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Sample records for chemical leaching reject

  1. Potential use of a chemical leaching reject from a kaolin industry as agricultural fertilizer Uso potencial do resíduo químico lixiviado duma indústria de caulim como adubo de terras agrícolas

    OpenAIRE

    Fabiana Rodrigues Ribeiro; Fernando Barboza Egreja Filho; José Domingos Fabris; Wagner da Nova Mussel; Roberto Ferreira Novais

    2007-01-01

    The industrial refining of kaolin involves the removal of iron oxides and hydroxides along with other impurities that cause discoloration of the final product and depreciate its commercial value, particularly undesirable if destined to the paper industry. The chemical leaching in the industrial processing requires treatments with sodium hyposulfite, metallic zinc, or sulfuric and phosphoric acids, in order to reduce, dissolve and remove ferruginous compounds. To mitigate the environmental imp...

  2. Potential use of a chemical leaching reject from a kaolin industry as agricultural fertilizer Uso potencial do resíduo químico lixiviado duma indústria de caulim como adubo de terras agrícolas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Rodrigues Ribeiro

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The industrial refining of kaolin involves the removal of iron oxides and hydroxides along with other impurities that cause discoloration of the final product and depreciate its commercial value, particularly undesirable if destined to the paper industry. The chemical leaching in the industrial processing requires treatments with sodium hyposulfite, metallic zinc, or sulfuric and phosphoric acids, in order to reduce, dissolve and remove ferruginous compounds. To mitigate the environmental impact, the acidic effluent from the leaching process must be neutralized, usually with calcium oxide. The resulting solid residue contains phosphorous, zinc, and calcium, among other essential nutrients for plant growth, suggesting its use as a macro and micronutrient source. Samples of such a solid industrial residue were used here to evaluate their potential as soil fertilizer in an incubation greenhouse experiment with two soil samples (clayey and medium-textured. The small pH shift generated by applying the residue to the soil was not a limiting factor for its use in agriculture. The evolution of the concentrations of exchangeable calcium, and phosphorous and zinc extractability by Mehlich-1 extractant during the incubation period confirms the potential use of this industrial residue as agricultural fertilizer.O beneficiamento industrial do caulim envolve a remoção de óxidos e hidróxidos de ferro e outras impurezas, que conferem coloração indesejável ao produto final e depreciam seu valor comercial, particularmente se destinado à indústria de papel. A lixiviação química, na linha de processamento industrial, pode ser feita com tratamentos com hipossulfito de sódio, zinco metálico e ácidos sulfúrico e fosfórico, para redução, solubilização e remoção de compostos ferruginosos. A fim de minimizar o impacto ambiental, o efluente ácido, procedente da etapa de lixiviação, deve ser inicialmente neutralizado, usualmente por óxido de c

  3. Improved pyrite rejection by chemically-modified fine coal flotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J.D.; Ye, Y.; Jin, R.

    1989-01-01

    Improved pyrite rejection during fine coal flotation can be achieved by chemical pretreatment of the coal prior to flotation. The process involves conditioning the suspension with potassium monopersulfate or other peroxy compounds followed by conventional flotation. The ambient-temperature treatment seems to improve the hydrophobic character of certain low-rank coals as is evident from induction time measurements and bench-scale flotation experiments. In addition, the chemical pretreatment leads to an improvement in ash rejection and to enhanced depression of pyrite. 23 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Leaching characteristics of Idaho Chemical Processing Plant calcines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents leaching studies conducted on two non-radioactive, pilot-plant calcines produced at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. The two pilot-plant calcines simulate radioactive calcine which may be produced in the New Waste Calcining Facility by blending high-level liquid waste and sodium-bearing liquid waste. The calcines were subjected to the Environmental Protection Agency's Extraction Procedure Toxicity Test and to a test based on the Materials Characterization Center's MCC-1 Static Leach Test. Following the protocol of these tests, leachates were obtained and analyzed for chemical composition to develop information about component mass loss and total mass loss. Surface analysis techniques were employed in an attempt to identify species that were leached from the calcines, but later precipitated during the MCC-1 tests. This report also documents leaching studies conducted on a radioactive fluorinel-sodium blend calcine produced in the New Waste Calcining Facility. This calcine was also subjected to a static leach test based on the MCC-1 test. The leachate was analyzed to develop information about total mass loss and leaching characteristics of radioactive species. 12 refs., 9 figs., 9 tabs

  5. Leaching characteristics of Idaho Chemical Processing Plant calcines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chipman, N A

    1990-02-01

    This report documents leaching studies conducted on two non-radioactive, pilot-plant calcines produced at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. The two pilot-plant calcines simulate radioactive calcine which may be produced in the New Waste Calcining Facility by blending high-level liquid waste and sodium-bearing liquid waste. The calcines were subjected to the Environmental Protection Agency's Extraction Procedure Toxicity Test and to a test based on the Materials Characterization Center's MCC-1 Static Leach Test. Following the protocol of these tests, leachates were obtained and analyzed for chemical composition to develop information about component mass loss and total mass loss. Surface analysis techniques were employed in an attempt to identify species that were leached from the calcines, but later precipitated during the MCC-1 tests. This report also documents leaching studies conducted on a radioactive fluorinel-sodium blend calcine produced in the New Waste Calcining Facility. This calcine was also subjected to a static leach test based on the MCC-1 test. The leachate was analyzed to develop information about total mass loss and leaching characteristics of radioactive species. 12 refs., 9 figs., 9 tabs.

  6. Chemical leaching methods and measurements of marine labile particulate Fe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revels, B. N.; John, S.

    2012-12-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential nutrient for life. Yet its low solubility and concentration in the ocean limits marine phytoplankton productivity in many regions of the world. Dissolved phase Fe (0.4μm) may contain an important, labile reservoir of Fe that may also be available to phytoplankton. However, concentration data alone cannot elucidate the sources of particulate Fe to the ocean and to what extent particulate iron may support phytoplankton growth. Isotopic analysis of natural particles may help to elucidate the biogeochemical cycling of Fe, though it is important to find a leaching method which accesses bioavailable Fe. Thirty-three different chemical leaches were performed on a marine sediment reference material, MESS-3. The combinations included four different acids (25% acetic acid, 0.01M HCl, 0.5M HCl, 0.1M H2SO4 at pH2), various redox conditions (0.02M hydroxylamine hydrochloride or 0.02M H2O2), three temperatures (25°C, 60°C, 90°C), and three time points (10 minutes, 2 hours, 24 hours). Leached Fe concentrations varied from 1mg/g to 35mg/g, with longer treatment times, stronger acids, and hotter temperatures generally associated with an increase in leached Fe. δ56Fe in these leaches varied from -1.0‰ to +0.2‰. Interestingly, regardless of leaching method used, there was a very similar relationship between the amount of Fe leached from the particles and the δ56Fe of this iron. Isotopically lighter δ56Fe values were associated with smaller amounts of leached Fe whereas isotopically heavier δ56Fe values were associated with larger amounts of leached Fe. Two alternate hypotheses could explain these data. Either, the particles may contain pools of isotopically light Fe that are easily accessed early in dissolution, or isotopically light Fe may be preferentially leached from the particle due to a kinetic isotope effect during dissolution. To explore the first hypothesis, we modeled dissolution of Fe from particles assuming two separate pools, labile

  7. HEPA filter leaching concept validation trials at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The enclosed report documents six New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) HEPA filter leaching trials conducted at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant using a filter leaching system to validate the filter leaching treatment concept. The test results show that a modified filter leaching system will be able to successfully remove both hazardous and radiological constituents to RCRA disposal levels. Based on the success of the filter leach trials, the existing leaching system will be modified to provide a safe, simple, effective, and operationally flexible filter leaching system

  8. Coupling between chemical degradation and mechanical behaviour of leached concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is in the context of the long term behavior of concrete employed in radioactive waste disposal. The objective is to study the coupled chemo-mechanical modelling of concrete. In the first part of this contribution, experimental investigations are described where the effects of the calcium leaching process of concrete on its mechanical properties are highlighted. An accelerated method has been chosen to perform this leaching process by using an ammonium nitrate solution. In the second part, we present a coupled phenomenological chemo-mechanical model that represents the degradation of concrete materials. On one hand, the chemical behavior is described by the simplified calcium leaching approach of cement paste and mortar. Then a homogenization approach using the asymptotic development is presented to take into account the influence of the presence of aggregates in concrete. And on the other hand, the mechanical part of the modelling is given. Here continuum damage mechanics is used to describe the mechanical degradation of concrete. The growth of inelastic strains observed during the mechanical tests is describes by means of a plastic like model. The model is established on the basis of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes framework. The coupled nonlinear problem at hand is addressed within the context of the finite element method. Finally, numerical simulations are compared with the experimental results for validation. (author)

  9. Leaching properties and chemical compositions of calcines produced at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    No significant chemical differences were determined between retrieved and fresh calcine based on chemical and spectrochemical analyses. Little can be derived from the amounts of the radioisotopes present in the retrieved calcine samples other than the ratios of strontium-90 to cesium-137 are typical of aged fission product. The variations in concentrations of radionuclides within the composite samples of each bin also reflect the differences in compositions of waste solutions calcined. In general the leaching characteristics of both calcines by distilled water are similar. In both materials the radionuclides of cesium and strontium were selectively leached at significant rates, although cesium leached much more completely from the alumina calcine than from the zirconia calcine. Cesium and strontium are probably contained in both calcines as nitrate salts and also as fluoride salts in zirconia calcine, all of which are at least slightly soluble in water. Radionuclides of cerium, ruthenium, and plutonium in both calcines were highly resistant to leaching and leached at rates similar to or less than those of the matrix elements. These elements exist as polyvalent metal ions in the waste solutions before calcination and they probably form insoluble oxides and fluorides in the calcine. The relatively slow leaching of nitrate ion from zirconia calcine and radiocesium from both calcines suggests that the calcine matrix in some manner prevents complete or immediate contact of the soluble ions with water. Whether radiostrontium forms slightly fluoride salts or forms nitrate salts which are protected in the same manner as radiocesium is unknown. Nevertheless, selective leaching of cesium and strontim is retarded in some manner by the calcine matrix

  10. Removal of phosphorus from iron ores by chemical leaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Yong-shi; JIANG Tao; YANG Yong-bin; LI Qian; LI Guang-hui; GUO Yu-feng

    2006-01-01

    Alkali-leaching and acid-leaching were proposed for the dephosphorization of Changde iron ore, which contains an average of 1.12% for phosphorus content. Sodium hydroxide, sulfuriced, hydrochloric and nitric acids were used for the preparation of leach solutions. The results show that phosphorus occurring as apatite phase could be removed by alkali-leaching, but those occurring in the iron phase could not. Sulfuric acid is the most effective among the three kinds of acid. 91.61% phosphorus removal was attained with 1% sulfuric acid after leaching for 20 min at room temperature. Iron loss during acid-leaching can be negligible, which was less than 0.25%.The pH value of solution after leaching with 1% sulfuric acid was about 0.86, which means acid would not be exhausted during the process and it could be recycled, and the recycle of sulfuric acid solution would make the dephosphorization process more economical.

  11. The performance with data processing of chemical treatment with leaching and bio-leaching

    OpenAIRE

    Agron, Alili; Krstev, Boris; Krstev, Aleksandar; Stamenov, Goran

    2015-01-01

    The refractory or low grade lead/zinc domestic ores in Republic of Macedonia are investigated by conventional separation technology or flotation separation. In the meantime, investigations are directed to the new possibilities of leaching by microorganisms – bioleaching. The paper is result of these technologies and investigations carried out for recovery of in the mentioned ores. Using Simplex EVOP and computer program Multisimplex performances are appropriate and most acceptable and excel...

  12. Computational Chemical Imaging for Cardiovascular Pathology: Chemical Microscopic Imaging Accurately Determines Cardiac Transplant Rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Saumya; Reddy, Vijaya B.; Bhargava, Rohit; Raman, Jaishankar

    2015-01-01

    Rejection is a common problem after cardiac transplants leading to significant number of adverse events and deaths, particularly in the first year of transplantation. The gold standard to identify rejection is endomyocardial biopsy. This technique is complex, cumbersome and requires a lot of expertise in the correct interpretation of stained biopsy sections. Traditional histopathology cannot be used actively or quickly during cardiac interventions or surgery. Our objective was to develop a stain-less approach using an emerging technology, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging to identify different components of cardiac tissue by their chemical and molecular basis aided by computer recognition, rather than by visual examination using optical microscopy. We studied this technique in assessment of cardiac transplant rejection to evaluate efficacy in an example of complex cardiovascular pathology. We recorded data from human cardiac transplant patients’ biopsies, used a Bayesian classification protocol and developed a visualization scheme to observe chemical differences without the need of stains or human supervision. Using receiver operating characteristic curves, we observed probabilities of detection greater than 95% for four out of five histological classes at 10% probability of false alarm at the cellular level while correctly identifying samples with the hallmarks of the immune response in all cases. The efficacy of manual examination can be significantly increased by observing the inherent biochemical changes in tissues, which enables us to achieve greater diagnostic confidence in an automated, label-free manner. We developed a computational pathology system that gives high contrast images and seems superior to traditional staining procedures. This study is a prelude to the development of real time in situ imaging systems, which can assist interventionists and surgeons actively during procedures. PMID:25932912

  13. Computational chemical imaging for cardiovascular pathology: chemical microscopic imaging accurately determines cardiac transplant rejection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saumya Tiwari

    Full Text Available Rejection is a common problem after cardiac transplants leading to significant number of adverse events and deaths, particularly in the first year of transplantation. The gold standard to identify rejection is endomyocardial biopsy. This technique is complex, cumbersome and requires a lot of expertise in the correct interpretation of stained biopsy sections. Traditional histopathology cannot be used actively or quickly during cardiac interventions or surgery. Our objective was to develop a stain-less approach using an emerging technology, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopic imaging to identify different components of cardiac tissue by their chemical and molecular basis aided by computer recognition, rather than by visual examination using optical microscopy. We studied this technique in assessment of cardiac transplant rejection to evaluate efficacy in an example of complex cardiovascular pathology. We recorded data from human cardiac transplant patients' biopsies, used a Bayesian classification protocol and developed a visualization scheme to observe chemical differences without the need of stains or human supervision. Using receiver operating characteristic curves, we observed probabilities of detection greater than 95% for four out of five histological classes at 10% probability of false alarm at the cellular level while correctly identifying samples with the hallmarks of the immune response in all cases. The efficacy of manual examination can be significantly increased by observing the inherent biochemical changes in tissues, which enables us to achieve greater diagnostic confidence in an automated, label-free manner. We developed a computational pathology system that gives high contrast images and seems superior to traditional staining procedures. This study is a prelude to the development of real time in situ imaging systems, which can assist interventionists and surgeons actively during procedures.

  14. The removal of mercury from solid mixed waste using chemical leaching processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The focus of this research was to evaluate chemical leaching as a technique to treat soils, sediments, and glass contaminated with either elemental mercury or a combination of several mercury species. Potassium iodide/iodine solutions were investigated as chemical leaching agents for contaminated soils and sediments. Clean, synthetic soil material and surrogate storm sewer sediments contaminated with mercury were treated with KI/I2 solutions. It was observed that these leaching solutions could reduce the mercury concentration in soil and sediments by 99.8%. Evaluation of selected posttreatment sediment samples revealed that leachable mercury levels in the treated solids exceeded RCRA requirements. The results of these studies suggest that KI/I2 leaching is a treatment process that can be used to remove large quantities of mercury from contaminated soils and sediments and may be the only treatment required if treatment goals are established on Hg residual concentrations in solid matrices. Fluorescent bulbs were used to simulate mercury contaminated glass mixed waste. To achieve mercury contamination levels similar to those found in larger bulbs such as those used in DOE facilities a small amount of Hg was added to the crushed bulbs. The most effective agents for leaching mercury from the crushed fluorescent bulbs were KI/I2, NaOCl, and NaBr + acid. Radionuclide surrogates were added to both the EPA synthetic soil material and the crushed fluorescent bulbs to determine the fate of radionuclides following chemical leaching with the leaching agents determined to be the most promising. These experiments revealed that although over 98% of the dosed mercury solubilized and was found in the leaching solution, no Cerium was measured in the posttreatment leaching solution. This finding suggest that Uranium, for which Ce was used as a surrogate, would not solubilize during leaching of mercury contaminated soil or glass

  15. Sequential leaching behaviour of some elements during chemical treatment of ceramic censorship from coal fly ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extractable contents of Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn were determined using a six-stage sequential leaching procedure to isolate: (1) water-soluble; (2) slightly changed organic matter; (3) carbonate; (4) Fe-Mn oxides; (5) glass and silicates; and (6) char fractions; of ceramic cenospheres (CCs) recovered from coal fly ash (FA). The leaching behaviour and modes of occurrence of the above-listed elements in CCs are discussed. The results show that this improved sequential leaching procedure applied on well characterized chemically and mineralogically CCs is promising and could be successfully used. (authors)

  16. Chemical characterization, leach, and adsorption studies of solidified low-level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laboratory and field leaching experiments are beig conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to investigate the performance of solidified low-level nuclear waste in a typical, arid, near-surface disposal site. Under PNL's Special Waste Form Lysimeters-Arid Program, a field test facility was constructed to monitor the leaching of commercial solidified waste. Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the leaching and adsorption characteristics of the waste forms in contact with soil. Liquid radioactive wastes solidified in cement, vinyl ester-styrene, and bitumen were obtained from commercial boiling water and pressurized water reactors, and buried in a field leaching facility on the Hanford site in southeastern Washington State. Batch leaching, soil column adsorption, and soil/waste form column experiments were conducted in the laboratory, using small-scale cement waste forms and Hanford site ground water. The purpose of these experiments is to evaluate the ability of laboratory leaching tests to predict leaching under actual field conditions and to determine which mechanisms (i.e., diffusion, solubility, adsorption) actually control the concentration of radionuclides in the soil surrounding the waste form. Chemical and radionuclide analyses performed on samples collected from the field and laboratory experiments indicate strong adsorption of /sup 134,137/Cs and 85Sr onto the Hanford site sediment. Small amounts of 60Co are leached from the waste forms as very mobile species. Some 60Co migrated through the soil at the same rate as water. Chemical constituents present in the reactor waste streams also found at elevated levels in the field and laboratory leachates include sodium, sulfate, magnesium, and nitrate. Plausible solid phases that could be controlling some of the chemical and radionuclide concentrations in the leachate were identified using the MINTEQ geochemical computer code

  17. Chemical characterization, leach, and adsorption studies of solidified low-level wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walter, M.B.; Serne, R.J.; Jones, T.L.; McLaurine, S.B.

    1986-12-01

    Laboratory and field leaching experiments are beig conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to investigate the performance of solidified low-level nuclear waste in a typical, arid, near-surface disposal site. Under PNL's Special Waste Form Lysimeters-Arid Program, a field test facility was constructed to monitor the leaching of commercial solidified waste. Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the leaching and adsorption characteristics of the waste forms in contact with soil. Liquid radioactive wastes solidified in cement, vinyl ester-styrene, and bitumen were obtained from commercial boiling water and pressurized water reactors, and buried in a field leaching facility on the Hanford site in southeastern Washington State. Batch leaching, soil column adsorption, and soil/waste form column experiments were conducted in the laboratory, using small-scale cement waste forms and Hanford site ground water. The purpose of these experiments is to evaluate the ability of laboratory leaching tests to predict leaching under actual field conditions and to determine which mechanisms (i.e., diffusion, solubility, adsorption) actually control the concentration of radionuclides in the soil surrounding the waste form. Chemical and radionuclide analyses performed on samples collected from the field and laboratory experiments indicate strong adsorption of /sup 134,137/Cs and /sup 85/Sr onto the Hanford site sediment. Small amounts of /sup 60/Co are leached from the waste forms as very mobile species. Some /sup 60/Co migrated through the soil at the same rate as water. Chemical constituents present in the reactor waste streams also found at elevated levels in the field and laboratory leachates include sodium, sulfate, magnesium, and nitrate. Plausible solid phases that could be controlling some of the chemical and radionuclide concentrations in the leachate were identified using the MINTEQ geochemical computer code.

  18. Chemical and biological evaluation of rejects from the wood industry

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Granato; Domingos Sávio Nunes; Patrícia Póvoa de Mattos; Ester de Moura Rios; Adeline Glinski; Luciana Collares Rodrigues; Gerson Zanusso Júnior

    2005-01-01

    This study aimed chemical characterization and microbiological evaluation of extracts obtained from the waste of woods marketed in Paraná State: Peroba-Rosa (Aspidosperma sp.), Roxinho (Peltogyne sp.), Jatobá(Hymenaea sp.), Curupixá (Micropholis sp.), Itaúba (Mezilaurus sp.), Cedrilho (Erisma sp.) and Imbúia (Licaria sp.), whose botanical identifications were based on anatomical studies. The extracts were prepared with different solvents, analyzed by TLC and UV/VIS techniques, and tested agai...

  19. [Investigation of stages of chemical leaching and biooxidation during the extraction of gold from sulfide concentrates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murav'ev, M I; Fomchenko, N V; Kondrat'eva, T V

    2015-01-01

    We examined the chemical leaching and biooxidation stages in a two-stage biooxidation process of an auriferous sulfide concentrate containing pyrrhotite, arsenopyrite and pyrite. Chemical leaching of the concentrate (slurry density at 200 g/L) by ferric sulfate biosolvent (initial concentration at 35.6 g/L), which was obtained by microbial oxidation of ferrous sulfate for 2 hours at 70°C at pH 1.4, was allowed to oxidize 20.4% ofarsenopyrite and 52.1% of sulfur. The most effective biooxidation of chemically leached concentrate was observed at 45°C in the presence of yeast extract. Oxidation of the sulfide concentrate in a two-step process proceeded more efficiently than in one-step. In a two-step mode, gold extraction from the precipitate was 10% higher and the content of elemental sulfur was two times lower than in a one-step process. PMID:25842906

  20. Outcome of radiation therapy for renal transplant rejection refractory to chemical immunosuppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty consecutive patients with kidney graft rejection refractory to chemical immunosuppression were treated with local irradiation to the transplanted renal graft (3x1.5 Gy). Ten patients were complete responders (median follow-up: 47 months). Six patients were partial responders and failed after 1-4 months. Four patients did not respond

  1. Chemical and biological evaluation of rejects from the wood industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Granato

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed chemical characterization and microbiological evaluation of extracts obtained from the waste of woods marketed in Paraná State: Peroba-Rosa (Aspidosperma sp., Roxinho (Peltogyne sp., Jatobá(Hymenaea sp., Curupixá (Micropholis sp., Itaúba (Mezilaurus sp., Cedrilho (Erisma sp. and Imbúia (Licaria sp., whose botanical identifications were based on anatomical studies. The extracts were prepared with different solvents, analyzed by TLC and UV/VIS techniques, and tested against: Proteus mirabilis ATCC15290, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC25923, Escherichia coli ATCC25922, Enterobacter aerogenes ATCC13048, Micrococcus luteus ATCC9341, Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC13883, Pseudomonas aeroginosa ATCC27853, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus mutans and Bacillus cereus isolated from the clinic. The ethanol extract from Peroba-rosa containing alkaloids showed activity against P. mirabilis. Itaúba, Jatobá and Imbúia methanol extracts containing phenolics, and the Roxinho ethyl acetate extract containing terpenoids and phenolics were active against K. pneumoniae, M. luteus, E. coli, S. aureus and P. mirabilis. P. aeroginosa, S. mutans and E. aerogenes were resistant to the extracts.Este estudo visa a caracterização química e a avaliação da atividade antimicrobiana de extratos obtidos a partir de rejeitos resultantes do beneficiamento de madeiras nobres comercializadas no Paraná: Peroba-Rosa (Aspidosperma sp., Roxinho (Peltogyne sp., Jatobá (Hymenaea sp., Curupixá (Micropholis sp., Itaúba (Mezilaurus sp., Cedrilho (Erisma sp. e Imbúia-do-Norte (Licaria sp., cujas identificações botânicas basearam-se em estudos anatômicos. Os extratos foram preparados com diversos solventes, analisados por CCD e espectrometria UV/VIS, testando-se contra: Proteus mirabilis ATCC15290, Escherichia coli ATCC25922, Enterobacter aerogenes ATCC13048, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC25923, Micrococcus luteus ATCC9341, Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC13883

  2. Speciation of heavy metals in garden soils. Evidences from selective and sequential chemical leaching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Zhongqi; Lee, Leda; Dayan, Sara; Grinshtein, Michael [Brooklyn College of The City Univ. of New York, Brooklyn, NY (United States). Environmental Sciences Analytical Cnter; Shaw, Richard [USDA-NRCS NYC Soil Survey, Staten Island, NY (United States)

    2011-06-15

    Purpose: Gardening (especially food growing) in urban areas is becoming popular, but urban soils are often very contaminated for historical reasons. There is lack of sufficient information as to the bioavailability of soil heavy metals to plants and human in urban environments. This study examines the relative leachability of Cr, Ni, As, Cd, Zn, and Pb for soils with varying characteristics. The speciation and mobility of these metals can be qualitatively inferred from the leaching experiments. The goal is to use the data to shed some light on their bioavailability to plant and human, as well as the basis for soil remediation. Materials and methods: Selective and sequential chemical leaching methods were both used to evaluate the speciation of Cr, Ni, As, Cd, Zn, and Pb in soil samples collected from New York City residential and community gardens. The sequential leaching experiment followed a standard BCR four-step procedure, while selective leaching involved seven different chemical extractants. Results and discussion: The results from selective and sequential leaching methods are consistent. In general, very little of the heavy metals were found in the easily soluble or exchangeable fractions. Larger fractions of Cd and Zn can be leached out than other metals. Lead appears predominantly in the organic or carbonate fractions, of which {proportional_to} 30-60% is in the easily soluble organic fraction. Most As cannot be leached out by any of the extractants used, but it could have been complicated by the ineffective dissolution of oxides by ammonium hydroxylamine. Ni and Cr were mostly in the residual fractions but some released in the oxidizable fractions. Therefore, the leachability of metals follow the order Cd/Zn > Pb > Ni/Cr. Conclusions: Despite of the controversy and inaccuracy surrounding chemical leaching methods for the speciation of metals, chemical leaching data provide important, general, and easy-to-access information on the mobility of heavy metals

  3. Computational Chemical Imaging for Cardiovascular Pathology: Chemical Microscopic Imaging Accurately Determines Cardiac Transplant Rejection

    OpenAIRE

    Tiwari, Saumya; Reddy, Vijaya B.; Bhargava, Rohit; Raman, Jaishankar

    2015-01-01

    Rejection is a common problem after cardiac transplants leading to significant number of adverse events and deaths, particularly in the first year of transplantation. The gold standard to identify rejection is endomyocardial biopsy. This technique is complex, cumbersome and requires a lot of expertise in the correct interpretation of stained biopsy sections. Traditional histopathology cannot be used actively or quickly during cardiac interventions or surgery. Our objective was to develop a st...

  4. Heavy metal recovery from contaminated biomass ashes by chemical leaching, bioleaching and biosorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashes from biomass combustion plants contain plant nutrients which makes their application as fertilizers economically interesting. The possibility of recycling the ash can be looked upon as a contribution to obtain a sustainable energy utilization from biomass. The ash contains heavy metals which have to be removed. The possibility of decontaminating the ash by chemical and biological leaching was investigated. The leaching capacity of commercially available organic and inorganic acids and of citric acid produced by the fungus Penicillium simplicissimus were determined. A process for heavy metal recovery from biomass ashes consisting of four steps was designed. All environmentally relevant heavy metals (except lead) were removed from contaminated biomass ashes by chemical leaching. The heavy metals were recovered and enriched by precipitation and subsequent biosorption. Inactivated bacteria and fungi were used as biosorbents. The overall costs and the washing-out of plant nutrients from the ashes by chemical leaching were drawbacks of the metal recovering process. Biosorption in combination with existing processes of waste water treatment would offer another promising possibility for achieving the low Austrian limiting values for heavy metals in waste water. (author)

  5. Effect of Rain Leaching on Chemical Composition of Alfalfa Hay

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia de Hernandez, Mercedes M.

    1981-01-01

    Yield and chemical changes of second-cutting alfalfa hay treated with artificial rain were determined in a 2 x 3 x 2 factorial experiment. Factors were 2 stages of maturity (1 late vegetative; 2 early bloom), 3 levels of artificial rain applied (1 =no rain; 2 =low or approximately 5 mm; 3 =high or approximately 20 mm), and 2 times of applying artificial rain (1 = when drying forage was 40-60% dry matter; 2 =when drying forage was 60-75% dry matter). Thirty samples of alfalfa were collected at...

  6. Dielectric behaviour of MgFe2O4 prepared from chemically beneficiated iron ore rejects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K S Rane; V M S Verenkar; P Y Sawant

    2001-06-01

    Chemically beneficiated high silica/alumina iron ore rejects (27–76% Fe2O3) were used to synthesize iron oxides of purity 96–98% with SiO2/Al2O3 ratio reduced to 0.03. The major impurities on chemical beneficiations were Al, Si, and Mn in the range 2–3%. A 99.73% purity Fe2O3 was also prepared by solvent extraction method using methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) from the acid extracts of the ore rejects. The magnesium ferrite, MgFe2O4, prepared from these synthetic iron oxides showed high resistivity of ∼ 108 ohm cm. All ferrites showed saturation magnetization, 4s, in the narrow range of 900–1200 Gauss and the Curie temperature, c, of all these fell within a small limit of 670 ± 30 K. All ferrites had low dielectric constants ('), 12–15, and low dielectric loss, tan , which decreased with the increase in frequency indicating a normal dielectric dispersion found in ferrites. The presence of insignificant amount of polarizable Fe2+ ions can be attributed to their high resistances and low dielectric constants. Impurities inherent in the samples had no marked influence on the electrical properties of the ferrites prepared from the iron ore rejects, suggesting the possibility of formation of ferrite of constant composition, MgFe2O4, of low magnetic and dielectric losses at lower temperatures of 1000°C by ceramic technique.

  7. Influence of physical and chemical factors on biological leaching process of copper from printed circuit boards

    OpenAIRE

    Willner, J

    2013-01-01

    The article presents the results of the research regarding the biological leaching of this metal from electronic wastes components in the form of printed circuit boards. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the influence of some physical and chemical factors (e.g. pH, oxidation-reduction potential) on bioleaching process and efficiency of copper transfer from solid phase into solution. Bioleaching experiments were carried out with pure cultures of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. The obtai...

  8. Physico-chemical transformations of sulfated compounds during the leaching of highly sulfated cemented wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cementation of sulfated evaporator concentrates leads to highly sulfated low level wastes, (ca. 25% w/w sodium sulfate solution as mix water), which exhibit the presence of U-phase, a sodium-bearing calcium monosulfphoaluminate-like phase. During the leaching of simulated highly sulfated OPC/BFS cements, cured at room temperature and containing U-phase, sodium sulfate, and ettringite, physico-chemical transformations have been pointed out (transformation of U-phase into ettringite). Samples having the same chemical composition, but cured at high temperature (maximal temperature during curing: 120 C), do not contain ettringite initially, but secondary ettringite is formed during leaching. XRD spectra point out the existence of precipitation fronts (or of phase formation fronts) varying linearly versus the square root of time. The analysis of leaching solutions has provided complementary data used in a code, the aim of which is to assess cement degradation, based on coupling between transport by diffusion and chemical reactions (DIFFUZON code). The U-phase-ettringite transformation is confirmed

  9. Kinetics and Modeling of Chemical Leaching of Sphalerite Concentrate Using Ferric Iron in a Redox-controlled Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋健; 高玲; 林建群; 吴洪斌; 林建强

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a study for chemical leaching of sphalerite concentrate under various constant Fe3+concentrations and redox potential conditions. The effects of Fe3+ concentration and redox potential on chemical leaching of sphalerite were investigated. The shrinking core model was applied to analyze the experimental results. It was found that both the Fe3+ concentration and the redox potential controlled the chemical leaching rate of sphalerite. A new kinetic model was developed, in which the chemical leaching rate of sphalerite was proportional to Fe3+concentration and Fe3+/Fe2+ratio. All the model parameters were evaluated from the experimental data. The model predictions fit well with the experimental observed values.

  10. Bioleaching and chemical leaching of heavy metals from anaerobically digested sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchioretto, M.M.; Bruning, H.; Hien, N.T.P.; Rulkens, W.H.

    2003-07-01

    The present work aims to evaluate the practical application of bioleaching in the solubilization of Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn from anaerobically digested sludge. Chemical leaching with H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and bioleaching with elemental sulfur and ferrous iron are applied. The results are compared with those found in the literature and in previous leaching experiments with HCl. Bioleaching can be a feasible alternative to promote Zn and Cu solubilizations, especially when ferrous iron is added as substrate. Under this condition, the maximum extraction yield achieved for Zn is 80.8 % with pH value of 2.7, and for Cu it is 65.5 % with pH value of 2.5. Cr solubilization is possible when pH is around 2.5 and Pb is not detected in solution. Chemical leaching with HCl at pH value of 1 solubilizes 100 % of Pb and also provides the best extraction yield for Cr (around 72 %). With the same pH value HCl is more effective than H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} to solubilize all the metals studied. (author)

  11. Thermal analyse - correlation with chemical analyse and performance of the uranium ores leaching process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper present the results of the research concerning the existence of some correlations between the results of thermal analyze, chemical analyse and the performances and parameters of the alkaline leaching process for the romanian uranium ores. With a view to putting in the evidence of these corelations they are taking into consideration the thermal effect and gravimetric aspects resulted by heating of the sample, the contents of total uranium, the mobile uranium, U(VI), S-2, CO2, dbc and as technological indicator, the leaching output of uranium for some constant technical parameters: the rapport S/L=1/2, temperature =120 C, pressure=12 atm, and the leaching time-12 hours. The results show very clear difference between the samples as a function of theirs analysed contents. So, the used technological method not diminish the uranium content in the leachings barrem gangue at the level of difference between the total and mobil uranium content of ore sample; the ratio U(VI)/U(VI), generally, has been subunitary, the U(VI) weight of over 50% require stronger condition for oxidation; the sulfides and carbonates content have a direct influence about the natrium carbonate and oxygen consumption; it has been demonstrated the connection between the presence of combustible component part, visible in the thermo-differential curve, in association with some affects on the gravimetric curve and the uranium mobil content but especially the U(IV), content. A large content of the organic matter (coal of bitumen nature) show a large content of U(VI). (orig.)

  12. Influence of physical and chemical factors on biological leaching process of copper from printed circuit boards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Willner

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of the research regarding the biological leaching of this metal from electronic wastes components in the form of printed circuit boards. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the influence of some physical and chemical factors (e.g. pH, oxidation-reduction potential on bioleaching process and efficiency of copper transfer from solid phase into solution. Bioleaching experiments were carried out with pure cultures of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. The obtained results were discussed.

  13. The effect of diluting groundwater on chemical sedimentation in alkaline in-situ leaching of a uranium deposit of Xinjiang

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the results computed by a geochemistry model, the unsuccessful reasons in acid and alkaline in-situ leaching of a uranium deposit of Xinjiang are analyzed. The necessity of diluting groundwater during leaching is pointed out. The results of laboratory and field tests indicate that the precipitation of CaSO4 and CaCO3 can be avoided by diluting groundwater. The dilution can be weakened by the mixing process of different liquids and dissolving process of mineral substances, but the effect can be neglected. Consequently, it is feasible to avoid chemical sedimentation during in-situ leaching by diluting groundwater. (authors)

  14. Comparative evaluation of microbial and chemical leaching processes for heavy metal removal from dewatered metal plating sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayat, Belgin, E-mail: bbayat@cu.edu.tr [Department of Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Cukurova University, Balcali, Adana 01330 (Turkey); Sari, Bulent [Department of Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Cukurova University, Balcali, Adana 01330 (Turkey)

    2010-02-15

    The purpose of the study described in this paper was to evaluate the application of bioleaching technique involving Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans to recover heavy metals (Zn, Cu, Ni, Pb, Cd and Cr) in dewatered metal plating sludge (with no sulfide or sulfate compounds). The effect of some conditional parameters (i.e. pH, oxidation-reduction potential (ORP), sulfate production) and operational parameters (i.e. pulp density of the sludge and agitation time) were investigated in a 3 l completely mixed batch (CMB) reactor. The metal recovery yields in bioleaching were also compared with chemical leaching of the sludge waste using commercial inorganic acids (sulfuric acids and ferric chloride). The leaching of heavy metals increased with decreasing of pH and increasing of ORP and sulfate production during the bioleaching experiment. Optimum pulp density for bioleaching was observed at 2% (w/v), and leaching efficiency decreased with increasing pulp density in bioleaching experiments. Maximum metal solubilization (97% of Zn, 96% of Cu, 93% of Ni, 84% of Pb, 67% of Cd and 34% of Cr) was achieved at pH 2, solids contents of 2% (w/v), and a reaction temperature of 25 {+-} 2 deg. C during the bioleaching process. The maximum removal efficiencies of 72% and 79% Zn, 70% and 75% Cu, 69% and 73% Ni, 57% and 70% Pb, 55% and 65% Cd, and 11% and 22% Cr were also attained with the chemical leaching using sulfuric acids and ferric chloride, respectively, at pH 2, solids contents of 2% (w/v), and a reaction temperature of 25 {+-} 2 deg. C during the acid leaching processes. The rates of metal leaching for bioleaching and chemical leaching are well described by a kinetic equation related to time. Although bioleaching generally requires a longer period of operation compared to chemical leaching, it achieves higher removal efficiency for heavy metals. The efficiency of leaching processes can be arranged in descending order as follows: bioleaching > ferric chloride leaching > sulfuric

  15. Comparative evaluation of microbial and chemical leaching processes for heavy metal removal from dewatered metal plating sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the study described in this paper was to evaluate the application of bioleaching technique involving Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans to recover heavy metals (Zn, Cu, Ni, Pb, Cd and Cr) in dewatered metal plating sludge (with no sulfide or sulfate compounds). The effect of some conditional parameters (i.e. pH, oxidation-reduction potential (ORP), sulfate production) and operational parameters (i.e. pulp density of the sludge and agitation time) were investigated in a 3 l completely mixed batch (CMB) reactor. The metal recovery yields in bioleaching were also compared with chemical leaching of the sludge waste using commercial inorganic acids (sulfuric acids and ferric chloride). The leaching of heavy metals increased with decreasing of pH and increasing of ORP and sulfate production during the bioleaching experiment. Optimum pulp density for bioleaching was observed at 2% (w/v), and leaching efficiency decreased with increasing pulp density in bioleaching experiments. Maximum metal solubilization (97% of Zn, 96% of Cu, 93% of Ni, 84% of Pb, 67% of Cd and 34% of Cr) was achieved at pH 2, solids contents of 2% (w/v), and a reaction temperature of 25 ± 2 deg. C during the bioleaching process. The maximum removal efficiencies of 72% and 79% Zn, 70% and 75% Cu, 69% and 73% Ni, 57% and 70% Pb, 55% and 65% Cd, and 11% and 22% Cr were also attained with the chemical leaching using sulfuric acids and ferric chloride, respectively, at pH 2, solids contents of 2% (w/v), and a reaction temperature of 25 ± 2 deg. C during the acid leaching processes. The rates of metal leaching for bioleaching and chemical leaching are well described by a kinetic equation related to time. Although bioleaching generally requires a longer period of operation compared to chemical leaching, it achieves higher removal efficiency for heavy metals. The efficiency of leaching processes can be arranged in descending order as follows: bioleaching > ferric chloride leaching > sulfuric acid

  16. Chemical Criteria to Assess Risk of Phosphorus Leaching from Urban Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Gan-Lin; W. BURGHARDT; YANG Jin-Ling

    2005-01-01

    Soils from urban and suburban areas are normally enriched with phosphorus (P). Sixteen urban soils with a wide range of total P concentrations under typical urban land uses were sampled and analyzed for extractable P concentrations using water, sodium bicarbonate and citric acid. Meanwhile the soils were artificially leached in columns and P concentrations in the leachates were determined. With linear regression a two-stage linear relationship was found to exist between concentrations of P in the leachates and soil P contents obtained by various chemical measurements, i.e., there was a "change-point" denoting the critical threshold value for extractable P between the regression lines, above which concentrations of P in leachates increased substantially. These threshold "change-point" values were 1.5 mg kg-1 for water-soluble P and CaC12-P, 25 mg kg-1 for Olsen-P, and 250-350 mg kg-1 for citric acid-P with the sharpest change and the best predictor [r2 (upper) = 0.928, r2 (lower)= 0.807] appearing for Olsen-P. These "change-points" were considered important criteria in assessing the risk of P leaching from urban soils and could be used as standards to delineate and target hazardous areas in urban and suburban areas.

  17. Recycling of metal-organic chemical vapor deposition waste of GaN based power device and LED industry by acidic leaching: Process optimization and kinetics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Basudev; Mishra, Chinmayee; Kang, Leeseung; Park, Kyung-Soo; Lee, Chan Gi; Hong, Hyun Seon; Park, Jeung-Jin

    2015-05-01

    Recovery of metal values from GaN, a metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) waste of GaN based power device and LED industry is investigated by acidic leaching. Leaching kinetics of gallium rich MOCVD waste is studied and the process is optimized. The gallium rich waste MOCVD dust is characterized by XRD and ICP-AES analysis followed by aqua regia digestion. Different mineral acids are used to find out the best lixiviant for selective leaching of the gallium and indium. Concentrated HCl is relatively better lixiviant having reasonably faster kinetic and better leaching efficiency. Various leaching process parameters like effect of acidity, pulp density, temperature and concentration of catalyst on the leaching efficiency of gallium and indium are investigated. Reasonably, 4 M HCl, a pulp density of 50 g/L, 100 °C and stirring rate of 400 rpm are the effective optimum condition for quantitative leaching of gallium and indium.

  18. Optimization and validation of a chemical process for uranium, mercury and cesium leaching from cemented radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) is developing a treatment and long-term management strategy for a legacy cemented radioactive waste that contains uranium, mercury and fission products. Extracting the uranium would be advantageous for decreasing the waste classification and reducing the cost of long-term management. Consequently, there are safety and economic and environmental incentives for the extraction of uranium, mercury and cesium before subjecting the cemented waste to a stabilization process. The mineralogical analysis of the surrogate cemented waste (SCW) indicated that uranium forms calcium uranate, CaUO4, occurring as layers of several millimeters or as grains of 20 μm. Hg is found mostly as large (∼50 μm) and small grains (5-8 μm) of HgO. The chemical leachability of three key elements (U, Hg, and Cs) from a SCW was studied with several leaching materials. The results showed that the most promising approach to leach and recover U, Hg, and Cs is the direct leaching of the SCW with H2SO4 in strong saline media. Operating parameters such as particle size, temperature, pulp density, leaching time, acid and salt concentrations, number of leaching/rinsing step, etc. were optimized to improve key elements solubilization. Sulfuric leaching in saline media of a SCW (U5) containing 1182 ppm of U, 1598 ppm of Hg, and 7.9 ppm of Cs in the optimized conditions allows key elements recovery of 98.5 ± 0.4%, 96.6 ± 0.1%, and 93.8 ± 1.1% of U, Hg, and Cs respectively. This solubilization process was then applied in triplicate to seven other SCW prepared with different cement, liquid ratio and at different aging time and temperature. Concentrated sulfuric acid is added to the slurry until the pH is about 2, which causes the complete degradation of cement and the formation of CaSO4. At this pH, the acid consumption is moderate and the formation of amorphous silica gel is avoided. Sulfuric acid is particularly useful because it produces a leachate that is

  19. Coupling between chemical degradation and mechanical behaviour of leached concrete; Couplage degradation chimique - comportement en compression du beton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, V.H

    2005-10-15

    This work is in the context of the long term behavior of concrete employed in radioactive waste disposal. The objective is to study the coupled chemo-mechanical modelling of concrete. In the first part of this contribution, experimental investigations are described where the effects of the calcium leaching process of concrete on its mechanical properties are highlighted. An accelerated method has been chosen to perform this leaching process by using an ammonium nitrate solution. In the second part, we present a coupled phenomenological chemo-mechanical model that represents the degradation of concrete materials. On one hand, the chemical behavior is described by the simplified calcium leaching approach of cement paste and mortar. Then a homogenization approach using the asymptotic development is presented to take into account the influence of the presence of aggregates in concrete. And on the other hand, the mechanical part of the modelling is given. Here continuum damage mechanics is used to describe the mechanical degradation of concrete. The growth of inelastic strains observed during the mechanical tests is describes by means of a plastic like model. The model is established on the basis of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes framework. The coupled nonlinear problem at hand is addressed within the context of the finite element method. Finally, numerical simulations are compared with the experimental results for validation. (author)

  20. Chemical extraction of copper from copper sulphide ores of Pakistan by roast leach method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copper ores, containing both complex sulphide minerals and those containing chalcopyrite mineral, were studied for the extraction of copper by leaching after roasting. Roasting at 650 deg. C for 30 min rendered the ore leachable in dilute sulphuric acid of 2.5% concentration. The process of metal extraction would be of hydro metallurgical importance for low to high grade sulphide and polymetallic complex sulphide ores occurring in Pakistan. The kinetic models of roasting reaction fit phase boundary as well as diffusion reaction mechanism. (author)

  1. Disturbance Rejection

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    This interactive tutorial reviews the disturbance rejection capabilities of different feedback control schemes. The interactions in this tutorial involve students analyzing 4 cases of step-like disturbance rejection. ME2801 Introduction to Engineering System Dynamics

  2. Nitrate leaching as a confounding factor in chemical recovery from acidification in UK upland waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the period 1988-2002, data from 18 of the 22 lakes and streams in the UK Acid Waters Monitoring Network (AWMN) show clear trends of declining excess sulphate concentrations in response to reductions in sulphur deposition, but fewer trends in increasing pH or alkalinity. There has been no significant decline in the deposition of total nitrogen over the same period, and no sites show a trend in nitrate concentration. Peak nitrate concentrations have already surpassed excess sulphate on occasion in half of the AWMN sites. Furthermore, current understanding of terrestrial N saturation processes suggests that nitrate leaching from soils may increase, even under a constant N deposition load. Best-case projections indicate that nitrate will overtake sulphate as the major excess acid anion in many sites within 10 years, while worst-case predictions with steady-state models suggest that in the longer-term, nitrate could become the dominant excess acid anion in most of the UK. - With declining excess sulphate, nitrate will become the dominant agent of continued anthropogenic acidification in many UK upland waters within a decade

  3. Rejecting Change

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KERRY; BROWN

    2011-01-01

    British voters overwhelmingly reject an alternative voting system The British electorate,in only the second ever national referendum held in their history (the first was on joining the EU,over 35 years ago) rejected alterations to their voting system from the current first-past-the-post system to a form of alternative voting similar to that used

  4. Characterization of Leached Phosphorus from Soil, Manure, and Manure-Amended Soil by Physical and Chemical Fractionation and Diffusive Gradients in Thin Films (DGT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glæsner, Nadia; Donner, Erica; Magid, Jakob;

    2012-01-01

    We are challenged to date to fully understand mechanisms controlling phosphorus (P) mobilization in soil. In this study we evaluated physical properties, chemical reactivity, and potential bioavailability of P mobilized in soil during a leaching event and examined how the amounts and properties of...... leached P were influenced by surface application of cattle manure. Leaching experiments on manure itself, and on intact soil columns (14.1 cm inner dia., 25 cm height) before and after manure application, were carried out at an irrigation rate of 1 mm h−1 for 48 h. High concentrations of dissolved...... reactive P (DRP) were found in manure leachates (up to 32 mg L−1), whereas concentrations of P in soil leachates were low both before and after manure application (around 0.04 mg L−1 before application and up to 0.4 mg L−1 afterward). This result indicates that the soil retained most of the P added with...

  5. Modelling chemical degradation of concrete during leaching with rain and soil water types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Percolation of external water through concrete results in the degradation of cement and changes the concrete pore water and solid phase composition. The assessment of long-term degradation of concrete is possible by means of model simulation. This paper describes simulations of chemical degradation of cement for different types of rain and soil water at an ambient earth surface temperature (10 oC). Rain and soil water types were derived using generic equations and measurement of atmospheric boundary conditions representative for North-Belgium. An up-to-date and consistent thermodynamic model is used to calculate the geochemical changes during chemical degradation of the concrete. A general pattern of four degradation stages was simulated with the third stage being the geochemically most complex stage involving reactions with calcium-silicate hydrates, AFm and AFt phases. Whereas the sequence of the dissolution reactions was relatively insensitive to the composition of the percolating water, the duration of the different reactions depends strongly on the percolating water composition. Major identified factors influencing the velocity of cement degradation are the effect of dry deposition and biological activity increasing the partial pressure of CO2(g) in the soil air phase (and thus increasing the inorganic carbon content in the percolating water). Soil weathering processes have only a minor impact, at least for the relatively inert sandy material considered in this study.

  6. Transplant rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is usually not perfect. No two people, except identical twins, have identical tissue antigens. Doctors use medicines to ... has no blood supply. Also, transplants from one identical twin to another are almost never rejected. There are ...

  7. Leaching of biomass from semi-natural grasslands – Effects on chemical composition and ash high-temperature behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combustion of biodiversity-rich semi-natural grassland biomass no longer needed for forage allows nature conservation to be combined with bioenergy production. Natural leaching by rainfall during the period between biomass harvest and collection can reduce the content of elements detrimental for the combustion of grassland biomass. This study assesses the influence of biomass characteristics on leaching efficiency and the potential effects of leaching on ash melting behaviour and elemental release. Grassland biomass harvested from five sites at two harvest dates was leached at two intensities. Low-temperature ash was heated to 700, 800, 900 and 1000 °C respectively and classified into four ash fusion classes. Ash mass loss was determined as a measure of high-temperature elemental release. Weather data were used to calculate the frequency of weather conditions favourable to on-field leaching. K and Cl were leached most strongly and were reduced by 30 and 45% respectively by a leaching treatment corresponding to 30–40 mm of rain. The effects of site and harvest date on leaching efficiency were significant but small. Ash melting behaviour and elemental release between 700 and 900 °C were favourably influenced by leaching. The K/(Ca + Mg) and Si/ash ratios were related to increased ash melting. In this respect, semi-natural grassland biomass differs from other, less Ca-rich, herbaceous biofuels. Even if suitable weather conditions are not occurring frequently at the study sites, on-field leaching can offer an additional low-cost, on-farm strategy option for farmers and nature conservation agencies to improve biomass quality of nature conservation grasslands for combustion. -- Graphical abstract: Highlights: ► Combustion of biomass from biodiversity-rich nature conservation grassland. ► Leaching by rain during the field period reduces K and Cl concentrations. ► Increasing K/(Ca + Mg) and decreasing (K + Ca + Mg)/ash ratios increase ash melting. ► Leaching

  8. Experimental design and optimization of leaching process for recovery of valuable chemical elements (U, La, V, Mo, Yb and Th) from low-grade uranium ore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakrzewska-Koltuniewicz, Grażyna, E-mail: g.zakrzewska@ichtj.waw.pl [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Dorodna 16, 03-195 Warsaw (Poland); Herdzik-Koniecko, Irena [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Dorodna 16, 03-195 Warsaw (Poland); Cojocaru, Corneliu [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry “Petru Poni”, Aleea Grigore Ghica Voda, nr. 41A, 700487 Iasi (Romania); Chajduk, Ewelina [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Dorodna 16, 03-195 Warsaw (Poland)

    2014-06-30

    Highlights: • The experimental design for optimization of leaching process of uranium from low-grade ores was applied. • Multi-objective optimization method based on desirability approach was employed. • The recovery of associated metals like vanadium, molybdenum and lanthanides was considered. • The effects of factors were identified by 3-D surface plots. • The optimum condition for valuable metals: P = 5 bar, T = 120 °C and t = 90 min has been determined. - Abstract: The paper deals with experimental design and optimization of leaching process of uranium and associated metals from low-grade, Polish ores. The chemical elements of interest for extraction from the ore were U, La, V, Mo, Yb and Th. Sulphuric acid has been used as leaching reagent. Based on the design of experiments the second-order regression models have been constructed to approximate the leaching efficiency of elements. The graphical illustrations using 3-D surface plots have been employed in order to identify the main, quadratic and interaction effects of the factors. The multi-objective optimization method based on desirability approach has been applied in this study. The optimum condition have been determined as P = 5 bar, T = 120 °C and t = 90 min. Under these optimal conditions, the overall extraction performance is 81.43% (for U), 64.24% (for La), 98.38% (for V), 43.69% (for Yb) and 76.89% (for Mo) and 97.00% (for Th)

  9. Experimental design and optimization of leaching process for recovery of valuable chemical elements (U, La, V, Mo, Yb and Th) from low-grade uranium ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The experimental design for optimization of leaching process of uranium from low-grade ores was applied. • Multi-objective optimization method based on desirability approach was employed. • The recovery of associated metals like vanadium, molybdenum and lanthanides was considered. • The effects of factors were identified by 3-D surface plots. • The optimum condition for valuable metals: P = 5 bar, T = 120 °C and t = 90 min has been determined. - Abstract: The paper deals with experimental design and optimization of leaching process of uranium and associated metals from low-grade, Polish ores. The chemical elements of interest for extraction from the ore were U, La, V, Mo, Yb and Th. Sulphuric acid has been used as leaching reagent. Based on the design of experiments the second-order regression models have been constructed to approximate the leaching efficiency of elements. The graphical illustrations using 3-D surface plots have been employed in order to identify the main, quadratic and interaction effects of the factors. The multi-objective optimization method based on desirability approach has been applied in this study. The optimum condition have been determined as P = 5 bar, T = 120 °C and t = 90 min. Under these optimal conditions, the overall extraction performance is 81.43% (for U), 64.24% (for La), 98.38% (for V), 43.69% (for Yb) and 76.89% (for Mo) and 97.00% (for Th)

  10. Comparative Mapping of Soil Physical-Chemical and Structural Parameters at Field Scale to Identify Zones of Enhanced Leaching Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Trine; Møldrup, Per; Olsen, Preben;

    2013-01-01

    , indicating that a few well-aligned and better connected macropores might change the hydraulic conductivity between the macropores and the soil matrix, triggering an on-set of preferential flow at lower rain intensities compared to less compacted soil. Overall, a comparison mapping of basic and structural...... and organic carbon content and investigate whether it was possible to relate these to derived structural parameters such as bulk density and conservative tracer parameters and to actual particle and phosphorus leaching patterns obtained from laboratory leaching experiments. Sixty-five cylindrical soil columns...... of 20 cm height and 20 cm diameter and bulk soil were sampled from the topsoil in a 15 m  15 m grid in an agricultural loamy field. Highest clay contents and highest bulk densities were found in the northern part of the field. Leaching experiments with a conservative tracer showed fast 5% tracer...

  11. Chemical durability and leaching mechanism of Ce0.5Eu0.5PO4 ceramics: Effects of temperature and pH values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaofeng; Teng, Yuancheng; Wu, Lang; Huang, Yi; Ma, Jiyan; Wang, Guolong

    2015-11-01

    Ce0.5Eu0.5PO4 ceramics with high relative density were prepared by hot-press (HPS) and pressureless (PLS) sintering. The effects of temperature and pH values on the chemical durability of the ceramics were investigated. The results show that an increase of acidity significantly accelerated the corrosion of the samples. In alkaline leachates, further release elements were prevented by the newborn surface precipitation. The leach rate (Rn) of HPS sample was similar to that of PLS specimen in deionized water, but higher Rn for PLS sample was found in pH = 11 solution. Moreover, apparent activation energy of the dissolution of Eu (40 ± 4 kJ mol-1) is much higher than that of Ce (20 ± 1 kJ mol-1), leading to the higher normalized elemental leach rate of Eu. Both the Eu and Ce elements have low leach rates (10-12-10-9 m d-1) after 42 days in all the leachates studied in this work.

  12. Assessment of long term mining waste behavior by a dynamic leaching test : application to contrasted physico-chemical conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Badreddine, Rabia; Brunel, Célia; Munoz, Marguerite; Destrigneville, Christine

    2008-01-01

    Mining activity has generated large amounts of mining wastes abandoned on the site after extraction, concentration or metallurgic processes. In this study assessment of the long term behaviour of mining wastes has been performed by the realisation of a dynamic leaching test performed with a Soxhlet device on mining wastes from two contrasted sites : Bentaillou and Saint-Salvy from south-west France. Sphalerite and galena are the source of heavy metals, (Zn, Cd and Pb) in both sites. Pyrite an...

  13. Solution Leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Tiejun; Zhu, Deqing; Pan, Jian; He, Zhen

    2014-06-01

    Recovery of alumina from magnetic separation tailings of red mud has been investigated by Na2CO3 solution leaching. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results show that most of the alumina is present as 12CaO·7Al2O3 and CaO·Al2O3 in the magnetic separation tailings. The shrinking core model was employed to describe the leaching kinetics. The results show that the calculated activation energy of 8.31 kJ/mol is characteristic for an internal diffusion-controlled process. The kinetic equation can be used to describe the leaching process. The effects of Na2CO3 concentration, liquid-to-solid ratio, and particle size on recovery of Al2O3 were examined.

  14. Mitigation of phosphorus leaching from agricultural soils

    OpenAIRE

    Svanbäck, Annika

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential element in crop production, but P losses from agricultural soils are a major contributor to surface water eutrophication. This thesis examined the effects of chemical soil properties and soil structure, as governed by agricultural management practices, on P leaching from agricultural soils and how this leaching can be reduced. An initial investigation on the effect of plant-available P concentration in the soil (P-AL) on topsoil P leaching from five soils clearl...

  15. Valorization of GaN based metal-organic chemical vapor deposition dust a semiconductor power device industry waste through mechanochemical oxidation and leaching: A sustainable green process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dust generated during metal organic vapor deposition (MOCVD) process of GaN based semiconductor power device industry contains significant amounts of gallium and indium. These semiconductor power device industry wastes contain gallium as GaN and Ga0.97N0.9O0.09 is a concern for the environment which can add value through recycling. In the present study, this waste is recycled through mechanochemical oxidation and leaching. For quantitative recovery of gallium, two different mechanochemical oxidation leaching process flow sheets are proposed. In one process, first the Ga0.97N0.9O0.09 of the MOCVD dust is leached at the optimum condition. Subsequently, the leach residue is mechanochemically treated, followed by oxidative annealing and finally re-leached. In the second process, the MOCVD waste dust is mechanochemically treated, followed by oxidative annealing and finally leached. Both of these treatment processes are competitive with each other, appropriate for gallium leaching and treatment of the waste MOCVD dust. Without mechanochemical oxidation, 40.11 and 1.86 w/w% of gallium and Indium are leached using 4 M HCl, 100 °C and pulp density of 100 kg/m3, respectively. After mechanochemical oxidation, both these processes achieved 90 w/w% of gallium and 1.86 w/w% of indium leaching at their optimum condition. - Highlights: • Waste MOCVD dust is treated through mechanochemical leaching. • GaN is hardly leached, and converted to NaGaO2 through ball milling and annealing. • Process for gallium recovery from waste MOCVD dust has been developed. • Thermal analysis and phase properties of GaN to Ga2O3 and GaN to NaGaO2 is revealed. • Solid-state chemistry involved in this process is reported

  16. Preparation of porous bio-char and activated carbon from rice husk by leaching ash and chemical activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahiduzzaman, Md; Sadrul Islam, A K M

    2016-01-01

    Preparation porous bio-char and activated carbon from rice husk char study has been conducted in this study. Rice husk char contains high amount silica that retards the porousness of bio-char. Porousness of rice husk char could be enhanced by removing the silica from char and applying heat at high temperature. Furthermore, the char is activated by using chemical activation under high temperature. In this study no inert media is used. The study is conducted at low oxygen environment by applying biomass for consuming oxygen inside reactor and double crucible method (one crucible inside another) is applied to prevent intrusion of oxygen into the char. The study results shows that porous carbon is prepared successfully without using any inert media. The adsorption capacity of material increased due to removal of silica and due to the activation with zinc chloride compared to using raw rice husk char. The surface area of porous carbon and activated carbon are found to be 28, 331 and 645 m(2) g(-1) for raw rice husk char, silica removed rice husk char and zinc chloride activated rice husk char, respectively. It is concluded from this study that porous bio-char and activated carbon could be prepared in normal environmental conditions instead of inert media. This study shows a method and possibility of activated carbon from agro-waste, and it could be scaled up for commercial production. PMID:27536531

  17. Task 38 - commercial mercury remediation demonstrations: Thermal retorting and physical separation/chemical leaching. Topical report, December 1, 1994--June 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charlton, D.S.; Fraley, R.H.; Stepan, D.J.

    1998-12-31

    Results are presented on the demonstration of two commercial technologies for the removal of mercury from soils found at natural gas metering sites. Technologies include a thermal retorting process and a combination of separation, leaching, and electrokinetic separation process.

  18. Valorization of GaN based metal-organic chemical vapor deposition dust a semiconductor power device industry waste through mechanochemical oxidation and leaching: A sustainable green process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swain, Basudev, E-mail: Swain@iae.re.kr [Institute for Advanced Engineering (IAE), Advanced Materials & Processing Center, Yongin-Si 449-863 (Korea, Republic of); Mishra, Chinmayee; Lee, Chan Gi; Park, Kyung-Soo [Institute for Advanced Engineering (IAE), Advanced Materials & Processing Center, Yongin-Si 449-863 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kun-Jae [Department of Energy Engineering, Dankook University, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    Dust generated during metal organic vapor deposition (MOCVD) process of GaN based semiconductor power device industry contains significant amounts of gallium and indium. These semiconductor power device industry wastes contain gallium as GaN and Ga{sub 0.97}N{sub 0.9}O{sub 0.09} is a concern for the environment which can add value through recycling. In the present study, this waste is recycled through mechanochemical oxidation and leaching. For quantitative recovery of gallium, two different mechanochemical oxidation leaching process flow sheets are proposed. In one process, first the Ga{sub 0.97}N{sub 0.9}O{sub 0.09} of the MOCVD dust is leached at the optimum condition. Subsequently, the leach residue is mechanochemically treated, followed by oxidative annealing and finally re-leached. In the second process, the MOCVD waste dust is mechanochemically treated, followed by oxidative annealing and finally leached. Both of these treatment processes are competitive with each other, appropriate for gallium leaching and treatment of the waste MOCVD dust. Without mechanochemical oxidation, 40.11 and 1.86 w/w% of gallium and Indium are leached using 4 M HCl, 100 °C and pulp density of 100 kg/m{sup 3,} respectively. After mechanochemical oxidation, both these processes achieved 90 w/w% of gallium and 1.86 w/w% of indium leaching at their optimum condition. - Highlights: • Waste MOCVD dust is treated through mechanochemical leaching. • GaN is hardly leached, and converted to NaGaO{sub 2} through ball milling and annealing. • Process for gallium recovery from waste MOCVD dust has been developed. • Thermal analysis and phase properties of GaN to Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} and GaN to NaGaO{sub 2} is revealed. • Solid-state chemistry involved in this process is reported.

  19. COPPER LEACHING FROM WASTE ELECTRIC CABLES BY BIOHYDROMETALLURGY

    OpenAIRE

    Lambert, Fanny; Bastin, David; GAYDARDZHIEV, Stoyan; Léonard, Grégoire

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the leaching of copper from waste electric cables by chemical leaching and leaching catalysed by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans in terms of leaching kinetics and reagents consumption. Operational parameters such as the nature of the oxidant (Fe3+, O2), the initial ferric iron concentration (0-10 g/L) and the temperature (21-50°C) were identified to have an important influence on the degree of copper solubilisation. At optimal process conditions, copper extraction above 90%...

  20. Experimental methodology for assessing the environmental fate of organic chemicals in polymer matrices using column leaching studies and OECD 308 water/sediment systems: Application to tire and road wear particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unice, Kenneth M., E-mail: ken.unice@cardno.com; Bare, Jennifer L.; Kreider, Marisa L.; Panko, Julie M.

    2015-11-15

    Automobile tires require functional rubber additives including curing agents and antioxidants, which are potentially environmentally available from tire and road wear particles (TRWP) deposited in soil and sediment. A novel methodology was employed to evaluate the environmental fate of three commonly-used tire chemicals (N-cyclohexylbenzothiazole-2-sulfenamide (CBS), N-(1,3-dimethylbutyl)-N′-phenyl-1,4-phenylenediamine (6-PPD) and 1,3-diphenylguanidine (DPG)), using a road simulator, an artificial weathering chamber, column leaching tests, and OECD 308 sediment/water incubator studies. Environmental release factors were quantified for curing (f{sub C}), tire wear (f{sub W}), terrestrial weathering (f{sub S}), leaching from TRWP (f{sub L}), and environmental availability from TRWP (f{sub A}) by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectroscopy (LC/MS/MS) analyses. Cumulative fractions representing total environmental availability (F{sub T}) and release to water (F{sub R}) were calculated for the tire chemicals and 13 transformation products. F{sub T} for CBS, DPG and 6-PPD inclusive of transformation products for an accelerated terrestrial aging time in soil of 0.1 years was 0.08, 0.1, and 0.06, respectively (equivalent to 6 to 10% of formulated mass). In contrast, a wider range of 5.5 × 10{sup −4} (6-PPD) to 0.06 (CBS) was observed for F{sub R} at an accelerated age of 0.1 years, reflecting the importance of hydrophobicity and solubility for determining the release to the water phase. Significant differences (p < 0.05) in the weathering factor, f{sub S}, were observed when chemicals were categorized by boiling point or hydrolysis rate constant. A significant difference in the leaching factor, f{sub L}, and environmental availability factor, f{sub A,} was also observed when chemicals were categorized by log K{sub ow}. Our methodology should be useful for lifecycle analysis of other functional polymer chemicals. - Highlights: • Studied two vulcanization

  1. Experimental methodology for assessing the environmental fate of organic chemicals in polymer matrices using column leaching studies and OECD 308 water/sediment systems: Application to tire and road wear particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Automobile tires require functional rubber additives including curing agents and antioxidants, which are potentially environmentally available from tire and road wear particles (TRWP) deposited in soil and sediment. A novel methodology was employed to evaluate the environmental fate of three commonly-used tire chemicals (N-cyclohexylbenzothiazole-2-sulfenamide (CBS), N-(1,3-dimethylbutyl)-N′-phenyl-1,4-phenylenediamine (6-PPD) and 1,3-diphenylguanidine (DPG)), using a road simulator, an artificial weathering chamber, column leaching tests, and OECD 308 sediment/water incubator studies. Environmental release factors were quantified for curing (fC), tire wear (fW), terrestrial weathering (fS), leaching from TRWP (fL), and environmental availability from TRWP (fA) by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectroscopy (LC/MS/MS) analyses. Cumulative fractions representing total environmental availability (FT) and release to water (FR) were calculated for the tire chemicals and 13 transformation products. FT for CBS, DPG and 6-PPD inclusive of transformation products for an accelerated terrestrial aging time in soil of 0.1 years was 0.08, 0.1, and 0.06, respectively (equivalent to 6 to 10% of formulated mass). In contrast, a wider range of 5.5 × 10−4 (6-PPD) to 0.06 (CBS) was observed for FR at an accelerated age of 0.1 years, reflecting the importance of hydrophobicity and solubility for determining the release to the water phase. Significant differences (p < 0.05) in the weathering factor, fS, were observed when chemicals were categorized by boiling point or hydrolysis rate constant. A significant difference in the leaching factor, fL, and environmental availability factor, fA, was also observed when chemicals were categorized by log Kow. Our methodology should be useful for lifecycle analysis of other functional polymer chemicals. - Highlights: • Studied two vulcanization accelerators and an antioxidant additive used in tire tread • Integrated several

  2. Experimental methodology for assessing the environmental fate of organic chemicals in polymer matrices using column leaching studies and OECD 308 water/sediment systems: Application to tire and road wear particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unice, Kenneth M; Bare, Jennifer L; Kreider, Marisa L; Panko, Julie M

    2015-11-15

    Automobile tires require functional rubber additives including curing agents and antioxidants, which are potentially environmentally available from tire and road wear particles (TRWP) deposited in soil and sediment. A novel methodology was employed to evaluate the environmental fate of three commonly-used tire chemicals (N-cyclohexylbenzothiazole-2-sulfenamide (CBS), N-(1,3-dimethylbutyl)-N'-phenyl-1,4-phenylenediamine (6-PPD) and 1,3-diphenylguanidine (DPG)), using a road simulator, an artificial weathering chamber, column leaching tests, and OECD 308 sediment/water incubator studies. Environmental release factors were quantified for curing (f(C)), tire wear (f(W)), terrestrial weathering (f(S)), leaching from TRWP (f(L)), and environmental availability from TRWP (f(A)) by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectroscopy (LC/MS/MS) analyses. Cumulative fractions representing total environmental availability (F(T)) and release to water (FR) were calculated for the tire chemicals and 13 transformation products. F(T) for CBS, DPG and 6-PPD inclusive of transformation products for an accelerated terrestrial aging time in soil of 0.1 years was 0.08, 0.1, and 0.06, respectively (equivalent to 6 to 10% of formulated mass). In contrast, a wider range of 5.5×10(-4) (6-PPD) to 0.06 (CBS) was observed for F(R) at an accelerated age of 0.1 years, reflecting the importance of hydrophobicity and solubility for determining the release to the water phase. Significant differences (pboiling point or hydrolysis rate constant. A significant difference in the leaching factor, f(L), and environmental availability factor, f(A), was also observed when chemicals were categorized by log K(ow). Our methodology should be useful for lifecycle analysis of other functional polymer chemicals. PMID:26184905

  3. A mathematical model for isothermal heap and column leaching

    OpenAIRE

    L.R.P. de Andrade Lima

    2004-01-01

    Leaching occurs in metals recovery, in contaminated soil washing, and in many natural processes, such as fertilizer dissolution and rock weathering. This paper presents a model developed to simulate the transient evolution of the dissolved chemical species in the heap and column isothermal leaching processes. In this model, the solid bed is numerically divided into plane layers; the recovery of the chemical species, the enrichment of the pregnant leach solution, and the residual concentration...

  4. Continuous reject analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of continuous film reject analysis conducted within the Medical Imaging Department of the Prince Charles Hospital over a thirty month period are reported. A computer program to record reject films was installed as part of normal computerized operations of the Department. This required discarded films to be recorded according to site, reason and operator. Repeat/reject rates in chest examinations that differ significantly from reported acceptable reject rates are described. It is suggested that previously reported overall repeat rates of 10% to 14%, which are heavily influenced by the frequency of chest examinations, should not be regarded as normal. The findings from the survey provide data that is both consistent and inconsistent with previous studies. The implications of the results with respect to costs, radiation exposure, student training and the need to monitor continuously reject rates to maintain suitable standards are commented on. 8 figs

  5. Column leaching from biomass combustion ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maresca, Alberto; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2015-01-01

    this study, a fly ash sample from an operating Danish power plant based on wood biomass was collected, chemically characterized and investigated for its leaching release of nutrients and heavy metals. A column leaching test was employed. The strongly alkaline pH of all the collected eluates suggested...... the potential suitability of the ash as a liming material. Although high contents of nutrients were detected, differences in their leaching release were found. Heavy metals were detected within typical literature contents for Nordic countries ashes....

  6. Chemical and isotopic tracing of underground water in relation with leaching of mine spoils, Nord-Pas-de-Calais Coal Basin (France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coal mining activity in the Nord-Pas-de-Calais region (Northern France) has generated many mine spoils. The oxidation of the pyrite content of such coal shales and their leaching can be a source of sulfate pollution for the underlying chalk aquifer, i.e. the main drinking water resource of the region. Two sites of study have been retained: one in the free water table zone and the other in the confined water table zone. Samples from both mine spoils have been analyzed with respect to their carbon and sulfur content and a superficial leaching of these elements has been evidenced. Water has been sampled in piezometers and boreholes close to the mine spoils and also along natural flux lines. The use of sulfur isotopes as markers of the different sulfate sources has confirmed the spoils source but has permitted to identify another source in the second site which is the Tertiary gypsum-bearing Ostricourt sands. This study has shown also that in the confined water table zone, part of the exported sulfates is reduced. This bacterial reduction of sulfates is due to a joint leaching of both carbon and sulfur in the mine spoils. A self-purification phenomenon occurs when the chalk aquifer is confined beneath the Cenozoic cover. (J.S.)

  7. Countering Rejection Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanselman, Peggy Riley

    1989-01-01

    Outlines a step-by-step approach for guidance counselors in holding a preliminary college planning conference with high school juniors and their families in order to help students subsequently deal with possible rejection from a college. (TE)

  8. Quantum rejection sampling

    CERN Document Server

    Ozols, Maris; Roland, Jérémie

    2011-01-01

    Rejection sampling is a well-known technique to sample from a target distribution, given the ability to sample from another distribution. The method has been first formalized by von Neumann (1951) and has many applications in classical computing. We define a quantum analogue of rejection sampling: given a black box producing a coherent superposition of quantum states with some amplitudes, the problem is to prepare a coherent superposition of the same states with different target amplitudes. The main result of this paper is a tight characterization of the query complexity of this quantum state generation problem. We exhibit an algorithm, which we call quantum rejection sampling, and analyze its cost using semidefinite programming. We prove a matching lower bound based on symmetrizing over the automorphism group of the problem and using a hybrid argument. Perhaps interestingly, the automorphism group turns out to be continuous in this case. Furthermore, we illustrate how quantum rejection sampling may be used a...

  9. Chronic alloantibody mediated rejection

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, R. Neal; Colvin, Robert B.

    2011-01-01

    Alloantibodies clearly cause acute antibody mediated rejection, and all available evidence supports their pathogenic etiology in the development of chronic alloantibody mediated rejection (CAMR). But the slow evolution of this disease, the on-going immunosuppression, the variations in titer of alloantibodies, and variation in antigenic targets all complicate identifying which dynamic factors are most important clinically and pathologically. This review highlights the pathological factors rela...

  10. Immobilized waste leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main mechanism by which the immobilized radioactive materials can return to biosphere is the leaching due to the intrusion of water into the repositories. Some mathematical models and experiments utilized to evaluate the leaching rates in different immobilization matrices are described. (author)

  11. In situ leaching of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process is described for the in-situ leaching of uranium-containing ores employing an acidic leach liquor containing peroxymonosulphuric acid. Preferably, additionally, sulphuric acid is present in the leach liquor. (author)

  12. Leaching of lead from zinc leach residue in acidic calcium chloride aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Le; Mu, Wen-ning; Shen, Hong-tao; Liu, Shao-ming; Zhai, Yu-chun

    2015-05-01

    A process with potentially reduced environmental impacts and occupational hazards of lead-bearing zinc plant residue was studied to achieve a higher recovery of lead via a cost-effective and environmentally friendly process. This paper describes an optimization study on the leaching of lead from zinc leach residue using acidic calcium chloride aqueous solution. Six main process conditions, i.e., the solution pH value, stirring rate, concentration of CaCl2 aqueous solution, liquid-to-solid (L/S) ratio, leaching temperature, and leaching time, were investigated. The microstructure and components of the residue and tailing were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). On the basis of experimental results, the optimum reaction conditions were determined to be a solution pH value of 1, a stirring rate of 500 r·min-1, a CaCl2 aqueous solution concentration of 400 g·L-1, a liquid-to-solid mass ratio of 7:1, a leaching temperature of 80°C, and a leaching time of 45 min. The leaching rate of lead under these conditions reached 93.79%, with an iron dissolution rate of 19.28%. Silica did not take part in the chemical reaction during the leaching process and was accumulated in the residue.

  13. Kinetic study on pressure leaching of high iron sphalerite concentrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Ke-qiang; YANG Xian-wan; WANG Ji-kun; YAN Jiang-feng; SHEN Qing-feng

    2007-01-01

    The kinetics of pressure leaching high iron sphalerite concentrate was studied. The effects of agitation rate, temperature, oxygen partial pressure, initial acid concentration, particle size, iron content in the concentrate and concentration of Fe2+ added into the solution on the leaching rate of zinc were examined. The experiment results indicate that if the agitation rate is greater than 600 r/min, its influence on Zn leaching rate is not substantial. A suitable rise in temperature can facilitate the leaching reaction, and the temperature should be controlled at 140-150 ℃. The increase trend of Zn leaching rate becomes slow when pressure is greater than 1.2 MPa, so the pressure is controlled at 1.2-1.4 MPa. Under the conditions of this study, Zn leaching rate decreases with a rise in the initial sulfuric acid concentration; and Zn leaching rate increases with a rise of iron content in the concentrate and Fe2+ concentration in the solution. Moreover, the experiment demonstrates that the leaching process follows the surface chemical reaction control kinetic law of "shrinking of unreacted core". The activation energy for pressure leaching high iron sphalerite concentrate is calculated, and a mathematical model for this pressure leaching is obtained. The model is promising to guide the practical operation of pressure leaching high iron sphalerite concentrate.

  14. Geochemical association of Pu and Am in selected host-phases of contaminated soils from the UK and their susceptibility to chemical and microbiological leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding the biogeochemical behaviour and potential mobility of actinides in soils and groundwater is vital for developing remediation and management strategies for radionuclide-contaminated land. Pu is known to have a high Kd in soils and sediments, however remobilization of low concentrations of Pu remains a concern. Here, some of the physicochemical properties of Pu and the co-contaminant, Am, are investigated in contaminated soils from Aldermaston, Berkshire, UK, and the Esk Estuary, Cumbria, UK, to determine their potential mobility. Sequential extraction techniques were used to examine the host-phases of the actinides in these soils and their susceptibility to microbiological leaching was investigated using acidophilic sulphur-oxidising bacteria. Sequential extractions found the majority of 239,240Pu associated with the highly refractory residual phase in both the Aldermaston (63.8–85.5 %) and Esk Estuary (91.9–94.5%) soils. The 241Am was distributed across multiple phases including the reducible oxide (26.1–40.0%), organic (45.6–63.6%) and residual fractions (1.9–11.1%). Plutonium proved largely resistant to leaching from microbially-produced sulphuric acid, with a maximum 0.18% leached into solution, although up to 12.5% of the 241Am was leached under the same conditions. If Pu was present as distinct oxide particles in the soil, then 241Am, a decay product of Pu, would be expected to be physically retained in the particle. The differences in geochemical association and bioleachability of the two actinides suggest that this is not the case and hence, that significant Pu is not present as distinct particles. These data suggest the majority of Pu in the contaminated soils studied is highly recalcitrant to geochemical changes and is likely to remain immobile over significant time periods, even when challenged with aggressive “bioleaching” bacteria. - Highlights: • Pu in the contaminated soils is associated with the recalcitrant residual

  15. Manual of acid in situ leach uranium mining technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In situ leaching (ISL) technology recovers uranium using two alternative chemical leaching systems - acid and alkaline. This report brings together information from several technical disciplines that are an essential part of ISL technology. They include uranium geology, geohydrology, chemistry as well as reservoir engineering and process engineering. This report provides an extensive description of acid ISL uranium mining technology

  16. SOC REJECTION BY NANOFILTRATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study was conducted to evaluate the rejection of six synthetic organic compounds (SOCs) from a potable water source by a nanofiltration membrane process. The S0Cs were ethylene dibromide (EDB), dibromochloropropane (DBCP), chlordane, heptachlor, methoxychlor and alachlor. To in...

  17. Bicarbonate leaching of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The alkaline leach process for extracting uranium from uranium ores is reviewed. This process is dependent on the chemistry of uranium and so is independent on the type of mining system (conventional, heap or in-situ) used. Particular reference is made to the geochemical conditions at Crownpoint. Some supporting data from studies using alkaline leach for remediation of uranium-contaminated sites is presented

  18. Underground leaching of uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large amounts of low-grade U ore, not worth processing by conventional methods, are to be found at many sites in mine pillars, walls, and backfilling. Many proven deposits are not being mined because the geological conditions are difficult or the U ore is of relatively low grade. Factors such as radioactive emission, radon emanation, and the formation of radioactive dust give rise to health hazards. When U ores are treated above ground, enormous quantities of solid and liquid radioactive waste and mining spoil accumulate. The underground leaching of U is a fundamentally different kind of process. It is based on the selective dissolving of U at the place where it occurs by a chemical reagent; all that reaches the ground surface is a solution containing U, and after extraction of the U by sorption the reagent is used again. The main difficult and dangerous operations associated with conventional methods (excavation; extraction and crushing of the ore; storage of wastes) are avoided. Before underground leaching the ore formation has to be fractured and large ore bodies broken down into blocks by shrinkage stopping. These operations are carried out by advanced machinery and require the presence underground of only a few workers. If the ore is in seams, the only mining operation is the drilling of boreholes. The chemical reagent is introduced under pressure through one set of boreholes, while the U bearing solution is pumped out from another set. The process is monitored with the help of control boreholes. After extraction of the U by sorption, the reagent is ready to be used again. Very few operations are involved and insignificant amounts of dissolved U escape into the surrounding rock formations. Experience has shown that underground leaching reduces the final cost of the U metal, increases productivity, reduces capital expenditure, and radically improves working conditions

  19. Kinetic process of oxidative leaching of chalcopyrite under low oxygen pressure and low temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Ting-sheng; NIE Guang-hua; WANG Jun-feng; CUI Li-feng

    2007-01-01

    Kinetic process of oxidative leaching of chalcopyrite in chloride acid hydroxide medium under oxygen pressure and low temperature was investigated. The effect on leaching rate of chalcopyrite caused by these factors such as ore granularity, vitriol concentration, sodium chloride concentration, oxygen pressure and temperature was discussed. The results show that the leaching rate of chalcopyrite increases with decreasing the ore granularity. At the early stage of oxidative reaction, the copper leaching rate increases with increasing the oxygen pressure and dosage of vitriol concentration, while oxygen pressure affects leaching less at the later stage. At low temperature, the earlier oxidative leaching process of chalcopyrite is controlled by chemical reactions while the later one by diffusion. The chalcopyrite oxidative leaching rate has close relation with ion concentration in the leaching solution. The higher ion concentration is propitious for chalcopyrite leaching.

  20. Action against Kruemmel rejected

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In its verdict dated September 2nd, 1976 - 10 A 211/74 -, the administrative court of Schleswig-Holstein at Schleswig has rejected with costs the action of a plaintiff resident in Hessen concerning the contestation of the 2nd partial licence for the erection of a nuclear power station at Kruemmel near Hamburg. The verdict is not subject to appeal. Furthermore, the administrative court of Schleswig-Holstein at Schleswig, in its verdict dated September 2nd, 1976 - 10 A 214/74 - has rejected with costs the actions of eight plaintiffs living in Hamburg and surroundings, concerning the contestation of the 1st, 2nd and 3rd partial licence for the erection of a nuclear power station at Kruemmel near Hamburg. An appeal against this verdict has been lodged at the higher administrative court at Lueneburg. The main gounds for the two judgments are given in full text. (orig./HP)

  1. Major leaching processes of combustion residues : characterisation, modelling and experimental investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Jinying

    1998-01-01

    Characterising leaching behaviour provides ample evidence toidentify the majorleaching processes of combustion residues.Neutralisation and chemical weatheringgovern the leachingreactions and control the release of major, minor and traceelementsfrom combustion residues, and are thus considered to bethe major leaching processes. Several geochemical models are used to describe theneutralisation and chemicalweathering processes based onleaching kinetics and the features of leaching systems.Areact...

  2. Uranium in situ leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite the depressed situation that has affected the uranium industry during the past years, the second Technical Committee Meeting on Uranium In Situ Leaching, organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency and held in Vienna from 5 to 8 October 1992, has attracted a relatively large number of participants. A notable development since the first meeting was that the majority of the contributions came from the actual operators of in situ leaching uranium production. At the present meeting, presentations on operations in the USA were balanced by those of the eastern European and Asian countries. Contributions from Bulgaria, China, Czechoslovakia, Germany (from the operation in the former German Democratic Republic), the Russian Federation and Uzbekistan represent new information not commonly available. In situ leach mining is defined in one of the paper presented as a ''mining method where the ore mineral is preferentially leached from the host rock in place, or in situ, by the use of leach solutions, and the mineral value is recovered. Refs, figs and tabs

  3. Chemical analysis and assessment of the heavy metal pollution in the sewage sludge and leaching solution%污水污泥及其浸出液重金属污染的化学分析与评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李娟英; 陈洁芸; 沈燕萍; 石恺柘; 郑健; 柯友章; 何培民

    2013-01-01

    The present article is engaged in a chemical analysis and assessment of the heavy metal pollution in the sewage sludge and leaching solution.For this purpose,we have analyzed in this paper the general characteristics as well as the actual content and speciation of heavy metals in the dehydrated sludge samples from eight sewage processing plants in Shanghai with our leaching tests including HJ 557-2010,NEN 7341:1994,US TCLP and EN 12457-3:2002.The results of our analysis indicate that the total content of Zn and Cu in all the sludge samples are rather high,followed by Pb,As,Cd and Hg.Among the heavy metal contents,Cd reveals the highest degree of mobility from what is extracted in the water soluble.Cd also proves exchangeable,carbonate-precipitated and oxidation-bounded.It tends to be highly mobile and potentially bio-available,which therefore accounts for a higl percentage (70%).Of all the above four unstable fractions,Zn accounted for 20%-50%,which means that the considerable amount of Zn could be released to the liquid phase.Cu proves to be mainly present in the organic compounds with sulfide and therefore poor in mobility.The results from our leaching tests also indicate that the leaching amount of Zn was the greatest and followed by Cu and Pb,with As,Hg and Cd being the least.It is more worthwhile commenting that the leaching test of NEN 7341:1994 is the most attractive for its greatest leaching amount of heavy metals,followed by the other two roughly the same tests,that is,US TCLP and EN 12457-3:2002,though HJ 557-2010 proposed by China proves to be the most gentle one.The difference among the above leaching tests is related to the parameters of leachants,ratios of liquid to solid,oscillation modes and so on commonly adopted in the different tests.Though all the sludge samples were excluded from the hazardous wastes according to the current standard implemented in China,it remains logic and reasonable to categorize all the above samples into hazardous

  4. Measurement of leached hulls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leached hulls are the short lengths of fuel rod cladding and fuel element hardware which constitute a major waste product of a reprocessing plant employing a chop-and-leach head-end process. The small, undissolved fuel residue (0.1 to 1.0% of original fuel content) which is discarded with this waste must be measured for safeguards, material accountability, and process control reasons. This report gives a critical analysis of hull measurement techniques involving the analysis of fission product gamma rays, spontaneous fission neutrons from curium, and delayed neutron activation. Major emphasis is given to the measurement of 2186-keV gamma rays from 144Ce--144Pr. A detailed description of typical leached hull characteristics is presented at the beginning of the report. An extensive review of experience gained from existing hull measurement systems in the United Kingdom, France, Japan, Germany, Italy, and the United States is presented

  5. Leaching of Pyrites of Various Reactivities by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans

    OpenAIRE

    Baldi, Franco; Clark, Thomas; Pollack, S. S.; Olson, Gregory J.

    1992-01-01

    Wide variations were found in the rate of chemical and microbiological leaching of iron from pyritic materials from various sources. Thiobacillus ferrooxidans accelerated leaching of iron from all of the pyritic materials tested in shake flask suspensions at loadings of 0.4% (wt/vol) pulp density. The most chemically reactive pyrites exhibited the fastest bioleaching rates. However, at 2.0% pulp density, a delay in onset of bioleaching occurred with two of the pyrites derived from coal source...

  6. Heat rejection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gregory C.; Tokarz, Richard D.; Parry, Jr., Harvey L.; Braun, Daniel J.

    1980-01-01

    A cooling system for rejecting waste heat consists of a cooling tower incorporating a plurality of coolant tubes provided with cooling fins and each having a plurality of cooling channels therein, means for directing a heat exchange fluid from the power plant through less than the total number of cooling channels to cool the heat exchange fluid under normal ambient temperature conditions, means for directing water through the remaining cooling channels whenever the ambient temperature rises above the temperature at which dry cooling of the heat exchange fluid is sufficient and means for cooling the water.

  7. Leaching technology of uranium in some ore containing several kinds of metallic mineral

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mineral components and chemical components of the metal mine containing uranium and other kinds of metallic elements are complicated with mineralogy research. The main zinc mineral is Calamine. The main lead mineral is cesarolite. The main manganese minerals are cesarolite and heterolite. The main iron minerals are limonite and hematite. And the main uranium mineral is PbUO4. The leaching technology tests of uranium of the ore are taken. Research shows that the leaching rate of uranium up to 90% with acidic agitation leaching, while it only about 10% with alkaline agitation leaching. And the leaching rate of uranium up to 91.5%, with acidic column leaching to the -5 mm ore sample. While the leaching rate up to 88.4% with the -10 mm ore sample. Therefore, uranium can be used with acid heap leaching technology in the mine. (authors)

  8. Drainage, salt leaching and physico-chemical properties of irrigated man-made terrace soils in a mountain oasis of northern Oman

    OpenAIRE

    Luedeling, E.; Nagieb, M.; Wichern, F.; Brandt, M.; Deurer, M.; Bürkert, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    Little is known about the sustainability of irrigated oasis agriculture in northern Oman. The objective of this study therefore was to examine which factors allowed agricultural productivity to be apparently maintained during the two millenia of a mountain oasis’ existence. Soil moisture and physico-chemical properties were measured in a typical flood-irrigated field sown to alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.). Particle size, organic (C_org) and inorganic carbon content, pH and electrical conductivi...

  9. Transplant rejection in terrestrial molluscs

    OpenAIRE

    E Furuta; Yamaguchi, K

    2011-01-01

    To know whether or not molluscs are capable of recognizing tissue allo-antigens, dorsal skin-allografts were exchanged between adult terrestrial slug, Incilaria fruhstorferi. We succeeded for the first time in orthotopic transplantation of allografts and observed chronic rejection of allografts. Cellular changes in the rejection process continued over for 40 days. Two functional types of “effector” cells were recognized at the rejection site, but they were observed to be macrophages possessin...

  10. In-situ uranium leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention provides a method for improving the recovery of mineral values from ore bodies subjected to in-situ leaching by controlling the flow behaviour of the leaching solution. In particular, the invention relates to an in-situ leaching operation employing a foam for mobility control of the leaching solution. A foam bank is either introduced into the ore bed or developed in-situ in the ore bed. The foam then becomes a diverting agent forcing the leaching fluid through the previously non-contacted regions of the deposit

  11. Leaching of RA-226 contaminated gravel using different aqueous treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigation of the efficiencies of different aqueous leaching treatments was carried out on gravel artificially contaminated with Ra-226. The extent of leaching efficiency was determined in terms of Ra-226 and its daughter Rn-222. Liquid scintillation counting using high efficiency mineral oil based liquid scintillator was the technique adopted for measuring Ra-226 and Rn-222 leached off the contaminated gravel. Water, dilute solutions of barium chloride and HCl were used as leachants. Different masses of gravel were leached with 200 mL of leachant for various contact time periods. The leached Rn-222 activity measured was plotted vs the decay factor e; from which Rn-222 and Ra-226 originally present in the sample were determined. Several leaching parameters were tested; namely type of leachant, leachant volume/gravel mass ratio, leachant contact time, effect of varying Ba Cl2 concentration, and successive leaching. Optimization of the leaching parameters for desorption of Ra-226 off the contaminated gravel under laboratory conditions may help determine the ideal conditions for remediating soil contaminated with radium or chemically similar radionuclides. 7 figs

  12. Physic-chemical evaluation of leach and water from the Borba Gato streamlet within the catchment area of the urban waste landfill of Maringá, Paraná State, Brazil - doi: 10.4025/actascitechnol.v34i1.6771

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Eliane Echeverria Borges

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The physic-chemical characteristics of leach deposited in the landfill waste pond and of water from the Borba Gato streamlet are evaluated. Twenty-six physic-chemical parameters were analyzed from three collection sites, or rather, two in the streamlet, one upstream (P-01 and one downstream (P-02 of the landfill waste pond, and one in the leach deposit pond (P-03. The streamlet area under analysis was impacted due to being in an agricultural area and for its urban waste deposits. Parameter concentrations of aluminum, iron and mercury were reported above the quality standard of freshwater, according to Conama 357/2005 resolution (class 2. Further, throughout the rainy period, the ammoniac nitrogen content was above the resolution quality standard for fresh water. Moreover, landfill leach was above standards of effluent discharge established by Conama 357/2005. An efficient treatment for the effluent generated in Maringá is required since there is evidence of leach pollution of the Borba Gato streamlet.

  13. Leaching Mechanisms Program. Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary goal of this work is to determine the leaching mechanisms of a variety of matrix materials either in use or being considered for the solidification of low-level radioactive wastes by defense and commercial waste generators. Since this program is new and did not formally begin until May of FY 84, the results reported here are few and preliminary. Efforts were concentrated in the following activities: (1) The literature search for leaching data and proposed leaching models and mechanisms for low-level waste. (2) Data base development for leaching data being compiled from the literature and from the leaching experiments in this program. (3) The selection of solidification agents for the experimental part of the program. (4) Fabrication of leach samples and initiation of leach testing. 28 references, 9 figures, 4 tables

  14. Evaluation of the effectiveness of the filtration leaching for uranium recovery from uranium ore

    OpenAIRE

    Bolat Uralbekov; Mukhambetkaly Burkitbayev; Bagdat Satybaldiev

    2015-01-01

    The physical and chemical processes taking place in filtration leaching of uranium from uranium ore sample by sulphuric acid solution have been studied by modern physico-chemical methods (X-ray diffraction, scanning electron spectroscopy, electron probe microanalysis, optical emission spectroscope, ICP OES). Column leaching test was carried out for ore samples obtained from a uranium in-situ leaching (ISL) mining site using deluted sulphuricacid to study the evolution of various elements conc...

  15. Chemo-mechanical coupling behaviour of leached concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, V.H. [Laboratoire d' Analyse des Materiaux et Identification, Ecole Nationale des Ponts et Chaussees, Institut Navier, 6 et 8, Avenue Blaise Pascal, 77455 Marne la Vallee Cedex 2 (France); Colina, H. [ATILH, 7, Place de la Defense, 92974 Paris-La-Defense Cedex (France); Torrenti, J.M. [LCPC Paris, 58, Boulevard Lefebvre 75732 Paris Cedex 15 (France); LMT, ENS Cachan, 61, Avenue du President Wilson, 94235 Cachan (France)], E-mail: jean-michel.torrenti@ponts.org; Boulay, C. [LCPC Paris, 58, Boulevard Lefebvre 75732 Paris Cedex 15 (France); Nedjar, B. [Laboratoire d' Analyse des Materiaux et Identification, Ecole Nationale des Ponts et Chaussees, Institut Navier, 6 et 8, Avenue Blaise Pascal, 77455 Marne la Vallee Cedex 2 (France)

    2007-11-15

    This paper deals with concrete behaviour under chemical and mechanical degradations. Experimental investigations are described where the effects of the calcium leaching process of concrete on its mechanical properties are highlighted. The calcium leaching and mechanical tests on cement paste, mortar and concrete samples are presented. Because of the slow kinetics of leaching under deionised water, an accelerated method has been chosen by using an ammonium nitrate solution instead. The specimens are immersed into a 6 mol/l ammonium nitrate solution with a controlled pH disposal. To quantify the leaching evolution, the degradation depth is then measured at certain time intervals by means of a phenolphthalein solution. The experimental results show the chemical degradation of the cement-based material and the important role of aggregate in the calcium leaching process of concrete. Compression tests of concrete samples are also performed. We observe that there is a strong coupling between the calcium leaching and the mechanical behaviour; as leaching grows, a loss of stiffness and of strength are observed and a smoother post-peak behaviour is noted.

  16. Gold and Silver Extraction from Leach Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagdaulet K. Kenzhaliyev

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available There has been carried out an investigation on the extraction of gold and silver from thiosulfate solutions: standard test and technological solutions of chemical and electrochemical leaching. The influence of related metals on the process of extracting gold from solution was studied. There has been conducted a comparative study of the IR spectra of solutions after the sorption of gold, silver and related metals.

  17. Transplant rejection and paradigms lost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Terry B.

    2013-01-01

    During transplant rejection, migrating T cells infiltrate the grafted organ, but the signals that direct this migration are incompletely understood. In this issue of the JCI, Walch et al. debunk two classical paradigms concerning transplant rejection, with important consequences for the design of antirejection therapeutics. PMID:23676457

  18. Transplant rejection and paradigms lost

    OpenAIRE

    Strom, Terry B.

    2013-01-01

    During transplant rejection, migrating T cells infiltrate the grafted organ, but the signals that direct this migration are incompletely understood. In this issue of the JCI, Walch et al. debunk two classical paradigms concerning transplant rejection, with important consequences for the design of antirejection therapeutics.

  19. Rejection sampling in demand systems

    OpenAIRE

    Ley, Eduardo; Mark F.J. Steel

    1992-01-01

    We illustrate the method of rejection sampling in a Bayesian application of a new approach toı estimating Demand Systems. This approach, suggested by Varian (1990), is based on a generalization of Afriat's (1967) efficiency index. Rejection sampling is applied to the prior-to-posterior mapping enabling us to obtain posterior results in a nonstandard model.

  20. Emotional responses to interpersonal rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leary, Mark R

    2015-12-01

    A great deal of human emotion arises in response to real, anticipated, remembered, or imagined rejection by other people. Because acceptance by other people improved evolutionary fitness, human beings developed biopsychological mechanisms to apprise them of threats to acceptance and belonging, along with emotional systems to deal with threats to acceptance. This article examines seven emotions that often arise when people perceive that their relational value to other people is low or in potential jeopardy, including hurt feelings, jealousy, loneliness, shame, guilt, social anxiety, and embarrassment. Other emotions, such as sadness and anger, may occur during rejection episodes, but are reactions to features of the situation other than low relational value. The article discusses the evolutionary functions of rejection-related emotions, neuroscience evidence regarding the brain regions that mediate reactions to rejection, and behavioral research from social, developmental, and clinical psychology regarding psychological and behavioral concomitants of interpersonal rejection. PMID:26869844

  1. Emotional responses to interpersonal rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leary, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    A great deal of human emotion arises in response to real, anticipated, remembered, or imagined rejection by other people. Because acceptance by other people improved evolutionary fitness, human beings developed biopsychological mechanisms to apprise them of threats to acceptance and belonging, along with emotional systems to deal with threats to acceptance. This article examines seven emotions that often arise when people perceive that their relational value to other people is low or in potential jeopardy, including hurt feelings, jealousy, loneliness, shame, guilt, social anxiety, and embarrassment. Other emotions, such as sadness and anger, may occur during rejection episodes, but are reactions to features of the situation other than low relational value. The article discusses the evolutionary functions of rejection-related emotions, neuroscience evidence regarding the brain regions that mediate reactions to rejection, and behavioral research from social, developmental, and clinical psychology regarding psychological and behavioral concomitants of interpersonal rejection. PMID:26869844

  2. Early diagnosis of acute postoperative renal transplant rejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A prospective evaluation of In-111 labeled autologous platelet scintigraphy for the early diagnosis of acute postoperative renal transplant rejection was undertaken. To date, 28 consecutive patients between 7 and 14 days post-op have been injected with 500μCi of In-111 platelets followed by imaging at 24 and 48 hours. Activity within the renal transplant exceeding activity in the adjacent iliac vessels was considered to be evidence of rejection, and both chemical evidence and clinical impression of rejection at 5 days after completion of imaging was accepted as proof of ongoing or incipient rejection at the time of scintigraphy. In addition, to visual inspection, independent quantitative analysis compared the area-normalized activity over the transplant with the adjacent iliac vessels (normal <1.0). For 5 patients, positive In-111 scintigraphy was present before convincing clinical evidence of rejection. In-111 platelet scintigraphy is useful not only to confirm the clinical diagnosis of rejection but also to establish the early, pre-clinical diagnosis of incipient acute postoperative renal transplant rejection

  3. Early diagnosis of acute postoperative renal transplant rejection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tisdale, P.L.; Collier, B.D.; Kauffman, H.M.; Adams, M.B.; Isitman, A.T.; Hellman, R.S.; Rao, S.A.; Joestgen, T.; Krohn, L.

    1985-05-01

    A prospective evaluation of In-111 labeled autologous platelet scintigraphy for the early diagnosis of acute postoperative renal transplant rejection was undertaken. To date, 28 consecutive patients between 7 and 14 days post-op have been injected with 500..mu..Ci of In-111 platelets followed by imaging at 24 and 48 hours. Activity within the renal transplant exceeding activity in the adjacent iliac vessels was considered to be evidence of rejection, and both chemical evidence and clinical impression of rejection at 5 days after completion of imaging was accepted as proof of ongoing or incipient rejection at the time of scintigraphy. In addition, to visual inspection, independent quantitative analysis compared the area-normalized activity over the transplant with the adjacent iliac vessels (normal <1.0). For 5 patients, positive In-111 scintigraphy was present before convincing clinical evidence of rejection. In-111 platelet scintigraphy is useful not only to confirm the clinical diagnosis of rejection but also to establish the early, pre-clinical diagnosis of incipient acute postoperative renal transplant rejection.

  4. Leaching Test Relationships, Laboratory-to-Field Comparisons and Recommendations for Leaching Evaluation using the Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report presents examples of the relationships between the results of laboratory leaching tests, as defined by the Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF) or analogous international test methods, and leaching of constituents from a broad range of materials under di...

  5. Leaching behavior of butanedionedioxime as gold ligand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Butanedionedioxime, a small organic compound with low-toxicity and good chemical stability, has been proposed as an effective gold ligand in gold extraction. The result of experiment shows that: 1) highly effective gold lixiviantcan be composed of butanedionedioxime (BDM) with many oxidants, especially potassium permanganate; 2)in the leaching system of BD M- K M nO4 the suitable Ox/Lig(ratio of oxidants to gold ligands) tange is 0.20 ~ 0. 50, optimally 0.25 ~0.45 at the pH range of 7 ~ 11; 3) BDM-KMnO4 extraction of gold from an oxide ore is similar to cyanide(cyanide-O2)extraction, but the leaching rate of gold by BDM-KMnO4 is faster than that by cyanide-O2; 4) gold may readily be recov-ered by carbon adsorption and zinc precipitation

  6. Variable Heat Rejection (VHR) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop advanced technologies to enable a variable heat rejection Thermal Control System (TCS) capable of operating through a wide range of thermal environments...

  7. Aluminum chloride restoration of in situ leached uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During in situ uranium mining using ammonium bicarbonate lixiviant, the ammonium exchanges with cations on the ore's clay. After mining is complete, the ammonium may desorb into post-leach ground water. For the particular ore studied, other chemicals (i.e., uranium and selenium) which are mobilized during the leach process, have also been found in the post-leach ground water. Laboratory column tests, used to simulate the leaching process, have shown that aluminum chloride can rapidly remove ammonium from the ore and thus greatly reduce the subsequent ammonium leakage level into ground water. The aluminum chloride has also been found to reduce the leakage levels of uranium and selenium. In addition, the aluminum chloride treatment produces a rapid improvement in permeability

  8. Aluminum chloride restoration of in situ leached uranium ores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, D.C.; Burgman, M.A.

    1982-09-01

    During in situ uranium mining using ammonium bicarbonate lixiviant, the ammonium exchanges with cations on the ore's clay. After mining is complete, the ammonium may desorb into post-leach ground water. For the particular ore studied, other chemicals (i.e., uranium and selenium) which are mobilized during the leach process, have also been found in the post-leach ground water. Laboratory column tests, used to simulate the leaching process, have shown that aluminum chloride can rapidly remove ammonium from the ore and thus greatly reduce the subsequent ammonium leakage level into ground water. The aluminum chloride has also been found to reduce the leakage levels of uranium and selenium. In addition, the aluminum chloride treatment produces a rapid improvement in permeability.

  9. Sulfuric acid leaching kinetics of South African chromite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Zhao; Cheng-jun Liu; Pei-yang Shi; Bo Zhang; Mao-fa Jiang; Qing-song Zhang; Ron Zevenhoven; Henrik Saxn

    2015-01-01

    The sulfuric acid leaching kinetics of South African chromite was investigated. The negative influence of a solid product layer constituted of a silicon-rich phase and chromium-rich sulfate was eliminated by crushing the chromite and by selecting proper leaching con-ditions. The dimensionless change in specific surface area and the conversion rate of the chromite were observed to exhibit a proportional re-lationship. A modified shrinking particle model was developed to account for the change in reactive surface area, and the model was fitted to experimental data. The resulting model was observed to describe experimental findings very well. Kinetics analysis revealed that the leach-ing process is controlled by a chemical reaction under the employed experimental conditions and the activation energy of the reaction is 48 kJ·mol–1.

  10. Coupling leaching of sphalerite concentrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭鹏; 谢惠琴; 卢立柱

    2004-01-01

    Coupling process of sphalerite concentrate leaching in H2 SO4-HNO3 and tetrachloroethylene extracting of sulfur was investigated. Effects of leaching temperature, leaching time, mass ratio of liquid to solid and tetrachloroethylene addition on zinc leaching processes were examined separately. SEM images of sphalerite concentrate and residues were performed by using JEM-6700F field emission scanning electron microscope. The relationship between the number of recycling and extraction ratio of zinc was studied. The results indicate that 99.6 % zinc is obtained after leaching for 3 h at 85 ℃ and pressure of 0.1 MPa O2, with 20 g sphalerite concentrate in 200 mL leaching solution containing 2.0 mol/L H2SO4 and 0.2 mol/L HNO3, in the presence of 10 mL C2Cl4. The leaching time of zinc is 50% shorter than that in the common leaching. The coupling effect is distinct. The recycled C2Cl4 exerts little influence on extraction ratio of zinc.

  11. Experience with restoration of ore-bearing aquifers after in situ leach uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In many cases the most important environmental issue for in situ leach uranium mining technology is the impact on groundwater. Usually the greatest issue is the chemical condition of the ore bearing aquifer following the completion of leaching. Based on experience gained during post leach monitoring, it has been found that in properly selected sites the impact following leaching is greatly reduced because of the process of self restoration, otherwise known as natural attenuation. This paper provides ground water monitoring data from 1985 to 1997 following completion of leaching at the Irkol uranium deposit, Kazakhstan. It shows the evolution of the pH, and other chemical parameters over this period. The monitoring results demonstrate that at this site the process of natural attenuation appears to have effectively reduced the impact on groundwater at the site, as well as to keep contaminated leaching fluids from moving more than a few hundreds of metres from the wellfield. (author)

  12. Leaching of Cs and Sr from sewage sludge ash buried in a landfill site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radionuclide contamination from the nuclear accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant has been found in sewage sludge ash produced in eastern Japan. When such contaminated waste contains less than 8,000 Bq/kg radiocesium, it is being disposed in controlled landfill sites. In order to assess the possible spread of the radionuclides by their leaching from the landfill sites, it is important to know the leaching behavior of the radionuclides from the sewage sludge ash and factors influencing the leaching behavior. In this study, leaching experiments using stable Cs and Sr were conducted for sewage sludge ash under several conditions to investigate effects of chemical composition of leachate, pH, and solid/liquid ratio on Cs and Sr leaching behaviors. In the pH range from 6 to 12, the leaching ratio of Cs or Sr was less than 5.2 or 0.21%, respectively. Additionally, the leaching ratio of Sr decreased with increasing pH of the leachate. In contrast, the higher the pH in the leachate was, the higher the leaching ratio of Cs was. Finally, possible radionuclide leaching from contaminated sewage sludge ash and then radionuclide concentrations in an actual landfill leachate were assessed. It could be suggested that 90Sr leaching from the landfill site had the least effect on the environment, whereas 134+137Cs leaching needed to be taken into account for spreading radioactive materials from the landfill site to the environment. (author)

  13. Defining Effective Salt Leaching Regions Between Drains

    OpenAIRE

    ANAPALI, Ömer; ŞAHİN, Üstün; Öztaş, Taşkın; Hanay, Abdurrahman

    2001-01-01

    The application of sufficient amounts of leaching water by means of an effective method is very important in the management and reclamation of saline and sodic soils. Reclamation cannot be achieved with insufficient leaching water application, while excess water application may cause severe problems in soil. Knowledge of the leaching regions and intensities may help to control the amounts of leaching water through effective leaching methods in areas of limited leaching. This study was und...

  14. Leaching assessments of toxic metals in waste plasma display panel glass

    OpenAIRE

    M. Chen; Jiang, P.; Chen, H.; Ogunseitan, OA; Li, Y.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 A&WMA. The plasma display panel (PDP) is rapidly becoming obsolete, contributing in large amounts to the electronic waste stream. In order to assess the potential for environmental pollution due to hazardous metals leached from PDP glass, standardized leaching procedures, chemical speciation assessments, and bioavailability tests were conducted. According to the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), arsenic in back glass was present at 4.46 ± 0.22 mg/L, close to its regula...

  15. Chemo-mechanical coupling behaviour of leached concrete. Part I : Experimental results

    OpenAIRE

    NGUYEN,VH; COLINA, H; Torrenti, Jean Michel; Boulay, Claude; Nedjar, Boumediene

    2007-01-01

    This paper deals with concrete behaviour under chemical and mechanical degradations. Experimental investigations are described where the effects of the calcium leaching process of concrete on its mechanical properties are highlighted. The calcium leaching and mechanical tests on cement paste, mortar and concrete samples are presented. Because of the slow kinetics of leaching under deionised water, an accelerated method has been chosen by using an ammonium nitrate solution instead. The specime...

  16. Transplant rejection in terrestrial molluscs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Furuta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To know whether or not molluscs are capable of recognizing tissue allo-antigens, dorsal skin-allografts were exchanged between adult terrestrial slug, Incilaria fruhstorferi. We succeeded for the first time in orthotopic transplantation of allografts and observed chronic rejection of allografts. Cellular changes in the rejection process continued over for 40 days. Two functional types of “effector” cells were recognized at the rejection site, but they were observed to be macrophages possessing perforin granules and phagocytosing damaged cells of the allograft. Three days after transplantation, the perforin-positive cells were recognized only in the recipient tissue surrounding the allograft. Five days after transplantation, these cells started to appear in the graft, while they disappeared from the host tissue. However, TUNEL-positive cells (apoptotic cells were not observed throughout the graft-rejection process. Electron microscopic examination of the graft tissue revealed autophagic degeneration of epithelial cells, mucous cells, pigment cells, fibroblasts, and muscle cells. These observations suggest that the slugs have the capability to recognize differences in cell-surface molecules between the allogeneic and recipient tissue, and that an allograft is chronically rejected due to a type of immunocyte (macrophage that can induce perforin-dependent cell death

  17. Nitrogen Leaching in Vegetable Fields in the Suburbs of Shanghai

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Lin-Kui; CHEN Guo-Jun; LU Yi-Tong

    2005-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) leaching in vegetable fields from December 2002 to May 2003 with equal dressings of total N for a sequential rotation of Chinese flat cabbage (Brassica chinensis L. var. rosularis) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) in a suburban major vegetable production base of Shanghai were examined using the lysimeter method to provide a scientific basis for rational utilization of nitrogen fertilizers so as to prevent nitrogen pollution of water resources. Results showed that leached N consisted mainly of nitrate N, which accounted for up to more than 90% of the total N loss and could contribute to groundwater pollution. Data also showed that by partly substituting chemical N (30%) in a basal dressing with equivalent N of refined organic fertilizer in the Chinese fiat cabbage field, 64.5% of the leached nitrate N was reduced,while in the lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) field, substituting 1/2 of the chemical N in a basal dressing and 1/3 of the chemical N in a top dressing with equivalent N of refined organic fertilizers reduced 46.6% of the leached nitrate N. In the two-year sequential rotation system of Chinese fiat cabbage and lettuce, nitrate-N leaching in the treatment with the highest amount of chemical fertilizer was up to 46.55 kg ha-1, while treatment plots with the highest amount of organic fertilizer had only 17.58 kg ha-1. Thus, partly substituting refined organic fertilizer for chemical nitrogen in the first two seasons has a great advantage of reducing nitrate-N leaching.

  18. Leaching of concrete : the leaching process : extrapolation of deterioration : effect on the structural stability

    OpenAIRE

    Fagerlund, Göran

    2000-01-01

    The leaching process when water attacks concrete, and the effect of leaching on the strength and durability of a concrete structure, is analysed theoretically. Technique for prediction of the future leaching and structural stability is outlined. The analysis is to a certain extent supported by data from literature. The leaching process is divided in five different types: 1: Pure surface leaching 2: Surface leaching involving erosion 3: Homogeneous leaching over the entire structure 4...

  19. Modelling inorganic and organic biocide leaching from CBA-amine (Copper–Boron–Azole) treated wood based on characterisation leaching tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerical simulation of the leaching behaviour of treated wood is the most pertinent and less expensive method for the prediction of biocides' release in water. Few studies based on mechanistic leaching models have been carried out so far. In this work, a coupled chemistry-mass transport model is developed for simulating the leaching behaviour of inorganic (Cu, B) and organic (Tebuconazole) biocides from CBA-amine treated wood. The model is based on experimental investigations (lab-scale leaching tests coupled with chemical and structural analysis). It considers biocides' interactions with wood solid components and with extractives (literature confirmed reactions), as well as transport mechanisms (diffusion, convection) in different compartments. Simulation results helped at identifying the main fixation mechanisms, like (i) direct complexation of Cu by wood-phenolic and -carboxylic sites (and not via monoethanolamine; complex) on lignin and hemicellulose and strong dependence on extractives' nature, (ii) pH dependent binding of tebuconazole on polarized -OH moieties on wood. The role of monoethanolamine is to provide a pore-solution pH of about 7.5, when copper solubility is found to be weakest. The capability of the developed model to simulate the chemical and transport behaviour is the main result of this study. Moreover, it proved that characterization leaching tests (pH dependency and dynamic tests), combined with appropriate analytical methods are useful experimental tools. Due to its flexibility for representing and simulating various leaching conditions, chemical-transport model developed could be used to further simulate the leaching behaviour of CBA treated wood at larger scales. - Highlights: • Biocide and extractives leaching from ammonia-CBA treated wood were modelled. • The chemical-transport model identifies the main fixation/solubilisation mechanisms. • The model describes well the results of equilibrium and dynamic leaching tests. • Cu is

  20. The Value of Laboratory Diagnostics of Acute Renal Graft Rejection Compared to the Goldstandard Transplant Biopsy

    OpenAIRE

    Fornara, P; Fischer, K; O. Rettkowski; Loertzer, H.; Wicht, A.; L. Kielwagen; Hamza, A.

    2006-01-01

    The main problem of organ transplantation is acute rejection and its therapy. Clinical symptoms (oliguria, hypertension, pain in the transplant, fever, weight gain) and laboratory chemical/histological findings are possible signs of a rejection after kidney transplantation. A suspicion for a rejection is firstly expressed by finding clinical signs. The laboratory chemistry and the histology prove this suspicion true or not. Deviate findings in laboratory chemistry and histology are possible. ...

  1. Diagnosis and Treatment of Pancreas Rejection

    OpenAIRE

    Redfield, R. R.; Kaufman, D. B.; Odorico, J. S.

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant improvement in pancreas allograft survival, rejection of the pancreas remains a major clinical problem. In addition to cellular rejection of the pancreas, antibody-mediated rejection of the pancreas is now a well-described entity. The 2011 Banff update established comprehensive guidelines for the diagnosis of acute and chronic AMR. The pancreas biopsy is critical in order to accurately diagnose and treat pancreas rejection. Other modes of monitoring pancreas rejection we f...

  2. Evaluation of glass leaching as nutrient source for microalgae growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three glasses with an elemental composition similar to the nutrient ratio required for Spirulina platensis growth and with different SiO2 content have been prepared. The glasses were crushed and sieved into 2 different fractions and the effect of the particle size has been studied in terms of the leaching kinetics of each element. The chemical analysis of the leaching water was used for obtaining the dissolution rate curves for each element taking part of the glass composition. From the calculation of the leaching rate constant and the exponential constant of the lixiviation reaction, it has been evaluated the Spirulina platensis growth in ambient normal conditions of light, temperature and pH of the growing media. It has been concluded that, either from the modification of the chemical composition of the glass or its particle size, it is possible to tune the delivery of the nutrients to match the growth rate of Spirulina platensis. (Author)

  3. Increasing silver leaching rate from leaching-resistant zinc residues by thiourea leaching method with pressurized preoxidation process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡天觉; 曾光明; 黄国和; 袁兴中; 李建兵

    2003-01-01

    As for the leaching-resistant zinc residues, the silver leaching rate can be over 98% through the processof pressurized preoxidation and thiourea leaching. Compared with the method of extracting the silver directly fromthe leaching-resistant zinc residues, the silver leaching rate is greatly improved. The optimum preoxidation condi-tions are: particle size range 40 - 60 μm, oxygen partial pressure 106 Pa, temperature 80 - 90 ℃, pH= 1.0, andleaching time 5 h. After pretreatment, the time of thiourea leaching silver is shortened to 1.5 h, and the thioureaconsumption is reduced greatly. The oxidation mechanism and the thiourea leaching kinetics were also explored.

  4. Leaching Properties of Naturally Occurring Heavy Metals from Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M.; Hoshino, M.; Yoshikawa, M.; Hara, J.; Sugita, H.

    2014-12-01

    The major threats to human health from heavy metals are associated with exposure to arsenic, lead, cadmium, chromium, mercury, as well as some other elements. The effects of such heavy metals on human health have been extensively studied and reviewed by international organizations such as WHO. Due to their toxicity, heavy metal contaminations have been regulated by national environmental standards in many countries, and/or laws such as the Soil Contamination Countermeasures Act in Japan. Leaching of naturally occurring heavy metals from the soils, especially those around abandoned metal mines into surrounding water systems, either groundwater or surface water systems, is one of the major pathways of exposure. Therefore, understanding the leaching properties of toxic heavy metals from naturally polluted soils is of fundamentally importance for effectively managing abandoned metal mines, excavated rocks discharged from infrastructure constructions such as tunneling, and/or selecting a pertinent countermeasure against pollution when it is necessary. In this study, soil samples taken from the surroundings of abandoned metal mines in different regions in Japan were collected and analyzed. The samples contained multiple heavy metals such as lead, arsenic and chromium. Standard leaching test and sequential leaching test considering different forms of contaminants, such as trivalent and pentavalent arsenics, and trivalent and hexavalent chromiums, together with standard test for evaluating total concentration, X-ray Fluorescence Analysis (XRF), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC) tests were performed. In addition, sequential leaching tests were performed to evaluate long-term leaching properties of lead from representative samples. This presentation introduces the details of the above experimental study, discusses the relationships among leaching properties and chemical and mineral compositions, indicates the difficulties associated with

  5. Carbonate heap leach of uranium-contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new approach to removal of uranium from soils based on existing heap leach mining technologies proved highly effective for remediation of soils from the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) near Cincinnati, Ohio. In laboratory tests, remediation of uranium-contaminated soils by heap leaching with carbonate salt solutions was demonstrated in column experiments. An understanding of the chemical processes that occur during carbonate leach of uranium from soils may lead to enhancement of uranium removal. Carbonate leaching requires the use of an integrated and closed circuit process, wherein the leach solutions are recycled and the reagents are reused, resulting in a minimum secondary waste stream. Carbonate salt leach solution has two important roles. Primarily, the formation of highly soluble anionic carbonate uranyl species, including uranyl dicarbonate (UO2CO32=) and uranyl tricarbonate (UO2CO334-), allows for high concentration of uranium in a leachate solution. Secondly, carbonate salts are nearly selective for dissolution of uranium from uranium contaminated soils. Other advantages of the carbonate leaching process include (1) the high solubility, (2) the selectivity, (3) the purity of the solution produced, (4) the relative ease with which a uranium product can be precipitated directly from the leachate solution, and (5) the relatively non-corrosive and safe handling characteristics of carbonate solutions. Experiments conducted in the laboratory have demonstrated the effectiveness of carbonate leach. Efficiencies of uranium removal from the soils have been as high as 92 percent. Higher molar strength carbonate solutions (∼0.5M) proved more effective than lower molar strength solutions (∼ 0.1M). Uranium removal is also a function of lixiviant loading rate. Furthermore, agglomeration of the soils with cement resulted in less effective uranium removal

  6. Leach test of cladding removal waste grout using Hanford groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R.J.; Martin, W.J.; Legore, V.L.

    1995-09-01

    This report describes laboratory experiments performed during 1986-1990 designed to produce empirical leach rate data for cladding removal waste (CRW) grout. At the completion of the laboratory work, funding was not available for report completion, and only now during final grout closeout activities is the report published. The leach rates serve as inputs to computer codes used in assessing the potential risk from the migration of waste species from disposed grout. This report discusses chemical analyses conducted on samples of CRW grout, and the results of geochemical computer code calculations that help identify mechanisms involved in the leaching process. The semi-infinite solid diffusion model was selected as the most representative model for describing leaching of grouts. The use of this model with empirically derived leach constants yields conservative predictions of waste release rates, provided no significant changes occur in the grout leach processes over long time periods. The test methods included three types of leach tests--the American Nuclear Society (ANS) 16.1 intermittent solution exchange test, a static leach test, and a once-through flow column test. The synthetic CRW used in the tests was prepared in five batches using simulated liquid waste spiked with several radionuclides: iodine ({sup 125}I), carbon ({sup 14}C), technetium ({sup 99}Tc), cesium ({sup 137}Cs), strontium ({sup 85}Sr), americium ({sup 241}Am), and plutonium ({sup 238}Pu). The grout was formed by mixing the simulated liquid waste with dry blend containing Type I and Type II Portland cement, class F fly ash, Indian Red Pottery clay, and calcium hydroxide. The mixture was allowed to set and cure at room temperature in closed containers for at least 46 days before it was tested.

  7. Leach test of cladding removal waste grout using Hanford groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes laboratory experiments performed during 1986-1990 designed to produce empirical leach rate data for cladding removal waste (CRW) grout. At the completion of the laboratory work, funding was not available for report completion, and only now during final grout closeout activities is the report published. The leach rates serve as inputs to computer codes used in assessing the potential risk from the migration of waste species from disposed grout. This report discusses chemical analyses conducted on samples of CRW grout, and the results of geochemical computer code calculations that help identify mechanisms involved in the leaching process. The semi-infinite solid diffusion model was selected as the most representative model for describing leaching of grouts. The use of this model with empirically derived leach constants yields conservative predictions of waste release rates, provided no significant changes occur in the grout leach processes over long time periods. The test methods included three types of leach tests--the American Nuclear Society (ANS) 16.1 intermittent solution exchange test, a static leach test, and a once-through flow column test. The synthetic CRW used in the tests was prepared in five batches using simulated liquid waste spiked with several radionuclides: iodine (125I), carbon (14C), technetium (99Tc), cesium (137Cs), strontium (85Sr), americium (241Am), and plutonium (238Pu). The grout was formed by mixing the simulated liquid waste with dry blend containing Type I and Type II Portland cement, class F fly ash, Indian Red Pottery clay, and calcium hydroxide. The mixture was allowed to set and cure at room temperature in closed containers for at least 46 days before it was tested

  8. Study on pressure alkaline leaching and its application to uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical processes and mechanism of pressure leaching of uranium ore and the factors affecting leaching rates are discussed in this paper. The results of bench scale experiments, the data from pilot plant operations and the data from industrial productions in a mill are also presented

  9. Next Generation of Leaching Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    A corresponding abstract has been cleared for this presentation. The four methods comprising the Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework are described along with the tools to support implementation of the more rigorous and accurate source terms that are developed using LEAF ...

  10. Preparation of manganese sulfate from low-grade manganese carbonate ores by sulfuric acid leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qing-quan; Gu, Guo-hua; Wang, Hui; Zhu, Ren-feng; Liu, You-cai; Fu, Jian-gang

    2016-05-01

    In this study, a method for preparing pure manganese sulfate from low-grade ores with a granule mean size of 0.47 mm by direct acid leaching was developed. The effects of the types of leaching agents, sulfuric acid concentration, reaction temperature, and agitation rate on the leaching efficiency of manganese were investigated. We observed that sulfuric acid used as a leaching agent provides a similar leaching efficiency of manganese and superior selectivity against calcium compared to hydrochloric acid. The optimal leaching conditions in sulfuric acid media were determined; under the optimal conditions, the leaching efficiencies of Mn and Ca were 92.42% and 9.61%, respectively. Moreover, the kinetics of manganese leaching indicated that the leaching follows the diffusion-controlled model with an apparent activation energy of 12.28 kJ·mol-1. The purification conditions of the leaching solution were also discussed. The results show that manganese dioxide is a suitable oxidant of ferrous ions and sodium dimethyldithiocarbamate is an effective precipitant of heavy metals. Finally, through chemical analysis and X-ray diffraction analysis, the obtained product was determined to contain 98% of MnSO4·H2O.

  11. Feasibility study for an additional HEPA filter leaching system in NWCF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the feasibility of installing a second high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter leaching system in the New Waste Calcining Facility at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). A large spent filter backlog already exists at the ICPP, and it has been uncertain whether the existing HEPA filter leaching system will have a throughput rate sufficient to work off the existing backlog in a timely manner. Three areas within the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) have been identified as possible locations for a second filter leaching system. This report examines the suitability of each location, identifies modifications that would be necessary-to install a filter leaching system at each location, examines the impact of modifying each location, and discusses recent efforts to estimate filter throughput using the existing filter leaching system. Based on all available information, installation of a second filter leaching system is not recommended at the present time

  12. Simultaneous leaching and carbon sequestration in constrained aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL; Moon, Ji Won [ORNL; Roh, Yul [Chonnam National University, Gwangju; Cho, Kyu Seong [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of metal ions leaching and precipitated mineral phases of metal-rich fly ash (FA) was examined in order to evaluate microbial impacts on carbon sequestration and metal immobilization. The leaching solutions consisted of aerobic deionized water (DW) and artificial eutrophic water (AEW) that was anaerobic, organic- and mineral-rich, and higher salinity as is typical of bottom water in eutrophic algae ponds. The Fe- and Ca-rich FAs were predominantly composed of quartz, mullite, portlandite, calcite, hannebachite, maghemite, and hematite. After 86 days, only Fe and Ca contents exhibited a decrease in leaching solutions while other major and trace elements showed increasing or steady trends in preference to the type of FA and leaching solution. Ca-rich FA showed strong carbon sequestration efficiency ranging up to 32.3 g CO(2)/kg FA after 86 days, corresponding to almost 65% of biotic carbon sequestration potential under some conditions. Variations in the properties of FAs such as chemical compositions, mineral constituents as well as the type of leaching solution impacted CO(2) capture. Even though the relative amount of calcite increased sixfold in the AEW and the relative amount of mineral phase reached 37.3 wt% using Ca-rich FA for 86 days, chemical sequestration did not accomplish simultaneous precipitation and sequestration of several heavy metals.

  13. Leaching of Natural Gravel and Concrete by CO2 - Experimental Design, Leaching Behaviour and Dissolution Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Rita; Leis, Albrecht; Mittermayr, Florian; Harer, Gerhard; Wagner, Hanns; Reichl, Peter; Dietzel, Martin

    2015-04-01

    The durability of building material in aggressive aqueous environments is a key factor for evaluating the product quality and application as well as of high economic interest. Therefore, aspects of durability have been frequently investigated with different approaches such as monitoring, modelling and experimental work. In the present study an experimental approach based on leaching behaviour of natural calcite-containing siliceous gravel used as backfill material in tunnelling and sprayed concrete by CO2 was developed. CO2 was introduced to form carbonic acid, which is known as an important agent to induce chemical attack. The goals of this study were (i) to develop a proper experimental design to survey the leaching of building materials on-line, (ii) to decipher individual reaction mechanisms and kinetics and (iii) to estimate time-resolved chemical resistance of the used material throughout leaching. A combined flow through reactor unit was successfully installed, where both open and closed system conditions can be easily simulated by changing flow directions and rates. The chemical compositions of the experimental solutions were adjusted by CO2 addition at pHstat conditions and monitored in-situ by pH/SpC electrodes and by analysing the chemical composition of samples throughout an experimental run. From the obtained data e.g. dissolution rates with respect to calcite were obtained for the gravel material, which were dependent on the individual calcite content of the leached material. The rates were found to reflect the flow rate conditions, and the kinetic data lay within the range expected from dissolution experiments in the CaCO3-CO2-H2O system. In case of concrete the reactions throughout the leaching experiment were complex. Coupled dissolution and precipitation phenomena (e.g. portlandite dissolution, calcite formation) occurred. The coupled reactions can be followed by the evolution of the solution chemistry. The overall rates of elemental removal from

  14. Leaching of heavy metals from steelmaking slags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomes, J. F. P

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Leaching tests with EAF and Ladle slags were performed, using a flow through test and the standard batch test DIN 38414-S4. The previous method was used to simulate the leaching behaviour of steel slags under landfill. The chemical analysis of the leachates during this period shows, in general, for both types of slag, an increase of heavy metal releases with ageing. Standard test method DIN 38414-S4 was used to evaluate leachability of heavy metals by water in unprocessed slags. After more than one year of trials, slag samples submitted to these trials presented very low total leaching levels. The most extracted elements are calcium and magnesium. Nevertheless, in flow-through test, calcium and magnesium leached from solid slags are below 0.5% and all other metals below 0.1%. Leachates obtained with DIN 38414-S4 present, as expected, higher leaching values; however, these are inferior to 5 % (Ca and 1% (other elements.

    Este articulo contiene los resultados obtenidos en ensayos de lixiviación de escorias de acero (horno electrico y cuchara ejecutados siguiendo la metodologia de flujo dinámico así como el ensayo normalizado DIN 38414-S4. El primer ensayo intenta simular el comportamiento de lixiviación de las escorias en vertedero. Para las escorias ensayadas se han complementado los ensayos con el análisis químico de los lixiviados y se ha verificado un aumento de la liberación de metales pesados. El ensayo DIN 38414-S4 se ha utilizado para evaluar la lixiviación por agua de metales pesados, en muestras de escorias originales. Despues de un año de ensayos, se han observado niveles muy bajos de lixiviación. Los elementos mas lixiviados han sido calcio y magnesio. No obstante, en los ensayos de flujo dinámico, el calcio y el magnesio lixiviados de las escorias sólidas era menor de 0,5% y el resto de los otros metales era inferior a 0,1%. Los lixiviados obtenidos con el ensayo DIN 38414-S4 presentan, como era de esperar, valores

  15. In-situ leaching of south Texas uranium ores--part 1: laboratory studies of ore composition and leaching performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents data on mineralogy and laboratory chemical-leaching tests for ore samples from several areas of the south Texas tertiary Catahoula formation. Optical microscope, electron microprobe, spectroscopic, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and various chemical analyses were performed. Batch screening tests gave qualitative estimates of leach rate and potential recovery. Packed column tests using hydrogen peroxide or pressurized oxygen gave more quantitative recovery estimates. The frequently friable sandstones contained highly variable amounts of quartz, feldspar, calcite, and clay, and in some cases, zeolite or mica. Clays were mainly mixed layer illite/smectite type. High cation exchange capacities (CEC's) correlated with clay (and zeolite) content, while high reducing capacities were often associated with pyrite level. Coffinite, in various environments, was the main uranium mineral. With batch tests using pseudo-first-order rate constants, ore leach rates were generally characterized as ''fast'' on a scale of fast, intermediate, and slow. However, there was variability in leach rates, both in samples from different areas and in samples taken at different depths in the same well. Fast rates and recoveries greater than 80% were observed in most column pack tests, but there was variation with leachate composition and sample source. The chemistry and kinetics of leaching are also discussed

  16. In-situ leaching of south Texas uranium ores--Part 1: Laboratory studies of ore composition and leaching performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents data on mineralogy and laboratory chemical-leaching tests for ore samples from several areas of the south Texas tertiary Catahoula formation. Optical microscope, electron microprobe, spectroscopic, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and various chemical analyses were performed. Batch screening tests gave qualitative estimates of leach rate and potential recovery. Packed column tests using hydrogen peroxide or pressurized oxygen gave more quantitative recovery estimates. The frequently friable sandstones contained highly variable amounts of quartz, feldspar, calcite, and clay, and in some cases, zeolite or mica. Clays were mainly mixed layer illite/smectite type. High cation exchange capacities (CEC's) correlated with clay (and zeolite) content, while high reducing capacities were often associated with pyrite level. Coffinite, in various environments, was the main uranium mineral. With batch tests using pseudo-first-order rate constants, ore leach rates were generally characterized as ''fast'' on a scale of fast, intermediate, and slow. However, there was variability in leach rates, both in samples from different areas and in samples taken at different depths in the same well. Fast rates and recoveries greater than 80% were observed in most column pack tests, but there was variation with leachate composition and sample source. The chemistry and kinetics of leaching are also discussed

  17. Study on Chemical Speciation of Uranium in Samples from in-situ Leaching Sandstone-type Uranium Deposit in Xinjiang%新疆某地浸砂岩型铀矿中铀赋存形态的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马强; 冯志刚; 孙静; 谢二举; 李小军

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a method of studying uranium speciation from in-situ leaching sandstone-type uranium deposits by a sequential extraction procedure and demonstrates its application to sandstone uranium exploration. The chemical extraction procedure was modified from Tessier. Uranium in samples was classified into five speciations: exchangeable ions, bound to carbonates, bound to Fe-Mn oxides, bound to sulfide-organic matter and residual speciation. The first four phases consisted of active uranium with the residual uranium being stable uranium. The results show that the uranium distribution characteristics were significantly different whether they were in different samples or in the same sample. The average amounts of residual speciation, carbonates speciation, exchangeable speciation, sulfide-organic matter speciation and Fe-Mn speciation decreased in order as 37. 75% (RSD = 1. 80% ), 20. 56% (RSD = 2. 72%), 15. 51% ( RSD = 1. 85% ), 14. 26% ( RSD = 2. 08% ) and 11.91% ( RSD = 1.75% ) , respectively. According to the present technology of acid dipped processing, the active uranium was teachable and the inert uranium was unleachable. This study indicates that residual speciation is the primary component. The uranium extraction rate for uranium ore with a high proportion of residual uranium ( such as the No.4 sample with 57.17% residual uranium in this paper) is lower and the extraction rale does not increase significantly by improving the dissolve acidity and oxidants.%以新疆某地浸砂岩型铀矿为研究对象,参考Tessier逐级化学提取方法,对10件矿芯试样进行铀赋存形态的研究.将铀赋存形态分为可交换离子态、碳酸盐结合态、铁锰氧化物结合态、硫化物及有机物结合态和残渣态,其中前4种形态铀为活性铀,残渣态铀为惰性铀.研究结果显示,无论是试样间还是同一试样内,铀的形态分布特征都存在明显的差异.各形态铀的含量(平均值)

  18. Antibody-Mediated Lung Transplant Rejection

    OpenAIRE

    Hachem, Ramsey

    2012-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection after lung transplantation remains enigmatic. However, emerging evidence over the past several years suggests that humoral immunity plays an important role in allograft rejection. Indeed, the development of donor-specific antibodies after transplantation has been identified as an independent risk factor for acute cellular rejection and bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. Furthermore, cases of acute antibody-mediated rejection resulting in severe allograft dysfunctio...

  19. Rejection mechanisms for contaminants in polymeric reverse osmosis membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Meng; Lueptow, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    Despite the success of reverse osmosis (RO) for water purification, the molecular-level physico-chemical processes of contaminant rejection are not well understood. Here we carry out NEMD simulations on a model polyamide RO membrane to understand the mechanisms of transport and rejection of both ionic and neutral contaminants in water. We observe that the rejection changes non-monotonously with ion sizes. In particular, the rejection of urea, 2.4 A radius, is higher than ethanol, 2.6 A radius, and the rejections for organic solutes, 2.2-2.8 A radius, are lower than Na+, 1.4 A radius, or Cl-, 2.3 A radius. We show that this can be explained in terms of the solute accessible intermolecular volume in the membrane and the solute-water pair interaction energy. If the smallest open spaces in the membrane's molecular structure are all larger than the hydrated solute, then the solute-water pair interaction energy does not matter. However, when the open spaces in the polymeric structure are such that solutes have to s...

  20. Complement and hyper acute rejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Rabia Mohammed

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Organ transplantation has been a major development in clinical medicine but its success has been marred by the immune system′s capacity to respond to "non-self" cells and tissues. A full molecular understanding of this mechanism and the myriad triggers for immune rejection is yet to be elucidated. Consequently, immunosuppressive drugs remain the mainstay of post-transplant ma-nagement; however, these interventions have side effects such as increased incidence of cancer, post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders, susceptibility to infection if not managed appro-priately and the inconvenience to the patient of lifelong treatment. Novel therapeutic approaches based on molecular understanding of immunological processes are thus needed in this field. The notion that factors influencing successful transplants might be of use as therapeutic approaches is both scientifically and medically appealing. Recent developments in the understanding of successful transplants are expected to provide new opportunities for safer transplantation. This article reviews the present understanding of the molecular basis of rejection and the role of complement in this process as well as the possibility of generating "intelligent" therapy that better target crucial components of hyper-acute rejections.

  1. Organic leaching and metal removal with Sargassum filipendula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Teresinha Veit

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The biosorption process with algae is usually carried out with a concomitant alginate leaching process. Alginate is identified as the main functional group, responsible for generating the most active sites. Biomass chemical and thermal pretreatment is an alternative process for reducing organic leaching. Experiments with different pH rates were performed to analyze the leaching process of pretreated (contact time: 24, 48 and 72 hours and non-pretreated biomass of Sargassum filipendula. The concentrations of calcium, magnesium, sodium and potassium ions, as well as total organic carbon, were determined to evaluate the biomass sorption capacity. Capacities of native and pretreated biomass to remove the heavy metal ions Cr and/or Ni from solutions of different concentrations were compared. The ion competition effect on removal capacity was studied. The biosorbent had a higher affinity with chromium ion.

  2. Leaching of Zinc Sulfide by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans: Bacterial Oxidation of the Sulfur Product Layer Increases the Rate of Zinc Sulfide Dissolution at High Concentrations of Ferrous Ions

    OpenAIRE

    Fowler, T. A.; Crundwell, F. K.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reports the results of leaching experiments conducted with and without Thiobacillus ferrooxidans at the same conditions in solution. The extent of leaching of ZnS with bacteria is significantly higher than that without bacteria at high concentrations of ferrous ions. A porous layer of elemental sulfur is present on the surfaces of the chemically leached particles, while no sulfur is present on the surfaces of the bacterially leached particles. The analysis of the data using the shr...

  3. 7 CFR 58.136 - Rejected milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rejected milk. 58.136 Section 58.136 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Milk § 58.136 Rejected milk. A plant shall reject specific milk from a producer if the milk fails...

  4. Molecular analysis of transplant rejection: marching onward

    OpenAIRE

    Lakkis, Fadi G.; Billiar, Timothy R.

    2013-01-01

    Transcriptional profiling of organ transplants is increasingly defining the biological pathways responsible for graft rejection at the molecular level and identifying gene transcripts that diagnose or predict rejection. These advances hold significant promise for the treatment of organ rejection and for improving clinical outcomes after transplantation, but hurdles remain.

  5. Molecular analysis of transplant rejection: marching onward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakkis, Fadi G.

    2013-01-01

    Transcriptional profiling of organ transplants is increasingly defining the biological pathways responsible for graft rejection at the molecular level and identifying gene transcripts that diagnose or predict rejection. These advances hold significant promise for the treatment of organ rejection and for improving clinical outcomes after transplantation, but hurdles remain. PMID:24145950

  6. Leaching characteristics of steel slag components and their application in cementitious property prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zaibo; Zhao, Sanyin; Zhao, Xuguang; He, Tusheng

    2012-01-15

    High-efficiency recovery and utilization of steel slag are important concerns for environmental protection and sustainable development. To establish a rapid method to evaluate the cementitious properties of steel slag, leaching tests were carried out on steel slag components via an evaporation-condensation method; the leaching characteristics and mechanism of the slag were also investigated. The relationship between leaching characteristics and cementitious properties, which were represented by mortar compressive strength, was analyzed. Results show that there exist significant differences among the amounts of chemically active leached components. The leaching process can be described by the shrinking unreacted core model controlled by intra-particle diffusion, and is in accordance with Kondo R hydration kinetics equation. The leaching process showed a good linear relationship between the amounts of components leached from steel slag and the mortar compressive strength of cementitious materials prepared from reference cement and steel slag with mass ratios of 50:50 and 70:30. The compressive strengths of mortars subjected to 7, 28, and 90 days of curing can be accurately predicted by the sum of leached (CaO+Al(2)O(3)) obtained after a certain length of leaching time. PMID:22088502

  7. The current status of glass leaching studies in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass has been selected in France as the material used to confine the activity of fission product solutions, and a continuous vitrification process has been developed at the Marcoule Vitrification Facility (AVM), the first industrial plant. Borosilicate glass was chosen in various compositions for its properties: it is a homogeneous, non-porous material that incorporates appreciable quantities of most of the fission product oxides, and is only alterable at the surface interface layer. Glass thus constitutes the primary radioactivity containment barrier, and it is essential to determine its long-term behavior. Water constitutes the principal hazard during temporary or definitive storage of the glass blocks. Two types of inherent material properties are studied from the standpoint of glass stability under leaching conditions: - chemical durability; - radioactive containability with regard to the various radionuclides, fission products and especially the actinides. Durability tests are carried out in SOXHLET devices and the alteration rates are measured by the weight loss. The containability is measured by the leach rate, i.e. by the rate of activity loss into the water. Leaching tests are conducted for several major objectives: - selection of glass compositions (leach rates); - leaching mechanism studies (hydrolyzed layer characteristics, effects of temperature, pressure, pH, etc.); - long-term behavior studies (glass specimens doped with alpha-emitters); - simulation of geological repository environments

  8. Kinetics of Aqueous Leaching and Carbonization of Steelmaking Slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekakh, S. N.; Rawlins, C. H.; Robertson, D. G. C.; Richards, V. L.; Peaslee, K. D.

    2008-02-01

    Sequestration of carbon dioxide by steelmaking slag was studied in an atmospheric three-phase system containing industrial slag particles, water, and CO2 gas. Batch-type reactors were used to measure the rate of aqueous alkaline leaching and slag particle carbonization independently. Four sizes of slag particles were tested for the Ca leaching rate in deionized water at a constant 7.5 pH in an argon atmosphere and for carbonate conversion with CO2 bubbled through an aqueous suspension. Conversion data (fraction of Ca leached or converted to carbonate) were evaluated to determine the rate-limiting step based on the shrinking core model. For Ca leaching, the chemical reaction is the controlling mechanism during the initial period of time, which then switches to diffusion through the developed porous layer as the rate-limiting step. Carbonate conversion proceeded much slower than leaching conversion and was found to be limited by diffusion through the product calcium carbonate layer. The calculated value of diffusivity was found to be 5 × 10-9 cm2/s, which decreased by an order of magnitude with increasing carbonization conversion as a result of changing density of the product layer. The experimental data fit the shrinking core model well after correction for the particle specific surface area.

  9. Radiotracer investigation in gold leaching tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagadu, C.P.K., E-mail: dagadukofi@yahoo.co.uk [Ghana Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box LG 80, Legon, Accra (Ghana); Akaho, E.H.K.; Danso, K.A. [Ghana Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box LG 80, Legon, Accra (Ghana); Stegowski, Z.; Furman, L. [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH-UST, 30-059 Krakow (Poland)

    2012-01-15

    Measurement and analysis of residence time distribution (RTD) is a classical method to investigate performance of chemical reactors. In the present investigation, the radioactive tracer technique was used to measure the RTD of aqueous phase in a series of gold leaching tanks at the Damang gold processing plant in Ghana. The objective of the investigation was to measure the effective volume of each tank and validate the design data after recent process intensification or revamping of the plant. I-131 was used as a radioactive tracer and was instantaneously injected into the feed stream of the first tank and monitored at the outlet of different tanks. Both sampling and online measurement methods were used to monitor the tracer concentration. The results of measurements indicated that both the methods provided identical RTD curves. The mean residence time (MRT) and effective volume of each tank was estimated. The tanks-in-series model with exchange between active and stagnant volume was used and found suitable to describe the flow structure of aqueous phase in the tanks. The estimated effective volume of the tanks and high degree of mixing in tanks could validate the design data and confirmed the expectation of the plant engineer after intensification of the process. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer I-131 radioactive tracer is suitable for tracing the aqueous phase in gold ore slurry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Online data collection is more convenient method for tracer monitoring in industrial process systems. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The tanks-in-series model with exchange between active and stagnant zones is suitable to describe the flow behavior of leaching tanks. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The radiotracer RTD technique could be used to validate design data after process intensification in gold leaching tanks.

  10. Basic leaching tests for pure beta long-lived emitters in radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specimens for the two first leaching stages were manufactured using samples of virgin resins saturated in simulated conditions. EPIFLOC 21H resin was 50% saturated with NaCl and DUOLITE ARM-9381 resin was 100% saturated with NaCl+H3BO3. Previously both resins were doped with Ni-63 and Sr-90. As far as the third leaching stage is concerning, samples of real resins from two Spanish nuclear power plants were used for manufacturing of leaching specimens. Because Sr-90 and Ni-63 radioactivity in these samples was not high enough to be detectable in leachate, samples were additionally loaded with Sr-90 and Ni-63 before mixing with cement. Leaching procedure was adapted to the French one (the same duration of leaching renewal steps and cumulative leaching time and also the same analytical preparation for chemical and radiochemical analysis). Specimens were hanged into leachant with nylon yarn and were surrounded by a leachant layer of 3 cm thickness. Additionally to Sr-90 and Ni-63, the main chemical elements present in cements used for manufacturing of specimens were analyzed in leachates from the two first leaching stages and the main gamma emitters present in the samples of real resins were analyzed in leachates from the third leaching stages. (Author)

  11. Zinc leaching from tire crumb rubber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Emily P; Ren, Zhiyong; Mays, David C

    2012-12-01

    Because tires contain approximately 1-2% zinc by weight, zinc leaching is an environmental concern associated with civil engineering applications of tire crumb rubber. An assessment of zinc leaching data from 14 studies in the published literature indicates that increasing zinc leaching is associated with lower pH and longer leaching times, but the data display a wide range of zinc concentrations, and do not address the effect of crumb rubber size or the dynamics of zinc leaching during flow through porous crumb rubber. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of crumb rubber size using the synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP), the effect of exposure time using quiescent batch leaching tests, and the dynamics of zinc leaching using column tests. Results indicate that zinc leaching from tire crumb rubber increases with smaller crumb rubber and longer exposure time. Results from SPLP and quiescent batch leaching tests are interpreted with a single-parameter leaching model that predicts a constant rate of zinc leaching up to 96 h. Breakthrough curves from column tests displayed an initial pulse of elevated zinc concentration (~3 mg/L) before settling down to a steady-state value (~0.2 mg/L), and were modeled with the software package HYDRUS-1D. Washing crumb rubber reduces this initial pulse but does not change the steady-state value. No leaching experiment significantly reduced the reservoir of zinc in the crumb rubber. PMID:23145882

  12. Ferrite grade iron oxides from ore rejects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K S Rane; V M S Verenkar; P Y Sawant

    2001-06-01

    Iron oxyhydroxides and hydroxides were synthesized from chemically beneficiated high SiO2/Al2O3 low-grade iron ore (57.49% Fe2O3) rejects and heated to get iron oxides of 96–99.73% purity. The infrared band positions, isothermal weight loss and thermogravimetric and chemical analysis established the chemical formulas of iron-oxyhydroxides as -FeOOH.0.3H2O; -FeOOH.0.2H2O and amorphous FeOOH. The thermal products of all these were -Fe2O3 excepting that of -FeOOH.0.3H2O which gave mainly -Fe2O3 and some admixture of -Fe2O3. The hydrazinated iron hydroxides and oxyhydroxides, on the other hand, decomposed autocatalytically to mainly -Fe2O3. Hydrazine method modifies the thermal decomposition path of the hydroxides. The saturation magnetization, s, values were found to be in the range 60–71 emu g–1 which are close to the reported values for -Fe2O3. Mechanism of the -Fe2O3 formation by hydrazine method is discussed.

  13. Prediction of RO/NF membrane rejections of PhACs and organic compounds: a statistical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Amy

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Rejections of pharmaceutical compounds (Ibuprofen, Diclofenac, Clofibric acid, Naproxen, Primidone, Phenacetin and organic compounds (Dichloroacetic acid, Trichloroacetic acid, Chloroform, Bromoform, Trichloroethene, Perchloroethene, Carbontetrachloride, Carbontetrabromide by NF (Filmtec, Saehan and RO (Filmtec, Saehan, Toray, Koch membranes were studied. Chloroform presented the lowest rejection due to small molar volume, equivalent width and length. Diclofenac and Primidone showed high rejections related to high molar volume and length. Dichloroacetic acid and Trichloroacetic acid presented good rejections caused by charge exclusion instead of steric hindrance mechanism influencing rejection. Bromoform and Trichloroethene showed low rejections due to small length and equivalent width. Carbontetrabromide, Perchloroethene and Carbontetrachloride with higher equivalent width than BF and TCE presented better rejections. A qualitative analysis of variables using Principal Component Analysis was successfully implemented for reduction of physical-chemical compound properties that influence membrane rejection of PhACs and organic compounds. Properties such as dipole moment, molar volume, hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity, molecular length and equivalent width were found to be important descriptors for prediction of membrane rejection. Ionic and neutral compounds were successfully separated before analysis. For membranes used in the experiments, we may conclude that charge repulsion was an important mechanism of rejection for ionic compounds. Molecular weight was a poor variable for rejection prediction. Membrane rejection of neutral compounds was well predicted by dipole moment, molar volume, length, equivalent width and hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity of compounds after analysis with Multiple Linear Regression.

  14. Modeling of RO/NF membrane rejections of PhACs and organic compounds: a statistical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Amy

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Rejections of pharmaceutical compounds (Ibuprofen, Diclofenac, Clofibric acid, Naproxen, Primidone, Phenacetin and organic compounds (Dichloroacetic acid, Trichloroacetic acid, Chloroform, Bromoform, Trichloroethene, Perchloroethene, Carbontetrachloride, Carbontetrabromide by NF (Filmtec, Saehan and RO (Filmtec, Saehan, Toray, Koch membranes were studied. Chloroform presented the lowest rejection due to small molar volume, equivalent width and length. Diclofenac and Primidone showed high rejections related to high molar volume and length. Dichloroacetic acid and Trichloroacetic acid presented good rejections caused by charge exclusion instead of steric hindrance mechanism influencing rejection. Bromoform and Trichloroethene showed low rejections due to small length and equivalent width. Carbontetrabromide, Perchloroethene and Carbontetrachloride with higher equivalent width than BF and TCE presented better rejections. A qualitative analysis of variables using Principal Component Analysis was successfully implemented for reduction of physical-chemical compound properties that influence membrane rejection of PhACs and organic compounds. Properties such as dipole moment, molar volume, hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity, molecular length and equivalent width were found to be important descriptors for simulation of membrane rejection. For membranes used in the experiments, we may conclude that charge repulsion was an important mechanism of rejection for ionic compounds. After analysis with Multiple Linear Regression, we also may conclude that membrane rejection of neutral compounds was well predicted by molar volume, length, equivalent width, hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity and dipole moment. Molecular weight was a poor descriptor variable for rejection modelling. We were able to provide acceptable statistical significance for important results.

  15. Saltstone Oxidation Study: Leaching Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C. A.; Stefanko, D. B.; Burns, H. H.

    2013-02-24

    Cementitious waste forms can be designed to chemically stabilize selected contaminants, such as Tc{sup +7} and Cr{sup +6}, by chemically reduction to lower valance states, Tc{sup +4} and Cr{sup +3}, respectively, and precipitation of these species in alkaline media as low solubility solid phases. Data for oxidation of this type of cementitious waste form cured under field conditions as a function of time is required for predicting the performance of the waste form and disposal facility. The rate of oxidation (oxidation front advancement) is an important parameter for predicting performance because the solubilities of some radionuclide contaminants, e.g., technetium, are a function of the oxidation state. A non-radioactive experiment was designed for quantifying the oxidation front advancement using chromium, as an approximate redox-sensitive surrogate (Cr{sup +6} / Cr{sup +3}) for technetium (Tc{sup +7} / Tc{sup +4}). Nonradioactive cementitious waste forms were prepared in the laboratory and cured under both laboratory and ?field conditions.? Laboratory conditions were ambient temperature and sealed sample containers. Field conditions were approximated by curing samples in open containers which were placed inside a plastic container stored outdoors at SRS. The container had a lid and was instrumented with temperature and humidity probes. Subsamples as thin as 0.2 mm were taken as a function of distance from the exposed surface of the as-cast sample. The subsamples were leached and the leachates were analyzed for chromium, nitrate, nitrite and sodium. Nitrate, nitrite, and sodium concentrations were used to provide baseline data because these species are not chemically retained in the waste form matrix to any significant extent and are not redox sensitive. ?Effective? oxidation fronts for Cr were measured for samples containing 1000, 500 and 20 mg/kg Cr added as soluble sodium chromate, Na{sub 2}CrO{sub 4}. For a sample cured for 129 days under field conditions

  16. Hanford tank waste oxidative leach behavior analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper study develops a modeling assumption for oxidative leaching Hanford tank wastes based on observed behavior of a limited set of samples tested. Oxidative Leaching of solids from Hanford tank wastes can reduce chromium concentrations appreciably

  17. Rejection index for pressure tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the present study was to establish a set of criteria (or Rejection Index) which could be used to decide whether a zirconium-2 1/2 w/o niobium pressure tube in a CANDU reactor should be removed from service due to in-service degradation. A critique of key issues associated with establishing a realistic rejection index was prepared. Areas of uncertainty in available information were identified and recommendations for further analysis and laboratory testing made. A Rejection Index based on the following limits has been recommended: 1) Limits related to design intent and normal operation: any garter spring must remain within the tolerance band specified for its design location; the annulus gas system must normally be operated in a circulating mode with a procedure in place for purging to prevent accumulation of deuterium. It must remain sensitive to leaks into any part of the systems; and pressure tube dimensions and distortions must be limited to maintain the fuel channels within the original design intent; 2) Limits related to defect tolerance: adequate time margins between occurrence of a leaking crack and unstable failure must be demonstrated for all fuel channels; long lap-type flaws are unacceptable; crack-like defects of any size are unacceptable; and score marks, frat marks and other defects with contoured profiles must fall below certain depth, length and stress intensity limits; and 3) Limits related to property degradation: at operating temperature each pressure tube must be demonstrated to have a critical length in excess of a stipulated value; the maximum equivalent hydrogen level in any pressure tube should not exceed a limit which should be defined taking into account the known history of that tube; the maximum equivalent hydrogen level in any rolled joint should not exceed a limit which is presently recommended as 200 ppm equivalent hydrogen; and the maximum diametral creep strain should be limited to less than 5%

  18. Liver transplant rejection and cholestasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on liver transplant biopsies with Tc-99m hepatobiliary scintigraphy in patients with and without rejection (RE) and or cholestasis (CS). The authors reviewed 76 Tc-99m disofenin hepatobiliary studies and corresponding liver biopsies. Uptake was assigned a value of 0 to 3 (0 = normal). Excretion was assigned a value of 0 to 2 (0 = normal). Biopsies were graded on scales of (1) 0 to 12 for findings of CS (0 = normal) and (2) 0 to 2 for RE (0 = normal)

  19. Leaching of complex sulphide concentrate in acidic cupric chloride solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. TCHOUMOU; M. ROYNETTE

    2007-01-01

    The chemical analysis of a complex sulphide concentrate by emission spectrometry and X-ray diffraction shows that it contains essentially copper, lead, zinc and iron in the form of chalcopyrite, sphalerite and galena. A small amount of pyrite is also present in the ore but does not be detected with X-ray diffraction. The cupric chloride leaching of the sulphide concentrate at various durations and solid/liquid ratios at 100 ℃ shows that the rate of dissolution of the ore is the fastest in the first several hours, and after 12 h it does not evolve significantly. If oxygen is excluded from the aqueous cupric chloride solution during the leaching experiment at 100 ℃, the pyrite in the ore will not be leached. The determination of principal dissolved metals in the leaching liquor by flame atomic absorption spectrometry, and the chemical analysis of solid residues by emission spectrometry and X-ray diffraction allow to conclude that the rate of dissolution of the minerals contained in the complex sulphide concentrate are in the order of galena>sphalerite>chalcopyrite.

  20. Effect of processing history of pyrite on its leaching kinetics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵中伟; 李洪桂; 孙培梅; 李运姣; 霍广生

    2003-01-01

    Different researchers often attained scattered kinetic results for the same leaching process. Usually, the difference is ascribed to the variation in mineral resource, chemical composition and, accuracy of experimental methods, while less attention is paid to the sample processing history. The present study shows that processing history of pyrite sample can cause great changes in its physico-chemical properties. Crushing, grinding and milling lead to an increase of the leachability of pyrite and the leaching becomes less temperature dependence owing to the decreasing of apparent activation energy of the reaction. The activation energy for its leaching in H2SO4-HNO3 solution is depressed from 73.9 to 47.5kJ/mol after being activated through vibrating milling for 40min. On the contrary, aging causes the reverse change owing to the release of extra inner energy stored during mechanical treatments. Thus activity of pyrite will decrease towards its original value. Surely the processing history of concentrate sample should be taken into consideration when studying the kinetics of leaching reaction.

  1. The treatments of soil Rirang by floatation and Acid leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The treatments of soil Rirang by floatation and acid leaching has been carried out to increase high uranium concentrates of materials, separating associated economical minerals and to reduce the gangue minerals which bothering at chemical processing. The physical treatment has been done by ore preparation and floatation using oleic acid and pine oil, 20 % of pulp at pH 9, condition time at 5 minutes and collections of float fraction was 10 minutes. The chemical processing has been done by dynamic leaching using H2SO4 100 kg/ton, MnO2 20 kg/ton, 50 % of solid with ore size - 65 mesh, temperature at 80 oC and time of leaching was 8 hours. The result of experiments is as follows : Physical treatment by floatation shown that the concentrates of U increased at sink fraction by (1.5 - 2) times against feed sample for all the samples, and in the float fraction the recovery of molybdenite separation is 58 - 81 % and rare earths is 57 - 80 %. The result of dynamic leaching is 76 - 91 %, and recovery uranium increasing from 81.02 % (mixture samples soil before floatation) to 91.16 % ( mixture samples of float fraction)

  2. Leaching of concrete : experiments and modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Ekström, Tomas

    2001-01-01

    Many concrete dams, and other concrete structures within the hydropower industry are old and in a more or less severe state of degradation. Leaching is, together with freeze-thaw, the most common degradation problem in Swedish hydraulic concrete structures. This report contains a literature survey of concrete leaching, and presents the results of an experimental determination of leaching.

  3. A Device for Uranium series Leaching from Glass Fiber in HEPA Filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gye Nam; Lee, Suk Chol; Yang, Hee Chul; Yoon, In Ho; Choi, Wang Kyu; Lee, Kune Woo; Moon, Jei Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    A great amount of radioactive waste has been generated during the operation of nuclear facilities. Recently, the storage space of a radioactive waste storage facility in the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) was almost saturated with many radioactive wastes. To derive an optimum method for the removal of uranium series from HEPA glass fiber, five methods were applied in this study. That is, chemical leaching by 4.0 M HNO{sub 3}-0.1M Ce(IV) solution, chemical leaching by 5 wt% NaOH solution, chemical leaching by 0.5M H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-1.0M Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solution, chemical consecutive leaching by 4.0 M HNO{sub 3} solution, and chemical repeated leaching by 4.0 M HNO{sub 3} solution were used to remove uranium series. Also, in order to reuse the leaching waste-solution contaminated with {sup 238}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 226}Ra, and {sup 234}Th, the precipitation-filtration experiment was carried out with NaOH and alum as precipitants

  4. About microcracking due to leaching in cementitious composites: X-ray microtomography description and numerical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical shock of cement based materials leads to significant degradation of their physical properties. A typical scenario is a calcium leaching due to water (water with very low pH compared with that of pore fluid). The main objective of this paper is to evaluate the evolution of microstructure induced by leaching of a cementitious composite using synchrotron X-ray micro tomography, mainly from an experimental point of view. In this particular case, it was possible to identify cracking induced by leaching. After a description of the degradation mechanism and the X-ray synchrotron microtomographic analysis, numerical simulations are performed in order to show that cracking is induced by an initial pre-stressing of the composite, coupled with decalcification shrinkage and dramatic decrease in tensile strength during leaching. X-ray microtomography analysis allowed to make evidence of an induced microcracking in cementitious material submitted to leaching.

  5. Bioleaching of spent hydrotreating catalyst by acidophilic thermophile Acidianus brierleyi: Leaching mechanism and effect of decoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharadwaj, Abhilasha; Ting, Yen-Peng

    2013-02-01

    Bioleaching of spent hydrotreating catalyst by thermophillic archae Acidianus brierleyi was investigated. The spent catalyst (containing Al, Fe, Ni and Mo as major elements) was characterized, and the effect of pretreatment (decoking) on two-step and spent medium leaching was examined at 1% w/v pulp density. Decoking resulted in removal of carbonaceous deposits and volatile impurities, and affected the solubility of metal compounds through oxidization of the metal sulfides. Nearly 100% extraction was achieved using spent medium leaching for Fe, Ni and Mo, and 67% for Al. Bioleaching reduced nickel concentration in the leachate below the regulated levels for safe waste disposal. Chemical (i.e. abiotic) leaching using equimolar concentration of sulfuric acid produced by the bacteria during two-step process achieved a lower leaching efficiency (by up to 30%). Results indicated that A. brierleyi successfully leached heavy metals from spent catalyst. PMID:23334026

  6. Kinetics of Hydrochloric Acid Leaching of Titanium from Titanium-Bearing Electric Furnace Slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Fuqiang; Chen, Feng; Guo, Yufeng; Jiang, Tao; Travyanov, Andrew Yakovlevich; Qiu, Guanzhou

    2016-05-01

    The hydrochloric acid leaching of titanium from titanium-bearing electric furnace slag was investigated under different experimental conditions. The results indicate that particle size, hydrochloric acid concentration and reaction temperature were of significance to the leaching kinetics. Specifically, reaction temperature was the most important factor followed by hydrochloric acid concentration and particle size. The shrinking core model was used to describe the leaching process which was controlled by surface chemical reaction. The kinetic equation was obtained and the activation energy was found to be 43.16 kJ/mol. Iron and calcium species were almost completely dissolved in the acid when the extraction degree of titanium reached 99.84%. MgO (19.34 wt.%) and Al2O3 (32.45 wt.%) in the spinel were still in the leaching residue and SiO2 (43.53 wt.%) in the form of quartz remained in the leaching residue.

  7. Determination of molybdenite leaching degree by x-ray radiometric analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bibinov, S.A.; Gladyshev, V.P.; Yarmolik, A.S.; Kim, A.Ch.; Sokur, N.P. (Vsesoyuznyj Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij, i Proektnyj Inst. Tugoplavikh Metallov i Tverdykh Splavov, Moscow (USSR))

    1984-01-01

    A express chemical X-ray radiometric method for determination of leaching degree and analysis of molybdenite products is developed. The method comprises chemical preparation and the following X-ray radiometric determination of molybdenum. Total duration of the analysis is 1-1.5 h. The best reproductivity is obtained at X-ray radiometric analysis as compared with the chemical one.

  8. Determination of molybdenite leaching degree by x-ray radiometric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A express chemical X-ray radiometric method for determination of leaching degree and analysis of molybdenite products is developed. The method comprises chemical preparation and the following X-ray radiometric determination of molyb bdenum. Total duration of the analysis is 1-1.5 h. The best reproductivity is btained at X-ray radiometric analysis as compared with the chemical one

  9. Rejection in the cardiac transplant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Standard chest radiography remains the most frequent applied method for monitoring post surgical cardiac transplant patients. Evidence suggests that after the 1st month cardiac enlargement is indeed a useful indicator of rejection, sometimes being caused by pericardial effusion and/or changes in left ventricular mass. Opportunistic infections, either pulmonary lesions or mediastinal abscesses, as well as malignant tumours may all occur and require evaluation or exclusion. Conventional computed transmission tomography is an excellent technique for surveying the entire thorax relatively non-invasively and is recommended whenever pulmonary, cardiac or mediastinal changes are unexplained. Coronary arteriography with or without digital subtraction remains the definitive method for examining the coronary arteries. Left ventricular function can be evaluated with either angiography or other non-invasive methods including such techniques as echocardiography and nuclear medicine. More recently monoclonal antibody labels for antimyosin show promise for identifying rejection. Ultrafast CT scanning is now available in a number of centres. It allows millisecond cross-sectional cine-tomography of the heart as well as of the whole chest, and also provides 3-D quantitative analyses of end-diastolic and systolic function including regional wall thickening dynamics and estimations of myocardial mass. Right, as well as left-sided cardiac chambers, are demonstrated routinely during the same ultrafast CT procedure. MRI, like ultrafast CT, is a new technique still being explored. MRI as well as MR spectroscopy are regarded as diagnostic radiology procedures. (author). 32 refs.; 3 figs.; 3 tabs

  10. Comparing reports of peer rejection: associations with rejection sensitivity, victimization, aggression, and friendship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer-Gembeck, Melanie J; Nesdale, Drew; McGregor, Leanne; Mastro, Shawna; Goodwin, Belinda; Downey, Geraldine

    2013-12-01

    Perceiving that one is rejected is an important correlate of emotional maladjustment. Yet, self-perceptions can substantially differ from classmate-reports of who is rejected. In this study, discrepancies between self- and classmate-reports of rejection were identified in 359 Australian adolescents (age 10-12 years). As expected, adolescents who overestimated rejection reported more rejection sensitivity and felt more victimized by their peers, but were not seen by peers as more victimized. Adolescents who underestimated rejection identified themselves as high in overt aggression, and their peers identified them as high in overt and relational aggression and low in prosocial behavior. Yet, underestimators' feelings of friendship satisfaction did not seem to suffer and they reported low rejection sensitivity. Results suggest that interventions to promote adolescent health should explicitly recognize the different needs of those who do and do not seem to perceive their high rejection, as well as adolescents who overestimate their rejection. PMID:24215970

  11. Bioactive contaminants leach from disposable laboratory plasticware.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, G Reid; Hudson, Alan L; Dunn, Susan M J; You, Haitao; Baker, Glen B; Whittal, Randy M; Martin, Jonathan W; Jha, Amitabh; Edmondson, Dale E; Holt, Andrew

    2008-11-01

    Disposable plasticware such as test tubes, pipette tips, and multiwell assay or culture plates are used routinely in most biological research laboratories. Manufacturing of plastics requires the inclusion of numerous chemicals to enhance stability, durability, and performance. Some lubricating (slip) agents, exemplified by oleamide, also occur endogenously in humans and are biologically active, and cationic biocides are included to prevent bacterial colonization of the plastic surface. We demonstrate that these manufacturing agents leach from laboratory plasticware into a standard aqueous buffer, dimethyl sulfoxide, and methanol and can have profound effects on proteins and thus on results from bioassays of protein function. These findings have far-reaching implications for the use of disposable plasticware in biological research. PMID:18988846

  12. Passivation of chalcopyrite during the leaching with sulphuric acid solution in presence of sodium nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokić Miroslav D.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the process of the chalcopyrite leaching in sulphuric acid solution was investigated. Sodium nitrate was used as oxidant in the leaching process. Chemical reactions of leaching and their thermodynamic possibilities are predicted based on the calculated Gibbs energies and analysis of E−pH diagrams. The negative values of the Gibbs energy show that all chemical reactions are thermodynamically feasible at atmospheric pressure and in a temperature range 25-90°C. At high electrode potential and low pH values, Cu2+, Fe2+ and Fe3+ ions exist in water solutions. The increase of temperature reduces the probability of Fe3+ ion existence in the system. The chalcopyrite concentrate, enriched in the “Rudnik” flotation plant, with 27.08% Cu, 25.12% Fe, 4.15% Zn and 2.28% Pb was used in the work. XRD and DTA analysis of the concentrate reveals that the sample contains mainly the chalcopyrite with small amount of sphalerite. For the description of the reaction of leaching process the leach residuals, obtained at different conditions, were chosen for XRD, TG/DTA and SEM/EDX analyses. The elemental sulphur and chalcopyrite phases identified in leach residuals confirm our prediction that the elemental sulphur is formed during the leaching process. Accordingly, elemental sulphur is the main product of the reaction, while a minor amount of sulphide sulphur is oxidized to sulphate during the leaching. The sulphur formed during the reaction was precipitated at the particle surfaces, and slowed down the leaching rate in the final stage of leaching process. In the initial stage, the reaction rate was controlled by the surface reaction. The mechanism, latter has been changed into a diffusion controlled one.

  13. Reverse osmosis membrane of high urea rejection properties. [water purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C. C.; Wydeven, T. J. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    Polymeric membranes suitable for use in reverse osmosis water purification because of their high urea and salt rejection properties are prepared by generating a plasma of an unsaturated hydrocarbon monomer and nitrogen gas from an electrical source. A polymeric membrane is formed by depositing a polymer of the unsaturated monomer from the plasma onto a substrate, so that nitrogen from the nitrogen gas is incorporated within the polymer in a chemically combined form.

  14. Study of uranium leaching from industrial residues of Industrias Nucleares do Brazil S.A. (INB), Caetite, Bahia, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uraniferous district of Lagoa Real, located in the south-central region of the state of Bahia, has reserves estimated at 100,000 tons of uranium, which is enough to supply Angra I, II and III for 100 more years. The process adopted for the beneficiation of the uranium ore from Lagoa Real is heap leaching, a static process in which the ore is crushed, disposed in heaps and irrigated with a sulfuric acid solution to remove the uranium. This technique has a relatively low cost of implementation, although the yield of uranium recovery is low, with an uranium content in the leached residue of 700 μg/g U3O8 for ores with an initial content of 2,700 μg/g U3O8. With the deepening of the mine pit, an increase in the carbonate content in the ore was noted, which required a higher acid consumption in the leaching. In order to reduce the concentration of carbonates, a study of the ore concentration by flotation column was accomplished. The flotation reject had high carbonate content, with a uranium content of about 2,300 μg/g U3O8 for flotation in one column and 1,100 μg/g U3O8 for flotation in two columns. This paper presents the study of the leaching process for the recovery of the uranium present in the residue of the heap leaching and in the carbonated residue from the flotation of the anomaly 13 ore. The results indicate the feasibility of treating the waste of the heap leaching through dynamic leaching. The study of the uranium leaching from the flotation residue through acid leaching technique indicated a recovery of 96% of uranium, however with a high consumption of acid, around 450 kg/t, showing that for this case, the most suitable technique for the process is alkaline leaching. (author)

  15. Brazilian quartz purification by leaching technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High purity quartz powder presents an increasing demand for the production of silica glass, widely used for semiconductor processing, particularly for photo-voltaic solar cells manufacturing. Motivated by the huge natural quartz potential of this country, the present paper studied the cleansing effect of acid leaching on Brazilian quartz powder, investigating the following parameters: type of solvent, temperature and leaching time. Still, aqueous leaching tests with ultrasound activation were also performed in order to verify its efficiency. The ideal conditions found for leaching,with a 74,2% purification degree, were achieved using a mixture of hydrofluoric acid with hydrochloric acid at 100 deg C for 6 hours. A leaching procedure longer than 6 hours is not necessary, since Fe, Ca, K and Mg amounts do not show significant variation after such time. Also, aqueous leaching caused purification rates higher than 30% for most of the impurities tested, proving itself as a effective leaching method (author)

  16. LATE RENAL GRAFT REJECTION: PATHOLOGY AND PROGNOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.S. Stolyarevich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rejection has always been one of the most important cause of late renal graft dysfunction. Aim of the study was to analyze the prevalence of different clinico-pathological variants of rejection that cause late graft dysfunction, and evaluate their impact on long-term outcome. Materials and methods. This is a retrospective study that analyzed 294 needle core biopsy specimens from 265 renal transplant recipients with late (48,8 ± 46,1 months after transplantation allograft dysfunction caused by late acute rejection (LAR, n = 193 or chronic rejection (CR, n = 78 or both (n = 23. C4d staining was performed by immunofl uorescence (IF on frozen sections using a standard protocol. Results. Peritubular capillary C4d deposition was identifi ed in 36% samples with acute rejection and in 62% cases of chronic rejection (including 67% cases of transplant glomerulopathy, and 50% – of isolated chronic vasculopathy. 5-year graft survival for LAR vs CR vs their combination was 47, 13 and 25%, respectively. The outcome of C4d– LAR was (p < 0,01 better than of C4d+ acute rejection: at 60 months graft survival for diffuse C4d+ vs C4d− was 33% vs 53%, respectively. In cases of chronic rejection C4d+ vs C4d– it was not statistically signifi cant (34% vs 36%. Conclusion. In long-term allograft biopsy C4d positivity is more haracteristic for chronic rejection than for acute rejection. Only diffuse C4d staining affects the outcome. C4d– positivity is associated with worse allograft survival in cases of late acute rejection, but not in cases of chronic rejection

  17. Uranium leaching from phosphate rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium in phosphate rock was removed by means of alkaline leach solutions. Ammonium carbonate/bicarbonate solution produced a very stable uranyl carbonate compound which was separated by centrifugation. Radiometric analysis showed that about 40% of uranium was solubilized and it can be recuperated. This process could be used before the manufacture of phosphatic fertilizers and the final products would contain smaller uranium quantities. (author). 8 refs., 4 figs

  18. Fractional active disturbance rejection control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dazi; Ding, Pan; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-05-01

    A fractional active disturbance rejection control (FADRC) scheme is proposed to improve the performance of commensurate linear fractional order systems (FOS) and the robust analysis shows that the controller is also applicable to incommensurate linear FOS control. In FADRC, the traditional extended states observer (ESO) is generalized to a fractional order extended states observer (FESO) by using the fractional calculus, and the tracking differentiator plus nonlinear state error feedback are replaced by a fractional proportional-derivative controller. To simplify controller tuning, the linear bandwidth-parameterization method has been adopted. The impacts of the observer bandwidth ωo and controller bandwidth ωc on system performance are then analyzed. Finally, the FADRC stability and frequency-domain characteristics for linear single-input single-output FOS are analyzed. Simulation results by FADRC and ADRC on typical FOS are compared to demonstrate the superiority and effectiveness of the proposed scheme. PMID:26928516

  19. Uranium leaching by fungal metabolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To explore new means of bioleaching, one strain of high-yielding fungi-Aspergillus niger which could produce organic acids was separated and purified from soil samples of uranium mine. The influence of cultural temperature, initial pH value, inoculum sizes on its growth characteristics were carried out. And the tests of uranium leaching of metabolin of Aspergillus niger were operated. On these tests, the effects of metabolin of Aspergillus niger with different pH value produced in the diverse culture temperature on uranium leaching were investigated. The results show that this strain of Aspergillus niger can grow best under the following conditions: the temperature is 37℃, the initial pH value is 7.0, the inoculum sizes is 2% (the OD value of the spores solution is 0.06). The uranium extraction effects relative to the final pH value of the cultures. and the maximum leaching rates is 83.05% when the pH value is 2.3. (authors)

  20. A device for uranium series leaching from glass fiber in HEPA filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the disposal of a high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) glass filter into the environment, the glass fiber should be leached to lower its radioactive concentration to the clearance level. To derive an optimum method for the removal of uranium series from a HEPA glass fiber, five methods were applied in this study. That is, chemical leaching by a 4.0 M HNO3-0.1 M Ce(IV) solution, chemical leaching by a 5 wt% NaOH solution, chemical leaching by a 0.5 M H2O2-1.0 M Na2CO3 solution, chemical consecutive chemical leaching by a 4.0 M HNO3 solution, and repeated chemical leaching by a 4.0 M HNO3 solution were used to remove the uranium series. The residual radioactivity concentrations of 238U, 235U, 226Ra, and 234Th in glass after leaching for 5 h by the 4.0 M HNO3-0.1 M Ce(IV) solution were 2.1, 0.3, 1.1, and 1.2 Bq/g. The residual radioactivity concentrations of 238U, 235U, 226Ra, and 234Th in glass after leaching for 36 h by 4.0 M HNO3-0.1 M Ce(IV) solution were 76.9, 3.4, 63.7, and 71.9 Bq/g. The residual radioactivity concentrations of 238U, 235U, 226Ra, and 234Th in glass after leaching for 8 h by a 0.5 M H2O2-1.0 M Na2CO3 solution were 8.9, 0.0, 1.91, and 6.4 Bq/g. The residual radioactivity concentrations of 238U, 235U, 226Ra, and 234Th in glass after consecutive leaching for 8 h by the 4.0 M HNO3 solution were 2.08, 0.12, 1.55, and 2.0 Bq/g. The residual radioactivity concentrations of 238U, 235U, 226Ra, and 234Th in glass after three repetitions of leaching for 3 h by the 4.0 M HNO3 solution were 0.02, 0.02, 0.29, and 0.26 Bq/g. Meanwhile, the removal efficiencies of 238U, 235U, 226Ra, and 234Th from the waste solution after its precipitation-filtration treatment with NaOH and alum for reuse of the 4.0 M HNO3 waste solution were 100, 100, 93.3, and 100%. (author)

  1. Major leaching processes of combustion residues - Characterisation, modelling and experimental investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan Jinying

    1998-12-31

    Characterising leaching behaviour provides ample evidence to identify the major leaching processes of combustion residues. Neutralisation and chemical weathering govern the leaching reactions and control the release of elements from combustion residues, and are thus considered to be the major leaching processes. According to experimental investigations and geochemical simulations, the leaching kinetics of buffering materials are key issues for the understanding of the neutralizing processes. The acid neutralizing capacity at different pH levels depends mainly on the mineralogy of the combustion residues. In combustion residues, the dissolution of glass phases is expected to play an important role in a long-term neutralizing process. The neutralizing process in a flow system is significantly different from that in a batch system. The neutralizing ability of a combustion residue may be strongly affected by solute transport and carbonation reactions in a natural leaching environment. The chemical weathering mainly involves the matrix of combustion residues consisting mostly of glass phases. The dissolution kinetics of waste glass and other possible processes involved in the chemical weathering have been investigated and incorporated into a kinetic reactive transport model. Most important processes in the chemical weathering can be simulated simultaneously using this model. The results show that there is a complicated relationship between the factors controlling the long-term chemical weathering. The environmental impact of the glass dissolution cannot be neglected. Although the glass dissolution provides considerable buffering capacity in long-term weathering, the carbonate is usually a dominant buffering mineral in actual weathering processes. The transformation of carbonate should be considered as an important process in the chemical weathering. The formation of secondary minerals may considerably alter the mineralogy of the waste, and thus change the leaching

  2. Desorption, persistence, and leaching of dibenzofuran in European Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Celis, R.; Real Ojeda, Miguel; Hermosín, M. C.; Cornejo, J.

    2006-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their heterocyclic analogs (hetero-PAHs) represent the predominant chemical classes in many contaminated soils. Despite the fact that hetero-PAHs are more soluble and hence potentially more mobile and bioavailable than similar nonsubstituted compounds, the existing information about the fate of these compounds in the soil environment is limited. In this article, laboratory experiments were designed to assess the desorption, persistence, and leaching...

  3. Weatherability and Leach Resistance of Wood Impregnated with Nano-Zinc Oxide

    OpenAIRE

    Nami Kartal S; Clausen Carol; Green Frederick

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Southern pine specimens vacuum-treated with nano-zinc oxide (nano-ZnO) dispersions were evaluated for leach resistance and UV protection. Virtually, no leaching occurred in any of the nano-ZnO–treated specimens in a laboratory leach test, even at the highest retention of 13 kg/m3. However, specimens treated with high concentrations of nano-ZnO showed 58–65% chemical depletion after 12 months of outdoor exposure. Protection from UV damage after 12 months exposure is visibl...

  4. Leaching characteristics of Wadi Belih uraniferous Hammamat sediments,eastern desert,Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work deals with the direct chemical treatment of Wadi Belih uraniferous ore material using the agitation leaching technique. The study ore is mainly localized in siltstones belonging to the Hammamat sediments situated in the northern part of the eastern desert. The uranium mineral in the ore are mainly represented by the silicate mineral uranophane, the vanadate mineral tyuyamunite and to a laser extent the sulphate mineral shroekingerite, both acid (sulphuric acid) alkaline (sodium carbonate and bicarbonate) leaching methods have been applied beside sodium and ferric chlorides. The latter leaching reagents are greatly beneficial in removing radium together with uranium, a matter which is greatly important for environmental concerns

  5. CHEMICALS

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  6. Long-time leaching on full size radioactive waste blocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leaching is generally accepted as the fundamental characteristic when judging the quality of radioactive waste packaging. Long duration leaching tests have been carried out on full size waste blocks at the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique. The monoliths studied are 200 litre cylinders made up of α, β and γ emitting liquid or solid waste embedded in cement or bitumen. Leaching takes place in accordance with rules based on I.A.E.A. recommendations embodying the specific concerns of safety and radiological capacity of storage sites. The tests are carried out at a Testing Station purpose built at Saclay. It includes several loops with instrumentation (volume: 3000 litres). The counting and analyses of the leached products have enabled the aggregated released fractions of the radionuclides and the structural and chemical modifications of the matrices to be assessed. The fractions of 137Cs and 239Pu released at 18 months are 10-2 and 5x10-6 for the cement coated wastes, and 10-4 and 10-5 for the bitumen coated wastes. The evaluation of the changes in the matrices made it possible, in particular, to observe the start of carbonation in the cement coated wastes. These trials are to be pursued for several years so as to obtain a better understanding of the exchange mechanics between the packaged wastes and the environment

  7. Leaching effect on arsenic mobility in agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dousova, Barbora; Buzek, Frantisek; Lhotka, Miloslav; Krejcova, Stanislava; Boubinova, Radka

    2016-04-15

    The stability of soil arsenic during long-term leaching was studied in four soils from an agricultural area. Two identical columns simulating soil profiles of three layers were leached with As-free natural rainwater (flow (μgg(-1)day(-1)) showed a comparable run for all soils, with the peak corresponding to maximum As release in the first leaching stage, and then with a tendency to equilibrate. The amount of released As was controlled by the saturated hydraulic conductivity Ksat and free Fe oxides, and the kinetics of the leaching process correlated with the content of organic matter (OM). An overall stability and accumulation of soil arsenic were mostly affected by soil properties (Ksat, particle size, clay fraction), while the chemical composition (Fe, OM content) and surface properties (specific surface area SBET, theoretical adsorption capacity Qt) were of marginal significance. The distribution of As forms was performed by sequential extraction (SEP), which indicated negligible transformation (<12%) of As species in upper soil layers. PMID:26785213

  8. Leaching Of Strontium From Cement-Based Matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cementation is a method used to immobilize radioactive waste in order to protect the environment from radionuclide release. Rice husk ash (RHA) has been used successfully as pozzolanic material for several years. The study was carried out to investigate the ability of RHA (10%, 15% and 25%) accompanied with kaolin (K) (5%, 10% and 15%) and cement at water-cement ratio (w/c) of 45% to improve their leachability resistance from a cement matrix. The study was subjected to the leaching procedure of ANSI (2003) for 120 days. The cumulative fractional release data suggested that there was a substantial decrease in strontium ions leachability from cement formulation containment with increase in its rice husk ash (RHA) at 25% and kaolin at 10% content. The improvement of strontium ions leach rates is mostly due to diffusion phenomena and selected additives which depend essentially on the degree of porosity of the cementitious products. The chemical performance of the matrices is acceptable and the decreased leachability was attributed to the progression in the formation of cement hydrated phases and the pozzolanic reaction between RHA, kaolin and lime in cement matrices. The mathematical analysis of the long term leaching results indicated that strontium leaching was resulted from a combination of first order reaction and diffusion mechanisms

  9. Are You Being Rejected or Excluded? Insights from Neuroimaging Studies Using Different Rejection Paradigms

    OpenAIRE

    Premkumar, Preethi

    2012-01-01

    Rejection sensitivity is the heightened tendency to perceive or anxiously expect disengagement from others during social interaction. There has been a recent wave of neuroimaging studies of rejection. The aim of the current review was to determine key brain regions involved in social rejection by selectively reviewing neuroimaging studies that employed one of three paradigms of social rejection, namely social exclusion during a ball-tossing game, evaluating feedback about preference from peer...

  10. Best Management Practices for Minimizing Nitrate Leaching from Container-Grown Nurseries

    OpenAIRE

    Jianjun Chen; Yingfeng Huang; Russell D. Caldwell

    2001-01-01

    Containerized plant production represents an extremely intensive agricultural practice; 40,000 to 300,000 containers may occupy one acre of surface area to which a large amount of chemical fertilizer is applied. Currently, recommended fertilizer application rates for the production of containerized nursery ornamental plants are in excess of plant requirements, and up to 50% of the applied fertilizers may run off or be leached from containers. Among the nutrients leached or allowed to runoff, ...

  11. Characterization and Leach Testing for REDOX Sludge and S-Saltcake Actual Waste Sample Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiskum, Sandra K.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Hubler, Timothy L.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Peterson, Reid A.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Snow, Lanee A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

    2008-07-10

    This report describes processing and analysis results of boehmite waste type (Group 5) and insoluble high Cr waste type (Group 6). The sample selection, compositing, subdivision, physical and chemical characterization are described. Extensive batch leach testing was conducted to define kinetics and leach factors of selected analytes as functions of NaOH concentration and temperature. Testing supports issue M-12 resolution for the Waste Treatment Plant.

  12. 21 CFR 1230.47 - Rejected containers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rejected containers. 1230.47 Section 1230.47 Food... FEDERAL CAUSTIC POISON ACT Imports § 1230.47 Rejected containers. (a) In all cases where the containers... notification to the importer that the containers must be exported under customs supervision within 3...

  13. MR imaging of renal transplant rejection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanna, S.; Helenon, O.; Legendre, C.; Chichie, J.F.; Di Stefano, D.; Kreis, H.; Moreau, J.F. (Hopital Necker, 75 - Paris (France). Dept. of Uro-Radiology Hopital Necker, 75 - Paris (France). Dept. of Renal Transplantation)

    1991-01-01

    The results of 62 consecutive MR examinations were correlated with the subsequent clinical course and histologic results. Twenty-six cases of rejection showed a marked diminution of cortico-medullary differentiation (CMD). The renal parenchymal vascular pattern and visibility of renal sinus fat were not markedly altered in rejection and there was no difference between normal and rejected allograft shape. The ability of MR imaging to diagnose renal transplant rejection is only based on CMD, which, however, is non-specific. In 2 cases of severe rejection, T2 weighted images showed an abnormal signal intensity of the cortex due to renal infarction. Our preliminary results in 8 patients with Gd-DOTA injection showed 2 cases with necrosis seen as areas with absent contrast enhancement. This technique seems to be promising in the detection of perfusion defects. (orig.).

  14. MR imaging of renal transplant rejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of 62 consecutive MR examinations were correlated with the subsequent clinical course and histologic results. Twenty-six cases of rejection showed a marked diminution of cortico-medullary differentiation (CMD). The renal parenchymal vascular pattern and visibility of renal sinus fat were not markedly altered in rejection and there was no difference between normal and rejected allograft shape. The ability of MR imaging to diagnose renal transplant rejection is only based on CMD, which, however, is non-specific. In 2 cases of severe rejection, T2 weighted images showed an abnormal signal intensity of the cortex due to renal infarction. Our preliminary results in 8 patients with Gd-DOTA injection showed 2 cases with necrosis seen as areas with absent contrast enhancement. This technique seems to be promising in the detection of perfusion defects. (orig.)

  15. Antibody-Mediated Lung Transplant Rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachem, Ramsey

    2012-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection after lung transplantation remains enigmatic. However, emerging evidence over the past several years suggests that humoral immunity plays an important role in allograft rejection. Indeed, the development of donor-specific antibodies after transplantation has been identified as an independent risk factor for acute cellular rejection and bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. Furthermore, cases of acute antibody-mediated rejection resulting in severe allograft dysfunction have been reported, and these demonstrate that antibodies can directly injure the allograft. However, the incidence and toll of antibody-mediated rejection are unknown because there is no widely accepted definition and some cases may be unrecognized. Clearly, humoral immunity has become an important area for research and clinical investigation. PMID:23002428

  16. Risk of renal allograft rejection following angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a retrospective study of 173 immediately functioning primary kidney transplants, correlation between angiography and renal allograft rejection was studied during the first 14 days. It was found that rejection was more frequent in kidneys undergoing angiography than in those not undergoing angiography. It was also found that in kidneys undergoing angiography an overwhelming number of the rejections started the day after angiography. These differences in rejection frequency could not be explained by differences in HLA matching or the origin of the kidneys. These findings suggest a possible connection indicating that the angiography might elicit an acute rejection episode. A possible mechanism for starting this reaction might be activation of the complement system which was found in 50 percent of the patients undergoing angiography in peripheral blood and in 100 percent when studied in vitro

  17. Leaching for recovery of copper from municipal solid waste incineration fly ash: influence of ash properties and metal speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassesson, Henric; Fedje, Karin Karlfeldt; Steenari, Britt-Marie

    2014-08-01

    Recovery of metals occurring in significant amounts in municipal solid waste incineration fly ash, such as copper, could offer several advantages: a decreased amount of potentially mobile metal compounds going to landfill, saving of natural resources and a monetary value. A combination of leaching and solvent extraction may constitute a feasible recovery path for metals from municipal solid waste incineration fly ash. However, it has been shown that the initial dissolution and leaching is a limiting step in such a recovery process. The work described in this article was focused on elucidating physical and chemical differences between two ash samples with the aim of explaining the differences in copper release from these samples in two leaching methods. The results showed that the chemical speciation is an important factor affecting the release of copper. The occurrence of copper as phosphate or silicate will hinder leaching, while sulphate and chloride will facilitate leaching. PMID:25106538

  18. Image rejects/retakes-radiographic challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general held position among radiological personnel prior to digitalisation was that the problem of image rejects/retakes should more or less vanish. However, rejects/retakes still impose several challenges within radiographic imaging; they occupy unnecessary resources, expose patients to unnecessary ionizing radiation and may also indicate suboptimal quality management. The latter is the main objective of this paper, which is based on a survey of international papers published both for screen/film and digital technology. The digital revolution in imaging seems to have reduced the percentage of image rejects/retakes from 10-15 to 3-5%. The major contribution to the decrease appears to be the dramatic reduction of incorrect exposures. At the same time, rejects/retakes due to lack of operator competence (positioning, etc.) are almost unchanged, or perhaps slightly increased (due to lack of proper technical competence, incorrect organ coding, etc.). However, the causes of rejects/retakes are in many cases defined and reported with reference to radiographers' subjective evaluations. Thus, unless radiographers share common views on image quality and acceptance criteria, objective measurements and assessments of reject/retake rates are challenging tasks. Interestingly, none of the investigated papers employs image quality parameters such as 'too much noise' as categories for rejects/retakes. Surprisingly, no reject/retake analysis seems yet to have been conducted for direct digital radiography departments. An increased percentage of rejects/retakes is related to 'digital skills' of radiographers and therefore points to areas for extended education and training. Furthermore, there is a need to investigate the inter subjectivity of radiographers' perception of, and attitude towards, both technical and clinical image quality criteria. Finally, there may be a need to validate whether reject/retake rate analysis is such an effective quality indicator as has been asserted

  19. Bacterial leaching of Pb -metallurgical wastes

    OpenAIRE

    Fečko, Peter; Janáková, Iva; Pertile, Eva; Kulová, Eliška

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is verification of application of bacterial leaching and calcination to recover heavy metals from metallurgical wastes - matte from metallurgical plant Kovohute Pribram. For bacterial leaching a pure bacterial culture of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans was used. For a verification test an original sample of matte and matte from 2004 year were used. This paper further shows changes in the samples after bacterial leaching and after calcination. The paper results...

  20. Nitrogen leaching in small agricultural catchments

    OpenAIRE

    Kyllmar, Katarina

    2004-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) leaching from arable land to the aquatic environment is considered a serious problem. Small agricultural monitoring catchments in Sweden were used for the application and testing of model-based methods for quantification of N leaching from arable fields, and for analysis of measured data. The physically-based modelling system SOILNDB was used in two different approaches for quantification of N leaching; by direct simulations using monitored field data and by producing field N lea...

  1. Leaching From Biomass Gasification Residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allegrini, Elisa; Boldrin, Alessio; Polletini, A.;

    2011-01-01

    composition, and DOC complexation and sorption mechanisms were found to have a great influence on their release. Like wood combustion residues, the analysed ashes could be relevant for recycling in agriculture or forestry because of the potential as liming agent and source of macroelements. However, the high...... geochemical modelling were carried out both on fresh and aged samples. The results showed that the material is comparable to residues from wood combustion and the leaching behaviour was dominated by Ca-containing minerals and solid solutions. Heavy metals were detected in very low concentrations in the bulk...

  2. Nitrate leaching from Silage Maize

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Elly Møller; Eriksen, Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    During the last 20 years the area with maize in Denmark has increased dramatically and reached 163,000 ha in 2008. Silage maize is easy to grow, is a suitable fodder for cows and goes well with grass-clover in the diet. This means that silage maize is often found in crop rotations with grass-clover on sandy soils in western Denmark. The ploughing in of grass-clover fields poses a serious risk of increased nitrate leaching on a coarse sandy soil, even when carried out in spring. With increased...

  3. Modelling and simulation of concrete leaching under outdoor exposure conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiopu, Nicoleta; Tiruta-Barna, Ligia; Jayr, Emmanuel; Méhu, Jacques; Moszkowicz, Pierre

    2009-02-15

    Recently, a demand regarding the assessment of release of dangerous substances from construction products was raised by European Commission which has issued the Mandate M/366 addressed to CEN. This action is in relation with the Essential Requirement No. 3 "Hygiene, Health and Environment" of the Construction Products Directive (89/106/EC). The potential hazard for environment and health may arise in different life cycle stages of a construction product. During the service life stage, the release of substances due to contact with the rain water is the main potential hazard source, as a consequence of the leaching phenomenon. The objective of this paper is to present the development of a coupled chemical-transport model for the case of a concrete based construction product, i.e. concrete paving slabs, exposed to rain water under outdoor exposure conditions. The development of the model is based on an iterative process of comparing the experimental results with the simulated results up to an acceptable fit. The experiments were conducted at laboratory scale (equilibrium and dynamic leaching tests) and field scale. The product was exposed for one year in two types of leaching scenarios under outdoor conditions, "runoff" and "stagnation", and the element release was monitored. The model was calibrated using the experimental data obtained at laboratory scale and validated against measured field data, by taking into account the specific rain water balance and the atmospheric CO2 uptake as input parameters. The numerical tool used in order to model and simulate the leaching behaviour was PHREEQC, coupled with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) thermodynamic data base. The simulation results are satisfying and the paper demonstrates the feasibility of the modelling approach for the leaching behaviour assessment of concrete type construction materials. PMID:19118868

  4. Modelling and simulation of concrete leaching under outdoor exposure conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, a demand regarding the assessment of release of dangerous substances from construction products was raised by European Commission which has issued the Mandate M/366 addressed to CEN. This action is in relation with the Essential Requirement No. 3 'Hygiene, Health and Environment' of the Construction Products Directive (89/106/EC). The potential hazard for environment and health may arise in different life cycle stages of a construction product. During the service life stage, the release of substances due to contact with the rain water is the main potential hazard source, as a consequence of the leaching phenomenon. The objective of this paper is to present the development of a coupled chemical-transport model for the case of a concrete based construction product, i.e. concrete paving slabs, exposed to rain water under outdoor exposure conditions. The development of the model is based on an iterative process of comparing the experimental results with the simulated results up to an acceptable fit. The experiments were conducted at laboratory scale (equilibrium and dynamic leaching tests) and field scale. The product was exposed for one year in two types of leaching scenarios under outdoor conditions, 'runoff' and 'stagnation', and the element release was monitored. The model was calibrated using the experimental data obtained at laboratory scale and validated against measured field data, by taking into account the specific rain water balance and the atmospheric CO2 uptake as input parameters. The numerical tool used in order to model and simulate the leaching behaviour was PHREEQC, coupled with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) thermodynamic data base. The simulation results are satisfying and the paper demonstrates the feasibility of the modelling approach for the leaching behaviour assessment of concrete type construction materials

  5. A New Generation of Leaching Tests – The Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provides an overview of newly released leaching tests that provide a more accurate source term when estimating environmental release of metals and other constituents of potential concern (COPCs). The Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF) methods have been (1) develo...

  6. Method of continuous pressure leaching of ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ore leaching, especially suspensions of ground ore or fine ore fractions from physical treatment was divided into two operations. The former, i.e., ore mixing with technical grade concentrated sulfuric acid proceeded in a separate mixer. The mixture was then transported into an autoclave where the actual leaching proceeded for 2 to 4 hours. The extracted mixture was discharged through the autoclave bottom. The leaching autoclave used can be without any inner structures. The separation of mixing from the actual leaching allows processing ores with high levels of clay components, increasing operating reliability of the facility, reducing consumption of special structural materials and energy, and increasing process efficiency. (E.S.)

  7. Reactive leaching of recovery boiler fly ash

    OpenAIRE

    Frigård, Antti

    2016-01-01

    This thesis studied a new CaO leaching method for chloride and potassium removal from recovery boiler fly ash. The concept of this method is to use calcium oxide (or calcium hydroxide) as an additive in the leaching stage in order to ease the subsequent solid-liquid separation. CaO leaching has several benefits over traditional leaching process which uses sulphuric acid as an additive: CaO does not include sulphur that would affect the mills sulphur sodium balance, CaO is readily available in...

  8. The development trends of shrinkage stope leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The shrinkage stope leaching is a comprehensive method of mining and hydrometallurgy containing the mining technology (involve developing, cutting, drilling, blasting, caving ore and moving some ores to ground) and leaching ore (include distributing solution, percolation leaching, bottom collecting solution, recovering solution containing metal and processing). Due to integration process, the mining and hydrometallurgy processes are greatly shortened, and the economic profits are very remarkable. The development history of shrinkage stope leaching is presented, and the property of its subject is briefly described. Using several typical examples, its characteristics are summarized and several problems to be resolved are discussed. Finally its development prospect is made

  9. Numerical study on in-situ leaching uranium with pressure fluctuation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent researches and innovation of in-situ leaching focus on the chemical process, which can not solve the low recovery in 'dead leaching zone' and 'non-preferential zone' caused by preferential flow and solute transport phenomena in heterogeneous ore deposits. Based on hydrodynamic effects and phenomena in highly heterogeneous porous media, gas injection experiments and laboratory experiment results, an innovative method for in-situ leaching, named as leaching with pressure fluctuation, was put forward to enhance the leaching effect and uranium recovery, especially in those uranium ore deposits with high heterogeneity. Based on the characteristics of gas/liquid mixture and flow-reactive-transport theory, a numerical modeling tool is established. By the numerical simulation, the field-scale traditional leaching method and the new method were studied. The simulation results show that the gas-liquid mixture will expand/shrink greatly in different flow zone during the pressure fluctuation process, and the deformation will enhance the solute transport effect among different flow zones, especially in non-preferential flow zone, and enhance the uranium recovery. The primary results show that in-situ leaching with pressure fluctuation is feasible technically. (authors)

  10. Effect of ferrous metal presence on lead leaching in municipal waste incineration bottom ashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehmig, Wesley N; Roessler, Justin G; Zhang, Jianye; Townsend, Timothy G

    2015-01-01

    The recovery of ferrous and non-ferrous metals from waste to energy (WTE) ash continues to advance as the sale of removed metals improves the economics of waste combustion. Published literature suggests that Fe and Fe oxides play a role in suppressing Pb leaching in the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP); further removal of ferrous metals from WTE ashes may facilitate higher Pb leaching under the TCLP. Eight WTE bottom ash size-fractions, from three facilities, were evaluated to assess the effect of metallic Fe addition and ferrous metal removal on TCLP leaching. Metallic Fe addition was demonstrated to reduce Pb leaching; the removal of ferrous metals by magnet resulted in a decrease in total available Pb (mg/kg) in most ash samples, yet Pb leachability increased in 5 of 6 ash samples. The research points to two chemical mechanisms to explain these results: redox interactions between Pb and Fe and the sorption of soluble Pb onto Fe oxide surfaces, as well as the effect of the leachate pH before and after metals recovery. The findings presented here indicate that generators, processors, and regulators of ash should be aware of the impact ferrous metal removal may have on Pb leaching, as a substantial increase in leaching may have significant implications regarding the management of WTE ashes. PMID:25464288

  11. Intensification of pretreatment and pressure leaching of copper anode slime by microwave radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨洪英; 马致远; 黄松涛; 吕阳; 熊柳

    2015-01-01

    The application of microwave irradiation for pretreatment of copper anode slime with high nickel content prior to pressure sulfuric acid leaching has been proposed. The microwave-assisted pretreatment is a rapid and efficient process. Through the technology of microwave assisted pretreatment-pressure leaching of copper anode slime, copper, tellurium, selenium and nickel are almost completely recovered. Under optimal conditions, the leaching efficiencies of copper, tellurium, selenium and nickel are 97.12%, 95.97%, 95.37% and 93.90%, respectively. The effect of microwave radiation on the temperature of copper anode slime and leaching solution is investigated. It is suggested that the enhancement on the recoveries of copper, tellurium and selenium can be attributed to the temperature gradient which is caused by shallow microwave penetration depth and super heating occurring at the solid–liquid interface. The kinetic study shows that the pressure leaching of copper anode slime, with and without microwave assisted pretreatment, are both controlled by chemical reactions on the surfaces of particles. It is found that the activation energy calculated for microwave-assisted pretreatment-pressure leaching (49.47 kJ/mol) is lower than that for pressure leaching which is without microwave assisted pretreatment (60.57 kJ/mol).

  12. Rejection of pharmaceuticals by forward osmosis membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xue; Shan, Junhong; Wang, Can; Wei, Jing; Tang, Chuyang Y

    2012-08-15

    Rejection of four pharmaceutical compounds, carbamazepine, diclofenac, ibuprofen and naproxen, by forward osmosis (FO) membranes was investigated in this study. For the first time, the rejection efficiency of the pharmaceutical compounds was compared between commercial cellulose triacetate (CTA) based membranes and thin film composite (TFC) polyamide based membranes. The rejection behavior was related to membrane interfacial properties, physicochemical characteristics of the pharmaceutical molecules and feed solution pH. TFC polyamide membranes exhibited excellent overall performance, with high water flux, excellent pH stability and great rejection of all pharmaceuticals investigated (>94%). For commercial CTA based FO membranes, hydrophobic interaction between the compounds and membranes exhibited strong influence on their rejection under acidic conditions. The pharmaceuticals rejection was well correlated to their hydrophobicity (log D). Under alkaline conditions, both electrostatic repulsion and size exclusion contributed to the removal of deprotonated molecules. The pharmaceuticals rejection by CTA-HW membrane at pH 8 followed the order: diclofenac (99%)>carbamazepine (95%)>ibuprofen (93%) ≈ naproxen (93%). These results can be important for FO membrane synthesis, modification and their application in water purification. PMID:22640821

  13. Aluminium leaching from red mud by filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urík, Martin; Bujdoš, Marek; Milová-Žiaková, Barbora; Mikušová, Petra; Slovák, Marek; Matúš, Peter

    2015-11-01

    This contribution investigates the efficient and environmentally friendly aluminium leaching from red mud (bauxite residue) by 17 species of filamentous fungi. Bioleaching experiments were examined in batch cultures with the red mud in static, 7-day cultivation. The most efficient fungal strains in aluminium bioleaching were Penicillium crustosum G-140 and Aspergillus niger G-10. The A. niger G-10 strain was capable to extract up to approximately 141 mg·L(-1) of aluminium from 0.2 g dry weight red mud. Chemical leaching with organic acids mixture, prepared according to A. niger G-10 strain's respective fungal excretion during cultivation, proved that organic acids significantly contribute to aluminium solubilization from red mud. PMID:26365318

  14. COMPARE AND ANALYSES OF OPTIMIZED R-LEACH WITH LEACH ALGORITHM IN WSN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarun Sharma

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks are composed of numerous small charge, little power devices with sensing, local processing and wireless communication capabilities. Minimizing energy consumption and maximizing network lifespan are significant issues in the design of routing protocols for sensor networks. In this paper, we analyses the efficiency of LEACH protocol in extending the existence for energy-constrained wireless sensor networks. Based on LEACH protocol, an enhanced protocol termed as R- LEACH is proposed which aims to diminish energy consumption within the wireless sensor networks. The simulation results suggest R-LEACH protocol could equilibrium network energy consumption and extend the network lifecycle more successfully as compared to LEACH.

  15. Study on Leaching of Hexavalent Chromium from Hardened Concretes Using Tank Leaching Test

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Shigeru; Sakai, Etsuo; Sugiyama, Takafumi

    2007-01-01

    Tank leaching tests were carried out to investigate the behavior of leaching trace elements from monolith samples. This study consists of two series, and the trace element used was hexavalent chromium. In Series I, the influence of the leachant/surface area of the specimen (L/S ratio) on the leaching amount was investigated. The leaching amount was found to increase with the amount of worked water. This shows that any L/S ratio can be selected in the tank leaching test. In Series II, th...

  16. Modify LEACH Algorithm for Wireless Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mortaza

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Research on wireless sensor networks has recently received much attention as they offer an advantage of monitoring various kinds of environment by sensing physical phenomenon. Prolonged network lifetime, scalability, and load balancing are important requirement for many sensor network applications. Clustering sensor nodes is an effective technique for achieving these goals. In this work, we introduce an energy efficient clustering algorithm for sensor networks based on the LEACH protocol. LEACH (Low Energy Adaptive Clustering Hierarchy is one of popular cluster-based structures, which has been widely proposed in wireless sensor networks. LEACH uses a TDMA based MAC protocol, and In order to maintain a balanced energy consumption. The proposed protocol adds feature to LEACH to reduce the consumption of the network resource in each round. The proposed protocol is simulated and the results show a significant reduction in network energy consumption compared to LEACH.

  17. Leaching behavior of solidified plastics radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is highly needed to develope the solidification process to dispose safely the radioactive wastes increasing with the growth of the nuclear industry. The leaching mechanisms of the solidified plastic wastes were investigated and the leaching rates of the plastic wastes were also measured among the many solidification processes. In addition, the transport equation based on the diffusion or the diffusion-dissolution was compared with the empirical equation derived from the experimental data by graphical method. Consequently, leaching process of the solidified plastic wastes is quite well agreed with the mass transport theory, but it may be difficult to simulate leaching process by diffusion dissolution mechanism. But the theoretical equation could be applicable to the cumulative amount of radionuclides leached form the plastic wastes disposed into the environment. (Author)

  18. Phosphorus leaching in a soil textural gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glæsner, Nadia; Kjærgaard, Charlotte; Rubæk, Gitte Holton;

    2009-01-01

    P leaching. We propose diverse interactions between dominant flow pathways and cattle slurry: - Injection of slurry reduces P leaching compared to surface application in soils with preferential flow behaviour - Injection of slurry has less impact on P leaching compared to surface application in......Texture is a major factor influencing mobilization and transport of P in soil owing partly to differences in adsorptive properties, and partly to differences in pore-size distribution and pore organization. Slurry application strategies may be important mitigation measures for reducing agricultural...... soils with matrix dominated flow behaviour We tested these hypotheses on three textural soil classes (Olsen-P 1.6 mg P 100 g-1) on intact soil columns (20*20 cm) and compared them to in situ P leaching before slurry application. In a loamy sand P leaching with both slurry application techniques slightly...

  19. Leaching of tritium from a cement composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leaching of tritium from cement composites into an aqueous phase has been studied to evaluate the safety of incorporation of the tritiated liquid waste into cement. Leaching tests were performed by the method recommended by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The Leaching fraction was measured as functions of waste-cement ratio (Wa/C), temperature of leachant and curing time. The tritium leachability of cement in the long term test follows the order: alumina cement portland cement slag cement. The fraction of tritium leached increases with increasing Wa/C and temperature and decreasing curing period. A deionized water as a leachant gives a slightly higher leachability than synthetic sea water. The amount leached of tritium from a 200 l drum size specimen was estimated on the basis of the above results. (author)

  20. LEACH Algorithm Based on Load Balancing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wangang Wang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses advantages of LEACH Algorithm and the existing improved model which takes the famous hierarchy clustering routing protocol LEACH Algorithm as researching object. Then the paper indicates the problem that in the algorithm capacity factor of cluster head node is not taken into account leading the structure of clusters to be not so reasonable. This research discusses an energy-uniform cluster and cluster head selecting mechanism in which “Pseudo cluster head” concept is introduced in order to coordinate with “Load Monitor” Mechanism and “Load Leisure” Mechanism to maintain load balancing of cluster head character and stability of network topology. On the basis of LEACH Protocol improving algorithm of LEACH-C, CEFL and DCHS. NS2 simulation instrument is applied to do simulation analysis on the improved algorithm. Simulation result shows that LEACH-P Protocol effectively increase energy utilization efficiency, lengthens network lifetime and balances network load.  

  1. The Danish Pesticide Leaching Assessment Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbom, Annette Elisabeth; Brüsch, Walter Michael; Juhler, Rene K.;

    In 1998, the Danish Parliament initiated the Pesticide Leaching Assessment Programme (PLAP), an intensive monitoring programme aimed at evaluating the leaching risk of pesticides under field conditions. The objective of the PLAP is to improve the scientific foundation for decision-making in the...... Danish regulation of pesticides. The specific aim is to analyse whether pesticides applied in accordance with current regulations leach to groundwater in unacceptable concentrations. The programme currently evaluates the leaching risk of 41 pesticides and 40 degradation products at five agricultural...... report covers the period May 1999-June 2009 and presents the monitoring results from the five agricultural sites presently monitored. The main focus is on evaluating the leaching risk of the pesticides applied during 2007....

  2. Structural Decoupling and Disturbance Rejection in a Distillation Column

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahar, Mehrdad; Jantzen, Jan; Commault, C.;

    1996-01-01

    Introduction, distillation column model, input-output decoupling, disturbance rejection, concluding remarks, references.......Introduction, distillation column model, input-output decoupling, disturbance rejection, concluding remarks, references....

  3. Thallium kinetics in rat cardiac transplant rejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac transplant rejection is a very complex process involving both cellular and vascular injury. Recently, thallium imaging has been used to assess acute transplant rejection. It has been suggested that changes in thallium kinetics might be a sensitive indicator of transplant rejection. Accordingly, thallium kinetics were assessed in vivo in acute untreated rat heterotopic (cervical) transplant rejection. Male Lewis rats weighing 225-250 g received heterotopic heart transplants from syngeneic Lewis rats (group A; n = 13), or allogeneic Brown Norway rats (group B; n = 11). Rats were imaged serially on the 2nd and the 7th postoperative days. Serial cardiac thallium content was determined utilizing data collected every 150 sec for 2 hr. The data were fit to a monoexponential curve and the decay rate constant (/sec) derived. By day 7 all group B hearts had histological evidence of severe acute rejection, and demonstrated decreased global contraction. Group A hearts showed normal histology and contractility. However, thallium uptakes and washout of the two groups were the same. Peak thallium uptake of group B was +/- 3758 1166 counts compared with 3553 +/- 950 counts in the control group A (P = 0.6395); The 2-hr percentage of washout was 12.1 +/- 1.04 compared with 12.1 +/- 9.3 (P = 1.0000); and the decay constant was -0.00002065 +/- 0.00001799 compared with -0.00002202 +/- 0.00001508 (P = 0.8409). These data indicate that in vivo global thallium kinetics are preserved during mild-to-severe acute transplant rejection. These findings suggest that the complex cellular and extracellular processes of acute rejection limit the usefulness of thallium kinetics in the detection of acute transplant rejection

  4. Thallium kinetics in rat cardiac transplant rejection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barak, J.H.; LaRaia, P.J.; Boucher, C.A.; Fallon, J.T.; Buckley, M.J.

    1988-04-01

    Cardiac transplant rejection is a very complex process involving both cellular and vascular injury. Recently, thallium imaging has been used to assess acute transplant rejection. It has been suggested that changes in thallium kinetics might be a sensitive indicator of transplant rejection. Accordingly, thallium kinetics were assessed in vivo in acute untreated rat heterotopic (cervical) transplant rejection. Male Lewis rats weighing 225-250 g received heterotopic heart transplants from syngeneic Lewis rats (group A; n = 13), or allogeneic Brown Norway rats (group B; n = 11). Rats were imaged serially on the 2nd and the 7th postoperative days. Serial cardiac thallium content was determined utilizing data collected every 150 sec for 2 hr. The data were fit to a monoexponential curve and the decay rate constant (/sec) derived. By day 7 all group B hearts had histological evidence of severe acute rejection, and demonstrated decreased global contraction. Group A hearts showed normal histology and contractility. However, thallium uptakes and washout of the two groups were the same. Peak thallium uptake of group B was +/- 3758 1166 counts compared with 3553 +/- 950 counts in the control group A (P = 0.6395); The 2-hr percentage of washout was 12.1 +/- 1.04 compared with 12.1 +/- 9.3 (P = 1.0000); and the decay constant was -0.00002065 +/- 0.00001799 compared with -0.00002202 +/- 0.00001508 (P = 0.8409). These data indicate that in vivo global thallium kinetics are preserved during mild-to-severe acute transplant rejection. These findings suggest that the complex cellular and extracellular processes of acute rejection limit the usefulness of thallium kinetics in the detection of acute transplant rejection.

  5. Peer acceptance/rejection and academic achievement

    OpenAIRE

    Spasenović Vera Z.

    2003-01-01

    Considerations of the nature and role of peer relations in child development indicate that peer interaction is an important factor in developing social and cognitive competences. Peer relations not only influence current but also subsequent academic, behavioral and emotional development. Accepted students more often display better academic achievement, whereas the status of rejection is coupled with academic difficulties and lower academic achievement. Peer rejection is a relatively stable ch...

  6. Experimental Quantum Error Rejection for Quantum Communication

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yu-Ao; Zhang, An-Ning; Zhao, Zhi; Zhou, Xiao-Qi; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2005-01-01

    We report an experimental realization of bit-flip error rejection for error-free transfer of quantum information through a noisy quantum channel. In the experiment, an unknown state to be transmitted is encoded into a two-photon entangled state, which is then sent through an engineered noisy quantum channel. At the final stage, the unknown state is decoded by a quantum parity measurement, successfully rejecting the erroneous transmission over the noisy quantum channel.

  7. Chemical correlations in Caetite (BA) region, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brazil's economic situation is responsible for an urgent demand for energy. There are several ways to generate energy, in some localities of our country, energy generation occurs almost exclusively by nuclear route, as in Rio de Janeiro state. Brazil has the sixth largest reserve of the uranium ore in the world. Nowadays there is only one mine under exploration (Uraniferous District of Lagoa Real - Caetite-BA). Unfortunately, nuclear power generation is better known, by common citizen, more for its unwanted effects than for its benefits. This fact is also powered by some Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs), such as Greenpeace, who claim the uranium mine is dangerous since it causes environmental contamination. However, Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB) rejected these accusations. In a previous study, we demonstrated that doses of the Caetite (BA) population are consistent with those usually found in other countries. We stated also the higher concentration of 238U determined, in only one water sample, is probably due to natural processes, as soil leaching. In order to verify the existing natural processes, macro and micro chemical elements present in water and soil samples collected in the Caetite (BA) region were determined by ICP-MS. The results were transformed into dendrograms where chemical correlations are evidenced and they are consistent with existing natural chemical processes. It was also possible to observe a correlation between samples corroborating with the Geographic Information Systems data to be presented in this same scientific event. (author)

  8. P-31 MR spectroscopy of acute rejection in transplanted rat hearts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the potential utility of P-31 NMR spectroscopy in the diagnosis of acute cardiac allograft rejection, the authors obtained high resolution in vitro spectra of perchloric acid extracts of freeze clamped transplanted rat hearts. These preliminary results suggest P-32 NMR spectroscopy may have utility in monitoring rejection in heart transplantation. In the acutely rejecting allografts they observed a marked increase in several resonances in the region downfield (to the left) from phosphocreatine (PCr) compared with the isografts. Specifically, the resonance of inorganic phosphate (Pi) which accounts for 55% - 65% of the total signal in the downfield region increased 1.85-fold. A fourfold increase was observed in the largest of three resonances present in the monophosphate region. Located at a chemical shift of 4.3 ppm, this resonance constituted 33% of the total signal in the downfield region. The PCr/B-ATP ratio decreased only slightly in the acutely rejecting allograft

  9. Crosslinked cellulose thin film composite nanofiltration membranes with zero salt rejection

    KAUST Repository

    Puspasari, Tiara

    2015-05-14

    We report a new synthetic route of fabricating regenerated cellulose nanofiltration membranes. The membranes are composite membranes with a thin selective layer of cellulose, which was prepared by regeneration of trimethylsilyl cellulose (a hydrophobic cellulose derivative) film followed by crosslinking. Filtration experiments using mixtures of sugar and sodium chloride showed that solutes above 300 Da were highly rejected whereas practically no rejection was observed for NaCl. This is a big advantage for a complete desalination as the existing commercial nanofiltration membranes typically exhibit NaCl rejection in the range of 30–60%. Membranes with zero NaCl rejection are required for recovery and purification applications in food, chemical and pharmaceutical industry.

  10. Dynamic leaching test of personal computer components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yadong; Richardson, Jay B; Niu, Xiaojun; Jackson, Ollie J; Laster, Jeremy D; Walker, Aaron K

    2009-11-15

    A dynamic leaching test (DLT) was developed and used to evaluate the leaching of toxic substances for electronic waste in the environment. The major components in personal computers (PCs) including motherboards, hard disc drives, floppy disc drives, and compact disc drives were tested. The tests lasted for 2 years for motherboards and 1.5 year for the disc drives. The extraction fluids for the standard toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP) were used as the DLT leaching solutions. A total of 18 elements including Ag, Al, As, Au, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ga, Ni, Pd, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, and Zn were analyzed in the DLT leachates. Only Al, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, and Zn were commonly found in the DLT leachates of the PC components. Their leaching levels were much higher in TCLP extraction fluid than in SPLP extraction fluid. The toxic heavy metal Pb was found to continuously leach out of the components over the entire test periods. The cumulative amounts of Pb leached out of the motherboards in TCLP extraction fluid reached 2.0 g per motherboard over the 2-year test period, and that in SPLP extraction fluid were 75-90% less. The leaching rates or levels of Pb were largely affected by the content of galvanized steel in the PC components. The higher was the steel content, the lower the Pb leaching rate would be. The findings suggest that the obsolete PCs disposed of in landfills or discarded in the environment continuously release Pb for years when subjected to landfill leachate or rains. PMID:19616380

  11. Microbial leaching of marmatite by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jun; QIU Guan-zhou; QIN Wen-qing; ZHANG Yan-sheng

    2006-01-01

    The bioleaching of marmatite in shaken flasks was studied. After leaching for 29 days, the leaching ratio of zinc was 91%.Three kinds of bacteria, mixture-based bacteria, 9K-based bacteria and sulfur-based bacteria were used in marmatite leaching, of which the mixture-based bacteria have the best leaching result while the sulfur-based bacteria have the worst. By analyzing the leaching residue using SEM and EDXA, the marmatite leaching mechanism was discussed.

  12. Bacteria heap leaching test of a uranium ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Column bioleaching test of a uranium ore was carried out. The optimum acidity, spraying intensity, spray-pause time ratio were determined. The potential, Fe and U concentrations in the leaching process were investigated. The effect of bacteria column leaching was compared with that of acid column leaching. The results show that bacteria column leaching can shorten leaching cycle, and the leaching rate of uranium increases by 9.7%. (authors)

  13. Atributos químicos do solo e lixiviação de compostos fenólicos após adição de resíduo sólido alcalino Chemical attributes of soil and leaching of phenolic compounds after addition of alkaline solid residue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina B. Branco

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A utilização de resíduos alcalinos da indústria de papel e celulose (DREGS na agricultura como corretivo de acidez do solo, vem sendo amplamente empregada como alternativa de descarte no solo de forma a reduzir o impacto ambiental. Objetivou-se, com este trabalho, determinar a influência da aplicação do dregs, rejeito da indústria de papel e celulose, nos atributos químicos do solo e na lixiviação de compostos fenólicos. As unidades experimentais foram constituídas por colunas de lixiviação preenchidas com solo incorporado com dregs nas doses de 0,0; 2,5; 5,0 e 10,0 g kg-1. Foram realizadas análises químicas nos solos estudados, um Camibissolo Húmico e um Neossolo Quartzarênico, testes de solubilização dos compostos fenólicos e ensaios de lixiviação visando determinar os teores totais de compostos fenólicos presentes nos lixiviados. O uso do dregs modificou os atributos químicos do Cambissolo Húmico e do Neossolo Quartzarênico. Os resultados obtidos nas análises dos lixiviados demonstraram que a aplicação do dregs levou ao incremento de compostos acima do máximo permitido pela legislação vigente, 0,01 mg L-1(ANBR, 2004a e de 0,5 mg L-1 (CONAMA, 2008.The use of alkaline residues from pulp and paper industry ('dregs' in agriculture as a corrective of soil acidity is being widely used as an alternative of ground disposal in order to reduce the environmental impact. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of application of the 'dregs', waste from pulp and paper industry, in soil chemical properties and leaching of phenolic compounds. The experimental units consisted of leaching columns filled with soil incorporated with 'dregs' at doses of 0, 2.5, 5.0 and 10.0 g kg-1. Chemical analysis were performed in these soils, a Humic Camibissolo and a Typic Quartzipsamment soils, tests of solubilization of phenolic compounds and leaching tests were also carried out to determine the total content of phenolic

  14. Mesophilic leaching of copper sulphide sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VLADIMIR B. CVETKOVSKI

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Copper was precipitated using a sodium sulphide solution as the precipitation agent from an acid solution containing 17 g/l copper and 350 g/l sulphuric acid. The particle size of nearly 1 µm in the sulphide sludge sample was detected by optical microscopy. Based on chemical and X-ray diffraction analyses, covellite was detected as the major sulphide mineral. The batch bioleach amenability test was performed at 32 °C on the Tk31 mine mesophilic mixed culture using a residence time of 28 days. The dissolution of copper sulphide by direct catalytic leaching of the sulphides with bacteria attached to the particles was found to be worthy, although a small quantity of ferrous ions had to be added to raise the activity of the bacteria and the redox potential of the culture medium. Throughout the 22-day period of the bioleach test, copper recovery based on residue analysis indicated a copper extraction of 95 %, with copper concentration in the bioleach solution of 15 g/l. The slope of the straight line tangential to the exponential part of the extraction curve gave a copper solubilisation rate of 1.1 g/l per day. This suggests that a copper extraction of 95 % for the period of bioleach test of 13.6 days may be attained in a three-stage bioreactor system.

  15. Corneal Graft Rejection: Incidence and Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Baradaran-Rafii

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available

    PURPOSE: To determine the incidence and risk factors of late corneal graft rejection after penetrating keratoplasty (PKP. METHODS: Records of all patients who had undergone PKP from 2002 to 2004 without immunosuppressive therapy other than systemic steroids and with at least one year of follow up were reviewed. The role of possible risk factors such as demographic factors, other host factors, donor factors, indications for PKP as well as type of rejection were evaluated. RESULTS: During the study period, 295 PKPs were performed on 286 patients (176 male, 110 female. Mean age at the time of keratoplasty was 38±20 (range, 40 days to 90 years and mean follow up period was 20±10 (range 12-43 months. Graft rejection occurred in 94 eyes (31.8% at an average of 7.3±6 months (range, 20 days to 39 months after PKP. The most common type of rejection was endothelial (20.7%. Corneal vascularization, regrafting, anterior synechiae, irritating sutures, active inflammation, additional anterior segment procedures, history of trauma, uncontrolled glaucoma, prior graft rejection, recurrence of herpetic infection and eccentric grafting increased the rate of rejection. Patient age, donor size and bilateral transplantation had no significant influence on graft rejection. CONCLUSION: Significant risk factors for corneal graft rejection include

  16. Suppressing Heavy Metal Leaching through Ball Milling of Fly Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiliang Chen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Ball milling is investigated as a method of reducing the leaching concentration (often termed stablilization of heavy metals in municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI fly ash. Three heavy metals (Cu, Cr, Pb loose much of their solubility in leachate by treating fly ash in a planetary ball mill, in which collisions between balls and fly ash drive various physical processes, as well as chemical reactions. The efficiency of stabilization is evaluated by analysing heavy metals in the leachable fraction from treated fly ash. Ball milling reduces the leaching concentration of Cu, Cr, and Pb, and water washing effectively promotes stabilization efficiency by removing soluble salts. Size distribution and morphology of particles were analysed by laser particle diameter analysis and scanning electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction analysis reveals significant reduction of the crystallinity of fly ash by milling. Fly ash particles can be activated through this ball milling, leading to a significant decrease in particle size, a rise in its BET-surface, and turning basic crystals therein into amorphous structures. The dissolution rate of acid buffering materials present in activated particles is enhanced, resulting in a rising pH value of the leachate, reducing the leaching out of some heavy metals.

  17. Characterizing the Leaching Behavior of Coal Combustion Residues using the Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF) to Inform Future Management Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract for presentation on Characterizing the Leaching Behavior of Coal Combustion Residues using the Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF) to Inform Future Management Decisions. The abstract is attached.

  18. Leaching of irradiated UO2 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leaching tests over a period of 105 days have been performed on 20 mm long sections of an irradiated fuel rod. The sections - fuel with clad - were selected from axial locations along the rod corresponding to average linear heat ratings of 11.2 and 23.5 kW/m. For each fuel type, two leachant solutions were used: a synthetic Swedish groundwater and distilled water as reference. Leaching was performed at 60 deg C without mechanical stirring. All the leached species which were measured (U, Sr-90, Cs-137 and total alpha activity) showed large initial leaching rates - expressed as fractions of the total inventory leached per day - but the end of the leaching period, values were obtained of about 10-6/d for U, Sr-90 and Cs-137 and about 10-7/d for total alpha activity. Comparison of the cumulative amounts leached out during 105 days between the highly-rated and low-rated specimens showed the greatest difference in the case of Cs-137 where values of about 0,7 percent and 0,03 percent of the total Cs-137 inventory were obtained. These values demonstrate the sensitivity to heat rating of the movement of Cs-137 during reactor operation to the pellet-clad gap and pheripheral cracks

  19. Image rejects in general direct digital radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The number of rejected images is an indicator of image quality and unnecessary imaging at a radiology department. Image reject analysis was frequent in the film era, but comparably few and small studies have been published after converting to digital radiography. One reason may be a belief that rejects have been eliminated with digitalization. To measure the extension of deleted images in direct digital radiography (DR), in order to assess the rates of rejects and unnecessary imaging and to analyze reasons for deletions, in order to improve the radiological services. All exposed images at two direct digital laboratories at a hospital in Norway were reviewed in January 2014. Type of examination, number of exposed images, and number of deleted images were registered. Each deleted image was analyzed separately and the reason for deleting the image was recorded. Out of 5417 exposed images, 596 were deleted, giving a deletion rate of 11%. A total of 51.3% were deleted due to positioning errors and 31.0% due to error in centering. The examinations with the highest percentage of deleted images were the knee, hip, and ankle, 20.6%, 18.5%, and 13.8% respectively. The reject rate is at least as high as the deletion rate and is comparable with previous film-based imaging systems. The reasons for rejection are quite different in digital systems. This falsifies the hypothesis that digitalization would eliminates rejects. A deleted image does not contribute to diagnostics, and therefore is an unnecessary image. Hence, the high rates of deleted images have implications for management, training, education, as well as for quality

  20. Effects of simple acid leaching of crushed and powdered geological materials on high-precision Pb isotope analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Erin; Stracke, Andreas; Scherer, Erik E.

    2015-07-01

    We present new results of simple acid leaching experiments on the Pb isotope composition of USGS standard reference material powders and on ocean island basalt whole rock splits and powders. Rock samples were leached with cold 6 N HCl in an ultrasonic bath, then on a hot plate, and washed with ultrapure H2O before sample digestion in HF-HNO3 and chromatographic purification of Pb. Lead isotope analyses were measured by Tl-doped MC-ICPMS. Intrasession and intersession analytical reproducibilities of repeated analyses of both synthetic Pb solutions and Pb from single digests of chemically processed natural samples were generally better than 100 ppm (2 SD). The comparison of leached and unleached samples shows that leaching consistently removes variable amounts of contaminants that differ in Pb isotopic composition for different starting materials. For repeated digests of a single sample, analyses of leached samples reproduce better than those of unleached ones, confirming that leaching effectively removes most of the heterogeneously distributed extraneous Pb. Nevertheless, the external reproducibility of leached samples is still up to an order of magnitude worse than that of Pb solution standards (˜100 ppm). More complex leaching methods employed by earlier studies yield Pb isotope ratios within error of those produced by our method and at similar levels of reproducibility, demonstrating that our simple leaching method is as effective as more complex leaching techniques. Therefore, any Pb isotope heterogeneity among multiple leached digests of samples in excess of the external reproducibility is attributed to inherent isotopic heterogeneity of the sample. The external precision of ˜100 ppm (2 SD) achieved for Pb isotope ratio determination by Tl-doped MC-ICPMS is thus sufficient for most rocks. The full advantage of the most precise Pb isotope analytical methods is only realized in cases where the natural isotopic heterogeneity among samples in a studied suite is

  1. Dry anaerobic digestion of rejects from pre-treated food waste; Torroetning av rejekt fraan foerbehandling av matavfall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohn, Irene [NSR, Helsingborg (Sweden); Murto, Marika; Bjoernsson, Lovisa [Bioteknik, LTH, Lund (Sweden); Rosqvist, Haakan [Rosqvist Resurs, Klaagerup (Sweden)

    2011-11-15

    When the organic fraction of source separated municipal solid waste is digested anaerobically in a continuously stirred tank reactor there is a need for a pretreatment to make the waste pumpable and remove contaminants. In one type of pretreatment the material passes through a screw press which separates waste in a liquid fraction and a dry fraction (the reject). At NSR this technique is used and at present the reject is incinerated. A previous study has shown that about 30 % of the methane potential of the incoming organic waste can be found in the reject. The aim of the present project was to investigate the possibilities of realizing the methane potential through batch wise dry anaerobic digestion followed by composting as an alternative to incineration. In the technique used in the present project the material was digested in an anaerobic leach-bed with recirculation of leachate over the bed. It is important that the material is sufficiently porous to let the leachate spread evenly through the leach-bed. Treatment of reject and a mixture of reject and structural material were tested to investigate if the addition of structural material had an effect on the porosity. The flow of liquid through a leach-bed of reject and one of reject mixed with structural material was studied using LiBr as tracer. The digestate from the dry digestion process was composted, and the resulting compost was evaluated. The odor from the digestate, the active compost and the compost product was measured by analyzing the odor in the air of the porous space in heaps of the different materials. This was used to evaluate the risk of odor problems. The dry digestion and the tracer experiment both showed that mixing the reject with structural material had a positive effect on the flow of liquid through the material and the digestion process. Addition of structural material to the reject was needed in order to achieve an efficient digestion process. Using tracers proved to be a useful way of

  2. Biocide leaching from CBA treated wood — A mechanistic interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treated wood is frequently used for construction. However, there is a need to ensure that biocides used for the treatment are not a threat for people or environment. The paper focused on Pinus sylvestris treated with copper–boron–azole (CBA), containing tebuconazole as organic biocide and monoethanolamine (Mea). This study investigates chemical mechanisms of fixation and mobilisation involved in the leaching process of the used inorganic and organic biocides in CBA. A pH dependent leaching test was performed, followed by a set of complementary analysis methods in order to identify and quantify the species released from wood. The main findings of this study are: -Organic compounds are released from untreated and treated wood; the quantity of released total organic carbon, carboxylic and phenolic functions increasing with the pH. -Nitrogen containing compounds, i.e. mainly Mea and its reaction products with extractives, are released in important quantities from CBA treated wood, especially at low pH. -The release of copper is the result of competitive reactions: fixation via complexation reactions and complexation with extractives in the liquid phase. The specific pH dependency of Cu leaching is explained by the competition of ligands for protonation and complexation. -Tebuconazole is released to a lesser extent relative to its initial content. Its fixation on solid wood structure seems to be influenced by pH, suggesting interactions with -OH groups on wood. Boron release appears to be pH independent and very high. This confirms its weak fixation on wood and also no or weak interaction with the extractives. - Highlights: ► A pH dependent leaching mechanism for CBA treated wood is described. ► The fixation and mobilisation of inorganic and organic biocides was investigated. ► Extractives' quantity and nature depend on pH. ► Competition of ligands for protonation and complexation explains Cu behaviour. ► Tebuconazole seems to interact with -OH groups on

  3. Leaching dynamics of uranium in a contaminated soil site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samples from a potentially contaminated industrial area were analyzed for uranium using neutron activation analysis (NAA). Uranium concentration values had a typical uncertainty of 2 % and a detection limit of 1 Bq/kg. To investigate the potential leaching dynamics into ground water two techniques were employed. The US EPA Toxicity Characterization Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and the Sequential Extraction Procedure (SEP) were used to determine the concentration of uranium in the leachates. TCLP and SEP showed that very little of the uranium leached into solution under different chemical conditions. Values of uranium leachates ranged from 0.05 to 3.5 Bq/L; a concentration much lower than the results found in the soil concentrations which ranged from 29 to 155 Bq/kg. NAA showed an 8 % uncertainty for leachates with a detection limit of 0.13 Bq/L. To mimic environmental conditions and acid rain, pH 4.3 water was used as the extraction solvent instead of the acetic acid routinely used in TCLP. Results confirmed that very low amounts of uranium leached with values ranging from 0.0002 to 0.0122 Bq/L. These values represent 0.01-1 % of the uranium in the soil samples. The distribution of uranium in soil according to particle size was also investigated to evaluate its potential movement and possible contamination of the water table. Particles below 250 μm in diameter showed a linear increase in uranium concentration whereas those with a larger diameter had constant uranium content. (author)

  4. Leaching properties of solidified TRU waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety analysis of waste forms requires an estimate of the ability of these forms to retain activity in the disposal environment. This program of leaching tests will determine the leaching properties of TRU contaminated incinerator ash waste forms using hydraulic cement, urea--formaldehyde, bitumen, and vinyl ester--styrene as solidification agents. Three types of leaching tests will be conducted, including both static and flow rate. Five generic groundwaters will be used. Equipment and procedures are described. Experiments have been conducted to determine plate out of 239Pu, counter efficiency, and stability of counting samples

  5. Leaching from municipal solid waste incineration residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyks, J.

    2008-02-15

    Leaching of pollutants from Municipal Solid Waste Incineration (MSWI) residues has been investigated combining a range of laboratory leaching experiments with geochemical modeling. Special attention was paid to assessing the applicability of laboratory data for subsequent modeling with respect to presumed full-scale conditions; both sample pretreatment and actual influence of leaching conditions on the results of laboratory experiments were considered. It was shown that sample pretreatment may have large impact on leaching test data. In particular, a significant fraction of Pb was shown mobile during the washing of residues with water. In addition, drying of residues (i.e. slow oxidation) prior to leaching experiments increased the leaching of Cr significantly. Significant differences regarding the leaching behavior of individual elements with respect to (non)equilibrium conditions in column percolation experiments were observed in the study. As a result, three groups of elements were identified based on the predominant leaching control and the influence of (non)equilibrium on the results of the laboratory column experiments: I. Predominantly availability-controlled elements (e.g. Na, K, Cl) II. Solubility-controlled elements (e.g. Ca, S, Si, Al, Ba, and Zn) III. Complexation-controlled elements (e.g. Cu and Ni) With respect to the above groups it was suggested that results of laboratory column experiments can, with consideration, be used to estimate full-scale leaching of elements from Group I and II. However, in order to avoid large underestimations in the assessment of leaching from Group III, it is imperative to describe the time-dependent transport of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the tested system or to minimize the physical non-equilibrium during laboratory experiments (e.g. bigger column, slower flow velocity). Forward geochemical modeling was applied to simulate long-term release of elements from a MSWI air-pollution-control residue. Leaching of a

  6. ALKALINE CARBONATE LEACHING PROCESS FOR URANIUM EXTRACTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thunaes, A.; Brown, E.A.; Rabbitts, A.T.

    1957-11-12

    A process for the leaching of uranium from high carbonate ores is presented. According to the process, the ore is leached at a temperature of about 200 deg C and a pressure of about 200 p.s.i.g. with a solution containing alkali carbonate, alkali permanganate, and bicarbonate ion, the bicarbonate ion functionlng to prevent premature formation of alkali hydroxide and consequent precipitation of a diuranate. After the leaching is complete, the uranium present is recovered by precipitation with NaOH.

  7. Electrochemical methods for leaching of spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrochemical methods were used to study the initial dissolution and leaching behavior of spent-fuel fragments. The initial dissolution rate and the nature of the surface film of the spent fuel was shown to be compatible with those of single-crystal UO/sub 2/ surfaces. Thus, studying the behavior of UO/sub 2/ may provide an understanding of spent-fuel leaching mechanisms. Also, the study showed that spent-fuel leach data and dissolution kinetics may be obtained from the electrochemical methods described

  8. Leaching of ceramics under simulated disposal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leaching tests have been performed with specimens of LD-porcelain, corderite and borning material, in simulated ground water as well as in day. The weights of all the specimens except the borning material increased after 10-30 days of leaching in water. After leaching in clay the weights decreased for all the elements. Furthermore the rate of corrosion of the borning material was determined to be 11+-6 μ per year between the 40th and the 150th day. (E.R.)

  9. 热酸浸出锌浸渣中镓锗的研究%Extracting Gallium and Germanium from Zinc-leaching Residues by Hot-acid Leaching Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马喜红; 覃文庆; 吴雪兰; 任浏祎

    2012-01-01

    研究了锌浸渣热酸浸出过程的工艺条件,分析了浸出热力学和动力学机理,并用于指导回收稀有金属镓和锗.实验结果表明,锌浸渣中镓和锗浸出的最佳工艺条件为:硫酸初始质量浓度为188 g/L,反应温度为95℃,反应时间为3h,液固比为5∶1,搅拌速度为300 r/min,该条件下多组综合实验的酸浸出液中Ga和Ge的浸出率均高于86%和62%.锌浸渣中金属镓锗的浸出过程在动力学上属于“未反应核减缩”模型,浸出过程主要受反应温度、始酸浓度、反应时间的影响,反应由界面化学反应控制.%Extraction of gallium and germanium from zinc leaching residue was carried out by hot-acid leaching. The effects of leaching agent ( sulfuric acid) , leaching temperature, leaching time, L/S ratio and agitation speed on the leaching rate of Ga and Ge were examined, while the thermodynamics and dynamic mechanism for the leaching were, also analyzed. Results showed that the optimal leaching conditions were as follows: the initial mass concentration of sulfuric acid was 188 g/L, leaching temperature was 95 ℃ , leaching time was 3 h, L/S ratio was 5:1, and agitation speed was 300 r/min. Under these conditions, the leaching rates of Ga and Ge in acid leaching solution from multi-group comprehensive tests were averagely above 86% and 62% , respectively. Furthermore, the leaching process of Ga and Ge follows the kinetic law of "shrinking of unreacted core" , mainly influenced by leaching temperature, concentration of sulfuric acid and leaching time, also being controlled by interface chemical reaction.

  10. Cu and Fe chalcopyrite leach activation energies and the effect of added Fe 3+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplun, K.; Li, J.; Kawashima, N.; Gerson, A. R.

    2011-10-01

    The leaching kinetics of chalcopyrite (CuFeS 2) concentrate in sulfuric acid leach media with and without the initial addition of Fe 3+ under carefully controlled solution conditions ( Eh 750 mV SHE, pH 1) at various temperatures from 55 to 85 °C were measured. Kinetic analyses by (i) apparent rate (not surface area normalised), and rate dependence using (ii) a shrinking core model and (iii) a shrinking core model in conjunction with Fe 3+ activity, were performed to estimate the activation energies ( Ea) for Cu and Fe dissolution. The Ea values determined for Cu and Fe leaching in the absence of added Fe 3+ are within experimental error, 80 ± 10 kJ mol -1 and 84 ± 10 kJ mol -1, respectively (type iii analyses Ea are quoted unless stated otherwise), and are indicative of a chemical reaction controlled process. On addition of Fe 3+ the initial Cu leach rate (up to 10 h) was increased and Cu was released to solution preferentially over Fe, with the Ea value of 21 ± 5 kJ mol -1 (type ii analysis) suggestive of a transport controlled rate determining process. However, the rate of leaching rapidly decreased until it was consistently slower than for the equivalent leaches where Fe 3+ was not added. The resulting Ea value for this leach regime of 83 ± 10 kJ mol -1 is within experimental error of that determined in the absence of added Fe 3+. In contrast to Cu release, Fe release to solution was consistent with a chemical reaction controlled leach rate throughout. The Fe release Ea of 76 ± 10 kJ mol -1 is also within experimental error of that determined in the absence of added Fe 3+. Where type (ii) and (iii) analyses were both successfully carried out (in all cases except for Cu leaching with added Fe 3+, 10 h), as compared to in the absence of added Fe 3+, returned a considerably smaller pre-exponential factors for both Cu and Fe leach analyses commensurate with the considerably slower leach rate, suggestive of a more applicable kinetic analysis. XPS examination

  11. Estimating subsoil resistance to nitrate leaching from easily measurable pedological properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Keiti Nakagawa

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Leaching of nitrate (NO3- can increase the groundwater concentration of this anion and reduce the agronomical effectiveness of nitrogen fertilizers. The main soil property inversely related to NO3- leaching is the anion exchange capacity (AEC, whose determination is however too time-consuming for being carried out in soil testing laboratories. For this reason, this study evaluated if more easily measurable soil properties could be used to estimate the resistance of subsoils to NO3- leaching. Samples from the subsurface layer (20-40 cm of 24 representative soils of São Paulo State were characterized for particle-size distribution and for chemical and electrochemical properties. The subsoil content of adsorbed NO3- was calculated from the difference between the NO3- contents extracted with 1 mol L-1 KCl and with water; furthermore, NO3- leaching was studied in miscible displacement experiments. The results of both adsorption and leaching experiments were consistent with the well-known role exerted by AEC on the nitrate behavior in weathered soils. Multiple regression analysis indicated that in subsoils with (i low values of remaining phosphorus (Prem, (ii low soil pH values measured in water (pH H2O, and (iii high pH values measured in 1 moL L-1 KCl (pH KCl, the amounts of surface positive charges tend to be greater. For this reason, NO3- leaching tends to be slower in these subsoils, even under saturated flow condition.

  12. Leaching of seven pesticides currently used in cotton crop in Mato Grosso State-Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Eucarlos L; Weber, Oscarlina L S; Dores, Eliana F G C; Spadotto, Cláudio A

    2007-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the leaching of pesticides and the applicability of the Attenuation Factor (AF) Model to predict their leaching. The leaching of carbofuran, carbendazim, diuron, metolachlor, alpha and beta endosulfan and chlorpyrifos was studied in an Oxisol using a field experiment lysimeter located in Dom Aquino-Mato Grosso. The samples of percolated water were collected by rain event and analyzed. Chemical and physical soil attributes were determined before pesticide application to the plots. The results showed that carbofuran was the pesticide that presented a higher leaching rate in the studied soil, so was the one representing the highest contamination potential. From the total carbofuran applied in the soil surface, around 6% leached below 50 cm. The other pesticides showed lower mobility in the studied soil. The calculated values to AF were 7.06E-12 (carbendazim), 5.08E-03 (carbofuran), 3.12E-17 (diuron), 6.66E-345 (alpha-endosulfan), 1.47E-162 (beta-endosulfan), 1.50E-06 (metolachlor), 3.51E-155 (chlorpyrifos). AF Model was useful to classify the pesticides' potential for contamination; however, that model underestimated pesticide leaching. PMID:17978955

  13. Temperature effects on bacterial leaching of sulfide minerals in shake flask experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahonen, L; Tuovinen, O H

    1991-01-01

    The microbiological leaching of a sulfide ore sample was investigated in shake flask experiments. The ore sample contained pyrite, pyrrhotite, pentlandite, sphalerite, and chalcopyrite as the main sulfide minerals. The tests were performed at eight different temperatures in the range of 4 to 37 degrees C. The primary data were used for rate constant calculations, based on kinetic equations underlying two simplified models of leaching, i.e., a shrinking particle model and a shrinking core model. The rate constants thus derived were further used for the calculation of activation energy values for some of the sulfide minerals present in the ore sample. The chalcopyrite leaching rates were strongly influenced by the interaction of temperature, pH, and redox potential. Sphalerite leaching could be explained with the shrinking particle model. The data on pyrrhotite leaching displayed good fit with the shrinking core model. Pyrite leaching was found to agree with the shrinking particle model. Activation energies calculated from the rate of constants suggested that the rate-limiting steps were different for the sulfide minerals examined; they could be attributed to a chemical or biochemical reaction rather than to diffusion control. PMID:16348389

  14. Rejection of pharmaceuticals by nanofiltration (NF) membranes: Effect of fouling on rejection behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahlangu, T. O.; Msagati, T. A. M.; Hoek, E. M. V.; Verliefde, A. R. D.; Mamba, B. B.

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of membrane fouling by sodium alginate, latex and a combination of alginate + latex on the rejection behaviour of salts and organics. Sodium chloride and caffeine were selected to represent salts and organics, respectively. The effects of the presence of calcium chloride on the fouling behaviour and rejection of solutes were investigated. The results revealed that the salt rejection by virgin membranes was 47% while that of caffeine was 85%. Fouling by alginate, latex and combined alginate-latex resulted in flux decline of 25%, 37% and 17%, respectively. The addition of Ca2+ aggravated fouling and resulted in further flux decline to 37%. Fouling decreased salt rejection, an observation that was further aggravated by the addition on Ca2+. However, it was also observed that fouling with alginate and calcium and with latex and calcium minimised salt rejection by 30% and 31%, respectively. This reduction in salt rejection was attributed to the decrease in permeate flux (since rejection is a function of flux). There was a slight increase in caffeine rejection when the membrane was fouled with latex particles. Moreover, the presence of foulants on the membrane resulted in a decrease in the surface charge of the membrane. The results of this study have shown that the NF 270 membrane can be used to treat water samples contaminated with caffeine and other organic compounds that have physicochemical properties similar to those of caffeine.

  15. The chemistry of sludge washing and caustic leaching processes for selected Hanford tank wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A broad-based study on washing and caustic leaching of Hanford tank sludges was performed in FY 1995 to gain a better understanding of the basic chemical processes that underlie this process. This approach involved testing of the baseline sludge washing and caustic leaching method on several Hanford tank sludges, and characterization of the solids both before and after testing by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. A thermodynamically based model was employed to help understand the factors involved in individual specie distribution in the various stages of the sludge washing and caustic leaching treatment. The behavior of the important chemical and radiochemical components throughout the testing is summarized and reviewed in this report

  16. Oxidizing autoclave-soda leaching of wolframite concentrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of technological investigations of oxidizing autoclave-soda leaching of artificial tungstates and wolframite concentrates having increased chemical resistance are presented. The oxidizing mechanism is proposed and phase composition of finishing hard products is determined. It is shown that processing of all kinds of wolframite concentrates with high degree of tungsten extraction in solution and with WO3 content in cakes less than 2% is possible at temperatures between 225 and 250 deg C, at excessive pressure not less that 1 MPa and at usual other conditions

  17. Watchdog-LEACH: A new method based on LEACH protocol to Secure Clustered Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Rohbanian

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor network comprises of small sensor nodes with limited resources. Clustered networks have been proposed in many researches to reduce the power consumption in sensor networks. LEACH is one of the most interested techniques that offer an efficient way to minimize the power consumption in sensor networks. However, due to the characteristics of restricted resources and operation in a hostile environment, WSNs are subjected to numerous threats and are vulnerable to attacks. This research proposes a solution that can be applied on LEACH to increase the level of security. In Watchdog-LEACH, some nodes are considered as watchdogs and some changes are applied on LEACH protocol for intrusion detection. Watchdog-LEACH is able to protect against a wide range of attacks and it provides security, energy efficiency and memory efficiency. The result of simulation shows that in comparison to LEACH, the energy overhead is about 2% so this method is practical and can be applied to WSNs.

  18. Leach-SX-EW copper revalorization from overburden of abandoned copper mine Cerovo, Eastern Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevanović Z.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrometallurgical processes for copper revalorization from overburden of abandoned mine Cerovo in Eastern Serbia were studied. Paper contain results of percolation leaching tests, performed with acidic mine waters accumulated in the bottom of the former open pit, followed by solvent extraction (SX and electrowinning (EW processes on achieved copper pregnant leach solutions. Usage of accumulated waste waters was objected to minimizing the environmental hazard due to uncontrolled leaking of these waters in nearby creeks and rivers. Chemical composition of acidic mine waters used for leaching tests was: (g/dm3: Cu - 0.201; Fe - 0.095; Mn - 0.041; Zn - 0.026; Ni - 0.0004; pH value - 3.3. Copper content in overburden sample used for leaching tests was 0.21% from which 64% were oxide copper minerals. In scope of leaching tests were examined influence of leaching solution pH values and iron (III concentration on copper recovery. It was established that for 120 hours of leaching on pH=1.5 without oxidant agents, copper concentration in pregnant leach solutions enriched up to 1.08g/dm3 which was enough for copper extraction from solution with SX-EW treatment. As extraction reagent in SX circuit was used LIX-984N in a kerosene diluent. Cathode current density in electrowinning cell was 220Am-2 while electrolyte temperature was kept on 50±2oC. Produced cathode copper at the end of SX-EW process has purity of 99.95% Cu.

  19. Role of minerals properties on leaching process of weathered crust elution-deposited rare earth ore

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖燕飞; 刘向生; 冯宗玉; 黄小卫; 黄莉; 陈迎迎; 吴文远

    2015-01-01

    Granite belonged to intrusive rock and volcanic was extrusive rock. There may be many differences in their degree of weathering and mineral chemical composition. The present study investigated the minerals properties and the leaching mechanism of the granitic weathered crust elution-deposited rare earth ore from Longnan Rare Earth Mine area (LN ores) and volcanic weathered crust elution-deposited rare earth ore from Liutang Rare Earth Mine area (LT ores). The X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) were used to characterize the phase of rare earth ores. The particle size distributions and main composition of the ore were also presented in this paper. The leaching mechanisms of two kinds of rare earth ores were analyzed with different kinetics models and could be described by the shrinking-core model. They were all inner diffusion-controlled leaching processes. The leaching equation of the kinetics of the LN ores could be expressed as:4 LN LN 1.096 10 2/3 0.377 8.314 0 2 3=0.1061 (1 ) Tr e tη η×−−− − −, leaching equation of kinetics of LT ores was 3 LT LT 4.640 10 2/3 0.411 8.314 0 32 3=8.33 101 (1 ) Tr e tη η×−− −×− − −. The rare earth leaching rate of LT ores was always lower in the same condition, and it would need more time and more (NH4)2SO4 consump-tion to achieve the same rare earth leaching efficiency, which would lead to more serious ammonia-nitrogen pollution. Therefore, magnesium salt was proposed as the leaching agent to eliminate ammonia-nitrogen pollution and further studies would be taken in the future.

  20. Pollutants leaching behaviour from solidified wastes: a selection of adapted various models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moszkowicz, P; Sanchez, F; Barna, R; Méhu, J

    1998-07-01

    Leaching tests are essential in the environmental assessment of stabilized wastes. Research programmes were conducted on their interpretation in order to develop tools for the evaluation of long term release of pollutants contained in solidified wastes. Models for the leaching of porous materials are discussed in this paper according to the specificity of the chemical species (i.e. transport model with total dissolution of species-diffusional model; transport model with progressive dissolution of species due to limitation of solubility-shrinking core model; and the model coupling transport and chemical phenomena). The leaching behaviour of pollutants (i.e. lead) solidified in a cement matrix was studied under different chemical conditions. Results have shown that the release of species whose solubilities depend on the physico-chemical conditions, and especially the pH (e.g. amphoteric metals), is governed by the solubility of the species in the pore water at local conditions and by the pH evolution within the matrix. A coupled dissolution/diffusion model was developed to describe the release of chemically complex species contained in a porous medium in contact with water. Leaching tests of cement matrices and artificial porous matrices containing calcium hydroxide and pollutants were conducted in order to validate the coupled dissolution/diffusion model. A good assessment of the retention of some pollutants contained in cement matrices could then be obtained by the association of two tests: solubilization of the pollutants related to the chemical context (pH) under steady state conditions and monolithic long term dynamic leaching tests in order to characterize the evolution of the chemical context (pH) and consequently the release of pollutants. The objective is to integrate this approach in the standardization process (CEN TC 292- WG 6, in progress). PMID:18967159

  1. Alternative leaching processes for uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laboratory studies have been carried out to compare the extraction of uranium from Australian ores by conventional leaching in sulphuric acid with that obtained using hydrochloric acid and acidified ferric sulphate solutions. Leaching with hydrochloric acid achieved higher extractions of radium-226 but the extraction of uranium was reduced considerably. The use of acidified ferric sulphate solution reduced acid consumption by 20-40% without any detrimental effect on uranium extraction. The ferric ion, which is reduced during leaching, can be reoxidized and recycled after the addition of acid makeup. Hydrogen peroxide was found to be an effective oxidant in conventional sulphuric acid leaching. It is more expensive than alternative oxidants, but it is non-polluting, lesser quantities are required and acid consumption is reduced

  2. YACON INULIN LEACHING DURING HOT WATER BLANCHING

    OpenAIRE

    Caroline Fenner Scher; Adriano Brandelli; Caciano Zapata Noreña

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACTYacon roots contain inulin, which has prebiotic properties and it may be used as sucrose or fat substitutes. However, inulin is very soluble in water. The loss of this important nutrient during blanching is caused mainly by diffusion or leaching, which might be diminished if blanching temperature - time conditions are correctly employed. The aim of this study was to determine the leaching of the sugars inulin, glucose and fructose, present in yacon roots, during hot water blanching un...

  3. Leaching of nuclear power reactor wastes forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The leaching tests for power reactor wastes carried out at IPEN/CNEN-SP are described. These waste forms consist mainly of spent resins and boric acid concentrates solidified in ordinary Portland cement. All tests were conducted according to the ISO and IAEA recommendations. 3 years leaching results are reported, determining cesium and strontium diffusivity coefficients for boric acid waste form and ion-exchange resins. (Author)

  4. Video auditing techniques for breaker reject

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, B.M.; Corke, P.I.; O`Brien, G.D.; Waugh, J.M. [CSIRO (Australia). Division of Minerals

    1998-12-31

    Rotary breakers are used by many Australian coal mines to reduce the topsize of run of mine (ROM) coal to a size that can be handled by the processing plant. Coal that does not break to the designated topsize therefore passes out with the rock as breaker rejects. The degree of coal loss can be assessed manually by stop belt auditing of the reject belt, but this method is impractical for long-term monitoring of breaker rejects and breaker performance. Case studies of several open cut coal mines in the Bowen Basin of Central Queensland were made to determine the extent of the problem. The results indicated instances where significant losses did occur, but it was not possible to make an accurate estimate of the total value of the losses. This paper covers work undertaken to develop new auditing techniques for qualitative, quantitative and continuous monitoring of reject belt material which uses relatively low-cost equipment and mature technology. Initial work has concentrated on developing video surveillance techniques suitable for the range of environmental conditions typically encountered in the field. Multi-media methods are being developed for qualitative data presentation, and image analysis techniques are being investigated to extract basic quantitative information from video sequences, such as particle size and shape. Future work includes development of automatic methods using machine vision for 100% on-line inspection. The main attraction of the methodology being adopted is the potential to easily adapt the techniques to diagnostic and control functions. In situations where significant losses occur, this approach could open up many possibilities for reducing coal rejection or allowing its recovery from the rejects stream to improve productivity. 12 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Study of the effects of sensitizer, radiation dose and leaching on the properties of irradiated field latex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of sensitizer, radiation dose and leaching on the properties of irradiated natural rubber field latex have been studied. Carbon tetrachloride, carbon tetrachloride + n-butyl acrylate and n-butyl acrylate + hydrogen peroxide were used as sensitizer for radiation chemical reaction. Samples were irradiated at the dose rate of 13-14 kGy/hr with 1480 TBq 60Co gamma source at room temperature. The samples were leached at various leaching conditions. Tensile strength, gel fraction, permanent set, swelling ratio, crosslinking density etc were measured by standard methods. (author). 18 refs., 8 tabs

  6. Radiation therapy for renal transplant rejection reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forty-four renal transplant patients were given radiation therapy for severe rejection phenomena. The 29 patients who had only one course of irradiation had a 52.3% successful function rate. Fifteen patients received from two to four courses of irradiation with an ultimate 60% rate of sustained function. Fifty patients who received only steroid and other medical management but no irradiation had a 60% rate of successful renal function. In the irradiation group, no patient whose creatinine level did not respond to radiation therapy maintained a functioning kidney. The data indicate that the overall successful function rate is maintained by radiation therapy in patients who show severe allograft rejection phenomena

  7. Radiation therapy for renal transplant rejection reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeples, W.J.; Wombolt, D.G.; El-Mahdi, A.M.; Turalba, C.I.

    1982-01-01

    Forty-four renal transplant patients were given radiation therapy for severe rejection phenomena. The 29 patients who had only one course of irradiation had a 52.3% successful function rate. Fifteen patients received from two to four courses of irradiation with an ultimate 60% rate of sustained function. Fifty patients who received only steroid and other medical management but no irradiation had a 60% rate of successful renal function. In the irradiation group, no patient whose creatinine level did not respond to radiation therapy maintained a functioning kidney. The data indicate that the overall successful function rate is maintained by radiation therapy in patients who show severe allograft rejection phenomena.

  8. On Multiple Hypothesis Testing with Rejection Option

    CERN Document Server

    Grigoryan, Naira; Voloshynovskiy, Svyatoslav; Koval, Oleksiy

    2011-01-01

    We extend existing results on multiple hypothesis testing (HT) in view of rejection option. The model has many different applications. Errors in testing of M hypotheses regarding the source distribution with an option of rejecting all those hypotheses are considered. The source is discrete and arbitrarily varying (AVS). The tradeoffs among error probability exponents/reliabilities are investigated and the optimal decision strategies are outlined. Then the main result is specialized for discrete memoryless sources (DMS) and studied further. Geometric interpretations of the optimal decision schemes are given for the current and known bounds in multi-HT for AVS.

  9. Solar dynamic space power system heat rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, A. W.; Gustafson, E.; Mclallin, K. L.

    1986-01-01

    A radiator system concept is described that meets the heat rejection requirements of the NASA Space Station solar dynamic power modules. The heat pipe radiator is a high-reliability, high-performance approach that is capable of erection in space and is maintainable on orbit. Results are present of trade studies that compare the radiator system area and weight estimates for candidate advanced high performance heat pipes. The results indicate the advantages of the dual-slot heat pipe radiator for high temperature applications as well as its weight-reduction potential over the range of temperatures to be encountered in the solar dynamic heat rejection systems.

  10. Zinc Leaching from Tire Crumb Rubber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, E. P.; Ren, J.; Mays, D. C.

    2010-12-01

    Recent estimates indicate that more than 2 billion scrap tires are currently stockpiled in the United States and approximately 280 million more tires are added annually. Various engineering applications utilize recycled tires in the form of shredded tire crumb rubber. However, the use of tire crumb rubber may have negative environmental impacts, especially when the rubber comes into contact with water. A review of the literature indicates that leaching of zinc from tire crumb rubber is the most significant water quality concern associated with using this material. Zinc is generally used in tire manufacturing, representing approximately 1.3% of the final product by mass. This study will report results from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Procedure, batch leaching tests, and column leaching tests performed to quantify the process by which zinc leaches from tire crumb rubber into water. Results are interpreted with a first-order kinetic attachment/detachment model, implemented with the U.S. Agricultural Research Service software HYDRUS-1D, in order to determine the circumstances when zinc leaching from tire crumb rubber would be expected to comply with the applicable discharge limits. One potential application for recycled tires is replacing sand with tire crumb rubber in granular media filters used for stormwater pollution control. For this to be a viable application, the total zinc in the stormwater discharge must be below the EPA’s benchmark value of 0.117 mg/L.

  11. Heat transfer law in leaching dump

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ai-xiang; WANG Hong-jiang; XI Yong; YANG Bao-hua; LI Jian-feng; YIN Sheng-hua; ZHA Ke-bing

    2005-01-01

    Based on the law of temperature changes in the leaching dump and the forming process of heat flux, the basic balance equation of heat flow in dump was established, the dissipated heat flow from dump to the atmosphere was analyzed to estimate the surface temperature of the ore particle in dump and discover the law of forced heat convection of heat flow transfer in dump. And the lixiviate flow formula taking a certain heat flow out of dump was deduced by using the inversion method. Through theoretic analysis, combining Dexing copper mine heap leaching production practice, the results show that the heat flow of chalcopyrite leaching emitted is not so great, but the heat flow of pyrite leaching and sulphur oxidation produced take up a higher proportion of total heat flow; the dissipated heat flow takes up a lower proportion, and most of heat flow is absorbed by itself, thus the inside temperature rises gradually; and the saturation flow form for leaching is adopted, which makes the lixiviate seepage in the transitional flow or even in the turbulent flow, so as to accelerate the heat flow diffusing and keep the leaching dump temperature suitable for bacteria living.

  12. Optimization of the factors that accelerate leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prediction of long-term leachability of low-level radioactive waste forms is an essential element of disposal-site performance assessment. This report describes experiments and modeling techniques used to develop an accelerated leach test that meets this need. The acceleration in leaching rates caused by the combinations of two or more factors were experimentally determined. These factors were identified earlier as being able to individually accelerate leaching. They are: elevated temperature, the size of the waste form, the ratio of the volume of leachant to the surface area of the waste form, and the frequency of replacement of the leachant. The solidification agents employed were ones that are currently used to treat low-level radioactive wastes, namely portland type I cement, bitumen, and vinyl ester-styrene. The simulated wastes, sodium sulfate, sodium tetraborate, and incinerator ash, are simplified representatives of typical low-level waste streams. Experiments determined the leaching behavior of the radionuclides of cesium (Cs-137), strontium (Sr-85), and cobalt (Co-60 or Co-57) from several different formulations of solidification agents and waste types. Leaching results were based upon radiochemical and elemental analyses of aliquots of the leachate, and on its total alkalinity and pH at various times during the experiment (up to 120 days). Solid phase analyses were carried out by Scanning/Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy on the waste forms before and after some leaching experiments. 43 refs., 96 figs., 16 tabs

  13. Treatment of cadmium dust with two-stage leaching process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The treatment of cadmium dust with a two-stage leaching process was investigated to replace the existing sulphation roast-leaching processes. The process parameters in the first stage leaching were basically similar to the neutralleaching in zinc hydrometallurgy. The effects of process parameters in the second stage leaching on the extraction of zincand cadmium were mainly studied. The experimental results indicated that zinc and cadmium could be efficiently recoveredfrom the cadmium dust by two-stage leaching process. The extraction percentages of zinc and cadmium in two stage leach-ing reached 95% and 88% respectively under the optimum conditions. The total extraction percentage of Zn and Cdreached 94%.

  14. Fractal kinetic model for heap leaching of uranium ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By using fractal dimensions of the full particle size distribution instead of average particle size, the analytical models describing heap leaching of uranium ore which were presented by Mellado et al, were improved. Meanwhile, the relationships between the model parameters of the fractal kinetic model for heap leaching of uranium ore and the fractal dimension of uranium ore were determined by column leaching experiments, and then a fractal kinetic model for heap leaching of uranium ore was established, and was further verified by column leaching experiments. The result shows that the fractal kinetic model can well reflect the law of uranium metal leaching of heap leaching of uranium ore. (authors)

  15. Laboratory leach tests of phosphate/sulfate waste grout and leachate adsorption tests using Hanford sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R.J.; Martin, W.J.; McLaurine, S.B.; Airhart, S.P.; LeGore, V.L.; Treat, R.L.

    1987-12-01

    An assessment of the long-term risks posed by grout disposal at Hanford requires data on the ability of grout to resist leaching of waste species contained in the grout via contact with water that percolates through the ground. Additionally, data are needed on the ability of Hanford sediment (soil) surrounding the grout and concrete vault to retard migration of any wastes released from the grout. This report describes specific laboratory experiments that are producing empirical leach rate data and leachate-sediment adsorption data for Phosphate-Sulfate Waste (PSW) grout. The leach rate and adsorption values serve as inputs to computer codes used to forecast potential risk resulting from the use of ground water containing leached species. In addition, the report discusses other chemical analyses and geochemical computer code calculations that were used to identify mechanisms that control leach rates and adsorption potential. Knowledge of the controlling chemical and physical processes provides technical defensibility for using the empirical laboratory data to extrapolate the performance of the actual grout disposal system to the long time periods of interest. 59 refs., 83 figs., 18 tabs.

  16. Laboratory leach tests of phosphate/sulfate waste grout and leachate adsorption tests using Hanford sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An assessment of the long-term risks posed by grout disposal at Hanford requires data on the ability of grout to resist leaching of waste species contained in the grout via contact with water that percolates through the ground. Additionally, data are needed on the ability of Hanford sediment (soil) surrounding the grout and concrete vault to retard migration of any wastes released from the grout. This report describes specific laboratory experiments that are producing empirical leach rate data and leachate-sediment adsorption data for Phosphate-Sulfate Waste (PSW) grout. The leach rate and adsorption values serve as inputs to computer codes used to forecast potential risk resulting from the use of ground water containing leached species. In addition, the report discusses other chemical analyses and geochemical computer code calculations that were used to identify mechanisms that control leach rates and adsorption potential. Knowledge of the controlling chemical and physical processes provides technical defensibility for using the empirical laboratory data to extrapolate the performance of the actual grout disposal system to the long time periods of interest. 59 refs., 83 figs., 18 tabs

  17. Leaching characteristics of a low grade uranium ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leaching characteristics of a low grade uranium ore in Jiangxi province are studied using agitating leaching and column leaching methods. The results of agitating leaching test show that leaching rate of uranium is above 85% under the conditions of sulphuric acid concentration of 10 g/L and stirring 12 h, and the ore is leachable. The results of column leaching test show that leaching rate of uranium is above 85.7% under the conditions of particle size of-5 mm, sulphuric acid dosage of 4.6% (w/w), and leaching time 40 d, and the permeability of ore heap is good (33 L/m2 h). The obtained leaching parameters can be used as the basis of industrial experiment design and adjusting the leaching parameters in production. (authors)

  18. Influencing factors of pyrite leaching in germ-free system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OU Le-ming; HE Rong-quan; FENG Qi-ming

    2007-01-01

    The effect of mineral particle size,pulp potential and category of oxidant on pyrite leaching was studied.The results show that a smaller mineral particle size leads to a higher leaching rate of pyrite, and the optimum result with pyrite leaching rate of 2.92% is obtained when mineral particle size is less than 0.037 1/mm.The pulp potential reflects the leaching process. The increase of pulp potential can improve pyrite leaching. The leaching rate and velocity of pyrite can be enhanced rapidly by adding strong oxidant. The kind and the method of adding oxidant have important effect on the pyrite leaching. Appropriate concentration of Fe3+ can enhance pyrite leaching but the precipitation generated by high concentration of ferric ion covers the surface of pyrites and prevents the leaching process.The leaching rate increases with the constant addition of H2O2.

  19. Long-term leaching of irradiated spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel with burnups of 9, 28 and 54 MWd/kg U were leach tested at 250C in deionized water in a Paige apparatus. No discernible differences in leach rates were observed due to burnup. Additionally, the 28 MWd/kg U fuel was IAEA leach tested in five different leachants using the IAEA method. Deionized water gave the highest leach rates and a calcium chloride solution gave the lowest leach rates. An accelerated leaching period was observed during the Paige leach test of the 54 MWd/kg U spent fuel. Comparison between spent fuel and borosilicate waste glass leach rates was made. In sodium bicarbonate solution the leach rates are near equal and the glass becomes increasingly more durable with CaCl2 solution, followed by sodium chloride solution, WIPP B brine and deionized water where the glass is two to three orders of magnitude more leach resistant than spent fuel. 16 figures

  20. Phosphorus leaching as influenced by animal manure and catch crops

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Leaching of phosphorus (P) constitutes an important part of P losses from Swedish agricultural soils. Phosphorus leaching is complex and is influenced by many factors, from source and mobilisation to transport pathways, as well as agricultural management practices. In order to design appropriate mitigation strategies to reduce P leaching, it is urgent to understand how different factors influence P leaching and to understand the methods for assessing P leaching. This thesis investigat...

  1. Selective process of zinc extraction from spent Zn–MnO2 batteries by ammonium chloride leaching

    OpenAIRE

    Nogueira, C. A.; Margarido, F.

    2015-01-01

    Recycling of spent Zn-MnO2 batteries by hydrometallurgy is usually carried out by leaching in acid media, mainly with sulphuric acid solutions. Another type of leachant was used in this work, specifically solutions of concentrated ammonium chloride. The development of this study has relied on the prediction of the chemical behavior of the constituting phases based on data obtained from theoretical and experimental equilibrium values. The assessment of the effects of factors on leaching effici...

  2. The geopolitical implications of the House of Commons’ decision to reject military intervention in Syria

    OpenAIRE

    Ulrichsen, Kristian Coates

    2015-01-01

    In August 2013, the House of Commons rejected a Government proposal to intervene in the Syrian conflict following that country’s regime’s use of chemical weapons. Here, Dr Kristian Coates Ulrichsen assesses the geopolitical implications of that dramatic night in the House of Commons, arguing that it decisively stopped the momentum towards war.

  3. Recovery of H2SO4 from an acid leach solution by diffusion dialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diffusion dialysis with a series of anion exchange membranes was used to recover H2SO4 from an acid leach solution produced during the vanadium manufacturing process. The effects of sulfuric acid, FeSO4 and VOSO4 concentration, flow rate and flow rate ratio on the recovery of H2SO4 were investigated. The results showed that sulfuric acid permeated well through the membranes used, while metal ions were efficiently rejected. The recovery of H2SO4 increased as the sulfate concentration of the feed increased and the flow rate ratio of water to feed increased. More than 80% of the H2SO4 could be recovered from the leach solution which contained 61.7 g/L free H2SO4, 11.2 g/L Fe and 4.60 g/L V at a flow rate of 0.19 x 10-3 m3/h m2. V and Fe ion rejection were within 93-95 and 92-94%, respectively. A preliminary economic evaluation revealed that an investment in this process could be recovered within 27 months.

  4. Antimyosin imaging in cardiac transplant rejection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, L.L.; Cannon, P.J. (Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York (United States))

    1991-09-01

    Fab fragments of antibodies specific for cardiac myosin have been labeled with indium-111 and injected intravenously into animals and into patients with heart transplants. The antibodies, developed by Khaw, Haber, and co-workers, localize in cardiac myocytes that have been damaged irreversibly by ischemia, myocarditis, or the rejection process. After clearance of the labeled antibody from the cardiac blood pool, planar imaging or single photon emission computed tomography is performed. Scintigrams reveal the uptake of the labeled antimyosin in areas of myocardium undergoing transplant rejection. In animal studies, the degree of antimyosin uptake appears to correlate significantly with the degree of rejection assessed at necropsy. In patients, the correlation between scans and pathologic findings from endomyocardial biopsy is not as good, possibly because of sampling error in the endomyocardial biopsy technique. The scan results at 1 year correlate with either late complications (positive) or benign course (negative). Current limitations of the method include slow blood clearance, long half-life of indium-111, and hepatic uptake. Overcoming these limitations represents a direction for current research. It is possible that from these efforts a noninvasive approach to the diagnosis and evaluation of cardiac transplantation may evolve that will decrease the number of endomyocardial biopsies required to evaluate rejection. This would be particularly useful in infants and children. 31 references.

  5. Local graft irradiation in renal transplant rejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From 1977 to 1988, of 142 renal transplantations, seven recipients (4.9%) received local graft irradiation following rejective reaction refractory to antirejection medical managements. Concurrent with the administration of pulsed high dose methylprednisolone and other antirejection medical managements, the graft was irradiated with a total dose of 6.0 Gy-150 cGy per fraction every other day at the midplane of the graft using two opposing portals of 4MX Linac. The fields were defined by palpation and echography. All patients had improvements in serum creatinine on the 10th day after beginning the irradiation. Four patients with peripheral lymphocytosis during the irradiation combined with pulsed high dose methylprednisolone improved in renal functions. On the other hand, out of 3 patients with lymphcytopenic changes, in two the transplanted graft was removed due to deteriorations, and the other patient is currently suffering from chronic rejection. Local graft irradiation can be useful in maintaining a rejective graft and reversing its functions in some patients whose rejective reaction failed to respond to the antirejection medical managements. (author)

  6. Local graft irradiation in renal transplant rejection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, Masashi; Kataoka, Masaaki; Itoh, Hisao (Ehime Univ., Matsuyama (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1990-04-01

    From 1977 to 1988, of 142 renal transplantations, seven recipients (4.9%) received local graft irradiation following rejective reaction refractory to antirejection medical managements. Concurrent with the administration of pulsed high dose methylprednisolone and other antirejection medical managements, the graft was irradiated with a total dose of 6.0 Gy-150 cGy per fraction every other day at the midplane of the graft using two opposing portals of 4MX Linac. The fields were defined by palpation and echography. All patients had improvements in serum creatinine on the 10th day after beginning the irradiation. Four patients with peripheral lymphocytosis during the irradiation combined with pulsed high dose methylprednisolone improved in renal functions. On the other hand, out of 3 patients with lymphcytopenic changes, in two the transplanted graft was removed due to deteriorations, and the other patient is currently suffering from chronic rejection. Local graft irradiation can be useful in maintaining a rejective graft and reversing its functions in some patients whose rejective reaction failed to respond to the antirejection medical managements. (author).

  7. Antimyosin imaging in cardiac transplant rejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fab fragments of antibodies specific for cardiac myosin have been labeled with indium-111 and injected intravenously into animals and into patients with heart transplants. The antibodies, developed by Khaw, Haber, and co-workers, localize in cardiac myocytes that have been damaged irreversibly by ischemia, myocarditis, or the rejection process. After clearance of the labeled antibody from the cardiac blood pool, planar imaging or single photon emission computed tomography is performed. Scintigrams reveal the uptake of the labeled antimyosin in areas of myocardium undergoing transplant rejection. In animal studies, the degree of antimyosin uptake appears to correlate significantly with the degree of rejection assessed at necropsy. In patients, the correlation between scans and pathologic findings from endomyocardial biopsy is not as good, possibly because of sampling error in the endomyocardial biopsy technique. The scan results at 1 year correlate with either late complications (positive) or benign course (negative). Current limitations of the method include slow blood clearance, long half-life of indium-111, and hepatic uptake. Overcoming these limitations represents a direction for current research. It is possible that from these efforts a noninvasive approach to the diagnosis and evaluation of cardiac transplantation may evolve that will decrease the number of endomyocardial biopsies required to evaluate rejection. This would be particularly useful in infants and children. 31 references

  8. Waste heat rejection from geothermal power stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, R.C.

    1978-12-01

    This study of waste heat rejection from geothermal power stations is concerned only with the heat rejected from the power cycle. The heat contained in reinjected or otherwise discharged geothermal fluids is not included with the waste heat considered here. The heat contained in the underflow from the flashtanks in such systems is not considered as part of the heat rejected from the power cycle. By following this definition of the waste heat to be rejected, various methods of waste heat dissipation are discussed without regard for the particular arrangement to obtain heat from the geothermal source. Recent conceptual design studies made for 50-MW(e) geothermal power stations at Heber and Niland, California, are of particular interst. The former uses a flashed-steam system and the latter a binary cycle that uses isopentane. In last-quarter 1976 dollars, the total estimated capital costs were about $750/kW and production costs about 50 mills/kWhr. If wet/dry towers were used to conserve 50% of the water evaporation at Heber, production costs would be about 65 mills/kWhr.

  9. Partial interference subspace rejection in CDMA systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henrik; Affes, Sofiene; Mewelstein, Paul

    2001-01-01

    Previously presented interference subspace rejection (ISR) proposed a family of new efficient multiuser detectors for CDMA. We reconsider in this paper the modes of ISR using decision feedback (DF). DF modes share similarities with parallel interference cancellation (PIC) but attempt to cancel...

  10. Development of enhanced sulfur rejection processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, R.H.; Luttrell, G.H.; Adel, G.T.; Richardson, P.E.

    1996-03-01

    Research at Virginia Tech led to the development of two complementary concepts for improving the removal of inorganic sulfur from many eastern U.S. coals. These concepts are referred to as Electrochemically Enhanced Sulfur Rejection (EESR) and Polymer Enhanced Sulfur Rejection (PESR) processes. The EESR process uses electrochemical techniques to suppress the formation of hydrophobic oxidation products believed to be responsible for the floatability of coal pyrite. The PESR process uses polymeric reagents that react with pyrite and convert floatable middlings, i.e., composite particles composed of pyrite with coal inclusions, into hydrophilic particles. These new pyritic-sulfur rejection processes do not require significant modifications to existing coal preparation facilities, thereby enhancing their adoptability by the coal industry. It is believed that these processes can be used simultaneously to maximize the rejection of both well-liberated pyrite and composite coal-pyrite particles. The project was initiated on October 1, 1992 and all technical work has been completed. This report is based on the research carried out under Tasks 2-7 described in the project proposal. These tasks include Characterization, Electrochemical Studies, In Situ Monitoring of Reagent Adsorption on Pyrite, Bench Scale Testing of the EESR Process, Bench Scale Testing of the PESR Process, and Modeling and Simulation.

  11. Leaching of zinc sulfide by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans: bacterial oxidation of the sulfur product layer increases the rate of zinc sulfide dissolution at high concentrations of ferrous ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, T A; Crundwell, F K

    1999-12-01

    This paper reports the results of leaching experiments conducted with and without Thiobacillus ferrooxidans at the same conditions in solution. The extent of leaching of ZnS with bacteria is significantly higher than that without bacteria at high concentrations of ferrous ions. A porous layer of elemental sulfur is present on the surfaces of the chemically leached particles, while no sulfur is present on the surfaces of the bacterially leached particles. The analysis of the data using the shrinking-core model shows that the chemical leaching of ZnS is limited by the diffusion of ferrous ions through the sulfur product layer at high concentrations of ferrous ions. The analysis of the data shows that diffusion through the product layer does not limit the rate of dissolution when bacteria are present. This suggests that the action of T. ferrooxidans in oxidizing the sulfur formed on the particle surface is to remove the barrier to diffusion by ferrous ions. PMID:10583978

  12. Selective leaching studies of deep-sea sediments loaded with americium, neptunium and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of selective leaching experiments were undertaken to investigate the solid phase speciation and distribution of americium, neptunium and plutonium which had been experimentally loaded onto different marine sediment types. The chemical leaches employed showed rather poor selectivity but certain trends were evident. Adsorption was not by ion exchange. Americium showed a preferential affinity for carbonate and plutonium for organic matter. Neptunium appeared to have no preferential affinities. Americium was sorbed by acetic acid residues (CaCO3 removed) and by unleached carbonate-rich sediments with equal efficiency. This indicates that it is able to diversify its solid phase affinity/distribution depending upon which solid phases are available. (author)

  13. A experiment of in-situ leaching of uranium with CO2 at a uranium deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to solve the chemical jamming appeared in the conventional acid or alkaline in-situ leaching of uranium, a experiment of in-situ leaching of uranium with CO2 was carried out at a uranium deposit, Xinjiang. It is the first time in China. The results indicate that CO2 can depress the pH value in lixiviation, restrain the creation of CO32-, reduce and avoid Ca[Mg]CO3 precipitates, and offset the loss of HCO3- in the solution during the process. (authors)

  14. Large Solar-Rejection Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, William; Sheikh, David; Patrick, Brian

    2007-01-01

    NASA utilized Image Intensified Video Cameras for ATV data acquisition from a jet flying at 12.8 km. Afterwards the video was digitized and then analyzed with a modified commercial software package, Image Systems Trackeye. Astrometric results were limited by saturation, plate scale, and imposed linear plate solution based on field reference stars. Time-dependent fragment angular trajectories, velocities, accelerations, and luminosities were derived in each video segment. It was evident that individual fragments behave differently. Photometric accuracy was insufficient to confidently assess correlations between luminosity and fragment spatial behavior (velocity, deceleration). Use of high resolution digital video cameras in future should remedy this shortcoming. A scenically accurate description of matter interpreted as a substance made up of corpuscular constituents was established during the course of the 19th century. In this description, atoms--the building blocks of the matter--form molecules. The properties of the molecules were described by chemistry or thermodynamics depending on what characteristics of the matter were investigated. In both theories, the molecules can dissociate to atoms when the kinetic energies of the atoms exceed the strength of the chemical bonds. The number of atoms is always preserved in a closed system. This is not true, however, when the matter takes up much higher energies at relativistic scales. New particles can be produced at the expense of the kinetic energy. The number of particles is no longer preserved. There are other conserved quantities, however, these quantities, the charge, baryon number, lepton number, are associated with particles that are considered elementary today. The properties and behavior of these elementary particles is the subject of Particle Physics or High Energy Physics. Practice Page: A crewmember touching a positively charged surface was thought to be galvanically isolated from the vehicle ground

  15. Investigation of Copper Ammonia Leaching from Smelter Slags: Characterization, Leaching and Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidari, Ehsan; Aghazadeh, Valeh

    2015-10-01

    Although ammonia leaching of copper from slags has been reported generally as a part of copper slag utilization methods, but no detailed studies have been reported in the literature. In this research, we tried to investigate the effect of different parameters on ammonia leaching of copper from copper smelting slag by identifying different copper-bearing phases and following them during leaching time. Mineralogical characterization of the smelting slag (1.7 pct Cu) was done using X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, diagnostic leaching tests, and scanning electron microscopy. The characterization studies indicated that main copper-bearing species are soluble copper oxides and chalcocite along with minor amount of covellite, bornite, blister copper particles, and chalcopyrite. It was also found that only approximately 0.2 pct Cu was present in the insoluble bulk silicate phases. These results suggest that approximately 88 pct of the total copper of slag could be extracted by ammonia sulfide leaching. Leaching tests were carried out and the effects of various parameters, namely pH, ammonia concentration, temperature, presence of oxygen, stirring speed, and pulp density were examined on copper leaching. The temperature and stirring speed had the most pronounced effect on the copper leaching, whereas ammonia affected the leaching yield at low concentrations of ammonia. It was found that 78 pct of Cu could be extracted within 4 hours and under optimum conditions: T = 343 K (70 °C), 2M ammonia, pH 10.5, stirring speed = 900 rpm, pulp density = 10 pct ( w s/ v). The kinetic data were analyzed with the shrinking core models, and it was found that the leaching process is controlled by both the interfacial transfer and diffusion across the product layer and the activation energy is calculated to be 49.4 kJ mol-1.

  16. Remediation of contaminated soil using heap leach mining technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is evaluating the systems technology for heap treatment of excavated soils to remove and treat hazardous chemical and radioactive wastes. This new technology would be an extrapolation of current heap leach mining technology. The candidate wastes for treatment are those organic or inorganic (including radioactive) compounds that will chemically, physically, or biologically react with selected reagents. The project would start with bench-scale testing, followed by pilot-scale testing, and eventually by field-scale testing. Various reagents would be tried in various combinations and sequences to obtain and optimize the desired treatment results. The field-scale testing would be preceded by site characterization, process design, and equipment selection. The final step in this project is to transfer the systems technology to the private sector, probably to the mining industry. 6 refs., 1 fig

  17. Analysis of factors affecting the effect of stope leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The industrial test and industrial trial production of stope leaching were carried out at Taoshan orefield of Dabu deposit. The results of test and trial production showed obvious differences in leaching rate and leaching time. Compared with industrial trial production of stope leaching, the leaching rate of industrial test was higher, and leaching time was shorter. It was considered that the blasting method and liquid arrangement were the main factors affecting the leaching rate and leaching time according to analysis. So we put forward the following suggestions: the technique of deep hole slicing tight-face blasting was used to reduce the yield of lump ores, the effective liquid arrangement methods were adopted to make the lixiviant infiltrating throughout whole ore heap, and bacterial leaching was introduced. (authors)

  18. Application of leaching tests for toxicity evaluation of coal fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsiridis, V.; Samaras, P.; Kungolos, A.; Sakellaropoullos, G.P. [Technological Educational Institute for West Macedonia, Kozani (Greece). Dept. for Pollution Control Technology

    2006-08-15

    The toxic properties of coal fly ash samples obtained from various coal combustion power plants were evaluated in this work using physicochemical analyses and bioassays. Physicochemical analyses showed that heavy metals present in solid samples included Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn. The results of the chemical analysis of eluates deduced by the application of standard leaching tests according to EN 12457-2 and Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) methods indicated that the compounds contained in fly ashes could potentially be transferred to the liquid phase depending upon the leaching method used. Heavy metal concentrations were higher in TCLP eluates, indicating that the initial pH value of the leaching medium significantly affected the transfer of these elements to the liquid phase. Tests conducted with the photobacterium Vibrio fischeri (Microtox test), the crustacean Daphnia magna, and the rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus were used to assess toxicity of eluates obtained by both leaching tests. Daphnia magna was the most sensitive test organism. The EN 12457-2 method proved to be more reliable for toxicity evaluation of eluates. In contrast, the TCLP method showed some interference owing to acetic acid toxicity, and precipitation occurred after pH adjustment of eluates from acid to neutral range. The toxicity of both fly ashes and the corresponding solid leaching residues of EN 12457-2 and TCLP leaching tests was also measured using the Microtox Basic Solid phase Test. The results generated with this bioassay indicated that toxicity was greatly influenced by the pH status of the solid samples.

  19. Uranium leaching and recovery from sandstone ores of Nong Son Basin (Viet Nam)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandstone ores containing uranium in Nong Son area were treated to recover uranium in the form of MDU. These ores are classified into 3 categories depending on the weathering degree, giving different chemical composition as shown. The amount of calcium carbonate (g CaCO3/100g of ore) reacted with HCI under different conditions of temperature and time shows that stirring method requires high acid consumption. The results obtained from static leaching of the 3 ore categories shows that leaching efficiency largely depends on the weathering degree and particle size of ore. The lowest leaching efficiency was observed for non-weathered ore. In order to increase uranium extraction this ore was ground to the size of max. 2.5mm, and then incubated by 40% H2SO4 for 48 hours with the addition of KCIO3 (3 kg/tone of ore) as oxidant. The results of acid pugging showed that uranium extraction efficiency reached min. 92%. The proposed flow-sheet for obtaining yellowcake is presented. The leaching experiments were carried out under the following conditions: Particle size of ore: Weathered: max. 30mm, Semi-weathered: max. 10mm, Non-weathered: max. 2.5mm (incubated by 40% H2SO4); Temperature 25-30 deg. C; Redox potential; pH1, acid consumption: 40-50 kg/ore tone. Leaching efficiency reached 90%. Uranium concentration in the solution after 8-stage counter-current leaching was min. 4 g/L, uranium content in solid waste 0.01%. Leaching solution was filtered and directly neutralized through two stages to precipitate yellowcake. Experimental data showed that the uranium recovery reached 90%. Yellowcake product met the relevant specifications and had U3O8 content of minimum 76%

  20. Reducing acid leaching of manganiferous ore: Effect of the iron removal operation on solid waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of reducing acid leaching of manganiferous ore is aimed at the extraction of manganese from low grade manganese ores. This work is focused on the iron removal operation. The following items have been considered in order to investigate the effect of the main operating conditions on solid waste disposal and on the process costs: (i) type and quantity of the base agent used for iron precipitation, (ii) effective need of leaching waste separation prior to the iron removal operation, (iii) presence of a second leaching stage with the roasted ore, which might also act as a preliminary iron removal step, and (iv) effect of tailings washing on the solid waste classification. Different base compounds have been tested, including CaO, CaCO3, NaOH, and Na2CO3. The latter gave the best results concerning both the precipitation process kinetics and the reagent consumption. The filtration of the liquor leach prior to iron removal was not necessary, implying significant savings in capital costs. A reduction of chemical consumption and an increase of manganese concentration in the solution were obtained by introducing secondary leaching tests with the previously roasted ore; this additional step was introduced without a significant decrease of global manganese extraction yield. Finally, toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) tests carried out on the leaching solid waste showed: (i) a reduction of arsenic mobility in the presence of iron precipitates, and (ii) the need for a washing step in order to produce a waste that is classifiable as not dangerous, taking into consideration the existing Environmental National Laws

  1. Monitoring of Acute Rejection after Orthotopic Heart Tranplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng chun ying; Huang ke li; Luo bin; Wen ding guo

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To study the monitoring of rejection after orthotopic heart thansplantation.Methods From 1998 to 2005, 10 othotopic heart thansplans were performed, and acute rejection was monitored by endomyocardial biopsy as well as by clinical features, ECG, ultrasonocardiography and blood serum determination of Tropin I, and by the combination of these methods, we analysed the monitoring of acute rejection after the heart transplantation. Results With the combination of clinical features, ECG, ultrasonocardiography and blood serum test, 5 occurences of acute rejection were judged in the postoperative course, which were comfirmed by endomyocardial biopsy to be 2 acute rejections in Ⅰ b degree, 3 acute rejections in Ⅲ a degree. Endomyocardial biopsy were routinely performed 21 times postoperatively in which there were 1 acute rejection in Ⅰ a degree and 5 acute rejections in Ⅰ b degree. Conclusions Acute rejection is an important factor influencing the postoperative course of heart transplantation, so it is imperative to have an intime, effective and planned monitoring procedure for acute rejection. Endomyocardial biopsy is a sensitive and reliable method in diagnosis of acute rejection, but it is invasive and probable for some complications. The noninvasive method such as clinical features, ECG,ultrasonocardiography and blood serum test can be used as additive means in the diagnosis of acute rejection.Endomyocardial biopsy should be combined with some noninvasive methods in monitoring acute rejection after the heart transplantation.

  2. Mechanisms controlling the leaching kinetics of fixated flue gas desulfurization (FGD) material under neutral and acidic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chin-Min; Walker, Harold W; Bigham, Jerry M

    2007-01-01

    A number of agricultural and engineering uses for fixated flue gas desulfurization (FGD) material exist; however, the potential for leaching of hazardous elements has limited widespread application and the processes controlling the leaching of this material are poorly understood. In this study, a flow-through rotating-disk system was applied to elucidate the relative importance of bulk diffusion, pore diffusion, and surface chemical reaction in controlling the leaching of fixated FGD material under pH conditions ranging from 2.2 to 6.8. Changing the hydrodynamics in the rotating disk system did not affect the leaching kinetics at both pH 2.2 and 6.8, indicating that bulk diffusion was not the kinetic-limiting step. Application of the shrinking core model (SCM) to the data suggested a surface reaction-controlled mechanism, rather than a pore diffusion mechanism. The leaching of fixated FGD material increased with decreasing pH, suggesting it can be described by a combination of an intrinsic hydration reaction and a proton-promoted dissolution reaction. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and elemental composition analyses before and after leaching suggests that for most elements a number of solid phases controlled the leaching process. PMID:17485719

  3. Leaching behaviour of bottom ash from RDF high-temperature gasification plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigated the physical properties, the chemical composition and the leaching behaviour of two bottom ash (BA) samples from two different refuse derived fuel high-temperature gasification plants, as a function of particle size. The X-ray diffraction patterns showed that the materials contained large amounts of glass. This aspect was also confirmed by the results of availability and ANC leaching tests. Chemical composition indicated that Fe, Mn, Cu and Cr were the most abundant metals, with a slight enrichment in the finest fractions. Suitability of samples for inert waste landfilling and reuse was evaluated through the leaching test EN 12457-2. In one sample the concentration of all metals was below the limit set by law, while limits were exceeded for Cu, Cr and Ni in the other sample, where the finest fraction showed to give the main contribution to leaching of Cu and Ni. Preliminary results of physical and geotechnical characterisation indicated the suitability of vitrified BA for reuse in the field of civil engineering. The possible application of a size separation pre-treatment in order to improve the chemical characteristics of the materials was also discussed.

  4. Leaching of the potentially toxic pollutants from composites based on waste raw material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terzić Anja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The disposal of the fly ash generated in coal based power-plants may pose a significant risk to the environment due to the possible leaching of hazardous pollutants, such as toxic metals. Also, there is a risk of leaching even when fly ash is built-in the construction composites. Fly ashes from various landfills were applied in several composite samples (mortar, concrete and brick without any physical or thermal pre-treatment. The leachability of the potentially toxic pollutants from the fly ash based products was investigated. The leaching behavior and potential environmental impact of the 11 potentially hazardous elements was tracked: Pb, Cd, Zn, Cu, Ni, Cr, Hg, As, Ba, Sb and Se. A detailed study of physico-chemical characteristics of the fly ash, with accent on trace elements and the chemical composition investigation is included. Physico/chemical properties of fly ash were investigated by means of X-ray fluorescence, differential thermal analysis and X-ray diffraction methods. Scanning electron microscope was used in microstructural analysis. The results show that most of the elements are more easily leachable from the fly ash in comparison with the fly ash based composites. The leaching of investigated pollutants is within allowed range thus investigated fly ashes can be reused in construction materials production.

  5. Study of Zinc Leaching of EAF Flue Dust Using Sodium Hydroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahsan Abdul Ghani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available During the production of steel from Electric Arc Furnace (EAF, large amount of by-product called EAF flue dust is generated. The major proportion of flue dust is comprised of Zn (41.5 % wt.. Different phases identified by XRD analysis are zincite, franklinite and magnetite with zincite being dominant. In this study, we have performed flue dust treatment using sodium hydroxide as leaching medium. Different concentrations of alkali were used to optimize maximum recovery of Zn. XRF and Wet Chemical method were used to characterize the dust samples both before and after leaching. The optimum alkali concentration for selective leaching of zinc was found to be 4 M with a zinc recovery of 90 %.

  6. Kinetics of Reductive Acid Leaching of Cadmium-Bearing Zinc Ferrite Mixture Using Hydrazine Sulfate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chun; Zhang, Jianqiang; Min, Xiaobo; Wang, Mi; Zhou, Bosheng; Shen, Chen

    2015-09-01

    The reductive acid leaching kinetics of synthetic cadmium-bearing zinc ferrite was investigated, and the influence of reaction temperature, sulfuric acid and hydrazine sulfate were studied. The results illustrated that an increase in the reaction temperature, initial sulfuric acid and hydrazine sulfate significantly enhanced the extraction efficiencies of cadmium, zinc and iron. The leaching kinetics were controlled by a surface chemical reaction based on a shrinking core model. The empirical equation applied was found to fit well with the kinetics analysis; the leaching processes of cadmium, zinc and iron were similar and the activation energies were 79.9 kJ/mol, 77.9 kJ/mol and 79.7 kJ/mol, respectively. The apparent orders of cadmium-bearing zinc ferrite dissolution with respect to sulfuric acid concentration were 0.83, 0.83 and 0.84 for Cd, Zn and Fe, respectively.

  7. Plant Biomass Leaching for Nutrient Recovery in Closed Loop Systems Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitlin, Nancy P.; Wheeler, Raymond (Compiler); Lunn, Griffin

    2015-01-01

    Plants will be important for food and O2 production during long term human habitation in space. Recycling of nutrients (e.g., from waste materials) could reduce the resupply costs of fertilizers for growing these plants. Work at NASA's Kennedy Space Center has shown that ion exchange resins can extract fertilizer (plant essential nutrients) from human waste water, after which the residual brine could be treated with electrodialysis to recover more water and produce high value chemicals (e.g., acids and bases). In habitats with significant plant production, inedible biomass becomes a major source of solid waste. To "close the loop" we also need to recover useful nutrients and fertilizer from inedible biomass. We are investigating different approaches to retrieve nutrients from inedible plant biomass, including physical leaching with water, processing the biomass in bioreactors, changing the pH of leaching processing, and/or conducting multiple leaches of biomass residues.

  8. Prediction of the P-leaching potential of arable soils in areas with high livestock densities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WERNER Wilfried; TRIMBORN Manfred; PIHL Uwe

    2006-01-01

    Due to long-term positive P-balances many surface soils in areas with high livestock density in Germany are oversupplied with available P, creating a potential for vertical P losses by leaching. In extensive studies to characterize the endangering of ground water to P pollution by chemical soil parameters it is shown that the available P content and the P concentration of the soil solution in the deeper soil layers, as indicators of the P-leaching potential, cannot be satisfactorily predicted from the available P content of the topsoils. The P equilibrium concentration in the soil solution directly above ground water table or the pipe drainage system highly depends on the relative saturation of the P-sorption capacity in this layer. A saturation index of <20% normally corresponds with Pequilibrium concentrations of <0.2 mg P/L. Phytoremediation may reduce the P leaching potential of P-enriched soils only over a very long period.

  9. Leaching of copper concentrates using NaCl and soluble copper contributed by the own concentrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leaching of copper concentrates using cupric chloro complexes, generated in situ by the reaction between Cu(II), aported by the soluble copper content of the concentrate, and sodium chloride in acid media was studied. The concentrate samples were obtained from mineral processing plants from Antofagasta, Chile. Chemical and mineralogical characterization from original concentrates was made. Typical variable such as a chloride concentration, soluble copper concentration, leaching time, solid percentage and temperature were studied. DRX and EDS analyzed some of the residues. the experimental results indicated that it is possible to obtain solutions having high copper content (15 to 35 g/L) and 2 to 5 g/L free acid in order to submit this solution directly to a solvent extraction stage. The leaching tests use common reactive and low cost such as sodium chloride and sulfuric acid. (Author) 16 refs

  10. Arbuscular mycorrhizas reduce nitrogen loss via leaching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid R Asghari

    Full Text Available The capacity of mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal root systems to reduce nitrate (NO₃⁻ and ammonium (NH₄⁺ loss from soils via leaching was investigated in a microcosm-based study. A mycorrhiza defective tomato mutant and its mycorrhizal wildtype progenitor were used in this experiment in order to avoid the indirect effects of establishing non-mycorrhizal control treatments on soil nitrogen cycling and the wider soil biota. Mycorrhizal root systems dramatically reduced nitrate loss (almost 40 times less via leaching, compared to their non-mycorrhizal counterparts, following a pulse application of ammonium nitrate to experimental microcosms. The capacity of AM to reduce nutrient loss via leaching has received relatively little attention, but as demonstrated here, can be significant. Taken together, these data highlight the need to consider the potential benefits of AM beyond improvements in plant nutrition alone.

  11. Behavior of calcium silicate in leaching process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘桂华; 李小斌; 彭志宏; 周秋生

    2003-01-01

    Based on the thermodynamic calculation, the mole ratio of CaO to SiO2, temperature and A/S of bauxitehave a profound influence on the mole ratio of 2CaO @ SiO2 to CaO @ SiO2 in sinter. CaO @ SiO2 and β-2CaO @ SiO2appear stable in caustic solution but unstable in soda solution, and CaO @ SiO2 is more stable than β-2CaO @ SiO2 un-der the same leaching condition. Compared with the conventional sinter, the rate of alumina extraction of the newsinter is large and the secondary reaction is restricted in the leaching, which might be mainly due to the more contentof CaO @ SiO2 in sinter and better stability of CaO @ SiO2 in leaching.

  12. Leaching of vanadium from stone coal with sulfuric acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Mingyu; XIAO Liansheng; LI Qinggang; WANG Xuewen; XIANG Xiaoyan

    2009-01-01

    The effects of roasting, mass ratio of H2SO4 to stone coal, leaching temperature, liquid-to-solid ratio, grinding fineness of stone coal, and two-stage counter-current leaching on the vanadium leaching ratio were studied. The results show that the vanadium leaching ratio of roasted stone coal through two-stage counter-current leaching can reach 65.1% at the mass ratio of H2SO4 to stone coal of 20%, leaching temperature for the production of vanadium from stone coal.

  13. Chapter 3. Classical method of uranium leaching from ores and reasons for incomplete recovery at dumps of State Enterprise 'VOSTOKREDMET'. 3.3. Basic regularities of uranium ores leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present article is devoted to basic regularities of uranium ores leaching. It was found that the basic method of uranium ores enrichment and producing of reasonably rich and pure uranium concentrates (usually technical uranium oxide) is a chemical concentration concluded in selective uranium leaching from ore raw materials with further, uranium compounds - so called uranium chemical concentrates. Such reprocessing of uranium ores with the purpose of uranium chemical concentrates production, currently, are produced everywhere by hydrometallurgical methods. This method in comparison with enrichment and thermal reprocessing is a universal one. Hydrometallurgy - the part of chemical technology covering so called moist methods of metals and their compounds (in the current case, uranium) extraction from raw materials, where they are contained. It can be ores or ore concentrates produced by radiometric, gravitational, floatation enrichment, sometimes passed through high-temperature reprocessing or even industry wastes. The basic operation in hydrometallurgy is its important industrial element - metal or metals leaching as one or another compound. Leaching is conversion of one or several components to solution under impact of relevant technical solvents: water, water solutions, acids, alkali or base, solution of some salts and etc. The basic purpose of leaching in uranium technology is to obtain the most full and selective solution of uranium.

  14. Suitability of leaching test methods for fly ash and slag: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Kumar Tiwari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Fly ash and slag leachate pollution can be of great environmental concern due to generation of these wastes in huge quantities from their respective industrial units, mainly coal-based thermal power plants and iron and steel plants. For simulation of natural leaching in laboratory, various leaching methods are available, but selection of a method that can exactly simulate the real-life scenario for accurate estimation of various pollutants is challenging; particularly, the heavy metals present and impact due to reuse or disposal of these wastes. For choosing the most suitable leaching method according to specific situation, one must primarily consider the chemical and physical properties of wastes, the composition of the source, age of waste disposal, and the climatic conditions of the disposal area. Since these factors may not be specified, a variety of leaching methods with relevant equipment have been proposed by researchers; that are based on their required information to particular conditions in absence of a prescribed protocol and non standardization of equipment. The present review is an attempt to investigate the suitable leaching method for coal fly ash and slag.

  15. Leaching mechanisms of solidified low-level waste. The literature survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A literature survey on leaching mechanisms, available mathematical models and factors that affect leaching from solidified low-level radioactive waste (LLW) was compiled. Physicochemical mechanisms identified include diffusion, dissolution, ion exchange, corrosion and surface effects. Diffusion was generally considered to be the predominant mechanism in LLW leachability. However, this hierarchy of importance has been strongly questioned for waste forms containing soluble salts and has been shown to be invalid for waste forms incorporating sorbents which control the release of radionuclides by ion exchange. Leaching behavior was modeled both mathematically for curve fitting to leaching data and by consideration of physical and chemical interactions within and between solidification agents, waste materials and additives, if any. Physicochemical analyses of bitumen and polymer solidification agents have considered them to be inert encapsulants with limited water permeability. All of the mathematical models are derived from solutions to the diffusion equation. Other mechanistic processes are included as additional terms in the equation. No comprehensive evaluations of mathematical models for LLW based on curve fitting to data were found in the literature. Factors that affect leaching have been categorized as system factors, leachant factors and waste form factors. System factors include temperature, pressure, radiation, time and the ratio of waste form area to leachant volume. Leachant factors include pH, Eh, flow or replacement frequency and composition while waste form factors include composition, surface condition, porosity and surface area to volume ratio. Information from the literature is reported for each of these factors. 75 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  16. Optimization Study on the Leaching of High Iron-Bearing Zinc Calcine After Reduction Roasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Junwei; Liu, Wei; Qin, Wenqing; Zheng, Yongxing; Luo, Honglin

    2016-02-01

    The selective leaching of zinc from high iron-bearing zinc calcine after reduction roasting was optimized by Taguchi experimental design method. The experimental parameters and their ranges were 303 to 343 K (30 to 70 °C) for leaching temperature ( T), 7 to 15 mL/g for liquid/solid ratio ( L/ S), 70 to 150 g/L for H2SO4 concentration ( C), 5 to 25 minutes for time ( t), and 100 to 500 rpm for stirring speed ( R). The results show that the optimum conditions were 303 K (30 °C), 9 mL/g, 110 g/L, 20 minutes, and 400 rpm, respectively. Under these conditions, about 92.81 pct Zn was extracted and more than 86 pct Fe was reported into the leach residue. L/ S and C had significant effects on the extractions of zinc and iron, while t and R had no significant effects, and T had significant effect on iron extraction but negligible effect on zinc extraction. This indicates that diffusion was not a major control step of the leaching process, and the dissolution of iron was controlled by chemical reaction. The interactive effects of parameters were negligible. The leach residue was mainly composed of Fe3O4 and ZnS, and its particle size was very fine.

  17. Ag recovery from copper anode slime by acid leaching at atmospheric pressure to synthesize silver nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Atefeh Khaleghi; Sattar Ghader; Dariush Afzali

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, recovery of silver from anode slime of Sarcheshmeh copper complex in Iran and subsequent synthesis of silver nanoparticles from leaching solution is investigated. Sarcheshmeh anode slime is mainly consisted of Cu, Ag, Pb and Se. Amount of Ag in the considered anode slime was 5.4%(by weight). The goal was to recover as much as possible Ag from anode slime at atmospheric pressure to synthesize Ag nanoparticles. Therefore, acid leaching was used for this purpose. The anode slime was leached with sulfuric and nitric acid from room to 90 ?C at different acid concentrations and the run which yielded the most recovery of Ag was selected for Ag nanoparticles synthesis. At this condition, Cu, Pb and Se are lea-ched as well as Ag. To separate Ag from leach solution HCl was added and silver was precipitated as AgCl which were then dissolved by ammonia solution. The Ag nanoparticles are synthesized from this solution by chemical reduction method by aid of sodium borohydride in the presence of PVP and PEG as stabiliz-ers. The synthesized Ag nanoparticles showed a peak of 394 nm in UV-vis spectrum and TEM images showed a rather uniform Ag nanoparticles of 12 nm.

  18. Leaching of solidified TRU-contaminated incinerator ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leach rate and cumulative fractional releases of plutonium were determined for a series of laboratory-scale waste forms containing transuranic (TRU) contaminated incinerator ash. The solidification agents from which these waste forms were produced are commercially available materials for radioactive waste disposal. The leachants simulate groundwaters with chemical compositions that are indiginous to different geological media proposed for repositories. In this study TRU-contaminated ash was incorporated into waste forms fabricated with portland type I cement, urea-formaldehyde, polyester-styrene or Pioneer 221 bitumen. The ash was generated at the dual-chamber incinerator at the Rocky Flats Plant. These waste forms contained between 1.25 x 10-2 and 4.4 x 10-2 Ci (depending on the solidification agent) of mixed TRU isotopes comprised primarily of 239Pu and 240Pu. Five leachant solutions were prepared consisting of: (1) demineralized water, (2) simulated brine, (3) simplified sodium-dominated groundwater (30 meq NaCl/liter), (4) simplified calcium-dominated groundwater (30 meq CaCl2/liter), and (5) simplified bicarbonate-dominated groundwater (30 meq NaHCO3/liter). Cumulative fractional releases were found to vary significantly with different leachants and solidification agents. In all cases waste forms leached in brine gave the lowest leach rates. Urea-formaldehyde had the greatest release of radionuclides while polyester-styrene and portland cement had approximately equivalent fractional releases. Cement cured for 210 days retained radionuclides three times more effectively than cement cured only 30 days

  19. Recycling process for recovery of gallium from GaN an e-waste of LED industry through ball milling, annealing and leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waste dust generated during manufacturing of LED contains significant amounts of gallium and indium, needs suitable treatment and can be an important resource for recovery. The LED industry waste dust contains primarily gallium as GaN. Leaching followed by purification technology is the green and clean technology. To develop treatment and recycling technology of these GaN bearing e-waste, leaching is the primary stage. In our current investigation possible process for treatment and quantitative leaching of gallium and indium from the GaN bearing e-waste or waste of LED industry dust has been developed. To recycle the waste and quantitative leaching of gallium, two different process flow sheets have been proposed. In one, process first the GaN of the waste the LED industry dust was leached at the optimum condition. Subsequently, the leach residue was mixed with Na2CO3, ball milled followed by annealing, again leached to recover gallium. In the second process, the waste LED industry dust was mixed with Na2CO3, after ball milling and annealing, followed acidic leaching. Without pretreatment, the gallium leaching was only 4.91 w/w % using 4 M HCl, 100 °C and pulp density of 20 g/L. After mechano-chemical processing, both these processes achieved 73.68 w/w % of gallium leaching at their optimum condition. The developed process can treat and recycle any e-waste containing GaN through ball milling, annealing and leaching. - Highlights: • Simplest process for treatment of GaN an LED industry waste developed. • The process developed recovers gallium from waste LED waste dust. • Thermal analysis and phase properties of GaN to Ga2O3 and GaN to NaGaO2 revealed. • Solid-state chemistry involved in this process reported. • Quantitative leaching of the GaN was achieved

  20. Long-term leaching from MSWI air-pollution-control residues: leaching characterization and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyks, Jiri; Astrup, Thomas; Christensen, Thomas H

    2009-02-15

    Long-term leaching of Ca, Fe, Mg, K, Na, S, Al, As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn, Mo, Sb, Si, Sn, Sr, Ti, V, P, Cl, and dissolved organic carbon from two different municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) air-pollution-control residues was monitored during 24 months of column percolation experiments; liquid-to-solid (L/S) ratios of 200-250L/kg corresponding to more than 10,000 years in a conventional landfill were reached. Less than 2% of the initially present As, Cu, Pb, Zn, Cr, and Sb had leached during the course of the experiments. Concentrations of Cd, Fe, Mg, Hg, Mn, Ni, Co, Sn, Ti, and P were generally bellow 1microg/L; overall less than 1% of their mass leached. Column leaching data were further used in a two-step geochemical modeling in PHREEQC in order to (i) identify solubility controlling minerals and (ii) evaluate their interactions in a water-percolated column system over L/S of 250L/kg. Adequate predictions of pH, alkalinity, and the leaching of Ca, S, Al, Si, Ba, and Zn were obtained in a simultaneous calculation. Also, it was suggested that removal of Ca and S together with depletion of several minerals apparently caused dissolution of ettringite-like phases. In turn, significant increase in leaching of oxyanions (especially Sb and Cr) was observed at late stage of leaching experiments. PMID:18583034

  1. Alkaline leaching of metal melting industry wastes dseparation of zinc and lead in the leach solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In this work, a thorough examinations on the extractability of zinc and lead present in the steelmaking dusts using alkaline leaching process and the effectiveness of the zinc and lead separation in the resultant leaching solutions using sulfide precipitation method were made. It was found that only about 53% of zinc and over 70% of the lead could be leached out of the dusts, while the other 47% of zinc and 306 of lead were left in the leaching residues. The zinc and lead in the resultant leaching solution can be effectively and selectively separated. When the weight ratio of sodium sulfide (M. W. = 222-240) to Pb was kept at 1.8, the lead in the solution could be precipitated out quantitatively while all the zinc was remained in the solution. The zinc left in the solution can be further recovered by the addition of extra sodium sulfide with a weight ratio of sodium sulfide to the zinc over 2.6. The resultant filtrate can be recycled to the leaching of dust in the next leaching process.

  2. Leaching of nuclear power reactor waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The leaching tests for immobilized power reactor wastes carried out at IPEN are described. These wastes forms consist mainly of spent resins and boric acid concentrates solidified in ordinary Portland cement. All tests were conducted according to the ISO and IAEA recommendations. Three years leaching results are reported. The cesium diffuvity coefficients determined out of these results are about 1 x 10-8 cm2/s for boric acid waste form and 9 x 10-9 cm2/s for ion-exchange resin waste. Strontium diffusivity coefficients found are about 3 x 10-11 cm2/s and 9 x 10-11 cm2/s respectively. (Author)

  3. Selective oxidation of uranium in situ leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on O2, NcC103, H2O2, NaOCl and Ce+4 which have been examined as oxidants in an alkaline carbonate system for uranium in in-situ leaching. The South Texas and New Mexico ores contained up to 2.6 meq/g of reducing compounds which consume oxidants in the leading operation. Leaching rates did not increase linearly with the oxidation potential of the oxidants. A mild oxidant can be used to maximize uranium oxidation selectively and oxidant efficiency. O2 can oxidize most of the uranium mineral with an adequate rate and high oxidant efficiency

  4. Physicochemical bases of underground leaching process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Physicochemical bases of uranium underground leaching (UL) from ores are considered. The UL process is generally characterized. Advantages and disadvantages of acidic and carbonate leaching techniques are discussed. UO2 oxidation and solution using oxygen and MnO2 as oxidizers in the presence of 3+Fe catalysts and nitrogen oxides, are considered. The data on the solvent interaction with ore and enclosing rock components are given. The mechanisms and kinetic regularities of extracting uranium from ores with natural and artificial permeability are described as well as the mechanisms and kinetic regularities of the process of dissolved uranium absorption by ore-free rocks

  5. Nitrate leaching in an Andisol treated with different types of fertilizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrate leaching in upland fields under Japanese conditions may be reduced by substituting compost or slow-release fertilizer for readily available chemical fertilizer. - Nitrate (NO3) leaching was studied in an Andisol treated with four N fertilizers (SC: swine compost, CU: coated urea, AN: ammonium N, or NF: no fertilizer) for 7 years. Sweet corn (Zea mays L.) was grown in summer, followed by Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa L. var. amplexicaulis) or cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata) in autumn each year. In chemical fertilizer plots treated with AN or CU, NO3-N concentrations in soil water at 1-m depth increased markedly in the summer of the second year and fluctuated between 30 and 60 mg l-1. In the SC plot, NO3-N concentration started increasing in the fourth year, reaching the same level as in the AN and CU plots in the late period of the experiment. In the NF plot, NO3-N concentration was about 10 mg l-1 for the first 4 years and decreased to 5 mg l-1. The potential NO3-N concentrations by an N and water balance equation satisfactorily predicted NO3-N concentration in the AN and CU plots, but substantially overestimated that in the SC plot, presumably because a large portion of N from SC first accumulated in soil in the organic form. Our results indicate that, under the Japanese climate (Asian monsoon), excessive N from chemical fertilizers applied to Andisols can cause substantial NO3 leaching, while compost application is promising to establish high yields and low N leaching during a few years but would cause the same level of NO3 leaching as in chemically fertilized plots over longer periods

  6. Nitrate leaching in an Andisol treated with different types of fertilizers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, Morihiro; Zhao Bingzi; Ozaki, Yasuo; Yoneyama, Tadakatsu

    2003-03-01

    Nitrate leaching in upland fields under Japanese conditions may be reduced by substituting compost or slow-release fertilizer for readily available chemical fertilizer. - Nitrate (NO{sub 3}) leaching was studied in an Andisol treated with four N fertilizers (SC: swine compost, CU: coated urea, AN: ammonium N, or NF: no fertilizer) for 7 years. Sweet corn (Zea mays L.) was grown in summer, followed by Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa L. var. amplexicaulis) or cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata) in autumn each year. In chemical fertilizer plots treated with AN or CU, NO{sub 3}-N concentrations in soil water at 1-m depth increased markedly in the summer of the second year and fluctuated between 30 and 60 mg l{sup -1}. In the SC plot, NO{sub 3}-N concentration started increasing in the fourth year, reaching the same level as in the AN and CU plots in the late period of the experiment. In the NF plot, NO{sub 3}-N concentration was about 10 mg l{sup -1} for the first 4 years and decreased to 5 mg l{sup -1}. The potential NO{sub 3}-N concentrations by an N and water balance equation satisfactorily predicted NO{sub 3}-N concentration in the AN and CU plots, but substantially overestimated that in the SC plot, presumably because a large portion of N from SC first accumulated in soil in the organic form. Our results indicate that, under the Japanese climate (Asian monsoon), excessive N from chemical fertilizers applied to Andisols can cause substantial NO{sub 3} leaching, while compost application is promising to establish high yields and low N leaching during a few years but would cause the same level of NO{sub 3} leaching as in chemically fertilized plots over longer periods.

  7. Ion mobility based on column leaching of South African gold tailings dam with chemometric evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukrowska, Ewa M; Govender, Koovila; Viljoen, Morris

    2004-07-01

    New column leaching experiments were designed and used as an alternative rapid screening approach to element mobility assessment. In these experiments, field-moist material was treated with an extracting solution to assess the effects of acidification on element mobility in mine tailings. The main advantage of this version of column leaching experiments with partitioned segments is that they give quick information on current element mobility in conditions closely simulating field conditions to compare with common unrepresentative air-dried, sieved samples used for column leaching experiments. Layers from the tailings dump material were sampled and packed into columns. The design of columns allows extracting leachates from each layer. The extracting solutions used were natural (pH 6.8) and acidified (pH 4.2) rainwater. Metals and anions were determined in the leachates. The concentrations of metals (Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn, Al, Cr, Ni, Co, Zn, and Cu) in sample leachates were determined using ICP OES. The most important anions (NO3-, Cl-, and SO4(2)-) were determined using the closed system izotacophoresis ITP analyser. The chemical analytical data from tailings leaching and physico-chemical data from field measurements (including pH, conductivity, redox potential, temperature) were used for chemometric evaluation of element mobility. Principal factor analysis (PFA) was used to evaluate ions mobility from different layers of tailings dump arising from varied pH and redox conditions. It was found that the results from the partitioned column leaching illustrate much better complex processes of metals mobility from tailings dump than the total column. The chemometric data analysis (PFA) proofed the differences in the various layers leachability that are arising from physico-chemical processes due to chemical composition of tailings dump deposit. PMID:15109878

  8. Chronic allograft rejection: A significant hurdle to transplant success

    OpenAIRE

    Malgorzata Kloc; Ghobrial, Rafik M.

    2014-01-01

    The state-of-the-art immunosuppression drugs do not ensure indefinite transplant survival, and most transplants are continuously lost to chronic rejection even years posttransplantation. This form of rejection is responsible for long-term failure of transplanted organs. The mechanisms involved in development of chronic rejection are not well-understood. One of the main features of chronic rejection is progressive luminal narrowing of graft vessels, which results in compromised blood flow, isc...

  9. Acute Rejection and Humoral Sensitization in Lung Transplant Recipients

    OpenAIRE

    Martinu, Tereza; Chen, Dong-Feng; Palmer, Scott M

    2009-01-01

    Despite the recent introduction of many improved immunosuppressive agents for use in transplantation, acute rejection affects up to 55% of lung transplant recipients within the first year after transplant. Acute lung allograft rejection is defined as perivascular or peribronchiolar mononuclear inflammation. Although histopathologic signs of rejection often resolve with treatment, the frequency and severity of acute rejections represent the most important risk factor for the subsequent develop...

  10. Characteristics of cadaveric renal allograft recipients developing chronic rejection.

    OpenAIRE

    Foster, M. C.; Rowe, P. A.; Dennis, M J; Morgan, A G; Burden, R. P.; Blamey, R. W.

    1990-01-01

    As the early results of renal transplantation improve, chronic rejection is increasing in relative importance as a cause of graft loss. The aetiology of the condition is unknown. In order to identify possible predisposing factors, the characteristics of 22 patients with chronic rejection were compared with those of 50 patients with stable graft function 2 years or more after transplantation. Patients with chronic rejection had significantly more acute rejection episodes in the first 6 months ...

  11. Rejection Pathways in Heart Transplant Recipients

    OpenAIRE

    Besouw, Nicole

    1999-01-01

    textabstractSince the beginning of this century experimental heart transplantations in animal studies were performed.' These studies were started in Rotterdam in the seventies to compare heterotopic and orthotopic heart transplantations, and to study the process of chronic rejection. The history of the first human heart transplantation started in South-Africa and it was carried out by Barnard in 1967. Several cardiac surgeons around the world initiated new transplantation programmes. However,...

  12. Life cycle assessment and residue leaching: The importance of parameter, scenario and leaching data selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allegrini, E., E-mail: elia@env.dtu.dk [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Environmental Engineering, Building 115, 2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Butera, S. [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Environmental Engineering, Building 115, 2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Kosson, D.S. [Vanderbilt University, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Box 1831 Station B, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Van Zomeren, A. [Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN), Department of Environmental Risk Assessment, P.O. Box 1, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Van der Sloot, H.A. [Hans van der Sloot Consultancy, Dorpsstraat 216, 1721 BV Langedijk (Netherlands); Astrup, T.F. [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Environmental Engineering, Building 115, 2800 Lyngby (Denmark)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Relevance of metal leaching in waste management system LCAs was assessed. • Toxic impacts from leaching could not be disregarded. • Uncertainty of toxicity, due to background activities, determines LCA outcomes. • Parameters such as pH and L/S affect LCA results. • Data modelling consistency and coverage within an LCA are crucial. - Abstract: Residues from industrial processes and waste management systems (WMSs) have been increasingly reutilised, leading to landfilling rate reductions and the optimisation of mineral resource utilisation in society. Life cycle assessment (LCA) is a holistic methodology allowing for the analysis of systems and products and can be applied to waste management systems to identify environmental benefits and critical aspects thereof. From an LCA perspective, residue utilisation provides benefits such as avoiding the production and depletion of primary materials, but it can lead to environmental burdens, due to the potential leaching of toxic substances. In waste LCA studies where residue utilisation is included, leaching has generally been neglected. In this study, municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash (MSWI BA) was used as a case study into three LCA scenarios having different system boundaries. The importance of data quality and parameter selection in the overall LCA results was evaluated, and an innovative method to assess metal transport into the environment was applied, in order to determine emissions to the soil and water compartments for use in an LCA. It was found that toxic impacts as a result of leaching were dominant in systems including only MSWI BA utilisation, while leaching appeared negligible in larger scenarios including the entire waste system. However, leaching could not be disregarded a priori, due to large uncertainties characterising other activities in the scenario (e.g. electricity production). Based on the analysis of relevant parameters relative to leaching, and on general results

  13. Life cycle assessment and residue leaching: The importance of parameter, scenario and leaching data selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Relevance of metal leaching in waste management system LCAs was assessed. • Toxic impacts from leaching could not be disregarded. • Uncertainty of toxicity, due to background activities, determines LCA outcomes. • Parameters such as pH and L/S affect LCA results. • Data modelling consistency and coverage within an LCA are crucial. - Abstract: Residues from industrial processes and waste management systems (WMSs) have been increasingly reutilised, leading to landfilling rate reductions and the optimisation of mineral resource utilisation in society. Life cycle assessment (LCA) is a holistic methodology allowing for the analysis of systems and products and can be applied to waste management systems to identify environmental benefits and critical aspects thereof. From an LCA perspective, residue utilisation provides benefits such as avoiding the production and depletion of primary materials, but it can lead to environmental burdens, due to the potential leaching of toxic substances. In waste LCA studies where residue utilisation is included, leaching has generally been neglected. In this study, municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash (MSWI BA) was used as a case study into three LCA scenarios having different system boundaries. The importance of data quality and parameter selection in the overall LCA results was evaluated, and an innovative method to assess metal transport into the environment was applied, in order to determine emissions to the soil and water compartments for use in an LCA. It was found that toxic impacts as a result of leaching were dominant in systems including only MSWI BA utilisation, while leaching appeared negligible in larger scenarios including the entire waste system. However, leaching could not be disregarded a priori, due to large uncertainties characterising other activities in the scenario (e.g. electricity production). Based on the analysis of relevant parameters relative to leaching, and on general results

  14. Autophagy in allografts rejection: A new direction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hukui; Cheng, Dayan; Ma, Yuanyuan; Wang, Huaiquan; Liang, Ting; Hou, Guihua

    2016-03-18

    Despite the introduction of new and effective immunosuppressive drugs, acute cellular graft rejection is still a major risk for graft survival. Modulating the dosage of immunosuppressive drugs is not a good choice for all patients, new rejection mechanisms discovery are crucial to limit the inflammatory process and preserve the function of the transplant. Autophagy, a fundamental cellular process, can be detected in all subsets of lymphocytes and freshly isolated naive T lymphocytes. It is required for the homeostasis and function of T lymphocytes, which lead to cell survival or cell death depending on the context. T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation and costimulator signals induce strong autophagy, and autophagy deficient T cells leads to rampant apoptosis upon TCR stimulation. Autophagy has been proved to be activated during ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury and associated with grafts dysfunction. Furthermore, Autophagy has also emerged as a key mechanism in orchestrating innate and adaptive immune response to self-antigens, which relates with negative selection and Foxp3(+) Treg induction. Although, the role of autophagy in allograft rejection is unknown, current data suggest that autophagy indeed sweeps across both in the graft organs and recipients lymphocytes after transplantation. This review presents the rationale for the hypothesis that targeting the autophagy pathway could be beneficial in promoting graft survival after transplantation. PMID:26876576

  15. Allograft renal rejection and chemokine polymorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Gorgi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines play a major role in the process by which leukocytes are recruited from the bloodstream into the sites of inflammation. Genes for the chemokine receptors CCR5, CCR2 and MCP-1 are characterized by functional polymorphisms implicated in transplant rejection. To investigate this association, we analyzed polymorphisms of CCR5-∆32, CCR5-59029-A/G, CCR2-V64I and MCP-1 G/A (-2518 in 173 renal transplant recipients and 169 healthy blood donors. The patients were classified in two groups: Group-1 (G-1 included 33 HLA-identical recipients and Group-2 (G-2 included 140 (one or more mismatched graft recipients. Forty-two patients had developed acute rejection episodes (ARs: seven in G-1 and 35 in G-2. Thirteen G-2 patients developed chronic allograft dysfunction (CAD. The genotypic and allelic frequencies of all polymorphisms studied did not reveal significant differences between patients and controls and among G-1 and G-2 recipients. However, a significant risk of acute renal transplant rejection was found in G-1 patients who possessed the CCR2-64I allele (odds ratio 0.24, 95% confidence inter-val [CI], 0.05-1.06; P = 0.035. There was no significant association of this polymorphism and CAD. In conclusion, the observed association of CCR2-64I with AR should be added to the spectrum of immunogenetic factors known to be involved in allograft renal loss.

  16. PEP Support: Laboratory Scale Leaching and Permeate Stability Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Renee L.; Peterson, Reid A.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Buchmiller, William C.

    2010-05-21

    This report documents results from a variety of activities requested by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The activities related to caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, permeate precipitation behavior of waste as well as chromium (Cr) leaching are: • Model Input Boehmite Leaching Tests • Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) Support Leaching Tests • PEP Parallel Leaching Tests • Precipitation Study Results • Cr Caustic and Oxidative Leaching Tests. Leaching test activities using the PEP simulant provided input to a boehmite dissolution model and determined the effect of temperature on mass loss during caustic leaching, the reaction rate constant for the boehmite dissolution, and the effect of aeration in enhancing the chromium dissolution during caustic leaching. Other tests were performed in parallel with the PEP tests to support the development of scaling factors for caustic and oxidative leaching. Another study determined if precipitate formed in the wash solution after the caustic leach in the PEP. Finally, the leaching characteristics of different chromium compounds under different conditions were examined to determine the best one to use in further testing.

  17. Coal fly ash interaction with environmental fluids: Geochemical and strontium isotope results from combined column and batch leaching experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Element release during fly ash extraction experiments controlled by mineralogy. ► Strontium isotopes in fly ash are not homogenized during coal combustion. ► Element correlations with 87Sr/86Sr indicate chemically resistant silicate phase. ► Sr isotopes can uniquely identify fly ash fluids leaking into the environment. - Abstract: The major element and Sr isotope systematics and geochemistry of coal fly ash and its interactions with environmental waters were investigated using laboratory flow-through column leaching experiments (sodium carbonate, acetic acid, nitric acid) and sequential batch leaching experiments (water, acetic acid, hydrochloric acid). Column leaching of Class F fly ash samples shows rapid release of most major elements early in the leaching procedure, suggesting an association of these elements with soluble and surface bound phases. Delayed release of certain elements (e.g., Al, Fe, Si) signals gradual dissolution of more resistant silicate or glass phases as leaching continues. Strontium isotope results from both column and batch leaching experiments show a marked increase in 87Sr/86Sr ratio with continued leaching, yielding a total range of values from 0.7107 to 0.7138. For comparison, the isotopic composition of fluid output from a fly ash impoundment in West Virginia falls in a narrow range around 0.7124. The experimental data suggest the presence of a more resistant, highly radiogenic silicate phase that survives the combustion process and is leached after the more soluble minerals are removed. Strontium isotopic homogenization of minerals in coal does not always occur during the combustion process, despite the high temperatures encountered in the boiler. Early-released Sr tends to be isotopically uniform; thus the Sr isotopic composition of fly ash could be distinguishable from other sources and is a useful tool for quantifying the possible contribution of fly ash leaching to the total dissolved load in natural surface

  18. Concentration-Purification of Uranium from an Acid Leaching Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guettaf, H.; Becis, A.; Ferhat, K.; Hanou, K.; Bouchiha, D.; Yakoubi, K.; Ferrad, F.

    2009-11-01

    Chemical processes for the elaboration of uranium concentrate from uranium ore have been studied. This process is composed of successive units operations: crushing, milling, acid conventional leaching, filtration-washing, purification-concentration by ion exchange resins and uranium precipitation. The acid leaching operating conditions allow us to obtain a recovery uranium rate of 93%. The uranium concentration of the pregnant solution is approximately of 1.2 g/l. This value justifies the use of ion exchange resins to the concentration-purification of our pregnant solution. We have noticed that the pregnant solution contains a relatively high phosphate concentration which causes a premature uranium precipitation at pH=1.8. This pH value is in general, considered optimal to obtain the highest amount of fixed uranium by the anionic resin. To avoid the precipitation of uranium, the pH=1.5 has been fixed. We have obtained at this condition a good adsorption capacity. A 75% uranium concentrate have been elaborated, but the filtration of this concentrate has been very difficult. We have also noticed an excessive sulphate concentration. In order to improve this process, we have tested nitrates as eluant at different operating conditions.

  19. Leaching of Main Elements of Glass Immersed in Beishan Groundwater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>The leaching quantities of the elements from the HLW are very important parameters for the safety assessments of the repository of high level radioactive wastes. It is necessary to study the leaching

  20. Spent LWR fuel leach tests: Waste Isolation Safety Assessment program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent light-water-reactor (LWR) fuels with burnups of 54.5, 28 and 9 MWd/kgU were leach-tested in deionized water at 250C. Fuel burnup has no apparent effect on the calculated leach rates based upon the behavior of 137Cs and 239+240Pu. A leach test of 54.5 MWd/kgU spent fuel in synthetic sea brine showed that the cesium-based leach rate is lower in sea brine than in deionized water. A rise in the leach rate was observed after approximately 600 d of cumulative leaching. During the rise, the leach rate for all the measured radionuclides become nearly equal. Evidence suggests that exposure of new surfaces to the leachant may cause the increase. As a result, experimental work to study leaching mechanisms of spent fuel has been initiated. 22 figures

  1. Heap leaching of clay ish uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes an experimental facility, built near El Lobo mine. In it we study the beneficiation of low-grade uranium ore. The mineral has a great amount of clay and fines. The flow-sheet used has four steps: head leaching, ph-ajustement, ion-exchange and participation. We show, also, the most interesting results. (Author)

  2. Study of ground and unground leached vermiculite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maqueda, C.; Perez-Rodriguez, J. L.; Šubrt, Jan; Murafa, Nataliya

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 44, 1-2 (2009), s. 178-184. ISSN 0169-1317 Grant ostatní: CICYT(ES) AGL-2005-0164 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : vermiculite * amorphous silica * acid leaching Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.784, year: 2009

  3. Impurity leaching rates of 1000 liter growth tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnham, A; Floyd, R; Robey, H F; Torres, R

    1999-02-19

    This memo reports on the analysis of some recent measurements of solution impurity levels in the three KDP and one DKDP Pilot Production 1000 liter growth tanks (Tanks B, C, D, & F). Solution samples were taken on a weekly basis during recent crystal growth runs in each tank and were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy (ICP-ES). The solution history for five specific elements, Si, B, Al, Fe and Ca will be analyzed in detail. The first four of these elements are input into solution via slow dissolution of the glass vessel at a rate which is strongly dependent on the solution temperature. Si and B continuously accumulate in solution, since they are not incorporated into the crystal. Al and Fe by comparison are incorporated into the crystal (primarily the prismatic sectors) and present problems to inclusion-free growth (Al) and 30 damage (Fe). The level of these impurities initially increases when the crystal size is small but later decreases when the rate of incorporation into the crystal exceeds the rate of dissolution of the glass tank. The last element, Ca is of interest since it has recently been observed to be one of the elements found at the location of 3cu damage. For Si and B, the dissolution or leach rate from the glass tank is easily obtained from the results of the chemical analysis. The temperature dependent leach rates are shown to be comparable (within a factor of two) for all four tanks, with Tank B (DKDP) having the lowest rate of Si accumulation. The glass leach rates of the two incorporating elements Al and Fe require substantially more analysis as the daily variation of the crystal dimensions, the solution concentration, and the mass of KDP remaining in solution must be taken into account in order to separate the rate of impurity incorporation from the rate of dissolution of the glass. The method for accomplishing this separation is described, and the result obtained is that the leach rates of all four tanks are within a

  4. Mineralogy and uranium leaching of ores from Triassic Peribaltic sandstones

    OpenAIRE

    Gajda, Dorota; Kiegiel, Katarzyna; Zakrzewska-Koltuniewicz, Grazyna; Chajduk, Ewelina; Bartosiewicz, Iwona; Wolkowicz, Stanislaw

    2014-01-01

    The recovery of uranium and other valuable metals from Polish Peribaltic sandstones were examined. The solid–liquid extraction is the first stage of the technology of uranium production and it is crucial for the next stages of processing. In the laboratory experiments uranium was leached with efficiencies 71–100 % by acidic lixiviants. Satisfactory results were obtained for the alkaline leaching process. Almost 100 % of uranium was leached with alkaline carbonate solution. In post leaching so...

  5. A study of extracting uranium by intensified alkaline heap leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new technique of extracting uranium by intensified alkaline heap leaching was presented to treat a uranium ore of high carbonate content. A lixiviant, high concentration of alkaline solution, reacts with the ore prior to heap making for some time at a certain temperature,reducing the leaching time remarkably. With this technique, the leaching rate of uranium increased from 50% to 90% or above and the leaching time decreased from 64 days to 12 days. (authors)

  6. Response of leaching from mire ecosystems to changing climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objectives of this subproject of SUOSILMU are to determine the role of leaching and retention in the long-term mass balance of mires, the primary regulators in the leaching process and the manner in which climatic change affects the rates of leaching from peatlands. This report focuses on the leaching rates of organic carbon, nitrogen and sulphur from the research sites of Lakkasuo, one of the main research objects of SUOSILMU

  7. Enhancements of LEACH Algorithm for Wireless Networks: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Madheswaran

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Low Energy Adaptive Clustering Hierarchy (LEACH protocol is the first hierarchical cluster based routing protocol successfully used in the Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN. In this paper, various enhancements used in the original LEACH protocol are examined. The basic operations, advantages and limitations of the modified LEACH algorithms are compared to identify the research issues to be solved and to give the suggestions for the future proposed routing algorithms of wireless networks based on LEACH routing algorithm.

  8. 4.2. Technological conditions and kinetics of leaching process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optimal technological conditions of leaching process was defined. The rates of Al2O3 extraction at different technological conditions of leaching were considered. The kinetics of leaching process was studied under isothermal conditions at temperature intervals 20-80 deg C during 10-60 min. The dependence of rate extraction of Al2O3 on time at different leaching temperatures was studied.

  9. Chemical processing of lunar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criswell, D. R.; Waldron, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    The paper highlights recent work on the general problem of processing lunar materials. The discussion covers lunar source materials, refined products, motivations for using lunar materials, and general considerations for a lunar or space processing plant. Attention is given to chemical processing through various techniques, including electrolysis of molten silicates, carbothermic/silicothermic reduction, carbo-chlorination process, NaOH basic-leach process, and HF acid-leach process. Several options for chemical processing of lunar materials are well within the state of the art of applied chemistry and chemical engineering to begin development based on the extensive knowledge of lunar materials.

  10. Two cases of hepatobiliary scintigraphy of liver transplantation in rejection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanegawa, Kimio; Nishiyama, Syouji; Muraji, Toshihiro (Kobe Children' s Hospital, Hyogo (Japan)); Ishii, Kazunari; Kouno, Michio

    1992-04-01

    We report two patients with liver transplantation who underwent hepatobiliary scintigraphy in rejection. In the first patient, hepatobiliary scintigraphy showed dilatation of bile duct but it showed good clearance from the liver. In the second patient, hepatobiliary scintigraphy showed delayed clearance from the liver. Both patients recovered from rejection. There were four main complications, including vascular and biliary abnormality, infection, and rejection, after liver transplantation. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy showed almost the same findings except for biliary complication, so it was difficult to distinguish between infection and rejection. But hepatobiliary scintigraphy may be useful to evaluate transplanted liver function in rejection. (author).

  11. Two cases of hepatobiliary scintigraphy of liver transplantation in rejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report two patients with liver transplantation who underwent hepatobiliary scintigraphy in rejection. In the first patient, hepatobiliary scintigraphy showed dilatation of bile duct but it showed good clearance from the liver. In the second patient, hepatobiliary scintigraphy showed delayed clearance from the liver. Both patients recovered from rejection. There were four main complications, including vascular and biliary abnormality, infection, and rejection, after liver transplantation. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy showed almost the same findings except for biliary complication, so it was difficult to distinguish between infection and rejection. But hepatobiliary scintigraphy may be useful to evaluate transplanted liver function in rejection. (author)

  12. Physical mechanisms of plant roots affecting weathering and leaching of loess soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Yong; ZHANG; Qingwen; WAN; Guojiang; HUANG; Ronggui; PIAO; Hechun; BAI; Lingyu; LI; Lu

    2006-01-01

    Plant roots have potential impacts on soil mineral weathering and leaching. Our objective is to understand the physical mechanisms of plant roots affecting weathering and leaching of loess soil. Root densities were measured through the method of a large-size dug profile, and transport fluxes of soil elements were determined using an undisturbed monolith soil infiltration device on the hilly and gully regions of the Chinese Loess Plateau. The results show that the improvement effects of soil environment by plant roots are mainly controlled by the density and weight of the fibrous roots with the diameters less than 1 mm. Plant roots have the stronger effects on soil physical properties than chemical properties. The principal components analysis (PCA) indicates that soil physical properties by plant roots account for 56.7% of variations in soil environment whereas soil chemical properties and pH contribute about 24.2% of the soil variations. The roles of plant roots in controlling soil weathering and leaching increased in the following order: infiltration enhancement > increase of bioactive substance > stabilization of soil structure. The effects of plant roots on soil mineral weathering and leaching can be quantified using the multiple regression models with the high prediction accuracies developed in this study.

  13. 300 Area Uranium Leach and Adsorption Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to measure the leaching and adsorption characteristics of uranium in six near-surface sediment samples collected from the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. Scanning electron micrographs of the samples showed that the uranium contamination in the sediments is most likely present as co-precipitates and/or discrete uranium particles. Molecular probe techniques also confirm the presence of crystalline discrete uranium bearing phases. In all cases, the uranium is present as oxidized uranium (uranyl [U(VI)]). Results from the column leach tests showed that uranium leaching did not follow a constant solubility paradigm. Four of the five contaminated sediments showed a large near instantaneous release of a few percent of the total uranium followed by a slower continual release. Steady-state uranium leachate concentrations were never measured and leaching characteristics and trends were not consistent among the samples. Dissolution kinetics were slow, and the measured leach curves most likely represent a slow kinetically controlled desorption or dissolution paradigm. Batch adsorption experiments were performed to investigate the effect of pH and uranium and carbonate solution concentrations on uranium adsorption onto the uncontaminated sediment. Uranium adsorption Kd values ranged from 0 to > 100 ml/g depending on which solution parameter was being adjusted. Results of the experiments showed that carbonate solution concentration has the greatest impact on uranium adsorption in the 300 Area. Solution pH was shown to be important in laboratory tests; however, the sediment will dominate the field pH and minimize its overall effect in the 300 Area sediments. Results also showed that uranium sorption onto the background sediment is linear up to uranium concentrations of 3 mg/L, well above the values found in the upper unconfined aquifer. Therefore, the linear Kd model is defensible in predicting the fate of uranium in the 300 Area aquifer

  14. Mitigating Agricultural Phosphorus Leaching : The Effect of Timing in Grass Harvesting in Mitigating Wintertime Phosphorus Leaching

    OpenAIRE

    Yli-Heikkilä, Katariina

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to study how much the above-ground grass biomass, harvested at different times during the growing season, contains phosphorus at the end of the growing season, and how much of it is leached after freezing and thawing. The study aims to give information about the ideal time for grass harvesting in order to mitigate the wintertime phosphorus leaching. The grass biomass was harvested from managed uncultivated arable field at MTT Agrifood Research Centre experi...

  15. Leaching of used CANDU fuel: Results from a 19-year leach test under oxidizing conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fuel leaching experiment has been in progress since 1977 to study the dissolution behavior of used CANDU fuel in aerated aqueous solution. The experiment involves exposure of 50-mm clad segments of an outer element of a Pickering fuel bundle (burnup 610 GJ/kg U; linear and peak power ratings 53 and 58 kW/m, respectively), to deionized distilled water (DDH2O, ∼2 mg/L carbonate) and tapwater (∼50 mg/L carbonate). In 1992, it was observed that the fuel in at least one of the leaching solutions showed some signs of deterioration and, therefore, in 1993, parts of the fuel samples were sacrificed for a detailed analysis of the physical state of the fuel, using SEM and optical microscopy. Leaching results to date show that even after >6900 days only 5 to 7.7% of the total calculated inventory of 137Cs has leached out preferentially and that leach rates suggest a development towards congruent dissolution. Total amounts of 137Cs and 90Sr leached are slightly larger in tapwater than in DDH2O. SEM examinations of leached fuel surface fragments indicate that the fuel surface exposed to DDH2O is covered in a needle-like precipitate. The fuel surface exposed to tapwater shows evidence of leaching but no precipitate, likely because uranium is kept in solution by carbonate. Detailed optical and SEM microscopy examinations on fuel cross sections suggest that grain-boundary dissolution in DDH2O is not prevalent, and in tapwater appears to be limited to the outer ∼0.5 mm (pellet/cladding) region of the fuel. Grain boundary attack seems to be limited to microcracks at or near the surface of the fuel. It thus appears that grain-boundary attack occurs only near the fuel pellet surface and is prevalent only in the presence of carbonate in solution

  16. LEACHING AND SELECTED HYDRAULIC PROPERTIES OF PROCESSED OIL SHALES

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report describes a column leaching test procedure developed to simulate the leaching of high volume wastes under semi-arid field conditions. The report also presents results obtained when retorted oil shales (Tosco, Paraho, Lurgi) are leached by this procedure. Selected hydr...

  17. Pesticide leaching through sandy and loamy fields - long-term lessons learnt from the Danish Pesticide Leaching Assessment Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbom, Annette E; Olsen, Preben; Plauborg, Finn; Grant, Ruth; Juhler, René K; Brüsch, Walter; Kjær, Jeanne

    2015-06-01

    The European Union authorization procedure for pesticides includes an assessment of the leaching risk posed by pesticides and their degradation products (DP) with the aim of avoiding any unacceptable influence on groundwater. Twelve-year's results of the Danish Pesticide Leaching Assessment Programme reveal shortcomings to the procedure by having assessed leaching into groundwater of 43 pesticides applied in accordance with current regulations on agricultural fields, and 47 of their DP. Three types of leaching scenario were not fully captured by the procedure: long-term leaching of DP of pesticides applied on potato crops cultivated in sand, leaching of strongly sorbing pesticides after autumn application on loam, and leaching of various pesticides and their DP following early summer application on loam. Rapid preferential transport that bypasses the retardation of the plow layer primarily in autumn, but also during early summer, seems to dominate leaching in a number of those scenarios. PMID:25771345

  18. Studies on long term leaching behaviour of vitrified waste product containing sulphate bearing high level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borosilicate glass system is adopted in India and world-wide as a matrix for immobilization of high level radioactive liquid waste (HLW). Sulphate bearing HLW is generated during reprocessing of spent fuel from research reactors at BARC, Trombay. The presently stored HLW at Trombay contains uranium, sodium and sulphate in addition to fission products, corrosion products and small amount of other actinides. Presence of sulphate in HLW is attributed to the usage of ferrous sulphamate as a reducing agent in earlier reprocessing flow sheets for valency adjustment of plutonium during partitioning stage. A barium borosilicate based glass matrix is developed for vitrification of sulphate bearing HLW. Assessment of long term chemical durability is one of the critical aspects for evaluation of conditioned products from containment and environmental protection point of view. Chemical durability of waste form is evaluated by studying the leaching behaviour of the conditioned product. Leaching, being the only pathway through which radionuclide can migrate to human environment, is one of the most important properties of vitrified waste product which depends on various factors like composition of waste, glass matrix, type of test method, flow rate, composition of leachant, effect of radiation etc. The present paper reports the details of leaching studies of the glass products made with chemically simulated waste. Efforts were also made to understand the mechanism of leaching and to study the alteration layer formed on the leached surface of the glass products. (author)

  19. Oedipal shame, rejection, and adolescent development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caparrotta, Luigi

    2003-12-01

    The definition of oedipal shame, dramatized in Sophocles' tragedy, is the painful affect resulting from accepting the reality of one's origins. A clinical example focusing on shame arising from adoption links oedipal shame to the theme of rejection. Furthermore, in adolescence the revival of the oedipal conflict may reactivate oedipal shame in which unconscious idealized fantasies of personal perfection and the object carried over from childhood have to be renegotiated. This process, illustrated by two clinical vignettes, may reveal entrenched masochistic defenses. An examination of a final scene from a film underscores the significance of oedipal shame in clinical practice. PMID:14703298

  20. USA: California rejects mandatory GMO labelling

    OpenAIRE

    Paull, John

    2012-01-01

    Buying organic remains the best strategy for US consumers to avoid eating GM food. The voters of California have rejected the proposal to label GMO food. The proposition was narrowly lost, 47% to 53% (4,326,770 ‘Yes’ votes vs. 4,884,961 ‘No’ votes). Proposition 47 was supported by the organic sector but opposed by a coalition of GMO companies and US multinational food companies. Californians were invited to vote into law ‘The California Right to Know Genetically Engineered Food Act’. Section ...

  1. Solar Rejection Filter for Large Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmati, Hamid; Lesh, James

    2009-01-01

    To reject solar radiation photons at the front aperture for large telescopes, a mosaic of large transmission mode filters is placed in front of the telescope or at the aperture of the dome. Filtering options for effective rejection of sunlight include a smaller filter down-path near the focus of the telescope, and a large-diameter filter located in the front of the main aperture. Two types of large filters are viable: reflectance mode and transmittance mode. In the case of reflectance mode, a dielectric coating on a suitable substrate (e.g. a low-thermal-expansion glass) is arranged to reflect only a single, narrow wavelength and to efficiently transmit all other wavelengths. These coatings are commonly referred to as notch filter. In this case, the large mirror located in front of the telescope aperture reflects the received (signal and background) light into the telescope. In the case of transmittance mode, a dielectric coating on a suitable substrate (glass, sapphire, clear plastic, membrane, and the like) is arranged to transmit only a single wavelength and to reject all other wavelengths (visible and near IR) of light. The substrate of the large filter will determine its mass. At first glance, a large optical filter with a diameter of up to 10 m, located in front of the main aperture, would require a significant thickness to avoid sagging. However, a segmented filter supported by a structurally rugged grid can support smaller filters. The obscuration introduced by the grid is minimal because the total area can be made insignificant. This configuration can be detrimental to a diffraction- limited telescope due to diffraction effects at the edges of each sub-panel. However, no discernable degradation would result for a 20 diffraction-limit telescope (a photon bucket). Even the small amount of sagging in each subpanel should have minimal effect in the performance of a non-diffraction limited telescope because the part has no appreciable optical power. If the

  2. Recovery of iron from cyanide tailings with reduction roasting-water leaching followed by magnetic separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yali; Li, Huaimei [College of Chemical Engineering, Shandong University of Technology, 255081, Zibo, Shandong (China); Yu, Xianjin, E-mail: xjy@sdut.edu.cn [College of Chemical Engineering, Shandong University of Technology, 255081, Zibo, Shandong (China)

    2012-04-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using reduction roasting-water leaching-magnetic separation method, the recovery of iron from cyanide tailings was optimized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The recovery of iron was highly depended on the water-leaching process after reduction roasting. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The results suggest that the method can be effectively used for iron recovery, and the grade of magnetic concentrate and recovery rate can reach 59.11% and 75.12%, respectively. - Abstract: Cyanide tailing is a kind of solid waste produced in the process of gold extraction from gold ore. In this paper, recovery of iron from cyanide tailings was studied with reduction roasting-water leaching process followed by magnetic separation. After analysis of chemical composition and crystalline phase, the effects of different parameters on recovery of iron were chiefly introduced. Systematic studies indicate that the high recovery rate and grade of magnetic concentrate of iron can be achieved under the following conditions: weight ratios of cyanide tailings/activated carbon/sodium carbonate/sodium sulfate, 100:10:3:10; temperature, 50 Degree-Sign C; time, 60 min at the reduction roasting stage; the liquid to solid ratio is 15:1 (ml/g), leaching at 60 Degree-Sign C for 5 min and stirring speed at 20 r/min at water-leaching; exciting current is 2 A at magnetic separation. The iron grade of magnetic concentrate was 59.11% and the recovery ratio was 75.12%. The mineralography of cyanide tailings, roasted product, water-leached sample, magnetic concentrate and magnetic tailings were studied by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) technique. The microstructures of above products except magnetic tailings were also analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy disperse spectroscopy (EDS) to help understand the mechanism.

  3. Influence of container base material (Fe) on SIMFUEL leaching behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical stability of spent fuel will be greatly influenced by the redox potential of the near field. Presence of reductants such as iron is likely to be an important factor to maintain the original integrity of spent fuel. In this work experimental data about the influence of metallic iron (container base material) on SIMFUEL leaching behavior under simulated granite and saline repository conditions is presented. In the presence of iron uranium concentration undergoes a sharp decrease. This is much more noticeable in the experiments performed under initial oxic conditions. The effect of iron on simulated fission products of SIMFUEL is very important for the elements with high redox sensitivity such as molybdenum. On the contrary, strontium remains stable during the entire tests and it seems not be affected by changes in redox potential. Copyright (2001) Material Research Society

  4. Leaching of chromated copper arsenate wood preservatives: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hingston, J A; Collins, C D; Murphy, R J; Lester, J N

    2001-01-01

    Recent studies have generated conflicting data regarding the bioaccumulation and toxicity of leachates from preservative-treated wood. Due to the scale of the wood preserving industry, timber treated with the most common preservative, chromated copper arsenate (CCA), may form a significant source of metals in the aquatic environment. The existing literature on leaching of CCA is reviewed, and the numerous factors affecting leaching rates, including pH, salinity, treatment and leaching test protocols are discussed. It is concluded from the literature that insufficient data exists regarding these effects to allow accurate quantification of leaching rates, and also highlights the need for standardised leaching protocols. PMID:11202715

  5. Physic-chemical evaluation of leach and water from the Borba Gato streamlet within the catchment area of the urban waste landfill of Maringá, Paraná State, Brazil=Avaliação físico-química do lixiviado e da água do ribeirão Borba Gato na área de influência do aterro de resíduos de Maringá, Estado do Paraná, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos de Barros Júnior

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The physic-chemical characteristics of leach deposited in the landfill waste pond and of water from the Borba Gato streamlet are evaluated. Twenty-six physic-chemical parameters were analyzed from three collection sites, or rather, two in the streamlet, one upstream (P-01 and one downstream (P-02 of the landfill waste pond, and one in the leach deposit pond (P-03. The streamlet area under analysis was impacted due to being in an agricultural area and for its urban waste deposits. Parameter concentrations of aluminum, iron and mercury were reported above the quality standard of freshwater, according to Conama 357/2005 resolution (class 2. Further, throughout the rainy period, the ammoniac nitrogen content was above the resolution quality standard for fresh water. Moreover, landfill leach was above standards of effluent discharge established by Conama 357/2005. An efficient treatment for the effluent generated in Maringá is required since there is evidence of leach pollution of the Borba Gato streamlet.Este estudo teve como objetivo avaliar as características físico-químicas do lixiviado depositado na lagoa do aterro e da água do ribeirão Borba Gato. Foram analisados 26 parâmetros físico-químicos de três pontos de coletas, dois no ribeirão, a montante (P-01 e a jusante (P-02 do aterro de resíduos, e um na lagoa de depósito de percolado do aterro (P-03. A área do ribeirão estudada se apresentou impactada, por ser uma região agrícola e pela deposição dos resíduos de Maringá. Dentre os parâmetros estudados, registrou-se que, na maioria dos meses, concentrações de alumínio, ferro e mercúrio estavam acima do padrão de qualidade de água doce da resolução do Conama 357/2005 (Classe 2. Além disso, verificou-se que no período chuvoso, P-02 registrou teores de nitrogênio amoniacal acima do padrão de qualidade de água doce da resolução, assim como o lixiviado do aterro apresentou-se acima do padrão do lançamento de

  6. Uremic escape of renal allograft rejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is demonstrated in rats that, in the presence of early postoperative severe but transient uremia, the survival of first set Brown-Norway (BN) renal allografts in Lewis (LEW) recipients is at least three times prolonged when compared to non-uremic controls. This phenomenon is called 'uremic escape of renal allograft rejection'. By means of lethal X-irradiation of donors of BN kidneys transplanted into transiently uremic and non-uremic LEW recipients, the presence of passenger lymphocyte immunocompetence is demonstrated to be obilgatory for this phenomenon to occur. As a result of mobile passenger lymphocyte immunocompetence, a graft-versus-host (GVH) reaction is elicited in the spleens of LEW recipients of BN kidneys which amplifies the host response. The splenomegaly observed in LEW recipients of BN kidneys is caused not only by this GVH reaction, which is shown to be exquisitely sensitive to even mild uremia. It is also contributed to by a proliferative response of the host against the graft (which latter response is equated with an in vivo equivalent of a unilateral mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR)), since the reduction in spleen weights caused by abrogation of mobile passenger lymphocyte immunocompetence brought about by lethal donor X-irradiation is increased significantly by early postoperative severe but transient uremia. It is concluded that in uremic escape of renal allograft rejection both reactions are suppressed by uremia during the early post-operative period. (Auth.)

  7. Mechanochemical leaching of chalcopyrite concentrate by sulfuric acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sina Hejazi; Jalil Vahdati khaki; Abolfazl Babakhani

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to introduce a new cost-effective methodology for increasing the leaching efficiency of chalcopyrite concentrates at ambient temperature and pressure. Mechanical activation was employed during the leaching (mechanochemical leaching) of chalcopyrite concentrates in a sulfuric acid medium at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. High energy ball milling process was used during the leaching to provide the mechanochemical leaching condition, and atomic absorption spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry were used to de-termine the leaching behavior of chalcopyrite. Moreover, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the chalcopyrite powder before and after leaching. The results demonstrated that mechanochemical leaching was effective; the extraction of copper increased significantly and continuously. Although the leaching efficiency of chalcopyrite was very low at ambient temperature, the percentages of copper dissolved in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and ferric sulfate (Fe2(SO4)3) after 20 h of mechanochemical leaching reached 28%and 33%, respectively. Given the efficiency of the developed method and the facts that it does not require the use of an autoclave and can be conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure, it represents an economical and easy-to-use method for the leaching industry.

  8. Mechanochemical leaching of chalcopyrite concentrate by sulfuric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadabad, Farhad Khorramshahi; Hejazi, Sina; khaki, Jalil Vahdati; Babakhani, Abolfazl

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to introduce a new cost-effective methodology for increasing the leaching efficiency of chalcopyrite concentrates at ambient temperature and pressure. Mechanical activation was employed during the leaching (mechanochemical leaching) of chalcopyrite concentrates in a sulfuric acid medium at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. High energy ball milling process was used during the leaching to provide the mechanochemical leaching condition, and atomic absorption spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry were used to determine the leaching behavior of chalcopyrite. Moreover, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the chalcopyrite powder before and after leaching. The results demonstrated that mechanochemical leaching was effective; the extraction of copper increased significantly and continuously. Although the leaching efficiency of chalcopyrite was very low at ambient temperature, the percentages of copper dissolved in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and ferric sulfate (Fe2(SO4)3) after 20 h of mechanochemical leaching reached 28% and 33%, respectively. Given the efficiency of the developed method and the facts that it does not require the use of an autoclave and can be conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure, it represents an economical and easy-to-use method for the leaching industry.

  9. Graft rejection after hematopoietic cell transplantation with nonmyeloablative conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masmas, Tania N; Petersen, Søren L; Madsen, Hans O; Ryder, Lars P; Kornblit, Brian; Svejgaard, Arne; Andersen, Pernille; Dickmeiss, Ebbe; Vindeløv, Lars L

    2008-07-01

    Graft rejection after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) with nonmyeloablative conditioning is a rare but serious clinical problem. Graft rejection and salvage therapy in eight patients in a retrospective analysis of 124 consecutive patients is reported. The patients were conditioned with low-dose fludarabine and total body irradiation (TBI). The association of pretransplantation risk factors with rejection and the effect of chimerism and graft-versus-host disease on rejection were analyzed. Overall survival (OS) and progression free survival (PFS) were compared between patients with and without rejection. Retransplantation was performed with increased TBI conditioning for all patients, and with increased mycophenolate mofetil doses for recipients with HLA-identical sibling donors. No known pretransplantation risk factors were confirmed in this study. Rejection episodes were unevenly distributed over time. The storage temperature of the apheresis products was identified as a risk factor for rejection. Storage of the apheresis products at 5 degrees C diminished the risk of rejection. Low donor T cell chimerism at Day +14 significantly increased the risk of rejection. Seven patients were retransplanted. All but one engrafted successfully, but with decreased OS and PFS. Two patients received pentostatin infusion prior to donor lymphocyte infusions in unsuccessful attempts at reversing rejection. Storage temperature and donor chimerism had a significant effect on rejection. Following rejection, patients are at greater risk of dying from infections and progression/relapse of their malignancy. Retransplantation is feasible and well tolerated after HCT with nonmyeloablative conditioning and should be performed without delay in patients with imminent and manifest graft rejection. PMID:18383319

  10. In-Situ leaching of Crownpoint, New Mexico, Uranium Ore: Part 2--laboratory study of a mild leaching system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes laboratory leaching studies involving Crownpoint uranium ore samples and a mild leaching system. Batch leach tests with sodium bicarbonate solution and either high-pressure oxygen or low-pressure hydrogen peroxide gave qualitative data used to estimate leach rate and potential recovery. Using pseudo-firstorder rate constants derived from the batch test data, ore leachability was characterized as fast, intermediate, or slow. It was observed that leach rates varied by a factor of 50 for samples taken from different areas at Crownpoint; samples from the same ore trend often varied by a factor of 10. Packed-column and core-leach tests with oxygen at pressures up to 800 psig (5520 kPa) provided more quantitative estimates of leach rate and uranium recovery. Batch test results were correlatable with leach rates and uranium recoveries in packed-column or core tests. In ore samples where uraninite was the predominant uranium mineral, leach rates and recoveries were high. In samples containing coffinite, leach rates were generally lower than those with uraninite. Very low leach rates and recoveries were encountered where coffinite was intimately associated with carbonaceous material. However, the slow leaching rates are not caused by differences in reactivity of coffinite and uraninite. Mineralogical studies before and after leaching using electron microprobe analyses indicated that exposed coffinite crystals are dissolved easily, but finely disseminated coffinite crystallites persist after leaching if they are encapsulated in the carbonaceous matrix. Slow-leaching ores that did not respond to the mild oxidant system are called ''refractory.''

  11. Evaluation of glass leaching as nutrient source for microalgae growth; Evaluacion del comportamiento de vidrios lixiviados como nutrientes de algas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grabska, N.; Tamayo, A.; Mazo, M. A.; Pascual, L.; Rubio, J.

    2015-10-01

    Three glasses with an elemental composition similar to the nutrient ratio required for Spirulina platensis growth and with different SiO{sub 2} content have been prepared. The glasses were crushed and sieved into 2 different fractions and the effect of the particle size has been studied in terms of the leaching kinetics of each element. The chemical analysis of the leaching water was used for obtaining the dissolution rate curves for each element taking part of the glass composition. From the calculation of the leaching rate constant and the exponential constant of the lixiviation reaction, it has been evaluated the Spirulina platensis growth in ambient normal conditions of light, temperature and pH of the growing media. It has been concluded that, either from the modification of the chemical composition of the glass or its particle size, it is possible to tune the delivery of the nutrients to match the growth rate of Spirulina platensis. (Author)

  12. Leaching of Electronic Waste Using Biometabolised Acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Saidan; B. Brown; M. Valix

    2012-01-01

    The revolution in information and communication technology has brought huge technical benefits and wealth, but has created a major global problem: the generation of vast amounts of electronic waste, or e-waste through product obsolesce. The challenge in managing e-waste will be in developing sustainable recycling tech- nologies that are able to address the volume and complexity of this waste using cost effective and ecologically sen-sitive methods. In this study, the capability or microorganism metabolic acids in dissolving the metallic tractions from waste printed circuit boards was examined. Several factors were considered in the examination of the activityof the acids-including secondary reactions, solution pH, temperature and the nature of ligands in solutions (or bioacid constituents). The leaching tests were cgnducted ex-situ, using synthetic organic acids. Leaching was performed for periods of up to 6 hat 70-90 ℃ and 1000 r-min-1.

  13. Combining sulfate electrowinning with chloride leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, A. W.; Sudderth, R. B.; Olafson, S. M.

    1991-08-01

    Although the chloride leaching of copper sulfide concentrates has proved highly efficient, electrowinning from chloride solutions presents many difficulties, notably in cell design and the handling of the powder product. Sulfate electrowinning,on the other hand, continues to improve and has played a significant part in the widespread adoption of the solvent extraction-electrowinning process for copper recovery from low-grade ores. It has been found that the two steps can be combined by introducing a novel solvent extraction process after chloride leaching. This article presents the results of laboratory tests to prove the feasibility of this approach and discusses how it can be integrated into a commercially viable flow sheet.

  14. Secure Improved Multi Group-LEACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Santosh.Irappa.Shirol#1 , Mr. Ashok Kumar. N #2 , Mr. Kalmesh.M.Waderhatt

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks are ad hoc networks mainly consist of small sensor nodes with limited energy resources, and are rapidly emerging as a technology for large-scale, low cost, automated sensing and monitoring of different environments of interest. Cluster-based communication has been proposed for these networks for various reasons such as scalability and energy efficiency. In this paper, we investigate the problem of adding security to cluster based communication protocols for homogeneous wireless sensor networks consisting of sensor nodes with severely limited resources, and propose a security solution for Improved MG-LEACH, a protocol where clusters are formed dynamically and periodically. Our solution uses building blocks from SPINS, a suite of highly optimized security building blocks that rely solely on symmetric-key methods; is lightweight and preserves the core of the original Improved MG-LEACH.

  15. Lead sulphate leaching by sodium chloride solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conić Vesna T.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioleaching treatment of complex multi-metallic Cu-Zn-Pb-Ag-Au mineral concentrates leds to the formation, besides easily soluble zinc and cooper sulphates, of hardly soluble lead (II sulfate (PbSO4 sludge. To determine the leaching parameters of PbSO4 with NaCl in the bioleaching residue, lead sulphate solution was synthetically prepared. The effect of process parameters, namely NaCl concentration, solid:liquid phase ratio, processing time, temperature and Cl ions was examined. It was found that 100% Pb by leaching can be achieved with NaCl concentration of 250 g/dm3, time 20 min, temperature 353 K and solid:liquid phase ratio =1:20.

  16. The equilibrium leach testing of CAGR hulls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Equilibrium leach tests were carried out on a laboratory scale in order to investigate the long-term performance of an intermediate level waste repository. The tests involved leaching fully active Commercial Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (CAGR) hulls in the presence of crushed matrix and backfill materials. The matrix materials used were blast furnace slag (BFS)/ordinary Portland cement (OPC) and epoxide MS7531/MS7532, and the backfill materials were bentonite and pulverised fuel ash/ordinary Portland cement (PFA/OPC). Comparison of the long-lived radionuclide concentrations with the derived drinking water levels indicates that the performance of a repository under oxidising conditions would tend to be limited by the release of I-129 and Tc-99. (author)

  17. Static Leaching of Spanish Uranium Ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper summarizes the experience acquired in Spain during seven years of investigation on the static leaching of uranium ores. The operations covered minerals showing wide variations with regard to both uranium content (250 and 2000 ppm) and the type of rock and gangue (granites, shales, sandstones, sulphides, carbonates, limonites etc. ). The studies were carried out on quantities of material varying from a few kilograms to several tons. Leaching agents included water, solid reagents (pyrites), alkaline carbonates and sulphuric acid. The systems used consisted of both simple layouts and other, more elaborate schemes including recycling of the liquors. The uranium was recovered from the liquors first by direct precipitation and later by ion-exchange and extraction with amines. (author)

  18. Static leaching of Spanish uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper summarizes the experience acquired in Spain during seven years of investigation on the static leaching of uranium ores. The operations covered minerals showing wide variations with regard to both uranium content (250 and 2000 ppm) and the type of rock and gangue (granites, shales, sandstones, sulphides, carbonates, limonites etc.). The studies were carried out on quantities of material varying from a few kilograms to several tons. Leaching agents included water, solid reagents (pyrites), alkaline carbonates and sulphuric acid. The systems used consisted of both simple layouts and other, more elaborate schemes including recycling of the liquors. The uranium was recovered from the liquors first by direct precipitation and later by ion-exchange and extraction with amines. (author)

  19. Interaction of technological solutions from underground leaching and cenoman horizon ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In leaching field decommissioning, both artificial and natural methods of environment regeneration are used. The former include rinsing with ground water or with suitable chemicals, the latter are based on geochemical interactions of ores. Simple experiments were conducted aimed at monitoring the natural ore ability to slow down the motion of ecologically important ions NH4+ and NO3-. Seven ore samples were used occurring in the leaching field for experiments in a glass flow column. An actual solution, i.e., the sorption waste from the chemical plant was used as the liquid phase. Studied were ore permeability, capacity for capture of ecologically important ions (in an order of 102 g/t for siltstone, 100-101 g/t for sandstone), neutralizing capacity. (M.D.). 3 tabs., 4 figs., 3 refs

  20. Alkaline leaching of iron and steelmaking dust

    OpenAIRE

    Stafanova, Anna; Aromaa, Jari

    2012-01-01

    Steel production generates significant quantities of dust and sludge in blast furnaces (BF),basic oxygen furnaces (BOF), and electric arc furnaces (EAF). These dusts contain toxicelements, such as heavy metals, and are thus classified as harmful waste making the disposalof them expensive. In addition, direct recycling of dust back to steel production is hindered dueto the presence of zinc. In this literature survey the alkaline leaching of zinc from iron and steelmaking dusts isreviewed. T...

  1. Residues leaching from 'Factory of barren ores'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the present work is safe management of residues from Factory of Barren Ores, their reprocessing, expenditures reduction for remediation of Istiklol city former uranium tailings. For this purpose, some experiences were adopted - Factory of Barren Ores tailing use for filling up the open pit where water with uranium content 3-5 mg/l is located. Factory of Barren Ores waste are passed through heap leaching and have some amount of uranium salts dissolved in water. Thus, we propose to dissolve uranium from Factory of Barren Ores wastes with uranium bearing water flowing out from gallery and filling up the open-pit by radioactive wastes. In so doing, uranium content flowing out from gallery will increase twice, and further, passing them through apricot's shell, as a sorbent, we will clean the water against radionuclides. Residue samples with uranium content 0,015% from Factory of Barren Ores and uranium bearing waters from gallery 1 with uranium content 0,0025 g/l were used for laboratory tests. After which, a slurry was prepared by means of residue mixing with water in ratio of solid and liquid phases (S:L) - 1:2 and 9,7 ml of sulfuric acid (Ρ=1,82) was added which corresponds consumption by H2SO4 176,54 kg/t. For the first test, leaching was carried out during 4 hours at ph=1,6 at room temperature. For the second test, leaching was carried out at 60deg Cand ph=1,6 during 4 hours. Slurry heating and mixing was carried out by means of magnetic mixer. The basic residue leaching indicators are provided in this article.

  2. Preparation of metalic nanoparticles by selective leaching

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Michalcová, A.; Vojtěch, D.; Marek, I.; Kubatík, Tomáš František

    Brno: Tribun EU, s. r. o, 2013 - (Švec, P.; Vávra, I.; Surová, S.). s. 42 ISBN 978-80-263-0511-8. [Nanoved 2013 & Nano Info Day : 6th International Conference on Nanosciences, Nanotechnologies, Nanomaterials and Nano Info Day of the Nanoforce Project. 22.09.2013-25.09.2013, Svit] Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Nanocrystaline materials * selective leaching Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy http://www.nanoved.sav.sk

  3. Long-term leaching mechanisms of ashes and slags; combining laboratory experiments with computer simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The leaching properties of slags and ashes have been studied on four waste materials: municipal solid waste incineration, MSWI, bottom ash, wood ash, electric arc furnace slag and blast furnace slag. The aim of the study has been to investigate properties that influence the long-term leaching of these materials. The results of the laboratory experiments have been used in computer simulations using CHEMFRONTS. CHEMFRONTS is a coupled geochemical and transport computer program developed by the author within this work. The main variable influencing the leaching of metal from solid waste is the final pH of the solution. This can be controlled by several factors, but if the contact time between the water and the waste material is sufficient, the waste itself often controls the pH by buffering reactions. The buffering capacity of a material is, therefore, one of the most important factors to investigate when the long-term leaching behaviour is to be predicted. A pH titration curve has been made for each material within this work, using a pH batch experimental series. The change in pH with time has also been studied. The materials have been studied by X-ray diffraction analysis and Scanning Electron Microscopy / Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy to assess the mineralogy and morphology of the materials. The mineralogy is important for computer simulations. A number of leaching experiments have been performed. A batch flow-through method has been developed which is a serial batch experiment, in which the contact time can be controlled. This technique makes it possible to have oxygen access in all the columns, to simulate partly saturated conditions. Sampling is also possible in the columns. The influence of particle size has been studied, and surprisingly no influence of the particle size could be noted after 24 hours of leaching. The substitution of sand in concrete with steel slag has been studied by both physical and chemical tests. The steel slag concrete had physical

  4. Long-term leaching mechanisms of ashes and slags; Combining laboratory experiments with computer simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeverman, C.

    1997-12-31

    The leaching properties of slags and ashes have been studied on four waste materials: municipal solid waste incineration, MSWI, bottom ash, wood ash, electric arc furnace slag and blast furnace slag. The aim of the study has been to investigate properties that influence the long-term leaching of these materials. The results of the laboratory experiments have been used in computer simulations using CHEMFRONTS. CHEMFRONTS is a coupled geochemical and transport computer program developed by the author within this work. The main variable influencing the leaching of metal from solid waste is the final pH of the solution. This can be controlled by several factors, but if the contact time between the water and the waste material is sufficient, the waste itself often controls the pH by buffering reactions. The buffering capacity of a material is, therefore, one of the most important factors to investigate when the long-term leaching behaviour is to be predicted. A pH titration curve has been made for each material within this work, using a pH batch experimental series. The change in pH with time has also been studied. The materials have been studied by X-ray diffraction analysis and Scanning Electron Microscopy / Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy to assess the mineralogy and morphology of the materials. The mineralogy is important for computer simulations. A number of leaching experiments have been performed. A batch flow-through method has been developed which is a serial batch experiment, in which the contact time can be controlled. This technique makes it possible to have oxygen access in all the {sup c}olumns{sup ,} to simulate partly saturated conditions. Sampling is also possible in the {sup c}olumns{sup .} The influence of particle size has been studied, and surprisingly no influence of the particle size could be noted after 24 hours of leaching. The substitution of sand in concrete with steel slag has been studied by both physical and chemical tests. The steel slag

  5. CHARACTERIZATION OF TANK 16H ANNULUS SAMPLES PART II: LEACHING RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hay, M.; Reboul, S.

    2012-06-19

    The closure of Tank 16H will require removal of material from the annulus of the tank. Samples from Tank 16H annulus were characterized and tested to provide information to evaluate various alternatives for removing the annulus waste. The analysis found all four annulus samples to be composed mainly of Si, Na, and Al and lesser amounts of other elements. The XRD data indicate quartz (SiO{sub 2}) and sodium aluminum nitrate silicate hydrate (Na{sub 8}(Al{sub 6}Si{sub 6}O{sub 24})(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}.4H{sub 2}O) as the predominant crystalline mineral phases in the samples. The XRD data also indicate the presence of crystalline sodium nitrate (NaNO{sub 3}), sodium nitrite (NaNO{sub 2}), gibbsite (Al(OH){sub 3}), hydrated sodium bicarbonate (Na{sub 3}H(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O), and muscovite (KAl{sub 2}(AlSi{sub 3}O{sub 10})(OH){sub 2}). Based on the weight of solids remaining at the end of the test, the water leaching test results indicate 20-35% of the solids dissolved after three contacts with an approximately 3:1 volume of water at 45 C. The chemical analysis of the leachates and the XRD results of the remaining solids indicate sodium salts of nitrate, nitrite, sulfate, and possibly carbonate/bicarbonate make up the majority of the dissolved material. The majority of these salts were dissolved in the first water contact and simply diluted with each subsequent water contact. The water leaching removed large amounts of the uranium in two of the samples and approximately 1/3 of the {sup 99}Tc from all four samples. Most of the other radionuclides analyzed showed low solubility in the water leaching test. The oxalic acid leaching test result indicate approximately 34-47% of the solids in the four annulus samples will dissolve after three contacts with an approximately 3:1 volume of acid to solids at 45 C. The same sodium salts found in the water leaching test comprise the majority of dissolved material in the oxalic acid leaching test. However, the oxalic acid was

  6. CVLEACH: Coverage based energy efficient LEACH algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankit Thakkar

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Designing a protocol stack for wireless sensor network (WSNis a challenging task due to energy, computational and storageconstraints. Energy spent for communication between sensornodes dominates the energy spent for the computation [10].Multi-hop short range communication between wireless sensorsnodes is energy efficient compared to single-hop long rangecommunication. Hierarchical clustering is one of the possiblesolutions to save energy of wireless sensor nodes. Low-EnergyAdaptive Clustering Hierarchy (LEACH, Centralized Low-Energy Adaptive Clustering Hierarchy (LEACH-C andAdvanced Low-Energy Adaptive Clustering Hierarchy(ALEACH are energy efficient hierarchical clustering routingprotocol. In this paper we proposed Coverage based Low-EnergyAdaptive Clustering Hierarchy routing protocol – CVLEACH tomake uniform distribution of Cluster Heads (CHs by creatingnon-overlapped cluster regions using overhearing properties ofthe sensor nodes, which makes the routing protocol more energyefficient and prolongs life time of a wireless sensor network.Simulation results show that CVLEACH improves network lifetime compared to LEACH and ALEACH algorithms.

  7. Economic leaching at Roessing Uranium Limited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the fourteen years that Roessing Uranium Limited has been in production, the metallurgical operations and controls on the leaching plant have envolved through four basic stages. Initially, the emphasis was placed on the achievement of consistent plant operation by overcoming severe start-up difficulties. The second stage involved the attainment of the design operating targets and also the commissioning of the ferric-leaching reactors in order to achieve a ferric ion concentration of more than 3.0 g/l. Improvements in control then became the priority, with the emphasis on consistently achieving the target concentrations of ferric ions, total iron, and terminal acidity. The latest phase has concentrated on the optimization of costs by means of adjustments to the historically established operating parameters in order to achieve large savings on consumables while maintaining the leaching efficiencies. Apart from the obvious incentive of reducing costs in an inflationary economy and a depressed uranium market, impetus for this work was given by a change in the type of ore from the open pit, which has the effect of reducing the extraction efficiency while increasing the consumption of consumable materials. These problems and their solutions are discussed in detail, and the importance to cost-effective optimization of an accurate up-to-date cost-reporting structure is stressed. 9 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Pesticide leaching through sandy and loamy fields – Long-term lessons learnt from the Danish Pesticide Leaching Assessment Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The European Union authorization procedure for pesticides includes an assessment of the leaching risk posed by pesticides and their degradation products (DP) with the aim of avoiding any unacceptable influence on groundwater. Twelve-year's results of the Danish Pesticide Leaching Assessment Programme reveal shortcomings to the procedure by having assessed leaching into groundwater of 43 pesticides applied in accordance with current regulations on agricultural fields, and 47 of their DP. Three types of leaching scenario were not fully captured by the procedure: long-term leaching of DP of pesticides applied on potato crops cultivated in sand, leaching of strongly sorbing pesticides after autumn application on loam, and leaching of various pesticides and their DP following early summer application on loam. Rapid preferential transport that bypasses the retardation of the plow layer primarily in autumn, but also during early summer, seems to dominate leaching in a number of those scenarios. - Highlights: • Field-results reveal shortcomings in the EU authorization procedure for pesticides. • The plough layer can be bypassed via preferential transport in e.g. wormholes. • Pesticides properties are decisive for leaching pattern on the sandy fields. • The hydrogeological settings control the leaching patterns on the loamy fields. • Pesticide detection frequency seems to be independent of the month of the year. - Long-term lessons learnt from the Danish Pesticide Leaching Assessment Programme reveals shortcomings in the European Union authorization procedure for pesticides

  9. Characterization, Washing, Leaching, and Filtration of C-104 Sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KP Brooks; PR Bredt; GR Golcar; SA Hartley; LK Jagoda; KG Rappe; MW Urie

    2000-06-09

    continuously adding approximately 5 L of 0.01-M NaOH and then removing it through the filter as permeate. The purpose of this washing step with 0.01-MNaOH was to remove water-soluble components that might inhibit dissolution of salts during caustic leaching, while avoiding peptization of the solids that occurs at a pH below 12. After washing the sludge with dilute caustic, it was combined with 3-M caustic, and the slurry was leached in a stainless steel vessel at 85 C for 8 hours. This leaching was followed by two 0.01-M caustic washes, each conducted in a stainless steel vessel to dilute remaining analytes from the interstitial liquids. Each rinse was performed at 85 C for 8 hours. Permeate from each of these process steps was removed using the crossflow filter system. Samples of the permeate from each slurry-washing activity and all intermediate process steps were taken and analyzed for chemical and radiochemical constituents. The fraction of each component removed was calculated. Key results are presented in Table S.1.

  10. Characterization, Washing, Leaching, and Filtration of C-104 Sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    approximately 5 L of 0.01-M NaOH and then removing it through the filter as permeate. The purpose of this washing step with 0.01-MNaOH was to remove water-soluble components that might inhibit dissolution of salts during caustic leaching, while avoiding peptization of the solids that occurs at a pH below 12. After washing the sludge with dilute caustic, it was combined with 3-M caustic, and the slurry was leached in a stainless steel vessel at 85 C for 8 hours. This leaching was followed by two 0.01-M caustic washes, each conducted in a stainless steel vessel to dilute remaining analytes from the interstitial liquids. Each rinse was performed at 85 C for 8 hours. Permeate from each of these process steps was removed using the crossflow filter system. Samples of the permeate from each slurry-washing activity and all intermediate process steps were taken and analyzed for chemical and radiochemical constituents. The fraction of each component removed was calculated. Key results are presented in Table S.1

  11. Mechanical Activation-Assisted Reductive Leaching of Cadmium from Zinc Neutral Leaching Residue Using Sulfur Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chun; Min, Xiaobo; Chai, Liyuan; Zhang, Jianqiang; Wang, Mi

    2015-12-01

    In this work, zinc neutral leaching residue was mechanically activated by ball-milling. The subsequent leaching behavior and kinetics of cadmium extraction in a mixed SO2-H2SO4 system were studied. Changes in the crystalline phase, lattice distortion, particle size and morphology, which were induced by mechanical activation, were also investigated. The activated samples showed different physicochemical characteristics, and cadmium extraction was found to be easier than for the un-activated samples. Under the same conditions, mechanical activation contributed to higher cadmium leaching. The cadmium extraction kinetics at 75-95°C was found to fit the shrinking core model. The raw neutral leaching residue, and the samples activated for 60 min and 120 min had a calculated activation energy of 65.02 kJ/mol, 59.45 kJ/mol and 53.46 kJ/mol, respectively. The leaching residue was characterized by ICP, XRD and SEM analysis. According to XRD analysis, the main phases in the residue were lead sulfate (PbSO4), zinc sulfide (ZnS) and cadmium sulfide (CdS).

  12. Cellular and Functional Imaging of Cardiac Transplant Rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yijen L.; Ye, Qing

    2011-01-01

    Heart transplantation is now an established treatment for patients suffering from end-stage heart diseases. With the advances in immunosuppressive treatment, the survival rate for transplant patients has improved greatly. However, allograft rejection, both acute and chronic, after heart transplantation is still a limitation leading to morbidity and mortality. The current clinical gold standard for screening rejection is endomyocardial biopsy (EMB), which is not only invasive, but also error-prone, due to the limited sample size and the site location of sampling. It would be highly desirable to have reliable and noninvasive alternatives for EMB in monitoring cardiac allograft rejection. The objective of this review is to highlight how cardiovascular imaging can contribute to noninvasively detecting and to evaluating both acute and chronic allograft rejection after heart transplantation, in particular, cardiovascular MRI (CMRI); and how CMRI can assess both immune cell infiltration at the rejecting organ, and the cardiac dysfunctions resulting from allograft rejection. PMID:21359095

  13. Multivisceral transplantation in pigs: a clinicopathological analysis of tissue rejection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuoka,Shintaro

    1995-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we established the surgical procedure and postoperative care of multivisceral transplantation (MVTX in pigs, and examined the functional changes and rejection pattern of transplanted organs in MVTX. Twenty-two MVTXs were performed without immunosuppression, and nine cases (41% that survived for 5 days or more after MVTX were used for evaluation. Rejection in grafts including the liver, pancreas, and gastrointestinal tract were assessed histopathologically. On day 5 after transplantation, the duodenum and small bowel already showed signs of mild rejection. On the other hand, in the liver, pancreas and stomach, rejection occurred later and was still mild on day 16. Hepatic rejection in MVTX appeared to occur later than in simple liver transplantation (LTX. These results showed that the susceptibility to rejection of individual visceral organs varies.

  14. The Rejection-Rage Contingency in Borderline Personality Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenson, Kathy R.; Downey, Geraldine; Rafaeli, Eshkol; Coifman, Karin; Leventhal, Nina

    2011-01-01

    Though longstanding clinical observation reflected in the DSM-IV suggests that the rage characteristic of borderline personality disorder (BPD) often appears in response to perceived rejection, the role of perceived rejection in triggering rage in BPD has never been empirically tested. Extending basic personality research on rejection sensitivity to a clinical sample, a priming-pronunciation experiment and a 21-day experience-sampling diary examined the contingent relationship between perceived rejection and rage in participants diagnosed with BPD compared to healthy controls. Despite the differences in these two assessment methods, the indices of rejection-contingent rage that they produced were both elevated in the BPD group, and were strongly interrelated. They provide corroborating evidence that reactions to perceived rejection significantly explain the rage seen in BPD. PMID:21500875

  15. Fractionation of iron isotopes during leaching of natural particles by acidic and circumneutral leaches and development of an optimal leach for marine particulate iron isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revels, Brandi N.; Zhang, Ruifeng; Adkins, Jess F.; John, Seth G.

    2015-10-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential nutrient for life on land and in the oceans. Iron stable isotope ratios (δ56Fe) can be used to study the biogeochemical cycling of Fe between particulate and dissolved phases in terrestrial and marine environments. We have investigated the dissolution of Fe from natural particles both to understand the mechanisms of Fe dissolution, and to choose a leach appropriate for extracting labile Fe phases of marine particles. With a goal of finding leaches which would be appropriate for studying dissolved-particle interactions in an oxic water column, three particle types were chosen including oxic seafloor sediments (MESS-3), terrestrial dust (Arizona Test Dust - A2 Fine), and ocean sediment trap material from the Cariaco basin. Four leaches were tested, including three acidic leaches similar to leaches previously applied to marine particles and sediments (25% acetic acid, 0.01 N HCl, and 0.5 N HCl) and a pH 8 oxalate-EDTA leach meant to mimic the dissolution of particles by organic complexation, as occurs in natural seawater. Each leach was applied for three different times (10 min, 2 h, 24 h) at three different temperatures (25 °C, 60 °C, 90 °C). MESS-3 was also leached under various redox conditions (0.02 M hydroxylamine hydrochloride or 0.02 M hydrogen peroxide). For all three sample types tested, we find a consistent relationship between the amount of Fe leached and leachate δ56Fe for all of the acidic leaches, and a different relationship between the amount of Fe leached and leachate δ56Fe for the oxalate-EDTA leach, suggesting that Fe was released through proton-promoted dissolution for all acidic leaches and by ligand-promoted dissolution for the oxalate-EDTA leach. Fe isotope fractionations of up to 2‰ were observed during acidic leaching of MESS-3 and Cariaco sediment trap material, but not for Arizona Test Dust, suggesting that sample composition influences fractionation, perhaps because Fe isotopes are greatly fractionated

  16. Process optimization and kinetics for leaching of rare earth metals from the spent Ni-metal hydride batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshram, Pratima; Pandey, B D; Mankhand, T R

    2016-05-01

    Nickel-metal hydride batteries (Ni-MH) contain not only the base metals, but valuable rare earth metals (REMs) viz. La, Sm, Nd, Pr and Ce as well. In view of the importance of resource recycling and assured supply of the contained metals in such wastes, the present study has focussed on the leaching of the rare earth metals from the spent Ni-MH batteries. The conditions for the leaching of REMs from the spent batteries were optimized as: 2M H2SO4, 348K temperature and 120min of time at a pulp density (PD) of 100g/L. Under this condition, the leaching of 98.1% Nd, 98.4% Sm, 95.5% Pr and 89.4% Ce was achieved. Besides the rare earth metals, more than 90% of base metals (Ni, Co, Mn and Zn) were also leached out in this condition. Kinetic data for the dissolution of all the rare earth metals showed the best fit to the chemical control shrinking core model. The leaching of metals followed the mechanism involving the chemical reaction proceeding on the surface of particles by the lixiviant, which was corroborated by the XRD phase analysis and SEM-EDS studies. The activation energy of 7.6, 6.3, 11.3 and 13.5kJ/mol was acquired for the leaching of neodymium, samarium, praseodymium and cerium, respectively in the temperature range 305-348K. From the leach liquor, the mixed rare earth metals were precipitated at pH∼1.8 and the precipitated REMs was analyzed by XRD and SEM studies to determine the phases and the morphological features. PMID:26746588

  17. Activation of Rejected Fly Ash Using Flue Gas Desulphurization (FGD) Sludge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAO Xiu-chen; POON Chisun; LIN Zong-shou

    2003-01-01

    Low-grade fly ash ( rejected fly ash, rFA ), a significant portion of the pulverized fuel ash ( PFA ) produced from coal-fired power plauts and rejected from the ash classifying process, remains unused due to its high carbon content and large particle size ( > 45μm ). But it is thonght that the rejected ash may have potential uses in chemical stabilization/solidification ( S/S ) processes which need relatively lower strengths and a lower chemical reactivity. Flue Gas Desulphurisation ( FGD ) sludge is a by-product of air pollution control equipment in coal fired power plants whose chemical composition is mainly gypsum. As there is no effective usage of both of these two ntaterials , it is of interest to research on the possible octtivation of rFA using FGD . This paper presents experimental results of a study on the properties of rFA activated by the FGD in rFA-cement pastes. Different percetages of FGD were added into the mix to study the effects of the FGD on the reaction of the rFA blended cement pastes.The results show that FGD takes effect as an activator only at late curing ages. Adding Ca ( OH)2 enhances the effect of FGD on activating the hytration of rFA. Also, 10% FGD by weight of rFA is the optimal addition in the rFA-cement pastes. The results of the compressive strength measurements correlate well with the porosity results.

  18. Leaching behaviour and ecotoxicity evaluation of chars from the pyrolysis of forestry biomass and polymeric materials

    OpenAIRE

    Bernardo, Maria S.; Mendes, S.; Lapa, N.; Gonçalves, Margarida; Mendes, Benilde; Pinto, Filomena; Lopes, M. Helena

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess the environmental risk of chars derived from the pyrolysis of mixtures of pine, plastics, and scrap tires, by studying their leaching potential and ecotoxicity. Relationships between chemical composition and ecotoxicity were established to identify contaminants responsible for toxicity. Since metallic contaminants were the focus of the present study, an EDTA washing step was applied to the chars to selectively remove metals that can be responsibl...

  19. Geochemical and petrographic studies and the relationships to durability and leach resistance of vitrified products from the in situ vitrification process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soil and sludge contaminated with hazardous and radioactive materials from sites in the United States and Australia were vitrified using in situ vitrification. Some of the resulting products were subjected to detailed geochemical, leach and durability testing using a variety of analytical techniques. The leach resistance and durability performance was compared to that of vitrified high level waste with borosilicate composition. Particular attention was given to crystallization behavior, the effects of crystallization on residual melt chemistry and how crystallization influences the behavior of contaminant ions. The results of this work show that the vitrified material studied has superior chemical durability and leach resistance relative to typical borosilicate waste glasses. Crystallization behavior was variable depending upon melt chemistry and cooling history. Crystallization was not observed to adversely affect chemical durability or leach resistance

  20. Development of thermal conditioning technology for alpha-contaminated wastes: a study on leaching characteristics and long-term safety assessment of simulated waste forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Yong Chil [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea); Lee, Sang Hoon; Yoo, Jong Ik; Choi, Yong Cheol [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea)

    2001-04-01

    Radioactive wastes should be stabilized for safe management during several hundred years. To assess stability of solidified waste forms, mechanical properties and chemical durability of the waste forms should be analyzed. Chemical durability is one of the most important factors in the assessment of waste forms, which could be examined by leaching tests. Various methods in leaching test are suggested by different organizations, but a formal test method in Korea is not ready yet. Therefore, the leaching test method applicable to various constituents is necessary for the safe management of radioactive wastes In this study, leaching behavior and characteristics of components such as solidification materials, heavy metals and radioactive nuclids were analyzed for cement waste form and glassy waste form. 58 refs., 25 figs., 8 tabs. (Author)

  1. Radionuclide release from simulated waste material after biogeochemical leaching of uraniferous mineral samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biogeochemical mineral dissolution is a promising method for the released of metals in low-grade host mineralization that contain sulphidic minerals. The application of biogeochemical mineral dissolution to engineered leach heap piles in the Elliot Lake region may be considered as a promising passive technology for the economic recovery of low grade Uranium-bearing ores. In the current investigation, the decrease of radiological activity of uraniferous mineral material after biogeochemical mineral dissolution is quantified by gamma spectroscopy and compared to the results from digestion/ICP-MS analysis of the ore materials to determine if gamma spectroscopy is a simple, viable alternative quantification method for heavy nuclides. The potential release of Uranium (U) and Radium-226 (226Ra) to the aqueous environment from samples that have been treated to represent various stages of leaching and passive closure processes are assessed. Dissolution of U from the solid phase has occurred during biogeochemical mineral dissolution in the presence of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, with gamma spectroscopy indicating an 84% decrease in Uranium-235 (235U) content, a value in accordance with the data obtained by dissolution chemistry. Gamma spectroscopy data indicate that only 30% of the 226Ra was removed during the biogeochemical mineral dissolution. Chemical inhibition and passivation treatments of waste materials following the biogeochemical mineral dissolution offer greater protection against residual U and 226Ra leaching. Pacified samples resist the release of 226Ra contained in the mineral phase and may offer more protection to the aqueous environment for the long term, compared to untreated or inhibited residues, and should be taken into account for future decommissioning. - Highlights: • Gamma counting showed an 84% decrease in 235U after biogeochemical mineral leaching. • Chemical digestion/ICP-MS analysis also showed an 84% decrease in total U. • Over 70% of

  2. MDMA DECREASES THE EFFECTS OF SIMULATED SOCIAL REJECTION

    OpenAIRE

    Frye, Charles G.; Wardle, Margaret C; Norman, Greg J.; de Wit, Harriet

    2013-01-01

    3-4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) increases self-reported positive social feelings and decreases the ability to detect social threat in faces, but its effects on experiences of social acceptance and rejection have not been determined. We examined how an acute dose of MDMA affects subjective and autonomic responses to simulated social acceptance and rejection. We predicted that MDMA would decrease subjective responses to rejection. On an exploratory basis, we also examined the effect of...

  3. Bronchoalveolar Immunologic Profile of Acute Human Lung Transplant Allograft Rejection

    OpenAIRE

    Gregson, Aric L.; Hoji, Aki; Saggar, Rajan; Ross, David J; Kubak, Bernard M; Jamieson, Beth D.; Weigt, S. Samuel; Lynch, Joseph P.; Ardehali, Abbas; Belperio, John A.; Yang, Otto O

    2008-01-01

    Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) offers a potential means to diagnose acute rejection and could provide insight into the immune mechanisms responsible for lung allograft rejection. Transbronchial biopsies from 29 bronchoscopic procedures were assessed for rejection. Concurrent BALF lymphocyte subsets were examined by flow cytometry, including CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and their activation status via CD38 expression, NK, NK-like T (NT), B, T regulatory (Treg) and invariant receptor NK-T cells (...

  4. LATE ACUTE REJECTION IN LIVER TRANSPLANT: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Nacif, Lucas Souto; Pinheiro, Rafael Soares; PÉCORA, Rafael Antônio de Arruda; Ducatti, Liliana; ROCHA-SANTOS, Vinicius; Andraus, Wellington; D'ALBUQUERQUE, Luiz Carneiro

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Late acute rejection leads to worse patient and graft survival after liver transplantation. Aim: To analyze the reported results published in recent years by leading transplant centers in evaluating late acute rejection and update the clinical manifestations, diagnosis and treatment of liver transplantation. Method: Systematic literature review through Medline-PubMed database with headings related to late acute rejection in articles published until November 2013 was done. Were a...

  5. Regulatory Allospecific T Cell Clones Abrogate Chronic Allograft Rejection

    OpenAIRE

    Waaga-Gasser, Ana Maria; Grimm, Martin R.; Lutz, Jens; Lange, Volkmar; Lenhard, Susanne M.; Aviles, Beatriz; Kist-van Holthe, Joana E; Lebedeva, Tatiana; Samsonov, Dimitry; Meyer, Detlef; Hancock, Wayne W.; Heemann, Uwe; Gasser, Martin; Chandraker, Anil

    2009-01-01

    True alloantigen-specific tolerance is the ultimate goal of solid organ transplantation, eliminating the need for long-term immunosuppression. Recent evidence suggests that Th1-derived cytokines are associated with rejection and Th2-derived cytokines with long-term allograft survival, but the roles of these subsets in rejection and tolerance are incompletely understood. Here, we analyzed the functional and regulatory capacities of T cell clones derived from tolerant and rejecting rats (Wistar...

  6. The private rejection of unfair offers and emotional commitment

    OpenAIRE

    Yamagishi, Toshio; Horita, Yutaka; Takagishi, Haruto; Shinada, Mizuho; Tanida, Shigehito; Cook, Karen S.

    2009-01-01

    In a series of experiments, we demonstrate that certain players of an economic game reject unfair offers even when this behavior increases rather than decreases inequity. A substantial proportion (30–40%, compared with 60–70% in the standard ultimatum game) of those who responded rejected unfair offers even when rejection reduced only their own earnings to 0, while not affecting the earnings of the person who proposed the unfair split (in an impunity game). Furthermore, even when the responde...

  7. Rejection of Organic Micropollutants by Clean and Fouled Nanofiltration Membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Lifang Zhu

    2015-01-01

    The rejection of organic micropollutants, including three polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and three phthalic acid esters (PAEs), by clean and fouled nanofiltration membranes was investigated in the present study. The rejection of organic micropollutants by clean NF90 membranes varied from 87.9 to more than 99.9%, while that of NF270 membranes ranged from 32.1 to 92.3%. Clear time-dependence was observed for the rejection of hydrophobic micropollutants, which was attributed to the adso...

  8. Effects of Sodium Citrate on the Ammonium Sulfate Recycled Leaching of Low-Grade Zinc Oxide Ores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kun; Li, Shi-wei; Zhang, Li-bo; Peng, Jin-hui; Ma, Ai-yuan; Wang, Bao-bao

    2016-03-01

    The effects of sodium citrate on ammonium sulfate recycled leaching of low-grade zinc oxide ores were studied. By applying various kinds of detection and analysis techniques such as chemical composition analysis, chemical phase method, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectrum (SEM/EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier-transforming infrared spectrum (FT-IR), zinc raw ore, its leaching slag and the functional mechanism of sodium citrate were investigated. Based on a comprehensive analysis, it can be concluded that in contrast to hemimorphite (Zn4Si2O7(OH)2 · H2O), amorphous smithsonite (ZnCO3) and zinc silicate (Zn2SiO4) prove to be refractory phases under ammonium sulfate leaching, while sodium citrate has a better chelating action with the refractory phases, resulting in a higher zinc leaching rate. Under conditions of [NH3]/[NH3]T molar ratio being 0.5, [NH3]T being 7.5 mol/L, [Na3C6H5O7] being 0.2 mol/L, S/L ratio being 1:5, temperature being 303 K, holding time being 1 h in each of the two stages, and stirring rate being 300 rpm, the leaching rate of zinc reached 93.4%. In this article, sulfate ammonium recycled technology also reveals its unique advantage in processing low-grade zinc oxide ores accompanied by high silicon and high alkaline gangue.

  9. Printed circuit board recycling: Physical processing and copper extraction by selective leaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvas, Flávia P C; Correa, Mónica M Jiménez; Caldas, Marcos P K; de Moraes, Viviane T; Espinosa, Denise C R; Tenório, Jorge A S

    2015-12-01

    Global generation of waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) is about 40 million tons per year. Constant increase in WEEE generation added to international legislations has improved the development of processes for materials recovery and sustainability of electrical and electronic industry. This paper describes a new hydrometallurgical route (leaching process) to recycle printed circuit boards (PCBs) from printers to recover copper. Methodology included PCBs characterization and a combined route of physical and hydrometallurgical processing. Magnetic separation, acid digestion and chemical analysis by ICP-OES were performed. On leaching process were used two stages: the first one in a sulfuric media and the second in an oxidant media. The results showed that the PCBs composition was 74.6 wt.% of non-magnetic material and 25.4 wt.% of magnetic one. The metallic fraction corresponded to 44.0 wt.%, the polymeric to 28.5 wt.% and the ceramic to 27.5 wt.%. The main metal was copper and its initial content was 32.5 wt.%. On sulfuric leaching 90 wt.% of Al, 40 wt.% of Zn and 8.6 wt.% of Sn were extracted, whereas on oxidant leaching tests the extraction percentage of Cu was 100 wt.%, of Zn 60 wt.% and of Al 10 wt.%. At the end of the hydrometallurgical processing was obtained 100% of copper extraction and the recovery factor was 98.46%, which corresponds to a 32 kg of Cu in 100 kg of PCB. PMID:26323203

  10. Modelling of long-term dynamic leaching tests applied to solidified/stabilised waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Windt, Laurent; Badreddine, Rabia

    2007-01-01

    The paper aims at simulating the closed-system dynamic leaching of a cement-based monolith containing lead with the numerical reactive transport code HYTEC in a 3D-cylindrical geometry. The model considers, simultaneously, the chemical evolution of pore water, the progression of mineralogical alteration fronts, and the concomitant release of elements from the S/S waste. In good agreement with the experiment, element releases were found to be mainly controlled by either diffusion (Na, K, and, to a lesser extent, Cl), by surface dissolution (Ca, Si) or by a mixed evolution (Pb, SO4). All of the calculated mineralogical transformations take place in a thin layer beyond the monolith surface. Consequently, modelling of Ca, Si and SO4 releases was quite sensitive to the node size of the simulation grid and was improved by taking into account the increase of porosity and effective diffusion coefficient due to mineral dissolution in the leached layer. In agreement with experimental results, the deepest front corresponds under closed-system conditions to portlandite dissolution and calcium silicate hydrates CSH 1.8 transformation into CSH of lower Ca/Si ratio. A second, distinct and intermediate, front is made by ettringite dissolution. The network of CSH is globally preserved in the leached layer, complete dissolution occurring over a very small thickness only. Finally, hydrotalcite precipitation in the leached layer is expected by modelling due to pH drop. PMID:17005384

  11. Role of Some Isolated Fungi in The Biological Leaching of Uranium From Low Grade Cretaceous Sandstone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microbiological leaching has been used as an alternative approach to conventional hydrometallurgical methods of uranium extraction. In this investigation, the biological leaching of uranium by isolated fungi from low grade sandstone was studied. Five isolates of fungi were obtained from sandstone sample. Cladosporium oxysporum and Penicilluim stoloniferum exhibited high potential in generating a variety of organic acids effective for uranium extraction. The percentages of organic acid produced by fungi were determined. By-product such as molasses was tested. The maximum dissolution of uranium was achieved at the following conditions; incubation period 6 days, pulp density 1:3 g/L, ph 3.5 and at 30 degree C. Maximum solubilization of uranium with values of 54% and 67% were achieved by Cladosporium oxysporum and Penicilluim stoloniferum, respectively. From properly prepared pregnant bio-leach liquor, the leached uranium was recovered in the form of marketable products (3UO3NH3 .5H2O) using classical chemical technique and the product was confirmed using XRD techniques

  12. Best Management Practices for Minimizing Nitrate Leaching from Container-Grown Nurseries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianjun Chen

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Containerized plant production represents an extremely intensive agricultural practice; 40,000 to 300,000 containers may occupy one acre of surface area to which a large amount of chemical fertilizer is applied. Currently, recommended fertilizer application rates for the production of containerized nursery ornamental plants are in excess of plant requirements, and up to 50% of the applied fertilizers may run off or be leached from containers. Among the nutrients leached or allowed to runoff, nitrogen (N is the most abundant and is of major concern as the source of ground and surface water pollution. In this report, current N fertilizer application rates for different container-grown nursery ornamental plants, the amount of nitrate leaching or runoff from containers, and the potential for nitrate contamination of ground and surface water are discussed. In contrast, our best N management practices include: (1 applying fertilizers based on plant species need; (2 improving potting medium�s nutrient holding capacity using obscure mineral additives; (3 using controlled-release fertilizers; and (4 implementing zero runoff irrigation or fertigation delivery systems that significantly reduce nitrate leaching or runoff in containerized plant production and encourage dramatic changes in N management.

  13. Leaching and heating process as alternative to produce fish protein powder from Kilka (Clupeonella cultiventris caspia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KAVEH RAHMANIFARAH

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Rahmanifarah K, Shabanpour B, Shaviklo AR, Aalami M. 2014. Leaching and heating process as alternative to produce fish protein powder from Kilka (Clupeonella cultiventris caspia. Nusantara Bioscience 6: 1-6. The effect of protein extraction procedures (leached mince and heated suspension on selected properties of fish protein powder (proximate composition, pH, color, density, viscosity, fat adsorption, emulsifying capacity, emulsifying stability, foaming capacity, foaming stability, WBC, protein solubility in water, hygroscopicity, Trichloroacetic acid (TCA-soluble peptides and free sulfhydryl groups was investigated. Results showed that Fish protein powder (FPP produced by leaching mince (LM have higher protein, moisture, ash, pH, L*, viscosity, emulsion capacity, emulsion stability, foam capacity, foam stability, water binding capacity (WBC, protein solubility, hygroscopicity, TCA soluble peptides and free sulfhydryl group content than heated suspension (HS (P0.05. Overall, it was observed that high temperature during heating of suspension in HS method makes possible protein denaturation and aggregation. Consequently, based on functional, chemical and physical properties, extraction of fish protein by leaching process was found to be suitable for the production of fish protein powder.

  14. Kinetics of the leaching of TiO2 from Ti-bearing blast furnace slag

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiao-hua; GAI Guo-sheng; YANG Yu-fen; SUI Zhi-tong; LI Li; FU Jian-xia

    2008-01-01

    Ti-bearing blast furnace slag is a valuable secondary resource containing about 24 percent of TiO2. In this paper a process of leaching Ti-bearing blast furnace slag with sulfuric acid to recover TiO2, and the kinetics of that reaction, are described. Under laboratory conditions the rate is controlled by a chemical reaction. The leaching reaction is in accord with a shrinking un-reacted-core model. The apparent reaction order of the leaching reaction was 1.222 and the apparent activation energy was 87.01 kJ/mol. The model fits the observed data well until 90% of the TiO2 has be leached from the particles. The model disagrees with observations during later periods of the reaction because the solution becomes supersaturated with Ti ions, which precipitate as H2TiO4. The assumptions of constant reactant concentration and that there is no effect from the product layer on diffusion, also cause the model to deviate from the actual values.

  15. Leaching from MSWI bottom ash: Evaluation of non-equilibrium in column percolation experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyks, Jiri; Astrup, Thomas; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2009-01-01

    applied at liquid-to-solid (L/S) ratios of L/S 2 L/kg and 12 L/kg, respectively. Concentrations of Na, K, Cl-, Ca. Si, SO42-, Al, Cu, Ni, Mo, Ba, Pb, Zn, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) were monitored throughout the entire leaching period: geochemical modeling was used to identify non......-equilibrium-induced changes in the solubility control. Despite both physical and chemical non-equilibrium, the Columns were found to provide adequate information for readily soluble compounds (i.e., Na, Cl-, and K) and solubility-controlled elements (i.e., Ca, SO42-, Ba, Si, Al, Zn, and Pb). The leaching Of Cu and Ni was...... shown to depend strongly on DOC leaching, which was likely affected by physical non-equilibrium during flow interruptions. Consequently, the leaching of Cu and Ni in the undisturbed Columns Was shown to be by about one order of magnitude lower compared with the interrupted column. The results indicate...

  16. Weatherability and Leach Resistance of Wood Impregnated with Nano-Zinc Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nami Kartal S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Southern pine specimens vacuum-treated with nano-zinc oxide (nano-ZnO dispersions were evaluated for leach resistance and UV protection. Virtually, no leaching occurred in any of the nano-ZnO–treated specimens in a laboratory leach test, even at the highest retention of 13 kg/m3. However, specimens treated with high concentrations of nano-ZnO showed 58–65% chemical depletion after 12 months of outdoor exposure. Protection from UV damage after 12 months exposure is visibly obvious on both exposed and unexposed surfaces compared to untreated controls. Graying was markedly diminished, although checking occurred in all specimens. Nano-zinc oxide treatment at a concentration of 2.5% or greater provided substantial resistance to water absorption following 12 months of outdoor exposure compared to untreated and unweathered southern pine. We conclude that nano-zinc oxide can be utilized in new wood preservative formulations to impart resistance to leaching, water absorption and UV damage of wood.

  17. Weatherability and Leach Resistance of Wood Impregnated with Nano-Zinc Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Southern pine specimens vacuum-treated with nano-zinc oxide (nano-ZnO) dispersions were evaluated for leach resistance and UV protection. Virtually, no leaching occurred in any of the nano-ZnO–treated specimens in a laboratory leach test, even at the highest retention of 13 kg/m3. However, specimens treated with high concentrations of nano-ZnO showed 58–65% chemical depletion after 12 months of outdoor exposure. Protection from UV damage after 12 months exposure is visibly obvious on both exposed and unexposed surfaces compared to untreated controls. Graying was markedly diminished, although checking occurred in all specimens. Nano-zinc oxide treatment at a concentration of 2.5% or greater provided substantial resistance to water absorption following 12 months of outdoor exposure compared to untreated and unweathered southern pine. We conclude that nano-zinc oxide can be utilized in new wood preservative formulations to impart resistance to leaching, water absorption and UV damage of wood. PMID:20730119

  18. ToF-SIMS analysis for leaching studies of potash–lime–silica glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the durability to acidic solutions of two kinds of potash–lime–silica glasses with compositions typical for mediaeval stained glass was investigated. The low amount of network formers such as silica and alumina, and the high amount of network modifiers such as potassium and calcium, give to the glass a lower chemical stability compared to modern glass. Studies on its durability are of interest to understand degradation mechanisms. In particular the leaching procedure was focused on determining any correlation between the type of acid and the corrosion of glass independently from the pH value, which was kept constant during the different acidic treatments. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) is a valuable tool to study compositional variations of glass, giving useful information concerning provenance, effects of the conservation environment, of weathering or leaching processes and about the compositional differences between the corroded layer and the bulk as a function of depth. In spite of that the insulating properties of glass, the surface roughness and the parameters used for the measurements can lead to possible misinterpretations of the results; in this paper these difficulties are discussed, in order to better interpret the analyses performed on leached glass. ToF-SIMS data are influenced by strong matrix effects making quantification difficult; for this reason the quantitative composition and surface morphology of the leached layer were additionally investigated with scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM–EDX)

  19. Acute pulmonary rejection in heart and lung transplant recipients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acute pulmonary rejection occurs in up to 50% of patients undergoing heart and lung transplant procedures. These patients are also susceptible to volume overload and pneumonia. To evaluate the radiographic and high-resolution CT appearances of acute pulmonary rejection, we compared chest radiographs and high-resolution CT scans with the clinical findings and with histologic and lavage data from 91 serial transbronchial biopsies in 13 patients. The radiographic appearance of acute pulmonary rejection is characterized by prominent septal lines and pleural effusions. The authors conclude that in the appropriate clinical setting, the appearance of new pleural effusions and prominent septal lines is highly suggestive of acute pulmonary rejections

  20. Experimental diabetes exacerbates skin transplant rejection in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Pola dos Reis

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate the effect of chronic experimental diabetes on skin allografts in rats as a simple model that could clarify some basic aspects and mechanisms involved in transplant rejection in diabetes compared to normal animals. METHODS: Skin grafting was performed with fragments of tail skin from sex matched non diabetic Wistar rats engrafted onto the thoracic area of diabetic and non diabetic recipients. Grafts were scored for rejection every other day and were removed on day 14. Skin grafts were graded according to the following itens: no rejection; or rejection including: acute, chronic and humoral and/or cellular rejection. Statistical analysis was performed using JMP 5.1 software with ANOVA test. Diabetes was induced with IV injection of alloxan 40 mg/kg. RESULTS: Inflammatory vascular infiltrate compromising the endothelium with areas of fibrinoid necrosis and thrombosis characteristics of acute humoral rejection and subendothelial lymphocyte infiltrate typical of acute cellular rejection were significantly (p<0.003 higher in diabetic than in non diabetic recipients as the inflammatory infiltrate in the epidermis (p<0.002. CONCLUSION: Skin transplant acute rejection from chronic alloxan diabetic rats to normal tissue was significantly more intense than the acute rejection between normal rats.

  1. Community rejection following sexual assault as ‘forced migration’

    OpenAIRE

    AJ Morgen

    2013-01-01

    When women are banished from their communities following sexual assault, this rejection should be considered an act of forced migration by the administrators of truth commission reparations programmes.

  2. Groundwater leaching of neutralized and untreated acid-leached uranium-mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tailings neutralization was examined to determine the effect of neutralization on contaminant release. Column leaching of acid extracted uranium mill tailings from Exxon Highland Mill, Wyoming, Pathfinder Gas Hills Mill, Wyoming, and the Dawn Midnite Mill, Washington, resulted in the flushing of high concentrations of salts in the first four pore volumes of leachate, followed by a steady decrease to the original groundwater salt concentrations. Neutralization decreased the concentration of salts and radionuclides leaching from the tailings and decreased the volume of solution required to return the solution to the groundwater pH and EC. Radium-226 and uranium-238 leached quickly from the tailings in the initial pore volumes of both neutralized and unneutralized tailings, and then decreased significantly. 6 figures, 5 tables

  3. DYNAMIC RE-CLUSTERING LEACH-BASED (DR-LEACH PROTOCOL FOR WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdallah Ijjeh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A Wireless Sensor Network (WSN contains a large number of sensor nodes equipped with limited energy supplies. In most applications, sensor nodes are deployed in a random fashion. Therefore, battery replacement or charging is considered not practical. As a result, routing protocols must be energy-efficient to prolong the network’s lifetime. In this paper, we propose a new Dynamic Re-clustering LEACH-Based protocol (DR-LEACH which aims to reduce the energy consumption and extending the network’s lifetime. The idea is to balance energy consumption of Cluster Heads (CHs by generating clusters with almost equal number of nodes during each round of the network life time. To perform this, we first calculate the optimal number of CHs in each round, and based on that we calculate the optimal size of each cluster. Results show that the proposed protocol improves network lifetime and reduces overall energy consumption compared to LEACH and BCDCP protocols.

  4. Continuous-flow leaching studies of crushed and cored SYNROC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both crushed (150 to 300 μm) and cored (1.8 mm diameter) samples of SYNROC have been leached with the single-pass continuous-flow leaching equipment. Crushed samples of Cs-hollandite were also leached in a similar experiment. Temperatures used were 25 and 750C and leachates were 0.03 N NaHCO3 and distilled water. Leaching rates from SYNROC C were ranked Cs > Sr greater than or equal to Ca > Ba > Zr. A comparison of leaching rates is made between crushed SYNROC, cored SYNROC, and PNL 76-68 glass beads. This comparison depends on how the surface areas are determined for each sample. Based on geometric surface areas for SYNROC cores and glass beads Cs leach rates from SYNROC compare well with both Na and Np leached from the glass. The other elements leached from SYNROC are lower than Na and Np leached from glass. They also vary for each element while glass shows nearly the same leach rate for both Na and Np

  5. Two stage column leaching of uranium from uraninite ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The leaching process of uraninite ore was divided into the acidification and bacterial leaching stages, and the two stage leaching experiments and the control were conducted with 3 columns, each being charged with 20 kg uraninite ore. The ore contained 0.113% uranium, 1.859% iron and large amounts of silica and alumina. In the acidification stage, high to low concentration sulfuric acid solutions were used to acidify the uranium ore in each column until the pH of the pregnant leach solution from each column was maintained at 2.0. The acidification lasted for 18 d and the uranium recoveries for the three columns reached about 70%. In the bacterial leaching stage, column 1, as the control, continued to be leached with sulfuric acid solution with pH=2.0, column 2, with the bacterial solution based on the indirect leaching mechanism, and column 3, with the bacterial solution based on the direct leaching mechanism. The leaching in this stage was continued until the concentrations of the uranium in the pregnant leach solutions from the three columns amounted to less than 50 mg/L. This stage lasted for 20 d and the final uranium recoveries for columns 1, 2 and 3 reached 73.72%, 78.97% and 75.79%, respectively. (authors)

  6. Life cycle assessment and residue leaching: The importance of parameter, scenario and leaching data selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allegrini, Elisa; Butera, Stefania; Kosson, D.S.;

    2015-01-01

    boundaries. The importance of data quality and parameter selection in the overall LCA results was evaluated, and an innovative method to assess metal transport into the environment was applied, in order to determine emissions to the soil and water compartments for use in an LCA. It was found that toxic...... scenario (e.g. electricity production). Based on the analysis of relevant parameters relative to leaching, and on general results of the study, recommendations are provided regarding the use of leaching data in LCA studies....

  7. Experimental study on bio-leaching of high sulphuric acid consumption uranium ore by adding sulphide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to decrease acid consumption and increase leaching rate, an experiment on bio-leach-ing of low grade uranium ore by adding sulphide was done. Compared with conventional leaching method, the leaching rate of uranium is improved by 3% and the leaching period was reduced to 60 days from 90 days by bio-leaching method of adding sulphide. In order to decrease acid consumption with bio-leaching by adding sulphide obviously, robust bacteria to sulphide should be chosen. (authors)

  8. Equilibrium leach testing of low level waste. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The equilibrium leach test was developed to simulate the chemical conditions in a repository after water has penetrated the near field barriers. The principal components of the repository (the waste, backfill and canister simulant) are equilibrated with water under static conditions to simulate the very low water flows likely to be encountered in the repository. The water is sampled at various times over a 1-2 year period and analysed for radionuclides. Equilibrium leach testing has now been extended to low level wastes and this report describes the effects of different backfill compositions. Later reports will deal with the effects of other variables. A series of experiments have been conducted using four different backfills with ferric floc sludge wastes in both oxidising and reducing environments. The water was sampled at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months and analysed for actinides, fission and activation products and inactive components. It was demonstrated that the activities released depended on the nature of the backfill but not very much on the redox potential of the system. Whereas fission and activation products generally reached steady state values by three months, this was not so for the actinides which had not reached a steady value even after twelve months. Initial experiments using membrane filters indicated this was partly due to the presence of colloidal material in the leachates. Similar tests for the inactive components of the leachates did not show any significant colloidal contribution from these elements except for iron and this only in a few cases. The role of these materials cannot be precluded however, since the amounts required to interact with actinides would be very small and might be difficult to detect. (author)

  9. Anion leaching from refinery oily sludge and ash from incineration of oily sludge stabilized/solidified with cement. Part II. Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamalidis, Athanasios K; Voudrias, Evangelos A

    2008-08-15

    This paper presents the modeling of anion leaching (SO4(2-) and CrO4(2-)) from refinery oily sludge and ash produced by incineration of oily sludge, stabilized/solidified (s/s) with two types of cement, 142.5 and 1142.5. Anion leaching was examined using a sequential toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) test. To elucidate the mechanisms of sulfate and chromate leaching, we employed Visual MINTEQ, incorporating a multiple-problem setup. Specifically, 10-14 different problems, depending on the pH range of the leachates, were connected together in the same run. Each problem corresponded to one pH value of the leachate and the model run covered the pH range of the five sequential TCLP extractions. This modeling approach was tested using chemical equilibrium with or without sorption onto ferrihydrite. Good agreement between experimental and modeling results was obtained for sulfate leaching from solidified oily sludge and ash, considering surface complexation onto ferrihydrite on top of chemical equilibrium controlled by gypsum at pH ettringite at pH >11. Chromate leaching was described by chemical equilibrium, controlled by CaCrO4(s) (at pH ettringite (at pH >11). PMID:18767676

  10. Corneal allograft rejection: Risk factors, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dua Harminder

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in corneal graft technology, including donor tissue retrieval, storage and surgical techniques, have greatly improved the clinical outcome of corneal grafts. Despite these advances, immune mediated corneal graft rejection remains the single most important cause of corneal graft failure. Several host factors have been identified as conferring a "high risk" status to the host. These include: more than two quadrant vascularisation, with associated lymphatics, which augment the afferent and efferent arc of the immune response; herpes simplex keratitis; uveitis; silicone oil keratopathy; previous failed (rejected grafts; "hot eyes"; young recipient age; and multiple surgical procedures at the time of grafting. Large grafts, by virtue of being closer to the host limbus, with its complement of vessels and antigen-presenting Langerhans cells, also are more susceptible to rejection. The diagnosis of graft rejection is entirely clinical and in its early stages the clinical signs could be subtle. Graft rejection is largely mediated by the major histocompatibility antigens, minor antigens and perhaps blood group ABO antigens and some cornea-specific antigens. Just as rejection is mediated by active immune mediated events, the lack of rejection (tolerance is also sustained by active immune regulatory mechanisms. The anterior chamber associated immune deviation (ACAID and probably, conjunctiva associated lymphoid tissue (CALT induced mucosal tolerance, besides others, play an important role. Although graft rejection can lead to graft failure, most rejections can be readily controlled if appropriate management is commenced at the proper time. Topical steroids are the mainstay of graft rejection management. In the high-risk situations however, systemic steroids, and other immunosuppressive drugs such as cyclosporin and tacrolimus (FK506 are of proven benefit, both for treatment and prevention of rejection.

  11. Leaching of 210Po in human saliva from smokeless tobacco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Use of smokeless tobacco (SLT) is associated with cancer of the oral cavity. 210Po, a known carcinogen present in SLT may leach into the saliva when the snuff is held in the mouth. Alpha emission from leached 210Po can cause oral tissue damage, especially in the presence of non healing ulcers seen frequently in snuff users' mouth. Leaching of 210Po from SLT in human saliva was determined for six popular US snuff brands. 210Po was leached into human saliva for 30 min, separated radiochemically and its activity was determined by α-counting. Approximately 2-10% of 210Po present in SLT was observed to leach. Annual exposure from leached 210Po, based on average daily consumption of 15 g of SLT, was calculated to range from 1.1 to 3.8 Bq year-1. (author)

  12. Leaching models of simulated and real paraffin wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several leaching models were developed in order to analyze the results of leaching test for simulated and real paraffin wastes. In case of simulated paraffin wastes, the experimental results could be satisfactorily explained by shrinking core model (SCM) based on diffusion-controlled dissolution reaction. Real paraffin wastes generated from domestic nuclear power plants showed the leaching behaviors of asymmetric breakthrough curves (BTCs) which were characterized by initial very high leaching rates and subsequent very low leaching rates. For the analysis of real paraffin wastes, empirical model (EM), bulk diffusion model (BDM), modified shrinking core model (MSCM), and uniform reaction model (URM) were suggested and compared with one another. If real paraffin wastes could be more uniformly manufactured, their leaching behaviors would be expected to be similar to those of simulated paraffin wastes

  13. Leaching and recycling of zinc from liquid waste sediments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Bing; GAO Hui-mei; CHAI Li-yuan; SHU Yu-de

    2008-01-01

    The selective leaching and recovery of zinc in a zinciferous sediment from a synthetic wastewater treatment was investigated. The main composition of the sediment includes 6% zinc and other metal elements such as Ca, Fe, Cu, Mg. The effects of sulfuric acid concentration, temperature, leaching time and the liquid-to-solid ratio on the leaching rate of zinc were studied by single factor and orthogonal experiments. The maximum difference of leaching rate between zinc and iron, 89.85%, was obtained by leaching under 170 g/L H2SO4 in liquid-to-solid ratio 4.2 mL/g at 65 "C for 1 h, and the leaching rates of zinc and iron were 91.20% and 1.35%, respectively.

  14. Nitrate leaching in an Andisol treated with different types of fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Morihiro; Zhao, Bingzi; Ozaki, Yasuo; Yoneyama, Tadakatsu

    2003-01-01

    Nitrate (NO3) leaching was studied in an Andisol treated with four N fertilizers (SC: swine compost, CU: coated urea, AN: ammonium N, or NF: no fertilizer) for 7 years. Sweet corn (Zea mays L.) was grown in summer, followed by Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa L. var. amplexicaulis) or cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata) in autumn each year. In chemical fertilizer plots treated with AN or CU, NO(3)-N concentrations in soil water at 1-m depth increased markedly in the summer of the second year and fluctuated between 30 and 60 mg l(-1). In the SC plot, NO(3)-N concentration started increasing in the fourth year, reaching the same level as in the AN and CU plots in the late period of the experiment. In the NF plot, NO(3)-N concentration was about 10 mg l(-1) for the first 4 years and decreased to 5 mg l(-1). The potential NO(3)-N concentrations by an N and water balance equation satisfactorily predicted NO(3)-N concentration in the AN and CU plots, but substantially overestimated that in the SC plot, presumably because a large portion of N from SC first accumulated in soil in the organic form. Our results indicate that, under the Japanese climate (Asian monsoon), excessive N from chemical fertilizers applied to Andisols can cause substantial NO3 leaching, while compost application is promising to establish high yields and low N leaching during a few years but would cause the same level of NO3 leaching as in chemically fertilized plots over longer periods. PMID:12685774

  15. RMDF leach-field decontamination. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the decontamination effort was to place the Radioactive Materials Disposal Facility (RMDF) leach field in a condition suitable for release for unrestricted use. Radioactively contaminated soil was excavated from the leach field to produce a condition of contamination as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). The contaminated soil was boxed and shipped to an NRC-licensed burial site at Beatty, Nevada, and to the DOE burial site at Hanford, Washington. The soil excavation project successfully reduced the contamination level in the leach field to background levels, except for less than 0.6 mCi of Sr-90 and trace amounts of Cs-137 that are isolated in cracks in the bedrock. The cracks are greater than 10 ft below the surface and have been sealed with a bituminous asphalt mastic. A pathways analysis for radiation exposure to humans from the remaining radionuclides was performed, assuming intensive home gardening, and the results show that the total first year whole body dose equivalent would be about 0.1 mrem/year. This dose equivalent is a projection for the hypothetical ingestion of vegetables grown on the site. Assuming that an average adult consumes 64 kg of green leafy vegetables per year and that the entire yearly supply could be grown on the site, the amount of ingested Sr-90 and Cs-137 is calculated to be 1100 pCi/year and 200 pCi/year. This ingested quantity would produce a total first year whole body dose equivalent of 0.10 mrem, using the accepted soil-to-plant transfer factors of 0.0172 and 0.010 for Sr-90 and Cs-137, respectively. The whole body dose equivalent exposure value of 0.1 mrem/year is far below the tentative limit established by NRC of 5 mrem/year for areas released for unrestricted use

  16. Probable leaching mechanisms for spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, researchers in the Waste/Rock Interaction Technology Program are studying spent fuel as a possible waste form for the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation. This paper presents probable leaching mechanisms for spent fuel and discusses current progress in identifying and understanding the leaching process. During the past year, experiments were begun to study the complex leaching mechanism of spent fuel. The initial work in this investigation was done with UO2, which provided the most information possible on the behavior of the spent-fuel matrix without encountering the very high radiation levels associated with spent fuel. Both single-crystal and polycrystalline UO2 samples were used for this study, and techniques applicable to remote experimentation in a hot cell are being developed. The effects of radiation are being studied in terms of radiolysis of water and surface activation of the UO2. Dissolution behavior and kinetics of UO2 were also investigated by electrochemical measurement techniques. These data will be correlated with those acquired when spent fuel is tested in a hot cell. Oxidation effects represent a major area of concern in evaluating the stability of spent fuel. Dissolution of UO2 is greatly increased in an oxidizing solution because the dissolution is then controlled by the formation of hexavalent uranium. In solutions containing very low oxygen levels (i.e., reducing solutions), oxidation-induced dissolution may be possible via a previously oxidized surface, through exposure to air during storage, or by local oxidants such as O2 and H2O2 produced from radiolysis of water and radiation-activated UO2 surfaces. The effects of oxidation not only increase the dissolution rate, but could lead to the disintegration of spent fuel into fine fragments

  17. Leaching of DOC, DN, and inorganic constituents from scrap tires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selbes, Meric; Yilmaz, Ozge; Khan, Abdul A; Karanfil, Tanju

    2015-11-01

    One concern for recycle and reuse of scrap tires is the leaching of tire constituents (organic and inorganic) with time, and their subsequent potential harmful impacts in environment. The main objective of this study was to examine the leaching of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved nitrogen (DN), and selected inorganic constituents from scrap tires. Different sizes of tire chips and crumb rubber were exposed to leaching solutions with pH's ranging from 3.0 to 10.0 for 28days. The leaching of DOC and DN were found to be higher for smaller size tire chips; however, the leaching of inorganic constituents was independent of the size. In general, basic pH conditions increased the leaching of DOC and DN, whereas acidic pH conditions led to elevated concentrations of metals. Leaching was minimal around the neutral pH values for all the monitored parameters. Analysis of the leaching rates showed that components associated with the rubbery portion of the tires (DOC, DN, zinc, calcium, magnesium, etc.) exhibited an initial rapid followed by a slow release. On the other hand, a constant rate of leaching was observed for iron and manganese, which are attributed to the metal wires present inside the tires. Although the total amounts that leached varied, the observed leaching rates were similar for all tire chip sizes and leaching solutions. Operation under neutral pH conditions, use of larger size tire chips, prewashing of tires, and removal of metal wires prior to application will reduce the impact of tire recycle and reuse. PMID:25712610

  18. Leaching of vanadium from sulphuric acid manufacture spent catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    García, Diego Juan; Lozano Blanco, Luis Javier; Mulero Vivancos, María Dolores

    2001-01-01

    Recovery of vanadium contained in spent catalysts from the manufacture of sulphuric acid has been studied in this work, resulting in an industrial multistage process for the treatment of them avoiding direct deposition or dumping. Characterization of supplied spent catalysts samples, confirmed vanadium levels showed in the literature. The study of variables influencing leaching process: type of leaching agent, leaching agent concentration, S/L ratio, stirring speed and temperature, allows to ...

  19. Leaching refuse after sphalerite mineral for extraction zinc and cobalt

    OpenAIRE

    S. Brožová; J. Drápala; Kursa, M.; Pustějovská, P.; S. Jursová

    2016-01-01

    The paper deals with a possibility of zinc and cobalt extraction from refuse after sphalerite mineral leaching. It contains theoretic analysis of hydrometallurgical processes. Practical part describes samples and their leaching in 10 % and 20 % sulphuric acid. In the end of the paper it is evaluated under which conditions the highest yield of zinc and cobalt from refuse after sulphide ore leaching is reached. Web of Science 55 3 499 497

  20. Leaching refuse after sphalerite mineral for extraction zinc and cobalt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Brožová

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with a possibility of zinc and cobalt extraction from refuse after sphalerite mineral leaching. It contains theoretic analysis of hydrometallurgical processes. Practical part describes samples and their leaching in 10 % and 20 % sulphuric acid. In the end of the paper it is evaluated under which conditions the highest yield of zinc and cobalt from refuse after sulphide ore leaching is reached.

  1. Computer Modeling of Leaching of Heavy Metal from Cementitious Waste

    OpenAIRE

    Peng Hu; Wei Dai

    2013-01-01

    Thermodynamic equilibrium model was used to simulate the results of leaching heavy metal from cementitious wastes. Modeling results of the leached major element concentrations for samples agreed well with the leaching test using the set of pure minerals and solid solutions present in the database. The model revealed Pb and Cd were predominantly incorporated within the calcium silicate hydrate matrix while a greater portion of Cd exist as discrete particles in the cement pores. Precipitation w...

  2. Leaching of Cs+ and Co2+ from cement matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the safety for disposal of radioactive cement-waste matrix, the leaching Cs+ and Co2+, has been studied. This paper also presents results from studies made to determine the influence of bentonite and zeolite in immobilization of these metal ions. Leaching tests were carried out in accordance with a method by Hespe during 98 days. From the leaching data the apparent diffusivity of cobalt and cesium in the cement matrix was measured. (author)

  3. Reductive Acid Leaching of Low Grade Manganese Ores

    OpenAIRE

    Alok Prasad Das; Sarpras Swain; Shriyanka Panda; Nilotpala Pradhan; Lala Behari Sukla

    2012-01-01

    Manganese recoveries from low-grade ores using organic acids as reducing agents were investigated in the present work. The acid leaching potential of both oxalic acid and citric acid were estimated. Manganese leaching amount were measured by using standard manganese curve and estimated by titration method. Effects of various acid concentrations on leaching efficiency were studied. The observed result suggested prominent manganese recovery of 66% by oxalic acid at 2 M concentration whereas cit...

  4. Grain legumes and nitrate leaching: significance and prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, E.S.; Hauggaard-Nielsen, H; Aveline, A. (collab.); Crozat, Y.

    2004-01-01

    The amount of internationally published evidence on the effects of grain legumes on nitrate leaching is sparse and some studies may have weak points. Nevertheless, this mini-review indicates that the level of N leaching is 0–20 kg N ha-1 greater after pea than after cereals. Methods to prevent N leaching should be further developed and there is a need to genetically improve the root systems of grain legumes.

  5. Nitrate leaching in grazed grasslands of different composition and age

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksen, J.; Vinther, F.P.

    2002-01-01

    In a field experiment at Research Centre Foulum a suction cup technique was used to investigate nitrate leaching from grassland depending on composition (grass-clover or perennial ryegrass), management (grazing or cutting) and age of the swards. In 1997-2001 was investigated the successive nitrate leaching from 4-7 year old grazed grass-clover and ryegrass with cut plots of similar age and spring barley as reference. In 2000-2001 the simultaneous nitrate leaching from newly established swards...

  6. Leaching of /sup 137/Cs from an epoxide resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leaching of /sup 137/Cs has been found to be independent of surface-area-to-volume ratio and leachant renewal frequency. Short-term leaching can be satisfactorily described by a simple diffusion model. Longer-term data are better explained by including a first-order reaction combined with diffusion. γ-irradiation to 10/sup 7/ Gy has little effect on leaching behaviour of samples containing IX resin

  7. PIXE/RBS as a tool to study cementitious materials: Application to the dynamic leaching of concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The suitability of the application of Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) techniques such as Particle Induced X-ray Emission spectrometry (PIXE) and Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) to elemental depth profiling in concrete is analysed, studying hardened samples of concrete prior to and after a dynamic leaching test. A calibration of the data has been done by comparing the results obtained by IBA techniques with those obtained by Chemical and Thermogravimetric Analysis (TG/DTA). From PIXE and RBS data relevant information about the migration of minor elements, within the concrete matrix after leaching is obtained.

  8. Ion implantation: effect on flux and rejection properties of NF membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abitoye, Joshua Olufemi; Mukherjee, J Parna; Jones, Kimberly

    2005-09-01

    Nanofiltration (NF) membranes typically carry a net electric charge, enabling electrostatic interactions to play a pivotal role in the rejection of species such as metals, nitrates, and other charged contaminants. In this study, two types of polymeric NF membranes, polyamide and cellulose acetate, were modified by ion implantation to increase the effective surface charge of the membranes. The modified membranes contain implanted ions in the membrane matrix, inducing a discrete, permanent charge in the active membrane layer. The presence of a permanent charge in the membrane matrix allows for increased electrostatic repulsive forces throughout the entire pH range. Streaming potential measurements were conducted as a function of pH for the modified and unmodified membranes to determine the effect of ion implantation on the zeta potential of the membranes. Rejection experiments were performed in order to quantify the effect of increased electrostatic repulsion on ion rejection, and flux measurements quantified the effect of the modification on permeability. Results indicate that electrostatic interactions near the membrane surface can affect rejection; however, the extent of the effect of increased membrane charge depends on physical-chemical characteristics of the membrane. Increased negative zeta potential of the modified membranes resulted in slightly higher rejection of salts with divalent co-ions from the membrane, with less increase observed with salts of monovalent co-ions. Modified membranes were less permeable than the unmodified membranes. Results of this research hold implications in membrane synthesis and modification studies as well as choice of membranes for water treatment applications. PMID:16190203

  9. Lead sulphate leaching by sodium chloride solution

    OpenAIRE

    Conić Vesna T.; Pešovski Branka D.; Cvetkovski Vladimir B.; Stanojević-Šimšić Zdenka S.; Dragulović Suzana S.; Simonović Danijela B.; Dimitrijević Silvana B.

    2013-01-01

    Bioleaching treatment of complex multi-metallic Cu-Zn-Pb-Ag-Au mineral concentrates leds to the formation, besides easily soluble zinc and cooper sulphates, of hardly soluble lead (II) sulfate (PbSO4) sludge. To determine the leaching parameters of PbSO4 with NaCl in the bioleaching residue, lead sulphate solution was synthetically prepared. The effect of process parameters, namely NaCl concentration, solid:liquid phase ratio, processing time, temperature and Cl ions was examined. It wa...

  10. Coupling GIS with Nitrogen Leaching Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Geographical information systems (GIS) are increasingly being applied to surface and subsurface flow and transport modeling issues. In this paper, more attentions are focused on the methodology and strategies of coupling GIS with non-point pollution models. Suggestions are made on how to best integrate current available or selected nitrogen leaching models, especially in the aspect of programming development so as to effectively and flexibly address the specific tasks. The new possibilities for dealing with non-point pollution problems at a regional scale are provided in the resulting integrated approach, including embedding grid-based GIS components in models.

  11. Chronic allograft rejection: A significant hurdle to transplant success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Kloc

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The state-of-the-art immunosuppression drugs do not ensure indefinite transplant survival, and most transplants are continuously lost to chronic rejection even years posttransplantation. This form of rejection is responsible for long-term failure of transplanted organs. The mechanisms involved in development of chronic rejection are not well-understood. One of the main features of chronic rejection is progressive luminal narrowing of graft vessels, which results in compromised blood flow, ischemia, cell death, and finally graft failure. All the existing immunosuppressive regimens are targeting acute rejection, and at present there is no available therapy for prevention of chronic rejection. Chronic rejection involves two major, but interrelated responses: The first is the host immune response against the transplant mediated primarily by alloreactive T and B cells, and the second is injury and repair of the graft (vasculopathy of graft vessels. Here we focus on recent advances in understanding the cellular and molecular aspects of chronic transplant vasculopathy and function of macrophages, topics pivotal for development of novel antichronic rejection therapies.

  12. Heterosexual Rejection and Mate Choice: A Sociometer Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin eZHANG

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies about the effects of social rejection on individuals’ social behaviors have produced mixed results and tend to study mating behaviors from a static point of view. However, mate selection in essence is a dynamic process, and therefore sociometer theory opens up a new perspective for studying mating and its underlying practices. Based on this theory and using self-perceived mate value in the relationship between heterosexual rejection and mate choice as a mediating role, this current study examined the effects of heterosexual rejection on mate choice in two experiments. Results showed that heterosexual rejection significantly reduced self-perceived mate value, expectation, and behavioral tendencies, while heterosexual acceptance indistinctively increased these measures. Self-perceived mate value did not serve as a mediator in the relationship between heterosexual rejection and mate expectation, but it mediated the relationship between heterosexual rejection and mating behavior tendencies towards potential objects. Moreover, individuals evaded both rejection and irrelevant people when suffering from rejection.

  13. 48 CFR 1419.505 - Rejecting Small Business Administration recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Rejecting Small Business Administration recommendations. (a) A written justification in support of the CO's... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rejecting Small Business Administration recommendations. 1419.505 Section 1419.505 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT...

  14. 48 CFR 19.505 - Rejecting Small Business Administration recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Small Business Administration recommendations. (a) If the contracting officer rejects a recommendation... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rejecting Small Business Administration recommendations. 19.505 Section 19.505 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL...

  15. 48 CFR 219.505 - Rejecting Small Business Administration recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...-Asides for Small Business 219.505 Rejecting Small Business Administration recommendations. (b) The... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rejecting Small Business Administration recommendations. 219.505 Section 219.505 Federal Acquisition Regulations System...

  16. 48 CFR 2919.505 - Rejecting Small Business Administration recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Small Business 2919.505 Rejecting Small Business Administration recommendations. When the SBA... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rejecting Small Business Administration recommendations. 2919.505 Section 2919.505 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT...

  17. Family Rejection Triples Risk for Suicide Attempts by Transgender People

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... contact with their child; there were incidents of domestic violence; children cut off communication; or parents or siblings stopped communicating with the person. In the case of "high" level rejection, the ... study found. A high level of family rejection was tied to a two and a ...

  18. Molecular phenotyping of T cell-mediated rejection

    OpenAIRE

    Chong, Anita S.; Perkins, David L.

    2014-01-01

    A new study has reported a molecular signature of T cell-mediated rejection in human kidney transplant biopsy samples that is enriched for effector T cells, interferon-γ and macrophages. Inhibitors of T cell activation, such as CTLA4 and PDL1, were also prominent, raising the possibility that these immunological constrains could be harnessed by therapies for treating rejection.

  19. A new molecular approach to the diagnosis of acute rejection

    OpenAIRE

    Chandraker, Anil; Strom, Terry B.

    2013-01-01

    Renal biopsy is the gold standard for detection of rejection in kidney transplant recipients but is not considered until evidence of renal dysfunction is apparent. Now, Suthanthiran and colleagues suggest that mRNA levels in urinary cells from these patients might be diagnostic and prognostic of acute cellular rejection.

  20. Rejection Sensitivity in Late Adolescence: Social and Emotional Sequelae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marston, Emily G.; Hare, Amanda; Allen, Joseph P.

    2010-01-01

    This study used longitudinal, multireporter data, in a community sample, to examine the role of rejection sensitivity in late adolescents' social and emotional development. Rejection sensitivity was linked to a relative increase in adolescent depressive and anxiety symptoms over a 3-year period, even after accounting for teens' baseline level of…

  1. Recovery of iron from cyanide tailings with reduction roasting–water leaching followed by magnetic separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Using reduction roasting–water leaching–magnetic separation method, the recovery of iron from cyanide tailings was optimized. ► The recovery of iron was highly depended on the water-leaching process after reduction roasting. ► The results suggest that the method can be effectively used for iron recovery, and the grade of magnetic concentrate and recovery rate can reach 59.11% and 75.12%, respectively. - Abstract: Cyanide tailing is a kind of solid waste produced in the process of gold extraction from gold ore. In this paper, recovery of iron from cyanide tailings was studied with reduction roasting–water leaching process followed by magnetic separation. After analysis of chemical composition and crystalline phase, the effects of different parameters on recovery of iron were chiefly introduced. Systematic studies indicate that the high recovery rate and grade of magnetic concentrate of iron can be achieved under the following conditions: weight ratios of cyanide tailings/activated carbon/sodium carbonate/sodium sulfate, 100:10:3:10; temperature, 50 °C; time, 60 min at the reduction roasting stage; the liquid to solid ratio is 15:1 (ml/g), leaching at 60 °C for 5 min and stirring speed at 20 r/min at water-leaching; exciting current is 2 A at magnetic separation. The iron grade of magnetic concentrate was 59.11% and the recovery ratio was 75.12%. The mineralography of cyanide tailings, roasted product, water-leached sample, magnetic concentrate and magnetic tailings were studied by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) technique. The microstructures of above products except magnetic tailings were also analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy disperse spectroscopy (EDS) to help understand the mechanism.

  2. Comparative evaluation of short-term leach tests for heavy metal release from mineral processing waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Abed, S. R.; Hageman, P.L.; Jegadeesan, G.; Madhavan, N.; Allen, D.

    2006-01-01

    Evaluation of metal leaching using a single leach test such as the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) is often questionable. The pH, redox potential (Eh), particle size and contact time are critical variables in controlling metal stability, not accounted for in the TCLP. This paper compares the leaching behavior of metals in mineral processing waste via short-term extraction tests such as TCLP, Field Leach Test (FLT) used by USGS and deionized water extraction tests. Variation in the extracted amounts was attributed to the use of different particle sizes, extraction fluid and contact time. In the controlled pH experiments, maximum metal extraction was obtained at acidic pH for cationic heavy metals such as Cu, Pb and Zn, while desorption of Se from the waste resulted in high extract concentrations in the alkaline region. Precipitation of iron, caused by a pH increase, probably resulted in co-precipitation and immobilization of Cu, Pb and Zn in the alkaline pH region. A sequential extraction procedure was performed on the original waste and the solid residue from the Eh-pH experiments to determine the chemical speciation and distribution of the heavy metals. In the as-received waste, Cu existed predominantly in water soluble or sulfidic phases, with no binding to carbonates or iron oxides. Similar characteristics were observed for Pb and Zn, while Se existed mostly associated with iron oxides or sulfides. Adsorption/co-precipitation of Cu, Se and Pb on precipitated iron hydroxides was observed in the experimental solid residues, resulting in metal immobilization above pH 7.

  3. The long-term stability of cement - Leaching tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concrete construction in the Swedish repository for long-lived low and intermediate level waste will give a stable chemical near field environment for 105 years. The pH is expected to exceed 12 for the life time for most of the radionuclides in the repository in both saline and non-saline groundwaters. This is shown by static leaching experiments performed in saline and non-saline granitic groundwater conditions. Five gram portions of crushed ordinary Portland cement paste were equilibrated with 20 ml of synthetic saline or non-saline groundwater in a nitrogen atmosphere. Each week 12 ml (60%) of the water was replaced. The withdrawn water was used for chemical analyses and the results were used to monitor the degradation of the cement paste. After eighty weeks, some samples were analysed for mineral composition and compared with the original unleached paste. The results indicated no secondary ettringite or calcite formation. The results also supported the conclusion that the salinity of the contacting water is of minor importance for the long-term performance of the cement paste. 18 refs, 32 figs

  4. Leaching from irradiated nuclear fuel by direct disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the radiological hazards of storing irradiated fuel in geological formations the literature of leaching irradiated LWR fuel in water has been studied. There seems to have been made very few relevant experimental studies. Leach tests are being performed at Batelle-Northwest, Richland, US and some of the results have been published. These results and conclusions are summarized and discussed. The relative leachability of the elements decrease in the order of Cs gt Sb gt Sr + Y gt Pu gt Cm. The cesium based periodic leach rate for irradiated fuel fragments are similar to the based leach rate for borosilicate glass containing radioactive waste. (author)

  5. Carbonate leaching of uranium and hydrogen peroxide stabilizer therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the carbonate leaching process for the solution mining of subterranean uranium containing formations in which an injection well is drilled and completed within the uranium formation; alkaline carbonate uranium leaching solution and sufficient hydrogen peroxide are injected through the injection wells into the formation whereby uranium values are produced from production wells, characterized by providing in the leaching solution a mixture of 1-hydroxyethylidene-1,1-diphosphonic acid and an alkali metal pyrophosphate in a weight ratio of from 1 to 10 to 10 to 1, the amount of said mixture being sufficient to inhibit decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide in said leaching solution

  6. Leaching of polyphase nuclear waste ceramics: microstructural and phase characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The leaching of complex polyphase nuclear waste ceramics is described in the context of the geochemically established dissolution behavior of the constituent phases. Static leach tests conducted on ceramic monoliths in deionized water, in simulated silicate, and in brine groundwaters, conforming to Materials Characterization Center standards and an accelerated, microscopic leach test, were used to identify the processes. Dissolution and formation of surface passivation layers are discussed in terms of hydrolysis and the adsorption of the metal hydroxocomplexes onto the monolith surface. The factors observed to affect dissolution are pertinent to the leaching of other polyphase nuclear waste ceramics. 11 figures, 1 table

  7. Development of improved leaching techniques for vitrified radioactive waste products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A critical review of the current techniques for evaluating the leach resistance of vitrified radioactive wastes has been made. Inadequacy of the available leaching techniques, with respect to their adoption as standard technique on an international scale, has been brought out for the three broad catagories of aqueous attack viz., (i) simple contact with leachant at a particular temperature, (ii) once-through or recirculatory flow of leachant at variable temperatures and flow rates, and (iii) contact with freshly distilled hot water in soxhelet type of extractor. In an effort to evolve a standard leaching technique in the latter two categories of aqueous attack, development of two leaching units viz., 'Dynamic Leaching Unit' and 'Modified Soxhlet Unit' is described. Both these units offer good control and wide flexibility on the important parameters affecting leaching such as leachant temperature, flow rate of residence time of leachant and ratio of leachant volume to sample surface area. The dynamic leaching units also offers a good control and flexibility on the two additional parameters viz., the composition and pH of the leachant. In the modified soxhlet unit the composition and pH of the leachant remains near to that of distilled water. The leach rate results have been found to be reproducible. A need for framing the set of standard conditions for adoption of these units in evolution of standard leaching techniques has been indicated. (auth.)

  8. Study of lanthanide leaching from phosphosemihydrate by nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitric acid leaching of lanthanides from phosphosemihydrate (PSH) prepared by treating the Khibiny apatite concentrate at nitric acid concentration of 2-8% and S:L ratio 1:3 was studied under laboratory conditions. Results of experiments are compared with the data obtained during sulfuric acid leaching. It is shown that during one-stage process nitric acid leaches lanthanides from PSH more effectively that sulfuric acid. However, in case of multiple use of the same solution for successive leaching of several portion of PSH, accumulation of lanthanides in nitric acid solutions occurs less intensively than in sulfuric acid ones

  9. Mineralogy and uranium leaching of ores from Triassic Peribaltic sandstones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recovery of uranium and other valuable metals from Polish Peribaltic sandstones were examined. The solid-liquid extraction is the first stage of the technology of uranium production and it is crucial for the next stages of processing. In the laboratory experiments uranium was leached with efficiencies 71-100 % by acidic lixiviants. Satisfactory results were obtained for the alkaline leaching process. Almost 100 % of uranium was leached with alkaline carbonate solution. In post leaching solutions only uranium and small amounts of vanadium were present. (author)

  10. Cadmium leaching from thermal treated and gamma irradiated Mexican aluminosilicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal and radiation effects on the leaching of cadmium from two cadmium exchanged zeolitic tuffs and one clay were determined. The cadmium exchanged aluminosilicates were heated at different temperatures (500, 700, 900 and 1100 oC), and the materials were then treated with NaCl (1 M and 5 M) and HNO3 (0.001 M and 1 M) solutions to determine the leaching behaviour of cadmium from the materials. The stability of cadmium in the materials increased as the heating temperature was increased. Cadmium leaching from gamma irradiated and heated materials at 1100 oC was higher than leaching from non-irradiated samples

  11. Actinide speciation in glass leach-layers: An EXAFS study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium L3 X-ray absorption data were obtained from two borosilicate glasses, which are considered as models for radioactive wasteforms, both before and after leaching. Surface sensitivity to uranium speciation was attained by a novel application of simultaneous fluorescence and electron-yield detection. Changes in speciation are clearly discernible, from U(VI) in the bulk to (UO2)2+-uranyl in the leach layer. The leach-layer uranium concentration variations with leaching times are also determined from the data

  12. Long-term leaching from MSWI air-pollution-control residues: Leaching characterization and modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyks, Jiri; Astrup, Thomas; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2009-01-01

    percolation experiments; liquid-to-solid (L/S) ratios of 200-250 L/kg corresponding to more than 10,000 years in a conventional landfill were reached. Less than 2% of the initially present As, Cu, Pb, Zn, Cr, and Sb had leached during the Course of the experiments. Concentrations of Cd, Fe, Mg, Hg, Mn, Ni, Co...

  13. Application of intensified heap leaching technology of uranium ores to Dabu uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the light of the preliminary design of uranium ore heap leaching for Dabu uranium mine, leaching agent with high concentration of sulfuric acid (about 50 g/L) was used to leach uranium from ores in the initial stage of heap leaching, and then the acidity of leaching agent was gradually reduced according to the concentration of sulfuric acid in leaching solution. Using the leaching agent with low concentration of sulfuric acid to leach uranium in the latter stage leaded to long leaching time, high content of uranium in the leaching residue, and high energy consumption in follow-up producing process. So an intensified heap leaching technology of uranium ores was put forward and adopted to shorten the leaching time and reduce the content of uranium in the leaching residue and the energy consumption. The application of the technology to Dabu uranium mine was introduced, and technical and economic evaluation was carried out. (authors)

  14. Uptake of myocardial imaging agents by rejected hearts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technetium 99 m pyrophosphate, Gallium 67 and Thallium 201 uptakes were measured in heterotopically transplanted rat hearts. Five days after transplantation, Technetium 99 m pyrophosphate, and Gallium 67 uptakes were significantly higher in allogeneic grafts than in syngeneic grafts. At an early stage of rejection (three days after transplantation), only Technetium 99 m pyrophosphate uptake in the left ventricle of allogeneic grafts showed a significant difference (p less than 0.04). At five days, Thallium 201 uptake was significantly lower in allo- than syngeneic grafts. There was a positive correlation between radionuclide uptake and histologic degree of rejection for Technetium 99 m pyrophosphate and Gallium 67 while Thallium 201 uptake correlated negatively. Analysis of variance revealed that hearts with no or minimal rejection had statistically different uptakes than hearts with mild to moderate rejection. These results suggest that uptake of imaging agents might be useful in the diagnosis of rejection of the transplanted heart

  15. Graft rejection after hematopoietic cell transplantation with nonmyeloablative conditioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masmas, T.N.; Petersen, S.L.; Madsen, H.O.; Ryder, L.P.; Kornblit, B.; Svejgaard, A.; Andersen, P.; Dickmeiss, E.; Vindelov, L.L.

    2008-01-01

    Graft rejection after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) with nonmyeloablative conditioning is a rare but serious clinical problem. Graft rejection and salvage therapy in eight patients in a retrospective analysis of 124 consecutive patients is reported. The patients were conditioned with low......-dose fludarabine and total body irradiation (TBI). The association of pretransplantation risk factors with rejection and the effect of chimerism and graft-versus-host disease on rejection were analyzed. Overall survival (OS) and progression free survival (PFS) were compared between patients with and without......, patients are at greater risk of dying from infections and progression/relapse of their malignancy. Retransplantation is feasible and well tolerated after HCT with nonmyeloablative conditioning and should be performed without delay in patients with imminent and manifest graft rejection Udgivelsesdato: 2008/7...

  16. Solar dynamic heat rejection technology. Task 1: System concept development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, Eric; Carlson, Albert W.

    1987-01-01

    The results are presented of a concept development study of heat rejection systems for Space Station solar dynamic power systems. The heat rejection concepts are based on recent developments in high thermal transport capacity heat pipe radiators. The thermal performance and weights of each of the heat rejection subsystems is addressed in detail, and critical technologies which require development tests and evaluation for successful demonstration are assessed and identified. Baseline and several alternate heat rejection system configurations and optimum designs are developed for both Brayton and Rankine cycles. The thermal performance, mass properties, assembly requirements, reliability, maintenance requirements and life cycle cost are determined for each configuration. A specific design was then selected for each configuration which represents an optimum design for that configuration. The final recommendations of heat rejection system configuration for either the Brayton or Rankine cycles depend on the priorities established for the evaluation criteria.

  17. Imaging-based diagnosis of acute renal allograft rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thölking, Gerold; Schuette-Nuetgen, Katharina; Kentrup, Dominik; Pawelski, Helga; Reuter, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the best available treatment for patients with end stage renal disease. Despite the introduction of effective immunosuppressant drugs, episodes of acute allograft rejection still endanger graft survival. Since efficient treatment of acute rejection is available, rapid diagnosis of this reversible graft injury is essential. For diagnosis of rejection, invasive core needle biopsy of the graft is the “gold-standard”. However, biopsy carries the risk of significant graft injury and is not immediately feasible in patients taking anticoagulants. Therefore, a non-invasive tool assessing the whole organ for specific and fast detection of acute allograft rejection is desirable. We herein review current imaging-based state of the art approaches for non-invasive diagnostics of acute renal transplant rejection. We especially focus on new positron emission tomography-based as well as targeted ultrasound-based methods. PMID:27011915

  18. Influence of leaching on surface composition, microstructure, and valence band of single grain icosahedral Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowe, M.; McGrath, R.; Sharma, H. R. [Surface Science Research Centre and The Department of Physics, The University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3BX (United Kingdom); Yadav, T. P. [Hydrogen Energy Centre, Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Fournée, V.; Ledieu, J. [Institut Jean Lamour (UMR7198 CNRS-Université de Lorraine), Parc de Saurupt, 54011 Nancy Cedex (France)

    2015-03-07

    The use of quasicrystals as precursors to catalysts for the steam reforming of methanol is potentially one of the most important applications of these new materials. To develop application as a technology requires a detailed understanding of the microscopic behavior of the catalyst. Here, we report the effect of leaching treatments on the surface microstructure, chemical composition, and valence band of the icosahedral (i-) Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystal in an attempt to prepare a model catalyst. The high symmetry fivefold surface of a single grain i-Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystal was leached with NaOH solution for varying times, and the resulting surface was characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The leaching treatments preferentially remove Al producing a capping layer consisting of Fe and Cu oxides. The subsurface layer contains elemental Fe and Cu in addition to the oxides. The quasicrystalline bulk structure beneath remains unchanged. The subsurface gradually becomes Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} rich with increasing leaching time. The surface after leaching exhibits micron sized dodecahedral cavities due to preferential leaching along the fivefold axis. Nanoparticles of the transition metals and their oxides are precipitated on the surface after leaching. The size of the nanoparticles is estimated by high resolution transmission microscopy to be 5-20 nm, which is in agreement with the AFM results. Selected area electron diffraction (SAED) confirms the crystalline nature of the nanoparticles. SAED further reveals the formation of an interface between the high atomic density lattice planes of nanoparticles and the quasicrystal. These results provide an important insight into the preparation of model catalysts of nanoparticles for steam reforming of methanol.

  19. Influence of leaching on surface composition, microstructure, and valence band of single grain icosahedral Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of quasicrystals as precursors to catalysts for the steam reforming of methanol is potentially one of the most important applications of these new materials. To develop application as a technology requires a detailed understanding of the microscopic behavior of the catalyst. Here, we report the effect of leaching treatments on the surface microstructure, chemical composition, and valence band of the icosahedral (i-) Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystal in an attempt to prepare a model catalyst. The high symmetry fivefold surface of a single grain i-Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystal was leached with NaOH solution for varying times, and the resulting surface was characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The leaching treatments preferentially remove Al producing a capping layer consisting of Fe and Cu oxides. The subsurface layer contains elemental Fe and Cu in addition to the oxides. The quasicrystalline bulk structure beneath remains unchanged. The subsurface gradually becomes Fe3O4 rich with increasing leaching time. The surface after leaching exhibits micron sized dodecahedral cavities due to preferential leaching along the fivefold axis. Nanoparticles of the transition metals and their oxides are precipitated on the surface after leaching. The size of the nanoparticles is estimated by high resolution transmission microscopy to be 5-20 nm, which is in agreement with the AFM results. Selected area electron diffraction (SAED) confirms the crystalline nature of the nanoparticles. SAED further reveals the formation of an interface between the high atomic density lattice planes of nanoparticles and the quasicrystal. These results provide an important insight into the preparation of model catalysts of nanoparticles for steam reforming of methanol

  20. Predictive active disturbance rejection control for processes with time delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qinling; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2014-07-01

    Active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) has been shown to be an effective tool in dealing with real world problems of dynamic uncertainties, disturbances, nonlinearities, etc. This paper addresses its existing limitations with plants that have a large transport delay. In particular, to overcome the delay, the extended state observer (ESO) in ADRC is modified to form a predictive ADRC, leading to significant improvements in the transient response and stability characteristics, as shown in extensive simulation studies and hardware-in-the-loop tests, as well as in the frequency response analysis. In this research, it is assumed that the amount of delay is approximately known, as is the approximated model of the plant. Even with such uncharacteristic assumptions for ADRC, the proposed method still exhibits significant improvements in both performance and robustness over the existing methods such as the dead-time compensator based on disturbance observer and the Filtered Smith Predictor, in the context of some well-known problems of chemical reactor and boiler control problems. PMID:24182516

  1. Rejection of micropollutants by clean and fouled forward osmosis membrane

    KAUST Repository

    Valladares Linares, Rodrigo

    2011-12-01

    As forward osmosis (FO) gains attention as an efficient technology to improve wastewater reclamation processes, it is fundamental to determine the influence of fouling in the rejection of emerging contaminants (micropollutants). This study focuses on the rejection of 13 selected micropollutants, spiked in a secondary wastewater effluent, by a FO membrane, using Red Sea water as draw solution (DS), differentiating the effects on the rejection caused by a clean and fouled membrane. The resulting effluent was then desalinated at low pressure with a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane, to produce a high quality permeate and determine the rejection with a coupled forward osmosis - low pressure reverse osmosis (FO-LPRO) system. When considering only FO with a clean membrane, the rejection of the hydrophilic neutral compounds was between 48.6% and 84.7%, for the hydrophobic neutrals the rejection ranged from 40.0% to 87.5%, and for the ionic compounds the rejections were between 92.9% and 96.5%. With a fouled membrane, the rejections were between 44.6% and 95.2%, 48.7%-91.5% and 96.9%-98.6%, respectively. These results suggest that, except for the hydrophilic neutral compounds, the rejection of the micropollutants is increased by the presence of a fouling layer, possibly due to the higher hydrophilicity of the FO fouled membrane compared to the clean one, the increased adsorption capacity of hydrophilic compounds and reduced mass transport capacity, membrane swelling, and the higher negative charge of the membrane surface, related to the foulants composition, mainly NOM acids (carboxylic radicals) and polysaccharides or polysaccharide-like substances. However, when coupled with RO, the rejections in both cases increased above 96%. The coupled FO-LPRO system was an effective double barrier against the selected micropollutants. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Rejection of micropollutants by clean and fouled forward osmosis membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valladares Linares, Rodrigo; Yangali-Quintanilla, Victor; Li, Zhenyu; Amy, Gary

    2011-12-15

    As forward osmosis (FO) gains attention as an efficient technology to improve wastewater reclamation processes, it is fundamental to determine the influence of fouling in the rejection of emerging contaminants (micropollutants). This study focuses on the rejection of 13 selected micropollutants, spiked in a secondary wastewater effluent, by a FO membrane, using Red Sea water as draw solution (DS), differentiating the effects on the rejection caused by a clean and fouled membrane. The resulting effluent was then desalinated at low pressure with a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane, to produce a high quality permeate and determine the rejection with a coupled forward osmosis - low pressure reverse osmosis (FO-LPRO) system. When considering only FO with a clean membrane, the rejection of the hydrophilic neutral compounds was between 48.6% and 84.7%, for the hydrophobic neutrals the rejection ranged from 40.0% to 87.5%, and for the ionic compounds the rejections were between 92.9% and 96.5%. With a fouled membrane, the rejections were between 44.6% and 95.2%, 48.7%-91.5% and 96.9%-98.6%, respectively. These results suggest that, except for the hydrophilic neutral compounds, the rejection of the micropollutants is increased by the presence of a fouling layer, possibly due to the higher hydrophilicity of the FO fouled membrane compared to the clean one, the increased adsorption capacity of hydrophilic compounds and reduced mass transport capacity, membrane swelling, and the higher negative charge of the membrane surface, related to the foulants composition, mainly NOM acids (carboxylic radicals) and polysaccharides or polysaccharide-like substances. However, when coupled with RO, the rejections in both cases increased above 96%. The coupled FO-LPRO system was an effective double barrier against the selected micropollutants. PMID:22055122

  3. Soil spreading of liquid olive mill processing wastes impacts leaching of adsorbed terbuthylazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharonov-Nadborny, R; Raviv, M; Graber, E R

    2016-08-01

    Olive mill waste water (OMWW) is a major byproduct of the three phase olive oil production process. OMWW has high acidity (pH ∼ 4-5), high salt content (EC ∼ 5-10 mS cm(-1)), extremely high biological and chemical oxygen demand (BOD and COD up to 100,000 and 220,000 mg L(-1), respectively), and also high concentrations of organic compounds such as phenols and polyphenols. As a result, OMWW cannot be freely discharged into domestic wastewater treatment plants, but on-site treatment is very expensive and not sufficiently effective. Uses for OMWW such as agricultural recycling and co-composting were found to be impractical or expensive. Thus, OMWW is frequently spread on agricultural land for disposal. However, excessive or uncontrolled spreading of such organic-rich and saline wastewater could have many deleterious effects on soil quality, including salinization, phytotoxicity, or contaminant movement. The impact of OMWW on the leaching of adsorbed terbuthylazine, a soil-applied herbicide, was tested in four soils of varying physical and chemical properties. Although terbuthylazine solubility in OMWW is significantly higher than in water, leaching of adsorbed terbuthylazine from OMWW-treated soils was less than from control treatments. Low soil organic carbon and clay contents were major factors that contributed to reduced terbuthylazine leaching after soil treatment with OMWW. PMID:27179239

  4. Ashes from oily sewage sludge combustion: chemistry, mineralogy and leaching properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Róbert Polc

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the current paper the chemical and mineralogical properties of bottom ash and fly ash from oily sewage sludge combustion are investigated. The mineralogical composition and the morphology of ashes were determined by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD in combination with scanning electron microscopy with quantitative energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (SEM-EDX. In addition, a leaching test results are presented to shed light on the potential toxicity of studied materials and their impact on the environment is discussed. Both of the studied materials are final products of thermal oxidation at industrial sludge incinerator. This facility aims to sanitary disposal of mechanical and biological sludge from industrial wastewater treatment plant. Bottom ash and fly ash are relatively stable solid products with slightly different chemical and mineralogical composition that reflects their different origin – burning condition in furnace vs. flues gas cleaning technology. Leaching tests of both mentioned materials were implemented under laboratory conditions. The aim of the laboratory tests was to determine the possibility of the pollutants release into the environment. The data presented herein support the importance of detailed mineralogical and geochemical study for the better understanding of the leaching tests. The obtained results showed that both of the sewage sludge ash samples exceed the criteria for accepting waste in landfilles established for Slovakia.

  5. Alpha Background Rejection in Bolometer Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deporzio, Nicholas

    2016-03-01

    This study presents the modification of bolometer detectors used in particle searches to veto or otherwise reject alpha radiation background and the statistical advantages of doing so. Several techniques are presented in detail - plastic film scintillator vetoes, metallic film ionization vetoes, and scintillating bolometer vetoes. Plastic scintillator films are cooled to bolometer temperatures and bombarded with 1.4MeV to 6.0MeV alpha particles representative of documented detector background. Photomultipliers detect this scintillation light and produce a veto signal. Layered metallic films of a primary metal, dielectric, and secondary metal, such as gold-polyethylene-gold films, are cooled to milli-kelvin temperatures and biased to produce a current signal veto when incident 1.4MeV to 6.0MeV alpha particles ionize conduction paths through the film. Modified Zinc Molybdate Bolometers are used to produce scintillation light when stimulated by alpha background. Calibration of veto signal to background energy is presented. Results are used to quantify the statistical impact of such modifications on bolometer searches.

  6. Solar gains and thermal rejects by ventilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data recorded between September 1983 and February 1985 were analyzed in detail and the main results are as follows: • Solar radiation covers a large fraction of the daily heat load : in local climatic conditions, between October and June, solar energy provided for nearly 40 % of the heat load of the greenhouse. This amount represents 32 % of the incident radiation. • Thermal excesses that were ventilated during overheating periods (Tint > 24 °C) represent 37 % of the incident solar energy. However, due to the seasonal phase differences between the thermal need and the incident solar power, only half of these rejects could potentially be saved by a short term storage system. • A method was developed for determining the monthy net auxiliary consumption of the greenhouse. Solar gains were evaluated by means of a monthly utilization factor (ratio of the solar energy used divided by the absorbed solar energy in the greenhouse). This factor has been experimentally fitted to a function of the gain load ratio (ratio of absorbed solar energy divided by the daytime heat load). The above representation appears to be valid for any type of climate or greenhouse. • The model also takes into account the effect of wind and radiative heat losses to the sky and calculates the net auxiliary requirements within less than 10%. (author)

  7. Subclinical Rejection in Renal Transplantation: Reappraised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Rajil; Sood, Puneet; Hariharan, Sundaram

    2016-08-01

    Short-term outcomes in renal transplantation have improved significantly in the past few years. However, the improvement in long-term outcomes has been modest. The reasons for graft failure beyond the first year of transplantation have been attributed to several different factors. We believe that subclinical rejection (SCR) may be 1 of the factors that contribute to graft loss in the long run. We also believe that there are data to suggest that SCR leads to progressive fibrosis and loss of graft function. This has been demonstrated even in patients who have mild degrees of subclinical inflammation. This review outlines the major studies that have been published on this important topic. It also outlines potential risk factors for the development of SCR. The current approach and diagnostic methods are discussed as well as their pros and cons. Newer noninvasive methods of diagnosis as well as molecular diagnostics and their merits and shortcomings are also discussed in some depth. Thus, the proposed state of the art review on SCR will create a renewed interest at all levels including transplant clinicians, transplant researchers, pharmaceutical industries as well as regulatory organizations. PMID:26985747

  8. Alpha Background Rejection in Bolometer Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deporzio, Nicholas; Cuore Collaboration

    This study presents the modification of bolometer detectors used in particle searches to veto or otherwise reject alpha radiation background and the statistical advantages of doing so. Several techniques are presented in detail - plastic film scintillator vetoes, metallic film ionization vetoes, and Cherenkov radiation vetoes. Plastic scintillator films are cooled to bolometer temperatures and bombarded with 1.4MeV to 6.0MeV alpha particles representative of documented detector background. Quantum dot based liquid scintillator is similarly bombarded to produce a background induced scintillation light. Photomultipliers detect this scintillation light and produce a veto signal. Layered metallic films of a primary metal, dielectric, and secondary metal, such as gold-polyethylene-gold films, are cooled to milli-kelvin temperatures and biased to produce a current signal veto when incident 1.4MeV to 6.0MeV alpha particles ionize conduction paths through the film. Calibration of veto signal to background energy is presented. These findings are extrapolated to quantify the statistical impact of such modifications to bolometer searches. Effects of these techniques on experiment duration and signal-background ratio are discussed.

  9. Background Assay and Rejection in DRIFT

    CERN Document Server

    Brack, Jeff; Dorofeev, Alexei; Ezeribe, Anthony; Gauvreau, Jean-Luc; Gold, Michael; Harton, John; Lafler, Randy; Lauer, Robert; Lee, Eric R; Loomba, Dinesh; Matthews, John; Miller, Eric H; Monte, Alissa; Murphy, Alex; Paling, Sean; Phan, Nguyen; Sadler, Steve; Scarff, Andrew; Snowden-Ifft, Daniel; Spooner, Neil; Telfer, Sam; Walker, Daniel; Williams, Matt; Yuriev, Leonid

    2014-01-01

    The DRIFT-IId dark matter detector is a m$^3$-scale low-pressure TPC with directional sensitivity to WIMP-induced nuclear recoils. Its primary backgrounds were due to alpha decays from contamination on the central cathode. Efforts to reduce these backgrounds led to replacing the 20 \\mu m wire central cathode with one constructed from 0.9 \\mu m aluminized mylar, which is almost totally transparent to alpha particles. Detailed modeling of the nature and origin of the remaining backgrounds led to an in-situ, ppt-sensitive assay of alpha decay backgrounds from the central cathode. This led to further improvements in the thin-film cathode resulting in over 2 orders of magnitude reduction in backgrounds compared to the wire cathode. Finally, the addition of O$_2$ to CS$_2$ gas was found to produce multiple species of electronegative charge carriers, providing a method to determine the absolute position of nuclear recoils and reject all known remaining backgrounds while retaining a high efficiency for nuclear recoil...

  10. An Analytical Model Approach for the Dissolution Kinetics of Magnesite Ore Using Ascorbic Acid as Leaching Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadeem Raza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ascorbic acid was used as leaching agent to investigate the dissolution kinetics of natural magnesite ore. The effects of various reaction parameters such as acid concentration, liquid-solid ratio, particle size, stirring speed, and temperature were determined on dissolution kinetics of the magnesite ore. It was found that the dissolution rate increased with increase in acid concentration, liquid-solid ratio, stirring speed, and temperature and decrease in the particle size of the ore. The graphical and statistical methods were applied to analyze the kinetic data, and it was evaluated that the leaching process was controlled by the chemical reaction, that is, . The activation energy of the leaching process was found to be 57.244 kJ mol−1 over the reaction temperature range from 313 to 343 K.

  11. Rejected by peers-attracted to antisocial media content: rejection-based anger impairs moral judgment among adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaisier, Xanthe S; Konijn, Elly A

    2013-06-01

    Adolescence is an important developmental stage during which both peers and the media have a strong influence. Both peer rejection and the use of morally adverse media are associated with negative developmental outcomes. This study examines processes by which peer rejection might drive adolescents to select antisocial media content by tying together developmental research on peer rejection and research on media effects. Assumed underlying mechanisms are rejection-based anger and frustration and the adolescent's moral judgment. A between-participants experimental design manipulated peer rejection versus acceptance in adolescents (Mage = 13.88 years; N = 74) and young adults (Mage = 21.37 years; N = 75), applying the Cyberball paradigm. Measures included the State Anger Inventory (STAXI) to assess feelings of rejection and the newly devised Media, Morals, and Youth Questionnaire (MMaYQue) to assess media preferences and moral judgment of media content. Using bootstrapping analyses, a double mediation was established: Higher levels of state anger in peer-rejected adolescents induced more tolerable moral judgments of antisocial media content, subsequently instigating a preference for antisocial media content. In contrast, the young adult sample showed no relations between peer rejection and antisocial media preference. Results are discussed within a downward spiral framework of combined peer and media influences. PMID:22799588

  12. Rejected by Peers--Attracted to Antisocial Media Content: Rejection-Based Anger Impairs Moral Judgment among Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaisier, Xanthe S.; Konijn, Elly A.

    2013-01-01

    Adolescence is an important developmental stage during which both peers and the media have a strong influence. Both peer rejection and the use of morally adverse media are associated with negative developmental outcomes. This study examines processes by which peer rejection might drive adolescents to select antisocial media content by tying…

  13. PAHs leaching test for solidified waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henzler, R.; Grathwohl, P. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Center for Applied Geoscience

    2003-07-01

    The treatment of waste materials to allow recycling or safe disposal is a rapidly expanding business, but also subject to increasing public awareness of enviromental issues and tightening of the regularise governing in many countries. One of the most widely used treatment for wastes is stabilisation /solidification using a cement matrix to obtain a monolithic residue. The most common test procedure to assess the risks of contaminant release into water (seepage, surface and groundwater) is the so-called ''tank leaching test'' or ''diffusion test'' (NEN 7345, Mulder et al 2001, Hohberg et al 2000), in which a solidified specimen is leached with water during different periods of time. The tests are usually done at room temperatures between 20 C and 25 C. However, the temperature under natural conditions are lower resulting in lower contaminant release rates. (subsurface temperature: 5 C - 10 C). If the thermodynamics of the contaminant release, especially the activation energy of desorption and diffusion, is known, it is possible to estimate the contaminant release for lower temperatures, e.g. down to groundwater temperatures. In addition the test can be accelerated if performed at high temperatures.

  14. YACON INULIN LEACHING DURING HOT WATER BLANCHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Fenner Scher

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTYacon roots contain inulin, which has prebiotic properties and it may be used as sucrose or fat substitutes. However, inulin is very soluble in water. The loss of this important nutrient during blanching is caused mainly by diffusion or leaching, which might be diminished if blanching temperature - time conditions are correctly employed. The aim of this study was to determine the leaching of the sugars inulin, glucose and fructose, present in yacon roots, during hot water blanching under different time/temperature conditions. The samples were cleaned and peeled and cut into geometric forms of 1.75 ± 0.35 mm thick disks. A complete factorial experimental design was used, and the treatments of the samples were compared using the Tukey test. The results indicated that the time and temperature were significant in the dissolution of the sugars. The lowest inulin losses occurred at temperatures and times lower than 60 ºC and 3 minutes. For all temperatures, the lowest glucose and fructose losses were obtained at time lower than 3 and 5 minutes, respectively.

  15. Model for leaching of SRP waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The leachability of glass has been studied by many different techniques. Most of the theoretical work has focused on only very simple glass systems. This work has lead to the identification of two main stages of glass corrosion - interdiffusion and matrix dissolution. These corrosion modes alone are inadequate to fully describe leaching of the more complicated waste glass systems. Recent work at Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) has identified a further stage of corrosion for waste glass compositions - surface layer formation. The formation and stability of protective surface layers are believed to be the most important factors affecting long-term performance of waste glass products during permanent storage. An SRL leachability model has been developed which assumes that glass corrodes congruently. The rate of corrosion is controlled by the rate of reaction of amorphous silica with water as well as the rate of diffusion of soluble silicates through the insoluble layer between the glass and the bulk solution. The thickness of the insoluble layer is proportional to the amount of glass that has dissolved from the start of the experiment. The silicate concentration gradient in the layer is equal to the difference between the silicate concentration at the glass layer interface and that in the bulk leachate divided by the layer thickness. A general equation for leaching of waste glass was derived from this model. 1 figure

  16. Simulation of in situ uraninite leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In situ leaching of uraninite is relevant to both uranium production processes and environmental remediation. In situ leaching of uraninite and calcite by H2O2-NH4HCO3-(NH4)2CO3 solutions has been simulated using a partial equilibrium model which incorporates a one-parameter mixing cell model of solution flow. Rate laws for UO2 dissolution and for CaCO3 dissolution/precipitation were taken from the literature, as were equilibrium constants for solution phase reactions. Parameters of the model include the UO2 and CaCO3 ore grades, the concentrations of the H2O2, NH4HCO3, and (NH4)2CO3 components, porosity, exit solution flow rate, ore and mineral densities, and mineral rate constants and surface areas. Mineral conversions, component and species concentrations, and porosity are among the time-dependent quantities calculated using the model. For the conditions simulated, calcite dissolved somewhat faster than uraninite. The results emphasize the importance of the coupling between the mineral reactions and solution flow. Changes in the concentrations of the CO2-3 and HCO-3 species are particularly complicated and not predictable from the calcite kinetics alone or from a purely equilibrium model; although the simulations did not reveal any conditions under which the solution would become saturated with CaCO3, the pH continued to change throughout the calcite dissolution and is buffered only after calcite has been consumed

  17. Surface modifications on InAs decrease indium and arsenic leaching under physiological conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jewett, Scott A. [Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Yoder, Jeffrey A. [Department of Molecular Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Center for Comparative Medicine and Translational Research, North Carolina State University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Ivanisevic, Albena, E-mail: ivanisevic@ncsu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering North Carolina State University/University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer InAs was assessed under physiological conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A thiol-alcohol and a PEG-based polymer layers demonstrated the highest stability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unmodified and modified InAs showed no toxicity to zebrafish up to 120 h post fertilization. - Abstract: Devices containing III-V semiconductors such as InAs are increasingly being used in the electronic industry for a variety of optoelectronic applications. Furthermore, the attractive chemical, material, electronic properties make such materials appealing for use in devices designed for biological applications, such as biosensors. However, in biological applications the leaching of toxic materials from these devices could cause harm to cells or tissue. Additionally, after disposal, toxic inorganic materials can leach from devices and buildup in the environment, causing long-term ecological harm. Therefore, the toxicity of these materials along with their stability in physiological conditions are important factors to consider. Surface modifications are one common method of stabilizing semiconductor materials in order to chemically and electronically passivate them. Such surface modifications could also prevent the leaching of toxic materials by preventing the regrowth of the unstable surface oxide layer and by creating an effective barrier between the semiconductor surface and the surrounding environment. In this study, various surface modifications on InAs are developed with the goal of decreasing the leaching of indium and arsenic. The leaching of indium and arsenic from modified substrates was assessed in physiological conditions using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Substrates modified with 11-mercapto-1-undecanol (MU) and graft polymerized with poly(ethylene) glycol (PEG) were most effective at preventing indium and arsenic leaching. These surfaces were characterized using contact angle analysis, ellipsometry

  18. Effects of Past Copper Contamination and Soil Structure on Copper Leaching from Soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paradelo Pérez, Marcos; Møldrup, Per; Arthur, Emmanuel;

    2013-01-01

    Copper contamination affects biological, chemical, and physical soil properties and associated ecological functions. Changes in soil pore organization as a result of Cu contamination can dramatically affect flow and contaminant transport in polluted soils. This study assessed the influence of soil...... structure on the movement of water and Cu in a long-term polluted soil. Undisturbed soil cores collected along a Cu gradient (from about 20 to about 3800 mg Cu kg−1 soil) were scanned using X-ray computed tomography (CT). Leaching experiments were performed to analyze tracer transport, colloid leaching, and...... the main driver of preferential flow, while macroporosity determined by X-ray CT (for pores >180 μm) proved the best predictor of solute transport. Higher preferential flow due to the presence of well-aligned pores and small cracks controlled water movement in compacted soil. Transport of Cu was rapid...

  19. Kinetics of the Leaching Process of an Australian Gibbsitic Bauxite by Hydrochloric Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aichun Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gibbsitic bauxite from Australia was leached by hydrochloric acid in this work. Analysis on kinetics for the extraction of Al2O3 was quantitatively studied. It was concluded that the hydrochloric acid leaching process of gibbsitic bauxite was controlled by chemical reaction. Moreover, the mechanism for the dissolution followed the equation, ln⁡k=39.44-1.66×104(1/T, with an apparent activation energy of 137.90 kJ/mol, according to the equation of k=Ae-Ea/RT. This work aims to provide a good theory support for the process control by using a new method of alumina production from the low grade bauxite.

  20. Factors affecting the leaching of radium-226 from barium-radium sulphate sludges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Uranium Tailings Program was established in 1982 to develop, in part, a mathematical predictive model which would allow the assessment of the impact of uranium mill tailings on the environment and particularly on humans. To achieve this, various studies were undertaken to establish the role played by key constituents of the tailings. This paper summarizes the findings of a study carried out under that program, to examine the leachability of barium-radium sulphate sludges produced in the treatment of uranium mill tailings decants. The investigators performed detailed chemical analysis of the sludge, applied geochemical computer models to investigate sludge leaching behaviour, and conducted experiments to assess the impact of bacteria on leaching. The modelling showed that the redox state of the sludge-leachant system was the most important factor. Substantial bacterially-mediated dissolution of the sludge and release of radium was demonstrated experimentally under suitable reducing conditions