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Sample records for chemical state image

  1. Chemical imaging and solid state analysis at compact surfaces using UV imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Jian X.; Rehder, Sönke; van den Berg, Frans;

    2014-01-01

    Fast non-destructive multi-wavelength UV imaging together with multivariate image analysis was utilized to visualize distribution of chemical components and their solid state form at compact surfaces. Amorphous and crystalline solid forms of the antidiabetic compound glibenclamide...... and excipients in a non-invasive way, as well as mapping the glibenclamide solid state form. An exploratory data analysis supported the critical evaluation of the mapping results and the selection of model parameters for the chemical mapping. The present study demonstrated that the multi-wavelength UV imaging...

  2. Chemical-state imaging of Li using scanning Auger electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, Nobuyuki, E-mail: ISHIDA.Nobuyuki@nims.go.jp [Global Research Center for Environment and Energy based on Nanomaterials Science (GREEN), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Fujita, Daisuke [Global Research Center for Environment and Energy based on Nanomaterials Science (GREEN), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Advanced Nanocharacterization Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: •Scanning Auger electron microscopy is used to image chemical states of Li. •The combined use of AES and EELS signals for the elemental mapping is powerful. •Distribution corresponding to metallic and oxidized states of Li can be imaged. -- Abstract: The demand for measurement tools to detect Li with high spatial resolution and precise chemical sensitivity is increasing with the spread of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) for use in a wide range of applications. In this work, scanning Auger electron microscopy (SAM) is used to image chemical states of a partially oxidized Li surface on the basis of the Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) data obtained during an oxidation process of a metal Li. We show that distribution of metallic and oxidized states of Li is clearly imaged by mapping the intensity of the corresponding AES and EELS peaks. Furthermore, a tiny difference in the extent of oxidation can be distinguished by comparing the elemental map of an AES peak with that of an EELS peak owing to the different behaviors of those signals to the chemical states of Li.

  3. Chemical Imaging of Ambient Aerosol Particles: Observational Constraints on Mixing State Parameterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, Rachel; Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander; Riemer, Nicole; West, Matthew; Zhang, Qi; Sun, Yele; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Alpert, Peter A.; Knopf, Daniel A.; Gilles, Mary K.; Moffet, Ryan

    2015-09-28

    A new parameterization for quantifying the mixing state of aerosol populations has been applied for the first time to samples of ambient particles analyzed using spectro-microscopy techniques. Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy/near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (STXM/NEXAFS) and computer controlled scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (CCSEM/EDX) were used to probe the composition of the organic and inorganic fraction of individual particles collected on June 27th and 28th during the 2010 Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects (CARES) study in the Central Valley, California. The first field site, T0, was located in downtown Sacramento, while T1 was located near the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Mass estimates of the aerosol particle components were used to calculate mixing state metrics, such as the particle-specific diversity, bulk population diversity, and mixing state index, for each sample. Both microscopy imaging techniques showed more changes over these two days in the mixing state at the T0 site than at the T1 site. The STXM data showed evidence of changes in the mixing state associated with a build-up of organic matter confirmed by collocated measurements and the largest impact on the mixing state was due to an increase in soot dominant particles during this build-up. The CCSEM/EDX analysis showed the presence of two types of particle populations; the first was dominated by aged sea salt particles and had a higher mixing state index (indicating a more homogeneous population), the second was dominated by carbonaceous particles and had a lower mixing state index.

  4. Acoustic Imaging of Microstructure and Evaluation of the Adhesive's Physical, Mechanical and Chemical Properties Changes at Different Cure States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severina, I. A.; Fabre, A. J.; Maeva, E. Yu.

    Epoxy thermoset adhesives transform during cure from liquid state into the highly cross-linked solid. Cure state of the material depends on condition of the reaction (temperature, pressure, time etc.) and resin/hardener ratio. It is known that the cure degree of the adhesive correlates with adhesion strength, which is critical for structural adhesives used in automotive, aerospace and marine industries. In this work, characterization of cure process of the adhesive with acoustic methods is presented. Evolution of the acoustic and elastic properties (attenuation, sound velocity, density, elastic moduli) during cure reaction was monitored in relation to the substantial physical and chemical changes of the material. These macro parameters of the adhesive were compared with the material's microstructure obtained by high-resolution acoustic microscopy technique in frequencies range of 50-400 MHz. Development of the microstructure of the adhesive as it cures at different conditions has been investigated. Appearance and development of the granular structure on the adhesive interface during cure reaction has been demonstrated. Acoustic images were analyzed by mathematical method to quantitatively characterize distribution of the adhesive's components. Statistical analysis of such images provides an accurate quantitative measure of the degree of cure of such samples. Research results presented in this paper can be useful as a basis for non-destructive evaluation of the adhesive materials

  5. Chemical imaging of ambient aerosol particles: Observational constraints on mixing state parameterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Rachel E.; Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander; Riemer, Nicole; West, Matthew; Zhang, Qi; Sun, Yele; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Alpert, Peter; Knopf, Daniel A.; Gilles, Mary K.; Moffet, Ryan C.

    2015-09-01

    A new parameterization for quantifying the mixing state of aerosol populations has been applied for the first time to samples of ambient particles analyzed using spectro-microscopy techniques. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy/near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (STXM/NEXAFS) and computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (CCSEM/EDX) were used to probe the composition of the organic and inorganic fraction of individual particles collected on 27 and 28 June during the 2010 Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects study in the Central Valley, California. The first field site, T0, was located in downtown Sacramento, while T1 was located near the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Mass estimates of the aerosol particle components were used to calculate mixing state metrics, such as the particle-specific diversity, bulk population diversity, and mixing state index, for each sample. The STXM data showed evidence of changes in the mixing state associated with a buildup of organic matter confirmed by collocated measurements, and the largest impact on the mixing state was due to an increase in soot dominant particles during this buildup. The mixing state from STXM was similar between T0 and T1, indicating that the increased organic fraction at T1 had a small effect on the mixing state of the population. The CCSEM/EDX analysis showed the presence of two types of particle populations: the first was dominated by aged sea-salt particles and had a higher mixing state index (indicating a more homogeneous population); the second was dominated by carbonaceous particles and had a lower mixing state index.

  6. Outpatient Imaging Efficiency - State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Use of medical imaging - state data. These measures give you information about hospitals' use of medical imaging tests for outpatients. Examples of medical imaging...

  7. Tobacco and chemicals (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Some of the chemicals associated with tobacco smoke include ammonia, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, propane, methane, acetone, hydrogen cyanide and various carcinogens. Other chemicals that are associated with chewing ...

  8. Soft X-ray imaging and spectromicroscopy: new insights in chemical state and morphology of the key components in operating fuel-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzini, Benedetto; Abyaneh, Majid Kazemian; Amati, Matteo; Gianoncelli, Alessandra; Gregoratti, Luca; Kaulich, Burkhard; Kiskinova, Maya

    2012-08-13

    Fuel cells are one of the most appealing environmentally friendly devices for the effective conversion of chemical energy into electricity and heat, but still there are key barriers to their broad commercialization. In addition to efficiency, a major challenge of fuel-cell technology is the durability of the key components (interconnects, electrodes, and electrolytes) that can be subject to corrosion or undesired morphology and chemical changes occurring under operating conditions. The complementary capabilities of synchrotron-based soft X-ray microscopes in terms of imaging, spectroscopy, spatial and time resolution, and variable probing depths are opening unique opportunities to shed light on the multiple processes occurring in these complex systems at microscopic length scales. This type of information is prerequisite for understanding and controlling the performance and durability of such devices. This paper reviews the most recent efforts in the implementation of these methods for exploring the evolving structure and chemical composition of some key fuel cell components. Recent achievements are illustrated by selected results obtained with simplified versions of proton-exchange fuel-cells (PEFC) and solid-oxide fuel-cells (SOFC), which allow in situ monitoring of the redox reactions resulting in: 1) undesired deposits at interconnects and electrodes (PEFC); 2) material interactions at the electrode-electrolyte interface (PEFC); 3) release of corrosion products to the electrolyte phase (PEFC, and 4) mass-transport processes and structural changes occurring at the high operation temperatures of SOFC and promoted by the polarization.

  9. Chemical Implementation of Finite-State Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjelmfelt, Allen; Weinberger, Edward D.; Ross, John

    1992-01-01

    With methods developed in a prior article on the chemical kinetic implementation of a McCulloch-Pitts neuron, connections among neurons, logic gates, and a clocking mechanism, we construct examples of clocked finite-state machines. These machines include a binary decoder, a binary adder, and a stack memory. An example of the operation of the binary adder is given, and the chemical concentrations corresponding to the state of each chemical neuron are followed in time. Using these methods, we can, in principle, construct a universal Turing machine, and these chemical networks inherit the halting problem

  10. QCLs and the future of IR chemical imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlette, Jeremy A.; Fotheringham, Edeline; Weida, Miles J.; Chapman, William B.; Larson, Paul; Day, Tiim

    2016-09-01

    High-fidelity, broadly-tunable quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) are replacing thermal light sources in next-generation infrared chemical imaging and microscopy instrumentation. Their superior spectral brightness, beam quality, and reliability are enabling new applications in biomedical, pharmaceutical, and industrial markets which demand substantially better noise performance, higher throughput, and ease-of-use. In this talk we will discuss the state-of-the-art in QCL source technology and describe our systems approach to leveraging QCL sources in the next-generation of infrared chemical imaging microscopes.

  11. Visualizing Chemistry: The Progess and Promise of Advanced Chemical Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Committee on Revealing Chemistry Through Advanced Chemical Imaging

    2006-09-01

    The field of chemical imaging can provide detailed structural, functional, and applicable information about chemistry and chemical engineering phenomena that have enormous impacts on medicine, materials, and technology. In recognizing the potential for more research development in the field of chemical imaging, the National Academies was asked by the National Science Foundation, Department of Energy, U.S. Army, and National Cancer Institute to complete a study that would review the current state of molecular imaging technology, point to promising future developments and their applications, and suggest a research and educational agenda to enable breakthrough improvements in the ability to image molecular processes simultaneously in multiple physical dimensions as well as time. The study resulted in a consensus report that provides guidance for a focused research and development program in chemical imaging and identifies research needs and possible applications of imaging technologies that can provide the breakthrough knowledge in chemistry, materials science, biology, and engineering for which we should strive. Public release of this report is expected in early October.

  12. Nanoscale chemical imaging by photoinduced force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Derek; Morrison, William; Wickramasinghe, H. Kumar; Jahng, Junghoon; Potma, Eric; Wan, Lei; Ruiz, Ricardo; Albrecht, Thomas R.; Schmidt, Kristin; Frommer, Jane; Sanders, Daniel P.; Park, Sung

    2016-01-01

    Correlating spatial chemical information with the morphology of closely packed nanostructures remains a challenge for the scientific community. For example, supramolecular self-assembly, which provides a powerful and low-cost way to create nanoscale patterns and engineered nanostructures, is not easily interrogated in real space via existing nondestructive techniques based on optics or electrons. A novel scanning probe technique called infrared photoinduced force microscopy (IR PiFM) directly measures the photoinduced polarizability of the sample in the near field by detecting the time-integrated force between the tip and the sample. By imaging at multiple IR wavelengths corresponding to absorption peaks of different chemical species, PiFM has demonstrated the ability to spatially map nm-scale patterns of the individual chemical components of two different types of self-assembled block copolymer films. With chemical-specific nanometer-scale imaging, PiFM provides a powerful new analytical method for deepening our understanding of nanomaterials. PMID:27051870

  13. Chemical state speciation by resonant Raman scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Karydas, A G; Zarkadas, C; Paradelis, T; Kallithrakas-Kontos, N

    2002-01-01

    In the resonant Raman scattering (RRS) process the emitted photon exhibits a continuous energy distribution with a high energy cutoff limit. This cutoff energy depends on the chemical state of the element under examination. In the present work, the possibility of identifying the chemical state of V atoms by employing RRS spectroscopy with a semiconductor Si(Li) detector is investigated. A proton induced Cr K alpha x-ray beam was used as the incident radiation, having a fixed energy lower than the V K-absorption edge. The net RRS distributions extracted from the energy dispersive spectra of metallic V and its compound targets were simulated by an appropriate theoretical model. The results showed the possibility of employing RRS spectroscopy with a semiconductor detector for chemical speciation studies.

  14. X-ray photon-in/photon-out methods for chemical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcus, Matthew A.

    2010-03-24

    Most interesting materials in nature are heterogeneous, so it is useful to have analytical techniques with spatial resolution sufficient to resolve these heterogeneities.This article presents the basics of X-ray photon-in/photon-out chemical imaging. This family of methods allows one to derive images reflectingthe chemical state of a given element in a complex sample, at micron or deep sub-micron scale. X-ray chemical imaging is relatively non-destructiveand element-selective, and requires minimal sample preparation. The article presents the basic concepts and some considerations of data takingand data analysis, along with some examples.

  15. [Application possibilities of chemical imaging in pharmaceutical technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajna, Balázs; Nagy, Zsombor; Patyi, Gergo; Zsigmond, Zsolt; Antal, István; Marosi, György

    2009-01-01

    Chemical imaging is a novel analytical method that simultaneously delivers spatial, chemical, structural, and functional information on the dosage forms. Both infrared and Raman spectroscopic imaging may serve as useful nondestructive analytical techniques in the pharmaceutical product development and quality control. Most important application possibilities are reviewed and some studies demonstrate the advantages of the structure exploration. Raman imaging is suitable to understand and control the quality attributes of different dosage forms.

  16. Computational chemical imaging for cardiovascular pathology: chemical microscopic imaging accurately determines cardiac transplant rejection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saumya Tiwari

    Full Text Available Rejection is a common problem after cardiac transplants leading to significant number of adverse events and deaths, particularly in the first year of transplantation. The gold standard to identify rejection is endomyocardial biopsy. This technique is complex, cumbersome and requires a lot of expertise in the correct interpretation of stained biopsy sections. Traditional histopathology cannot be used actively or quickly during cardiac interventions or surgery. Our objective was to develop a stain-less approach using an emerging technology, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopic imaging to identify different components of cardiac tissue by their chemical and molecular basis aided by computer recognition, rather than by visual examination using optical microscopy. We studied this technique in assessment of cardiac transplant rejection to evaluate efficacy in an example of complex cardiovascular pathology. We recorded data from human cardiac transplant patients' biopsies, used a Bayesian classification protocol and developed a visualization scheme to observe chemical differences without the need of stains or human supervision. Using receiver operating characteristic curves, we observed probabilities of detection greater than 95% for four out of five histological classes at 10% probability of false alarm at the cellular level while correctly identifying samples with the hallmarks of the immune response in all cases. The efficacy of manual examination can be significantly increased by observing the inherent biochemical changes in tissues, which enables us to achieve greater diagnostic confidence in an automated, label-free manner. We developed a computational pathology system that gives high contrast images and seems superior to traditional staining procedures. This study is a prelude to the development of real time in situ imaging systems, which can assist interventionists and surgeons actively during procedures.

  17. Penn State's Visual Image User Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisciotta, Henry A.; Dooris, Michael J.; Frost, James; Halm, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The Visual Image User Study (VIUS), an extensive needs assessment project at Penn State University, describes academic users of pictures and their perceptions. These findings outline the potential market for digital images and list the likely determinates of whether or not a system will be used. They also explain some key user requirements for…

  18. Forensic analysis of bicomponent fibers using infrared chemical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Katherine; O'Leary, Robyn; Roux, Claude; Reedy, Brian J

    2006-05-01

    The application of infrared chemical imaging to the analysis of bicomponent fibers was evaluated. Eleven nominally bicomponent fibers were examined either side-on or in cross-section. In six of the 11 samples, infrared chemical imaging was able to spatially resolve two spectroscopically distinct regions when the fibers were examined side-on. As well as yielding characteristic infrared spectra of each component, the technique also provided images that clearly illustrated the side-by-side configuration of these components in the fiber. In one case it was possible to prepare and image a cross-section of the fiber, but in general the preparation of fiber cross-sections proved very difficult. In five of the 11 samples, the infrared spectra could be used to identify the overall chemical composition of the fibers, according to a published classification scheme, but the fiber components could not be spatially resolved. Difficulties that are inherent to conventional "single-point" infrared spectroscopy, such as interference fringing and sloping baselines, particularly when analyzing acrylic type fibers, were also encountered in the infrared chemical image analysis of bicomponent fibers. A number of infrared sampling techniques were investigated to overcome these problems, and recommendations for the best sampling technique are given. Chemical imaging results were compared with those obtained using conventional fiber microscopy techniques.

  19. Automated extraction of chemical structure information from digital raster images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shedden Kerby A

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To search for chemical structures in research articles, diagrams or text representing molecules need to be translated to a standard chemical file format compatible with cheminformatic search engines. Nevertheless, chemical information contained in research articles is often referenced as analog diagrams of chemical structures embedded in digital raster images. To automate analog-to-digital conversion of chemical structure diagrams in scientific research articles, several software systems have been developed. But their algorithmic performance and utility in cheminformatic research have not been investigated. Results This paper aims to provide critical reviews for these systems and also report our recent development of ChemReader – a fully automated tool for extracting chemical structure diagrams in research articles and converting them into standard, searchable chemical file formats. Basic algorithms for recognizing lines and letters representing bonds and atoms in chemical structure diagrams can be independently run in sequence from a graphical user interface-and the algorithm parameters can be readily changed-to facilitate additional development specifically tailored to a chemical database annotation scheme. Compared with existing software programs such as OSRA, Kekule, and CLiDE, our results indicate that ChemReader outperforms other software systems on several sets of sample images from diverse sources in terms of the rate of correct outputs and the accuracy on extracting molecular substructure patterns. Conclusion The availability of ChemReader as a cheminformatic tool for extracting chemical structure information from digital raster images allows research and development groups to enrich their chemical structure databases by annotating the entries with published research articles. Based on its stable performance and high accuracy, ChemReader may be sufficiently accurate for annotating the chemical database with links

  20. The Galileo Solid-State Imaging experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belton, Michael J. S.; Klaasen, Kenneth P.; Clary, Maurice C.; Anderson, James L.; Anger, Clifford D.; Carr, Michael H.; Chapman, Clark R.; Davies, Merton E.; Greeley, Ronald; Anderson, Donald

    1992-01-01

    The Galileo Orbiter's Solid-State Imaging (SSI) experiment uses a 1.5-m focal length TV camera with 800 x 800 pixel, virtual-phase CCD detector in order to obtain images of Jupiter and its satellites which possess a combination of sensitivity levels, spatial resolutions, geometric fidelity, and spectral range that are unmatched by earlier imaging data. After describing the performance of this equipment on the basis of ground calibrations, attention is given to the SSI experiment's Jupiter system observation objectives; these encompass atmospheric science, satellite surfaces, ring structure, and 'darkside' experiments.

  1. Chemically Specific Cellular Imaging of Biofilm Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herberg, J L; Schaldach, C; Horn, J; Gjersing, E; Maxwell, R

    2006-02-09

    complicated organism, we needed to first turn our attention to a well understood organism. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is a well-studied organism and will be used to compare our results with others. Then, we will turn our attention to TD. It is expected that the research performed will provide key data to validate biochemical studies of TD and result in high profile publications in leading journals. For this project, our ultimate goal was to combine both Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experimental analysis with computer simulations to provide unique 3D molecular structural, dynamics, and functional information on the order of microns for this DOE mission relevant microorganism, T. denitrificans. For FY05, our goals were to: (1) Determine proper media for optimal growth of PA; growth rate measurements in that media and characterization of metabolite signatures during growth via {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR, (2) Determine and build mineral, metal, and implant material surfaces to support growth of PA, (3) Implementing new MRI sequences to image biofilms more efficiently and increase resolution with new hardware design, (4) Develop further diffusion and flow MRI measurements of biofilms and biofilm formation with different MRI pulse sequences and different hardware design, and (5) Develop a zero dimension model of the rate of growth and the metabolite profiles of PA. Our major accomplishments are discussed in the following text. However, the bulk of this work is described in the attached manuscript entitled, ''NMR Metabolomics of Planktonic and Biofilm Modes of Growth in Pseudomonas aeruginosa''. This paper will be submitted to the Journal of Bacteriology in coming weeks. In addition, this one-year effort has lead to our incorporation into the Enhanced Surveillance Campaign during FY05 for some proof-of-principle MRI measurements on polymers. We are currently using similar methods to evaluate these polymers. In addition

  2. Chemically Specific Cellular Imaging of Biofilm Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herberg, J L; Schaldach, C; Horn, J; Gjersing, E; Maxwell, R

    2006-02-09

    complicated organism, we needed to first turn our attention to a well understood organism. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is a well-studied organism and will be used to compare our results with others. Then, we will turn our attention to TD. It is expected that the research performed will provide key data to validate biochemical studies of TD and result in high profile publications in leading journals. For this project, our ultimate goal was to combine both Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experimental analysis with computer simulations to provide unique 3D molecular structural, dynamics, and functional information on the order of microns for this DOE mission relevant microorganism, T. denitrificans. For FY05, our goals were to: (1) Determine proper media for optimal growth of PA; growth rate measurements in that media and characterization of metabolite signatures during growth via {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR, (2) Determine and build mineral, metal, and implant material surfaces to support growth of PA, (3) Implementing new MRI sequences to image biofilms more efficiently and increase resolution with new hardware design, (4) Develop further diffusion and flow MRI measurements of biofilms and biofilm formation with different MRI pulse sequences and different hardware design, and (5) Develop a zero dimension model of the rate of growth and the metabolite profiles of PA. Our major accomplishments are discussed in the following text. However, the bulk of this work is described in the attached manuscript entitled, ''NMR Metabolomics of Planktonic and Biofilm Modes of Growth in Pseudomonas aeruginosa''. This paper will be submitted to the Journal of Bacteriology in coming weeks. In addition, this one-year effort has lead to our incorporation into the Enhanced Surveillance Campaign during FY05 for some proof-of-principle MRI measurements on polymers. We are currently using similar methods to evaluate these polymers. In addition

  3. Pharmaceutical applications of vibrational chemical imaging and chemometrics: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendrin, C; Roggo, Y; Collet, C

    2008-11-04

    The emergence of chemical imaging (CI) has gifted spectroscopy an additional dimension. Chemical imaging systems complement chemical identification by acquiring spatially located spectra that enable visualization of chemical compound distributions. Such techniques are highly relevant to pharmaceutics in that the distribution of excipients and active pharmaceutical ingredient informs not only a product's behavior during manufacture but also its physical attributes (dissolution properties, stability, etc.). The rapid image acquisition made possible by the emergence of focal plane array detectors, combined with publication of the Food and Drug Administration guidelines for process analytical technology in 2001, has heightened interest in the pharmaceutical applications of CI, notably as a tool for enhancing drug quality and understanding process. Papers on the pharmaceutical applications of CI have been appearing in steadily increasing numbers since 2000. The aim of the present paper is to give an overview of infrared, near-infrared and Raman imaging in pharmaceutics. Sections 2 and 3 deal with the theory, device set-ups, mode of acquisition and processing techniques used to extract information of interest. Section 4 addresses the pharmaceutical applications.

  4. Imaging Acute Appendicitis: State of the Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Gaitini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this review is to present the state of the art in imaging tests for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Relevant publications regarding performance and advantages/disadvantages of imaging modalities for the diagnosis of appendicitis in different clinical situations were reviewed. Articles were extracted from a computerized database (MEDLINE with the following activated limits: Humans, English, core clinical journals, and published in the last five years. Reference lists of relevant studies were checked manually to identify additional, related articles. Ultrasound (US examination should be the first imaging test performed, particularly among the pediatric and young adult populations, who represent the main targets for appendicitis, as well as in pregnant patients. A positive US examination for appendicitis or an alternative diagnosis of possible gastrointestinal or urological origin, or a negative US, either showing a normal appendix or presenting low clinical suspicion of appendicitis, should lead to a final diagnosis. A negative or indeterminate examination with a strong clinical suspicion of appendicitis should be followed by a computed tomography (CT scan or alternatively, a magnetic resonanace imaging (MRI scan in a pregnant patient. A second US examination in a patient with persistent symptoms, especially if the first one was performed by a less experienced imaging professional, is a valid alternative to a CT.

  5. Simultaneous imaging of MR angiographic image and brain surface image using steady-state free precession

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takane, Atsushi; Tsuda, Munetaka (Hitachi Ltd., Katsuta, Ibaraki (Japan)); Koizumi, Hideaki; Koyama, Susumu; Yoshida, Takeyuki

    1993-09-01

    Synthesis of a brain surface image and an angiographic image representing brain surface vasculatures can be useful for pre-operational contemplation of brain surgery. Both brain surface images and brain surface vasculature images were successfully acquired simultaneously utilizing both FID signals and time-reversed FID signals created under steady-state free precession (SSFP). This simultaneous imaging method has several advantages. No positional discrepancies between both images and prolongation of scan time are anticipated because of concurrent acquisition of the two kinds of image data. Superimposition and stereo-display of both images enable understanding of their spatial relationship, and therefore afford a useful means for pre-operational simulation of brain surgery. (author).

  6. Spatially resolved chemical reaction monitoring using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feindel, Kirk W

    2016-06-01

    Over the previous three decades, the use of MRI for studying dynamic physical and chemical processes of materials systems has grown significantly. This mini-review provides a brief introduction to relevant principles of MRI, including methods of spatial localization, factors contributing to image contrast, and chemical shift imaging. A few historical examples of (1) H MRI for reaction monitoring will be presented, followed by a review of recent research including (1) H MRI studies of gelation and biofilms, (1) H, (7) Li, and (11) B MRI studies of electrochemical systems, in vivo glucose metabolism monitored with (19) F MRI, and in situ temperature monitoring with (27) Al MRI. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Quantum-State Controlled Chemical Reactions of Ultracold KRb Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Ospelkaus, S; Wang, D; de Miranda, M H G; Neyenhuis, B; Quéméner, G; Julienne, P S; Bohn, J L; Jin, D S; Ye, J

    2009-01-01

    How does a chemical reaction proceed at ultralow temperatures? Can simple quantum mechanical rules such as quantum statistics, single scattering partial waves, and quantum threshold laws provide a clear understanding for the molecular reactivity under a vanishing collision energy? Starting with an optically trapped near quantum degenerate gas of polar $^{40}$K$^{87}$Rb molecules prepared in their absolute ground state, we report experimental evidence for exothermic atom-exchange chemical reactions. When these fermionic molecules are prepared in a single quantum state at a temperature of a few hundreds of nanoKelvins, we observe p-wave-dominated quantum threshold collisions arising from tunneling through an angular momentum barrier followed by a near-unity probability short-range chemical reaction. When these molecules are prepared in two different internal states or when molecules and atoms are brought together, the reaction rates are enhanced by a factor of 10 to 100 due to s-wave scattering, which does not ...

  8. Reaction diffusion and solid state chemical kinetics handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Dybkov, V I

    2010-01-01

    This monograph deals with a physico-chemical approach to the problem of the solid-state growth of chemical compound layers and reaction-diffusion in binary heterogeneous systems formed by two solids; as well as a solid with a liquid or a gas. It is explained why the number of compound layers growing at the interface between the original phases is usually much lower than the number of chemical compounds in the phase diagram of a given binary system. For example, of the eight intermetallic compounds which exist in the aluminium-zirconium binary system, only ZrAl3 was found to grow as a separate

  9. Spectrum multiplexing and coherent-state decomposition in Fourier ptychographic imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Siyuan; Nanda, Pariksheet; Zheng, Guoan

    2014-01-01

    Information multiplexing is important for biomedical imaging and chemical sensing. In this paper, we report a microscopy imaging technique, termed state-multiplexed Fourier ptychography (FP), for information multiplexing and coherent-state decomposition. Similar to a typical Fourier ptychographic setting, we use an array of light sources to illuminate the sample from different incident angles and acquire corresponding low-resolution images using a monochromatic camera. In the reported technique, however, multiple light sources are lit up simultaneously for information multiplexing, and the acquired images thus represent incoherent summations of the sample transmission profiles corresponding to different coherent states. We show that, by using the state-multiplexed FP recovery routine, we can decompose the incoherent mixture of the FP acquisitions to recover a high-resolution sample image. We also show that, color-multiplexed imaging can be performed by simultaneously turning on R/G/B LEDs for data acquisition...

  10. Chemical state of fission products in irradiated uranium carbide fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Yasuo; Iwai, Takashi; Ohmichi, Toshihiko

    1987-12-01

    The chemical state of fission products in irradiated uranium carbide fuel has been estimated by equilibrium calculation using the SOLGASMIX-PV program. Solid state fission products are distributed to the fuel matrix, ternary compounds, carbides of fission products and intermetallic compounds among the condensed phases appearing in the irradiated uranium carbide fuel. The chemical forms are influenced by burnup as well as stoichiometry of the fuel. The results of the present study almost agree with the experimental ones reported for burnup simulated carbides.

  11. The Galileo Solid-State Imaging experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belton, M.J.S.; Klaasen, K.P.; Clary, M.C.; Anderson, J.L.; Anger, C.D.; Carr, M.H.; Chapman, C.R.; Davies, M.E.; Greeley, R.; Anderson, D.; Bolef, L.K.; Townsend, T.E.; Greenberg, R.; Head, J. W.; Neukum, G.; Pilcher, C.B.; Veverka, J.; Gierasch, P.J.; Fanale, F.P.; Ingersoll, A.P.; Masursky, H.; Morrison, D.; Pollack, James B.

    1992-01-01

    The Solid State Imaging (SSI) experiment on the Galileo Orbiter spacecraft utilizes a high-resolution (1500 mm focal length) television camera with an 800 ?? 800 pixel virtual-phase, charge-coupled detector. It is designed to return images of Jupiter and its satellites that are characterized by a combination of sensitivity levels, spatial resolution, geometric fiedelity, and spectral range unmatched by imaging data obtained previously. The spectral range extends from approximately 375 to 1100 nm and only in the near ultra-violet region (??? 350 nm) is the spectral coverage reduced from previous missions. The camera is approximately 100 times more sensitive than those used in the Voyager mission, and, because of the nature of the satellite encounters, will produce images with approximately 100 times the ground resolution (i.e., ??? 50 m lp-1) on the Galilean satellites. We describe aspects of the detector including its sensitivity to energetic particle radiation and how the requirements for a large full-well capacity and long-term stability in operating voltages led to the choice of the virtual phase chip. The F/8.5 camera system can reach point sources of V(mag) ??? 11 with S/N ??? 10 and extended sources with surface brightness as low as 20 kR in its highest gain state and longest exposure mode. We describe the performance of the system as determined by ground calibration and the improvements that have been made to the telescope (same basic catadioptric design that was used in Mariner 10 and the Voyager high-resolution cameras) to reduce the scattered light reaching the detector. The images are linearly digitized 8-bits deep and, after flat-fielding, are cosmetically clean. Information 'preserving' and 'non-preserving' on-board data compression capabilities are outlined. A special "summation" mode, designed for use deep in the Jovian radiation belts, near Io, is also described. The detector is 'preflashed' before each exposure to ensure the photometric linearity

  12. Photoacoustic Detection of Terahertz Radiation for Chemical Sensing and Imaging Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    PHOTOACOUSTIC ... PHOTOACOUSTIC DETECTION OF TERAHERTZ RADIATION FOR CHEMICAL SENSING AND IMAGING THESIS Presented to the Faculty...AFIT-ENG-13-M-08 PHOTOACOUSTIC DETECTION OF TERAHERTZ RADIATION FOR CHEMICAL SENSING AND IMAGING Stjepan Blazevic, B. E. E

  13. High-resolution chemical imaging of gold nanoparticles using hard x-ray ptychography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoppe, R.; Reinhardt, J.; Hofmann, G.

    2013-01-01

    We combine resonant scattering with (ptychographic) scanning coherent diffraction microscopy to determine the chemical state of gold nanoparticles with high spatial resolution. Ptychographic images of the sample are recorded for a series of energies around the gold L3 absorption edge. From...... these data, chemical information in the form of absorption and resonant scattering spectra is reconstructed at each location in the sample. For gold nanoparticles of about 100 nm diameter, a spatial resolution of about 20-30 nm is obtained. In the future, this microscopy approach will open the way...

  14. Atomic Resolution Imaging and Quantification of Chemical Functionality of Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Udo D. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science; Altman, Eric I. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Environmental Engineering

    2014-12-10

    The work carried out from 2006-2014 under DoE support was targeted at developing new approaches to the atomic-scale characterization of surfaces that include species-selective imaging and an ability to quantify chemical surface interactions with site-specific accuracy. The newly established methods were subsequently applied to gain insight into the local chemical interactions that govern the catalytic properties of model catalysts of interest to DoE. The foundation of our work was the development of three-dimensional atomic force microscopy (3DAFM), a new measurement mode that allows the mapping of the complete surface force and energy fields with picometer resolution in space (x, y, and z) and piconewton/millielectron volts in force/energy. From this experimental platform, we further expanded by adding the simultaneous recording of tunneling current (3D-AFM/STM) using chemically well-defined tips. Through comparison with simulations, we were able to achieve precise quantification and assignment of local chemical interactions to exact positions within the lattice. During the course of the project, the novel techniques were applied to surface-oxidized copper, titanium dioxide, and silicon oxide. On these materials, defect-induced changes to the chemical surface reactivity and electronic charge density were characterized with site-specific accuracy.

  15. Atomic Resolution Imaging and Quantification of Chemical Functionality of Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Udo [Yale University

    2014-12-10

    The work carried out from 2006-2014 under DoE support was targeted at developing new approaches to the atomic-scale characterization of surfaces that include species-selective imaging and an ability to quantify chemical surface interactions with site-specific accuracy. The newly established methods were subsequently applied to gain insight into the local chemical interactions that govern the catalytic properties of model catalysts of interest to DoE. The foundation of our work was the development of three-dimensional atomic force microscopy (3D-AFM), a new measurement mode that allows the mapping of the complete surface force and energy fields with picometer resolution in space (x, y, and z) and piconewton/millielectron volts in force/energy. From this experimental platform, we further expanded by adding the simultaneous recording of tunneling current (3D-AFM/STM) using chemically well-defined tips. Through comparison with simulations, we were able to achieve precise quantification and assignment of local chemical interactions to exact positions within the lattice. During the course of the project, the novel techniques were applied to surface-oxidized copper, titanium dioxide, and silicon oxide. On these materials, defect-induced changes to the chemical surface reactivity and electronic charge density were characterized with site-specific accuracy.

  16. Topological engineering of glass for modulating chemical state of dopants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shifeng; Guo, Qiangbing; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Ye, Qun; Masuno, Atsunobu; Zheng, Binbin; Yu, Yongze; Qiu, Jianrong

    2014-12-17

    A novel approach to modulating the chemical state of dopants by engineering the topological features of a glass matrix is presented. The method allows selective stabilization of dopants on a wide range of length scales, from dispersed ions to aggregated clusters to nanoparticles, leading to various intriguing optical phenomena, such as great emission enhancement and ultra-broadband optical amplification.

  17. In Situ Correlated Molecular Imaging of Chemically Communicating Microbial Communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohn, Paul W. [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States); Shrout, J. D. [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States); Sweedler, J. V. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Farrand, S. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2016-01-25

    This document constitutes the final technical report for DE-SC0006642, In Situ Correlated Molecular Imaging of Chemically Communicating Microbial Communities, a project carried out collaboratively by investigators at Notre Dame and UIUC. The work carried out under DOE support in this project produced advances in two areas: development of new highly sophisticated correlated imaging approaches and the application of these new tools to the growth and differentiation of microbial communities under a variety of environmental conditions. A significant effort involved the creation of technical enhancements and sampling approaches to allow us to advance heterocorrelated mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) and correlated Raman microscopy (CRM) from bacterial cultures and biofilms. We then exploited these measurement advances in heterocorrelated MS/CRM imaging to determine relationship of signaling molecules and excreted signaling molecules produced by P. aeruginosa to conditions relevant to the rhizosphere. In particular, we: (1) developed a laboratory testbed mimic for the rhizosphere to enable microbial growth on slides under controlled conditions; (2) integrated specific measurements of (a) rhamnolipids, (b) quinolone/quinolones, and (c) phenazines specific to P. aeruginosa; and (3) utilized the imaging tools to probe how messenger secretion, quorum sensing and swarming behavior are correlated with behavior.

  18. Acoustic imaging for diagnostics of chemically reacting systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramohalli, K.; Seshan, P.

    1983-01-01

    The concept of local diagnostics, in chemically reacting systems, with acoustic imaging is developed. The elements of acoustic imaging through ellipsoidal mirrors are theoretically discussed. In a general plan of the experimental program, the first system is chosen in these studies to be a simple open jet, non premixed turbulent flame. Methane is the fuel and enriched air is the oxidizer. This simple chemically reacting flow system is established at a Reynolds number (based on cold viscosity) of 50,000. A 1.5 m diameter high resolution acoustic mirror with an f-number of 0.75 is used to map the acoustic source zone along the axis of the flame. The results are presented as acoustic power spectra at various distances from the nozzle exit. It is seen that most of the reaction intensity is localized in a zone within 8 diameters from the exit. The bulk reactions (possibly around the periphery of the larger eddies) are evenly distributed along the length of the flame. Possibilities are seen for locally diagnosing single zones in a multiple cluster of reaction zones that occur frequently in practice. A brief outline is given of the future of this work which will be to apply this technique to chemically reacting flows not limited to combustion.

  19. Nonlinear chemical imaging microscopy: near-field third harmonic generation imaging of human red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, R D; Johnson, J C; Saykally, R J

    2000-11-01

    Third harmonic generation (THG) imaging using a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) is demonstrated for the first time. A femtosecond, tunable near-infrared laser was used to generate both nonresonant and resonantly enhanced third harmonic radiation in human red blood cells. We show that resonantly enhanced THG is a chemically specific bulk probe in NSOM imaging by tuning the excitation source onto and off of resonance with the Soret transition of oxyhemoglobin. Additionally, we provide evidence that tightly focused, nonresonant, far-field THG imaging experiments do not produce contrast that is truly surface specific.

  20. Tabletop imaging of structural evolutions in chemical reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Ibrahim, Heide; Beaulieu, Samuel; Schmidt, Bruno E; Thiré, Nicolas; Bisson, Éric; Hebeisen, Christoph T; Wanie, Vincent; Giguére, Mathieu; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Sanderson, Joseph; Schuurman, Michael S; Légaré, François

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of femto-chemistry has made it a primary goal to follow the nuclear and electronic evolution of a molecule in time and space as it undergoes a chemical reaction. Using Coulomb Explosion Imaging we have shot the first high-resolution molecular movie of a to and fro isomerization process in the acetylene cation. So far, this kind of phenomenon could only be observed using VUV light from a Free Electron Laser [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 263002 (2010)]. Here we show that 266 nm ultrashort laser pulses are capable of initiating rich dynamics through multiphoton ionization. With our generally applicable tabletop approach that can be used for other small organic molecules, we have investigated two basic chemical reactions simultaneously: proton migration and C=C bond-breaking, triggered by multiphoton ionization. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with the timescales and relaxation pathways predicted by new and definitively quantitative ab initio trajectory simulations.

  1. Image subtraction by solid state electroradiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallone, B.G.; Podgorsak, E.B. (McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology)

    1984-06-01

    An analog radiographic image subtraction technique is presented. A selenium photoconductor is used as the radiation sensitive medium and image subtraction is achieved by electrostatically adding latent images of opposite polarities to get a latent image of the region of interest. In principle, the technique is simple and a comparison with commercial digital techniques shows a similar image quality, suggesting that the electrostatic subtraction technique could be developed into a clinical tool as an inexpensive alternative to digital radiography.

  2. Chemical state of fission products in irradiated UO 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imoto, S.

    1986-08-01

    The chemical state of fission products in irradiated UO 2 fuel has been estimated for FBR as well as LWR on the basis of equilibrium calculation with the SOLGASMIX-PV code. The system considered for the calculation is composed of a gas phase, a CaF 2 type oxide phase, three grey phases, a noble metal alloy, a mixed telluride phase and several other phases each consisting of single compound. The distribution of elements into these phases and the amount of chemical species in each phase at different temperatures are obtained as a function of oxygen potential for LWR and FBR. Changes of the chemical potential of the fuel-fission products system during burnup are also evaluated with particular attention to the difference between LWR and FBR. Some informations obtained by the calculation are compared with the results of post irradiation examination of UO 2 fuels.

  3. State estimation of chemical engineering systems tending to multiple solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. P. G. Salau

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A well-evaluated state covariance matrix avoids error propagation due to divergence issues and, thereby, it is crucial for a successful state estimator design. In this paper we investigate the performance of the state covariance matrices used in three unconstrained Extended Kalman Filter (EKF formulations and one constrained EKF formulation (CEKF. As benchmark case studies we have chosen: a a batch chemical reactor with reversible reactions whose system model and measurement are such that multiple states satisfy the equilibrium condition and b a CSTR with exothermic irreversible reactions and cooling jacket energy balance whose nonlinear behavior includes multiple steady-states and limit cycles. The results have shown that CEKF is in general the best choice of EKF formulations (even if they are constrained with an ad hoc clipping strategy which avoids undesired states for such case studies. Contrary to a clipped EKF formulation, CEKF incorporates constraints into an optimization problem, which minimizes the noise in a least square sense preventing a bad noise distribution. It is also shown that, although the Moving Horizon Estimation (MHE provides greater robustness to a poor guess of the initial state, converging in less steps to the actual states, it is not justified for our examples due to the high additional computational effort.

  4. Automated high-throughput assessment of prostate biopsy tissue using infrared spectroscopic chemical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassan, Paul; Sachdeva, Ashwin; Shanks, Jonathan H.; Brown, Mick D.; Clarke, Noel W.; Gardner, Peter

    2014-03-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) chemical imaging has been demonstrated as a promising technique to complement histopathological assessment of biomedical tissue samples. Current histopathology practice involves preparing thin tissue sections and staining them using hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) after which a histopathologist manually assess the tissue architecture under a visible microscope. Studies have shown that there is disagreement between operators viewing the same tissue suggesting that a complementary technique for verification could improve the robustness of the evaluation, and improve patient care. FT-IR chemical imaging allows the spatial distribution of chemistry to be rapidly imaged at a high (diffraction-limited) spatial resolution where each pixel represents an area of 5.5 × 5.5 μm2 and contains a full infrared spectrum providing a chemical fingerprint which studies have shown contains the diagnostic potential to discriminate between different cell-types, and even the benign or malignant state of prostatic epithelial cells. We report a label-free (i.e. no chemical de-waxing, or staining) method of imaging large pieces of prostate tissue (typically 1 cm × 2 cm) in tens of minutes (at a rate of 0.704 × 0.704 mm2 every 14.5 s) yielding images containing millions of spectra. Due to refractive index matching between sample and surrounding paraffin, minimal signal processing is required to recover spectra with their natural profile as opposed to harsh baseline correction methods, paving the way for future quantitative analysis of biochemical signatures. The quality of the spectral information is demonstrated by building and testing an automated cell-type classifier based upon spectral features.

  5. State waste discharge permit application, 200-E chemical drain field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations (Ecology et al. 1994), the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affect groundwater or have the potential to affect ground would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173-216 (or 173-218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. As a result of this decision, the Washington State Department of Ecology and the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office entered into Consent Order No. DE 91NM-177, (Ecology and DOE-RL 1991). The Consent Order No. DE 91NM-177 requires a series of permitting activities for liquid effluent discharges. This document presents the State Waste Discharge Permit (SWDP) application for the 200-E Chemical Drain Field. Waste water from the 272-E Building enters the process sewer line directly through a floor drain, while waste water from the 2703-E Building is collected in two floor drains, (north and south) that act as sumps and are discharged periodically. The 272-E and 2703-E Buildings constitute the only discharges to the process sewer line and the 200-E Chemical Drain Field.

  6. Magnetic Doppler imaging of the chemically peculiar star HD 125248

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusomarov, N.; Kochukhov, O.; Ryabchikova, T.; Ilyin, I.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Intermediate-mass, chemically peculiar stars with strong magnetic fields provide an excellent opportunity to study the topology of their surface magnetic fields and the interplay between magnetic geometries and abundance inhomogeneities in the atmospheres of these stars. Aims: We reconstruct detailed maps of the surface magnetic field and abundance distributions for the magnetic Ap star HD 125248. Methods: We performed the analysis based on phase-resolved, four Stokes parameter spectropolarimetric observations obtained with the HARPSpol instrument. These data were interpreted with the help of magnetic Doppler imaging techniques and model atmospheres taking the effects of strong magnetic fields and nonsolar chemical composition into account. Results: We improved the atmospheric parameters of the star, Teff = 9850 ± 250 K and log g = 4.05 ± 0.10. We performed detailed abundance analysis, which confirmed that HD 125248 has abundances typical of other Ap stars, and discovered significant vertical stratification effects for the Fe ii and Cr ii ions. We computed LSD Stokes profiles using several line masks corresponding to Fe-peak and rare earth elements, and studied their behavior with rotational phase. Combining previous longitudinal field measurements with our own observations, we improved the rotational period of the star Prot = 9.29558 ± 0.00006 d. Magnetic Doppler imaging of HD 125248 showed that its magnetic field is mostly poloidal and quasi-dipolar with two large spots of different polarity and field strength. The chemical maps of Fe, Cr, Ce, Nd, Gd, and Ti show abundance contrasts of 0.9-3.5 dex. Among these elements, the Fe abundance map does not show high-contrast features. Cr is overabundant around the negative magnetic pole and has 3.5 dex abundance range. The rare earth elements and Ti are overabundant near the positive magnetic pole. Conclusions: The magnetic field of HD 125248 has strong deviations from the classical oblique dipole field

  7. Linear complexions: Confined chemical and structural states at dislocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmina, M; Herbig, M; Ponge, D; Sandlöbes, S; Raabe, D

    2015-09-04

    For 5000 years, metals have been mankind's most essential materials owing to their ductility and strength. Linear defects called dislocations carry atomic shear steps, enabling their formability. We report chemical and structural states confined at dislocations. In a body-centered cubic Fe-9 atomic percent Mn alloy, we found Mn segregation at dislocation cores during heating, followed by formation of face-centered cubic regions but no further growth. The regions are in equilibrium with the matrix and remain confined to the dislocation cores with coherent interfaces. The phenomenon resembles interface-stabilized structural states called complexions. A cubic meter of strained alloy contains up to a light year of dislocation length, suggesting that linear complexions could provide opportunities to nanostructure alloys via segregation and confined structural states.

  8. Structural simplification of chemical reaction networks in partial steady states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madelaine, Guillaume; Lhoussaine, Cédric; Niehren, Joachim; Tonello, Elisa

    2016-11-01

    We study the structural simplification of chemical reaction networks with partial steady state semantics assuming that the concentrations of some but not all species are constant. We present a simplification rule that can eliminate intermediate species that are in partial steady state, while preserving the dynamics of all other species. Our simplification rule can be applied to general reaction networks with some but few restrictions on the possible kinetic laws. We can also simplify reaction networks subject to conservation laws. We prove that our simplification rule is correct when applied to a module of a reaction network, as long as the partial steady state is assumed with respect to the complete network. Michaelis-Menten's simplification rule for enzymatic reactions falls out as a special case. We have implemented an algorithm that applies our simplification rules repeatedly and applied it to reaction networks from systems biology.

  9. Applications of Chemical Shift Imaging to Marine Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haakil Lee

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The successful applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in medicine are mostly due to the non-invasive and non-destructive nature of MRI techniques. Longitudinal studies of humans and animals are easily accomplished, taking advantage of the fact that MRI does not use harmful radiation that would be needed for plain film radiographic, computerized tomography (CT or positron emission (PET scans. Routine anatomic and functional studies using the strong signal from the most abundant magnetic nucleus, the proton, can also provide metabolic information when combined with in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS. MRS can be performed using either protons or hetero-nuclei (meaning any magnetic nuclei other than protons or 1H including carbon (13C or phosphorus (31P. In vivo MR spectra can be obtained from single region ofinterest (ROI or voxel or multiple ROIs simultaneously using the technique typically called chemical shift imaging (CSI. Here we report applications of CSI to marine samples and describe a technique to study in vivo glycine metabolism in oysters using 13C MRS 12 h after immersion in a sea water chamber dosed with [2-13C]-glycine. This is the first report of 13C CSI in a marine organism.

  10. Magnetic Doppler imaging of the chemically peculiar star HD 125248

    CERN Document Server

    Rusomarov, N; Ryabchikova, T; Ilyin, I

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate-mass, chemically peculiar stars with strong magnetic fields give us an excellent opportunity to study the topology of their surface magnetic fields and the interplay between magnetic geometries and abundance inhomogeneities in their atmospheres. We reconstruct detailed maps of the surface magnetic field and abundance distributions for the magnetic Ap star HD 125248. We performed the analysis based on phase-resolved, four Stokes parameter spectropolarimetric observations obtained with the HARPSpol instrument. These data were interpreted with the magnetic Doppler imaging technique. We improved the atmospheric parameters of the star, T_eff = 9850K +/- 250K and logg = 4.05 +/- 0.10. We performed detailed abundance analysis and discovered vertical stratification effects for the FeII and CrII ions. We computed LSD Stokes profiles and studied their behavior with rotational phase. We improved the rotational period of the star P_rot = 9.29558(6)d. Magnetic Doppler imaging of HD 125248 showed that its magn...

  11. Solid-State NMR Studies of Chemically Lithiated CFx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leifer, N. D.; Johnson, V. S.; Ben-Ari, R.; Gan, H.; Lehnes, J. M.; Guo, R.; Lu, W.; Muffoletto, B. C.; Reddy, T.; Stallworth, P. E.; Greenbaum, S. G.

    2010-01-01

    Three types of fluorinated carbon, all in their original form and upon sequential chemical lithiations via n-butyllithium, were investigated by 13C and 19F solid-state NMR methods. The three starting CFx materials [where x = 1 (nominally)] were fiber based, graphite based, and petroleum coke based. The aim of the current study was to identify, at the atomic/molecular structural level, factors that might account for differences in electrochemical performance among the different kinds of CFx. Differences were noted in the covalent F character among the starting compounds and in the details of LiF production among the lithiated samples. PMID:20676233

  12. State-to-state dynamics of elementary chemical reactions using Rydberg H-atom translational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xueming

    In this review, a few examples of state-to-state dynamics studies of both unimolecular and bimolecular reactions using the H-atom Rydberg tagging TOF technique were presented. From the H2O photodissociation at 157 nm, a direction dissociation example is provided, while photodissociation of H2O at 121.6 has provided an excellent dynamical case of complicated, yet direct dissociation process through conical intersections. The studies of the O(1D) + H2 → OH + H reaction has also been reviewed here. A prototype example of state-to-state dynamics of pure insertion chemical reaction is provided. Effect of the reagent rotational excitation and the isotope effect on the dynamics of this reaction have also been investigated. The detailed mechanism for abstraction channel in this reaction has also been closely studied. The experimental investigations of the simplest chemical reaction, the H3 system, have also been described here. Through extensive collaborations between theory and experiment, the mechanism for forward scattering product at high collision energies for the H + HD reaction was clarified, which is attributed to a slow down mechanism on the top of a quantized barrier transition state. Oscillations in the product quantum state resolved different cross sections have also been observed in the H + D2 reaction, and were attributed to the interference of adiabatic transition state pathways from detailed theoretical analysis. The results reviewed here clearly show the significant advances we have made in the studies of the state-to-state molecular reaction dynamics.

  13. Monitoring of Spectral Map Changes from Normal State to Superconducting State in High-TC Superconductor Films Using Raman Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. González-Solís

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We have explored the chemical structure of TlBa2Ca2Cu3O9 high-TC superconductor films with Tl-1223 phase to monitor spectral map changes from normal state to superconducting state using the technique of Raman imaging. Raman images were performed for 12 different temperatures in the 77–293 K range. At room temperature, the Raman images were characterized by a single color but as the temperature dropped a new color appeared and when the temperature of 77 K is reached and the superconducting state is assured, the Raman images were characterized by the red, green, and blue colors. Our study could suggest that the superconducting state emerged around 133 K, in full agreement with those reported in the literature. A cross-checking was done applying principal component analysis (PCA to other sets of Raman spectra of our films measured at different temperatures. PCA result showed that the spectra can be grouped into two temperature ranges, one in the 293–153 K range and the other in the 133–77 K range suggesting that transition to the superconducting state occurred at some temperature around 133 K. This is the first report of preliminary results evaluating the usefulness of Raman imaging in determination of transition temperature of superconductor films.

  14. Protein's native state stability in a chemically induced denaturation mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares-Quiroz, L; Garcia-Colin, L S

    2007-05-21

    In this work, we present a generalization of Zwanzig's protein unfolding analysis [Zwanzig, R., 1997. Two-state models of protein folding kinetics. Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 94, 148-150; Zwanzig, R., 1995. Simple model of protein folding kinetics. Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 92, 9801], in order to calculate the free energy change Delta(N)(D)F between the protein's native state N and its unfolded state D in a chemically induced denaturation. This Extended Zwanzig Model (EZM) is both based on an equilibrium statistical mechanics approach and the inclusion of experimental denaturation curves. It enables us to construct a suitable partition function Z and to derive an analytical formula for Delta(N)(D)F in terms of the number K of residues of the macromolecule, the average number nu of accessible states for each single amino acid and the concentration C(1/2) where the midpoint of the ND transition occurs. The results of the EZM for proteins where chemical denaturation follows a sigmoidal-type profile, as it occurs for the case of the T70N human variant of lysozyme (PDB code: T70N) [Esposito, G., et al., 2003. J. Biol. Chem. 278, 25910-25918], can be splitted into two lines. First, EZM shows that for sigmoidal denaturation profiles, the internal degrees of freedom of the chain play an outstanding role in the stability of the native state. On the other hand, that under certain conditions DeltaF can be written as a quadratic polynomial on concentration C(1/2), i.e., DeltaF approximately aC(1/2)(2)+bC(1/2)+c, where a,b,c are constant coefficients directly linked to protein's size K and the averaged number of non-native conformations nu. Such functional form for DeltaF has been widely known to fit experimental measures in chemically induced protein denaturation [Yagi, M., et al., 2003. J. Biol. Chem. 278, 47009-47015; Asgeirsson, B., Guojonsdottir, K., 2006. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1764, 190-198; Sharma, S., et al., 2006. Protein Pept. Lett. 13(4), 323-329; Salem, M., et al

  15. Chemical Imaging of the Cell Membrane by NanoSIMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, P K; Kraft, M L; Frisz, J F; Carpenter, K J; Hutcheon, I D

    2010-02-23

    The existence of lipid microdomains and their role in cell membrane organization are currently topics of great interest and controversy. The cell membrane is composed of a lipid bilayer with embedded proteins that can flow along the two-dimensional surface defined by the membrane. Microdomains, known as lipid rafts, are believed to play a central role in organizing this fluid system, enabling the cell membrane to carry out essential cellular processes, including protein recruitment and signal transduction. Lipid rafts are also implicated in cell invasion by pathogens, as in the case of the HIV. Therefore, understanding the role of lipid rafts in cell membrane organization not only has broad scientific implications, but also has practical implications for medical therapies. One of the major limitations on lipid organization research has been the inability to directly analyze lipid composition without introducing artifacts and at the relevant length-scales of tens to hundreds of nanometers. Fluorescence microscopy is widely used due to its sensitivity and specificity to the labeled species, but only the labeled components can be observed, fluorophores can alter the behavior of the lipids they label, and the length scales relevant to imaging cell membrane domains are between that probed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging (<10 nm) and the diffraction limit of light. Topographical features can be imaged on this length scale by atomic force microscopy (AFM), but the chemical composition of the observed structures cannot be determined. Immuno-labeling can be used to study the distribution of membrane proteins at high resolution, but not lipid composition. We are using imaging mass spectrometry by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) in concert with other high resolution imaging methods to overcome these limitations. The experimental approach of this project is to combine molecule-specific stable isotope labeling with high-resolution SIMS using a

  16. Reacting gas mixtures in the state-to-state approach: The chemical reaction rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kustova, Elena V. [Department of Mathematics and Mechanics, Saint Petersburg State University, 198504 Universitetskiy pr., 28, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Kremer, Gilberto M. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Caixa Postal 19044, 81531-980 Curitiba (Brazil)

    2014-12-09

    In this work chemically reacting mixtures of viscous flows are analyzed within the framework of Boltzmann equation. By applying a modified Chapman-Enskog method to the system of Boltzmann equations general expressions for the rates of chemical reactions and vibrational energy transitions are determined as functions of two thermodynamic forces: the velocity divergence and the affinity. As an application chemically reacting mixtures of N{sub 2} across a shock wave are studied, where the first lowest vibrational states are taken into account. Here we consider only the contributions from the first four single quantum vibrational-translational energy transitions. It is shown that the contribution to the chemical reaction rate related to the affinity is much larger than that of the velocity divergence.

  17. Reacting gas mixtures in the state-to-state approach: The chemical reaction rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustova, Elena V.; Kremer, Gilberto M.

    2014-12-01

    In this work chemically reacting mixtures of viscous flows are analyzed within the framework of Boltzmann equation. By applying a modified Chapman-Enskog method to the system of Boltzmann equations general expressions for the rates of chemical reactions and vibrational energy transitions are determined as functions of two thermodynamic forces: the velocity divergence and the affinity. As an application chemically reacting mixtures of N2 across a shock wave are studied, where the first lowest vibrational states are taken into account. Here we consider only the contributions from the first four single quantum vibrational-translational energy transitions. It is shown that the contribution to the chemical reaction rate related to the affinity is much larger than that of the velocity divergence.

  18. A Learning State-Space Model for Image Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Greg C

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an approach based on a state-space model for learning the user concepts in image retrieval. We first design a scheme of region-based image representation based on concept units, which are integrated with different types of feature spaces and with different region scales of image segmentation. The design of the concept units aims at describing similar characteristics at a certain perspective among relevant images. We present the details of our proposed approach based on a state-space model for interactive image retrieval, including likelihood and transition models, and we also describe some experiments that show the efficacy of our proposed model. This work demonstrates the feasibility of using a state-space model to estimate the user intuition in image retrieval.

  19. Chemically modified STM tips for atomic-resolution imaging of ultrathin NaCI films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhe Li[1; Koen Schouteden[1; Violeta lancu[1; Ewald Janssens[1; Peter Lievens[1; Chris Van Haesendonck[1; Jorge I. Cerda[2

    2015-01-01

    Cl-functionalized scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tips are fabricated by modifying a tungsten STM tip in situ on islands of ultrathin NaCI(100) films on Au(111) surfaces. The functionalized tips are used to achieve clear atomic- resolution imaging of NaCI(100) islands. In comparison with bare metal tips, the chemically modified tips yield drastically enhanced spatial resolution as well as contrast reversal in STM topographs, implying that Na atoms, rather than C1 atoms, are imaged as protrusions. STM simulations based on a Green's function formalism reveal that the experimentally observed contrast reversal in the STM topographs is due to the highly localized character of the Cl-pz states at the tip apex. An additional remarkable characteristic of the modified tips is that in dI/dV maps, a Na atom appears as a ring with a diameter that depends crucially on the tip-sample distance.

  20. Control of multiple excited image states around segmented carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knörzer, J., E-mail: johannes.knoerzer@physnet.uni-hamburg.de; Fey, C., E-mail: christian.fey@physnet.uni-hamburg.de [Zentrum für Optische Quantentechnologien, Universität Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, Hamburg 22761 (Germany); Sadeghpour, H. R. [ITAMP, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Schmelcher, P. [Zentrum für Optische Quantentechnologien, Universität Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, Hamburg 22761 (Germany); The Hamburg Centre for Ultrafast Imaging, Luruper Chaussee 149, Hamburg 22761 (Germany)

    2015-11-28

    Electronic image states around segmented carbon nanotubes can be confined and shaped along the nanotube axis by engineering the image potential. We show how several such image states can be prepared simultaneously along the same nanotube. The inter-electronic distance can be controlled a priori by engineering tubes of specific geometries. High sensitivity to external electric and magnetic fields can be exploited to manipulate these states and their mutual long-range interactions. These building blocks provide access to a new kind of tailored interacting quantum systems.

  1. State-of-the-art imaging of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marko, Jamie; Gould, C Frank; Bonavia, Grant H; Wolfman, Darcy J

    2016-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men. Modern medical imaging is intimately involved in the diagnosis and management of prostate cancer. Ultrasound is primarily used to guide prostate biopsy to establish the diagnosis of prostate carcinoma. Prostate magnetic resonance imaging uses a multiparametric approach, including anatomic and functional imaging sequences. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging can be used for detection and localization of prostate cancer and to evaluate for disease recurrence. Computed tomography and scintigraphic imaging are primarily used to detect regional lymph node spread and distant metastases. Recent advancements in ultrasound, multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging, and scintigraphic imaging have the potential to change the way prostate cancer is diagnosed and managed. This article addresses the major imaging modalities involved in the evaluation of prostate cancer and updates the reader on the state of the art for each modality.

  2. Mid-infrared (MIR) photonics: MIR passive and active fiberoptics chemical and biomedical, sensing and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddon, Angela B.

    2016-10-01

    The case for new, portable, real-time mid-infrared (MIR) molecular sensing and imaging is discussed. We set a record in demonstrating extreme broad-band supercontinuum (SC) generated light 1.4-13.3 μm in a specially engineered, step-index MIR optical fiber of high numerical aperture. This was the first experimental demonstration truly to reveal the potential of MIR fibers to emit across the MIR molecular "fingerprint spectral region" and a key first step towards bright, portable, broadband MIR sources for chemical and biomedical, molecular sensing and imaging in real-time. Potential applications are in the healthcare, security, energy, environmental monitoring, chemical-processing, manufacturing and the agriculture sectors. MIR narrow-line fiber lasers are now required to pump the fiber MIR-SC for a compact all-fiber solution. Rare-earth-ion (RE-) doped MIR fiber lasers are not yet demonstrated >=4 μm wavelength. We have fabricated small-core RE-fiber with photoluminescence across 3.5-6 μm, and long excited-state lifetimes. MIR-RE-fiber lasers are also applicable as discrete MIR fiber sensors in their own right, for applications including: ship-to-ship free-space communications, aircraft counter-measures, coherent MIR imaging, MIR-optical coherent tomography, laser-cutting/ patterning of soft materials and new wavelengths for fiber laser medical surgery.

  3. Vapor Phase Alkyne Coating of Pharmaceutical Excipients: Discrimination Enhancement of Raman Chemical Imaging for Tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Mayumi; Sasaki, Hiroaki; Moriyama, Kei

    2015-12-01

    Raman chemical imaging has become a powerful analytical tool to investigate the crystallographic characteristics of pharmaceutical ingredients in tablet. However, it is often difficult to discriminate some pharmaceutical excipients from each other by Raman spectrum because of broad and overlapping signals, limiting their detailed assessments. To overcome this difficulty, we developed a vapor phase coating method of excipients by an alkyne, which exhibits a distinctive Raman signal in the range of 2100-2300 cm(-1) . We found that the combination of two volatile reagents, propargyl bromide and triethylamine, formed a thin and nonvolatile coating on the excipient and observed the Raman signal of the alkyne at the surface. We prepared alkyne-coated cellulose by this method and formed a tablet. The Raman chemical imaging of the tablet cross-section using the alkyne peak area intensity of 2120 cm(-1) as the index showed a much clearer particle image of cellulose than using the peak area intensity of 1370 cm(-1) , which originated from the cellulose itself. Our method provides an innovative technique to analyze the solid-state characteristics of pharmaceutical excipients in tablets.

  4. Chemical state of tellurium in a degraded LWR core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imoto, S.; Tanabe, T.

    1988-06-01

    Changes of the chemical state of tellurium in the heatup stage of a severe fuel damage accident are estimated thermodynamically. According to equilibrium calculations with the SOLGASMIX-PV code, tellurium exists as cesium telluride, as the element or possibly as PdTe during normal operation. In the heatup stage of an accident, elemental tellurium is absorbed in the Zircaloy cladding by formation of ZrTe x ( x = 1-2). Cesium telluride does not react with Zr even under the low oxygen potentials favoring the {Zr}/{UO 2} reaction. Tellurium is also absorbed in oxygen-stabilized alpha-zirconium. The stability of Cs 2Te in the steam/hydrogen atmosphere is discussed.

  5. Zirconia-based solid state chemical gas sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Zhuiykov, S

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of chemical gas sensors, based on solid state technology, that are sensitive to environmental gases, such as O sub 2 , SO sub x , NO sub x , CO sub 2 and hydrocarbons. The paper is focussed on performance of electrochemical gas sensors that are based on zirconia as a solid electrolyte. The paper considers sensor structures and selection of electrode materials. Impact of interfaces on sensor performance is discussed. This paper also provides a brief overview of electrochemical properties of zirconia and their effect on sensor performance. Impact of auxiliary materials on sensors performance characteristics, such as sensitivity, selectivity, response time and recovery time, is also discussed. Dual gas sensors that can be applied for simultaneous monitoring of the concentration of both oxygen and other gas phase components, are briefly considered

  6. Chemically modified solid state nanopores for high throughput nanoparticle separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhu, Anmiv S; Kim, Min Jun [School of Biomedical Engineering and Health Science, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Jubery, Talukder Zaki N; Dutta, Prashanta [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164 (United States); Freedman, Kevin J; Mulero, Rafael, E-mail: mkim@coe.drexel.ed [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2010-11-17

    The separation of biomolecules and other nanoparticles is a vital step in several analytical and diagnostic techniques. Towards this end we present a solid state nanopore-based set-up as an efficient separation platform. The translocation of charged particles through a nanopore was first modeled mathematically using the multi-ion model and the surface charge density of the nanopore membrane was identified as a critical parameter that determines the selectivity of the membrane and the throughput of the separation process. Drawing from these simulations a single 150 nm pore was fabricated in a 50 nm thick free-standing silicon nitride membrane by focused-ion-beam milling and was chemically modified with (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane to change its surface charge density. This chemically modified membrane was then used to separate 22 and 58 nm polystyrene nanoparticles in solution. Once optimized, this approach can readily be scaled up to nanopore arrays which would function as a key component of next-generation nanosieving systems.

  7. Translation of infrared chemical imaging for cardiovascular evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Saumya; Raman, Jai; Reddy, Vijaya; Dawson, Miranda; Bhargava, Rohit

    2016-03-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopic imaging has been applied to study histology of cardiovascular tissue, primarily using Fourier transform IR (FTIR) Imaging. Here we describe results for histologic imaging of cardiac biopsies using a fast, discrete frequency IR (DFIR) imaging system. Histologic classification of tissue is understood in terms of the constituent frequencies and speeded up by careful optimization of the data acquired. Results are compared to FTIR imaging in terms of the signal to noise ratio and information content.

  8. Reflective ghost imaging with classical Gaussian-state light

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deyang Duan; Yunjie Xia

    2012-01-01

    In this letter, we use quantum description and the Gaussian state to study reflective ghost imaging with two classical sources, and to provide their expressions. We find that the reflective ghost imaging of a rough-surfaced object, using Gaussian-state phase-insensitive or classically correlated phase-sensitive light, can be expressed in terms of the phase-insensitive or phase-sensitive cross-correlations between the two detected fields, including a background term. Moreover, reflective ghost imaging with two classical Gaussian-state lights is shown to have similar features as spatial resolution and field of view.%In this letter,we use quantum description and the Gaussian state to study reflective ghost imaging with two classical sources,and to provide their expressions.We find that the reflective ghost imaging of a rough-surfaced object,using Gaussian-state phase-insensitive or classically correlated phase-sensitive light,can be expressed in terms of the phase-insensitive or phase-sensitive cross-correlations between the two detected fields,including a background term.Moreover,reflective ghost imaging with two classical Gaussian-state lights is shown to have similar features as spatial resolution and field of view.

  9. Testing fundamentals: The chemical state of geochemical tracers in biominerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branson, O.; Redfern, S. A. T.; Read, E.; Elderfield, H.

    2015-12-01

    The use of many carbonate-derived geochemical proxies is underpinned by the assumption that tracer elements are incorporated 'ideally' as impurities the mineral lattice, following relatively straightforward kinetic and thermodynamic drives. This allows comparison to inorganic precipitation experiments, and provides a systematic starting point from which to translate geochemical tracers to environmental records. Biomineral carbonates are a prominent source of geochemical proxy material, and are far from an ideal inorganic system. They are structurally and compositionally heterogeneous mineral-organic composites, produced in tightly controlled biological environments, possibly via non-classical crystal growth mechanisms. Biominerals offer numerous opportunities for tracers to be incorporated in a 'non-ideal' state. For instance, tracers could be hosted within the organic component of the structure, in interstitial micro-domains of a separate mineral phase, or in localized high-impurity clusters. If a proxy element is hosted in a non-ideal state, our understanding of its incorporation and preservation is flawed, and the theoretical basis behind the proxies derived from it must be reevaluated. Thus far, the assumption of ideal tracer incorporation has remained largely untested, owing to the spatial resolution and sensitivity limits of available techniques. Developments in high-resolution, high-sensitivity X-ray spectroscopy at Scanning Transmission X-Ray Microscopes (STXMs) have allowed us to measure trace element coordination in foraminiferal calcite, at length-scales relevant to biomineralisation processes and tracer incorporation. This instrument has allowed us to test the fundamental assumptions behind several geochemical proxy elements. We present a summary of four STXM studies, assessing the chemical state and distribution of Mg (Branson et al, 2014), B (Branson et al, 2015), S and Na (unpub.), and highlight the implications of these data for the use of these

  10. Political Parties’ Welfare Image, Electoral Punishment and Welfare State Retrenchment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schumacher, Gijs; Vis, Barbara; van Kersbergen, Kees

    2013-01-01

    parties of 14 OECD countries between 1970 and 2002, we show that most parties with a positive welfare image lose after they implemented cutbacks, whereas most parties with a negative welfare image do not. In addition, we show that positive welfare image parties in opposition gain votes, at the expense......Will voters punish the government for cutting back welfare state entitlements? The comparative literature on the welfare state suggests that the answer is yes. Unless governments are effectively employing strategies of blame avoidance, retrenchment leads to vote loss. Because a large majority...... of those positive welfare image parties in government that implemented welfare state retrenchment. Comparative European Politics (2013) 11, 1-21. doi:10.1057/cep.2012.5; published online 11 June 2012...

  11. Quantum Enhanced Imaging by Entangled States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    REMOTE SENSING; LIDAR ; RADAR; SYNTHETIC APERTURE RADAR (SAR); SENSORS USING PHOTONS IN A NON- CLASSICAL STATE; EG SQUEEZED, ENTANGLED 16. SECURITY...idler photodetectors are ηs and ηi, respectively, we have, for the number of coincidence counts, islocalwaypairccoinc fN ηηηημ −= 2 . (13...in the square root comes from the beam splitter relation for photons incident on an inefficient photodetector in the quantum model of direct

  12. Effect of the Temperature-Emissivity Contrast on the Chemical Signal for Gas Plume Detection Using Thermal Image Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candace Metoyer

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Detecting and identifying weak gaseous plumes using thermal imaging data is complicated by many factors. These include variability due to atmosphere, ground and plume temperature, and background clutter. This paper presents an analysis of one formulation of the physics-based radiance model, which describes at-sensor observed radiance. The background emissivity and plume/ground temperatures are isolated, and their effects on chemical signal are described. This analysis shows that the plume’s physical state, emission or absorption, is directly dependent on the background emissivity and plume/ground temperatures. It then describes what conditions on the background emissivity and plume/ground temperatures have inhibiting or amplifying effects on the chemical signal. These claims are illustrated by analyzing synthetic hyperspectral imaging data with the adaptive matched filter using two chemicals and three distinct background emissivities.

  13. Accumulation and chemical states of radiocesium by fungus Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Sakamoto, Fuminori; Kozai, Naofumi; Yamasaki, Shinya; Yu, Qianqian

    2014-05-01

    After accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, the fall-out radiocesium was deposited on the ground. Filamentous fungus is known to accumulate radiocesium in environment, even though many minerals are involved in soil. These facts suggest that fungus affect the migration behavior of radiocesium in the environment. However, accumulation mechanism of radiocesium by fungus is not understood. In the present study, accumulation and chemical states change of Cs by unicellular fungus of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been studied to elucidate the role of microorganisms in the migration of radiocesium in the environment. Two different experimental conditions were employed; one is the accumulation experiments of radiocesium by S. cerevisiae from the agar medium containing 137Cs and a mineral of zeolite, vermiculite, smectite, mica, or illite. The other is the experiments using stable cesium to examine the chemical states change of Cs. In the former experiment, the cells were grown on membrane filter of 0.45 μm installed on the agar medium. After the grown cells were weighed, radioactivity in the cells was measured by an autoradiography technique. The mineral weight contents were changed from 0.1% to 1% of the medium. In the latter experiment, the cells were grown in the medium containing stable Cs between 1 mM and 10mM. The Cs accumulated cells were analyzed by SEM-EDS and EXAFS. The adsorption experiments of cesium by the cells under resting condition were also conducted to test the effect of cells metabolic activity. Without mineral in the medium, cells of S. cerevisiae accumulated 1.5x103 Bq/g from the medium containing 137Cs of 2.6x102 Bq/g. When mineral was added in the medium, concentration of 137Cs in the cells decreased. The concentration of 137Cs in the cells from the medium containing different minerals were in the following order; smectite, illite, mica > vermiculite > zeolite. This order was nearly the same as the inverse of distribution coefficient of

  14. Imaging of lumbar degenerative disk disease: history and current state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emch, Todd M. [Cleveland Clinic, Division of Neuroradiology, Imaging Institute, Neuroradiology L-10, Cleveland, OH (United States); Modic, Michael T. [Cleveland Clinic, Division of Neuroradiology, Imaging Institute, Neurological Institute T-13, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2011-09-15

    One of the most common indications for performing magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the lumbar spine is the symptom complex thought to originate as a result of degenerative disk disease. MR imaging, which has emerged as perhaps the modality of choice for imaging degenerative disk disease, can readily demonstrate disk pathology, degenerative endplate changes, facet and ligamentous hypertrophic changes, and the sequelae of instability. Its role in terms of predicting natural history of low back pain, identifying causality, or offering prognostic information is unclear. As available modalities for imaging the spine have progressed from radiography, myelography, and computed tomography to MR imaging, there have also been advances in spine surgery for degenerative disk disease. These advances are described in a temporal context for historical purposes with a focus on MR imaging's history and current state. (orig.)

  15. Fourth-Order Vibrational Transition State Theory and Chemical Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, John F.; Matthews, Devin A.; Gong, Justin Z.

    2015-06-01

    Second-order vibrational perturbation theory (VPT2) is an enormously successful and well-established theory for treating anharmonic effects on the vibrational levels of semi-rigid molecules. Partially as a consequence of the fact that the theory is exact for the Morse potential (which provides an appropriate qualitative model for stretching anharmonicity), VPT2 calculations for such systems with appropriate ab initio potential functions tend to give fundamental and overtone levels that fall within a handful of wavenumbers of experimentally measured positions. As a consequence, the next non-vanishing level of perturbation theory -- VPT4 -- offers only slight improvements over VPT2 and is not practical for most calculations since it requires information about force constants up through sextic. However, VPT4 (as well as VPT2) can be used for other applications such as the next vibrational correction to rotational constants (the ``gammas'') and other spectroscopic parameters. In addition, the marriage of VPT with the semi-classical transition state theory of Miller (SCTST) has recently proven to be a powerful and accurate treatment for chemical kinetics. In this talk, VPT4-based SCTST tunneling probabilities and cumulative reaction probabilities are give for the first time for selected low-dimensional model systems. The prospects for VPT4, both practical and intrinsic, will also be discussed.

  16. Image-potential states and work function of graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niesner, Daniel; Fauster, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Image-potential states of graphene on various substrates have been investigated by two-photon photoemission and scanning tunneling spectroscopy. They are used as a probe for the graphene-substrate interaction and resulting changes in the (local) work function. The latter is driven by the work function difference between graphene and the substrate. This results in a charge transfer which also contributes to core-level shifts in x-ray photoemission. In this review article, we give an overview over the theoretical models and the experimental data for image-potential states and work function of graphene on various substrates.

  17. Return to sender - American Images of the Nordic Welfare States and Nordic Welfare State Branding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marklund, C.; Petersen, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    argues that these American images, narratives, and stereotypes did not only fulfill a function in the American debate, but were also relayed back to Norden, and affected debate, nation-branding strategies, and self-understandings there. During the Cold War, furthermore, the Nordic welfare state image...

  18. Solid-state flat panel imager with avalanche amorphous selenium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuermann, James R.; Howansky, Adrian; Goldan, Amir H.; Tousignant, Olivier; Levéille, Sébastien; Tanioka, K.; Zhao, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Active matrix flat panel imagers (AMFPI) have become the dominant detector technology for digital radiography and fluoroscopy. For low dose imaging, electronic noise from the amorphous silicon thin film transistor (TFT) array degrades imaging performance. We have fabricated the first prototype solid-state AMFPI using a uniform layer of avalanche amorphous selenium (a-Se) photoconductor to amplify the signal to eliminate the effect of electronic noise. We have previously developed a large area solid-state avalanche a-Se sensor structure referred to as High Gain Avalanche Rushing Photoconductor (HARP) capable of achieving gains of 75. In this work we successfully deposited this HARP structure onto a 24 x 30 cm2 TFT array with a pixel pitch of 85 μm. An electric field (ESe) up to 105 Vμm-1 was applied across the a-Se layer without breakdown. Using the HARP layer as a direct detector, an X-ray avalanche gain of 15 +/- 3 was achieved at ESe = 105 Vμm-1. In indirect mode with a 150 μm thick structured CsI scintillator, an optical gain of 76 +/- 5 was measured at ESe = 105 Vμm-1. Image quality at low dose increases with the avalanche gain until the electronic noise is overcome at a constant exposure level of 0.76 mR. We demonstrate the success of a solid-state HARP X-ray imager as well as the largest active area HARP sensor to date.

  19. Radiochemistry, PET Imaging, and the Internet of Chemical Things.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Stephen; Kilbourn, Michael R; Scott, Peter J H

    2016-08-24

    The Internet of Chemical Things (IoCT), a growing network of computers, mobile devices, online resources, software suites, laboratory equipment, synthesis apparatus, analytical devices, and a host of other machines, all interconnected to users, manufacturers, and others through the infrastructure of the Internet, is changing how we do chemistry. While in its infancy across many chemistry laboratories and departments, it became apparent when considering our own work synthesizing radiopharmaceuticals for positron emission tomography (PET) that a more mature incarnation of the IoCT already exists. How does the IoCT impact our lives today, and what does it hold for the smart (radio)chemical laboratories of the future?

  20. Solid-State Imaging Device With Carbon Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazer, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    Performance of solid-state imaging device enhanced by coating surface through which photons enter with thin film of carbon or diamondlike carbon. Film beneficial in two ways: acts as antireflection coat, and helps to dissipate undesired static electric charges that otherwise accumulate on surface.

  1. Application of magnetic resonance imaging in transgenic and chemical mouse models of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liedtke Christian

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is one of the most common cancers worldwide. The molecular mechanisms underlying hepatocarcinogenesis are still poorly understood. Genetically modified mice are powerful tools to further investigate the mechanisms of HCC development. However, this approach is limited due to the lack of non-invasive detection methods in small rodents. The aim of this study was to establish a protocol for the non-invasive analysis of hepatocarcinogenesis in transgenic mice using a clinical 1.5 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging scanner. Results As a model system we used hepatocyte-specific c-myc transgenic mice developing hepatocellular carcinoma at the age of 12-15 months. The scans of the murine livers included axial T2-weighted turbo-spin echo (TSE images, axial T1-weighted and contrast enhanced T1-weighted gradient echo (fast field echo, FFE and sagittal true Fast Imaging with Steady state Precession (true-FISP images. Application of contrast agent was performed via tail vein-catheter and confirmed by evaluation of the altered longitudinal relaxation T1 time before and after application. Through technical adaptation and optimization we could detect murine liver lesions with a minimum diameter of approximately 2 mm and provided histopathological evidence that these MR findings correspond to hepatocellular carcinoma. Tumor growth was repeatedly measured using sequential MRI with intervals of 5 weeks and subsequent volumetric analysis facilitating direct comparison of tumor progression between individual animals. We finally demonstrated that our protocol is also applicable in the widely- used chemical model of N-nitrosodiethylamine-induced hepatocarcinogenesis. Conclusion Our protocol allows the non-invasive, early detection of HCC and the subsequent continuous monitoring of liver tumorgenesis in transgenic mice thereby facilitating future investigations of transgenic tumor mouse models of the liver.

  2. Multiport solid-state imager characterization at variable pixel rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, George J.; Albright, Kevin L.; Turko, Bojan T.

    1993-10-01

    The imaging performance of an 8-port Full Frame Transfer Charge Coupled Device (FFT CCD) as a function of several parameters including pixel clock rate is presented. The device, model CCD-13, manufactured by English Electric Valve (EEV), is a 512 X 512 pixel array designed with four individual programmable bidirectional serial registers and eight output amplifiers permitting simultaneous readout of eight segments (128 horizontal X 256 vertical pixels) of the array. The imager was evaluated in Los Alamos National Laboratory's High-Speed Solid-State Imager Test Station at true pixel rates as high as 50 MHz for effective imager pixel rates approaching 400 MHz from multiporting. Key response characteristics measured include absolute responsivity, Charge-Transfer-Efficiency (CTE), dynamic range, resolution, signal-to-noise ratio, and electronic and optical crosstalk among the eight video channels. Preliminary test results and data obtained from the CCD-13 are presented and the versatility/capabilities of the test station are reviewed.

  3. Ultrasound imaging of oxidative stress in vivo with chemically-generated gas microbubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perng, John Kangchun; Lee, Seungjun; Kundu, Kousik; Caskey, Charles F; Knight, Sarah F; Satir, Sarp; Ferrara, Katherine W; Taylor, W Robert; Degertekin, F Levent; Sorescu, Daniel; Murthy, Niren

    2012-09-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) have tremendous potential for in vivo molecular imaging because of their high sensitivity. However, the diagnostic potential of UCAs has been difficult to exploit because current UCAs are based on pre-formed microbubbles, which can only detect cell surface receptors. Here, we demonstrate that chemical reactions that generate gas forming molecules can be used to perform molecular imaging by ultrasound in vivo. This new approach was demonstrated by imaging reactive oxygen species in vivo with allylhydrazine, a liquid compound that is converted into nitrogen and propylene gas after reacting with radical oxidants. We demonstrate that allylhydrazine encapsulated within liposomes can detect a 10 micromolar concentration of radical oxidants by ultrasound, and can image oxidative stress in mice, induced by lipopolysaccharide, using a clinical ultrasound system. We anticipate numerous applications of chemically-generated microbubbles for molecular imaging by ultrasound, given ultrasound's ability to detect small increments above the gas saturation limit, its spatial resolution and widespread clinical use.

  4. Some Chemical and Electronic Considerations of Solid State Semiconductor Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinitz, Herman J.

    1986-01-01

    Describes the trend toward the use of electronic instrumentation to monitor and measure various parameters in chemical reactions. Stresses that a knowledge of the operational relationships involved in such instruments is essential for students beginning in science. Discusses electrostatic charges, semiconductor crystals, electronic conductors,…

  5. Chemical reaction rates and non-equilibrium pressure of reacting gas mixtures in the state-to-state approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kustova, Elena V., E-mail: e.kustova@spbu.ru [Department of Mathematics and Mechanics, Saint Petersburg State University, 198504 Universitetskiy pr. 28, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Kremer, Gilberto M., E-mail: kremer@fisica.ufpr.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Caixa Postal 19044, 81531-980 Curitiba (Brazil)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • State-to-state approach for coupled vibrational relaxation and chemical reactions. • Self-consistent model for rates of non-equilibrium reactions and energy transitions. • In viscous flows mass action law is violated. • Cross coupling between reaction rates and non-equilibrium pressure in viscous flow. • Results allow implementing the state-to-state approach for viscous flow simulations. - Abstract: Viscous gas flows with vibrational relaxation and chemical reactions in the state-to-state approach are analyzed. A modified Chapman–Enskog method is used for the determination of chemical reaction and vibrational transition rates and non-equilibrium pressure. Constitutive equations depend on the thermodynamic forces: velocity divergence and chemical reaction/transition affinity. As an application, N{sub 2} flow with vibrational relaxation across a shock wave is investigated. Two distinct processes occur behind the shock: for small values of the distance the affinity is large and vibrational relaxation is in its initial stage; for large distances the affinity is small and the chemical reaction is in its final stage. The affinity contributes more to the transition rate than the velocity divergence and the effect of these two contributions are more important for small distances from the shock front. For the non-equilibrium pressure, the term associated with the bulk viscosity increases by a small amount the hydrostatic pressure.

  6. Molecular perspectives on solid-state phase transformation and chemical reactivity of drugs: metoclopramide as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shan-Yang

    2015-02-01

    Here, I provide an overview of the solid-state characteristics, phase transformations and chemical reactions of metoclopramide hydrochloride monohydrate (MCP HCl H2O). Three unique techniques, including thermoanalytical methods, one-step simultaneous differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy, and hot-stage microscopic (HSM) imaging, have been applied to study the solid-state phase transitions of MCP HCl H2O in continuous dehydration, amorphization and recrystallization processes. I also review the effects of grinding or heating on ion-exchange reactions, milling, compression or colyophilization on Maillard reactions, and γ-ray irradiation or electron beams on radiolysis in the solid state. I also report the exposure of MCP HCl H2O in solution to light, irradiation, oxidants or π-acceptors. This review will serve as a useful keynote for the evolving realm of solid-state chemistry research.

  7. Imaging the neural circuitry and chemical control of aggressive motivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanchard D Caroline

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the advent of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI in awake animals it is possible to resolve patterns of neuronal activity across the entire brain with high spatial and temporal resolution. Synchronized changes in neuronal activity across multiple brain areas can be viewed as functional neuroanatomical circuits coordinating the thoughts, memories and emotions for particular behaviors. To this end, fMRI in conscious rats combined with 3D computational analysis was used to identifying the putative distributed neural circuit involved in aggressive motivation and how this circuit is affected by drugs that block aggressive behavior. Results To trigger aggressive motivation, male rats were presented with their female cage mate plus a novel male intruder in the bore of the magnet during image acquisition. As expected, brain areas previously identified as critical in the organization and expression of aggressive behavior were activated, e.g., lateral hypothalamus, medial basal amygdala. Unexpected was the intense activation of the forebrain cortex and anterior thalamic nuclei. Oral administration of a selective vasopressin V1a receptor antagonist SRX251 or the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine, drugs that block aggressive behavior, both caused a general suppression of the distributed neural circuit involved in aggressive motivation. However, the effect of SRX251, but not fluoxetine, was specific to aggression as brain activation in response to a novel sexually receptive female was unaffected. Conclusion The putative neural circuit of aggressive motivation identified with fMRI includes neural substrates contributing to emotional expression (i.e. cortical and medial amygdala, BNST, lateral hypothalamus, emotional experience (i.e. hippocampus, forebrain cortex, anterior cingulate, retrosplenial cortex and the anterior thalamic nuclei that bridge the motor and cognitive components of aggressive responding

  8. Chemical shift selective magnetic resonance imaging of the optic nerve in patients with acute optic neuritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Thomsen, C; Frederiksen, J;

    1988-01-01

    Optic neuritis is often the first manifestation of multiple sclerosis (MS). Sixteen patients with acute optic neuritis and one patient with benign intracranial hypertension (BIH) were investigated by magnetic resonance imaging, using a chemical shift selective double spin echo sequence. In 3...... were only shown in 3/16 (19%) of the patients with optic neuritis. Nevertheless, the presented chemical shift selective double spin echo sequence may be of great value for detection of retrobulbar lesions....

  9. Chemical imaging of Fischer-Tropsch catalysts under operating conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Stephen W. T.; Martin, David J.; Parsons, Aaron D.; Sławiński, Wojciech A.; Vamvakeros, Antonios; Keylock, Stephen J.; Beale, Andrew M.; Mosselmans, J. Frederick W.

    2017-01-01

    Although we often understand empirically what constitutes an active catalyst, there is still much to be understood fundamentally about how catalytic performance is influenced by formulation. Catalysts are often designed to have a microstructure and nanostructure that can influence performance but that is rarely considered when correlating structure with function. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) is a well-known and potentially sustainable technology for converting synthetic natural gas (“syngas”: CO + H2) into functional hydrocarbons, such as sulfur- and aromatic-free fuel and high-value wax products. FTS catalysts typically contain Co or Fe nanoparticles, which are often optimized in terms of size/composition for a particular catalytic performance. We use a novel, “multimodal” tomographic approach to studying active Co-based catalysts under operando conditions, revealing how a simple parameter, such as the order of addition of metal precursors and promoters, affects the spatial distribution of the elements as well as their physicochemical properties, that is, crystalline phase and crystallite size during catalyst activation and operation. We show in particular how the order of addition affects the crystallinity of the TiO2 anatase phase, which in turn leads to the formation of highly intergrown cubic close-packed/hexagonal close-packed Co nanoparticles that are very reactive, exhibiting high CO conversion. This work highlights the importance of operando microtomography to understand the evolution of chemical species and their spatial distribution before any concrete understanding of impact on catalytic performance can be realized. PMID:28345057

  10. Occupational chemical exposures and congenital anomalies: state of the art

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordier, S. (Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Gustave-Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France)); Goujard, J. (Maternite Baudelocque, 75 - Paris (France))

    1994-01-01

    Several thousands of compounds with a potential reproductive toxicity have been identified in animals, some of them are teratogens. In humans, only a small number of chemicals, administered as drugs, present in the diet, or in the occupational environment are recognized human teratogens. In parallel, about 60% of congenital anomalies have no identified cause and most probably some compounds present in the environment may contribute to certain anomalies. This paper presents a review of published epidemiological studies on the association between occupational exposures and congenital anomalies, focusing more particularly on some groups of compounds or some occupations such as: anaesthetic gases, laboratory work, solvents, pesticides and lead. (authors).

  11. State-correlated DC slice imaging of formaldehyde photodissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suits, Arthur G.; Chambreau, Steven D.; Lahankar, Sridhar A.

    High-resolution slice imaging methods allow for detection of single product quantum states with sufficient velocity resolution to infer the full correlated product state distribution of the undetected fragment. This is a level of detail not available in previous studies of formaldehyde photodissociation, and in this application it reveals startling new aspects of unimolecular decomposition. The CO rotational distributions from near ultraviolet dissociation of formaldehyde are bimodal, and the imaging experiments allow us to decompose these into two dynamically distinct components: the conventional molecular dissociation over a high exit barrier, and a novel `roaming atom' reaction in which frustrated radical dissociation events lead to intramolecular H abstraction, bypassing the transition state entirely. In probing the dynamics of the conventional molecular dissociation over the barrier, we use the complete vH2-jCO correlation to model the exit channel dynamics in new detail. Furthermore, these state-correlated measurements provide insight into radical-radical reactions and the underlying dynamics and energy dependence of the roaming pathway.

  12. Standoff chemical D and Id with extended LWIR hyperspectral imaging spectroradiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prel, Florent; Moreau, Louis; Lavoie, Hugo; Bouffard, François; Thériault, Jean-Marc; Vallieres, Christian; Roy, Claude; Dubé, Denis

    2013-05-01

    Standoff detection and identification (D and Id) of unknown volatile chemicals such as chemical pollutants and consequences of industrial incidents has been increasingly desired for first responders and for environmental monitoring. On site gas detection sensors are commercially available and several of them can even detect more than one chemical species, however only few of them have the capabilities of detecting a wide variety of gases at long and safe distances. The ABB Hyperspectral Imaging Spectroradiometer (MR-i), configured for gas detection detects and identifies a wide variety of chemical species including toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) and surrogates several kilometers away from the sensor. This configuration is called iCATSI for improved Compact Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer. iCATSI is a standoff passive system. The modularity of the MR-i platform allows optimization of the detection configuration with a 256 x 256 Focal Plane Array imager or a line scanning imager both covering the long wave IR atmospheric window up to 14 μm. The uniqueness of its extended LWIR cut off enables to detect more chemicals as well as provide higher probability of detection than usual LWIR sensors.

  13. Imaging of Coulomb-Driven Quantum Hall Edge States

    KAUST Repository

    Lai, Keji

    2011-10-01

    The edges of a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in the quantum Hall effect (QHE) regime are divided into alternating metallic and insulating strips, with their widths determined by the energy gaps of the QHE states and the electrostatic Coulomb interaction. Local probing of these submicrometer features, however, is challenging due to the buried 2DEG structures. Using a newly developed microwave impedance microscope, we demonstrate the real-space conductivity mapping of the edge and bulk states. The sizes, positions, and field dependence of the edge strips around the sample perimeter agree quantitatively with the self-consistent electrostatic picture. The evolution of microwave images as a function of magnetic fields provides rich microscopic information around the ν=2 QHE state. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  14. Interaction-Enhanced Imaging of Rydberg P states

    CERN Document Server

    Gavryusev, Vladislav; Kekić, Armin; Zürn, Gerhard; Signoles, Adrien

    2016-01-01

    The Interaction Enhanced Imaging technique allows to detect the spatial distribution of strongly interacting impurities embedded within a gas of background atoms used as a contrast medium. Here we present a detailed study of this technique, applied to detect Rydberg $P$ states. We experimentally realize fast and efficient three-photon excitation of $P$ states, optimized according to the results of a theoretical effective two-level model. Few Rydberg $P$-state atoms, prepared in a small cloud with dimensions comparable to the blockade radius, are detected with a good sensitivity by averaging over 50 shots. The main aspects of the technique are described with a hard-sphere model, finding good agreement with experimental data. This work paves the way to a non-destructive optical detection of single Rydberg atoms with high spatial and temporal resolution.

  15. Chemical reaction rates and non-equilibrium pressure of reacting gas mixtures in the state-to-state approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustova, Elena V.; Kremer, Gilberto M.

    2014-12-01

    Viscous gas flows with vibrational relaxation and chemical reactions in the state-to-state approach are analyzed. A modified Chapman-Enskog method is used for the determination of chemical reaction and vibrational transition rates and non-equilibrium pressure. Constitutive equations depend on the thermodynamic forces: velocity divergence and chemical reaction/transition affinity. As an application, N2 flow with vibrational relaxation across a shock wave is investigated. Two distinct processes occur behind the shock: for small values of the distance the affinity is large and vibrational relaxation is in its initial stage; for large distances the affinity is small and the chemical reaction is in its final stage. The affinity contributes more to the transition rate than the velocity divergence and the effect of these two contributions are more important for small distances from the shock front. For the non-equilibrium pressure, the term associated with the bulk viscosity increases by a small amount the hydrostatic pressure.

  16. Cyanobactins from Cyanobacteria: Current Genetic and Chemical State of Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Martins

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria are considered to be one of the most promising sources of new, natural products. Apart from non-ribosomal peptides and polyketides, ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs are one of the leading groups of bioactive compounds produced by cyanobacteria. Among these, cyanobactins have sparked attention due to their interesting bioactivities and for their potential to be prospective candidates in the development of drugs. It is assumed that the primary source of cyanobactins is cyanobacteria, although these compounds have also been isolated from marine animals such as ascidians, sponges and mollusks. The aim of this review is to update the current knowledge of cyanobactins, recognized as being produced by cyanobacteria, and to emphasize their genetic clusters and chemical structures as well as their bioactivities, ecological roles and biotechnological potential.

  17. Cyanobactins from Cyanobacteria: Current Genetic and Chemical State of Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Joana; Vasconcelos, Vitor

    2015-11-13

    Cyanobacteria are considered to be one of the most promising sources of new, natural products. Apart from non-ribosomal peptides and polyketides, ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs) are one of the leading groups of bioactive compounds produced by cyanobacteria. Among these, cyanobactins have sparked attention due to their interesting bioactivities and for their potential to be prospective candidates in the development of drugs. It is assumed that the primary source of cyanobactins is cyanobacteria, although these compounds have also been isolated from marine animals such as ascidians, sponges and mollusks. The aim of this review is to update the current knowledge of cyanobactins, recognized as being produced by cyanobacteria, and to emphasize their genetic clusters and chemical structures as well as their bioactivities, ecological roles and biotechnological potential.

  18. Multiport solid-state imager characterization at variable pixel rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yates, G.J.; Albright, K.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Turko, B.T. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-08-01

    The imaging performance of an 8-port Full Frame Transfer Charge Coupled Device (FFT CCD) as a function of several parameters including pixel clock rate is presented. The device, model CCD- 13, manufactured by English Electric Valve (EEV) is a 512 {times} 512 pixel array designed with four individual programmable bidirectional serial registers and eight output amplifiers permitting simultaneous readout of eight segments (128 horizontal {times} 256 vertical pixels) of the array. The imager was evaluated in Los Alamos National Laboratory`s High-Speed Solid-State Imager Test Station at true pixel rates as high as 50 MHz for effective imager pixel rates approaching 400 MHz from multiporting. Key response characteristics measured include absolute responsivity, Charge-Transfer-Efficiency (CTE), dynamic range, resolution, signal-to-noise ratio, and electronic and optical crosstalk among the eight video channels. Preliminary test results and data obtained from the CCD-13 will be presented and the versatility/capabilities of the test station will be reviewed.

  19. [Proton imaging applications for proton therapy: state of the art].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amblard, R; Floquet, V; Angellier, G; Hannoun-Lévi, J M; Hérault, J

    2015-04-01

    Proton therapy allows a highly precise tumour volume irradiation with a low dose delivered to the healthy tissues. The steep dose gradients observed and the high treatment conformity require a precise knowledge of the proton range in matter and the target volume position relative to the beam. Thus, proton imaging allows an improvement of the treatment accuracy, and thereby, in treatment quality. Initially suggested in 1963, radiographic imaging with proton is still not used in clinical routine. The principal difficulty is the lack of spatial resolution, induced by the multiple Coulomb scattering of protons with nuclei. Moreover, its realization for all clinical locations requires relatively high energies that are previously not considered for clinical routine. Abandoned for some time in favor of X-ray technologies, research into new imaging methods using protons is back in the news because of the increase of proton radiation therapy centers in the world. This article exhibits a non-exhaustive state of the art in proton imaging.

  20. Prostate cancer: state of the art imaging and focal treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodrum, D A; Kawashima, A; Gorny, K R; Mynderse, L A

    2017-04-03

    In 2016, it is estimated 180,890 men are newly diagnosed with prostate cancer and 3,306,760 men live with prostate cancer in the United States. The introduction of multiparametric (mp) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the prostate, standardised interpretation guidelines such as Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS version 2), and MRI-based targeted biopsy has improved detection of clinically significant prostate cancer. Accurate risk stratification (Gleason grade/score and tumour stage) using imaging and image-guided targeted biopsy has become critical for the management of patients with prostate cancer. Recent advances in MRI-guided minimally invasive ablative treatment (MIAT) utilising cryoablation, laser ablation, high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation, have allowed accurate focal or regional delivery of optimal thermal energy to the biopsy proven, MRI-detected tumour, under real-time or near simultaneous MRI monitoring of the ablation zone. A contemporary review on prostate mpMRI, MRI-based targeted biopsy, and MRI-guided ablation techniques is presented.

  1. Brain imaging of pain: state of the art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Debbie L; Sandhu, Javin S; Jones, Anthony KP

    2016-01-01

    Pain is a complex sensory and emotional experience that is heavily influenced by prior experience and expectations of pain. Before the development of noninvasive human brain imaging, our grasp of the brain’s role in pain processing was limited to data from postmortem studies, direct recording of brain activity, patient experience and stimulation during neurosurgical procedures, and animal models of pain. Advances made in neuroimaging have bridged the gap between brain activity and the subjective experience of pain and allowed us to better understand the changes in the brain that are associated with both acute and chronic pain. Additionally, cognitive influences on pain such as attention, anticipation, and fear can now be directly observed, allowing for the interpretation of the neural basis of the psychological modulation of pain. The use of functional brain imaging to measure changes in endogenous neurochemistry has increased our understanding of how states of increased resilience and vulnerability to pain are maintained. PMID:27660488

  2. Brain imaging of pain: state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Debbie L; Sandhu, Javin S; Jones, Anthony Kp

    2016-01-01

    Pain is a complex sensory and emotional experience that is heavily influenced by prior experience and expectations of pain. Before the development of noninvasive human brain imaging, our grasp of the brain's role in pain processing was limited to data from postmortem studies, direct recording of brain activity, patient experience and stimulation during neurosurgical procedures, and animal models of pain. Advances made in neuroimaging have bridged the gap between brain activity and the subjective experience of pain and allowed us to better understand the changes in the brain that are associated with both acute and chronic pain. Additionally, cognitive influences on pain such as attention, anticipation, and fear can now be directly observed, allowing for the interpretation of the neural basis of the psychological modulation of pain. The use of functional brain imaging to measure changes in endogenous neurochemistry has increased our understanding of how states of increased resilience and vulnerability to pain are maintained.

  3. Investigation of drug distribution in tablets using surface enhanced Raman chemical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firkala, Tamás; Farkas, Attila; Vajna, Balázs; Farkas, István; Marosi, György

    2013-03-25

    This paper reports the first application of surface enhanced Raman chemical imaging on pharmaceutical tablets containing the active ingredient (API) in very low concentrations. Taking advantage of the extremely intensive Raman signals in the presence of silver colloids, image aquisition time was radically decreased. Moreover, the investigation of drug distribution below the detection limit of regular micro-Raman spectrometry was made feasible. The characteristics of different manufacturing technologies could be revealed at very low API concentrations by using chemometric methods for processing and evaluating the large number of varying spectra provided with this imaging method.

  4. Characterization of Chemical Suicides in the United States and Its Adverse Impact on Responders and Bystanders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayana R. Anderson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A suicide trend that involves mixing household chemicals to produce hydrogen sulfide or hydrogen cyanide, commonly referred to as a detergent, hydrogen sulfide, or chemical suicide is a continuing problem in the United States (U.S.. Because there is not one database responsible for tracking chemical suicides, the actual number of incidents in the U.S. is unknown. To prevent morbidity and mortality associated with chemical suicides, it is important to characterize the incidents that have occurred in the U.S. Methods: The author analyzed data from 2011-2013 from state health departments participating in the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry’s National Toxic Substance Incidents Program (NTSIP. NTSIP is a web-based chemical incident surveillance system that tracks the public health consequences (e.g., morbidity, mortality from acute chemical releases. Reporting sources for NTSIP incidents typically include first responders, hospitals, state environmental agencies, and media outlets. To find chemical suicide incidents in NTSIP’s database, the author queried open text fields in the comment, synopsis, and contributing factors variables for potential incidents. Results: Five of the nine states participating in NTSIP reported a total of 22 chemical suicide incidents or attempted suicides during 2011-2013. These states reported a total of 43 victims: 15 suicide victims who died, seven people who attempted suicide but survived, eight responders, and four employees working at a coroner’s office; the remainder were members of the general public. None of the injured responders reported receiving HazMat technician-level training, and none had documented appropriate personal protective equipment. Conclusion: Chemical suicides produce lethal gases that can pose a threat to responders and bystanders. Describing the characteristics of these incidents can help raise awareness among responders and the public about the dangers of

  5. Chemical imaging of cotton fibers using an infrared microscope and a focal-plane array detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this presentation, the chemical imaging of cotton fibers with an infrared microscope and a Focal-Plane Array (FPA) detector will be discussed. Infrared spectroscopy can provide us with information on the structure and quality of cotton fibers. In addition, FPA detectors allow for simultaneous spe...

  6. Visualization and prediction of porosity in roller compacted ribbonswith near infrared chemical imaging (NIR-CI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khorasani, Milad Rouhi; Amigo Rubio, Jose Manuel; Sonnergaard, Jørn

    2015-01-01

    The porosity of roller compacted ribbon is recognized as an important critical quality attribute which has a huge impact on the final product quality. The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of near-infrared chemical imaging (NIR-CI) for porosity estimation of ribbons produced...

  7. Investigation of Raman chemical imaging for detection of Lycopene changes in tomatoes during postharvest ripening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lycopene is a major carotenoid in tomatoes and detecting changes in lycopene content can be used to monitor the ripening of tomatoes. Raman chemical imaging is a new technique that shows promise for mapping constituents of interest in complex food matrices. In this study, a benchtop point-scanning...

  8. Generation of chemical movies: FT-IR spectroscopic imaging of segmented flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, K L Andrew; Niu, X; deMello, A J; Kazarian, S G

    2011-05-01

    We have previously demonstrated that FT-IR spectroscopic imaging can be used as a powerful, label-free detection method for studying laminar flows. However, to date, the speed of image acquisition has been too slow for the efficient detection of moving droplets within segmented flow systems. In this paper, we demonstrate the extraction of fast FT-IR images with acquisition times of 50 ms. This approach allows efficient interrogation of segmented flow systems where aqueous droplets move at a speed of 2.5 mm/s. Consecutive FT-IR images separated by 120 ms intervals allow the generation of chemical movies at eight frames per second. The technique has been applied to the study of microfluidic systems containing moving droplets of water in oil and droplets of protein solution in oil. The presented work demonstrates the feasibility of the use of FT-IR imaging to study dynamic systems with subsecond temporal resolution.

  9. Quantitative Chemically-Specific Coherent Diffractive Imaging of Buried Interfaces using a Tabletop EUV Nanoscope

    CERN Document Server

    Shanblatt, Elisabeth R; Gardner, Dennis F; Mancini, Giulia F; Karl, Robert M; Tanksalvala, Michael D; Bevis, Charles S; Vartanian, Victor H; Kapteyn, Henry C; Adams, Daniel E; Murnane, Margaret M

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing buried layers and interfaces is critical for a host of applications in nanoscience and nano-manufacturing. Here we demonstrate non-invasive, non-destructive imaging of buried interfaces using a tabletop, extreme ultraviolet (EUV), coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) nanoscope. Copper nanostructures inlaid in SiO2 are coated with 100 nm of aluminum, which is opaque to visible light and thick enough that neither optical microscopy nor atomic force microscopy can image the buried interfaces. Short wavelength (29 nm) high harmonic light can penetrate the aluminum layer, yielding high-contrast images of the buried structures. Moreover, differences in the absolute reflectivity of the interfaces before and after coating reveal the formation of interstitial diffusion and oxidation layers at the Al-Cu and Al-SiO2 boundaries. Finally, we show that EUV CDI provides a unique capability for quantitative, chemically-specific imaging of buried structures, and the material evolution that occurs at these buried ...

  10. From multispectral imaging of autofluorescence to chemical and sensory images of lipid oxidation in cod caviar paste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airado-Rodríguez, Diego; Høy, Martin; Skaret, Josefine; Wold, Jens Petter

    2014-05-01

    The potential of multispectral imaging of autofluorescence to map sensory flavour properties and fluorophore concentrations in cod caviar paste has been investigated. Cod caviar paste was used as a case product and it was stored over time, under different headspace gas composition and light exposure conditions, to obtain a relevant span in lipid oxidation and sensory properties. Samples were divided in two sets, calibration and test sets, with 16 and 7 samples, respectively. A third set of samples was prepared with induced gradients in lipid oxidation and sensory properties by light exposure of certain parts of the sample surface. Front-face fluorescence emission images were obtained for excitation wavelength 382 nm at 11 different channels ranging from 400 to 700 nm. The analysis of the obtained sets of images was divided in two parts: First, in an effort to compress and extract relevant information, multivariate curve resolution was applied on the calibration set and three spectral components and their relative concentrations in each sample were obtained. The obtained profiles were employed to estimate the concentrations of each component in the images of the heterogeneous samples, giving chemical images of the distribution of fluorescent oxidation products, protoporphyrin IX and photoprotoporphyrin. Second, regression models for sensory attributes related to lipid oxidation were constructed based on the spectra of homogeneous samples from the calibration set. These models were successfully validated with the test set. The models were then applied for pixel-wise estimation of sensory flavours in the heterogeneous images, giving rise to sensory images. As far as we know this is the first time that sensory images of odour and flavour are obtained based on multispectral imaging.

  11. Particle Filter with State Permutations for Solving Image Jigsaw Puzzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xingwei; Adluru, Nagesh; Latecki, Longin Jan

    2016-01-01

    We deal with an image jigsaw puzzle problem, which is defined as reconstructing an image from a set of square and non-overlapping image patches. It is known that a general instance of this problem is NP-complete, and it is also challenging for humans, since in the considered setting the original image is not given. Recently a graphical model has been proposed to solve this and related problems. The target label probability function is then maximized using loopy belief propagation. We also formulate the problem as maximizing a label probability function and use exactly the same pairwise potentials. Our main contribution is a novel inference approach in the sampling framework of Particle Filter (PF). Usually in the PF framework it is assumed that the observations arrive sequentially, e.g., the observations are naturally ordered by their time stamps in the tracking scenario. Based on this assumption, the posterior density over the corresponding hidden states is estimated. In the jigsaw puzzle problem all observations (puzzle pieces) are given at once without any particular order. Therefore, we relax the assumption of having ordered observations and extend the PF framework to estimate the posterior density by exploring different orders of observations and selecting the most informative permutations of observations. This significantly broadens the scope of applications of the PF inference. Our experimental results demonstrate that the proposed inference framework significantly outperforms the loopy belief propagation in solving the image jigsaw puzzle problem. In particular, the extended PF inference triples the accuracy of the label assignment compared to that using loopy belief propagation.

  12. Evaluation of C60 secondary ion mass spectrometry for the chemical analysis and imaging of fingerprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisco, Edward; Demoranville, Leonard T; Gillen, Greg

    2013-09-10

    The feasibility of using C60(+) cluster primary ion bombardment secondary ion mass spectrometry (C60(+) SIMS) for the analysis of the chemical composition of fingerprints is evaluated. It was found that C60(+) SIMS could be used to detect and image the spatial localization of a number of sebaceous and eccrine components in fingerprints. These analyses were also found to not be hindered by the use of common latent print powder development techniques. Finally, the ability to monitor the depth distribution of fingerprint constituents was found to be possible - a capability which has not been shown using other chemical imaging techniques. This paper illustrates a number of strengths and potential weaknesses of C60(+) SIMS as an additional or complimentary technique for the chemical analysis of fingerprints.

  13. Chemical climatology of the southeastern United States, 1999-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidy, G. M.; Blanchard, C. L.; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, E.; Tanenbaum, S.; Shaw, S.; Knipping, E.; Tombach, I.; Jansen, J.; Walters, J.

    2014-11-01

    A series of experiments (the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study - SOAS) took place in central Alabama in June-July, 2013 as part of the broader Southern Atmosphere Study (SAS). These projects were aimed at studying oxidant photochemistry and formation and impacts of aerosols at a detailed process level in a location where high biogenic organic vapor emissions interact with anthropogenic emissions, and the atmospheric chemistry occurs in a subtropical climate in North America. The majority of the ground-based experiments were located at the Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization (SEARCH) Centreville (CTR) site near Brent, Alabama, where extensive, unique aerometric measurements of trace gases and particles and meteorology were made beginning in the early 1990s through 2013. The SEARCH network data permits a characterization of the temporal and spatial context of the SOAS findings. Our earlier analyses of emissions and air quality trends are extended through 2013 to provide a perspective for continued decline in ambient concentrations, and the implications of these changes to regional sulfur oxide, nitrogen-ozone, and carbon chemistry. The narrative supports the SAS program in terms of long-term average chemistry (chemical climatology) and short-term comparisons of early summer average spatial variability across the southeastern US at high temporal (hourly) resolution. The long-term measurements show that the SOAS experiments took place during the second wettest and coolest year in the 2000-2013 period, with lower than average solar radiation. The pollution levels at CTR and other SEARCH sites were the lowest since full measurements began in 1999. Changes in anthropogenic gas and particle emissions between 1999 and 2013 account for the decline in pollutant concentrations at the monitoring sites in the region. The data provide an opportunity to contrast SOAS results with temporally and spatially variable conditions in support of the development of tests

  14. Chemical climatology of the southeastern United States, 1999–2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Hidy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A series of experiments (the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study-SOAS took place in central Alabama in June–July 2013 as part of the broader Southern Atmosphere Study (SAS. These projects were aimed at studying oxidant photochemistry and formation and impacts of aerosols at a detailed process level in a location where high biogenic organic vapor emissions interact with anthropogenic emissions, and the atmospheric chemistry occurs in a subtropical climate in North America. The majority of the ground-based experiments were located at the Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization (SEARCH Centreville (CTR site near Brent, Alabama, where extensive, unique aerometric measurements of meteorology, trace gases and particles have been made from the early 1990s through 2013. The SEARCH network data permits a characterization of temporal and spatial context of the SOAS findings. The long-term measurements show that the SOAS experiments took place during the second wettest and coolest year in the 2000–2013 period, with lower than average solar radiation. The pollution levels at CTR and other SEARCH sites were the lowest since full measurements began in 1999. This dataset provides a perspective for the SOAS program in terms of long-term average chemistry (chemical climatology and short-term comparisons of summer average spatial variability across the Southeast at high temporal (hourly resolution. Changes in anthropogenic gas and particle emissions between 1999 and 2013, account for the decline in pollutant concentrations at the monitoring sites in the region. The long-term and short-term data provide an opportunity to contrast SOAS results with temporally and spatially variable conditions in support for the development of tests for the robustness of SOAS findings.

  15. Multicomponent chemical imaging of pharmaceutical solid dosage forms with broadband CARS microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartshorn, Christopher M; Lee, Young Jong; Camp, Charles H; Liu, Zhen; Heddleston, John; Canfield, Nicole; Rhodes, Timothy A; Hight Walker, Angela R; Marsac, Patrick J; Cicerone, Marcus T

    2013-09-03

    We compare a coherent Raman imaging modality, broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (BCARS) microscopy, with spontaneous Raman microscopy for quantitative and qualitative assessment of multicomponent pharmaceuticals. Indomethacin was used as a model active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and was analyzed in a tabulated solid dosage form, embedded within commonly used excipients. In comparison with wide-field spontaneous Raman chemical imaging, BCARS acquired images 10× faster, at higher spatiochemical resolution and with spectra of much higher SNR, eliminating the need for multivariate methods to identify chemical components. The significant increase in spatiochemical resolution allowed identification of an unanticipated API phase that was missed by the spontaneous wide-field method and bulk Raman spectroscopy. We confirmed the presence of the unanticipated API phase using confocal spontaneous Raman, which provided spatiochemical resolution similar to BCARS but at 100× slower acquisition times.

  16. Steady-state properties of a finite system driven by a chemical-potential gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jørgen Vitting; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    1990-01-01

    A two-dimensional lattice-gas model with repulsive interactions periodically infinite in one dimension and finite in the other is driven into a mass-transporting steady state by asymmetric chemical potentials applied at the open edges. By computer-simulation techniques the steady-state current...

  17. Screening of adulterants in powdered foods and ingredients using line-scan Raman chemical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jianwei; Chao, Kuanglin; Kim, Moon S.

    2015-05-01

    A newly developed line-scan Raman imaging system using a 785 nm line laser was used to authenticate powdered foods and ingredients. The system was used to collect hyperspectral Raman images in a wavenumber range of 102-2865 cm-1 from three representative food powders mixed with selected adulterants with a concentration of 0.5%, including milk and melamine, flour and benzoyl peroxide, and starch and maleic anhydride. An acoustic mixer was used to create food adulterant mixtures. All the mixed samples were placed in sample holders with a surface area of 50 mm×50 mm. Spectral and image processing algorithms were developed based on single-band images at unique Raman peaks of the individual adulterants. Chemical images were created to show identification, spatial distribution, and morphological features of the adulterant particles mixed in the food powders. The potential of estimating mass concentrations of the adulterants using the percentages of the adulterant pixels in the chemical images was also demonstrated.

  18. Quantitative super-resolution imaging of Bruchpilot distinguishes active zone states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehmann, Nadine; van de Linde, Sebastian; Alon, Amit; Ljaschenko, Dmitrij; Keung, Xi Zhen; Holm, Thorge; Rings, Annika; DiAntonio, Aaron; Hallermann, Stefan; Ashery, Uri; Heckmann, Manfred; Sauer, Markus; Kittel, Robert J

    2014-08-18

    The precise molecular architecture of synaptic active zones (AZs) gives rise to different structural and functional AZ states that fundamentally shape chemical neurotransmission. However, elucidating the nanoscopic protein arrangement at AZs is impeded by the diffraction-limited resolution of conventional light microscopy. Here we introduce new approaches to quantify endogenous protein organization at single-molecule resolution in situ with super-resolution imaging by direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM). Focusing on the Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ), we find that the AZ cytomatrix (CAZ) is composed of units containing ~137 Bruchpilot (Brp) proteins, three quarters of which are organized into about 15 heptameric clusters. We test for a quantitative relationship between CAZ ultrastructure and neurotransmitter release properties by engaging Drosophila mutants and electrophysiology. Our results indicate that the precise nanoscopic organization of Brp distinguishes different physiological AZ states and link functional diversification to a heretofore unrecognized neuronal gradient of the CAZ ultrastructure.

  19. Evaluating carotenoid changes in tomatoes during postharvest ripening using Raman chemical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jianwei; Chao, Kuanglin; Kim, Moon S.

    2011-06-01

    Lycopene is a major carotenoid in tomatoes and its content varies considerably during postharvest ripening. Hence evaluating lycopene changes can be used to monitor the ripening of tomatoes. Raman chemical imaging technique is promising for mapping constituents of interest in complex food matrices. In this study, a benchtop point-scanning Raman chemical imaging system was developed to evaluate lycopene content in tomatoes at different maturity stages. The system consists of a 785 nm laser, a fiber optic probe, a dispersive imaging spectrometer, a spectroscopic CCD camera, and a two-axis positioning table. Tomato samples at different ripeness stages (i.e., green, breaker, turning, pink, light red, and red) were selected and cut before imaging. Hyperspectral Raman images were acquired from cross sections of the fruits in the wavenumber range of 200 to 2500 cm-1 with a spatial resolution of 1 mm. The Raman spectrum of pure lycopene was measured as reference for spectral matching. A polynomial curve-fitting method was used to correct for the underlying fluorescence background in the Raman spectra of the tomatoes. A hyperspectral image classification method was developed based on spectral information divergence to identify lycopene in the tomatoes. Raman chemical images were created to visualize quantity and spatial distribution of the lycopene at different ripeness stages. The lycopene patterns revealed the mechanism of lycopene generation during the postharvest development of the tomatoes. The method and findings of this study form a basis for the future development of a Raman-based nondestructive approach for monitoring internal maturity of the tomatoes.

  20. Infrared hyperspectral tunable filter imaging spectrometer for remote leak detection, chemical speciation, and stack/vent analysis applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinnrichs, Michele

    2002-02-01

    With support from the Department of Energy, the State of California and the Gas Technology Institute, Pacific Advanced Technology is developing a small field portable infrared imaging spectrometer (Sherlock) based on the advances in hyperspectral tunable filter technology, that will be applied to the detection of fugitive gas leaks. This imaging spectrometer uses the Image Multi-spectral Sensing (IMSS) diffractive optic tunable filter invented by Pacific Advanced Technology . The Sherlock has an embedded digital signal processor for real time detection of the gas leak while surrounded by severe background noise. The infrared sensor engine is a 256 x 320 midwave cooled focal plane array which spans the spectral range from 3 to 5 microns, ideal for most hydrocarbon leaks. The technology is by no means limited to this spectral region, and can just as easily work in the longwave infrared from 8 to 12 microns for chemical detection applications. This paper will present the design of the Sherlock camera as well as processed data collected at a gas processing plant and an instrumented kiln at LSU using the prototype camera. The processed data shows that the IMSS imaging spectrometer, using an all passive approach, has the sensitivity to detect methane gas leaks at short range with a flow rate as low as 0.01 scfm2. In addition, the IMSS imaging spectrometer can measure hot gas plumes at longer ranges. As will be shown in this paper the IMSS can detect and image warm species gas additives of methane and propane in the Kiln exhaust stack. The methane injected gas with a concentration of 72 ppm and the propane with a concentration of 49 ppm (as seen by the IMSS sensor) at a range of 60 meters. The atmospheric path was a stressing environment, being hot and humid, for any imaging infrared spectrometer.

  1. Analysis of pharmaceutical pellets: An approach using near-infrared chemical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabin, Guilherme P.; Breitkreitz, Marcia C.; Souza, Andre M. de [Institute of Chemistry, University of Campinas, P.O. Box 6154, 13084-971 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Fonseca, Patricia da; Calefe, Lupercio; Moffa, Mario [Zelus Servicos para Industria Farmaceutica Ltda., Av. Professor Lineu Prestes n. 2242, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Poppi, Ronei J., E-mail: ronei@iqm.unicamp.br [Institute of Chemistry, University of Campinas, P.O. Box 6154, 13084-971 Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2011-11-07

    Highlights: {yields} Near-Infrared Chemical Imaging was used for pellets analysis. {yields} Distribution of the components throughout the coatings layers and core of the pellets was estimated. {yields} Classical Least Squares (CLS) was used for calculation of the concentration maps. - Abstract: Pharmaceutical pellets are spherical or nearly spherical multi-unit dosage forms designed to optimize pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics features of drug release. The distribution of the pharmaceutical ingredients in the layers and core is a very important parameter for appropriate drug release, especially for pellets manufactured by the process of layer gain. Physical aspects of the sample are normally evaluated by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), but it is in many cases unsuitable to provide conclusive chemical information about the distribution of the pharmaceutical ingredients in both layers and core. On the other hand, methods based on spectroscopic imaging can be very promising for this purpose. In this work, a Near-Infrared Chemical Imaging (NIR-CI) method was developed and applied to the analysis of diclophenac sodium pellets. Since all the compounds present in the sample were known in advance, Classical Least Squares (CLS) was used for calculations. The results have shown that the method was capable of providing chemical information about the distribution of the active ingredient and excipients in the core and coating layers and therefore can be complementary to SEM for the pharmaceutical development of pellets.

  2. A Raman chemical imaging system for detection of contaminants in food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Kaunglin; Qin, Jianwei; Kim, Moon S.; Mo, Chang Yeon

    2011-06-01

    This study presented a preliminary investigation into the use of macro-scale Raman chemical imaging for the screening of dry milk powder for the presence of chemical contaminants. Melamine was mixed into dry milk at concentrations (w/w) of 0.2%, 0.5%, 1.0%, 2.0%, 5.0%, and 10.0% and images of the mixtures were analyzed by a spectral information divergence algorithm. Ammonium sulfate, dicyandiamide, and urea were each separately mixed into dry milk at concentrations of (w/w) of 0.5%, 1.0%, and 5.0%, and an algorithm based on self-modeling mixture analysis was applied to these sample images. The contaminants were successfully detected and the spatial distribution of the contaminants within the sample mixtures was visualized using these algorithms. Although further studies are necessary, macro-scale Raman chemical imaging shows promise for use in detecting contaminants in food ingredients and may also be useful for authentication of food ingredients.

  3. Time-resolved imaging of purely valence-electron dynamics during a chemical reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hockett, Paul; Bisgaard, Christer Z.; Clarkin, Owen J.

    2011-01-01

    Chemical reactions are manifestations of the dynamics of molecular valence electrons and their couplings to atomic motions. Emerging methods in attosecond science can probe purely electronic dynamics in atomic and molecular systems(1-6). By contrast, time-resolved structural-dynamics methods......,17): in both cases, this sensitivity derives from the ionization-matrix element(18,19). Here we demonstrate a time-resolved molecular-frame photoelectron-angular-distribution (TRMFPAD) method for imaging the purely valence-electron dynamics during a chemical reaction. Specifically, the TRMFPADs measured during...

  4. Hierarchy of Electronic Properties of Chemically Derived and Pristine Graphene Probed by Microwave Imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Kundhikanjana, Worasom

    2009-11-11

    Local electrical imaging using microwave impedance microscope is performed on graphene in different modalities, yielding a rich hierarchy of the local conductivity. The low-conductivity graphite oxide and its derivatives show significant electronic inhomogeneity. For the conductive chemical graphene, the residual defects lead to a systematic reduction of the microwave signals. In contrast, the signals on pristine graphene agree well with a lumped-element circuit model. The local impedance information can also be used to verify the electrical contact between overlapped graphene pieces. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  5. Infrared chemical imaging: Spatial resolution evaluation and super-resolution concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Offroy, Marc [Laboratoire de Spectrochimie Infrarouge et Raman, LASIR, CNRS UMR 8516, Bat. C5, Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Roggo, Yves [F. Hoffmann-La Roche A.G., Basel (Switzerland); Milanfar, Peyman [Multi-Dimensional Signal Processing Laboratory, Electrical Engineering Department, Baskin School of Engineering, University of California, 1156 High Street, Mailcode SOE2, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Duponchel, Ludovic, E-mail: ludovic.duponchel@univ-lille1.fr [Laboratoire de Spectrochimie Infrarouge et Raman, LASIR, CNRS UMR 8516, Bat. C5, Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)

    2010-08-03

    Chemical imaging systems help to solve many challenges in various scientific fields. Able to deliver rapid spatial and chemical information, modern infrared spectrometers using Focal Plane Array detectors (FPA) are of great interest. Considering conventional infrared spectrometers with a single element detector, we can consider that the diffraction-limited spatial resolution is more or less equal to the wavelength of the light (i.e. 2.5-25 {mu}m). Unfortunately, the spatial resolution of FPA spectroscopic setup is even lower due to the detector pixel size. This becomes a real constraint when micron-sized samples are analysed. New chemometrics methods are thus of great interest to overcome such resolution drawback, while keeping our far-field infrared imaging spectrometers. The aim of the present work is to evaluate the super-resolution concept in order to increase the spatial resolution of infrared imaging spectrometers using FPA detectors. The main idea of super-resolution is the fusion of several low-resolution images of the same sample to obtain a higher-resolution image. Applying the super-resolution concept on a relatively low number of FPA acquisitions, it was possible to observe a 30% decrease in spatial resolution.

  6. Two decades of chemical imaging of solutes in sediments and soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santner, Jakob; Larsen, Morten; Kreuzeder, Andreas;

    2015-01-01

    sampling of solutes (diffusive equilibration in thin films, diffusive gradients in thin films) followed by planar luminescent sensors (planar optodes) have been used as analytical tools for studies on solute distribution and dynamics. These approaches have provided new conceptual and quantitative......-called sandwich sensors for multianalyte measurements. Here we review the capabilities and limitations of the chemical imaging methods that are currently at hand, using a number of case studies, and provide an outlook on potential future developments for two-dimensional solute imaging in soils and sediments....

  7. Mapping from Speech to Images Using Continuous State Space Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehn-Schiøler, Tue; Hansen, Lars Kai; Larsen, Jan

    2005-01-01

    In this paper a system that transforms speech waveforms to animated faces are proposed. The system relies on continuous state space models to perform the mapping, this makes it possible to ensure video with no sudden jumps and allows continuous control of the parameters in 'face space...... a subjective point of view the model is able to construct an image sequence from an unknown noisy speech sequence even though the number of training examples are limited.......'. The performance of the system is critically dependent on the number of hidden variables, with too few variables the model cannot represent data, and with too many overfitting is noticed. Simulations are performed on recordings of 3-5 sec.\\$\\backslash\\$ video sequences with sentences from the Timit database. From...

  8. [Relationship among soil enzyme activities, vegetation state, and soil chemical properties of coal cinder yard].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Youbao; Zhang, Li; Liu, Dengyi

    2003-01-01

    From field investigation and laboratory analysis, the relationships among soil enzyme activities, vegetation state and soil chemical properties of coal cinder yard in thermal power station were studied. The results showed that vegetation on coal cinder yard was distributed in scattered patch mainly with single species of plant, and herbs were the dominant species. At the same time, the activity of three soil enzymes had a stronger relativity to environment conditions, such as vegetation state and soil chemical properties. The sensitivity of three soil enzymes to environmental stress was in order of urease > sucrase > catalase. The relativity of three soil enzymes to environmental factor was in order of sucrase > urease > catalase. Because of urease being the most susceptible enzyme to environmental conditions, and it was marked or utmost marked interrelated with vegetation state and soil chemical properties, urease activity could be used as an indicator for the reclamation of wasteland.

  9. DPABI: Data Processing & Analysis for (Resting-State) Brain Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chao-Gan; Wang, Xin-Di; Zuo, Xi-Nian; Zang, Yu-Feng

    2016-07-01

    Brain imaging efforts are being increasingly devoted to decode the functioning of the human brain. Among neuroimaging techniques, resting-state fMRI (R-fMRI) is currently expanding exponentially. Beyond the general neuroimaging analysis packages (e.g., SPM, AFNI and FSL), REST and DPARSF were developed to meet the increasing need of user-friendly toolboxes for R-fMRI data processing. To address recently identified methodological challenges of R-fMRI, we introduce the newly developed toolbox, DPABI, which was evolved from REST and DPARSF. DPABI incorporates recent research advances on head motion control and measurement standardization, thus allowing users to evaluate results using stringent control strategies. DPABI also emphasizes test-retest reliability and quality control of data processing. Furthermore, DPABI provides a user-friendly pipeline analysis toolkit for rat/monkey R-fMRI data analysis to reflect the rapid advances in animal imaging. In addition, DPABI includes preprocessing modules for task-based fMRI, voxel-based morphometry analysis, statistical analysis and results viewing. DPABI is designed to make data analysis require fewer manual operations, be less time-consuming, have a lower skill requirement, a smaller risk of inadvertent mistakes, and be more comparable across studies. We anticipate this open-source toolbox will assist novices and expert users alike and continue to support advancing R-fMRI methodology and its application to clinical translational studies.

  10. Brain imaging of pain: state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morton DL

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Debbie L Morton, Javin S Sandhu, Anthony KP Jones Human Pain Research Group, Institute of Brain, Behaviour and Mental Health, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK Abstract: Pain is a complex sensory and emotional experience that is heavily influenced by prior experience and expectations of pain. Before the development of noninvasive human brain imaging, our grasp of the brain’s role in pain processing was limited to data from postmortem studies, direct recording of brain activity, patient experience and stimulation during neurosurgical procedures, and animal models of pain. Advances made in neuroimaging have bridged the gap between brain activity and the subjective experience of pain and allowed us to better understand the changes in the brain that are associated with both acute and chronic pain. Additionally, cognitive influences on pain such as attention, anticipation, and fear can now be directly observed, allowing for the interpretation of the neural basis of the psychological modulation of pain. The use of functional brain imaging to measure changes in endogenous neurochemistry has increased our understanding of how states of increased resilience and vulnerability to pain are maintained. Keywords: fMRI, PET, EEG, arthritis, fibromyalgia

  11. Looking for chemical reaction networks exhibiting a drift along a manifold of marginally stable states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogioli, Doriano

    2013-02-07

    I recently reported some examples of mass-action equations that have a continuous manifold of marginally stable stationary states [Brogioli, D., 2010. Marginally stable chemical systems as precursors of life. Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 058102; Brogioli, D., 2011. Marginal stability in chemical systems and its relevance in the origin of life. Phys. Rev. E 84, 031931]. The corresponding chemical reaction networks show nonclassical effects, i.e. a violation of the mass-action equations, under the effect of the concentration fluctuations: the chemical system drifts along the marginally stable states. I proposed that this effect is potentially involved in abiogenesis. In the present paper, I analyze the mathematical properties of mass-action equations of marginally stable chemical reaction networks. The marginal stability implies that the mass-action equations obey some conservation law; I show that the mathematical properties of the conserved quantity characterize the motion along the marginally stable stationary state manifold, i.e. they allow to predict if the fluctuations give rise to a random walk or a drift under the effect of concentration fluctuations. Moreover, I show that the presence of the drift along the manifold of marginally stable stationary-states is a critical property, i.e. at least one of the reaction constants must be fine tuned in order to obtain the drift.

  12. Biochemical imaging of cervical intervertebral discs with glycosaminoglycan chemical exchange saturation transfer magnetic resonance imaging: feasibility and initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleich, Christoph; Mueller-Lutz, Anja; Zimmermann, Lisa; Boos, Johannes; Wittsack, Hans-Joerg; Antoch, Gerald; Miese, Falk [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Dusseldorf (Germany); Schmitt, Benjamin [Siemens Ltd. Australia, Healthcare Sector, Macquarie Park, NSW (Australia)

    2016-01-15

    To evaluate glycosaminoglycan chemical exchange saturation transfer (gagCEST) imaging at 3T in the assessment of the GAG content of cervical IVDs in healthy volunteers. Forty-two cervical intervertebral discs of seven healthy volunteers (four females, three males; mean age: 21.4 ± 1.4 years; range: 19-24 years) were examined at a 3T MRI scanner in this prospective study. The MRI protocol comprised standard morphological, sagittal T2 weighted (T2w) images to assess the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based grading system for cervical intervertebral disc degeneration (IVD) and biochemical imaging with gagCEST to calculate a region-of-interest analysis of nucleus pulposus (NP) and annulus fibrosus (AF). GagCEST of cervical IVDs was technically successful at 3T with significant higher gagCEST values in NP compared to AF (1.17 % ± 1.03 % vs. 0.79 % ± 1.75 %; p = 0.005). We found topological differences of gagCEST values of the cervical spine with significant higher gagCEST effects in lower IVDs (r = 1; p = 0). We could demonstrate a significant, negative correlation between gagCEST values and cervical disc degeneration of NP (r = -0.360; p = 0.019). Non-degenerated IVDs had significantly higher gagCEST effects compared to degenerated IVDs in NP (1.76 % ± 0.92 % vs. 0.52 % ± 1.17 %; p < 0.001). Biochemical imaging of cervical IVDs is feasible at 3T. GagCEST analysis demonstrated a topological GAG distribution of the cervical spine. The depletion of GAG in the NP with increasing level of morphological degeneration can be assessed using gagCEST imaging. (orig.)

  13. Super-resolution chemical imaging with dynamic placement of plasmonic hotspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Aeli P.; Ertsgaard, Christopher T.; McKoskey, Rachel M.; Rich, Isabel S.; Lindquist, Nathan C.

    2015-08-01

    We demonstrate dynamic placement of plasmonic "hotspots" for super-resolution chemical imaging via Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS). A silver nanohole array surface was coated with biological samples and illuminated with a laser. Due to the large plasmonic field enhancements, blinking behavior of the SERS hotspots was observed and processed using a Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy (STORM) algorithm enabling localization to within 10 nm. However, illumination of the sample with a single static laser beam (i.e., a slightly defocused Gaussian beam) only produced SERS hotspots in fixed locations on the surface, leaving noticeable gaps in any final image. But, by using a spatial light modulator (SLM), the illumination profile of the beam could be altered, shifting any hotspots across the nanohole array surface in sub-wavelength steps. Therefore, by properly structuring an illuminating light field with the SLM, we show the possibility of positioning plasmonic hotspots over a metallic nanohole surface on-the-fly. Using this and our SERS-STORM imaging technique, we show potential for high-resolution chemical imaging without the noticeable gaps that were present with static laser illumination. Interestingly, even illuminating the surface with randomly shifting SLM phase profiles was sufficient to completely fill in a wide field of view for super-resolution SERS imaging of a single strand of 100-nm thick collagen protein fibrils. Images were then compared to those obtained with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Additionally, we explored alternative methods of phase shifting other than holographic illumination through the SLM to create localization of hotspots necessary for SERS-STORM imaging.

  14. Crime Scene Investigation: Clinical Application of Chemical Shift Imaging as a Problem Solving Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-26

    MDW/SGVU SUBJECT: Professional Presentation Approva l 26 FEB 2016 1. Your paper, entitled Crime Scene Investigation: Clinical Aoolication of...or technical information as a publication/presentation, a new 59 MDW Form 3039 must be submitted for review and approval.] Crime Scene Investiga...tion: Clinical Application of Chemical Shift Imaging as a Problem Solving Tool 1. TITLE OF MATERIAL TO BE PUBLISHED OR PRESENTED Crime Scene

  15. Real time chemical imaging of a working catalytic membrane reactor during oxidative coupling of methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vamvakeros, A; Jacques, S D M; Middelkoop, V; Di Michiel, M; Egan, C K; Ismagilov, I Z; Vaughan, G B M; Gallucci, F; van Sint Annaland, M; Shearing, P R; Cernik, R J; Beale, A M

    2015-08-18

    We report the results from an operando XRD-CT study of a working catalytic membrane reactor for the oxidative coupling of methane. These results reveal the importance of the evolving solid state chemistry during catalytic reaction, particularly the chemical interaction between the catalyst and the oxygen transport membrane.

  16. Handheld hyperspectral imager for standoff detection of chemical and biological aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinnrichs, Michele; Jensen, James O.; McAnally, Gerard

    2004-08-01

    Pacific Advanced Technology has developed a small hand held imaging spectrometer, Sherlock, for gas leak and aerosol detection and imaging. The system is based on a patented technique, (IMSS Image Multi-spectral Sensing), that uses diffractive optics and image processing algorithms to detect spectral information about objects in the scene of the camera. This cameras technology has been tested at Dugway Proving Ground and Dstl Porton Down facilities looking at Chemical and Biological agent simulants. In addition to Chemical and Biological detection, the camera has been used for environmental monitoring of green house gases and is currently undergoing extensive laboratory and field testing by the Gas Technology Institute, British Petroleum and Shell Oil for applications for gas leak detection and repair. In this paper we will present some of the results from the data collection at the TRE test at Dugway Proving Ground during the summer of 2002 and laboratory testing at the Dstl facility at Porton Down in the UK in the fall of 2002.

  17. Two decades of chemical imaging of solutes in sediments and soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santner, Jakob; Larsen, Morten; Kreuzeder, Andreas;

    2015-01-01

    -called sandwich sensors for multianalyte measurements. Here we review the capabilities and limitations of the chemical imaging methods that are currently at hand, using a number of case studies, and provide an outlook on potential future developments for two-dimensional solute imaging in soils and sediments.......The increasing appreciation of the small-scale (sub-mm) heterogeneity of biogeochemical processes in sediments, wetlands and soils has led to the development of several methods for high-resolution two-dimensional imaging of solute distribution in porewaters. Over the past decades, localised...... sampling of solutes (diffusive equilibration in thin films, diffusive gradients in thin films) followed by planar luminescent sensors (planar optodes) have been used as analytical tools for studies on solute distribution and dynamics. These approaches have provided new conceptual and quantitative...

  18. Raman imaging to study structural and chemical features of the dentin enamel junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alebrahim, M. Anwar; Krafft, C.; Popp, J.

    2015-10-01

    The structure and chemical features of the human dentin enamel junction (DEJ) were characterized using Raman spectroscopic imaging. Slices were prepared from 10 German, and 10 Turkish teeth. Raman images were collected at 785 nm excitation and the average Raman spectra were calculated for analysis. Univariate and multivariate spectral analysis were applied for investigation. Raman images were obtained based on the intensity ratios of CH at 1450 cm-1 (matrix) to phosphate at 960 cm-1 (mineral), and carbonate to phosphate (1070/960) ratios. Different algorithms (HCA, K-means cluster and VCA) also used to study the DEJ. The obtained results showed that the width of DEJ is about 5 pm related to univariate method while it varies from 6 to 12 μm based on multivariate spectral technique. Both spectral analyses showed increasing in carbonate content inside the DEJ compared to the dentin, and the amide I (collagen) peak in dentin spectra is higher than DEJ spectra peak.

  19. Mapping lipid and collagen by multispectral photoacoustic imaging of chemical bond vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pu; Wang, Ping; Wang, Han-Wei; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2012-09-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy using vibrational overtone absorption as a contrast mechanism allows bond-selective imaging of deep tissues. Due to the spectral similarity of molecules in the region of overtone vibration, it is difficult to interrogate chemical components using photoacoustic signal at single excitation wavelength. Here we demonstrate that lipids and collagen, two critical markers for many kinds of diseases, can be distinguished by multispectral photoacoustic imaging of the first overtone of C-H bond. A phantom consisting of rat-tail tendon and fat was constructed to demonstrate this technique. Wavelengths between 1650 and 1850 nm were scanned to excite both the first overtone and combination bands of C-H bonds. B-scan multispectral photoacoustic images, in which each pixel contains a spectrum, were analyzed by a multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares algorithm to recover the spatial distribution of collagen and lipids in the phantom.

  20. Development of Methods for Obtaining Position Image and Chemical Binding Information from Flow Experiments of Porous Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haugan, Are

    1998-12-01

    Existing oil reservoirs might be more fully exploited if the properties of the flow of oil and water in porous media were better known. In laboratory experiments it is important to collect as much information as possible to make a descriptive model of the system, including position imaging and chemical binding information. This thesis develops nuclear methods for obtaining position image and chemical binding information from flow experiments of porous media. A combined positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography system to obtain position images, and a time-differential perturbed angular correlation system to obtain chemical binding information, have been built and thoroughly tested. 68 refs., 123 figs., 14 tabs.

  1. SURFACE AND LIGHTNING SOURCES OF NITROGEN OXIDES OVER THE UNITED STATES: MAGNITUDES, CHEMICAL EVOLUTION, AND OUTFLOW

    Science.gov (United States)

    We use observations from two aircraft during the ICARTT campaign over the eastern United States and North Atlantic during summer 2004, interpreted with a global 3-D model of tropospheric chemistry (GEOS-Chem) to test current understanding of regional sources, chemical evolution...

  2. Chemical Engineering Education in Japan and the United States: A Perspective (Part 2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, Sigmund

    1988-01-01

    Compares graduate chemical engineering education practices of the U.S. and Japan. States that Japanese universities have set time limits on degrees due to industrial hiring practices. Concludes that Japanese graduates are highly trained and uniform. They tend to stay in the same job throughout their career. (MVL)

  3. The chemical state of arsenic in minerals of environmental interest--an XPS and an XAES study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atzei, Davide; Da Pelo, Stefania; Elsener, Bernhard; Fantauzzi, Marzia; Frau, Franco; Pierfranco, Lattanzi; Rossi, Antonella

    2003-01-01

    A systematic analytical study using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray induced Auger electron spectroscopy (XAES) has been carried out to characterize the chemical state of arsenic in complex environmental samples. The conventional approach, which relies on the chemical shift of the core levels As3d, provides ambiguous results in determining the chemical environment of arsenic. A more accurate approach, based on the Auger parameter and on the Wagner (Chemical State) plot, which combines AsLMM kinetic energy and As3d binding energy, was adopted. This novel method for determining the chemical state of arsenic was employed to completely characterize arsenic in complex environmental samples.

  4. Inferring the unobserved chemical state of the atmosphere: idealized data assimilation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knote, C. J.; Barré, J.; Eckl, M.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Wiedinmyer, C.; Emmons, L. K.; Orlando, J. J.; Tyndall, G. S.; Arellano, A. F.

    2015-12-01

    Chemical data assimilation in numerical models of the atmosphere is a venture into uncharted territory, into a world populated by a vast zoo of chemical compounds with strongly non-linear interactions. Commonly assimilated observations exist for only a selected few of those key gas phase compounds (CO, O3, NO2), and assimilating those in models assuming linearity begs the question of: To what extent we can infer the remainder to create a new state of the atmosphere that is chemically sound and optimal? In our work we present the first systematic investigation of sensitivities that exist between chemical compounds under varying ambient conditions in order to inform scientists on the potential pitfalls when assimilating single/few chemical compounds into complex 3D chemistry transport models. In order to do this, we developed a box-modeling tool (BOXMOX) based on the Kinetic PreProcessor (KPP, http://people.cs.vt.edu/~asandu/Software/Kpp/) in which we can conduct simulations with a suite of 'mechanisms', sets of differential equations describing atmospheric photochemistry. The box modeling approach allows us to sample a large variety of atmospheric conditions (urban, rural, biogenically dominated, biomass burning plumes) to capture the range of chemical conditions that typically exist in the atmosphere. Included in our suite are 'lumped' mechanisms typically used in regional and global chemistry transport models (MOZART, RACM, RADM2, SAPRC99, CB05, CBMZ) as well as the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM, U. Leeds). We will use an Observing System Simulation Experiment approach with the MCM prediction as 'nature' or 'true' state, assimilating idealized synthetic observations (from MCM) into the different ‚lumped' mechanisms under various environments. Two approaches to estimate the sensitivity of the chemical system will be compared: 1) adjoint: using Jacobians computed by KPP and 2) ensemble: by perturbing emissions, temperature, photolysis rates, entrainment, etc., in

  5. Chemical exchange saturation transfer MR imaging of Parkinson's disease at 3 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chunmei; Peng, Shuai; Wang, Rui; Chen, Min [Beijing Hospital, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Chen, Haibo; Su, Wen [Beijing Hospital, Department of Neurology, Beijing (China); Zhao, Xuna [Peking University, Center for MRI Research and Beijing City Key Lab for Medical Physics and Engineering, Beijing (China); Zhou, Jinyuan [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-10-15

    To demonstrate the feasibility of using chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging to detect Parkinson's disease (PD) in patients at 3 Tesla. Twenty-seven PD patients (17 men and 10 women; age range, 54-77 years) and 22 age-matched normal controls (13 men and 9 women; age range, 55-73 years) were examined on a 3-Tesla MRI system. Magnetization transfer spectra with 31 different frequency offsets (-6 to 6 ppm) were acquired at two transverse slices of the head, including the basal ganglia and midbrain. One-way analysis of variance tests was used to compare the differences in CEST imaging signals between PD patients and normal controls. Total CEST signal between the offsets of 0 and 4 ppm in the substantia nigra was significantly lower in PD patients than in normal controls (P = 0.006), which could be associated with the loss of dopaminergic neurons. Protein-based CEST imaging signals at the offset of 3.5 ppm in the globus pallidus, putamen and caudate were significantly increased in PD patients, compared to normal controls (P < 0.001, P = 0.003, P < 0.001, respectively). CEST imaging signals could potentially serve as imaging biomarkers to aid in the non-invasive molecular diagnosis of PD. (orig.)

  6. Infrared Chemical Nano-Imaging: Accessing Structure, Coupling, and Dynamics on Molecular Length Scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, Eric A.; Pollard, Benjamin; Raschke, Markus Bernd

    2015-04-02

    This Perspective highlights recent advances in infrared vibrational chemical nano-imaging. In its implementations of scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) and photothermal-induced resonance (PTIR), IR nanospectroscopy provides few-nanometer spatial resolution for the investigation of polymer, biomaterial, and related soft-matter surfaces and nanostructures. Broad-band IR s-SNOM with coherent laser and synchrotron sources allows for chemical recognition with small-ensemble sensitivity and the potential for sensitivity reaching the single-molecule limit. Probing selected vibrational marker resonances, it gives access to nanoscale chemical imaging of composition, domain morphologies, order/disorder, molecular orientation, or crystallographic phases. Local intra- and intermolecular coupling can be measured through frequency shifts of a vibrational marker in heterogeneous environments and associated inhomogeneities in vibrational dephasing. In combination with ultrafast spectroscopy, the vibrational coherent evolution of homogeneous sub-ensembles coupled to their environment can be observed. Outstanding challenges are discussed in terms of extensions to coherent and multidimensional spectroscopies, implementation in liquid and in situ environments, general sample limitations, and engineering s-SNOM scanning probes to better control the nano-localized optical excitation and to increase sensitivity.

  7. Chemical shift selective magnetic resonance imaging of the optic nerve in patients with acute optic neuritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsson, H.B.W.; Thomsen, C.; Frederiksen, J.; Henriksen, O.; Olesen, J.

    Optic neuritis is often the first manifestion of multiple sclerosis (MS). Sixteen patients with acute optic neuritis and one patient with benign intracranial hypertension (BIH) were investigated by magnetic resonance imaging, using a chemical shift selective double spin echo sequence. In 3 of the 16 patients, abnormalities were seen. In one patient with bilateral symptoms, signal hyperintensity and swelling of the right side of the chiasm were found. In another patient the optic nerve was found diffusely enlarged with only a marginally increased signal in the second echo. In the third patient an area of signal hyperintensity and swelling was seen in the left optic nerve. In the patient with BIH the subarachnoid space which surrounds the optic nerves was enlarged. Even using this refined pulse sequence, avoiding the major artefact in imaging the optic nerve, the chemical shift artefact, lesions were only shown in 3/16 (19%) of the patients with optic neuritis. Nevertheless, the presented chemical shift selective double spin echo sequence may be of great value for detection of retrobulbar lesions.

  8. Fast Atomic-Scale Chemical Imaging of Crystalline Materials and Dynamic Phase Transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ping; Yuan, Ren Liang; Ihlefeld, Jon F; Spoerke, Erik David; Pan, Wei; Zuo, Jian Min

    2016-04-13

    Atomic-scale phenomena fundamentally influence materials form and function that makes the ability to locally probe and study these processes critical to advancing our understanding and development of materials. Atomic-scale chemical imaging by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) is a powerful approach to investigate solid crystal structures. Inefficient X-ray emission and collection, however, require long acquisition times (typically hundreds of seconds), making the technique incompatible with electron-beam sensitive materials and study of dynamic material phenomena. Here we describe an atomic-scale STEM-EDS chemical imaging technique that decreases the acquisition time to as little as one second, a reduction of more than 100 times. We demonstrate this new approach using LaAlO3 single crystal and study dynamic phase transformation in beam-sensitive Li[Li0.2Ni0.2Mn0.6]O2 (LNMO) lithium ion battery cathode material. By capturing a series of time-lapsed chemical maps, we show for the first time clear atomic-scale evidence of preferred Ni-mobility in LNMO transformation, revealing new kinetic mechanisms. These examples highlight the potential of this approach toward temporal, atomic-scale mapping of crystal structure and chemistry for investigating dynamic material phenomena.

  9. Multiple repetition time balanced steady-state free precession imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukur, Tolga; Nishimura, Dwight G

    2009-07-01

    Although balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) imaging yields high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) efficiency, the bright lipid signal is often undesirable. The bSSFP spectrum can be shaped to suppress the fat signal with scan-efficient alternating repetition time (ATR) bSSFP. However, the level of suppression is limited, and the pass-band is narrow due to its nonuniform shape. A multiple repetition time (TR) bSSFP scheme is proposed that creates a broad stop-band with a scan efficiency comparable with ATR-SSFP. Furthermore, the pass-band signal uniformity is improved, resulting in fewer shading/banding artifacts. When data acquisition occurs in more than a single TR within the multiple-TR period, the echoes can be combined to significantly improve the level of suppression. The signal characteristics of the proposed technique were compared with bSSFP and ATR-SSFP. The multiple-TR method generates identical contrast to bSSFP, and achieves up to an order of magnitude higher stop-band suppression than ATR-SSFP. In vivo studies at 1.5 T and 3 T demonstrate the superior fat-suppression performance of multiple-TR bSSFP.

  10. Multi-dimensional color image storage and retrieval for a normal arbitrary quantum superposition state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hai-Sheng; Zhu, Qingxin; Zhou, Ri-Gui; Song, Lan; Yang, Xing-jiang

    2014-04-01

    Multi-dimensional color image processing has two difficulties: One is that a large number of bits are needed to store multi-dimensional color images, such as, a three-dimensional color image of needs bits. The other one is that the efficiency or accuracy of image segmentation is not high enough for some images to be used in content-based image search. In order to solve the above problems, this paper proposes a new representation for multi-dimensional color image, called a -qubit normal arbitrary quantum superposition state (NAQSS), where qubits represent colors and coordinates of pixels (e.g., represent a three-dimensional color image of only using 30 qubits), and the remaining 1 qubit represents an image segmentation information to improve the accuracy of image segmentation. And then we design a general quantum circuit to create the NAQSS state in order to store a multi-dimensional color image in a quantum system and propose a quantum circuit simplification algorithm to reduce the number of the quantum gates of the general quantum circuit. Finally, different strategies to retrieve a whole image or the target sub-image of an image from a quantum system are studied, including Monte Carlo sampling and improved Grover's algorithm which can search out a coordinate of a target sub-image only running in where and are the numbers of pixels of an image and a target sub-image, respectively.

  11. Application and state of development for remote chemical sensors in environmental monitoring: A literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schabron, J.F.; Niss, N.D.; Hart, B.K.

    1991-09-01

    A study was performed on chemical sensor technology currently available and under development. The information was compiled into a format wherein information on the sensors is listed in a comparable manner. An introductory section is provided to illustrate the regulatory environment in which such sensor technology will be used. This information should allow corporations or federal agencies ready access to useful information for the potential licensing of sensor technology for commercial development or specific environmental monitoring operations. Although every attempt was made to identify as many chemical sensors as possible, we recognize that some may be missed inadvertently. The accuracy of the information provided by the various sources regarding the state of development for the various sensors was not verified. Judgments or opinions regarding the actual state of development or utility of these devices are not included in this report. However, we feel that this report accurately reflects the state of the art at the present time.

  12. Application and state of development for remote chemical sensors in environmental monitoring: A literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schabron, J.F.; Niss, N.D.; Hart, B.K.

    1991-09-01

    A study was performed on chemical sensor technology currently available and under development. The information was compiled into a format wherein information on the sensors is listed in a comparable manner. As introductory section is provided to illustrate the regulatory environment in which such sensor technology will be used. This information should allow corporations or federal agencies ready access to useful information for the potential licensing of sensor technology for commercial development or specific environmental monitoring operations. Although every attempt was made to identify as many chemical sensors as possible, we recognize that some may be missed inadvertently. The accuracy of the information provided by the various sources regarding the state of development for the various sensors was not verified. Judgments or opinions regarding the actual state of development or utility of these devices are not included in this report. However, we feel that this report accurately reflects the state of the art at the present time.

  13. A Potential Magnetic Resonance Imaging Technique Based on Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer for In Vivo γ-Aminobutyric Acid Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Gen; Zhang, Tao; Dai, Zhuozhi; Yi, Meizhi; Jia, Yanlong; Nie, Tingting; Zhang, Handi; Xiao, Gang; Wu, Renhua

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We developed a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique based on chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) for GABA imaging and investigated the concentration-dependent CEST effect ofGABA in a rat model of brain tumor with blood—brain barrier (BBB) disruption. Materials and Methods All MRI studies were performed using a 7.0-T Agilent MRI scanner. Z-spectra for GABA were acquired at 7.0 T, 37°C, and a pH of 7.0 using varying B1 amplitudes. CEST images of phantoms with different concentrations of GABA solutions (pH, 7.0) and other metabolites (glutamine, myoinositol, creatinine, and choline) were collected to investigate the concentration-dependent CEST effect of GABA and the potential contribution from other brain metabolites. CEST maps for GABA in rat brains with tumors were collected at baseline and 50 min, 1.5 h, and 2.0 h after the injection of GABA solution. Results The CEST effect of GABA was observed at approximately 2.75 parts per million(ppm) downfield from bulk water, and this effect increased with an increase in the B1 amplitude and remained steady after the B1 amplitude reached 6.0 μT (255 Hz). The CEST effect of GABA was proportional to the GABA concentration in vitro. CEST imaging of GABA in a rat brain with a tumor and compromised BBB showed a gradual increase in the CEST effect after GABA injection. Conclusion The findings of this study demonstrate the feasibility and potential of CEST MRI with the optimal B1 amplitude, which exhibits excellent spatial and temporal resolutions, to map changes in GABA. PMID:27711138

  14. Optimal voxel size for measuring global gray and white matter proton metabolite concentrations using chemical shift imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanson, Lars Peter Grüner; Adalsteinsson, E; Pfefferbaum, A;

    2000-01-01

    Quantification of gray and white matter levels of spectroscopically visible metabolites can provide important insights into brain development and pathological conditions. Chemical shift imaging offers a gain in efficiency for estimation of global gray and white matter metabolite concentrations...

  15. Comparative performance studies between tunable filter and push-broom chemical imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinen, Jouko; Saari, Heikki; Kemeny, Gabor; Shi, Zhenqi; Anderson, Carl

    2010-04-01

    This paper reports instrument characterization measurements, which were recently arranged to provide comparative information on different hyperspectral chemical imaging systems. Three different instruments were studied covering both tunable filter and push-broom techniques: The first instrument MatrixNIRTM is based on a LCTF tunable filter and InGaAs camera and covers wavelengths from 1000 to 1700 nm. The second one SisuCHEMATM is based on push-broom technology and MCT camera operating from 1000 to 2500 nm. The third system is an instrument prototype from VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland exploiting high speed Fabry-Perot interferometer and MCT camera, currently calibrated from 1260 to 2500 nm. The characterization procedure was designed to study instrumental noise, signal-to-noise ratio, linearity and spectral as well as spatial resolution. Finally, a pharmaceutical tablet sample was measured with each instrument to demonstrate speed of measurement in a typical application. In spite of differences in wavelength ranges and camera technologies used, the results provide interesting information on relative instrumental advantages and disadvantages, which may be useful for selecting appropriate instrumentation for defined applications. Further, an additional aim of this study is to compare the high speed Fabry-Perot imaging technology under development against the established chemical imaging techniques available on the market today.

  16. Laser Microdissection and Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry Coupled for Multimodal Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, Matthias [ORNL; Ovchinnikova, Olga S [ORNL; Kertesz, Vilmos [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the coupling of ambient laser ablation surface sampling, accomplished using a laser capture microdissection system, with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry for high spatial resolution multimodal imaging. A commercial laser capture microdissection system was placed in close proximity to a modified ion source of a mass spectrometer designed to allow for sampling of laser ablated material via a transfer tube directly into the ionization region. Rhodamine 6G dye of red sharpie ink in a laser etched pattern as well as cholesterol and phosphatidylcholine in a cerebellum mouse brain thin tissue section were identified and imaged from full scan mass spectra. A minimal spot diameter of 8 m was achieved using the 10X microscope cutting objective with a lateral oversampling pixel resolution of about 3.7 m. Distinguishing between features approximately 13 m apart in a cerebellum mouse brain thin tissue section was demonstrated in a multimodal fashion including co-registered optical and mass spectral chemical images.

  17. In Situ Environmental TEM in Imaging Gas and Liquid Phase Chemical Reactions for Materials Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianbo; Shan, Hao; Chen, Wenlong; Gu, Xin; Tao, Peng; Song, Chengyi; Shang, Wen; Deng, Tao

    2016-11-01

    Gas and liquid phase chemical reactions cover a broad range of research areas in materials science and engineering, including the synthesis of nanomaterials and application of nanomaterials, for example, in the areas of sensing, energy storage and conversion, catalysis, and bio-related applications. Environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) provides a unique opportunity for monitoring gas and liquid phase reactions because it enables the observation of those reactions at the ultra-high spatial resolution, which is not achievable through other techniques. Here, the fundamental science and technology developments of gas and liquid phase TEM that facilitate the mechanistic study of the gas and liquid phase chemical reactions are discussed. Combined with other characterization tools integrated in TEM, unprecedented material behaviors and reaction mechanisms are observed through the use of the in situ gas and liquid phase TEM. These observations and also the recent applications in this emerging area are described. The current challenges in the imaging process are also discussed, including the imaging speed, imaging resolution, and data management.

  18. Gel for simultaneous chemical imaging of anionic and cationic solutes using diffusive gradients in thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuzeder, Andreas; Santner, Jakob; Prohaska, Thomas; Wenzel, Walter W

    2013-12-17

    We report on a novel gel based on diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) for the simultaneous measurement of cations and anions and its suitability for high resolution chemical imaging by using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS). The new high resolution mixed binding gel (HR-MBG) is based on zirconium-hydroxide and suspended particulate reagent-iminodiacetate (SPR-IDA) as resin materials which are embedded in an ether-based urethane polymer hydrogel. The use of this polymer hydrogel material allows the production of ultrathin, highly stable and tear-proof resin gel layers with superior handling properties compared to existing ultrathin polyacrylamide gels. The gel was characterized regarding its uptake kinetics, the anion and cation capacities, and the effects of pH, ionic strength, and aging on the performance of the HR-MBG. Our results demonstrate the capability of this novel gel for concomitant sampling of anions and cations. The suitability of this new gel type for DGT chemical imaging at submm spatial resolution in soils using LA-ICPMS is shown. 2D images of P, As, Co, Cu, Mn, and Zn distributions around roots of Zea mays L. demonstrate the new opportunities offered by the HR-MBG for high-resolution mapping of solute dynamics in soil and sediment hotspots, such as the rhizosphere, by simultaneous observation of anionic and cationic solute species.

  19. Molecular Origin of Color Variation in Firefly (Beetle) Bioluminescence: A Chemical Basis for Biological Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Firefly shows bioluminescence by "luciferin-luciferase" (L-L) reaction using luciferin, luciferase, ATP and O2. The chemical photon generation by an enzymatic reaction is widely utilized for analytical methods including biological imaging in the life science fields. To expand photondetecting analyses with firefly bioluminescence, it is important for users to understand the chemical basis of the L-L reaction. In particular, the emission color variation of the L-L reaction is one of the distinguishing characteristics for multicolor luciferase assay and in vivo imaging. From the viewpoint of fundamental chemistry, this review explains the recent progress in the studies on the molecular mechanism of emission color variation after showing the outline of the reaction mechanism of the whole L-L reaction. On the basis of the mechanism, the progresses in organic synthesis of luciferin analogs modulating their emission colors are also presented to support further developments of red/near infrared in vivo biological imaging utility of firefly bioluminescence.

  20. High-throughput Raman chemical imaging for evaluating food safety and quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jianwei; Chao, Kuanglin; Kim, Moon S.

    2014-05-01

    A line-scan hyperspectral system was developed to enable Raman chemical imaging for large sample areas. A custom-designed 785 nm line-laser based on a scanning mirror serves as an excitation source. A 45° dichroic beamsplitter reflects the laser light to form a 24 cm x 1 mm excitation line normally incident on the sample surface. Raman signals along the laser line are collected by a detection module consisting of a dispersive imaging spectrograph and a CCD camera. A hypercube is accumulated line by line as a motorized table moves the samples transversely through the laser line. The system covers a Raman shift range of -648.7-2889.0 cm-1 and a 23 cm wide area. An example application, for authenticating milk powder, was presented to demonstrate the system performance. In four minutes, the system acquired a 512x110x1024 hypercube (56,320 spectra) from four 47-mm-diameter Petri dishes containing four powder samples. Chemical images were created for detecting two adulterants (melamine and dicyandiamide) that had been mixed into the milk powder.

  1. Chemical imaging analysis of the brain with X-ray methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collingwood, Joanna F.; Adams, Freddy

    2017-04-01

    Cells employ various metal and metalloid ions to augment the structure and the function of proteins and to assist with vital biological processes. In the brain they mediate biochemical processes, and disrupted metabolism of metals may be a contributing factor in neurodegenerative disorders. In this tutorial review we will discuss the particular role of X-ray methods for elemental imaging analysis of accumulated metal species and metal-containing compounds in biological materials, in the context of post-mortem brain tissue. X-rays have the advantage that they have a short wavelength and can penetrate through a thick biological sample. Many of the X-ray microscopy techniques that provide the greatest sensitivity and specificity for trace metal concentrations in biological materials are emerging at synchrotron X-ray facilities. Here, the extremely high flux available across a wide range of soft and hard X-rays, combined with state-of-the-art focusing techniques and ultra-sensitive detectors, makes it viable to undertake direct imaging of a number of elements in brain tissue. The different methods for synchrotron imaging of metals in brain tissues at regional, cellular, and sub-cellular spatial resolution are discussed. Methods covered include X-ray fluorescence for elemental imaging, X-ray absorption spectrometry for speciation imaging, X-ray diffraction for structural imaging, phase contrast for enhanced contrast imaging and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy for spectromicroscopy. Two- and three-dimensional (confocal and tomographic) imaging methods are considered as well as the correlation of X-ray microscopy with other imaging tools.

  2. Modulated electron-multiplied fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope: all-solid-state camera for fluorescence lifetime imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Q.; Schelen, B.; Schouten, R., et al.

    2012-01-01

    We have built an all-solid-state camera that is directly modulated at the pixel level for frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) measurements. This novel camera eliminates the need for an image intensifier through the use of an application-specific charge coupled device des

  3. Hot QCD equation of state and quark-gluon plasma-- finite quark chemical potential

    CERN Document Server

    Chandra, Vinod

    2008-01-01

    We explore the relevance of a hot QCD equation of state of $O[g^6\\ln(1/g)]$, which has been obtained\\cite{avrn} for non-vanishing quark-chemical potentials to heavy ion collisions. Employing a method proposed in a recent paper \\cite{chandra1}, we use the EOS to determine a host of thermodynamic quantities, the energy density, specific heat, entropy dnesity, and the temperature dependence of screening lengths, with the behaviour of QGP at RHIC and LHC in mind. We also investigate the sensitivity of these observables to the quark chemical potential.

  4. Multi-GPU unsteady 2D flow simulation coupled with a state-to-state chemical kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttafesta, Michele; Pascazio, Giuseppe; Colonna, Gianpiero

    2016-10-01

    In this work we are presenting a GPU version of a CFD code for high enthalpy reacting flow, using the state-to-state approach. In supersonic and hypersonic flows, thermal and chemical non-equilibrium is one of the fundamental aspects that must be taken into account for the accurate characterization of the plasma and state-to-state kinetics is the most accurate approach used for this kind of problems. This model consists in writing a continuity equation for the population of each vibrational level of the molecules in the mixture, determining at the same time the species densities and the distribution of the population in internal levels. An explicit scheme is employed here to integrate the governing equations, so as to exploit the GPU structure and obtain an efficient algorithm. The best performances are obtained for reacting flows in state-to-state approach, reaching speedups of the order of 100, thanks to the use of an operator splitting scheme for the kinetics equations.

  5. Two-Dimensional Proton Chemical-Shift Imaging of Human Muscle Metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiani; Willcott, M. Robert; Moore, Gregory J.

    1997-06-01

    Large lipid signals and strong susceptibility gradients introduced by muscle-bone interfaces represent major technical challenges forin vivoproton MRS of human muscle. Here, the demonstration of two-dimensional proton chemical-shift imaging of human muscle metabolites is presented. This technique utilizes a chemical-shift-selective method for water and lipid suppression and automatic shimming for optimal homogeneity of the magnetic field. The 2D1H CSI technique described facilitates the acquisition of high-spatial-resolution spectra, and allows one to acquire data from multiple muscle groups in a single experiment. A preliminary investigation utilizing this technique in healthy adult males (n= 4) revealed a highly significant difference in the ratio of the creatine to trimethylamine resonance between the fast and slow twitch muscle groups examined. The technique is robust, can be implemented on a commercial scanner with relative ease, and should prove to be a useful tool for both clinical and basic investigators.

  6. AFM-IR: Technology and Applications in Nanoscale Infrared Spectroscopy and Chemical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dazzi, Alexandre; Prater, Craig B

    2016-12-13

    Atomic force microscopy-based infrared spectroscopy (AFM-IR) is a rapidly emerging technique that provides chemical analysis and compositional mapping with spatial resolution far below conventional optical diffraction limits. AFM-IR works by using the tip of an AFM probe to locally detect thermal expansion in a sample resulting from absorption of infrared radiation. AFM-IR thus can provide the spatial resolution of AFM in combination with the chemical analysis and compositional imaging capabilities of infrared spectroscopy. This article briefly reviews the development and underlying technology of AFM-IR, including recent advances, and then surveys a wide range of applications and investigations using AFM-IR. AFM-IR applications that will be discussed include those in polymers, life sciences, photonics, solar cells, semiconductors, pharmaceuticals, and cultural heritage. In the Supporting Information , the authors provide a theoretical section that reviews the physics underlying the AFM-IR measurement and detection mechanisms.

  7. Moisture-induced solid state instabilities in α-chymotrypsin and their reduction through chemical glycosylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solá Ricardo J

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein instability remains the main factor limiting the development of protein therapeutics. The fragile nature (structurally and chemically of proteins makes them susceptible to detrimental events during processing, storage, and delivery. To overcome this, proteins are often formulated in the solid-state which combines superior stability properties with reduced operational costs. Nevertheless, solid protein pharmaceuticals can also suffer from instability problems due to moisture sorption. Chemical protein glycosylation has evolved into an important tool to overcome several instability issues associated with proteins. Herein, we employed chemical glycosylation to stabilize a solid-state protein formulation against moisture-induced deterioration in the lyophilized state. Results First, we investigated the consequences of moisture sorption on the stability and structural conformation of the model enzyme α-chymotrypsin (α-CT under controlled humidity conditions. Results showed that α-CT aggregates and inactivates as a function of increased relative humidity (RH. Furthermore, α-CT loses its native secondary and tertiary structure rapidly at increasing RH. In addition, H/D exchange studies revealed that α-CT structural dynamics increased at increasing RH. The magnitude of the structural changes in tendency parallels the solid-state instability data (i.e., formation of buffer-insoluble aggregates, inactivation, and loss of native conformation upon reconstitution. To determine if these moisture-induced instability issues could be ameliorated by chemical glycosylation we proceeded to modify our model protein with chemically activated glycans of differing lengths (lactose and dextran (10 kDa. The various glycoconjugates showed a marked decrease in aggregation and an increase in residual activity after incubation. These stabilization effects were found to be independent of the glycan size. Conclusion Water sorption leads to

  8. Monitoring chemical degradation of thermally cycled glass-fibre composites using hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, V. M.; Müller, B.; Hagenbeek, M.; Sinke, J.; Groves, R. M.

    2016-04-01

    Nowadays, the application of glass-fibre composites in light-weight structures is growing. Although mechanical characterizations of those structures are commonly performed in testing, chemical changes of materials under stresses have not yet been well documented. In the present work coupon tests and Hyperspectral Imaging (HSI) have been used to categorise possible chemical changes of glass-fibre reinforced polymers (GFRP) which are currently used in the aircraft industry. HSI is a hybrid technique that combines spectroscopy with imaging. It is able to detect chemical degradation of surfaces and has already been successfully applied in a wide range of fields including astronomy, remote sensing, cultural heritage and medical sciences. GFRP specimens were exposed to two different thermal loading conditions. One thermal loading condition was a continuous thermal exposure at 120°C for 24h, 48 h and 96h, i.e. ageing at a constant temperature. The other thermal loading condition was thermal cycling with three different numbers of cycles (4000, 8000, 12000) and two temperature ranges (0°C to 120°C and -25°C to 95°C). The effects of both conditions were measured using both HSI and interlaminar shear (ILSS) tests. No significant changes of the physical properties of the thermally cycled GFRP specimens were detected using interlaminar shear strength tests and optical microscopy. However, when using HIS, differences of the surface conditions were detected. The results showed that the different thermal loading conditions could be successfully clustered in different colours, using the HSI linear unmixing technique. Each different thermal loading condition showed a different chemical degradation level on its surface which was indicated using different colours.

  9. Hierarchy of Electronic Properties of Chemically Derived and Pristine Graphene Probed by Microwave Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundhikanjana, W.

    2010-06-02

    Local electrical imaging using microwave impedance microscope is performed on graphene in different modalities, yielding a rich hierarchy of the local conductivity. The low-conductivity graphite oxide and its derivatives show significant electronic inhomogeneity. For the conductive chemical graphene, the residual defects lead to a systematic reduction of the microwave signals. In contrast, the signals on pristine graphene agree well with a lumped-element circuit model. The local impedance information can also be used to verify the electrical contact between overlapped graphene pieces.

  10. Microfluidic electrochemical device and process for chemical imaging and electrochemical analysis at the electrode-liquid interface in-situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao-Ying; Liu, Bingwen; Yang, Li; Zhu, Zihua; Marshall, Matthew J.

    2016-03-01

    A microfluidic electrochemical device and process are detailed that provide chemical imaging and electrochemical analysis under vacuum at the surface of the electrode-sample or electrode-liquid interface in-situ. The electrochemical device allows investigation of various surface layers including diffuse layers at selected depths populated with, e.g., adsorbed molecules in which chemical transformation in electrolyte solutions occurs.

  11. Near-infrared chemical imaging (NIR-CI) of 3D printed pharmaceuticals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khorasani, Milad; Edinger, Magnus; Raijada, Dhara

    2016-01-01

    Hot-melt extrusion and 3D printing are enabling manufacturing approaches for patient-centred medicinal products. Hot-melt extrusion is a flexible and continuously operating technique which is a crucial part of a typical processing cycle of printed medicines. In this work we use hot-melt extrusion...... for manufacturing of medicinal films containing indomethacin (IND) and polycaprolactone (PCL), extruded strands with nitrofurantoin monohydrate (NFMH) and poly (ethylene oxide) (PEO), and feedstocks for 3D printed dosage forms with nitrofurantoin anhydrate (NFAH), hydroxyapatite (HA) and poly (lactic acid) (PLA......). These feedstocks were printed into a prototype solid dosage form using a desktop 3D printer. These model formulations were characterized using near-infrared chemical imaging (NIR-CI) and, more specifically, the image analytical data were analysed using multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR...

  12. Imaging in Vivo Extracellular pH with a Single Paramagnetic Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanshu Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of extracellular pH (pHe has potential utility for cancer diagnoses and for assessing the therapeutic effects of pH-dependent therapies. A single magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agent that is detected through paramagnetic chemical exchange saturation transfer (PARACEST was designed to measure tumor pHe throughout the range of physiologic pH and with magnetic resonance saturation powers that are not harmful to a mouse model of cancer. The chemical characterization and modeling of the contrast agent Yb3+-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7-triacetic acid, 10-o-aminoanilide (Yb-DO3A-oAA suggested that the aryl amine of the agent forms an intramolecular hydrogen bond with a proximal carboxylate ligand, which was essential for generating a practical chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST effect from an amine. A ratio of CEST effects from the aryl amine and amide was linearly correlated with pH throughout the physiologic pH range. The pH calibration was used to produce a parametric pH map of a subcutaneous flank tumor on a mouse model of MCF-7 mammary carcinoma. Although refinements in the in vivo CEST MRI methodology may improve the accuracy of pHe measurements, this study demonstrated that the PARACEST contrast agent can be used to generate parametric pH maps of in vivo tumors with saturation power levels that are not harmful to a mouse model of cancer.

  13. Histopathological image analysis of chemical-induced hepatocellular hypertrophy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaoka, Yoshiji; Togashi, Yuko; Mutsuga, Mayu; Imura, Naoko; Miyoshi, Tomoya; Miyamoto, Yohei

    2016-04-01

    Chemical-induced hepatocellular hypertrophy is frequently observed in rodents, and is mostly caused by the induction of phase I and phase II drug metabolic enzymes and peroxisomal lipid metabolic enzymes. Liver weight is a sensitive and commonly used marker for detecting hepatocellular hypertrophy, but is also increased by a number of other factors. Histopathological observations subjectively detect changes such as hepatocellular hypertrophy based on the size of a hepatocyte. Therefore, quantitative microscopic observations are required to evaluate histopathological alterations objectively. In the present study, we developed a novel quantitative method for an image analysis of hepatocellular hypertrophy using liver sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and demonstrated its usefulness for evaluating hepatocellular hypertrophy induced by phenobarbital (a phase I and phase II enzyme inducer) and clofibrate (a peroxisomal enzyme inducer) in mice. The algorithm of this imaging analysis was designed to recognize an individual hepatocyte through a combination of pixel-based and object-based analyses. Hepatocellular nuclei and the surrounding non-hepatocellular cells were recognized by the pixel-based analysis, while the areas of the recognized hepatocellular nuclei were then expanded until they ran against their expanding neighboring hepatocytes and surrounding non-hepatocellular cells by the object-based analysis. The expanded area of each hepatocellular nucleus was regarded as the size of an individual hepatocyte. The results of this imaging analysis showed that changes in the sizes of hepatocytes corresponded with histopathological observations in phenobarbital and clofibrate-treated mice, and revealed a correlation between hepatocyte size and liver weight. In conclusion, our novel image analysis method is very useful for quantitative evaluations of chemical-induced hepatocellular hypertrophy.

  14. Handheld hyperspectral imager system for chemical/biological and environmental applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinnrichs, Michele; Piatek, Bob

    2004-08-01

    A small, hand held, battery operated imaging infrared spectrometer, Sherlock, has been developed by Pacific Advanced Technology and was field tested in early 2003. The Sherlock spectral imaging camera has been designed for remote gas leak detection, however, the architecture of the camera is versatile enough that it can be applied to numerous other applications such as homeland security, chemical/biological agent detection, medical and pharmaceutical applications as well as standard research and development. This paper describes the Sherlock camera, theory of operations, shows current applications and touches on potential future applications for the camera. The Sherlock has an embedded Power PC and performs real-time-image processing function in an embedded FPGA. The camera has a built in LCD display as well as output to a standard monitor, or NTSC display. It has several I/O ports, ethernet, firewire, RS232 and thus can be easily controlled from a remote location. In addition, software upgrades can be performed over the ethernet eliminating the need to send the camera back to the factory for a retrofit. Using the USB port a mouse and key board can be connected and the camera can be used in a laboratory environment as a stand alone imaging spectrometer.

  15. Lactate Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (LATEST) Imaging in vivo A Biomarker for LDH Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBrosse, Catherine; Nanga, Ravi Prakash Reddy; Bagga, Puneet; Nath, Kavindra; Haris, Mohammad; Marincola, Francesco; Schnall, Mitchell D; Hariharan, Hari; Reddy, Ravinder

    2016-01-22

    Non-invasive imaging of lactate is of enormous significance in cancer and metabolic disorders where glycolysis dominates. Here, for the first time, we describe a chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method (LATEST), based on the exchange between lactate hydroxyl proton and bulk water protons to image lactate with high spatial resolution. We demonstrate the feasibility of imaging lactate with LATEST in lactate phantoms under physiological conditions, in a mouse model of lymphoma tumors, and in skeletal muscle of healthy human subjects pre- and post-exercise. The method is validated by measuring LATEST changes in lymphoma tumors pre- and post-infusion of pyruvate and correlating them with lactate determined from multiple quantum filtered proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (SEL-MQC (1)H-MRS). Similarly, dynamic LATEST changes in exercising human skeletal muscle are correlated with lactate determined from SEL-MQC (1)H-MRS. The LATEST method does not involve injection of radioactive isotopes or labeled metabolites. It has over two orders of magnitude higher sensitivity compared to conventional (1)H-MRS. It is anticipated that this technique will have a wide range of applications including diagnosis and evaluation of therapeutic response of cancer, diabetes, cardiac, and musculoskeletal diseases. The advantages of LATEST over existing methods and its potential challenges are discussed.

  16. Functional imaging reveals movement preparatory activity in the vegetative state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tristan A Bekinschtein

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Vegetative State (VS is characterized by the absence of awareness of self or the environment and preserved autonomic functions. The diagnosis relies critically on the lack of consistent signs of purposeful behavior in response to external stimulation. Yet, given that patients with disorders of consciousness often exhibit fragmented movement patterns, voluntary actions may go unnoticed. Here we designed a simple motor paradigm that could potentially detect residual conscious awareness in VS patients with mild to severe brain damage by examining the neural correlates of motor preparation in response to verbal commands. Twenty-four patients who met the diagnostic criteria for VS were recruited for this study. Eleven of these patients showing preserved auditory evoked potentials underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to test for basic speech processing. Five of these patients, who showed word related activity, were included in a second fMRI study aimed at detecting functional changes in premotor cortex elicited by specific verbal instructions to move either their left or their right hand. Despite the lack of overt muscle activity, two patients out of five activated the dorsal premotor cortex contralateral to the instructed hand, consistent with movement preparation. Given that movement preparation in response to a motor command is a sign of purposeful behavior, our results are consistent with residual conscious awareness in these patients. We believe that the identification of positive results with fMRI using this simple task, may complement the clinical assessment by helping attain a more precise diagnosis in patients with disorders of consciousness.

  17. Oxygen reduction reaction over silver particles with various morphologies and surface chemical states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohyama, Junya; Okata, Yui; Watabe, Noriyuki; Katagiri, Makoto; Nakamura, Ayaka; Arikawa, Hidekazu; Shimizu, Ken-ichi; Takeguchi, Tatsuya; Ueda, Wataru; Satsuma, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in an alkaline solution was carried out using Ag powders having various particle morphologies and surface chemical states (Size: ca. 40-110 nm in crystalline size. Shape: spherical, worm like, and angular. Surface: smooth with easily reduced AgOx, defective with AgOx, and Ag2CO3 surface layer). The various Ag powders were well characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, N2 adsorption, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and stripping voltammetry of underpotential-deposited lead. Defective and oxidized surfaces enhanced the Ag active surface area during the ORR. The ORR activity was affected by the morphology and surface chemical state: Ag particles with defective and angular surfaces showed smaller electron exchange number between three and four but showed higher specific activity compared to Ag particles with smooth surfaces.

  18. Chemical state analysis of conversion coatings by SR-XPS and TEY-XANES

    CERN Document Server

    Noro, H; Nagoshi, M

    2002-01-01

    Chromate coatings on galvanized steel have been studied by Synchrotron Radiation (SR) based techniques that include X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Total-Electron-Yield X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (TEY-XANES). Non-destructive depth profiling of the coatings by SR-XPS reveals the enhancement of Cr sup 6 sup + in the outer surface. TEY-XANES spectroscopy based on simple specimen current measurement is demonstrated as an effective technique for analyzing chemical states of conversion coatings on general bulk substrates. The sampling depth of this technique, which exceeds several tens of nanometer, is determined by the penetration length of Auger electrons excited by X-ray and the inelastic mean free path of secondary electrons excited by inelastically scattered Auger electrons. The chemical states of phosphoric acid added chromate coatings are studied using this technique. The phosphoric acid is taken into the chromate coatings as partially changed into zinc and chromium phosphates, and the r...

  19. CHEMICALS

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  20. State of the art cranial ultrasound imaging in neonates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ecury-Goossen, Ginette M; Camfferman, Fleur A; Leijser, Lara M; Govaert, Paul; Dudink, Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    Cranial ultrasound (CUS) is a reputable tool for brain imaging in critically ill neonates. It is safe, relatively cheap and easy to use, even when a patient is unstable. In addition it is radiation-free and allows serial imaging. CUS possibilities have steadily expanded. However, in many neonatal in

  1. Imaging of HCC—Current State of the Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Schraml

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Early diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is crucial for optimizing treatment outcome. Ongoing advances are being made in imaging of HCC regarding detection, grading, staging, and also treatment monitoring. This review gives an overview of the current international guidelines for diagnosing HCC and their discrepancies as well as critically summarizes the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and computed tomography (CT techniques for imaging in HCC. The diagnostic performance of MRI with nonspecific and hepatobililiary contrast agents and the role of functional imaging with diffusion-weighted imaging will be discussed. On the other hand, CT as a fast, cheap and easily accessible imaging modality plays a major role in the clinical routine work-up of HCC. Technical advances in CT, such as dual energy CT and volume perfusion CT, are currently being explored for improving detection, characterization and staging of HCC with promising results. Cone beam CT can provide a three-dimensional analysis of the liver with tumor and vessel characterization comparable to cross-sectional imaging so that this technique is gaining an increasing role in the peri-procedural imaging of HCC treated with interventional techniques.

  2. The international image of the state as an instrument of soft power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna A. Koptyaeva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The international image of the state as an instrument of soft power is revealed on the example of Russia as one of the Arctic states. The analysis of the main aspects of the international image of Russia, a set of causes and factors that influence the perception of Russia abroad have been analyzed. The specific of the international image making of Russia is discussed.

  3. Application of Photocured Polymer Ion Selective Membranes for Solid-State Chemical Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Abramova

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Application of conducting polymers with additional functional groups for a solid contact formation and photocurable membranes as sensitive elements of solid-state chemical sensors is discussed. Problems associated with application of UV-curable polymers for sensors are analyzed. A method of sensor fabrication using copolymerized conductive layer and sensitive membrane is presented and the proof of concept is confirmed by two examples of solid-contact electrodes for Ca ions and pH.

  4. Development of an Electrolyte CPA Equation of state for Applications in the Petroleum and Chemical Industries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maribo-Mogensen, Bjørn

    This thesis extends the Cubic Plus Association (CPA) equation of state (EoS) to handle mixtures containing ions from fully dissociated salts. The CPA EoS has during the past 18 years been applied to thermodynamic modeling of a wide range of industrially important chemicals, mainly in relation...... to provide sufficient driving forces for electrolytes towards the most polar phase. The static permittivity of the mixture was found to be the most important property; yet it was shown that the empirical models suggested by literature could lead to unphysical behavior of the equation of state. A new...

  5. Bioorthogonal chemical imaging of metabolic activities in live mammalian hippocampal tissues with stimulated Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Fanghao; Lamprecht, Michael R.; Wei, Lu; Morrison, Barclay; Min, Wei

    2016-12-01

    Brain is an immensely complex system displaying dynamic and heterogeneous metabolic activities. Visualizing cellular metabolism of nucleic acids, proteins, and lipids in brain with chemical specificity has been a long-standing challenge. Recent development in metabolic labeling of small biomolecules allows the study of these metabolisms at the global level. However, these techniques generally require nonphysiological sample preparation for either destructive mass spectrometry imaging or secondary labeling with relatively bulky fluorescent labels. In this study, we have demonstrated bioorthogonal chemical imaging of DNA, RNA, protein and lipid metabolism in live rat brain hippocampal tissues by coupling stimulated Raman scattering microscopy with integrated deuterium and alkyne labeling. Heterogeneous metabolic incorporations for different molecular species and neurogenesis with newly-incorporated DNA were observed in the dentate gyrus of hippocampus at the single cell level. We further applied this platform to study metabolic responses to traumatic brain injury in hippocampal slice cultures, and observed marked upregulation of protein and lipid metabolism particularly in the hilus region of the hippocampus within days of mechanical injury. Thus, our method paves the way for the study of complex metabolic profiles in live brain tissue under both physiological and pathological conditions with single-cell resolution and minimal perturbation.

  6. Soft Sensor for Inputs and Parameters Using Nonlinear Singular State Observer in Chemical Processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许锋; 汪晔晔; 罗雄麟

    2013-01-01

    Chemical processes are usually nonlinear singular systems. In this study, a soft sensor using nonlinear singular state observer is established for unknown inputs and uncertain model parameters in chemical processes, which are augmented as state variables. Based on the observability of the singular system, this paper presents a simplified observability criterion under certain conditions for unknown inputs and uncertain model parameters. When the observability is satisfied, the unknown inputs and the uncertain model parameters are estimated online by the soft sensor using augmented nonlinear singular state observer. The riser reactor of fluid catalytic cracking unit is used as an example for analysis and simulation. With the catalyst circulation rate as the only unknown input without model error, one temperature sensor at the riser reactor outlet will ensure the correct estimation for the catalyst cir-culation rate. However, when uncertain model parameters also exist, additional temperature sensors must be used to ensure correct estimation for unknown inputs and uncertain model parameters of chemical processes.

  7. Experiments on bifurcation of periodic states into tori for a periodically forced chemical oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, William; Ross, John

    1988-05-01

    We study experimentally continuous transitions from quasiperiodic to periodic states for a time-periodically forced chemical oscillator. The chemical reaction is the hydration of 2,3-epoxy-1-propanol, and is carried out in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR). Periodic oscillatory states are observed to arise in the autonomous system through supercritical Hopf bifurcations as either the total flow rate or the cooling coil temperature is changed. Under conditions of oscillation for the autonomous system, small-amplitude periodic variation of the total flow rate generates an attracting two-torus from the stable limit cycle. From the experiments we determine the structure of the toroidal flow, stroboscopic phase portraits, and circle maps as a function of the forcing amplitude and period. A continuous transition from the quasiperiodic to a periodic state, in which the two-torus contracts to a closed curve (Neimark-Sacker torus bifurcation), is observed as the forcing amplitude is increased at a constant forcing period, or as the forcing period is changed at a constant moderate forcing amplitude. Qualitative theoretical predictions compare well with the experimental observations. This paper presents the first experimental observation of a Neimark-Sacker torus bifurcation in a forced chemical oscillator system, and relates the bifurcation diagram of the unforced system to that of the forced system.

  8. Chemical modifications and bioconjugate reactions of nanomaterials for sensing, imaging, drug delivery and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biju, Vasudevanpillai

    2014-02-07

    As prepared nanomaterials of metals, semiconductors, polymers and carbon often need surface modifications such as ligand exchange, and chemical and bioconjugate reactions for various biosensor, bioanalytical, bioimaging, drug delivery and therapeutic applications. Such surface modifications help us to control the physico-chemical, toxicological and pharmacological properties of nanomaterials. Furthermore, introduction of various reactive functional groups on the surface of nanomaterials allows us to conjugate a spectrum of contrast agents, antibodies, peptides, ligands, drugs and genes, and construct multifunctional and hybrid nanomaterials for the targeted imaging and treatment of cancers. This tutorial review is intended to provide an introduction to newcomers about how chemical and bioconjugate reactions transform the surface of nanomaterials such as silica nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles, gold quantum clusters, semiconductor quantum dots, carbon nanotubes, fullerene and graphene, and accordingly formulate them for applications such as biosensing, bioimaging, drug and gene delivery, chemotherapy, photodynamic therapy and photothermal therapy. Nonetheless, controversial reports and our growing concerns about toxicity and pharmacokinetics of nanomaterials suggest the need for not only rigorous in vivo experiments in animal models but also novel nanomaterials for practical applications in the clinical settings. Further reading of original and review articles cited herein is necessary to buildup in-depth knowledge about the chemistry, bioconjugate chemistry and biological applications of individual nanomaterials.

  9. Direct imaging of mechanical and chemical gradients across the thickness of graded organosilicone microwave PECVD coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Colin J; Murphy, Peter J; Griesser, Hans J

    2014-01-22

    The characterization of variations in the chemical composition and ensuing mechanical properties across the thickness of coatings with continuously varying compositions through their thickness (graded coatings) presents considerable challenges for current analytical techniques in materials science. We report here the direct imaging of nanomechanical and chemical gradients across cross-sections of an organosilicone coating fabricated via microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Cross-sectional nanoindentation was used to determine the mechanical properties of uniform and graded organosilicone coatings. Both hardness and modulus across the coatings were directly measured. Additionally, "modulus mapping" on cross-sections was used to map the complex modulus. For the graded coating, it was found that variations in the complex modulus was predominantly due to varying storage modulus. It was observed that at the interface with the substrate there was a low storage modulus, which linearly increased to a relatively high storage modulus at the surface. It is proposed that the increase in stiffness, from the substrate interface to the outer surface, is due to the increasing content of a cross-linked O-Si-O network. This mechanical gradient has been linked to a change in the Si:O ratio via direct compositional mapping using ToF-SIMS. Direct mapping of the mechanical and compositional gradients across these protective coatings provides insight into the changes in properties with depth and supports optimization of the critical mechanical performance of PECVD graded coatings.

  10. Fiber array based hyperspectral Raman imaging for chemical selective analysis of malaria-infected red blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brückner, Michael [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, 07745 Jena (Germany); Becker, Katja [Justus Liebig University Giessen, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 35392 Giessen (Germany); Popp, Jürgen [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, 07745 Jena (Germany); Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Institute for Physical Chemistry, 07745 Jena (Germany); Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Abbe Centre of Photonics, 07745 Jena (Germany); Frosch, Torsten, E-mail: torsten.frosch@uni-jena.de [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, 07745 Jena (Germany); Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Institute for Physical Chemistry, 07745 Jena (Germany); Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Abbe Centre of Photonics, 07745 Jena (Germany)

    2015-09-24

    A new setup for Raman spectroscopic wide-field imaging is presented. It combines the advantages of a fiber array based spectral translator with a tailor-made laser illumination system for high-quality Raman chemical imaging of sensitive biological samples. The Gaussian-like intensity distribution of the illuminating laser beam is shaped by a square-core optical multimode fiber to a top-hat profile with very homogeneous intensity distribution to fulfill the conditions of Koehler. The 30 m long optical fiber and an additional vibrator efficiently destroy the polarization and coherence of the illuminating light. This homogeneous, incoherent illumination is an essential prerequisite for stable quantitative imaging of complex biological samples. The fiber array translates the two-dimensional lateral information of the Raman stray light into separated spectral channels with very high contrast. The Raman image can be correlated with a corresponding white light microscopic image of the sample. The new setup enables simultaneous quantification of all Raman spectra across the whole spatial area with very good spectral resolution and thus outperforms other Raman imaging approaches based on scanning and tunable filters. The unique capabilities of the setup for fast, gentle, sensitive, and selective chemical imaging of biological samples were applied for automated hemozoin analysis. A special algorithm was developed to generate Raman images based on the hemozoin distribution in red blood cells without any influence from other Raman scattering. The new imaging setup in combination with the robust algorithm provides a novel, elegant way for chemical selective analysis of the malaria pigment hemozoin in early ring stages of Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes. - Highlights: • Raman hyperspectral imaging allows for chemical selective analysis of biological samples with spatial heterogeneity. • A homogeneous, incoherent illumination is essential for reliable

  11. Teleseismic receiver function imaging of the Pacific Northwest, United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eager, Kevin Charles

    The origins of widespread Cenozoic tectonomagmatism in the Pacific Northwest, United States likely involve complex dynamics including subduction of the Juan de Fuca plate and mantle upwelling processes, all of which are reflected in the crust and upper mantle. To provide an improved understanding of these processes, I analyze P-to- S converted phases using the receiver function method to image topographic variations on regional seismic discontinuities in the upper mantle, which provides constraints on mantle thermal structure, and the crust-mantle interface, which provides constraints on crustal thickness and composition. My results confirm complexity in the Juan de Fuca slab structure as found by regional tomographic studies, including limited evidence of the slab penetrating the transition zone between the 410 and 660 km discontinuities. Evidence is inconclusive for a simple mantle plume beneath the central Oregon High Lava Plains, but indicates a regional increase in mantle temperatures stretching to the east. This result implies the inflow of warm material, either from around the southern edge of the Juan de Fuca plate as it descends into the mantle, or from a regional upwelling to the east related to the Yellowstone hotspot. Results for regional crustal structure reveal thin (˜31 km) crust beneath the High Lava Plains relative to surrounding regions that exhibit thicker (35+ km) crust. The thick (≥ 40 km) crust of the Owyhee Plateau has a sharp western boundary and normal Poisson's ratio, a measure of crustal composition. I find a slightly thickened crust and low Poisson's ratio between Steens Mountain and the Owyhee Plateau, consistent with residuum from source magma of the Steens flood basalts. Central and southern Oregon exhibit very high Poisson's ratios and low velocity zones within the crust, suggesting a degree of intracrustal partial melt not seen along the center of the age-progressive High Lava Plains magmatic track, perhaps due to crustal melt

  12. Scan time reduction in {sup 23}Na-Magnetic Resonance Imaging using the chemical shift imaging sequence. Evaluation of an iterative reconstruction method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weingaertner, Sebastian; Konstandin, Simon; Schad, Lothar R. [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine; Wetterling, Friedrich [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine; Dublin Univ. (Ireland) Trinity Inst. of Neuroscience; Fatar, Marc [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Dept. of Neurology; Neumaier-Probst, Eva [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate potential scan time reduction in {sup 23}Na-Magnetic Resonance Imaging with the chemical shift imaging sequence (CSI) using undersampled data of high-quality datasets, reconstructed with an iterative constrained reconstruction, compared to reduced resolution or reduced signal-to-noise ratio. CSI {sup 23}Na-images were retrospectively undersampled and reconstructed with a constrained reconstruction scheme. The results were compared to conventional methods of scan time reduction. The constrained reconstruction scheme used a phase constraint and a finite object support, which was extracted from a spatially registered {sup 1}H-image acquired with a double-tuned coil. The methods were evaluated using numerical simulations, phantom images and in-vivo images of a healthy volunteer and a patient who suffered from cerebral ischemic stroke. The constrained reconstruction scheme showed improved image quality compared to a decreased number of averages, images with decreased resolution or circular undersampling with weighted averaging for any undersampling factor. Brain images of a stroke patient, which were reconstructed from three-fold undersampled k-space data, resulted in only minor differences from the original image (normalized root means square error < 12%) and an almost identical delineation of the stroke region (mismatch < 6%). The acquisition of undersampled {sup 23}Na-CSI images enables up to three-fold scan time reduction with improved image quality compared to conventional methods of scan time saving.

  13. Miniature Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope for In-Situ Imaging and Chemical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskin, Jessica A.; Jerman, Gregory; Gregory, Don; Sampson, Allen R.

    2012-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is leading an effort to develop a Miniaturized Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope (MVP-SEM) for in-situ imaging and chemical analysis of uncoated samples. This instrument development will be geared towards operation on Mars and builds on a previous MSFC design of a mini-SEM for the moon (funded through the NASA Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program). Because Mars has a dramatically different environment than the moon, modifications to the MSFC lunar mini-SEM are necessary. Mainly, the higher atmospheric pressure calls for the use of an electron gun that can operate at High Vacuum, rather than Ultra-High Vacuum. The presence of a CO2-rich atmosphere also allows for the incorporation of a variable pressure system that enables the in-situ analysis of nonconductive geological specimens. Preliminary testing of Mars meteorites in a commercial Environmental SEM(Tradmark) (FEI) confirms the usefulness of lowcurrent/low-accelerating voltage imaging and highlights the advantages of using the Mars atmosphere for environmental imaging. The unique capabilities of the MVP-SEM make it an ideal tool for pursuing key scientific goals of NASA's Flagship Mission Max-C; to perform in-situ science and collect and cache samples in preparation for sample return from Mars.

  14. Computer systems for three-dimensional diagnostic imaging: an examination of the state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stytz, M R; Frieder, O

    1991-01-01

    This survey reviews three-dimensional (3D) medical imaging machines and 3D medical imaging operations. The survey is designed to provide a snapshot overview of the present state of computer architectures for 3D medical imaging. The basic volume manipulation, object segmentation, and graphics operations required of a 3D medical imaging machine are described and sample algorithms are presented. The architecture and 3D imaging algorithms employed in 11 machines which render medical images are assessed. The performance of the machines is compared across several dimensions, including image resolution, elapsed time to form an image, imaging algorithms employed in the machine, and the degree of parallelism employed in the architecture. The innovation in each machine, whether architectural or algorithmic, is described in detail. General trends for future developments in this field are delineated and an extensive bibliography is provided.

  15. Emergence of a super-synchronized mobbing state in a large population of coupled chemical oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, Gourab; Muñuzuri, Alberto P.; Pérez-Mercader, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Oscillatory phenomena are ubiquitous in Nature. The ability of a large population of coupled oscillators to synchronize constitutes an important mechanism to express information and establish communication among members. To understand such phenomena, models and experimental realizations of globally coupled oscillators have proven to be invaluable in settings as varied as chemical, biological and physical systems. A variety of rich dynamical behavior has been uncovered, although usually in the context of a single state of synchronization or lack thereof. Through the experimental and numerical study of a large population of discrete chemical oscillators, here we report on the unexpected discovery of a new phenomenon revealing the existence of dynamically distinct synchronized states reflecting different degrees of communication. Specifically, we discover a novel large-amplitude super-synchronized state separated from the conventionally reported synchronized and quiescent states through an unusual sharp jump transition when sampling the strong coupling limit. Our results assume significance for further elucidating globally coherent phenomena, such as in neuropathologies, bacterial cell colonies, social systems and semiconductor lasers.

  16. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of an Individual Catalyst Particle with Soft X-ray Ptychography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Understanding Fe deposition in fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysis is critical for the mitigation of catalyst degradation. Here we employ soft X-ray ptychography to determine at the nanoscale the distribution and chemical state of Fe in an aged FCC catalyst particle. We show that both particle swelling due to colloidal Fe deposition and Fe penetration into the matrix as a result of precracking of large organic molecules occur. The application of ptychography allowed us to provide direct visual evidence for these two distinct Fe-based deactivation mechanisms, which have so far been proposed only on the basis of indirect evidence. PMID:27076990

  17. Evaluation of chemical fluorescent dyes as a protein conjugation partner for live cell imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Hayashi-Takanaka

    Full Text Available To optimize live cell fluorescence imaging, the choice of fluorescent substrate is a critical factor. Although genetically encoded fluorescent proteins have been used widely, chemical fluorescent dyes are still useful when conjugated to proteins or ligands. However, little information is available for the suitability of different fluorescent dyes for live imaging. We here systematically analyzed the property of a number of commercial fluorescent dyes when conjugated with antigen-binding (Fab fragments directed against specific histone modifications, in particular, phosphorylated H3S28 (H3S28ph and acetylated H3K9 (H3K9ac. These Fab fragments were conjugated with a fluorescent dye and loaded into living HeLa cells. H3S28ph-specific Fab fragments were expected to be enriched in condensed chromosomes, as H3S28 is phosphorylated during mitosis. However, the degree of Fab fragment enrichment on mitotic chromosomes varied depending on the conjugated dye. In general, green fluorescent dyes showed higher enrichment, compared to red and far-red fluorescent dyes, even when dye:protein conjugation ratios were similar. These differences are partly explained by an altered affinity of Fab fragment after dye-conjugation; some dyes have less effect on the affinity, while others can affect it more. Moreover, red and far-red fluorescent dyes tended to form aggregates in the cytoplasm. Similar results were observed when H3K9ac-specific Fab fragments were used, suggesting that the properties of each dye affect different Fab fragments similarly. According to our analysis, conjugation with green fluorescent dyes, like Alexa Fluor 488 and Dylight 488, has the least effect on Fab affinity and is the best for live cell imaging, although these dyes are less photostable than red fluorescent dyes. When multicolor imaging is required, we recommend the following dye combinations for optimal results: Alexa Fluor 488 (green, Cy3 (red, and Cy5 or CF640 (far-red.

  18. Nuclear overhauser enhancement mediated chemical exchange saturation transfer imaging at 7 Tesla in glioblastoma patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Paech

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Nuclear Overhauser Enhancement (NOE mediated chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST is a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI technique on the basis of saturation transfer between exchanging protons of tissue proteins and bulk water. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the information provided by three dimensional NOE mediated CEST at 7 Tesla (7T and standard MRI in glioblastoma patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Twelve patients with newly diagnosed histologically proven glioblastoma were enrolled in this prospective ethics committee-approved study. NOE mediated CEST contrast was acquired with a modified three-dimensional gradient-echo sequence and asymmetry analysis was conducted at 3.3 ppm (B1 = 0.7 µT to calculate the magnetization transfer ratio asymmetry (MTR(asym. Contrast enhanced T1 (CE-T1 and T2-weighted images were acquired at 3T and used for data co-registration and comparison. RESULTS: Mean NOE mediated CEST signal based on MTR(asym values over all patients was significantly increased (p<0.001 in CE-T1 tumor (-1.99 ± 1.22%, tumor necrosis (-1.36 ± 1.30% and peritumoral CEST hyperintensities (PTCH within T2 edema margins (-3.56 ± 1.24% compared to contralateral normal appearing white matter (-8.38 ± 1.19%. In CE-T1 tumor (p = 0.015 and tumor necrosis (p<0.001 mean MTR(asym values were significantly higher than in PTCH. Extent of the surrounding tumor hyperintensity was smaller in eight out of 12 patients on CEST than on T2-weighted images, while four displayed at equal size. In all patients, isolated high intensity regions (0.40 ± 2.21% displayed on CEST within the CE-T1 tumor that were not discernible on CE-T1 or T2-weighted images. CONCLUSION: NOE mediated CEST Imaging at 7 T provides additional information on the structure of peritumoral hyperintensities in glioblastoma and displays isolated high intensity regions within the CE-T1 tumor that cannot be acquired on CE-T1 or T2

  19. PET/MRI in Oncological Imaging: State of the Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usman Bashir

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET combined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is a hybrid technology which has recently gained interest as a potential cancer imaging tool. Compared with CT, MRI is advantageous due to its lack of ionizing radiation, superior soft-tissue contrast resolution, and wider range of acquisition sequences. Several studies have shown PET/MRI to be equivalent to PET/CT in most oncological applications, possibly superior in certain body parts, e.g., head and neck, pelvis, and in certain situations, e.g., cancer recurrence. This review will update the readers on recent advances in PET/MRI technology and review key literature, while highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of PET/MRI in cancer imaging.

  20. Formation of image-potential states at the graphene/metal interface

    OpenAIRE

    Armbrust, N.; Güdde, J.; Höfer, U.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of image-potential states at the interface between a graphene layer and a metal surface is studied by means of model calculations. An analytical one-dimensional model-potential for the combined system is constructed and used to calculate energies and wave functions of the image-potential states at the Gamma-point as a function of the graphene-metal distance. It is demonstrated how the double series of image-potential states of free-standing graphene evolves into interfacial stat...

  1. State-of-the-Art Imaging in Pulmonary Embolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hess, Søren; Frary, Charles; Gerke, Oke

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a common, ubiquitous, and potentially lethal disease. As symptoms and clinical findings are notoriously nonspecific, diagnostic imaging is essential to avoid undertreatment as well as overtreatment. Controversies remain regarding first-line imaging in suspected PE...... (93.0 vs. 93.8%), negative predictive values (98.6 vs. 84.7%), and accuracies (96.5 vs. 88.6%). We further address some of the ongoing controversies regarding the various modalities, that is, radiation exposure, the issues of subsegmental PE, nondiagnostic studies, and various challenges in specific...

  2. Chemical States of Lanthanum in Carbonized La2O3-Mo Thermionic Cathode Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王金淑; 周美玲; 王亦曼; 张久兴; 聂祚仁; 左铁镛

    2003-01-01

    The chemical reaction between lanthanum oxide and molybdenum carbide was studied by thermodynamic calculation, thermal analysis and in-situ X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. The theoretical results show that at the environment allowing for the evaporation of lanthanum, such as in high vacuum, La2O3 in the La2O3-Mo materials can be reduced to metallic lanthanum by molybdenum carbide (Mo2C). To confirm the conclusion, many analysis methods such as XRD, SPS, and TG-DTA were taken. The experimental results show that the chemical state of lanthanum changes during heating. It was proved, for the first time, that reacted metallic lanthanum appears at the surface of this kind of material at high temperature.

  3. Dual Raman-Brillouin Microscope for Chemical and Mechanical Characterization and Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, Andrew J; Thompson, Jonathan V; Steelman, Zachary A; Meng, Zhaokai; Scully, Marlan O; Yakovlev, Vladislav V

    2015-08-01

    We present a unique confocal microscope capable of measuring the Raman and Brillouin spectra simultaneously from a single spatial location. Raman and Brillouin scattering offer complementary information about a material's chemical and mechanical structure, respectively, and concurrent monitoring of both of these spectra would set a new standard for material characterization. We achieve this by applying recent innovations in Brillouin spectroscopy that reduce the necessary acquisition times to durations comparable to conventional Raman spectroscopy while attaining a high level of spectral accuracy. To demonstrate the potential of the system, we map the Raman and Brillouin spectra of a molded poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogel sample in cyclohexane to create two-dimensional images with high contrast at microscale resolutions. This powerful tool has the potential for very diverse analytical applications in basic science, industry, and medicine.

  4. Application of Image Analysis Based on SEM and Chemical Mapping on PC Mortars under Sulfate Attack

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Cheng; SUN Wei; Scrivener Karen

    2014-01-01

    The degradation mechanisms of cementitious materials exposed to sulfate solutions have been controversial, despite considerable research. In this paper, two methodologies of image analysis based on scanning electron microscope and chemical mapping are used to analyse Portland cement mortars exposed to sodium sulfate solution. The effects of sulfate concentration in solution and water to cement ratio of mortar, which are considered as the most sensitive factors to sulfate attack, are investigated respectively by comparing the macro expansion with microstructure analysis. It is found that the sulfate concentration in pore solution, expressed as sulfate content in C-S-H, plays a critical role on the supersaturation with respect to ettringite and so on the expansion force generated.

  5. Chemical sensing and imaging based on photon upconverting nano- and microcrystals: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christ, Simon; Schäferling, Michael

    2015-09-01

    The demand for photostable luminescent reporters that absorb and emit light in the red to near-infrared (NIR) spectral region continues in biomedical research and bioanalysis. In recent years, classical organic fluorophores have increasingly been displaced by luminescent nanoparticles. These consist of either polymer or silica based beads that are loaded with luminescent dyes, conjugated polymers, or inorganic nanomaterials such as semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots), colloidal clusters of silver and gold, or carbon dots. Among the inorganic materials, photon upconversion nanocrystals exhibit a high potential for application to bioimaging or biomolecular assays. They offer an exceptionally high photostability, can be excited in the NIR, and their anti-Stokes emission enables luminescence detection free of background and perturbing scatter effects even in complex biological samples. These lanthanide doped inorganic crystals have multiple emission lines that can be tuned by the selection of the dopants. This review article is focused on the applications of functionalized photon upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) to chemical sensing. This is a comparatively new field of research activity and mainly directed at the sensing and imaging of ubiquitous chemical analytes in biological samples, particularly in living cells. For this purpose, the particles have to be functionalized with suitable indicator dyes or recognition elements, as they do not show an intrinsic or specific luminescence response to most of these analytes (e.g. pH, oxygen, metal ions). We describe the strategies for the design of such responsive nanocomposites utilizing either luminescence resonance energy transfer or emission-reabsorption (inner filter effect) mechanisms and also highlight examples for their use either immobilized in sensor layers or directly as nanoprobes for intracellular sensing and imaging.

  6. Prosthetic joint infections: radionuclide state-of-the-art imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gemmel, Filip [AZ Alma Campus Sijsele, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sijsele-Damme (Belgium); Wyngaert, Hans van den [AZ Alma Campus Sijsele, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Sijsele-Damme (Belgium); Love, Charito [Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Radiology, Bronx, NY (United States); Welling, M.M. [Leiden University Medical Center, Scientist Molecular Imaging, Department of Radiology, Section of Nuclear Medicine C2-203, Leiden (Netherlands); Gemmel, Paul [Ghent University, The Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent (Belgium); Palestro, Christopher J. [Hofstra North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Radiology, Hempstead, NY (United States)

    2012-05-15

    Prosthetic joint replacement surgery is performed with increasing frequency. Overall the incidence of prosthetic joint infection (PJI) and subsequently prosthesis revision failure is estimated to be between 1 and 3%. Differentiating infection from aseptic mechanical loosening, which is the most common cause of prosthetic failure, is especially important because of different types of therapeutic management. Despite a thorough patient history, physical examination, multiple diagnostic tests and complex algorithms, differentiating PJI from aseptic loosening remains challenging. Among imaging modalities, radiographs are neither sensitive nor specific and cross-sectional imaging techniques, such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, are limited by hardware-induced artefacts. Radionuclide imaging reflects functional rather than anatomical changes and is not hampered by the presence of a metallic joint prosthesis. As a result scintigraphy is currently the modality of choice in the investigation of suspected PJI. Unfortunately, there is no true consensus about the gold standard technique since there are several drawbacks and limitations inherent to each modality. Bone scintigraphy (BS) is sensitive for identifying the failed joint replacement, but cannot differentiate between infection and aseptic loosening. Combined bone/gallium scintigraphy (BS/GS) offers modest improvement over BS alone for diagnosing PJI. However, due to a number of drawbacks, BS/GS has generally been superseded by other techniques but it still may have a role in neutropenic patients. Radiolabelled leucocyte scintigraphy remains the gold standard technique for diagnosing neutrophil-mediated processes. It seems to be that combined in vitro labelled leucocyte/bone marrow scintigraphy (LS/BMS), with an accuracy of about 90%, is currently the imaging modality of choice for diagnosing PJI. There are, however, significant limitations using in vitro labelled leucocytes and considerable effort

  7. Quantum-chemical study of electronically excited states of protolytic forms of vanillic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vusovich, O. V.; Tchaikovskaya, O. N.; Sokolova, I. V.; Vasil'eva, N. Y.

    2015-12-01

    The paper describes an analysis of possible ways of deactivation of electronically excited states of 4-hydroxy- 3-methoxy-benzoic acid (vanillic acid) and its protolytic forms with the use of quantum-chemical methods INDO/S (intermediate neglect of differential overlap with a spectroscopic parameterization) and MEP (molecular electrostatic potential). The ratio of radiative and non-radiative deactivation channels of the electronic excitation energy is established. The rate constants of photophysical processes (internal and intercombination conversions) occurring after the absorption of light in these forms are evaluated.

  8. Understanding the finite state projection and related methods for solving the chemical master equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, Khanh N.; Sidje, Roger B.

    2016-06-01

    The finite state projection (FSP) method has enabled us to solve the chemical master equation of some biological models that were considered out of reach not long ago. Since the original FSP method, much effort has gone into transforming it into an adaptive time-stepping algorithm as well as studying its accuracy. Some of the improvements include the multiple time interval FSP, the sliding windows, and most notably the Krylov-FSP approach. Our goal in this tutorial is to give the reader an overview of the current methods that build on the FSP.

  9. Study of Cu-Inhibitor State for Post-Chemical Mechanical Polishing Cleaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Ken; Ito, Atsushi; Kawase, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Hara, Makoto; Sakae, Rina; Kimura, Chiharu; Aoki, Hidemitsu

    2011-05-01

    In order to reduce corrosion on the Cu surface in post-chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) cleaning, controlling the state of inhibitor layers is indispensable. In this study, to investigate the behavior of inhibitor layers in the cleaning process, Cu-benzotriazole (BTA) layers on CuOX were analyzed by electrochemical measurements and surface analysis. Electrochemical measurements revealed that Cu(I)-BTA can prevent corrosion more efficiently than Cu(II)-BTA, and surface analysis revealed that the Cu(I)-BTA layer is thin, whereas the Cu(II)-BTA layer is bulky. The Cu(I)-BTA layer is effective in preventing corrosion of the Cu surface.

  10. Ensemble velocity of non-processive molecular motors with multiple chemical states

    CERN Document Server

    Vilfan, Andrej

    2014-01-01

    We study the ensemble velocity of non-processive motor proteins, described with multiple chemical states. In particular, we discuss the velocity as a function of ATP concentration. Even a simple model which neglects the strain-dependence of transition rates, reverse transition rates and nonlinearities in the elasticity can show interesting functional dependencies, which deviate significantly from the frequently assumed Michaelis-Menten form. We discuss how the oder of events in the duty cycle can be inferred from the measured dependence. The model also predicts the possibility of velocity reversal at a certain ATP concentration if the duty cycle contains several conformational changes of opposite directionalities.

  11. Behaviors of optical and chemical state of Nb+ implanted sapphire after annealing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The behavior of the radiation damage of sapphire crystal, produced by implantation with 380 keV Nb+ ion followed by annealing in a series of steps from 500 to 1100℃C at reducing atmosphere, was investigated in optical absorption and XPS measurements. It is found that the implanted niobium in sapphire is in different local environments with different chemical states after the annealing. The changes in optical density (OD) from the bands, based on the well known F-type centers, show that the annealing behavior of the radiation damage may be divided into different stages due to different mechanisms.

  12. Remote sensing for gas plume monitoring using state-of-the-art infrared hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinnrichs, Michele

    1999-02-01

    Under contract to the US Air Force and Navy, Pacific Advanced Technology has developed a very sensitive hyperspectral imaging infrared camera that can perform remote imaging spectro-radiometry. One of the most exciting applications for this technology is in the remote monitoring of gas plume emissions. Pacific Advanced Technology (PAT) currently has the technology available to detect and identify chemical species in gas plumes using a small light weight infrared camera the size of a camcorder. Using this technology as a remote sensor can give advanced warning of hazardous chemical vapors undetectable by the human eye as well as monitor the species concentrations in a gas plume from smoke stack and fugitive leaks. Some of the gas plumes that have been measured and species detected using an IMSS imaging spectrometer are refinery smoke stacks plumes with emission of CO2, CO, SO2, NOx. Low concentration vapor unseen by the human eye that has been imaged and measured is acetone vapor evaporating at room temperature. The PAT hyperspectral imaging sensor is called 'Image Multi-spectral Sensing or IMSS.' The IMSS instrument uses defractive optic technology and exploits the chromatic aberrations of such lenses. Using diffractive optics for both imaging and dispersion allows for a very low cost light weight robust imaging spectrometer. PAT has developed imaging spectrometers that span the spectral range from the visible, midwave infrared (3 to 5 microns) and longwave infrared (8 to 12 microns) with this technology. This paper will present the imaging spectral data that we have collected on various targets with our hyperspectral imaging instruments as will also describe the IMSS approach to imaging spectroscopy.

  13. Analytical solution of steady-state equations for chemical reaction networks with bilinear rate laws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halász, Adám M; Lai, Hong-Jian; McCabe Pryor, Meghan; Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Edwards, Jeremy S

    2013-01-01

    True steady states are a rare occurrence in living organisms, yet their knowledge is essential for quasi-steady-state approximations, multistability analysis, and other important tools in the investigation of chemical reaction networks (CRN) used to describe molecular processes on the cellular level. Here, we present an approach that can provide closed form steady-state solutions to complex systems, resulting from CRN with binary reactions and mass-action rate laws. We map the nonlinear algebraic problem of finding steady states onto a linear problem in a higher-dimensional space. We show that the linearized version of the steady-state equations obeys the linear conservation laws of the original CRN. We identify two classes of problems for which complete, minimally parameterized solutions may be obtained using only the machinery of linear systems and a judicious choice of the variables used as free parameters. We exemplify our method, providing explicit formulae, on CRN describing signal initiation of two important types of RTK receptor-ligand systems, VEGF and EGF-ErbB1.

  14. Chemical shift imaging and localised magnetic resonance spectroscopy in full-term asphyxiated neonates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brissaud, Olivier [Children' s Hospital, Paediatric Intensive Care Unit, Bordeaux (France); Chateil, Jean-Francois; Bordessoules, Martine; Brun, Muriel [Children' s Hospital, Radiology Unit, Bordeaux (France)

    2005-10-01

    Diagnosis of brain lesions after birth anoxia-ischemia is essential for appropriate management. Clinical evaluation is not sufficient. MRI has been proven to provide useful information. To compare abnormalities observed with MRI, including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), localised magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and chemical shift imaging (CSI) and correlate these findings with the clinical outcome. Fourteen full-term neonates with birth asphyxia were studied. MRI, MRS and CSI were performed within the first 4 days of life. Lesions observed with DWI were correlated with outcome, but the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) did improve diagnostic confidence. The mean value of Lac/Cr for the neonates with a favourable outcome was statically lower than for those who died (0.22 vs 1.04; P = 0.01). The same results were observed for the Lac/NAA ratio (0.21 vs 1.23; P = 0.01). Data obtained with localised MRS and CSI were correlated for the ratio N-acetyl-aspartate/choline, but not for the other metabolites. No correlation was found between the ADC values and the metabolite ratios. Combination of these techniques could be helpful in our understanding of the physiopathological events occurring in neonates with asphyxia. (orig.)

  15. Imaging the dynamics of free-electron Landau states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schattschneider, P; Schachinger, Th; Stöger-Pollach, M; Löffler, S; Steiger-Thirsfeld, A; Bliokh, K Y; Nori, Franco

    2014-08-08

    Landau levels and states of electrons in a magnetic field are fundamental quantum entities underlying the quantum Hall and related effects in condensed matter physics. However, the real-space properties and observation of Landau wave functions remain elusive. Here we report the real-space observation of Landau states and the internal rotational dynamics of free electrons. States with different quantum numbers are produced using nanometre-sized electron vortex beams, with a radius chosen to match the waist of the Landau states, in a quasi-uniform magnetic field. Scanning the beams along the propagation direction, we reconstruct the rotational dynamics of the Landau wave functions with angular frequency ~100 GHz. We observe that Landau modes with different azimuthal quantum numbers belong to three classes, which are characterized by rotations with zero, Larmor and cyclotron frequencies, respectively. This is in sharp contrast to the uniform cyclotron rotation of classical electrons, and in perfect agreement with recent theoretical predictions.

  16. Chemical design of a radiolabeled gelatinase inhibitor peptide for the imaging of gelatinase activity in tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanaoka, Hirofumi [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Yoshida Shimoadachi-cho, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Graduate School of Medicine, Gunma University, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan); Mukai, Takahiro [Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Habashita, Sayo [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Yoshida Shimoadachi-cho, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Asano, Daigo [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Yoshida Shimoadachi-cho, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Ogawa, Kazuma [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Yoshida Shimoadachi-cho, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Kuroda, Yoshihiro [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Yoshida Shimoadachi-cho, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Akizawa, Hiromichi [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8675 (Japan); Iida, Yasuhiko [Graduate School of Medicine, Gunma University, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan); Endo, Keigo [Graduate School of Medicine, Gunma University, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan); Saga, Tsuneo [Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Saji, Hideo [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Yoshida Shimoadachi-cho, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)]. E-mail: hsaji@pharm.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2007-07-15

    Since elevated levels of gelatinases [matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9] are associated with a poor prognosis in cancer patients, these enzymes are potential targets for tumor imaging. In the present study, a cyclic decapeptide, cCTTHWGFTLC (CTT), was selected as a mother compound because of its selective inhibitory activity toward gelatinases. For imaging gelatinase activity in tumors, we designed a CTT-based radiopharmaceutical taking into consideration that (1) the HWGF motif of the peptide is important for the activity (2) hydrophilic radiolabeled peptides show low-level accumulation in the liver and (3) an increase in the negative charge of radiolabeled peptides is effective in reducing renal accumulation. Thus, a highly hydrophilic and negatively charged radiolabel, indiun-111-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid ({sup 111}In-DTPA), was attached to an N-terminal residue distant from the HWGF motif ({sup 111}In-DTPA-CTT). In MMP-2 inhibition assays, In-DTPA-CTT significantly inhibited the proteolytic activity in a concentration-dependent fashion. When injected into normal mice, {sup 111}In-DTPA-CTT showed low levels of radioactivity in the liver and kidney. A comparison of the pharmacokinetic characteristics of {sup 111}In-DTPA-CTT with those of other CTT derivatives having different physicochemical properties revealed that the increase in hydrophilicity and negative charge caused by the conjugation of {sup 111}In-DTPA reduced levels of radioactivity in the liver and kidney. In tumor-bearing mice, a significant correlation was observed between the accumulation in the tumor as well as tumor-to-blood ratio of {sup 111}In-DTPA-CTT and gelatinase activity. These findings support the validity of the chemical design of {sup 111}In-DTPA-CTT for reducing accumulation in nontarget tissues and maintaining the inhibitory activity of the mother compound. Furthermore, {sup 111}In-DTPA-CTT derivatives would be potential radiopharmaceuticals for the imaging of

  17. THE IMPACT OF REDUCED AGRICULTURAL CHEMICAL USE ON FOOD: A REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE FOR THE UNITED STATES

    OpenAIRE

    Senauer, Benjamin

    1993-01-01

    Concerns about food safety and environmental quality have increased in recent years. Consumers are particularly concerned about the health risks posed by pesticide residues in food and the environmental impact of agricultural chemicals. These concerns have stimulated a considerable amount of recent research to assess the effects of reduced agricultural chemical use. This paper focuses on the research in the United States which has examined the impact of reduced agricultural chemical use on fo...

  18. Chemical composition of sage (Salvia officinalis L. essential oil from the Rio de Janeiro State (Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Porte

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the chemical composition of the essential oil from fresh leaves of sage (Salvia officinalis L. from Petrópolis, Rio de Janeiro State, for international trade. The oil was isolated by hydrodistillation in a Clevenger-type apparatus and analyzed through a combination of GC-FID and GC-MS. The yield was 2.3 % on dry basis. Forty-seven constituents were identified according to their chromatographic retention indices and mass spectra, corresponding to 94.90 % of the compounds present. The major constituents of the oil were α-thujone (40.90 %, camphor (26.12 %, α-pinene (5.85 % and β-thujone (5.62 %. The essential oil studied was similar to those found in several European countries and can be a valuable product for the small farmers from the Petrópolis region in Rio de Janeiro State.

  19. What do molecules do when we are not looking? State sequence analysis for stochastic chemical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Pavel; Lefebvre, Jérémie; Perkins, Theodore J

    2012-12-07

    Many biomolecular systems depend on orderly sequences of chemical transformations or reactions. Yet, the dynamics of single molecules or small-copy-number molecular systems are significantly stochastic. Here, we propose state sequence analysis--a new approach for predicting or visualizing the behaviour of stochastic molecular systems by computing maximum probability state sequences, based on initial conditions or boundary conditions. We demonstrate this approach by analysing the acquisition of drug-resistance mutations in the human immunodeficiency virus genome, which depends on rare events occurring on the time scale of years, and the stochastic opening and closing behaviour of a single sodium ion channel, which occurs on the time scale of milliseconds. In both cases, we find that our approach yields novel insights into the stochastic dynamical behaviour of these systems, including insights that are not correctly reproduced in standard time-discretization approaches to trajectory analysis.

  20. Is an "ideal" service institution image the same for all referral sources? The case of chemical dependency treatment programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, K; LaTour, M S

    1993-01-01

    In a competitive market like chemical dependency treatment, segmenting the professional referral market according to an "ideal" service image may offer a service institution a strategic advantage. Results of this study suggest that while different professionals in a referral market may attach differential importance to the same service feature, a favorable or unfavorable "image" seems to encompass how well both the professional and the professionals' client are treated by the service institution.

  1. Influence of Appearance-Related TV Commercials on Body Image State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legenbauer, Tanja; Ruhl, Ilka; Vocks, Silja

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of media exposure on body image state in eating-disordered (ED) patients. The attitudinal and perceptual components of body image are assessed, as well as any associations with dysfunctional cognitions and behavioral consequences. Twenty-five ED patients and 25 non-ED controls (ND) viewed commercials either…

  2. State Space Truncation with Quantified Errors for Accurate Solutions to Discrete Chemical Master Equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Youfang; Terebus, Anna; Liang, Jie

    2016-04-01

    The discrete chemical master equation (dCME) provides a general framework for studying stochasticity in mesoscopic reaction networks. Since its direct solution rapidly becomes intractable due to the increasing size of the state space, truncation of the state space is necessary for solving most dCMEs. It is therefore important to assess the consequences of state space truncations so errors can be quantified and minimized. Here we describe a novel method for state space truncation. By partitioning a reaction network into multiple molecular equivalence groups (MEGs), we truncate the state space by limiting the total molecular copy numbers in each MEG. We further describe a theoretical framework for analysis of the truncation error in the steady-state probability landscape using reflecting boundaries. By aggregating the state space based on the usage of a MEG and constructing an aggregated Markov process, we show that the truncation error of a MEG can be asymptotically bounded by the probability of states on the reflecting boundary of the MEG. Furthermore, truncating states of an arbitrary MEG will not undermine the estimated error of truncating any other MEGs. We then provide an overall error estimate for networks with multiple MEGs. To rapidly determine the appropriate size of an arbitrary MEG, we also introduce an a priori method to estimate the upper bound of its truncation error. This a priori estimate can be rapidly computed from reaction rates of the network, without the need of costly trial solutions of the dCME. As examples, we show results of applying our methods to the four stochastic networks of (1) the birth and death model, (2) the single gene expression model, (3) the genetic toggle switch model, and (4) the phage lambda bistable epigenetic switch model. We demonstrate how truncation errors and steady-state probability landscapes can be computed using different sizes of the MEG(s) and how the results validate our theories. Overall, the novel state space

  3. Extracting knowledge from chemical imaging data using computational algorithms for digital cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Saumya; Bhargava, Rohit

    2015-06-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic imaging is an emerging microscopy modality for clinical histopathologic diagnoses as well as for biomedical research. Spectral data recorded in this modality are indicative of the underlying, spatially resolved biochemical composition but need computerized algorithms to digitally recognize and transform this information to a diagnostic tool to identify cancer or other physiologic conditions. Statistical pattern recognition forms the backbone of these recognition protocols and can be used for highly accurate results. Aided by biochemical correlations with normal and diseased states and the power of modern computer-aided pattern recognition, this approach is capable of combating many standing questions of traditional histology-based diagnosis models. For example, a simple diagnostic test can be developed to determine cell types in tissue. As a more advanced application, IR spectral data can be integrated with patient information to predict risk of cancer, providing a potential road to precision medicine and personalized care in cancer treatment. The IR imaging approach can be implemented to complement conventional diagnoses, as the samples remain unperturbed and are not destroyed. Despite high potential and utility of this approach, clinical implementation has not yet been achieved due to practical hurdles like speed of data acquisition and lack of optimized computational procedures for extracting clinically actionable information rapidly. The latter problem has been addressed by developing highly efficient ways to process IR imaging data but remains one that has considerable scope for progress. Here, we summarize the major issues and provide practical considerations in implementing a modified Bayesian classification protocol for digital molecular pathology. We hope to familiarize readers with analysis methods in IR imaging data and enable researchers to develop methods that can lead to the use of this promising

  4. A Review of Equation of State Models, Chemical Equilibrium Calculations and CERV Code Requirements for SHS Detonation Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    Beattie - Bridgeman Virial expansion The above equations are suitable for moderate pressures and are usually based on either empirical constants...CR 2010-013 October 2009 A Review of Equation of State Models, Chemical Equilibrium Calculations and CERV Code Requirements for SHS Detonation...Defence R&D Canada. A Review of Equation of State Models, Chemical Equilibrium Calculations and CERV Code Requirements for SHS Detonation

  5. Atomic scale imaging of competing polar states in a Ruddlesden-Popper layered oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Greg; Ophus, Colin; Birol, Turan; Ciston, Jim; Lee, Che-Hui; Wang, Ke; Fennie, Craig J.; Schlom, Darrell G.; Alem, Nasim; Gopalan, Venkatraman

    2016-08-01

    Layered complex oxides offer an unusually rich materials platform for emergent phenomena through many built-in design knobs such as varied topologies, chemical ordering schemes and geometric tuning of the structure. A multitude of polar phases are predicted to compete in Ruddlesden-Popper (RP), An+1BnO3n+1, thin films by tuning layer dimension (n) and strain; however, direct atomic-scale evidence for such competing states is currently absent. Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy with sub-Ångstrom resolution in Srn+1TinO3n+1 thin films, we demonstrate the coexistence of antiferroelectric, ferroelectric and new ordered and low-symmetry phases. We also directly image the atomic rumpling of the rock salt layer, a critical feature in RP structures that is responsible for the competing phases; exceptional quantitative agreement between electron microscopy and density functional theory is demonstrated. The study shows that layered topologies can enable multifunctionality through highly competitive phases exhibiting diverse phenomena in a single structure.

  6. Atomic scale imaging of competing polar states in a Ruddlesden–Popper layered oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Greg; Ophus, Colin; Birol, Turan; Ciston, Jim; Lee, Che-Hui; Wang, Ke; Fennie, Craig J.; Schlom, Darrell G.; Alem, Nasim; Gopalan, Venkatraman

    2016-01-01

    Layered complex oxides offer an unusually rich materials platform for emergent phenomena through many built-in design knobs such as varied topologies, chemical ordering schemes and geometric tuning of the structure. A multitude of polar phases are predicted to compete in Ruddlesden–Popper (RP), An+1BnO3n+1, thin films by tuning layer dimension (n) and strain; however, direct atomic-scale evidence for such competing states is currently absent. Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy with sub-Ångstrom resolution in Srn+1TinO3n+1 thin films, we demonstrate the coexistence of antiferroelectric, ferroelectric and new ordered and low-symmetry phases. We also directly image the atomic rumpling of the rock salt layer, a critical feature in RP structures that is responsible for the competing phases; exceptional quantitative agreement between electron microscopy and density functional theory is demonstrated. The study shows that layered topologies can enable multifunctionality through highly competitive phases exhibiting diverse phenomena in a single structure. PMID:27578622

  7. STUDIES ON THE CHEMICAL STRUCTURES OF ACTIVATED CARBON FIBERS BY SOLID STATE NMR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FURuowen; HuangWenqiang; 等

    1999-01-01

    The solid state C13-NMR spectra of different ACFs from various precursor fibers were recorded in this paper,The effects of activation conditions on chemical structures of ACFs,as well as the changes of chemical structures during carbonization and redox reaction were inverstigated by NMR technique,At same time,the soild state P31-NMR spectra of ACFS are studied.The C13-NMR spectra of ACFs can be divided into six bands that are assigned to methyl and methylene groups,hydroxyl and ether groups.acetal (or methylenedioxy) carbon,graphite-like aromatic carbon structure,phenol,and quinone groups,respectively.Only phosphorous pentoxide exists on ACFs and CFs.Moreover,most of them are stuck over the crystal face but not at the edge of graphite-like micro-crystal.The carbonization and activation conditions affect the C13-NMR spectra of ACFs.The experimental rsults indicate that the redox reaction of ACFs with oxidants greatly consumes C-H group.

  8. Chemical state of mercury and selenium in sewage sludge ash based P-fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Christian; Krüger, Oliver; Herzel, Hannes; Amidani, Lucia; Adam, Christian

    2016-08-05

    Phosphorus-fertilizers from secondary resources such as sewage sludge ash (SSA) will become more important in the future as they could substitute conventional fertilizers based on the nonrenewable resource phosphate rock. Thermochemical approaches were developed which remove heavy metals from SSA prior to its fertilizer application on farmlands. We analyzed the chemical state of mercury and selenium in SSA before and after thermochemical treatment under different conditions for P-fertilizer production by X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. In some incineration plants the mercury loaded carbon adsorber from off-gas cleaning was collected together with the SSA for waste disposal. SSAs from those plants contained mercury mainly bound to carbon/organic material. The other SSAs contained inorganic mercury compounds which are most probably stabilized in the SSA matrix and were thus not evaporated during incineration. During thermochemical treatment, carbon-bound mercury was removed quantitatively. In contrast, a certain immobile fraction of inorganic mercury compounds remained in thermochemically treated SSA, which were not clearly identified. HgSe might be one of the inorganic compounds, which is supported by results of Se K-edge XANES spectroscopy. Furthermore, the chemical state of selenium in the SSAs was very sensitive to the conditions of the thermochemical treatment.

  9. Synthesis of high surface area nanometer magnesia by solid-state chemical reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Hongbo; WANG Pei; ZHAO Biying; ZHU Yuexiang; XIE Youchang

    2007-01-01

    Nanometer MgO samples with high surface area,small crystal size and mesoporous texture were synthesized tion process accelerated the sintering of MgO,and MgO with calcining its precursor in flowing dry nitrogen at 520℃ for 4 h.The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction,N2 adsorption,transmission electron microscopy,thermogravimetry,and differential thermal analysis.The as-prepared MgO was composed of nanocrystals with a size of about 4-5 nm and formed a wormhole-like porous structure.The MgO also had good thermal stability,and its surface areas remained at 357 and 153 m2.g-1 after calcination at 600 and 800℃ for 2 h,respectively.Compared with the MgO sample prepared by the precipitation method,MgO prepared by solid-state chemical reaction has uniform pore size distribution,surface area,and crystal size.The solid-state chemical method has the advantages of low cost,low pollution,and high yield,therefore it appears to be a promising method in the industrial manufacture of nanometer MgO.

  10. Imaging of degenerative spine disease--the state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasiadek, Marek J; Bladowska, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    The authors review the current state of imaging of degenerative spinal disease (DSD), which is one of the most common disorders in humans. The most important definitions as well as short descriptions of the etiopathology and clinical presentation of DSD are provided first, followed by an overview of conventional and advanced imaging methods that are used in DSD. The authors then discuss in detail the imaging patterns of particular types of degenerative changes. Finally, the current imaging algorithm in DSD is presented. The imaging method of choice is magnetic resonance, including advanced techniques--especially diffusion tensor imaging. Other imaging methods (plain radiography, computed tomography, vascular studies, scintigraphy, positron emission tomography, discography) play a supplementary role ).

  11. Direct imaging of topological edge states at a bilayer graphene domain wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Long-Jing; Jiang, Hua; Qiao, Jia-Bin; He, Lin

    2016-06-01

    The AB-BA domain wall in gapped graphene bilayers is a rare naked structure hosting topological electronic states. Although it has been extensively studied in theory, a direct imaging of its topological edge states is still missing. Here we image the topological edge states at the graphene bilayer domain wall by using scanning tunnelling microscope. The simultaneously obtained atomic-resolution images of the domain wall provide us unprecedented opportunities to measure the spatially varying edge states within it. The one-dimensional conducting channels are observed to be mainly located around the two edges of the domain wall, which is reproduced quite well by our theoretical calculations. Our experiment further demonstrates that the one-dimensional topological states are quite robust even in the presence of high magnetic fields. The result reported here may raise hopes of graphene-based electronics with ultra-low dissipation.

  12. Experimental and Quantum-Chemical Study of Electronically Excited States of Protolytic Isovanillin Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vusovich, O. V.; Tchaikovskaya, O. N.; Sokolova, I. V.; Vasil'eva, N. Yu.

    2014-05-01

    Methods of electronic spectroscopy and quantum chemistry are used to compare protolytic vanillin and isovanillin species. Three protolytic species: anion, cation, and neutral are distinguished in the ground state of the examined molecules. Vanillin and isovanillin in the ground state in water possess identical spectral characteristics: line positions and intensities in the absorption spectra coincide. Minima of the electrostatic potential demonstrate that the deepest isomer minimum is observed on the carbonyl oxygen atom. However, investigations of the fluorescence spectra show that the radiative properties of isomers differ. An analysis of results of quantum-chemical calculations demonstrate that the long-wavelength ππ* transition in the vanillin absorption spectra is formed due to electron charge transfer from the phenol part of the molecule to oxygen atoms of the methoxy and carbonyl groups, and in the isovanillin absorption spectra, it is formed only on the oxygen atom of the methoxy group. The presence of hydroxyl and carbonyl groups in the structure of the examined molecules leads to the fact that isovanillin in the ground S0 state, the same as vanillin, possesses acidic properties, whereas in the excited S1 state, they possess basic properties. A comparison of the рKа values of aqueous solutions demonstrates that vanillin possesses stronger acidic and basic properties in comparison with isovanillin.

  13. Fiber array based hyperspectral Raman imaging for chemical selective analysis of malaria-infected red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brückner, Michael; Becker, Katja; Popp, Jürgen; Frosch, Torsten

    2015-09-24

    A new setup for Raman spectroscopic wide-field imaging is presented. It combines the advantages of a fiber array based spectral translator with a tailor-made laser illumination system for high-quality Raman chemical imaging of sensitive biological samples. The Gaussian-like intensity distribution of the illuminating laser beam is shaped by a square-core optical multimode fiber to a top-hat profile with very homogeneous intensity distribution to fulfill the conditions of Koehler. The 30 m long optical fiber and an additional vibrator efficiently destroy the polarization and coherence of the illuminating light. This homogeneous, incoherent illumination is an essential prerequisite for stable quantitative imaging of complex biological samples. The fiber array translates the two-dimensional lateral information of the Raman stray light into separated spectral channels with very high contrast. The Raman image can be correlated with a corresponding white light microscopic image of the sample. The new setup enables simultaneous quantification of all Raman spectra across the whole spatial area with very good spectral resolution and thus outperforms other Raman imaging approaches based on scanning and tunable filters. The unique capabilities of the setup for fast, gentle, sensitive, and selective chemical imaging of biological samples were applied for automated hemozoin analysis. A special algorithm was developed to generate Raman images based on the hemozoin distribution in red blood cells without any influence from other Raman scattering. The new imaging setup in combination with the robust algorithm provides a novel, elegant way for chemical selective analysis of the malaria pigment hemozoin in early ring stages of Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes.

  14. Chemically robust platform for optical solid-state conducting polymer sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, A. L.; Bearinger, J. P.; Carter, S. A.

    2006-10-01

    Conjugated polymers are unique materials for use in the development of chemical and biological sensors because of their widely tunable optical and electrical properties that allow them dual functionality as both the sensing element and the signal transducer. Furthermore, as optical photoluminescence based sensors, electroactive polymers are found to exhibit high sensitivity due to the ability of the analyte of interest to quench the photoluminescence of the entire polymer chain. In order to produce a more chemically robust thin film for use as a "solid-state" optical sensor, we succeeded in grafting various poly (3-alkyl-thiophene)s to optically transparent substrates such as glass, quartz, and ITO coated glass. This was accomplished by first grafting a thiophene monomer to the surface then chemically growing the films via oxidative polymerization. XPS studies indicated that each chemical step was accurately understood. The polythiophene growth, unaltered by sonication and tape peeling tests, was uniform across the substrate and could be directed by selective silanization of the substrate. Film thicknesses range from 20 to 200 nm and exhibit varying degrees of surface roughness, depending on the polymerization process. The reaction times and solvents were varied in order to optimize the desired film properties. The absorption and photoluminescence properties of the thin films compared well with literature on spun-cast polythiophene films, as did the electrical conductivities of the doped and undoped material. The photoluminescence intensities of the films are found to be unaffected by paraquat in water but are sensitive to trace amounts of ferric chloride in acetonitrile with measurable Stern Volmer constants.

  15. Underwater Image Processing: State of the Art of Restoration and Image Enhancement Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Corchs

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The underwater image processing area has received considerable attention within the last decades, showing important achievements. In this paper we review some of the most recent methods that have been specifically developed for the underwater environment. These techniques are capable of extending the range of underwater imaging, improving image contrast and resolution. After considering the basic physics of the light propagation in the water medium, we focus on the different algorithms available in the literature. The conditions for which each of them have been originally developed are highlighted as well as the quality assessment methods used to evaluate their performance.

  16. Liver magnetic resonance imaging: State of the art

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paul; E; Sijens

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has now been used for about three decades to characterize the human liver in a non-invasive way, that is without the need of using ionizing radiation or removing tissue samples. During the past few years, technical progress has been considerable and novel applications of MRI have been implemented in the clinic. The beginning of a new decade offers an excellent opportunity for having fi ve experts to present their view on the current status of MRI (and magnetic resonance spec...

  17. Balanced Steady-State Free Precession (bSSFP) from an effective field perspective: Application to the detection of chemical exchange (bSSFPX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shu; Liu, Zheng; Grant, Aaron; Keupp, Jochen; Lenkinski, Robert E.; Vinogradov, Elena

    2017-02-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) is a novel contrast mechanism and it is gaining increasing popularity as many promising applications have been proposed and investigated. Fast and quantitative CEST imaging techniques are further needed in order to increase the applicability of CEST for clinical use as well as to derive quantitative physiological and biological information. Steady-state methods for fast CEST imaging have been reported recently. Here, we observe that an extreme case of these methods is a balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) sequence. The bSSFP in itself is sensitive to the exchange processes; hence, no additional saturation or preparation is needed for CEST-like data acquisition. The bSSFP experiment can be regarded as observation during saturation, without separate saturation and acquisition modules as used in standard CEST and similar experiments. One of the differences from standard CEST methods is that the bSSFP spectrum is an XY-spectrum not a Z-spectrum. As the first proof-of-principle step, we have implemented the steady-state bSSFP sequence for chemical exchange detection (bSSFPX) and verified its feasibility in phantom studies. These studies have shown that bSSFPX can achieve exchange-mediated contrast comparable to the standard CEST experiment. Therefore, the bSSFPX method has a potential for fast and quantitative CEST data acquisition.

  18. Transmission coefficients for chemical reactions with multiple states: role of quantum decoherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Lande, Aurélien; Řezáč, Jan; Lévy, Bernard; Sanders, Barry C; Salahub, Dennis R

    2011-03-23

    Transition-state theory (TST) is a widely accepted paradigm for rationalizing the kinetics of chemical reactions involving one potential energy surface (PES). Multiple PES reaction rate constants can also be estimated within semiclassical approaches provided the hopping probability between the quantum states is taken into account when determining the transmission coefficient. In the Marcus theory of electron transfer, this hopping probability was historically calculated with models such as Landau-Zener theory. Although the hopping probability is intimately related to the question of the transition from the fully quantum to the semiclassical description, this issue is not adequately handled in physicochemical models commonly in use. In particular, quantum nuclear effects such as decoherence or dephasing are not present in the rate constant expressions. Retaining the convenient semiclassical picture, we include these effects through the introduction of a phenomenological quantum decoherence function. A simple modification to the usual TST rate constant expression is proposed: in addition to the electronic coupling, a characteristic decoherence time τ(dec) now also appears as a key parameter of the rate constant. This new parameter captures the idea that molecular systems, although intrinsically obeying quantum mechanical laws, behave semiclassically after a finite but nonzero amount of time (τ(dec)). This new degree of freedom allows a fresh look at the underlying physics of chemical reactions involving more than one quantum state. The ability of the proposed formula to describe the main physical lines of the phenomenon is confirmed by comparison with results obtained from density functional theory molecular dynamics simulations for a triplet to singlet transition within a copper dioxygen adduct relevant to the question of dioxygen activation by copper monooxygenases.

  19. Imaging Taurine in the Central Nervous System Using Chemically Specific X-ray Fluorescence Imaging at the Sulfur K-Edge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackett, Mark J.; Paterson, Phyllis G.; Pickering, Ingrid J.; George, Graham N. (Curtin U.); (Saskatchewan)

    2016-11-15

    A method to image taurine distributions within the central nervous system and other organs has long been sought. Since taurine is small and mobile, it cannot be chemically “tagged” and imaged using conventional immuno-histochemistry methods. Combining numerous indirect measurements, taurine is known to play critical roles in brain function during health and disease and is proposed to act as a neuro-osmolyte, neuro-modulator, and possibly a neuro-transmitter. Elucidation of taurine’s neurochemical roles and importance would be substantially enhanced by a direct method to visualize alterations, due to physiological and pathological events in the brain, in the local concentration of taurine at or near cellular spatial resolution in vivo or in situ in tissue sections. We thus have developed chemically specific X-ray fluorescence imaging (XFI) at the sulfur K-edge to image the sulfonate group in taurine in situ in ex vivo tissue sections. To our knowledge, this represents the first undistorted imaging of taurine distribution in brain at 20 μm resolution. We report quantitative technique validation by imaging taurine in the cerebellum and hippocampus regions of the rat brain. Further, we apply the technique to image taurine loss from the vulnerable CA1 (cornus ammonis 1) sector of the rat hippocampus following global brain ischemia. The location-specific loss of taurine from CA1 but not CA3 neurons following ischemia reveals osmotic stress may be a key factor in delayed neurodegeneration after a cerebral ischemic insult and highlights the significant potential of chemically specific XFI to study the role of taurine in brain disease.

  20. 3D Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of the Distribution of Aluminum Coordination Environments in Zeolites with Soft X-Ray Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aramburo, Luis R.; Liu, Yijin; Tyliszczak, Tolek; de Groot, Frank M. F.; Andrews, Joy C.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we present the first nanoscale chemical imaging study revealing the spatial distribution of the amount and coordination environment of aluminum in zeolite materials with 3D scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). For this purpose, we have focused on two showcase samples involving the in

  1. A Practical and Portable Solids-State Electronic Terahertz Imaging System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Smart

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A practical compact solid-state terahertz imaging system is presented. Various beam guiding architectures were explored and hardware performance assessed to improve its compactness, robustness, multi-functionality and simplicity of operation. The system performance in terms of image resolution, signal-to-noise ratio, the electronic signal modulation versus optical chopper, is evaluated and discussed. The system can be conveniently switched between transmission and reflection mode according to the application. A range of imaging application scenarios was explored and images of high visual quality were obtained in both transmission and reflection mode.

  2. Methods used to characterize the chemical composition and biological activity of environmental waters throughout the United States, 2012-14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanok, Kristin M.; Reilly, Timothy J.; Barber, Larry B.; Boone, J. Scott; Buxton, Herbert T.; Foreman, William T.; Furlong, Edward T.; Hladik, Michelle; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Journey, Celeste; Kolpin, Dana W.; Kuivila, Kathryn; Loftin, Keith A.; Mills, Marc A.; Meyer, Michael T.; Orlando, James L.; Smalling, Kelly L.; Villeneuve, Daniel L.; Bradley, Paul M.

    2017-03-22

    A vast array of chemical compounds are in wide commercial use in the United States, and the potential ecological and human-health effect of exposure to chemical mixtures has been identified as a high priority in environment health science. Awareness of the potential effects of low-level chemical exposures is rising. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, conducted a study in which samples were collected from 38 streams in 25 States to provide an overview of contaminants found in stream water across the Nation. Additionally, biological screening assays were used to help determine any potential ecological and human-health effects of these chemical mixtures and to prioritize target chemicals for future toxicological studies. This report describes the site locations and the sampling and analytical methods and quality-assurance procedures used in the study.

  3. Chemical imaging of protein adsorption and crystallization on a wettability gradient surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassford, Stefanie; Chan, K L Andrew; Byrne, Bernadette; Kazarian, Sergei G

    2012-02-14

    The use of self-assembled monolayers is an established method to study the effect of surface properties on proteins and other biological materials. The generation of a monolayer with a gradient of chemical properties allows for the study of multiple surface properties simultaneously in a high throughput manner. Typically, in order to detect the presence of proteins or biological material on a surface, the use of additional dyes or tags is required. Here we present a novel method of studying the effect of gradient surface properties on protein adsorption and crystallization in situ through the use of ATR-FTIR spectroscopic imaging, which removes the need for additional labeling. We describe the successful application of this technique to the measurement of the growth of a gradient monolayer of octyltrichlorosilane across the surface of a silicon ATR element. ATR-FTIR imaging was also used to study the adsorption of lysozyme, as a model protein, onto the modified surface. The sensitivity of measurements obtained with a focal plane array (FPA) detector were improved though the use of pixel averaging which allowed small absorption bands to be detected with minimal effect on the spatial resolution along the gradient. Study of the effect of surface hydrophobicity on both adsorption of lysozyme to the element and lysozyme crystallization revealed that more lysozyme adsorbed to the hydrophobic side of the ATR element and more lysozyme crystals formed in the same region. These findings strongly suggest a correlation exists between surface protein adsorption and protein crystallization. This method could be applied to the study of other proteins and whole cells.

  4. Chemical reactivity of graphene oxide towards amines elucidated by solid-state NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacchi, Isabella A.; Spinato, Cinzia; Raya, Jésus; Bianco, Alberto; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia

    2016-07-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is an attractive nanomaterial for many applications. Controlling the functionalization of GO is essential for the design of graphene-based conjugates with novel properties. But, the chemical composition of GO has not been fully elucidated yet. Due to the high reactivity of the oxygenated moieties, mainly epoxy, hydroxyl and carboxyl groups, several derivatization reactions may occur concomitantly. The reactivity of GO with amine derivatives has been exploited in the literature to design graphene-based conjugates, mainly through amidation. However, in this study we undoubtedly demonstrate using magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR that the reaction between GO and amine functions occurs via ring opening of the epoxides, and not by amidation. We also prove that there is a negligible amount of carboxylic acid groups in two GO samples obtained by a different synthesis process, hence eliminating the possibility of amidation reactions with amine derivatives. This work brings additional insights into the chemical reactivity of GO, which is fundamental to control its functionalization, and highlights the major role of MAS NMR spectroscopy for a comprehensive characterization of derivatized GO.Graphene oxide (GO) is an attractive nanomaterial for many applications. Controlling the functionalization of GO is essential for the design of graphene-based conjugates with novel properties. But, the chemical composition of GO has not been fully elucidated yet. Due to the high reactivity of the oxygenated moieties, mainly epoxy, hydroxyl and carboxyl groups, several derivatization reactions may occur concomitantly. The reactivity of GO with amine derivatives has been exploited in the literature to design graphene-based conjugates, mainly through amidation. However, in this study we undoubtedly demonstrate using magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR that the reaction between GO and amine functions occurs via ring opening of the epoxides, and not by

  5. Imaging Photon Lattice States by Scanning Defect Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, D. L.; Shanks, W. E.; Li, Andy C. Y.; Ateshian, Lamia; Koch, Jens; Houck, A. A.

    2016-04-01

    Microwave photons inside lattices of coupled resonators and superconducting qubits can exhibit surprising matterlike behavior. Realizing such open-system quantum simulators presents an experimental challenge and requires new tools and measurement techniques. Here, we introduce scanning defect microscopy as one such tool and illustrate its use in mapping the normal-mode structure of microwave photons inside a 49-site kagome lattice of coplanar waveguide resonators. Scanning is accomplished by moving a probe equipped with a sapphire tip across the lattice. This locally perturbs resonator frequencies and induces shifts of the lattice resonance frequencies, which we determine by measuring the transmission spectrum. From the magnitude of mode shifts, we can reconstruct photon field amplitudes at each lattice site and thus create spatial images of the photon-lattice normal modes.

  6. Media images of physicians and nurses in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantzler, N J

    1986-01-01

    This paper analyzes images of physicians and nurses presented in advertisements in the medical and nursing journals JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association) and AJN (American Journal of Nursing). Advertisements are viewed as hyper-ritualized displays of symbols and rituals associated with medical and nursing practice, both reflecting and reaffirming stereotypes and beliefs that are widely held in the society at large. Trends over the past few decades show that medical advertisements are dropping some traditional symbols (such as the white coat and stethoscope) in favor of depicting science-in-action and high technology. Nursing advertisements, however, are more frequently utilizing the symbols formerly reserved for physicians. Both physicians and nurses are depicted in their respective journals as existing largely independent of one another. While these advertisements clearly do not depict social reality, they present a fictionalized version which reflects and reproduces some of the expressed ideals in medical and nursing practice.

  7. Label-free chemical imaging of live Euglena gracilis by high-speed SRS spectral microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakisaka, Yoshifumi; Suzuki, Yuta; Tokunaga, Kyoya; Hirose, Misa; Domon, Ryota; Akaho, Rina; Kuroshima, Mai; Tsumura, Norimichi; Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Iwata, Osamu; Suzuki, Kengo; Nakashima, Ayaka; Goda, Keisuke; Ozeki, Yasuyuki

    2016-03-01

    Microbes, especially microalgae, have recently been of great interest for developing novel biofuels, drugs, and biomaterials. Imaging-based screening of live cells can provide high selectivity and is attractive for efficient bio-production from microalgae. Although conventional cellular screening techniques use cell labeling, labeling of microbes is still under development and can interfere with their cellular functions. Furthermore, since live microbes move and change their shapes rapidly, a high-speed imaging technique is required to suppress motion artifacts. Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy allows for label-free and high-speed spectral imaging, which helps us visualize chemical components inside biological cells and tissues. Here we demonstrate high-speed SRS imaging, with temporal resolution of 0.14 seconds, of intracellular distributions of lipid, polysaccharide, and chlorophyll concentrations in rapidly moving Euglena gracilis, a unicellular phytoflagellate. Furthermore, we show that our method allows us to analyze the amount of chemical components inside each living cell. Our results indicate that SRS imaging may be applied to label-free screening of living microbes based on chemical information.

  8. Multispectral UV imaging for fast and non-destructive quality control of chemical and physical tablet attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klukkert, Marten; Wu, Jian X; Rantanen, Jukka; Carstensen, Jens M; Rades, Thomas; Leopold, Claudia S

    2016-07-30

    Monitoring of tablet quality attributes in direct vicinity of the production process requires analytical techniques that allow fast, non-destructive, and accurate tablet characterization. The overall objective of this study was to investigate the applicability of multispectral UV imaging as a reliable, rapid technique for estimation of the tablet API content and tablet hardness, as well as determination of tablet intactness and the tablet surface density profile. One of the aims was to establish an image analysis approach based on multivariate image analysis and pattern recognition to evaluate the potential of UV imaging for automatized quality control of tablets with respect to their intactness and surface density profile. Various tablets of different composition and different quality regarding their API content, radial tensile strength, intactness, and surface density profile were prepared using an eccentric as well as a rotary tablet press at compression pressures from 20MPa up to 410MPa. It was found, that UV imaging can provide both, relevant information on chemical and physical tablet attributes. The tablet API content and radial tensile strength could be estimated by UV imaging combined with partial least squares analysis. Furthermore, an image analysis routine was developed and successfully applied to the UV images that provided qualitative information on physical tablet surface properties such as intactness and surface density profiles, as well as quantitative information on variations in the surface density. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that UV imaging combined with image analysis is an effective and non-destructive method to determine chemical and physical quality attributes of tablets and is a promising approach for (near) real-time monitoring of the tablet compaction process and formulation optimization purposes.

  9. Does short-term fasting promote changes in state body image?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaumberg, Katherine; Anderson, Drew A

    2014-03-01

    Fasting, or going a significant amount of time without food, is a predictor of eating pathology in at-risk samples. The current study examined whether acute changes in body image occur after an episode of fasting in college students. Furthermore, it evaluated whether individual difference variables might inform the relationship between fasting and shifts in body image. Participants (N=186) included male (44.7%) and female college students who completed the Body Image States Scale (BISS) and other eating-related measures before a 24-h fast. Participants completed the BISS again after fasting. While no overall changes in BISS scores emerged during the study, some individuals evidenced body image improvement. Baseline levels of disinhibition and self-reported fasting at least once per week uniquely predicted improvement in body image. Individual difference variables may play a role in how fasting could be reinforced by shifts in body image.

  10. Matching Element Symbols with State Abbreviations: A Fun Activity for Browsing the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woelk, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    A classroom activity is presented in which students are challenged to find matches between the United States two-letter postal abbreviations for states and chemical element symbols. The activity aims to lessen negative apprehensions students might have when the periodic table of the elements with its more than 100 combinations of letters is first…

  11. Analysis of a multiple reception model for processing images from the solid-state imaging camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, T.-Y.

    1991-01-01

    A detection model to identify the presence of Galileo optical communications from an Earth-based Transmitter (GOPEX) signal by processing multiple signal receptions extracted from the camera images is described. The model decomposes a multi-signal reception camera image into a set of images so that the location of the pixel being illuminated is known a priori and the laser can illuminate only one pixel at each reception instance. Numerical results show that if effects on the pointing error due to atmospheric refraction can be controlled to between 20 to 30 microrad, the beam divergence of the GOPEX laser should be adjusted to be between 30 to 40 microrad when the spacecraft is 30 million km away from Earth. Furthermore, increasing beyond 5 the number of receptions for processing will not produce a significant detection probability advantage.

  12. Nanoparticle probes and mid-infrared chemical imaging for DNA microarray detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossoba, Magdi M; Al-Khaldi, Sufian F; Schoen, Brianna; Yakes, Betsy Jean

    2010-11-01

    To date most mid-infrared spectroscopic studies have been limited, due to lack of sensitivity, to the structural characterization of a single oligonucleotide probe immobilized over the entire surface of a gold-coated slide or other infrared substrate. By contrast, widely used and commercially available glass slides and a microarray spotter that prints approximately 120-μm-diameter DNA spots were employed in the present work. To our knowledge, mid-infrared chemical imaging (IRCI) in the external reflection mode has been applied in the present study for the first time to the detection of nanostructure-based DNA microarrays spotted on glass slides. Alkyl amine-modified oligonucleotide probes were immobilized on glass slides that had been prefunctionalized with succinimidyl ester groups. This molecular fluorophore-free method entailed the binding of gold-nanoparticle-streptavidin conjugates to biotinylated DNA targets. Hybridization was visualized by the silver enhancement of gold nanoparticles. The adlayer of silver, selectively bound only to hybridized spots in a microarray, formed the external reflective infrared substrate that was necessary for the detection of DNA hybridization by IRCI in the present proof-of-concept study. IRCI made it possible to discriminate between diffuse and specular external reflection modes. The promising qualitative results are presented herein, and the implications for quantitative determination of DNA microarrays are discussed.

  13. Diagnostic accuracy of digital images for detection of artificial chemical proximal caries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Geum Mee; Nah, Kyung Soo [Pusan National University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-06-15

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of proximal caries detection between Kodak Insight film and the Biomedisys CDX2000HQ digital (CCD) sensor. 156 proximal surfaces of extracted teeth, 78 of which had chemical artificial caries, were used in this study. Four observers interpreted the radiographs using a five-point confidence rating scale to record their diagnoses. The results were analyzed by receiver operating characteristic curves, ANOVA and Kappa values. Analysis using receiver operating characteristic curves revealed the areas under each curve which indicated a diagnostic accuracy of 0.951 in Insight and 0.952 in CDX2000HQ digital sensor. ANOVA revealed no significant differences between the two images with respect to caries detection. Kappa values indicated that the mean intra-observer agreement was 0.85 and inter-observer agreement 0.71 in conventional radiography. In digital radiography, the mean intra-observer agreement was 0.84 and inter-observer agreement 0.72. The results suggest that no significant difference exists between the two modalities for artificial caries detection and that CDX2000HQ was as good as Insight film for this purpose.

  14. Research on the chemical adsorption precursor state of CaCl2-NH3 for adsorption refrigeration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Liwei; WANG; Ruzhu; WU; Jingyi; WANG; Kai

    2005-01-01

    As a type of chemical adsorption working pair, the physical adsorption occurs first for CaCl2-NH3 because the effective reaction distance for van der Waals force is longer than that for chemical reaction force, and this physical adsorption state is named the precursor state of chemical adsorption. In order to get the different precursor states of CaCl2-NH3, the different distances between NH3 gas and Ca2+ are realized by the control of different phenomena of swelling and agglomeration in the process of adsorption. When the serious swelling exists while the agglomeration does not exist in the process of adsorption, experimental results show that the activated energy consumed by adsorption reaction increases for the reason of longer distance between Ca2+ and NH3, and at the same time the performance attenuation occurs in the repeated adsorption cycles. When the agglomeration occurs in the process of adsorption, the activated energy for the transition from precursor state to chemical adsorption decreases because the distance between NH3 gas and Ca2+ is shortened by the limited expansion space of adsorbent, and at the same time the performance attenuation does not occur. The adsorption refrigeration isobars are researched by the precursor state of chemical adsorption; results also show that the precursor state is a key factor for isobaric adsorption performance while the distribution of Ca2+ does not influence the permeation of NH3 gas in adsorbent.

  15. Chemical fingerprinting of whitewares from Nanwa site of the Chinese Erlitou state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Baoping [Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, University of Queensland, QLD 4072 (Australia)], E-mail: b.li@uq.edu.au; Liu Li [Archaeology Program, La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC 3086 (Australia); Zhao Jianxin [Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, University of Queensland, QLD 4072 (Australia); Chen Xingcan [Institute of Archaeology, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, Beijing 100710 (China); Feng Yuexing [Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, University of Queensland, QLD 4072 (Australia); Han Guohe; Zhu Junxiao [Department of Archaeology, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052 (China)

    2008-06-15

    Whitewares are among the most significant finds from Erlitou, China's earliest state (c. 1900-1500 BC). They were primarily discovered in small numbers from elite tombs of a few sites, leading to the hypothesis that they were made at only a few places and then circulated as prestige items. Recent archaeological work indicates Nanwa may be a whiteware production site. To facilitate determining provenances, we compare the ICP-MS trace elements and TIMS Sr isotopes of Nanwa whitewares with those from Tang dynasty (618-907 AD) Gongxian kilns and Song dynasty (960-1279 AD) Ding kilns. Although all were made of white-firing kaolinic clays, each of the three groups shows a different chemical composition. Furthermore, samples from Nanwa are chemically consistent and restricted in a way analogous to those from Gongxian and Ding, implying that Nanwa whiteware was probably produced in situ. In addition, Gongxian and Ding samples define two separate linear arrays in their {sup 87}Rb/{sup 86}Sr versus {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios, demonstrating that the clays for these samples are respectively related geochemically. Nanwa samples fall out of the linear arrays of both Gongxian and Ding, indicating that Nanwa whiteware clays were not derived from the same source rock as Gongxian clays, although the two sites are only some 25.5 km apart. In sum, beyond the general similarity of kaolinic clays used at Nanwa, Gongxian and Ding and the geographical proximity of those sites, finer distinctions of elemental and Sr isotopic contents indicate relatively unique chemical characteristics for each group. These traits provide valuable criteria to source traded ceramics of uncertain origins.

  16. Prediction of microvascular invasion of hepatocellular carcinomas with gadoxetic acid-enhanced MR imaging: Impact of intra-tumoral fat detected on chemical-shift images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Ji Hye [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Kon, E-mail: jmyr@dreamwiz.com [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Sanghyeok [Department of Radiology, Guri Hospital, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Guri (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Woo Kyoung; Choi, Dongil; Lee, Won Jae [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Intra-tumoral fat detected with MR imaging may suggest lower risk for MVI of HCC. • Alfa-fetoprotein, tumor size, and fat component were associated with MVI of HCC. • Chemical shift MRI should be considered for the evaluation of HCC. - Abstract: Purpose: To investigate the impact of intra-tumoral fat detected by chemical-shift MR imaging in predicting the MVI of HCC. Materials and methods: Gadoxetic acid-enhanced MR imaging of 365 surgically proven HCCs from 365 patients (306 men, 59 women; mean age, 55.6 years) were evaluated. HCCs were classified into two groups, fat-containing and non-fat-containing, based on the presence of fat on chemical-shift images. Fat-containing HCCs were subdivided into diffuse or focal fatty change groups. Logistic regression analyses were used to identify clinical and MR findings associated with MVI. Results: Based on MR imaging, 66 tumors were classified as fat-containing HCCs and 299 as non-fat-containing HCCs. Among the 66 fat-containing HCCs, 38 (57.6%) showed diffuse fatty changes and 28 (42.4%) showed focal fatty changes. MVI was present in 18 (27.3%) fat-containing HCCs and in 117 (39.1%) non-fat-containing HCCs (P = 0.07). Univariate analysis revealed that serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and tumor size were significantly associated with MVI (P < 0.001). A multiple logistic regression analysis showed that log AFP (odds ratio 1.178, P = 0.0016), tumor size (odds ratio 1.809, P < 0.001), and intra-tumoral fat (odds ratio 0.515, P = 0.0387) were independent variables associated with MVI. Conclusion: Intra-tumoral fat detected with MR imaging may suggest lower risk for MVI of HCC and, therefore, a possibly more favorable prognosis, but the clinical value of this finding is uncertain.

  17. Effects of temperature and relative humidity on the solid-state chemical stability of ranitidine hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teraoka, R; Otsuka, M; Matsuda, Y

    1993-06-01

    The chemical stability of ranitidine HCl in solution and in the solid state at various temperatures was investigated by high-performance liquid chromatography. Ranitidine HCl was unstable in lower pH buffer solutions, and the percent degradation after 72 h increased as the pH of the buffer solution was reduced. The percent degradation in the unbuffered solution increased dose dependently. The critical relative humidity (CRH) of the ranitidine HCl bulk powder was approximately 67% relative humidity (RH). The amount of water adsorbed onto the sample above the CRH was proportional to the RH level. The percent degradation of the powder below 50% RH was almost negligible because, at this level, it was a solid. The percent degradation at 60-70% RH was higher than that above 70% RH. Ranitidine HCl powder was unstable around the CRH.

  18. Near-infrared chemical imaging (NIR-CI) on roll compacted ribbons and tablets--multivariate mapping of physical and chemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souihi, Nabil; Nilsson, David; Josefson, Mats; Trygg, Johan

    2015-04-10

    Near-infrared chemical imaging (NIR-CI) is an attractive technique within the pharmaceutical industry, where tools are continuously in demand to assess the quality of the intermediate and final products. The present paper demonstrates how NIR-CI in combination with multivariate methods was utilized to spatially map physical properties and content of roll compacted ribbons and tablets. Additionally, extracted textural parameters from tablet images were correlated to the design parameters of the roll compaction process as well as to the physical properties of the granules. The results established the use of NIR-CI as a complementary nondestructive tool to determine the ribbon density and map the density distribution across the width and along the length of the ribbons. For the tablets, the compaction pressure developed during compression increased with the lateral distance from the center. Therefore, NIR-CI can be an effective tool to provide information about the spatial distribution of the compaction pressures on the surface of the tablet. Moreover, low roll compaction roll force correlated to a heterogeneous type of texture in the API chemical image. Overall, texture analysis of the tablets enabled efficient investigation of the spatial variation and could be used to advance process understanding. Finally, orthogonal projections to latent structures (O2PLS) model facilitated the understanding of the interrelationships between textural features, design parameters and physical properties data by separately joint and unique variations.

  19. Interface chemical states of NiO/NiFe films and their effects on magnetic properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于广华; 柴春林; 朱逢吾; 赖武彦

    2002-01-01

    Ta/NiOx/Ni81Fe19/Ta multilayers were prepared by rf reactive and dc magnetron sputtering.The exchange coupling field (Hex) and the coercivity (Hc) of NiOx/Ni81Fe19 as a function of the ratio of Ar to O2 during the deposition process were studied.The composition and chemical states at the interface region of NiOx/NiFe were also investigated using the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and peak decomposition technique.The results show that the ratio of Ar to O2 has great effect on the nickel chemical states in NiOx film.When the ratio of Ar to O2 is equal to 7 and the argon sputtering pressure is 0.57 Pa,the x value is approximately 1 and the valence of nickel is +2.At this point,NiOx is antiferromagnetic NiO and the corresponding Hex is the largest.As the ratio of Ar/O2 deviates from 7,the exchange coupling field (Hex) will decrease due to the presence of magnetic impurities such as Ni+3 or metallic Ni at the interface region of NiOx/NiFe,while the coercivity (Hc) will increase due to the metallic Ni.XPS studies also show that there are two thermodynamically favorable reactions at the NiO/NiFe interface: NiO+Fe=Ni+FeO and 3NiO+2Fe=3Ni+Fe2O3.These interface reaction products are magnetic impurities at the interface region of NiO/NiFe.It is believed that these magnetic impurities would have effect on the exchange coupling field (Hex) and the coercivity (Hc) of NiO/NiFe.

  20. Time-resolved imaging of laser-induced vibrational wave packets in neutral and ionic states of iodomethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malakar, Y.; Kaderiya, B.; Zohrabi, M.; Pearson, W. L.; Ziaee, F.; Kananka Raju, P.; Ben-Itzhak, I.; Rolles, D.; Rudenko, A.

    2016-05-01

    Light-driven vibrational wave packets play an important role in molecular imaging and coherent control applications. Here we present the results of a pump-probe experiment characterizing laser-induced vibrational wave packets in both, neutral and ionic states of CH3 I (iodomethane), one of the prototypical polyatomic systems. Measuring yields and kinetic energies of all ionic fragments as a function of the time delay between two 25 fs, 800 nm pump and probe pulses, we map vibrational motion of the molecule, and identify the states involved by channel-resolved Fourier spectroscopy. In the Coulomb explosion channels we observe features with ~ 130 fs periodicity resulting from C-I symmetric stretch (ν3 mode) of the electronically excited cationic state. However the Fourier transform of the low-energy I+ ion yield produced by the dissociative ionization of CH3 I reveals the signatures of the same vibrational mode in the ground electronic states of both, neutral and cation, reflected in 65-70 fs oscillations. We observe the degeneration of the oscillatory structures from the cationic states within ~ 2 ps and discuss most likely reasons for this behavior. Supported by the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, U. S. DOE. K. R. P. and W. L. P. supported by NSF Award No. IIA-143049.

  1. Topographical and Chemical Imaging of a Phase Separated Polymer Using a Combined Atomic Force Microscopy/Infrared Spectroscopy/Mass Spectrometry Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Tamin; Karácsony, Orsolya; Bocharova, Vera; Van Berkel, Gary J; Kertesz, Vilmos

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the use of a hybrid atomic force microscopy/infrared spectroscopy/mass spectrometry imaging platform was demonstrated for the acquisition and correlation of nanoscale sample surface topography and chemical images based on infrared spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The infrared chemical imaging component of the system utilized photothermal expansion of the sample at the tip of the atomic force microscopy probe recorded at infrared wave numbers specific to the different surface constituents. The mass spectrometry-based chemical imaging component of the system utilized nanothermal analysis probes for thermolytic surface sampling followed by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization of the gas phase species produced with subsequent mass analysis. The basic instrumental setup, operation, and image correlation procedures are discussed, and the multimodal imaging capability and utility are demonstrated using a phase separated poly(2-vinylpyridine)/poly(methyl methacrylate) polymer thin film. The topography and both the infrared and mass spectral chemical images showed that the valley regions of the thin film surface were comprised primarily of poly(2-vinylpyridine) and hill or plateau regions were primarily poly(methyl methacrylate). The spatial resolution of the mass spectral chemical images was estimated to be 1.6 μm based on the ability to distinguish surface features in those images that were also observed in the topography and infrared images of the same surface.

  2. Nudged-elastic band method with two climbing images: finding transition states in complex energy landscapes

    CERN Document Server

    Zarkevich, Nikolai A

    2014-01-01

    The nudged-elastic band (NEB) method is modified with concomitant two climbing images (C2-NEB) to find a transition state (TS) in complex energy landscapes, such as those with serpentine minimal energy path (MEP). If a single climbing image (C1-NEB) successfully finds the TS, C2-NEB finds it with higher stability and accuracy. However, C2-NEB is suitable for more complex cases, where C1-NEB misses the TS because the MEP and NEB directions near the saddle point are different. Generally, C2-NEB not only finds the TS but guarantees that the climbing images approach it from the opposite sides along the MEP, and it estimates accuracy from the three images: the highest-energy one and its climbing neighbors. C2-NEB is suitable for fixed-cell NEB and the generalized solid-state NEB (SS-NEB).

  3. Regional Differences in Muscle Energy Metabolism in Human Muscle by 31P-Chemical Shift Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kime, Ryotaro; Kaneko, Yasuhisa; Hongo, Yoshinori; Ohno, Yusuke; Sakamoto, Ayumi; Katsumura, Toshihito

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have reported significant region-dependent differences in the fiber-type composition of human skeletal muscle. It is therefore hypothesized that there is a difference between the deep and superficial parts of muscle energy metabolism during exercise. We hypothesized that the inorganic phosphate (Pi)/phosphocreatine (PCr) ratio of the superficial parts would be higher, compared with the deep parts, as the work rate increases, because the muscle fiber-type composition of the fast-type may be greater in the superficial parts compared with the deep parts. This study used two-dimensional 31Phosphorus Chemical Shift Imaging (31P-CSI) to detect differences between the deep and superficial parts of the human leg muscles during dynamic knee extension exercise. Six healthy men participated in this study (age 27±1 year, height 169.4±4.1 cm, weight 65.9±8.4 kg). The experiments were carried out with a 1.5-T superconducting magnet with a 5-in. diameter circular surface coil. The subjects performed dynamic one-legged knee extension exercise in the prone position, with the transmit-receive coil placed under the right quadriceps muscles in the magnet. The subjects pulled down an elastic rubber band attached to the ankle at a frequency of 0.25, 0.5 and 1 Hz for 320 s each. The intracellular pH (pHi) was calculated from the median chemical shift of the Pi peak relative to PCr. No significant difference in Pi/PCr was observed between the deep and the superficial parts of the quadriceps muscles at rest. The Pi/PCr of the superficial parts was not significantly increased with increasing work rate. Compared with the superficial areas, the Pi/PCr of the deep parts was significantly higher (p<0.05) at 1 Hz. The pHi showed no significant difference between the two parts. These results suggest that muscle oxidative metabolism is different between deep and superficial parts of quadriceps muscles during dynamic exercise.

  4. A Practical and Portable Solids-State Electronic Terahertz Imaging System

    OpenAIRE

    Ken Smart; Jia Du; Li Li; David Wang; Keith Leslie; Fan Ji; Xiang Dong Li; Da Zhang Zeng

    2016-01-01

    A practical compact solid-state terahertz imaging system is presented. Various beam guiding architectures were explored and hardware performance assessed to improve its compactness, robustness, multi-functionality and simplicity of operation. The system performance in terms of image resolution, signal-to-noise ratio, the electronic signal modulation versus optical chopper, is evaluated and discussed. The system can be conveniently switched between transmission and reflection mode according to...

  5. X-ray chemical imaging and the electronic structure of a single nanoplatelet Ni/graphene composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chunyu; Wang, Jian; Szpunar, Jerzy A

    2014-03-01

    Chemical imaging and quantitative analysis of a single graphene nanoplatelet grown with Ni nanoparticles (Ni/graphene) has been performed by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). Local electronic and chemical structure of Ni/graphene has been investigated by spatially resolved C, O K-edges and Ni L-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, revealing the covalent anchoring of Ni(0) on graphene. This study facilitates the understanding of the structure modification of host materials for hydrogen storage and offers a better understanding of interaction between Ni particles and graphene.

  6. Enhanced 2D-image upconversion using solid-state lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian; Karamehmedovic, Emir; Dam, Jeppe Seidelin

    2009-01-01

    the image inside a nonlinear PPKTP crystal located in the high intra-cavity field of a 1342 nm solid-state Nd:YVO4 laser, an upconverted image at 488 nm is generated. We have experimentally achieved an upconversion efficiency of 40% under CW conditions. The proposed technique can be further adapted for high...... efficiency mid-infrared image upconversion where direct and fast detection is difficult or impossible to perform with existing detector technologies.......Based on enhanced upconversion, we demonstrate a highly efficient method for converting a full image from one part of the electromagnetic spectrum into a new desired wavelength region. By illuminating a metal transmission mask with a 765 nm Gaussian beam to create an image and subsequently focusing...

  7. Energy-Looping Nanoparticles: Harnessing Excited-State Absorption for Deep-Tissue Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Elizabeth S; Tajon, Cheryl A; Bischof, Thomas S; Iafrati, Jillian; Fernandez-Bravo, Angel; Garfield, David J; Chamanzar, Maysamreza; Maharbiz, Michel M; Sohal, Vikaas S; Schuck, P James; Cohen, Bruce E; Chan, Emory M

    2016-09-27

    Near infrared (NIR) microscopy enables noninvasive imaging in tissue, particularly in the NIR-II spectral range (1000-1400 nm) where attenuation due to tissue scattering and absorption is minimized. Lanthanide-doped upconverting nanocrystals are promising deep-tissue imaging probes due to their photostable emission in the visible and NIR, but these materials are not efficiently excited at NIR-II wavelengths due to the dearth of lanthanide ground-state absorption transitions in this window. Here, we develop a class of lanthanide-doped imaging probes that harness an energy-looping mechanism that facilitates excitation at NIR-II wavelengths, such as 1064 nm, that are resonant with excited-state absorption transitions but not ground-state absorption. Using computational methods and combinatorial screening, we have identified Tm(3+)-doped NaYF4 nanoparticles as efficient looping systems that emit at 800 nm under continuous-wave excitation at 1064 nm. Using this benign excitation with standard confocal microscopy, energy-looping nanoparticles (ELNPs) are imaged in cultured mammalian cells and through brain tissue without autofluorescence. The 1 mm imaging depths and 2 μm feature sizes are comparable to those demonstrated by state-of-the-art multiphoton techniques, illustrating that ELNPs are a promising class of NIR probes for high-fidelity visualization in cells and tissue.

  8. Imaging the equilibrium state and magnetization dynamics of partially built hard disk write heads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valkass, R. A. J., E-mail: rajv202@ex.ac.uk; Yu, W.; Shelford, L. R.; Keatley, P. S.; Loughran, T. H. J.; Hicken, R. J. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom); Cavill, S. A. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Laan, G. van der; Dhesi, S. S. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Bashir, M. A.; Gubbins, M. A. [Research and Development, Seagate Technology, 1 Disc Drive, Springtown Industrial Estate, Derry BT48 0BF (United Kingdom); Czoschke, P. J.; Lopusnik, R. [Recording Heads Operation, Seagate Technology, 7801 Computer Avenue South, Bloomington, Minnesota 55435 (United States)

    2015-06-08

    Four different designs of partially built hard disk write heads with a yoke comprising four repeats of NiFe (1 nm)/CoFe (50 nm) were studied by both x-ray photoemission electron microscopy (XPEEM) and time-resolved scanning Kerr microscopy (TRSKM). These techniques were used to investigate the static equilibrium domain configuration and the magnetodynamic response across the entire structure, respectively. Simulations and previous TRSKM studies have made proposals for the equilibrium domain configuration of similar structures, but no direct observation of the equilibrium state of the writers has yet been made. In this study, static XPEEM images of the equilibrium state of writer structures were acquired using x-ray magnetic circular dichroism as the contrast mechanism. These images suggest that the crystalline anisotropy dominates the equilibrium state domain configuration, but competition with shape anisotropy ultimately determines the stability of the equilibrium state. Dynamic TRSKM images were acquired from nominally identical devices. These images suggest that a longer confluence region may hinder flux conduction from the yoke into the pole tip: the shorter confluence region exhibits clear flux beaming along the symmetry axis, whereas the longer confluence region causes flux to conduct along one edge of the writer. The observed variations in dynamic response agree well with the differences in the equilibrium magnetization configuration visible in the XPEEM images, confirming that minor variations in the geometric design of the writer structure can have significant effects on the process of flux beaming.

  9. Mixing and transport during pharmaceutical twin-screw wet granulation: experimental analysis via chemical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashish; Vercruysse, Jurgen; Toiviainen, Maunu; Panouillot, Pierre-Emmanuel; Juuti, Mikko; Vanhoorne, Valérie; Vervaet, Chris; Remon, Jean Paul; Gernaey, Krist V; De Beer, Thomas; Nopens, Ingmar

    2014-07-01

    Twin-screw granulation is a promising continuous alternative for traditional batch high shear wet granulation (HSWG). The extent of HSWG in a twin screw granulator (TSG) is greatly governed by the residence time of the granulation materials in the TSG and degree of mixing. In order to determine the residence time distribution (RTD) and mixing in TSG, mostly visual observation and particle tracking methods are used, which are either inaccurate and difficult for short RTD, or provide an RTD only for a finite number of preferential tracer paths. In this study, near infrared chemical imaging, which is more accurate and provides a complete RTD, was used. The impact of changes in material throughput (10-17 kg/h), screw speed (500-900 rpm), number of kneading discs (2-12) and stagger angle (30-90°) on the RTD and axial mixing of the material was characterised. The experimental RTD curves were used to calculate the mean residence time, mean centred variance and the Péclet number to determine the axial mixing and predominance of convective over dispersive transport. The results showed that screw speed is the most influential parameter in terms of RTD and axial mixing in the TSG and established a significant interaction between screw design parameters (number and stagger angle of kneading discs) and the process parameters (material throughput and number of kneading discs). The results of the study will allow the development and validation of a transport model capable of predicting the RTD and macro-mixing in the TSG. These can later be coupled with a population balance model in order to predict granulation yields in a TSG more accurately.

  10. Universal imaging: Dissociative ionization of polyatomic molecules, chemical dynamics beamline 9.0.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, M.; Chen, D.; Suits, A.G. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    A third endstation was recently added to the Chemical Dynamics beamline, designed to exploit the high flux broadband undulator light for a range of studies of reactive scattering, photochemistry and photoionization processes using time-of-flight mass spectroscopy coupled with position-sensitive detection. Two molecular beam sources are fixed at right angles, with the undulator light, or laser beams, intersecting the molecular beams at 45{degrees}. To date, beamline experiments have included a study of dissociative photoionization of a variety of molecules including N{sub 2}O and SF{sub 6}. In this mode, a single molecular beam source is used, with the tunable undulator light inducing, in SF{sub 6} for example, the process SF{sub 6} {r_arrow} SF{sub 6}{sup +} + e{sup {minus}} {r_arrow} SF{sub 5}{sup +} + F + e{sup {minus}}. The SF{sub 5}{sup +} ions are accelerated up the flight tube, mass selected and detected as a function of position on a phosphor screen viewed by a CCD camera. The position directly reveals the recoil speed (or translational energy release) and angular distribution for the dissociative ionization process. Furthermore, this measurement is obtained for all recoil speeds and angles simultaneously. Such detailed angular information has not previously been obtained for dissociative ionization processes; typically ion time-of-flight profiles are deconvoluted to yield rough insight into the angular distributions. The recorded image is actually a 2-dimensional projection of the nascent 3-dimensional velocity distribution, but established tomographic techniques enable the authors to reconstruct the 3-D distribution.

  11. Super-resolution Imaging by Evanescent Wave Coupling to Surface States on Effective Gain Media

    CERN Document Server

    Mehrotra, Prateek; Blaikie, Richard J

    2012-01-01

    Higher resolution demands for semiconductor lithography may be fulfilled by higher numerical aperture (NA) systems. However, NAs more than the photoresist refractive index (~1.7) cause surface confinement of the image. In this letter we describe how evanescent wave coupling to effective gain medium surface states beneath the imaging layer can counter this problem. At {\\lambda}=193 nm a layer of sapphire on SiO2 counters image decay by an effective-gain-medium resonance phenomena allowing evanescent interferometric lithography to create high aspect ratio structures at NAs of 1.85 (26-nm) and beyond.

  12. Tolosa–Hunt Syndrome Demonstrated by Constructive Interference Steady State Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wani, Nisar A.; Jehangir, Majid; Lone, Parveen A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To highlight the role of constructive interference steady state (CISS) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of Tolosa-Hunt Syndrome (THS). Case Report: We describe a case of THS in a 55-year-old woman presenting with left painful opthalmoplegia that was diagnosed by CISS MRI. Patient responded to steroid treatment and the lesion resolved. Conclusion: Imaging with MRI can help in making the diagnosis of THS by demonstrating an enhancing soft tissue lesion in the cavernous sinus and orbital apex resolving with steroids. CISS MRI is a sensitive sequence for diagnosis and follow-up imaging in THS.

  13. Pool chemical-associated health events in public and residential settings - United States, 2003-2012, and Minnesota, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlavsa, Michele C; Robinson, Trisha J; Collier, Sarah A; Beach, Michael J

    2014-05-16

    Pool chemicals are added to treated recreational water venues (e.g., pools, hot tubs/spas, and interactive fountains) primarily to protect public health by inactivating pathogens and maximizing the effectiveness of disinfection by controlling pH. However, pool chemicals also can cause injuries when handled or stored improperly. To estimate the number of emergency department (ED) visits for injuries associated with pool chemicals in the United States per year during 2003-2012, CDC analyzed data from the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission's National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS). This report summarizes the results of that analysis. In 2012 alone, an estimated 4,876 persons (95% confidence interval [CI] = 2,821-6,930) visited an ED for injuries associated with pool chemicals. Almost half of the patients were aged pool chemical-associated health event that occurred in Minnesota in 2013, which sent seven children and one adult to an ED. An investigation by the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) determined the cause to be poor monitoring of or response to pool chemistry. Pool chemical-associated health events are preventable. CDC's Model Aquatic Health Code (MAHC) (1) is a resource that state and local agencies can use to optimize prevention of injuries and illnesses associated with public treated recreational water venues, including pool chemical-associated health events.

  14. Quantitative Chemical Analysis of Slag Ash of Novocherkassk State District Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Germanovna Korotkova

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative chemical composition of ash and slag mix generated upon combustion of Donetsk culm is determined. It is established that ash and slag mix of Novocherkassk state district power plant (SDPP (Rostov region, Russia after coal combustion has the following composition: iron – 2.3%; mineral constituents – 75.8%; calcium oxide – 20.4%; aluminum oxide – 0.0118%; water – 1.3022%; manganese oxide – 0.18%; copper oxide – 0.0043%; plumbum – 0.0017%; it is qualified as hazard class IV for environment. Cadmium, mercury, arsenic, selenium, antimony, bismuth are contained in trace amounts < 0.1 mg/kg. In order to reduce dust emissions the cleaning stage I of gas scrubbing facility is equipped with group cyclone comprised of four cyclone units. Medium and coarse particles under the action of centrifugal force are deposited in the cyclone. This promoted decrease in dust load on bag filters, the cleaning stage II. Qualitative chemical composition of ash captured by group cyclone and that of ash captured by bag filter are determined. Cadmium, copper, plumbum, zinc, iron, manganese, and calcium are contained in coarse and fine particles captured by group cyclone and bag filter. Aluminum referred to light metals is completely captured by cyclone. The ash dust in its bulk is of dark gray color. The ash captured by cyclone contains coarse particles of black color and the ash captured bag filter contains fine particles of light colors (gray-yellow color producing silky gloss. This is characteristic for ash dust after combustion of Donetsk culm. The main component of the ash is silicon dioxide, its content in the ash captured by filter reaches 91%. These fine particles create light tone of this ash.

  15. Chemical and non-chemical s tressors affecting childhood obesity: a state-of-the-science-review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childhood obesity has tripled in the last three decades and now affects 17% of children in the United States (US). In 2010, the percentage of obese children in the US was nearly 18% for both 6-11 and 12-19 years of age. Recent evidence in the literature suggests that exposure to ...

  16. Applying Chemical Imaging Analysis to Improve Our Understanding of Cold Cloud Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskin, A.; Knopf, D. A.; Wang, B.; Alpert, P. A.; Roedel, T.; Gilles, M. K.; Moffet, R.; Tivanski, A.

    2012-12-01

    The impact that atmospheric ice nucleation has on the global radiation budget is one of the least understood problems in atmospheric sciences. This is in part due to the incomplete understanding of various ice nucleation pathways that lead to ice crystal formation from pre-existing aerosol particles. Studies investigating the ice nucleation propensity of laboratory generated particles indicate that individual particle types are highly selective in their ice nucleating efficiency. This description of heterogeneous ice nucleation would present a challenge when applying to the atmosphere which contains a complex mixture of particles. Here, we employ a combination of micro-spectroscopic and optical single particle analytical methods to relate particle physical and chemical properties with observed water uptake and ice nucleation. Field-collected particles from urban environments impacted by anthropogenic and marine emissions and aging processes are investigated. Single particle characterization is provided by computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). A particle-on-substrate approach coupled to a vapor controlled cooling-stage and a microscope system is applied to determine the onsets of water uptake and ice nucleation including immersion freezing and deposition ice nucleation as a function of temperature (T) as low as 200 K and relative humidity (RH) up to water saturation. We observe for urban aerosol particles that for T > 230 K the oxidation level affects initial water uptake and that subsequent immersion freezing depends on particle mixing state, e.g. by the presence of insoluble particles. For T cloud formation. Initial results applying single particle IN analysis using CCSEM/EDX and STXM/NEXAFS reveal that a significant amount of IN are coated by organics and, thus, are similar to the

  17. Chemical Imaging and Dynamical Studies of Reactivity and Emergent Behavior in Complex Interfacial Systems. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sibener, Steven J. [University of Chicago, IL (United States)

    2014-03-11

    This research program explored the efficacy of using molecular-level manipulation, imaging and scanning tunneling spectroscopy in conjunction with supersonic molecular beam gas-surface scattering to significantly enhance our understanding of chemical processes occurring on well-characterized interfaces. One program focus was on the spatially-resolved emergent behavior of complex reaction systems as a function of the local geometry and density of adsorbate-substrate systems under reaction conditions. Another focus was on elucidating the emergent electronic and related reactivity characteristics of intentionally constructed single and multicomponent atom- and nanoparticle-based materials. We also examined emergent chirality and self-organization in adsorbed molecular systems where collective interactions between adsorbates and the supporting interface lead to spatial symmetry breaking. In many of these studies we combined the advantages of scanning tunneling (STM) and atomic force (AFM) imaging, scanning tunneling local electronic spectroscopy (STS), and reactive supersonic molecular beams to elucidate precise details of interfacial reactivity that had not been observed by more traditional surface science methods. Using these methods, it was possible to examine, for example, the differential reactivity of molecules adsorbed at different bonding sites in conjunction with how reactivity is modified by the local configuration of nearby adsorbates. At the core of this effort was the goal of significantly extending our understanding of interfacial atomic-scale interactions to create, with intent, molecular assemblies and materials with advanced chemical and physical properties. This ambitious program addressed several key topics in DOE Grand Challenge Science, including emergent chemical and physical properties in condensed phase systems, novel uses of chemical imaging, and the development of advanced reactivity concepts in combustion and catalysis including carbon

  18. HIGH DENSITY AERIAL IMAGE MATCHING: STATE-OF-THE-ART AND FUTURE PROSPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Haala

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ongoing innovations in matching algorithms are continuously improving the quality of geometric surface representations generated automatically from aerial images. This development motivated the launch of the joint ISPRS/EuroSDR project “Benchmark on High Density Aerial Image Matching”, which aims on the evaluation of photogrammetric 3D data capture in view of the current developments in dense multi-view stereo-image matching. Originally, the test aimed on image based DSM computation from conventional aerial image flights for different landuse and image block configurations. The second phase then put an additional focus on high quality, high resolution 3D geometric data capture in complex urban areas. This includes both the extension of the test scenario to oblique aerial image flights as well as the generation of filtered point clouds as additional output of the respective multi-view reconstruction. The paper uses the preliminary outcomes of the benchmark to demonstrate the state-of-the-art in airborne image matching with a special focus of high quality geometric data capture in urban scenarios.

  19. Optically induced effective mass renormalization: the case of graphite image potential states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagnese, M.; Pagliara, S.; Galimberti, G.; Dal Conte, S.; Ferrini, G.; van Loosdrecht, P. H. M.; Parmigiani, F.

    2016-10-01

    Many-body interactions with the underlying bulk electrons determine the properties of confined electronic states at the surface of a metal. Using momentum resolved nonlinear photoelectron spectroscopy we show that one can tailor these many-body interactions in graphite, leading to a strong renormalization of the dispersion and linewidth of the image potential state. These observations are interpreted in terms of a basic self-energy model, and may be considered as exemplary for optically induced many-body interactions.

  20. Non-rigid registration of medical images based on estimation of deformation states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marami, Bahram; Sirouspour, Shahin; Capson, David W.

    2014-11-01

    A unified framework for automatic non-rigid 3D-3D and 3D-2D registration of medical images with static and dynamic deformations is proposed in this paper. The problem of non-rigid image registration is approached as a classical state estimation problem using a generic deformation model for the soft tissue. The registration technique employs a dynamic linear elastic continuum mechanics model of the tissue deformation, which is discretized using the finite element method. In the proposed method, the registration is achieved through a Kalman-like filtering process, which incorporates information from the deformation model and a vector of observation prediction errors computed from an intensity-based similarity/distance metric between images. With this formulation, single and multiple-modality, 3D-3D and 3D-2D image registration problems can all be treated within the same framework. The performance of the proposed registration technique was evaluated in a number of different registration scenarios. First, 3D magnetic resonance (MR) images of uncompressed and compressed breast tissue were co-registered. 3D MR images of the uncompressed breast tissue were also registered to a sequence of simulated 2D interventional MR images of the compressed breast. Finally, the registration algorithm was employed to dynamically track a target sub-volume inside the breast tissue during the process of the biopsy needle insertion based on registering pre-insertion 3D MR images to a sequence of real-time simulated 2D interventional MR images. Registration results indicate that the proposed method can be effectively employed for the registration of medical images in image-guided procedures, such as breast biopsy in which the tissue undergoes static and dynamic deformations.

  1. Modulated electron-multiplied fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope: all-solid-state camera for fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qiaole; Schelen, Ben; Schouten, Raymond; van den Oever, Rein; Leenen, René; van Kuijk, Harry; Peters, Inge; Polderdijk, Frank; Bosiers, Jan; Raspe, Marcel; Jalink, Kees; Geert Sander de Jong, Jan; van Geest, Bert; Stoop, Karel; Young, Ian Ted

    2012-12-01

    We have built an all-solid-state camera that is directly modulated at the pixel level for frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) measurements. This novel camera eliminates the need for an image intensifier through the use of an application-specific charge coupled device design in a frequency-domain FLIM system. The first stage of evaluation for the camera has been carried out. Camera characteristics such as noise distribution, dark current influence, camera gain, sampling density, sensitivity, linearity of photometric response, and optical transfer function have been studied through experiments. We are able to do lifetime measurement using our modulated, electron-multiplied fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope (MEM-FLIM) camera for various objects, e.g., fluorescein solution, fixed green fluorescent protein (GFP) cells, and GFP-actin stained live cells. A detailed comparison of a conventional microchannel plate (MCP)-based FLIM system and the MEM-FLIM system is presented. The MEM-FLIM camera shows higher resolution and a better image quality. The MEM-FLIM camera provides a new opportunity for performing frequency-domain FLIM.

  2. On the use of steady-state signal equations for 2D TrueFISP imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coolen, Bram F; Heijman, Edwin; Nicolay, Klaas; Strijkers, Gustav J

    2009-07-01

    To explain the signal behavior in 2D-TrueFISP imaging, a slice excitation profile should be considered that describes a variation of effective flip angles and magnetization phases after excitation. These parameters can be incorporated into steady-state equations to predict the final signal within a pixel. The use of steady-state equations assumes that excitation occurs instantaneously, although in reality this is a nonlinear process. In addition, often the flip angle variation within the slice excitation profile is solely considered when using steady-state equations, while TrueFISP is especially known for its sensitivity to phase variations. The purpose of this study was therefore to evaluate the precision of steady-state equations in calculating signal intensities in 2D TrueFISP imaging. To that end, steady-state slice profiles and corresponding signal intensities were calculated as function of flip angle, RF phase advance and pulse shape. More complex Bloch simulations were considered as a gold standard, which described every excitation within the sequence until steady state was reached. They were used to analyze two different methods based on steady-state equations. In addition, measurements on phantoms were done with corresponding imaging parameters. Although the Bloch simulations described the steady-state slice profile formation better than methods based on steady-state equations, the latter performed well in predicting the steady-state signal resulting from it. In certain cases the phase variation within the slice excitation profile did not even have to be taken into account.

  3. Segmentation algorithm of chemical molecular structure images%化学分子结构图分割算法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    管燕; 李存华; 仲兆满; 孙兰兰

    2012-01-01

    为了将化学分子结构图中化学键与杂原子、基团分割开,提出了基于区域尺寸和弯曲度的化学分子结构图分割算法。首先,根据连通区域尺寸大小,将化学分子结构图分割成两部分:一部分是由化学键组成的所有大尺寸连通区域的组合,另一部分是杂原子、基团和单化学键等小尺寸区域的组合。然后,根据弯曲度将小尺寸组合图中的表示化学键的单线段和类线段“I”、“1”、“-”提取出。最后根据位置等信息将“I”、“1”、“-”和单线段进行区分,将单线段的化学键和大尺寸连通区组合,实现了化学键与杂原子、基团的分离。实验结果表明,该图像分割算法准确率高达98.3%,与人类视觉感知具有一致性。这为后续的化学分子结构图像信息的自动提取奠定了基础。%The segmentation algorithm of chemical molecular structure based on area size and bending degree was proposed to segment chemical bonds, heteroatoms and perssad. First, chemical molecular structure images were segmented into two parts according to connection area size. One was the combination of all big size connection areas containing chemical bonds, and the other was the combination of heteroatoms, perssad and single chemical bonds. Second, single lines were extracted based on bending degree, which represents small size combination images, and like-lines such as "I" ,"l" and " - ". Finally, "I" ,"l", " - " and single lines were distinguished, chemical bonds of single lines and big size connection areas were combined, and the segmentation of chemical bonds, heteroatoms and perssad was realized. The accuracy by the proposed algorithm reached to 98. 3%, and the segmentation effect was consistent with human visual perception. This is the foundation for automatically extracting chemical molecular structure images.

  4. Doppler imaging of chemical spots on magnetic Ap/Bp stars. Numerical tests and assessment of systematic errors

    CERN Document Server

    Kochukhov, O

    2016-01-01

    Doppler imaging (DI) is a powerful spectroscopic inversion technique that enables conversion of a line profile time series into a two-dimensional map of the stellar surface inhomogeneities. In this paper we investigate the accuracy of chemical abundance DI of Ap/Bp stars and assess the impact of several different systematic errors on the reconstructed spot maps. We simulate spectroscopic observational data for different spot distributions in the presence of a moderately strong dipolar magnetic field. We then reconstruct chemical maps using different sets of spectral lines and making different assumptions about line formation in the inversion calculations. Our numerical experiments demonstrate that a modern DI code successfully recovers the input chemical spot distributions comprised of multiple circular spots at different latitudes or an element overabundance belt at the magnetic equator. For the optimal reconstruction the average reconstruction errors do not exceed ~0.10 dex. The errors increase to about 0.1...

  5. Predicting the redox state and secondary structure of cysteine residues using multi-dimensional classification analysis of NMR chemical shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ching-Cheng; Lai, Wen-Chung; Chuang, Woei-Jer

    2016-09-01

    A tool for predicting the redox state and secondary structure of cysteine residues using multi-dimensional analyses of different combinations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts has been developed. A data set of cysteine [Formula: see text], (13)C(α), (13)C(β), (1)H(α), (1)H(N), and (15)N(H) chemical shifts was created, classified according to redox state and secondary structure, using a library of 540 re-referenced BioMagResBank (BMRB) entries. Multi-dimensional analyses of three, four, five, and six chemical shifts were used to derive rules for predicting the structural states of cysteine residues. The results from 60 BMRB entries containing 122 cysteines showed that four-dimensional analysis of the C(α), C(β), H(α), and N(H) chemical shifts had the highest prediction accuracy of 100 and 95.9 % for the redox state and secondary structure, respectively. The prediction of secondary structure using 3D, 5D, and 6D analyses had the accuracy of ~90 %, suggesting that H(N) and [Formula: see text] chemical shifts may be noisy and made the discrimination worse. A web server (6DCSi) was established to enable users to submit NMR chemical shifts, either in BMRB or key-in formats, for prediction. 6DCSi displays predictions using sets of 3, 4, 5, and 6 chemical shifts, which shows their consistency and allows users to draw their own conclusions. This web-based tool can be used to rapidly obtain structural information regarding cysteine residues directly from experimental NMR data.

  6. Solid-state, flat-panel, digital radiography detectors and their physical imaging characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowen, A R; Kengyelics, S M; Davies, A G

    2008-05-01

    Solid-state, digital radiography (DR) detectors, designed specifically for standard projection radiography, emerged just before the turn of the millennium. This new generation of digital image detector comprises a thin layer of x-ray absorptive material combined with an electronic active matrix array fabricated in a thin film of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). DR detectors can offer both efficient (low-dose) x-ray image acquisition plus on-line readout of the latent image as electronic data. To date, solid-state, flat-panel, DR detectors have come in two principal designs, the indirect-conversion (x-ray scintillator-based) and the direct-conversion (x-ray photoconductor-based) types. This review describes the underlying principles and enabling technologies exploited by these designs of detector, and evaluates their physical imaging characteristics, comparing performance both against each other and computed radiography (CR). In standard projection radiography indirect conversion DR detectors currently offer superior physical image quality and dose efficiency compared with direct conversion DR and modern point-scan CR. These conclusions have been confirmed in the findings of clinical evaluations of DR detectors. Future trends in solid-state DR detector technologies are also briefly considered. Salient innovations include WiFi-enabled, portable DR detectors, improvements in x-ray absorber layers and developments in alternative electronic media to a-Si:H.

  7. Management of social sphere as a factor of positive image of the state in the modern world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pakulina Alevtyna

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The object of study is the process of state management of social sphere as a factor of positive image of Ukraine in the modern world. The article conducts a complex analysis of state management of social sphere as a factor of positive image of Ukraine. The authors have defined the modern tendencies, features of management of social sphere and formation of the state positive image. The dominant, which characterize the positive image of Ukraine in the world as a basis of priorities of systemic reform of the social sphere was scientifically proved. The authors of the article define the priorities of state management of social sphere of Kharkov region.

  8. Chemical Bonding States of TiC Films before and after Hydrogen Ion Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    TiC films deposited by rf magnetron sputtering followed by Ar+ ion bombardment were irradiated with a hydrogen ion beam. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used for characterization of the chemical bonding states of C and Ti elements of the TiC films before and after hydrogen ion irradiation, in order to understand the effect of hydrogen ion irradiation on the films and to study the mechanism of hydrogen resistance of TiC films. Conclusions can be drawn that ion bombardment at moderate energy can cause preferential physical sputtering of carbon atoms from the surface of low atomic number (Z) material. This means that ion beam bombardment leads to the formation of a non-stoichiometric composition of TiC on the surface.TiC films prepared by ion beam mixing have the more excellent characteristic of hydrogen resistance. One important cause, in addition to TiC itself, is that there are many vacant sites in TiC created by ion beam mixing.These defects can easily trap hydrogen and effectively enhance the effect of hydrogen resistance.

  9. Chemical Composition and Disruption of Quorum Sensing Signaling in Geographically Diverse United States Propolis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savka, Michael A.; Dailey, Lucas; Popova, Milena; Mihaylova, Ralitsa; Merritt, Benjamin; Masek, Marissa; Le, Phuong; Nor, Sharifah Radziah Mat; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hudson, André O.; Bankova, Vassya

    2015-01-01

    Propolis or bee glue has been used for centuries for various purposes and is especially important in human health due to many of its biological and pharmacological properties. In this work we showed quorum sensing inhibitory (QSI) activity of ten geographically distinct propolis samples from the United States using the acyl-homoserine lactone- (AHL-) dependent Chromobacterium violaceum strain CV026. Based on GC-MS chemical profiling the propolis samples can be classified into several groups that are as follows: (1) rich in cinnamic acid derivatives, (2) rich in flavonoids, and (3) rich in triterpenes. An in-depth analysis of the propolis from North Carolina led to the isolation and identification of a triterpenic acid that was recently isolated from Hondurian propolis (Central America) and ethyl ether of p-coumaric alcohol not previously identified in bee propolis. QSI activity was also observed in the second group US propolis samples which contained the flavonoid pinocembrin in addition to other flavonoid compounds. The discovery of compounds that are involved in QSI activity has the potential to facilitate studies that may lead to the development of antivirulence therapies that can be complementary and/or alternative treatments against antibiotic resistant bacterial pathogens and/or emerging pathogens that have yet to be identified. PMID:25960752

  10. Rate constants of chemical reactions from semiclassical transition state theory in full and one dimension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Samuel M; Shan, Xiao; Clary, David C

    2016-06-28

    Semiclassical Transition State Theory (SCTST), a method for calculating rate constants of chemical reactions, offers gains in computational efficiency relative to more accurate quantum scattering methods. In full-dimensional (FD) SCTST, reaction probabilities are calculated from third and fourth potential derivatives along all vibrational degrees of freedom. However, the computational cost of FD SCTST scales unfavorably with system size, which prohibits its application to larger systems. In this study, the accuracy and efficiency of 1-D SCTST, in which only third and fourth derivatives along the reaction mode are used, are investigated in comparison to those of FD SCTST. Potential derivatives are obtained from numerical ab initio Hessian matrix calculations at the MP2/cc-pVTZ level of theory, and Richardson extrapolation is applied to improve the accuracy of these derivatives. Reaction barriers are calculated at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ level. Results from FD SCTST agree with results from previous theoretical and experimental studies when Richardson extrapolation is applied. Results from our implementation of 1-D SCTST, which uses only 4 single-point MP2/cc-pVTZ energy calculations in addition to those for conventional TST, agree with FD results to within a factor of 5 at 250 K. This degree of agreement and the efficiency of the 1-D method suggest its potential as a means of approximating rate constants for systems too large for existing quantum scattering methods.

  11. Finite state projection based bounds to compare chemical master equation models using single-cell data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Zachary; Neuert, Gregor; Munsky, Brian

    2016-08-01

    Emerging techniques now allow for precise quantification of distributions of biological molecules in single cells. These rapidly advancing experimental methods have created a need for more rigorous and efficient modeling tools. Here, we derive new bounds on the likelihood that observations of single-cell, single-molecule responses come from a discrete stochastic model, posed in the form of the chemical master equation. These strict upper and lower bounds are based on a finite state projection approach, and they converge monotonically to the exact likelihood value. These bounds allow one to discriminate rigorously between models and with a minimum level of computational effort. In practice, these bounds can be incorporated into stochastic model identification and parameter inference routines, which improve the accuracy and efficiency of endeavors to analyze and predict single-cell behavior. We demonstrate the applicability of our approach using simulated data for three example models as well as for experimental measurements of a time-varying stochastic transcriptional response in yeast.

  12. Octafluorodirhenate(III) Revisited: Solid-State Preparation, Characterization, and Multiconfigurational Quantum Chemical Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariappan Balasekaran, Samundeeswari; Todorova, Tanya K; Pham, Chien Thang; Hartmann, Thomas; Abram, Ulrich; Sattelberger, Alfred P; Poineau, Frederic

    2016-06-01

    A simple method for the high-yield preparation of (NH4)2[Re2F8]·2H2O has been developed that involves the reaction of (n-Bu4N)2[Re2Cl8] with molten ammonium bifluoride (NH4HF2). Using this method, the new salt [NH4]2[Re2F8]·2H2O was prepared in ∼90% yield. The product was characterized in solution by ultraviolet-visible light (UV-vis) and (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance ((19)F NMR) spectroscopies and in the solid-state by elemental analysis, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Multiconfigurational CASSCF/CASPT2 quantum chemical calculations were performed to investigate the molecular and electronic structure, as well as the electronic absorption spectrum of the [Re2F8](2-) anion. The metal-metal bonding in the Re2(6+) unit was quantified in terms of effective bond order (EBO) and compared to that of its [Re2Cl8](2-) and [Re2Br8](2-) analogues.

  13. Evaluating chemical extraction techniques for the determination of uranium oxidation state in reduced aquifer sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoliker, Deborah L; Campbell, Kate M; Fox, Patricia M; Singer, David M; Kaviani, Nazila; Carey, Minna; Peck, Nicole E; Bargar, John R; Kent, Douglas B; Davis, James A

    2013-08-20

    Extraction techniques utilizing high pH and (bi)carbonate concentrations were evaluated for their efficacy in determining the oxidation state of uranium (U) in reduced sediments collected from Rifle, CO. Differences in dissolved concentrations between oxic and anoxic extractions have been proposed as a means to quantify the U(VI) and U(IV) content of sediments. An additional step was added to anoxic extractions using a strong anion exchange resin to separate dissolved U(IV) and U(VI). X-ray spectroscopy showed that U(IV) in the sediments was present as polymerized precipitates similar to uraninite and/or less ordered U(IV), referred to as non-uraninite U(IV) species associated with biomass (NUSAB). Extractions of sediment containing both uraninite and NUSAB displayed higher dissolved uranium concentrations under oxic than anoxic conditions while extractions of sediment dominated by NUSAB resulted in identical dissolved U concentrations. Dissolved U(IV) was rapidly oxidized under anoxic conditions in all experiments. Uraninite reacted minimally under anoxic conditions but thermodynamic calculations show that its propensity to oxidize is sensitive to solution chemistry and sediment mineralogy. A universal method for quantification of U(IV) and U(VI) in sediments has not yet been developed but the chemical extractions, when combined with solid-phase characterization, have a narrow range of applicability for sediments without U(VI).

  14. Evaluating chemical extraction techniques for the determination of uranium oxidation state in reduced aquifer sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoliker, Deborah L.; Campbell, Kate M.; Fox, Patricia M.; Singer, David M.; Kaviani, Nazila; Carey, Minna; Peck, Nicole E.; Barger, John R.; Kent, Douglas B.; Davis, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Extraction techniques utilizing high pH and (bi)carbonate concentrations were evaluated for their efficacy in determining the oxidation state of uranium (U) in reduced sediments collected from Rifle, CO. Differences in dissolved concentrations between oxic and anoxic extractions have been proposed as a means to quantify the U(VI) and U(IV) content of sediments. An additional step was added to anoxic extractions using a strong anion exchange resin to separate dissolved U(IV) and U(VI). X-ray spectroscopy showed that U(IV) in the sediments was present as polymerized precipitates similar to uraninite and/or less ordered U(IV), referred to as non-uraninite U(IV) species associated with biomass (NUSAB). Extractions of sediment containing both uraninite and NUSAB displayed higher dissolved uranium concentrations under oxic than anoxic conditions while extractions of sediment dominated by NUSAB resulted in identical dissolved U concentrations. Dissolved U(IV) was rapidly oxidized under anoxic conditions in all experiments. Uraninite reacted minimally under anoxic conditions but thermodynamic calculations show that its propensity to oxidize is sensitive to solution chemistry and sediment mineralogy. A universal method for quantification of U(IV) and U(VI) in sediments has not yet been developed but the chemical extractions, when combined with solid-phase characterization, have a narrow range of applicability for sediments without U(VI).

  15. Chemical Composition and Disruption of Quorum Sensing Signaling in Geographically Diverse United States Propolis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Savka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Propolis or bee glue has been used for centuries for various purposes and is especially important in human health due to many of its biological and pharmacological properties. In this work we showed quorum sensing inhibitory (QSI activity of ten geographically distinct propolis samples from the United States using the acyl-homoserine lactone- (AHL- dependent Chromobacterium violaceum strain CV026. Based on GC-MS chemical profiling the propolis samples can be classified into several groups that are as follows: (1 rich in cinnamic acid derivatives, (2 rich in flavonoids, and (3 rich in triterpenes. An in-depth analysis of the propolis from North Carolina led to the isolation and identification of a triterpenic acid that was recently isolated from Hondurian propolis (Central America and ethyl ether of p-coumaric alcohol not previously identified in bee propolis. QSI activity was also observed in the second group US propolis samples which contained the flavonoid pinocembrin in addition to other flavonoid compounds. The discovery of compounds that are involved in QSI activity has the potential to facilitate studies that may lead to the development of antivirulence therapies that can be complementary and/or alternative treatments against antibiotic resistant bacterial pathogens and/or emerging pathogens that have yet to be identified.

  16. Doppler colour flow imaging of fetal intracerebral arteries relative to fetal behavioural states in normal pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Noordam (Marja); F.M.E. Hoekstra (Franciska); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); J.W. Wladimiroff (Juriy)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractIn 14 normally developing term fetuses, the relationship between the blood flow velocity waveforms at cerebral arterial level (internal carotid artery, anterior, middle and posterior cerebral artery) and fetal behavioural states was studied using Doppler colour flow imaging. Behavioural

  17. Monitoring the metabolic state of fungal hyphae and the presence of melanin by nonlinear spectral imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knaus, H.; Blab, G.; Agronskaia, A.V.; van den Heuvel, D.J.; Gerritsen, H.C.; Wösten, H.A.B.

    2013-01-01

    Label-free nonlinear spectral imaging microscopy (NLSM) records two-photon-excited fluorescence emission spectra of endogenous fluorophores within the specimen. Here, NLSM is introduced as a novel, minimally invasive method to analyze the metabolic state of fungal hyphae by monitoring the autofluore

  18. Diffusion tensor Imaging and chemical shift imaging assessment of heterogeneity in low grade glioma under temozolomide chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijens, P. E.; Heesters, Martinus; Enting, Roeline; van der Graaf, W. T. A.; Potze, J. H.; Irwan, Roy; Meiners, L. C.; Oudkerk, M.

    2007-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging and multiple voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy were performed in the MRI follow-up of a patient with a glioma treated with temozolomide chemotherapy. Tumor shrinkage was paralleled by reductions in choline level and by increases in apparent diffusion coefficient indicati

  19. Programmable Adaptive Spectral Imagers for Mission-Specific Application in Chemical/Biological Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    detection of chemical/biological agents. Extensive research into both passive remote chemical/biological sensors and active laser- based ( LIDAR ... photodetector (Fig. 1). Fig. 1. Adaptive spectrograph concept: light from a standoff spectral scene is dispersed, dynamically encoded with...the purpose. Data acquisition and processing software was developed for the control of the DMA, capturing data from the photodetectors , and for

  20. Computational analysis of the mechanism of chemical reactions in terms of reaction phases: hidden intermediates and hidden transition States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraka, Elfi; Cremer, Dieter

    2010-05-18

    Computational approaches to understanding chemical reaction mechanisms generally begin by establishing the relative energies of the starting materials, transition state, and products, that is, the stationary points on the potential energy surface of the reaction complex. Examining the intervening species via the intrinsic reaction coordinate (IRC) offers further insight into the fate of the reactants by delineating, step-by-step, the energetics involved along the reaction path between the stationary states. For a detailed analysis of the mechanism and dynamics of a chemical reaction, the reaction path Hamiltonian (RPH) and the united reaction valley approach (URVA) are an efficient combination. The chemical conversion of the reaction complex is reflected by the changes in the reaction path direction t(s) and reaction path curvature k(s), both expressed as a function of the path length s. This information can be used to partition the reaction path, and by this the reaction mechanism, of a chemical reaction into reaction phases describing chemically relevant changes of the reaction complex: (i) a contact phase characterized by van der Waals interactions, (ii) a preparation phase, in which the reactants prepare for the chemical processes, (iii) one or more transition state phases, in which the chemical processes of bond cleavage and bond formation take place, (iv) a product adjustment phase, and (v) a separation phase. In this Account, we examine mechanistic analysis with URVA in detail, focusing on recent theoretical insights (with a variety of reaction types) from our laboratories. Through the utilization of the concept of localized adiabatic vibrational modes that are associated with the internal coordinates, q(n)(s), of the reaction complex, the chemical character of each reaction phase can be identified via the adiabatic curvature coupling coefficients, A(n,s)(s). These quantities reveal whether a local adiabatic vibrational mode supports (A(n,s) > 0) or resists

  1. Time and Frequency Resolved Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of Dimercaptostilbene on Silver

    CERN Document Server

    El-Khoury, Patrick Z; Hess, Wayne P

    2014-01-01

    Non-resonant tip-enhanced Raman images of dimercaptostilbene on silver reveal that different vibrational resonances of the reporter are selectively enhanced at different sites on the metal substrate. Sequentially recorded images track molecular diffusion within the diffraction-limited laser spot which illuminates the substrate. In effect, the recorded time resolved (dt = 10 s) pixelated images (25 nm x 8 cm-1) broadcast molecule-local field interactions which take place on much finer scales.

  2. Chemical-state analysis of organic semiconductors using soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy combined with first-principles calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsume, Yutaka; Kohno, Teiichiro; Minakata, Takashi; Konishi, Tokuzo; Gullikson, Eric M; Muramatsu, Yasuji

    2012-02-16

    The chemical states of organic semiconductors were investigated by total-electron-yield soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (TEY-XAS) and first-principles calculations. The organic semiconductors, pentacene (C(22)H(14)) and pentacenequinone (C(22)H(12)O(2)), were subjected to TEY-XAS and the experimental spectra obtained were compared with the 1s core-level excited spectra of C and O atoms, calculated by a first-principles planewave pseudopotential method. Excellent agreement between the measured and the calculated spectra were obtained for both materials. Using this methodology, we examined the chemical states of the aged pentacene, and confirmed that both C-OH and C═O chemical bonds are generated by exposure to air. This result implies that not only oxygen but also humidity causes pentacene oxidation.

  3. In situ chemical state analysis of buried polymer/metal adhesive interface by hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozawa, Kenichi, E-mail: ozawa.k.ab@m.titech.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry and Materials Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Kakubo, Takashi; Shimizu, Katsunori; Amino, Naoya [The Yokohama Rubber Co., Ltd., Oiwake, Hiratsuka 254-8601 (Japan); Mase, Kazuhiko [Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Ikenaga, Eiji; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Kinoshita, Toyohiko; Oji, Hiroshi [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI), SPring-8, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2014-11-30

    Highlights: • Chemical state analysis of the buried rubber/brass interface is conducted by HAXPES. • Ultrathin rubber films are prepared on the brass surface by two methods. • A high density of Cu{sub 2}S is found on the rubber side of the buried adhesive layer. • The chemical states of the buried and exposed interfaces are compared. - Abstract: Chemical state analysis of adhesive interfaces is important to understand an adhesion mechanism between two different materials. Although photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) is an ideal tool for such an analysis, the adhesive interfaces must be exposed to the surface because PES is essentially a surface sensitive technique. However, an in situ observation is possible by hard X-ray PES (HAXPES) owing to its large probing depth. In the present study, HAXPES is applied to investigate the adhesive interface between rubber and brass without exposing the interface. It is demonstrated that copper sulfides formed at the buried rubber/brass interface are distinguished from S-containing species in the rubber overlayer. The chemical state of the buried interface is compared with that of the “exposed” interface prepared by so-called a filter-paper method.

  4. Multi-View Algorithm for Face, Eyes and Eye State Detection in Human Image- Study Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latesh Kumari

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available For fatigue detection such as in the application of driver‟s fatigue monitoring system, the eye state analysis is one of the important and deciding steps to determine the fatigue of driver‟s eyes. In this study, algorithms for face detection, eye detection and eye state analysis have been studied and presented as well as an efficient algorithm for detection of face, eyes have been proposed. Firstly the efficient algorithm for face detection method has been presented which find the face area in the human images. Then, novel algorithms for detection of eye region and eye state are introduced. In this paper we propose a multi-view based eye state detection to determine the state of the eye. With the help of skin color model, the algorithm detects the face regions in an YCbCr color model. By applying the skin segmentation which normally separates the skin and non-skin pixels of the images, it detects the face regions of the image under various lighting and noise conditions. Then from these face regions, the eye regions are extracted within those extracted face regions. Our proposed algorithms are fast and robust as there is not pattern match.

  5. Ionization of Rydberg H atoms at band-gap metal surfaces via surface and image states

    CERN Document Server

    So, E; Softley, T P

    2015-01-01

    Wavepacket propagation calculations are reported for the interaction of a Rydberg hydrogen atom ($n=2-8)$ with Cu(111) and Cu(100) surfaces (represented by a Chulkov potential), in comparison with a Jellium surface. Both copper surfaces have a projected band gap at the surface in the energy range degenerate with some or all of the Rydberg energies. The charge transfer of the Rydberg electron to the surface is found to be enhanced for $n$ values at which there is a near-degeneracy between the Rydberg energy level and an image state or a surface state of the surface. The enhancement is facilitated by the strong overlap of the surface image-state orbital lying outside the surface and the orbital of the incoming Rydberg atom. These calculations point to the possibility of using Rydberg-surface collisions as a probe of surface electronic structure.

  6. Phase-sensitive lock-in imaging of surface densities of states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svec, Martin; Mutombo, Pingo; Shukrinov, Pavel; Dudr, Viktor; Cháb, Vladimír

    2006-01-01

    A new way of imaging the local density of states has been devised through a combination of the constant-height scanning tunnelling microscopy operational mode and lock-in techniques. We have obtained current images simultaneously with real space dynamical conductance maps (d I/d V) for energies around the Fermi level, on the Si(111)-(7 × 7) surface. We reconstructed the normalized dynamical conductance spectra—(d I/d V)/(I/V). Since the (d I/d V)/(I/V) curves are closely related to the local densities of states, we compared their sum over the unit cell to photoelectron spectra and theoretical calculations. We find that the results are in good agreement. Consequently, the extent of localization of surface electronic states at lattice positions was determined.

  7. Quantum chemical characterization of low-lying excited states of an aryl peroxycarbonate: mechanistic implications for photodissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Seth; Schwarzer, Dirk; Troe, Jürgen; Smith, Sean C

    2010-04-01

    Recent experiments have revealed the existence of an excited state dissociative mechanism for certain peroxycarbonates, with the demonstration that the lifetime of the excited state matches the picosecond time scale for appearance of nascent carbon dioxide product. The data infer that the photoreaction proceeds via an effectively concerted three-body dissociation within the lifetime of the singlet excited state. Many other arylperoxides decay sequentially via [(aryloxy)carbonyl]oxy radical intermediates on nanosecond-microsecond time scales. Uncertainty as to the lifetime of the excited state relates to the character and the relative energetic ordering of states of the parent molecule, since the spectra and photochemistry imply that low-lying states may exist on each of the aryl, carbonate, and peroxide chemical functionalities. We employ many-body electronic structure calculations to determine the energies and characters of the low-lying valence states of a minimal aryl peroxycarbonate model germane to the above-mentioned experiments, methyl phenyl peroxycarbonate (MPC). Our results indicate that the lowest-lying state is an intrinsically nondissociative aryl pipi* excited state. We identify additional low-lying states that are expected to be dissociative in nature and propose that the time scales observed for the dissociation reaction may correspond to the time scale for transfer of excited state population to these states.

  8. Evaluation of dispersion state of the two racemic compounds of troglitazone in pharmaceutical granules using IR-to-THz imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonemochi, Etsuo; Furuyama, Naho; Bunko, Mika; Moriwaki, Taro; Ikemoto, Yuka; Terada, Katsuhide

    2008-05-01

    Troglitazone exists as four isomers in equal amount and these isomers compose two racemic compounds, RR/SS and RS/SR. The objective of this study was to discriminate between the racemic compounds and between the crystal and amorphous forms of troglitazone in solid dispersions (SDs) using IR-to-THz imaging. SDs of troglitazone with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP, carrier) were prepared by the closed melting method. SDs were heated at various temperatures and water content. The mid-to-far infrared measurements for the powder samples were performed by using the synchrotron radiation source at the BL43IR in SPring-8. Crystalline RR/SS (L) and RS/SR (H) showed different spectra, that is, each form had a specific peak, respectively. However, amorphous forms prepared from each crystalline form exhibited the same spectra. Using the chemo-metric analysis, the existing component was decided in each pixel and the distribution of crystalline L, H and amorphous troglitazone in SDs could be illustrated. For the sample heated at 105 °C, 75%RH, scattered plots of H and amorphous against PVP showed the trend for H was negative; on the other hand, amorphous showed positive correlation. This result suggested that H existed separately, whereas amorphous would be dissolved in PVP. Based on these evaluations, it was clear that the physical state and distribution of troglitazone in SDs, including the discrimination between L, H, and amorphous, reflect the preparation conditions. Chemical imaging can observe a difference in the dispersed state of drug and ingredient in a visible image by performing statistical processing.

  9. Resting-state functional connectivity imaging of the mouse brain using photoacoustic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza; Xia, Jun; Wan, Hanlin; Bauer, Adam Q.; Culver, Joseph P.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-03-01

    Resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) imaging is an emerging neuroimaging approach that aims to identify spontaneous cerebral hemodynamic fluctuations and their associated functional connections. Clinical studies have demonstrated that RSFC is altered in brain disorders such as stroke, Alzheimer's, autism, and epilepsy. However, conventional neuroimaging modalities cannot easily be applied to mice, the most widely used model species for human brain disease studies. For instance, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of mice requires a very high magnetic field to obtain a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution. Functional connectivity mapping with optical intrinsic signal imaging (fcOIS) is an alternative method. Due to the diffusion of light in tissue, the spatial resolution of fcOIS is limited, and experiments have been performed using an exposed skull preparation. In this study, we show for the first time, the use of photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) to noninvasively image resting-state functional connectivity in the mouse brain, with a large field of view and a high spatial resolution. Bilateral correlations were observed in eight regions, as well as several subregions. These findings agreed well with the Paxinos mouse brain atlas. This study showed that PACT is a promising, non-invasive modality for small-animal functional brain imaging.

  10. Advances in Bio-Imaging From Physics to Signal Understanding Issues State-of-the-Art and Challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Racoceanu, Daniel; Gouaillard, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    Advances in Imaging Devices and Image processing stem from cross-fertilization between many fields of research such as Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics and Computer Sciences. This BioImaging Community feel the urge to integrate more intensively its various results, discoveries and innovation into ready to use tools that can address all the new exciting challenges that Life Scientists (Biologists, Medical doctors, ...) keep providing, almost on a daily basis. Devising innovative chemical probes, for example, is an archetypal goal in which image quality improvement must be driven by the physics of acquisition, the image processing and analysis algorithms and the chemical skills in order to design an optimal bioprobe. This book offers an overview of the current advances in many research fields related to bioimaging and highlights the current limitations that would need to be addressed in the next decade to design fully integrated BioImaging Device.

  11. Resting state functional connectivity in perfusion imaging: correlation maps with BOLD connectivity and resting state perfusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Viviani

    Full Text Available Functional connectivity is a property of the resting state that may provide biomarkers of brain function and individual differences. Classically, connectivity is estimated as the temporal correlation of spontaneous fluctuations of BOLD signal. We investigated differences in connectivity estimated from the BOLD and CBF signal present in volumes acquired with arterial spin labeling technique in a large sample (N = 265 of healthy individuals. Positive connectivity was observable in both BOLD and CBF signal, and was present in the CBF signal also at frequencies lower than 0.009 Hz, here investigated for the first time. Negative connectivity was more variable. The validity of positive connectivity was confirmed by the existence of correlation across individuals in its intensity estimated from the BOLD and CBF signal. In contrast, there was little or no correlation across individuals between intensity of connectivity and mean perfusion levels, suggesting that these two biomarkers correspond to distinct sources of individual differences.

  12. The influence of chemical composition and mixing state of Los Angeles urban aerosol on CCN number and cloud properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Cubison

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between cloud condensation nuclei (CCN number and the physical and chemical properties of the atmospheric aerosol distribution is explored for a polluted urban data set from the Study of Organic Aerosols at Riverside I (SOAR-1 campaign conducted at Riverside, California, USA during summer 2005. The mixing state and, to a lesser degree, the average chemical composition are shown to be important parameters in determining the activation properties of those particles around the critical activation diameters for atmospherically-realistic supersaturation values. Closure between predictions and measurements of CCN number at several supersaturations is attempted by modeling a number of aerosol chemical composition and mixing state schemes of increasing complexity. It is shown that a realistic treatment of the state of mixing of the urban aerosol distribution is critical in order to eliminate model bias. Fresh emissions such as elemental carbon and small organic particles must be treated as non-activating and explicitly accounted for in the model scheme. The relative number concentration of these particles compared to inorganics and oxygenated organic compounds of limited hygroscopicity plays an important role in determining the CCN number. Furthermore, expanding the different composition/mixing state schemes to predictions of cloud droplet number concentration in a cloud parcel model highlights the dependence of cloud optical properties on the state of mixing and hygroscopic properties of the different aerosol modes, but shows that the relative differences between the different schemes are reduced compared to those from the CCN model.

  13. Calculation of Equation of State of QCD at Finite Chemical Potential and Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAO Qing-Peng; ZONG Hong-Shi; TANG Jian; HOU Feng-Yao; LI Xue-Qian; SUN Wei-Min; L(U) Xiao-Fu

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, using path integral techniques we derive a model-independent formula for the pressure density (μ, T) (or equivalently the partition function) of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), which gives the equation of state (EOS) of QCD at finite chemical potential and temperature. In this formula the pressure density (μ, T) consists of two terms: the first term (μ,T) T=0) is a #-independent (but T-dependent) constant; the second term is totally determined by G[μ, T] (p ωn) (the dressed quark propagator at finite μ and finite T), which contains all the nontrivial μ-dependence. Then, in the framework of the rainbow-ladder approximation of the Dyson-Schwinger (DS) approach and under the approximation of neglecting the μ-dependence of the dressed gluon propagator, we show that G[μ, T] (p, ωn) can be obtained from G[T] (p, ωn) (the dressed quark propagator at μ = 0) by the substitution ωn →ωn + iμ. This result facilitates numerical calculations considerably. By this result, once G[T](p, ωn) is known, one can determine the EOS of QCD under the above approximations (up to the additive term (μ, T)[T=0). Finally, a comparison of the present EOS of QCD and the EOS obtained in the previous literatures in the framework of the rainbow-ladder approximation of the DS approach is given. It is found that the EOS given in the previous literatures does not satisfy the thermodynamic relation p(μ, T) = T.

  14. Octafluorodirhenate(III) Revisited: Solid-State Preparation, Characterization, and Multiconfigurational Quantum Chemical Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariappan Balasekaran, Samundeeswari; Todorova, Tanya K.; Pham, Chien Thang; Hartmann, Thomas; Abram, Ulrich; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Poineau, Frederic

    2016-06-06

    A simple method for the high-yield preparation of (NH4)2[Re2F8]· 2H2O has been developed that involves the reaction of (n-Bu4N)2[Re2Cl8] with molten ammonium bifluoride (NH4HF2). Using this method, the new salt [NH4]2[Re2F8]·2H2O was prepared in ~90% yield. The product was characterized in solution by ultraviolet-visible light (UV-vis) and 19F nuclear magnetic resonance (19F NMR) spectroscopies and in the solid-state by elemental analysis, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Multiconfigurational CASSCF/CASPT2 quantum chemical calculations were performed to investigate the molecular and electronic structure, as well as the electronic absorption spectrum of the [Re2F8] 2- anion. The metal-metal bonding in the Re2 6+ unit was quantified in terms of effective bond order (EBO) and compared to that of its [Re2Cl8] 2- and [Re2Br8] 2- analogues.

  15. Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer MR Imaging Is Superior to Diffusion Tensor Imaging in the Diagnosis and Severity Evaluation of Parkinson's Disease: a Study on Substantia Nigra and Striatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunmei eLi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by nigrostriatal cell loss. To date the diagnosis of PD is still based primarily on the clinical manifestations which may be typical and obvious only in advanced-stage PD. Thus, it is crucial to find a reliable marker for the diagnosis of PD. We conducted this study to assess the diagnostic efficiency of chemical-exchange-saturation-transfer (CEST imaging and diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI in PD at 3 Tesla by evaluating changes on substantia nigra and striatum. Twenty-three PD patients and twenty-three age-matched normal controls were recruited. All patients and controls were imaged on a 3 Tesla MR system, using an 8-channel head coil. CEST imaging was acquired in two transverse slices of the head, including substantia nigra and striatum. The magnetization-transfer-ratio asymmetry at 3.5 ppm, MTRasym(3.5ppm, and the total CEST signal intensity between 0 and 4 ppm were calculated. Multi-slice DTI was acquired for all the patients and normal controls. Quantitative analysis was performed on the substantia nigra, globus pallidus, putamen and caudate. The MTRasym(3.5ppm value, the total CEST signal intensity and fractional anisotropy (FA value of the substantia nigra were all significantly lower in PD patients than in normal controls (P = 0.003, P = 0.004 and P < 0.001, respectively. The MTRasym(3.5ppm values of the putamen and the caudate were significantly higher in PD patients than in normal controls (P = 0.010 and P = 0.009, respectively. There were no significant differences for the mean diffusivity (MD in these four regions between PD patients and normal controls. In conclusion, CEST MR imaging provided multiple CEST image contrasts in the substantia nigra and the striatum in PD and may be superior to DTI in the diagnosis of PD.

  16. In vivo imaging of C. elegans ASH neurons: cellular response and adaptation to chemical repellents

    OpenAIRE

    Hilliard, Massimo A.; Apicella, Alfonso J.; Kerr, Rex; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Bazzicalupo, Paolo; Schafer, William R

    2004-01-01

    ASH sensory neurons are required in Caenorhabditis elegans for a wide range of avoidance behaviors in response to chemical repellents, high osmotic solutions and nose touch. The ASH neurons are therefore hypothesized to be polymodal nociceptive neurons. To understand the nature of polymodal sensory response and adaptation at the cellular level, we expressed the calcium indicator protein cameleon in ASH and analyzed intracellular Ca2+ responses following stimulation with chemical repellents, o...

  17. Decreased regional homogeneity in major depression as revealed by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Dai-hui; JIANG Kai-da; FANG Yi-ru; XU Yi-feng; SHEN Ting; LONG Xiang-yu; LIU Jun; ZANG Yu-feng

    2011-01-01

    Backgroud Functional imaging studies indicate abnormal activities in cortico-limbic network in depression during either task or resting state. The present work was to explore the abnormal spontaneous activity shown with regional homogeneity (ReHo) in depression by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).Methods Using fMRI, the differences of regional brain activity were measured in resting state in depressed vs. healthy participants. Sixteen participants firstly diagnosed with major depressive disorder and 16 controls were scanned during resting state. A novel method based on ReHo was used to detect spontaneous hemodynamic responses across the whole brain.Results ReHo in the left thalamus, left temporal lobe, left cerebellar posterior lobe, and the bilateral occipital lobe was found to be significantly decreased in depression compared to healthy controls in resting state of depression.Conclusions Abnormal spontaneous activity exists in the left thalamus, left temporal lobe, left cerebellar posterior lobe,and the bilateral occipital lobe. And the ReHo may be a potential reference in understanding the distinct brain activity in resting state of depression.

  18. Diffusion tensor imaging and chemical shift imaging assessment of heterogeneity in low grade glioma under temozolomide chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sijens, P E; Heesters, M A A M; Enting, R H; van der Graaf, W T A; Potze, J H; Irwan, R; Meiners, L C; Oudkerk, M

    2007-12-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging and multiple voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy were performed in the MRI follow-up of a patient with a glioma treated with temozolomide chemotherapy. Tumor shrinkage was paralleled by reductions in choline level and by increases in apparent diffusion coefficient indicating decreased cellularity. Within the tumor, choline level and apparent diffusion coefficient showed a significant inverse correlation (P < 0.01). Fractional anisotropy distribution in the tumor correlated positively with N-acetyl aspartate level (P < 0.001), indicating that these parameters reflect (remaining) axonal structure. Tumor lactate level, also found to decrease under therapy, did not correlate with any other parameter.

  19. Retinal imaging in the twenty-first century: state of the art and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Pearse A; Sadda, Srinivas R

    2014-12-01

    Assessment of chorioretinal disease is dependent on the ability to visualize pathologic changes occurring in the posterior segment of the eye using optical instruments, termed ophthalmoscopy. Ophthalmoscopy, in turn, has been enhanced greatly by the development of techniques that allow recording of these changes, termed retinal imaging. As well as documenting pathologic features, retinal and fundal imaging facilitates the identification of morphologic features not visible to the clinician on biomicroscopy. As such, advances in retinal imaging have proven fundamental to many paradigm shifts in our understanding and treatment of ocular disease. In the 1950s, with the advent of electronic flashes and 35-mm cameras, the field of modern fundus photography was born. Similarly, in the 1960s and 1970s, the introduction of fluorescein and indocyanine green angiography revolutionized our ability to assess the integrity of the chorioretinal vasculature. More recently, in the 1990s, the introduction of a wholly new form of noninvasive cross-sectional imaging, optical coherence tomography, has greatly facilitated use of emerging pharmacotherapies in diagnosing and monitoring chorioretinal disease. In this translational science review, we provide an overview of current, state-of-the-art retinal imaging technologies, as well as highlight many emerging imaging technologies that we believe are likely to transform the provision of eye care in the 21st century.

  20. Key study on the potential of hydrazine bisborane for solid- and liquid-state chemical hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pylypko, Sergii; Petit, Eddy; Yot, Pascal G; Salles, Fabrice; Cretin, Marc; Miele, Philippe; Demirci, Umit B

    2015-05-04

    Hydrazine bisborane N2H4(BH3)2 (HBB; 16.8 wt %) recently re-emerged as a potential hydrogen storage material. However, such potential is controversial: HBB was seen as a hazardous compound up to 2010, but now it would be suitable for hydrogen storage. In this context, we focused on fundamentals of HBB because they are missing in the literature and should help to shed light on its effective potential while taking into consideration any risk. Experimental/computational methods were used to get a complete characterization data sheet, including, e.g., XRD, NMR, FTIR, Raman, TGA, and DSC. From the reported results and discussion, it is concluded that HBB has potential in the field of chemical hydrogen storage given that both thermolytic and hydrolytic dehydrogenations were analyzed. In solid-state chemical hydrogen storage, it cannot be used in the pristine state (risk of explosion during dehydrogenation) but can be used for the synthesis of derivatives with improved dehydrogenation properties. In liquid-state chemical hydrogen storage, it can be studied for room-temperature dehydrogenation, but this requires the development of an active and selective metal-based catalyst. HBB is a thus a candidate for chemical hydrogen storage.

  1. Spectral imaging of chemical compounds using multivariate optically enhanced filters integrated with InGaAs VGA cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priore, Ryan J.; Jacksen, Niels

    2016-05-01

    Infrared hyperspectral imagers (HSI) have been fielded for the detection of hazardous chemical and biological compounds, tag detection (friend versus foe detection) and other defense critical sensing missions over the last two decades. Low Size/Weight/Power/Cost (SWaPc) methods of identification of chemical compounds spectroscopy has been a long term goal for hand held applications. We describe a new HSI concept for low cost / high performance InGaAs SWIR camera chemical identification for military, security, industrial and commercial end user applications. Multivariate Optical Elements (MOEs) are thin-film devices that encode a broadband, spectroscopic pattern allowing a simple broadband detector to generate a highly sensitive and specific detection for a target analyte. MOEs can be matched 1:1 to a discrete analyte or class prediction. Additionally, MOE filter sets are capable of sensing an orthogonal projection of the original sparse spectroscopic space enabling a small set of MOEs to discriminate a multitude of target analytes. This paper identifies algorithms and broadband optical filter designs that have been demonstrated to identify chemical compounds using high performance InGaAs VGA detectors. It shows how some of the initial models have been reduced to simple spectral designs and tested to produce positive identification of such chemicals. We also are developing pixilated MOE compressed detection sensors for the detection of a multitude of chemical targets in challenging backgrounds/environments for both commercial and defense/security applications. This MOE based, real-time HSI sensor will exhibit superior sensitivity and specificity as compared to currently fielded HSI systems.

  2. Indications of chemical bond contrast in AFM images of a hydrogen-terminated silicon surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labidi, Hatem; Koleini, Mohammad; Huff, Taleana; Salomons, Mark; Cloutier, Martin; Pitters, Jason; Wolkow, Robert A.

    2017-01-01

    The origin of bond-resolved atomic force microscope images remains controversial. Moreover, most work to date has involved planar, conjugated hydrocarbon molecules on a metal substrate thereby limiting knowledge of the generality of findings made about the imaging mechanism. Here we report the study of a very different sample; a hydrogen-terminated silicon surface. A procedure to obtain a passivated hydrogen-functionalized tip is defined and evolution of atomic force microscopy images at different tip elevations are shown. At relatively large tip-sample distances, the topmost atoms appear as distinct protrusions. However, on decreasing the tip-sample distance, features consistent with the silicon covalent bonds of the surface emerge. Using a density functional tight-binding-based method to simulate atomic force microscopy images, we reproduce the experimental results. The role of the tip flexibility and the nature of bonds and false bond-like features are discussed. PMID:28194036

  3. Indications of chemical bond contrast in AFM images of a hydrogen-terminated silicon surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labidi, Hatem; Koleini, Mohammad; Huff, Taleana; Salomons, Mark; Cloutier, Martin; Pitters, Jason; Wolkow, Robert A.

    2017-02-01

    The origin of bond-resolved atomic force microscope images remains controversial. Moreover, most work to date has involved planar, conjugated hydrocarbon molecules on a metal substrate thereby limiting knowledge of the generality of findings made about the imaging mechanism. Here we report the study of a very different sample; a hydrogen-terminated silicon surface. A procedure to obtain a passivated hydrogen-functionalized tip is defined and evolution of atomic force microscopy images at different tip elevations are shown. At relatively large tip-sample distances, the topmost atoms appear as distinct protrusions. However, on decreasing the tip-sample distance, features consistent with the silicon covalent bonds of the surface emerge. Using a density functional tight-binding-based method to simulate atomic force microscopy images, we reproduce the experimental results. The role of the tip flexibility and the nature of bonds and false bond-like features are discussed.

  4. 3-D imaging of particle tracks in solid state nuclear track detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Wertheim

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that 3 to 5% of total lung cancer deaths in the UK may be associated with elevated radon concentration. Radon gas levels can be assessed using CR-39 plastic detectors which are often assessed by 2-D image analysis of surface images. 3-D analysis has the potential to provide information relating to the angle at which alpha particles impinge on the detector. In this study we used a "LEXT" OLS3100 confocal laser scanning microscope (Olympus Corporation, Tokyo, Japan to image tracks on five CR-39 detectors. We were able to identify several patterns of single and coalescing tracks from 3-D visualisation. Thus this method may provide a means of detailed 3-D analysis of Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors.

  5. 3-D imaging of particle tracks in solid state nuclear track detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertheim, D.; Gillmore, G.; Brown, L.; Petford, N.

    2010-05-01

    It has been suggested that 3 to 5% of total lung cancer deaths in the UK may be associated with elevated radon concentration. Radon gas levels can be assessed using CR-39 plastic detectors which are often assessed by 2-D image analysis of surface images. 3-D analysis has the potential to provide information relating to the angle at which alpha particles impinge on the detector. In this study we used a "LEXT" OLS3100 confocal laser scanning microscope (Olympus Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) to image tracks on five CR-39 detectors. We were able to identify several patterns of single and coalescing tracks from 3-D visualisation. Thus this method may provide a means of detailed 3-D analysis of Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors.

  6. Ultrastructural analysis of neuronal synapses using state-of-the-art nano-imaging techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changlu Tao; Chenglong Xia; Xiaobing Chen; Z. Hong Zhou; Guoqiang Bi

    2012-01-01

    Neuronal synapses are functional nodes in neural circuits.Their organization and activity define an individual's level of intelligence,emotional state and mental health.Changes in the structure and efficacy of synapses are the biological basis of learning and memory.However,investigation of the molecular architecture of synapses has been impeded by the lack of efficient techniques with sufficient resolution.Recent developments in state-of-the-art nano-imaging techniques have opened up a new window for dissecting the molecular organization of neuronal synapses with unprecedented resolution.Here,we review recent technological advances in nano-imaging techniques as well as their applications to the study of synapses,emphasizing super-resolution light microscopy and 3-dimensional electron tomography.

  7. Preliminary analysis of the forest health state based on multispectral images acquired by Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Czapski Paweł

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this publication is to present the current progress of the work associated with the use of a lightweight unmanned platforms for various environmental studies. Current development in information technology, electronics and sensors miniaturisation allows mounting multispectral cameras and scanners on unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV that could only be used on board aircraft and satellites. Remote Sensing Division in the Institute of Aviation carries out innovative researches using multisensory platform and lightweight unmanned vehicle to evaluate the health state of forests in Wielkopolska province. In this paper, applicability of multispectral images analysis acquired several times during the growing season from low altitude (up to 800m is presented. We present remote sensing indicators computed by our software and common methods for assessing state of trees health. The correctness of applied methods is verified using analysis of satellite scenes acquired by Landsat 8 OLI instrument (Operational Land Imager.

  8. Electronic Structure, Oxidation State of Sn, and Chemical Stability of Photovoltaic Perovskite Variant Cs2SnI6

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, Zewen; Zhang, Xiao; Zhou, Yuanyuan; Hosono, Hideo; Kamiya, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    Cs2SnI6, a variant of perovskite CsSnI3, is expected for a photovoltaic material. Based on a simple ionic model, it is expected that Cs2SnI6 is composed of Cs+, I-, and Sn4+ ions and that the band gap is primarily made of occupied I- 5p6 valence band maximum (VBM) and unoccupied Sn4+ 5s conduction band minimum (CBM) similar to SnO2. In this work, we performed density functional theory (DFT) calculations and revealed that the real charge state of the Sn ion in this compound is +2 similar to CsSnI3. This is due to strong covalent nature between the I ion and the Sn ion, the VBM consists of I 5p - I 5p antibonding states, and the CBM of I 5p - Sn 5s antibonding states. The +2 oxidation state of Sn is realized by the apparent charge state of I-2/3, because the I 5p - Sn 5s antibonding states form the unoccupied CBM and apparently 1/18 of the I 5p orbitals are unoccupied. These results are further supported by comparing chemical bonding analyses with those of related compounds. The chemical stability of the Cs2SnI...

  9. The Image of the United States in the Israeli-Palestinian relationships from 1988 to 1992

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Meson

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available USA’s image throughout the world usually symbolizes force, security, power of a great country but most of all the power of the dollar. America appears as the world’s leading economy far ahead of all others. She exerts an imperial economy and her military power is apparent on a world level. However, the United States also evoke, for some, vice, dirty money and decadence. Sometimes loved, sometimes decried, the United States still fascinated. During our research in Jerusalem for our doctorate i...

  10. State-dependent cellular activity patterns of the cat paraventricular hypothalamus measured by reflectance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten Pilgaard; Rector, D M; Poe, G R;

    1996-01-01

    Activity within the cat paraventricular hypothalamus (PVH) during sleep and waking states was measured by quantifying intrinsic tissue reflectivity. A fiber optic probe consisting of a 1.0 mm coherent image conduit, surrounded by plastic fibers which conducted 660 nm source light, was attached...... to a charge-coupled device camera, and positioned over the PVH in five cats. Electrodes for assessing state variables, including electroencephalographic activity, eye movement, and somatic muscle tone were also placed. After surgical recovery, reflected light intensity was measured continuously at 2.5 Hz...

  11. Remote sensing of thermal state of volcanoes in Turkey and neighbouring countries using ASTER nighttime images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulusoy, İnan; Diker, Caner

    2016-04-01

    Ongoing studies are increasingly revealing that Holocene and historical activity has been reported for many of the Anatolian volcanoes. So far, hydrothermal activity have been observed on Nemrut, Tendürek, Aǧrı (Ararat), Hasan daǧ and Kula. Fumaroles, steam vents, steam/gas emission and zones of hot grounds have been reported. Thermal state of Anatolian volcanoes have been investigated using ASTER nighttime satellite imagery. We have analyzed the nighttime thermal images of Aǧrı, Akça, Çandarlı, Erciyes, Gölcük, Göllüdaǧ, Hasandaǧ, Kula, Meydan, Nemrut, Süphan and Tendürek volcanoes in Turkey and Demavand and Nisyros volcanoes in the neighboring countries. In order to quantify the current thermal state of the volcanos studied, we have used ASTER Thermal Infrared spectra. Several ASTER nighttime images have been used to calculate land surface temperature, surface thermal anomaly and relative radiative heat flux on the volcanoes. Following the atmospheric correction of thermal images, temperature and emissivity have been separated and then land surface temperature have been calculated from 5 thermal bands. Surface temperature images have been topographically corrected. Relative radiative heat flux have been calculated using corrected surface temperature data, emissivity, vapor pressure and height-dependent air temperature values. These values have been correlated with ongoing activity observed on active Indonesian volcanoes Sinabung, Semeru and Bromo Tengger. (This study have been financially supported by TUBITAK project no: 113Y032).

  12. Line-imaging VISAR for laser-driven equations of state experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhaylyuk, A. V.; Koshkin, D. S.; Gubskii, K. L.; Kuznetsov, A. P.

    2016-11-01

    The paper presents the diagnostic system for velocity measurements in laser- driven equations of state experiments. Two Mach-Zehnder line-imaging VISAR-type (velocity interferometer system for any reflector) interferometers form a vernier measuring system and can measure velocity in the interval of 5 to 50 km/s. Also, the system includes a passive channel that records target luminescence in the shock wave front. Spatial resolution of the optical layout is about 5 μm.

  13. The Physics of Imaging with Remote Sensors : Photon State Space & Radiative Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Anthony B.

    2012-01-01

    Standard (mono-pixel/steady-source) retrieval methodology is reaching its fundamental limit with access to multi-angle/multi-spectral photo- polarimetry. Next... Two emerging new classes of retrieval algorithm worth nurturing: multi-pixel time-domain Wave-radiometry transition regimes, and more... Cross-fertilization with bio-medical imaging. Physics-based remote sensing: - What is "photon state space?" - What is "radiative transfer?" - Is "the end" in sight? Two wide-open frontiers! center dot Examples (with variations.

  14. Extraction of structural and chemical information from high angle annular dark-field image by an improved peaks finding method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Wenhao; Huang, Rong; Qi, Ruijuan; Duan, Chungang

    2016-09-01

    With the development of spherical aberration (Cs) corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), high angle annular dark filed (HAADF) imaging technique has been widely applied in the microstructure characterization of various advanced materials with atomic resolution. However, current qualitative interpretation of the HAADF image is not enough to extract all the useful information. Here a modified peaks finding method was proposed to quantify the HAADF-STEM image to extract structural and chemical information. Firstly, an automatic segmentation technique including numerical filters and watershed algorithm was used to define the sub-areas for each atomic column. Then a 2D Gaussian fitting was carried out to determine the atomic column positions precisely, which provides the geometric information at the unit-cell scale. Furthermore, a self-adaptive integration based on the column position and the covariance of statistical Gaussian distribution were performed. The integrated intensities show very high sensitivity on the mean atomic number with improved signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio. Consequently, the polarization map and strain distributions were rebuilt from a HAADF-STEM image of the rhombohedral and tetragonal BiFeO3 interface and a MnO2 monolayer in LaAlO3 /SrMnO3 /SrTiO3 heterostructure was discerned from its neighbor TiO2 layers. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:820-826, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Biopesticides: State of the Art and Future Opportunities by the American Chemical Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chapter from an American Chemical Society symposium reviews areas including how EPA views the benefits of biopesticides, related laws and legal requirements, biopesticide registration, and biopesticide data requirements.

  16. Reversible Diffusion-Limited Reactions: "Chemical Equilibrium" State and the Law of Mass Action Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Voituriez, R.; Moreau, M.; Oshanin, G.

    2004-01-01

    The validity of two fundamental concepts of classical chemical kinetics - the notion of "Chemical Equilibrium" and the "Law of Mass Action" - are re-examined for reversible \\textit{diffusion-limited} reactions (DLR), as exemplified here by association/dissociation $A+A \\rightleftharpoons B$ reactions. We consider a general model of long-ranged reactions, such that any pair of $A$ particles, separated by distance $\\mu$, may react with probability $\\omega_+(\\mu)$, and any $B$ may dissociate wit...

  17. State of chemical modeling modules for the degradation of concrete and cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meike, A.

    1997-04-15

    This report describes the conceptual framework upon which modeling activities will be needed to predict the chemistry of water in contact with concrete and its degradation products cover a broad area, from developing databases for existing abiotic codes, to developing codes that can simulate the chemical impact of microbial activities at a level of sophistication equivalent to that of the abiotic modeling codes, and ultimately, to simulating drift-scale chemical systems in support of hydrological, geochemical,a nd engineering efforts.

  18. Dosimetry and image quality in digital mammography facilities in the State of Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Sabrina Donato; Joana, Geórgia Santos; Oliveira, Bruno Beraldo; de Oliveira, Marcio Alves; Leyton, Fernando; Nogueira, Maria do Socorro

    2015-11-01

    According to the National Register of Health Care Facilities (CNES), there are approximately 477 mammography systems operating in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, of which an estimated 200 are digital apparatus using mainly computerized radiography (CR) or direct radiography (DR) systems. Mammography is irreplaceable in the diagnosis and early detection of breast cancer, the leading cause of cancer death among women worldwide. A high standard of image quality alongside smaller doses and optimization of procedures are essential if early detection is to occur. This study aimed to determine dosimetry and image quality in 68 mammography services in Minas Gerais using CR or DR systems. The data of this study were collected between the years of 2011 and 2013. The contrast-to-noise ratio proved to be a critical point in the image production chain in digital systems, since 90% of services were not compliant in this regard, mainly for larger PMMA thicknesses (60 and 70 mm). Regarding the image noise, only 31% of these were compliant. The average glandular dose found is of concern, since more than half of the services presented doses above acceptable limits. Therefore, despite the potential benefits of using CR and DR systems, the employment of this technology has to be revised and optimized to achieve better quality image and reduce radiation dose as much as possible.

  19. SIMS ion microscopy as a novel, practical tool for subcellular chemical imaging in cancer research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandra, S

    2003-01-15

    The development of cryogenic sample preparations, subcellular image quantification schemes, and correlative confocal laser scanning microscopy and ion microscopy have made dynamic SIMS a versatile tool in biology and medicine. For example, ion microscopy can provide much needed, novel information on calcium influx and intracellular calcium stores at organelle resolution in normal and transformed cells in order to better understand the altered calcium signaling in malignant cells. 3-D SIMS imaging of cells revealed dynamic gradients of calcium in cells undergoing mitosis and cytokinesis. Studies of subcellular localization of anticancer drugs is another area of research where ion microscopy can provide novel observations in many types of cancers. Ion microscopy is already an essential tool in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of brain cancer as it can be used to quantitatively image the subcellular location of boron in cells and tissues. This information is critically needed for testing the efficacy of boronated agents and for calculations of radiation dosimetry.

  20. The multi-flavor Schwinger model with chemical potential - Overcoming the sign problem with Matrix Product States

    CERN Document Server

    Bañuls, Mari Carmen; Cirac, J Ignacio; Jansen, Karl; Kühn, Stefan; Saito, Hana

    2016-01-01

    During recent years there has been an increasing interest in the application of matrix product states, and more generally tensor networks, to lattice gauge theories. This non-perturbative method is sign problem free and has already been successfully used to compute mass spectra, thermal states and phase diagrams, as well as real-time dynamics for Abelian and non-Abelian gauge models. In previous work we showed the suitability of the method to explore the zero-temperature phase structure of the multi-flavor Schwinger model at non-zero chemical potential, a regime where the conventional Monte Carlo approach suffers from the sign problem. Here we extend our numerical study by looking at the spatially resolved chiral condensate in the massless case. We recover spatial oscillations, similar to the theoretical predictions for the single-flavor case, with a chemical potential dependent frequency and an amplitude approximately given by the homogeneous zero density condensate value.

  1. Excited state properties of the astaxanthin radical cation: A quantum chemical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreuw, Andreas; Starcke, Jan Hendrik; Wachtveitl, Josef

    2010-07-01

    Using time-dependent density functional theory, the excited electronic states of the astaxanthin radical cation (AXT rad + ) are investigated. While the optically allowed excited D 1 and D 3 states are typical ππ∗ excited states, the D 2 and D 4 states are nπ∗ states. Special emphasis is put onto the influence of the carbonyl groups onto the excited states. For this objective, the excited states of four hypothetical carotenoids and zeaxanthin have been computed. Addition of a carbonyl group to a conjugated carbon double bond system does essentially not change the vertical excitation energies of the optically allowed ππ∗ states due to two counter-acting effects: the excitation energy should increase due to the -M-effect of the carbonyl group and at the same time decrease owing to the elongation of the conjugated double bond system by the carbonyl group itself.

  2. Excited state properties of the astaxanthin radical cation: A quantum chemical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreuw, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.dreuw@theochem.uni-frankfurt.de [Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Goethe-University Frankfurt, Max von Laue-Str. 7, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Starcke, Jan Hendrik; Wachtveitl, Josef [Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Goethe-University Frankfurt, Max von Laue-Str. 7, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2010-07-19

    Using time-dependent density functional theory, the excited electronic states of the astaxanthin radical cation (AXT{sup {center_dot}+}) are investigated. While the optically allowed excited D{sub 1} and D{sub 3} states are typical {pi}{pi}* excited states, the D{sub 2} and D{sub 4} states are n{pi}* states. Special emphasis is put onto the influence of the carbonyl groups onto the excited states. For this objective, the excited states of four hypothetical carotenoids and zeaxanthin have been computed. Addition of a carbonyl group to a conjugated carbon double bond system does essentially not change the vertical excitation energies of the optically allowed {pi}{pi}* states due to two counter-acting effects: the excitation energy should increase due to the -M-effect of the carbonyl group and at the same time decrease owing to the elongation of the conjugated double bond system by the carbonyl group itself.

  3. Transition state trajectory stability determines barrier crossing rates in chemical reactions induced by time-dependent oscillating fields

    CERN Document Server

    Craven, Galen T; Hernandez, Rigoberto

    2015-01-01

    When a chemical reaction is driven by an external field, the transition state that the system must pass through as it changes from reactant to product -for example, an energy barrier- becomes time-dependent. We show that for periodic forcing the rate of barrier crossing can be determined through stability analysis of the non-autonomous transition state. Specifically, strong agreement is observed between the difference in the Floquet exponents describing stability of the transition state trajectory, which defines a recrossing-free dividing surface [G. T. Craven, T. Bartsch, and R. Hernandez, Phys. Rev. E 89, 040801(R) (2014)], and the rates calculated by simulation of ensembles of trajectories. This result opens the possibility to extract rates directly from the intrinsic stability of the transition state, even when it is time-dependent, without requiring a numerically-expensive simulation of the long-time dynamics of a large ensemble of trajectories.

  4. Prediction of the Chapman–Jouguet chemical equilibrium state in a detonation wave from first principles based reactive molecular dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Dezhou; Zybin, Sergey V.; An, Qi; Goddard, William A.; Huang, Fenglei

    2016-01-01

    The combustion or detonation of reacting materials at high temperature and pressure can be characterized by the Chapman–Jouguet (CJ) state that describes the chemical equilibrium of the products at the end of the reaction zone of the detonation wave for sustained detonation. This provides the critical properties and product kinetics for input to macroscale continuum simulations of energetic materials. We propose the ReaxFF Reactive Dynamics to CJ point protocol (Rx2CJ) for predicting the CJ s...

  5. Mapping the chemical states of an element inside a sample using tomographic x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroer, C G; Kuhlmann, M; Gunzler, T F; Lengeler, B; Richwin, M; Griesebock, B; Lutzenkirchen-Hect, D; Frahm, R; Ziegler, E; Mashayekhi, A; Haeffner, D R; Grunwaldt, J -D; Baiker, A; XFD,

    2003-05-12

    Hard x-ray absorption spectroscopy is combined with scanning microtomography to reconstruct full near-edge spectra of an elemental species at each location on an arbitrary virtual section through a sample. These spectra reveal the local concentrations of different chemical compounds of the absorbing element inside the sample and give insight into the oxidation state, the local atomic structure, and the local projected free density of states. The method is implemented by combining a quick scanning monochromator and data acquisition system with a scanning microprobe setup based on refractive x-ray lenses.

  6. Development of carbon electrodes for electrochemistry, solid-state electronics and multimodal atomic force microscopy imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Kirstin Claire

    Carbon is one of the most remarkable elements due to its wide abundance on Earth and its many allotropes, which include diamond and graphite. Many carbon allotropes are conductive and in recent decades scientists have discovered and synthesized many new forms of carbon, including graphene and carbon nanotubes. The work in this thesis specifically focuses on the fabrication and characterization of pyrolyzed parylene C (PPC), a conductive pyrocarbon, as an electrode material for diodes, as a conductive coating for atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes and as an ultramicroelectrode (UME) for the electrochemical interrogation of cellular systems in vitro. Herein, planar and three-dimensional (3D) PPC electrodes were microscopically, spectroscopically and electrochemically characterized. First, planar PPC films and PPC-coated nanopipettes were utilized to detect a model redox species, Ru(NH3) 6Cl3. Then, free-standing PPC thin films were chemically doped, with hydrazine and concentrated nitric acid, to yield p- and n-type carbon films. Doped PPC thin films were positioned in conjunction with doped silicon to create Schottky and p-n junction diodes for use in an alternating current half-wave rectifier circuit. Pyrolyzed parylene C has found particular merit as a 3D electrode coating of AFM probes. Current sensing-atomic force microscopy imaging in air of nanoscale metallic features was undertaken to demonstrate the electronic imaging applicability of PPC AFM probes. Upon further insulation with parylene C and modification with a focused ion beam, a PPC UME was microfabricated near the AFM probe apex and utilized for electrochemical imaging. Subsequently, scanning electrochemical microscopy-atomic force microscopy imaging was undertaken to electrochemically quantify and image the spatial location of dopamine exocytotic release, elicited mechanically via the AFM probe itself, from differentiated pheochromocytoma 12 cells in vitro.

  7. Handling the influence of chemical shift in amplitude-modulated heteronuclear dipolar recoupling solid-state NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basse, Kristoffer; Shankar, Ravi; Bjerring, Morten; Vosegaard, Thomas; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Nielsen, Anders B.

    2016-09-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the influence of chemical shifts on amplitude-modulated heteronuclear dipolar recoupling experiments in solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The method is demonstrated using the Rotor Echo Short Pulse IRrAdiaTION mediated Cross-Polarization (RESPIRATIONCP) experiment as an example. By going into the pulse sequence rf interaction frame and employing a quintuple-mode operator-based Floquet approach, we describe how chemical shift offset and anisotropic chemical shift affect the efficiency of heteronuclear polarization transfer. In this description, it becomes transparent that the main attribute leading to non-ideal performance is a fictitious field along the rf field axis, which is generated from second-order cross terms arising mainly between chemical shift tensors and themselves. This insight is useful for the development of improved recoupling experiments. We discuss the validity of this approach and present quaternion calculations to determine the effective resonance conditions in a combined rf field and chemical shift offset interaction frame transformation. Based on this, we derive a broad-banded version of the RESPIRATIONCP experiment. The new sequence is experimentally verified using SNNFGAILSS amyloid fibrils where simultaneous 15N → 13CO and 15N → 13Cα coherence transfer is demonstrated on high-field NMR instrumentation, requiring great offset stability.

  8. Optical cryo-imaging of kidney mitochondrial redox state in diabetic mice models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, S.; Sepehr, R.; Staniszewski, K.; Sheibani, N.; Sorenson, C. M.; Ranji, M.

    2012-03-01

    Oxidative stress (OS), which increases during diabetes, exacerbates the development and progression of diabetes complications including renal vascular and proximal tubule cell dysfunction. The objective of this study was to investigate the changes in the metabolic state of the tissue in diabetic mice kidneys using fluorescence imaging. Mitochondrial metabolic coenzymes NADH (Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide), and FADH-2 (Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide) are autofluorescent and can be monitored without exogenous labels by optical techniques. The ratio of the fluorescence intensity of these fluorophores, (NADH/FAD), called the NADH redox ratio (RR), is a marker of metabolic state of a tissue. We examined mitochondrial redox states of kidneys from diabetic mice, Akita/+ and its control wild type (WT) for a group of 8- and 12-week-old mice. Average intensity and histogram of maximum projected images of FAD, NADH, and NADH RR were calculated for each kidney. Our results indicated a 17% decrease in the mean NADH RR of the kidney from 8-week-old mice compared with WT mice and, a 30% decrease in the mean NADH RR of kidney from12-week-old mice compared with WT mice. These results indicated an increase in OS in diabetic animals and its progression over time. Thus, NADH RR can be used as a hallmark of OS in diabetic kidney allowing temporal identification of oxidative state.

  9. Super-resolution and super-localization microscopy: A novel tool for imaging chemical and biological processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Bin [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Optical microscopy imaging of single molecules and single particles is an essential method for studying fundamental biological and chemical processes at the molecular and nanometer scale. The best spatial resolution (~ λ/2) achievable in traditional optical microscopy is governed by the diffraction of light. However, single molecule-based super-localization and super-resolution microscopy imaging techniques have emerged in the past decade. Individual molecules can be localized with nanometer scale accuracy and precision for studying of biological and chemical processes.This work uncovered the heterogeneous properties of the pore structures. In this dissertation, the coupling of molecular transport and catalytic reaction at the single molecule and single particle level in multilayer mesoporous nanocatalysts was elucidated. Most previous studies dealt with these two important phenomena separately. A fluorogenic oxidation reaction of non-fluorescent amplex red to highly fluorescent resorufin was tested. The diffusion behavior of single resorufin molecules in aligned nanopores was studied using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM).

  10. Chemical food safety issues in the United States: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Lauren S

    2009-09-23

    Considerable advances have been made over the past century in the understanding of the chemical hazards in food and ways for assessing and managing these risks. At the turn of the 20th century, many Americans were exposed to foods adulterated with toxic compounds. In the 1920s the increasing use of insecticides led to concerns of chronic ingestion of heavy metals such as lead and arsenic from residues remaining on crops. By the 1930s, a variety of agrochemicals were commonly used, and food additives were becoming common in processed foods. During the 1940s and 1950s advances were made in toxicology, and more systematic approaches were adopted for evaluating the safety of chemical contaminants in food. Modern gas chromatography and liquid chromatography, both invented in the 1950s and 1960s, were responsible for progress in detecting, quantifying, and assessing the risk of food contaminants and adulterants. In recent decades, chemical food safety issues that have been the center of media attention include the presence of natural toxins, processing-produced toxins (e.g., acrylamide, heterocyclic aromatic amines, and furan), food allergens, heavy metals (e.g., lead, arsenic, mercury, cadmium), industrial chemicals (e.g., benzene, perchlorate), contaminants from packaging materials, and unconventional contaminants (melamine) in food and feed. Due to the global nature of the food supply and advances in analytical capabilities, chemical contaminants will continue to be an area of concern for regulatory agencies, the food industry, and consumers in the future.

  11. Exploring altered consciousness states by magnetic resonance imaging in brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lescot, Thomas; Galanaud, Damien; Puybasset, Louis

    2009-03-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) occurs abruptly, involves multiple specialized teams, calls on the health-care system in its emergency dimension, and engages the well-being of the patient and his relatives for a lifetime period. Clinicians in charge of these patients are faced with issues of uppermost importance: medical issues such as predicting the long-term neurological outcome of the comatose patient; ethical issues because of the influence of intensive care on the long-term survival of patients in a vegetative and minimally conscious state; legal issues because of the law that has set the concept of proportionality of care as the legal rule; and social issues as the result of the very high cost of these pathologies. Today's larger availability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in ventilated patients and the recent improvements in hardware and in imaging techniques that have made the last-developed imaging techniques such as diffusion tensor imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy available in brain-trauma patients, are changing the paradigm in neurointensive care regarding outcome prediction. The old paradigm that no individual prognosis could be made at the subacute phase in TBI patients does not hold true anymore. This major change opens new challenging ethical questions. This review focuses on the brain explorations that are required, such as MRI, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and diffusion tensor imaging, to provide the clinician with a multimodal assessment of the brain state to predict outcome of coma. Such an assessment will become mandatory in the near future to answer the crucial question of proportionality of care in these patients.

  12. Encoding physiological signals as images for affective state recognition using convolutional neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guangliang; Li, Xiang; Song, Dawei; Zhao, Xiaozhao; Zhang, Peng; Hou, Yuexian; Hu, Bin; Guangliang Yu; Xiang Li; Dawei Song; Xiaozhao Zhao; Peng Zhang; Yuexian Hou; Bin Hu; Zhao, Xiaozhao; Hou, Yuexian; Li, Xiang; Hu, Bin; Zhang, Peng; Song, Dawei; Yu, Guangliang

    2016-08-01

    Affective state recognition based on multiple modalities of physiological signals has been a hot research topic. Traditional methods require designing hand-crafted features based on domain knowledge, which is time-consuming and has not achieved a satisfactory performance. On the other hand, conducting classification on raw signals directly can also cause some problems, such as the interference of noise and the curse of dimensionality. To address these problems, we propose a novel approach that encodes different modalities of data as images and use convolutional neural networks (CNN) to perform the affective state recognition task. We validate our aproach on the DECAF dataset in comparison with two state-of-the-art methods, i.e., the Support Vector Machines (SVM) and Random Forest (RF). Experimental results show that our aproach outperforms the baselines by 5% to 9%.

  13. Ultrasonic C-scanning imaging inspection of superplastic solid-state welded joint quality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张柯柯; 陈怀东; 杨蕴林; 薛锦

    2002-01-01

    Based on a large amount of dissection at welded interface and quantitative microscopic examination of welded rate, the suitable limit grey scale value was determined, and the welded rate of superplastic solid-state welding interface of heterogeneous steel was systematically studied by means of self-made ultrasonic C-scanning imaging inspection system. The experimental results show: the welded state of superplastic solid-state welding interface of heterogeneous steel can be conducted to be more accurately, reliably and quickly inspected by means of this system, and the ultrasonic testing results are good consistent with actual examination results of the interface defective distribution. Within the extent of the suitble welded rate,the welded rate in 40Cr/T10A superplastic welding process tested by this system is linear with its tensile strength of joint.

  14. Electronic transport characterization of silicon wafers by spatially resolved steady-state photocarrier radiometric imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qian [Institute of Optics and Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 350, Shuangliu, Chengdu 610209 (China); University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Li, Bincheng, E-mail: bcli@ioe.ac.cn [Institute of Optics and Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 350, Shuangliu, Chengdu 610209 (China); School of Optoelectronic Information, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China)

    2015-09-28

    Spatially resolved steady-state photocarrier radiometric (PCR) imaging technique is developed to characterize the electronic transport properties of silicon wafers. Based on a nonlinear PCR theory, simulations are performed to investigate the effects of electronic transport parameters (the carrier lifetime, the carrier diffusion coefficient, and the front surface recombination velocity) on the steady-state PCR intensity profiles. The electronic transport parameters of an n-type silicon wafer are simultaneously determined by fitting the measured steady-state PCR intensity profiles to the three-dimensional nonlinear PCR model. The determined transport parameters are in good agreement with the results obtained by the conventional modulated PCR technique with multiple pump beam radii.

  15. Coordinated Chemical and Isotopic Imaging of Bells (CM2) Meteorite Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemett, S. J.; Messenger, S.; Naklamura-Messenger, K.; Thomas-Keprta, K. L.

    2014-01-01

    Meteoritic organic matter is a complex conglomeration of species formed in distinct environments and processes in circumstellar space, the interstellar medium, the Solar Nebula and asteroids. Consequently meteorites constitute a unique record of primordial organic chemical evolution. While bulk chemical analysis has provided a detailed description of the range and diversity of organic species present in carbonaceous chondrites, there is little information as to how these species are spatially distributed and their relationship to the host mineral matrix. The distribution of organic phases is nevertheless critical to understanding parent body processes. The CM and CI chondrites all display evidence of low temperature (meteorite using a newly developed two-step laser mass spectrometer (mu-L(sup 2)MS) capable of measuring a broad range of organic compounds.

  16. Information and backaction due to phase contrast imaging measurements of cold atomic gases: beyond Gaussian states

    CERN Document Server

    Ilo-Okeke, Ebubechukwu O

    2016-01-01

    We further examine a theory of phase contrast imaging (PCI) of cold atomic gases, first introduced by us in Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 112}, 233602 (2014). We model the PCI measurement by directly calculating the entangled state between the light and the atoms due to the ac Stark shift, which induces a conditional phase shift on the light depending upon the atomic state. By interfering the light that passes through the BEC with the original light, one can obtain information of the atomic state at a single shot level. We derive an exact expression for a measurement operator that embodies the information obtained from PCI, as well as the back-action on the atomic state. By the use of exact expressions for the measurement process, we go beyond the continuous variables approximation such that the non-Gaussian regime can be accessed for both the measured state and the post-measurement state. Features such as the photon probability density, signal, signal variance, Fisher information, error of the measurement, and the b...

  17. Assessment of active pharmaceutical ingredient particle size in tablets by Raman chemical imaging validated using polystyrene microsphere size standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriyama, Atsushi; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2014-04-01

    Particle size is a critical parameter for controlling pharmaceutical quality. The aim of this study was to assess the size of the micrometer-scale active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) in tablets using Raman chemical imaging and to understand the effects of formulation on particle size. Model tablets containing National Institute of Standards and Technology traceable polystyrene microsphere size standards were developed to determine the binarization threshold value of Raman chemical images for API particle sizing in specific formulations and processes. Three sets of model tablets containing 5, 10, and 15 μm polystyrene microspheres, used to mimic API, were prepared using a commercial tablet formulation (Ebastel tablets, mean API particle size was about 5 μm). Raman mapping with a 50× objective (NA, 0.75) was applied to tablet cross-sections, and particle size of polystyrene microspheres was estimated from binary images using several binarization thresholds. Mean particle size for three sets of polystyrene microspheres showed good agreement between pre- and postformulation (the slope = 1.024, R = 1.000) at the specific threshold value ((mean + 0.5σ) of the polystyrene-specific peak intensity histogram), regardless of particle agglomeration, tablet surface roughness, and laser penetration depth. The binarization threshold value showed good applicability to Ebastel tablets, where the API-specific peak intensity histogram showed a pattern similar to that of polystyrene microspheres in model tablets. The model tablets enabled determination of an appropriate binarization threshold for assessing the mean particle size of micrometer-scale API in tablets by utilizing the unique physicochemical properties of polystyrene microspheres.

  18. Recycling-oriented characterization of plastic frames and printed circuit boards from mobile phones by electronic and chemical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmieri, Roberta; Bonifazi, Giuseppe; Serranti, Silvia, E-mail: silvia.serranti@uniroma1.it

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • A recycling oriented characterization of end-of-life mobile phones was carried out. • Characterization was developed in a zero-waste-perspective, aiming to recover all the mobile phone materials. • Plastic frames and printed circuit boards were analyzed by electronic and chemical imaging. • Suitable milling/classification strategies were set up to define specialized-pre-concentrated-streams. • The proposed approach can improve the recovery of polymers, base/precious metals, rare earths and critical raw materials. - Abstract: This study characterizes the composition of plastic frames and printed circuit boards from end-of-life mobile phones. This knowledge may help define an optimal processing strategy for using these items as potential raw materials. Correct handling of such a waste is essential for its further “sustainable” recovery, especially to maximize the extraction of base, rare and precious metals, minimizing the environmental impact of the entire process chain. A combination of electronic and chemical imaging techniques was thus examined, applied and critically evaluated in order to optimize the processing, through the identification and the topological assessment of the materials of interest and their quantitative distribution. To reach this goal, end-of-life mobile phone derived wastes have been systematically characterized adopting both “traditional” (e.g. scanning electronic microscopy combined with microanalysis and Raman spectroscopy) and innovative (e.g. hyperspectral imaging in short wave infrared field) techniques, with reference to frames and printed circuit boards. Results showed as the combination of both the approaches (i.e. traditional and classical) could dramatically improve recycling strategies set up, as well as final products recovery.

  19. The importance of the country image: the united states of america case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina Pipoli de Azambuja

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Country image is an issue that is becoming more relevant in the last few years due to competition generated among countries to attract tourists and increase their exports in the wake of globalization. Nowadays, countries are more concerned about country image being projected and, therefore, the favourable or unfavourable perception that consumers have of the country. This research is an exploratory study to determine the components of the United States of America country image, from the perspective of consumers of Peru and France. The United States was chosen for purposes of this study because it is the country that provides the greatest flow of tourists to Peru and is the main destination market for exports; while in the case of France it is the opposite: it has a low rate of tourists and trade. This allows comparing the results of two samples: one with a high level of familiarity (Peru and one with a low level of familiarity (France. The same questionnaire was used for both markets under the same conditions, and the same variables and indicators were measured.

  20. A regional assessment of chemicals of concern in surface waters of four Midwestern United States national parks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Sarah M; VanderMeulen, David D

    2017-02-01

    Anthropogenic chemicals and their potential for adverse biological effects raise concern for aquatic ecosystem health in protected areas. During 2013-15, surface waters of four Midwestern United States national parks were sampled and analyzed for wastewater indicators, pharmaceuticals, personal care products, and pesticides. More chemicals and higher concentrations were detected at the two parks with greater urban influences (Mississippi National River and Recreation Area and Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore) than at the two more remote parks (Apostle Islands National Lakeshore and Isle Royale National Park). Atrazine (10-15ng/L) and N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide (16-120ng/L) were the only chemicals detected in inland lakes of a remote island national park (Isle Royale National Park). Bisphenol A and organophosphate flame retardants were commonly detected at the other sampled parks. Gabapentin and simazine had the highest observed concentrations (>1000ng/L) in three and two samples, respectively. At the two parks with urban influences, metolachlor and simazine concentrations were similar to those reported for other major urban rivers in the United States. Environmental concentrations of detected chemicals were often orders of magnitude less than standards or reference values with three exceptions: (1) hydrochlorothiazide exceeded a human health-based screening value in seven samples, (2) estrone exceeded a predicted critical environmental concentration for fish pharmacological effects in one sample, and (3) simazine was approaching the 4000ng/L Maximum Contaminant Level in one sample even though this concentration is not expected to reflect peak pesticide use. Although few environmental concentrations were approaching or exceeded standards or reference values, concentrations were often in ranges reported to elicit effects in aquatic biota. Data from this study will assist in establishing a baseline for chemicals of concern in Midwestern national parks and highlight

  1. A regional assessment of chemicals of concern in surface waters of four Midwestern United States national parks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Sarah M.; VanderMeulen, David

    2017-01-01

    Anthropogenic chemicals and their potential for adverse biological effects raise concern for aquatic ecosystem health in protected areas. During 2013–15, surface waters of four Midwestern United States national parks were sampled and analyzed for wastewater indicators, pharmaceuticals, personal care products, and pesticides. More chemicals and higher concentrations were detected at the two parks with greater urban influences (Mississippi National River and Recreation Area and Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore) than at the two more remote parks (Apostle Islands National Lakeshore and Isle Royale National Park). Atrazine (10–15 ng/L) and N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide (16–120 ng/L) were the only chemicals detected in inland lakes of a remote island national park (Isle Royale National Park). Bisphenol A and organophosphate flame retardants were commonly detected at the other sampled parks. Gabapentin and simazine had the highest observed concentrations (> 1000 ng/L) in three and two samples, respectively. At the two parks with urban influences, metolachlor and simazine concentrations were similar to those reported for other major urban rivers in the United States. Environmental concentrations of detected chemicals were often orders of magnitude less than standards or reference values with three exceptions: (1) hydrochlorothiazide exceeded a human health-based screening value in seven samples, (2) estrone exceeded a predicted critical environmental concentration for fish pharmacological effects in one sample, and (3) simazine was approaching the 4000 ng/L Maximum Contaminant Level in one sample even though this concentration is not expected to reflect peak pesticide use. Although few environmental concentrations were approaching or exceeded standards or reference values, concentrations were often in ranges reported to elicit effects in aquatic biota. Data from this study will assist in establishing a baseline for chemicals of concern in Midwestern national parks and

  2. Chimera and chimera-like states in populations of nonlocally coupled homogeneous and heterogeneous chemical oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkomo, Simbarashe; Tinsley, Mark R.; Showalter, Kenneth

    2016-09-01

    Chimera and chimera-like states are characterized in populations of photochemically coupled Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) oscillators. Simple chimeras and chimera states with multiple and traveling phase clusters, phase-slip behavior, and chimera-like states with phase waves are described. Simulations with a realistic model of the discrete BZ system of populations of homogeneous and heterogeneous oscillators are compared with each other and with experimental behavior.

  3. Chemically Modified Bacteriophage as a Streamlined Approach to Noninvasive Breast Cancer Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    filamentous phage were used for western blotting experiments. Because M13KE lacks antibiotic resistance, it was grown from plaques rather than colonies. It...surface marker-specific phage identified from library screens into imaging agents that can target and differentiate breast cancer cell types. This is...accomplished by using efficient synthetic protocols to conjugate small molecules to phage coat proteins. In the current work, I have examined the use of

  4. "Mirror-image" manipulation of curdione stereoisomer scaffolds by chemical and biological approaches: development of a sesquiterpenoid library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Bin; Li, Yuxin; Meng, Lingxin; Ouyang, Jingping; Jin, Danni; Wu, Lei; Zhang, Xin; Jia, Xian; You, Song

    2015-02-27

    The sesquiterpenoid curdione is one of the main bioactive components in the essential oil of Rhizoma Curcumae (Curcuma wenyujin, Curcuma phaeocaulis, and Curcuma kwangsiensis), which has been clinically used for the treatment of cancer in mainland China. Recently it was reported that natural curdione could be hydroxylated by Aspergillus niger and transferred to its corresponding curcumalactones under acidic conditions. Based on this study, the development of a sesquiterpenoid library through the "mirror-image" manipulation of bioactive (non)natural curdione scaffolds by chemical and biological approaches is presented herein. A. niger induced the hydroxylation of two pairs of curdione enantiomers, yielding the corresponding mirror-image hydroxylated curdiones. Simultaneously, the acid-mediated intramolecular "ene" rearrangements of these curdiones and hydroxylated curdione enantiomers yielded the corresponding mirror-image curcumalactones and hydroxylated curcumalactones. Among the 16 pairs of enantiomers obtained in this study, 23 compounds are new sesquiterpenoids. These curdione and curcumalactone derivatives are of particular interest, as they have the potential to be used as lead compounds and scaffolds in drug discovery.

  5. Chemical Reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, C. N.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a course, including content, reading list, and presentation on chemical reactors at Cambridge University, England. A brief comparison of chemical engineering education between the United States and England is also given. (JN)

  6. Evolution of mammographic image quality in the state of Rio de Janeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Cristina Felippe Lopes Villar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the evolution of mammographic image quality in the state of Rio de Janeiro on the basis of parameters measured and analyzed during health surveillance inspections in the period from 2006 to 2011. Materials and Methods: Descriptive study analyzing parameters connected with imaging quality of 52 mammography apparatuses inspected at least twice with a one-year interval. Results: Amongst the 16 analyzed parameters, 7 presented more than 70% of conformity, namely: compression paddle pressure intensity (85.1%, films development (72.7%, film response (72.7%, low contrast fine detail (92.2%, tumor mass visualization (76.5%, absence of image artifacts (94.1%, mammography-specific developers availability (88.2%. On the other hand, relevant parameters were below 50% conformity, namely: monthly image quality control testing (28.8% and high contrast details with respect to microcalcifications visualization (47.1%. Conclusion: The analysis revealed critical situations in terms of compliance with the health surveillance standards. Priority should be given to those mammography apparatuses that remained non-compliant at the second inspection performed within the one-year interval.

  7. Image transmission in mid-IR using a solid state laser pumped optical parametric oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Kratovil, Pat; Magee, James R.

    2002-04-01

    In this paper, image transmission using a mid-wave IR (MWIR) optical transceiver based free-space data link under low visibility conditions is presented. The all-solid-state MWIR transceiver primarily consisted of a passively Q-switched, short-pulsed Nd:YAG laser pumping a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) based optical parametric oscillator and a Dember effect detector. The MILES transceiver generates pulse position waveforms. The optical data link consisting of transmitter drive electronics, pulse conditioning electronics and a computer generating pulses compatible with the 2400-baud rate RS232 receiver was utilized. Data formatting and RS232 transmission and reception were achieved using a computer. Data formatting transformed an arbitrary image file format compatible with the basic operation of pump laser. Images were transmitted at a date rate of 2400 kbits/sec with 16 bits/pixel. Test images consisting of 50X40 pixels and 100X80 pixels were transmitted through free-space filled with light fog up to 120 ft. Besides optical parametric oscillators, the proposed concept can be extended to optical parametric amplifiers, Raman lasers and other nonlinear optical devices to achieve multi-functionality.

  8. Neurophysiological assessment of perceived image quality using steady-state visual evoked potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosse, Sebastian; Acqualagna, Laura; Porbadnigk, Anne K.; Curio, Gabriel; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Blankertz, Benjamin; Wiegand, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    An approach to the neural measurement of perceived image quality using electroencephalography (EEG) is presented. 6 different images were tested on 6 different distortion levels. The distortions were introduced by a hybrid video encoder. The presented study consists of two parts: In a first part, subjects were asked to evaluate the quality of the test stimuli behaviorally during a conventional psychophysical test using a degradation category rating procedure. In a second part, subjects were presented undistorted and distorted texture images in a periodically alternating fashion at a fixed frequency. This alternating presentation elicits so called steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEP) as a brain response that can be measured on the scalp. The amplitude of modulations in the brain signals is significantly and strongly negatively correlated with the magnitude of visual impairment reported by the subjects. This neurophysiological approach to image quality assessment may potentially lead to a more objective evaluation, as behavioral approaches suffer from drawbacks such as biases, inter-subject variances and limitations to test duration.

  9. Three-State Locally Adaptive Texture Preserving Filter for Radar and Optical Image Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaakko T. Astola

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Textural features are one of the most important types of useful information contained in images. In practice, these features are commonly masked by noise. Relatively little attention has been paid to texture preserving properties of noise attenuation methods. This stimulates solving the following tasks: (1 to analyze the texture preservation properties of various filters; and (2 to design image processing methods capable to preserve texture features well and to effectively reduce noise. This paper deals with examining texture feature preserving properties of different filters. The study is performed for a set of texture samples and different noise variances. The locally adaptive three-state schemes are proposed for which texture is considered as a particular class. For “detection” of texture regions, several classifiers are proposed and analyzed. As shown, an appropriate trade-off of the designed filter properties is provided. This is demonstrated quantitatively for artificial test images and is confirmed visually for real-life images.

  10. Solid-state nanoparticle coated emulsions for encapsulation and improving the chemical stability of all-trans-retinol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghouchi-Eskandar, Nasrin; Simovic, Spomenka; Prestidge, Clive A

    2012-02-28

    Submicron oil-in-water (o/w) emulsions stabilised with conventional surfactants and silica nanoparticles were prepared and freeze-dried to obtain free-flowing powders with good redispersibility and a three-dimensional porous matrix structure. Solid-state emulsions were characterised for visual appearance, particle size distribution, zeta potential and reconstitution properties after freeze-drying with various sugars and at a range of sugar to oil ratios. Comparative degradation kinetics of all-trans-retinol from freeze-dried and liquid emulsions was investigated as a function of storage temperatures. Optimum stability was observed for silica-coated oleylamine emulsions at 4 °C in their wet state. The half-life of all-trans-retinol was 25.66 and 22.08 weeks for silica incorporation from the oil and water phases respectively. This was ∼4 times higher compared to the equivalent solid-state emulsions with drug half-life of 6.18 and 6.06 weeks at 4 °C. Exceptionally, at a storage temperature of 40 °C, the chemical stability of the drug was 3 times higher in the solid-state compared to the wet emulsions which confirmed that freeze-drying is a promising approach to improve the chemical stability of water-labile compounds provided that the storage conditions are optimised.

  11. Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Images for the website main pages and all configurations. The upload and access points for the other images are: Website Template RSW images BSCW Images HIRENASD...

  12. Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging of endoscopic third ventriculostomy patency with differently acquired fast imaging with steady-state precession sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucic, Milos A; Koprivsek, Katarina; Kozic, Dusko; Spero, Martina; Spirovski, Milena; Lucic, Silvija

    2014-08-16

    The aim of the study was to determine the possibilities of two differently acquired two-dimensional fast imaging with steady-state precession (FISP 2D) magnetic resonance sequences in estimation of the third ventricle floor fenestration patency after endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) in the subjects with aqueductal stenosis/obstruction.Fifty eight subjects (37 males, 21 females, mean age 27 years) with previously successfully performed ETV underwent brain MRI on 1.5T MR imager 3-6 months after the procedure. Two different FISP 2D sequences (one included in the standard vendor provided software package, and the other, experimentally developed by our team) were performed respectively at two fixed slice positions: midsagittal and perpendicular to the ETV fenestration, and displayed in a closed-loop cinematographic format in order to estimate the patency. The ventricular volume reduction has been observed as well.Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow through the ETV fenestration was observed in midsagittal plane with both FISP 2D sequences in 93.11% subjects, while in 6.89% subjects the dynamic CSF flow MRI was inconclusive. In the perpendicular plane CSF flow through the ETV fenestration was visible only by use of experimentally developed FISP 2D (TR30/FA70) sequence. Postoperative volume reduction of lateral and third ventricle was detected in 67.24% subjects.Though both FISP 2D sequences acquired in midsagittal plane may be used to estimate the effects of performed ETV, due to achieved higher CSF pulsatile flow sensitivity, only the use of FISP 2D (TR30/FA70) sequence enables the estimation of the treatment effect in perpendicular plane in the absence of phase-contrast sequences. 

  13. Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Endoscopic Third Ventriculostomy Patency With Differently Acquired Fast Imaging With Steady-State Precission Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milos A. Lucic

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the possibilities of two differently acquired two-dimensional fast imaging with steady-state precession (FISP 2D magnetic resonance sequences in estimation of the third ventricle floor fenestration patency after endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV in the subjects with aqueductal stenosis/obstruction.Fifty eight subjects (37 males, 21 females, mean age 27 years with previously successfully performed ETV underwent brain MRI on 1.5T MR imager 3-6 months after the procedure. Two different FISP 2D sequences (one included in the standard vendor provided software package, and the other, experimentally developed by our team were performed respectively at two fixed slice positions: midsagittal and perpendicular to the ETV fenestration, and displayed in a closed-loop cinematographic format in order to estimate the patency. The ventricular volume reduction has been observed as well.Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF flow through the ETV fenestration was observed in midsagittal plane with both FISP 2D sequences in 93.11% subjects, while in 6.89% subjects the dynamic CSF flow MRI was inconclusive. In the perpendicular plane CSF flow through the ETV fenestration was visible only by use of experimentally developed FISP 2D (TR30/FA70 sequence. Postoperative volume reduction of lateral and third ventricle was detected in 67.24% subjects.Though both FISP 2D sequences acquired in midsagittal plane may be used to estimate the effects of performed ETV, due to achieved higher CSF pulsatile flow sensitivity, only the use of FISP 2D (TR30/FA70 sequence enables the estimation of the treatment effect in perpendicular plane in the absence of phase-contrast sequences. 

  14. Physiological and functional magnetic resonance imaging using balanced steady-state free precession

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sung Hong; Han, Paul Kyu [Magnetic Resonance Imaging Lab, Dept. of Bio and Brain Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon(Korea, Republic of); Choi, Seung Hong [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) is a highly efficient pulse sequence that is known to provide the highest signal-to-noise ratio per unit time. Recently, bSSFP is getting increasingly popular in both the research and clinical communities. This review will be focusing on the application of the bSSFP technique in the context of probing the physiological and functional information. In the first part of this review, the basic principles of bSSFP are briefly covered. Afterwards, recent developments related to the application of bSSFP, in terms of physiological and functional imaging, are introduced and reviewed. Despite its long development history, bSSFP is still a promising technique that has many potential benefits for obtaining high-resolution physiological and functional images.

  15. Images of safe tourism destinations in the United States held by African Americans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingjie Liu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Ensuring a safe destination is an essential factor in travelers’ decision-making, as well as a destination’s success. Recent crises have threatened perceptions of safety related to tourism. Under such circumstances, negative destination images might be produced and destination choices might be altered. Thus, understanding the effect of risk perceptions on destination image is a necessary researchstream. This study examined African American travelers’ perceptions of safety related to the top three state tourism destinations in the USA. Factors that influenced perceptions of a safe destination varied among the destinations. Consistently, however, past travel experience and the perception of the likelihood of health-related crisis were significant predictors of perceptions of a safe destination

  16. Doppler imaging of chemical spots on magnetic Ap/Bp stars. Numerical tests and assessment of systematic errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochukhov, O.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Doppler imaging (DI) is a powerful spectroscopic inversion technique that enables conversion of a line profile time series into a two-dimensional map of the stellar surface inhomogeneities. DI has been repeatedly applied to reconstruct chemical spot topologies of magnetic Ap/Bp stars with the goal of understanding variability of these objects and gaining an insight into the physical processes responsible for spot formation. Aims: In this paper we investigate the accuracy of chemical abundance DI and assess the impact of several different systematic errors on the reconstructed spot maps. Methods: We have simulated spectroscopic observational data for two different Fe spot distributions with a surface abundance contrast of 1.5 dex in the presence of a moderately strong dipolar magnetic field. We then reconstructed chemical maps using different sets of spectral lines and making different assumptions about line formation in the inversion calculations. Results: Our numerical experiments demonstrate that a modern DI code successfully recovers the input chemical spot distributions comprised of multiple circular spots at different latitudes or an element overabundance belt at the magnetic equator. For the optimal reconstruction based on half a dozen spectral intervals, the average reconstruction errors do not exceed 0.10 dex. The errors increase to about 0.15 dex when abundance distributions are recovered from a few and/or blended spectral lines. Ignoring a 2.5 kG dipolar magnetic field in chemical abundance DI leads to an average relative error of 0.2 dex and maximum errors of 0.3 dex. Similar errors are encountered if a DI inversion is carried out neglecting a non-uniform continuum brightness distribution and variation of the local atmospheric structure. None of the considered systematic effects lead to major spurious features in the recovered abundance maps. Conclusions: This series of numerical DI simulations proves that inversions based on one or two spectral

  17. Chemically-activatable alkyne-tagged probe for imaging microdomains in lipid bilayer membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Matsushita, Taku; Izuta, Shin; Katada, Sumika; Ura, Manami; Ikeda, Taro; Hayashi, Gosuke; Suzuki, Yuta; Kobayashi, Koya; Tokunaga, Kyoya; Ozeki, Yasuyuki; Okamoto, Akimitsu

    2017-01-01

    A chemically-activatable alkynyl steroid analogue probe has been synthesized for visualizing the lipid raft membrane domains by Raman microscopy. The Raman probe, in which ring A of its steroid backbone is replaced with an alkynyl group, was designed to enable activation of the alkyne signal through the Eschenmoser-Tanabe fragmentation reaction of the oxidized cholesterol precursor in lipid bilayer membranes. The alkynyl steroid analogue was observed to form liquid-ordered raft-like domains on a model giant-liposome system in a similar manner as cholesterol, and the large alkyne signal of the accumulated probe at 2120 cm−1 was mapped on the microdomains with a Raman microscope. The alkyne moiety of the probe was confirmed to be converted from the α,β-epoxy ketone group of its precursor by reaction with p-toluensulfonyl hydrazine under a mild condition. Through the reaction, the alkyne signal of the probe was activated on the lipid bilayer membrane of liposomes. Furthermore, the signal activation of the probe was also detected on living cells by stimulated Raman scattering microscopy. The ring-A-opened alkyne steroid analogue, thus, provides a first chemically-activatable Raman probe as a promising tool for potentially unravelling the intracellular formation and trafficking of cholesterol-rich microdomains. PMID:28117375

  18. XPEEM valence state imaging of mineral micro-intergrowths with a spatial resolution of 100nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A. D.; Schofield, P. F.; Scholl, A.; Pattrick, R. A. D.; Bridges, J. C.

    2003-03-01

    The crystal chemistry and textural relationships of minerals hold a vast amount of information relating to the formation, history and stability of natural materials. The application of soft X-ray spectroscopy to mineralogical material has revealed that 2p (L{2,3}) spectra provide a sensitive fingerprint of the electronic states of 3d metals. In bulk powdered samples much of the textural and microstructural information is lost, but the area-selectivity capability of X-ray Photo-Emission Electron Microscopy (XPEEM) provides the ability to obtain valence state information from mineral intergrowths with a submicron spatial resolution. Using the state-of-the-art PEEM2 facility on beamline 7.3.1.1 at the Advanced Light Source, Berkeley, USA, a range of minerals, mineral intergrowths and mineralogical textures have been studied for a broad suite of geological, planetary and environmental science materials. High-quality, multi-element valence images have been obtained showing the distribution/variation of the metal valence states across single grains or mineral intergrowths/textures at the l00 nm scale and quantitative valence state ratios can be obtained from areas of 0.01 μ m^2.

  19. The design and imaging characteristics of dynamic, solid-state, flat-panel x-ray image detectors for digital fluoroscopy and fluorography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowen, A R; Davies, A G; Sivananthan, M U

    2008-10-01

    Dynamic, flat-panel, solid-state, x-ray image detectors for use in digital fluoroscopy and fluorography emerged at the turn of the millennium. This new generation of dynamic detectors utilize a thin layer of x-ray absorptive material superimposed upon an electronic active matrix array fabricated in a film of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). Dynamic solid-state detectors come in two basic designs, the indirect-conversion (x-ray scintillator based) and the direct-conversion (x-ray photoconductor based). This review explains the underlying principles and enabling technologies associated with these detector designs, and evaluates their physical imaging characteristics, comparing their performance against the long established x-ray image intensifier television (TV) system. Solid-state detectors afford a number of physical imaging benefits compared with the latter. These include zero geometrical distortion and vignetting, immunity from blooming at exposure highlights and negligible contrast loss (due to internal scatter). They also exhibit a wider dynamic range and maintain higher spatial resolution when imaging over larger fields of view. The detective quantum efficiency of indirect-conversion, dynamic, solid-state detectors is superior to that of both x-ray image intensifier TV systems and direct-conversion detectors. Dynamic solid-state detectors are playing a burgeoning role in fluoroscopy-guided diagnosis and intervention, leading to the displacement of x-ray image intensifier TV-based systems. Future trends in dynamic, solid-state, digital fluoroscopy detectors are also briefly considered. These include the growth in associated three-dimensional (3D) visualization techniques and potential improvements in dynamic detector design.

  20. Electrostatic transition state stabilization rather than reactant destabilization provides the chemical basis for efficient chorismate mutase catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burschowsky, Daniel; van Eerde, André; Ökvist, Mats; Kienhöfer, Alexander; Kast, Peter; Hilvert, Donald; Krengel, Ute

    2014-12-09

    For more than half a century, transition state theory has provided a useful framework for understanding the origins of enzyme catalysis. As proposed by Pauling, enzymes accelerate chemical reactions by binding transition states tighter than substrates, thereby lowering the activation energy compared with that of the corresponding uncatalyzed process. This paradigm has been challenged for chorismate mutase (CM), a well-characterized metabolic enzyme that catalyzes the rearrangement of chorismate to prephenate. Calculations have predicted the decisive factor in CM catalysis to be ground state destabilization rather than transition state stabilization. Using X-ray crystallography, we show, in contrast, that a sluggish variant of Bacillus subtilis CM, in which a cationic active-site arginine was replaced by a neutral citrulline, is a poor catalyst even though it effectively preorganizes chorismate for the reaction. A series of high-resolution molecular snapshots of the reaction coordinate, including the apo enzyme, and complexes with substrate, transition state analog and product, demonstrate that an active site, which is only complementary in shape to a reactive substrate conformer, is insufficient for effective catalysis. Instead, as with other enzymes, electrostatic stabilization of the CM transition state appears to be crucial for achieving high reaction rates.

  1. Step-Scan FTIR spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations of xanthone in the triplet state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschhaus, L.; Kleinermanns, K.

    2014-10-01

    Step-Scan-FTIR spectroscopy has been used to measure the infrared spectrum of xanthone in the triplet state using chloroform as solvent. Xanthone is an important triplet sensitizer and therefore suitable as model system. Xanthone was excited at 266 nm and its IR triplet spectrum measured in the range 1000-1750 cm-1. The spectrum was analyzed by comparison with DFT/B3LYP/TZVP/COSMO calculations. Further on the results were compared to gas phase IR measurements of triplet xanthone and calculations of isolated xanthone. Mainly based on the calculations we tried to identify the geometry changes from the electronic ground state to the first triplet state.

  2. New Approaches For Asteroid Spin State and Shape Modeling From Delay-Doppler Radar Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raissi, Chedy; Lamee, Mehdi; Mosiane, Olorato; Vassallo, Corinne; Busch, Michael W.; Greenberg, Adam; Benner, Lance A. M.; Naidu, Shantanu P.; Duong, Nicholas

    2016-10-01

    Delay-Doppler radar imaging is a powerful technique to characterize the trajectories, shapes, and spin states of near-Earth asteroids; and has yielded detailed models of dozens of objects. Reconstructing objects' shapes and spins from delay-Doppler data is a computationally intensive inversion problem. Since the 1990s, delay-Doppler data has been analyzed using the SHAPE software. SHAPE performs sequential single-parameter fitting, and requires considerable computer runtime and human intervention (Hudson 1993, Magri et al. 2007). Recently, multiple-parameter fitting algorithms have been shown to more efficiently invert delay-Doppler datasets (Greenberg & Margot 2015) - decreasing runtime while improving accuracy. However, extensive human oversight of the shape modeling process is still required. We have explored two new techniques to better automate delay-Doppler shape modeling: Bayesian optimization and a machine-learning neural network.One of the most time-intensive steps of the shape modeling process is to perform a grid search to constrain the target's spin state. We have implemented a Bayesian optimization routine that uses SHAPE to autonomously search the space of spin-state parameters. To test the efficacy of this technique, we compared it to results with human-guided SHAPE for asteroids 1992 UY4, 2000 RS11, and 2008 EV5. Bayesian optimization yielded similar spin state constraints within a factor of 3 less computer runtime.The shape modeling process could be further accelerated using a deep neural network to replace iterative fitting. We have implemented a neural network with a variational autoencoder (VAE), using a subset of known asteroid shapes and a large set of synthetic radar images as inputs to train the network. Conditioning the VAE in this manner allows the user to give the network a set of radar images and get a 3D shape model as an output. Additional development will be required to train a network to reliably render shapes from delay

  3. Solid-state fluoroscopic imager for high-resolution angiography: parallel-cascaded linear systems analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Karellas, Andrew; Suryanarayanan, Sankararaman

    2004-05-01

    Cascaded linear systems based modeling techniques have been used in the past to predict important system parameters that have a direct impact on image quality. Such models are also useful in optimizing system parameters to improve image quality. In this work, detailed analysis of a solid-state fluoroscopic imaging system intended for high-resolution angiography is presented with the use of such a model. The imaging system analyzed through this model uses four 8 x 8 cm three-side buttable interlined charge-coupled devices (CCDs) specifically designed for high-resolution angiography and tiled in a seamless fashion to achieve a field of view (FOV) of 16 x 16 cm. Larger FOVs can be achieved by tiling more CCDs in a similar manner. The system employs a CsI:Tl scintillator coupled to the CCDs by straight (nontapering) fiberoptics and can potentially be operated in 78, 156, or 234 microm pixel pitch modes. The system parameters analyzed through this model include presampling modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). The results of the simulations performed indicate that DQE(0) in excess of 0.6 is achievable, with the imager operating at 156 microm pixel pitch, 30 frames/s, and employing a 450-microm-thick CsI:Tl scintillator, even at a low fluoroscopic exposure rate of 1 microR/frame. Further, at a nominal fluoroscopic exposure rate of 2.5 microR/frame there was no noticeable degradation of the DQE even at the 78 microm pixel pitch mode suggesting that it is feasible to perform high-resolution angiography hitherto unattainable in clinical practice.

  4. Whole-brain perfusion imaging with balanced steady-state free precession arterial spin labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Paul Kyu; Ye, Jong Chul; Kim, Eung Yeop; Choi, Seung Hong; Park, Sung-Hong

    2016-03-01

    Recently, balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) readout has been proposed for arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion imaging to reduce susceptibility artifacts at a relatively high spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). However, the main limitation of bSSFP-ASL is the low spatial coverage. In this work, methods to increase the spatial coverage of bSSFP-ASL are proposed for distortion-free, high-resolution, whole-brain perfusion imaging. Three strategies of (i) segmentation, (ii) compressed sensing (CS) and (iii) a hybrid approach combining the two methods were tested to increase the spatial coverage of pseudo-continuous ASL (pCASL) with three-dimensional bSSFP readout. The spatial coverage was increased by factors of two, four and six using each of the three approaches, whilst maintaining the same total scan time (5.3 min). The number of segments and/or CS acceleration rate (R) correspondingly increased to maintain the same bSSFP readout time (1.2 s). The segmentation approach allowed whole-brain perfusion imaging for pCASL-bSSFP with no penalty in SNR and/or total scan time. The CS approach increased the spatial coverage of pCASL-bSSFP whilst maintaining the temporal resolution, with minimal impact on the image quality. The hybrid approach provided compromised effects between the two methods. Balanced SSFP-based ASL allows the acquisition of perfusion images with wide spatial coverage, high spatial resolution and SNR, and reduced susceptibility artifacts, and thus may become a good choice for clinical and neurological studies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Micro-PIXE for the quantitative imaging of chemical elements in single cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, R. [Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, Gradignan (France)

    2013-07-01

    Full text: The knowledge of the intracellular distribution of biological relevant metals is important to understand their mechanisms of action in cells, either for physiological, toxicological or pathological processes. However, the direct detection of trace metals in single cells is a challenging task that requires sophisticated analytical developments. The aim of this seminar will be to present the recent achievements in this field using micro-PIXE analysis. The combination of micro-PIXE with RBS (Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry) and STIM (Scanning Transmission lon Microscopy) allows the quantitative determination of trace metal content within sub-cellular compartments. The application of STlM analysis will be more specifically highlighted as it provides high spatial resolution imaging (<200 nm) and excellent mass sensitivity (<0.1 ng). Application of the STIM-PIXE-RBS methodology is absolutely needed when organic mass loss appears during PIXE-RBS irradiation. This combination of STIM-PIXE-RBS provides fully quantitative determination of trace element content, expressed in μg/g, which is a quite unique capability for micro-PIXE compared to other micro-analytical methods such as the electron and synchrotron X-ray fluorescence or the techniques based on mass spectrometry. Examples of micro-PIXE studies for subcellular imaging of trace elements in the various fields of interest will be presented such as metal-based toxicology, pharmacology, and neuro degeneration [1] R. Ortega, G. Devés, A. Carmona. J. R. Soc. Interface, 6, (2009) S649-S658. (author)

  6. Physico-chemical characteristics of honey produced by Apis mellifera in the Picos region, state of Piauí, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geni da Silva Sodré

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this research were to determine physico-chemical characteristics of 1,758 Apis mellifera L. honey samples produced by in the productive pole of Picos, state of Piauí, to understand, based on these characteristics, how they are grouped and to determine the percentage of honey that fit the specifications determined by Brazilian legislation. Thirty-five honey samples were collected directly from beekeepers for determination of total sugars, reducing sugars, apparent sucrose, humidity, diastase activity, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF, protein, ash, pH, acidity, formol index, electrical conductivity, viscosity and color. Mean values of each one of the analyzed physico-chemical parameters are within the limits established by the current Brazilian legislation, but it was verified for apparent sacarosis, diastase activity and HMF, values different from the established ones. Protein and HMF were the traits that contributed most for group formation.

  7. Chemical composition of lipids from native and exotic fish in reservoirs of the state of Ceará, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selene Maia de Morais

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Current study analyzes the chemical composition of lipids in fish commonly found in the dams of the state of Ceará, Brazil, namely Pterygoplichthys pardalis (bodó, Hoplias malabaricus (traira, Cichla ocellaris (tucunaré, Prochilodus brevis (curimatã and Oreochomis niloticus (tilapia. The animals were collected during the summer and Folch extraction procedure was used for the extraction of lipids, whilst Iupac methodology (International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry [Iupac], 1987 was used to methylate the fatty acids. Methyl esters were analyzed by GC/MS and the different components in fish oil were identified. Palmitic acid, C16:0 (35.71-45.02%, was the saturated fatty acid with the highest percentage, while oleic acid, C18:1Δ9 (10.62-25.29% had the highest percentage among the unsaturated fatty acids. The chemical composition of analyzed freshwater fish lipids revealed low levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids.

  8. A clickable UTP analog for the posttranscriptional chemical labeling and imaging of RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Anupam A; Mukherjee, Progya P; Jangid, Rahul K; Galande, Sanjeev; Srivatsan, Seergazhi G

    2016-06-28

    The development of robust tools and practical RNA labeling strategies that would facilitate the biophysical analysis of RNA in both cell-free and cellular systems will have profound implications in the discovery of new RNA diagnostic tools and therapeutic strategies. In this context, we describe the development of a new alkyne-modified UTP analog, 5-(1,7-octadinyl)uridine triphosphate (ODUTP), which serves as an efficient substrate for the introduction of a clickable alkyne label into RNA transcripts by bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase and mammalian cellular RNA polymerases. The ODU-labeled RNA is effectively used by reverse transcriptase to produce cDNA, a property which could be utilized in expanding the chemical space of a RNA library in the aptamer selection scheme. Further, the alkyne label on RNA provides a convenient tool for the posttranscriptional chemical functionalization with a variety of biophysical tags (fluorescent, affinity, amino acid and sugar) by using alkyne-azide cycloaddition reaction. Importantly, the ability of endogenous RNA polymerases to specifically incorporate ODUTP into cellular RNA transcripts enabled the visualization of newly transcribing RNA in cells by microscopy using click reactions. In addition to a clickable alkyne group, ODU contains a Raman scattering label (internal disubstituted alkyne), which exhibits characteristic Raman shifts that fall in the Raman-silent region of cells. Our results indicate that an ODU label could potentially facilitate two-channel visualization of RNA in cells by using click chemistry and Raman spectroscopy. Taken together, ODU represents a multipurpose ribonucleoside tool, which is expected to provide new avenues to study RNA in cell-free and cellular systems.

  9. Photoswitchable Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast by Improved Light-Driven Coordination-Induced Spin State Switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dommaschk, Marcel; Peters, Morten; Gutzeit, Florian; Schütt, Christian; Näther, Christian; Sönnichsen, Frank D; Tiwari, Sanjay; Riedel, Christian; Boretius, Susann; Herges, Rainer

    2015-06-24

    We present a fully reversible and highly efficient on-off photoswitching of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast with green (500 nm) and violet-blue (435 nm) light. The contrast change is based on intramolecular light-driven coordination-induced spin state switch (LD-CISSS), performed with azopyridine-substituted Ni-porphyrins. The relaxation time of the solvent protons in 3 mM solutions of the azoporphyrins in DMSO was switched between 3.5 and 1.7 s. The relaxivity of the contrast agent changes by a factor of 6.7. No fatigue or side reaction was observed, even after >100,000 switching cycles in air at room temperature. Electron-donating substituents at the pyridine improve the LD-CISSS in two ways: better photostationary states are achieved, and intramolecular binding is enhanced.

  10. A chemically modified [alpha]-amylase with a molten-globule state has entropically driven enhanced thermal stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siddiqui, Khawar Sohail; Poljak, Anne; De Francisci, Davide; Guerriero, Gea; Pilak, Oliver; Burg, Dominic; Raftery, Mark J.; Parkin, Don M.; Trewhella, Jill; Cavicchioli, Ricardo (Sydney); (New South)

    2010-11-15

    The thermostability properties of TAA were investigated by chemically modifying carboxyl groups on the surface of the enzyme with AMEs. The TAA{sub MOD} exhibited a 200% improvement in starch-hydrolyzing productivity at 60 C. By studying the kinetic, thermodynamic and biophysical properties, we found that TAA{sub MOD} had formed a thermostable, MG state, in which the unfolding of the tertiary structure preceded that of the secondary structure by at least 20 C. The X-ray crystal structure of TAA{sub MOD} revealed no new permanent interactions (electrostatic or other) resulting from the modification. By deriving thermodynamic activation parameters of TAA{sub MOD}, we rationalised that thermostabilisation have been caused by a decrease in the entropy of the transition state, rather than being enthalpically driven. Far-UV CD shows that the origin of decreased entropy may have arisen from a higher helical content of TAA{sub MOD}. This study provides new insight into the intriguing properties of an MG state resulting from the chemical modification of TAA.

  11. Steady-state equation of water vapor sorption for CaCl2-based chemical sorbents and its application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haiquan; Yuan, Yanping; Sun, Qingrong; Cao, Xiaoling; Sun, Liangliang

    2016-09-01

    Green CaCl2-based chemical sorbent has been widely used in sorption refrigeration, air purification and air desiccation. Methods to improve the sorption rate have been extensively investigated, but the corresponding theoretical formulations have not been reported. In this paper, a sorption system of solid-liquid coexistence is established based on the hypothesis of steady-state sorption. The combination of theoretical analysis and experimental results indicates that the system can be described by steady-state sorption process. The steady-state sorption equation, μ = (η - γT) , was obtained in consideration of humidity, temperature and the surface area. Based on engineering applications and this equation, two methods including an increase of specific surface area and adjustment of the critical relative humidity (γ) for chemical sorbents, have been proposed to increase the sorption rate. The results indicate that the CaCl2/CNTs composite with a large specific surface area can be obtained by coating CaCl2 powder on the surface of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The composite reached sorption equilibrium within only 4 h, and the sorption capacity was improved by 75% compared with pure CaCl2 powder. Furthermore, the addition of NaCl powder to saturated CaCl2 solution could significantly lower the solution’s γ. The sorption rate was improved by 30% under the same environment.

  12. Steady-state equation of water vapor sorption for CaCl2-based chemical sorbents and its application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haiquan; Yuan, Yanping; Sun, Qingrong; Cao, Xiaoling; Sun, Liangliang

    2016-01-01

    Green CaCl2-based chemical sorbent has been widely used in sorption refrigeration, air purification and air desiccation. Methods to improve the sorption rate have been extensively investigated, but the corresponding theoretical formulations have not been reported. In this paper, a sorption system of solid-liquid coexistence is established based on the hypothesis of steady-state sorption. The combination of theoretical analysis and experimental results indicates that the system can be described by steady-state sorption process. The steady-state sorption equation, μ = (η − γT) , was obtained in consideration of humidity, temperature and the surface area. Based on engineering applications and this equation, two methods including an increase of specific surface area and adjustment of the critical relative humidity (γ) for chemical sorbents, have been proposed to increase the sorption rate. The results indicate that the CaCl2/CNTs composite with a large specific surface area can be obtained by coating CaCl2 powder on the surface of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The composite reached sorption equilibrium within only 4 h, and the sorption capacity was improved by 75% compared with pure CaCl2 powder. Furthermore, the addition of NaCl powder to saturated CaCl2 solution could significantly lower the solution’s γ. The sorption rate was improved by 30% under the same environment. PMID:27682811

  13. Evaluation of a rabbit model for osteomyelitis by high field, high resolution imaging using the chemical-shift-specific-slice-selection technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, A; Crémieux, A C; Belmatoug, N; Vallois, J M; Pocidalo, J J; Carbon, C

    1994-01-01

    The rabbit model of osteomyelitis introduced by C.W. Norden, based on injection of an infecting solution (Staphylococcus aureus, sodium morrhuate) into the tibia, was studied at 4.7 Tesla with a time-efficient chemical shift selective imaging technique, Chemical Shift Specific Slice Selection (C4S). The evolution of the disease over several weeks was followed on water-selective, fat-selective, and sum images obtained simultaneously with this imaging sequence. Experiments were performed either on different groups of rabbits at different times after infection with subsequent sacrifice of the animal and microbiological analysis of the infected tibia or on the same group of animals imaged several times after infection. Associated analysis of the water and fat selective images revealed marrow modifications very early (Day 5 after inoculation) demonstrating the high sensitivity of the employed imaging technique. Later on, bone modifications were best identified on the sum images. Additional experiments performed on animals injected with a noninfecting solution containing only sodium morrhuate showed however that the sclerosing agent alone can yield images similar to those produced by infection at early stages after inoculation. Therefore, the Norden model would not be suitable for monitoring quantitatively outcome of therapy by magnetic resonance imaging. It is however well adapted for the evaluation and optimization of MRI techniques or protocols intended to detect early changes of bone marrow produced by septic or aseptic infarct.

  14. Near-infrared chemical imaging used for in-line analysis of inside adhesive layers in textile laminates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirschel, Gabriele; Daikos, Olesya; Scherzer, Tom; Steckert, Carsten

    2016-08-17

    This paper demonstrates for the first time that near-infrared (NIR) chemical imaging can be used for in-line analysis of textile lamination processes. In particular, it was applied for the quantitative determination of the applied coating weight and for monitoring of the spatial distribution of hot melt adhesive layers using chemometric approaches for spectra evaluation. Layers with coating weights between about 25 and 130 g m(-2) were used for the lamination of polyester fabrics and nonwovens as well as for polyurethane foam. It was shown that quantitative data with adequate precision can be actually obtained for layers applied to materials with significantly heterogeneous surface structure such as foam or for hidden layers inside fabric laminates. Even the coating weight and the homogeneity of adhesive layers in composites consisting of black textiles only could be quantitatively analyzed. The prediction errors (RMSEP) determined in an external validation of each calibration model were found to range from about 2 g m(-2) to 6 g m(-2) depending on the specific system under investigation. All calibration models were applied for chemical imaging in order to prove their performance for monitoring the thickness and the homogeneity of adhesive layers in the various textile systems. Moreover, they were used for the detection of irregularities and coating defects. Investigations were carried out with a large hyperspectral camera mounted above a conveyor. Therefore, this method allows large-area monitoring of the properties of laminar materials. Consequently, it is potentially suited for process and quality control during the lamination of fabrics, foams and other materials in field-scale.

  15. Visualization and understanding of the granulation liquid mixing and distribution during continuous twin screw granulation using NIR chemical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercruysse, Jurgen; Toiviainen, Maunu; Fonteyne, Margot; Helkimo, Niko; Ketolainen, Jarkko; Juuti, Mikko; Delaet, Urbain; Van Assche, Ivo; Remon, Jean Paul; Vervaet, Chris; De Beer, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    Over the last decade, there has been increased interest in the application of twin screw granulation as a continuous wet granulation technique for pharmaceutical drug formulations. However, the mixing of granulation liquid and powder material during the short residence time inside the screw chamber and the atypical particle size distribution (PSD) of granules produced by twin screw granulation is not yet fully understood. Therefore, this study aims at visualizing the granulation liquid mixing and distribution during continuous twin screw granulation using NIR chemical imaging. In first instance, the residence time of material inside the barrel was investigated as function of screw speed and moisture content followed by the visualization of the granulation liquid distribution as function of different formulation and process parameters (liquid feed rate, liquid addition method, screw configuration, moisture content and barrel filling degree). The link between moisture uniformity and granule size distributions was also studied. For residence time analysis, increased screw speed and lower moisture content resulted to a shorter mean residence time and narrower residence time distribution. Besides, the distribution of granulation liquid was more homogenous at higher moisture content and with more kneading zones on the granulator screws. After optimization of the screw configuration, a two-level full factorial experimental design was performed to evaluate the influence of moisture content, screw speed and powder feed rate on the mixing efficiency of the powder and liquid phase. From these results, it was concluded that only increasing the moisture content significantly improved the granulation liquid distribution. This study demonstrates that NIR chemical imaging is a fast and adequate measurement tool for allowing process visualization and hence for providing better process understanding of a continuous twin screw granulation system.

  16. Temporal variation of chemical and mechanical weathering in NE Iceland: Evaluation of a steady-state model of erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiriksdottir, E. S.; Louvat, P.; Gislason, S. R.; Óskarsson, N.; Hardardóttir, J.

    2008-07-01

    This study critically assesses the temporal sensitivity of the steady-state model of erosion that has been applied to chemical and mechanical weathering studies of volcanic islands and the continents, using only one sample from each catchment. The model assumes a geochemical mass balance between the initially unweathered rock of a drainage basin and the dissolved and solid loads of the river. Chemical composition of 178 samples of suspended and dissolved inorganic river constituents, collected in 1998-2002, were studied from five basaltic river catchments in NE Iceland. The Hydrological Service in Iceland has monitored the discharge and the total suspended inorganic matter concentration (SIM) of the glacial rivers for ~ four decades, making it possible to compare modelled and measured SIM fluxes. Concentration of SIM and grain size increased with discharge. As proportion of clay size particles in the SIM samples increased, concentrations of insoluble elements increased and of soluble decreased. The highest proportion of altered basaltic glass was in the clay size particles. The concentration ratio of insoluble elements in the SIM was used along with data on chemical composition of unweathered rocks (high-Mg basalts, tholeiites, rhyolites) to calculate the pristine composition of the original catchment rocks. The calculated rhyolite proportions compare nicely with area-weighted average proportions, from geological maps of these catchments. The calculated composition of the unweathered bedrock was used in the steady-state model, together with the chemical composition of the suspended and dissolved constituents of the river. Seasonal changes in dissolved constituent concentrations resulted in too low modelled concentrations of SIM mod at high discharge (and too high SIM mod at low discharge). Samples collected at annual average river dissolved load yielded SIM mod concentrations close to the measured ones. According to the model, the studied rivers had specific

  17. Noise-induced modulation of the relaxation kinetics around a non-equilibrium steady state of non-linear chemical reaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswamy, Rajesh; Sbalzarini, Ivo F; González-Segredo, Nélido

    2011-01-28

    Stochastic effects from correlated noise non-trivially modulate the kinetics of non-linear chemical reaction networks. This is especially important in systems where reactions are confined to small volumes and reactants are delivered in bursts. We characterise how the two noise sources confinement and burst modulate the relaxation kinetics of a non-linear reaction network around a non-equilibrium steady state. We find that the lifetimes of species change with burst input and confinement. Confinement increases the lifetimes of all species that are involved in any non-linear reaction as a reactant. Burst monotonically increases or decreases lifetimes. Competition between burst-induced and confinement-induced modulation may hence lead to a non-monotonic modulation. We quantify lifetime as the integral of the time autocorrelation function (ACF) of concentration fluctuations around a non-equilibrium steady state of the reaction network. Furthermore, we look at the first and second derivatives of the ACF, each of which is affected in opposite ways by burst and confinement. This allows discriminating between these two noise sources. We analytically derive the ACF from the linear Fokker-Planck approximation of the chemical master equation in order to establish a baseline for the burst-induced modulation at low confinement. Effects of higher confinement are then studied using a partial-propensity stochastic simulation algorithm. The results presented here may help understand the mechanisms that deviate stochastic kinetics from its deterministic counterpart. In addition, they may be instrumental when using fluorescence-lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) or fluorescence-correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to measure confinement and burst in systems with known reaction rates, or, alternatively, to correct for the effects of confinement and burst when experimentally measuring reaction rates.

  18. Time-resolved Chemical Imaging of Molecules by High-order Harmonics and Ultrashort Rescattering Electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chii Dong [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States)

    2016-03-21

    Directly monitoring atomic motion during a molecular transformation with atomic-scale spatio-temporal resolution is a frontier of ultrafast optical science and physical chemistry. Here we provide the foundation for a new imaging method, fixed-angle broadband laser-induced electron scattering, based on structural retrieval by direct one-dimensional Fourier transform of a photoelectron energy distribution observed along the polarization direction of an intense ultrafast light pulse. The approach exploits the scattering of a broadband wave packet created by strong-field tunnel ionization to self-interrogate the molecular structure with picometre spatial resolution and bond specificity. With its inherent femtosecond resolution, combining our technique with molecular alignment can, in principle, provide the basis for time-resolved tomography for multi-dimensional transient structural determination.

  19. Chemical design of nanoprobes for T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Kang Peng

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, which offers a number of advantages such as unlimited tissue penetration, zero ionizing radiation, and a noninvasive nature, has received considerable attention over the past two decades as a technique for clinical diagnosis. To improve imaging sensitivity, contrast agents have been employed to accelerate the relaxation rate of water molecules and thus to increase the contrast between specific tissues or organs of interest. However, conventional contrast agents such as Gd3+-based T1 complexes and iron oxide nanoparticle-based T2 contrast agents have been proven to have adverse effects. The former may cause fatal nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF and difficulty in metabolism, while the latter is less sensitive due to the background interference. Also, their development has been well documented. Therefore, the orientation of this review will be geared toward the newly developed nanoparticulate agents that serve as better alternatives. In this regard, the recent advances on various nanostructured Mn/Fe-based T1 contrast agents seem to fit these categories. As they reveal longer circulation half-life and better biocompatibility, they have demonstrated themselves as a promising T1 candidate for MRI. The focus of this review will be on the preparation and fabrication of T1 contrast agents that contain mainly paramagnetic manganese and iron ions, with special attention being paid to the growth mechanism. Additional emphasis is also put on their progressive development in an aim to overcome the drawbacks of classical iron oxide nanoparticle-based T2 and Gd3+-based T1 contrast agents. Representative applications in vitro and in vivo will be presented for this new generation of contrast agents. The pros and cons of each case are also briefly summarized.

  20. In vivo chemical exchange saturation transfer imaging allows early detection of a therapeutic response in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagiyama, Koji; Mashimo, Tomoyuki; Togao, Osamu; Vemireddy, Vamsidhara; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J; Maher, Elizabeth A; Mickey, Bruce E; Pan, Edward; Sherry, A Dean; Bachoo, Robert M; Takahashi, Masaya

    2014-03-25

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), which account for more than 50% of all gliomas, is among the deadliest of all human cancers. Given the dismal prognosis of GBM, it would be advantageous to identify early biomarkers of a response to therapy to avoid continuing ineffective treatments and to initiate other therapeutic strategies. The present in vivo longitudinal study in an orthotopic mouse model demonstrates quantitative assessment of early treatment response during short-term chemotherapy with temozolomide (TMZ) by amide proton transfer (APT) imaging. In a GBM line, only one course of TMZ (3 d exposure and 4 d rest) at a dose of 80 mg/kg resulted in substantial reduction in APT signal compared with untreated control animals, in which the APT signal continued to increase. Although there were no detectable differences in tumor volume, cell density, or apoptosis rate between groups, levels of Ki67 (index of cell proliferation) were substantially reduced in treated tumors. In another TMZ-resistant GBM line, the APT signal and levels of Ki67 increased despite the same course of TMZ treatment. As metabolite changes are known to occur early in the time course of chemotherapy and precede morphologic changes, these results suggest that the APT signal in glioma may be a useful functional biomarker of treatment response or degree of tumor progression. Thus, APT imaging may serve as a sensitive biomarker of early treatment response and could potentially replace invasive biopsies to provide a definitive diagnosis. This would have a major impact on the clinical management of patients with glioma.

  1. State-space blur model for high-speed forward-moving imaging system and its recursive restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Fengmei; Chen, Xichun; Jin, Weiqi

    2007-01-01

    When an imaging system is approaching the object at a high speed, because of the existence of integration time, the images obtained are always blurred radially. Since the degradation process is space variant, this kind of blur is difficult to handle, traditional frequency domain techniques can't be applied here. Obviously, the radially blurred image obtained is rotation symmetrical, so the usual uniformly sampled image can be resampled with fan-shaped grids, and the gray level of these new sampling points build up a new image matrix. The new image matrix's columns and rows are never the edges of the image, but the image's radius and angle. So, the original two-dimensional problem is simplified. Even after the resampling, the blur is still space variant, and the PSF (point spread function) will change along the radius direction. So the authors come up with a state-space method, a state-space blur model is constructed, which handles the problem recursively. To restore the degraded image simply means to find the inverse of the degradation system and computer simulation result shows the restoration algorithm restored the radially blurred image approvingly.

  2. Imaging the He2 quantum halo state using a free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, Stefan; Kunitski, Maksim; Voigtsberger, Jörg; Kalinin, Anton; Schottelius, Alexander; Schober, Carl; Waitz, Markus; Sann, Hendrik; Hartung, Alexander; Bauer, Tobias; Pitzer, Martin; Trinter, Florian; Goihl, Christoph; Janke, Christian; Richter, Martin; Kastirke, Gregor; Weller, Miriam; Czasch, Achim; Kitzler, Markus; Braune, Markus; Grisenti, Robert E.; Schöllkopf, Wieland; Schmidt, Lothar Ph. H.; Schöffler, Markus S.; Williams, Joshua B.; Jahnke, Till; Dörner, Reinhard

    2016-12-01

    Quantum tunneling is a ubiquitous phenomenon in nature and crucial for many technological applications. It allows quantum particles to reach regions in space which are energetically not accessible according to classical mechanics. In this “tunneling region,” the particle density is known to decay exponentially. This behavior is universal across all energy scales from nuclear physics to chemistry and solid state systems. Although typically only a small fraction of a particle wavefunction extends into the tunneling region, we present here an extreme quantum system: a gigantic molecule consisting of two helium atoms, with an 80% probability that its two nuclei will be found in this classical forbidden region. This circumstance allows us to directly image the exponentially decaying density of a tunneling particle, which we achieved for over two orders of magnitude. Imaging a tunneling particle shows one of the few features of our world that is truly universal: the probability to find one of the constituents of bound matter far away is never zero but decreases exponentially. The results were obtained by Coulomb explosion imaging using a free electron laser and furthermore yielded He2’s binding energy of 151.9±13.3151.9±13.3 neV, which is in agreement with most recent calculations.

  3. Sulfur and ash reduction potential and selected chemical and physical properties of United States coals. [Contains glossary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavallaro, J.A.; Deurbrouck, A.W.; Killmeyer, R.P.; Fuchs, W. (USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (USA). Coal Preparation Div.); Jacobsen, P.S. (Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (USA))

    1991-02-01

    This report presents the washability and comprehensive characterization results of 184 raw coal channel samples, including anthracite, bituminous and lignite coals, collected from the Central Region of the United States. This is the second of a three volume report on the coals of the United States. All the data are presented in six appendices. Statistical techniques and definitions are presented in Appendix A, and a glossary of terms is presented in Appendix B. The complete washability data and an in-depth characterization of each sample are presented alphabetically by state in Appendix C. In Appendix D, a statistical evaluation is given for the composited washability data, selected chemical and physical properties and washability data interpolated at various levels of Btu recovery. This presentation is shown by state, section, and region where four or more samples were collected. Appendix E presents coalbed codes and names for the Central Region coals. Graphical summations are presented by state, section and region showing the effects of crushing on impurity reductions, and the distribution of raw and clean coal samples meeting various levels of SO{sub 2} emissions. 35 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Sulfur and ash reduction potential and selected chemical and physical properties of United States coals. [Contains glossary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavallaro, J.A.; Deurbrouck, A.W.; Killmeyer, R.P.; Fuchs, W. (USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (USA)); Jacobsen, P.S. (Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (USA))

    1990-01-01

    This report presents the washability and comprehensive characterization results of 543 raw coal samples collected from the Eastern Region of the United States. This is the first volume of a three-volume report on the coals of the United States. All the data are presented in six appendices. Statistical techniques and definitions are presented in Appendix A, and a glossary of terms is presented in Appendix B. The complete washability data and an in- depth characterization of each sample are presented alphbetically by state in Appendix C. In Appendix D, a statistical evaluation is given for the composited washability data, selected chemical and physical properties, and washability data interpolated at various levels of Btu recovery. This presentation is shown by state, section, and region where four or more samples were collected. Appendix E presents coalbed codes and names for the Eastern Region coals. Graphical summations are presented by state, section, and region showing the effects of crushing on impurity reductions, and the distribution of raw and clean coal samples meeting various levels of SO{sub 2} emissions. 14 refs., 27 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Functional imaging of skeletal muscle fiber in different physiological states by second harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nucciotti, V.; Stringari, C.; Sacconi, L.; Vanzi, F.; Tesi, C.; Piroddi, N.; Poggesi, C.; Castiglioni, C.; Milani, A.; Linari, M.; Piazzesi, G.; Lombardi, V.; Pavone, F. S.

    2007-07-01

    The intrinsically ordered arrays of proteins in skeletal muscle allows imaging of this tissue by Second Harmonic Generation (SHG). Biochemical and colocalization studies have gathered an increasing wealth of clues for the attribution of the molecular origin of the muscle SHG signal to the motor protein myosin. Thus, SHG represents a potentially very powerful tool in the investigation of structural dynamics occurring in muscle during active production of force. A full characterization of the polarization-dependence of the SHG signal represents a very selective information on the orientation of the emitting proteins and their dynamics during contraction, provided that different physiological states of muscle (relaxed, rigor and active) exhibit distinct patterns of SHG polarization dependence. Here polarization data are obtained from single frog muscle fibers at rest and during isometric contraction and interpreted, by means of a model, in terms of an average orientation of the SHG emitters which are structured with a cylindrical symmetry about the fiber axis. Optimizing the setup for accurate polarization measurements with SHG, we developed a line scan imaging method allowing measurement of SHG polarization curves in different physiological states. We demonstrate that muscle fiber displays a measurable variation of the orientation of SHG emitters with the transition from rest to isometric contraction.

  6. Equation-of-State Measurements of Resorcinol Formaldehyde Foam Using Imaging X-Ray Thomson Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belancourt, Patrick; Theobald, W.; Keiter, P. A.; Collins, T. J. B.; Bonino, M. J.; Kozlowski, P.; Drake, R. P.

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the equation of state of materials under shocked conditions is important for laboratory astrophysics and high-energy-density physics experiments. This talk will focus on experiments dedicated to developing a platform for measuring the equation of state of shocked foams on OMEGA EP. The foam used in the development of this platform is resorcinol formaldehyde foam with an initial density of 0.34 g/cc. One OMEGA EP beam drives a shock into the foam, while the remaining three beams irradiate a nickel foil to create the x-ray backlighter. The primary diagnostic for this platform, the imaging x-ray Thomson spectrometer (IXTS), spectrally resolves the scattered x-ray beam while imaging in one spatial dimension. The IXTS is ideally suited to measure plasma conditions upstream, downstream and at the shock front in the foam. Preliminary results from these experiments will be shown. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944, the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas DE-NA0001840, and by the National Laser User Facility Program DE-NA0000850.

  7. Preliminary results of equation of state measurements using imaging x-ray Thomson spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belancourt, Patrick; Theobald, Wolfgang; Keiter, Paul; Collins, Timothy; Bonino, Mark; Kozlowski, Pawel; Drake, Paul; University of Michigan Team; LaboratoryLaser Energetics Team; University of Oxford Team

    2014-10-01

    Understanding the equation of state of materials under shocked conditions is important for laboratory astrophysics and high-energy-density physics experiments. The goal of the experiments discussed here is to create a platform for equation of state measurements in shocked foams on Omega EP. The target of interest for these experiments is shocked carbonized resorcinol formaldehyde foam with an initial density of 0.34 g/cc. Lasers irradiate an ablator, driving a shock into the foam. Plasma conditions ahead of the shock, at the shock and behind the shock are diagnosed using the imaging x-ray Thomson spectrometer (IXTS). The IXTS is capable of spectrally resolving the scattered x-ray beam while imaging in one spatial dimension. Preliminary results from these experiments will be shown. This work is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, through the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, grant number DE-NA0001840, and the National Laser User Facility Program, Grant Number DE-NA0000850, and through the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester by the NNSA/OICF under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC52-08NA28302.

  8. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging for language preoperative planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo eBranco

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Functional magnetic resonance imaging, fMRI, is a well-known non-invasive technique for the study of brain function. One of its most common clinical applications is preoperative language mapping, essential for the preservation of function in neurosurgical patients. Typically, fMRI is used to track task-related activity, but poor task performance and movement artefacts can be critical limitations in clinical settings. Recent advances in resting-state protocols open new possibilities for pre-surgical mapping of language potentially overcoming these limitations. To test the feasibility of using resting-state fMRI instead of conventional active task-based protocols, we compared results from fifteen patients with brain lesions while performing a verb-to-noun generation task and while at rest. Task-activity was measured using a general linear model analysis and independent component analysis (ICA. Resting-state networks were extracted using ICA and further classified in two ways: manually by an expert and by using an automated template matching procedure. The results revealed that the automated classification procedure correctly identified language networks as compared to the expert manual classification. We found a good overlay between task-related activity and resting state language maps, particularly within the language regions of interest. Furthermore, resting-state language maps were as sensitive as task-related maps, and had higher specificity. Our findings suggest that resting-state protocols may be suitable to map language networks in a quick and clinically efficient way.

  9. CMOS image sensor with organic photoconductive layer having narrow absorption band and proposal of stack type solid-state image sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Shunji; Ihama, Mikio; Inuiya, Masafumi

    2006-02-01

    Digital still cameras overtook film cameras in Japanese market in 2000 in terms of sales volume owing to their versatile functions. However, the image-capturing capabilities such as sensitivity and latitude of color films are still superior to those of digital image sensors. In this paper, we attribute the cause for the high performance of color films to their multi-layered structure, and propose the solid-state image sensors with stacked organic photoconductive layers having narrow absorption bands on CMOS read-out circuits.

  10. Chemical Biology in the Embryo: In Situ Imaging of Sulfur Biochemistry in Normal and Proteoglycan-Deficient Cartilage Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, Mark J; George, Graham N; Pickering, Ingrid J; Eames, B Frank

    2016-05-01

    Proteoglycans (PGs) are heavily glycosylated proteins that play major structural and biological roles in many tissues. Proteoglycans are abundant in cartilage extracellular matrix; their loss is a main feature of the joint disease osteoarthritis. Proteoglycan function is regulated by sulfation-sulfate ester formation with specific sugar residues. Visualization of sulfation within cartilage matrix would yield vital insights into its biological roles. We present synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence imaging of developing zebrafish cartilage, providing the first in situ maps of sulfate ester distribution. Levels of both sulfur and sulfate esters decrease as cartilage develops through late phase differentiation (maturation or hypertrophy), suggesting a functional link between cartilage matrix sulfur content and chondrocyte differentiation. Genetic experiments confirm that sulfate ester levels were due to cartilage proteoglycans and support the hypothesis that sulfate ester levels regulate chondrocyte differentiation. Surprisingly, in the PG synthesis mutant, the total level of sulfur was not significantly reduced, suggesting sulfur is distributed in an alternative chemical form during lowered cartilage proteoglycan production. Fourier transform infrared imaging indicated increased levels of protein in the mutant fish, suggesting that this alternative sulfur form might be ascribed to an increased level of protein synthesis in the mutant fish, as part of a compensatory mechanism.

  11. Recycling-oriented characterization of plastic frames and printed circuit boards from mobile phones by electronic and chemical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Roberta; Bonifazi, Giuseppe; Serranti, Silvia

    2014-11-01

    This study characterizes the composition of plastic frames and printed circuit boards from end-of-life mobile phones. This knowledge may help define an optimal processing strategy for using these items as potential raw materials. Correct handling of such a waste is essential for its further "sustainable" recovery, especially to maximize the extraction of base, rare and precious metals, minimizing the environmental impact of the entire process chain. A combination of electronic and chemical imaging techniques was thus examined, applied and critically evaluated in order to optimize the processing, through the identification and the topological assessment of the materials of interest and their quantitative distribution. To reach this goal, end-of-life mobile phone derived wastes have been systematically characterized adopting both "traditional" (e.g. scanning electronic microscopy combined with microanalysis and Raman spectroscopy) and innovative (e.g. hyperspectral imaging in short wave infrared field) techniques, with reference to frames and printed circuit boards. Results showed as the combination of both the approaches (i.e. traditional and classical) could dramatically improve recycling strategies set up, as well as final products recovery.

  12. Interrogation of living myocardium in multiple static deformation states with diffusion tensor and diffusion spectrum imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohezic, Maelene; Teh, Irvin; Bollensdorff, Christian; Peyronnet, Rémi; Hales, Patrick W; Grau, Vicente; Kohl, Peter; Schneider, Jürgen E

    2014-08-01

    Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) reveals valuable insights into tissue histo-anatomy and microstructure, and has steadily gained traction in the cardiac community. Its wider use in small animal cardiac imaging in vivo has been constrained by its extreme sensitivity to motion, exaggerated by the high heart rates usually seen in rodents. Imaging of the isolated heart eliminates respiratory motion and, if conducted on arrested hearts, cardiac pulsation. This serves as an important intermediate step for basic and translational studies. However, investigating the micro-structural basis of cardiac deformation in the same heart requires observations in different deformation states. Here, we illustrate the imaging of isolated rat hearts in three mechanical states mimicking diastole (cardioplegic arrest), left-ventricular (LV) volume overload (cardioplegic arrest plus LV balloon inflation), and peak systole (lithium-induced contracture). An optimised MRI-compatible Langendorff perfusion setup with the radio-frequency (RF) coil integrated into the wet chamber was developed for use in a 9.4T horizontal bore scanner. Signal-to-noise ratio improved significantly, by 75% compared to a previous design with external RF coil, and stability tests showed no significant changes in mean T1, T2 or LV wall thickness over a 170 min period. In contracture, we observed a significant reduction in mean fractional anisotropy from 0.32 ± 0.02 to 0.28 ± 0.02, as well as a significant rightward shift in helix angles with a decrease in the proportion of left-handed fibres, as referring to the locally prevailing cell orientation in the heart, from 24.9% to 23.3%, and an increase in the proportion of right-handed fibres from 25.5% to 28.4%. LV overload, in contrast, gave rise to a decrease in the proportion of left-handed fibres from 24.9% to 21.4% and an increase in the proportion of right-handed fibres from 25.5% to 26.0%. The modified perfusion and coil setup offers

  13. Phytoestrogens in postmenopause: the state of the art from a chemical, pharmacological and regulatory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poluzzi, Elisabetta; Piccinni, Carlo; Raschi, Emanuel; Rampa, Angela; Recanatini, Maurizio; De Ponti, Fabrizio

    2014-01-01

    Phytoestrogens represent a diverse group of non-steroidal natural products, which seem to have some oestrogenic effects and are often marketed as food supplements. Population exposed to phytoestrogens is potentially increasing, in part because an unfavourable risk-benefit profile of Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) for prolonged treatments (e.g., osteoporosis prevention) highlighted by the publication of the Women Health Initiative (WHI) trial in 2002, but also because many post-menopausal women often perceived phytoestrogens in food supplements as a safer alternative than HRT. Despite of increasing preclinical and clinical studies in the past decade, appealing evidence is still lacking to support the overall positive risk-benefit profile of phytoestrogens. Their status as food supplements seems to discourage studies to obtain new evidence, and the chance to buy them by user's initiative make it difficult to survey their prevalence and pattern of use. The aim of the present review is to: (a) outline the clinical scenario underlying the increased interest on phytoestrogens, by overviewing the evolution of the evidence on HRT and its main therapeutic goals (e.g., menopausal symptoms relief, chemoprevention, osteoporosis prevention); (b) address the chemical and pharmacological features (e.g. chemical structure, botanical sources, mechanism of action) of the main compounds (e.g., isoflavones, lignans, coumestans); (c) describe the clinical evidence on potential therapeutic applications; (d) put available evidence on their riskbenefit profile in a regulatory perspective, in light of the recent regulation on health claims of food supplements.

  14. On the binary helium star DY Centauri: chemical composition and evolutionary state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, Gajendra; Rao, N. Kameswara [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore 560034 (India); Jeffery, C. Simon [Armagh Observatory, Collage Hill, Armagh BT61 9DG (United Kingdom); Lambert, David L., E-mail: pandey@iiap.res.in, E-mail: nkrao@iiap.res.in, E-mail: csj@arm.ac.uk, E-mail: dll@astro.as.utexas.edu [The W. J. McDonald Observatory and Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712-1083 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    DY Cen has shown a steady fading of its visual light by about one magnitude in the last 40 yr, suggesting a secular increase in its effective temperature. We have conducted non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and LTE abundance analyses to determine the star's effective temperature, surface gravity, and chemical composition using high-resolution spectra obtained over two decades. The derived stellar parameters for three epochs suggest that DY Cen has evolved at a constant luminosity and has become hotter by about 5000 K in 23 yr. We show that the derived abundances remain unchanged for the three epochs. The derived abundances of the key elements, including F and Ne, are as observed for the extreme helium stars resulting from a merger of a He white dwarf with a C-O white dwarf. Thus DY Cen by chemical composition appears to also be a product of a merger of two white dwarfs. This appearance seems to be at odds with the recent suggestion that DY Cen is a single-lined spectroscopic binary.

  15. Chemical vapor transport and solid-state exchange synthesis of new copper selenite bromides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charkin, Dmitri O.; Kayukov, Roman A.; Zagidullin, Karim A.; Siidra, Oleg I.

    2017-02-01

    A new dimorphic copper selenite bromide, Cu5(SeO3)4Br2 was obtained via chemical transport reactions. α-Cu5(SeO3)4Br2, monoclinic (1m) and β-Cu5(SeO3)4Br2, triclinic (1a) polymorphs were produced simultaneously upon reaction of amorphous, partially dehydrated copper selenite and copper bromide. 1m is similar to Cu5(SeO3)4Cl2, whereas 1a is distantly related to Ni5(SeO3)4Br2 and Co5(SeO3)4Br2. Attempts to reproduce synthesis of 1a via exchange reaction between Na2SeO3 and CuBr2 resulted in a new Na2[Cu7O2](SeO3)4Br4 (2). Current study demonstrates for the first time, that both chemical vapor and exchange reactions can be employed in preparation of new selenite halides.

  16. Microsolvated transition state models for improved insight into chemical properties and reaction mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunoj, Raghavan B; Anand, Megha

    2012-10-05

    Over the years, several methods have been developed to effectively represent the chemical behavior of solutes in solvents. The environmental effects arising due to solvation can generally be achieved either through inclusion of discrete solvent molecules or by inscribing into a cavity in a homogeneous and continuum dielectric medium. In both these approaches of computational origin, the perturbations on the solute induced by the surrounding solvent are at the focus of the problem. While the rigor and method of inclusion of solvent effects vary, such solvation models have found widespread applications, as evident from modern chemical literature. A hybrid method, commonly referred to as cluster-continuum model (CCM), brings together the key advantages of discrete and continuum models. In this perspective, we intend to highlight the latent potential of CCM toward obtaining accurate estimates on a number of properties as well as reactions of contemporary significance. The objective has generally been achieved by choosing illustrative examples from the literature, besides expending efforts to bring out the complementary advantages of CCM as compared to continuum or discrete solvation models. The majority of examples emanate from the prevalent applications of CCM to organic reactions, although a handful of interesting organometallic reactions have also been discussed. In addition, increasingly accurate computations of properties like pK(a) and solvation of ions obtained using the CCM protocol are also presented.

  17. Rational chemical design of the next generation of molecular imaging probes based on physics and biology: mixing modalities, colors and signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hisataka; Longmire, Michelle R; Ogawa, Mikako; Choyke, Peter L

    2011-09-01

    In recent years, numerous in vivo molecular imaging probes have been developed. As a consequence, much has been published on the design and synthesis of molecular imaging probes focusing on each modality, each type of material, or each target disease. More recently, second generation molecular imaging probes with unique, multi-functional, or multiplexed characteristics have been designed. This critical review focuses on (i) molecular imaging using combinations of modalities and signals that employ the full range of the electromagnetic spectra, (ii) optimized chemical design of molecular imaging probes for in vivo kinetics based on biology and physiology across a range of physical sizes, (iii) practical examples of second generation molecular imaging probes designed to extract complementary data from targets using multiple modalities, color, and comprehensive signals (277 references).

  18. Handheld and mobile hyperspectral imaging sensors for wide-area standoff detection of explosives and chemical warfare agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomer, Nathaniel R.; Gardner, Charles W.; Nelson, Matthew P.

    2016-05-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is a valuable tool for the investigation and analysis of targets in complex background with a high degree of autonomy. HSI is beneficial for the detection of threat materials on environmental surfaces, where the concentration of the target of interest is often very low and is typically found within complex scenery. Two HSI techniques that have proven to be valuable are Raman and shortwave infrared (SWIR) HSI. Unfortunately, current generation HSI systems have numerous size, weight, and power (SWaP) limitations that make their potential integration onto a handheld or field portable platform difficult. The systems that are field-portable do so by sacrificing system performance, typically by providing an inefficient area search rate, requiring close proximity to the target for screening, and/or eliminating the potential to conduct real-time measurements. To address these shortcomings, ChemImage Sensor Systems (CISS) is developing a variety of wide-field hyperspectral imaging systems. Raman HSI sensors are being developed to overcome two obstacles present in standard Raman detection systems: slow area search rate (due to small laser spot sizes) and lack of eye-safety. SWIR HSI sensors have been integrated into mobile, robot based platforms and handheld variants for the detection of explosives and chemical warfare agents (CWAs). In addition, the fusion of these two technologies into a single system has shown the feasibility of using both techniques concurrently to provide higher probability of detection and lower false alarm rates. This paper will provide background on Raman and SWIR HSI, discuss the applications for these techniques, and provide an overview of novel CISS HSI sensors focused on sensor design and detection results.

  19. Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MR technique for in-vivo liver imaging at 3.0 tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shu-Zhong; Deng, Min; Wang, Yi-Xiang J. [Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Department of Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Faculty of Medicine (China); Yuan, Jing [Hong Kong Sanatorium and Hospital, Medical Physics and Research Department, Happy Valley, Hong Kong (China); Wei, Juan [Philips Healthcare Asia, Shanghai (China); Zhou, Jinyuan [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Kennedy Krieger Institute, F.M. Kirby Research Center for Functional Brain Imaging, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    To evaluate Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) MRI for liver imaging at 3.0-T. Images were acquired at offsets (n = 41, increment = 0.25 ppm) from -5 to 5 ppm using a TSE sequence with a continuous rectangular saturation pulse. Amide proton transfer-weighted (APTw) and GlycoCEST signals were quantified as the asymmetric magnetization transfer ratio (MTR{sub asym}) at 3.5 ppm and the total MTR{sub asym} integrated from 0.5 to 1.5 ppm, respectively, from the corrected Z-spectrum. Reproducibility was assessed for rats and humans. Eight rats were devoid of chow for 24 hours and scanned before and after fasting. Eleven rats were scanned before and after one-time CCl4 intoxication. For reproducibility, rat liver APTw and GlycoCEST measurements had 95 % limits of agreement of -1.49 % to 1.28 % and -0.317 % to 0.345 %. Human liver APTw and GlycoCEST measurements had 95 % limits of agreement of -0.842 % to 0.899 % and -0.344 % to 0.164 %. After 24 hours, fasting rat liver APTw and GlycoCEST signals decreased from 2.38 ± 0.86 % to 0.67 ± 1.12 % and from 0.34 ± 0.26 % to -0.18 ± 0.37 % respectively (p < 0.05). After CCl4 intoxication rat liver APTw and GlycoCEST signals decreased from 2.46 ± 0.48 % to 1.10 ± 0.77 %, and from 0.34 ± 0.23 % to -0.16 ± 0.51 % respectively (p < 0.05). CEST liver imaging at 3.0-T showed high sensitivity for fasting as well as CCl4 intoxication. (orig.)

  20. Unenhanced steady state free precession versus traditional MR imaging for congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Dandan, E-mail: chchsister@163.com [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Kong, Xiangquan, E-mail: kxq0525@126.com [Department of Radiology, the Affiliated Union Hospital, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Zhou, Xuhui, E-mail: xiaolintongqq@126.com [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Li, Shurong, E-mail: 80917333@qq.com [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Wang, Huanjun, E-mail: 463822507@qq.com [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China)

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To assess potential benefits of three dimensional (3D) steady state free precession (SSFP) magnetic resonance sequence for congenital heart disease (CHD). Materials and methods: Twenty consecutive patients with CHD (male:female ratio,14:6, mean age, 27.5 ± 8.5 years) underwent both 3D SSFP and traditional MR imaging (TMRI) [including two dimensional (2D) SSFP and contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CEMRA)]. Image quality and diagnosis were compared, and Bland–Altman analysis was used to evaluate consistency of 3D SSFP and CEMRA for diameter measurements. Results: A total of 35 intra and 81 extra cardiac anomalies were identified in all patients. The image quality of 3D SSFP and TMRI for either intra or extra cardiac anomalies of all patients scored ≥3, which allowed an establishment of diagnosis for all cases. The diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 3D SSFP for the detection of intra cardiac anomalies were all 100%, whereas for extra cardiac anomalies they were 93.8%, 93.8%, 100%, respectively. Mean differences (3D SSFP minus CEMRA) for aorta and pulmonary arteries were 0.5 ± 1.2 mm and 0.0 ± 1.7 mm, respectively, showing good consistency of 3D SSFP and CEMRA for diameter measurements. Conclusion: 3D SSFP MRI can be an alternative image modality to TMRI for patients with congenital heart disease, especially for those who have renal insufficiency, breath-hold difficulty or who are allergic to contrast agent. It can also provide powerful complementary information for patients who undergo TMRI, especially at ventriculoarterial connection site.

  1. The Solid State X-ray Image Intensifier (SSXII) in Single Photon Counting (SPC) mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhls-Gilcrist, Andrew; Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel R; Rudin, Stephen

    2010-03-22

    The new Solid State X-Ray Image Intensifier (SSXII) has the unique ability to operate in single photon counting (SPC) mode, with improved resolution, as well as in traditional energy integrating (EI) mode. The SSXII utilizes an electron-multiplying CCD (EMCCD), with an effective pixel size of 32μm, which enables variable signal amplification (up to a factor of 2000) prior to digital readout, providing very high-sensitivity capabilities. The presampled MTF was measured in both imaging modes using the standard angulated-slit method. A measured detector entrance exposure of 24μR per frame was used to provide approximately 0.8 interaction events per pixel in the 10μm-wide slit area. For demonstration purposes, a simple thresholding technique was used to localize events in SPC mode and a number of such frames were summed to provide an image with the same total exposure used for acquiring the EI image. The MTF for SPC mode, using a threshold level of 15% of the maximum 12-bit signal and 95% of the expected events, and for EI mode (in parentheses) was 0.67 (0.20), 0.37 (0.07), 0.20 (0.03), and 0.11 (0.01) at 2.5, 5, 7.5, and 10 cycles/mm, respectively. Increasing the threshold level resulted in a corresponding increase in the measured SPC MTF and a lower number of detected events, indicating a tradeoff between resolution and count efficiency is required. The SSXII in SPC mode was shown to provide substantial improvements in resolution relative to traditional EI mode, which should benefit applications that have demanding spatial resolution requirements, such as mammography.

  2. Hyaloperonospora camelinae on Camelina sativa (L.) in Washington State: Detection, seed transmission, and chemical control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camelina (Camelina sativa [L.] Crantz) plants with symptoms of downy mildew were obtained from three different locations in Washington State. Based on PCR and sequencing of the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region, the causal pathogen was identified as Hyaloperonospora camelinae. The PCR primers consistently ampli...

  3. Physical and Chemical Properties of Jupiter's Polar Vortices and Regions of Auroral Influence Revealed Through High-Resolution Infrared Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Josh; Orton, Glenn S.; Sinclair, James; Kasaba, Yasumasa; Sato, Takao M.; Fujiyoshi, Takuya; Momary, Thomas W.; Yanamandra-Fisher, Padma A.

    2016-10-01

    We report characterization of the physical and chemical properties of Jupiter's polar regions derived from mid-infrared imaging of Jupiter covering all longitudes at unprecedented spatial resolution using the COMICS instrument at the Subaru Telescope on the nights of January 24 and 25, 2016 (UT). Because of Jupiter's slight axial tilt of 3°, the low angular resolution and incomplete longitudinal coverage of previous mid-infrared observations, the physical and chemical properties of Jupiter's polar regions have been poorly characterized. In advance of the Juno mission's exploration of the polar regions, this study focuses on mapping the 3-dimensional structure of Jupiter's polar regions, specifically to characterize the polar vortices and compact regions of auroral influence. Using mid-infrared images taken in the 7.8 - 24.2 µm range, we determined the 3-dimensional temperature field, mapped the para-H2 fraction and aerosol opacity at 700 mbar and lower pressures, and constrained the distribution of gaseous NH3 in Jupiter's northern and southern polar regions. Retrievals of these atmospheric parameters was performed using NEMESIS, a radiative transfer forward model and retrieval code. Preliminary results indicate that there are vortices at both poles, each with very distinct low-latitude boundaries approximately 60° (planetocentric) from the equator, which can be defined by sharp thermal gradients extending at least from the upper troposphere (500 mbar) and into the stratosphere (0.1 mbar). These polar regions are characterized by lower temperatures, lower aerosol number densities, and lower NH3 volume mixing ratios, compared with the regions immediately outside the vortex boundaries. These images also provided the highest resolution of prominent auroral-related stratospheric heating to date, revealing a teardrop-shaped morphology in the north and a sharp-edged oval shape in the south. Both appear to be contained inside the locus of H3+ auroral emission detected

  4. THE BACTERIOLOGICAL AND PHYSICO-CHEMICAL STUDIES ON OLUMIRIN WATERFALL ERIN- IJESHA, OSUN STATE, NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwakemi Akindolapo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The potability and qualities of Olumirin waterfall, Erin-Ijesa were investigated by determining the total bacteria and coliform count with antibiotic susceptibility of the isolated bacteria and physico-chemical qualities of the water samples. Total bacteria and coliform enumeration were determined using pour plating and multiple tube techniques, the antibiotic susceptibility were carried out using disc diffusion method, while physico-chemical and mineral studies were also carried out using standard methods. The mean total viable count of the water samples ranged 14.8 x 102 CFU.ml-1 - 21.3 x 103 CFU.ml-1 while the coliform count ranged 13 -175 MPN/100ml. The identified bacteria isolates and their percentage distribution were E.coli (43.1%, Klebsiella spp (20.7%, Proteus spp (12.1%, Salmonella spp (6.99%, Pseudomonas spp (5.17%, Shigella spp (6.9%, and Enterococcus spp (5.17 %. Antibiotic resistance shown by bacteria isolates were exhibited as follow; Nalixidic acid (31%, Ampicilin (76%, Cotrimoxazole (60%, Gentamicin (19%, Nitrofurantoin (24%, Colitin (48%, Streptomycin (34% and tetracycline (52%. 82.8% of the isolate exhibited multiple antibiotic resistance. The physico-chemical analysis also revealed the presence of some mineral elements in the water samples. The mineral value of the water samples include; magnesium (84.8 - 93.4 mg.L-1, phosphate (12.6 - 17.1 mg.L-1, sodium (47.8 - 87.6 mg.L-1, potassium (76.6 - 104.5 mg.L-1, chloride (59.0 - 90.2 mg.L-1, zinc (0.75 - 1.82 mg.L-1, lead (0.12 - 0.33 mg.L-1, iron (0.52 - 0.60 mg.L-1, copper (0.12 - 0.27 mg.L-1 while nickel and arsenic were not detected in any of the water samples. Comparing the experimental results with the international water standard for natural water, the waterfall is not fit for consumption or for any domestic purpose unless being treated. Also, problems that may arise from the resistance bacteria strains can be tackled while the new antibiotics can also be developed.

  5. Estimates of agricultural-chemical use in counties in the conterminous United States as reported in the 1987 Census of Agriculture

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This coverage contains estimates of agricultural-chemical use in counties in the conterminous United States as reported in the 1987 Census of Agriculture (U.S....

  6. CHEMICAL IMAGING OF THE CO SNOW LINE IN THE HD 163296 DISK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Chunhua; Öberg, Karin I.; Andrews, Sean M.; Wilner, David J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Bergin, Edwin A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Hughes, A. Meredith [Van Vleck Observatory, Astronomy Department, Wesleyan University, 96 Foss Hill Drive, Middletown, CT 06459 (United States); Hogherheijde, Michiel [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); D’Alessio, Paola [Centro de Radioastronomi´a y Astrofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, 58089 Morelia, Michoacán, México (Mexico)

    2015-11-10

    The condensation fronts (snow lines) of H{sub 2}O, CO, and other abundant volatiles in the midplane of a protoplanetary disk affect several aspects of planet formation. Locating the CO snow line, where the CO gas column density is expected to drop substantially, based solely on CO emission profiles, is challenging. This has prompted an exploration of chemical signatures of CO freeze-out. We present ALMA Cycle 1 observations of the N{sub 2}H{sup +} J = 3−2 and DCO{sup +} J = 4−3 emission lines toward the disk around the Herbig Ae star HD 163296 at ∼0.″5 (60 AU) resolution, and evaluate their utility as tracers of the CO snow line location. The N{sub 2}H{sup +} emission is distributed in a ring with an inner radius at 90 AU, corresponding to a midplane temperature of 25 K. This result is consistent with a new analysis of optically thin C{sup 18}O data, which implies a sharp drop in CO abundance at 90 AU. Thus N{sub 2}H{sup +} appears to be a robust tracer of the midplane CO snow line. The DCO{sup +} emission also has a ring morphology, but neither the inner nor the outer radius coincide with the CO snow line location of 90 AU, indicative of a complex relationship between DCO{sup +} emission and CO freeze-out in the disk midplane. Compared to TW Hya, CO freezes out at a higher temperature in the disk around HD 163296 (25 versus 17 K in the TW Hya disk), perhaps due to different ice compositions. This highlights the importance of actually measuring the CO snow line location, rather than assuming a constant CO freeze-out temperature for all disks.

  7. Love-related changes in the brain: A resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwen eSong

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Romantic love is a motivational state associated with a desire to enter or maintain a close relationship with a specific other person. Studies with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI have found activation increases in brain regions involved in processing of reward, emotion, motivation when romantic lovers view photographs of their partners. However, not much is known on whether romantic love affects the brain’s functional architecture during rest. In the present study, resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI data was collected to compare the regional homogeneity (ReHo and functional connectivity (FC across a lover group (LG, N=34, currently intensely in love, ended-love group (ELG, N=34, romantic relationship ended recently, and single group (SG, N=32, never fallen in love.The results showed that:1 ReHo of the left dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC was significantly increased in the LG (in comparison to the ELG and the SG; 2 ReHo of the left dACC was positively correlated with length of time in love in the LG, and negatively correlated with the lovelorn duration since breakup in the ELG; 3 functional connectivity (FC within the reward, motivation, and emotion network (dACC, insula, caudate, amygdala and nucleus accumbens and the social cognition network (temporo-parietal junction (TPJ, posterior cingulate cortex (PCC, medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC, inferior parietal, precuneus and temporal lobe was significantly increased in the LG (in comparison to the ELG and SG; 4 in most regions within both networks FC was positively correlated with the love duration in the LG but negatively correlated with the lovelorn duration in the ELG. This study provides first empirical evidence of love-related alterations of brain functional architecture. The results shed light on the underlying neural mechanisms of romantic love, and demonstrate the possibility of applying a resting state approach for investigating romantic love.

  8. Chemical and biochemical properties of Araucaria angustifolia (Bert. Ktze. forest soils in the state of São Paulo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda de Carvalho

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Araucaria angustifolia, commonly named Araucaria, is a Brazilian native species that is intensively exploited due to its timber quality. Therefore, Araucaria is on the list of species threatened by extinction. Despite the importance of soil for forest production, little is known about the soil properties of the highly fragmented Araucaria forests. This study was designed to investigate the use of chemical and biological properties as indicators of conservation and anthropogenic disturbance of Araucaria forests in different sampling periods. The research was carried out in two State parks of São Paulo: Parque Estadual Turístico do Alto do Ribeira and Parque Estadual de Campos de Jordão. The biochemical properties carbon and nitrogen in microbial biomass (MB-C and MB-N, basal respiration (BR, the metabolic quotient (qCO2 and the following enzyme activities: β-glucosidase, urease, and fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis (FDA were evaluated. The sampling period (dry or rainy season influenced the results of mainly MB-C, MB-N, BR, and qCO2. The chemical and biochemical properties, except K content, were sensitive indicators of differences in the conservation and anthropogenic disturbance stages of Araucaria forests. Although these forests differ in biochemical and chemical properties, they are efficient in energy use and conservation, which is shown by their low qCO2, suggesting an advanced stage of succession.

  9. Determination of chemical elements in africanized Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera: Apidae honey samples from the State of Piauí, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geni da Silva Sodré

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Honey is a food used since the most remote times, appreciated for its characteristic flavor, considerable nutritional value and medicinal properties; however, little information exists about the presence of chemical elements in it. The objectives of this work were to determine the chemical elements present in 38 honey samples, collected directly from beekeepers from the State of Piauí, Brazil and to verify whether they presented any contamination. The chemical elements were determined by means of Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence. The means of three replicates were: K (109.671 ± 17.487, Ca (14.471 ± 3.8797, Ti (0.112 ± 0.07, Cr (0.196 ± 0.11, Mn (0.493 ± 0.103, Fe (1.722 ± 0.446, Co (0.038, Ni (0.728 ± 0.706, Cu (0.179 ± 0.0471, Zn (0.967 ± 0.653, Se (not detected, Br (not detected, Rb (0.371 ± 0.097, Sr (0.145 ± 0.45, Ba (11.681, Hg (not detected, and Pb (0.863 µg g-1.

  10. Small targeted cytotoxics: current state and promises from DNA-encoded chemical libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krall, Nikolaus; Scheuermann, Jörg; Neri, Dario

    2013-01-28

    The targeted delivery of potent cytotoxic agents has emerged as a promising strategy for the treatment of cancer and other serious conditions. Traditionally, antibodies against markers of disease have been used as drug-delivery vehicles. More recently, lower molecular weight ligands have been proposed for the generation of a novel class of targeted cytotoxics with improved properties. Advances in this field crucially rely on efficient methods for the identification and optimization of organic molecules capable of high-affinity binding and selective recognition of target proteins. The advent of DNA-encoded chemical libraries allows the construction and screening of compound collections of unprecedented size. In this Review, we survey developments in the field of small ligand-based targeted cytotoxics and show how innovative library technologies will help develop the drugs of the future.

  11. Changes in the chemical structure of polytetrafluoroethylene induced by electron beam irradiation in the molten state

    CERN Document Server

    Lappan, U; Lunkwitz, K

    2000-01-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) was exposed to electron beam radiation at elevated temperature above the melting point under nitrogen atmosphere and in vacuum for comparison. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to study the changes in the chemical structure. The irradiation under nitrogen atmosphere leads to the same structures as described recently for PTFE irradiated in vacuum. Trifluoromethyl branches and double bond structures were detected. The concentrations of terminal and internal double bonds are higher after irradiation under nitrogen than in vacuum. Annealing experiments have shown that the thermal oxidative stability of the radiation-modified PTFE is reduced compared to unirradiated PTFE. The reason are the formation of unstable structures such as double bonds.

  12. High sensitivity detection and characterization of the chemical state of trace element contamination on silicon wafers

    CERN Document Server

    Pianetta, Piero A; Baur, K; Brennan, S; Homma, T; Kubo, N

    2003-01-01

    Increasing the speed and complexity of semiconductor integrated circuits requires advanced processes that put extreme constraints on the level of metal contamination allowed on the surfaces of silicon wafers. Such contamination degrades the performance of the ultrathin SiO sub 2 gate dielectrics that form the heart of the individual transistors. Ultimately, reliability and yield are reduced to levels that must be improved before new processes can be put into production. It should be noted that much of this metal contamination occurs during the wet chemical etching and rinsing steps required for the manufacture of integrated circuits and industry is actively developing new processes that have already brought the metal contamination to levels beyond the measurement capabilities of conventional analytical techniques. The measurement of these extremely low contamination levels has required the use of synchrotron radiation total reflection X-ray fluorescence (SR-TXRF) where sensitivities 100 times better than conv...

  13. Chemical shift imaging at 3 Tesla: effect of echo time on assessing bone marrow abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Grande, F. [The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Ospedale Regionale di Lugano, Servizio di Radiologia, Lugano, TI (Switzerland); Subhawong, Ty [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Miami, FL (United States); Flammang, A. [Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc., Malvern, PA (United States); Fayad, L.M. [The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Our purpose is to test the effect of varied in-phase (IP) and opposed-phase (OP) sequence order on characterizing marrow signal changes at 3T. The study was HIPAA compliant and IRB approved. Informed consent was waived. At 3T, IP and OP sequences were acquired in three patients with biopsy-proven osteosarcomas, using two methods: approach 1 (OP acquisition before IP acquisition) and approach 2 (OP after IP). Signal intensity (SI) measurements in 12 locations of biopsy-proven osteosarcoma and in six locations with normal bone marrow were performed independently by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists. The signal intensity ratio (SIR) was measured within the marrow where there was T1 signal lower than skeletal muscle. A SIR < 20 % on the OP compared with IP imaging was considered positive for marrow replacement, while SIR > = 20 % was considered negative. Interobserver agreement was measured by the Lin concordance correlation coefficient (CCC). In 75 % (18/24) of locations within the biopsy-proven tumors, the SIR was >20 % (SI drop more than 20 % in OP compared to IP) using approach 2 and in 100 % (24/24) of the locations the SIR was <20 % (SI drop less than 20 % in OP compared to IP) using approach 1, indicating a high percentage of false-negative results by approach 2, and no false-negative results with approach 1. There was good agreement between observer measurement (CCC = 0.96). At 3T, the OP sequence should be acquired prior to the IP sequence, because susceptibility artifacts on a later-acquired OP sequence may lead to an erroneous interpretation of marrow signal abnormalities. (orig.)

  14. Combination of chemical suppression techniques for dual suppression of fat and silicone at diffusion-weighted MR imaging in women with breast implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Dow-Mu; Hughes, J. [Royal Marsden Hospital, Department of Radiology, Sutton (United Kingdom); Blackledge, M.; Leach, M.O.; Collins, D.J. [Institute of Cancer Research, CR UK-EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Sutton (United Kingdom); Burns, S. [Nuada 3T MRI Centre, London (United Kingdom); Stemmer, A.; Kiefer, B. [Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Silicone breast prostheses prove technically challenging when performing diffusion-weighted MR imaging in the breasts. We describe a combined fat and chemical suppression scheme to achieve dual suppression of fat and silicone, thereby improving the quality of diffusion-weighted images in women with breast implants. MR imaging was performed at 3.0 and 1.5 T in women with silicone breast implants using short-tau inversion recovery (STIR) fat-suppressed echo-planar (EPI) diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) on its own and combined with the slice-select gradient-reversal (SSGR) technique. Imaging was performed using dedicated breast imaging coils. Complete suppression of the fat and silicone signal was possible at 3.0 T using EPI DWI with STIR and SSGR, evaluated with dedicated breast coils. However, a residual silicone signal was still perceptible at 1.5 T using this combined approach. Nevertheless, a further reduction in silicone signal at 1.5 T could be achieved by employing thinner slice partitions and the addition of the chemical-selective fat-suppression (CHESS) technique. DWI using combined STIR and SSGR chemical suppression techniques is feasible to eliminate or reduce silicone signal from prosthetic breast implants. (orig.)

  15. (31)P Solid-State NMR study of the chemical setting process of a dual-paste injectable brushite cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrand, A P; Sfihi, H; Lequeux, N; Lemaître, J

    2009-10-01

    The composition and evolution of a brushite-type calcium phosphate cement was investigated by Solid-State NMR and X-ray during the setting process. The cement is obtained by mixing beta-tricalcium phosphate [Ca(3)(PO(4))(2), beta-TCP] and monocalcium phosphate monohydrate [Ca(H(2)PO(4))(2).H(2)O, MCPM] in presence of water, with formation of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate or brushite [CaHPO(2).2H(2)O, DCPD]. Analysis of the initial beta-TCP paste has shown the presence of beta-calcium pyrophosphate [Ca(2)P(2)O(7), beta-CPy] and that of the initial MCPM a mixture of MCPM and dicalcium phosphate [CaHPO(4), DCP]. Follow-up of the chemical composition by (31)P Solid-State NMR enables to show that the chemical setting process appeared to reach an end after 20 min. The constant composition observed at the end of the process was similarly determined.

  16. Theory of NMR chemical shift in an electronic state with arbitrary degeneracy

    CERN Document Server

    Heuvel, Willem Van den

    2012-01-01

    We present a theory of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding tensors for electronic states with arbitrary degeneracy. The shieldings are here expressed in terms of generalized Zeeman ($g^{(k)}$) and hyperfine ($A^{(k)}$) tensors, of all ranks $k$ allowed by the size of degeneracy. Contrary to recent proposals [T. O. Pennanen and J. Vaara, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 133002 (2008)], our theory is valid in the strong spin-orbit coupling limit. Ab initio calculations for the 4-fold degenerate $\\Gamma_8$ ground state of lanthanide-doped fluorite crystals CaF$_2$:Ln (Ln = Pr$^{2+}$, Nd$^{3+}$, Sm$^{3+}$, and Dy$^{3+}$) show that previously neglected contributions can account for more than 50% of the paramagnetic shift.

  17. Error sensitivity to environmental noise in quantum circuits for chemical state preparation

    CERN Document Server

    Sawaya, Nicolas P D; McClean, Jarrod R; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2016-01-01

    Calculating molecular energies is likely to be one of the first useful applications to achieve quantum supremacy, performing faster on a quantum than a classical computer. However, if future quantum devices are to produce accurate calculations, errors due to environmental noise and algorithmic approximations need to be characterized and reduced. In this study, we use the high performance qHiPSTER software to investigate the effects of environmental noise on the preparation of quantum chemistry states. We simulate nineteen 16-qubit quantum circuits under environmental noise, each corresponding to a unitary coupled cluster state preparation of a different molecule or molecular configuration. Additionally, we analyze the nature of simple gate errors in noise-free circuits of up to 40 qubits. We find that the Jordan-Wigner (JW) encoding produces consistently smaller errors under a noisy environment as compared to the Bravyi-Kitaev (BK) encoding. For the JW encoding, pure-dephasing noise is shown to produce substa...

  18. Quantum physical states for describing photonic assisted chemical change: I. Torsional phenomenon at femtosecond time scale

    CERN Document Server

    Tapia, O

    2012-01-01

    Femtosecond torsional relaxation processes experimentally detected and recently reported by Clark et al. (Nature Phys. 8,225 (2012)) are theoretically dissected with a Hilbert/Fock quantum physical (QP) framework incorporating entanglement of photon/matter base states overcoming standard semi-classic vibrational descriptions. The quantum analysis of a generic Z/E (cis/trans) isomerization in abstract QP terms shed light to fundamental roles played by photonic spin and excited electronic singlet coupled to triplet states. It is shown that one photon activation cannot elicit femtosecond phenomenon, while a two-photon pulse would do. Estimated time scales for the two-photon case indicate the process to lie between a slower than electronic Franck-Condon-like transition yet faster than (semi-classic) vibration relaxation ones.

  19. State Key Laboratory of Catalysis Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Can Li

    2002-01-01

    @@ I. Introduction The State Key Laboratory of Catalysis (SKLC)was founded in 1987 as one of the first state key labo-ratories in China. The current director of the SKLC isProfessor Can Li (the previous directors were Profes-sor Xiexian Guo and Professor Yide Xu). ProfessorLiwu Lin chairs the Academic Committee, which iscomposed of 15 distinguished Chinese catalytic scien-tists. In addition, the SKLC appoints internationallyknown scientists in the field of catalysis to its Inter-national Advisory Committee. There are about 35permanent staff members including professors, tech-nicians, and administrators, over 80 Ph.D. and M.S.graduate students and 10 post-doctoral fellows.

  20. Excited State Properties of Fluorine-Substituted Hexabenzocoronene: A Quantum-Chemical Characterization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yuan-Zuo; SUN Yu; LI Yong-Qing; MA Feng-Cai

    2006-01-01

    The first fluorine-substituted hexabenzocoronene has been synthesized and its electronic structure and optical properties have been reported [Q. Zhang, et al., Org. Lett.7 (2005) 5019]. In this letter, the electronic structure and excited state properties of the fluorine-substituted hexabenzocoronene are studied with quantum chemistry method as well as the transition and the charge difference densities. The transition densities show the orientations and strength of the dipole moments and the charge difference densities reveal the orientation and results of the intramolecular charge transfer. The calculated transition energies and oscillator strengths are consistent with the experimental data, and the theoretical results of transition and charge difference densities are valuable to understanding the excited state properties of the fluorine-substituted hexabenzocoronene.

  1. Survey of chemical disinfectants used by poultry farmers in Imo state, Nigeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.U. Chima

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Pathogen contamination can be prevented with aid of proper health care products such as disinfectants. This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of common disinfectants and disinfection practice of poultry farmers in Imo State, Nigeria, in order to generate information needed for the proper regulation of disinfectant use in the area. Primary data were generated from structured questionnaires distributed to animal health practitioners and poultry farmers in the State. Results showed that farmers choice of disinfectants were dependent on cost and availability. Z-germicide® 10 (22.27% and Izal® with 9 (20.45% are more widely distributed in the various animal health outfits. This was closely followed by Lysol® 6 (13.63% and Diskol® 6 (13.63%. Morigard® 3 (6.81%, Dettol® and Septol® 3 (6.81% appeared each in three outfits. Vox® 1 (2.27% CID 20® 1 (2.27% a Virkon® 1 (2.27% occurred once and that is at the Avian influenza desk officer’s store. Izal® 140 (58.82 was more widely used by farmers followed by Z-germicide®, both of which are phenolic products. Morigad® with 2 (2.94% and Lysol® with 91.47%0 are also phenolic products. Altogether 76.47% of disinfectants used in Imo State were of phenolic products. Most poultry farms in the State did not use disinfectant footbath. Those that used them did not insist on workers or visitors dipping their feet in them before entering the farm house. They also did not reconstitute the disinfectants according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

  2. Integration of Biological Specificity with Solid-State Devices for Selective Chemical Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-29

    transferred from air into a liquid or hydrogel layer that passes over a bank of aptamer functionalized sensor arrays. Figure 5. A multi-tip nanoscale...see any limitations for the integration of solid-state aptamer sensors with liquid flow cells. We have also investigated the scaling of chemiresistors...complex 3D structure. However, we did not test the aptamer against the ATP target, because the latter requires a liquid solution environment and our

  3. Phase state of ambient aerosol linked with water uptake and chemical aging in the southeastern US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajunoja, Aki; Hu, Weiwei; Leong, Yu J.; Taylor, Nathan F.; Miettinen, Pasi; Palm, Brett B.; Mikkonen, Santtu; Collins, Don R.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Virtanen, Annele

    2016-09-01

    During the summer 2013 Southern Aerosol and Oxidant Study (SOAS) field campaign in a rural site in the southeastern United States, the effect of hygroscopicity and composition on the phase state of atmospheric aerosol particles dominated by the organic fraction was studied. The analysis is based on hygroscopicity measurements by a Hygroscopic Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA), physical phase state investigations by an Aerosol Bounce Instrument (ABI) and composition measurements using a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). To study the effect of atmospheric aging on these properties, an OH-radical oxidation flow reactor (OFR) was used to simulate longer atmospheric aging times of up to 3 weeks. Hygroscopicity and bounce behavior of the particles had a clear relationship showing higher bounce at elevated relative humidity (RH) values for less hygroscopic particles, which agrees well with earlier laboratory studies. Additional OH oxidation of the aerosol particles in the OFR increased the O : C and the hygroscopicity resulting in liquefying of the particles at lower RH values. At the highest OH exposures, the inorganic fraction starts to dominate the bounce process due to production of inorganics and concurrent loss of organics in the OFR. Our results indicate that at typical ambient RH and temperature, organic-dominated particles stay mostly liquid in the atmospheric conditions in the southeastern US, but they often turn semisolid when dried below ˜ 50 % RH in the sampling inlets. While the liquid phase state suggests solution behavior and equilibrium partitioning for the SOA particles in ambient air, the possible phase change in the drying process highlights the importance of thoroughly considered sampling techniques of SOA particles.

  4. Level crossing analysis of chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization: Towards a common description of liquid-state and solid-state cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosnovsky, Denis V; Jeschke, Gunnar; Matysik, Jörg; Vieth, Hans-Martin; Ivanov, Konstantin L

    2016-04-14

    Chemically Induced Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (CIDNP) is an efficient method of creating non-equilibrium polarization of nuclear spins by using chemical reactions, which have radical pairs as intermediates. The CIDNP effect originates from (i) electron spin-selective recombination of radical pairs and (ii) the dependence of the inter-system crossing rate in radical pairs on the state of magnetic nuclei. The CIDNP effect can be investigated by using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) methods. The gain from CIDNP is then two-fold: it allows one to obtain considerable amplification of NMR signals; in addition, it provides a very useful tool for investigating elusive radicals and radical pairs. While the mechanisms of the CIDNP effect in liquids are well established and understood, detailed analysis of solid-state CIDNP mechanisms still remains challenging; likewise a common theoretical frame for the description of CIDNP in both solids and liquids is missing. Difficulties in understanding the spin dynamics that lead to the CIDNP effect in the solid-state case are caused by the anisotropy of spin interactions, which increase the complexity of spin evolution. In this work, we propose to analyze CIDNP in terms of level crossing phenomena, namely, to attribute features in the CIDNP magnetic field dependence to Level Crossings (LCs) and Level Anti-Crossings (LACs) in a radical pair. This approach allows one to describe liquid-state CIDNP; the same holds for the solid-state case where anisotropic interactions play a significant role in CIDNP formation. In solids, features arise predominantly from LACs, since in most cases anisotropic couplings result in perturbations, which turn LCs into LACs. We have interpreted the CIDNP mechanisms in terms of the LC/LAC concept. This consideration allows one to find analytical expressions for a wide magnetic field range, where several different mechanisms are operative; furthermore, the LAC description gives a way to determine CIDNP sign

  5. Level crossing analysis of chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization: Towards a common description of liquid-state and solid-state cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosnovsky, Denis V.; Jeschke, Gunnar; Matysik, Jörg; Vieth, Hans-Martin; Ivanov, Konstantin L.

    2016-04-01

    Chemically Induced Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (CIDNP) is an efficient method of creating non-equilibrium polarization of nuclear spins by using chemical reactions, which have radical pairs as intermediates. The CIDNP effect originates from (i) electron spin-selective recombination of radical pairs and (ii) the dependence of the inter-system crossing rate in radical pairs on the state of magnetic nuclei. The CIDNP effect can be investigated by using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) methods. The gain from CIDNP is then two-fold: it allows one to obtain considerable amplification of NMR signals; in addition, it provides a very useful tool for investigating elusive radicals and radical pairs. While the mechanisms of the CIDNP effect in liquids are well established and understood, detailed analysis of solid-state CIDNP mechanisms still remains challenging; likewise a common theoretical frame for the description of CIDNP in both solids and liquids is missing. Difficulties in understanding the spin dynamics that lead to the CIDNP effect in the solid-state case are caused by the anisotropy of spin interactions, which increase the complexity of spin evolution. In this work, we propose to analyze CIDNP in terms of level crossing phenomena, namely, to attribute features in the CIDNP magnetic field dependence to Level Crossings (LCs) and Level Anti-Crossings (LACs) in a radical pair. This approach allows one to describe liquid-state CIDNP; the same holds for the solid-state case where anisotropic interactions play a significant role in CIDNP formation. In solids, features arise predominantly from LACs, since in most cases anisotropic couplings result in perturbations, which turn LCs into LACs. We have interpreted the CIDNP mechanisms in terms of the LC/LAC concept. This consideration allows one to find analytical expressions for a wide magnetic field range, where several different mechanisms are operative; furthermore, the LAC description gives a way to determine CIDNP sign

  6. Generalized molybdenum oxide surface chemical state XPS determination via informed amorphous sample model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baltrusaitis, Jonas, E-mail: job314@lehigh.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, Lehigh University, B336 Iacocca Hall, 111 Research Drive, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States); PhotoCatalytic Synthesis group, MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Twente, Meander 229, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Mendoza-Sanchez, Beatriz [CRANN, Chemistry School, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin (Ireland); Fernandez, Vincent [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP 32229, F-44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Veenstra, Rick [PhotoCatalytic Synthesis group, MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Twente, Meander 229, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Dukstiene, Nijole [Department of Physical and Inorganic Chemistry, Kaunas University of Technology, Radvilenu pl. 19, LT-50254 Kaunas (Lithuania); Roberts, Adam [Kratos Analytical Ltd, Trafford Wharf Road, Wharfside, Manchester, M17 1GP (United Kingdom); Fairley, Neal [Casa Software Ltd, Bay House, 5 Grosvenor Terrace, Teignmouth, Devon TQ14 8NE (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-30

    Highlights: • We analyzed and modeled spectral envelopes of complex molybdenum oxides. • Molybdenum oxide films of varying valence and crystallinity were synthesized. • MoO{sub 3} and MoO{sub 2} line shapes from experimental data were created. • Informed amorphous sample model (IASM) developed. • Amorphous molybdenum oxide XPS envelopes were interpreted. - Abstract: Accurate elemental oxidation state determination for the outer surface of a complex material is of crucial importance in many science and engineering disciplines, including chemistry, fundamental and applied surface science, catalysis, semiconductors and many others. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is the primary tool used for this purpose. The spectral data obtained, however, is often very complex and can be subject to incorrect interpretation. Unlike traditional XPS spectra fitting procedures using purely synthetic spectral components, here we develop and present an XPS data processing method based on vector analysis that allows creating XPS spectral components by incorporating key information, obtained experimentally. XPS spectral data, obtained from series of molybdenum oxide samples with varying oxidation states and degree of crystallinity, were processed using this method and the corresponding oxidation states present, as well as their relative distribution was elucidated. It was shown that monitoring the evolution of the chemistry and crystal structure of a molybdenum oxide sample due to an invasive X-ray probe could be used to infer solutions to complex spectral envelopes.

  7. Resonant impurity states in chemically disordered half-Heusler Dirac semimetals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadova, K.; Ködderitzsch, D.; Minár, J.; Ebert, H.; Kiss, J.; D'Souza, S. W.; Wollmann, L.; Felser, C.; Chadov, S.

    2016-05-01

    We address the electron transport characteristics in bulk half-Heusler alloys with their compositions tuned to the borderline between topologically nontrivial semimetallic and trivial semiconducting phases. Accurate first-principles calculations based on the coherent potential approximation (CPA) reveal that all the studied systems exhibit sets of dispersionless impurity-like resonant levels, with one of them being located at the Dirac point. By means of the Kubo-Bastin formalism we reveal that the residual conductivity of these alloys is strongly suppressed by impurity scattering, whereas the spin Hall conductivity exhibits a rather complex behavior induced by the resonant states. In particular for LaPt0.5Pd0.5Bi we find that the total spin Hall conductivity is strongly suppressed by two large and opposite contributions: the negative Fermi-surface contribution produced by the resonant impurity and the positive Fermi-sea term stemming from the occupied states. At the same time, we identify no conductivity contributions from the conical states.

  8. Generalized molybdenum oxide surface chemical state XPS determination via informed amorphous sample model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Mendoza-Sanchez, Beatriz; Fernandez, Vincent; Veenstra, Rick; Dukstiene, Nijole; Roberts, Adam; Fairley, Neal

    2015-01-01

    Accurate elemental oxidation state determination for the outer surface of a complex material is of crucial importance in many science and engineering disciplines, including chemistry, fundamental and applied surface science, catalysis, semiconductors and many others. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is the primary tool used for this purpose. The spectral data obtained, however, is often very complex and can be subject to incorrect interpretation. Unlike traditional XPS spectra fitting procedures using purely synthetic spectral components, here we develop and present an XPS data processing method based on vector analysis that allows creating XPS spectral components by incorporating key information, obtained experimentally. XPS spectral data, obtained from series of molybdenum oxide samples with varying oxidation states and degree of crystallinity, were processed using this method and the corresponding oxidation states present, as well as their relative distribution was elucidated. It was shown that monitoring the evolution of the chemistry and crystal structure of a molybdenum oxide sample due to an invasive X-ray probe could be used to infer solutions to complex spectral envelopes.

  9. IGE Model: An Extension of the Ideal Gas Model to Include Chemical Composition as Part of the Equilibrium State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher P. Paolini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The ideal gas (IG model is probably the most well-known gas models in engineering thermodynamics. In this paper, we extend the IG model into an ideal gas equilibrium (IGE model mixture model by incorporating chemical equilibrium calculations as part of the state evaluation. Through a simple graphical interface, users can set the atomic composition of a gas mixture. We have integrated this model into a thermodynamic web portal TEST (http://thermofluids.sdsu.edu/ that contains Java applets for various models for properties of pure substances. In the state panel of the IGE model, the known thermodynamic properties are entered. For a given pressure and temperature, the mixture's Gibbs function is minimized subject to atomic constraints and the equilibrium composition along with thermodynamic properties of the mixture are calculated and displayed. What is unique about this approach is that equilibrium computations are performed in the background, without requiring any major change in the familiar user interface used in other state daemons. Properties calculated by this equilibrium state daemon are compared with results from other established applications such as NASA CEA and STANJAN. Also, two different algorithms, an iterative approach and a direct approach based on minimizing different thermodynamic functions in different situation, are compared.

  10. Micro-Spectroscopic Chemical Imaging of Individual Identified Marine Biogenic and Ambient Organic Ice Nuclei (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopf, D. A.; Alpert, P. A.; Wang, B.; OBrien, R. E.; Moffet, R. C.; Aller, J. Y.; Laskin, A.; Gilles, M.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric ice formation represents one of the least understood atmospheric processes with important implications for the hydrological cycle and climate. Current freezing descriptions assume that ice active sites on the particle surface initiate ice nucleation, however, the nature of these sites remains elusive. Here, we present a new experimental method that allows us to relate physical and chemical properties of individual particles with observed water uptake and ice nucleation ability using a combination of micro-spectroscopic and optical single particle analytical techniques. We apply this method to field-collected particles and particles generated via bursting of bubbles produced by glass frit aeration and plunging water impingement jets in a mesocosm containing artificial sea water and bacteria and/or phytoplankton. The most efficient ice nuclei (IN) within a particle population are identified and characterized. Single particle characterization is achieved by computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. A vapor controlled cooling-stage coupled to an optical microscope is used to determine the onsets of water uptake, immersion freezing, and deposition ice nucleation of the individual particles as a function of temperature (T) as low as 200 K and relative humidity (RH) up to water saturation. In addition, we perform CCSEM/EDX to obtain on a single particle level the elemental composition of the entire particle population. Thus, we can determine if the IN are exceptional in nature or belong to a major particle type class with respect to composition and size. We find that ambient and sea spray particles are coated by organic material and can induce ice formation under tropospheric relevant conditions. Micro-spectroscopic single particle analysis of the investigated particle samples invokes a potential

  11. Iterative cross-correlation analysis of resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqin Yang

    Full Text Available Seed-based cross-correlation analysis (sCCA and independent component analysis have been widely employed to extract functional networks from the resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging data. However, the results of sCCA, in terms of both connectivity strength and network topology, can be sensitive to seed selection variations. ICA avoids the potential problems due to seed selection, but choosing which component(s to represent the network of interest could be subjective and problematic. In this study, we proposed a seed-based iterative cross-correlation analysis (siCCA method for resting state brain network analysis. The method was applied to extract default mode network (DMN and stable task control network (STCN in two independent datasets acquired from normal adults. Compared with the networks obtained by traditional sCCA and ICA, the resting state networks produced by siCCA were found to be highly stable and independent on seed selection. siCCA was used to analyze DMN in first-episode major depressive disorder (MDD patients. It was found that, in the MDD patients, the volume of DMN negatively correlated with the patients' social disability screening schedule scores.

  12. Surface chemical state of Ti powders and its alloys: Effect of storage conditions and alloy composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hryha, Eduard; Shvab, Ruslan; Bram, Martin; Bitzer, Martin; Nyborg, Lars

    2016-12-01

    High affinity of titanium to oxygen in combination with the high surface area of the powder results in tremendous powder reactivity and almost inevitable presence of passivation oxide film on the powder surface. Oxide film is formed during the short exposure of the powder to the environment at even a trace amount of oxygen. Hence, surface state of the powder determines its usefulness for powder metallurgy processing. Present study is focused on the evaluation of the surface oxide state of the Ti, NiTi and Ti6Al4V powders in as-atomized state and after storage under air or Ar for up to eight years. Powder surface oxide state was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HR SEM). Results indicate that powder in as-atomized state is covered by homogeneous Ti-oxide layer with the thickness of ∼2.9 nm for Ti, ∼3.2 nm and ∼4.2 nm in case of Ti6Al4V and NiTi powders, respectively. Exposure to the air results in oxide growth of about 30% in case of Ti and only about 10% in case of NiTi and Ti6Al4V. After the storage under the dry air for two years oxide growth of only about 3-4% was detected in case of both, Ti and NiTi powders. NiTi powder, stored under the dry air for eight years, indicates oxide thickness of about 5.3 nm, which is about 30% thicker in comparison with the as-atomized powder. Oxide thickness increase of only ∼15% during the storage for eight years in comparison with the powder, shortly exposed to the air after manufacturing, was detected. Results indicate a high passivation of the Ti, Ti6Al4V and NiTi powder surface by homogeneous layer of Ti-oxide formed even during short exposure of the powder to the air.

  13. Size and functional tuning of solid state nanopores by chemical functionalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussi, Valentina; Fanzio, Paola; Firpo, Giuseppe; Repetto, Luca; Valbusa, Ugo

    2012-11-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of using a simple functionalization procedure, based on an initial vapour-phase silanization, to control the size and functionality of solid state nanopores. The presented results show that, by varying the silanization time, it is possible to modify the efficiency of probe molecule attachment, thus shrinking the pore to the chosen size, while introducing a specific sensing selectivity. The proposed method allows us to tune the nanopore biosensor adapting it to the specific final application, and it can be efficiently applied when the pore initial diameter does not exceed a limit dimension related to the mean free path of the silane molecules at the working pressure.

  14. Chemical Dynamics of State-Selected Atomic and Diatomic Ions of Aerospace Relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    modified the triple - quadrupole -double-octopole y<t&te Cy» LJMW • • Figure 1. Schematic diagram of the comprehensive VUV laser system, which...H. Xu, and C. Y. Ng, "The Study of State-Selected Ion-Molecule Reactions using the Pulsed-Field Ionization- Photoion Technique ", J. Chem. Phys...8217==0-4) + He collisions in the ET range of 0-3 eV have also been measured using the VUV-photoionization-guided-ion beam mass spectrometric technique

  15. Chemical composition of Thymus vulgaris L. (thyme essential oil from the Rio de Janeiro State (Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEXANDRE PORTE

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The essential oil from fresh leaves of Thymus vulgaris L. from Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil, was isolated by hydrodistillation and analyzed through a combination of GC and GC/MS. Compounds representing 95.1 % of the oil were identified. Thirty-nine constituents were detected, of which twenty-eight were identified according to their chromatographic retention indices and mass spectra. The major constituents of the oil were thymol (44.7 %, p-cymene (18.6 % and g-terpinene (16.5 %.

  16. Spatially organized dynamical states in chemical oscillator networks: synchronization, dynamical differentiation, and chimera patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh Wickramasinghe

    Full Text Available Dynamical processes in many engineered and living systems take place on complex networks of discrete dynamical units. We present laboratory experiments with a networked chemical system of nickel electrodissolution in which synchronization patterns are recorded in systems with smooth periodic, relaxation periodic, and chaotic oscillators organized in networks composed of up to twenty dynamical units and 140 connections. The reaction system formed domains of synchronization patterns that are strongly affected by the architecture of the network. Spatially organized partial synchronization could be observed either due to densely connected network nodes or through the 'chimera' symmetry breaking mechanism. Relaxation periodic and chaotic oscillators formed structures by dynamical differentiation. We have identified effects of network structure on pattern selection (through permutation symmetry and coupling directness and on formation of hierarchical and 'fuzzy' clusters. With chaotic oscillators we provide experimental evidence that critical coupling strengths at which transition to identical synchronization occurs can be interpreted by experiments with a pair of oscillators and analysis of the eigenvalues of the Laplacian connectivity matrix. The experiments thus provide an insight into the extent of the impact of the architecture of a network on self-organized synchronization patterns.

  17. Terahertz spectroscopy and imaging for cultural heritage management: state of art and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catapano, Ilaria; Soldovieri, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    Non-invasive diagnostic tools able to provide information on the materials and preservation state of artworks are crucial to help conservators, archaeologists and anthropologists to plan and carry out their tasks properly. In this frame, technological solutions exploiting Terahertz (THz) radiation, i.e., working at frequencies ranging from 0.1 to 10 THz, are currently deserving huge attention as complementary techniques to classical analysis methodologies based on electromagnetic radiations from X-rays to mid infrared [1]. The main advantage offered by THz spectroscopy and imaging systems is referred to their capability of providing information useful to determine the construction modality, the history life and the conservation state of artworks as well as to identify previous restoration actions [1,2]. In particular, unlike mid- and near-infrared spectroscopy, which provides fingerprint absorption spectra depending on the intramolecular behavior, THz spectroscopy is related to the structure of the molecules of the investigated object. Hence, it can discriminate, for instance, the different materials mixed in a paint [1,2]. Moreover, THz radiation is able to penetrate several materials which are opaque to both visible and infrared materials, such as varnish, paint, plaster, paper, wood, plastic, and so on. Accordingly, it is useful to detect hidden objects and characterize the inner structure of the artwork under test even in the direction of the depth, while avoiding core drillings. In this frame, THz systems allow us to discriminate different layers of materials present in artworks like paints, to obtain images providing information on the construction technique as well as to discover risk factors affecting the preservation state, such as non-visible cracks, hidden molds and air gaps between the paint layer and underlying structure. Furthermore, adopting a no-ionizing radiation, THz systems offer the not trivial benefit of negligible long term risks to the

  18. A single-photon sampling architecture for solid-state imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Berg, Ewout van den; Chinn, Garry; Levin, Craig; Olcott, Peter; Sing-Long, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Advances in solid-state technology have enabled the development of silicon photomultiplier sensor arrays capable of sensing individual photons. Combined with high-frequency time-to-digital converters (TDCs), this technology opens up the prospect of sensors capable of recording with high accuracy both the time and location of each detected photon. Such a capability could lead to significant improvements in imaging accuracy, especially for applications operating with low photon fluxes such as LiDAR and positron emission tomography. The demands placed on on-chip readout circuitry imposes stringent trade-offs between fill factor and spatio-temporal resolution, causing many contemporary designs to severely underutilize the technology's full potential. Concentrating on the low photon flux setting, this paper leverages results from group testing and proposes an architecture for a highly efficient readout of pixels using only a small number of TDCs, thereby also reducing both cost and power consumption. The design re...

  19. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and the Challenge of Balancing Human Security with State Security

    CERN Document Server

    Sahito, Farhan

    2012-01-01

    Recent reports reveal that violent extremists are trying to obtain insider positions that may increase the impact of any attack on critical infrastructure and could potentially endanger state services, people's lives and even democracy. It is of utmost importance to be able to adopt extreme security measures in certain high-risk situations in order to secure critical infrastructure and thus lower the level of terrorist threats while preserving the rights of citizens. To counter these threats, our research is aiming for extreme measures to analyse and evaluate human threats related assessment methods for employee screening and evaluations using cognitive analysis technology, in particular functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). The development of fMRI has led some researchers to conclude that this technology has forensic potential and may be useful in investing personality traits, mental illness, psychopathology, racial prejudice and religious extremism. However, critics claim that this technology may pr...

  20. QUANTITATIVE IMAGE ANALYSIS OF MICROSTRUCTURE EVOLUTION DURING SOLID STATE SINTERING OF W-Cu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Popa

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The microstructure evolution of W-Cu composites during solid state sintering at 1050°C is studied on samples quenched after different sintering times. The microstructure is formed by 3 phases: tungsten (W, copper (Cu and pores. During the process, the initial mixture of W- and Cu-powder is transformed by migration of Cu and rearrangement of W particles. These microstructural changes are studied to identify the underlying phenomena and to control the material properties. Based on experiments performed with two different W powders, this paper deals with various aspects of the quantitative analysis of the observed evolution. A careful preparation of the images is necessary. The porous samples are impregnated with a resin under vacuum before being cut and carefully polished. Low voltage (<10 kV is used during image acquisition on a scanning electron microscope. Area fraction measurements are used to check the quality of the images and the segmentation process. Classical measurements are used to study the spreading of Cu onto the surface of W particles: surface area of each phase, area of contact between phases, chord length distributions. New measurements based on classical methods are also developed to distinguish between two mechanisms of Cu migration in the microstructure : Cu spreading on W surface (wetting of the surface, and capillary penetration in the inter-W channels. An analysis of the location of Cu and pores in the space between W particles (inter-W space is performed using a granulometry based on 2D openings. It evidences the mechanism of capillary penetration of Cu in the inter-W space in the case of small W-particles.

  1. Combination of diffusion tensor and functional magnetic resonance imaging during recovery from the vegetative state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández-Espejo Davinia

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rate of recovery from the vegetative state (VS is low. Currently, little is known of the mechanisms and cerebral changes that accompany those relatively rare cases of good recovery. Here, we combined functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI to study the evolution of one VS patient at one month post-ictus and again twelve months later when he had recovered consciousness. Methods fMRI was used to investigate cortical responses to passive language stimulation as well as task-induced deactivations related to the default-mode network. DTI was used to assess the integrity of the global white matter and the arcuate fasciculus. We also performed a neuropsychological assessment at the time of the second MRI examination in order to characterize the profile of cognitive deficits. Results fMRI analysis revealed anatomically appropriate activation to speech in both the first and the second scans but a reduced pattern of task-induced deactivations in the first scan. In the second scan, following the recovery of consciousness, this pattern became more similar to that classically described for the default-mode network. DTI analysis revealed relative preservation of the arcuate fasciculus and of the global normal-appearing white matter at both time points. The neuropsychological assessment revealed recovery of receptive linguistic functioning by 12-months post-ictus. Conclusions These results suggest that the combination of different structural and functional imaging modalities may provide a powerful means for assessing the mechanisms involved in the recovery from the VS.

  2. Lipid fingerprint image accurately conveys human colon cell pathophysiologic state: A solid candidate as biomarker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bestard-Escalas, Joan; Garate, Jone; Maimó-Barceló, Albert; Fernández, Roberto; Lopez, Daniel Horacio; Lage, Sergio; Reigada, Rebeca; Khorrami, Sam; Ginard, Daniel; Reyes, José; Amengual, Isabel; Fernández, José A; Barceló-Coblijn, Gwendolyn

    2016-12-01

    Membrane lipids are gaining increasing attention in the clinical biomarker field, as they are associated with different pathologic processes such as cancer or neurodegenerative diseases. Analyzing human colonoscopic sections by matrix assisted laser/desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry imaging techniques, we identified a defined number of lipid species changing concomitant to the colonocyte differentiation and according to a quite simple mathematical expression. These species felt into two lipid families tightly associated in signaling: phosphatidylinositols and arachidonic acid-containing lipids. On the other hand, an opposed pattern was observed in lamina propria for AA-containing lipids, coinciding with the physiological distribution of the immunological response cells in this tissue. Importantly, the lipid gradient was accompanied by a gradient in expression of enzymes involved in lipid mobilization. Finally, both lipid and protein gradients were lost in adenomatous polyps. The latter allowed us to assess how different a single lipid species is handled in a pathological context depending on the cell type. The strict patterns of distribution in lipid species and lipid enzymes described here unveil the existence of fine regulatory mechanisms orchestrating the lipidome according to the physiological state of the cell. In addition, these results provide solid evidence that the cell lipid fingerprint image can be used to predict precisely the physiological and pathological status of a cell, reinforcing its translational impact in clinical research.

  3. Hybridization State Detection of DNA-Functionalized Gold Nanoparticles Using Hyperspectral Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C. Murdock

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperspectral imaging has the unique ability of capturing spectral data for multiple wavelengths at each pixel in an image. This gives the ability to distinguish, with certainty, different nanomaterials and/or distinguish nanomaterials from biological materials. In this study, 4 nm and 13 nm gold nanoparticles (Au NPs were synthesized, functionalized with complimentary oligonucleotides, and hybridized to form large networks of NPs. Scattering spectra were collected from each sample (unfunctionalized, functionalized, and hybridized and evaluated. The spectra showed unique peaks for each size of Au NP sample and also exhibited narrowing and intensifying of the spectra as the NPs were functionalized and then subsequently hybridized. These spectra are different from normal aggregation effects where the LSPR and reflected spectrum broaden and are red-shifted. Rather, this appears to be dependent on the ability to control the interparticle distance through oligonucleotide length, which is also investigated through the incorporation of a poly-A spacer. Also, hybridized Au NPs were exposed to cells with no adverse effects and retained their unique spectral signatures. With the ability to distinguish between hybridization states at nearly individual NP levels, this could provide a new method of tracking the intracellular actions of nanomaterials as well as extracellular biosensing applications.

  4. Direct observation of bulk and surface chemical morphologies of Ginkgo biloba leaves by Fourier transform mid- and near-infrared microspectroscopic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianbo; Sun, Suqin; Zhou, Qun

    2013-11-01

    Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy is a powerful tool to obtain knowledge about the spatial and/or temporal distributions of the chemical compositions of plants for better understanding of their biological properties. However, the chemical morphologies of plant leaves in the plane of the blade are barely studied, because sections in this plane for mid-infrared transmission measurements are difficult to obtain. Besides, native compositions may be changed by chemical reagents used when plant samples are microtomed. To improve methods for direct infrared microspectroscopic imaging of plant leaves in the plane of the blade, the bulk and surface chemical morphologies of nonmicrotomed Ginkgo biloba leaves were characterized by near-infrared transmission and mid-infrared attenuated total reflection microspectroscopic imaging. A new self-modeling curve resolution procedure was proposed to extract the spectral and concentration information of pure compounds. Primary and secondary metabolites of secretory cavities, veins, and mesophylls of Ginkgo biloba leaf blades were analyzed, and the distributions of cuticle, protein, calcium oxalate, cellulose, and ginkgolic acids on the adaxial surface were determined. By the integration of multiple infrared microspectroscopic imaging and chemometrics methods, it is possible to analyze nonmicrotomed leaves and other plant samples directly to understand their native chemical morphologies in detail.

  5. Imaging and chemical surface analysis of biomolecular functionalization of monolithically integrated on silicon Mach-Zehnder interferometric immunosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gajos, Katarzyna, E-mail: kasia.fornal@uj.edu.pl [M. Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Łojasiewicza 11, 30-348 Kraków (Poland); Angelopoulou, Michailia; Petrou, Panagiota [Institute of Nuclear & Radiological Sciences & Technology, Energy & Safety, NCSR Demokritos, P. Grigoriou & Neapoleos St, Aghia Paraksevi 15310, Athens (Greece); Awsiuk, Kamil [M. Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Łojasiewicza 11, 30-348 Kraków (Poland); Kakabakos, Sotirios [Institute of Nuclear & Radiological Sciences & Technology, Energy & Safety, NCSR Demokritos, P. Grigoriou & Neapoleos St, Aghia Paraksevi 15310, Athens (Greece); Haasnoot, Willem [RIKILT Wageningen UR, Akkermaalsbos 2, 6708 WB Wageningen (Netherlands); Bernasik, Andrzej [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH University of Science and Technology, Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Academic Centre for Materials and Nanotechnology, AGH University of Science and Technology, Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Rysz, Jakub [M. Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Łojasiewicza 11, 30-348 Kraków (Poland); Marzec, Mateusz M. [Academic Centre for Materials and Nanotechnology, AGH University of Science and Technology, Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Misiakos, Konstantinos; Raptis, Ioannis [Department of Microelectronics, Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, NCSR Demokritos, P. Grigoriou & Neapoleos St, Aghia Paraksevi 15310, Athens (Greece); Budkowski, Andrzej [M. Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Łojasiewicza 11, 30-348 Kraków (Poland)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Optimization of probe immobilization with robotic spotter printing overlapping spots. • In-situ inspection of microstructured surfaces of biosensors integrated on silicon. • Imaging and chemical analysis of immobilization, surface blocking and immunoreaction. • Insight with molecular discrimination into step-by-step sensor surface modifications. • Optimized biofunctionalization improves sensor sensitivity and response repeatability. - Abstract: Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (imaging, micro-analysis) has been employed to evaluate biofunctionalization of the sensing arm areas of Mach-Zehnder interferometers monolithically integrated on silicon chips for the immunochemical (competitive) detection of bovine κ-casein in goat milk. Biosensor surfaces are examined after: modification with (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane, application of multiple overlapping spots of κ-casein solutions, blocking with 100-times diluted goat milk, and reaction with monoclonal mouse anti-κ-casein antibodies in blocking solution. The areas spotted with κ-casein solutions of different concentrations are examined and optimum concentration providing homogeneous coverage is determined. Coverage of biosensor surfaces with biomolecules after each of the sequential steps employed in immunodetection is also evaluated with TOF-SIMS, supplemented by Atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Uniform molecular distributions are observed on the sensing arm areas after spotting with optimum κ-casein concentration, blocking and immunoreaction. The corresponding biomolecular compositions are determined with a Principal Component Analysis that distinguished between protein amino acids and milk glycerides, as well as between amino acids characteristic for Mabs and κ-casein, respectively. Use of the optimum conditions (κ-casein concentration) for functionalization of chips with arrays of ten Mach-Zehnder interferometers provided on-chips assays

  6. PSI's 1kW imaging furnace-A tool for high-temperature chemical reactivity studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guesdon, C.; Alxneit, I.; Tschudi, H.R.; Wuillemin, D.; Brunner, Y.; Winkel, L.; Sturzenegger, M. [Laboratory for High-Temperature Solar Technology, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Petrasch, J. [Professorship for Renewable Energy Carriers, ETHZ Zentrum, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2006-10-15

    A new experiment has been installed to conduct studies at temperatures as high as 2500K on chemical reactions that involve solids or melts and the release of condensable gases. The sample is radiatively heated by a 1kW xenon short arc lamp placed in the upper focus of a vertically oriented ellipsoid of revolution. The optimal optical configuration has been determined by a Monte-Carlo Ray tracing method. Several methods to machine the reflector have been evaluated by experimentally determining the optical quality of the surface of plane test pieces. In the imaging furnace the sample is placed on a water-cooled support and heated by the concentrated radiation. This arrangement allows for fast heating and impedes the reaction of the sample with crucible material. A remotely controlled hammer allows for freezing the high-temperature composition of the sample by a fast quench. Thus, the sample can be later analyzed by conventional methods such as XRD or TEM. To allow for measurements under defined atmospheres and to protect the ellipsoidal reflector from liberated condensable products, the entire sample stage is enclosed by a hemispherical glass dome. The dome itself is protected from condensable compounds by a laminar flow of inert gas. Experiments with an incense cone at the place of the sample to visualize the gas flow showed that a steady layer of inert gas protects the dome from smoke, if the inert gas flow is properly adjusted. Measured peak flux densities clearly exceed 500Wcm{sup -2} required to access temperatures of at least 2500K. Decomposition experiments on copper sulfides confirmed the operation of the furnace. In the near future flash assisted multi-wavelength pyrometry (FAMP) will be implemented to measure sample temperatures online. Though the imaging furnace was developed to study the decomposition of metal sulfides it is obviously suited to conduct high-temperature studies on most materials relevant for high-temperature solar technology. (author)

  7. Chemical degradation of proteins in the solid state with a focus on photochemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozziconacci, Olivier; Schöneich, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Protein pharmaceuticals comprise an increasing fraction of marketed products but the limited solution stability of proteins requires considerable research effort to prepare stable formulations. An alternative is solid formulation, as proteins in the solid state are thermodynamically less susceptible to degradation. Nevertheless, within the time of storage a large panel of kinetically controlled degradation reactions can occur such as, e.g., hydrolysis reactions, the formation of diketopiperazine, condensation and aggregation reactions. These mechanisms of degradation in protein solids are relatively well covered by the literature. Considerably less is known about oxidative and photochemical reactions of solid proteins. This review will provide an overview over photolytic and non-photolytic degradation reactions, and specially emphasize mechanistic details on how solid structure may affect the interaction of protein solids with light.

  8. Positronium in a Liquid Phase: Formation, Bubble State and Chemical Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Stepanov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present approach describes the e+ fate since its injection into a liquid until its annihilation. Several stages of the e+ evolution are discussed: (1 energy deposition and track structure of fast positrons: ionization slowing down, number of ion-electron pairs, typical sizes, thermalization, electrostatic interaction between e+ and the constituents of its blob, and effect of local heating; (2 positronium formation in condensed media: the Ore model, quasifree Ps state, intratrack mechanism of Ps formation; (3 fast intratrack diffusion-controlled reactions: Ps oxidation and ortho-paraconversion by radiolytic products, reaction rate constants, and interpretation of the PAL spectra in water at different temperatures; (4 Ps bubble models. Inner structure of positronium (wave function, energy contributions, relationship between the pick-off annihilation rate and the bubble radius.

  9. Chemical shift magnetic resonance imaging in differentiation of benign from malignant vertebral collapse in a rural tertiary care hospital in North India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Puneet; Gupta, Ranjana; Mittal, Amit; Joshi, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the modality of the first choice for evaluation of vertebral compression/collapse. Many MRI qualitative features help to differentiate benign from malignant collapse. We conducted this study to look for a quantitative difference in chemical shift values in benign and malignant collapse using dual-echo gradient echo in-phase/out-phase imaging. Materials and Methods: MRI examinations of a total of 38 patients were retrospectively included in the study who had vertebral compression/collapse with marrow edema in which final diagnosis was available at the time of imaging/follow-up. Signal intensity value in the region of abnormal marrow signal and adjacent normal vertebra was measured on in phase/out phase images. Signal intensity ratio (SIR) was measured by dividing signal intensity value on opposite phase images to that on in phase images. SIR was compared in normal vertebrae and benign and malignant vertebral collapse. Results: There were 21 males and 17 females with mean age of 52.4 years (range 28–76 years). Out of total 38 patients, 18 were of benign vertebral collapse and 20 of malignant vertebral collapse. SIR in normal vertebrae was 0.30 ± 0.14, 0.67 ± 0.18 in benign vertebral collapse, and 1.20 ± 0.27 in malignant vertebral collapse with significant difference in SIR of normal vertebrae versus benign collapse (P < 0.01) and in benign collapse versus malignant collapse (P < 0.01). Assuming a cutoff of <0.95 for benign collapse and ≥0.95 for malignant collapse, chemical shift imaging had a sensitivity of 90% and specificity of 94.4%. Conclusion: Chemical shift imaging is a rapid and useful sequence in differentiating benign from malignant vertebral collapse with good specificity and sensitivity.

  10. Chemical imaging of molecular changes in a hydrated single cell by dynamic secondary ion mass spectrometry and super-resolution microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, Xin; Szymanski, Craig J.; Wang, Zhaoying; Zhou, Yufan; Ma, Xiang; Yu, Jiachao; Evans, James E.; Orr, Galya; Liu, Songqin; Zhu, Zihua; Yu, Xiao-Ying

    2016-05-15

    Chemical imaging of single cells is important in capturing biological dynamics. Single cell correlative imaging is realized between structured illumination microscopy (SIM) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) using System for Analysis at the Liquid Vacuum Interface (SALVI), a multimodal microreactor. SIM characterized cells and guided subsequent ToF-SIMS analysis. Dynamic ToF-SIMS provided time- and space-resolved cell molecular mapping. Lipid fragments were identified in the hydrated cell membrane. Principal component analysis was used to elucidate chemical component differences among mouse lung cells that uptake zinc oxide nanoparticles. Our results provided submicron chemical spatial mapping for investigations of cell dynamics at the molecular level.

  11. Measurements of the aerosol chemical composition and mixing state in the Po Valley using multiple spectroscopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decesari, S.; Allan, J.; Plass-Duelmer, C.; Williams, B. J.; Paglione, M.; Facchini, M. C.; O'Dowd, C.; Harrison, R. M.; Gietl, J. K.; Coe, H.; Giulianelli, L.; Gobbi, G. P.; Lanconelli, C.; Carbone, C.; Worsnop, D.; Lambe, A. T.; Ahern, A. T.; Moretti, F.; Tagliavini, E.; Elste, T.; Gilge, S.; Zhang, Y.; Dall'Osto, M.

    2014-11-01

    The use of co-located multiple spectroscopic techniques can provide detailed information on the atmospheric processes regulating aerosol chemical composition and mixing state. So far, field campaigns heavily equipped with aerosol mass spectrometers have been carried out mainly in large conurbations and in areas directly affected by their outflow, whereas lesser efforts have been dedicated to continental areas characterised by a less dense urbanisation. We present here the results obtained at a background site in the Po Valley, Italy, in summer 2009. For the first time in Europe, six state-of-the-art spectrometric techniques were used in parallel: aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS), two aerosol mass spectrometers (high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer - HR-ToF-AMS and soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer - SP-AMS), thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatography (TAG), chemical ionisation mass spectrometry (CIMS) and (offline) proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy. The results indicate that, under high-pressure conditions, atmospheric stratification at night and early morning hours led to the accumulation of aerosols produced by anthropogenic sources distributed over the Po Valley plain. Such aerosols include primary components such as black carbon (BC), secondary semivolatile compounds such as ammonium nitrate and amines and a class of monocarboxylic acids which correspond to the AMS cooking organic aerosol (COA) already identified in urban areas. In daytime, the entrainment of aged air masses in the mixing layer is responsible for the accumulation of low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA) and also for the recycling of non-volatile primary species such as black carbon. According to organic aerosol source apportionment, anthropogenic aerosols accumulating in the lower layers overnight accounted for 38% of organic aerosol mass on average, another 21% was accounted for by aerosols recirculated in

  12. Prediction of the Chapman-Jouguet chemical equilibrium state in a detonation wave from first principles based reactive molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Dezhou; Zybin, Sergey V; An, Qi; Goddard, William A; Huang, Fenglei

    2016-01-21

    The combustion or detonation of reacting materials at high temperature and pressure can be characterized by the Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) state that describes the chemical equilibrium of the products at the end of the reaction zone of the detonation wave for sustained detonation. This provides the critical properties and product kinetics for input to macroscale continuum simulations of energetic materials. We propose the ReaxFF Reactive Dynamics to CJ point protocol (Rx2CJ) for predicting the CJ state parameters, providing the means to predict the performance of new materials prior to synthesis and characterization, allowing the simulation based design to be done in silico. Our Rx2CJ method is based on atomistic reactive molecular dynamics (RMD) using the QM-derived ReaxFF force field. We validate this method here by predicting the CJ point and detonation products for three typical energetic materials. We find good agreement between the predicted and experimental detonation velocities, indicating that this method can reliably predict the CJ state using modest levels of computation.

  13. A finite state model for respiratory motion analysis in image guided radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Huanmei [College of Computer and Information Science, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Sharp, Gregory C [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Salzberg, Betty [College of Computer and Information Science, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Kaeli, David [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Shirato, Hiroki [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Jiang, Steve B [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States)

    2004-12-07

    Effective image guided radiation treatment of a moving tumour requires adequate information on respiratory motion characteristics. For margin expansion, beam tracking and respiratory gating, the tumour motion must be quantified for pretreatment planning and monitored on-line. We propose a finite state model for respiratory motion analysis that captures our natural understanding of breathing stages. In this model, a regular breathing cycle is represented by three line segments, exhale, end-of-exhale and inhale, while abnormal breathing is represented by an irregular breathing state. In addition, we describe an on-line implementation of this model in one dimension. We found this model can accurately characterize a wide variety of patient breathing patterns. This model was used to describe the respiratory motion for 23 patients with peak-to-peak motion greater than 7 mm. The average root mean square error over all patients was less than 1 mm and no patient has an error worse than 1.5 mm. Our model provides a convenient tool to quantify respiratory motion characteristics, such as patterns of frequency changes and amplitude changes, and can be applied to internal or external motion, including internal tumour position, abdominal surface, diaphragm, spirometry and other surrogates.

  14. Increased regional homogeneity in internet addiction disorder: a resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jun; GAO Xue-ping; Isoken Osunde; LI Xin; ZHOU Shun-ke; ZHENG Hui-rong; LI Ling-jiang

    2010-01-01

    Background Internet addition disorder (lAD) is currently becoming a serious mental health problem among Chinese adolescents. The pathogenesis of IAD, however, remains unclear. The purpose of this study applied regional homogeneity (ReHo) method to analyze encephalic functional characteristic of IAD college students under resting state. Methods Functional magnetic resonanc image (fMRI) was performed in 19 IAD college students and 19 controls under resting state. ReHo method was used to analyze the differences between the average ReHo in two groups. Results The following increased ReHo brain regions were found in IAD group compared with control group: cerebellum,brainstem, right cingulate gyrus, bilateral parahippocampus, right frontal lobe (rectal gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus and middle frontal gyrus), left superior frontal gyrus, left precuneus, right postcentral gyrus, right middle occipital gyrus, right inferior temporal gyrus, left superior temporal gyrus and middle temporal gyrus. The decreased ReHo brain regions were not found in the IAD group compared with the control group. Conclusions There are abnormalities in regional homogeneity in IAD college students compared with the controls and enhancement of synchronization in most encephalic regions can be found. The results reflect the functional change of brain in IAD college students. The connections between the enhancement of synchronization among cerebellum, brainstem, limbic lobe, frontal lobe and apical lobe may be relative to reward pathways.

  15. Chemical, colloidal and mechanical contributions to the state of water in wood cell walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertinetti, L.; Fratzl, P.; Zemb, T.

    2016-08-01

    The properties of wood depend strongly on its water content, but the physicochemical basis for the interaction of water with cell wall components is poorly understood. Due to the importance of the problem both in the context of wood technology and the biological function of swelling and dehydration for growth stresses and seed dispersal, a wealth of descriptive data has been accumulated but a microscopic theory of water-biomolecular interactions is missing. We develop here, at a primitive level, a minimal parameter-free, coarse-grained, model of wood secondary cell walls to predict water absorption, in the form of an equation of state. It includes for the first time all three—mechanical, colloidal and chemical—contributions, taking into account the cell walls microstructure. The hydration force around the elongated cellulose crystals and entropy of mixing of the matrix polymers (hemicelluloses and lignin) are the dominant contributions driving the swelling. The elastic energy needed to swell the composite is the main term opposing water uptake. Hysteresis is not predicted but water uptake versus humidity, is reproduced in a large temperature range. Within this framework, the origin of wood dissolution and different effects of wood treatments on water sorption can be understood at the molecular level.

  16. New Patterns in Steady-State Chemical Kinetics: Intersections, Coincidences, Map of Events (Two-Step Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Branco Pinto

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available New patterns of steady-state chemical kinetics for continuously stirred-tank reactors (CSTR have been found, i.e., intersections, maxima and coincidences, for two-step mechanism A↔B→C. There were found elegant analytical relationships for characteristics of these patterns (space times, values of concentrations and rates allowing kinetic parameters to be easily determined. It was demonstrated that for the pair of species involved into the irreversible reaction (B and C, the space time of their corresponding concentration dependence intersection is invariant and does not depend on the initial conditions of the system. Maps of patterns are presented for visualization of their combinations and ranking in space time, and values of concentration and rates.

  17. Unconditionally stable, second-order accurate schemes for solid state phase transformations driven by mechano-chemical spinodal decomposition

    CERN Document Server

    Sagiyama, Koki; Garikipati, Krishna

    2015-01-01

    We consider solid state phase transformations that are caused by free energy densities with domains of non-convexity in strain-composition space. We refer to the non-convex domains as mechano-chemical spinodals. The non-convexity with respect to composition causes segregation into phases with different crystal structures. If, for one of these crystal structures, the free energy density is also non-convex with respect to strain, there is potential for the corresponding phase to further separate into multiple variants. For mathematical well-posedness the free energy description must be enhanced by interface terms that penalize gradients with respect to strain and composition. A system of PDEs results that couples the classical Cahn-Hilliard equation with those of gradient elasticity. Since the materials systems of interest display finite strains, the appropriate description is Toupin's theory of gradient elasticity at finite strains. The presence of strain and composition gradients in the free energy density le...

  18. Some Physico-Chemical and Bacteriological Characteristics of Soil Samples around Calabar Metropolis, Cross River State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okorafor, K. A

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Physico-chemical and bacteriological parameters of soil samples around Calabar Metropolis, Cross River State, Nigeria were examined to determine the pollution status of the soil quality. Results of the physico-chemical analysis showed that the soil samples had pH range of 4.4 – 5.2. Tinapa soil has the highest value of Copper (39.63mg/kg and Nickel (11.36mg/kg and Anantigha has the highest value of Zinc (14.59mg/kg, Iron Fe (78.19mg/kg and Manganese (47.42mg/kg. The results revealed a high total count of 23.5x106 cfu/g in Anantigha and 24.5x10-3 cfu/g in Tinapa for bacteria and fungi respectively. Some bacteria isolates found during the study includes, Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilus, Clostridium sp, Arthrobacter sp, Streptomyces sp, Nocardia sp, Pseudomonas sp and Micrococcus sp., and Fungal isolates includes, Actinomycete sp, Verticullium sp, Aspergillus sp, Mucor sp, Nigospora sp and Paecilomyces sp. From the result, soil sample from Anantigha have comparatively the highest Total Bacterial Counts compared to the other two locations. The health implications of this work is that Anantigha and Tinapa areas being low lying were likely, because of the presence of Escherichia coli, to experience gastro-intestinal diseases such as dysentery and cholera than the Ediba environments.

  19. Quasi-solid state dye-sensitized solar cells based on pyridine or imidazole containing copolymer chemically crosslinked gel electrolytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Quasi-solid state dye-sensitized solar cells based on chemically crosslinking with backbone polymers of poly(vinylpyridine-co-acrylonitrile) (P(VP-co-AN)) or poly(vinylimidazole-co-acrylonitrile) (P(VIM-co- AN)) and diiodide compounds of I(CH2)6I or I(CH2CH2O)nCH2CH2I solidified EC/PC/KI/I2 gel electrolytes have been fabricated. The ionic conductivities and apparent diffusion coefficients of I3-Of the electrolytes and cell performances have been investigated. Providing chemically crosslinking points, pyridine or imidazole from the backbone polymers benefited the open circuit voltage and fill factor of the cells. Consequently, the overall energy conversion efficiencies of the quasi-solid DSSCs improved over 10% even near 20% from that of the liquid electrolyte before solidification. Besides, the employing of crosslinker I(CH2CH2O)nCH2CH2I showed higher electrolytic and cell characters than that of I(CH2)6I.

  20. The modelling of dynamic chemical state of paper machine unit operations; Dynaamisen kemiallisen tilan mallintaminen paperikoneen yksikkoeoperaatioissa - MPKT 04

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ylen, J.P.; Jutila, P. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland)

    1998-12-31

    The chemical state of paper mass is considered to be a key factor to the smooth operation of the paper machine. There are simulators that have been developed either for dynamic energy and mass balances or for static chemical phenomena, but the combination of these is not a straight forward task. Control Engineering Laboratory of Helsinki University of Technology has studied the paper machine wet end phenomena with the emphasis on pH-modelling. VTT (Technical Research Centre of Finland) Process Physics has used thermodynamical modelling successfully in e.g. Bleaching processes. In this research the different approaches are combined in order to get reliable dynamical models and modelling procedures for various unit operations. A flexible pilot process will be constructed and different materials will be processed starting from simple inorganic substances (e.g. Calcium carbonate and distilled water) working towards more complex masses (thick pulp with process waters and various reagents). The pilot process is well instrumented with ion selective electrodes, total calcium analysator and all basic measurements. (orig.)

  1. Steady state anisotropy two-photon microscopy resolves multiple, spectrally similar fluorophores, enabling in vivo multilabel imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubach, J Matthew; Vinegoni, Claudio; Weissleder, Ralph

    2014-08-01

    The use of spectrally distinguishable fluorescent dyes enables imaging of multiple targets. However, in two-photon microscopy, the number of fluorescent labels with distinct emission spectra that can be effectively excited and resolved is constrained by the confined tuning range of the excitation laser and the broad and overlapping nature of fluorophore two-photon absorption spectra. This limitation effectively reduces the number of available imaging channels. Here, we demonstrate that two-photon steady state anisotropy imaging (2PSSA) offers the capability to resolve otherwise unresolvable fluorescent tracers both in live cells and in mouse tumor models. This approach expands the number of biological targets that can be imaged simultaneously, increasing the total amount of information that can be obtained through imaging.

  2. Steady-state acceptor fluorescence anisotropy imaging under evanescent excitation for visualisation of FRET at the plasma membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Devauges

    Full Text Available We present a novel imaging system combining total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF microscopy with measurement of steady-state acceptor fluorescence anisotropy in order to perform live cell Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET imaging at the plasma membrane. We compare directly the imaging performance of fluorescence anisotropy resolved TIRF with epifluorescence illumination. The use of high numerical aperture objective for TIRF required correction for induced depolarization factors. This arrangement enabled visualisation of conformational changes of a Raichu-Cdc42 FRET biosensor by measurement of intramolecular FRET between eGFP and mRFP1. Higher activity of the probe was found at the cell plasma membrane compared to intracellularly. Imaging fluorescence anisotropy in TIRF allowed clear differentiation of the Raichu-Cdc42 biosensor from negative control mutants. Finally, inhibition of Cdc42 was imaged dynamically in live cells, where we show temporal changes of the activity of the Raichu-Cdc42 biosensor.

  3. In Situ Solid-State Reactions Monitored by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy: Temperature-Induced Proton Transfer Leads to Chemical Shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Joanna S; Walczak, Monika; Jaye, Cherno; Fischer, Daniel A

    2016-10-24

    The dramatic colour and phase alteration with the solid-state, temperature-dependent reaction between squaric acid and 4,4'-bipyridine has been probed in situ with X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The electronic and chemical sensitivity to the local atomic environment through chemical shifts in the near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) revealed proton transfer from the acid to the bipyridine base through the change in nitrogen protonation state in the high-temperature form. Direct detection of proton transfer coupled with structural analysis elucidates the nature of the solid-state process, with intermolecular proton transfer occurring along an acid-base chain followed by a domino effect to the subsequent acid-base chains, leading to the rapid migration along the length of the crystal. NEXAFS thereby conveys the ability to monitor the nature of solid-state chemical reactions in situ, without the need for a priori information or long-range order.

  4. Feasibility and limitation of constructive interference in steady-state (CISS) MR imaging in neonates with lumbosacral myeloschisis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashiguchi, Kimiaki; Morioka, Takato; Yoshida, Fumiaki; Miyagi, Yasushi; Nagata, Shinji; Sasaki, Tomio [Kyushu University, Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Mihara, Futoshi; Yoshiura, Takashi [Kyushu University, Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2007-07-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate three-dimensional Fourier transformation-constructive interference in steady-state (CISS) imaging as a preoperative anatomical evaluation of the relationship between the placode, spinal nerve roots, CSF space, and the myelomeningocele sac in neonates with lumbosacral myeloschisis. Five consecutive patients with lumbosacral myeloschisis were included in this study. Magnetic resonance (MR) CISS, conventional T1-weighted (T1-W) and T2-weighted (T2-W) images were acquired on the day of birth to compare the anatomical findings with each sequence. We also performed curvilinear reconstruction of the CISS images, which can be reconstructed along the curved spinal cord and neural placode. Neural placodes were demonstrated in two patients on T1-W images and in three patients on T2-W images. T2-W images revealed a small number of nerve roots in two patients, while no nerve roots were demonstrated on T1-W images. In contrast, CISS images clearly demonstrated neural placodes and spinal nerve roots in four patients. These findings were in accordance with intraoperative findings. Curvilinear CISS images demonstrated the neuroanatomy around the myeloschisis in one slice. The resulting images were degraded by a band artifact that obstructed fine anatomical analysis of the nerve roots in the ventral CSF space. The placode and nerve roots could not be visualized in one patient in whom the CSF space was narrow due to the collapse of the myelomeningocele sac. MR CISS imaging is superior to T1-W and T2-W imaging for demonstrating the neural placode and nerve roots, although problems remain in terms of artifacts. (orig.)

  5. NON-EQUILIBRIUM STATIONARY STATE IN CHEMICAL REACTION OF SiO2/Fe AT INTERFACE OF SLAG/METAL AND ITS STABILITY DURING ARC WELDING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiaoquan; DU Zeyu; YANG Xuguang

    2007-01-01

    For characteristics of open and far from thermodynamic equilibrium in welding chemical reaction, a new kind of quantitative method, which is used to analyze direction and extent for chemical reaction of SiO2/Fe during quasi-steady state period, is introduced with the concept of non-equilibrium stationary state. The main idea is based on thermodynamic driving forces, which result in non-zero thermodynamic fluxes and lead to chemical reaction far away from thermodynamic equilibrium. There exists certain dynamic equilibrium relationship between rates of diffusion fluxes in liquid phase of reactants or products and the rate equation of chemical reaction when welding is in quasi-steady state. As result of this, a group of non-linear equations containing concentrations of all substances at interface of slag/liquid-metal may be established. Moreover the stability of this non-equilibrium stationary state is discussed using dissipative structure theory and it is concluded theoretically that this non-equilibrium stationary state for welding chemical reaction is of stability.

  6. Synchrotron-based multiple-beam FTIR chemical imaging of a multi-layered polymer in transmission and reflection: towards cultural heritage applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Miriam; Mattson, Eric; Schmidt Patterson, Catherine; Alavi, Zahrasadet; Carson, David; Hirschmugl, Carol J.

    2013-04-01

    IRENI (infrared environmental imaging) is a recently commissioned Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) chemical imaging beamline at the Synchrotron Radiation Center in Madison, WI, USA. This novel beamline extracts 320 mrad of radiation, horizontally, from one bending magnet. The optical transport separates and recombines the beam into 12 parallel collimated beams to illuminate a commercial FTIR microspectrometer (Bruker Hyperion 3000) equipped with a focal plane array detector where single pixels in the detector image a projected sample area of either 0.54×0.54 μm2 or 2×2 μm2, depending in the measurement geometry. The 12 beams are partially overlapped and defocused, similar to wide-field microscopy, homogeneously illuminating a relatively large sample area compared to single-beam arrangements. Both transmission and reflection geometries are used to examine a model cross section from a layered polymer material. The compromises for sample preparation and measurement strategies are discussed, and the chemical composition and spatial definition of the layers are distinguished in chemical images generated from data sets. Deconvolution methods that may allow more detailed data analysis are also discussed.

  7. Estimation and Prediction of Bioconcentration Factors of Nonionic Organic Chemicals in Fish by Electrotopological State Indices and Structural Parameter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Chang-Jun; YANG Wei-Hua; MU Lai-Long

    2008-01-01

    Based on the characteristics of atom types, Hall's electrotopological state indices (En) are calculated for 165 nonionic organic compounds. On the basis of the characteristics of substituent and conjugated matrix, a novel molecular structure parameter (G) is defined and calcu- lated for 165 molecules in this paper. En and G show good structural selectivity for organic molecules. G, a satisfactory relationship between bioconcentration factor (BCF) and En, is expressed as: lgBCF = -0.283 + 1.246G + 0.079E42 + 0.351E9 - 0.063E17 (n' = 122, R = 0.967, F = 425.636, s = 0.394), which could provide estimation and prediction for the lgBCF of nonionic organic chemicals. Furthermore, the model is examined to validate overall robustness with Jackknife tests, and the independent variables in model do not exist cross correlation with VIF. All these regression results show that the new parameter G and electrotopological state index have good rationality and efficiency. It is concluded that the En and G will be used widely in quantitative structure-property/activity relationship (QSPR/QSAR) research.

  8. Probing physical and chemical changes in cortical bone due to osteoporosis and type 2 diabetes by solid-state NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Donghua; Taylor, Amanda; Rendina, Beth; Smith, Brenda; Department of Physics Collaboration; Department of Nutritional Sciences Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    Approximately 1.5 million fractures occur each year in the U.S. due to osteoporosis, which is characterized by decreased bone mineral density and deterioration of bone micro-architecture. On the other hand, type 2 diabetes also significantly increases fracture risks, despite having a normal or even higher bone mineral density. Solid-state NMR has been applied to bone tissues from normal and disease-inflicted mouse models to study structural and chemical dynamics as the disease progresses. Proton relaxation experiments were performed to measure water populations in the bone matrix and pores. Collagen-bound water has strong influence on bone resilience, while water content in the pores reveals amount and size of pores from micro- to millimeter range. Other biochemical and atomic-scale structural alterations in the mineral and organic phases and their interface were investigated by proton, phosphorus, and carbon NMR spectroscopy. Experiments were designed to individually detect different types of phosphorus environments: near the mineral surface, similar to hydroxyapatite, and deficient of hydrogens due to substitution of the hydroxyl group by other ions. A new method was also developed for accurate quantification of each phosphorus species. The authors appreciate financial support for this project from the College of Human Sciences and the College of Arts and Sciences, Oklahoma State University.

  9. Comparative analysis of iterative reconstruction algorithms with resolution recovery and new solid state cameras dedicated to myocardial perfusion imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambilla, Marco; Lecchi, Michela; Matheoud, Roberta; Leva, Lucia; Lucignani, Giovanni; Marcassa, Claudio; Zoccarato, Orazio

    2017-03-23

    New technologies are available in myocardial perfusion imaging. They include new software that recovers image resolution and limits image noise, multifocal collimators and dedicated cardiac cameras in which solid-state detectors are used and all available detectors are constrained to imaging just the cardiac field of view. These innovations resulted in shortened study times or reduced administered activity to patients, while preserving image quality. Many single center and some multicenter studies have been published during the introduction of these innovations in the clinical practice. Most of these studies were lead in the framework of "agreement studies" between different methods of clinical measurement. They aimed to demonstrate that these new software/hardware solutions allow the acquisition of images with reduced acquisition time or administered activity with comparable results (as for image quality, image interpretation, perfusion defect quantification, left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction) to the standard-time or standard-dose SPECT acquired with a conventional gamma camera and reconstructed with the traditional FBP method, considered as the gold standard. The purpose of this review is to provide the reader with a comprehensive understanding of the pro and cons of the different approaches summarizing the achievements reached so far and the issues that need further investigations.

  10. Imaging the photodissociation dynamics of the methyl radical from the 3s and 3pz Rydberg states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marggi Poullain, Sonia; Chicharro, David V; Zanchet, Alexandre; González, Marta G; Rubio-Lago, Luis; Senent, María L; García-Vela, Alberto; Bañares, Luis

    2016-06-22

    The photodissociation dynamics of the methyl radical from the 3s and 3pz Rydberg states have been studied using the velocity map and slice ion imaging in combination with pump-probe nanosecond laser pulses. The reported translational energy and angular distributions of the H((2)S) photofragment detected by (2+1) REMPI highlight different dissociation mechanisms for the 3s and 3pz Rydberg states. A narrow peak in the translational energy distribution and an anisotropic angular distribution characterize the fast 3s photodissociation, while for the 3pz state Boltzmann-type translational energy and isotropic angular distributions are found. High level ab initio calculations have been performed in order to elucidate the photodissociation mechanisms from the two Rydberg states and to rationalize the experimental results. The calculated potential energy curves highlight a typical predissociation mechanism for the 3s state, characterized by the coupling between the 3s Rydberg state and a valence repulsive state. On the other hand, the photodissociation on the 3pz state is initiated by a predissociation process due to the coupling between the 3pz Rydberg state and a valence repulsive state and constrained, later on, by two conical intersections that allow the system to relax to lower electronic states. Such a mechanism opens up different reaction pathways leading to CH2 photofragments in different electronic states and inducing a transfer of energy between translational and internal modes.

  11. Imaging the photodissociation dynamics of the methyl radical from the 3s and 3pz Rydberg states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marggi Poullain, Sonia; Chicharro, David V.; Zanchet, Alexandre; González, Marta G.; Rubio-Lago, Luis; Senent, María L.; García-Vela, Alberto; Bañares, Luis

    2016-01-01

    The photodissociation dynamics of the methyl radical from the 3s and 3pz Rydberg states have been studied using velocity map and slice ion imaging in combination with pump-probe nanosecond laser pulses. The reported translational energy and angular distributions of the H(2S) photofragment detected by (2+1) REMPI highlight different dissociation mechanisms for the 3s and 3pz Rydberg states. A narrow peak in the translational energy distribution and an anisotropic angular distribution characterizes the fast 3s photodissociation, while for the 3pz state Boltzmann-type translational energy and isotropic angular distributions are found. High level ab initio calculations have been performed in order to elucidate the photodissociation mechanisms from the two Rydberg states and to rationalize the experimental results. The calculated potential energy curves highlight a typical predissociation mechanism for the 3s state, characterized by the coupling between the 3s Rydberg state and a valence repulsive state. On the other hand, the photodissociation on the 3pz state is initiated by