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Sample records for chemical effects of nuclear transformations

  1. Chemical effects of nuclear transformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulbulian, S

    1982-06-01

    A brief survey of the present state of knowledge on the chemical effects of nuclear transformations is presented. The recoil energy produced by these transformations in the nuclide is often sufficiently high to disrupt the chemical ligands between these particular atoms affected by the nuclear transformations, while the rest of their molecules. It also contains a discussion of the different annealing processes that produce the cancellation of the chemical change produced by the nuclear transformation.

  2. Chemical effects of nuclear transformations symposium in Prague

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1961-01-15

    The Symposium on Chemical Effects of Nuclear Transformations showed that interest in the subject matter is far from being exclusively academic. Though a large number of the papers dealt with theoretical aspects, it was felt that hot atom reactions provided a valuable means by which a large number of radioactive isotopes and labelled compounds could be prepared practically free from their inactive counterparts. Such so-called carrier-free preparations are in great demand for industrial, medical and scientific applications. Discussions showed that a detailed knowledge o: the characteristics of radiation damage was essential to the successful development of nuclear power Nuclear transformations in solids provide a method of generating such damage and at the same time leave radioactive products that permit the study of the subsequent repair. This technique permits studies a' levels of damage much below those that are necessary with the less sensitive purely physical procedures. A number of papers emphasized the theoretical importance of the insight which hot atom chemistry gives into the mechanism of reactions occurring at abnormal temperatures.

  3. Chemical consequences of nuclear transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, C.H.; Lancas, F.M.; Andrade, J.C. de; Collins, K.E.

    1979-01-01

    The recombination processes of chemical bonds in liquid phase, after being split by nuclear transformations, include hot and diffuse reactions. Both processes probably occur by different mechanisms. The direct substitution process as well as processes which involve atoms, ions or other fragments retained in 'cages' formed by surrounding molecules, are processes not sensitive to the presence of a sequestering agent. The diffuse reactions whose fragments escaped from the 'cage' involve reactions with any reactive species found in the medium. (Author) [pt

  4. Chemical effects of nuclear transformations in metal permanganates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung Hun; Kim, Bong Whan

    1986-01-01

    The chemical effects resulting from the capture of the thermal neutrons by manganese in different crystalline permanganates, that is, potassium permanganate,sodium permanganate, silver permanganate, barium permanganate and ammonium permanganate, have been investigated. The distribution of radioactive manganese formed has been determined by using different absorbents and ion-exchangers, that is,manganese dioxide, alumina, Zeolite A-3, Kaolinite and Dowex-50. The distribution of radioactive manganese in various adsorbents and ion-exchangers has almost similar result for each permanganate. The affinity for radioactive manganous ion is greatest for Dewex-50. A significant increase of retention is shown through the thermal annealing and the retention depends on the first ionization potential of metal ion in permanganates. (Author)

  5. Chemical effects of nuclear transformations in molybdenum complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millan S, S.A.

    1977-01-01

    The Szilard-Chalmers effect was studied in the complexes: tetraacetatedimolybdenum(II), tetrabenzoatedimolybdenum(II), benzenetricarbonylmolybdenym(0). The results we obtained in the measurement of the Szilard-Chalmers effect on the studied complexes imply some influence of the structure in the molecular fragmentation, or the conservation of the links molybdenum-ligands. (author)

  6. Chemical Effects of Nuclear Transformations Vol. I. Proceedings of the Symposium on Chemical Effects Associated with Nuclear Reactions and Radioactive Transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1965-01-01

    The study of the chemical changes consequent upon the nuclear transformation of an atom that is linked with other atoms in a molecule and surrounded by other similar or dissimilar molecules has intrigued chemists for a number of years. This interest is certainly not static but if anything is increasing. The main theme of this meeting was a discussion of the suggestions and theories that have been advanced to explain the wealth of experimental observations on the behaviour of atoms at energies and in situations not normally accessible in the laboratory. Though the subject has some practical implications in the preparation of radioisotopes, this was not an important consideration at this Symposium. The first Symposium on hot-atom chemistry organized by the Agency was held in Prague in October 1960. Comparison of the past and the present state of the subject shows that a greater variety and sophistication of techniques are now being applied as the simpler approaches used in the past have been shown to be inadequate. Progress has been made in the understanding of the simpler gas system, but in liquids and solids there is still much to clarify. It is also of interest that for the majority of the work reported in these Proceedings a reactor was the radiation source, and in this field much experimental work still remains to be done. The Symposium on Chemical Effects Associated with Nuclear Reactions and Radioactive Transformations was held from 7 to 11 December 1964 in Vienna, and was attended by 136 participants from 29 countries and 4 international organizations. It was organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency in co-operation with the Joint Commission on Applied Radioactivity. The publication of these Proceedings makes the content of the papers and discussion available to a wider audience than was possible at the meeting in Vienna

  7. Investigation of the chemical effects of nuclear transformations by Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagy, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    Moessbauer spectroscopy proved to be a very successful method for the investigation of the effect of nuclear transformations in solid matrixes. This method makes possible the observation of the atoms to be investigated without the dissolution of the sample i.e. without interfering with the eventual intermediates or their environment, ensuring thus ''in situ'' analysis. The method besides the informations concerning the chemical state of the derivative gives data concerning its immediate environment and its site in the crystal lattice. Products having a very short lifetime can be observed, too. Though the method is suitable only for the investigation of such nucleogenetic nuclei which are at the same time also Moessbauer atoms, the method has several times given fundamental information on the chemical and crystal-structural effects of transformations in solid compounds. Isotopes from nuclear reactions are in general pushed back at a high kinetical energy during their formation, and the method makes possible to deduce the consequences of this push-back effect and of radioactive decays and nuclear reactions. A separate chapter summarizes the recent statements concerning the consequences of the electron capture in solid cobalt compounds, the consequences of the isomer transition of Sn-119 in solid tin compounds etc. (P.J.)

  8. Transformation of highly toxic chemicals factory for Fuqing nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hongkai; Gao Yuan; Li Hua

    2014-01-01

    For the iodine adsorption tests of current M310 nuclear power plant, dimethyl sulfate is one of highly toxic chemical of national strict standard management, and the nation make strict control over toxic chemicals procurement, transportation, storage, management requirements. Since the appropriate toxic chemicals storage place was not considered in the design of M310 nuclear power plant, Fuqing nuclear power sites for storage of dimethyl sulfate implement technical transformation to meet and regulate the storage requirements for highly toxic chemical. This will lay the foundation for carrying out smoothly the relevant tests of nuclear power plant, and provide the reference for the use and construction of toxic chemicals reactor in the same type nuclear power plant. (authors)

  9. Chemical effects of nuclear transformations in mixed potassium hexahalogenometallates(IV), K2MXnY6-n Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, H.; Hagenlocher, I.

    1990-01-01

    Damage initiated by halogen recoil atoms in mixed hexabromochlorometallates has been evaluated with the help of the Impact-induced Multiple Ligand Abstraction (IMULA) model. The essential reactions within the scope of the model are primary retention for recoil atoms with energies below some threshold of displacement energy; halide-halide substitution reactions; reactions in which two or more halide ligands are displaced with subsequent reoccupation of the vacancies by adjacent halides; formation of interstitials which form free halide during the dissolution of the irradiated substances. It was found that for all recoil atoms and both potassium hexabromochlorometallates the contributions of the different reaction channels are very similar. These results do not differ essentially from results so far obtained in mixed crystal systems. (author) 12 refs.; 15 tabs

  10. Delayed effects of nuclear and chemical weapons in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dienstbier, Z.

    1984-01-01

    Delayed radiation effects are discussed of the use of nuclear and chemical weapons (defoliants and herbicides). Attention is drawn to the development of delayed malignities in exposed subjects and their pathophysiologic causes are explained. The only prevention of these effects is to prohibit the use of weapons of mass destruction. (author)

  11. Chemical effects of nuclear transformations in mixed crystals. 7. Chemical effects of the 35Cl(n,γ)36Cl nuclear reaction in K2ReCl6-K2ReBr6 mixed crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, H.; Diefallah, E.H.M.; Martin, S.

    1981-01-01

    The solid-state reactions occurring during the moderation of recoiling 36 Cl, produced by the (n,γ) reaction, have been studied in K 2 ReCl 6 -K 2 ReBr 6 mixed crystals. The main reaction products are Re 36 ClCl 5 2- , Re 36 ClBr 5 2- , and 36 Cl - , but the more intimately mixed species Re 36 ClCl/sub n/Br/sub 5-n/ 2- (n = 1, 2, 3, 4) are found in significant amounts. The production of the different recoil-labeled species can be explained by elementary impact models: 6% of the recoils do not leave their original lattice site (primary retetion); between 6% and 23%, dependent upon the mixed-crystal composition, appear as interstitials; 31 to 48% give rise to direct displacement reactions of one halide ligand; and 40% produce larger disruption by substitution of at least two halide ligands. The results have been compared with Roessler's 38 Cl recoil experiments

  12. Comparative Studies of Chemical Effects following Nuclear Reactions and Transformations on Metal Organic Phenyl Compounds; Etudes Comparatives des Effets Chimiques Induits par les Reactions et les Transformations Nucleaires sur des Composes Phenylmetalliques; 0421 0420 0410 0414 ; Estudios Comparativos de los Efectos Quimicos de las Reacciones y Transformaciones Nucleares en Compuestos Fenil-Organometalicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merz, E.; Riedel, H. J. [Kernforschungsanlage, Juelich, Federal Republic of Germany (Germany)

    1965-04-15

    A study of the chemical effects created by the energetic recoil atoms of nuclear reactions in solids and liquids was made on the basis of a broad comparison of the products formed by (n, {gamma}) and (n, 2n) processes in the metalphenyl compounds of germanium, tin, lead, arsenic and antimony. In addition, the radioactive recoil products formed after the K-capture process on Ge{sup 68} - tetraphenyl are compared with the results from the (n, {gamma}) -process on Ga-triphenyl and the (n,p) process on Ge-tetra phenyl. Finally, the studies include the {beta}{sup -} transition on Ge{sup 77}-tetraphenyl to As{sup 77}. Applying different separation methods, e.g. adsorption chromatography on alumina, ion exchange and electrophoresis, the various radioactive recoil products were separated and the individual yields determined. It was found that in nuclear reactions the compounds of the mentioned metals having identical ligands formed practically the same classes of recoil products. The yield distribution however reveals characteristic alterations between the (n, {gamma}) and (n, 2n) reaction. Only a small influence on the yields is perceptible when irradiations are performed in liquids and solutions. The large differences found for the new compounds formed by nuclear transformations are striking, not only in the kind of typical products but also in their percentage yields. Thus, several recoil products of Ge and Ga with metalorganic character were found by nuclear reactions on Ge-tetraphenyl that could not be detected at all by the K-capture process on Ge{sup 68}-tetraphenyl. The {beta}{sup -} decay on Ge{sup 77}-tetraphenyl produces practically the same chemical compounds as were observed by nuclear reactions. However, a remarkable increase in the portion of the labelled parent molecules (retention) is typical for the {beta}{sup -} transition. The results are discussed on the basis of theoretical considerations of the amount of kinetic energy transferred to the reacting

  13. Chemical effects associated to (n, γ) nuclear reactions in diluted aqueous solutions of liquid or frozen organic halogenides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bermudez Rodriguez, I.M.

    1985-09-01

    Chemical effects associated to nuclear transformation 37 Cl (n, γ) 38 Cl or 127 I (n, γ) 128 I in solid or liquid aqueous solutions of ethyl iodide, trichloro-ethylene, thyroxine or DDT irradiated in a nuclear reactor are studied. The retention of radiohalogen under its initial chemical shape decrease with solute concentration in liquid phase but is almost constant with solute dilution in the solid phase. Potential applications in neutron activation analysis evidencing halogenated molecules in irradiated media are discussed. 57 refs [fr

  14. Sustainable Transformation & Effective Competency Management Practices in Nuclear Organizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardelliano, S.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Managing essential knowledge as a strategic organizational asset is a factor of upmost relevance in today’s nuclear organizations. The author considers evident that competencies are critical carriers of knowledge. As such the use of an appropriate competency model could be the most effective way to capture the present reservoir of explicit and tacit Knowledge of specific functions or organizational areas. Besides, we could use them for new or other redesigned functions or determine the needs of specific competencies for future positions. Therefore, appropriate competency models or systems have to be developed or updated in each nuclear organization since these are fundamental for managing more effectively and efficiently the present nuclear human capital and to forecast the evolving competence required in management, technical, scientific and safety areas to continuously ensure a highly competent nuclear workforce. On the other hand, competency based management models or systems would not achieve the expected results if they are not fully designed and integrated within the strategic organizational infrastructure of the related nuclear organization. This paper is expected to provide a wider view and practical reflections on organizational transformation issues and the benefits of using an integrative competency model in the nuclear industry. Particularly, the paper give an insight of an empiric model for strategic organizational transformation processes and integrative management practices, and on how to realign strategic issues with top management processes and build organizational capacity through effective competency based management for the sustainable transformation of nuclear organizations. (author

  15. In vitro transformation: interactions of chemical carcinogens and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiPaolo, J.A.

    1976-01-01

    The development of reproducible quantitative in vitro procedures resulting in neoplastic transformation of mammalian cells has made possible the separation of events related to the process leading to transformation from secondary events that interfere with the early recognition of transformation. The use of chemical carcinogens on Syrian hamster cell strains results in a dose-response relation consistent with a Poisson distribution, indicating that the transformation phenomenon is inductive. In some circumstances, the joint action or interaction of chemical carcinogens with other agents results in an increased incidence of transformation. The pretreatment of Syrian hamster cells with ionizing radiation (250 R) or alkylating chemicals enhances the frequency of transformation on a cell or colony basis ordinarily obtained with known chemical carcinogens. Pretreatment with non-ionizing irradiation (uv, 254 nm) did not have a similar effect. The two types of irradiation and the alkylating agents reduced the cloning efficiency of the cells. X ray alone produced no transformation; the alkylating chemicals produced transformations infrequently, whereas uv produced a significant number of transformations. The number of transformations associated with uv is increased by pretreatment of the cells by x-irradiation. The enhancement of transformation by x-ray or x-ray-type agents appears to be independent of the type of second carcinogen used

  16. Denaturation of collagen structures and their transformation under the physical and chemical effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivankin, A.; Boldirev, V.; Fadeev, G.; Baburina, M.; Kulikovskii, A.; Vostrikova, N.

    2017-11-01

    The process of denaturation of collagen structures under the influence of physical and chemical factors play an important role in the manufacture of food technology and the production of drugs for medicine and cosmetology. The paper discussed the problem of the combined effects of heat treatment, mechanical dispersion and ultrasonic action on the structural changes of the animal collagen in the presence of weak protonated organic acids. Algorithm combined effects of physical and chemical factors as a result of the formation of the technological properties of products containing collagen has been shown.

  17. Chemical Transformation Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Chemical Transformation Simulator (CTS) is a web-based, high-throughput screening tool that automates the calculation and collection of physicochemical properties for an organic chemical of interest and its predicted products resulting from transformations in environmental sy...

  18. Some radiation chemical aspects of nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pikaev, A.K.; Kabakchi, S.A.; Egorov, G.F.

    1988-01-01

    Some radiation chemical aspects of nuclear engineering are discussed (predominantly on the base of the works performed in the Soviet Union). The data on the influence of temperature within the range of 0-300 0 C on the yields of water radiolysis products are considered. The results obtained from the study of reactivity of actinide ions towards inorganic free radicals in acid aqueous solutions are summarized. The information on composition and properties of the products of radiolytic transformations of different extragents and diluents and on their influence on the behaviour of extraction systems during processing of irradiated nuclear fuel is presented. (author)

  19. Effect of chemical ordering annealing on martensitic transformation and superelasticity in polycrystalline Ni–Mn–Ga microwires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, M.F. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Advanced Composites Centre for Innovation and Science (ACCIS), University of Bristol, Queen’s Building, University Walk, Bristol BS8 1TR (United Kingdom); Zhang, X.X., E-mail: xxzhang@hit.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wei, L.S.; Geng, L. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Peng, H.X., E-mail: hxpengwork@zju.edu.cn [Institute for Composites Science Innovation (InCSI), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Chemical ordering annealing on Ni–Mn–Ga microwires was found to reduce the defect density and internal stress. • Chemical ordering annealing on Ni–Mn–Ga microwires was found to increase the MT temperatures, Curie point and saturation magnetization. • Chemical ordering annealing on Ni–Mn–Ga microwires was found to decrease the SIM stress and improve the superelastic reversibility. • Chemical ordering annealing on Ni–Mn–Ga microwires was found to weaken the temperature dependences of the superelastic stresses. - Abstract: Polycrystalline Ni–Mn–Ga microwires of diameter 30–80 μm were prepared by melt-extraction technique on a large scale. The rapidly solidified microwires exhibit a fairly high ductility and excellent shape memory property. Here, with the aim to reduce the defect density, internal stress and compositional inhomogeneity in the as-extracted microwires, a stepwise chemical ordering annealing heat treatment was carried out and the effect of annealing on martensitic transformation, magnetic properties and superelastic behavior were investigated. The results indicate that annealing increase the transformation temperature and decrease the transformation hysteresis. These are related to composition homogenization, increase of atomic ordering and decrease in internal stress and defects. During mechanical tests, the stress-induced martensite (SIM) formation took place at a much lower stress after annealing treatment. The annealed microwires also demonstrate a lower superelastic hysteresis and a higher recovery rate compared to the as-extracted microwires. The temperature dependence of SIM stress is weaker after annealing, which is related to the enthalpy change (ΔH) and phase transformation temperature change according to the Clausius–Clapeyron relation.

  20. Acquired experience resulting from transforming a chemical installation into a nuclear one

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamfirache, M.; Stefan, L.; Bornea, A.; Stefanescu, I. [National Research and Development Institute for Cryogenics and Isotopic Technologies - ICIT, Uzinei (Romania)

    2015-03-15

    ICIT-Valcea has developed an experimental pilot-scale installation for tritium and deuterium separation. The main objective of this pilot was to demonstrate the water detritiation technology and to transfer this technology to the CANDU reactors of the Cernavoda nuclear power plant. The pilot-scale installation was initiated in 1992. The initial design and construction were performed similarly to chemical plants as the separation of isotopes was focused on only hydrogen and deuterium to assess feasibility. In a second phase we have begun to transform it into a nuclear facility with the aim of separating tritium. Moving to tritium separation has imposed a lot of changes. Changes consisted mainly of: -) re-design of the technological systems for nuclear material processing, applying specific codes and standards (ASME, Romanian nuclear specific pressure boundary prescriptions for code classification); -) design and implementation of new systems, classified as safety systems; -) re-design and implementation of command and control systems, complying with the requirements of reliability and maintenance required for the project promoted; -) revaluation of auxiliary systems (utilities, power supply); -) implementing radiation protection systems, including secondary barriers; -) implementing and maintaining environment operational program specific to the new nuclear plant; -) developing and conducting safety analyzes; and -) the production of specific documentation to obtain the necessary permits for construction, commissioning and operation of the plant.

  1. Nuclear transformations studies in selenium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez M, B.E.

    1976-01-01

    A compilation is made with regard to the chemical effects produced by nuclear transformations, such as the chemical effects of the beta decay and the chemical effects of the reaction (n,γ) in selenium radioisotopes. As a particular case the chemical effect of the isomeric transition of sup(81m)Se(VI) in potassium selenate crystals marked with radioactive selenium is studied experimentally and the method of adsorption in activated carbon is applied for the analytical separation of the traces of the nuclear isomer tetravalent sup(81b)Se(IV) of one fraction which contains the mixture of the selenium radioisotopes. (author)

  2. Microbial transformations of radionuclides released from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, A.J.

    2007-01-01

    Microorganisms can affect the stability and mobility of the actinides U, Pu, Cm, Am, Np, and the fission products Tc, I, Cs, Sr, released from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. Under appropriate conditions, microorganisms can alter the chemical speciation, solubility and sorption properties and thus could increase or decrease the concentrations of radionuclides in solution and the bioavailability. Dissolution or immobilization of radionuclides is brought about by direct enzymatic action or indirect non-enzymatic action of microorganisms. Although the physical, chemical, and geochemical processes affecting dissolution, precipitation, and mobilization of radionuclides have been investigated, we have only limited information on the effects of microbial processes. The mechanisms of microbial transformations of the major and minor actinides and the fission products under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in the presence of electron donors and acceptors are reviewed. (author)

  3. Comparative study of radiation, chemical, and aging effects on viral transformation. Annual progress report, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coggin, J.H. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: evaluation of isotopic antiglobulin test (IAT) to detect tumor associated antigens using antisera induced by x-irradiated tumor cells; development of cytotoxic antibody for embryonic antigens (EA); acrylamide gel cell culture assay for transformation; and evaluation of 3-MCA induced sarcomas for TSTA and cross-reacting antigens

  4. Comparative study of radiation, chemical, and aging effects on viral transformation. Annual progress report, 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coggin, J.H. Jr.

    1976-03-31

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: evaluation of isotopic antiglobulin test (IAT) to detect tumor associated antigens using antisera induced by x-irradiated tumor cells; development of cytotoxic antibody for embryonic antigens (EA); acrylamide gel cell culture assay for transformation; and evaluation of 3-MCA induced sarcomas for TSTA and cross-reacting antigens. (HLW)

  5. Effect of nuclear radiation on the electrical properties of chemical double layer capacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laghari, J.R.; Hammoud, A.N.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of nuclear radiation on the electrical properties of chemical double layer capacitors are determined. The capacitors were irradiated in a 2-MW nuclear reactor to different fluence levels. The exposure rate was 2.2 x 10 10 n/cm 2 · s of thermal neutrons, 9.52 x 10 8 n/cm 2 · s of fast neutrons (> 2 MeV), and 1.47 x 10 6 rad/h of gamma radiation. The properties measured during and after irradiation included the capacitance, equivalent series resistance, and open-circuit voltage. The post-irradiation effect on the leakage current was also determined. It was found that while the capacitance increased during irradiation, the equivalent series resistance and the open-circuit voltage decreased slightly during irradiation. Changes in these properties were not permanent s was evident from post-irradiation measurements. The leakage current did not show any significant change with radiation. The results indicate that chemical double layer capacitors can be suitably used as backup power source in electronic equipment operating in a radiation environment with total fluences up to 4.05 x 10 14 n/cm 2

  6. Cumulative and competitive effects of chemical elements on nuclear glass alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arena, Helene

    2016-01-01

    This work takes place in the context of the long-term behavior of nuclear glasses under repository conditions. The main objective is to identify, understand and compare the effects of some chemical elements present in the glass composition and/or in the repository media (Zn, Mg, Ni, Co, Fe, Ca, Gd, Ce, K, Cs, Cr and Ag) on the processes involved in glass alteration by water. The cumulative or competitive nature of the effects of these chemical elements was determined. To reach this goal, a 6 oxides simple glass (ISG) has been altered for more than 500 days in a solution containing one or more of the chemical elements of interest. The results indicate that Zn, Mg, Ni, Co and Fe elements increase glass alteration forming secondary phases with the same structure and stoichiometry (tri-octahedral smectites). To form, these silicates consume chemical elements (Si, Al) from the environment and induce a pH decrease until a limiting value of pH. Beyond this pH the precipitation of secondary phases is inhibited and these chemical elements can be integrated into the gel, replacing Ca whose solubility increases at lower pH. As long as they form secondary phases, the effects of these elements are cumulative. Rare earths Gd and Ce also increase glass alteration forming secondary phases but their effects are lower as they contain less silicon. These elements are not integrated in the gel. Chromium increases glass alteration by precipitating with Ca and leading to a less protective gel, depleted in Ca. Silver precipitates as AgCl and has no effect on the alteration of the glass. The chemical elements K, Cs and Ca limit glass alteration by integrating into the gel and slowing down the transport phenomena therein. This integration is competitive: the order of integration (quantity and effectiveness glass alteration limitation) is the following Ca≥≥Cs≥K. Thus, the increase of glass alteration may be proportional to the quantity of elements promoting the precipitation of

  7. Stable nuclear transformation of Eudorina elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lerche Kai

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A fundamental step in evolution was the transition from unicellular to differentiated, multicellular organisms. Volvocine algae have been used for several decades as a model lineage to investigate the evolutionary aspects of multicellularity and cellular differentiation. There are two well-studied volvocine species, a unicellular alga (Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and a multicellular alga with differentiated cell types (Volvox carteri. Species with intermediate characteristics also exist, which blur the boundaries between unicellularity and differentiated multicellularity. These species include the globular alga Eudorina elegans, which is composed of 16–32 cells. However, detailed molecular analyses of E. elegans require genetic manipulation. Unfortunately, genetic engineering has not yet been established for Eudorina, and only limited DNA and/or protein sequence information is available. Results Here, we describe the stable nuclear transformation of E. elegans by particle bombardment using both a chimeric selectable marker and reporter genes from different heterologous sources. Transgenic algae resistant to paromomycin were achieved using the aminoglycoside 3′-phosphotransferase VIII (aphVIII gene of Streptomyces rimosus, an actinobacterium, under the control of an artificial promoter consisting of two V. carteri promoters in tandem. Transformants exhibited an increase in resistance to paromomycin by up to 333-fold. Co-transformation with non-selectable plasmids was achieved with a rate of 50 - 100%. The luciferase (gluc gene from the marine copepod Gaussia princeps, which previously was engineered to match the codon usage of C. reinhardtii, was used as a reporter gene. The expression of gluc was mediated by promoters from C. reinhardtii and V. carteri. Heterologous heat shock promoters induced an increase in luciferase activity (up to 600-fold at elevated temperatures. Long-term stability and both constitutive and

  8. Development of stable marker-free nuclear transformation strategy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Development of stable marker-free nuclear transformation strategy in the green microalga Chlorella vulgaris. ... into Chlorella by electroporation has very low stability and it is hard to screen the transformants without antibiotic marker genes.

  9. Effect of Organic Solvents in Preparation of Silica-Based Chemical Gel Decontaminates for Decontamination of Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Suk Bon; Jung, Chong Hun; Kim, Chang Ki; Choi, Byung Seon; Lee, Kune Woo; Moon, Jei Kwon

    2011-01-01

    Decontamination of nuclear facilities is necessary to reduce the radiation field during normal operations and decommissioning of complex equipment such as stainless steel components, other iron-based steel and alloys, metal surfaces, structural materials and so on. Chemical decontamination technology in particular is a highly effective method to remove the radioactive contamination through a chemical dissolution or a redox reaction. However, this method has the serious drawback due to the generation of large amounts of the radioactive liquid wastes. Recently, a few literatures have been reported for the preparation of the chemical gel decontaminants to reduce the amount of the radioactive liquid wastes and to enhance the decontamination efficiency through increasing the contact time between the gels and the radioactive contaminants. In the preparation of the chemical gels, the control of the viscosity highly depends on the amount of a coviscosifier used among the components of the chemical gels consisted of a viscosifier, a coviscosifier, and a chemical decontaminant. In this works, a new effective method for the preparation of the chemical gel was investigated by introducing the organic solvents. The mixture solution of the coviscosifier and organic solvent was more effective in the control of the viscosity compared with that of the coviscosifier only in gels. Furthermore, the decontamination efficiency of the chemical gels measured by using the multi-channel analyzer (MCA) showed the high decontamination factor for Co-60 and Cs-137 contaminated on the surface of the stainless steel 304

  10. Thermodynamics of nuclear track chemical etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Mukhtar Ahmed

    2018-05-01

    This is a brief paper with new and useful scientific information on nuclear track chemical etching. Nuclear track etching is described here by using basic concepts of thermodynamics. Enthalpy, entropy and free energy parameters are considered for the nuclear track etching. The free energy of etching is determined using etching experiments of fission fragment tracks in CR-39. Relationship between the free energy and the etching temperature is explored and is found to be approximately linear. The above relationship is discussed. A simple enthalpy-entropy model of chemical etching is presented. Experimental and computational results presented here are of fundamental interest in nuclear track detection methodology.

  11. Aging of safety class 1E transformers in safety systems of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, E.W.; Edson, J.L.; Udy, A.C.

    1996-02-01

    This report discusses aging effects on safety-related power transformers in nuclear power plants. It also evaluates maintenance, testing, and monitoring practices with respect to their effectiveness in detecting and mitigating the effects of aging. The study follows the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) Nuclear Plant-Aging Research approach. It investigates the materials used in transformer construction, identifies stressors and aging mechanisms, presents operating and testing experience with aging effects, analyzes transformer failure events reported in various databases, and evaluates maintenance practices. Databases maintained by the nuclear industry were analyzed to evaluate the effects of aging on the operation of nuclear power plants

  12. Aging of safety class 1E transformers in safety systems of nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, E.W.; Edson, J.L.; Udy, A.C. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1996-02-01

    This report discusses aging effects on safety-related power transformers in nuclear power plants. It also evaluates maintenance, testing, and monitoring practices with respect to their effectiveness in detecting and mitigating the effects of aging. The study follows the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC`s) Nuclear Plant-Aging Research approach. It investigates the materials used in transformer construction, identifies stressors and aging mechanisms, presents operating and testing experience with aging effects, analyzes transformer failure events reported in various databases, and evaluates maintenance practices. Databases maintained by the nuclear industry were analyzed to evaluate the effects of aging on the operation of nuclear power plants.

  13. Applications of wavelet transforms for nuclear power plant signal analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seker, S.; Turkcan, E.; Upadhyaya, B.R.; Erbay, A.S.

    1998-01-01

    The safety of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) may be enhanced by the timely processing of information derived from multiple process signals from NPPs. The most widely used technique in signal analysis applications is the Fourier transform in the frequency domain to generate power spectral densities (PSD). However, the Fourier transform is global in nature and will obscure any non-stationary signal feature. Lately, a powerful technique called the Wavelet Transform, has been developed. This transform uses certain basis functions for representing the data in an effective manner, with capability for sub-band analysis and providing time-frequency localization as needed. This paper presents a brief overview of wavelets applied to the nuclear industry for signal processing and plant monitoring. The basic theory of Wavelets is also summarized. In order to illustrate the application of wavelet transforms data were acquired from the operating nuclear power plant Borssele in the Netherlands. The experimental data consist of various signals in the power plant and are selected from a stationary power operation. Their frequency characteristics and the mutual relations were investigated using MATLAB signal processing and wavelet toolbox for computing their PSDs and coherence functions by multi-resolution analysis. The results indicate that the sub-band PSD matches with the original signal PSD and enhances the estimation of coherence functions. The Wavelet analysis demonstrates the feasibility of application to stationary signals to provide better estimates in the frequency band of interest as compared to the classical FFT approach. (author)

  14. Primary processes initiated by nuclear transformations in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, Hirotoshi

    1975-01-01

    Primary processes of hot atom production initiated by nuclear transformation were discussed from past studies using Moessbauer spectroscopy. Many insulators (dielectric substances) showed various effect, such as abnormaly oxdized condition, following nuclear disintegration within the time duration of the life of Moessbauer nuclear excited state. Supposing these hot atom processes belonged to radiochemical processes, radiochemical characteristics of a certain chemical substance could be clarified by placing Moessbauer nuclide in the neighbourhood of the chemical substance to be studied. Chemical effects of disintegrated atom in the first and second composition, chemical substances produced in the surroundings of disintegrated atom, and environmental disturbance of disintegrated atom were studied and discussed. (Tsukamoto, Y.)

  15. Fourier Transform Near Infrared Microspectroscopy, Infrared Chemical Imaging, High-Resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Fluorescence Microspectroscopy Detection of Single Cancer Cells and Single Viral Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Baianu,I C; Hofmann, N E; Korban, S S; Lozano, P; You, T

    2004-01-01

    Single Cancer Cells from Human tumors are being detected and imaged by Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR), Fourier Transform Near Infrared (FT-NIR)Hyperspectral Imaging and Fluorescence Correlation Microspectroscopy. The first FT-NIR chemical, microscopic images of biological systems approaching one micron resolution are here reported. Chemical images obtained by FT-NIR and FT-IR Microspectroscopy are also presented for oil in soybean seeds and somatic embryos under physiological conditions. FT-NIR spectra of oil and proteins were obtained for volumes as small as two cubic microns. Related, HR-NMR analyses of oil contents in somatic embryos as well as 99% accurate calibrations are also presented here with nanoliter precision. Such high-resolution, 400 MHz H-1 NMR analyses allowed the selection of mutagenized embryos with higher oil content (e.g. >~20%) compared to the average levels in non-mutagenized control embryos. Moreover, developmental changes in single soybean seeds and/or somatic embryos may be monito...

  16. Bonding pathways of high-pressure chemical transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Anguang; Zhang Fan

    2013-01-01

    A three-stage bonding pathway towards high-pressure chemical transformations from molecular precursors or intermediate states has been identified by first-principles simulations. With the evolution of principal stress tensor components in the response of chemical bonding to compressive loading, the three stages can be defined as the van der Waals bonding destruction, a bond breaking and forming reaction, and equilibrium of new bonds. The three-stage bonding pathway leads to the establishment of a fundamental principle of chemical bonding under compression. It reveals that during high-pressure chemical transformation, electrons moving away from functional groups follow anti-addition, collision-free paths to form new bonds in counteracting the local stress confinement. In applying this principle, a large number of molecular precursors were identified for high-pressure chemical transformations, resulting in new materials. (fast track communication)

  17. Microbiological and chemical transformations of argentatin B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maatooq, Galal T

    2003-01-01

    Argentatin B is a naturally occurring tetracyclic triterpene isolated from Parthenium argentatum x P. tomentosa. It was microbiologically transformed to 16, 24-epoxycycloartan-3alpha, 25-diol, (isoargentatin D), by Nocardia corallina var. taoka ATCC 31338, Mycobacterium species NRRL B3683 and Septomyxa affinis ATCC 6737. The later microbe also produced 16, 24-epoxycycloartan-3beta, 25-diol (argentatin D) and 1, 2-didehydroargentatin B, (isoargentatin D). Sodium hydroxide converted argentatin B to argentatin D and isoargentatin D. Hydrochloric acid treatment gave cycloartan-25-ol-3, 24-dione. Cerium sulfate/sulfuric acid/aqueous methanol induced scission of the isopropanol moiety and provided an isomeric mixture of 24-methoxy-25-27-trinorargentatin B. Oxidation of this isomeric mixture with pyridinium chlorochromate, selectively, attacked the isomer with the equatorial proton at position-24 to give the corresponding lactone, 24-oxo-25-27-trinorargentatin B. The produced compounds were characterized by spectroscopic methods.

  18. Chemical engineering side of nuclear fusion power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, E.F.

    1976-10-01

    It is widely recognized that chemical engineering has important roles to play in the development of national and world wide energy resources through optimal utilization of fossil fuel reserves. It is much less appreciated that there are crucial chemical engineering problems in the development of energy production from other sources. In particular the successful development of nuclear fusion power generating systems will require the solution of many problems that are uniquely suited to chemical engineers. This article presents a brief overview of the fusion development program and an identification of the major technological problems remaining to be solved

  19. Chemical aspects of nuclear fuel fabrication processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naylor, A; Ellis, J F; Watson, R H

    1986-04-01

    Processes used by British Nuclear Fuels plc for the conversion of uranium ore concentrates to uranium metal and uranium hexafluoride, are reviewed. Means of converting the latter compound, after enrichment, to sintered UO/sub 2/ fuel bodies are also described. An overview is given of the associated chemical engineering technology.

  20. Nuclear war: short-term chemical and radiative effects of stratospheric injections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luther, F.M.

    1983-10-01

    Earlier investigations of the atmospheric effects of a nuclear war focused primarily on the potential reduction in stratospheric ozone. The numerical models used in those assessments were one-dimensional and calculated the average ozone reduction over the Northern Hemisphere. The results presented here are the first assessment of the potential reduction in total ozone on a subcontinental scale. The purpose is to determine whether regions of large ozone reduction (sometimes called ozone holes) are possible, and to identify the important parameters affecting the magnitude of the ozone reduction and rate of recovery

  1. Survey of Nuclear Methods in Chemical Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broda, E.

    1966-01-01

    An attempt is made to classify nuclear methods on a logical basis to facilitate assimilation by the technologist. The three main groups are: (I) Tracer methods, (II) Methods based on the influence of absorbers on radiations to be measured, and (III) Radiation chemical methods. The variants of the first two groups are discussed in some detail, and typical examples are given. Group I can be subdivided into (1) Indicator methods, (2) Emanation methods, (3) Radioreagent methods, and (4) Isotope dilution methods, Group II into (5) Activation methods, (6) Absorption methods, (7) Induced Nuclear Reaction methods, (8) Scattering methods, and (9) Fluorescence methods. While the economic benefits due to nuclear methods already run into hundreds of millions of dollars annually, owing to radiation protection problems radiochemical methods in the strict sense are not widely used in actual production. It is suggested that more use should be made of pilot plant tracer studies of chemical processes as used in industry. (author)

  2. Comparison of the effects in the rock mass of large-scale chemical and nuclear explosions. Final technical report, June 9, 1994--October 9, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spivak, A.A.

    1995-04-01

    It was found that in the first approximation the mechanical effect of underground nuclear explosion is analogous to the effect of chemical explosion. Really qualitative analysis shows that accompanying mechanical effects of nuclear and chemical explosions are the same: in the both cases explosion consequences are characterized by formation of the camouplet cavity (crater after explosion near free surface), destruction of the rock massif near explosion centre, creation of the stress wave, which forms seismoexplosive effect a long distance from explosion epicentre. Qualitative likeness of underground nuclear explosions and chemical explosions is the base of modelling the mechanical effects of the underground nuclear explosion. In this paper we`ll compare two explosions: nuclear (15-04-84) and chemical (27.06.95) with large power. These explosions were realized at the same geological conditions at Degelen test area, which is a part of the Semipalatinsk Test Site. In the case of the nuclear explosion, the charge was disposed in the face of the deep horizontal gallery. The charge of the chemical explosion was a semisphere from explosives at the rock massif surface. In the both case rock massif behavior after explosions was investigated at underground conditions (in the case of chemical explosion -- in the long underground excavation from explosion epicentre). Mechanical effects from the nuclear and chemical explosions were investigated with the same methods. The changes in geological medium after a large-scale explosive actions will be analyzed in detail too. Investigations of the influence of tectonic energy on the mechanical effects after underground nuclear, explosions represents the main interest. In this paper we`ll discuss this question on the data from underground nuclear explosion, realized 08.09.89 in the deep well at the Balapan test area, at the Semipalatinsk Test Site.

  3. Chemical oxidation of unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine transformation products in water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abilev, M.; Kenessov, B.N.; Batyrbekova, S.; Grotenhuis, J.T.C.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidation of unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine (UDMH) during a water treatment has several disadvantages including formation of stable toxic byproducts. Effectiveness of treatment methods in relation to UDMH transformation products is currently poorly studied. This work considers the effectiveness of

  4. Chemical effects of (n, γ) nuclear reaction on (Mo6Cl8)Cl4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fucugauchi, L.A.; Millan, S.; Mondragon, A.; Solache-Rios, M.

    1994-01-01

    The chemical effects of 98 Mo(n, γ) 99 Mo reaction on molybdenum(II) chloride [(Mo 6 Cl 8 )Cl 4 ] have been studied. Retention, thermal and radiolytical annealing were determined. It was found that this molybdenum compound has low retention, a negligible tendency to thermal annealing and a virtual insensitivity to hydrolysis. For practical applications in the enrichment of 99 Mo by the Shilard-Chalmers method, molybdenum(II) chloride [(Mo 6 Cl 8 )Cl 4 ] appears to offer good prospects. (author) 14 refs.; 2 figs

  5. Chemical Reductive Transformations of Synthetic Organic Compounds

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peyton, Gary

    2001-01-01

    .... A kinetic model that was previously developed to describe the results of batch AOP treatment by H2O2/UV did not give satisfactory predictive results obtained when extended to describe flow experiments...

  6. Environmental parameters of the Tennessee River in Alabama. 2: Physical, chemical, and biological parameters. [biological and chemical effects of thermal pollution from nuclear power plants on water quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosing, L. M.

    1976-01-01

    Physical, chemical and biological water quality data from five sites in the Tennessee River, two in Guntersville Reservoir and three in Wheeler Reservoir were correlated with climatological data for three annual cycles. Two of the annual cycles are for the years prior to the Browns Ferry Nuclear Power Plant operations and one is for the first 14 months of Plant operations. A comparison of the results of the annual cycles indicates that two distinct physical conditions in the reservoirs occur, one during the warm months when the reservoirs are at capacity and one during the colder winter months when the reservoirs have been drawn-down for water storage during the rainy months and for weed control. The wide variations of physical and chemical parameters to which the biological organisms are subjected on an annual basis control the biological organisms and their population levels. A comparison of the parameters of the site below the Power plant indicates that the heated effluent from the plant operating with two of the three reactors has not had any effect on the organisms at this site. Recommendations given include the development of prediction mathematical models (statistical analysis) for the physical and chemical parameters under specific climatological conditions which affect biological organisms. Tabulated data of chemical analysis of water and organism populations studied is given.

  7. Effect of Containment Spray Additives on the Chemical Effect after a Loss of Coolant Accident in Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Chan; Park, Jong Woon; Lee, Guen Sung [KOREA HYDRO and NUCLEAR POWER Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-10-15

    As a part of USNRC GSI-191, evaluation of Kori Unit 1 ECCS recirculation sump performance has been carried out in 2006. The work is derived from the result of first PSR(Periodic Safety Review) of Kori Unit1. In this work, we have considered the replacement of spray additive in containment building to solve issues of GSI-191 and GL2004-02. We estimated the chemical effect of changing NaOH into TSP(Trisodium Phosphate) based on SRP(Standard Review Plan) 6.5.2. Rev.02. WCAP-16530 methodology is used to compare chemical effects of spray additive(or buffering agents). In the other side, chemical thermodynamic simulation can be utilized. Herein, the results using WCAP-16530 methodology and chemical simulation are presented.

  8. Chemical characterization of nuclear materials: recent trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, Amrit; Nandi, C.; Patil, A.B.; Khan, K.B.

    2013-01-01

    Analytical chemistry plays a very important role for nuclear fuel activities be it fuel fabrication, waste management or reprocessing. Nuclear fuels are selected based on the type of reactor. The nuclear fuel has to conform to stringent chemical specifications like boron, cadmium, rare earths, hydrogen, oxygen to metal ratio, total gas, heavy metal content, chlorine and fluorine etc. Selection of technique is very important to evaluate the true specification. This is important particularly when the analyses have to perform inside leak tight enclosure. The present paper describes the details of advanced analytical techniques being developed and used in chemical characterization of nuclear materials specially fuels during their fabrication. Nuclear fuels comprise of fuels based on UO 2 , PUO 2 , ThO 2 and combination of (U+Pu)O 2 , (Th+U)O 2 , (Th+Pu)O 2 , (U+Pu)C, (U+Pu)N etc depending on the type of reactors chosen Viz. Pressurized Heavy water Reactor (PHWR), Boiling Water Reactor (BWR), Fast Breeder Test Reactor and Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR). Chemical characterization of these fuels is very important for performance of fuel in the reactor. It provides means to ascertain that the quality of the fabricated fuel conforms to the chemical specifications for the fuel laid down by the designer. The batches of sintered/degassed pellets are subjected to comprehensive chemical quality control for trace constituents, stoichiometry and isotopic composition. Chemical Quality Control of fuel is carried out at different stages of manufacture namely feed materials, sintering, vacuum degassing and fuel element welding. Advanced analytical technique based on titrimetry, spectroscopy, thermogravimetry, XRF and XRD have largely been used for this purpose. Since they have to be handled inside special enclosures, extreme care are being taken during handling. Instruments are being developed/modified for ease of handling and maintenance. The method should be fast to reduce

  9. Characterization of the Environmentally Induced Chemical Transformations of Uranium Tetrafluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellons, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-09-29

    A key challenge with nuclear safeguards environmental sampling is identification of the materials post release due to subsequent chemical reactions with ambient water and oxygen. Uranium Tetrafluoride (UF4) is of interest as an intermediate in both the upstream and downstream portions of uranium feedstock and metal production processes used in nuclear fuel production; however minimal published research exists relating to UF4 hydrolysis. FY16 efforts were dedicated to in-situ Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction characterization of UF4 during exposure to various relative humidity conditions. This effort mapped several hydrolysis reaction pathways and identified both intermediate, and terminal progeny species.

  10. Nuclear chemical engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Geon Jae; Shin, Young Jun

    1989-08-01

    The contents of this book are introduction of chemical engineering and related chemistry on an atomic reactor, foundation of the chemistry nuclear chemical engineering, theory on nuclear engineering, the cycle of uranium and nuclear fuel, a product of nuclear division, nuclear reprocessing, management of spent fuel separation of radioisotope, materials of an atomic reactor, technology and chemistry related water in atomic reactors and utilization of radioisotope and radiation. This book has the exercises and reference books for the each chapter.

  11. Chemical characterization of nuclear fuel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramakumar, K.L.

    2011-01-01

    India is fabricating nuclear fuels for various types of reactors, for example, (U-Pu) MOX fuel of varying Pu content for boiling water reactors (BWRs), pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs), prototype fast breeder reactors (PFBRs), (U-Pu) carbide fuel fast breeder test reactor (FBTR), and U-based fuels for research reactors. Nuclear fuel being the heart of the reactor, its chemical and physical characterisation is an important component of this design. Both the fuel materials and finished fuel products are to be characterised for this purpose. Quality control (both chemical and physical) provides a means to ensure that the quality of the fabricated fuel conforms to the specifications for the fuel laid down by the fuel designer. Chemical specifications are worked out for the major and minor constituents which affect the fuel properties and hence its performance under conditions prevailing in an operating reactor. Each fuel batch has to be subjected to comprehensive chemical quality control for trace constituents, stoichiometry and isotopic composition. A number of advanced process and quality control steps are required to ensure the quality of the fuels. Further more, in the case of Pu-based fuels, it is necessary to extract maximum quality data by employing different evaluation techniques which would result in minimum scrap/waste generation of valuable plutonium. The task of quality control during fabrication of nuclear fuels of various types is both challenging and difficult. The underlying philosophy is total quality control of the fuel by proper mix of process and quality control steps at various stages of fuel manufacture starting from the feed materials. It is also desirable to adapt more than one analytical technique to increase the confidence and reliability of the quality data generated. This is all the most required when certified reference materials are not available. In addition, the adaptation of non-destructive techniques in the chemical quality

  12. Chemical aspects of nuclear waste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, W.D.

    1980-01-01

    The chemical aspects of the treatment of gaseous, liquid, and solid wastes are discussed in overview. The role of chemistry and the chemical reactions in waste treatment are emphasized. Waste treatment methods encompass the chemistry of radioactive elements from every group of the periodic table. In most streams, the radioactive elements are present in relatively low concentrations and are often associated with moderately large amounts of process reagents, or materials. In general, it is desirable that waste treatment methods are based on chemistry that is selective for the concentration of radionuclides and does not require the addition of reagents that contribute significantly to the volume of the treated waste. Solvent extraction, ion exchange, and sorbent chemistry play a major role in waste treatment because of the high selectivity provided for many radionuclides. This paper deals with the chemistry of the onsite treatment methods that is typically used at nuclear installations and is not concerned with the chemistry of the various alternative materials proposed for long-term storage of nuclear wastes. The chemical aspects are discussed from a generic point of view in which the chemistry of important radionuclides is emphasized

  13. Chemicals in effluent waters from nuclear power stations: the distribution, fate, and effects of copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, F.L.

    1984-04-01

    This report provides a summary of research performed to determine the physicochemical forms and fate of copper in effluents from power stations adjacent to aquatic ecosystems with water that differs in salinity, pH, and concentrations of organic and inorganic constituents. In addition, research performed to evaluate responses of selected ecologically and economically important marine and freshwater organisms to increased concentrations of soluble copper is reviewed. The same parameters were measured and the same analytical techniques were used throughout the study. Copper concentration and speciation, in influent and effluent waters collected from eight power stations using copper alloys in their cooling systems, showed that the quantities of copper associated with particles, colloids, and organic and inorganic ligands differed with the site, season, and mode of operation of the station. Under normal operating conditions, the differences between influent and effluent waters were generally small, and most of the copper was in bound (complexed) species except when low pH water was circulated. However, copper was high in concentration and present in labile species during start-up of water circulation through some cooling systems and during changeover from open-cycle to closed-cycle operation. The toxic response to copper differed with the species and life stage of the organism and with the chemical form of copper in the water. Our primary emphasis was on acute effects and most of the testing was performed under controlled laboratory conditions. However, sublethal effects of copper on a population of bluegills living in a power station cooling lake containing water of low pH and on a population exposed to increased soluble copper in the laboratory were also assessed. 105 references, 15 figures, 11 tables

  14. Interaction mechanisms of radioactive, chemical and thermal releases from the nuclear industry: Methodology for considering co-operative effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streffer, C.

    1975-01-01

    A number of chemicals are known which can modify radiation effects on cell killing, carcinogenesis and mutagenesis. In this paper data are reported for radiosensitizing agents. In order to discuss the interaction mechanisms of these synergistic effects, the action of radiation on DNA, on its biological functions and on its metabolism are explained briefly. Also it is indicated that part of the radiation effects in the DNA can be 'repaired' and that living cells can recover from radiation damage. One group of radiosensitizers interacts with cellular DNA or with the DNP-complex. These reactions change the configurational structure or metabolism of DNA and DNP. In this connection the action of antibiotics such as actinomycin D, and the action of SH-blocking agents such as iodoacetamide and NEM, as well as the action of alkylating agents, are discussed. A second group of radiosensitizers, especially with hypoxic cells, are the electron affinic chemicals like nitro-compounds, ketones and others. Data are also given on the modification of radiation effects by changes in temperature. Further, the problem of whether synergistic effects are to be expected arising from the chemicals and radiation originating in the nuclear industry is considered. Data show that repair and recovery processes especially are modified by radiosensitizers. The implications of this fact on sensitization at low radiation doses and at low dose rates, as well as the effect of high LET radiation, are considered. It is of interest that the dose modifying factor of some sensitizers can reach a magnitude of a factor of two to three. (author)

  15. Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geick, R.

    1981-01-01

    This review starts with the basic principles of resonance phenomena in physical systems. Especially, the connection is shown between the properties of these systems and Fourier transforms. Next, we discuss the principles of nuclear magnetic resonance. Starting from the general properties of physical systems showing resonance phenomena and from the special properties of nuclear spin systems, the main part of this paper reviews pulse and Fourier methods in nuclear magnetic resonance. Among pulse methods, an introduction will be given to spin echoes, and, apart from the principle of Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance, an introduction to the technical problems of this method, e.g. resolution in the frequency domain, aliasing, phase and intensity errors, stationary state of the spin systems for repetitive measurements, proton decoupling, and application of Fourier methods to systems in a nonequilibrium state. The last section is devoted to special applications of Fourier methods and recent developments, e.g. measurement of relaxation times, solvent peak suppression, 'rapid scan'-method, methods for suppressing the effects of dipolar coupling in solids, two-dimensional Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance, and spin mapping or zeugmatography. (author)

  16. Chemical oxidation of unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine transformation products in water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madi Abilev

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Oxidation of unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine (UDMH during a water treatment has several disadvantages including formation of stable toxic byproducts. Effectiveness of treatment methods in relation to UDMH transformation products is currently poorly studied. This work considers the effectiveness of chemical oxidants in respect to main metabolites of UDMH – 1-formyl-2,2-dimethylhydrazine, dimethylaminoacetontrile, N-nitrosodimethylamine and 1-methyl-1H-1,2,4-triazole. Experiments on chemical oxidation by Fenton's reagent, potassium permanganate and sodium nitrite were conducted. Quantitative determination was performed by HPLC. Oxidation products were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in combination with solid-phase microextraction. 1-Formyl-2,2-dimethylhydrazine was completely oxidized by Fenton's reagent with formation of formaldehyde N-formyl-N-methyl-hydrazone, 1,4-dihydro-1,4-dimethyl-5H-tetrazol-5-one by the action of potassium permanganate and N-methyl-N-nitro-methanamine in the presence of sodium nitrite. Oxidation of 1-formyl-2,2-dimethylhydrazine also resulted in formation of N-nitrosodimethylamine. Oxidation of dimethylaminoacetontrile proceeded with formation of hydroxyacetonitrile, dimethylformamide and 1,2,5-trimethylpyrrole. After 30 days, dimethylaminoacetontrile was not detected in the presence of Fenton’s reagent and potassium permanganate, but it’s concentration in samples with sodium nitrite was 77.3 mg/L. In the presence of Fenton’s reagent, potassium permanganate and sodium nitrite after 30 days, N-nitrosodimethylamine concentration decreased by 85, 80 and 50%, respectively. In control sample, N-nitrosodimethylamine concentration decreased by 50%, indicating that sodium nitrite has no effect of on N-nitrosodimethylamine concentration. Only Fenton's reagent allowed to reduce the concentration of 1-methyl-1H-1,2,4-triazole to 50% in 30 days. In the presence of other oxidants, 1-methyl-1H-1,2,4-triazole

  17. Chemical speciation and transformation of mercury in contaminated sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Drott, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Biomagnification of mercury (Hg) in aquatic food webs occurs almost exclusively as mono-methyl Hg (MeHg). In this thesis, the influence of chemical speciation and environmental conditions on transformations of inorganic Hg (HgII) and MeHg was studied at eight sites in Sweden with Hg contaminated sediments. The source of contamination was either Hg0(l) or phenyl-Hg, and total Hg concentrations ranged between 1.0-1100 nmol g-1. The environmental conditions, e.g. salinity, temperature climate, p...

  18. Chemical transformations associated with neutronic irradiation of telluric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertet, M.

    1963-01-01

    The chemical transformations which arise from irradiation of telluric acid with neutrons have been studied under several experimental conditions. The effects of the reaction (n, γ ) on Te VI and of the isomeric transitions 131m Te VI → 131 Te and 129m Te VI → 129 Te, and the oxidation states of 131 I formed by β decay of 131 Te have been investigated in detail. The Szilard-Chalmers effect has been put in evidence. Retention (R) depends on the isomeric state of Rd-Te and is higher for the metastable isotopes. R increases with the time of irradiation. R seems to be independent of the medium which is used for dissolving telluric acid irradiated in the solid state. Higher values of R are found if the acid is irradiated in neutral or alkaline solution; irradiation in acid solution leads to lower values for R. Retention for 131 Te VI and 129 Te VI formed by isomeric transition depends on the pH of the solution where this disintegration occurs. For instance, with 129 Te, R is greater in 6 M NaOH (80 per cent) than in 3 M HCI (40 per cent). The relative amounts of the oxidation states of 131 I (reduced fraction (I - , IO - , I 2 ), iodate and periodate) depend on the medium, both if the acid is irradiated in the solid state and it is irradiated in solution. In the first case, the reduced fraction increases from 12 to 89 per cent when the dissolving medium is changed from neutral to 0.8 M HNO 3 . In the second case, the reduced fraction is 90 per cent in neutral or acid solution and 64 per cent in 0.5 M KOH. It has been shown, furthermore, that microamounts of Te VI are formed in certain cases. (author) [fr

  19. Effect of annealing temperature on the crystalline quality and phase transformation of chemically deposited CdSe films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapata-Torres, M.; Chale-Lara, F.; Caballero-Briones, F.; Calzadilla, O.

    2005-01-01

    Polycrystalline CdSe thin films were grown on glass substrates by chemical bath deposition at 50 C. The samples were annealed in air atmosphere at different temperatures and characterized by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. It was found that the as-grown films have cubic structure. These samples maintain their cubic structure for annealing temperatures between 60 C and 300 C. For annealing temperatures higher than 300 C we obtain a mixture of cubic and hexagonal phases. The analysis made by X-ray diffraction and Raman dispersion show that the samples annealed at temperatures under the phase-transition temperature increase their crystalline quality. In order to determinate the temperature for the complete transition of the cubic phase, we used the precipitated material obtained during the grown of the CdSe films. This material was annealed on air atmosphere between 300 C and 500 C with 50 intervals. The samples were measured by X-ray diffraction. The samples maintained the cubic structure if the annealing temperature is under 300 C. For temperatures between 300 C and 450 C we found a mixture of cubic and hexagonal phase. For an annealing temperature of 500 C we obtain only the hexagonal phase. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  20. Chemical nuclear polarization effects in photoreactions of 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane with carbonyl-containing compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porkhun, V. I.; Rakhimov, A. I.

    2012-11-01

    Elementary acts of the photoreaction of diamine with 2,6-diphenyl- p-benzoquinone are determined from the effects of chemical nuclear polarization effects. Hydrogen atom transfer is shown to occur in two stages with the participation of a radical ion pair.

  1. Chemicals as the Sole Transformers of Cell Fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Behnam

    2016-05-30

    Forced expression of lineage-specific transcription factors in somatic cells can result in the generation of different cell types in a process named direct reprogramming, bypassing the pluripotent state. However, the introduction of transgenes limits the therapeutic applications of the produced cells. Numerous small-molecules have been introduced in the field of stem cell biology capable of governing self-renewal, reprogramming, transdifferentiation and regeneration. These chemical compounds are versatile tools for cell fate conversion toward desired outcomes. Cell fate conversion using small-molecules alone (chemical reprogramming) has superiority over arduous traditional genetic techniques in several aspects. For instance, rapid, transient, and reversible effects in activation and inhibition of functions of specific proteins are of the profits of small-molecules. They are cost-effective, have a long half-life, diversity on structure and function, and allow for temporal and flexible regulation of signaling pathways. Additionally, their effects could be adjusted by fine-tuning concentrations and combinations of different small-molecules. Therefore, chemicals are powerful tools in cell fate conversion and study of stem cell and chemical biology in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, transgene-free and chemical-only transdifferentiation approaches provide alternative strategies for the generation of various cell types, disease modeling, drug screening, and regenerative medicine. The current review gives an overview of the recent findings concerning transdifferentiation by only small-molecules without the use of transgenes.

  2. American Chemical Society. Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    The meeting of the 201st American Chemical Society Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology was comprised from a variety of topics in this field including: nuclear chemistry, nuclear physics, and nuclear techniques for environmental studies. Particular emphasis was given to fundamental research concerning nuclear structure (seven of the nineteen symposia) and studies of airborne particle monitoring and transport (five symposia). 105 papers were presented

  3. Transport of chemically bonded nuclear energy in a closed cycle with special consideration to energy disconnection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ossami, S.

    1976-01-01

    The article describes the utilisation of nuclear energy in the form of 'nuclear long-distance energy'. Heat produced by nuclear fission is bonded to a reversible chemical reaction (cracking gas) which release the heat again at the place of comsumption by catalytic transformation. The article deals in particular with the process of methane cracking/methanisation, the disconnection of the energy (heat) by the methanisation process and the decisive role of the methanisation catalyzers. (orig.) [de

  4. Effect of nuclear spin on chemical reactions and internal molecular rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterna, L.L.

    1980-12-01

    Part I of this dissertation is a study of the magnetic isotope effect, and results are presented for the separation of 13 C and 12 C isotopes. Two models are included in the theoretical treatment of the effect. In the first model the spin states evolve quantum mechanically, and geminate recombination is calculated by numerically integrating the collision probability times the probability the radical pair is in a singlet state. In the second model the intersystem crossing is treated via first-order rate constants which are average values of the hyperfine couplings. Using these rate constants and hydrodynamic diffusion equations, an analytical solution, which accounts for all collisions, is obtained for the geminate recombination. The two reactions studied are photolysis of benzophenone and toluene and the photolytic decomposition of dibenzylketone (1,3-diphenyl-2-propanone). No magnetic isotope effect was observed in the benzophenone reaction. 13 C enrichment was observed for the dibenzylketone reaction, and this enrichment was substantially enhanced at intermediate viscosities and low temperatures. Part II of this dissertation is a presentation of theory and results for the use of Zeeman spin-lattice relaxation as a probe of methyl group rotation in the solid state. Experimental results are presented for the time and angular dependences of rotational polarization, the methyl group magnetic moment, and methyl-methyl steric interactions. The compounds studied are 2,6-dimethylphenol, methyl iodide, 1,4,5,8-tetramethylanthracene, 1,4,5,8-tetramethylnaphthalene, 1,2,4,5-tetramethylbenzene, and 2,3-dimethylmaleicanhydride

  5. Composition effects on chemical durability and viscosity of nuclear waste glasses - systematic studies and structural thermodynamic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, X.

    1988-01-01

    Two of the primary criteria for the acceptability of nuclear waste glasses are their durability, i.e. chemical resistance to aqueous attack for 10 4 to 10 5 years, and processability, which requires their viscosity at the desired melt temperature to be sufficiently low. Chapter 3 presents the results of systematic composition variation studies around the preliminary reference glass composition WV205 and an atomistic interpretation of the effects of individual oxides. Chapter 4 is concerned with modifications of the Jantzen-Plodinec hydration model which takes into account formation of complex aluminosilicate compounds in the glass. Chapter 5 is devoted to the development and validation of the structural-thermodynamic model for both durability and viscosity. This model assumes the strength of bonds between atoms to be the controlling factor in the composition dependence of these glass properties. The binding strengths are derived from the known heats of formation and the structural roles of constituent oxides. Since the coordination state of various oxides in the glass is temperature dependent and cation size has opposite effects on the two properties, the correlation between melt viscosity and rate of corrosion at low temperature is not simply linear. Chapter 6 surveys the effects of aqueous phase composition on the leach behavior of glasses. These studies provide a comprehensive view of the effects of both glass composition and leachant composition on leaching. The models developed correlate both durability and viscosity with glass composition. A major implication is that these findings can be used in the systematic optimization of the properties of complex oxide glasses

  6. Chemical effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philips, G.O.

    1986-01-01

    Ionizing radiations initiate chemical changes in materials because of the high energy of their quanta. In water, highly reactive free radicals are produced which can initiate secondary changes of solutes, and in chemical of biological molecules in contact with the water. Free radicals can also be directly produced in irradiated medical products. Their fate can be identified and the molecular basis of radiation inactivation clarified. Methods have now been developed to protect and minimise such radiation damage. (author)

  7. Nuclear and chemical data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Regge, P.

    1978-12-15

    The neutron fission yield and other nuclear and chemical data of interest to the nuclear applications of mass spectrometry (mainly in the field of burnup determination) are examined. The performance of those determinations and the achievable accuracy should match the needs of the users of the data produced. 3 figures, 2 tables. (RWR)

  8. Understanding mechanisms of solid-state phase transformations by probing nuclear materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Srikumar; Donthula, Harish

    2018-04-01

    In this review a few examples will be cited to illustrate that a study on a specific nuclear material sometimes lead to a better understanding of scientific phenomena of broader interests. Zirconium alloys offer some unique opportunities in addressing fundamental issues such as (i) distinctive features between displacive and diffusional transformations, (ii) characteristics of shuffle and shear dominated displacive transformations and (iii) nature of mixed-mode transformations. Whether a transformation is of first or higher order?" is often raised while classifying it. There are rare examples, such as Ni-Mo alloys, in which during early stages of ordering the system experiences tendencies for both first order and second order transitions. Studies on the order-disorder transitions under a radiation environment have established the pathway for the evolution of ordering. These studies have also identified the temperature range over which the chemically ordered state remains stable in steady state under radiation.

  9. Nuclear, biological and chemical warfare. Part I: Medical aspects of nuclear warfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasthuri, A S; Pradhan, A B; Dham, S K; Bhalla, I P; Paul, J S

    1990-04-01

    Casualties in earlier wars were due much more to diseases than to weapons. Mention has been made in history of the use of biological agents in warfare, to deny the enemy food and water and to cause disease. In the first world war chemical agents were used to cause mass casualties. Nuclear weapons were introduced in the second world war. Several countries are now involved in developing nuclear, biological and chemical weapon systems, for the mass annihilation of human beings, animals and plants, and to destroy the economy of their enemies. Recently, natural calamities and accidents in nuclear, chemical and biological laboratories and industries have caused mass instantaneous deaths in civilian population. The effects of future wars will not be restricted to uniformed persons. It is time that physicians become aware of the destructive potential of these weapons. Awareness, immediate protective measures and first aid will save a large number of persons. This series of articles will outline the medical aspects of nuclear, biological and chemical weapon systems in three parts. Part I will deal with the biological effects of a nuclear explosion. The short and long term effects due to blast, heat and associated radiation are highlighted. In Part II, the role of biological agents which cause commoner or new disease patterns is mentioned. Some of the accidents from biological warfare laboratories are a testimony to its potential deleterious effects. Part III deals with medical aspects of chemical warfare agents, which in view of their mass effects can overwhelm the existing medical resources, both civilian and military.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Chemical effects of /sup 32/P recoil atom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuura, N [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Coll. of General Education

    1975-06-01

    Szilard-Chalmers' effect of /sup 32/P were reviewed. The concentration method using Szilard-Chalmers' effect in production of radioisotope, circumstances such as exposure time in an atomic pile, states of target substances and the yields by them were discussed. Many kinds of chemical effects, such as chemical effects of /sup 32/P recoil atom in phosphorated glass, studies of the effect of adducts, the threshold of ..gamma..-ray effect, the oxidation number of /sup 32/P in phosphorated glass by exposure time in the pile and the labelling position of /sup 32/P, are associated with caryotransformation (nuclear transformation) by environmental factors. The abovementioned articles were explained concerning /sup 32/P.

  11. Nuclear weapons and conflict transformation: the case of India-Pakistan. - Pbk ed.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khan, S.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Part 1: Theory 1. Studies on Conflict Transformation 2. Scholarship on Ramifications of Nuclear Weapons Acquisition 3. Elucidating Conflict Transformation with Nuclear Weapons Part 2: The India-Pakistan Protracted Conflict 4. Life of the Protracted Conflict 5. Introduction of Nuclear

  12. Nuclear DNA synthesis rate and labelling index: effects of carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic chemicals on its behaviour in the organism of growing CBA mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amlacher, E.; Rudolph, C.

    1978-01-01

    Well known bioassays have been compared with the author's thymidine incorporation-screening system and other assays based on biochemical quantification of DNA synthesis as a possibility of identification of carcinogens. The partial inhibition of the whole DNA synthesis in a proliferating cell population after treatment with toxic and carcinogenic chemicals is an early common response especially in hepatectomized animal, livers caused by the effects of those substances. However, by quantitative evaluation of the nuclear DNA synthesis rate as a basic parameter, using autoradiographs of kidney and liver of juvenile growing CBA mice, it is possible to differentiate carcinogenic from non-carcinogenic chemicals by means of silver grain counting after 3 H-TdR incorporation. On the contrary, the whole DNA synthesis, expressed by the 3 H-labelling index (in per cent) of kidney and liver, did not permit such a differentiation in the experimental arrangement used. It could be demonstrated that carcinogenic compounds of different chemical classes partially inhibit the nuclear DNA synthesis rate significantly over a period of more than 24 hours. The tested non-carcinogenic compounds did not show this suppressive effect on the nuclear DNA synthesis rate. (author)

  13. The chemical transformation of copper in aluminium oxide during heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Y-L; Wang, H-C; Yang, Y-W; Lee, J-F

    2004-01-01

    Thermal treatment has recently been emerging as a promising environmental technology to stabilize heavy metal-containing industrial sludge. This study used x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to identify the species of copper contaminant contained in aluminium oxide that is one of the main compositions of sludge and soil. Results indicate that the originally loaded copper nitrate was transformed into Cu(OH) 2 after its dissolution in the aluminium oxide slurry. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) fitting indicates that the main copper species in the 105 deg. C dried Cu(NO 3 ) 2 -loaded aluminium oxide is Cu(OH) 2 which accounts for ca. 75% of the loaded copper. After thermal treatment at 500 deg. C for 1 h, both x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and EXAFS fitting results show that CuO became the prevailing copper species (about 85%); the rest of the copper consisted of ∼ 15% Cu(OH) 2 and a negligible amount of Cu(NO 3 ) 2 . It was found that most Cu(OH) 2 and Cu(NO 3 ) 2 decomposed into CuO at 500 deg. C. Further increase of the heating temperature from 500 to 900 deg. C resulted in more decomposition of Cu(OH) 2 and Cu(NO 3 ) 2 ; therefore CuO remained as the main copper species. However, it was suggested that about 15% of the loaded copper formed CuAl 2 O 4 through the chemical reaction between CuO and Al 2 O 3 at 900 deg. C

  14. Allocation of fossil and nuclear fuels. Heat production from chemically and physically bound energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, U.

    2008-01-01

    The first part of the book presents the broad field of allocation, transformation, transport and distribution of the most important energy carriers in the modern power industry. The following chapters cover solid fossil fuel, liquid fuel, gaseous fuel and nuclear fuel. The final chapters concern the heat production from chemically and physically bound energy, including elementary analysis, combustion calculations, energy balance considerations in fossil fuel fired systems, and fundamentals of nuclear physics

  15. The Use of the Moessbauer Effect in Investigating the Chemical Effects of Nuclear Transmutations in Oxygenous Compounds of Manganese and Tin; Utilisation de l'Effet Moessbauer pour l'Etude des Effets Chimiques des Transformations Nucleaires dans les Composes de Manganese et d'Etain; 0418 0421 0421 041b 0415 0414 ; Empleo del Efecto Moessbauer para Investigar las Transformaciones Nucleares de Compuestos Oxigenados de Estano y de Manganeso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nesmejanov, An. N.; Babeshkin, A. M.; Kosev, N. P.; Bekker, A. A.; Lebedev, V. A. [Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Universitet Im. M.V. Lomonosova, Moskva, SSSR (Russian Federation)

    1965-04-15

    The customary methods of studying the chemical state of recoil atoms, i. e. those connected with phase transitions (chemical analysis, chromatography, electrophoresis) and also the annealing technique, permit only indirect judgments as to the stabilization mechanism of hot atoms. In analysis with the method of resonance absorption of non-recoil gamma-quanta, no changes are introduced into the sample that could influence the forms of stabilization, even where stability is not very great. In the present study we investigated the forms of stabilization of Mn56 recoil atoms in irradiated solutions and solid samples of permanganate, and of Sn{sup 119m} recoil atoms in stannic oxide and stannous oxide. The permanganate samples were irradiated in a paraffin block with a polonium-beryllium source at a neutron flux of 10{sup 7} - 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}. s. The hot Mn{sup 56} atoms are formed in the +7, +4 and lower valency states. From samples (SnO and SnO{sub 2}) irradiated in a reactor for 1800 h at a flux of 2.2 x 10{sup 13} n/cm{sup 2}. s, sources were prepared directly for a study of the resonance absorption of gamma-quanta in an apparatus operating at constant speed. Suitable compounds of tin were used as absorbers. The Sn{sup 119m} recoil atoms were detected only in the +4-valency state. The data obtained are taken as the basis for a discussion of the stabilization mechanism of recoil atoms. (author) [French] Les methodes habituellement appliquees pour etudier l'etat chimique des atomes de recul (analyse chimique, chromatographie, electro- phorese) sont liees, comme le recuit, aux transitions de phases et ne permettent de determiner le mecanisme de stabilisation des atomes chauds que d'une facon indirecte. Lorsque l'analyse est faite au moyen d'une methode fondee sur l'absorption par resonance des phonons sans recul, l'echantillon ne subit aucune modification pouvant exercer une influence sur les formes de stabilisation, meme si ces formes sont peu durables. Les

  16. The effects of climate and landscape position on chemical denudation and mineral transformation in the Santa Catalina mountain critical zone observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lybrand, Rebecca, E-mail: rlybrand@email.arizona.edu [Department of Soil, Water and Environmental Science, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Rasmussen, Craig [Department of Soil, Water and Environmental Science, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Jardine, Angie; Troch, Peter [Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Chorover, Jon [Department of Soil, Water and Environmental Science, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > Depth to paralithic contact generally increased with elevation. > Q/P ratios were higher in divergent landscape positions compared to adjacent convergent hollows. > Clay mineral assemblages changed as a function of elevation. > Climate, landscape position and erosion interactively control soil and regolith development. - Abstract: Understanding the interactions of climate, physical erosion, chemical weathering and pedogenic processes is essential when considering the evolution of critical zone systems. Interactions among these components are particularly important to predicting how semiarid landscapes will respond to forecasted changes in precipitation and temperature under future climate change. The primary goal of this study was to understand how climate and landscape structure interact to control chemical denudation and mineral transformation across a range of semiarid ecosystems in southern Arizona. The research was conducted along the steep environmental gradient encompassed by the Santa Catalina Mountains Critical Zone Observatory (SCM-CZO). The gradient is dominated by granitic parent materials and spans significant range in both mean annual temperature (>10 deg. C) and precipitation (>50 cm a{sup -1}), with concomitant shift in vegetation communities from desert scrub to mixed conifer forest. Regolith profiles were sampled from divergent and convergent landscape positions in five different ecosystems to quantify how climate-landscape position interactions control regolith development. Regolith development was quantified as depth to paralithic contact and degree of chemical weathering and mineral transformation using a combination of quantitative and semi-quantitative X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses of bulk soils and specific particle size classes. Depth to paralithic contact was found to increase systematically with elevation for divergent positions at approximately 28 cm per 1000 m elevation, but varied inconsistently for convergent

  17. The effects of climate and landscape position on chemical denudation and mineral transformation in the Santa Catalina mountain critical zone observatory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lybrand, Rebecca; Rasmussen, Craig; Jardine, Angie; Troch, Peter; Chorover, Jon

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Depth to paralithic contact generally increased with elevation. → Q/P ratios were higher in divergent landscape positions compared to adjacent convergent hollows. → Clay mineral assemblages changed as a function of elevation. → Climate, landscape position and erosion interactively control soil and regolith development. - Abstract: Understanding the interactions of climate, physical erosion, chemical weathering and pedogenic processes is essential when considering the evolution of critical zone systems. Interactions among these components are particularly important to predicting how semiarid landscapes will respond to forecasted changes in precipitation and temperature under future climate change. The primary goal of this study was to understand how climate and landscape structure interact to control chemical denudation and mineral transformation across a range of semiarid ecosystems in southern Arizona. The research was conducted along the steep environmental gradient encompassed by the Santa Catalina Mountains Critical Zone Observatory (SCM-CZO). The gradient is dominated by granitic parent materials and spans significant range in both mean annual temperature (>10 deg. C) and precipitation (>50 cm a -1 ), with concomitant shift in vegetation communities from desert scrub to mixed conifer forest. Regolith profiles were sampled from divergent and convergent landscape positions in five different ecosystems to quantify how climate-landscape position interactions control regolith development. Regolith development was quantified as depth to paralithic contact and degree of chemical weathering and mineral transformation using a combination of quantitative and semi-quantitative X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses of bulk soils and specific particle size classes. Depth to paralithic contact was found to increase systematically with elevation for divergent positions at approximately 28 cm per 1000 m elevation, but varied inconsistently for convergent

  18. Contaminated site investigation using nuclear technique: a case study of temporary transformer storage sites in Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanu, J. K.

    2013-07-01

    Recent introduction of man-made toxic chemicals, and the massive relocation of natural materials to different environmental compartment like soil, ground water and atmosphere, has resulted in severe pressure on the self- cleansing capacity of recipient ecosystems. Various accomulated pollutants and contaminants such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are of much concern relative to both human and ecosystemm exposure and potential health impact. PCBs which are resistant to degradation and bioremediation accumulated in different niches of the biosphere. This significantly affects the ecological balances and cause adverse health effect on both human and the environment. Temporal transformer storage sites at four locations in Ghana (Tema, Temale, Bolgatanga and Wa) were investigated for PCB contamination using nuclear techniques. Analysis of soil samples from four temporal transformer storage sites revealed that the soil samples from Tema, Tamale, Bolgatanga and Wa were generally sandy with pH and EC ranging between 6.24 - 7.29 and 44.60 - 188.30 respectively. The PCB levels detected in the soil samples from the various locations varied considerably with mean ranging between 7.69 and 51.92 mg/kg. The highest mean PCB level was recorded at the Tema temporal transformer storage site (51.92 mg/kg), whilst the least mean level of 7.69 mg/kg was recorded at Wa storage site. At Tamale the individual levels range between 3.57 mg/kg and 38.70 mg/kg while at Bolgatanga it was 6.85 - 16.30 mg/kg and Wa, 6.08 - 14.70mg/kg. About 9% of soil samples from temporal transformer storage sites analysed had total PCBs concentrations above the 25mg/kg and 33 mg/kg level recommended by the Canadian Council of Ministers of environment (CCME) and EPA Ghana respectively for the protection of environment and human health. Generally, the Levels of PCBs in soil samples were found to decrease with increasing depth at all the temporal transformer storage sites. Results obtained using the EPA's L

  19. Transformation of Library Services in Nuclear Malaysia: e-SDI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Hafizal Yusof; Nasaruddin Ahmad; Habibah Adnan

    2015-01-01

    In order to deliver its services to the public, library must have initiatives to attract the public on using their services. One of the services offered by the library is information packaging or Selective Dissemination of Information (SDI). SDI is services that enable the librarian to serve the user on upcoming information according to the users interest. Before this, librarian will package new publication or information regarding certain topics of the user need and deliver it to the target user frequently. Theorically, this service is connection between library and user and back to library again. Nuclear Malaysia Library has used Integrated Library Management Utilities (ILMU) since 2005. Through this system, there is one module known as Article Browsing where its function same with SDI. This paper will elaborate on transformation of SDI services from conventional to the electronic form. (author)

  20. Psychological effects of nuclear warfare

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mickley, G.A.

    1987-01-01

    This report is divided into five parts. (1) Discussion of the psychological milieu before a nuclear confrontation. (2) Acute psychological reactions to nuclear warfare (some of which may reflect, in part, direct radiogenic alteration of nervous system functions). (3) Chronic psychological effects of a nuclear confrontation. (4) Issues concerning treatment of these psychological changes. (5) Prevention of adverse psychological reactions to nuclear warfare

  1. Investigation into radiation-chemical transformations of polyamide P-54

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khabarov, V.N.; Kozlov, L.L.; Panchenkov, G.M.

    1981-01-01

    Investigation results of alcohol-soluble polyamide P-54 radiolysis by different physicochemical methods are presented. It has been established that under the effect of γ-radiation certain processes take place in polyamide, which are connected with branching, structurization and destruction of macromolecules. Radiation-chemical yields of gaseous products during irradiation in the air and in vacuum at irradiation temperatures from 273 to 393 K are calculated. The ratio of the rates of lacing and destruction processes is found and radiation yields of the processes are determined. Under irradiation in the air at temperatures >333 K chain oxidation of P-54 takes place and the growth of pe-- roxide compounds with 8 molecules/100 eV at 298 K up to 135 mole-- cules/100 eV at irradiation temperature 373 K testifies to the fact

  2. Factors influencing chemical durability of nuclear waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Xiangdong; Bates, J.K.

    1993-01-01

    A short summary is given of our studies on the major factors that affect the chemical durability of nuclear waste glasses. These factors include glass composition, solution composition, SA/V (ratio of glass surface area to the volume of solution), radiation, and colloidal formation. These investigations have enabled us to gain a better understanding of the chemical durability of nuclear waste glasses and to accumulate.a data base for modeling the long-term durability of waste glass, which will be used in the risk assessment of nuclear waste disposal. This knowledge gained also enhances our ability to formulate optimal waste glass compositions

  3. Chemical aspects of nuclear fusion: New developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ache, H.J.; Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH

    1990-01-01

    Managing thermally controlled nuclear fusion will certainly be regarded one day as one of the most successful accomplishments in nuclear physics. At the same time, however, it will represent a technical achievement unparalleled in the history of science and engineering. This in turn would mean, in retrospect, that decisive contributions had to come from a number of disciplines as diverse as materials and engineering sciences and classical chemistry, and that the same collaboration will have to continue in the future in order to reach the ultimate goal, to construct a reactor capable of producing energy from almost inexhaustible source materials (fuels), such as deuterium and lithium. What is the chemist's role in this development. Similarly as in the development of fission reactors, i.e., the nuclear power plants currently in operation, chemists will have to ensure the existence of a reliable fuel cycle - starting from the availability, storage and reprocessing of the fuel through to the provision for safe storage of the waste. In this review article an attempt will be made to outline the problems associated with these tasks and the approaches to be made by the chemist in solving them. (orig.)

  4. Spin coherence transfer in chemical transformations monitoredNMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anwar, Sabieh M.; Hilty, Christian; Chu, Chester; Bouchard,Louis-S.; Pierce, Kimberly L.; Pines, Alexander

    2006-07-31

    We demonstrate the use of micro-scale nuclear magneticresonance (NMR) for studying the transfer of spin coherence innon-equilibrium chemical processes, using spatially separated NMRencoding and detection coils. As an example, we provide the map ofchemical shift correlations for the amino acid alanine as it transitionsfrom the zwitterionic to the anionic form. Our method is unique in thesense that it allows us to track the chemical migration of encodednuclear spins during the course of chemical transformations.

  5. Dismantlement and destruction of chemical, nuclear and conventional weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulte, N.T.

    1997-01-01

    The safe destruction and dismantling of chemical, nuclear and conventional weapons is of fundamental importance to the security of all countries represented in this volume. Expertise in the field is not confined to one country or organisation: all can benefit from each other. There is an ever present danger of proliferation of weapons of mass destruction: approximately two dozen countries have ongoing programmes to develop or acquire such weapons, and many are also gaining the capability to build air-surface delivery systems. But much can be done to prevent proliferation by reducing leakage of materials and know-how and by solving the problems of the destruction of surplus weapons systems, which has now come to be a key issue. In 13 sessions of the workshop attention was paid to (1) Dismantlement and Destruction of Chemical, Nuclear and Conventional Weapons; (2) Status of Implementation of Arms Control Treaties and Voluntary Commitments; (3) National Perspectives on Cooperation in Disarmament; (4) Stocktaking of National and Bilateral Disposal/Destruction Programmes: Chemical Weapons; (5) Stocktaking of National and Bilateral Disposal/Destruction Programmes: Nuclear Weapons; (6) Stocktaking of National and Bilateral Disposal/Destruction Programmes: Conventional Weapons. Session; (7) Experience with Currently Employed Chemical Destruction Technologies; (8) Alternative Chemical Destruction Technologies; (9) Deactivation, Dismantlement and Destruction of Delivery Systems and Infrastructure for Nuclear Weapons; (10) Storage, Safeguarding and Disposition of Fissile Materials; (11) Technologies for Conversion and Civil Use of Demilitarized Materials; (12) International Organizations; and (13) Environmental Challenges Posed by Chemical and Nuclear Disarmament

  6. Microbial transformation of highly persistent chlorinated pesticides and industrial chemicals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middeldorp, P.J.M.

    1997-01-01

    Organic pollutants can be transformed, both in unsaturated and saturated areas of the soil, by means of biologically mediated reactions. The potential of soil microorganisms to clean up polluted soils is enormous. However, soil systems are highly heterogeneous with respect to the spatial

  7. Chemical Graph Transformation with Stereo-Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jakob Lykke; Flamm, Christoph; Merkle, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Double Pushout graph transformation naturally facilitates the modelling of chemical reactions: labelled undirected graphs model molecules and direct derivations model chemical reactions. However, the most straightforward modelling approach ignores the relative placement of atoms and their neighbo......Double Pushout graph transformation naturally facilitates the modelling of chemical reactions: labelled undirected graphs model molecules and direct derivations model chemical reactions. However, the most straightforward modelling approach ignores the relative placement of atoms...... and their neighbours in space. Stereoisomers of chemical compounds thus cannot be distinguished, even though their chemical activity may differ substantially. In this contribution we propose an extended chemical graph transformation system with attributes that encode information about local geometry. The modelling...... of graph transformation, but we here propose a framework that also allows for partially specified stereoinformation. While there are several stereochemical configurations to be considered, we focus here on the tetrahedral molecular shape, and suggest general principles for how to treat all other chemically...

  8. Neutron albedo effects of underground nuclear explosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Bo; Ying Yangjun; Li Jinhong; Bai Yun

    2013-01-01

    The neutron field distribution is affected by the surrounding medium in the underground nuclear explosion. It will influence the radiation chemical diagnosis. By Monte Carlo simulation, the fuel burnup induced by device and neutron albedo was calculated. The analysis method of albedo effect on radiation chemical diagnosis result under special environment was proposed. Neutron albedo should be considered when capture reaction burnup fraction is used, and then correct analysis can be carried out on the nuclear device.The neutron field distribution is affected by the surrounding medium in the underground nuclear explosion. It will influence the radiation chemical diagnosis. By Monte Carlo simulation, the fuel burnup induced by device and neutron albedo was calculated. The analysis method of albedo effect on radiation chemical diagnosis result under special environment was proposed. Neutron albedo should be considered when capture reaction burnup fraction is used, and then correct analysis can be carried out on the nuclear device. (authors)

  9. Management of risks in the chemical and nuclear areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venuti, G.C.; Frullani, S.; Pocchiari, F.; Rogani, A.; Silano, V.; Tabet, E.; Zapponi, G.

    1984-01-01

    A comparative overview is provided of some major aspects concerning assessment and management of chemical and nuclear risks arising as a consequence of accidents. Statutory procedures for constructing and running nuclear and chemical plants in Italy are discussed in detail. Special attention is given to the major changes that are likely to occur after the adoption of the EEC Council Directive 82/501, designed to prevent major accidents which might result from certain industrial activities and to limit their consequences for humans and their environment. Present status and future trends of accident analysis and risk assessment are also dealt with, and special emphasis is placed on aspects common to both nuclear and chemical plants. Lastly, managerial aspects of contingency planning for, and response to, emergencies and accidents involving toxic chemical and/or ionizing radiations are examined with the aim of identifying more critical steps. (author)

  10. Quantum-chemical study of hydride transfer in catalytic transformation of paraffins on zeolites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kazansky, V.B.; Frash, M.V.; Santen, van R.A.; Chon, H.; Ihm, S.-K.; Uh, Y.S.

    1997-01-01

    Ab initio quantum-chemical cluster calculations demonstrate that the activated complexes of hydride transfer reaction in catalytic transformation of paraffins on zeolites very much resembles adsorbed nonclassical carbonium ions. The calculated activation energies for reactions involving propane and

  11. Chemical cleaning of nuclear (PWR) steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welty, C.S. Jr.; Mundis, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    This paper reports on a significant research program sponsored by a group of utilities (the Steam Generator Owners Group), which was undertaken to develop a process to chemically remove corrosion product deposits from the secondary side of pressurized water reactor (PWR) power plant steam generators. Results of this work have defined a process (solvent system and application methods) that is capable of removing sludge and tube-to-tube support plate crevice corrosion products generated during operation with all-volatile treatment (AVT) water chemistry. Considers a plant-specific test program that includes all materials in the steam generator to be cleaned and accounts for the physical locations (proximity and contact) of those materials. Points out that prior to applying the process in an operational unit, the utility, with the participation of the NSSR vendor, must define allowable total corrosion to the materials of construction of the unit

  12. Application of Rader transforms to the analysis of nuclear spectral data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kekre, H.B.; Madan, V.K.; Bairi, B.R.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes a Rader transform method using a special arithmetic for the processing of nuclear spectral data. Rader transforms offer impressive computational savings vis-a-vis Fourier transform methods. Rader transforms require only integer additions and word shifts but no multiplications while Fourier transforms require complex arithmetic operations. Moreover, use of Rader transforms gives exact computations without any roundoff errors and does not require storage of basis functions. They are 'the best transforms' for computer processing of nuclear spectral data. Rader transforms using a Fermat prime 65 537 have been applied to deconvolve observed spectral data using a special filter function. A uniform improvement in resolution of 45% has been observed both in single and double spectrallines. A FORTRAN program GAMRAD is written to deconvolve spectral data using the special filter function. (orig.)

  13. Suppression of SOS-inducing activity of chemical mutagens by metabolites from microbial transformation of (-)-isolongifolene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Kazuki; Oda, Yoshimitsu; Miyazawa, Mitsuo

    2010-02-24

    In this study, biotransformation of (-)-isolongifolene (1) by Glomerella cingulata and suppressive effect on umuC gene expression by chemical mutagens 2-(2-furyl)-3-(5-nitro-2-furyl)acrylamide (furylfuramide) and aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1)) of the SOS response in Salmonella typhimurium TA1535/pSK1002 were investigated. Initially, 1 was carried out the microbial transformation by G. cingulata. The result found that 1 was converted into (-)-isolongifolen-9-one (2), (-)-(2S)-13-hydroxy-isolongifolen-9-one (3), and (-)-(4R)-4-hydroxy-isolongifolen-9-one (4) by G. cingulata, and their conversion rates were 60, 25, and 15%, respectively. The metabolites suppressed the SOS-inducing activity of furylfuramid and AFB(1) in the umu test. Comound 2 showed gene expression by chemical mutagens furylfuramide and AFB(1) was suppressed 54 and 50% at <0.5 mM, respectively. Compound 2 is the most effective compound in this experiment.

  14. Nuclear research center transformation experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, J. L.; Jimenez, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    As consequence of the changes in the energy polities of each countries in the 80th. many of the Nuclear Research Centres suffered a transformation (more of less deep) in other Research and Development Centres with a wider spectrum that the exclusively nuclear one. This year is the 50 anniversary of the Spanish Centre of Nuclear Research-Junta de Energia Nuclear.The JEN the same as other suffered a deep renovation to become the CIEMAT Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (Research Centre for Energy, Environment and Technology). This paper is focussed on the evolution of JEN to CIEMAT besides analysing the reach of this re-foundation considering the political reasons and technical aspect that justified it and the laws in those it is based on. (Author)

  15. Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance studies of 199Hg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krueger, H.; Lutz, O.; Nolle, A.; Schwenk, A.

    1975-01-01

    199 Hg Fourier Transform NMR studies of various solutions of diverse mercury salts in H 2 O and D 2 O or in the appropriate protonated and deuterated acids are reported for both Hg 2 ++ and Hg ++ . In the different solutions investigated the 199 Hg line positions depend on the concentration of the solution, on the solvents and their isotopic composition and on the temperature of the sample. A ratio of the Larmor frequency of 199 Hg and of 2 H in a Hg(NO 3 ) 2 solution in dilute DNO 3 is given. Using this ratio and the measured chemical shifts, a ratio of the Larmor frequencies of 199 Hg for infinite dilution relative to 2 H in pure D 2 O is given. From this a g 1 -factor for 199 Hg is derived and compared with the g 1 -factor of an optical pumping experiment. The resulting shielding constant is sigma (hydrated 199 Hg ++ versus 199 Hg atom) = -24.32(5) x 10 -4 . This yields an atomic reference scale for all measured NMR line shifts of mercury. (orig.) [de

  16. Study of kinetics and mechanism of diazo compound reactions using nuclear chemical polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gragerov, I.P.; Levit, A.F.; Kiprianova, L.A.; Buchachenko, A.L.; Sterleva, T.G.

    1975-01-01

    It has been established that at the rate-determining steps of the radical reactions in which aniline interacts with isoamyl nitrite and substituted diazo salts interact with sodium methylate, tertiary fatty amines, or phosphinic acid, no transfer of a single electron occurs. The processes of single electron transfer do not seem to play a decisive role in the kinetics of most transformations of diazo compounds. Chemical nuclear polarization is shown to be suitable for kinetic studies of fast radical processes

  17. The Characteristics of an Effective Nuclear Regulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheok, Michael; Wertelaers, An; Lojk, Robert; Santini, Miguel; Alm-Lytz, Kirsi; Rigail, Anne-Cecile; Weidenbruck, Kai-Jochen; Stoppa, Gisela; Rainieri, Roberto; Aoki, Masahiro; Gonzalez-Mercado; Miroshnichenko, Mikhail; Kuznetsov, Nikolay; Kudryavtsev, Evgeny; Cid, Rafael; Franzen, Anna; Skanberg, Lars; Gibson, Steve; Golshan, Mina; Cheok, Michael; Nicic, Adriana; Salgado, Nancy; Creswell, Len

    2014-01-01

    Both national and international organisations agree that the fundamental objective of all nuclear safety regulatory bodies - the regulator's prime purpose - is to ensure that nuclear licensees operate their facilities at all times in a safe manner. Much has been written about ways to improve regulatory processes or to improve the effectiveness of a regulatory body, including in previous OECD/NEA regulatory guidance booklets. But until now, none have focused on the characteristics of an effective nuclear safety regulator. Effective organisations are those that have good leadership and are able to transform strategic direction into operational programmes. Effectiveness is about how well the organisation is achieving its fundamental purpose - in the case of a nuclear safety regulator, ensuring that licensees operate their facilities and discharge their obligations in a safe manner. This regulatory guidance booklet describes the characteristics of an effective nuclear safety regulator in terms of roles and responsibilities, principles and attributes. Each of the characteristics discussed in this report is a necessary feature of an effective nuclear safety regulator but no one characteristic is sufficient on its own. It is the combination of these characteristics that leads to the effectiveness of a nuclear regulatory body. The report provides a unique resource to countries with existing, mature regulators and can be used for benchmarking as well as training and developing staff. It will also be useful for new entrant countries in the process of developing and maintaining an effective nuclear safety regulator. (authors)

  18. Chemical digestion of low level nuclear solid waste material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooley, C.R.; Lerch, R.E.

    1976-01-01

    A chemical digestion for treatment of low level combustible nuclear solid waste material is provided and comprises reacting the solid waste material with concentrated sulfuric acid at a temperature within the range of 230 0 --300 0 C and simultaneously and/or thereafter contacting the reacting mixture with concentrated nitric acid or nitrogen dioxide. In a special embodiment spent ion exchange resins are converted by this chemical digestion to noncombustible gases and a low volume noncombustible residue. 6 claims, no drawings

  19. Disposal and handling of nuclear steam generator chemical cleaning wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larrick, A.P.; Schneidmiller, D.

    1978-01-01

    A large number of pressurized water nuclear reactor electrical generating plants have experienced a corrosion-related problem with their steam generators known as denting. Denting is a mechanical deformation of the steam generator tubes that occurs at the tube support plates. Corrosion of the tube support plates occurs within the annuli through which the tubes pass and the resulting corrosion oxides, which are larger in volume than the original metal, compress and deform the tubes. In some cases, the induced stresses have been severe enough to cause tube and/or support cracking. The problem was so severe at the Turkey Point and Surrey plants that the tubing is being replaced. For less severe cases, chemical cleaning of the oxides, and other materials which deposit in the annuli from the water, is being considered. A Department of Energy-sponsored program was conducted by Consolidated Edison Co. of New York which identified several suitable cleaning solvents and led to in-plant chemical cleaning pilot demonstrations in the Indian Point Unit 1 steam generators. Current programs to improve the technology are being conducted by the Electric Power Research Institute, and the three PWR NSSS vendors with the assistance of numerous consultants, vendors, and laboratories. These programs are expected to result in more effective, less corrosive solvents. However, after a chemical cleaning is conducted, a large problem still remains- that of disposing of the spent wastes. The paper summarizes some of the methods currently available for handling and disposal of the wastes

  20. Evaluation of thorium based nuclear fuel. Chemical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konings, R.J.M.; Blankenvoorde, P.J.A.M.; Cordfunke, E.H.P.; Bakker, K.

    1995-07-01

    This report describes the chemical aspects of a thorium-based fuel cycle. It is part of a series devoted to the study of thorium-based fuel as a means to achieve a considerable reduction of the radiotoxicity of the waste from nuclear power production. Therefore special emphasis is placed on fuel (re-)fabrication and fuel reprocessing in the present work. (orig.)

  1. Evaluation of thorium based nuclear fuel. Chemical aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konings, R.J.M.; Blankenvoorde, P.J.A.M.; Cordfunke, E.H.P.; Bakker, K.

    1995-07-01

    This report describes the chemical aspects of a thorium-based fuel cycle. It is part of a series devoted to the study of thorium-based fuel as a means to achieve a considerable reduction of the radiotoxicity of the waste from nuclear power production. Therefore special emphasis is placed on fuel (re-)fabrication and fuel reprocessing in the present work. (orig.).

  2. System for chemical decontamination of nuclear reactor primary systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlonski, J.S.; McGiure, M.F.; Corpora, G.J.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a method of chemically decontaminating a nuclear reactor primary system, having a residual heat removal system with one or more residual heat removal heat exchangers, each having an upstream and a downstream side, at or above ambient pressure. It comprises: injecting decontamination chemicals using an injection means; circulating the injected decontamination chemicals throughout the primary system; directing the circulated decontamination chemicals and process fluids to a means for removing suspended solids and dissolved materials after the circulated chemicals and process fluids have passed through the residual heat removal heat exchanger; decontaminating the process fluids; and feeding the decontaminated process fluids to the injection means. This patent also describes a chemical decontamination system for use at, or above, ambient pressure in a nuclear reactor primary system having a residual heat removal system. It comprises: means for injecting decontamination chemicals into the primary system; means for removing dissolved and suspended materials and decontamination chemicals from the primary system; one or more residual heat removal pumps; means located downstream of one of the residual heat removal heat exchangers; and a return line connecting the means

  3. Climatic effects of nuclear war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crutzen, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    Although considerable further research has been conducted since the writing of the Scientific Committee on Problems of the Environment (SCOPE) study, the main conclusions reached in early 1986 about the potential climatic, atmospheric, chemical, ecological, and agricultural consequences of a nuclear war are still valid, also taking into account the latest research results by Thompson and Schneider (1986). The main finding of the SCOPE study is that severe, large-scale, possibly global, climatic disturbances could result from a nuclear war in which a substantial fraction (10% or more) of the combustible materials in the NATO and Warsaw Pact nations would burn, producing several tens of million tonnes of soot. This could be caused by nuclear attacks on less than a hundred of the most important urban and industrial centres of these nations. As a consequence, it is estimated that surface temperatures might drop by more than 10 deg. C over a large fraction of the continents in the northern hemisphere and that rainfall could also be strongly reduced. These effects could last for weeks, maybe years. In many parts of the northern hemisphere agricultural productivity would be severely reduced, contributing to serious food shortages. 37 refs, 5 figs, 4 tabs

  4. Effects of Irradiation on Albite's Chemical Durability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Yi-Hsuan; La Plante, Erika Callagon; Krishnan, N M Anoop; Le Pape, Yann; Neithalath, Narayanan; Bauchy, Mathieu; Sant, Gaurav

    2017-10-19

    Albite (NaAlSi 3 O 8 ), a framework silicate of the plagioclase feldspar family and a common constituent of felsic rocks, is often present in the siliceous mineral aggregates that compose concrete. When exposed to radiation (e.g., in the form of neutrons) in nuclear power plants, the crystal structure of albite can undergo significant alterations. These alterations may degrade its chemical durability. Indeed, careful examinations of Ar + -implanted albite carried out using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and molecular dynamics simulations show that albite's crystal structure, upon irradiation, undergoes progressive disordering, resulting in an expansion in its molar volume (i.e., a reduction of density) and a reduction in the connectivity of its atomic network. This loss of network connectivity (i.e., rigidity) results in an enhancement of the aqueous dissolution rate of albite-measured using vertical scanning interferometry (VSI) in alkaline environments-by a factor of 20. This enhancement in the dissolution rate (i.e., reduction in chemical durability) of albite following irradiation has significant impacts on the durability of felsic rocks and of concrete containing them upon their exposure to radiation in nuclear power plant (NPP) environments.

  5. Mechanisms of chemical modification of neoplastic cell transformation by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, T.C.; Tobias, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    During space travel, astronauts will be continuously exposed to ionizing radiation; therefore, it is necessary to minimize the radiation damage by all possible means. The authors' studies show that DMSO (when present during irradiation) can protect cells from being killed and transformed by X rays and that low concentration of DMSO can reduce the transformation frequency significantly when it is applied to cells, even many days after irradiation. The process of neoplastic cell transformation is a complicated one and includes at least two different stages: induction and expression. DMSO apparently can modify the radiation damage during both stages. There are several possible mechanisms for the DMSO effect: (1) changing the cell membrane structure and properties; (2) inducing cell differentiation by acting on DNA; and (3) scavanging free radicals in the cell. Recent studies with various chemical agents, e.g., 5-azacytidine, dexamethane, rhodamin-123, etc., indicate that the induction of cell differentiation by acting on DNA may be an important mechanism for the suppression of expression of neoplastic cell transformation by DMSO

  6. Effect of Phase Transformations on Seismic Velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidner, D. J.; Li, L.; Whitaker, M.; Triplett, R.

    2017-12-01

    The radial velocity structure of the Earth consists of smooth variations of velocities with depth punctuated by abrupt changes of velocity, which are typically due to multivariant phase transformations, where high - low pressure phases can coexist. In this mixed phase region, both the effective shear and bulk moduli will be significantly reduced by the dynamic interaction of the propagating wave and the phase transition if the period of the wave is long enough relative to the kinetic time so that some of the transition can take place. In this presentation, we will give examples from both laboratory studies of phases transitions of Earth minerals and the calculated velocity profile based on our models. We focus on understanding the time limiting factor of the phase transformation in order to extrapolate laboratory results to Earth observations. Both the olivine to ringwoodite transition and KLB-1 partial melting are explored. We find that when the transformation requires diffusion, the kinetics are often slowed down considerably and as a result the diffusivity of atoms become the limiting factor of characteristic time. Specifically Fe-Mg exchange rate in the olivine-ringwoodite phase transition becomes the limiting factor that seismic waves are likely to sample. On the other hand, partial melting is an extremely fast phase transformation at seismic wave periods. We present evidence that ultrasonic waves, with a period of a few tens of nanoseconds, are slowed by the reduction of the effective elastic moduli in this case.

  7. Seismic assessment of existing nuclear chemical plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merriman, P.A.

    1997-01-01

    This paper outlines the generic approach to the seismic assessment of existing structures. It describes the role of the safety case in determining the studies carried out by the functional departments on individual projects. There is an emphasis on the role of existing information and material tests to provide realistic properties for analysis to account for possible degradation effects. Finally, a case study of a concrete containment cell is shown to illustrate the approach. (author)

  8. Quinones from plants of northeastern Brazil: structural diversity, chemical transformations, NMR data and biological activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Telma L G; Monte, Francisco J Q; Santos, Allana Kellen L; Fonseca, Aluisio M; Santos, Hélcio S; Oliveira, Mailcar F; Costa, Sonia M O; Pessoa, Otilia D L; Braz-Filho, Raimundo

    2007-05-20

    The present review focus in quinones found in species of Brazilian northeastern Capraria biflora, Lippia sidoides, Lippia microphylla and Tabebuia serratifolia. The review cover ethnopharmacological aspects including photography of species, chemical structure feature, NMR datea and biological properties. Chemical transformations of lapachol to form enamine derivatives and biological activities are discussed.

  9. About the safety of power transformers in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovan Boiarciuc, M.; Muller, S.; Perigaud, G.

    2010-01-01

    Oil-filled transformer explosions are due to electrical arcs occurring in transformer tanks. Within milliseconds, arcs vaporize the surrounding oil and the generated gas is quickly pressurized. The pressure difference between the gas bubble and the surrounding liquid oil generates one dynamic pressure peak which propagates and interacts with the tank. Then, the reflections of the pressure peak build up the static pressure, which rises and leads to the tank rupture since tanks are not designed to withstand such levels of static pressure. This results in dangerous explosions, expensive damages and possible environmental pollution. While protective walls surrounding transformers can contain the explosion and sprinklers can fight the induced fire, the current paper presents a strategy to prevent the transformer tank rupture. Once an electrical fault occurs, the fast depressurization of the tank is induced by quick oil evacuation to a reservoir in order to prevent the tank explosion. To evaluate the efficiency of this strategy, experiments and computer simulations are used. The experiments were performed on large scale transformers equipped with the protection. Besides, simulations of the consequences of an electrical arc occurring in a 200 MVA transformer geometry were run and the pressure maps obtained with and without protection were compared. (authors)

  10. Complete chemical transformation of a molecular film by subexcitation electrons (<3 eV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balog, Richard; Illenberger, Eugen

    2003-11-21

    The potential of slow electrons to act as a soft tool to control a chemical reaction in the condensed phase is demonstrated. By setting the energy of a well defined electron beam to values below 3 eV, the surface of a thin film of 1,2-C(2)F(4)C(l2) molecules can completely be transformed into molecular chlorine (and by-products, possibly perfluorinated polymers). At higher energies (>6 eV) some equilibrium state between product and educt composition can be achieved, however, accompanied by a gradual overall degradation of the film. The effect of complete transformation is based on both the selectivity and particular energy dependence of the initial step of the reaction which is dissociative electron attachment to C(2)F(4)C(l2), but also the fact that the initial molecule is efficiently decomposed by subexcitation electrons while the product C(l2) is virtually unaffected.

  11. Transformation of Nuclear Malaysia into Research and Development Organisation and Technical Support Organisation (TSO++): Restructuring Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhd Noor Muhd Yunus; Ariff Shah Ismail; Prak Tom, P.P.

    2011-01-01

    Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuklear Malaysia), formerly known as Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT) was established on September 1972. As an agency under the purview of Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation (MOSTI), Nuklear Malaysia has a role to introduce and promote the application of nuclear science and technology for national development. Besides that, Nuklear Malaysia plays important role in providing quality and best-in-class research towards comprehensively generating new technologies in nuclear field. For the past few years, the government has been studying the possibility of deploying nuclear energy for electricity generation. On 11th January 2011, Y.A.B Prime Minister announced the establishment of Malaysian Nuclear Power Cooperation (MNPC) that is responsible to plan, spearhead and coordinate the implementation of nuclear energy development program for Malaysia and to take the necessary action to realize the development of the first nuclear power plant (NPP) in Malaysia. This is a strong and significant indication that Malaysia is seriously considering to embark into nuclear power program. As an agency that has been involve in nuclear field for the past few decades, Nuklear Malaysia has been identified as Technical Support Organisation (TSO) for the NPP project. Since then, preparation for transforming Nuklear Malaysia into TSO has been started. One of the areas that have been studied is the preparedness of organizations structure to effectively uphold the responsibilities of TSO. This paper briefly describes attributes of TSO, example of effective TSO organizations and study that has been conducted in preparation of Nuklear Malaysia to be Research and Development and Technical Support Organization (TSO++). (author)

  12. Continuous-Flow Processes in Heterogeneously Catalyzed Transformations of Biomass Derivatives into Fuels and Chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio A. Romero

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Continuous flow chemical processes offer several advantages as compared to batch chemistries. These are particularly relevant in the case of heterogeneously catalyzed transformations of biomass-derived platform molecules into valuable chemicals and fuels. This work is aimed to provide an overview of key continuous flow processes developed to date dealing with a series of transformations of platform chemicals including alcohols, furanics, organic acids and polyols using a wide range of heterogeneous catalysts based on supported metals, solid acids and bifunctional (metal + acidic materials.

  13. Chemical aspects of nuclear methods of analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This final report includes papers which fall into three general areas: development of practical pre-analysis separation techniques, uranium/thorium separation from other elements for analytical and processing operations, and theory and mechanism of separation techniques. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 9 papers

  14. Chemical durability of simulated nuclear glasses containing water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, H.; Tomozawa, M.

    1995-04-01

    The chemical durability of simulated nuclear waste glasses having different water contents was studied. Results from the product consistency test (PCT) showed that glass dissolution increased with water content in the glass. This trend was not observed during MCC-1 testing. This difference was attributed to the differences in reactions between glass and water. In the PCT, the glass network dissolution controlled the elemental releases, and water in the glass accelerated the reaction rate. On the other hand, alkali ion exchange with hydronium played an important role in the MCC-1. For the latter, the amount of water introduced into a leached layer from ion-exchange was found to be much greater than that of initially incorporated water in the glass. Hence, the initial water content has no effect on glass dissolution as measured by the MCC-1 test

  15. A review of chemical decontamination systems for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, L.; Chamberlain, D.B.; Conner, C.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1996-01-01

    With the downsizing of the Department of Energy (DOE) complex, many of its buildings and facilities will be decommissioned and dismantled. As part of this decommissioning, some form of decontamination will be required. To develop an appropriate technology for in situ chemical decontamination of equipment interiors in the decommissioning of DOE nuclear facilities, knowledge of the existing chemical decontamination methods is needed. This paper attempts to give an up-to-date review of chemical decontamination methods. This survey revealed that aqueous systems are the most widely used for the decontamination and cleaning of metal surfaces. We have subdivided the aqueous systems by types of chemical solvent: acid, alkaline permanganate, highly oxidizing, peroxide, and proprietary. Two other systems, electropolishing and foams and gels, are also described in this paper

  16. Impact of TiO2 on the chemical and biological transformation of formulated chiral-metalaxyl in agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Junxing; Zhang, Xu; Liang, Chuanzhou; Hu, Jun

    2018-04-15

    The impacts of TiO 2 on the chemical and biological transformation of racemic metalaxyl wettable powder (rac-metalaxyl WP) in agricultural soils, and soil microorganisms were investigated. Under simulated solar irradiation, TiO 2 highly promoted the transformation of rac-metalaxyl WP without changing the enantiomer fraction, with the promotion amplitude (60-1280%) being dependent on TiO 2 characteristics. TiO 2 characteristics showed different influence on the transformation of rac-metalaxyl WP in soils and aqueous solutions because their characteristics changed differently in soils. The impact of the mancozeb and other co-constituents on the transformation of rac-metalaxyl WP was smaller in soil media than in aqueous solution. Autoclave sterilization changed soil properties and subsequently weakened the promotion effects of TiO 2 on the chemical transformations of rac-metalaxyl WP to 0-233%. Microorganism biomass and bacterial community were not statistically significant changed by TiO 2 exposure regardless of rac-metalaxyl WP, suggesting that the promotional effects occurred mainly through chemical processes. The results also showed TiO 2 -soil interactions may be strengthened with TiO 2 (Degussa P25) aging time in soils, which decreased its promotion amplitude from 1060% (without aging) to 880% (aging for 20 days). Intermediate formed in soil biological transformation process was different from that in TiO 2 photocatalysis process. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Biological effects of nuclear weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frischauf, H.

    1983-01-01

    Prompt and delayed biological effects of nuclear weapons are discussed. The response to excess pressure on man is estimated, the acute radiation syndrome caused by different radiation doses and cancerogenous and genetic effects are described. Medical care after a nuclear explosion would be difficult and imperfect. (M.J.)

  18. Nuclear, biological and chemical contamination survivability of Army material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feeney, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    Army Regulation (AR) 70-71, Nuclear, Biological and Chemical (NBC) Contamination Survivability of Army Material, published during 1984, establishes Army policy and procedures for the development and acquisition of material to ensure its survivablility and sustainability on the NBC-contaminated battlefield. This regulation defines NBC contamination as a term that includes both the individual and collective effects of residual radiological, biological, and chemical contamination. AR 70-71 applies to all mission-essential equipment within the Army. NBC contamination survivability is the capability of a system and its crew to withstand an NBC-contaminated environment, including decontamination, without losing the ability to accomplish the assigned mission. Characteristics of NBC contamination survivability are decontaminability, hardness, and compatability. These characteristics are engineering design criteria which are intended for use only in a developmental setting. To comply with AR 70-71, each mission-essential item must address all three criteria. The Department of Defense (DOD) has published a draft instruction addressing acquisition of NBC contamination survivable systems. This instruction will apply throughout DOD to those programs, systems and subsystems designated by the Secretary of Defense as major systems acquisition programs and to those non-major systems that have potential impact on critical functions

  19. Monitoring systems online of oil for transformers of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarandeses, S.

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear power plants are showing their concern due to the existence of recent failures related to the bulky transformers of power. These transformers are not security, but are important for the production of power as its failure can cause transient on the floor, reactor scram or shooting, that can cause interruptions in the production of energy or might force us to reduce the power of production The analysis of gases dissolved in transformer oil is recognized as a trial key to identify a submerged transformer failure in oil. With this analysis it is not possible to ensure that there is no damage in the transformer, but the probability of risk of this type of failure can be reduced. The industry recommended to equip the new large power transformers with oil online monitoring systems and in some cases also be It recommended its use in existing transformers. (Author)

  20. Stable Chemical Dosimeters for Partial Reconstruction of Nuclear Accident Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dvornik, I.; Zec, U.; Baric, M.; Razem, D. [Ruder Boskovic Nuclear Institute, Zagreb, Yugoslavia (Croatia)

    1969-10-15

    The application of chemical dosimeters, tissue equivalent with respect to gamma rays and neutrons, is proposed for dosimetric topography of the space around nuclear devices in case of accidents. The dosimeters in the form of sealed glass ampoules have sufficient sensitivity and long-term stability and are evaluated or checked directly by conventional spectrophotometry. The sensitivity, expressed as yield per rad, is approximately equal for gamma rays and neutrons. The resolution in both cases is about one rad, and the range is up to several thousand rads. The precision of dosimetry is {+-} 1 rad or {+-} 2%, whichever is higher. In free space and unshielded the dosimeter measures the total rad-absorbed dose delivered by gamma rays and neutrons, i.e. the first collision gamma plus neutron dose. If used on- or in-phantom, especially if several dosimeters are disposed within and around the same phantom, it can give important data about the amount of the neutron component of the dose and about the effective mean energy of incident neutrons. The neutron component of the dose can be directly measured if the gamma dosimeter is used together with the chemical dosimeter. The experiments giving the change of optical density per rad and the radiation chemical yield with respect to the absorbed dose delivered by 14-MeV neutrons are described in detail. The possibility is also mentioned of applying the dosimeter as a very sensitive monitor for thermal neutrons, which is due to the chlorine content of 4.73% and activation to {sup 38}Cl. The opinion is expressed that this dosimeter deserves some attention as a part of future planning and development work on area and personnel accidental dosimetry systems. (author)

  1. Imaging properties of the mesooptical Fourier transform microscope for nuclear research emulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bencze, Gy.L.; Soroko, L.M.

    1987-01-01

    The optical signal transformation in the Mesooptical Fourier Transform Microscope (MFTM) for nuclear emulsion is treated in terms of Fourier Optics. A continuous conversion of the traditional optical microscope into the MFTM is followed. The images of dot-like and straight line objects given by the MFTM are discussed

  2. Radiation-chemical transformations of coumarins in ethanolic solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samovich, S.N.; Brinkevich, S.D.; Edimecheva, I.P.; Shadyro, O.I.

    2014-01-01

    Effects of coumarin and its derivatives on product formation during radiolysis of deaerated and oxygenated ethanol were investigated. The data obtained in this study indicate that coumarin, 4-hydroxycoumarin and warfarin effectively oxidized α-hydroxyethyl radicals (α-HER), while esculetin and fraxetin predominantly reduced the above named intermediates. Coumarin, esculetin and fraxetin were able to add α-HER to the double carbon–carbon bond of the pyrone ring to form stable products with molecular masses exceeding those of the starting molecules. Coumarin, warfarin, esculetin and fraxetin were shown to display antioxidant activity during radiation-induced oxidation of ethanol. - Highlights: • Coumarin, 4-hydroxycoumarin and warfarin oxidize α-hydroxyethyl radicals. • Esculetin and fraxetin predominantly reduce α-hydroxyethyl radicals. • Coumarins add α-hydroxyethyl radicals to the C=C bonds of the pyrone ring. • Coumarins display antioxidant activity on radiation-induced oxidation of ethanol

  3. Degradative crystal–chemical transformations of clay minerals under the influence of cyanobacterium-actinomycetal symbiotic associations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Ivanova

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria and actinomycetes are essential components of soil microbial community and play an active role in ash elements leaching from minerals of the parent rock. Content and composition of clay minerals in soil determine the sorption properties of the soil horizons, water-holding capacity of the soil, stickiness, plasticity, etc. The transformative effect of cyanobacterial–actinomycetes associations on the structure of clay minerals – kaolinite, vermiculite, montmorillonite, biotite and muscovite – was observed, with the greatest structural lattice transformation revealed under the influence of association in comparison with monocultures of cyanobacterium and actinomycete. The range of the transformative effect depended both on the type of biota (component composition of association and on the crystal–chemical parameters of the mineral itself (trioctahedral mica – biotite, was more prone to microbial degradation than the dioctahedral – muscovite. The formation of the swelling phase – the product of biotite transformation into the mica–vermicullite mixed-layered formation was revealed as a result of association cultivation. Crystal chemical transformation of vermiculite was accompanied by the removal of potassium (К, magnesium (Mg and aluminum (Al from the crystal lattice. The study of such prokaryotic communities existed even in the early stages of the Earth's history helps to understand the causes and nature of the transformations undergone by the atmosphere, hydrosphere and lithosphere of the planet.contribution of treatments on structure induces and model parameters are discussed in the paper.

  4. Climate risks by radioactive krypton-85 from nuclear fission. Atmospheric-electrical and air-chemical effects of ionizing radiation in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kollert, R.

    1994-01-01

    The study shows that krypton-85 from nuclear fission enhances air ionization and, thus, interferes with the atmospheric-electrical system and the water balance of the earth atmosphere. This is reason for concern: There are unforeseeable effects for weather and climate if the krypton-85 content of the earth atmosphere continues to rise. There may be a krypton-specific greenhouse effect and a collapse of the natural atmospheric-electrical field. In addition, human well-being may be expected to be impaired as a result of the diminished atmospheric-electrical field. There is also the risk of radiochemical actions and effects caused-by krypton-85-containing plumes in other air-borne pollutants like the latters' transformation to aggressive oxidants. This implies radiation smog and more acid rain in the countries exposed. This study summarizes findings gained in these issues by various sciences, analyses them and elaborates hypotheses on the actions and effects of krypton-85 on the air, the atmosphere and the climate. (orig./HP) [de

  5. Development of Chemical Technology in Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jee, Kwang Yong; Kim, W. H.; Kim, J. S.

    2007-06-01

    This project mainly concentrates on the development of technologies related to elemental analysis for the mass balance of pyro-chemical process, on the development of in-line measurement system for high temperature molten salt, and on the development of radiation shielded LA-ICP-MS and micro-XRD system to evaluate the integrity of nuclear fuel. Chemical analysis methods for the quantitative determination of fissile elements, minor actinide elements, fission products, chemical additive and corrosion products in Uranium Metal Ingots are established. It will be applied to the evaluation of mass balance in electrolytic reduction process for the optimization of the process. Optical fiber based UV-VIS spectrophotometer combined with reaction cell was developed for the measurement of reactions in high temperature molten salt. This system is applicable to in-line monitoring of electro-refining process and contribute to clarify the chemical reactions. Radiation shielded LA-ICP-MS and micro-XRD systems are planned to be used for the analysis of isotopic distribution and structural changes from core to rim of spent nuclear fuel pellet, respectively. The developed techniques can contribute to produce database needed for authorization and practical use of ultra high burn-up fuel. In addition, it can be applicable to the other industries such as microelectronics, nano material science and semiconductor to analyze micro region

  6. Trend analyses of transformer problems in the U.S. nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Yoshio

    2009-01-01

    Up to 2007, the authors have conducted the trend analyses of trouble events related to main generators, emergency diesel generators, breakers and motors, which are more likely to cause problems than other electric equipments in nuclear power plants. The frequency of trouble events in transformers in domestic nuclear power plants at present is approximately one third of the publicly reported cases in the U.S. However, as the situation of maintenance in Japan in the future will become similar to those in the U.S. if the operating period is extended or the maintenance method is to be shifted from preventive maintenance to condition based maintenance, there is a concern that the frequency of transformer events in Japan will increase in Japan, also. Thus, trend analyses were conducted on transformers events which had not been subject to such analyses, from among electrical equipments which are likely to cause problems. The trend analyses were performed on 23 transformer events which had occurred in the U.S. nuclear power plants in five years from 2003 through 2007 among events reported in the Licensee Event Reports (LERs: event reports submitted to NRC by U.S. nuclear power plants) which have been registered in the nuclear information database of the Institute of Nuclear Safety System, Incorporated's (INSS), as well as 8 events registered in the Nuclear Information Archives (NUCIA), which had occurred in domestic nuclear power plants in five from 2003 through 2007. Lessons learned from the trend analyses of the transformer trouble events in the U.S. revealed that for transformers in general, the maintenance management of tap changers is important, while for the main transformers which are most likely to cause problems, it is vital to prevent the deterioration of insulation and insulating oil. (author)

  7. Environmental transformations and ecological effects of iron-based nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Cheng; Sun, Yuqing; Tsang, Daniel C W; Lin, Daohui

    2018-01-01

    The increasing application of iron-based nanoparticles (NPs), especially high concentrations of zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI), has raised concerns regarding their environmental behavior and potential ecological effects. In the environment, iron-based NPs undergo physical, chemical, and/or biological transformations as influenced by environmental factors such as pH, ions, dissolved oxygen, natural organic matter (NOM), and biotas. This review presents recent research advances on environmental transformations of iron-based NPs, and articulates their relationships with the observed toxicities. The type and extent of physical, chemical, and biological transformations, including aggregation, oxidation, and bio-reduction, depend on the properties of NPs and the receiving environment. Toxicities of iron-based NPs to bacteria, algae, fish, and plants are increasingly observed, which are evaluated with a particular focus on the underlying mechanisms. The toxicity of iron-based NPs is a function of their properties, tolerance of test organisms, and environmental conditions. Oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species is considered as the primary toxic mechanism of iron-based NPs. Factors influencing the toxicity of iron-based NPs are addressed and environmental transformations play a significant role, for example, surface oxidation or coating by NOM generally lowers the toxicity of nZVI. Research gaps and future directions are suggested with an aim to boost concerted research efforts on environmental transformations and toxicity of iron-based NPs, e.g., toxicity studies of transformed NPs in field, expansion of toxicity endpoints, and roles of laden contaminants and surface coating. This review will enhance our understanding of potential risks of iron-based NPs and proper uses of environmentally benign NPs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A systematic model identification method for chemical transformation pathways – the case of heroin biomarkers in wastewater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramin, Pedram; Valverde Pérez, Borja; Polesel, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    This study presents a novel statistical approach for identifying sequenced chemical transformation pathways in combination with reaction kinetics models. The proposed method relies on sound uncertainty propagation by considering parameter ranges and associated probability distribution obtained...... at any given transformation pathway levels as priors for parameter estimation at any subsequent transformation levels. The method was applied to calibrate a model predicting the transformation in untreated wastewater of six biomarkers, excreted following human metabolism of heroin and codeine. The method....... Results obtained suggest that the method developed has the potential to outperform conventional approaches in terms of prediction accuracy, transformation pathway identification and parameter identifiability. This method can be used in conjunction with optimal experimental designs to effectively identify...

  9. Shape Transformation of the Nuclear Envelope during Closed Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qian; Zheng, Fan; Liu, Allen P; Qian, Jin; Fu, Chuanhai; Lin, Yuan

    2016-11-15

    The nuclear envelope (NE) in lower eukaryotes such as Schizosaccharomyces pombe undergoes large morphology changes during closed mitosis. However, which physical parameters are important in governing the shape evolution of the NE, and how defects in the dividing chromosomes/microtubules are reflected in those parameters, are fundamental questions that remain unresolved. In this study, we show that improper separation of chromosomes in genetically deficient cells leads to membrane tethering or asymmetric division in contrast to the formation of two equal-sized daughter nuclei in wild-type cells. We hypothesize that the poleward force is transmitted to the nuclear membrane through its physical contact with the separated sister chromatids at the two spindle poles. A theoretical model is developed to predict the morphology evolution of the NE where key factors such as the work done by the poleward force and bending and surface energies stored in the membrane have been taken into account. Interestingly, the predicted phase diagram, summarizing the dependence of nuclear shape on the size of the load transmission regions, and the pole-to-pole distance versus surface area relationship all quantitatively agree well with our experimental observations, suggesting that this model captures the essential physics involved in closed mitosis. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Escalation of terrorism? On the risk of attacks with chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear weapons or materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nass, Jens

    2010-01-01

    The report on the risk of attacks with chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear weapons or materials covers the following topics: the variety of terrorism: ethnic-nationalistic, politically motivated, social revolutionary, political extremism, religious fanaticism, governmental terrorism; CBRN (chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear) weapons and materials: their availability and effectiveness in case of use; potential actor groups; prevention and counter measures, emergency and mitigating measures.

  11. Chemical risks from nuclear waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, L.

    1988-01-01

    Studies concerning the chemical risks of nuclear waste are reviewed. The radiological toxicity of the material is of primary concern but the potential nonradiological toxicity should not be overlooked as the chemotoxic substances may reach the biosphere from a nuclear waste repository. In the report is concluded that the possible chemotoxic effects of a repository for nuclear waste should be studied as a part of the formal risk assessment of the disposal concept. (author)

  12. Upper Secondary French Students, Chemical Transformations and the "Register of Models": A Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cokelez, Aytekin; Dumon, Alain; Taber, Keith S.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify how upper secondary school French students (Grade 10-12) interpret chemical transformation with regards to the changes within molecules and atoms, and in terms of intramolecular and/or intermolecular bond breaking. In order to identify and describe the students' assimilated knowledge, four questions were…

  13. Nuclear and conventional energy transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schikarski, W.

    1979-03-01

    Atmospheric pollution from fossil fuel- and nuclear power plants have been compared. SO 2 is the substance chosen from coal- and oil fuel power plants. Measured values for chemical pollution are at levels 10 times, and radioactive pollution near to nuclear power plants, 10.000 times, below that which would cause damage to health. (A.R.H.) [pt

  14. Nuclear Weapons Enterprise Transformation - A Sustainable Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, K H

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear weapons play an essential role in United States (U.S.) National Security Policy and a succession of official reviews has concluded that nuclear weapons will continue to have a role for the foreseeable future. Under the evolving U.S. government policy, it is clear that role will be quite different from what it was during the Cold War. The nuclear-weapons stockpile as well as the nuclear-weapons enterprise needs to continue to change to reflect this evolving role. Stockpile reductions in the early 1990s and the Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP), established after the cessation of nuclear testing in 1992, began this process of change. Further evolution is needed to address changing security environments, to enable further reductions in the number of stockpiled weapons, and to create a nuclear enterprise that is cost effective and sustainable for the long term. The SSP has successfully maintained the U.S. nuclear stockpile for more than a decade, since the end of nuclear testing. Current plans foresee maintaining warheads produced in the 1980s until about 2040. These warheads continue to age and they are expensive to refurbish. The current Life Extension Program plans for these legacy warheads are straining both the nuclear-weapons production and certification infrastructure making it difficult to respond rapidly to problems or changes in requirements. Furthermore, refurbishing and preserving Cold-War-era nuclear weapons requires refurbishing and preserving an infrastructure geared to support old technology. Stockpile Stewardship could continue this refurbishment approach, but an alternative approach could be considered that is more focused on sustainable technologies, and developing a more responsive nuclear weapons infrastructure. Guided by what we have learned from SSP during the last decade, the stewardship program can be evolved to address this increasing challenge using its computational and experimental tools and capabilities. This approach must start

  15. Chemical synthesis, redox transformation, and identification of sonnerphenolic C, an antioxidant in Acer nikoense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwadate, Takehiro; Nihei, Ken-Ichi

    2017-04-15

    Sonnerphenolic C (3), which was predicted in a redox product of epirhododendrin (1) isolated from Acer nikoense, was synthesized for the first time via the epimeric separation of benzylidene acetal intermediates as a key step. From a similar synthetic route, 1 was obtained concisely. As a result of their antioxidative evaluation, only 3 revealed potent activity. The redox transformation of 1 into 3 was achieved in the presence of tyrosinase and vitamin C. Moreover, 3 was identified in the decoction of A. nikoense by HPLC analysis with the effective use of synthesized 3. Thus, a novel naturally occurring antioxidant 3 was developed through the sequential flow including redox prediction, chemical synthesis, evaluation of the activity, and identification as the natural product. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Qualification test of chemical cleaning for secondary side of steam generator in Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Mengqin; Zhang Shufeng; Yu Jinghua; Hou Shufeng

    1997-07-01

    The chemical cleaning technique for removing sludge on the secondary side in Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant has been qualified. The chemical cleaning process will carry out during shutdown refuelling. The qualification test has studied the effect of chemical cleaning agent component, cleaning time on dissolution effectiveness of sludge (Fe 3 O 4 ) and to evaluate corrosion situation of main materials of SG in the cleaning process. The main component of cleaning agent is EDTA. The cleaning temperature is 20∼30 degree C. It is determined that allowable remains amount of cleaning agent (EDTA). The technique of cleaning, rinse, passivation for the chemical cleaning in Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant has been made. The qualification test shown that the technique can dissolve Fe 3 O 4 >1 g/L, the corrosion of materials is in allowable value, the allowable remains of EDTA is <0.01%. The technique character is static, ambient temperature. (9 refs., 12 tabs.)

  17. Hydrodeoxygenation processes: advances on catalytic transformations of biomass-derived platform chemicals into hydrocarbon fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Sudipta; Saha, Basudeb; Luque, Rafael

    2015-02-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass provides an attractive source of renewable carbon that can be sustainably converted into chemicals and fuels. Hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) processes have recently received considerable attention to upgrade biomass-derived feedstocks into liquid transportation fuels. The selection and design of HDO catalysts plays an important role to determine the success of the process. This review has been aimed to emphasize recent developments on HDO catalysts in effective transformations of biomass-derived platform molecules into hydrocarbon fuels with reduced oxygen content and improved H/C ratios. Liquid hydrocarbon fuels can be obtained by combining oxygen removal processes (e.g. dehydration, hydrogenation, hydrogenolysis, decarbonylation etc.) as well as by increasing the molecular weight via C-C coupling reactions (e.g. aldol condensation, ketonization, oligomerization, hydroxyalkylation etc.). Fundamentals and mechanistic aspects of the use of HDO catalysts in deoxygenation reactions will also be discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Determination of air pollutants by nuclear chemical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesny, J.; Toelgyessy, J.

    1975-01-01

    Nuclear analytical methods are discussed with a view to their applicability in the determination of air pollutants. It is shown that some methods (use of radioactive kryptonates in automatic analyzers, application of activation analysis, X-ray fluorescence methods) are developed in theory and proven in practice in such an extent to be widely used in the near future in the control of the environment. Many other methods are becoming increasingly important for the solution of specific problems of environmental protection (such as the control of sudden environmental contamination in the proximity of chemical plants and industrial centers). (author)

  19. Modification of valencene by bio- and chemical transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakawa, Yoshinori; Hashimoto, Toshihiro; Noma, Yoshiaki; Furusawa, Mai

    2013-07-01

    Highly efficient production is discussed of nootkatone, the most important fragrant component of grapefruit and which possesses anti-obesity activity, from valencene, obtained from Valencia orange, by the green alga, Chlorella, and the fungi, Mucor, Botryospaeria and Botryodiplodia. The microorganisms introduce an oxygen atom at an allylic position to give secondary hydroxyl and keto groups. The presented methods are a cheap one step reaction, non-hazardous and very useful for the production of fragrant components from commercially available natural sesquiterpene hydrocarbons.

  20. Method for the chemical reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuels, in particular nuclear fuels containing uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, G.

    1976-01-01

    In the chemical processing of irradiated uranium-containing nuclear fuels which are hydrolyzed with aqueous nitric acid, a suggestion is made to use as quaternary ammonium nitrate trialkyl-methyl ammonium nitrates as extracting agent, in which the sum of C atoms is greater than 16. In the illustrated examples, tricaprylmethylammonium nitrate, trilaurylmethylammonium nitrate and tridecylmethylammonium nitrate are named. (HPH/LH) [de

  1. Study of the mineralogical transformations of granite by underground nuclear explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, Jean

    1970-01-01

    The object of the following communication is to prove new data about the petrographic effects of the underground nuclear explosions. It is founded on the results of trench tests in granite rock. The samples are collected by drilling and the temperature of the rock was measured in the hole. Four types of melted rocks can be sorted, grey-green glass and pumices, beige to red-brown pumices, dark lavas, dark veinlets and crushed granite. The distribution of these rocks is studied. Optical microscopy, X-rays and chemical analysis, study by electron probe, are made. The results complete previously published data. They are interesting as far as the use of nuclear explosions for industrial applications is concerned. (author)

  2. Study of the mineralogical transformations of granite by underground nuclear explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faure, Jean [Commissariat a I' Energie Atomique, Centre d' Etudes de Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France)

    1970-05-15

    The object of the following communication is to prove new data about the petrographic effects of the underground nuclear explosions. It is founded on the results of trench tests in granite rock. The samples are collected by drilling and the temperature of the rock was measured in the hole. Four types of melted rocks can be sorted, grey-green glass and pumices, beige to red-brown pumices, dark lavas, dark veinlets and crushed granite. The distribution of these rocks is studied. Optical microscopy, X-rays and chemical analysis, study by electron probe, are made. The results complete previously published data. They are interesting as far as the use of nuclear explosions for industrial applications is concerned. (author)

  3. The Effects of Nuclear Weapons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glasstone, Samuel

    1964-02-01

    This book is a revision of "The Effects of Nuclear Weapons" which was issued in 1957. It was prepared by the Defense Atomic Support Agency of the Department of Defense in coordination with other cognizant governmental agencies and was published by the U.S. Atomc Energy Commission. Although the complex nature of nuclear weapons effects does not always allow exact evaluation, the conclusions reached herein represent the combined judgment of a number of the most competent scientists working the problem. There is a need for widespread public understanding of the best information available on the effects of nuclear weapons. The purpose of this book is to present as accurately as possible, within the limits of national security, a comprehensive summary of this information.

  4. Development of stable marker-free nuclear transformation strategy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ahmed & Sameh

    2Center for Nutraceutical and Pharmaceutical Materials, Myongji University, Gyeonggi ... has very low stability and it is hard to screen the transformants without antibiotic .... GenePulser Xcell apparatus (Bio-Rad, CA, USA) according to the.

  5. Investigations on the optimum design of chemical addition system for nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Byong Hoon [Junior College of Inchon, Inchon (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Chang Kyu; Choi, Han Rim; Kim, Eun Kee; Ro, Tae Sun [Korea Power Engineering Company, Inc. Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    Mixing characteristics of the chemical additives in the chemical injection tank of the chemical and volume control system(CVCS) were investigated for the Yonggwang Nuclear units 5 and 6. Numerical calculations were performed with a low-Reynolds number turbulence model. Studies were also conducted for the injection tank with a disk located at 1/4H, 2/4H, and 3/4H from the inlet in order to see the effect in the enhancement of chemical mixing. Results show that the optimum arrangement is to locate a disk close to the inlet. 10 refs., 4 figs. (Author)

  6. Investigations on the optimum design of chemical addition system for nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Byong Hoon [Junior College of Inchon, Inchon (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Chang Kyu; Choi, Han Rim; Kim, Eun Kee; Ro, Tae Sun [Korea Power Engineering Company, Inc. Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    Mixing characteristics of the chemical additives in the chemical injection tank of the chemical and volume control system(CVCS) were investigated for the Yonggwang Nuclear units 5 and 6. Numerical calculations were performed with a low-Reynolds number turbulence model. Studies were also conducted for the injection tank with a disk located at 1/4H, 2/4H, and 3/4H from the inlet in order to see the effect in the enhancement of chemical mixing. Results show that the optimum arrangement is to locate a disk close to the inlet. 10 refs., 4 figs. (Author)

  7. The Violation of Childhood: A Review of Possible Effects on Development of Toxic Chemical and Nuclear Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Roy

    Emphasizing that for any known teratogen no safe dosage level exists, this case-illustrated review identifies the bases for current concern about the pollution of the environment, reflects on the promise and complexities of the emerging disciplines of behavioral toxicology and behavioral teratology, and describes existing evidence of teratogenic…

  8. Study of the mechanism of radiation-chemical transformations in rubber-resinous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharova, L.B.; Astakhova, L.G. Trufanova, N.D.; Persinen, A.A.; Vasil'ev, I.A.

    1993-01-01

    Materials based on butadiene-nitrile rubbers reinforced by phenol-formaldehyde resins presently find wide application as reliable heat-insulating coatings for various metallic constructions and are utilized under exposure to ionizing radiation. In this connection, when estimating the assured lifetime of heat-insulating coatings, it is necessary to take into account the character and degree of their radiation-chemical transformations. The aim of the present work was to study the radiation-chemical transformations of materials based on a composite of butadiene-nitrile rubber and phenol-formaldehyde resin. The investigations were carried out on model materials S-O, S-25, S-100, S-130, and S-150 based on the SKN-40M rubber with a varied content of SF-010A brand phenol-formaldehyde resin, the content of which in parts by weight per 100 parts by weight of rubber is indicated in the specifications of the materials. The possible directions of the radiation-chemical transformations in the rubber-resinous vulcanizates were studied by the method of disrupted total internal reflection (MDTIR) IR spectroscopy

  9. The main chemical safety problems in main process of nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Fengli; Zhao Shangui; Liu Xinhua; Zhang Chunlong; Lu Dan; Liu Yuntao; Yang Xiaowei; Wang Shijun

    2014-01-01

    There are many chemical reactions in the aqueous process of nuclear fuel reprocessing. The reaction conditions and the products are different so that the chemical safety problems are different. In the paper the chemical reactions in the aqueous process of nuclear fuel reprocessing are described and the main chemical safety problems are analyzed. The reference is offered to the design and accident analysis of the nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. (authors)

  10. Study of nuclear statics and dynamics using the Wigner transform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shlomo, S.

    1983-01-01

    The Wigner phase-space distribution function, given as the shifted Fourier transform of the density matrix, provides a framework for an exact reformulation of non-relativistic quantum mechanics in terms of classical concepts. The Wigner distribution function (WDF), f(r-vector, p-vector), is considered as a quantum mechanical generalization of the classical phase space distribution function. While basic observables, such as matter density and momentum density, are given by the same integrals over f(r-vector, p-vector) as in classical physics, f(r-vector, p-vector) differs from its classical analog by the fact that it can assume negative values in some regions. However, it is known that the WDF is a useful and convenient tool for the study of the static and the dynamical aspects of many-body quantum systems, and the equation of motion for f(r-vector, p-vector) serves as a starting point for semi-classical approximations. The aim of this talk is to present and discuss some recent results for static and dynamic properties of nuclei obtained by exact evaluation of the WDF

  11. Chemical immobilization of fission products reactive with nuclear reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, L.N.; Kaznoff, A.I.; Clukey, H.V.

    1975-01-01

    This invention teaches a method of immobilizing deleterious fission products produced in nuclear fuel materials during nuclear fission chain reactions through the use of additives. The additives are disposed with the nuclear fuel materials in controlled quantities to form new compositions preventing attack of reactor components, especially nuclear fuel cld, by the deleterious fission products. (Patent Office Record)

  12. Polyfluorinated chemicals and transformation products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knepper, Thomas P. [Univ. of Applied Sciences Fresenius, Idstein (Germany). Inst. for Analytical Research; Lange, Frank Thomas (eds.) [DVGW-Technologiezentrum Wasser, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Due to their unparalleled effectiveness and efficiency, polyfluorinated chemicals (PFC) have become essential in numerous technical applications. However, many PFCs brought to market show limited biodegradability, and their environmental persistence combined with toxic and bioaccumulative potential have become a matter of concern in some instances. This volume highlights the synthesis of PFCs, focusing on substances with improved application and environmental properties, which are a challenge for synthetic chemists. Further, modern mass spectrometric techniques for the detection and identification of biotransformation products of PFCs are described. The sorption and leaching behavior of PFC in soil is also addressed in order to predict their fate in the environment. Several contributions discuss the monitoring of PFCs in European surface, ground and drinking waters, treatment options for PFC removal from drinking water, occurrence in food, and the human biomonitoring of PFCs. (orig.)

  13. Chemical stability of insulin. 4. Mechanisms and kinetics of chemical transformations in pharmaceutical formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brange, J

    1992-01-01

    Insulin decomposes by a multitude of chemical reactions [1-3]. It deamidates at two different residues by entirely different mechanisms. In acid, deamidation at AsnA21 is intramolecularly catalyzed by the protonated C-terminal, whereas above pH 6 an intermediate imide formation at residue AsnB3 leads to isoAsp and Asp derivatives. The imide formation requires a large rotation around the alpha-carbon/peptide carbonyl carbon bond at B3, corresponding to a 10 A movement of the B-chain N-terminal. The main determinant for the rate of B3 deamidation, as well as for the ratio between the two products formed, is the local conformational structure, which is highly influenced by various excipients and the physical state of the insulin. An amazing thermolysin-like, autoproteolytic cleavage of the A-chain takes place in rhombohedral insulin crystals, mediated by a concerted catalytic action by several, inter-hexameric functional groups and Zn2+. Intermolecular, covalent cross-linking of insulin molecules occurs via several mechanisms. The most prominent type of mechanism is aminolysis by the N-terminals, leading to isopeptide linkages with the A-chain side-chain amides of residues GlnA15, AsnA18 and AsnA21. The same type of reaction also leads to covalent cross-linking of the N-terminal in protamine with insulin. Disulfide exchange reactions, initiated by lysis of the A7-B7 disulfide bridge, lead mainly to formation of covalent oligo- and polymers. Activation energy (Ea) for the neutral deamidation and the aminolysis reactions was found to be 80 and 119 KJ/mol, respectively.

  14. Cell-mediated mutagenesis and cell transformation of mammalian cells by chemical carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huberman, E.; Langenbach, R.

    1977-01-01

    We have developed a cell-mediated mutagenesis assay in which cells with the appropriate markers for mutagenesis are co-cultivated with either lethally irradiated rodent embryonic cells that can metabolize carcinogenic hydrocarbons or with primary rat liver cells that can metabolize chemicals carcinogenic to the liver. During co-cultivation, the reactive metabolites of the procarcinogen appear to be transmitted to the mutable cells and induce mutations in them. Assays of this type make it possible to demonstrate a relationship between carcinogenic potency of the chemicals and their ability to induce mutations in mammalian cells. In addition, by simultaneously comparing the frequencies of transformation and mutation induced in normal diploid hamster cells by benzo(a)pyrene (BP) and one of its metabolites, it is possible to estimate the genetic target size for cell transformation in vitro

  15. Immunofluorescent staining of nuclear antigen in lymphoid cells transformed by Herpesvirus papio (HVP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, H

    1981-01-01

    An improved fixation method for antigen detection in lymphoblastoid cells is described. Herpesvirus papio nuclear antigen (HUPNA) could be stained in several transformed lymphoid cell lines by anti-complement immunofluorescence (ACIF). Antibody to HUPNA was detected in many human sera containing antibodies to Epstein-Barr virus capsid and nuclear antigen (EBNA). Rheumatoid arthritis sera showed a high incidence of both anti-EBNA and anti-HUPNA antibodies.

  16. Chemical synthesis, phase transformation and magnetic proprieties of FePt and FePd nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delattre, Anastasia

    2010-01-01

    This work aims at understanding the chemical synthesis of FePt and FePd nanoparticles (NPs), and at exploring how to implement the phase transformation from the chemically disordered to the L10 phase, without coalescence. Using hexadecanenitrile instead of oleylamine, we obtain NPs with a more homogenous internal composition, instead of core-shell NPs. Through a systematic study (designed experiment relying on Taguchi tables), we developed the FePd synthesis, while evidencing the role of each ligand and of the reductor. To induce the crystalline phase transformation while avoiding coalescence, we explored two ways. In the first one, atomic vacancies are introduced in the NPs through light ion irradiation, atomic mobility being ensured by annealing at moderate temperature (300 C). As a result, the blocking temperature is multiplied by 4, due to anisotropy enhancement. However, strong chemical ordering in the L10 phase cannot be achieved. The second approach relies on the dispersion of the NPs in a salt (NaCl) matrix, prior to annealing at 700 C: high chemical ordering is achieved, and the blocking temperature is beyond 400 C. We then developed a single-step process to remove the salt by dissolution in water and to re-disperse NPs in stable aqueous or organics solutions. These high magnetic anisotropy NPs are then readily available for further chemical or manipulation steps, with applied perspectives in areas such as data storage, or biology. (author)

  17. Biological effects of nuclear radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hotz, G.

    1975-01-01

    After a brief survey about the main radiobiological effects caused by ionizing radiation, human symptoms after irradiation and incorporation are shown. The special radiotoxic effect of radionuclides which are chemically associated with metabolism-specific elements such as calcium and potassium is shown and methods of treatment are indicated. (ORU) [de

  18. Transformation Leadership in Chemical Industry

    KAUST Repository

    Alsherehy, Fahad A.

    2018-01-16

    SABIC is a global leader in diversified chemicals headquartered in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. It manufactures on a global scale in the Americas, Europe, Middle East and Asia Pacific, making distinctly different kinds of products: chemicals, commodity and high performance plastics, agri-nutrients and metals. The company has more than 35,000 employees worldwide and operates in more than 50 countries, with innovation hubs in five key geographies ヨ USA, Europe, Middle East, South East Asia and North East Asia.

  19. Transformation Leadership in Chemical Industry

    KAUST Repository

    Alsherehy, Fahad A.

    2018-01-01

    SABIC is a global leader in diversified chemicals headquartered in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. It manufactures on a global scale in the Americas, Europe, Middle East and Asia Pacific, making distinctly different kinds of products: chemicals, commodity and high performance plastics, agri-nutrients and metals. The company has more than 35,000 employees worldwide and operates in more than 50 countries, with innovation hubs in five key geographies ヨ USA, Europe, Middle East, South East Asia and North East Asia.

  20. Synthesis of iron oxide nanorods via chemical scavenging and phase transformations of intermediates at ambient conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshmukh, Ruchi; Mehra, Anurag; Thaokar, Rochish, E-mail: rochish@che.iitb.ac.in [Indian Institute of Technology-Bombay, Department of Chemical Engineering (India)

    2017-01-15

    Chemically induced shape transformations of isotropic seeds, comprised of iron oxyhydroxides and iron oxide borate into nanorods, is reported. Transient growth studies show that the nanorods are formed via phase transformation and aggregation of various metastable species. Addition of tetra-methyl-ammonium hydroxide (TMAH) to the in situ synthesized seeds ensures a typical reaction pathway that favors formation of magnetite (Fe {sub 3}O{sub 4}) via the steps of chemical etching, phase transformation of intermediates, and crystal consolidation. Whereas, with addition of sodium hydroxide (NaOH), either magnetite (Fe {sub 3}O{sub 4}) or a mixture of (γ-Fe {sub 2}O{sub 3} + α-FeOOH) is obtained. The shape with both the additives is always that of nanorods. When the seeds treated with TMAH were aged in an ultrasonication bath, rods with almost twice the length and diameter (length = 2800 nm, diameter = 345 nm) are obtained as compared to the sample aged without ultrasonication (length = 1535 nm, diameter = 172 nm). The morphology of nanostructures depending upon other experimental conditions such as, aging the sample at 60 {sup ∘}C, seeds synthesized under ultrasonication/ stirring or externally added are also examined and discussed in detail. All the samples show high coercivity and strong ferromagnetic behavior at room temperature and should be promising candidates as ferro-fluids for various applications.

  1. Bioprocessing applications in the management of nuclear and chemical wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genung, R.K.

    1988-01-01

    The projected requirements for waste management and environmental restoration activities within the United States will probably cost tens of billions of dollars annually during the next two decades. Expenditures of this magnitude clearly have the potential to affect the international competitiveness of many US industries and the continued operation of many federal facilities. It is argued that the costs of implementing current technology will be too high unless the standards and schedules for compliance are relaxed. Since this is socially unacceptable, efforts to improve the efficiency of existing technologies and to develop new technologies should be pursued. A sizable research, development, and demonstration effort can be easily justified if the potential for reducing costs can be shown. Bioprocessing systems for the treatment of nuclear and chemically hazardous wastes offer such promise. 11 refs

  2. Climatic effects of nuclear war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Covey, C.

    1985-01-01

    Global climatic consequences of a nuclear war have, until recently, been assumed to be insignificant compared with the obviously devastating direct effects from blast, heat, and short-term fallout. But a number of investigations carried out over the past few years indicate that climatic impact could actually be severe enough to threaten the global ecosystem significantly, including regions that may not have been directly involved in the war. This change in perception comes as researchers realize that the fires ignited by nuclear explosions would generate so much smoke that, even spread over a large portion of Earth's surface, densities could be high enough to block most of the sunlight normally reaching the ground. As a result, temperatures could decrease below freezing in a nuclear winter lasting weeks to months. Smoke from fires is what would make nuclear winter so severe. Of necessity, theoretical models are relied upon to estimate the climatic impact of nuclear war. The models incorporate many uncertain assumptions, particularly regarding the small-scale details of smoke production by fires

  3. Chemical ageing and transformation of diffusivity in semi-solid multi-component organic aerosol particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfrang, C.; Shiraiwa, M.; Pöschl, U.

    2011-07-01

    Recent experimental evidence underlines the importance of reduced diffusivity in amorphous semi-solid or glassy atmospheric aerosols. This paper investigates the impact of diffusivity on the ageing of multi-component reactive organic particles approximating atmospheric cooking aerosols. We apply and extend the recently developed KM-SUB model in a study of a 12-component mixture containing oleic and palmitoleic acids. We demonstrate that changes in the diffusivity may explain the evolution of chemical loss rates in ageing semi-solid particles, and we resolve surface and bulk processes under transient reaction conditions considering diffusivities altered by oligomerisation. This new model treatment allows prediction of the ageing of mixed organic multi-component aerosols over atmospherically relevant timescales and conditions. We illustrate the impact of changing diffusivity on the chemical half-life of reactive components in semi-solid particles, and we demonstrate how solidification and crust formation at the particle surface can affect the chemical transformation of organic aerosols.

  4. The Effects of Nuclear Weapons

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    34Nuclear Explosion Effects Practice No. 42, 1961. on Structui’es and Protective Construction-A * ARMOUR RESEARCH FOUNDATION, "A Sim- Selected Bibliography...34 U.S. Atomic Energy p1e Method of Evaluating Blast Effects on Commission, April 1961, TID-3092. Buildihigs," Armour Research Foundation, PI(KERINU, E...stripes have been destroyed by the heat fiom the therm. al radiation. lion points could receive thermal radia- as shades, curtains, and drapes . Of

  5. Bioprocessing applications in the management of nuclear and chemical wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genung, R.K.

    1989-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), the US Department of Defense (DOD), and other federal agencies already face profound challenges in finding strategies that manage budgets and priorities while bringing their sites and facilities into compliance with current statues and regulations and with agency policies and orders. While it is often agreed that current technology can be used to address most waste management and environmental restoration needs, it is also argued by many that the costs of implementing current technology will be too high unless the standards and schedules for compliance are relaxed. Since this is socially unacceptable, efforts to improve the efficiency of existing technologies and to develop new technologies should be pursued. A sizable research, development, and demonstration effort can be easily justified if the potential for reducing costs can be shown. Bioprocessing systems for the treatment of nuclear and chemically hazardous wastes offer such promise

  6. Fourier transform IR studies on the interaction of selected chemicals with isolated cuticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luque, P.; Ramirez, F.J.; Heredia, A.; Bukovac, M.J.

    1994-01-01

    It is known that the plant cuticle represents the first barrier that must be overcome by any chemical reaching the plant surface from the atmosphere before entering the plant. Because of the importance of the cuticle as a barrier to penetration of a wide variety of compounds, its morphology, chemistry, and permeability have been extensively studied. However, only limited information is available on the nature of functional chemical groups present and their interaction and role during the penetration process. The usefulness of in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy studies in identifying functional groups present in isolated cuticles is described and their relationships to the structure of the cuticular membrane are discussed. Applications of infrared spectroscopy on the presence and role of phenolics in the cuticle structure and during the cuticle development, nitrogen oxide binding to isolated cuticles, and the interactions between selected chemical probes during sorption by the cuticle are also described. (orig.)

  7. Thyroid effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boas, Malene; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Main, Katharina M

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, many studies of thyroid-disrupting effects of environmental chemicals have been published. Of special concern is the exposure of pregnant women and infants, as thyroid disruption of the developing organism may have deleterious effects on neurological outcome. Chemicals may exert ...... thyroid-disrupting effects, and there is emerging evidence that also phthalates, bisphenol A, brominated flame retardants and perfluorinated chemicals may have thyroid disrupting properties....

  8. Effect of ABCD transformations on beam paraxiality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaveliuk, Pablo; Martinez-Matos, Oscar

    2011-12-19

    The limits of the paraxial approximation for a laser beam under ABCD transformations is established through the relationship between a parameter concerning the beam paraxiality, the paraxial estimator, and the beam second-order moments. The applicability of such an estimator is extended to an optical system composed by optical elements as mirrors and lenses and sections of free space, what completes the analysis early performed for free-space propagation solely. As an example, the paraxiality of a system composed by free space and a spherical thin lens under the propagation of Hermite-Gauss and Laguerre-Gauss modes is established. The results show that the the paraxial approximation fails for a certain feasible range of values of main parameters. In this sense, the paraxial estimator is an useful tool to monitor the limits of the paraxial optics theory under ABCD transformations.

  9. Changes of chemical properties of humic acids from crude and fungal transformed lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LianHua Dong; Quan Yuan; HongLi Yuan [China Agricultural University, Beijing (China). College of Biological Science

    2006-12-15

    The development of biological processes for fossil energy utilization has received increasing attention in recent years. There are abundance of lignite resources in China and the lignite, a low-grade coal, can be transformed by a Penicillium sp. After fungal transformation, the contents of humic acid and water-soluble humic material increased from 38.6% to 55.1%, and from less than 4.0% to 28.2%, respectively. The differences in chemical properties of crude lignite humic acid (aHA), fungal transformed lignite humic acid (bHA) and water-soluble humic material from fungal transformed lignite (WS) were studied. Elemental analysis and size exclusion chromatography showed that the N content of bHA increased by 47.36% compared with aHA, and the molecular mass of bHA was smaller than aHA. And the WS with the smallest molecular mass contained most content of N. The {sup 13}C NMR and FT-IR spectra of aHA and bHA showed that aHA contained more aromatic structure than bHA. 44 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Recent studies of nuclear and chemical properties of elements 103, 104 and 105

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1990-08-01

    Information obtained since 1983 on the nuclear and chemical properties of element 103, the last on the actinide series, and elements 104 and 105, at the beginning of the transactinide series, is reviewed. Their chemical properties are compared with their lanthanide and lighter group 4 and 5 homologs and evidence for possible relativistic effects is discussed. The current knowledge of the nuclear properties of these elements and how these affect of the study of chemical properties is discussed. Some of the challenges involved in the study of short-lived isotopes which can only be produced an ''atom-at-a-time'' at an appropriate accelerator and the prognosis for future studies of these and still heavier elements are considered. 40 refs., 4 figs

  11. Effects of protease inhibitors on radiation transformation in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, A.R.; Little, J.B.

    1981-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of three protease inhibitors, antipain, leupeptin, and soybean trypsin inhibitor, on the induction of oncogenic transformation in mouse C3H10T 1/2 cells by X-rays. The patterns of inhibition by the three protease inhibitors were different. Antipain was the most effective, having the ability to suppress completely radiation transformation as well as radiation transformation enhanced by the phorbol ester promoting agent 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate. The fact that antipain could suppress transformation when present for only 1 day following irradiation suggests that an effect on a DNA repair process might be important in its action. Leupeptin was less effective than antipain in its inhibition of radiation transformation. Soybean trypsin inhibitor suppressed only the promotional effects of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate on transformation. Our results suggest that there may be more than one protease involved in carcinogenesis

  12. A simple and non-invasive method for nuclear transformation of intact-walled Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sora Kim

    Full Text Available Genetic engineering in microalgae is gaining attraction but nuclear transformation methods available so far are either inefficient or require special equipment. In this study, we employ positively charged nanoparticles, 3-aminopropyl-functionalized magnesium phyllosilicate (aminoclay, approximate unit cell composition of [H2N(CH23]8Si8Mg6O12(OH4, for nuclear transformation into eukaryotic microalgae. TEM and EDX analysis of the process of transformation reveals that aminoclay coats negatively-charged DNA biomolecules and forms a self-assembled hybrid nanostructure. Subsequently, when this nanostructure is mixed with microalgal cells and plated onto selective agar plates with high friction force, cell wall is disrupted facilitating delivery of plasmid DNA into the cell and ultimately to the nucleus. This method is not only simple, inexpensive, and non-toxic to cells but also provides efficient transformation (5.03×10(2 transformants/µg DNA, second only to electroporation which needs advanced instrumentation. We present optimized parameters for efficient transformation including pre-treatment, friction force, concentration of foreign DNA/aminoclay, and plasticity of agar plates. It is also confirmed the successful integration and stable expression of foreign gene in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii through molecular methods.

  13. Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Regional Centres of Excellence Initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bril, L.V.

    2013-01-01

    This series of slides presents the initiative launched in May 2010 by the European Union to develop at national and regional levels the necessary institutional capacity to fight against the CBRN (Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear) risk. The origin of the risk can be: -) criminal (proliferation, theft, sabotage and illicit traffics), -) accidental (industrial catastrophes, transport accidents...) and -) natural (mainly pandemics). The initiative consists in the creation of Centres of Excellence for providing assistance and cooperation in the field of CBRN risk and the creation of experts networks for sharing best practices, reviewing laws and regulation, developing technical capacities in order to mitigate the CBRN risk. The initiative is complementary to the instrument for nuclear safety cooperation. Regional Centres of Excellence are being set up in 6 regions: South East Europe, South East Asia, North Africa, West Africa, Middle East, and Central Asia covering nearly 40 countries. A global budget of 100 million Euros will be dedicated to this initiative for the 2009-2013 period. (A.C.)

  14. Understanding the chemical and structural transformations of lignin macromolecule during torrefaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, Jia-Long; Sun, Shao-Long; Yuan, Tong-Qi; Xu, Feng; Sun, Run-Cang

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The terrified bamboo has a high energy yield of 85.7% and a HHV of 20.13 MJ/kg. • The structural changes of hemicelluloses, cellulose, and lignin were investigated. • First study on the structural transformations of lignin during torrefaction. • The mechanism of structural changes of lignin has been proposed. - Abstract: Torrefaction is an efficient method to recover energy from biomass. Herein, the characteristics (mass yield, energy yield, physical, and chemical characteristics) of torrefied bamboo at diverse temperatures (200–300 °C) were firstly evaluated by elemental analysis, XRD, and CP–MAS 13 C NMR methodologies. Under an optimal condition the terrified bamboo has a relative high energy yield of 85.7% and a HHV of 20.13 MJ/kg. The chemical and structural transformations of lignin induced by thermal treatment were thoroughly investigated by FT-IR and solution-state NMR techniques (quantitative 13 C NMR, 2D-HSQC, and 31 P-NMR methodologies). The results highlighted the chemical reactions of the native bamboo lignins towards severe torrefaction treatments occurred, such as depolymerization, demethoxylation, bond cleavage, and condensation reactions. NMR results indicated that aryl-ether bonds (β-O-4) and p-coumaric ester in lignin were cleaved during the torrefaction process at mild conditions. The severe treatments of bamboo (275 °C and 300 °C) induced a dramatic enrichment in lignin content together with the almost complete disappearance of β-O-4, β-β, and β-5 linkages. Further analysis of the molecular weight of milled wood lignin (MWL) indicated that the average molecular weights of “torrefied MWL” were lower than those of control MWL. It is believed that understanding of the reactivity and chemical transformations of lignin during torrefaction will contribute to the integrated torrefaction mechanism

  15. Weapons of mass destruction: Overview of the CBRNEs (Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosives).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prockop, Leon D

    2006-11-01

    The events of September 11, 2001, made citizens of the world acutely aware of disasters consequent to present-day terrorism. This is a war being waged for reasons obscure to many of its potential victims. The term "NBCs" was coined in reference to terrorist weapons of mass destruction, i.e., nuclear, biological and chemical. The currently accepted acronym is "CBRNE" which includes Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosive weapons. Non-nuclear explosives are the most common terrorist weapon now in use. Nuclear and radiological weapons are beyond the scope of this publication, which focuses on the "CBEs", i.e. chemical, biological and explosive weapons. Although neurologists will not be the first responders to CBEs, they must know about the neurological effects in order to provide diagnosis and treatment to survivors. Neurological complications of chemical, biological and explosive weapons which have or may be used by terrorists are reviewed by international experts in this publication. Management and treatment profiles are outlined.

  16. Molten salt fueled nuclear facility with steam-and gas turbine cycles of heat transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ananich, P.I.; Bunin, E.N.; Kazazyan, V.T.; Nemtsev, V.A.; Sikorin, S.N.

    2001-01-01

    The molten salt fueled nuclear facilities with fuel circulating in the primary circuit have a series of the potential advantages in comparison with the traditional thermal and fast reactors with solid fuel elements. These advantages are ensured by the possibility to receive effective neutron balance in the core, minimum margin reactivity, more deep fuel burnup, unbroken correctness of the fuel physical and chemical properties and by low prices of the fuel cycle. The neutron and thermal-physical calculations of the various variants of the MSFNF with steam-water and gas turbine power circuits and their technical and economical comparison are carried out in this article. Calculations of molten salt nuclear power plant with gas turbine power circuit have been carried out using chemically reacting working body ''nitrin'' (N304 + 1%NO). The molten salt fueled reactors with the thermal power near of 2300 MW with two fuel compositions have been considered. The base variant has been taken the design of NPP with VVER NP-1000 when comparing the results of the calculations. Its economical performances are presented in prices of 1990. The results of the calculations show that it is difficult to determine the advantages of any one of the variants considered in a unique fashion. But NPP with MSR possesses large reserves in the process of optimization of cycle and energy equipment parameters that can improve its technical and economical performances sufficiently. (author)

  17. Development of chemical technology in nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Won Ho; Kim, J. S.; Kim, J. G.

    2004-04-01

    The objectives of this study are to develop the technology for both chemical analysis of fissile materials and fission products and chemical characterization in dry process, and also to compose LA/ICP-MS and micro-XRD systems. Chemical techniques for quantitative analysis of Cs, Tc, Np, Am, Cm in LiCl molten salts and Am, Cm, Tc, 3 H, 14 C in oxidized PWR spent fuel powders were developed for the evaluation of its material balance in the dry process. In particular, the rate of uranium oxide reduction was measured by the determination of concentrations of lithium metal and lithium oxide in LiCl molten salts. The solubility data of the reactants in LiCl molten salt were acquired, the oxide ion selective electrode to determine the oxide contents in the medium being fabricated, and a chronoamperometric technique applicable to in-line and real time monitoring of lithium metal reduction process was developed. On the other side, the electrochemical reduction of uranium oxides was studied, which has contributed to better understand the reduction behavior and thus lead to modify processes involved. Laser ablation ICP-MS system was developed by coupling laser ablation system with ICP-MS system, which was supposed to measure the isotope distribution from core to rim of irradiated fuel. The micro-XRD was developed with a micro beam, two hundreds times as narrow as conventional XRD, to measure structural changes of solid samples by 50μm interval in the radial direction. The performance of the two systems developed was confirmed by means of the examinations on precision, spatial resolution, and reproducibility. The development of LA/ICP-MS and micro-XRD system led to an establishment of techniques for the evaluation of its long-term integrity of high burn-up spent nuclear fuel and these techniques will be applied to the development of new nuclear fuels. Especially, the micro-XRD system will be useful to develop new materials and to control the quality in the various industrial

  18. Climatic effects of nuclear war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turco, R.P.; Toon, O.B.; Ackerman, T.P.; Pollack, J.B.; Sagan, C.

    1984-01-01

    Recent findings by this group confirmed by workers in Europe, the US and the USSR, suggest that the long-term climatic effects of a major nuclear war are likely to be much severer and farther-reaching than had been supposed. In the aftermath of such a war vast areas of the earth could be subjected to prolonged darkness, abnormally low temperatures, violent windstorms, toxic smog and persistent radioactive fallout - in short, the combination of conditions that has come to be known as nuclear winter. In brief, the authors' initial results, published in Science in December, 1983, showed that the potential global atmospheric and climatic consequences of nuclear war...are serious. Significant hemispherical attenuation of the solar radiation flux and subfreezing land temperatures may be caused by fine dust raised in high-yield nuclear surface bursts and by smoke from city and forest fires ignited by airbursts of all yields. Subsequent studies, based on more powerful models of the general circulation of the earth's atmosphere, have tended to confirm both the validity of the authors' investgative approach and the main thrust of their findings. Most of this article is devoted to reviewing the current state of knowledge on this vital issue

  19. Overview of climatic effects of nuclear winter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, E.M.; Malone, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    A general description of the climatic effects of a nuclear war are presented. This paper offers a short history of the subject, a discussion of relevant parameters and physical processes, and a description of plausible nuclear winter scenario. 9 refs

  20. Immunogenicity of guinea pig cells transformed in culture by chemical carcinogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohanian, S H; McCabe, R P; Evans, C H

    1981-12-01

    The immunogenicity of inbred strain 2/N guinea pig fibroblasts transformed to the malignant state in vitro by chemical carcinogens was evaluated with the use of a variety of in vivo and in vitro methods including delayed-type hypersensitivity skin and tumor transplantation tests and analysis of antibody production by immunofluorescence, complement fixation, and staphylococcal protein A binding tests. Neoplastic transformation was induced by direct treatment of cells in culture with benzo[a]pyrene, 3-methylcholanthrene, or N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) or by the host-mediated method by which fetuses were exposed to diethylnitrosamine or MNNG in vivo prior to cell culture. Rabbits and syngeneic guinea pigs were inoculated with unirradiated and X-irradiated clonally derived cells. Delayed hypersensitivity skin reactions to immunizing or other cells were equivalent in immunized or control guinea pigs, and no protection to tumor outgrowth from a challenge inoculum of immunizing cells was observed. Antibody activity induced in the sera of immunized guinea pigs was cross-reactive and removed by absorption with nontumorigenic cells. Rabbit antisera after absorption with fetal guinea pig cells were nonreactive with the specific immunizing or other culture cells. Chemical carcinogen-induced neoplastic transformation of guinea pig cells can, therefore, occur without formation of detectable, individually distinct cell surface tumor-specific neoantigens.

  1. Immunogenicity of guinea pig cells transformed in culture by chemical carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohanian, S.H.; McCabe, R.P.; Evans, C.H.

    1981-01-01

    The immunogenicity of inbred strain 2/N guinea pig fibroblasts transformed to the malignant state in vitro by chemical carcinogens was evaluated with the use of a variety of in vivo and in vitro methods including delayed-type hypersensitivity skin and tumor transplantation tests and analysis of antibody production by immunofluorescence, complement fixation, and staphylococcal protein A binding tests. Neoplastic transformation was induced by direct treatment of cells in culture with benzo[a]pyrene, 3-methylcholanthrene, or N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) or by the host-mediated method by which fetuses were exposed to diethylnitrosamine or MNNG in vivo prior to cell culture. Rabbits and syngeneic guinea pigs were inoculated with unirradiated and X-irradiated clonally derived cells. Delayed hypersensitivity skin reactions to immunizing or other cells were equivalent in immunized or control guinea pigs, and no protection to tumor outgrowth from a challenge inoculum of immunizing cells was observed. Antibody activity induced in the sera of immunized guinea pigs was cross-reactive and removed by absorption with nontumorigenic cells. Rabbit anitsera after absorption with fetal guinea pig cells were nonreactive with the specific immunizing or other cultured cells. Chemical carcinogen-induced neoplastic transformation of guinea pig cells can, therefore, occur without formation of detectable, individually distinct cell surface tumor-specific neoantigens

  2. Isotope effects of sulfur in chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikolajczuk, A.

    1999-01-01

    Sulfur is an important component of organic matter because it forms compounds with many elements. Due to high chemical activity of sulfur, it takes part in biological and geological processes in which isotope effects are occurring. It has been shown during last years research of isotope effects that we have take into account not only mass difference but also many other physical properties of nuclides e.g. even or odd number of neutrons in nuclei, shape and distribution of charge, turn of nuclear spin etc. The factor remains that new theoretical ideas have been formed on the base of data, being obtained in fractionation processes of heavy element isotope, particularly uranium. Now it is being well known that effects unconnected with vibration energy have also caused an effect on fractionation of considerably lighter elements like iron and magnesium. The important question is, if these effects would come to light during the separation of sulfur isotopes. Sulfur have three even isotopes M = (32, 34, 36) and one odd M 33). This problem is still open. (author)

  3. Accuracy in the quantification of chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) and relayed nuclear Overhauser enhancement (rNOE) saturation transfer effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Yong; Wang, Feng; Li, Hua; Xu, Junzhong; Gochberg, Daniel F; Gore, John C; Zu, Zhongliang

    2017-07-01

    Accurate quantification of chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) effects, including dipole-dipole mediated relayed nuclear Overhauser enhancement (rNOE) saturation transfer, is important for applications and studies of molecular concentration and transfer rate (and thereby pH or temperature). Although several quantification methods, such as Lorentzian difference (LD) analysis, multiple-pool Lorentzian fits, and the three-point method, have been extensively used in several preclinical and clinical applications, the accuracy of these methods has not been evaluated. Here we simulated multiple-pool Z spectra containing the pools that contribute to the main CEST and rNOE saturation transfer signals in the brain, numerically fit them using the different methods, and then compared their derived CEST metrics with the known solute concentrations and exchange rates. Our results show that the LD analysis overestimates contributions from amide proton transfer (APT) and intermediate exchanging amine protons; the three-point method significantly underestimates both APT and rNOE saturation transfer at -3.5 ppm (NOE(-3.5)). The multiple-pool Lorentzian fit is more accurate than the other two methods, but only at lower irradiation powers (≤1 μT at 9.4 T) within the range of our simulations. At higher irradiation powers, this method is also inaccurate because of the presence of a fast exchanging CEST signal that has a non-Lorentzian lineshape. Quantitative parameters derived from in vivo images of rodent brain tumor obtained using an irradiation power of 1 μT were also compared. Our results demonstrate that all three quantification methods show similar contrasts between tumor and contralateral normal tissue for both APT and the NOE(-3.5). However, the quantified values of the three methods are significantly different. Our work provides insight into the fitting accuracy obtainable in a complex tissue model and provides guidelines for evaluating other newly developed

  4. Mathematical model of phase transformations in thermo-chemical cathodes with zirconium insertion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavokin, A.A.; Kazmi, I.H.

    2007-01-01

    The mathematical model of thermo-chemical processes in the cathode of plasmatron working in the gas environment is investigated. The model describes electromagnetic, temperature and concentration fields taking into account kinetic of phase transformation and chemical reaction in accordance with a state diagram. The offered approach is simpler than the Stefan's approach of describing an analogical phase transformation. As an example the case of copper cathodes with the zirconium insertion in the environment of oxygen is considered. The influence of separate parts of process on distribution of temperature inside of the insertion is estimated. On the basis of this analysis the opportunity of use of stationary approach for electric and temperature fields is shown and analytical formulas for temperature are received. After that a numerical solution for gas concentration distribution is obtained. The calculations on the specified model show that the size of area of a phase zirconium oxides depends mainly upon coefficient of diffusion of oxygen. The calculations for various types of dependencies of gas diffusion coefficient from temperature are concluded. The results of calculations develop understanding of some features of oxidation process of a zirconium insertion. Typical example of multi phase process model is the mathematical description of a heat and mass transfer occurring in metal which is being heated by an electric arch in the gas medium (1, 2, 4). The macroscopic model of physical and chemical transformations can be described as follows (3). As a metal is heated on the surface of an electrode as a function of rising results in the border dividing solid and liquid phases moves ahead deep into the electrode. At the same time there is a diffusion of gas in electrode and formation of new chemical compounds which can noticeably differ in the physical and chemical properties from each other and metal of the electrode. Moreover we shall name a phase of substance not

  5. Organic Acids Regulation of Chemical-Microbial Phosphorus Transformations in Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes-Blackburn, Daniel; Paredes, Cecilia; Zhang, Hao; Giles, Courtney D; Darch, Tegan; Stutter, Marc; George, Timothy S; Shand, Charles; Lumsdon, David; Cooper, Patricia; Wendler, Renate; Brown, Lawrie; Blackwell, Martin; Wearing, Catherine; Haygarth, Philip M

    2016-11-01

    We have used an integrated approach to study the mobility of inorganic phosphorus (P) from soil solid phase as well as the microbial biomass P and respiration at increasing doses of citric and oxalic acid in two different soils with contrasting agronomic P status. Citric or oxalic acids significantly increased soil solution P concentrations for doses over 2 mmol kg -1 . However, low organic acid doses (<2 mmol kg -1 ) were associated with a steep increase in microbial biomass P, which was not seen for higher doses. In both soils, treatment with the tribasic citric acid led to a greater increase in soil solution P than the dibasic oxalic acid, likely due to the rapid degrading of oxalic acids in soils. After equilibration of soils with citric or oxalic acids, the adsorbed-to-solution distribution coefficient (K d ) and desorption rate constants (k -1 ) decreased whereas an increase in the response time of solution P equilibration (T c ) was observed. The extent of this effect was shown to be both soil and organic acid specific. Our results illustrate the critical thresholds of organic acid concentration necessary to mobilize sorbed and precipitated P, bringing new insight on how the exudation of organic acids regulate chemical-microbial soil phosphorus transformations.

  6. Tautomeric transformation of temozolomide, their proton affinities and chemical reactivities: A theoretical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang-Aroon, Wichien; Ruangpornvisuti, Vithaya; Amornkitbamrung, Vittaya

    2016-05-01

    The gas-phase geometry optimizations of bare, mono- and dihydrated complexes of temozolomide isomers were carried out using density functional calculation at the M06-2X/6-31+G(d,p) level of the theory. The structures and protonation energies of protonated species of temozolomide are reported. Chemical indices of all isomers and protonated species are also reported. Energies, thermodynamic quantities, rate constants and equilibrium constants of tautomeric and rotameric transformations of all isomers I1↔TZM↔HIa↔HIb↔I2↔I3 in bare and hydrated systems were obtained. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The Effects of Nuclear Weapons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glasstone, Samuel

    1957-06-01

    This handbook prepared by the Armed Forces Special Weapons Project of the Department of Defense in coordination with other cognizant government agencies and published by the United States Atomic Energy Commission, is a comprehensive summary of current knowledge on the effects of nuclear weapons. The effects information contained herein is calculated for yields up to 20 megatons and the scaling laws for hypothetically extending the calculations beyond this limit are given. The figure of 20 megatons however is not be taken as an indication of capabilities or developments.

  8. Transformation processes influencing physico-chemical forms of radionuclides and trace elements in natural water systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salbu, B.; Riise, G.; Oughton, D.H.

    1995-01-01

    In order to assess short and long term consequences of radionuclides and trace elements introduced to aquatic systems, knowledge on source terms, key factors and key processes influencing the speciation is essential. The mobility, bioavailability and subsequent transfer into food chains depend on the physico-chemical forms on radionuclides and trace metals. In addition, transformation processes and especially the interaction with natural organic matter (NOM) influences the distribution pattern. Furthermore, the prevailing climate conditions, e.g. episodic events and temperature are vital for fluxes and for the kinetics of the transformation processes. In the present work processes in catchments and processes associated with acidification, episodic events, climate conditions (temperature) and mixing zone phenomena influencing the speciation of radionuclides and trace metals are highlighted. These processes should be highly relevant for assessing far field consequences of radionuclides potentially released from disposal sites. (authors). 21 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  9. Chemical effects of fission recoils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meisels, G.G.; Freeman, J.P.; Gregory, J.P.; Richardson, W.C.; Sroka, G.J.

    1978-01-01

    The production of nitrogen from nitrous oxide at high density was employed to investigate the energy deposition efficiency of fission recoils produced from fission of U 235 in uranium-palladium foils clad with platinum. Nitrogen production varied linearly with fission recoil dose from 1.1 x 10 20 to 9.0 x 10 20 eV, and was independent of density between 12.5 and 127.5 g l -1 N 2 O. 16.2 +- 0.8% of the fission recoil energy was deposited external to the foil. Electron microprobe analysis showed some unevenness of new foil and polymer buildup on the surface after irradiation of ethylene-oxygen mixtures. Subsequent irradiation in the presence of nitrous oxide restored some of the original efficiency. This is ascribed to chemical oxidation of the polymer induced by reactive intermediates produced from nitrous oxide. (author)

  10. Reactions of charged and neutral recoil particles following nuclear transformations. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ache, H.J.

    1980-12-01

    A summary is given of the various activities conducted as part of the research on the chemical reactions of energetic particles generated in nuclear reactions. Emphasis was on hot atom chemistry in gases and liquids. A bibliography of 110 publications published as part of the program is included

  11. Chemical Constraints Governing the Origin of Metabolism: The Thermodynamic Landscape of Carbon Group Transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Arthur L.; Fonda, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The thermodynamics of organic chemistry under mild aqueous conditions was examined in order to begin to understand its influence on the structure and operation of metabolism and its antecedents. Free energies were estimated for four types reactions of biochemical importance carbon-carbon bond cleavage and synthesis, hydrogen transfer between carbon groups, dehydration of alcohol groups, and aldo-keto isomerization. The energies were calculated for mainly aliphatic groups composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. The energy values showed that (1) when carbon-carbon bond cleavage involves two different types of functional groups, transfer of the shared electron-pair to the more reduced carbon group is energetically favored over transfer to the more oxidized carbon group, and (2) the energy of carbon-carbon bond transformation is strongly dependent on the type of functional group that donates the shared electron-pair during cleavage, and the group that accepts the shared electron-pair during synthesis, and (3) the energetics of C-C bond transformation is determined primarily by the half-reaction energies of the couples: carbonyl/carboxylic acid, carboxylic acid/carbon dioxide, alcohol/carbonyl, and hydrocarbon/alcohol. The energy of hydrogen-transfer between carbon groups was found to depend on the functional group class of both the hydrogen-donor and hydrogen-acceptor. From these and other observations we concluded that the chemistry of the origin of metabolism (and to a lesser degree modem metabolism) is strongly constrained by the (1) limited disproportionation energy of organic substrates that can be dissipated in a few irreversible reactions, (2) the energy-dominance of few half-reaction couples in carbon-carbon bond transformation that establishes whether a chemical reaction is energetically irreversible, reversible or unfeasible, and (3) the dependence of the transformation-energy on the oxidation state of carbon groups (functional group type) which is

  12. Investigating the role for adaptation of the microbial community to transform trace organic chemicals during managed aquifer recharge

    KAUST Repository

    Alidina, Mazahirali; Li, Dong; Drewes, Jorg

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate whether adaptation by pre-exposure to trace organic chemicals (TOrCs) was necessary for microbial transformation during managed aquifer recharge (MAR). Two pairs of laboratory-scale soil columns, each

  13. Sorption, Photodegradation, and Chemical Transformation of Naproxen and Ibuprofen in Soils and Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulava, V. M.; Cory, W. C.; Murphey, V.; Ulmer, C.

    2015-12-01

    Trace levels of pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) are increasingly being found in municipal drinking water and natural streams around the world. PhACs enter natural water systems after passing through wastewater treatment plants that have proven to be relatively inefficient at removing them. Once they are released into the environment, they can undergo (1) soil sorption, (2) photodegradation, and/or (3) chemical transformation into structurally similar compounds. The overarching goal of this study is to understand the geochemical fate of common PhACs in the environment. Here we report on our studies with naproxen (NAP) and ibuprofen (IBP) in soils and water. Both compounds are complex nonpolar (aromatic) organic molecules with polar (carboxylic acid) functional groups. The carboxylic functional groups are likely to be deprotonated at environmentally relevant pHs (~4-8). Sorption studies of both compounds were conducted in clean and relatively acidic (soil pH ~4.5-6.5) natural soils that contained varying levels of organic matter (OM), clay minerals, and Fe oxides. OM was observed to play an important role in each of the above three processes. Sorption was observed to be stronger and nonlinear in higher OM soils, while weaker but still significant in lower OM, higher clay soils; the amphiphilic nature of NAP and IBP combined with the complex charged and nonpolar surfaces available in the soil was observed to control the sorption behavior. Both NAP and IBP underwent rapid photodegradation in aqueous suspensions when exposed to simulated sunlight. The degradation rates were observed to change in the presence of humic acid or fulvic acid. During sorption and photodegradation experiments, common transformation products were observed for both NAP and IBP. The transformation products produced were indicative of chemical transformation and not biological factors. Concentrations of the transformation products were significantly higher in the photoexposed aqueous

  14. Chemical stability of insulin. 5. Isolation, characterization and identification of insulin transformation products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brange, J; Hallund, O; Sørensen, E

    1992-01-01

    During storage of insulin formulated for therapy, minor amounts of various degradation and covalent di- and polymerization products are formed [1-3]. The main chemical transformation products were isolated from aged preparations and characterized chemically and biologically. The most prominent products formed in neutral medium were identified as a mixture of deamidation products hydrolyzed at residue B3, namely isoAsp B3 and Asp B3 derivatives. A hydrolysis product formed only in crystals of insulin zinc suspensions containing a surplus of zinc ions in the supernatant was identified as an A8-A9 cleavage product. The small amounts of covalent insulin dimers (CID) formed in all formulations were shown to be a heterogenous mixture of 5-6 different CIDs with a composition dependent on the pharmaceutical formulation. The chemical characteristics of the CIDs indicate that they are formed through a transamidation reaction mainly between the B-chain N-terminal and one of the four amide side-chains of the A chain. GlnA15, AsnA18 and, in particular, AsnA21 participate in the formation of such isopeptide links between two insulin molecules. The covalent insulin-protamine products (CIPP) formed during storage of NPH preparations presumably originate from a similar reaction between the protamine N-terminal with an amide in insulin. Covalent polymerization products, mainly formed during storage of amorphously suspended insulin at higher temperature, were shown to be due to disulfide interactions. Biological in vivo potencies relative to native insulin were less than 2% for the split-(A8-A9)-product and for the covalent disulfide exchange polymers, 4% for the CIPP, approximately 15% for the CIDs, whereas the B3 derivatives exhibited full potency. Rabbit immunization experiments revealed that none of the insulin transformation products had significantly increased immunogenicity in rabbits.

  15. Effects of variable transformations on errors in FORM results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Quan; Lin Daojin; Mei Gang; Chen Hao

    2006-01-01

    On the basis of studies on second partial derivatives of the variable transformation functions for nine different non-normal variables the paper comprehensively discusses the effects of the transformation on FORM results and shows that senses and values of the errors in FORM results depend on distributions of the basic variables, whether resistances or actions basic variables represent, and the design point locations in the standard normal space. The transformations of the exponential or Gamma resistance variables can generate +24% errors in the FORM failure probability, and the transformation of Frechet action variables could generate -31% errors

  16. chemical determination of burnup ratio in nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guereli, L.

    1997-01-01

    Measurements of the extent of fission are important to determine the irradiation performance of a nuclear fuel. The energy released per unit mass of uranium (burnup) can be determined from measurement of the percent of heavy atoms that have fissioned during irradiation.The preferred method for this determination is choosing a suitable fission monitor (usually ''1''4''8Nd) and its determination after separation from the fuel matrix. In thermal reactor fuels where the only heavy element in the starting material is uranium, uranium depletion can be used for burnup determination. ''2''3''5U depletion method requires measurement of uranium isotopic ratios of both irradiated and unirradiated fuel. Isotopic ratios can be determined by thermal ionization mass spectrometer following separation of uranium from the fuel matrix. Separation procedures include solvent extraction, ion exchange and anion exchange chromatography. Another fission monitor used is ''1''3''9La determination by HPLC. Because La is monoisotopic (''1''3''9La) in the fuel, it can be determined by chemical analysis techniques

  17. Chemical fingerprinting of Arabidopsis using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorzsás, András; Sundberg, Björn

    2014-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy is a fast, sensitive, inexpensive, and nondestructive technique for chemical profiling of plant materials. In this chapter we discuss the instrumental setup, the basic principles of analysis, and the possibilities for and limitations of obtaining qualitative and semiquantitative information by FT-IR spectroscopy. We provide detailed protocols for four fully customizable techniques: (1) Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DRIFTS): a sensitive and high-throughput technique for powders; (2) attenuated total reflectance (ATR) spectroscopy: a technique that requires no sample preparation and can be used for solid samples as well as for cell cultures; (3) microspectroscopy using a single element (SE) detector: a technique used for analyzing sections at low spatial resolution; and (4) microspectroscopy using a focal plane array (FPA) detector: a technique for rapid chemical profiling of plant sections at cellular resolution. Sample preparation, measurement, and data analysis steps are listed for each of the techniques to help the user collect the best quality spectra and prepare them for subsequent multivariate analysis.

  18. Radiation-chemical transformations of antioxidants of alkylated phenols class. 3. 2.2'-methylene-bis-4-methyl-6-tret-butylphenol bis-phenol transformations in the absence of oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonova, E.A.; Zhirkova, O.A.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental results on radiation-chemical yields of products in the course of bisphenol-agidol transformations in n-decane in the absence of oxygen are presented. It is ascertained that monophenols of different structure are the main stable products of radiation-chemical transformations of agidol. Radiation-chemical mechanism of required product formation is discussed

  19. Rapid, portable detection of endocrine disrupting chemicals through ligand-nuclear hormone receptor interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, J Porter; Schinn, Song-Min; Jones, Matthew D; Bundy, Bradley C

    2017-12-04

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) are structurally diverse compounds that can interact with nuclear hormone receptors, posing significant risk to human and ecological health. Unfortunately, many conventional biosensors have been too structure-specific, labor-intensive or laboratory-oriented to detect broad ranges of EDC effectively. Recently, several technological advances are providing more rapid, portable, and affordable detection of endocrine-disrupting activity through ligand-nuclear hormone receptor interactions. Here, we overview these recent advances applied to EDC biosensors - including cell lyophilization, cell immobilization, cell-free systems, smartphone-based signal detection, and improved competitive binding assays.

  20. The effects of nuclear weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnaby, F.; Rotblat, J.

    1982-01-01

    At least 40% of the population of Hiroshima and 26% of that of Nagasaki were killed in the nuclear attacks. The early and late effects in these two cities and in relation to present weaponry are briefly discussed. The effects of blast, heat and initial and delayed radiation are outlined. Neutron and gamma doses as functions of slant distances for bombs of various specified yields are presented. Dose rates for fallout at various times after explosions in terms of wind velocity and various cloud formations are also outlined. In Western Europe there are only 145 cities with populations of over 200,000. It is concluded that the destruction of these cities would kill in a short time more than one third of the population of Western Europe, and in a nuclear world war, not only would a fair part of the urban population in the Northern Hemisphere be killed by fire and blast, and most of the survivors by radiation, but much of the rural population would be killed by radiation from fallout. Many millions in the Southern Hemisphere would also be killed by fallout radiation. (U.K.)

  1. Health and environmental effects of nuclear weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report briefly reviews previous WHO work on the health consequences of nuclear war and concentrates on current information about the effects of nuclear weapons on health, and related environmental problems. 15 refs

  2. Chemical and spectroscopic characterization of a vegetable oil used as dielectric coolant in distribution transformers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, Neffer A.; Abonia, Rodrigo, E-mail: rodrigo.abonia@correounivalle.edu.co [Departamento de Quimica, Escuela de Ingenieria Electrica, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Cadavid, Hector [Grupo GRALTA, Escuela de Ingenieria Electrica, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Vargas, Ines H. [Area de Ingenieria de Distribucion, Empresas Publicas de Medellin (EPM), Medellin (Colombia)

    2011-09-15

    In this work, a complete UV-Vis, IR and (1H, 13C and DEPT) NMR spectroscopic analysis was performed for a FR3 vegetable oil sample used as dielectric coolant in an experimental distribution transformer. The same spectroscopic analysis was performed for three used FR3 oil samples (i.e., 4 months in use, 8 months in use and 7 years in use), removed from several operating distribution transformers. Comparison of the data indicated that no significant spectroscopic changes, and hence, no structural changes occurred to the oils by the use. Chemical transformations like catalytic hydrogenation (hardening) and hydrolysis were performed to the FR3 oil sample and the obtained products were analyzed by spectroscopic methods in order to collect further structural information about the FR3 oil. Accelerated aging tests in laboratory were also performed for three FR3 oil samples affording interesting information about the structure of the degradation products. These findings would be valuable to search for a spectroscopy-based technique for monitoring the lifetime and performance of this insulating vegetable oil. (author)

  3. Chemical characterization of materials relevant to nuclear technology using neutron and proton based nuclear analytical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acharya, R.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear analytical techniques (NATs), utilizing neutron and proton based nuclear reactions and subsequent measurement of gamma rays, are capable of chemical characterization of various materials at major to trace concentration levels. The present article deals with the recent developments and applications of conventional and k0-based internal monostandard (i) neutron activation analysis (NAA) and (ii) prompt gamma ray NAA (PGNAA) methods as well as (iii) in situ current normalized particle induced gamma ray emission (PIGE). The materials that have been analyzed by NAA and PGNAA include (i) nuclear reactor structural materials like zircaloys, stainless steels, Ni alloys, high purity aluminium and graphite and (ii) uranium oxide, U-Th mixed oxides, uranium ores and minerals. Internal monostandard NAA (IM-NAA) method with in situ detection efficiency was used to analyze large and non-standard geometry samples and standard-less compositional characterization was carried out for zircaloys and stainless steels. PIGE methods using proton beams were standardized for quantification of low Z elements (Li to Ti) and applied for compositional analysis of borosilicate glass and lithium titanate (Li 2 TiO 3 ) samples and quantification of total B and its isotopic composition of B ( 10 B/ 11 B) in boron based neutron absorbers like B 4 C. (author)

  4. On the effect of response transformations in sequential parameter optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Tobias; Wessing, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Parameter tuning of evolutionary algorithms (EAs) is attracting more and more interest. In particular, the sequential parameter optimization (SPO) framework for the model-assisted tuning of stochastic optimizers has resulted in established parameter tuning algorithms. In this paper, we enhance the SPO framework by introducing transformation steps before the response aggregation and before the actual modeling. Based on design-of-experiments techniques, we empirically analyze the effect of integrating different transformations. We show that in particular, a rank transformation of the responses provides significant improvements. A deeper analysis of the resulting models and additional experiments with adaptive procedures indicates that the rank and the Box-Cox transformation are able to improve the properties of the resultant distributions with respect to symmetry and normality of the residuals. Moreover, model-based effect plots document a higher discriminatory power obtained by the rank transformation.

  5. Chemical and catalytic effects of ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, G.K.

    1982-01-01

    Energetic particles are used for inducing chemical reactions as well as for modifying the properties of materials with regard to their bulk and surface chemical behavior. The effects are partly caused by radiation damage or phase intermixing, partly by the chemical properties of the individual bombarding particles. In this contribution a survey of relevant applications of these techniques is presented: (1) Chemical reactions of implanted and recoil atoms and their use for syntheses, doping and labeling of compounds. (2) The formation of thin films by decomposing chemical compounds with ion beams. 3) Catalytic effects on substrates treated by sputtering or ion implantation. Recent results with nonmetallic substrates are reviewed. Mainly hydrogenation reactions at a solid/gas interface or redox reactions at an electrified solid/liquid interface are mentioned. The present status and future prospects of these kinds of investigations will be discussed. (author)

  6. Nuclear chemical method for preparation of free carbenium ions and radiochemical investigation of reactions of these particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nefedov, V.D.; Sinotova, E.N.; Toropova, M.A.

    1980-01-01

    Tritium nuclear transformation (β-decay) in the composition of the molecules of hydrocarbons, appearance of primary molecular ions and formation of free carbenium ion are the main items of nuclear-chemical method of preparation of free carbenium ions. The method permits to prepare carbenium ions present in free state, i.e. without counterion and without solvate sheath of variou nitial localization of the charge. The rate of carbenium ion generation is strictly definite and does not depend upon outer conditions. The method suggested permits to prepare carbenium ions in all phases, study their reactions with individual substances in gaseous, liquid and solid states. The study of ion-molecular reactions is carried out using radiochemical method. The analysis of the products is made using the method of gaseous radiochromatography. Development of preparation techniques of carbenium ions and their analogues, study of the reactions of these particles with different classes of compounds, investigation of the effect of different factors upon procedure of ion-molecular reactions are the main directions of the investigations

  7. Reduction-Triggered Transformation of Crosslinking Modules of Disulfide-Containing Micelles with Chemically Tunable Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhengyu; Yuan, Shuai; Xu, Ronald X; Liang, Haojun; Liu, Shiyong

    2018-05-16

    A dilemma exists between the circulation stability and cargo release/mass diffusion at desired sites for designing delivery nanocarriers and in vivo nanoreactors. We herein report disulfide-crosslinked (DCL) micelles exhibiting reduction-triggered switching of crosslinking modules and synchronized hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic transition. Tumor cell-targeted DCL micelles undergo cytoplasmic milieu-triggered disulfide cleavage and cascade self-immolative decaging reactions at chemically adjustable rates, generating primary amine moieties. Extensive amidation reactions with neighboring ester moieties then occur due to high local concentrations and suppression of apparent amine pKa within hydrophobic cores, leading to the transformation of crosslinking modules and formation of tracelessly crosslinked (TCL) micelles with hydrophilic cores inside live cells. We further integrate this design principle with theranostic nanocarriers for selective intracellular drug transport guided by enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging performance. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. The Potential Pathways of Radionuclide Transformations On The Location Candidate of Nuclear Power Plants in Muria Peninsula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simandjuntak, A.G.; Syahrir

    1998-01-01

    The potential pathways of radionuclide transformations on the location candidate of nuclear power plants in Muria peninsula proposed to explain the potential of radionuclide pathways in the ecosystem to human based on annual effective dose calculations with elimination factor ≥ 1 of dose limit 50 mSv per year. The effective dose equivalent calculations used the program package Genll. The datum found from Bureau of Statistic Centre and NEWJEC was taken into calculations. The result of this study is very useful for radiological impact and environmental impact analysis. (author)

  9. Nuclear industry - challenges in chemical engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, S.; Sunder Rajan, N.S.; Balu, K.; Garg, R.K.; Murthy, L.G.K.; Ramani, M.P.S.; Rao, M.K.; Sadhukhan, H.K.; Venkat Raj, V.

    1978-01-01

    As chemical engineering processes and operations are closely involved in many areas of nuclear industry, the chemical engineer has a vital role to play in its growth and development. An account of the major achievements of the Indian chemical engineers in this field is given with view of impressing upon the faculty members of the Indian universities the need for taking appropriate steps to prepare chemical engineers suitable for nuclear industry. Some of the major achievements of the Indian chemical engineers in this field are : (1) separation of useful minerals from beach sand, (2) preparation of thorium nitrate of nuclear purity from monazite, (3) processing of zircon sand to obtain nuclear grade zirconium and its separation from hafnium to obtain zirconium metal sponge, (4) recovery of uranium from copper tailings, (5) economic recovery of nuclear grade uranium from low grade uranium ores found in India, (6) fuel reprocessing, (7) chemical processing of both low and high level radioactive wastes. (M.G.B.)

  10. Chemical ageing and transformation of diffusivity in semi-solid multi-component organic aerosol particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Pfrang

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent experimental evidence underlines the importance of reduced diffusivity in amorphous semi-solid or glassy atmospheric aerosols. This paper investigates the impact of diffusivity on the ageing of multi-component reactive organic particles approximating atmospheric cooking aerosols. We apply and extend the recently developed KM-SUB model in a study of a 12-component mixture containing oleic and palmitoleic acids. We demonstrate that changes in the diffusivity may explain the evolution of chemical loss rates in ageing semi-solid particles, and we resolve surface and bulk processes under transient reaction conditions considering diffusivities altered by oligomerisation. This new model treatment allows prediction of the ageing of mixed organic multi-component aerosols over atmospherically relevant timescales and conditions. We illustrate the impact of changing diffusivity on the chemical half-life of reactive components in semi-solid particles, and we demonstrate how solidification and crust formation at the particle surface can affect the chemical transformation of organic aerosols.

  11. The Effects of Nuclear Weapons. Third edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glasstone, S; Dolan, P J

    1977-01-01

    Since the last edition of ''The Effects of Nuclear Weapons'' in 1962 much new information has become available concerning nuclear weapon effects. This has come in part from the series of atmospheric tests, including several at very high altitudes, conducted in the Pacific Ocean area in 1962. In addition, laboratory studies, theoretical calculations, and computer simulations have provided a better understanding of the various effects. A new chapter has been added on the electromagnetic pulse. The chapter titles are as follows: general principles of nuclear explosions; descriptions of nuclear explosions; air blast phenomena in air and surface bursts; air blast loading; structural damage from air blast; shock effects of surface and subsurface bursts; thermal radiation and its effects; initial nuclear radiation; residual nuclear radiation and fallout; radio and radar effects; the electromagnetic pulse and its effects; and biological effects. (LTN)

  12. Nuclear famine: The indirect effects of nuclear war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harwell, M.A.; Harwell, C.C.

    1986-01-01

    The indirect effects of a nuclear war, especially as mediated by disruption in food availability, could be much more extensive than the direct effects. Furthermore, this risk is especially severe for noncombatant countries - for the 4 billion or so humans expected to survive the immediate period after a nuclear war relatively physically unharmed. Thus, a fundamentally different picture of the post-nuclear-war world results, where a large-scale nuclear war between the United States and the Soviet Union would probably result in more eventual fatalities in India than in the United States and the Soviet Union combined, and more people would die on the African continent than in all of Europe. Rather than reflecting images of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, a modern nuclear war would, for most of the people of the world, much more resemble current images of Ethiopia and the Sudan

  13. Thyroid effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boas, Malene; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Main, Katharina M

    2012-05-22

    In recent years, many studies of thyroid-disrupting effects of environmental chemicals have been published. Of special concern is the exposure of pregnant women and infants, as thyroid disruption of the developing organism may have deleterious effects on neurological outcome. Chemicals may exert thyroid effects through a variety of mechanisms of action, and some animal experiments and in vitro studies have focused on elucidating the mode of action of specific chemical compounds. Long-term human studies on effects of environmental chemicals on thyroid related outcomes such as growth and development are still lacking. The human exposure scenario with life long exposure to a vast mixture of chemicals in low doses and the large physiological variation in thyroid hormone levels between individuals render human studies very difficult. However, there is now reasonably firm evidence that PCBs have thyroid-disrupting effects, and there is emerging evidence that also phthalates, bisphenol A, brominated flame retardants and perfluorinated chemicals may have thyroid disrupting properties. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Chemical characteristics of fulvic acids from Arctic surface waters: Microbial contributions and photochemical transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cory, Rose M.; McKnight, Diane M.; Chin, Yu-Ping; Miller, Penney; Jaros, Chris L.

    2007-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) originating from the extensive Arctic tundra is an important source of organic material to the Arctic Ocean. Chemical characteristics of whole water dissolved organic matter (DOM) and the fulvic acid fraction of DOM were studied from nine surface waters in the Arctic region of Alaska to gain insight into the extent of microbial and photochemical transformation of this DOM. All the fulvic acids had a strong terrestrial/higher plant signature, with uniformly depleted δ13C values of -28‰, and low fluorescence indices around 1.3. Several of the measured chemical characteristics of the Arctic fulvic acids were related to water residence time, a measure of environmental exposure to sunlight and microbial activity. For example, fulvic acids from Arctic streams had higher aromatic contents, higher specific absorbance values, lower nitrogen content, lower amino acid-like fluorescence and were more depleted in δ15N relative to fulvic acids isolated from lake and coastal surface waters. The differences in the nitrogen signature between the lake and coastal fulvic acids compared to the stream fulvic acids indicated that microbial contributions to the fulvic acid pool increased with increasing water residence time. The photo-lability of the fulvic acids was positively correlated with water residence time, suggesting that the fulvic acids isolated from source waters with larger water residence times (i.e., lakes and coastal waters) have experienced greater photochemical degradation than the stream fulvic acids. In addition, many of the initial differences in fulvic acid chemical characteristics across the gradient of water residence times were consistent with changes observed in fulvic acid photolysis experiments. Taken together, results from this study suggest that photochemical processes predominantly control the chemical character of fulvic acids in Arctic surface waters. Our findings show that hydrologic transport in addition to

  15. Radiation and chemical effects on viral transformation and tumor antigen expression. Annual progress report, August 1, 1978--May 1, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coggin, J.H. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Studies aimed at the biological, biochemical, and immunologic characterization of fetal antigens (EA) in hamsters and mice and locating and determining the distribution of fetal antigens in tumor tissues and in developing fetuses have been underway for several months. Progress has been made in isolating embryonic or fetal antigens from fetuses and from tumor cells. We have developed and reported a reliable lymphocyte transformation assay (LTA) which meets our needs in routinely assaying cell free tumor associated antigen (TAA) preparations from fetal and tumor cells. The assay correlated with transplantation resistance assays and has appropriate specificity. We have also developed the staph-A protein binding assay utilizing anti-serum derived against embryonic antigens present on SV40 tumor cells. In other studies, we have reported increases and perturbations in thymocytes during viral and chemical oncogenesis in hamsters, have developed a simple technique for preserving functional lymphocytes sensitized against TAA by freezing for use in our model system work, have reported the cross-reactivity of tranplantation resistance antigen on a spectrum of chemically induced tumors previously believed to only contain individually specific TSTAs and have recently reported the cross-reactivity of papovavirus induced transplantation resistance antigen in sarcoma cells induced by different viruses. We have concluded our studies of glycosyltransferases in the membranes of developing fetuses and noted no differences in their levels with advancing days of gestation using whold embryo cell populations

  16. Divergent effects of transformational and passive leadership on employee safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelloway, E Kevin; Mullen, Jane; Francis, Lori

    2006-01-01

    The authors concurrently examined the impact of safety-specific transformational leadership and safety-specific passive leadership on safety outcomes. First, the authors demonstrated via confirmatory factor analysis that safety-specific transformational leadership and safety-specific passive leadership are empirically distinct constructs. Second, using hierarchical regression, the authors illustrated, contrary to a stated corollary of transformational leadership theory (B. M. Bass, 1997), that passive leadership contributes incrementally to the prediction of organizationally relevant outcomes, in this case safety-related variables, beyond transformational leadership alone. Third, further analyses via structural equation modeling showed that both transformational and passive leadership have opposite effects on safety climate and safety consciousness, and these variables, in turn, predict safety events and injuries. Implications for research and application are discussed. Copyright 2006 APA.

  17. Organization of the lamin scaffold in the internal nuclear matrix of normal and transformed hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barboro, Paola; D'Arrigo, Cristina; Repaci, Erica; Patrone, Eligio; Balbi, Cecilia

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear lamins are among the more abundant proteins making up the internal nuclear matrix, but very little is known about their structure in the nucleoplasm. Using immunoelectron microscopy, we demonstrate the organization of lamins in the nuclear matrix isolated from rat hepatocytes for the first time. Lamin epitopes are arrayed both in locally ordered clusters and in quasi-regular rows. Fourier filtering of the images demonstrates that the epitopes are placed at the nodes and halfway between the nodes of square or rhombic lattices that are about 50 nm on each side, as well as along rows at regular ∼25-nm intervals. In addition, we have compared this structure with that of the internal nuclear matrix isolated from persistent hepatocyte nodules. In transformed hepatocytes, the islands of lamin lattice are lost, and only a partial regularity in the rows of gold particles remains. We suggest that orthogonal lattice assembly might be an intrinsic property of lamin molecules, and that the disassembly may be triggered by simple molecular events such as phosphorylation.

  18. Stereoelectronic effects on 1H nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts in methoxybenzenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambert, Maja; Olsen, Lars; Jaroszewski, Jerzy W

    2006-01-01

    the Ar-OCH3 torsion out of the ring plane, resulting in large stereoelectronic effects on the chemical shift of Hpara. Conformational searches and geometry optimizations for 3-16 at the B3LYP/6-31G** level, followed by B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,2p) calculations for all low-energy conformers, gave excellent...

  19. Health and environmental effects of complex chemical mixtures: proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    The Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) of the Department of Energy supports a broad long-term research program on human health and environmental effects from potential exposure to energy-related complex chemical mixtures. The program seeks basic mechanistic data on the effects of complex mixtures at the cellular, molecular, and whole animal levels to aid in predicting human health effects and seeks ecological data on biological and physical transformations in the mixtures, concentrations of the mixtures in various compartments of the environment, and potential routes for human exposure to these mixtures (e.g., food chain). On June 17-18, 1985, OHER held its First Annual Technical Meeting on the Complex Chemical Mixtures Program in Chicago, IL. The primary purpose of the meeting was to enable principal investigators to report the research status and accomplishments of ongoing complex chemical mixture studies supported by OHER. To help focus future research directions round table discussions were conducted.

  20. Preparation and properties of the magnetic absorbent polymer via the chemical transformation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Shengyu, E-mail: liusytyut@sina.com [Department of Mineral Processing, College of Mining Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Key Laboratory of In-situ Property-improving Mining of Ministry of Education, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Zhang, Suhong, E-mail: zhangsh04@sina.com [Department of Mineral Processing, College of Mining Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Guo, Jianying; Wen, Jing; Qiao, Yan [Department of Mineral Processing, College of Mining Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China)

    2017-01-15

    Magnetic polyacrylic acid sodium polymer (MPAAS) was prepared by chemical transformation method. Key parameters were investigated in the synthesis process of the magnetic polymer and an optimum preparation condition was gained. The structure of the magnetic polymer was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectrosocopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Magnetic property of the magnetic polymer was measured by the magnet and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). Both the swelling ratio and kinetics and the water retention ratio and kinetics were investigated. Based on the results, it can be gained that both swelling rate and equilibrium swelling rate were lowered after magnetization while the water retention ability of the magnetic polymer is stronger than that of the polymer. - Highlights: • The preparation mechanism of the magnetic polymer was proposed. • The magnetic property of the magnetic polymer was related to reaction conditions. • Swelling ratio and kinetics of polymer and magnetic polymer were studied. • Water retention ratio and kinetics of polymer and magnetic polymer were studied.

  1. Preparation and properties of the magnetic absorbent polymer via the chemical transformation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Shengyu; Zhang, Suhong; Guo, Jianying; Wen, Jing; Qiao, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic polyacrylic acid sodium polymer (MPAAS) was prepared by chemical transformation method. Key parameters were investigated in the synthesis process of the magnetic polymer and an optimum preparation condition was gained. The structure of the magnetic polymer was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectrosocopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Magnetic property of the magnetic polymer was measured by the magnet and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). Both the swelling ratio and kinetics and the water retention ratio and kinetics were investigated. Based on the results, it can be gained that both swelling rate and equilibrium swelling rate were lowered after magnetization while the water retention ability of the magnetic polymer is stronger than that of the polymer. - Highlights: • The preparation mechanism of the magnetic polymer was proposed. • The magnetic property of the magnetic polymer was related to reaction conditions. • Swelling ratio and kinetics of polymer and magnetic polymer were studied. • Water retention ratio and kinetics of polymer and magnetic polymer were studied.

  2. The plutonium: brief presentation of its nuclear, physical and chemical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madic, C.

    1993-01-01

    In this text we give a brief presentation of the nuclear properties (isotopes, isotopic composition of spent fuels, decay), of the physical properties (phase diagrams, alloys) and of the chemical properties (complexes, solvent extraction) of the plutonium

  3. Chemical transformations of chlorophyll and its application in the design of a new generation of environmentally safe dyes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berezin, Boris D; Rumyantseva, Svetlana V; Moryganov, Andrey P; Berezin, Mikhail B [Institute of Solution Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Ivanovo (Russian Federation)

    2004-02-28

    Chemical transformations of chlorophyll and physicochemical properties of its derivatives are considered. These compounds can be used in the design of a new generation of chlorophyll- and porphyrin-based dyes environmentally more safe than currently used arene dyes and possessing renewable sources of raw materials. The first results on the use of chlorophyll derivatives for dyeing wool, acetate fibres and cotton are reported.

  4. Chemical transformations of chlorophyll and its application in the design of a new generation of environmentally safe dyes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berezin, Boris D; Rumyantseva, Svetlana V; Moryganov, Andrey P; Berezin, Mikhail B

    2004-01-01

    Chemical transformations of chlorophyll and physicochemical properties of its derivatives are considered. These compounds can be used in the design of a new generation of chlorophyll- and porphyrin-based dyes environmentally more safe than currently used arene dyes and possessing renewable sources of raw materials. The first results on the use of chlorophyll derivatives for dyeing wool, acetate fibres and cotton are reported.

  5. UK Chemical Nuclear Data Committee: progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, A.L.

    1992-02-01

    Studies of the basic nuclear data for commercial and industrial application are monitored by the UK Chemical Nuclear Data Committee (UKCNDC). Such data are defined on the basis of chemical methods of analysis, and include half-lives, decay parameters and fission yields. Work undertaken within this area is described in this document for information. (author)

  6. Prospects for improved detection of chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear threats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuest, Craig R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hart, Brad [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Slezak, Thomas R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2012-07-31

    Acquisition and use of Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear (CBRN) weapons continue to be a major focus of concern form the security apparatus of nation states because of their potential for mass casualties when used by a determined adversary.

  7. The chemical transformation of calcium in Shenhua coal during combustion in a muffle furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Sida [North China Electric Power Univ., Beijing (China). School of Energy, Power and Mechanical Engineering; Ministry of Education, Beijing (China). Key Lab. of Condition Monitoring and Control for Power Plant Equipment; Zhuo, Yuqun; Chen, Changhe [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Dept. of Thermal Engineering; Ministry of Education, Beijing (China). Key Lab. for Thermal Science and Power Engineering; Shu, Xinqian [China Univ. of Mining and Technology, Beijing (China). School of Chemical and Environmental Engineering

    2013-07-01

    The chemical reaction characteristics of calcium in three samples of Shenhua coal, i.e. raw sample, hydrochloric acid washed sample and hydrochloric acid washed light fraction, during combustion in a muffle furnace have been investigated in this paper. Ca is bound by calcite and organic matter in Shenhua coal. X ray diffraction (XRD) phase analysis has been conducted to these samples' combustion products obtained by heating at different temperatures. It has been found that the organically-bound calcium could easily react with clays and transform into gehlenite and anorthite partially if combusted under 815 C, whilst the excluded minerals promoted the conversion of gehlenite to anorthite. Calcite in Shenhua coal decomposed into calcium oxide and partially transformed into calcium sulfate under 815 C, and formed gehlenite and anorthite under 1,050 C. Calcite and other HCl-dissolved minerals in Shenhua coal were responsible mainly for the characteristic that the clay minerals in Shenhua coal hardly became mullite during combustion.

  8. Investigating the Non-Covalent Functionalization and Chemical Transformation of Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sham, Chun-Hong

    Trend in device miniatures demands capabilities to produce rationally designed patterns in ever-shrinking length scale. The research community has examined various techniques to push the current lithography resolution to sub-10nm scale. One of the ideas is to utilize the natural nanoscale patterns of molecular assemblies. In this thesis, the self-assembling phenomenon of a photoactive molecule on epitaxial graphene (EG) grown on SiC was discussed. This molecular assembly enables manipulation of chemical contrast in nanoscale through UV exposure or atomic layer deposition. Future development of nanoelectronics industry will be fueled by innovations in electronics materials, which could be discovered through covalent modification of graphene. In a study reported in this thesis, silicon is deposited onto EG. After annealing, a new surface reconstruction, identified to be (3x3)-SiC, was formed. Raman spectroscopy finds no signature of graphene after annealing, indicating a complete chemical transformation of graphene. DFT calculations reveal a possible conversion mechanism. Overall, these studies provide insights for future device miniaturization; contribute to the search of novel materials and help bridging the gap between graphene and current silicon-based industrial infrastructures.

  9. Chemical and nuclear properties of Rutherfordium (Element 104)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kacher, C.D.

    1995-01-01

    The chemical-properties of rutherfordium (Rf) and its group 4 homologs were studied by sorption on glass support surfaces coated with cobalt(II)ferrocyanide and by solvent extraction with tributylphosphate (TBP) and triisooctylamine (TIOA). The surface studies showed that the hydrolysis trend in the group 4 elements and the pseudogroup 4 element, lb, decreases in the order Rf>Zr∼Hf>Th. This trend was attributed to relativistic effects which predicted that Rf would be more prone to having a coordination number of 6 than 8 in most aqueous solutions due to a destabilization of the 6d 5/2 shell and a stabilization of the 7p l/2 shell. This hydrolysis trend was confirmed in the TBP/HBr solvent extraction studies which showed that the extraction trend decreased in the order Zr>Hf>Rf?Ti for HBr, showing that Rf and Ti did not extract as well because they hydrolyzed more easily than Zr and Hf. The TIOA/HF solvent extraction studies showed that the extraction trend for the group 4 elements decreased in the order Ti>Zr∼Hf>Rf, in inverse order from the trend of ionic radii Rf>Zr∼Hf>Ti. An attempt was made to produce 263 Rf (a) via the 248 Cm( 22 Ne, α3n) reaction employing thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) solvent extraction chemistry and (b) via the 249 Bk( 18 O,4n) reaction employing the Automated Rapid Chemistry Apparatus (ARCA). In the TTA studies, 16 fissions were observed but were all attributed to 256 Fm. No alpha events were observed in the Rf chemical fraction. A 0.2 nb upper limit production cross section for the 248 Cm( 22 Ne, α3n) 263 Rf reaction was calculated assuming the 500-sec half-life reported previously by Czerwinski et al. [CZE92A

  10. High-content image informatics of the structural nuclear protein NuMA parses trajectories for stem/progenitor cell lineages and oncogenic transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Sebastián L; Liu, Er; Arvind, Varun; Bushman, Jared; Sung, Hak-Joon; Becker, Matthew L; Lelièvre, Sophie; Kohn, Joachim; Vidi, Pierre-Alexandre; Moghe, Prabhas V

    2017-02-01

    Stem and progenitor cells that exhibit significant regenerative potential and critical roles in cancer initiation and progression remain difficult to characterize. Cell fates are determined by reciprocal signaling between the cell microenvironment and the nucleus; hence parameters derived from nuclear remodeling are ideal candidates for stem/progenitor cell characterization. Here we applied high-content, single cell analysis of nuclear shape and organization to examine stem and progenitor cells destined to distinct differentiation endpoints, yet undistinguishable by conventional methods. Nuclear descriptors defined through image informatics classified mesenchymal stem cells poised to either adipogenic or osteogenic differentiation, and oligodendrocyte precursors isolated from different regions of the brain and destined to distinct astrocyte subtypes. Nuclear descriptors also revealed early changes in stem cells after chemical oncogenesis, allowing the identification of a class of cancer-mitigating biomaterials. To capture the metrology of nuclear changes, we developed a simple and quantitative "imaging-derived" parsing index, which reflects the dynamic evolution of the high-dimensional space of nuclear organizational features. A comparative analysis of parsing outcomes via either nuclear shape or textural metrics of the nuclear structural protein NuMA indicates the nuclear shape alone is a weak phenotypic predictor. In contrast, variations in the NuMA organization parsed emergent cell phenotypes and discerned emergent stages of stem cell transformation, supporting a prognosticating role for this protein in the outcomes of nuclear functions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Proceedings of 26. annual academic conference of China Chemical Society--modern nuclear chemistry and radiochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-08-01

    26. annual academic conference of China Chemical Society was held in Tianjing, 13-16 July, 2008. This proceedings is about modern nuclear chemistry and radiochemistry, the contents include: new elements and new nuclides; advanced nuclear chemistry; radiochemistry and national security; new radiopharmaceutical chemistry; modern radiological analytical chemistry and large scientific facilities; radiological environmental chemistry and nuclear radioactive waste; actinide chemistry and transactinide chemistry; radiochemistry and cross discipline, etc.

  12. Shielding behavior of multi-transformation phase change materials (MTPCM) against nuclear radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Ravindra; Goplani, Deepak; Kumar, Rohitash; Das, Mrinal Kumar; Kumar, Pramod; Jodha, Ajay Singh; Misra, Manoj; Khatri, P.K.

    2008-01-01

    In nuclear hardened structures and AFV's, special shielding materials are being used to provide protection from radiations generated in nuclear blast. However, in blast an intense heat pulse is also generated along with radiation. Currently used shield does not take care of this heat pulse. Defence Laboratory, Jodhpur has developed multi transformation phase change materials (MTPCM) based cool panels for passive moderation of temperature in severe desert heat. The MTPCM contains light nuclei of hydrogen, carbon and oxygen, and thus can absorb good amount of neutrons. MTPCM can also absorb intense heat pulse along with heat generated by secondary fires during blast as its latent heat (160-170 J/g) without significant rise in temperature (melting point 36-38 deg. C). Thus MTPCM can provide protection against both radiation as well as heat pulse generated in a nuclear blast along with its designed regular function of passively moderating temperature below 40 deg C during severe desert summer. A study has been undertaken to explore multiple applications of MTPCM panel. Protection factor provided by standard MTPCM panels against neutron and gamma radiations (both initial and fall out) were measured and results compared with PF provided by special lining pad currently being used in AFV's and field structures for nuclear protection. It is observed that MTPCM provides good PF (2.17) against neutron which is better than currently used shield pads (PFP%1.8). Present paper discusses results of this study. (author)

  13. The Influence of Supervisor's Transformational Leadership on Learning Culture and Learning Transfer of Nuclear R and D Personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Sang-Ki; Hwang, Hye-Seon; Jin, You-Rim; Lee, Eui-Jin; Lee, Soo-Jin

    2017-01-01

    Transformational leadership means that supervisors try to support the members individually, and encourage them to find new methods and approaches. In this study, it was identified empirically that a supervisor's transformational leadership has a strong influence on the learning culture and learning transfer of nuclear R and D personnel. To develop the competency of R and D personnel, not only formal education programs but also informal learning such as workplace learning have been carried out in the nuclear R and D organization. In this situation, transformational leadership has an effect on willingness and behavior of nuclear R and D personnel on the formal and informal learning. Therefore, transformational leadership is crucial factor in the human resource development system. The leadership required by them is not a one-sided order, but rather individual consideration, charisma, and intellectual stimulation for their nuclear R and D members. As a point of nuclear training and education, it is necessary to consider the operation of leadership programs that strengthen the transformational leadership of the project managers.

  14. Study of effect of chromium on titanium dioxide phase transformation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Study of effect of chromium on titanium dioxide phase transformation by A Bellifa (pp 669–677). Figure S1. Structural ... 4 × 1⋅9486; 2 × 1⋅9799. Octahedral packing. 2 × 2 shared edges. 8 free edges. 3 shared edges. 4 corners. 5 free edges. 2 parallel shared edges. 2 corners. 10 free edges. O. O. Coordination scheme.

  15. Effectiveness of Discovery Learning-Based Transformation Geometry Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Febriana, R.; Haryono, Y.; Yusri, R.

    2017-09-01

    Development of transformation geometry module is conducted because the students got difficulties to understand the existing book. The purpose of the research was to find out the effectiveness of discovery learning-based transformation geometry module toward student’s activity. Model of the development was Plomp model consisting preliminary research, prototyping phase and assessment phase. The research was focused on assessment phase where it was to observe the designed product effectiveness. The instrument was observation sheet. The observed activities were visual activities, oral activities, listening activities, mental activities, emotional activities and motor activities. Based on the result of the research, it is found that visual activities, learning activities, writing activities, the student’s activity is in the criteria very effective. It can be concluded that the use of discovery learning-based transformation geometry module use can increase the positive student’s activity and decrease the negative activity.

  16. Characterisation of Authentic Lignin Biorefinery Samples by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and Determination of the Chemical Formula for Lignin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le, Duy Michael; Damgaard Nielsen, Anders; Sørensen, Hanne

    2017-01-01

    samples in situ with no prior purification and minimal sample preparation. Lignin chemical formulas and lignin Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra were extracted from mixed spectra by filtering out signals from residual carbohydrates and minerals. From estimations of C, H and O and adjustment...

  17. Effect of temporal distribution of dose on oncogenic transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.C.; Brenner, D.J.; Geard, C.R.; Marino, S.A.; Hall, E.J.

    1988-01-01

    Risk estimates for neutron hazards are of considerable social and economic importance. Effectiveness per unit dose of X or γ rays (low-LET radiations) has been consistently observed to be dependent on the temporal distribution of dose. In a series of comparisons, 0.5 Gy of single or fractionated (five fractions in 8 h), neutrons of 0.23, 0.35, 0.45, 5.9, or 13.7 MeV were delivered to a synchronous C3H 10T1/2 cells. Transformation frequencies per surviving cell are shown. Cells exposed to one energy (5.9 MeV) show a significant enhancement at the 95% level due to fractionated exposures, and at the 85% confidence level the 0.35- and 0.45-MeV fractionated exposures additionally result in significantly greater transformation frequencies. The frequencies of surviving cells per dish between a single or fractionated exposure vary by less than 10%. In three of five pairwise comparisons, fractionated exposures result in statistically greater frequencies of transformants per dish, and are in complete agreement with the results when induction is expressed as transformants per surviving cell. However, after 0.23-MeV neutron irradiation, the single dose resulted in a greater incidence of transformed foci than the fractionated dose

  18. Chemical and nuclear properties of Rutherfordium (Element 104)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kacher, Christian D. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-10-30

    The chemical-properties of rutherfordium (Rf) and its group 4 homologs were studied by sorption on glass support surfaces coated with cobalt(II)ferrocyanide and by solvent extraction with tributylphosphate (TBP) and triisooctylamine (TIOA). The surface studies showed that the hydrolysis trend in the group 4 elements and the pseudogroup 4 element, lb, decreases in the order Rf>Zr≈Hf>Th. This trend was attributed to relativistic effects which predicted that Rf would be more prone to having a coordination number of 6 than 8 in most aqueous solutions due to a destabilization of the 6d5/2 shell and a stabilization of the 7pI/2 shell. This hydrolysis trend was confirmed in the TBP/HBr solvent extraction studies which showed that the extraction trend decreased in the order Zr>Hf>Rf?Ti for HBr, showing that Rf and Ti did not extract as well because they hydrolyzed more easily than Zr and Hf. The TIOA/HF solvent extraction studies showed that the extraction trend for the group 4 elements decreased in the order Ti>Zr≈Hf>Rf, in inverse order from the trend of ionic radii Rf>Zr≈Hf>Ti. An attempt was made to produce 263Rf (a) via the 248Cm(22Ne, α3n) reaction employing thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) solvent extraction chemistry and (b) via the 249Bk(18O,4n) reaction employing the Automated Rapid Chemistry Apparatus (ARCA). In the TTA studies, 16 fissions were observed but were all attributed to 256Fm. No alpha events were observed in the Rf chemical fraction. A 0.2 nb upper limit production cross section for the 248Cm(22Ne, α3n)263Rf reaction was calculated assuming the 500-sec half-life reported previously by Czerwinski et al. [CZE92A].

  19. Effects of nuclear electromagnetic pulse (EMP) on nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, P.R.; Manweiler, R.W.; Davis, R.R.

    1977-09-01

    The electromagnetic pulse (EMP) from a high-altitude nuclear detonation consists of a transient pulse of high intensity electromagnetic fields. These intense fields induce current and voltage transients in electrical conductors. Although most nuclear power plant cables are not directly exposed to these fields, the attenuated EMP fields that propagate into the plant will couple some EMP energy to these cables. The report predicts the probable effects of the EMP transients that could be induced in critical circuits of safety-related systems. It was found that the most likely consequence of EMP for nuclear plants is an unscheduled shutdown. EMP could prolong the shutdown period by the unnecessary actuation of certain safety systems. In general, EMP could be a nuisance to nuclear power plants, but it is not considered a serious threat to plant safety

  20. Cost effectiveness of dilute chemical decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Surf, J.E.; Weyman, G.D.

    1983-01-01

    The origin and basic principles of the dilute chemical decontamination (DCD) concept are described and illustrated by reference to the CAN-DECON process. The estimated dose savings from the actual application of the process at several reactors are presented and discussed. Two methods of performing a cost/benefit appraisal are described and discussed. This methodology requires more study by the nuclear industry, including collection by station staff of relevant data on which future cost/benefit appraisals may be based. Finally, three illustrative cases are examinated to show the breakeven point and potential savings achievable by DCD with different initial radiation fields and different amounts of work to be done. The overall conclusion is that there are many situations in which DCD is desirable to reduce radiation exposure of workers, to save costs to the station, and to ease the performance of maintenance and repair work on reactor systems

  1. Effective citizen advocacy of beneficial nuclear technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKibben, J. Malvyn; Wood, Susan

    2007-01-01

    In 1991, a small group of citizens from communities near the Savannah River Site (SRS) formed a pro-nuclear education and advocacy group, Citizens for Nuclear Technology Awareness (CNTA). Their purpose was to: (1) counter nuclear misinformation that dominated the nation's news outlets, (2) provide education on nuclear subjects to area citizens, students, elected officials, and (3) provide informed citizen support for potential new missions for SRS when needed. To effectively accomplish these objectives it is also essential to establish and maintain good relations with community leaders and reporters that cover energy and nuclear subjects. The organization has grown considerably since its inception and has expanded its sphere of influence. We believe that our experiences over these fifteen years are a good model for effectively communicating nuclear subjects with the public. This paper describes the structure, operation and some of the results of CNTA. (authors)

  2. Serum Transforming Growth Factor Beta-1 as an Index of Chemical Hepato carcinogenesis in Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelgawad, M.R.; Fekry, A.E.; Edrees, G.; Ali, M.A.; Ghareeb, N.A.

    2008-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF β1) is an important mediator which controls liver cell proliferation and replication. The relation between TGF β1, Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and clinically thought hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in rats were investigated to clarify the clinical value of measuring peripheral serum TGF β1 and AFP in evaluation of HCC. Peripheral serum TGF β1 and AFP were measured during chemically induced hepato carcinogenesis. Male rats were given a genotoxic compound diethylnitrosamine (DEN) in drinking water for 149 days with control receiving drinking water only. Animals were killed at different times intervals 54, 86 and 149 days, serum TGF β1 levels were measured by, Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) and AFP levels were assayed by immunoradiometric assay (IRMA). In DEN treated rats 54 days, there was mild portal tract inflammatory cellular infiltrate, serum TGF β1 and AFP levels were both significantly elevated above control (P>0.05 and P<0.001). At 86 days there were moderate inflammation (portal and peri portal), serum TGF β1 and AFP levels were significantly increased, (P<0.001). At 149 days typical HCC were present in ten of ten rats and serum TGF β1 and AFP were both significantly elevated compared with controls, (P<0.001). It can be concluded that serum TGF β1 and AFP levels are elevated during chemically induced HCC and have roles during the stages of process (initiation, promotion and progression); both serum TGF β1 and AFP levels can be used in parallel as a non invasive tumor markers for early diagnosis and prognosis of HCC

  3. Health and environmental effects of nuclear weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    Since 1981 WHO has been studying and reporting on the effects of nuclear war on health and health services. This report provides information on the subject and refers to earlier related work of WHO. It forms the basis for a request from WHO to the International Court of Justice regarding the legality of the use of nuclear weapons. 15 refs

  4. Effects of phase transformation of steam-water relative permeabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, A.K.

    1986-03-01

    A combined theoretical and experimental study of steam-water relative permeabilities (RPs) was carried out. First, an experimental study of two-phase concurrent flow of steam and water was conducted and a set of RP curves was obtained. These curves were compared with semi-empirical and experimental results obtained by other investigators for two-phase, two-component flow (oil/gas; gas/water; gas/oil). It was found that while the wetting phase RPs were in good agreement, RPs for the steam phase were considerably higher than the non-wetting phase RPs in two-component systems. This enhancement of steam RP is attributed to phase transformation effects at the pore level in flow channels. The effects of phase transformation were studied theoretically. This study indicates that there are two separate mechanisms by which phase transformation affects RP curves: (1) Phase transformation is converging-diverging flow channels can cause an enhancement of steam phase RP. In a channel dominated by steam a fraction of the flowing steam condenses upstream from the constriction, depositing its latent heat of condensation. This heat is conducted through the solid grains around the pore throat, and evaporation takes place downstream from it. Therefore, for a given bulk flow quality; a smaller fraction of steam actually flows through the throat segments. This pore-level effect manifests itself as relative permeability enhancement on a macroscopic level; and (2) phase transformation along the interface of a stagnant phase and the phase flowing around it controls the irreducible phase saturation. Therefore, the irreducible phase saturation in steam-water flow will depend, among other factors, on the boundary conditions of the flow.

  5. High-content image informatics of the structural nuclear protein NuMA parses trajectories for stem/progenitor cell lineages and oncogenic transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega, Sebastián L. [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Liu, Er; Arvind, Varun [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Bushman, Jared [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, New Jersey Center for Biomaterials, Piscataway, NJ (United States); School of Pharmacy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States); Sung, Hak-Joon [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, New Jersey Center for Biomaterials, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Becker, Matthew L. [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, University of Akron, Akron, OH (United States); Lelièvre, Sophie [Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Kohn, Joachim [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, New Jersey Center for Biomaterials, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Vidi, Pierre-Alexandre, E-mail: pvidi@wakehealth.edu [Department of Cancer Biology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Moghe, Prabhas V., E-mail: moghe@rutgers.edu [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Stem and progenitor cells that exhibit significant regenerative potential and critical roles in cancer initiation and progression remain difficult to characterize. Cell fates are determined by reciprocal signaling between the cell microenvironment and the nucleus; hence parameters derived from nuclear remodeling are ideal candidates for stem/progenitor cell characterization. Here we applied high-content, single cell analysis of nuclear shape and organization to examine stem and progenitor cells destined to distinct differentiation endpoints, yet undistinguishable by conventional methods. Nuclear descriptors defined through image informatics classified mesenchymal stem cells poised to either adipogenic or osteogenic differentiation, and oligodendrocyte precursors isolated from different regions of the brain and destined to distinct astrocyte subtypes. Nuclear descriptors also revealed early changes in stem cells after chemical oncogenesis, allowing the identification of a class of cancer-mitigating biomaterials. To capture the metrology of nuclear changes, we developed a simple and quantitative “imaging-derived” parsing index, which reflects the dynamic evolution of the high-dimensional space of nuclear organizational features. A comparative analysis of parsing outcomes via either nuclear shape or textural metrics of the nuclear structural protein NuMA indicates the nuclear shape alone is a weak phenotypic predictor. In contrast, variations in the NuMA organization parsed emergent cell phenotypes and discerned emergent stages of stem cell transformation, supporting a prognosticating role for this protein in the outcomes of nuclear functions. - Highlights: • High-content analysis of nuclear shape and organization classify stem and progenitor cells poised for distinct lineages. • Early oncogenic changes in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are also detected with nuclear descriptors. • A new class of cancer-mitigating biomaterials was identified based on image

  6. High-content image informatics of the structural nuclear protein NuMA parses trajectories for stem/progenitor cell lineages and oncogenic transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega, Sebastián L.; Liu, Er; Arvind, Varun; Bushman, Jared; Sung, Hak-Joon; Becker, Matthew L.; Lelièvre, Sophie; Kohn, Joachim; Vidi, Pierre-Alexandre; Moghe, Prabhas V.

    2017-01-01

    Stem and progenitor cells that exhibit significant regenerative potential and critical roles in cancer initiation and progression remain difficult to characterize. Cell fates are determined by reciprocal signaling between the cell microenvironment and the nucleus; hence parameters derived from nuclear remodeling are ideal candidates for stem/progenitor cell characterization. Here we applied high-content, single cell analysis of nuclear shape and organization to examine stem and progenitor cells destined to distinct differentiation endpoints, yet undistinguishable by conventional methods. Nuclear descriptors defined through image informatics classified mesenchymal stem cells poised to either adipogenic or osteogenic differentiation, and oligodendrocyte precursors isolated from different regions of the brain and destined to distinct astrocyte subtypes. Nuclear descriptors also revealed early changes in stem cells after chemical oncogenesis, allowing the identification of a class of cancer-mitigating biomaterials. To capture the metrology of nuclear changes, we developed a simple and quantitative “imaging-derived” parsing index, which reflects the dynamic evolution of the high-dimensional space of nuclear organizational features. A comparative analysis of parsing outcomes via either nuclear shape or textural metrics of the nuclear structural protein NuMA indicates the nuclear shape alone is a weak phenotypic predictor. In contrast, variations in the NuMA organization parsed emergent cell phenotypes and discerned emergent stages of stem cell transformation, supporting a prognosticating role for this protein in the outcomes of nuclear functions. - Highlights: • High-content analysis of nuclear shape and organization classify stem and progenitor cells poised for distinct lineages. • Early oncogenic changes in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are also detected with nuclear descriptors. • A new class of cancer-mitigating biomaterials was identified based on image

  7. Microwave-assisted Chemical Transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    In recent years, there has been a considerable interest in developing sustainable chemistries utilizing green chemistry principles. Since the first published report in 1986 by Gedye and Giguere on microwave assisted synthesis in household microwave ovens, the use of microwaves as...

  8. Perceived Effect of Agricultural Transformation Agenda on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO), CABI and Scopus .... from 1990. The problem was compounded by high cost of labour, inputs, supply of .... increase yield, profit maximization, increase income and poverty reduction. This study ...

  9. Aerosol simulation including chemical and nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marwil, E.S.; Lemmon, E.C.

    1985-01-01

    The numerical simulation of aerosol transport, including the effects of chemical and nuclear reactions presents a challenging dynamic accounting problem. Particles of different sizes agglomerate and settle out due to various mechanisms, such as diffusion, diffusiophoresis, thermophoresis, gravitational settling, turbulent acceleration, and centrifugal acceleration. Particles also change size, due to the condensation and evaporation of materials on the particle. Heterogeneous chemical reactions occur at the interface between a particle and the suspending medium, or a surface and the gas in the aerosol. Homogeneous chemical reactions occur within the aersol suspending medium, within a particle, and on a surface. These reactions may include a phase change. Nuclear reactions occur in all locations. These spontaneous transmutations from one element form to another occur at greatly varying rates and may result in phase or chemical changes which complicate the accounting process. This paper presents an approach for inclusion of these effects on the transport of aerosols. The accounting system is very complex and results in a large set of stiff ordinary differential equations (ODEs). The techniques for numerical solution of these ODEs require special attention to achieve their solution in an efficient and affordable manner. 4 refs

  10. Inventory of chemical releases of nuclear installations in the North-Cotentin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-05-01

    The nuclear installations concerned by this study are Cogema La Hague, the Flamanville nuclear power plant, the Manche plant and the National Navy of Cherbourg.The objective followed by the ' source term ' work group has consisted in counting and examining the whole of existing measures relative to the releases of chemical substances in the liquid and gaseous effluents. Then because of the lack of measures for the operation first years of installations, the work group has estimated the order of magnitude of these chemical releases (essentially for Cogema La Hague). This report presents a review of the literature looking at the background levels of chemicals in different environmental compartments: air, soil, plants and animals products. these values have been summarized here to be available for comparisons with concentrations input by the North Cotentin nuclear installations, calculated by the G.R.N.C. (radioecology group of Nord Cotentin)

  11. Widespread after-effects of nuclear war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teller, E.

    1984-01-01

    Radioactive fallout and depletion of the ozone layer, once believed catastrophic consequences of nuclear war, are now proved unimportant in comparison to immediate war damage. Today, ''nuclear winter'' is claimed to have apocalyptic effects. Uncertainties in massive smoke production and in meteorological phenomena give reason to doubt this conclusion. (author)

  12. Chemical Modifications of Starch: Microwave Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Lewicka, Kamila; Siemion, Przemysław; Kurcok, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents basic methods of starch chemical modification, the effect of microwave radiation on the modification process, and the physicochemical properties of starch. It has been shown that the modifications contribute to improvement of the material performance and likewise to significant improvement of its mechanical properties. As a result, more and more extensive use of starch is possible in various industries. In addition, methods of oxidized starch and starch esters preparation ...

  13. Digital transformation and nuclear knowledge management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz M, F. J.

    2017-09-01

    The digital transformations that shape and condition the context in which we move are based on an apparent dichotomy between autonomy and collaboration. From this base and taking advantage of hyper connectivity phenomena, the consequences for the knowledge management in its broadest sense, and its involvement in concepts such as smart planet, are analyzed. This concept determines the evolution of organizations towards intelligent (smart) and opens conceptions that influence, in turn, a redesign of teaching-learning processes in the framework of organizations in accordance with these demands. The future bet of Tecnatom is to respond to the challenges that this situation poses in the nuclear and technological sector. (Author)

  14. Chemical sensors for nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnanasekaran, K.I.

    2012-01-01

    Development of chemical sensors for detection of gases at trace levels for applications in nuclear industry will be highlighted. The sensors have to be highly sensitive, reliable and rugged with long term stability to operate in harsh industrial environment. Semiconductor and solid electrolyte based electrochemical sensors satisfy the requirements. Physico-chemical aspects underlying the development of H 2 sensors in sodium and in cover gas circuit of the Fast breeder reactors for its smooth functioning, NH 3 and H 2 S sensors for use in Heavy water production industries and NO x sensors for spent fuel reprocessing plants will be presented. Development of oxygen sensors to monitor the oxygen level in the reactor containments and sodium sensors for detection of sodium leakages will also be discussed. The talk will focus the general aspects of identification of the sensing material for the respective analyte species, development of suitable chemical route for preparing them as fine powders, the need for configuring them in thick film or thin film geometries and their performance. Pulsed laser deposition method, an elegant technique to prepare the high quality thin films of multicomponent oxides is demonstrated for preparation of nanostructured thin films of complex oxides and its use in tailoring the morphology of the complex sensing material in the desired form by optimizing the in-situ growth conditions. (author)

  15. The environmental effects of nuclear war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacCracken, M.C.

    1988-09-01

    Substantial environmental disruption will significantly add to the disastrous consequences caused by the direct thermal, blast, and radiological effects brought on by a major nuclear war. Local fallout could cover several percent of the Northern Hemisphere with potentially lethal doses. Smoke from post-nuclear fires could darken the skies and induce temperature decreases of tens of degrees in continental interiors. Stratospheric ozone could be significantly reduced due to nitric oxide injections and smoke-induced circulation changes. The environmental effects spread the consequences of a nuclear war to the world population, adding to the potentially large disruptive effects a further reason to avoid such a catastrophe. 27 refs., 4 figs

  16. Production of radionuclides and preparation of labelled compounds. Nuclear chemical technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    A general review is presented of methods of producing radionuclide preparations and labelled compounds, such as their production from natural raw materials, from a nuclear reactor, a particle accelerator, and using radioisotope generators. Also described are the fundamental kinetic relations of nuclear reactions. Basic methods are surveyed of obtaining labelled compounds by chemical synthesis, biosynthesis, exchange reactions, recoil reactions, by the Wilzbach method and the Szillard-Chalmers reaction. (L.K.)

  17. The Department of Defense Chemical, Biological, Nuclear and High Yield Explosive Response Enterprise: Have We Learned the Lessons to Ensure an Effective Response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-10

    Chernobyl . New York, NY: Warner Books. Gniady, Lisa N. 2008. Bridging the gap: Department of Defense’s planning for domestic disaster assistance. Thesis...Hurricane Katrina disaster . Fort Leavenworth: Combat Studies Institute Press. Yaroshinskaya, Alla. 1994. Chernobyl : The forbidden truth. Lincoln, NE...41 Chernobyl Nuclear Reactor Incident ............................................................................ 43 Conclusion

  18. Overview of chemical modeling of nuclear waste glass dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourcier, W.L.

    1991-02-01

    Glass dissolution takes place through metal leaching and hydration of the glass surface accompanied by development of alternation layers of varying crystallinity. The reaction which controls the long-term glass dissolution rate appears to be surface layer dissolution. This reaction is reversible because the buildup of dissolved species in solution slows the dissolution rate due to a decreased dissolution affinity. Glass dissolution rates are therefore highly dependent on silica concentrations in solution because silica is the major component of the alteration layer. Chemical modeling of glass dissolution using reaction path computer codes has successfully been applied to short term experimental tests and used to predict long-term repository performance. Current problems and limitations of the models include a poorly defined long-term glass dissolution mechanism, the use of model parameters determined from the same experiments that the model is used to predict, and the lack of sufficient validation of key assumptions in the modeling approach. Work is in progress that addresses these issues. 41 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Effect of nuclear education on public attitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnishi, Teruaki

    1995-01-01

    A method is proposed to assess the effect of nuclear education. In this method, the nuclear education is treated as a part of the activities for public acceptance (PA), and a unit PA activity is assumed to give the same effect on the public, in essence, as a unit of nuclear information given by the newsmedia. Moreover, the change of attitude to nuclear energy is assumed to originate from enhanced understanding which, in turn, is brought by the stimulus given by the nuclear education. With the values of constants determined by using the data in Japan, example calculations were made for the educational time b 0 and the infiltration rate of education into minors B as parameters. It became clear from this calculation that the attitude to nuclear energy formed in the age of school children plays an essential role in shaping future public opinion since it is held in individuals without any notable modification for a long time after its formation, and that the effect of nuclear education to minors emerges depending on the variables b 0 and B in a highly non-linear manner. It was also found that there exists an optimum condition for nuclear education to attain the maximum amelioration of public opinion under a given condition of man-power for educational workers. (author)

  20. Synthesis and Analysis of Methacryloyl-L-Alanine Methyl Ester using fourier Transform Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tri Darwinto

    2008-01-01

    Methacryloyl-L-alanine methyl ester was synthesized by reacting methacrylic acid with L-alanine methyl ester hydrochloride in triethylamine at temperature of 90 o C. Hydrogel polymer of poly(methacryloyl-L-alanine methyl ester) was much used for diagnosis and therapy of vascular tumor. The molecular structure methacryloyl-L-alanine methyl ester analyzed by fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance (FT-NMR) for analyzing of carbon atom ( 13 C) using Distortionless Enhancement by Polarization Transfer (DEPT) measurement mode with coupling as well as without coupling from proton atom ( 1 H). Molecular structure analysis result showed that DEPT FT-NMR measurement mode with coupling as well as without coupling from 1 H was very fast, exact and accurate method for molecular analysis of organic compound especially methacryloyl-L-alanine methyl ester. (author)

  1. Combined genetic effects of chemicals and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kada, T.; Inoue, T.; Yokoiyama, A.; Russel, L.B.

    1979-01-01

    Interactions of chemicals and radiation are complex and there may exist other unexpected patterns that are not mentioned. We show some examples. Photodynamic mutation induction by fluorescein dyes and Radiosensitization with iodine compounds are classified as Interactions of chemicals and radiation outside of the cell. On the other hand, the Antimutagenic effects of cobaltous chloride is concerned with events taking place in cells that had already been exposed to a mutagenic agent. It is likely that the action of a mutagenic agent is not direct and that cellular functions, such as mutators or repair systems, are involved in the mutagenesis initiated by the agent. Such cellular functions can be affected by a second agent. In sexually reproducing organisms, the two agents can also act on separate cells (male and female germcells) which subsequently fuse. Interaction effects of all types will be useful in future research in shedding light on the main pathways of mutagenesis

  2. Chemical, physical and isotopic characterization of U3Si2, for nuclear forensics purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, Daniele Scarpim

    2011-01-01

    In the early 1990's, the first illicit trafficking of nuclear and radioactive materials was observed mainly in Europe. A decade marked by numerous cases of seizures of these materials. As a result, these events have become the subject of criminal forensic investigations and develop from there, nuclear forensics. In Brazil there are no illicit trafficking official records of nuclear material, however, is widely known the extraction and illegal transportation of radioactive geological materials, and the materials pieces attachment used as shielding for radioactive sources. One of the main tools used in nuclear forensics is the nuclear materials databases establishment. These documents must contain the most information as possible about the physical, chemical and nuclear material seized, allowing the identification of their origin, manufacturing process or age. Thus, it sets characteristic composition standards of each material, called 'chemical signatures' (chemical finger print). In this work nuclear forensic protocol was adopted as well as the three stages of assessment suggested by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in identifying the origin of uranium silicide (U 3 Si 2 ). Assays were performed in order to make physical, chemical and isotopic characterization of the studied materials and compared the data with those obtained for other uranium compounds (Uranium tetrafluoride, UF 4 ; uranium oxide, UO 2 and U 3 O 8 ; Yellow cake) by establishing a characteristic signature for each one. Through the assays the uranium compounds were classify by origin groups, as far as they are from different manufactured process and/ or origin. It was also possible to show the importance of a nuclear forensic database during an investigation of a nuclear forensic event. (author)

  3. Atmospheric effects of a nuclear war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birks, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    The subject is discussed under the headings: nuclear war scenario (assumptions of size and place of explosions); fires; urban and forest fires; smoke and soot; darkness; meteorological and climatic effects; photochemical smog; ozone shield depletion; conclusions. (U.K.)

  4. The American Chemical Society's Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology's summer schools in nuclear and radiochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    This successful educational program in nuclear and radiochemistry for advanced undergraduate students is described. Funding from the U.S. Department of Energy supports 24 fellowships for participants in the intensive six-week programs at San Jose State University (CA) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (NY). Students are provided transportation to and from the school site, room and board, books, lab supplies, and six units of college credit. The instructional program consists of lectures and laboratory exercises that cover the fundamentals of nuclear theory, radiochemistry, nuclear instrumentation, radiological safety, and applications in research, medicine, and industry. Guest lectures and field trips broaden the students' exposure to nuclear science. Assistance is provided in the following year to those students who wish to join a research project at a university or national laboratory, and thereafter, in their applications to graduate or professional school. (author)

  5. Evaluating the Effects of Chemicals on Nervous System Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are thousands of chemicals that lack data on their potential effects on neurodevelopment. EPA is developing New Approach Methods to evaluate these chemicals for developmental neurotoxicity hazard.

  6. Chemical effect in nuclear decay processes. Applications in in situ studies in hot atom chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urch, D.S.

    1993-01-01

    In certain cases, secondary processes, such as X-ray or electron emission initiated by the primary event, do show effects which can be correlated with the chemical state of the emitting atom. The most well known is Moessbauer recoil-less γ-emission, but this talk will concentrate on other, more widespread processes that follow either γ-ray internal conversion (γIC) or electron capture (EC). The former leads to electron emission and the latter to X-ray and Auger electron emission. Such emissions have been extensively studied in non-radioactive situations. These studies have shown that changes in photo- or Auger-electron energy can be readily correlated with valency and that the energies, peak shapes and peak intensities of X-rays that are generated by valence-core transitions show chemically related perturbations. γIC has been applied to the determination of changes of 3p and 3d binding energies as a function of technetium valency. The results are comparable with those from conventional X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) it is the Kα and Kβ X-rays from chromium ( 51 Cr) that have been most extensively studied. Studies in non-radioactive systems for chromium and related first row transition elements seem to indicate that the Kβ/Kα intensity ratio increases with valency. This may be rationalized as due to a greater response by 3p than 2p electrons to a reduction in the number of 3d electrons: 3p becomes more contracted and so the 3p → 1s transition probability is enhanced leading to the relative increase in Kβ intensity. Once 'chemical effects' in γIC and EC:XES have been established for a range of recoil elements they may be used to determine the chemical state of a recoil atom in a solid state matrix without recourse to dissolution. Such a non-invasive procedure will yield invalunable data on the primary hot atom chemistry processes. (author)

  7. Mo- and V-catalyzed transformation of biomass into high-value chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lasse Bo; Dethlefsen, Johannes Rytter; Lupp, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The possibility of converting biomass into higher-value chemicals has received increased attention over the last few years. If biomass could be converted into biofules or platform chemicals, then it could constitute a large source of renewable energy and economy for society.......The possibility of converting biomass into higher-value chemicals has received increased attention over the last few years. If biomass could be converted into biofules or platform chemicals, then it could constitute a large source of renewable energy and economy for society....

  8. Role of alkyl alcohol on viscosity of silica-based chemical gels for decontamination of highly radioactive nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, B. S.; Yoon, S. B.; Jung, C. H.; Lee, K. W.; Moon, J. K.

    2012-01-01

    Silica-based chemical gel for the decontamination of nuclear facilities was prepared by using fumed silica as a viscosifier, a 0.5 M Ce (IV) solution dissolved in concentrated nitric acid as a chemical decontamination agent, and tripropylene glycol butyl ether (TPGBE) as a co-viscosifier. A new effective strategy for the preparation of the chemical gel was investigated by introducing the alkyl alcohols as organic solvents to effectively dissolve the co-viscosifier. The mixture solution of the co-viscosifier and alkyl alcohols was more effective in the control of viscosity than that of the co-viscosifier only in gel. Here, the alkyl alcohols played a key role as an effective dissolution solvent for the co-viscosifier in the preparation of the chemical gel, resulting in a reducing of the amount of the co-viscosifier and gel time compared with that of the chemical gel prepared without the alkyl alcohols. It was considered that the alkyl alcohols contributed to the effective dissolution of the co-viscosifier as well as the homogeneous mixing in the formation of the gel, while the co-viscosifier in an aqueous media of the chemical decontamination agent solution showed a lower solubility. The decontamination efficiency of the chemical gels prepared in this work using a multi-channel analyzer (MCA) showed a high decontamination efficiency of over ca. 94% and ca. 92% for Co-60 and Cs-137 contaminated on surface of the stainless steel 304, respectively. (authors)

  9. The application of nuclear energy to the Canadian chemical process industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, R.F.S.

    1976-03-01

    A study has been made to determine what role nuclear energy, either electrical or thermal, could play in the Canadian chemical process industry. The study was restricted to current-scale CANDU type power reactors. It is concluded that the scale of operation of the chemical industry is rarely large enough to use blocks of electrical power (e) of 500 MW or thermal power (t) of 1500 MW. Thus, with a few predictable exceptions, the role of nuclear energy in the Canadian chemical industry will be as a general thermal/electrical utility supplier, serving a variety of customers in a particular geographic area. This picture would change if nuclear steam generators of 20 to 50 MW(t) become available and are economically competitive. (author)

  10. Chemical speciation of U, Fe, and Pu in melt glass from nuclear weapons testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacold, J. I.; Lukens, W. W.; Booth, C. H.; Shuh, D. K. [Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Knight, K. B.; Eppich, G. R. [Nuclear and Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Holliday, K. S. [Materials Science Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2016-05-21

    Nuclear weapons testing generates large volumes of glassy materials that influence the transport of dispersed actinides in the environment and may carry information on the composition of the detonated device. We determine the oxidation state of U and Fe (which is known to buffer the oxidation state of actinide elements and to affect the redox state of groundwater) in samples of melt glass collected from three U.S. nuclear weapons tests. For selected samples, we also determine the coordination geometry of U and Fe, and we report the oxidation state of Pu from one melt glass sample. We find significant variations among the melt glass samples and, in particular, find a clear deviation in one sample from the expected buffering effect of Fe(II)/Fe(III) on the oxidation state of uranium. In the first direct measurement of Pu oxidation state in a nuclear test melt glass, we obtain a result consistent with existing literature that proposes Pu is primarily present as Pu(IV) in post-detonation material. In addition, our measurements imply that highly mobile U(VI) may be produced in significant quantities when melt glass is quenched rapidly following a nuclear detonation, though these products may remain immobile in the vitrified matrices. The observed differences in chemical state among the three samples show that redox conditions can vary dramatically across different nuclear test conditions. The local soil composition, associated device materials, and the rate of quenching are all likely to affect the final redox state of the glass. The resulting variations in glass chemistry are significant for understanding and interpreting debris chemistry and the later environmental mobility of dispersed material.

  11. Chemical speciation of U, Fe, and Pu in melt glass from nuclear weapons testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacold, J. I.; Lukens, W. W.; Booth, C. H.; Shuh, D. K.; Knight, K. B.; Eppich, G. R.; Holliday, K. S.

    2016-05-01

    Nuclear weapons testing generates large volumes of glassy materials that influence the transport of dispersed actinides in the environment and may carry information on the composition of the detonated device. We determine the oxidation state of U and Fe (which is known to buffer the oxidation state of actinide elements and to affect the redox state of groundwater) in samples of melt glass collected from three U.S. nuclear weapons tests. For selected samples, we also determine the coordination geometry of U and Fe, and we report the oxidation state of Pu from one melt glass sample. We find significant variations among the melt glass samples and, in particular, find a clear deviation in one sample from the expected buffering effect of Fe(II)/Fe(III) on the oxidation state of uranium. In the first direct measurement of Pu oxidation state in a nuclear test melt glass, we obtain a result consistent with existing literature that proposes Pu is primarily present as Pu(IV) in post-detonation material. In addition, our measurements imply that highly mobile U(VI) may be produced in significant quantities when melt glass is quenched rapidly following a nuclear detonation, though these products may remain immobile in the vitrified matrices. The observed differences in chemical state among the three samples show that redox conditions can vary dramatically across different nuclear test conditions. The local soil composition, associated device materials, and the rate of quenching are all likely to affect the final redox state of the glass. The resulting variations in glass chemistry are significant for understanding and interpreting debris chemistry and the later environmental mobility of dispersed material.

  12. Transformation of correlation coefficients between normal and lognormal distribution and implications for nuclear applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Žerovnik, Gašper, E-mail: gasper.zerovnik@ijs.si [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Trkov, Andrej, E-mail: andrej.trkov@ijs.si [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Smith, Donald L., E-mail: donald.l.smith@anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, 1710 Avenida del Mundo, Coronado, CA 92118-3073 (United States); Capote, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.capotenoy@iaea.org [NAPC–Nuclear Data Section, International Atomic Energy Agency, PO Box 100, Vienna-A-1400 (Austria)

    2013-11-01

    Inherently positive parameters with large relative uncertainties (typically ≳30%) are often considered to be governed by the lognormal distribution. This assumption has the practical benefit of avoiding the possibility of sampling negative values in stochastic applications. Furthermore, it is typically assumed that the correlation coefficients for comparable multivariate normal and lognormal distributions are equivalent. However, this ideal situation is approached only in the linear approximation which happens to be applicable just for small uncertainties. This paper derives and discusses the proper transformation of correlation coefficients between both distributions for the most general case which is applicable for arbitrary uncertainties. It is seen that for lognormal distributions with large relative uncertainties strong anti-correlations (negative correlations) are mathematically forbidden. This is due to the asymmetry that is an inherent feature of these distributions. Some implications of these results for practical nuclear applications are discussed and they are illustrated with examples in this paper. Finally, modifications to the ENDF-6 format used for representing uncertainties in evaluated nuclear data libraries are suggested, as needed to deal with this issue.

  13. Transformation of correlation coefficients between normal and lognormal distribution and implications for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Žerovnik, Gašper; Trkov, Andrej; Smith, Donald L.; Capote, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Inherently positive parameters with large relative uncertainties (typically ≳30%) are often considered to be governed by the lognormal distribution. This assumption has the practical benefit of avoiding the possibility of sampling negative values in stochastic applications. Furthermore, it is typically assumed that the correlation coefficients for comparable multivariate normal and lognormal distributions are equivalent. However, this ideal situation is approached only in the linear approximation which happens to be applicable just for small uncertainties. This paper derives and discusses the proper transformation of correlation coefficients between both distributions for the most general case which is applicable for arbitrary uncertainties. It is seen that for lognormal distributions with large relative uncertainties strong anti-correlations (negative correlations) are mathematically forbidden. This is due to the asymmetry that is an inherent feature of these distributions. Some implications of these results for practical nuclear applications are discussed and they are illustrated with examples in this paper. Finally, modifications to the ENDF-6 format used for representing uncertainties in evaluated nuclear data libraries are suggested, as needed to deal with this issue

  14. Combined genetic effects of chemicals and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kada, T.; Inoue, T.; Yokoiyama, A.; Russell, L.B.

    1979-01-01

    The interactions of chemicals and radiation are complex, and there may exist other unexpected patterns. The photodynamic induction of mutation by fluorescein dyes, and the radiosensitization with iodine compounds are classified as the interactions of chemicals and radiation outside cells. On the other hand, the antimutagenic effects of cobaltous chloride is concerned with the events taking place in the cells that had already been exposed to mutagenic agents. It is likely that the action of mutagenic agents is not direct, and that cellular functions, such as mutators or repair systems, are involved in the mutagenesis initiated by the agents. Such cellular functions can be affected by a second agent. In sexually reproducing organisms, two agents can also act on separate cells (male and female germ cells) which subsequently fuse. In mice, the experiments combining the radiation applied to one sex with the chemicals given to the other sex are only in early stages. Males were irradiated with X-ray (spermatozoa and spermatids sampled) and females (mature oocytes) were treated with caffeine. When the endpoint was dominant lethal, the level of X-ray effect induced in the male genome was independent of the caffeine treatment of the female. However, when the endpoint was sex-chromosome-loss, and a different strain of female was used, the caffeine potentiation was statistically significant at 5% level. (Yamashita, S.)

  15. UK Chemical Nuclear Data Committee progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, A.L.

    1990-01-01

    Basic nuclear data requirements for industrial application are monitored by the UK Chemical Nuclear Data Committee (UKCNDC), covering half-lives, decay data, fission yields and the content of computerised data files. While the UKCNDC Request list was reviewed at the end of 1989 to reveal new and continued requirements, funding problems have increased during the year. Difficulties in the UK nuclear power industry are reflected in the decline in experimental studies, although evaluation efforts have been maintained. (author)

  16. Efficiency factor of a chemical nuclear reactor with gamma sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anguis T, C.

    1975-01-01

    A chemonuclear reactor is simulated in order to calculate the efficiency factor of molecular species in chemical reactions induced by gamma radiation, with the purpose to obtain information for its design and consider the electromagnetic energy as a possible solution to the present problem of energy. The research is based on a mathematical model of succesive Compton processes applied to spherical and cylindrical geometry and corroborated through the absorbed dose and the experimental date of the increase factor, for the radioisotopic sources Co-60 and Cs-137 relating the quantity of energy deposited into various cylinders with the G value, the relation radius/height of the reactor is optimized according to the molecular production. This is illustrated with the radiolysis of a solution of CH 3 OH/H 2 O which forms H 2 and with the obtainment of C 2 H 5 Br that represents and industrial process induced radioactively. The results show a greater energy deposition with Cs-137 but a larger production of H 2 /hr with Co-60, and besides we can find high production values of C 2 H 5 Br. The cylinder with more advantages is that whose relation R/H is of 0.5. It can be concluded that the final selection of the reactor should be made after a more intense study of the used isotope and the source activity. The efficiency factor of H 2 can be increased selecting the appropriate type and concentration of solute of the irradiated aqueous solutions

  17. Gene-Transformation-Induced Changes in Chemical Functional Group Features and Molecular Structure Conformation in Alfalfa Plants Co-Expressing Lc-bHLH and C1-MYB Transcriptive Flavanoid Regulatory Genes: Effects of Single-Gene and Two-Gene Insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heendeniya, Ravindra G; Yu, Peiqiang

    2017-03-20

    Alfalfa ( Medicago sativa L.) genotypes transformed with Lc-bHLH and Lc transcription genes were developed with the intention of stimulating proanthocyanidin synthesis in the aerial parts of the plant. To our knowledge, there are no studies on the effect of single-gene and two-gene transformation on chemical functional groups and molecular structure changes in these plants. The objective of this study was to use advanced molecular spectroscopy with multivariate chemometrics to determine chemical functional group intensity and molecular structure changes in alfalfa plants when co-expressing Lc-bHLH and C1-MYB transcriptive flavanoid regulatory genes in comparison with non-transgenic (NT) and AC Grazeland (ACGL) genotypes. The results showed that compared to NT genotype, the presence of double genes ( Lc and C1 ) increased ratios of both the area and peak height of protein structural Amide I/II and the height ratio of α-helix to β-sheet. In carbohydrate-related spectral analysis, the double gene-transformed alfalfa genotypes exhibited lower peak heights at 1370, 1240, 1153, and 1020 cm -1 compared to the NT genotype. Furthermore, the effect of double gene transformation on carbohydrate molecular structure was clearly revealed in the principal component analysis of the spectra. In conclusion, single or double transformation of Lc and C1 genes resulted in changing functional groups and molecular structure related to proteins and carbohydrates compared to the NT alfalfa genotype. The current study provided molecular structural information on the transgenic alfalfa plants and provided an insight into the impact of transgenes on protein and carbohydrate properties and their molecular structure's changes.

  18. Radioactive and Other Effects of Nuclear Explosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilijas, B.; Cizmek, A.; Prah, M.; Medakovic, S.

    2008-01-01

    As a result of long lasting efforts of international community to definitely ban all test nuclear explosions, the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) was opened for signature in New York on 24 September 1996, when it was signed by 71 states, including Croatia. The State Office for Nuclear Safety (SONS) which, as an independent state regulatory authority has a responsibility for activities relating to nuclear safety, including the national authority over this Treaty, is actively engaged in CTBTO activities. The nuclear explosion causes a lot of effects (blast, thermal, radioactive, electromagnetic) which differs a lot in its nature, reach, lasting and other. The longest lasting aftermath is from the radioactive effects that cause a radioactive fallout and a lot of radioactive elements in the environment, created by the influence of a primary beam of radiation. Fission and fusion are the main source of radionuclide created by the nuclear explosion, and the longest lasting aftermaths are by the fission products, namely their offspring in natural disintegration chains. This can make contaminated areas inappropriate for life for very long periods. Even in the case of underground nuclear explosion (when underground cavity is formed with no effects on the surface), a leakage of radioactive gases through cracks is possible. A number of radionuclide is created by the neutron activation of elements naturally present in an environment, because a very strong neutron radiation appears in the moment of nuclear explosion. The abundance of particular radionuclide is a very much dependent of a place of performing nuclear explosion and a composition of soil or water in the vicinity.(author)

  19. Chemical Modifications of Starch: Microwave Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Lewicka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents basic methods of starch chemical modification, the effect of microwave radiation on the modification process, and the physicochemical properties of starch. It has been shown that the modifications contribute to improvement of the material performance and likewise to significant improvement of its mechanical properties. As a result, more and more extensive use of starch is possible in various industries. In addition, methods of oxidized starch and starch esters preparation are discussed. Properties of microwave radiation and its impact on starch (with particular regard to modifications described in literature are characterized.

  20. Productivity of a nuclear chemical reactor with gamma radioisotopic sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anguis T, C.

    1975-01-01

    According to an established mathematical model of successive Compton interaction processes the made calculations for major distances are extended checking the acceptability of the spheric geometry model for the experimental data for radioisotopic sources of Co-60 and Cs-137. Parameters such as the increasing factor and the absorbed dose served as comparative base. calculations for the case of a punctual source succession inside a determined volume cylinder are made to obtain the total dose, the deposited energy by each photons energetic group and the total absorbed energy inside the reactor. Varying adequately the height/radius relation for different cylinders, the distinct energy depositions are compared in each one of them once a time standardized toward a standard value of energy emitted by the reactor volume. A relation between the quantity of deposited energy in each point of the reactor and the conversion values of chemical species is established. They are induced by electromagnetic radiation and that are reported as ''G'' in the scientific literature (number of molecules formed or disappeared by each 100 e.v. of energy). Once obtained the molecular performance inside the reactor for each type of geometry, it is optimized the height/radius relation according to the maximum production of molecules by unity of time. It is completed a bibliographical review of ''G'' values reported by different types of aqueous solutions with the purpose to determine the maximum performance of molecular hydrogen as a function of pH of the solution and of the used type of solute among other factors. Calculations for the ethyl bromide production as an example of one of the industrial processes which actually work using the gamma radiation as reactions inductor are realized. (Author)

  1. Identification of the chemical inventory of different paint types applied in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabrina Tietze; Foreman, M.R.St.J.; Ekberg, CH.H.; Chalmers University of Technology, Chemical and Biological Engineering, Goeteborg; Dongen van, B.E.

    2013-01-01

    The floors, concrete walls and many of the metal surfaces in nuclear power plant containments are coated with zinc primers or paint films to preserve the metal surfaces and simplify decontamination in the containment after the occurrence of a severe nuclear incident or accident. A chemical examination of paint films from different nuclear installations out of operation, as well as current operating ones, reveals that different types of paints are used whose composition can vary significantly. Results obtained for one type of paint at a certain nuclear site are in most cases unlikely to be comparable with sites painted with another type of paint. During normal operation and particularly during nuclear accidents, the paints will degrade under the high temperature, steam and irradiation influence. As paint and its degradation products can act as sources and depots for volatile iodine compounds, the type and aging conditions of the paint films will have a significant impact on the source term of the volatile fission product iodine. Thus, great care should be taken when extrapolating any results obtained for the interaction of radioactive iodine with one paint product to a different paint product. The main focus of the study is a comparison of the chemical profile of paint films applied in Swedish nuclear power plants. Teknopox Aqua V A, an epoxy paint recently used at Ringhals 2, and an emulsion paint used in the scrubber buildings of Ringhals 1-4 are compared with a paint film from Barsebaeck nuclear power plant unit 1 that had been aged under real reactor conditions for 20 years. In addition, two paint films, an emulsion and a gloss paint, used in an international nuclear fuel reprocessing facility, are compared with the paints from the Swedish nuclear power plants. (author)

  2. What transformations in the international system are prerequisites for the complete elimination of nuclear weapons?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsipis, K.

    1993-01-01

    The author reviews prerequisites for the complete elimination of nuclear weapons (NW), among which are: symmetry of NW possession; stopping the NW tests; establishment of a multinational nuclear deterrent force; common security regional arrangements aimed at denuclearization

  3. Chemical transformations of characteristic hop secondary metabolites in relation to beer properties and the brewing process: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenackers, Bart; De Cooman, Luc; De Vos, Dirk

    2015-04-01

    The annual production of hops (Humulus lupulus L.) exceeds 100,000 mt and is almost exclusively consumed by the brewing industry. The value of hops is attributed to their characteristic secondary metabolites; these metabolites are precursors which are transformed during the brewing process into important bittering, aromatising and preservative components with rather low efficiency. By selectively transforming these components off-line, both their utilisation efficiency and functionality can be significantly improved. Therefore, the chemical transformations of these secondary metabolites will be considered with special attention to recent advances in the field. The considered components are the hop alpha-acids, hop beta-acids and xanthohumol, which are components unique to hops, and alpha-humulene and beta-caryophyllene, sesquiterpenes which are highly characteristic of hops. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Modernization of the Electric Power Systems (transformers, rods and switches) in the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant (Mexico)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Solarzano, J. J.; Gabaldon Martin, M. A.; Pallisa Nunez, J.; Florez Ordeonez, A.; Fernandez Corbeira, A.; Prieto Diez, I.

    2010-01-01

    Description of the changes made in the Electric Power Systems as a part of the power increase project in the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant (Mexico). The main electrical changes to make, besides the turbo group, are the main generation transformers, the isolated rods and the generation switch.

  5. Lessons Learned on University Education Programs of Chemical Engineering Principles for Nuclear Plant Operations - 13588

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Jun-hyung

    2013-01-01

    University education aims to supply qualified human resources for industries. In complex large scale engineering systems such as nuclear power plants, the importance of qualified human resources cannot be underestimated. The corresponding education program should involve many topics systematically. Recently a nuclear engineering program has been initiated in Dongguk University, South Korea. The current education program focuses on undergraduate level nuclear engineering students. Our main objective is to provide industries fresh engineers with the understanding on the interconnection of local parts and the entire systems of nuclear power plants and the associated systems. From the experience there is a huge opportunity for chemical engineering disciple in the context of giving macroscopic overview on nuclear power plant and waste treatment management by strengthening the analyzing capability of fundamental situations. (authors)

  6. Chemically vapor deposited coatings for multibarrier containment of nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusin, J.M.; Shade, J.W.; Kidd, R.W.; Browning, M.F.

    1981-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was selected as a feasible method to coat ceramic cores, since the technology has previously been demonstrated for high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel particles. CVD coatings, including SiC, PyC (pyrolytic carbon), SiO 2 , and Al 2 O 3 were studied. This paper will discuss the development and characterization of PyC and Al 2 O 3 CVD coatings on supercalcine cores. Coatings were applied to 2 mm particles in either fluidized or vibrating beds. The PyC coating was deposited in a fluidized bed with ZrO 2 diluent from C 2 H 2 at temperatures between 1100 and 1200 0 C. The Al 2 O 3 coatings were deposited in a vibrated bed by a two-stage process to minimize loss of PyC during the overcoating operation. This process involved applying 10 μm of Al 2 O 3 using water vapor hydrolysis of AlCl 3 and then switching to the more surface-controlled hydrolysis via the H 2 + CO 2 reaction (3CO 2 + 3H 2 + 2AlCl 3 = Al 2 O 3 + 6HCl + 3CO). Typically, 50 to 80 μm Al 2 O 3 coatings were applied over 30 to 40 μm PyC coatings. The coatings were evaluated by metallographic examination, PyC oxidation tests, and leach resistance. After air oxidation for 100 hours at 750 0 C, the duplex PyC/Al 2 O 3 coated particles exhibited a weight loss of 0.01 percent. Leach resistance is being determined for temperatures from 50 to 150 0 C in various solutions. Typical results are given for selected ions. The leach resistance of supercalcine cores is significantly improved by the application of PyC and/or Al 2 O 3 coatings

  7. Chemical transformation of 3-bromo-2,2-bis(bromomethyl)-propanol under basic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezra, Shai; Feinstein, Shimon; Bilkis, Itzhak; Adar, Eilon; Ganor, Jiwchar

    2005-01-15

    The mechanism of the spontaneous decomposition of 3-bromo-2,2-bis(bromomethyl)propanol (TBNPA) and the kinetics of the reaction of the parent compound and two subsequent products were determined in aqueous solution at temperatures from 30 to 70 degrees C and pH from 7.0 to 9.5. TBNPA is decomposed by a sequence of reactions that form 3,3-bis(bromomethyl)oxetane (BBMO), 3-bromomethyl-3-hydroxymethyloxetane (BMHMO), and 2,6-dioxaspiro[3.3]-heptane (DOH), releasing one bromide ion at each stage. The pseudo-first-order rate constant of the decomposition of TBNPA increases linearlywith the pH. The apparent activation energy of this transformation (98+/-2 KJ/mol) was calculated from the change of the effective second-order rate constant with temperature. The pseudoactivation energies of BBMO and BMHMO were estimated to be 109 and 151 KJ/mol, respectively. Good agreement was found between the rate coefficients derived from changes in the organic molecules concentrations and those determined from the changes in the Br- concentrations. TBNPA is the most abundant semivolatile organic pollutant in the aquitard studied, and together with its byproducts they posess an environmental hazard. TBNPA half-life is estimated to be about 100 years. This implies that high concentrations of TBNPA will persist in the aquifer long after the elimination of all its sources.

  8. Climate and chemistry effects of a regional scale nuclear conflict

    OpenAIRE

    Stenke A.; Hoyle C. R.; Luo B.; Rozanov E.; Groebner J.; Maag L.; Broennimann S.; Peter T.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have highlighted the severity of detrimental effects for life on Earth after an assumed regionally limited nuclear war. These effects are caused by climatic, chemical and radiative changes persisting for up to one decade. However, so far only a very limited number of climate model simulations have been performed, giving rise to the question how realistic previous computations have been. This study uses the coupled chemistry climate model (CCM) SOCOL, which belongs to a...

  9. Sustainable 'Greener' Methods for Chemical Transformations and Applications of Nano-Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    The presentation summarizes our sustainable chemical synthesis activity involving benign alternatives, such as the use of supported reagents, and greener reaction medium in aqueous or solvent-free conditions.1 Synthesis of heterocyclic compounds, coupling reactions, and name reac...

  10. Greener Syntheses and Chemical Transformations: Sustainable Alternative Methods and Applications of Nano-Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    The presentation summarizes our sustainable chemical synthesis activity involving benign alternatives, such as the use of supported reagents, and greener reaction medium in aqueous or solvent-free conditions.1 The synthesis of heterocyclic compounds, coupling reactions, and a var...

  11. Nonadverse effects on allergenicity of isopentenyltransferase-transformed broccoli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, E C; Chen, J T; Chao, M L; Yu, S C; Chang, C Y; Chu, W S; Tsai, J J

    2013-01-01

    Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) provide modern agriculture with improvements in efficiency and the benefits of enhanced food production; however, the potential impact of GMOs on human health has not yet been clarified. To investigate the allergenicity of isopentenyltransferase (ipt)-transformed broccoli compared with non-GM broccoli. Sera from allergic individuals were used to identify the allergenicity of GM and non-GM broccoli. Immunoglobulin (Ig) binding of different lines of GM and non-GM broccoli was identified using immunoblotting, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the histamin release assay. Positive reactions to broccoli (Brassica Oleracea) were observed in 7.02% of individuals. Specific IgE to broccoli and total IgE fro allergic individuals were well correlated. The different tests performed showed no significant differences in the allergenicity of conventionally raised and GM broccoli, indicating the absence of unexpected effects on allergenicity in ipt-transformed plants. Using Western blot analysis we detected heterogeneous IgE-reactive allergenic components in broccoli-allergic sera, but no significant differences between GM an non-GM broccoli were observed in serum from the same patients. Our study demonstrates that there are no differences between GM (ipt-transformed) broccoli and non-GM broccoli, as determined by specific IgE in sera from broccoli-allergic patients. This indicates that there were no unexpected effects on allergenicity in this GM broccoli.

  12. Inhibition of Neoplastic Transformation and Chemically-Induced Skin Hyperplasia in Mice by Traditional Chinese Medicinal Formula Si-Wu-Tang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandy M. Liu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Exploring traditional medicines may lead to the development of low-cost and non-toxic cancer preventive agents. Si-Wu-Tang (SWT, comprising the combination of four herbs, Rehmanniae, Angelica, Chuanxiong, and Paeoniae, is one of the most popular traditional Chinese medicines for women’s diseases. In our previous studies, the antioxidant Nrf2 pathways were strongly induced by SWT in vitro and in vivo. Since Nrf2 activation has been associated with anticarcinogenic effects, the purpose of this study is to evaluate SWT’s activity of cancer prevention. In the Ames test, SWT demonstrated an antimutagenic activity against mutagenicity induced by the chemical carcinogen 7,12-dimethylbenz(aanthracene (DMBA. In JB6 P+ cells, a non-cancerous murine epidermal model for studying tumor promotion, SWT inhibited epidermal growth factor (EGF-induced neoplastic transformation. The luciferase reporter gene assays demonstrated that SWT suppressed EGF-induced AP-1 and TNF-α-induced NF-κB activation, which are essential factors involved in skin carcinogenesis. In a DMBA-induced skin hyperplasia assay in ‘Sensitivity to Carcinogenesis’ (SENCAR mice, both topical and oral SWT inhibited DMBA-induced epidermal hyperplasia, expression of the proliferation marker Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, and H-ras mutations. These findings demonstrate, for the first time, that SWT prevents tumor promoter and chemical-induced carcinogenesis in vitro and in vivo, partly by inhibiting DNA damage and blocking the activation of AP-1 and NF-κB.

  13. Chemical cleaning for sludge in steam generator of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Mengqin; Lu Yucheng; Zhang Binyong; Yu Jinghua

    2002-01-01

    The sludge induced corrosion damage to secondary side of tubes of Steam Generator (SG), effect of chemical cleaning technique on maintenance integrity of tubes of SG NPP and use of chemical cleaning technique in SG NPP have been summarized. The engineering technique of chemical cleaning for removing sludge in secondary side of SG NPP has been studied and qualified by CIAE (China Institute of Atomic Energy). Chemical cleaning engineering technique is introduced (main agent is EDTA, temp. <100 degree C), including chemical cleaning technology for tube plate and full tube nest of secondary side of SG, the monitoring technique of chemical cleaning process (effectiveness and safety), the disposal method of wastage of chemical cleaning, the system of chemical cleaning. The method for preventing sludge deposition in secondary side and the research on advanced water chemistry of secondary loop are introduced

  14. Persistence of sister chromatid exchanges and in vitro morphological transformation of Syrian hamster fetal cells by chemical and physical carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popescu, N.C.; Amsbaugh, S.C.; DiPaolo, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    The induction of neoplastic cell transformation is closely associated with DNA alterations which occur shortly after carcinogen exposure. Sister chromatid exchange (SCE) formation is a sensitive indicator of carcinogen-DNA interaction and correlates with the induction of morphological cell transformation. The persistence of lesions generating SCE produced by chemical and physical carcinogens and its relevance to the induction of morphologic transformation was evaluated in coordinated experiments with cultured Syrian hamster fetal cells (HFC). Exponentially growing HFC were exposed for 1 h to benzo[a]pyrene (BP), methyl-methanesulfonate (MMS), cis-platinum (II) diaminedichloride (cis Pt II), N-methyl-N'-nitrosourea (MNU), mitomycin C (MMC), N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), N-acetoxy-2-fluorenyl-acetamide (AcAAF) or u.v. light irradiated. SCE analysis demonstrates that for a period of 48 h after carcinogen exposure, during which time the cells undergo at least four replicative cycles, DNA damage generating SCE induced by all chemical carcinogens either persisted or was partially removed, whereas u.v.-induced lesions were completely removed. An elevated SCE frequency persisted after two additional cell cycles after treatment with BP, AcAAF or MMC without increased cell lethality as compared to other carcinogens whose lesions were completely eliminated during the same period

  15. Cost effectiveness of dilute chemical decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeSurf, J.E.; Weyman, G.D.

    The basic principles of dilute chemical decontamination are described, as well as the method of application. Methods of computing savings in radiation dose and costs are presented, with results from actual experience and illustrative examples. It is concluded that dilute chemical decontamination is beneficial in many cases. It reduces radiation exposure of workers, saves money, and simplifies maintenance work

  16. Plutonium contents of broadleaf vegetable crops grown near a nuclear fuel chemical separations facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLeod, K W; Alberts, J J; Adriano, D C; Pinder, III, J E

    1984-02-01

    Among agricultural crops, broadleaf vegetables are particularly prone to intercept and retain aerially released contaminants. The plutonium concentration of four broadleaf crops (broccoli, cabbage, lettuce and turnip greens) was determined, when grown in close proximity to a nuclear-fuel chemical-separations facility. Concentrations varied among species, apparently influenced by the crop morphology, with Pu concentrations increasing in the sequence: cabbage < broccoli < turnip greens < lettuce. Washing of the crops significantly reduced the Pu concentration of lettuce, but had no effect on Pu concentration of broccoli and cabbage. The vast majority of Pu found in the crops was due to direct deposition of recently released Pu and resuspension of Pu-bearing soil particles, and was not due to root uptake. Resultant doses from consumption are small relative to the annual background dose.

  17. Control and management of the chemical risk linked with hydrazine hydrate storage, unloading and injection across French nuclear fleet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spahic, Mersiha; Dzemidzic Aida; Dijoux, Michel; Pages, Danielle; Rigal, Jean-Francois; Boize, Magali

    2012-09-01

    Across the EDF nuclear fleet, the chemical risk linked with hydrazine hydrate storage, unloading and injection has received much attention in the past decades. Since 1997, continuous investigation into the substitution of dangerous and carcinogenic chemicals has been conducted and regularly updated by EDF. As a downstream user of hydrazine hydrate, EDF is concerned by REACH legislation, in force since 1 June 2007. As part of the compliance process with REACH, EDF provided its hydrazine hydrate suppliers with information regarding the uses of the chemical. This was done by the end of 2008, as per REACH deadline. On the other hand, EDF contributed throughout European Chemicals Agency consultation phase by submitting data relating to hydrazine hydrate uses across nuclear sites. The absence of a suitable hydrazine hydrate replacement product, able to satisfy the entirety of technical requirements, entails rigorous arrangements to be implemented in order to segregate the zones where use of hydrazine is made and therefore eradicate the risk to personnel regarding hydrazine effects. Consequently, a number of engineering changes and modifications are to be carried out on the chemical injection systems of 58 French nuclear power plants over the next few years as part of the EDF Hydrazine Fleet Programme. (authors)

  18. Development of Procedures for the Analysis of Components of Dumped Chemical Weapons and Their Principal Transformation Products in Sea Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saveleva, E. I.; Koryagina, N. L.; Radilov, A. S.; Khlebnikova, N. S.; Khrustaleva, V. S.

    2007-01-01

    A package of chemical analytical procedures was developed for the detection of products indicative of the presence of damped chemical weapons in the Baltic Sea. The principal requirements imposed upon the procedures were the following: high sensitivity, reliable identification of target compounds, wide range of components covered by survey analysis, and lack of interferences from sea salts. Thiodiglycol, a product of hydrolysis of sulfur mustard reportedly always detected in the sites of damping chemical weapons in the Baltic Sea, was considered the principal marker. We developed a high-sensitivity procedure for the determination of thiodiglycol in sea water, involving evaporation of samples to dryness in a vacuum concentrator, followed by tert-butyldimethylsilylation of the residue and GCMS analysis in the SIM mode with meta-fluorobenzoic acid as internal reference. The detection limit of thiodiglycol was 0.001 mg/l, and the procedure throughput was up to 30 samples per day. The same procedure, but with BSTFA as derivatizing agent instead of MTBSTFA, was used for preparing samples for survey analysis of nonvolatile components. In this case, full mass spectra were measured in the GCMS analysis. The use of BSTFA was motivated by the fact that trimethylsilyl derivatives are much wider represented in electronic mass spectral databases. The identification of sulfur mustard, volatile transformation products of sulfur mustard and lewisite, as well as chloroacetophenone in sea water was performed by means of GCMS in combination with SPME. The survey GC-MS analysis was focused on the identification of volatile and nonvolatile toxic chemicals whose mass spectra are included in the OPCW database (3219 toxic chemicals, precursors, and transformation products) with the use of AMDIS software (version 2.62). Using 2 GC-MS instruments, we could perform the survey analysis for volatile and nonvolatile components of up to 20 samples per day. Thus, the package of three procedures

  19. The effects on the atmosphere of a major nuclear exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    Most of the earth's population would survive the immediate horrors of a nuclear holocaust, but what long-term climatological changes would affect their ability to secure food and shelter. This sobering report considers the effects of fine dust from ground-level detonations, of smoke from widespread fires, and of chemicals released into the atmosphere. The authors use mathematical models of atmospheric processes and data from natural situations - e.g., volcanic eruptions and arctic haze - to draw their conclusions

  20. Effectiveness of Existing International Nuclear Liability Regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Doais, Salwa; Kessel, Daivd

    2015-01-01

    The first convention was the Paris Convention on Third Party Liability in the Field of Nuclear Energy (the Paris Convention) had been adopted on 29 July 1960 under the auspices of the OECD, and entered into force on 1 April 1968. In 1963,the Brussels Convention - supplementary to the Paris Convention- was adopted in to provide additional funds to compensate damage as a result of a nuclear incident where Paris Convention funds proved to be insufficient. The IAEA's first convention was the Vienna Convention on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage (the Vienna Convention) which adopted on 21 May 1963,and entered into force in 1977. Both the Paris Convention and the Vienna Convention laid down very similar nuclear liability rules based on the same general principles. The broad principles in these conventions can be summarized as follows: 1- The no-fault liability principle (strict liability) 2- Liability is channeled exclusively to the operator of the nuclear installation (legal channeling) 3- Only courts of the state in which the nuclear accident occurs would have jurisdiction (exclusive jurisdiction) 4- Limitation of the amount of liability and the time frame for claiming damages (limited liability) 5- The operator is required to have adequate insurance or financial guarantees to the extent of its liability amount (liability must be financially secured). 6- Liability is limited in time. Compensation rights are extinguished after specific time. 7- Non-discrimination of victims on the grounds of nationality, domicile or residence. Nuclear liability conventions objective is to provide adequate compensation payments to victims of a nuclear accident. Procedures for receiving these compensation are controlled by some rules such as exclusive jurisdiction, that rule need a further amendment to ensure the effectiveness of the exiting nuclear liability regime . Membership of the Conventions is a critical issue, because the existence of the conventions without being party to

  1. Effectiveness of Existing International Nuclear Liability Regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Doais, Salwa; Kessel, Daivd [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The first convention was the Paris Convention on Third Party Liability in the Field of Nuclear Energy (the Paris Convention) had been adopted on 29 July 1960 under the auspices of the OECD, and entered into force on 1 April 1968. In 1963,the Brussels Convention - supplementary to the Paris Convention- was adopted in to provide additional funds to compensate damage as a result of a nuclear incident where Paris Convention funds proved to be insufficient. The IAEA's first convention was the Vienna Convention on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage (the Vienna Convention) which adopted on 21 May 1963,and entered into force in 1977. Both the Paris Convention and the Vienna Convention laid down very similar nuclear liability rules based on the same general principles. The broad principles in these conventions can be summarized as follows: 1- The no-fault liability principle (strict liability) 2- Liability is channeled exclusively to the operator of the nuclear installation (legal channeling) 3- Only courts of the state in which the nuclear accident occurs would have jurisdiction (exclusive jurisdiction) 4- Limitation of the amount of liability and the time frame for claiming damages (limited liability) 5- The operator is required to have adequate insurance or financial guarantees to the extent of its liability amount (liability must be financially secured). 6- Liability is limited in time. Compensation rights are extinguished after specific time. 7- Non-discrimination of victims on the grounds of nationality, domicile or residence. Nuclear liability conventions objective is to provide adequate compensation payments to victims of a nuclear accident. Procedures for receiving these compensation are controlled by some rules such as exclusive jurisdiction, that rule need a further amendment to ensure the effectiveness of the exiting nuclear liability regime . Membership of the Conventions is a critical issue, because the existence of the conventions without being party to

  2. Induction of cellular transformation by irradiation from artificial light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Withrow, T.J.

    1981-01-01

    Cellular transformation in vitro has been used to test for the carcinogenic potential of chemical and physical insults including light. This report discusses the measurement of transformation, and reviews studies done on the effects of exposure to artificial light on cellular transformation or on cellular transformation by a virus. To date, cool-white lamps have been found to cause cellular transformation, while germicidal lamps and sunlamps have been found to cause cellular transformation and to enhance virally produced transformation

  3. Final report on 'biological effects of tritium as a basis of research and development in nuclear fusion'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    The National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Japan, has undertaken a special study of ''biological effects of tritium as a basis of research and development in nuclear fusion'' over a 5-year period from April 1981 through March 1986. This is a final report, covering incorporation and metabolism of tritium, physical, chemical, and cellular effects of tritium, tritium damage to the mammalian tissue, and human exposure to tritium. The report is organized into five chapters, including ''Study of incorporation of tritium into the living body and its in vivo behavior''; ''Physical and chemical studies for the determination of relative biological effectiveness''; ''Analytical study on biological effects of tritium in cultured mammalian cells''; ''Study of tritium effects on the mammalian tissue, germ cells, and cell transformation''; and ''Changes in the hemopoietic stem cells and lymphocyte subsets in humans after exposure to some internal emitters''. (Namekawa, K.)

  4. Chemically Induced Phase Transformation in Austenite by Focused Ion Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basa, Adina; Thaulow, Christian; Barnoush, Afrooz

    2014-03-01

    A highly stable austenite phase in a super duplex stainless steel was subjected to a combination of different gallium ion doses at different acceleration voltages. It was shown that contrary to what is expected, an austenite to ferrite phase transformation occurred within the focused ion beam (FIB) milled regions. Chemical analysis of the FIB milled region proved that the gallium implantation preceded the FIB milling. High resolution electron backscatter diffraction analysis also showed that the phase transformation was not followed by the typical shear and plastic deformation expected from the martensitic transformation. On the basis of these observations, it was concluded that the change in the chemical composition of the austenite and the local increase in gallium, which is a ferrite stabilizer, results in the local selective transformation of austenite to ferrite.

  5. The climatic effects of nuclear war

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turco, R. P.; Toon, O. B.; Ackerman, T. P.; Pollack, J. B.; Sagan, C.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of various US-USSR nuclear-exchange scenarios on global climate are investigated by means of computer simulations, summarizing the results of Turco et al. (1983) and follow-up studies using 3D global-circulation models. A nuclear-scenario model is used to determine the amounts of dust, smoke, radioactivity, and pyrotoxins generated by a particular type of nuclear exchange (such as a general 5,000-Mt exchange, a 1,000-Mt limited exchange, a 5,000-Mt hard-target counterforce attack, and a 100-Mt attack on cities only): a particle-microphysics model predicts the evolution of the dust and smoke particles; and a radiative-convective climate model estimates the effects of the dust and smoke clouds on the global radiation budget. The findings are presented in graphs, diagrams, and a table. Thick clouds blocking most sunlight over the Northern Hemisphere midlatitudes for weeks or months and producing ground-temperature reductions of 20-40 C, disruption of global circulation patterns, and rapid spread of clouds to the Southern Hemisphere are among the 'nuclear-winter' effects predicted for the 5,000-Mt baseline case. The catastrophic consequences for plant, animal, and human populations are considered, and the revision of superpower nuclear strategies is urged.

  6. Engineering effects of underground nuclear explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boardman, Charles R [CER Geonuclear Corporation, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1970-05-01

    Useful effects of contained underground nuclear explosions are discussed in light of today's most promising potential applications. Relevant data obtained through exploration of explosion environments of nine U.S. tests in competent rock are summarized and presented as a practical basis for estimating magnitudes of effects. Effects discussed include chimney configuration, permeability, and volume as well as rubble particle size distributions and extents of permeability change in the chimney wall rock. Explosion mediums include shale, granite, dolomite, and salt. (author)

  7. Engineering effects of underground nuclear explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boardman, Charles R.

    1970-01-01

    Useful effects of contained underground nuclear explosions are discussed in light of today's most promising potential applications. Relevant data obtained through exploration of explosion environments of nine U.S. tests in competent rock are summarized and presented as a practical basis for estimating magnitudes of effects. Effects discussed include chimney configuration, permeability, and volume as well as rubble particle size distributions and extents of permeability change in the chimney wall rock. Explosion mediums include shale, granite, dolomite, and salt. (author)

  8. The Transformations of French Nuclear Export Policy (1974-1976): A Triple Double Game

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pouponneau, Florent

    2013-01-01

    A number of problems present themselves for any scholar seeking to take into account all determinants relating to 'national' and 'international' action in the analysis of foreign policy. In the domain of the French diplomatic practices of the mid-1970's-structured around the apparent issue of nuclear exports-archival consultation and interviews reveal that the various actors involved in this policy were not necessarily playing the same national and international 'double game.' While relations between states shape what they are and do, the various effects of refraction at work at the internal level prevents one from speaking of a state taken uniformly across a space of competition

  9. Fourier transform infrared spectra applications to chemical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraro, John R

    1978-01-01

    Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy: Applications to Chemical Systems presents the chemical applications of the Fourier transform interferometry (FT-IR).The book contains discussions on the applications of FT-IR in the fields of chromatography FT-IR, polymers and biological macromolecules, emission spectroscopy, matrix isolation, high-pressure interferometry, and far infrared interferometry. The final chapter is devoted to the presentation of the use of FT-IR in solving national technical problems such as air pollution, space exploration, and energy related subjects.Researc

  10. ARTIST process. A novel chemical process for treatment of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachimori, Shoichi

    2001-10-01

    A new chemical process, ARTIST process, is proposed for the treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The main concept of the ARTIST process is to recover and stock all actinides (Ans) as two groups, uranium (U) and a mixture of transuranics (TRU), to preserve their resource value and to dispose solely fission products (FPs). The process is composed of two main steps, an U exclusive isolation and a total recovery of TRU; which copes with the nuclear non-proliferation measures, and additionally of Pu separation process and soft N-donor process if requested, and optionally of processes for separation of long-lived FPs. These An products: U-product and TRU-product, are to be solidified by calcination and allowed to the interim stockpile for future utilization. These separations are achieved by use of amidic extractants in accord with the CHON principle. The technical feasibility of the ARTIST process was explained by the performance of both the branched alkyl monoamides in extracting U and suppressing the extraction of tetravalent Ans due to the steric effect and the diglycolic amide (TODGA) in thorough extraction of all TRU by tridentate fashion. When these TRU are requested to put into reactors, LWR or FBR, for power generation or the Accelerator - Driven System (ADS) for transmutation, Pu (Np) or Am-Cm (Np) are to be extracted from the TRU-product. (author)

  11. Effects on social economics from transformations of the bioenergy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braennlund, R.; Ankarhem, M.; Sjoestroem, M.; Marklund, P.O.; Lundgren, T.

    2002-02-01

    The transformation of the energy sector that is taking place in Sweden - substitution of renewable energy sources, in particular biofuels, for fossil fuels - will cause changes in the economy that are analysed in this report. The main issues are: How will the market be affected by a higher competition for wood? How will the fuel mix change in the heating sector? What environmental effects will result from the new energy policy? How will governmentally implemented economic incentives act on the fuel choices in the heating sector? Is the market for wood fuels efficient in the meaning that it reflects the values of the resource as the sellers and the buyers see it?

  12. Uranium for Nuclear Power: Resources, Mining and Transformation to Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hore-Lacy, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Uranium for Nuclear Power: Resources, Mining and Transformation to Fuel discusses the nuclear industry and its dependence on a steady supply of competitively priced uranium as a key factor in its long-term sustainability. A better understanding of uranium ore geology and advances in exploration and mining methods will facilitate the discovery and exploitation of new uranium deposits. The practice of efficient, safe, environmentally-benign exploration, mining and milling technologies, and effective site decommissioning and remediation are also fundamental to the public image of nuclear power. This book provides a comprehensive review of developments in these areas: • Provides researchers in academia and industry with an authoritative overview of the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle • Presents a comprehensive and systematic coverage of geology, mining, and conversion to fuel, alternative fuel sources, and the environmental and social aspects • Written by leading experts in the field of nuclear power, uranium mining, milling, and geological exploration who highlight the best practices needed to ensure environmental safety

  13. Possible penetration of nuclear power in fuel and power demand structure in chemical industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balajka, J.

    1985-01-01

    The possibilities are indicated of the technological applications of high temperature reactors in chemical operations. Nuclear heating may be applied to such processes whose temperature does not 850 degC and pressure is approximately equal to the pressure of helium in the primary circuit of the reactor. The following processes may be implemented: the production of ammonia and methanol, the reduction of iron ore, the implementation of the system of long-distance heat transmission in chemically bound form, etc. The diagram has been designed for the production of ammonia and methanol by steam reforming of methane. The natural gas which enters the process is distributed in the technological and power branches. In the technological branch it is preheated and desulphurized, then mixed with steam and entered the reactor.The outlet mixture of CO, CO 2 , H 2 and Csub(n)Hsub(m) is oxidized with air and following further catalyses a mixture is obtained of N 2 and H 2 in the 1:3 ratio. The power balances and variants are calculated of the distribution of reactor power and its effect on the basic parameters of the technology of the production of NH 3 . (M.D.)

  14. Inherently safe technologies-chemical and nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberg, A.M.

    1984-01-01

    Probabilistic risk assessments show an inverse relationship between the likelihood and the consequences of nuclear and chemical plant accidents, but the Bhopal accident has change public complacency about the safety of chemical plants to such an extent that public confidence is now at the same low level as with nuclear plants. The nuclear industry's response was to strengthen its institutions and improve its technologies, but the public may not be convinced. One solution is to develop reactors which do not depend upon the active intervention of humans of electromechanical devices to deal with emergencies, but which have physical properties that limit the possible temperature and power of a reactor. The Process Inherent Ultimately Safe and the modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled reactors are two possibilities. the chemical industry needs to develop its own inherently safe design precepts that incorporate smallness, safe processes, and hardening against sabotage. 5 references

  15. Chemical modeling of irreversible reactions in nuclear waste-water-rock systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolery, T.J.

    1981-02-01

    Chemical models of aqueous geochemical systems are usually built on the concept of thermodynamic equilibrium. Though many elementary reactions in a geochemical system may be close to equilibrium, others may not be. Chemical models of aqueous fluids should take into account that many aqueous redox reactions are among the latter. The behavior of redox reactions may critically affect migration of certain radionuclides, especially the actinides. In addition, the progress of reaction in geochemical systems requires thermodynamic driving forces associated with elementary reactions not at equilibrium, which are termed irreversible reactions. Both static chemical models of fluids and dynamic models of reacting systems have been applied to a wide spectrum of problems in water-rock interactions. Potential applications in nuclear waste disposal range from problems in geochemical aspects of site evaluation to those of waste-water-rock interactions. However, much further work in the laboratory and the field will be required to develop and verify such applications of chemical modeling

  16. Nuclear reactions and self-shielding effects of gamma-ray database for nuclear materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, Mitsutane; Noda, Tetsuji [National Research Institute for Metals, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2001-03-01

    A database for transmutation and radioactivity of nuclear materials is required for selection and design of materials used in various nuclear reactors. The database based on the FENDL/A-2.0 on the Internet and the additional data collected from several references has been developed in NRIM site of 'Data-Free-Way' on the Internet. Recently, the function predicted self-shielding effect of materials for {gamma}-ray was added to this database. The user interface for this database has been constructed for retrieval of necessary data and for graphical presentation of the relation between the energy spectrum of neutron and neutron capture cross section. It is demonstrated that the possibility of chemical compositional change and radioactivity in a material caused by nuclear reactions can be easily retrieved using a browser such as Netscape or Explorer. (author)

  17. Nuclear reactions and self-shielding effects of gamma-ray database for nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Mitsutane; Noda, Tetsuji

    2001-01-01

    A database for transmutation and radioactivity of nuclear materials is required for selection and design of materials used in various nuclear reactors. The database based on the FENDL/A-2.0 on the Internet and the additional data collected from several references has been developed in NRIM site of 'Data-Free-Way' on the Internet. Recently, the function predicted self-shielding effect of materials for γ-ray was added to this database. The user interface for this database has been constructed for retrieval of necessary data and for graphical presentation of the relation between the energy spectrum of neutron and neutron capture cross section. It is demonstrated that the possibility of chemical compositional change and radioactivity in a material caused by nuclear reactions can be easily retrieved using a browser such as Netscape or Explorer. (author)

  18. Effective Methods of Nuclear Power Technology Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shave, D. F.; Kent, G. F.; Giambusso, A.

    1987-01-01

    An effective technology transfer program is a necessary and significant step towards independence in nuclear power technology. Attaining success in the conduct of such a program is a result of a) the donor and recipient jointly understanding the fundamental concepts of the learning process, b) sharing a mutual philosophy involving a partnership relationship, c) joint and careful planning, d) rigorous adherence to proven project management techniques, and e) presence of adequate feedback to assure continuing success as the program proceeds. Several years ago, KEPCO President Park, Jung-KI presented a paper on technology in which he stated, 'Nuclear technology is an integration of many unit disciplines, and thus requires extensive investment and training in order to establish the base for efficient absorption of transferred technology.' This paper addresses President Park's observations by discussing the philosophy, approach, and mechanisms that are necessary to support an efficient and effective process of nuclear power technology transfer. All technical content and presentation methods discussed are based on a technology transfer program developed by Stone and Webster, as an Engineer/Constructor for nuclear power plants, and are designed and implemented to promote the primary program goal - the ability of the trainees and the organization to perform specific nuclear power related multi-discipline function independently and competitively

  19. Application of in vitro cell transformation assays in regulatory toxicology for pharmaceuticals, chemicals, food products and cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanparys, Philippe; Corvi, Raffaella; Aardema, Marilyn J; Gribaldo, Laura; Hayashi, Makoto; Hoffmann, Sebastian; Schechtman, Leonard

    2012-04-11

    Two year rodent bioassays play a key role in the assessment of carcinogenic potential of chemicals to humans. The seventh amendment to the European Cosmetics Directive will ban in 2013 the marketing of cosmetic and personal care products that contain ingredients that have been tested in animal models. Thus 2-year rodent bioassays will not be available for cosmetics/personal care products. Furthermore, for large testing programs like REACH, in vivo carcinogenicity testing is impractical. Alternative ways to carcinogenicity assessment are urgently required. In terms of standardization and validation, the most advanced in vitro tests for carcinogenicity are the cell transformation assays (CTAs). Although CTAs do not mimic the whole carcinogenesis process in vivo, they represent a valuable support in identifying transforming potential of chemicals. CTAs have been shown to detect genotoxic as well as non-genotoxic carcinogens and are helpful in the determination of thresholds for genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens. The extensive review on CTAs by the OECD (OECD (2007) Environmental Health and Safety Publications, Series on Testing and Assessment, No. 31) and the proven within- and between-laboratories reproducibility of the SHE CTAs justifies broader use of these methods to assess carcinogenic potential of chemicals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Thermo effect of chemical reaction in irreversible electrochemical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Vinh Quy; Nguyen Tang

    1989-01-01

    From first law of thermodynamics the expressions of statistical calculation of 'Fundamental' and 'Thermo-chemical' thermal effects are obtained. Besides, method of calculation of thermal effect of chemical reactions in non-equilibrium electro-chemical systems is accurately discussed. (author). 7 refs

  1. The study of the radiation chemical transformation of the hexane on the surface of aluminium by IR-spectroscopy method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimikhanova, A.N.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: In this work the experimental results of the radiation-chemical transformation of hexane on the aluminum surface obtained by IR spectroscopy method at room temperature have been presented. The metallic aluminum plates which was obtained by stage pressing granules by mark of AD-00 with the reflection coefficient R=0,85 in the middle infrared range of waves length λ=15 ± 2,2 mkm were used. As an adsorbate unsaturated vapors of hexane were used, the absorption of which was being carried out at the room temperature by the method. The radiation of system was carried out with γ-quanta of Co 60 with doze rate of 1,03 Gy/s - 1, and the absorbed doze in the system was (0,5-2)10 4 Gy. IR reflection spectra when beams fall on the sample under angle near the slipping were measured in diapason of 3600-650 cm - 1 by the spectrophotometer S pecord 71IR . The radiation chemical decomposition of hexane in heterosystem was being traced in stretching (3000-2700 cm - 1) and deformation (1500-1300 cm - 1) vibration diapasons of C-H bonds. The analysis of IR reflection spectra of Al-ads.hexane heterosystem showed that the main products of radiation chemical transformation are hydrocarbons C1-C5, olefins: propylene, butene-1, hexene-1, transhexene-3 and hydrocarbons more heavy than hexane. In frequency range of 1700-2000 cm - 1 the absorption bands of Al-H vibration which concern to aluminum hydrides are founded. By increasing of radiation dose the tendency of increasing of hydrogen accumulation as aluminum hydrides has been established

  2. Effects of high magnetic field on martensitic transformation behavior and structure in Fe-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtsuka, H.; Wada, H.; Ghosh, G.

    2000-01-01

    Effects of magnetic field on lath-type martensitic transformation behavior and the reverse transformation behavior from lath math martensite to austenite have been investigated in 18Ni maraging steel. It was found that the reverse transformation temperature during heating is increased by magnetic field. Reverse transformation behavior during isothermal holding was also found to be retarded by magnetic field. (orig.)

  3. Clean Transformation of Ethanol to Useful Chemicals. The Behavior of a Gold-Modified Silicalite Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falletta, Ermelinda; Rossi, Michele; Teles, Joaquim Henrique; Della Pina, Cristina

    2016-03-19

    Upon addition of gold to silicalite-1 pellets (a MFI-type zeolite), the vapor phase oxidation of ethanol could be addressed to acetaldehyde or acetic acid formation. By optimizing the catalyst composition and reaction conditions, the conversion of ethanol could be tuned to acetaldehyde with 97% selectivity at 71% conversion or to acetic acid with 78% selectivity at total conversion. Considering that unloaded silicalite-1 was found to catalyze the dehydration of ethanol to diethylether or ethene, a green approach for the integrated production of four important chemicals is herein presented. This is based on renewable ethanol as a reagent and a modular catalytic process.

  4. Clean Transformation of Ethanol to Useful Chemicals. The Behavior of a Gold-Modified Silicalite Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ermelinda Falletta

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Upon addition of gold to silicalite-1 pellets (a MFI-type zeolite, the vapor phase oxidation of ethanol could be addressed to acetaldehyde or acetic acid formation. By optimizing the catalyst composition and reaction conditions, the conversion of ethanol could be tuned to acetaldehyde with 97% selectivity at 71% conversion or to acetic acid with 78% selectivity at total conversion. Considering that unloaded silicalite-1 was found to catalyze the dehydration of ethanol to diethylether or ethene, a green approach for the integrated production of four important chemicals is herein presented. This is based on renewable ethanol as a reagent and a modular catalytic process.

  5. Surface effects of underground nuclear explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, B.M.; Drellack, S.L. Jr.; Townsend, M.J.

    1997-06-01

    The effects of nuclear explosions have been observed and studied since the first nuclear test (code named Trinity) on July 16, 1945. Since that first detonation, 1,053 nuclear tests have been conducted by the US, most of which were sited underground at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The effects of underground nuclear explosions (UNEs) on their surroundings have long been the object of much interest and study, especially for containment, engineering, and treaty verification purposes. One aspect of these explosion-induced phenomena is the disruption or alteration of the near-surface environment, also known as surface effects. This report was prepared at the request of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), to bring together, correlate, and preserve information and techniques used in the recognition and documentation of surface effects of UNEs. This report has several main sections, including pertinent background information (Section 2.0), descriptions of the different types of surface effects (Section 3.0), discussion of their application and limitations (Section 4.0), an extensive bibliography and glossary (Section 6.0 and Appendix A), and procedures used to document geologic surface effects at the NTS (Appendix C). Because a majority of US surface-effects experience is from the NTS, an overview of pertinent NTS-specific information also is provided in Appendix B. It is not within the scope of this report to explore new relationships among test parameters, physiographic setting, and the types or degree of manifestation of surface effects, but rather to compile, summarize, and capture surface-effects observations and interpretations, as well as documentation procedures and the rationale behind them.

  6. Study of phase transformation of U-2,5Zr-7,5Nb e U-3Zr-9Nb alloys for application in advanced nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pais, Rafael Witter Dias

    2015-01-01

    Metal fuels are relevant in the nuclear area due to the versatility of its use in the nuclear fuel cycle. Among the alloys of uranium investigated with high potential for use in nuclear power reactors, U-Zr-Nb alloys appear as an important alternative because of their superior physico-chemical and metallurgical properties. These alloys have also potential for use in nuclear testing, research and production radioisotopes of high performance nuclear reactors. Therefore, the development of these alloys is strategic since they are planned to be used in national reactors as RMB (Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor) and LABGENE (Electrical Generation Core Laboratory), currently under development in Brazil. In this work it was realized a extensive study in the scope of the manufacturing, heat treatment and phase transformations of U-2,5Zr-7,5Nb (m/m%) and U-3ZR-9NB (m/m%) fuel alloys. Ingots of both alloys were produced employing a specific methodology developed in this study. This methodology comprised the melting process in a vacuum induction furnace at high temperatures (1500 °C) and thermal-mechanical processing to break the as-cast structure. Samples with typical dimensions (17 x 7 x 2.5 mm) free from macrostructural defects were homogenized at 1000 °C in vacuum of 10 -5 torr for 17.5 hours with a 10°C/min cooling rate until to 820 °C and, subsequently, quenched in water. The samples, randomly selected, were subjected to isothermal treatment tests under different conditions of time and temperature. Isothermal treatments for transformation and retention phases were carried out in a special assembly designed for this work. After the tests, the samples were characterized by the usual phase characterization techniques with particular emphasis for the X-ray diffraction technique. In this way, the Rietveld refinement method was applied. In the case of uranium based alloys it is quite challenging due to the lack of data in the literature. In this work a strategy for the

  7. Composition models for the viscosity and chemical durability of West Valley related nuclear waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, X.; Saad, E.E.; Freeborn, W.P.; Macedo, P.B.; Pegg, I.L.; Sassoon, R.E.; Barkatt, A.; Finger, S.M.

    1988-01-01

    There are two important criteria that must be satisfied by a nuclear waste glass durability and processability. The chemical composition of the glass must be such that it does not dissolve or erode appreciably faster than the decay of the radioactive materials embedded in it. The second criterion, processability, means that the glass must melt with ease, must be easily pourable, and must not crystallize appreciably. This paper summarizes the development of simple models for predicting the durability and viscosity of nuclear waste glasses from their composition

  8. Laplace transform method in analysing the effect of amplifier parameter on identification of light charged particles with CsI(Tl) + PD (photodiodes) detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jinchuan; Xi Hongfei; Guo Zhongyan; Zhan Wenlong; Zhu Yongtai; Zhou Jianqun; Liu Guanhua; Su Hong

    1992-01-01

    Laplace transform method is applied to investigate the effect of the choice of amplifier parameter on identification of the light charged particles emitted from 12 C(46.7 MeV/u) + 58 Ni reaction. The significance of application of Laplace transformation method in heavy ion experimental nuclear physics is discussed as well

  9. Digital transformation of nuclear industry, what improvement made in France and abroad?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, L.

    2017-01-01

    In Russia digital technologies have entered nuclear industry since long, they are not only an important tool for reducing costs but also a part of the cost itself as a digital twin of the plant is sold with the plant. This digital plant will be useful for operating the real plant in terms of maintenance and testing the procedures. In the United-States, nuclear energy faces the fierce competition of shale gas and some plant operators foresee to close nuclear stations in a near future but other plant operators think that digital technologies will be a major tool to cut by 30% their operating costs. A feature of the American nuclear industry is the important number of innovative start-ups, the NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Commission) has accepted to be involved as soon as the design phase of projects in order to ease the certification process and shorten schedules. Generally speaking the weight of engineering in the nuclear industry is more than twice as important as in other industries, so the use of digital tools has a more important positive impact in nuclear projects than in other sectors. In France the complete overhaul of nuclear reactors that is imposed by law every 10 years, is already largely based on digital technologies through the use of partial digital twins of the plant. (A.C.)

  10. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solutions

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1999-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solution to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Determination of Uranium 7 Specific Gravity by Pycnometry 15-20 Free Acid by Oxalate Complexation 21-27 Determination of Thorium 28 Determination of Chromium 29 Determination of Molybdenum 30 Halogens Separation by Steam Distillation 31-35 Fluoride by Specific Ion Electrode 36-42 Halogen Distillate Analysis: Chloride, Bromide, and Iodide by Amperometric Microtitrimetry 43 Determination of Chloride and Bromide 44 Determination of Sulfur by X-Ray Fluorescence 45 Sulfate Sulfur by (Photometric) Turbidimetry 46 Phosphorus by the Molybdenum Blue (Photometric) Method 54-61 Silicon by the Molybdenum Blue (Photometric) Method 62-69 Carbon by Persulfate Oxidation-Acid Titrimetry 70 Conversion to U3O8 71-74 Boron by ...

  11. Limits of transforming competence of SV40 nuclear and cytoplasmic large T mutants with altered Rb binding sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedesco, D; Fischer-Fantuzzi, L; Vesco, C

    1993-03-01

    Multiple amino acid substitutions were introduced into the SV40 large T region that harbors the retinoblastoma protein (Rb) binding site and the nuclear transport signal, changing either one or both of these determinants. Mutant activities were examined in a set of assays allowing different levels of transforming potential to be distinguished; phenotypic changes in established and pre-crisis rat embryo fibroblasts (REFs) were detected under isogenic cell conditions, and comparisons made with other established rodent cells. The limit of the transforming ability of mutants with important substitutions in the Rb binding site fell between two transformation levels of the same established rat cells. Such cells could be induced to form dense foci but not agar colonies (their parental pre-crises REFs, as expected, were untransformed either way). Nonetheless, agar colony induction was possible in other cell lines, such as mouse NIH3T3 and (for one of the mutants) rat F2408. All these mutants efficiently immortalized pre-crisis REFs. The transforming ability of cytoplasmic mutants appeared to depend on the integrity of the Rb-binding sequence to approximately the same extent as that of the wild-type large T, although evidence of in vivo Rb-cytoplasmic large T complexes was not found. The presence or absence of small t was critical when the transforming task of mutants was near the limit of their abilities.

  12. Transformation of Sorbitol to Biofuels by Heterogeneous Catalysis: Chemical and Industrial Considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilcocq, L.; Cabiac, A.; Guillon, E.; Especel, C.; Duprez, D.

    2013-01-01

    Decreasing oil supplies and increasing energy demand provide incentives to find alternative fuels. First, the valorisation of edible crops for ethanol and bio-diesel production led to first generation biofuels. Nowadays, research is focused on lignocellulosic biomass as a source of renewable carbon (second generation biofuels). Whereas the cellulosic ethanol production is in progress, a new way consisting of the transformation of ex-lignocellulose sugars and polyols towards light hydrocarbons by heterogeneous catalysis in aqueous phase has been recently described. This process is performed under mild conditions (T < 300 deg. C and P < 50 bar). It requires on one hand hydrogen formation by catalytic reforming of carbohydrates in aqueous phase and on the other hand, the dehydration/hydrogenation of polyols leading to alkanes by selective C-O bond cleavages. The challenge here is to conceive multifunctional catalytic systems that are stable, active and selective under the reaction conditions. The aim of this article is to present the involved reactions, the catalytic systems described in literature for that kind of transformation and examples of industrial applications. (authors)

  13. PREDICTION OF ATMOSPHERIC AIR POLLUTION BY EMISSIONS OF MOTOR TRANSPORT TAKING INTO ACCOUNT THE CHEMICAL TRANSFORMATION OF HARMFUL SUBSTANCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Biliaiev

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Development of 3D numerical models, which allow us to calculate air pollution process from road transport emissions based on chemical transformation of pollutants. Creating numerical models, which would give the opportunity to predict the level of air pollution in urban areas. Methodology. To address the evaluation of the air pollution problem of emissions of vehicles the equations of aerodynamics and mass transfer were used. In order to solve differential equations of aerodynamics and mass transfer the finite difference methods are used. For the numerical integration of the equation for the velocity potential the method of conditional approximation was applied. The equation for the velocity potential written in difference form, is being split into two equations, and at each step of splitting the unknown value of the potential speed is determined by the explicit scheme of running account and the difference scheme itself is implicit. For the numerical integration of the equation of dispersion of emissions in the atmosphere is used implicit alternating-triangular difference splitting scheme. Emissions from the road are simulated by a series of point sources of a given intensity. The developed numerical models are the basis of established software package.Findings. There were developed 3D numerical models, which belong to the class «diagnostic models». These models take into account the main physical factors affecting the process of dispersion of pollutants in the atmosphere when emissions from road transport taking into account the chemical transformation of pollutants. On the basis of the constructed numerical models a computational experiment to assess the level of air pollution in the street was carried out. Originality. Numerical models that allow you to calculate the 3D aerodynamic of wind flow in urban areas and the process of mass transfer of emissions from the road were developed. The models make it possible to account the

  14. Twenty years of development and transformation in exploiting nuclear energy in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khazaneh, R.

    1992-01-01

    Problems concern to exploiting nuclear energy in the world in two decades from 1970-1990 is briefly investigated. Historical prelude of technical evolution of nuclear energy is included to be recognized the relevant events occurred in the seventies. The intention is to give general information to those who have not sufficient time to study deeply in the field

  15. Analysis of chemical factors affecting marine ecosystem around nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Kwan Sik; Choi, Yoon Dong; Chun, Ki Jeong; Kim, Jin Kyu; Jung, Kyeong Chai; Lee, Yeong Keun; Park, Hyo Kook

    1994-06-01

    The ecological data of the coastal area of Youngkwang nuclear power plant from 1987 to 1993 were comprehensively analyzed, and various physical and chemical properties of sea water and sediments were measured. Major factors affecting phytoplankton standing crops were suspended substances, nitrate, and silicate. The contents of iron, chromium, copper, and sulfur in sediments sampled from the discharge channel were slightly higher than those in the other areas. In order to qantify the chemical impacts on marine ecosystem, it is desirable that a systematic survey be made through the whole year cycle to assure the consistency and confidence of the related data. (Author)

  16. Recommendations for sampling for prevention of hazards in civil defense. On analytics of chemical, biological and radioactive contaminations. Brief instruction for the CBRN (chemical, biological, radioactive, nuclear) sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachmann, Udo; Biederbick, Walter; Derakshani, Nahid

    2010-01-01

    The recommendation for sampling for prevention of hazards in civil defense is describing the analytics of chemical, biological and radioactive contaminations and includes detail information on the sampling, protocol preparation and documentation procedures. The volume includes a separate brief instruction for the CBRN (chemical, biological, radioactive, nuclear) sampling.

  17. An Investigation into the Physico-chemical Properties of Transformer Oil Blends with Antioxidants extracted from Turmeric Powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukhi, Veresha; Bissessur, Ajay; Ngila, Catherine Jane; Ijumba, Nelson Mutatina

    2013-07-01

    The blending of transformer oil (used mainly as an insulating oil) with appropriate synthetic antioxidants, such as BHT (2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol) and DBP (2,6-di-tert-butylphenol) have been previously reported. This article is focused on the use of antioxidant extracts from turmeric (Curcuma longa), a natural source. Turmeric is well known for its antimicrobial, antioxidant and anticarcinogenic properties owing to the active nature of its components. Extracts from powdered turmeric were subsequently blended into naphthenic-based uninhibited virgin transformer oil, hereinafter referred to as extract-oil blends (E-OB). Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) of the oil blends revealed that five components extracted from turmeric powder were successfully blended into the oil. Subsequent gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis confirmed the presence of the compounds: curcumene, sesquiphellandrene, ar-turmerone, turmerone and curlone. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of the extract-oil blends, containing various levels of extracts, revealed an average temperature shift of ˜8.21°C in the initial onset of degradation in comparison to virgin non-blended oil. The 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay showed that an increase in the mass aliquot of turmeric extracts in the transformer oil increased the free radical scavenging activity of the oil. Electrical properties of the oil investigated showed that the dissipation factor in the blended oil was found to be lower than that of virgin transformer oil. Evidently, a lower dissipation value renders the oil blend as a superior insulator over normal virgin non-blended oil. This investigation elucidated improved physico-chemical properties of transformer oil blended with turmeric antioxidant extracts.

  18. Climatic Effects of Regional Nuclear War

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oman, Luke D.

    2011-01-01

    We use a modern climate model and new estimates of smoke generated by fires in contemporary cities to calculate the response of the climate system to a regional nuclear war between emerging third world nuclear powers using 100 Hiroshima-size bombs (less than 0.03% of the explosive yield of the current global nuclear arsenal) on cities in the subtropics. We find significant cooling and reductions of precipitation lasting years, which would impact the global food supply. The climate changes are large and longlasting because the fuel loadings in modern cities are quite high and the subtropical solar insolation heats the resulting smoke cloud and lofts it into the high stratosphere, where removal mechanisms are slow. While the climate changes are less dramatic than found in previous "nuclear winter" simulations of a massive nuclear exchange between the superpowers, because less smoke is emitted, the changes seem to be more persistent because of improvements in representing aerosol processes and microphysical/dynamical interactions, including radiative heating effects, in newer global climate system models. The assumptions and calculations that go into these conclusions will be described.

  19. Effects of the fluid flows on enzymatic chemical oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shklyaev, Oleg; Yashin, Victor; Balazs, Anna

    2017-11-01

    Chemical oscillations are ubiquitous in nature and have a variety of promising applications. Usually, oscillating chemical systems are analyzed within the context of a reaction-diffusion framework. Here, we examine how fluid flows carrying the reactants can be utilized to modulate the negative feedback loops and time delays that promote chemical oscillations. We consider a model where a chemical reaction network involves two species, X and Y, which undergo transformations catalyzed by respective enzymes immobilized at the bottom wall of a fluid-filled microchamber. The reactions with the enzymes provide a negative feedback in the chemically oscillating system. In particular, the first enzyme, localized on the first patch, promotes production of chemical X, while the second enzyme, immobilized on the second patch, promotes production of chemical Y, which inhibits the production of chemical X. The separation distance between the enzyme-coated patches sets the time delay required for the transportation of X and Y. The chemical transport is significantly enhanced if convective fluxes accompany the diffusive ones. Therefore, the parameter region where oscillations are present is modified. The findings provide guidance to designing micro-scale chemical reactors with improved functionalities.

  20. The deterrent effect of nuclear forensics: The case of Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil, Laura

    2016-01-01

    A State capable of identifying the origin and history of intercepted nuclear or radioactive material can have a deterrent effect. This is why nuclear forensics — the examination of nuclear and other radioactive material as part of criminal or nuclear security investigations — is an important tool.

  1. Low temperature chemical processing of graphite-clad nuclear fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Robert A.

    2017-10-17

    A reduced-temperature method for treatment of a fuel element is described. The method includes molten salt treatment of a fuel element with a nitrate salt. The nitrate salt can oxidize the outer graphite matrix of a fuel element. The method can also include reduced temperature degradation of the carbide layer of a fuel element and low temperature solubilization of the fuel in a kernel of a fuel element.

  2. Study relating to the physico-chemical behaviour of heavy water in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chenouard, J.; Dirian, G.; Roth, E.; Vignet, P.; Platzer, R.

    1959-01-01

    Chemical and isotope pollution, and radiolytic decomposition are the two most important ways in which heavy water becomes degraded in nuclear reactors. Chemical pollution has led to the creation of ion exchange purification loops specially designed for reactors: the report contains a description in detail of the application of this purification method in CEA research reactors, including the analysis required, results obtained, and their interpretation. The intelligence obtained on radiolytic decomposition with the same facilities is also discussed, as well as the recombination apparatus and control equipment utilized. Finally, investigation to date in the CEA on recombination circuits for power reactors is also discussed. (author) [fr

  3. Diffusion, Thermal Properties and Chemical Compatibilities of Select MAX Phases with Materials For Advanced Nuclear Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barsoum, Michel [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bentzel, Grady [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Tallman, Darin J. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Sindelar, Robert [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Garcia-Diaz, Brenda [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hoffman, Elizabeth [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-04-04

    The demands of Gen IV nuclear power plants for long service life under neutron irradiation at high temperature are severe. Advanced materials that would withstand high temperatures (up to 1000+ ºC) to high doses in a neutron field would be ideal for reactor internal structures and would add to the long service life and reliability of the reactors. The objective of this work is to investigate the chemical compatibility of select MAX with potential materials that are important for nuclear energy, as well as to measure the thermal transport properties as a function of neutron irradiation. The chemical counterparts chosen for this work are: pyrolytic carbon, SiC, U, Pd, FLiBe, Pb-Bi and Na, the latter 3 in the molten state. The thermal conductivities and heat capacities of non-irradiated MAX phases will be measured.

  4. Evidence of Non-local Chemical, Thermal and Gravitational Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu H.

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Quantum entanglement is ubiquitous in the microscopic world and manifests itself macroscopically under some circumstances. But common belief is that it alone cannot be used to transmit information nor could it be used to produce macroscopic non- local effects. Yet we have recently found evidence of non-local effects of chemical substances on the brain produced through it. While our reported results are under independent verifications by other groups, we report here our experimental findings of non-local chemical, thermal and gravitational effects in simple physical systems such as reservoirs of water quantum-entangled with water being manipulated in a remote reservoir. With the aids of high-precision instruments, we have found that the pH value, temperature and gravity of water in the detecting reservoirs can be non-locally affected through manipulating water in the remote reservoir. In particular, the pH value changes in the same direction as that being manipulated; the temperature can change against that of local environment; and the gravity apparently can also change against local gravity. These non-local effects are all reproducible and can be used for non-local signalling and many other purposes. We suggest that they are mediated by quantum entanglement between nuclear and/or electron spins in treated water and discuss the implications of these results.

  5. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade plutonium nitrate solutions

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade plutonium nitrate solutions to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Plutonium by Controlled-Potential Coulometry Plutonium by Amperometric Titration with Iron(II) Plutonium by Diode Array Spectrophotometry Free Acid by Titration in an Oxalate Solution 8 to 15 Free Acid by Iodate Precipitation-Potentiometric Titration Test Method 16 to 22 Uranium by Arsenazo I Spectrophotometric Test Method 23 to 33 Thorium by Thorin Spectrophotometric Test Method 34 to 42 Iron by 1,10-Phenanthroline Spectrophotometric Test Method 43 to 50 Impurities by ICP-AES Chloride by Thiocyanate Spectrophotometric Test Method 51 to 58 Fluoride by Distillation-Spectrophotometric Test Method 59 to 66 Sulfate by Barium Sulfate Turbidimetric Test Method 67 to 74 Isotopic Composition by Mass Spectrom...

  6. Study on the welding continuous cooling transformation and weldability of SA508Gr4 steel for nuclear pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Qingwei; Ma, Yonglin; Xing, Shuqing; Chen, Zhongyi

    2017-01-01

    SA508Gr4 is a newly developed high-strength steel for nuclear reactor pressure vessels. Its welding characteristics remain largely unexplored. In this work, the simulated heat affected zone continuous cooling transformation (SH-CCT) diagram of SA508Gr4 steel was constructed and the high-temperature cooling phase compositions and the properties of the heat affected zone (HAZ) were characterized using dilatometry and microscopic tests. The results show that the phase transformation in the HAZ was divided into bainite and martensite transformation stages. When 4.6 ≤ t_8_/_5 (the HAZ cooling time from 800 C to 500 C) ≤ 15 s, lath-shaped martensite was fully developed, resulting in extensive hardening and cold cracking in the HAZ, while the cooling time required to form the bainite completely exceeds 1 200 s. Thus, to improve weld quality, preheating to 196 C or higher is recommended.

  7. Study on the welding continuous cooling transformation and weldability of SA508Gr4 steel for nuclear pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Qingwei; Ma, Yonglin; Xing, Shuqing; Chen, Zhongyi [Inner Mongolia Univ. of Science and Technology, Baotou (China). School of Material and Metallurgy; Kang, Xiaolan [Baotou Vocational and Technical College (China)

    2017-02-15

    SA508Gr4 is a newly developed high-strength steel for nuclear reactor pressure vessels. Its welding characteristics remain largely unexplored. In this work, the simulated heat affected zone continuous cooling transformation (SH-CCT) diagram of SA508Gr4 steel was constructed and the high-temperature cooling phase compositions and the properties of the heat affected zone (HAZ) were characterized using dilatometry and microscopic tests. The results show that the phase transformation in the HAZ was divided into bainite and martensite transformation stages. When 4.6 ≤ t{sub 8/5} (the HAZ cooling time from 800 C to 500 C) ≤ 15 s, lath-shaped martensite was fully developed, resulting in extensive hardening and cold cracking in the HAZ, while the cooling time required to form the bainite completely exceeds 1 200 s. Thus, to improve weld quality, preheating to 196 C or higher is recommended.

  8. Regulation of chemical safety at fuel cycle facilities by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsey, Kevin M.

    2013-01-01

    When the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) was established in 1975, its regulations were based on radiation dose limits. Chemical hazards rarely influenced NRC regulations. After the Three Mile Island reactor accident in 1979, the NRC staff was directed to address emergency planning at non-reactor facilities. Several fuel cycle facilities were ordered to submit emergency plans consistent with reactor emergency plans because no other guidance was available. NRC published a notice that it was writing regulations to codify the requirements in the Orders and upgrade the emergency plans to address all hazards, including chemical hazards. The legal authority of NRC to regulate chemical safety was questioned. In 1986, an overfilled uranium hexafluoride cylinder ruptured and killed a worker. The NRC staff was directed to address emergency planning for hazardous chemicals in its regulations. The final rule included a requirement for fuel cycle facilities to certify compliance with legislation requiring local authorities to establish emergency plans for hazardous chemicals. As with emergency planning, NRC's authority to regulate chemical safety during routine operations was limited. NRC established memoranda of understanding (MOUs) with other regulatory agencies to encourage exchange of information between the agencies regarding occupational hazards. In 2000, NRC published new, performance-based, regulations for fuel cycle facilities. The new regulations required an integrated safety analysis (ISA) which used quantitative standards to assess chemical exposures. Some unique chemical exposure cases were addressed while implementing the new regulations. In addition, some gaps remain in the regulation of hazardous chemicals at fuel cycle facilities. The status of ongoing efforts to improve regulation of chemical safety at fuel cycle facilities is discussed. (authors)

  9. Effects of scalp dermatitis on chemical property of hair keratin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung Sook; Shin, Min Kyung; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2013-05-01

    The effects of scalp dermatitis (seborrheic dermatitis (SD), psoriasis, and atopic dermatitis (AD)) on chemical properties of hair keratin were investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Hairs were collected from lesional regions affected by SD, psoriasis, and AD and non-lesional regions separately. The hairs with SD were taken from patients with ages of 16-80 years. The ages of patients with psoriasis ranged from 8 to 67 years, and all patients exhibited moderate disease. Hairs with AD were taken from the patients with ages of 24-45 years and the average SCORing atopic dermatitis (SCORAD) was 48.75. Hairs from 20 normal adults were collected as a control. The FT-IR absorbance bands were analyzed by the Gaussian model to obtain the center frequency, half width, height, and area of each band. The height and area of all bands in the spectra were normalized to the amide I centered at 1652 cm-1 to quantitatively analyze the chemical composition of keratin. The spectra of hair with scalp dermatitis were different with that of control, the amide A components centered at 3278 cm-1 were smaller than those of the control. The psoriasis hair showed a large difference in the IR absorbance band between lesional and non-lesional hairs indicating good agreement with the morphological changes. The hairs with diseases did not show differences in the content of cystine, which was centered at 1054 cm-1, from the control. The chemical properties of keratin were not significantly different between the hairs affected by SD, psoriasis, and AD. However, the changes induced by scalp dermatitis were different with weathering. Therefore, FT-IR analysis could be used to screen differences between the physiological and pathological conditions of scalp hair.

  10. Nuclear security in a transformed world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottfried, K.; Dean, J.

    1991-01-01

    In the wake of the failed coup attempt in the Soviet Union, the world stands hopeful that a new era of international peace and cooperation lies ahead. President Bush's unilateral reductions in tactical nuclear weapons and in the alert levels of US forces, coupled with President Gorbachev's largely reciprocal actions, are important steps toward realizing that hope. While bold in the context of recent arms control history, however, these actions are modest in the face of the current enormous opportunity and the shifting threats the world now faces. Even with these welcome unilateral actions, the likely continued presence of thousands of nuclear weapons throughout many of the Soviet republics, the temporary uncertainty over central government command during the coup, and fuller knowledge of Iraq's aggressive efforts to build a nuclear bomb serve as stark reminders that the danger of nuclear catastrophe has not disappeared. Although a deliberate attack by the Soviet Union against the US or Europe is now almost inconceivable, nuclear weapons continue to pose significant threats to US security and world peace. These threats fall into three broad categories: a persistent risk of regional nuclear war involving countries other than the Soviet Union that are already in possession of nuclear weapons or capable of building them; the spread of nuclear weapons to other countries; accidental or unauthorized use. To meet this new challenge, three key steps must be taken: reduce dramatically Soviet and US nuclear arsenals; negotiate restrictions on the arsenals of other nuclear powers; strengthen the nuclear nonproliferation regime

  11. What transformations in the international system are prerequisites for the complete elimination of nuclear weapons?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, M.

    1993-01-01

    Pointing out that the task presented to the panel is to explore how and when the world might cross the threshold to the post-nuclear-weapon age, the author deals with the topic by first stating several basic assumptions which help frame the discussion in general terms; then constructing a model of a phased approach for dealing practically with nuclear weapons during the next several decades; and finally identifying changes needed in the international system if a program of nuclear disarmament is to have any chance of success over the long term

  12. Modeling mechanical effects on promotion and retardation of martensitic transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maalekian, Mehran, E-mail: mehran.maalekian@ubc.ca [Department of Materials Engineering, University of British Columbia, 309-6350 Stores Road, Vancouver, B.C. V61Z4 (Canada); Kozeschnik, Ernst [Christian Doppler Laboratory for ' Early Stages of Precipitation' , Institute of Materials Science and Technology, Vienna University of Technology (Austria)

    2011-01-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Compressive elastic stresses up to 250 MPa are applied in continuous cooling. {yields} Using the thermodynamic data and maximum value of the mechanical driving force the predicted increase in M{sub s} ({approx}0.1 K/MPa) is in agreement with experiment {yields} Austenite was deformed plastically at different temperatures (800 deg. C-1100 deg. C). {yields} High deformation temperature (i.e. 1100 deg. C) as well as low plastic strain (i.e. {epsilon}{sub ave} {approx} 30%) do not affect martensite transformation noticeably, whereas lower deformation temperature (e.g. 900 deg. C) and large plastic strain (i.e. {epsilon}{sub ave} {approx} 70%) retards martensite transformation. {yields} The theory of mechanical stabilization predicts the depression of M{sub s}. - Abstract: The influence of compressive stress and prior plastic deformation of austenite on the martensite transformation in a eutectoid steel is studied both experimentally and theoretically. It is demonstrated that martensite formation is assisted by stress but it is retarded when transformation occurs from deformed austenite. With the quantitative modeling of the problem based on the theory of displacive shear transformation, the explanation of the two opposite roles of mechanical treatment prior to or simultaneously to martensite transformation is presented.

  13. Some nuclear chemical aspects of medical generator nuclide production at the Los Alamos hot cell facility

    CERN Document Server

    Fassbender, M; Heaton, R C; Jamriska, D J; Kitten, J J; Nortier, F M; Peterson, E J; Phillips, D R; Pitt, L R; Salazar, L L; Valdez, F O; 10.1524/ract.92.4.237.35596

    2004-01-01

    Generator nuclides constitute a convenient tool for applications in nuclear medicine. In this paper, some radiochemical aspects of generator nuclide parents regularly processed at Los Alamos are introduced. The bulk production of the parent nuclides /sup 68/Ge, /sup 82/Sr, /sup 109/Cd and /sup 88/Zr using charged particle beams is discussed. Production nuclear reactions for these radioisotopes, and chemical separation procedures are presented. Experimental processing yields correspond to 80%-98% of the theoretical thick target yield. Reaction cross sections are modeled using the code ALICE-IPPE; it is observed that the model largely disagrees with experimental values for the nuclear processes treated. Radionuclide production batches are prepared 1-6 times yearly for sales. Batch activities range from 40MBq to 75 GBq.

  14. Some nuclear chemical aspects of medical generator nuclide production at the Los Alamos hot cell facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fassbender, M.; Nortier, F.M.; Phillips, D.R.; Hamilton, V.T.; Heaton, R.C.; Jamriska, D.J.; Kitten, J.J.; Pitt, L.R.; Salazar, L.L.; Valdez, F.O.; Peterson, E.J.

    2004-01-01

    Generator nuclides constitute a convenient tool for applications in nuclear medicine. In this paper, some radiochemical aspects of generator nuclide parents regularly processed at Los Alamos are introduced. The bulk production of the parent nuclides 68 Ge, 82 Sr, 109 Cd and 88 Zr using charged particle beams is discussed. Production nuclear reactions for these radioisotopes, and chemical separation procedures are presented. Experimental processing yields correspond to 80%-98% of the theoretical thick target yield. Reaction cross sections are modeled using the code ALICE-IPPE; it is observed that the model largely disagrees with experimental values for the nuclear processes treated. Radionuclide production batches are prepared 1-6 times yearly for sales. Batch activities range from 40 MBq to 75 GBq. (orig.)

  15. Corrosion surveillance of the chemical decontamination process in Kuosheng nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.H.

    2002-01-01

    The Piping Recirculation System (RRS) and reactor water clean-up system (RWCU) of Kuosheng Nuclear Power Plant of Taiwan Power Company were decontaminated by CORD process of Framatome ANP GmbH during the outage at October 2001. This is the first time that CORD process was adopted and applied in Taiwan Nuclear Power Plant. To verify minor corrosion damage and correct process control, the material corrosion condition was monitored during all the stages of the chemical decontamination work. Three kinds of specimen were adopted in this corrosion monitoring, including corrosion coupons for weight loss measurements, electrochemical specimens for on-line corrosion monitoring, and WOL specimens (wedge opening loaded) for stress corrosion evaluation. The measured metal losses from nine coupon materials did not reveal any unexpected or intolerable high corrosion damage from the CORD UV or CORD CS processes. The coupon materials included type 304 stainless steel (SS) with sensitized and as-received thermal history, type 308 weld filler, type CF8 cast SS, nickel base alloy 182 weld filler, Inconel 600, Stellite 6 hard facing alloy, NOREM low cobalt hard facing alloy, and A106B carbon steel (CS). The electrochemical noise (ECN) measurements from three-electrode electrochemical probe precisely depicted the metal corrosion variation with the decontamination process change. Most interestingly, the estimated trend of accumulated metal loss is perfectly corresponding to the total removed activities. The ECN measurements were also used for examining the effect of different SS oxide films pre-formed in NWC and HWC on the decontamination efficiency, and for evaluating the galvanic effect of CS with SS. The existing cracks did not propagate further during the decontamination. The average decontamination factors achieved were 50.8 and 4.2 respectively for RRS and RWCU. (authors)

  16. Detection of a nuclear, EBNA-type antigen in apparently EBNA-negative Herpesvirus papio (HVP)-transformed lymphoid lines by the acid-fixed nuclear binding technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, S; Luka, J; Falk, L; Klein, G

    1977-12-15

    In agreement with the findings of previous authors, we could not detect a virally determined nuclear antigen in Herpesvirus papio (HVP)-transformed baboon lymphoid lines by anticomplementary staining in situ, as for EBNA. However, by means of our recently developed acid-fixed nuclear binding technique an EBNA-like antigen could be readily demonstrated, after extraction from both producer and non-producer lines. We propose to designate the antigen as HUPNA. It can be detected by a human anti-EBNA antibody, suggesting cross-reactivity, if not identity, between EBNA and HUPNA. HVP-DNA carrying non-producer lines, negative for in situ ACIF stainability but capable of yielding HUPNA by the nuclear binding technique, can be superinfected with EBV, with brilliant EBNA expression as the result, suggesting that the defective in situ staining is a property associated with the baboon HVP, rather than the baboon lymphoid cell per se.

  17. Radiation effects in nuclear materials: Role of nuclear and electronic energy losses and their synergy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomé, Lionel [Centre de Spectrométrie Nucléaire et de Spectrométrie de Masse, CNRS-IN2P3-Université Paris-Sud; Debelle, Aurelien [Universite Paris Sud, Orsay, France; Garrido, Frederico [Universite Paris Sud, Orsay, France; Mylonas, Stamatis [Universite Paris Sud, Orsay, France; Décamps, B. [Universite Paris Sud, Orsay, France; Bachelet, C. [Universite Paris Sud, Orsay, France; Sattonnay, G. [LEMHE/ICMMO, Université Paris-Sud, Bât. Orsay, France; Moll, Sandra [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Centre de Saclay, Gif sur Yvette; Pellegrino, S. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA); Miro, S. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA); Trocellier, P. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA); Serruys, Y. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA); Velisa, G. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA); Grygiel, C. [CNRS, France; Monnet, I. [CIMAP, CEA-CNRS-Université de Caen, France; Toulemonde, Marcel [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS)-ENSICAE; Simon, P. [CEMHTI, CNRS, France; Jagielski, Jacek [Institute for Electronic Materials Technology; Jozwik-Biala, Iwona [Institute for Electronic Materials Technology; Nowicki, Lech [Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Swierk, Poland; Behar, M. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre,; Weber, William J [ORNL; Zhang, Yanwen [ORNL; Backman, Marie [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Nordlund, Kai [University of Helsinki; Djurabekova, Flyura [University of Helsinki

    2013-01-01

    Ceramic oxides and carbides are promising matrices for the immobilization and/or transmutation of nuclear wastes, cladding materials for gas-cooled fission reactors and structural components for fusion reactors. For these applications there is a need of fundamental data concerning the behavior of nuclear ceramics upon irradiation. This article is focused on the presentation of a few remarkable examples regarding ion-beam modifications of nuclear ceramics with an emphasis on the mechanisms leading to damage creation and phase transformations. Results obtained by combining advanced techniques (Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and channeling, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy) concern irradiations in a broad energy range (from keV to GeV) with the aim of exploring both nuclear collision (Sn) and electronic excitation (Se) regimes. Finally, the daunting challenge of the demonstration of the existence of synergistic effects between Sn and Se is tackled by discussing the healing due to intense electronic energy deposition (SHIBIEC) and by reporting results recently obtained in dual-beam irradiation (DBI) experiments.

  18. Effect of isochronal annealing on phase transformation studies of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The mixed phase sample shows higher value of magnetization because of the presence of ferromagnetic γ-Fe2O3 ... 1. Introduction. The study of particle size, phase transformation and micros- ..... The results are in qualitative agreement with ...

  19. Development and validation of a tokamak skin effect transformer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, J.A.; Moret, J.-M.; Coda, S.; Felici, F.; Garrido, I.

    2012-01-01

    A lumped parameter, state space model for a tokamak transformer including the slow flux penetration in the plasma (skin effect transformer model) is presented. The model does not require detailed or explicit information about plasma profiles or geometry. Instead, this information is lumped in system variables, parameters and inputs. The model has an exact mathematical structure built from energy and flux conservation theorems, predicting the evolution and non-linear interaction of plasma current and internal inductance as functions of the primary coil currents, plasma resistance, non-inductive current drive and the loop voltage at a specific location inside the plasma (equilibrium loop voltage). Loop voltage profile in the plasma is substituted by a three-point discretization, and ordinary differential equations are used to predict the equilibrium loop voltage as a function of the boundary and resistive loop voltages. This provides a model for equilibrium loop voltage evolution, which is reminiscent of the skin effect. The order and parameters of this differential equation are determined empirically using system identification techniques. Fast plasma current modulation experiments with random binary signals have been conducted in the TCV tokamak to generate the required data for the analysis. Plasma current was modulated under ohmic conditions between 200 and 300 kA with 30 ms rise time, several times faster than its time constant L/R ≈ 200 ms. A second-order linear differential equation for equilibrium loop voltage is sufficient to describe the plasma current and internal inductance modulation with 70% and 38% fit parameters, respectively. The model explains the most salient features of the plasma current transients, such as the inverse correlation between plasma current ramp rates and internal inductance changes, without requiring detailed or explicit information about resistivity profiles. This proves that a lumped parameter modelling approach can be used to

  20. Chemical analysis by nuclear methods. v. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfassi, Z.B.

    1998-01-01

    'Chemical analysis by Nuclear Methods' is an effort of some renowned authors in field of nuclear chemistry and radiochemistry which is compiled by Alfassi, Z.B. and translated into Farsi version collected in two volumes. The second volume consists of the following chapters: Detecting ion recoil scattering and elastic scattering are dealt in the eleventh chapter, the twelfth chapter is devoted to nuclear reaction analysis using charged particles, X-ray emission is discussed at thirteenth chapter, the fourteenth chapter is about using ion microprobes, X-ray fluorescence analysis is discussed in the fifteenth chapter, alpha, beta and gamma ray scattering in chemical analysis are dealt in chapter sixteen, Moessbauer spectroscopy and positron annihilation are discussed in chapter seventeen and eighteen; The last two chapters are about isotope dilution analysis and radioimmunoassay

  1. The effects of nuclear war. 2. rev. enl. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodejohann, J.

    1982-01-01

    Possible and probable effects of a nuclear war in Europe are described on the basis of a study by the Office of Technology Assessment, US Kongress ('The effects of nuclear war', Wash. D.C. 1979). (HP) [de

  2. Effect of the Fukushima nuclear disaster on global public acceptance of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Younghwan; Kim, Minki; Kim, Wonjoon

    2013-01-01

    The Fukushima nuclear disaster has significantly changed public attitudes toward nuclear energy. It is important to understand how this change has occurred in different countries before the global community revises existing nuclear policies. This study examines the effect of the Fukushima disaster on public acceptance of nuclear energy in 42 countries. We find that the operational experience of nuclear power generation which has significantly affected positive public opinion about nuclear energy became considerably negative after the disaster, suggesting fundamental changes in public acceptance regardless of the level of acceptance before the disaster. In addition, contrary to our expectation, the proportion of nuclear power generation is positively and significantly related to public acceptance of nuclear energy after the Fukushima accident and government pressure on media content led to a greater decrease in the level of public acceptance after the accident. Nuclear energy policymakers should consider the varied factors affecting public acceptance of nuclear energy in each country depending on its historical, environmental, and geographical circumstances before they revise nuclear policy in response to the Fukushima accident. - Highlights: • Fukushima accident has negatively changed public attitudes toward nuclear energy. • Effect of operational experience became considerably negative after the accident. • Effect of proportion of nuclear power generation is positive after the accident. • Effect of government pressure on media content became negative after the accident. • Country specific policy responses on nuclear public acceptance are required

  3. Short-circuit tests of 1650 and 96 MVA transformers for 1300 MW french nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mailhot, M.

    1989-01-01

    Power evacuation and feeding of the auxiliaries directly from the 400 kV grid are sensitive points governing the security of 1300 MW PWR Nuclear Power Plants of the French Program. These two different functions are provided by two specific types of transformers. - Banks of 3 single-phase 550 MVA - 400 kV/20 kV transformers. - Three-phase 96 MVA - 400 kV / 3 x 6.8 kV transformers. These passive elements must have a never failing reliability and assure a continuous service in spite of electric, thermal and mechanical stresses that may occur during the lifetime of the power plant. Dielectric and thermal tests carried out in the manufacturers test floors insure these stresses withstand capabilities of transformers. In France, high short-circuit power for the 400 kV network added to often low impedance voltages for transformers impose on them very high stresses during short-circuits. Calculation and experimentation on scale or partial models are not sufficient to insure short-circuit currents withstand capabilities of transformers. The margin of uncertainty dependent on obligatory extrapolations for this kind of complex systems [steel, magnetic sheets, copper, oil, paper and transformerboard] can be reduced in a significant way only by real scale tests on prototypes. These tests that need both high power and voltage cannot be performed in manufacturers test floors. So, in France they are carried out at the EDF Les Renardieres Laboratory. Following paper deals with SHELL TYPE TRANSFORMERS which, particularly thanks to their interleaved rectangular windings display a great resistance to short-circuit stresses

  4. Air pollutant concentrations near three Texas roadways, part II: Chemical characterization and transformation of pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Andrea L.; Jia, Yuling; Denbleyker, Allison; McDonald-Buller, Elena; Fraser, Matthew P.; Allen, David T.; Collins, Donald R.; Michel, Edward; Pudota, Jayanth; Sullivan, David; Zhu, Yifang

    Spatial gradients of vehicular emitted air pollutants were measured in the vicinity of three roadways in the Austin, Texas area: (1) State Highway 71 (SH-71), a heavily traveled arterial highway dominated by passenger vehicles; (2) Interstate 35 (I-35), a limited access highway north of Austin in Georgetown; and (3) Farm to Market Road 973 (FM-973), a heavily traveled surface roadway with significant truck traffic. A mobile monitoring platform was used to characterize the gradients of CO and NO x concentrations with increased distance from each roadway, while concentrations of carbonyls in the gas-phase and fine particulate matter mass and composition were measured at stationary sites upwind and at one (I-35 and FM-973) or two (SH-71) downwind sites. Regardless of roadway type or wind direction, concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), and oxides of nitrogen (NO x) returned to background levels within a few hundred meters of the roadway. Under perpendicular wind conditions, CO, NO and NO x concentrations decreased exponentially with increasing distance perpendicular to the roadways. The decay rate for NO was more than a factor of two greater than for CO, and it comprised a larger fraction of NO x closer to the roadways than further downwind suggesting the potential significance of near roadway chemical processing as well as atmospheric dilution. Concentrations of most carbonyl species decreased with distance downwind of SH-71. However, concentrations of acetaldehyde and acrolein increased farther downwind of SH-71, suggesting chemical generation from the oxidation of primary vehicular emissions. The behavior of particle-bound organic species was complex and further investigation of the size-segregated chemical composition of particulate matter (PM) at increasing downwind distances from roadways is warranted. Fine particulate matter (PM 2.5) mass concentrations, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), hopanes, and elemental carbon (EC

  5. Radiation chemical transformations of some polyarylates by γ-radiation in vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyashevich, V.V.; Korshak, V.V.; Rodeh, V.V.; Timofeeva, G.I.

    1976-01-01

    A study was made of ageing by radiation of F-2 and D-9 polyarylates using γ-radiation in vacuum. Their high resistance to radiation was indicated. It was found that γ-radiation on polymers caused competing reactions to take place resulting in macromolecular breakdown and structure formation, which in the end produced threedimensional network formation. The initial formation of gel fractions was preceded by the formation of branched macromolecules. The radiation resistance of polyarylates depends on the type of lateral substituent at the central carbon atom of the initial bis-phenol and increases in the presence of a fluorene ring in the lateral chain. The radiation resistance of a lactone ring is lower than that of an ether bond of the main chain. It was shown that 0-hydroxy-ketone structures were formed in the polyarylates examined as a result of regrouping due to radiation. A basic system is proposed for chemical conversion of polyarylates by radiation

  6. Chemical and photochemical degradation of chlorantraniliprole and characterization of its transformation products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavtižar, Vesna; van Gestel, Cornelis A M; Dolenc, Darko; Trebše, Polonca

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed at assessing the photodegradation of the insecticide chlorantraniliprole (CAP) in deionized water and in tap water amended with humic acids and nitrate. Photolysis was carried out under simulated solar or UV-A light. CAP (39 μM) photodegradation was slightly faster in tap water than in deionized water with half lives of 4.1 and 5.1 days, respectively. Photodegradation rate of CAP was hardly affected by humic acids (up to 100 mg L(-1)) and nitrate. Photodegradation pattern was different in slightly acidic (pH=6.1) deionized water compared to basic (pH=8.0) tap water. Four main degradation products have been isolated and characterized spectroscopically, and crystal structure was recorded for the first two photodegradation products. CAP also degraded in the dark controls, but only at basic pH (23% loss at pH 8.0 in tap water after 6 days), resulting in the formation of one single degradation product. Our study shows that the degradation of chlorantraniliprole in water is a combination of chemical and photochemical reactions, which are highly dependent on the pH of the solution. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Oncogenic transformation with radiation and chemicals: review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, E.J.; Hei, T.K.

    1985-01-01

    Quantitative in vitro assay systems for oncogenic transformation are a powerful research tool. They may be based on short-term cultures of hamster embryo cells, or established cell lines of mouse origin. While X-ray-induced transformation of human cells has been demonstrated, it has proved difficult to develop quantitative assay systems based on cells of human origin. The presently available quantitative assays have two quite distinct basic uses. First, they may be useful to accumulate data which is essentially pragmatic in nature. For example, they may be used to compare and contrast the oncogenic potential of chemotherapeutic agents or hypoxic cell sensitizers used or proposed in the clinic. They may be used to identify compounds that inhibit or suppress the transformation incidence resulting from known oncogenic agents, or they may be used to demonstrate the interaction between two different agents, such as radiation and asbestos. Second, they may prove to be invaluable in the study of the basic mechanisms of carcinogenesis, inasmuch as they represent models of tumourigenesis in which the various steps can be manipulated and modified more readily and in a controlled way. (author)

  8. Anaerobic Transformation of Chlorinated Aliphatic Hydrocarbons in a Sand Aquifer Based on Spatial Chemical Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semprini, Lewis; Kitanidis, Peter K.; Kampbell, Don H.; Wilson, John T.

    1995-04-01

    We estimated the distribution of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) from groundwater samples collected along three transects in a sand aquifer. Trichloroethylene (TCE) leaked and contaminated the aquifer probably more than a decade before we collected the measurements. The data show significant concentrations of TCE, cis-l,2-dichloroethylene (c-DCE), vinyl chloride (VC), and ethene. We attributed DCE, VC, and ethene to the reductive dehalogenation of TCE. The CAH concentrations varied significantly with depth and correlate with sulfate and methane concentrations. Anoxic aquifer conditions exist with methane present at relatively high concentrations at depth. High concentrations of TCE correspond with the absence of methane or low methane concentrations, whereas products of TCE dehalogenation are associated with higher methane concentrations and low sulfate concentrations. Indications are that the dechlorination of TCE and DCE to VC and ethene is associated with sulfate reduction and active methanogenesis. TCE dechlorination to DCE is likely occurring under the less reducing conditions of sulfate reduction, with further reductions to VC and ethene occurring under methanogenic conditions. We estimated that about 20% of TCE has dechlorinated to ethene. The analysis of the data enhanced our knowledge of natural in situ transformation and transport processes of CAHs.

  9. Chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The standard covers analytical procedures to determine compliance of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solution to specifications. The following methods are described in detail: uranium by ferrous sulfate reduction-potassium dichromate titrimetry and by ignition gravimetry; specific gravity by pycnometry; free acid by oxalate complexation; thorium by the Arsenazo(III) (photometric) method; chromium by the diphenylcarbazide (photometric) method; molybdenum by the thiocyanate (photometric) method; halogens separation by steam distillation; fluorine by specific ion electrode; halogen distillate analysis: chloride, bromide and iodide by amperometric microtitrimetry; bromine by the fluorescein (photometric) method; sulfate sulfur by (photometric) turbidimetry; phosphorus by the molybdenum blue (photometric) method; silicon by the molybdenum blue (photometric) method; carbon by persulfate oxidation-acid titrimetry; nonvolatile impurities by spectrography; volatile impurities by rotating-disk spark spectrography; boron by emission spectrography; impurity elements by spark source mass spectrography; isotopic composition by multiple filament surface-ionization mass spectrometry; uranium-232 by alpha spectrometry; total alpha activity by direct alpha counting; fission product activity by beta and gamma counting; entrained organic matter by infrared spectrophotometry

  10. An integrated multi-label classifier with chemical-chemical interactions for prediction of chemical toxicity effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Chen, Lei; Pan, Xiaoyong

    2018-05-31

    Chemical toxicity effect is one of the major reasons for declining candidate drugs. Detecting the toxicity effects of all chemicals can accelerate the procedures of drug discovery. However, it is time-consuming and expensive to identify the toxicity effects of a given chemical through traditional experiments. Designing quick, reliable and non-animal-involved computational methods is an alternative way. In this study, a novel integrated multi-label classifier was proposed. First, based on five types of chemical-chemical interactions retrieved from STITCH, each of which is derived from one aspect of chemicals, five individual classifiers were built. Then, several integrated classifiers were built by integrating some or all individual classifiers. By testing the integrated classifiers on a dataset with chemicals and their toxicity effects in Accelrys Toxicity database and non-toxic chemicals with their performance evaluated by jackknife test, an optimal integrated classifier was selected as the proposed classifier, which provided quite high prediction accuracies and wide applications. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  11. Immune effects of respiratory exposure to fragrance chemicals

    OpenAIRE

    Ezendam J; Klerk A de; Cassee FR; Fokkens PHB; Park MVDZ; Loveren H van; Jong WH de; GBO

    2007-01-01

    Inhalation of the fragrance chemicals, isoeugenol and cinnamal, by mice resulted in immune reactions in the respiratory tract. This was observed in experiments performed by the RIVM (National Institute for Public Health and the Enviroment) of which results indicate that inhalation of some fragrance chemicals could induce unwanted effects on the immune system. Fragrance chemicals are common ingredients in such consumer products as cosmetics and scented products. Several fragrance chemicals are...

  12. Chemical and nuclear properties of lawrencium (element 103) and hahnium (element 105)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    The chemical and nuclear properties of Lr and Ha have been studied, using 3-minute 260 Lr and 35-second 262 Ha. The crystal ionic radius of Lr 3+ was determined by comparing its elution position from a cation-exchange resin column with those of lanthanide elements having known ionic radii. Comparisons are made to the ionic radii of the heavy actinides, Am 3+ through Es 3+ , obtained by x-ray diffraction methods, and to Md 3+ and Fm 3+ which were determined in the same manner as Lr 3+ . The hydration enthalpy of -3622 kJ/mol was calculated from the crystal ionic radius using an empirical form of the Born equation. Comparisons to the spacings between the ionic radii of the heaviest members of the lanthanide series show that the 2Z spacing between Lr 3+ and Md 3+ is anomalously small, as the ionic radius of Lr 3+ of 0.0886 nm is significantly smaller than had been expected. The chemical properties of Ha were determined relative to the lighter homologs in group 5, Nb and Ta. Group 4 and group 5 tracer activities, as well as Ha, were absorbed onto glass surfaces as a first step toward the determination of the chemical properties of Ha. Ha was found to adsorb on surfaces, a chemical property unique to the group 5 elements, and as such demonstrates that Ha has the chemical properties of a group 5 element. A solvent extraction procedure was adapted for use as a micro-scale chemical procedure to examine whether or not Ha displays eka-Ta-like chemical under conditions where Ta will be extracted into the organic phase and Nb will not. Under the conditions of this experiment Ha did not extract, and does not show eka-Ta-like chemical properties

  13. Chemical mining of primary copper ores by use of nuclear technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, A E [Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1970-05-15

    Chemical mining of primary copper ores, with nuclear explosives to break the ore and in-situ hydrostatic pressure to accelerate dissolution of primary ore minerals, may be feasible. A contained nuclear explosion well below the water table would be used to provide a mass of broken ore in a flooded 'chimney'. The hydrostatic pressure in the chimney should increase the solubility of oxygen in a water-sulfuric acid system enough to allow primary copper minerals such as chalcopyrite and bornite to be dissolved in an acceptably short time. Circulation and collection would be accomplished through drill holes. This method should be especially applicable to the deep portions of porphyry copper deposits that are not economical to mine by present techniques. (author)

  14. Scientific and technical conference. Problems and horizons of development of chemical and radiochemical control in nuclear energetics. Collection of summaries of reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    During scientific and technical conference on problems of development of chemical and radiochemical control in nuclear energetics following themes were considered: the problems of methodological and instrumental assurance of chemical and radiochemical control at working nuclear power plants and nuclear energetic units; modern conceptions of automation systems construction of chemical and radiochemical control on the basis of intellectual measuring channels; the ways of decision of generally system problems of organization and management of chemical and radiochemical control using computed technologies; the problems of certification of chemical and radiochemical methods of measuring in nuclear energetics [ru

  15. Two-dimensional electrophoretic analysis of transformation-sensitive polypeptides during chemically, spontaneously, and oncogene-induced transformation of rat liver epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wirth, P J; Luo, L D; Fujimoto, Y

    1992-01-01

    ; AFB), spontaneously, and oncogene (v-Ha-ras, v-raf, and v-myc/v-raf)-induced transformation of RLE cells. Two-dimensional mapping of [35S]methionine-labeled whole cell lysate, cell-free in vitro translation products and [32P]orthophosphate-labeled polypeptides revealed subsets of polypeptides specific...... for each transformation modality. A search of the RLE protein database indicated the specific subcellular location for the majority of these transformation-sensitive proteins. Significant alterations in the expression of the extracellular matrix protein, fibronectin, as well as tropomyosin......- and intermediate filament-related polypeptides (vimentin, beta-tubulin, the cytokeratins, and actin) were observed among the various transformant cell lines. Immunoprecipitation and Western immunoblot analysis of tropomyosin expression in four individual AFB-, as well as four spontaneously induced, and each...

  16. Probing atomic scale transformation of fossil dental enamel using Fourier transform infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: a case study from the Tugen Hills (Rift Gregory, Kenya).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Haohao; Balan, Etienne; Gervais, Christel; Ségalen, Loïc; Roche, Damien; Person, Alain; Fayon, Franck; Morin, Guillaume; Babonneau, Florence

    2014-09-01

    A series of fossil tooth enamel samples was investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, (13)C and (19)F magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Tooth remains were collected in Mio-Pliocene deposits of the Tugen Hills in Kenya. Significant transformations were observed in fossil enamel as a function of increasing fluorine content (up to 2.8wt.%). FTIR spectroscopy revealed a shift of the ν1 PO4 stretching band to higher frequency. The ν2 CO3 vibrational band showed a decrease in the intensity of the primary B-type carbonate signal, which was replaced by a specific band at 864cm(-1). This last band was ascribed to a specific carbonate environment in which the carbonate group is closely associated to a fluoride ion. The occurrence of this carbonate defect was consistently attested by the observation of two different fluoride signals in the (19)F NMR spectra. One main signal, at ∼-100ppm, is related to structural F ions in the apatite channel and the other, at -88ppm, corresponds to the composite defect. These spectroscopic observations can be understood as resulting from the mixture of two phases: biogenic hydroxylapatite (bioapatite) and secondary fluorapatite. SEM observations of the most altered sample confirmed the extensive replacement of the bioapatite by fluorapatite, resulting from the dissolution of the primary bioapatite followed by the precipitation of carbonate-fluorapatite. The ν2 CO3 IR bands can be efficiently used to monitor the extent of this type of bioapatite transformation during fossilization. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Insight into the Effects of Reinforcement Shape on Achieving Continuous Martensite Transformation in Phase Transforming Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xudong; Ren, Junqiang; Wang, Xiaofei; Zong, Hongxiang; Cui, Lishan; Ding, Xiangdong

    2017-12-01

    A continuous martensite transformation is indispensable for achieving large linear superelasticity and low modulus in phase transforming metal-based composites. However, determining how to accurately condition the residual martensite in a shape memory alloy matrix though the reinforcement shape to achieve continuous martensite transformation has been a challenge. Here, we take the finite element method to perform a comparative study of the effects of nanoinclusion shape on the interaction and martensite phase transformation in this new composite. Two typical samples are compared: one reinforced by metallic nanowires and the other by nanoparticles. We find that the residual martensite within the shape memory alloy matrix after a pretreatment can be tailored by the reinforcement shape. In particular, our results show that the shape memory alloy matrix can retain enough residual martensite phases to achieve continuous martensite transformation in the subsequent loading when the aspect ratio of nanoreinforcement is larger than 20. In contrast, the composites reinforced with spherical or low aspect ratio reinforcement show a typical nonlinear superelasticity as a result of a low stress transfer-induced discontinuous martensite transformation within the shape memory alloy matrix.

  18. Laboratory and Field Testing of Commercially Available Detectors for the Identification of Chemicals of Interest in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle for the Detection of Undeclared Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carla Miller; Mary Adamic; Stacey Barker; Barry Siskind; Joe Brady; Warren Stern; Heidi Smartt; Mike McDaniel; Mike Stern; Rollin Lakis

    2014-07-01

    Traditionally, IAEA inspectors have focused on the detection of nuclear indicators as part of infield inspection activities. The ability to rapidly detect and identify chemical as well as nuclear signatures can increase the ability of IAEA inspectors to detect undeclared activities at a site. Identification of chemical indicators have been limited to use in the analysis of environmental samples. Although IAEA analytical laboratories are highly effective, environmental sample processing does not allow for immediate or real-time results to an IAEA inspector at a facility. During a complementary access inspection, under the Additional Protocol, the use of fieldable technologies that can quickly provide accurate information on chemicals that may be indicative of undeclared activities can increase the ability of IAEA to effectively and efficiently complete their mission. The Complementary Access Working Group (CAWG) is a multi-laboratory team with members from Brookhaven National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratory. The team identified chemicals at each stage of the nuclear fuel cycle that may provide IAEA inspectors with indications that proliferation activities may be occurring. The group eliminated all indicators related to equipment, technology and training, developing a list of by-products/effluents, non-nuclear materials, nuclear materials, and other observables. These proliferation indicators were prioritized based on detectability from a conduct of operations (CONOPS) perspective of a CA inspection (for example, whether an inspector actually can access the S&O or whether it is in process with no physical access), and the IAEA’s interest in the detection technology in conjunction with radiation detectors. The list was consolidated to general categories (nuclear materials from a chemical detection technique, inorganic chemicals, organic chemicals, halogens, and miscellaneous materials). The team

  19. Nuclear industry - challenges in chemical engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, S.; Sunder Rajan, N.S.; Balu, K.; Garg, R.K.; Murthy, L.G.K.; Ramani, M.P.S.; Rao, M.K.; Sadhukhan, H.K.; Venkat Raj, V.

    1978-01-01

    Chemical engineering processes and operations are closely involved in every step of the nuclear fuel cycle. Starting from mining and milling of the ore through the production of fuel and other materials and their use in nuclear reactors, fuel reprocessing, fissile material recycle and treatment and disposal of fission product wastes, each step presents a challenge to the chemical engineer to evolve and innovate processes and techniques for more efficient utilization of the energy in the atom. The requirement of high recovery of the desired components at high purity levels is in itself a challenge. ''Nuclear Grade'' specifications for materials put a requirement which very few industries can satisfy. Recovery of uranium and thorium from low grade ores, of heavy water from raw water, etc. are examples. Economical and large scale separation of isotopes particularly those of heavy elements is a task for which processess are under various stages of development. Further design of chemical plants such as fuel reprocessing plants and high level waste treatment plants, which are to be operated and maintained remotely due to the high levels of radio-activity call for engineering skills which are being continually evolved. In the reactor, analysis of the fluid mechanics and optimum design of heat removal system are other examples where a chemical engineer can play a useful role. In addition to the above, the activities in the nuclear industry cover a very wide range of chemical engineering applications, such as desalination and other energy intensive processes, radioisotope and radiation applications in industry, medicine and agriculture. (auth.)

  20. Chemical history with a nuclear microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maggiore, C.J.; Benjamin, T.M.; Burnett, D.S.; Hyde, P.J.; Rogers, P.S.Z.; Srinivasan, S.; Tesmer, T.; Woolum, D.S.

    1983-01-01

    A nuclear microprobe cannot give direct information on the chemical state of an element, but the spatial distribution of elements in a specimen is often determined by the chemical history of the sample. Fuel cells and minerals are examples of complex systems whose elemental distributions are determined by past chemical history. The distribution of catalyst in used fuel cell electrodes provides direct information on the chemical stability of dispersed catalysts under operating conditions. The authors have used spatially resolved Rutherford backscattering to measure the migration of platinum and vanadium from intermetallic catalysts and to determine their suitability for use under the extreme operating conditions found in phosphoric acid fuel cells. Geologic materials are complex, heterogeneous samples with small mineral grains. The trace element distribution within the individual mineral grains and between different mineral phases is sensitive to the details of the mineral formation and history. The spatial resolution and sub-100-ppm sensitivity available with a nuclear microprobe open up several new classes of experiments to the geochemist. Geochemistry and electrochemistry are two areas proving particularly fruitful for application of the nuclear microprobe

  1. Escalation of terrorism? On the risk of attacks with chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear weapons or materials; Eskalation des Terrors? Ueber das Anschlagsrisiko mit chemischen, biologischen, radiologischen und nuklearen Waffen oder Stoffen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nass, Jens

    2010-07-01

    The report on the risk of attacks with chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear weapons or materials covers the following topics: the variety of terrorism: ethnic-nationalistic, politically motivated, social revolutionary, political extremism, religious fanaticism, governmental terrorism; CBRN (chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear) weapons and materials: their availability and effectiveness in case of use; potential actor groups; prevention and counter measures, emergency and mitigating measures.

  2. Proceedings of chemical engineering in nuclear technology - national seminar on recent advances in fuel cycle technologies: book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Kalpakkam Regional Centre of Indian Institute of Chemical Engineers is embarking on conducting a series of national seminars on Chemical Engineering in Nuclear Technology 2014. For CHEMENT-2014 the theme was Seminar on recent advances in fuel cycle technologies. The topics covered included research and development, modeling and simulation and equipment development. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  3. Wavelets transforms and fuzzy logic in the eddy-current inspection of nuclear power plants steam generator tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, Luiz Antonio Negro Martin

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear power plants steam generators around the world have presented early damage history in their tubes, caused either by design errors or by inappropriate operation, which besides reducing the availability and the safety of the nuclear power plants it also generates heavy economical burden. To monitor the steam generators operational condition, the Eddy Current testing of their tubes is the non destructive method used to detect, localize, classify and to size the defects. The inspection is performed by inserting probes with coils in the tubes generating a signal correlated to the defect. These signals produced by the probe electric circuit are composed by the resistance and the inductive components which can be combined to produce a Lissajous figure in the complex plane. However, Eddy-Current signals contain noise which induce subjectivity inducing to errors in the inspector diagnosis. It is not uncommon to have different diagnosis from two inspectors about the same signal. The present work has the objective of supplying a methodology to analyze the signals which could help the inspector in the difficult task of interpreting the Eddy Current signals. It is proposed a method to remove the noise based on Wavelets Transforms. It is also proposed a normalization in the signal phase angle measurements. Furthermore, two additional characteristics are also studied, namely: the signal amplitudes and the widths of the Lissajous petals. The use of a Fuzzy Logic based inference engine is also developed and its use is demonstrated to be viable. The defects studied in this work are those which produces volumetric changes in the material. In order to test the proposed methodology, several artificial defects were produced in tubes using different types of materials like: brass, 316L stainless steel and Inconel 600 to produce a experimental data base. An Eddy-Current inspection equipment, the MIZ-17ET was used. Around 1000 time series signals of defects were acquired through

  4. The challenge of preparation for a chemical, biological, radiological or nuclear terrorist attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander David

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Terrorism is not a new phenomenon, but, in the contemporary scene, it has established itself in a manner which commands the most serious attention of the authorities. Until relatively recently, the major threat has been through the medium of conventional weaponry and explosives. Their obvious convenience of use and accessibility guarantees that such methods will continue to represent a serious threat. However, over the last few years, terrorists have displayed an enthusiasm for higher levels of carnage, destruction and publicity. This trend leads inexorably to the conclusion that chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear (CBRN methods will be pursued by terrorist organisations, particularly those which are well organised, are based on immutable ideological principles, and have significant financial backing. Whilst it is important that the authorities and the general public do not risk over-reacting to such a threat (otherwise, they will do the work of the terrorists for them, it would be equally ill-advised to seek comfort in denial. The reality of a CBRN event has to be accepted and, as a consequence, the authorities need to consider (and take seriously how individuals and the community are likely to react thereto and to identify (and rehearse in a realistic climate what steps would need to be taken to ameliorate the effects of such an event.

  5. Chemical transformations associated with neutronic irradiation of telluric acid; Transformations chimiques associees a l'irradiation neutronique de l'acide teliurique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertet, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-01-15

    The chemical transformations which arise from irradiation of telluric acid with neutrons have been studied under several experimental conditions. The effects of the reaction (n, {gamma} ) on Te{sup VI} and of the isomeric transitions {sup 131m}Te{sup VI} {yields} {sup 131}Te and {sup 129m}Te{sup VI} {yields} {sup 129}Te, and the oxidation states of {sup 131}I formed by {beta} decay of {sup 131}Te have been investigated in detail. The Szilard-Chalmers effect has been put in evidence. Retention (R) depends on the isomeric state of Rd-Te and is higher for the metastable isotopes. R increases with the time of irradiation. R seems to be independent of the medium which is used for dissolving telluric acid irradiated in the solid state. Higher values of R are found if the acid is irradiated in neutral or alkaline solution; irradiation in acid solution leads to lower values for R. Retention for {sup 131}Te{sup VI} and {sup 129}Te{sup VI} formed by isomeric transition depends on the pH of the solution where this disintegration occurs. For instance, with {sup 129}Te, R is greater in 6 M NaOH (80 per cent) than in 3 M HCI (40 per cent). The relative amounts of the oxidation states of {sup 131}I (reduced fraction (I{sup -}, IO{sup -}, I{sub 2}), iodate and periodate) depend on the medium, both if the acid is irradiated in the solid state and it is irradiated in solution. In the first case, the reduced fraction increases from 12 to 89 per cent when the dissolving medium is changed from neutral to 0.8 M HNO{sub 3}. In the second case, the reduced fraction is 90 per cent in neutral or acid solution and 64 per cent in 0.5 M KOH. It has been shown, furthermore, that microamounts of Te{sup VI} are formed in certain cases. (author) [French] Les transformations chimiques accompagnant l'irradiation neutronique de l'acide tellurique ont ete etudiees dans differentes conditions experimentales. On a examine notamment les consequences de la reaction (n, {gamma}) sur Te{sup VI}, des

  6. Experimental studies of thermal and chemical interactions between molten aluminum and nuclear dispersion fuels with water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farahani, A.A.

    1997-01-01

    Because of the possibility of rapid physical and chemical molten fuel-water interactions during a core melt accident in noncommercial or experimental reactors, it is important to understand the interactions that might occur if these materials were to contact water. An existing vertical 1-D shock tube facility was improved and a gas sampling device to measure the gaseous hydrogen in the upper chamber of the shock tube was designed and built to study the impact of a water column driven downward by a pressurized gas onto both molten aluminum (6061 alloy) and oxide and silicide depleted nuclear dispersion fuels in aluminum matrices. The experiments were carried out with melt temperatures initially at 750 to 1,000 C and water at room temperature and driving pressures of 0.5 and 1 MPa. Very high transient pressures, in many cases even larger than the thermodynamic critical pressure of the water (∼ 20 MPa), were generated due to the interactions between the water and the crucible and its contents. The molten aluminum always reacted chemically with the water but the reaction did not increase consistently with increasing melt temperature. An aluminum ignition occurred when water at room temperature impacted 28.48 grams of molten aluminum at 980.3 C causing transient pressures greater than 69 MPa. No signs of aluminum ignition were observed in any of the experiments with the depleted nuclear dispersion fuels, U 3 O 8 -Al and U 3 Si 2 -Al. The greater was the molten aluminum-water chemical reaction, the finer was the debris recovered for a given set of initial conditions. Larger coolant velocities (larger driving pressures) resulted in more melt fragmentation but did not result in more molten aluminum-water chemical reaction. Decreasing the water temperature also resulted in more melt fragmentation and did not suppress the molten aluminum-water chemical reaction

  7. The Department of Energy/American Chemical Society Summer School in Nuclear and Radiochemistry at San Jose State University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinard, W.F.; Silber, H.B.

    2005-01-01

    A Summer School in Nuclear Chemistry sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy and the American Chemical Society has been held at San Jose State University for the past 20 years. The intent of the program is to introduce outstanding college students to the field of nuclear and radiochemistry with the goal that some of these students will consider careers on nuclear science. The program features radiochemistry experiments along with radiation safety training, guest lectures by well known nuclear scientists and field trips to nuclear chemistry facilities in the San Francisco area. (author)

  8. Experimental studies of thermal and chemical interactions between oxide and silicide nuclear fuels with water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    farahani, A.A.; Corradini, M.L. [Univ. of Wisconsi, Madison, WI (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Given some transient power/cooling mismatch is a nuclear reactor and its inability to establish the necessary core cooling, energetic fuel-coolant interactions (FCI`s commonly called `vapor explosions`) could occur as a result of the core melting and coolant contact. Although a large number of studies have been done on energetic FCI`s, very few experiments have been performed with the actual fuel materials postulated to be produced in severe accidents. Because of the scarcity of well-characterized FCI data for uranium allows in noncommercial reactors (cermet and silicide fuels), we have conducted a series of experiments to provide a data base for the foregoing materials. An existing 1-D shock-tube facility was modified to handle depleted radioactive materials (U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-Al, and U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al). Our objectives have been to determine the effects of the initial fuel composition and temperature and the driving pressure (triggering) on the explosion work output, dynamic pressures, transient temperatures, and the hydrogen production. Experimental results indicate limited energetics, mainly thermal interactions, for these fuel materials as compared to aluminum where more chemical reactions occur between the molten aluminum and water.

  9. Monitoring systems online of oil for transformers of nuclear power plants; Sistemas de monitorizacion online del aceite para transformadores de potencia de Centrales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarandeses, S.

    2014-07-01

    The nuclear power plants are showing their concern due to the existence of recent failures related to the bulky transformers of power. These transformers are not security, but are important for the production of power as its failure can cause transient on the floor, reactor scram or shooting, that can cause interruptions in the production of energy or might force us to reduce the power of production The analysis of gases dissolved in transformer oil is recognized as a trial key to identify a submerged transformer failure in oil. With this analysis it is not possible to ensure that there is no damage in the transformer, but the probability of risk of this type of failure can be reduced. The industry recommended to equip the new large power transformers with oil online monitoring systems and in some cases also be It recommended its use in existing transformers. (Author)

  10. Physical and toxic properties of hazardous chemicals regularly stored and transported in the vicinity of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-03-01

    This report gives a compilation of data based on information assembled by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and completed by the Safety and Reliability Directorate of the UK AEA, the Dutch Reactor Safety Commission, the French Atomic Energy Commission, and the CSNI Secretariat. Data sheets for a large number of hazardous chemicals are presented (from acetaldehyde to xylene), giving details of their physical and toxic properties such as: molecular weight, boiling point, vapor density, heat of vaporization, toxic concentration in air, flammability limits, toxic effects, vapor pressure data, etc.

  11. Synthesis of ultra-long cadmium telluride nanotubes via combinational chemical transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kee-Ryung; Cho, Hong-Baek; Choa, Yong-Ho, E-mail: choa15@hanyang.ac.kr

    2017-03-01

    Synthesis of high-throughput cadmium telluride (CdTe) nanotubes with an ultra-long aspect ratio is presented via a combination process concept combined with electrospinning, electrodeposition, and cationic exchange reaction. Ultra-long sacrificial silver (Ag) nanofibers were synthesized by electrospinning involving two-step calcination, and were then electrodeposited to create silver telluride nanotubes. These nanotubes underwent cationic exchange reaction in cadmium nitrate tetrahydrate solution with the aid of a ligand, tributylphosphine (TBP). Analysis showed that ultra-long pure zinc blende CdTe nanotubes were obtained with controlled dimension and uniform morphology. The thermodynamic driving force induced by the coordination of methanol solvent and TBP attributed to overcome the kinetic barrier between Ag{sub 2}Te and CdTe nanotubes, facilitating the synthesis of CdTe nanotubes. This synthetic process involving a topotactic reaction route paves a way for high-throughput extended synthesis of new chalcogenide hollow nanotubes for application in photodetectors and solar cells. - Highlights: • High throughput synthetic route of hollow CdTe nanotubes with ultra-long aspect ratio. • Chemical combination of electrospinning, electrodeposition & cation exchange reaction. • Pure zinc blende CdTe by controlled dimension & structural variation of Ag nanofibers. • Potential for the high throughput synthesis of new exotic chalcogenide nanotubes.

  12. Reactions of charged and neutral recoil particles following nuclear transformations. Progress report No. 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ache, H.J.

    1976-09-01

    The status of the following programs is reported: study of the stereochemistry of halogen atom reactions produced via (n,γ) nuclear reactions with diastereomeric molecules in the condensed phase; decay-induced labelling of compounds of biochemical interest; and chemistry of positronium

  13. Experimental and theoretical analysis of vacuum circuit breaker prestrike effect on a transformer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popov, M.; Smeets, R.P.P.; Van der Sluis, L.; De Herdt, H.; Declerq, J.

    2009-01-01

    The work presented in this paper deals with the investigation of circuit breaker prestrike effect that occurs during energizing a distribution transformer. An experimental test setup that consists of a supply transformer, a vacuum circuit breaker (VCB), a cable and a test transformer is built, and

  14. The effects on the atmosphere of a major nuclear exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    Most of the earth's population would survive the immediate horrors of a nuclear holocaust, but what long-term climatological changes would affect their ability to secure food and shelter. This sobering report considers the effects of fine dust from ground-level detonations, of smoke from widespread fires, and of chemicals released into the atmosphere. The authors use mathematical models of atmospheric processes and data from natural situations - e.g., volcanic eruptions and arctic haze - to draw their conclusions.

  15. Effectiveness of the Convention on Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, G.

    2016-01-01

    The Convention on Nuclear Safety (CNS) has been established after the Chernobyl accident with the primary objective of achieving and maintaining a high level of nuclear safety worldwide, through the enhancement of national measures and international cooperation. The CNS is an incentive convention. It defines the basic safety standard which shall be met by the Contracting Parties. The verification of compliance is based on a self-assessment by the Countries and a Peer Review by the other Contracting Parties. As of July 2015, there are 78 Contracting Parties. Among the Contracting Parties of the Convention are all countries operating nuclear power plants except the Islamic Republic of Iran and Taiwan, all countries constructing nuclear power plants, all countries having nuclear power plants in long term shutdown and all countries having signed contracts for the construction of nuclear power plants. The National Reports under the CNS therefore cover almost all nuclear power plants of the world. The peer review of reports, questions and answers that are exchanged in connection with the Review Meetings provided a unique overview of nuclear safety provisions and issues in countries planning or operating nuclear power plants. This is especially important for neighbouring countries to those operating nuclear power plants.

  16. The effectiveness and development trend of nuclear third party liability insurance in the nuclear risk management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Pei

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear power considerably benefited mankind since it was utilized peaceably. The cleanness, safety and high efficiency of nuclear power were gradually known and recognized by the public. However at the same time, nuclear power had produced significant accident and consequently caused severe aftereffects during its utilization. Therefore, effective management of nuclear risk and reducing its accident probability are the social responsibilities of every nuclear nation. From the insurance point of view, this document analyzes the validity and development trends of nuclear third party insurance in nuclear risk management. It also introduces effectual experience in this field from nuclear insurance developed countries. This document discusses the necessity of consummating nuclear third party insurance under the aggressive development situation of nuclear power in our country. (author)

  17. Assessing the risks of nuclear and chemical contamination in the former Soviet Union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, J.

    1996-01-01

    In the first four chapters the focus is on risk assessment and the role of various segments of the society in defining risk criteria. In Chapter 2, the interface between science, policymaking, and environmental law is addressed. In chapter 3, the importance of including organizational and human factors in risk assessments is discussed. It is noted that risk assessment is also a matter for an informed public. Chapter 4 focuses on the specific application of technology to hazardous waste disposal. The most expensive high-tech equipment may not always be the best to solve a particular disposal problem. In Chapter 5 international efforts to determine the effects of nuclear testing are examined, moving on to question the methods used to define risk criteria. The last four chapters of the book focus on risk assessment and the role of various segments of the society in defining risk criteria. Chapter 6 is an introduction to the work done to assess the environmental and health affects of the 1986 accident at Chernobyl. Also the Ukrainian government's effort to assess additional natural and anthropogenic sources of radioactive contamination is discussed. In chapter 7, the efforts by the International Atomic Energy Agency and other organizations to assess the effects of Chernobyl are examined. The eighth chapter introduces the means by which nongovernmental environmental groups (NGO), e.g. Greenpeace, collect information on environmental threats and the role they play in informing the larger public about them. In this case, the dumping of radioactive waste in the Kara and Barents Seas is examined in detail. In Chapter 9 it is examined how interdisciplinary groups are required to assess the environmental and health effects of the dumping in the Kara and Barents Seas. The issues of reliable data and determining risk in the absence of data are discussed. In the final chapter, the major themes and results of the workshop are summarized, including a set of recommendations for

  18. Nuclear techniques in coal and chemical industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elbern, A.W.; Leal, C.A.

    1980-01-01

    The use of nuclear techniques for the determination of important parameters in industrial installations is exemplified; advantages of these techniques over other methods conventionally used are pointed out. The use of radiotracers in the study of physical and chemical phenomena occurring in the chemical industry is discussed. It is also shown that, using certain radioisotopes, it is possible to construct devices which enable, for example, the determination of the ash content in coal samples. These devices are economical and easy to be installed for the on-line control during coal transportation. (C.L.B.) [pt

  19. The Effects of Integrated Transformational Leadership on Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boberg, John Eric; Bourgeois, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Greater understanding about how variables mediate the relationship between leadership and achievement is essential to the success of reform efforts that hold leaders accountable for student learning. The purpose of this paper is to test a model of integrated transformational leadership including three important school mediators.…

  20. Valuation of the safety concept of the combined nuclear/chemical complex for hydrogen production with HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verfondern, K.; Nishihara, T.

    2004-06-01

    The high-temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) in Oarai, Japan, will be worldwide the first plant to demonstrate the production of hydrogen by applying the steam reforming process and using nuclear process heat as primary energy. Particular safety aspects for such a combined nuclear/chemical complex have to be investigated to further detail. One of these special aspects is the fire and explosion hazard associated with the presence of flammable gases including a large LNG storage tank in close vicinity to the reactor building. A special focus is laid upon the conceivable development of a detonation pressure wave and its damaging effect on the reactor building. A literature study has shown that methane is a comparatively slow reacting gas and that a methane vapor cloud in the open atmosphere or partially obstructed areas is highly unlikely to result in a detonation if inadvertently released and ignited. Various theoretical assessments and experimental studies, which have been conducted in the past and which are of significance for the HTTR-steam reforming system, include the spreading and combustion behavior of cryogenic liquids and flammable gas mixtures providing the basis of a comprehensive safety analysis of the combined nuclear/chemical facility. (orig.)

  1. Political aspects of nuclear test effects at Semipalatinsk nuclear test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sydykov, E.B.; Panin, M.S.

    2003-01-01

    The paper describes tense struggle of Kazakhstan people for closure of the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site. It reveals major foreign policy aspects and nuclear test effects for both Kazakhstan and the world community. (author)

  2. Quantum Nuclear Extension of Electron Nuclear Dynamics on Folded Effective-Potential Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, B.; Deumens, E.; Ohrn, Y.

    2014-01-01

    A perennial problem in quantum scattering calculations is accurate theoretical treatment of low energy collisions. We propose a method of extracting a folded, nonadiabatic, effective potential energy surface from electron nuclear dynamics (END) trajectories; we then perform nuclear wave packet...

  3. Transformation strain by chemical disordering in silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ju

    2004-01-01

    Swelling is observed in radiation-induced amorphization of SiC, which can be attributed to both structural and chemical disordering. By first-principles calculations, an attempt is made to separate the two factors by creating complete chemical disorder with no initial structural disorder in a 64-atom supercell. By relaxing all stresses and internal forces, significant transformation strains, both hydrostatic and shear, are observed. The relaxed configurations are found to be metallic. Softening of the bulk modulus is found to correlate closely with volume expansion, regardless of whether the expansion is caused by structural or chemical disordering, or with no disorder at all. It is postulated that partial chemical disordering contributes significantly to the internal residual stresses and macroscopic swelling of amorphous SiC

  4. Terror weapons. Ridding the world of nuclear, biological and chemical weapons - Commission on mass destruction weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blix, H.; Journe, V.

    2010-01-01

    This book approaches in 8 chapters the ambitious challenge of ridding the world of all mass destruction weapons: 1 - re-launching disarmament; 2 - terror weapons: nature of threats and answers (weakness of traditional answers, counter-proliferation); 3 - nuclear weapons: preventing proliferation and terrorism, reducing threat and nuclear weapons number, from regulation to banning); 4 - biological or toxin weapons; 5 - chemical weapons; 6 - vectors, anti-missile defenses and space weapons; 7 - exports control, international assistance and non-governmental actors; 8 - respect, verification, enforcement and role of the United Nations. The recommendations and works of the Commission are presented in appendix together with the declaration adopted on April 30, 2009. (J.S.)

  5. Technology of thorium concentrates purification and their transformation in pure nuclear products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikuta, A.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental study for the purification of thorium concentrates by solvent extraction is presented. The product of purification is appropriate for utilization in the fabrication of nuclear reactor fuel elements. The experiments are carried out in a laboratory scale and the following operations are studied: dissolution, extraction-scrubbing, stripping-scrubbing, thorium oxalate precipitation, and thorium nitrate coagulation [pt

  6. Potential effects of nuclear war on agricultural productivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harwell, M.A.; Cropper, W.P. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The authors examine the vulnerabilities of agricultural systems to nuclear war-induced climatic perturbations and to other, indirect effects of nuclear war. Discussion is included of the dependency of agricultural production on technological inputs and the effects of loss or reduction of these inputs in a post-nuclear war world

  7. Postsynthesis Transformation of Insulating Cs4PbBr6 Nanocrystals into Bright Perovskite CsPbBr3 through Physical and Chemical Extraction of CsBr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazon, Francisco; Urso, Carmine; De Trizio, Luca; Akkerman, Quinten; Marras, Sergio; Locardi, Federico; Nelli, Ilaria; Ferretti, Maurizio; Prato, Mirko; Manna, Liberato

    2017-10-13

    Perovskite-related Cs 4 PbBr 6 nanocrystals present a "zero-dimensional" crystalline structure where adjacent [PbBr 6 ] 4- octahedra do not share any corners. We show in this work that these nanocrystals can be converted into "three-dimensional" CsPbBr 3 perovskites by extraction of CsBr. This conversion drastically changes the optoelectronic properties of the nanocrystals that become highly photoluminescent. The extraction of CsBr can be achieved either by thermal annealing (physical approach) or by chemical reaction with Prussian Blue (chemical approach). The former approach can be simply carried out on a dried film without addition of any chemicals but does not yield a full transformation. Instead, reaction with Prussian Blue in solution achieves a full transformation into the perovskite phase. This transformation was also verified on the iodide counterpart (Cs 4 PbI 6 ).

  8. Energy Transformation of Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potocnik, V.

    2014-01-01

    Due to obvious climate change, caused mainly by combustion of the fossil fuels, as well as to their modest reserves, energy transformation is under way. It is the transition from the fossil fuels to improved energy efficiency (ENEF) and renewable energy sources (RES). Leading role in the energy transformation has Germany with 'Energiewende', which among other includes closing of existing nuclear power plants until 2022. Croatia has very limited proven fossil fuels reserves, which cover 3/4 of primary energy in consumption. Croatia also has large potential for improvements in ENEF and RES. Therefore, energy transformation of Croatia is justified. (author).

  9. Application study of nuclear technologies for integration chemical, biological and radiological technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Jae Kon; Han, M. H.; Kim, Y. H.; Yang, J. E.; Jung, K. S.; Cha, H. K.; Moon, J.; La, K. H

    2001-02-01

    The projects are suggested the method to maximize the technology and research results which are being carried out by KAERI on the nuclear field. The study presents 1)the technology to rapidly and accurately determine and the nature of contamination, 2) the technology to predict the spread of contaminant and the magnitude of damage, and 3) the expert-aided decision making technology to identify the optimum counter-measures. And the solutions are also suggested the application to military technology in Chemical, Biological and Radiation field. In addition, I hope this kind of cooperation model come to be the good case of military civilian research harmony to improve the national competition capability.

  10. Transformations. I. The Effect of DAF on Sentence Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, David

    1976-01-01

    A hypothesis based on the psycholinguistic derivation of sentences was tested. The task required that sentences temporarily stored in memory be transformed and spoken with delayed auditory feedback. Available from Plenum Publishing Corp., 227 W. 17th St., New York, NY 10011. (Author/RM)

  11. Chemical process measurements in PWR-type nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaeser, E.

    1978-01-01

    In order to achieve high levels of availability of nuclear power plants equipped with pressurized water reactors, strict standards have to be applied to the purity of coolant and of other media. Chemical process measurements can meet these requirements only if programmes are established giving maximum information with minimum expenditure and if these programmes are realized with effective analytical methods. Analysis programmes known from literature are proved for their usefulness, and hints are given for establishing rational programmes. Analytical techniques are compared with each other taking into consideration both methods which have already been introduced into nuclear power plant practice and methods not yet generally used in practice, such as atomic absorption spectrophotometry, gas chromatography, etc. Finally, based on the state of the art of chemical process measurements in nuclear power plants, the trends of future development are pointed out. (author)

  12. Nuclear spin relaxation due to chemical shift anisotropy of gas-phase 129Xe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanni, Matti; Lantto, Perttu; Vaara, Juha

    2011-08-14

    Nuclear spin relaxation provides detailed dynamical information on molecular systems and materials. Here, first-principles modeling of the chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) relaxation time for the prototypic monoatomic (129)Xe gas is carried out, both complementing and predicting the results of NMR measurements. Our approach is based on molecular dynamics simulations combined with pre-parametrized ab initio binary nuclear shielding tensors, an "NMR force field". By using the Redfield relaxation formalism, the simulated CSA time correlation functions lead to spectral density functions that, for the first time, quantitatively determine the experimental spin-lattice relaxation times T(1). The quality requirements on both the Xe-Xe interaction potential and binary shielding tensor are investigated in the context of CSA T(1). Persistent dimers Xe(2) are found to be responsible for the CSA relaxation mechanism in the low-density limit of the gas, completely in line with the earlier experimental findings.

  13. Effect of decontamination on nuclear power plant primary circuit materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brezina, M.; Kupca, L.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of repeated decontamination on the properties of structural materials of the WWER-440 primary coolant circuit was examined. Three kinds of specimens of 08Kh18Ni10T steel were used for radioactivity-free laboratory experiments; they included material obtained from assembly additions to the V-2 nuclear power plant primary piping, and a sheet of the CSN 17247 steel. Various chemical, electrochemical and semi-dry electrochemical decontamination procedures were tested. Chemical decontamination was based on the conventional AP(20/5)-CITROX(20/20) procedure and its variants; NP-CITROX type procedures with various compositions were also employed. Solutions based on oxalic acid were tested for the electrochemical and semi-dry electrochemical decontamination. The results of measurements of mass losses of the surfaces, of changes in the corrosion resistance and in the mechanical properties of the materials due to repeated decontamination are summarized. (Z.S.). 12 figs., 1 tab., 8 refs

  14. Natural radiation, nuclear wastes and chemical pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, T.; Ehdwall, H.; Stranden, E.

    1990-01-01

    Doses from natural radiation to the population in the Nordic Countries are summarized and man made modifications of the natural radiation environment are discussed. An account is given of the radiological consequences of energy conservation by reduced ventilation. Risks from possible future releases of radioactivity from final repositories of spent nuclear fuel are compared to the risks from present natural radioactivity in the environment. The possibilities for comparison between chemical and radiological risks are discussed. (author) 13 refs

  15. Project research on nuclear physical and chemical characteristics of actinide nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamana, Hajimu; Nakagome, Yoshihiro; Shibata, Seiichi; Fujii, Toshiyuki; Uehara, Akihiro; Shirai, Osamu; Moriyama, Hirotake; Nagai, Takayuki; Yamanaka, Shinsuke; Shinohara, Atsushi; Kurata, Masaki; Myochin, Munetaka; Nakamura, Shoji; Matsuura, Haruaki

    2008-01-01

    The chemical and nuclear physical characteristics of actinide elements have been investigated using the experimental methods and instruments of this laboratory. This laboratory has a facility in which the transuranium elements (TRU) and the long-lived fission products (LLFP) can be dealt with. The utility of this facility has been expected. The investigation on the actinide elements and its fission products have been carried out as a project research from both view points of science and technology. The research reports during three years (2005-07) are described here. (M.H.)

  16. Quantitative analysis of chemical elements in single cells using nuclear microprobe and nano-probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deves, Guillaume

    2010-01-01

    The study of the role of trace elements at cellular level requires the use of state-of-the-art analytical tools that could achieve enough sensitivity and spatial resolution. We developed a new methodology for the accurate quantification of chemical element distribution in single cells based on a combination of ion beam analysis techniques STIM, PIXE and RBS. The quantification procedure relies on the development of a STIM data analysis software (Paparamborde). Validity of this methodology and limits are discussed here. The method allows the quantification of trace elements (μg/g) with a 19.8 % uncertainty in cellular compartments with mass below 0.1 ng. The main limit of the method lies in the poor number of samples that can be analyzed, due to long irradiation times required and limited access to ion beam analysis facilities. This is the reason why we developed a database for cellular chemical composition capitalization (BDC4). BDC4 has been designed in order to use cellular chemical composition as a tracer for biological activities and is expected to provide in the future reference chemical compositions for any cellular type or compartment. Application of the STIM-PIXE-RBS methodology to the study of nuclear toxicology of cobalt compounds is presented here showing that STIM analysis is absolutely needed when organic mass loss appears during PIXE-RBS irradiation. (author)

  17. Impacts on health and safety from transfer/consolidation of nuclear materials and hazardous chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallucci, R.H.V.

    1994-11-01

    Environmental restoration plans at the US Department of Energy (USDOE) Hanford Site calls for transfer/consolidation of ''targets/threats,'' namely nuclear materials and hazardous chemicals. Reductions in the health and safety hazards will depend on the plans implemented. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) estimated these potential impacts, assuming implementation of the current reference plan and employing ongoing risk and safety analyses. The results indicated the potential for ''significant'' reductions in health and safety hazards in the long term (> 25 years) and a potentially ''noteworthy'' reduction in health hazard in the short term (≤ 25 years)

  18. Effect of austenitization conditions on kinetics of isothermal transformation of austenite of structural steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konopleva, E.V.; Bayazitov, V.M.; Abramov, O.V.; Kozlova, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    Effect of austenization of kinetics of pearlite and bainite transformations for steels with different carbon content differing by alloying character and degree has been investigated. Austenization temperature increase is shown to leads to retardation of ferrite-pearlite transformation in low- and medium-carbon alloyed steels. Step-like holding in the region of austenite stable state (850, 950 deg) after high-temperature heating (1100 deg C) increases the rate of transformation partially recovering its kinetics and decomposition velocity after low-temperature heating in steels alloyed advantageously with carbide-forming elements (08Kh2G2F, 30Kh3) and does not affect kinetics in the 35Kh, 30KhGSN2A, 45N5 steels. Increase of heating temperature and growth of an austenite grain cause considerable acceleration of bainite transformation, increase of the temperaure of bainite transformation beginning and increase of the transformation amplitude in the 08Kh2G2F, 30Kh3 steels and affect weakly kinetics in steels with mixed alloying (30KhGSN2A) or low-alloy one (35Kh). The bainite transformation rate in the 45N5 steelite does not depend on austenization. The effect of additional acceleration of bainite transformation as a result holding after high-temperature heating in those steels, where activation of transformation occurs with increase of heating temperature

  19. Effectiveness and efficiency of chemical mutagens in cowpea (Vigna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-11-19

    Nov 19, 2008 ... A study was undertaken in a cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.) variety CO 6 to assess the efficiency and effectiveness of chemical mutagens; ethyl methane sulphonate (EMS), diethyl sulphate (DES) and sodium azide (SA). EMS treatments were found highly effective than the other chemicals.

  20. On-Road Chemical Transformation as an Important Mechanism of NO2 Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) not only is linked with a number of adverse effects on the respiratory system, but also contributes to the formation of ground-level ozone (O3) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) pollution. NO2 levels near major roads have been monitored as part of the one...

  1. Chemical removal of radionuclides in contaminated spinach derived from the Fukushima nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiba, Kazuhiro; Kitamura, Yoji; Kozaka, Takashi; Uno, Izumi; Miyoshi, Hirokazu; Yanaga, Makoto

    2012-01-01

    We examined a simple and effective removal method for contaminated farm products to ensure the relief of farmers and the security of consumers. Removal of radionuclides from spinach by chemical methods was investigated. The result of chemical removal showed that antioxidant agents removed radionuclides from spinach by 70–80% for 131 I and more than 80% for radiocesium. In particular, ascorbic acid is promising as a safe and versatile option. (author)

  2. Design of chemical treatment unit for radioactive liquid wastes in Serpong nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salimin, Z.; Walman, E.; Santoso, P.; Purnomo, S.; Sugito; Suwardiyono; Wintono

    1996-01-01

    The chemical treatment unit for radioactive liquid wastes arising from nuclear fuel fabrication, radioisotopes production and radiometallurgy facility has been designed. The design of chemical processing unit is based on the characteristics of liquid wastes containing fluors from uranium fluoride conversion process to ammonium uranyl carbonate on the fuel fabrication. The chemical treatment has the following process steps: coagulation-precipitation of fluoride ion by calcium hydroxide coagulant, separation of supernatant solution from sludge, coagulation of remaining fluoride on the supernatant solution by alum, separation of supernatant from sludge, and than precipitation of fluors on the supernatant by polymer resin WWS 116. The processing unit is composed of 3 storage tanks for raw liquid wastes (capacity 1 m 3 per tank), 5 storage tanks for chemicals (capacity 0.5 m 3 per tank), 2 mixing reactors (capacity 0.5 m 3 per reactor), 1 storage tank for supernatant solution (capacity 1 m 3 ), and 1 storage tank for sludge (capacity 1 m 3 )

  3. Effects of symbiotic bacteria on chemical sensitivity of Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manakul, Patcharaporn; Peerakietkhajorn, Saranya; Matsuura, Tomoaki; Kato, Yasuhiko; Watanabe, Hajime

    2017-07-01

    The crustacean zooplankton Daphnia magna has been widely used for chemical toxicity tests. Although abiotic factors have been well documented in ecotoxicological test protocols, biotic factors that may affect the sensitivity to chemical compounds remain limited. Recently, we identified symbiotic bacteria that are critical for the growth and reproduction of D. magna. The presence of symbiotic bacteria on Daphnia raised the question as to whether these bacteria have a positive or negative effect on toxicity tests. In order to evaluate the effects of symbiotic bacteria on toxicity tests, bacteria-free Daphnia were prepared, and their chemical sensitivities were compared with that of Daphnia with symbiotic bacteria based on an acute immobilization test. The Daphnia with symbiotic bacteria showed higher chemical resistance to nonylphenol, fenoxycarb, and pentachlorophenol than bacteria-free Daphnia. These results suggested potential roles of symbiotic bacteria in the chemical resistance of its host Daphnia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of Containment on Radionuclide Releases from Underground Nuclear Explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrigan, C. R.; Sun, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Confirming the occurrence of an underground nuclear explosion can require capturing short-lived noble gas radioisotopes produced by the explosion, sometimes referred to as the "smoking gun" for nuclear explosion detection. It is well known that the radioisotopic distribution resulting from the detonation evolves with time in the explosion cavity. In effect, the explosion cavity or chimney behaves as a chemical reactor. As long as the parent and daughter radionuclides remain in a closed and well-mixed cavity, parameters, such as radioxenon isotopic ratios, can be calculated analytically from a decay-chain network model. When gases from the cavity migrate into the containment regime, consideration of a "leaky reactor" model is more appropriate. We consider several implications of such a leaky reactor model relevant to interpretations of gas samples from the subsurface during an on-site inspection that could potentially be carried out under the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. Additionally, we have attempted to validate our leaky reactor model against atmospheric observations of radioactive xenon isotopes detected by radionuclide monitoring stations in Japan and Russia following the February 2013 DPRK underground nuclear explosion (Carrigan et al., 2016). While both model uncertainty and observational error are significant, our model of isotopic evolution appears to be in broad agreement with radionuclide observations, and for the first time links atmospheric measurements of radioxenon isotopic ratios to estimates of seismic yield. Carrigan et al., Scientific Reports 6, Article number: 23032 (2016) doi:10.1038/srep23032

  5. Effects of 17β-estradiol on radiation transformation in vitro; inhibition of effects by protease inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, A.R.; Weichselbaum, R.R.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of 17β-estradiol, given either alone or with X-radiation, on the induction of malignant transformation were investigated in vitro. Treatment with 10 -6 M 17β-estradiol for 6 weeks, or 10 -5 M 17β-estradiol for only 5 days, induced malignant transformation in C3H 10T1/2 cells. Estradiol also acted as a cocarcinogen for X-ray induced transformation; the results indicated an additive effect when the cells were exposed to both agents together. The protease inhibitors antipain and leupeptin suppressed estradiol induced transformation as well as the additive effect observed for estradiol-radiation transformation. (author)

  6. New fundamental equations of thermodynamics for systems in chemical equilibrium at a specified partial pressure of a reactant and the standard transformed formation properties of reactants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberty, R.A.; Oppenheim, I.

    1993-01-01

    When temperature, pressure, and the partial pressure of a reactant are fixed, the criterion of chemical equilibrium can be expressed in terms of the transformed Gibbs energy G' that is obtained by using a Legendre transform involving the chemical potential of the reactant that is fixed. For reactions of ideal gases, the most natural variables to use in the fundamental equation are T, P', and P B , where P' is the partial pressure of the reactants other than the one that is fixed and P B is the partial pressure of the reactant that is fixed. The fundamental equation for G' yields the expression for the transformed entropy S', and a transformed enthalpy can be defined by the additional Legendre transform H'=G'+TS'. This leads to an additional form of the fundamental equation. The calculation of transformed thermodynamic properties and equilibrium compositions is discussed for a simple system and for a general multireaction system. The change, in a reaction, of the binding of the reactant that is at a specified pressure can be calculated using one of the six Maxwell equations of the fundamental equation in G'

  7. Effect of pairing on nuclear dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scamps, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Pairing correlations is an essential component for the description of the atomic nuclei. The effects of pairing on static property of nuclei are now well known. In this thesis, the effect of pairing on nuclear dynamics is investigated. Theories that includes pairing are benchmarked in a model case. The TDHF+BCS theory turns out to be a good compromise between the physics taken into account and the numerical cost. This TDHF+BCS theory was retained for realistic calculations. Nevertheless, the application of pairing in the BCS approximation may induce new problems due to (1) the particle number symmetry breaking, (2) the non-conservation of the continuity equation. These difficulties are analysed in detail and solutions are proposed. In this thesis, a 3 dimensional TDHF+BCS code is developed to simulate the nuclear dynamic. Applications to giant resonances show that pairing modify only the low lying peaks. The high lying collective components are only affected by the initial conditions. An exhaustive study of the giant quadrupole resonances with the TDHF+BCS theory is performed on more than 700 spherical or deformed nuclei. Is is shown that the TDHF+BCS theory reproduces well the collective energy of the resonance. After validation on the small amplitude limit problem, the approach was applied to study nucleon transfer in heavy ion reactions. A new method to extract transfer probabilities is introduced. It is demonstrated that pairing significantly increases the two-nucleon transfer probability. (author) [fr

  8. The effect of manganese on the kinetics of phase transformations of austenite in structural steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacyna, J.; Jedrzejewska-Strach, A.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this work was to examine the effect of Mn on the kinetics of phase transformations of supercooled austenite. It was executed the 4 CCT diagrams for alloys of a variable Mn content. The obtained results indicate that with the increase of Mn concentrations in austenite in the range 0.73-2.94% the times to the beginning of its transformation are lengthened and the temperatures of these transformations into ferrite and the bainitic transformations are lengthened slightly whole only the time to the beginning of a pearlitic transformation is lengthened more strongly. In the range of 2.0-2.94% Mn the times to the beginnings of all transformations grow very strongly. (author)

  9. Safety criteria for nuclear chemical plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, P.W.; Curtis, L.M.

    1983-01-01

    Safety measures have always been required to limit the hazards due to accidental release of radioactive substances from nuclear power plants and chemical plants. The risk associated with the discharge of radioactive substances during normal operation has also to be kept acceptably low. BNFL (British Nuclear Fuels Ltd.) are developing risk criteria as targets for safe plant design and operation. The numerical values derived are compared with these criteria to see if plants are 'acceptably safe'. However, the criteria are not mandatory and may be exceeded if this can be justified. The risk assessments are subject to independent review and audit. The Nuclear Installations Inspectorate also has to pass the plants as safe. The assessment principles it uses are stated. The development of risk criteria for a multiplant site (nuclear chemical plants tend to be sited with many others which are related functionally) is discussed. This covers individual members of the general public, societal risks, risks to the workforce and external hazards. (U.K.)

  10. In vitro anti-leukemic activity and chemical transformation of the 5'-chloro-5'-deoxy derivative of cyclo-cytidine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stankovicova, M.; Bachrata, M.; Sveda, P.; Rauko, P.; Blesova, P.

    1995-01-01

    Hydrochloride of 5'-chloro-5'-deoxy-cytocytidine (Cl-cC) is an analogue of hydrochloride (cC), a pro-drug of the compound with of the compound with the strong anti-leukemic activity arabinosylcytosine (araC). This paper is devoted to the study of its cytotoxic activity in vitro and to the effect of acid alkaline conditions and temperature on its stability. Cl-cC inhibits not only the growth of L1210 leukemia cells in vitro and the DNA synthesis (IC 50 = 0.09 μmol/dm 3 ) but, at the same time, it has a weak effect on RNA synthesis (IC 50 > 250 μmol/dm 3 ) and no effect on proteosynthesis. In alkaline conditions Cl-cC is transformed to 5'-chloro-araC and 2',5'-anhydro-araC but is more stable in acid solutions. (author)

  11. Nuclear Winter: Uncertainties Surround the Long-Term Effects of Nuclear War. Report to the Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    Nuclear winter, a term used to describe potential long-term climate and environmental effects of nuclear war, has been a subject of debate and controversy. This report examines and presents scientific and policy implications of nuclear winter. Contents include: (1) an executive summary (highlighting previous and current studies on the topic); (2)…

  12. The nuclear terrorist, radiological, biological, chemical threat. Medical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gourmelon, P.; Vidal, D.; Renaudeau, C.

    2005-01-01

    This book illustrates the cooperation of the civil and the military experts in the domain of the NBRC (nuclear, biological, radiological and chemical threat). The different aspects bond to the use of nuclear, biological and chemical weapons, are discussed. Al topics of each domains (NRBC) are presented: historical and fundamental aspects, diagnostic, therapeutic and prevention. (A.L.B.)

  13. Biological effects of radiation: The induction of malignant transformation and programmed cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servomaa, K.

    1991-04-01

    In the Chernobyl explosions and fire, powderized nuclear fuel was released from the reactor core, causing an unexpected fallout. X-ray analysis and scanning electron microscopy showed that the isolated single particles were essentially pure uranium. These uranium aerosols contained all of the nonvolatile fission products, including the b-emitters, 95 Zr, 103 Ru, 106 Ru, 141 Ce, and 144 Ce. The hot particles are extremely effective in inducing malignant transformation in mouse fibroblast cells in vitro. The major factor responsible for this effect is focus promotion caused by a wound-mediated permanent increase in cell proliferation (mitogenesis associated with mutagenesis). Transformed foci were analysed for the activation of c-abl, c-erb-A, c-erb-B, c-fms, c-fos, c-myb, c-myc, c-Ha-ras, c-Ki-ras, c-sis, and c-raf oncogenes at the transcriptional level. The pattern of oncogene activation was found to vary from focus to focus. Long interspersed repeated DNA (L1 or LINE makes up a class of mobile genetic elements which can amplify in the cell genome by retroposition. This element is spontaneously transcriptionally activated at a critical population density and later amplified in rat chloroleukaemia cells. UV light and ionizing radiation induce this activation prematurely, and the activation is followed by programmed cell death (apoptosis) in a sequence of events identical to that seen in LIRn activation occurring spontaneously

  14. Nuclear activated cw chemical laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, T.G.

    1982-01-01

    A cw chemical laser which uses processed radioactive waste to produce active atoms from a chemically inactive gas before being mixed with another molecule such as hydrogen or deuterium is disclosed. This laser uses no toxic or corrosive fuels and does not require any electrical or other type of auxiliary power supply. The energy released by the radioactive material is used to produce the active atoms such as fluorine. This is accomplished by using the radiation products from processed radioactive waste to dissociate the inert gas in the plenum of the laser. The radioactive material is held in the passageway walls of a device similar to a heat exchanger. The exchanger device may be located in the gas generator section of a chemical laser. The inactive gas is passed through the exchanger device and while passing through it the radiation from the radioactive material dissociates the gas, producing a concentration of free active atoms. This active atom generator then feeds the nozzle bank or mixing section of a laser to produce a lasing action

  15. Effects of oxygen and misonidazole on cell transformation and cell killing in C3H 10T1/2 cells by X rays in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borsa, J.; Sargent, M.D.; Einspenner, M.; Azzam, E.I.; Raaphorst, G.P.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of oxygen (air) and misonidazole on the transformation and killing of 10T1/2 cells by X rays were examined. The oxygen effect for the cell transformation end point was very similar to that for cell killing. Misonidazole enhanced both cell killing and cell transformation to a similar extent. The enhancement of both end points by misonidazole occurred only in the absence of oxygen during irradiation and was of lesser magnitude than that observed for oxygen. These results demonstrate that the radiation chemical processes leading to cell killing and cell transformation, respectively, are affected similarly by these two enhancers of radiation action. 22 references, 3 figures, 2 tables

  16. High-throughput screening of chemical effects on ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disruption of steroidogenesis by environmental chemicals can result in altered hormone levels causing adverse reproductive and developmental effects. A high-throughput assay using H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cells was used to evaluate the effect of 2,060 chemical samples on steroidogenesis via HPLC-MS/MS quantification of 10 steroid hormones, including progestagens, glucocorticoids, androgens, and estrogens. The study employed a three stage screening strategy. The first stage established the maximum tolerated concentration (MTC; >70% viability) per sample. The second stage quantified changes in hormone levels at the MTC while the third stage performed concentration-response (CR) on a subset of samples. At all stages, cells were pre-stimulated with 10 µM forskolin for 48 h to induce steroidogenesis followed by chemical treatment for 48 h. Of the 2,060 chemical samples evaluated, 524 samples were selected for six-point CR screening, based in part on significantly altering at least 4 hormones at the MTC. CR screening identified 232 chemical samples with concentration-dependent effects on 17β-estradiol and/or testosterone, with 411 chemical samples showing an effect on at least one hormone across the steroidogenesis pathway. Clustering of the concentration-dependent chemical-mediated steroid hormone effects grouped chemical samples into five distinct profiles generally representing putative mechanisms of action, including CYP17A1 and HSD3B inhibition. A d

  17. Electronic structure, excitation properties, and chemical transformations of extreme ultra-violet resist materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangan, Sylvie; Bartynski, Robert A.; Narasimhan, Amrit; Brainard, Robert L.

    2017-07-01

    The electronic structure of extreme ultra violet resist materials and of their individual components, two polymers and two photoacid generators (PAGs), is studied using a combination of x-ray and UV photoemission spectroscopies, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and ab-initio techniques. It is shown that simple molecular models can be used to understand the electronic structure of each sample and describe the experimental data. Additionally, effects directly relevant to the photochemical processes are observed: low energy loss processes are observed for the phenolic polymer containing samples that should favor thermalization of electrons; PAG segregation is measured at the surface of the resist films that could lead to surface inhomogeneities; both PAGs are found to be stable upon irradiation in the absence of the polymer, contrasting with a high reactivity that can be followed upon x-ray irradiation of the full resist.

  18. Effects of radiation and chemicals on SV40 oncogenesis. Final progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coggin, J.H. Jr.

    1982-05-01

    This project is directed toward developing rapid, quantitative methods and immunologic markers which will permit the early detection of newly forming tumors induced or enhanced by x-irradiation, chemical carcinogens, viruses or combinations of the three. The projects under study in our ongoing collaborative program seek to develop the detailed understanding and precise methodology required for the early detection of embryonic antigens in transformed cells induced by the co-carcinogenic effects of viruses and low-level radiation. A new technique for assaying the earliest transformed cells appearing in a carcinogen treated population affords a unique tool for this study. Present plans involve efforts to purify embryonic determinants from fetal and transformed cells of hamsters and mice in order to define their role in the transformation process and in tumor development

  19. Effect of heat treatment on transformation behavior of Ti-Ni-V shape memory alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Zhirong; Liu Manqian

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → New shape memory alloy (SMA) - Ti-50.8Ni-0.5V SMA. → The evolution laws of transformation types of annealed Ti-50.8Ni-0.5V SMA. → The evolution laws of transformation types of aged Ti-50.8Ni-0.5V SMA. → The effect laws of annealing on transformation temperature and hysteresis of the alloy. → The effect laws of aging on transformation temperature and hysterises of the alloy. - Abstract: Effects of annealing and aging processes on the transformation behaviors of Ti-50.8Ni-0.5V (atomic fraction, %) shape memory alloy were investigated by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The A → R/R → A (A - parent phase, R - R phase) type one-stage reversible transformation occurs in 350-400 deg. C annealed alloy, the A → R → M/M → R → A (M - martensite) type two-stage transformation occurs in 450-500 deg. C annealed alloy, the A → R → M/M → A type transformation occurs in 550 deg. C annealed alloy, and A → M/M → A type transformation occurs in the alloy annealed at above 600 deg. C upon cooling/heating. The transformation type of 300 deg. C aged alloy is A → R/R → A, and that of 500 deg. C aged alloy is A → R → M/M → A, while that of 400 deg. C aged alloy changes from A → R/R → A to A → R → M/M → R → A with increasing aging time. The effects of annealing and aging processes on R and M transformation temperatures and temperature hysteresis are given. The influence of annealing and aging temperature on transformation behaviors is stronger than that of annealing and aging time.

  20. Effect of ozone gas processing on physical and chemical properties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of ozone treatment on chemical and physical properties of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) gluten, glutenin and gliadin. Methods: Wheat proteins isolated from wheat flour were treated with ozone gas. The physical and chemical properties of gluten proteins were investigated after treatment ...

  1. Chemical warfare in freshwater, allelopathic effects of macrophytes on phytoplankton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulderij, G.

    2006-01-01

    Aquatic macrophytes can excrete chemical substances into their enviroment and these compounds may inhibit the growth of phytoplankton. This process is defined as allelopathy: one organism has effects on another via the excretion of a (mixture of) chemical substance(s). With laboratory and field

  2. Chemical warfare in freshwater. Allelpathic effects of macrophytes on phytoplankton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulderij, G.

    2006-01-01

    Aquatic macrophytes can excrete chemical substances into their enviroment and these compounds may inhibit the growth of phytoplankton. This process is defined as allelopathy: one organism has effects on another via the excretion of a (mixture of) chemical substance(s). With laboratory and field

  3. Transformation of methylparaben during water chlorination: Effects of bromide and dissolved organic matter on reaction kinetics and transformation pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoom, Hoonsik; Shin, Jaedon; Ra, Jiwoon; Son, Heejong; Ryu, Dongchoon; Kim, Changwon; Lee, Yunho

    2018-09-01

    The reaction kinetics, products, and pathways of methylparaben (MeP) during water chlorination with and without bromide (Br - ) were investigated to better understand the fate of parabens in chlorinated waters. During the chlorination of MeP-spiked waters without Br - , MeP was transformed into mono-Cl-MeP and di-Cl-MeP with apparent second-order rate constants (k app ) of 64M -1 s -1 and 243M -1 s -1 at pH7, respectively, while further chlorination of di-Cl-MeP was relatively slower (k app =1.3M -1 s -1 at pH7). With increasing Br - concentration, brominated MePs, such as mono-Br-MeP, Br-Cl-MeP, and di-Br-MeP, became major transformation products. The di-halogenated MePs (di-Cl-MeP, Br,Cl-MeP, and di-Br-MeP) showed relatively low reactivity to chlorine at pH7 (k app =1.3-4.6M -1 s -1 ) and bromine (k app =32-71M -1 s -1 ), which explains the observed high stability of di-halogenated MePs in chlorinated waters. With increasing pH from 7 to 8.5, the transformation of di-halogenated MePs was further slowed due to the decreasing reactivity of di-MePs to chlorine. The formation of the di-halogenated MePs and their further transformation become considerably faster at Br - concentrations higher than 0.5μM (40μg/L). Nonetheless, the accelerating effect of Br - diminishes in the presence of dissolved organic matter (DOM) extract (Suwannee River humic acid (SRHA)) due to a more rapid consumption of bromine by DOM than chlorine. The effect of Br - on the fate of MeP was less in the tested real water matrices, possibly due to a more rapid bromine consumption by the real water DOM compared to SRHA. A kinetic model was developed based on the determined species-specific second-order rate constants for chlorination/bromination of MeP and its chlorinated and brominated MePs and the transformation pathway information, which could reasonably simulate the transformation of MePs during the chlorination of water in the presence of Br - and selected DOM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B

  4. UK Chemical Nuclear Data Committee request list - 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, A.L.

    1990-03-01

    The 1986 UK request list for chemical nuclear data has been reviewed in detail by members of the UK Chemical Nuclear Data Committee. New requirements for data measurements and evaluations have been identified, and specific requests have been withdrawn. A new UK request list has evolved, and is given in the form of tabulations covering measurements and evaluations. (author)

  5. Prevalence and effects of multiple chemical sensitivities in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Steinemann

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Multiple chemical sensitivities (MCS is a medical condition associated with exposure to common chemical pollutants. The aims of this study are to assess the prevalence of MCS, its overlaps with asthma and fragrance sensitivity, and its health and societal effects in Australia. Data were collected in June 2016 using an on-line survey with a representative national sample (N = 1098 of adults (ages 18–65 in Australia. Results found that, across the country, 6.5% report medically diagnosed MCS, 18.9% report chemical sensitivity (being unusually sensitive to everyday chemicals and chemically formulated products, and 19.9% either or both. Among people with MCS, 74.6% also have diagnosed asthma or an asthma-like condition, and 91.5% have fragrance sensitivity, reporting health problems (such as migraine headaches when exposed to fragranced consumer products (such as air fresheners and cleaning supplies. In addition, among people with MCS, 77.5% are prevented from access to places because of fragranced products, 52.1% lost workdays or a job in the past year due to fragranced product exposure in the workplace, and 55.4% report health effects considered potentially disabling. Results indicate that MCS is a widespread disease, affecting an estimated 1 million adult Australians, with chemical sensitivity affecting another 2 million. Reducing chemical exposure to problematic sources, such as fragranced consumer products, is critical to reduce adverse effects. Keywords: MCS, Multiple chemical sensitivities, Chemical sensitivity, Asthma, Fragrance sensitivity, Fragranced consumer products

  6. Chemical and physical transformations of organic aerosol from the photo-oxidation of open biomass burning emissions in an environmental chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. J. Hennigan; M. A. Miracolo; G. J. Engelhart; A. A. May; A. A. Presto; T. Lee; A. P. Sullivan; G. R. McMeeking; H. Coe; C. E. Wold; W.-M. Hao; J. B. Gilman; W. C. Kuster; J. de Gouw; B. A. Schichtel; J. L. Collett; S. M. Kreidenweis; A. L. Robinson

    2011-01-01

    Smog chamber experiments were conducted to investigate the chemical and physical transformations of organic aerosol (OA) during photo-oxidation of open biomass burning emissions. The experiments were carried out at the US Forest Service Fire Science Laboratory as part of the third Fire Lab at Missoula Experiment (FLAME III). We investigated emissions from 12 different...

  7. Acceptance of nuclear power: The Fukushima effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegrist, Michael; Visschers, Vivianne H.M.

    2013-01-01

    Utilizing a longitudinal study design, the impact of the 2011 accident in Fukushima on acceptance of nuclear power and the evaluation of several scenarios with different percentages of nuclear power were examined. Mail surveys were conducted in the German-speaking part of Switzerland. The first survey took place before the accident in Fukushima (Autumn 2010), the second survey immediately after the accident (March 2011), and the third survey half a year after the accident (October 2011). A sample of 463 persons participated in all three surveys. The accident had a negative impact on the acceptance of nuclear power. The mean change was moderate, and high correlations between the measurement points were observed. Overall, participants thus showed rather stable attitudes towards nuclear power across the three measurement waves. Results of the present study demonstrate the importance of prior beliefs and attitudes for the interpretation of an accident. The evaluation of the various scenarios was strongly influenced by participants’ pre-Fukushima attitudes towards nuclear power. - Highlights: ► Longitudinal studies are important for risk perception research. ► The accident in Fukushima had only a moderate impact on acceptance. ► Acceptance of nuclear power before and after Fukushima was highly correlated. ► People have stable attitudes towards nuclear power

  8. Direct measurement of Lorentz transformation with Doppler effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shao-Guang

    , r is the unit vector from lamphouse point to counters. Or: L (0) L (pi) =L0 (1+(v/c)) L0 (1 - (v/c)) =L0 2 y2 =L2 Or: L ≡ [L(0)L(pi)]1/2 =L0 y , which y ≡ (1 - (v/c)2 )1/2 is just Fitzgerald-Lorentzian contraction-factor. Also, when a light-wave period p is defined as time unit, from Doppler's frequency-shift the count N with p of one period T of moving-clock is: T(q) = N(q) p = T0 /(1+(v/c) cos q) Or: T ≡ (T(0) T(pi))1/2 = T 0 /y , where T0 is the proper period when v = 0, which is just the moving-clock-slower effect. Let r from clock point to lamp-house ((v/c) symbol reverse), Doppler formula in the usual form is: f (q) = 1/T(q) = f0 (1 - (v/c) cos q). Therefore, Lorentz transformation is the square root average of positive and negative directions twice metrical results of Doppler's frequency-shift, which Doppler's once items ( positive and negative v/c ) are counteract only residual twice item (v/c)2 (relativity-factor). Then Lorentz transformation can be directly measured by Doppler's frequency-shift method. The half-life of moving mu-meson is statistical average of many particles, the usual explanation using relativity-factor y is correct. An airship moving simultaneously along contrary directions is impossible, which makes that the relativity-factor y and the twin-paradox are inexistent in the macroscopical movement. Thereby, in the navigations of airship or satellite only use the measurement of Doppler's frequency-shift but have no use for Lorentz transformation.

  9. Effect of potassium on micromorphological and chemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-08-04

    Aug 4, 2009 ... study the effect of potassium on yield and internal leaf tissues composition of cotton ... Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) were applied at 150 mg N/kg soil and 75 mg ..... Copper enzymes in isolated chloroplasts: Polyphenol.

  10. Effect of chemical reaction on unsteady MHD free convective two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of flow parameters on the coefficient of skin friction, Nusselt number and Sherwood number are also tabulated and discussed appropriately. It was observed that the increase in chemical reaction coefficient/parameter suppresses both velocity and concentration profiles. Keywords: Chemical Reaction, MHD, ...

  11. Simulation of the chemical environment of a nuclear explosion with exploding wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Walter; Block, Oliver U.J. [Nuclear Engineering, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS (United States)

    1970-05-15

    The chemical processes in an expanding underground cavity resulting from a nuclear explosion cannot be predicted or controlled as well as such physical characteristics as crater size, magnitude of the outgoing shock wave, or the extent of rock fracturing. However in most underground nuclear explosions it would be desirable to control the chemical and/or physical form and amount of radioactive fallout venting from the explosion. The high temperatures and corresponding high energy densities produced by exploding wires are sufficient to produce in the wire and material immediately surrounding it the temperature (a few thousand degrees) required to simulate the chemical environment of a nuclear explosion in the time interval just preceding the venting of the cavity. The economics and the size of exploding wire apparatus make this type of experiment readily applicable to laboratory study. Design of exploding wire circuits to obtain particular temperatures or energy densities can be completed using several different combinations of circuit and wire conditions. Since the circuit parameters, including charging voltage, capacitor bank capacitance and circuit inductance primarily determine the cost of the necessary laboratory equipment, these parameters should be selected by theoretical expressions while also considering economic factors. Wire parameters are then experimentally determined to produce the most energetic explosions with the selected circuit parameters. A theoretical method applicable to designing exploding wire circuits to produce the desired high temperatures and energy densities in the wire and surrounding sample material has been obtained. The method assumes that a thermal spike of energy is deposited in a low conductivity material (typical of the earth's crust) surrounding the wire. From the assumed temperature distribution in the surrounding sample material the energy which must be deposited in the thermal spike to produce the desired temperature and

  12. Effects of nuclear war on health and health services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report reviews the findings since 1987 in the field of research related to the possible impact of nuclear war and nuclear explosions on health and health services. An annex contains the finding and conclusions of a 1989 United Nations study on the climatic and other effects of nuclear war. 1 tab

  13. Rapid characterization of the chemical constituents of Sijunzi decoction by UHPLC coupled with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zhibo; Wang, Miao; Cai, Yi; Yang, Hongmei; Zhao, Min; Zhao, Chunjie

    2018-06-01

    Sijunzi decoction, a renowned Chinese prescription has long been utilized to treat gastrointestinal problems. In the context of this research work, the use of Ultra high performance liquid chromatography combined with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry was made to separate and characterize the components of Sijunzi decoction. The performance of Liquid chromatography was carried out on a C8 column (150 mm × 2.1 mm, 1.8 μm); moreover, the mobile phase were consisted of 0.2% formic acid (A) and acetonitrile (B). In accordance with the findings, characterization of 120 chemical compounds was performed by liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry. The key constituents among them included ginsenosides (in Radix Ginseng), 16 triterpene carboxylic acids (in Poria), sesquiterpenes (in Rhizoma Atractylodis Macrocephalae), triterpenesaponins (in Glycyrrhizae Radix et Rhizoma Praeparata Cum Melle) as well as flavonoids (in Glycyrrhizae Radix et Rhizoma Praeparata Cum Melle) in Sijunzi decoction. This research developed the bases for prospective research associated with Sijunzi decoction, together with being expected to be useful to rapidly extract and characterize the constituents in other Traditional Chinese herbal formulations. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. PCB transformer fires: the risk in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackmon, K.

    1988-01-01

    It is estimated that 1/2 of the present nuclear power plants operate with PCB-filled transformer equipment. In an attempt to obtain better estimates of clean-up costs in a nuclear power plant under reasonable-loss scenarios, a study was commissioned. This study was a joint venture between Blackmon-Mooring Steamatic Technologies, Inc., (BMS-TECH) and M and M Protection Consultants. This joint study was conducted at a typical pressurized-water reactor plant consisting of two 1000-MW units. Three specific scenarios were selected and analyzed for this typical power plant. These scenarios were: (1) an electrical failure of a transformer in an isolated switch gear room; (2) a transformer exposed to a 55-gallon transient combustion oil fire in the auxiliary building; and (3) a PCB transformer involved in a major turbine lube fire in the turbine building. Based on results of this study, the insurance carriers for this industry implemented an adjustment in their rate structures for nuclear power plants that have PCB equipment

  15. Effect of pairing in nuclear level density at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhine Kumar, A.K.; Modi, Swati; Arumugam, P.

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear level density (NLD) has been an interesting topic for researchers, due its importance in many aspects of nuclear physics, nuclear astrophysics, nuclear medicine, and other applied areas. The calculation of NLD helps us to understand the energy distribution of the excited levels of nuclei, entropy, specific heat, reaction cross sections etc. In this work the effect of temperature and pairing on level-density of the nucleus 116 Sn has been studied

  16. Chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade plutonium nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    These analytical procedures are designed to show whether a given material meets the purchaser's specifications as to plutonium content, effective fissile content, and impurity content. The following procedures are described in detail: plutonium by controlled-potential coulometry; plutonium by amperometric titration with iron(II); free acid by titration in an oxalate solution; free acid by iodate precipitation-potentiometric titration method; uranium by Arsenazo I spectrophotometric method; thorium by thorin spectrophotometric method; iron by 1,10-phenanthroline spectrophotometric method; chloride by thiocyanate spectrophotometric method; fluoride by distillation-spectrophotometric method; sulfate by barium sulfate turbidimetric method; isotopic composition by mass spectrometry; americium-241 by extraction and gamma counting; americium-241 by gamma counting; gamma-emitting fission products, uranium, and thorium by gamma-ray spectroscopy; rare earths by copper spark spectrochemical method; tungsten, niobium (columbium), and tantalum by spectrochemical method; simple preparation by spectrographic analysis for general impurities

  17. Pressure fluctuation analysis for charging pump of chemical and volume control system of nuclear power plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Equipment Failure Root Cause Analysis (ERCA methodology is employed in this paper to investigate the root cause for charging pump’s pressure fluctuation of chemical and volume control system (RCV in pressurized water reactor (PWR nuclear power plant. RCA project task group has been set up at the beginning of the analysis process. The possible failure modes are listed according to the characteristics of charging pump’s actual pressure fluctuation and maintenance experience during the analysis process. And the failure modes are analysed in proper sequence by the evidence-collecting. It suggests that the gradually untightened and loosed shaft nut in service should be the root cause. And corresponding corrective actions are put forward in details.

  18. Transformation of bisdithiocarbamate fungicides and the chemical nature of their residues in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vonk, J.W.

    1975-01-01

    Studies on the fate of 1,2- 14 C-disodium ethylenebisdithiocarbamate (nabam) applied to roots and leaves of cucumber plants under laboratory conditions have revealed that ethylenethiourea (ETU) and dihydro-3 H-imidazodithiazole (DIDT) were major initial breakdown products. On applying nabam to roots, residues in the plants consisted mainly of ETU, which was rapidly metabolized to 2-imidazoline and ethyleneurea. Moreover, a considerable amount of unidentified, mostly polar material was found. After 19 days, 87% of the total radioactivity taken up could be recovered. Of this only 22% could be identified. Two weeks after applying nabam to leaves, about 89% of the applied activity could be recovered. ETU, DIDT, a small amount of 2-imidazoline, and unknown polar material were present in or on the treated leaf. Only 0.3% had moved into the untreated parts. (author)

  19. Improving nuclear regulatory effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Ensuring that nuclear installations are operated and maintained in such a way that their impact on public health and safety is as low as reasonably practicable has been and will continue to be the cornerstone of nuclear regulation. In the past, nuclear incidents provided the main impetus for regulatory change. Today, economic factors, deregulation, technological advancements, government oversight and the general requirements for openness and accountability are leading regulatory bodies to review their effectiveness. In addition, seeking to enhance the present level of nuclear safety by continuously improving the effectiveness of regulatory bodies is seen as one of the ways to strengthen public confidence in the regulatory systems. This report covers the basic concepts underlying nuclear regulatory effectiveness, advances being made and future requirements. The intended audience is primarily nuclear safety regulators, but government authorities, nuclear power plant operators and the general public may also be interested. (author)

  20. A transformation theory of stochastic evolution in Red Moon methodology to time evolution of chemical reaction process in the full atomistic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yuichi; Nagaoka, Masataka

    2017-05-28

    Atomistic information of a whole chemical reaction system, e.g., instantaneous microscopic molecular structures and orientations, offers important and deeper insight into clearly understanding unknown chemical phenomena. In accordance with the progress of a number of simultaneous chemical reactions, the Red Moon method (a hybrid Monte Carlo/molecular dynamics reaction method) is capable of simulating atomistically the chemical reaction process from an initial state to the final one of complex chemical reaction systems. In the present study, we have proposed a transformation theory to interpret the chemical reaction process of the Red Moon methodology as the time evolution process in harmony with the chemical kinetics. For the demonstration of the theory, we have chosen the gas reaction system in which the reversible second-order reaction H 2 + I 2  ⇌ 2HI occurs. First, the chemical reaction process was simulated from the initial configurational arrangement containing a number of H 2 and I 2 molecules, each at 300 K, 500 K, and 700 K. To reproduce the chemical equilibrium for the system, the collision frequencies for the reactions were taken into consideration in the theoretical treatment. As a result, the calculated equilibrium concentrations [H 2 ] eq and equilibrium constants K eq at all the temperatures were in good agreement with their corresponding experimental values. Further, we applied the theoretical treatment for the time transformation to the system and have shown that the calculated half-life τ's of [H 2 ] reproduce very well the analytical ones at all the temperatures. It is, therefore, concluded that the application of the present theoretical treatment with the Red Moon method makes it possible to analyze reasonably the time evolution of complex chemical reaction systems to chemical equilibrium at the atomistic level.

  1. The effect of gender and leisure preference on transformational leadership behaviour of high school students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekinci Nurullah Emir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aimed to investigate transformational leadership behaviors of high school students according to their leisure preference and gender. Randomly chosen 391 high school students from Kutahya voluntarily took part in the study. In the study Transformational Leadership Scale was used as data gathering tool and after evaluation of dispersion of the data Two-way Analysis of Variance was used as a hypothesis test. As a result, this study showed that transformational leadership behavior differs according to gender and also both leisure preference and gender have an effect on transformational leadership behavior of high school students.

  2. Chemical and photochemical degradation of chlorantraniliprole and characterization of its transformation products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lavtižar, V.; van Gestel, C.A.M.; Dolenc, D.; Trebše, P.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed at assessing the photodegradation of the insecticide chlorantraniliprole (CAP) in deionized water and in tap water amended with humic acids and nitrate. Photolysis was carried out under simulated solar or UV-A light. CAP (39μM) photodegradation was slightly faster in tap water than

  3. Characterization of Chemical Exchange Using Relaxation Dispersion of Hyperpolarized Nuclear Spins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mengxiao; Kim, Yaewon; Hilty, Christian

    2017-09-05

    Chemical exchange phenomena are ubiquitous in macromolecules, which undergo conformational change or ligand complexation. NMR relaxation dispersion (RD) spectroscopy based on a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill pulse sequence is widely applied to identify the exchange and measure the lifetime of intermediate states on the millisecond time scale. Advances in hyperpolarization methods improve the applicability of NMR spectroscopy when rapid acquisitions or low concentrations are required, through an increase in signal strength by several orders of magnitude. Here, we demonstrate the measurement of chemical exchange from a single aliquot of a ligand hyperpolarized by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (D-DNP). Transverse relaxation rates are measured simultaneously at different pulsing delays by dual-channel 19 F NMR spectroscopy. This two-point measurement is shown to allow the determination of the exchange term in the relaxation rate expression. For the ligand 4-(trifluoromethyl)benzene-1-carboximidamide binding to the protein trypsin, the exchange term is found to be equal within error limits in neutral and acidic environments from D-DNP NMR spectroscopy, corresponding to a pre-equilibrium of trypsin deprotonation. This finding illustrates the capability for determination of binding mechanisms using D-DNP RD. Taking advantage of hyperpolarization, the ligand concentration in the exchange measurements can reach on the order of tens of μM and protein concentration can be below 1 μM, i.e., conditions typically accessible in drug discovery.

  4. Adolescents' knowledge of nuclear issues and the effects of nuclear war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roscoe, B.; Goodwin, M.P.

    1987-01-01

    Three hundred fifty-seven college students were surveyed to assess later adolescents' awareness of the status of nuclear arms development and possible effects of a nuclear war on people and the environment. Chi-square analyses were performed to determine whether the frequency of correct responses differed with regard to participants' sex, political orientation, and position toward the United States' possession of nuclear weapons. Results suggest that later adolescents are extremely uninformed regarding the current status of nuclear issues and the consequences of a nuclear war. These data, coupled with findings from previous studies reporting children's and adolescents' concerns and fears about nuclear war, indicate that there is a strong need to educate young people concerning nuclear issues

  5. Effect of Biological and Chemical Ripening Agents on the Nutritional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of Biological and Chemical Ripening Agents on the Nutritional and Metal Composition of Banana ( Musa spp ) ... Journal Home > Vol 18, No 2 (2014) > ... curcas leaf were used and compared with a control with no ripening agent.

  6. Investigation of correlations in some chemical impurities and isotope ratios for nuclear forensic purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallenius, M.; Mayer, K.; Nicholl, A.; Horta, J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU) has worked in the area of nuclear forensic science since 1992 when the first seized sample was analysed. From the beginning the analytical tools for seized materials were adapted from safeguards measurements and from materials science. Especially in the view of the origin determination the spectrum of parameters to be taken into account had to be widened. In addition to the development of a comprehensive database on nuclear materials for power reactor fuels, experimental investigations were started to identify characteristic parameters. These systematic investigations comprised the development of methodologies for age determination of Pu and highly enriched uranium, surface roughness determination of UO 2 pellets and n( 18 O)/n( 16 O) measurements in uranium oxides. However, a more profound understanding on the nature of the characteristic chemical impurities and their propagation throughout the entire process appeared necessary in particular for uranium materials. Therefore a systematic research programme was launched in order to better understand which chemical impurities might be considered as characteristic for the origin of the base material. On the other hand some impurities are introduced intentionally during the processing of the material. These impurities might be characteristic for the process used or for the plant where the material was processed. We carried out impurity measurements on uranium ores, on intermediate products (Ammoniumdiuranate or yellow cake) and on (natural) uranium oxides, hence 'vertically' throughout the process in individual facilities. n( 18 O)/n( 16 O) ratio measurements have been proven to provide useful additional information on the geographic origin of the materials. We therefore investigated the n( 18 O)/n( 16 O) isotope ratios in these different compounds, in order to obtain further experimental evidence for a consistent set of materials reportedly originating from the same

  7. Conservation of connectivity of model-space effective interactions under a class of similarity transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Changkui; Gong Yungui; Dong Huining; Reid, Michael F.

    2004-01-01

    Effective interaction operators usually act on a restricted model space and give the same energies (for Hamiltonian) and matrix elements (for transition operators, etc.) as those of the original operators between the corresponding true eigenstates. Various types of effective operators are possible. Those well defined effective operators have been shown to be related to each other by similarity transformation. Some of the effective operators have been shown to have connected-diagram expansions. It is shown in this paper that under a class of very general similarity transformations, the connectivity is conserved. The similarity transformation between Hermitian and non-Hermitian Rayleigh-Schroedinger perturbative effective operators is one of such transformations and hence the connectivity can be deducted from each other

  8. Conservation of connectivity of model-space effective interactions under a class of similarity transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Chang-Kui; Gong, Yungui; Dong, Hui-Ning; Reid, Michael F

    2004-09-15

    Effective interaction operators usually act on a restricted model space and give the same energies (for Hamiltonian) and matrix elements (for transition operators, etc.) as those of the original operators between the corresponding true eigenstates. Various types of effective operators are possible. Those well defined effective operators have been shown to be related to each other by similarity transformation. Some of the effective operators have been shown to have connected-diagram expansions. It is shown in this paper that under a class of very general similarity transformations, the connectivity is conserved. The similarity transformation between Hermitian and non-Hermitian Rayleigh-Schrodinger perturbative effective operators is one of such transformations and hence the connectivity can be deducted from each other.

  9. Association between shortage of energy supply and nuclear gene mutations leading to carcinomatous transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DU, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic bacteria use glycolysis, an oxygen-independent metabolic pathway, whereas energy metabolism in the evolved eukaryotic cell is performed via oxidative phosphorylation, with all eukaryotic cell activities depending upon high energy consumption. However, in cancer cells evolving from eukaryotic cells, the energy metabolism switches from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis. The shortage of energy supply induces cancer cells to acquire specific characteristics. Base pair renewal is the most energy-consuming process in the cell, and shortage of energy supply may lead to errors in this process; the more prominent the shortage in energy supply, the more errors are likely to occur in base pair renewal, resulting in gene mutations and expression of cancer cell characteristics. Thus, shortage of energy supply is associated with carcinomatous transformation.

  10. Coordination chemistry of the 212Pb/212Bi nuclear transformation: Alpha-emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, N.J.; Harris, W.R.; Keen, C.L.; Cooper, S.R.

    1992-07-01

    Subdivisions of this project are: (a) the synthesis of prototypical thiolate and dithiocarbamate based hexacoordinate complexes, (b) radiochemical engineering for generation of no-carrier-added lead and bismuth radioelements, (c) the first isolation of bismuth-binding proteins from in vivo studies with cyclotron produced 205/206 Bi tracer, and (d) initial development of transport mechanisms for the intracellular radiobiological study of alpha emitting bismuth, and (e) the initiation of chemical equilibrium studies and biochemical pathways with cyclotron-produced, no-carrier-added, 203 Pb (T 1/2 = 51 hr)

  11. Coordination chemistry of the sup 212 Pb/ sup 212 Bi nuclear transformation: Alpha-emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parks, N.J.; Harris, W.R.; Keen, C.L.; Cooper, S.R.

    1992-07-01

    Subdivisions of this project are: (a) the synthesis of prototypical thiolate and dithiocarbamate based hexacoordinate complexes, (b) radiochemical engineering for generation of no-carrier-added lead and bismuth radioelements, (c) the first isolation of bismuth-binding proteins from in vivo studies with cyclotron produced {sup 205/206}Bi tracer, and (d) initial development of transport mechanisms for the intracellular radiobiological study of alpha emitting bismuth, and (e) the initiation of chemical equilibrium studies and biochemical pathways with cyclotron-produced, no-carrier-added, {sup 203}Pb (T{sub 1/2} = 51 hr).

  12. Effects of chemical treatments on hemp fibre structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabir, M.M., E-mail: kabirm@usq.edu.au [Centre of Excellence in Engineered Fibre Composite (CEEFC), Faculty of Engineering and Surveying, University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, Queensland 4350 (Australia); Wang, H. [Centre of Excellence in Engineered Fibre Composite (CEEFC), Faculty of Engineering and Surveying, University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, Queensland 4350 (Australia); Lau, K.T. [Centre of Excellence in Engineered Fibre Composite (CEEFC), Faculty of Engineering and Surveying, University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, Queensland 4350 (Australia); Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong); Cardona, F. [Centre of Excellence in Engineered Fibre Composite (CEEFC), Faculty of Engineering and Surveying, University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, Queensland 4350 (Australia)

    2013-07-01

    In this study, hemp fibres were treated with alkali, acetyl and silane chemicals. Fibre constituents such as cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin constituents were separated from treated fibres. The chemical and thermal influences of these constituents on the treated fibres were examined by using scanning electron microscope (SEM), fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Experimental results revealed that, hemicellulose was degraded faster than that of cellulose and lignin. Cellulose exhibited better thermal stability and lignin was degraded in a wide range of temperatures. The hydrophilic nature of the fibres was predominantly caused by the presence of hemicellulose and then lignin constituents. Hemicellulose and lignin were mostly removed by the alkalisation with higher concentrations of NaOH, followed by acetylation. Silane treatment could not remove the hemicellulose and lignin, rather this treatment facilitated coupling with the fibre constituents.

  13. Effects of chemical treatments on hemp fibre structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabir, M.M.; Wang, H.; Lau, K.T.; Cardona, F.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, hemp fibres were treated with alkali, acetyl and silane chemicals. Fibre constituents such as cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin constituents were separated from treated fibres. The chemical and thermal influences of these constituents on the treated fibres were examined by using scanning electron microscope (SEM), fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Experimental results revealed that, hemicellulose was degraded faster than that of cellulose and lignin. Cellulose exhibited better thermal stability and lignin was degraded in a wide range of temperatures. The hydrophilic nature of the fibres was predominantly caused by the presence of hemicellulose and then lignin constituents. Hemicellulose and lignin were mostly removed by the alkalisation with higher concentrations of NaOH, followed by acetylation. Silane treatment could not remove the hemicellulose and lignin, rather this treatment facilitated coupling with the fibre constituents.

  14. Chemical composition and prophylactic effects of Saturja ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: The main components of SKEO were carvacrol (78.8%), thymol (7.5%), and beta-Bisabolene (1.2%). Findings of prophylactic effects revealed that mortality rate of infected mice was 8 days after oral administration of SKEO at the concentration of 0.2 and 0.3ml/kg (P<0.05). In contrast, this value for control group was ...

  15. Absence of PDGF-induced, PKC-independent c-fos expression in a chemically transformed C3H/10T1/2 cell clone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassbotn, F S; Skar, R; Holmsen, H; Lillehaug, J R

    1992-09-01

    The effect of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) on c-fos mRNA transcription was studied in the immortalized mouse embryo fibroblast C3H/10T1/2 Cl 8 (10T1/2) cells and the chemically transformed, tumorigenic subclone C3H/10T1/2 Cl 16 (Cl 16). In the 10T1/2 cells as well as the Cl 16 subclone, the dose-dependent PDGF stimulation of c-fos mRNA synthesis was similar in both logarithmically growing and confluent cultures. c-fos mRNA was induced severalfold by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) in both 10T1/2 and Cl 16. Down-regulation of protein kinase C (PKC) activity by TPA pretreatment inhibited PDGF-stimulated c-fos mRNA expression in Cl 16 cells but did not affect this induction in the 10T1/2 cells. This inhibition was not a general phenomenon of 3-methylcholanthrene-mediated transformation of 10T1/2 cells since experiments with another transformed 10T1/2 cell clone, C3H/10T1/2 TPA 482, gave qualitatively the same results as the 10T1/2 cells. Receptor binding experiments showed that the nontransformed and transformed cells had a comparable number of PDGF receptors, 1.3 x 10(5) and 0.7 x 10(5) receptors per cell, respectively. Furthermore, cAMP-induced c-fos expression induced by forskolin is formerly shown to be independent of PKC down-regulation. In our experiments, forskolin induced c-fos expression in both clones. However, PKC down-regulation inhibited the forskolin-induced c-fos expression in Cl 16 cells. This apparently demonstrates cross talk between PKC and PKA in the c-fos induction pathway. The present results provide evidence for