WorldWideScience

Sample records for chemical effluents

  1. Recycling of dyehouse effluents by biological and chemical treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krull, R.; Doepkens, E. [Inst. of Biochemical Engineering, Technical Univ. of Braunschweig, Braunschweig (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    The introduction of the production integrated environmental protection by closing raw material cycles is shown exemplary for the textile finishing industry. Colored process water with a high content of dissolved organic dyes has always been a non-trivial problem for the sewage engineering sector. The recycling of process water of textile mills is often hindered by remaining color of water-soluable azo dyes after conventional wastewater treatment. Rising costs of emitted wastewater, lawful limits and restricted availability of water makes it of great interest to introduce sophisticated techniques helping to purify dye effluents and to recycle process water. A combined biological and chemical process of purification and recycling of residual dyehouse split flows into the production was developed, investigated and installed by a textile finishing company which produces 330,000 m{sup 3} colored wastewater effluents per year. The process contains anaerobic dye-cleavage, aerobic mineralization of cleavage-products and the decolorization and partial oxidation of traces of dyeresiduals by advanced oxidation. (orig.)

  2. Analysis and Physico-Chemical Parameters of Sarvar Devla Sugar Mill Studies of Effluents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Pathak

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The physico-chemical characteristics contents in the effluents discharged from Neoly sugar mill have been explored. The physico-chemical parameters such as colour, odour, temperature, pH, electrical conductivity, COD, BOD, alkalinity, total hardness,Ca+2, Mg+2, chloride, of the effluent collected from the various sites between the exit point at the mill and discharge point In, have been determined.

  3. Effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals from leather industry effluents on male reproductive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vikas; Majumdar, Chandrajeetbalo; Roy, Partha

    2008-09-01

    The leather tanning industry is characterized by the production of different kinds of effluents, generated in each step of leather processing. These effluents have various chemical compounds which may cause toxicity and endocrine disruption and are thus known as endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC). This study was aimed to examine the androgenic potential of leather industry effluents collected from northern region of India. Hershberger assay data showed a significant increase (pGC-MS, it was found to contain various aromatic compounds (nonylphenol, hexaclrobenzene and several azo dyes) some of which independently demonstrated similar effects as shown by water samples. Our data suggests that the effluents from leather industry have potential EDC demonstrating androgenic activities.

  4. Detection of Chlorophenolic Compounds in Bleaching Effluents of Chemical Pulps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chhaya Sharma; S.Mohanty; S.Kumar; N.J.Rao; li qian

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory bleaching effluents from the chlorination and caustic extraction stages of mixed wood kraft pulp processing have been analysed both qualitatively and quantitatively for various chlorophenolics by using GC.A number of chlorinated derivaties of phenols,catechols,guaiacols and syringaldehydes have been detected and their concentrations are estimated.The results are compared with that of different agriculture residue / hardwood pulps,which were reported in literature.The concentrations of various compounds detected have also been compared with their reported 96LC50 values.

  5. The occurrence of emerging trace organic chemicals in wastewater effluents in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alidina, Mazahirali; Hoppe-Jones, Christiane; Yoon, Min; Hamadeh, Ahmed F; Li, Dong; Drewes, Jörg E

    2014-04-15

    Emerging trace organic chemicals (TOrCs) released into the environment via discharge of wastewater effluents have been detected in rivers and lakes worldwide, raising concerns due to their potential persistence, toxicity and bioaccumulation. This study provides the first reconnaissance of TOrC occurrence in wastewater effluents within Saudi Arabia. Four wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs 1-4) located in Western Saudi Arabia were sampled hourly over twelve-hour periods, for a total of six sampling events. All samples were analyzed for a wide range of TOrC encompassing pharmaceuticals, personal care products and household chemicals. Treatment and capacities of the plants varied from non-nitrifying to full biological nutrient removal providing a representative cross section of different types of plants operational within the country. A comparison of TOrC occurrence in effluents in Saudi Arabia with respective effluent qualities in the United States revealed similar levels for most TOrC. Overall, the occurrence of TOrC was higher at two of the plants. The higher TOrC concentrations at WWTP 1 are likely due to the non-nitrifying biological treatment process. The unique TOrC occurrence observed in the WWTP 3 effluent was unlike any other plant and was attributed to the influence of a large number of international visitors in its sewershed. The occurrence of TOrC in this plant was not expected to be representative of the occurrence elsewhere in the country. Bimodal diurnal variation expected for a range of TOrC was not observed, though some hourly variation in TOrC loading was noted for WWTP 3. Since water reclamation and reuse have received increasing interest in Saudi Arabia within the last few years, results from this study provide a good foundation in deciding whether advanced treatment is necessary to attenuate TOrC deemed to be of concern in effluents, or if natural treatment such as managed aquifer recharge provides sufficient protection to public health.

  6. Treatment of textile effluent by chemical (Fenton's Reagent) and biological (sequencing batch reactor) oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Carmen S D; Madeira, Luis M; Boaventura, Rui A R

    2009-12-30

    The removal of organic compounds and colour from a synthetic effluent simulating a cotton dyeing wastewater was evaluated by using a combined process of Fenton's Reagent oxidation and biological degradation in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR). The experimental design methodology was first applied to the chemical oxidation process in order to determine the values of temperature, ferrous ion concentration and hydrogen peroxide concentration that maximize dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and colour removals and increase the effluent's biodegradability. Additional studies on the biological oxidation (SBR) of the raw and previously submitted to Fenton's oxidation effluent had been performed during 15 cycles (i.e., up to steady-state conditions), each one with the duration of 11.5h; Fenton's oxidation was performed either in conditions that maximize the colour removal or the increase in the biodegradability. The obtained results allowed concluding that the combination of the two treatment processes provides much better removals of DOC, BOD(5) and colour than the biological or chemical treatment alone. Moreover, the removal of organic matter in the integrated process is particularly effective when Fenton's pre-oxidation is carried out under conditions that promote the maximum increase in wastewater biodegradability.

  7. Combined biological and chemical assessment of estrogenic activities in wastewater treatment plant effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerni, Hans-Rudolf; Kobler, Bernd; Rutishauser, Barbara V; Wettstein, Felix E; Fischer, René; Giger, Walter; Hungerbühler, Andreas; Marazuela, M Dolores; Peter, Armin; Schönenberger, René; Vögeli, A Christiane; Suter, Marc J-F; Eggen, Rik I L

    2004-02-01

    Five wastewater treatment plant effluents were analyzed for known endocrine disrupters and estrogenicity. Estrogenicity was determined by using the yeast estrogen screen (YES) and by measuring the blood plasma vitellogenin (VTG) concentrations in exposed male rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). While all wastewater treatment plant effluents contained measurable concentrations of estrogens and gave a positive response with the YES, only at two sites did the male fish have significantly increased VTG blood plasma concentrations after the exposure, compared to pre-exposure concentrations. Estrone (E1) concentrations ranged up to 51 ng L(-1), estradiol (E2) up to 6 ng L(-1), and ethinylestradiol (EE2) up to 2 ng L(-1) in the 90 samples analyzed. Alkylphenols, alkylphenolmonoethoxylates and alkylphenoldiethoxylates, even though found at microg L(-1) concentrations in effluents from wastewater treatment plants with a significant industrial content, did not contribute much to the overall estrogenicity of the samples taken due to their low relative potency. Expected estrogenicities were calculated from the chemical data for each sample by using the principle of concentration additivity and relative potencies of the various chemicals as determined with the yeast estrogen screen. Measured and calculated estradiol equivalents gave the same order of magnitude and correlated rather well (R(2)=0.6).

  8. The occurrence of emerging trace organic chemicals in wastewater effluents in Saudi Arabia

    KAUST Repository

    Alidina, Mazahirali

    2014-04-01

    Emerging trace organic chemicals (TOrCs) released into the environment via discharge of wastewater effluents have been detected in rivers and lakes worldwide, raising concerns due to their potential persistence, toxicity and bioaccumulation. This study provides the first reconnaissance of TOrC occurrence in wastewater effluents within Saudi Arabia. Four wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs 1-4) located in Western Saudi Arabia were sampled hourly over twelve-hour periods, for a total of six sampling events. All samples were analyzed for a wide range of TOrC encompassing pharmaceuticals, personal care products and household chemicals. Treatment and capacities of the plants varied from non-nitrifying to full biological nutrient removal providing a representative cross section of different types of plants operational within the country. A comparison of TOrC occurrence in effluents in Saudi Arabia with respective effluent qualities in the United States revealed similar levels for most TOrC. Overall, the occurrence of TOrC was higher at two of the plants. The higher TOrC concentrations at WWTP 1 are likely due to the non-nitrifying biological treatment process. The unique TOrC occurrence observed in the WWTP 3 effluent was unlike any other plant and was attributed to the influence of a large number of international visitors in its sewershed. The occurrence of TOrC in this plant was not expected to be representative of the occurrence elsewhere in the country. Bimodal diurnal variation expected for a range of TOrC was not observed, though some hourly variation in TOrC loading was noted for WWTP 3. Since water reclamation and reuse have received increasing interest in Saudi Arabia within the last few years, results from this study provide a good foundation in deciding whether advanced treatment is necessary to attenuate TOrC deemed to be of concern in effluents, or if natural treatment such as managed aquifer recharge provides sufficient protection to public health. © 2014

  9. Hospital effluents management: Chemical, physical, microbiological risks and legislation in different countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraro, E; Bonetta, Si; Bertino, C; Lorenzi, E; Bonetta, Sa; Gilli, G

    2016-03-01

    Hospital wastewater (HWW) can contain hazardous substances, such as pharmaceutical residues, chemical hazardous substances, pathogens and radioisotopes. Due to these substances, hospital wastewater can represent a chemical, biological and physical risk for public and environmental health. In particular, several studies demonstrate that the main effects of these substances can't be neutralised by wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). These substances can be found in a wide range of concentrations due to the size of a hospital, the bed density, number of inpatients and outpatients, the number and the type of wards, the number and types of services, the country and the season. Some hazardous substances produced in hospital facilities have a regulatory status and are treated like waste and are disposed of accordingly (i.e., dental amalgam and medications). Legislation is quite homogeneous for these substances in all industrial countries. Problems that have emerged in the last decade concern substances and microorganisms that don't have a regulatory status, such as antibiotic residues, drugs and specific pathogens. At a global level, guidelines exist for treatment methods for these effluents, but legislation in all major industrial countries don't contain limitations on these parameters. Therefore, a monitoring system is necessary for these effluents as well as for substances and pathogens, as these elements can represent a risk to the environment and public health.

  10. Chemometrics-assisted spectrophotometry method for the determination of chemical oxygen demand in pulping effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Honglei; Chen, Yuancai; Zhan, Huaiyu; Fu, Shiyu

    2011-04-01

    A new method has been developed for the determination of chemical oxygen demand (COD) in pulping effluent using chemometrics-assisted spectrophotometry. Two calibration models were established by inducing UV-visible spectroscopy (model 1) and derivative spectroscopy (model 2), combined with the chemometrics software Smica-P. Correlation coefficients of the two models are 0.9954 (model 1) and 0.9963 (model 2) when COD of samples is in the range of 0 to 405 mg/L. Sensitivities of the two models are 0.0061 (model 1) and 0.0056 (model 2) and method detection limits are 2.02-2.45 mg/L (model 1) and 2.13-2.51 mg/L (model 2). Validation experiment showed that the average standard deviation of model 2 was 1.11 and that of model 1 was 1.54. Similarly, average relative error of model 2 (4.25%) was lower than model 1 (5.00%), which indicated that the predictability of model 2 was better than that of model 1. Chemometrics-assisted spectrophotometry method did not need chemical reagents and digestion which were required in the conventional methods, and the testing time of the new method was significantly shorter than the conventional ones. The proposed method can be used to measure COD in pulping effluent as an environmentally friendly approach with satisfactory results.

  11. Ecotoxicological and chemical characterization of selected treatment process effluents of municipal sewage treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunxia; Wang, Yi; Kiefer, F; Yediler, A; Wang, Zijian; Kettrup, A

    2003-10-01

    The triolein-containing semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) were deployed for 4 weeks in a sewage treatment plant in Beijing, China, to sample and concentrate priority hydrophobic organic pollutants in a sewage treatment process. The chemical analyses and ecotoxicities of the residuals of SPMDs dialysate were examined. The data from the chemical analyses by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry selected ion monitoring mode indicated the lower removal for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) congeners and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) coincided with the persistence of them in the environment. The acute toxicity examined by bioluminescence test with Vibrio fischeri revealed approximately only 20% decrease in the overall toxicity of the influent after the activate sludge treatment process. The ethoxy resorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) induction with a micro-EROD assay in vitro using H4-IIE rat hepatoma cell cultures demonstrated the presence of persistent organics in influent and sequency effluents. Results obtained suggested that integration of the SPMD technique and chemical analyses and bioassay might be a valuable approach for the risk assessment of hydrophobic organic pollutants in water ecosystem. It revealed the necessity for organic pollutants monitoring and ecotoxicities examining of sewage treatment plants.

  12. Bentonite chemical modification for use in industrial effluents; Modificacao quimica de bentonita para uso em efluentes industriais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laranjeira, E.; Pinto, M.R.O.; Rodrigues, D.P.; Costa, B.P.; Guimaraes, P.L.F. [Universidade Estadual da Paraiba (DQ/CCT/UEPB), Campina Grande (Brazil). CCT. Dept. de Quimica

    2010-07-01

    The present work aims at synthesizing organoclays using a layered silicate of regional importance, bentonite clay, for the treatment of industrial effluents. The choice of clay to be organophilized was based on cation exchange capacity (CEC). Bentonite with higher CTC was called AN 35 (92 meq/100 g), and therefore was the one that suffered the chemical modification with salt cetyl trimethyl ammonium Cetremide, provided by Vetec.The unmodified and modified clays were characterized by FTIR and XDR. The data obtained through the characterizations confirmed the acquisition of bentonite organoclay thus suggesting its subsequent application in the treatment of industrial effluents. (author)

  13. Treatment of anaerobic digester effluents of nylon wastewater through chemical precipitation and a sequencing batch reactor process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haiming; Song, Qianwu; Wang, Wenjun; Wu, Shaowei; Dai, Jiankun

    2012-06-30

    Chemical precipitation, in combination with a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) process, was employed to remove pollutants from anaerobic digester effluents of nylon wastewater. The effects of the chemicals along with various Mg:N:P ratios on the chemical precipitation (struvite precipitation) were investigated. When brucite and H(3)PO(4) were applied at an Mg:N:P molar ratio of 3:1:1, an ammonia-removal rate of 81% was achieved, which was slightly more than that (80%) obtained with MgSO(4)·7H(2)O and Na(2)HPO(4)·12H(2)O at Mg:N:P molar ratios greater than the stoichiometric ratio. To further reduce the ammonia loads of the successive biotreatment, an overdose of phosphate with brucite and H(3)PO(4) was applied during chemical precipitation. The ammonia-removal rate at the Mg:N:P molar ratio of 3.5:1:1.05 reached 88%, with a residual PO(4)-P concentration of 16 mg/L. The economic analysis showed that the chemical cost of chemical precipitation could be reduced by about 41% when brucite and H(3)PO(4) were used instead of MgSO(4)·7H(2)O and Na(2)HPO(4)·12H(2)O. The subsequent biological process that used a sequencing batch reactor showed high removal rates of contaminants. The quality of the final effluent met the requisite effluent-discharging standards.

  14. Electrochemical treatment of rice grain-based distillery effluent: chemical oxygen demand and colour removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, Abhinesh Kumar; Chaudhari, Parmesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    The electrochemical (EC) treatment of rice grain-based distillery wastewater was carried out in a 1.5 dm3 electrolytic batch reactor using aluminium plate electrodes. With the four-plate configurations, a current density (j) of 89.3 A/m2 and pH 8 was found to be optimal, obtaining a maximum chemical oxygen demand (COD) and colour removal of 93% and 87%, respectively. The chemical dissolution of aluminium was strongly influenced by initial pH (pHi). At higher pHi (pH 9.5) anode consumption decreased while energy consumption increased. At the optimal current density 89.3 A/m2, the aluminium electrode consumption was 16.855 g/dm3 wastewater and energy consumption was 31.4 Wh/dm3 achieving a maximum COD removal of 87%. The settling and filterability characteristics ofelectrochemically treated sludge were also analysed at different pH. It was noted that treated slurry at pHi 9.5 gave best settling characteristic, which decreased with increase in pH. EC-treated effluent at pHi 8 had provided best filterability. Characteristics of scum and residues are also analysed at different pH.

  15. Diagnosis of water pollution caused by chemical effluents using hydro biological methods; Diagnostic de la pollution des eaux par les effluents chimiques au moyen des methodes hydrobiologiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simeon, C.; Bonnefoy-Claudet, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Pierrelatte (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-04-01

    Industrial plants which discharge chemical effluents into rivers are faced with a double problem. 1 - To avoid excessive pollution which leads to an important modification of the medium and to a poisoning of the aquatic fauna, and in particular to the killing of fish. These disadvantages are avoided by a treatment of the effluents, by calculating the minimum fatal doses and the limiting dilutions for fish, and by carrying out biological analyses and tests on the residual waters. 2 - To avoid provoking continuous, slow and insidious pollutions which are more difficult to detect and which would result in the gradual sterilization of receptive media. In order to estimate this possible influence, the authors have listed the aquatic fauna and flora found in the canal which was the object of the experiment, and have modified the Saprobies system due to Kolwickz. They have tried to detect the presence or absence of pollution by estimating the density of the phyto-plankton formed on submerged laminae (periphyton) and the specific variations in the alga of which these populations are made up. In this report are given details of the tests and of the first results obtained. (authors) [French] Les usines deversant dans les cours d'eaux des effluents chimiques se trouvent devant un double probleme. 1 - Eviter les pollutions aigues qui se traduisent par une modification importante du milieu et par l'empoisonnement de la faune aquatique et notamment la mort du poisson. On evite ces inconvenients en traitant les effluents, en calculant les doses minima mortelles et les dilutions limites pour le poisson, en surveillant les eaux residuaires par analyses et tests biologiques. 2 - Ne pas provoquer des pollutions chroniques, lentes, insidieuses, plus difficiles a mettre en evidence qui aboutiraient a la sterilisation progressive des milieux recepteurs. Pour apprecier cette influence eventuelle les auteurs ont inventorie la faune et la flore aquatique du canal, objet de l

  16. An Assessment of the Model of Concentration Addition for Predicting the Estrogenic Activity of Chemical Mixtures in Wastewater Treatment Works Effluents

    OpenAIRE

    Thorpe, Karen L.; Gross-Sorokin, Melanie; Johnson, Ian; Brighty, Geoff; Tyler, Charles R.

    2005-01-01

    The effects of simple mixtures of chemicals, with similar mechanisms of action, can be predicted using the concentration addition model (CA). The ability of this model to predict the estrogenic effects of more complex mixtures such as effluent discharges, however, has yet to be established. Effluents from 43 U.K. wastewater treatment works were analyzed for the presence of the principal estrogenic chemical contaminants, estradiol, estrone, ethinylestradiol, and nonylphenol. The measured conce...

  17. Utilizing Palm Oil Mill Effluent Compost for Improvement of Acid Mineral Soil Chemical Properties and Soybean Yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ermadani Ermadani

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Effluent from a palm oil mill contains organic matters and nutrients. It can result in water pollution when it is discharged into river without treatment. One way to manage this effluent is through composting that has potential to allow the recycling of effluent nutrients in a sustainable and environmentally friendly manner so that it can be used as organic fertilizer. This study wasintended to evaluate the benefit of effluent compost application to improve soil chemical properties and soybean yield. Effluent wascomposted with chicken manure and lime for eight weeks. A pot experiment of which each pot was filled with 10 kg of soil (Ultisolwas conducted in a screen house from April to November 2012 at the Experimental Farm, University of Jambi, Muaro JambiResidency. The treatments were without compost (adding 0,25 g Urea, 0,75 g SP-36 and 0,50 g KCl and compost application with amounts of 12,5 ml, 25 ml, 37,5 ml, 50 ml, 62,5 ml, and 75 ml. The indicator plant was soybean. The treatments were arranged in acompletely randomized design and replicated four times. Results of study showed a significant improvement of soil chemicalproperties with compost application in which application of 75 ml compost resulted in the highest increase of pH, organic C, cationexchange capacity, total N, available P, exchangeable cations (K, Ca, Mg. Furthermore, the dry weight of shoot, pod number and dryweight of seed increased significantly with compost application. The highest dry weight of seed was 28 g (equivalent to 2, 82 t ha-1obtained by compost application of 75 ml (equivalent to 15 t ha -1.

  18. Treatment of textile effluent by chemical (Fenton's Reagent) and biological (sequencing batch reactor) oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Carmen S.D. [LSRE - Laboratory of Separation and Reaction Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, R. Dr. Roberto Frias, s/n, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Madeira, Luis M. [LEPAE - Laboratory for Process, Environmental and Energy Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, R. Dr. Roberto Frias, s/n, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Boaventura, Rui A.R., E-mail: bventura@fe.up.pt [LSRE - Laboratory of Separation and Reaction Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, R. Dr. Roberto Frias, s/n, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)

    2009-12-30

    The removal of organic compounds and colour from a synthetic effluent simulating a cotton dyeing wastewater was evaluated by using a combined process of Fenton's Reagent oxidation and biological degradation in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR). The experimental design methodology was first applied to the chemical oxidation process in order to determine the values of temperature, ferrous ion concentration and hydrogen peroxide concentration that maximize dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and colour removals and increase the effluent's biodegradability. Additional studies on the biological oxidation (SBR) of the raw and previously submitted to Fenton's oxidation effluent had been performed during 15 cycles (i.e., up to steady-state conditions), each one with the duration of 11.5 h; Fenton's oxidation was performed either in conditions that maximize the colour removal or the increase in the biodegradability. The obtained results allowed concluding that the combination of the two treatment processes provides much better removals of DOC, BOD{sub 5} and colour than the biological or chemical treatment alone. Moreover, the removal of organic matter in the integrated process is particularly effective when Fenton's pre-oxidation is carried out under conditions that promote the maximum increase in wastewater biodegradability.

  19. Using quantum chemical modeling and calculations for evaluation of cellulose potential for estrogen micropollutants removal from water effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Amin; Asgarpour Khansary, Milad; Marjani, Azam; Shirazian, Saeed

    2017-03-03

    This paper is devoted to investigate the suitability of cellulose for estrogens micropollutants removal from water effluent. For this purpose, the sorption of eight estrogens including Estradiol, Estrone, Testosterone, Progesterone, Estriol, Mestranol, Ethinylestradiol and Diethylstilbestrol were investigated. The charge density profiles and sorption curves were obtained and discussed using quantum chemical calculations where the Accelrys Materials Studio software and COSMO-SAC model were employed. The geometry optimization of compound molecule and energy minimizations was performed using the Dmol3 Module and density functional theory of generalized gradient approximate and Volsko-Wilk-Nusair functional. We found that cellulose cannot be a reliable choice of sorbent for removal of Estrone and Estradiol, but it is a poor choice of sorbent for removal of Estriol, Ethinylestradiol. Cellulose can be used for Diethylstilbestrol, Mestranol, Testosterone and Progesterone removal from estrogens containing effluents.

  20. Application of chemical oxidation for removal of pharmaceuticals in wastewater effluents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hey, G.; Ledin, A.; la Cour Jansen, J.

    2012-01-01

    ). In effluent 1 (35 mg/L COD), more than half of the APIs were already oxidized at 5 mg/L ClO2 in comparison to effluent 2 (55 mg/L COD) where significant increase in API oxidation was observed after treatment with 8 mg/L ClO2. The antiphlogistic diclofenac and antidiabetic repaglinide can be easily oxidized...... of wastewater effluent, over 90% removal of diclofenac and repaglinide was reached but with much higher ozone dose. On the other hand in effluent 3 (51 mg/L COD), citalopram and trimetoprim can be oxidized effectively by lower O3 dose than ClO2 however, in high COD wastewater (effluent 4, 90 mg/L COD), O3......-rich functional groups in their structure such as aniline (diclofenac) and tertiary amine (repaglinide) are easily removed during oxidation. On the other hand, the presence of electron-withdrawing functional groups such as halogens resulted in slow reactivity of the APIs to oxidation. In addition, the difference...

  1. Setting the most robust effluent level under severe uncertainty: application of information-gap decision theory to chemical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokomizo, Hiroyuki; Naito, Wataru; Tanaka, Yoshinari; Kamo, Masashi

    2013-11-01

    Decisions in ecological risk management for chemical substances must be made based on incomplete information due to uncertainties. To protect the ecosystems from the adverse effect of chemicals, a precautionary approach is often taken. The precautionary approach, which is based on conservative assumptions about the risks of chemical substances, can be applied selecting management models and data. This approach can lead to an adequate margin of safety for ecosystems by reducing exposure to harmful substances, either by reducing the use of target chemicals or putting in place strict water quality criteria. However, the reduction of chemical use or effluent concentrations typically entails a financial burden. The cost effectiveness of the precautionary approach may be small. Hence, we need to develop a formulaic methodology in chemical risk management that can sufficiently protect ecosystems in a cost-effective way, even when we do not have sufficient information for chemical management. Information-gap decision theory can provide the formulaic methodology. Information-gap decision theory determines which action is the most robust to uncertainty by guaranteeing an acceptable outcome under the largest degree of uncertainty without requiring information about the extent of parameter uncertainty at the outset. In this paper, we illustrate the application of information-gap decision theory to derive a framework for setting effluent limits of pollutants for point sources under uncertainty. Our application incorporates a cost for reduction in pollutant emission and a cost to wildlife species affected by the pollutant. Our framework enables us to settle upon actions to deal with severe uncertainty in ecological risk management of chemicals.

  2. An assessment of the model of concentration addition for predicting the estrogenic activity of chemical mixtures in wastewater treatment works effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Karen L; Gross-Sorokin, Melanie; Johnson, Ian; Brighty, Geoff; Tyler, Charles R

    2006-04-01

    The effects of simple mixtures of chemicals, with similar mechanisms of action, can be predicted using the concentration addition model (CA). The ability of this model to predict the estrogenic effects of more complex mixtures such as effluent discharges, however, has yet to be established. Effluents from 43 U.K. wastewater treatment works were analyzed for the presence of the principal estrogenic chemical contaminants, estradiol, estrone, ethinylestradiol, and nonylphenol. The measured concentrations were used to predict the estrogenic activity of each effluent, employing the model of CA, based on the relative potencies of the individual chemicals in an in vitro recombinant yeast estrogen screen (rYES) and a short-term (14-day) in vivo rainbow trout vitellogenin induction assay. Based on the measured concentrations of the four chemicals in the effluents and their relative potencies in each assay, the calculated in vitro and in vivo responses compared well and ranged between 3.5 and 87 ng/L of estradiol equivalents (E2 EQ) for the different effluents. In the rYES, however, the measured E2 EQ concentrations in the effluents ranged between 0.65 and 43 ng E2 EQ/L, and they varied against those predicted by the CA model. Deviations in the estimation of the estrogenic potency of the effluents by the CA model, compared with the measured responses in the rYES, are likely to have resulted from inaccuracies associated with the measurement of the chemicals in the extracts derived from the complex effluents. Such deviations could also result as a consequence of interactions between chemicals present in the extracts that disrupted the activation of the estrogen response elements in the rYES. E2 EQ concentrations derived from the vitellogenic response in fathead minnows exposed to a series of effluent dilutions were highly comparable with the E2 EQ concentrations derived from assessments of the estrogenic potency of these dilutions in the rYES. Together these data support the

  3. Physico-chemical assessment of paper mill effluent and its heavy metal remediation using aquatic macrophytes--a case study at JK Paper mill, Rayagada, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Swayamprabha; Mohanty, Monalisa; Pradhan, Chinmay; Patra, Hemanta Kumar; Das, Ritarani; Sahoo, Santilata

    2013-05-01

    The present investigation aims to assess the phytoremediation potential of six aquatic macrophytes, viz. Eichhornia crassipes, Hydrilla verticillata, Jussiaea repens, Lemna minor, Pistia stratiotes and Trapa natans grown in paper mill effluent of JK Paper mill of Rayagada, Orissa, for remediation of heavy metals. The experiment was designed in pot culture experiments. Assessment of physico-chemical parameters of paper mill effluent showed significant decrease in pH, conductivity, total dissolved solids, total suspended solids, chlorine, sulphur, biological and chemical oxygen demand after growth of macrophytes for 20 days. Phytoremediation ability of these aquatic macrophytic species for copper (Cu) and mercury (Hg) was indicated by assessing the decrease in the levels of heavy metals from effluent water. Maximum reduction (66.5 %) in Hg content of untreated paper mill effluent was observed using L. minor followed by T. natans (64.8 %). L. minor showed highest reduction (71.4 %) of Cu content from effluent water followed by E. crassipes (63.6 %). Phytoextraction potential of L. minor was remarkable for Hg and Cu, and bioaccumulation was evident from bioconcentration factor values, i.e. 0.59 and 0.70, respectively. The present phytoremediation approach was considered more effective than conventional chemical treatment method for removing toxic contaminants from paper mill effluent.

  4. Effective Extraction of Heavy Metals from their Effluents Using Some Potential Ionic Liquids as Green Chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rajendran

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis of nine Task Specific Ionic liquids (TSILs, their characterization using 1H NMR spectral studies and other physical properties and potential applications in the removal of certain heavy metals such as Nickel, Iron, Zinc, Copper and Lead has been studied. The removal of these heavy metals from the industrial effluents / contaminated water bodies using these ionic liquids has been proved to be more successful than conventional methods such as precipitation, cementation, reverse osmosis, ion exchange and adsorption.

  5. Application of chemical, biological and membrane separation processes in textile industry with recourse to zero effluent discharge--a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandy, T; Dhodapkar, R S; Pophali, G R; Kaul, S N; Devotta, S

    2005-09-01

    Environmental concerns associated with textile processing had placed the textile sector in a Southern State of India under serious threat of survival. The textile industries were closed under the orders of the Statutory Board for reason of inadequate compliance to environmental discharge norms of the State for the protection of the drinking water source of the State capital. In compliance with the direction of the Board for zero effluent discharge, advanced treatment process have been implemented for recovery of boiler feed quality water with recourse to effluent recycling/reuse. The paper describes to a case study on the adequacy assessment of the full scale effluent treatment plant comprising chemical, biological and filtration processes in a small scale textile industry. In addition, implementation of measures for discernable improvement in the performance of the existing units through effective operation & maintenance, and application of membrane separation processes leading to zero effluent discharge is also highlighted.

  6. Removal of Organic Pollutants and Decolorization of Bleaching Effluents from Pulp and Paper Mill by Adsorption using Chemically Treated Oil Palm Empty Fruit Bunch Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Shaiful Sajab

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of bleaching effluents from pulp and paper mills using oil palm empty fruit bunch (EFB fibers as an adsorbent was conducted to remove color and organic pollutants. Empty fruit bunch fibers were chemically modified with polyethylenimine to enhance the adsorption capacity toward anionic species in the effluents. Effluents from the primary clarifier and aerated treatment pond were treated, and the performance of the adsorbent was investigated in terms of decolorization, total organic carbon, and oxygen demand level. Increasing adsorbent dosage and lower pH resulted in greater adsorption performance. The highest decolorization and reduction of total organic carbon of the effluents were 95.0% and 58.2%, respectively. The adsorption equilibrium can be achieved after 4 h of the adsorption process.

  7. Efficiency of horizontal roughing filter in removing nitrate, phosphate and chemical oxygen demand from effluent of waste stabilization pond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mostafa Khezri

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The effective size of the end grain of horizontal roughing filters (HRFs is larger than 2 mm. This study aimed to examine the efficiency of HRFs in removing nitrate, phosphate, and chemical oxygen demand (COD from effluent of a wastewater stabilization pond. Methods: This experimental study was conducted in 2013. The pilot project was transferred to the Karaj wastewater treatment plant (stabilization pond, and the installation, equipping, and start-up of the system began using an effluent treatment plant. Sampling was done from March to August in 3 rates, 0.5, 1 and 1.5 m/h, and included simultaneous sampling from inlet and outlet filtering to determine the concentrations of nitrate, phosphate, and COD. Results: At filtration rates of 0.5, 1, and 1.5 m/h, the average nitrate removal equaled 25%, 32%, and 34%, respectively, average phosphate removal equaled 29%, 26%, and 28%, respectively, and the average COD removal at filtration rates of 0.5, 1, and 1.5 m/h equaled 62%, 66%, and 68%, respectively. Outlet values of phosphate and nitrate were lower than the standards set by the Environmental Standards Organization (ESO (P < 0.05. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, the HRF function was approximately adequate in COD removal, but its efficiency in nitrate and phosphate removal was lower.

  8. Combination of physico-chemical analysis, Allium cepa test system and Oreochromis niloticus erythrocyte based comet assay/nuclear abnormalities tests for cyto-genotoxicity assessments of treated effluents discharged from textile industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemachandra, Chamini K; Pathiratne, Asoka

    2016-09-01

    Bioassays for cyto-genotoxicity assessments are generally not required in current textile industry effluent discharge management regulations. The present study applied in vivo plant and fish based toxicity tests viz. Allium cepa test system and Oreochromis niloticus erythrocyte based comet assay and nuclear abnormalities tests in combination with physico-chemical analysis for assessing potential cytotoxic/genotoxic impacts of treated textile industry effluents reaching a major river (Kelani River) in Sri Lanka. Of the treated effluents tested from two textile industries, color in the Textile industry 1 effluents occasionally and color, biochemical oxygen demand and chemical oxygen demand in the Textile industry 2 effluents frequently exceeded the specified Sri Lankan tolerance limits for discharge of industrial effluents into inland surface waters. Exposure of A. cepa bulbs to 100% and 12.5% treated effluents from both industries resulted in statistically significant root growth retardation, mito-depression, and induction of chromosomal abnormalities in root meristematic cells in comparison to the dilution water in all cases demonstrating cyto-genotoxicity associated with the treated effluents. Exposure of O. niloticus to the 100% and 12.5% effluents, resulted in erythrocytic genetic damage as shown by elevated total comet scores and induction of nuclear abnormalities confirming the genotoxicity of the treated effluents even with 1:8 dilution. The results provide strong scientific evidence for the crucial necessity of incorporating cyto-genotoxicity impact assessment tools in textile industry effluent management regulations considering human health and ecological health of the receiving water course under chronic exposure.

  9. Endocrine disrupting alkylphenolic chemicals and other contaminants in wastewater treatment plant effluents, urban streams, and fish in the Great Lakes and Upper Mississippi River Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Larry B.; Loyo-Rosales, Jorge E.; Rice, Clifford P.; Minarik, Thomas A.; Oskouie, Ali K.

    2015-01-01

    Urban streams are an integral part of the municipal water cycle and provide a point of discharge for wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents, allowing additional attenuation through dilution and transformation processes, as well as a conduit for transporting contaminants to downstream water supplies. Domestic and commercial activities dispose of wastes down-the-drain, resulting in wastewater containing complex chemical mixtures that are only partially removed during treatment. A key issue associated with WWTP effluent discharge into streams is the potential to cause endocrine disruption in fish. This study provides a long-term (1999-2009) evaluation of the occurrence of alkylphenolic endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) and other contaminants discharged from WWTPs into streams in the Great Lakes and Upper Mississippi River Regions (Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Minnesota, and Ohio). The Greater Metropolitan Chicago Area Waterways, Illinois, were evaluated to determine contaminant concentrations in the major WWTP effluents and receiving streams, and assess the behavior of EDCs from their sources within the sewer collection system, through the major treatment unit processes at a WWTP, to their persistence and transport in the receiving stream. Water samples were analyzed for alkylphenolic EDCs and other contaminants, including 4-nonylphenol (NP), 4-nonylphenolpolyethoxylates (NPEO), 4-nonylphenolethoxycarboxylic acids (NPEC), 4-tert-octylphenol (OP), 4-tert-octylphenolpolyethoxylates (OPEO), bisphenol A, triclosan, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and trace elements. All of the compounds were detected in all of the WWTP effluents, with EDTA and NPEC having the greatest concentrations. The compounds also were detected in the WWTP effluent dominated rivers. Multiple fish species were collected from river and lake sites and analyzed for NP, NPEO, NPEC, OP, and OPEO. Whole-body fish tissue analysis indicated widespread occurrence of alkylphenolic compounds

  10. The effect of sewage effluent on the physico-chemical and biological characteristics of the Sand River, Limpopo, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seanego, K. G.; Moyo, N. A. G.

    Population growth in urban areas is putting pressure on sewage treatment plants. The improper treatment of sewage entering the aquatic ecosystems causes deterioration of the water quality of the receiving water body. The effect of sewage effluent on the Sand River was assessed. Eight sampling sites were selected, site 1 and 2 were upstream of the sewage treatment plant along the urbanised area of Polokwane, whilst sites 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8 were downstream. The physico-chemical parameters and coliform counts in the water samples were determined. The suitability of the water for irrigation was also determined. Hierarchical average linkage cluster analysis produced two clusters, grouping two sites above the sewage treatment works and six sites downstream of the sewage effluent discharge point. Principal component analysis (PCA) identified total nitrogen, total phosphorus, conductivity and salinity as the major factors contributing to the variability of the Sand River water quality. These factors are strongly associated with the downstream sites. Canonial correspondence analysis (CCA) indicated the macroinvertebrates, Chironomidae, Belastomatidae, Chaoborus and Hirudinea being strongly associated with nitrogen, phosphorus, conductivity and temperature. Escherichia coli levels in the Polokwane wastewater treatment works maturation ponds, could potentially lead to contamination of the Polokwane aquifer. The Sodium Adsorption Ratio was between 1.5 and 3.0 and residual sodium carbonate was below 1.24 Meq/l, indicating that the Sand River water is still suitable for irrigation. The total phosphorus concentrations fluctuated across the different site. Total nitrogen concentrations showed a gradual decrease downstream from the point of discharge. This shows that the river still has a good self-purification capacity.

  11. Chemical and toxicological evaluation of underground coal gasification (UCG) effluents. The coal rank effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapusta, Krzysztof; Stańczyk, Krzysztof

    2015-02-01

    The effect of coal rank on the composition and toxicity of water effluents resulting from two underground coal gasification experiments with distinct coal samples (lignite and hard coal) was investigated. A broad range of organic and inorganic parameters was determined in the sampled condensates. The physicochemical tests were supplemented by toxicity bioassays based on the luminescent bacteria Vibrio fischeri as the test organism. The principal component analysis and Pearson correlation analysis were adopted to assist in the interpretation of the raw experimental data, and the multiple regression statistical method was subsequently employed to enable predictions of the toxicity based on the values of the selected parameters. Significant differences in the qualitative and quantitative description of the contamination profiles were identified for both types of coal under study. Independent of the coal rank, the most characteristic organic components of the studied condensates were phenols, naphthalene and benzene. In the inorganic array, ammonia, sulphates and selected heavy metals and metalloids were identified as the dominant constituents. Except for benzene with its alkyl homologues (BTEX), selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), zinc and selenium, the values of the remaining parameters were considerably greater for the hard coal condensates. The studies revealed that all of the tested UCG condensates were extremely toxic to V. fischeri; however, the average toxicity level for the hard coal condensates was approximately 56% higher than that obtained for the lignite. The statistical analysis provided results supporting that the toxicity of the condensates was most positively correlated with the concentrations of free ammonia, phenols and certain heavy metals.

  12. Treatment of IGCC power station effluents by physico-chemical and advanced oxidation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán, A; Monteagudo, J M; Sanmartín, I; García-Peña, F; Coca, P

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this work was to improve the quality of aqueous effluents coming from the Gasification Unit in an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Thermoelectric Power Station, with the purpose of fulfilling the future more demanding normative. To this end, an integral wastewater treatment including coagulation, flocculation, neutralization, photocatalytic oxidation, and ion-exchange has been studied. A final scheme has been proposed to remove pollutants. All the parameters of the treated wastewater are below pouring specifications. In the first stage, the wastewater was treated with CaCl2 (optimal dose=11 g CaCl2/g F-) as coagulant and a commercial anionic polyelectrolyte (optimal dose=0.02 g/g F-) as flocculant to remove fluoride ions (99%) and suspended solids (92%). The water was then neutralized, improving the degree of transmission of ultraviolet light, allowing the faster photo-degradation of pollutants. The photochemical study included different systems (H2O2, UV/H2O2, Fenton, Fenton-like, UV/Fenton, UV/Fenton-like and UV/H2O2/O2). In the Fenton-like system, the influence of two parameters (initial concentration of H2O2 and amount of Cu(II)) on the degradation of cyanide and formate (taken as the reference of the process) was studied. Experimental results were fit using neural networks (NNs). Results showed that the photocatalytic process was effective for total cyanide destruction after 60 min, while 180 min was needed to remove 80% of formates. However, a more simple system with UV/H2O2/O2 yields similar results and is preferred for industrial application due to fewer complications. Finally, an ion-exchange process with Amberlite IRA-420 was proposed to remove the excess of chlorides added as a consequence of the initial coagulation process.

  13. Wastewater treatment plant effluent as a source of microplastics: review of the fate, chemical interactions and potential risks to aquatic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziajahromi, Shima; Neale, Peta A; Leusch, Frederic D L

    2016-11-01

    Wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent has been identified as a potential source of microplastics in the aquatic environment. Microplastics have recently been detected in wastewater effluent in Western Europe, Russia and the USA. As there are only a handful of studies on microplastics in wastewater, it is difficult to accurately determine the contribution of wastewater effluent as a source of microplastics. However, even the small amounts of microplastics detected in wastewater effluent may be a remarkable source given the large volumes of wastewater treatment effluent discharged to the aquatic environment annually. Further, there is strong evidence that microplastics can interact with wastewater-associated contaminants, which has the potential to transport chemicals to aquatic organisms after exposure to contaminated microplastics. In this review we apply lessons learned from the literature on microplastics in the aquatic environment and knowledge on current wastewater treatment technologies, with the aim of identifying the research gaps in terms of (i) the fate of microplastics in WWTPs, (ii) the potential interaction of wastewater-based microplastics with trace organic contaminants and metals, and (iii) the risk for aquatic organisms.

  14. Selective adsorption of molybdenum(VI) from Mo-Re bearing effluent by chemically modified astringent persimmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Ying; Wang, Haitao; Lou, Zhenning; Shan, Weijun; Xing, Zhiqiang; Deng, Guichun; Wu, Dongbei; Fang, Dawei; Biswas, Biplob Kumar

    2011-02-28

    Astringent persimmon was chemically cross-linked by formaldehyde to obtain a novel kind of adsorption gel, which was named as APF gel. The adsorption behaviors of Mo(VI) and Re(VII) along with other coexisting metals onto the APF gel were studied in the present paper. The APF gel was found to be effective for the adsorption of Mo(VI) while the gel is almost completely inert toward rhenium and calcium over the whole hydrochloric acid concentration region. The APF gel has a low affinity for iron, copper, lead, nickel, manganese and zinc ions when the concentration of HCl is higher than 1 mol/L. The gel exhibited selectivity only for Mo(VI) with a remarkably high adsorption capacity 1.05 mol/kg, and the adsorption behavior obeys the Langmuir model. According to the thermodynamic and kinetic studies, the endothermic adsorption process followed pseudo-second order kinetics. Also, its excellent adsorption characteristics for Mo(VI) were confirmed by the adsorption and elution tests using a column packed with the APF gel. The result provides a new approach for the recovery of Mo(VI) from a industrial waste effluent.

  15. Assembly, start and operation of an activated sludge reactor for the industrial effluents treatment: physico chemical and biological parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Regina Assalin

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Although of the immense available bibliography regarding the activated sludge process, little it is found in relation to the basic procedure to be adopted to implant, to activate and to monitor a reactor of activated sludge in laboratory scales. This article describes the assembly, departure and operation of an activated sludge system, operating in continuous process, at a laboratory scale, to study effluents treatments, using as example, Kraft E1 pulp mill effluent. Factors as biodegradability of the effluent to be treated, stationary state of the reactor, conventional operation parameters as physical chemistry and biological parameters are presented.

  16. Method for analyzing the chemical composition of liquid effluent from a direct contact condenser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharathan, Desikan; Parent, Yves; Hassani, A. Vahab

    2001-01-01

    A computational modeling method for predicting the chemical, physical, and thermodynamic performance of a condenser using calculations based on equations of physics for heat, momentum and mass transfer and equations of equilibrium thermodynamics to determine steady state profiles of parameters throughout the condenser. The method includes providing a set of input values relating to a condenser including liquid loading, vapor loading, and geometric characteristics of the contact medium in the condenser. The geometric and packing characteristics of the contact medium include the dimensions and orientation of a channel in the contact medium. The method further includes simulating performance of the condenser using the set of input values to determine a related set of output values such as outlet liquid temperature, outlet flow rates, pressures, and the concentration(s) of one or more dissolved noncondensable gas species in the outlet liquid. The method may also include iteratively performing the above computation steps using a plurality of sets of input values and then determining whether each of the resulting output values and performance profiles satisfies acceptance criteria.

  17. Endocrine active chemicals, pharmaceuticals, and other chemicals of concern in surface water, wastewater-treatment plant effluent, and bed sediment, and biological characteristics in selected streams, Minnesota-design, methods, and data, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kathy E.; Langer, Susan K.; Barber, Larry B.; Writer, Jeff H.; Ferrey, Mark L.; Schoenfuss, Heiko L.; Furlong, Edward T.; Foreman, William T.; Gray, James L.; ReVello, Rhiannon C.; Martinovic, Dalma; Woodruff, Olivia R.; Keefe, Steffanie H.; Brown, Greg K.; Taylor, Howard E.; Ferrer, Imma; Thurman, E. Michael

    2011-01-01

    This report presents the study design, environmental data, and quality-assurance data for an integrated chemical and biological study of selected streams or lakes that receive wastewater-treatment plant effluent in Minnesota. This study was a cooperative effort of the U.S. Geological Survey, the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, St. Cloud State University, the University of St. Thomas, and the University of Colorado. The objective of the study was to identify distribution patterns of endocrine active chemicals, pharmaceuticals, and other organic and inorganic chemicals of concern indicative of wastewater effluent, and to identify biological characteristics of estrogenicity and fish responses in the same streams. The U.S. Geological Survey collected and analyzed water, bed-sediment, and quality-assurance samples, and measured or recorded streamflow once at each sampling location from September through November 2009. Sampling locations included surface water and wastewater-treatment plant effluent. Twenty-five wastewater-treatment plants were selected to include continuous flow and periodic release facilities with differing processing steps (activated sludge or trickling filters) and plant design flows ranging from 0.002 to 10.9 cubic meters per second (0.04 to 251 million gallons per day) throughout Minnesota in varying land-use settings. Water samples were collected from the treated effluent of the 25 wastewater-treatment plants and at one point upstream from and one point downstream from wastewater-treatment plant effluent discharges. Bed-sediment samples also were collected at each of the stream or lake locations. Water samples were analyzed for major ions, nutrients, trace elements, pharmaceuticals, phytoestrogens and pharmaceuticals, alkylphenols and other neutral organic chemicals, carboxylic acids, and steroidal hormones. A subset (25 samples) of the bed-sediment samples were analyzed for carbon, wastewater-indicator chemicals, and steroidal hormones; the

  18. Genotoxicity of swine effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Techio, V H; Stolberg, J; Kunz, A; Zanin, E; Perdomo, C C

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed at the investigation of genotoxic effects of swine effluents from different stages of a treatment system for swine wastes through bioassay of stamen hairs and micronuclei in Tradescantia (clone BNL 4430). No significant differences (p≥0.05) regarding the genic mutations were found in the bioassay of stamen hairs, independently of the effluent analysed. For the genotoxicity test with micronuclei, the plants exposed to raw wastes, to sludge, and to effluent of the biodigester have presented higher rates of chromosomal damages (micronuclei), with significant differences in relation to the control group and other effluent of the waste treatment system (p≤0.05). The association between the chemical parameters and the genotoxicity data have shown that the variables COD and TKN have presented significant correlation (p≤0.05) with the number of mutagenic events in the tetrads.

  19. Polar organic chemical integrative sampling and liquid chromatography- electrospray/ion-trap mass spectrometry for assessing selected prescription and illicit drugs in treated sewage effluents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones-Lepp, T. L.; Alvarez, D.A.; Petty, J.D.; Huckins, J.N.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the research presented in this paper was twofold: (1) to demonstrate the coupling of two state-of-the-art techniques: a time-weighted polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) and microliquid chromatography-electrospray/ion-trap mass spectrometry and (2) to assess the ability of these methodologies to detect six drugs (azithromycin, fluoxetine, omeprazole, levothyroxine, methamphetamine, methylenedioxymethamphetamine [MDMA]) in a real-world environment, e.g., waste water effluent. In the effluent from three wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), azithromycin was detected at concentrations ranging from 15 to 66 ng/L, which is equivalent to a total annual release of 1 to 4 kg into receiving waters. Detected and confirmed in the effluent from two WWTPs were two illicit drugs, methamphetamine and MDMA, at 2 and 0.5 ng/L, respectively. Although the ecotoxicologic significance of drugs in environmental matrices, particularly water, has not been closely examined, it can only be surmised that these substances have the potential to adversely affect biota that are continuously exposed to them even at very low levels. The potential for chronic effects on human health is also unknown but of increasing concern because of the multi-use character of water, particularly in densely populated, arid areas.

  20. Physico-chemical factors affecting the E.coli removal in a rotating biological contactor (RBC) treating UASB effluent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tafwik, A.; Klapwijk, A.; Buuren, van J.C.L.; El-Gohary, F.; Lettinga, G.

    2004-01-01

    The removal mechanism of E coli from UASB effluent using a Rotating Biological Contractor (RBC) has been investigated. Preliminary batch experiments in a RBC indicate a first-order removal kinetics. Variation in the dissolved oxygen concentration and E coli counts over the depth of the RBC has been

  1. Potential chemical and microbiological risks on human health from urban wastewater reuse in agriculture. Case study of wastewater effluents in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Ivan; Tomàs, Núria; Mas, Jordi; García-Reyes, Juan Fracisco; Molina-Díaz, Antonio; Fernández-Alba, Amadeo R

    2010-05-01

    Potential health risks derived from wastewater reuse in agriculture have been evaluated with Risk Assessment modelling techniques, in a case study involving the effluents of two Spanish wastewater treatment plants. One of the plants applies primary and secondary treatment, and the other one applies an additional tertiary treatment. Health risks were assessed on the basis of ingesting contaminated food, due to exposure to: (i) 22 chemical pollutants, namely pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs), and priority pollutants included in the European Framework Directive, and (ii) microorganisms, namely enterovirus. Chemical Risk Assessment has been carried out following the European Commission's technical guidelines, while risks from exposure to viruses have been evaluated by means of Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment, assuming a virus to coliform ratio of 1:10(5). The results of the chemical assessment show that there is a margin of safety above 100 for all substances, with the exception of gemfibrozil, for which the mean margin of safety (MOS) is above 100, but the lower bound of MOS with a 95 % confidence interval lies in the 3-4 range. A MOS under 100 was also found for 2,3,7,8-TCDD in one of the effluents. The assessment of risks from viruses shows a very low probability of infection. The overall results show that risks are lower for the plant applying tertiary treatment, especially concerning microbiological parameters.

  2. Physic-Chemical treatment and demineralization by EDR to reutilize the effluent of an urban waste water treatment plant; Tratamiento fisico-quimico y desmineralizacion por electrodialisis reversible para reutilizar el efluente de una EDAR urbana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres Corral, M.; Pino, M.P. del; Gil Lodos, M.; Rodriguez Garcia, M.

    1998-12-01

    Etudes held at the research and development center DEREA placed at Gran Canaria, Canary islands, have proved the viability of regenerating urban waste waters treating the effluent of an urban waste water treatment plant (WWTP del surest) with a physic-chemical treatment followed by a demineralization by electrodialysis reversal. The physic-chemical system was composed of the following units: 1 coagulation tank, 3 floculators, 1 lamellar decanter, 1 pH neutralization system, 1 chlorination system, 1 multi bed filter with chemicals reservoir, dosifiers for lime, FeCl{sub 3} polielectrolytes, sulfuric acid, and NaOCl. The physic-chemical system treated daily about 250-300 cubic meters of the effluents of the EDAR del surest, without chlorination effluent, and worked with a 90% recovery (got 90 m``3 for each 100 feeded). (Author)

  3. Removal of an endocrine disrupting chemical (17 alpha-ethinyloestradiol) from wastewater effluent by activated carbon adsorption: Effects of activated carbon type and competitive adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ifelebuegu, A.O.; Lester, J.N.; Churchley, J.; Cartmell, E. [Cranfield University, Cranfield (United Kingdom). School of Water Science

    2006-12-15

    Granular activated carbon has been extensively used for the adsorption of organic micropollutants for potable water production. In this study the removal of an endocrine disrupting chemical from wastewater final effluent by three types of granular activated carbon (wood, coconut and coal based) has been investigated in batch adsorption experiments and correlated with the removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD), total organic carbon (TOC) and ultraviolet absorbance (UV). The results obtained demonstrated 17 alpha-ethinyloestradiol (EE2) removals of 98.6%, 99.3%, and 96.4% were achieved by the coal based (ACo), coconut based (ACn) and wood based (AWd) carbons respectively at the lowest dose of carbon (0.1 gl{sup -1}). The other adsorbates investigated all exhibited good removal. At an equilibrium concentration of 7 mgl{sup -1} the COD adsorption capacities were 3.16 mg g{sup -1}, 4.8 mg g{sup -1} and 7.1 mg g{sup -1} for the wood, coconut and coal based carbons respectively. Overall, the order of removal efficiency of EE2 and the other adsorbates for the three activated carbons was ACn {gt} ACo {gt} AWd. The adsorption capacities of the carbons were found to be reduced by the effects of other competing adsorbates in the wastewater effluent.

  4. Endocrine disrupting activities in sewage effluent and river water determined by chemical analysis and in vitro assay in the context of granular activated carbon upgrade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, D P; Balaam, J; Pacitto, S; Readman, J W; White, S; Zhou, J L

    2011-09-01

    As part of endocrine disruption in catchments (EDCAT) programme, this work aims to assess the temporal and spatial variations of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in River Ray, before and after the commissioning of a full-scale granular activated carbon (GAC) plant at a sewage treatment works (STW). Through spot and passive sampling from effluent and river sites, estrogenic and anti-androgenic activities were determined by chemical analysis and in vitro bio-assay. A correlation was found between chemical analyses of the most potent estrogens (estrone (E1), 17β-estradiol (E2), 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2)) and yeast estrogen screen (YES) measurement, both showing clearly a reduction in estrogenic activity after the commissioning of the GAC plant at the STW. During the study period, the annual average concentrations of E1, E2 and EE2 had decreased from 3.5 ng L(-1), 3.1 ng L(-1) and 0.5 ng L(-1) to below their limit of detection (LOD), respectively, with a concentration reduction of at least 91%, 81% and 60%. Annual mean estrogenic activity measured by YES of spot samples varied from 1.9 ng L(-1) to 0.4 ng L(-1) E2 equivalent between 2006 and 2008 representing a 79% reduction. Similarly, anti-androgenic activity measured by yeast anti-androgen screen (anti-YAS) of spot samples was reduced from 148.8 to 22.4 μg flutamide L(-1), or by 85%. YES and anti-YAS values were related to each other, suggesting co-existence of both types of activities from chemical mixtures in environmental samples. The findings confirm the effectiveness of a full-scale GAC in removing both estrogenic and anti-androgenic activities from sewage effluent.

  5. Achieving low effluent NO3-N and TN concentrations in low influent chemical oxygen demand (COD) to total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN) ratio without using external carbon source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jiashun; Oleyiblo, Oloche James; Xue, Zhaoxia; Otache, Y. Martins; Feng, Qian

    2015-07-01

    Two mathematical models were used to optimize the performance of a full-scale biological nutrient removal (BNR) activated treatment plant, a plug-flow bioreactors operated in a 3-stage phoredox process configuration, anaerobic anoxic oxic (A2/O). The ASM2d implemented on the platform of WEST2011 software and the BioWin activated sludge/anaerobic digestion (AS/AD) models were used in this study with the aim of consistently achieving the designed effluent criteria at a low operational cost. Four ASM2d parameters (the reduction factor for denitrification , the maximum growth rate of heterotrophs (µH), the rate constant for stored polyphosphates in PAOs ( q pp), and the hydrolysis rate constant ( k h)) were adjusted. Whereas three BioWin parameters (aerobic decay rate ( b H), heterotrophic dissolved oxygen (DO) half saturation ( K OA), and Y P/acetic) were adjusted. Calibration of the two models was successful; both models have average relative deviations (ARD) less than 10% for all the output variables. Low effluent concentrations of nitrate nitrogen (N-NO3), total nitrogen (TN), and total phosphorus (TP) were achieved in a full-scale BNR treatment plant having low influent chemical oxygen demand (COD) to total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN) ratio (COD/TKN). The effluent total nitrogen and nitrate nitrogen concentrations were improved by 50% and energy consumption was reduced by approximately 25%, which was accomplished by converting the two-pass aerobic compartment of the plug-flow bioreactor to anoxic reactors and being operated in an alternating mode. Findings in this work are helpful in improving the operation of wastewater treatment plant while eliminating the cost of external carbon source and reducing energy consumption.

  6. Bulking on the activated slugde process applied to the cheese whey effluent treatment: characterization and use of chemical flocullants to improve settling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Duran

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work was studied the activated sludge process applied to an effluent treatment from a cheese manufacture (cheese whey, which is characterized by the high organic content containing easily biodegradable compounds as lactose. In the diluted whey treatment, it was found that the activated sludge is an adequate system at a diluted condition (100x, 50x, 25x e 10x and treatment (HRT varying between 6-36 h and suspended solid (SS between 2800-19417mgL-1. However, the system is susceptible to bulking occurrence. Chemical flocculants were evaluated in order to monitoring the biological flocs sedimentation present in a continuous activated sludge system under bulking conditions. The treatment was carried out in a continuous reactor at laboratory scale and the coagulants (Al2 (SO43 and FeSO4 .7H2O were added to sludge at 50-200 mg L-1 concentration range. The results showed that Al3+ presented higher settling capacity compared with Fe2+ effect, and the good settling characteristics were observed in terms of SVI (sludge volume index. However, more detailed studies in this direction should be done to evaluate if the characteristic organisms in the activated sludge are not irreversible suppressed with the use of chemical flocculants.

  7. Characteristics of liquid effluents and treatment systems; Caracteristicas dos efluentes liquidos e sistemas de tratamento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This chapter gives an overview on the liquid effluents characteristics and the treatment systems, approaching the following subjects: the hydrological cycle; physical, chemical and biological characteristics of the liquid effluents; biological, chemical and physical characteristics; records on industrial effluents; treatment processes of industrial effluents.

  8. Measurement of beta-glucuronidase in effluent of perifused alveolar macrophages challenged with chemically modified chrysotile asbestos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forget, G; Lacroix, M J; Calvert, R; Sirois, P

    1984-06-01

    Chrysotile asbestos has been implicated with lung disorders, notably fibrotic lesions and cancer. In vitro, chrysotile fibers are cytotoxic to lung macrophages and stimulate the release of inflammatory mediators. Reports to the effect that chemical modifications of asbestos fibers reduce their cytotoxic and inflammatory potential initiated the present study of three fiber modifications. The cytotoxic and inflammatory effects of magnesium-leached chrysotile, POCL3-treated chrysotile, and CaO-treated chrysotile were studied in a perifused rat alveolar macrophage culture system, relative to untreated fibers. Natural Canadian chrysotile (UICC "B") caused dose-dependent cell mortality and clumping. The release of beta-glucuronidase (beta-Glu), a lysosomal enzyme, was also dose dependent. Rhodesian chrysotile (UICC "A") caused similar cytotoxic and inflammatory effects. However, magnesium-leached chrysotile was less cytotoxic (39% less) and had a lesser clumping capacity (31% less) than untreated chrysotile. Total secretion of beta-Glu elicited by magnesium-leached chrysotile was reduced by 43% from the untreated sample, but kinetic monitoring indicates that this reduction in inflammatory potential is only significant during the first 12 h of an 18-h culture period. POCl3 treatment of chrysotile fibers produced differing effects depending on the length of the fibers under study. Treating fibers with a mean length of 8 micron produced a secretion pattern similar to that produced by acid leaching. The total output for the treated sample was 44% lower than with untreated chrysotile; the difference was only significant during the first 12 h of perifusion. Cell mortality and aggregation were not reduced in any important way with POCl3 treatment of these longer fibers. When ultra-short fibers (mean length = 0.8 micron) were treated with POCl3, the total decrease in beta-Glu output was equal to 41%, and the release of enzyme was significantly lower during the whole 18-h

  9. Co-Digestion of Palm Oil Mill Effluent and Refined Glycerin Wash Water for Chemical Oxygen Demand Removal and Methane Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sulaiman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Refined Glycerin Wash Water (RGWW from the oleochemical industry contains high Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD and requires proper treatment before disposal. Unfortunately the wash water also contains high concentration of sodium chloride (NaCl that could cause inhibition to the normal biological treatment process. However, there is feasibility of co-digesting the RGWW and Palm Oil Mill Effluent (POME for its treatment and methane recovery. Approach: A large 500 m3 semi-commercial closed digester tank was used to study the effect of co-digesting POME and RGWW under mesophilic condition at different RGWW percentage. The digester performance in terms of COD removal efficiency and methane production rate and stability based on total Volatile Fatty Acids (VFA accumulation, Mixed Liquor Volatile Suspended Solid (MLVSS and pH were evaluated. Results: At 1.0% of RGWW co-digested, both COD removal efficiency and methane production rate showed satisfactory results with higher than 90% and 505 m3 day-1, respectively. However, once the percentage was increased to a maximum of 5.25%, COD removal efficiency remains high but the methane production rate reduced significantly down to 307 m3 day-1. At this stage, the digester was already unstable with high total VFA recorded of 913 mg L-1 and low cells concentration of 8.58 g L-1. This was probably due to the effect of plasmolysis on the methanogens at high concentration of NaCl in the digester of nearly 4000 mg L-1. Conclusion: Co-digesting of RGWW with high NaCl content and POME is satisfactory for COD removal but not for increasing the methane production.

  10. Animal alternatives for whole effluent toxicity testing ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since the 1940s, effluent toxicity testing has been utilized to varying degrees in many countries to assess potential ecological impacts and assist in determining necessary treatment options for environmental protection. However, it was only in the early 1980’s that toxicity based effluent assessments and subsequent discharge controls became globally important, when it was recognized that physical and chemical measurements alone did not protect the environment from potential impacts. Consequently, various strategies using different toxicity tests, whole effluent assessment techniques (incorporating bioaccumulation potential and persistence) plus supporting analytical tools have been developed over 30 years of practice. Numerous workshops and meetings have focused on effluent risk assessment through ASTM, SETAC, OSPAR, UK competent authorities, and EU specific country rules. Concurrent with this drive to improve effluent quality using toxicity tests, interest in reducing animal use has risen. The Health and Environmental Sciences Institute (HESI) organized and facilitated an international workshop in March 2016 to evaluate strategies for concepts, tools, and effluent assessments and update the toolbox of for effluent testing methods. The workshop objectives were to identify opportunities to use a suite of strategies for effluents, and to identify opportunities to reduce the reliance on animal tests and to determine barriers to implementation of new methodologie

  11. Quality of effluents from Hattar Industrial Estate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SIAL R.A.; CHAUDHARY M.F.; ABBAS S.T.; LATIF M.I.; KHAN A.G.

    2006-01-01

    Of 6634 registered industries in Pakistan, 1228 are considered to be highly polluting. The major industries include textile, pharmaceutical, chemicals (organic and inorganic), food industries, ceramics, steel, oil mills and leather tanning which spread all over four provinces, with the larger number located in Sindh and Punjab, with smaller number in North Western Frontier Province (NWFP) and Baluchistan. Hattar Industrial Estate extending over 700 acres located in Haripur district of NWFP is a new industrial estate, which has been developed with proper planning for management of industrial effluents. The major industries located in Hattar are ghee industry, chemical (sulfuric acid, synthetic fiber) industry, textile industry and pharmaceuticals industry.These industries, although developed with proper planning are discharging their effluents in the nearby natural drains and ultimately collected in a big drain near Wah. The farmers in the vicinity are using these effluents for growing vegetables and cereal crops due to shortage of water. In view of this discussion, there is a dire need to determine ifthese effluents are hazardous for soil and plant growth. So, effluents from different industries, sewage and normal tap water samples were collected and analysed for pH,electrical conductivity (EC), total soluble salts (TSS), biological oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), total nitrogen, cations and anions and heavy metals. The effluents of ghee and textile industries are highly alkaline. EC and TSS loads of ghee and textile industries are also above the National Environmental Quality Standards (NEQS), Pakistan. All the effluents had residual sodium carbonates (RSCs), carbonates and bicarbonates in amounts that cannot be used for irrigation. Total toxic metals load in all the effluents is also above the limit i.e. 2.0 mg/L. Copper in effluents of textile and sewage, manganese in ghee industry effluents and iron contents in all the effluents were higher

  12. Facility effluent monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gleckler, B.P.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the facility effluent monitoring programs and provides an evaluation of effluent monitoring data. These evaluations are useful in assessing the effectiveness of effluent treatment and control systems, as well as management practices.

  13. Optimization of O3 as Pre-Treatment and Chemical Enhanced Backwashing in UF and MF Ceramic Membranes for the Treatment of Secondary Wastewater Effluent and Red Sea Water

    KAUST Repository

    Herrera, Catalina

    2011-12-12

    Ceramic membranes have proven to have many advantages over polymeric membranes. Some of these advantages are: resistance against extreme pH, higher permeate flux, less frequent chemical cleaning, excellent backwash efficiency and longer lifetime. Other main advantage is the use of strong chemical agent such as Ozone (O3), to perform membrane cleaning. Ozone has proven to be a good disinfection agent, deactivating bacteria and viruses. Ozone has high oxidation potential and high reactivity with natural organic matter (NOM). Several studies have shown that combining ozone to MF/UF systems could minimize membrane fouling and getting higher operational fluxes. This work focused on ozone – ceramic membrane filtration for treating wastewater effluent and seawater. Effects of ozone as a pre – treatment or chemical cleaning with ceramic membrane filtration were identified in terms of permeate flux and organic fouling. Ozonation tests were done by adjusting O3 dose with source water, monitoring flux decline and membrane fouling. Backwashing availability and membrane recovery rate were also analyzed. Two types of MF/UF ceramics membranes (AAO and TAMI) were used for this study. When ozone dosage was higher in the source water, membrane filtration improved in performance, resulting in a reduced flux decline. In secondary wastewater effluent, raw source water declined up to 77% of normalized flux, while with O3 as pre – treatment, source water at its higher O3 dose, flux decreased only 33% of normalized flux. For seawater, membrane performance increase from declining to 37% of its final normalized flux to 21%, when O3 as a pre – treatment was used. Membrane recovery rate also improved even with low O3 dose, as an example, with 8 mg/L irreversible fouling decreases from 58% with no ozone addition to 29% for secondary wastewater effluent treatment. For seawater treatment, irreversible fouling decreased from 37% with no ozone addition to 21% at 8 mg/L, proving ozone is a

  14. Assessment of wastewater treatment plant effluent on fish reproduction utilizing the adverse outcome pathway conceptual framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents are a known contributor of chemical mixture inputs into the environment. Whole effluent testing guidelines were developed to screen these complex mixtures for acute toxicity. However, efficient and cost-effective approaches for screenin...

  15. Limno-chemical and microbiology aspects in Uranium Pit Mine Lake (Osamu Utsumi), in Antas and Bortolan reservoirs under the influence of effluent Ore Treatment Unit, Caldas - Minas Gerais State, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronqui, Leilane B.; Nasciment, Marcos R.L. do; Roque, Claudio V.; Bruschi, Armando; Borba Junior, Palvo J.; Nascimento, Heliana A. F. do, E-mail: leilanebio@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: pmarcos@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: cvroque@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: abruschi@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: jouber_borba@hotmail.com, E-mail: hazevedo@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (LAPOC/CNEN), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Laboratorio de Pocos de Caldas; Almeida, Tito C.M. de, E-mail: titoalmeida2008@gmail.com [Universidade do Vale do Itajai (CTT-Mar/UNIVALI), SC (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Tecnologicas da Terra e do Mar

    2013-07-01

    Due to high natural radioactivity there in Pocos de Caldas Plateau (Minas Gerais State, Brazil) and the existence of the first uranium mine in Brazil (Pit Mine Osamu Utsumi - Mineral Treatment Unit/Brazilian Nuclear Industries, MTU/BNI), which is characterized by an open-pit mine presents as increased environmental liability the formation of acid mine drainage, this study was conducted to evaluate the limno-chemicals and microbiology aspects (protozooplankton and bacterioplankton) belonging to uranium pit mine lake (PM) and evaluate the possible effects of acid effluents treated and discharged by MTU/BNI in Antas reservoir-AR and downstream of this, the Bortolan reservoir-BR. Besides the realization of abiotic and microbiology analysis of protozooplankton and bacterioplankton; was held standardization and deployment of the Fluorescence 'In Situ' Hybridization (FISH) technical using oligonucleotide probes for extremophile Archaea and Bacteria. According to the results, the PM showed the highest values for the chemical variables, lower pH values, lower protozooplankton density, however, protozooplanktonic high biomass showing the presence of tolerant species in this extreme environment. Antas and Bortolan reservoirs showed differences in the abiotic and biotic variables, AR showed suffer greater interference of acid effluents released at P41point and downstream of this at P14 point, lower protozooplankton biomass, lower bacterial density and pollution characteristics of inorganic sources. Using the FISH technique standard in this study to water bodies evaluated, it was possible to detect the presence of the extremophile bacteria of the Archaea domain in the three water bodies. The results of this study contribute to the knowledge of the pit mine lakes limnology which have become a major concern due to increased mining in the open. (author)

  16. 40 CFR 415.33 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS INORGANIC CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Calcium Carbide Production Subcategory § 415.33 Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of... (BAT). Except as provided in 40 CFR 125.30 through 125.32, any existing point source subject to...

  17. INEEL Liquid Effluent Inventory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Major, C.A.

    1997-06-01

    The INEEL contractors and their associated facilities are required to identify all liquid effluent discharges that may impact the environment at the INEEL. This liquid effluent information is then placed in the Liquid Effluent Inventory (LEI) database, which is maintained by the INEEL prime contractor. The purpose of the LEI is to identify and maintain a current listing of all liquid effluent discharge points and to identify which discharges are subject to federal, state, or local permitting or reporting requirements and DOE order requirements. Initial characterization, which represents most of the INEEL liquid effluents, has been performed, and additional characterization may be required in the future to meet regulations. LEI information is made available to persons responsible for or concerned with INEEL compliance with liquid effluent permitting or reporting requirements, such as the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System, Wastewater Land Application, Storm Water Pollution Prevention, Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasures, and Industrial Wastewater Pretreatment. The State of Idaho Environmental Oversight and Monitoring Program also needs the information for tracking liquid effluent discharges at the INEEL. The information provides a baseline from which future liquid discharges can be identified, characterized, and regulated, if appropriate. The review covered new and removed buildings/structures, buildings/structures which most likely had new, relocated, or removed LEI discharge points, and at least 10% of the remaining discharge points.

  18. Assessment of wastewater treatment plant effluent effects on fish reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents are known contributors of chemical mixtures into the environment. Of particular concern are endocrine-disrupting compounds that can affect hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis function in exposed organisms. The present study examined t...

  19. Role of H2O2 in the fluctuating patterns of COD (chemical oxygen demand) during the treatment of palm oil mill effluent (POME) using pilot scale triple frequency ultrasound cavitation reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manickam, Sivakumar; Abidin, Norhaida binti Zainal; Parthasarathy, Shridharan; Alzorqi, Ibrahim; Ng, Ern Huay; Tiong, Timm Joyce; Gomes, Rachel L; Ali, Asgar

    2014-07-01

    Palm oil mill effluent (POME) is a highly contaminating wastewater due to its high chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD). Conventional treatment methods require longer residence time (10-15 days) and higher operating cost. Owing to this, finding a suitable and efficient method for the treatment of POME is crucial. In this investigation, ultrasound cavitation technology has been used as an alternative technique to treat POME. Cavitation is the phenomenon of formation, growth and collapse of bubbles in a liquid. The end process of collapse leads to intense conditions of temperature and pressure and shock waves which assist various physical and chemical transformations. Two different ultrasound systems i.e. ultrasonic bath (37 kHz) and a hexagonal triple frequency ultrasonic reactor (28, 40 and 70 kHz) of 15 L have been used. The results showed a fluctuating COD pattern (in between 45,000 and 60,000 mg/L) while using ultrasound bath alone, whereas a non-fluctuating COD pattern with a final COD of 27,000 mg/L was achieved when hydrogen peroxide was introduced. Similarly for the triple frequency ultrasound reactor, coupling all the three frequencies resulted into a final COD of 41,300 mg/L compared to any other individual or combination of two frequencies. With the possibility of larger and continuous ultrasonic cavitational reactors, it is believed that this could be a promising and a fruitful green process engineering technique for the treatment of POME.

  20. Nuclear reactor effluent monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minns, J.L.; Essig, T.H. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Radiological environmental monitoring and effluent monitoring at nuclear power plants is important both for normal operations, as well as in the event of an accident. During normal operations, environmental monitoring verifies the effectiveness of in-plant measures for controlling the release of radioactive materials in the plant. Following an accident, it would be an additional mechanism for estimating doses to members of the general public. This paper identifies the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulatory basis for requiring radiological environmental and effluent monitoring, licensee conditions for effluent and environmental monitoring, NRC independent oversight activities, and NRC`s program results.

  1. Treated Effluent Disposal Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Treated non-hazardous and non-radioactive liquid wastes are collected and then disposed of through the systems at the Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF). More...

  2. Liquid Effluent Retention Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Liquid Effluent Retention Facility (LERF) is located in the central part of the Hanford Site. LERF is permitted by the State of Washington and has three liquid...

  3. Treatment of industrial effluents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cahey, A.G.

    1977-01-01

    The textbook is designed for students of water resources technology and as a guide for water quality engineers and those concerned with industrial effluents. The authors come from water authorities, industry and the academic world. Among the subjects considered are microbes and effluent treatments; legal aspects of pollution; analytical techniques; bio-oxidation; physical treatment; biological and ecological aspects of waste treatment; biological treatment of coke-oven liquors; water tracing.

  4. Kinetic Modeling of Dye Effluent Biodegradation by Pseudomonas Stutzeri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Rajamohan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Dye industry waste water is difficult to treat because of the presence of dyes with complex aromatic structure. In this research study, the biodegradation studies of dye effluent were performed utilizing Pseudomonas stutzeri in a controlled laboratory environment under anoxic conditions. The effects of operational parameters like initial pH of the effluent and initial Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD of the effluent on percentage COD removal were studied. A biokinetic model is established giving the dependence of percentage COD removal on biomass concentration and initial COD of the effluent. The biokinetics of the COD removal was found to be first order with respect to both the microbial concentration and initial COD of the effluent. The optimal pH for better bacterial degradation was found to be 8.The specific degradation rate was found to be 0.1417 l/g Dry Cell Mass (DCM h, at 320 C.

  5. Altered Reproduction in Clarias gariepinus Exposed to Industrial Effluents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeogun A. Olubukola

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Reproductive success is a key factor in determining species survival and the unregulated discharge of industrial effluents into rivers and streams in a developing country like Nigeria, can impair reproductive ability in non-target organisms like fish. Fish, generally accumulate contaminants from their environment in their tissues and these can be transmitted through the yolk lipids to the eggs. Approach: Prespawning Clarias gariepinus female brooders were exposed to composite effluent mixtures from a food and beverage industry (discharged into Ona river for a period of thirty days to determine its effect on growth and fertility/reproductive success (viability of eggs and survival of the F1 generation fries. Physico-chemical parameters of effluent samples and exposure concentrations were analyzed and effluent sample was further analyzed for heavy metals (Fe, Pb, Cd, Ni, Zn, Cu, Mn. Results: Exposure to the effluents caused decreased weight (-7.33% and egg production (198 eggs in the highest exposure concentration. Significant decreases (p1 generation fries (68.68, 46.42 and 22.33% with increasing effluent concentration was also observed in the order 0.00%> 4.40%> 6.60% and there were no viable eggs and fingerlings in the highest exposure concentration(13.20%. Effluent sample and exposure concentrations had acidic pH and low DO values while effluent sample contained Fe and Pb in concentrations above the specified standard by the National Environment Standards and Regulation Agency (NESREA for food and beverage industry effluent discharged into surface waters. Conclusion: The toxic nature of these effluents on the reproductive success of C. gariepinus (a commercially important freshwater fish in Nigeria is of great concern to sustainable fisheries if stringent measures to monitor effluent quality discharge into this river are not implemented.

  6. Plating effluent management in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paine, P. [Environment Canada, Hull, PQ (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    There are some 600 firms in Canada classified as metal finishers, employing about 8,000 people; 60 per cent of these firms are located in Ontario. Annual sales are in the range of $800 million. About 25 per cent of the total effort is devoted to the automotive industry. Regulatory initiatives are based on the Toxic Substance Management Policy 1995 Framework, and involve multi-stakeholder consultation to identify, evaluate and recommend goals, targets, and management options to reduce exposure to hexavalent chromium, maximize the recycling of nickel and minimize the releases of cadmium from industry operations by promoting and encouraging appropriate P2 practices. Other regulatory initiatives follow from the Fisheries Act of 1970, the Metal Finishing Liquid Effluent Guidelines of 1977, and the Canadian Environmental Protection Act of 1988. There are also non-regulatory initiatives, such as the Metal Finishing Industry Pollution Project, a voluntary cooperative effort directed towards formulating plans to reduce toxic effluents from metal finishing operations and to develop and implement site-specific P2 plans. The various treatment technologies such as physico-chemical treatment of multi-metal rinse waters and periodic bath dumpings at on-site waste water treatment plants, water reduction practices to make more effective use of rinse water, evaporation, ion exchange, packed bed scrubbers, fume suppressants, composite mesh pads and separate ventilation for degreasing are also described. Specific case studies are cited to illustrate the various treatment technologies.

  7. Radioactivity in the industrial effluent disposed soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthilkumar, R. D.; Narayanaswamy, R.; Meenashisundaram, V.

    2012-04-01

    Studies on radiation and radioactivity distribution in the soils of effluent disposed from the sugar industry in India have been conducted. The external gamma dose rates in air and natural radionuclides activities in the soils were measured using an Environmental Radiation Dosimeter and a Gamma-ray Spectrometer respectively. The soil samples were also subject to various physico-chemical analyses. This study revealed some remarkable results that are discussed in the article.

  8. Genotoxicity of industrial wastes and effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claxton, L D; Houk, V S; Hughes, T J

    1998-06-01

    In excess of several million pounds of genotoxic and/or carcinogenic industrial wastes are released into the U.S. environment each year. Chemical characterization of these waste materials can rarely provide an adequate assessment of their genotoxicity and potential hazard. Bioassays do not require prior information about chemical composition and can effectively assess the genotoxicity of complex waste materials. The most commonly used genotoxicity assay has been the Salmonella mutagenicity assay. Results with this system have shown that the genotoxic potency of industrial wastes can vary over 10 orders of magnitude, from virtually nondetectable to highly potent. Industries employing similar industrial processes generally release wastes of similar potency. Extremely high potency wastes include those from furazolidone and nitrofurfural production. Pulp and paper mills, steel foundries, and organic chemical manufacturing facilities also discharge wastes of noteworthy potency. Treatment and remediation of some wastes, such as pulp and paper mill effluents, have been shown to reduce or eliminate genotoxicity. However, in other cases, treatment and remediation have been shown to enhance genotoxicity, such as for fungal treatment of oils. Analyses of samples collected from areas known to receive industrial wastes and effluents have shown that genotoxins can accumulate in the receiving environment and have adverse effects on indigenous biota. The evaluation of hazardous wastes and effluents by genotoxicity assays may provide data useful not only for hazard identification but for comparative risk assessment.

  9. Effect of paper mill effluent on germination of green gram (Phaseolus aureus Roxb.) and growth behaviour of it's seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malla, Luna; Mohanty, B K

    2005-06-01

    Effect of paper mill effluents on Phaseolus aureus Roxb was studied. The effluent significantly inhibited germination of root and shoot length. The bio-chemical injury does not appear spontaneously but with the increase in effluent treatment there is reduction in observed biochemical parameters (chlorophyll, protein, amino acid, nuclic acids and carbohydrate) which are negatively correlated. The shoots of the seedlings were found to be resistant; whereas roots of the seedlings were susceptible to paper mill effluent treatment.

  10. ASSESSMENT OF DISTILLERY EFFLUENT IRRIGATION ON SOIL MICROBES AND ITS BIOREMEDIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripathi D. M

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with the assessment of toxicity of distillery effluent on soil microorganisms and its quality improvement through bioremediation using Pseudomonas spp. Under lab scale experiment, different dilutions of distillery effluent i.e. 25%, 50%, 75% were used to examine effects on physico-chemical parameters of effluent and on soil microflora e.g. algae, bacteria, fungi and actinomycetes. The results revealed that dilution may reduce significantly the metal contents and other toxicants in the effluent as well as in the soil. Statistical analysis revealed that bioremediation of distillery effluent using Pseudomonas spp. caused significant reduction in BOD, COD, TDS, TN, TP and color. The study indicates that raw distillery effluent is harmful for soil microflora and bioremediation improves the quality of distillery effluent making it suitable as a soil amendment.

  11. Bioremediation of the textile waste effluent by Chlorella vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala Yassin El-Kassas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The microalgae biomass production from textile waste effluent is a possible solution for the environmental impact generated by the effluent discharge into water sources. The potential application of Chlorella vulgaris for bioremediation of textile waste effluent (WE was investigated using 22 Central Composite Design (CCD. This work addresses the adaptation of the microalgae C. vulgaris in textile waste effluent (WE and the study of the best dilution of the WE for maximum biomass production and for the removal of colour and Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD by this microalga. The cultivation of C. vulgaris, presented maximum cellular concentrations Cmax and maximum specific growth rates μmax in the wastewater concentration of 5.0% and 17.5%, respectively. The highest colour and COD removals occurred with 17.5% of textile waste effluent. The results of C. vulgaris culture in the textile waste effluent demonstrated the possibility of using this microalga for the colour and COD removal and for biomass production. There was a significant negative relationship between textile waste effluent concentration and Cmax at 0.05 level of significance. However, sodium bicarbonate concentration did not significantly influence the responses of Cmax and the removal of colour and COD.

  12. Chemical and microbiological water quality of subsurface agricultural drains during a field trial of liquid dairy manure effluent application rate and varying tillage practices, Upper Tiffin Watershed, southeastern Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, Sheridan Kidd; Duris, Joseph W.

    2008-01-01

    A field trial was done in the Upper Tiffin River Watershed, in southeastern Michigan, to determine the influence of liquid dairy manure effluent (LDME) management practices on the quality of agricultural subsurface-drain water. Samples from subsurface drains were analyzed for nutrients, fecal-coliform and Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria, antibiotics, chemicals typically detected in wastewater, and the occurrence of genes indicating the presence of shiga-toxin-producing E. coli, or of bovine-specific Bacteroidetes bacteria. Samples were collected from November 2, 2006, to March 20, 2007, from eight subsurface drains under field plots that received no LDME and no tillage (controls) or received 4,000 or 8,000 gallons per acre (gal/acre) of LDME and either no tillage or two different types of tillage. The two types of tillage tested were (1) ground-driven, rotary, subsurface cultivation and (2) rolling-tine aeration. Samples were collected before LDME application and at 4 hours, and 1, 2, 6, 7, and 14 days post-application. Nutrient concentrations were high in subsurface-drain water throughout the field-trial period and could not be attributed to the field-trial LDME application. Of the 59 drain-water samples, including those collected before LDME application and control samples for each date, 56 had concentrations greater than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), Ecoregion VI recommended surface-water criterion for total phosphorus, and all samples had concentrations greater than the recommended total nitrogen criterion. Nitrate + nitrite nitrogen concentration exceeded 20 milligrams per liter for every sample and contributed most to the total nitrogen concentrations. Substantial increases in drain-water concentrations of organic and ammonia nitrogen and total phosphorus were found for all treatments, including controls, at 14 days post-application after 0.84 inch of rainfall over 2 days. E. coli concentrations exceeded the USEPA recreational

  13. Zero effluent; Efluente zero

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteiro, Silvio Rogerio; Santos, Angelo Francisco dos [Liquigas Distribuidora S.A., Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    A scenery of water shortage and the search for profitability improvement obligate the companies to exercise their creativity and to adopt alternative methods to the conventional ones to preserve the environmental resources. The 'Effluent Zero' project comes from a paradigms changing that the environmental preservation is a necessary cost. It brings a new analysis approach of this problem with the purpose to adapt the investments and operational costs with the effluents treatment to the demands of the productive processes. In Liquigas, the project brought significant results; made a potential reduction of nearly 90% in the investments of the effluents treatment systems. That means nearly 13% in reduction in the total investments in modernization and upgrade of the existents companies installations and of 1,6% in the total operational costs of the Company. Further more, it has contributed for a reduction of until 43% of the water consumption in the bottling process of the Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG). This way, the project resulted in effective actions of environmental protection with relevant economic benefits. (author)

  14. CHEMICALS

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  15. [Detoxification of textile industry effluents by photocatalytic treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebrati, L; Idrissi, L Loukili; Mountassir, Y; Nejmeddine, A

    2010-05-01

    In Morocco the textile industry, representing 31% of all Moroccan industries, is accompanied by high water consumption and important wastewater discharges rejected without any treatment. The focus of this study was to characterize the effluent from the textile industry, to test separately the effect of UV light and TiO2 catalyst and to determine the optimum conditions (pH, concentration and reaction time) in photocatalytic treatment to reduce chemical oxygen demand (COD) and colour. The biodegradability of the effluent was also studied using a toxicity test before and after treatment. After 90 min of reaction time at pH 4 and with 1.5 g F' of TiO2 catalyst, the photocatalytic treatment reached a global removal rate of 53% for COD and 89% for discoloration of the effluent. The relation BOD5/COD increased from around 0 to 0.3. The effluent became accessible to a biological treatment. The toxicity was studied by the Daphnia magna test over 24 hours. The results have shown the important toxicity of these effluents, which are rich in organic matter and other chemical compounds. After treatment by photocatalytic oxidation, the CI50 24 increased from 3.8% to 22.8%. This reduction of toxicity is related to the reduction of COD (53%) and colour (89%). Photocatalytic treatment has been shown to have an environmental benefit and, in combination with a secondary biological treatment, can be important for a significant reduction in the pollution of textile effluents.

  16. A survey of Canadian mechanical pulp and paper mill effluents: insights concerning the potential to affect fish reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Tibor G; Martel, Pierre H; O'Connor, Brian I; Hewitt, L Mark; Parrott, Joanne L; McMaster, Mark E; MacLatchy, Deborah L; Van Der Kraak, Glen J; Van Den Heuvel, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Building on breakthroughs recently made at kraft mills, a survey of mechanical pulp and paper mill effluents was undertaken to gain insights concerning potential effects on fish reproduction. Effluents from seven Canadian mills were characterized chemically for conventional parameters such as biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and total suspended solids (TSS). Each sample was further subjected to solvent extraction followed by gas chromatographic separation for the determination of resin/fatty acids and for the estimation of a gas chromatography (GC) profile index. Each mill effluent was assessed for the potential to affect fish reproduction in the laboratory using a five day adult fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) egg production bioassay with exposures to 100% effluent. The seven effluents were found to have substantial variation both in terms of chemical characterization and effects on fish reproduction. Temporal variations were also noted in effluent quality at mills sampled on different occasions. Similar to what has been observed for kraft mills, a general trend of greater reductions in egg production caused by effluents with greater BOD concentrations and GC profile indices was noted. Effluents with BOD > 25 mg/L and GC Profile indices >5.0 caused a complete cessation of egg production. At the same time, about half of the total effluents sampled had BOD reproductive effects caused by such effluents is presently unclear. The effluent quality parameters considered in this study may require further refinement to address their utility in predicting the adverse reproductive effects induced by effluents from mechanical pulp and paper mills.

  17. The Potential of Extended Aeration System for Sago Effluent Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahi A. Rashid

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Sago effluent contains large amount of organic material which has a potential to cause water pollution. In order to reduce this problem, an experiment was conducted to remove organic material from sago effluent using lab scale of Extended Aeration (EA system. Approach: The EA system consisted of the combination of physical and biological treatment unit. For Physical Treatment Unit (PTU, the sago effluent was filtered using 710 µm mesh size filter. For Biological Treatment Unit (BTU, the effluent were mixed and aerated with activated sago sludge for 48 h. The treatment efficiency with respect to Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD, Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD and Total Suspended Solid (TSS removal were evaluated and compared with regulatory requirement by Department of Environment, Malaysia. Results: The result showed, the EA system could reduce BOD, COD and TSS up to 84, 87.8 and 73% respectively, however it did not comply with the regulatory requirement. Conclusion: This study suggested the EA system have potential to be apply on sago effluent, however it should be integrated with additional treatment unit to achieve the effluent quality standard.

  18. Electrochemical treatment of textile dyes and dyehouse effluents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatzisymeon, Efthalia [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Crete, Polytechneioupolis, GR-73100 Chania (Greece); Xekoukoulotakis, Nikolaos P. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Crete, Polytechneioupolis, GR-73100 Chania (Greece); Coz, Alberto [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Crete, Polytechneioupolis, GR-73100 Chania (Greece); Kalogerakis, Nicolas [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Crete, Polytechneioupolis, GR-73100 Chania (Greece); Mantzavinos, Dionissios [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Crete, Polytechneioupolis, GR-73100 Chania (Greece)]. E-mail: mantzavi@mred.tuc.gr

    2006-09-21

    The electrochemical oxidation of textile effluents over a titanium-tantalum-platinum-iridium anode was investigated. Batch experiments were conducted in a flow-through electrolytic cell with internal recirculation at current intensities of 5, 10, 14 and 20 A, NaCl concentrations of 0.5, 1, 2 and 4% and recirculation rates of 0.81 and 0.65 L/s using a highly colored, synthetic effluent containing 16 textile dyes at a total concentration of 361 mg/L and chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 281 mg/L. Moreover, an actual dyehouse effluent containing residual dyes as well as various inorganic and organic compounds with a COD of 404 mg/L was tested. In most cases, quantitative effluent decolorization was achieved after 10-15 min of treatment and this required low energy consumption; conversely, the extent of mineralization varied between 30 and 90% after 180 min depending on the operating conditions and the type of effluent. In general, treatment performance improved with increasing current intensity and salinity and decreasing solution pH. However, the use of electrolytes not containing chloride (e.g. FeSO{sub 4} or Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) suppressed degradation. Although the acute toxicity of the actual effluent to marine bacteria Vibrio fischeri was weak, it increased sharply following treatment, thus suggesting the formation of persistent toxic by-products.

  19. Whole Effluent Assessment of urban discharges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lützhøft, Hans-Christian Holten; Qualmann, Signe; Kusk, Kresten Ole;

    2011-01-01

    The European Water Framework Directive and the Environmental Quality Standards Directive lay down a framework for maintaining or obtaining good ecological and chemical status of European surface and coastal water bodies by the year 2015. The aim of this work was through Whole Effluent Assessment......-hatched eggs, nauplii and copepodites was determined in controls as well as in samples and the effect was calculated as the ratio between the number of copepodites and the sum of the numbers of nauplii and copepodites. Ratios below or above 1 significantly (t-test) differing from the control group...

  20. Four marine-derived fungi for bioremediation of raw textile mill effluents

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Verma, A.K.; Raghukumar, C.; Verma, P.; Shouche, Y.S.; Naik, C.G.

    and 70-80% reduction in chemical oxygen demand and total phenolics. Mass spectrometric scan of effluents after fungal treatment revealed degradation of most of the components. The ascomycetes appeared to remove color primarily by adsorption, whereas...

  1. Enhanced production of laccase by a marine fungus during treatment of colored effluents and synthetic dyes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DeSouza-Ticlo, D.; Tiwari, R.; Sah, A.K.; Raghukumar, C.

    Paper and pulp mills, textile and dye-making industries and alcohol distilleries release highly colored effluents that are relatively difficult to decolorize by chemical and physical treatments. White-rot basidiomycetous fungi that produce lignin...

  2. Facility effluent monitoring plan for WESF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SIMMONS, F.M.

    1999-09-01

    The FEMP for the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) provides sufficient information on the WESF effluent characteristics and the effluent monitoring systems so that a compliance assessment against applicable requirements may be performed. Radioactive and hazardous material source terms are related to specific effluent streams that are in turn, related to discharge points and, finally are compared to the effluent monitoring system capability.

  3. Descoloration of industrial dyes and simulated textile effluents dyes by turnip peroxidase

    OpenAIRE

    Silva,Maria Cristina; Angelita D Corrêa; Torres, Juliana A.; Amorim, M. T. Pessoa de

    2012-01-01

    The removal of important textile dyes by turnip peroxidase (TNP) was evaluated. The textile effluents besides the residual dyes contain also chemical auxiliaries such as salts, dispersing and wetting agents. The effect of these was evaluated in the removal of the dyes reactive blue 21 and reactive blue 19 by TNP in synthetic effluents. A decrease of the efficency decolorization was observed. The action of the enzyme on colour removal of dye mixture was equivalent to the dyes alone. The chemic...

  4. Health effects in fish of long-term exposure to effluents from wastewater treatment works

    OpenAIRE

    Thorpe, KL; Gross-Sorokin, M; Johnson, I.; Brighty, G; Tyler, CR; Jobling, S

    2005-01-01

    The effects of simple mixtures of chemicals, with similar mechanisms of action, can be predicted using the concentration addition model (CA). The ability of this model to predict the estrogenic effects of more complex mixtures such as effluent discharges, however, has yet to be established. Effluents from 43 U.K. wastewater treatment works were analyzed for the presence of the principal estrogenic chemical contaminants, estradiol, estrone, ethinylestradiol, and nonylphenol. The measured conce...

  5. Fusion fuel cycle: material requirements and potential effluents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teofilo, V.L.; Bickford, W.E.; Long, L.W.; Price, B.A.; Mellinger, P.J.; Willingham, C.E.; Young, J.K.

    1980-10-01

    Environmental effluents that may be associated with the fusion fuel cycle are identified. Existing standards for controlling their release are summarized and anticipated regulatory changes are identified. The ability of existing and planned environmental control technology to limit effluent releases to acceptable levels is evaluated. Reference tokamak fusion system concepts are described and the principal materials required of the associated fuel cycle are analyzed. These materials include the fusion fuels deuterium and tritium; helium, which is used as a coolant for both the blanket and superconducting magnets; lithium and beryllium used in the blanket; and niobium used in the magnets. The chemical and physical processes used to prepare these materials are also described.

  6. Composição bromatológica e produção de efluente de silagens de capim-tanzânia sob efeitos do emurchecimento, do tamanho de partícula e do uso de aditivos biológicos Chemical composition and effluent yield of Tanzaniagrass silages affected by wilting, particle size and enzymatic/microbial additive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Rebouças Santana Loures

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho foi conduzido para se avaliar o efeito do emurchecimento, da redução do tamanho das partículas e da adição de enzimas fibrolíticas (com ou sem inoculante bacteriano Lactobacillus plantarum sobre a composição bromatológica da silagem e a produção de efluente em silagens de capim-tanzânia (Panicum maximum Jacq. cv. Tanzânia. A forragem foi cortada aos 45 dias de crescimento vegetativo e armazenada em silos experimentais (50 L durante 136 dias. O efluente foi coletado e quantificado no 1º, 2º, 7º, 14º, 21º, 60º, 90º e 136º dias de armazenamento. A adição de enzimas fibrolíticas, associadas ou não ao inoculante bacteriano, promoveu redução da fração fibrosa (FDN, FDA, celulose e hemicelulose, que foi mais acentuada nas silagens emurchecidas. Contudo, não houve aumento da digestibilidade in vitro da MS com a adição de enzimas fibrolíticas. Embora tenha havido diferenças no tamanho de partícula, a amplitude alcançada não foi suficiente para provocar alterações significativas na composição química e no efluente das silagens. Observou-se que a quantidade total de efluente produzida foi maior (250L/t forragem ensilada em silagens não-emurchecidas e esporádica nas emurchecidas. A adição de enzimas com ou sem inoculante bacteriano não aumentou as perdas por efluente. Os valores médios de DBO (11.289 mg/L, DQO (36.279 mg/L, DQO/DBO (3, 35, pH (4, 9 e de sólidos totais (34.395 mg/L e sólidos totais fixos (16.533 mg/L foram observados no efluente das silagens não-emurchecidas. As silagens não-emurchecidas apresentaram efluente com elevado potencial poluidor para o meio ambiente.The present trial aimed to evaluate the effects of wilting (wet vs. wilted, particle size reduction (small vs. large and the addition of fibrolytic enzymes (alone vs. combined with Lactobacillus plantarum on the chemical composition and effluent yield of Tanzaniagrass silages (Panicum maximum Jacq. cv. Tanzania

  7. Influence of distillery effluent on germination and growth of mung bean (Vigna radiata) seeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kannan, A. [Biomembrane Toxicology Division, Industrial Toxicology Research Centre, Post Box No. 80, M.G. Marg, Lucknow 226001 (India); Upreti, Raj K. [Biomembrane Toxicology Division, Industrial Toxicology Research Centre, Post Box No. 80, M.G. Marg, Lucknow 226001 (India)], E-mail: upretirk@rediffmail.com

    2008-05-01

    Distillery effluent or spent wash discharged as waste water contains various toxic chemicals that can contaminate water and soil and may affect the common crops if used for agricultural irrigation. Toxic nature of distillery effluent is due to the presence of high amounts of organic and inorganic chemical loads and its high-acidic pH. Experimental effects of untreated (Raw) distillery effluent, discharged from a distillery unit (based on fermentation of alcohol from sugarcane molasses), and the post-treatment effluent from the outlet of conventional anaerobic treatment plant (Treated effluent) of the distillery unit were studied in mung bean (Vigna radiata, L.R. Wilczek). Mung bean is a commonly used legume crop in India and its neighboring countries. Mung bean seeds were presoaked for 6 h and 30 h, respectively, in different concentrations (5-20%, v/v) of each effluent and germination, growth characters, and seedling membrane enzymes and constituents were investigated. Results revealed that the leaching of carbohydrates and proteins (solute efflux) were much higher in case of untreated effluent and were also dependent to the presoaking time. Other germination characters including percentage of germination, speed of germination index, vigor index and length of root and embryonic axis revealed significant concentration-dependent decline in untreated effluent. Evaluation of seedlings membrane transport enzymes and structural constituents (hexose, sialic acid and phospholipids) following 6 h presoaking of seeds revealed concentration-dependent decline, which were much less in treated effluent as compared to the untreated effluent. Treated effluent up to 10% (v/v) concentration reflected low-observed adverse effect levels.

  8. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 324 Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-11-01

    The 324 Facility [Waste Technology Engineering Laboratory] in the 300 Area primarily supports the research and development of radioactive and nonradioactive waste vitrification technologies, biological waste remediation technologies, spent nuclear fuel studies, waste mixing and transport studies, and tritium development programs. All of the above-mentioned programs deal with, and have the potential to, release hazardous and/or radioactive material. The potential for discharge would primarily result from (1) conducting research activities using the hazardous materials, (2) storing radionuclides and hazardous chemicals, and (3) waste accumulation and storage. This report summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents, and the results of the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) determination for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterizing effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements.

  9. UTILIZING Aspergillus niger FOR BIOREMEDIATION OF TANNERY EFFLUENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Bisht

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Tannery waste water is characterized by highly toxic ammonium, sulfates, surfactants, acids, dyes, sulfonated oils and organic substances, including natural or synthetic tannins. This study was designed to study the potential of Aspergillus niger for bioremediation of tannery effluent. Addition of glucose as a carbon source in the tannery effluent encouraged the growth of A. niger but there was no change in physico-chemical parameters. The toxic effects were mostly reduced after treatment when 20% mineral salt medium was added in tannery effluent. Colour, COD, TS, TDS, TSS, chlorides, sulfides and chromium reduction were 71.9%, 72.1%, 69.0%, 65.0%, 68.1%, 66.8%, 65.7% and 57.8%, respectively.

  10. Evaluation of the Phytotoxic and Genotoxic Potential of Pulp and Paper Mill Effluent Using Vigna radiata and Allium cepa

    OpenAIRE

    Izharul Haq; Vineeta Kumari; Sharad Kumar; Abhay Raj; Mohtashim Lohani; Ram Naresh Bhargava

    2016-01-01

    Pulp and paper mill effluent induced phytotoxicity and genotoxicity in mung bean (Vigna radiata L.) and root tip cells of onion (Allium cepa L.) were investigated. Physicochemical characteristics such as electrical conductivity (EC), biological oxygen demand (BOD5), chemical oxygen demand (COD), and total phenols of the pulp and paper mill effluent were beyond the permissible limit specified for the discharge of effluent in inland water bodies. Compared to control plants, seedling exposed to ...

  11. Demasculinization of male fish by wastewater treatment plant effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajda, Alan M; Barber, Larry B; Gray, James L; Lopez, Elena M; Bolden, Ashley M; Schoenfuss, Heiko L; Norris, David O

    2011-06-01

    Adult male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were exposed to effluent from the City of Boulder, Colorado wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) under controlled conditions in the field to determine if the effluent induced reproductive disruption in fish. Gonadal intersex and other evidence of reproductive disruption were previously identified in white suckers (Catostomus commersoni) in Boulder Creek downstream from this WWTP effluent outfall. Fish were exposed within a mobile flow-through exposure laboratory in July 2005 and August 2006 to WWTP effluent (EFF), Boulder Creek water (REF), or mixtures of EFF and REF for up to 28 days. Primary (sperm abundance) and secondary (nuptial tubercles and dorsal fat pads) sex characteristics were demasculinized within 14 days of exposure to 50% and 100% EFF. Vitellogenin was maximally elevated in both 50% and 100% EFF treatments within 7 days and significantly elevated by 25% EFF within 14 days. The steroidal estrogens 17β-estradiol, estrone, estriol, and 17α-ethynylestradiol, as well as estrogenic alkylphenols and bisphenol A were identified within the EFF treatments and not in the REF treatment. These results support the hypothesis that the reproductive disruption observed in this watershed is due to endocrine-active chemicals in the WWTP effluent.

  12. Demasculinization of male fish by wastewater treatment plant effluent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajda, A.M.; Barber, L.B.; Gray, J.L.; Lopez, E.M.; Bolden, A.M.; Schoenfuss, H.L.; Norris, D.O.

    2011-01-01

    Adult male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were exposed to effluent from the City of Boulder, Colorado wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) under controlled conditions in the field to determine if the effluent induced reproductive disruption in fish. Gonadal intersex and other evidence of reproductive disruption were previously identified in white suckers (Catostomus commersoni) in Boulder Creek downstream from this WWTP effluent outfall. Fish were exposed within a mobile flow-through exposure laboratory in July 2005 and August 2006 to WWTP effluent (EFF), Boulder Creek water (REF), or mixtures of EFF and REF for up to 28 days. Primary (sperm abundance) and secondary (nuptial tubercles and dorsal fat pads) sex characteristics were demasculinized within 14 days of exposure to 50% and 100% EFF. Vitellogenin was maximally elevated in both 50% and 100% EFF treatments within 7 days and significantly elevated by 25% EFF within 14 days. The steroidal estrogens 17??-estradiol, estrone, estriol, and 17??-ethynylestradiol, as well as estrogenic alkylphenols and bisphenol A were identified within the EFF treatments and not in the REF treatment. These results support the hypothesis that the reproductive disruption observed in this watershed is due to endocrine-active chemicals in the WWTP effluent. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  13. Bioplastic production using wood mill effluents as feedstock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben, M; Mato, T; Lopez, A; Vila, M; Kennes, C; Veiga, M C

    2011-01-01

    Fibreboard production is one of the most important industrial activities in Galicia (Spain). Great amounts of wastewater are generated, with properties depending on the type of wood, treatment process, final product and water reusing, among others. These effluents are characterized by a high chemical oxygen demand, low pH and nutrients limitation. Although anaerobic digestion is one of the most suitable processes for the treatment, lately bioplastics production (mainly polyhydroxyalkanoates) from wastewaters with mixed cultures is being evaluated. Substrate requirements for these processes consist of high organic matter content and low nutrient concentration. Therefore, wood mill effluents could be a suitable feedstock. In this work, the possibility of producing bioplastics from to wood mill effluents is evaluated. First, wood mill effluent was converted to volatile fatty acids in an acidogenic reactor operated at two different hydraulic retention times of 1 and 1.5 d. The acidification percentage obtained was 37% and 42%, respectively. Then, aerobic batch assays were performed using fermented wood mill effluents obtained at different hydraulic retention times. Assays were developed using different cultures as inoculums. The maximum storage yield of 0.57 Cmmol/Cmmol was obtained when when the culture was enriched on a synthetic media.

  14. Tannery Effluent Treatment by Yeast Species Isolates from Watermelon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley Irobekhian Reuben Okoduwa

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The quest for an effective alternative means for effluent treatment is a major concern of the modern-day scientist. Fungi have been attracting a growing interest for the biological treatment of industrial wastewater. In this study, Saccharomycescerevisiae and Torulasporadelbrueckii were isolated from spoiled watermelon and inoculated into different concentrations of effluent. The inoculants were incubated for 21-days to monitor the performance of the isolates by measurement of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD, chemical oxygen demand (COD, nitrates, conductivity, phosphates, sulphates and turbidity. The results showed that Saccharomycescerevisiae had the highest percentage decrease of 98.1%, 83.0%, 60.7%, 60.5%, and 54.2% for turbidity, sulphates, BOD, phosphates and COD, respectively, of the tannery effluent. Torulasporadelbrueckii showed the highest percentage decrease of 92.9%, 90.6%, and 61.9% for sulphates, COD, and phosphates, respectively, while the syndicate showed the highest percentage reduction of 87.4% and 70.2% for nitrate and total dissolve solid (TDS, respectively. The least percentage decrease was displayed by syndicate organisms at 51.2%, 48.1% and 40.3% for BOD, COD and conductivity, respectively. The study revealed that Saccharomycescerevisiae and Torulasporadelbrueckii could be used in the biological treatment of tannery-effluent. Hence, it was concluded that the use of these organisms could contribute to minimizing the adverse environmental risks and health-hazards associated with the disposal of untreated tannery-effluents.

  15. 40 CFR 426.67 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS GLASS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Automotive Glass Tempering Subcategory § 426.67 Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent...

  16. 40 CFR 430.92 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS THE PULP, PAPER, AND PAPERBOARD POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Secondary Fiber Deink Subcategory § 430.92 Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent...

  17. Reproductive responses of male fathead minnows exposed to wastewater treatment plant effluent, effluent treated with XAD8 resin, and an environmentally relevant mixture of alkylphenol compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, L.B.; Lee, K.E.; Swackhamer, D.L.; Schoenfuss, H.L.

    2007-01-01

    On-site, continuous-flow experiments were conducted during August and October 2002 at a major metropolitan wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) to determine if effluent exposure induced endocrine disruption as manifested in the reproductive competence of sexually mature male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). The fathead minnows were exposed in parallel experiments to WWTP effluent and WWTP effluent treated with XAD8 macroreticular resin to remove the hydrophobic-neutral fraction which contained steroidal hormones, alkylphenolethoxylates (APEs), and other potential endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs). The effluent composition varied on a temporal scale and the continuous-flow experiments captured the range of chemical variability that occurred during normal WWTP operations. Exposure to WWTP effluent resulted in vitellogenin induction in male fathead minnows, with greater response in October than in August. Concentrations of ammonia, APEs, 17??-estradiol, and other EDCs also were greater in October than in August, reflecting a change in effluent composition. In the October experiment, XAD8 treatment significantly reduced vitellogenin induction in the male fathead minnows relative to the untreated effluent, whereas in August, XAD8 treatment had little effect. During both experiments, XAD8 treatment removed greater than 90% of the APEs. Exposure of fish to a mixture of APEs similar in composition and concentration to the WWTP effluent, but prepared in groundwater and conducted at a separate facility, elicited vitellogenin induction during both experiments. There was a positive relation between vitellogenin induction and hepatosomatic index (HSI), but not gonadosomatic index (GSI), secondary sexual characteristics index (SSCI), or reproductive competency. In contrast to expectations, the GSI and SSCI increased in males exposed to WWTP effluent compared to groundwater controls. The GSI, SSCI, and reproductive competency were positively affected by XAD8 treatment of

  18. Methanization of industrial liquid effluents; Methanisation des effluents industriels liquides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frederic, S.; Lugardon, A. [Societe Naskeo Environnement, 92 - Levallois-Perret (France)

    2007-09-15

    In a first part, this work deals with the theoretical aspects of the methanization of the industrial effluents; the associated reactional processes are detailed. The second part presents the technological criteria for choosing the methanization process in terms of the characteristics of the effluent to be treated. Some of the methanization processes are presented with their respective advantages and disadvantages. At last, is described the implementation of an industrial methanization unit. The size and the main choices are detailed: the anaerobic reactor, the control, the valorization aspects of the biogas produced. Some examples of industrial developments illustrate the different used options. (O.M.)

  19. Effect of Carbon Sources on the Biomass Build-Up and Degradation of Rubber Processing Industry Effluent

    OpenAIRE

    Girish, K.

    2014-01-01

    Rubber processing industry effluent represents a serious environmental pollution problem especially for underground and surface water. Wastewater collected from rubber processing industry was characterized for their pollution characteristics. Analysis showed that the biological oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), total dissolved solids (TDS), total suspended solids (TSS), total solids (TS), ammonia and phosphate were high when compared to effluent discharge standard for industr...

  20. Predicting refinery effluent toxicity on the basis of hydrocarbon composition determined by GCxGC analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whale, G. [and others

    2013-04-15

    A high resolution analytical method for determining hydrocarbon blocks in petroleum products by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GCxGC) was used for the analysis of petroleum hydrocarbons extracted from refinery effluents. From 105 CONCAWE refineries in Europe 111 refinery effluents were collected in the period June 2008 to March 2009 (CONCAWE, 2010). The effluents were analysed for metals, standard effluent parameters (including Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD), Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD), oil in water (OiW), GCxGC speciated hydrocarbons, BTEX (Benzene, Toluene, Ethylbenzene, and Xylenes) and volatile organic compounds. This report describes the subsequent analysis of the GCxGC data, as described in hydrocarbon blocks, and uses the PETROTOX model, to predict the environmental toxicity (i.e. ecotoxicity) of the discharged effluents. A further analysis was undertaken to address the potential environmental impact of these predicted effects initially using default dilution factors and then,when necessary site specific factors. The report describes all the methods used to arrive at the predictions, and shows that for the majority of refinery effluents direct toxicity effects in the effluents are not anticipated. Furthermore, when applying either the EU Risk Assessment Technical Guidance Document (TGD) default dilution factors or site specific dilution factors, none of the refineries are predicted to exerting either acute or chronic toxicity to organisms in the receiving aquatic environment, based on their hydrocarbon composition present in the effluent samples.

  1. Occurrence of disinfection byproducts in United States wastewater treatment plant effluents

    KAUST Repository

    Krasner, Stuart W.

    2009-11-01

    Effluents from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) contain disinfection byproducts (DBPs) of health concern when the water is utilized downstream as a potable water supply. The pattern of DBP formation was strongly affected by whether or not the WWTP achieved good nitrification. Chlorine addition to poorly nitrified effluents formed low levels of halogenated DBPs, except for (in some cases) dihalogenated acetic acids, but often substantial amounts of N-nitrosodimethyamine (NDMA). Chlorination of well-nitrified effluent typically resulted in substantial formation of halogenated DBPs but much less NDMA. For example, on a median basis after chlorine addition, the well-nitrified effluents had 57 μg/L of trihalomethanes [THMs] and 3 ng/L of NDMA, while the poorly nitrified effluents had 2 μg/L of THMs and 11 ng/L of NDMA. DBPs with amino acid precursors (haloacetonitriles, haloacetaldehydes) formed at substantial levels after chlorination of well-nitrified effluent. The formation of halogenated DBPs but not that of NDMA correlated with the formation of THMs in WWTP effluents disinfected with free chlorine. However, THM formation did not correlate with the formation of other DBPs in effluents disinfected with chloramines. Because of the relatively high levels of bromide in treated wastewater, bromine incorporation was observed in various classes of DBPs. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  2. Characteristics of treated effluents and their potential applications for producing concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noruzman, Ainul Haezah; Muhammad, Bala; Ismail, Mohammad; Abdul-Majid, Zaiton

    2012-11-15

    Conservation and preservation of freshwater is increasingly becoming important as the global population grows. Presently, enormous volumes of freshwater are used to mix concrete. This paper reports experimental findings regarding the feasibility of using treated effluents as alternatives to freshwater in mixing concrete. Samples were obtained from three effluent sources: heavy industry, a palm-oil mill and domestic sewage. The effluents were discharge into public drain without danger to human health and natural environment. Chemical compositions and physical properties of the treated effluents were investigated. Fifteen compositional properties of each effluent were correlated with the requirements set out by the relevant standards. Concrete mixes were prepared using the effluents and freshwater to establish a base for control performance. The concrete samples were evaluated with regard to setting time, workability, compressive strength and permeability. The results show that except for some slight excesses in total solids and pH, the properties of the effluents satisfy the recommended disposal requirements. Two concrete samples performed well for all of the properties investigated. In fact, one sample was comparatively better in compressive strength than the normal concrete; a 9.4% increase was observed at the end of the curing period. Indeed, in addition to environmental conservation, the use of treated effluents as alternatives to freshwater for mixing concrete could save a large amount of freshwater, especially in arid zones.

  3. ADVANCED TREATMENT OF SAHEBGHARANIEH SECONDARY EFFLUENT BY OZONATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Vaezi

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Chemical oxidation is one of the most suitable treatment methods for reducing organic pollutants and the number of pathogens remaining in secondary effluents. Ozone is the most powerful oxidizing agent commonly used because of it's many advantages over chlorination. In this study the efficiency of ozonation in advanced wastewater treatment of Sahebgharanieh Plant has been determined. Ozone generation has been performed by irradiation of compressed air with 4 special UV lamps. The total output of these lamps was determined to be 0.74 mg ozone per minute at established conditions. Considering 3 periods of ozonation of effluent samples (30, 60 and 120 min and ozone transfer coefficient of 95%, the concentrations of applied ozone for wastewater treatment were specified to be 10.5, 21 and 42 mg/l, respectively. Ozonation of secondary effluents at these periods has resulted in 17, 24 and 30 percent reduction in average COD and about 20, 18 and 32 percent decrease in BOD5. It is believed that the 2 percent increase observed in BOD after 30 minutes is caused by changing some amount of COD to BOD5 by applied ozone. According to the prescribed reduction values it could be concluded that the final effluent of a typical treatment plant would become better qualified for water reuse in irrigation. But it should be declared that the effluent might not be completely disinfected irrespective of about 99.0% decrease determined in MPN of total coliforms. Also it must be noted that this degree of disinfection was accomplished only for 62.5% of samples. Ozonation of effluent samples has caused an increase in pH value which was at least 0.4 of a pH unit.

  4. Use of polishing pond effluents to cultivate lettuce (Lactuca sativa) in a hydroponic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, R; Perin, K; Souza, W G; Cruz, L S; Zandonade, E; Cassini, S T A; Goncalves, R F

    2008-01-01

    The sanitary quality and productivity of hydroponic lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) plants cultivated under greenhouse conditions and treated with effluent from anaerobic reactor + polishing pond followed by physical-chemical treatment was evaluated. Two hydroponic cultivations were performed at summer and winter time at Vitoria-ES, Brazil. The treatments for both cultivations were: T1) conventional nutrient solution, T2) effluent from physical-chemical treatment, T3) effluent from polishing pond, and T4) effluent from polishing pond with 50% dilution. The plants were evaluated for microbial contamination, productivity and nutrient content. In all cases, no significant microbial contamination of lettuce was detected and the levels of macronutrients in the shoot system were similar to those in published reports. In the experiments from summer season, the treatments T1 and T2 resulted in higher production than the T3 and T4 treatments. Plants from T3 and T4 had a less developed root system as a result of reduced oxygenation from competition with the higher algae biomass content from the polishing pond effluent. In the winter season, the effect of the algal biomass was pronounced only in the T3 treatment (undiluted effluent from polishing pond). In conclusion, hydroponic cultivation of lettuce with pond effluent is suitable as a complement to water and nutrients for plants.

  5. Electrocoagulation for the treatment of textile industry effluent--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandegar, V; Saroha, Anil K

    2013-10-15

    Various techniques such as physical, chemical, biological, advanced oxidation and electrochemical are used for the treatment of industrial effluent. The commonly used conventional biological treatment processes are time consuming, need large operational area and are not effective for effluent containing toxic elements. Advanced oxidation techniques result in high treatment cost and are generally used to obtain high purity grade water. The chemical coagulation technique is slow and generates large amount of sludge. Electrocoagulation has recently attracted attention as a potential technique for treating industrial effluent due to its versatility and environmental compatibility. This technique uses direct current source between metal electrodes immersed in the effluent, which causes the dissolution of electrode plates into the effluent. The metal ions, at an appropriate pH, can form wide range of coagulated species and metal hydroxides that destabilize and aggregate particles or precipitate and adsorb the dissolved contaminants. Therefore, the objective of the present manuscript is to review the potential of electrocoagulation for the treatment of industrial effluents, mainly removal of dyes from textile effluent.

  6. Decolorization of textile plant effluent by Citrobacter sp. strain KCTC 18061P.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Moon-Sun; Jung, Byung-Gil; Sung, Nak-Chang; Lee, Young-Choon

    2007-12-01

    Citrobacter sp. strain KCTC 18061P was found to be able to decolorize textile plant effluent containing different types of reactive dyes. Effects of physico-chemical parameters, such as aeration, nitrogen source, glucose and effluent concentrations on the color removal of real dye effluent by this strain were investigated. The observed changes in the visible spectra indicated color removal by the absorption of dye to cells during incubation with the strain. This strain showed higher decolorization ability under aerobic than static culture conditions. With 1% glucose, this strain removed 70% of effluent color within 5 days. Decolorization was not significantly dependent on the nitrogen sources tested. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biological oxygen demand (BOD) were decreased in proportion to incubation times, and their removal rates were about 35% and 50%, respectively, at 7 days of culture.

  7. Removal of silicon and turbidity from oil refinery effluent by chemical coagulation progress%化学混凝法同步除炼油污水中硅和浊度的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜文婷; 王兵; 刘光全; 任雯; 刘鹏; 任宏洋

    2014-01-01

    The oil refinery effluent was dealt with biochemical treatment taking A 2/O as a core ,and its quality could reach the comprehensive discharge standard of effluent .The effluent could be recycled by the low pressure multi-effect evaporation system using the low temperature heat of oil refinery ,and it was the new measure of energy saving and emission reduction .The sil-icon and turbidity were the main parameters of evaporation process .The removal effect of silicon and turbidity by softening with lime ,magnesium salt precipitation and precipitation by combina-tion coagulant of molysite and aluminium salt were researched .The results indicated that :when the dosage of Ca(OH)2 was 500 mg/L ,the removal rate of silicon and turbidity were 79 .2% and 4 .2% ,respectively ,and when the dosage of MgCl2 was 400 mg/L at the pH value of 10 ,the re-moval rate of silicon and turbidity were 91 .6% and 74 .4% ,respectively .The requirement of low temperature multi-effect evaporation system could be achieved ,w hen the dosage of Fe(Ⅱ/Ⅲ)Al combination coagulant was 400 mg/L and the removal rate of silicon and turbidity were 91 .9%and 90 .4% ,respectively . The residual silicon content and turbidity were 17 .93 mg/L and 3 NTU .%炼油厂污水经A2/O为核心的生化系统处理后,水质可达到污水综合排放标准。有效利用炼油厂低温余热,通过负压多效蒸发工艺实现净化后污水的回收再利用,是炼油厂节能减排的新举措。进水水质中硅、浊度是蒸发工艺防垢、控制水质的主要参数,以硅、浊度的同步去除为目标,研究了石灰、镁盐沉淀、铁铝盐共沉淀法对硅和浊度去除效果的影响。结果表明,当Ca (OH )2的投加量为500 m g/L时,硅、浊度的同步去除率分别为79.2%和4.2%;p H值=10.0,Mg Cl2投加量为400 mg/L时,硅、浊度的同步去除率分别为91.6%和74.4%;优选的Fe(Ⅱ/Ⅲ)Al复合混凝剂投加量为400 mg/L时

  8. Wastes treatment: Naskeo undertakes on the way of methanization; Traitement des effluents: Naskeo mise sur la methanisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2005-09-15

    Naskeo proposes to cleanse the organic effluents of the chemical or pharmaceutical firms by methanization. A process which produces a renewable biogas, directly valorizable at the level of the process of the manufacturer. (O.M.)

  9. The Relationship Between Organic Loading and Effects on Fish Reproduction for Pulp Mill Effluents Across Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Pierre H; O'Connor, Brian I; Kovacs, Tibor G; Van Den Heuvel, Michael R; Parrott, Joanne L; McMaster, Mark E; MacLatchy, Deborah L; Van Der Kraak, Glen J; Hewitt, L Mark

    2017-02-21

    This study builds upon the work of a multiagency consortium tasked with determining cost effective solutions for the effects of pulp mill effluents on fish reproduction. A laboratory fathead minnow egg production test and chemical characterization tools were used to benchmark eighty-one effluents from twenty mills across Canada, representing the major pulping, bleaching and effluent treatment technologies. For Kraft and mechanical pulp mills, effluents containing less than 20 mg/L BOD5 were found to have the greatest probability of having no effects. Organic loading, expressed as the total detected solvent-extractable components by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), also correlate with decreased egg laying. Exceptions were found for specific Kraft, mechanical and sulfite mills, suggesting yet unidentified, causative agents are involved. Recycled fibre mill effluents, tested for the first time, were found to have little potential for reproductive effects despite large variations in BOD5 and the GC/MS profiles. Effluent treatment systems across all production types were generally efficient, achieving a combined 82-98 % BOD5 removal. Further reductions of final effluent organic loadings towards the target of less than 20 mg/L are recommended and can be realized through biotreatment optimization, the reduction of organic losses associated with production upsets and selecting best available technologies that reduce organic loadings to biotreatment.

  10. The estrogen receptor of the gastropod Nucella lapillus: Modulation following exposure to an estrogenic effluent?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, L. Filipe C. [CIIMAR, Centre of Marine and Environmental Research, Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Studies, University of Porto, Rua dos Bragas 177, 4050-123 Porto (Portugal)], E-mail: filipe.castro@ciimar.up.pt; Melo, C. [CIIMAR, Centre of Marine and Environmental Research, Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Studies, University of Porto, Rua dos Bragas 177, 4050-123 Porto (Portugal); Guillot, R.; Mendes, I.; Queiros, S.; Lima, D. [CIIMAR, Centre of Marine and Environmental Research, Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology, University of Porto, Rua dos Bragas 177, 4050-123 Porto (Portugal); Reis-Henriques, M.A. [CIIMAR, Centre of Marine and Environmental Research, Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology, University of Porto, Rua dos Bragas 177, 4050-123 Porto (Portugal); ICBAS, Instituto Ciencias Biomedicas Abel Salazar, University of Porto, Largo Professor Abel Salazar 2, 4099-003 Porto (Portugal); Santos, M.M. [CIIMAR, Centre of Marine and Environmental Research, Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology, University of Porto, Rua dos Bragas 177, 4050-123 Porto (Portugal)], E-mail: santos@ciimar.up.pt

    2007-10-30

    The molecular targets of estrogenic endocrine disrupting chemicals have been studied in detail in vertebrates. The lack of basic endocrine knowledge impairs similar approaches for invertebrates. Evidence indicates that the signalling pathways of invertebrates may also be a target of estrogenic chemicals (ECs). In fact, the exposure to effluents containing ECs has been reported to impact mollusc reproduction. Despite the reported estrogen independence of the mollusc nuclear estrogen receptor (ER), its role in EC-induced toxicity has not been investigated in vivo. Therefore, we have cloned the ER of the gastropod Nucella lapillus and evaluated the effects of a mixture of estrogenic chemicals (sewage effluent) on its expression in the ovary. Here, we show that the exposure to a raw domestic/industrial effluent, impact ER expression with a simultaneous reproductive maturation. These results highlight the need to further investigate the role of ER on the reproductive process in prosobranch gastropods and whether this signalling pathway is prone to disruption by ECs.

  11. Interactions argiles naturelles-effluents teinturiers : influence des propriétés de surface des argiles et mécanismes d'adsorption des colorants

    OpenAIRE

    Abidi, Nejib

    2015-01-01

    Industrial effluents from textile activities often have a high pollution load readily biodegradable. Previous work has shown the potential of natural untreated clays to clean up these dyers effluents although anionic dyes are not easily absorbable on these media. The effluents also contain other chemical compounds used in the different stages of the dyeing process, and which are of various natures (salts, acids, bases, detergents, enzyme derivatives, etc ...). It appears that these auxiliary ...

  12. Ultraviolet, chlorine and ozone disinfection of some enteroviruses in drinking water and treated effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M A

    1997-01-01

    The inactivation efficiency of chlorine, ultraviolet light and ozone were determined for poliovirus type 3, Coxsackievirus type B4 and Hepatitis A virus in drinking water and treated effluent. Ultraviolet was more efficient than the other two disinfectants at wave length 254 nm where no infective virus was detected after 4 min of UV irradiation in both drinking water and treated effluent. Inactivation by chlorine dose more than 25 mg/L was sufficient for studied viruses in both drinking water and treated effluent. Also virus-seeded drinking water was exposed to ozone for 18 min at ozone rate of 319 mg/L/h to obtain the maximum inactivation of PV3, CoxB4 and HAV but about 20 min of ozone exposure was needed for treated effluent. Physico-chemical parameters were measured before and after disinfection assay. No significant changes were observed.

  13. Assessment of the effluent quality from a gold mining industry in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acheampong, Mike A; Paksirajan, Kannan; Lens, Piet N L

    2013-06-01

    The physical and chemical qualities of the process effluent and the tailings dam wastewater of AngloGold-Ashanti Limited, a gold mining company in Ghana, were studied from June to September, 2010. The process effluent from the gold extraction plant contains high amounts of suspended solids and is therefore highly turbid. Arsenic, copper and cyanide were identified as the major pollutants in the process effluent with average concentrations of 10.0, 3.1 and 21.6 mg L(-1), respectively. Arsenic, copper, iron and free cyanide (CN(-)) concentrations in the process effluent exceeded the Ghana EPA discharge limits; therefore, it is necessary to treat the process effluent before it can be discharged into the environment. Principal component analysis of the data indicated that the process effluent characteristics were influenced by the gold extraction process as well as the nature of the gold-bearing ore processed. No significant correlation was observed between the wastewater characteristics themselves, except for the dissolved oxygen and the biochemical oxygen demand. The process effluent is fed to the Sansu tailings dam, which removes 99.9 % of the total suspended solids and 99.7 % of the turbidity; but copper, arsenic and cyanide concentrations were still high. The effluent produced can be classified as inorganic with a high load of non-biodegradable compounds. It was noted that, though the Sansu tailings dam stores the polluted effluent from the gold extraction plant, there will still be serious environmental problems in the event of failure of the dam.

  14. The impact of zinc oxide nanoparticles in freshwater mussels exposed to municipal effluents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagné F

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Zinc oxide nanoparticles (nano-ZnO are used in the production of transparent sunscreens and cosmetics, which are released into the environment through municipal effluents. The purpose of this study was to examine the toxicity of nano-ZnO to freshwater mussels (Elliptio complanata in the presence of municipal effluents. Mussels were exposed for 21 days at 15 o C to 1 and 10 µg/L nanoZnO, and ZnCl2 in the presence of a physico-chemically treated municipal effluent (3 and 10 % v/v. After the exposure period and a 24 h depuration step, mussels were analyzed for free Zn in gills, metallothioneins (MT, oxidative stress (production of malondialdehyde (MDA during lipid peroxidation, gonad alkali-labile phosphate (ALP levels and genotoxicity. Gill MT levels were increased at 10 µg/L nano-ZnO and ZnCl2 and in the presence of the municipal effluent. MT levels were positively correlated with free Zn in gills and negatively correlated with MDA levels, indicating its involvement in the prevention of oxidative stress. However, MDA levels were significantly related to DNA damage in gills, indicating that MT induction did not prevent oxidative-mediated damage in cells. Gonad ALP levels were increased by exposure to ZnCl2 and to the highest concentration of municipal effluent. DNA strand breaks were increased in mussels treated to nano-ZnO indepentely of municipal effluent. Multivariate discriminant function analysis revealed that control mussels differed from mussels exposed to the municipal effluent and from those exposed to nano-ZnO or ZnCl2 alone. When the municipal effluent was added, changes in MDA, MT and labile Zn were produced and formed another cluster, suggesting a change in the toxicity of the municipal effluent in the presence of nano-ZnO.

  15. Strategies for chromium bioremediation of tannery effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Satyendra Kumar; Tripathi, Manikant; Srinath, Thiruneelakantan

    2012-01-01

    Bioremediation offers the possibility of using living organisms (bacteria, fungi, algae,or plants), but primarily microorganisms, to degrade or remove environmental contaminants, and transform them into nontoxic or less-toxic forms. The major advantages of bioremediation over conventional physicochemical and biological treatment methods include low cost, good efficiency, minimization of chemicals, reduced quantity of secondary sludge, regeneration of cell biomass, and the possibility of recover-ing pollutant metals. Leather industries, which extensively employ chromium compounds in the tanning process, discharge spent-chromium-laden effluent into nearby water bodies. Worldwide, chromium is known to be one of the most common inorganic contaminants of groundwater at pollutant hazardous sites. Hexavalent chromium poses a health risk to all forms of life. Bioremediation of chromium extant in tannery waste involves different strategies that include biosorption, bioaccumulation,bioreduction, and immobilization of biomaterial(s). Biosorption is a nondirected physiochemical interaction that occurs between metal species and the cellular components of biological species. It is metabolism-dependent when living biomass is employed, and metabolism-independent in dead cell biomass. Dead cell biomass is much more effective than living cell biomass at biosorping heavy metals, including chromium. Bioaccumulation is a metabolically active process in living organisms that works through adsorption, intracellular accumulation, and bioprecipitation mechanisms. In bioreduction processes, microorganisms alter the oxidation/reduction state of toxic metals through direct or indirect biological and chemical process(es).Bioreduction of Cr6+ to Cr3+ not only decreases the chromium toxicity to living organisms, but also helps precipitate chromium at a neutral pH for further physical removal,thus offering promise as a bioremediation strategy. However, biosorption, bioaccumulation, and

  16. Identification of organic compounds and ecotoxicological assessment of sewage treatment plants (STP) effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguayo, Sonia; Muñoz, M Jesús; de la Torre, Ana; Roset, Jaime; de la Peña, Eduardo; Carballo, Matilde

    2004-07-26

    An integrated approach combining chemistry and biological methods was conducted to assess the toxicity of seven sewage treatment plant effluents. Solid phase concentration procedures were applied to facilitate the study of organic micro pollutants. A chemical analysis was performed by GC/MS. Organic fraction toxicity was determined by using bioassays such as Daphnia magna and Chlorella vulgaris tests and sub-lethal effects were also evaluated by using Salmonella typhimurium Test (mutagenicity), recombinant yeast screen (estrogenicity), and Oryzias latipes embryo-larval test. More than 49 compounds were detected in the organic fraction due to the various inputs of each effluents. The most frequently detected compounds in the effluents were bisphenol A (BPA), octylphenol (OP), 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid, bis(2-ethylhexyl) ester (DEHP) and 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid, bis(methylpropyl) ester (DBP). Biological assays showed toxicity effects on D. magna tests in all samples, whereas toxicity on C. vulgaris or S. typhimurium tests were not observed. Estrogenicity and teratogenicity were observed in several samples. The cause-effect relationship could not be established given the high chemical complexity of the effluents and the lack of information available on 70% of the detected compounds subsequent to reviewing various data bases. Nevertheless, due to the high chemical variability revealed by STP effluents, bioassay sets may provide a very useful amount of information for detecting potential toxicity risks.

  17. Efficacy of Allium cepa test system for screening cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of industrial effluents originated from different industrial activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathiratne, Asoka; Hemachandra, Chamini K; De Silva, Nimal

    2015-12-01

    Efficacy of Allium cepa test system for screening cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of treated effluents originated from four types of industrial activities (two textile industries, three rubber based industries, two common treatment plants of industrial zones, and two water treatment plants) was assessed. Physico-chemical parameters including the heavy metal/metalloid levels of the effluents varied depending on the industry profile, but most of the measured parameters in the effluents were within the specified tolerance limits of Sri Lankan environmental regulations for discharge of industrial effluents into inland surface waters. In the A. cepa test system, the undiluted effluents induced statistically significant root growth retardation, mitosis depression, and chromosomal aberrations in root meristematic cells in most cases in comparison to the dilution water and upstream water signifying effluent induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity. Ethyl methane sulphonate (a mutagen, positive control) and all the effluents under 1:8 dilution significantly induced total chromosomal aberrations in root meristematic cells in comparison to the dilution water and upstream water indicating inadequacy of expected 1:8 dilutions in the receiving waters for curtailing genotoxic impacts. The results support the use of a practically feasible A. cepa test system for rapid screening of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of diverse industrial effluents discharging into inland surface waters.

  18. Evaluation of the Phytotoxic and Genotoxic Potential of Pulp and Paper Mill Effluent Using Vigna radiata and Allium cepa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izharul Haq

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulp and paper mill effluent induced phytotoxicity and genotoxicity in mung bean (Vigna radiata L. and root tip cells of onion (Allium cepa L. were investigated. Physicochemical characteristics such as electrical conductivity (EC, biological oxygen demand (BOD5, chemical oxygen demand (COD, and total phenols of the pulp and paper mill effluent were beyond the permissible limit specified for the discharge of effluent in inland water bodies. Compared to control plants, seedling exposed to 100% effluent concentration showed a reduction in root and shoot length and biomass by 65%, 67%, and 84%, respectively, after 5 days of treatment. A. cepa root tip cells exposed to effluent concentrations ranging from 25 to 100% v/v showed a significant decrease in mitotic index (MI from 32 to 11% with respect to control root tip cells (69% indicating effluent induced cytotoxicity. Further, the effluent induced DNA damage as evidenced by the presence of various chromosomal aberrations like stickiness, chromosome loss, anaphase bridge, c-mitosis, tripolar anaphase, vagrant chromosome, and telophase bridge and micronucleated and binucleated cell in A. cepa. Findings of the present study indicate that pulp and paper mill effluents may act as genotoxic and phytotoxic agents in plant model system.

  19. Direct nanofiltration of wastewater treatment plant effluent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrader, Guillo Alexander

    2006-01-01

    Membrane technology, especially nanofiltration, is seen as a suitable technology to polish WWTP effluent to EU WFD standards and consequently produce an effluent quality suitable for agricultural or (in)direct potable usage. The objective of this study was to assess the potential of direct nanofiltr

  20. 40 CFR 420.133 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS IRON AND STEEL MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY... representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best available technology... effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best available technology economically...

  1. 40 CFR 430.102 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS THE PULP, PAPER, AND PAPERBOARD POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Secondary Fiber Non-Deink Subcategory § 430.102 Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent...

  2. 40 CFR 430.104 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS THE PULP, PAPER, AND PAPERBOARD POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Secondary Fiber Non-Deink Subcategory § 430.104 Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent...

  3. Characterisation of the ecotoxicity of hospital effluents: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orias, Frédéric; Perrodin, Yves

    2013-06-01

    The multiple activities that take place in hospitals (surgery, drug treatments, radiology, cleaning of premises and linen, chemical and biological analysis laboratories, etc.), are a major source of pollutant emissions into the environment (disinfectants, detergents, drug residues, etc.). Most of these pollutants can be found in hospital effluents (HWW), then in urban sewer networks and WWTP (weakly adapted for their treatment) and finally in aquatic environments. In view to evaluating the impact of these pollutants on aquatic ecosystems, it is necessary to characterise their ecotoxicity. Several reviews have focused on the quantitative and qualitative characterisation of pollutants present in HWW. However, none have focused specifically on the characterisation of their experimental ecotoxicity. We have evaluated this according to two complementary approaches: (i) a “substance” approach based on the identification of the experimental data in the literature for different substances found in hospital effluents, and on the calculation of their PNEC (Predicted Non Effect Concentration), (ii) a “matrix” approach for which we have synthesised ecotoxicity data obtained from the hospital effluents directly. This work first highlights the diversity of the substances present within hospital effluents, and the very high ecotoxicity of some of them (minimum PNEC observed close to 0,01 pg/L). We also observed that the consumption of drugs in hospitals was a predominant factor chosen by authors to prioritise the compounds to be sought. Other criteria such as biodegradability, excretion rate and the bioaccumulability of pollutants are considered, though more rarely. Studies of the ecotoxicity of the particulate phase of effluents must also be taken into account. It is also necessary to monitor the effluents of each of the specialised departments of the hospital studied. These steps is necessary to define realistic environmental management policies for hospitals

  4. EPA Enforcement and Compliance History Online: Water Effluent Charts Details

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Detailed Discharge Monitoring Report (DMR) data supporting effluent charts for one Clean Water Act discharge permit. Includes effluent parameters, amounts discharged...

  5. EPA Enforcement and Compliance History Online: Water Effluent Charts Downloads

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Detailed Discharge Monitoring Report (DMR) data supporting effluent charts for one Clean Water Act discharge permit. Includes effluent parameters, amounts discharged...

  6. Improved biodegradation of textile dye effluent by coculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayalakshmidevi, S R; Muthukumar, Karuppan

    2015-04-01

    The present study demonstrates the de-colorization and degradation of textile effluent by coculture consisting of three bacterial species isolated from textile effluent contaminated environment with an aim to reduce the treatment time. The isolates were identified as Ochrobactrum sp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Providencia vermicola by 16S rRNA analysis. Their secondary structure was predicted and GC content of the sequence was found to be 54.39, 52.10, and 52.53%. The co-culture showed a prominent increase in the degradation activity due to the action of oxidoreductase enzymatic mechanism of laccase, NADH-DCIP reductase and azoreductase activity. The biodegradability index of 0.75 was achieved with 95% chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction in 16 h and 78 and 85% reduction in total organic carbon (TOC) and total solids was observed. Bioaccumulation of metals was identified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The effective decolorization was confirmed from the results of UV-vis spectroscopy, high performance liquid chromatography and Fourier transformed infrared spectrometer analyzes. The possible degradation pathway was obtained from the analysis of liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy analysis and the metabolites such as 2-amino naphthalene and N-phenyl-1.3,5 triazine were observed. The toxic nature of the effluent was analyzed using phyto-toxicity, cell-death assay and geno-toxicity tests.

  7. Field assessments in conjunction with whole effluent toxicity testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Point, T.W.; Waller, W.T.

    2000-01-01

    Whole effluent toxicity (WET) tests are widely used to assess potential effects of wastewater discharges on aquatic life. This paper represents a summary of chapters in a 1996 Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry-sponsored workshop and a literature review concerning linkages between WET testing and associated field biomonitoring. Most published studies thus far focus primarily on benthic macroinvertebrates and on effluent-dominated stream systems in which effluents demonstrate little or no significant acute toxicity. Fewer studies examine WET test predictability in other aquatic ecosystems (e.g., wetlands, estuaries, large rivers) or deal with instream biota such as fish and primary producers. Published results indicate that standards for the usual WET freshwater test species, Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas, may not always protect most of the species inhabiting a receiving stream. Although WET tests are useful in predicting aquatic individual responses, they are not meant to directly measure natural population or community responses. Further, they do not address bioconcentration or bioaccumulation of hydrophobic compounds; do not assess eutrophication effects in receiving systems; and lastly, do not reflect genotoxic effects or function to test for endocrine-disrupting chemicals. Consequently, a more direct evaluation of ecosystem health, using bioassessment techniques, may be needed to properly evaluate aquatic systems affected by wastewater discharges.

  8. Decoloration and detoxification of effluents by ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrely, Sueli I.; Morais, Aline V.; Rosa, Jorge M.; Badaró-Pedroso, Cintia; da Conceição Pereira, Maria; Higa, Marcela C.

    2016-07-01

    Three distinct textile samples were investigated for color and toxicity (S1-chemical/textile industry; S2-final textile effluent; S3 - standard textile produced effluent-untreated blue). Radiation processing of these samples were carried out at Dynamitron Electron Beam Accelerator and color and toxicity removal were determined: color removal by radiation was 96% (40 kGy, S1); 55% (2.5 kGy, S2) and 90% (2.5 kGy, S3). Concerning toxicity assays, Vibrio fischeri luminescent bacteria demonstrated higher reduction after radiation than the other systems: removal efficiencies were 33% (20 kGy, S1); 55% (2.5 kGy, S2) and 33% (2.5 kGy, S3). Daphnia similis and Brachionus plicatilis fitted well for S3 effluents. Hard toxic volumes into biological treatment plant may be avoided if radiation would be previously applied in a real plant. Results reveled how indispensable is to run toxicity to more than one living-organism.

  9. Peracetic acid for secondary effluent disinfection: a comprehensive performance assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonelli, M; Turolla, A; Mezzanotte, V; Nurizzo, C

    2013-01-01

    The paper is a review of previous research on secondary effluent disinfection by peracetic acid (PAA) integrated with new data about the effect of a preliminary flash-mixing step. The process was studied at bench and pilot scale to assess its performance for discharge in surface water and agricultural reuse (target microorganisms: Escherichia coli and faecal coliform bacteria). The purposes of the research were: (1) determining PAA decay and disinfection kinetics as a function of operating parameters, (2) evaluating PAA suitability as a disinfectant, (3) assessing long-term disinfection efficiency, (4) investigating disinfected effluent biological toxicity on some aquatic indicator organisms (Vibrio fischeri, Daphnia magna and Selenastrum capricornutum), (5) comparing PAA with conventional disinfectants (sodium hypochlorite, UV irradiation). PAA disinfection was capable of complying with Italian regulations on reuse (10 CFU/100 mL for E. coli) and was competitive with benchmarks. No regrowth phenomena were observed, as long as needed for agricultural reuse (29 h after disinfection), even at negligible concentrations of residual disinfectant. The toxic effect of PAA on the aquatic environment was due to the residual disinfectant in the water, rather than to chemical modification of the effluent.

  10. Characterization of secondary treated effluents for tertiary membrane filtration and water recycling

    KAUST Repository

    Ayache, C.

    2012-06-01

    This study evaluates the impacts of water quality from three different secondary effluents on low pressure membrane fouling. Effluent organic matter (EfOM) has been reported by previous studies as responsible for membrane fouling. However, the contribution of the different components of EfOM to membrane fouling is still not well understood. In order to improve and optimize treatment processes, characterization and quantification of the organic matter are important. The characterization methods used in this study are liquid chromatography coupled with an organic detector (LC-OCD) and excitation emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy (EEM). A bench-scale hollow fibre membrane system was used to identify the type of fouling depending on the feed water quality. Results showed no measurable dissolved organic carbon removal by the membranes for the three secondary effluents. Biopolymers and humic-like substances found in different proportions in the three effluents were partially retained by the membranes and were identified to contribute significantly to the flux decline of the low pressure membranes. The observed fouling was determined to be reversible by hydraulic backwashing for two effluents and only by chemical cleaning for the third effluent. © IWA Publishing 2012.

  11. The occurrence of illicit and therapeutic pharmaceuticals in wastewater effluent and surface waters in Nebraska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon L. [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 203B Peter Kiewit Institute, Omaha, NE 68182-0178 (United States)], E-mail: sbartelt2@unl.edu; Snow, Daniel D.; Damon, Teyona [Water Sciences Laboratory, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583-0844 (United States); Shockley, Johnette [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 203B Peter Kiewit Institute, Omaha, NE 68182-0178 (United States); Hoagland, Kyle [UNL Water Center, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583-0995 (United States)

    2009-03-15

    The occurrence and estimated concentration of twenty illicit and therapeutic pharmaceuticals and metabolites in surface waters influenced by wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) discharge and in wastewater effluents in Nebraska were determined using Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Samplers (POCIS). Samplers were installed in rivers upstream and downstream of treated WWTP discharge at four sites and in a discharge canal at a fifth location. Based on differences in estimated concentrations determined from pharmaceuticals recovered from POCIS, WWTP effluent was found to be a significant source of pharmaceutical loading to the receiving waters. Effluents from WWTPs with trickling filters or trickling filters in parallel with activated sludge resulted in the highest observed in-stream pharmaceutical concentrations. Azithromycin, caffeine, 1,7-dimethylzanthine, carbamazepine, cotinine, DEET, diphenhydramine, and sulfamethazine were detected at all locations. Methamphetamine, an illicit pharmaceutical, was detected at all but one of the sampling locations, representing only the second report of methamphetamine detected in WWTP effluent and in streams impacted by WWTP effluent. - Passive samplers were used to develop semi-quantitative estimates of pharmaceutical concentrations in receiving waters influenced by wastewater effluent.

  12. A new multiple-stage electrocoagulation process on anaerobic digestion effluent to simultaneously reclaim water and clean up biogas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiguo; Stromberg, David; Liu, Xuming; Liao, Wei; Liu, Yan

    2015-03-21

    A new multiple-stage treatment process was developed via integrating electrocoagulation with biogas pumping to simultaneously reclaim anaerobic digestion effluent and clean up biogas. The 1st stage of electrocoagulation treatment under the preferred reaction condition led to removal efficiencies of 30%, 81%, 37% and >99.9% for total solids, chemical oxygen demand, total nitrogen and total phosphorus, respectively. Raw biogas was then used as a reactant and pumped into the effluent to simultaneously neutralize pH of the effluent and remove H2S in the biogas. The 2nd stage of electrocoagulation treatment on the neutralized effluent showed that under the selected reaction condition, additional 60% and 10% of turbidity and chemical oxygen demand were further removed. The study concluded a dual-purpose approach for the first time to synergistically combine biogas purification and water reclamation for anaerobic digestion system, which well addresses the downstream challenges of anaerobic digestion technology.

  13. 40 CFR 420.72 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS IRON AND STEEL MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Hot Forming... tube mills, carbon and specialty. Subpart G Pollutant or pollutant property BPT effluent...

  14. 40 CFR 426.62 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS GLASS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Automotive Glass Tempering Subcategory § 426.62 Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of...

  15. 40 CFR 430.93 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS THE PULP, PAPER, AND PAPERBOARD POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Secondary Fiber Deink Subcategory § 430.93 Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of...

  16. 40 CFR 415.512 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SOURCE CATEGORY Potassium Iodide Production Subcategory § 415.512 Effluent limitations guidelines... available (BPT): Subpart AY—Potassium Iodide Pollutant or pollutant property BPT effluent...

  17. 40 CFR 469.14 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Semiconductor Subcategory § 469.14 Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable... of the best practicable control technology currently available (BPT): Subpart A—Semiconductor...

  18. 40 CFR 469.19 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Semiconductor... conventional pollution control technology (BCT): Subpart A—Semiconductor BCT Effluent Limitations Pollutant...

  19. 40 CFR 424.57 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS FERROALLOY MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Other Calcium Carbide Furnaces Subcategory § 424.57 Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of...

  20. 40 CFR 424.53 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS FERROALLOY MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Other Calcium Carbide Furnaces Subcategory § 424.53 Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of...

  1. 40 CFR 424.47 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS FERROALLOY MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Covered Calcium Carbide Furnaces With Wet Air Pollution Control Devices Subcategory § 424.47 Effluent...

  2. 40 CFR 424.43 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS FERROALLOY MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Covered Calcium Carbide Furnaces With Wet Air Pollution Control Devices Subcategory § 424.43 Effluent...

  3. Marine Fungi and their Enzymes for Decolorization of Colored Effluents

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Raghukumar, C.

    crops. Anaerobic digestion of MSW- containing effluents is one of the treatments followed by distilleries and the resulting dark brown sludge is used as a fertilizer. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biological oxygen demand (BOD) are reduced in treated... dilution, the activity was 2.6?2.6 U ml-1 serum. Thus, treatment of MSW with fungus has affected a near total (ca.98%) removal of the damage- causing factor (Raghukumar et al., 2004). Toxicity test was also done using Comet assay, a technique to detect DNA...

  4. Biochemical methane potential of kraft bleaching effluent and codigestion with other in-mill streams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fitamo, Temesgen Mathewos; Dahl, Olli; Master, Emma;

    2016-01-01

    and in combination: total bleaching effluent, alkaline bleaching effluent, kraft evaporator condensate, and chemithermomechanical pulping effluent. The total bleaching effluent, consisting of the chlorine dioxide bleaching and alkaline bleaching effluents, exhibited the highest potential for organic matter...

  5. Textile effluent induced genotoxic effects and oxidative stress in Clarias gariepinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayoola, S O; Bassey, B O; Alimba, C G; Ajani, E K

    2012-09-01

    Human and ecological disorder experienced in industrial settlements as a result of improper disposal of chemicals such as textile effluent calls for careful surveillance on the state of the environment. This study investigated the toxicity of textile effluent discharge using biochemical and cytogenetic responses to ascertain the acute and sub lethal effects on Clarias gariepinus. The 96 h LC50 of C. gariepinus exposed to the textile effluent was 8.203 ml L(-1). Fourteen day exposures to 1, 2, 4 and 6 ml L(-1) doses were conducted and several toxicological endpoints were evaluated. Sub lethal genotoxicity and biochemical study was also carried out for fourteen days. The genotoxicity studies utilized micronucleus test while the biochemical studies quantified serum anti-oxidant status Total Protein (TP), Catalase (CAT), Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) and Malondialdehyde (MDA) of the exposed fish. Toxicity factor indicates that the 96 h LC50 was significantly more toxic than the 24 h LC50 (p 0.05). The results obtained from this study showed that textile effluent increase cytogenetic damage and altered anti-oxidant status in C. gariepinus. Chemicals in the effluent can be bioaccumulated and biomagnified in the aquatic organism hence affecting man.

  6. Pathway-based approaches for assessment of real-time exposure to an estrogenic wastewater treatment plant effluent on fathead minnow reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallin, Jenna E; Jensen, Kathleen M; Kahl, Michael D; Villeneuve, Daniel L; Lee, Kathy E; Schroeder, Anthony L; Mayasich, Joe; Eid, Evan P; Nelson, Krysta R; Milsk, Rebecca Y; Blackwell, Brett R; Berninger, Jason P; LaLone, Carlie A; Blanksma, Chad; Jicha, Terri; Elonen, Colleen; Johnson, Rodney; Ankley, Gerald T

    2016-03-01

    Wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents are known contributors of chemical mixtures into the environment. Of particular concern are endocrine-disrupting compounds, such as estrogens, which can affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis function in exposed organisms. The present study examined reproductive effects in fathead minnows exposed for 21 d to a historically estrogenic WWTP effluent. Fathead minnow breeding pairs were held in control water or 1 of 3 effluent concentrations (5%, 20%, and 100%) in a novel onsite, flow-through system providing real-time exposure. The authors examined molecular and biochemical endpoints representing key events along adverse outcome pathways linking estrogen receptor activation and other molecular initiating events to reproductive impairment. In addition, the authors used chemical analysis of the effluent to construct a chemical-gene interaction network to aid in targeted gene expression analyses and identifying potentially impacted biological pathways. Cumulative fecundity was significantly reduced in fish exposed to 100% effluent but increased in those exposed to 20% effluent, the approximate dilution factor in the receiving waters. Plasma vitellogenin concentrations in males increased in a dose-dependent manner with effluent concentration; however, male fertility was not impacted. Although in vitro analyses, analytical chemistry, and biomarker responses confirmed the effluent was estrogenic, estrogen receptor agonists were unlikely the primary driver of impaired reproduction. The results provide insights into the significance of pathway-based effects with regard to predicting adverse reproductive outcomes.

  7. Pathway-based approaches for assessment of real-time exposure to an estrogenic wastewater treatment plant effluent on fathead minnow reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallin, Jenna E.; Jensen, Kathleen M.; Kahl, Michael D.; Villeneuve, Daniel L.; Lee, Kathy E.; Schroeder, Anthony L.; Mayasich, Joe; Eid, Evan P.; Nelson, Krysta R.; Milsk, Rebecca Y.; Blackwell, Brett R.; Berninger, Jason P.; LaLone, Carlie A.; Blanskma, Chad; Jicha, Terri M.; Elonen, Colleen M.; Johnson, Rodney C.; Ankley, Gerald T.

    2016-01-01

    Wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents are known contributors of chemical mixtures into the environment. Of particular concern are endocrine-disrupting compounds, such as estrogens, which can affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis function in exposed organisms. The present study examined reproductive effects in fathead minnows exposed for 21 d to a historically estrogenic WWTP effluent. Fathead minnow breeding pairs were held in control water or 1 of 3 effluent concentrations (5%, 20%, and 100%) in a novel onsite, flow-through system providing real-time exposure. The authors examined molecular and biochemical endpoints representing key events along adverse outcome pathways linking estrogen receptor activation and other molecular initiating events to reproductive impairment. In addition, the authors used chemical analysis of the effluent to construct a chemical-gene interaction network to aid in targeted gene expression analyses and identifying potentially impacted biological pathways. Cumulative fecundity was significantly reduced in fish exposed to 100% effluent but increased in those exposed to 20% effluent, the approximate dilution factor in the receiving waters. Plasma vitellogenin concentrations in males increased in a dose-dependent manner with effluent concentration; however, male fertility was not impacted. Although in vitro analyses, analytical chemistry, and biomarker responses confirmed the effluent was estrogenic, estrogen receptor agonists were unlikely the primary driver of impaired reproduction. The results provide insights into the significance of pathway-based effects with regard to predicting adverse reproductive outcomes.

  8. Enhancing recovery of ammonia from swine manure anaerobic digester effluent using gas-permeable membrane technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gas-permeable membrane technology is useful to recover ammonia from manure. In this study, the technology was enhanced using aeration instead of alkali chemicals to increase pH and the ammonia recovery rate. Digested effluents from covered anaerobic swine lagoons containing 1375 to 2089 milligram am...

  9. Combination of anaerobic effluent and lignocellulosic bacterial consortium to reduce vermicomposting time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utilization of solid bio-fertilizers is an alternative to avoid chemical degradation of soil. Anaerobic biodigestor effluents/digestates have been used effectively as fertilizers. However, they may have several risk factors such as the presence of pathogens and heavy metals. Vermicomposting could he...

  10. Screening Complex Effluents for Estrogenic Activity with the T47D-Kbluc Cell Bioassay: Assay Optimization and Comparison to In Vivo Responses in Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    The endocrine activity of complex mixtures of chemicals associated with wastewater treatment plant effluents, runoff from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs), and/or other environmental samples can be difficult to characterize based on analytical chemistry. In vitro bi...

  11. Genotoxicity assessment of pulp and paper mill effluent before and after bacterial degradation using Allium cepa test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haq, Izharul; Kumar, Sharad; Raj, Abhay; Lohani, Mohtashim; Satyanarayana, G N V

    2017-02-01

    A lignin peroxidases-producing Serratia liquefaciens was used for bioremediation of pulp and paper (P&P) mill effluent. The treatment led to reduction of chemical oxygen demand (COD), colour, lignin and phenolic content by 84%, 72%, 61% and 95%, respectively. The effluent detoxification was studied by genotoxicity assays using Allium cepa L. (onion) root tip cells. Genotoxicity studies included measuring mitotic index (MI), chromosomal aberrations (CA) and nuclear abnormalities (NA) in root tip cells following treatment with 25, 50, 75 and 100% (v/v) of effluent. The root tip cells grown in untreated effluent showed a significant decrease in MI from 69% (control) to 32%, 27%, 22% and 11% at 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% effluent concentration, respectively. This indicated that the untreated effluent was highly cytotoxic in nature. Further, root tip cells, when treated with different concentrations of effluent showed various CA and NA including c-mitosis, stickiness, chromosome loss, chromosome break, anaphase bridge, multipolar anaphase, vagrant chromosomes, micronucleated and binucleated cells. The MI observed in root tip cells grown in bacterial treated effluents at similar concentrations (25, 50, 75 and 100% v/v) showed an increase of 33%, 36%, 42% and 66%. CA showed a substantial decrease and in some instances, complete absence of CA was also observed. The findings suggest that S. liquefaciens culture could be a potential bacterial culture for bioremediation of P&P mill effluent, as it is effective in substantial lowering of pollutants load as well as reduces the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of effluent.

  12. POTENTIAL FUNGI FOR BIOREMEDIATION OF INDUSTRIAL EFFLUENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vara Saritha

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Two fungi (unidentified were isolated from soil and marine environ-ments. These isolates were used for bioremediation of pulp and paper mill effluent at the laboratory scale. The treatment resulted in the reduction of color, lignin, and COD of the effluent in the order of 78.6%, 79.0%, and 89.4% in 21 days. A major part of reductions in these parameters occurred within 5 days of the treatment, which was also characterized by a steep decline in the pH of the effluent. The enzyme activity of these fungi was also tested, and the clearance zone was obtained in the plate assay.

  13. POTENTIAL FUNGI FOR BIOREMEDIATION OF INDUSTRIAL EFFLUENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Vara Saritha; Avasn Maruthi; Mukkanti, K.

    2010-01-01

    Two fungi (unidentified) were isolated from soil and marine environ-ments. These isolates were used for bioremediation of pulp and paper mill effluent at the laboratory scale. The treatment resulted in the reduction of color, lignin, and COD of the effluent in the order of 78.6%, 79.0%, and 89.4% in 21 days. A major part of reductions in these parameters occurred within 5 days of the treatment, which was also characterized by a steep decline in the pH of the effluent. The enzyme activity of t...

  14. Desalination of brackish water and concentration of industrial effluents by electrodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Schoeman

    1983-03-01

    Full Text Available Electrodialysis (ED is, at present, used mainly for the desalination of brackish drinking-water. Brackish water with a high scaling potential can be successfully treated, using the electrodialysis reversal (EDR process without the addition of chemicals. The reliability of the ED process makes it very attractive for water treatment. Although used mainly for brackish water desalination, ED also has certain industrial applications. Plating wash waters, cooling tower recirculation water and glass etching effluents have been treated successfully with ED for water recovery and effluent volume reduction, while ED treatment of nickel plating wash waters is an established industrial process.

  15. Characterization and use of Moringa oleifera seeds as biosorbent for removing metal ions from aqueous effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Cleide S T; Alves, Vanessa N; Rezende, Hélen C; Almeida, Ione L S; de Assunção, Rosana M N; Tarley, César R T; Segatelli, Mariana G; Coelho, Nivia M Melo

    2010-01-01

    Moringa oleifera seeds were investigated as a biosorbent for removing metal ions from aqueous effluents. The morphological characteristics as well as the chemical composition of M. oleifera seeds were evaluated using Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectroscopy, Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The FT-IR spectra showed the presence of lipids and protein components. Scanning electron micrographs showed that Moringa seeds have an adequate morphological profile for the retention of metal ions. The results suggest that M. oleifera seeds have potential application in Cd(II), Pb(II), Co(II), Cu(II) and Ag(I) decontamination from aqueous effluents.

  16. Removal of pharmaceuticals in WWTP effluents by ozone and hydrogen peroxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hey, G.; Vega, S. R.; Fick, J.

    2014-01-01

    to ozone treatment could improve the removal and lower the reaction time. The effluents studied differed in their chemical characteristics, particularly in terms of alkalinity (65.3–427 mg·l-1) HCO3-), COD (18.2–41.8 mg·l-1), DOC (6.9–12.5 mg·l-1), ammonium content (0.02–3.6 mg·l-1) and specific UV......, this will mean that the reactor volume needed for the ozonation of wastewater effluents can be reduced....

  17. A WET TALE: TOXICITY OF COMPLEX EFFLUENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This course covers standards, regulations, policy, guidance and technical aspects of implementing the whole effluent toxicity program. The curriculum incorporates rationale and information on WET test requirements from USEPA documents, such as the Technical Support Document for W...

  18. Anaerobic digestion of cassava starch factory effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manilal, V B; Narayanan, C S; Balagopalan, C

    1990-06-01

    Biomethanation of cassava starch factory effluent in a batch digester produced 130 l biogas/kg dry matter with an average melthane content of 59%. About 63% COD was removed during 60 days. In semicontinuous digesters, gas production was 3251/kg dry matter with a retention time of 33,3 days giving a COD reduction of 50%. Size of starter inoculum was important for good biogasification of the effluent.

  19. Characterization of effluent from food processing industries and stillage treatment trial with Eichhornia crassipes (Mart. and Panicum maximum (Jacq.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A. Noukeu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, effluents from 11 food processing industries from various sectors were characterized through analysis of physical and chemical parameters. In general, effluents pHs are between 4.07 and 7.63. Lead (Pb2+ and cadmium (Cd+ concentrations range from 0.083 to 1.025 mg/l and 0.052–0.158 mg/l respectively. The biodegradability of the effluent is very low. The principal component analysis (PCA grouped industries according to their organic matter levels; thus, stillage, livestock, molasses and sugar refinery effluents show some similarities, as well as confectionery, oil mill, dairy and brewery effluents. Forms of nitrogen measured show low levels of nitrites (NO2−, high levels of nitrates (NO3−, ammonium (NH4+ and Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN. Among these effluents, a treatment trial with Eichhornia crassipes and Panicum maximum was applied to stillage effluent from Fermencam distillery. The results show that Panicum maximum and Eichhornia crassipes reduce pollutant loads of Fermencam's wastewater.

  20. Effect of surfactant-coated iron oxide nanoparticles on the effluent water quality from a simulated sequencing batch reactor treating domestic wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Sangchul, E-mail: sangchul.hwang@upr.edu [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, PR 00681 (Puerto Rico); Martinez, Diana [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, PR 00681 (Puerto Rico); Perez, Priscilla [Department of Biology, University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, PR 00681 (Puerto Rico); Rinaldi, Carlos [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, PR 00681 (Puerto Rico)

    2011-12-15

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of commercially available engineered iron oxide nanoparticles coated with a surfactant (ENP{sub Fe-surf}) on effluent water quality from a lab-scale sequencing batch reactor as a model secondary biological wastewater treatment. Results showed that {approx}8.7% of ENP{sub Fe-surf} applied were present in the effluent stream. The stable presence of ENP{sub Fe-surf} was confirmed by analyzing the mean particle diameter and iron concentration in the effluent. Consequently, aqueous ENP{sub Fe-surf} deteriorated the effluent water quality at a statistically significant level (p < 0.05) with respect to soluble chemical oxygen demand, turbidity, and apparent color. This implied that ENP{sub Fe-surf} would be introduced into environmental receptors through the treated effluent and could potentially impact them. - Highlights: > Surfactant-coated engineered iron oxide nanoparticles (ENP{sub Fe-surf}) were assessed. > Effluent quality was analyzed from a sequencing batch reactor with ENP{sub Fe-surf}. > {approx}8.7% of ENP{sub Fe-surf} applied was present in the effluent. > ENP{sub Fe-surf} significantly (p < 0.05) deteriorated the effluent water quality. > Stable fraction of ENP{sub Fe-surf} will be introduced into environmental receptors. - Stable presence of surfactant-coated engineered iron oxides nanoparticles deteriorated the effluent water quality at a statistically significant level (p < 0.05).

  1. Influence of bleaching technologies on the aerobic biodegradability of effluents from Eucalyptus kraft pulps factories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladys Vidal

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerobic biodegradability of effluents from different Eucalyptus kraft pulp bleaching processes was studied. Bleaching effluents were obtained from: i Chlorine Bleaching (CB processes, with partial substitution of chlorine by chlorine dioxide and ii Total Chlorine Free (TCF processes. The overall biodegradability, in terms of Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD was higher for TCF effluents (96-98% than for CB ones (82-93%. Taking into account the higher organic load of CB effluents, this fact implied a much higher residual COD for them (100-180 mg/L than for TCF effluents (10-30 mg/L. Furthermore, a refractory fraction of molecular weight higher than 43,000 Da was found in CB effluent, which implied the necessity of a further specific treatment. The toxicity was completely removed after the biological treatmentA biodegradabilidade aerobica das águas residuais provenientes de diferentes procesos de branqueos de pulpa kraft foi estudada. Os efluentes são gerados no branqueo com cloro ou parcialmente sustituido com dioxido de cloro (CB ou bem em processos livres do cloro (TCF. A biodegradabilidade, quantificada como DQO foi maior para as águas do processo CB. Tendo em conta o elevado conteúdo orgânico do efluente CB obteinse uma maior concentraç&ão do DQO final neste efluente comparado com o efluente TCF. Uma fracçao recalcitrante maior a 43,000 Da no effluente BC foi encontrada, isto significa um tratamento adicional específico para sua eliminaçã o. A toxicidade foi totalmente eliminada despois do tratamento aeração.

  2. Comparison of different liquid anaerobic digestion effluents as inocula and nitrogen sources for solid-state batch anaerobic digestion of corn stover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Fuqing; Shi Jian [Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Ohio State University, Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, 1680 Madison Ave., Wooster, OH 44691 (United States); Lv Wen; Yu Zhongtang [Department of Animal Sciences, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Li Yebo, E-mail: li.851@osu.edu [Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Ohio State University, Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, 1680 Madison Ave., Wooster, OH 44691 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compared methane production of solid AD inoculated with different effluents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Food waste effluent (FWE) had the largest population of acetoclastic methanogens. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid AD inoculated with FWE produced the highest methane yield at F/E ratio of 4. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dairy waste effluent (DWE) was rich of cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacteria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid AD inoculated with DWE produced the highest methane yield at F/E ratio of 2. - Abstract: Effluents from three liquid anaerobic digesters, fed with municipal sewage sludge, food waste, or dairy waste, were evaluated as inocula and nitrogen sources for solid-state batch anaerobic digestion of corn stover in mesophilic reactors. Three feedstock-to-effluent (F/E) ratios (i.e., 2, 4, and 6) were tested for each effluent. At an F/E ratio of 2, the reactor inoculated by dairy waste effluent achieved the highest methane yield of 238.5 L/kgVS{sub feed}, while at an F/E ratio of 4, the reactor inoculated by food waste effluent achieved the highest methane yield of 199.6 L/kgVS{sub feed}. The microbial population and chemical composition of the three effluents were substantially different. Food waste effluent had the largest population of acetoclastic methanogens, while dairy waste effluent had the largest populations of cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacteria. Dairy waste also had the highest C/N ratio of 8.5 and the highest alkalinity of 19.3 g CaCO{sub 3}/kg. The performance of solid-state batch anaerobic digestion reactors was closely related to the microbial status in the liquid anaerobic digestion effluents.

  3. Gaseous effluent monitoring and identification using an imaging Fourier transform spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, M.R.; Bennett, C.L.; Fields, D.J.; Hernandez, J.

    1993-10-01

    We are developing an imaging Fourier transform spectrometer for chemical effluent monitoring. The system consists of a 2-D infrared imaging array in the focal plane of a Michelson interferometer. Individual images are coordinated with the positioning of a moving mirror in the Michelson interferometer. A three dimensional data cube with two spatial dimensions and one interferogram dimension is then Fourier transformed to produce a hyperspectral data cube with one spectral dimension and two spatial dimensions. The spectral range of the instrument is determined by the choice of optical components and the spectral range of the focal plane array. Measurements in the near UV, visible, near IR, and mid-IR ranges are possible with the existing instrument. Gaseous effluent monitoring and identification measurements will be primarily in the ``fingerprint`` region of the spectrum, ({lambda} = 8 to 12 {mu}m). Initial measurements of effluent using this imaging interferometer in the mid-IR will be presented.

  4. Dragon Fruit Foliage Plant-Based Coagulant for Treatment of Concentrated Latex Effluent: Comparison of Treatment with Ferric Sulfate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juferi Idris

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of dragon fruit foliage as a natural coagulant for treatment of concentrated latex effluent was investigated and compared with ferric sulfate, a chemical coagulant. Dragon fruit is a round and often red-colored fruit with scales-like texture and is native to south American countries which is also cultivated and heavily marketed in southeast Asian countries. Its foliage represents a part of its overall plant system. Latex effluent is one of the main byproduct from rubber processing factories in Malaysia. Three main parameters investigated were chemical oxygen demand (COD, suspended solids (SS, and turbidity of effluent. Coagulation experiments using jar test were performed with a flocculation system where the effects of latex effluent pH as well as coagulation dosage on coagulation effectiveness were examined. The highest recorded COD, SS, and turbidity removal percentages for foliage were observed for effluent pH 10 at 94.7, 88.9, and 99.7%, respectively. It is concluded that the foliage showed tremendous potential as a natural coagulant for water treatment purposes. The foliage could be used in the pretreatment stage of Malaysian latex effluent prior to secondary treatment.

  5. Degradation behavior of 17α-ethinylestradiol by ozonation in the synthetic secondary effluent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheyun Zhang; Hongtao Zhu; Xianghua Wen; Xiurong Si

    2012-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in the secondary effluent discharged from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are of great concern in the process of water reuse.Ozonation has been reported as a powerful oxidation technology to eliminate micropollutants in water treatment.Due to the complexity of the wastewater matrix,orthogonal experiments and single factor experiments were conducted to study the influence of operational parameters on the degradation of 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) in the synthetic secondary effluent.The results of the orthogonal experiments indicated that the initial ozone and natural organic matter (NOM) concentration significantly affected EE2 degradation efficiency,which was further validated by the single factor confirmation experiments.EE2 was shown to be effectively degraded by ozonation in the conditions of low pH (6),NOM (10 mg/L),carbonate (50 mg/L),but high suspended solid (20 mg/L) and initial ozone concentration (9 mg/L).The study firstly revealed that the lower pH resulted in higher degradation of EE2in the synthetic secondary effluent,which differed from EDCs ozonation behavior in pure water.EE2 degradation by ozone molecule instead of hydroxyl radical was proposed to play a key role in the degradation of EDCs by ozonation in the secondary effluent.The ratio between O3 and TOC was identified as an appropriate index to assess the degradation of EE2 by ozonation in the synthetic secondary effluent.

  6. Comparative study on the treatment of raw and biologically treated textile effluents through submerged nanofiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qing; Yang, Ying; Zhou, Mengsi; Liu, Meihong; Yu, Sanchuan; Gao, Congjie

    2015-03-02

    Raw and biologically treated textile effluents were submerged filtrated using lab-fabricated hollow fiber nanofiltration membrane with a molecular weight cut-off of about 650 g/mol. Permeate flux, chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction, color removal, membrane fouling, and cleaning were investigated and compared by varying the trans-membrane pressure (TMP) and volume concentrating factor (VCF). It was found that both raw and biologically treated textile effluents could be efficiently treated through submerged nanofiltration. The increase of TMP resulted in a decline in water permeability, COD reduction, color removal, and flux recovery ratio, while the increase of VCF resulted in both increased COD reduction and color removal. Under the TMP of 0.4 bar and VCF of 5.0, fluxes of 1.96 and 2.59 l/m(2)h, COD reductions of 95.7 and 94.2%, color removals of 99.0, and 97.3% and flux recovery ratios of 91.1 and 92.9% could be obtained in filtration of raw and biologically treated effluents, respectively. After filtration, the COD and color contents of the raw effluent declined sharply from 1780 to 325 mg/l and 1.200 to 0.060 Abs/cm, respectively, while for the biologically treated effluent, they decreased from 780 to 180 mg/l and 0.370 to 0.045 Abs/cm, respectively.

  7. Decolorization of salt-alkaline effluent with industrial reactive dyes by laccase-producing Basidiomycetes strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira-Neto, S L; Mussatto, S I; Machado, K M G; Milagres, A M F

    2013-04-01

    The discharge of highly coloured synthetic dye effluents into rivers and lakes is harmful to the water bodies, and therefore, intensive researches have been focussed on the decolorization of wastewater by biological, physical or chemical treatments. In the present study, 12 basidiomycetes strains from the genus Pleurotus, Trametes, Lentinus, Peniophora, Pycnoporus, Rigidoporus, Hygrocybe and Psilocybe were evaluated for decolorization of the reactive dyes Cibacron Brilliant Blue H-GR and Cibacron Red FN-2BL, both in solid and liquid media. Among the evaluated fungi, seven showed great ability to decolorize the synthetic textile effluent, both in vivo (74-77%) or in vitro (60-74%), and laccase was the main ligninolytic enzyme involved on dyes decolorization. Pleurotus ostreatus, Trametes villosa and Peniophora cinerea reduced near to 60% of the effluent colour after only 1 h of treatment. The decolorization results were still improved by establishing the nitrogen source and amount to be used during the fungal strains cultivation in synthetic medium previous their action on the textile effluent, with yeast extract being a better nitrogen source than ammonium tartarate. These results contribute for the development of an effective microbiological process for decolorization of dye effluents with reduced time of treatment.

  8. Cytogenotoxicity of Abattoir Effluent in Clarias gariepinus (Burchell, 1822 Using Micronucleus Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chibuisi G. Alimba

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The cytogenotoxic potential of abattoir effluent from Bodija, Nigeria, was investigated using micronucleus test in Clarias gariepinus. Fish was exposed to five different concentrations: 0.2, 0.4, 0.8, 1.6, and 3.1% of the effluent for 7, 14, and 28 days. Tap water and 0.02 mL/L of benzene were used as negative and positive controls, respectively. Physicochemical parameters and heavy metals were analyzed in the effluent in accordance with standard methods. After exposure, blood was collected from the treated and control fish and slides were prepared for micronuclei (MN and nuclear abnormality evaluation in the peripheral erythrocytes. The effluent induced significant (p<0.05 increase in the frequency of MN in a time dependent manner. Similarly, the frequency of total nuclear abnormalities (blebbing, notch, bud, binucleation, and vacuolation was higher in the exposed fish than the negative control. Electrical conductivity, nitrate, biochemical oxygen demand, chemical oxygen demand, arsenic, and copper analyzed in the effluent may have provoked the observed cytogenetic damage. The findings herein suggest the presence of clastogens and cytotoxins in Bodija abattoir wastewater which are capable of increasing genomic instability in aquatic biota.

  9. Mutagenicity, cytotoxicity and phytotoxicity evaluation of biodegraded textile effluent by fungal ligninolytic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilal, Muhammad; Iqbal, Munawar; Hu, Hongbo; Zhang, Xuehong

    2016-01-01

    Colored effluents from the textile industry have led to severe environmental pollution, and this has emerged as a global issue. The feasibility of ligninolytic enzymes for the detoxification and degradation of textile wastewater was investigated. Ganoderma lucidum crude ligninolytic enzymes extract (MnP 717.7, LiP 576.3, and Laccase 323.2 IU/mL) was produced using solid-state culture using wheat bran as substrate. The biodegradation treatment efficiency was evaluated on the basis of degradation and detoxification of textile effluents. Standard bioassays were employed for mutagenicity, cytotoxicity and phytotoxicity evaluation before and after biodegradation. The degradation of Masood Textile, Kalash Textile, Khyber Textile and Sitara Textile effluents was achieved up to 87.29%, 80.17%, 77.31% and 69.04%, respectively. The biochemical oxygen demand, chemical oxygen demand, total suspended solids and total organic carbon were improved considerably as a result of biodegradation of textile effluents, which were beyond the permissible limits established by the National Environmental Quality Standards before treatment. The cytotoxicity (Allium cepa, hemolytic, Daphnia magna and brine shrimp), mutagenicity (Ames TA98 and TA100) and phytotoxicity (Triticum aestivum) tests revealed that biodegradation significantly (P < 0.05) detoxifies the toxic agents in wastewater. Results revealed that biodegradation could possibly be used for remediation of textile effluents. However, detoxification monitoring is crucial and should always be used to evaluate the bio-efficiency of a treatment technique.

  10. Assessment of Coagulant Synergy for the Depollution of Binder Emulsion Plant Effluent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Farman Ali Shah

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Binder emulsion plant effluent is a source of intense pollution when discharged into the environment without proper degree of treatment due to its strong color as well as higher total suspended solids (TSS and chemical oxygen demand (COD contents. An empirical study was conducted to optimize the effect of the coagulants used for the removal of Color, Turbidity, TSS, and COD from binder emulsion effluent. The coagulants, used with and without the induction of Powdered Activated Carbon (PAC to enhance the decrease in pollution concentration, included Ferrous Sulfate, Ferric Chloride, Alum and Lime. Ferric Chloride used in combination with PAC produced a synergistic effect in terms of effluent depollution and transpired into efficient removal of effluent COD (83%, Color (98%, Turbidity (97% and TSS (96%. Induction of PAC with all the coagulants combined proved highly effective as well in decreasing the effluent COD, color, Turbidity and TSS by 91%, 99%, 99% and 97% respectively. In a combined process of coagulation and adsorption, combination of ferric chloride and PAC gave effective results in terms of pollutants removal by around 90% as compared to combination of PAC with other coagulants, yielding removal percentages of lower than 50%.

  11. 40 CFR 434.53 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effluent limitations guidelines... economically achievable (BAT). 434.53 Section 434.53 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS COAL MINING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY BPT, BAT, BCT LIMITATIONS...

  12. 40 CFR 471.52 - Effluent limitations representating the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effluent limitations representating... economically achievable (BAT). 471.52 Section 471.52 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS NONFERROUS METALS FORMING AND METAL POWDERS POINT...

  13. Experiment of Surface-Molecular-Imprinted and Polymer-Modified TiO2 Nanotubes for Estrogenic Chemicals Removal from Secondary Effluents of WWTP%表面分子印迹聚合物修饰 TiO2纳米管去除污水厂二级处理出水中雌激素试验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡磊; 张文龙; 李轶

    2014-01-01

    制备了基于表面分子印迹聚合物修饰的TiO2纳米管(S MIP TiO2 NTs)光催化剂,并利用SEM和FT IR手段进行了表征。结果表明S MIP TiO2 NTs的平均粒径为60 nm,针对模板分子,相对于修饰前的TiO2纳米管(TiO2 NTs),S MIP TiO2 NTs的吸附选择性和光催化性能得到了提高。相对于高浓度范围(10~100 mg/L),在低浓度范围(10~100μg/L)内S MIP TiO2 NTs显示出较高的吸附催化性能。利用S MIP TiO2 NTs可以去除尾水中部分代表性的雌激素,同时还具有较好的再生性能。%Surface-molecular-imprinted and polymer-modified TiO2 nanotube (S MIP TiO2 NTs)photocatalysts were fabricated, characterized,and tested for the removal of estrogenic pollutants from wastewater in this study for the first time. The results of scanning electron microscopy and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy show that average diameters of TiO2 NTs is 60 nm. The adsorption selectivity and photocatalytic activity of S MIP TiO2 NTs on template compound,which is compared with TiO2 NTs,are improved. Interestingly,S MIP TiO2 NTs exhibits higher adsorption intensity and photocatalytic selectivity at low concentrations (10~100μg/L)of E2 than at high concentrations (10 ~100 mg/L ). It is also found that some representative estrogenic chemicals could be selectively and rapidly removed from secondary effluents of municipal wastewater treatment plants using S MIP TiO2 NTs as photocatalysts. S MIP TiO2 NTs photocatalysts exhibit excellent regeneration characteristics.

  14. Effect of surfactant-coated iron oxide nanoparticles on the effluent water quality from a simulated sequencing batch reactor treating domestic wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sangchul; Martinez, Diana; Perez, Priscilla; Rinaldi, Carlos

    2011-12-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of commercially available engineered iron oxide nanoparticles coated with a surfactant (ENP(Fe-surf)) on effluent water quality from a lab-scale sequencing batch reactor as a model secondary biological wastewater treatment. Results showed that ~8.7% of ENP(Fe-surf) applied were present in the effluent stream. The stable presence of ENP(Fe-surf) was confirmed by analyzing the mean particle diameter and iron concentration in the effluent. Consequently, aqueous ENP(Fe-surf) deteriorated the effluent water quality at a statistically significant level (p < 0.05) with respect to soluble chemical oxygen demand, turbidity, and apparent color. This implied that ENP(Fe-surf) would be introduced into environmental receptors through the treated effluent and could potentially impact them.

  15. Halonitromethanes formation in wastewater treatment plant effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hocheol; Addison, Jesse W; Hu, Jia; Karanfil, Tanju

    2010-03-01

    Halonitromethanes (HNMs) constitute one class of emerging disinfection by-products with high potential health risks. This study investigated the formation and occurrence of HNMs under different disinfection scenarios and the presence of their precursors in municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTPs) effluents. Formation potential tests performed on WWTP effluents revealed that HNM formation occurred in the order of ozonation-chlorination > ozonation-chloramination > chlorination > chloramination. Ozonation alone did not produce any HNM. Municipal WWTP effluents contained some reactive HNM precursors, possibly the by-products of biological treatment processes and/or some moiety of industry or household origin. No effects of nitrate on the formation of HNMs were observed in this study, and nitrification in WWTPs appears to remove appreciable portion of HNM precursors, especially those reactive to chlorine. UV disinfection using low pressure lamps in municipal WWTPs had negligible impact on HNM formation potential. HNM concentrations in the effluents of selected WWTPs were either non-detectable or less than minimum reporting level, except for one WWTP that gave trichloronitromethane concentrations in the range of 0.9-1.5 microg L(-1). No HNMs were observed in the effluents disinfected with UV radiation. Therefore, it appears the typical wastewater disinfection processes involving chlorination or UV treatment in WWTPs do not produce significant amounts of HNMs.

  16. EFFLUENTS QUALITY DURING THE GROW-OUT PHASE OF THE AMAZON SHRIMP Macrobrachium amazonicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayra Nogueira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years shrimp culture farms have been one of the most growing sectors in aquaculture. Research has been carried out in order to establish a sustainable production maintaining profit and low environmental impact. Current investigation analyzed source and effluent water produced during the final grow-out phase of the Amazon shrimp (Macrobrachium amazonicum. Twelve natural-bottom ponds, with continuous water flow and stock density comprising 40, 60, 80 and 100 young shrimps/m2 were analyzed. The experiment design comprised totally randomized blocks with four treatments and three replications. Microbiological analyses for Escherichia coli was attempted, coupled to physical and chemical analyses for pH, temperature, total suspended solids, total nitrogen, nitrite, nitrate, biochemical oxygen demand and chemical oxygen demand of water supply and pond effluents. Results show that whereas effluent quality complied with current legal rules, there was no significant difference between supply and effluent water for the analyzed variables and between stock densities. Under the conditions investigated and the intensification of culture in the final grow-out phase up to a density of 100 young shrimps/m2, the production of M. amazonicum reveals low potential for environmental impact for the variables analyzed.

  17. Screening complex effluents for estrogenic activity with the T47D-KBluc cell bioassay: assay optimization and comparison with in vivo responses in fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehmas, Leah C; Cavallin, Jenna E; Durhan, Elizabeth J; Kahl, Michael D; Martinovic, Dalma; Mayasich, Joe; Tuominen, Tim; Villeneuve, Daniel L; Ankley, Gerald T

    2011-02-01

    Wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents can contain estrogenic chemicals, which potentially disrupt fish reproduction and development. The current study focused on the use of an estrogen-responsive in vitro cell bioassay (T47D-KBluc), to quantify total estrogenicity of WWTP effluents. We tested a novel sample preparation method for the T47D-KBluc assay, using powdered media prepared with direct effluent. Results of the T47D-KBluc assay were compared with the induction of estrogen receptor-regulated gene transcription in male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed to the same effluents. Effluent samples for the paired studies were collected over the course of three months. According to the T47D-KBluc assay, the effluent estrogenicity ranged from 1.13 to 2.00 ng 17β-estradiol (E2) equivalents/L. Corresponding in vivo studies exposing male fathead minnows to 0, 10, 50, and 100% effluent dilutions demonstrated that exposure to 100% effluent significantly increased hepatic vitellogenin (VTG) and estrogen receptor α subunit transcripts relative to controls. The induction was also significant in males exposed to 250 ng E2/L or 100 ng E2/L. The in vitro and in vivo results support the conclusion that the effluent contains significant estrogenic activity, but there was a discrepancy between in vitro- and in vivo-based E2 equivalent estimates. Our results suggest that the direct effluent preparation method for the T47D-KBluc assay is a reasonable approach to estimate the estrogenicity of wastewater effluent.

  18. Recycling liquid effluents in a ceramic industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo Almeida, B.; Almeida, M.; Martins, S.; Alexandra Macarico, V.; Tomas da Fonseca, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this work is presented a study on the recycling of liquid effluents in a ceramic installation for sanitary industry. The effluents were characterized by X-ray diffraction and inductively coupled plasma to evaluate their compositions. It was also assessed the daily production rate. Several glaze-slurry mixtures were prepared and characterized according to procedures and equipment of the company's quality laboratory. The results show that for most of the properties, the tested mixtures exhibited acceptable performance. However, the pyro plasticity parameter is highly influenced by the glaze content and imposes the separation of glaze and slurry liquid effluents. In addition, it is necessary to invest on a storage plant, including tanks with constant stirring and a new pipeline structure to implement the reincorporation method on the slurry processing. (Author)

  19. A long-term, multitrophic level study to assess pulp and paper mill effluent effects on aquatic communities in four US receiving waters: characteristics of the study streams, sample sites, mills, and mill effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Timothy J; Ragsdale, Renee L; Arthurs, William J; Ikoma, Joan; Borton, Dennis L; Cook, Diana L

    2009-04-01

    upstream or downstream of the effluent discharge. In addition, broader watershed differences were evident on Codorus Creek, where a relatively rich riparian corridor and stream structure occurred upstream in contrast to areas of canopy and stream-structure loss in the downstream urban area. The mill effluent discharges contributed to increases in receiving-water color and conductivity, although upstream tributaries contributed additional conductivity to Codorus Creek and color to the Leaf River. The McKenzie River provided the only example of a nutrient increase immediately downstream of a mill discharge. This increase in total nitrogen (0.11 vs 0.16 mg/L) could not, however, be differentiated with respect to whether it was of mill effluent or tributary stream origin. Tributary streams were potentially important total nitrogen contributors on Codorus Creek and the Willamette River. As an integrated study, the effluent quality and physical/chemical watershed descriptions provided here represent 1 component of the broader study addressing potential point-source effluent effects within the context of the larger watershed and a multiyear timescale. The absence of effluent-related in-stream chemical/physical responses, other than increases in conductivity and color, and a considerable bioassay-based margin of safety, provides for a working hypothesis that there will be no effluent-related biological population/community responses from these 4 mill discharges. This hypothesis, as it relates to periphyton, macroinvertebrate, and fish communities, will be addressed in other articles in this series.

  20. Identification of septic system effluent in ground water using small catchment hydrochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, M.B.J.; Alexander, E.C. Jr. (Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1992-01-01

    In many areas the contribution of septic system effluent to ground water contamination is still uncertain because of ambiguous provenance of chemical constituents. The problem is to establish a diagnostic chemical signature for the septic system effluent. Chlorides, nitrogen isotopes and optical brighteners have all been used as single constituent tracers for this purpose. These tracers tend to have limited range of application and cannot resolve ambiguity in areas with multiple potential contaminant sources. The authors addressed this problem using eight major ions to characterize the ground water chemistry, graphically or statistically. They identify the chemical signatures of septic system effluent and other non-point source contamination from the ground water chemistry of small ground water catchments overlain by single or very restricted land use types. They studied five small catchments near Rochester, Minnesota to isolate pre-development and non-septic system components of the ground water chemistry. Five small isolated hills were selected each with a distinct land-use type; natural forest, agricultural, unsewered residential, mixed agricultural/residential and fully sewered residential. The results show that Piper diagrams and statistical analysis can be used to define chemical signatures for the unsewered residential area using septic systems, the natural forest, and the agricultural catchments. The signatures of the mixed agriculture/residential and the fully sewered catchments are very similar to that of the agricultural catchment.

  1. Application of novel consortium TSR for treatment of industrial dye manufacturing effluent with concurrent removal of ADMI, COD, heavy metals and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Tallika L; Patel, Bhargav C; Kadam, Avinash A; Tipre, Devayani R; Dave, Shailesh R

    2015-01-01

    The present study was aimed towards the effective bio-treatment of actual industrial effluent containing as high as 42,000 mg/L COD (chemical oxygen demand), >28,000 ADMI (American Dye Manufacturers Institute) color value and four heavy metals using indigenous developed bacterial consortium TSR. Mineral salt medium supplemented with as low as 0.02% (w/v) yeast extract and glucose was found to remove 70% ADMI, 69% COD and >99% sorption of heavy metals in 24 h from the effluent by consortium TSR. The biodegradation of effluent was monitored by UV-vis light, HPLC (high performance liquid chromatography), HPTLC (high performance thin layer chromotography) and FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) and showed significant differences in spectra of untreated and treated effluent, confirming degradation of the effluent. Induction of intracellular azoreductase (107%) and NADH-DCIP reductase (128%) in addition to extracellular laccase (489%) indicates the vital role of the consortium TSR in the degradation process. Toxicity study of the effluent using Allium cepa by single cell gel electrophoresis showed detoxification of the effluent. Ninety per cent germination of plant seeds, Triticum aestivum and Phaseolus mungo, was achieved after treatment by consortium TSR in contrast to only 20% and 30% germination of the respective plants in case of untreated effluent.

  2. Treatment of dairy effluents by electrocoagulation using aluminium electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchamango, Serge; Nanseu-Njiki, Charles P; Ngameni, Emmanuel; Hadjiev, Dimiter; Darchen, André

    2010-01-15

    This work sets out to examine the efficiency of an electrolytic treatment: electrocoagulation, applied to dairy effluents. The experiments were carried out using a soluble aluminium anode on artificial wastewater derived from solutions of milk powder. The flocks generated during this treatment were separated by filtration. The analysis of the filtrates showed that the chemical oxygen demand (COD) was reduced by up to 61% while the removal of phosphorus, nitrogen contents, and turbidity were 89, 81 and 100%, respectively. An analogous treatment applied to phosphate and lactose solutions revealed that lactose was not eliminated, a fact that could account for the rather poor lowering of the COD. Compared to the chemical coagulation treatment with aluminium sulphate, the efficiency of the electrocoagulation technique was almost identical. However the wastewaters treated by electrocoagulation differed by the fact that they exhibited a lower conductivity and a neutral pH value (by contrast to the acid nature of the solution treated by the chemical coagulation). This result (low conductivity, neutral pH) tends to show that it may be possible to recycle the treated water for some industrial uses. Moreover, the electrocoagulation process uses fewer reagents: the mass of the aluminium anode dissolved during the treatment is lower compared to the quantity of the aluminium salt used in chemical coagulation. These two observations clearly show that the electrocoagulation technique is more performing.

  3. POLISHING THE EFFLUENT FROM AN ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL PERCHLORATE TREATMENT PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaerobic biological processes effectively reduce perchlorate to chloride. However, the effluent can be biologically unstable, high in particulates and high in disinfection by-product precursor compounds. Such an effluent would be unsuitable for transmission into a drinking water...

  4. Four marine-derived fungi for bioremediation of raw textile mill effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Ashutosh Kumar; Raghukumar, Chandralata; Verma, Pankaj; Shouche, Yogesh S; Naik, Chandrakant Govind

    2010-04-01

    Textile dye effluents pose environmental hazards because of color and toxicity. Bioremediation of these has been widely attempted. However, their widely differing characteristics and high salt contents have required application of different microorganisms and high dilutions. We report here decolorization and detoxification of two raw textile effluents, with extreme variations in their pH and dye composition, used at 20-90% concentrations by each of the four marine-derived fungi. Textile effluent A (TEA) contained an azo dye and had a pH of 8.9 and textile effluent B (TEB) with a pH of 2.5 contained a mixture of eight reactive dyes. The fungi isolated from mangroves and identified by 18S and ITS sequencing corresponded to two ascomycetes and two basidiomycetes. Each of these fungi decolorized TEA by 30-60% and TEB by 33-80% used at 20-90% concentrations and salinity of 15 ppt within 6 days. This was accompanied by two to threefold reduction in toxicity as measured by LC(50) values against Artemia larvae and 70-80% reduction in chemical oxygen demand and total phenolics. Mass spectrometric scan of effluents after fungal treatment revealed degradation of most of the components. The ascomycetes appeared to remove color primarily by adsorption, whereas laccase played a major role in decolorization by basidiomycetes. A process consisting of a combination of sorption by fungal biomass of an ascomycete and biodegradation by laccase from a basidiomycete was used in two separate steps or simultaneously for bioremediation of these two effluents.

  5. Ciprofloxacin residue and antibiotic-resistant biofilm bacteria in hospital effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ory, Jérôme; Bricheux, Geneviève; Togola, Anne; Bonnet, Jean Louis; Donnadieu-Bernard, Florence; Nakusi, Laurence; Forestier, Christiane; Traore, Ousmane

    2016-07-01

    Discharge of antimicrobial residues and resistant bacteria in hospital effluents is supposed to have strong impacts on the spread of antibiotic resistant bacteria in the environment. This study aimed to characterize the effluents of the Gabriel Montpied teaching hospital, Clermont-Ferrand, France, by simultaneously measuring the concentration of ciprofloxacin and of biological indicators resistant to this molecule in biofilms formed in the hospital effluent and by comparing these data to ciprofloxacin consumption and resistant bacterial isolates of the hospital. Determination of the measured environmental concentration of ciprofloxacin by spot sampling and polar organic chemical integrative (POCIS) sampling over 2 weeks, and comparison with predicted environmental concentrations produced a hazard quotient >1, indicating a potential ecotoxicological risk. A negative impact was also observed with whole hospital effluent samples using the Tetrahymena pyriformis biological model. During the same period, biofilms were formed within the hospital effluent, and analysis of ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates indicated that Gamma-Proteobacteria were numerous, predominantly Aeromonadaceae (69.56%) and Enterobacteriaceae (22.61%). Among the 115 isolates collected, plasmid-mediated fluoroquinolone-resistant genes were detected, with mostly aac(6')-lb-cr and qnrS. In addition, 60% of the isolates were resistant to up to six antibiotics, including molecules mostly used in the hospital (aminosides and third-generation cephalosporins). In parallel, 1247 bacteria isolated from hospitalized patients and resistant to at least one of the fluoroquinolones were collected. Only 5 of the 14 species identified in the effluent biofilm were also found in the clinical isolates, but PFGE typing of the Gram-negative isolates found in both compartments showed there was no clonality among the strains. Altogether, these data confirm the role of hospital loads as sources of pollution for wastewater

  6. Urban effluent discharges as causes of public and environmental health concerns in South Africa's aquatic milieu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibanda, Timothy; Selvarajan, Ramganesh; Tekere, Memory

    2015-12-01

    The water quality in South Africa's river systems is rapidly deteriorating as a consequence of increased discharge of wastewater effluents. The natural ability of rivers and reservoirs to trap toxic chemicals and nutrients in their sediments enables these systems to accumulate contaminants, altering the natural balance in environmental water quality, thereby raising a plethora of public and environmental health concerns. Impaired water quality has been linked to an array of problems in South Africa including massive fish mortalities, altered habitat template leading to the thinning of riverine macroinvertebrate diversity, shifts in microbial community structures with drastic ecological consequences and evolvement of antibiotic resistance genes that, under natural conditions, can be transferred to waterborne pathogens. Urban wastewater discharge has also been implicated in increased bioaccumulation of metals in edible plant parts, elevated concentrations of endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs), which are blamed for reduced fertility and increased cancer risk, excessive growth of toxic cyanobacteria and an increase in concentrations of pathogenic microorganisms which constitute a potential health threat to humans. However, despite the ecotoxicological hazards posed by wastewater effluents, ecotoxicological studies are currently underutilised in South African aquatic ecosystem assessments, and where they have been done, the observation is that ecotoxicological studies are mostly experimental and restricted to small study areas. More research is still needed to fully assess especially the ecotoxicological consequences of surface water pollution by urban wastewater effluents in South Africa. A review of the effects of urban effluent discharges that include domestic effluent mixed with industrial effluent and/or urban stormwater run-off is hereby presented.

  7. An advanced anaerobic biofilter with effluent recirculation for phenol removal and methane production in treatment of coal gasification wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yajie; Tabassum, Salma; Zhang, Zhenjia

    2016-09-01

    An advanced anaerobic biofilter (AF) was introduced for the treatment of coal gasification wastewater (CGW), and effluent recirculation was adopted to enhance phenol removal and methane production. The results indicated that AF was reliable in treating diluted CGW, while its efficiency and stability were seriously reduced when directly treating raw CGW. However, its performance could be greatly enhanced by effluent recirculation. Under optimal effluent recirculation of 0.5 to the influent, concentrations of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total phenol in the effluent could reach as low as 234.0 and 14.2mg/L, respectively. Also, the rate of methane production reached 169.0mLCH4/L/day. Though CGW seemed to restrain the growth of anaerobic microorganisms, especially methanogens, the inhibition was temporary and reversible, and anaerobic bacteria presented strong tolerance. The activities of methanogens cultivated in CGW could quickly recover on feeding with glucose wastewater (GW). However, the adaptability of anaerobic bacteria to the CGW was very poor and the activity of methanogens could not be improved by long-term domestication. By analysis using the Haldane model, it was further confirmed that high effluent recirculation could result in high activity for hydrolytic bacteria and substrate affinity for toxic matters, but only suitable effluent recirculation could result in high methanogenic activity.

  8. Effluent monitoring at a bleached kraft mill: directions for best management practices for eliminating effects on fish reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Pierre H; Kovacs, Tibor G; O'connor, Brian I; Semeniuk, Sharon; Hewitt, L Mark; Maclatchy, Deborah L; McMaster, Mark E; Parrott, Joanne L; van den Heuvel, Michael R; Van Der Kraak, Glen J

    2011-01-01

    A long-term monitoring study was conducted on effluents from a bleached kraft pulp and paper mill located in Eastern Canada. The study was designed to gain insights into temporal effluent variability with respect to fish reproduction as it related to production upsets, mill restarts and conditions affecting biological treatment performance. Final effluent quality was monitored between February 2007 and May 2009 using biochemical and chemical oxygen demand, total suspended solids, resin and fatty acids, a gas chromatographic profiling index, and the presence of methyl substituted 2-cyclopentenones. Selected effluent samples were evaluated for effects on fish reproduction (egg production) using a shortened version of the adult fathead minnow reproductive test. The events relating to negative effects on fish reproduction were upsets of the pulping liquor recovery system resulting in black liquor losses, operational upsets of the hardwood line resulting in the loss of oxygen delignification filtrates, and conditions that reduced the performance of biological treatment (e.g., mill shutdown and low ambient temperatures). The reductions in egg production observed in fathead minnow were associated with biochemical oxygen demand values > 20 mg/L, GC profiling indices > 1.2 and the presence of methyl-substituted 2-cyclopentenones at concentrations > 100 μg/L. This study demonstrated the importance of both in-plant measures for controlling the loss of organics as well as the optimum operation of biological effluent treatment for eliminating effluent-related effects on fish reproduction (egg production) in the laboratory.

  9. Evaluation of growth, biochemical and bioaccumulation parameters in Pelophylax perezi tadpoles, following an in-situ acute exposure to three different effluent ponds from a uranium mine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, Sérgio M., E-mail: s.reis.marques@gmail.com [Departamento de Biologia da Universidade de Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); CESAM (Centro de Estudos do Ambiente e do Mar), Universidade de Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Chaves, Sandra [Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciências, Centro de Biodiversidade, Genómica Integrativa e Funcional (BioFIG), Edifício ICAT, Campus da FCUL Campo Grande, Lisboa (Portugal); Gonçalves, Fernando [Departamento de Biologia da Universidade de Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); CESAM (Centro de Estudos do Ambiente e do Mar), Universidade de Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Pereira, Ruth [CESAM (Centro de Estudos do Ambiente e do Mar), Universidade de Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Departamento de Biologia da Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal)

    2013-02-15

    Mining activities invariably produce metal contaminated effluents. Depending on factors such as pH and metal concentration the toxicity of the effluent may vary. To assess the effects of three characteristically different effluent ponds from a deactivated uranium mine, with toxicologically relevant data, an in situ exposure with Pelophylax perezi tadpoles, was conducted. Tadpoles were exposed to the three effluent ponds, ranked by increasing order of metals concentrations (REF, M1, M2). Survival, growth, metal accumulation, antioxidant enzymes (catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase) and lipid peroxidation (LPO) were determined in tadpoles. As well, physical and chemical variables of the effluents were measured. Death percentage in the effluents was 3.17 (REF), 9.84 (M1) and 42.86% (M2) and was not coincident with metal accumulation which was highest in tadpoles exposed to M1, while metal contents in M2 tadpoles were quite similar to those recorded in REF tadpoles. However, high mortality in M2 was attributed to the extremely low pH (≈ 3.77). From the three effluents M2 tadpoles had the lowest growth and the antioxidant enzymatic activity was only affected in the case glutathione peroxidase (GPx) with significantly higher activity in M1, being in accordance with the highest accumulation of metals. LPO, usually associated with metal accumulation, had the following pattern M1 > REF > M2. Overall, effluent toxicity in tadpoles exposed to M2 effluent seems to be primarily an effect of pH while in M1 toxicity is mainly owed to high metal concentrations. The effluent acidity seems to reduce metal accumulation probably due to damage in the integument, affecting ion uptake. The results obtained bring a better understanding of the toxicological processes that local P. perezi population is subjected to, mainly in the early life stages. Furthermore this study highlights the influence of pH in the toxicity of metal rich effluents. - Highlights:

  10. Evaluation of Fluidized Bed Reactor in treating Dyeing effluent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Poongoth

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Textile dyeing industries one of the complicated industries which use many chemicals like dyes, starch, acids, alkalis, surfactants and refractory organics for their process. As it is a wet process it requires more amount of water ranging 65-104 L/Kg of product and it discharges 52-95 L/Kg of product as wastewater. The COD, BOD,TDS, Colour and SS are the major pollutants from these industries to the receiving streams. Biological treatment is employed mostly when compared to the physicochemical treatment. More sludge, toxic bye products and cost for the treatment are the reasons for not employing the physiochemical treatment processes. Biological treatments like aerobic and anaerobic processes overcome the disadvantages of physicochemical treatment. The present study evaluates the Aerobic Fluidized bed Reactor for the treatment of Dyeing effluent. It has been observed through this study that 89% colour removal and 83.3% COD removal were achieved.

  11. Plant and soil modifications by continuous surface effluent application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tedesco, M.J.; Levien, R. [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Dept. of Solos; Mohrdieck, F.G.; Rodrigues, N.R. [CORSAN-SITEL, Triunfo, RS (Brazil). Polo Petroquimico do Sul. Dept. de Operacao e Manutencao; Flores, A.I.P.

    1993-12-31

    In order to study the effects on soil and plants of the liquid effluent generated by a the Integrated Liquid Effluent Treatment System of a large Brazilian petrochemical complex, a field study was conducted in four areas which received the effluent and compared to control sites. This work presents some results of this study. 12 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  12. 40 CFR 420.92 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS IRON AND STEEL MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Acid... degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best practicable control technology... by the application of the best practicable control technology currently available (BPT). Except...

  13. 40 CFR 420.52 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS IRON AND STEEL MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Vacuum... degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best practicable control technology... by the application of the best practicable control technology currently available (BPT). Except...

  14. 40 CFR 420.62 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS IRON AND STEEL MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Continuous... degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best practicable control technology... by the application of the best practicable control technology currently available (BPT). Except...

  15. 40 CFR 420.73 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS IRON AND STEEL MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Hot Forming... degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best available technology economically... application of the best available technology economically achievable (BAT). The Agency has determined...

  16. Anaerobic effluent disinfection using ozone: Byproducts formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, G.H.R.; Daniel, L.A.; Bruning, H.; Rulkens, W.H.

    2010-01-01

    This research was aimed at studying oxidation processes, coliform inactivation effectiveness and disinfection byproducts (DBPs) associated with the disinfection of anaerobic sanitary wastewater effluent with ozone applied at doses of 5.0, 8.0 and 10.0mg O(3)L(-1) for contact times of 5, 10 and 15 mi

  17. BIOEQUIVALENCE APPROACH FOR WHOLE EFFLUENT TOXICITY TESTING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increased use of whole effluent toxicity (WET) tests in the regulatory arena has brought increased concern over the statistical analysis of WET test data and the determination of toxicity. One concern is the issue of statistical power. A number of WET tests may pass the current...

  18. Wastewater effluent dispersal in Southern California Bays

    KAUST Repository

    Uchiyama, Yusuke

    2014-03-01

    The dispersal and dilution of urban wastewater effluents from offshore, subsurface outfalls is simulated with a comprehensive circulation model with downscaling in nested grid configurations for San Pedro and Santa Monica Bays in Southern California during Fall of 2006. The circulation is comprised of mean persistent currents, mesoscale and submesoscale eddies, and tides. Effluent volume inflow rates at Huntington Beach and Hyperion are specified, and both their present outfall locations and alternative nearshore diversion sites are assessed. The effluent tracer concentration fields are highly intermittent mainly due to eddy currents, and their probability distribution functions have long tails of high concentration. The dilution rate is controlled by submesoscale stirring and straining in tracer filaments. The dominant dispersal pattern is alongshore in both directions, approximately along isobaths, over distances of more than 10. km before dilution takes over. The current outfall locations mostly keep the effluent below the surface and away from the shore, as intended, but the nearshore diversions do not. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Wide-band heterodyne receiver development for effluent measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchinson, D.P.; Richards, R.K.; Simpson, M.L.; Bennett, C.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Liu, H.C.; Buchanan, M. [National Research Council of Canada (Canada)

    1998-05-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been developing advanced infrared heterodyne receivers for plasma diagnostics in fusion reactors for over 20 years. Passive heterodyne radiometry in the LWIR region of the spectrum has historically been restricted by HgCdTe (MCT) detector technology to receiver bandwidths of only 2 GHz. Given typical atmospheric line widths of approximately 3 GHz, a CO{sub 2} (or isotope) laser local oscillator with an average line spacing of 50 GHz, and an MCT detector, only chemical species whose absorptions fall directly on top of laser lines can be measured. Thus, with traditional narrow-band heterodyne radiometry, much of the LWIR spectrum is missed and the less complex direct detection DIAL has been the preferred technique in remote sensing applications. Wide-band heterodyne receivers offer significant improvements in remote measurement capability. Progress at the Institute for Microstructural Sciences (IMS) at National Research Council of Canada and at ORNL in wide-band quantum-well infrared photodetectors (QIPs) and receivers is significantly enhancing the bandwidth capabilities of heterodyne radiometers. ORNL recently made measurements in the lab using QWIPs developed at IMS that demonstrate heterodyne quantum efficiencies of 5% with a heterodyne bandwidth of 7 GHz. The path forward indicates that > 10% heterodyne quantum efficiencies and 30-GHz bandwidths are achievable with current QWIP technology. With a chopped, 30-GHz passive heterodyne receiver, a much larger portion of the LWIR spectrum can now be covered. One potential advantage of wide-band heterodyne receivers for effluent measurements is to dramatically reduce the number of laser lines needed to characterize and distinguish multiple chemical species of interest. In the following paper, the authors discuss this and other implications of these new technologies to the characterization of effluents using both passive heterodyne radiometry and thermo-luminescence.

  20. Phosphorus leaching in soils amended with piggery effluent or lime residues from effluent treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, D M; Ritchie, G S

    1994-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) in wastes from piggeries may contribute to the eutrophication of waterways if not disposed of appropriately. Phosphorus leaching, from three soils with different P sorption characteristics (two with low P retention and one with moderate P retention) when treated with piggery effluent (with or without struvite), was investigated using batch and leaching experiments. The leaching of P retained in soil from the application of struvite effluent was determined. In addition, P leaching from lime residues (resulting from the treatment of piggery effluent with lime to remove P) was determined in comparison to superphosphate when applied to the same three soils. Most P was leached from sandy soils with low P retention when effluent with or without struvite was applied. More than 100% of the filterable P applied in struvite effluent was leached in sandy soils with low P retention. Solid, inorganic forms of P (struvite) became soluble and potentially leachable at pHdissolution if there were sufficient sorption sites. In sandy soils with low P retention, more than 39% of the total filterable P applied in recycled effluent (without struvite) was leached. Soil P increased mainly in surface layers after treatment with effluent. Sandy soils pre-treated with struvite effluent leached 40% of the P retained in the previous application. Phosphorus decreased in surface layers and increased at depth in the soil with moderate P retention after leaching the struvite effluent pre-treated soil with water. The soils capacity to adsorb P and the soil pH were the major soil properties that affected the rate and amount of P leaching, whereas the important characteristics of the effluent were pH, P concentration and the forms of P in the effluent. Phosphorus losses from soils amended with hydrated lime and lime kiln dust residues were much lower than losses from soils amended with superphosphate. Up to 92% of the P applied as superphosphate was leached from sandy soils with low P

  1. Catalysts with Cerium in a Membrane Reactor for the Removal of Formaldehyde Pollutant from Water Effluents

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    We report the synthesis of cerium oxide, cobalt oxide, mixed cerium, and cobalt oxides and a Ce–Co/Al2O3 membrane, which are employed as catalysts for the catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) reaction process and the removal of formaldehyde from industrial effluents. Formaldehyde is present in numerous waste streams from the chemical industry in a concentration low enough to make its recovery not economically justified but high enough to create an environmental hazard. Common biological degradation ...

  2. REMOVAL OF HEAVY METALS FROM DYE EFFLUENT USING ACTIVATED CARBON PRODUCED FROM COCONUT SHELL

    OpenAIRE

    Onyeji, L. I.; Aboje, A. A.

    2011-01-01

    The ability of activated carbon produced from coconut shell to remoe mercury Hg (II), Lead Pb (II) and Copper Cu (II) from dye effluent was investigated. The activated carbon was produced through chemical activation processes by using zinc chloride (ZnCl2). The adsorption capacity was determined as a function of adsorbent dosage. The adsorption Isotherms of the studied metals on adsorbent were also determined and compared with the Langmair models. The activated carbon produced showed excellen...

  3. Application of Doehlert matrix to determine the optimal conditions of electrochemical treatment of tannery effluents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammami, Samiha [Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique et Electrochimie, Departement de Chimie, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, Campus Universitaire, 2092 Tunis El Manar (Tunisia)], E-mail: samiha.hammami@laposte.net; Ouejhani, Ali [Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique et Electrochimie, Departement de Chimie, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, Campus Universitaire, 2092 Tunis El Manar (Tunisia); Bellakhal, Nizar [Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique et Electrochimie, Departement de Chimie, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, Campus Universitaire, 2092 Tunis El Manar (Tunisia); Departement de Chimie et de Biologie Appliquees, Institut National des Sciences Appliquees et de Technologie (INSAT), B.P. No676, 1080 Tunis Cedex (Tunisia); Dachraoui, Mohamed [Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique et Electrochimie, Departement de Chimie, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, Campus Universitaire, 2092 Tunis El Manar (Tunisia)

    2009-04-15

    The oxidation of organic and inorganic pollutants present in tannery effluents has been realised by electrochemical way. The influence of the electrochemical reactor parameters was carried out by the use of Doehlert matrix. The obtained results have shown that the current intensity and the electrolysis time were the main influent parameters on the removal ratio of chemical oxygen demand (COD), total organic carbon (TOC), electrochemical oxidation of trivalent chromium and sulphite ions.

  4. 40 CFR 420.137 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS IRON AND STEEL MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY... representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best control technology for... effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best control technology for conventional...

  5. 40 CFR 417.22 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... CATEGORY Fatty Acid Manufacturing by Fat Splitting Subcategory § 417.22 Effluent limitations guidelines... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best practicable...

  6. 40 CFR 417.23 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Acid Manufacturing by Fat Splitting Subcategory § 417.23 Effluent limitations guidelines representing... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best available...

  7. 40 CFR 471.61 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS NONFERROUS METALS FORMING AND METAL POWDERS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Titanium Forming Subcategory § 471.61 Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent... (1) (1) 1 Within the range of 7.5 to 10.0 at all times. (k) Tube reducing spent lubricants—Subpart...

  8. 40 CFR 471.92 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS NONFERROUS METALS FORMING AND METAL POWDERS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Zirconium-Hafnium Forming Subcategory § 471.92 Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent... 0.006 Cyanide 0.010 0.004 Nickel 0.066 0.044 Ammonia 4.57 2.01 Fluoride 2.04 0.906 (g) Tube...

  9. 40 CFR 405.127 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant... Whey Subcategory § 405.127 Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant control technology (BCT)....

  10. 40 CFR 405.117 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant... Condensed Whey Subcategory § 405.117 Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant control technology (BCT)....

  11. 40 CFR 421.113 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...—Reduction of Tantalum Salt to Metal Wet Air Pollution Control. BAT Effluent Limitations Pollutant or... Columbium-Tantalum Subcategory § 421.113 Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent... application of the best available technology economically achievable: (a) Subpart K—Concentrate Digestion...

  12. Effluent Zero Release Concept——The Brazilian Experience

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    José Carlos Mierzwa; Sandra Mara Garcia Bello; Ivanildo Hespanhol

    2006-01-01

    Water scarcity is pushing the government, industries and researchers to the development of new strategies for water and wastewater management. An approach aimed at the optimization of the water use and minimization of effluent generation was developed at the Centro Experimental ARAMAR (CEA), a nuclear research facility, located in the State of Sao Paulo,Brazil. Bench scale tests followed by a pilot plant treating effluents from some nuclear research facilities have shown the results leading to the conclusion that the effluent zero release concept is feasible. Based on the gathered data, a project of an integrated effluent treatment system focusing on water recovery and environmental effluent release reduction has been developed.

  13. EVALUATION OF DIFFERENT COAGULANTS FOR PHOSPHORUS REMOVAL IN DAIRY INDUSTRY EFFLUENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Braun

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Effluent treatment processes may be currently performed by physic-chemical or biological processes which may be aerobic as well as anaerobic. Both processes generally aim to remove organic loading. The study aimed to evaluate the application of coagulants for effluent treatment in a dairy industry by using two different coagulants which are ferric chloride and aluminum sulfate - both were dosed at the beginning of the treatment, i.e., in the flotator. Along with phosphorus analysis, pH, conductivity, and total nitrogen were also carried out. Both treatments were robust and efficient regarding the removal of phosphorus, reaching removal percentages of 97.7% of phosphorus when ferric chloride was used and 98.9% when aluminum sulfate was used. Regarding other parameters studied, the total amount of nitrogen was below 20 mg L-1, pH average was 5.56 while conductivity rates increased 30% due to the greater quantity of ions after the treatment. Results are in agreement with the Resolution of CONSEMA no. 128/2006 regarding to liquid effluents for emissions that discharge effluents in superficial waters in Rio Grande do Sul State.

  14. High efficient treatment of citric acid effluent by Chlorella vulgaris and potential biomass utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Changling; Yang, Hailin; Xia, Xiaole; Li, Yuji; Chen, Luping; Zhang, Meng; Zhang, Ling; Wang, Wu

    2013-01-01

    The efficiency of treating citric acid effluent by green algae Chlorella was investigated. With the highest growth rate, Chlorella vulgaris C9-JN2010 that could efficiently remove nutrients in the citric acid effluent was selected for scale-up batch experiments under the optimal conditions, where its maximum biomass was 1.04 g l(-1) and removal efficiencies of nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorus, total organic carbon, chemical oxygen demand and biochemical oxygen demand) were above 90.0%. Algal lipid and protein contents were around 340.0 and 500.0 mg · g(-1) of the harvested biomass, respectively. Proportions of polyunsaturated fatty acids in the lipids and eight kinds of essential amino acids in algal protein were 74.0% and 40.0%, respectively. Three major fatty acids were hexadecanoic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid and docosadienoic acid. This specific effluent treatment process could be proposed as a dual-beneficial approach, which converts nutrients in the high strength citric acid effluent into profitable byproducts and reduces the contaminations.

  15. Membrane filtration technologies applied to municipal secondary effluents for potential reuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acero, Juan L; Benitez, F Javier; Leal, Ana I; Real, Francisco J; Teva, Fernando

    2010-05-15

    Four UF membranes (denoted GH, GK, PT and PW with MWCO of 1000, 2000, 5000 and 20,000Da, respectively) and four NF membranes (denoted DL, CK, DK and HL, with an approximate MWCO of 150-300Da in all cases) were used for the filtration of an effluent generated in a municipal wastewater plant after a secondary treatment. The influence of the most important operating variables (nature and MWCO of the membranes, transmembrane pressure, tangential velocity, and temperature) on the permeate flux was widely discussed, and the resistances to the permeate flux were determined following the resistances in series model. Rejection coefficients for parameters that measure the global pollutant content of the effluent (chemical oxygen demand, total organic carbon, absorbance at 254nm, turbidity, total nitrogen and total phosphorus) were also evaluated, and the results revealed that both UF and NF are feasible options for the treatment of this effluent, yielding a permeate stream that can be reused in several applications. Finally, 28 pharmaceutical compounds were initially detected in this effluent, and their respective rejection coefficients were determined, with eliminations higher than 75% in the case of NF with the HL membrane. Therefore, it is concluded that NF is an excellent option for the removal of toxic pharmaceuticals in municipal wastewaters.

  16. Bioassay-directed identification of novel antiandrogenic compounds in bile of fish exposed to wastewater effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostkowski, Pawel; Horwood, Julia; Shears, Janice A; Lange, Anke; Oladapo, Francis O; Besselink, Harrie T; Tyler, Charles R; Hill, Elizabeth M

    2011-12-15

    The widespread occurrence of feminized male fish downstream of some UK Wastewater Treatment Works (WwTWs) has been associated with exposure to estrogenic and potentially antiandrogenic (AA) contaminants in the effluents. In this study, profiling of AA contaminants in WwTW effluents and fish was conducted using HPLC in combination with in vitro androgen receptor transcription screens. Analysis of extracts of wastewater effluents revealed complex profiles of AA activity comprising 21-53 HPLC fractions. Structures of bioavailable antiandrogens were identified by exposing rainbow trout to a WwTW effluent and profiling the bile for AA activity using yeast (anti-YAS) and mammalian-based (AR-CALUX) androgen receptor transcription screens. The predominant fractions with AA activity in both androgen receptor screens contained the germicides chlorophene and triclosan, and together these contaminants accounted for 51% of the total anti-YAS activity in the fish bile. Other AA compounds identified in bile included chloroxylenol, dichlorophene, resin acids, napthols, oxybenzone, 4-nonylphenol, and bisphenol A. Pure standards of these compounds were active in the androgen receptor screens at potencies relative to flutamide of between 0.1 and 13.0. Thus, we have identified, for the first time, a diverse range of AA chemicals in WwTWs that are bioavailable to fish and which need to be assessed for their risk to the reproductive health of these organisms and other aquatic biota.

  17. Contribution of Wastewater Treatment Plant Effluents to Nutrient Dynamics in Aquatic Systems: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Richard O.; Migliaccio, Kati W.

    2009-08-01

    Excessive nutrient loading (considering nitrogen and phosphorus) is a major ongoing threat to water quality and here we review the impact of nutrient discharges from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) to United States (U.S.) freshwater systems. While urban and agricultural land uses are significant nonpoint nutrient contributors, effluent from point sources such as WWTPs can overwhelm receiving waters, effectively dominating hydrological characteristics and regulating instream nutrient processes. Population growth, increased wastewater volumes, and sustainability of critical water resources have all been key factors influencing the extent of wastewater treatment. Reducing nutrient concentrations in wastewater is an important aspect of water quality management because excessive nutrient concentrations often prevent water bodies from meeting designated uses. WWTPs employ numerous physical, chemical, and biological methods to improve effluent water quality but nutrient removal requires advanced treatment and infrastructure that may be economically prohibitive. Therefore, effluent nutrient concentrations vary depending on the particular processes used to treat influent wastewater. Increasingly stringent regulations regarding nutrient concentrations in discharged effluent, along with greater freshwater demand in populous areas, have led to the development of extensive water recycling programs within many U.S. regions. Reuse programs provide an opportunity to reduce or eliminate direct nutrient discharges to receiving waters while allowing for the beneficial use of reclaimed water. However, nutrients in reclaimed water can still be a concern for reuse applications, such as agricultural and landscape irrigation.

  18. Spectral Studies of UV and Solar Photocatalytic Degradation of AZO Dye and Textile Dye Effluents Using Green Synthesized Silver Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariselvam, R; Ranjitsingh, A J A; Mosae Selvakumar, P; Alarfaj, Abdullah A; Munusamy, Murugan A

    2016-01-01

    The photocatalytic degradation of the chemical dye AZO and dye effluents in different time duration has been investigated using biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles. Dye industry effluents and AZO dye undergo degradation to form harmless intermediate and colourless products following irradiation by UV and solar light in the presence of green synthesized silver nanoparticles. The degree of degradation was tested under the experimental conditions such as P(H), temperature, and absorbance of the dye in UV and solar light was measured. The degradation was higher in the UV light source than in the solar light source. Green synthesized silver nanoparticles in the UV light source were found to expedite the dye degradation process.

  19. Integrated assessment of wastewater treatment plant effluent estrogenicity in the Upper Murray River, Australia, using the native Murray rainbowfish (Melanotaenia fluviatilis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajda, Alan M; Kumar, Anupama; Woods, Marianne; Williams, Mike; Doan, Hai; Tolsher, Peter; Kookana, Rai S; Barber, Larry B

    2015-05-01

    The contamination of major continental river systems by endocrine-active chemicals (EACs) derived from the discharge of wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents can affect human and ecosystem health. As part of a long-term effort to develop a native fish model organism for assessment of endocrine disruption in Australia's largest watershed, the Murray-Darling River Basin, the present study evaluated endocrine disruption in adult males of the native Australian Murray rainbowfish (Melanotaenia fluviatilis) exposed to effluent from an activated sludge WWTP and water from the Murray River during a 28-d, continuous-flow, on-site experiment. Analysis of the WWTP effluent and river water detected estrone and 17β-estradiol at concentrations up to approximately 25 ng L(-1) . Anti-estrogenicity of effluent samples was detected in vitro using yeast-based bioassays (yeast estrogen screen) throughout the experiment, but estrogenicity was limited to the first week of the experiment. Histological evaluation of the testes indicated significant suppression of spermatogenesis by WWTP effluent after 28 d of exposure. Plasma vitellogenin concentrations and expression of vitellogenin messenger RNA in liver were not significantly affected by exposure to WWTP effluent. The combination of low contaminant concentrations in the WWTP effluent, limited endocrine disrupting effects in the Murray rainbowfish, and high in-stream dilution factors (>99%) suggest minimal endocrine disruption impacts on native Australian fish in the Murray River downstream from the WWTP outfall.

  20. Integrated assessment of wastewater treatment plant effluent estrogenicity in the Upper Murray River, Australia, using the native Murray rainbowfish (Melanotaenia fluviatilis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajda, Alan M.; Kumar, Anupama; Woods, Marianne; Williams, Mike; Doan, Hai; Tolsher, Peter; Kookana, Rai S.; Barber, Larry B.

    2016-01-01

    The contamination of major continental river systems by endocrine-active chemicals (EACs) derived from the discharge of wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents can affect human and ecosystem health. As part of a long-term effort to develop a native fish model organism for assessment of endocrine disruption in Australia's largest watershed, the Murray-Darling River Basin, the present study evaluated endocrine disruption in adult males of the native Australian Murray rainbowfish (Melanotaenia fluviatilis) exposed to effluent from an activated sludge WWTP and water from the Murray River during a 28-d, continuous-flow, on-site experiment. Analysis of the WWTP effluent and river water detected estrone and 17β-estradiol at concentrations up to approximately 25 ng L−1. Anti-estrogenicity of effluent samples was detected in vitro using yeast-based bioassays (yeast estrogen screen) throughout the experiment, but estrogenicity was limited to the first week of the experiment. Histological evaluation of the testes indicated significant suppression of spermatogenesis by WWTP effluent after 28 d of exposure. Plasma vitellogenin concentrations and expression of vitellogenin messenger RNA in liver were not significantly affected by exposure to WWTP effluent. The combination of low contaminant concentrations in the WWTP effluent, limited endocrine disrupting effects in the Murray rainbowfish, and high in-stream dilution factors (>99%) suggest minimal endocrine disruption impacts on native Australian fish in the Murray River downstream from the WWTP outfall. 

  1. Toxicity assays applied for evaluation of ionizing radiation and zeolites adsorption as treatment technologies for coloured effluent; Aplicacao de ensaios de toxicidade na avaliacao da eficiencia da radiacao ionizante e da adsorcao em zeolitas para o tratamento de efluentes coloridos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higa, Marcela Cantelli

    2008-07-01

    Textile industry is one raising commercial activity in Brazil. This activity has been generating important environmental interferences such as colour and bad biological effects into aquatic environment. Liquid textile effluents are toxic to lived organisms and may present low biological degradability. Although foreseen at federal regulation, the effluent quality is not controlled by toxicity assays in the country. These assays are carried out to determine the potential effects of chemical substances and effluents to cause negative effects to the exposed organisms. The present work aimed whole toxicity evaluation as well as the applicability of two different treatment techniques: ionizing radiation and zeolite adsorption. The efficacy of them were evaluated using eco toxicity bases and real effluents. Two different industries from Sao Paulo State contributed to this project supplying their real effluents. The samples were collected at a Textile Industry and at a Chemical Industry (dying producer) and after the measurement of whole toxicity the samples were submitted to treatments. Toxicity assays were carried out for Daphnia similis and for Vibrio fischeri. Sample irradiations were performed at an Electron Beam Accelerator at CTR/IPEN. Zeolites treatment is an P and D activity from CQMA/IPEN which contributed to this Project. Zeolites v/ere prepared from fly ash previously being used as an adsorber material. Both treatments (electron irradiation and zeolite adsorption) resulted on important toxicity and colour reduction. Concerning irradiation the effluents from chemical industry required higher radiation doses than that from textile activity. The radiation dose to be suggested is 40 kGy (toxicity reduction > 60%) for the chemical effluents and 0.5 kGy for the textile effluents (toxicity reduction > 90%). When zeolite adsorption was evaluated the Z1M6 resulted in 85%o v/hole toxicity reduction and ZC6 resulted in very low efficiency for the effluents of chemical

  2. Effluent metering and liquid gas ratio analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conrad, L.M. [EnCana Corp., Calgary, AB (Canada); Howell, K. [Intricate Group, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    The Industry Measurement Group (IMG) launched a 2 year initiative in 2007 focused on creating technically based regulations to improve the economics on low pressure, low liquid gas plays in western Canada. The IMG is the liaison between the petroleum industry and regulatory agencies in the development of industry accepted standards for measuring activities. The Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP) supported the IMG's initiative, which led to a joint CAPP/IMG review of effluent metering applications and the associated testing requirements for gas wells in British Columbia and Alberta. The primary objectives of the joint CAPP/IMG review were to bring all parties together to form a common framework for effluent metering application and testing expectations, based on a risk and volumetric approach; and to support an economical approach to the continued development of unconventional gas resource plays in Alberta and British Columbia, with a focus on well-site infrastructure and operational cost optimization. This paper focused primarily on the well testing requirements and discussed the benefits of creating technically based, pragmatic regulations. Existing regulations were used to help the CAPP/IMG project team to develop a new practical and pragmatic regulatory framework and policy for effluent metering and well testing. 1 ref., 2 tabs., 15 figs.

  3. Analysis of nitrogenous and algal oxygen demand in effluent from a system of aerated lagoons followed by polishing pond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorsandi, Hassan; Alizadeh, Rahimeh; Tosinejad, Horiyeh; Porghaffar, Hadi

    2014-01-01

    In this descriptive-analytical study, nitrogenous and algal oxygen demand were assessed for effluent from a system of facultative partially mixed lagoons followed by the polishing pond using 120 grab samples over 1 year. Filtered and non-filtered samples of polishing pond effluent were tested in the presence and absence of a nitrification inhibitor. Effective factors, including 5-day biochemical and chemical oxygen demand (BOD and COD), total suspended solids (TSS), dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll A, and temperature, were measured using standard methods for water and wastewater tests. The results were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance with SPSS version 16. Findings show that the annual mean of the total 5-day BOD in the effluent from the polishing pond consisted of 44.92% as the algal carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand (CBOD), 43.61% as the nitrogenous biochemical oxygen demand (NBOD), and 11.47% as the soluble CBOD. According to this study, the annual mean ratios of algal COD and 5-day algal CBOD to TSS were 0.8 and 0.37, respectively. As the results demonstrate, undertaking quality evaluation of the final effluent from the lagoons without considering nitrogenous and algal oxygen demand would undermine effluent quality assessment and interpretation of the performance of the wastewater treatment plant.

  4. Framework Design and Influencing Factor Analysis of a Water Environmental Functional Zone-Based Effluent Trading System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Han, Zhaoxing; Li, Shuang; Shen, Zhenyao

    2016-10-01

    The efficacy of traditional effluent trading systems is questionable due to their neglect of seasonal hydrological variation and the creation of upstream hot spots within a watershed. Besides, few studies have been conducted to distinguish the impacts of each influencing factor on effluent trading systems outputs. In this study, a water environmental functional zone-based effluent trading systems framework was configured and a comprehensive analysis of its influencing factors was conducted. This proposed water environmental functional zone-based effluent trading systems was then applied for the control of chemical oxygen demand in the Beiyun River watershed, Beijing, China. Optimal trading results highlighted the integration of water quality constraints and different hydrological seasons, especially for downstream dischargers. The optimal trading of each discharger, in terms of pollutant reduction load and abatement cost, is greatly influenced by environmental and political factors such as background water quality, the location of river assessment points, and tradable discharge permits. In addition, the initial permit allowance has little influence on the market as a whole but does impact the individual discharger. These results provide information that is critical to understanding the impact of policy design on the functionality of an effluent trading systems.

  5. Framework Design and Influencing Factor Analysis of a Water Environmental Functional Zone-Based Effluent Trading System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Han, Zhaoxing; Li, Shuang; Shen, Zhenyao

    2016-10-01

    The efficacy of traditional effluent trading systems is questionable due to their neglect of seasonal hydrological variation and the creation of upstream hot spots within a watershed. Besides, few studies have been conducted to distinguish the impacts of each influencing factor on effluent trading systems outputs. In this study, a water environmental functional zone-based effluent trading systems framework was configured and a comprehensive analysis of its influencing factors was conducted. This proposed water environmental functional zone-based effluent trading systems was then applied for the control of chemical oxygen demand in the Beiyun River watershed, Beijing, China. Optimal trading results highlighted the integration of water quality constraints and different hydrological seasons, especially for downstream dischargers. The optimal trading of each discharger, in terms of pollutant reduction load and abatement cost, is greatly influenced by environmental and political factors such as background water quality, the location of river assessment points, and tradable discharge permits. In addition, the initial permit allowance has little influence on the market as a whole but does impact the individual discharger. These results provide information that is critical to understanding the impact of policy design on the functionality of an effluent trading systems.

  6. A study conducted on the impact of effluent waste from machining process on the environment by water analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovoor, Punnose P.; Idris, Mohd Razif [Kuala Lumpur Univ. (Malaysia). Inst. of Product Design and Manufacturing, IPROM; Hassan, Masjuki Haji [Univ. of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Tengku Yahya, Tengku Fazli [Kuala Lumpur Univ., Melaka (Malaysia). Malaysian Inst. of Chemical and Bio Engineering Technology, MICET

    2012-11-01

    Ferrous block metals are used frequently in large quantities in various sectors of industry for making automotive, furniture, electrical and mechanical items, body parts for consumables, and so forth. During the manufacturing stage, the block metals are subjected to some form of material removal process either through turning, grinding, milling, or drilling operations to obtain the final product. Wastes are generated from the machining process in the form of effluent waste, solid waste, atmospheric emission, and energy emission. These wastes, if not recycled or treated properly before disposal, will have a detrimental impact on the environment through air, water, and soil pollution. The purpose of this paper is to determine the impact of the effluent waste from the machining process on the environment through water analysis. A twofold study is carried out to determine the impact of the effluent waste on the water stream. The preliminary study consists of a scenario analysis where five scenarios are drawn out using substances such as spent coolant, tramp oil, solvent, powdered chips, and sludge, which are commonly found in the effluent waste. The wastes are prepared according to the scenarios and are disposed through the Institute of Product Design and Manufacturing (IPROM) storm water drain. Samples of effluent waste are collected at specific locations according to the APHA method and are tested for parameters such as pH, ammoniacal nitrogen, dissolved oxygen, biochemical oxygen demand, chemical oxygen demand, and total suspended solids. A subsequent study is done by collecting 30 samples of the effluent waste from the machining operations from two small- and medium-scale enterprise locations and the IPROM workshop to test the quality of water. The results obtained from the tests showed high values of chemical oxygen demand, ammoniacal nitrogen, and total suspended solids when compared with the Standard B specification for inland water bodies as specified by the

  7. Hanford Facility dangerous waste permit application, liquid effluent retention facility and 200 area effluent treatment facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coenenberg, J.G.

    1997-08-15

    The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to 10 be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (document 11 number DOE/RL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. The scope of the 12 Unit-Specific Portion is limited to Part B permit application documentation 13 submitted for individual, `operating` treatment, storage, and/or disposal 14 units, such as the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility and 200 Area Effluent 15 Treatment Facility (this document, DOE/RL-97-03). 16 17 Both the General Information and Unit-Specific portions of the Hanford 18 Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application address the content of the Part B 19 permit application guidance prepared by the Washington State Department of 20 Ecology (Ecology 1987 and 1996) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 21 (40 Code of Federal Regulations 270), with additional information needs 22 defined by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments and revisions of 23 Washington Administrative Code 173-303. For ease of reference, the Washington 24 State Department of Ecology alpha-numeric section identifiers from the permit 25 application guidance documentation (Ecology 1996) follow, in brackets, the 26 chapter headings and subheadings. A checklist indicating where information is 27 contained in the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility and 200 Area Effluent 28 Treatment Facility permit application documentation, in relation to the 29 Washington State Department of Ecology guidance, is located in the Contents 30 Section. 31 32 Documentation contained in the General Information Portion is broader in 33 nature and could be used by multiple treatment, storage, and/or disposal units 34 (e.g., the glossary provided in the General Information Portion). Wherever 35 appropriate, the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility and 200 Area Effluent 36 Treatment Facility permit application documentation makes cross-reference to 37 the General Information Portion, rather than duplicating

  8. Treatment of the Bleaching Effluent from Sulfite Pulp Production by Ceramic Membrane Filtration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Ebrahimi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pulp and paper waste water is one of the major sources of industrial water pollution. This study tested the suitability of ceramic tubular membrane technology as an alternative to conventional waste water treatment in the pulp and paper industry. In this context, in series batch and semi-batch membrane processes comprising microfiltration, ultrafiltration and nanofiltration, ceramic membranes were developed to reduce the chemical oxygen demand (COD and remove residual lignin from the effluent flow during sulfite pulp production. A comparison of the ceramic membranes in terms of separation efficiency and performance revealed that the two-stage process configuration with microfiltration followed by ultrafiltration was most suitable for the efficient treatment of the alkaline bleaching effluent tested herein, reducing the COD concentration and residual lignin levels by more than 35% and 70%, respectively.

  9. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the plutonium uranium extraction facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiegand, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated at a minimum of every three years.

  10. Quality Assurance Project Plan for Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frazier, T.P.

    1994-10-20

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for the activities associated with the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, which are part of the overall Hanford Site Environmental Protection Plan. This plan specifically applies to the sampling and analysis activities and continuous monitoring performed for all Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan activities conducted by Westinghouse Hanford Company. It is generic in approach and will be implemented in conjunction with the specific requirements of the individual Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans.

  11. Effluent generation by the dairy industry: preventive attitudes and opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    V. B. Brião; C. R. Granhen Tavares

    2007-01-01

    Work aimed to identify the effluent is generating areas in a dairy company for purpose of changing concept pollution prevention. methodology consisted measuring volumes and collecting samples effluents production sectors. analysis was conducted by sector, order those which generated excessive amounts effluents. results show that dry products (powdered milk powdered whey) are greatest generators BOD, nitrogen phosphorus, while fluid form (UHT milk, formulated UHT, pasteurized cream) butter pro...

  12. Evaluation of membrane bioreactor process capabilities to meet stringent effluent nutrient discharge requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Edwin J; Broderick, Thomas A; Daigger, Glen T; Fonseca, Anabela D; Holbrook, R David; Murthy, Sudhir N

    2005-01-01

    A six-stage membrane bioreactor (MBR) pilot plant was operated to determine and demonstrate the capability of this process to produce a low-nutrient effluent, consistent with the nutrient reduction goals for the Chesapeake Bay. Biological nitrogen removal was accomplished using a multistage configuration with an initial anoxic zone (using the carbon in the influent wastewater), an aerobic zone (where nitrification occurred), a downstream anoxic zone (where methanol was added as a carbon source), and the aerated submerged membrane zone. The capability to reliably reduce effluent total nitrogen to less than 3 mg/L as nitrogen (N) was demonstrated. A combination of biological (using an initial anaerobic zone) and chemical (using alum) phosphorus removal was used to achieve effluent total phosphate concentrations reliably less than 0.1 mg/L as phosphorus (P) and as low as 0.03 mg/L as P. Alum addition also appeared to enhance the filtration characteristics of the MBR sludge and to reduce membrane fouling. Aeration of the submerged membranes results in thickened sludge with a high dissolved oxygen concentration (approaching saturation), which can be recycled to the main aeration zone rather than to an anoxic or anaerobic zone to optimize biological nutrient removal. Biological nutrient removal was characterized using the International Water Association Activated Sludge Model No. 2d. The stoichiometry of chemical phosphorus removal was also consistent with conventional theory and experience. The characteristics of the solids produced in the MBR were compared with those of a parallel full-scale conventional biological nitrogen removal process and were generally found to be similar. These results provide valuable insight to the design and operating characteristics of MBRs intended to produce effluents with very low nutrient concentrations.

  13. Characterisation of acute toxicity, genotoxicity and oxidative stress posed by textile effluent on zebrafish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenjuan Zhang; Wei Liu; Jing Zhang; Huimin Zhao; Yaobin Zhang; Xie Quan; Yihe Jin

    2012-01-01

    Textile industries are important sources of toxic discharges and contribute enormously to water deterioration,while little attention has been paid to the toxicity of textile effluents in discharge regulation.Bioassays with zebrafish were employed to evaluate the toxicity of wastewater samples collected from different stages at a textile factory and sewage treatment plants (STPs).Physico-chemical parameters,acute toxicity,genotoxicity and oxidative stress biomarkers were analyzed.The wastewater samples from bleaching,rinsing and soaping of the textile factory exhibited high acute toxicity and genotoxicity.The coexisting components of dye compounds,as assistants and oxidants,seemed to cause some effect on the toxic response.After treatment employing the anoxic-oxic (A/O) process in STPs,the color and the chemical oxygen demand (COD) were reduced by 40% and 84%,respectively,falling within the criteria of the Chinese Sewage Discharge Standard.In contrast,increases in acute toxicity and genotoxicity were observed in the anaerobic tank,indicating the formation of toxic intermediates.The genotoxicity of the effluent of the STP was not significantly different from that of the influent,suggesting the wastewater treatment processes were not effective in removing the genotoxicity of the dye wastewater.Results indicated that the effluent contains pro-oxidants since the activities of glutathione (GSH),malondialdehyde (MDA),and total anti-oxidation capacity (T-AOC) were all elevated.In addition,decreases in superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione-S transferase (GST) activities observed can be interpreted as a cytotoxicity sign due to an over-production of reactive oxygen species (ROS).The results of the present study suggest that the STPs were not capable of reducing the toxicity of wastewater sufficiently.Further treatment is needed to remove the potential risks posed by textile effluent to ecosystems and human health,and employing a toxicity index is necessary for

  14. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations for the 600 Area facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickels, J.M.

    1991-08-01

    This document determines the need for Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans for Westinghouse Hanford Company's 600 Area facilities on the Hanford Site. The Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations were prepared in accordance with A Guide For Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans (WHC 1991). Five major Westinghouse Hanford Company facilities in the 600 Area were evaluated: the Purge Water Storage Facility, 212-N, -P, and -R Facilities, the 616 Facility, and the 213-J K Storage Vaults. Of the five major facilities evaluated in the 600 Area, none will require preparation of a Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan.

  15. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the tank farm facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crummel, G.M.

    1998-05-18

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements.

  16. Quality Assurance Project Plan for Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickels, J.M.

    1991-06-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for the Facility Monitoring Plans of the overall site-wide environmental monitoring plan. This plan specifically applies to the sampling and analysis activities and continuous monitoring performed for all Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan activities conducted by Westinghouse Hanford Company. It is generic in approach and will be implemented in conjunction with the specific requirements of individual Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans. This document is intended to be a basic road map to the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan documents (i.e., the guidance document for preparing Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations, management plan, and Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans). The implementing procedures, plans, and instructions are appropriate for the control of effluent monitoring plans requiring compliance with US Department of Energy, US Environmental Protection Agency, state, and local requirements. This Quality Assurance Project Plan contains a matrix of organizational responsibilities, procedural resources from facility or site manuals used in the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, and a list of the analytes of interest and analytical methods for each facility preparing a Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan. 44 refs., 1 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Treatment of effluents from uranium oxide production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladeira, A C Q; Gonçalves, J S; Morais, C A

    2011-01-01

    The nuclear fuel cycle comprises a series of industrial processes which involve the production of electricity from uranium in nuclear power reactors. In Brazil the conversion of uranium hexafluoride (UF6) into uranium dioxide (UO2) takes place in Resende (RJ) at the Nuclear Fuel Factory (FCN). The process generates liquid effluents with significant concentrations of uranium, which might be treated before being discharged into the environment. This study investigates the recovery of uranium from three distinct liquid effluents: one with a high carbonate content and the other with an elevated fluoride concentration. This paper also presents a study on carbonate removal from an effluent that consists of a water-methanol solution generated during the filtration of the yellow cake (ammonium uranyl tricarbonate). The results showed that: (1) the uranium from the carbonated solution can be recovered through the ion exchange technique using the strong base anionic resin IRA 910-U, as the carbonate has been removed as CO2 after heating; (2) the most suitable technique to recover uranium from the fluoride solution is its precipitation as (NH4)2UO4F2 (ammonium fluorouranate peroxide), (3) the solution free of carbonate can be added to the fluoride solution and the uranium from the final solution can be recovered by precipitation as ammonium fluorouranate peroxide as well; (4) the carbonate from the water-methanol solution can be recovered as calcium carbonate through the addition of calcium chloride, or it can be recovered as ammonium sulphate through the addition of sulphuric acid. The ammonium sulphate product can be used as a fertilizer.

  18. 78 FR 48159 - Preliminary 2012 Effluent Guidelines Program Plan and 2011 Annual Effluent Guidelines Review Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-07

    ... captured and included as part of the comment that is placed in the public docket and made available on the... delist from the effluent guidelines plan the rulemaking for the Coalbed Methane Extraction subcategory... Regenerated Cellulose Manufacturers (previously categorized as Plastics Molding and Forming (40 CFR Part...

  19. Treatment of fatliquoring effluent from a tannery using membrane separation process: experimental and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhavathy, C; De, Sirshendu

    2010-04-15

    Treatment of fatliquoring effluent generated from a tannery, using a hybrid separation process involving gravity settling, two step coagulation, nanofiltration and reverse osmosis is presented in this study. The optimum dose of coagulation, i.e., 0.5% (w/v) of ferrous sulfate followed by 0.15% (w/v) calcium oxide resulted in reduction of chemical oxygen demand from 13,688 to 4921 mg/l. Low pressure nanofiltration of the supernatant was carried out in the range of 828-1242 kPa. Chemical oxygen demand of the nanofiltration permeate varied from about 1300-2700 mg/l depending upon the operating conditions. To bring the chemical oxygen demand value less than the allowable permissible limit in India (250 mg/l), nanofiltration permeate was subjected to reverse osmosis (operating pressure range from 1313 to 1724 kPa). The final treated effluent, i.e., reverse osmosis permeate had chemical oxygen demand values in the range of 117-174 mg/l. The membrane filtration experiments included flow in laminar, laminar with turbulent promoter and turbulent flow regimes. Using a combination of osmotic pressure and solution diffusion model for both nanofiltration and reverse osmosis, three transport coefficients, namely, the effective osmotic coefficient, solute diffusivity and solute permeability through the membrane were obtained by comparing the permeate flux and permeate concentrations using the model calculated values and the experimental data. The calculated data agreed closely with the experimental values.

  20. Removal of the organic content from a bleached kraft pulp mill effluent by a treatment with silica-alginate-fungi biocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Katia; Justino, Celine I L; Pereira, Ruth; Panteleitchouk, Teresa S L; Freitas, Ana C; Rocha-Santos, Teresa A P; Duarte, Armando C

    2013-01-01

    This study attempts a treatment strategy of a bleached kraft pulp mill effluent with Rhizopus oryzae or Pleurotus sajor caju encapsulated on silica-alginate (biocomposite of silica-alginate-fungi, with the purpose of reducing its potential impact in the environment. Active (alive) or inactive (death by sterilization) Rhizopus oryzae or Pleurotus sajor caju was encapsulated in alginate beads. Five beads containing active and inactive fungus were placed in a mold and filled with silica hydrogel (biocomposites). The biocomposites were added to batch reactors containing the bleached kraft pulp mill effluent. The treatment of bleached kraft pulp mill effluent by active and inactive biocomposites was performed throughout 29 days at 28°C. The efficiency of treatment was evaluated by measuring the removal of organic compounds, chemical oxygen demand and the relative absorbance ratio over time. Both fungi species showed potential for removal of organic compounds, colour and chemical oxygen demand. Maximum values of reduction in terms of colour (56%), chemical oxygen demand (65%) and organic compounds (72-79%) were attained after 29 days of treatment of bleached kraft pulp mill effluent by active Rhizopus oryzae biocomposites. The immobilization of fungi, the need for low fungal biomass, and the possibility of reutlization of the biocomposites clearly demonstrate the industrial and environmental interest in bleached kraft pulp mill effluent treatment by silica-alginate-fungi biocomposites.

  1. 40 CFR 469.15 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Semiconductor... best available technology economically achievable (BAT): Subpart A—Semiconductor BAT...

  2. Hydroponics reducing effluent's heavy metals discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rababah, Abdellah; Al-Shuha, Ahmad

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the capacity of Nutrient Film Technique (NFT) to control effluent's heavy metals discharge. A commercial hydroponic system was adapted to irrigate lettuces with primary treated wastewater for studying the potential heavy metals removal. A second commercial hydroponic system was used to irrigate the same type of lettuces with nutrient solution and this system was used as a control. Results showed that lettuces grew well when irrigated with primary treated effluent in the commercial hydroponic system. The NFT-plant system heavy metals removal efficiency varied amongst the different elements, The system's removal efficiency for Cr was more than 92%, Ni more than 85%, in addition to more than 60% reduction of B, Pb, and Zn. Nonetheless, the NFT-plants system removal efficiencies for As, Cd and Cu were lower than 30%. Results show that lettuces accumulated heavy metals in leaves at concentrations higher than the maximum acceptable European and Australian levels. Therefore, non-edible plants such as flowers or pyrethrum are recommended as value added crops for the proposed NFT.

  3. Fungal protein from corn waste effluents : a model study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, J.A.

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study the microbiological aspects of the production of microbial protein ('single cell protein'; SCP) from corn waste effluents with simultaneous reduction of the COD of these effluents.For practical reasons the corn waste water itself was not used in the exp

  4. Integrated treatment of farm effluents in New Zealand's dairy operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolan, N S; Laurenson, S; Luo, J; Sukias, J

    2009-11-01

    Maintaining growth through intensification in the New Zealand dairy industry is a challenge for various reasons, in particular sustainably managing the large volumes of effluent. Dairy farm effluents have traditionally been treated using two-pond systems that are effective in the removal of carbon and suspended solids, however limited in their ability to remove nutrients. In the past these nutrient-rich two-pond treated effluents were disposed of in surface waters. Current environmental concerns associated with the direct discharge of these effluents to surface waters has prompted in developing technologies to either minimise the nutrient content of the effluent or apply effluents to land. Here, we discuss various approaches and methods of treatment that enable producers to sustainably manage farm effluents, including advanced pond treatment systems, stripping techniques to reduce nutrient concentration, land application strategies involving nutrient budgeting models to minimise environmental degradation and enhance fodder quality. We also discuss alternative uses of farm effluents to produce energy and animal feed.

  5. Facility effluent monitoring plan for 242-A evaporator facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crummel, G.M.; Gustavson, R.D.

    1995-02-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the U.S. Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could affect employee or public safety or the environment. A facility effluent monitoring plan determination was performed during Calendar Year 1991 and the evaluation showed the need for a facility effluent monitoring plan. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-1. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated, as a minimum, every three years.

  6. Wet air oxidation induced enhanced biodegradability of distillery effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, S N; Saratchandra, T; Tembhekar, P D; Padoley, K V; Mudliar, S L; Mudliar, S N

    2014-04-01

    The present study reports the feasibility of Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) as a pretreatment option for enhanced biodegradation of complex distillery effluent. Initially, the distillery effluent was pretreated by WAO at different process conditions (pressure, temperature and time) to facilitate enhancement in the biodegradability index (BI = BOD5: COD ratio). The biodegradability of WAO pretreated effluent was evaluated by subjecting it to aerobic biodegradation and anaerobic followed by aerobic biodegradation. Aerobic biodegradation of pretreated effluent with enhanced biodegradability index (BI = 0.4-0.8) showed enhanced COD reduction of up to 67.7%, whereas the untreated effluent (BI = 0.17) indicated poor COD reduction of only 22.5%. Anaerobic followed by aerobic biodegradation of pretreated effluent has shown up to 87.9% COD reduction, while the untreated effluent has shown only 43.1% COD reduction. Bio-kinetic parameters also confirmed the increased rate of bio-oxidation at enhanced BIs. The results indicate that the WAO pretreatment facilitates enhanced bio-oxidation/bio-degradation of complex effluents like the distillery spent wash.

  7. Assessing Ecological Impacts of Shrimp and Sewage Effluent: Biological Indicators with Standard Water Quality Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. B.; O'Donohue, M. J.; Udy, J.; Dennison, W. C.

    2001-01-01

    flora indicated that sewage N extended further from the creek mouths than shrimp N. The combination of physical/chemical and biological indicators used in this study was effective in distinguishing the composition and subsequent impacts of aquaculture and sewage effluent on the receiving waters.

  8. Development of an analytical method for the determination of anthracyclines in hospital effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahnik, Susanne N; Rizovski, Blanka; Fuerhacker, Maria; Mader, Robert M

    2006-11-01

    Little is known about the fate of cytostatics after their elimination from humans into the environment. Being often very toxic compounds, their quantification in hospital effluents may be necessary to individualise the putative magnitude of pollution problems. We therefore developed a method for the determination of the very important group of anthracyclines (doxorubicin, epirubicin, and daunorubicin) in hospital effluents. Waste water samples were enriched by solid phase extraction (concentration factor 100), analysed by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), and monitored by fluorescence detection. This method is reproducible and accurate within a range of 0.1-5 micro g l(-1) for all compounds (limits of quantification: 0.26-0.29 micro g l(-1) ; recoveries >80%). The applicability of the method was proven by chemical analysis of hospital sewage samples (range: 0.1-1.4 micro g l(-1) epirubicin and 0.1-0.5 micro g l(-1) doxorubicin). Obtained over a time period of one month, the results were in line with those calculated by an input-output model. These investigations show that the examined cytostatics are easily detectable and that the presented method is suitable to estimate the dimension of pharmaceutical contamination originating from hospital effluents.

  9. Partial characterization of an effluent produced by cooking of Jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) mantle muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Romero, Zaidy G; Ramirez-Suarez, Juan C; Pacheco-Aguilar, Ramón; Lugo-Sánchez, Maria E; Carvallo-Ruiz, Gisela; García-Sánchez, Guillermina

    2010-01-01

    Jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) mantle muscle was cooked simulating industrial procedures (95 degrees C x 25 min, 1.2:5 muscle:water ratio). The effluent produced was analyzed for chemical and biochemical oxygen demands (COD and BOD(5), respectively), proximate analysis, flavor-related compounds (free amino acids, nucleotides and carbohydrates) and SDS-PAGE. The COD and BOD(5) exhibited variation among samplings (N=3) (27.4-118.5 g O(2)/L for COD and 11.3-26.7 g O(2)/L for BOD(5)). The effluent consisted of 1% total solids, 75% of which represented crude protein. Sixty percent of the total free amino acid content, which imparts flavor in squid species, corresponded to glutamic acid, serine, glycine, arginine, alanine, leucine and lysine. The nucleotide concentration followed this order, Hx>ADP>AMP>ATP>IMP>HxR. The variation observed in the present work was probably due to physiological maturity differences among the squid specimens (i.e., juvenile versus mature). Solids present in squid cooking effluent could be recovered and potentially used as flavor ingredients in squid-analog production by the food industry.

  10. Color, TOC and AOX removals from pulp mill effluent by advanced oxidation processes: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalkaya, Ebru Cokay; Kargi, Fikret

    2007-01-10

    Pulp mill effluent containing toxic chemicals was treated by different advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) consisting of treatments by hydrogen peroxide, Fenton's reagent (H2O2/Fe2+), UV, UV/H2O2, photo-Fenton (UV/H2O2/Fe2+), ozonation and peroxone (ozone/H2O2) in laboratory-scale reactors for color, total organic carbon (TOC) and adsorbable organic halogens (AOX) removals from the pulp mill effluent. Effects of some operating parameters such as the initial pH, oxidant and catalyst concentrations on TOC, color, AOX removals were investigated. Almost every method used resulted in some degree of color removal from the pulp mill effluent. However, the Fenton's reagent utilizing H2O2/Fe2+ resulted in the highest color, TOC and AOX removals under acidic conditions when compared with the other AOPs tested. Approximately, 88% TOC, 85% color and 89% AOX removals were obtained by the Fenton's reagent at pH 5 within 30 min. Photo-Fenton process yielded comparable TOC (85%), color (82%) and AOX (93%) removals within 5 min due to oxidations by UV light in addition to the Fenton's reagent. Fast oxidation reactions by the photo-Fenton treatment makes this approach more favorable as compared to the others used.

  11. Biosynthesis of titanium dioxide nanoparticles using a probiotic from coal fly ash effluent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babitha, S; Korrapati, Purna Sai, E-mail: purnasaik.clri@gmail.com

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Metal resistant probiotic species was isolated from coal fly ash effluent site. • Uniform sized anatase form of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were synthesized using Propionibacterium jensenii. • Diffraction patterns confirmed the anatase – TiO{sub 2} NPs with average size <80 nm. • TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle incorporated wound dressing exhibits better wound healing. - Abstract: The synthesis of titanium dioxide nanoparticle (TiO{sub 2} NP) has gained importance in the recent years owing to its wide range of potential biological applications. The present study demonstrates the synthesis of TiO{sub 2} NPs by a metal resistant bacterium isolated from the coal fly ash effluent. This bacterial strain was identified on the basis of morphology and 16s rDNA gene sequence [KC545833]. The physico-chemical characterization of the synthesized nanoparticles is completely elucidated by energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM, SEM). The crystalline nature of the nanoparticles was confirmed by X-RD pattern. Further, cell viability and haemolytic assays confirmed the biocompatible and non toxic nature of the NPs. The TiO{sub 2} NPs was found to enhance the collagen stabilization and thereby enabling the preparation of collagen based biological wound dressing. The paper essentially provides scope for an easy bioprocess for the synthesis of TiO{sub 2} NPs from the metal oxide enriched effluent sample for future biological applications.

  12. Treatment of Pulp Mill D-Stage Bleaching Effluent Using a Pilot-Scale Electrocoagulation System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perng, Yuan-Shing; Wang, Eugene I-Chen

    2016-03-01

    A pilot-scale study was conducted using electrocoagulation technology to treat chlorine dioxide bleaching-stage effluent of a local pulp mill, with the purpose of evaluating the treatment performance. The operating variables were the current density (0 ~ 133.3 A/m(2)) and hydraulic retention time (HRT, 6.5 ~ 16.25 minutes). Water quality indicators investigated were the conductivity, suspended solids (SS), chemical oxygen demand (COD), true color, and hardness. The results showed that electrocoagulation technology can be used to treat D-stage bleaching effluent for water reuse. Under the operating conditions studied, the removal of conductivity and COD always increased with increases in either the current density or HRT. The highest removals obtained at 133.3 A/m(2) and an HRT of 16.25 minutes for conductivity, SS, COD, true color, and hardness were respectively 44.2, 98.5, 75.0, 85.9, and 36.9% with aluminum electrodes. Iron electrodes were not applicable to the D-stage effluent due to formation of dark-colored ferric complexes.

  13. Palm oil mill effluent treatment using coconut shell – based activated carbon: Adsorption equilibrium and isotherm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaman Sherlynna Parveen Deshon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The current ponding system applied for palm oil mill effluent (POME treatment often struggle to comply with the POME discharge limit, thus it has become a major environmental concern. Batch adsorption study was conducted for reducing the Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD, Total Suspended Solids (TSS and Color of pre-treated POME using coconut shell-based activated carbon (CS-AC. The CS-AC showed BET surface area of 744.118 m2/g, with pore volume of 04359cm3/g. The adsorption uptake was studied at various contact time and POME initial concentration. The CS-AC exhibited good ability with average percentage removal of 70% for COD, TSS and Color. The adsorption uptake increased over time and attained equilibrium in 30 hours. The equilibrium data were analyzed using the Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Dubinin–Radushkevich isotherm models. Based on the coefficient regression and sum of squared errors, the Langmuir isotherm described the adsorption of COD satisfactorily, while best described the TSS and Color adsorption; giving the highest adsorption capacity of 10.215 mg/g, 1.435 mg/g, and 63.291 PtCo/g respectively. The CS-AC was shown to be a promising adsorbent for treating POME and was able to comply with the Environmental Quality Act (EQA discharge limit. The outcome of treated effluent using CS-AC was shown to be cleaner than the industrial biologically treated effluent, achieved within shorter treatment time.

  14. Potential of domestic sewage effluent treated as a source of water and nutrients in hydroponic lettuce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata da Silva Cuba

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The search for alternative sources of water for agriculture makes the use of treated sewage sludge an important strategy for achieving sustainability. This study evaluated the feasibility of reusing treated sewage effluent as alternative source of water and nutrients for the hydroponic cultivation of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. The experiment was conducted in the greenhouse of the Center for Agricultural Sciences - UFSCar, in Araras, SP. The cultivation took place from February to March 2014. The hydroponic system used was the Nutrient Film Technique, and included three treatments: 1 water supply and mineral fertilizers (TA; 2 use of effluent treated and complemented with mineral fertilizers based on results of previous chemical analysis (TRA; and 3 use of treated effluent (TR. The applied experimental design was four randomly distributed blocks. We evaluated the fresh weight, nutritional status, the microbiological quality of the culture, and the amount of mineral fertilizers used in the treatments. The fresh weights were subjected to analysis of variance and means were compared by the Tukey test at 5% probability. Only the TR treatment showed a significant difference in the evaluated variables, as symptoms of nutritional deficiencies in plants and significant reduction in fresh weights (p <0.01 were found. There was no detectable presence of Escherichia coli in any treatment, and it was possible to use less of some fertilizers in the TRA treatment compared to TA.

  15. COLLOIDS IN SEPTIC TANK EFFLUENT AND THEIR INFLUENCE ON FILTER PERMEABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Spychała

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the content of colloids in septic tank effluent and their impact on textile filter permeability. Measurements were performed on septic tank effluent without suspended solids but containing colloids and without colloids - including only dissolved substances (filtered by micro-filters and centrifuged. The study was conducted on unclogged and clogged textile filter coupons. During the study the following measurements were determined: turbidity, chemical oxygen demand and hydraulic conductivity of textile filter coupons. The colloid size range was assumed to be less than 1.2 microns according to the literature. Despite the relatively low content in the septic tank effluent the colloids played an important role in the clogging process. Both the filtering media, filled with low (unclogged and high content of biomass (clogged were sensitive to the clogging process of colloid acceleration due to the possibility of small diameter pore closure and oxygen access termination. Moreover, small size pores were probably sensitive to closing or bridging by small size colloidal particles.

  16. Removal of stigmasterol from Kraft mill effluent by aerobic biological treatment with steroidal metabolite detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamorro, Soledad; Vergara, Juan P; Jarpa, Mayra; Hernandez, Victor; Becerra, Jose; Vidal, Gladys

    2016-10-14

    Stigmasterol is a phytosterol contained in Kraft mill effluent that is able to increase over 100% after aerobic biological treatment. This compound can act as an endocrine disrupter as its structure is similar to that of cholesterol. The aim of this study was to evaluate the removal of stigmasterol from Kraft mill effluents treated by a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) with steroidal metabolite detection. The MBBR was operated for 145 days, with a hydraulic retention time of 2 days. Stigmasterol and steroidal metabolites were detected by gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector during MBBR operation. The results show that the MBBR removed 87.4% of biological oxygen demand (BOD5), 61.5% of chemical oxygen demand (COD), 24.5% of phenol and 31.5% of lignin, expressed in average values. The MBBR system successfully removed 100% of the stigmasterol contained in the influent (33 µg L(-1)) after 5 weeks of operation. In that case, the organic load rate was 0.343 kg COD m(-3) d(-1). Furthermore, different steroidal compounds (e.g., testosterone propionate, stigmast-4-en-3-one, 5α-pregnan-12-one-20α-hydroxy, 5α-pregnane-3,11,20-trione and 3α-hydroxy-5α-androstane-11,17-dione were detected in the Kraft mill effluent as potential products of phytosterol biotransformation.

  17. Development of microbial consortium for the biodegradation and biodecolorization of textile effluents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra Ramasany

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In the current study three bacterial species (Bacillus sp., Pseudomonas sp., and Alcaligenes sp. and two fungal species (Aspergillus sp., and Penicillium sp. screened from 265 bacterial isolates and 35 fungal isolates respectively, were used in 23 different combinations for the biotreatment of textile waste water collected from Karur, Tiruppur and Coimbatore districts under aerated conditions. The chemical oxygen demand (COD, total solids (TS total dissolved solids (TDS & total suspended solids (TSS, hardness, and color intensity of the textile effluent was found to be very high than the permissible limits before treatment. After treatment one particular combination was capable of reducing the COD of the effluent sample by 75%. About five combinations of microbes efficiently reduced the color of the effluent by more than 50%. Another combination was found to be the most effective in the reduction of TS and TDS by 90% and 69%, respectively. Though there was no drastic change in the pH of the sample, it was not of great concern as the pH of the sample was well within the permissible limits for the discharge of the wastewater in to natural sources after treatment.

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF MICROBIAL CONSORTIUM FOR THE BIODEGRADATION AND BIODECOLORIZATION OF TEXTILE EFFLUENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra Ramasany

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the current study three bacterial species (Bacillus sp., Pseudomonas sp., and Alcaligenes sp. and two fungal species (Aspergillus sp., and Penicillium sp. screened from 265 bacterial isolates and 35 fungal isolates respectively, were used in 23 different combinations for the biotreatment of textile waste water collected from Karur, Tiruppur and Coimbatore districts under aerated conditions. The chemical oxygen demand (COD, total solids (TS total dissolved solids (TDS & total suspended solids (TSS, hardness, and color intensity of the textile effluent was found to be very high than the permissible limits before treatment. After treatment one particular combination was capable of reducing the COD of the effluent sample by 75%. About five combinations of microbes efficiently reduced the color of the effluent by more than 50%. Another combination was found to be the most effective in the reduction of TS and TDS by 90% and 69%, respectively. Though there was no drastic change in the pH of the sample, it was not of great concern as the pH of the sample was well within the permissible limits for the discharge of the wastewater in to natural sources after treatment.

  19. Recovery of volatile fatty acids (VFA) from complex waste effluents using membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharof, M-P; Lovitt, R W

    2014-01-01

    Waste effluents from anaerobic digesters of agricultural waste were treated with a range of membranes, including microfiltration and nanofiltration (NF), to concentrate volatile fatty acids (VFA). Microfiltration was applied successfully to produce sterile, particle-free solutions with a VFA concentration of 21.08 mM of acetic acid and 15.81 mM of butyric acid. These were further treated using a variety of NF membranes: NF270 (Dow Chemicals, USA), HL, DL, DK (Osmonics, USA) and LF10 (Nitto Denko, Japan), achieving retention ratios of up to 75%, and giving retentates of up to 53.94 mM of acetate and 28.38 mM of butyrate. DK and NF270 membranes were identified as the best candidates for VFA separation and concentration from these multicomponent effluents, both in terms of retention and permeate flux. When the effluents are adjusted to alkali conditions, the highest productivity, retention and flux were achieved at pH 7. At higher pH there was a significant reduction in flux.

  20. Chemical industrial wastewater treated by combined biological and chemical oxidation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guomin, Cao; Guoping, Yang; Mei, Sheng; Yongjian, Wang

    2009-01-01

    Wastewaters from phenol and rubber synthesis were treated by the activated sludge process in a large-scale chemical factory in Shanghai, but the final effluent quality cannot conform with the local discharge limit without using river water for dilution. Therefore, this chemical factory had to upgrade its wastewater treatment plant. To fully use the present buildings and equipment during upgrading of the chemical factory's wastewater treatment plant and to save operation costs, a sequential biological pre-treatement, chemical oxidation, and biological post-treatment (or BCB for short) process had been proposed and investigated in a pilot trial. The pilot trial results showed that about 80% COD in the chemical wastewater could be removed through anoxic and aerobic degradation in the biological pre-treatement section, and the residual COD in the effluent of the biological pre-treatment section belongs to refractory chemicals which cannot be removed by the normal biological process. The refractory chemicals were partial oxidized using Fenton's reagent in the chemical oxidation section to improve their biodegradability; subsequently the wastewater was treated by the SBR process in the biological post-treatment section. The final effluent COD reached the first grade discharge limit (process, the operation cost of the BCB process increased by about 0.5 yuan (RMB) per cubic metre wastewater, but about 1,240,000 m(3) a(-1) dilution water could be saved and the COD emission could be cut down by 112 tonne each year.

  1. A novel thermotolerant Pediococcus acidilactici B-25 strain for color, COD, and BOD reduction of distillery effluent for end use applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Soni; Rai, Priyanka; Yadav, Santosh Kumar; Gaur, Rajeeva

    2013-06-01

    The present study was aimed to characterize physico-chemical and microbial population of distillery effluent and isolate a novel thermotolerant bacterium for color, COD, and BOD reduction of spentwash. The level of alkalinity, TSS, DO, COD, BOD, TN, ammonical nitrogen, nitrate nitrogen, phosphorous, potassium, chloride, and calcium of spentwash (SW), bioreactor effluent (BE), and secondary treated effluent (STE) were well above the permissible limits. The level of color, TS, and TDS were under the permissible limits for STE but not for SW and BE. The microbial population was higher in BE. The results revealed that effluent was highly polluted and require suitable treatment before discharge. A novel thermotolerant bacterium, identified as Pediococcus acidilactici, was isolated which exhibited maximum 79 % decolorization, 85 % COD, and 94 % BOD reduction at 45 °C using 0.1 %, glucose; 0.1 %, peptone; 0.05 %, MgSO4; 0.05 %, K2HPO4; pH 6.0 within 24 h under static condition. The ability of this strain to decolorize melanoidin at minimum carbon and nitrogen supplementation warrants its possible application for effluent treatment at industrial level. In addition, it is first instance when melanoidin decolorization was reported by P. acidilactici. This study could be an approach towards control of environmental pollution and health hazards of people in and around the effluent distillery unit.

  2. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the tank farms facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachand, D.D.; Crummel, G.M.

    1995-05-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using specific guidelines. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated as a minimum every three years.

  3. Asymptomatic Effluent Protozoa Colonization in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões-Silva, Liliana; Correia, Inês; Barbosa, Joana; Santos-Araujo, Carla; Sousa, Maria João; Pestana, Manuel; Soares-Silva, Isabel; Sampaio-Maia, Benedita

    Currently, chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a global health problem. Considering the impaired immunity of CKD patients, the relevance of infection in peritoneal dialysis (PD), and the increased prevalence of parasites in CKD patients, protozoa colonization was evaluated in PD effluent from CKD patients undergoing PD. Overnight PD effluent was obtained from 49 asymptomatic stable PD patients. Protozoa analysis was performed microscopically by searching cysts and trophozoites in direct wet mount of PD effluent and after staining smears. Protozoa were found in PD effluent of 10.2% of evaluated PD patients, namely Blastocystis hominis, in 2 patients, and Entamoeba sp., Giardia sp., and Endolimax nana in the other 3 patients, respectively. None of these patients presented clinical signs or symptoms of peritonitis at the time of protozoa screening. Our results demonstrate that PD effluent may be susceptible to asymptomatic protozoa colonization. The clinical impact of this finding should be further investigated.

  4. Nanofiltration based water reclamation from tannery effluent following coagulation pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, J; Mondal, D; Chakraborty, S; Sikder, J; Curcio, S; Arafat, H A

    2015-11-01

    Coagulation-nanofiltration based integrated treatment scheme was employed in the present study to maximize the removal of toxic Cr(VI) species from tannery effluents. The coagulation pretreatment step using aluminium sulphate hexadecahydrate (alum) was optimized by response surface methodology (RSM). A nanofiltration unit was integrated with this coagulation pre-treatment unit and the resulting flux decline and permeate quality were investigated. Herein, the coagulation was conducted under response surface-optimized operating conditions. The hybrid process demonstrated high chromium(VI) removal efficiency over 98%. Besides, fouling of two of the tested nanofiltration membranes (NF1 and NF3) was relatively mitigated after feed pretreatment. Nanofiltration permeation fluxes as high as 80-100L/m(2)h were thereby obtained. The resulting permeate stream quality post nanofiltration (NF3) was found to be suitable for effective reuse in tanneries, keeping the Cr(VI) concentration (0.13mg/L), Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD) (65mg/L), Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) (142mg/L), Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) (108mg/L), Total Solids (TS) (86mg/L) and conductivity levels (14mho/cm) in perspective. The process water reclaiming ability of nanofiltration was thereby substantiated and the effectiveness of the proposed hybrid system was thus affirmed.

  5. The possibility of palm oil mill effluent for biogas production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EDWI MAHAJOENO

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The world currently obtains its energy from the fossil fuels such as oil, natural gas and coal. However, the international crisis in the Middle East, rapid depletion of fossil fuel reserves as well as climate change have driven the world towards renewable energy sources which are abundant, untapped and environmentally friendly. Indonesia has abundant biomass resources generated from the agricultural industry particularly the large commodity, palm oil (Elaeis guiinensis Jacq.. The aims of the research were to (i characterize palm oil mill effluent which will be used as source of biogas production, (ii know the biotic and abiotic factors which effect POME substrate for biogas production by anaerobic digestion in bulk system. The results show that POME sludge generated from PT Pinago Utama mill is viscous, brown or grey and has an average total solid (TS content of, 26.5-45.4, BOD is 23.5-29.3, COD is 49.0-63.6 and SS is 17.1-35.9 g/L, respectively. This substrate is a potential source of environmental pollutants. The biotic factors were kind and concentration of the inoculums, i.e. seed sludge of anaerobic lagoon II and 20% (w/v respectively. Both physical and chemical factors such as pre-treated POME pH, pH neutralizer matter Ca (OH2, temperature ≥40oC, agitation effect to increase biogas production, but in both coagulant concentration, FeCl2 were not.

  6. Optimization of electrocoagulation process to treat biologically pretreated bagasse effluent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thirugnanasambandham K.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the present study was to investigate the efficiency of electrocoagulation process as a post-treatment to treat biologically pretreated bagasse effluent using iron electrodes. The removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD and total suspended solids (TSS were studied under different operating conditions such as amount of dilution, initial pH, applied current and electrolyte dose by using response surface methodology (RSM coupled with four-factor three-level Box-Behnken experimental design (BBD. The experimental results were analyzed by Pareto analysis of variance (ANOVA and second order polynomial mathematical models were developed with high correlation of efficiency (R2 for COD, TSS removal and electrical energy consumption (EEC. The individual and combined effect of variables on responses was studied using three dimensional response surface plots. Under the optimum operating conditions, such as amount of dilution at 30 %, initial pH of 6.5, applied current of 8 mA cm-2 and electrolyte dose of 740 mg l-1 shows the higher removal efficiency of COD (98 % and TSS (93 % with EEC of 2.40 Wh, which were confirmed by validation experiments.

  7. 40 CFR 420.122 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS IRON AND STEEL MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Hot Coating... application of the best practicable control technology currently available (BPT). Except as provided in 40 CFR... degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best practicable control...

  8. 40 CFR 420.93 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS IRON AND STEEL MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Acid Pickling... application of the best available technology economically achievable (BAT). Except as provided in 40 CFR 125... degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best available technology...

  9. 40 CFR 420.23 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS IRON AND STEEL MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Sintering... representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best available technology... by the application of the best available technology economically achievable (BAT). Except as...

  10. 40 CFR 420.113 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS IRON AND STEEL MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Alkaline... degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best available technology economically... attainable by the application of the best available technology economically achievable (BAT). The Agency...

  11. 40 CFR 420.63 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS IRON AND STEEL MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Continuous Casting... application of the best available technology economically achievable (BAT). Except as provided in 40 CFR 125... degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best available technology...

  12. 40 CFR 420.123 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS IRON AND STEEL MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Hot Coating... application of the best available technology economically achievable (BAT). Except as provided in 40 CFR 125... degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best available technology...

  13. 40 CFR 420.42 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS IRON AND STEEL MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Steelmaking... application of the best practicable control technology currently available (BPT). Except as provided in 40 CFR... degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best practicable control...

  14. 40 CFR 420.13 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS IRON AND STEEL MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Cokemaking... representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best available technology... by the application of the best available technology economically achievable (BAT). Except as...

  15. 40 CFR 420.82 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS IRON AND STEEL MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Salt Bath... degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best practicable control technology... by the application of the best practicable control technology currently available (BPT). Except...

  16. 40 CFR 420.112 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS IRON AND STEEL MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Alkaline... degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best practicable control technology... attainable by the application of the best practicable control technology currently available (BPT). Except...

  17. 40 CFR 420.83 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS IRON AND STEEL MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Salt Bath Descaling... application of the best available technology economically achievable (BAT). Except as provided in 40 CFR 125... degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best available technology...

  18. 40 CFR 420.43 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS IRON AND STEEL MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Steelmaking... application of the best available technology economically achievable (BAT). Except as provided in 40 CFR 125... degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best available technology...

  19. 40 CFR 420.53 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS IRON AND STEEL MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Vacuum Degassing... application of the best available technology economically achievable (BAT). Except as provided in 40 CFR 125... degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best available technology...

  20. 40 CFR 420.103 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS IRON AND STEEL MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Cold Forming...) Cold worked pipe and tube—(1) Using water. Subpart J Pollutant or pollutant property BAT effluent... for lead and zinc when cold forming wastewaters are treated with descaling or combination...

  1. 40 CFR 420.102 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS IRON AND STEEL MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Cold Forming.... (b) Cold worked pipe and tube—(1) Using water. Subpart J Pollutant of pollutant property BPT effluent... and nickel shall be applicable in lieu of those for lead and zinc when cold forming wastewaters...

  2. 40 CFR 471.91 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS NONFERROUS METALS FORMING AND METAL POWDERS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Zirconium-Hafnium Forming Subcategory § 471.91 Effluent limitations representing the degree of... Within the range of 7.5 to 10.0 at all times. (g) Tube Reducing Spent Lubricant—Subpart I—BPT. (1)...

  3. 40 CFR 417.153 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... operation of spray drying towers as defined above, the following values pertain: Effluent characteristic...) 1 Within the range 6.0 to 9.0. (b) For air quality restricted operation of a spray drying tower, but... Manufacture of Spray Dried Detergents Subcategory § 417.153 Effluent limitations guidelines representing...

  4. 40 CFR 417.63 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS SOAP AND DETERGENT MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Manufacture of Soap Flakes and Powders Subcategory § 417.63 Effluent limitations guidelines representing the... 0.02 .01 Oil and grease 0.02 .01 pH (1) (1) English units (pounds per 1,000 lb of anhydrous...

  5. 40 CFR 417.62 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS SOAP AND DETERGENT MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Manufacture of Soap Flakes and Powders Subcategory § 417.62 Effluent limitations guidelines...) BOD5 0.03 0.01 COD 0.15 .05 TSS 0.03 .01 Oil and grease 0.03 .01 pH (1) (1) English units (pounds per...

  6. 40 CFR 417.12 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS SOAP AND DETERGENT MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Soap Manufacturing by Batch Kettle Subcategory § 417.12 Effluent limitations guidelines...) BOD5 1.80 0.60 COD 4.50 1.50 TSS 1.20 .40 Oil and grease 0.30 .10 pH (1) (1) English units (pounds...

  7. 40 CFR 417.32 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS SOAP AND DETERGENT MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Soap Manufacturing by Fatty Acid Neutralization Subcategory § 417.32 Effluent limitations... anhydrous product) BOD5 0.03 0.01 COD 0.15 .05 TSS 0.06 .02 Oil and grease 0.03 .01 pH (1) (1) English...

  8. The effluent problem in a plutonium production centre; Probleme des effluents d'un centre de production de plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galley, R.; Cantel, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-07-01

    The first part of the report is devoted to generalities: the geographical situation of the Marcoule Centre, the sources of radio-active effluent, methods of treating this effluent. In the second part the authors gives a detailed description of the various installations in the Radio-active Effluent Treatment Station at the Marcoule Centre, and outline the conditions governing the rejection of treated effluent into the Rhone. A few lines are given to comparisons between the results obtained from the use of these installations up till may 1959 and the expected results published by the same authors at the Brussels Conference (1956). In conclusion the authors lay down some of the essential principles, applicable to the study of new installations. (author) [French] La premiere partie du rapport est consacree a quelques generalites: situation geographique du Centre de Marcoule, provenance des effluents radioactifs, methodes de traitement de ces effluents. Dans la seconde partie, les auteurs presentent une description detaillee des diverses installations de la Station de Traitement des Effluents radioactifs du Centre de Marcoule et precisent les conditions de rejet dans le Rhone des effluents radioactifs traites. Quelques lignes sont consacrees aux comparaisons entre les resultats de l'exploitation des installations jusqu'en mai 1959 et les previsions publiees par les memes auteurs a l'occasion de la Conference de Bruxelles (1956). En conclusion, les auteurs donnent quelques principes essentiels, applicables a l'etude de nouvelles installations. (auteur)

  9. 40 CFR 435.44 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... drilling fluids, drill cuttings, and dewatering effluent Free Oil No discharge. 2 Non-aqueous drilling... Free Oil No discharge. 2 Well Treatment, Workover and Completion Fluids Free Oil No discharge. 2... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS OIL AND GAS EXTRACTION POINT SOURCE CATEGORY...

  10. 40 CFR 422.57 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Phosphoric Acid Subcategory § 422.57 Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent... discharge of process waste water pollutants to navigable waters. (b) Process waste water pollutants from a... to the runoff from the 25-year, 24-hour rainfall event may be discharged, after treatment to...

  11. 40 CFR 422.53 - Effluent limitations and guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Phosphoric Acid Subcategory § 422.53 Effluent limitations and guidelines representing the degree of effluent... discharge of process wastewater pollutants to navigable waters. (b) Process waste water pollutants from a... to the runoff from the 25-year, 24-hour rainfall event may be discharged, after treatment to...

  12. 40 CFR 434.54 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effluent limitations guidelines... control technology (BCT). 434.54 Section 434.54 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS COAL MINING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY BPT, BAT, BCT LIMITATIONS...

  13. 40 CFR 434.52 - Effluent limitations quidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effluent limitations quidelines... technology currently available (BPT). 434.52 Section 434.52 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS COAL MINING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY BPT,...

  14. 40 CFR 405.112 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... application of the best practicable control technology currently available (BPT): (a) For whey condensing... representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best practicable control... Condensed Whey Subcategory § 405.112 Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of...

  15. 40 CFR 405.122 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... application of the best practicable control technology currently available (BPT): (a) For whey drying plants... representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best practicable control... Whey Subcategory § 405.122 Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of...

  16. 40 CFR 421.283 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....214 Lead 0.098 0.046 Nickel 0.193 0.130 Zinc 0.357 0.147 Tantalum 0.158 (e) Leaching wet air pollution... Tantalum Subcategory § 421.283 Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent... application of the best available technology economically achievable: (a) Tantalum alloy leach and rinse....

  17. 40 CFR 421.112 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... to 10.0 at all times. (i) Subpart K—Reduction of Tantalum Salt to Metal Wet Air Pollution Control... CATEGORY Primary Columbium-Tantalum Subcategory § 421.112 Effluent limitations guidelines representing the... K—Concentrate Digestion Wet Air Pollution Control. BPT Effluent Limitations Pollutant or...

  18. 40 CFR 430.54 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... ammonium-based sulfite pulp segment with respect to each fiber line that uses exclusively TCF bleaching... effluent limitations apply to dischargers in the specialty grade pulp segment with respect to each fiber...) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS THE PULP, PAPER, AND PAPERBOARD POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Papergrade...

  19. 40 CFR 430.103 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS THE PULP, PAPER, AND PAPERBOARD POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Secondary Fiber Non-Deink Subcategory § 430.103 Effluent limitations guidelines representing the...). (b) For secondary fiber non-deink facilities where paperboard from wastepaper is produced,...

  20. 40 CFR 430.24 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS THE PULP, PAPER, AND PAPERBOARD POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Bleached Papergrade... (b) of this section— (1) The following effluent limitations apply with respect to each fiber line... to each fiber line that uses exclusively TCF bleaching processes, as disclosed by the discharger...

  1. 40 CFR 428.63 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effluent limitations guidelines... economically achievable. 428.63 Section 428.63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Medium-Sized...

  2. 40 CFR 428.62 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effluent limitations guidelines... technology currently available. 428.62 Section 428.62 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY...

  3. 40 CFR 421.323 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 90.860 (c) Solvent extraction raffinate filtrate. BAT Limitations for the Secondary Uranium... Uranium Subcategory § 421.323 Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent... Limitations for the Secondary Uranium Subcategory Pollutant or pollutant property Maximum for any 1...

  4. 40 CFR 471.46 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effluent limitations representing the... technology (BCT). 471.46 Section 471.46 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS NONFERROUS METALS FORMING AND METAL POWDERS POINT SOURCE...

  5. 40 CFR 471.102 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effluent limitations representing the... achievable (BAT). 471.102 Section 471.102 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS NONFERROUS METALS FORMING AND METAL POWDERS POINT...

  6. 40 CFR 471.26 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effluent limitations representing the... technology (BCT). 471.26 Section 471.26 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS NONFERROUS METALS FORMING AND METAL POWDERS POINT SOURCE...

  7. 40 CFR 421.252 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Effluent limitations guidelines... technology currently available. 421.252 Section 421.252 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS NONFERROUS METALS MANUFACTURING POINT...

  8. 40 CFR 471.66 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effluent limitations representing the... technology (BCT). 471.66 Section 471.66 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS NONFERROUS METALS FORMING AND METAL POWDERS POINT SOURCE...

  9. 40 CFR 471.56 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effluent limitations representing the... technology (BCT). 471.56 Section 471.56 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS NONFERROUS METALS FORMING AND METAL POWDERS POINT SOURCE...

  10. 40 CFR 471.51 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effluent limitations representing the... currently available (BPT). 471.51 Section 471.51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS NONFERROUS METALS FORMING AND METAL POWDERS POINT...

  11. 40 CFR 471.81 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effluent limitations representing the... currently available (BPT). 471.81 Section 471.81 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS NONFERROUS METALS FORMING AND METAL POWDERS POINT...

  12. 40 CFR 471.22 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effluent limitations representing the... achievable (BAT). 471.22 Section 471.22 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS NONFERROUS METALS FORMING AND METAL POWDERS POINT SOURCE...

  13. 40 CFR 471.42 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effluent limitations representing the... achievable (BAT). 471.42 Section 471.42 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS NONFERROUS METALS FORMING AND METAL POWDERS POINT SOURCE...

  14. 40 CFR 421.263 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Effluent limitations guidelines... economically achievable. 421.263 Section 421.263 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS NONFERROUS METALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY...

  15. 40 CFR 471.62 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effluent limitations representing the... achievable (BAT). 471.62 Section 471.62 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS NONFERROUS METALS FORMING AND METAL POWDERS POINT SOURCE...

  16. 40 CFR 471.106 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effluent limitations representing the... technology (BCT). 471.106 Section 471.106 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS NONFERROUS METALS FORMING AND METAL POWDERS POINT...

  17. 40 CFR 421.262 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Effluent limitations guidelines... technology currently available. 421.262 Section 421.262 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS NONFERROUS METALS MANUFACTURING POINT...

  18. 40 CFR 471.41 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effluent limitations representing the... currently available (BPT). 471.41 Section 471.41 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS NONFERROUS METALS FORMING AND METAL POWDERS POINT...

  19. 40 CFR 471.101 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effluent limitations representing the... currently available (BPT). 471.101 Section 471.101 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS NONFERROUS METALS FORMING AND METAL POWDERS POINT...

  20. Losses through gases and effluent and nutritional value of Brachiaria decumbens with addition of soybean hulls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Clayton Oliveira Dantas

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this experiment was to evaluate the losses of nutrient through gases and effluents, the nutrient recovery, fermentation parameters and the chemical parameters of silages of Brachiaria decumbens with the addition of soybean hulls, testing five levels of inclusion: 0, 10, 20, 30 and 40% (as is, with five replications per treatment. After the standardization cut of the forage, performed at 5 cm from the soil level, the soil was fertilized with nitrogen and potassium in the form of ammonium sulfate and potassium chloride, respectively, at 60 kg/ha. After 60 days, the grass was cut at 10 cm from the soil and ensiled. Experimental silos with capacity of 10 liters with Bunsen valve were used. Silos had 3 kg of sand conditioned at the bottom for retention of the effluents. The results show that the contents of dry matter, crude protein, acid detergent insoluble fiber and total digestible nutrients presented positive linear behavior with the inclusion of soybean hulls. In the grass silages with addition of soybean hulls, there was greater recovery of dry matter in relation to the control silage, which is a reflection of the negative linear behavior for the values of losses of gases and effluent. There was quadratic behavior in the pH values and negative linear behavior for the ammonia N values and buffering capacity with the inclusion of the additive in the grass silage. Inclusion of soybean hulls is sufficient to improve the fermentation pattern and minimize the losses through gases and effluents, contributing to the nutrient recovery, in addition to promoting overall improvement of the nutritional value of Brachiaria grass silages.

  1. Treatment of turtle aquaculture effluent by an improved multi-soil-layer system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ying; Huang, Yu-ting; Ji, Hong-fang; Nie, Xin-jun; Zhang, Zhi-yuan; Ge, Chuan; Luo, An-cheng; Chen, Xin

    2015-02-01

    Concentrated turtle aquaculture effluent poses an environmental threat to water bodies, and therefore needs to be treated prior to disposal. This study was conducted to assess the effect of multi-soil-layer (MSL) systems treating turtle aquaculture effluent with adding different amounts of sludge. Four MSL systems were constructed with dry weight ratios of sludge with 0%, 5%, 10%, and 20% (MSL 1, MSL 2, MSL 3, and MSL 4, respectively). The turtle aquaculture effluent had an average chemical oxygen demand (COD), ammonia nitrogen (NH4(+)-N) and total nitrogen (TN) concentration of 288.4, 213.4, and 252.0 mg/L, respectively. The COD/TN (C/N) ratio was 1.2. The results showed that the four MSL systems could effectively treat the COD, NH4(+)-N, and TN, and MSL 4 showed significantly improved NH4(+)-N removal efficiency, suggesting the potential of sludge addition to improve the turtle aquaculture effluent treatment. The average COD, TN, and NH4(+)-N removal efficiencies of MSL 4 were 70.3%, 66.5%, and 72.7%, respectively. To further interpret the contribution of microorganisms to the removal, the microbial community compositions and diversities of the four MSL systems were measured. Comparisons of the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiles revealed that the amount of nitrifying bacteria and diversity in MSL 4 were higher than those in the other three systems. We concluded that adding 20% of sludge improved the NH4(+)-N removal and stability of the system for nitrification, due to the enrichment of the nitrifying bacteria in MSL 4.

  2. Conventional methods and emerging wastewater polishing technologies for palm oil mill effluent treatment: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Wai Loan; Kassim, Mohd Azraai; Muda, Khalida; Loh, Soh Kheang; Affam, Augustine Chioma

    2015-02-01

    The Malaysian palm oil industry is a major revenue earner and the country is ranked as one of the largest producers in the world. However, growth of the industry is synonymous with a massive production of agro-industrial wastewater. As an environmental protection and public health concern, the highly polluting palm oil mill effluent (POME) has become a major attention-grabber. Hence, the industry is targeting for POME pollution abatement in order to promote a greener image of palm oil and to achieve sustainability. At present, most palm oil mills have adopted the ponding system for treatment. Due to the successful POME pollution abatement experiences, Malaysia is currently planning to revise the effluent quality standards towards a more stringent discharge limits. Hence, the current trend of POME research focuses on developing tertiary treatment or polishing systems for better effluent management. Biotechnologically-advanced POME tertiary (polishing) technologies as well as other physicochemical methods are gaining much attention as these processes are the key players to push the industry towards the goal of environmental sustainability. There are still ongoing treatment technologies being researched and the outcomes maybe available in a while. However, the research completed so far are compiled herein and reported for the first time to acquire a better perspective and insight on the subject with a view of meeting the new standards. To this end, the most feasible technology could be the combination of advanced biological processes (bioreactor systems) with extended aeration, followed by solids separation prior to discharge. Chemical dosing is favoured only if effluent of higher quality is anticipated.

  3. Comparison of the MBBR denitrification carriers for advanced nitrogen removal of wastewater treatment plant effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Quan; Wang, Haiyan; Hang, Qianyu; Deng, Yangfan; Liu, Kai; Li, Chunmei; Zheng, Shengzhi

    2015-09-01

    The moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBRs) were used to remove the residual NO3(-)-N of wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent, and the MBBR carriers for denitrification were compared. The results showed that high denitrification efficiency can be achieved with polyethylene, polypropylene, polyurethane foam, and haydite carriers under following conditions: 7.2 to 8.0 pH, 24 to 26 °C temperature, 12 h hydraulic retention time (HRT), and 25.5 mg L(-1) external methanol dosage, while the WWTP effluent total nitrogen (TN) was between 2.6 and 15.4 mg L(-1) and NO3(-)-N was between 0.2 and 12.6 mg L(-1). The MBBR filled with polyethylene carriers had higher TN and NO3(-)-N removal rate (44.9 ± 19.1 and 83.4 ± 13.0%, respectively) than those with other carriers. The minimum effluent TN and NO3(-)-N of polyethylene MBBR were 1.6 and 0.1 mg L(-1), respectively, and the maximum denitrification rate reached 23.0 g m(-2) day(-1). When chemical oxygen demand (COD)/TN ratio dropped from 6 to 4, the NO3(-)- N and TN removal efficiency decreased significantly in all reactors except for that filled with polyethylene, which indicated that the polyethylene MBBR can resist influent fluctuation much better. The three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix analysis showed that all the influent and effluent of MBBRs contain soluble microbial products (SMPs)-like organics and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), which can be removed better by MBBRs filled with haydite and polyethylene carriers. The nitrous oxide reductase (nosZ)-based terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis suggested that the dominant bacteria in polyethylene MBBR are the key denitrificans.

  4. Evaluation of Vali Asr (aj hospital effluent for irrigation of the green

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taher Shahryari

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Recycling of sewage in our country can be one of the ways to overcome the problem of water shortage. The aim of this paper is Evaluation of Valli-e-asr hospital effluent for irrigation of the green. Materials and Methods: During the 12 months of the project since January 2009, twelve samples of the hospital water were selected. 35 samples were taken both from raw sewage and refined effluent with the average frequency of two samples every month. Various physical, chemical, and biological factors were measured on the basis of the standard method book (AWWA. The gathered data was statistically analyzed using SPSS software (version 15 and paired T test at the significant level . Results: The percentages of separating some parameters such as BOD, TSS, COD, and MPS in the exiting effluent were 63.56%, 44.9%, 42.9%, and 89.97% respectively and those of the parameters PH, Mg, SO4, and SAR were 7.52mg/l, 66.82 mg/l, 382.14 mg/l, and 0.54 mg/l respectively. The amount of parameters BOD, COD, TSS, MPN, EC, CL, TDS, and NA% were 165.14mg/l, 887.657mg/l, 784.4286mg/l, 1856857 MPN, 4137.97µs/cm, 999mg/l, 2866.57mg/l, and 75.11% respectively. Conclusion: The sewage refinery of Valli-e-asr hospital does not produce a favorable outcome and some of the parameters of the effluent such as PH, Mg, SO4, and SAR are in accord with the standards of reusing in agriculture and irrigation but many of the necessary parameters do not correspond with the necessary standards for this task.

  5. A review on Advanced Oxidation Processes for the treatment of Textile effluent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    *Rafia Azmat

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dyes are those synthetic and natural compounds which applied in form of aqueous based solutions with many additives to strong attachment of dye molecule with a fabric for persistence the colour on it while pigments are usually insoluble. There are various methods of dye all over the world for dye fabrications. Dyes fabrication processes require thousands liters of water for coloring materials which need very small amount of it and remaining water discharged as a dye waste water and become hazardous to ecology. As an effluent from textile and printing industries having remaining dyes and several additives it become one of the central sources with severe pollution complications worldwide and hard to treat by conventional Chemical/Biological processes. This complex nature of dye wastewater can be converted into less harmless/useful by products along with conventional biological treatment, chemical treatment or set of chemical treatments like Advanced Oxidation processes are used. This paper reviews various Advanced Oxidation processes (AOPs like Hydrogen peroxide, ozonation, ultra violet radiations, alone or in combinations for the treatment of textile effluent and their efficiency regarding detoxification and color removal. The current review describes the efficiency of various advanced oxidation processes in which hydroxyl radical was generated for color removal dye bath.

  6. Anaerobic digestion in the treatment of waste and wastewater effluent; Digestion anaerobia en el tratamiento de efluentes y lodos residuales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baraza, X.; Galimary, F.; Torres, R.

    2003-07-01

    Anaerobic digestion is one of the processes most commonly employed at the present time in treating effluent and wastewater containing a large proportion of organic matter. This article describes the process involved and its applications in the environmental engineering field. It also discusses the physical, chemical and biological factors influencing anaerobic digestion and which therefore have a bearing on whether to implements this process and how it is actually applied from a technological point of view. (Author) 125 refs.

  7. Sequential anaerobic-adsorption treatment of chemical industry wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daga, Kailash; Pallavi, V; Patel, Dharmendra

    2011-10-01

    Treatment technologies needed to reduce the pollutant load of chemical industry effluent have been found to involve exorbitantly high costs. The present investigation aimed to treat the wastewater from chemical industry by cost effective sequential anaerobic-adsorption treatment. Wastewaters from chemical industry that are rich in biodegradable organics are tested for anaerobic treatability. The efficiency of anaerobic reactor is relatively lower 79.3%, and therefore post treatment of effluent was done by adsorption using Poly vinyl alcohol coated Datura stramonium (PVAC-DS) as an adsorbent. An overall COD removal of 93.8 % was achieved after sequential Anaerobic-Adsorption treatment, which lead to a better final effluent and a more economical treatment system.

  8. Fast microbial reduction of ferrihydrite colloids from a soil effluent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsche, Andreas; Bosch, Julian; Rennert, Thilo; Heister, Katja; Braunschweig, Juliane; Meckenstock, Rainer U.; Totsche, Kai U.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies on the microbial reduction of synthetic iron oxide colloids showed their superior electron accepting property in comparison to bulk iron oxides. However, natural colloidal iron oxides differ in composition from their synthetic counterparts. Besides a potential effect of colloid size, microbial iron reduction may be accelerated by electron-shuttling dissolved organic matter (DOM) as well as slowed down by inhibitors such as arsenic. We examined the microbial reduction of OM- and arsenic-containing ferrihydrite colloids. Four effluent fractions were collected from a soil column experiment run under water-saturated conditions. Ferrihydrite colloids precipitated from the soil effluent and exhibited stable hydrodynamic diameters ranging from 281 (±146) nm in the effluent fraction that was collected first and 100 (±43) nm in a subsequently obtained effluent fraction. Aliquots of these oxic effluent fractions were added to anoxic low salt medium containing diluted suspensions of Geobacter sulfurreducens. Independent of the initial colloid size, the soil effluent ferrihydrite colloids were quickly and completely reduced. The rates of Fe2+ formation ranged between 1.9 and 3.3 fmol h-1 cell-1, and are in the range of or slightly exceeding previously reported rates of synthetic ferrihydrite colloids (1.3 fmol h-1 cell-1), but greatly exceeding previously known rates of macroaggregate-ferrihydrite reduction (0.07 fmol h-1 cell-1). The inhibition of microbial Fe(III) reduction by arsenic is unlikely or overridden by the concurrent enhancement induced by soil effluent DOM. These organic species may have increased the already high intrinsic reducibility of colloidal ferrihydrite owing to quinone-mediated electron shuttling. Additionally, OM, which is structurally associated with the soil effluent ferrihydrite colloids, may also contribute to the higher reactivity due to increasing solubility and specific surface area of ferrihydrite. In conclusion, ferrihydrite

  9. UV/H2O2 process performance improvement by ultrafiltration and physicochemical clarification systems for industrial effluent pretreatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanildo Hespanhol

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluated the removal of TOC from an effluent with high organic load resulted from the treatment of oil-water emulsion by thermal process. Hollow Fiber Ultrafiltration membrane (HF-UF and physicochemical clarification process were used as pretreatment options to assess the influence of feed effluent quality on the UV/H2O2 oxidation process. Results for TOC removals showed HF-UF and physicochemical clarification processes can significantly improve the efficiency of UV/H2O2 oxidation process, when compared with the direct effluent oxidation. Reaction time for obtaining a TOC removal higher than 90% was reduced to approximately half of the time needed when no pretreatment was applied. Considering both pretreatment processes it was not possible to notice any significant difference on the UV/H2O2 oxidation process performance. However, the complexity of physicochemical process due to the use of three different chemicals and sludge production made the HF-UF process the best pretreatment alternative, without increasing the Total Dissolved Solids of the effluent, a very important issue when water reuse is considered.

  10. Processing of rayon waste effluent for the recovery of zinc and separation of calcium using thiophosphinic extractant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, M K; Kumar, V; Bagchi, D; Singh, R J; Lee, Jae-chun

    2007-06-25

    Zinc is used in various metallurgical, chemical and textile industries. In textile industries, waste effluent containing zinc is generated during the manufacture of rayon yarn. Due to the strict environmental regulations and the presence of toxic metallic and other constituents, the discharge of effluents in sewage is restricted. In view of above a process has been developed for the recovery of zinc from rayon waste effluent following solvent extraction technique using thiophosphinic extractants Cyanex 272 and 302. Before recycling of zinc sulphate solution in spinning bath, solution must be free from calcium, which is deleterious to the process as gypsum precipitates and forms scale. The extractant Cyanex 302 has been found selective for the recovery of 99.99% of zinc in the form of [R(2)Zn](org) from the effluent above equilibrium pH 3.4 maintaining the O/A ratio of 1/30 leaving all the calcium in the raffinate. The zinc from the loaded Cyanex 302 can be stripped with 10% sulphuric acid at even O/A ratio of 10. The stripped solution thus obtained could be recycled in the spinning bath of the rayon plant and raffinate could be disposed safely without affecting environment.

  11. Evaluation of radioecological impact of the effluents from the mineral treatment unit on Antas Reservoir - Caldas - MG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronqui, Leilane B.; Gomes, Heliana A.; Nascimento, Marcos Roberto Lopes [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Laboratorio]. E-mail: leilanebio@yahoo.com.br; hgomes@cnen.gov.br; pmarcos@cnen.gov.br; Seleghim, Mirna H.R. [Sao Carlos Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Biologia. Dept. de Ecologia e Biologia Evolutiva]. E-mail: mirnaiqsc@usp.br

    2005-07-01

    The Antas Reservoir (AR) is an aquatic body that was built in 1982 for supplying of the Mineral Treatment Unit - Brazilian Nuclear Industries (UTM/INB), an uranium mining and processing facility. Currently the reservoir receives the treated effluents from pit mine (PM) and the sterile piles. This study was conducted in order to survey the possible environmental impact caused by this nuclear installation on the AR (points 041 and 014S). During the period of eight months, these two water bodies (points 041, 014 and PM) were evaluated through the physical chemical variables as well as radiological and microbiological variables. According to the results obtained it was verified that this nuclear installation discharged effluents into the AR outside the standards established by the current regulation for manganese (3.13 mg.L{sup -1}) and fluoride (7.12 mg.L{sup -1}) in class 3 water. Such results agreed with the biological analysis, since the P041 that receives the treated effluent from the PM presented the smallest diversity and biomass of protozooplanktonic organisms, indicating a possible environmental impact in this ecosystem due to the discharge of effluent by this mining company. (author)

  12. Effluent generation by the dairy industry: preventive attitudes and opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Brião

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Work aimed to identify the effluent is generating areas in a dairy company for purpose of changing concept pollution prevention. methodology consisted measuring volumes and collecting samples effluents production sectors. analysis was conducted by sector, order those which generated excessive amounts effluents. results show that dry products (powdered milk powdered whey are greatest generators BOD, nitrogen phosphorus, while fluid form (UHT milk, formulated UHT, pasteurized cream butter produced large quantities oils grease. solids recovery, waste segregation water reuse can be applied with saving potential as much R$ 28,000 ($ 11,200 per month only raw materials also environmental gains in pollution prevention.

  13. Demonstration of Virus in Groundwater after Effluent Discharge onto Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellings, Flora Mae; Lewis, Arthur L.; Mountain, Carrol W.; Pierce, L. Virginia

    1975-01-01

    The survival of virus present in secondary effluents discharged into a cypress dome was studied. Isolations were made from concentrates of water drawn from 10-foot (304.80 cm) deep wells. Data presented show vertical and lateral virus movement as well as survival within the dome for 28 days during a period of heavy rains when no effluent was being applied. Due to the inefficiency of virus concentration procedures, it is proposed that much of the virus present was probably not demonstrated. A rapid, relatively inexpensive concentration technique for sewage influents and effluents is discussed. PMID:168809

  14. Baker's yeast effluent as a liquid feed for dairy cows and heifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blauwiekel, R; Loney, K A; Riley, R E

    1995-02-01

    Liquid effluent from baker's yeast production was fed to dairy cows to determine whether effluent is an acceptable feed and whether it affects milk yield or composition. Effluent averaged 5.4% DM and 6.1% N (DM basis). In experiment 1, 20 Holstein cows were offered effluent free choice or no effluent for 8 wk. Milk yield, composition, and group feed intake were measured. In Experiment 2, 20 cows were fed effluent blended into the TMR (11.3 L/d per cow) or no effluent for 4 wk. In Experiment 3, six groups of 6 heifers were offered free choice or no effluent. Free choice intake of effluent peaked at 15 L/d per cow at wk 3 but declined to 5.3 L/d per cow by wk 6. Milk and 3.5% FCM yields were not affected by effluent regardless of feeding system. Milk protein and fat percentages were higher for cows offered effluent free choice. Milk protein percentage and yield were lower with effluent in the TMR. Intake of effluent by heifers was 1.05 L/d, and effluent did not affect DMI or weight gain. Acceptability of yeast effluent fed free choice is poor, but when yeast is blended into the TMR, cows consume effluent without adverse effects on milk yield or DMI.

  15. 40 CFR 455.20 - Applicability; description of the organic pesticide chemicals manufacturing subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... organic pesticide chemicals manufacturing subcategory. 455.20 Section 455.20 Protection of Environment... Pesticide Chemicals Manufacturing Subcategory § 455.20 Applicability; description of the organic pesticide chemicals manufacturing subcategory. (a) For the purpose of calculating and applying effluent...

  16. 40 CFR 414.80 - Applicability; description of the specialty organic chemicals subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Applicability; description of the specialty organic chemicals subcategory. 414.80 Section 414.80 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORGANIC CHEMICALS, PLASTICS, AND SYNTHETIC FIBERS Specialty Organic Chemicals §...

  17. 40 CFR 414.60 - Applicability; description of the commodity organic chemicals subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Applicability; description of the commodity organic chemicals subcategory. 414.60 Section 414.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORGANIC CHEMICALS, PLASTICS, AND SYNTHETIC FIBERS Commodity Organic Chemicals §...

  18. 40 CFR 414.70 - Applicability; description of the bulk organic chemicals subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Applicability; description of the bulk organic chemicals subcategory. 414.70 Section 414.70 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORGANIC CHEMICALS, PLASTICS, AND SYNTHETIC FIBERS Bulk Organic Chemicals §...

  19. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Balance-of-Plant Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Gervais, Todd L.

    2004-11-15

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operates a number of Research & Development (R&D) facilities for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on the Hanford Site. Facility effluent monitoring plans (FEMPs) have been developed to document the facility effluent monitoring portion of the Environmental Monitoring Plan (DOE 2000) for the Hanford Site. Three of PNNL’s R&D facilities, the 325, 331, and 3720 Buildings, are considered major emission points for radionuclide air sampling, and individual FEMPs were developed for these facilities in the past. In addition, a balance-of-plant (BOP) FEMP was developed for all other DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities at the Hanford Site. Recent changes, including shutdown of buildings and transition of PNNL facilities to the Office of Science, have resulted in retiring the 3720 FEMP and combining the 331 FEMP into the BOP FEMP. This version of the BOP FEMP addresses all DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities at the Hanford Site, excepting the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory, which has its own FEMP because of the unique nature of the building and operations. Activities in the BOP facilities range from administrative to laboratory and pilot-scale R&D. R&D activities include both radioactive and chemical waste characterization, fluid dynamics research, mechanical property testing, dosimetry research, and molecular sciences. The mission and activities for individual buildings are described in Appendix A. Potential radioactive airborne emissions in the BOP facilities are estimated annually using a building inventory-based approach provided in federal regulations. Sampling at individual BOP facilities is based on a potential-to-emit assessment. Some of these facilities are considered minor emission points and thus are sampled routinely, but not continuously, to confirm the low emission potential. One facility, the 331 Life Sciences Laboratory, has a major emission point and is sampled continuously. Sampling systems are

  20. Trihalomethane formation potential of organic fractions in secondary effluent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Shuang; ZHAO Qingliang; WEI Liangliang; JIA Ting

    2008-01-01

    Organic matter is known to be the precursor of numerous chlorination by-products. Organic matter in the secondary effluent from the Wenchang Wastewater Treatment Plant(Harbin. China)was physically separated into the following fractions: particulate organic carbon(1. 2-0. 45un), colloidal organic carbon(0. 45-0. 1um), fine colloidal organic carbon(0. 1-0. 025um), and dissolved organic carbon(DOC)(<0. 025um). Moreover, <0. 45 um fraction was chemically separated into hydrophobic acid(HPO-A), hydrophobic neutral(HPO-N), transphilic acid(TPI-A), transphilic neutral(TPI-N), and hydrophilic fraction(HPI). The chlorine reactivity of these organic fractions obtained from both size and XAD fractionations were evaluated. The structural and chemical compositions of the HPO-A. HPO-N. TPI-A. and TPI-N isolates were characterized using elemental analysis(C, H, 0, and N), Fourier trailsform infrared spectroscopy(FT-IR), and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy(1H-NMR). Results showed that Doe was dominant in terms of total concentration and trihalomethane formation potential(THMFP). and there was no statistical difference in both specific THMFP(STHMFP)and specific ultraviolet light absorbance among the 0. 45, 0. 1, and 0. 025 um filtrates. HPO-A had the highest STHMFP compared to other chemical fractions. HPO-A, HPO-N, TPI-A, and TPI-N contained 3. 02%-3. 52%of nitrogen. The molar Ratio of H/C increased in the order of HPO. A

  1. Manatee use of power plant effluents in Brevard County, Florida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shane, S.H.

    The relationship between manatees and power plants was investigated at 2 power plants on the Indian River in Brevard County, Florida from January 1978-February 1980. Manatee presence in the power plant effluent zones was correlated with cold air and water temperatures. When air temperatures were below 16 C most manatees in the country were found in the effluent zones. Manatees in the effluent zones move with the wind-blown warm water plume, demonstrating a sensitivity to small changes in water temperature. Some individuals were frequently resighted at 1 plant, while others moved between the 2 plants. Because industrial warm water sources are less reliable than natural warm water refuges, it is recommended that no new artificial warm water effluents be constructed north of the species' traditional winter range. 16 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  2. Heterotrophic denitrification of aquaculture effluent using fluidized sand biofilters

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability to consistently and cost-effectively reduce nitrate-nitrogen loads in effluent from recirculating aquaculture systems would enhance the industry's environmental stewardship and allow improved facility proximity to large markets in sensitive watersheds. Heterotrophic denitrification techn...

  3. Feasibility of using geothermal effluents for waterfowl wetlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-09-01

    This project was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using geothermal effluents for developing and maintaining waterfowl wetlands. Information in the document pertains to a seven State area the West where geothermal resources have development potential. Information is included on physiochemical characteristics of geothermal effluents; known effects of constituents in the water on a wetland ecosystem and water quality criteria for maintaining a viable wetland; potential of sites for wetland development and disposal of effluent water from geothermal facilities; methods of disposal of effluents, including advantages of each method and associated costs; legal and institutional constraints which could affect geothermal wetland development; potential problems associated with depletion of geothermal resources and subsidence of wetland areas; potential interference (adverse and beneficial) of wetlands with ground water; special considerations for wetlands requirements including size, flows, and potential water usage; and final conclusions and recommendations for suitable sites for developing demonstration wetlands.

  4. 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF) Hazards Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CAMPBELL, L.R.

    1999-01-15

    This document establishes the technical basis in support of emergency planning activities for the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility. The technical basis for project-specific Emergency Action Levels and Emergency Planning Zone is demonstrated.

  5. Performance evaluation of effluent treatment plant for automobile industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ansari, Farid [Department of Applied Science and Humanities, PDM College of Engineering, Bahadurgarh (Haryana) (India); Pandey, Yashwant K. [School of Energy and Environmental Studies, Devi Ahilya Vishwavidyalaya, Indore (India); Kumar, P.; Pandey, Priyanka [Department of Environmental Science, Post Graduate College Ghazipur (IN

    2013-07-01

    The automobile industry’s wastewater not only contains high levels of suspended and total solids such as oil, grease, dyestuff, chromium, phosphate in washing products, and coloring, at various stages of manufacturing but also, a significant amount of dissolved organics, resulting in high BOD or COD loads. The study reveals the performance, evaluation and operational aspects of effluent treatment plant and its treatability, rather than the contamination status of the real property. The Results revealed that the treated effluent shows most of the parameters are within permissible limits of Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB), India and based on the site visits, discussion with operation peoples, evaluation of process design, treatment system, existing effluent discharge, results of sample analyzed and found that effluent treatment plant of automobile industry are under performance satisfactory.

  6. Polishing of Anaerobic Secondary Effluent and Symbiotic Bioremediation of Raw Municipal Wastewater by Chlorella Vulgaris

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Tuoyuan

    2016-05-01

    To assess polishing of anaerobic secondary effluent and symbiotic bioremediation of primary effluent by microalgae, bench scale bubbling column reactors were operated in batch modes to test nutrients removal capacity and associated factors. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) together with oil and grease in terms of hexane extractable material (HEM) in the reactors were measured after batch cultivation tests of Chlorella Vulgaris, indicating the releasing algal metabolites were oleaginous (dissolved HEM up to 8.470 mg/L) and might hazard effluent quality. Ultrafiltration adopted as solid-liquid separation step was studied via critical flux and liquid chromatography-organic carbon detection (LC-OCD) analysis. Although nutrients removal was dominated by algal assimilation, nitrogen removal (99.6% maximum) was affected by generation time (2.49 days minimum) instead of specific nitrogen removal rate (sN, 20.72% maximum), while phosphorus removal (49.83% maximum) was related to both generation time and specific phosphorus removal rate (sP, 1.50% maximum). COD increase was affected by cell concentration (370.90 mg/L maximum), specific COD change rate (sCOD, 0.87 maximum) and shading effect. sCOD results implied algal metabolic pathway shift under nutrients stress, generally from lipid accumulation to starch accumulation when phosphorus lower than 5 mg/L, while HEM for batches with initial nitrogen of 10 mg/L implied this threshold around 8 mg/L. HEM and COD results implied algal metabolic pathway shift under nutrients stress. Anaerobic membrane bioreactor effluent polishing showed similar results to synthetic anaerobic secondary effluent with slight inhibition while 4 symbiotic bioremediation of raw municipal wastewater with microalgae and activated sludge showed competition for ammonium together with precipitation or microalgal luxury uptake of phosphorus. Critical flux was governed by algal cell concentration for ultrafiltration membrane with pore size of 30 nm, while

  7. Electrolytic treatment applied to the industrial effluent containing persistent wastes monitored by Bartha respirometric assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisela Régis

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The effluent of a rubber chemical antioxidant and antiozonant producer industry, with high content of organic material was subjected to electrolytic process. To evaluate the speed of stabilization of the eletroctrolyzed effluents, and to evaluate the biodegradation the respirometric test of Bartha and Pramer was used. The monitoring of the biodegradation of the effluent, after different periods of electrolysis show that the ideal time of electrolysis was 10 and 25 min. It was concluded that the eletrolytic process was viable to diminish the adaptation time of the microorganism to the effluent and consequently increased the biodegradation of effluent.O efluente de uma indústria produtora de antioxidante e antiozonante para borracha, caracterizado por alta concentração de matéria orgânica e aminas aromáticas que são poluentes e tóxicos, foi tratado através do processo eletrolítico de forma a melhorar as condições para a biodegradabilidade de seus resíduos persistentes. A avaliação da velocidade de estabilização dos efluentes eletrolisados e não eletrolisado, em meio líquido, biodegradação, sob a ação de bactérias, foi utilizado o respirômetro de Bartha and Pramer. A aferição da biodegradabilidade dos efluentes, após os diferentes tempos de eletrólise, permitiu determinar o tempo ótimo de exposição à eletrólise. Os tempos de eletrólise que permitiram uma maior degradação da matéria orgânica foram de 10 min e 25 min. Pode-se concluir que o tratamento eletrolítico é um método viável para a diminuição do tempo de adaptação dos microrganismos ao efluente e conseqüentemente acelerar a biodegradação do efluente da indústria química.

  8. TRAITEMENT PHYSICO - CHIMIQUE ET BIOLOGIQ UE D’UN EFFLUENT LAITIER LIQ UIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N . ELOUTASSI

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Effluent dairy industries are among the most organic-rich food waste. The milk processing unit of the City Rabat / Salè rejects daily about 900 m3/d of liquid waste(including 7.5 m3/d of whey They are a source of dangerous pollution by its richness in microorganisms, lactose, protein, vitamins and minerals which is explained by the high values of DCO, total nitrogen, total phosphorus, fecal coliforms and fecal streptococci.This study focuses on the treatment of dairy effluent by two different methods. The first is a physicochemical treatment (coagulation, flocculation using aluminum sulphate and sodium alginate. The results show a decrease of about 30% of chemical oxygen demand, 49% of turbidity, 78% of suspended solids and 20% of the total phosphorus.While the second process is a biological treatment using Pseudomonas fluorescens and Bacillus spp. This process has shown a significant reduction of the studied parameters even better than the physico- chemical treatment, with fluctuations in efficacy between the strains tested.In conclusion, we have developed biotechnological processes, which are simple,economical and environmentally friendly for treating the discharges of the dairy industry and reduce polluting factors.

  9. Thief carbon catalyst for oxidation of mercury in effluent stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granite, Evan J.; Pennline, Henry W.

    2011-12-06

    A catalyst for the oxidation of heavy metal contaminants, especially mercury (Hg), in an effluent stream is presented. The catalyst facilitates removal of mercury through the oxidation of elemental Hg into mercury (II) moieties. The active component of the catalyst is partially combusted coal, or "Thief" carbon, which can be pre-treated with a halogen. An untreated Thief carbon catalyst can be self-promoting in the presence of an effluent gas streams entrained with a halogen.

  10. Microalgal Cultivation in Secondary Effluent: Recent Developments and Future Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junping Lv

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Eutrophication of water catchments and the greenhouse effect are major challenges in developing the global economy in the near future. Secondary effluents, containing high amounts of nitrogen and phosphorus, need further treatment before being discharged into receiving water bodies. At the same time, new environmentally friendly energy sources need to be developed. Integrating microalgal cultivation for the production of biodiesel feedstock with the treatment of secondary effluent is one way of addressing both issues. This article provides a comprehensive review of the latest progress in microalgal cultivation in secondary effluent to remove pollutants and accumulate lipids. Researchers have discovered that microalgae remove nitrogen and phosphorus effectively from secondary effluent, accumulating biomass and lipids in the process. Immobilization of appropriate microalgae, and establishing a consortium of microalgae and/or bacteria, were both found to be feasible ways to enhance pollutant removal and lipid production. Demonstrations of pilot-scale microalgal cultures in secondary effluent have also taken place. However there is still much work to be done in improving pollutants removal, biomass production, and lipid accumulation in secondary effluent. This includes screening microalgae, constructing the consortium, making use of flue gas and nitrogen, developing technologies related to microalgal harvesting, and using lipid-extracted algal residues (LEA.

  11. Efficiency of aquatic macrophytes to treat Nile tilapia pond effluents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry-Silva Gustavo Gonzaga

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The effluents from fish farming can increase the quantity of suspended solids and promote the enrichment of nitrogen and phosphorus in aquatic ecosystems. In this context, the aim of this work was to evaluate the efficiency of three species of floating aquatic macrophytes (Eichhornia crassipes, Pistia stratiotes and Salvinia molesta to treat effluents from Nile tilapia culture ponds. The effluent originated from a 1,000-m² pond stocked with 2,000 male Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus. The treatment systems consisted of 12 experimental tanks, three tanks for each macrophyte species, and three control tanks (without plants. Water samples were collected from the: (i fish pond source water, (ii effluent from fish pond and (iii effluents from the treatment tanks. The following water variables were evaluated: turbidity, total and dissolved nitrogen, ammoniacal-N, nitrate-N, nitrite-N, total phosphorus and dissolved phosphorus. E. crassipes and P. stratiotes were more efficient in total phosphorus removal (82.0% and 83.3%, respectively and total nitrogen removal (46.1% and 43.9%, respectively than the S. molesta (72.1% total phosphorus and 42.7% total nitrogen and the control (50.3% total phosphorus and 22.8% total nitrogen, indicating that the treated effluents may be reused in the aquaculture activity.

  12. Electrochemical degradation of a real textile effluent using boron-doped diamond or {beta}-PbO{sub 2} as anode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aquino, Jose M.; Pereira, Gabriel F. [Departmento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, C. P. 676, 13560-970 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Rocha-Filho, Romeu C., E-mail: romeu@dq.ufscar.br [Departmento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, C. P. 676, 13560-970 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Bocchi, Nerilso; Biaggio, Sonia R. [Departmento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, C. P. 676, 13560-970 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: {center_dot} Diamond anode enables total abatement of a real textile effluent COD with low energy consumption. {center_dot} Use of diamond anode enables excellent decolorization rate of effluent in the presence of Cl{sup -} ions. {center_dot} Diamond anode might be an excellent option for electrochemical treatment of real textile effluents. {center_dot} PbO{sub 2} anode, due to low cost and easiness of preparation, may be an option to decolorize the effluents. - Abstract: Constant current electrolyses are carried out in a filter-press reactor using a boron-doped diamond (Nb/BDD) or a Ti-Pt/{beta}-PbO{sub 2} anode, varying current density (j) and temperature. The degradation of the real textile effluent is followed by its decolorization and chemical oxygen demand (COD) abatement. The effect of adding NaCl (1.5 g L{sup -1}) on the degradation of the effluent is also investigated. The Nb/BDD anode yields much higher decolorization (attaining the DFZ limit) and COD-abatement rates than the Ti-Pt/{beta}-PbO{sub 2} anode, at any experimental condition. The best conditions are j = 5 mA cm{sup -2} and 55 {sup o}C, for the system's optimized hydrodynamic conditions. The addition of chloride ions significantly increases the decolorization rate; thus a decrease of more than 90% of the effluent relative absorbance is attained using an applied electric charge per unit volume of the electrolyzed effluent (Q{sub ap}) of only about 2 kA h m{sup -3}. Practically total abatement of the effluent COD is attained with the Nb/BDD anode using a Q{sub ap} value of only 7 kA h m{sup -3}, with an energy consumption of about 30 kW h m{sup -3}. This result allows to conclude that the Nb/BDD electrode might be an excellent option for the remediation of textile effluents.

  13. Bioequivalence approach for whole effluent toxicity testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukla, R.; Wang, Q.; Fulk, F.; Deng, C.; Denton, D.

    2000-01-01

    Increased use of whole effluent toxicity (WET) tests in the regulatory arena has brought increased concern over the statistical analysis of WET test data and the determination of toxicity. One concern is the issue of statistical power. A number of WET tests may pass the current hypothesis test approach because they lack statistical power to detect relevant toxic effects because of large within-test variability. Additionally, a number of WET tests may fail the current approach because they possess excessive statistical power, as a result of small within-test variability, and detect small differences that may not be biologically relevant. The strengths and limitations of both the traditional hypothesis test approach and the bioequivalence approach for use in the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System program were evaluated. Data from 5,213 single-concentration, short-term chronic WET tests with Ceriodaphnia dubia provided the database for analysis. Comparison of results between the current approach and the bioequivalence approach indicates that the current approach to WET testing is generally sound but that adopting the proposed bioequivalence approach resolves concerns of statistical power. Specifically, within this data set, applying the bioequivalence approach resulted in failure for tests with relatively large test variability and a pass for tests with relatively small within-test variability.

  14. Soil aquifer treatment using advanced primary effluent

    KAUST Repository

    Sharma, Saroj K.

    2011-08-01

    Soil aquifer treatment (SAT) using primary effluent (PE) is an attractive option for wastewater treatment and reuse in many developing countries with no or minimal wastewater treatment. One of the main limitations of SAT of PE is rapid clogging of the infiltration basin due to high suspended solid concentrations. Some pre-treatment of PE before infiltration is likely to reduce this limitation, improve performance of SAT and help to implement this technology effectively. The effects of three pre-treatment options namely sedimentation (SED), coagulation (COAG) and horizontal roughing filtration (HRF) on SAT were analyzed by conducting laboratory-scale batch and soil column experiments. The sedimentation and coagulation pre-treatments led to less head loss development and reduction of clogging effect. The head loss development in soil column using PE + COAG and PE + SED was reduced by 85 and 72%, respectively, compared to PE alone without any pretreatment. The overall dissolved organic carbon (DOC) removal of pre-treatments and soil column collectively were 34, 44, 51 and 43.5% for PE without any pre-treatment, PE + SED, PE+ COAG and PE + HRF, respectively. Coagulation pre-treatment of PE was found to be the most effective option in terms of suspended solids, DOC and nitrogen removal. Sedimentation pre-treatment of PE could be attractive where land is relatively less expensive for the construction of sedimentation basins. © IWA Publishing 2011.

  15. EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY PEROXIDE DESTRUCTION CATALYST TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HALGREN DL

    2008-07-30

    The 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) main treatment train includes the peroxide destruction module (PDM) where the hydrogen peroxide residual from the upstream ultraviolet light/hydrogen peroxide oxidation unit is destroyed. Removal of the residual peroxide is necessary to protect downstream membranes from the strong oxidizer. The main component of the PDM is two reaction vessels utilizing granular activated carbon (GAC) as the reaction media. The PDM experienced a number of operability problems, including frequent plugging, and has not been utilized since the ETF changed to groundwater as the predominant feed. The unit seemed to be underperforming in regards to peroxide removal during the early periods of operation as well. It is anticipated that a functional PDM will be required for wastewater from the vitrification plant and other future streams. An alternate media or methodology needs to be identified to replace the GAC in the PDMs. This series of bench scale tests is to develop information to support an engineering study on the options for replacement of the existing GAC method for peroxide destruction at the ETF. A number of different catalysts will be compared as well as other potential methods such as strong reducing agents. The testing should lead to general conclusions on the viability of different catalysts and identify candidates for further study and evaluation.

  16. Declines in phosphorus concentration in the upper River Thames (UK): links to sewage effluent cleanup and extended end-member mixing analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Colin; Jarvie, Helen P; Williams, Richard; Love, Alison; Neal, Margaret; Wickham, Heather; Harman, Sarah; Armstrong, Linda

    2010-02-15

    Phosphorus concentrations in the upper River Thames Basin (southeastern England) are described and linked to sewage effluent sources. Weekly surveys between 1997 and 2007 of the Thames and two of its major tributaries, the Thame and the Kennet indicated that phosphorus was mainly in soluble reactive (SRP) form. Baseflow concentrations in the Thames reduced from 1584microg/l in 1998 to 376microg/l in 2006 and from 2655 to 715microg/l for the Thame. Flow response, flux and endmember mixing analysis indicated that these declines resulted from SRP reductions in sewage treatment works (STW) effluent following phosphorus stripping for the major STWs in the region. This was confirmed by comparing our analysis with direct measurements of SRP in the effluents based on Environment Agency data. A within-river loss under baseflow of approximately 64% (range 56-78%) of the SRP-effluent input was estimated for the Thames, with a near balance for the Thame. SRP concentrations in the Kennet were an order of magnitude lower than the Thames/Thame: non-point sources dominated and were important for all the rivers at high flows. It was concluded that removal of SRP from effluents would be insufficient SRP in the Thames and Thame to meet annual average environmental targets of 50 to 120microg/l. The paper flags the value of combining hydrological/chemical tracing and concentration/flux approaches to data interrogation and the bonus of having actual measurements of the effluent. It highlights the need for fuller assessment of water storage/sediment/biota interactions for phosphorus and for caution in using boron as a long-term tracer for effluent inputs, its concentrations having declined markedly in response to reduced usage in washing powders: the value of using sodium as a tracer for examining SRP changes is shown.

  17. Removal of pharmaceuticals from MWTP effluent by nanofiltration and solar photo-Fenton using two different iron complexes at neutral pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miralles-Cuevas, S; Oller, I; Sánchez Pérez, J A; Malato, S

    2014-11-01

    In recent years, membrane technologies (nanofiltration (NF)/reverse osmosis (RO)) have received much attention for micropollutant separation from Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant (MWTP) effluents. Practically all micropollutants are retained in the concentrate stream, which must be treated. Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs) have been demonstrated to be a good option for the removal of microcontaminants from water systems. However, these processes are expensive, and therefore, are usually combined with other techniques (such as membrane systems) in an attempt at cost reduction. One of the main costs in solar photo-Fenton comes from reagent consumption, mainly hydrogen peroxide and chemicals for pH adjustment. Thus, in this study, solar photo-Fenton was used to treat a real MWTP effluent with low initial iron (less than 0.2 mM) and hydrogen peroxide (less than 2 mM) concentrations. In order to work at neutral pH, iron complexing agents (EDDS and citrate) were used in the two cases studied: direct treatment of the MWTP effluent and treatment of the concentrate stream generated by NF. The degradation of five pharmaceuticals (carbamazepine, flumequine, ibuprofen, ofloxacin and sulfamethoxazole) spiked in the effluent at low initial concentrations (μg L(-1)) was monitored as the main variable in the pilot-plant-scale photo-Fenton experiments. In both effluents, pharmaceuticals were efficiently removed (>90%), requiring low accumulated solar energy (2 kJUV L(-1), key parameter in scaling up the CPC photoreactor) and low iron and hydrogen peroxide concentrations (reagent costs, 0.1 and 1.5 mM, respectively). NF provided a clean effluent, and the concentrate was positively treated by solar photo-Fenton with no significant differences between the direct MWTP effluent and NF concentrate treatments.

  18. 40 CFR 415.653 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... CATEGORY Cobalt Salts Production Subcategory § 415.653 Effluent limitations guidelines representing the... limitations for cobalt (T), copper (T), and nickel (T), are the same as specified in § 415.652....

  19. 40 CFR 435.32 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... exploration, drilling, well completion, or well treatment (i.e., produced water, drilling muds, drill cuttings... AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS OIL AND GAS EXTRACTION POINT SOURCE CATEGORY...

  20. 40 CFR 415.32 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SOURCE CATEGORY Calcium Carbide Production Subcategory § 415.32 Effluent limitations guidelines... technology currently available (BPT). Except as provided in 40 CFR 125.30 through 125.32, any existing...

  1. 40 CFR 421.222 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... all times. (b) Molybdenum filtrate solvent extraction raffinate. BPT Limitations for the Secondary... CATEGORY Secondary Molybdenum and Vanadium Subcategory § 421.222 Effluent limitations guidelines...) Leach tailings. BPT Limitations for the Secondary Molybdenum and Vanadium Subcategory Pollutant...

  2. 40 CFR 421.223 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) Molybdenum filtrate solvent extraction raffinate. BAT Limitations for the Secondary Molybdenum and Vanadium... Molybdenum and Vanadium Subcategory § 421.223 Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of.... BAT Limitations for the Secondary Molybdenum and Vanadium Subcategory Pollutant or pollutant...

  3. Pretreatment of Palm Oil Mill Effluent (POME Using Magnetic Chitosan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Saifuddin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan is a natural organic polyelectrolyte of high molecular weight and charge density; obtained from deacetylation of chitin. This study explored the potential and effectiveness of applying chitosan-magnetite nanocomposite particles as a primary coagulant and flocculent, in comparison with chitosan for pre-treatment of palm oil mill effluent (POME. A series of batch coagulation processes with chitosan-magnetite nanocomposite particles and chitosan under different conditions, i.e. dosage and pH were conducted, in order to determine their optimum conditions. The performance was assessed in terms of turbidity, total suspended solids (TSS and chemical oxygen demand (COD reductions. Chitosan-magnetite particles showed better parameter reductions with much lower dosage consumption, compared to chitosan, even at the original pH of POME, i.e. 4.5. At pH 6, the optimum chitosan-magnetite dosage of 250 mg/L was able to reduce turbidity, TSS and COD levels by 98.8%, 97.6% and 62.5% respectively. At this pH, the coagulation of POME by chitosan-magnetite was brought by the combination of charge neutralization and polymer bridging mechanism. On the other hand, chitosan seems to require much higher dosage, i.e. 370 mg/L to achieve the best turbidity, TSS and COD reductions, which were 97.7%, 91.7% and 42.70%, respectively. The synergistic effect of cationic character of both the chitosan amino group and the magnetite ion in the pre-treatment process for POME brings about enhanced performance for effective agglomeration, adsorption and coagulation.

  4. Chemical Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    When a hazardous chemical has been released, it may harm people's health. Chemical releases can be unintentional, as in the case of an ... the case of a terrorist attack with a chemical weapon. Some hazardous chemicals have been developed by ...

  5. 40 CFR 415.652 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SOURCE CATEGORY Cobalt Salts Production Subcategory § 415.652 Effluent limitations guidelines... available (BPT): Subpart BM—Cobalt Salts Pollutant or pollutant property BPT effluent limitations Maximum... product TSS 0.0023 0.0014 Cobalt (T) 0.0003 0.00012 Copper (T) 2.7×10−4 8.3×10−5 Nickel (T) 2.7×10−4...

  6. 40 CFR 461.12 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 2.96 Zinc 3.40 1.42 Cobalt 0.49 0.21 (6) Subpart A—Cadmium Powder Production. BAT Effluent... Cadmium 2.23 0.99 Nickel 12.61 8.34 Zinc 9.59 4.01 Cobalt 1.38 0.59 (7) Subpart A—Silver Powder Production....44 Cobalt 7.38 3.16 (2) Subpart A—Impregnated Anodes. BAT Effluent Limitations Pollutant or...

  7. ifferential Gene Expression in Zebrafish (Danio rerio Following Exposure to Gaseous Diffusion Plant Effluent and Effluent Receiving Stream Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben F. Brammell

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The expression of six genes known to serve as bioindicators of environmental stress were examined using real-time quantitative PCR in liver tissue extracted from zebrafish (Danio rerio, Hamilton exposed to effluent and effluent containing stream water associated with the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP. Approach: The PGDP, the only active uranium enrichment facility in the US, is located in western Kentucky and discharges treated effluents into several surrounding streams. Environmentally relevant concentrations of several heavy metals and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs can be found in effluents emerging from the plant as well as in receiving streams. Fish were exposed in the laboratory to water from both effluents and downstream areas as well as to water from an upstream reference site. Expression of six genes known to be altered by metal and/or PCB exposure was quantified at both 7 and 14 day time points. Results: Transcription of the biomarker enzyme cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1 was significantly elevated in fish exposed to one plant effluent at both the 7 (16 fold and 14 (10 fold day time points. Sediment PCB levels from this site were the highest observed in the study, indicating PCBs may be contributing to the elevated CYP1A1 mRNA. Additionally, catalase, an enzyme responsible for hydrogen peroxide detoxification and known to be impacted by metal contamination, demonstrated significant alterations in expression in the effluent containing the highest concentrations of most metals observed in this study. Interestingly, despite the presence of metal levels consistent with the induction of metallothionein in other studies, no metallothionein induction was observed. All other stress biomarker encoding genes were likewise unaffected by effluent water exposure. Conclusion/Recommendations: These results indicate that contaminant levels observed in this system altered transcription of catalase and CYP1A1 but failed to

  8. Assessment of heavy metals in the industrial effluents, tube-wells and municipal supplied water of Dehradun, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulshrestha, Shail; Awasthi, Alok; Dabral, S K

    2013-07-01

    The bio-geochemical cycles of metals involve the lands, rivers, oceans and the atmosphere. Although a large number of metals are introduced to the water bodies during their mining and extraction processes and geochemical weathering of rocks, but the role of domestic and industrial wastes is predominant and of much concern. Increased industrial activities has increased the incidence of percolation of toxic metal ions to the soil and water bodies and presently their presence in ecosystem, have reached to an alarming level that environmentalists are finding it difficult to enforce control measures. Human activities and large number of small and big industrial units are increasingly discharging deleterious metals present in the effluents and wastes, to the environment and aquatic systems and have contaminated heavily even the ground water. The toxic metals have a great tendency of bioaccumulation through which they enter the food chain system and ultimately affect adversely the life on this planet Earth in various ways. Further, due to contamination of irrigation system by the harmful Chemicals and toxic metals, the farm products, vegetables, fruits, potable water and even milk is not spared. This paper describes the assessment of the heavy metal concentration in various industrial effluents of the surrounding area. Various physico-chemical characteristics of the effluents collected from various sites are also reported. To assess the status of ground water quality, water samples from four tube wells of different localities of the area and four drinking water samples supplied by Municipal Distribution System were also analyzed.

  9. Control of Reactive Species Generated by Low-frequency Biased Nanosecond Pulse Discharge in Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Effluent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takashima, Keisuke; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2016-09-01

    The control of hydroxyl radical and the other gas phase species generation in the ejected gas through air plasma (air plasma effluent) has been experimentally studied, which is a key to extend the range of plasma treatment. Nanosecond pulse discharge is known to produce high reduced electric field (E/N) discharge that leads to efficient generation of the reactive species than conventional low frequency discharge, while the charge-voltage cycle in the low frequency discharge is known to be well-controlled. In this study, the nanosecond pulse discharge biased with AC low frequency high voltage is used to take advantages of these discharges, which allows us to modulate the reactive species composition in the air plasma effluent. The utilization of the gas-liquid interface and the liquid phase chemical reactions between the modulated long-lived reactive species delivered from the air plasma effluent could realize efficient liquid phase chemical reactions leading to short-lived reactive species production far from the air plasma, which is crucial for some plasma agricultural applications.

  10. Wastewater treatment plant effluent alters pituitary gland gonadotropin mRNA levels in juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Louisa B; Schultz, Irvin R; da Silva, Denis A M; Ylitalo, Gina M; Ragsdale, Dave; Harris, Stephanie I; Bailey, Stephanie; Pepich, Barry V; Swanson, Penny

    2016-09-01

    estrogenic activity of the WWTP effluents. These results suggest that lhb gene expression may be a sensitive index of acute exposure to estrogenic chemicals in juvenile coho salmon. Further work is needed to determine the kinetics and specificity of lhb induction to evaluate its utility as a potential indicator of estrogen exposure in immature fish.

  11. Use of calcined layered double hydroxides for the removal of color and organic matter from textile effluents: kinetic, equilibrium and recycling studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. P. F. Teixeira

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents data for the synthesis and characterization of layer double hydroxides (LDH and their use for color and chemical oxygen demand (COD removal from effluents generated by a textile industry. Adsorption studies with raw and biologically treated (activated sludge textile effluent showed that the pseudo-second order model best fitted the experimental data, leading to adsorption coefficients of 39.1 and 102.9 mgCOD/gLDH for raw and treated effluents, respectively. The best conditions for color and COD removal were obtained at lower values of temperature and pH (25 °C and pH 7 and, in these conditions, an LDH dose of 10 g/L resulted in color removal efficiencies of 56% for samples of raw and 66% for samples of treated effluent. Recycling studies indicated that the reuse of thermally treated LDH led to a progressive loss in the removal efficiencies of COD and color. The reduction was more pronounced with samples of the raw textile effluent. LDH characterization performed before and after each adsorption and regeneration experiment showed that there was no intercalation of dye molecules in the interlayer region of the LDH, indicating that COD and color removal might be due to the adsorption of organic molecules onto the LDH surface.

  12. The role of enzymes produced by white-rot fungus Irpex lacteus in the decolorization of the textile industry effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kwang-Soo

    2004-03-01

    The textile industry wastewater has been decolorized efficiently by the white rot fungus, Irpex lacteus, without adding any chemicals. The degree of the decolorization of the dye effluent by shaking or stationary cultures is 59 and 93%, respectively, on the 8th day. The higher level of manganese-dependent peroxidase (MnP) and non-specific peroxidase (NsP) was detected in stationary cultures than in the cultures shaken. Laccase activities were equivalent in both cultures and its level was not affected significantly by the culture duration. Neither lignin peroxidase (LiP) nor Remazol Brilliant Blue R oxidase (RBBR ox) was detected in both cultures. The absorbance of the dye effluent was significantly decreased by the stationary culture filtrate of 7 days in the absence of Mn (II) and veratryl alcohol. In the stationary culture filtrate, three or more additional peroxidase bands were detected by the zymogram analysis.

  13. Reagent dyes in textile effluents: new eliminating treatments; Colorantes reactivos en los efluentes textiles: nuevos tratamientos para su eliminacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, M. C.; Crespi, M. [Institut d' Investigacio Textil i Cooperacion Industrial de Tarrasa (Spain)

    1999-07-01

    Textile effluents containing reagent dyes are the most difficult to decolour, Among the techniques described for eliminating them from textile waste waters, chemical coagulation is the most commonly employed, followed by ozonization. Adsorption by active carbon is also employed, either by putting carbon powder in the biological reactor or using it as a tertiary treatment, having the effluent pass through columns of granulated active carbon. However, this technique is expensive and is only justified when the treated water is partially recycled. Ultra-infiltration and nanofiltration are allowed in countries where it is permitted to discharge the concentrate directly into the sea or when it is cost-effective to incinerate it. The remaining technologies are still at the research stage in pilot plants. They include electrochemical techniques that provide excellent results and have a promising future in industry. (Author) 41 refs.

  14. Ecotoxicological risks associated with tannery effluent wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakir, Lubna; Ejaz, Sohail; Ashraf, Muhammad; Qureshi, Naureen Aziz; Anjum, Aftab Ahmad; Iltaf, Imran; Javeed, Aqeel

    2012-09-01

    The problem of water pollution acquires greater relevance in the context of a developing agrarian economy like Pakistan. Even though, the leather industry is a leading economic sector in Pakistan, there is an increasing environmental concern regarding tanneries because they produce large amounts of potentially toxic wastewater containing both trivalent and hexavalent chromium, which are equally hazardous for human population, aquaculture and agricultural activities in the area. Therefore, we defined the scope of the present study as to employ different bioassays to determine the eco-toxic potential of tannery effluent wastewater (TW) and its chromium based components, i.e., potassium dichromate (K(2)Cr(2)O(7)) and chromium sulfate Cr(2)(SO(4))(3). Particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis of TW was carried out to determine the concentration of chromium in TW and then equal concentrations of hexavalent (K(2)Cr(2)O(7)) and trivalent chromium Cr(2)(SO(4))(3) were obtained for this study. Cytotoxicity assay, artemia bioassay and phytotoxicity assay was utilized to investigate the eco-toxicological potential of different concentrations of TW, K(2)Cr(2)O(7) and Cr(2)(SO(4))(3). All the dilutions of TW, K(2)Cr(2)O(7) and Cr(2)(SO(4))(3) presented concentration dependent cytotoxic effects in these assays. The data clearly represents that among all three tested materials, different dilutions of K(2)Cr(2)O(7) caused significantly more damage (Prisk to the human population, aquaculture and agricultural industry that can obliterate ecosystem surrounding the tanneries.

  15. High Speed/ Low Effluent Process for Ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Clark Dale

    2006-10-30

    n this project, BPI demonstrated a new ethanol fermentation technology, termed the High Speed/ Low Effluent (HS/LE) process on both lab and large pilot scale as it would apply to wet mill and/or dry mill corn ethanol production. The HS/LE process allows very rapid fermentations, with 18 to 22% sugar syrups converted to 9 to 11% ethanol ‘beers’ in 6 to 12 hours using either a ‘consecutive batch’ or ‘continuous cascade’ implementation. This represents a 5 to 8X increase in fermentation speeds over conventional 72 hour batch fermentations which are the norm in the fuel ethanol industry today. The ‘consecutive batch’ technology was demonstrated on a large pilot scale (4,800 L) in a dry mill corn ethanol plant near Cedar Rapids, IA (Xethanol Biofuels). The pilot demonstrated that 12 hour fermentations can be accomplished on an industrial scale in a non-sterile industrial environment. Other objectives met in this project included development of a Low Energy (LE) Distillation process which reduces the energy requirements for distillation from about 14,000 BTU/gal steam ($0.126/gal with natural gas @ $9.00 MCF) to as low as 0.40 KW/gal electrical requirements ($0.022/gal with electricity @ $0.055/KWH). BPI also worked on the development of processes that would allow application of the HS/LE fermentation process to dry mill ethanol plants. A High-Value Corn ethanol plant concept was developed to produce 1) corn germ/oil, 2) corn bran, 3) ethanol, 4) zein protein, and 5) nutritional protein, giving multiple higher value products from the incoming corn stream.

  16. Composition of CBRN Decontamination Effluent and Development of Surrogate Mixtures for Testing Effluent Treatment Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    including ammonia , bromine (CA), hydrogen chloride, methyl bromide, osmium tetroxide, phosphine, phosphorus (elemental, white, or yellow), sulfuryl...chemical structure Diethoxyphosphate-VX (DEVX) *Very similar chemical structure *Not commercially available; must be synthesized *Highly toxic

  17. Toxicity Identification and Evaluation for the Effluent from Wastewater Treatment Plant in Industrial Complex using D.magna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.; Keum, H.; Chun Sang, H.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, the interests on the impacts of industrial wastewater on aquatic ecosystem have increased with concern about ecosystem protection and human health. Whole effluent toxicity tests are used to monitor toxicity by unknown toxic chemicals as well as conventional pollutants from industrial effluent discharges. This study describes the application of TIE (toxicity identification evaluation) procedures to an acutely toxic effluent from a wastewater treatment plant in industrial complex which was toxic to Daphnia magna. In TIE phase I (characterization step), the toxic effects by heavy metals, organic compounds, oxidants, volatile organic compounds, suspended solids and ammonia were screened and revealed that the source of toxicity is far from these toxicants group. Chemical analysis (TIE phase II) on TDS showed that the concentration of chloride ion (6,900 mg/L) was substantially higher than that predicted from EC50 for D. magna. In confirmation step (TIE phase III), chloride ion was demonstrated to be main toxicant in this effluent by the spiking approach, species sensitivity approach and deletion approach. Calcium, potassium, magnesium, sodium, fluorine, sulfate ion concentration (450, 100, 80, 5,300, 0.66, 2,200mg/L) was not shown toxicity from D. magna. Finally, we concluded that chloride was the most contributing toxicant in the waste water treatment plant. Further research activities are needed for technical support of toxicity identification and evaluation on the various types of wastewater treatment plant discharge in Korea. Keywords : TIE, D. magna, Industrial waste water Acknowledgement This research was supported by a grant (15IFIP-B089908-02) from Plant Research Program funded by Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport of Korean government

  18. Assessment of reproductive effects in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) exposed to bleached/unbleached kraft mill effluents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulveda, M.S.; Ruessler, D.S.; Denslow, N.D.; Holm, S.E.; Schoeb, T.R.; Gross, T.S.

    2001-01-01

    This study evaluated the potential effects of different concentrations of bleached/unbleached kraft mill effluent (B/UKME) on several reproductive endpoints in adult largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). The kraft mill studied produces a 50/50 mix of bleached/unbleached market pulp with an estimated release of 36 million gal of efffluent/day. Bleaching sequences were C90d10EopHDp and CEHD for softwood (pines) and hardwoods (mainly tupelo, gums, magnolia, and water oaks), respectively. Bass were exposed to different effluent concentrations (0 [controls, exposed to well water], 10, 20, 40, or 80%) for either 28 or 56 days. At the end of each exposure period, fish were euthanized, gonads collected for histological evaluation and determination of gonadosomatic index (GSI), and plasma was analyzed for 17??-estradiol, 11-ketotestosterone, and vitellogenin (VTG). Largemouth bass exposed to B/UKME responded with changes at the biochemical level (decline in sex steroids in both sexes and VTG in females) that were usually translated into tissue/organ-level responses (declines in GSI in both sexes and in ovarian development in females). Although most of these responses occurred after exposing fish to 40% B/UKME concentrations or greater, some were observed after exposures to 20% B/UKME. These threshold concentrations fall within the 60% average yearly concentration of effluent that exists in the stream near the point of discharge (Rice Creek), but are above the <10% effluent concentration present in the St. Johns River. The chemical(s) responsible for such changes as well as their mode(s) of action remain unknown at this time.

  19. Pollution profile and biodegradation characteristics of fur-suede processing effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz Töre, G; Insel, G; Ubay Cokgör, E; Ferlier, E; Kabdaşli, I; Orhon, D

    2011-07-01

    This study investigated the effect of stream segregation on the biodegradation characteristics of wastewaters generated by fur-suede processing. It was conducted on a plant located in an organized industrial district in Turkey. A detailed in-plant analysis of the process profile and the resulting pollution profile in terms of significant parameters indicated the characteristics of a strong wastewater with a maximum total COD of 4285 mg L(-1), despite the excessive wastewater generation of 205 m3 (ton skin)(-1). Respirometric analysis by model calibration yielded slow biodegradation kinetics and showed that around 50% of the particulate organics were utilized at a rate similar to that of endogenous respiration. A similar analysis on the segregated wastewater streams suggested that biodegradation of the plant effluent is controlled largely by the initial washing/pickling operations. The effect of other effluent streams was not significant due to their relatively low contribution to the overall organic load. The respirometric tests showed that the biodegradation kinetics of the joint treatment plant influent of the district were substantially improved and exhibited typical levels reported for tannery wastewater, so that the inhibitory impact was suppressed to a great extent by dilution and mixing with effluents of the other plants. The chemical treatment step in the joint treatment plant removed the majority of the particulate organics so that 80% of the available COD was utilized in the oxygen uptake rate (OUR) test, a ratio quite compatible with the biodegradable COD fractions of tannery wastewater. Consequently, process kinetics and especially the hydrolysis rate appeared to be significantly improved.

  20. Cathode Assessment for Maximizing Current Generation in Microbial Fuel Cells Utilizing Bioethanol Effluent as Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guotao Sun

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Implementation of microbial fuel cells (MFCs for electricity production requires effective current generation from waste products via robust cathode reduction. Three cathode types using dissolved oxygen cathodes (DOCs, ferricyanide cathodes (FeCs and air cathodes (AiCs were therefore assessed using bioethanol effluent, containing 20.5 g/L xylose, 1.8 g/L arabinose and 2.5 g/L propionic acid. In each set-up the anode and cathode had an electrode surface area of 88 cm2, which was used for calculation of the current density. Electricity generation was evaluated by quantifying current responses to substrate loading rates and external resistance. At the lowest external resistance of 27 Ω and highest substrate loading rate of 2 g chemical oxygen demand (COD per L·day, FeC-MFC generated highest average current density (1630 mA/m2 followed by AiC-MFC (802 mA/m2 and DOC-MFC (184 mA/m2. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS was used to determine the impedance of the cathodes. It was thereby confirmed that the FeC-MFC produced the highest current density with the lowest internal resistance for the cathode. However, in a setup using bioethanol effluent, the AiC-MFC was concluded to be the most sustainable option since it does not require ferricyanide. The data offer a new add-on option to the straw biorefinery by using bioethanol effluent for microbial electricity production.

  1. Electrocoagulation of simulated reactive dyebath effluent with aluminum and stainless steel electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan-Alaton, Idil; Kabdaşli, Işik; Vardar, Burcu; Tünay, Olcay

    2009-05-30

    Reactive dyebath effluents are ideal candidates for electrocoagulation due to their intensive color, medium strength, recalcitrant COD and high electrolyte (NaCl) content. The present study focused on the treatability of simulated reactive dyebath effluent (COD(o)=300 mg/L; color in terms of absorbance values A(o,436)=0.532 cm(-1), A(o,525)=0.693 cm(-1) and A(o,620)=0.808 cm(-1)) employing electrocoagulation with aluminum and stainless steel electrodes. Optimization of critical operating parameters such as initial pH (pH(o) 3-11), applied current density (J(c)=22-87 mA/cm(2)) and electrolyte type (NaCl or Na(2)SO(4)) improved the overall treatment efficiencies resulting in effective decolorization (99% using stainless steel electrodes after 60 min, 95% using aluminum electrodes after 90 min electrocoagulation) and COD abatement (93% with stainless steel electrodes after 60 min, 86% with aluminum electrodes after 90 min of reaction time). Optimum electrocoagulation conditions were established as pH(o) 5 and J(c)=22 mA/cm(2) for both electrode materials. The COD and color removal efficiencies also depended on the electrolyte type. No in situ, surplus adsorbable organically bound halogens (AOX) formation associated with the use of NaCl as the electrolyte during electrocoagulation was detected. An economical evaluation was also carried out within the frame of the study. It was demonstrated that electrocoagulation of reactive dyebath effluent with aluminum and stainless steel electrodes was a considerably less electrical energy-intensive, alternative treatment method as compared with advanced chemical oxidation techniques.

  2. Statistical Optimization of Fermentation Conditions for Cellulase Production from Palm Oil Mill Effluent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal I. Daoud

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Palm oil mill effluent discharged by the oil palm industries is considered as the mixed of high polluted effluent which is abundant (about 20 million tonnes year-1 and its effect contributes to the serious environmental problems through the pollution of water bodies. Approach: The aim of this study was to identify the potential of low cost substrate such as Palm Oil Mill Effluent (POME for the production of cellulase enzyme by liquid state bioconversion. The filamentous fungus Trichoderma harzianum was used for liquid state bioconversion of POME for cellulase production. Statistical optimization was carried out to evaluate the physico-chemical parameters (factors for maximum cellulase production by 2-level fractional factorial design with six central points. The polynomial regression model was developed using the experimental data including the effects of linear, quadratic and interaction of the factors. The factors involved were substrate (POME and co-substrate (wheat flour concentrations, temperature, pH, inoculum and agitation. Results: Statistical analysis showed that the optimum conditions were: Temperature of 30°C, substrate concentration of 2%, wheat flour concentration of 3%, pH of 4, inoculum of 3% and agitation of 200 rpm. Under these conditions, the model predicted the enzyme production to be about 14 FPU mL-1. Analysis Of Variance (ANOVA of the design showed a high coefficient of determination (R2 value of 0.999, thus ensuring a high satisfactory adjustment of the quadratic model with the experimental data. Conclusion/Recommendations: This study indicates a better solution for waste management through the utilization of POME for cellulase production that could be used in the industrial applications such as bioethanol production.

  3. Microbial community structure of a freshwater system receiving wastewater effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hladilek, Matthew D; Gaines, Karen F; Novak, James M; Collard, David A; Johnson, Daniel B; Canam, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    Despite our dependency on treatment facilities to condition wastewater for eventual release to the environment, our knowledge regarding the effects of treated water on the local watershed is extremely limited. Responses of lotic systems to the treated wastewater effluent have been traditionally investigated by examining the benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages and community structure; however, these studies do not address the microbial diversity of the water systems. In the present study, planktonic and benthic bacterial community structure were examined at 14 sites (from 60 m upstream to 12,100 m downstream) and at two time points along an aquatic system receiving treated effluent from the Charleston Wastewater Treatment Plant (Charleston, IL). Total bacterial DNA was isolated and 16S rRNA sequences were analyzed using a metagenomics platform. The community structure in planktonic bacterial communities was significantly correlated with dissolved oxygen concentration. Benthic bacterial communities were not correlated with water quality but did have a significant geographic structuring. A local restructuring effect was observed in both planktonic and benthic communities near the treated wastewater effluent, which was characterized by an increase in abundance of sphingobacteria. Sites further downstream from the wastewater facility appeared to be less influenced by the effluent. Overall, the present study demonstrated the utility of targeted high-throughput sequencing as a tool to assess the effects of treated wastewater effluent on a receiving water system, and highlighted the potential for this technology to be used for routine monitoring by wastewater facilities.

  4. Management plan for Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickels, J.M.; Pratt, D.R.

    1991-08-01

    The DOE/RL 89-19, United States Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (1989), requires the Hanford Site to prepare an Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) by November 9, 1991. The DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (1991), provides additional guidance and requires implementation of the EMP within 36 months of the effective data of the rule. DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, requires each US Department of Energy (DOE) site, facility, or activity that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant quantities of hazardous materials to prepare an EMP. This EMP is to identify and discuss two major activities: (1) effluent monitoring and (2) environmental surveillance. At the Hanford Site, the site-wide EMP will consist of the following elements: (1) A conceptual plan addressing effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance; (2) Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) site-wide environmental surveillance program; (3) Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) effluent monitoring program consisting of the near-field operations environmental monitoring activities and abstracts of each Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP). This management plan addresses the third of these three elements of the EMP, the FEMPs.

  5. Effects of ozone on kraft process pulp mill effluent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammed, A. (Stanley Industrial Consultants, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)); Smith, D.W. (Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, (Canada))

    1992-12-01

    Effluent from a kraft process pulp mill was studied in a batch reactor for ozone doses between 50 and 200 mg O[sub 3]/L to identify the suitability of ozone application locations in the treatment process and see the improvements in biotreatability of wastewaters from a kraft process pulp mill. Laboratory acclimatized seed were used for (Biochemical Oxygen Demand) BOD tests for ozonated and unozonated samples. The inhibitory effects were minimized by using optimum dilutions. The studies were divided into three major sections: characterization of mill effluent; ozone system calibration, and reactor design; and ozonation of mill effluent. Seed for BOD tests were acclimatized in batch units for primary, bleach and secondary effluents separately. The results were analyzed using the [open quote]t[close quote] test for paired experiments and an ANOVA table for statistical confirmation. Residuals were plotted to check the assumptions of constant variance and normal distribution. It was concluded that ozone is most effective for the removal of color and the increase of BOD in secondary effluent. 21 refs., 9 figs., 7 tabs.

  6. Comparative study of the fate and mobility of metals discharged in mining and urban effluents using sequential extractions on suspended solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Christian; Turcotte, Patrice; Vigneault, Bernard

    2009-12-01

    The fate, bioavailability and environmental impacts of metals discharged in municipal and mining wastewater discharge will depend to a large extent on chemical speciation and distribution. Previous studies on metal bioaccumulation have shown that total metal concentrations are not a good predictor of bioavailability in the dispersion plumes of municipal effluents. The objective of this study was to determine the solid phase speciation of metals in surface waters receiving urban and mining effluents in order to assess their fate and relative mobility in the receiving environment. Suspended particulate matter was sampled using sediment traps at several sites downstream of effluent outfall plumes as well as at reference upstream sites. Particulate metal in operationally defined fractions--exchangeable/carbonates, reducible, oxidisable and residual--were determined in suspended particulate matter with a series of selective chemical extractions. Metal enrichment in suspended particles was generally observed in both mining and urban effluent discharges. When compared to its receiving environment, the mining effluent appeared to release more particulate metals (Cu, Fe, Zn) in the most reactive fractions (i.e. exchangeable/carbonates + reducible forms, 23-43%), while other released metals, such as Cd and Mn, were predominantly in the least reactive forms (i.e., oxidisable + residual, 73-97%). In contrast, the reactivity of all particulate metals, with the exception of Mn, from the urban effluent was much higher, with up to 65, 42, 30 and 43% for Cd, Cu, Fe and Zn, respectively, in the two most reactive fractions. As expected in effluent dispersion plumes, parameters such as the organic carbon, Fe oxide and carbonate contents have specific effects on the partitioning of several trace metals, particularly Cd, Cu and Zn. Our results indicated that the relative distributions of metals among geochemical fractions varied in the effluent receiving waters where organic carbon and

  7. Evaluation of dairy effluent management options using multiple criteria analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajkowicz, Stefan A; Wheeler, Sarah A

    2008-04-01

    This article describes how options for managing dairy effluent on the Lower Murray River in South Australia were evaluated using multiple criteria analysis (MCA). Multiple criteria analysis is a framework for combining multiple environmental, social, and economic objectives in policy decisions. At the time of the study, dairy irrigation in the region was based on flood irrigation which involved returning effluent to the river. The returned water contained nutrients, salts, and microbial contaminants leading to environmental, human health, and tourism impacts. In this study MCA was used to evaluate 11 options against 6 criteria for managing dairy effluent problems. Of the 11 options, the MCA model selected partial rehabilitation of dairy paddocks with the conversion of remaining land to other agriculture. Soon after, the South Australian Government adopted this course of action and is now providing incentives for dairy farmers in the region to upgrade irrigation infrastructure and/or enter alternative industries.

  8. Required ozone doses for removing pharmaceuticals from wastewater effluents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Maria; Hey, Gerly; Rodríguez Vega, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the this study was to investigate the ozone dosage required to remove active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) from biologically treated wastewater of varying quality, originated from different raw wastewater and wastewater treatment processes.Secondary effluents from six Swedish...... wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) were spiked with 42 APIs (nominal concentration 1μg/L) and treated with different O3 doses (0.5–12.0mg/L ozone) in bench-scale experiments.In order to compare the sensitivity of APIs in each matrix, the specific dose of ozone required to achieve reduction by one decade...... of each investigated API (DDO3) was determined for each effluent by fitting a first order equation to the remaining concentration of API at each applied ozone dose. Ozone dose requirements were found to vary significantly between effluents depending on their matrix characteristics.The specific ozone dose...

  9. Optimizing nitrate removal in woodchip beds treating aquaculture effluents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Ahnen, Mathis; Pedersen, Per Bovbjerg; Hoffmann, Carl Christian

    2016-01-01

    Nitrate is typically removed from aquaculture effluents using heterotrophic denitrification reactors. Heterotrophic denitrification reactors, however, require a constant input of readily available organic carbon (C) sources which limits their application in many aquaculture systems for practical...... the potential of optimizing woodchip reactors for treating aquaculture effluent. A central composite design (CCD) was applied to assess the effects of simultaneously changing the empty bed contact time (EBCTs of 5.0-15.0 h; corresponding to theoretical hydraulic retention times of 3.3-9.9 h) and bicarbonate...... (HCO3 -) inlet concentration (0.50-1.59 g HCO3 -/l) on the removal rate of NO3 -N, and additional organic and inorganic nutrients, in effluent deriving from an experimental recirculating aquaculture system (RAS).Volumetric NO3 -N removal rates ranged from 5.20 ± 0.02 to 8.96 ± 0.19 g/m3/day and were...

  10. Splenotoxic effect of radiographic developer effluent on Wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony C. Ugwu

    2016-05-01

    Results: Normal spleen histology was observed in the control group. In contrast, tissue degeneration and necrosis; lymphocytic infiltration as well as reduction of splenic follicles were observed in some of the test groups (IIA, IIB and IIIA. Interestingly, the toxic effects of the developer effluent on group IIIB administered with higher dose for a longer period of 28 days were not as severe as observed in the other test groups. Conclusions: The present study which indicated adverse effects of exposures to sub-lethal doses of developer effluent on Wistar rats' spleen tissues suggests the need for proper management and disposal of radiographic effluents. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(5.000: 1625-1631

  11. Irreversible fouling during multicycle microfiltration of wastewater effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Huifeng; Neufeld, Ronald D

    2007-12-01

    This study focused on irreversible fouling during microfiltration of primary and secondary effluents from municipal wastewater treatment plants. Flow resistances were calculated from the sum of clean membrane resistances, resultant cake layer resistances, and consequent irreversible fouling resistances. Results from a dead-end cell experimental system showed that the accumulated cake resistance was dominating for microfiltration of primary/secondary effluents. Suspended solids in the primary and secondary effluents had a similar compressibility index, n, with a value of approximately 0.5, indicating that they were moderately compressible particles. The value of irreversible resistance is dependent on the intensity of membrane cleaning; however, for a given membrane cleaning strategy, this value steadily increased and reached a maximum after approximately 6 cycles of filtration and cleaning. This study provided an explanation for the significant drop of throughput flux in the early application of membrane processes, and a plateau flux approached correspondingly.

  12. Treatment of milk industry effluent by dissolved air flotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J .B. Couto

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the application of the flotation technique by dissolved air (FAD to the treatment of milk industry effluent (milky effluent is analyzed. Initially, batch studies were carried out in a column built of acrylic with an external diameter of 2.5 cm and 50 cm in height. Afterwards, the performance of a flotation tank with a 5.5 L capacity in the treatment of the milky effluent was addressed. In continuous mode of operation, separation efficiencies up to 90% were obtained for the experiments carried out at a saturation pressure of 4 atm and having a ratio of feed flow rate (Qa to saturated liquid flow rate equal to 1. The separation efficiency for flocculated milk was estimated from the overall mass balance for the flotation tank. Separation efficiencies obtained agreed very well with the experimental results collected for Qa/Q Ls ratios lower than 1.

  13. Catalytic oxidation of pulping effluent by activated carbon-supported heterogeneous catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Bholu Ram; Garg, Anurag

    2016-01-01

    The present study deals with the non-catalytic and catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) for the removal of persistent organic compounds from the pulping effluent. Two activated carbon-supported heterogeneous catalysts (Cu/Ce/AC and Cu/Mn/AC) were used for CWO after characterization by the following techniques: temperature-programmed reduction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermo-gravimetric analysis. The oxidation reaction was performed in a batch high-pressure reactor (capacity = 0.7  L) at moderate oxidation conditions (temperature = 190°C and oxygen pressure = 0.9 MPa). With Cu/Ce/AC catalyst, the maximum chemical oxygen demand (COD), total organic carbon (TOC) and lignin removals of 79%, 77% and 88% were achieved compared to only 50% removal during the non-catalytic process. The 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) to COD ratio (a measure for biodegradability) of the pulping effluent was improved to 0.52 from an initial value of 0.16. The mass balance calculations for solid recovered after CWO reaction showed 8% and 10% deduction in catalyst mass primarily attributed to the loss of carbon and metal leaching. After the CWO process, carbon deposition was also observed on the recovered catalyst which was responsible for around 3-4% TOC reduction.

  14. Phototreatment of Palm Oil Mill Effluent (POME over Cu/TiO2 Photocatalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Hoong Ng

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The current work reported on the use of different formulations of Cu/TiO2 photocatalysts for the UV-irradiation of palm oil mills effluent (POME. Different copper loadings, viz. 2 wt%, 5 wt%, 10 wt%, 15 wt%, 20 wt% and 25 wt% were doped onto titania. XRD pattern confirmed the presence of anatase TiO2 as primary phase due to mild calcination temperature (573 K. Photo-decomposition of POME over 20 wt% Cu/TiO2 exhibited the highest conversion (27.0% attributed to its large pore diameter (20.0 nm. In addition, optimum loading was 0.83 g/l. © 2014 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 5th January 2014; Revised: 8th April 2014; Accepted: 8th April 2014[How to Cite: Hoong, N.K., Deraman, M.R., Ang, C.H., Chong, S.K., Kong, Z.Y., Khan, M.R., Cheng, C.K., (2014. Phototreatment of Palm Oil Mill Effluent (POME over Cu/TiO2 Photocatalyst. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 9 (2: 121-127. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.9.2.6011.121-127][Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.9.2.6011.121-127

  15. Advanced biological treatment of aqueous effluent from the nuclear fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitt, Jr., W. W.; Hancher, C. W.; Patton, B. D.; Shumate, II, S. E.

    1979-01-01

    Many of the processing steps in the nuclear fuel cycle generate aqueous effluent streams bearing contaminants that can, because of their chemical or radiological properties, pose an environmental hazard. Concentration of such contaminants must be reduced to acceptable levels before the streams can be discharged to the environment. Two classes of contaminants, nitrates and heavy metals, are addressed in this study. Specific techniques aimed at the removal of nitrates and radioactive heavy metals by biological processes are being developed, tested, and demonstrated. Although cost comparisons between biological processes and current treatment methods are presented, these comparisons may be misleading because biological processes yield environmentally better end results which are difficult to price. However, a strong case is made for the use of biological processes for removing nitrates and heavy metals fron nuclear fuel cycle effluents. The estimated costs for these methods are as low as, or lower than, those for alternate processes. In addition, the resulting disposal products - nitrogen gas, CO/sub 2/, and heavy metals incorporated into microorganisms - are much more ecologically desirable than the end products of other waste treatment methods.

  16. Potential environmental impact of effluents from the artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) byproduct ensiling process using additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megías, M D; Martínez-Teruel, A; Hérnandez, M R

    1999-06-01

    Three treatments have been tested on canned artichoke byproduct after 50 days of ensilage: formic acid at 20% in doses of 2 mL. kg(-)(1) (FA), cane sugar molasses at 50 g.kg(-)(1) (M), and sodium chloride at 30 g.kg(-)(1) (SC). A fourth batch acted as a control group (C). The nutritive value, fermentation characteristics, environmental pollution effect, and total volume of effluents released have been studied. The highest nutritive value recorded was with SC silage. The use of the additives did not significantly improve the fermentation stability of the silage, but the total production of effluents in each treatment-52.7 (FA), 46.9 (M), and 55.2 (SC)-was significantly lower (P < 0.01) than that of the control group (70.1 L.Tm(-)(1)). The chemical oxygen demand (COD), 117300 mg of O(2).L(-)(1), and the conductivity, 46.4 microOmega(-)(1). cm(-)(1), were significantly higher (P < 0.01) in M and SC, respectively, than in the other group.

  17. Electrocoagulation of palm oil mill effluent as wastewater treatment and hydrogen production using electrode aluminum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasution, M Ansori; Yaakob, Z; Ali, Ehsan; Tasirin, S M; Abdullah, S R S

    2011-01-01

    Palm oil mill effluent (POME) is highly polluting wastewater generated from the palm oil milling process. Palm oil mill effluent was used as an electrolyte without any additive or pretreatment to perform electrocoagulation (EC) using electricity (direct current) ranging from 2 to 4 volts in the presence of aluminum electrodes with a reactor volume of 20 L. The production of hydrogen gas, removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD), and turbidity as a result of electrocoagulation of POME were determined. The results show that EC can reduce the COD and turbidity of POME by 57 and 62%, respectively, in addition to the 42% hydrogen production. Hydrogen production was also helpful to remove the lighter suspended solids toward the surface. The production of Al(OH)XHO at the aluminum electrode (anode) was responsible for the flocculation-coagulation process of suspended solids followed by sedimentation under gravity. The production of hydrogen gas from POME during EC was also compared with hydrogen gas production by electrolysis of tap water at pH 4 and tap water without pH adjustment under the same conditions. The main advantage of this study is to produce hydrogen gas while treating POME with EC to reduce COD and turbidity effectively.

  18. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Balance-of-Plant Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballinger, M.Y.; Shields, K.D.

    1999-04-02

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operates a number of research and development (R and D) facilities for the Department of Energy on the Hanford Site. According to DOE Order 5400.1, a Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan is required for each site, facility, or process that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant pollutants or hazardous materials. Three of the R and D facilities: the 325, 331, and 3720 Buildings, are considered major emission points for radionuclide air sampling and thus individual Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans (FEMPs) have been developed for them. Because no definition of ''significant'' is provided in DOE Order 5400.1 or the accompanying regulatory guide DOE/EH-0173T, this FEMP was developed to describe monitoring requirements in the DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities that do not have individual FEMPs. The remainder of the DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities are referred to as Balance-of-Plant (BOP) facilities. Activities in the BOP facilities range from administrative to laboratory and pilot-scale R and D. R and D activities include both radioactive and chemical waste characterization, fluid dynamics research, mechanical property testing, dosimetry research, and molecular sciences. The mission and activities for individual buildings are described in the FEMP.

  19. Treatment of complex Remazol dye effluent using sawdust- and coal-based activated carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayaraghavan, K; Won, Sung Wook; Yun, Yeoung-Sang

    2009-08-15

    A complex Remazol dye effluent, comprised of four reactive dyes and auxiliary chemicals, was decolorized using SPS-200 (sawdust-based) and SPC-100 (coal-based) activated carbons. A detailed characterization revealed that the pore diameter of the activated carbon played an important role in dye adsorption. The solution pH had no significant effect on the adsorption capacity in the pH range of 2-10.7. According to the Langmuir model, the maximum uptakes of SPS-200 were 415.4, 510.3, 368.5 and 453.0 mg g(-1) for Reactive Black 5 (RB5), Reactive Orange 16 (RO16), Remazol Brilliant Blue R (RBBR) and Remazol Brilliant Violet 5R (RBV), respectively. Conversely, those of SPC-100 were slightly lower, at 150.8, 197.4, 178.3 and 201.1 mg g(-1) for RB5, RO16, RBBR and RBV, respectively. In the case of Remazol effluent, SPS-200 exhibited a decolorization efficiency of 100% under unadjusted pH conditions at 10.7, compared to that of 52% for SPC-100.

  20. Photo-assisted electrochemical degradation of simulated textile effluent coupled with simultaneous chlorine photolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mello Florêncio, Thaíla; de Araújo, Karla Santos; Antonelli, Raissa; de Toledo Fornazari, Ana Luiza; da Cunha, Paula Cordeiro Rodrigues; da Silva Bontempo, Letícia Helena; de Jesus Motheo, Artur; Granato, Ana Claudia; Malpass, Geoffroy Roger Pointer

    2016-10-01

    The influence of chloride ion concentration during the photo-assisted electrochemical degradation of simulated textile effluent, using a commercial Ti/Ru0.3Ti0.7O2 anode, was evaluated. Initially, the effect of applied current and supporting electrolyte concentration on the conversion of chloride ions to form reactive chlorine species in 90 min of experiment was analyzed in order to determine the maximum production of reactive chlorine species. The optimum conditions encountered (1.5 A and 0.3 mol dm(-3) NaCl) were subsequently employed for the degradation of simulated textile effluent. The efficiency of the process was determined through the analysis of chemical oxygen demand (COD), total organic carbon (TOC), of the presence of organochlorine products and phytotoxicity. Photo-assisted electrochemical degradation was more efficient for COD and TOC removal than the electrochemical technique alone. With simultaneous UV irradiation, a reduced quantity of reactive chlorine was produced, indicating that photolysis of the chlorine species led to the formation of hydroxyl radicals. This fact turns a simple electrochemical process into an advanced oxidation process.

  1. Enhanced Biodegradability of Aerobic Sludge by Bioaugmentation for Pulping Effluent Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honglei Chen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available To demonstrate the feasibility of bioaugmentation in enhancement of the biodegradation of pulping effluent, aerobic sludge was intensified with superior mixed flora. The differences between intensified aerobic activated sludge and original sludge were compared. The results showed that the chemical oxygen demand (COD of pulping effluent treated with the intensified sludge dropped to a much lower level compared with the original sludge, which indicated that the biodegradability of sludge was enhanced by bioaugmentation. The growth kinetics of the sludges were established. The growth rate Vmax of the intensified sludge was elevated from 7.8×10-3 to 7.1×10-3, while the saturation constant Ks decreased from 0.33 to 0.21 after bioaugmentation. In addition, the degradation kinetics showed that the equation coefficient of sludge increased from 4.6×10-3 to 6.4×10-3, confirming the intensification of biodegradation as a result of bioaugmentation.

  2. Anodic oxidation of textile dyehouse effluents on boron-doped diamond electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsantaki, Eleni; Velegraki, Theodora; Katsaounis, Alexandros [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Crete, Polytechneioupolis, GR-73100 Chania (Greece); Mantzavinos, Dionissios, E-mail: mantzavi@mred.tuc.gr [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Crete, Polytechneioupolis, GR-73100 Chania (Greece)

    2012-03-15

    The electrochemical oxidation of textile effluents over a boron-doped diamond anode was investigated in the present study. Experiments were conducted with a multi-component synthetic solution containing seventeen dyes and other auxiliary inorganics, as well as an actual effluent from a textile dyeing process. The effect of varying operating parameters, such as current density (4-50 mA/cm{sup 2}), electrolyte concentration (0.1-0.5 M HClO{sub 4}), initial solution pH (1-12.3) and temperature (22-43 Degree-Sign C), on process efficiency was investigated following changes in total organic carbon (TOC), chemical oxygen demand (COD) and color. Complete decolorization accompanied by significant mineralization (up to 85% depending on the conditions) could be achieved after 180 min of treatment. Performance was improved at higher electrolyte concentrations and lower pH values, while the effect of temperature was marginal. Energy consumption per unit mass of COD removed was favored at lower current densities, since energy was unnecessarily wasted to side reactions at higher densities.

  3. Comparative study of leaching of silver nanoparticles from fabric and effective effluent treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aneesh Pasricha; Sant Lal Jangra; Nahar Singh; Neeraj Dilbaghi; K. N. Sood; Kanupriya Arora; Renu Pasricha

    2012-01-01

    Nano silver (Agn) is employed as an active antimicrobial agent,but the environmental impact of Agn released from commercial products is unknown.The quantity of nanomaterial released from consumer products during use should be determined to assess the environmental risks of advancement of nanotechnology.This work investigated the amount of silver released from three different types of fabric into water during washing.Three different types of fabric were loaded with chemically synthesized Ag nanoparticles and washed repeatedly under simulated washing conditions.Variable leaching rates among fabric types suggest that the manufacturing process may control the release of silver reaching the waste water treatment plants.In an attempt to recover the Agn for reutilizatlon and to save it from polluting water,the effluents from the wash were efficiently treated with bacterial strains.This treatment was based on biosorption and was very efficient for the elimination of silver nanoparticles in the wash water.The process ensured the recovery of the Agn leached into the effluent for reutilization,thus preventing environmental repercussions.

  4. Comparative study of leaching of silver nanoparticles from fabric and effective effluent treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasricha, Aneesh; Jangra, Sant Lal; Singh, Nahar; Dilbaghi, Neeraj; Sood, K N; Arora, Kanupriya; Pasricha, Renu

    2012-01-01

    Nano silver (Ag(n)) is employed as an active antimicrobial agent, but the environmental impact of Ag(n) released from commercial products is unknown. The quantity of nanomaterial released from consumer products during use should be determined to assess the environmental risks of advancement of nanotechnology. This work investigated the amount of silver released from three different types of fabric into water during washing. Three different types of fabric were loaded with chemically synthesized Ag nanoparticles and washed repeatedly under simulated washing conditions. Variable leaching rates among fabric types suggest that the manufacturing process may control the release of silver reaching the waste water treatment plants. In an attempt to recover the Ag(n) for reutilization and to save it from polluting water, the effluents from the wash were efficiently treated with bacterial strains. This treatment was based on biosorption and was very efficient for the elimination of silver nanoparticles in the wash water. The process ensured the recovery of the Ag(n) leached into the effluent for reutilization, thus preventing environmental repercussions.

  5. Treatment of colored and real industrial effluents through electrocoagulation using solar energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirkarami, Azam; Olya, Mohammad Ebrahim; Tabibian, Sahar

    2013-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the removal of Acid Orange 2 (sodium 4-[(2E)-2-(2-oxonaphthalen-1-ylidene) hydrazinyl] benzenesulfonate) and Reactive Blue 19 (2-Anthracenesulfonicacid,1-amino-9,10-dihydro-9,10-dioxo-4-[[3-[[2-(sulfooxy) ethyl] sulfonyl] phenyl] amino]-,sodium salt (1:2)) from synthesized and real effluents through electrocoagulation using solar cells for the purpose of improving economic efficiency of the process. The impact of a number of key operating parameters was explored including current density, anode type, temperature, pH, and electrolyte concentration. The current density of 45 Am(-2) proved to be the optimum level for both dyes. The same optimum alternatives were found for the other parameters in both cases: iron anode, a temperature level of 25°C, a pH of 7, and an electrolyte concentration of 15 mg L(-1). Both effluent samples were subjected to COD (chemical oxygen demand) and TOC (total organic carbon) tests. Cost analysis was performed for the treatment process.

  6. Influence of solid retention time on sludge characteristics and effluent quality in immersed membrane bioreactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO ZhanPing; ZHANG JingLi; ZHANG HongWe

    2008-01-01

    Here the effect of solid retention time (SRT) on the concentration of the mixed liquor suspend solid (MLSS), the sludge characteristics, the content of extra-cellular polymeric substances (EPS), the viscosity of mixed liquor and effluent quality in the immersed membrane bioreactor (IMBR) was investigated. The results indicate that the increase of the EPS content is the main reason for the increase of mixed liquor viscosity, the former is positively correlated with the latter (R2 = 0.9751). The size distribution profile of particles in the mixed liquor presents double-peak shape at SRT more than 30 days. The filtration resistance of membrane in IMBR is mainly caused by the tiny particles and the viscosity of the mixed liquor. In this study, the extension of SRT can hardly affect the removal efficiency of Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) and NH+4-N, and when SRT is below 30 days, silt density index (SDI15) is less than 3, the effluent can be deeply treated by using reverse osmosis system (RO) or nano-filtration system (NF). The method of controlling SRT is put forward by analyzing the relationship between SRT and the minimum generation-time of dominant bacteria (at the maximum specific growth rate under the operation temperature).

  7. Performance evaluation of low cost adsorbents in reduction of COD in sugar industrial effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parande, Anand K; Sivashanmugam, A; Beulah, H; Palaniswamy, N

    2009-09-15

    Studies on reduction of chemical oxygen demand (COD) in effluent from sugar industry have been carried out by employing different absorbents optimizing various parameters, such as initial concentration of adsorbate, pH, adsorbent dosage and contact time. Experimental studies were carried out in batches using metakaolin, tamarind nut carbon and dates nut carbon as adsorbents by keeping initial adsorbent dosage at 1 g l(-1), agitation time over a range of 30-240 min, adsorbent dosage at 100-800 mg l(-1) by varying the pH range from 4 to 10. Characterization of there adsorbents were done using techniques such as Fourier transforms infra red spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The experimental adsorption data fitted well to Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms. The isotherms of the adsorbents indicate appreciable adsorption capacity. Higher COD removal was observed at neutral pH conditions. Studies reveal that maximum reduction efficiency of COD takes place using metakaolin as an absorbent at a dosage of 500 mg l(-1) in a contact time of 180 min at pH 7 and it could be used as an efficient absorbent for treating sugar industrial effluent.

  8. Soluble phosphate fertilizer production using acid effluent from metallurgical industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattiello, Edson M; Resende Filho, Itamar D P; Barreto, Matheus S; Soares, Aline R; Silva, Ivo R da; Vergütz, Leonardus; Melo, Leônidas C A; Soares, Emanuelle M B

    2016-01-15

    Preventive and effective waste management requires cleaner production strategies and technologies for recycling and reuse. Metallurgical industries produce a great amount of acid effluent that must be discarded in a responsible manner, protecting the environment. The focus of this study was to examine the use of this effluent to increase reactivity of some phosphate rocks, thus enabling soluble phosphate fertilizer production. The effluent was diluted in deionized water with the following concentrations 0; 12.5; 25; 50; 75% (v v(-1)), which were added to four natural phosphate rocks: Araxá, Patos, Bayovar and Catalão and then left to react for 1 h and 24 h. There was an increase in water (PW), neutral ammonium citrate (PNAC) and citric acid (PCA) soluble phosphorus fractions. Such increases were dependent of rock type while the reaction time had no significant effect (p fertilizers with low toxic metal concentrations and a high level of micronutrients were produced compared to the original natural rocks. The minimum amount of total P2O5, PNAC and PW, required for national legislation for phosphate partially acidulated fertilizer, were met when using Catalão and the effluent at the concentration of 55% (v v(-1)). Fertilizer similar to partially acidulated phosphate was obtained when Bayovar with effluent at 37.5% (v v(-1)) was used. Even though fertilizers obtained from Araxá and Patos did not contain the minimum levels of total P2O5 required by legislation, they can be used as a nutrient source and for acid effluent recycling and reuse.

  9. Airborne effluent control for LMFBR fuel reprocessing plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarbro, O.O.; Groenier, W.S.; Stephenson, M.J.

    1976-01-01

    A significant part of the LMFBR fuel reprocessing development program has been devoted to the development of efficient removal systems for the volatile fission products, including /sup 131/I, krypton, tritium, /sup 129/I, and most recently /sup 14/C. Flowsheet studies have indicated that very significant reductions of radioactive effluents can be achieved by integrating advanced effluent control systems with new concepts of containment and ventilation; however, the feasibility of such has not yet been established, nor have the economics been examined. This paper presents a flowsheet for the application of advanced containment systems to the processing of LMFBR fuels and summarizes the status and applicability of specific fission product removal systems.

  10. Cleanup Verification Package for the 116-K-2 Effluent Trench

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. M. Capron

    2006-04-04

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 116-K-2 effluent trench, also referred to as the 116-K-2 mile-long trench and the 116-K-2 site. During its period of operation, the 116-K-2 site was used to dispose of cooling water effluent from the 105-KE and 105-KW Reactors by percolation into the soil. This site also received mixed liquid wastes from the 105-KW and 105-KE fuel storage basins, reactor floor drains, and miscellaneous decontamination activities.

  11. Nonradiological liquid effluent monitoring program. 1992 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.A.; Peterson-Wright, L.J.; Meachum, T.R.

    1993-08-01

    A monitoring program for nonradioactive parameters and pollutants in liquid effluents was initiated in October 1985 for facilities operated by EG&G Idaho, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Program design and implementation are discussed in this report. Design and methodologies for sampling, analysis, and data management are also discussed. Monitoring results for 28 liquid effluent streams from (October 1991 through December 1992) are presented with emphasis on calendar year 1992 activities. All parameter measurements and concentrations were below the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act toxic characteristics limits.

  12. Ecotoxicity tests using the green algae Chlorella vulgaris-A useful tool in hazardous effluents management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Aurora [REQUIMTE, Instituto Superior de Engenharia do Instituto Politecnico do Porto, R. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 431 4200-072 Porto (Portugal); Figueiredo, Sonia A., E-mail: saf@isep.ipp.pt [REQUIMTE, Instituto Superior de Engenharia do Instituto Politecnico do Porto, R. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 431 4200-072 Porto (Portugal); Sales, M. Goreti; Delerue-Matos, Cristina [REQUIMTE, Instituto Superior de Engenharia do Instituto Politecnico do Porto, R. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 431 4200-072 Porto (Portugal)

    2009-08-15

    The treatment efficiency of laboratory wastewaters was evaluated and ecotoxicity tests with Chlorella vulgaris were performed on them to assess the safety of their environmental discharge. For chemical oxygen demand wastewaters, chromium (VI), mercury (II) and silver were efficiently removed by chemical treatments. A reduction of ecotoxicity was achieved; nevertheless, an EC50 (effective concentration that causes a 50% inhibition in the algae growth) of 1.5% (v/v) indicated still high level of ecotoxicity. For chloride determination wastewaters, an efficient reduction of chromium and silver was achieved after treatment. Regarding the reduction of ecotoxicity observed, EC50 increased from 0.059% to 0.5%, only a 0.02% concentration in the aquatic environment would guarantee no effects. Wastewaters containing phenanthroline/iron (II) complex were treated by chemical oxidation. Treatment was satisfactory concerning chemical parameters, although an increase in ecotoxicity was observed (EC50 reduced from 0.31% to 0.21%). The wastes from the kinetic study of persulphate and iodide reaction were treated with sodium bisulphite until colour was removed. Although they did not reveal significant ecotoxicity, only over 1% of the untreated waste produced observable effects over algae. Therefore, ecotoxicity tests could be considered a useful tool not only in laboratory effluents treatment, as shown, but also in hazardous wastewaters management.

  13. POLISHING THE EFFLUENT FROM AN ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL PERCHLORATE TREATMENT PROCESS - SLIDES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaerobic biological processes effectively reduce perchlorate to chloride. However, the effluent can be biologically unstable, high in particulates and high in disinfection by-product precursor compounds. Such an effluent would be unsuitable for transmission into a drinking water...

  14. A novel hybrid technology for remediation of molasses-based raw effluents

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Verma, A.K.; Raghukumar, C.; Naik, C.G.

    A novel three-step technology for treatment of four molasses-based raw industrial effluents, varying in their COD, color and turbidity is reported here. Sequential steps involved in this treatment are; (1) sonication of the effluents, (2) whole...

  15. Corrosivity of paper mill effluent and corrosion performance of stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Chhotu; Sharma, Chhaya; Singh, A K

    2015-01-01

    Present study relates to the corrosivity of paper mill effluent and corrosion performance of stainless steel (SS) as a construction material for the effluent treatment plant (ETP). Accordingly, immersion test and electrochemical polarization tests were performed on SS 304 L, 316 L and duplex 2205 in paper mill effluent and synthetic effluent. This paper presents electrochemical polarization measurements, performed for the first time to the best of the authors' information, to see the influence of chlorophenols on the corrosivity of effluents. The corrosivity of the effluent was observed to increase with the decrease in pH and increase in Cl- content while the addition of SO4- tends to inhibit corrosion. Mill effluent was found to be more corrosive as compared to synthetic effluent and has been attributed to the presence of various chlorophenols. Corrosion performance of SS was observed to govern by the presence of Cr, Mo and N contents.

  16. Toxicity of effluents emitted by the diesel engines vehicles; Toxicite des effluents emis par les vehicules a moteur diesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcon, St.

    1998-04-29

    The exhaust gases of diesel engine vehicles are atmospheric pollutants. They are characterised by a gaseous phase and a particulate phase. The diesel particulates are composed of a nucleus formed with elementary carbon, forming aggregates that absorb the organic by-products at their surface. A first part treats the effluents of diesel engine vehicles: their characteristics, the factors influencing the diesel emissions, the noxiousness of the gaseous phase, the kinetics and the metabolism of the particulate phase and analysis methods. A second part tackles the experimental toxicity of diesel effluents on insisting on the nature of exposures, the mutagenicity, the carcinogenicity, the effects on the reproduction function and immuno-toxicity. A third part is devoted to the toxicity for man with epidemiology data and some studies under controlled exposures. Then, a fourth part, explains the toxicity mechanisms and the action modes of diesel effluents on the carcinogen effects and on respiratory diseases. (N.C.)

  17. Metabolic response of environmentally isolated microorganisms to industrial effluents: Use of a newly described cell culture assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferebee, Robert N.

    1992-01-01

    An environmental application using a microtiter culture assay to measure the metabolic sensitivity of microorganisms to petrochemical effluents will be tested. The Biomedical Operations and Research Branch at NASA JSC has recently developed a rapid and nondestructive method to measure cell growth and metabolism. Using a colorimetric procedure the uniquely modified assay allows the metabolic kinetics of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells to be measured. Use of such an assay if adapted for the routine monitoring of waste products, process effluents, and environmentally hazardous substances may prove to be invaluable to the industrial community. The microtiter method as described will be tested using microorganisms isolated from the Galveston Bay aquatic habitat. The microbial isolates will be identified prior to testing using the automated systems available at JSC. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), cadmium, and lead will provide control toxic chemicals. The toxicity of industrial effluent from two industrial sites will be tested. An effort will be made to test the efficacy of this assay for measuring toxicity in a mixed culture community.

  18. Selection of a bioassay battery to assess toxicity in the affluents and effluents of three water-treatment plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Bohórquez-Echeverry

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of water quality includes the analysis of both physical-chemical and microbiological parameters. However,none of these evaluates the biological effect that can be generated in ecosystems or humans. In order to define the most suitable organismsto evaluate the toxicity in the affluent and effluent of three drinking-water treatment plants, five acute toxicity bioassays were used,incorporating three taxonomic groups of the food chain. Materials and methods. The bioassays used were Daphnia magna and Hydraattenuata as animal models, Lactuca sativa and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata as plant models, and Photobacterium leioghnathi asbacterial model. To meet this objective, selection criteria of the organisms evaluated and cluster analysis were used to identify the mostsensitive in the affluent and effluent of each plant. Results. All organisms are potentially useful in the assessment of water quality bymeeting four essential requirements and 17 desirable requirements equivalent to 100% acceptability, except P. leioghnathi which doesnot meet two essential requirements that are the IC50 for the toxic reference and the confidence interval. The animal, plant and bacterialmodels showed different levels of sensitivity at the entrance and exit of the water treatment systems. Conclusions. H. attenuata, P.subcapitata and P. leioghnathi were the most effective organisms in detecting toxicity levels in the affluents and D. magna, P. subcapitataand P. leioghnathi in the effluents.

  19. Oxidative stress responses of Daphnia magna exposed to effluents spiked with emerging contaminants under ozonation and advanced oxidation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oropesa, Ana Lourdes; Novais, Sara C; Lemos, Marco F L; Espejo, Azahara; Gravato, Carlos; Beltrán, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Integration of conventional wastewater treatments with advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) has become of great interest to remove pharmaceuticals and their metabolites from wastewater. However, application of these technologies generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) that may reach superficial waters through effluents from sewage treatment plants. The main objective of the present study was to elucidate if ROS present in real effluents after biological and then chemical (single ozonation, solar photolytic ozonation, solar photocatalytic ozonation (TiO2, Fe3O4) and solar photocatalytic oxidation (TiO2)) treatments induce oxidative stress in Daphnia magna. For this, the activity of two antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase and catalase) and the level of lipid peroxidation were determined in Daphnia. The results of oxidative stress biomarkers studied suggest that D. magna is able to cope with the superoxide ion radical (O2·(-)) present in the treated effluent due to single ozonation by mainly inducing the antioxidant activity superoxide dismutase, thus preventing lipid peroxidation. Lethal effects (measured in terms of immobility) were not observed in these organisms after exposure to any solution. Therefore, in order to probe the ecological efficiency of urban wastewater treatments, studies on lethal and sublethal effects in D. magna would be advisable.

  20. Advanced treatment of effluents from an industrial park wastewater treatment plant by ferrous ion activated persulfate oxidation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Songmei; Zhou, Zhen; Jiang, Haitao; Ye, Jianfeng; Ren, Jiamin; Gu, Lingyun; Wang, Luochun

    The advanced oxidation technology, ferrous ion (Fe(II)) activated persulfate (PS) producing sulfate radicals, was used for the advanced treatment of effluent from an integrated wastewater treatment plant in a papermaking industrial park. Separate and interactive effects of PS dosage, Fe(II)/PS ratio and initial pH on chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal were analyzed by the response surface methodology (RSM). The results showed that Fe(II)-PS system was effective in COD removal from the secondary effluent. PS dosage was the most dominant factor with positive influence on COD removal, followed by initial pH value. The optimum conditions with COD removal of 54.4% were obtained at PS/COD of 2.2, initial pH of 6.47 and Fe(II)/PS of 1.89. UV-visible spectrum analysis showed that after RSM optimization, Fe(II)-PS system effectively degraded large organic molecules into small ones, and decreased humification degree of the effluent. Three-dimensional fluorescence analysis demonstrated that aromatic protein and fulvic substances were fully decomposed by the Fe(II)-PS treatment.

  1. Evaluation of a hybrid anaerobic biofilm reactor treating winery effluents and using grape stalks as biofilm carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahab, Mohamed Ali; Habouzit, Frédéric; Bernet, Nicolas; Jedidi, Naceur; Escudié, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    Wine production processes generate large amount of both winery wastewater and solid wastes. Furthermore, working periods, volumes and pollution loads greatly vary over the year. Therefore, it is recommended to develop a low-cost treatment technology for the treatment of winery effluents taking into account the variation of the organic loading rate (OLR). Accordingly, we have investigated the sequential operation of an anaerobic biofilm reactor treating winery effluents and using grape stalks (GSs) as biofilm carrier with an OLR ranging from 0.65 to 27 gCOD/L/d. The result showed that, during the start-up with wastewater influent, the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal rate ranged from 83% to 93% and was about 91% at the end of the start-up period that lasted for 40 days. After 3 months of inactivity period of the reactor (no influent feeding), we have succeeded in restarting-up the reactor in only 15 days with a COD removal of 82% and a low concentration of volatile fatty acids (1 g/L), which confirms the robustness of the reactor. As a consequence, GSs can be used as an efficient carrier support, allowing a fast reactor start-up, while the biofilm conserves its activity during a non-feeding period. The proposed hybrid reactor thus permits to treat both winery effluents and GSs.

  2. Performance of photoperiod and light intensity on biogas upgrade and biogas effluent nutrient reduction by the microalgae Chlorella sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Cheng; Zheng, Zheng

    2013-07-01

    Biogas is an environment-friendly fuel but that must be upgraded before being utilized. The method about removing CO2 from biogas by microalgal culturing using biogas effluent as nutrient medium in this study could effectively upgrade biogas and simultaneously reduce the biogas effluent nutrient. Results showed that the optimum parameters for microalgal growth and biogas effluent nutrient reduction was moderate light intensity with middle photoperiod. While low light intensity with long photoperiod and moderate light intensity with middle photoperiod obtained the best biogas CO2 removal and biogas upgrade effects. Therefore, the optimal parameters were moderate light intensity 350 μmol m(-2)s(-1) with middle photoperiod 14 h light:10h dark. Under this condition, the microalgal dry weight, CH4 concentration, reduction efficiency of chemical oxygen demand, total nitrogen, and total phosphorus was 615.84 ± 33.07 mg L(-1), 92.16 ± 2.83% (v/v), 88.74 ± 3.45%, 83.94 ± 3.51%, and 80.43 ± 4.17%, respectively.

  3. Glider and remote sensing observations of the upper ocean response to an extended shallow coastal diversion of wastewater effluent

    KAUST Repository

    Seegers, Bridget N.

    2016-06-21

    The Orange County Sanitation District (OCSD) diverted wastewater discharge (5.3 × 108 l d−1) from its primary deep (56 m) outfall 8 km offshore, to a secondary shallower (16 m) outfall 1.6 km offshore for a period of three weeks. It was anticipated that the low salinity and density of the effluent would cause it to rise to the surface with limited dilution, elevating nutrient concentrations in near-surface waters and stimulating phytoplankton blooms in the region. Three Teledyne Webb Slocum gliders and a Liquid Robotics surface wave glider were deployed on transects near the outfalls to acquire high spatial and temporal coverage of physical and chemical parameters before, during, and after the wastewater diversion. Combined autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) and MODIS-Aqua satellite ocean color data indicated that phytoplankton biomass increased in the upper water column in response to the diversion, but that the magnitude of the response was spatially patchy and significantly less than expected. Little evidence of the plume or its effects was detectable 72 h following the diversion. The effluent plume exhibited high rates of dilution and mixed throughout the upper 20 m and occasionally throughout the upper 40 m during the diversion. Rapid plume advection and dilution appeared to contribute to the muted impact of the nutrient-rich effluent on the phytoplankton community in this coastal ecosystem.

  4. Bioremediation of industrial effluents containing heavy metals using brewing cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a green technology: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Eduardo V; Soares, Helena M V M

    2012-05-01

    The release of heavy metals into the environment, mainly as a consequence of anthropogenic activities, constitutes a worldwide environmental pollution problem. Unlike organic pollutants, heavy metals are not degraded and remain indefinitely in the ecosystem, which poses a different kind of challenge for remediation. It seems that the "best treatment technologies" available may not be completely effective for metal removal or can be expensive; therefore, new methodologies have been proposed for the detoxification of metal-bearing wastewaters. The present work reviews and discusses the advantages of using brewing yeast cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the detoxification of effluents containing heavy metals. The current knowledge of the mechanisms of metal removal by yeast biomass is presented. The use of live or dead biomass and the influence of biomass inactivation on the metal accumulation characteristics are outlined. The role of chemical speciation for predicting and optimising the efficiency of metal removal is highlighted. The problem of biomass separation, after treatment of the effluents, and the use of flocculent characteristics, as an alternative process of cell-liquid separation, are also discussed. The use of yeast cells in the treatment of real effluents to bridge the gap between fundamental and applied studies is presented and updated. The convenient management of the contaminated biomass and the advantages of the selective recovery of heavy metals in the development of a closed cycle without residues (green technology) are critically reviewed.

  5. The potentialities of the complexation ultrafiltration technique for the decontamination of fission product contaminated aqueous effluents; Potentialites de la complexation - ultrafiltration a la decontamination d`effluents radioactifs en produits de fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thibert, V.

    1995-07-01

    Many nuclear researchers and industrial operators lay emphasis on improving the back end of the fuel cycle. A major problem concerns the liquid wastes generated by the reprocessing plant at La Hague, discharged into the sea after treatment in the Effluent Treatment Station (STE) (3), and which have become crucial matter. The activity of these wastes is well below the current legal limits, and is constantly decreasing these last years. To bring it close to zero, and ambitious goal, entails innovative new reprocessing techniques. We accordingly investigated the possibilities of complexation-ultrafiltration, a technique that uses water-soluble macromolecules to complex the target elements to be separated. We first achieved the strontium (II) separation with poly-acrylic and poly-sulfonic acids. The effects of pH and NaNO{sub 3} concentration influence on Sr (II) complexation were studied. The Sr (II) complexation and concentration phases, followed by cation de-complexation to recover the polymer, were also taken into account. This research, combined with a potentiometric study of the polymers, offered a close understanding of the chemical systems involved, and of the operating conditions and limits of complexation-ultrafiltration. The laboratory results were also validated on a tangential ultrafiltration pilot plant. We then used complexation-ultrafiltration to treat a real effluent generated bu La Hague`s STE 3 plant. This experiment demonstrated minimum 90 % decontamination of Sr (II) (with polyacrylate complexing agent), and also for {sup 134-137}Cs (with simple ultrafiltration). The use of two polyamides allowed partial decontamination of the effluent for {sup 60}Co and {sup 106}Ru. This work therefore offers a global approach to complexation-ultrafiltration, from laboratory to pilot scale, on real and simulated effluents. The future of this technique relies chiefly on the ability to solve the problem of polymer recovery. (Abstract Truncated)

  6. Bioremediation Kinetics of Pharmaceutical Industrial Effluent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Šabić

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, concerns about the occurrence and fate of pharmaceuticals that could be present in water and wastewater has gained increasing attention. With the public’s enhanced awareness of eco-safety, environmentally benign methods based on microorganisms have become more accepted methods of removing pollutants from aquatic systems. This study investigates bioremediation of pharmaceutical wastewater from pharmaceutical company Pliva Hrvatska d.o.o., using activated sludge and bioaugmented activated sludge with isolated mixed bacterial culture. The experiments were conducted in a batch reactor in submerged conditions, at initial concentration of organic matter in pharmaceutical wastewater, expressed as COD, 5.01 g dm–3 and different initial concentrations of activated sludge, which ranged from 1.16 to 3.54 g dm–3. During the experiments, the COD, pH, concentrations of dissolved oxygen and biomass were monitored. Microscopic analyses were performed to monitor the quality of activated sludge. Before starting with the bioremediation in the batch reactor, toxicity of the pharmaceutical wastewater was determined by toxicity test using bacteria Vibrio fischeri. The obtained results showed that the effective concentration of the pharmaceutical wastewater was EC50 = 17 % and toxicity impact index was TII50 = 5.9, meaning that the untreated pharmaceutical industrial effluent must not be discharged into the environment before treatment. The results of the pharmaceutical wastewater bioremediation process in the batch reactor are presented in Table 1. The ratio γXv ⁄ γX maintained high values throughout all experiments and ranged from 0.90 and 0.95, suggesting that the concentrations of biomass remained unchanged during the experiments. The important kinetic parameters required for performance of the biological removal process, namely μmax, Ks, Ki, Y and kd were calculated from batch experiments (Table 2. Figs. 1 and 2 show the experimental

  7. Study of Influence of Effluent on Ground Water Using Remote Sensing, GIS and Modeling Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, S.; Bhadra, B. K.; Sharma, J. R.

    2012-07-01

    The area lies in arid zone of western Rajasthan having very scanty rains and very low ground water reserves. Some of the other problems that are faced by the area are disposal of industrial effluent posing threat to its sustainability of water resource. Textiles, dyeing and printing industries, various mechanical process and chemical/synthetic dyes are used and considerable wastewater discharged from these textile units contains about high amount of the dyes into the adjoining drainages. This has caused degradation of water quality in this water scarce semi-arid region of the country. Pali city is located South-West, 70 Kms from Jodhpur in western Rajasthan (India). There are four Common Effluent Treatment Plant (CETP) treating wastewater to meet the pollutant level permissible to river discharge, a huge amount of effluent water of these factories directly meets the into the river Bandi - a tributary of river Luni. In order to monitor the impact of industrial effluents on the environment, identifying the extent of the degradation and evolving possible means of minimizing the impacts studies on quality of effluents, polluted river water and water of adjoining wells, the contamination migration of the pollutants from the river to ground water were studied. Remote sensing analysis has been carried out using Resourcesat -1 multispectral satellite data along with DEM derived from IRS P5 stereo pair. GIS database generated of various thematic layers viz. base layer - inventorying all waterbodies in the vicinity, transport network and village layer, drainage, geomorphology, structure, land use. Analysis of spatial distribution of the features and change detection in land use/cover carried out. GIS maps have been used to help factor in spatial location of source and hydro-geomorphological settings. DEM & elevation contour helped in delineation of watershed and identifying flow modelling boundaries. Litholog data analysis carried out for aquifer boundaries using specialized

  8. STUDY OF INFLUENCE OF EFFLUENT ON GROUND WATER USING REMOTE SENSING, GIS AND MODELING TECHNIQUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pathak

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The area lies in arid zone of western Rajasthan having very scanty rains and very low ground water reserves. Some of the other problems that are faced by the area are disposal of industrial effluent posing threat to its sustainability of water resource. Textiles, dyeing and printing industries, various mechanical process and chemical/synthetic dyes are used and considerable wastewater discharged from these textile units contains about high amount of the dyes into the adjoining drainages. This has caused degradation of water quality in this water scarce semi-arid region of the country. Pali city is located South-West, 70 Kms from Jodhpur in western Rajasthan (India. There are four Common Effluent Treatment Plant (CETP treating wastewater to meet the pollutant level permissible to river discharge, a huge amount of effluent water of these factories directly meets the into the river Bandi – a tributary of river Luni. In order to monitor the impact of industrial effluents on the environment, identifying the extent of the degradation and evolving possible means of minimizing the impacts studies on quality of effluents, polluted river water and water of adjoining wells, the contamination migration of the pollutants from the river to ground water were studied. Remote sensing analysis has been carried out using Resourcesat −1 multispectral satellite data along with DEM derived from IRS P5 stereo pair. GIS database generated of various thematic layers viz. base layer – inventorying all waterbodies in the vicinity, transport network and village layer, drainage, geomorphology, structure, land use. Analysis of spatial distribution of the features and change detection in land use/cover carried out. GIS maps have been used to help factor in spatial location of source and hydro-geomorphological settings. DEM & elevation contour helped in delineation of watershed and identifying flow modelling boundaries. Litholog data analysis carried out for aquifer

  9. Coupled photocatalytic-biodegradation of 2,4,5-trichlorophenol: effects of photolytic and photocatalytic effluent composition on bioreactor process performance, community diversity, and resistance and resilience to perturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsolek, Michael D; Kirisits, Mary Jo; Gray, Kimberly A; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2014-03-01

    Sequentially coupled advanced oxidation-biodegradation systems have proven effective for treating a variety of wastewaters, but in several cases the pretreatment did not improve, or even hindered, subsequent biodegradation. Therefore, investigating the relationship between advanced oxidation pretreated effluent and subsequent bioreactor performance can help to optimize these systems. Here, a photocatalytic reactor was used to produce four unique effluents from 2,4,5-trichlorophenol (TCP) by varying light wavelength, catalyst presence, and reaction time, demonstrating that the conditions of photocatalytic pretreatment can be tuned to achieve a variety of treatment objectives. The photocatalytic effluents were characterized for chemical oxygen demand (COD), chloride release, aromaticity, and residual TCP concentration. The four effluents were normalized to 40 mg COD/L, combined with biological medium components, and fed to continuous bioreactors. Bioreactors were assayed for COD removal, TCP removal, optical density (OD), and microbial diversity via denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. In general COD removal in the bioreactors increased as aromatic character of the photoeffluent decreased, but the least aromatic effluent performed poorly indicating the nuanced relationship between photoreactor effluent composition and bioreactor performance. While neither indicator of community diversity, richness nor evenness, correlated with COD removal or biomass accumulation, each effluent produced a unique community as indicated through similarity indices. All conditions demonstrated strong overall TCP removal. After two weeks at steady state, the reactors were perturbed with a 120-μM spike of TCP. Overall the most aromatic photoeffluent produced the most resistant community to the perturbation, while the optimum effluents at steady state produced communities with poor resistance in terms of biomass accumulation and COD removal. These results highlight the tradeoffs

  10. Cathode Assessment for Maximizing Current Generation in Microbial Fuel Cells Utilizing Bioethanol Effluent as Substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Guotao; Thygesen, Anders; Meyer, Anne S.

    2016-01-01

    responses to substrate loading rates and external resistance. At the lowest external resistance of 27 and highest substrate loading rate of 2 g chemical oxygen demand (COD) per Lday, FeC-MFC generated highest average current density (1630 mA/m(2)) followed by AiC-MFC (802 mA/m(2)) and DOC-MFC (184 mA/m(2......)). Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to determine the impedance of the cathodes. It was thereby confirmed that the FeC-MFC produced the highest current density with the lowest internal resistance for the cathode. However, in a setup using bioethanol effluent, the AiC-MFC was concluded...

  11. Treatment of effluents of poultry slaughterhouse with aluminum salts and natural polyelectrolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, E; Rodrigues, D G; Nozaki, J

    2002-08-01

    A mixture of aluminum salts and natural polyelectrolytes, extracted from the cactus Opuntia ficus indica, has been used for cleaning of wastewater from poultry slaughterhouse. The aggregation and settling properties of colloids and complex organics such as oil, grease, fats, proteins, and suspended solids, was increased if compared with conventional methods of wastewater treatment using only aluminum or iron sulfate. A mixture of aluminum salt in a concentration range of 300 to 600 mg l(-1) and natural polyelectrolytes of 0.6 to 0.8 mg l(-1) was used for flocculation and coagulation. The combination of coagulant and natural polyelectrolytes was able to remove chemical oxygen demand (86%), oil and grease (93%), turbidity (89%), and suspended solids (93%). Methanization activity was also investigated for the effluents in natura.

  12. Distillery effluent as a liquid fertilizer: a win-win option for sustainable agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, K; Ranjan, N; Kumar, S; Sinha, R C

    2016-01-01

    A promising approach to recycle the residual distillery waste as a potential liquid fertilizer has been discussed in this paper. Field studies were conducted on Brassica compestris to assess the potential of the diluted post- methanated distillery effluent. The results indicated that there was not much variation in pH, conductivity and nitrate of soil, whereas total dissolved solids, conductivity, nitrate and chemical oxygen demand of the well water increased slightly but well within the permissible limit. However, there was a significant increase in the plant biomass, diameter of the shoot and root, area of leaf, as well as number and length of pods and root hairs. The hydrophilic colloids of the seed increased significantly (p fertilizer. The carbohydrate, chlorophyll and ascorbic acid content of the leaf, stem and root were also analysed and its morpho- physiological significance is also presented in this paper.

  13. Biological decolourisation of pulp mill effluent using white rot fungus Trametes versicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, S V; Murthy, D V S; Swaminathan, T

    2012-07-01

    The conventional biological treatment methods employed in the pulp and paper industries are not effective in reducing the colour and chemical oxygen demand (COD). The white-rot fungi are reported to have the ability to biodegrade the lignin and its derivatives. This paper is focused on the biological treatment of pulp mill effluent from a bagasse-based pulp and paper industry using fungal treatment. Experiments were conducted using the white rot fungus, Trametes versicolor in shake flasks operated in batch mode with different carbon sources. The decolourisation efficiencies of 82.5% and 80.3% were obtained in the presence of 15 g/L and 5 g/L of glucose and sucrose concentrations respectively with a considerable COD reduction. The possibility of reusing the grown fungus was examined for repeated treatment studies.

  14. Polishing of treated palm oil mill effluent (POME) from ponding system by electrocoagulation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Mohammed J K; Mau Han, Tham; Jun Wei, Lim; Choon Aun, Ng; Abu Amr, Salem S

    2016-01-01

    As the ponding system used to treat palm oil mill effluent (POME) frequently fails to satisfy the discharge standard in Malaysia, the present study aimed to resolve this problem using an optimized electrocoagulation process. Thus, a central composite design (CCD) module in response surface methodology was employed to optimize the interactions of process variables, namely current density, contact time and initial pH targeted on maximum removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD), colour and turbidity with satisfactory pH of discharge POME. The batch study was initially designed by CCD and statistical models of responses were subsequently derived to indicate the significant terms of interactive process variables. All models were verified by analysis of variance showing model significances with Prob > F electrocoagulation process optimized by CCD.

  15. REDUCING COD AND BOD, AS WELL AS PRODUCING TRIACYLGLYCEROL BY LDS5 GROWN IN CTMP EFFLUENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunfeng Ding

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Both the energy shortage and pollution tend to slow down economic development and affect our daily lives. Some microorganisms not only can digest pollutants, but also can convert pollutant metabolites to triacylglycerol (TAG that can be used to produce biodiesel. Here, we present results showing that the bacterium strain LDS5, a mutant of Rhodococcus sp. RHA1 (RHA1 generated in our lab, could grow well in chemithermomechanical pulping (CTMP effluent, a type of paper mill wastewater, reduce chemical oxygen demand (CODCr and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5 significantly, and produce TAG. Our data suggest that this strain has the potential to be used in paper mill wastewater treatment as well as in the development of biodiesel using biomass from paper mills.

  16. Pretreatment of palm oil mill effluent (POME) using Moringa oleifera seeds as natural coagulant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Subhash; Othman, Zalina; Ahmad, Abdul Latif

    2007-06-25

    Moringa oleifera seeds, an environmental friendly and natural coagulant are reported for the pretreatment of palm oil mill effluent (POME). In coagulation-flocculation process, the M. oleifera seeds after oil extraction (MOAE) are an effective coagulant with the removal of 95% suspended solids and 52.2% reduction in the chemical oxygen demand (COD). The combination of MOAE with flocculant (NALCO 7751), the suspended solids removal increased to 99.3% and COD reduction was 52.5%. The coagulation-flocculation process at the temperature of 30 degrees C resulted in better suspended solids removal and COD reduction compared to the temperature of 40, 55 and 70 degrees C. The MOAE combined with flocculant (NALCO 7751) reduced the sludge volume index (SVI) to 210mL/g with higher recovery of dry mass of sludge (87.25%) and water (50.3%).

  17. Dye removal from textile industrial effluents by adsorption on exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets: kinetic and equilibrium studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvallho, Marilda N; da Silva, Karolyne S; Sales, Deivson C S; Freire, Eleonora M P L; Sobrinho, Maurício A M; Ghislandi, Marcos G

    2016-01-01

    The concept of physical adsorption was applied for the removal of direct and reactive blue textile dyes from industrial effluents. Commercial graphite nanoplatelets were used as substrate, and the quality of the material was characterized by atomic force and transmission electron microscopies. Dye/graphite nanoplatelets water solutions were prepared varying their pH and initial dye concentration. Exceptionally high values (beyond 100 mg/L) for adsorptive capacity of graphite nanoplatelets could be achieved without complicated chemical modifications, and equilibrium and kinetic experiments were performed. Our findings were compared with the state of the art, and compared with theoretical models. Agreement between them was satisfactory, and allowed us to propose novel considerations describing the interactions of the dyes and the graphene planar structure. The work highlights the important role of these interactions, which can govern the mobility of the dye molecules and the amount of layers that can be stacked on the graphite nanoplatelets surface.

  18. MICROFILTRATION AS ADVANCED TREATMENT PROCESS FOR AN EFFLUENT OF BEEF CATTLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Osório da Silva

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to clarify an effluent of a cattle slaughter industry by means of polmeric membranes ofmicrofiltration (porosity of 0.4 μm with the purpose of removing its turbidity, COD, total suspended solids,volatile solids, inorganic phosphorus and ammonia nitrogen. And also the characteristics of the flow behaviorand transmembrane pressure, and permeate temperature for this wastewater. It was noted that the efficiencyregarding the removal of physical-chemical parameters was 98%, for Turbidity; 97%, for TSS; 97%, for VSS; 92%, for COD; 9%, for N-NH4- and 49%, for P-PO4 3-. Frequency operation of 35 Hz presented the highest permeate flux (18 L.h-1.m-2, lowest temperature and transmembrane pressure. Result showed that tangentialfiltration process is satisfactory in terms of macromolecules and turbidity removal.

  19. Analysis of Effluent Gases During the CCVD Growth of Multi Wall Carbon Nanotubes from Acetylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, T. C.; Biris, A. S.; Miller, D. W.; Biris, A. R.; Lupu, D.; Trigwell, S.; Rahman, Z. U.

    2005-01-01

    Catalytic chemical vapor deposition was used to grow multi-walled carbon nanotubes on a Fe:Co:CaCO3 catalyst from acetylene. The influent and effluent gases were analyzed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry at different time intervals during the nanotubes growth process in order to better understand and optimize the overall reaction. A large number of byproducts were identified and it was found that the number and the level for some of the carbon byproducts significantly increased over time. The CaCO3 catalytic support thermally decomposed into CaO and CO2 resulting in a mixture of two catalysts for growing the nanotubes, which were found to have outer diameters belonging to two main groups 8 to 35 nm and 40 to 60 nm, respectively.

  20. 40 CFR 434.84 - Effluent limitations attainable by application of the best conventional pollutant control...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS COAL MINING POINT... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effluent limitations attainable by... Mining § 434.84 Effluent limitations attainable by application of the best conventional pollutant...

  1. Removal of heavy metals from tannery effluents of Ambur industrial area, Tamilnadu by Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaji, S; Kalaivani, T; Rajasekaran, C; Shalini, M; Vinodhini, S; Priyadharshini, S Sunitha; Vidya, A G

    2015-06-01

    The present study was carried out with the tannery effluent contaminated with heavy metals collected from Ambur industrial area to determine the phycoremediation potential of Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis. Two different concentrations (50 and 100 %) of heavy metals containing tannery effluent treated with A. platensis were analysed for growth, absorption spectra, biochemical properties and antioxidant enzyme activity levels. The effluent treatments revealed dose-dependent decrease in the levels of A. platensis growth (65.37 % for 50 % effluent and 49.32 % for 100 % effluent), chlorophyll content (97.43 % for 50 % effluent and 71.05 % for 100 % effluent) and total protein content (82.63 % for 50 % effluent and 62.10 % for 100 % effluent) that leads to the reduction of total solids, total dissolved solids and total suspended solids. A. platensis with lower effluent concentration was effective than at higher concentration. Treatment with the effluent also resulted in increased activity levels of antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (14.58 units/g fresh weight for 50 % and 24.57 units/g fresh weight for 100 %) and catalase (0.963 units/g fresh weight for 50 % and 1.263 units/g fresh weight for 100 %). Furthermore, heavy metal content was determined using atomic absorption spectrometry. These results indicated that A. platensis has the ability to combat heavy metal stress by the induction of antioxidant enzymes demonstrating its potential usefulness in phycoremediation of tannery effluent.

  2. 40 CFR 141.551 - What strengthened combined filter effluent turbidity limits must my system meet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... in at least 95 percent of the turbidity measurements taken each month. Measurements must continue to... effluent turbidity limits must my system meet? 141.551 Section 141.551 Protection of Environment... Effluent Requirements § 141.551 What strengthened combined filter effluent turbidity limits must my...

  3. 40 CFR 401.17 - pH Effluent limitations under continuous monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true pH Effluent limitations under... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS § 401.17 pH Effluent limitations under continuous monitoring. (a) Where a permittee continuously measures the pH of wastewater pursuant to...

  4. Adding silver and copper to hydrogen peroxide and peracetic acid in the disinfection of an advanced primary treatment effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orta De Velásquez, M T; Yáñez-Noguez, I; Jiménez-Cisneros, B; Luna Pabello, V M

    2008-11-01

    This paper evaluates the efficacy of hydrogen peroxide (HP) and peracetic acid (PAA) in the disinfection of an Advanced Primary Treatment (APT) effluent, and how said disinfection capacities can be enhanced by combining the oxidants with copper (Cu2+) and silver (Ag). The treatment sequence consisted of APT (adding chemicals to water to remove suspended solids by coagulation and flocculation), followed by disinfection with various doses of HP, HP+Cu2+, HP+Ag, PAA and PAA+Ag. Microbiological quality was determined by monitoring concentrations of fecal coliforms (FC), pathogenic bacteria (PB) and helminth eggs (HE) throughout the sequence. The results revealed that APT effluent still contains very high levels of bacteria as the treatment only removes 1-2 log of FC and PB, but the reduction in the number of viable helminth eggs was 83%. Subsequent disinfection stages demonstrated that both HP+Cu2+ and HP+Ag have a marked disinfection capacity for bacteria (3.9 and 3.4 log-inactivation, respectively). Peracetic acid on its own was already extremely efficient at disinfecting for bacteria, and the effect was enhanced when combining PAA with silver (PAA+Ag). The best result for HE removal was achieved by combining PAA with silver (PAA+Ag) at doses of 20 + 2.0 mg l(-1), respectively. The study concluded that the PAA+Ag and HP+Ag combinations were good alternatives for APT effluent disinfection, because the disinfected effluents met the standards in NOM-001-SEMARNAT-1996, Mexico's regulation governing the microbiological quality required in treated wastewater destined for unrestricted reuse in agricultural irrigation (< or =1 helminths per litre). Combining either of these disinfection treatments with a primary method such as APT, therefore, offers an effective and practical way of reducing the health risks normally associated with the reuse of wastewaters.

  5. Enhanced oil recovery chemicals from renewable wood resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grune, W.N.; Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.; Crenshaw, J.M.

    1979-04-01

    Most of the wood pulp in the U.S. is produced by cooking, or digesting, wood chips in a chemical solution. These pulping processes have effluent streams which contain dissolved lignins, lignin breakdown products, and carbohydrates. There is a substantial economic incentive to use these materials as feedstocks for the production of high-valued micellar flood chemicals. The pulp and paper industries have practiced chemical recovery for almost a century. The largest chemical recycle processes are the internal recycle of inorganic salts for reuse in pulping. This is coupled with the use of waste organic compounds in the liquor as a fuel for directly-fired evaporation processes. Diversion of effluent and low valued streams for chemical recovery using fermentation, purification, or synthesis methods appears technically feasible in several cases. The use of new recovery processes could yield a variety of different wood-effluent based products. Some of the sugar acids in pulping liquors might be used as sequestering agents in reservoirs where there are large amounts of multivalent cations in flood brines. Fermentation production of high viscosity polymers, sequestering agents, and coagent alcohols appears worth further investigation. Tall oil acids and their derivatives can be used as surfactants in some reservoirs. Some waste constituents may adsorb preferentially on formations and thereby reduce loss of surfactants and other higher-valued chemicals.

  6. Nile tilapia culture on domestic effluent treated in stabilization ponds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clovis Matheus Pereira

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The performance and filet quality of tilapias (Oreochromis niloticus culture in effluent stabilization lagoons was tested at the densities of 3 fish/m2 (T3, 7 fish/m2 (T2 and 7 fish/m2 in clean water + diet (T1 with 3 repetitions in tanks of 2.57m2 and 0.60m of water column with supplemental aeration. Fish culture in clean water plus diet (T1 presented the highest growth. The higher density T3 (7/m2 compared to T2 (3/m2 did not result in any difference of total production (p > 0.05 but this was compensated by the increased individual fish growth rate at lower density. The conditions that sustain fish survival culture with ETE effluent were attested by the high survival (> 90% under both treatments, but only 10% of the water samples from T2 and T3 N-total ammonium was favorable for fish growth (< 2.0mg/L. The rearing system improved the effluent quality, reducing the total organic nitrogen and the solids in suspension. The faecal coliforms, Salmonella sp. and Staphylococcus aureus from the effluent and fish were verified to be within the standards laid down by the World Health Organization (WHO.

  7. Removal of Heavy Metals in Effluent by Adsorption and Coagulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Ting LI; Xia LI; Bing Ru ZHANG; Qing Hua OUYANG

    2004-01-01

    The silicate colloids with an average diameter 100 nm, were prepared by the hydrolysis of tetraethoxysilane (TES), NH4OH (30%) and then modified by (3-mercaptopropyl) trimethoxysilane ( APS). The colloids can adsorb heavy metals such as Pb and Cr in effluent and after adsorption the colloids can be separated by coagulation of aluminum sulfate. The removal of heavy metals is up to 99%.

  8. Modelling anaerobic codigestion of manure with olive oil mill effluent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelidaki, I.; Ellegaard, L.; Ahring, B.K.

    1997-01-01

    anaerobic codigestion of cattle manure together with olive oil mill effluent (OME) and the simulations were compared with experimental data. Simulation data indicated that lack of ammonia, needed as nitrogen source for synthesis of bacterial biomass and as an important pH buffer, could be responsible...

  9. Develop Plan for Analysis of the Effluent from GCM Production.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nenoff, Tina M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mowry, Curtis D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-08-24

    This milestone is focused on developing a plan for the analysis of the effluent from the Sandia low temperature sintering Bi-Si-Zn oxide glass composite material (GCM) waste form for the long term storage of iodine and its capture materials.

  10. Radioactive Effluents from Nuclear Power Plants Annual Report 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation

    2010-12-10

    This report describes radioactive effluents from commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States. This information was reported by the licensees for radioactive discharges that occurred in 2007. The report provides information relevant to the potential impact of NPPs on the environment and on public health.

  11. Radioactive Effluents from Nuclear Power Plants Annual Report 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation

    2010-12-10

    This report describes radioactive effluents from commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States. This information was reported by the licensees for radioactive discharges that occurred in 2008. The report provides information relevant to the potential impact of NPPs on the environment and on public health.

  12. POLISHING EFFLUENT FROM A PERCHLORATE-REDUCING ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL CONTACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency undertook at 3 ½ year pilot-scale biological perchlorate treatment study that included two long (311 and 340 days) examinations of anaerobic effluent polishing. The polishing system consisted of hydrogen peroxide addition and aeration, fo...

  13. Consideration of Factors Affecting Strip Effluent PH and Sodium Content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-07-29

    A number of factors were investigated to determine possible reasons for why the Strip Effluent (SE) can sometimes have higher than expected pH values and/or sodium content, both of which have prescribed limits. All of the factors likely have some impact on the pH values and Na content.

  14. Performance evaluation of Effluent Treatment Plant of Dairy Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratiksinh Chavda

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Dairy industry is among the most polluting of the food industries in regard to its large water consumption. Dairy is one of the major industries causing water pollution. Considering the increased milk demand, the dairy industry in India is expected to grow rapidly and have the waste generation and related environmental problems are also assumed increased importance. Poorly treated wastewater with high level of pollutants caused by poor design, operation or treatment systems creates major environmental problems when discharged to the surface land or water. Various operations in a dairy industry may include pasteurization, cream, cheese, milk powder etc. Considering the above stated implications an attempt has been made in the present project to evaluate one of the Effluent Treatment Plant for dairy waste. Samples are collected from three points; Collection tank (CT, primary clarifier (PC and Secondary clarifier (SC to evaluate the performance of Effluent Treatment Plant. Parameters analyzed for evaluation of performance of Effluent Treatment Plant are pH, TDS, TSS, COD, and BOD at 200C The pH, TDS, TSS, COD and BOD removal efficiency of Effluent Treatment Plant were 26.14 %, 33.30 %, 93.85 %, 94.19 % and 98.19 % respectively.

  15. Wastewater use in agriculture: irrigation of sugar cane with effluents from the Cañaveralejo wastewater treatment plant in Cali, Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madera, C A; Silva, J; Mara, D D; Torres, P

    2009-09-01

    In Valle del Cauca, south-west Colombia, surface and ground waters are used for sugar cane irrigation at a rate of 100 m3 of water per tonne of sugar produced. In addition large quantities of artificial fertilizers and pesticides are used to grow the crop. Preliminary experiments were undertaken to determine the feasibility of using effluents from the Cañaveralejo primary wastewater treatment plant in Cali. Sugar cane variety CC 8592 was planted in 18 box plots, each 0.5 m2. Six were irrigated with conventional primary effluent, six with chemically enhanced primary effluent and six with groundwater. For each set of six box plots, three contained local soil and three a 50:50 mixture of sand and rice husks. The three irrigation waters were monitored for 12 months, and immediately after harvest the sugar content of the sugar cane juice determined. All physico-chemical quality parameters for the three irrigation waters were lower than the FAO guideline values for irrigation water quality; on the basis of their sodium absorption ratios and electrical conductivity values, both wastewater effluents were in the USDA low-to-medium risk category C2S1. There was no difference in the sugar content of the cane juice irrigated with the three waters. However, the microbiological quality (E. coli and helminth numbers) of the two effluents did not meet the WHO guidelines and therefore additional human exposure control measures are required in order to minimize any resulting adverse health risks to those working in the wastewater-irrigated fields.

  16. Phytoremediation of textile dyes and effluents: Current scenario and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandare, Rahul V; Govindwar, Sanjay P

    2015-12-01

    Phytoremediation has emerged as a green, passive, solar energy driven and cost effective approach for environmental cleanup when compared to physico-chemical and even other biological methods. Textile dyes and effluents are condemned as one of the worst polluters of our precious water bodies and soils. They are well known mutagenic, carcinogenic, allergic and cytotoxic agents posing threats to all life forms. Plant based treatment of textile dyes is relatively new and hitherto has remained an unexplored area of research. Use of macrophytes like Phragmites australis and Rheum rhabarbarum have shown efficient removal of Acid Orange 7 and sulfonated anthraquinones, respectively. Common garden and ornamental plants namely Aster amellus, Portulaca grandiflora, Zinnia angustifolia, Petunia grandiflora, Glandularia pulchella, many ferns and aquatic plants have also been advocated for their dye degradation potential. Plant tissue cultures like suspension cells of Blumea malcolmii and Nopalea cochenillifera, hairy roots of Brassica juncea and Tagetes patula and whole plants of several other species have confirmed their role in dye degradation. Plants' oxidoreductases such as lignin peroxidase, laccase, tyrosinase, azo reductase, veratryl alcohol oxidase, riboflavin reductase and dichlorophenolindophenol reductase are known as key biodegrading enzymes which break the complex structures of dyes. Schematic metabolic pathways of degradation of different dyes and their environmental fates have also been proposed. Degradation products of dyes and their fates of metabolism have been reported to be validated by UV-vis spectrophotometry, high performance liquid chromatography, high performance thin layer chromatography, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, gas chromatograph-mass spectroscopy and several other analytical tools. Constructed wetlands and various pilots scale reactors were developed independently using the plants of P. australis, Portulaca grandiflora, G. pulchella

  17. Behavioral changes in female Swiss mice exposed to tannery effluents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Ferreira de Almeida

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Among the anthropic activities generating potentially toxic residues are those involved with bovine hide processing (tannery industries. However, knowledge is scant regarding the damage caused to the health of various organisms by tannery waste and studies are rare, especially in mammalian experimental models. This study therefore aimed to evaluate the physical and behavioral effects of the exposure of female Swiss mice to tannery effluent. To accomplish this, for a period of 15 days the animals were fed tannery effluent diluted with water in the following concentrations: 0% (control group, received only potable water, 5% and 10%. The body mass of the animals was evaluated at the beginning and end of the experiment, as well as the daily consumption of water and food. After 15 days of exposure to the effluent, the animals were submitted to the elevated plus maze (predictive of anxiety and the forced swim test (predictive of depression. The treatments did not affect the animals' body mass, either in eating behavior or in consumption of water. However, it was found that the animals that ingested tannery effluent concentrations of 5% and 10% exhibited an anxiolytic (lower level of anxiety, greater percentage of time in the open arms, longer time and frequency in the diving behavior, less time of lurks and less frequency of freezing and an antidepressant effect (more time in climbing behavior and less time of immobility when compared to the control group. It was concluded that the exposure of female Swiss mice to tannery effluents (5% and 10% diluted with water causes behavioral changes, possibly related to the neurotoxicity of this waste, without causing physical changes in the animals.

  18. Biogas Production From Cassava Starch Effluent Using Microalgae As Biostabilisator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Budiyono

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The rapid growing of Indonesian population is emerging several critical national issues i.e. energy, food, environmental, water, transportation, as well as law and human right. As an agricultural country, Indonesia has abundant of biomass wastes such as agricultural wastes include the cassava starch wastes. The problem is that the effluent from cassava starch factories is released directly into the river before properly treatment. It has been a great source of pollution and has caused environmental problems to the nearby rural population. The possible alternative to solve the problem is by converting waste to energy biogas in the biodigester. The main problem of the biogas production of cassava starch effluent is acid forming-bacteria quickly produced acid resulting significantly in declining pH below the neutral pH and diminishing growth of methane bacteria. Hence, the only one of the method to cover this problem is by adding microalgae as biostabilisator of pH. Microalgae can also be used as purifier agent to absorb CO2.The general objective of this research project was to develop an integrated process of biogas production and purification from cassava starch effluent by using biostabilisator agent microalgae. This study has been focused on the used of urea, ruminant, yeast, microalgae, the treatment of gelled and ungelled feed for biogas production, pH control during biogas production using buffer Na2CO3, and feeding management in the semi-continuous process of biogas production. The result can be concluded as follows: i The biogas production increased after cassava starch effluent and yeast was added, ii Biogas production with microalgae and cassava starch effluent, yeast, ruminant bacteria, and urea were 726.43 ml/g total solid, iii Biogas production without  microalgae was 189 ml/g total solid.

  19. Treatment of textile dye wastewaters using ferrous sulphate in a chemical coagulation/flocculation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Carmen S D; Madeira, Luís M; Boaventura, Rui A R

    2013-01-01

    The coagulation/flocculation treatment using FeSO4 x 7H2O as a coagulant is evaluated in this work for the removal of organic compounds and colour from synthetic effluents simulating the cotton, acrylic and polyester dyeing wastewaters. The coagulant dose, temperature, pH, stirring speed and stirring time that maximized the removal of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and colour for each effluent are determined for the coagulation process. The effect of the stirring speed, stirring time and the dose of flocculant (Magnafloc 155 or Superfloc C-573) on the flocculation stage is also evaluated for effluents pretreated by coagulation at the optimal conditions previously determined. The obtained results showed that the optimal operating conditions are different for each effluent, and the process (coagulation/flocculation) as a whole was efficient in terms of colour removal (-91% for cotton, -94% for acrylic effluents; polyester effluent is practically colourless). However, the DOC removal observed is not significant (33% for polyester, -45% for cotton and -28% for acrylic effluents). On the other hand, the remaining dissolved iron content is appropriate for further integrating the treatment with an iron-catalysed Fenton process, thus reducing the consumption of chemicals in the overall treatment.

  20. Dispersion of effluents in the atmosphere; Dispersion des effluents dans l`atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    This conference day was organized by the `convection` section of the French association of thermal engineers with the support of the environment and energy mastery agency (ADEME). This book of proceedings contains 10 papers entitled: `physical modeling of atmospheric dispersion in wind tunnels. Some industrial examples`; `modeling of the noxious effects of a fire on the environment of an industrial site: importance of thermal engineering related hypotheses`; `atmospheric diffusion of a noxious cloud: fast evaluation method of safety areas around refrigerating installations that use ammonia`; `modeling of atmospheric flows in urban areas in order to study the dispersion of pollutants`; `use of a dispersion parameter to characterize the evolution of a diffusion process downstream of a linear source of passive contaminant placed inside a turbulent boundary layer`; `elements of reflexion around the development of an analytical methodology applied to the elaboration of measurement strategies of air quality in ambient and outdoor atmospheres around industrial sites`; `state-of-the-art about treatment techniques for VOC-rich gaseous effluents`; `characteristics of the time variation of the atmospheric pollution in the Paris region and visualization of its space distribution`; `mass-spectrometry for the measurement of atmospheric pollutants`; `volume variations in natural convection turbulence`. (J.S.)

  1. ifferential Gene Expression in Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Following Exposure to Gaseous Diffusion Plant Effluent and Effluent Receiving Stream Water

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Problem statement: The expression of six genes known to serve as bioindicators of environmental stress were examined using real-time quantitative PCR in liver tissue extracted from zebrafish (Danio rerio, Hamilton) exposed to effluent and effluent containing stream water associated with the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). Approach: The PGDP, the only active uranium enrichment facility in the US, is located in western Kentucky and discharges treated effluents into several surrounding s...

  2. 40 CFR 454.62 - Effluent limitations and guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... CATEGORY Rosin-Based Derivatives Subcategory § 454.62 Effluent limitations and guidelines representing the...): (a) The following limitations establish the quantity or quality of pollutants or pollutant properties, controlled by this paragraph, which may be discharged from the manufacture of rosin-based derivatives by...

  3. 40 CFR 420.12 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... best practicable control technology currently available. (a) By-product cokemaking—iron and steel... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS IRON AND STEEL MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Cokemaking... application of the best practicable control technology currently available (BPT). Except as provided in 40...

  4. 40 CFR 420.97 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS IRON AND STEEL MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Acid Pickling Subcategory § 420... of the best conventional technology (BCT). Except as provided in 40 CFR 125.30 through 125.32, any... degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best conventional technology (BCT)....

  5. 40 CFR 420.47 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... control technology (BCT). 420.47 Section 420.47 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS IRON AND STEEL MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Steelmaking... by the application of the best conventional pollutant control technology (BCT). (a) Electric...

  6. 40 CFR 420.33 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS IRON AND STEEL MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Ironmaking Subcategory... application of the best available technology economically achievable (BAT). Except as provided in 40 CFR 125... best available technology economically achievable. (a) Iron blast furnace. Subpart C Pollutant...

  7. 40 CFR 420.87 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS IRON AND STEEL MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Salt Bath Descaling Subcategory... application of the best conventional technology (BCT). Except as provided in 40 CFR 125.30 through 125.32, any... degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best conventional technology (BCT)....

  8. 40 CFR 420.32 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS IRON AND STEEL MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Ironmaking... application of the best practicable control technology currently available (BPT). Except as provided in 40 CFR... best practicable control technology currently available. (a) Iron blast furnace. Subpart C Pollutant...

  9. 40 CFR 420.127 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS IRON AND STEEL MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Hot Coating Subcategory § 420.127... best conventional technology (BCT). Except as provided in 40 CFR 125.30 through 125.32, any existing... degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best conventional technology (BCT)....

  10. 40 CFR 420.117 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS IRON AND STEEL MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Alkaline Cleaning Subcategory... application of the best conventional technology (BCT). Except as provided in 40 CFR 125.30 through 125.32, any... degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best conventional technology (BCT)....

  11. 40 CFR 420.22 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... technology currently available (BPT). 420.22 Section 420.22 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS IRON AND STEEL MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE... reduction attainable by the application of the best practicable control technology currently available...

  12. 40 CFR 420.17 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS IRON AND STEEL MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Cokemaking Subcategory § 420.17... best conventional technology (BCT). Except as provided in 40 CFR 125.30 through 125.32, any existing...-product cokemaking—iron and steel. Subpart A Pollutant or pollutant property BCT effluent...

  13. 40 CFR 430.124 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., Filter, Non-Woven, and Paperboard From Purchased Pulp Subcategory § 430.124 Effluent limitations... best available technology economically achievable (BAT). Non-continuous dischargers shall not be... limitations. Concentration limitations are only applicable to non-continuous dischargers. Permittees not...

  14. 40 CFR 430.122 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., Filter, Non-Woven, and Paperboard From Purchased Pulp Subcategory § 430.122 Effluent limitations... available (BPT), except that non-continuous dischargers shall not be subject to the maximum day and average... Maximum for any 1 day Average of daily values for 30 consecutive days Non-continuous...

  15. 40 CFR 415.242 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SOURCE CATEGORY Ammonium Chloride Production Subcategory § 415.242 Effluent limitations guidelines...): Subpart X—Ammonium Chloride Solvay Process Pollutant or pollutant property BPT limitations Maximum for any... point source subject to this subpart and reacting anhydrous ammonia with hydrogen chloride gas...

  16. 40 CFR 421.132 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... attainable by the application of the best practicable technology currently available: (a) Subpart M—Battery... Lead .283 .135 Zinc .983 .411 Ammonia (as N) .000 .000 Total suspended solids 27.600 13.130 pH (1) (1... Furnace Wet Air Pollution Control BPT Effluent Limitations Pollutant or pollutant property Maximum for...

  17. 40 CFR 421.232 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., nickel, and cobalt in the crushed raw material Copper 0.146 0.077 Nickel 0.148 0.098 Ammonia (as N) 10.../kg (pounds per million pounds) of cobalt produced Copper 40.660 21.400 Nickel 41.080 27.180 Ammonia... CATEGORY Primary Nickel and Cobalt Subcategory § 421.232 Effluent limitations guidelines representing...

  18. 40 CFR 417.152 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... available (BPT): (a) For normal operation of spray drying towers as defined above, the following values... operation of a spray drying tower, but only when a high rate of wet scrubbing is in operation which produces... CATEGORY Manufacture of Spray Dried Detergents Subcategory § 417.152 Effluent limitations...

  19. 40 CFR 421.123 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Maximum for any 1 day Maximum for monthly average mg/troy ounce of silver produced from leaching Copper... produced from leaching or silver precipitated Copper 5.671 2.703 Zinc 4.519 1.861 Ammonia (as N) 590.500... Silver Subcategory § 421.123 Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of...

  20. 40 CFR 421.122 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Maximum for any 1 day Maximum for monthly average mg/troy ounce of silver produced from leaching Copper... leaching or silver precipitated Copper 8.417 4.430 Zinc 6.468 2.703 Ammonia (as N) 590.500 259.600 Total... CATEGORY Secondary Silver Subcategory § 421.122 Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree...

  1. 40 CFR 422.52 - Effluent limitations and guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Defluorinated Phosphoric Acid Subcategory § 422.52 Effluent limitations and guidelines representing the degree... process wastewater pollutants to navigable waters. (b) Process waste water pollutants from a cooling water... the 10-year, 24-hour rainfall event may be discharged, after treatment to the standards set forth...

  2. 40 CFR 421.282 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) Leaching wet air pollution control. BPT Limitations for the Secondary Tantalum Subcategory Pollutant or... CATEGORY Secondary Tantalum Subcategory § 421.282 Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree... reduction attainable by the application of the best practicable technology currently available: (a)...

  3. 40 CFR 415.92 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...—Hydrogen Peroxide Organic Process Pollutant or pollutant property BPT limitations Maximum for any 1 day... SOURCE CATEGORY Hydrogen Peroxide Production Subcategory § 415.92 Effluent limitations guidelines... point source subject to this subpart and manufacturing hydrogen peroxide by the oxidation of...

  4. 40 CFR 415.302 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... best practicable control technology currently available (BPT): Subpart AD—Calcium Carbonate Milk of... SOURCE CATEGORY Calcium Carbonate Production Subcategory § 415.302 Effluent limitations guidelines... point source subject to this subpart and using the milk of lime process must achieve the...

  5. 40 CFR 421.322 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... times. (c) Solvent extraction raffinate filtrate. BPT Limitations for the Secondary Uranium Subcategory... CATEGORY Secondary Uranium Subcategory § 421.322 Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of... filtrate. BPT Limitations for the Secondary Uranium Subcategory Pollutant or pollutant property Maximum...

  6. 40 CFR 440.32 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... acid leach, alkaline leach or combined acid and alkaline leach process for the extraction of uranium... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORE MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Uranium, Radium... or underground, from which uranium, radium and vanadium ores are produced excluding mines using...

  7. 40 CFR 435.14 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... located beyond 3 miles from shore: Water-based drilling fluids and associated drill cuttings Free Oil No... fluids Free Oil No discharge. 2 Well treatment, completion and workover fluids Free oil No discharge. 2... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS OIL AND GAS EXTRACTION POINT SOURCE CATEGORY...

  8. Effects of wastewater effluent discharge and treatment facility upgrades on environmental and biological conditions of Indian Creek, Johnson County, Kansas, June 2004 through June 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Jennifer L.; Stone, Mandy L.; Rasmussen, Teresa J.; Foster, Guy M.; Poulton, Barry C.; Paxson, Chelsea R.; Harris, Theodore D.

    2014-01-01

    Indian Creek is one of the most urban drainage basins in Johnson County, Kansas, and environmental and biological conditions of the creek are affected by contaminants from point and other urban sources. The Johnson County Douglas L. Smith Middle Basin (hereafter referred to as the “Middle Basin”) and Tomahawk Creek Wastewater Treatment Facilities (WWTFs) discharge to Indian Creek. In summer 2010, upgrades were completed to increase capacity and include biological nutrient removal at the Middle Basin facility. There have been no recent infrastructure changes at the Tomahawk Creek facility; however, during 2009, chemically enhanced primary treatment was added to the treatment process for better process settling before disinfection and discharge with the added effect of enhanced phosphorus removal. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Johnson County Wastewater, assessed the effects of wastewater effluent on environmental and biological conditions of Indian Creek by comparing two upstream sites to four sites located downstream from the WWTFs using data collected during June 2004 through June 2013. Environmental conditions were evaluated using previously and newly collected discrete and continuous data and were compared with an assessment of biological community composition and ecosystem function along the upstream-downstream gradient. This study improves the understanding of the effects of wastewater effluent on stream-water and streambed sediment quality, biological community composition, and ecosystem function in urban areas. After the addition of biological nutrient removal to the Middle Basin WWTF in 2010, annual mean total nitrogen concentrations in effluent decreased by 46 percent, but still exceeded the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) wastewater effluent permit concentration goal of 8.0 milligrams per liter (mg/L); however, the NPDES wastewater effluent permit total phosphorus concentration goal of 1.5 mg/L or less was

  9. Rapid analysis of effluents generated by the dairy industry for fat determination by preconcentration in nylon membranes and attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moliner Martínez, Y; Muñoz-Ortuño, M; Herráez-Hernández, R; Campíns-Falcó, P

    2014-02-01

    This paper describes a new approach for the determination of fat in the effluents generated by the dairy industry which is based on the retention of fat in nylon membranes and measurement of the absorbances on the membrane surface by ATR-IR spectroscopy. Different options have been evaluated for retaining fat in the membranes using milk samples of different origin and fat content. Based on the results obtained, a method is proposed for the determination of fat in effluents which involves the filtration of 1 mL of the samples through 0.45 µm nylon membranes of 13 mm diameter. The fat content is then determined by measuring the absorbance of band at 1745 cm(-1). The proposed method can be used for the direct estimation of fat at concentrations in the 2-12 mg/L interval with adequate reproducibility. The intraday precision, expressed as coefficients of variation CVs, were ≤ 11%, whereas the interday CVs were ≤ 20%. The method shows a good tolerance towards conditions typically found in the effluents generated by the dairy industry. The most relevant features of the proposed method are simplicity and speed as the samples can be characterized in a few minutes. Sample preparation does not involve either additional instrumentation (such as pumps or vacuum equipment) or organic solvents or other chemicals. Therefore, the proposed method can be considered a rapid, simple and cost-effective alternative to gravimetric methods for controlling fat content in these effluents during production or cleaning processes.

  10. Prevalence of Antimicrobial Resistant and Virulent Salmonella spp. in Treated Effluent and Receiving Aquatic Milieu of Wastewater Treatment Plants in Durban, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ejovwokoghene C. Odjadjare

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we evaluated the impact of treated wastewater effluent from two wastewater treatment plants on the physicochemical parameters and Salmonella spp. load of receiving rivers. Presumptive Salmonella spp. were obtained at all sampled points including the discharge points, with counts ranging from 0 to 4.14 log cfu/mL at both plants. Turbidity, chemical and biological oxygen demand were found to be high and mostly above the required limit for treated wastewater discharge. However, recorded nitrate and phosphate values were very low. Of the 200 confirmed Salmonella spp. isolates recovered from the treated effluent and receiving surface waters, 93% harbored the spiC gene, 84% harbored the misL gene, and 87.5% harbored the orfL gene while 87% harbored the pipD gene. The antibiotic resistance profile revealed that the isolates were resistant to sulfamethoxazole, nalidixic acid and streptomycin, but susceptible to quinolones and third generation β-lactams. These results indicate that in South Africa treated effluents are still a major source of contamination of rivers with pathogens such as Salmonella. Appropriate steps by the regulatory authorities and workers at the treatment plants are needed to enforce stipulated guidelines in order to prevent pollution of surface water resources due to the discharge of poorly treated effluents.

  11. Prevalence of Antimicrobial Resistant and Virulent Salmonella spp. in Treated Effluent and Receiving Aquatic Milieu of Wastewater Treatment Plants in Durban, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odjadjare, Ejovwokoghene C; Olaniran, Ademola O

    2015-08-18

    In this study, we evaluated the impact of treated wastewater effluent from two wastewater treatment plants on the physicochemical parameters and Salmonella spp. load of receiving rivers. Presumptive Salmonella spp. were obtained at all sampled points including the discharge points, with counts ranging from 0 to 4.14 log cfu/mL at both plants. Turbidity, chemical and biological oxygen demand were found to be high and mostly above the required limit for treated wastewater discharge. However, recorded nitrate and phosphate values were very low. Of the 200 confirmed Salmonella spp. isolates recovered from the treated effluent and receiving surface waters, 93% harbored the spiC gene, 84% harbored the misL gene, and 87.5% harbored the orfL gene while 87% harbored the pipD gene. The antibiotic resistance profile revealed that the isolates were resistant to sulfamethoxazole, nalidixic acid and streptomycin, but susceptible to quinolones and third generation β-lactams. These results indicate that in South Africa treated effluents are still a major source of contamination of rivers with pathogens such as Salmonella. Appropriate steps by the regulatory authorities and workers at the treatment plants are needed to enforce stipulated guidelines in order to prevent pollution of surface water resources due to the discharge of poorly treated effluents.

  12. Revision of by-laws about effluents of EdF's nuclear power plants; Revision des arretes de rejets des centrales nucleaires d'EDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    In France, in application of the clean water law from January 3, 1992 and since the decree 95-540 from May 4, 1995, each basic nuclear facility receives a single permission which covers both its water takes and its radioactive and non-radioactive effluents. This decree, initially dedicated to new facilities has been enlarged to all existing installations for which the prefectorial by-laws have reached their date-line. Thus, up to now, five inter-ministerial by-laws have renewed the permissions of water takes and effluents evacuation of the power plants of Saint-Laurent-des-Eaux (Loir-et-Cher), Flamanville (Manche), Paluel (Seine-Maritime), Belleville (Cher) and Saint-Alban (Isere). These by-laws foresee an important abatement of the effluents and concern more particularly the tritium, {sup 14}C, the iodine isotopes and also some other non-radioactive chemical compounds. This document is a compilation of all revised by-laws about effluents and concerning the nuclear power plants listed above. (J.S.)

  13. Decolorization and detoxification of two textile industry effluents by the laccase/1-hydroxybenzotriazole system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzina, Ouafa; Daâssi, Dalel; Zouari-Mechichi, Héla; Frikha, Fakher; Woodward, Steve; Belbahri, Lassaad; Rodriguez-Couto, Susana; Mechichi, Tahar

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the optimal conditions for the decolorization and the detoxification of two effluents from a textile industry-effluent A (the reactive dye bath Bezactive) and effluent B (the direct dye bath Tubantin)-using a laccase mediator system. Response surface methodology (RSM) was applied to optimize textile effluents decolorization. A Box-Behnken design using RSM with the four variables pH, effluent concentration, 1-hydroxybenzotriazole (HBT) concentration, and enzyme (laccase) concentration was used to determine correlations between the effects of these variables on the decolorization of the two effluents. The optimum conditions for pH and concentrations of HBT, effluent and laccase were 5, 1 mM, 50 % and 0.6 U/ml, respectively, for maximum decolorization of effluent A (68 %). For effluent B, optima were 4, 1 mM, 75 %, and 0.6 U/ml, respectively, for maximum decolorization of approximately 88 %. Both effluents were treated at 30 °C for 20 h. A quadratic model was obtained for each decolorization through this design. The experimental and predicted values were in good agreement and both models were highly significant. In addition, the toxicity of the two effluents was determined before and after laccase treatment using Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Bacillus cereus, and germination of tomato seeds.

  14. 液相化学处理MBBR填料对城市污水厂尾水深度脱氮的影响%Influence of the Liquid-phase Chemical Method Modified MBBR Carriers on Advanced Nitrogen Removal of Urban Wastewater Treatment Plant Effluent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李春梅; 王海燕; 王有乐; 杭前宇; 程子芮; 刘凯

    2016-01-01

    To improve the nitrate removal ability of the polythene ( PE) carriers in the moving bed biofilm reactors ( MBBR) , the liquid-phase chemical method was used to modify the PE carriers and the ability of advanced nitrogen removal denitrification of the modified PE ( MPE) carriers also studied extensively. The results showed that the static contact angle of the MPE surface was 75. 5° which decreased by 26. 6% compared with that of PE. The MPE surface structure roughness was higher than that of PE through the scanning electron microscopy ( SEM ) observation, and the oxygen element content of MPE was increased and the surface structure was changed compared with PE using the energy dispersive spectra and IR spectra analysis. The denitrification ability of MPE MBBR was improved obviously compared with PE MBBR. When the influent NO3--N and TN of MPE MBBR were (8. 5 ± 1. 5) mg∕L and (14. 3 ± 2. 1) mg∕L, the NO3--N and TN removal were (75. 2 ± 7. 0)% and (56. 5 ± 10. 7)%, respectively, which were increased 20. 8% and 58. 1% compared with the PE MBBR accordingly.%为进一步提高移动床生物膜反应器( MBBR)中普通聚乙烯( PE)填料对城市污水处理厂尾水中NO3--N的去除能力,采用液相化学处理法对PE进行改性,并对其反硝化深度脱氮效能进行研究。结果表明:改性聚乙烯( MPE)填料的静态接触角为75.5°,与PE相比降低了26.6%;扫描电镜显示,MPE与PE相比表面结构粗糙度增强;能谱及红外光谱分析表明,MPE表面氧元素含量及结构都发生了变化;MPE填料的MBBR反硝化能力与PE相比得到了明显提高,当进水NO3--N和TN浓度分别为(8.5±1.5)和(14.3±2.1) mg∕L时,MPE填料的MBBR对NO3--N和TN的平均去除率分别为(75.2±7.0)%和(56.5±10.7)%,与PE相比分别提高了20.8%和58.1%。

  15. Chemical use

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a summary of research and activities related to chemical use on Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge between 1992 and 2009. The chemicals used on the Refuge...

  16. Chemical Reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, C. N.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a course, including content, reading list, and presentation on chemical reactors at Cambridge University, England. A brief comparison of chemical engineering education between the United States and England is also given. (JN)

  17. Trends in oil discharged with aqueous effluents from oil refineries in Europe. 2010 survey data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldoni-Andrey, P.; Girling, A.; Bakker, A.; Muller, A.; Struijk, K.; Fotiadou, I.; Andres Huertas, A.; Negroni, J.; Neal, G.; Den Haan, K.

    2012-10-15

    the amount of effluent discharged from all sources per tonne of capacity and throughput compared with 2008. The amount of oil discharged in effluents from reporting installations continued to decrease both in terms of the absolute amount discharged and the amount expressed relative to the volume of feedstock processed (throughput) and the refining capacity of the installations. The amounts of ammonia, total nitrogen (TN) and phenols also appear to have continued to decrease but the figures are more difficult to interpret because the number of refineries that reported data was,particularly in the case of ammonia, lower. However, when expressed relative to feedstock throughput, the decrease is still evident. Similar trends are evident in the data for Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD), Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) and Total Organic Carbon (TOC) content. It should be noted, however, that the 2010 figure also includes data for non-process related effluent streams if reported. The majority of the reporting installations have on-site waste water treatment plant (WWTP) and the total emission loads for ammonia, total nitrogen, phenols, BOD, COD and TOC are reported as associated with their discharges. For installations that transfer their effluents to an off-site WWTP for treatment prior to discharge, these are reported separately. The distribution of the 2010 Nelson Complexity Index (NCI) scores is very similar to that derived for 2005 and 2008. It shows a slightly increasing trend of operation complexity of the refinery installations operated by CONCAWE members. The trend series available in CONCAWE demonstrate that the refining sector has reduced its oil and TPH releases into the aquatic environment significantly over the past 40 years. Overall a reduction of more than 99.5%-mass is demonstrated.

  18. A Novel Technique to Prevent Effluent Spillage During Percutaneous Cystolithotripsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenoy SP

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Our objective was to design an efficient system for collection of refluxing irrigant during performance of percutaneous cystolithotripsy (PCL to avoid the messy spillage and its undesirable consequences on the patient, the operating team and the operating room environment. A closed drainage system using a long sleeve surgical glove, 10 millimeter laparoscopic trocar, 30 french Amplatz sheath, Y-tubing and linen thread was designed for performing PCL without disconnection during the procedure. While the refluxing effluent was efficiently drained, minimizing spillage, the calculus fragments were collected in a distensible receptacle adjacent to the Amplatz sheath. Three procedures were performed over a year on males with large bladder calculi. The system designed by us was easy to set up, lent itself to easy unhindered performance of the procedure, and spillage of effluent was minimized.

  19. Aquatic Plant/microbial Filters for Treating Septic Tank Effluent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolverton, B. C.

    1988-01-01

    The use of natural biological processes for treating many types of wastewater have been developed by NASA at the John C. Stennis Space Center, NSTL, Mississippi, during the past 15 years. The simplest form of this technology involves the use of aquatic plant/marsh filters for treatment of septic tank effluent. Septic tank effluent from single home units can be treated to advanced secondary levels and beyond by using a 37.2 sq m (400 sq ft) surface area washed gravel filter. This filter is generally 0.3 m (1 ft) deep with a surface cover of approximately 0.15 m (6 in.) of gravel. The plants in this filter are usually aesthetic or ornamental such as calla lily (Zantedeschia aethiopica), canna lily (Canna flaccida), elephant ear (Colocasia esculenta), and water iris (Iris pseudacorus).

  20. Application of ozone based treatments of secondary effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Smriti; Pathak, Vinita; Tripathi, Devendra Mani; Tripathi, B D

    2011-02-01

    The present work was aimed at studying the efficiency of ozone in oxidation processes, coliform inactivation and Disinfection Byproducts (DBPs) formation, associated with the potential of ozone to increase the Biodegradable Dissolved Organic Carbon (BDOC) in secondary effluent with applied ozone doses of 5.0, 10.0 and 15.0 mg/L for contact times of 2, 5 and 10 min. The wastewater used in this work was collected from the Bhagwanpur Sewage Treatment Plant, Varanasi, India. Results of this experiment showed that 10 mg O(3)/L O(3) for 5 min exposure was found most suitable dose for highest degradation of COD, TOC, UV(254), color, turbidity and total nitrogen parameters. The inactivation range of microbial biomass range was found in between 95% and 98%. Experiment revealed the fact that aldehydes and carboxylic acid formation were significantly related with the ozone dose and exposure time and ozone might enhance the treatment efficiency of secondary effluent treatment.