two-dimensional imaging of solute distribution in porewaters. Over the past decades, localised...... understanding of biogeochemical processes regulating the distribution of key elements and solutes including O2, CO2, pH, redox conditions as well as nutrient and contaminant ion species in structurally complex soils and sediments. Recently these methods have been applied in parallel or integrated as so......-called sandwich sensors for multianalyte measurements. Here we review the capabilities and limitations of the chemical imaging methods that are currently at hand, using a number of case studies, and provide an outlook on potential future developments for two-dimensional solute imaging in soils and sediments....

  15. Catalytic activity of platinum on ruthenium electrodes with modified (electro)chemical states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung-Won; Sung, Yung-Eun

    2005-07-21

    Using Pt on Ru thin-film electrodes with various (electro)chemical states designed by the sputtering method, the effect of Ru states on the catalytic activity of Pt was investigated. The chemical and electrochemical properties of Pt/Ru thin-film samples were confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and cyclic voltammetry. In addition, Pt nanoparticles on Ru metal or oxide for an actual fuel cell system showed an effect of Ru states on the catalytic activity of Pt in methanol electrooxidation. Finally, it was concluded that such an enhancement of methanol electrooxidation on the Pt is responsible for Ru metallic and/or oxidation sites compared to pure Pt without any Ru state. PMID:16852701

  16. Chemical exchange saturation transfer MR imaging of Parkinson's disease at 3 Tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To demonstrate the feasibility of using chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging to detect Parkinson's disease (PD) in patients at 3 Tesla. Twenty-seven PD patients (17 men and 10 women; age range, 54-77 years) and 22 age-matched normal controls (13 men and 9 women; age range, 55-73 years) were examined on a 3-Tesla MRI system. Magnetization transfer spectra with 31 different frequency offsets (-6 to 6 ppm) were acquired at two transverse slices of the head, including the basal ganglia and midbrain. One-way analysis of variance tests was used to compare the differences in CEST imaging signals between PD patients and normal controls. Total CEST signal between the offsets of 0 and 4 ppm in the substantia nigra was significantly lower in PD patients than in normal controls (P = 0.006), which could be associated with the loss of dopaminergic neurons. Protein-based CEST imaging signals at the offset of 3.5 ppm in the globus pallidus, putamen and caudate were significantly increased in PD patients, compared to normal controls (P < 0.001, P = 0.003, P < 0.001, respectively). CEST imaging signals could potentially serve as imaging biomarkers to aid in the non-invasive molecular diagnosis of PD. (orig.)

  17. Chemical exchange saturation transfer MR imaging of Parkinson's disease at 3 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chunmei; Peng, Shuai; Wang, Rui; Chen, Min [Beijing Hospital, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Chen, Haibo; Su, Wen [Beijing Hospital, Department of Neurology, Beijing (China); Zhao, Xuna [Peking University, Center for MRI Research and Beijing City Key Lab for Medical Physics and Engineering, Beijing (China); Zhou, Jinyuan [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-10-15

    To demonstrate the feasibility of using chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging to detect Parkinson's disease (PD) in patients at 3 Tesla. Twenty-seven PD patients (17 men and 10 women; age range, 54-77 years) and 22 age-matched normal controls (13 men and 9 women; age range, 55-73 years) were examined on a 3-Tesla MRI system. Magnetization transfer spectra with 31 different frequency offsets (-6 to 6 ppm) were acquired at two transverse slices of the head, including the basal ganglia and midbrain. One-way analysis of variance tests was used to compare the differences in CEST imaging signals between PD patients and normal controls. Total CEST signal between the offsets of 0 and 4 ppm in the substantia nigra was significantly lower in PD patients than in normal controls (P = 0.006), which could be associated with the loss of dopaminergic neurons. Protein-based CEST imaging signals at the offset of 3.5 ppm in the globus pallidus, putamen and caudate were significantly increased in PD patients, compared to normal controls (P < 0.001, P = 0.003, P < 0.001, respectively). CEST imaging signals could potentially serve as imaging biomarkers to aid in the non-invasive molecular diagnosis of PD. (orig.)

  18. Multiple repetition time balanced steady-state free precession imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukur, Tolga; Nishimura, Dwight G

    2009-07-01

    Although balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) imaging yields high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) efficiency, the bright lipid signal is often undesirable. The bSSFP spectrum can be shaped to suppress the fat signal with scan-efficient alternating repetition time (ATR) bSSFP. However, the level of suppression is limited, and the pass-band is narrow due to its nonuniform shape. A multiple repetition time (TR) bSSFP scheme is proposed that creates a broad stop-band with a scan efficiency comparable with ATR-SSFP. Furthermore, the pass-band signal uniformity is improved, resulting in fewer shading/banding artifacts. When data acquisition occurs in more than a single TR within the multiple-TR period, the echoes can be combined to significantly improve the level of suppression. The signal characteristics of the proposed technique were compared with bSSFP and ATR-SSFP. The multiple-TR method generates identical contrast to bSSFP, and achieves up to an order of magnitude higher stop-band suppression than ATR-SSFP. In vivo studies at 1.5 T and 3 T demonstrate the superior fat-suppression performance of multiple-TR bSSFP.

  19. Determining titan's spin state from cassini radar images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiles, B.W.; Kirk, R.L.; Lorenz, R.D.; Hensley, S.; Lee, E.; Ostro, S.J.; Allison, M.D.; Callahan, P.S.; Gim, Y.; Iess, L.; Del Marmo, P.P.; Hamilton, G.; Johnson, W.T.K.; West, R.D.

    2008-01-01

    For some 19 areas of Titan's surface, the Cassini RADAR instrument has obtained synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images during two different flybys. The time interval between flybys varies from several weeks to two years. We have used the apparent misregistration (by 10-30 km) of features between separate flybys to construct a refined model of Titan's spin state, estimating six parameters: north pole right ascension and declination, spin rate, and these quantities' first time derivatives We determine a pole location with right ascension of 39.48 degrees and declination of 83.43 degrees corresponding to a 0.3 degree obliquity. We determine the spin rate to be 22.5781 deg day -1 or 0.001 deg day-1 faster than the synchronous spin rate. Our estimated corrections to the pole and spin rate exceed their corresponding standard errors by factors of 80 and 8, respectively. We also found that the rate of change in the pole right ascension is -30 deg century-1, ten times faster than right ascension rate of change for the orbit normal. The spin rate is increasing at a rate of 0.05 deg day -1 per century. We observed no significant change in pole declination over the period for which we have data. Applying our pole correction reduces the feature misregistration from tens of km to 3 km. Applying the spin rate and derivative corrections further reduces the misregistration to 1.2 km. ?? 2008. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.

  20. A Potential Magnetic Resonance Imaging Technique Based on Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer for In Vivo γ-Aminobutyric Acid Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Gen; Zhang, Tao; Dai, Zhuozhi; Yi, Meizhi; Jia, Yanlong; Nie, Tingting; Zhang, Handi; Xiao, Gang; Wu, Renhua

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We developed a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique based on chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) for GABA imaging and investigated the concentration-dependent CEST effect ofGABA in a rat model of brain tumor with blood—brain barrier (BBB) disruption. Materials and Methods All MRI studies were performed using a 7.0-T Agilent MRI scanner. Z-spectra for GABA were acquired at 7.0 T, 37°C, and a pH of 7.0 using varying B1 amplitudes. CEST images of phantoms with different concentrations of GABA solutions (pH, 7.0) and other metabolites (glutamine, myoinositol, creatinine, and choline) were collected to investigate the concentration-dependent CEST effect of GABA and the potential contribution from other brain metabolites. CEST maps for GABA in rat brains with tumors were collected at baseline and 50 min, 1.5 h, and 2.0 h after the injection of GABA solution. Results The CEST effect of GABA was observed at approximately 2.75 parts per million(ppm) downfield from bulk water, and this effect increased with an increase in the B1 amplitude and remained steady after the B1 amplitude reached 6.0 μT (255 Hz). The CEST effect of GABA was proportional to the GABA concentration in vitro. CEST imaging of GABA in a rat brain with a tumor and compromised BBB showed a gradual increase in the CEST effect after GABA injection. Conclusion The findings of this study demonstrate the feasibility and potential of CEST MRI with the optimal B1 amplitude, which exhibits excellent spatial and temporal resolutions, to map changes in GABA. PMID:27711138

  1. The chemical state of arsenic in minerals of environmental interest--an XPS and an XAES study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atzei, Davide; Da Pelo, Stefania; Elsener, Bernhard; Fantauzzi, Marzia; Frau, Franco; Pierfranco, Lattanzi; Rossi, Antonella

    2003-01-01

    A systematic analytical study using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray induced Auger electron spectroscopy (XAES) has been carried out to characterize the chemical state of arsenic in complex environmental samples. The conventional approach, which relies on the chemical shift of the core levels As3d, provides ambiguous results in determining the chemical environment of arsenic. A more accurate approach, based on the Auger parameter and on the Wagner (Chemical State) plot, which combines AsLMM kinetic energy and As3d binding energy, was adopted. This novel method for determining the chemical state of arsenic was employed to completely characterize arsenic in complex environmental samples.

  2. Inferring the unobserved chemical state of the atmosphere: idealized data assimilation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knote, C. J.; Barré, J.; Eckl, M.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Wiedinmyer, C.; Emmons, L. K.; Orlando, J. J.; Tyndall, G. S.; Arellano, A. F.

    2015-12-01

    Chemical data assimilation in numerical models of the atmosphere is a venture into uncharted territory, into a world populated by a vast zoo of chemical compounds with strongly non-linear interactions. Commonly assimilated observations exist for only a selected few of those key gas phase compounds (CO, O3, NO2), and assimilating those in models assuming linearity begs the question of: To what extent we can infer the remainder to create a new state of the atmosphere that is chemically sound and optimal? In our work we present the first systematic investigation of sensitivities that exist between chemical compounds under varying ambient conditions in order to inform scientists on the potential pitfalls when assimilating single/few chemical compounds into complex 3D chemistry transport models. In order to do this, we developed a box-modeling tool (BOXMOX) based on the Kinetic PreProcessor (KPP, http://people.cs.vt.edu/~asandu/Software/Kpp/) in which we can conduct simulations with a suite of 'mechanisms', sets of differential equations describing atmospheric photochemistry. The box modeling approach allows us to sample a large variety of atmospheric conditions (urban, rural, biogenically dominated, biomass burning plumes) to capture the range of chemical conditions that typically exist in the atmosphere. Included in our suite are 'lumped' mechanisms typically used in regional and global chemistry transport models (MOZART, RACM, RADM2, SAPRC99, CB05, CBMZ) as well as the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM, U. Leeds). We will use an Observing System Simulation Experiment approach with the MCM prediction as 'nature' or 'true' state, assimilating idealized synthetic observations (from MCM) into the different ‚lumped' mechanisms under various environments. Two approaches to estimate the sensitivity of the chemical system will be compared: 1) adjoint: using Jacobians computed by KPP and 2) ensemble: by perturbing emissions, temperature, photolysis rates, entrainment, etc., in

  3. Comparative performance studies between tunable filter and push-broom chemical imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinen, Jouko; Saari, Heikki; Kemeny, Gabor; Shi, Zhenqi; Anderson, Carl

    2010-04-01

    This paper reports instrument characterization measurements, which were recently arranged to provide comparative information on different hyperspectral chemical imaging systems. Three different instruments were studied covering both tunable filter and push-broom techniques: The first instrument MatrixNIRTM is based on a LCTF tunable filter and InGaAs camera and covers wavelengths from 1000 to 1700 nm. The second one SisuCHEMATM is based on push-broom technology and MCT camera operating from 1000 to 2500 nm. The third system is an instrument prototype from VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland exploiting high speed Fabry-Perot interferometer and MCT camera, currently calibrated from 1260 to 2500 nm. The characterization procedure was designed to study instrumental noise, signal-to-noise ratio, linearity and spectral as well as spatial resolution. Finally, a pharmaceutical tablet sample was measured with each instrument to demonstrate speed of measurement in a typical application. In spite of differences in wavelength ranges and camera technologies used, the results provide interesting information on relative instrumental advantages and disadvantages, which may be useful for selecting appropriate instrumentation for defined applications. Further, an additional aim of this study is to compare the high speed Fabry-Perot imaging technology under development against the established chemical imaging techniques available on the market today.

  4. Ultrahigh-spatial-resolution chemical and magnetic imaging by laser-based photoemission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the first experiments carried out on a new chemical and magnetic imaging system, which combines the high spatial resolution of a photoemission electron microscope (PEEM) with a continuous-wave deep-ultraviolet laser. Threshold photoemission is sensitive to the chemical and magnetic structures of the surface of materials. The spatial resolution of PEEM is limited by space charging when using pulsed photon sources as well as aberrations in the electron optics. We show that the use of a continuous-wave laser enabled us to overcome such a limit by suppressing the space-charge effect, allowing us to obtain a resolution of approximately 2.6 nm. With this system, we demonstrated the imaging of surface reconstruction domains on Si(001) by linear dichroism with normal incidence of the laser beam. We also succeeded in magnetic imaging of thin films with the use of magnetic circular dichroism near the Fermi level. The unique features of the ultraviolet laser will give us fast switching of the incident angles and polarizations of the photon source, which will be useful for the characterization of antiferromagnetic materials as well as ferromagnetic materials

  5. Localizing chemical groups while imaging single native proteins by high-resolution atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfreundschuh, Moritz; Alsteens, David; Hilbert, Manuel; Steinmetz, Michel O; Müller, Daniel J

    2014-05-14

    Simultaneous high-resolution imaging and localization of chemical interaction sites on single native proteins is a pertinent biophysical, biochemical, and nanotechnological challenge. Such structural mapping and characterization of binding sites is of importance in understanding how proteins interact with their environment and in manipulating such interactions in a plethora of biotechnological applications. Thus far, this challenge remains to be tackled. Here, we introduce force-distance curve-based atomic force microscopy (FD-based AFM) for the high-resolution imaging of SAS-6, a protein that self-assembles into cartwheel-like structures. Using functionalized AFM tips bearing Ni(2+)-N-nitrilotriacetate groups, we locate specific interaction sites on SAS-6 at nanometer resolution and quantify the binding strength of the Ni(2+)-NTA groups to histidine residues. The FD-based AFM approach can readily be applied to image any other native protein and to locate and structurally map histidine residues. Moreover, the surface chemistry used to functionalize the AFM tip can be modified to map other chemical interaction sites. PMID:24766578

  6. Gel for simultaneous chemical imaging of anionic and cationic solutes using diffusive gradients in thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuzeder, Andreas; Santner, Jakob; Prohaska, Thomas; Wenzel, Walter W

    2013-12-17

    We report on a novel gel based on diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) for the simultaneous measurement of cations and anions and its suitability for high resolution chemical imaging by using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS). The new high resolution mixed binding gel (HR-MBG) is based on zirconium-hydroxide and suspended particulate reagent-iminodiacetate (SPR-IDA) as resin materials which are embedded in an ether-based urethane polymer hydrogel. The use of this polymer hydrogel material allows the production of ultrathin, highly stable and tear-proof resin gel layers with superior handling properties compared to existing ultrathin polyacrylamide gels. The gel was characterized regarding its uptake kinetics, the anion and cation capacities, and the effects of pH, ionic strength, and aging on the performance of the HR-MBG. Our results demonstrate the capability of this novel gel for concomitant sampling of anions and cations. The suitability of this new gel type for DGT chemical imaging at submm spatial resolution in soils using LA-ICPMS is shown. 2D images of P, As, Co, Cu, Mn, and Zn distributions around roots of Zea mays L. demonstrate the new opportunities offered by the HR-MBG for high-resolution mapping of solute dynamics in soil and sediment hotspots, such as the rhizosphere, by simultaneous observation of anionic and cationic solute species.

  7. High-throughput Raman chemical imaging for evaluating food safety and quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jianwei; Chao, Kuanglin; Kim, Moon S.

    2014-05-01

    A line-scan hyperspectral system was developed to enable Raman chemical imaging for large sample areas. A custom-designed 785 nm line-laser based on a scanning mirror serves as an excitation source. A 45° dichroic beamsplitter reflects the laser light to form a 24 cm x 1 mm excitation line normally incident on the sample surface. Raman signals along the laser line are collected by a detection module consisting of a dispersive imaging spectrograph and a CCD camera. A hypercube is accumulated line by line as a motorized table moves the samples transversely through the laser line. The system covers a Raman shift range of -648.7-2889.0 cm-1 and a 23 cm wide area. An example application, for authenticating milk powder, was presented to demonstrate the system performance. In four minutes, the system acquired a 512x110x1024 hypercube (56,320 spectra) from four 47-mm-diameter Petri dishes containing four powder samples. Chemical images were created for detecting two adulterants (melamine and dicyandiamide) that had been mixed into the milk powder.

  8. Molecular Origin of Color Variation in Firefly (Beetle) Bioluminescence: A Chemical Basis for Biological Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Firefly shows bioluminescence by "luciferin-luciferase" (L-L) reaction using luciferin, luciferase, ATP and O2. The chemical photon generation by an enzymatic reaction is widely utilized for analytical methods including biological imaging in the life science fields. To expand photondetecting analyses with firefly bioluminescence, it is important for users to understand the chemical basis of the L-L reaction. In particular, the emission color variation of the L-L reaction is one of the distinguishing characteristics for multicolor luciferase assay and in vivo imaging. From the viewpoint of fundamental chemistry, this review explains the recent progress in the studies on the molecular mechanism of emission color variation after showing the outline of the reaction mechanism of the whole L-L reaction. On the basis of the mechanism, the progresses in organic synthesis of luciferin analogs modulating their emission colors are also presented to support further developments of red/near infrared in vivo biological imaging utility of firefly bioluminescence.

  9. Modulated electron-multiplied fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope: all-solid-state camera for fluorescence lifetime imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Q.; Schelen, B.; Schouten, R., et al.

    2012-01-01

    We have built an all-solid-state camera that is directly modulated at the pixel level for frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) measurements. This novel camera eliminates the need for an image intensifier through the use of an application-specific charge coupled device des

  10. Metal Oxide Nanoparticles: The Importance of Size, Shape, Chemical Composition, and Valence State in Determining Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunnick, Katherine

    Nanoparticles, which are defined as a structure with at least one dimension between 1 and 100 nm, have the potential to be used in a variety of consumer products due to their improved functionality compared to similar particles of larger size. Their small size is associated with increased strength, improved catalytic properties, and increased reactivity; however, their size is also associated with increased toxicity in vitro and in vivo. Numerous toxicological studies have been conducted to determine the properties of nanomaterials that increase their toxicity in order to manufacture new nanomaterials with decreased toxicity. Data indicates that size, shape, chemical composition, and valence state of nanomaterials can dramatically alter their toxicity profile. Therefore, the purpose of this dissertation was to determine how altering the shape, size, and chemical composition of various metal oxide nanoparticles would affect their toxicity. Metal oxides are used in variety of consumer products, from spray-sun screens, to food coloring agents; thus, understanding the toxicity of metal oxides and determining which aspects affect their toxicity may provide safe alternatives nanomaterials for continued use in manufacturing. Tungstate nanoparticles toxicity was assessed in an in vitro model using RAW 264.7 cells. The size, shape, and chemical composition of these nanomaterials were altered and the effect on reactive oxygen species and general cytotoxicity was determined using a variety of techniques. Results demonstrate that shape was important in reactive oxygen species production as wires were able to induce significant reactive oxygen species compared to spheres. Shape, size, and chemical composition did not have much effect on the overall toxicity of these nanoparticles in RAW 264.7 cells over a 72 hour time course, implicating that the base material of the nanoparticles was not toxic in these cells. To further assess how chemical composition can affect toxicity

  11. Effects of a single session of physical exercise on body state image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attilio Carraro

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that athletes and physically active persons are generally more satisfied with their bodies than sedentary people, physical activity seems to exert both negative and positive influences on body image. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a single session of exercise in state body image modification. In particular, we observed if a single session of sport or fitness activity could have a positive influence on state body image, considered as an episodic, evaluative and affective perception of the own physical appearance. Results showed an increase of the mean state body image rate (assessed with the Body Image States Scales, BISS after a one-hour session of sport or fitness activities in a sample of 295 individuals. Intensity and fun seemed to be key-factors in state body image enhancement. These findings could have significant implications in the treatment of BI disturbances and in their prevention.

  12. Application and state of development for remote chemical sensors in environmental monitoring: A literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schabron, J.F.; Niss, N.D.; Hart, B.K.

    1991-09-01

    A study was performed on chemical sensor technology currently available and under development. The information was compiled into a format wherein information on the sensors is listed in a comparable manner. An introductory section is provided to illustrate the regulatory environment in which such sensor technology will be used. This information should allow corporations or federal agencies ready access to useful information for the potential licensing of sensor technology for commercial development or specific environmental monitoring operations. Although every attempt was made to identify as many chemical sensors as possible, we recognize that some may be missed inadvertently. The accuracy of the information provided by the various sources regarding the state of development for the various sensors was not verified. Judgments or opinions regarding the actual state of development or utility of these devices are not included in this report. However, we feel that this report accurately reflects the state of the art at the present time.

  13. Application and state of development for remote chemical sensors in environmental monitoring: A literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schabron, J.F.; Niss, N.D.; Hart, B.K.

    1991-09-01

    A study was performed on chemical sensor technology currently available and under development. The information was compiled into a format wherein information on the sensors is listed in a comparable manner. As introductory section is provided to illustrate the regulatory environment in which such sensor technology will be used. This information should allow corporations or federal agencies ready access to useful information for the potential licensing of sensor technology for commercial development or specific environmental monitoring operations. Although every attempt was made to identify as many chemical sensors as possible, we recognize that some may be missed inadvertently. The accuracy of the information provided by the various sources regarding the state of development for the various sensors was not verified. Judgments or opinions regarding the actual state of development or utility of these devices are not included in this report. However, we feel that this report accurately reflects the state of the art at the present time.

  14. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of an Individual Catalyst Particle with Soft X-ray Ptychography

    OpenAIRE

    Wise, Anna M.; Weker, Johanna Nelson; Kalirai, Sam; Farmand, Maryam; Shapiro, David A.; MEIRER, FLORIAN; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding Fe deposition in fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysis is critical for the mitigation of catalyst degradation. Here we employ soft X-ray ptychography to determine at the nanoscale the distribution and chemical state of Fe in an aged FCC catalyst particle. We show that both particle swelling due to colloidal Fe deposition and Fe penetration into the matrix as a result of precracking of large organic molecules occur. The application of ptychography allowed us to provide direct ...

  15. Monitoring chemical degradation of thermally cycled glass-fibre composites using hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, V. M.; Müller, B.; Hagenbeek, M.; Sinke, J.; Groves, R. M.

    2016-04-01

    Nowadays, the application of glass-fibre composites in light-weight structures is growing. Although mechanical characterizations of those structures are commonly performed in testing, chemical changes of materials under stresses have not yet been well documented. In the present work coupon tests and Hyperspectral Imaging (HSI) have been used to categorise possible chemical changes of glass-fibre reinforced polymers (GFRP) which are currently used in the aircraft industry. HSI is a hybrid technique that combines spectroscopy with imaging. It is able to detect chemical degradation of surfaces and has already been successfully applied in a wide range of fields including astronomy, remote sensing, cultural heritage and medical sciences. GFRP specimens were exposed to two different thermal loading conditions. One thermal loading condition was a continuous thermal exposure at 120°C for 24h, 48 h and 96h, i.e. ageing at a constant temperature. The other thermal loading condition was thermal cycling with three different numbers of cycles (4000, 8000, 12000) and two temperature ranges (0°C to 120°C and -25°C to 95°C). The effects of both conditions were measured using both HSI and interlaminar shear (ILSS) tests. No significant changes of the physical properties of the thermally cycled GFRP specimens were detected using interlaminar shear strength tests and optical microscopy. However, when using HIS, differences of the surface conditions were detected. The results showed that the different thermal loading conditions could be successfully clustered in different colours, using the HSI linear unmixing technique. Each different thermal loading condition showed a different chemical degradation level on its surface which was indicated using different colours.

  16. Assessment of chemical lumbar sympathectomy in critical limb ischaemia using thermal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenstein, D; Brown, T F; Kester, R C

    1994-02-01

    Objective assessment of chemical lumbar sympathectomy (CLS) is lacking. Its success is usually judged in terms of the patient's clinical improvement. We have thermographically measured the immediate temperature changes of the lower limb following CLS using a thermal imager (SAN-EI Thermotracer 6T61). Seven patients with critical limb ischaemia and one patient with Raynaud's phenomenon underwent unilateral ablation of the lumbar sympathetic chain using 5% phenol. Four patients were diabetic, two of whom had undergone previous sympathectomy on the same side. Within fifteen minutes of injection, all patients showed a rise in skin temperature in parts of the sock distribution of between 0.8 degrees C and 8.5 degrees C. We conclude that the haemodynamic effects of CLS are immediate and can be objectively measured with thermal imaging. PMID:8195656

  17. Hierarchy of Electronic Properties of Chemically Derived and Pristine Graphene Probed by Microwave Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundhikanjana, W.

    2010-06-02

    Local electrical imaging using microwave impedance microscope is performed on graphene in different modalities, yielding a rich hierarchy of the local conductivity. The low-conductivity graphite oxide and its derivatives show significant electronic inhomogeneity. For the conductive chemical graphene, the residual defects lead to a systematic reduction of the microwave signals. In contrast, the signals on pristine graphene agree well with a lumped-element circuit model. The local impedance information can also be used to verify the electrical contact between overlapped graphene pieces.

  18. Infrared spectroscopic imaging detects chemical modifications in liver fibrosis due to diabetes and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreedhar, Hari; Varma, Vishal K.; Gambacorta, Francesca V.; Guzman, Grace; Walsh, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    The importance of stroma as a rich diagnostic region in tissue biopsies is growing as there is an increasing understanding that disease processes in multiple organs can affect the composition of adjacent connective tissue regions. This may be especially true in the liver, since this organ’s central metabolic role exposes it to multiple disease processes. We use quantum cascade laser infrared spectroscopic imaging to study changes in the chemical status of hepatocytes and fibrotic regions of liver tissue that result from the progression of liver cirrhosis to hepatocellular carcinoma and the potentially confounding effects of diabetes mellitus. PMID:27375956

  19. ESTE: Verification of Portable Optical and Thermal Imaging Devices for Leak Detection at Petroleum Refineries and Chemical Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is an ESTE project summary brief. EPA’s Environmental Technology Verification Program (ETV) is verifying the performance of portable optical and thermal imaging devices for leak detection at petroleum refineries and chemical plans. Industrial facilities, such as chemical p...

  20. Microfluidic electrochemical device and process for chemical imaging and electrochemical analysis at the electrode-liquid interface in-situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao-Ying; Liu, Bingwen; Yang, Li; Zhu, Zihua; Marshall, Matthew J.

    2016-03-01

    A microfluidic electrochemical device and process are detailed that provide chemical imaging and electrochemical analysis under vacuum at the surface of the electrode-sample or electrode-liquid interface in-situ. The electrochemical device allows investigation of various surface layers including diffuse layers at selected depths populated with, e.g., adsorbed molecules in which chemical transformation in electrolyte solutions occurs.

  1. Multi-GPU unsteady 2D flow simulation coupled with a state-to-state chemical kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttafesta, Michele; Pascazio, Giuseppe; Colonna, Gianpiero

    2016-10-01

    In this work we are presenting a GPU version of a CFD code for high enthalpy reacting flow, using the state-to-state approach. In supersonic and hypersonic flows, thermal and chemical non-equilibrium is one of the fundamental aspects that must be taken into account for the accurate characterization of the plasma and state-to-state kinetics is the most accurate approach used for this kind of problems. This model consists in writing a continuity equation for the population of each vibrational level of the molecules in the mixture, determining at the same time the species densities and the distribution of the population in internal levels. An explicit scheme is employed here to integrate the governing equations, so as to exploit the GPU structure and obtain an efficient algorithm. The best performances are obtained for reacting flows in state-to-state approach, reaching speedups of the order of 100, thanks to the use of an operator splitting scheme for the kinetics equations.

  2. Hot QCD equation of state and quark-gluon plasma-- finite quark chemical potential

    CERN Document Server

    Chandra, Vinod

    2008-01-01

    We explore the relevance of a hot QCD equation of state of $O[g^6\\ln(1/g)]$, which has been obtained\\cite{avrn} for non-vanishing quark-chemical potentials to heavy ion collisions. Employing a method proposed in a recent paper \\cite{chandra1}, we use the EOS to determine a host of thermodynamic quantities, the energy density, specific heat, entropy dnesity, and the temperature dependence of screening lengths, with the behaviour of QGP at RHIC and LHC in mind. We also investigate the sensitivity of these observables to the quark chemical potential.

  3. Functional imaging reveals movement preparatory activity in the vegetative state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tristan A Bekinschtein

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Vegetative State (VS is characterized by the absence of awareness of self or the environment and preserved autonomic functions. The diagnosis relies critically on the lack of consistent signs of purposeful behavior in response to external stimulation. Yet, given that patients with disorders of consciousness often exhibit fragmented movement patterns, voluntary actions may go unnoticed. Here we designed a simple motor paradigm that could potentially detect residual conscious awareness in VS patients with mild to severe brain damage by examining the neural correlates of motor preparation in response to verbal commands. Twenty-four patients who met the diagnostic criteria for VS were recruited for this study. Eleven of these patients showing preserved auditory evoked potentials underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to test for basic speech processing. Five of these patients, who showed word related activity, were included in a second fMRI study aimed at detecting functional changes in premotor cortex elicited by specific verbal instructions to move either their left or their right hand. Despite the lack of overt muscle activity, two patients out of five activated the dorsal premotor cortex contralateral to the instructed hand, consistent with movement preparation. Given that movement preparation in response to a motor command is a sign of purposeful behavior, our results are consistent with residual conscious awareness in these patients. We believe that the identification of positive results with fMRI using this simple task, may complement the clinical assessment by helping attain a more precise diagnosis in patients with disorders of consciousness.

  4. Moisture-induced solid state instabilities in α-chymotrypsin and their reduction through chemical glycosylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solá Ricardo J

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein instability remains the main factor limiting the development of protein therapeutics. The fragile nature (structurally and chemically of proteins makes them susceptible to detrimental events during processing, storage, and delivery. To overcome this, proteins are often formulated in the solid-state which combines superior stability properties with reduced operational costs. Nevertheless, solid protein pharmaceuticals can also suffer from instability problems due to moisture sorption. Chemical protein glycosylation has evolved into an important tool to overcome several instability issues associated with proteins. Herein, we employed chemical glycosylation to stabilize a solid-state protein formulation against moisture-induced deterioration in the lyophilized state. Results First, we investigated the consequences of moisture sorption on the stability and structural conformation of the model enzyme α-chymotrypsin (α-CT under controlled humidity conditions. Results showed that α-CT aggregates and inactivates as a function of increased relative humidity (RH. Furthermore, α-CT loses its native secondary and tertiary structure rapidly at increasing RH. In addition, H/D exchange studies revealed that α-CT structural dynamics increased at increasing RH. The magnitude of the structural changes in tendency parallels the solid-state instability data (i.e., formation of buffer-insoluble aggregates, inactivation, and loss of native conformation upon reconstitution. To determine if these moisture-induced instability issues could be ameliorated by chemical glycosylation we proceeded to modify our model protein with chemically activated glycans of differing lengths (lactose and dextran (10 kDa. The various glycoconjugates showed a marked decrease in aggregation and an increase in residual activity after incubation. These stabilization effects were found to be independent of the glycan size. Conclusion Water sorption leads to

  5. Multispectral UV imaging for fast and non-destructive quality control of chemical and physical tablet attributes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klukkert, Marten; Wu, Jian X; Rantanen, Jukka;

    2016-01-01

    with partial least squares analysis. Furthermore, an image analysis routine was developed and successfully applied to the UV images that provided qualitative information on physical tablet surface properties such as intactness and surface density profiles, as well as quantitative information on variations...... an eccentric as well as a rotary tablet press at compression pressures from 20MPa up to 410MPa. It was found, that UV imaging can provide both, relevant information on chemical and physical tablet attributes. The tablet API content and radial tensile strength could be estimated by UV imaging combined...... in the surface density. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that UV imaging combined with image analysis is an effective and non-destructive method to determine chemical and physical quality attributes of tablets and is a promising approach for (near) real-time monitoring of the tablet compaction process...

  6. Imaging of HCC—Current State of the Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Schraml

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Early diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is crucial for optimizing treatment outcome. Ongoing advances are being made in imaging of HCC regarding detection, grading, staging, and also treatment monitoring. This review gives an overview of the current international guidelines for diagnosing HCC and their discrepancies as well as critically summarizes the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and computed tomography (CT techniques for imaging in HCC. The diagnostic performance of MRI with nonspecific and hepatobililiary contrast agents and the role of functional imaging with diffusion-weighted imaging will be discussed. On the other hand, CT as a fast, cheap and easily accessible imaging modality plays a major role in the clinical routine work-up of HCC. Technical advances in CT, such as dual energy CT and volume perfusion CT, are currently being explored for improving detection, characterization and staging of HCC with promising results. Cone beam CT can provide a three-dimensional analysis of the liver with tumor and vessel characterization comparable to cross-sectional imaging so that this technique is gaining an increasing role in the peri-procedural imaging of HCC treated with interventional techniques.

  7. Effects of a single session of physical exercise on body state image

    OpenAIRE

    Attilio Carraro; Alessandra Nart; Stefano Scarpa

    2010-01-01

    Despite the fact that athletes and physically active persons are generally more satisfied with their bodies than sedentary people, physical activity seems to exert both negative and positive influences on body image. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a single session of exercise in state body image modification. In particular, we observed if a single session of sport or fitness activity could have a positive influence on state body image, considered as an episodic, evalua...

  8. CHEMICALS

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  9. Chemical imaging of single catalyst particles with scanning μ-XANES-CT and μ-XRF-CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, S W T; Ignatyev, K; Geraki, K; Basham, M; Filik, J; Vo, N T; Witte, P T; Beale, A M; Mosselmans, J F W

    2015-01-01

    The physicochemical state of a catalyst is a key factor in determining both activity and selectivity; however these materials are often not structurally or compositionally homogeneous. Here we report on the 3-dimensional imaging of an industrial catalyst, Mo-promoted colloidal Pt supported on carbon. The distribution of both the active Pt species and Mo promoter have been mapped over a single particle of catalyst using microfocus X-ray fluorescence computed tomography. X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure revealed a mixed local coordination environment, including the presence of both metallic Pt clusters and Pt chloride species, but also no direct interaction between the catalyst and Mo promoter. We also report on the benefits of scanning μ-XANES computed tomography for chemical imaging, allowing for 2- and 3-dimensional mapping of the local electronic and geometric environment, in this instance for both the Pt catalyst and Mo promoter throughout the catalyst particle. PMID:25407850

  10. Applications for Solid-State Joints in the chemical process industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goin, R. David

    2008-11-01

    Two forms of solid-state joining of tubing are explored here for use in the chemical process industry and other applications. Extrusion bonding consists of diffusion bonding an inner seamless tube of one material to an outer seamless tube of another material. Inertia welding consists of rotating one tube while pressing a second stationary tube into the first. In both cases, a very strong and robust metallurgical bond can result. This paper explores the testing and properties of such metallurgical bonds.

  11. Application of Photocured Polymer Ion Selective Membranes for Solid-State Chemical Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Abramova

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Application of conducting polymers with additional functional groups for a solid contact formation and photocurable membranes as sensitive elements of solid-state chemical sensors is discussed. Problems associated with application of UV-curable polymers for sensors are analyzed. A method of sensor fabrication using copolymerized conductive layer and sensitive membrane is presented and the proof of concept is confirmed by two examples of solid-contact electrodes for Ca ions and pH.

  12. Quantum-chemical study of electronically excited states ofprotolytic forms of vanillic acid

    OpenAIRE

    Vusovich, O. V.; Tchaikovskaya, O. N.; I. V. Sokolova; Vasileva, N. Y.

    2015-01-01

    The paper describes an analysis of possible ways of deactivation of electronically excited states of 4-hydroxy- 3-methoxy-benzoic acid (vanillic acid) and its protolytic forms with the use of quantum-chemical methods INDO/S (intermediate neglect of differential overlap with a spectroscopic parameterization) and MEP (molecular electrostatic potential). The ratio of radiative and non-radiative deactivation channels of the electronic excitation energy is established. The rate constants of photop...

  13. Direct imaging of mechanical and chemical gradients across the thickness of graded organosilicone microwave PECVD coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Colin J; Murphy, Peter J; Griesser, Hans J

    2014-01-22

    The characterization of variations in the chemical composition and ensuing mechanical properties across the thickness of coatings with continuously varying compositions through their thickness (graded coatings) presents considerable challenges for current analytical techniques in materials science. We report here the direct imaging of nanomechanical and chemical gradients across cross-sections of an organosilicone coating fabricated via microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Cross-sectional nanoindentation was used to determine the mechanical properties of uniform and graded organosilicone coatings. Both hardness and modulus across the coatings were directly measured. Additionally, "modulus mapping" on cross-sections was used to map the complex modulus. For the graded coating, it was found that variations in the complex modulus was predominantly due to varying storage modulus. It was observed that at the interface with the substrate there was a low storage modulus, which linearly increased to a relatively high storage modulus at the surface. It is proposed that the increase in stiffness, from the substrate interface to the outer surface, is due to the increasing content of a cross-linked O-Si-O network. This mechanical gradient has been linked to a change in the Si:O ratio via direct compositional mapping using ToF-SIMS. Direct mapping of the mechanical and compositional gradients across these protective coatings provides insight into the changes in properties with depth and supports optimization of the critical mechanical performance of PECVD graded coatings.

  14. Experiments on bifurcation of periodic states into tori for a periodically forced chemical oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, William; Ross, John

    1988-05-01

    We study experimentally continuous transitions from quasiperiodic to periodic states for a time-periodically forced chemical oscillator. The chemical reaction is the hydration of 2,3-epoxy-1-propanol, and is carried out in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR). Periodic oscillatory states are observed to arise in the autonomous system through supercritical Hopf bifurcations as either the total flow rate or the cooling coil temperature is changed. Under conditions of oscillation for the autonomous system, small-amplitude periodic variation of the total flow rate generates an attracting two-torus from the stable limit cycle. From the experiments we determine the structure of the toroidal flow, stroboscopic phase portraits, and circle maps as a function of the forcing amplitude and period. A continuous transition from the quasiperiodic to a periodic state, in which the two-torus contracts to a closed curve (Neimark-Sacker torus bifurcation), is observed as the forcing amplitude is increased at a constant forcing period, or as the forcing period is changed at a constant moderate forcing amplitude. Qualitative theoretical predictions compare well with the experimental observations. This paper presents the first experimental observation of a Neimark-Sacker torus bifurcation in a forced chemical oscillator system, and relates the bifurcation diagram of the unforced system to that of the forced system.

  15. Scan time reduction in {sup 23}Na-Magnetic Resonance Imaging using the chemical shift imaging sequence. Evaluation of an iterative reconstruction method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weingaertner, Sebastian; Konstandin, Simon; Schad, Lothar R. [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine; Wetterling, Friedrich [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine; Dublin Univ. (Ireland) Trinity Inst. of Neuroscience; Fatar, Marc [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Dept. of Neurology; Neumaier-Probst, Eva [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate potential scan time reduction in {sup 23}Na-Magnetic Resonance Imaging with the chemical shift imaging sequence (CSI) using undersampled data of high-quality datasets, reconstructed with an iterative constrained reconstruction, compared to reduced resolution or reduced signal-to-noise ratio. CSI {sup 23}Na-images were retrospectively undersampled and reconstructed with a constrained reconstruction scheme. The results were compared to conventional methods of scan time reduction. The constrained reconstruction scheme used a phase constraint and a finite object support, which was extracted from a spatially registered {sup 1}H-image acquired with a double-tuned coil. The methods were evaluated using numerical simulations, phantom images and in-vivo images of a healthy volunteer and a patient who suffered from cerebral ischemic stroke. The constrained reconstruction scheme showed improved image quality compared to a decreased number of averages, images with decreased resolution or circular undersampling with weighted averaging for any undersampling factor. Brain images of a stroke patient, which were reconstructed from three-fold undersampled k-space data, resulted in only minor differences from the original image (normalized root means square error < 12%) and an almost identical delineation of the stroke region (mismatch < 6%). The acquisition of undersampled {sup 23}Na-CSI images enables up to three-fold scan time reduction with improved image quality compared to conventional methods of scan time saving.

  16. Scanning microwave microscope imaging of micro-patterned monolayer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, J.; Mou, S.; Chen, K.-H.; Zhuang, Y.

    2016-02-01

    Characterization of micro-patterned chemical vapor deposited monolayer graphene using a scanning microwave microscope has been presented. Monolayer graphene sheets deposited on a copper substrate were transferred to a variety of substrates and micro-patterned into a periodic array of parallel lines. The measured complex reflection coefficients exhibit a strong dependency on the operating frequency and on the samples' electrical conductivity and permittivity. The experiments show an extremely high sensitivity by detecting image contrast between single and double layer graphene sheets. Correlating the images recorded at the half- and quarter-wavelength resonant frequencies shows that the relative permittivity of the single layer graphene sheet is above 105. The results are in good agreement with the three dimensional numerical electromagnetic simulations. This method may be instrumental for a comprehensive understanding of the scanning microwave microscope image contrast and provide a unique technique to estimate the local electrical properties with nano-meter scale spatial resolution of two dimensional materials at radio frequency.

  17. Miniature Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope for In-Situ Imaging and Chemical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskin, Jessica A.; Jerman, Gregory; Gregory, Don; Sampson, Allen R.

    2012-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is leading an effort to develop a Miniaturized Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope (MVP-SEM) for in-situ imaging and chemical analysis of uncoated samples. This instrument development will be geared towards operation on Mars and builds on a previous MSFC design of a mini-SEM for the moon (funded through the NASA Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program). Because Mars has a dramatically different environment than the moon, modifications to the MSFC lunar mini-SEM are necessary. Mainly, the higher atmospheric pressure calls for the use of an electron gun that can operate at High Vacuum, rather than Ultra-High Vacuum. The presence of a CO2-rich atmosphere also allows for the incorporation of a variable pressure system that enables the in-situ analysis of nonconductive geological specimens. Preliminary testing of Mars meteorites in a commercial Environmental SEM(Tradmark) (FEI) confirms the usefulness of lowcurrent/low-accelerating voltage imaging and highlights the advantages of using the Mars atmosphere for environmental imaging. The unique capabilities of the MVP-SEM make it an ideal tool for pursuing key scientific goals of NASA's Flagship Mission Max-C; to perform in-situ science and collect and cache samples in preparation for sample return from Mars.

  18. Progress in clinical research and application of resting state functional brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resting state functional brain imaging experimental design is free of stimulus task and offers various parametric maps through different data-driven post processing methods with endogenous BOLD signal changes as the source of imaging. Mechanism of resting state brain activities could be extensively studied with improved patient compliance and clinical application compared with task related functional brain imaging. Also resting state functional brain imaging can be used as a method of data acquisition, with implicit neuronal activity as a kind of experimental design, to reveal characteristic brain activities of epileptic patient. Even resting state functional brain imaging data processing method can be used to analyze task related functional MRI data, opening new horizons of task related functional MRI study. (authors)

  19. Incorporation of a Chemical Equilibrium Equation of State into LOCI-Chem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Carey F.

    2005-01-01

    Renewed interest in development of advanced high-speed transport, reentry vehicles and propulsion systems has led to a resurgence of research into high speed aerodynamics. As this flow regime is typically dominated by hot reacting gaseous flow, efficient models for the characteristic chemical activity are necessary for accurate and cost effective analysis and design of aerodynamic vehicles that transit this regime. The LOCI-Chem code recently developed by Ed Luke at Mississippi State University for NASA/MSFC and used by NASA/MSFC and SSC represents an important step in providing an accurate, efficient computational tool for the simulation of reacting flows through the use of finite-rate kinetics [3]. Finite rate chemistry however, requires the solution of an additional N-1 species mass conservation equations with source terms involving reaction kinetics that are not fully understood. In the equilibrium limit, where the reaction rates approach infinity, these equations become very stiff. Through the use of the assumption of local chemical equilibrium the set of governing equations is reduced back to the usual gas dynamic equations, and thus requires less computation, while still allowing for the inclusion of reacting flow phenomenology. The incorporation of a chemical equilibrium equation of state module into the LOCI-Chem code was the primary objective of the current research. The major goals of the project were: (1) the development of a chemical equilibrium composition solver, and (2) the incorporation of chemical equilibrium solver into LOCI-Chem. Due to time and resource constraints, code optimization was not considered unless it was important to the proper functioning of the code.

  20. Evaluation of chemical fluorescent dyes as a protein conjugation partner for live cell imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Hayashi-Takanaka

    Full Text Available To optimize live cell fluorescence imaging, the choice of fluorescent substrate is a critical factor. Although genetically encoded fluorescent proteins have been used widely, chemical fluorescent dyes are still useful when conjugated to proteins or ligands. However, little information is available for the suitability of different fluorescent dyes for live imaging. We here systematically analyzed the property of a number of commercial fluorescent dyes when conjugated with antigen-binding (Fab fragments directed against specific histone modifications, in particular, phosphorylated H3S28 (H3S28ph and acetylated H3K9 (H3K9ac. These Fab fragments were conjugated with a fluorescent dye and loaded into living HeLa cells. H3S28ph-specific Fab fragments were expected to be enriched in condensed chromosomes, as H3S28 is phosphorylated during mitosis. However, the degree of Fab fragment enrichment on mitotic chromosomes varied depending on the conjugated dye. In general, green fluorescent dyes showed higher enrichment, compared to red and far-red fluorescent dyes, even when dye:protein conjugation ratios were similar. These differences are partly explained by an altered affinity of Fab fragment after dye-conjugation; some dyes have less effect on the affinity, while others can affect it more. Moreover, red and far-red fluorescent dyes tended to form aggregates in the cytoplasm. Similar results were observed when H3K9ac-specific Fab fragments were used, suggesting that the properties of each dye affect different Fab fragments similarly. According to our analysis, conjugation with green fluorescent dyes, like Alexa Fluor 488 and Dylight 488, has the least effect on Fab affinity and is the best for live cell imaging, although these dyes are less photostable than red fluorescent dyes. When multicolor imaging is required, we recommend the following dye combinations for optimal results: Alexa Fluor 488 (green, Cy3 (red, and Cy5 or CF640 (far-red.

  1. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of an Individual Catalyst Particle with Soft X-ray Ptychography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Understanding Fe deposition in fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysis is critical for the mitigation of catalyst degradation. Here we employ soft X-ray ptychography to determine at the nanoscale the distribution and chemical state of Fe in an aged FCC catalyst particle. We show that both particle swelling due to colloidal Fe deposition and Fe penetration into the matrix as a result of precracking of large organic molecules occur. The application of ptychography allowed us to provide direct visual evidence for these two distinct Fe-based deactivation mechanisms, which have so far been proposed only on the basis of indirect evidence. PMID:27076990

  2. Emergence of a super-synchronized mobbing state in a large population of coupled chemical oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, Gourab; Muñuzuri, Alberto P.; Pérez-Mercader, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Oscillatory phenomena are ubiquitous in Nature. The ability of a large population of coupled oscillators to synchronize constitutes an important mechanism to express information and establish communication among members. To understand such phenomena, models and experimental realizations of globally coupled oscillators have proven to be invaluable in settings as varied as chemical, biological and physical systems. A variety of rich dynamical behavior has been uncovered, although usually in the context of a single state of synchronization or lack thereof. Through the experimental and numerical study of a large population of discrete chemical oscillators, here we report on the unexpected discovery of a new phenomenon revealing the existence of dynamically distinct synchronized states reflecting different degrees of communication. Specifically, we discover a novel large-amplitude super-synchronized state separated from the conventionally reported synchronized and quiescent states through an unusual sharp jump transition when sampling the strong coupling limit. Our results assume significance for further elucidating globally coherent phenomena, such as in neuropathologies, bacterial cell colonies, social systems and semiconductor lasers.

  3. Technical guidance for the development of a solid state image sensor for human low vision image warping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderspiegel, Jan

    1994-01-01

    This report surveys different technologies and approaches to realize sensors for image warping. The goal is to study the feasibility, technical aspects, and limitations of making an electronic camera with special geometries which implements certain transformations for image warping. This work was inspired by the research done by Dr. Juday at NASA Johnson Space Center on image warping. The study has looked into different solid-state technologies to fabricate image sensors. It is found that among the available technologies, CMOS is preferred over CCD technology. CMOS provides more flexibility to design different functions into the sensor, is more widely available, and is a lower cost solution. By using an architecture with row and column decoders one has the added flexibility of addressing the pixels at random, or read out only part of the image.

  4. PET/MRI in Oncological Imaging: State of the Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Usman; Mallia, Andrew; Stirling, James; Joemon, John; MacKewn, Jane; Charles-Edwards, Geoff; Goh, Vicky; Cook, Gary J

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) combined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a hybrid technology which has recently gained interest as a potential cancer imaging tool. Compared with CT, MRI is advantageous due to its lack of ionizing radiation, superior soft-tissue contrast resolution, and wider range of acquisition sequences. Several studies have shown PET/MRI to be equivalent to PET/CT in most oncological applications, possibly superior in certain body parts, e.g., head and neck, pelvis, and in certain situations, e.g., cancer recurrence. This review will update the readers on recent advances in PET/MRI technology and review key literature, while highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of PET/MRI in cancer imaging. PMID:26854157

  5. PET/MRI in Oncological Imaging: State of the Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usman Bashir

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET combined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is a hybrid technology which has recently gained interest as a potential cancer imaging tool. Compared with CT, MRI is advantageous due to its lack of ionizing radiation, superior soft-tissue contrast resolution, and wider range of acquisition sequences. Several studies have shown PET/MRI to be equivalent to PET/CT in most oncological applications, possibly superior in certain body parts, e.g., head and neck, pelvis, and in certain situations, e.g., cancer recurrence. This review will update the readers on recent advances in PET/MRI technology and review key literature, while highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of PET/MRI in cancer imaging.

  6. Nuclear overhauser enhancement mediated chemical exchange saturation transfer imaging at 7 Tesla in glioblastoma patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Paech

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Nuclear Overhauser Enhancement (NOE mediated chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST is a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI technique on the basis of saturation transfer between exchanging protons of tissue proteins and bulk water. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the information provided by three dimensional NOE mediated CEST at 7 Tesla (7T and standard MRI in glioblastoma patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Twelve patients with newly diagnosed histologically proven glioblastoma were enrolled in this prospective ethics committee-approved study. NOE mediated CEST contrast was acquired with a modified three-dimensional gradient-echo sequence and asymmetry analysis was conducted at 3.3 ppm (B1 = 0.7 µT to calculate the magnetization transfer ratio asymmetry (MTR(asym. Contrast enhanced T1 (CE-T1 and T2-weighted images were acquired at 3T and used for data co-registration and comparison. RESULTS: Mean NOE mediated CEST signal based on MTR(asym values over all patients was significantly increased (p<0.001 in CE-T1 tumor (-1.99 ± 1.22%, tumor necrosis (-1.36 ± 1.30% and peritumoral CEST hyperintensities (PTCH within T2 edema margins (-3.56 ± 1.24% compared to contralateral normal appearing white matter (-8.38 ± 1.19%. In CE-T1 tumor (p = 0.015 and tumor necrosis (p<0.001 mean MTR(asym values were significantly higher than in PTCH. Extent of the surrounding tumor hyperintensity was smaller in eight out of 12 patients on CEST than on T2-weighted images, while four displayed at equal size. In all patients, isolated high intensity regions (0.40 ± 2.21% displayed on CEST within the CE-T1 tumor that were not discernible on CE-T1 or T2-weighted images. CONCLUSION: NOE mediated CEST Imaging at 7 T provides additional information on the structure of peritumoral hyperintensities in glioblastoma and displays isolated high intensity regions within the CE-T1 tumor that cannot be acquired on CE-T1 or T2

  7. Chimera and phase-cluster states in populations of coupled chemical oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinsley, Mark R.; Nkomo, Simbarashe; Showalter, Kenneth

    2012-09-01

    Populations of coupled oscillators may exhibit two coexisting subpopulations, one with synchronized oscillations and the other with unsynchronized oscillations, even though all of the oscillators are coupled to each other in an equivalent manner. This phenomenon, discovered about ten years ago in theoretical studies, was then further characterized and named the chimera state after the Greek mythological creature made up of different animals. The highly counterintuitive coexistence of coherent and incoherent oscillations in populations of identical oscillators, each with an equivalent coupling structure, inspired great interest and a flurry of theoretical activity. Here we report on experimental studies of chimera states and their relation to other synchronization states in populations of coupled chemical oscillators. Our experiments with coupled Belousov-Zhabotinsky oscillators and corresponding simulations reveal chimera behaviour that differs significantly from the behaviour found in theoretical studies of phase-oscillator models.

  8. Application of Image Analysis Based on SEM and Chemical Mapping on PC Mortars under Sulfate Attack

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Cheng; SUN Wei; Scrivener Karen

    2014-01-01

    The degradation mechanisms of cementitious materials exposed to sulfate solutions have been controversial, despite considerable research. In this paper, two methodologies of image analysis based on scanning electron microscope and chemical mapping are used to analyse Portland cement mortars exposed to sodium sulfate solution. The effects of sulfate concentration in solution and water to cement ratio of mortar, which are considered as the most sensitive factors to sulfate attack, are investigated respectively by comparing the macro expansion with microstructure analysis. It is found that the sulfate concentration in pore solution, expressed as sulfate content in C-S-H, plays a critical role on the supersaturation with respect to ettringite and so on the expansion force generated.

  9. Dual Raman-Brillouin Microscope for Chemical and Mechanical Characterization and Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, Andrew J; Thompson, Jonathan V; Steelman, Zachary A; Meng, Zhaokai; Scully, Marlan O; Yakovlev, Vladislav V

    2015-08-01

    We present a unique confocal microscope capable of measuring the Raman and Brillouin spectra simultaneously from a single spatial location. Raman and Brillouin scattering offer complementary information about a material's chemical and mechanical structure, respectively, and concurrent monitoring of both of these spectra would set a new standard for material characterization. We achieve this by applying recent innovations in Brillouin spectroscopy that reduce the necessary acquisition times to durations comparable to conventional Raman spectroscopy while attaining a high level of spectral accuracy. To demonstrate the potential of the system, we map the Raman and Brillouin spectra of a molded poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogel sample in cyclohexane to create two-dimensional images with high contrast at microscale resolutions. This powerful tool has the potential for very diverse analytical applications in basic science, industry, and medicine.

  10. Political Parties’ Welfare Image, Electoral Punishment and Welfare State Retrenchment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schumacher, Gijs; Vis, Barbara; van Kersbergen, Kees

    2013-01-01

    Will voters punish the government for cutting back welfare state entitlements? The comparative literature on the welfare state suggests that the answer is yes. Unless governments are effectively employing strategies of blame avoidance, retrenchment leads to vote loss. Because a large majority...

  11. Two-state kinetics character ized by image analysis of nuclear magnetic resonance spectra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has become an important tool in modern biological research. NMR spectra image analysis can be used to analyze the kinetics of biomacromolecular conformational changes.The relationship between the image parameters and the protein dynamics was investigated by using a small globular protein ω-conotoxin SO3 (ω-CTX SO3). The physical meanings of the image parameters were characterized from the results. Comparison of the data from the traditional integral area of specific resonance peaks method and the NMR image analysis method showed the advantages of using NMR spectra image analysis for kinetic analysis of two-state processes monitored by 1D proton NMR.

  12. Chemical sensing and imaging based on photon upconverting nano- and microcrystals: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christ, Simon; Schäferling, Michael

    2015-09-01

    The demand for photostable luminescent reporters that absorb and emit light in the red to near-infrared (NIR) spectral region continues in biomedical research and bioanalysis. In recent years, classical organic fluorophores have increasingly been displaced by luminescent nanoparticles. These consist of either polymer or silica based beads that are loaded with luminescent dyes, conjugated polymers, or inorganic nanomaterials such as semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots), colloidal clusters of silver and gold, or carbon dots. Among the inorganic materials, photon upconversion nanocrystals exhibit a high potential for application to bioimaging or biomolecular assays. They offer an exceptionally high photostability, can be excited in the NIR, and their anti-Stokes emission enables luminescence detection free of background and perturbing scatter effects even in complex biological samples. These lanthanide doped inorganic crystals have multiple emission lines that can be tuned by the selection of the dopants. This review article is focused on the applications of functionalized photon upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) to chemical sensing. This is a comparatively new field of research activity and mainly directed at the sensing and imaging of ubiquitous chemical analytes in biological samples, particularly in living cells. For this purpose, the particles have to be functionalized with suitable indicator dyes or recognition elements, as they do not show an intrinsic or specific luminescence response to most of these analytes (e.g. pH, oxygen, metal ions). We describe the strategies for the design of such responsive nanocomposites utilizing either luminescence resonance energy transfer or emission-reabsorption (inner filter effect) mechanisms and also highlight examples for their use either immobilized in sensor layers or directly as nanoprobes for intracellular sensing and imaging.

  13. Prosthetic joint infections: radionuclide state-of-the-art imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gemmel, Filip [AZ Alma Campus Sijsele, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sijsele-Damme (Belgium); Wyngaert, Hans van den [AZ Alma Campus Sijsele, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Sijsele-Damme (Belgium); Love, Charito [Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Radiology, Bronx, NY (United States); Welling, M.M. [Leiden University Medical Center, Scientist Molecular Imaging, Department of Radiology, Section of Nuclear Medicine C2-203, Leiden (Netherlands); Gemmel, Paul [Ghent University, The Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent (Belgium); Palestro, Christopher J. [Hofstra North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Radiology, Hempstead, NY (United States)

    2012-05-15

    Prosthetic joint replacement surgery is performed with increasing frequency. Overall the incidence of prosthetic joint infection (PJI) and subsequently prosthesis revision failure is estimated to be between 1 and 3%. Differentiating infection from aseptic mechanical loosening, which is the most common cause of prosthetic failure, is especially important because of different types of therapeutic management. Despite a thorough patient history, physical examination, multiple diagnostic tests and complex algorithms, differentiating PJI from aseptic loosening remains challenging. Among imaging modalities, radiographs are neither sensitive nor specific and cross-sectional imaging techniques, such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, are limited by hardware-induced artefacts. Radionuclide imaging reflects functional rather than anatomical changes and is not hampered by the presence of a metallic joint prosthesis. As a result scintigraphy is currently the modality of choice in the investigation of suspected PJI. Unfortunately, there is no true consensus about the gold standard technique since there are several drawbacks and limitations inherent to each modality. Bone scintigraphy (BS) is sensitive for identifying the failed joint replacement, but cannot differentiate between infection and aseptic loosening. Combined bone/gallium scintigraphy (BS/GS) offers modest improvement over BS alone for diagnosing PJI. However, due to a number of drawbacks, BS/GS has generally been superseded by other techniques but it still may have a role in neutropenic patients. Radiolabelled leucocyte scintigraphy remains the gold standard technique for diagnosing neutrophil-mediated processes. It seems to be that combined in vitro labelled leucocyte/bone marrow scintigraphy (LS/BMS), with an accuracy of about 90%, is currently the imaging modality of choice for diagnosing PJI. There are, however, significant limitations using in vitro labelled leucocytes and considerable effort

  14. Two dimensional solid state NMR methods applied to whole coals and chemically modified coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zilm, K.W.; Webb, G.G.; Millar, J.M.

    1987-04-01

    Two dimensional NMR methods have been shown to provide a much finer accounting of the functional types present in coals than by CPMAS spectroscopy alone. The ADIPSHIFT method has been shown to be at least as quantitative as CPMAS both in theory and experimentally. The method gives reliable distributions of carbons with differing multiplicities which is useful in identifying different functionalities that overlap in chemical shift. Recent studies of a model system indicate that the connectivity of the different groups in chemically modified coals should be obtainable from solid state COSY and NOESY experiments. This type of information will provide a very accurate picture of the structure of the alkylated sites and the substitution patterns surrounding them.

  15. Chemical States of Lanthanum in Carbonized La2O3-Mo Thermionic Cathode Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王金淑; 周美玲; 王亦曼; 张久兴; 聂祚仁; 左铁镛

    2003-01-01

    The chemical reaction between lanthanum oxide and molybdenum carbide was studied by thermodynamic calculation, thermal analysis and in-situ X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. The theoretical results show that at the environment allowing for the evaporation of lanthanum, such as in high vacuum, La2O3 in the La2O3-Mo materials can be reduced to metallic lanthanum by molybdenum carbide (Mo2C). To confirm the conclusion, many analysis methods such as XRD, SPS, and TG-DTA were taken. The experimental results show that the chemical state of lanthanum changes during heating. It was proved, for the first time, that reacted metallic lanthanum appears at the surface of this kind of material at high temperature.

  16. A Steady-State Approximation to the Two-Dimensional Master Equation for Chemical Kinetics Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thanh Lam; Stanton, John F

    2015-07-16

    In the field of chemical kinetics, the solution of a two-dimensional master equation that depends explicitly on both total internal energy (E) and total angular momentum (J) is a challenging problem. In this work, a weak-E/fixed-J collisional model (i.e., weak-collisional internal energy relaxation/free-collisional angular momentum relaxation) is used along with the steady-state approach to solve the resulting (simplified) two-dimensional (E,J)-grained master equation. The corresponding solutions give thermal rate constants and product branching ratios as functions of both temperature and pressure. We also have developed a program that can be used to predict and analyze experimental chemical kinetics results. This expedient technique, when combined with highly accurate potential energy surfaces, is cable of providing results that may be meaningfully compared to experiments. The reaction of singlet oxygen with methane proceeding through vibrationally excited methanol is used as an illustrative example. PMID:25815602

  17. Remote sensing for gas plume monitoring using state-of-the-art infrared hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinnrichs, Michele

    1999-02-01

    Under contract to the US Air Force and Navy, Pacific Advanced Technology has developed a very sensitive hyperspectral imaging infrared camera that can perform remote imaging spectro-radiometry. One of the most exciting applications for this technology is in the remote monitoring of gas plume emissions. Pacific Advanced Technology (PAT) currently has the technology available to detect and identify chemical species in gas plumes using a small light weight infrared camera the size of a camcorder. Using this technology as a remote sensor can give advanced warning of hazardous chemical vapors undetectable by the human eye as well as monitor the species concentrations in a gas plume from smoke stack and fugitive leaks. Some of the gas plumes that have been measured and species detected using an IMSS imaging spectrometer are refinery smoke stacks plumes with emission of CO2, CO, SO2, NOx. Low concentration vapor unseen by the human eye that has been imaged and measured is acetone vapor evaporating at room temperature. The PAT hyperspectral imaging sensor is called 'Image Multi-spectral Sensing or IMSS.' The IMSS instrument uses defractive optic technology and exploits the chromatic aberrations of such lenses. Using diffractive optics for both imaging and dispersion allows for a very low cost light weight robust imaging spectrometer. PAT has developed imaging spectrometers that span the spectral range from the visible, midwave infrared (3 to 5 microns) and longwave infrared (8 to 12 microns) with this technology. This paper will present the imaging spectral data that we have collected on various targets with our hyperspectral imaging instruments as will also describe the IMSS approach to imaging spectroscopy.

  18. In vitro chemical and cellular tests applied to uranium trioxide with different hydration states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple and rapid in vitro chemical solubility test applicable to industrial uranium trioxide (UO3) was developed together with two in vitro cellular tests using rat alveolar macrophages maintained either in gas phase or in alginate beads at 37 degrees C. Industrial UO3 was characterized by particle size, X-ray, and IR spectra, and chemical transformation (e.g., aging and hydration of the dust) was also studied. Solvents used for the in vitro chemical solubility study included carbonates, citrates, phosphates, water, Eagle's basal medium, and Gamble's solution (simulated lung fluid), alone, with oxygen, or with superoxide ions. Results, expressed in terms of the half-time of dissolution, according to International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) classification (D,W,Y), varied for different hydration states of UO3, showing a lower solubility of hydrated UO3 in solvents compared to basic UO3 or UO3 heated at 450 degrees C. Two in vitro cellular tests on cultured rat alveolar macrophages (cells maintained in gas phase and cells immobilized in alginate beads) were used on the same UO3 samples and generally showed a lower solution transfer rate in the presence of macrophages than in the culture medium alone. The results of in vitro chemical and cellular tests were compared, with four main conclusions; a good reproducibility of the three tests in Eagle's basal medium of the effect of hydration state on solubility, the classification of UO3 in terms of ICRP solubility criteria, and the ability of macrophoges to decrease uranium solubility in medium. 16 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  19. Fast simulation and optimization of pulse-train chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI has been increasingly applied to detect dilute solutes and physicochemical properties, with promising in vivo applications. Whereas CEST imaging has been implemented with continuous wave (CW) radio-frequency irradiation on preclinical scanners, pulse-train irradiation is often chosen on clinical systems. Therefore, it is necessary to optimize pulse-train CEST imaging, particularly important for translational studies. Because conventional Bloch–McConnell formulas are not in the form of homogeneous differential equations, the routine simulation approach simulates the evolving magnetization step by step, which is time consuming. Herein we developed a computationally efficient numerical solution using matrix iterative analysis of homogeneous Bloch–McConnell equations. The proposed algorithm requires simulation of pulse-train CEST MRI magnetization within one irradiation repeat, with 99% computation time reduction from that of conventional approach under typical experimental conditions. The proposed solution enables determination of labile proton ratio and exchange rate from pulse-train CEST MRI experiment, within 5% from those determined from quantitative CW-CEST MRI. In addition, the structural similarity index analysis shows that the dependence of CEST contrast on saturation pulse flip angle and duration between simulation and experiment was 0.98  ±  0.01, indicating that the proposed simulation algorithm permits fast optimization and quantification of pulse-train CEST MRI. (paper)

  20. Fast simulation and optimization of pulse-train chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Gang; Sun, Phillip Zhe; Wu, Renhua

    2015-06-21

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI has been increasingly applied to detect dilute solutes and physicochemical properties, with promising in vivo applications. Whereas CEST imaging has been implemented with continuous wave (CW) radio-frequency irradiation on preclinical scanners, pulse-train irradiation is often chosen on clinical systems. Therefore, it is necessary to optimize pulse-train CEST imaging, particularly important for translational studies. Because conventional Bloch-McConnell formulas are not in the form of homogeneous differential equations, the routine simulation approach simulates the evolving magnetization step by step, which is time consuming. Herein we developed a computationally efficient numerical solution using matrix iterative analysis of homogeneous Bloch-McConnell equations. The proposed algorithm requires simulation of pulse-train CEST MRI magnetization within one irradiation repeat, with 99% computation time reduction from that of conventional approach under typical experimental conditions. The proposed solution enables determination of labile proton ratio and exchange rate from pulse-train CEST MRI experiment, within 5% from those determined from quantitative CW-CEST MRI. In addition, the structural similarity index analysis shows that the dependence of CEST contrast on saturation pulse flip angle and duration between simulation and experiment was 0.98 ± 0.01, indicating that the proposed simulation algorithm permits fast optimization and quantification of pulse-train CEST MRI. PMID:26020414

  1. Imaging the dynamics of free-electron Landau states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schattschneider, P; Schachinger, Th; Stöger-Pollach, M; Löffler, S; Steiger-Thirsfeld, A; Bliokh, K Y; Nori, Franco

    2014-08-08

    Landau levels and states of electrons in a magnetic field are fundamental quantum entities underlying the quantum Hall and related effects in condensed matter physics. However, the real-space properties and observation of Landau wave functions remain elusive. Here we report the real-space observation of Landau states and the internal rotational dynamics of free electrons. States with different quantum numbers are produced using nanometre-sized electron vortex beams, with a radius chosen to match the waist of the Landau states, in a quasi-uniform magnetic field. Scanning the beams along the propagation direction, we reconstruct the rotational dynamics of the Landau wave functions with angular frequency ~100 GHz. We observe that Landau modes with different azimuthal quantum numbers belong to three classes, which are characterized by rotations with zero, Larmor and cyclotron frequencies, respectively. This is in sharp contrast to the uniform cyclotron rotation of classical electrons, and in perfect agreement with recent theoretical predictions.

  2. Image Acquisition Rate Control Based on Object State Information in Physical and Image Coordinates

    OpenAIRE

    Lian, Feng-Li; Peng, Shih-Yuan

    2008-01-01

    In this study, three methods for controlling image acquisition rate are designed and analyzed. In order to verify the control methods, the 3-D positioning of balls is used to compare the performance of the three control methods in terms of the percentage of saving images and the accuracy of the 3-D positioning results. Experimental results show that the

  3. Imaging spectroscopy algorithms for mapping canopy foliar chemical and morphological traits and their uncertainties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Aditya; Serbin, Shawn P; McNeil, Brenden E; Kingdon, Clayton C; Townsend, Philip A

    2015-12-01

    A major goal of remote sensing is the development of generalizable algorithms to repeatedly and accurately map ecosystem properties across space and time. Imaging spectroscopy has great potential to map vegetation traits that cannot be retrieved from broadband spectral data, but rarely have such methods been tested across broad regions. Here we illustrate a general approach for estimating key foliar chemical and morphological traits through space and time using NASA's Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS-Classic). We apply partial least squares regression (PLSR) to data from 237 field plots within 51 images acquired between 2008 and 2011. Using a series of 500 randomized 50/50 subsets of the original data, we generated spatially explicit maps of seven traits (leaf mass per area (M(area)), percentage nitrogen, carbon, fiber, lignin, and cellulose, and isotopic nitrogen concentration, δ15N) as well as pixel-wise uncertainties in their estimates based on error propagation in the analytical methods. Both M(area) and %N PLSR models had a R2 > 0.85. Root mean square errors (RMSEs) for both variables were less than 9% of the range of data. Fiber and lignin were predicted with R2 > 0.65 and carbon and cellulose with R2 > 0.45. Although R2 of %C and cellulose were lower than M(area) and %N, the measured variability of these constituents (especially %C) was also lower, and their RMSE values were beneath 12% of the range in overall variability. Model performance for δ15N was the lowest (R2 = 0.48, RMSE = 0.95 per thousand), but within 15% of the observed range. The resulting maps of chemical and morphological traits, together with their overall uncertainties, represent a first-of-its-kind approach for examining the spatiotemporal patterns of forest functioning and nutrient cycling across a broad range of temperate and sub-boreal ecosystems. These results offer an alternative to categorical maps of functional or physiognomic types by providing non

  4. Advanced imaging in femoroacetabular impingement: current state and future prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd eBittersohl

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement (FAI is now a known precursor of early osteoarthritis (OA of the hip. In terms of clinical intervention, the decision between joint preservation and joint replacement hinges on the severity of articular cartilage degeneration. The exact threshold during the course of disease progression when the cartilage damage is irreparable remains elusive. The intention behind radiographic imaging is to accurately identify the morphology of osseous structural abnormalities and to accurately characterize the chondrolabral damage as much as possible. However, both plain radiographs and computed tomography (CT are insensitive for articular cartilage anatomy and pathology. Advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI techniques include magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA and biochemically sensitive techniques of delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC, T1rho, T2/T2* mapping and several others. The diagnostic performance of these techniques to evaluate cartilage degeneration could improve the ability to predict an individual patient-specific outcome with non-surgical and surgical care. This review discusses the facts and current applications of biochemical MRI for hip joint cartilage assessment covering the roles of dGEMRIC, T2/T2*, and T1rho mapping. The basics of each technique and their specific role in FAI assessment are outlined. Current limitations and potential pitfalls as well as future directions of biochemical imaging are also outlined.

  5. Diabetic nonketotic hyperosmolar state: Interesting imaging observations in 2 patients with involuntary movements and seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shobha N

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We report two patients of diabetic nonketotic hyperosmolar state presenting acutely with "self-limiting hemichorea - hemiballismus" and "generalized convulsive status epilepticus". CT scan in both the patienta revealed a hyperdense nonenhancing basal ganglia. Magnetic resonance imaging brain of patient 1 showed it to be hyperintense on T1W image and iso-hyper intense on T2W image, minimally enhancing with contrast injection

  6. Diabetic nonketotic hyperosmolar state: Interesting imaging observations in 2 patients with involuntary movements and seizures

    OpenAIRE

    Shobha N; Sinha S; Taly A; Pal P; Chandrasekhar H

    2006-01-01

    We report two patients of diabetic nonketotic hyperosmolar state presenting acutely with "self-limiting hemichorea - hemiballismus" and "generalized convulsive status epilepticus". CT scan in both the patienta revealed a hyperdense nonenhancing basal ganglia. Magnetic resonance imaging brain of patient 1 showed it to be hyperintense on T1W image and iso-hyper intense on T2W image, minimally enhancing with contrast injection

  7. Behaviors of optical and chemical state of Nb+ implanted sapphire after annealing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The behavior of the radiation damage of sapphire crystal, produced by implantation with 380 keV Nb+ ion followed by annealing in a series of steps from 500 to 1100℃C at reducing atmosphere, was investigated in optical absorption and XPS measurements. It is found that the implanted niobium in sapphire is in different local environments with different chemical states after the annealing. The changes in optical density (OD) from the bands, based on the well known F-type centers, show that the annealing behavior of the radiation damage may be divided into different stages due to different mechanisms.

  8. Understanding the finite state projection and related methods for solving the chemical master equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, Khanh N.; Sidje, Roger B.

    2016-06-01

    The finite state projection (FSP) method has enabled us to solve the chemical master equation of some biological models that were considered out of reach not long ago. Since the original FSP method, much effort has gone into transforming it into an adaptive time-stepping algorithm as well as studying its accuracy. Some of the improvements include the multiple time interval FSP, the sliding windows, and most notably the Krylov-FSP approach. Our goal in this tutorial is to give the reader an overview of the current methods that build on the FSP.

  9. Ensemble velocity of non-processive molecular motors with multiple chemical states

    CERN Document Server

    Vilfan, Andrej

    2014-01-01

    We study the ensemble velocity of non-processive motor proteins, described with multiple chemical states. In particular, we discuss the velocity as a function of ATP concentration. Even a simple model which neglects the strain-dependence of transition rates, reverse transition rates and nonlinearities in the elasticity can show interesting functional dependencies, which deviate significantly from the frequently assumed Michaelis-Menten form. We discuss how the oder of events in the duty cycle can be inferred from the measured dependence. The model also predicts the possibility of velocity reversal at a certain ATP concentration if the duty cycle contains several conformational changes of opposite directionalities.

  10. Solid State and Chemical Radiation Dosimetry in Medicine and Biology. Proceedings of a Symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proceedings of a Symposium organized by the IAEA and held in Vienna, 3-7 October 1966. The meeting was attended by 104 participants from 21 countries and three international organizations. Contents: Solid state dosimetry (17 papers); Chemical dosimetry (10 papers); Invited lectures (2 papers); General aspects and other methods of dosimetry (6 papers); Panel discussion on research and development needed in dosimetry. Each paper is in its original language (32 English, 2 French and 1 Spanish) and is preceded by an abstract in English and one in the original language, if this is not English. Discussions are in English. (author)

  11. Quantum-chemical study of electronically excited states of protolytic forms of vanillic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vusovich, O. V.; Tchaikovskaya, O. N.; Sokolova, I. V.; Vasil'eva, N. Y.

    2015-12-01

    The paper describes an analysis of possible ways of deactivation of electronically excited states of 4-hydroxy- 3-methoxy-benzoic acid (vanillic acid) and its protolytic forms with the use of quantum-chemical methods INDO/S (intermediate neglect of differential overlap with a spectroscopic parameterization) and MEP (molecular electrostatic potential). The ratio of radiative and non-radiative deactivation channels of the electronic excitation energy is established. The rate constants of photophysical processes (internal and intercombination conversions) occurring after the absorption of light in these forms are evaluated.

  12. Is an "ideal" service institution image the same for all referral sources? The case of chemical dependency treatment programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, K; LaTour, M S

    1993-01-01

    In a competitive market like chemical dependency treatment, segmenting the professional referral market according to an "ideal" service image may offer a service institution a strategic advantage. Results of this study suggest that while different professionals in a referral market may attach differential importance to the same service feature, a favorable or unfavorable "image" seems to encompass how well both the professional and the professionals' client are treated by the service institution.

  13. Is an "ideal" service institution image the same for all referral sources? The case of chemical dependency treatment programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, K; LaTour, M S

    1993-01-01

    In a competitive market like chemical dependency treatment, segmenting the professional referral market according to an "ideal" service image may offer a service institution a strategic advantage. Results of this study suggest that while different professionals in a referral market may attach differential importance to the same service feature, a favorable or unfavorable "image" seems to encompass how well both the professional and the professionals' client are treated by the service institution. PMID:10129241

  14. Influence of Appearance-Related TV Commercials on Body Image State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legenbauer, Tanja; Ruhl, Ilka; Vocks, Silja

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of media exposure on body image state in eating-disordered (ED) patients. The attitudinal and perceptual components of body image are assessed, as well as any associations with dysfunctional cognitions and behavioral consequences. Twenty-five ED patients and 25 non-ED controls (ND) viewed commercials either…

  15. Enhanced 2D-image upconversion using solid-state lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian; Karamehmedovic, Emir; Dam, Jeppe Seidelin;

    2009-01-01

    the image inside a nonlinear PPKTP crystal located in the high intra-cavity field of a 1342 nm solid-state Nd:YVO4 laser, an upconverted image at 488 nm is generated. We have experimentally achieved an upconversion efficiency of 40% under CW conditions. The proposed technique can be further adapted for high...

  16. Microscope-on-Chip Using Micro-Channel and Solid State Image Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu

    2000-01-01

    Recently, Jet Propulsion Laboratory has invented and developed a miniature optical microscope, microscope-on-chip using micro-channel and solid state image sensors. It is lightweight, low-power, fast speed instrument, it has no image lens, does not need focus adjustment, and the total mass is less than 100g. A prototype has been built and demonstrated at JPL.

  17. Atomic scale imaging and spectroscopy of individual electron trap states using force detected dynamic tunnelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the first atomic scale imaging and spectroscopic measurements of electron trap states in completely non-conducting surfaces by dynamic tunnelling force microscopy/spectroscopy. Single electrons are dynamically shuttled to/from individual states in thick films of hafnium silicate and silicon dioxide. The new method opens up surfaces that are inaccessible to the scanning tunnelling microscope for imaging and spectroscopy on an atomic scale.

  18. Extracting knowledge from chemical imaging data using computational algorithms for digital cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Saumya; Bhargava, Rohit

    2015-06-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic imaging is an emerging microscopy modality for clinical histopathologic diagnoses as well as for biomedical research. Spectral data recorded in this modality are indicative of the underlying, spatially resolved biochemical composition but need computerized algorithms to digitally recognize and transform this information to a diagnostic tool to identify cancer or other physiologic conditions. Statistical pattern recognition forms the backbone of these recognition protocols and can be used for highly accurate results. Aided by biochemical correlations with normal and diseased states and the power of modern computer-aided pattern recognition, this approach is capable of combating many standing questions of traditional histology-based diagnosis models. For example, a simple diagnostic test can be developed to determine cell types in tissue. As a more advanced application, IR spectral data can be integrated with patient information to predict risk of cancer, providing a potential road to precision medicine and personalized care in cancer treatment. The IR imaging approach can be implemented to complement conventional diagnoses, as the samples remain unperturbed and are not destroyed. Despite high potential and utility of this approach, clinical implementation has not yet been achieved due to practical hurdles like speed of data acquisition and lack of optimized computational procedures for extracting clinically actionable information rapidly. The latter problem has been addressed by developing highly efficient ways to process IR imaging data but remains one that has considerable scope for progress. Here, we summarize the major issues and provide practical considerations in implementing a modified Bayesian classification protocol for digital molecular pathology. We hope to familiarize readers with analysis methods in IR imaging data and enable researchers to develop methods that can lead to the use of this promising

  19. Finite-state residual vector quantizer for image coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Steve S.; Wang, Jia-Shung

    1993-10-01

    Finite state vector quantization (FSVQ) has been proven during recent years to be a high quality and low bit rate coding scheme. A FSVQ has achieved the efficiency of a small codebook (the state codebook) VQ while maintaining the quality of a large codebook (the master codebook) VQ. However, the large master codebook has become a primary limitation of FSVQ if the implementation is carefully taken into account. A large amount of memory would be required in storing the master codebook and also much effort would be spent in maintaining the state codebook if the master codebook became too large. This problem could be partially solved by the mean/residual technique (MRVQ). That is, the block means and the residual vectors would be separately coded. A new hybrid coding scheme called the finite state residual vector quantization (FSRVQ) is proposed in this paper for the sake of utilizing both advantage in FSVQ and MRVQ. The codewords in FSRVQ were designed by removing the block means so as to reduce the codebook size. The block means were predicted by the neighboring blocks to reduce the bit rate. Additionally, the predicted means were added to the residual vectors so that the state codebooks could be generated entirely. The performance of FSRVQ was indicated from the experimental results to be better than that of both ordinary FSVQ and RMVQ uniformly.

  20. Imaging of degenerative spine disease--the state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasiadek, Marek J; Bladowska, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    The authors review the current state of imaging of degenerative spinal disease (DSD), which is one of the most common disorders in humans. The most important definitions as well as short descriptions of the etiopathology and clinical presentation of DSD are provided first, followed by an overview of conventional and advanced imaging methods that are used in DSD. The authors then discuss in detail the imaging patterns of particular types of degenerative changes. Finally, the current imaging algorithm in DSD is presented. The imaging method of choice is magnetic resonance, including advanced techniques--especially diffusion tensor imaging. Other imaging methods (plain radiography, computed tomography, vascular studies, scintigraphy, positron emission tomography, discography) play a supplementary role ).

  1. Quantitative chemical state analysis of supported vanadium oxide catalysts by high resolution vanadium Kα spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Takashi; Nanbu, Fumitaka; Tanaka, Tsunehiro; Kawai, Jun

    2011-03-01

    Oxidation states of vanadium species on Al(2)O(3), SiO(2), and TiO(2) were quantitatively analyzed by least-squares fitting of V Kα spectra recorded with a two-crystal X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. Uncertainties of analytical results by the normalization procedure, and coefficient of validation and the reduction behavior of vanadium species by X-ray irradiation were discussed. The V(5+)/V(4+)/V(3+) ratios on Al(2)O(3), SiO(2), and TiO(2) calcined at 773 K in air were determined to be ca. 6/3/1, 3/6/1, and 5/4/1, respectively. The possible chemical states of vanadium species on supports were proposed. PMID:21302919

  2. Atomic scale imaging of competing polar states in a Ruddlesden-Popper layered oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Greg; Ophus, Colin; Birol, Turan; Ciston, Jim; Lee, Che-Hui; Wang, Ke; Fennie, Craig J.; Schlom, Darrell G.; Alem, Nasim; Gopalan, Venkatraman

    2016-08-01

    Layered complex oxides offer an unusually rich materials platform for emergent phenomena through many built-in design knobs such as varied topologies, chemical ordering schemes and geometric tuning of the structure. A multitude of polar phases are predicted to compete in Ruddlesden-Popper (RP), An+1BnO3n+1, thin films by tuning layer dimension (n) and strain; however, direct atomic-scale evidence for such competing states is currently absent. Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy with sub-Ångstrom resolution in Srn+1TinO3n+1 thin films, we demonstrate the coexistence of antiferroelectric, ferroelectric and new ordered and low-symmetry phases. We also directly image the atomic rumpling of the rock salt layer, a critical feature in RP structures that is responsible for the competing phases; exceptional quantitative agreement between electron microscopy and density functional theory is demonstrated. The study shows that layered topologies can enable multifunctionality through highly competitive phases exhibiting diverse phenomena in a single structure.

  3. Atomic scale imaging of competing polar states in a Ruddlesden–Popper layered oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Greg; Ophus, Colin; Birol, Turan; Ciston, Jim; Lee, Che-Hui; Wang, Ke; Fennie, Craig J.; Schlom, Darrell G.; Alem, Nasim; Gopalan, Venkatraman

    2016-01-01

    Layered complex oxides offer an unusually rich materials platform for emergent phenomena through many built-in design knobs such as varied topologies, chemical ordering schemes and geometric tuning of the structure. A multitude of polar phases are predicted to compete in Ruddlesden–Popper (RP), An+1BnO3n+1, thin films by tuning layer dimension (n) and strain; however, direct atomic-scale evidence for such competing states is currently absent. Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy with sub-Ångstrom resolution in Srn+1TinO3n+1 thin films, we demonstrate the coexistence of antiferroelectric, ferroelectric and new ordered and low-symmetry phases. We also directly image the atomic rumpling of the rock salt layer, a critical feature in RP structures that is responsible for the competing phases; exceptional quantitative agreement between electron microscopy and density functional theory is demonstrated. The study shows that layered topologies can enable multifunctionality through highly competitive phases exhibiting diverse phenomena in a single structure. PMID:27578622

  4. Atomic scale imaging of competing polar states in a Ruddlesden-Popper layered oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Greg; Ophus, Colin; Birol, Turan; Ciston, Jim; Lee, Che-Hui; Wang, Ke; Fennie, Craig J; Schlom, Darrell G; Alem, Nasim; Gopalan, Venkatraman

    2016-01-01

    Layered complex oxides offer an unusually rich materials platform for emergent phenomena through many built-in design knobs such as varied topologies, chemical ordering schemes and geometric tuning of the structure. A multitude of polar phases are predicted to compete in Ruddlesden-Popper (RP), An+1BnO3n+1, thin films by tuning layer dimension (n) and strain; however, direct atomic-scale evidence for such competing states is currently absent. Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy with sub-Ångstrom resolution in Srn+1TinO3n+1 thin films, we demonstrate the coexistence of antiferroelectric, ferroelectric and new ordered and low-symmetry phases. We also directly image the atomic rumpling of the rock salt layer, a critical feature in RP structures that is responsible for the competing phases; exceptional quantitative agreement between electron microscopy and density functional theory is demonstrated. The study shows that layered topologies can enable multifunctionality through highly competitive phases exhibiting diverse phenomena in a single structure. PMID:27578622

  5. State Space Truncation with Quantified Errors for Accurate Solutions to Discrete Chemical Master Equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Youfang; Terebus, Anna; Liang, Jie

    2016-04-01

    The discrete chemical master equation (dCME) provides a general framework for studying stochasticity in mesoscopic reaction networks. Since its direct solution rapidly becomes intractable due to the increasing size of the state space, truncation of the state space is necessary for solving most dCMEs. It is therefore important to assess the consequences of state space truncations so errors can be quantified and minimized. Here we describe a novel method for state space truncation. By partitioning a reaction network into multiple molecular equivalence groups (MEGs), we truncate the state space by limiting the total molecular copy numbers in each MEG. We further describe a theoretical framework for analysis of the truncation error in the steady-state probability landscape using reflecting boundaries. By aggregating the state space based on the usage of a MEG and constructing an aggregated Markov process, we show that the truncation error of a MEG can be asymptotically bounded by the probability of states on the reflecting boundary of the MEG. Furthermore, truncating states of an arbitrary MEG will not undermine the estimated error of truncating any other MEGs. We then provide an overall error estimate for networks with multiple MEGs. To rapidly determine the appropriate size of an arbitrary MEG, we also introduce an a priori method to estimate the upper bound of its truncation error. This a priori estimate can be rapidly computed from reaction rates of the network, without the need of costly trial solutions of the dCME. As examples, we show results of applying our methods to the four stochastic networks of (1) the birth and death model, (2) the single gene expression model, (3) the genetic toggle switch model, and (4) the phage lambda bistable epigenetic switch model. We demonstrate how truncation errors and steady-state probability landscapes can be computed using different sizes of the MEG(s) and how the results validate our theories. Overall, the novel state space

  6. Image-guided breast biopsy: state-of-the-art

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Flynn, E.A.M., E-mail: lizoflynn@doctors.org.u [South East London Breast Screening Programme and National Breast Screening Training Centre, Kings College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London SE5 9RS (United Kingdom); Wilson, A.R.M.; Michell, M.J. [South East London Breast Screening Programme and National Breast Screening Training Centre, Kings College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London SE5 9RS (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-15

    Percutaneous image-guided breast biopsy is widely practised to evaluate predominantly non-palpable breast lesions. There has been steady development in percutaneous biopsy techniques. Fine-needle aspiration cytology was the original method of sampling, followed in the early 1990s by large core needle biopsy. The accuracy of both has been improved by ultrasound and stereotactic guidance. Larger bore vacuum-assisted biopsy devices became available in the late 1990s and are now commonplace in most breast units. We review the different types of breast biopsy devices currently available together with various localization techniques used, focusing on their advantages, limitations and current controversial clinical management issues.

  7. Liver magnetic resonance imaging: State of the art

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paul; E; Sijens

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has now been used for about three decades to characterize the human liver in a non-invasive way, that is without the need of using ionizing radiation or removing tissue samples. During the past few years, technical progress has been considerable and novel applications of MRI have been implemented in the clinic. The beginning of a new decade offers an excellent opportunity for having fi ve experts to present their view on the current status of MRI (and magnetic resonance spec...

  8. Image-guided breast biopsy: state-of-the-art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Flynn, E A M; Wilson, A R M; Michell, M J

    2010-04-01

    Percutaneous image-guided breast biopsy is widely practised to evaluate predominantly non-palpable breast lesions. There has been steady development in percutaneous biopsy techniques. Fine-needle aspiration cytology was the original method of sampling, followed in the early 1990s by large core needle biopsy. The accuracy of both has been improved by ultrasound and stereotactic guidance. Larger bore vacuum-assisted biopsy devices became available in the late 1990s and are now commonplace in most breast units. We review the different types of breast biopsy devices currently available together with various localization techniques used, focusing on their advantages, limitations and current controversial clinical management issues. PMID:20338392

  9. Image-guided breast biopsy: state-of-the-art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Percutaneous image-guided breast biopsy is widely practised to evaluate predominantly non-palpable breast lesions. There has been steady development in percutaneous biopsy techniques. Fine-needle aspiration cytology was the original method of sampling, followed in the early 1990s by large core needle biopsy. The accuracy of both has been improved by ultrasound and stereotactic guidance. Larger bore vacuum-assisted biopsy devices became available in the late 1990s and are now commonplace in most breast units. We review the different types of breast biopsy devices currently available together with various localization techniques used, focusing on their advantages, limitations and current controversial clinical management issues.

  10. Direct imaging of topological edge states at a bilayer graphene domain wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Long-Jing; Jiang, Hua; Qiao, Jia-Bin; He, Lin

    2016-06-01

    The AB-BA domain wall in gapped graphene bilayers is a rare naked structure hosting topological electronic states. Although it has been extensively studied in theory, a direct imaging of its topological edge states is still missing. Here we image the topological edge states at the graphene bilayer domain wall by using scanning tunnelling microscope. The simultaneously obtained atomic-resolution images of the domain wall provide us unprecedented opportunities to measure the spatially varying edge states within it. The one-dimensional conducting channels are observed to be mainly located around the two edges of the domain wall, which is reproduced quite well by our theoretical calculations. Our experiment further demonstrates that the one-dimensional topological states are quite robust even in the presence of high magnetic fields. The result reported here may raise hopes of graphene-based electronics with ultra-low dissipation.

  11. Imaging the dynamics of free-electron Landau states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schattschneider, P; Schachinger, Th; Stöger-Pollach, M; Löffler, S; Steiger-Thirsfeld, A; Bliokh, K Y; Nori, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Landau levels and states of electrons in a magnetic field are fundamental quantum entities underlying the quantum Hall and related effects in condensed matter physics. However, the real-space properties and observation of Landau wave functions remain elusive. Here we report the real-space observation of Landau states and the internal rotational dynamics of free electrons. States with different quantum numbers are produced using nanometre-sized electron vortex beams, with a radius chosen to match the waist of the Landau states, in a quasi-uniform magnetic field. Scanning the beams along the propagation direction, we reconstruct the rotational dynamics of the Landau wave functions with angular frequency ~100 GHz. We observe that Landau modes with different azimuthal quantum numbers belong to three classes, which are characterized by rotations with zero, Larmor and cyclotron frequencies, respectively. This is in sharp contrast to the uniform cyclotron rotation of classical electrons, and in perfect agreement with recent theoretical predictions. PMID:25105563

  12. Chemical Imaging and Stable Isotope Analysis of Atmospheric Particles by NanoSIMS (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, B.; Harris, E. J.; Pöhlker, C.; Wiedemann, K. T.; van Pinxteren, D.; Tilgner, A.; Fomba, K. W.; Schneider, J.; Roth, A.; Gnauk, T.; Fahlbusch, B.; Mertes, S.; Lee, T.; Collett, J. L.; Shiraiwa, M.; Gunthe, S. S.; Smith, M.; Artaxo, P. P.; Gilles, M.; Kilcoyne, A. L.; Moffet, R.; Weigand, M.; Martin, S. T.; Poeschl, U.; Andreae, M. O.; Hoppe, P.; Herrmann, H.; Borrmann, S.

    2013-12-01

    Chemical imaging analysis of the internal distribution of chemical compounds by a combination of SEM-EDX, and NanoSIMS allows investigating the physico-chemical properties and isotopic composition of individual aerosol particles. Stable sulphur isotope analysis provides insight into the sources, sinks and oxidation pathways of SO2 in the environment. Oxidation by OH radicals, O3 and H2O2 enriches the heavier isotope in the product sulphate, whereas oxidation by transition metal ions (TMI), hypohalites and hypohalous acids depletes the heavier isotope in the product sulphate. The isotope fractionation during SO2 oxidation by stabilized Criegee Intermediate radicals is unknown. We studied the relationship between aerosol chemical composition and predominant sulphate formation pathways in continental clouds in Central Europe and during the wet season in the Amazon rain forest. Sulphate formation in continental clouds in Central Europe was studied during HCCT-2010, a lagrangian-type field experiment, during which an orographic cloud was used as a natural flow-through reactor to study in-cloud aerosol processing (Harris et al. 2013). Sulphur isotopic compositions in SO2 and H2SO4 gas and particulate sulphate were measured and changes in the sulphur isotope composition of SO2 between the upwind and downwind measurement sites were used to determine the dominant SO2 chemical removal process occurring in the cloud. Changes in the isotopic composition of particulate sulphate revealed that transition metal catalysis pathway was the dominant SO2 oxidation pathway. This reaction occurred primarily on coarse mineral dust particles. Thus, sulphate produced due to in-cloud SO2 oxidation is removed relatively quickly from the atmosphere and has a minor climatic effect. The aerosol samples from the Amazonian rainforest, a pristine tropical environment, were collected during the rainy season. The samples were found to be dominated by SOA particles in the fine mode and primary

  13. STUDIES ON THE CHEMICAL STRUCTURES OF ACTIVATED CARBON FIBERS BY SOLID STATE NMR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FURuowen; HuangWenqiang; 等

    1999-01-01

    The solid state C13-NMR spectra of different ACFs from various precursor fibers were recorded in this paper,The effects of activation conditions on chemical structures of ACFs,as well as the changes of chemical structures during carbonization and redox reaction were inverstigated by NMR technique,At same time,the soild state P31-NMR spectra of ACFS are studied.The C13-NMR spectra of ACFs can be divided into six bands that are assigned to methyl and methylene groups,hydroxyl and ether groups.acetal (or methylenedioxy) carbon,graphite-like aromatic carbon structure,phenol,and quinone groups,respectively.Only phosphorous pentoxide exists on ACFs and CFs.Moreover,most of them are stuck over the crystal face but not at the edge of graphite-like micro-crystal.The carbonization and activation conditions affect the C13-NMR spectra of ACFs.The experimental rsults indicate that the redox reaction of ACFs with oxidants greatly consumes C-H group.

  14. Synthesis of high surface area nanometer magnesia by solid-state chemical reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Hongbo; WANG Pei; ZHAO Biying; ZHU Yuexiang; XIE Youchang

    2007-01-01

    Nanometer MgO samples with high surface area,small crystal size and mesoporous texture were synthesized tion process accelerated the sintering of MgO,and MgO with calcining its precursor in flowing dry nitrogen at 520℃ for 4 h.The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction,N2 adsorption,transmission electron microscopy,thermogravimetry,and differential thermal analysis.The as-prepared MgO was composed of nanocrystals with a size of about 4-5 nm and formed a wormhole-like porous structure.The MgO also had good thermal stability,and its surface areas remained at 357 and 153 m2.g-1 after calcination at 600 and 800℃ for 2 h,respectively.Compared with the MgO sample prepared by the precipitation method,MgO prepared by solid-state chemical reaction has uniform pore size distribution,surface area,and crystal size.The solid-state chemical method has the advantages of low cost,low pollution,and high yield,therefore it appears to be a promising method in the industrial manufacture of nanometer MgO.

  15. Chemical state of mercury and selenium in sewage sludge ash based P-fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Christian; Krüger, Oliver; Herzel, Hannes; Amidani, Lucia; Adam, Christian

    2016-08-01

    Phosphorus-fertilizers from secondary resources such as sewage sludge ash (SSA) will become more important in the future as they could substitute conventional fertilizers based on the nonrenewable resource phosphate rock. Thermochemical approaches were developed which remove heavy metals from SSA prior to its fertilizer application on farmlands. We analyzed the chemical state of mercury and selenium in SSA before and after thermochemical treatment under different conditions for P-fertilizer production by X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. In some incineration plants the mercury loaded carbon adsorber from off-gas cleaning was collected together with the SSA for waste disposal. SSAs from those plants contained mercury mainly bound to carbon/organic material. The other SSAs contained inorganic mercury compounds which are most probably stabilized in the SSA matrix and were thus not evaporated during incineration. During thermochemical treatment, carbon-bound mercury was removed quantitatively. In contrast, a certain immobile fraction of inorganic mercury compounds remained in thermochemically treated SSA, which were not clearly identified. HgSe might be one of the inorganic compounds, which is supported by results of Se K-edge XANES spectroscopy. Furthermore, the chemical state of selenium in the SSAs was very sensitive to the conditions of the thermochemical treatment. PMID:27060867

  16. Novel chemically cross-linked solid state electrolyte for dye-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin Xiong; Tan Weiwei; Xiang Wangchun [Key Laboratory of Photochemistry, Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)] [Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Lin Yuan, E-mail: Linyuan@iccas.ac.c [Key Laboratory of Photochemistry, Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Zhang Jingbo, E-mail: jbzhang@iccas.ac.c [Key Laboratory of Photochemistry, Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Xiao Xurui; Li Xueping; Zhou Xiaowen; Fang Shibi [Key Laboratory of Photochemistry, Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2010-08-01

    Poly(vinylpyridine-co-ethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate) (P(VP-co-MEOMA)) and {alpha},{omega}-diiodo poly(ethylene oxide-co-propylene oxide) (I[(EO){sub 0.8}-co-(PO){sub 0.2}]{sub y}I) were synthesized and used as chemically cross-linked precursors of the electrolyte for dye-sensitized solar cells. Meanwhile, {alpha}-iodo poly(ethylene oxide-co-propylene oxide) methyl ether (CH{sub 3}O[(EO){sub 0.8}-co-(PO){sub 0.2}]{sub x}I) was synthesized and added into the electrolyte as an internal plasticizer. Novel polymer electrolyte resulting from chemically cross-linked precursors was obtained by the quaterisation at 90 {sup o}C for 30 min. The characteristics for this kind of electrolyte were investigated by means of ionic conductivity, thermogravimetric and photocurrent-voltage. The ambient ionic conductivity was significantly enhanced to 2.3 x 10{sup -4} S cm{sup -1} after introducing plasticizer, modified-ionic liquid. The weight loss of the solid state electrolyte at 200 {sup o}C was 1.8%, and its decomposition temperature was 287 {sup o}C. Solid state dye-sensitized solar cell based on chemically cross-linked electrolyte presented an overall conversion efficiency of 2.35% under AM1.5 irradiation (100 mW cm{sup -2}). The as-fabricated device maintained 88% of its initial performance at room temperature even without sealing for 30 days, showing a good stability.

  17. Quantifying the chemical composition of soil organic carbon with solid-state 13C NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldock, J. A.; Sanderman, J.

    2011-12-01

    The vulnerability of soil organic carbon (SOC) to biological decomposition and mineralisation to CO2 is defined at least partially by its chemical composition. Highly aromatic charcoal-like SOC components are more stable to biological decomposition than other forms of carbon including cellulose. Solid-state 13C NMR has gained wide acceptance as a method capable of defining SOC chemical composition and mathematical fitting processes have been developed to estimate biochemical composition. Obtaining accurate estimates depends on an ability to quantitatively detect all carbon present in a sample. Often little attention has been paid to defining the proportion of organic carbon present in a soil that is observable in solid-state 13C NMR analyses of soil samples. However, if such data is to be used to inform carbon cycling studies, it is critical that quantitative assessments of SOC observability be undertaken. For example, it is now well established that a significant discrimination exists against the detection of the low proton content polyaromatic structures typical of charcoal using cross polarisation 13C NMR analyses. Such discrimination does not exist where direct polarisation analyses are completed. In this study, the chemical composition of SOC as defined by cross polarisation and direct polarisation13C NMR analyses will be compared for Australian soils collected from under a diverse range of agricultural managements and climatic conditions. Results indicate that where significant charcoal C contents exist, it is highly under-represented in the acquired CP spectra. For some soils, a discrimination against alkyl carbon was also evident. The ability to derive correction factors to compensate for such discriminations will be assessed and presented.

  18. Experimental and Quantum-Chemical Study of Electronically Excited States of Protolytic Isovanillin Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vusovich, O. V.; Tchaikovskaya, O. N.; Sokolova, I. V.; Vasil'eva, N. Yu.

    2014-05-01

    Methods of electronic spectroscopy and quantum chemistry are used to compare protolytic vanillin and isovanillin species. Three protolytic species: anion, cation, and neutral are distinguished in the ground state of the examined molecules. Vanillin and isovanillin in the ground state in water possess identical spectral characteristics: line positions and intensities in the absorption spectra coincide. Minima of the electrostatic potential demonstrate that the deepest isomer minimum is observed on the carbonyl oxygen atom. However, investigations of the fluorescence spectra show that the radiative properties of isomers differ. An analysis of results of quantum-chemical calculations demonstrate that the long-wavelength ππ* transition in the vanillin absorption spectra is formed due to electron charge transfer from the phenol part of the molecule to oxygen atoms of the methoxy and carbonyl groups, and in the isovanillin absorption spectra, it is formed only on the oxygen atom of the methoxy group. The presence of hydroxyl and carbonyl groups in the structure of the examined molecules leads to the fact that isovanillin in the ground S0 state, the same as vanillin, possesses acidic properties, whereas in the excited S1 state, they possess basic properties. A comparison of the рKа values of aqueous solutions demonstrates that vanillin possesses stronger acidic and basic properties in comparison with isovanillin.

  19. A Practical and Portable Solids-State Electronic Terahertz Imaging System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Smart

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A practical compact solid-state terahertz imaging system is presented. Various beam guiding architectures were explored and hardware performance assessed to improve its compactness, robustness, multi-functionality and simplicity of operation. The system performance in terms of image resolution, signal-to-noise ratio, the electronic signal modulation versus optical chopper, is evaluated and discussed. The system can be conveniently switched between transmission and reflection mode according to the application. A range of imaging application scenarios was explored and images of high visual quality were obtained in both transmission and reflection mode.

  20. Stochastic quasi-steady state approximations for asymptotic solutions of the chemical master equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alarcón, Tomás [Centre de Recerca Matemàtica, Edifici C, Campus de Bellaterra, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Departament de Matemàtiques, Universitat Atonòma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain)

    2014-05-14

    In this paper, we propose two methods to carry out the quasi-steady state approximation in stochastic models of enzyme catalytic regulation, based on WKB asymptotics of the chemical master equation or of the corresponding partial differential equation for the generating function. The first of the methods we propose involves the development of multiscale generalisation of a WKB approximation of the solution of the master equation, where the separation of time scales is made explicit which allows us to apply the quasi-steady state approximation in a straightforward manner. To the lowest order, the multi-scale WKB method provides a quasi-steady state, Gaussian approximation of the probability distribution. The second method is based on the Hamilton-Jacobi representation of the stochastic process where, as predicted by large deviation theory, the solution of the partial differential equation for the corresponding characteristic function is given in terms of an effective action functional. The optimal transition paths between two states are then given by those paths that maximise the effective action. Such paths are the solutions of the Hamilton equations for the Hamiltonian associated to the effective action functional. The quasi-steady state approximation is applied to the Hamilton equations thus providing an approximation to the optimal transition paths and the transition time between two states. Using this approximation we predict that, unlike the mean-field quasi-steady approximation result, the rate of enzyme catalysis depends explicitly on the initial number of enzyme molecules. The accuracy and validity of our approximated results as well as that of our predictions regarding the behaviour of the stochastic enzyme catalytic models are verified by direct simulation of the stochastic model using Gillespie stochastic simulation algorithm.

  1. 3D Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of the Distribution of Aluminum Coordination Environments in Zeolites with Soft X-Ray Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aramburo, Luis R.; Liu, Yijin; Tyliszczak, Tolek; de Groot, Frank M. F.; Andrews, Joy C.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we present the first nanoscale chemical imaging study revealing the spatial distribution of the amount and coordination environment of aluminum in zeolite materials with 3D scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). For this purpose, we have focused on two showcase samples involving the in

  2. Imaging Photon Lattice States by Scanning Defect Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, D. L.; Shanks, W. E.; Li, Andy C. Y.; Ateshian, Lamia; Koch, Jens; Houck, A. A.

    2016-04-01

    Microwave photons inside lattices of coupled resonators and superconducting qubits can exhibit surprising matterlike behavior. Realizing such open-system quantum simulators presents an experimental challenge and requires new tools and measurement techniques. Here, we introduce scanning defect microscopy as one such tool and illustrate its use in mapping the normal-mode structure of microwave photons inside a 49-site kagome lattice of coplanar waveguide resonators. Scanning is accomplished by moving a probe equipped with a sapphire tip across the lattice. This locally perturbs resonator frequencies and induces shifts of the lattice resonance frequencies, which we determine by measuring the transmission spectrum. From the magnitude of mode shifts, we can reconstruct photon field amplitudes at each lattice site and thus create spatial images of the photon-lattice normal modes.

  3. Multispectral UV imaging for fast and non-destructive quality control of chemical and physical tablet attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klukkert, Marten; Wu, Jian X; Rantanen, Jukka; Carstensen, Jens M; Rades, Thomas; Leopold, Claudia S

    2016-07-30

    Monitoring of tablet quality attributes in direct vicinity of the production process requires analytical techniques that allow fast, non-destructive, and accurate tablet characterization. The overall objective of this study was to investigate the applicability of multispectral UV imaging as a reliable, rapid technique for estimation of the tablet API content and tablet hardness, as well as determination of tablet intactness and the tablet surface density profile. One of the aims was to establish an image analysis approach based on multivariate image analysis and pattern recognition to evaluate the potential of UV imaging for automatized quality control of tablets with respect to their intactness and surface density profile. Various tablets of different composition and different quality regarding their API content, radial tensile strength, intactness, and surface density profile were prepared using an eccentric as well as a rotary tablet press at compression pressures from 20MPa up to 410MPa. It was found, that UV imaging can provide both, relevant information on chemical and physical tablet attributes. The tablet API content and radial tensile strength could be estimated by UV imaging combined with partial least squares analysis. Furthermore, an image analysis routine was developed and successfully applied to the UV images that provided qualitative information on physical tablet surface properties such as intactness and surface density profiles, as well as quantitative information on variations in the surface density. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that UV imaging combined with image analysis is an effective and non-destructive method to determine chemical and physical quality attributes of tablets and is a promising approach for (near) real-time monitoring of the tablet compaction process and formulation optimization purposes. PMID:26657202

  4. Transmission coefficients for chemical reactions with multiple states: role of quantum decoherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Lande, Aurélien; Řezáč, Jan; Lévy, Bernard; Sanders, Barry C; Salahub, Dennis R

    2011-03-23

    Transition-state theory (TST) is a widely accepted paradigm for rationalizing the kinetics of chemical reactions involving one potential energy surface (PES). Multiple PES reaction rate constants can also be estimated within semiclassical approaches provided the hopping probability between the quantum states is taken into account when determining the transmission coefficient. In the Marcus theory of electron transfer, this hopping probability was historically calculated with models such as Landau-Zener theory. Although the hopping probability is intimately related to the question of the transition from the fully quantum to the semiclassical description, this issue is not adequately handled in physicochemical models commonly in use. In particular, quantum nuclear effects such as decoherence or dephasing are not present in the rate constant expressions. Retaining the convenient semiclassical picture, we include these effects through the introduction of a phenomenological quantum decoherence function. A simple modification to the usual TST rate constant expression is proposed: in addition to the electronic coupling, a characteristic decoherence time τ(dec) now also appears as a key parameter of the rate constant. This new parameter captures the idea that molecular systems, although intrinsically obeying quantum mechanical laws, behave semiclassically after a finite but nonzero amount of time (τ(dec)). This new degree of freedom allows a fresh look at the underlying physics of chemical reactions involving more than one quantum state. The ability of the proposed formula to describe the main physical lines of the phenomenon is confirmed by comparison with results obtained from density functional theory molecular dynamics simulations for a triplet to singlet transition within a copper dioxygen adduct relevant to the question of dioxygen activation by copper monooxygenases.

  5. Chemical reactivity of graphene oxide towards amines elucidated by solid-state NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacchi, Isabella A.; Spinato, Cinzia; Raya, Jésus; Bianco, Alberto; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia

    2016-07-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is an attractive nanomaterial for many applications. Controlling the functionalization of GO is essential for the design of graphene-based conjugates with novel properties. But, the chemical composition of GO has not been fully elucidated yet. Due to the high reactivity of the oxygenated moieties, mainly epoxy, hydroxyl and carboxyl groups, several derivatization reactions may occur concomitantly. The reactivity of GO with amine derivatives has been exploited in the literature to design graphene-based conjugates, mainly through amidation. However, in this study we undoubtedly demonstrate using magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR that the reaction between GO and amine functions occurs via ring opening of the epoxides, and not by amidation. We also prove that there is a negligible amount of carboxylic acid groups in two GO samples obtained by a different synthesis process, hence eliminating the possibility of amidation reactions with amine derivatives. This work brings additional insights into the chemical reactivity of GO, which is fundamental to control its functionalization, and highlights the major role of MAS NMR spectroscopy for a comprehensive characterization of derivatized GO.Graphene oxide (GO) is an attractive nanomaterial for many applications. Controlling the functionalization of GO is essential for the design of graphene-based conjugates with novel properties. But, the chemical composition of GO has not been fully elucidated yet. Due to the high reactivity of the oxygenated moieties, mainly epoxy, hydroxyl and carboxyl groups, several derivatization reactions may occur concomitantly. The reactivity of GO with amine derivatives has been exploited in the literature to design graphene-based conjugates, mainly through amidation. However, in this study we undoubtedly demonstrate using magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR that the reaction between GO and amine functions occurs via ring opening of the epoxides, and not by

  6. Universal imaging: Dissociative ionization of polyatomic molecules, chemical dynamics beamline 9.0.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A third endstation was recently added to the Chemical Dynamics beamline, designed to exploit the high flux broadband undulator light for a range of studies of reactive scattering, photochemistry and photoionization processes using time-of-flight mass spectroscopy coupled with position-sensitive detection. Two molecular beam sources are fixed at right angles, with the undulator light, or laser beams, intersecting the molecular beams at 45 degrees. To date, beamline experiments have included a study of dissociative photoionization of a variety of molecules including N2O and SF6. In this mode, a single molecular beam source is used, with the tunable undulator light inducing, in SF6 for example, the process SF6 → SF6+ + e- → SF5+ + F + e-. The SF5+ ions are accelerated up the flight tube, mass selected and detected as a function of position on a phosphor screen viewed by a CCD camera. The position directly reveals the recoil speed (or translational energy release) and angular distribution for the dissociative ionization process. Furthermore, this measurement is obtained for all recoil speeds and angles simultaneously. Such detailed angular information has not previously been obtained for dissociative ionization processes; typically ion time-of-flight profiles are deconvoluted to yield rough insight into the angular distributions. The recorded image is actually a 2-dimensional projection of the nascent 3-dimensional velocity distribution, but established tomographic techniques enable the authors to reconstruct the 3-D distribution

  7. Measurement of drug agglomerates in powder blending simulation samples by near infrared chemical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weiyong; Woldu, Abraham; Kelly, Richard; McCool, Jim; Bruce, Rick; Rasmussen, Henrik; Cunningham, John; Winstead, Denita

    2008-02-28

    This research note describes a powder blending simulation study conducted using 20-mL scintillation vials and a bench-top rotating mixer on a scale of 2g for each sample. In order to investigate the impact of mean particle size and size distribution on blending behavior of an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), the drug substance was separated into sieve fractions using the US standard sieves of 60, 80, 100, 200, and 325mesh. Each of the fractions was mixed with two excipients (hydroxypropyl methylcellulose and microcrystalline cellulose) for up to 20min. Then the blending samples were analyzed by a near infrared chemical imaging (NIR-CI) system. The NIR-CI system was able to measure API particles/domains (agglomerates) at 0.001mm(2) and above within a 11.2mmx9.0mm field of view. It was found that blends prepared with larger API particles (60-200 mesh) contain agglomerated API domains > or =0.1mm(2). The blends prepared with finer API particles (< or =325 mesh) show the characteristics of a randomized mixing. This simple and effective method can be used for evaluation of blending behavior for APIs in formulation development. PMID:17951017

  8. iCATSI: multi-pixel imaging differential spectroradiometer for standoff detection and quantification of chemical threats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prel, Florent; Moreau, Louis; Lavoie, Hugo; Bouffard, François; Thériault, Jean-Marc; Vallieres, Christian; Roy, Claude; Dubé, Denis

    2011-11-01

    Homeland security and first responders are often faced with safety situations involving the identification of unknown volatile chemicals. Examples include industrial fires, chemical warfare, industrial leak, etc. The Improved Compact ATmospheric Sounding Interferometer (iCATSI) sensor has been developed to investigate the standoff detection and identification of toxic industrial chemicals (TICs), chemical warfare agents (CWA) and other chemicals. iCATSI is a combination of the CATSI instrument, a standoff differential FTIR optimised for the characterization of chemicals and the MR-i, the hyperspectral imaging spectroradiometer of ABB Bomem based on the proven MR spectroradiometers. The instrument is equipped with a dual-input telescope to perform optical background subtraction. The resulting signal is the difference between the spectral radiance entering each input port. With that method, the signal from the background is automatically removed from the signal of the target of interest. The iCATSI sensor is able to detect, spectrally resolve and identify 5 meters plumes up to 5 km range. The instrument is capable of sensing in the VLWIR (cut-off near 14 μm) to support research related to standoff chemical detection. In one of its configurations, iCATSI produces three 24 × 16 spectral images per second from 5.5 to 14 μm at a spectral resolution of 16 cm-1. In another configuration, iCATSI produces from two to four spectral images per second of 256 × 256 pixels from 8 to 13 μm with the same spectral resolution. Overview of the capabilities of the instrument and results from tests and field trials will be presented.

  9. Prediction of microvascular invasion of hepatocellular carcinomas with gadoxetic acid-enhanced MR imaging: Impact of intra-tumoral fat detected on chemical-shift images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Ji Hye [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Kon, E-mail: jmyr@dreamwiz.com [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Sanghyeok [Department of Radiology, Guri Hospital, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Guri (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Woo Kyoung; Choi, Dongil; Lee, Won Jae [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Intra-tumoral fat detected with MR imaging may suggest lower risk for MVI of HCC. • Alfa-fetoprotein, tumor size, and fat component were associated with MVI of HCC. • Chemical shift MRI should be considered for the evaluation of HCC. - Abstract: Purpose: To investigate the impact of intra-tumoral fat detected by chemical-shift MR imaging in predicting the MVI of HCC. Materials and methods: Gadoxetic acid-enhanced MR imaging of 365 surgically proven HCCs from 365 patients (306 men, 59 women; mean age, 55.6 years) were evaluated. HCCs were classified into two groups, fat-containing and non-fat-containing, based on the presence of fat on chemical-shift images. Fat-containing HCCs were subdivided into diffuse or focal fatty change groups. Logistic regression analyses were used to identify clinical and MR findings associated with MVI. Results: Based on MR imaging, 66 tumors were classified as fat-containing HCCs and 299 as non-fat-containing HCCs. Among the 66 fat-containing HCCs, 38 (57.6%) showed diffuse fatty changes and 28 (42.4%) showed focal fatty changes. MVI was present in 18 (27.3%) fat-containing HCCs and in 117 (39.1%) non-fat-containing HCCs (P = 0.07). Univariate analysis revealed that serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and tumor size were significantly associated with MVI (P < 0.001). A multiple logistic regression analysis showed that log AFP (odds ratio 1.178, P = 0.0016), tumor size (odds ratio 1.809, P < 0.001), and intra-tumoral fat (odds ratio 0.515, P = 0.0387) were independent variables associated with MVI. Conclusion: Intra-tumoral fat detected with MR imaging may suggest lower risk for MVI of HCC and, therefore, a possibly more favorable prognosis, but the clinical value of this finding is uncertain.

  10. Three-dimensional imaging of the metabolic state of c-MYC-induced mammary tumor with the cryo-imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhihong; Liu, Qian; Luo, Qingming; Zhang, Min Z.; Blessington, Dana M.; Zhou, Lanlan; Chodosh, Lewis A.; Zheng, Gang; Chance, Britton

    2003-07-01

    This study imaged the metabolic state of a growing tumor and the relationship between energy metabolism and the ability of glucose uptake in whole tumor tissue with cryo-imaging at 77° K. A MTB/TOM mouse model, bearing c-MYC-induced mammary tumor, was very rapidly freeze-trapped 2 hrs post Pyro-2DG injection. The fluorescence signals of oxidized flavoprotein (Fp), reduced pyridine nucleotide (PN), pyro-2DG, and the reflection signal of deoxy-hemoglobin were imaged every 100 μm from the top surface to the bottom of the tumor sequentially, 9 sections in total. Each of the four signals was constructed into 3D images with Amira software. Both Fp and PN signals could be detected in the growing tumor regions, and a higher reduction state where was shown in the ratio images. The necrotic tumor regions displayed a very strong Fp signal and weak PN signal. In the bloody extravasation regions, Fp and PN signals were observably diminished. Therefore, the regions of high growth and necrosis in the tumor could be determined according to the Fp and PN signals. The content of deoxy-hemoglobin (Hb) in the tumor was positively correlated with the reduced PN signal. Pyro-2DG signal was only evident in the growing condition region in the tumor. Normalized 3D cross-correlation showed that Pyro-2DG signal was similar to the redox ratio. The results indicated that glucose uptake in the tumor was consistent with the redox state of the tumor. And both Pyro-2DG and mitochondrial NADH fluorescence showed bimodal histograms suggesting that the two population of c-MYC induced mammary tumor, one of which could be controlled by c-MYC transgene.

  11. Ab initio studies of equations of state and chemical reactions of reactive structural materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharieva, Roussislava

    subject of studies of the shock or thermally induced chemical reactions of the two solids comprising these reactive materials, from first principles, is a relatively new field of study. The published literature on ab initio techniques or quantum mechanics based approaches consists of the ab initio or ab initio-molecular dynamics studies in related fields that contain a solid and a gas. One such study in the literature involves a gas and a solid. This is an investigation of the adsorption of gasses such as carbon monoxide (CO) on Tungsten. The motivation for these studies is to synthesize alternate or synthetic fuel technology by Fischer-Tropsch process. In this thesis these studies are first to establish the procedure for solid-solid reaction and then to extend that to consider the effects of mechanical strain and temperature on the binding energy and chemisorptions of CO on tungsten. Then in this thesis, similar studies are also conducted on the effect of mechanical strain and temperature on the binding energies of Titanium and hydrogen. The motivations are again to understand the method and extend the method to such solid-solid reactions. A second motivation is to seek strained conditions that favor hydrogen storage and strain conditions that release hydrogen easily when needed. Following the establishment of ab initio and ab initio studies of chemical reactions between a solid and a gas, the next step of research is to study thermally induced chemical reaction between two solids (Ni+Al). Thus, specific new studies of the thesis are as follows: (1) Ab initio Studies of Binding energies associated with chemisorption of (a) CO on W surfaces (111, and 100) at elevated temperatures and strains and (b) adsorption of hydrogen in titanium base. (2) Equations of state of mixtures of reactive material structures from ab initio methods. (3) Ab initio studies of the reaction initiation, transition states and reaction products of intermetallic mixtures of (Ni+Al) at elevated

  12. Matching Element Symbols with State Abbreviations: A Fun Activity for Browsing the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woelk, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    A classroom activity is presented in which students are challenged to find matches between the United States two-letter postal abbreviations for states and chemical element symbols. The activity aims to lessen negative apprehensions students might have when the periodic table of the elements with its more than 100 combinations of letters is first…

  13. State-resolved imaging of CO from propenal photodissociation: Signatures of concerted three-body dissociation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    State-selected DC sliced images of propenal photodissociation show clear signatures of a novel synchronous concerted three-body dissociation of propenal recently proposed by Lee and co-workers to give C2H2 + H2 + CO [S. H. Lee, C. H. Chin, C. Chaudhuri, ChemPhysChem 12, 753 (2011)]. Unlike any prior example of a concerted 3-body dissociation event, this mechanism involves breaking three distinct bonds and yields 3 distinct molecules. DC sliced images of CO fragments were recorded for a range of rotational levels for both v = 0 and v = 1. The results show formation of two distinct CO product channels having dissimilar translational energy distributions with characteristic rovibrational state distributions. The images for CO (v = 0) show a large contribution of slower CO fragments at lower rotational levels (J = 5–25). This slow component is completely absent from the v = 1 CO images. The images for the higher rotational levels of the v = 0 and v = 1 CO are nearly identical, and this provides a basis for decomposing the two channels for v = 0. The quantum state and translational energy distributions for the slow channel are readily assigned to the 3-body dissociation based on the properties of the transition state. The faster CO fragments dominating the higher rotational levels in both v = 0 and v = 1 are attributed to formation of CH3CH + CO, also in agreement with the inferences based on previous non-state-resolved measurements with supporting theoretical calculations

  14. Chemical fingerprinting of whitewares from Nanwa site of the Chinese Erlitou state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitewares are among the most significant finds from Erlitou, China's earliest state (c. 1900-1500 BC). They were primarily discovered in small numbers from elite tombs of a few sites, leading to the hypothesis that they were made at only a few places and then circulated as prestige items. Recent archaeological work indicates Nanwa may be a whiteware production site. To facilitate determining provenances, we compare the ICP-MS trace elements and TIMS Sr isotopes of Nanwa whitewares with those from Tang dynasty (618-907 AD) Gongxian kilns and Song dynasty (960-1279 AD) Ding kilns. Although all were made of white-firing kaolinic clays, each of the three groups shows a different chemical composition. Furthermore, samples from Nanwa are chemically consistent and restricted in a way analogous to those from Gongxian and Ding, implying that Nanwa whiteware was probably produced in situ. In addition, Gongxian and Ding samples define two separate linear arrays in their 87Rb/86Sr versus 87Sr/86Sr ratios, demonstrating that the clays for these samples are respectively related geochemically. Nanwa samples fall out of the linear arrays of both Gongxian and Ding, indicating that Nanwa whiteware clays were not derived from the same source rock as Gongxian clays, although the two sites are only some 25.5 km apart. In sum, beyond the general similarity of kaolinic clays used at Nanwa, Gongxian and Ding and the geographical proximity of those sites, finer distinctions of elemental and Sr isotopic contents indicate relatively unique chemical characteristics for each group. These traits provide valuable criteria to source traded ceramics of uncertain origins

  15. High sensitivity detection and characterization of the chemical state of trace element contamination on silicon wafers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increasing the speed and complexity of semiconductor integrated circuits requires advanced processes that put extreme constraints on the level of metal contamination allowed on the surfaces of silicon wafers. Such contamination degrades the performance of the ultrathin SiO2 gate dielectrics that form the heart of the individual transistors. Ultimately, reliability and yield are reduced to levels that must be improved before new processes can be put into production. It should be noted that much of this metal contamination occurs during the wet chemical etching and rinsing steps required for the manufacture of integrated circuits and industry is actively developing new processes that have already brought the metal contamination to levels beyond the measurement capabilities of conventional analytical techniques. The measurement of these extremely low contamination levels has required the use of synchrotron radiation total reflection X-ray fluorescence (SR-TXRF) where sensitivities 100 times better than conventional techniques have been achieved. This has resulted in minimum detection limits for transition metals of 8 x 107 atoms/cm2. SR-TXRF studies of the amount of metal contamination deposited on a silicon surface as a function of pH and oxygen content of the etching solutions have provided insights into the mechanisms of metal deposition from solutions containing trace amounts of metals ranging from parts per trillion to parts per billion. Furthermore, by using XANES to understand the chemical state of the metal atmos after deposition, it has been possible to develop chemical models for the deposition processes. Examples will be provided for copper deposition from ultra pure water and acidic solutions. (author)

  16. Chemical fingerprinting of whitewares from Nanwa site of the Chinese Erlitou state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Baoping [Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, University of Queensland, QLD 4072 (Australia)], E-mail: b.li@uq.edu.au; Liu Li [Archaeology Program, La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC 3086 (Australia); Zhao Jianxin [Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, University of Queensland, QLD 4072 (Australia); Chen Xingcan [Institute of Archaeology, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, Beijing 100710 (China); Feng Yuexing [Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, University of Queensland, QLD 4072 (Australia); Han Guohe; Zhu Junxiao [Department of Archaeology, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052 (China)

    2008-06-15

    Whitewares are among the most significant finds from Erlitou, China's earliest state (c. 1900-1500 BC). They were primarily discovered in small numbers from elite tombs of a few sites, leading to the hypothesis that they were made at only a few places and then circulated as prestige items. Recent archaeological work indicates Nanwa may be a whiteware production site. To facilitate determining provenances, we compare the ICP-MS trace elements and TIMS Sr isotopes of Nanwa whitewares with those from Tang dynasty (618-907 AD) Gongxian kilns and Song dynasty (960-1279 AD) Ding kilns. Although all were made of white-firing kaolinic clays, each of the three groups shows a different chemical composition. Furthermore, samples from Nanwa are chemically consistent and restricted in a way analogous to those from Gongxian and Ding, implying that Nanwa whiteware was probably produced in situ. In addition, Gongxian and Ding samples define two separate linear arrays in their {sup 87}Rb/{sup 86}Sr versus {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios, demonstrating that the clays for these samples are respectively related geochemically. Nanwa samples fall out of the linear arrays of both Gongxian and Ding, indicating that Nanwa whiteware clays were not derived from the same source rock as Gongxian clays, although the two sites are only some 25.5 km apart. In sum, beyond the general similarity of kaolinic clays used at Nanwa, Gongxian and Ding and the geographical proximity of those sites, finer distinctions of elemental and Sr isotopic contents indicate relatively unique chemical characteristics for each group. These traits provide valuable criteria to source traded ceramics of uncertain origins.

  17. Research on the chemical adsorption precursor state of CaCl2-NH3 for adsorption refrigeration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Liwei; WANG Ruzhu; WU Jingyi; WANG Kai

    2005-01-01

    As a type of chemical adsorption working pair, the physical adsorption occurs first for CaCl2-NH3 because the effective reaction distance for van der Waals force is longer than that for chemical reaction force, and this physical adsorption state is named the precursor state of chemical adsorption. In order to get the different precursor states of CaCl2-NH3, the different distances between NH3 gas and Ca2+ are realized by the control of different phenomena of swelling and agglomeration in the process of adsorption. When the serious swelling exists while the agglomeration does not exist in the process of adsorption, experimental results show that the activated energy consumed by adsorption reaction increases for the reason of longer distance between Ca2+ and NH3, and at the same time the performance attenuation occurs in the repeated adsorption cycles. When the agglomeration occurs in the process of adsorption, the activated energy for the transition from precursor state to chemical adsorption decreases because the distance between NH3 gas and Ca2+ is shortened by the limited expansion space of adsorbent, and at the same time the performance attenuation does not occur. The adsorption refrigeration isobars are researched by the precursor state of chemical adsorption; results also show that the precursor state is a key factor for isobaric adsorption performance while the distribution of Ca2+ does not influence the permeation of NH3 gas in adsorbent.

  18. Interface chemical states of NiO/NiFe films and their effects on magnetic properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于广华; 柴春林; 朱逢吾; 赖武彦

    2002-01-01

    Ta/NiOx/Ni81Fe19/Ta multilayers were prepared by rf reactive and dc magnetron sputtering.The exchange coupling field (Hex) and the coercivity (Hc) of NiOx/Ni81Fe19 as a function of the ratio of Ar to O2 during the deposition process were studied.The composition and chemical states at the interface region of NiOx/NiFe were also investigated using the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and peak decomposition technique.The results show that the ratio of Ar to O2 has great effect on the nickel chemical states in NiOx film.When the ratio of Ar to O2 is equal to 7 and the argon sputtering pressure is 0.57 Pa,the x value is approximately 1 and the valence of nickel is +2.At this point,NiOx is antiferromagnetic NiO and the corresponding Hex is the largest.As the ratio of Ar/O2 deviates from 7,the exchange coupling field (Hex) will decrease due to the presence of magnetic impurities such as Ni+3 or metallic Ni at the interface region of NiOx/NiFe,while the coercivity (Hc) will increase due to the metallic Ni.XPS studies also show that there are two thermodynamically favorable reactions at the NiO/NiFe interface: NiO+Fe=Ni+FeO and 3NiO+2Fe=3Ni+Fe2O3.These interface reaction products are magnetic impurities at the interface region of NiO/NiFe.It is believed that these magnetic impurities would have effect on the exchange coupling field (Hex) and the coercivity (Hc) of NiO/NiFe.

  19. Prediction of monomer reactivity in radical copolymerizations from transition state quantum chemical descriptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengde Tan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In comparison with the Q-e scheme, the Revised Patterns Scheme: the U, V Version (the U-V scheme has greatly improved both its accessibility and its accuracy in interpreting and predicting the reactivity of a monomer in free-radical copolymerizations. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR models were developed to predict the reactivity parameters u and v of the U-V scheme, by applying genetic algorithm (GA and support vector machine (SVM techniques. Quantum chemical descriptors used for QSAR models were calculated from transition state species with structures C¹H3 - C²HR³• or •C¹H2 - C²H2R³ (formed from vinyl monomers C¹H²=C²HR³ + H•, using density functional theory (DFT, at the UB3LYP level of theory with 6-31G(d basis set. The optimum support vector regression (SVR model of the reactivity parameter u based on Gaussian radial basis function (RBF kernel (C = 10, ε = 10- 5 and γ = 1.0 produced root-mean-square (rms errors for the training, validation and prediction sets being 0.220, 0.326 and 0.345, respectively. The optimal SVR model for v with the RBF kernel (C = 20, ε = 10- 4 and γ = 1.2 produced rms errors for the training set of 0.123, the validation set of 0.206 and the prediction set of 0.238. The feasibility of applying the transition state quantum chemical descriptors to develop SVM models for reactivity parameters u and v in the U-V scheme has been demonstrated.

  20. Time-resolved imaging of laser-induced vibrational wave packets in neutral and ionic states of iodomethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malakar, Y.; Kaderiya, B.; Zohrabi, M.; Pearson, W. L.; Ziaee, F.; Kananka Raju, P.; Ben-Itzhak, I.; Rolles, D.; Rudenko, A.

    2016-05-01

    Light-driven vibrational wave packets play an important role in molecular imaging and coherent control applications. Here we present the results of a pump-probe experiment characterizing laser-induced vibrational wave packets in both, neutral and ionic states of CH3 I (iodomethane), one of the prototypical polyatomic systems. Measuring yields and kinetic energies of all ionic fragments as a function of the time delay between two 25 fs, 800 nm pump and probe pulses, we map vibrational motion of the molecule, and identify the states involved by channel-resolved Fourier spectroscopy. In the Coulomb explosion channels we observe features with ~ 130 fs periodicity resulting from C-I symmetric stretch (ν3 mode) of the electronically excited cationic state. However the Fourier transform of the low-energy I+ ion yield produced by the dissociative ionization of CH3 I reveals the signatures of the same vibrational mode in the ground electronic states of both, neutral and cation, reflected in 65-70 fs oscillations. We observe the degeneration of the oscillatory structures from the cationic states within ~ 2 ps and discuss most likely reasons for this behavior. Supported by the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, U. S. DOE. K. R. P. and W. L. P. supported by NSF Award No. IIA-143049.

  1. Distinguishing between cystic teratomas and endometriomas of the ovary using chemical shift gradient echo magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishijima Hideyuki; Ishizaka Hiroshi; Inoue Tomio [Gunma University Hospital, Gunma (Japan). Depts. of Diagnostic Radiaology and Nuclear Medicine

    1996-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of chemical shift gradient echo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in distinguishing between cystic teratomas and endometriomas of the ovary, using a 1.5 T magnet. The study included 22 patients with 31 ovarian lesions (15 cystic teratomas and 16 endometriomas), which showed high signal intensity on T1-weighted spin echo images. Chemical shift gradient echo images with three different echo times (TE = 2.5, 4.5 and 6.5 ms) were obtained in all cases. Indices were calculated on the basis of the signal intensities of lesions on the chemical shift gradient echo images. All endometriomas had signal intensity indices of less than 2.1, while all cystic teratomas had signal intensity indices of 18.1 or greater. It was concluded that the method used in this study presents the following advantages: the acquisition time is short; it needs no special software; and it does not depend on magnetic field homogeneity. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Stokes IQUV magnetic Doppler imaging of Ap stars - III. Next generation chemical abundance mapping of α2 CVn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvester, J.; Kochukhov, O.; Wade, G. A.

    2014-10-01

    In a previous paper, we presented an updated magnetic field map for the chemically peculiar star α2 CVn using ESPaDOnS and Narval time-resolved high-resolution Stokes IQUV spectra. In this paper, we focus on mapping various chemical element distributions on the surface of α2 CVn. With the new magnetic field map and new chemical abundance distributions, we can investigate the interplay between the chemical abundance structures and the magnetic field topology on the surface of α2 CVn. Previous attempts at chemical abundance mapping of α2 CVn relied on lower resolution data. With our high-resolution (R = 65 000) data set, we present nine chemical abundance maps for the elements O, Si, Cl, Ti, Cr, Fe, Pr, Nd and Eu. We also derive an updated magnetic field map from Fe and Cr lines in Stokes IQUV and O and Cl in Stokes IV. These new maps are inferred from line profiles in Stokes IV using the magnetic Doppler imaging code INVERS10. We examine these new chemical maps and investigate correlations with the magnetic topology of α2 CVn. We show that chemical abundance distributions vary between elements, with two distinct groups of elements; one accumulates close to the negative part of the radial field, whilst the other group shows higher abundances located where the radial magnetic field is of the order of 2 kG regardless of the polarity of the radial field component. We compare our results with previous works which have mapped chemical abundance structures of Ap stars. With the exception of Cr and Fe, we find no clear trend between what we reconstruct and other mapping results. We also find a lack of agreement with theoretical predictions. This suggests that there is a gap in our theoretical understanding of the formation of horizontal chemical abundance structures and the connection to the magnetic field in Ap stars.

  3. Regional Differences in Muscle Energy Metabolism in Human Muscle by 31P-Chemical Shift Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kime, Ryotaro; Kaneko, Yasuhisa; Hongo, Yoshinori; Ohno, Yusuke; Sakamoto, Ayumi; Katsumura, Toshihito

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have reported significant region-dependent differences in the fiber-type composition of human skeletal muscle. It is therefore hypothesized that there is a difference between the deep and superficial parts of muscle energy metabolism during exercise. We hypothesized that the inorganic phosphate (Pi)/phosphocreatine (PCr) ratio of the superficial parts would be higher, compared with the deep parts, as the work rate increases, because the muscle fiber-type composition of the fast-type may be greater in the superficial parts compared with the deep parts. This study used two-dimensional 31Phosphorus Chemical Shift Imaging (31P-CSI) to detect differences between the deep and superficial parts of the human leg muscles during dynamic knee extension exercise. Six healthy men participated in this study (age 27±1 year, height 169.4±4.1 cm, weight 65.9±8.4 kg). The experiments were carried out with a 1.5-T superconducting magnet with a 5-in. diameter circular surface coil. The subjects performed dynamic one-legged knee extension exercise in the prone position, with the transmit-receive coil placed under the right quadriceps muscles in the magnet. The subjects pulled down an elastic rubber band attached to the ankle at a frequency of 0.25, 0.5 and 1 Hz for 320 s each. The intracellular pH (pHi) was calculated from the median chemical shift of the Pi peak relative to PCr. No significant difference in Pi/PCr was observed between the deep and the superficial parts of the quadriceps muscles at rest. The Pi/PCr of the superficial parts was not significantly increased with increasing work rate. Compared with the superficial areas, the Pi/PCr of the deep parts was significantly higher (p<0.05) at 1 Hz. The pHi showed no significant difference between the two parts. These results suggest that muscle oxidative metabolism is different between deep and superficial parts of quadriceps muscles during dynamic exercise. PMID:26782194

  4. Regional Differences in Muscle Energy Metabolism in Human Muscle by 31P-Chemical Shift Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kime, Ryotaro; Kaneko, Yasuhisa; Hongo, Yoshinori; Ohno, Yusuke; Sakamoto, Ayumi; Katsumura, Toshihito

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have reported significant region-dependent differences in the fiber-type composition of human skeletal muscle. It is therefore hypothesized that there is a difference between the deep and superficial parts of muscle energy metabolism during exercise. We hypothesized that the inorganic phosphate (Pi)/phosphocreatine (PCr) ratio of the superficial parts would be higher, compared with the deep parts, as the work rate increases, because the muscle fiber-type composition of the fast-type may be greater in the superficial parts compared with the deep parts. This study used two-dimensional 31Phosphorus Chemical Shift Imaging (31P-CSI) to detect differences between the deep and superficial parts of the human leg muscles during dynamic knee extension exercise. Six healthy men participated in this study (age 27±1 year, height 169.4±4.1 cm, weight 65.9±8.4 kg). The experiments were carried out with a 1.5-T superconducting magnet with a 5-in. diameter circular surface coil. The subjects performed dynamic one-legged knee extension exercise in the prone position, with the transmit-receive coil placed under the right quadriceps muscles in the magnet. The subjects pulled down an elastic rubber band attached to the ankle at a frequency of 0.25, 0.5 and 1 Hz for 320 s each. The intracellular pH (pHi) was calculated from the median chemical shift of the Pi peak relative to PCr. No significant difference in Pi/PCr was observed between the deep and the superficial parts of the quadriceps muscles at rest. The Pi/PCr of the superficial parts was not significantly increased with increasing work rate. Compared with the superficial areas, the Pi/PCr of the deep parts was significantly higher (p<0.05) at 1 Hz. The pHi showed no significant difference between the two parts. These results suggest that muscle oxidative metabolism is different between deep and superficial parts of quadriceps muscles during dynamic exercise.

  5. Stokes $IQUV$ magnetic Doppler imaging of Ap stars - III. Next generation chemical abundance mapping of Alpha 2 CVn

    CERN Document Server

    Silvester, James; Wade, Gregg A

    2014-01-01

    In a previous paper we presented an updated magnetic field map for the chemically peculiar star Alpha 2 CVn using ESPaDOnS and Narval time-resolved high-resolution Stokes $IQUV$ spectra. In this paper we focus on mapping various chemical element distributions on the surface of Alpha 2 CVn. With the new magnetic field map and new chemical abundance distributions we can investigate the interplay between the chemical abundance structures and the magnetic field topology on the surface of Alpha 2 CVn. Previous attempts at chemical abundance mapping of Alpha 2 CVn relied on lower resolution data. With our high resolution (R=65,000) dataset we present nine chemical abundance maps for the elements O, Si, Cl, Ti, Cr, Fe, Pr, Nd and Eu. We also derive an updated magnetic field map from Fe and Cr lines in Stokes $IQUV$ and O and Cl in Stokes $IV$. These new maps are inferred from line profiles in Stokes $IV$ using the magnetic Doppler imaging code Invers10. We examine these new chemical maps and investigate correlations...

  6. Rydberg and valence state excitation dynamics: a velocity map imaging study involving the E-V state interaction in HBr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaouris, Dimitris; Kartakoullis, Andreas; Glodic, Pavle; Samartzis, Peter C; Rafn Hróðmarsson, Helgi; Kvaran, Ágúst

    2015-04-28

    Photoexcitation dynamics of the E((1)Σ(+)) (v' = 0) Rydberg state and the V((1)Σ(+)) (v') ion-pair vibrational states of HBr are investigated by velocity map imaging (VMI). H(+) photoions, produced through a number of vibrational and rotational levels of the two states were imaged and kinetic energy release (KER) and angular distributions were extracted from the data. In agreement with previous work, we found the photodissociation channels forming H*(n = 2) + Br((2)P3/2)/Br*((2)P1/2) to be dominant. Autoionization pathways leading to H(+) + Br((2)P3/2)/Br*((2)P1/2) via either HBr(+)((2)Π3/2) or HBr(+)*((2)Π1/2) formation were also present. The analysis of KER and angular distributions and comparison with rotationally and mass resolved resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectra revealed the excitation transition mechanisms and characteristics of states involved as well as the involvement of the E-V state interactions and their v' and J' dependence. PMID:25801122

  7. X-ray chemical imaging and the electronic structure of a single nanoplatelet Ni/graphene composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chunyu; Wang, Jian; Szpunar, Jerzy A

    2014-03-01

    Chemical imaging and quantitative analysis of a single graphene nanoplatelet grown with Ni nanoparticles (Ni/graphene) has been performed by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). Local electronic and chemical structure of Ni/graphene has been investigated by spatially resolved C, O K-edges and Ni L-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, revealing the covalent anchoring of Ni(0) on graphene. This study facilitates the understanding of the structure modification of host materials for hydrogen storage and offers a better understanding of interaction between Ni particles and graphene.

  8. Methodology for correlations between doses and detectability in standard mammographic images: application in Sao Paulo state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements using mammography units were performed in loco in 50 health establishments, randomly sampled from an equipment list of the Cadastro Nacional de Estabelecimentos de Saude (Health Establishments Brazilian Catalog). For the measurements six phantoms were utilized to establish different quality criteria and to evaluate doses in different breast thicknesses. Two different methods of measuring average glandular doses (AGD) were applied, and measurements of entrance surface doses (ESD) were also realized, in order to obtain mean values to Sao Paulo State. A study relating distribution and properties of different mammography trademarks with doses was performed. The sensitometry of processors allowed a quantification of the film-processing contrast index, Ag, establishing a state mean value. The phantom images allowed the evaluation of detection limits of structures as microcalcifications, fibers, and masses, and state mean values were established for: spatial resolution (on surface and glandular breast position); image contrast; and detection expert ability from phantom images in two situations: before knowing the image targets and after viewing of a target map. Then, the results were compared to target detections in laboratory environment. Based on dose results, Ag, image contrast, maximum contrast, and detection ratio, a relationship between them was determined. The results show that, in Sao Paulo State, mean glandular doses were lower than reference levels considering the Wu method, and close to or above reference levels for ail phantoms considering the Dance method. The ESD was always close to or above reference levels. The Ag presented a mean value of (10,42 ± 0,20) for Sao Paulo State, and the image contrast was lower than the required limits established by the phantom manufacturers. The high contrast resolution showed that mammography units presented the expected values of line pair per mm in the State. The detectability evaluation of local experts was

  9. Quantification of fat using chemical shift imaging and 1H-MR spectroscopy in phantom model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the accuracy of chemical shift imaging (CSI) and MR spectroscopy (MRS) for fat quantification in phantom model. Methods: Eleven phantoms were made according to the volume percentage of fat ranging from 0 to 100% with an interval of 10%. The fat concentration in the phantoms were measured respectively by CSI and MRS and compared using one-sample t test. The correlation between the two methods was also analyzed. The concentration of saturated fatty acids (FS), unsaturated fatty acids (FU) and the poly, unsaturation degree (PUD) were calculated by using MRS. Results: The fat concentration was (48.0±1.0)%, (57.0±0.5)%, (67.3±0.6)%, (77.3± 0.6)%, (83.3±0.6)% and (91.0±1.0)% respectively with fat volume of 50% to 100% by CSI. The fat concentration was (8.3±0.6)%, (16.3±0.7)%, (27.7±0.6)%, (36.0±1.0)%, (43.5± 0.6)% and (56.5±1.0)% respectively with fat volume of 10% to 60% by MRS, the fat concentration were underestimated by CSI and MRS (P<0.05), and had high linear correlation with the real concentration in phantoms (CSI: r=0.998, MRS: r=0.996, P<0.01). There was also a linear correlation between two methods (r=0.992, P<0.01) but no statistically significant difference (paired- samples t test, t=-0.125, P=0.903). By using MRS, the relative ratio of FS and FU in fat were 0. 15 and 0.85, the PUD was 0.0325, respectively, and highly consistent with these in phantoms. Conclusion: Both CSI and MRS are efficient and accurate methods in fat quantification at 7.0 T MR. (authors)

  10. Universal imaging: Dissociative ionization of polyatomic molecules, chemical dynamics beamline 9.0.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, M.; Chen, D.; Suits, A.G. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    A third endstation was recently added to the Chemical Dynamics beamline, designed to exploit the high flux broadband undulator light for a range of studies of reactive scattering, photochemistry and photoionization processes using time-of-flight mass spectroscopy coupled with position-sensitive detection. Two molecular beam sources are fixed at right angles, with the undulator light, or laser beams, intersecting the molecular beams at 45{degrees}. To date, beamline experiments have included a study of dissociative photoionization of a variety of molecules including N{sub 2}O and SF{sub 6}. In this mode, a single molecular beam source is used, with the tunable undulator light inducing, in SF{sub 6} for example, the process SF{sub 6} {r_arrow} SF{sub 6}{sup +} + e{sup {minus}} {r_arrow} SF{sub 5}{sup +} + F + e{sup {minus}}. The SF{sub 5}{sup +} ions are accelerated up the flight tube, mass selected and detected as a function of position on a phosphor screen viewed by a CCD camera. The position directly reveals the recoil speed (or translational energy release) and angular distribution for the dissociative ionization process. Furthermore, this measurement is obtained for all recoil speeds and angles simultaneously. Such detailed angular information has not previously been obtained for dissociative ionization processes; typically ion time-of-flight profiles are deconvoluted to yield rough insight into the angular distributions. The recorded image is actually a 2-dimensional projection of the nascent 3-dimensional velocity distribution, but established tomographic techniques enable the authors to reconstruct the 3-D distribution.

  11. A review of optimization and quantification techniques for chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI toward sensitive in vivo imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinsuh; Wu, Yin; Guo, Yingkun; Zheng, Hairong; Sun, Phillip Zhe

    2015-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI is a versatile imaging method that probes the chemical exchange between bulk water and exchangeable protons. CEST imaging indirectly detects dilute labile protons via bulk water signal changes following selective saturation of exchangeable protons, which offers substantial sensitivity enhancement and has sparked numerous biomedical applications. Over the past decade, CEST imaging techniques have rapidly evolved owing to contributions from multiple domains, including the development of CEST mathematical models, innovative contrast agent designs, sensitive data acquisition schemes, efficient field inhomogeneity correction algorithms, and quantitative CEST (qCEST) analysis. The CEST system that underlies the apparent CEST-weighted effect, however, is complex. The experimentally measurable CEST effect depends not only on parameters such as CEST agent concentration, pH and temperature, but also on relaxation rate, magnetic field strength and more importantly, experimental parameters including repetition time, RF irradiation amplitude and scheme, and image readout. Thorough understanding of the underlying CEST system using qCEST analysis may augment the diagnostic capability of conventional imaging. In this review, we provide a concise explanation of CEST acquisition methods and processing algorithms, including their advantages and limitations, for optimization and quantification of CEST MRI experiments. PMID:25641791

  12. Charge-transfer photodissociation of adsorbed molecules via electron image states

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, E T

    2007-01-01

    The 248nm and 193nm photodissociation of submonolayer quantities of CH$_3$Br and CH$_3$I adsorbed on thin layers of n-hexane indicate that the dissociation is caused by dissociative electron attachment from sub-vacuum level photoelectrons created in the copper substrate. The characteristics of this photodissociation-- translation energy distributions and coverage dependences show that the dissociation is mediated by an image potential state which temporarily traps the photoelectrons near the n-hexane--vacuum interface, and then the charge transfers from this image state to the affinity level of a co-adsorbed halomethane which then dissociates.

  13. High Density Aerial Image Matching: State-Of and Future Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haala, N.; Cavegn, S.

    2016-06-01

    Ongoing innovations in matching algorithms are continuously improving the quality of geometric surface representations generated automatically from aerial images. This development motivated the launch of the joint ISPRS/EuroSDR project "Benchmark on High Density Aerial Image Matching", which aims on the evaluation of photogrammetric 3D data capture in view of the current developments in dense multi-view stereo-image matching. Originally, the test aimed on image based DSM computation from conventional aerial image flights for different landuse and image block configurations. The second phase then put an additional focus on high quality, high resolution 3D geometric data capture in complex urban areas. This includes both the extension of the test scenario to oblique aerial image flights as well as the generation of filtered point clouds as additional output of the respective multi-view reconstruction. The paper uses the preliminary outcomes of the benchmark to demonstrate the state-of-the-art in airborne image matching with a special focus of high quality geometric data capture in urban scenarios.

  14. CARS hyperspectral imaging of cartilage aiming for state discrimination of cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiozawa, Manabu; Shirai, Masataka; Izumisawa, Junko; Tanabe, Maiko; Watanabe, Koichi

    2016-03-01

    Non-invasive cell analyses are increasingly important for medical field. A CARS microscope is one of the non-invasive imaging equipments and enables to obtain images indicating molecular distribution. Some studies on discrimination of cell state by using CARS images of lipid are reported. However, due to low signal intensity, it is still challenging to obtain images of the fingerprint region (800~1800 cm-1), in which many spectrum peaks correspond to compositions of a cell. Here, to identify cell differentiation by using multiplex CARS, we investigated hyperspectral imaging of fingerprint region of living cells. To perform multiplex CARS, we used a prototype of a compact light source, which consists of a microchip laser, a single-mode fiber, and a photonic crystal fiber to generate supercontinuum light. Assuming application to regenerative medicine, we chose a cartilage cell, whose differentiation is difficult to be identified by change of the cell morphology. Because one of the major components of cartilage is collagen, we focused on distribution of proline, which accounts for approximately 20% of collagen in general. The spectrum quality was improved by optical adjustments about power branching ratio and divergence of broadband Stokes light. Hyperspectral images were successfully obtained by the improvement. Periphery of a cartilage cell was highlighted in CARS image of proline, and this result suggests correspondence with collagen generated as extracellular matrix. A possibility of cell analyses by using CARS hyperspectral imaging was indicated.

  15. Modulated electron-multiplied fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope: all-solid-state camera for fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qiaole; Schelen, Ben; Schouten, Raymond; van den Oever, Rein; Leenen, René; van Kuijk, Harry; Peters, Inge; Polderdijk, Frank; Bosiers, Jan; Raspe, Marcel; Jalink, Kees; Geert Sander de Jong, Jan; van Geest, Bert; Stoop, Karel; Young, Ian Ted

    2012-12-01

    We have built an all-solid-state camera that is directly modulated at the pixel level for frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) measurements. This novel camera eliminates the need for an image intensifier through the use of an application-specific charge coupled device design in a frequency-domain FLIM system. The first stage of evaluation for the camera has been carried out. Camera characteristics such as noise distribution, dark current influence, camera gain, sampling density, sensitivity, linearity of photometric response, and optical transfer function have been studied through experiments. We are able to do lifetime measurement using our modulated, electron-multiplied fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope (MEM-FLIM) camera for various objects, e.g., fluorescein solution, fixed green fluorescent protein (GFP) cells, and GFP-actin stained live cells. A detailed comparison of a conventional microchannel plate (MCP)-based FLIM system and the MEM-FLIM system is presented. The MEM-FLIM camera shows higher resolution and a better image quality. The MEM-FLIM camera provides a new opportunity for performing frequency-domain FLIM.

  16. Applying Chemical Imaging Analysis to Improve Our Understanding of Cold Cloud Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskin, A.; Knopf, D. A.; Wang, B.; Alpert, P. A.; Roedel, T.; Gilles, M. K.; Moffet, R.; Tivanski, A.

    2012-12-01

    The impact that atmospheric ice nucleation has on the global radiation budget is one of the least understood problems in atmospheric sciences. This is in part due to the incomplete understanding of various ice nucleation pathways that lead to ice crystal formation from pre-existing aerosol particles. Studies investigating the ice nucleation propensity of laboratory generated particles indicate that individual particle types are highly selective in their ice nucleating efficiency. This description of heterogeneous ice nucleation would present a challenge when applying to the atmosphere which contains a complex mixture of particles. Here, we employ a combination of micro-spectroscopic and optical single particle analytical methods to relate particle physical and chemical properties with observed water uptake and ice nucleation. Field-collected particles from urban environments impacted by anthropogenic and marine emissions and aging processes are investigated. Single particle characterization is provided by computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). A particle-on-substrate approach coupled to a vapor controlled cooling-stage and a microscope system is applied to determine the onsets of water uptake and ice nucleation including immersion freezing and deposition ice nucleation as a function of temperature (T) as low as 200 K and relative humidity (RH) up to water saturation. We observe for urban aerosol particles that for T > 230 K the oxidation level affects initial water uptake and that subsequent immersion freezing depends on particle mixing state, e.g. by the presence of insoluble particles. For T cloud formation. Initial results applying single particle IN analysis using CCSEM/EDX and STXM/NEXAFS reveal that a significant amount of IN are coated by organics and, thus, are similar to the

  17. Chemical Imaging and Dynamical Studies of Reactivity and Emergent Behavior in Complex Interfacial Systems. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sibener, Steven J. [University of Chicago, IL (United States)

    2014-03-11

    This research program explored the efficacy of using molecular-level manipulation, imaging and scanning tunneling spectroscopy in conjunction with supersonic molecular beam gas-surface scattering to significantly enhance our understanding of chemical processes occurring on well-characterized interfaces. One program focus was on the spatially-resolved emergent behavior of complex reaction systems as a function of the local geometry and density of adsorbate-substrate systems under reaction conditions. Another focus was on elucidating the emergent electronic and related reactivity characteristics of intentionally constructed single and multicomponent atom- and nanoparticle-based materials. We also examined emergent chirality and self-organization in adsorbed molecular systems where collective interactions between adsorbates and the supporting interface lead to spatial symmetry breaking. In many of these studies we combined the advantages of scanning tunneling (STM) and atomic force (AFM) imaging, scanning tunneling local electronic spectroscopy (STS), and reactive supersonic molecular beams to elucidate precise details of interfacial reactivity that had not been observed by more traditional surface science methods. Using these methods, it was possible to examine, for example, the differential reactivity of molecules adsorbed at different bonding sites in conjunction with how reactivity is modified by the local configuration of nearby adsorbates. At the core of this effort was the goal of significantly extending our understanding of interfacial atomic-scale interactions to create, with intent, molecular assemblies and materials with advanced chemical and physical properties. This ambitious program addressed several key topics in DOE Grand Challenge Science, including emergent chemical and physical properties in condensed phase systems, novel uses of chemical imaging, and the development of advanced reactivity concepts in combustion and catalysis including carbon

  18. Optically induced effective mass renormalization: the case of graphite image potential states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagnese, M.; Pagliara, S.; Galimberti, G.; Dal Conte, S.; Ferrini, G.; van Loosdrecht, P. H. M.; Parmigiani, F.

    2016-10-01

    Many-body interactions with the underlying bulk electrons determine the properties of confined electronic states at the surface of a metal. Using momentum resolved nonlinear photoelectron spectroscopy we show that one can tailor these many-body interactions in graphite, leading to a strong renormalization of the dispersion and linewidth of the image potential state. These observations are interpreted in terms of a basic self-energy model, and may be considered as exemplary for optically induced many-body interactions.

  19. Pool chemical-associated health events in public and residential settings - United States, 2003-2012, and Minnesota, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlavsa, Michele C; Robinson, Trisha J; Collier, Sarah A; Beach, Michael J

    2014-05-16

    Pool chemicals are added to treated recreational water venues (e.g., pools, hot tubs/spas, and interactive fountains) primarily to protect public health by inactivating pathogens and maximizing the effectiveness of disinfection by controlling pH. However, pool chemicals also can cause injuries when handled or stored improperly. To estimate the number of emergency department (ED) visits for injuries associated with pool chemicals in the United States per year during 2003-2012, CDC analyzed data from the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission's National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS). This report summarizes the results of that analysis. In 2012 alone, an estimated 4,876 persons (95% confidence interval [CI] = 2,821-6,930) visited an ED for injuries associated with pool chemicals. Almost half of the patients were aged pool chemical-associated health event that occurred in Minnesota in 2013, which sent seven children and one adult to an ED. An investigation by the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) determined the cause to be poor monitoring of or response to pool chemistry. Pool chemical-associated health events are preventable. CDC's Model Aquatic Health Code (MAHC) (1) is a resource that state and local agencies can use to optimize prevention of injuries and illnesses associated with public treated recreational water venues, including pool chemical-associated health events.

  20. Visualization of electrochemically driven solid-state phase transformations using operando hard X-ray spectro-imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linsen; Chen-Wiegart, Yu-chen Karen; Wang, Jiajun; Gao, Peng; Ding, Qi; Yu, Young-Sang; Wang, Feng; Cabana, Jordi; Wang, Jun; Jin, Song

    2015-01-01

    In situ techniques with high temporal, spatial and chemical resolution are key to understand ubiquitous solid-state phase transformations, which are crucial to many technological applications. Hard X-ray spectro-imaging can visualize electrochemically driven phase transformations but demands considerably large samples with strong absorption signal so far. Here we show a conceptually new data analysis method to enable operando visualization of mechanistically relevant weakly absorbing samples at the nanoscale and study electrochemical reaction dynamics of iron fluoride, a promising high-capacity conversion cathode material. In two specially designed samples with distinctive microstructure and porosity, we observe homogeneous phase transformations during both discharge and charge, faster and more complete Li-storage occurring in porous polycrystalline iron fluoride, and further, incomplete charge reaction following a pathway different from conventional belief. These mechanistic insights provide guidelines for designing better conversion cathode materials to realize the promise of high-capacity lithium-ion batteries. PMID:25892338

  1. Visualization of electrochemically driven solid-state phase transformations using operando hard X-ray spectro-imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linsen; Chen-Wiegart, Yu-Chen Karen; Wang, Jiajun; Gao, Peng; Ding, Qi; Yu, Young-Sang; Wang, Feng; Cabana, Jordi; Wang, Jun; Jin, Song

    2015-04-01

    In situ techniques with high temporal, spatial and chemical resolution are key to understand ubiquitous solid-state phase transformations, which are crucial to many technological applications. Hard X-ray spectro-imaging can visualize electrochemically driven phase transformations but demands considerably large samples with strong absorption signal so far. Here we show a conceptually new data analysis method to enable operando visualization of mechanistically relevant weakly absorbing samples at the nanoscale and study electrochemical reaction dynamics of iron fluoride, a promising high-capacity conversion cathode material. In two specially designed samples with distinctive microstructure and porosity, we observe homogeneous phase transformations during both discharge and charge, faster and more complete Li-storage occurring in porous polycrystalline iron fluoride, and further, incomplete charge reaction following a pathway different from conventional belief. These mechanistic insights provide guidelines for designing better conversion cathode materials to realize the promise of high-capacity lithium-ion batteries.

  2. Chemical and non-chemical s tressors affecting childhood obesity: a state-of-the-science-review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childhood obesity has tripled in the last three decades and now affects 17% of children in the United States (US). In 2010, the percentage of obese children in the US was nearly 18% for both 6-11 and 12-19 years of age. Recent evidence in the literature suggests that exposure to ...

  3. Mammalian models of chemically induced primary malignancies exploitable for imaging-based preclinical theragnostic research

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yewei; YIN Ting; Feng, Yuanbo; Cona, Marlein Miranda; Huang, Gang; Liu, Jianjun; Song, Shaoli; Jiang, Yansheng; Xia, Qian; Swinnen, Johannes V; Bormans, Guy; Himmelreich, Uwe; Oyen, Raymond; Ni, Yicheng

    2015-01-01

    Compared with transplanted tumor models or genetically engineered cancer models, chemically induced primary malignancies in experimental animals can mimic the clinical cancer progress from the early stage on. Cancer caused by chemical carcinogens generally develops through three phases namely initiation, promotion and progression. Based on different mechanisms, chemical carcinogens can be divided into genotoxic and non-genotoxic ones, or complete and incomplete ones, usually with an organ-spe...

  4. Solid-state, flat-panel, digital radiography detectors and their physical imaging characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowen, A R; Kengyelics, S M; Davies, A G

    2008-05-01

    Solid-state, digital radiography (DR) detectors, designed specifically for standard projection radiography, emerged just before the turn of the millennium. This new generation of digital image detector comprises a thin layer of x-ray absorptive material combined with an electronic active matrix array fabricated in a thin film of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). DR detectors can offer both efficient (low-dose) x-ray image acquisition plus on-line readout of the latent image as electronic data. To date, solid-state, flat-panel, DR detectors have come in two principal designs, the indirect-conversion (x-ray scintillator-based) and the direct-conversion (x-ray photoconductor-based) types. This review describes the underlying principles and enabling technologies exploited by these designs of detector, and evaluates their physical imaging characteristics, comparing performance both against each other and computed radiography (CR). In standard projection radiography indirect conversion DR detectors currently offer superior physical image quality and dose efficiency compared with direct conversion DR and modern point-scan CR. These conclusions have been confirmed in the findings of clinical evaluations of DR detectors. Future trends in solid-state DR detector technologies are also briefly considered. Salient innovations include WiFi-enabled, portable DR detectors, improvements in x-ray absorber layers and developments in alternative electronic media to a-Si:H. PMID:18374710

  5. Solid-state, flat-panel, digital radiography detectors and their physical imaging characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solid-state, digital radiography (DR) detectors, designed specifically for standard projection radiography, emerged just before the turn of the millennium. This new generation of digital image detector comprises a thin layer of x-ray absorptive material combined with an electronic active matrix array fabricated in a thin film of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). DR detectors can offer both efficient (low-dose) x-ray image acquisition plus on-line readout of the latent image as electronic data. To date, solid-state, flat-panel, DR detectors have come in two principal designs, the indirect-conversion (x-ray scintillator-based) and the direct-conversion (x-ray photoconductor-based) types. This review describes the underlying principles and enabling technologies exploited by these designs of detector, and evaluates their physical imaging characteristics, comparing performance both against each other and computed radiography (CR). In standard projection radiography indirect conversion DR detectors currently offer superior physical image quality and dose efficiency compared with direct conversion DR and modern point-scan CR. These conclusions have been confirmed in the findings of clinical evaluations of DR detectors. Future trends in solid-state DR detector technologies are also briefly considered. Salient innovations include WiFi-enabled, portable DR detectors, improvements in x-ray absorber layers and developments in alternative electronic media to a-Si:H

  6. Fast variance reduction for steady-state simulation and sensitivity analysis of stochastic chemical systems using shadow function estimators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milias-Argeitis, Andreas; Lygeros, John; Khammash, Mustafa

    2014-07-01

    We address the problem of estimating steady-state quantities associated to systems of stochastic chemical kinetics. In most cases of interest, these systems are analytically intractable, and one has to resort to computational methods to estimate stationary values of cost functions. In this work, we introduce a novel variance reduction algorithm for stochastic chemical kinetics, inspired by related methods in queueing theory, in particular the use of shadow functions. Using two numerical examples, we demonstrate the efficiency of the method for the calculation of steady-state parametric sensitivities and evaluate its performance in comparison to other estimation methods.

  7. Mortality among flavour and fragrance chemical plant workers in the United States.

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, T L

    1987-01-01

    Vital status on 1 January 1981 was determined for a cohort of 1412 white men employed in a flavour and fragrance chemical plant between 1945 and 1965 in order to investigate the risks from fatal diseases among men exposed to multiple chemicals in the manufacture of fragrances, flavours, aroma chemicals, and other organic substances. Cause specific standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) were calculated for the entire study population and for several subsets by likelihood of exposure to chemicals...

  8. Diffusion tensor Imaging and chemical shift imaging assessment of heterogeneity in low grade glioma under temozolomide chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijens, P. E.; Heesters, Martinus; Enting, Roeline; van der Graaf, W. T. A.; Potze, J. H.; Irwan, Roy; Meiners, L. C.; Oudkerk, M.

    2007-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging and multiple voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy were performed in the MRI follow-up of a patient with a glioma treated with temozolomide chemotherapy. Tumor shrinkage was paralleled by reductions in choline level and by increases in apparent diffusion coefficient indicati

  9. Management of social sphere as a factor of positive image of the state in the modern world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pakulina Alevtyna

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The object of study is the process of state management of social sphere as a factor of positive image of Ukraine in the modern world. The article conducts a complex analysis of state management of social sphere as a factor of positive image of Ukraine. The authors have defined the modern tendencies, features of management of social sphere and formation of the state positive image. The dominant, which characterize the positive image of Ukraine in the world as a basis of priorities of systemic reform of the social sphere was scientifically proved. The authors of the article define the priorities of state management of social sphere of Kharkov region.

  10. Parametric analysis of the liquid-state objects images obtained by gas discharge visualization method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.D. Pysarenko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the parametric methods for the liquid-state objects images estimation obtained by gas discharge visualization (GDV method was done. New quantitative parameters for geometric and fractal properties of GDV-grams determination was offered. Modified algorithm for their calculation was shown.

  11. State-dependent cellular activity patterns of the cat paraventricular hypothalamus measured by reflectance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten Pilgaard; Rector, D M; Poe, G R;

    1996-01-01

    Activity within the cat paraventricular hypothalamus (PVH) during sleep and waking states was measured by quantifying intrinsic tissue reflectivity. A fiber optic probe consisting of a 1.0 mm coherent image conduit, surrounded by plastic fibers which conducted 660 nm source light, was attached to...

  12. Chemical composition and mixing-state of ice residuals sampled within mixed phase clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, M.; Worringen, A.; Benker, N.; Mertes, S.; Weingartner, E.; Weinbruch, S.

    2011-03-01

    During an intensive campaign at the high alpine research station Jungfraujoch, Switzerland, in February/March 2006 ice particle residuals within mixed-phase clouds were sampled using the Ice-counterflow virtual impactor (Ice-CVI). Size, morphology, chemical composition, mineralogy and mixing state of the ice residual and the interstitial (i.e., non-activated) aerosol particles were analyzed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Ice nuclei (IN) were identified from the significant enrichment of particle groups in the ice residual (IR) samples relative to the interstitial aerosol. In terms of number lead-bearing particles are enriched by a factor of approximately 25, complex internal mixtures with silicates or metal oxides as major components by a factor of 11, and mixtures of secondary aerosol and carbonaceous material (C-O-S particles) by a factor of 2. Other particle groups (sulfates, sea salt, Ca-rich particles, external silicates) observed in the ice-residual samples cannot be assigned unambiguously as IN. Between 9 and 24% of all IR are Pb-bearing particles. Pb was found as major component in around 10% of these particles (PbO, PbCl2). In the other particles, Pb was found as some 100 nm sized agglomerates consisting of 3-8 nm sized primary particles (PbS, elemental Pb). C-O-S particles are present in the IR at an abundance of 17-27%. The soot component within these particles is strongly aged. Complex internal mixtures occur in the IR at an abundance of 9-15%. Most IN identified at the Jungfraujoch station are internal mixtures containing anthropogenic components (either as main or minor constituent), and it is concluded that admixture of the anthropogenic component is responsible for the increased IN efficiency within mixed phase clouds. The mixing state appears to be a key parameter for the ice nucleation behaviour that cannot be predicted from the sole knowledge of the main component of an individual particle.

  13. Computational analysis of the mechanism of chemical reactions in terms of reaction phases: hidden intermediates and hidden transition States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraka, Elfi; Cremer, Dieter

    2010-05-18

    Computational approaches to understanding chemical reaction mechanisms generally begin by establishing the relative energies of the starting materials, transition state, and products, that is, the stationary points on the potential energy surface of the reaction complex. Examining the intervening species via the intrinsic reaction coordinate (IRC) offers further insight into the fate of the reactants by delineating, step-by-step, the energetics involved along the reaction path between the stationary states. For a detailed analysis of the mechanism and dynamics of a chemical reaction, the reaction path Hamiltonian (RPH) and the united reaction valley approach (URVA) are an efficient combination. The chemical conversion of the reaction complex is reflected by the changes in the reaction path direction t(s) and reaction path curvature k(s), both expressed as a function of the path length s. This information can be used to partition the reaction path, and by this the reaction mechanism, of a chemical reaction into reaction phases describing chemically relevant changes of the reaction complex: (i) a contact phase characterized by van der Waals interactions, (ii) a preparation phase, in which the reactants prepare for the chemical processes, (iii) one or more transition state phases, in which the chemical processes of bond cleavage and bond formation take place, (iv) a product adjustment phase, and (v) a separation phase. In this Account, we examine mechanistic analysis with URVA in detail, focusing on recent theoretical insights (with a variety of reaction types) from our laboratories. Through the utilization of the concept of localized adiabatic vibrational modes that are associated with the internal coordinates, q(n)(s), of the reaction complex, the chemical character of each reaction phase can be identified via the adiabatic curvature coupling coefficients, A(n,s)(s). These quantities reveal whether a local adiabatic vibrational mode supports (A(n,s) > 0) or resists

  14. Predicting the redox state and secondary structure of cysteine residues using multi-dimensional classification analysis of NMR chemical shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ching-Cheng; Lai, Wen-Chung; Chuang, Woei-Jer

    2016-09-01

    A tool for predicting the redox state and secondary structure of cysteine residues using multi-dimensional analyses of different combinations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts has been developed. A data set of cysteine [Formula: see text], (13)C(α), (13)C(β), (1)H(α), (1)H(N), and (15)N(H) chemical shifts was created, classified according to redox state and secondary structure, using a library of 540 re-referenced BioMagResBank (BMRB) entries. Multi-dimensional analyses of three, four, five, and six chemical shifts were used to derive rules for predicting the structural states of cysteine residues. The results from 60 BMRB entries containing 122 cysteines showed that four-dimensional analysis of the C(α), C(β), H(α), and N(H) chemical shifts had the highest prediction accuracy of 100 and 95.9 % for the redox state and secondary structure, respectively. The prediction of secondary structure using 3D, 5D, and 6D analyses had the accuracy of ~90 %, suggesting that H(N) and [Formula: see text] chemical shifts may be noisy and made the discrimination worse. A web server (6DCSi) was established to enable users to submit NMR chemical shifts, either in BMRB or key-in formats, for prediction. 6DCSi displays predictions using sets of 3, 4, 5, and 6 chemical shifts, which shows their consistency and allows users to draw their own conclusions. This web-based tool can be used to rapidly obtain structural information regarding cysteine residues directly from experimental NMR data.

  15. Time and Frequency Resolved Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of Dimercaptostilbene on Silver

    CERN Document Server

    El-Khoury, Patrick Z; Hess, Wayne P

    2014-01-01

    Non-resonant tip-enhanced Raman images of dimercaptostilbene on silver reveal that different vibrational resonances of the reporter are selectively enhanced at different sites on the metal substrate. Sequentially recorded images track molecular diffusion within the diffraction-limited laser spot which illuminates the substrate. In effect, the recorded time resolved (dt = 10 s) pixelated images (25 nm x 8 cm-1) broadcast molecule-local field interactions which take place on much finer scales.

  16. Quantitative Chemically-Specific Coherent Diffractive Imaging of Buried Interfaces using a Tabletop EUV Nanoscope

    OpenAIRE

    Shanblatt, Elisabeth R.; Porter, Christina L.; Gardner, Dennis F.; Mancini, Giulia F.; Karl Jr., Robert M.; Tanksalvala, Michael D.; Bevis, Charles S.; Vartanian, Victor H.; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Adams, Daniel E.; Murnane, Margaret M.

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing buried layers and interfaces is critical for a host of applications in nanoscience and nano-manufacturing. Here we demonstrate non-invasive, non-destructive imaging of buried interfaces using a tabletop, extreme ultraviolet (EUV), coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) nanoscope. Copper nanostructures inlaid in SiO2 are coated with 100 nm of aluminum, which is opaque to visible light and thick enough that neither optical microscopy nor atomic force microscopy can image the buried i...

  17. Chemical Composition and Disruption of Quorum Sensing Signaling in Geographically Diverse United States Propolis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Savka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Propolis or bee glue has been used for centuries for various purposes and is especially important in human health due to many of its biological and pharmacological properties. In this work we showed quorum sensing inhibitory (QSI activity of ten geographically distinct propolis samples from the United States using the acyl-homoserine lactone- (AHL- dependent Chromobacterium violaceum strain CV026. Based on GC-MS chemical profiling the propolis samples can be classified into several groups that are as follows: (1 rich in cinnamic acid derivatives, (2 rich in flavonoids, and (3 rich in triterpenes. An in-depth analysis of the propolis from North Carolina led to the isolation and identification of a triterpenic acid that was recently isolated from Hondurian propolis (Central America and ethyl ether of p-coumaric alcohol not previously identified in bee propolis. QSI activity was also observed in the second group US propolis samples which contained the flavonoid pinocembrin in addition to other flavonoid compounds. The discovery of compounds that are involved in QSI activity has the potential to facilitate studies that may lead to the development of antivirulence therapies that can be complementary and/or alternative treatments against antibiotic resistant bacterial pathogens and/or emerging pathogens that have yet to be identified.

  18. Rate constants of chemical reactions from semiclassical transition state theory in full and one dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Samuel M.; Shan, Xiao; Clary, David C.

    2016-06-01

    Semiclassical Transition State Theory (SCTST), a method for calculating rate constants of chemical reactions, offers gains in computational efficiency relative to more accurate quantum scattering methods. In full-dimensional (FD) SCTST, reaction probabilities are calculated from third and fourth potential derivatives along all vibrational degrees of freedom. However, the computational cost of FD SCTST scales unfavorably with system size, which prohibits its application to larger systems. In this study, the accuracy and efficiency of 1-D SCTST, in which only third and fourth derivatives along the reaction mode are used, are investigated in comparison to those of FD SCTST. Potential derivatives are obtained from numerical ab initio Hessian matrix calculations at the MP2/cc-pVTZ level of theory, and Richardson extrapolation is applied to improve the accuracy of these derivatives. Reaction barriers are calculated at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ level. Results from FD SCTST agree with results from previous theoretical and experimental studies when Richardson extrapolation is applied. Results from our implementation of 1-D SCTST, which uses only 4 single-point MP2/cc-pVTZ energy calculations in addition to those for conventional TST, agree with FD results to within a factor of 5 at 250 K. This degree of agreement and the efficiency of the 1-D method suggest its potential as a means of approximating rate constants for systems too large for existing quantum scattering methods.

  19. Chemical Bonding States of TiC Films before and after Hydrogen Ion Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    TiC films deposited by rf magnetron sputtering followed by Ar+ ion bombardment were irradiated with a hydrogen ion beam. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used for characterization of the chemical bonding states of C and Ti elements of the TiC films before and after hydrogen ion irradiation, in order to understand the effect of hydrogen ion irradiation on the films and to study the mechanism of hydrogen resistance of TiC films. Conclusions can be drawn that ion bombardment at moderate energy can cause preferential physical sputtering of carbon atoms from the surface of low atomic number (Z) material. This means that ion beam bombardment leads to the formation of a non-stoichiometric composition of TiC on the surface.TiC films prepared by ion beam mixing have the more excellent characteristic of hydrogen resistance. One important cause, in addition to TiC itself, is that there are many vacant sites in TiC created by ion beam mixing.These defects can easily trap hydrogen and effectively enhance the effect of hydrogen resistance.

  20. Superconducting High-Resolution X-Ray Spectrometers for Chemical State Analysis of Dilute Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cryogenic X-ray spectrometers operating at temperatures below 1 K combine high energy resolution with broadband efficiency for X-ray energies up to 10 keV. They offer advantages for chemical state analysis of dilute samples by fluorescence-detected X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) in cases where conventional Ge or Si(Li) detectors lack energy resolution and grating spectrometers lack detection efficiency. We are developing soft X-ray spectrometers based on superconducting Nb-Al-AlOx-Al-Nb tunnel junction (STJ) technology. X-rays absorbed in one of the superconducting electrodes generate excess charge carriers in proportion to their energy, thereby producing a measurable temporary increase in tunneling current. For STJ operation at the synchrotron, we have designed a two-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) with a cold finger that holds a 3 x 3 array of STJs inside the UHV sample chamber at a temperature of ∼0.1 K within ∼15 mm of a room temperature sample. Our STJ spectrometer can have an energy resolution below 10 eV FWHM for X-ray energies up to 1 keV, and has total count rate capabilities above 100,000 counts/s. We will describe detector performance in synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence experiments and demonstrate its use for XAS on a dilute metal site in a metalloprotein

  1. Rate constants of chemical reactions from semiclassical transition state theory in full and one dimension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Samuel M; Shan, Xiao; Clary, David C

    2016-06-28

    Semiclassical Transition State Theory (SCTST), a method for calculating rate constants of chemical reactions, offers gains in computational efficiency relative to more accurate quantum scattering methods. In full-dimensional (FD) SCTST, reaction probabilities are calculated from third and fourth potential derivatives along all vibrational degrees of freedom. However, the computational cost of FD SCTST scales unfavorably with system size, which prohibits its application to larger systems. In this study, the accuracy and efficiency of 1-D SCTST, in which only third and fourth derivatives along the reaction mode are used, are investigated in comparison to those of FD SCTST. Potential derivatives are obtained from numerical ab initio Hessian matrix calculations at the MP2/cc-pVTZ level of theory, and Richardson extrapolation is applied to improve the accuracy of these derivatives. Reaction barriers are calculated at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ level. Results from FD SCTST agree with results from previous theoretical and experimental studies when Richardson extrapolation is applied. Results from our implementation of 1-D SCTST, which uses only 4 single-point MP2/cc-pVTZ energy calculations in addition to those for conventional TST, agree with FD results to within a factor of 5 at 250 K. This degree of agreement and the efficiency of the 1-D method suggest its potential as a means of approximating rate constants for systems too large for existing quantum scattering methods. PMID:27369506

  2. Octafluorodirhenate(III) Revisited: Solid-State Preparation, Characterization, and Multiconfigurational Quantum Chemical Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariappan Balasekaran, Samundeeswari; Todorova, Tanya K; Pham, Chien Thang; Hartmann, Thomas; Abram, Ulrich; Sattelberger, Alfred P; Poineau, Frederic

    2016-06-01

    A simple method for the high-yield preparation of (NH4)2[Re2F8]·2H2O has been developed that involves the reaction of (n-Bu4N)2[Re2Cl8] with molten ammonium bifluoride (NH4HF2). Using this method, the new salt [NH4]2[Re2F8]·2H2O was prepared in ∼90% yield. The product was characterized in solution by ultraviolet-visible light (UV-vis) and (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance ((19)F NMR) spectroscopies and in the solid-state by elemental analysis, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Multiconfigurational CASSCF/CASPT2 quantum chemical calculations were performed to investigate the molecular and electronic structure, as well as the electronic absorption spectrum of the [Re2F8](2-) anion. The metal-metal bonding in the Re2(6+) unit was quantified in terms of effective bond order (EBO) and compared to that of its [Re2Cl8](2-) and [Re2Br8](2-) analogues.

  3. Chemical morphology of Areca nut characterized directly by Fourier transform near-infrared and mid-infrared microspectroscopic imaging in reflection modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian-Bo; Sun, Su-Qin; Zhou, Qun

    2016-12-01

    Fourier transform near-infrared (NIR) and mid-infrared (MIR) imaging techniques are essential tools to characterize the chemical morphology of plant. The transmission imaging mode is mostly used to obtain easy-to-interpret spectra with high signal-to-noise ratio. However, the native chemical compositions and physical structures of plant samples may be altered when they are microtomed for the transmission tests. For the direct characterization of thick plant samples, the combination of the reflection NIR imaging and the attenuated total reflection (ATR) MIR imaging is proposed in this research. First, the reflection NIR imaging method can explore the whole sample quickly to find out typical regions in small sizes. Next, each small typical region can be measured by the ATR-MIR imaging method to reveal the molecular structures and spatial distributions of compounds of interest. As an example, the chemical morphology of Areca nut section is characterized directly by the above approach. PMID:27374557

  4. Multi-View Algorithm for Face, Eyes and Eye State Detection in Human Image- Study Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latesh Kumari

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available For fatigue detection such as in the application of driver‟s fatigue monitoring system, the eye state analysis is one of the important and deciding steps to determine the fatigue of driver‟s eyes. In this study, algorithms for face detection, eye detection and eye state analysis have been studied and presented as well as an efficient algorithm for detection of face, eyes have been proposed. Firstly the efficient algorithm for face detection method has been presented which find the face area in the human images. Then, novel algorithms for detection of eye region and eye state are introduced. In this paper we propose a multi-view based eye state detection to determine the state of the eye. With the help of skin color model, the algorithm detects the face regions in an YCbCr color model. By applying the skin segmentation which normally separates the skin and non-skin pixels of the images, it detects the face regions of the image under various lighting and noise conditions. Then from these face regions, the eye regions are extracted within those extracted face regions. Our proposed algorithms are fast and robust as there is not pattern match.

  5. Phase-sensitive lock-in imaging of surface densities of states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svec, Martin; Mutombo, Pingo; Shukrinov, Pavel; Dudr, Viktor; Cháb, Vladimír

    2006-01-01

    A new way of imaging the local density of states has been devised through a combination of the constant-height scanning tunnelling microscopy operational mode and lock-in techniques. We have obtained current images simultaneously with real space dynamical conductance maps (d I/d V) for energies around the Fermi level, on the Si(111)-(7 × 7) surface. We reconstructed the normalized dynamical conductance spectra—(d I/d V)/(I/V). Since the (d I/d V)/(I/V) curves are closely related to the local densities of states, we compared their sum over the unit cell to photoelectron spectra and theoretical calculations. We find that the results are in good agreement. Consequently, the extent of localization of surface electronic states at lattice positions was determined.

  6. Chemical-state analysis of organic semiconductors using soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy combined with first-principles calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsume, Yutaka; Kohno, Teiichiro; Minakata, Takashi; Konishi, Tokuzo; Gullikson, Eric M; Muramatsu, Yasuji

    2012-02-16

    The chemical states of organic semiconductors were investigated by total-electron-yield soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (TEY-XAS) and first-principles calculations. The organic semiconductors, pentacene (C(22)H(14)) and pentacenequinone (C(22)H(12)O(2)), were subjected to TEY-XAS and the experimental spectra obtained were compared with the 1s core-level excited spectra of C and O atoms, calculated by a first-principles planewave pseudopotential method. Excellent agreement between the measured and the calculated spectra were obtained for both materials. Using this methodology, we examined the chemical states of the aged pentacene, and confirmed that both C-OH and C═O chemical bonds are generated by exposure to air. This result implies that not only oxygen but also humidity causes pentacene oxidation.

  7. Advances in Bio-Imaging From Physics to Signal Understanding Issues State-of-the-Art and Challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Racoceanu, Daniel; Gouaillard, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    Advances in Imaging Devices and Image processing stem from cross-fertilization between many fields of research such as Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics and Computer Sciences. This BioImaging Community feel the urge to integrate more intensively its various results, discoveries and innovation into ready to use tools that can address all the new exciting challenges that Life Scientists (Biologists, Medical doctors, ...) keep providing, almost on a daily basis. Devising innovative chemical probes, for example, is an archetypal goal in which image quality improvement must be driven by the physics of acquisition, the image processing and analysis algorithms and the chemical skills in order to design an optimal bioprobe. This book offers an overview of the current advances in many research fields related to bioimaging and highlights the current limitations that would need to be addressed in the next decade to design fully integrated BioImaging Device.

  8. Resting state functional connectivity in perfusion imaging: correlation maps with BOLD connectivity and resting state perfusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Viviani

    Full Text Available Functional connectivity is a property of the resting state that may provide biomarkers of brain function and individual differences. Classically, connectivity is estimated as the temporal correlation of spontaneous fluctuations of BOLD signal. We investigated differences in connectivity estimated from the BOLD and CBF signal present in volumes acquired with arterial spin labeling technique in a large sample (N = 265 of healthy individuals. Positive connectivity was observable in both BOLD and CBF signal, and was present in the CBF signal also at frequencies lower than 0.009 Hz, here investigated for the first time. Negative connectivity was more variable. The validity of positive connectivity was confirmed by the existence of correlation across individuals in its intensity estimated from the BOLD and CBF signal. In contrast, there was little or no correlation across individuals between intensity of connectivity and mean perfusion levels, suggesting that these two biomarkers correspond to distinct sources of individual differences.

  9. Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer MR Imaging Is Superior to Diffusion Tensor Imaging in the Diagnosis and Severity Evaluation of Parkinson's Disease: a Study on Substantia Nigra and Striatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunmei eLi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by nigrostriatal cell loss. To date the diagnosis of PD is still based primarily on the clinical manifestations which may be typical and obvious only in advanced-stage PD. Thus, it is crucial to find a reliable marker for the diagnosis of PD. We conducted this study to assess the diagnostic efficiency of chemical-exchange-saturation-transfer (CEST imaging and diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI in PD at 3 Tesla by evaluating changes on substantia nigra and striatum. Twenty-three PD patients and twenty-three age-matched normal controls were recruited. All patients and controls were imaged on a 3 Tesla MR system, using an 8-channel head coil. CEST imaging was acquired in two transverse slices of the head, including substantia nigra and striatum. The magnetization-transfer-ratio asymmetry at 3.5 ppm, MTRasym(3.5ppm, and the total CEST signal intensity between 0 and 4 ppm were calculated. Multi-slice DTI was acquired for all the patients and normal controls. Quantitative analysis was performed on the substantia nigra, globus pallidus, putamen and caudate. The MTRasym(3.5ppm value, the total CEST signal intensity and fractional anisotropy (FA value of the substantia nigra were all significantly lower in PD patients than in normal controls (P = 0.003, P = 0.004 and P < 0.001, respectively. The MTRasym(3.5ppm values of the putamen and the caudate were significantly higher in PD patients than in normal controls (P = 0.010 and P = 0.009, respectively. There were no significant differences for the mean diffusivity (MD in these four regions between PD patients and normal controls. In conclusion, CEST MR imaging provided multiple CEST image contrasts in the substantia nigra and the striatum in PD and may be superior to DTI in the diagnosis of PD.

  10. Diffusion tensor imaging and chemical shift imaging assessment of heterogeneity in low grade glioma under temozolomide chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sijens, P E; Heesters, M A A M; Enting, R H; van der Graaf, W T A; Potze, J H; Irwan, R; Meiners, L C; Oudkerk, M

    2007-12-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging and multiple voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy were performed in the MRI follow-up of a patient with a glioma treated with temozolomide chemotherapy. Tumor shrinkage was paralleled by reductions in choline level and by increases in apparent diffusion coefficient indicating decreased cellularity. Within the tumor, choline level and apparent diffusion coefficient showed a significant inverse correlation (P < 0.01). Fractional anisotropy distribution in the tumor correlated positively with N-acetyl aspartate level (P < 0.001), indicating that these parameters reflect (remaining) axonal structure. Tumor lactate level, also found to decrease under therapy, did not correlate with any other parameter.

  11. In vivo imaging of C. elegans ASH neurons: cellular response and adaptation to chemical repellents

    OpenAIRE

    Massimo A Hilliard; Apicella, Alfonso J; Kerr, Rex; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Bazzicalupo, Paolo; Schafer, William R.

    2005-01-01

    ASH sensory neurons are required in Caenorhabditis elegans for a wide range of avoidance behaviors in response to chemical repellents, high osmotic solutions and nose touch. The ASH neurons are therefore hypothesized to be polymodal nociceptive neurons. To understand the nature of polymodal sensory response and adaptation at the cellular level, we expressed the calcium indicator protein cameleon in ASH and analyzed intracellular Ca2+ responses following stimulation with chemical repellents, o...

  12. Decreased regional homogeneity in major depression as revealed by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Dai-hui; JIANG Kai-da; FANG Yi-ru; XU Yi-feng; SHEN Ting; LONG Xiang-yu; LIU Jun; ZANG Yu-feng

    2011-01-01

    Backgroud Functional imaging studies indicate abnormal activities in cortico-limbic network in depression during either task or resting state. The present work was to explore the abnormal spontaneous activity shown with regional homogeneity (ReHo) in depression by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).Methods Using fMRI, the differences of regional brain activity were measured in resting state in depressed vs. healthy participants. Sixteen participants firstly diagnosed with major depressive disorder and 16 controls were scanned during resting state. A novel method based on ReHo was used to detect spontaneous hemodynamic responses across the whole brain.Results ReHo in the left thalamus, left temporal lobe, left cerebellar posterior lobe, and the bilateral occipital lobe was found to be significantly decreased in depression compared to healthy controls in resting state of depression.Conclusions Abnormal spontaneous activity exists in the left thalamus, left temporal lobe, left cerebellar posterior lobe,and the bilateral occipital lobe. And the ReHo may be a potential reference in understanding the distinct brain activity in resting state of depression.

  13. Octafluorodirhenate(III) Revisited: Solid-State Preparation, Characterization, and Multiconfigurational Quantum Chemical Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariappan Balasekaran, Samundeeswari; Todorova, Tanya K.; Pham, Chien Thang; Hartmann, Thomas; Abram, Ulrich; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Poineau, Frederic

    2016-06-06

    A simple method for the high-yield preparation of (NH4)2[Re2F8]· 2H2O has been developed that involves the reaction of (n-Bu4N)2[Re2Cl8] with molten ammonium bifluoride (NH4HF2). Using this method, the new salt [NH4]2[Re2F8]·2H2O was prepared in ~90% yield. The product was characterized in solution by ultraviolet-visible light (UV-vis) and 19F nuclear magnetic resonance (19F NMR) spectroscopies and in the solid-state by elemental analysis, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Multiconfigurational CASSCF/CASPT2 quantum chemical calculations were performed to investigate the molecular and electronic structure, as well as the electronic absorption spectrum of the [Re2F8] 2- anion. The metal-metal bonding in the Re2 6+ unit was quantified in terms of effective bond order (EBO) and compared to that of its [Re2Cl8] 2- and [Re2Br8] 2- analogues.

  14. Calculation of Equation of State of QCD at Finite Chemical Potential and Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAO Qing-Peng; ZONG Hong-Shi; TANG Jian; HOU Feng-Yao; LI Xue-Qian; SUN Wei-Min; L(U) Xiao-Fu

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, using path integral techniques we derive a model-independent formula for the pressure density (μ, T) (or equivalently the partition function) of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), which gives the equation of state (EOS) of QCD at finite chemical potential and temperature. In this formula the pressure density (μ, T) consists of two terms: the first term (μ,T) T=0) is a #-independent (but T-dependent) constant; the second term is totally determined by G[μ, T] (p ωn) (the dressed quark propagator at finite μ and finite T), which contains all the nontrivial μ-dependence. Then, in the framework of the rainbow-ladder approximation of the Dyson-Schwinger (DS) approach and under the approximation of neglecting the μ-dependence of the dressed gluon propagator, we show that G[μ, T] (p, ωn) can be obtained from G[T] (p, ωn) (the dressed quark propagator at μ = 0) by the substitution ωn →ωn + iμ. This result facilitates numerical calculations considerably. By this result, once G[T](p, ωn) is known, one can determine the EOS of QCD under the above approximations (up to the additive term (μ, T)[T=0). Finally, a comparison of the present EOS of QCD and the EOS obtained in the previous literatures in the framework of the rainbow-ladder approximation of the DS approach is given. It is found that the EOS given in the previous literatures does not satisfy the thermodynamic relation p(μ, T) = T.

  15. Femtosecond electron diffraction and spectroscopic studies of a solid state organic chemical reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean-Ruel, Hubert

    Photochromic diarylethene molecules are excellent model systems for studying electrocyclic reactions, in addition to having important technological applications in optoelectronics. The photoinduced ring-closing reaction in a crystalline photochromic diarylethene derivative was fully resolved using the complementary techniques of transient absorption spectroscopy and femtosecond electron crystallography. These studies are detailed in this thesis, together with the associated technical developments which enabled them. Importantly, the time-resolved crystallographic investigation reported here represents a highly significant proof-of-principle experiment. It constitutes the first study directly probing the molecular structural changes associated with an organic chemical reaction with sub-picosecond temporal and atomic spatial resolution---to follow the primary motions directing chemistry. In terms of technological development, the most important advance reported is the implementation of a radio frequency rebunching system capable of producing femtosecond electron pulses of exceptional brightness. The temporal resolution of this newly developed electron source was fully characterized using laser ponderomotive scattering, confirming a 435 +/- 75 fs instrument response time with 0.20 pC bunches. The ultrafast spectroscopic and crystallographic measurements were both achieved by exploiting the photoreversibility of diarylethene. The transient absorption study was first performed, after developing a novel robust acquisition scheme for thermally irreversible reactions in the solid state. It revealed the formation of an open-ring excited state intermediate, following photoexcitation of the open-ring isomer with an ultraviolet laser pulse, with a time constant of approximately 200 fs. The actual ring closing was found to occur from this intermediate with a time constant of 5.3 +/- 0.3 ps. The femtosecond diffraction measurements were then performed using multiple crystal

  16. Spectral imaging of chemical compounds using multivariate optically enhanced filters integrated with InGaAs VGA cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priore, Ryan J.; Jacksen, Niels

    2016-05-01

    Infrared hyperspectral imagers (HSI) have been fielded for the detection of hazardous chemical and biological compounds, tag detection (friend versus foe detection) and other defense critical sensing missions over the last two decades. Low Size/Weight/Power/Cost (SWaPc) methods of identification of chemical compounds spectroscopy has been a long term goal for hand held applications. We describe a new HSI concept for low cost / high performance InGaAs SWIR camera chemical identification for military, security, industrial and commercial end user applications. Multivariate Optical Elements (MOEs) are thin-film devices that encode a broadband, spectroscopic pattern allowing a simple broadband detector to generate a highly sensitive and specific detection for a target analyte. MOEs can be matched 1:1 to a discrete analyte or class prediction. Additionally, MOE filter sets are capable of sensing an orthogonal projection of the original sparse spectroscopic space enabling a small set of MOEs to discriminate a multitude of target analytes. This paper identifies algorithms and broadband optical filter designs that have been demonstrated to identify chemical compounds using high performance InGaAs VGA detectors. It shows how some of the initial models have been reduced to simple spectral designs and tested to produce positive identification of such chemicals. We also are developing pixilated MOE compressed detection sensors for the detection of a multitude of chemical targets in challenging backgrounds/environments for both commercial and defense/security applications. This MOE based, real-time HSI sensor will exhibit superior sensitivity and specificity as compared to currently fielded HSI systems.

  17. Regulation of chemical safety at fuel cycle facilities by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) was established in 1975, its regulations were based on radiation dose limits. Chemical hazards rarely influenced NRC regulations. After the Three Mile Island reactor accident in 1979, the NRC staff was directed to address emergency planning at non-reactor facilities. Several fuel cycle facilities were ordered to submit emergency plans consistent with reactor emergency plans because no other guidance was available. NRC published a notice that it was writing regulations to codify the requirements in the Orders and upgrade the emergency plans to address all hazards, including chemical hazards. The legal authority of NRC to regulate chemical safety was questioned. In 1986, an overfilled uranium hexafluoride cylinder ruptured and killed a worker. The NRC staff was directed to address emergency planning for hazardous chemicals in its regulations. The final rule included a requirement for fuel cycle facilities to certify compliance with legislation requiring local authorities to establish emergency plans for hazardous chemicals. As with emergency planning, NRC's authority to regulate chemical safety during routine operations was limited. NRC established memoranda of understanding (MOUs) with other regulatory agencies to encourage exchange of information between the agencies regarding occupational hazards. In 2000, NRC published new, performance-based, regulations for fuel cycle facilities. The new regulations required an integrated safety analysis (ISA) which used quantitative standards to assess chemical exposures. Some unique chemical exposure cases were addressed while implementing the new regulations. In addition, some gaps remain in the regulation of hazardous chemicals at fuel cycle facilities. The status of ongoing efforts to improve regulation of chemical safety at fuel cycle facilities is discussed. (authors)

  18. 3-D imaging of particle tracks in solid state nuclear track detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Wertheim

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that 3 to 5% of total lung cancer deaths in the UK may be associated with elevated radon concentration. Radon gas levels can be assessed using CR-39 plastic detectors which are often assessed by 2-D image analysis of surface images. 3-D analysis has the potential to provide information relating to the angle at which alpha particles impinge on the detector. In this study we used a "LEXT" OLS3100 confocal laser scanning microscope (Olympus Corporation, Tokyo, Japan to image tracks on five CR-39 detectors. We were able to identify several patterns of single and coalescing tracks from 3-D visualisation. Thus this method may provide a means of detailed 3-D analysis of Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors.

  19. 3-D imaging of particle tracks in solid state nuclear track detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertheim, D.; Gillmore, G.; Brown, L.; Petford, N.

    2010-05-01

    It has been suggested that 3 to 5% of total lung cancer deaths in the UK may be associated with elevated radon concentration. Radon gas levels can be assessed using CR-39 plastic detectors which are often assessed by 2-D image analysis of surface images. 3-D analysis has the potential to provide information relating to the angle at which alpha particles impinge on the detector. In this study we used a "LEXT" OLS3100 confocal laser scanning microscope (Olympus Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) to image tracks on five CR-39 detectors. We were able to identify several patterns of single and coalescing tracks from 3-D visualisation. Thus this method may provide a means of detailed 3-D analysis of Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors.

  20. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Dynamic Molecular Phase Boundary with Ultrahigh Vacuum Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Nan; Chiang, Naihao; Madison, Lindsey R; Pozzi, Eric A; Wasielewski, Michael R; Seideman, Tamar; Ratner, Mark A; Hersam, Mark C; Schatz, George C; Van Duyne, Richard P

    2016-06-01

    Nanoscale chemical imaging of a dynamic molecular phase boundary has broad implications for a range of problems in catalysis, surface science, and molecular electronics. While scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is commonly used to study molecular phase boundaries, its information content can be severely compromised by surface diffusion, irregular packing, or three-dimensional adsorbate geometry. Here, we demonstrate the simultaneous chemical and structural analysis of N-N'-bis(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)-1,7-(4'-t-butylphenoxy)perylene-3,4:9,10-bis(dicarboximide) (PPDI) molecules by UHV tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. Both condensed and diffusing domains of PPDI coexist on Ag(100) at room temperature. Through comparison with time-dependent density functional theory simulations, we unravel the orientation of PPDI molecules at the dynamic molecular domain boundary with unprecedented ∼4 nm spatial resolution. PMID:27183322

  1. Dark current random telegraph signals in solid-state image sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper focuses on the Dark Current-Random Telegraph Signal (DC-RTS) in solid-state image sensors. The DC-RTS is investigated in several bulk materials, for different surface interfaces and for different trench isolation interfaces. The main parameter used to characterize the DC-RTS is the transition maximum amplitude which seems to be the most appropriate for studying the phenomenon and identifying its origin. Proton, neutron and Co-60 Gamma-ray irradiations are used to study DC-RTS induced by both Total Ionizing Dose (TID) and Displacement damage (Dd) dose. Conclusions are drawn by analyzing the correlation between the exponential slope of the transition maximum amplitude histogram and the location of the DC-RTS-induced defects. The presented results can be extrapolated to predict DC-RTS distributions in various kinds of solid state image sensors. (authors)

  2. Ultrastructural analysis of neuronal synapses using state-of-the-art nano-imaging techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changlu Tao; Chenglong Xia; Xiaobing Chen; Z. Hong Zhou; Guoqiang Bi

    2012-01-01

    Neuronal synapses are functional nodes in neural circuits.Their organization and activity define an individual's level of intelligence,emotional state and mental health.Changes in the structure and efficacy of synapses are the biological basis of learning and memory.However,investigation of the molecular architecture of synapses has been impeded by the lack of efficient techniques with sufficient resolution.Recent developments in state-of-the-art nano-imaging techniques have opened up a new window for dissecting the molecular organization of neuronal synapses with unprecedented resolution.Here,we review recent technological advances in nano-imaging techniques as well as their applications to the study of synapses,emphasizing super-resolution light microscopy and 3-dimensional electron tomography.

  3. Line-imaging velocimetry for observing spatially heterogeneous mechanical and chemical responses in plastic bonded explosives during impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolme, C A; Ramos, K J

    2013-08-01

    A line-imaging velocity interferometer was implemented on a single-stage light gas gun to probe the spatial heterogeneity of mechanical response, chemical reaction, and initiation of detonation in explosives. The instrument is described in detail, and then data are presented on several shock-compressed materials to demonstrate the instrument performance on both homogeneous and heterogeneous samples. The noise floor of this diagnostic was determined to be 0.24 rad with a shot on elastically compressed sapphire. The diagnostic was then applied to two heterogeneous plastic bonded explosives: 3,3(')-diaminoazoxyfurazan (DAAF) and PBX 9501, where significant spatial velocity heterogeneity was observed during the build up to detonation. In PBX 9501, the velocity heterogeneity was consistent with the explosive grain size, however in DAAF, we observed heterogeneity on a much larger length scale than the grain size that was similar to the imaging resolution of the instrument. PMID:24007075

  4. Gradient-echo in-phase and opposed-phase chemical shift imaging: Role in evaluating bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical shift imaging (CSI) provides valuable information for assessing the bone marrow, while adding little to total examination time. In this article, we review the uses of CSI for evaluating bone marrow abnormalities. CSI can be used for differentiating marrow-replacing lesions from a range of non-marrow-replacing processes, although the sequence is associated with technical limitations and pitfalls. Particularly at 3 T, susceptibility artefacts are prevalent, and optimal technical parameters must be implemented with appropriate choices for echo times

  5. The Image of the United States in the Israeli-Palestinian relationships from 1988 to 1992

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Meson

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available USA’s image throughout the world usually symbolizes force, security, power of a great country but most of all the power of the dollar. America appears as the world’s leading economy far ahead of all others. She exerts an imperial economy and her military power is apparent on a world level. However, the United States also evoke, for some, vice, dirty money and decadence. Sometimes loved, sometimes decried, the United States still fascinated. During our research in Jerusalem for our doctorate i...

  6. The Physics of Imaging with Remote Sensors : Photon State Space & Radiative Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Anthony B.

    2012-01-01

    Standard (mono-pixel/steady-source) retrieval methodology is reaching its fundamental limit with access to multi-angle/multi-spectral photo- polarimetry. Next... Two emerging new classes of retrieval algorithm worth nurturing: multi-pixel time-domain Wave-radiometry transition regimes, and more... Cross-fertilization with bio-medical imaging. Physics-based remote sensing: - What is "photon state space?" - What is "radiative transfer?" - Is "the end" in sight? Two wide-open frontiers! center dot Examples (with variations.

  7. Proposal for a remote sensing trophic state index based upon Thematic Mapper/Landsat images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evlyn Márcia Leão de Moraes Novo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This work proposes a trophic state index based on the remote sensing retrieval of chlorophyll-α concentration. For that, in situ Bidirectional Reflectance Factor (BRF data acquired in the Ibitinga reservoir were resampled to match Landsat/TM spectral simulated bands (TM_sim bands and used to run linear correlation with concurrent measurements of chlorophyll-α concentration. Monte Carlo simulation was then applied to select the most suitable model relating chlorophyll-α concentration and simulated TM/Landsat reflectance. TM4_sim/TM3_sim ratio provided the best model with a R2 value of 0.78. The model was then inverted to create a look-up-table (LUT relating TM4_sim/TM3_sim ratio intervals to chlorophyll-α concentration trophic state classes covering the entire range measured in the reservoir. Atmospheric corrected Landsat TM images converted to surface reflectance were then used to generate a TM4/TM3 ratio image. The ratio image frequency distribution encompassed the range of TM4_sim/TM3_sim ratio indicating agreement between in situ and satellite data and supporting the use of satellite data to map chlorophyll- concentration trophic state distribution in the reservoir. Based on that, the LUT was applied to a Landsat/TM ratio image to map the spatial distribution of chlorophyll- trophic state classes in Ibitinga reservoir. Despite the stochastic selection of TM4_sim/TM3_sim ratio as the best input variable for modeling the chlorophyll-α concentration, it has a physical basis: high concentration of phytoplankton increases the reflectance in the near-infrared (TM4 and decreases the reflectance in the red (TM3. The band ratio, therefore, enhances the relationship between chlorophyll- concentration and remotely sensed reflectance.

  8. Development of a handheld widefield hyperspectral imaging (HSI) sensor for standoff detection of explosive, chemical, and narcotic residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Matthew P.; Basta, Andrew; Patil, Raju; Klueva, Oksana; Treado, Patrick J.

    2013-05-01

    The utility of Hyper Spectral Imaging (HSI) passive chemical detection employing wide field, standoff imaging continues to be advanced in detection applications. With a drive for reduced SWaP (Size, Weight, and Power), increased speed of detection and sensitivity, developing a handheld platform that is robust and user-friendly increases the detection capabilities of the end user. In addition, easy to use handheld detectors could improve the effectiveness of locating and identifying threats while reducing risks to the individual. ChemImage Sensor Systems (CISS) has developed the HSI Aperio™ sensor for real time, wide area surveillance and standoff detection of explosives, chemical threats, and narcotics for use in both government and commercial contexts. Employing liquid crystal tunable filter technology, the HSI system has an intuitive user interface that produces automated detections and real-time display of threats with an end user created library of threat signatures that is easily updated allowing for new hazardous materials. Unlike existing detection technologies that often require close proximity for sensing and so endanger operators and costly equipment, the handheld sensor allows the individual operator to detect threats from a safe distance. Uses of the sensor include locating production facilities of illegal drugs or IEDs by identification of materials on surfaces such as walls, floors, doors, deposits on production tools and residue on individuals. In addition, the sensor can be used for longer-range standoff applications such as hasty checkpoint or vehicle inspection of residue materials on surfaces or bulk material identification. The CISS Aperio™ sensor has faster data collection, faster image processing, and increased detection capability compared to previous sensors.

  9. Ultrafast magnetic-resonance-imaging velocimetry of liquid-liquid systems: overcoming chemical-shift artifacts using compressed sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayler, Alexander B; Benning, Martin; Sederman, Andrew J; Holland, Daniel J; Gladden, Lynn F

    2014-06-01

    We present simultaneous measurement of dispersed and continuous phase flow fields for liquid-liquid systems obtained using ultrafast magnetic resonance imaging. Chemical-shift artifacts, which are otherwise highly problematic for this type of measurement, are overcome using a compressed sensing based image reconstruction algorithm that accounts for off-resonant signal components. This scheme is combined with high-temporal-resolution spiral imaging (188 frames per second), which is noted for its robustness to flow. It is demonstrated that both quantitative signal intensity and phase preconditioning are preserved throughout the image reconstruction algorithm. Measurements are acquired of oil droplets of varying viscosity rising through stagnant water. From these data it is apparent that the internal droplet flow fields are heavily influenced by the droplet shape oscillations, and that the accurate modeling of droplet shape is of critical importance in the modeling of droplet-side hydrodynamics. The application of the technique to three-component systems is also demonstrated, as is the measurement of local concentration maps of a mutually soluble species (acetone in polydimethylsiloxane-water).

  10. Dosimetry and image quality in digital mammography facilities in the State of Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Sabrina Donato; Joana, Geórgia Santos; Oliveira, Bruno Beraldo; de Oliveira, Marcio Alves; Leyton, Fernando; Nogueira, Maria do Socorro

    2015-11-01

    According to the National Register of Health Care Facilities (CNES), there are approximately 477 mammography systems operating in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, of which an estimated 200 are digital apparatus using mainly computerized radiography (CR) or direct radiography (DR) systems. Mammography is irreplaceable in the diagnosis and early detection of breast cancer, the leading cause of cancer death among women worldwide. A high standard of image quality alongside smaller doses and optimization of procedures are essential if early detection is to occur. This study aimed to determine dosimetry and image quality in 68 mammography services in Minas Gerais using CR or DR systems. The data of this study were collected between the years of 2011 and 2013. The contrast-to-noise ratio proved to be a critical point in the image production chain in digital systems, since 90% of services were not compliant in this regard, mainly for larger PMMA thicknesses (60 and 70 mm). Regarding the image noise, only 31% of these were compliant. The average glandular dose found is of concern, since more than half of the services presented doses above acceptable limits. Therefore, despite the potential benefits of using CR and DR systems, the employment of this technology has to be revised and optimized to achieve better quality image and reduce radiation dose as much as possible.

  11. SIMS ion microscopy as a novel, practical tool for subcellular chemical imaging in cancer research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandra, S

    2003-01-15

    The development of cryogenic sample preparations, subcellular image quantification schemes, and correlative confocal laser scanning microscopy and ion microscopy have made dynamic SIMS a versatile tool in biology and medicine. For example, ion microscopy can provide much needed, novel information on calcium influx and intracellular calcium stores at organelle resolution in normal and transformed cells in order to better understand the altered calcium signaling in malignant cells. 3-D SIMS imaging of cells revealed dynamic gradients of calcium in cells undergoing mitosis and cytokinesis. Studies of subcellular localization of anticancer drugs is another area of research where ion microscopy can provide novel observations in many types of cancers. Ion microscopy is already an essential tool in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of brain cancer as it can be used to quantitatively image the subcellular location of boron in cells and tissues. This information is critically needed for testing the efficacy of boronated agents and for calculations of radiation dosimetry.

  12. Towards Chemical Imaging of Living Cells: Design and Application of a Confocal Raman Microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijtsema, Nanna Maria

    1997-01-01

    Raman microspectroscopy is a technique that can be used to obtain information about the chemical composition of a very small measurement volume (0.5 fl) in a (biological) sample. Molecules present in the sample can be identified based on their scattering characteristics and no special treatment or p

  13. Using a chemical concept for reactivity for the interpretation of STM images of physisorbed molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electrostatic potential mapped on the electron density contour of gas phase molecules is used to identify several molecules physisorbed on transition metals imaged by scanning tunnelling microscopy within the molecular HOMO-LUMO gap. It is rationalized that the inverted of this potential, representing the potential energy felt by a negative test charge, is a good concept to interpret changes in the dielectricity constant through the influence of physisorbed molecules and thus to understand their submolecular resolution images. The validity of the concept is demonstrated on dichlorobenzene, chloronitrobenzene, and two azobenzene derivates on the surfaces of Au(111), Ag(111), and Cu(111)

  14. Chemical imaging of single catalyst particles with scanning μ-XANES-CT and μ-XRF-CT

    OpenAIRE

    Price, S. W.; Ignatyev, K.; Geraki, K.; Basham, M.; Filik, J.; Vo, N. T.; Witte, P.T.; Beale, A. M.; Mosselmans, J. F.

    2015-01-01

    The physicochemical state of a catalyst is a key factor in determining both activity and selectivity; however these materials are often not structurally or compositionally homogeneous. Here we report on the 3-dimensional imaging of an industrial catalyst, Mo-promoted colloidal Pt supported on carbon. The distribution of both the active Pt species and Mo promoter have been mapped over a single particle of catalyst using microfocus X-ray fluorescence computed tomography. X-ray absorption near e...

  15. State of chemical modeling modules for the degradation of concrete and cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meike, A.

    1997-04-15

    This report describes the conceptual framework upon which modeling activities will be needed to predict the chemistry of water in contact with concrete and its degradation products cover a broad area, from developing databases for existing abiotic codes, to developing codes that can simulate the chemical impact of microbial activities at a level of sophistication equivalent to that of the abiotic modeling codes, and ultimately, to simulating drift-scale chemical systems in support of hydrological, geochemical,a nd engineering efforts.

  16. Fat suppression techniques in breast magnetic resonance imaging: a critical comparison and state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin C

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Chen Lin, Clark David Rogers, Shadie Majidi Department of Radiology and Imaging Science, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USAAbstract: Robust and accurate fat suppression is highly desirable in breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI because it can considerably improve the image quality and lesion conspicuity. However, fat suppression is also more challenging in the breast compared with other regions in the body. Technical advances have been made over time to make fat suppression more efficient and reliable. Combined with other innovations, breast MRI continues to be the most sensitive and comprehensive diagnostic modality in the detection and evaluation of breast lesions. This review offers a critical comparison of various fat suppression techniques in breast MRI including spectral-selective excitation and saturation techniques based on the chemical shift difference between fat and water, the inversion recovery techniques based on the T1 relaxation time difference, the hybrid spectral-selective inversion recovery techniques, and the new Dixon fat and water separation techniques based on the phase difference between fat and water signal at different echo times. This review will also cover less frequently used techniques such as slice-selective gradient reversal. For each fat suppression technique in breast MRI, a detailed explanation of the technical principle, the advantages and disadvantages, the approaches for optimization as well as the clinical examples are included. The additional challenges of fat suppression in breast MRI at higher field strength and in the presence of metallic and silicone implants are also discussed. Keywords: breast MRI, fat suppression, dynamic contrast enhanced imaging, diffusion weighted imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy

  17. Screening of adulterants in milk powder using a high-throughput Raman chemical imaging method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milk is one of the most common targets for economically motivated adulteration. Adulterants in milk can cause illness and death when consumed, thus rapid and accurate detection method is needed for authenticating milk products. Our previous studies based on a point-scan Raman imaging system have dem...

  18. Optical cryo-imaging of kidney mitochondrial redox state in diabetic mice models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, S.; Sepehr, R.; Staniszewski, K.; Sheibani, N.; Sorenson, C. M.; Ranji, M.

    2012-03-01

    Oxidative stress (OS), which increases during diabetes, exacerbates the development and progression of diabetes complications including renal vascular and proximal tubule cell dysfunction. The objective of this study was to investigate the changes in the metabolic state of the tissue in diabetic mice kidneys using fluorescence imaging. Mitochondrial metabolic coenzymes NADH (Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide), and FADH-2 (Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide) are autofluorescent and can be monitored without exogenous labels by optical techniques. The ratio of the fluorescence intensity of these fluorophores, (NADH/FAD), called the NADH redox ratio (RR), is a marker of metabolic state of a tissue. We examined mitochondrial redox states of kidneys from diabetic mice, Akita/+ and its control wild type (WT) for a group of 8- and 12-week-old mice. Average intensity and histogram of maximum projected images of FAD, NADH, and NADH RR were calculated for each kidney. Our results indicated a 17% decrease in the mean NADH RR of the kidney from 8-week-old mice compared with WT mice and, a 30% decrease in the mean NADH RR of kidney from12-week-old mice compared with WT mice. These results indicated an increase in OS in diabetic animals and its progression over time. Thus, NADH RR can be used as a hallmark of OS in diabetic kidney allowing temporal identification of oxidative state.

  19. Application of multivariate image analysis in QSPR study of 13C chemical shifts of naphthalene derivatives: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garkani-Nejad, Zahra; Poshteh-Shirani, Marziyeh

    2010-11-15

    A new implemented QSPR method, whose descriptors achieved from bidimensional images, was applied for predicting (13)C NMR chemical shifts of 25 mono substituted naphthalenes. The resulted descriptors were subjected to principal component analysis (PCA) and the most significant principal components (PCs) were extracted. MIA-QSPR (multivariate image analysis applied to quantitative structure-property relationship) modeling was done by means of principal component regression (PCR) and principal component-artificial neural network (PC-ANN) methods. Eigen value ranking (EV) and correlation ranking (CR) were used here to select the most relevant set of PCs as inputs for PCR and PC-ANN modeling methods. The results supported that the correlation ranking-principal component-artificial neural network (CR-PC-ANN) model could predict the (13)C NMR chemical shifts of all 10 carbon atoms in mono substituted naphthalenes with R(2) ≥ 0.922 for training set, R(2) ≥ 0.963 for validation set and R(2) ≥ 0.936 for the test set. Comparison of the results with other existing factor selection method revealed that less accurate results were obtained by the eigen value ranking procedure. PMID:21035668

  20. The multi-flavor Schwinger model with chemical potential - Overcoming the sign problem with Matrix Product States

    CERN Document Server

    Bañuls, Mari Carmen; Cirac, J Ignacio; Jansen, Karl; Kühn, Stefan; Saito, Hana

    2016-01-01

    During recent years there has been an increasing interest in the application of matrix product states, and more generally tensor networks, to lattice gauge theories. This non-perturbative method is sign problem free and has already been successfully used to compute mass spectra, thermal states and phase diagrams, as well as real-time dynamics for Abelian and non-Abelian gauge models. In previous work we showed the suitability of the method to explore the zero-temperature phase structure of the multi-flavor Schwinger model at non-zero chemical potential, a regime where the conventional Monte Carlo approach suffers from the sign problem. Here we extend our numerical study by looking at the spatially resolved chiral condensate in the massless case. We recover spatial oscillations, similar to the theoretical predictions for the single-flavor case, with a chemical potential dependent frequency and an amplitude approximately given by the homogeneous zero density condensate value.

  1. Change of chemical states of niobium in the oxide layer of zirconium–niobium alloys with oxide growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The change of chemical states of niobium with oxide growth was examined in the oxide layers of Zr–2.5Nb around the first kinetic transition by the conversion electron yield – X-ray absorption near-edge structure measurements. The detailed depth profiles of niobium chemical states were obtained in both the pre- and the post-transition oxide layers of Zr–2.5Nb formed in water at 663 K for 40–280 d. The depth profiling revealed that the inner oxide layer remained protective to oxidizing species even though in the post-transition region and this excellent stability of barrierness would be attributed the suppression of hydrogen pickup. (author)

  2. Accuracy of chemical shift MR imaging in diagnosing indeterminate bone marrow lesions in the pelvis: review of a single institution's experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To re-assess the accuracy of chemical shift imaging in diagnosing indeterminate bone marrow lesions as benign or malignant. We retrospectively reviewed our experience with MR imaging of the pelvis to assess the accuracy of chemical shift imaging in distinguishing benign from malignant bone lesions. Two musculoskeletal radiologists retrospectively reviewed all osseous lesions biopsied since 2006, when chemical shift imaging was added to our routine pelvic imaging protocol. Study inclusion criteria required (1) MR imaging of an indeterminate bone marrow lesion about the pelvis and (2) subsequent histologic confirmation. The study group included 50 patients (29 male, 21 female) with an average age of 67 years (range, 41-89 years). MR imaging results were evaluated using biopsy results as the ''gold standard.'' There were 27 malignant and 23 benign lesions. Chemical shift imaging using an opposed-phase signal loss criteria of less than 20 % to indicate a malignant lesion, correctly diagnosed 27/27 malignant lesions and 14/23 benign lesions, yielding a 100 % sensitivity, 61 % specificity, 75 % PPV, 100 % NPV, and 82 % accuracy. The area under the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.88. The inter-rater and intra-rater agreement K values were both 1.0. Chemical shift imaging is a useful adjunct MR technique to characterize focal and diffuse marrow abnormalities on routine non-contrast pelvic imaging. It is highly sensitive in identifying malignant disease. Despite its lower specificity, the need for biopsy could be eliminated in more than 60 % of patients with benign disease. (orig.)

  3. Accuracy of chemical shift MR imaging in diagnosing indeterminate bone marrow lesions in the pelvis: review of a single institution's experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohl, Chad A. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Radiology Ltd., Tucson, AZ (United States); Chivers, F.S.; Lorans, Roxanne; Roberts, Catherine C.; Kransdorf, Mark J. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2014-08-15

    To re-assess the accuracy of chemical shift imaging in diagnosing indeterminate bone marrow lesions as benign or malignant. We retrospectively reviewed our experience with MR imaging of the pelvis to assess the accuracy of chemical shift imaging in distinguishing benign from malignant bone lesions. Two musculoskeletal radiologists retrospectively reviewed all osseous lesions biopsied since 2006, when chemical shift imaging was added to our routine pelvic imaging protocol. Study inclusion criteria required (1) MR imaging of an indeterminate bone marrow lesion about the pelvis and (2) subsequent histologic confirmation. The study group included 50 patients (29 male, 21 female) with an average age of 67 years (range, 41-89 years). MR imaging results were evaluated using biopsy results as the ''gold standard.'' There were 27 malignant and 23 benign lesions. Chemical shift imaging using an opposed-phase signal loss criteria of less than 20 % to indicate a malignant lesion, correctly diagnosed 27/27 malignant lesions and 14/23 benign lesions, yielding a 100 % sensitivity, 61 % specificity, 75 % PPV, 100 % NPV, and 82 % accuracy. The area under the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.88. The inter-rater and intra-rater agreement K values were both 1.0. Chemical shift imaging is a useful adjunct MR technique to characterize focal and diffuse marrow abnormalities on routine non-contrast pelvic imaging. It is highly sensitive in identifying malignant disease. Despite its lower specificity, the need for biopsy could be eliminated in more than 60 % of patients with benign disease. (orig.)

  4. Photoelectron spectroscopic imaging and device applications of large-area patternable single-layer MoS2 synthesized by chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Woanseo; Baik, Jaeyoon; Kim, Tae-Young; Cho, Kyungjune; Hong, Woong-Ki; Shin, Hyun-Joon; Lee, Takhee

    2014-05-27

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) films, which are only a single atomic layer thick, have been synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and have gained significant attention due to their band-gap semiconducting properties. However, in order for them to be useful for the fabrication of practical devices, patterning processes that can be used to form specific MoS2 structures must be integrated with the existing synthetic approaches. Here, we report a method for the synthesis of centimeter-scale, high-quality single-layer MoS2 that can be directly patterned during CVD, so that postpatterning processes can be avoided and device fabrication can be streamlined. Utilizing X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic imaging, we characterize the chemical states of these CVD-synthesized single-layer MoS2 films and demonstrate that the triangular-shaped MoS2 are single-crystalline single-domain monolayers. We also demonstrate the use of these high-quality and directly patterned MoS2 films in electronic device applications by fabricating and characterizing field effect transistors. PMID:24730654

  5. Current state and temporal evolution of the chemical composition of atmospheric depositions in forest areas of the CONECOFOR network

    OpenAIRE

    Marchetto A; Arisci S.; Tartari GA; Balestrini R; Tait D

    2014-01-01

    Current state and temporal evolution of the chemical composition of atmospheric depositions in forest areas of the CONECOFOR network. Since 1997, atmospheric deposition was sampled and analyzed in the permanent plots of the Italian network for the evaluation of forest health (CONECOFOR), under the coordination of the Italian Forest Service. This paper presents the results of the activity carried out in 2009, when the EU-funded LIFE+ “FutMon” project allowed to extend the sampling network to 2...

  6. Prediction of the Chapman–Jouguet chemical equilibrium state in a detonation wave from first principles based reactive molecular dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Dezhou; Zybin, Sergey V.; An, Qi; Goddard, William A.; Huang, Fenglei

    2016-01-01

    The combustion or detonation of reacting materials at high temperature and pressure can be characterized by the Chapman–Jouguet (CJ) state that describes the chemical equilibrium of the products at the end of the reaction zone of the detonation wave for sustained detonation. This provides the critical properties and product kinetics for input to macroscale continuum simulations of energetic materials. We propose the ReaxFF Reactive Dynamics to CJ point protocol (Rx2CJ) for predicting the CJ s...

  7. State-of-the-art of screening methods for the rapid identification of chemicals in drinking water Deliverable D1

    OpenAIRE

    Llorca, Marta; Rodríguez-Mozaz, Sara

    2013-01-01

    The contamination of drinking water is potentially harmful and poses a risk to public health. If any observation suggests a potential contamination of drinking water, such as consumer complaints about the alteration of the water’s organoleptic properties, the appearance of health problems or an alarm triggered by sensors, a rapid identification of the hazard causing the problem is necessary. With regards to chemical contamination, EU Member States have several strategies to deal with the pres...

  8. Quantum-Chemical Simulation of Solid-State NMR Spectra: The Example of a Molecular Tweezer Host-Guest Complex

    OpenAIRE

    Zienau, Jan; Kussmann, Joerg; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Abstract A systematic quantum-chemical study of the convergence of proton NMR shieldings with the size of solid-state fragments is presented for a host-guest system. The largest system computed at Hartree-Fock and density-functional theory levels comprises a full first shell of complexes surrounding a central unit within an X-ray based structure and a total of 1196 atoms and 13260 basis functions. While the influence of methodological aspects can be considered ...

  9. Electronic transport characterization of silicon wafers by spatially resolved steady-state photocarrier radiometric imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qian [Institute of Optics and Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 350, Shuangliu, Chengdu 610209 (China); University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Li, Bincheng, E-mail: bcli@ioe.ac.cn [Institute of Optics and Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 350, Shuangliu, Chengdu 610209 (China); School of Optoelectronic Information, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China)

    2015-09-28

    Spatially resolved steady-state photocarrier radiometric (PCR) imaging technique is developed to characterize the electronic transport properties of silicon wafers. Based on a nonlinear PCR theory, simulations are performed to investigate the effects of electronic transport parameters (the carrier lifetime, the carrier diffusion coefficient, and the front surface recombination velocity) on the steady-state PCR intensity profiles. The electronic transport parameters of an n-type silicon wafer are simultaneously determined by fitting the measured steady-state PCR intensity profiles to the three-dimensional nonlinear PCR model. The determined transport parameters are in good agreement with the results obtained by the conventional modulated PCR technique with multiple pump beam radii.

  10. Ultrasonic C-scanning imaging inspection of superplastic solid-state welded joint quality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张柯柯; 陈怀东; 杨蕴林; 薛锦

    2002-01-01

    Based on a large amount of dissection at welded interface and quantitative microscopic examination of welded rate, the suitable limit grey scale value was determined, and the welded rate of superplastic solid-state welding interface of heterogeneous steel was systematically studied by means of self-made ultrasonic C-scanning imaging inspection system. The experimental results show: the welded state of superplastic solid-state welding interface of heterogeneous steel can be conducted to be more accurately, reliably and quickly inspected by means of this system, and the ultrasonic testing results are good consistent with actual examination results of the interface defective distribution. Within the extent of the suitble welded rate,the welded rate in 40Cr/T10A superplastic welding process tested by this system is linear with its tensile strength of joint.

  11. Determining a Magnetic Resonance Imaging Inflammatory Activity Acceptable State Without Subsequent Radiographic Progression in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gandjbakhch, Frédérique; Haavardsholm, Espen A; Conaghan, Philip G;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the predictive value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-detected subclinical inflammation for subsequent radiographic progression in a longitudinal study of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in clinical remission or low disease activity (LDA), and to determine cutoffs...... for an MRI inflammatory activity acceptable state in RA in which radiographic progression rarely occurs. METHODS: Patients with RA in clinical remission [28-joint Disease Activity Score-C-reactive protein (DAS28-CRP) LDA state (2.6 ≤ DAS28-CRP ....4 (95% CI 1.72-11.4) for radiographic progression. CONCLUSION: High MRI synovitis score predicts radiographic progression in patients in clinical remission/LDA. A cutoff point for determining an MRI inflammatory activity acceptable state based on the RAMRIS synovitis score was established. Incorporating...

  12. Comment on “Computed Tomography Imaging Findings in Chemical Warfare Victims with Pulmonary Complications”

    OpenAIRE

    Shahrzad M.Lari

    2013-01-01

    Dr.Mirsadraei and colleagues performed an interesting study about the lung HRCT findings in chemical warfare patients who suffering from long-term pulmonary complications. They found that air trapping and mosaic attenuation were the most common lung HRCT findings. Also they divided patients in different clinical entities according to the lung HRCT findings (Bronchiolitis Oblitrans, pulmonary fibrosis, bronchiectasis, asthma, and COPD). At present, GOLD and GINA recommend the diagnosis of COPD...

  13. Ultra-spatial synchrotron radiation for imaging molecular chemical structure: Applications in plant and animal studies

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Peiqiang

    2007-01-01

    Synchrotron-based Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (S-FTIR) has been developed as a rapid, direct, non-destructive, bioanalytical technique. This technique takes advantage of synchrotron light brightness and small effective source size and is capable of exploring the molecular chemical features and make-up within microstructures of a biological tissue without destruction of inherent structures at ultra-spatial resolutions within cellular dimension. To date there has been very litt...

  14. Handling the influence of chemical shift in amplitude-modulated heteronuclear dipolar recoupling solid-state NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basse, Kristoffer; Shankar, Ravi; Bjerring, Morten; Vosegaard, Thomas; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Nielsen, Anders B.

    2016-09-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the influence of chemical shifts on amplitude-modulated heteronuclear dipolar recoupling experiments in solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The method is demonstrated using the Rotor Echo Short Pulse IRrAdiaTION mediated Cross-Polarization (RESPIRATIONCP) experiment as an example. By going into the pulse sequence rf interaction frame and employing a quintuple-mode operator-based Floquet approach, we describe how chemical shift offset and anisotropic chemical shift affect the efficiency of heteronuclear polarization transfer. In this description, it becomes transparent that the main attribute leading to non-ideal performance is a fictitious field along the rf field axis, which is generated from second-order cross terms arising mainly between chemical shift tensors and themselves. This insight is useful for the development of improved recoupling experiments. We discuss the validity of this approach and present quaternion calculations to determine the effective resonance conditions in a combined rf field and chemical shift offset interaction frame transformation. Based on this, we derive a broad-banded version of the RESPIRATIONCP experiment. The new sequence is experimentally verified using SNNFGAILSS amyloid fibrils where simultaneous 15N → 13CO and 15N → 13Cα coherence transfer is demonstrated on high-field NMR instrumentation, requiring great offset stability.

  15. Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Images for the website main pages and all configurations. The upload and access points for the other images are: Website Template RSW images BSCW Images HIRENASD...

  16. Recycling-oriented characterization of plastic frames and printed circuit boards from mobile phones by electronic and chemical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmieri, Roberta; Bonifazi, Giuseppe; Serranti, Silvia, E-mail: silvia.serranti@uniroma1.it

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • A recycling oriented characterization of end-of-life mobile phones was carried out. • Characterization was developed in a zero-waste-perspective, aiming to recover all the mobile phone materials. • Plastic frames and printed circuit boards were analyzed by electronic and chemical imaging. • Suitable milling/classification strategies were set up to define specialized-pre-concentrated-streams. • The proposed approach can improve the recovery of polymers, base/precious metals, rare earths and critical raw materials. - Abstract: This study characterizes the composition of plastic frames and printed circuit boards from end-of-life mobile phones. This knowledge may help define an optimal processing strategy for using these items as potential raw materials. Correct handling of such a waste is essential for its further “sustainable” recovery, especially to maximize the extraction of base, rare and precious metals, minimizing the environmental impact of the entire process chain. A combination of electronic and chemical imaging techniques was thus examined, applied and critically evaluated in order to optimize the processing, through the identification and the topological assessment of the materials of interest and their quantitative distribution. To reach this goal, end-of-life mobile phone derived wastes have been systematically characterized adopting both “traditional” (e.g. scanning electronic microscopy combined with microanalysis and Raman spectroscopy) and innovative (e.g. hyperspectral imaging in short wave infrared field) techniques, with reference to frames and printed circuit boards. Results showed as the combination of both the approaches (i.e. traditional and classical) could dramatically improve recycling strategies set up, as well as final products recovery.

  17. Recycling-oriented characterization of plastic frames and printed circuit boards from mobile phones by electronic and chemical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A recycling oriented characterization of end-of-life mobile phones was carried out. • Characterization was developed in a zero-waste-perspective, aiming to recover all the mobile phone materials. • Plastic frames and printed circuit boards were analyzed by electronic and chemical imaging. • Suitable milling/classification strategies were set up to define specialized-pre-concentrated-streams. • The proposed approach can improve the recovery of polymers, base/precious metals, rare earths and critical raw materials. - Abstract: This study characterizes the composition of plastic frames and printed circuit boards from end-of-life mobile phones. This knowledge may help define an optimal processing strategy for using these items as potential raw materials. Correct handling of such a waste is essential for its further “sustainable” recovery, especially to maximize the extraction of base, rare and precious metals, minimizing the environmental impact of the entire process chain. A combination of electronic and chemical imaging techniques was thus examined, applied and critically evaluated in order to optimize the processing, through the identification and the topological assessment of the materials of interest and their quantitative distribution. To reach this goal, end-of-life mobile phone derived wastes have been systematically characterized adopting both “traditional” (e.g. scanning electronic microscopy combined with microanalysis and Raman spectroscopy) and innovative (e.g. hyperspectral imaging in short wave infrared field) techniques, with reference to frames and printed circuit boards. Results showed as the combination of both the approaches (i.e. traditional and classical) could dramatically improve recycling strategies set up, as well as final products recovery

  18. Information and backaction due to phase contrast imaging measurements of cold atomic gases: beyond Gaussian states

    CERN Document Server

    Ilo-Okeke, Ebubechukwu O

    2016-01-01

    We further examine a theory of phase contrast imaging (PCI) of cold atomic gases, first introduced by us in Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 112}, 233602 (2014). We model the PCI measurement by directly calculating the entangled state between the light and the atoms due to the ac Stark shift, which induces a conditional phase shift on the light depending upon the atomic state. By interfering the light that passes through the BEC with the original light, one can obtain information of the atomic state at a single shot level. We derive an exact expression for a measurement operator that embodies the information obtained from PCI, as well as the back-action on the atomic state. By the use of exact expressions for the measurement process, we go beyond the continuous variables approximation such that the non-Gaussian regime can be accessed for both the measured state and the post-measurement state. Features such as the photon probability density, signal, signal variance, Fisher information, error of the measurement, and the b...

  19. Foods that are perceived as healthy or unhealthy differentially alter young women's state body image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Jacqueline F; D'Anci, Kristen E; Kanarek, Robin B

    2011-10-01

    Body image can be influenced by day-to-day events, including food intake. The present study investigated the effects of foods typically perceived as "healthy" or "unhealthy" on state body image and mood. College-aged women were told the experiment was designed to assess the effects of food on cognition. Using a between-subjects design, participants consumed isocaloric amounts of foods perceived to be healthy (banana) or unhealthy (donut) or ate nothing. Next, participants completed three cognitive tasks. Prior to eating and following the cognitive tests, participants completed the BISS, POMS, the Figure Rating Scale, and the Restraint Scale. Body satisfaction decreased following intake of a donut, but was not altered in the other conditions. Depression scores significantly decreased after intake of either a donut or banana, but did not decrease in the no-food condition. Tension scores decreased significantly after consumption of a banana and in the no-food condition, but did not decrease following consumption of a donut. These results indicate that intake of a food that is perceived as unhealthy negatively affects state body image. PMID:21669241

  20. "Mirror-image" manipulation of curdione stereoisomer scaffolds by chemical and biological approaches: development of a sesquiterpenoid library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Bin; Li, Yuxin; Meng, Lingxin; Ouyang, Jingping; Jin, Danni; Wu, Lei; Zhang, Xin; Jia, Xian; You, Song

    2015-02-27

    The sesquiterpenoid curdione is one of the main bioactive components in the essential oil of Rhizoma Curcumae (Curcuma wenyujin, Curcuma phaeocaulis, and Curcuma kwangsiensis), which has been clinically used for the treatment of cancer in mainland China. Recently it was reported that natural curdione could be hydroxylated by Aspergillus niger and transferred to its corresponding curcumalactones under acidic conditions. Based on this study, the development of a sesquiterpenoid library through the "mirror-image" manipulation of bioactive (non)natural curdione scaffolds by chemical and biological approaches is presented herein. A. niger induced the hydroxylation of two pairs of curdione enantiomers, yielding the corresponding mirror-image hydroxylated curdiones. Simultaneously, the acid-mediated intramolecular "ene" rearrangements of these curdiones and hydroxylated curdione enantiomers yielded the corresponding mirror-image curcumalactones and hydroxylated curcumalactones. Among the 16 pairs of enantiomers obtained in this study, 23 compounds are new sesquiterpenoids. These curdione and curcumalactone derivatives are of particular interest, as they have the potential to be used as lead compounds and scaffolds in drug discovery.

  1. Three-State Locally Adaptive Texture Preserving Filter for Radar and Optical Image Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaakko T. Astola

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Textural features are one of the most important types of useful information contained in images. In practice, these features are commonly masked by noise. Relatively little attention has been paid to texture preserving properties of noise attenuation methods. This stimulates solving the following tasks: (1 to analyze the texture preservation properties of various filters; and (2 to design image processing methods capable to preserve texture features well and to effectively reduce noise. This paper deals with examining texture feature preserving properties of different filters. The study is performed for a set of texture samples and different noise variances. The locally adaptive three-state schemes are proposed for which texture is considered as a particular class. For “detection” of texture regions, several classifiers are proposed and analyzed. As shown, an appropriate trade-off of the designed filter properties is provided. This is demonstrated quantitatively for artificial test images and is confirmed visually for real-life images.

  2. Evolution of mammographic image quality in the state of Rio de Janeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Cristina Felippe Lopes Villar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the evolution of mammographic image quality in the state of Rio de Janeiro on the basis of parameters measured and analyzed during health surveillance inspections in the period from 2006 to 2011. Materials and Methods: Descriptive study analyzing parameters connected with imaging quality of 52 mammography apparatuses inspected at least twice with a one-year interval. Results: Amongst the 16 analyzed parameters, 7 presented more than 70% of conformity, namely: compression paddle pressure intensity (85.1%, films development (72.7%, film response (72.7%, low contrast fine detail (92.2%, tumor mass visualization (76.5%, absence of image artifacts (94.1%, mammography-specific developers availability (88.2%. On the other hand, relevant parameters were below 50% conformity, namely: monthly image quality control testing (28.8% and high contrast details with respect to microcalcifications visualization (47.1%. Conclusion: The analysis revealed critical situations in terms of compliance with the health surveillance standards. Priority should be given to those mammography apparatuses that remained non-compliant at the second inspection performed within the one-year interval.

  3. Molecular Imaging in Preclinical Models of IBD with Nuclear Imaging Techniques: State-of-the-Art and Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaaru, Eric; Bianchi, Andrea; Wunder, Andreas; Rasche, Volker; Stiller, Detlef

    2016-10-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which includes ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, is characterized by chronic unregulated inflammation of the intestinal mucosa of the gastrointestinal tract. To date, this pathology has no cure. Colonoscopy and biopsies are the current gold standard diagnostic tools. However, being a chronic disease, IBD requires continuous follow-up to check for disease progress, treatment response, and remission. Unfortunately, these 2 diagnostic procedures are invasive and generally unable to show the cellular and molecular changes that take place in vivo. In this context, it is clear that there is a strong need for optimized noninvasive imaging techniques able to overcome the aforementioned limitations. This review aims to bring to light the scientific advancements that have been achieved so far in nuclear medicine in relation to tracking of immune cells involved in the preclinical models of IBD. In particular, this review will explore the advantages and limitations of the radiopharmaceuticals that aim to track whole cells like neutrophils, those that involve the radiolabeling of immune cell substrates or available human IBD medical therapies, and those that aim to track cell signaling molecules (e.g., cytokines and cell adhesion molecules). After a detailed critical summary of the state-of-the art, the challenges and perspectives of molecular imaging applied to IBD studies will be analyzed. Special attention will be paid to the translational potential of the described techniques and on the potential impact of these innovative approaches on the drug discovery pipelines and their contribution to the evolution of personalized medicine. PMID:27580387

  4. Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging of endoscopic third ventriculostomy patency with differently acquired fast imaging with steady-state precession sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucic, Milos A; Koprivsek, Katarina; Kozic, Dusko; Spero, Martina; Spirovski, Milena; Lucic, Silvija

    2014-08-16

    The aim of the study was to determine the possibilities of two differently acquired two-dimensional fast imaging with steady-state precession (FISP 2D) magnetic resonance sequences in estimation of the third ventricle floor fenestration patency after endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) in the subjects with aqueductal stenosis/obstruction.Fifty eight subjects (37 males, 21 females, mean age 27 years) with previously successfully performed ETV underwent brain MRI on 1.5T MR imager 3-6 months after the procedure. Two different FISP 2D sequences (one included in the standard vendor provided software package, and the other, experimentally developed by our team) were performed respectively at two fixed slice positions: midsagittal and perpendicular to the ETV fenestration, and displayed in a closed-loop cinematographic format in order to estimate the patency. The ventricular volume reduction has been observed as well.Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow through the ETV fenestration was observed in midsagittal plane with both FISP 2D sequences in 93.11% subjects, while in 6.89% subjects the dynamic CSF flow MRI was inconclusive. In the perpendicular plane CSF flow through the ETV fenestration was visible only by use of experimentally developed FISP 2D (TR30/FA70) sequence. Postoperative volume reduction of lateral and third ventricle was detected in 67.24% subjects.Though both FISP 2D sequences acquired in midsagittal plane may be used to estimate the effects of performed ETV, due to achieved higher CSF pulsatile flow sensitivity, only the use of FISP 2D (TR30/FA70) sequence enables the estimation of the treatment effect in perpendicular plane in the absence of phase-contrast sequences. 

  5. Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Endoscopic Third Ventriculostomy Patency With Differently Acquired Fast Imaging With Steady-State Precission Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milos A. Lucic

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the possibilities of two differently acquired two-dimensional fast imaging with steady-state precession (FISP 2D magnetic resonance sequences in estimation of the third ventricle floor fenestration patency after endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV in the subjects with aqueductal stenosis/obstruction.Fifty eight subjects (37 males, 21 females, mean age 27 years with previously successfully performed ETV underwent brain MRI on 1.5T MR imager 3-6 months after the procedure. Two different FISP 2D sequences (one included in the standard vendor provided software package, and the other, experimentally developed by our team were performed respectively at two fixed slice positions: midsagittal and perpendicular to the ETV fenestration, and displayed in a closed-loop cinematographic format in order to estimate the patency. The ventricular volume reduction has been observed as well.Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF flow through the ETV fenestration was observed in midsagittal plane with both FISP 2D sequences in 93.11% subjects, while in 6.89% subjects the dynamic CSF flow MRI was inconclusive. In the perpendicular plane CSF flow through the ETV fenestration was visible only by use of experimentally developed FISP 2D (TR30/FA70 sequence. Postoperative volume reduction of lateral and third ventricle was detected in 67.24% subjects.Though both FISP 2D sequences acquired in midsagittal plane may be used to estimate the effects of performed ETV, due to achieved higher CSF pulsatile flow sensitivity, only the use of FISP 2D (TR30/FA70 sequence enables the estimation of the treatment effect in perpendicular plane in the absence of phase-contrast sequences. 

  6. State-of-the-Art CT Imaging Techniques for Congenital Heart Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Hyun Woo [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-02-15

    CT is increasingly being used for evaluating the cardiovascular structures and airways in the patients with congenital heart disease. Multi-slice CT has traditionally been used for the evaluation of the extracardiac vascular and airway abnormalities because of its inherent high spatial resolution and excellent air-tissue contrast. Recent developments in CT technology primarily by reducing the cardiac motion and the radiation dose usage in congenital heart disease evaluation have helped expand the indications for CT usage. Tracheobronchomalacia associated with congenital heart disease can be evaluated with cine CT. Intravenous contrast injection should be tailored to unequivocally demonstrate cardiovascular abnormalities. Knowledge of the state-of-the-art CT imaging techniques that are used for evaluating congenital heart disease is helpful not only for planning and performing CT examinations, but also for interpreting and presenting the CT image findings that consequently guide the proper medical and surgical management.

  7. Images of safe tourism destinations in the United States held by African Americans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingjie Liu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Ensuring a safe destination is an essential factor in travelers’ decision-making, as well as a destination’s success. Recent crises have threatened perceptions of safety related to tourism. Under such circumstances, negative destination images might be produced and destination choices might be altered. Thus, understanding the effect of risk perceptions on destination image is a necessary researchstream. This study examined African American travelers’ perceptions of safety related to the top three state tourism destinations in the USA. Factors that influenced perceptions of a safe destination varied among the destinations. Consistently, however, past travel experience and the perception of the likelihood of health-related crisis were significant predictors of perceptions of a safe destination

  8. Physiological and functional magnetic resonance imaging using balanced steady-state free precession

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sung Hong; Han, Paul Kyu [Magnetic Resonance Imaging Lab, Dept. of Bio and Brain Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon(Korea, Republic of); Choi, Seung Hong [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) is a highly efficient pulse sequence that is known to provide the highest signal-to-noise ratio per unit time. Recently, bSSFP is getting increasingly popular in both the research and clinical communities. This review will be focusing on the application of the bSSFP technique in the context of probing the physiological and functional information. In the first part of this review, the basic principles of bSSFP are briefly covered. Afterwards, recent developments related to the application of bSSFP, in terms of physiological and functional imaging, are introduced and reviewed. Despite its long development history, bSSFP is still a promising technique that has many potential benefits for obtaining high-resolution physiological and functional images.

  9. A velocity map imaging study of the photodissociation of the à state of ammonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Javier D; González, Marta G; Rubio-Lago, Luis; Bañares, Luis

    2014-01-14

    NH3(Ã) photodissociation dynamics has been studied using a combination of velocity map imaging (VMI) and resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) of the H-atom product. H(+) ion images have been recorded after excitation to the first five NH3 (Ã, ν2' = n) ← (X, ν = 0) vibronic transitions (denoted as 0(0)(0) and 2(0)(n) with n = 1-4). The measured high-resolution H-atom kinetic energy distributions (KED) show a dense set of sharp structures related to rovibrational states of the NH2 co-fragment. A careful simulation of the KEDs in terms of the known internal energies of the NH2 fragment has allowed the extraction of the non-adiabatic NH2(X) rovibrational populations for the 0(0)(0), 2(0)(1) and 2(0)(2) transitions, which are in good agreement with previous measurements. For the 2(0)(3) and 2(0)(4) transitions, some features of the KED have been assigned to rovibrational states of NH2(Ã) fragments produced adiabatically. In particular, the sharp feature distinctively observed at very low kinetic energies in the H-atom KED for the 2(0)(4) transition has been undoubtedly assigned to H atoms produced in correlation with rotationally excited NH2 fragments in the à electronic state. For these two transitions, the analysis of the KEDs has allowed the determination of the NH2(X, Ã) rovibrational populations and precise electronic branching ratios, Φ* = [NH2(Ã)]/([NH2(X)] + [NH2(Ã)]). A speed-dependent anisotropy analysis of the H-atom images has been made for all transitions, which provides a picture of the partitioning of the available energy among the NH2 co-product internal modes - including the electronic branching ratios - in terms of a roaming-like mechanism. PMID:24201819

  10. XPEEM valence state imaging of mineral micro-intergrowths with a spatial resolution of 100nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A. D.; Schofield, P. F.; Scholl, A.; Pattrick, R. A. D.; Bridges, J. C.

    2003-03-01

    The crystal chemistry and textural relationships of minerals hold a vast amount of information relating to the formation, history and stability of natural materials. The application of soft X-ray spectroscopy to mineralogical material has revealed that 2p (L{2,3}) spectra provide a sensitive fingerprint of the electronic states of 3d metals. In bulk powdered samples much of the textural and microstructural information is lost, but the area-selectivity capability of X-ray Photo-Emission Electron Microscopy (XPEEM) provides the ability to obtain valence state information from mineral intergrowths with a submicron spatial resolution. Using the state-of-the-art PEEM2 facility on beamline 7.3.1.1 at the Advanced Light Source, Berkeley, USA, a range of minerals, mineral intergrowths and mineralogical textures have been studied for a broad suite of geological, planetary and environmental science materials. High-quality, multi-element valence images have been obtained showing the distribution/variation of the metal valence states across single grains or mineral intergrowths/textures at the l00 nm scale and quantitative valence state ratios can be obtained from areas of 0.01 μ m^2.

  11. Chemical Reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, C. N.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a course, including content, reading list, and presentation on chemical reactors at Cambridge University, England. A brief comparison of chemical engineering education between the United States and England is also given. (JN)

  12. Whole-brain perfusion imaging with balanced steady-state free precession arterial spin labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Paul Kyu; Ye, Jong Chul; Kim, Eung Yeop; Choi, Seung Hong; Park, Sung-Hong

    2016-03-01

    Recently, balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) readout has been proposed for arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion imaging to reduce susceptibility artifacts at a relatively high spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). However, the main limitation of bSSFP-ASL is the low spatial coverage. In this work, methods to increase the spatial coverage of bSSFP-ASL are proposed for distortion-free, high-resolution, whole-brain perfusion imaging. Three strategies of (i) segmentation, (ii) compressed sensing (CS) and (iii) a hybrid approach combining the two methods were tested to increase the spatial coverage of pseudo-continuous ASL (pCASL) with three-dimensional bSSFP readout. The spatial coverage was increased by factors of two, four and six using each of the three approaches, whilst maintaining the same total scan time (5.3 min). The number of segments and/or CS acceleration rate (R) correspondingly increased to maintain the same bSSFP readout time (1.2 s). The segmentation approach allowed whole-brain perfusion imaging for pCASL-bSSFP with no penalty in SNR and/or total scan time. The CS approach increased the spatial coverage of pCASL-bSSFP whilst maintaining the temporal resolution, with minimal impact on the image quality. The hybrid approach provided compromised effects between the two methods. Balanced SSFP-based ASL allows the acquisition of perfusion images with wide spatial coverage, high spatial resolution and SNR, and reduced susceptibility artifacts, and thus may become a good choice for clinical and neurological studies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. New Approaches For Asteroid Spin State and Shape Modeling From Delay-Doppler Radar Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raissi, Chedy; Lamee, Mehdi; Mosiane, Olorato; Vassallo, Corinne; Busch, Michael W.; Greenberg, Adam; Benner, Lance A. M.; Naidu, Shantanu P.; Duong, Nicholas

    2016-10-01

    Delay-Doppler radar imaging is a powerful technique to characterize the trajectories, shapes, and spin states of near-Earth asteroids; and has yielded detailed models of dozens of objects. Reconstructing objects' shapes and spins from delay-Doppler data is a computationally intensive inversion problem. Since the 1990s, delay-Doppler data has been analyzed using the SHAPE software. SHAPE performs sequential single-parameter fitting, and requires considerable computer runtime and human intervention (Hudson 1993, Magri et al. 2007). Recently, multiple-parameter fitting algorithms have been shown to more efficiently invert delay-Doppler datasets (Greenberg & Margot 2015) – decreasing runtime while improving accuracy. However, extensive human oversight of the shape modeling process is still required. We have explored two new techniques to better automate delay-Doppler shape modeling: Bayesian optimization and a machine-learning neural network.One of the most time-intensive steps of the shape modeling process is to perform a grid search to constrain the target's spin state. We have implemented a Bayesian optimization routine that uses SHAPE to autonomously search the space of spin-state parameters. To test the efficacy of this technique, we compared it to results with human-guided SHAPE for asteroids 1992 UY4, 2000 RS11, and 2008 EV5. Bayesian optimization yielded similar spin state constraints within a factor of 3 less computer runtime.The shape modeling process could be further accelerated using a deep neural network to replace iterative fitting. We have implemented a neural network with a variational autoencoder (VAE), using a subset of known asteroid shapes and a large set of synthetic radar images as inputs to train the network. Conditioning the VAE in this manner allows the user to give the network a set of radar images and get a 3D shape model as an output. Additional development will be required to train a network to reliably render shapes from delay

  14. Vibrational autodetachment spectroscopy of Au-6 : Image-charge-bound states of a gold ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spectral experiments on mass-selected negative cluster ions of gold and silver were performed in the wavelength range near the threshold for one-photon photodetachment of the extra electron. The Au-6 cluster ion displayed a uniquely well resolved spectrum consisting of a progression in a single vibrational mode. Details of this threshold photodetachment spectrum and the associated photoelectron energy distribution suggest an explanation based on autodetachment from totally symmetric vibrational levels of very weakly bound excited electronic state (bound by image charge forces) of the Au-6 cluster in the form of a planar, six-fold symmetric, gold ring

  15. Dark Current Random Telegraph Signals in Solid-State Image Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Virmontois, Cédric; Goiffon, Vincent; Robbins, Mark S; Tauziède, Laurie; Geoffray, Hervé; Raine, Mélanie; Girard, Sylvain; Gilard, Olivier; Magnan, Pierre; Bardoux, Alain

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the Dark Current-Random Telegraph Signal (DC-RTS) in solid-state image sensors. The DCRTS is investigated in several bulk materials, for different surface interfaces and for different trench isolation interfaces. The main parameter used to characterize the DC-RTS is the transition maximum amplitude which seems to be the most appropriate for studying the phenomenon and identifying its origin. Proton, neutron and Co-60 Gamma-ray irradiations are used to study DC-RTS induce...

  16. Micro-PIXE for the quantitative imaging of chemical elements in single cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, R. [Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, Gradignan (France)

    2013-07-01

    Full text: The knowledge of the intracellular distribution of biological relevant metals is important to understand their mechanisms of action in cells, either for physiological, toxicological or pathological processes. However, the direct detection of trace metals in single cells is a challenging task that requires sophisticated analytical developments. The aim of this seminar will be to present the recent achievements in this field using micro-PIXE analysis. The combination of micro-PIXE with RBS (Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry) and STIM (Scanning Transmission lon Microscopy) allows the quantitative determination of trace metal content within sub-cellular compartments. The application of STlM analysis will be more specifically highlighted as it provides high spatial resolution imaging (<200 nm) and excellent mass sensitivity (<0.1 ng). Application of the STIM-PIXE-RBS methodology is absolutely needed when organic mass loss appears during PIXE-RBS irradiation. This combination of STIM-PIXE-RBS provides fully quantitative determination of trace element content, expressed in μg/g, which is a quite unique capability for micro-PIXE compared to other micro-analytical methods such as the electron and synchrotron X-ray fluorescence or the techniques based on mass spectrometry. Examples of micro-PIXE studies for subcellular imaging of trace elements in the various fields of interest will be presented such as metal-based toxicology, pharmacology, and neuro degeneration [1] R. Ortega, G. Devés, A. Carmona. J. R. Soc. Interface, 6, (2009) S649-S658. (author)

  17. Micro-PIXE for the quantitative imaging of chemical elements in single cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The knowledge of the intracellular distribution of biological relevant metals is important to understand their mechanisms of action in cells, either for physiological, toxicological or pathological processes. However, the direct detection of trace metals in single cells is a challenging task that requires sophisticated analytical developments. The aim of this seminar will be to present the recent achievements in this field using micro-PIXE analysis. The combination of micro-PIXE with RBS (Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry) and STIM (Scanning Transmission lon Microscopy) allows the quantitative determination of trace metal content within sub-cellular compartments. The application of STlM analysis will be more specifically highlighted as it provides high spatial resolution imaging (<200 nm) and excellent mass sensitivity (<0.1 ng). Application of the STIM-PIXE-RBS methodology is absolutely needed when organic mass loss appears during PIXE-RBS irradiation. This combination of STIM-PIXE-RBS provides fully quantitative determination of trace element content, expressed in μg/g, which is a quite unique capability for micro-PIXE compared to other micro-analytical methods such as the electron and synchrotron X-ray fluorescence or the techniques based on mass spectrometry. Examples of micro-PIXE studies for subcellular imaging of trace elements in the various fields of interest will be presented such as metal-based toxicology, pharmacology, and neuro degeneration [1] R. Ortega, G. Devés, A. Carmona. J. R. Soc. Interface, 6, (2009) S649-S658. (author)

  18. Brain activation and inhibition after acupuncture at Taichong and Taixi: resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Shao-qun Zhang; Yan-jie Wang; Ji-ping Zhang; Jun-qi Chen; Chun-xiao Wu; Zhi-peng Li; Jia-rong Chen; Huai-liang Ouyang; Yong Huang; Chun-zhi Tang

    2015-01-01

    Acupuncture can induce changes in the brain. However, the majority of studies to date have focused on a single acupoint at a time. In the present study, we observed activity changes in the brains of healthy volunteers before and after acupuncture at Taichong (LR3) and Taixi (KI3) using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. Fifteen healthy volunteers underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging of the brain 15 minutes before acupuncture, then received acupunctur...

  19. Chemical signature study of tupiguarani ceramic tradition from Central region of the Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work a model based on experimental results using chemical composition data of the pottery sherds applied to Spearmann's no parametric test, principal component analysis and discriminant analysis, was applied. The samples are soils and Tupiguarani Tradition pottery sherd from the central area of the Rio Grande do Sul State. The chemical elements , Al, Ba, Ca, Cr, Fe, K Mn, Pb, Rb, S, Si, Sr, Ti, V and Zn were determined by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXFR) while Ce, Cu, Gd, La, Nd, Pr, Sm, Th and Y by high-resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HR-ICP-MS) techniques. Relationships among the pottery characteristics, studied sites and sherd dispersion in the several sites were proposed. Indications of chemical signature of the small pottery with function to go or not to the fire were observed. The largest dispersion is of small pottery with surface treatment no corrugated. The potteries chemical fingerprints from Ijui River, Ibicui-Vacacai Mirim River and Jacui River were verified. (author)

  20. Chemical portioning and speciation of some trace elements in soil and street dust from Khartoum state, Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, surface soil and street dust samples were collected from Khartoum State, from areas exposed to industrial and traffic emission and from areas expected to be free from elemental emission to serve as control. Samples were digested using wet digestion method to determine the total concentration of Na, K, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn and Pb using Atomic Absorption spectrophotometer (Aas), X-Ray fluorescence and flame photometer. Also samples were chemically fractionated using chemical specification method, and the solutions analyzed using Aas to determine the chemical form of the elements. Quality assurance of the data was achieved through the analysis of certified reference material. The range of the total concentration for Na, K, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn and Pb are 400-5175, 220-4690, 0.07-315.25, 20-250, 2050.8-46000, 0.5-2305, 4.5-280, 9.5-6200 mg/kg respectively. results obtained agree with expected emission profile as inferred from the emitting source locations. Distribution of elements from emitting source locations and control samples in different chemical fractions was carried out, and the findings reinforced by enrichment factors calculations as well by the results obtained by statistical multi-variate analysis methods such as principle compared with previous literature.(Author)

  1. Following Ostwald ripening in nanoalloys by high-resolution imaging with single-atom chemical sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several studies have shown that substantial compositional changes can occur during the coarsening of bimetallic nanoparticles (CoPt, AuPd). To explain this phenomenon that could dramatically impacts all the technologically relevant properties of nanoalloys, we have exploited the sensitivity of the latest generation of electron microscope to prove that during the beam-induced coarsening of CoPt nanoparticles, the dynamic of atom exchanges between the particles is different for Co and Pt. By distinguishing the chemical nature of individual atoms of Co and Pt, while they are diffusing on a carbon film, we have clearly shown that Co atoms have a higher mobility than Pt atoms because of their higher evaporation rate from the particles. These atomic-scale observations bring the experimental evidence on the origin of the compositional changes in nanoalloys induced by Ostwald ripening mechanisms.

  2. Molecular imaging of tumors and metastases using chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivlin, Michal; Horev, Judith; Tsarfaty, Ilan; Navon, Gil

    2013-10-01

    The two glucose analogs 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) and 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) are preferentially taken up by cancer cells, undergo phosphorylation and accumulate in the cells. Owing to their exchangeable protons on their hydroxyl residues they exhibit significant chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) effect in MRI. Here we report CEST-MRI on mice bearing orthotopic mammary tumors injected with 2-DG or FDG. The tumor exhibited an enhanced CEST effect of up to 30% that persisted for over one hour. Thus 2-DG/FDG CEST MRI can replace PET/CT or PET/MRI for cancer research in laboratory animals, but also has the potential to be used in the clinic for the detection of tumors and metastases, distinguishing between malignant and benign tumors and monitoring tumor response to therapy as well as tumors metabolism noninvasively by using MRI, without the need for radio-labeled isotopes.

  3. Following Ostwald ripening in nanoalloys by high-resolution imaging with single-atom chemical sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alloyeau, D.; Oikawa, T.; Nelayah, J.; Wang, G.; Ricolleau, C.

    2012-09-01

    Several studies have shown that substantial compositional changes can occur during the coarsening of bimetallic nanoparticles (CoPt, AuPd). To explain this phenomenon that could dramatically impacts all the technologically relevant properties of nanoalloys, we have exploited the sensitivity of the latest generation of electron microscope to prove that during the beam-induced coarsening of CoPt nanoparticles, the dynamic of atom exchanges between the particles is different for Co and Pt. By distinguishing the chemical nature of individual atoms of Co and Pt, while they are diffusing on a carbon film, we have clearly shown that Co atoms have a higher mobility than Pt atoms because of their higher evaporation rate from the particles. These atomic-scale observations bring the experimental evidence on the origin of the compositional changes in nanoalloys induced by Ostwald ripening mechanisms.

  4. Comment on “Computed Tomography Imaging Findings in Chemical Warfare Victims with Pulmonary Complications”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Dr.Mirsadraei and colleagues performed an interesting study about the lung HRCT findings in chemical warfare patients who suffering from long-term pulmonary complications. They found that air trapping and mosaic attenuation were the most common lung HRCT findings. Also they divided patients in different clinical entities according to the lung HRCT findings (Bronchiolitis Oblitrans, pulmonary fibrosis, bronchiectasis, asthma, and COPD. At present, GOLD and GINA recommend the diagnosis of COPD and asthma mainly on spirometry (1, 2. Although the HRCT may have valuable diagnostic points, but the diagnosis of COPD and asthma is according to the spirometry and relevant clinical symptoms. In this article, the authors relied only on clinical symptoms and corresponding lung HRCT findings that may have overlapping points in the diagnosis of asthma and COPD since normal lung HRCT with or without air trapping can be seen in COPD too (3. It has been proposed that saber-sheath trachea (tracheal index

  5. Near-infrared chemical imaging (NIR-CI) of 3D printed pharmaceuticals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khorasani, Milad; Edinger, Magnus; Raijada, Dhara;

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hot-melt extrusion and 3D printing are enabling manufacturing approaches for patient-centred medicinal products. Hot-melt extrusion is a flexible and continuously operating technique which is a crucial part of a typical processing cycle of printed medicines. In this work we use hot......-melt extrusion for manufacturing of medicinal films containing indomethacin (IND) and polycaprolactone (PCL), extruded strands with nitrofurantoin monohydrate (NFMH) and poly (ethylene oxide) (PEO), and feedstocks for 3D printed dosage forms with nitrofurantoin anhydrate (NFAH), hydroxyapatite (HA) and poly...... phase of molten PEO and nitrofurantoin). Similar results were achieved in the 3D printed solid dosage forms produced from the extruded feedstocks. The results presented in this work clearly demonstrate that NIR-CI in combination with MCR-ALS can be used for chemical mapping of both active compound...

  6. Dynamics of transient metastable states in mixtures under coupled phase ordering and chemical demixing

    OpenAIRE

    Soulé, Ezequiel R.; Rey, Alejandro D.

    2013-01-01

    We present theory and simulation of simultaneous chemical demixing and phase ordering in a polymer-liquid crystal mixture in conditions where isotropic-isotropic phase separation is metastable with respect to isotropic-nematic phase transition. In the case the mechanism is nucleation and growth, it is found that mesophase growth proceeds by a transient metastable phase that surround the ordered phase, and whose lifetime is a function of the ratio of diffusional to orientational mobilities. In...

  7. A clickable UTP analog for the posttranscriptional chemical labeling and imaging of RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Anupam A; Mukherjee, Progya P; Jangid, Rahul K; Galande, Sanjeev; Srivatsan, Seergazhi G

    2016-06-28

    The development of robust tools and practical RNA labeling strategies that would facilitate the biophysical analysis of RNA in both cell-free and cellular systems will have profound implications in the discovery of new RNA diagnostic tools and therapeutic strategies. In this context, we describe the development of a new alkyne-modified UTP analog, 5-(1,7-octadinyl)uridine triphosphate (ODUTP), which serves as an efficient substrate for the introduction of a clickable alkyne label into RNA transcripts by bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase and mammalian cellular RNA polymerases. The ODU-labeled RNA is effectively used by reverse transcriptase to produce cDNA, a property which could be utilized in expanding the chemical space of a RNA library in the aptamer selection scheme. Further, the alkyne label on RNA provides a convenient tool for the posttranscriptional chemical functionalization with a variety of biophysical tags (fluorescent, affinity, amino acid and sugar) by using alkyne-azide cycloaddition reaction. Importantly, the ability of endogenous RNA polymerases to specifically incorporate ODUTP into cellular RNA transcripts enabled the visualization of newly transcribing RNA in cells by microscopy using click reactions. In addition to a clickable alkyne group, ODU contains a Raman scattering label (internal disubstituted alkyne), which exhibits characteristic Raman shifts that fall in the Raman-silent region of cells. Our results indicate that an ODU label could potentially facilitate two-channel visualization of RNA in cells by using click chemistry and Raman spectroscopy. Taken together, ODU represents a multipurpose ribonucleoside tool, which is expected to provide new avenues to study RNA in cell-free and cellular systems. PMID:27173127

  8. Mercury's rotational state from combined MESSENGER laser altimeter and image data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Alexander; Oberst, Jürgen; Preusker, Frank; Margot, Jean-Luc; Phillips, Roger J.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2016-04-01

    With orbital data from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, we measured the rotational state of Mercury. We developed a novel approach that combined digital terrain models from stereo images (stereo DTMs) and laser altimeter data, and we applied it to 3 years of MESSENGER observations. We find a large libration amplitude, which in combination with the measured obliquity confirms that Mercury possesses a liquid outer core. Our results confirm previous Earth-based observations of Mercury's rotational state. However, we measured a rotation rate that deviates significantly from the mean resonant rotation rate. The larger rotation rate can be interpreted as the signature of a long-period libration cycle. From these findings we derived new constraints on the interior structure of Mercury. The measured rotational parameters define Mercury's body-fixed frame and are critical for the coordinate system of the planet as well as for planning the future BepiColombo spacecraft mission.

  9. Photoswitchable Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast by Improved Light-Driven Coordination-Induced Spin State Switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dommaschk, Marcel; Peters, Morten; Gutzeit, Florian; Schütt, Christian; Näther, Christian; Sönnichsen, Frank D; Tiwari, Sanjay; Riedel, Christian; Boretius, Susann; Herges, Rainer

    2015-06-24

    We present a fully reversible and highly efficient on-off photoswitching of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast with green (500 nm) and violet-blue (435 nm) light. The contrast change is based on intramolecular light-driven coordination-induced spin state switch (LD-CISSS), performed with azopyridine-substituted Ni-porphyrins. The relaxation time of the solvent protons in 3 mM solutions of the azoporphyrins in DMSO was switched between 3.5 and 1.7 s. The relaxivity of the contrast agent changes by a factor of 6.7. No fatigue or side reaction was observed, even after >100,000 switching cycles in air at room temperature. Electron-donating substituents at the pyridine improve the LD-CISSS in two ways: better photostationary states are achieved, and intramolecular binding is enhanced.

  10. Electrostatic transition state stabilization rather than reactant destabilization provides the chemical basis for efficient chorismate mutase catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burschowsky, Daniel; van Eerde, André; Ökvist, Mats; Kienhöfer, Alexander; Kast, Peter; Hilvert, Donald; Krengel, Ute

    2014-12-01

    For more than half a century, transition state theory has provided a useful framework for understanding the origins of enzyme catalysis. As proposed by Pauling, enzymes accelerate chemical reactions by binding transition states tighter than substrates, thereby lowering the activation energy compared with that of the corresponding uncatalyzed process. This paradigm has been challenged for chorismate mutase (CM), a well-characterized metabolic enzyme that catalyzes the rearrangement of chorismate to prephenate. Calculations have predicted the decisive factor in CM catalysis to be ground state destabilization rather than transition state stabilization. Using X-ray crystallography, we show, in contrast, that a sluggish variant of Bacillus subtilis CM, in which a cationic active-site arginine was replaced by a neutral citrulline, is a poor catalyst even though it effectively preorganizes chorismate for the reaction. A series of high-resolution molecular snapshots of the reaction coordinate, including the apo enzyme, and complexes with substrate, transition state analog and product, demonstrate that an active site, which is only complementary in shape to a reactive substrate conformer, is insufficient for effective catalysis. Instead, as with other enzymes, electrostatic stabilization of the CM transition state appears to be crucial for achieving high reaction rates.

  11. Comparisons of classical and Wigner sampling of transition state energy levels for quasiclassical trajectory chemical dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quasiclassical trajectory calculations are compared, with classical and Wigner sampling of transition state (TS) energy levels, for C2H5F≠→HF+C2H4 product energy partitioning and [Cl···CH3···Cl]- central barrier dynamics. The calculations with Wigner sampling are reported here for comparison with the previously reported calculations with classical sampling [Y. J. Cho et al., J. Chem. Phys. 96, 8275 (1992); L. Sun and W. L. Hase, J. Chem. Phys. 121, 8831 (2004)]. The C2H5F≠ calculations were performed with direct dynamics at the MP2/6-31G* level of theory. Classical and Wigner sampling give post-transition state dynamics, for these two chemical systems, which are the same within statistical uncertainties. This is a result of important equivalences in these two sampling methods for selecting initial conditions at a TS. In contrast, classical and Wigner sampling often give different photodissociation dynamics [R. Schinke, J. Phys. Chem. 92, 3195 (1988)]. Here the sampling is performed for a vibrational state of the ground electronic state potential energy surface (PES), which is then projected onto the excited electronic state's PES. Differences between the ground and the excited PESs may give rise to substantially different excitations of the vibrational and dissociative coordinates on the excited state PES by classical and Wigner sampling, resulting in different photodissociation dynamics.

  12. Automatic selection of resting-state networks with functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Francesca eStorti

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI during a resting-state condition can reveal the co-activation of specific brain regions in distributed networks, called resting-state networks, which are selected by independent component analysis (ICA of the fMRI data. One of the major difficulties with component analysis is the automatic selection of the ICA features related to brain activity. In this study we describe a method designed to automatically select networks of potential functional relevance, specifically, those regions known to be involved in motor function, visual processing, executive functioning, auditory processing, memory, and the default-mode network. To do this, image analysis was based on probabilistic ICA as implemented in FSL software. After decomposition, the optimal number of components was selected by applying a novel algorithm which takes into account, for each component, Pearson's median coefficient of skewness of the spatial maps generated by FSL, followed by clustering, segmentation, and spectral analysis. To evaluate the performance of the approach, we investigated the resting-state networks in 25 subjects. For each subject, three resting-state scans were obtained with a Siemens Allegra 3 T scanner (NYU data set. Comparison of the visually and the automatically identified neuronal networks showed that the algorithm had high accuracy (first scan: 95%, second scan: 95%, third scan: 93% and precision (90%, 90%, 84%. The reproducibility of the networks for visual and automatic selection was very close: it was highly consistent in each subject for the default-mode network (≥ 92% and the occipital network, which includes the medial visual cortical areas (≥ 94%, and consistent for the attention network (≥ 80%, the right and/or left lateralized frontoparietal attention networks, and the temporal-motor network (≥ 80%. The automatic selection method may be used to detect neural networks and reduce subjectivity in ICA

  13. Time-resolved Chemical Imaging of Molecules by High-order Harmonics and Ultrashort Rescattering Electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chii Dong [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States)

    2016-03-21

    Directly monitoring atomic motion during a molecular transformation with atomic-scale spatio-temporal resolution is a frontier of ultrafast optical science and physical chemistry. Here we provide the foundation for a new imaging method, fixed-angle broadband laser-induced electron scattering, based on structural retrieval by direct one-dimensional Fourier transform of a photoelectron energy distribution observed along the polarization direction of an intense ultrafast light pulse. The approach exploits the scattering of a broadband wave packet created by strong-field tunnel ionization to self-interrogate the molecular structure with picometre spatial resolution and bond specificity. With its inherent femtosecond resolution, combining our technique with molecular alignment can, in principle, provide the basis for time-resolved tomography for multi-dimensional transient structural determination.

  14. Chemical design of nanoprobes for T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Kang Peng

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, which offers a number of advantages such as unlimited tissue penetration, zero ionizing radiation, and a noninvasive nature, has received considerable attention over the past two decades as a technique for clinical diagnosis. To improve imaging sensitivity, contrast agents have been employed to accelerate the relaxation rate of water molecules and thus to increase the contrast between specific tissues or organs of interest. However, conventional contrast agents such as Gd3+-based T1 complexes and iron oxide nanoparticle-based T2 contrast agents have been proven to have adverse effects. The former may cause fatal nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF and difficulty in metabolism, while the latter is less sensitive due to the background interference. Also, their development has been well documented. Therefore, the orientation of this review will be geared toward the newly developed nanoparticulate agents that serve as better alternatives. In this regard, the recent advances on various nanostructured Mn/Fe-based T1 contrast agents seem to fit these categories. As they reveal longer circulation half-life and better biocompatibility, they have demonstrated themselves as a promising T1 candidate for MRI. The focus of this review will be on the preparation and fabrication of T1 contrast agents that contain mainly paramagnetic manganese and iron ions, with special attention being paid to the growth mechanism. Additional emphasis is also put on their progressive development in an aim to overcome the drawbacks of classical iron oxide nanoparticle-based T2 and Gd3+-based T1 contrast agents. Representative applications in vitro and in vivo will be presented for this new generation of contrast agents. The pros and cons of each case are also briefly summarized.

  15. Continued development of a portable widefield hyperspectral imaging (HSI) sensor for standoff detection of explosive, chemical, and narcotic residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Matthew P.; Gardner, Charles W.; Klueva, Oksana; Tomas, David

    2014-05-01

    Passive, standoff detection of chemical, explosive and narcotic threats employing widefield, shortwave infrared (SWIR) hyperspectral imaging (HSI) continues to gain acceptance in defense and security fields. A robust and user-friendly portable platform with such capabilities increases the effectiveness of locating and identifying threats while reducing risks to personnel. In 2013 ChemImage Sensor Systems (CISS) introduced Aperio, a handheld sensor, using real-time SWIR HSI for wide area surveillance and standoff detection of explosives, chemical threats, and narcotics. That SWIR HSI system employed a liquid-crystal tunable filter for real-time automated detection and display of threats. In these proceedings, we report on a next generation device called VeroVision™, which incorporates an improved optical design that enhances detection performance at greater standoff distances with increased sensitivity and detection speed. A tripod mounted sensor head unit (SHU) with an optional motorized pan-tilt unit (PTU) is available for precision pointing and sensor stabilization. This option supports longer standoff range applications which are often seen at checkpoint vehicle inspection where speed and precision is necessary. Basic software has been extended to include advanced algorithms providing multi-target display functionality, automatic threshold determination, and an automated detection recipe capability for expanding the library as new threats emerge. In these proceedings, we report on the improvements associated with the next generation portable widefield SWIR HSI sensor, VeroVision™. Test data collected during development are presented in this report which supports the targeted applications for use of VeroVision™ for screening residue and bulk levels of explosive and drugs on vehicles and personnel at checkpoints as well as various applications for other secure areas. Additionally, we highlight a forensic application of the technology for assisting forensic

  16. Visualization and understanding of the granulation liquid mixing and distribution during continuous twin screw granulation using NIR chemical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercruysse, Jurgen; Toiviainen, Maunu; Fonteyne, Margot; Helkimo, Niko; Ketolainen, Jarkko; Juuti, Mikko; Delaet, Urbain; Van Assche, Ivo; Remon, Jean Paul; Vervaet, Chris; De Beer, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    Over the last decade, there has been increased interest in the application of twin screw granulation as a continuous wet granulation technique for pharmaceutical drug formulations. However, the mixing of granulation liquid and powder material during the short residence time inside the screw chamber and the atypical particle size distribution (PSD) of granules produced by twin screw granulation is not yet fully understood. Therefore, this study aims at visualizing the granulation liquid mixing and distribution during continuous twin screw granulation using NIR chemical imaging. In first instance, the residence time of material inside the barrel was investigated as function of screw speed and moisture content followed by the visualization of the granulation liquid distribution as function of different formulation and process parameters (liquid feed rate, liquid addition method, screw configuration, moisture content and barrel filling degree). The link between moisture uniformity and granule size distributions was also studied. For residence time analysis, increased screw speed and lower moisture content resulted to a shorter mean residence time and narrower residence time distribution. Besides, the distribution of granulation liquid was more homogenous at higher moisture content and with more kneading zones on the granulator screws. After optimization of the screw configuration, a two-level full factorial experimental design was performed to evaluate the influence of moisture content, screw speed and powder feed rate on the mixing efficiency of the powder and liquid phase. From these results, it was concluded that only increasing the moisture content significantly improved the granulation liquid distribution. This study demonstrates that NIR chemical imaging is a fast and adequate measurement tool for allowing process visualization and hence for providing better process understanding of a continuous twin screw granulation system.

  17. Physico-chemical characteristics of honey produced by Apis mellifera in the Picos region, state of Piauí, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geni da Silva Sodré

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this research were to determine physico-chemical characteristics of 1,758 Apis mellifera L. honey samples produced by in the productive pole of Picos, state of Piauí, to understand, based on these characteristics, how they are grouped and to determine the percentage of honey that fit the specifications determined by Brazilian legislation. Thirty-five honey samples were collected directly from beekeepers for determination of total sugars, reducing sugars, apparent sucrose, humidity, diastase activity, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF, protein, ash, pH, acidity, formol index, electrical conductivity, viscosity and color. Mean values of each one of the analyzed physico-chemical parameters are within the limits established by the current Brazilian legislation, but it was verified for apparent sacarosis, diastase activity and HMF, values different from the established ones. Protein and HMF were the traits that contributed most for group formation.

  18. Solid-state Image Sensor with Focal-plane Digital Photon-counting Pixel Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossum, Eric R.; Pain, Bedabrata

    1997-01-01

    A solid-state focal-plane imaging system comprises an NxN array of high gain. low-noise unit cells. each unit cell being connected to a different one of photovoltaic detector diodes, one for each unit cell, interspersed in the array for ultra low level image detection and a plurality of digital counters coupled to the outputs of the unit cell by a multiplexer(either a separate counter for each unit cell or a row of N of counters time shared with N rows of digital counters). Each unit cell includes two self-biasing cascode amplifiers in cascade for a high charge-to-voltage conversion gain (greater than 1mV/e(-)) and an electronic switch to reset input capacitance to a reference potential in order to be able to discriminate detection of an incident photon by the photoelectron (e(-))generated in the detector diode at the input of the first cascode amplifier in order to count incident photons individually in a digital counter connected to the output of the second cascade amplifier. Reseting the input capacitance and initiating self-biasing of the amplifiers occurs every clock cycle of an integratng period to enable ultralow light level image detection by the may of photovoltaic detector diodes under such ultralow light level conditions that the photon flux will statistically provide only a single photon at a time incident on anyone detector diode during any clock cycle.

  19. A chemically modified [alpha]-amylase with a molten-globule state has entropically driven enhanced thermal stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siddiqui, Khawar Sohail; Poljak, Anne; De Francisci, Davide; Guerriero, Gea; Pilak, Oliver; Burg, Dominic; Raftery, Mark J.; Parkin, Don M.; Trewhella, Jill; Cavicchioli, Ricardo (Sydney); (New South)

    2010-11-15

    The thermostability properties of TAA were investigated by chemically modifying carboxyl groups on the surface of the enzyme with AMEs. The TAA{sub MOD} exhibited a 200% improvement in starch-hydrolyzing productivity at 60 C. By studying the kinetic, thermodynamic and biophysical properties, we found that TAA{sub MOD} had formed a thermostable, MG state, in which the unfolding of the tertiary structure preceded that of the secondary structure by at least 20 C. The X-ray crystal structure of TAA{sub MOD} revealed no new permanent interactions (electrostatic or other) resulting from the modification. By deriving thermodynamic activation parameters of TAA{sub MOD}, we rationalised that thermostabilisation have been caused by a decrease in the entropy of the transition state, rather than being enthalpically driven. Far-UV CD shows that the origin of decreased entropy may have arisen from a higher helical content of TAA{sub MOD}. This study provides new insight into the intriguing properties of an MG state resulting from the chemical modification of TAA.

  20. Steady-state equation of water vapor sorption for CaCl2-based chemical sorbents and its application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haiquan; Yuan, Yanping; Sun, Qingrong; Cao, Xiaoling; Sun, Liangliang

    2016-01-01

    Green CaCl2-based chemical sorbent has been widely used in sorption refrigeration, air purification and air desiccation. Methods to improve the sorption rate have been extensively investigated, but the corresponding theoretical formulations have not been reported. In this paper, a sorption system of solid-liquid coexistence is established based on the hypothesis of steady-state sorption. The combination of theoretical analysis and experimental results indicates that the system can be described by steady-state sorption process. The steady-state sorption equation, μ = (η − γT) , was obtained in consideration of humidity, temperature and the surface area. Based on engineering applications and this equation, two methods including an increase of specific surface area and adjustment of the critical relative humidity (γ) for chemical sorbents, have been proposed to increase the sorption rate. The results indicate that the CaCl2/CNTs composite with a large specific surface area can be obtained by coating CaCl2 powder on the surface of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The composite reached sorption equilibrium within only 4 h, and the sorption capacity was improved by 75% compared with pure CaCl2 powder. Furthermore, the addition of NaCl powder to saturated CaCl2 solution could significantly lower the solution’s γ. The sorption rate was improved by 30% under the same environment. PMID:27682811

  1. A microfluidic platform with pH imaging for chemical and hydrodynamic stimulation of intact oral biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gashti, M Parvinzadeh; Asselin, J; Barbeau, J; Boudreau, D; Greener, J

    2016-04-12

    A microfluidic platform with a fluorescent nanoparticle-based sensor is demonstrated for real-time, ratiometric pH imaging of biofilms. Sensing is accomplished by a thin patterned layer of covalently bonded Ag@SiO2+FiTC nanoparticles on an embedded planar glass substrate. The system is designed to be sensitive, responsive and give sufficient spatial resolution to enable new micro-scale studies of the dynamic response of oral biofilms to well-controlled chemical and hydrodynamic stimulation. Performance under challenging operational conditions is demonstrated, which include long-duration exposure to sheer stresses, photoexcitation and pH sensor biofouling. After comprehensive validation, the device was used to monitor pH changes at the attachment surface of a biofilm of the oral bacteria, Streptococcus salivarius. By controlling flow and chemical concentration conditions in the microchannel, biochemical and mass transport contributions to the Stephan curve could be probed individually. This opens the way for the analysis of separate contributions to dental caries due to localized acidification directly at the biofilm tooth interface. PMID:26956837

  2. Equation-of-State Measurements of Resorcinol Formaldehyde Foam Using Imaging X-Ray Thomson Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belancourt, Patrick; Theobald, W.; Keiter, P. A.; Collins, T. J. B.; Bonino, M. J.; Kozlowski, P.; Drake, R. P.

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the equation of state of materials under shocked conditions is important for laboratory astrophysics and high-energy-density physics experiments. This talk will focus on experiments dedicated to developing a platform for measuring the equation of state of shocked foams on OMEGA EP. The foam used in the development of this platform is resorcinol formaldehyde foam with an initial density of 0.34 g/cc. One OMEGA EP beam drives a shock into the foam, while the remaining three beams irradiate a nickel foil to create the x-ray backlighter. The primary diagnostic for this platform, the imaging x-ray Thomson spectrometer (IXTS), spectrally resolves the scattered x-ray beam while imaging in one spatial dimension. The IXTS is ideally suited to measure plasma conditions upstream, downstream and at the shock front in the foam. Preliminary results from these experiments will be shown. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944, the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas DE-NA0001840, and by the National Laser User Facility Program DE-NA0000850.

  3. Preliminary results of equation of state measurements using imaging x-ray Thomson spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belancourt, Patrick; Theobald, Wolfgang; Keiter, Paul; Collins, Timothy; Bonino, Mark; Kozlowski, Pawel; Drake, Paul; University of Michigan Team; LaboratoryLaser Energetics Team; University of Oxford Team

    2014-10-01

    Understanding the equation of state of materials under shocked conditions is important for laboratory astrophysics and high-energy-density physics experiments. The goal of the experiments discussed here is to create a platform for equation of state measurements in shocked foams on Omega EP. The target of interest for these experiments is shocked carbonized resorcinol formaldehyde foam with an initial density of 0.34 g/cc. Lasers irradiate an ablator, driving a shock into the foam. Plasma conditions ahead of the shock, at the shock and behind the shock are diagnosed using the imaging x-ray Thomson spectrometer (IXTS). The IXTS is capable of spectrally resolving the scattered x-ray beam while imaging in one spatial dimension. Preliminary results from these experiments will be shown. This work is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, through the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, grant number DE-NA0001840, and the National Laser User Facility Program, Grant Number DE-NA0000850, and through the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester by the NNSA/OICF under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC52-08NA28302.

  4. Combining scanning tunneling microscopy and synchrotron radiation for high-resolution imaging and spectroscopy with chemical, electronic, and magnetic contrast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combination of high-brilliance synchrotron radiation with scanning tunneling microscopy opens the path to high-resolution imaging with chemical, electronic, and magnetic contrast. Here, the design and experimental results of an in-situ synchrotron enhanced x-ray scanning tunneling microscope (SXSTM) system are presented. The system is designed to allow monochromatic synchrotron radiation to enter the chamber, illuminating the sample with x-ray radiation, while an insulator-coated tip (metallic tip apex open for tunneling, electron collection) is scanned over the surface. A unique feature of the SXSTM is the STM mount assembly, designed with a two free-flex pivot, providing an angular degree of freedom for the alignment of the tip and sample with respect to the incoming x-ray beam. The system designed successfully demonstrates the ability to resolve atomic-scale corrugations. In addition, experiments with synchrotron x-ray radiation validate the SXSTM system as an accurate analysis technique for the study of local magnetic and chemical properties on sample surfaces. The SXSTM system's capabilities have the potential to broaden and deepen the general understanding of surface phenomena by adding elemental contrast to the high-resolution of STM. -- Highlights: ► Synchrotron enhanced x-ray scanning tunneling microscope (SXSTM) system designed. ► Unique STM mount design allows angular DOF for tip alignment with x-ray beam. ► System demonstrates ability to resolve atomic corrugations on HOPG. ► Studies show chemical sensitivity with STM tip from photocurrent and tunneling. ► Results show system's ability to study local magnetic (XMCD) properties on Fe films.

  5. Chemical Water Quality Assessment in Selected Location in Jos, Plateau State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.G. Jidauna

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The study examined well water quality (chemical in Jos metropolis which it collected a total of twenty water samples that were taken for laboratory analysis. The stratified systematic random method was used in the selection of sample area/location. A total of (10 out of the existing (20 wards were systematically selected, while in each of the wards, two wells with one each from higher and lower elevations were randomly selected in which water samples were collected. The samples collected were analyses at UNICEF (WATSAN Laboratory Bauchi. USEPA method of water analysis was used to test for the chemical parameters. Pearson product moment correlation co-efficient was used test for the relationship between high and low elevation in the sample elements, as well as mean and standard deviation. The results indicates that pH, E.C, TDS, Pb, As and Cyanide appears within NSDWQMPL, while NO2, Cl, F, Mn, Mg, Ca, Cu, Zn, CaCo3 and Cr marginally falls within acceptable standard for drinking water quality maximum permitted limit. Consequently, NO3, SO4, Fe and CaCo3 in some parts of Jos metropolis fall outside acceptable standard of NSDWQMPL. Moreover, pH, E.C, TDS, Pb, NO2, NO3, Cl, F, Mn, Cr, As, Cu, Zn, showed that there is no significant relationship within the individual elements in regards to elevation (high and low in the study area whereas, SO4, Fe, Mg, Ca, CaCo 3 and CaCo3 showed that there is significant relationship in elevation (high and low among the individual sample elements. The study concludes that well water quality through chemical assessment in Jos metropolis is not fit for drinking. It recommends sensitizations campaign on the importance of clean water, sanitation, enforcement of existing laws and more research be undertaken to cover for seasonal variation, more elements and sample size.

  6. Chemical gas-generating nanoparticles for tumor-targeted ultrasound imaging and ultrasound-triggered drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Hyun Su; Son, Sejin; You, Dong Gil; Lee, Tae Woong; Lee, Jangwook; Lee, Sangmin; Yhee, Ji Young; Lee, Jaeyoung; Han, Moon Hee; Park, Jae Hyung; Kim, Sun Hwa; Choi, Kuiwon; Park, Kinam; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Kwon, Ick Chan

    2016-11-01

    Although there is great versatility of ultrasound (US) technologies in the real clinical field, one main technical challenge is the compromising of high quality of echo properties and size engineering of ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs); a high echo property is offset by reducing particle size. Herein, a new strategy for overcoming the dilemma by devising chemical gas (CO2) generating carbonate copolymer nanoparticles (Gas-NPs), which are clearly distinguished from the conventional gas-encapsulated micro-sized UCAs. More importantly, Gas-NPs could be readily engineered to strengthen the desirable in vivo physicochemical properties for nano-sized drug carriers with higher tumor targeting ability, as well as the high quality of echo properties for tumor-targeted US imaging. In tumor-bearing mice, anticancer drug-loaded Gas-NPs showed the desirable theranostic functions for US-triggered drug delivery, even after i.v. injection. In this regard, and as demonstrated in the aforementioned study, our technology could serve a highly effective platform in building theranostic UCAs with great sophistication and therapeutic applicability in tumor-targeted US imaging and US-triggered drug delivery. PMID:27619240

  7. Recycling-oriented characterization of plastic frames and printed circuit boards from mobile phones by electronic and chemical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Roberta; Bonifazi, Giuseppe; Serranti, Silvia

    2014-11-01

    This study characterizes the composition of plastic frames and printed circuit boards from end-of-life mobile phones. This knowledge may help define an optimal processing strategy for using these items as potential raw materials. Correct handling of such a waste is essential for its further "sustainable" recovery, especially to maximize the extraction of base, rare and precious metals, minimizing the environmental impact of the entire process chain. A combination of electronic and chemical imaging techniques was thus examined, applied and critically evaluated in order to optimize the processing, through the identification and the topological assessment of the materials of interest and their quantitative distribution. To reach this goal, end-of-life mobile phone derived wastes have been systematically characterized adopting both "traditional" (e.g. scanning electronic microscopy combined with microanalysis and Raman spectroscopy) and innovative (e.g. hyperspectral imaging in short wave infrared field) techniques, with reference to frames and printed circuit boards. Results showed as the combination of both the approaches (i.e. traditional and classical) could dramatically improve recycling strategies set up, as well as final products recovery.

  8. Chemical Biology in the Embryo: In Situ Imaging of Sulfur Biochemistry in Normal and Proteoglycan-Deficient Cartilage Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, Mark J; George, Graham N; Pickering, Ingrid J; Eames, B Frank

    2016-05-01

    Proteoglycans (PGs) are heavily glycosylated proteins that play major structural and biological roles in many tissues. Proteoglycans are abundant in cartilage extracellular matrix; their loss is a main feature of the joint disease osteoarthritis. Proteoglycan function is regulated by sulfation-sulfate ester formation with specific sugar residues. Visualization of sulfation within cartilage matrix would yield vital insights into its biological roles. We present synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence imaging of developing zebrafish cartilage, providing the first in situ maps of sulfate ester distribution. Levels of both sulfur and sulfate esters decrease as cartilage develops through late phase differentiation (maturation or hypertrophy), suggesting a functional link between cartilage matrix sulfur content and chondrocyte differentiation. Genetic experiments confirm that sulfate ester levels were due to cartilage proteoglycans and support the hypothesis that sulfate ester levels regulate chondrocyte differentiation. Surprisingly, in the PG synthesis mutant, the total level of sulfur was not significantly reduced, suggesting sulfur is distributed in an alternative chemical form during lowered cartilage proteoglycan production. Fourier transform infrared imaging indicated increased levels of protein in the mutant fish, suggesting that this alternative sulfur form might be ascribed to an increased level of protein synthesis in the mutant fish, as part of a compensatory mechanism.

  9. Chemical Imaging of the CO Snow Line in the HD 163296 Disk

    CERN Document Server

    Qi, Chunhua; Andrews, Sean M; Wilner, David J; Bergin, Edwin A; Hughes, A Meredith; Hogherheijde, Michiel; D'Alessio, Paola

    2015-01-01

    The condensation fronts (snow lines) of H2O, CO and other abundant volatiles in the midplane of a protoplanetary disk affect several aspects of planet formation. Locating the CO snow line, where the CO gas column density is expected to drop substantially, based solely on CO emission profiles is challenging. This has prompted an exploration of chemical signatures of CO freeze-out. We present ALMA Cycle 1 observations of the N2H+ J=3-2 and DCO+ J=4-3 emission lines toward the disk around the Herbig Ae star HD~163296 at ~0.5" (60 AU) resolution, and evaluate their utility as tracers of the CO snow line location. The N2H+ emission is distributed in a ring with an inner radius at 90 AU, corresponding to a midplane temperature of 25 K. This result is consistent with a new analysis of optically thin C18O data, which implies a sharp drop in CO abundance at 90 AU. Thus N2H+ appears to be a robust tracer of the midplane CO snow line. The DCO+ emission also has a ring morphology, but neither the inner nor the outer radi...

  10. Unenhanced steady state free precession versus traditional MR imaging for congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Dandan, E-mail: chchsister@163.com [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Kong, Xiangquan, E-mail: kxq0525@126.com [Department of Radiology, the Affiliated Union Hospital, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Zhou, Xuhui, E-mail: xiaolintongqq@126.com [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Li, Shurong, E-mail: 80917333@qq.com [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Wang, Huanjun, E-mail: 463822507@qq.com [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China)

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To assess potential benefits of three dimensional (3D) steady state free precession (SSFP) magnetic resonance sequence for congenital heart disease (CHD). Materials and methods: Twenty consecutive patients with CHD (male:female ratio,14:6, mean age, 27.5 ± 8.5 years) underwent both 3D SSFP and traditional MR imaging (TMRI) [including two dimensional (2D) SSFP and contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CEMRA)]. Image quality and diagnosis were compared, and Bland–Altman analysis was used to evaluate consistency of 3D SSFP and CEMRA for diameter measurements. Results: A total of 35 intra and 81 extra cardiac anomalies were identified in all patients. The image quality of 3D SSFP and TMRI for either intra or extra cardiac anomalies of all patients scored ≥3, which allowed an establishment of diagnosis for all cases. The diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 3D SSFP for the detection of intra cardiac anomalies were all 100%, whereas for extra cardiac anomalies they were 93.8%, 93.8%, 100%, respectively. Mean differences (3D SSFP minus CEMRA) for aorta and pulmonary arteries were 0.5 ± 1.2 mm and 0.0 ± 1.7 mm, respectively, showing good consistency of 3D SSFP and CEMRA for diameter measurements. Conclusion: 3D SSFP MRI can be an alternative image modality to TMRI for patients with congenital heart disease, especially for those who have renal insufficiency, breath-hold difficulty or who are allergic to contrast agent. It can also provide powerful complementary information for patients who undergo TMRI, especially at ventriculoarterial connection site.

  11. Handheld and mobile hyperspectral imaging sensors for wide-area standoff detection of explosives and chemical warfare agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomer, Nathaniel R.; Gardner, Charles W.; Nelson, Matthew P.

    2016-05-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is a valuable tool for the investigation and analysis of targets in complex background with a high degree of autonomy. HSI is beneficial for the detection of threat materials on environmental surfaces, where the concentration of the target of interest is often very low and is typically found within complex scenery. Two HSI techniques that have proven to be valuable are Raman and shortwave infrared (SWIR) HSI. Unfortunately, current generation HSI systems have numerous size, weight, and power (SWaP) limitations that make their potential integration onto a handheld or field portable platform difficult. The systems that are field-portable do so by sacrificing system performance, typically by providing an inefficient area search rate, requiring close proximity to the target for screening, and/or eliminating the potential to conduct real-time measurements. To address these shortcomings, ChemImage Sensor Systems (CISS) is developing a variety of wide-field hyperspectral imaging systems. Raman HSI sensors are being developed to overcome two obstacles present in standard Raman detection systems: slow area search rate (due to small laser spot sizes) and lack of eye-safety. SWIR HSI sensors have been integrated into mobile, robot based platforms and handheld variants for the detection of explosives and chemical warfare agents (CWAs). In addition, the fusion of these two technologies into a single system has shown the feasibility of using both techniques concurrently to provide higher probability of detection and lower false alarm rates. This paper will provide background on Raman and SWIR HSI, discuss the applications for these techniques, and provide an overview of novel CISS HSI sensors focused on sensor design and detection results.

  12. Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MR technique for in-vivo liver imaging at 3.0 tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shu-Zhong; Deng, Min; Wang, Yi-Xiang J. [Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Department of Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Faculty of Medicine (China); Yuan, Jing [Hong Kong Sanatorium and Hospital, Medical Physics and Research Department, Happy Valley, Hong Kong (China); Wei, Juan [Philips Healthcare Asia, Shanghai (China); Zhou, Jinyuan [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Kennedy Krieger Institute, F.M. Kirby Research Center for Functional Brain Imaging, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    To evaluate Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) MRI for liver imaging at 3.0-T. Images were acquired at offsets (n = 41, increment = 0.25 ppm) from -5 to 5 ppm using a TSE sequence with a continuous rectangular saturation pulse. Amide proton transfer-weighted (APTw) and GlycoCEST signals were quantified as the asymmetric magnetization transfer ratio (MTR{sub asym}) at 3.5 ppm and the total MTR{sub asym} integrated from 0.5 to 1.5 ppm, respectively, from the corrected Z-spectrum. Reproducibility was assessed for rats and humans. Eight rats were devoid of chow for 24 hours and scanned before and after fasting. Eleven rats were scanned before and after one-time CCl4 intoxication. For reproducibility, rat liver APTw and GlycoCEST measurements had 95 % limits of agreement of -1.49 % to 1.28 % and -0.317 % to 0.345 %. Human liver APTw and GlycoCEST measurements had 95 % limits of agreement of -0.842 % to 0.899 % and -0.344 % to 0.164 %. After 24 hours, fasting rat liver APTw and GlycoCEST signals decreased from 2.38 ± 0.86 % to 0.67 ± 1.12 % and from 0.34 ± 0.26 % to -0.18 ± 0.37 % respectively (p < 0.05). After CCl4 intoxication rat liver APTw and GlycoCEST signals decreased from 2.46 ± 0.48 % to 1.10 ± 0.77 %, and from 0.34 ± 0.23 % to -0.16 ± 0.51 % respectively (p < 0.05). CEST liver imaging at 3.0-T showed high sensitivity for fasting as well as CCl4 intoxication. (orig.)

  13. [Physico-chemical and toxicological profile of gadolinium chelates as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idée, J-M; Fretellier, N; Thurnher, M M; Bonnemain, B; Corot, C

    2015-07-01

    Gadolinium chelates (GC) are contrast agents widely used to facilitate or to enable diagnosis using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). From a regulatory viewpoint, GC are drugs. GC have largely contributed to the success of MRI, which has become a major component of clinician's diagnostic armamentarium. GC are not metabolised and are excreted by the kidneys. They distribute into the extracellular compartment. Because of its high intrinsic toxicity, gadolinium must be administered as a chelate. GC can be classified according to two key molecular features: (a) nature of the chelating moiety: either macrocyclic molecules in which gadolinium is caged in the pre-organized cavity of the ligand, or linear, open-chain molecules, (b) ionicity: Gd chelates can be ionic (meglumine or sodium salts) or non-ionic. The thermodynamic and kinetic stabilities of the various GCs differ according to these structural characteristics. The kinetic stability of macrocyclic GCs is much higher than that of linear GCs and the thermodynamic stability of ionic GCs is generally higher than that of non-ionic GC, thus leading to a lower risk of gadolinium dissociation. This class of drugs has enjoyed an excellent reputation in terms of safety for a long time, until a causal link with a recently-described serious disease, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), was evidenced. It is acknowledged that the vast majority of NSF cases are related to the administration of some linear CG in renally-impaired patients. Health authorities, worldwide, released recommendations which drastically reduced the occurrence of new cases. PMID:25731664

  14. State-of-the-art of non-hormonal methods of contraception: II. Chemical barrier contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batár, István

    2010-04-01

    Chemical contraceptives mainly known as spermicides are one of the oldest types of contraceptives. The industrial revolution facilitated new developments, and they became a leading and widespread method. However, their use declined in the second half of the 20th century, and came under focus again only with the upsurge of sexually transmitted infections (STIs). The effectiveness of spermicides depends on the users' compliance and pregnancy rates vary widely: from 6/100 woman-year (with perfect use) to 26/100 woman-year (with typical use). Preparations consist of two components: an excipient (foam, cream, jelly, soluble film, suppository or tablet); and a chemical agent with spermicidal properties (acidic compound, microbicidal agent, detergent). The most widely used active agent has been the surface active (detergent) nonoxynol-9 (N-9). Based on their mode of action (surfactant effect of detergents, enzymatic action of microbicides on cell metabolism) spermicides were thought to provide protection against STIs including HIV. Recent studies have, however, shown that detergents may actually increase the risk. Because of this, there is an urgent need for a suitable non-detergent spermicide, and research should focus on developing new compounds to replace N-9 and other agents having similar undesired effects. This paper reviews the latest studies reporting results on these recent developments. PMID:20055729

  15. On the binary helium star DY Centauri: chemical composition and evolutionary state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, Gajendra; Rao, N. Kameswara [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore 560034 (India); Jeffery, C. Simon [Armagh Observatory, Collage Hill, Armagh BT61 9DG (United Kingdom); Lambert, David L., E-mail: pandey@iiap.res.in, E-mail: nkrao@iiap.res.in, E-mail: csj@arm.ac.uk, E-mail: dll@astro.as.utexas.edu [The W. J. McDonald Observatory and Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712-1083 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    DY Cen has shown a steady fading of its visual light by about one magnitude in the last 40 yr, suggesting a secular increase in its effective temperature. We have conducted non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and LTE abundance analyses to determine the star's effective temperature, surface gravity, and chemical composition using high-resolution spectra obtained over two decades. The derived stellar parameters for three epochs suggest that DY Cen has evolved at a constant luminosity and has become hotter by about 5000 K in 23 yr. We show that the derived abundances remain unchanged for the three epochs. The derived abundances of the key elements, including F and Ne, are as observed for the extreme helium stars resulting from a merger of a He white dwarf with a C-O white dwarf. Thus DY Cen by chemical composition appears to also be a product of a merger of two white dwarfs. This appearance seems to be at odds with the recent suggestion that DY Cen is a single-lined spectroscopic binary.

  16. Phytoestrogens in postmenopause: the state of the art from a chemical, pharmacological and regulatory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poluzzi, Elisabetta; Piccinni, Carlo; Raschi, Emanuel; Rampa, Angela; Recanatini, Maurizio; De Ponti, Fabrizio

    2014-01-01

    Phytoestrogens represent a diverse group of non-steroidal natural products, which seem to have some oestrogenic effects and are often marketed as food supplements. Population exposed to phytoestrogens is potentially increasing, in part because an unfavourable risk-benefit profile of Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) for prolonged treatments (e.g., osteoporosis prevention) highlighted by the publication of the Women Health Initiative (WHI) trial in 2002, but also because many post-menopausal women often perceived phytoestrogens in food supplements as a safer alternative than HRT. Despite of increasing preclinical and clinical studies in the past decade, appealing evidence is still lacking to support the overall positive risk-benefit profile of phytoestrogens. Their status as food supplements seems to discourage studies to obtain new evidence, and the chance to buy them by user's initiative make it difficult to survey their prevalence and pattern of use. The aim of the present review is to: (a) outline the clinical scenario underlying the increased interest on phytoestrogens, by overviewing the evolution of the evidence on HRT and its main therapeutic goals (e.g., menopausal symptoms relief, chemoprevention, osteoporosis prevention); (b) address the chemical and pharmacological features (e.g. chemical structure, botanical sources, mechanism of action) of the main compounds (e.g., isoflavones, lignans, coumestans); (c) describe the clinical evidence on potential therapeutic applications; (d) put available evidence on their riskbenefit profile in a regulatory perspective, in light of the recent regulation on health claims of food supplements. PMID:24164197

  17. Medical Image Fusion: A survey of the state of the art

    CERN Document Server

    James, A P

    2014-01-01

    Medical image fusion is the process of registering and combining multiple images from single or multiple imaging modalities to improve the imaging quality and reduce randomness and redundancy in order to increase the clinical applicability of medical images for diagnosis and assessment of medical problems. Multi-modal medical image fusion algorithms and devices have shown notable achievements in improving clinical accuracy of decisions based on medical images. This review article provides a factual listing of methods and summarizes the broad scientific challenges faced in the field of medical image fusion. We characterize the medical image fusion research based on (1) the widely used image fusion methods, (2) imaging modalities, and (3) imaging of organs that are under study. This review concludes that even though there exists several open ended technological and scientific challenges, the fusion of medical images has proved to be useful for advancing the clinical reliability of using medical imaging for medi...

  18. Love-related changes in the brain: A resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwen eSong

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Romantic love is a motivational state associated with a desire to enter or maintain a close relationship with a specific other person. Studies with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI have found activation increases in brain regions involved in processing of reward, emotion, motivation when romantic lovers view photographs of their partners. However, not much is known on whether romantic love affects the brain’s functional architecture during rest. In the present study, resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI data was collected to compare the regional homogeneity (ReHo and functional connectivity (FC across a lover group (LG, N=34, currently intensely in love, ended-love group (ELG, N=34, romantic relationship ended recently, and single group (SG, N=32, never fallen in love.The results showed that:1 ReHo of the left dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC was significantly increased in the LG (in comparison to the ELG and the SG; 2 ReHo of the left dACC was positively correlated with length of time in love in the LG, and negatively correlated with the lovelorn duration since breakup in the ELG; 3 functional connectivity (FC within the reward, motivation, and emotion network (dACC, insula, caudate, amygdala and nucleus accumbens and the social cognition network (temporo-parietal junction (TPJ, posterior cingulate cortex (PCC, medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC, inferior parietal, precuneus and temporal lobe was significantly increased in the LG (in comparison to the ELG and SG; 4 in most regions within both networks FC was positively correlated with the love duration in the LG but negatively correlated with the lovelorn duration in the ELG. This study provides first empirical evidence of love-related alterations of brain functional architecture. The results shed light on the underlying neural mechanisms of romantic love, and demonstrate the possibility of applying a resting state approach for investigating romantic love.

  19. Medical Image Fusion: A survey of the state of the art

    OpenAIRE

    James, A. P.; Dasarathy, B. V.

    2013-01-01

    Medical image fusion is the process of registering and combining multiple images from single or multiple imaging modalities to improve the imaging quality and reduce randomness and redundancy in order to increase the clinical applicability of medical images for diagnosis and assessment of medical problems. Multi-modal medical image fusion algorithms and devices have shown notable achievements in improving clinical accuracy of decisions based on medical images. This review article provides a f...

  20. Atomic-Scale Imaging and Control of Interface Magnetic States in Vacancy Ordered Cobaltite Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisevich, Albina; Kim, Young-Min; Biegalski, Michael; He, Jun; Christen, Hans; Pantelides, Sokrates; Pennycook, Stephen

    2012-02-01

    Magnetic properties of complex oxide thin films are strongly affected by strain, chemical composition, and octahedral tilt of the substrate. Here, we study lanthanum/strontium cobaltite (La0.5Sr0.5CoO3-x, LSCO) thin films via quantitative aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) to explore the coupling between magnetic properties, ionic behavior, and oxygen octahedral tilts. LSCO films were grown by PLD in identical conditions on two different substrates, LSAT (cubic) and NGO (orthorhombic). These substrates have nearly identical lattice parameters, but different octahedral tilts. The film on NGO appears to be La0.5Sr0.5CoO2.5, while the film on LSAT is less oxygen deficient. Comparison of measured lattice parameters with the first-principles calculations allows us to determine oxygen content in the film. In La0.5Sr0.5CoO2.5/NGO films, EELS reveals different valence states of Co at the interface depending on termination, resulting in different magnetic states. Therefore changes in octahedral tilts can induce changes in oxygen stoichiometry and interface magnetic states of the vacancy ordered structures.

  1. THE BACTERIOLOGICAL AND PHYSICO-CHEMICAL STUDIES ON OLUMIRIN WATERFALL ERIN- IJESHA, OSUN STATE, NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwakemi Akindolapo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The potability and qualities of Olumirin waterfall, Erin-Ijesa were investigated by determining the total bacteria and coliform count with antibiotic susceptibility of the isolated bacteria and physico-chemical qualities of the water samples. Total bacteria and coliform enumeration were determined using pour plating and multiple tube techniques, the antibiotic susceptibility were carried out using disc diffusion method, while physico-chemical and mineral studies were also carried out using standard methods. The mean total viable count of the water samples ranged 14.8 x 102 CFU.ml-1 - 21.3 x 103 CFU.ml-1 while the coliform count ranged 13 -175 MPN/100ml. The identified bacteria isolates and their percentage distribution were E.coli (43.1%, Klebsiella spp (20.7%, Proteus spp (12.1%, Salmonella spp (6.99%, Pseudomonas spp (5.17%, Shigella spp (6.9%, and Enterococcus spp (5.17 %. Antibiotic resistance shown by bacteria isolates were exhibited as follow; Nalixidic acid (31%, Ampicilin (76%, Cotrimoxazole (60%, Gentamicin (19%, Nitrofurantoin (24%, Colitin (48%, Streptomycin (34% and tetracycline (52%. 82.8% of the isolate exhibited multiple antibiotic resistance. The physico-chemical analysis also revealed the presence of some mineral elements in the water samples. The mineral value of the water samples include; magnesium (84.8 - 93.4 mg.L-1, phosphate (12.6 - 17.1 mg.L-1, sodium (47.8 - 87.6 mg.L-1, potassium (76.6 - 104.5 mg.L-1, chloride (59.0 - 90.2 mg.L-1, zinc (0.75 - 1.82 mg.L-1, lead (0.12 - 0.33 mg.L-1, iron (0.52 - 0.60 mg.L-1, copper (0.12 - 0.27 mg.L-1 while nickel and arsenic were not detected in any of the water samples. Comparing the experimental results with the international water standard for natural water, the waterfall is not fit for consumption or for any domestic purpose unless being treated. Also, problems that may arise from the resistance bacteria strains can be tackled while the new antibiotics can also be developed.

  2. Combination of chemical suppression techniques for dual suppression of fat and silicone at diffusion-weighted MR imaging in women with breast implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Dow-Mu; Hughes, J. [Royal Marsden Hospital, Department of Radiology, Sutton (United Kingdom); Blackledge, M.; Leach, M.O.; Collins, D.J. [Institute of Cancer Research, CR UK-EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Sutton (United Kingdom); Burns, S. [Nuada 3T MRI Centre, London (United Kingdom); Stemmer, A.; Kiefer, B. [Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Silicone breast prostheses prove technically challenging when performing diffusion-weighted MR imaging in the breasts. We describe a combined fat and chemical suppression scheme to achieve dual suppression of fat and silicone, thereby improving the quality of diffusion-weighted images in women with breast implants. MR imaging was performed at 3.0 and 1.5 T in women with silicone breast implants using short-tau inversion recovery (STIR) fat-suppressed echo-planar (EPI) diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) on its own and combined with the slice-select gradient-reversal (SSGR) technique. Imaging was performed using dedicated breast imaging coils. Complete suppression of the fat and silicone signal was possible at 3.0 T using EPI DWI with STIR and SSGR, evaluated with dedicated breast coils. However, a residual silicone signal was still perceptible at 1.5 T using this combined approach. Nevertheless, a further reduction in silicone signal at 1.5 T could be achieved by employing thinner slice partitions and the addition of the chemical-selective fat-suppression (CHESS) technique. DWI using combined STIR and SSGR chemical suppression techniques is feasible to eliminate or reduce silicone signal from prosthetic breast implants. (orig.)

  3. Micro-Spectroscopic Chemical Imaging of Individual Identified Marine Biogenic and Ambient Organic Ice Nuclei (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopf, D. A.; Alpert, P. A.; Wang, B.; OBrien, R. E.; Moffet, R. C.; Aller, J. Y.; Laskin, A.; Gilles, M.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric ice formation represents one of the least understood atmospheric processes with important implications for the hydrological cycle and climate. Current freezing descriptions assume that ice active sites on the particle surface initiate ice nucleation, however, the nature of these sites remains elusive. Here, we present a new experimental method that allows us to relate physical and chemical properties of individual particles with observed water uptake and ice nucleation ability using a combination of micro-spectroscopic and optical single particle analytical techniques. We apply this method to field-collected particles and particles generated via bursting of bubbles produced by glass frit aeration and plunging water impingement jets in a mesocosm containing artificial sea water and bacteria and/or phytoplankton. The most efficient ice nuclei (IN) within a particle population are identified and characterized. Single particle characterization is achieved by computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. A vapor controlled cooling-stage coupled to an optical microscope is used to determine the onsets of water uptake, immersion freezing, and deposition ice nucleation of the individual particles as a function of temperature (T) as low as 200 K and relative humidity (RH) up to water saturation. In addition, we perform CCSEM/EDX to obtain on a single particle level the elemental composition of the entire particle population. Thus, we can determine if the IN are exceptional in nature or belong to a major particle type class with respect to composition and size. We find that ambient and sea spray particles are coated by organic material and can induce ice formation under tropospheric relevant conditions. Micro-spectroscopic single particle analysis of the investigated particle samples invokes a potential

  4. Quantum chemical simulation of hydrogen like states in silicon and diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quantum-chemical methods of the complete neglect of differential overlap (CNDO) and intermediate neglect of differential overlap (INDO) are used to calculate the electronic structure of atomic hydrogen (muonium) located at different interstital sites of the silicon and diamond crystal lattices. The electronic g- and hyperfine interaction tensors of the impure atom are determined.The results obtained are compared with the experimental data on the 'normal' (Mu') and 'anomalous' (Mu*) muonium centers as well as on the hydrogen-bearing Si-AA9 EPR center which is a hydrogen-bearing analogue of (Mu*). The most likely localization sites for hydrogen (muonium) atoms in silicon and diamond crystals are established. 22 refs

  5. High sensitivity detection and characterization of the chemical state of trace element contamination on silicon wafers

    CERN Document Server

    Pianetta, Piero A; Baur, K; Brennan, S; Homma, T; Kubo, N

    2003-01-01

    Increasing the speed and complexity of semiconductor integrated circuits requires advanced processes that put extreme constraints on the level of metal contamination allowed on the surfaces of silicon wafers. Such contamination degrades the performance of the ultrathin SiO sub 2 gate dielectrics that form the heart of the individual transistors. Ultimately, reliability and yield are reduced to levels that must be improved before new processes can be put into production. It should be noted that much of this metal contamination occurs during the wet chemical etching and rinsing steps required for the manufacture of integrated circuits and industry is actively developing new processes that have already brought the metal contamination to levels beyond the measurement capabilities of conventional analytical techniques. The measurement of these extremely low contamination levels has required the use of synchrotron radiation total reflection X-ray fluorescence (SR-TXRF) where sensitivities 100 times better than conv...

  6. Plasmonic hot carrier dynamics in solid-state and chemical systems for energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Prineha; Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Atwater, Harry A.

    2016-06-01

    Surface plasmons provide a pathway to efficiently absorb and confine light in metallic nanostructures, thereby bridging photonics to the nano scale. The decay of surface plasmons generates energetic `hot' carriers, which can drive chemical reactions or be injected into semiconductors for nano-scale photochemical or photovoltaic energy conversion. Novel plasmonic hot carrier devices and architectures continue to be demonstrated, but the complexity of the underlying processes make a complete microscopic understanding of all the mechanisms and design considerations for such devices extremely challenging.Here,we review the theoretical and computational efforts to understand and model plasmonic hot carrier devices.We split the problem into three steps: hot carrier generation, transport and collection, and review theoretical approaches with the appropriate level of detail for each step along with their predictions.We identify the key advances necessary to complete the microscopic mechanistic picture and facilitate the design of the next generation of devices and materials for plasmonic energy conversion.

  7. Changes in the chemical structure of polytetrafluoroethylene induced by electron beam irradiation in the molten state

    CERN Document Server

    Lappan, U; Lunkwitz, K

    2000-01-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) was exposed to electron beam radiation at elevated temperature above the melting point under nitrogen atmosphere and in vacuum for comparison. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to study the changes in the chemical structure. The irradiation under nitrogen atmosphere leads to the same structures as described recently for PTFE irradiated in vacuum. Trifluoromethyl branches and double bond structures were detected. The concentrations of terminal and internal double bonds are higher after irradiation under nitrogen than in vacuum. Annealing experiments have shown that the thermal oxidative stability of the radiation-modified PTFE is reduced compared to unirradiated PTFE. The reason are the formation of unstable structures such as double bonds.

  8. Chemical and biochemical properties of Araucaria angustifolia (Bert. Ktze. forest soils in the state of São Paulo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda de Carvalho

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Araucaria angustifolia, commonly named Araucaria, is a Brazilian native species that is intensively exploited due to its timber quality. Therefore, Araucaria is on the list of species threatened by extinction. Despite the importance of soil for forest production, little is known about the soil properties of the highly fragmented Araucaria forests. This study was designed to investigate the use of chemical and biological properties as indicators of conservation and anthropogenic disturbance of Araucaria forests in different sampling periods. The research was carried out in two State parks of São Paulo: Parque Estadual Turístico do Alto do Ribeira and Parque Estadual de Campos de Jordão. The biochemical properties carbon and nitrogen in microbial biomass (MB-C and MB-N, basal respiration (BR, the metabolic quotient (qCO2 and the following enzyme activities: β-glucosidase, urease, and fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis (FDA were evaluated. The sampling period (dry or rainy season influenced the results of mainly MB-C, MB-N, BR, and qCO2. The chemical and biochemical properties, except K content, were sensitive indicators of differences in the conservation and anthropogenic disturbance stages of Araucaria forests. Although these forests differ in biochemical and chemical properties, they are efficient in energy use and conservation, which is shown by their low qCO2, suggesting an advanced stage of succession.

  9. Effects of Different Soil Management Systems in the Chemical Properties in the Coastal Plains of State Paraiba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iêde de Brito Chaves

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the chemical characteristics of soils under different management systems, i.e., the culture of sugar cane with and without vinasse compared to forest area in the Coastal Plains ofState Paraiba. For each management system were opened five profiles occurring in the same soil class, dystrophic Ultisol grayish. In each profile, the soil samples were collected at 0-5, 5-10, 10-20 and 20-40 cm depths. These samples, after being air dried and passed through a sieve of 2 mm, were characterized chemically. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, analysis of variance and Tukey test at 5% probability. The pH, electrical conductivity, exchangeable aluminum, potential acidity and phosphorus results, in relation to soil management, were significantly affected; in relation to depth, there was a significant effect on the pH results and on the electrical conductivity, calcium, sodium, potassium, potential acidity and P results. However, for area x depths there was a significant difference only for aluminum, potential acidity and phosphorus contents. The results of this study show that treatment with vinasse application promotes improvements in soil chemical properties such as pH increases and the availability of K and P in the surface layers of soil.

  10. Estimates of agricultural-chemical use in counties in the conterminous United States as reported in the 1987 Census of Agriculture

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This coverage contains estimates of agricultural-chemical use in counties in the conterminous United States as reported in the 1987 Census of Agriculture (U.S....

  11. State Key Laboratory of Catalysis Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Can Li

    2002-01-01

    @@ I. Introduction The State Key Laboratory of Catalysis (SKLC)was founded in 1987 as one of the first state key labo-ratories in China. The current director of the SKLC isProfessor Can Li (the previous directors were Profes-sor Xiexian Guo and Professor Yide Xu). ProfessorLiwu Lin chairs the Academic Committee, which iscomposed of 15 distinguished Chinese catalytic scien-tists. In addition, the SKLC appoints internationallyknown scientists in the field of catalysis to its Inter-national Advisory Committee. There are about 35permanent staff members including professors, tech-nicians, and administrators, over 80 Ph.D. and M.S.graduate students and 10 post-doctoral fellows.

  12. Error sensitivity to environmental noise in quantum circuits for chemical state preparation

    CERN Document Server

    Sawaya, Nicolas P D; McClean, Jarrod R; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2016-01-01

    Calculating molecular energies is likely to be one of the first useful applications to achieve quantum supremacy, performing faster on a quantum than a classical computer. However, if future quantum devices are to produce accurate calculations, errors due to environmental noise and algorithmic approximations need to be characterized and reduced. In this study, we use the high performance qHiPSTER software to investigate the effects of environmental noise on the preparation of quantum chemistry states. We simulate nineteen 16-qubit quantum circuits under environmental noise, each corresponding to a unitary coupled cluster state preparation of a different molecule or molecular configuration. Additionally, we analyze the nature of simple gate errors in noise-free circuits of up to 40 qubits. We find that the Jordan-Wigner (JW) encoding produces consistently smaller errors under a noisy environment as compared to the Bravyi-Kitaev (BK) encoding. For the JW encoding, pure-dephasing noise is shown to produce substa...

  13. Rural measurements of the chemical composition of airborne particles in the Eastern United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantitative measurements of particulate composition was made at three rural sites: in central South Dakota, on the Louisiana Gulf Coastal, and in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia. The first two sites were selected to determine background concentrations in continental polar and maritime tropical air masses, respectively, which affect the eastern United State during the summer. The Virginia site was selected as a receptor site, downwind of the midwestern source area. The South Dakota data established the background concentrations. These concentrations were similar to the levels in Louisiana when air parcels arrived from the Gulf of Mexico, without recently passing over the United States. Levels of fine particles (diameters less than 2.5 μm) were highest in Virginia and were due chiefly to sulfate. Using trajectory and statistical analyses, it is shown that the residence time of an air parcel over the midwestern source area was the most important variable in determining the sulface levels in the Blue Ridge Mountains

  14. Excited State Properties of Fluorine-Substituted Hexabenzocoronene: A Quantum-Chemical Characterization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yuan-Zuo; SUN Yu; LI Yong-Qing; MA Feng-Cai

    2006-01-01

    The first fluorine-substituted hexabenzocoronene has been synthesized and its electronic structure and optical properties have been reported [Q. Zhang, et al., Org. Lett.7 (2005) 5019]. In this letter, the electronic structure and excited state properties of the fluorine-substituted hexabenzocoronene are studied with quantum chemistry method as well as the transition and the charge difference densities. The transition densities show the orientations and strength of the dipole moments and the charge difference densities reveal the orientation and results of the intramolecular charge transfer. The calculated transition energies and oscillator strengths are consistent with the experimental data, and the theoretical results of transition and charge difference densities are valuable to understanding the excited state properties of the fluorine-substituted hexabenzocoronene.

  15. Survey of chemical disinfectants used by poultry farmers in Imo state, Nigeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.U. Chima

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Pathogen contamination can be prevented with aid of proper health care products such as disinfectants. This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of common disinfectants and disinfection practice of poultry farmers in Imo State, Nigeria, in order to generate information needed for the proper regulation of disinfectant use in the area. Primary data were generated from structured questionnaires distributed to animal health practitioners and poultry farmers in the State. Results showed that farmers choice of disinfectants were dependent on cost and availability. Z-germicide® 10 (22.27% and Izal® with 9 (20.45% are more widely distributed in the various animal health outfits. This was closely followed by Lysol® 6 (13.63% and Diskol® 6 (13.63%. Morigard® 3 (6.81%, Dettol® and Septol® 3 (6.81% appeared each in three outfits. Vox® 1 (2.27% CID 20® 1 (2.27% a Virkon® 1 (2.27% occurred once and that is at the Avian influenza desk officer’s store. Izal® 140 (58.82 was more widely used by farmers followed by Z-germicide®, both of which are phenolic products. Morigad® with 2 (2.94% and Lysol® with 91.47%0 are also phenolic products. Altogether 76.47% of disinfectants used in Imo State were of phenolic products. Most poultry farms in the State did not use disinfectant footbath. Those that used them did not insist on workers or visitors dipping their feet in them before entering the farm house. They also did not reconstitute the disinfectants according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

  16. Phase state of ambient aerosol linked with water uptake and chemical aging in the southeastern US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajunoja, Aki; Hu, Weiwei; Leong, Yu J.; Taylor, Nathan F.; Miettinen, Pasi; Palm, Brett B.; Mikkonen, Santtu; Collins, Don R.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Virtanen, Annele

    2016-09-01

    During the summer 2013 Southern Aerosol and Oxidant Study (SOAS) field campaign in a rural site in the southeastern United States, the effect of hygroscopicity and composition on the phase state of atmospheric aerosol particles dominated by the organic fraction was studied. The analysis is based on hygroscopicity measurements by a Hygroscopic Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA), physical phase state investigations by an Aerosol Bounce Instrument (ABI) and composition measurements using a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). To study the effect of atmospheric aging on these properties, an OH-radical oxidation flow reactor (OFR) was used to simulate longer atmospheric aging times of up to 3 weeks. Hygroscopicity and bounce behavior of the particles had a clear relationship showing higher bounce at elevated relative humidity (RH) values for less hygroscopic particles, which agrees well with earlier laboratory studies. Additional OH oxidation of the aerosol particles in the OFR increased the O : C and the hygroscopicity resulting in liquefying of the particles at lower RH values. At the highest OH exposures, the inorganic fraction starts to dominate the bounce process due to production of inorganics and concurrent loss of organics in the OFR. Our results indicate that at typical ambient RH and temperature, organic-dominated particles stay mostly liquid in the atmospheric conditions in the southeastern US, but they often turn semisolid when dried below ˜ 50 % RH in the sampling inlets. While the liquid phase state suggests solution behavior and equilibrium partitioning for the SOA particles in ambient air, the possible phase change in the drying process highlights the importance of thoroughly considered sampling techniques of SOA particles.

  17. Error Sensitivity to Environmental Noise in Quantum Circuits for Chemical State Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawaya, Nicolas P D; Smelyanskiy, Mikhail; McClean, Jarrod R; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2016-07-12

    Calculating molecular energies is likely to be one of the first useful applications to achieve quantum supremacy, performing faster on a quantum than a classical computer. However, if future quantum devices are to produce accurate calculations, errors due to environmental noise and algorithmic approximations need to be characterized and reduced. In this study, we use the high performance qHiPSTER software to investigate the effects of environmental noise on the preparation of quantum chemistry states. We simulated 18 16-qubit quantum circuits under environmental noise, each corresponding to a unitary coupled cluster state preparation of a different molecule or molecular configuration. Additionally, we analyze the nature of simple gate errors in noise-free circuits of up to 40 qubits. We find that, in most cases, the Jordan-Wigner (JW) encoding produces smaller errors under a noisy environment as compared to the Bravyi-Kitaev (BK) encoding. For the JW encoding, pure dephasing noise is shown to produce substantially smaller errors than pure relaxation noise of the same magnitude. We report error trends in both molecular energy and electron particle number within a unitary coupled cluster state preparation scheme, against changes in nuclear charge, bond length, number of electrons, noise types, and noise magnitude. These trends may prove to be useful in making algorithmic and hardware-related choices for quantum simulation of molecular energies. PMID:27254482

  18. Generalized molybdenum oxide surface chemical state XPS determination via informed amorphous sample model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baltrusaitis, Jonas, E-mail: job314@lehigh.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, Lehigh University, B336 Iacocca Hall, 111 Research Drive, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States); PhotoCatalytic Synthesis group, MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Twente, Meander 229, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Mendoza-Sanchez, Beatriz [CRANN, Chemistry School, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin (Ireland); Fernandez, Vincent [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP 32229, F-44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Veenstra, Rick [PhotoCatalytic Synthesis group, MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Twente, Meander 229, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Dukstiene, Nijole [Department of Physical and Inorganic Chemistry, Kaunas University of Technology, Radvilenu pl. 19, LT-50254 Kaunas (Lithuania); Roberts, Adam [Kratos Analytical Ltd, Trafford Wharf Road, Wharfside, Manchester, M17 1GP (United Kingdom); Fairley, Neal [Casa Software Ltd, Bay House, 5 Grosvenor Terrace, Teignmouth, Devon TQ14 8NE (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-30

    Highlights: • We analyzed and modeled spectral envelopes of complex molybdenum oxides. • Molybdenum oxide films of varying valence and crystallinity were synthesized. • MoO{sub 3} and MoO{sub 2} line shapes from experimental data were created. • Informed amorphous sample model (IASM) developed. • Amorphous molybdenum oxide XPS envelopes were interpreted. - Abstract: Accurate elemental oxidation state determination for the outer surface of a complex material is of crucial importance in many science and engineering disciplines, including chemistry, fundamental and applied surface science, catalysis, semiconductors and many others. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is the primary tool used for this purpose. The spectral data obtained, however, is often very complex and can be subject to incorrect interpretation. Unlike traditional XPS spectra fitting procedures using purely synthetic spectral components, here we develop and present an XPS data processing method based on vector analysis that allows creating XPS spectral components by incorporating key information, obtained experimentally. XPS spectral data, obtained from series of molybdenum oxide samples with varying oxidation states and degree of crystallinity, were processed using this method and the corresponding oxidation states present, as well as their relative distribution was elucidated. It was shown that monitoring the evolution of the chemistry and crystal structure of a molybdenum oxide sample due to an invasive X-ray probe could be used to infer solutions to complex spectral envelopes.

  19. (31)P Solid-State NMR study of the chemical setting process of a dual-paste injectable brushite cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrand, A P; Sfihi, H; Lequeux, N; Lemaître, J

    2009-10-01

    The composition and evolution of a brushite-type calcium phosphate cement was investigated by Solid-State NMR and X-ray during the setting process. The cement is obtained by mixing beta-tricalcium phosphate [Ca(3)(PO(4))(2), beta-TCP] and monocalcium phosphate monohydrate [Ca(H(2)PO(4))(2).H(2)O, MCPM] in presence of water, with formation of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate or brushite [CaHPO(2).2H(2)O, DCPD]. Analysis of the initial beta-TCP paste has shown the presence of beta-calcium pyrophosphate [Ca(2)P(2)O(7), beta-CPy] and that of the initial MCPM a mixture of MCPM and dicalcium phosphate [CaHPO(4), DCP]. Follow-up of the chemical composition by (31)P Solid-State NMR enables to show that the chemical setting process appeared to reach an end after 20 min. The constant composition observed at the end of the process was similarly determined.

  20. Level crossing analysis of chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization: Towards a common description of liquid-state and solid-state cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosnovsky, Denis V.; Jeschke, Gunnar; Matysik, Jörg; Vieth, Hans-Martin; Ivanov, Konstantin L.

    2016-04-01

    Chemically Induced Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (CIDNP) is an efficient method of creating non-equilibrium polarization of nuclear spins by using chemical reactions, which have radical pairs as intermediates. The CIDNP effect originates from (i) electron spin-selective recombination of radical pairs and (ii) the dependence of the inter-system crossing rate in radical pairs on the state of magnetic nuclei. The CIDNP effect can be investigated by using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) methods. The gain from CIDNP is then two-fold: it allows one to obtain considerable amplification of NMR signals; in addition, it provides a very useful tool for investigating elusive radicals and radical pairs. While the mechanisms of the CIDNP effect in liquids are well established and understood, detailed analysis of solid-state CIDNP mechanisms still remains challenging; likewise a common theoretical frame for the description of CIDNP in both solids and liquids is missing. Difficulties in understanding the spin dynamics that lead to the CIDNP effect in the solid-state case are caused by the anisotropy of spin interactions, which increase the complexity of spin evolution. In this work, we propose to analyze CIDNP in terms of level crossing phenomena, namely, to attribute features in the CIDNP magnetic field dependence to Level Crossings (LCs) and Level Anti-Crossings (LACs) in a radical pair. This approach allows one to describe liquid-state CIDNP; the same holds for the solid-state case where anisotropic interactions play a significant role in CIDNP formation. In solids, features arise predominantly from LACs, since in most cases anisotropic couplings result in perturbations, which turn LCs into LACs. We have interpreted the CIDNP mechanisms in terms of the LC/LAC concept. This consideration allows one to find analytical expressions for a wide magnetic field range, where several different mechanisms are operative; furthermore, the LAC description gives a way to determine CIDNP sign

  1. Terahertz spectroscopy and imaging for cultural heritage management: state of art and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catapano, Ilaria; Soldovieri, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    Non-invasive diagnostic tools able to provide information on the materials and preservation state of artworks are crucial to help conservators, archaeologists and anthropologists to plan and carry out their tasks properly. In this frame, technological solutions exploiting Terahertz (THz) radiation, i.e., working at frequencies ranging from 0.1 to 10 THz, are currently deserving huge attention as complementary techniques to classical analysis methodologies based on electromagnetic radiations from X-rays to mid infrared [1]. The main advantage offered by THz spectroscopy and imaging systems is referred to their capability of providing information useful to determine the construction modality, the history life and the conservation state of artworks as well as to identify previous restoration actions [1,2]. In particular, unlike mid- and near-infrared spectroscopy, which provides fingerprint absorption spectra depending on the intramolecular behavior, THz spectroscopy is related to the structure of the molecules of the investigated object. Hence, it can discriminate, for instance, the different materials mixed in a paint [1,2]. Moreover, THz radiation is able to penetrate several materials which are opaque to both visible and infrared materials, such as varnish, paint, plaster, paper, wood, plastic, and so on. Accordingly, it is useful to detect hidden objects and characterize the inner structure of the artwork under test even in the direction of the depth, while avoiding core drillings. In this frame, THz systems allow us to discriminate different layers of materials present in artworks like paints, to obtain images providing information on the construction technique as well as to discover risk factors affecting the preservation state, such as non-visible cracks, hidden molds and air gaps between the paint layer and underlying structure. Furthermore, adopting a no-ionizing radiation, THz systems offer the not trivial benefit of negligible long term risks to the

  2. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and the Challenge of Balancing Human Security with State Security

    CERN Document Server

    Sahito, Farhan

    2012-01-01

    Recent reports reveal that violent extremists are trying to obtain insider positions that may increase the impact of any attack on critical infrastructure and could potentially endanger state services, people's lives and even democracy. It is of utmost importance to be able to adopt extreme security measures in certain high-risk situations in order to secure critical infrastructure and thus lower the level of terrorist threats while preserving the rights of citizens. To counter these threats, our research is aiming for extreme measures to analyse and evaluate human threats related assessment methods for employee screening and evaluations using cognitive analysis technology, in particular functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). The development of fMRI has led some researchers to conclude that this technology has forensic potential and may be useful in investing personality traits, mental illness, psychopathology, racial prejudice and religious extremism. However, critics claim that this technology may pr...

  3. A single-photon sampling architecture for solid-state imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Berg, Ewout van den; Chinn, Garry; Levin, Craig; Olcott, Peter; Sing-Long, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Advances in solid-state technology have enabled the development of silicon photomultiplier sensor arrays capable of sensing individual photons. Combined with high-frequency time-to-digital converters (TDCs), this technology opens up the prospect of sensors capable of recording with high accuracy both the time and location of each detected photon. Such a capability could lead to significant improvements in imaging accuracy, especially for applications operating with low photon fluxes such as LiDAR and positron emission tomography. The demands placed on on-chip readout circuitry imposes stringent trade-offs between fill factor and spatio-temporal resolution, causing many contemporary designs to severely underutilize the technology's full potential. Concentrating on the low photon flux setting, this paper leverages results from group testing and proposes an architecture for a highly efficient readout of pixels using only a small number of TDCs, thereby also reducing both cost and power consumption. The design re...

  4. Rashba splitting in an image potential state investigated by circular dichroism two-photon photoemission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, T.; Takagi, N.; Kawai, Maki; Ishida, H.; Arafune, R.

    2016-09-01

    We have explored the band splitting and spin texture of the image potential state (IPS) on Au(001) derived from the Rashba-type spin-orbit interaction (SOI) by using angle-resolved bichromatic two-photon photoemission (2PPE) spectroscopy in combination with circular dichroism (CD). The Rashba parameter for the first (n =1 ) IPS is determined to be 48-20+8meV Å , which is consistent with the spin-polarized band structure calculated from the embedded Green's function technique for semi-infinite crystals. The present results demonstrate that bichromatic CD-2PPE spectroscopy is powerful for mapping the spin-polarized unoccupied band structures originating from SOIs in various classes of condensed matter.

  5. QUANTITATIVE IMAGE ANALYSIS OF MICROSTRUCTURE EVOLUTION DURING SOLID STATE SINTERING OF W-Cu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Popa

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The microstructure evolution of W-Cu composites during solid state sintering at 1050°C is studied on samples quenched after different sintering times. The microstructure is formed by 3 phases: tungsten (W, copper (Cu and pores. During the process, the initial mixture of W- and Cu-powder is transformed by migration of Cu and rearrangement of W particles. These microstructural changes are studied to identify the underlying phenomena and to control the material properties. Based on experiments performed with two different W powders, this paper deals with various aspects of the quantitative analysis of the observed evolution. A careful preparation of the images is necessary. The porous samples are impregnated with a resin under vacuum before being cut and carefully polished. Low voltage (<10 kV is used during image acquisition on a scanning electron microscope. Area fraction measurements are used to check the quality of the images and the segmentation process. Classical measurements are used to study the spreading of Cu onto the surface of W particles: surface area of each phase, area of contact between phases, chord length distributions. New measurements based on classical methods are also developed to distinguish between two mechanisms of Cu migration in the microstructure : Cu spreading on W surface (wetting of the surface, and capillary penetration in the inter-W channels. An analysis of the location of Cu and pores in the space between W particles (inter-W space is performed using a granulometry based on 2D openings. It evidences the mechanism of capillary penetration of Cu in the inter-W space in the case of small W-particles.

  6. Combination of diffusion tensor and functional magnetic resonance imaging during recovery from the vegetative state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández-Espejo Davinia

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rate of recovery from the vegetative state (VS is low. Currently, little is known of the mechanisms and cerebral changes that accompany those relatively rare cases of good recovery. Here, we combined functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI to study the evolution of one VS patient at one month post-ictus and again twelve months later when he had recovered consciousness. Methods fMRI was used to investigate cortical responses to passive language stimulation as well as task-induced deactivations related to the default-mode network. DTI was used to assess the integrity of the global white matter and the arcuate fasciculus. We also performed a neuropsychological assessment at the time of the second MRI examination in order to characterize the profile of cognitive deficits. Results fMRI analysis revealed anatomically appropriate activation to speech in both the first and the second scans but a reduced pattern of task-induced deactivations in the first scan. In the second scan, following the recovery of consciousness, this pattern became more similar to that classically described for the default-mode network. DTI analysis revealed relative preservation of the arcuate fasciculus and of the global normal-appearing white matter at both time points. The neuropsychological assessment revealed recovery of receptive linguistic functioning by 12-months post-ictus. Conclusions These results suggest that the combination of different structural and functional imaging modalities may provide a powerful means for assessing the mechanisms involved in the recovery from the VS.

  7. Variability of Ecosystem State in Rivers Containing Natural Dams: A Chemical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Z. A.

    2015-12-01

    Flooding, and the resulting economic damage to roads and property, is associated with natural dams such as beaver dams or log jams. For this reason, humans often remove natural dams; however, river reaches with natural dams provide very different ecosystem services in comparison with free-flowing river reaches. Therefore, the goal of this project is to assess the differences in ecosystem state between these different river reach types in the northeastern United States. We focused on differences in basic chemistry (e.g., dissolved oxygen, pH, temperature, and organic carbon) to assess the impact of natural dams on river ecosystem state. Study sites include rivers in the White Mountains and southeastern New Hampshire at locations with beaver dams, beaver ponds, beaver meadows, log jams, and free-flowing reaches. Dissolved oxygen, ORP, pH, temperature, and conductivity were measured in the field with a YSI Professional Plus meter. Water samples were collected for subsequent laboratory analysis of total organic carbon with a Shimadzu TOC-L. Preliminary results show that the chemistry of river water varies with feature type. Most significantly, dissolved oxygen concentrations are highest in free-flowing reaches and lowest in beaver ponds. Although beaver ponds are often associated with lower pH, due the increased concentration of organic acids, some beaver ponds can increase pH when compared to free-flowing reaches on the same river. Early results also show that water chemistry returns quickly to the chemistry typical of the free-flowing river reaches after being altered by a natural dam. Overall, natural dams create a river system that has more heterogeneity, and therefore has opportunities to provide more ecosystem functions, than a purely free-flowing river; this can increase the number of supported instream and riparian species. By increasing the understanding of how natural dams affect the chemistry of river water, river engineers can improve their decisions on how

  8. Chemical composition of Thymus vulgaris L. (thyme essential oil from the Rio de Janeiro State (Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEXANDRE PORTE

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The essential oil from fresh leaves of Thymus vulgaris L. from Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil, was isolated by hydrodistillation and analyzed through a combination of GC and GC/MS. Compounds representing 95.1 % of the oil were identified. Thirty-nine constituents were detected, of which twenty-eight were identified according to their chromatographic retention indices and mass spectra. The major constituents of the oil were thymol (44.7 %, p-cymene (18.6 % and g-terpinene (16.5 %.

  9. Imaging Rayleigh wave attenuation and phase velocity in the western and central United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, X.; Dalton, C. A.; Jin, G.; Gaherty, J. B.

    2013-12-01

    The EarthScope USArray provides an opportunity to obtain detailed images of the continental upper mantle at an unprecedented scale. The majority of mantle models derived from USArray data to date contain spatial variations in seismic-wave speed; however, little is known about the attenuation structure of the North American upper mantle. Joint interpretation of seismic attenuation and velocity models can improve upon the interpretations based only on velocity, and provide important constraints on the temperature, composition, melt content, and volatile content of the mantle. We jointly invert Rayleigh wave phase and amplitude observations for phase velocity and attenuation maps for the western and central United States using USArray data. This approach exploits the amplitudes' sensitivity to velocity and the phase delays' sensitivity to attenuation. The phase and amplitude data are measured in the period range 20--100 s using a new interstation cross-correlation approach, based on the Generalized Seismological Data Functional algorithm, that takes advantage of waveform similarity at nearby stations. The Rayleigh waves are generated from 670 large teleseismic earthquakes that occurred between 2006 and 2012, and measured from all available Transportable Array stations. We consider two separate and complementary approaches for imaging attenuation variations: (1) the Helmholtz tomography (Lin et al., 2012) and (2) two-station path tomography. Results obtained from the two methods are contrasted. We provide a preliminary interpretation based on the observed relationship between Rayleigh wave attenuation and phase velocity.

  10. Plasmonic hot carrier dynamics in solid-state and chemical systems for energy conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narang Prineha

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Surface plasmons provide a pathway to efficiently absorb and confine light in metallic nanostructures, thereby bridging photonics to the nano scale. The decay of surface plasmons generates energetic ‘hot’ carriers, which can drive chemical reactions or be injected into semiconductors for nano-scale photochemical or photovoltaic energy conversion. Novel plasmonic hot carrier devices and architectures continue to be demonstrated, but the complexity of the underlying processes make a complete microscopic understanding of all the mechanisms and design considerations for such devices extremely challenging.Here,we review the theoretical and computational efforts to understand and model plasmonic hot carrier devices.We split the problem into three steps: hot carrier generation, transport and collection, and review theoretical approaches with the appropriate level of detail for each step along with their predictions.We identify the key advances necessary to complete the microscopic mechanistic picture and facilitate the design of the next generation of devices and materials for plasmonic energy conversion.

  11. Chemical Inhomogeneity and Mixed-State Ferromagnetism in Diluted Magnetic Semiconductor Co:TiO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogale,S.; Kundaliya, D.; Mehraeen, S.; Fu, L.; Zhang, S.; Lussier, A.; Dvorak, J.; Browning, N.; Idzerda, Y.; Venkatesan, T.

    2008-01-01

    Diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS) are among the most intensely investigated materials in recent times in view of their great application potential. Yet, they are also the most controversial because of the possibility of extrinsic effects attributable to dopant solubility and clustering, point defects, incorporation of unintentional impurities, etc. This has highlighted the central role of materials chemistry in rendering a specific microstate and property response. In this work, we provide a combined window of high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectrometry, X-ray absorption (XAS)/X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD), and magnetization measurements on epitaxial rutile CoxTi1-xO2 (x = 0-0.06) system (the first discovered oxide-DMS, which continues to be controversial) grown at low temperature (400 C) under different ambient atmospheres. The study brings out a mixed-state scenario of ferromagnetism involving intrinsic DMS (uniform dopant distribution at low dopant concentration) and coupled cluster magnetism, involving cobalt associations within the matrix at higher concentrations. We also show that by matrix valence control during growth, it is possible to realize a uniform embedded cluster state and the related coupled cluster magnetism.

  12. Direct observation of bulk and surface chemical morphologies of Ginkgo biloba leaves by Fourier transform mid- and near-infrared microspectroscopic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianbo; Sun, Suqin; Zhou, Qun

    2013-11-01

    Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy is a powerful tool to obtain knowledge about the spatial and/or temporal distributions of the chemical compositions of plants for better understanding of their biological properties. However, the chemical morphologies of plant leaves in the plane of the blade are barely studied, because sections in this plane for mid-infrared transmission measurements are difficult to obtain. Besides, native compositions may be changed by chemical reagents used when plant samples are microtomed. To improve methods for direct infrared microspectroscopic imaging of plant leaves in the plane of the blade, the bulk and surface chemical morphologies of nonmicrotomed Ginkgo biloba leaves were characterized by near-infrared transmission and mid-infrared attenuated total reflection microspectroscopic imaging. A new self-modeling curve resolution procedure was proposed to extract the spectral and concentration information of pure compounds. Primary and secondary metabolites of secretory cavities, veins, and mesophylls of Ginkgo biloba leaf blades were analyzed, and the distributions of cuticle, protein, calcium oxalate, cellulose, and ginkgolic acids on the adaxial surface were determined. By the integration of multiple infrared microspectroscopic imaging and chemometrics methods, it is possible to analyze nonmicrotomed leaves and other plant samples directly to understand their native chemical morphologies in detail.

  13. PSI's 1kW imaging furnace-A tool for high-temperature chemical reactivity studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guesdon, C.; Alxneit, I.; Tschudi, H.R.; Wuillemin, D.; Brunner, Y.; Winkel, L.; Sturzenegger, M. [Laboratory for High-Temperature Solar Technology, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Petrasch, J. [Professorship for Renewable Energy Carriers, ETHZ Zentrum, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2006-10-15

    A new experiment has been installed to conduct studies at temperatures as high as 2500K on chemical reactions that involve solids or melts and the release of condensable gases. The sample is radiatively heated by a 1kW xenon short arc lamp placed in the upper focus of a vertically oriented ellipsoid of revolution. The optimal optical configuration has been determined by a Monte-Carlo Ray tracing method. Several methods to machine the reflector have been evaluated by experimentally determining the optical quality of the surface of plane test pieces. In the imaging furnace the sample is placed on a water-cooled support and heated by the concentrated radiation. This arrangement allows for fast heating and impedes the reaction of the sample with crucible material. A remotely controlled hammer allows for freezing the high-temperature composition of the sample by a fast quench. Thus, the sample can be later analyzed by conventional methods such as XRD or TEM. To allow for measurements under defined atmospheres and to protect the ellipsoidal reflector from liberated condensable products, the entire sample stage is enclosed by a hemispherical glass dome. The dome itself is protected from condensable compounds by a laminar flow of inert gas. Experiments with an incense cone at the place of the sample to visualize the gas flow showed that a steady layer of inert gas protects the dome from smoke, if the inert gas flow is properly adjusted. Measured peak flux densities clearly exceed 500Wcm{sup -2} required to access temperatures of at least 2500K. Decomposition experiments on copper sulfides confirmed the operation of the furnace. In the near future flash assisted multi-wavelength pyrometry (FAMP) will be implemented to measure sample temperatures online. Though the imaging furnace was developed to study the decomposition of metal sulfides it is obviously suited to conduct high-temperature studies on most materials relevant for high-temperature solar technology. (author)

  14. Chemical shift magnetic resonance imaging in differentiation of benign from malignant vertebral collapse in a rural tertiary care hospital in North India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Puneet; Gupta, Ranjana; Mittal, Amit; Joshi, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the modality of the first choice for evaluation of vertebral compression/collapse. Many MRI qualitative features help to differentiate benign from malignant collapse. We conducted this study to look for a quantitative difference in chemical shift values in benign and malignant collapse using dual-echo gradient echo in-phase/out-phase imaging. Materials and Methods: MRI examinations of a total of 38 patients were retrospectively included in the study who had vertebral compression/collapse with marrow edema in which final diagnosis was available at the time of imaging/follow-up. Signal intensity value in the region of abnormal marrow signal and adjacent normal vertebra was measured on in phase/out phase images. Signal intensity ratio (SIR) was measured by dividing signal intensity value on opposite phase images to that on in phase images. SIR was compared in normal vertebrae and benign and malignant vertebral collapse. Results: There were 21 males and 17 females with mean age of 52.4 years (range 28–76 years). Out of total 38 patients, 18 were of benign vertebral collapse and 20 of malignant vertebral collapse. SIR in normal vertebrae was 0.30 ± 0.14, 0.67 ± 0.18 in benign vertebral collapse, and 1.20 ± 0.27 in malignant vertebral collapse with significant difference in SIR of normal vertebrae versus benign collapse (P < 0.01) and in benign collapse versus malignant collapse (P < 0.01). Assuming a cutoff of <0.95 for benign collapse and ≥0.95 for malignant collapse, chemical shift imaging had a sensitivity of 90% and specificity of 94.4%. Conclusion: Chemical shift imaging is a rapid and useful sequence in differentiating benign from malignant vertebral collapse with good specificity and sensitivity.

  15. Chemical imaging of molecular changes in a hydrated single cell by dynamic secondary ion mass spectrometry and super-resolution microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, Xin; Szymanski, Craig J.; Wang, Zhaoying; Zhou, Yufan; Ma, Xiang; Yu, Jiachao; Evans, James E.; Orr, Galya; Liu, Songqin; Zhu, Zihua; Yu, Xiao-Ying

    2016-05-15

    Chemical imaging of single cells is important in capturing biological dynamics. Single cell correlative imaging is realized between structured illumination microscopy (SIM) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) using System for Analysis at the Liquid Vacuum Interface (SALVI), a multimodal microreactor. SIM characterized cells and guided subsequent ToF-SIMS analysis. Dynamic ToF-SIMS provided time- and space-resolved cell molecular mapping. Lipid fragments were identified in the hydrated cell membrane. Principal component analysis was used to elucidate chemical component differences among mouse lung cells that uptake zinc oxide nanoparticles. Our results provided submicron chemical spatial mapping for investigations of cell dynamics at the molecular level.

  16. Positronium in a Liquid Phase: Formation, Bubble State and Chemical Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Stepanov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present approach describes the e+ fate since its injection into a liquid until its annihilation. Several stages of the e+ evolution are discussed: (1 energy deposition and track structure of fast positrons: ionization slowing down, number of ion-electron pairs, typical sizes, thermalization, electrostatic interaction between e+ and the constituents of its blob, and effect of local heating; (2 positronium formation in condensed media: the Ore model, quasifree Ps state, intratrack mechanism of Ps formation; (3 fast intratrack diffusion-controlled reactions: Ps oxidation and ortho-paraconversion by radiolytic products, reaction rate constants, and interpretation of the PAL spectra in water at different temperatures; (4 Ps bubble models. Inner structure of positronium (wave function, energy contributions, relationship between the pick-off annihilation rate and the bubble radius.

  17. Semiempirical Quantum-Chemical Orthogonalization-Corrected Methods: Benchmarks for Ground-State Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dral, Pavlo O; Wu, Xin; Spörkel, Lasse; Koslowski, Axel; Thiel, Walter

    2016-03-01

    The semiempirical orthogonalization-corrected OMx methods (OM1, OM2, and OM3) go beyond the standard MNDO model by including additional interactions in the electronic structure calculation. When augmented with empirical dispersion corrections, the resulting OMx-Dn approaches offer a fast and robust treatment of noncovalent interactions. Here we evaluate the performance of the OMx and OMx-Dn methods for a variety of ground-state properties using a large and diverse collection of benchmark sets from the literature, with a total of 13035 original and derived reference data. Extensive comparisons are made with the results from established semiempirical methods (MNDO, AM1, PM3, PM6, and PM7) that also use the NDDO (neglect of diatomic differential overlap) integral approximation. Statistical evaluations show that the OMx and OMx-Dn methods outperform the other methods for most of the benchmark sets. PMID:26771261

  18. Photo- and radiation chemical studies of intermediates involved in excited-state electron-transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Excited-state inter- and intramolecular electron-transfer reactions lie at the heart of the most photochemical solar energy conversion schemes. The authors research, which has utilized the techniques of continuous and pulsed photolysis and radiolysis, has focused on three general aspects of these reactions involving transition metal coordination complexes and electron donor-acceptor complexes: i) the effect of solution medium on the properties and quenching of the excited states; ii) the control of the quantum yields of formation of redox products; iii) the mechanism by which reduced species interact with water to yield H2 homogeneously and heterogeneously. EDTA is among the most popular sacrificial electron donors used in model systems. Its role is to scavenge the oxidized form of the photosensitizer in order to prevent its rapid reaction with the reduced form of the electron relay species that results from the electron-transfer quenching of the excited photosensitizer. In systems involving MV2+, the radicals resulting from the oxidation of EDTA can eventually lead to the generation of a second equivalent of MV+; the reducing agent is believed to be a radical localized on the carbon atom alpha to the carboxylate group. The reaction of radiolytically-generated OH/H with EDTA produces this radical directly via H-abstraction or indirectly via deprotonation of the carbon atom adjacent to the nitrogen radical site in the oxidized amine moiety; it reduces MV2+ with rate constants of 2.8 x 109, 7.6 x 109, and 8.5 x 106M-1s-1 at pH 12.5, 8.3, and 4.7, respectively. Degradative decarboxylation of EDTA-radicals and their back electron-transfer reactions are enhanced in acidic solution causing the yield of MV+ to be severely diminished

  19. Increased regional homogeneity in internet addiction disorder: a resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jun; GAO Xue-ping; Isoken Osunde; LI Xin; ZHOU Shun-ke; ZHENG Hui-rong; LI Ling-jiang

    2010-01-01

    Background Internet addition disorder (lAD) is currently becoming a serious mental health problem among Chinese adolescents. The pathogenesis of IAD, however, remains unclear. The purpose of this study applied regional homogeneity (ReHo) method to analyze encephalic functional characteristic of IAD college students under resting state. Methods Functional magnetic resonanc image (fMRI) was performed in 19 IAD college students and 19 controls under resting state. ReHo method was used to analyze the differences between the average ReHo in two groups. Results The following increased ReHo brain regions were found in IAD group compared with control group: cerebellum,brainstem, right cingulate gyrus, bilateral parahippocampus, right frontal lobe (rectal gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus and middle frontal gyrus), left superior frontal gyrus, left precuneus, right postcentral gyrus, right middle occipital gyrus, right inferior temporal gyrus, left superior temporal gyrus and middle temporal gyrus. The decreased ReHo brain regions were not found in the IAD group compared with the control group. Conclusions There are abnormalities in regional homogeneity in IAD college students compared with the controls and enhancement of synchronization in most encephalic regions can be found. The results reflect the functional change of brain in IAD college students. The connections between the enhancement of synchronization among cerebellum, brainstem, limbic lobe, frontal lobe and apical lobe may be relative to reward pathways.

  20. A finite state model for respiratory motion analysis in image guided radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Huanmei [College of Computer and Information Science, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Sharp, Gregory C [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Salzberg, Betty [College of Computer and Information Science, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Kaeli, David [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Shirato, Hiroki [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Jiang, Steve B [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States)

    2004-12-07

    Effective image guided radiation treatment of a moving tumour requires adequate information on respiratory motion characteristics. For margin expansion, beam tracking and respiratory gating, the tumour motion must be quantified for pretreatment planning and monitored on-line. We propose a finite state model for respiratory motion analysis that captures our natural understanding of breathing stages. In this model, a regular breathing cycle is represented by three line segments, exhale, end-of-exhale and inhale, while abnormal breathing is represented by an irregular breathing state. In addition, we describe an on-line implementation of this model in one dimension. We found this model can accurately characterize a wide variety of patient breathing patterns. This model was used to describe the respiratory motion for 23 patients with peak-to-peak motion greater than 7 mm. The average root mean square error over all patients was less than 1 mm and no patient has an error worse than 1.5 mm. Our model provides a convenient tool to quantify respiratory motion characteristics, such as patterns of frequency changes and amplitude changes, and can be applied to internal or external motion, including internal tumour position, abdominal surface, diaphragm, spirometry and other surrogates.

  1. Measurements of the aerosol chemical composition and mixing state in the Po Valley using multiple spectroscopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decesari, S.; Allan, J.; Plass-Duelmer, C.; Williams, B. J.; Paglione, M.; Facchini, M. C.; O'Dowd, C.; Harrison, R. M.; Gietl, J. K.; Coe, H.; Giulianelli, L.; Gobbi, G. P.; Lanconelli, C.; Carbone, C.; Worsnop, D.; Lambe, A. T.; Ahern, A. T.; Moretti, F.; Tagliavini, E.; Elste, T.; Gilge, S.; Zhang, Y.; Dall'Osto, M.

    2014-11-01

    The use of co-located multiple spectroscopic techniques can provide detailed information on the atmospheric processes regulating aerosol chemical composition and mixing state. So far, field campaigns heavily equipped with aerosol mass spectrometers have been carried out mainly in large conurbations and in areas directly affected by their outflow, whereas lesser efforts have been dedicated to continental areas characterised by a less dense urbanisation. We present here the results obtained at a background site in the Po Valley, Italy, in summer 2009. For the first time in Europe, six state-of-the-art spectrometric techniques were used in parallel: aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS), two aerosol mass spectrometers (high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer - HR-ToF-AMS and soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer - SP-AMS), thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatography (TAG), chemical ionisation mass spectrometry (CIMS) and (offline) proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy. The results indicate that, under high-pressure conditions, atmospheric stratification at night and early morning hours led to the accumulation of aerosols produced by anthropogenic sources distributed over the Po Valley plain. Such aerosols include primary components such as black carbon (BC), secondary semivolatile compounds such as ammonium nitrate and amines and a class of monocarboxylic acids which correspond to the AMS cooking organic aerosol (COA) already identified in urban areas. In daytime, the entrainment of aged air masses in the mixing layer is responsible for the accumulation of low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA) and also for the recycling of non-volatile primary species such as black carbon. According to organic aerosol source apportionment, anthropogenic aerosols accumulating in the lower layers overnight accounted for 38% of organic aerosol mass on average, another 21% was accounted for by aerosols recirculated in

  2. Prediction of the Chapman-Jouguet chemical equilibrium state in a detonation wave from first principles based reactive molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Dezhou; Zybin, Sergey V; An, Qi; Goddard, William A; Huang, Fenglei

    2016-01-21

    The combustion or detonation of reacting materials at high temperature and pressure can be characterized by the Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) state that describes the chemical equilibrium of the products at the end of the reaction zone of the detonation wave for sustained detonation. This provides the critical properties and product kinetics for input to macroscale continuum simulations of energetic materials. We propose the ReaxFF Reactive Dynamics to CJ point protocol (Rx2CJ) for predicting the CJ state parameters, providing the means to predict the performance of new materials prior to synthesis and characterization, allowing the simulation based design to be done in silico. Our Rx2CJ method is based on atomistic reactive molecular dynamics (RMD) using the QM-derived ReaxFF force field. We validate this method here by predicting the CJ point and detonation products for three typical energetic materials. We find good agreement between the predicted and experimental detonation velocities, indicating that this method can reliably predict the CJ state using modest levels of computation. PMID:26688211

  3. Prediction of the Chapman-Jouguet chemical equilibrium state in a detonation wave from first principles based reactive molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Dezhou; Zybin, Sergey V; An, Qi; Goddard, William A; Huang, Fenglei

    2016-01-21

    The combustion or detonation of reacting materials at high temperature and pressure can be characterized by the Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) state that describes the chemical equilibrium of the products at the end of the reaction zone of the detonation wave for sustained detonation. This provides the critical properties and product kinetics for input to macroscale continuum simulations of energetic materials. We propose the ReaxFF Reactive Dynamics to CJ point protocol (Rx2CJ) for predicting the CJ state parameters, providing the means to predict the performance of new materials prior to synthesis and characterization, allowing the simulation based design to be done in silico. Our Rx2CJ method is based on atomistic reactive molecular dynamics (RMD) using the QM-derived ReaxFF force field. We validate this method here by predicting the CJ point and detonation products for three typical energetic materials. We find good agreement between the predicted and experimental detonation velocities, indicating that this method can reliably predict the CJ state using modest levels of computation.

  4. The study on temporal lobe epilepsy with single-voxel proton MR spectroscopy and chemical shift imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the value of different proton MR spectroscopy techniques including single-voxel spectroscopy (SVS) and chemical shift imaging (CSI) in diagnosing patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. Methods: Sixty cases (40 normal, 20 temporal lobe epilepsy) experienced SVS and CSI. The volume of interest (VOI) of SVS was placed over the anterior hippocampus formation (HF) region, including part of the head and body of the HF. The VOI of CSI encompassed bilateral HF and the head, body and tail of HF. The VOI was divided into 5 voxels from anterior to posterior. The metabolite data of both SVS and CSI were obtained and the ratios of NAA/Cr and NAA/(Cho+Cr) were recorded or calculated. Results: The ipsilateral hippocampus to the seizure of TLE patients had lower ratios of NAA/(Cho+Cr) and NAA/Cr, and the differences compared with those of the normal group and contralateral subgroup were statistically significant (F=41.958, P1HMRS study improved the diagnostic yield of MR evaluation in TLE patients. There was a correlation between the ratio of NAA/(Cho+Cr) and the location of HF. Regional variation must be considered when interpreting proton spectra of the HF. (author)

  5. Steady state anisotropy two-photon microscopy resolves multiple, spectrally similar fluorophores, enabling in vivo multilabel imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubach, J Matthew; Vinegoni, Claudio; Weissleder, Ralph

    2014-08-01

    The use of spectrally distinguishable fluorescent dyes enables imaging of multiple targets. However, in two-photon microscopy, the number of fluorescent labels with distinct emission spectra that can be effectively excited and resolved is constrained by the confined tuning range of the excitation laser and the broad and overlapping nature of fluorophore two-photon absorption spectra. This limitation effectively reduces the number of available imaging channels. Here, we demonstrate that two-photon steady state anisotropy imaging (2PSSA) offers the capability to resolve otherwise unresolvable fluorescent tracers both in live cells and in mouse tumor models. This approach expands the number of biological targets that can be imaged simultaneously, increasing the total amount of information that can be obtained through imaging.

  6. Steady-state acceptor fluorescence anisotropy imaging under evanescent excitation for visualisation of FRET at the plasma membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Devauges

    Full Text Available We present a novel imaging system combining total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF microscopy with measurement of steady-state acceptor fluorescence anisotropy in order to perform live cell Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET imaging at the plasma membrane. We compare directly the imaging performance of fluorescence anisotropy resolved TIRF with epifluorescence illumination. The use of high numerical aperture objective for TIRF required correction for induced depolarization factors. This arrangement enabled visualisation of conformational changes of a Raichu-Cdc42 FRET biosensor by measurement of intramolecular FRET between eGFP and mRFP1. Higher activity of the probe was found at the cell plasma membrane compared to intracellularly. Imaging fluorescence anisotropy in TIRF allowed clear differentiation of the Raichu-Cdc42 biosensor from negative control mutants. Finally, inhibition of Cdc42 was imaged dynamically in live cells, where we show temporal changes of the activity of the Raichu-Cdc42 biosensor.

  7. Radio Imaging Observations of PSR J1023+0038 in an LMXB State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deller, A. T.; Moldon, J.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Patruno, A.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Archibald, A. M.; Paragi, Z.; Heald, G.; Vilchez, N.

    2015-08-01

    The transitional millisecond pulsar (MSP) binary system PSR J1023+0038 re-entered an accreting state in 2013 June in which it bears many similarities to low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) in quiescence or near-quiescence. At a distance of just 1.37 kpc, PSR J1023+0038 offers an unsurpassed ability to study low-level accretion onto a highly magnetized compact object. We have monitored PSR J1023+0038 intensively using radio imaging with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array, the European VLBI Network and the Low Frequency Array, seeing rapidly variable, flat spectrum emission that persists over a period of six months. The flat spectrum and variability are indicative of synchrotron emission originating in an outflow from the system, most likely in the form of a compact, partially self-absorbed jet, as is seen in LMXBs at higher accretion rates. The radio brightness, however, greatly exceeds extrapolations made from observations of more vigorously accreting neutron star LMXB systems. We postulate that PSR J1023+0038 is undergoing radiatively inefficient “propeller-mode” accretion, with the jet carrying away a dominant fraction of the liberated accretion luminosity. We confirm that the enhanced γ-ray emission seen in PSR J1023+0038 since it re-entered an accreting state has been maintained; the increased γ-ray emission in this state can also potentially be associated with propeller-mode accretion. Similar accretion modes can be invoked to explain the radio and X-ray properties of the other two known transitional MSP systems XSS J12270-4859 and PSR J1824-2452I (M28I), suggesting that radiatively inefficient accretion may be a ubiquitous phenomenon among (at least one class of) neutron star binaries at low accretion rates.

  8. Chemical, colloidal and mechanical contributions to the state of water in wood cell walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertinetti, L.; Fratzl, P.; Zemb, T.

    2016-08-01

    The properties of wood depend strongly on its water content, but the physicochemical basis for the interaction of water with cell wall components is poorly understood. Due to the importance of the problem both in the context of wood technology and the biological function of swelling and dehydration for growth stresses and seed dispersal, a wealth of descriptive data has been accumulated but a microscopic theory of water-biomolecular interactions is missing. We develop here, at a primitive level, a minimal parameter-free, coarse-grained, model of wood secondary cell walls to predict water absorption, in the form of an equation of state. It includes for the first time all three—mechanical, colloidal and chemical—contributions, taking into account the cell walls microstructure. The hydration force around the elongated cellulose crystals and entropy of mixing of the matrix polymers (hemicelluloses and lignin) are the dominant contributions driving the swelling. The elastic energy needed to swell the composite is the main term opposing water uptake. Hysteresis is not predicted but water uptake versus humidity, is reproduced in a large temperature range. Within this framework, the origin of wood dissolution and different effects of wood treatments on water sorption can be understood at the molecular level.

  9. Feasibility and limitation of constructive interference in steady-state (CISS) MR imaging in neonates with lumbosacral myeloschisis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate three-dimensional Fourier transformation-constructive interference in steady-state (CISS) imaging as a preoperative anatomical evaluation of the relationship between the placode, spinal nerve roots, CSF space, and the myelomeningocele sac in neonates with lumbosacral myeloschisis. Five consecutive patients with lumbosacral myeloschisis were included in this study. Magnetic resonance (MR) CISS, conventional T1-weighted (T1-W) and T2-weighted (T2-W) images were acquired on the day of birth to compare the anatomical findings with each sequence. We also performed curvilinear reconstruction of the CISS images, which can be reconstructed along the curved spinal cord and neural placode. Neural placodes were demonstrated in two patients on T1-W images and in three patients on T2-W images. T2-W images revealed a small number of nerve roots in two patients, while no nerve roots were demonstrated on T1-W images. In contrast, CISS images clearly demonstrated neural placodes and spinal nerve roots in four patients. These findings were in accordance with intraoperative findings. Curvilinear CISS images demonstrated the neuroanatomy around the myeloschisis in one slice. The resulting images were degraded by a band artifact that obstructed fine anatomical analysis of the nerve roots in the ventral CSF space. The placode and nerve roots could not be visualized in one patient in whom the CSF space was narrow due to the collapse of the myelomeningocele sac. MR CISS imaging is superior to T1-W and T2-W imaging for demonstrating the neural placode and nerve roots, although problems remain in terms of artifacts. (orig.)

  10. Unconditionally stable, second-order accurate schemes for solid state phase transformations driven by mechano-chemical spinodal decomposition

    CERN Document Server

    Sagiyama, Koki; Garikipati, Krishna

    2015-01-01

    We consider solid state phase transformations that are caused by free energy densities with domains of non-convexity in strain-composition space. We refer to the non-convex domains as mechano-chemical spinodals. The non-convexity with respect to composition causes segregation into phases with different crystal structures. If, for one of these crystal structures, the free energy density is also non-convex with respect to strain, there is potential for the corresponding phase to further separate into multiple variants. For mathematical well-posedness the free energy description must be enhanced by interface terms that penalize gradients with respect to strain and composition. A system of PDEs results that couples the classical Cahn-Hilliard equation with those of gradient elasticity. Since the materials systems of interest display finite strains, the appropriate description is Toupin's theory of gradient elasticity at finite strains. The presence of strain and composition gradients in the free energy density le...

  11. New Patterns in Steady-State Chemical Kinetics: Intersections, Coincidences, Map of Events (Two-Step Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Branco Pinto

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available New patterns of steady-state chemical kinetics for continuously stirred-tank reactors (CSTR have been found, i.e., intersections, maxima and coincidences, for two-step mechanism A↔B→C. There were found elegant analytical relationships for characteristics of these patterns (space times, values of concentrations and rates allowing kinetic parameters to be easily determined. It was demonstrated that for the pair of species involved into the irreversible reaction (B and C, the space time of their corresponding concentration dependence intersection is invariant and does not depend on the initial conditions of the system. Maps of patterns are presented for visualization of their combinations and ranking in space time, and values of concentration and rates.

  12. Sensitivity Amplification in the Phosphorylation-Dephosphorylation Cycle: Nonequilibrium steady states, chemical master equation and temporal cooperativity

    CERN Document Server

    Ge, Hao

    2009-01-01

    A new type of cooperativity termed temporal cooperativity [Biophys. Chem. 105 585-593 (2003), Annu. Rev. Phys. Chem. 58 113-142 (2007)], emerges in the signal transduction module of phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle (PdPC). It utilizes multiple kinetic cycles in time, in contrast to allosteric cooperativity that utilizes multiple subunits in a protein. In the present paper, we thoroughly investigate both the deterministic (microscopic) and stochastic (mesoscopic) models, and focus on the identification of the source of temporal cooperativity via comparing with allosteric cooperativity. A thermodynamic analysis confirms again the claim that the chemical equilibrium state exists if and only if the phosphorylation potential $\\triangle G=0$, in which case the amplification of sensitivity is completely abolished. Then we provide comprehensive theoretical and numerical analysis with the first-order and zero-order assumptions in phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle respectively. Furthermore, it is interesti...

  13. Some Physico-Chemical and Bacteriological Characteristics of Soil Samples around Calabar Metropolis, Cross River State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okorafor, K. A

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Physico-chemical and bacteriological parameters of soil samples around Calabar Metropolis, Cross River State, Nigeria were examined to determine the pollution status of the soil quality. Results of the physico-chemical analysis showed that the soil samples had pH range of 4.4 – 5.2. Tinapa soil has the highest value of Copper (39.63mg/kg and Nickel (11.36mg/kg and Anantigha has the highest value of Zinc (14.59mg/kg, Iron Fe (78.19mg/kg and Manganese (47.42mg/kg. The results revealed a high total count of 23.5x106 cfu/g in Anantigha and 24.5x10-3 cfu/g in Tinapa for bacteria and fungi respectively. Some bacteria isolates found during the study includes, Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilus, Clostridium sp, Arthrobacter sp, Streptomyces sp, Nocardia sp, Pseudomonas sp and Micrococcus sp., and Fungal isolates includes, Actinomycete sp, Verticullium sp, Aspergillus sp, Mucor sp, Nigospora sp and Paecilomyces sp. From the result, soil sample from Anantigha have comparatively the highest Total Bacterial Counts compared to the other two locations. The health implications of this work is that Anantigha and Tinapa areas being low lying were likely, because of the presence of Escherichia coli, to experience gastro-intestinal diseases such as dysentery and cholera than the Ediba environments.

  14. The modelling of dynamic chemical state of paper machine unit operations; Dynaamisen kemiallisen tilan mallintaminen paperikoneen yksikkoeoperaatioissa - MPKT 04

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ylen, J.P.; Jutila, P. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland)

    1998-12-31

    The chemical state of paper mass is considered to be a key factor to the smooth operation of the paper machine. There are simulators that have been developed either for dynamic energy and mass balances or for static chemical phenomena, but the combination of these is not a straight forward task. Control Engineering Laboratory of Helsinki University of Technology has studied the paper machine wet end phenomena with the emphasis on pH-modelling. VTT (Technical Research Centre of Finland) Process Physics has used thermodynamical modelling successfully in e.g. Bleaching processes. In this research the different approaches are combined in order to get reliable dynamical models and modelling procedures for various unit operations. A flexible pilot process will be constructed and different materials will be processed starting from simple inorganic substances (e.g. Calcium carbonate and distilled water) working towards more complex masses (thick pulp with process waters and various reagents). The pilot process is well instrumented with ion selective electrodes, total calcium analysator and all basic measurements. (orig.)

  15. Chemical and Sensory Evaluation of Bread Sold in Benue and Nasarawa States of Central Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.O. Eke

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The proximate composition, vitamin and mineral contents as well as sensory properties of some selected brands of bread sold in Benue and Nasarawa States were determined using standard methods of analysis. Fresh loaves of six of the most popular brands of bread, three from Benue (Top choice, Ostrich, Tito and three from Nasarawa (Emziler, Canaan, Gods Promise, constituting samples A-F, were purchased from the respective bread factories within 4hrs of their production and used for the investigation. There were significant differences (p<0.05 in proximate composition with values ranging from 30.21-35.07% (moisture, 8.74-14.22% (crude protein, 2.00-8.10% (crude fat, 0.71-1.05% (crude fibre, 6.00-7.93% (ash and 35.81-48.18% (carbohydrate, thus showing compliance with Standards Organisation of Nigeria (SON specifications, especially in terms of moisture, protein, crude fibre and carbohydrate contents. The fat and ash contents of most of the bread samples were far above the specifications of 2.00% and 0.60% maximum, respectively. The mineral and vitamin contents were found to be quite high in all the bread samples. Sensory evaluation showed that sample C (Tito was the most preferred followed by sample E, A, B, D in that order. Sample F (Gods Promise was the least preferred in terms of sensory evaluation, but showed the highest compliance to SON specifications in terms of proximate composition. All the bread samples were found to be very rich in macro-and micro-nutrients.

  16. Crustal diversity of the Moon: Compositional analyses of Galileo solid state imaging data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieters, C. M.; Sunshine, J. M.; Fischer, E. M.; Murchie, S. L.; Belton, M.; McEwen, A.; Gaddis, L.; Greeley, R.; Neukum, G.; Jaumann, R.; Hoffmann, H.

    1993-09-01

    The multispectral images of the lunar limb and farside obtained by the solid state imaging (SSI) system on board the Galileo spacecraft provide the first new pulse of compositional data of the Moon by a spacecraft in well over a decade. The wavelength range covered by SSI filters (0.4-1.0 μm) is particularly sensitive to the composition of mare basalts, the abundance of mafic (ferrous) minerals, and the maturity of the regolith. To a first order, the limb and farside material is consistent with previous characterization of nearside lunar spectral types for mare and highland soils and craters. Most basalts are of an intermediate TiO2 composition and most of the highland crust is feldspathic with local variations in mafic content identified principally at impact craters. Dark mantling material on the farside can be interpreted in terms of known properties of lunar pyroclastic glass. Regions of cryptomare are shown to have spectral properties intermediate between those of highland and mare soils, as would be expected from mixture of the two. There are several important exceptions and surprises, however. Unlike the basalt types identified on the nearside, limb and farside basalts exhibit an exceptionally weak 1 μm ferrous absorption band. This may indicate a compositionally distinct lunar basalt group that, for example, is more Mg-rich than most basalts of the nearside. Some of the most notable compositional anomalies are associated with South Pole-Aitken Basin. This large region has a much lower albedo than surrounding highlands. The inner, darkest, portion of the basin exhibits optical properties indistinguishable from low-Ti basalts. Deposits to the south exhibit unique properties with a strong and broad ferrous 1 μm absorption, most consistent with abundant olivine. The unusual compositions associated with South Pole-Aitken and their spatial extent suggests the impact creating this huge lunar basin excavated mafic-rich lower crust or perhaps mantle material.

  17. Synchrotron-based multiple-beam FTIR chemical imaging of a multi-layered polymer in transmission and reflection: towards cultural heritage applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Miriam; Mattson, Eric; Schmidt Patterson, Catherine; Alavi, Zahrasadet; Carson, David; Hirschmugl, Carol J.

    2013-04-01

    IRENI (infrared environmental imaging) is a recently commissioned Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) chemical imaging beamline at the Synchrotron Radiation Center in Madison, WI, USA. This novel beamline extracts 320 mrad of radiation, horizontally, from one bending magnet. The optical transport separates and recombines the beam into 12 parallel collimated beams to illuminate a commercial FTIR microspectrometer (Bruker Hyperion 3000) equipped with a focal plane array detector where single pixels in the detector image a projected sample area of either 0.54×0.54 μm2 or 2×2 μm2, depending in the measurement geometry. The 12 beams are partially overlapped and defocused, similar to wide-field microscopy, homogeneously illuminating a relatively large sample area compared to single-beam arrangements. Both transmission and reflection geometries are used to examine a model cross section from a layered polymer material. The compromises for sample preparation and measurement strategies are discussed, and the chemical composition and spatial definition of the layers are distinguished in chemical images generated from data sets. Deconvolution methods that may allow more detailed data analysis are also discussed.

  18. Chemical composition, mixing state, size and morphology of Ice nucleating particles at the Jungfraujoch research station, Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Martin; Worringen, Annette; Kandler, Konrad; Weinbruch, Stephan; Schenk, Ludwig; Mertes, Stephan; Schmidt, Susan; Schneider, Johannes; Frank, Fabian; Nilius, Björn; Danielczok, Anja; Bingemer, Heinz

    2014-05-01

    An intense field campaign from the Ice Nuclei Research Unit (INUIT) was performed in January and February of 2013 at the High-Alpine Research Station Jungfraujoch (3580 m a.s.l., Switzerland). Main goal was the assessment of microphysical and chemical properties of free-tropospheric ice-nucelating particles. The ice-nucleating particles were discriminated from the total aerosol with the 'Fast Ice Nucleation CHamber' (FINCH; University Frankfurt) and the 'Ice-Selective Inlet' (ISI, Paul Scherer Institute) followed by a pumped counter-stream virtual impactor. The separated ice-nucleating particles were then collected with a nozzle-type impactor. With the 'FRankfurt Ice nuclei Deposition freezinG Experiment' (FRIDGE), aerosol particles are sampled on a silicon wafer, which is than exposed to ice-activating conditions in a static diffusion chamber. The locations of the growing ice crystals are recorded for later analysis. Finally, with the ICE Counter-stream Virtual Impactor (ICE-CVI) atmospheric ice crystals are separated from the total aerosol and their water content is evaporated to retain the ice residual particles, which are then collected also by impactor sampling. All samples were analyzed in a high-resolution scanning electron microscope. By this method, for each particle its size, morphology, mixing-state and chemical composition is obtained. In total approximately 1700 ice nucleating particles were analyzed. Based on their chemical composition, the particles were classified into seven groups: silicates, metal oxides, Ca-rich particles, (aged) sea-salt, soot, sulphates and carbonaceous matter. Sea-salt is considered as artifact and is not regarded as ice nuclei here. The most frequent ice nucleating particles/ice residuals at the Jungfraujoch station are silicates > carbonaceous particles > metal oxides. Calcium-rich particles and soot play a minor role. Similar results are obtained by quasi-parallel measurements with an online single particle laser ablation

  19. Cranial nerve assessment in cavernous sinus tumors with contrast-enhanced 3D fast-imaging employing steady-state acquisition MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amemiya, Shiori; Aoki, Shigeki; Ohtomo, Kuni [University of Tokyo, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2009-07-15

    The purpose of this study is to apply contrast-enhanced 3D fast-imaging employing steady-state acquisition (3D-FIESTA) imaging to the evaluation of cranial nerves (CN) in patients with cavernous sinus tumors. Contrast-enhanced 3D-FIESTA images were acquired from ten patients with cavernous sinus tumors with a 3-T unit. In all cases, the trigeminal nerve with tumor involvement was easily identified in the cavernous portions. Although oculomotor and abducens nerves were clearly visualized against the tumor area with intense contrast enhancement, they were hardly identifiable within the area lacking contrast enhancement. The trochlear nerve was visualized in part, but not delineated as a linear structure outside of the lesion. Contrast-enhanced 3D-FIESTA can be useful in the assessment of cranial nerves in and around the cavernous sinus with tumor involvement. (orig.)

  20. Imaging the photodissociation dynamics of the methyl radical from the 3s and 3pz Rydberg states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marggi Poullain, Sonia; Chicharro, David V; Zanchet, Alexandre; González, Marta G; Rubio-Lago, Luis; Senent, María L; García-Vela, Alberto; Bañares, Luis

    2016-06-22

    The photodissociation dynamics of the methyl radical from the 3s and 3pz Rydberg states have been studied using the velocity map and slice ion imaging in combination with pump-probe nanosecond laser pulses. The reported translational energy and angular distributions of the H((2)S) photofragment detected by (2+1) REMPI highlight different dissociation mechanisms for the 3s and 3pz Rydberg states. A narrow peak in the translational energy distribution and an anisotropic angular distribution characterize the fast 3s photodissociation, while for the 3pz state Boltzmann-type translational energy and isotropic angular distributions are found. High level ab initio calculations have been performed in order to elucidate the photodissociation mechanisms from the two Rydberg states and to rationalize the experimental results. The calculated potential energy curves highlight a typical predissociation mechanism for the 3s state, characterized by the coupling between the 3s Rydberg state and a valence repulsive state. On the other hand, the photodissociation on the 3pz state is initiated by a predissociation process due to the coupling between the 3pz Rydberg state and a valence repulsive state and constrained, later on, by two conical intersections that allow the system to relax to lower electronic states. Such a mechanism opens up different reaction pathways leading to CH2 photofragments in different electronic states and inducing a transfer of energy between translational and internal modes.