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Sample records for chemical deposition method

  1. Tungsten chemical vapor deposition method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Kiichi; Takeda, Nobuo.

    1993-07-13

    A tungsten chemical vapor deposition method is described, comprising: a first step of selectively growing a first thin tungsten film of a predetermined thickness in a desired region on the surface of a silicon substrate by reduction of a WF[sub 6] gas introduced into an atmosphere of a predetermined temperature containing said silicon substrate; and a second step of selectively growing a second tungsten film of a predetermined thickness on said first thin tungsten film by reduction of said WF[sub 6] with a silane gas further introduced into said atmosphere, wherein the surface state of said substrate is monitored by a pyrometer and the switching from said first step to said second step is performed when the emissivity of infrared light from the substrate surfaces reaches a predetermined value.

  2. Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition as a Method for the Deposition of Peptide Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-17

    peptide nanotubes, plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, nano assembly 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18...Using physical vapor deposition ( PVD ) well-ordered assemblies of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) composed of dipeptide subunits are obtained on various...for the deposition of thin films (Figure 1b). A. B. Figure 1. (a) Illustration of physical vapor deposition ( PVD ) process of diphenylalanine

  3. Discrete formulation of mixed finite element methods for vapor deposition chemical reaction equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Zhen-dong; ZHOU Yan-jie; ZHU Jiang

    2007-01-01

    The vapor deposition chemical reaction processes, which are of extremely extensive applications, can be classified as a mathematical modes by the following governing nonlinear partial differential equations containing velocity vector,temperature field,pressure field,and gas mass field.The mixed finite element(MFE)method is employed to study the system of equations for the vapor deposition chemical reaction processes.The semidiscrete and fully discrete MFE formulations are derived.And the existence and convergence(error estimate)of the semidiscrete and fully discrete MFE solutions are deposition chemical reaction processes,the numerical solutions of the velocity vector,the temperature field,the pressure field,and the gas mass field can be found out simultaneonsly.Thus,these researches are not only of important theoretical means,but also of extremely extensive applied vistas.

  4. Using different chemical methods for deposition of copper selenide thin films and comparison of their characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güzeldir, Betül; Sağlam, Mustafa

    2015-11-05

    Different chemical methods such as Successive Ionic Layer Adsorption and Reaction (SILAR), spin coating and spray pyrolysis methods were used to deposite of copper selenide thin films on the glass substrates. The films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) spectroscopy and UV-vis spectrophotometry. The XRD and SEM studies showed that all the films exhibit polycrystalline nature and crystallinity of copper selenide thin films prepared with spray pyrolysis greater than spin coating and SILAR methods. From SEM and AFM images, it was observed copper selenide films were uniform on the glass substrates without any visible cracks or pores. The EDX spectra showed that the expected elements exist in the thin films. Optical absorption studies showed that the band gaps of copper selenide thin films were in the range 2.84-2.93 eV depending on different chemical methods. The refractive index (n), optical static and high frequency dielectric constants (ε0, ε∞) values were calculated by using the energy bandgap values for each deposition method. The obtained results from different chemical methods revealed that the spray pyrolysis technique is the best chemical deposition method to fabricate copper selenide thin films. This absolute advantage was lead to play key roles on performance and efficiency electrochromic and photovoltaic devices.

  5. Low Temperature Growth of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes via Floating Catalyst Chemical Vapor Deposition Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.R. Atiyan; D.R. Awang Biak; F. Ahmadun; I.S. Ahamad; F. Mohd Yasin; H. Mohamed Yusoff

    2011-01-01

    Synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) below 600℃ using supporting catalyst chemical vapor deposition method was reported by many research groups. However, the floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition received less attention due to imperfect nanotubes produced. In this work, the effects of varying the preheating temperature on the synthesis of CNT were investigated. The reaction temperature was set at 570℃. The preheating set temperature was varied from 150 to 400℃ at 50℃ interval. Three O-ring shape heating mantels were used as heating source for the preheater. In situ monitoring device was used to observe the temperature profile in the reactor. Benzene and ferrocene were used as the carbon source and catalyst precursor, respectively. Vertically aligned CNTs were synthesized when the preheating temperature was set at 400℃. When the preheating temperature was increased up to 400℃, both the length and the alignment of CNTs produced were improved.

  6. Structural, Optical and Electrical Properties of Nanocrystalline Cuprous Oxide Thin Film Deposited By Chemical Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Bansilal Ahirrao

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Cuprous oxide (Cu2O is an interesting p-type semiconductor material used in solar cell applications.  The Modified Chemical Bath Deposition (M-CBD method is suitable for growing thin multilayer structure due to low deposition temperature. This method does not require any sophisticated instrument and substrate need not to be conductive. The nanocrystalline Cu2O thin films were deposited on glass substrates by M-CBD method. The deposited films were characterized by different characterization techniques to study structural, surface morphological, optical and electrical properties. The structural studies show that, the formation of Cu2O thin films with an average crystallite size of 14 nm. Optical studies show a direct band gap 2.48 eV. The room temperature electrical resistivity is of the order of 1.3 kW-cm and activation energy 0.33 eV. The films exhibit p-type electrical conductivity as seen by thermo-emf measurements.

  7. Fabrication of ZnO nanorod using spray-pyrolysis and chemical bath deposition method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramadhani, Muhammad F., E-mail: brian@tf.itb.ac.id; Pasaribu, Maruli A. H., E-mail: brian@tf.itb.ac.id; Yuliarto, Brian, E-mail: brian@tf.itb.ac.id; Nugraha, E-mail: brian@tf.itb.ac.id [Advanced Functional Materials Laboratory, Engineering Physics Department Faculty of Industrial Technology, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia)

    2014-02-24

    ZnO thin films with nanorod structure were deposited using Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis method for seed growth, and Chemical Bath Deposition (CBD) for nanorod growth. High purity Zn-hydrate and Urea are used to control Ph were dissolved in ethanol and aqua bidest in Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis process. Glass substrate was placed above the heater plate of reaction chamber, and subsequently sprayed with the range duration of 5, 10 and 20 minutes at the temperatures of 3500 C. As for the Chemical Bath Deposition, the glass substrate with ZnO seed on the surface was immerse to Zn-hydrate, HMTA (Hexa Methylene Tetra Amine) and deionized water solution for duration of 3, 5 and 7 hour and temperatures of 600 C, washed in distilled water, dried, and annealed at 3500 C for an hour. The characterization of samples was carried out to reveal the surface morphology using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). From the data, the combination of 5 minutes of Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis process and 3 hour of CBD has showed the best structure of nanorod. Meanwhile the longer Spraying process and CBD yield the bigger nanorod structure that have been made, and it makes the films more dense which make the nanorod collide each other and as a result produce unsymetric nanorod structure.

  8. Synthesis and Characterization of Tin(IV) Oxide Obtained by Chemical Vapor Deposition Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagirnyak, Svitlana V.; Lutz, Victoriya A.; Dontsova, Tatiana A.; Astrelin, Igor M.

    2016-07-01

    The effect of precursors on the characteristics of tin oxide obtained by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method was investigated. The synthesis of nanosized tin(IV) oxide was carried out with the use of two different precursors: tin(II) oxalate obtained using tin chloride(II) and oxalic acid; tin(II) oxalate obtained using tin chloride(II); and ammonium oxalate. The synthesized tin(IV) oxide samples were studied by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and optical spectra. The lattice parameters of tin(IV) oxide samples were defined, the bandgap of samples were calculated.

  9. Synthesis and Characterization of Tin(IV) Oxide Obtained by Chemical Vapor Deposition Method

    OpenAIRE

    Nagirnyak, Svitlana V.; Lutz, Victoriya A.; Dontsova, Tatiana A.; Astrelin, Igor M.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of precursors on the characteristics of tin oxide obtained by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method was investigated. The synthesis of nanosized tin(IV) oxide was carried out with the use of two different precursors: tin(II) oxalate obtained using tin chloride(II) and oxalic acid; tin(II) oxalate obtained using tin chloride(II); and ammonium oxalate. The synthesized tin(IV) oxide samples were studied by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and optical spectra. The lattice parame...

  10. Faraday effect of polycrystalline bismuth iron garnet thin film prepared by mist chemical vapor deposition method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Situ; Kamakura, Ryosuke; Murai, Shunsuke; Fujita, Koji; Tanaka, Katsuhisa

    2017-01-01

    We have synthesized polycrystalline thin film composed of a single phase of metastable bismuth iron garnet, Bi3Fe5O12, on a fused silica substrate, one of the most widely utilized substrates in the solid-state electronics, by using mist chemical vapor deposition (mist CVD) method. The phase purity and stoichiometry are confirmed by X-ray diffraction and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. The resultant thin film shows a small surface roughness of 3.251 nm. The saturation magnetization at room temperature is 1200 G, and the Faraday rotation angle at 633 nm reaches -5.2 deg/μm. Both the magnetization and the Faraday rotation angles are somewhat higher than those of polycrystalline BIG thin films prepared by other methods.

  11. Chemically deposited tin sulphide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akkari, A., E-mail: anis.akkari@ies.univ-montp2.f [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Condensee, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis El Manar, Tunisie 2092 (Tunisia); Institut d' Electronique du Sud, Unite Mixte de Recherche 5214 UM2-CNRS (ST2i), Universite Montpellier 2, Place Eugene Bataillon, CC 082, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Guasch, C. [Institut d' Electronique du Sud, Unite Mixte de Recherche 5214 UM2-CNRS (ST2i), Universite Montpellier 2, Place Eugene Bataillon, CC 082, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Kamoun-Turki, N. [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Condensee, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis El Manar, Tunisie 2092 (Tunisia)

    2010-02-04

    SnS thin films were deposited on glass substrates after multi-deposition runs by chemical bath deposition from aqueous solution containing 30 ml triethanolamine (TEA) (C{sub 6}H{sub 15}NO{sub 3}) (50%), 10 ml thioacetamide (CH{sub 3}CSNH{sub 2}), 8 ml ammonia (NH{sub 3}) solution and 10 ml of Sn{sup 2+}(0.1 M). These films were characterised with X-ray diffraction (XRD), with scanning electron microscopy, and with spectrophotometric measurements. The obtained thin films exhibit the zinc blend structure, the crystallinity seems to be improved as the film thickness increases and the band gap energy is found to be about 1.76 eV for film prepared after six depositions runs.

  12. Highly conducting phosphorous doped Nc-Si:H thin films deposited at high deposition rate by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waman, V S; Kamble, M M; Ghosh, S S; Mayabadi, Azam; Sathe, V G; Amalnekar, D P; Pathan, H M; Jadkar, S R

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we report the synthesis of highly conducting phosphorous doped hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H) films at substantially low substrate temperature (200 degrees C) by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HW-CVD) method using pure silane (SiH4) and phosphine (PH3) gas mixture without hydrogen dilution. Structural, optical and electrical properties of these films were investigated as a function of PH3 gas-phase ratio. The characterization of these films by low-angle X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy revealed that, the incorporation of phosphorous in nc-Si:H induces an amorphization in the nc-Si:H film structure. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis indicates that hydrogen predominately incorporated in phosphorous doped n-type nc-Si:H films mainly in di-hydrogen species (Si-H2) and poly-hydrogen (Si-H2)n bonded species signifying that the films become porous, and micro-void rich. We have observed high band gap (1.97-2.37 eV) in the films, though the hydrogen content is low (< 1.4 at.%) over the entire range of PH3 gas-phase ratio studied. Under the optimum deposition conditions, phosphorous doped nc-Si:H films with high dark conductivity (sigma Dark -5.3 S/cm), low charge-carrier activation energy (E(act) - 132 meV) and high band gap (- 2.01 eV), low hydrogen content (- 0.74 at.%) were obtained at high deposition rate (12.9 angstroms/s).

  13. Continuous production of carbon nanotubes and diamond films by swirled floating catalyst chemical vapour deposition method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.E. Iyuke

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Various techniques for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs are being developed to meet an increasing demand as a result of their versatile applications. Swirled floating catalyst chemical vapour deposition (SFCCVD is one of these techniques. This method was used to synthesise CNTs on a continuous basis using acetylene gas as a carbon source, ferrocene dissolved in xylene as a catalyst precursor, and both hydrogen and argon as carrier gases. Transmission electron microscopy analyses revealed that a mixture of single and multi-wall carbon nanotubes and other carbon nanomaterials were produced within the pyrolytic temperature range of 900–1 100°C and acetylene flow rate range of 118–370 ml min–1. Image comparison of raw and purified products showed that low contents of iron particles and amorphous carbon were contained in the synthesised carbon nanotubes. Diamond films were produced at high ferrocene concentration, hydrogen flow rate and pyrolysis temperatures, while carbon nanoballs were formed and attached to the surface of theCNTs at low ferrocene content and low pyrolysis temperature.

  14. Femtosecond Transient Absorption Studies in Cadmium Selenide Nanocrystal Thin Films Prepared by Chemical Bath Deposition Method

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    M. C. Rath

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamics of photo-excited carrier relaxation processes in cadmium selenide nanocrystal thin films prepared by chemical bath deposition method have been studied by nondegenerate femtosecond transient pump-probe spectroscopy. The carriers were generated by exciting at 400 nm laser light and monitored by several other wavelengths. The induced absorption followed by a fast bleach recovery observed near and above the bandgap indicates that the photo-excited carriers (electrons are first trapped by the available traps and then the trapped electrons absorb the probe light to show a delayed absorption process. The transient decay kinetics was found to be multiexponential in nature. The short time constant, <1 picosecond, was attributed to the trapping of electrons by the surface and/or deep traps and the long time constant, ≥20 picoseconds, was due to the recombination of the trapped carriers. A very little difference in the relaxation processes was observed in the samples prepared at bath temperatures from 25∘C to 60∘C.

  15. Purification of Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes Grown by a Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A procedure for purification of single-walled carbon nanotubes(SWNTs) grown by the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of carbon monooxide has been developed. Based on the result from TGA/DTA of as-prepared sample, the oxidation temperature was determined. The process included sonication, oxidation and acid washing steps. The purity and yield after purification were determined and estimated by TEM. Moreover, for the first time, a loop structure for CVD SWNTs has been observed.

  16. NiS/ZnS multilayer thinfilm prepared by chemical bath deposition method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuvaloshini, J.; Ravi, G.; Shanmugavadivu, Ra.

    2013-06-01

    NiS/ZnS multilayer thin films were prepared by Chemical Bath Deposition (CBD) technique by successive coatings of nickel, zinc and sulphur. The X-ray diffraction was used to obtain structural characterization for the multilayer thinfilms, the crystalline size of 50 nm. The Scanning Electron Microscope techniques were employed to study the internal structure and indentified as of hexagonal structure. An EDAX spectrum confirms the compositional analysis of nickel, zinc and sulphur in nominal composition. The photoluminescence behaviour of NiS/ZnS multilayered system consists in the superposition independent photoluminescence emission in blue shift.

  17. Effect of Reaction Temperature of CdS Buffer Layers by Chemical Bath Deposition Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye Jin; Kim, Chae-Woong; Jung, Duk Young; Jeong, Chaehwan

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated CdS deposition on a Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) film via chemical bath deposition (CBD) in order to obtain a high-quality optimized buffer layer. The thickness and reaction temperature (from 50 degrees C to 65 degrees C) were investigated, and we found that an increase in the reaction temperature during CBD, resulted in a thicker CdS layer. We obtained a thin film with a thickness of 50 nm at a reaction temperature of 60 degrees C, which also exhibited the highest photoelectric conversion efficiency for use in solar cells. Room temperature time-resolved photoluminescence (TR-PL) measurements were performed on the Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) thin film and CdS/CIGS samples to determine the recombination process of the photo-generated minority carrier. The device performance was found to be dependent on the thickness of the CdS layer. As the thickness of the CdS increases, the fill factor and the series resistance increased to 61.66% and decreased to 8.35 Ω, respectively. The best condition was observed at a reaction temperature of 60 degrees C, and its conversion efficiency was 12.20%.

  18. Microstructure and Mechanics of Superconductor Epitaxy via the Chemical Solution Deposition Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frederick F. Lange

    2006-11-30

    Executive Summary: Initially the funds were sufficient funds were awarded to support one graduate student and one post-doc. Lange, though other funds, also supported a graduate intern from ETH Zurich, Switzerland for a period of 6 months. The initial direction was to study the chemical solution deposition method to understand the microstructural and mechanical phenomena that currently limit the production of thick film, reliable superconductor wires. The study was focused on producing thicker buffer layer(s) on Ni-alloy substrates produced by the RABiTS method. It focused on the development of the microstructure during epitaxy, and the mechanical phenomena that produce cracks during dip-coating, pyrolysis (decomposition of precursors during heating), crystallization and epitaxy. The initial direction of producing thicker layers of a know buffer layer material was redirected by co-workers at ORNL, in an attempt to epitaxially synthesize a potential buffer layer material, LaMnO3, via the solution route. After a more than a period of 6 months that showed that the LaMnO3 reacted with the Ni-W substrate at temperatures that could produce epitaxy, reviewers at the annual program review strongly recommended that the research was not yielding positive results. The only positive result presented at the meeting was that much thicker films could be produce by incorporating a polymer into the precursor that appeared to increase the precursor’s resistance to crack growth. Thus, to continue the program, the objectives were changed to find compositions with the perovskite structure that would be a) chemically compatible with either the Ni-W RABiTS or the MgO IBAD Ni-alloy substrates, and produce a better lattice parameter fit between either of the two substrates. At the start of the second year, the funding was reduced to 2/3’s of the first year level, which required the termination of the post-doc after approximately 5 months into the second year. From then on, further

  19. Synthesis and characterization of flower-like ZnSe nanostructured thin films by chemical bath deposition (CBD) method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakiyaraj, G.; Dhanasekaran, R.

    2013-04-01

    Flower-like zinc selenide nanostructured thin films were successfully prepared by a chemical bath deposition method on non-conducting glass substrate in an aqueous alkaline medium using sodium selenosulphate as Se2- ion source. The as-deposited films have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM), energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), optical absorption, and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). The XRD studies reveal that the as-deposited ZnSe thin film is nanocrystalline with a face-centered cubic phase. SEM image shows the tens to hundreds of petals are self-assembled within a single nanoflower. The direct optical band gap ` E g' for as-deposited flower-like ZnSe thin films is found to be 2.80 eV. Room temperature PL measurement indicates that the as-deposited cubic ZnSe thin films have a near band edge (NBE) emission peaked at around 440 nm (2.81 eV) and broad weak band emission peak from 552 nm (2.24 eV) to 658 nm (1.88 eV). The strong NBE emission from the flower-like ZnSe nanostructured thin films reveals their potential as building for optoelectronic devices.

  20. Chemical solution deposition method of fabricating highly aligned MgO templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [Knoxville, TN; Sathyamurthy, Srivatsan [Knoxville, TN; Aytug, Tolga [Knoxville, TN; Arendt, Paul N [Los Alamos, NM; Stan, Liliana [Los Alamos, NM; Foltyn, Stephen R [Los Alamos, NM

    2012-01-03

    A superconducting article includes a substrate having an untextured metal surface; an untextured barrier layer of La.sub.2Zr.sub.2O.sub.7 or Gd.sub.2Zr.sub.2O.sub.7 supported by and in contact with the surface of the substrate; a biaxially textured buffer layer supported by the untextured barrier layer; and a biaxially textured superconducting layer supported by the biaxially textured buffer layer. Moreover, a method of forming a buffer layer on a metal substrate includes the steps of: providing a substrate having an untextured metal surface; coating the surface of the substrate with a barrier layer precursor; converting the precursor to an untextured barrier layer; and depositing a biaxially textured buffer layer above and supported by the untextured barrier layer.

  1. Production of HfO2 thin films using different methods: chemical bath deposition, SILAR and sol-gel process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariper, İ. A.

    2014-08-01

    Hafnium oxide thin films (HOTFs) were successfully deposited onto amorphous glasses using chemical bath deposition, successive ionic layer absorption and reaction (SILAR), and sol-gel methods. The same reactive precursors were used for all of the methods, and all of the films were annealed at 300°C in an oven (ambient conditions). After this step, the optical and structural properties of the films produced by using the three different methods were compared. The structures of the films were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The optical properties are investigated using the ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) spectroscopic technique. The film thickness was measured via atomic force microscopy (AFM) in the tapping mode. The surface properties and elemental ratios of the films were investigated and measured by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The lowest transmittance and the highest reflectance values were observed for the films produced using the SILAR method. In addition, the most intense characteristic XRD peak was observed in the diffraction pattern of the film produced using the SILAR method, and the greatest thickness and average grain size were calculated for the film produced using the SILAR method. The films produced using SILAR method contained fewer cracks than those produced using the other methods. In conclusion, the SILAR method was observed to be the best method for the production of HOTFs.

  2. Laboratory investigations on the use of chemical methods for the prevention of paraffin deposits in oil wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liszka, K.; Koehsling, Z.; Jewulski, J.; Ogorzakek, A.

    1970-06-01

    Two major reasons for paraffin precipitation in oil wells are the decrease in temperature caused by the evolving and expanding gas and the accompanied change of the crude oil's physical properties, such as decreased solubility of heavier hydrocarbon components. Seven industrial solvents were tested for their merits in removal of paraffin deposits from production wells and the formation immediately adjacent to the well bore. The tests were made under various temperature conditions; the methods of testing is briefly described. The solubility of paraffin as a function of temperature for the 7 chemicals tested is illustrated in 4 graphs.

  3. Preliminary viability studies of fibroblastic cells cultured on microcrystalline and nanocrystalline diamonds produced by chemical vapour deposition method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Amélia Rodrigues

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Implant materials used in orthopedics surgery have demonstrated some disadvantages, such as metallic corrosion processes, generation of wear particles, inflammation reactions and bone reabsorption in the implant region. The diamond produced through hot-filament chemical vapour deposition method is a new potential biomedical material due to its chemical inertness, extreme hardness and low coefficient of friction. In the present study we analysis two samples: the microcrystalline diamond and the nanocrystalline diamond. The aim of this study was to evaluate the surface properties of the diamond samples by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. Cell viability and morphology were assessed using thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide, cytochemical assay and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The results revealed that the two samples did not interfere in the cell viability, however the proliferation of fibroblasts cells observed was comparatively higher with the nanocrystalline diamond.

  4. Preliminary viability studies of fibroblastic cells cultured on microcrystalline and nanocrystalline diamonds produced by chemical vapour deposition method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Amélia Rodrigues

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Implant materials used in orthopedics surgery have demonstrated some disadvantages, such as metallic corrosion processes, generation of wear particles, inflammation reactions and bone reabsorption in the implant region. The diamond produced through hot-filament chemical vapour deposition method is a new potential biomedical material due to its chemical inertness, extreme hardness and low coefficient of friction. In the present study we analysis two samples: the microcrystalline diamond and the nanocrystalline diamond. The aim of this study was to evaluate the surface properties of the diamond samples by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. Cell viability and morphology were assessed using thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide, cytochemical assay and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The results revealed that the two samples did not interfere in the cell viability, however the proliferation of fibroblasts cells observed was comparatively higher with the nanocrystalline diamond.

  5. Ni nanoparticles prepared by simple chemical method for the synthesis of Ni/NiO-multi-layered graphene by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mokhtar; Remalli, Nagarjuna; Gedela, Venkataramana; Padya, Balaji; Jain, Pawan Kumar; Al-Fatesh, Ahmed; Rana, Usman Ali; Srikanth, Vadali V. S. S.

    2017-02-01

    A new chemical method was used to obtain a high yield of nickel nanoparticles (Ni-NPs). The effect of solvent (distilled water, ethylene glycol, and ethanol) and surfactant (oleic acid and polyvinyl pyrrolidinone) on the morphology and crystallinity of the synthesized Ni-NPs has been investigated. The experimental results revealed that among the solvents mentioned above, ethanol gives the best results in terms of complete reduction, controlled morphology and size distribution of Ni-NPs. The surfactants played an important role in impeding the agglomeration and surface oxidation of Ni-NPs. The surfactants also affected the morphology of the Ni-NPs. The synthesized Ni-NPs are found to be quite stable in air. The best of the synthesized Ni-NPs were effectively used as catalysts for the synthesis of Ni/NiO-multi-layered graphene using catalytic chemical vapor deposition technique.

  6. Simple Chemical Vapor Deposition Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a process commonly used for the synthesis of thin films for several important technological applications, for example, microelectronics, hard coatings, and smart windows. Unfortunately, the complexity and prohibitive cost of CVD equipment makes it seldom available for undergraduate chemistry students. Here, a…

  7. Synthesis of Nanocrystalline SnOx (x = 1–2 Thin Film Using a Chemical Bath Deposition Method with Improved Deposition Time, Temperature and pH

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    Zulkarnain Zainal

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystalline SnOx (x = 1–2 thin films were prepared on glass substrates by a simple chemical bath deposition method. Triethanolamine was used as complexing agent to decrease time and temperature of deposition and shift the pH of the solution to the noncorrosive region. The films were characterized for composition, surface morphology, structure and optical properties. X-ray diffraction analysis confirms that SnOx thin films consist of a polycrystalline structure with an average grain size of 36 nm. Atomic force microscopy studies show a uniform grain distribution without pinholes. The elemental composition was evaluated by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The average O/Sn atomic percentage ratio is 1.72. Band gap energy and optical transition were determined from optical absorbance data. The film was found to exhibit direct and indirect transitions in the visible spectrum with band gap values of about 3.9 and 3.7 eV, respectively. The optical transmittance in the visible region is 82%. The SnOx nanocrystals exhibit an ultraviolet emission band centered at 392 nm in the vicinity of the band edge, which is attributed to the well-known exciton transition in SnOx. Photosensitivity was detected in the positive region under illumination with white light.

  8. Unusual Blueshifting of Optical Band Gap of CdS Nanocrystals through a Chemical Bath Deposition Method

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    Shu Qing Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available CdS nanocrystals are synthesized through a chemical bath deposition method. After annealing, these nanocrystals are enlarged according to Scherrer’s formula. Small nanocrystals display wide band gaps as a result of the quantum effect experienced by nanocrystals of a certain size. However, the absorption edge and green and red emissions of annealed CdS nanocrystals show obvious blueshift compared with the as-grown ones. After annealing, the intensity ratio of these green and red emissions increases, which indicated that the defect states are reduced. Therefore, the improvement in crystalline quality and the reduced strain contribute to the unusual blueshifting of the optical band gap and of the green and red emissions.

  9. Large-scale Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes by Catalytic Chemical Vapor Deposition Method and Their Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Morinobu

    2005-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes consisting of rolled graphene layer built from sp2-units have attracted the imagination of scientists as one-dimensional macromolecules. Their unusual physical and chemical properties make them useful in the fabrication of nanocomposite, nanoelectronic device and sensor etc. In this study, the recent hot topics "highly pure and crystalline double walled carbon nanotubes" will be described because it is expected that these tubes are thermally and structurally stable, and also contain small-sized tubes (below 2 nm). Among the recent applications of carbon nanotubes, micro-catheter fabricated from high purity carbon nanotubes as filler and nylon as matrix exhibited quite low blood coagulation and also reduced thrombogenity. It is envisaged that carbon nanotubes will play an important role in the development of nano-technology in the near-future.

  10. Regression Methods for Virtual Metrology of Layer Thickness in Chemical Vapor Deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Purwins, Hendrik; Barak, Bernd; Nagi, Ahmed;

    2014-01-01

    The quality of wafer production in semiconductor manufacturing cannot always be monitored by a costly physical measurement. Instead of measuring a quantity directly, it can be predicted by a regression method (Virtual Metrology). In this paper, a survey on regression methods is given to predict...... expert knowledge used for a priori variable selection further enhances the performance slightly. The results confirm earlier findings that Virtual Metrology can benefit from the robustness of SVR, an adaptive generic method that performs well even if no process knowledge is applied. However...

  11. Method of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of diamond using methanol-based solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeng, Yonhua (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Briefly described, methods of forming diamond are described. A representative method, among others, includes: providing a substrate in a reaction chamber in a non-magnetic-field microwave plasma system; introducing, in the absence of a gas stream, a liquid precursor substantially free of water and containing methanol and at least one carbon and oxygen containing compound having a carbon to oxygen ratio greater than one, into an inlet of the reaction chamber; vaporizing the liquid precursor; and subjecting the vaporized precursor, in the absence of a carrier gas and in the absence in a reactive gas, to a plasma under conditions effective to disassociate the vaporized precursor and promote diamond growth on the substrate in a pressure range from about 70 to 130 Torr.

  12. Preparation of a-Si and a-Si-Alloy Films Using an Ion-Gun Chemical Vapor Deposition Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haku, Hisao; Sayama, Katsunobu; Matsuoka, Tsugufumi; Tsuda, Shinya; Nakano, Shoichi; Ohnishi, Michitoshi; Kuwano, Yukinori

    1991-07-01

    As a new amorphous-silicon (a-Si) fabrication technique, an ion-gun chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method, in which ions add energy to surface reactions, has been developed. The ion source employed in this gun is of the hot cathode type with a multicapillary anode which creates a collimated gas flow. A-Si:H and a-Ge:H films, fabricated at the substrate temperature of 130°C, show low dihydride bond density and high photosensitivity (4.0× 105 at Eopt˜1.95 eV and 5.1 at Eopt˜1.03 eV, respectively). In addition, a double ion-gun CVD method, for which the energy of two kinds of ion species can be independently controlled, has been developed for fabricating high-quality a-Si-alloy films. Highly photoconductive a-SiGe:H films with low optical gaps (<1.3 eV) were obtained using this fabrication method.

  13. In-Situ Synchrotron X-ray Study of the Phase and Texture Evolution of Ceria and Superconductor Films Deposited by Chemical Solution Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yue, Zhao; Grivel, Jean-Claude; He, Dong

    2012-01-01

    In situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction is used to study the phase and texture formation of ceria based films and superconductor films deposited by the chemical solution method on technical substrates. Combined analysis using in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry/differential ther......In situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction is used to study the phase and texture formation of ceria based films and superconductor films deposited by the chemical solution method on technical substrates. Combined analysis using in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry...

  14. A new method for quantitative marking of deposited lithium by chemical treatment on graphite anodes in lithium-ion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, Yvonne; Birkenmaier, Claudia; Feinauer, Julian; Hintennach, Andreas; Bender, Conrad L; Meiler, Markus; Schmidt, Volker; Dinnebier, Robert E; Schleid, Thomas

    2015-04-13

    A novel approach for the marking of deposited lithium on graphite anodes from large automotive lithium-ion cells (≥6 Ah) is presented. Graphite anode samples were extracted from two different formats (cylindrical and pouch cells) of pristine and differently aged lithium-ion cells. The samples present a variety of anodes with various states of lithium deposition (also known as plating). A chemical modification was performed to metallic lithium deposited on the anode surface due to previous plating with isopropanol (IPA). After this procedure an oxygenated species was detected by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), which later was confirmed as Li2 CO3 by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). A valuation of the covered area by Li2 CO3 was carried out with an image analysis using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and quantitative Rietveld refinement.

  15. Studies on Hall Effect and DC Conductivity Measurements of Semiconductor Thin films Prepared by Chemical Bath Deposition (CBD method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Thirumavalavana

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Semiconductors have various useful properties that can be exploited for the realization of a large number of high performance devices in fields such as electronics and optoelectronics. Many novel semiconductors, especially in the form of thin films, are continually being developed. Thin films have drawn the attention of many researchers because of their numerous applications. As the film becomes thinner, the properties acquire greater importance in the miniaturization of elements such as resistors, transistors, capacitors, and solar cells. In the present work, copper selenide (CuSe, cadmium selenide (CdSe, zinc selenide (ZnSe, lead sulphide (PbS, zinc sulphide (ZnS, and cadmium sulphide (CdS thin films were prepared by chemical bath deposition (CBD method. The prepared thin films were analyzed by using Hall measurements in Van Der Pauw configuration (ECOPIA HMS-3000 at room temperature. The Hall parameters such as Hall mobility of the material, resistivity, carrier concentration, Hall coefficient and conductivity were determined. The DC electrical conductivity measurements were also carried out for the thin films using the conventional two – probe technique. The activation energies were also calculated from DC conductivity studies.

  16. Optimization of parameters by Taguchi method for controlling purity of carbon nanotubes in chemical vapour deposition technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, K; Sen, D; Mazumder, S; Basak, C B; Joshi, J B; Banerjee, S

    2010-06-01

    The process parameters (viz. temperature of synthesis, type of catalyst, concentration of catalyst and type of catalyst-support material) for controlling purity of carbon nanotubes synthesized by catalytic chemical vapour deposition of acetylene have been optimized by analyzing the experimental results using Taguchi method. It has been observed that the catalyst-support material has the maximum (59.4%) and the temperature of synthesis has the minimum effect (2.1%) on purity of the nanotubes. At optimum condition (15% ferrocene supported on carbon black at the synthesis temperature of 700 degrees C) the purity of nanotubes was found out to be 96.2% with yield of 1900%. Thermogravimetry has been used to assess purity of nanotubes. These nantubes have been further characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Raman Spectroscopy. Small angle neutron scattering has been used to find out their average inner and outer diameter using an appropriate model. The nanotubes are well crystallized but with wide range of diameter varying between 20-150 nm.

  17. Characterization of annealed Eu3+-doped ZnO flower-like morphology synthesized by chemical bath deposition method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koao, L. F.; Dejene, B. F.; Swart, H. C.; Motloung, S. V.; Motaung, T. E.

    2016-10-01

    Undoped and europium ion (Eu3+) doped ZnO nanostructures were synthesized via the chemical bath deposition method and annealed afterwards in air at 700 °C. The X-ray diffraction measurements confirmed the hexagonal wurtzite structure for all samples. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that the nanopowder samples were assembled in flower-like shapes for undoped and hexagonal-shaped for Eu3+-doped ZnO. Elemental energy dispersive (EDS) analysis mapping conducted on the samples revealed homogeneous distribution of Zn, O, and Eu ions. The Ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) diffusion reflectance spectroscopy showed a decrease in the band gap with an increasing Eu3+ concentration. The photoluminescence (PL) results showed that by exciting Eu3+ (4 mol%) doped ZnO with different excitation wavelength the highest luminescence intensity was observed at an excitation wavelength of 395 nm but no emissions were observed from Eu3+. By exciting further with 465 nm the Eu3+ emissions were observed and emission from undoped ZnO was found for the first time.

  18. Single step synthesis of rutile TiO2 nanoflower array film by chemical bath deposition method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhandayuthapani, T.; Sivakumar, R.; Ilangovan, R.

    2016-05-01

    Titanium oxide (TiO2) nanostructures such as nanorod arrays, nanotube arrays and nanoflower arrays have been extensively investigated by the researchers. Among them nanoflower arrays has shown superior performance than other nanostructures in Dye sensitized solar cell, photocatalysis and energy storage applications. Herein, a single step synthesis for rutile TiO2 nanoflower array films suitable for device applications has been reported. Rutile TiO2 nanoflower thin film was synthesized by chemical bath deposition method using NaCl as an additive. Bath temperature induced evolution of nanoflower thin film arrays was observed from the morphological study. X-ray diffraction study confirmed the presence of rutile phase polycrystalline TiO2. Micro-Raman study revealed the presence of surface phonon mode at 105 cm-1 due to the phonon confinement effect (finite size effect), in addition with the rutile Raman active modes of B1g (143 cm-1), Eg (442 cm-1) and A1g (607 cm-1). Further, the FTIR spectrum confirmed the presence of Ti-O-Ti bonding vibration. The Tauc plot showed the direct energy band gap nature of the film with the value of 2.9 eV.

  19. Structural and optical properties of Ni-doped CdS thin films prepared by chemical bath deposition method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Premarani, R. [Arumugam Pillai SeethaiAmmal College, Thiruppattur-630211 (India); Saravanakumar, S., E-mail: sarophy84@gmail.com; Chandramohan, R. [SreeSevuganAnnamalai College, Devakottai-630303 (India); Mahalingam, T. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-24

    The structural and optical behavior of undoped Cadmiun Sulphide (CdS) and Ni-doped CdS thinfilms prepared by Chemical Bath Deposition (CBD) technique is reported. The crystallite sizes of the thinfilms have been characterized by X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD). The particle sizes increase with the increase of Ni content in the CdS thinfilms. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) results indicated that CdS thinfilms is made up of aggregate of spherical-like particles. The composition was estimated by Energy Dispersive Analysis of X-ray (EDX) and reported. Spectroscopic studies revealed considerable improvement in transmission and the band gap of the films changes with addition of Ni dopant that is associated with variation in crystallite sizes in the nano regime.

  20. Room-Temperature Ferromagnetic ZnMnO Thin Films Synthesized by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Ying-Bin; ZHANG Feng-Ming; DU You-Wei; HUANG Zhi-Gao; ZHENG Jian-Guo; LU Zhi-Hai; ZOU Wen-Qin; LU Zhong-Lin; XU Jian-Ping; JI Jian-Ti; LIU Xing-Chong; WANG Jian-Feng; LV Li-Ya

    2007-01-01

    Room-temperature ferromagnetic Mn-doped ZnO films are grown on Si (001) substrates by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD). X-ray diffraction measurements reveal that the Zn1-xMnxO films have the single-phase wurtzite structure. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicates the existence of Mn2+ ions in Mndoped ZnO films. Furthermore, the decreasing additional Raman peak with increasing Mn-doping is considered to relate to the substitution of Mn ions for the Zn ions in ZnO lattice. Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) measurements demonstrate that Mn-doped ZnO films have ferromagnetic behaviour at room temperature.

  1. Optical Properties of One-Dimensional Structured GaN:Mn Fabricated by a Chemical Vapor Deposition Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Wook Ui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Group III nitride semiconductors with direct band gaps have recently become increasingly important in optoelectronics and microelectronics applications due to their direct band gaps, which cover the whole visible spectrum and a large part of the UV range. Major developments in wide band gap III–V nitride semiconductors have recently led to the commercial production of high-temperature, high-power electronic devices, light-emitting diodes (LEDs, and laser diodes (LDs. In this study, GaN nanowires were grown on horizontal reactors by chemical vapor deposition (CVD employing a vapor-solid mechanism. Many studies have described how to control the diameters of wires in the liquid phase catalytic process, but one-dimensional nanostructures, which are grown using a noncatalytic process, are relatively unexplored due to the challenge of producing high-quality synthetic materials of controlled size. However, vapor-solid mechanisms to make synthesized nanowires are simple to implement. We obtained results from GaN nanostructures that were a preferential c-axis orientation from the substrate. The morphology and crystallinity of the GaN nanowires were characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The chemical compositions of GaN with Mn were analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Optical properties were investigated using photo luminescence and cathode-luminescence measurements.

  2. Surface engineering of artificial heart valve disks using nanostructured thin films deposited by chemical vapour deposition and sol-gel methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, M J; Robinson, G M; Ali, N; Kousar, Y; Mei, S; Gracio, J; Taylor, H; Ahmed, W

    2006-01-01

    Pyrolytic carbon (PyC) is widely used in manufacturing commercial artificial heart valve disks (HVD). Although PyC is commonly used in HVD, it is not the best material for this application since its blood compatibility is not ideal for prolonged clinical use. As a result thrombosis often occurs and the patients are required to take anti-coagulation drugs on a regular basis in order to minimize the formation of thrombosis. However, anti-coagulation therapy gives rise to some detrimental side effects in patients. Therefore, it is extremely urgent that newer and more technically advanced materials with better surface and bulk properties are developed. In this paper, we report the mechanical properties of PyC-HVD, i.e. strength, wear resistance and coefficient of friction. The strength of the material was assessed using Brinell indentation tests. Furthermore, wear resistance and coefficient of friction values were obtained from pin-on-disk testing. The micro-structural properties of PyC were characterized using XRD, Raman spectroscopy and SEM analysis. Also in this paper we report the preparation of freestanding nanocrystalline diamond films (FSND) using the time-modulated chemical vapour deposition (TMCVD) process. Furthermore, the sol-gel technique was used to uniformly coat PyC-HVD with dense, nanocrystalline-titanium oxide (nc-TiO2) coatings. The as-grown nc-TiO2 coatings were characterized for microstructure using SEM and XRD analysis.

  3. RETRACTED: Ammonia-free method for synthesis of CdS nanocrystalline thin films through chemical bath deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, M.; Rabiee, M.; Moztarzadeh, F.; Bodaghi, M.; Tahriri, M.

    2009-11-01

    This article has been retracted: please see Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal ( http://www.elsevier.com/locate/withdrawalpolicy). This article has been retracted at the request of the Editor-in-Chief of Solid State Communications as the authors have plagiarized part of a paper that has also appeared in Current Applied Physics: Controlled synthesis, characterization and optical properties of CdS nanocrystalline thin films via chemical bath deposition (CBD) route Meysam Karimi, Mohammad Rabiee, Fathollah Moztarzadeh, Mohammadreza Tahriri and Masoud Bodaghi; Curr. Appl. Phys., 9 (2009) 1263-1268, doi: 10.1016/j.cap.2009.02.006. One of the conditions of submission of a paper for publication is that authors declare explicitly that their work is original and has not appeared in a publication elsewhere. Re-use of any data should be appropriately cited. As such this article represents a severe abuse of the scientific publishing system. The scientific community takes a very strong view on this matter and apologies are offered to readers of the journal that this was not detected during the submission process.

  4. Production of HfO2 thin films using different methods:chemical bath deposition, SILAR and sol-gel process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    İ.A.Kariper

    2014-01-01

    Hafnium oxide thin films (HOTFs) were successfully deposited onto amorphous glasses using chemical bath deposition, succes-sive ionic layer absorption and reaction (SILAR), and sol-gel methods. The same reactive precursors were used for all of the methods, and all of the films were annealed at 300°C in an oven (ambient conditions). After this step, the optical and structural properties of the films pro-duced by using the three different methods were compared. The structures of the films were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The opti-cal properties are investigated using the ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) spectroscopic technique. The film thickness was measured via atomic force microscopy (AFM) in the tapping mode. The surface properties and elemental ratios of the films were investigated and measured by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The lowest transmittance and the highest reflectance values were observed for the films produced using the SILAR method. In addition, the most intense characteristic XRD peak was observed in the diffraction pattern of the film produced using the SILAR method, and the greatest thickness and average grain size were calculated for the film produced using the SILAR method. The films produced using SILAR method contained fewer cracks than those produced using the other methods. In conclusion, the SILAR method was observed to be the best method for the production of HOTFs.

  5. Chemical vapor deposition of mullite coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarin, Vinod; Mulpuri, Rao

    1998-01-01

    This invention is directed to the creation of crystalline mullite coatings having uniform microstructure by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The process comprises the steps of establishing a flow of reactants which will yield mullite in a CVD reactor, and depositing a crystalline coating from the reactant flow. The process will yield crystalline coatings which are dense and of uniform thickness.

  6. Chemical-vapor-deposition reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chern, S.

    1979-01-01

    Reactor utilizes multiple stacked trays compactly arranged in paths of horizontally channeled reactant gas streams. Design allows faster and more efficient deposits of film on substrates, and reduces gas and energy consumption. Lack of dead spots that trap reactive gases reduces reactor purge time.

  7. Preparation of nanocrystalline Ni doped ZnS thin films by ammonia-free chemical bath deposition method and optical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahraei, Reza, E-mail: r.sahraei@ilam.ac.ir; Darafarin, Soraya

    2014-05-01

    Nanocrystalline Ni doped ZnS thin films were deposited on quartz, silicon, and glass substrates using chemical bath deposition method in a weak acidic solution containing ethylenediamine tetra acetic acid disodium salt (Na{sub 2}EDTA) as a complexing agent for zinc ions and thioacetamide (TAA) as a sulfide source at 80 °C. The films were characterized by energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX), inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), ultraviolet–visible spectrophotometry, and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. UV–vis transmission data showed that the films were transparent in the visible region. The X-ray diffraction analysis showed a cubic zinc blend structure. FE-SEM revealed a homogeneous morphology and dense nanostructures. The PL spectra of the ZnS:Ni films showed two characteristic bands, one broad band centered at 430 and another narrow band at 523 nm. Furthermore, concentration quenching effect on the photoluminescence intensity has been observed. - Highlights: • Nanocrystalline ZnS:Ni thin films were prepared by the chemical bath deposition method. • The size of ZnS:Ni nanocrystals was less than 10 nm showing quantum size effect. • SEM images demonstrated a dense and uniform surface that was free of pinholes. • The deposited films were highly transparent (>70%) in the visible region. • The PL spectra of ZnS:Ni thin films showed two emission peaks at 430 and 523 nm.

  8. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes by arc-discharge and chemical vapor deposition method with analysis of its morphology, dispersion and functionalization characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritu Sharma

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, multi-walled carbon nanotubes are synthesized by arc-discharge and chemical vapor decomposition methods. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes are synthesized on thin film of nickel sputtered on silicon substrate by thermal chemical vapor deposition of acetylene at a temperature of 750°C. The flow of current in arc-discharge method varies in the range 50–200 A. Further arc-synthesized carbon nanotubes are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and the results are compared with nanotubes grown by chemical vapor deposition method. XRD result shows a characteristic peak (0 0 2 at 26.54° corresponding to the presence of carbon nanotubes. SEM and TEM results give morphology of as-synthesized multi-walled nanotubes. TEM results indicate synthesis of well-graphitized carbon nanotubes by arc-discharge method. Dispersion of arc-synthesized nanotubes in SDS solution under the effect of different sonication times is studied. Dispersion of nanotubes in SDS solution is analyzed using UV–vis–NIR spectroscopy and it shows an absorption peak at 260 nm. It was found that with the increase in sonication time, the absorption peak in UV–vis–NIR spectra will increase and optimum sonication time was 2 hours. Functionalization of synthesized carbon nanotubes by H2SO4 and HNO3 acids has been studied and analysis of functionalized groups has been done using FT-IR spectroscopy and compared and the results are reported in this paper. FT-IR spectroscopy verifies the presence of carboxylic groups attached to carbon nanotubes. These functional groups may change properties of carbon nanotubes and may be used in vast applications of carbon nanotubes.

  9. Surface engineering of biaxial Gd2Zr2O7 thin films deposited on Ni–5at%W substrates by a chemical solution method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yue, Zhao; Grivel, Jean-Claude; Liu, Min;

    2012-01-01

    crystal structure along the film thickness observed by a transmission electron microscope. On the basis of the enhanced understanding of the crystallization processes, we demonstrate a possibility of engineering the surface morphology and texture in the film deposited on technical substrates using...... a chemical solution deposition route....

  10. Effect of deposition parameters and strontium doping on characteristics of nanostructured ZnO thin film by chemical bath deposition method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheeba, N. H.; Naduvath, J.; Abraham, A.; Weiss, M. P.; Diener, Z. J.; Remillard, S. K.; DeYoung, P. A.; Philip, R. R.

    2014-10-01

    Polycrystalline thin films of ZnO and Sr-doped ZnO (ZnO:Sr) on ultrasonically cleaned soda lime glass substrates are synthesized through successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction. The XRD profiles of ZnO and ZnO:Sr films prepared at different number of deposition cycles exhibit hexagonal wurtzite structure with preferred orientation along (002) direction. The crystallites are found to be nano sized, having variation in size with the increase in number of depositions cycles and also with Sr doping. Optical absorbance studies reveal a systematically controllable blueshift in band gap of Sr-doped ZnO films. SEM images indicate enhanced assembling of crystallites to form elongated rods as number of dips increased in Sr doped ZnO. The films are found to be n-type with the Sr doping having little effect on the electrical properties.

  11. Effect of deposition parameters and strontium doping on characteristics of nanostructured ZnO thin film by chemical bath deposition method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheeba, N. H., E-mail: sheebames.naser@gmail.com [M.E.S. Asmabi College, P. Vemballur, Thrissur, Kerala (India); Naduvath, J., E-mail: johnsnaduvath@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology, Mumbai (India); Abraham, A., E-mail: anithakklm@gmail.com; Philip, R. R., E-mail: reenatara@rediffmail.com [Thin Film Research Lab, U.C. College, Aluva, Kerala (India); Weiss, M. P., E-mail: matthew@hope.edu, E-mail: zachary.diener@hope.edu, E-mail: remillard@hope.edu, E-mail: deyoung@hope.edu; Diener, Z. J., E-mail: matthew@hope.edu, E-mail: zachary.diener@hope.edu, E-mail: remillard@hope.edu, E-mail: deyoung@hope.edu; Remillard, S. K., E-mail: matthew@hope.edu, E-mail: zachary.diener@hope.edu, E-mail: remillard@hope.edu, E-mail: deyoung@hope.edu; DeYoung, P. A., E-mail: matthew@hope.edu, E-mail: zachary.diener@hope.edu, E-mail: remillard@hope.edu, E-mail: deyoung@hope.edu [Hope Ion Beam Accelerator Laboratory, Hope College, Holland, MI (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Polycrystalline thin films of ZnO and Sr-doped ZnO (ZnO:Sr) on ultrasonically cleaned soda lime glass substrates are synthesized through successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction. The XRD profiles of ZnO and ZnO:Sr films prepared at different number of deposition cycles exhibit hexagonal wurtzite structure with preferred orientation along (002) direction. The crystallites are found to be nano sized, having variation in size with the increase in number of depositions cycles and also with Sr doping. Optical absorbance studies reveal a systematically controllable blueshift in band gap of Sr-doped ZnO films. SEM images indicate enhanced assembling of crystallites to form elongated rods as number of dips increased in Sr doped ZnO. The films are found to be n-type with the Sr doping having little effect on the electrical properties.

  12. Laser Velocimetry of Chemical Vapor Deposition Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Laser velocimetry (LV) is being used to measure the gas flows in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactors. These gas flow measurements can be used to improve industrial processes in semiconductor and optical layer deposition and to validate numerical models. Visible in the center of the picture is the graphite susceptor glowing orange-hot at 600 degrees C. It is inductively heated via the copper cool surrounding the glass reactor.

  13. Simple fabrication of air-stable black phosphorus heterostructures with large-area hBN sheets grown by chemical vapor deposition method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Sapna; Takabayashi, Yuya; Shinohara, Hisanori; Kitaura, Ryo

    2016-09-01

    We have developed a facile and general method to passivate thin black phosphorus (BP) flakes with large-area high-quality monolayer hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) sheets grown by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. In spite of the one-atom-thick structure, the high-quality CVD-grown monolayer hBN has proven to be useful to prevent the degradation of thin BP flakes exfoliated on substrates. Mechanically exfoliated BP flakes prepared on a Si substrate are covered by the monolayer hBN sheet to preserve (otherwise unstable) atomic layered BP flakes from degradation. The present technique can generally be applied to fabricating BP-based electronic devices with much easiness.

  14. PMMA-Etching-Free Transfer of Wafer-scale Chemical Vapor Deposition Two-dimensional Atomic Crystal by a Water Soluble Polyvinyl Alcohol Polymer Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ngoc, Huynh; Qian, Yongteng; Han, Suk Kil; Kang, Dae Joon

    2016-09-01

    We have explored a facile technique to transfer large area 2-Dimensional (2D) materials grown by chemical vapor deposition method onto various substrates by adding a water-soluble Polyvinyl Alcohol (PVA) layer between the polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) and the 2D material film. This technique not only allows the effective transfer to an arbitrary target substrate with a high degree of freedom, but also avoids PMMA etching thereby maintaining the high quality of the transferred 2D materials with minimum contamination. We applied this method to transfer various 2D materials grown on different rigid substrates of general interest, such as graphene on copper foil, h-BN on platinum and MoS2 on SiO2/Si. This facile transfer technique has great potential for future research towards the application of 2D materials in high performance optical, mechanical and electronic devices.

  15. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Turbine Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haven, Victor E.

    1999-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings extend the operating temperature range of actively cooled gas turbine components, therefore increasing thermal efficiency. Performance and lifetime of existing ceram ic coatings are limited by spallation during heating and cooling cycles. Spallation of the ceramic is a function of its microstructure, which is determined by the deposition method. This research is investigating metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) of yttria stabilized zirconia to improve performance and reduce costs relative to electron beam physical vapor deposition. Coatings are deposited in an induction-heated, low-pressure reactor at 10 microns per hour. The coating's composition, structure, and response to the turbine environment will be characterized.

  16. Ga N nano wires and nano tubes growth by chemical vapor deposition method at different NH{sub 3} flow rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, P.; Liu, Y.; Meng, X. [Wuhan University, School of Physics and Technology, Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro and Nanostructures of Ministry of Education, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2016-11-01

    Ga N nano wires and nano tubes have been successfully synthesized via the simple chemical vapor deposition method. NH{sub 3} flow rate was found to be a crucial factor in the synthesis of different type of Ga N which affects the shape and the diameter of generated Ga N nano structures. X-ray diffraction confirms that Ga N nano wires grown on Si(111) substrate under 900 degrees Celsius and with NH{sub 3} flow rate of 50 sc cm presents the preferred orientation growth in the (002) direction. It is beneficial to the growth of nano structure through catalyst annealing. Transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to measure the size and structures of the samples. (Author)

  17. Investigations on the synthesis, optical and electrical properties of TiO{sub 2} thin films by Chemical Bath Deposition (CBD) method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Govindasamy, Geetha [Bharathiar University, Coimbatore (India); Murugasen, Priya [Department of Physics, Saveetha Engineering College (India); Sagadevan, Suresh [Department of Physics, AMET University, Chennai (India)

    2016-03-15

    Titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2} ) thin films were prepared by Chemical Bath Deposition (CBD) method. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis was used to examine the structure and to determine the crystallite size of TiO{sub 2} thin film. The surface morphology of the film was studied using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM).The optical properties were studied using the UV-Visible and photoluminescence (PL) spectrum. Optical constants such as band gap, refractive index, extinction coefficient and electric susceptibility were determined. The FTIR spectrum revealed the strong presence of TiO{sub 2} . The dielectric properties of TiO{sub 2} thin films were studied for different frequencies and different temperatures. The AC electrical conductivity test revealed that the conduction depended both on the frequency and the temperature. Photoconductivity study was carried out in order to ascertain the positive photoconductivity of the TiO{sub 2} thin films. (author)

  18. Chemical vapor deposition coating for micromachines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MANI,SEETHAMBAL S.; FLEMING,JAMES G.; SNIEGOWSKI,JEFFRY J.; DE BOER,MAARTEN P.; IRWIN,LAWRENCE W.; WALRAVEN,JEREMY A.; TANNER,DANELLE M.; DUGGER,MICHAEL T.

    2000-04-21

    Two major problems associated with Si-based MEMS devices are stiction and wear. Surface modifications are needed to reduce both adhesion and friction in micromechanical structures to solve these problems. In this paper, the authors will present a process used to selectively coat MEMS devices with tungsten using a CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) process. The selective W deposition process results in a very conformal coating and can potentially solve both stiction and wear problems confronting MEMS processing. The selective deposition of tungsten is accomplished through silicon reduction of WF{sub 6}, which results in a self-limiting reaction. The selective deposition of W only on polysilicon surfaces prevents electrical shorts. Further, the self-limiting nature of this selective W deposition process ensures the consistency necessary for process control. Selective tungsten is deposited after the removal of the sacrificial oxides to minimize process integration problems. This tungsten coating adheres well and is hard and conducting, requirements for device performance. Furthermore, since the deposited tungsten infiltrates under adhered silicon parts and the volume of W deposited is less than the amount of Si consumed, it appears to be possible to release stuck parts that are contacted over small areas such as dimples. Results from tungsten deposition on MEMS structures with dimples will be presented. The effect of wet and vapor phase cleanings prior to the deposition will be discussed along with other process details. The W coating improved wear by orders of magnitude compared to uncoated parts. Tungsten CVD is used in the integrated-circuit industry, which makes this approach manufacturable.

  19. Superhydrophobic Cu2S@Cu2O film on copper surface fabricated by a facile chemical bath deposition method and its application in oil-water separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, Pihui; Hou, Kun; Zhou, Cailong; Li, Guidong; Wen, Xiufang; Xu, Shouping; Cheng, Jiang; Wang, Shuangfeng

    2017-02-01

    Cu2S and Cu2O composite (Cu2S@Cu2O) film with micro/nano binary structure was created on copper surface using the mixing solution of sodium thiosulphate and copper sulfate by a facile chemical bath deposition method. After modification with low-cost polydimethylsioxane (PDMS), the superhydrophobic Cu2S@Cu2O film was obtained. The as-prepared film shows outstanding water repellency with a water contact angle larger than 150° and long-term storage stability. The geometric morphology and chemical composition of the film were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), respectively. Moreover, the same method was used to fabricate superhydrophobic/superoleophilic copper mesh, and it could realize separation of various oily sewages with separation efficiency above 94%. This strategy has potential to fabricate the practical superhydrophobic Cu2S@Cu2O film on copper surface on a large scale due to its simplicity and low cost.

  20. Absence of morphotropic phase boundary effects in BiFeO3-PbTiO3 thin films grown via a chemical multilayer deposition method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shashaank; Bhattacharjee, Shuvrajyoti; Pandey, Dhananjai; Bansal, Vipul; Bhargava, Suresh K.; Peng, Ju Lin; Garg, Ashish

    2011-07-01

    We report an unusual behavior observed in (BiFeO3)1- x -(PbTiO3) x (BF- xPT) thin films prepared using a multilayer chemical solution deposition method. Films of different compositions were grown by depositing several bilayers of BF and PT precursors of varying BF and PT layer thicknesses followed by heat treatment in air. X-ray diffraction showed that samples of all compositions show mixing of two compounds resulting in a single-phase mixture, also confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. In contrast to bulk compositions, samples show a monoclinic (MA-type) structure suggesting disappearance of the morphotropic phase boundary (MPB) at x=0.30 as observed in the bulk. This is accompanied by the lack of any enhancement of the remanent polarization at the MPB, as shown by the ferroelectric measurements. Magnetic measurements showed an increase in the magnetization of the samples with increasing BF content. Significant magnetization in the samples indicates melting of spin spirals in the BF- xPT films, arising from a random distribution of iron atoms. Absence of Fe2+ ions was corroborated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. The results illustrate that thin film processing methodology significantly changes the structural evolution, in contrast to predictions from the equilibrium phase diagram, besides modifying the functional characteristics of the BP- xPT system dramatically.

  1. Determination of electroless deposition by chemical nickeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Badida

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Increasing of technical level and reliability of machine products in compliance with the economical and ecological terms belongs to the main trends of the industrial development. During the utilisation of these products there arise their each other contacts and the interaction with the environment. That is the reason for their surface degradation by wear effect, corrosion and other influences. The chemical nickel-plating allows autocatalytic deposition of nickel from water solutions in the form of coherent, technically very profitable coating without usage of external source of electric current. The research was aimed at evaluating the surface changes after chemical nickel-plating at various changes of technological parameters.

  2. A Comparative Study on Structural and Optical Properties of ZnO Micro-Nanorod Arrays Grown on Seed Layers Using Chemical Bath Deposition and Spin Coating Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibel MORKOÇ KARADENİZ

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Zinc Oxide (ZnO seed layers were prepared on Indium Tin Oxide (ITO substrates by using Chemical Bath Deposition (CBD method and Sol-gel Spin Coating (SC method. ZnO micro-nanorod arrays were grown on ZnO seed layers by using Hydrothermal Synthesis method. Seed layer effects of structural and optical properties of ZnO arrays were characterized. X-ray diffractometer (XRD, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and Ultraviolet Visible (UV-Vis Spectrometer were used for analyses. ZnO micro-nanorod arrays consisted of a single crystalline wurtzite ZnO structure for each seed layer. Besides, ZnO rod arrays were grown smoothly and vertically on SC seed layer, while ZnO rod arrays were grown randomly and flower like structures on CBD seed layer. The optical absorbance peaks found at 422 nm wavelength in the visible region for both ZnO arrays. Optical bandgap values were determined by using UV-Vis measurements at 3.12 and 3.15 eV for ZnO micro-nanorod arrays on CBD seed layer and for ZnO micro-nanorod arrays on SC-seed layer respectively.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.4.13443

  3. Radiative transfer modeling of surface chemical deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichardt, Thomas A.; Kulp, Thomas J.

    2016-05-01

    Remote detection of a surface-bound chemical relies on the recognition of a pattern, or "signature," that is distinct from the background. Such signatures are a function of a chemical's fundamental optical properties, but also depend upon its specific morphology. Importantly, the same chemical can exhibit vastly different signatures depending on the size of particles composing the deposit. We present a parameterized model to account for such morphological effects on surface-deposited chemical signatures. This model leverages computational tools developed within the planetary and atmospheric science communities, beginning with T-matrix and ray-tracing approaches for evaluating the scattering and extinction properties of individual particles based on their size and shape, and the complex refractive index of the material itself. These individual-particle properties then serve as input to the Ambartsumian invariant imbedding solution for the reflectance of a particulate surface composed of these particles. The inputs to the model include parameters associated with a functionalized form of the particle size distribution (PSD) as well as parameters associated with the particle packing density and surface roughness. The model is numerically inverted via Sandia's Dakota package, optimizing agreement between modeled and measured reflectance spectra, which we demonstrate on data acquired on five size-selected silica powders over the 4-16 μm wavelength range. Agreements between modeled and measured reflectance spectra are assessed, while the optimized PSDs resulting from the spectral fitting are then compared to PSD data acquired from independent particle size measurements.

  4. Physical-chemical conditions of ore deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, P.B.

    1981-01-01

    Ore deposits form under a wide range of physical and chemical conditions, but those precipitating from hot, aqueous fluids-i.e. the hydrothermal deposits-form generally below 700??C and at pressures of only 1 or 2 kbar or less. Natural aqueous fluids in rocks may extract metal and sulfur from a variety of rock types or may acquire them as a residual heritage from a crystallizing silicate magma. Ore-forming hydrothermal fluids never appear as hot springs (except in deep, submarine situations) because they boil, mix with surface waters, and cool, thereby losing their ore-bearing ability before reaching the surface. Mineral systems function as chemical buffers and indicators just as buffers and indicators function in a chemical laboratory. By reading the record written in the buffer/indicator assemblages of minerals one can reconstruct many aspects of the former chemical environment. By studying the record of changing conditions one may deduce information regarding the processes functioning to create the succession of chemical environments and the ore deposits they represent. The example of the OH vein at Creede, Colorado, shows a pH buffered by the K-feldspar + muscovite + quartz assemblage and the covariation of S2 and O2 buffered by the assemblage chlorite + pyrite + quartz. Boiling of the ore fluid led to its oxidation to hematite-bearing assemblages and simultaneously produced an intensely altered, sericitic capping over the vein in response to the condensation of vapors bearing acidic components. The solubility of metals as calculated from experimental and theoretical studies of mineral solubility appears too low by at least one or two powers of ten to explain the mineralization at Creede. In contrast to Creede where the mineral stabilities all point to a relatively consistent chemistry, the Mississippi Valley type deposits present a puzzle of conflicting chemical clues that are impossible to reconcile with any single equilibrium situation. Thus we must

  5. Physical-chemical conditions of ore deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Paul B.

    Ore deposits form under a wide range of physical and chemical conditions, but those precipitating from hot, aqueous fluids-i.e. the hydrothermal deposits-form generally below 700°C and at pressures of only 1 or 2 kbar or less. Natural aqueous fluids in rocks may extract metal and sulfur from a variety of rock types or may acquire them as a residual heritage from a crystallizing silicate magma. Ore-forming hydrothermal fluids never appear as hot springs (except in deep, submarine situations) because they boil, mix with surface waters, and cool, thereby losing their ore-bearing ability before reaching the surface. Mineral systems function as chemical buffers and indicators just as buffers and indicators function in a chemical laboratory. By reading the record written in the buffer/indicator assemblages of minerals one can reconstruct many aspects of the former chemical environment. By studying the record of changing conditions one may deduce information regarding the processes functioning to create the succession of chemical environments and the ore deposits they represent. The example of the OH vein at Creede, Colorado, shows a pH buffered by the K-feldspar + muscovite + quartz assemblage and the covariation of S 2 and O 2 buffered by the assemblage chlorite + pyrite + quartz. Boiling of the ore fluid led to its oxidation to hematite-bearing assemblages and simultaneously produced an intensely altered, sericitic capping over the vein in response to the condensation of vapors bearing acidic components. The solubility of metals as calculated from experimental and theoretical studies of mineral solubility appears too low by at least one or two powers of ten to explain the mineralization at Creede. In contrast to Creede where the mineral stabilities all point to a relatively consistent chemistry, the Mississippi Valley type deposits present a puzzle of conflicting chemical clues that are impossible to reconcile with any single equilibrium situation. Thus we must

  6. Nanocrystalline silicon and silicon quantum dots formation within amorphous silicon carbide by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition method controlling the Argon dilution of the process gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kole, Arindam; Chaudhuri, Partha, E-mail: erpc@iacs.res.in

    2012-11-01

    Structural and optical properties of the amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H) thin films deposited by radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition method from a mixture of silane (SiH{sub 4}) and methane (CH{sub 4}) diluted in argon (Ar) have been studied with variation of Ar dilution from 94% to 98.4%. It is observed that nanocrystalline silicon starts to form within the a-SiC:H matrix by increasing the dilution to 96%. With further increase in Ar dilution to 98% formation of the silicon nanocrystals (nc-Si) with variable size is enhanced. The optical band gap (E{sub g}) of the a-SiC:H film decreases from 2.0 eV to 1.9 eV with increase in Ar dilution from 96% to 98% as the a-SiC:H films gradually become Si rich. On increasing the Ar dilution further to 98.4% leads to the appearance of crystalline silicon quantum dots (c-Si q-dots) of nearly uniform size of 3.5 nm. The quantum confinement effect is apparent from the sharp increase in the E{sub g} value to 2.6 eV. The phase transformation phenomenon from nc-Si within the a-SiC:H films to Si q-dot were further studied by high resolution transmission electron microscopy and the grazing angle X-ray diffraction spectra. A relaxation in the lattice strain has been observed with the formation of Si q-dots.

  7. The Effect of Alumina and Magnesia Supported Germanium Nanoparticles on the Growth of Carbon Nanotubes in the Chemical Vapor Deposition Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazaleh Allaedini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of alumina and magnesia supported germanium (Ge nanoparticles on the synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs using the chemical vapor deposition (CVD method in atmospheric pressure was investigated. The TEM micrographs confirmed the formation of carbon nanotubes, and the field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM analysis suggested a tip-growth mechanism for the grown carbon nanotubes. The X-ray diffraction (XRD pattern indicated a graphitic nature of the carbon nanotubes. The obtained CNTs using Ge nanoparticles supported by MgO resulted in a higher degree of graphitization than the CNTs obtained using Ge nanoparticles supported by Al2O3. Raman spectroscopy analysis of the CNTs confirmed the presence of radial breathing modes (RBM, which verified the formation of CNTs. High frequency Raman analysis demonstrated that the degree of graphitization of the synthesized CNTs using magnesia supported Ge nanoparticles is higher than that of the alumina supported Ge nanoparticles with the values of (ID/IG ratios equal to 0.45 and 0.73, respectively.

  8. Effect of processing parameters on microstructure of MoS2 ultra-thin films synthesized by chemical vapor deposition method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Song

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available MoS2 ultra-thin layers are synthesized using a chemical vapor deposition method based on the sulfurization of molybdenum trioxide (MoO3. The ultra-thin layers are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, photoluminescence (PL spectroscopy and atomic force microscope (AFM. Based on our experimental results, all the processing parameters, such as the tilt angle of substrate, applied voltage, heating time and the weight of source materials have effect on the microstructures of the layers. In this paper, the effects of such processing parameters on the crystal structures and morphologies of the as-grown layers are studied. It is found that the film obtained with the tilt angle of 0.06° is more uniform. A larger applied voltage is preferred to the growth of MoS2 thin films at a certain heating time. In order to obtain the ultra-thin layers of MoS2, the weight of 0.003 g of source materials is preferred. Under our optimal experimental conditions, the surface of the film is smooth and composed of many uniformly distributed and aggregated particles, and the ultra-thin MoS2 atomic layers (1∼10 layers covers an area of more than 2 mm×2 mm.

  9. Influence of Codoping on the Optical Properties of ZnO Thin Films Synthesized on Glass Substrate by Chemical Bath Deposition Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Shanmuganathan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fe and K simultaneously doped ZnO thin films Zn0.99 K0.01 (Fex O (x=1, 2, 3, and 4% were synthesized by chemical bath deposition method. The XRD investigation reveals that all the doped ZnO thin films are in hexagonal wurtzite crystal structure without impurity phases. With increase in Fe concentration, the growth of thin films along c axis is evident from the XRD which indicates the increase in intensity along (002 direction. The same is visible from the surface morphology which shows the formation of hexagonal structure for higher Fe concentration. The topography shows gradual variation with Fe incorporation. The optical energy band gap obtained from the transmittance spectrum decreases from 3.42 to 3.06 eV with increase in Fe concentration indicating the red shift and this trend is consistent with the earlier experimental results. The UV emission is centered around 3.59 eV. The optical constants such as refractive index, extinction coefficient, and absorption coefficient which are essential for the optoelectronic applications were also determined.

  10. Chemical Vapour Deposition of Large Area Graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin Benjamin Barbour Spanget

    structure. Optimization of a process for graphene growth on commercially available copper foil is limited by the number of aluminium oxide particles on the surface of the catalyst. By replacing the copper foil with a thin deposited copper film on a SiO2/Si or c-plane sapphire wafer the particles can......Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) is a viable technique for fabrication of large areas of graphene. CVD fabrication is the most prominent and common way of fabricating graphene in industry. In this thesis I have attempted to optimize a growth recipe and catalyst layer for CVD fabrication of uniform......, single layer, and high carrier mobility large area graphene. The main goals of this work are; (1) explore the graphene growth mechanics in a low pressure cold-wall CVD system on a copper substrate, and (2) optimize the process of growing high quality graphene in terms of carrier mobility, and crystal...

  11. Effective conductivity of chemically deposited ZnO thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robles, M. [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Morelos (UAEM), Cuernavaca (Mexico). Fac. de Ciencias; Tagueena-Martinez, J. [IIM-UNAM, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico). Lab. de Energia Solar; Del Rio, J.A. [IIM-UNAM, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico). Lab. de Energia Solar

    1997-01-30

    Chemically deposited thin films have multiple applications. However, as a result of their complex structure, their physical properties are very difficult to predict. In this paper, we use an effective medium approach to model these heterogeneous systems. We extend Thorpe`s formula for the effective electrical conductivity of elliptical holes randomly distributed in a matrix to a system composed of conducting ellipses in a conducting matrix. This extension is used to calculate the effective electrical conductivity of polycrystalline chemically deposited ZnO thin films. We compare experimental results obtained by two different deposition methods: spray pyrolysis and successive ion layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) reported here. We select the elliptical geometric parameters from microstructural data. Good agreement between the experimental measurements and our calculation is obtained. In addition, we present a new proof of the reciprocity theorem used to derive the theoretical relation. (orig.)

  12. Evolution of Ore Deposits and Technology Transfer Project: Isotope and Chemical Methods in Support of the U.S. Geological Survey Science Strategy, 2003-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rye, Robert O.; Johnson, Craig A.; Landis, Gary P.; Hofstra, Albert H.; Emsbo, Poul; Stricker, Craig A.; Hunt, Andrew G.; Rusk, Brian G.

    2010-01-01

    Principal functions of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Resources Program are providing assessments of the location, quantity, and quality of undiscovered mineral deposits, and predicting the environmental impacts of exploration and mine development. The mineral and environmental assessments of domestic deposits are used by planners and decisionmakers to improve the stewardship of public lands and public resources. Assessments of undiscovered mineral deposits on a global scale reveal the potential availability of minerals to the United States and other countries that manufacture goods imported to the United States. These resources are of fundamental relevance to national and international economic and security policy in our globalized world economy. Performing mineral and environmental assessments requires that predictions be made of the likelihood of undiscovered deposits. The predictions are based on geologic and geoenvironmental models that are constructed for the diverse types of mineral deposits from detailed descriptions of actual deposits and detailed understanding of the processes that formed them. Over the past three decades the understanding of ore-forming processes has benefited greatly from the integration of laboratory-based geochemical tools with field observations and other data sources. Under the aegis of the Evolution of Ore Deposits and Technology Transfer Project (referred to hereinafter as the Project), a 5-year effort that terminated in 2008, the Mineral Resources Program provided state-of-the-art analytical capabilities to support applications of several related geochemical tools to ore-deposit-related studies. The analytical capabilities and scientific approaches developed within the Project have wide applicability within Earth-system science. For this reason the Project Laboratories represent a valuable catalyst for interdisciplinary collaborations of the type that should be formed in the coming years for the United States to meet

  13. Tungsten Deposition on Graphite using Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Uttam; Chauhan, Sachin S.; Sharma, Jayshree; Sanyasi, A. K.; Ghosh, J.; Choudhary, K. K.; Ghosh, S. K.

    2016-10-01

    The tokamak concept is the frontrunner for achieving controlled thermonuclear reaction on earth, an environment friendly way to solve future energy crisis. Although much progress has been made in controlling the heated fusion plasmas (temperature ∼ 150 million degrees) in tokamaks, technological issues related to plasma wall interaction topic still need focused attention. In future, reactor grade tokamak operational scenarios, the reactor wall and target plates are expected to experience a heat load of 10 MW/m2 and even more during the unfortunate events of ELM's and disruptions. Tungsten remains a suitable choice for the wall and target plates. It can withstand high temperatures, its ductile to brittle temperature is fairly low and it has low sputtering yield and low fuel retention capabilities. However, it is difficult to machine tungsten and hence usages of tungsten coated surfaces are mostly desirable. To produce tungsten coated graphite tiles for the above-mentioned purpose, a coating reactor has been designed, developed and made operational at the SVITS, Indore. Tungsten coating on graphite has been attempted and successfully carried out by using radio frequency induced plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (rf -PECVD) for the first time in India. Tungsten hexa-fluoride has been used as a pre-cursor gas. Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) clearly showed the presence of tungsten coating on the graphite samples. This paper presents the details of successful operation and achievement of tungsten coating in the reactor at SVITS.

  14. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in thin films of LaMnO3 deposited by a chemical method over large areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila-Fungueiriño, José Manuel; Rivas-Murias, Beatriz; Rodríguez-González, Benito; Txoperena, O; Ciudad, D; Hueso, Luis E; Lazzari, Massimo; Rivadulla, Francisco

    2015-03-11

    Hole-doping into the Mott insulator LaMnO3 results in a very rich magneto-electric phase diagram, including colossal magnetoresistance and different types of charge and orbital ordering. On the other hand, LaMnO3 presents an important catalytic activity for oxygen reduction, which is fundamental for increasing the efficiency of solid-oxide fuel cells and other energy-conversion devices. In this work, we report the chemical solution (water-based) synthesis of high-quality epitaxial thin films of LaMnO3, free of defects at square-centimeter scales, and compatible with standard microfabrication techniques. The films show a robust ferromagnetic moment and large magnetoresistance at room temperature. Through a comparison with films grown by pulsed laser deposition, we show that the quasi-equilibrium growth conditions characteristic of this chemical process can be exploited to tune new functionalities of the material.

  15. A comparative study of thin films of Zn(O;OH)S and In(O;OH)S deposited on CuInS2 by chemical bath deposition method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo, W.; Quiñones, C.; Gordillo, G.

    2012-04-01

    In this work, a study of synthesis of thin films of Zn(O;OH)S and In(O;OH)S deposited by chemical bath deposition (CBD) is presented. The thin films of Zn(O;OH)S and In(O;OH)S were deposited from different chemical bath systems on absorber layers of CuInS2 (CIS), indium tin oxide substrates (ITO) and soda lime glass substrates (SL). The differences on the growth rate, optical, morphological and structural properties of the thin films Zn(O;OH)S and In(O;OH)S are studied. The Growth studies showed that thin films of Zn(O;OH)S and In(O;OH)S grown faster on CIS than on SL and ITO substrates. The optical and morphological studies showed that both thin films present high transmittance in visible electromagnetic spectrum and covered uniformly the surface of the substrate, furthermore it was observed that thin films of Zn(O;OH)S and In(O;OH)S were polycrystalline. Finally, the results suggest that thin films of Zn(O;OH)S and In(O;OH)S obtained in this work could be used as buffer layer to replace the thin films of CdS, which are conventionally used as buffer layer in chalcopyrite based solar cells.

  16. Ultrafast deposition of silicon nitride and semiconductor silicon thin films by Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schropp, R.E.I.; van der Werf, C.H.M.; Verlaan, V.; Rath, J.K.; Li, H. B. T.

    2009-01-01

    The technology of Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (HWCVD) or Catalytic Chemical Vapor Deposition (Cat-CVD) has made great progress during the last couple of years. This review discusses examples of significant progress. Specifically, silicon nitride deposition by HWCVD (HW-SiNx) is highlighted, a

  17. Mechanical and piezoresistive properties of thin silicon films deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition and hot-wire chemical vapor deposition at low substrate temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, J.; Gualdino, A.; Lemke, B.; Paul, O.; Chu, V.; Conde, J. P.

    2012-07-01

    This paper reports on the mechanical and piezoresistance characterization of hydrogenated amorphous and nanocrystalline silicon thin films deposited by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) and radio-frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using substrate temperatures between 100 and 250 °C. The microtensile technique is used to determine film properties such as Young's modulus, fracture strength and Weibull parameters, and linear and quadratic piezoresistance coefficients obtained at large applied stresses. The 95%-confidence interval for the elastic constant of the films characterized, 85.9 ± 0.3 GPa, does not depend significantly on the deposition method or on film structure. In contrast, mean fracture strength values range between 256 ± 8 MPa and 600 ± 32 MPa: nanocrystalline layers are slightly stronger than their amorphous counterparts and a pronounced increase in strength is observed for films deposited using HWCVD when compared to those grown by PECVD. Extracted Weibull moduli are below 10. In terms of piezoresistance, n-doped radio-frequency nanocrystalline silicon films deposited at 250 °C present longitudinal piezoresistive coefficients as large as -(2.57 ± 0.03) × 10-10 Pa-1 with marginally nonlinear response. Such values approach those of crystalline silicon and of polysilicon layers deposited at much higher temperatures.

  18. Chemical bath ZnSe thin films: deposition and characterisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokhande, C. D.; Patil, P. S.; Ennaoui, A.; Tributsch, H.

    1998-01-01

    The zinc selenide (ZnSe) thin films have been deposited by a simple and inexpensive chemical bath deposition (CBD) method. The selenourea was used as a selenide ion source. The ZnSe films have been characterised by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDAX), Rutherford back scattering (RBS), and optical absorption. The as-deposited ZnSe films on various substrates are found to be amorphous and contain O2 and N2 in addition to Zn and Se. The optical band gap of the film is estimated to be 2.9 eV. The films are photoactive as evidenced by time resolved microwave conductivity (TRMC).

  19. The deposit size frequency method for estimating undiscovered uranium deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCammon, R.B.; Finch, W.I.

    1993-01-01

    The deposit size frequency (DSF) method has been developed as a generalization of the method that was used in the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program to estimate the uranium endowment of the United States. The DSF method overcomes difficulties encountered during the NURE program when geologists were asked to provide subjective estimates of (1) the endowed fraction of an area judged favorable (factor F) for the occurrence of undiscovered uranium deposits and (2) the tons of endowed rock per unit area (factor T) within the endowed fraction of the favorable area. Because the magnitudes of factors F and T were unfamiliar to nearly all of the geologists, most geologists responded by estimating the number of undiscovered deposits likely to occur within the favorable area and the average size of these deposits. The DSF method combines factors F and T into a single factor (F??T) that represents the tons of endowed rock per unit area of the undiscovered deposits within the favorable area. Factor F??T, provided by the geologist, is the estimated number of undiscovered deposits per unit area in each of a number of specified deposit-size classes. The number of deposit-size classes and the size interval of each class are based on the data collected from the deposits in known (control) areas. The DSF method affords greater latitude in making subjective estimates than the NURE method and emphasizes more of the everyday experience of exploration geologists. Using the DSF method, new assessments have been made for the "young, organic-rich" surficial uranium deposits in Washington and idaho and for the solution-collapse breccia pipe uranium deposits in the Grand Canyon region in Arizona and adjacent Utah. ?? 1993 Oxford University Press.

  20. Research on chemical vapor deposition processes for advanced ceramic coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Daniel E.

    1993-01-01

    Our interdisciplinary background and fundamentally-oriented studies of the laws governing multi-component chemical vapor deposition (VD), particle deposition (PD), and their interactions, put the Yale University HTCRE Laboratory in a unique position to significantly advance the 'state-of-the-art' of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) R&D. With NASA-Lewis RC financial support, we initiated a program in March of 1988 that has led to the advances described in this report (Section 2) in predicting chemical vapor transport in high temperature systems relevant to the fabrication of refractory ceramic coatings for turbine engine components. This Final Report covers our principal results and activities for the total NASA grant of $190,000. over the 4.67 year period: 1 March 1988-1 November 1992. Since our methods and the technical details are contained in the publications listed (9 Abstracts are given as Appendices) our emphasis here is on broad conclusions/implications and administrative data, including personnel, talks, interactions with industry, and some known applications of our work.

  1. Effect of thermal annealing on the properties of cadmium sulfide deposited via chemical bath deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Faisal R., E-mail: ahmad@ge.com; Yakimov, Aharon; Davis, Robert J.; Her, Jae-Hyuk; Cournoyer, James R.; Ayensu, Nana Menya

    2013-05-01

    This study elucidates how post-deposition annealing in air of CdS thin films deposited via chemical bath deposition, influences the defects and impurities in the films, which in turn affect the electrical conductivity and optical transparency of the films. The electrical properties of the annealed CdS films were characterized using a van der Pauw Hall effect measurement method. Using low-temperature photoluminescence measurements, a variety of sub-bandgap energy levels were observed and identified that are believed to play a critical role in impacting the concentration of carriers in the films. In addition, we studied the optical transmission and crystalline quality of the films as a function of the different annealing conditions. - Highlights: ► Annealing CdS affects its bandgap, structure and electrical conductivity. ► Low temperature photoluminescence spectra show how annealing affects CdS. ► Carrier concentration affected sulfur vacancies and cadmium interstitials.

  2. Variation in chemical wet deposition with meteorological conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynor, Gilbert S.; Hayes, Janet V.

    Analysis of hourly sequential precipitation samples collected at Brookhaven National Laboratory over a 4-y period shows systematic relationships between amounts of chemicals deposited in precipitation and meteorological conditions. Samples were taken by an automatic, sequential sampler and measured for pH, conductivity and the concentrations of major ions. Concurrent measurements and observations were made of the synoptic situation, precipitation type and rate, wind speed and direction, and temperature. Deposition per unit area was computed for subsets of the data classified by meteorological and time parameters. Results demonstrate that precipitation amount alone is not an adequate predictor of chemical wet deposition because of the variability of concentration in precipitation which is a complex function of emission rates and atmospheric processes. Results, however, document those conditions under which most material is deposited and those circumstances in which deposition occurs at the greatest rate. When classified by season, hydrogen and sulfate ion deposition are greatest in the summer when precipitation is lowest and least in the winter when precipitation is greatest. Nitrogen in both nitrate and ammonium has a similar but less extreme pattern. By synoptic type, all chemicals are deposited most heavily in warm front precipitation but the fraction of hydrogen and sulfate deposited in cold front and squall line hours is greater than the fraction of precipitation. All chemicals are deposited most heavily in steady rain when examined by precipitation type but thundershowers deposit chemicals of anthropogenic origin in amounts disproportionate to precipitation amounts. Results are also presented from data classified by other parameters.

  3. Thin alumina and silica films by chemical vapor deposition (CVD)

    OpenAIRE

    Hofman, R.; Morssinkhof, R.W.J.; Fransen, T.; Westheim, J.G.F.; Gellings, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    Alumina and silica coatings have been deposited by MOCVD (Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition) on alloys to protect them against high temperature corrosion. Aluminium Tri-lsopropoxide (ATI) and DiAcetoxyDitertiaryButoxySilane (DAOBS) have been used as metal organic precursors to prepare these ceramic coatings. The influence of several process steps on the deposition rate and surface morphology is discussed. The deposition of SiO2 at atmospheric pressure is kinetically limited below 833 K ...

  4. The mechanical properties of thin alumina film deposited by metal-organic chemical vapour deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanappel, V.A.C.; Gellings, P.J.; Vendel, van de D.; Metselaar, H.S.C.; Corbach, van H.D.; Fransen, T.

    1995-01-01

    Amorphous alumina films were deposited by metal-organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) on stainless steel, type AISI 304. The MOCVD experiments were performed in nitrogen at low and atmospheric pressures. The effects of deposition temperature, growth rate and film thickness on the mechanical pro

  5. Effects of the gas feeding method on the properties of 3C-SiC/Si(111) grown by rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Shim, H W; Suh, E K

    1998-01-01

    High-quality crystalline 3C-SiC thin films are grown by rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition (RTCVD) on Si(111) by using two different growth processes. The films are grown along the [111] direction at 1200 .deg. C. The quality of the films are investigated by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and transmission electron diffraction. The SiC film grown by flowing the tetramethylsilane (TMS) gas before heating the substrate up to the growth temperature does not contain many voids at the SiC/Si interface, while the SiC grown by heating the substrate before supplying the TMS gas possesses many voids at the interface. The unintentionally doped SiC film grown by gas flow before heating the substrate appears to be n-type with a carrier concentration of 1.48 x 10 sup 1 sup 6 cm sup - sup 3 , a electron mobility of 884 cm sup 2 /V centre dot s, and a resistivity of 0.462 OMEGA centre dot cm. The physical properties, such as the electrical properties, the surface morphology, and the crystallinity, ...

  6. Adherent apatite coating on titanium substrate using chemical deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohanizadeh, R; LeGeros, R Z; Harsono, M; Bendavid, A

    2005-03-15

    Plasma-sprayed "HA" coatings on commercial orthopedic and dental implants consist of mixtures of calcium phosphate phases, predominantly a crystalline calcium phosphate phase, hydroxyapatite (HA) and an amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) with varying HA/ACP ratios. Alternatives to the plasma-spray method are being explored because of some of its disadvantages. The purpose of this study was to deposit an adherent apatite coating on titanium substrate using a two-step method. First, titanium substrates were immersed in acidic solution of calcium phosphate resulting in the deposition of a monetite (CaHPO4) coating. Second, the monetite crystals were transformed to apatite by hydrolysis in NaOH solution. Composition and morphology of the initial and final coatings were identified using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy, and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). The final coating was porous and the apatite crystals were agglomerated and followed the outline of the large monetite crystals. EDS revealed the presence of calcium and phosphorous elements on the titanium substrate after removing the coating using tensile or scratching tests. The average tensile bond of the coating was 5.2 MPa and cohesion failures were observed more frequently than adhesion failures. The coating adhesion measured using scratch test with a 200-microm-radius stylus was 13.1N. Images from the scratch tracks demonstrated that the coating materials were squashed without fracturing inside and/or at the border of the tracks until the failure point of the coating. In conclusion, this study showed the potential of a chemical deposition method for depositing a coating consisting of either monetite or apatite. This method has the advantage of producing a coating with homogenous composition on even implants of complex geometry or porosity. This method involves low temperatures and, therefore, can allow the incorporation of growth factors or biogenic molecules.

  7. Plasma-enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition of Aluminum Oxide Using Ultrashort Precursor Injection Pulses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dingemans, G.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,; Kessels, W. M. M.

    2012-01-01

    An alternative plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) method is developed and applied for the deposition of high-quality aluminum oxide (AlOx) films. The PECVD method combines a continuous plasma with ultrashort precursor injection pulses. We demonstrate that the modulation of the precurs

  8. Tunnel conduction in epitaxial bilayers of ferromagnetic LaCoO₃/La₂/₃Sr₁/₃MnO₃ deposited by a chemical solution method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Irene; Vila-Fungueiriño, José Manuel; Jiménez-Cavero, Pilar; Rivas-Murias, Beatriz; Magén, César; Morellón, Luis; Rivadulla, Francisco

    2014-12-10

    We report magnetic and electronic transport measurements across epitaxial bilayers of ferromagnetic insulator LaCoO3 and half-metallic ferromagnet La2/3Sr1/3MnO3 (LCO/LSMO: 3.5 nm/20 nm) fabricated by a chemical solution method. The I-V curves at room temperature and 4K measured with conducting atomic force microscopy (CAFM) on well-defined patterned areas exhibit the typical features of a tunneling process. The curves have been fitted to the Simmons model to determine the height (φ) and width (s) of the insulating LCO barrier. The results yield φ = 0.40 ± 0.05 eV (0.50 ± 0.01 eV) at room temperature (4K) and s = 3 nm, in good agreement with the structural analysis. Our results demonstrate that this chemical method is able to produce epitaxial heterostructures with the quality required for this type of fundamental studies and applications.

  9. Ti-doped hydrogenated diamond like carbon coating deposited by hybrid physical vapor deposition and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Na Rae; Sle Jun, Yee; Moon, Kyoung Il; Sunyong Lee, Caroline

    2017-03-01

    Diamond-like carbon films containing titanium and hydrogen (Ti-doped DLC:H) were synthesized using a hybrid technique based on physical vapor deposition (PVD) and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The film was deposited under a mixture of argon (Ar) and acetylene gas (C2H2). The amount of Ti in the Ti-doped DLC:H film was controlled by varying the DC power of the Ti sputtering target ranging from 0 to 240 W. The composition, microstructure, mechanical and chemical properties of Ti-doped DLC:H films with varying Ti concentrations, were investigated using Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), nano indentation, a ball-on-disk tribometer, a four-point probe system and dynamic anodic testing. As a result, the optimum composition of Ti in Ti-doped DLC:H film using our hybrid method was found to be a Ti content of 18 at. %, having superior electrical conductivity and high corrosion resistance, suitable for bipolar plates. Its hardness value was measured to be 25.6 GPa with a low friction factor.

  10. Thin alumina and silica films by chemical vapor deposition (CVD)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman, R.; Morssinkhof, R.W.J.; Fransen, T.; Westheim, J.G.F.; Gellings, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    Alumina and silica coatings have been deposited by MOCVD (Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition) on alloys to protect them against high temperature corrosion. Aluminium Tri-lsopropoxide (ATI) and DiAcetoxyDitertiaryButoxySilane (DAOBS) have been used as metal organic precursors to prepare these ce

  11. Initiated chemical vapor deposition of antimicrobial polymer coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, T P; Kooi, S E; Chang, S H; Sedransk, K L; Gleason, K K

    2007-02-01

    The vapor phase deposition of polymeric antimicrobial coatings is reported. Initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD), a solventless low-temperature process, is used to form thin films of polymers on fragile substrates. For this work, finished nylon fabric is coated by iCVD with no affect on the color or feel of the fabric. Infrared characterization confirms the polymer structure. Coatings of poly(dimethylaminomethyl styrene) of up to 540 microg/cm2 were deposited on the fabric. The antimicrobial properties were tested using standard method ASTM E2149-01. A coating of 40 microg/cm2 of fabric was found to be very effective against gram-negative Escherichia coli, with over a 99.99%, or 4 log, kill in just 2 min continuing to over a 99.9999%, or 6 log, reduction in viable bacteria in 60 min. A coating of 120 microg/cm2 was most effective against the gram-positive Bacillus subtilis. Further tests confirmed that the iCVD polymer did not leach off the fabric.

  12. Dependence of electro-optical properties on the deposition conditions of chemical bath deposited CdS thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dona, J.M.; Herrero, J. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Energias Renovables

    1997-11-01

    Lately, there has been a sharp increase in the publication of papers on chemical bath deposition of CdS thin films and related materials due to successful results obtained using this method to fabricate CdS thin-film buffer layers for CuInSe{sub 2}- and CdTe-based polycrystalline thin-film solar cells. Generally, these papers focus on previously proposed methods of studying film characteristics without a systematic study of the influence of deposition conditions on film characteristics. In this paper the authors present an exhaustive study of the chemical bath-deposited CdS thin films electro-optical properties dependence on deposition variables. The authors propose not only a set of conditions for obtaining CdS thin films by this method but additionally, suitable deposition process conditions for certain application requirements, such as buffer layers for thin-film solar cells. The observed electro-optical characteristics dependence on the deposition variables corroborates the chemical mechanism that they proposed previously for this process.

  13. Advances in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of Tantalum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mugabi, James Atwoki; Eriksen, Søren; Christensen, Erik

    2014-01-01

    The chemical stability of tantalum in hot acidic media has made it a key material in the protection of industrial equipment from corrosion under such conditions. The Chemical Vapor Deposition of tantalum to achieve such thin corrosion resistant coatings is one of the most widely mentioned examples...

  14. Tandem solar cells deposited using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, M.K. van

    2003-01-01

    In this thesis, the application of the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) technique for the deposition of silicon thin films is described. The HWCVD technique is based on the dissociation of silicon-containing gasses at the catalytic surface of a hot filament. Advantages of this technique ar

  15. Controlling the resistivity gradient in chemical vapor deposition-deposited aluminum-doped zinc oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponomarev, M. V.; Verheijen, M. A.; Keuning, W.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,; Creatore, M.

    2012-01-01

    Aluminum-doped ZnO (ZnO:Al) grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) generally exhibit a major drawback, i.e., a gradient in resistivity extending over a large range of film thickness. The present contribution addresses the plasma-enhanced CVD deposition of ZnO: Al layers by focusing on the control

  16. Clean diffusion coatings by chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warnes, B.M.; Punola, D.C. [Howmet Thermatech Coatings, Whitehall, MI (United States)

    1997-10-01

    An experimental program was undertaken to identify diffusion coating impurities introduced by standard aluminizing processes and to evaluate the impact of those impurities on oxidation resistance of the resultant Pt aluminide coating. IN-738 tabs and foils were platinum-electroplated, and then aluminized using three different processes: high-activity pack cementation, high-activity CVD and low-activity CVD. The results suggest that aluminizing processes which involve aluminum bearing alloys in the coating retort with H{sub 2} or H{sub 2}/HCl gas at high temperature can contaminate the diffusion coating during deposition. CVD low-activity aluminizing (coating gas generated at low temperature outside the coating chamber from 99.999% Al) did not introduce any coating impurities. In addition, the data indicates that harmful impurities from the IN-738 substrate (sulfur, boron and tungsten) and the electroplating process (phosphorus) were removed from the coating during deposition. The CVD low-activity Pt aluminide coating was the `cleanest` in the study, and it exhibited the best high-temperature oxidation resistance of the coatings considered. It can be concluded that trace elements in diffusion coatings from the superalloy substrate and/or the aluminizing process can adversely effect the oxidation resistance of those coatings, and that CVD low-activity aluminizing yields cleaner coatings than other commercially available aluminizing techniques. (orig.) 10 refs.

  17. Structure, optical and electrical properties of Bi{sub 2}VO{sub 5.5} films deposited on ITO/glass substrates by chemical solution method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo Ming; Liu Changxin [College of Electronics and Information Engineering, Jingganshan University, ji' an, jiangxi 343009 (China); Shen Yude; Yang Pingxiong, E-mail: pxyang@ee.ecnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Polar Materials and Devices, Department of Electronics, East China Normal University, 500 Dongchuan Rd, Shanghai 200241 (China)

    2011-02-01

    Bismuth vanadate (Bi{sub 2}VO{sub 5.5}) thin films were fabricated on indium-doped tin oxide (ITO)-coated glass substrates by chemical solution method combined with a rapid thermal annealing process. The structure of the films was characterized with X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy. The Bi{sub 2}VO{sub 5.5} films annealed at 600 deg. C showed a good match with the ITO coated glass substrates and had a desired perovskite structure with high (00l) preferred orientation. The spherical grains with a homogeneous distribution of high crystallinity and packing density were observed. Optical properties of the Bi{sub 2}VO{sub 5.5} thin films were studied by Raman spectra and the lattice vibration modes of the films were obtained. A low frequency dielectric dispersion was observed in the films. Dielectric constant and loss was about 75 and 0.076 at 10kHz, respectively. The ac conductivity obeyed Jonscher's universal power law, which may be originated a possible hopping mechanism for Bi{sub 2}VO{sub 5.5} thin films. The complex impedance traces revealed material dielectric dispersion nature and the presence of grain effects in the films.

  18. Structure, optical and electrical properties of Bi2VO5.5 films deposited on ITO/glass substrates by chemical solution method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ming; Shen, Yude; Liu, Changxin; Yang, Pingxiong

    2011-02-01

    Bismuth vanadate (Bi2VO5.5) thin films were fabricated on indium-doped tin oxide (ITO)-coated glass substrates by chemical solution method combined with a rapid thermal annealing process. The structure of the films was characterized with X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy. The Bi2VO5.5 films annealed at 600 °C showed a good match with the ITO coated glass substrates and had a desired perovskite structure with high (00l) preferred orientation. The spherical grains with a homogeneous distribution of high crystallinity and packing density were observed. Optical properties of the Bi2VO5.5 thin films were studied by Raman spectra and the lattice vibration modes of the films were obtained. A low frequency dielectric dispersion was observed in the films. Dielectric constant and loss was about 75 and 0.076 at 10kHz, respectively. The ac conductivity obeyed Jonscher's universal power law, which may be originated a possible hopping mechanism for Bi2VO5.5 thin films. The complex impedance traces revealed material dielectric dispersion nature and the presence of grain effects in the films.

  19. CdS films deposited by chemical bath under rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliva-Aviles, A.I., E-mail: aoliva@mda.cinvestav.mx [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados Unidad Merida, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada. A.P. 73-Cordemex, 97310 Merida, Yucatan (Mexico); Patino, R.; Oliva, A.I. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados Unidad Merida, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada. A.P. 73-Cordemex, 97310 Merida, Yucatan (Mexico)

    2010-08-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) films were deposited on rotating substrates by the chemical bath technique. The effects of the rotation speed on the morphological, optical, and structural properties of the films were discussed. A rotating substrate-holder was fabricated such that substrates can be taken out from the bath during the deposition. CdS films were deposited at different deposition times (10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 min) onto Corning glass substrates at different rotation velocities (150, 300, 450, and 600 rpm) during chemical deposition. The chemical bath was composed by CdCl{sub 2}, KOH, NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} and CS(NH{sub 2}){sub 2} as chemical reagents and heated at 75 deg. C. The results show no critical effects on the band gap energy and the surface roughness of the CdS films when the rotation speed changes. However, a linear increase on the deposition rate with the rotation energy was observed, meanwhile the stoichiometry was strongly affected by the rotation speed, resulting a better 1:1 Cd/S ratio as speed increases. Rotation effects may be of interest in industrial production of CdTe/CdS solar cells.

  20. Structural and Optical Properties of Chemical Bath Deposited Silver Oxide Thin Films: Role of Deposition Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. Nwanya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Silver oxide thin films were deposited on glass substrates at a temperature of 50°C by chemical bath deposition technique under different deposition times using pure AgNO3 precursor and triethanolamine as the complexing agent. The chemical analysis based on EDX technique shows the presence of Ag and O at the appropriate energy levels. The morphological features obtained from SEM showed that the AgxO structures varied as the deposition time changes. The X-ray diffraction showed the peaks of Ag2O and AgO in the structure. The direct band gap and the refractive index increased as the deposition time increased and was in the range of 1.64–1.95 eV and 1.02–2.07, respectively. The values of the band gap and refractive index obtained indicate possible applications in photovoltaic and photothermal systems.

  1. Effects of deposition time in chemically deposited ZnS films in acidic solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddad, H.; Chelouche, A., E-mail: azeddinechelouche@gmail.com; Talantikite, D.; Merzouk, H.; Boudjouan, F.; Djouadi, D.

    2015-08-31

    We report an experimental study on the synthesis and characterization of zinc sulfide (ZnS) single layer thin films deposited on glass substrates by chemical bath deposition technique in acidic solution. The effect of deposition time on the microstructure, surface morphology, optical absorption, transmittance, and photoluminescence (PL) was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), UV-Vis–NIR spectrophotometry and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The results showed that the samples exhibit wurtzite structure and their crystal quality is improved by increasing deposition time. The latter, was found to affect the morphology of the thin films as showed by SEM micrographs. The optical measurements revealed a high transparency in the visible range and a dependence of absorption edge and band gap on deposition time. The room temperature PL spectra indicated that all ZnS grown thin films emit a UV and blue light, while the band intensities are found to be dependent on deposition times. - Highlights: • Single layer ZnS thin films were deposited by CBD in acidic solution at 95 °C. • The effect of deposition time was investigated. • Coexistence of ZnS and ZnO hexagonal structures for time deposition below 2 h • Thicker ZnS films were achieved after monolayer deposition for 5 h. • The highest UV-blue emission observed in thin film deposited at 5 h.

  2. Deposition of electrochromic tungsten oxide thin films by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henley, W.B.; Sacks, G.J. [Univ. of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States). Center of Microelectronics

    1997-03-01

    Use of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) for electrochromic WO{sub 3} film deposition is investigated. Oxygen, hydrogen, and tungsten hexafluoride were used as source gases. Reactant gas flow was investigated to determine the effect on film characteristics. High quality optical films were obtained at deposition rates on the order of 100 {angstrom}/s. Higher deposition rates were attainable but film quality and optical coherence degraded. Atomic emission spectroscopy (AES), was used to provide an in situ assessment of the plasma deposition chemistry. Through AES, it is shown that the hydrogen gas flow is essential to the deposition of the WO{sub 3} film. Oxygen gas flow and tungsten hexafluoride gas flow must be approximately equal for high quality films.

  3. Cobalt Xanthate Thin Film with Chemical Bath Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İ. A. Kariper

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cobalt xanthate thin films (CXTFs were successfully deposited by chemical bath deposition, onto amorphous glass substrates, as well as on p- and n-silicon, indium tin oxide, and poly(methyl methacrylate. The structure of the films was analyzed by far-infrared spectrum (FIR, mid-infrared (MIR spectrum, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. These films were investigated from their structural, optical, and electrical properties point of view. Electrical properties were measured using four-point method, whereas optical properties were investigated via UV-VIS spectroscopic technique. Uniform distribution of grains was clearly observed from the photographs taken by scanning electron microscope (SEM. The transmittance was about 70–80% (4 hours, 50°C. The optical band gap of the CXTF was graphically estimated to be 3.99–4.02 eV. The resistivity of the films was calculated as 22.47–75.91 Ω·cm on commercial glass depending on film thickness and 44.90–73.10 Ω ·cm on the other substrates. It has been observed that the relative resistivity changed with film thickness. The MIR and FIR spectra of the films were in agreement with the literature analogues. The expected peaks of cobalt xanthate were observed in NMR analysis on glass. The films were dipped in chloroform as organic solvent and were analyzed by NMR.

  4. Chemical vapor deposition reactor. [providing uniform film thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chern, S. S.; Maserjian, J. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An improved chemical vapor deposition reactor is characterized by a vapor deposition chamber configured to substantially eliminate non-uniformities in films deposited on substrates by control of gas flow and removing gas phase reaction materials from the chamber. Uniformity in the thickness of films is produced by having reactive gases injected through multiple jets which are placed at uniformally distributed locations. Gas phase reaction materials are removed through an exhaust chimney which is positioned above the centrally located, heated pad or platform on which substrates are placed. A baffle is situated above the heated platform below the mouth of the chimney to prevent downdraft dispersion and scattering of gas phase reactant materials.

  5. Chemical vapor deposition polymerization the growth and properties of parylene thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Fortin, Jeffrey B

    2004-01-01

    Chemical Vapor Deposition Polymerization - The Growth and Properties of Parylene Thin Films is intended to be valuable to both users and researchers of parylene thin films. It should be particularly useful for those setting up and characterizing their first research deposition system. It provides a good picture of the deposition process and equipment, as well as information on system-to-system variations that is important to consider when designing a deposition system or making modifications to an existing one. Also included are methods to characterizae a deposition system's pumping properties as well as monitor the deposition process via mass spectrometry. There are many references that will lead the reader to further information on the topic being discussed. This text should serve as a useful reference source and handbook for scientists and engineers interested in depositing high quality parylene thin films.

  6. Semiclassical Methods in Chemical Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, William H.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the role of semiclassical theory in chemical physics both as a computational method and conceptual framework for interpreting quantum mechanical experiments and calculations. Topics covered include energy wells and eigenvalues, scattering, statistical mechanics and electronically nonadiabiatic processes. (JM)

  7. A novel induction heater for chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, C. W.; Wong, H. K.; Sin, K. S.; Yip, S. T.; Chik, K. P.

    1989-06-01

    We report how an induction cooker for household use can be modified for heating substrate or heating gases to high temperature in a chemical vapor deposition system. Only minor changes of the cooker are necessary. Stable substrate temperature as high as 900 °C was achieved with input power of about 1150 W.

  8. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Aluminum Oxide Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vohs, Jason K.; Bentz, Amy; Eleamos, Krystal; Poole, John; Fahlman, Bradley D.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a process routinely used to produce thin films of materials via decomposition of volatile precursor molecules. Unfortunately, the equipment required for a conventional CVD experiment is not practical or affordable for many undergraduate chemistry laboratories, especially at smaller institutions. In an effort to…

  9. DLC Films Deposited by the DC PACVD Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Palamarchuk

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available DLC (Diamond-Like Carbon coatings have been suggested as protective surface layers against wear. However hard DLC coatings, especially those of greater thickness, have poor adhesion to substrates. We have used several ways to increase the adhesion of DLC coatings prepared by the PACVD (Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapour Deposition method on steel substrates. One of these is the DC PACVD method for preparing DLC films.

  10. DLC Films Deposited by the DC PACVD Method

    OpenAIRE

    D. Palamarchuk; M. Zoriy; J. Gurovič; F. Černý; S. Konvičková; I. Hüttel

    2003-01-01

    DLC (Diamond-Like Carbon) coatings have been suggested as protective surface layers against wear. However hard DLC coatings, especially those of greater thickness, have poor adhesion to substrates. We have used several ways to increase the adhesion of DLC coatings prepared by the PACVD (Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapour Deposition) method on steel substrates. One of these is the DC PACVD method for preparing DLC films.

  11. Influence of deposition time on the properties of chemical bath deposited manganese sulfide thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuar Kassim

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Manganese sulfide thin films were chemically deposited from an aqueous solution containing manganese sulfate, sodium thiosulfate and sodium tartrate. The influence of deposition time (2, 3, 6 and 8 days on the properties of thin films was investigated. The structure and surface morphology of the thin films were studied by X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy, respectively. In addition, in order to investigate the optical properties of the thin films, the UV-visible spectrophotometry was used. The XRD results indicated that the deposited MnS2 thin films exhibited a polycrystalline cubic structure. The number of MnS2 peaks on the XRD patterns initially increased from three to six peaks and then decreased to five peaks, as the deposition time was increased from 2 to 8 days. From the AFM measurements, the film thickness and surface roughness were found to be dependent on the deposition time.

  12. Nanocrystalline Diamond Films Deposited by Electron Assisted Hot Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Nanocrystalline diamond films were deposited on polished Si wafer surface with electron assisted hot filament chemical vapor deposition at 1 kPa gas pressure, the deposited films were characterized and observed by Raman spectrum, X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy and semiconductor characterization system. The results show that when 8 A bias current is applied for 5 h, the surface roughness decreases to 28.5 nm. After 6 and 8 A bias current are applied for 1 h, and the nanocrystalline films deposition continue for 4 h with 0 A bias current at 1 kPa gas pressure. The nanocrystalline diamond films with 0.5×109 and 1×1010 Ω·cm resistivity respectively are obtained. It is demonstrated that electron bombardment plays an important role of nucleation to deposit diamond films with smooth surface and high resistivity.

  13. Characterization of copper selenide thin films deposited by chemical bath deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mamun; Islam, A. B. M. O.

    2004-11-01

    A low-cost chemical bath deposition (CBD) technique has been used for the preparation of Cu2-xSe thin films onto glass substrates and deposited films were characterized by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and UV-vis spectrophotometry. Good quality thin films of smooth surface of copper selenide thin films were deposited using sodium selenosulfate as a source of selenide ions. The structural and optical behaviour of the films are discussed in the light of the observed data.

  14. Low-temperature deposition of crystalline silicon nitride nanoparticles by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chan-Soo; Youn, Woong-Kyu; Lee, Dong-Kwon; Seol, Kwang-Soo; Hwang, Nong-Moon

    2009-07-01

    The nanocrystalline alpha silicon nitride (α-Si 3N 4) was deposited on a silicon substrate by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition at the substrate temperature of 700 °C under 4 and 40 Torr at the wire temperatures of 1430 and 1730 °C, with a gas mixture of SiH 4 and NH 3. The size and density of crystalline nanoparticles on the substrate increased with increasing wire temperature. With increasing reactor pressure, the crystallinity of α-Si 3N 4 nanoparticles increased, but the deposition rate decreased.

  15. SnS thin films deposited by chemical bath deposition, dip coating and SILAR techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaki, Sunil H.; Chaudhary, Mahesh D.; Deshpande, M. P.

    2016-05-01

    The SnS thin films were synthesized by chemical bath deposition (CBD), dip coating and successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) techniques. In them, the CBD thin films were deposited at two temperatures: ambient and 70 °C. The energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical spectroscopy techniques were used to characterize the thin films. The electrical transport properties studies on the as-deposited thin films were done by measuring the I-V characteristics, DC electrical resistivity variation with temperature and the room temperature Hall effect. The obtained results are deliberated in this paper.

  16. The atmospheric chemical vapour deposition of coatings on glass

    CERN Document Server

    Sanderson, K D

    1996-01-01

    The deposition of thin films of indium oxide, tin doped indium oxide (ITO) and titanium nitride for solar control applications have been investigated by Atmospheric Chemical Vapour Deposition (APCVD). Experimental details of the deposition system and the techniques used to characterise the films are presented. Results from investigations into the deposition parameters, the film microstructure and film material properties are discussed. A range of precursors were investigated for the deposition of indium oxide. The effect of pro-mixing the vaporised precursor with an oxidant source and the deposition temperature has been studied. Polycrystalline In sub 2 O sub 3 films with a resistivity of 1.1 - 3x10 sup - sup 3 OMEGA cm were obtained with ln(thd) sub 3 , oxygen and nitrogen. The growth of ITO films from ln(thd) sub 3 , oxygen and a range of tin dopants is also presented. The effect of the dopant precursor, the doping concentration, deposition temperature and the effect of additives on film growth and microstr...

  17. Chemical microreactor and method thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Jeffrey D.; Jankowski, Alan

    2011-08-09

    A method for forming a chemical microreactor includes forming at least one capillary microchannel in a substrate having at least one inlet and at least one outlet, integrating at least one heater into the chemical microreactor, interfacing the capillary microchannel with a liquid chemical reservoir at the inlet of the capillary microchannel, and interfacing the capillary microchannel with a porous membrane near the outlet of the capillary microchannel, the porous membrane being positioned beyond the outlet of the capillary microchannel, wherein the porous membrane has at least one catalyst material imbedded therein.

  18. Combustion chemical vapor deposited coatings for thermal barrier coating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Materials Science and Engineering

    1995-12-31

    The new deposition process, combustion chemical vapor deposition, shows a great deal of promise in the area of thermal barrier coating systems. This technique produces dense, adherent coatings, and does not require a reaction chamber. Coatings can therefore be applied in the open atmosphere. The process is potentially suitable for producing high quality CVD coatings for use as interlayers between the bond coat and thermal barrier coating, and/or as overlayers, on top of thermal barrier coatings. In this report, the evaluation of alumina and ceria coatings on a nickel-chromium alloy is described.

  19. Oxygen Barrier Coating Deposited by Novel Plasma-enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Juan; Benter, M.; Taboryski, Rafael Jozef

    2010-01-01

    We report the use of a novel plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition chamber with coaxial electrode geometry for the SiOx deposition. This novel plasma setup exploits the diffusion of electrons through the inner most electrode to the interior samples space as the major energy source. This confi......We report the use of a novel plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition chamber with coaxial electrode geometry for the SiOx deposition. This novel plasma setup exploits the diffusion of electrons through the inner most electrode to the interior samples space as the major energy source....... This configuration enables a gentle treatment of sensitive materials like low-density polyethylene foils and biodegradable materials. SiOx coatings deposited in the novel setup were compared with other state of the art plasma coatings and were found to possess equally good or better barrier properties. The barrier...... effect of single-layer coatings deposited under different reaction conditions was studied. The coating thickness and the carbon content in the coatings were found to be the critical parameters for the barrier property. The novel barrier coating was applied on different polymeric materials...

  20. Shallow bath chemical deposition of CdS thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, Y.S. [Department of Molecule Science and Engineering, National Taipei University of Science and Technology, Taipei, 10617, Taiwan (China); Choubey, R.K. [Department of Applied Physics, Birla Institute of Technology, Mesra, Ranchi, 835 215 (India); Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 10617, Taiwan (China); Yu, W.C. [Department of Molecule Science and Engineering, National Taipei University of Science and Technology, Taipei, 10617, Taiwan (China); Hsu, W.T. [Green Energy and Environmental Research Laboratory, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Hsin-Chu, Taiwan (China); Lan, C.W., E-mail: cwlan@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2011-10-31

    Cadmium sulfide thin film was grown by shallow chemical bath deposition technique. This technique used a highly conducted hot plate to heat the substrate, while using a shallow bath for higher thermal gradients. As a result, large area uniformity could be achieved and the homogeneous nucleation was suppressed. More importantly, the solution used was greatly reduced, which is crucial for cost reduction in practice. The effects of temperature and shaking on the growth kinetics and film properties were investigated. The reaction activation energy was obtained to be 0.84 eV, and was not affected much by shaking indicating that the deposition is essentially reaction controlled. Furthermore, the films deposited at low or high temperature conditions had better photoconductivity.

  1. Preparation and analysis of chemically gradient functional bioceramic coating formed by pulsed laser deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, P; Muraleedharan, C V; Sureshbabu, S; Komath, Manoj; Varma, Harikrishna

    2012-02-01

    Bioactive ceramic coatings based on calcium phosphates yield better functionality in the human body for a variety of metallic implant devices including orthopaedic and dental prostheses. In the present study chemically and hence functionally gradient bioceramic coating was obtained by pulsed laser deposition method. Calcium phosphate bioactive ceramic coatings based on hydroxyapatite (HA) and tricalcium phosphate (TCP) were deposited over titanium substrate to produce gradation in physico-chemical characteristics and in vitro dissolution behaviour. Sintered targets of HA and α-TCP were deposited in a multi target laser deposition system. The obtained deposits were characterized by X-ray diffraction, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy was used to estimate the in vitro dissolution behaviour of coatings. The variation in mechanical property of the gradient layer was evaluated through scratch test and micro-indentation hardness. The bioactivity was examined in vitro with respect to the ability of HA layer to form on the surface as a result of contact with simulated body fluid. It could be inferred that chemically gradient functional bioceramic coating can be produced by laser deposition of multiple sintered targets with variable chemical composition.

  2. Self-organization and nanostructure formation in chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walgraef, Daniel

    2013-10-01

    When thin films are grown on a substrate by chemical vapor deposition, the evolution of the first deposited layers may be described, on mesoscopic scales, by dynamical models of the reaction-diffusion type. For monatomic layers, such models describe the evolution of atomic coverage due to the combined effect of reaction terms representing adsorption-desorption and chemical processes and nonlinear diffusion terms that are of the Cahn-Hilliard type. This combination may lead, below a critical temperature, to the instability of uniform deposited layers. This instability triggers the formation of nanostructures corresponding to regular spatial variations of substrate coverage. Patterns wavelengths and symmetries are selected by dynamical variables and not by variational arguments. According to the balance between reaction- and diffusion-induced nonlinearities, a succession of nanostructures including hexagonal arrays of dots, stripes, and localized structures of various types may be obtained. These structures may initiate different growth mechanisms, including Volmer-Weber and Frank-Van der Merwe types of growth. The relevance of this approach to the study of deposited layers of different species is discussed.

  3. Chemical vapor deposition coating of fibers using microwave application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, Martin B. (Inventor); Hoover, Gordon (Inventor); Jackson, Henry W. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition coating is carried out in a cylindrical cavity. The fibers are heated by a microwave source that is uses a TM0N0 mode, where O is an integer, and produces a field that depends substantially only on radius. The fibers are observed to determine their heating, and their position can be adjusted. Once the fibers are uniformly heated, a CVD reagent is added to process the fibers.

  4. Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition of Few-Layer Graphene on Copper Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, Víctor-Manuel Freire; Badia-Canal, Jordi; Roca, Carles Corbella; Miralles, Esther Pascual; Serra, Enric Bertran; Bella, José-Luís Andújar

    2013-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of graphene on copper is an efficient technology for producing high-quality graphene for large areas. The objective of this work is to deposit graphene/few-layer graphene (FLG) using different types of copper substrate by a new hot-wire CVD process. We carried out the processes at temperatures below 1000 °C with acetylene (C2H2) as a precursor gas. After a general characterization of the samples, the results mostly indicate the formation of FLG on copper samples by this method. Nevertheless, the presence of pure, crystalline, and sufficiently flat surfaces is needed for depositing high-quality graphene layers.

  5. High Quality SiGe Layer Deposited by a New Ultrahigh Vacuum Chemical Vapor Deposition System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    An ultrahigh vacuum chemical vapor deposition (UHV/CVD) system is developed and the details of its construction and operation are reported. Using high purity SiH4 and GeH4 reactant gases,the Si0.82Ge0.18 layer is deposited at 550℃. With the measurements by double crystal X-ray diffraction (DCXRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) techniques, it is shown that the crystalline quality of the SiGe layer is good,and the underlying SiGe/Si heterointerface is sharply defined.

  6. Tip-based chemical vapor deposition with a scanning nano-heater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaitas, A.

    2013-01-01

    In this preliminary effort, a moving nano-heater directs a chemical vapor deposition reaction (nano-CVD) demonstrating a tip-based nanofabrication (TBN) method. Localized nano-CVD of copper (Cu) and copper oxide (CuO) on a silicon (Si) and silicon oxide (SiO2) substrate from gasses, namely sublimate

  7. Characterization of nanocarbon deposited on insulator substrate by alcohol chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Marina; Murata, Hidenobu; Tachibana, Masaru

    2016-10-01

    Single-layer-graphene-like nanocarbon materials were directly deposited on c-plane sapphire substrates by thermal chemical vapor deposition with ethanol as a carbon source. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images show that the deposited materials have sheetlike grains of around 100 nm diameter. Most of them have “hills” with 32 nm diameter on the grains. According to atomic force microscopy (AFM) observation, the height of the sheetlike grains is below 1 nm, which is comparable to that of single-layer graphene, while the hills have a height of several nm. Raman spectra show that the material is similar to graphitic nanocarbon, which has a strong D band. This result implies that there are a number of defects in the nanocarbon materials.

  8. Characterization of Thin Films Deposited with Precursor Ferrocene by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Kailun; ZHENG Jianwan; LIU Zuli; JIA Lihui

    2007-01-01

    In this paper,the characterization of thin films,deposited with the precursor ferrocene(FcH)by the plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition(PECVD)technique,was investigated.The films were measured by Scanning Electronic Microscopy(SEM),Atomic Force Microscopy(AFM),Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis(ESCA),and superconducting Quantum Interference Device(SQUID).It was observed that the film's layer is homogeneous in thickness and has a dense morphology without cracks.The surface roughness is about 36 nm.From the results of ESCA,it can be inferred that the film mainly contains the compound FeOOH,and carbon is combined with oxygen in different forms under different supply-powers.The hysteresis loops indicate that the film is of soft magnetism.

  9. Deposition of thermal and hot-wire chemical vapor deposition copper thin films on patterned substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitropoulos, G; Davazoglou, D

    2011-09-01

    In this work we study the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) of copper films on blanket and patterned substrates at high filament temperatures. A vertical chemical vapor deposition reactor was used in which the chemical reactions were assisted by a tungsten filament heated at 650 degrees C. Hexafluoroacetylacetonate Cu(I) trimethylvinylsilane (CupraSelect) vapors were used, directly injected into the reactor with the aid of a liquid injection system using N2 as carrier gas. Copper thin films grown also by thermal and hot-wire CVD. The substrates used were oxidized silicon wafers on which trenches with dimensions of the order of 500 nm were formed and subsequently covered with LPCVD W. HWCVD copper thin films grown at filament temperature of 650 degrees C showed higher growth rates compared to the thermally ones. They also exhibited higher resistivities than thermal and HWCVD films grown at lower filament temperatures. Thermally grown Cu films have very uniform deposition leading to full coverage of the patterned substrates while the HWCVD films exhibited a tendency to vertical growth, thereby creating gaps and incomplete step coverage.

  10. Filtered cathodic arc deposition apparatus and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Alan R.

    1999-01-01

    A filtered cathodic arc deposition method and apparatus for the production of highly dense, wear resistant coatings which are free from macro particles. The filtered cathodic arc deposition apparatus includes a cross shaped vacuum chamber which houses a cathode target having an evaporable surface comprised of the coating material, means for generating a stream of plasma, means for generating a transverse magnetic field, and a macro particle deflector. The transverse magnetic field bends the generated stream of plasma in the direction of a substrate. Macro particles are effectively filtered from the stream of plasma by traveling, unaffected by the transverse magnetic field, along the initial path of the plasma stream to a macro particle deflector. The macro particle deflector has a preformed surface which deflects macro particles away from the substrate.

  11. Cadmium Sulfide Thin Films Deposited onto MWCNT/Polysulfone Substrates by Chemical Bath Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Moreno

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium sulfide (CdS thin films were deposited by chemical bath deposition (CBD onto polymeric composites with electric field-aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs. MWCNT/polysulfone composites were prepared by dispersing low concentrations of MWCNTs within dissolved polysulfone (PSF. An alternating current electric field was “in situ” applied to align the MWCNTs within the dissolved polymer along the field direction until the solvent was evaporated. 80 μm thick solid MWCNT/PSF composites with an electrical conductivity 13 orders of magnitude higher than the conductivity of the neat PSF were obtained. The MWCNT/PSF composites were subsequently used as flexible substrates for the deposition of CdS thin films by CBD. Transparent and adherent CdS thin films with an average thickness of 475 nm were obtained. The values of the energy band gap, average grain size, rms roughness, crystalline structure, and preferential orientation of the CdS films deposited onto the polymeric substrate were very similar to the corresponding values of the CdS deposited onto glass (conventional substrate. These results show that the MWCNT/PSF composites with electric field-tailored MWCNTs represent a suitable option to be used as flexible conducting substrate for CdS thin films, which represents an important step towards the developing of flexible systems for photovoltaic applications.

  12. Synthesis of Aligned Carbon Nanotubes by Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Gang; ZHOU Ming; MA Weiwei; CAI Lan

    2009-01-01

    Single crystal silicon was found to be very beneficial to the growth of aligned carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition with C2H2 as carbon source. A thin film of Ni served as catalyst was deposited on the Si substrate by the K575X Peltier Cooled High Resolution Sputter Coater before growth. The growth properties of carbon nanotubes were studied as a function of the Ni catalyst layer thickness. The diameter, growth rate and areal density of the carbon nanotubes were controlled by the initial thickness of the catalyst layer. Steric hindrance between nanotubes forces them to grow in well-aligned manner at an initial stage of growth. Transmission electron microscope analysis revealed that nanotubes grew by a tip growth mechanism.

  13. Electrospray deposition of isolated chemically synthesized magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agostini, Pierre; Meffre, Anca; Lacroix, Lise-Marie; Ugnati, Damien [Université de Toulouse (France); INSA, UPS, CNRS, Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie des Nano-objets (LPCNO) (France); Ondarçuhu, Thierry [Centre d’Elaboration de Matériaux et d’Etudes Structurales (CEMES-CNRS) (France); Respaud, Marc; Lassagne, Benjamin, E-mail: lassagne@insa-toulouse.fr [Université de Toulouse (France); INSA, UPS, CNRS, Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie des Nano-objets (LPCNO) (France)

    2016-01-15

    The deposition of isolated magnetic nanoparticles onto a substrate was performed using electrohydrodynamic spraying. Two kinds of nanoparticles were sprayed, 11 nm CoFe carbide nanospheres and 10.5 nm Fe nanocubes. By studying carefully the evolution of the sprayed charged droplets and the mechanism of nanoparticle dispersion in them, we could optimize the nanoparticle concentration within the initial nanoparticle solution (i) to reduce the magnetic interaction and therefore prevent agglomeration and (ii) to obtain in a relatively short period (1 h) a deposit of isolated magnetic nanoparticles with a density of up to 400 nanoparticles per µm{sup 2}. These results open great perspectives for magnetic measurements on single objects using advanced magnetometry techniques as long as spintronics applications based on single chemically synthesized magnetic nanoparticles.

  14. Synthesis of mullite coatings by chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulpuri, R.P.; Auger, M.; Sarin, V.K. [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Formation of mullite on ceramic substrates via chemical vapor deposition was investigated. Mullite is a solid solution of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2} with a composition of 3Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{circ}2SiO{sub 2}. Thermodynamic calculations performed on the AlCl{sub 3}-SiCl{sub 4}-CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2} system were used to construct equilibrium CVD phase diagrams. With the aid of these diagrams and consideration of kinetic rate limiting factors, initial process parameters were determined. Through process optimization, crystalline CVD mullite coatings have been successfully grown on SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} substrates. Results from the thermodynamic analysis, process optimization, and effect of various process parameters on deposition rate and coating morphology are discussed.

  15. Effect of Different Catalyst Deposition Technique on Aligned Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Grown by Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Shuaib Mohamed Saheed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reported the investigation of the substrate preparation technique involving deposition of iron catalyst by electron beam evaporation and ferrocene vaporization in order to produce vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes array needed for fabrication of tailored devices. Prior to the growth at 700°C in ethylene, silicon dioxide coated silicon substrate was prepared by depositing alumina followed by iron using two different methods as described earlier. Characterization analysis revealed that aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes array of 107.9 µm thickness grown by thermal chemical vapor deposition technique can only be achieved for the sample with iron deposited using ferrocene vaporization. The thick layer of partially oxidized iron film can prevent the deactivation of catalyst and thus is able to sustain the growth. It also increases the rate of permeation of the hydrocarbon gas into the catalyst particles and prevents agglomeration at the growth temperature. Combination of alumina-iron layer provides an efficient growth of high density multiwalled carbon nanotubes array with the steady growth rate of 3.6 µm per minute for the first 12 minutes and dropped by half after 40 minutes. Thicker and uniform iron catalyst film obtained from ferrocene vaporization is attributed to the multidirectional deposition of particles in the gaseous form.

  16. Chemical vapour deposited diamonds for dosimetry of radiotherapeutical beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucciolini, M.; Mazzocchi, S. [Firenze Univ., Firenze (Italy). Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica; INFN, Firenze (Italy); Borchi, E.; Bruzzi, M.; Pini, S.; Sciortino, S. [Firenze Univ., Firenze (Italy). Dipartimento di Energetica; INFN, Firenze (Italy); Cirrone, G.A.P.; Guttone, G.; Raffaele, L.; Sabini, M.G. [INFN, Catania (Italy). Laboratori Nazionali del Sud

    2002-07-01

    This paper deals with the application of synthetic diamond detectors to the clinical dosimetry of photon and electron beams. It has been developed in the frame of INFN CANDIDO project and MURST Cofin. Diamonds grown with CVD (Chemical Vapour Deposition) technique have been studied; some of them are commercial samples while others have been locally synthesised. Experiments have been formed using both on-line and off-line approaches. For the off-line measurements, TL (thermoluminescent) and TSC (thermally stimulated current) techniques have been used.

  17. Handbook of chemical vapor deposition principles, technology and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Pierson, Hugh O

    1999-01-01

    Turn to this new second edition for an understanding of the latest advances in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. CVD technology has recently grown at a rapid rate, and the number and scope of its applications and their impact on the market have increased considerably. The market is now estimated to be at least double that of a mere seven years ago when the first edition of this book was published. The second edition is an update with a considerably expanded and revised scope. Plasma CVD and metallo-organic CVD are two major factors in this rapid growth. Readers will find the latest

  18. A novel electroless silver depositing method for magnesium alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Hui; CUI Jian-zhong

    2006-01-01

    Depositing silver on magnesium alloy by both electroless plating and organic coatings was studied. The organic coating was made by immersing samples in organosilicon heat-resisting varnish. In this method the organic coating acts as interlayer between the substrate and silver film. When the reaction starts, silver deposits directly on the interlayer. X-ray diffraction and SEM analysis were used to determine the composition and morphology of the interlayer and silver film. The potentiodynamic polarization curves for corrosion studies of coated magnesium alloys were performed in a corrosive environment of 3.5% NaCl(mass fraction) at neutral pH (6.9). The results indicate that compared with the substrate, the corrosion resistance of coated magnesium alloys increases greatly. Moreover, the method proposed in this work is environmentally friendly, non-toxic chemicals were used. In addition, it provides a new concept for the corrosion inhibition of magnesium alloys.

  19. Chemical vapor deposition of ceramic coatings on metals and ceramic fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nable, Jun Co

    2005-07-01

    The research presented in this study consists of two major parts. The first part is about the development of ceramic coatings on metals by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Ceramics such as Al2O3 and Cr2O3, are used as protective coatings for materials used at elevated temperatures (>700°C). These metal oxides either exhibit oxidation resistance or have been used as environmental bond coats. Conventional methods of coating by chemical vapor deposition requires deposition temperatures of >950°C which could damage the substrate material during the coating process. Lower deposition temperatures (400 to 600°C) by MOCVD of these metal oxides were successful on Ni metal substrates. Surface modification such as pre-oxidation and etching were also investigated. In addition, a novel approach for the CVD of TiN on metals was developed. This new approach utilizes ambient pressure conditions which lead to deposition temperatures of 800°C or lower compared to conventional CVD of TiN at 1000°C. Titanium nitride can be used as an abrasive and wear coating on cutting and grinding tools. This nitride can also serve as a diffusion coating in metals. The second major part of this research involves the synthesis of interfacial coatings on ceramic reinforcing fibers for ceramic matrix composites. Aluminum and chromium oxides were deposited onto SiC, and Al2O3-SiO 2 fibers by MOCVD. The effects of the interface coatings on the tensile strength of ceramic fibers are also discussed. New duplex interface coatings consisting of BN or TiN together with Al2O3 or ZrO 2 were also successfully deposited and evaluated on SiC fibers.

  20. Method and apparatus for electrospark deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, Jeffrey A.; Johnson, Roger N.; Park, Walter R.; Munley, John T.

    2004-12-28

    A method and apparatus for controlling electrospark deposition (ESD) comprises using electrical variable waveforms from the ESD process as a feedback parameter. The method comprises measuring a plurality of peak amplitudes from a series of electrical energy pulses delivered to an electrode tip. The maximum peak value from among the plurality of peak amplitudes correlates to the contact force between the electrode tip and a workpiece. The method further comprises comparing the maximum peak value to a set point to determine an offset and optimizing the contact force according to the value of the offset. The apparatus comprises an electrode tip connected to an electrical energy wave generator and an electrical signal sensor, which connects to a high-speed data acquisition card. An actuator provides relative motion between the electrode tip and a workpiece by receiving a feedback drive signal from a processor that is operably connected to the actuator and the high-speed data acquisition card.

  1. Conversion Coatings for Aluminum Alloys by Chemical Vapor Deposition Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reye, John T.; McFadden, Lisa S.; Gatica, Jorge E.; Morales, Wilfredo

    2004-01-01

    With the rise of environmental awareness and the renewed importance of environmentally friendly processes, the United States Environmental Protection Agency has targeted surface pre-treatment processes based on chromates. Indeed, this process has been subject to regulations under the Clean Water Act as well as other environmental initiatives, and there is today a marked movement to phase the process out in the near future. Therefore, there is a clear need for new advances in coating technology that could provide practical options for replacing present industrial practices. Depending on the final application, such coatings might be required to be resistant to corrosion, act as chemically resistant coatings, or both. This research examined a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) mechanism to deposit uniform conversion coatings onto aluminum alloy substrates. Robust protocols based on solutions of aryl phosphate ester and multi-oxide conversion coating (submicron) films were successfully grown onto the aluminum alloy samples. These films were characterized by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Preliminary results indicate the potential of this technology to replace aqueous-based chromate processes.

  2. Chemically deposited TiO2/CdS bilayer system for photoelectrochemical properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P R Deshmukh; U M Patil; K V Gurav; S B Kulkarni; C D Lokhande

    2012-12-01

    In the present investigation, TiO2, CdS and TiO2/CdS bilayer system have been deposited on the fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) coated glass substrate by chemical methods. Nanograined TiO2 was deposited on FTO coated glass substrates by successive ionic layers adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method. Chemical bath deposition (CBD)method was employed to deposit CdS thin film on pre-deposited TiO2 film. A further study has beenmade for structural, surface morphological, optical and photoelectrochemical (PEC) properties of FTO/TiO2, FTO/CdS and FTO/TiO2/CdS bilayers system. PEC behaviour of FTO/TiO2/CdS bilayers was studied and compared with FTO/CdS single system. FTO/TiO2/CdS bilayers system showed improved performance of PEC properties over individual FTO/CdS thin films.

  3. Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapour Deposition – Technological Design Of Functional Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Januś M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapour Deposition (PA CVD method allows to deposit of homogeneous, well-adhesive coatings at lower temperature on different substrates. Plasmochemical treatment significantly impacts on physicochemical parameters of modified surfaces. In this study we present the overview of the possibilities of plasma processes for the deposition of diamond-like carbon coatings doped Si and/or N atoms on the Ti Grade2, aluminum-zinc alloy and polyetherketone substrate. Depending on the type of modified substrate had improved the corrosion properties including biocompatibility of titanium surface, increase of surface hardness with deposition of good adhesion and fine-grained coatings (in the case of Al-Zn alloy and improving of the wear resistance (in the case of PEEK substrate.

  4. Low resistance polycrystalline diamond thin films deposited by hot filament chemical vapour deposition

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mahtab Ullah; Ejaz Ahmed; Abdelbary Elhissi; Waqar Ahmed

    2014-05-01

    Polycrystalline diamond thin films with outgrowing diamond (OGD) grains were deposited onto silicon wafers using a hydrocarbon gas (CH4) highly diluted with H2 at low pressure in a hot filament chemical vapour deposition (HFCVD) reactor with a range of gas flow rates. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and SEM showed polycrystalline diamond structure with a random orientation. Polycrystalline diamond films with various textures were grown and (111) facets were dominant with sharp grain boundaries. Outgrowth was observed in flowerish character at high gas flow rates. Isolated single crystals with little openings appeared at various stages at low gas flow rates. Thus, changing gas flow rates had a beneficial influence on the grain size, growth rate and electrical resistivity. CVD diamond films gave an excellent performance for medium film thickness with relatively low electrical resistivity and making them potentially useful in many industrial applications.

  5. Method of forming a chemical composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Dennis N.; Wilding, Bruce M.; Klingler, Kerry M.; Zollinger, William T.; Wendt, Kraig M.

    2007-10-09

    A method of forming a chemical composition such as a chemical hydride is described and which includes the steps of selecting a composition having chemical bonds and which is capable of forming a chemical hydride; providing a source of hydrogen; and exposing the selected composition to an amount of ionizing radiation to encourage the changing of the chemical bonds of the selected composition, and chemically reacting the selected composition with the source of hydrogen to facilitate the formation of a chemical hydride.

  6. Modelling and optimization of film thickness variation for plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, Ewan; Gibson, Des; Lin, Li; Fu, Xiuhua

    2011-09-01

    This paper describes a method for modelling film thickness variation across the deposition area within plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) processes. The model enables identification and optimization of film thickness uniformity sensitivities to electrode configuration, temperature, deposition system design and gas flow distribution. PECVD deposition utilizes a co-planar 300mm diameter electrodes with separate RF power matching to each electrode. The system has capability to adjust electrode separation and electrode temperature as parameters to optimize uniformity. Vacuum is achieved using dry pumping with real time control of butterfly valve position for active pressure control. Comparison between theory and experiment is provided for PECVD of diamond-like-carbon (DLC) deposition onto flat and curved substrate geometries. The process utilizes butane reactive feedstock with an argon carrier gas. Radiofrequency plasma is used. Deposited film thickness sensitivities to electrode geometry, plasma power density, pressure and gas flow distribution are demonstrated. Use of modelling to optimise film thickness uniformity is demonstrated. Results show DLC uniformity of 0.30% over a 200 mm flat zone diameter within overall electrode diameter of 300mm. Thickness uniformity of 0.75% is demonstrated over a 200mm diameter for a non-conformal substrate geometry. Use of the modelling method for PECVD using metal-organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) feedstock is demonstrated, specifically for deposition of silica films using metal-organic tetraethoxy-silane. Excellent agreement between experimental and theory is demonstrated for conformal and non-conformal geometries. The model is used to explore scalability of PECVD processes and trade-off against film thickness uniformity. Application to MEMS, optical coatings and thin film photovoltaics is discussed.

  7. Electrical Properties of Photodiode Ba0.25Sr0.75TiO3 (BST Thin Film Doped with Ferric Oxide on p-type Si (100 Substrate using Chemical Solution Deposition Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irzaman

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we have grown pure Ba0.25Sr0.75TiO3 (BST and BST doped by Ferric Oxide Fe2O3 (BFST with doping variations of 5%, 10%, and 15% above type-p Silicon (100 substrate using the chemical solution deposition (CSD method with spin coating technique at rotation speed of 3000 rpm, for 30 seconds. BST thin film are made with a concentration of 1 M 2-methoxyethanol and annealing temperature of 850OC for the Si (100 substrate. Characterization of the thin film is performed for the electrical properties such as the current-voltage (I-V curve using Keithley model 2400 as well as dielectric constant, time constant, pyroelectric characteristics, and depth measurement. The results show that the thin film depth increases if the concentration of the Ferric Oxide doping increases. The I-V characterization shows that the BST and BFST thin film has photodiode properties. The dielectric constant increases with the addition of doping. The maximum dielectric constant value is obtained for 15 % doping concentration namely 83.1 for pure BST and 6.89, 11.1, 41.63 and 83.1, respectively for the Ferric Oxide doping based BST with concentration of 5%, 10%, and 15%. XRD spectra of 15 % of ferric oxide doped BST thin film tetragonal phase, we carried out the lattice constant were a = b = 4.203 Å; c = 4.214 Å; c/a ratio = 1.003

  8. Regular growth combined with lateral etching in diamond deposited over silicon substrate by using hot filament chemical vapor deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M.; Ürgen, M.

    2013-05-01

    Hot filament chemical vapor deposition has proved to be an attractive method for growing diamond films with good quality and higher growth rate. Diamond films were produced at deposition parameters under which, it is possible to have regular growth combined with lateral etching (RGCLE). Fracture cross-section SEM images showed that RGCLE initiated over polycrystalline diamond film and proceeded by the growth of consecutive steps in each crystallite, which terminated with square/rectangle shaped facets. All the diamond films exhibit RGCLE but with different type of growth behavior. Present work discusses the cyclic formation of the steps in diamond crystallites and RGCLE modes. RGCLE in diamond film may find important applications where heat absorption and dissipation are key issues.

  9. ZnS thin film deposited with chemical bath deposition process directed by different stirring speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Dang, X. Y.; Jin, J.; Yu, T.; Li, B. Z.; He, Q.; Li, F. Y.; Sun, Y.

    2010-09-01

    In this combined film thickness, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction and optical properties study, we explore the effects of different stirring speeds on the growth and optical properties of ZnS film deposited by CBD method. From the disclosed changes of thickness of ZnS film, we conclude that film thickness is independent of the stirring speeds in the heterogeneous process (deposition time less than 40 min), but increases with the stirring speeds and/or deposition time increasing in the homogeneous process. Grazing incident X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and the study of optical properties disclosed that the ZnS films grown with different stirring speeds show partially crystallized film and exhibit good transmittance (70-88% in the visible region), but the stirring speeds cannot give much effects on the structure and optical properties in the homogeneous process.

  10. Surface modification of reverse osmosis desalination membranes by thin-film coatings deposited by initiated chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozaydin-Ince, Gozde, E-mail: gozdeince@sabanciuniv.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Matin, Asif, E-mail: amatin@mit.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Khan, Zafarullah, E-mail: zukhan@mit.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Zaidi, S.M. Javaid, E-mail: zaidismj@kfupm.edu.sa [Department of Mechanical Engineering, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Gleason, Karen K., E-mail: kkgleasn@mit.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2013-07-31

    Thin-film polymeric reverse osmosis membranes, due to their high permeation rates and good salt rejection capabilities, are widely used for seawater desalination. However, these membranes are prone to biofouling, which affects their performance and efficiency. In this work, we report a method to modify the membrane surface without damaging the active layer or significantly affecting the performance of the membrane. Amphiphilic copolymer films of hydrophilic hydroxyethylmethacrylate and hydrophobic perfluorodecylacrylate (PFA) were synthesized and deposited on commercial RO membranes using an initiated chemical vapor deposition technique which is a polymer deposition technique that involves free-radical polymerization initiated by gas-phase radicals. Relevant surface characteristics such as hydrophilicity and roughness could be systematically controlled by varying the polymer chemistry. Increasing the hydrophobic PFA content in the films leads to an increase in the surface roughness and hydrophobicity. Furthermore, the surface morphology studies performed using the atomic force microscopy show that as the thickness of the coating increases average surface roughness increases. Using this knowledge, the coating thickness and chemistry were optimized to achieve high permeate flux and to reduce cell attachment. Results of the static bacterial adhesion tests show that the attachment of bacterial cells is significantly reduced on the coated membranes. - Highlights: • Thin films are deposited on reverse osmosis membranes. • Amphiphilic thin films are resistant to protein attachment. • The permeation performance of the membranes is not affected by the coating. • The thin film coatings delayed the biofouling.

  11. Preparation of Dispersed Platinum Nanoparticles on a Carbon Nanostructured Surface Using Supercritical Fluid Chemical Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mineo Hiramatsu

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a method of forming platinum (Pt nanoparticles using a metal organic chemical fluid deposition (MOCFD process employing a supercritical fluid (SCF, and have demonstrated the synthesis of dispersed Pt nanoparticles on the surfaces of carbon nanowalls (CNWs, two-dimensional carbon nanostructures, and carbon nanotubes (CNTs. By using SCF-MOCFD with supercritical carbon dioxide as a solvent of metal-organic compounds, highly dispersed Pt nanoparticles of 2 nm diameter were deposited on the entire surface of CNWs and CNTs. The SCF-MOCFD process proved to be effective for the synthesis of Pt nanoparticles on the entire surface of intricate carbon nanostructures with narrow interspaces.

  12. Sputter deposition of transition-metal carbide films — A critical review from a chemical perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Ulf, E-mail: ulf.jansson@kemi.uu.se [Department of Chemistry, Ångström, Uppsala Universitet (Sweden); Lewin, Erik [Laboratory for Nanoscale Materials Science, Empa (Switzerland); Department of Chemistry, Ångström, Uppsala Universitet (Sweden)

    2013-06-01

    Thin films based on transition-metal carbides exhibit many interesting physical and chemical properties making them attractive for a variety of applications. The most widely used method to produce metal carbide films with specific properties at reduced deposition temperatures is sputter deposition. A large number of papers in this field have been published during the last decades, showing that large variations in structure and properties can be obtained. This review will summarise the literature on sputter-deposited carbide films based on chemical aspects of the various elements in the films. By considering the chemical affinities (primarily towards carbon) and structural preferences of different elements, it is possible to understand trends in structure of binary transition-metal carbides and the ternary materials based on these carbides. These trends in chemical affinity and structure will also directly affect the growth process during sputter deposition. A fundamental chemical perspective of the transition-metal carbides and their alloying elements is essential to obtain control of the material structure (from the atomic level), and thereby its properties and performance. This review covers a wide range of materials: binary transition-metal carbides and their nanocomposites with amorphous carbon; the effect of alloying carbide-based materials with a third element (mainly elements from groups 3 through 14); as well as the amorphous binary and ternary materials from these elements deposited under specific conditions or at certain compositional ranges. Furthermore, the review will also emphasise important aspects regarding materials characterisation which may affect the interpretation of data such as beam-induced crystallisation and sputter-damage during surface analysis.

  13. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes using the cobalt nanocatalyst by thermal chemical vapor deposition technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madani, S.S. [Department of Chemistry, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zare, K. [Department of Chemistry, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghoranneviss, M. [Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salar Elahi, A., E-mail: Salari_phy@yahoo.com [Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-05

    The three main synthesis methods of Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are the arc discharge, the laser ablation and the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) with a special regard to the latter one. CNTs were produced on a silicon wafer by Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition (TCVD) using acetylene as a carbon source, cobalt as a catalyst and ammonia as a reactive gas. The DC-sputtering system was used to prepare cobalt thin films on Si substrates. A series of experiments was carried out to investigate the effects of reaction temperature and deposition time on the synthesis of the nanotubes. The deposition time was selected as 15 and 25 min for all growth temperatures. Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) measurements were used to investigate the elemental composition of the Co nanocatalyst deposited on Si substrates. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to characterize the surface topography of the Co nanocatalyst deposited on Si substrates. The as-grown CNTs were characterized under Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) to study the morphological properties of CNTs. Also, the grown CNTs have been investigated by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The results demonstrated that increasing the temperature leads to increasing the diameter of CNTs. The ideal reaction temperature was 850 °C and the deposition time was 15 min. - Graphical abstract: FESEM images of CNTs grown on the cobalt catalyst at growth temperatures of (a) 850 °C, (b) 900 °C, (c) 950 °C and (d) 1000 °C during the deposition time of 15 min. - Highlights: • Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were produced on a silicon wafer by TCVD technique. • EDX and AFM were used to investigate the elemental composition and surface topography. • FESEM was used to study the morphological properties of CNTs. • The grown CNTs have been investigated by HRTEM and Raman spectroscopy.

  14. Luminescent Nanocrystalline Silicon Carbide Thin Film Deposited by Helicon Wave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Wan-bing; YU Wei; WU Li-ping; CUI Shuang-kui; FU Guang-sheng

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon carbide (SiC) thin films were deposited on the single-crystal silicon substrate using the helicon wave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (HW-PECVD) technique. The influences of magnetic field and hydrogen dilution ratio on the structures of SiC thin film were investigated with the atomic force microscopy (AFM), the Fourier transform infrared absorption (FTIR) and the transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results indicate that the high plasma activity of the helicon wave mode proves to be a key factor to grow crystalline SiC thin films at a relative low substrate temperature. Also, the decrease in the grain sizes from the level of microcrystalline to that of nanocrystalline can be achieved by increasing the hydrogen dilution ratios. Transmission electron microscopy measurements reveal that the size of most nanocrystals in the film deposited under the higher hydrogen dilution ratios is smaller than the doubled Bohr radius of 3C-SiC (approximately 5.4 nm), and the light emission measurements also show a strong blue photoluminescence at the room temperature, which is considered to be caused by the quantum confinement effect of small-sized SiC nanocrystals.

  15. Design and implementation of a novel portable atomic layer deposition/chemical vapor deposition hybrid reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj, Sathees Kannan; Jursich, Gregory; Takoudis, Christos G.

    2013-09-01

    We report the development of a novel portable atomic layer deposition chemical vapor deposition (ALD/CVD) hybrid reactor setup. Unique feature of this reactor is the use of ALD/CVD mode in a single portable deposition system to fabricate multi-layer thin films over a broad range from "bulk-like" multi-micrometer to nanometer atomic dimensions. The precursor delivery system and control-architecture are designed so that continuous reactant flows for CVD and cyclic pulsating flows for ALD mode are facilitated. A custom-written LabVIEW program controls the valve sequencing to allow synthesis of different kinds of film structures under either ALD or CVD mode or both. The entire reactor setup weighs less than 40 lb and has a relatively small footprint of 8 × 9 in., making it compact and easy for transportation. The reactor is tested in the ALD mode with titanium oxide (TiO2) ALD using tetrakis(diethylamino)titanium and water vapor. The resulting growth rate of 0.04 nm/cycle and purity of the films are in good agreement with literature values. The ALD/CVD hybrid mode is demonstrated with ALD of TiO2 and CVD of tin oxide (SnOx). Transmission electron microscopy images of the resulting films confirm the formation of successive distinct TiO2-ALD and SnOx-CVD layers.

  16. Design and implementation of a novel portable atomic layer deposition/chemical vapor deposition hybrid reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj, Sathees Kannan; Jursich, Gregory; Takoudis, Christos G

    2013-09-01

    We report the development of a novel portable atomic layer deposition chemical vapor deposition (ALD/CVD) hybrid reactor setup. Unique feature of this reactor is the use of ALD/CVD mode in a single portable deposition system to fabricate multi-layer thin films over a broad range from "bulk-like" multi-micrometer to nanometer atomic dimensions. The precursor delivery system and control-architecture are designed so that continuous reactant flows for CVD and cyclic pulsating flows for ALD mode are facilitated. A custom-written LabVIEW program controls the valve sequencing to allow synthesis of different kinds of film structures under either ALD or CVD mode or both. The entire reactor setup weighs less than 40 lb and has a relatively small footprint of 8 × 9 in., making it compact and easy for transportation. The reactor is tested in the ALD mode with titanium oxide (TiO2) ALD using tetrakis(diethylamino)titanium and water vapor. The resulting growth rate of 0.04 nm/cycle and purity of the films are in good agreement with literature values. The ALD/CVD hybrid mode is demonstrated with ALD of TiO2 and CVD of tin oxide (SnOx). Transmission electron microscopy images of the resulting films confirm the formation of successive distinct TiO2-ALD and SnO(x)-CVD layers.

  17. Microstructural characterization and chemical compatibility of pulsed laser deposited yttria coatings on high density graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sure, Jagadeesh [Corrosion Science and Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam — 603 102 (India); Mishra, Maneesha [Physical Metallurgy Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam-603 102 (India); Tarini, M. [SRM University, Kattankulathur-603 203 (India); Shankar, A. Ravi; Krishna, Nanda Gopala [Corrosion Science and Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam — 603 102 (India); Kuppusami, P. [Physical Metallurgy Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam-603 102 (India); Mallika, C. [Corrosion Science and Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam — 603 102 (India); Mudali, U. Kamachi, E-mail: kamachi@igcar.gov.in [Corrosion Science and Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam — 603 102 (India)

    2013-10-01

    Yttria coatings were deposited on high density (HD) graphite substrate by pulsed laser deposition method and subsequently annealing in vacuum at 1373 K was carried out to evaluate the thermal stability of the coatings. Yttria deposited on HD graphite samples were exposed to molten LiCl–KCl salt at 873 K for 3 h to evaluate the corrosion behavior of the coating for the purpose of pyrochemical reprocessing applications. The microstructure and the corrosion behavior of the yttria coating deposited on HD graphite in molten LiCl–KCl salt were evaluated by several characterization techniques. X-ray diffraction and Laser Raman patterns confirmed the presence of cubic phase of yttria in the coating. The surface morphology of yttria coating on HD graphite examined by scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscopy revealed the agglomeration of oxide particles and formation of clusters. After annealing at 1373 K, no appreciable grain growth of yttria particles could be observed. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis was carried out for elemental analysis before and after chemical compatibility test of the coated samples in molten LiCl–KCl salt to identify the corrosive elements present on the yttria coatings. The chemical compatibility and thermal stability of the yttria coating on HD graphite in molten LiCl–KCl salt medium have been established. - Highlights: • Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating was deposited on graphite by pulsed laser deposition method. • Chemical compatibility of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating in LiCl–KCl salt at 873 K was studied. • Gibbs free energy change was positive for Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} reaction with Cl{sub 2}, U and UCl{sub 3}. • Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating exhibited better corrosion performance in molten LiCl–KCl salt.

  18. Silicon nitride at high growth rate using hot wire chemical vapor deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlaan, V.

    2008-01-01

    Amorphous silicon nitride (SiNx) is a widely studied alloy with many commercial applications. This thesis describes the application of SiNx deposited at high deposition rate using hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) for solar cells and thin film transistors (TFTs). The deposition process of H

  19. Strain relaxation in graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troppenz, Gerald V., E-mail: gerald.troppenz@helmholtz-berlin.de; Gluba, Marc A.; Kraft, Marco; Rappich, Jörg; Nickel, Norbert H. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Institut für Silizium Photovoltaik, Kekuléstr. 5, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-12-07

    The growth of single layer graphene by chemical vapor deposition on polycrystalline Cu substrates induces large internal biaxial compressive strain due to thermal expansion mismatch. Raman backscattering spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to study the strain relaxation during and after the transfer process from Cu foil to SiO{sub 2}. Interestingly, the growth of graphene results in a pronounced ripple structure on the Cu substrate that is indicative of strain relaxation of about 0.76% during the cooling from the growth temperature. Removing graphene from the Cu substrates and transferring it to SiO{sub 2} results in a shift of the 2D phonon line by 27 cm{sup −1} to lower frequencies. This translates into additional strain relaxation. The influence of the processing steps, used etching solution and solvents on strain, is investigated.

  20. Thermoluminescence characterisation of chemical vapour deposited diamond films

    CERN Document Server

    Mazzocchi, S; Bucciolini, M; Cuttone, G; Pini, S; Sabini, M G; Sciortino, S

    2002-01-01

    The thermoluminescence (TL) characteristics of a set of six chemical vapour deposited diamond films have been studied with regard to their use as off-line dosimeters in radiotherapy. The structural characterisation has been performed by means of Raman spectroscopy. Their TL responses have been tested with radiotherapy beams ( sup 6 sup 0 Co photons, photons and electrons from a linear accelerator (Linac), 26 MeV protons from a TANDEM accelerator) in the dose range 0.1-7 Gy. The dosimetric characterisation has yielded a very good reproducibility, a very low dependence of the TL response on the type of particle and independence of the radiation energy. The TL signal is not influenced by the dose rate and exhibits a very low thermal fading. Moreover, the sensitivity of the diamond samples compares favourably with that of standard TLD100 dosimeters.

  1. Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition of Horizontally Aligned Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew T. Cole

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition reactor has been developed to synthesis horizontally aligned carbon nanotubes. The width of the aligning sheath was modelled based on a collisionless, quasi-neutral, Child’s law ion sheath where these estimates were empirically validated by direct Langmuir probe measurements, thereby confirming the proposed reactors ability to extend the existing sheath fields by up to 7 mm. A 7 mbar growth atmosphere combined with a 25 W plasma permitted the concurrent growth and alignment of carbon nanotubes with electric fields of the order of 0.04 V μm−1 with linear packing densities of up to ~5 × 104 cm−1. These results open up the potential for multi-directional in situ alignment of carbon nanotubes providing one viable route to the fabrication of many novel optoelectronic devices.

  2. Chemical vapor deposition of amorphous ruthenium-phosphorus alloy films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin Jinhong [Texas Materials Institute, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78750 (United States); Waheed, Abdul [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Winkenwerder, Wyatt A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Kim, Hyun-Woo [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Agapiou, Kyriacos [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Jones, Richard A. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Hwang, Gyeong S. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Ekerdt, John G. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)]. E-mail: ekerdt@che.utexas.edu

    2007-05-07

    Chemical vapor deposition growth of amorphous ruthenium-phosphorus films on SiO{sub 2} containing {approx} 15% phosphorus is reported. cis-Ruthenium(II)dihydridotetrakis-(trimethylphosphine), cis-RuH{sub 2}(PMe{sub 3}){sub 4} (Me = CH{sub 3}) was used at growth temperatures ranging from 525 to 575 K. Both Ru and P are zero-valent. The films are metastable, becoming increasingly more polycrystalline upon annealing to 775 and 975 K. Surface studies illustrate that demethylation is quite efficient near 560 K. Precursor adsorption at 135 K or 210 K and heating reveal the precursor undergoes a complex decomposition process in which the hydride and trimethylphosphine ligands are lost at temperatures as low at 280 K. Phosphorus and its manner of incorporation appear responsible for the amorphous-like character. Molecular dynamics simulations are presented to suggest the local structure in the films and the causes for phosphorus stabilizing the amorphous phase.

  3. Field emission properties of chemical vapor deposited individual graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamri Yusop, Mohd [Department of Frontier Materials, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, 466-8555 Nagoya (Japan); Department of Materials, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Kalita, Golap, E-mail: kalita.golap@nitech.ac.jp [Department of Frontier Materials, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, 466-8555 Nagoya (Japan); Center for Fostering Young and Innovative Researchers, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, 466-8555 Nagoya (Japan); Yaakob, Yazid; Takahashi, Chisato; Tanemura, Masaki [Department of Frontier Materials, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, 466-8555 Nagoya (Japan)

    2014-03-03

    Here, we report field emission (FE) properties of a chemical vapor deposited individual graphene investigated by in-situ transmission electron microscopy. Free-standing bilayer graphene is mounted on a cathode microprobe and FE processes are investigated varying the vacuum gap of cathode and anode. The threshold field for 10 nA current were found to be 515, 610, and 870 V/μm for vacuum gap of 400, 300, and 200 nm, respectively. It is observed that the structural stability of a high quality bilayer graphene is considerably stable during emission process. By contacting the nanoprobe with graphene and applying a bias voltage, structural deformation and buckling are observed with significant rise in temperature owing to Joule heating effect. The finding can be significant for practical application of graphene related materials in emitter based devices as well as understanding the contact resistance influence and heating effect.

  4. Advanced titania buffer layer architectures prepared by chemical solution deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunert, J.; Bäcker, M.; Brunkahl, O.; Wesolowski, D.; Edney, C.; Clem, P.; Thomas, N.; Liersch, A.

    2011-08-01

    Chemical solution deposition (CSD) was used to grow high-quality (100) oriented films of SrTiO3 (STO) on CSD CaTiO3 (CTO), Ba0.1Ca0.9TiO3 (BCT) and STO seed and template layers. These template films bridge the lattice misfit between STO and the nickel-tungsten (NiW) substrate, assisting in dense growth of textured STO. Additional niobium (Nb) doping of the STO buffer layer reduces oxygen diffusion which is necessary to avoid undesired oxidation of the NiW. The investigated templates offer suitable alternatives to established standard buffer systems like La2Zr2O7 (LZO) and CeO2 for coated conductors.

  5. Chemical vapor deposition synthesis of tunable unsubstituted polythiophene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejati, Siamak; Lau, Kenneth K S

    2011-12-20

    Despite having exceptional electroactive properties, applications of unsubstituted polythiophene (PTh) have been limited due to its insolubility. To overcome this challenge, we have employed oxidative chemical vapor deposition (oCVD) as a unique liquid-free technique to enable the oxidative polymerization of PTh using thiophene as the starting monomer and vanadium oxytrichloride as an effective vaporizable oxidant initiator. Vibrational and phototelectron spectroscopy indicated the formation of unsubstituted polythiophene. Cyclic voltammetry revealed its electrochromic behavior in solution. Significantly, polymer conjugation length and electrical conductivity can be tuned by controlling oCVD process variables. Polymerization is found to be adsorption-limited, so by providing sufficient monomer and limiting the amount of initiator at the growth surface, PTh is believed to be formed through α-α thiophene linkages.

  6. The Chemical Vapour Deposition of Tantalum - in long narrow channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mugabi, James Atwoki

    use as a construction material for process equipment, with the cheaper alternative being the construction of equipment from steel and then protecting it with a thin but efficacious layer of tantalum. Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) is chosen as the most effective process to apply thin corrosion...... protective layers of tantalum because of the process’ ability to coat complex geometries and its relative ease to control. This work focuses on studying the CVD of tantalum in long narrow channels with the view that the knowledge gained during the project can be used to optimise the commercial coating...... process that Tantaline A/S and Alfa Laval (Sweden) use to manufacture tantalum coated plate heat exchangers. Experiments are done by coating the inner side of long, thin stainless steel tubes in the temperature range of 700 – 950 °C and pressure range of 25 – 990 mbar while using different reactant...

  7. Chemical vapor deposition coatings for oxidation protection of titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunnington, G. R.; Robinson, J. C.; Clark, R. K.

    1991-01-01

    Results of an experimental investigation of the oxidation protection afforded to Ti-14Al-21Nb and Ti-14Al-23Nb-2V titanium aluminides and Ti-17Mo-3Al-3Nb titanium alloy by aluminum-boron-silicon and boron-silicon coatings are presented. These coatings are applied by a combination of physical vapor deposition (PVD) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes. The former is for the application of aluminum, and the latter is for codeposition of boron and silicon. Coating thickness is in the range of 2 to 7 microns, and coating weights are 0.6 to 2.0 mg/sq cm. Oxidation testing was performed in air at temperatures to 1255 K in both static and hypersonic flow environments. The degree of oxidation protection provided by the coatings is determined from weight change measurements made during the testing and post test compositional analyses. Temperature-dependent total normal emittance data are also presented for four coating/substrate combinations. Both types of coatings provided excellent oxidation protection for the exposure conditions of this investigation. Total normal emittances were greater than 0.80 in all cases.

  8. High index of refraction films for dielectric mirrors prepared by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brusasco, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    A wide variety of metal oxides with high index of refraction can be prepared by Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition. We present some recent optical and laser damage results on oxide films prepared by MOCVD which could be used in a multilayer structure for highly reflecting (HR) dielectric mirror applications. The method of preparation affects both optical properties and laser damage threshold. 10 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Laser diagnostics of chemical vapour deposition of diamond films

    CERN Document Server

    Wills, J B

    2002-01-01

    Cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) has been used to make diagnostic measurements of chemically activated CH sub 4 / H sub 2 gas mixtures during the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of thin diamond films. Absolute absorbances, concentrations and temperatures are presented for CH sub 3 , NH and C sub 2 H sub 2 in a hot filament (HF) activated gas mixture and CH, C sub 2 and C sub 2 H sub 2 in a DC arc plasma jet activated mixture. Measurements of the radical species were made using a pulsed dye laser system to generate tuneable visible and UV wavelengths. These species have greatest concentration in the hottest, activated regions of the reactors. Spatial profiling of the number densities of CH sub 3 and NH radicals have been used as stringent tests of predictions of radical absorbance and number densities made by 3-D numerical simulations, with near quantitative agreement. O sub 2 has been shown to reside in the activated region of the Bristol DC arc jet at concentrations (approx 10 sup 1 sup 3 molecules / cm...

  10. Method of producing a chemical hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingler, Kerry M.; Zollinger, William T.; Wilding, Bruce M.; Bingham, Dennis N.; Wendt, Kraig M.

    2007-11-13

    A method of producing a chemical hydride is described and which includes selecting a composition having chemical bonds and which is capable of forming a chemical hydride; providing a source of a hydrocarbon; and reacting the composition with the source of the hydrocarbon to generate a chemical hydride.

  11. Surface modification of silicon-containing fluorocarbon films prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yoonyoung; Desta, Yohannes; Goettert, Jost; Lee, G. S.; Ajmera, P. K.

    2005-07-01

    Surface modification of silicon-containing fluorocarbon (SiCF) films achieved by wet chemical treatments and through x-ray irradiation is examined. The SiCF films were prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, using gas precursors of tetrafluoromethane and disilane. As-deposited SiCF film composition was analyzed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Surface modification of SiCF films utilizing n-lithiodiaminoethane wet chemical treatment is discussed. Sessile water-drop contact angle changed from 95°+/-2° before treatment to 32°+/-2° after treatment, indicating a change in the film surface characteristics from hydrophobic to hydrophilic. For x-ray irradiation on the SiCF film with a dose of 27.4 kJ/cm3, the contact angle of the sessile water drop changed from 95°+/-2° before radiation to 39°+/-3° after x-ray exposure. The effect of x-ray exposure on chemical bond structure of SiCF films is studied using Fourier transform infrared measurements. Electroless Cu deposition was performed to test the applicability of the surface modified films. The x-ray irradiation method offers a unique advantage in making possible surface modification in a localized area of high-aspect-ratio microstructures. Fabrication of a Ti-membrane x-ray mask is introduced here for selective surface modification using x-ray irradiation.

  12. Brittleness of 6.5wt% Si Silicon Steel Prepared by Chemical Vapor Deposition Method%化学气相沉积法制备硅质量分数6.5%硅钢的脆性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高超; 苏芳臣; 相颖杰; 孙权; 陈建钧

    2015-01-01

    6.5wt% Si silicon steel was prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD)method and the effects of reaction temperature,oxygen content in atmosphere and SiCl4 content on the brittleness of 6.5wt%Si silicon steel were studied using SEM,EDS and self-developed three-point bending machine.The results show that the grain size of the silicon steel increased with the reaction temperature rising,and the brittleness of the silicon steel increased with the increase of the grain size.Grain boundary oxidation was observed in the silicon steel when oxygen content in atmosphere was 100 mg·kg-1 ,which increased the brittleness of the silicon steel.Kirkendall voids were found in the silicon steel with a relatively high SiCl4 content of 35vol%,which increased the brittleness of the steel.%采用化学气相沉积(CVD)法制备了硅质量分数为6.5%的硅钢,利用扫描电镜、能谱仪和自主设计研发的三点压弯机研究了反应温度、气氛含氧量和 SiCl4含量对硅钢脆性的影响.结果表明:硅钢的晶粒尺寸随反应温度的升高而长大,硅钢的脆性随着晶粒尺寸的增加而增大;气氛含氧量在100 mg·kg-1时所制备的硅钢产生了晶界氧化现象,使硅钢脆性增加;SiCl4含量较大时(体积分数35%)所制备的硅钢产生了 Kirkendall 空洞,导致其脆性加剧.

  13. Evaluation of chemical and structural properties of germanium-carbon coatings deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamali, Hossein, E-mail: h.jamali@mut-es.ac.ir; Mozafarinia, Reza; Eshaghi, Akbar

    2015-10-15

    Germanium-carbon coatings were deposited on silicon and glass substrates by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using three different flow ratios of GeH{sub 4} and CH{sub 4} precursors. Elemental analysis, structural evaluation and microscopic investigation of coatings were performed using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. Based on the results, the coatings exhibited a homogeneous and dense structure free of pores with a very good adhesion to substrate. The structural evaluation revealed that the germanium-carbon coatings were a kind of a Ge-rich composite material containing the amorphous and crystalline germanium and amorphous carbon with the mixture of Ge–Ge, Ge–C, C–C, Ge–H and C–H bonds. The result suggested that the amorphisation of the coatings could be increased with raising CH{sub 4}:GeH{sub 4} flow rate ratio and subsequently increasing C amount incorporated into the coating. - Highlights: • Germanium-carbon coatings were prepared by PECVD technique. • The germanium-carbon coatings were a kind of composite material. • The amorphisation of the coatings were increased with raising CH{sub 4}:GeH{sub 4} flow ratio.

  14. The structural properties of CdS deposited by chemical bath deposition and pulsed direct current magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisco, F., E-mail: F.Lisco@lboro.ac.uk [Centre for Renewable Energy Systems Technology (CREST), School of Electronic, Electrical and Systems Engineering, Loughborough University, Leicestershire, LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Kaminski, P.M.; Abbas, A.; Bass, K.; Bowers, J.W.; Claudio, G. [Centre for Renewable Energy Systems Technology (CREST), School of Electronic, Electrical and Systems Engineering, Loughborough University, Leicestershire, LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Losurdo, M. [Institute of Inorganic Methodologies and of Plasmas, IMIP-CNR, via Orabona 4, 70126 Bari (Italy); Walls, J.M. [Centre for Renewable Energy Systems Technology (CREST), School of Electronic, Electrical and Systems Engineering, Loughborough University, Leicestershire, LE11 3TU (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-01

    Cadmium sulphide (CdS) thin films were deposited by two different processes, chemical bath deposition (CBD), and pulsed DC magnetron sputtering (PDCMS) on fluorine doped-tin oxide coated glass to assess the potential advantages of the pulsed DC magnetron sputtering process. The structural, optical and morphological properties of films obtained by CBD and PDCMS were investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry and UV-Vis spectrophotometry. The as-grown films were studied and comparisons were drawn between their morphology, uniformity, crystallinity, and the deposition rate of the process. The highest crystallinity is observed for sputtered CdS thin films. The absorption in the visible wavelength increased for PDCMS CdS thin films, due to the higher density of the films. The band gap measured for the as-grown CBD-CdS is 2.38 eV compared to 2.34 eV for PDCMS-CdS, confirming the higher density of the sputtered thin film. The higher deposition rate for PDCMS is a significant advantage of this technique which has potential use for high rate and low cost manufacturing. - Highlights: • Pulsed DC magnetron sputtering (PDCMS) of CdS films • Chemical bath deposition of CdS films • Comparison between CdS thin films deposited by chemical bath and PDCMS techniques • High deposition rate deposition for PDCMS deposition • Uniform, pinhole free CdS thin films.

  15. Electrochromic Devices Deposited on Low-Temperature Plastics by Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, Joshua; Seman, Michael

    2005-09-20

    Electrochromic windows have been identified by the Basic energy Sciences Advisory committee as an important technology for the reduction of energy spent on heating and cooling in residential and commercial buildings. Electrochromic devices have the ability to reversibly alter their optical properties in response to a small electric field. By blocking ultraviolet and infrared radiation, while modulating the incoming visible radiation, electrochromics could reduce energy consumption by several Quads per year. This amounts to several percent of the total annual national energy expenditures. The purpose of this project was to demonstrate proof of concept for using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) for depositing all five layers necessary for full electrochromic devices, as an alternative to sputtering techniques. The overall goal is to produce electrochromic devices on flexible polymer substrates using PECVD to significantly reduce the cost of the final product. We have successfully deposited all of the films necessary for a complete electrochromic devices using PECVD. The electrochromic layer, WO3, displayed excellent change in visible transmission with good switching times. The storage layer, V2O5, exhibited a high storage capacity and good clear state transmission. The electrolyte, Ta2O5, was shown to functional with good electrical resistivity to go along with the ability to transfer Li ions. There were issues with leakage over larger areas, which can be address with further process development. We developed a process to deposit ZnO:Ga with a sheet resistance of < 50 W/sq. with > 90% transmission. Although we were not able to deposit on polymers due to the temperatures required in combination with the inverted position of our substrates. Two types of full devices were produced. Devices with Ta2O5 were shown to be functional using small aluminum dots as the top contact. The polymer electrolyte devices were shown to have a clear state transmission of

  16. Preparation of Nano-Particles (Pb,La)TiO3 Thin Films by Liquid Source Misted Chemical Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张之圣; 曾建平; 李小图

    2004-01-01

    Nano-particles lanthanum-modified lead titanate (PLT) thin films are grown on Pt/Ti/SiO2/Si substrate by liquid source misted chemical deposition (LSMCD). PLT films are deposited for 4-8 times, and then annealed at various temperature. XRD and SEM show that the prepared films have good crystallization behavior and perovskite structure. The crystallite is about 60 nm. The deposition speed is 3 nm/min. This deposition method can exactly control stoichiometry ratios, doping concentration ratio and thickness of PLT thin films. The best annealing process is to bake at 300 ℃ for 10 min and anneal at 600 ℃ for 1 h.

  17. Low temperature metal free growth of graphene on insulating substrates by plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, R.; Munuera, C.; Martínez, J. I.; Azpeitia, J.; Gómez-Aleixandre, C.; García-Hernández, M.

    2017-03-01

    Direct growth of graphene films on dielectric substrates (quartz and silica) is reported, by means of remote electron cyclotron resonance plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition r-(ECR-CVD) at low temperature (650 °C). Using a two step deposition process- nucleation and growth- by changing the partial pressure of the gas precursors at constant temperature, mostly monolayer continuous films, with grain sizes up to 500 nm are grown, exhibiting transmittance larger than 92% and sheet resistance as low as 900 Ω sq-1. The grain size and nucleation density of the resulting graphene sheets can be controlled varying the deposition time and pressure. In additon, first-principles DFT-based calculations have been carried out in order to rationalize the oxygen reduction in the quartz surface experimentally observed. This method is easily scalable and avoids damaging and expensive transfer steps of graphene films, improving compatibility with current fabrication technologies.

  18. Structural and Optical Properties of CdS Thin Film Grown by Chemical Bath Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Rajpal

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work we report synthesis and optical characterization of CdS thin films coated on glass substrate. The films were deposited using chemical bath deposition method. Scanning Electron microscopy shows a uniform film of CdS film at particular concentration and dipping time. The Energy Dispersive spectroscopy reveals the presence of Cd and S in the CdS film. X-Ray diffraction confirms the cubic structure of CdS deposited on glass and amorphous nature of glass. Optical and photoluminescence studies were done using UV-Visible spectroscopy and Photoluminescence spectroscopy respectively. We have determined bandgap by analyzing UV-Visible spectra results. Wettability studies were done using Optical Contact Angle, which confirms the hydrophobic nature of the CdS films.

  19. Study of planar heterojunction perovskite photovoltaic cells using compact titanium oxide by chemical bath deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kouhei; Kuwabara, Takayuki; Takahashi, Kohshin; Taima, Tetsuya

    2015-08-01

    Spin-coated perovskite solar cells from sol-gels result in high processing costs because of the need for high temperatures. Here, we report a low-temperature spin-coating route to fabricate planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells using chemical bath deposition of compact-TiOx layers. Comparison of the solar cell properties of compact-TiOx and compact-TiO2 layers show that the power conversion efficiency of the planar heterojunction perovskite solar cell fabricated by the low-temperature, compact-TiOx route is comparable to that of conventional TiO2. The chemical bath deposition method requires heating to 150 °C only to form amorphous compact-TiOx films compared with the 450 °C required for crystalline anatase compact-TiO2 films.

  20. Deposition and characterization of diamond-like nanocomposite coatings grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition over different substrate materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Awadesh Kr Mallik; Nanadadulal Dandapat; Prajit Ghosh; Utpal Ganguly; Sukhendu Jana; Sayan Das; Kaustav Guha; Garfield Rebello; Samir Kumar Lahiri; Someswar Datta

    2013-04-01

    Diamond-like nanocomposite (DLN) coatings have been deposited over different substrates used for biomedical applications by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD). DLN has an interconnecting network of amorphous hydrogenated carbon and quartz-like oxygenated silicon. Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform–infra red (FT–IR) spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) have been used for structural characterization. Typical DLN growth rate is about 1 m/h, measured by stylus profilometer. Due to the presence of quartz-like Si:O in the structure, it is found to have very good adhesive property with all the substrates. The adhesion strength found to be as high as 0.6 N on SS 316 L steel substrates by scratch testing method. The Young’s modulus and hardness have found to be 132 GPa and 14.4 GPa, respectively. DLN coatings have wear factor in the order of 1 × 10-7 mm3/N-m. This coating has found to be compatible with all important biomedical substrate materials and has successfully been deposited over Co–Cr alloy based knee implant of complex shape.

  1. Deposition of highly (111)-oriented PZT thin films by using metal organic chemical deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Bu, K H; Choi, D K; Seong, W K; Kim, J D

    1999-01-01

    Lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thin films have been grown on Pt/Ta/SiNx/Si substrates by using metal organic chemical vapor deposition with Pb(C sub 2 H sub 5) sub 4 , Zr(O-t-C sub 4 H sub 9) sub 4 , and Ti(O-i-C sub 3 H sub 7) sub 4 as source materials and O sub 2 as an oxidizing gas. The Zr fraction in the thin films was controlled by varying the flow rate of the Zr source material. The crystal structure and the electrical properties were investigated as functions of the composition. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that at a certain range of Zr fraction, highly (111)-oriented PZT thin films with no pyrochlore phases were deposited. On the other hand, at low Zr fractions, there were peaks from Pb-oxide phases. At high Zr fractions, peaks from pyrochlore phase were seen. The films also showed good electrical properties, such as a high dielectric constant of more than 1200 and a low coercive voltage of 1.35 V.

  2. Atmospheric Deposition: Sampling Procedures, Analytical Methods, and Main Recent Findings from the Scientific Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Amodio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The atmosphere is a carrier on which some natural and anthropogenic organic and inorganic chemicals are transported, and the wet and dry deposition events are the most important processes that remove those chemicals, depositing it on soil and water. A wide variety of different collectors were tested to evaluate site-specificity, seasonality and daily variability of settleable particle concentrations. Deposition fluxes of POPs showed spatial and seasonal variations, diagnostic ratios of PAHs on deposited particles, allowed the discrimination between pyrolytic or petrogenic sources. Congener pattern analysis and bulk deposition fluxes in rural sites confirmed long-range atmospheric transport of PCDDs/Fs. More and more sophisticated and newly designed deposition samplers have being used for characterization of deposited mercury, demonstrating the importance of rain scavenging and the relatively higher magnitude of Hg deposition from Chinese anthropogenic sources. Recently biological monitors demonstrated that PAH concentrations in lichens were comparable with concentrations measured in a conventional active sampler in an outdoor environment. In this review the authors explore the methodological approaches used for the assessment of atmospheric deposition, from the analysis of the sampling methods, the analytical procedures for chemical characterization of pollutants and the main results from the scientific literature.

  3. Temperature admittance spectroscopy of boron doped chemical vapor deposition diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubkov, V. I., E-mail: VZubkovspb@mail.ru; Kucherova, O. V.; Zubkova, A. V.; Ilyin, V. A.; Afanas' ev, A. V. [St. Petersburg State Electrotechnical University (LETI), Professor Popov Street 5, 197376 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Bogdanov, S. A.; Vikharev, A. L. [Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Ul' yanov Street 46, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Butler, J. E. [St. Petersburg State Electrotechnical University (LETI), Professor Popov Street 5, 197376 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Ul' yanov Street 46, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); National Museum of Natural History (NMNH), P.O. Box 37012 Smithsonian Inst., Washington, D.C. 20013-7012 (United States)

    2015-10-14

    Precision admittance spectroscopy measurements over wide temperature and frequency ranges were carried out for chemical vapor deposition epitaxial diamond samples doped with various concentrations of boron. It was found that the experimentally detected boron activation energy in the samples decreased from 314 meV down to 101 meV with an increase of B/C ratio from 600 to 18000 ppm in the gas reactants. For the heavily doped samples, a transition from thermally activated valence band conduction to hopping within the impurity band (with apparent activation energy 20 meV) was detected at temperatures 120–150 K. Numerical simulation was used to estimate the impurity DOS broadening. Accurate determination of continuously altering activation energy, which takes place during the transformation of conduction mechanisms, was proposed by numerical differentiation of the Arrhenius plot. With increase of boron doping level the gradual decreasing of capture cross section from 3 × 10{sup −13} down to 2 × 10{sup −17} cm{sup 2} was noticed. Moreover, for the hopping conduction the capture cross section becomes 4 orders of magnitude less (∼2 × 10{sup −20} cm{sup 2}). At T > T{sub room} in doped samples the birth of the second conductance peak was observed. We attribute it to a defect, related to the boron doping of the material.

  4. Review: Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of nanocrystalline diamond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuyuki Okada

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystalline diamond films have attracted considerable attention because they have a low coefficient of friction and a low electron emission threshold voltage. In this paper, the author reviews the plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PE-CVD of nanocrystalline diamond and mainly focuses on the growth of nanocrystalline diamond by low-pressure PE-CVD. Nanocrystalline diamond particles of 200–700 nm diameter have been prepared in a 13.56 MHz low-pressure inductively coupled CH4/CO/H2 plasma. The bonding state of carbon atoms was investigated by ultraviolet-excited Raman spectroscopy. Electron energy loss spectroscopy identified sp2-bonded carbons around the 20–50 nm subgrains of nanocrystalline diamond particles. Plasma diagnostics using a Langmuir probe and the comparison with plasma simulation are also reviewed. The electron energy distribution functions are discussed by considering different inelastic interaction channels between electrons and heavy particles in a molecular CH4/H2 plasma.

  5. On The Stability Of Model Flows For Chemical Vapour Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert

    2016-11-01

    The flow in a chemical vapour deposition (CVD) reactor is assessed. The reactor is modelled as a flow over an infinite-radius rotating disk, where the mean flow and convective instability of the disk boundary layer are measured. Temperature-dependent viscosity and enforced axial flow are used to model the steep temperature gradients present in CVD reactors and the pumping of the gas towards the disk, respectively. Increasing the temperature-dependence parameter of the fluid viscosity (ɛ) results in an overall narrowing of the fluid boundary layer. Increasing the axial flow strength parameter (Ts) accelerates the fluid both radially and axially, while also narrowing the thermal boundary layer. It is seen that when both effects are imposed, the effects of axial flow generally dominate those of the viscosity temperature dependence. A local stability analysis is performed and the linearized stability equations are solved using a Galerkin projection in terms of Chebyshev polynomials. The neutral stability curves are then plotted for a range of ɛ and Ts values. Preliminary results suggest that increasing Ts has a stabilising effect on both type I and type II stationary instabilities, while small increases in ɛ results in a significant reduction to the critical Reynolds number.

  6. Charged impurity-induced scatterings in chemical vapor deposited graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ming-Yang; Tang, Chiu-Chun [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Ling, D. C. [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui Dist., New Taipei 25137, Taiwan (China); Li, L. J. [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Chi, C. C.; Chen, Jeng-Chung [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Frontier Research Center on Fundamental and Applied Sciences of Matters, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2013-12-21

    We investigate the effects of defect scatterings on the electric transport properties of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graphene by measuring the carrier density dependence of the magneto-conductivity. To clarify the dominant scattering mechanism, we perform extensive measurements on large-area samples with different mobility to exclude the edge effect. We analyze our data with the major scattering mechanisms such as short-range static scatters, short-range screened Coulomb disorders, and weak-localization (WL). We establish that the charged impurities are the predominant scatters because there is a strong correlation between the mobility and the charge impurity density. Near the charge neutral point (CNP), the electron-hole puddles that are induced by the charged impurities enhance the inter-valley scattering, which is favorable for WL observations. Away from the CNP, the charged-impurity-induced scattering is weak because of the effective screening by the charge carriers. As a result, the local static structural defects govern the charge transport. Our findings provide compelling evidence for understanding the scattering mechanisms in graphene and pave the way for the improvement of fabrication techniques to achieve high-quality CVD graphene.

  7. Chemical vapor deposited silica coatings for solar mirror protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulino, Daniel A.; Dever, Therese M.; Banholzer, William F.

    1988-01-01

    A variety of techniques is available to apply protective coatings to oxidation susceptible spacecraft components, and each has associated advantages and disadvantages. Film applications by means of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has the advantage of being able to be applied conformally to objects of irregular shape. For this reason, a study was made of the oxygen plasma durability of thin film (less than 5000 A) silicon dioxide coatings applied by CVD. In these experiments, such coatings were applied to silver mirrors, which are strongly subject to oxidation, and which are proposed for use on the space station solar dynamic power system. Results indicate that such coatings can provide adequate protection without affecting the reflectance of the mirror. Scanning electron micrographs indicated that oxidation of the silver layer did occur at stress crack locations, but this did not affect the measured solar reflectances. Oxidation of the silver did not proceed beyond the immediate location of the crack. Such stress cracks did not occur in thinner silica films, and hence such films would be desirable for this application.

  8. High surface area graphene foams by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drieschner, Simon; Weber, Michael; Wohlketzetter, Jörg; Vieten, Josua; Makrygiannis, Evangelos; Blaschke, Benno M.; Morandi, Vittorio; Colombo, Luigi; Bonaccorso, Francesco; Garrido, Jose A.

    2016-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) graphene-based structures combine the unique physical properties of graphene with the opportunity to get high electrochemically available surface area per unit of geometric surface area. Several preparation techniques have been reported to fabricate 3D graphene-based macroscopic structures for energy storage applications such as supercapacitors. Although reaserch has been focused so far on achieving either high specific capacitance or high volumetric capacitance, much less attention has been dedicated to obtain high specific and high volumetric capacitance simultaneously. Here, we present a facile technique to fabricate graphene foams (GF) of high crystal quality with tunable pore size grown by chemical vapor deposition. We exploited porous sacrificial templates prepared by sintering nickel and copper metal powders. Tuning the particle size of the metal powders and the growth temperature allow fine control of the resulting pore size of the 3D graphene-based structures smaller than 1 μm. The as-produced 3D graphene structures provide a high volumetric electric double layer capacitance (165 mF cm-3). High specific capacitance (100 Fg-1) is obtained by lowering the number of layers down to single layer graphene. Furthermore, the small pore size increases the stability of these GFs in contrast to the ones that have been grown so far on commercial metal foams. Electrodes based on the as-prepared GFs can be a boost for the development of supercapacitors, where both low volume and mass are required.

  9. Fabrication of copper nanorods by low-temperature metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ying; Frank Leung-Yuk Lam; HU Xijun; YAN Zifeng

    2006-01-01

    Copper nanorods have been synthesized in mesoporous SBA-15 by a low-temperature metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD)employing copper (Ⅱ) acetylacetonate, Cu(acac)2,and hydrogen as a precursor and reactant gas, respectively. The hydrogen plays an important role in chemical reduction of oganometallic precursor which enhances mass transfer in the interior of the SBA-15 porous substrate. Such copper nanostructures are of great potentials in the semiconductor due to their unusual optical, magnetic and electronic properties.In addition, it has been found that chemically modifying the substrate surface by carbon deposition is crucial to such synthesis of copper nanostructures in the interior of the SBA-15, which is able to change the surface properties of SBA-15 from hydrophilic to hydrophobic to promote the adsorption of organic cupric precursor. It has also been found that the copper nanoparticles deposited on the external surface are almost eliminated and the copper nanorods are more distinct while the product was treated with ammonia. This approach could be achieved under a mild condition: a low temperature (400℃) and vacuum (2 kPa) which is extremely milder than the conventional method. It actually sounds as a foundation which is the first time to synthesize a copper nanorod at a mild condition of a low reaction temperature and pressure.

  10. High rate deposition of microcrystalline silicon films by high-pressure radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si:H) thin films were prepared by high- pressure radio-frequency (13.56 MHz) plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (rf-PECVD) with a screened plasma. The deposition rate and crystallinity varying with the deposition pressure, rf power, hydrogen dilution ratio and electrodes distance were systematically studied. By optimizing the deposition parameters the device quality μc-Si:H films have been achieved with a high deposition rate of 7.8 /s at a high pressure. The Voc of 560 mV and the FF of 0.70 have been achieved for a single-junction μc-Si:H p-i-n solar cell at a deposition rate of 7.8 /s.

  11. Chemical bath deposition and characterization of Cu2O-CuxS thin films

    OpenAIRE

    EYA, D. D. O.

    2010-01-01

    Cu2O-CuxS thin films have been deposited on glass substrate by chemical bath deposition technique. The films were obtained by depositing Copper Sulphide (CuxS) on Copper (I) Oxide (Cu2O) and then Cu2O on CuxS. The peak solar transmittance across the thin films were found to be

  12. Properties of alumina films by atmospheric pressure metal-organic chemical vapour deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanappel, V.A.C.; Corbach, van H.D.; Fransen, T.; Gellings, P.J.

    1994-01-01

    Thin alumina films were deposited at low temperatures (290–420°C) on stainless steel, type AISI 304. The deposition process was carried out in nitrogen by metal-organic chemical vapour deposition using aluminum tri-sec-butoxide. The film properties including the protection of the underlying substrat

  13. Initiated-chemical vapor deposition of organosilicon layers: Monomer adsorption, bulk growth, and process window definition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aresta, G.; Palmans, J.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,; Creatore, M.

    2012-01-01

    Organosilicon layers have been deposited from 1,3,5-trivinyl-1,3,5-trimethylcyclotrisiloxane (V3D3) by means of the initiated-chemical vapor deposition (i-CVD) technique in a deposition setup, ad hoc designed for the engineering of multilayer moisture permeation barriers. The application of Fourier

  14. Method and apparatus for depositing atomic layers on a substrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeer, A.J.P.M.; Roozeboom, F.; Deelen, J. van

    2016-01-01

    Method of depositing an atomic layer on a substrate. The method comprises supplying a precursor gas from a precursor-gas supply of a deposition head that may be part of a rotatable drum. The precursor gas is provided from the precursor-gas supply towards the substrate. The method further comprises m

  15. Studies on non-oxide coating on carbon fibers using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, R. H.; Sharma, S.; Prajapati, K. K.; Vyas, M. M.; Batra, N. M.

    2016-05-01

    A new way of improving the oxidative behavior of carbon fibers coated with SiC through Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition technique. The complete study includes coating of SiC on glass slab and Stainless steel specimen as a starting test subjects but the major focus was to increase the oxidation temperature of carbon fibers by PECVD technique. This method uses relatively lower substrate temperature and guarantees better stoichiometry than other coating methods and hence the substrate shows higher resistance towards mechanical and thermal stresses along with increase in oxidation temperature.

  16. Chemical reaction and separation method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J.C.; Kapteijn, F.; Strous, S.A.

    2005-01-01

    The invention is directed to process for performing a chemical reaction in a reaction mixture, which reaction produces water as by-product, wherein the reaction mixture is in contact with a hydroxy sodalite membrane, through which water produced during the reaction is removed from the reaction mixtu

  17. Supercritical fluid chemical deposition of Pd nanoparticles on magnesium–scandium alloy for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couillaud, Samuel; Kirikova, Marina [CNRS, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France); Univ. Bordeaux, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France); Zaïdi, Warda; Bonnet, Jean-Pierre [LRCS, UMR CNRS 6007, 33 rue Saint-Leu, 80039-Amiens (France); Marre, Samuel; Aymonier, Cyril [CNRS, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France); Univ. Bordeaux, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France); Zhang, Junxian; Cuevas, Fermin; Latroche, Michel [ICMPE, CNRS-UPEC, UMR 7182, 2-8 rue Henri Dunant, 94320-Thiais (France); Aymard, Luc [LRCS, UMR CNRS 6007, 33 rue Saint-Leu, 80039-Amiens (France); Bobet, Jean-Louis, E-mail: bobet@icmcb-bordeaux.cnrs.fr [CNRS, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France); Univ. Bordeaux, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •Nanoparticles of Pd were deposed on the binary compound Mg{sub 0.65}Sc{sub 0.35} using the Supercritical Fluid Chemical Deposition (SFCD) method. •Numerous parameters were tested and optimized in order to obtain a homogeneous deposition. •At the first step, Pd@Mg0.65Sc0.35 decomposes into ScH{sub 2} and MgH{sub 2} under hydrogen pressure (1 MPa) at 330 °C. •The mixture, after decomposition absorbs hydrogen reversibly on Mg/MgH{sub 2} couple with good kinetics. -- Abstract: The deposition of Pd nanoparticles on the binary compound Mg{sub 0.65}Sc{sub 0.35} using the Supercritical Fluid Chemical Deposition (SFCD) method was performed. There, the SFCD operating parameters (co-solvent, temperature, CO{sub 2} and hydrogen pressure, reaction time) have been optimized to obtain homogeneous deposition of Pd nanoparticles (around 10 nm). The hydrogenation properties of the optimized Pd@Mg{sub 0.65}Sc{sub 0.35} material were determined and compared to those of Mg{sub 0.65}Sc{sub 0.35}Pd{sub 0.024}. The latter compound forms at 300 °C and 1 MPa of H{sub 2} a hydride that crystallizes in the fluorite structure, absorbs reversibly 1.5 wt.% hydrogen and exhibits fast kinetics. In contrast, Pd@Mg{sub 0.65}Sc{sub 0.35} compound decomposes into ScH{sub 2} and MgH{sub 2} during hydrogen absorption under the same conditions. However, reversible sorption reaches 3.3 wt.% of hydrogen while keeping good kinetics. The possible roles of Pd on the hydrogen-induced alloy decomposition are discussed.

  18. Electrical and magnetoresistivity studies in chemical solution deposited La

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angappane, S.; Murugaraj, P.; Sethupathi, K.; Rangarajan, G.; Sastry, V. S.; Chakkaravarthi, A. Arul; Ramasamy, P.

    2001-06-01

    High quality magnetoresistive La{sub (1{minus}x)}Ca{sub x}MnO{sub 3} thin films have been prepared by the chemical solution deposition technique. A solution of propionate precursors of lanthanum, calcium, and manganese in propionic acid was used for this purpose. Films of varying compositions (x varying from 0.1 to 0.4) were spin coated on to LaAlO{sub 3}(100) and SrTiO{sub 3}(100) substrates at room temperature and pyrolyzed in the temperature range 600{endash}850{degree}C. For fixed compositions, annealing at higher temperatures shifts the insulator{endash}metal transition temperature (T{sub I{endash}M}) to higher values accompanied by a reduction in the resistivity values. The T{sub I{endash}M} variation for different x values was found to be less pronounced in the compositions x=0.2, 0.3, and 0.4. Typical T{sub I{endash}M} values of 283 K and 290 K were obtained for La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} coated on LaAlO{sub 3} and SrTiO{sub 3} substrates, respectively, when annealed at 850{degree}C. The substrate effect was found to be more pronounced for the x value 0.1 which showed two peaks (one at 271 K and another at 122 K) in the {rho}-T curve. The roles of substrate mismatch, composition variation, and annealing temperatures are discussed. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  19. Control of crystallite size in diamond film chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Mark B.; Johnson, Linda F.; Klemm, Karl A.

    1992-12-01

    In depositing an adhering, continuous, polycrystalline diamond film of optical or semiconductor quality on a substrate, as by forming on the substrate a layer of a refractory nitride interlayer and depositing diamond on the interlayer without mechanical treatment or seeding of the substrate or the interlayer, the substrate is heated in a vacuum chamber containing a microwave activated mixture of hydrogen and a gas including carbon, and the size of deposited diamond crystallites and their rate of deposition selectively varied by a bias voltage applied to the substrate.

  20. Synthesis of multiferroic Er-Fe-O thin films by atomic layer and chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantovan, R., E-mail: roberto.mantovan@mdm.imm.cnr.it; Vangelista, S.; Wiemer, C.; Lamperti, A.; Tallarida, G. [Laboratorio MDM IMM-CNR, I-20864 Agrate Brianza (MB) (Italy); Chikoidze, E.; Dumont, Y. [GEMaC, Université de Versailles St. Quentin en Yvelines-CNRS, Versailles (France); Fanciulli, M. [Laboratorio MDM IMM-CNR, I-20864 Agrate Brianza (MB) (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Università di Milano Bicocca, Milano (Italy)

    2014-05-07

    R-Fe-O (R = rare earth) compounds have recently attracted high interest as potential new multiferroic materials. Here, we report a method based on the solid-state reaction between Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe layers, respectively grown by atomic layer deposition and chemical vapor deposition, to synthesize Er-Fe-O thin films. The reaction is induced by thermal annealing and evolution of the formed phases is followed by in situ grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. Dominant ErFeO{sub 3} and ErFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} phases develop following subsequent thermal annealing processes at 850 °C in air and N{sub 2}. Structural, chemical, and morphological characterization of the layers are conducted through X-ray diffraction and reflectivity, time-of-flight secondary ion-mass spectrometry, and atomic force microscopy. Magnetic properties are evaluated by magnetic force microscopy, conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer, being consistent with the presence of the phases identified by X-ray diffraction. Our results constitute a first step toward the use of cost-effective chemical methods for the synthesis of this class of multiferroic thin films.

  1. Synthesis of multiferroic Er-Fe-O thin films by atomic layer and chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantovan, R.; Vangelista, S.; Wiemer, C.; Lamperti, A.; Tallarida, G.; Chikoidze, E.; Dumont, Y.; Fanciulli, M.

    2014-05-01

    R-Fe-O (R = rare earth) compounds have recently attracted high interest as potential new multiferroic materials. Here, we report a method based on the solid-state reaction between Er2O3 and Fe layers, respectively grown by atomic layer deposition and chemical vapor deposition, to synthesize Er-Fe-O thin films. The reaction is induced by thermal annealing and evolution of the formed phases is followed by in situ grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. Dominant ErFeO3 and ErFe2O4 phases develop following subsequent thermal annealing processes at 850 °C in air and N2. Structural, chemical, and morphological characterization of the layers are conducted through X-ray diffraction and reflectivity, time-of-flight secondary ion-mass spectrometry, and atomic force microscopy. Magnetic properties are evaluated by magnetic force microscopy, conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer, being consistent with the presence of the phases identified by X-ray diffraction. Our results constitute a first step toward the use of cost-effective chemical methods for the synthesis of this class of multiferroic thin films.

  2. Evaluation of methods for characterizations of deposits; Utvaerdering av metoder foer avlagringsmaetningar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoegberg, J.; Bjoerkman, P. [Vattenfall Utveckling AB, Aelvkarleby (Sweden)

    2001-11-01

    In boilers there are problems with deposits on parts exposed to the flue gas, in particular on heat exchanging parts and to an increasing extent with the changeover to the use of biofuels and wood waste fuels. In order to solve the problems deposits are examined by using a deposit probe and taking deposit samples from the interior of the boiler. In this report an evaluation of methods of analysis is performed based on experiences in both literature and laboratory work. The evaluation forms the basis of an instruction for deposit measurements in 'Vaermeforsks Maethandbok'. The procedure for use of deposit probes is treated as well as the importance of careful and well planned sample preparation before analysis. In the literature a large number of methods used for analysis of deposits from flue ashes and similar applications are found. The methods include chemical analyses of solids and liquids, analysis of crystal structures, thermal properties and the solid mechanics of the materials. Several methods, for example SEM-EDX, XRF, ICP, IC and methods for determining the mechanical and thermal properties are suited for a survey examination of a deposit, while more specialised methods with higher resolution can add information but require a clear framing of a question and in practice are suited for only separate samples. Examples from the latter category are AES, ESCA and TOF-SIMS.

  3. A Comparison between Thin-Film Transistors Deposited by Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition and PECVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meysam Zarchi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of new growth techniques on the mobility and stability of amorphous silicon (a-Si:H thin film transistors (TFTs has been studied. It was suggested that the key parameter controlling the field-effect mobility and stability is the intrinsic stress in the a-Si:H layer. Amorphous and microcrystalline silicon films were deposited by radiofrequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD and hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HW-CVD at 100 ºC and 25 ºC. Structural properties of these films were measured by Raman Spectroscopy. Electronic properties were measured by dark conductivity, σd, and photoconductivity, σph. For amorphous silicon films deposited by RF-PECVD on PET, photosensitivity's of >105 were obtained at both 100 º C and 25 ºC. For amorphous silicon films deposited by HW-CVD, a photosensitivity of > 105 was obtained at 100 ºC. Microcrystalline silicon films deposited by HW-CVD at 95% hydrogen dilution show σph~ 10-4 Ω-1cm-1, while maintaining a photosensitivity of ~102 at both 100 ºC and 25 ºC. Microcrystalline silicon films with a large crystalline fraction (> 50% can be deposited by HW-CVD all the way down to room temperature.

  4. Chemical Methods for the Production of Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kent, Stephen B.H.

    2008-09-15

    The goal of this research program was to develop improved methods for chemical peptide and protein synthesis, and to apply these methods to the total synthesis of small proteins (<80 amino acids) & integral membrane proteins.

  5. THE EFFECT OF DEPOSITION PARAMETERS ON THE CHEMICAL COMPOSITION AND CORROSION RESISTANCE OF TICXNY COATINGS PRODUCED ON HIGH-SPEED STEEL SUBSTRATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senna L.F.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available TiCxNy coatings deposited on high-speed steel substrates have been used to enhance the tribological properties of cutting tools (hardness, wear resistance, etc. as well as their corrosion resistance in an aggressive environment. These layers are usually produced by plasma deposition techniques (PVD or CVD, and different coating properties can be obtained with each method. In this work, TiCxNy films were deposited on AISI M2 high-speed steel substrates by the reactive magnetron sputtering technique. A series of samples with a variety of reactive gas mixtures (nitrogen and methane, substrate biases, and deposition temperatures was produced. As a result, coatings with different chemical compositions were deposited for each group of deposition parameters. Gas mixture composition and substrate bias directly affected the chemical composition of the coating, while deposition temperature influenced the chemical composition of TiCxNy layers to a very low extent.

  6. Structural, morphology and optical properties of chemically deposited Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maghraoui-Meherzi, H., E-mail: hajer.maghraoui@laposte.ne [Laboratoire de chimie Analytique et Electrochimie, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, Campus universitaire 2092 Tunis El Manar (Tunisia); Ben Nasr, T.; Kamoun, N. [Laboratoire de physique de la Matiere Condensee, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, Campus universitaire 2092 Tunis El Manar (Tunisia); Dachraoui, M. [Laboratoire de chimie Analytique et Electrochimie, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, Campus universitaire 2092 Tunis El Manar (Tunisia)

    2010-08-01

    Metal chalcogenide thin films prepared by chemical methods are currently attracting considerable attention, as they are relatively inexpensive, simple and convenient for large area deposition. Antimony sulphide (Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}) films were deposited on glass substrate by chemical bath deposition from solution containing SbCl{sub 3} and Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Characterization of the films was carried out with X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and UV-Vis spectrophotometry. Using these techniques, we have specified the effect of temperature and time deposition on the crystallinity structure of antimony sulphide films. Homogeneous films were found to be crystallized on orthorhombic structure, and indicate a direct band gap of 2.24 eV.

  7. Fabrication of complex oxide microstructures by combinatorial chemical beam vapour deposition through stencil masks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, E. [3D-OXIDES, 70 rue Gustave Eiffel, Saint Genis Pouilly 01630 (France); Sandu, C.S., E-mail: cosmin.sandu@3d-oxides.com [3D-OXIDES, 70 rue Gustave Eiffel, Saint Genis Pouilly 01630 (France); Laboratoire de Céramique, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Station 12, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Harada, S.; Benvenuti, G. [3D-OXIDES, 70 rue Gustave Eiffel, Saint Genis Pouilly 01630 (France); Savu, V. [Laboratoire de Microsystèmes 1, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Station 17, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Muralt, P. [Laboratoire de Céramique, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Station 12, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2015-07-01

    Chemical Beam Vapour Deposition is a gas phase deposition technique, operated under high vacuum conditions, in which evaporated chemical precursors are thermally decomposed on heated substrates to form a film. In the particular equipment used in this work, different chemical beams effuse from a plurality of punctual precursor sources with line of sight trajectory to the substrate. A shadow mask is used to produce 3D-structures in a single step, replicating the apertures of a stencil as deposits on the substrate. The small gap introduced between substrate and mask induces a temperature difference between both surfaces and is used to deposit selectively solely on the substrate without modifying the mask, taking advantage of the deposition rate dependency on temperature. This small gap also enables the deposition of complex patterned structures resulting from the superposition of many patterns obtained using several precursor beams from different directions through a single mask aperture. A suitable process parameter window for precursor flow and substrate temperature is evidenced to maximize resolution. - Highlights: • Micro-feature growth with stencil mask by Chemical Beam Vapour Deposition • Growth of complex structured oxide films in one step • The gap between substrate and mask avoids deposition on the stencil. • Fabrication of 3D structures by superposing deposits from several beams • The versatile setup combines few chemical beams, variable geometry and stencil mask patterns.

  8. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of amorphous Si on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupina, G.; Strobel, C.; Dabrowski, J.; Lippert, G.; Kitzmann, J.; Krause, H. M.; Wenger, Ch.; Lukosius, M.; Wolff, A.; Albert, M.; Bartha, J. W.

    2016-05-01

    Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of thin a-Si:H layers on transferred large area graphene is investigated. Radio frequency (RF, 13.56 MHz) and very high frequency (VHF, 140 MHz) plasma processes are compared. Both methods provide conformal coating of graphene with Si layers as thin as 20 nm without any additional seed layer. The RF plasma process results in amorphization of the graphene layer. In contrast, the VHF process keeps the high crystalline quality of the graphene layer almost intact. Correlation analysis of Raman 2D and G band positions indicates that Si deposition induces reduction of the initial doping in graphene and an increase of compressive strain. Upon rapid thermal annealing, the amorphous Si layer undergoes dehydrogenation and transformation into a polycrystalline film, whereby a high crystalline quality of graphene is preserved.

  9. Platinum-ruthenium bimetallic clusters on graphite: a comparison of vapor deposition and electroless deposition methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galhenage, Randima P; Xie, Kangmin; Diao, Weijian; Tengco, John Meynard M; Seuser, Grant S; Monnier, John R; Chen, Donna A

    2015-11-14

    Bimetallic Pt-Ru clusters have been grown on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surfaces by vapor deposition and by electroless deposition. These studies help to bridge the material gap between well-characterized vapor deposited clusters and electrolessly deposited clusters, which are better suited for industrial catalyst preparation. In the vapor deposition experiments, bimetallic clusters were formed by the sequential deposition of Pt on Ru or Ru on Pt. Seed clusters of the first metal were grown on HOPG surfaces that were sputtered with Ar(+) to introduce defects, which act as nucleation sites for Pt or Ru. On the unmodified HOPG surface, both Pt and Ru clusters preferentially nucleated at the step edges, whereas on the sputtered surface, clusters with relatively uniform sizes and spatial distributions were formed. Low energy ion scattering experiments showed that the surface compositions of the bimetallic clusters are Pt-rich, regardless of the order of deposition, indicating that the interdiffusion of metals within the clusters is facile at room temperature. Bimetallic clusters on sputtered HOPG were prepared by the electroless deposition of Pt on Ru seed clusters from a Pt(+2) solution using dimethylamine borane as the reducing agent at pH 11 and 40 °C. After exposure to the electroless deposition bath, Pt was selectively deposited on Ru, as demonstrated by the detection of Pt on the surface by XPS, and the increase in the average cluster height without an increase in the number of clusters, indicating that Pt atoms are incorporated into the Ru seed clusters. Electroless deposition of Ru on Pt seed clusters was also achieved, but it should be noted that this deposition method is extremely sensitive to the presence of other metal ions in solution that have a higher reduction potential than the metal ion targeted for deposition.

  10. Chemical surface deposition of cds thin films from CdI2 aqueous solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Il’chuk

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available For the first time using CdI2 solution CdS films on glass and ITO coated glass substrates were produced by the method of layerwise chemical surface deposition (ChSD. CdS thin films with the widths from 40 nm to 100 nm were obtained for windows in solar cells based on CdS/CdTe heterojunctions. Changes of the structural and optical properties of CdS films due to air annealing are shown.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of well-aligned carbon nitrogen nanotubes by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Well-aligned carbon nitrogen nanotube films have been synthesized successfully on mesoporous silica substrates by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MWPCVD) method. Studies on their morphology, structure, and composition by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), respectively, indicate that these nanotubes consist of linearly polymerized carbon nitrogen nanobells, and the nitrogen atoms have been doped into carbon netweork to form a new structure C1-xNx (x=0.16±0.01). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results of the samples further demonstrate that carbon bonds covalently with nitrogen in all the carbon nitrogen nanotube films.

  12. Size dependent optical characteristics of chemically deposited nanostructured ZnS thin films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A U Ubale; V S Sangawar; D K Kulkarni

    2007-04-01

    ZnS thin films of different thicknesses were prepared by chemical bath deposition using thiourea and zinc acetate as S2- and Zn2+ source. The effect of film thickness on the optical and structural properties was studied. The optical absorption studies in the wavelength range 250–750 nm show that band gap energy of ZnS increases from 3.68–4.10 eV as thickness varied from 332–76 nm. The structural estimation shows variation in grain size from 6.9–17.8 nm with thickness. The thermoemf measurement indicates that films prepared by this method are of -type.

  13. Direct Fabrication of Carbon Nanotubes STM Tips by Liquid Catalyst-Assisted Microwave Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fa-Kuei Tung

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct and facile method to make carbon nanotube (CNT tips for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM is presented. Cobalt (Co particles, as catalysts, are electrochemically deposited on the apex of tungsten (W STM tip for CNT growth. It is found that the quantity of Co particles is well controlled by applied DC voltage, concentration of catalyst solution, and deposition time. Using optimum growth condition, CNTs are successfully synthesized on the tip apex by catalyst-assisted microwave-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (CA-MPECVD. A HOPG surface is clearly observed at an atomic scale using the present CNT-STM tip.

  14. Functionalization of Hydrogenated Chemical Vapour Deposition-Grown Graphene by On-Surface Chemical Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drogowska, Karolina; Kovaříček, Petr; Kalbáč, Martin

    2017-03-23

    The reactivity of hydrogenated graphene when treated with oxidising agents, KMnO4 and KIO4 , as well as alkylated with benzyl bromide (BnBr) was studied. The probed reactions are strictly limited to the partly hydrogenated form of graphene in which most of the hydrogen atoms are located in activated benzylic/allylic positions. This, in turn, clearly demonstrates the presence of hydrogen attached to the graphene lattice. Attachment of the benzyl group was also unequivocally demonstrated by characteristic vibrations recorded in the surface-enhanced Raman spectra, and all reactions were shown to proceed solely on hydrogenated graphene as evidenced by the comparison with pristine chemical vapour deposition-grown graphene.

  15. Nucleation and growth of single layer graphene on electrodeposited Cu by cold wall chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Shantanu; Drucker, Jeff

    2017-03-01

    The nucleation density and average size of graphene crystallites grown using cold wall chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on 4 μm thick Cu films electrodeposited on W substrates can be tuned by varying growth parameters. Growth at a fixed substrate temperature of 1000 °C and total pressure of 700 Torr using Ar, H2 and CH4 mixtures enabled the contribution of total flow rate, CH4:H2 ratio and dilution of the CH4/H2 mixture by Ar to be identified. The largest variation in nucleation density was obtained by varying the CH4:H2 ratio. The observed morphological changes are analogous to those that would be expected if the deposition rate were varied at fixed substrate temperature for physical deposition using thermal evaporation. The graphene crystallite boundary morphology progresses from irregular/jagged through convex hexagonal to regular hexagonal as the effective C deposition rate decreases. This observation suggests that edge diffusion of C atoms along the crystallite boundaries, in addition to H2 etching, may contribute to shape evolution of the graphene crystallites. These results demonstrate that graphene grown using cold wall CVD follows a nucleation and growth mechanism similar to hot wall CVD. As a consequence, the vast knowledge base relevant to hot wall CVD may be exploited for graphene synthesis by the industrially preferable cold wall method.

  16. Practical silicon deposition rules derived from silane monitoring during plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartlome, Richard, E-mail: richard.bartlome@alumni.ethz.ch; De Wolf, Stefaan; Demaurex, Bénédicte; Ballif, Christophe [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Institute of Microengineering (IMT), Photovoltaics and Thin-Film Electronics Laboratory, Rue de la Maladière 71b, 2000 Neuchâtel (Switzerland); Amanatides, Eleftherios; Mataras, Dimitrios [University of Patras, Department of Chemical Engineering, Plasma Technology Laboratory, P.O. Box 1407, 26504 Patras (Greece)

    2015-05-28

    We clarify the difference between the SiH{sub 4} consumption efficiency η and the SiH{sub 4} depletion fraction D, as measured in the pumping line and the actual reactor of an industrial plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition system. In the absence of significant polysilane and powder formation, η is proportional to the film growth rate. Above a certain powder formation threshold, any additional amount of SiH{sub 4} consumed translates into increased powder formation rather than into a faster growing Si film. In order to discuss a zero-dimensional analytical model and a two-dimensional numerical model, we measure η as a function of the radio frequency (RF) power density coupled into the plasma, the total gas flow rate, the input SiH{sub 4} concentration, and the reactor pressure. The adjunction of a small trimethylboron flow rate increases η and reduces the formation of powder, while the adjunction of a small disilane flow rate decreases η and favors the formation of powder. Unlike η, D is a location-dependent quantity. It is related to the SiH{sub 4} concentration in the plasma c{sub p}, and to the phase of the growing Si film, whether the substrate is glass or a c-Si wafer. In order to investigate transient effects due to the RF matching, the precoating of reactor walls, or the introduction of a purifier in the gas line, we measure the gas residence time and acquire time-resolved SiH{sub 4} density measurements throughout the ignition and the termination of a plasma.

  17. Synthesis of Si/SiO2/ZnO nanoporous materials using chemical and electrochemical deposition techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauletbekova, A. K.; Alzhanova, A. Ye.; Akilbekov, A. T.; Mashentseva, A. A.; Zdorovets, M. V.; Balabekov, K. N.

    2016-09-01

    The work represents the results of forming Zn-based nanoprecipitates in nanoporous amorphous silicon dioxide on silicon substrate by the template synthesis method. SEM and AFM images of the surface after chemical and electrochemical deposition of zinc were obtained. The analysis of photoluminescence of the precipitated samples resulted in the assumption of formation of nanoclusters of zinc oxide.

  18. PbS Thin Films for Photovoltaic Applications Obtained by Non-Traditional Chemical Bath Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    To optimize cost-efficiency relation for thin film solar cells, we explore the recently developed versions of chemical deposition of semiconductor films, together with classic CBD (Chemical Bath Deposition): SILAR (Successive Ionic Layer Adsorption and Reaction) and PCBD (Photo Chemical Bath Deposition), all of them ammonia-free and ecologically friendly. The films of CdS and PbS were made, and experimental solar cells with CdS window layer and PbS absorber elaborated. We found that band gap ...

  19. Numerical modeling of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) in a horizontal reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikholeslami, M. Z.; Jasinski, T.; Fretz, K. W.

    1988-01-01

    In the present numerical prediction of the deposition rate of silicon from silane in a CVD process, the conservation equations for mass, momentum, energy, and chemical species are solved on a staggered grid using the SIMPLE algorithm, while the rate of chemical reactions in the gas phase and on the susceptor surface is obtained from an Arrhenius rate equation. Predicted deposition rates as a function of position along the susceptor with and without the gas phase chemical reaction are compared with the available experimental and numerical data; agreement is excellent except at the leading edge of the susceptor, where the deposition rate is overpredicted.

  20. Metallization on FDM Parts Using the Chemical Deposition Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azhar Equbal

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Metallization of ABS (acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene parts has been studied on flat part surfaces. These parts are fabricated on an FDM (fused deposition modeling machine using the layer-wise deposition principle using ABS as a part material. Electroless copper deposition on ABS parts was performed using two different surface preparation processes, namely ABS parts prepared using chromic acid for etching and ABS parts prepared using a solution mixture of sulphuric acid and hydrogen peroxide (H2SO4/H2O2 for etching. After surface preparations using these routes, copper (Cu is deposited electrolessly using four different acidic baths. The acidic baths used are 5 wt% CuSO4 (copper sulfate with 15 wt% of individual acids, namely HF (hydrofluoric acid, H2SO4 (sulphuric acid, H3PO4 (phosphoric acid and CH3COOH (acetic acid. Cu deposition under different acidic baths used for both the routes is presented and compared based on their electrical performance, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS. The result shows that chromic acid etched samples show better electrical performance and Cu deposition in comparison to samples etched via H2SO4/H2O2.

  1. Method of depositing a high-emissivity layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickersham, Charles E.; Foster, Ellis L.

    1983-01-01

    A method of depositing a high-emissivity layer on a substrate comprising RF sputter deposition of a carbide-containing target in an atmosphere of a hydrocarbon gas and a noble gas. As the carbide is deposited on the substrate the hydrocarbon gas decomposes to hydrogen and carbon. The carbon deposits on the target and substrate causing a carbide/carbon composition gradient to form on the substrate. At a sufficiently high partial pressure of hydrocarbon gas, a film of high-emissivity pure carbon will eventually form over the substrate.

  2. Silicon carbide and other films and method of deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehregany, Mehran (Inventor); Zorman, Christian A. (Inventor); Fu, Xiao-An (Inventor); Dunning, Jeremy (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method of depositing a ceramic film, particularly a silicon carbide film, on a substrate is disclosed in which the residual stress, residual stress gradient, and resistivity are controlled. Also disclosed are substrates having a deposited film with these controlled properties and devices, particularly MEMS and NEMS devices, having substrates with films having these properties.

  3. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of uranium for alpha spectrometry; Deposicion quimica de vapor (CVD) de uranio para espectrometria alfa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez V, M. L.; Rios M, C.; Ramirez O, J.; Davila R, J. I.; Mireles G, F., E-mail: luisalawliet@gmail.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    The uranium determination through radiometric techniques as alpha spectrometry requires for its proper analysis, preparation methods of the source to analyze and procedures for the deposit of this on a surface or substrate. Given the characteristics of alpha particles (small penetration distance and great loss of energy during their journey or its interaction with the matter), is important to ensure that the prepared sources are thin, to avoid problems of self-absorption. The routine methods used for this are the cathodic electro deposition and the direct evaporation, among others. In this paper the use of technique of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) for the preparation of uranium sources is investigated; because by this, is possible to obtain thin films (much thinner than those resulting from electro deposition or evaporation) on a substrate and comprises reacting a precursor with a gas, which in turn serves as a carrier of the reaction products to achieve deposition. Preliminary results of the chemical vapor deposition of uranium are presented, synthesizing and using as precursor molecule the uranyl acetylacetonate, using oxygen as carrier gas for the deposition reaction on a glass substrate. The uranium films obtained were found suitable for alpha spectrometry. The variables taken into account were the precursor sublimation temperatures and deposition temperature, the reaction time and the type and flow of carrier gas. Of the investigated conditions, two depositions with encouraging results that can serve as reference for further work to improve the technique presented here were selected. Alpha spectra obtained for these depositions and the characterization of the representative samples by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction are also presented. (Author)

  4. Fabrication of Isotropic Pyrocarbon at 1400℃ by Thermal Gradient Chemical Vapor Deposition Apparatus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Lingjun; ZHANG Dongsheng; LI Kezhi; LI Hejun

    2009-01-01

    An experiment was designed to prepare isotropic pyrocarbon by thermal gradient chemical vapor deposition apparatus.The deposition was performed under ambient atmosphere at 1400℃,with natural gas volume flow of 3.5 m~3/h for 80 h.The results show that the thickness and the bulk density of the deposit are about 1.95 g/cm~3 and 10 mm,respectively.The microstructure of the deposit was examined by polarized light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy,which shows that the deposit is constituted of sphere isotropic pyrocarbon,pebble pyrocarbon and laminar pyrocarbon.

  5. Laterally Stitched Heterostructures of Transition Metal Dichalcogenide: Chemical Vapor Deposition Growth on Lithographically Patterned Area

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Henan

    2016-10-31

    Two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) have shown great promise in electronics and optoelectronics due to their unique electrical and optical properties. Heterostructured TMDC layers such as the laterally stitched TMDCs offer the advantages of better electronic contact and easier band offset tuning. Here, we demonstrate a photoresist-free focused ion beam (FIB) method to pattern as-grown TMDC monolayers by chemical vapor deposition, where the exposed edges from FIB etching serve as the seeds for growing a second TMDC material to form desired lateral heterostructures with arbitrary layouts. The proposed lithographic and growth processes offer better controllability for fabrication of the TMDC heterostrucuture, which enables the construction of devices based on heterostructural monolayers. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  6. Suitable alkaline for graphene peeling grown on metallic catalysts using chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamat, S.; Sonuşen, S.; Çelik, Ü.; Uysallı, Y.; Oral, A.

    2016-04-01

    In chemical vapor deposition, the higher growth temperature roughens the surface of the metal catalyst and a delicate method is necessary for the transfer of graphene from metal catalyst to the desired substrates. In this work, we grow graphene on Pt and Cu foil via ambient pressure chemical vapor deposition (AP-CVD) method and further alkaline water electrolysis was used to peel off graphene from the metallic catalyst. We used different electrolytes i.e., sodium hydroxide (NaOH), potassium hydroxide (KOH), lithium hydroxide (LiOH) and barium hydroxide Ba(OH)2 for electrolysis, hydrogen bubbles evolved at the Pt cathode (graphene/Pt/PMMA stack) and as a result graphene layer peeled off from the substrate without damage. The peeling time for KOH and LiOH was ∼6 min and for NaOH and Ba(OH)2 it was ∼15 min. KOH and LiOH peeled off graphene very efficiently as compared to NaOH and Ba(OH)2 from the Pt electrode. In case of copper, the peeling time is ∼3-5 min. Different characterizations like optical microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy were done to analyze the as grown and transferred graphene samples.

  7. Chemical Pre-treatment Methods for Measurement of Ge Isotopic Ratio on Sphalerite in Lead-Zinc Deposits%铅锌矿床地质样品的Ge同位素预处理方法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱传威; 温汉捷; 樊海峰; 张羽旭; 刘洁; 杨涛; 王光辉

    2014-01-01

    Up to the present,main research of Ge isotopes has been carried out on organic,magmatic and meteoritic samples. Pb-Zn deposits are one of the most important reservoirs of Ge;however,there are few studies on Ge isotopes for these samples. Ge separation and purification for samples collected from Pb-Zn deposits are the basis of Ge isotope research. Therefore,the suitability for Pb-Zn ores of the Ge isotopic purification method established for meteoritic samples in details has been investigated. The results demonstrate that anion exchange resins single-column method for Pb-Zn ores can eliminate the potential interferences efficiently( including Fe,Se and other interfering matrix elements),but does not work for Zn as Zn/Ge﹥3,indicating that further separation and purification by ion-exchange column are needed to eliminate Zn. Conditional experiments of standard samples ( ores and sphalerite)and three sphalerite samples from the Fule deposits showed that adjusting the volume of anion exchange resin elution acid(1. 4 mol/L,HNO3 )from 6 mL to 10 mL and maintaining the method of cation exchange resin is suitable for Ge isotope purification. The results of anion/cation exchange resin two-column procedure indicate that the recovery of Ge was better than 99%,and the potential interferences on Ge isotopes ( including Fe,Se,Zn and other interfering matrix elements)were almost 100% eliminated. Although the previous method has a good recovery of Ge(97. 3%)and the potential interferences on Ge isotopes(including Fe,Se,Zn and other interfering matrix elements ) were reduced to the negligible levels,the recovery is lower than the recommended method in this paper. Furthermore,the Ge isotopic composition of three sphalerite samples from the Fule deposit show that there are no signals coming from interfering elements and matrix elements,and the mass fractionation of Ge isotope followed the rule of mass-dependent fractionation. Overall,this modified method for Ge isotope measurement

  8. All hot wire chemical vapor deposition low substrate temperature transparent thin film moisture barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spee, D.A.; Schipper, M.R.; van der Werf, C.H.M.; Rath, J.K.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2013-01-01

    We deposited a silicon nitride/polymer hybrid multilayer moisture barrier for flexible electronics in a hot wire chemical vapor deposition process, entirely below 100 °C. We were able to reach a water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) as low as 5×10−6 g/m2/day at a temperature of 60 °C and a relative h

  9. Low temperature junction growth using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qi; Page, Matthew; Iwaniczko, Eugene; Wang, Tihu; Yan, Yanfa

    2014-02-04

    A system and a process for forming a semi-conductor device, and solar cells (10) formed thereby. The process includes preparing a substrate (12) for deposition of a junction layer (14); forming the junction layer (14) on the substrate (12) using hot wire chemical vapor deposition; and, finishing the semi-conductor device.

  10. Expanding thermal plasma chemical vapour deposition of ZnO:Al layers for CIGS solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharma, K.; Williams, B.L.; Mittal, A.; Knoops, H.C.M.; Kniknie, B.J.; Bakker, N.J.; Kessels, W.M.M.; Schropp, R.E.I.; Creatore, M.

    2014-01-01

    Aluminium-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Al) grown by expanding thermal plasma chemical vapour deposition (ETP-CVD) has demonstrated excellent electrical and optical properties, which make it an attractive candidate as a transparent conductive oxide for photovoltaic applications. However, when depositing ZnO

  11. Hot-filament chemical vapour deposition of diamond onto steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijnsters, Ivan

    2003-01-01

    The main goal of this project was to establish the feasibility of depositing well adhering polycrystalline diamond coatings on steel substrates. It is well known that the growth and adhesion of diamond layers directly onto steels is complicated by the high carbon solubility and the high thermal expa

  12. Properties of CdTe layers deposited by a novel method -Pulsed Plasma Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Ancora, C.; Nozar, P.; Mittica, G.; Prescimone, F.; A. Neri; Contaldi, S.; Milita, S.; Albonetti, C.; Corticelli, F.; Brillante, A.; Bilotti, I.; Tedeschi, G.; Taliani, C.

    2011-01-01

    CdTe and CdS are emerging as the most promising materials for thin film photovoltaics in the quest of the achievement of grid parity. The major challenge for the advancement of grid parity is the achievement of high quality at the same time as low fabrication cost. The present paper reports the results of the new deposition technique, Pulsed Plasma Deposition (PPD), for the growth of the CdTe layers on CdS/ZnO/quartz and quartz substrates. The PPD method allows to deposit at low temperature. ...

  13. Suitable alkaline for graphene peeling grown on metallic catalysts using chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karamat, S., E-mail: shumailakaramat@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Middle East Technical University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad 54000 (Pakistan); Sonuşen, S. [Sabancı Üniversitesi (SUNUM), İstanbul 34956 (Turkey); Çelik, Ü. [Nanomagnetics Instruments, Ankara (Turkey); Uysallı, Y. [Department of Physics, Middle East Technical University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Oral, A., E-mail: orahmet@metu.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Middle East Technical University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey)

    2016-04-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Graphene layers were grown on Pt and Cu foil via ambient pressure chemical vapor deposition method and for the delicate removal of graphene from metal catalysts, electrolysis method was used by using different alkaline (sodium hydroxide, potassium hydroxide, lithium hydroxide and barium hydroxide). • The delamination speed of PMMA/graphene stack was higher during the KOH and LiOH electrolysis as compare to NaOH and Ba(OH){sub 2}. Ba(OH){sub 2} is not advisable because of the residues left on the graphene surface which would further trapped in between graphene and SiO{sub 2}/Si surface after transfer. The average peeling time in case of Pt electrode is ∼6 min for KOH and LiOH and ∼15 min for NaOH and Ba(OH){sub 2}. • Electrolysis method also works for the Cu catalyst. The peeling of graphene was faster in the case of Cu foil due to small size of bubbles which moves faster between the stack and the electrode surface. The average peeling time was ∼3–5 min. • XPS analysis clearly showed that the Pt substrates can be re-used again. Graphene layer was transferred to SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates and to the flexible substrate by using the same peeling method. - Abstract: In chemical vapor deposition, the higher growth temperature roughens the surface of the metal catalyst and a delicate method is necessary for the transfer of graphene from metal catalyst to the desired substrates. In this work, we grow graphene on Pt and Cu foil via ambient pressure chemical vapor deposition (AP-CVD) method and further alkaline water electrolysis was used to peel off graphene from the metallic catalyst. We used different electrolytes i.e., sodium hydroxide (NaOH), potassium hydroxide (KOH), lithium hydroxide (LiOH) and barium hydroxide Ba(OH){sub 2} for electrolysis, hydrogen bubbles evolved at the Pt cathode (graphene/Pt/PMMA stack) and as a result graphene layer peeled off from the substrate without damage. The peeling time for KOH and Li

  14. Chemical vapor deposition graphene transfer process to a polymeric substrate assisted by a spin coater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Felipe; da Rocha, Caique O. C.; Medeiros, Gabriela S.; Fechine, Guilhermino J. M.

    2016-03-01

    A new method to transfer chemical vapor deposition graphene to polymeric substrates is demonstrated here, it is called direct dry transfer assisted by a spin coater (DDT-SC). Compared to the conventional method DDT, the improvement of the contact between graphene-polymer due to a very thin polymeric film deposited by spin coater before the transfer process prevented air bubbles and/or moisture and avoided molecular expansion on the graphene-polymer interface. An acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene copolymer, a high impact polystyrene, polybutadiene adipate-co-terephthalate, polylactide acid, and a styrene-butadiene-styrene copolymer are the polymers used for the transfers since they did not work very well by using the DDT process. Raman spectroscopy and optical microscopy were used to identify, to quantify, and to qualify graphene transferred to the polymer substrates. The quantity of graphene transferred was substantially increased for all polymers by using the DDT-SC method when compared with the DDT standard method. After the transfer, the intensity of the D band remained low, indicating low defect density and good quality of the transfer. The DDT-SC transfer process expands the number of graphene applications since the polymer substrate candidates are increased.

  15. Chemical resistance of thin film materials based on metal oxides grown by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sammelselg, Väino, E-mail: vaino.sammelselg@ut.ee [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Riia 142, 51014 Tartu (Estonia); Institute of Chemistry, University of Tartu, Ravila 14a, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); Netšipailo, Ivan; Aidla, Aleks; Tarre, Aivar; Aarik, Lauri; Asari, Jelena; Ritslaid, Peeter; Aarik, Jaan [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Riia 142, 51014 Tartu (Estonia)

    2013-09-02

    Etching rate of technologically important metal oxide thin films in hot sulphuric acid was investigated. The films of Al-, Ti-, Cr-, and Ta-oxides studied were grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) method on silicon substrates from different precursors in large ranges of growth temperatures (80–900 °C) in order to reveal process parameters that allow deposition of coatings with higher chemical resistance. The results obtained demonstrate that application of processes that yield films with lower concentration of residual impurities as well as crystallization of films in thermal ALD processes leads to significant decrease of etching rate. Crystalline films of materials studied showed etching rates down to values of < 5 pm/s. - Highlights: • Etching of atomic layer deposited thin metal oxide films in hot H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} was studied. • Smallest etching rates of < 5 pm/s for TiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} were reached. • Highest etching rate of 2.8 nm/s for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was occurred. • Remarkable differences in etching of non- and crystalline films were observed.

  16. Analysis of Fiber deposition using Automatic Image Processing Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belka, M.; Lizal, F.; Jedelsky, J.; Jicha, M.

    2013-04-01

    Fibers are permanent threat for a human health. They have an ability to penetrate deeper in the human lung, deposit there and cause health hazards, e.glung cancer. An experiment was carried out to gain more data about deposition of fibers. Monodisperse glass fibers were delivered into a realistic model of human airways with an inspiratory flow rate of 30 l/min. Replica included human airways from oral cavity up to seventh generation of branching. Deposited fibers were rinsed from the model and placed on nitrocellulose filters after the delivery. A new novel method was established for deposition data acquisition. The method is based on a principle of image analysis. The images were captured by high definition camera attached to a phase contrast microscope. Results of new method were compared with standard PCM method, which follows methodology NIOSH 7400, and a good match was found. The new method was found applicable for evaluation of fibers and deposition fraction and deposition efficiency were calculated afterwards.

  17. Analysis of Fiber deposition using Automatic Image Processing Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jicha M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Fibers are permanent threat for a human health. They have an ability to penetrate deeper in the human lung, deposit there and cause health hazards, e.glung cancer. An experiment was carried out to gain more data about deposition of fibers. Monodisperse glass fibers were delivered into a realistic model of human airways with an inspiratory flow rate of 30 l/min. Replica included human airways from oral cavity up to seventh generation of branching. Deposited fibers were rinsed from the model and placed on nitrocellulose filters after the delivery. A new novel method was established for deposition data acquisition. The method is based on a principle of image analysis. The images were captured by high definition camera attached to a phase contrast microscope. Results of new method were compared with standard PCM method, which follows methodology NIOSH 7400, and a good match was found. The new method was found applicable for evaluation of fibers and deposition fraction and deposition efficiency were calculated afterwards.

  18. Chemical vapor deposition of silicon carbide for large area mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentilman, R. L.; Maguire, E. A.

    1982-05-01

    CVD-SiC has been identified as the leading mirror material for high energy synchrotron radiation because of its high K/alpha ratio and its ability to be super-polished to less than or equal to 10 A rms roughness. Technology already exists for depositing SiC over large areas (approximately 70 cm x 20 cm). The CVD process, substrate selection, and mirror design considerations are discussed.

  19. Zinc oxide nanostructures by chemical vapour deposition as anodes for Li-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurenti, M., E-mail: marco.laurenti@iit.it [Center for Space Human Robotics @Polito, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Corso Trento, 21, 10129 Turin (Italy); Department of Applied Science and Technology – DISAT, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Garino, N. [Center for Space Human Robotics @Polito, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Corso Trento, 21, 10129 Turin (Italy); Porro, S.; Fontana, M. [Center for Space Human Robotics @Polito, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Corso Trento, 21, 10129 Turin (Italy); Department of Applied Science and Technology – DISAT, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Gerbaldi, C., E-mail: claudio.gerbaldi@polito.it [Center for Space Human Robotics @Polito, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Corso Trento, 21, 10129 Turin (Italy); Department of Applied Science and Technology – DISAT, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • ZnO nanostructures are grown by simple chemical vapour deposition. • Polycrystalline nanostructured porous thin film is obtained. • Film exhibits stable specific capacity (∼400 mA h g{sup −1}) after prolonged cycling. • CVD-grown ZnO nanostructures show promising prospects as Li-ion battery anode. - Abstract: ZnO nanostructures are grown by a simple chemical vapour deposition method directly on a stainless steel disc current collector and successfully tested in lithium cells. The structural/morphological characterization points out the presence of well-defined polycrystalline nanostructures having different shapes and a preferential orientation along the c-axis direction. In addition, the high active surface of the ZnO nanostructures, which accounts for a large electrode/electrolyte contact area, and the complete wetting with the electrolyte solution are considered to be responsible for the good electrical transport properties and the adequate electrochemical behaviour, as confirmed by cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge/discharge cycling. Indeed, despite no binder or conducting additives are used, when galvanostatically tested in lithium cells, after an initial decay, the ZnO nanostructures can provide a rather stable specific capacity approaching 70 μA h cm{sup −2} (i.e., around 400 mA h g{sup −1}) after prolonged cycling at 1 C, with very high Coulombic efficiency and an overall capacity retention exceeding 62%.

  20. Comprehensive optical studies on SnS layers synthesized by chemical bath deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedi, Sreedevi; Minnam Reddy, Vasudeva Reddy; Park, Chinho; Chan-Wook, Jeon; Ramakrishna Reddy, K. T.

    2015-04-01

    A simple non-vacuum and cost effective wet chemical technique, chemical bath deposition was used to prepare tin sulphide (SnS) layers on glass substrates. The layers were formed by varying bath temperature in the range, 40-80 °C, keeping other deposition parameters as constant. An exhaustive investigation on their optical properties with bath temperature was made using the transmittance and reflectance measurements. The absorption coefficient was evaluated from the optical transmittance data utilizing Lambert's principle and is >104 cm-1 for all the as-prepared layers. The energy band gap of the layers was determined from the differential reflectance spectra that varied from 1.41 eV to 1.30 eV. Consequently, refractive index and extinction coefficient were obtained from Pankov relations and dispersion constants were calculated using Wemple-Didomenico method. In addition, other optical parameters such as the optical conductivity, dielectric constants, dissipation factor, high frequency dielectric constant and relaxation time were also calculated. Finally electrical parameters such as resistivity, carrier mobility and carrier density of as-prepared layers were estimated using optical data. A detailed analysis of the dependence of all above mentioned parameters on bath temperature is reported and discussed for a clean understanding of electronic characteristics of SnS layers.

  1. Atomic Layer Deposition of Chemical Passivation Layers and High Performance Anti-Reflection Coatings on Back-Illuminated Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenk, Michael E. (Inventor); Greer, Frank (Inventor); Nikzad, Shouleh (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A back-illuminated silicon photodetector has a layer of Al2O3 deposited on a silicon oxide surface that receives electromagnetic radiation to be detected. The Al2O3 layer has an antireflection coating deposited thereon. The Al2O3 layer provides a chemically resistant separation layer between the silicon oxide surface and the antireflection coating. The Al2O3 layer is thin enough that it is optically innocuous. Under deep ultraviolet radiation, the silicon oxide layer and the antireflection coating do not interact chemically. In one embodiment, the silicon photodetector has a delta-doped layer near (within a few nanometers of) the silicon oxide surface. The Al2O3 layer is expected to provide similar protection for doped layers fabricated using other methods, such as MBE, ion implantation and CVD deposition.

  2. Spectroscopic Chemical Analysis Methods and Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hug, William F. (Inventor); Reid, Ray D. (Inventor); Bhartia, Rohit (Inventor); Lane, Arthur L. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Spectroscopic chemical analysis methods and apparatus are disclosed which employ deep ultraviolet (e.g. in the 200 nm to 300 nm spectral range) electron beam pumped wide bandgap semiconductor lasers, incoherent wide bandgap semiconductor light emitting devices, and hollow cathode metal ion lasers to perform non-contact, non-invasive detection of unknown chemical analytes. These deep ultraviolet sources enable dramatic size, weight and power consumption reductions of chemical analysis instruments. In some embodiments, Raman spectroscopic detection methods and apparatus use ultra-narrow-band angle tuning filters, acousto-optic tuning filters, and temperature tuned filters to enable ultra-miniature analyzers for chemical identification. In some embodiments Raman analysis is conducted along with photoluminescence spectroscopy (i.e. fluorescence and/or phosphorescence spectroscopy) to provide high levels of sensitivity and specificity in the same instrument.

  3. PARTICLE COATING BY CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION IN A FLUIDI7ED BED REACTOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gregor; Czok; Joachim; Werther

    2005-01-01

    Aluminum coatings were created onto glass beads by chemical vapor deposition in a fluidized bed reactor at different temperatures. Nitrogen was enriched with Triisobutylaluminum (TIBA) vapor and the latter was thermally decomposed inside the fluidized bed to deposit the elemental aluminum. To ensure homogeneous coating on the bed material, the fluidizing conditions necessary to avoid agglomeration were investigated for a broad range of temperatures.The deposition reaction was modeled on the basis of a discrete particle simulation to gain insight into homogeneity and thickness of the coating throughout the bed material. In particular, the take-up of aluminum was traced for selected particles that exhibited a large mass of deposited aluminum.

  4. Co3O4 protective coatings prepared by Pulsed Injection Metal Organic Chemical Vapour Deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burriel, M.; Garcia, G.; Santiso, J.

    2005-01-01

    Cobalt oxide films were grown by Pulsed Injection Metal Organic Chemical Vapour Deposition (PI-MOCVD) using Co(acac)(3) (acac=acetylacetonate) precursor dissolved in toluene. The structure, morphology and growth rate of the layers deposited on silicon substrates were studied as a function...... of deposition temperature. Pure Co3O4 spinel structure was found for deposition temperatures ranging from 360 to 540 degreesC. The optimum experimental parameters to prepare dense layers with a high growth rate were determined and used to prepare corrosion protective coatings for Fe-22Cr metallic interconnects...

  5. High Resistive ZnO/Diamond/Si Films Grown via Metal-organic Chemical Vapour Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Hong-jun; ZHAO Bai-jun; FANG Xiu-jun; DU Guo-tong; LIU Da-li; GAO Chun-xiao; LIU Xi-zhe

    2005-01-01

    Piezoelectric ZnO layers with high resistivity for surface acoustic wave applications were prepared on polycrystalline diamond/Si substrates with (111) orientation via metal-organic chemical vapour deposition.The characteristics of the films were optimized through different growth methods. The comparative study of the X-ray diffraction spectra and scanning electron microscopic images showed that the final-prepared ZnO films were dominantly c-axis oriented. Zn and O elements in the final prepared ZnO films were investigated through X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. According to the statistical results, the n(Zn)/n(O) ratio is near 1. The Raman scattering was also performed in back scattering configuration. E2 mode was observed for the final films, which indicated that the better quality ZnO films had been obtained. The resistivity of the films was also enhanced via the modification of the growth methods.

  6. Catalytic Chemical Vapor Deposition Synthesis of Carbon Aerogels of High-Surface Area and Porosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Peña

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work carbon aerogels were synthesized by catalytic chemical vapor deposition method (CCVD. Ferrocene were employed as a source both of catalytic material (Fe and of carbon. Gaseous hydrogen and argon were used as reductant and carrier gas, respectively. The products of reaction were collected over alumina. The morphology and textural properties of the soot produced in the reaction chamber were investigated using Scanning Electron Microscopy, High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and N2 physisorption (BET and BHJ methods. After the evaluation of the porous structure of the synthesized products, 780 ± 20 m2/g of SBET and 0.55 ± 0.02 cm3/g of VBJH were found. The presence of iron carbide and the partial oxidation of carbon nanostructures were revealed by XPS.

  7. Chemical Bath Deposition of Nickel Sulphide (Ni4S3 Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren TEO

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Thin films of nickel sulphide were deposited from aqueous baths on indium tin oxide glass substrate. The chemical bath contained nickel sulphate, sodium thiosulfate and triethanolamine solutions. The aim of the present study was to analyze the different experimental conditions to prepare Ni4S3 thin films using chemical bath deposition technique. The structural, morphological and optical properties of nickel sulphide thin films were obtained by X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy and UV-Vis Spectrophotometer will be presented. The properties of the films varied with the variation in the deposition parameters. The films deposited at longer deposition time using lower concentration in more acidic medium showed improved crystallinity, good uniformity and better adhesion to the substrate. Films showed band gap of 0.35 eV and exhibited p-type semiconductor behaviour.

  8. Modification of optical and electrical properties of chemical bath deposited CdS using plasma treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, G. [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon, C.P 66450 (Mexico); Krishnan, B. [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon, C.P 66450 (Mexico); CIIDIT, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Apodaca, Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Avellaneda, D.; Castillo, G. Alan; Das Roy, T.K. [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon, C.P 66450 (Mexico); Shaji, S., E-mail: sshajis@yahoo.com [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon, C.P 66450 (Mexico); CIIDIT, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Apodaca, Nuevo Leon (Mexico)

    2011-08-31

    Cadmium sulphide (CdS) is a well known n-type semiconductor that is widely used in solar cells. Here we report preparation and characterization of chemical bath deposited CdS thin films and modification of their optical and electrical properties using plasma treatments. CdS thin films were prepared from a chemical bath containing Cadmium chloride, Triethanolamine and Thiourea under various deposition conditions. Good quality thin films were obtained during deposition times of 5, 10 and 15 min. CdS thin films prepared for 10 min. were treated using a glow discharge plasma having nitrogen and argon carrier gases. The changes in morphology, optical and electrical properties of these plasma treated CdS thin films were analyzed in detail. The results obtained show that plasma treatment is an effective technique in modification of the optical and electrical properties of chemical bath deposited CdS thin films.

  9. PbS Thin Films for Photovoltaic Applications Obtained by Non-Traditional Chemical Bath Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pérez-García Claudia Elena

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To optimize cost-efficiency relation for thin film solar cells, we explore the recently developed versions of chemical deposition of semiconductor films, together with classic CBD (Chemical Bath Deposition: SILAR (Successive Ionic Layer Adsorption and Reaction and PCBD (Photo Chemical Bath Deposition, all of them ammonia-free and ecologically friendly. The films of CdS and PbS were made, and experimental solar cells with CdS window layer and PbS absorber elaborated. We found that band gap of PbS films can be monitored by deposition process due to porosity-induced quantum confinement which depends on the parameters of the process. We expect that the techniques employed can be successfully used for production of optoelectronic devices.

  10. A mathematical model and simulation results of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of silicon nitride films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konakov, S.A.; Krzhizhanovskaya, V.V.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a mathematical model of Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) of silicon nitride thin films from SiH4-NH3-N2-Ar mixture, an important application in modern materials science. Our multiphysics model describes gas dynamics, chemical physics, plasma physics and electrodynamics.

  11. Industrial Scale Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes Via Fluidized Bed Chemical Vapor Deposition: A Senior Design Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, York R.; Fuchs, Alan; Meyyappan, M.

    2010-01-01

    Senior year chemical engineering students designed a process to produce 10 000 tonnes per annum of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) and also conducted bench-top experiments to synthesize SWNTs via fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition techniques. This was an excellent pedagogical experience because it related to the type of real world design…

  12. Synthesis and Characterization of In2S3 Thin Films Deposited by Chemical Bath Deposition on Polyethylene Naphthalate Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelo-González, O. A.; Santacruz-Ortega, H. C.; Quevedo-López, M. A.; Sotelo-Lerma, M.

    2012-04-01

    Indium sulfide (In2S3) thin films were deposited on polyethylene naphthalate (PEN) by chemical bath deposition (CBD). The materials were characterized by ultraviolet (UV)-visible spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and x-ray diffraction (XRD) to investigate the influence of the polymeric substrate on the resulting thin In2S3. The films showed polycrystalline (cubic and tetragonal) structure. A reduction of the ordering of the polymeric chains at the surface of the PEN was also observed, demonstrated by the appearance of two infrared bands at 1094 cm-1 and 1266 cm-1. Presence of oxygen during the early stages of In2S3 growth was also identified. We propose a reaction mechanism for both the equilibrium and nucleation stages. These results demonstrate that In2S3 can be deposited at room temperature on a flexible substrate.

  13. Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of iron doped thin dioxide films, their structure and photowetting effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobczyk-Guzenda, A., E-mail: anna.sobczyk-guzenda@p.lodz.pl [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Lodz University of Technology, Stefanowskiego 1/15, 90-924 Lodz (Poland); Owczarek, S.; Szymanowski, H. [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Lodz University of Technology, Stefanowskiego 1/15, 90-924 Lodz (Poland); Wypych-Puszkarz, A. [Department of Molecular Physics, Lodz University of Technology, Zeromskiego 116, 90-924 Lodz (Poland); Volesky, L. [Technical University of Liberec, Institute for Nanomaterials, Advanced Technologies and Innovation, Studentska 1402/2, 461 17 Liberec 1 (Czech Republic); Gazicki-Lipman, M. [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Lodz University of Technology, Stefanowskiego 1/15, 90-924 Lodz (Poland)

    2015-08-31

    Radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF PECVD) technique was applied for the purpose of deposition of iron doped titanium dioxide coatings from a gaseous mixture of oxygen with titanium (IV) chloride and iron (0) pentacarbonyl. Glass slides and silicon wafers were used as substrates. The coatings morphology was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Their elemental and chemical composition was studied with the help of X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, respectively, while their phase composition was analyzed with the Raman spectroscopy. For the determination of the film optical properties, ultraviolet (UV–Vis) spectroscopy techniques were used. Iron content in the range of 0.07 to 11.5 at.% was found in the coatings. FTIR studies showed that iron was built-in in the structure of TiO{sub 2} matrix. Surface roughness, assessed with the SEM and AFM techniques, increases with an increasing content of this element. Trace amounts of iron resulted in a lowering of an absorption threshold of the films and their optical gap, but the tendency was reversed for high concentrations of that element. The effect of iron doping on UV photowettability of the films was also studied and, for coatings containing up to 5% of iron, it was stronger than that exhibited by pure TiO{sub 2}. - Highlights: • Iron doped TiO{sub 2} films were deposited with the PECVD method. • Differences of surface morphology of the films with different iron content were shown. • Depending on the iron content, the film structure is either amorphous or crystalline. • A parabolic character of the optical gap dependence on the concentration of iron was observed. • Up to a concentration of 5% of iron, doped TiO{sub 2} films exhibit a super-hydrophilic effect.

  14. Ultrafine Microstructure Composites Prepared by Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-01

    pressed AIN from Denka , hot pressed BN+AlN from Union Carbide (71%BN, 20%AIN, and 4%B203 ) ..... . 217 5-57 XRD patterns of BN+AlN deposited on A1203 at...side wall of the top section of the graphite extension tube as shown in Figure 3-9. The top end of the extension tube was sealed using graphite cement ...samples) are shown in Figures 5-34 through 5-36. Also, the XRD spectra of uncoated A 20,O and hot-pressed AlN ( Denka , Inc.) are included in Figure 5-34 for

  15. Method for electrostatic deposition of graphene on a substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumanasekera, Gamini (Inventor); Sidorov, Anton N. (Inventor); Ouseph, P. John (Inventor); Yazdanpanah, Mehdi M. (Inventor); Cohn, Robert W. (Inventor); Jalilian, Romaneh (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method for electrostatic deposition of graphene on a substrate comprises the steps of securing a graphite sample to a first electrode; electrically connecting the first electrode to a positive terminal of a power source; electrically connecting a second electrode to a ground terminal of the power source; placing the substrate over the second electrode; and using the power source to apply a voltage, such that graphene is removed from the graphite sample and deposited on the substrate.

  16. Antimony sulfide thin films prepared by laser assisted chemical bath deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaji, S.; Garcia, L. V.; Loredo, S. L.; Krishnan, B.; Aguilar Martinez, J. A.; Das Roy, T. K.; Avellaneda, D. A.

    2017-01-01

    Antimony sulfide (Sb2S3) thin films were prepared by laser assisted chemical bath deposition (LACBD) technique. These thin films were deposited on glass substrates from a chemical bath containing antimony chloride, acetone and sodium thiosulfate under various conditions of normal chemical bath deposition (CBD) as well as in-situ irradiation of the chemical bath using a continuous laser of 532 nm wavelength. Structure, composition, morphology, optical and electrical properties of the Sb2S3 thin films produced by normal CBD and LACBD were analyzed by X-Ray diffraction (XRD), Raman Spectroscopy, Atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis spectroscopy and Photoconductivity. The results showed that LACBD is an effective synthesis technique to obtain Sb2S3 thin films for optoelectronic applications.

  17. Studies of CdS/CdTe interface: Comparison of CdS films deposited by close space sublimation and chemical bath deposition techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jun-feng, E-mail: pkuhjf@bit.edu.cn [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel (IMN), Université de Nantes, UMR CNRS 6502, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP 32229, 44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Institute of Materials Science, Darmstadt University of Technology, Petersenstr. 23, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); School of Physics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Fu, Gan-hua; Krishnakumar, V.; Schimper, Hermann-Josef [Institute of Materials Science, Darmstadt University of Technology, Petersenstr. 23, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Liao, Cheng [Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Jaegermann, Wolfram [Institute of Materials Science, Darmstadt University of Technology, Petersenstr. 23, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Besland, M.P. [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel (IMN), Université de Nantes, UMR CNRS 6502, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP 32229, 44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France)

    2015-05-01

    The CdS layers were deposited by two different methods, close space sublimation (CSS) and chemical bath deposition (CBD) technique. The CdS/CdTe interface properties were investigated by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The TEM images showed a large CSS-CdS grain size in the range of 70-80 nm. The interface between CSS-CdS and CdTe were clear and sharp, indicating an abrupt hetero-junction. On the other hand, CBD-CdS layer had much smaller grain size in the 5-10 nm range. The interface between CBD-CdS and CdTe was not as clear as CSS-CdS. With the stepwise coverage of CdTe layer, the XPS core levels of Cd 3d and S 2p in CSS-CdS had a sudden shift to lower binding energies, while those core levels shifted gradually in CBD-CdS. In addition, XPS depth profile analyses indicated a strong diffusion in the interface between CBD-CdS and CdTe. The solar cells prepared using CSS-CdS yielded better device performance than the CBD-CdS layer. The relationships between the solar cell performances and properties of CdS/CdTe interfaces were discussed. - Highlights: • Studies of CdS deposited by close space sublimation and chemical bath deposition • An observation of CdS/CdTe interface by transmission electron microscope • A careful investigation of CdS/CdTe interface by X ray photoelectron spectra • An easier diffusion at the chemical bath deposition CdS and CdTe interface.

  18. Silicon doping techniques using chemical vapor dopant deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popadic, M.

    2009-11-12

    Ultrashallow junctions are essential for the achievement of superior transistor performance, both in MOSFET and bipolar transistors. The stringent demands require state-of-the-art fabrication techniques. At the same time, in a different context, the accurate fabrication of various n type doping profiles by low-temperature Si epitaxy is a challenge due to autodoping. In this thesis, these two, apparently unrelated, problems are both addressed as the layer of CVD surface-deposited dopant atoms is used as a doping source. It is demonstrated that a layer of dopants deposited on the Si surface can be used as a doping source by either thermal or laser drive-in for the fabrication of both deep and ultrashallow defect-free junctions. In low-temperature CVD epitaxy, autodoping is a consequence of dopant surface segregation and doping from the surface layer. This process has been characterized, and consequently excellent controllability is achieved. In addition, new results related to the CVD of dopants itself are obtained, and two theoretical achievements are made: the analytical model of arbitrarily shallow junctions is derived, and a new C-V profiling technique suitable for the characterization of ultrashallow junctions is developed.

  19. A new modular multichamber plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, A.; Rava, P.; Schropp, R. E. I.; von Roedern, B.

    1993-06-01

    The present work reports on a new modular UHV multichamber PECVD system with characteristics which prevent both the incorporation of residual impurities and cross contamination between different layers. A wide range of intrinsic and doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) materials have been produced and single junction pin solar cells with an efficiency greater than 10% have been readily obtained with little optimization. The system contains three UHV modular process zones (MPZ's); the MPZ's and a load lock chamber are located around a central isolation and transfer zone which contains the transport mechanism consisting of an arm with radial and linear movement. This configuration allows for introduction of the substrate into the MPZ's in any sequence so that any type of multilayer device can be produced. The interelectrode distance in the MPZ's can be adjusted between 1 and 5 cm. This has been found to be an important parameter in the optimisation of the deposition rate and of the uniformity. The multichamber concept also allows individually optimized deposition temperatures and interelectrode distances for the various layers. The system installed in Utrecht will be employed for further optimization of single junction solar cells and for research and development of stable a-Si:H tandem cells.

  20. Low temperature deposition of polycrystalline silicon thin films on a flexible polymer substrate by hot wire chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-hoon; Jung, Jae-soo; Lee, Sung-soo; Lee, Sung-bo; Hwang, Nong-moon

    2016-11-01

    For the applications such as flexible displays and solar cells, the direct deposition of crystalline silicon films on a flexible polymer substrate has been a great issue. Here, we investigated the direct deposition of polycrystalline silicon films on a polyimide film at the substrate temperature of 200 °C. The low temperature deposition of crystalline silicon on a flexible substrate has been successfully made based on two ideas. One is that the Si-Cl-H system has a retrograde solubility of silicon in the gas phase near the substrate temperature. The other is the new concept of non-classical crystallization, where films grow by the building block of nanoparticles formed in the gas phase during hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD). The total amount of precipitation of silicon nanoparticles decreased with increasing HCl concentration. By adding HCl, the amount and the size of silicon nanoparticles were reduced remarkably, which is related with the low temperature deposition of silicon films of highly crystalline fraction with a very thin amorphous incubation layer. The dark conductivity of the intrinsic film prepared at the flow rate ratio of RHCl=[HCl]/[SiH4]=3.61 was 1.84×10-6 Scm-1 at room temperature. The Hall mobility of the n-type silicon film prepared at RHCl=3.61 was 5.72 cm2 V-1s-1. These electrical properties of silicon films are high enough and could be used in flexible electric devices.

  1. Chemical Methods for Ugnu Viscous Oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishore Mohanty

    2012-03-31

    The North Slope of Alaska has large (about 20 billion barrels) deposits of viscous oil in Ugnu, West Sak and Shraeder Bluff reservoirs. These shallow reservoirs overlie existing productive reservoirs such as Kuparuk and Milne Point. The viscosity of the Ugnu reservoir on top of Milne Point varies from 200 cp to 10,000 cp and the depth is about 3300 ft. The same reservoir extends to the west on the top of the Kuparuk River Unit and onto the Beaufort Sea. The depth of the reservoir decreases and the viscosity increases towards the west. Currently, the operators are testing cold heavy oil production with sand (CHOPS) in Ugnu, but oil recovery is expected to be low (< 10%). Improved oil recovery techniques must be developed for these reservoirs. The proximity to the permafrost is an issue for thermal methods; thus nonthermal methods must be considered. The objective of this project is to develop chemical methods for the Ugnu reservoir on the top of Milne Point. An alkaline-surfactant-polymer (ASP) formulation was developed for a viscous oil (330 cp) where as an alkaline-surfactant formulation was developed for a heavy oil (10,000 cp). These formulations were tested in one-dimensional and quarter five-spot Ugnu sand packs. Micromodel studies were conducted to determine the mechanisms of high viscosity ratio displacements. Laboratory displacements were modeled and transport parameters (such as relative permeability) were determined that can be used in reservoir simulations. Ugnu oil is suitable for chemical flooding because it is biodegraded and contains some organic acids. The acids react with injected alkali to produce soap. This soap helps in lowering interfacial tension between water and oil which in turn helps in the formation of macro and micro emulsions. A lower amount of synthetic surfactant is needed because of the presence of organic acids in the oil. Tertiary ASP flooding is very effective for the 330 cp viscous oil in 1D sand pack. This chemical formulation

  2. Method And Apparatus For Detecting Chemical Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warner, Benjamin P. (Los Alamos, NM); Havrilla, George J. (Los Alamos, NM); Miller, Thomasin C. (Los Alamos, NM); Wells, Cyndi A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2005-02-22

    The method for screening binding between a target binder and potential pharmaceutical chemicals involves sending a solution (preferably an aqueous solution) of the target binder through a conduit to a size exclusion filter, the target binder being too large to pass through the size exclusion filter, and then sending a solution of one or more potential pharmaceutical chemicals (preferably an aqueous solution) through the same conduit to the size exclusion filter after target binder has collected on the filter. The potential pharmaceutical chemicals are small enough to pass through the filter. Afterwards, x-rays are sent from an x-ray source to the size exclusion filter, and if the potential pharmaceutical chemicals form a complex with the target binder, the complex produces an x-ray fluorescence signal having an intensity that indicates that a complex has formed.

  3. Method and apparatus for detecting chemical binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warner, Benjamin P. (Los Alamos, NM); Havrilla, George J. (Los Alamos, NM); Miller, Thomasin C. (Los Alamos, NM); Wells, Cyndi A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2007-07-10

    The method for screening binding between a target binder and potential pharmaceutical chemicals involves sending a solution (preferably an aqueous solution) of the target binder through a conduit to a size exclusion filter, the target binder being too large to pass through the size exclusion filter, and then sending a solution of one or more potential pharmaceutical chemicals (preferably an aqueous solution) through the same conduit to the size exclusion filter after target binder has collected on the filter. The potential pharmaceutical chemicals are small enough to pass through the filter. Afterwards, x-rays are sent from an x-ray source to the size exclusion filter, and if the potential pharmaceutical chemicals form a complex with the target binder, the complex produces an x-ray fluorescence signal having an intensity that indicates that a complex has formed.

  4. Vitroceramic interface deposited on titanium substrate by pulsed laser deposition method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voicu, Georgeta; Miu, Dana; Dogaru, Ionut; Jinga, Sorin Ion; Busuioc, Cristina

    2016-08-30

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method was used to obtain biovitroceramic thin film coatings on titanium substrates. The composition of the targets was selected from SiO2-CaO-P2O5-(CaF2) systems and the corresponding masses were prepared using the sol-gel method. The depositions were performed in oxygen atmosphere (100mTorr), while the substrates were heated at 400°C. The PLD deposited films were analysed through different experimental techniques: X-ray diffraction, scanning (SEM, EDX) and transmission (HRTEM, SAED) electron microscopy and infra-red spectroscopy coupled with optical microscopy. They were also biologically tested by in vitro cell culture and the contact angle was determined. The bioevaluation results indicate a high biocompatibilty of the obtained materials, demonstrating their potential use for biomedical applications.

  5. Method and system for continuous atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elam, Jeffrey W.; Yanguas-Gil, Angel; Libera, Joseph A.

    2017-03-21

    A system and method for continuous atomic layer deposition. The system and method includes a housing, a moving bed which passes through the housing, a plurality of precursor gases and associated input ports and the amount of precursor gases, position of the input ports, and relative velocity of the moving bed and carrier gases enabling exhaustion of the precursor gases at available reaction sites.

  6. The relationship between chemical structure and dielectric properties of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited polymer thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Hao [Materials Sci and Tech Applications, LLC, 409 Maple Springs Drive, Dayton OH 45458 (United States)]. E-mail: hao.jiang@wpafb.af.mil; Hong Lianggou [Materials Sci and Tech Applications, LLC, 409 Maple Springs Drive, Dayton OH 45458 (United States); Venkatasubramanian, N. [Research Institute, University of Dayton, 300 College Park, Dayton, OH 45469-0168 (United States); Grant, John T. [Research Institute, University of Dayton, 300 College Park, Dayton, OH 45469-0168 (United States); Eyink, Kurt [Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials Directorate, 3005 Hobson Way, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433-7707 (United States); Wiacek, Kevin [Air Force Research Laboratory, Propulsion Directorate, 1950 Fifth Street, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433-7251 (United States); Fries-Carr, Sandra [Air Force Research Laboratory, Propulsion Directorate, 1950 Fifth Street, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433-7251 (United States); Enlow, Jesse [Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials Directorate, 3005 Hobson Way, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433-7707 (United States); Bunning, Timothy J. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials Directorate, 3005 Hobson Way, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433-7707 (United States)

    2007-02-26

    Polymer dielectric films fabricated by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) have unique properties due to their dense crosslinked bulk structure. These spatially uniform films exhibit good adhesion to a variety of substrates, excellent chemical inertness, high thermal resistance, and are formed from an inexpensive, solvent-free, room temperature process. In this work, we studied the dielectric properties of plasma polymerized (PP) carbon-based polymer thin films prepared from two precursors, benzene and octafluorocyclobutane. Two different monomer feed locations, directly in the plasma zone or in the downstream region (DS) and two different pressures, 80 Pa (high pressure) or 6.7 Pa (low pressure), were used. The chemical structure of the PECVD films was examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The dielectric constant ({epsilon} {sub r}) and dielectric loss (tan {delta}) of the films were investigated over a range of frequencies up to 1 MHz and the dielectric strength (breakdown voltage) (F {sub b}) was characterized by the current-voltage method. Spectroscopic ellipsometry was performed to determine the film thickness and refractive index. Good dielectric properties were exhibited, as PP-benzene films formed in the high pressure, DS region showed a F{sub b} of 610 V/{mu}m, an {epsilon} {sub r} of 3.07, and a tan {delta} of 7.0 x 10{sup -3} at 1 kHz. The PECVD processing pressure has a significant effect on final film structure and the film's physical density has a strong impact on dielectric breakdown strength. Also noted was that the residual oxygen content in the PP-benzene films significantly affected the frequency dependences of the dielectric constant and loss.

  7. A new pulsed laser deposition technique: scanning multi-component pulsed laser deposition method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, D; de la Fuente, G F; Jansen, M

    2012-04-01

    The scanning multi-component pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method realizes uniform depositions of desired coatings by a modified pulsed laser deposition process, preferably with a femto-second laser-system. Multi-component coatings (single or multilayered) are thus deposited onto substrates via laser induced ablation of segmented targets. This is achieved via horizontal line-scanning of a focused laser beam over a uniformly moving target's surface. This process allows to deposit the desired composition of the coating simultaneously, starting from the different segments of the target and adjusting the scan line as a function of target geometry. The sequence and thickness of multilayers can easily be adjusted by target architecture and motion, enabling inter/intra layer concentration gradients and thus functional gradient coatings. This new, simple PLD method enables the achievement of uniform, large-area coatings. Case studies were performed with segmented targets containing aluminum, titanium, and niobium. Under the laser irradiation conditions applied, all three metals were uniformly ablated. The elemental composition within the rough coatings obtained was fixed by the scanned area to Ti-Al-Nb = 1:1:1. Crystalline aluminum, titanium, and niobium were found to coexist side by side at room temperature within the substrate, without alloy formation up to 600 °C.

  8. New methods for chemical protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Xiaoyang; Chaffey, Patrick K; Zeng, Chen; Tan, Zhongping

    2015-01-01

    Chemical protein synthesis is a useful tool to generate pure proteins which are otherwise difficult to obtain in sufficient amounts for structure and property analysis. Additionally, because of the precise and flexible nature of chemical synthesis, it allows for controllable variation of protein sequences, which is valuable for understanding the relationships between protein structure and function. Despite the usefulness of chemical protein synthesis, it has not been widely adopted as a tool for protein characterization, mainly because of the lack of general and efficient methods for the preparation and coupling of peptide fragments and for the folding of polypeptide chains. To address these issues, many new methods have recently been developed in the areas of solid-phase peptide synthesis, peptide fragment assembly, and protein folding. Here we review these recent technological advances and highlight the gaps needing to be addressed in future research.

  9. Structural and optical properties of tellurium films obtained by chemical vapor deposition(CVD)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Yu-tian; GONG Zhu-Qing; XU Wei-Hong; HUANG Jian

    2006-01-01

    Tellurium thin films were prepared by the chemical vapor deposition method. The structure, surface morphology and optical properties of the Te thin films were analyzed by powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, FTIR transmission,UV/VIS/NIR transmission and reflectance. The results show that the films structural and optical properties are influenced by many factors such as film thickness, crystallite size and substrate temperature. The films as thick as 111-133 nm have high IR transmission across the full 8-13 μm band and highly blocking in the solar spectral region elsewhere, which indicates that Te films thickness in this region can be used as good solar radiation shields in radiative cooling devices.

  10. AB-stacked multilayer graphene synthesized via chemical vapor deposition: a characterization by hot carrier transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Pinto, Carlos; De, Debtanu; Hadjiev, Viktor G; Peng, Haibing

    2012-02-28

    We report the synthesis of AB-stacked multilayer graphene via ambient pressure chemical vapor deposition on Cu foils and demonstrate a method to construct suspended multilayer graphene devices. In four-terminal geometry, such devices were characterized by hot carrier transport at temperatures down to 240 mK and in magnetic fields up to 14 T. The differential conductance (dI/dV) shows a characteristic dip at longitudinal voltage bias V = 0 at low temperatures, indicating the presence of hot electron effect due to a weak electron-phonon coupling. Under magnetic fields, the magnitude of the dI/dV dip diminishes through the enhanced intra-Landau level cyclotron phonon scattering. Our results provide new perspectives in obtaining and understanding AB-stacked multilayer graphene, important for future graphene-based applications.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of well-aligned carbon nitrogen nanotubes by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马旭村; 徐贵昌; 王恩哥

    2000-01-01

    Well-aligned carbon nitrogen nanotube films have been synthesized successfully on meso-porous silica substrates by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MWPCVD) method. Studies on their morphology, structure, and composition by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), respectively, indicate that these nanotubes consist of linearly polymerized carbon nitrogen nanobells, and the nitrogen atoms have been doped into carbon netweork to form a new structure C1-xNx( x = 0.16±0.01). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results of the samples further demonstrate that carbon bonds cova-lently with nitrogen in all the carbon nitrogen nanotube films.

  12. Study of surface morphology and alignment of MWCNTs grown by chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukrullah, S., E-mail: zshukrullah@gmail.com, E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my, E-mail: maizats@petronas.com.my; Mohamed, N. M., E-mail: zshukrullah@gmail.com, E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my, E-mail: maizats@petronas.com.my; Shaharun, M. S., E-mail: zshukrullah@gmail.com, E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my, E-mail: maizats@petronas.com.my [Department of Fundamental and Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia); Yasar, M., E-mail: Muhammad.yasar@ieee.org [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24

    In this research work, Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs) have been synthesized successfully by using floating catalytic chemical vapor deposition (FCCVD) method. Different ferrocene amounts (0.1, 0.125 and 0.15 g) were used as catalyst and ethylene was used as a carbon precursor at reaction temperature of 800°C. Characterization of the grown MWCNTs was carried out by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The obtained data showed that the catalyst weight affects the nanotubes diameter, alignment, crystallinity and growth significantly, whereas negligible influence was noticed on CNTs forest length. The dense, uniform and meadow like patterns of grown CNTs were observed for 0.15 g ferrocene. The average diameter of the grown CNTs was found in the range of 32 to 75 nm. Close inspection of the TEM images also confirmed the defects in some of the grown CNTs, where few black spots were evident in CNTs structure.

  13. Ethanol Sensing Properties of Nanosheets ZnO Thin Films Prepared by Chemical Bath Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julia, Sri; Nururddin, Ahmad; Nugraha, Suyatman; Yuliarto, Brian

    2011-12-01

    Nanosheets ZnO thin films were successfully fabricated on alumina substrate by chemical bath deposition method using Zinc Nitrate Tetra hydrate as precursor. Films were annealed at 300 °C for 30 minutes and observed by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS) to know crystal phase and structure, surface morphology, and elemental composition respectively. The gas sensing performance of ZnO thin films was studied on exposure to ethanol gas sensing in various concentration (300 and 600 ppm). The films showed higher response towards ethanol gas sensing at optimized temperature of 250 °C and exhibited excellent sensitivity of 62.45% upon exposure 300 ppm and 69% upon exposure of 600 ppm ethanol gas sensing. Further, the response and recovery times of ZnO thin films to ethanol become shorter at higher operating temperatures. A possible mechanism of ethanol sensing has been explained.

  14. Carbon nanotubes for supercapacitors: Consideration of cost and chemical vapor deposition techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Zheng; Weizhong Qian; Chaojie Cui; Guanghui Xu; Mengqiang Zhao; Guili Tian; Fei Wei

    2012-01-01

    In this topic,we first discussed the requirement and performance of supercapacitors using carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as the electrode,including specific surface area,purity and cost.Then we reviewed the preparation technique of single walled CNTs (SWNTs) in relatively large scale by chemical vapor deposition method.Its catalysis on the decomposition of methane and other carbon source,the reactor type and the process control strategies were discussed.Special focus was concentrated on how to increase the yield,selectivity,and purity of SWNTs and how to inhibit the formation of impurities,including amorphous carbon,multiwalled CNTs and the carbon encapsulated metal particles,since these impurities seriously influenced the performance of SWNTs in supercapacitors.Wish it be helpful to further decrease its product cost and for the commercial use in supercapacitors.

  15. Fabrication of copper (Ⅰ) nitride nanorods within SBA-15 by metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Copper (Ⅰ) nitride nanorods grown in channels of mesoporous silica SBA-15 by chemical vapor deposition method has been synthesized. The morphology and microstructure of the resulting product were characterized by XRD patters, TEM images, EDS analysis and Raman spectra. The XRD and TEM revealed that the Cu3N phase was confined in channels of SBA-15 forming continuous nanowires with 6 nm around and hundreds of nanometers in length. Raman spectra of the final product and pure Cu3N showed peaks shift due to the quantum confinement effect of the nanowires. This preparation methodology only requires a mild working condition and is capable of template synthesis of other binary nitride nanostructures with controlled morphology inside the channels of mesoporous materials.

  16. Model reduction and temperature uniformity control for rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodoropoulou, Artemis-Georgia

    The consideration of Rapid Thermal Processing (RTP) in semiconductor manufacturing has recently been increasing. As a result, control of RTP systems has become of great importance since it is expected to help in addressing uniformity problems that, so far, have been obstructing the acceptance of the method. The spatial distribution appearing in RTP models necessitates the use of model reduction in order to obtain models of a size suitable for use in control algorithms. This dissertation addresses model reduction as well as control issues for RTP systems. A model of a three-zone Rapid Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition (RTCVD) system is developed to study the effects of spatial wafer temperature patterns on polysilicon deposition uniformity. A sequence of simulated runs is performed, varying the lamp power profiles so that different wafer temperature modes are excited. The dominant spatial wafer thermal modes are extracted via Proper Orthogonal Decomposition and subsequently used as a set of trial functions to represent both the wafer temperature and deposition thickness. A collocation formulation of Galerkin's method is used to discretize the original modeling equations, giving a low-order model which loses little of the original, high-order model's fidelity. We make use of the excellent predictive capabilities of the reduced model to optimize power inputs to the lamp banks to achieve a desired polysilicon deposition thickness at the end of a run with minimal deposition spatial nonuniformity. Since the results illustrate that the optimization procedure benefits from the use of the reduced-order model, we further utilize the reduced order model for real time Model Based Control. The feedback controller is designed using the Internal Model Control (IMC) structure especially modified to handle systems described by ordinary differential and algebraic equations. The IMC controller is obtained using optimal control theory on singular arcs extended for multi input systems

  17. Atomic-layer chemical-vapor-deposition of TiN thin films on Si(100) and Si(111)

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Y S; Kim, Y D; Kim, W M

    2000-01-01

    An atomic-layer chemical vapor deposition (AL-CVD) system was used to deposit TiN thin films on Si(100) and Si(111) substrates by cyclic exposures of TiCl sub 4 and NH sub 3. The growth rate was measured by using the number of deposition cycles, and the physical properties were compared with those of TiN films grown by using conventional deposition methods. To investigate the growth mechanism, we suggest a growth model for TiN n order to calculate the growth rate per cycle with a Cerius program. The results of the calculation with the model were compared with the experimental values for the TiN film deposited using the AL-CVD method. The stoichiometry of the TiN film was examined by using Auger electron spectroscopy, and the chlorine and the oxygen impurities were examined. The x-ray diffraction and the transmission electron microscopy results for the TiN film exhibited a strong (200) peak and a randomly oriented columnar microstructure. The electrical resistivity was found to decrease with increasing deposit...

  18. Silicon epitaxy using tetrasilane at low temperatures in ultra-high vacuum chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazbun, Ramsey; Hart, John; Hickey, Ryan; Ghosh, Ayana; Fernando, Nalin; Zollner, Stefan; Adam, Thomas N.; Kolodzey, James

    2016-06-01

    The deposition of silicon using tetrasilane as a vapor precursor is described for an ultra-high vacuum chemical vapor deposition tool. The growth rates and morphology of the Si epitaxial layers over a range of temperatures and pressures are presented. The layers were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, spectroscopic ellipsometry, Atomic Force Microscopy, and secondary ion mass spectrometry. Based on this characterization, high quality single crystal silicon epitaxy was observed. Tetrasilane was found to produce higher growth rates relative to lower order silanes, with the ability to deposit crystalline Si at low temperatures (T=400 °C), with significant amorphous growth and reactivity measured as low as 325 °C, indicating the suitability of tetrasilane for low temperature chemical vapor deposition such as for SiGeSn alloys.

  19. Effects of deposition parameters on microstructure and thermal conductivity of diamond films deposited by DC arc plasma jet chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QU Quan-yan; QIU Wan-qi; ZENG De-chang; LIU Zhong-wu; DAI Ming-jiang; ZHOU Ke-song

    2009-01-01

    The uniform diamond films with 60 mm in diameter were deposited by improved DC arc plasma jet chemical vapor deposition technique. The structure of the film was characterized by scanning electronic microcopy(SEM) and laser Raman spectrometry. The thermal conductivity was measured by a photo thermal deflection technique. The effects of main deposition parameters on microstructure and thermal conductivity of the films were investigated. The results show that high thermal conductivity, 10.0 W/(K-cm), can be obtained at a CH4 concentration of 1.5% (volume fraction) and the substrate temperatures of 880-920 ℃ due to the high density and high purity of the film. A low pressure difference between nozzle and vacuum chamber is also beneficial to the high thermal conductivity.

  20. Effects of Buffer Salt Concentration on the Dominated Deposition Mechanism and Optical Characteristics of Chemically Deposited Cadmium Sulfide Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakhaki, Z. Makhdoumi; Youzbashi, A.; Sangpour, P.; Kazemzadeh, A.; Naderi, N.; Bazargan, A. M.

    2016-02-01

    Effects of buffer salt concentration on the rate of deposition, dominated deposition mechanism and subsequently the structural, morphological, and optical properties of cadmium sulfide (CdS) thin films deposited by chemical bath deposition (CBD) on glass substrate were investigated. The precursors were chosen to be cadmium chloride (CdCl2) as the cadmium source, thiourea (CS(NH2)2) as the sulfur source, ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) as the buffer salt and ammonia as the complexing agent and the pH controller. The influence of the NH4NO3 concentration on the structure, morphology, film uniformity, stoichiometry and optical properties of CdS thin films was also studied by X-ray diffractometer (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscope, uv-visible and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopes. The XRD studies revealed that all the deposited films exhibited a (002)h/(111)c preferred orientation. The crystallite size was increased from 20nm to 30nm by the increase of concentration of NH4NO3 from 0.5M to 2.5M. The morphology of CdS thin films were agglomerated spherical particles consisted of smaller particles. The surface of thin films deposited at the NH4NO3 concentration of 0.5M was compact and smooth. The increase of the concentration of NH4NO3 decreased the packing density of the films. The optical band gap was in the range of 2.25-2.4eV, which was decreased by the decrement of packing density. The PL spectra showed two peaks centered at 400nm and 500nm which are attributed to violet and band-to-band emissions, respectively.

  1. Enhanced Bactericidal Activity of Silver Thin Films Deposited via Aerosol-Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Ponja, S. D.; Sehmi, S. K.; Allan, E.; MacRobert, A. J.; Parkin, I. P.; Carmalt, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    Silver thin films were deposited on SiO2-barrier-coated float glass, fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) glass, Activ glass, and TiO2-coated float glass via AACVD using silver nitrate at 350 °C. The films were annealed at 600 °C and analyzed by X-ray powder diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, UV/vis/near-IR spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. All the films were crystalline, and the silver was present in its elemental form and of nanometer dimension. The antibacterial activit...

  2. TiOxNy coatings grown by atmospheric pressure metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Maury, Francis; Duminica, Florin-Daniel

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Titanium oxynitride coatings were deposited on various substrates by an original atmospheric pressure metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) process using titanium tetra-iso-propoxide as titanium and oxygen precursors and hydrazine as a nitrogen source. The films composition was monitored by controlling the N2H4 mole fraction in the initial reactive gas phase. The variation of the N content in the films results in significant changes in morphological, structur...

  3. On-line coating of glass with tin oxide by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Sopko, J.F. (PPF Industries, Pittsburgh, PA); Houf, William G.; Chae, Yong Kee; McDaniel, Anthony H.; Li, M. (PPF Industries, Pittsburgh, PA); McCamy, J.W. (PPF Industries, Pittsburgh, PA)

    2006-11-01

    Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) of tin oxide is a very important manufacturing technique used in the production of low-emissivity glass. It is also the primary method used to provide wear-resistant coatings on glass containers. The complexity of these systems, which involve chemical reactions in both the gas phase and on the deposition surface, as well as complex fluid dynamics, makes process optimization and design of new coating reactors a very difficult task. In 2001 the U.S. Dept. of Energy Industrial Technologies Program Glass Industry of the Future Team funded a project to address the need for more accurate data concerning the tin oxide APCVD process. This report presents a case study of on-line APCVD using organometallic precursors, which are the primary reactants used in industrial coating processes. Research staff at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, CA, and the PPG Industries Glass Technology Center in Pittsburgh, PA collaborated to produce this work. In this report, we describe a detailed investigation of the factors controlling the growth of tin oxide films. The report begins with a discussion of the basic elements of the deposition chemistry, including gas-phase thermochemistry of tin species and mechanisms of chemical reactions involved in the decomposition of tin precursors. These results provide the basis for experimental investigations in which tin oxide growth rates were measured as a function of all major process variables. The experiments focused on growth from monobutyltintrichloride (MBTC) since this is one of the two primary precursors used industrially. There are almost no reliable growth-rate data available for this precursor. Robust models describing the growth rate as a function of these variables are derived from modeling of these data. Finally, the results are used to conduct computational fluid dynamic simulations of both pilot- and full-scale coating reactors. As a result, general conclusions are

  4. Improvement of the Crystallinity of Silicon Films Deposited by Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition with Negative Substrate Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Shen, Honglie; You, Jiayi

    2013-08-01

    We have investigated the effect of negative substrate bias on microcrystalline silicon films deposited on glass and stainless steel by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) to gain insight into the effect of negative substrate bias on crystallization. Structural characterization of the silicon films was performed by Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy. It was found that the crystallinity of the films is obviously improved by applying the substrate bias, especially for films on stainless steel. At hot-wire temperature of 1800°C and negative substrate bias of -800 V, grain size as large as 200 nm was obtained on stainless-steel substrate with crystalline fraction 9% higher than that of films deposited on glass and 15% higher than that of films deposited without substrate bias. It is deduced that the improvement of the crystallinity is mainly related to the accelerated electrons emitted from the hot wires. The differences in this improvement between different substrates are caused by the different electrical potential of the substrates. A solar cell fabricated by HWCVD with -800 V substrate bias is demonstrated, showing an obviously higher conversion efficiency than that without substrate bias.

  5. Temperature regulated-chemical vapor deposition for incorporating NiO nanoparticles into mesoporous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sang Wook; Kim, Il Hee; Kim, Dae Han; Park, Ki Jung; Park, Eun Ji; Jeong, Myung-Geun; Kim, Young Dok

    2016-11-01

    We have developed a novel strategy for incorporating NiO nanoparticles into mesoporous Al2O3 with a mean pore size of ∼12 nm and particle size of ∼1 mm. Ni-precursor vapor and ambient atmosphere were filled in a closed chamber with mesoporous Al2O3, and the chamber was initially heated at ∼100 °C, at which no chemical reaction between the inorganic precursor, oxygen, water vapor in the atmosphere, and the surface of Al2O3 took place. Next, the temperature of the system was increased to 260 °C for deposition of NiO. We found that NiO nanoparticles were not only deposited on the surface, but were also incorporated in a 50 μm-deep region of the mesoporous Al2O3 gel. We also demonstrated high CO oxidation activity and reusability of the deactivated NiO/Al2O3 catalysts prepared by the aforementioned method. These results suggest that our strategy could be widely applicable to the incorporation of various nanoparticles into mesoporous supports.

  6. High-Rate Growth and Nitrogen Distribution in Homoepitaxial Chemical Vapour Deposited Single-crystal Diamond

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hong-Dong; ZOU Guang-Tian; WANG Qi-Liang; CHENG Shao-Heng; LI Bo; L(U) Jian-Nan; L(U) Xian-Yi; JIN Zeng-Sun

    2008-01-01

    High rate (> 50 μm/h) growth of homoepitaxial single-crystal diamond (SCD) is carried out by microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition (MPCVD) with added nitrogen in the reactant gases of methane and hydrogen,using a polycrystalline-CVD-diamond-film-made seed holder. Photoluminescence results indicate that the nitrogen concentration is spatially inhomogeneous in a large scale,either on the top surface or in the bulk of those as-grown SCDs.The presence of N-distribution is attributed to the facts: (I) a difference in N-incorporation efficiency and (ii) N-diffusion,resulting from the local growth temperatures changed during the high-rate deposition process.In addition,the formed nitrogen-vacancy centres play a crucial role in N-diffusion through the growing crystal.Based on the N-distribution observed in the as-grown crystals,we propose a simple method to distinguish natural diamonds and man-made CVD SCDs.Finally,the disappearance of void defect on the top surface of SCDs is discussed to be related to a filling-in mechanism.

  7. Study of filament performance in heat transfer and hydrogen dissociation in diamond chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) is a promising method for commercial production of diamond films.Filament performance in heat transfer and hydrogen decomposition in reactive environment was investigated. Power consumption by the filament in vacuum, helium and 2% CH4/H2 was experimentally determined in temperature range 1300℃-2200℃. Filament heat transfer mechanism in C-H reactive environment was calculated and analyzed. The result shows that due to surface carburization and slight carbon deposition, radiation in stead of hydrogen dissociation, becomes the largest contributor to power consumption. Filament-surface dissociation of H2 was observed at temperatures below 1873K, demonstrating the feasibility of diamond growth at low filament temperatures. The effective activation energies of hydrogen dissociation on several clean refractory filaments were derived from power consumption data in literatures. They are all lower than that of thermal dissociation of hydrogen, revealing the nature of catalytic dissociation of hydrogen on filament surface. Observation of substrate temperature suggested a weakerrole of atomic hydrogen recombination in heating substrates in C-H environment than in pure hydrogen.

  8. Atomic Force Microscopy Studies on The Surface Morphologies of Chemical Bath Deposited Cus Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Soonmin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, copper sulphide thin films were deposited onto microscope glass slide by chemical bath deposition technique. The tartaric acid was served as complexing agent to chelate with Cu2+ to obtain complex solution. The influence of pH value on the surface morphologies of the films has been particularly investigated using the atomic force microscopy technique. The atomic force microscopy results indicate that the CuS films deposited at pH 1 were uniform, compact and pinhole free. However, the incomplete surface coverage observed for the films prepared at high pH (pH 2 and 2.5 values.

  9. LASER-INDUCED DECOMPOSITION OF METAL CARBONYLS FOR CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION OF MICROSTRUCTURES

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    Tungsten and nickel carbonyls were used to produce metal microstructures by laser-induced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on various substrates. The deposition rate of microstructures produced by thermodecomposition of W(CO)6 on Si substrates heated with a cw Ar+ laser beam was relatively low (10 to 30 nm/s) even at high temperatures (above 900°C). Ni microstructures were deposited on quartz substrates irradiated with a CO2 laser beam. Relatively high laser powers were needed to heat the Ni s...

  10. Synthesis of silicon carbide nanowires by solid phase source chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NI Jie; LI Zhengcao; ZHANG Zhengjun

    2007-01-01

    In this paper,we report a simple approach to synthesize silicon carbide(SiC)nanowires by solid phase source chemical vapor deposition(CVD) at relatively low temperatures.3C-SiC nanowires covered by an amorphous shell were obtained on a thin film which was first deposited on silicon substrates,and the nanowires are 20-80 am in diameter and several μm in length,with a growth direction of[200].The growth of the nanowires agrees well on vapor-liquid-solid (VLS)process and the film deposited on the substrates plays an important role in the formation of nanowires.

  11. Method of porous diamond deposition on porous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranauskas, Vitor; Peterlevitz, Alfredo C.; Chang, Dahge C.; Durrant, Steven F.

    2001-12-01

    In this paper, we discuss the experimental results of the fabrication of porous diamond/porous silicon and porous diamond structures by chemical vapor deposition of diamond over a skeleton of porous silicon, replicating the porous surface geometry around the Si pores and also creating new porous diamond structures. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that the diamond nuclei are deposited on the top of the porous silicon skeleton, forming isolated grains in the first nucleation stages, and then growing like the usual structure of most ceramic materials, making a self-sustained porous diamond structure. Raman spectroscopy revealed that the diamond films are of good quality, close to that of diamond films grown on crystalline silicon.

  12. Characterization of Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition-Physical Vapor Deposition transparent deposits on textiles to trigger various antimicrobial properties to food industry textiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunon, Celine [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, Laboratoire des Sciences Analytiques (LSA), CNRS, UMR 5180, Bat. J. Raulin 5eme etage, F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Chadeau, Elise; Oulahal, Nadia [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, Laboratoire de Recherche en Genie Industriel Alimentaire (LRGIA, E.A. 3733), Rue Henri de Boissieu, F-01000 Bourg en Bresse (France); Grossiord, Carol [Science et Surface, 64, Chemin des Mouilles, F-69130 Ecully (France); Dubost, Laurent [HEF, ZI SUD, Rue Benoit Fourneyron, F-42166 Andrezieux Boutheon (France); Bessueille, Francois [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, Laboratoire des Sciences Analytiques (LSA), CNRS, UMR 5180, Bat. J. Raulin 5eme etage, F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Simon, Farida [TDV Industrie, 43 Rue du Bas des Bois, BP 121, F-53012 Laval Cedex (France); Degraeve, Pascal [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, Laboratoire de Recherche en Genie Industriel Alimentaire (LRGIA, E.A. 3733), Rue Henri de Boissieu, F-01000 Bourg en Bresse (France); Leonard, Didier, E-mail: didier.leonard@univ-lyon1.fr [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, Laboratoire des Sciences Analytiques (LSA), CNRS, UMR 5180, Bat. J. Raulin 5eme etage, F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2011-07-01

    Textiles for the food industry were treated with an original deposition technique based on a combination of Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition and Physical Vapor Deposition to obtain nanometer size silver clusters incorporated into a SiOCH matrix. The optimization of plasma deposition parameters (gas mixture, pressure, and power) was focused on textile transparency and antimicrobial properties and was based on the study of both surface and depth composition (X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), as well as Transmission Electron Microscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy, SIMS depth profiling and XPS depth profiling on treated glass slides). Deposition conditions were identified in order to obtain a variable and controlled quantity of {approx} 10 nm size silver particles at the surface and inside of coatings exhibiting acceptable transparency properties. Microbiological characterization indicated that the surface variable silver content as calculated from XPS and ToF-SIMS data directly influences the level of antimicrobial activity.

  13. Development of aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition for thin film fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulana, Dwindra Wilham; Marthatika, Dian; Panatarani, Camellia; Mindara, Jajat Yuda; Joni, I. Made

    2016-02-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is widely used to grow a thin film applied in many industrial applications. This paper report the development of an aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD) which is one of the CVD methods. Newly developed AACVD system consists of a chamber of pyrex glass, two wire-heating elements placed to cover pyrex glass, a substrate holder, and an aerosol generator using an air brush sprayer. The temperature control system was developed to prevent condensation on the chamber walls. The control performances such as the overshoot and settling time were obtained from of the developed temperature controller. Wire-heating elements were controlled at certain setting value to heat the injected aerosol to form a thin film in the substrate. The performance of as-developed AACVD system tested to form a thin film where aerosol was sprayed into the chamber with a flow rate of 7 liters/minutes, and vary in temperatures and concentrations of precursor. The temperature control system have an overshoot around 25 °C from the desired set point temperature, very small temperature ripple 2 °C and a settling time of 20 minutes. As-developed AACVD successfully fabricated a ZnO thin film with thickness of below 1 µm. The performances of system on formation of thin films influenced by the generally controlled process such as values of setting temperature and concentration where the aerosol flow rate was fixed. Higher temperature was applied, the more uniform ZnO thin films were produced. In addition, temperature of the substrate also affected on surface roughness of the obtained films, while concentration of ZnO precursor determined the thickness of produce films. It is concluded that newly simple AACVD can be applied to produce a thin film.

  14. Copper selenide thin films by chemical bath deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, V. M.; Nair, P. K.; Nair, M. T. S.

    1999-05-01

    We report the structural, optical, and electrical properties of thin films (0.05 to 0.25 μm) of copper selenide obtained from chemical baths using sodium selenosulfate or N,N-dimethylselenourea as a source of selenide ions. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies on the films obtained from baths using sodium selenosulfate suggest a cubic structure as in berzelianite, Cu 2- xSe with x=0.15. Annealing the films at 400°C in nitrogen leads to a partial conversion of the film to Cu 2Se. In the case of films obtained from the baths containing dimethylselenourea, the XRD patterns match that of klockmannite, CuSe. Annealing these films in nitrogen at 400°C results in loss of selenium, and consequently a composition rich in copper, similar to Cu 2- xSe, is reached. Optical absorption in the films result from free carrier absorption in the near infrared region with absorption coefficient of ˜10 5 cm -1. Band-to-band transitions which gives rise to the optical absorption in the visible-ultraviolet region may be interpreted in terms of direct allowed transitions with band gap in the 2.1-2.3 eV range and indirect allowed transitions with band gap 1.2-1.4 eV. All the films, as prepared and annealed, show p-type conductivity, in the range of (1-5)×10 3 Ω -1 cm -1. This results in high near infrared reflectance, of 30-80%.

  15. Carbon nanostructures and networks produced by chemical vapor deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kowlgi, N.K.K.; Koper, G.J.M.; Van Raalten, R.A.D.

    2012-01-01

    The invention pertains to a method for manufacturing crystalline carbon nanostructures and/or a network of crystalline carbon nanostructures, comprising: (i) providing a bicontinuous micro-emulsion containing metal nanoparticles having an average particle size between 1and 100nm; (ii) bringing said

  16. Formation of Micro- and Nanostructures on the Nanotitanium Surface by Chemical Etching and Deposition of Titania Films by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis V. Nazarov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an integrated approach was used for the preparation of a nanotitanium-based bioactive material. The integrated approach included three methods: severe plastic deformation (SPD, chemical etching and atomic layer deposition (ALD. For the first time, it was experimentally shown that the nature of the etching medium (acidic or basic Piranha solutions and the etching time have a significant qualitative impact on the nanotitanium surface structure both at the nano- and microscale. The etched samples were coated with crystalline biocompatible TiO2 films with a thickness of 20 nm by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD. Comparative study of the adhesive and spreading properties of human osteoblasts MG-63 has demonstrated that presence of nano- and microscale structures and crystalline titanium oxide on the surface of nanotitanium improve bioactive properties of the material.

  17. Formation of silicon nanoislands on crystalline silicon substrates by thermal annealing of silicon rich oxide deposited by low pressure chemical vapour deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Zhenrui [Department of Electronics, INAOE, Apartado 51, Puebla, Puebla 72000 (Mexico); Aceves-Mijares, Mariano [Department of Electronics, INAOE, Apartado 51, Puebla, Puebla 72000 (Mexico); Luna-Lopez, A [Department of Electronics, INAOE, Apartado 51, Puebla, Puebla 72000 (Mexico); Du Jinhui [College of Material Science and Chemistry Engineering, Tianjin Polytechnical University (China); Bian Dongcai [College of Material Science and Chemistry Engineering, Tianjin Polytechnical University (China)

    2006-10-14

    We report the preparation and characterization of Si nanoislands grown on a c-Si substrate by thermal annealing of silicon-rich oxide (SRO) films deposited using a conventional low pressure chemical vapour deposition (LPCVD) technique. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that a high density of Si nanoislands was formed on the surface of the c-Si substrate during thermal annealing. The nanoislands are nanocrystallites with the same crystal orientation as the substrate. The strain at the c-Si/SRO interface is probably the main reason for the nucleation of the self-assembled Si nanoislands that epitaxially grow on the c-Si substrate. The proposed method is very simple and compatible with Si integrated circuit technology.

  18. Stability increase of fuel clad with zirconium oxynitride thin film by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jee, Seung Hyun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, 134 Sinchon Dong, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Materials Research and Education Center, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Auburn University, 275 Wilmore Labs, AL 36849-5341 (United States); Kim, Jun Hwan; Baek, Jong Hyuk [Recycled Fuel Development Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, P.O. Box 105, Yuseong, Daejeon, 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong-Joo [Materials Research and Education Center, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Auburn University, 275 Wilmore Labs, AL 36849-5341 (United States); Kang, Seong Sik [Regulatory Research Division, Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, 19, Guseong-Dong, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon, 305-338 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Young Soo, E-mail: yoonys@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, 134 Sinchon Dong, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-01

    A zirconium oxynitride (ZON) thin film was deposited onto HT9 steel as a cladding material by a metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) in order to prevent a fuel-clad chemical interaction (FCCI) between a U-10 wt% Zr metal fuel and a clad material. X-ray diffraction spectrums indicated that the mixture of structures of zirconium nitride, oxide and carbide in the MOCVD grown ZON thin films. Also, typical equiaxial grain structures were found in plane and cross sectional images of the as-deposited ZON thin films with a thickness range of 250-500 nm. A depth profile using auger electron microscopy revealed that carbon and oxygen atoms were decreased in the ZON thin film deposited with hydrogen gas flow. Diffusion couple tests at 800 Degree-Sign C for 25 hours showed that the as-deposited ZON thin films had low carbon and oxygen content, confirmed by the Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy, which showed a barrier behavior for FCCI between the metal fuel and the clad. This result suggested that ZON thin film cladding by MOCVD, even with the thickness below the micro-meter level, has a high possibility as an effective FCCI barrier. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zirconium oxynitride (ZON) deposited by metal organic chemical vapor deposition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Prevention of fuel cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interfusion reduced by between metal fuel (U-10 wt% Zr) and a HT9 cladding material. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrogenation of the ZON during growth improved the FCCI barrier performance.

  19. Optical and passivating properties of hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition for application on silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wight, Daniel Nilsen

    2008-07-01

    Within this thesis, several important subjects related to the use of amorphous silicon nitride made by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition as an anti-reflective coating on silicon solar cells are presented. The first part of the thesis covers optical simulations to optimise single and double layer anti-reflective coatings with respect to optical performance when situated on a silicon solar cell. The second part investigates the relationship between important physical properties of silicon nitride films when deposited under different conditions. The optical simulations were either based on minimising the reflectance off a silicon nitride/silicon wafer stack or maximising the transmittance through the silicon nitride into the silicon wafer. The former method allowed consideration of the reflectance off the back surface of the wafer, which occurs typically at wavelengths above 1000 nm due to the transparency of silicon at these wavelengths. However, this method does not take into consideration the absorption occurring in the silicon nitride, which is negligible at low refractive indexes but quite significant when the refractive index increases above 2.1. For high-index silicon nitride films, the latter method is more accurate as it considers both reflectance and absorbance in the film to calculate the transmittance into the Si wafer. Both methods reach similar values for film thickness and refractive index for optimised single layer anti-reflective coatings, due to the negligible absorption occurring in these films. For double layer coatings, though, the reflectance based simulations overestimated the optimum refractive index for the bottom layer, which would have lead to excessive absorption if applied to real anti-reflective coatings. The experimental study on physical properties for silicon nitride films deposited under varying conditions concentrated on the estimation of properties important for its applications, such as optical properties, passivation

  20. Dynamic scaling and optical properties of Zn(S, O,OH) thin film grown by chemical bath deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Yi; Li Bo-Yan; Dang Xiang-Yu; Wu Li; Jin Jing; Li Feng-Yan; Ao Jian-Ping; Sun Yun

    2011-01-01

    The scaling behavior and optical properties of Zn(S,O and OH) thin films deposited on soda-lime glass substrates by chemical bath deposition method were studied by combined roughness measurements,scanning electron microscopy and optical properties measurement.From the scaling behaviour,the value of growth scaling exponent β,0.38±0.06,was determined.This value indicated that the Zn(S,O,OH) film growth in the heterogeneous process was influenced by the surface diffusion and shadowing effect.Results of the optical properties measurements disclosed that the transmittance of the film was in the region of 70%-88% and the optical properties of the film grown for 40 min were better than those grown under other conditions.The energy band gap of the film deposited with 40 min was around 3.63 eV.

  1. Influence of air annealing on the structural, morphological, optical and electrical properties of chemically deposited ZnSe thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kale, R. B.; Lokhande, C. D.

    2005-11-01

    Zinc selenide nanocrystalline thin films are grown onto amorphous glass substrate from an aqueous alkaline medium, using chemical bath deposition (CBD) method. The ZnSe thin films are annealed in air for 4 h at various temperatures and characterized by structural, morphological, optical and electrical properties. The as-deposited ZnSe film grew with nanocrystalline cubic phase alongwith some amorphous phase present in it. After annealing metastable nanocrystalline cubic phase was transformed into stable polycrystalline hexagonal phase with partial conversion of ZnSe into ZnO. The optical band gap, Eg, of as-deposited film is 2.85 eV and electrical resistivity of the order of 10 6-10 7 Ω cm. Depending upon annealing temperature, decrease up to 0.15 eV and 10 2 Ω cm were observed in the optical band gap, Eg, and electrical resistivity, respectively.

  2. Aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition of germanium thin films using organogermanium carboxylates as precursors and formation of germania films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alpa Y Shah; Amey Wadawale; Vijaykumar S Sagoria; Vimal K Jain; C A Betty; S Bhattacharya

    2012-06-01

    Diethyl germanium bis-picolinate, [Et2Ge(O2CC5H4N)2], and trimethyl germanium quinaldate, [Me3Ge(O2CC9H6N)], have been used as precursors for deposition of thin films of germanium by aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD). The thermogravimetric analysis revealed complete volatilization of complexes under nitrogen atmosphere. Germanium thin films were deposited on silicon wafers at 700°C employing AACVD method. These films on oxidation under an oxygen atmosphere at 600°C yield GeO2. Both Ge and GeO2 films were characterized by XRD, SEM and EDS measurements. Their electrical properties were assessed by current–voltage (–) characterization.

  3. Resolving the nanostructure of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited nanocrystalline SiOx layers for application in solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingsporn, M.; Kirner, S.; Villringer, C.; Abou-Ras, D.; Costina, I.; Lehmann, M.; Stannowski, B.

    2016-06-01

    Nanocrystalline silicon suboxides (nc-SiOx) have attracted attention during the past years for the use in thin-film silicon solar cells. We investigated the relationships between the nanostructure as well as the chemical, electrical, and optical properties of phosphorous, doped, nc-SiO0.8:H fabricated by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The nanostructure was varied through the sample series by changing the deposition pressure from 533 to 1067 Pa. The samples were then characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, Raman spectroscopy, aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, selected-area electron diffraction, and a specialized plasmon imaging method. We found that the material changed with increasing pressure from predominantly amorphous silicon monoxide to silicon dioxide containing nanocrystalline silicon. The nanostructure changed from amorphous silicon filaments to nanocrystalline silicon filaments, which were found to cause anisotropic electron transport.

  4. Numerical Methods For Chemically Reacting Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leveque, R. J.; Yee, H. C.

    1990-01-01

    Issues related to numerical stability, accuracy, and resolution discussed. Technical memorandum presents issues in numerical solution of hyperbolic conservation laws containing "stiff" (relatively large and rapidly changing) source terms. Such equations often used to represent chemically reacting flows. Usually solved by finite-difference numerical methods. Source terms generally necessitate use of small time and/or space steps to obtain sufficient resolution, especially at discontinuities, where incorrect mathematical modeling results in unphysical solutions.

  5. Monolayer MoSe 2 Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition for Fast Photodetection

    KAUST Repository

    Chang, Yung-Huang

    2014-08-26

    Monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has become a promising building block in optoelectronics for its high photosensitivity. However, sulfur vacancies and other defects significantly affect the electrical and optoelectronic properties of monolayer MoS2 devices. Here, highly crystalline molybdenum diselenide (MoSe2) monolayers have been successfully synthesized by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Low-temperature photoluminescence comparison for MoS2 and MoSe 2 monolayers reveals that the MoSe2 monolayer shows a much weaker bound exciton peak; hence, the phototransistor based on MoSe2 presents a much faster response time (<25 ms) than the corresponding 30 s for the CVD MoS2 monolayer at room temperature in ambient conditions. The images obtained from transmission electron microscopy indicate that the MoSe exhibits fewer defects than MoS2. This work provides the fundamental understanding for the differences in optoelectronic behaviors between MoSe2 and MoS2 and is useful for guiding future designs in 2D material-based optoelectronic devices. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  6. Unraveling the complex chemistry using dimethylsilane as a precursor gas in hot wire chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toukabri, Rim; Shi, Yujun

    2014-05-07

    The gas-phase reaction chemistry when using dimethylsilane (DMS) as a source gas in a hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process has been studied in this work. The complex chemistry is unraveled by using a soft 10.5 eV single photon ionization technique coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry in combination with the isotope labelling and chemical trapping methods. It has been demonstrated that both free-radical reactions and those involving silylene/silene intermediates are important. The reaction chemistry is characterized by the formation of 1,1,2,2-tetramethyldisilane (TMDS) from dimethylsilylene insertion into the Si-H bond of DMS, trimethylsilane (TriMS) from free-radical recombination, and 1,3-dimethyl-1,3-disilacyclobutane (DMDSCB) from the self dimerization of either dimethylsilylene or 1-methylsilene. At low filament temperatures and short reaction time, silylene chemistry dominates. The free-radical reactions become more important with increasing temperature and time. The same three products have been detected when using tantalum and tungsten filaments, indicating that changing the filament material from Ta to W does not affect much the gas-phase reaction chemistry when using DMS as a source gas in a hot-wire CVD reactor.

  7. Metalorganic chemical vapor deposition of iron disulfide and its use for solar energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennaoui, Ahmed; Fiechter, Sebastian; Vogel, Ralf; Giersig, M.; Weller, Horst; Tributsch, Helmut

    1992-12-01

    Thin polycrystalline films of iron disulfide have been grown on different substrates by chemical vapour deposition. The films were characterized using optical absorption and TEM. RBS and EDAX analysis has been used to explore the chemical stoichiometry. XRD and FTIR allowed the identification of both FeS2 phases pyrite and marcasite. A novel method for sensitization of highly porous Ti02 elecrodes with ultra thin (10-20 nm) polycrystalline films of FeS2 (pyrite) is presented. Photoelectrochemical solar cell using the above electrode generated high photovoltage of up to 600mV compared with single crystalline electrode (200 mV). In this device the semiconductor with a small band gap and high absorption coefficient (FeS2 pyrite; EG = 0.9 eV; a = 6 x 105 cm-1) absorbs the light and injects electrons into the conduction band the wide band gap semiconductor (Ti02 anatase; EG = 3.2 eV). Regeneration of holes is taking place by electron transfer from redox system in the electrolyte.

  8. Cytotoxicity of Boron-Doped Nanocrystalline Diamond Films Prepared by Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dan; Gou, Li; Ran, Junguo; Zhu, Hong; Zhang, Xiang

    2015-07-01

    Boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) exhibits extraordinary mechanical properties and chemical stability, making it highly suitable for biomedical applications. For implant materials, the impact of boron-doped NCD films on the character of cell growth (i.e., adhesion, proliferation) is very important. Boron-doped NCD films with resistivity of 10-2 Ω·cm were grown on Si substrates by the microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) process with H2 bubbled B2O3. The crystal structure, diamond character, surface morphology, and surface roughness of the boron-doped NCD films were analyzed using different characterization methods, such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The contact potential difference and possible boron distribution within the film were studied with a scanning kelvin force microscope (SKFM). The cytotoxicity of films was studied by in vitro tests, including fluorescence microscopy, SEM and MTT assay. Results indicated that the surface roughness value of NCD films was 56.6 nm and boron was probably accumulated at the boundaries between diamond agglomerates. MG-63 cells adhered well and exhibited a significant growth on the surface of films, suggesting that the boron-doped NCD films were non-toxic to cells. supported by the Open Foundation of State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices (University of Electronic Science and Technology of China) (No. KFJJ201313)

  9. Superhydrophobicity of polyvinylidene fluoride membrane fabricated by chemical vapor deposition from solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng Zhenrong [College of Textiles, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300160 (China); Gu Zhenya, E-mail: zhenyagu@hotmail.com [College of Textiles, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300160 (China); Huo Ruiting; Ye Yonghong [College of Textiles, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300160 (China)

    2009-05-30

    Due to the chemical stability and flexibility, polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membranes are widely used as the topcoat of architectural membrane structures, roof materials of vehicle, tent fabrics, and so on. Further modified PVDF membrane with superhydrophobic property may be even superior as the coating layer surface. The lotus flower is always considered to be a sacred plant, which can protect itself against water, dirt, and dust. The superhydrophobic surface of lotus leaf is rough, showing the micro- and nanometer scale morphology. In this work, the microreliefs of lotus leaf were mimicked using PVDF membrane and the nanometer scale peaks on the top of the microreliefs were obtained by the method of chemical vapor deposition from solution. The surface morphology of PVDF membrane was investigated by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM). Elemental composition analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that the material of the nanostructure of PVDF membrane was polymethylsiloxane. On the lotus-leaf-like PVDF membrane, the water contact angle and sliding angle were 155 deg. and 4 deg., respectively, exhibiting superhydrophobic property.

  10. Superhydrophobicity of polyvinylidene fluoride membrane fabricated by chemical vapor deposition from solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhenrong; Gu, Zhenya; Huo, Ruiting; Ye, Yonghong

    2009-05-01

    Due to the chemical stability and flexibility, polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membranes are widely used as the topcoat of architectural membrane structures, roof materials of vehicle, tent fabrics, and so on. Further modified PVDF membrane with superhydrophobic property may be even superior as the coating layer surface. The lotus flower is always considered to be a sacred plant, which can protect itself against water, dirt, and dust. The superhydrophobic surface of lotus leaf is rough, showing the micro- and nanometer scale morphology. In this work, the microreliefs of lotus leaf were mimicked using PVDF membrane and the nanometer scale peaks on the top of the microreliefs were obtained by the method of chemical vapor deposition from solution. The surface morphology of PVDF membrane was investigated by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM). Elemental composition analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that the material of the nanostructure of PVDF membrane was polymethylsiloxane. On the lotus-leaf-like PVDF membrane, the water contact angle and sliding angle were 155° and 4°, respectively, exhibiting superhydrophobic property.

  11. Density-controlled growth of well-aligned ZnO nanowires using chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Well-aligned ZnO nanowires were grown on Si substrate by chemical vapor deposition.The experimental results showed that the density of nanowires was related to the heating process and growth temperature.High-density ZnO nanowires were obtained under optimal conditions.The growth mechanism of the ZnO nanowires was presented as well.

  12. In situ observations during chemical vapor deposition of hexagonal boron nitride on polycrystalline copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kidambi, Piran R.; Blume, Raoul; Kling, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Using a combination of complementary in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, we study the fundamental mechanisms underlying the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) on polycrystalline Cu. The nucleation and growth of h-BN layers is found to occ...

  13. Growth Process Conditions of Tungsten Oxide Thin Films Using Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houweling, Z.S.; Geus, J.W.; de Jong, M.; Harks, P.P.R.M.L.; van der Werf, C.H.M.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2011-01-01

    We report the growth conditions of nanostructured tungsten oxide (WO3−x) thin films using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD). Two tungsten filaments were resistively heated to various temperatures and exposed to an air flow at various subatmospheric pressures. The oxygen partial pressure was

  14. Vaporization of a mixed precursors in chemical vapor deposition for YBCO films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Gang; Meng, Guangyao; Schneider, Roger L.; Sarma, Bimal K.; Levy, Moises

    1995-01-01

    Single phase YBa2Cu3O7-delta thin films with T(c) values around 90 K are readily obtained by using a single source chemical vapor deposition technique with a normal precursor mass transport. The quality of the films is controlled by adjusting the carrier gas flow rate and the precursor feed rate.

  15. Electrical properties of plasma-deposited silicon oxide clarified by chemical modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovalgin, A.Y.; Boogaard, A.; Brunets, I.; Aarnink, A.A.I.; Wolters, R.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Our study is focused on Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) of silicon dioxide films at low temperatures (< 150 oC) using Inductively Coupled (IC) High-Density (HD) plasma source. We recently fabricated Thin Film Transistors (TFTs) with high-quality ICPECVD gate oxides, which exhibited

  16. CHEMICALLY DEPOSITED SILVER FILM USED AS A SERS-ACTIVE OVER COATING LAYER FOR POLYMER FILM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-ning Liu; Gi Xue; Yun Lu; Jun Zhang; Fen-ting Li; Chen-chen Xue; Stephen Z.D. Cheng

    2001-01-01

    When colloidal silver particles were chemically deposited onto polymer film as an over-coating layer, surfaceenhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra could be collected for the surface analysis. SERS measurements of liquid crystal film were successfully performed without disturbing the surface morphology.

  17. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Atomically-Thin Molybdenum Disulfide (MoS2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    photoluminescence. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) Nanotechnology Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) Raman spectroscopy 16...by ANSI Std. Z39.18 UNCLASSIFIED Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. i CONTENTS Page Introduction 1...UNCLASSIFIED Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 1 INTRODUCTION Recently, an explosion of interest in low-dimensional

  18. Single- and few-layer graphene growth on stainless steel substrates by direct thermal chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Robin; Ashokreddy, A.; Vijayan, C.; Pradeep, T.

    2011-04-01

    Increasing interest in graphene research in basic sciences and applications emphasizes the need for an economical means of synthesizing it. We report a method for the synthesis of graphene on commercially available stainless steel foils using direct thermal chemical vapor deposition. Our method of synthesis and the use of relatively cheap precursors such as ethanol (CH3CH2OH) as a source of carbon and SS 304 as the substrate proved to be economically viable. The presence of single- and few-layer graphene was confirmed using confocal Raman microscopy/spectroscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic measurements were further used to establish the influence of various elemental species present in stainless steel on graphene growth. The role of cooling rate on surface migration of certain chemical species (oxides of Fe, Cr and Mn) that promote or hinder the growth of graphene is probed. Such analysis of the chemical species present on the surface can be promising for graphene based catalytic research.

  19. Structural and Optical Study of Chemical Bath Deposited Nano-Structured CdS Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Suresh; Sharma, Dheeraj; Sharma, Pankaj; Sharma, Vineet; Barman, P. B.; Katyal, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    CdS is commonly used as window layer in polycrystalline solar cells. The paper presents a structural and optical study of CdS nano-structured thin films. High quality CdS thin films are grown on commercial glass by means of chemical bath deposition. It involves an alkaline solution of cadmium salt, a complexant, a chalcogen source and a non-ionic surfactant. The films have been prepared under various process parameters. The chemically deposited films are annealed to estimate its effect on the structural and optical properties of films. These films (as -deposited and annealed) have been characterized by means of XRD, SEM and UV-Visible spectrophotometer. XRD of films show the nano-crystalline nature. The energy gap of films is found to be of direct in nature.

  20. A Study on Medium Temperature Chemical Vapor Deposition (MT-CVD) Technology and Super Coating Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Jian; LI Jian-ping; ZENG Xiang-cai; MA Wen-cun

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the dense and columnar crystalline TiCN coating layers with very good bonding strength between a layer and another layer was deposited using Medium Temperature Chemical Vapor Deposition (MT-CVD) where CH3CN organic composite with C/N atomic clusters etc. was utilized at 700 ~ 900 ℃. Effect of coating processing parameters, such as coating temperature, pressure and different gas flow quantity on structures and properties of TiCN coating layers were investigated. The super coating mechanis mand structures were analyzed. The new coating processing parameters and properties of carbide inserts with super coating layers were gained by using the improved high temperature chemical vapor deposition (HTCVD) equipment and HT-CVD, in combination with MT-CVD technology.

  1. A sub-atmospheric chemical vapor deposition process for deposition of oxide liner in high aspect ratio through silicon vias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisker, Marco; Marschmeyer, Steffen; Kaynak, Mehmet; Tekin, Ibrahim

    2011-09-01

    The formation of a Through Silicon Via (TSV) includes a deep Si trench etching and the formation of an insulating layer along the high-aspect-ratio trench and the filling of a conductive material into the via hole. The isolation of the filling conductor from the silicon substrate becomes more important for higher frequencies due to the high coupling of the signal to the silicon. The importance of the oxide thickness on the via wall isolation can be verified using electromagnetic field simulators. To satisfy the needs on the Silicon dioxide deposition, a sub-atmospheric chemical vapor deposition (SA-CVD) process has been developed to deposit an isolation oxide to the walls of deep silicon trenches. The technique provides excellent step coverage of the 100 microm depth silicon trenches with the high aspect ratio of 20 and more. The developed technique allows covering the deep silicon trenches by oxide and makes the high isolation of TSVs from silicon substrate feasible which is the key factor for the performance of TSVs for mm-wave 3D packaging.

  2. Influence of gas phase equilibria on the chemical vapor deposition of graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Amanda M; Derby, Brian; Kinloch, Ian A

    2013-04-23

    We have investigated the influence of gas phase chemistry on the chemical vapor deposition of graphene in a hot wall reactor. A new extended parameter space for graphene growth was defined through literature review and experimentation at low pressures (≥0.001 mbar). The deposited films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and dark field optical microscopy, with the latter showing promise as a rapid and nondestructive characterization technique for graphene films. The equilibrium gas compositions have been calculated across this parameter space. Correlations between the graphene films grown and prevalent species in the equilibrium gas phase revealed that deposition conditions associated with a high acetylene equilibrium concentration lead to good quality graphene deposition, and conditions that stabilize large hydrocarbon molecules in the gas phase result in films with multiple defects. The transition between lobed and hexagonal graphene islands was found to be linked to the concentration of the monatomic hydrogen radical, with low concentrations associated with hexagonal islands.

  3. Zirconium influence on microstructure of aluminide coatings deposited on nickel substrate by CVD method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jolanta Romanowska; Maryana Zagula-Yavorska; Jan Sieniawski

    2013-11-01

    Influence of Zr on the microstructure and phase characteristics of aluminide diffusion coatings deposited on the nickel substrate has been investigated in this study. The coatings with and without zirconium were deposited by CVD method. The cross-section chemical composition investigations revealed that during the coatings formation, there is an inward aluminum diffusion and outward nickel diffusion in both types of coatings (with and without zirconium), whereas zirconium is located far below the coating surface, at a depth of ∼17 m, between -NiAl phase and '-Ni3Al phase. XRD examinations showed that -NiAl, -NiAl and '-Ni3Al were the main components of the deposited coatings. -NiAl phase is on the surface of the coatings, whereas -NiAl and '-Ni3Al form deeper parts of the coatings. Zirconium is dissolved in NiAl on the border between -NiAl and '-Ni3Al.

  4. Processes and environmental significance of the subglacial chemical deposits in Tianshan Mountains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Gengnian; LUO; Risheng; CAO; Jun

    2005-01-01

    On the bedrock surface of Glacier No.1 in the headwater of Urumqi River, Tianshan Mts., well layered and crystallized subglacial calcite precipitations were discovered. Based on observations and analysis of the surface form, sedimentary texture and structure, and chemical composition of the deposits, clues about the subglacial processes and environment are deduced. The radial-growth crustation texture of the deposits, which builds up in the saturated CaCO3 solution, proves the existence of pressure melting water and water films under Glacier No.1; and their rhythmic beddings, dissolved planes and unconformable contacts show that the water films responsible for the formation of these structures were in a wide range of spatial as well as temporal variations. Though formed under continental glacier in non-limestone area, the deposits are quite similar to those formed under temperate glaciers in limestone areas, a fact that shows a similar process of chemical precipitation between the two. Hence the enrichment of calcium in the subglacial melting water and the process of precipitation have actually little to do with the bedrock lithology and the glacier types. The cemented detritus in the deposits are rich in Fe and Al while depleted in K, Na and Si; also the included clay mineral consists mainly of illite, which reveals some weak chemical weathering under the continental glacier. The subglacial CaCO3 precipitates when plenty of Ca++ melt into the subglacial melting water on a comparatively enclosed ice-bedrock interface under a high CO2 partial pressure, the forming of subglacial chemical deposits therefore offers unequivocal evidence for the ongoing of subglacial chemical reactions.

  5. FTIR Characterization of Fluorine Doped Silicon Dioxide Thin Films Deposited by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Peng-Fei; DING Shi-Jin; ZHANG Wei; ZHANG Jian-Yun; WANGJi-Tao; WEI William Lee

    2000-01-01

    Fluorine doped silicon dioxide (SiOF) thin films have been prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor depo sition. The Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR) spectra of SiOF films are deliberated to reveal the structure change of SiO2 and the mechanism of dielectric constant reduction after doping fluorine. When F is doped in SiO2 films, the Si-O stretching absorption peak will have a blue-shift due to increase of the partial charge of the O atom. The FTIR spectra indicate that some Si-OH components in the thin film can be removed after doping fluorine. These changes reduce the ionic and orientational polarization, and result in the reduction in dielectric constant of the film. According to Gaussian fitting, it is found that the Si-F2 bonds will appear in the SiOF film with increase of the fluorine content. The Si-F2 structures are liable to react with water, and cause the same increase of absorbed moisture in the film.

  6. Cu{sub 2}ZnSn(S,Se){sub 4} solar cells based on chemical bath deposited precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Chao, E-mail: chao.gao@kit.edu [Institute of Applied Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Schnabel, Thomas; Abzieher, Tobias [Zentrum für Sonnenenergie-und Wasserstoff-Forschung Baden-Württemberg (ZSW), 70565 Stuttgart (Germany); Krämmer, Christoph [Institute of Applied Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Powalla, Michael [Zentrum für Sonnenenergie-und Wasserstoff-Forschung Baden-Württemberg (ZSW), 70565 Stuttgart (Germany); Light Technology Institute (LTI), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Kalt, Heinz; Hetterich, Michael [Institute of Applied Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    A low-cost method has been developed to fabricate Cu{sub 2}ZnSn(S,Se){sub 4} solar cells. By this method, firstly SnS, CuS, and ZnS layers are successively deposited on a molybdenum/soda lime glass (Mo/SLG) substrate by chemical bath deposition. The Cu{sub 2}ZnSn(S,Se){sub 4} thin films are obtained by annealing the precursor in a selenium atmosphere utilizing a graphite box in the furnace. The obtained Cu{sub 2}ZnSn(S,Se){sub 4} thin films show large crystalline grains. By optimizing the preparation process, Cu{sub 2}ZnSn(S,Se){sub 4} solar cells with efficiencies up to 4.5% are obtained. The results imply that the Cu{sub 2}ZnSn(S,Se){sub 4}/CdS interface and the back contact may be limiting factors for solar cell efficiency. - Highlights: • A chemical bath deposition method is developed to prepare Cu{sub 2}ZnSn(S,Se){sub 4} thin films. • The Cu{sub 2}ZnSn(S,Se){sub 4} thin films show good crystallization. • Solar cells with efficiencies up to 4.5% can be prepared based on the Cu{sub 2}ZnSn(S,Se){sub 4} layer. • The limiting factors for the solar cell efficiency are analyzed.

  7. Methods of preparing deposits containing iron oxides for recycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Lis

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The metallurgical industry is one of the largest sources of wastes. Some of them, however, owing to their content of metals such as zinc or iron, may become valuable secondary raw materials. In order to achieve that purpose, they require appropriate preparation. This article provides a discussion on the methods of preparation of scrap from steelworks, namely deposits containing iron oxides, enabling their recycling.

  8. The influence of methanol addition during the film growth of SnO 2 by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volintiru, I.; Graaf, A. de; Deelen, J. van; Poodt, P.W.G.

    2011-01-01

    Undoped tin oxide (SnO2) thin films have been deposited in a stagnant point flow chemical vapor deposition reactor from a water/tin tetrachloride mixture. By adding methanol during the deposition process the film electrical properties change significantly: ten times more conductive SnO 2 films are o

  9. Influence of precursor solution parameters on chemical properties of calcium phosphate coatings prepared using Electrostatic Spray Deposition (ESD).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwenburgh, S.C.G.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Schoonman, J.; Jansen, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    A novel coating technique, referred to as Electrostatic Spray Deposition (ESD), was used to deposit calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings with a variety of chemical properties. The relationship between the composition of the precursor solutions and the crystal and molecular structure of the deposited coa

  10. Metallorganic chemical vapor deposition and atomic layer deposition approaches for the growth of hafnium-based thin films from dialkylamide precursors for advanced CMOS gate stack applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consiglio, Steven P.

    To continue the rapid progress of the semiconductor industry as described by Moore's Law, the feasibility of new material systems for front end of the line (FEOL) process technologies needs to be investigated, since the currently employed polysilicon/SiO2-based transistor system is reaching its fundamental scaling limits. Revolutionary breakthroughs in complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology were recently announced by Intel Corporation and International Business Machines Corporation (IBM), with both organizations revealing significant progress in the implementation of hafnium-based high-k dielectrics along with metal gates. This announcement was heralded by Gordon Moore as "...the biggest change in transistor technology since the introduction of polysilicon gate MOS transistors in the late 1960s." Accordingly, the study described herein focuses on the growth of Hf-based dielectrics and Hf-based metal gates using chemical vapor-based deposition methods, specifically metallorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and atomic layer deposition (ALD). A family of Hf source complexes that has received much attention recently due to their desirable properties for implementation in wafer scale manufacturing is the Hf dialkylamide precursors. These precursors are room temperature liquids and possess sufficient volatility and desirable decomposition characteristics for both MOCVD and ALD processing. Another benefit of using these sources is the existence of chemically compatible Si dialkylamide sources as co-precursors for use in Hf silicate growth. The first part of this study investigates properties of MOCVD-deposited HfO2 and HfSixOy using dimethylamido Hf and Si precursor sources using a customized MOCVD reactor. The second part of this study involves a study of wet and dry surface pre-treatments for ALD growth of HfO2 using tetrakis(ethylmethylamido)hafnium in a wafer scale manufacturing environment. The third part of this study is an investigation of

  11. Uniformly Distributed Graphene Domain Grows on Standing Copper via Low-Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Hao Chan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Uniformly distributed graphene domains were synthesized on standing copper foil by a low-pressure chemical vapor deposition system. This method improved the distribution of the graphene domains at different positions on the same piece of copper foil along the forward direction of the gas flow. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM showed the average size of the graphene domains to be about ~20 m. This results show that the sheet resistance of monolayer graphene on a polyethylene terephthalate (PET substrate is about ~359 /□ whereas that of the four-layer graphene films is about ~178 /□, with a transmittance value of 88.86% at the 550 nm wavelength. Furthermore, the sheet resistance can be reduced with the addition of HNO3 resulting in a value of 84 /□. These values meet the absolute standard for touch sensor applications, so we believe that this method can be a candidate for some transparent conductive electrode applications.

  12. Synthesis of thick diamond films by direct current hot-cathode plasma chemical vapour deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Jin Zeng Sun; Bai Yi Zhen; Lu Xian Yi

    2002-01-01

    The method of direct current hot-cathode plasma chemical vapour deposition has been established. A long-time stable glow discharge at large discharge current and high gas pressure has been achieved by using a hot cathode in the temperature range from 1100 degree C to 1500 degree C and non-symmetrical configuration of the poles, in which the diameter of the cathode is larger than that of anode. High-quality thick diamond films, with a diameter of 40-50 mm and thickness of 0.5-4.2 mm, have been synthesized by this method. Transparent thick diamond films were grown over a range of growth rates between 5-10 mu m/h. Most of the thick diamond films have thermal conductivities of 10-12 W/K centre dot cm. The thick diamond films with high thermal conductivity can be used as a heat sink of semiconducting laser diode array and as a heat spreading and isolation substrate of multichip modules. The performance can be obviously improved

  13. Characterization of Si:O:C:H films fabricated using electron emission enhanced chemical vapour deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durrant, Steven F. [Laboratorio de Plasmas Tecnologicos, Campus Experimental de Sorocaba, Universidade Estadual Paulista-UNESP, Avenida Tres de Marco, 511, Alto da Boa Vista, 18087-180, Soracaba, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: steve@sorocaba.unesp.br; Rouxinol, Francisco P.M.; Gelamo, Rogerio V. [Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-970, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Trasferetti, B. Claudio [Present address: Superintendencia Regional da Policia Federal em Sao Paulo, Setor Tecnico-Cientifico, Rua Hugo d' Antola 95/10o Andar, Lapa de Baixo, 05038-090 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Davanzo, C.U. [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-970, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Bica de Moraes, Mario A. [Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-970, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2008-01-15

    Silicon-based polymers and oxides may be formed when vapours of oxygen-containing organosilicone compounds are exposed to energetic electrons drawn from a hot filament by a bias potential applied to a second electrode in a controlled atmosphere in a vacuum chamber. As little deposition occurs in the absence of the bias potential, electron impact fragmentation is the key mechanism in film fabrication using electron-emission enhanced chemical vapour deposition (EEECVD). The feasibility of depositing amorphous hydrogenated carbon films also containing silicon from plasmas of tetramethylsilane or hexamethyldisiloxane has already been shown. In this work, we report the deposition of diverse films from plasmas of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS)-argon mixtures and the characterization of the materials obtained. The effects of changes in the substrate holder bias (V{sub S}) and of the proportion of TEOS in the mixture (X{sub T}) on the chemical structure of the films are examined by infrared-reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) at near-normal and oblique incidence using unpolarised and p-polarised, light, respectively. The latter is particularly useful in detecting vibrational modes not observed when using conventional near-normal incidence. Elemental analyses of the film were carried out by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), which was also useful in complementary structural investigations. In addition, the dependencies of the deposition rate on V{sub S} and X{sub T} are presented.

  14. Control of interface nanoscale structure created by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peri, Someswara R; Akgun, Bulent; Satija, Sushil K; Jiang, Hao; Enlow, Jesse; Bunning, Timothy J; Foster, Mark D

    2011-09-01

    Tailoring the structure of films deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) to specific applications requires a depth-resolved understanding of how the interface structures in such films are impacted by variations in deposition parameters such as feed position and plasma power. Analysis of complementary X-ray and neutron reflectivity (XR, NR) data provide a rich picture of changes in structure with feed position and plasma power, with those changes resolved on the nanoscale. For plasma-polymerized octafluorocyclobutane (PP-OFCB) films, a region of distinct chemical composition and lower cross-link density is found at the substrate interface for the range of processing conditions studied and a surface layer of lower cross-link density also appears when plasma power exceeds 40 W. Varying the distance of the feed from the plasma impacts the degree of cross-linking in the film center, thickness of the surface layer, and thickness of the transition region at the substrate. Deposition at the highest power, 65 W, both enhances cross-linking and creates loose fragments with fluorine content higher than the average. The thickness of the low cross-link density region at the air interface plays an important role in determining the width of the interface built with a layer subsequently deposited atop the first.

  15. Morphology control of zinc oxide films via polysaccharide-mediated, low temperature, chemical bath deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Waltz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study we present a three-step process for the low-temperature chemical bath deposition of crystalline ZnO films on glass substrates. The process consists of a seeding step followed by two chemical bath deposition steps. In the second step (the first of the two bath deposition steps, a natural polysaccharide, namely hyaluronic acid, is used to manipulate the morphology of the films. Previous experiments revealed a strong influence of this polysaccharide on the formation of zinc oxide crystallites. The present work aims to transfer this gained knowledge to the formation of zinc oxide films. The influence of hyaluronic acid and the time of its addition on the morphology of the resulting ZnO film were investigated. By meticulous adjustment of the parameters in this step, the film morphology can be tailored to provide an optimal growth platform for the third step (a subsequent chemical bath deposition step. In this step, the film is covered by a dense layer of ZnO. This optimized procedure leads to ZnO films with a very high electrical conductivity, opening up interesting possibilities for applications of such films. The films were characterized by means of electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and measurements of the electrical conductivity.

  16. Atmospheric pressure plasma-initiated chemical vapor deposition (AP-PiCVD) of poly(diethylallylphosphate) coating: a char-forming protective coating for cellulosic textile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilt, Florian; Boscher, Nicolas D; Duday, David; Desbenoit, Nicolas; Levalois-Grützmacher, Joëlle; Choquet, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    An innovative atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition method toward the deposition of polymeric layers has been developed. This latter involves the use of a nanopulsed plasma discharge to initiate the free-radical polymerization of an allyl monomer containing phosphorus (diethylallylphosphate, DEAP) at atmospheric pressure. The polymeric structure of the film is evidence by mass spectrometry. The method, highly suitable for the treatment of natural biopolymer substrate, has been carried out on cotton textile to perform the deposition of an efficient and conformal protective coating.

  17. Selective growth of graphene in layer-by-layer via chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaehyun; An, Hyosub; Choi, Dong-Chul; Hussain, Sajjad; Song, Wooseok; An, Ki-Seok; Lee, Won-Jun; Lee, Naesung; Lee, Wan-Gyu; Jung, Jongwan

    2016-07-01

    Selective and precise control of the layer number of graphene remains a critical issue for the practical applications of graphene. First, it is highly challenging to grow a continuous and uniform few-layer graphene since once the monolayer graphene fully covers a copper (Cu) surface, the growth of the second layer stops, resulting in mostly nonhomogeneous films. Second, from the selective adlayer growth point of view, there is no clear pathway for achieving this. We have developed the selective growth of a graphene adlayer in layer-by-layer via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) which makes it possible to stack graphene on a specific position. The key idea is to deposit a thin Cu layer (~40 nm thick) on pre-grown monolayer graphene and to apply additional growth. The thin Cu atop the graphene/Cu substrate acts as a catalyst to decompose methane (CH4) gas during the additional growth. The adlayer is grown selectively on the pre-grown graphene, and the thin Cu is removed through evaporation during CVD, eventually forming large-area and uniform double layer graphene. With this technology, highly uniform graphene films with precise thicknesses of 1 to 5 layers and graphene check patterns with 1 to 3 layers were successfully demonstrated. This method provides precise LBL growth for a uniform graphene film and a technique for the design of new graphene devices.Selective and precise control of the layer number of graphene remains a critical issue for the practical applications of graphene. First, it is highly challenging to grow a continuous and uniform few-layer graphene since once the monolayer graphene fully covers a copper (Cu) surface, the growth of the second layer stops, resulting in mostly nonhomogeneous films. Second, from the selective adlayer growth point of view, there is no clear pathway for achieving this. We have developed the selective growth of a graphene adlayer in layer-by-layer via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) which makes it possible to stack graphene

  18. Zirconium doped TiO2 thin films deposited by chemical spray pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juma, A.; Oja Acik, I.; Oluwabi, A. T.; Mere, A.; Mikli, V.; Danilson, M.; Krunks, M.

    2016-11-01

    Chemical spray pyrolysis (CSP) is a flexible deposition technique that allows for mixing of the precursor solutions in different proportions suitable for doping thin films. The CSP method was used to dope TiO2 thin films with Zr by adding zirconium(IV) acetylacetonate into a solution of titanium(IV) isopropoxide in ethanol stabilized by acetylacetone at [Zr]/[Ti] of 0, 5, 10 and 20 at%. The Zr-doped TiO2 thin films were uniform and homogeneous showing much smaller grains than the undoped TiO2 films. Zr stabilized the anatase phase to temperatures above 800 °C depending on Zr concentration in the spray solution. The concentration of Zr determined by XPS was 6.4 at% for the thin film deposited from the 20 at% solution. According to AFM studies, Zr doping decreased the root mean square roughness of TiO2 film from 5.9 to 1.1 nm. An XRD study of samples with the highest Zr amount showed the ZrTiO4 phase started forming after annealing at 800 °C. The optical band gap for TiO2 decreased from 3.3 eV to 3.0 eV after annealing at 800 °C but for the TiO2:Zr(20) film it remained at 3.4 eV. The dielectric constant increased by more than four times with Zr-doping and this was associated with the change in the bond formations caused by substitution of Ti by Zr in the lattice.

  19. An automatic modeling system of the reaction mechanisms for chemical vapor deposition processes using real-coded genetic algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Takahiro; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Kinpara, Hiroki; Ema, Yoshinori

    2011-09-01

    The identification of appropriate reaction models is very helpful for developing chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes. In this study, we have developed an automatic system to model reaction mechanisms in the CVD processes by analyzing the experimental results, which are cross-sectional shapes of the deposited films on substrates with micrometer- or nanometer-sized trenches. We designed the inference engine to model the reaction mechanism in the system by the use of real-coded genetic algorithms (RCGAs). We studied the dependence of the system performance on two methods using simple genetic algorithms (SGAs) and the RCGAs; the one involves the conventional GA operators and the other involves the blend crossover operator (BLX-alpha). Although we demonstrated that the systems using both the methods could successfully model the reaction mechanisms, the RCGAs showed the better performance with respect to the accuracy and the calculation cost for identifying the models.

  20. Physical properties of chemical bath deposited CdS thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ximello-Quiebras, J.N.; Contreras-Puente, G.; Aguilar-Hernandez, J. [Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas-Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Edificio 9, U.P.A.L.M. 07738 DF (Mexico); Santana-Rodriguez, G.; Arias-Carbajal Readigos, A. [Facultad de Fisica IMRE, Universidad de la Habana, 10400 La Habana (Cuba)

    2004-05-01

    Cadmium sulfide films of different thicknesses were deposited by chemical bath deposition (CBD) from a bath containing cadmium chloride, ammonium chloride, ammonium hydroxide and thiourea. The XRD patterns show that the films have a hexagonal phase with a preferential (002) orientation. The photoluminescence spectra show a defect structure, characteristics of the CdS films obtained by CBD. The electrical behavior in dark and under illumination, the optical properties and the band gap value reported in this work is in agreement with that reported in the literature.

  1. Boron coating on boron nitride coated nuclear fuels by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durmazuçar, Hasan H.; Gündüz, Güngör

    2000-12-01

    Uranium dioxide-only and uranium dioxide-gadolinium oxide (5% and 10%) ceramic nuclear fuel pellets which were already coated with boron nitride were coated with thin boron layer by chemical vapor deposition to increase the burn-up efficiency of the fuel during reactor operation. Coating was accomplished from the reaction of boron trichloride with hydrogen at 1250 K in a tube furnace, and then sintering at 1400 and 1525 K. The deposited boron was identified by infrared spectrum. The morphology of the coating was studied by using scanning electron microscope. The plate, grainy and string (fiber)-like boron structures were observed.

  2. Studies on chemical bath deposited zinc sulphide thin films with special optical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladar, Maria [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, ' Babes-Bolyai' University, 400028 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); ' Raluca Ripan' Institute for Research in Chemistry, 30 Fantanele, 400294 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Popovici, Elisabeth-Jeanne [' Raluca Ripan' Institute for Research in Chemistry, 30 Fantanele, 400294 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)]. E-mail: jennypopovici@yahoo.com; Baldea, Ioan [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, ' Babes-Bolyai' University, 400028 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Grecu, Rodica [' Raluca Ripan' Institute for Research in Chemistry, 30 Fantanele, 400294 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Indrea, Emil [National Institute for R and D of Isotopic and Molecular Technology, Donath 71-103, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2007-05-31

    Adherent and uniform zinc sulphide thin films were deposited on optical glass platelets from chemical bath containing thiourea, zinc acetate, ammonia and sodium citrate. The samples, as they were prepared were investigated by UV-vis absorption/reflection spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The effects of growth conditions such as reagent concentration and deposition technique (mono- and multi-layer) on optical and structural properties of the ZnS thin films have been studied. The ability of ZnS films to exhibit luminescent properties has also been investigated.

  3. A mathematical model and simulation results of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of silicon nitride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konakov, S. A.; Krzhizhanovskaya, V. V.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a mathematical model of Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) of silicon nitride thin films from SiH4-NH3-N2-Ar mixture, an important application in modern materials science. Our multiphysics model describes gas dynamics, chemical physics, plasma physics and electrodynamics. The PECVD technology is inherently multiscale, from macroscale processes in the chemical reactor to atomic-scale surface chemistry. Our macroscale model is based on Navier-Stokes equations for a transient laminar flow of a compressible chemically reacting gas mixture, together with the mass transfer and energy balance equations, Poisson equation for electric potential, electrons and ions balance equations. The chemical kinetics model includes 24 species and 58 reactions: 37 in the gas phase and 21 on the surface. A deposition model consists of three stages: adsorption to the surface, diffusion along the surface and embedding of products into the substrate. A new model has been validated on experimental results obtained with the "Plasmalab System 100" reactor. We present the mathematical model and simulation results investigating the influence of flow rate and source gas proportion on silicon nitride film growth rate and chemical composition.

  4. Chemical vapor deposition fabrication and characterization of silica-coated carbon fiber ultramicroelectrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, G; Giolando, D M; Kirchhoff, J R

    1995-08-01

    Carbon fiber disk ultramicroelectrodes (UMEs) with well-defined geometries were prepared by chemical vapor deposition techniques. Transparent silica films with thicknesses from 1 to 600 microns were deposited on the cylindrical length of 5 and 10 microns carbon fibers from a SiCl4, H2, and O2 ternary precursor system at 850-1150 degrees C or sequential deposition from Si(OEt)4 as a single source precursor at 700 degrees C followed by the SiCl4, H2, and O2 precursor system. Film thickness, film adhesion to the fiber substrate, and the overall dimensions of the silica-coated carbon fiber were studied and found to be a function of the precursor system, precursor concentrations, fiber diameter, deposition time, and fiber temperature. The silica films were found to be free of microcracks and characterized by a quality seal between the carbon fiber and the coating. As a result, the silica-coated disk UME exhibits an excellent electrochemical response without the need to use an epoxy sealant at the electrode tip. Furthermore, the deposition of hard and inert ceramic materials imparts durability to fragile carbon fibers and facilitates the handling of UMEs in microenvironments. Finally, the advantage of concentric deposition about the fibers to produce a disk UME in the center of an insulating plane was used to examine the effect of the thickness of the insulating coating on the limiting current response.

  5. Conformal encapsulation of three-dimensional, bioresorbable polymeric scaffolds using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawker, Morgan J; Pegalajar-Jurado, Adoracion; Fisher, Ellen R

    2014-10-21

    Bioresorbable polymers such as poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) have a multitude of potential biomaterial applications such as controlled-release drug delivery and regenerative tissue engineering. For such biological applications, the fabrication of porous three-dimensional bioresorbable materials with tunable surface chemistry is critical to maximize their surface-to-volume ratio, mimic the extracellular matrix, and increase drug-loading capacity. Here, two different fluorocarbon (FC) precursors (octofluoropropane (C3F8) and hexafluoropropylene oxide (HFPO)) were used to deposit FC films on PCL scaffolds using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). These two coating systems were chosen with the intent of modifying the scaffold surfaces to be bio-nonreactive while maintaining desirable bulk properties of the scaffold. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed high-CF2 content films were deposited on both the exterior and interior of PCL scaffolds and that deposition behavior is PECVD system specific. Scanning electron microscopy data confirmed that FC film deposition yielded conformal rather than blanket coatings as the porous scaffold structure was maintained after plasma treatment. Treated scaffolds seeded with human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) demonstrate that the cells do not attach after 72 h and that the scaffolds are noncytotoxic to HDF. This work demonstrates conformal FC coatings can be deposited on 3D polymeric scaffolds using PECVD to fabricate 3D bio-nonreactive materials.

  6. Preparation and characterization of boron nitride coatings on carbon fibers from borazine by chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Junsheng, E-mail: charlesljs@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Ceramic Fibers and Composites, College of Aerospace and Materials Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha, 410073 (China); Zhang Changrui; Li Bin [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Ceramic Fibers and Composites, College of Aerospace and Materials Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha, 410073 (China)

    2011-06-15

    Boron nitride (BN) coatings were deposited on carbon fibers by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using borazine as single source precursor. The deposited coatings were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy. The effect of temperatures on growth kinetics, morphology, composition and structure of the coatings was investigated. In the low temperature range of 900 deg. C-1000 deg. C, the growth rate increased with increasing temperature complying with Arrhenius law, and an apparent active energy of 72 kJ/mol was calculated. The coating surface was smooth and compact, and the coatings uniformly deposited on individual fibers of carbon fiber bundles. The growth was controlled by surface reaction. At 1000 deg. C, the deposition rate reached a maximum (2.5 {mu}m/h). At the same time, the limiting step of the growth translated to be mass-transportation. Above 1100 deg. C, the growth rate decreased drastically due to the occurrence of gas-phase nucleation. Moreover, the coating surface became loose and rough. Composition and structure examinations revealed that stoichiometric BN coatings with turbostratic structure were obtained below 1000 deg. C, while hexagonal BN coatings were deposited above 1100 deg. C. A penetration of carbon element from the fibers to the coatings was observed.

  7. CdS/FTO thin film electrodes deposited by chemical bath deposition and by electrochemical deposition: A comparative assessment of photo-electrochemical characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyoud, Ahed; Saa'deddin, Iyad; Khudruj, Sahar; Hawash, Zafer M.; Park, DaeHoon; Campet, Guy; Hilal, Hikmat S.

    2013-04-01

    CdS thin films have been deposited onto FTO/glass substrates by two different techniques, electrochemical deposition (ECD) and chemical bath deposition (CBD). Feasibility of using these two film types in photoelectrochemical processes has been critically investigated here. The films were comparatively characterized by a number of techniques (solid state absorption spectra, solid state photoluminescence spectra, XRD and SEM). PEC characteristics of the electrodes, including current density-voltage (J-V) plots, conversion efficiency (η), stability and fill-factor (FF) were then studied. The results show that both systems involved nano-sized CdS particles living in coagulates. The ECD was thinner and more uniform than the CBD system. The CBD films were more effective in PEC processes than the ECD counterparts. Effect of annealing on characteristics of both electrode systems has been investigated. Annealing enhanced both film characteristics, but the CBD was affected to a higher extent, and the annealed CBD film was more effective than the ECD counterpart.

  8. Predicting sulphur and nitrogen deposition using a simple statistical method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oulehle, Filip; Kopáček, Jiří; Chuman, Tomáš; Černohous, Vladimír; Hůnová, Iva; Hruška, Jakub; Krám, Pavel; Lachmanová, Zora; Navrátil, Tomáš; Štěpánek, Petr; Tesař, Miroslav; Evans, Christopher D.

    2016-09-01

    Data from 32 long-term (1994-2012) monitoring sites were used to assess temporal development and spatial variability of sulphur (S) and inorganic nitrogen (N) concentrations in bulk precipitation, and S in throughfall, for the Czech Republic. Despite large variance in absolute S and N concentration/deposition among sites, temporal coherence using standardised data (Z score) was demonstrated. Overall significant declines of SO4 concentration in bulk and throughfall precipitation, as well as NO3 and NH4 concentration in bulk precipitation, were observed. Median Z score values of bulk SO4, NO3 and NH4 and throughfall SO4 derived from observations and the respective emission rates of SO2, NOx and NH3 in the Czech Republic and Slovakia showed highly significant (p Z score values were calculated for the whole period 1900-2012 and then back-transformed to give estimates of concentration for the individual sites. Uncertainty associated with the concentration calculations was estimated as 20% for SO4 bulk precipitation, 22% for throughfall SO4, 18% for bulk NO3 and 28% for bulk NH4. The application of the method suggested that it is effective in the long-term reconstruction and prediction of S and N deposition at a variety of sites. Multiple regression modelling was used to extrapolate site characteristics (mean precipitation chemistry and its standard deviation) from monitored to unmonitored sites. Spatially distributed temporal development of S and N depositions were calculated since 1900. The method allows spatio-temporal estimation of the acid deposition in regions with extensive monitoring of precipitation chemistry.

  9. Synthesis of few layer single crystal graphene grains on platinum by chemical vapour deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. Karamat; S. Sonuşen; Ü. Çelik; Y. Uysallı; E. Özgönül; A. Oral

    2015-01-01

    The present competition of graphene electronics demands an efficient route which produces high quality and large area graphene. Chemical vapour deposition technique, where hydrocarbons dissociate in to active carbon species and form graphene layer on the desired metal catalyst via nucleation is considered as the most suitable method. In this study, single layer graphene with the presence of few layer single crystal graphene grains were grown on Pt foil via chemical vapour deposition. The higher growth temperature changes the surface morphology of the Pt foil so a delicate process of hydrogen bubbling was used to peel off graphene from Pt foil samples with the mechanical support of photoresist and further transferred to SiO2/Si substrates for analysis. Optical microscopy of the graphene transferred samples showed the regions of single layer along with different oriented graphene domains. Two type of interlayer stacking sequences, Bernal and twisted, were observed in the graphene grains. The presence of different stacking sequences in the graphene layers influence the electronic and optical properties;in Bernal stacking the band gap can be tunable and in twisted stacking the overall sheet resistance can be reduced. Grain boundaries of Pt provides low energy sites to the carbon species, therefore the nucleation of grains are more at the boundaries. The stacking order and the number of layers in grains were seen more clearly with scanning electron microscopy. Raman spectroscopy showed high quality graphene samples due to very small D peak. 2D Raman peak for single layer graphene showed full width half maximum (FWHM) value of 30 cm ? 1. At points A, B and C, Bernal stacked grain showed FWHM values of 51.22, 58.45 and 64.72 cm ? 1, while twisted stacked grain showed the FWHM values of 27.26, 28.83 and 20.99 cm ? 1, respectively. FWHM values of 2D peak of Bernal stacked grain showed an increase of 20–30 cm ? 1 as compare to single layer graphene which showed its

  10. Synthesis of few layer single crystal graphene grains on platinum by chemical vapour deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Karamat

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The present competition of graphene electronics demands an efficient route which produces high quality and large area graphene. Chemical vapour deposition technique, where hydrocarbons dissociate in to active carbon species and form graphene layer on the desired metal catalyst via nucleation is considered as the most suitable method. In this study, single layer graphene with the presence of few layer single crystal graphene grains were grown on Pt foil via chemical vapour deposition. The higher growth temperature changes the surface morphology of the Pt foil so a delicate process of hydrogen bubbling was used to peel off graphene from Pt foil samples with the mechanical support of photoresist and further transferred to SiO2/Si substrates for analysis. Optical microscopy of the graphene transferred samples showed the regions of single layer along with different oriented graphene domains. Two type of interlayer stacking sequences, Bernal and twisted, were observed in the graphene grains. The presence of different stacking sequences in the graphene layers influence the electronic and optical properties; in Bernal stacking the band gap can be tunable and in twisted stacking the overall sheet resistance can be reduced. Grain boundaries of Pt provides low energy sites to the carbon species, therefore the nucleation of grains are more at the boundaries. The stacking order and the number of layers in grains were seen more clearly with scanning electron microscopy. Raman spectroscopy showed high quality graphene samples due to very small D peak. 2D Raman peak for single layer graphene showed full width half maximum (FWHM value of 30 cm−1. At points A, B and C, Bernal stacked grain showed FWHM values of 51.22, 58.45 and 64.72 cm−1, while twisted stacked grain showed the FWHM values of 27.26, 28.83 and 20.99 cm−1, respectively. FWHM values of 2D peak of Bernal stacked grain showed an increase of 20–30 cm−1 as compare to single layer graphene

  11. Chemical characterisation of rainwater at Stromboli Island (Italy): The effect of post-depositional processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cangemi, Marianna; Madonia, Paolo; Favara, Rocco

    2017-04-01

    Volcanoes emit fluids and solid particles into the atmosphere that modify the chemical composition of natural precipitation. We have investigated the geochemistry of Stromboli's rainfall during the period from November 2014 to March 2016 using a network of a new type of sampler specifically designed for operations on volcanic islands. We found that most of the chemical modifications are due to processes occurring after the storage of rainwater in the sampling bottles. These processes include dissolution of volcanogenic soluble salts encrusting volcanic ash and a variable contribution of sea spray aerosol. Our data showed noticeably less scatter than has previously been achieved with a different sampling system that was more open to the atmosphere. This demonstrates the improved efficacy of the new sampler design. The data showed that post-depositional chemical alteration of rain samples dominates over processes occurring during droplet formation ad precipitation. This has important implications for the calculation of fluxes of chemicals from rainfall in volcanic regions.

  12. Electronic structure and chemical reaction of Ca deposition on regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Wei; GUO YuXian; FENG XueFei; ZHANG Liang; ZHANG WenHua; ZHU JunFa

    2009-01-01

    Conjugated polymer, regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (rr-P3HT), films were prepared by spin-coating the rr-P3HT chloroform solution onto clean silicon wafer surfaces. The chemical re-action and electronic structure of Ca deposition on rr-P3HT surfaces were in situ investigated by synchrotron radiation photoemission spectroscopy (SRPES) and X-ray photoemission spectros-copy (XPS). Upon Ca deposition, Ca-induced band bending of rr-P3HT is observed. In addition, Ca atoms preferentially react with S atoms of rr-P3HT. No obvious reaction between Ca and C atoms can be found. Through the investigation of the evolution of valence band spectra and secondary electron cut-off of rr-P3HT during the process of Ca deposition, an energy level alignment diagram at the Ca/rr-P3HT interface is derived.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of chemically deposited CdS thin films without toxic precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Pérez, A.; Sandoval-Paz, M. G.

    2016-05-01

    Al doped and undoped CdS thin films (CdS:Al) were deposited on glass, copper and bronze substrates by chemical bath deposition technique in an ammonia-free cadmium-sodium citrate system. The structural and optical properties of the CdS films were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and simultaneous transmission- reflection spectroscopy. It was found that the properties of the films depend on the amount of Al in the growth solutions and deposition time. The increase in Al content in the reaction solution led to a smaller crystallite size and higher energy band gap that varies in the range 2.42 eV - 2.59 eV depending on the Al content.

  14. FABRICATION OF DIAMOND TUBES IN BIAS-ENHANCED HOT-FILAMENT CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ming; MA Yuping; XIANG Daohui; SUN Fanghong

    2007-01-01

    Deposition of diamond thin films on tungsten wire Substrate with the gas mixture of acetone and hydrogen by using bias-enhanced hol filament chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with the tantalum wires being optimized arranged is investigated. The self-supported diamond tubes are obtained by etching away the tungsten Substrates. The quality of the diamond film before and after the removal of Substrates is observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Raman spectrum. The results show that the cylindrical diamond tubes with good quality and uniform thickness are obtained on tungsten wires by using bias enhanced hot filament CVD. The compressive stress in diamond film formed during the deposition is released after the Substrate etches away by mixture of H202 and NH4OH. There is no residual stress in diamond tube after Substrate removal.

  15. Characterization of chemical bath deposited buffer layers for thin film solar cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwyer, D.; Efstathiadis, H.; Haldar, P. [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, University at Albany - State University of New York, 257 Fuller Rd., Albany, NY 12203 (United States); Sun, R. [Angstrom Sun Technologies Inc., 33 Nagog Park, Acton, MA 01720 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS), indium sulfide (In{sub 2}S{sub 3}) and zinc sulfide (ZnS) thin films have been deposited by chemical bath deposition (CBD) for buffer layer applications in Cu-chalcopyrite-based thin film solar cells. Films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), UV-Vis transmission, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD), and spectroscopic ellipsometry. Results indicate CdS can be deposited with low oxygen content and high light transmission over 245-1700 nm. CBD-ZnS and CBD-InS both exhibit 5-10% less light transmission than CdS in the same thickness range. In terms of light transmission and degree of impurities CdS appears to be a better buffer material than CBD-ZnS or CBD-InS. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  16. Non-classical crystallization of silicon thin films during hot wire chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jae-Soo; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Da-Seul; Kim, Kun-Su; Park, Soon-Won; Hwang, Nong-Moon

    2017-01-01

    The deposition behavior of silicon films by hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) was approached by non-classical crystallization, where the building block of deposition is a nanoparticle generated in the gas phase of the reactor. The puzzling phenomenon of the formation of an amorphous incubation layer on glass could be explained by the liquid-like property of small charged nanoparticles (CNPs), which are generated in the initial stage of the HWCVD process. Using the liquid-like property of small CNPs, homo-epitaxial growth as thick as 150 nm could be successfully grown on a silicon wafer at 600 °C under the processing condition where CNPs as small as possible could be supplied steadily by a cyclic process which periodically resets the process. The size of CNPs turned out to be an important parameter in the microstructure evolution of thin films.

  17. Simultaneous growth of diamond and nanostructured graphite thin films by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M.; Ürgen, M.

    2012-01-01

    Diamond and graphite films on silicon wafer were simultaneously synthesized at 850 °C without any additional catalyst. The synthesis was achieved in hot-filament chemical vapor deposition reactor by changing distance among filaments in traditional gas mixture. The inter-wire distance for diamond and graphite deposition was kept 5 and 15 mm, whereas kept constant from the substrate. The Raman spectroscopic analyses show that film deposited at 5 mm is good quality diamond and at 15 mm is nanostructured graphite and respective growths confirm by scanning auger electron microscopy. The scanning electron microscope results exhibit that black soot graphite is composed of needle-like nanostructures, whereas diamond with pyramidal featured structure. Transformation of diamond into graphite mainly attributes lacking in atomic hydrogen. The present study develops new trend in the field of carbon based coatings, where single substrate incorporate dual application can be utilized.

  18. Chemical solution deposition of CaCu3Ti4O12 thin film

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Viswanathan S Saji; Han Cheol Choe

    2010-06-01

    CaCu3Ti4O12 (CCTO) thin film was successfully deposited on boron doped silica substrate by chemical solution deposition and rapid thermal processing. The phase and microstructure of the deposited films were studied as a function of sintering temperature, employing X-ray diffractometry and scanning electron microscopy. Dielectric properties of the films were measured at room temperature using impedance spectroscopy. Polycrystalline pure phase CCTO thin films with (220) preferential orientation was obtained at a sintering temperature of 750°C. There was a bimodal size distribution of grains. The dielectric constant and loss factor at 1 kHz obtained for a film sintered at 750°C was ∼ 2000 and tan ∼ 0.05.

  19. Nano sized bismuth oxy chloride by metal organic chemical vapour deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagdale, Pravin, E-mail: pravin.jagdale@polito.it [Department of Applied Science and Technology (DISAT), Politecnico di Torino, 10129 (Italy); Castellino, Micaela [Center for Space Human Robotics, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Corso Trento 21, 10129 Torino (Italy); Marrec, Françoise [Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, University of Picardie Jules Verne (UPJV), Amiens 80039 (France); Rodil, Sandra E. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexicom (UNAM), Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Tagliaferro, Alberto [Department of Applied Science and Technology (DISAT), Politecnico di Torino, 10129 (Italy)

    2014-06-01

    Metal organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) method was used to prepare thin films of bismuth based nano particles starting from bismuth salts. Nano sized bismuth oxy chloride (BiOCl) crystals were synthesized from solution containing bismuth chloride (BiCl{sub 3}) in acetone (CH{sub 3}-CO-CH{sub 3}). Self-assembly of nano sized BiOCl crystals were observed on the surface of silicon, fused silica, copper, carbon nanotubes and aluminium substrates. Various synthesis parameters and their significant impact onto the formation of self-assembled nano-crystalline BiOCl were investigated. BiOCl nano particles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Micro-Raman spectroscopy. These analyses confirm that bismuth nanometer-sized crystal structures showing a single tetragonal phase were indeed bismuth oxy chloride (BiOCl) square platelets 18–250 nm thick and a few micrometres wide.

  20. Incremental growth of short SWNT arrays by pulsed chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puretzky, Alexander A [ORNL; Geohegan, David B [ORNL; Jackson, Jeremy [Sentech, Inc.; Pannala, Sreekanth [ORNL; Eres, Gyula [ORNL; Rouleau, Christopher M [ORNL; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL; Thonnard, Norbert [ORNL; Readle, Jason D [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Very short, aligned arrays of continuous single wall carbon nanotubes were grown incrementally in steps as small as 25 nm using pulsed chemical vapor deposition. In situ optical extinction measurements indicate that over 98% of the nanotubes reinitiate growth on successive gas pulses, and HRTEM images show that the SWNTs do not exhibit segments, caps, or noticeable sidewall defects resulting from repeatedly stopping and restarting growth. Time-resolved laser reflectivity (3-ms temporal resolution) was used to record the nucleation and growth kinetics for each fast (0.2 second) gas pulse and measure the height increase of the array in situ, providing a "digital" method to incrementally grow short nanotube arrays to precise heights. Derivatives of the optical reflectivity signal reveal distinct temporal signatures for both nucleation and growth kinetics, with their amplitude ratio on the first gas pulse serving as a good predictor for aligned vs. unaligned growth. Incremental growth by pulsed CVD is interpreted in the context of autocatalytic kinetic models as a special processing window in which a sufficiently high flux of feedstock gas drives the nucleation and rapid growth phases of a catalyst nanoparticle ensemble to occur within the temporal period of the gas pulse, but without inducing growth termination.

  1. Incremental growth of short SWNT arrays by pulsed chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puretzky, Alexander A; Geohegan, David B; Jackson, Jeremy J; Pannala, Sreekanth; Eres, Gyula; Rouleau, Christopher M; More, Karren L; Thonnard, Norbert; Readle, Jason D

    2012-05-21

    Very short arrays of continuous single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are grown incrementally in steps as small as 25 nm using pulsed chemical vapor deposition (CVD). In-situ optical extinction measurements indicate that over 98% of the nanotubes reinitiate growth on successive gas pulses, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) images show that the SWNTs do not exhibit segments, caps, or noticeable sidewall defects resulting from repeatedly stopping and restarting growth. Time-resolved laser reflectivity (3-ms temporal resolution) is used to record the nucleation and growth kinetics for each fast (0.2 s) gas pulse and to measure the height increase of the array in situ, providing a method to incrementally grow short nanotube arrays to precise heights. Derivatives of the optical reflectivity signal reveal distinct temporal signatures for both nucleation and growth kinetics, with their amplitude ratio on the first gas pulse serving as a good predictor for the evolution of the growth of the nanotube ensemble into a coordinated array. Incremental growth by pulsed CVD is interpreted in the context of autocatalytic kinetic models as a special processing window in which a sufficiently high flux of feedstock gas drives the nucleation and rapid growth phases of a catalyst nanoparticle ensemble to occur within the temporal period of the gas pulse, but without inducing growth termination.

  2. Chemical Vapour Deposition of Graphene with Re-useable Pt and Cu substrates for Flexible Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamat, Shumaila; Sonusen, Selda; Celik, Umit; Uysalli, Yigit; Oral, Ahmet

    2015-03-01

    Graphene has gained the attention of scientific world due to its outstanding physical properties. The future demand of flexible electronics such as solar cells, light emitting diodes, photo-detectors and touch screen technology requires more exploration of graphene properties on flexible substrates. The most interesting application of graphene is in organic light emitting diodes (OLED) where efforts are in progress to replace brittle indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode with a flexible graphene electrode because ITO raw materials are becoming increasingly expensive, and its brittle nature makes it unsuitable for flexible devices. In this work, we grow graphene on Pt and Cu substrates using chemical vapour deposition (CVD) and transferred it to a polymer material (PVA) using lamination technique. We used hydrogen bubbling method for separating graphene from Pt and Cu catalyst to reuse the substrates many times. After successful transfer of graphene on polymer samples, we checked the resistivity values of the graphene sheet which varies with growth conditions. Furthermore, Raman, atomic force microscopy (AFM), I-V and Force-displacement measurements will be presented for these samples.

  3. Investigations of high mobility single crystal chemical vapor deposition diamond for radiotherapy photon beam monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tromson, D.; Descamps, C.; Tranchant, N.; Bergonzo, P.; Nesladek, M.; Isambert, A.

    2008-03-01

    The intrinsic properties of diamond make this material theoretically very suitable for applications in medical physics. Until now ionization chambers have been fabricated from natural stones and are commercialized by PTW, but their fairly high costs and long delivery times have often limited their use in hospital. The properties of commercialized intrinsic polycrystalline diamond were investigated in the past by many groups. The results were not completely satisfactory due to the nature of the polycrystalline material itself. In contrast, the recent progresses in the growth of high mobility single crystal synthetic diamonds prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique offer new alternatives. In the framework of the MAESTRO project (Methods and Advanced Treatments and Simulations for Radio Oncology), the CEA-LIST is studying the potentialities of synthetic diamond for new techniques of irradiation such as intensity modulated radiation therapy. In this paper, we present the growth and characteristics of single crystal diamond prepared at CEA-LIST in the framework of the NoRHDia project (Novel Radiation Hard CVD Diamond Detector for Hadrons Physics), as well as the investigations of high mobility single crystal CVD diamond for radiotherapy photon beam monitoring: dosimetric analysis performed with the single crystal diamond detector in terms of stability and repeatability of the response signal, signal to noise ratio, response speed, linearity of the signal versus the absorbed dose, and dose rate. The measurements performed with photon beams using radiotherapy facilities demonstrate that single crystal CVD diamond is a good alternative for air ionization chambers for beam quality control.

  4. Direct-Liquid-Evaporation Chemical Vapor Deposition of Nanocrystalline Cobalt Metal for Nanoscale Copper Interconnect Encapsulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jun; Gong, Xian; Lou, Xiabing; Gordon, Roy G

    2017-03-29

    In advanced microelectronics, precise design of liner and capping layers become critical, especially when it comes to the fabrication of Cu interconnects with dimensions lower than its mean free path. Herein, we demonstrate that direct-liquid-evaporation chemical vapor deposition (DLE-CVD) of Co is a promising method to make liner and capping layers for nanoscale Cu interconnects. DLE-CVD makes pure, smooth, nanocrystalline, and highly conformal Co films with highly controllable growth characteristics. This process allows full Co encapsulation of nanoscale Cu interconnects, thus stabilizing Cu against diffusion and electromigration. Electrical measurements and high-resolution elemental imaging studies show that the DLE-CVD Co encapsulation layer can improve the reliability and thermal stability of Cu interconnects. Also, with the high conductivity of Co, the DLE-CVD Co encapsulation layer have the potential to further decrease the power consumption of nanoscale Cu interconnects, paving the way for Cu interconnects with higher efficiency in future high-end microelectronics.

  5. Chemical vapor deposition based tungsten disulfide (WS2) thin film transistor

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Aftab M.

    2013-04-01

    Tungsten disulfide (WS2) is a layered transition metal dichalcogenide with a reported band gap of 1.8 eV in bulk and 1.32-1.4 eV in its thin film form. 2D atomic layers of metal dichalcogenides have shown changes in conductivity with applied electric field. This makes them an interesting option for channel material in field effect transistors (FETs). Therefore, we show a highly manufacturable chemical vapor deposition (CVD) based simple process to grow WS2 directly on silicon oxide in a furnace and then its transistor action with back gated device with room temperature field effect mobility of 0.1003 cm2/V-s using the Schottky barrier contact model. We also show the semiconducting behavior of this WS2 thin film which is more promising than thermally unstable organic materials for thin film transistor application. Our direct growth method on silicon oxide also holds interesting opportunities for macro-electronics applications. © 2013 IEEE.

  6. PENGARUH TEMPERATUR DEPOSISI PADA PENUMBUHAN FILM TIPIS SILIKON KARBIDA DENGAN METODE HOMEMADE HOT-MESH CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Astuti

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Film tipis silikon karbida (SiC telah ditumbuhkan di atas substrate graphene/SiO2/Si dengan metode Homemade Hot-mesh chemical vapor deposition (Hot-Mesh CVD. Pengaruh dari temperature deposisi pada struktur dan morfologi film tipis SiC telah dipelajari dengan menggunakan X-Ray diffractometer (XRD, FESEM dan EDX, dan spektroskopi Raman. Karakterisasi XRD menunjukkan bahwa film tipis SiC memiliki struktur polikristal tipe kubik dengan orientasi (111. Kualitas film tipis SiC, dan ukuran butir kristal dari morfologi film yang dihasilkan meningkat dengan peningkatan temperatur deposisi. Dari karakterisasi spektroskopi Raman, dapati terdapat dua puncak pergeseran Raman yang dominan pada daerah sekitar 780 - 800 cm-1 dan  950 – 980 cm-1 yang merupakan mode fonon SiC-TO dan SiC-LO. Puncak pergeseran Raman tersebut bergeser ke bilangan gelombang yang lebih pendek dengan peningkatan temperature deposisi.Silicon carbide (SiC thin film grown on graphene/SiO2/Si substrate using homemade hot mesh chemical vapor deposition (Hot-Mesh SVD method has been done. Effect of  deposition temperature on structure and morphology of the thin film was studied by using X-ray diffractometer (XRD, FESEM and EDX, and Raman spectroscopy. XRD characteristics shows that SiC thin film has cubic polycrystalline structure with (111 orientation. Quality of the SiC thin film, and crystallite grain size from the film morphology was resulted increases with the increase of the deposition temperature. Based on the characterization of Raman spectroscopy, shows that two peak Raman shift in the range of 780 - 800 cm-1 and  950 – 980 cm-1 was attributed to SiC-TO and SiC-LO phonon mode.  The Raman shift peak was shifted toward the lower wavenumber with the increase of deposition temperature.

  7. High quality antireflective ZnS thin films prepared by chemical bath deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tec-Yam, S.; Rojas, J.; Rejon, V. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Unidad Merida, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Km. 6 Antigua Carretera a Progreso, AP 73-Cordemex, 97310 Merida Yucatan (Mexico); Oliva, A.I., E-mail: oliva@mda.cinvestav.mx [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Unidad Merida, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Km. 6 Antigua Carretera a Progreso, AP 73-Cordemex, 97310 Merida Yucatan (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    Zinc sulfide (ZnS) thin films for antireflective applications were deposited on glass substrates by chemical bath deposition (CBD). Chemical analysis of the soluble species permits to predict the optimal pH conditions to obtain high quality ZnS films. For the CBD, the ZnCl{sub 2}, NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}, and CS(NH{sub 2}){sub 2} were fixed components, whereas the KOH concentration was varied from 0.8 to 1.4 M. Groups of samples with deposition times from 60 to 120 min were prepared in a bath with magnetic agitation and heated at 90 Degree-Sign C. ZnS films obtained from optimal KOH concentrations of 0.9 M and 1.0 M exhibited high transparency, homogeneity, adherence, and crystalline. The ZnS films presented a band gap energy of 3.84 eV, an atomic Zn:S stoichiometry ratio of 49:51, a transmittance above 85% in the 300-800 nm wavelength range, and a reflectance below 25% in the UV-Vis range. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed a cubic structure in the (111) orientation for the films. The thickness of the films was tuned between 60 nm and 135 nm by controlling the deposition time and KOH concentration. The incorporation of the CBD-ZnS films into ITO/ZnS/CdS/CdTe and glass/Mo/ZnS heterostructures as antireflective layer confirms their high optical quality. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High quality ZnS thin films were prepared by chemical bath deposition (CBD). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Better CBD-ZnS films were achieved by using 0.9 M-KOH concentration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reduction in the reflectance was obtained for ZnS films used as buffer layers.

  8. Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) grown bi-layer graphene transistor characteristics at high temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Qaisi, Ramy M.

    2014-05-15

    We report the characteristics of atmospheric chemical vapor deposition grown bilayer graphene transistors fabricated on ultra-scaled (10 nm) high-κ dielectric aluminum oxide (Al2O3) at elevated temperatures. We observed that the drive current increased by >400% as temperature increased from room temperature to 250 °C. Low gate leakage was maintained for prolonged exposure at 100 °C but increased significantly at temperatures >200 °C. These results provide important insights for considering chemical vapor deposition graphene on aluminum oxide for high temperature applications where low power and high frequency operation are required. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Synthesis of magnetic tunnel junctions with full in situ atomic layer and chemical vapor deposition processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantovan, R., E-mail: roberto.mantovan@mdm.imm.cnr.it [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR, Via C. Olivetti 2, 20864 Agrate Brianza (Italy); Vangelista, S.; Kutrzeba-Kotowska, B.; Cocco, S.; Lamperti, A.; Tallarida, G. [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR, Via C. Olivetti 2, 20864 Agrate Brianza (MB) (Italy); Mameli, D. [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR, Via C. Olivetti 2, 20864 Agrate Brianza (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Universita di Cagliari, Cittadella Universitaria, 09042 Monserrato, Cagliari (Italy); Fanciulli, M. [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR, Via C. Olivetti 2, 20864 Agrate Brianza (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Universita degli studi Milano-Bicocca, Via R Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy)

    2012-05-01

    Magnetic tunnel junctions, i.e. the combination of two ferromagnetic electrodes separated by an ultrathin tunnel oxide barrier, are core elements in a large variety of spin-based devices. We report on the use of combined chemical vapor and atomic layer deposition processes for the synthesis of magnetic tunnel junctions with no vacuum break. Structural, chemical and morphological characterizations of selected ferromagnetic and oxide layers are reported, together with the evidence of tunnel magnetoresistance effect in patterned Fe/MgO/Co junctions.

  10. Thin Films with Low Zn Content Prepared by Chemical Bath Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caijuan Tian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical bath deposition (CBD was used for the growth of thin films with low Zn content. The influence of preparation conditions, such as pH, temperature, and concentration, on film properties was investigated. The chemical growth mechanism of thin films was analyzed, and optimized growth conditions for the thin films were established. The fill factor and short-circuit current were improved while was used to replace CdS as the window layer in CdTe solar cells.

  11. Methods in industrial biotechnology for chemical engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Kandasamy, W B Vasantha

    2008-01-01

    In keeping with the definition that biotechnology is really no more than a name given to a set of techniques and processes, the authors apply some set of fuzzy techniques to chemical industry problems such as finding the proper proportion of raw mix to control pollution, to study flow rates, to find out the better quality of products. We use fuzzy control theory, fuzzy neural networks, fuzzy relational equations, genetic algorithms to these problems for solutions. When the solution to the problem can have certain concepts or attributes as indeterminate, the only model that can tackle such a situation is the neutrosophic model. The authors have also used these models in this book to study the use of biotechnology in chemical industries. This book has six chapters. First chapter gives a brief description of biotechnology. Second chapter deals will proper proportion of mix of raw materials in cement industries to minimize pollution using fuzzy control theory. Chapter three gives the method of determination of te...

  12. CdS thin films prepared by laser assisted chemical bath deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, L.V.; Mendivil, M.I.; Garcia Guillen, G.; Aguilar Martinez, J.A. [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Av. Pedro de Alba s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon 66450 (Mexico); Krishnan, B. [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Av. Pedro de Alba s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon 66450 (Mexico); CIIDIT – Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Apodaca, Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Avellaneda, D.; Castillo, G.A.; Das Roy, T.K. [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Av. Pedro de Alba s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon 66450 (Mexico); Shaji, S., E-mail: sshajis@yahoo.com [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Av. Pedro de Alba s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon 66450 (Mexico); CIIDIT – Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Apodaca, Nuevo Leon (Mexico)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • CdS thin films by conventional CBD and laser assisted CBD. • Characterized these films using XRD, XPS, AFM, optical and electrical measurements. • Accelerated growth was observed in the laser assisted CBD process. • Improved dark conductivity and good photocurrent response for the LACBD CdS. - Abstract: In this work, we report the preparation and characterization of CdS thin films by laser assisted chemical bath deposition (LACBD). CdS thin films were prepared from a chemical bath containing cadmium chloride, triethanolamine, ammonium hydroxide and thiourea under various deposition conditions. The thin films were deposited by in situ irradiation of the bath using a continuous laser of wavelength 532 nm, varying the power density. The thin films obtained during deposition of 10, 20 and 30 min were analyzed. The changes in morphology, structure, composition, optical and electrical properties of the CdS thin films due to in situ irradiation of the bath were analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and UV–vis spectroscopy. The thin films obtained by LACBD were nanocrystalline, photoconductive and presented interesting morphologies. The results showed that LACBD is an effective synthesis technique to obtain nanocrystalline CdS thin films having good optoelectronic properties.

  13. Large improvement of phosphorus incorporation efficiency in n-type chemical vapor deposition of diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtani, Ryota; Yamamoto, Takashi; Janssens, Stoffel D.; Yamasaki, Satoshi; Koizumi, Satoshi

    2014-12-01

    Microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition is a promising way to generate n-type, e.g., phosphorus-doped, diamond layers for the fabrication of electronic components, which can operate at extreme conditions. However, a deeper understanding of the doping process is lacking and low phosphorus incorporation efficiencies are generally observed. In this work, it is shown that systematically changing the internal design of a non-commercial chemical vapor deposition chamber, used to grow diamond layers, leads to a large increase of the phosphorus doping efficiency in diamond, produced in this device, without compromising its electronic properties. Compared to the initial reactor design, the doping efficiency is about 100 times higher, reaching 10%, and for a very broad doping range, the doping efficiency remains highly constant. It is hypothesized that redesigning the deposition chamber generates a higher flow of active phosphorus species towards the substrate, thereby increasing phosphorus incorporation in diamond and reducing deposition of phosphorus species at reactor walls, which additionally reduces undesirable memory effects.

  14. Structural, optical and electrical properties of chemically deposited nonstoichiometric copper indium diselenide films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R H Bari; L A Patil; P P Patil

    2006-10-01

    Thin films of copper indium diselenide (CIS) were prepared by chemical bath deposition technique onto glass substrate at temperature, 60°C. The studies on composition, morphology, optical absorption, electrical conductivity and structure of the films were carried out and discussed. Characterization included X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) and absorption spectroscopy. The results are discussed and interpreted.

  15. Chemical spray pyrolysis of β-In2S3 thin films deposited at different temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    SALL, THIERNO; Marí Soucase, Bernabé; Mollar García, Miguel Alfonso; Hartitti, Bouchaib; Fahoume, Mounir

    2015-01-01

    In2S3 thin films were deposited onto indium tin oxide-coated glass substrates by chemical spray pyrolysis while keeping the substrates at different temperatures. The structures of the sprayed In2S3 thin films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XFD). The quality of the thin films was determined by Raman spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy were used to explore the surface morphology and topography of the thin films, respectively. The optic...

  16. Theoretical Descriptions of Carbon Nanotubes Synthesis in a Chemical Vapor Deposition Reactor: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Lubej, M.; Plazl, I.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms by which carbon nanotubes nucleate and grow are still poorly understood. Understanding and mathematically describing the process is crucial for its optimization. This paper reviews different models which have been proposed to explain carbon nanotube growth in the chemical vapor deposition process. The review is divided into two sections, the first section describes some nucleation, growth and termination simulations based on molecular dynamics, and the second section describes ...

  17. Graphene growth from reduced graphene oxide by chemical vapour deposition: seeded growth accompanied by restoration

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the underlying mechanisms involved in graphene growth via chemical vapour deposition (CVD) is critical for precise control of the characteristics of graphene. Despite much effort, the actual processes behind graphene synthesis still remain to be elucidated in a large number of aspects. Herein, we report the evolution of graphene properties during in-plane growth of graphene from reduced graphene oxide (RGO) on copper (Cu) via methane CVD. While graphene is laterally grown from R...

  18. Fabrication of Rare Earth-Doped Transparent Glass Ceramic Optical Fibers by Modified Chemical Vapor Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    International audience; Rare earth (RE) doped silica-based optical fibers with transparent glass ceramic (TGC) core was fabricated through the well-known modified chemical vapor deposition (MCVD) process without going through the commonly used stage of post-ceramming. The main characteristics of the RE-doped oxyde nanoparticles namely, their density and mean diameter in the fibers are dictated by the concentration of alkaline earth element used as phase separating agent. Magnesium and erbium ...

  19. Growth of Aligned Carbon Nanotubes through Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王升高; 汪建华; 马志斌; 王传新; 满卫东

    2005-01-01

    Aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were synthesized on glass by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MWPCVD) with a mixture of methane and hydrogen gases at the low temperature of 550 ℃. The experimental results show that both the self-bias potential and the density of the catalyst particles are responsible for the alignment of CNTs. When the catalyst particle density is high enough, strong interactions among the CNTs can inhibit CNTs from growing randomly and result in parallel alignment.

  20. Growth process conditions of tungsten oxide thin films using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houweling, Z. Silvester, E-mail: Z.S.Houweling@uu.nl [Nanophotonics - Physics of Devices, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University, Princetonlaan 4, 3584 CB Utrecht (Netherlands); Geus, John W. [Electron Microscopy, Utrecht University, Padualaan 8, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands); Jong, Michiel de; Harks, Peter-Paul R.M.L.; Werf, Karine H.M. van der; Schropp, Ruud E.I. [Nanophotonics - Physics of Devices, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University, Princetonlaan 4, 3584 CB Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Process parameters to control hot-wire CVD of WO{sub 3-x} are categorized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Growth time, oxygen partial pressure, filament and substrate temperature are varied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemical and crystal structure, optical bandgap and morphology are determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxygen partial pressure determines the deposition rate up to as high as 36 {mu}m min{sup -1}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanostructures, viz. wires, crystallites and closed crystallite films, are controllably deposited. - Abstract: We report the growth conditions of nanostructured tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3-x}) thin films using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD). Two tungsten filaments were resistively heated to various temperatures and exposed to an air flow at various subatmospheric pressures. The oxygen partial pressure was varied from 6.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} to 1.0 mbar and the current through the filaments was varied from 4.0 to 9.0 A, which constitutes a filament temperature of 1390-2340 Degree-Sign C in vacuum. It is observed that the deposition rate of the films is predominantly determined by the oxygen partial pressure; it changes from about 1 to about 36,000 nm min{sup -1} in the investigated range. Regardless of the oxygen partial pressure and filament temperature used, thin films with a nanogranular morphology are obtained, provided that the depositions last for 30 min or shorter. The films consist either of amorphous or partially crystallized WO{sub 3-x} with high averaged transparencies of over 70% and an indirect optical band gap of 3.3 {+-} 0.1 eV. A prolonged deposition time entails an extended exposure of the films to thermal radiation from the filaments, which causes crystallization to monoclinic WO{sub 3} with diffraction maxima due to the (0 0 2), (2 0 0) and (0 2 0) crystallographic planes, furthermore the nanograins sinter and the films exhibit a cone

  1. Influence of the growth parameters on TiO2 thin films deposited using the MOCVD method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardi M. I. B.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we report the synthesis of TiO2 thin films by the Organometallic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD method. The influence of deposition parameters used during the growth in the obtained structural characteristics was studied. Different temperatures of the organometallic bath, deposition time, temperature and type of the substrate were combined. Using Scanning Electron Microscopy associated to Electron Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy and X-ray Diffraction, the strong influence of these parameters in the thin films final microstructure was verified.

  2. Electrodes on a budget: Micropatterned electrode fabrication by wet chemical deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Ebina, Wataru; Rowat, Amy C; Weitz, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Precise patterning of metals is required for diverse microfluidic and microelectromechanical system (MEMS) applications ranging from the separation of proteins to the manipulation of single cells and drops of water-in-oil emulsions. Here we present a very simple, inexpensive method for fabricating micropatterned electrodes. We deposit a thin metal layer of controlled thickness using wet chemistry, thus eliminating the need for expensive equipment typically required for metal deposition. We de...

  3. Hybrid opto-chemical doping in Ag nanoparticle-decorated monolayer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition probed by Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, R.; Haldar, S.; Majumdar, D.; Singha, A.; Ray, S. K.

    2017-02-01

    The novel opto-chemical doping effect in Ag nanoparticle-decorated monolayer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition has been investigated using Raman spectroscopy for the first time. We used both noble metal nanoparticles and optical excitation, in a hybrid opto-chemical route, to tune the doping level in graphene. Metal nanoparticle-induced chemical effects and laser power-induced substrate effects alter the doping nature of graphene from p- to n-type. Compared with earlier studies, the proposed method significantly lowers the laser intensity required for optical power-dependent doping, resulting in prevention of damage to the sample due to local heating. Some other interesting observations are the enhanced peak intensity in the Raman spectrum of graphene, enhancement of the D-band intensity and the introduction of G-band splitting. This novel, cheap and easily implemented hybrid optical-chemical doping strategy could be very useful for tuning graphene plasmons on the widely used Si/SiO2 substrates for various photonic device applications.

  4. Chemical Methods for Peptide and Protein Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istvan Toth

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Since the invention of solid phase synthetic methods by Merrifield in 1963, the number of research groups focusing on peptide synthesis has grown exponentially. However, the original step-by-step synthesis had limitations: the purity of the final product decreased with the number of coupling steps. After the development of Boc and Fmoc protecting groups, novel amino acid protecting groups and new techniques were introduced to provide high quality and quantity peptide products. Fragment condensation was a popular method for peptide production in the 1980s, but unfortunately the rate of racemization and reaction difficulties proved less than ideal. Kent and co-workers revolutionized peptide coupling by introducing the chemoselective reaction of unprotected peptides, called native chemical ligation. Subsequently, research has focused on the development of novel ligating techniques including the famous click reaction, ligation of peptide hydrazides, and the recently reported a-ketoacid-hydroxylamine ligations with 5-oxaproline. Several companies have been formed all over the world to prepare high quality Good Manufacturing Practice peptide products on a multi-kilogram scale. This review describes the advances in peptide chemistry including the variety of synthetic peptide methods currently available and the broad application of peptides in medicinal chemistry.

  5. Highly efficient shrinkage of inverted-pyramid silicon nanopores by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yifan; Deng, Tao; Chen, Qi; Liang, Feng; Liu, Zewen

    2016-06-24

    Solid-state nanopore-based analysis systems are currently one of the most attractive and promising platforms in sensing fields. This work presents a highly efficient method to shrink inverted-pyramid silicon nanopores using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) technology by the deposition of SiN x onto the surface of the nanopore. The contraction of the inverted-pyramid silicon nanopores when subjected to the PECVD process has been modeled and carefully analyzed, and the modeling data are in good agreement with the experimental results within a specific PECVD shrinkage period (∼0-600 s). Silicon nanopores within a 50-400 nm size range contract to sub-10 nm dimensions. Additionally, the inner structure of the nanopores after the PECVD process has been analyzed by focused ion beam cutting process. The results show an inner structure morphology change from inverted-pyramid to hourglass, which may enhance the spatial resolution of sensing devices.

  6. Raman Spectroscopic Study of Carbon Nanotubes Prepared Using Fe/ZnO-Palm Olein-Chemical Vapour Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syazwan Afif Mohd Zobir

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs were synthesized using Fe/ZnO catalyst by a dual-furnace thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD method at 800–1000°C using nitrogen gas with a constant flow rate of 150 sccm/min as a gas carrier. Palm olein (PO, ferrocene in the presence of 0.05 M zinc nitrate, and a p-type silicon wafer were used as carbon source, catalyst precursor, and sample target, respectively. D, G, and G′ bands were observed at 1336–1364, 1559–1680, and 2667–2682 cm-1, respectively. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs with the highest degree of crystallinity were obtained at around 8000°C, and the smallest diameter of about 2 nm was deposited on the silicon substrate at 1000°C.

  7. Highly efficient shrinkage of inverted-pyramid silicon nanopores by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yifan; Deng, Tao; Chen, Qi; Liang, Feng; Liu, Zewen

    2016-06-01

    Solid-state nanopore-based analysis systems are currently one of the most attractive and promising platforms in sensing fields. This work presents a highly efficient method to shrink inverted-pyramid silicon nanopores using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) technology by the deposition of SiN x onto the surface of the nanopore. The contraction of the inverted-pyramid silicon nanopores when subjected to the PECVD process has been modeled and carefully analyzed, and the modeling data are in good agreement with the experimental results within a specific PECVD shrinkage period (˜0-600 s). Silicon nanopores within a 50-400 nm size range contract to sub-10 nm dimensions. Additionally, the inner structure of the nanopores after the PECVD process has been analyzed by focused ion beam cutting process. The results show an inner structure morphology change from inverted-pyramid to hourglass, which may enhance the spatial resolution of sensing devices.

  8. Intertwisted fibrillar diamond-like carbon films prepared by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨武保; 王久丽; 张谷令; 范松华; 刘赤子; 杨思泽

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the structures, optical and mechanical properties of diamond-like carbon films are studied, which are prepared by a self-fabricated electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition method at room temperature in the ambient gases of mixed acetylene and nitrogen. The morphology and microstructure of the processed film are characterized by the atomic force microscope image, Raman spectra and middle Fourier transform infrared transmittance spectra, which reveal that there is an intertwisted fibrillar diamond-like structure in the film and the film is mainly composed of sp3 CH, sp3 C-C, sp2 C=C, C=N and C60. The film micro-hardness and bulk modulus are measured by a nano-indenter and the refractive constant and deposition rate are also calculated.

  9. Influence of complexing agent on the growth of chemically deposited Ni3Pb2S2 thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Soonmin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Ni3Pb2S2 thin films were prepared by chemical bath deposition method. Here, the objective of this research was to investigate the influence of complexing agent on the properties of films.These films were characterized using atomic force microscopy, UV-Visible spectro photometer and X-ray diffraction. It was found that, as the concentration of tartaric acid increased, film thickness increased, but, the band gap reduced. For the films prepared using 0.1M of tartaric acid, the films were uniform and completely covered the substrates.

  10. Effect of MoO3 constituents on the growth of MoS2 nanosheets by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuan; Zhang, Yong Ping; Qian Chen, Zhi

    2016-06-01

    The highly crystalline and uniform MoS2 film was grown on Si substrate by a low-pressure chemical vapor deposition method using S and MoO3 as precursors at an elevated temperature. The structures and properties of MoS2 nanosheets vary greatly with the content of MoO3 constituents in the films. The nanostructured MoS2 film exhibits strong photoluminescence in the visible range. This work may provide a pathway to synthesizing MoS2 nanosheets and facilitate the development of applicable devices.

  11. Silica-titania composite aerogel photocatalysts by chemical liquid deposition of titania onto nanoporous silica scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zu, Guoqing; Shen, Jun; Wang, Wenqin; Zou, Liping; Lian, Ya; Zhang, Zhihua

    2015-03-11

    Silica-titania composite aerogels were synthesized by chemical liquid deposition of titania onto nanoporous silica scaffolds. This novel deposition process was based on chemisorption of partially hydrolyzed titanium alkoxides from solution onto silica nanoparticle surfaces and subsequent hydrolysis and condensation to afford titania nanoparticles on the silica surface. The titania is homogeneously distributed in the silica-titania composite aerogels, and the titania content can be effectively controlled by regulating the deposition cycles. The resultant composite aerogel with 15 deposition cycles possessed a high specific surface area (SSA) of 425 m(2)/g, a small particle size of 5-14 nm, and a large pore volume and pore size of 2.41 cm(3)/g and 18.1 nm, respectively, after heat treatment at 600 °C and showed high photocatalytic activity in the photodegradation of methylene blue under UV-light irradiation. Its photocatalytic activity highly depends on the deposition cycles and heat treatment. The combination of small particle size, high SSA, and enhanced crystallinity after heat treatment at 600 °C contributes to the excellent photocatalytic property of the silica-titania composite aerogel. The higher SSAs compared to those of the reported titania aerogels (aerogels promising candidates as photocatalysts.

  12. Chain Assemblies from Nanoparticles Synthesized by Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition: The Computational View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishin, Maxim V; Zamotin, Kirill Y; Protopopova, Vera S; Alexandrov, Sergey E

    2015-12-01

    This article refers to the computational study of nanoparticle self-organization on the solid-state substrate surface with consideration of the experimental results, when nanoparticles were synthesised during atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (AP-PECVD). The experimental study of silicon dioxide nanoparticle synthesis by AP-PECVD demonstrated that all deposit volume consists of tangled chains of nanoparticles. In certain cases, micron-sized fractals are formed from tangled chains due to deposit rearrangement. This work is focused on the study of tangled chain formation only. In order to reveal their formation mechanism, a physico-mathematical model was developed. The suggested model was based on the motion equation solution for charged and neutral nanoparticles in the potential fields with the use of the empirical interaction potentials. In addition, the computational simulation was carried out based on the suggested model. As a result, the influence of such experimental parameters as deposition duration, particle charge, gas flow velocity, and angle of gas flow was found. It was demonstrated that electrical charges carried by nanoparticles from the discharge area are not responsible for the formation of tangled chains from nanoparticles, whereas nanoparticle kinetic energy plays a crucial role in deposit morphology and density. The computational results were consistent with experimental results.

  13. Growth of nanocrystalline silicon carbide thin films by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, S W; Moon, J Y; Ahn, S S; Kim, H Y; Shin, D H

    1999-01-01

    Nanocrystalline silicon carbide thin films have been deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using SiH sub 4 , CH sub 4 , and H sub 2 gases. The effects of gas mixing ratio (CH sub 4 /SiH sub 4), deposition temperature, and RF power on the film properties have been studied. The growth rate, refractive index, and the optical energy gap depends critically on the growth conditions. The dependence of the growth rate on the gas flow ratio is quite different from the results obtained for the growth using C sub 2 H sub 2 gas instead of CH sub 4. As the deposition temperature is increased from 300 .deg. C to 600 .deg. C, hydrogen and carbon content in the film decreases and as a result the optical gap decreases. At the deposition temperature of 600 .deg. C and RF power of 150 W, the film structure si nanocrystalline, As the result of the nanocrystallization the dark conductivity is greatly improved. The nanocrystalline silicon carbide thin films may be used for large area optoelectronic devices...

  14. Synthesis of thin films in boron-carbon-nitrogen ternary system by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukreja, Ratandeep Singh

    The Boron Carbon Nitorgen (B-C-N) ternary system includes materials with exceptional properties such as wide band gap, excellent thermal conductivity, high bulk modulus, extreme hardness and transparency in the optical and UV range that find application in most fields ranging from micro-electronics, bio-sensors, and cutting tools to materials for space age technology. Interesting materials that belong to the B-C-N ternary system include Carbon nano-tubes, Boron Carbide, Boron Carbon Nitride (B-CN), hexagonal Boron Nitride ( h-BN), cubic Boron Nitride (c-BN), Diamond and beta Carbon Nitride (beta-C3N4). Synthesis of these materials requires precisely controlled and energetically favorable conditions. Chemical vapor deposition is widely used technique for deposition of thin films of ceramics, metals and metal-organic compounds. Microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD) is especially interesting because of its ability to deposit materials that are meta-stable under the deposition conditions, for e.g. diamond. In the present study, attempt has been made to synthesize beta-carbon nitride (beta-C3N4) and cubic-Boron Nitride (c-BN) thin films by MPECVD. Also included is the investigation of dependence of residual stress and thermal conductivity of the diamond thin films, deposited by MPECVD, on substrate pre-treatment and deposition temperature. Si incorporated CNx thin films are synthesized and characterized while attempting to deposit beta-C3N4 thin films on Si substrates using Methane (CH4), Nitrogen (N2), and Hydrogen (H2). It is shown that the composition and morphology of Si incorporated CNx thin film can be tailored by controlling the sequence of introduction of the precursor gases in the plasma chamber. Greater than 100mum size hexagonal crystals of N-Si-C are deposited when Nitrogen precursor is introduced first while agglomerates of nano-meter range graphitic needles of C-Si-N are deposited when Carbon precursor is introduced first in the

  15. Comparison of galvanic displacement and electroless methods for deposition of gold nanoparticles on synthetic calcite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chamarthi K Srikanth; P Jeevanandam

    2012-11-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been deposited on synthetic calcite substrate by galvanic displacement reaction and electroless deposition methods. A comparative study has shown that electroless deposition is superior compared to galvanic displacement reaction for uniform deposition of gold nanoparticles on calcite. Characterization of the samples, prepared by two different deposition methods, was carried out by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE–SEM) and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) measurements. FE–SEM studies prove that smaller nanoparticles of gold are deposited uniformly on calcite if electroless deposition method was employed and DRS measurements show the characteristic surface plasmon resonance of gold nanoparticles.

  16. a Design of Experiment Study of the Nucleation of Chemical Vapor Deposited Diamond Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chi

    1995-01-01

    Because of its property, diamond has a unique role in the semiconductor and tool industry. As diamond synthesis technology advances, more and more applications are emerging. However, in order to take advantage of its exceptional property, reliable control of nucleation and growth must be accomplished. In this study, the author systematically studies the nucleation process in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of diamonds. Among many important intricacies concerning diamond nucleation on foreign surfaces, this study addresses the following issues: the role of ultrasonic pre-treatment in CVD; the correlation between hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) and microwave assisted chemical vapor deposition (MACVD) control parameters and the nucleation processes; the role of biasing substrates on the nucleation density in MACVD; the correlation between parameters of biasing substrates and the nucleation density; the reliable control of nucleation in CVD diamond synthesis. To achieve the goal of this research, a multi -purpose deposition system was built enabling the author to eliminate unnecessary variables in the deposition process. To ensure the accuracy of the nucleation effects of parameters investigated, great effort was made to calibrate measurement instruments so that noise or fluctuations in the experiments were minimized. The implementation of design of experiments (DOE), a systematic investigating technique, vastly improved the efficiency of this study over the less sophisticated empirical approach. In addition, DOE allowed the author to quantitatively estimate the effects of control parameters. Finally, diamond deposition was confirmed by Scanning Electron microscope, Micro Raman Scattering and Rutherford Backscattering. This research has successfully implemented DOE in estimating the effects of diamond nucleation quantitatively. The mechanism of ultrasonic pre-treatment is explained, and its effects are ascribed to seeding. The effects of primary CVD

  17. Osteoconductive Potential of Barrier NanoSiO2 PLGA Membranes Functionalized by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terriza, Antonia; Vilches-Pérez, Jose I.; de la Orden, Emilio; Yubero, Francisco; Gonzalez-Caballero, Juan L.; González-Elipe, Agustin R.; Vilches, José; Salido, Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    The possibility of tailoring membrane surfaces with osteoconductive potential, in particular in biodegradable devices, to create modified biomaterials that stimulate osteoblast response should make them more suitable for clinical use, hopefully enhancing bone regeneration. Bioactive inorganic materials, such as silica, have been suggested to improve the bioactivity of synthetic biopolymers. An in vitro study on HOB human osteoblasts was performed to assess biocompatibility and bioactivity of SiO2 functionalized poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) membranes, prior to clinical use. A 15 nm SiO2 layer was deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD), onto a resorbable PLGA membrane. Samples were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). HOB cells were seeded on sterilized test surfaces where cell morphology, spreading, actin cytoskeletal organization, and focal adhesion expression were assessed. As proved by the FT-IR analysis of samples, the deposition by PECVD of the SiO2 onto the PLGA membrane did not alter the composition and other characteristics of the organic membrane. A temporal and spatial reorganization of cytoskeleton and focal adhesions and morphological changes in response to SiO2 nanolayer were identified in our model. The novedous SiO2 deposition method is compatible with the standard sterilization protocols and reveals as a valuable tool to increase bioactivity of resorbable PLGA membranes. PMID:24883304

  18. Effect of growth time on Ti-doped ZnO nanorods prepared by low-temperature chemical bath deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidier, Shaker A.; Hashim, M. R.; Al-Diabat, Ahmad M.; Bououdina, M.

    2017-04-01

    Ti-doped ZnO nanorod arrays were grown onto Si substrate using chemical bath deposition (CBD) method at 93 °C. To investigate the effect of time deposition on the morphological, and structural properties, four Ti-doped ZnO samples were prepared at various deposition periods of time (2, 3.5, 5, and 6.5 h). FESEM images displayed high-quality and uniform nanorods with a mean length strongly dependent upon deposition time; i.e. it increases for prolonged growth time. Additionally, EFTEM images reveal a strong erosion on the lateral side for the sample prepared for 6.5 h as compared to 5 h. This might be attributed to the dissolution reaction of ZnO with for prolonged growth time. XRD analysis confirms the formation of a hexagonal wurtzite-type structure for all samples with a preferred growth orientation along the c-axis direction. The (100) peak intensity was enhanced and then quenched, which might be the result of an erosion on the lateral side of nanorods as seen in EFTEM. This study confirms the important role of growth time on the morphological features of Ti-doped ZnO nanorods prepared using CBD.

  19. Mechanical stability of two-step chemically deposited hydroxyapatite coating on Ti substrate: effects of various surface pretreatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavgorodniy, Alexander V; Borrero-López, Oscar; Hoffman, Mark; LeGeros, Racquel Z; Rohanizadeh, Ramin

    2011-10-01

    The success of implants in orthopaedic and dental load-bearing applications crucially depends on the initial biological fixation of implants in surrounding bone tissues. Using hydroxyapatite (HA) coating on Ti implant as carrier for bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) may promote the osteointegration of implants; therefore, reduce the risk of implant failure. The goal of this study was to develop an HA coating method in conditions allowing the incorporation of protein-based drugs into the coating materials, while achieving a mechanical stable coating on Ti implant. HA coatings were deposited on six different groups of Ti surfaces: control (no pretreatment), pretreated with alkali, acid, heat at 800°C, grit blasted with Al₂O₃, and grit blasted followed by heat treatment. HA coating was prepared using a two-step procedure. First step was the chemical deposition of a monetite coating on Ti substrate in acidic condition at 75°C and the second step was the hydrolysis of the monetite coating to HA. Coatings were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The roughness of substrates and coatings was measured using profilometry technique. The mechanical stability of the coatings deposited on the pretreated substrates was assessed using scratch test. The coatings deposited on the grit-blasted Ti surface demonstrated superior adhesive properties with critical shearing stress 131.6 ± 0.2 MPa.

  20. Effect of Thermal Annealing on the Band GAP and Optical Properties of Chemical Bath Deposited ZnSe Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezema, F. I.; Ekwealor, A. B. C.; Osuji, R. U.

    2006-05-01

    Zinc selenide (ZnSe) thin films were deposited on glass substrate using the chemical bath deposition method at room temperature from aqueous solutions of zinc sulphate and sodium selenosulfate in which sodium hydroxide was employed as complexing agents. The `as-deposited' ZnSe thin films are red in color and annealed in oven at 473 K for 1 hour and on a hot plate in open air at 333 K for 5 minutes, affecting the morphological and optical properties. Optical properties such as absorption coefficient a and extinction coefficient k, were determined using the absorbance and transmission measurement from Unico UV-2102 PC spectrophotometer, at normal incidence of light in the wavelength range of 200-1000 nm. The films have transmittance in VIS-NIR regions that range between 26 and 87%. From absorbance and transmittance spectra, the band gap energy determined ranged between 1.60 eV and 1.75 for the `as deposited' samples, and the annealed samples exhibited a band gap shift of 0.15 eV. The high transmittance of the films together with its large band gap made them good materials for selective coatings for solar cells.

  1. Osteoconductive Potential of Barrier NanoSiO2 PLGA Membranes Functionalized by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Terriza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of tailoring membrane surfaces with osteoconductive potential, in particular in biodegradable devices, to create modified biomaterials that stimulate osteoblast response should make them more suitable for clinical use, hopefully enhancing bone regeneration. Bioactive inorganic materials, such as silica, have been suggested to improve the bioactivity of synthetic biopolymers. An in vitro study on HOB human osteoblasts was performed to assess biocompatibility and bioactivity of SiO2 functionalized poly(lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA membranes, prior to clinical use. A 15 nm SiO2 layer was deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD, onto a resorbable PLGA membrane. Samples were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR. HOB cells were seeded on sterilized test surfaces where cell morphology, spreading, actin cytoskeletal organization, and focal adhesion expression were assessed. As proved by the FT-IR analysis of samples, the deposition by PECVD of the SiO2 onto the PLGA membrane did not alter the composition and other characteristics of the organic membrane. A temporal and spatial reorganization of cytoskeleton and focal adhesions and morphological changes in response to SiO2 nanolayer were identified in our model. The novedous SiO2 deposition method is compatible with the standard sterilization protocols and reveals as a valuable tool to increase bioactivity of resorbable PLGA membranes.

  2. Temporal and spatial trends of chemical composition of wet deposition samples collected in Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, Elisabeth; Kasper-Giebl, Anne; Lohninger, Hans

    2016-04-01

    Triggered by the occurrence of acid rain a sampling network for the collection of wet deposition samples was initiated in Austria in the early 1980s. Now the data set covers a time period of slightly more than 30 years for the stations being operable since the beginning. Sampling of rain water and snow was and is performed with Wet and Dry Only Samplers (WADOS) on a daily basis. Chemical analysis of rain water and snow samples comprised anions (chloride, nitrate, sulfate) and cations (sodium, ammonium, potassium, calcium and magnesium) as well as pH and electrical conductivity. Here we evaluate and discuss temporal trends of both, ion concentrations and wet deposition data for twelve sampling stations, which were operable for most of the observation period of 30 years. As expected concentrations and wet deposition loads of sulfate and acidity decreased significantly during the last three decades - which is also reflected by a strong decrease of sulfur emissions in Austria and neighboring countries. Regarding nitrate the decrease of concentrations and wet deposition loads is less pronounced. Again this is in accordance with changes in emission data. In case of ammonium even less stations showed a significant decrease of annual average concentrations and depositions. Reasons for that might be twofold. On one hand emissions of ammonia did not decrease as strongly as e.g. sulfur emissions. Furthermore local sources will be more dominant and can influence the year to year variability. Seasonality of ion concentrations and deposition loads were investigated using Fourier analysis. Sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, acidity and also precipitation amount showed characteristic seasonal patterns for most of the sites and for concentrations as well as deposition loads. However the maxima in ion concentrations and deposition loads were observed during different times of the year. Concentrations of basic cations and chloride, on the contrary, hardly showed any seasonality. However, as

  3. Structural properties of produced CuO/NiO/glass thin layers Produced by chemical method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ramezani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nickel Oxide and Copper oxide on Nickel Oxide thin layers were produced by chemical bath deposition method. There nano structures were investigated by SEM and EDAX analysis. By producing CuO/NiO/glass sandwich layers nano structure of NiO/glass layer changed and fraction of voids decreases. In sandwich layer physical property of outer layer was dominant

  4. Microstructural, chemical and textural characterization of ZnO nanorods synthesized by aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sáenz-Trevizo, A.; Amézaga-Madrid, P.; Fuentes-Cobas, L.; Pizá-Ruiz, P.; Antúnez-Flores, W.; Ornelas-Gutiérrez, C. [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados, S.C., Chihuahua, Chihuahua 31109 (Mexico); Pérez-García, S.A. [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados, S.C., Unidad Monterrey, Apodaca, Nuevo León 66600 (Mexico); Miki-Yoshida, M., E-mail: mario.miki@cimav.edu.mx [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados, S.C., Chihuahua, Chihuahua 31109 (Mexico)

    2014-12-15

    ZnO nanorods were synthesized by aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition onto TiO{sub 2} covered borosilicate glass substrates. Deposition parameters were optimized and kept constant. Solely the effect of different nozzle velocities on the growth of ZnO nanorods was evaluated in order to develop a dense and uniform structure. The crystalline structure was characterized by conventional X-ray diffraction in grazing incidence and Bragg–Brentano configurations. In addition, two-dimensional grazing incidence synchrotron radiation diffraction was employed to determine the preferred growth direction of the nanorods. Morphology and growth characteristics analyzed by electron microscopy were correlated with diffraction outcomes. Chemical composition was established by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction results and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed the presence of wurtzite ZnO and anatase TiO{sub 2} phases. Morphological changes noticed when the deposition velocity was lowered to the minimum, indicated the formation of relatively vertically oriented nanorods evenly distributed onto the TiO{sub 2} buffer film. By coupling two-dimensional X-ray diffraction and computational modeling with ANAELU it was proved that a successful texture determination was achieved and confirmed by scanning electron microscopy analysis. Texture analysis led to the conclusion of a preferred growth direction in [001] having a distribution width Ω = 20° ± 2°. - Highlights: • Uniform and pure single-crystal ZnO nanorods were obtained by AACVD technique. • Longitudinal and transversal axis parallel to the [001] and [110] directions, respectively. • Texture was determined by 2D synchrotron diffraction and electron microscopy analysis. • Nanorods have its [001] direction distributed close to the normal of the substrate. • Angular spread about the preferred orientation is 20° ± 2°.

  5. Physical Property Characterization of Pb2+-Doped CdS Nanofilms Deposited by Chemical-Bath Deposition at Low Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Reyes, J.; Contreras-Rascón, J. I.; Galván-Arellano, M.; Arias-Cerón, J. S.; Gutiérrez-Arias, J. E. M.; Flores-Mena, J. E.; Morín-Castillo, M. M.

    2016-08-01

    Pb2 +-doped CdS nanofilms are prepared using the growth technique chemical bath deposition (CBD) under optimum conditions lead acetate at the reservoir temperature of 20 ± 2 °C. The Pb2+ molar concentration was in the range 0.0 ≤ x ≤ 0.19.67, which was determined by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The X-ray diffraction results show that the films are of PbS-CdS composites with individual CdS and PbS planes. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and Raman scattering reveal that CdS-deposited films showed the zincblende (ZB) crystalline phase. The average grain size of the CdS films ranged from 1.21 to 6.67 nm that was determined by the Debye-Scherrer equation from ZB (111) direction, and it was confirmed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Raman scattering shows that the lattice dynamics is characteristic of bimodal behaviour and the multipeaks adjust of the first optical longitudinal mode for the Pb2+-doped CdS denotes the Raman shift of the characteristic peak in the range of 305-298 cm-1 of the CdS crystals, which is associated with the lead ion incorporation. The films exhibit three direct bandgaps, ~2.44 eV attributed to CdS; the other varies continuously from 1.67 to 1.99 eV and another disappears as Pb2+ molar fraction increases.

  6. Superconducting Dy1-x(Gd,Yb)xBa2Cu3O7-δ thin films made by Chemical Solution Deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Opata, Yuri Aparecido; Wulff, Anders Christian; Hansen, Jørn Otto Bindslev

    2016-01-01

    Dy1-x(Gd or Yb)xBa2Cu3O7-δ samples were prepared using chemical solution deposition (CSD), based on trifluoroacetate metal-organic decomposition (MOD) methods. X-ray diffraction results demonstrated the formation of the RE123 superconducting phase with a strong in-plane and out-of-plane texture. c...

  7. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Monolayer Mo(1-x)W(x)S2 Crystals with Tunable Band Gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ziqian; Liu, Pan; Ito, Yoshikazu; Ning, Shoucong; Tan, Yongwen; Fujita, Takeshi; Hirata, Akihiko; Chen, Mingwei

    2016-02-22

    Band gap engineering of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides, such as MoS2 and WS2, is essential for the applications of the two-dimensional (2D) crystals in electronic and optoelectronic devices. Although it is known that chemical mixture can evidently change the band gaps of alloyed Mo(1-x)W(x)S2 crystals, the successful growth of Mo(1-x)W(x)S2 monolayers with tunable Mo/W ratios has not been realized by conventional chemical vapor deposition. Herein, we developed a low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LP-CVD) method to grow monolayer Mo(1-x)W(x)S2 (x = 0-1) 2D crystals with a wide range of Mo/W ratios. Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy demonstrate the homogeneous mixture of Mo and W in the 2D alloys. Photoluminescence measurements show that the optical band gaps of the monolayer Mo(1-x)W(x)S2 crystals strongly depend on the Mo/W ratios and continuously tunable band gap can be achieved by controlling the W or Mo portion by the LP-CVD.

  8. Optical and structural properties of chemically deposited CdS thin films on polyethylene naphthalate substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandoval-Paz, M.G., E-mail: myrnasandoval@udec.cl [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas y Matematicas, Universidad de Concepcion, Casilla 160-C, Concepcion (Chile); Ramirez-Bon, R. [Centro de Investigacion y Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Unidad Queretaro, Apdo. Postal 1-798, 76001 Queretaro, Qro. (Mexico)

    2011-11-30

    CdS thin films were deposited on polyethylene naphthalate substrates by means of the chemical bath deposition technique in an ammonia-free cadmium-sodium citrate system. Three sets of CdS films were grown in precursor solutions with different contents of Cd and thiourea maintaining constant the concentration ratios [Cd]/[thiourea] and [Cd]/[sodium citrate] at 0.2 and 0.1 M/M, respectively. The concentrations of cadmium in the reaction solutions were 0.01, 7.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} and 6.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} M, respectively. The three sets of CdS films were homogeneous, hard, specularly reflecting, yellowish and adhered very well to the plastic substrates, quite similar to those deposited on glass substrates. The structural and optical properties of the CdS films were determined from X-ray diffraction, optical transmission and reflection spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy measurements. We found that the properties of the films depend on both the amount of Cd in the growth solutions and on the deposition time. The increasing of Cd concentration in the reaction solution yield to thicker CdS films with smaller grain size, shorter lattice constant, and higher energy band gap. The energy band gap of the CdS films varied in the range 2.42-2.54 eV depending on the precursor solution. The properties of the films were analyzed in terms of the growth mechanisms during the chemical deposition of CdS layers.

  9. Indium sulfide thin films as window layer in chemically deposited solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lugo-Loredo, S. [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, UANL, Fac. de Ciencias Químicas, Av. Universidad S/N Ciudad Universitaria San Nicolás de Los Garza Nuevo León, C.P. 66451 (Mexico); Peña-Méndez, Y., E-mail: yolapm@gmail.com [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, UANL, Fac. de Ciencias Químicas, Av. Universidad S/N Ciudad Universitaria San Nicolás de Los Garza Nuevo León, C.P. 66451 (Mexico); Calixto-Rodriguez, M. [Universidad Tecnológica Emiliano Zapata del Estado de Morelos, Av. Universidad Tecnológica No. 1, C.P. 62760 Emiliano Zapata, Morelos (Mexico); Messina-Fernández, S. [Universidad Autónoma de Nayarit, Ciudad de la Cultura “Amado Nervo” S/N, C.P. 63190 Tepic, Nayarit (Mexico); Alvarez-Gallegos, A. [Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos, Centro de Investigación en Ingeniería y Ciencias Aplicadas, Av. Universidad 1001, C.P. 62209, Cuernavaca Morelos (Mexico); Vázquez-Dimas, A.; Hernández-García, T. [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, UANL, Fac. de Ciencias Químicas, Av. Universidad S/N Ciudad Universitaria San Nicolás de Los Garza Nuevo León, C.P. 66451 (Mexico)

    2014-01-01

    Indium sulfide (In{sub 2}S{sub 3}) thin films have been synthesized by chemical bath deposition technique onto glass substrates using In(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} as indium precursor and thioacetamide as sulfur source. X-ray diffraction studies have shown that the crystalline state of the as-prepared and the annealed films is β-In{sub 2}S{sub 3}. Optical band gap values between 2.27 and 2.41 eV were obtained for these films. The In{sub 2}S{sub 3} thin films are photosensitive with an electrical conductivity value in the range of 10{sup −3}–10{sup −7} (Ω cm){sup −1}, depending on the film preparation conditions. We have demonstrated that the In{sub 2}S{sub 3} thin films obtained in this work are suitable candidates to be used as window layer in thin film solar cells. These films were integrated in SnO{sub 2}:F/In{sub 2}S{sub 3}/Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}/PbS/C–Ag solar cell structures, which showed an open circuit voltage of 630 mV and a short circuit current density of 0.6 mA/cm{sup 2}. - Highlights: • In{sub 2}S{sub 3} thin films were deposited using the Chemical Bath Deposition technique. • A direct energy band gap between 2.41 to 2.27 eV was evaluated for the In{sub 2}S{sub 3} films. • We made chemically deposited solar cells using the In{sub 2}S{sub 3} thin films.

  10. High-temperature conductivity in chemical bath deposited copper selenide thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanam, M.; Manoj, P. K.; Prabhu, Rajeev. R.

    2005-07-01

    This paper reports high-temperature (305-523 K) electrical studies of chemical bath deposited copper (I) selenide (Cu 2-xSe) and copper (II) selenide (Cu 3Se 2) thin films. Cu 2-xSe and Cu 3Se 2 have been prepared on glass substrates from the same chemical bath at room temperature by controlling the pH. From X-ray diffraction (XRD) profiles, it has been found that Cu 2-xSe and Cu 3Se 2 have cubic and tetragonal structures, respectively. The composition of the chemical constituent in the films has been confirmed from XRD data and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX). It has been found that both phases of copper selenide thin films have thermally activated conduction in the high-temperature range. In this paper we also report the variation of electrical parameters with film thickness and the applied voltage.

  11. Electroluminescence and photoluminescence of conjugated polymer films prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of naphthalene

    CERN Document Server

    Rajabi, Mojtaaba; Firouzjah, Marzieh Abbasi; Hosseini, Seyed Iman; Shokri, Babak

    2012-01-01

    Polymer light-emitting devices were fabricated utilizing plasma polymerized thin films as emissive layers. These conjugated polymer films were prepared by RF Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) using naphthalene as monomer. The effect of different applied powers on the chemical structure and optical properties of the conjugated polymers was investigated. The fabricated devices with structure of ITO/PEDOT:PSS/ plasma polymerized Naphthalene/Alq3/Al showed broadband Electroluminescence (EL) emission peaks with center at 535-550 nm. Using different structural and optical tests, connection between polymers chemical structure and optical properties under different plasma powers has been studied. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopies confirmed that a conjugated polymer film with a 3-D cross-linked network was developed. By increasing the power, products tended to form as highly cross-linked polymer films. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of plasma polymers showed different excimerc ...

  12. Liquid precursor for deposition of copper selenide and method of preparing the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, Calvin J.; Miedaner, Alexander; Franciscus Antonius Maria Van Hest, Marinus; Ginley, David S.; Hersh, Peter A.; Eldada, Louay; Stanbery, Billy J.

    2015-09-08

    Liquid precursors containing copper and selenium suitable for deposition on a substrate to form thin films suitable for semiconductor applications are disclosed. Methods of preparing such liquid precursors and methods of depositing a precursor on a substrate are also disclosed.

  13. Growth of AlGaN Epitaxial Film with High Al Content by Metalorganic Chemical Vapour Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao-Lan; ZHAO De-Gang; YANG Hui; LIANG Jun-Wu

    2007-01-01

    A high-Al-content AlCaN epilayer is grown on a low-temperature-deposited AlN buffer on (0001) sapphire bylow pressure metalorganic chemical vapour deposition. The dependence of surface roughness, tilted mosaicity,and twisted mosaicity on the conditions of the AlCaN epilayer deposition is evaluated. An AlCaN epilayer withfavourable surface morphology and crystal quality is deposited on a 20nm low-temperature-deposited AlN buffer at a low Ⅴ/Ⅲ flow ratio of 783 and at a low reactor pressure of 100 Torr, and the adduct reaction between trimethylaluminium and NH3 is considered.

  14. In Situ Coupling of Ultrasound to Electro- and Photo-Deposition Methods for Materials Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Magdziarz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This short review provides the current state-of-the-art of in situ coupling of ultrasound to chemical deposition methods. A synergetic action of the ultrasound and light radiation or electrical fields may result in new powerful methodologies, and these include sonophotodeposition and sonoelectrodeposition processes. The effect of ultrasound is explained on the base of different physical mechanisms emerging from cavitation phenomenon. Some possible mechanisms of the interactions between ultrasound and photochemical and electrochemical processes are discussed here. The application of sonophotodeposition and sonoelectrodeposition as green energy sources in the syntheses of different nanomaterials is also reviewed.

  15. In Situ Coupling of Ultrasound to Electro- and Photo-Deposition Methods for Materials Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdziarz, Agnieszka; Colmenares, Juan C

    2017-01-31

    This short review provides the current state-of-the-art of in situ coupling of ultrasound to chemical deposition methods. A synergetic action of the ultrasound and light radiation or electrical fields may result in new powerful methodologies, and these include sonophotodeposition and sonoelectrodeposition processes. The effect of ultrasound is explained on the base of different physical mechanisms emerging from cavitation phenomenon. Some possible mechanisms of the interactions between ultrasound and photochemical and electrochemical processes are discussed here. The application of sonophotodeposition and sonoelectrodeposition as green energy sources in the syntheses of different nanomaterials is also reviewed.

  16. MBMS studies of gas-phase kinetics in diamond chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, C.A. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); McMaster, M.C. [IBM San Jose, CA (United States); Tung, D.M. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-03-01

    A molecular beam mass spectrometer system (MBMS) has been used to determine the near-surface gaseous composition involved in the low pressure chemical vapor deposition of diamond. With this system, radical and stable species can be detected with a sensitivity better than 10 ppm. Threshold ionization techniques have been employed to distinguish between radical species in the deposition environment from radical species generated by parent molecule cracking. An extensive calibration procedure was used to enable the quantitative determination of H-atom and CH{sub 3} radical mole fractions. Using the MBMS system, the gaseous composition involved in LPCVD of diamond has been measured for a wide variety of deposition conditions, including hot-filament gas activation, microwave-plasma gas activation, and a variety of precursor feed mixtures (ex: CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}). For microwave-plasma activation (MPCVD), the radical concentrations (H-atom and CH{sub 3} radicals) are independent of the identity of the precursor feed gas provided the input carbon mole fraction is constant. However, in hot-filament diamond deposition (HFCVD), the atomic hydrogen concentration decreased by an order of magnitude as the mole fraction of carbon in the precursor mixture is increased to .07; this sharp reduction has been attributed to filament poisoning of the catalytic tungsten surface via hydrocarbon deposition. Additionally, the authors find that the H-atom concentration is independent of the substrate temperature for both hot-filament and microwave plasma deposition; radial H-atom diffusion is invoked to explain this observation.

  17. Zirconium doped TiO{sub 2} thin films deposited by chemical spray pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juma, A. [Laboratory of Thin Film Chemical Technologies, Department of Materials Science, Tallinn University of Technology, Ehitajate tee 5, 19086 Tallinn (Estonia); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Botswana International University of Science and Technology, Private bag 16, Palapye (Botswana); Oja Acik, I., E-mail: ilona.oja@ttu.ee [Laboratory of Thin Film Chemical Technologies, Department of Materials Science, Tallinn University of Technology, Ehitajate tee 5, 19086 Tallinn (Estonia); Oluwabi, A.T.; Mere, A. [Laboratory of Thin Film Chemical Technologies, Department of Materials Science, Tallinn University of Technology, Ehitajate tee 5, 19086 Tallinn (Estonia); Mikli, V.; Danilson, M. [Chair of Semiconductor Materials Technology, Department of Materials Science, Tallinn University of Technology, Ehitajate tee 5, 19086 Tallinn (Estonia); Krunks, M. [Laboratory of Thin Film Chemical Technologies, Department of Materials Science, Tallinn University of Technology, Ehitajate tee 5, 19086 Tallinn (Estonia)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Mean crystallite size of TiO{sub 2}:Zr film decreases with increasing [Zr] in the solution. • Zr doping supresses the anatase to rutile transformation process in TiO{sub 2} films. • Band gap of TiO{sub 2}:Zr film is 3.4 eV irrespective of the annealing temperature. - Abstract: Chemical spray pyrolysis (CSP) is a flexible deposition technique that allows for mixing of the precursor solutions in different proportions suitable for doping thin films. The CSP method was used to dope TiO{sub 2} thin films with Zr by adding zirconium(IV) acetylacetonate into a solution of titanium(IV) isopropoxide in ethanol stabilized by acetylacetone at [Zr]/[Ti] of 0, 5, 10 and 20 at%. The Zr-doped TiO{sub 2} thin films were uniform and homogeneous showing much smaller grains than the undoped TiO{sub 2} films. Zr stabilized the anatase phase to temperatures above 800 °C depending on Zr concentration in the spray solution. The concentration of Zr determined by XPS was 6.4 at% for the thin film deposited from the 20 at% solution. According to AFM studies, Zr doping decreased the root mean square roughness of TiO{sub 2} film from 5.9 to 1.1 nm. An XRD study of samples with the highest Zr amount showed the ZrTiO{sub 4} phase started forming after annealing at 800 °C. The optical band gap for TiO{sub 2} decreased from 3.3 eV to 3.0 eV after annealing at 800 °C but for the TiO{sub 2}:Zr(20) film it remained at 3.4 eV. The dielectric constant increased by more than four times with Zr-doping and this was associated with the change in the bond formations caused by substitution of Ti by Zr in the lattice.

  18. Low-Temperature Process for Atomic Layer Chemical Vapor Deposition of an Al2O3 Passivation Layer for Organic Photovoltaic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hoonbae; Lee, Jihye; Sohn, Sunyoung; Jung, Donggeun

    2016-05-01

    Flexible organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells have drawn extensive attention due to their light weight, cost efficiency, portability, and so on. However, OPV cells degrade quickly due to organic damage by water vapor or oxygen penetration when the devices are driven in the atmosphere without a passivation layer. In order to prevent damage due to water vapor or oxygen permeation into the devices, passivation layers have been introduced through methods such as sputtering, plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, and atomic layer chemical vapor deposition (ALCVD). In this work, the structural and chemical properties of Al2O3 films, deposited via ALCVD at relatively low temperatures of 109 degrees C, 200 degrees C, and 300 degrees C, are analyzed. In our experiment, trimethylaluminum (TMA) and H2O were used as precursors for Al2O3 film deposition via ALCVD. All of the Al2O3 films showed very smooth, featureless surfaces without notable defects. However, we found that the plastic flexible substrate of an OPV device passivated with 300 degrees C deposition temperature was partially bended and melted, indicating that passivation layers for OPV cells on plastic flexible substrates need to be formed at temperatures lower than 300 degrees C. The OPV cells on plastic flexible substrates were passivated by the Al2O3 film deposited at the temperature of 109 degrees C. Thereafter, the photovoltaic properties of passivated OPV cells were investigated as a function of exposure time under the atmosphere.

  19. Deposition of carbon nanotubes onto aramid fibers using as-received and chemically modified fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez-Uicab, O. [Centro de Investigación Científica de Yucatán A.C., Unidad de Materiales, Calle 43 No.130, Col. Chuburna de Hidalgo, C.P. 97200 Mérida, Yucatán (Mexico); Avilés, F., E-mail: faviles@cicy.mx [Centro de Investigación Científica de Yucatán A.C., Unidad de Materiales, Calle 43 No.130, Col. Chuburna de Hidalgo, C.P. 97200 Mérida, Yucatán (Mexico); Gonzalez-Chi, P.I; Canché-Escamilla, G.; Duarte-Aranda, S. [Centro de Investigación Científica de Yucatán A.C., Unidad de Materiales, Calle 43 No.130, Col. Chuburna de Hidalgo, C.P. 97200 Mérida, Yucatán (Mexico); Yazdani-Pedram, M. [Facultad de Ciencias Químicas y Farmacéuticas, Universidad de Chile, S. Livingstone 1007, Independencia, Santiago (Chile); Toro, P. [Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Av. Beauchef 850, Santiago (Chile); Gamboa, F. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Unidad Mérida, Depto. de Física Aplicada, Km. 6 Antigua Carretera a Progreso, 97310 Mérida, Yucatán (Mexico); Mazo, M.A.; Nistal, A.; Rubio, J. [Instituto de Cerámica y Vidrio (ICV-CSIC), Kelsen 5, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • The surface of aramid fibers was functionalized by two acid treatments. • The treatment based on HNO{sub 3}/H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} reduced the mechanical properties of the fibers. • CNTs were deposited on the aramid fibers, reaching electrical conductivity. • Homogeneous CNT distribution was achieved by using pristine fibers or chlorosulfonic acid. - Abstract: Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) oxidized by an acid treatment were deposited on the surface of as-received commercial aramid fibers containing a surface coating (“sizing”), and fibers modified by either a chlorosulfonic treatment or a mixture of nitric and sulfuric acids. The surface of the aramid fiber activated by the chemical treatments presents increasing density of CO, COOH and OH functional groups. However, these chemical treatments reduced the tensile mechanical properties of the fibers, especially when the nitric and sulfuric acid mixture was used. Characterization of the MWCNTs deposited on the fiber surface was conducted by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy mapping and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. These characterizations showed higher areal concentration and more homogeneous distribution of MWCNTs over the aramid fibers for as-received fibers and for those modified with chlorosulfonic acid, suggesting the existence of interaction between the oxidized MWCNTs and the fiber coating. The electrical resistance of the MWCNT-modified aramid yarns comprising ∼1000 individual fibers was in the order of MΩ/cm, which renders multifunctional properties.

  20. Expanding Thermal Plasma Chemical Vapour Deposition of ZnO:Al Layers for CIGS Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Al grown by expanding thermal plasma chemical vapour deposition (ETP-CVD has demonstrated excellent electrical and optical properties, which make it an attractive candidate as a transparent conductive oxide for photovoltaic applications. However, when depositing ZnO:Al on CIGS solar cell stacks, one should be aware that high substrate temperature processing (i.e., >200°C can damage the crucial underlying layers/interfaces (such as CIGS/CdS and CdS/i-ZnO. In this paper, the potential of adopting ETP-CVD ZnO:Al in CIGS solar cells is assessed: the effect of substrate temperature during film deposition on both the electrical properties of the ZnO:Al and the eventual performance of the CIGS solar cells was investigated. For ZnO:Al films grown using the high thermal budget (HTB condition, lower resistivities, ρ, were achievable (~5 × 10−4 Ω·cm than those grown using the low thermal budget (LTB conditions (~2 × 10−3 Ω·cm, whereas higher CIGS conversion efficiencies were obtained for the LTB condition (up to 10.9% than for the HTB condition (up to 9.0%. Whereas such temperature-dependence of CIGS device parameters has previously been linked with chemical migration between individual layers, we demonstrate that in this case it is primarily attributed to the prevalence of shunt currents.

  1. Chemically deposited CdS by an ammonia-free process for solar cells window layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ochoa-Landin, R. [Centro de Investigacion y Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Unidad Queretaro, Apdo. Postal 1-798, 76001 Queretaro, Qro. (Mexico); Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Sonora, Apdo. Postal 88, 83190 Hermosillo, Son. (Mexico); Sastre-Hernandez, J.; Vigil-Galan, O. [Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Instituto Politecnico Nacional UP Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Edif. 9, 07738 Mexico, DF (Mexico); Ramirez-Bon, R. [Centro de Investigacion y Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Unidad Queretaro, Apdo. Postal 1-798, 76001 Queretaro, Qro. (Mexico)

    2010-02-15

    Chemically deposited CdS window layers were studied on two different transparent conductive substrates, namely indium tin oxide (ITO) and fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO), to determine the influence of their properties on CdS/CdTe solar cells performance. Three types of CdS films obtained from different chemical bath deposition (CBD) processes were studied. The three CBD processes employed sodium citrate as the complexing agent in partial or full substitution of ammonia. The CdS films were studied by X-ray diffraction, optical transmission spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. CdS/CdTe devices were completed by depositing 3 {mu}m thick CdTe absorbent layers by means of the close-spaced vapor transport technique (CSVT). Evaporated Cu-Au was used as the back contact in all the solar cells. Dark and under illumination J-V characteristic and quantum efficiency measurements were done on the CdS/CdTe devices to determine their conversion efficiency and spectral response. The efficiency of the cells depended on the window layer and on the transparent contact with values between 5.7% and 8.7%. (author)

  2. Application of Taguchi method for the characterization of calcareous deposits formed by pulse cathodic protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamanzade, M.; Shahrabi, T. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran); Gharacheh, E.A. [Department of Industrial Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran)

    2007-09-15

    In this study, the Taguchi method, a powerful tool to design optimization for quality, is used to find the optimal process parameters of pulse cathodic protection system for the calcareous deposits' formation. An orthogonal array, main effect and the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio are employed to investigate the process parameters in order to achieve optimum final current density. Through this study also the main process parameters that affect the calcareous deposits' formation can be found. Experiments were carried out to confirm the effectiveness of this approach. From the results, chronoamperometric measurements have been used to evaluate the influence of pulse cathodic protection on decreasing the required cathodic current for protection and also decreasing the surface coverage. The morphology of the formed deposits has been evaluated through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and chemical analysis of the formed deposits has been performed using X-ray diffraction (XRD). It is found that the different environmental conditions, i.e., Ca{sup 2+} concentration, Mg{sup 2+} concentration, rotation speed, and temperature significantly affect the final required current density of the pulse cathodic protection. The optimum levels of parameters at different frequencies are also presented. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  3. Annealing dependence of residual stress and optical properties of TiO2 thin film deposited by different deposition methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsi-Chao; Lee, Kuan-Shiang; Lee, Cheng-Chung

    2008-05-01

    Titanium oxide (TiO(2)) thin films were prepared by different deposition methods. The methods were E-gun evaporation with ion-assisted deposition (IAD), radio-frequency (RF) ion-beam sputtering, and direct current (DC) magnetron sputtering. Residual stress was released after annealing the films deposited by RF ion-beam or DC magnetron sputtering but not evaporation, and the extinction coefficient varied significantly. The surface roughness of the evaporated films exceeded that of both sputtered films. At the annealing temperature of 300 degrees C, anatase crystallization occurred in evaporated film but not in the RF ion-beam or DC magnetron-sputtered films. TiO(2) films deposited by sputtering were generally more stable during annealing than those deposited by evaporation.

  4. GREENSCOPE: A Method for Modeling Chemical Process ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Current work within the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s National Risk Management Research Laboratory is focused on the development of a method for modeling chemical process sustainability. The GREENSCOPE methodology, defined for the four bases of Environment, Economics, Efficiency, and Energy, can evaluate processes with over a hundred different indicators. These indicators provide a means for realizing the principles of green chemistry and green engineering in the context of sustainability. Development of the methodology has centered around three focal points. One is a taxonomy of impacts that describe the indicators and provide absolute scales for their evaluation. The setting of best and worst limits for the indicators allows the user to know the status of the process under study in relation to understood values. Thus, existing or imagined processes can be evaluated according to their relative indicator scores, and process modifications can strive towards realizable targets. A second area of focus is in advancing definitions of data needs for the many indicators of the taxonomy. Each of the indicators has specific data that is necessary for their calculation. Values needed and data sources have been identified. These needs can be mapped according to the information source (e.g., input stream, output stream, external data, etc.) for each of the bases. The user can visualize data-indicator relationships on the way to choosing selected ones for evalua

  5. Nucleation and growth of chemically vapor deposited tungsten on various substrate materials: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broadbent, E.K.

    1987-11-01

    W films produced by chemical-vapor deposition (CVD), typically via reduction of WF/sub 6/, are being used for numerous applications in very large scale integrated circuit technology. Blanket and selectively deposited films require nucleation and growth on a specific underlayer material: Si, metal, or metal silicide. The compatibility of CVD W with various underlayers is reviewed for the device applications of contact/via fill, diffusion barrier, metal interconnect, and source/drain coating. Nucleation of W directly on single crystal Si can sometimes produce tunnel-defect structures at the edges or along the entire interface of the deposit. Sputtered Mo and W, and to some extent TiW and TiN, have been shown to be suitable nucleation layers for CVD W, yielding a fluorine-free interface with low-electrical contact resistance. A sputtered W/Ti adhesion bilayer is demonstrated for a blanket W deposition+etchback process. CoSi/sub 2/ appears an appropriate choice where CVD W and salicide technologies are combined.

  6. Structure and mechanical properties of pyrolytic carbon produced by fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Honorato, E.; Meadows, P.J. [Manchester Materials Science Centre, School of Materials, University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom); Xiao, P. [Manchester Materials Science Centre, School of Materials, University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Ping.Xiao@manchester.ac.uk; Marsh, G.; Abram, T.J. [Nexia Solutions Ltd., Springfields PR4 0XJ (United Kingdom)

    2008-11-15

    Pyrolytic carbon was deposited on spherical particles using a multi-spout fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition reactor to fabricate TRISO fuel for the High Temperature Reactor (HTR). Modern techniques such as Raman spectroscopy and nanoindentation supported by porosimetry, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were employed to analyze the particle coatings directly. Raman spectroscopy and nanoindentation were given special attention due to their capacity to provide information on the internal structure of pyrolytic carbon and its mechanical properties without the necessity of complex sample preparation. The results obtained were used to study the relationship deposition conditions-microstructure-mechanical properties in more detail. Increasing the deposition temperature reduced the density and Young's modulus as porosity and in-plane disorder of carbon domains increased. There was also a change from a laminar microstructure of PyC to that containing more spherical particles. It appeared that anisotropy, domain size and level of graphitization (examined by Raman and TEM) had a strong influence on the mechanical properties. Clear differences were observed between acetylene and the acetylene/propylene mixture as precursor gases.

  7. Nanostructured silicon carbon thin films grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coscia, U. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli “Federico II” Complesso Universitario MSA, via Cinthia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); CNISM Unita' di Napoli, Complesso Universitario MSA, via Cinthia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Ambrosone, G., E-mail: ambrosone@na.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli “Federico II” Complesso Universitario MSA, via Cinthia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); SPIN-CNR, Complesso Universitario MSA, via Cinthia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Basa, D.K. [Department of Physics, Utkal University, Bhubaneswar 751004 (India); Rigato, V. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali Legnaro, 35020 Legnaro (Padova) (Italy); Ferrero, S.; Virga, A. [Dipartimento di Scienza Applicata e Tecnologia, Politecnico di Torino, C.so Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2013-09-30

    Nanostructured silicon carbon thin films, composed of Si nanocrystallites embedded in hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbon matrix, have been prepared by varying rf power in ultra high vacuum plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition system using silane and methane gas mixtures diluted in hydrogen. In this paper we have studied the compositional, structural and electrical properties of these films as a function of rf power. It is shown that with increasing rf power the atomic densities of carbon and hydrogen increase while the atomic density of silicon decreases, resulting in a reduction in the mass density. Further, it is demonstrated that carbon is incorporated into amorphous matrix and it is mainly bonded to silicon. The study has also revealed that the crystalline volume fraction decreases with increase in rf power and that the films deposited with low rf power have a size distribution of large and small crystallites while the films deposited with relatively high power have only small crystallites. Finally, the enhanced transport properties of the nanostructured silicon carbon films, as compared to amorphous counterpart, have been attributed to the presence of Si nanocrystallites. - Highlights: • The mass density of silicon carbon films decreases from 2.3 to 2 g/cm{sup 3}. • Carbon is incorporated in the amorphous phase and it is mainly bonded to silicon. • Nanostructured silicon carbon films are deposited at rf power > 40 W. • Si nanocrystallites in amorphous silicon carbon enhance the electrical properties.

  8. Doped Titanium Dioxide Films Prepared by Pulsed Laser Deposition Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juguang Hu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available TiO2 was intensively researched especially for photocatalystic applications. The nitrogen-doped TiO2 films prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD method were reviewed, and some recent new experimental results were also presented in this paper. A new optical transmission method for evaluating the photocatalystic activity was presented. The main results are (1 PLD method is versatile for preparing oxide material or complex component films with excellent controllability and high reproducibility. (2 Anatase nitrogen-doped TiO2 films were prepared at room temperature, 200°C, and 400°C by PLD method using novel ceramic target of mixture of TiN and TiO2. UV/Vis spectra, AFM, Raman spectra, and photocatalystic activity for decomposition of methyl orange (MO tests showed that visible light response was improved at higher temperature. (3 The automatic, continuous optical transmission autorecorder method is suitable for detecting the photodecomposition dynamic process of organic compound.

  9. [Pollutant source apportionment of combined sewer overflows using chemical mass balance method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Mei-Hong; Li, Tian; Zhang, Wei

    2013-11-01

    Pollutant characteristics of surface runoff, sanitary sewage and sewer deposits from a combined sewer system in Shanghai were studied. It was confirmed that the content of Zn, NH4(+) -N, P, respectively in surface runoff, sanitary sewage and sewer deposits was specific and relatively stable based on contrasting pollutant characteristics of different sources. Three non-dimensional parameters-Zn/P, NH4(+) -N/Zn, P/K were proposed as characteristic index for surface runoff, sanitary sewage and sewer deposits. In order to find sources of pollutants in CSO, the application of chemical mass balance method was discussed: the average contributions to CSO were 42.8% for surface runoff, 12.2% for sanitary sewage, 23.8% for sewer deposits, and the results basically reflected the composition of CSO pollution. The research method and results can provide guidance for pollutant source apportionment of combined sewer overflows.

  10. Electrochemical metal speciation analysis of chemically heterogeneous samples: the outstanding features of stripping chronopotentiometry at scanned deposition potential

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, van H.P.; Town, R.M.

    2003-01-01

    The application of depletive stripping chronopotentiometry at scanned deposition potential (SSCP) to metal ion speciation analysis of chemically heterogeneous complex systems is described. In this electroanalytical stripping technique, metal which is accumulated in the electrode during the depositio

  11. Synthesis of one-dimensional boron-related nanostructures by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Li

    in the submicron range were used to synthesize aligned BNNTs. Fine BN nanostructures with a diameter around 10-20 nm and length up to 10 microns were grown and dispersed in the Ni dots. Nanosized Ni dots were suggested for the growth of the vertically aligned BNNTs. Boron nanowires (BNWs) were also grown by the decomposition of diborane using a thermal CVD process at a temperature of 900°C, a pressure of 20 torr, diborane flow rate (5 vol.% in hydrogen) of 5 sccm, and nitrogen flow rate of 55 sccm. These BNWs had diameters in a range of 20-200 nanometers and lengths up to several tens of micrometers. Repeatable Raman spectra indicated icosahedra B12 to be the basic building units forming the B nanowires. Amorphous BNWs with rough surface were obtained without any catalysts on different substrates, such as Si wafer or ZrB2 powders. A vapor-solid (VS) growth was proposed for the amorphous BNWs, in which the solid phase precipitated directly from the vapor phase reactions. The amorphous BNWs were modified for size and composition using a plasma CVD process containing argon, ammonia and hydrogen. The diameters of these BNWs were reduced from 200 nm to several tens of nanometers, and a small amount of N was incorporated into BNWs after the plasma treatment. On the other hand, the metal catalyst proved to be effective for the growth of crystalline BNWs. Tetragonal BNWs with smooth surface were grown on thin Ni film (1 nm) coated Si substrates. Ni attachment was observed at the tip of the BNW for the first time, which indicated that the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth mechanism can be used for synthesis of the BNW. The diameters of these BNWs were strongly dependent on the size of the metal particles encapsulated in the BNWs. In summary, two boron-related nanostructures were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) in this work. A new method was successfully developed to decrease the substrate temperature more than 400°C to fabricate boron nitride nanotubes in a

  12. The effect of ultrasonic pre-treatment on nucleation density of chemical vapor deposition diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chi; Ingram, David C.

    1995-11-01

    Using statistical design of experiments, the effect of ultrasonic pre-treatment on the nucleation density of diamond was studied. The parameters investigated included ultrasonic excitation power, concentration of diamond powder in water, duration of ultrasonic excitation, and duration of cleaning with water after ultrasonic excitation. Diamond films were deposited on silicon (100) substrates using microwave assisted plasma chemical vapor deposition. The nucleation density varied from 106 nuclei/cm2 to 109 nuclei/cm2. The results illustrated that the dominant effect in ultrasonic pre-treatment was seeding. Moreover, scratches caused by the seeds during the treatment enabled more seeds to be retained on the surface. Based on these results, an optimized ultrasonic pretreatment has been developed. The new procedure yields a uniform nucleation density of 109 nuclei/cm2 on silicon (100) substrates.

  13. Bath Parameter Dependence of Chemically-Deposited Copper Selenide Thin Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mamun; Islam, A. B. M. O.

    In this article, a low cost chemical bath deposition (CBD) technique has been used for the preparation of Cu2-xSe thin films on to glass substrate. Different thin films (0.2-0.6 μm) were prepared by adjusting the bath parameter like concentration of ammonia, deposition time, temperature of the solution, and the ratios of the mixing composition between copper and selenium in the reaction bath. From these studies, it reveals that at low concentration of ammonia or TEA, the terminal thicknesses of the films are less, which gradually increases with the increase of concentrations and then drop down at still higher concentrations. It has been found that complexing the Cu2+ ions with TEA first, and then addition of ammonia yields better results than the reverse process. The film thickness increases with the decrease of value x of Cu2-xSe.

  14. Preparation of γ-Al2O3 films by laser chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ming; Ito, Akihiko; Goto, Takashi

    2015-06-01

    γ- and α-Al2O3 films were prepared by chemical vapor deposition using CO2, Nd:YAG, and InGaAs lasers to investigate the effects of varying the laser wavelength and deposition conditions on the phase composition and microstructure. The CO2 laser was found to mostly produce α-Al2O3 films, whereas the Nd:YAG and InGaAs lasers produced γ-Al2O3 films when used at a high total pressure. γ-Al2O3 films had a cauliflower-like structure, while the α-Al2O3 films had a dense and columnar structure. Of the three lasers, it was the Nd:YAG laser that interacted most with intermediate gas species. This promoted γ-Al2O3 nucleation in the gas phase at high total pressure, which explains the cauliflower-like structure of nanoparticles observed.

  15. Chemically deposited Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} thin films for optical recording

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaji, S; Arato, A; Castillo, G Alan; Palma, M I Mendivil; Roy, T K Das; Krishnan, B [Facultad de IngenierIa Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon, C.P- 66450 (Mexico); O' Brien, J J; Liu, J, E-mail: bkrishnan@fime.uanl.m [Center for Nanoscience and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Missouri-St. Louis, One Univ. Blvd., St. Louis, MO - 63121 (United States)

    2010-02-24

    Laser induced changes in the properties of Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} thin films prepared by chemical bath deposition are described in this paper. Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} thin films of thickness 550 nm were deposited from a solution containing SbCl{sub 3} and Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 3} at 27 {sup 0}C for 5 h. These thin films were irradiated by a 532 nm continuous wave laser beam under different conditions at ambient atmosphere. X-ray diffraction analysis showed amorphous to polycrystalline transformation due to laser exposure of these thin films. Morphology and composition of these films were described. Optical properties of these films before and after laser irradiation were analysed. The optical band gap of the material was decreased due to laser induced crystallization. The results obtained confirm that there is further scope for developing this material as an optical recording media.

  16. Synthesis of zirconia (ZrO2) nanowires via chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, M. K.; Park, S. J.; Choi, D. J.

    2017-02-01

    Monoclinic zirconia nanowires were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition using ZrCl4 powder as a starting material at 1200 °C and 760 Torr. Graphite was employed as a substrate, and an Au thin film was pre-deposited on the graphite as a catalyst. The zirconia nanostructure morphology was observed through scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Based on X-ray diffraction, selected area electron diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy data, the resulting crystal structure was found to be single crystalline monoclinic zirconia. The homogeneous distributions of Zr, O and Au were studied by scanning transmission electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy mapping, and there was no metal droplet at the nanowire tips despite the use of an Au metal catalyst. This result is apart from that of conventional metal catalyzed nanowires.

  17. Preparation of diamond/Cu microchannel heat sink by chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘学璋; 罗浩; 苏栩; 余志明

    2015-01-01

    A Ti interlayer with thickness about 300 nm was sputtered on Cu microchannels, followed by an ultrasonic seeding with nanodiamond powders. Adherent diamond film with crystalline grains close to thermal equilibrium shape was tightly deposited by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HF-CVD). The nucleation and growth of diamond were investigated with micro-Raman spectroscope and field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray detector (EDX). Results show that the nucleation density is found to be up to 1010 cm−2. The enhancement of the nucleation kinetics can be attributed to the nanometer rough Ti interlayer surface. An improved absorption of nanodiamond particles is found, which act as starting points for the diamond nucleation during HF-CVD process. Furthermore, finite element simulation was conducted to understand the thermal management properties of prepared diamond/Cu microchannel heat sink.

  18. Translation Effects in Fluorine Doped Tin Oxide Thin Film Properties by Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Vapour Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Afzaal

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the impact of translation rates in fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO thin films using atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition (APCVD were studied. We demonstrated that by adjusting the translation speeds of the susceptor, the growth rates of the FTO films varied and hence many of the film properties were modified. X-ray powder diffraction showed an increased preferred orientation along the (200 plane at higher translation rates, although with no actual change in the particle sizes. A reduction in dopant level resulted in decreased particle sizes and a much greater degree of (200 preferred orientation. For low dopant concentration levels, atomic force microscope (AFM studies showed a reduction in roughness (and lower optical haze with increased translation rate and decreased growth rates. Electrical measurements concluded that the resistivity, carrier concentration, and mobility of films were dependent on the level of fluorine dopant, the translation rate and hence the growth rates of the deposited films.

  19. Synthesis and Characterization of SnO2 Thin Films by Chemical Bath Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rifai, Aditia; Iqbal, Muhammad; Nugraha; Nuruddin, Ahmad; Suyatman; Yuliarto, Brian

    2011-12-01

    SnO2 thin films were deposited on glass substrate by chemical bath deposition (CBD) with stannous chloride (SnCl2..2H2O) as a precursor and urea (CO(NH2)2) as a buffer. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) are used to characterize the structure of the films; the surface morphology of the films were observed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Using this techniques, we specify the effect of stannous chloride concentration and weight ratio of urea/H2O on the crystallinity and morphology of these films. The rutile structure corresponding (110), (101) and (211) planes of SnO2 is obtained. The increasing of stannous chloride concentration and the decreasing weight ratio of urea/H2O is found to improve the crystallinity of the film. The average diameter of grain size is about 96 nm.

  20. The Physico-Chemical Conditions for Mobilization of Gold in Mobin Gold Deposit, Southwest Hunan, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谷俐; 杨华; 戴塔根; 刘利萍

    2002-01-01

    Experiments on water-rock interaction were carried out on wall-rock samples from the Mobin gold deposit, Southwest Hunan, China, with the aim of determining the optimum physical and chemical conditions for the mobilization of gold in solution. Results indicate that gold is most easily mobilized from the wall rock-tuffaceous slate of the Mobin Deposit. Mobi lization is optimized if fluids are neutral to slightly alkaline and contain both chlorine and sulphur ions at the concentration and composition of about [0.25M (NH4)2S + 1M NaCl]. The amount of gold leached from the tuffaceous slate increases with temperature although the effect decreases above about 200℃ .

  1. MgB{sub 2} thin films by hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi, X.X. [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)]|[Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)]. E-mail: xxx4@psu.edu; Pogrebnyakov, A.V. [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)]|[Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Xu, S.Y.; Chen, K.; Cui, Y.; Maertz, E.C. [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Zhuang, C.G. [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)]|[Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)]|[Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Li, Qi [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Lamborn, D.R. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Redwing, J.M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)]|[Department of Chemical Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Liu, Z.K.; Soukiassian, A.; Schlom, D.G.; Weng, X.J.; Dickey, E.C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Chen, Y.B.; Tian, W.; Pan, X.Q. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Cybart, S.A. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Dynes, R.C. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2007-06-01

    Hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition (HPCVD) has been the most effective technique for depositing MgB{sub 2} thin films. It generates high magnesium vapor pressures and provides a clean environment for the growth of high purity MgB{sub 2} films. The epitaxial pure MgB{sub 2} films grown by HPCVD show higher-than-bulk T {sub c} due to tensile strain in the films. The HPCVD films are the cleanest MgB{sub 2} materials reported, allowing basic research, such as on magnetoresistance, that reveals the two-band nature of MgB{sub 2}. The carbon-alloyed HPCVD films demonstrate record-high H {sub c2} values promising for high magnetic field applications. The HPCVD films and multilayers have enabled the fabrication of high quality MgB{sub 2} Josephson junctions.

  2. Chemical solution deposition of ferroelectric yttrium-doped hafnium oxide films on platinum electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starschich, S.; Griesche, D.; Schneller, T.; Waser, R.; Böttger, U.

    2014-05-01

    Ferroelectric hafnium oxide films were fabricated by chemical solution deposition with a remnant polarization of >13 μC/cm2. The samples were prepared with 5.2 mol. % yttrium-doping and the thickness varied from 18 nm to 70 nm. The hafnium oxide layer was integrated into a metal-insulator-metal capacitor using platinum electrodes. Due to the processing procedure, no thickness dependence of the ferroelectric properties was observed. To confirm the ferroelectric nature of the deposited samples, polarization, capacitance, and piezoelectric displacement measurements were performed. However, no evidence of the orthorhombic phase was found which has been proposed to be the non-centrosymmetric, ferroelectric phase in HfO2.

  3. Chemical solution deposition of YBCO thin film by different polymer additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W.T.; Li, G.; Pu, M.H.; Sun, R.P.; Zhou, H.M.; Zhang, Y. [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Levitation Technologies and Maglev Trains, Ministry of Education of China, Superconductivity R and D Center (SRDC), Mail Stop 165, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Zhang, H. [Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Yang, Y. [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Levitation Technologies and Maglev Trains, Ministry of Education of China, Superconductivity R and D Center (SRDC), Mail Stop 165, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Cheng, C.H. [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Levitation Technologies and Maglev Trains, Ministry of Education of China, Superconductivity R and D Center (SRDC), Mail Stop 165, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wale, Sydney, 2052 NSW (Australia); Zhao, Y. [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Levitation Technologies and Maglev Trains, Ministry of Education of China, Superconductivity R and D Center (SRDC), Mail Stop 165, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wale, Sydney, 2052 NSW (Australia)], E-mail: yzhao@swjtu.edu.cn

    2008-09-15

    A polymer-assisted chemical solution deposition approach has been proposed for the preparation of YBCO thin film. Different additives like PVB (polyvinyl butyral), PEG (polyethylene glycol) and PVP (polyvinylpyrrolidone) have been used to adjust the final viscosity of the precursor solution and thus the film formation. In this fluorine-free approach, YBCO has been deposited on single crystal substrates with metal acetates being starting materials. Biaxially textured YBCO thin films have been obtained. However, different additives lead to different microstructure. Dense, smooth and crack-free YBCO film prepared with PVB as additive yields sharp superconducting transition around T{sub c} = 90 K as well as high J{sub c} (0 T, 77 K) over 3 MA/cm{sup 2}.

  4. Chemical solution deposition of YBCO thin film by different polymer additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W. T.; Li, G.; Pu, M. H.; Sun, R. P.; Zhou, H. M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, H.; Yang, Y.; Cheng, C. H.; Zhao, Y.

    2008-09-01

    A polymer-assisted chemical solution deposition approach has been proposed for the preparation of YBCO thin film. Different additives like PVB (polyvinyl butyral), PEG (polyethylene glycol) and PVP (polyvinylpyrrolidone) have been used to adjust the final viscosity of the precursor solution and thus the film formation. In this fluorine-free approach, YBCO has been deposited on single crystal substrates with metal acetates being starting materials. Biaxially textured YBCO thin films have been obtained. However, different additives lead to different microstructure. Dense, smooth and crack-free YBCO film prepared with PVB as additive yields sharp superconducting transition around Tc = 90 K as well as high Jc (0 T, 77 K) over 3 MA/cm 2.

  5. Nanoscale arrays of antimony telluride single crystals by selective chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ruomeng; Benjamin, Sophie L.; Gurnani, Chitra; Wang, Yudong; Hector, Andrew L.; Levason, William; Reid, Gillian; De Groot, C. H. (Kees)

    2016-01-01

    Arrays of individual single nanocrystals of Sb2Te3 have been formed using selective chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from a single source precursor. Crystals are self-assembled reproducibly in confined spaces of 100 nm diameter with pitch down to 500 nm. The distribution of crystallite sizes across the arrays is very narrow (standard deviation of 15%) and is affected by both the hole diameter and the array pitch. The preferred growth of the crystals in the orientation along the diagonal of the square holes strongly indicates that the diffusion of adatoms results in a near thermodynamic equilibrium growth mechanism of the nuclei. A clear relationship between electrical resistivity and selectivity is established across a range of metal selenides and tellurides, showing that conductive materials result in more selective growth and suggesting that electron donation is of critical importance for selective deposition. PMID:27283116

  6. Hot wire chemical vapor deposition chemistry in the gas phase and on the catalyst surface with organosilicon compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yujun

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: Hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD), also referred to as catalytic CVD (Cat-CVD), has been used to produce Si-containing thin films, nanomaterials, and functional polymer coatings that have found wide applications in microelectronic and photovoltaic devices, in automobiles, and in biotechnology. The success of HWCVD is largely due to its various advantages, including high deposition rate, low substrate temperatures, lack of plasma-induced damage, and large-area uniformity. Film growth in HWCVD is induced by reactive species generated from primary decomposition on the metal wire or from secondary reactions in the gas phase. In order to achieve a rational and efficient optimization of the process, it is essential to identify the reactive species and to understand the chemical kinetics that govern the production of these precursor species for film growth. In this Account, we report recent progress in unraveling the complex gas-phase reaction chemistry in the HWCVD growth of silicon carbide thin films using organosilicon compounds as single-source precursors. We have demonstrated that laser ionization mass spectrometry is a powerful diagnostic tool for studying the gas-phase reaction chemistry when combined with the methods of isotope labeling and chemical trapping. The four methyl-substituted silane molecules, belonging to open-chain alkylsilanes, dissociatively adsorb on W and Ta filaments to produce methyl radical and H2 molecule. Under the typical deposition pressures, with increasing number of methyl substitution, the dominant chemistry occurring in the gas phase switches from silylene/silene reactions to free-radical short chain reactions. This change in dominant reaction intermediates from silylene/silene to methyl radicals explains the observation from thin film deposition that silicon carbide films become more C-rich with a decreasing number of Si-H bonds in the four precursor molecules. In the case of cyclic monosilacyclobutanes, we have

  7. Synthesis of nanocrystalline silicon thin films using the increase of the deposition pressure in the hot-wire chemical vapour deposition technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.K. Rath

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured thin silicon-based films have been deposited using the hot-wire chemical vapour deposition (HWCVD technique at the University of the Western Cape. A variety of techniques including optical and infrared spectroscopy, Raman scattering spectroscopy, X-rays diffraction (XRD and transmission electron microscopy (TEM have been used for characterisation of the films. The electrical measurements show that the films have good values of photoresponse, and the photocurrent remains stable after several hours of light soaking. This contribution will discuss the characteristics of the hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon thin films deposited using increased process chamber pressure at a fixed hydrogen dilution ratio in monosilane gas.

  8. The chemical composition and fluxes of atmospheric wet deposition at four sites in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conradie, E. H.; Van Zyl, P. G.; Pienaar, J. J.; Beukes, J. P.; Galy-Lacaux, C.; Venter, A. D.; Mkhatshwa, G. V.

    2016-12-01

    South Africa is the economic hub of southern Africa and is regarded as an important source region of atmospheric pollutants. A nitrogen dioxide (NO2) hotspot is clearly visible from space over the South African Mpumalanga Highveld, while South Africa is also regarded as the 9th largest anthropogenic sulphur (S) emitting country. Notwithstanding the importance of South Africa with regard to nitrogen (N) and S emissions, very limited data has been published on the chemical composition of wet deposition for this region. This paper presents the concentrations of sodium (Na+), ammonium (NH4+), potassium (K+), calcium (Ca2+), magnesium (Mg2+), nitrate (NO3-), chloride (Cl-), sulphate (SO42-) and water-soluble organic acids (OA) in the wet deposition samples collected between 2009 and 2014 at four South African IDAF (IGAC DEBITS Africa) sites, which are regarded as regional representatives of the north-eastern interior. Also, wet deposition fluxes of the ten ions are calculated and presented in this paper. The results show that the total ionic concentrations and fluxes of wet deposition were much higher at the two sites closer to anthropogenic emissions, while the pH of wet deposition at these two sites were lower compared to that of the two sites that were less impacted by anthropogenic emissions. . The major sources of the ten ions included marine, terrigenous (crust), fossil fuel combustion, agriculture and biomass burning. Significant contributions from fossil fuel combustion were determined for the two sites in close proximity to anthropogenic source regions. The results of back trajectory analysis, however, did indicate that the two remote sites are also affected by air masses passing over the source region through anti-cyclonic recirculation. The largest contributions at the two sites distant from the anthropogenic source regions were marine sources, while the impact of biomass burning was also more significant at the remote sites. Comparison to previous wet

  9. Behavior of incorporated nitrogen in plasma-nitrided silicon oxide formed by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinoda, Nao; Itokawa, Hiroshi; Fujitsuka, Ryota; Sekine, Katsuyuki; Onoue, Seiji; Tonotani, Junichi

    2016-04-01

    The behavior of nitrogen (N) atoms in plasma-nitrided silicon oxide (SiO2) formed by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was characterized by physical analysis and from electrical properties. The changes in the chemical bonding and distribution of N in plasma-nitrided SiO2 were investigated for different subsequent processes. N-Si3, N-Si2O, and N2 are formed in a SiO2 film by plasma nitridation. N2 molecules diffuse out during annealing at temperatures higher than 900 °C. NH species are generated from N2 molecules and H in the SiO2 film with subsequent oxide deposition using O3 as an oxidant. The capacitance-voltage (C-V) curves of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors are obtained. The negative shift of the C-V curve is caused by the increase in the density of positive fix charge traps in CVD-SiO2 induced by plasma nitridation. The C-V curve of plasma-nitrided SiO2 subjected to annealing shifts to the positive direction and that subjected to the subsequent oxide deposition shifts markedly to the negative direction. It is clarified that the density of positive charge fixed traps in plasma-nitrided SiO2 films decrease because the amount of N2 molecules is decreased by annealing, and that the density of traps increases because NH species are generated and move to the interface between SiO2 and the Si substrate with the subsequent oxide deposition.

  10. Corrosion resistant coatings (Al2O3) produced by metal organic chemical vapour deposition using aluminium-tri-sec-butoxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanappel, V.A.C.; Corbach, van H.D.; Fransen, T.; Gellings, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    The metal organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) of amorphous alumina films on steel was performed in nitrogen at atmospheric pressure. This MOCVD process is based on the thermal decomposition of aluminium-tri-sec-butoxide (ATSB). The effect of the deposition temperature (within the range 290–42

  11. Evaluation of niobium dimethylamino-ethoxide for chemical vapour deposition of niobium oxide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dabirian, Ali [Laboratory for Photonic Materials and Characterization, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Station 17, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Kuzminykh, Yury, E-mail: yury.kuzminykh@empa.ch [Laboratory for Photonic Materials and Characterization, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Station 17, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing, Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, 3602 Thun (Switzerland); Wagner, Estelle; Benvenuti, Giacomo [3D-Oxides, 70 Rue G. Eiffel Technoparc, 01630 St Genis Pouilly (France); ABCD Technology, 12 route de Champ-Colin, 1260 Nyon (Switzerland); Rushworth, Simon [Tyndall National Institute, Lee Maltings, Dyke Parade, Cork (Ireland); Hoffmann, Patrik, E-mail: patrik.hoffmann@empa.ch [Laboratory for Photonic Materials and Characterization, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Station 17, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing, Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, 3602 Thun (Switzerland)

    2014-11-28

    Chemical vapour deposition (CVD) processes depend on the availability of suitable precursors. Precursors that deliver a stable vapour pressure are favourable in classical CVD processes, as they ensure process reproducibility. In high vacuum CVD (HV-CVD) process vapour pressure stability of the precursor is of particular importance, since no carrier gas assisted transport can be used. The dimeric Nb{sub 2}(OEt){sub 10} does not fulfil this requirement since it partially dissociates upon heating. Dimethylamino functionalization of an ethoxy ligand of Nb(OEt){sub 5} acts as an octahedral field completing entity and leads to Nb(OEt){sub 4}(dmae). We show that Nb(OEt){sub 4}(dmae) evaporates as monomeric molecule and ensures a stable vapour pressure and, consequently, stable flow. A set of HV-CVD experiments were conducted using this precursor by projecting a graded molecular beam of the precursor onto the substrate at deposition temperatures from 320 °C to 650 °C. Film growth rates ranging from 8 nm·h{sup −1} to values larger than 400 nm·h{sup −1} can be obtained in this system illustrating the high level of control available over the film growth process. Classical CVD limiting conditions along with the recently reported adsorption–reaction limited conditions are observed and the chemical composition, and microstructural and optical properties of the films are related to the corresponding growth regime. Nb(OEt){sub 4}(dmae) provides a large process window of deposition temperatures and precursor fluxes over which carbon-free and polycrystalline niobium oxide films with growth rates proportional to precursor flux are obtained. This feature makes Nb(OEt){sub 4}(dmae) an attractive precursor for combinatorial CVD of niobium containing complex oxide films that are finding an increasing interest in photonics and photoelectrochemical water splitting applications. The adsorption–reaction limited conditions provide extremely small growth rates comparable to an

  12. Direct chemical vapour deposited grapheme synthesis on silicon oxide by controlled copper dewettting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beld, van den Wesley T.E.; Berg, van den Albert; Eijkel, Jan C.T.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel method for direct uniform graphene synthesis onto silicon oxide in a controlled manner. On a grooved silicon oxide wafer is copper deposited under a slight angle and subsequently the substrate is treated by a typical graphene synthesis process. During this process di

  13. Spatial control of direct chemical vapor deposition of graphene on silicon dioxide by directional copper dewetting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beld, van den Wesley T.E.; Berg, van den Albert; Eijkel, Jan C.T.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present a method for the spatial control of direct graphene synthesis onto silicon dioxide by controlled dewetting. The dewetting process is controlled through a combination of using a grooved substrate and conducting copper deposition at an angle. The substrate is then treated usin

  14. Chemical Reactivity as Described by Quantum Chemical Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. De Proft

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Density Functional Theory is situated within the evolution of Quantum Chemistry as a facilitator of computations and a provider of new, chemical insights. The importance of the latter branch of DFT, conceptual DFT is highlighted following Parr's dictum "to calculate a molecule is not to understand it". An overview is given of the most important reactivity descriptors and the principles they are couched in. Examples are given on the evolution of the structure-property-wave function triangle which can be considered as the central paradigm of molecular quantum chemistry to (for many purposes a structure-property-density triangle. Both kinetic as well as thermodynamic aspects can be included when further linking reactivity to the property vertex. In the field of organic chemistry, the ab initio calculation of functional group properties and their use in studies on acidity and basicity is discussed together with the use of DFT descriptors to study the kinetics of SN2 reactions and the regioselectivity in Diels Alder reactions. Similarity in reactivity is illustrated via a study on peptide isosteres. In the field of inorganic chemistry non empirical studies of adsorption of small molecules in zeolite cages are discussed providing Henry constants and separation constants, the latter in remarkable good agreement with experiments. Possible refinements in a conceptual DFT context are presented. Finally an example from biochemistry is discussed : the influence of point mutations on the catalytic activity of subtilisin.

  15. MgB2 superconducting whiskers synthesized by using the hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yazhou; Zhuang, Chenggang; Gao, Jingyun; Shan, Xudong; Zhang, Jingmin; Liao, Zhimin; Xu, Hongjun; Yu, Dapeng; Feng, Qingrong

    2009-02-25

    In this work, MgB(2) whiskers were fabricated on a copper substrate by using the hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition, which was one of the most effective ways to make high quality pure MgB(2) films, with the possible growth mechanism discussed. The whiskers are hexagonal and conelike and grow along the [0001] direction with a single-crystal structure. The onset transition temperature is approximately 39 K, which is among the best in the published nanostructure MgB(2) papers. Fabrication of nanoscale MgB(2) whiskers provides the fundamental understanding of the effect of dimensionality and size on superconductivity.

  16. Ion beam analysis of copper selenide thin films prepared by chemical bath deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, E.; García, V. M.; Nair, P. K.; Nair, M. T. S.; Zavala, E. P.; Huerta, L.; Rocha, M. F.

    2000-03-01

    Analyses of Rutherford back scattered (RBS) 4He+-particle spectra of copper selenide thin films deposited on glass slides by chemical bath were carried out to determine the changes brought about in the thin film by annealing processes. The atomic density per unit area and composition of the films were obtained from these measurements. This analysis shows that annealing in a nitrogen atmosphere at 400°C leads to the conversion of Cu xSe thin film to Cu 2Se. Results of X-ray diffraction, optical, and electrical characteristics on the films are presented to supplement the RBS results.

  17. Magnetic property and recording performance of chemical deposition CoP thin films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    The thickness of CoP thin films prepared by wet chemical deposition is of crucial importance on magnetic property and recording perform-ance. The coercivity of CoP films decreased with increasing film thickness. The coercivity was 45.37 kA m 1 at the thickness of 300 nm, and decreased to 21.65 kA m 1 at 5.7 μm. Recording performance tests indicate that, for drums with the same size, different recorded magnetic pole density have different thickness requirements. For 40 mm diameter magnetic drum, the optimal ...

  18. Synthesis of carbon nanotube array using corona discharge plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A corona discharge plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition with the features of atmospheric pressure and low temperature has been developed to synthesize the carbon nanotube array. The array was synthesized from methane and hydrogen mixture in anodic aluminum oxide template channels in that cobalt was electrodeposited at the bottom. The characterization results by the scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy indicate that the array consists of carbon nanotubes with the diameter of about 40 nm and the length of more than 4 -m, and the carbon nanotubes are mainly restrained within the channels of templates.

  19. Growth of straight carbon nanotubes by simple thermal chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Xiao-ping; H. ABE; T. SHIMIZU; A. ANDO; H. TOKUMOTO; ZHU Shen-ming; ZHOU Hao-shen

    2006-01-01

    Straight carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were achieved by simple thermal chemical vapor deposition(STCVD) catalyzed by Mo-Fe alloy catalyst on silica supporting substrate at 700 ℃. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy images show that the straight CNTs are well graphitized with no attached amorphous carbon. Mo-Fe alloy catalyst particles play a very crucial role in the growth of straight CNTs. The straight carbon nanotubes contain much less defects than the curved nanotubes and might have potential applications for nanoelectrical devices in the future. The simple synthesis of straight CNTs may have benefit for large-scale productions.

  20. High-purity cobalt thin films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy prepared by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ootera, Yasuaki; Shimada, Takuya; Kado, Masaki; Quinsat, Michael; Morise, Hirofumi; Nakamura, Shiho; Kondo, Tsuyoshi

    2015-11-01

    A study of the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of high-purity cobalt thin films is described. The Co layer prepared by a thermal CVD technique with a Pt/Ta underlayer and a Pt cap layer shows a saturation magnetization (Ms) of ∼1.8 T and perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) with an anisotropy energy (Ku) of ∼105 J/m3. The cobalt thickness dependence of Ku reveals that the interfacial anisotropy at the Pt/Co interface is most likely the origin of the obtained PMA.

  1. High efficiency AIGaAs/Si monolithic tandem solar cell grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Tetsuo, Soga; T.", "Kato; M., Yang; Masayoshi, Umeno; Takashi, Jimbo

    1995-01-01

    The improvements of the AlGaAs solar cell grown on the Si substrate and the AlGaAs/Si tandem solar cell by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition have been investigated. The active‐area conversion efficiency of the Al0.1Ga0.9As solar cell on the Si substrate as high as 12.9% has been obtained by improving the growth sequence and adopting an Al compositionally graded band emitter layer. A high efficiency monolithic AlGaAs/Si tandem solar cell with the active‐area conversion efficiency of 19.9%...

  2. Synthesis and oxidation behavior of boron-substituted carbon powders by hot filament chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Boron-substituted carbon powder, BxC1-x with x up to 0.17, has been successfully synthesized by hot filament chemical vapor deposition. The boron concentration in prepared BxC1-x samples can be controlled by varying the relative proportions of methane and diborane. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and electron energy loss spectrum confirm the successful synthesis of an amorphous BC5 compound, which consists of 10―20 nm particles with disk-like morphology. Thermogravimetry measurement shows that BC5 compound starts to oxidize ap-proximately at 620℃ and has a higher oxidation resistance than carbon.

  3. Time variant layer control in atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition based growth of graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Qaisi, Ramy M.

    2013-04-01

    Graphene is a semi-metallic, transparent, atomic crystal structure material which is promising for its high mobility, strength and transparency - potentially applicable for radio frequency (RF) circuitry and energy harvesting and storage applications. Uniform (same number of layers), continuous (not torn or discontinuous), large area (100 mm to 200 mm wafer scale), low-cost, reliable growth are the first hand challenges for its commercialization prospect. We show a time variant uniform (layer control) growth of bi- to multi-layer graphene using atmospheric chemical vapor deposition system. We use Raman spectroscopy for physical characterization supported by electrical property analysis. © 2013 IEEE.

  4. Structural, optical and electrical properties of chemically deposited copper selenide films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R H Bari; V Ganesan; S Potadar; L A Patil

    2009-02-01

    Stoichiometric and nonstoichiometric thin films of copper selenide have been prepared by chemical bath deposition technique at temperature below 60°C on glass substrate. The effect of nonstoichiometry on the optical, electrical and structural properties of the film was studied. The bandgap energy was observed to increase with the increase in at % of copper in composition. The grain size was also observed to increase with the decrease of at % of copper in composition. The films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS), absorption spectroscopy, and AFM. The results are discussed and interpreted.

  5. MgB2 ultrathin films fabricated by hybrid physical chemical vapor deposition and ion milling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narendra Acharya

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this letter, we report on the structural and transport measurements of ultrathin MgB2 films grown by hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition followed by low incident angle Ar ion milling. The ultrathin films as thin as 1.8 nm, or 6 unit cells, exhibit excellent superconducting properties such as high critical temperature (Tc and high critical current density (Jc. The results show the great potential of these ultrathin films for superconducting devices and present a possibility to explore superconductivity in MgB2 at the 2D limit.

  6. Electro-chemical deposition of zinc oxide nanostructures by using two electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Taleatu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the most viable ways to grow nanostructures is electro deposition. However, most electrodeposited samples are obtained by three-electrode electrochemical cell. We successfully use a much simpler two-electrode cell to grow different ZnO nanostructures from common chemical reagents. Concentration, pH of the electrolytes and growth parameters like potentials at the electrodes, are tailored to allow fast growth without complexity. Morphology and surface roughness are investigated by Scanning Electron and Air Force Microscopy (SEM and AFM respectively, crystal structure by X-Ray Diffraction measurements (XRD and ZnO stoichiometry by core level photoemission spectroscopy (XPS.

  7. MgB2 ultrathin films fabricated by hybrid physical chemical vapor deposition and ion milling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Narendra; Wolak, Matthäus A.; Tan, Teng; Lee, Namhoon; Lang, Andrew C.; Taheri, Mitra; Cunnane, Dan; Karasik, Boris. S.; Xi, X. X.

    2016-08-01

    In this letter, we report on the structural and transport measurements of ultrathin MgB2 films grown by hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition followed by low incident angle Ar ion milling. The ultrathin films as thin as 1.8 nm, or 6 unit cells, exhibit excellent superconducting properties such as high critical temperature (Tc) and high critical current density (Jc). The results show the great potential of these ultrathin films for superconducting devices and present a possibility to explore superconductivity in MgB2 at the 2D limit.

  8. An Investigation on the Formation of Carbon Nanotubes by Two-Stage Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Shamsudin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available High density of carbon nanotubes (CNTs has been synthesized from agricultural hydrocarbon: camphor oil using a one-hour synthesis time and a titanium dioxide sol gel catalyst. The pyrolysis temperature is studied in the range of 700–900°C at increments of 50°C. The synthesis process is done using a custom-made two-stage catalytic chemical vapor deposition apparatus. The CNT characteristics are investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The experimental results showed that structural properties of CNT are highly dependent on pyrolysis temperature changes.

  9. Development of Diffusion barrier coatings and Deposition Technologies for Mitigating Fuel Cladding Chemical Interactions (FCCI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sridharan, Kumar; Allen, Todd; Cole, James

    2013-02-27

    The goal of this project is to develop diffusion barrier coatings on the inner cladding surface to mitigate fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI). FCCI occurs due to thermal and radiation enhanced inter-diffusion between the cladding and fuel materials, and can have the detrimental effects of reducing the effective cladding wall thickness and lowering the melting points of the fuel and cladding. The research is aimed at the Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR), a sodium-cooled fast reactor, in which higher burn-ups will exacerbate the FCCI problem. This project will study both diffusion barrier coating materials and deposition technologies. Researchers will investigate pure vanadium, zirconium, and titanium metals, along with their respective oxides, on substrates of HT-9, T91, and oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steels; these materials are leading candidates for ABR fuel cladding. To test the efficacy of the coating materials, the research team will perform high-temperature diffusion couple studies using both a prototypic metallic uranium fuel and a surrogate the rare-earth element lanthanum. Ion irradiation experiments will test the stability of the coating and the coating-cladding interface. A critical technological challenge is the ability to deposit uniform coatings on the inner surface of cladding. The team will develop a promising non-line-of-sight approach that uses nanofluids . Recent research has shown the feasibility of this simple yet novel approach to deposit coatings on test flats and inside small sections of claddings. Two approaches will be investigated: 1) modified electrophoretic deposition (MEPD) and 2) boiling nanofluids. The coatings will be evaluated in the as-deposited condition and after sintering.

  10. Methods of Boron-carbon Deposited Film Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airapetov, A.; Terentiev, V.; Voituk, A.; Zakharov, A.

    Boron carbide was proposed as a material for in-situ renewable protecting coating for tungsten tiles of the ITER divertor. It is necessary to develop a method of gasification of boron-carbon film which deposits during B4C sputtering. In this paper the results of the first stage investigation of gasification methods of boron-carbon films are presented. Two gasification methods of films are investigated: interaction with the ozone-oxygen mixture and irradiation in plasma with the working gas composed of oxygen, ethanol, and, in some cases, helium. The gasification rate in the ozone-oxygen mixture at 250 °C for B/C films with different B/C ratio and carbon fiber composite (CFC), was measured. For B/C films the gasification rate decreased with increasing B/C ratio (from 45 nm/h at B/C=0.7 to 4 nm/h at B/C=2.1; for CFC - 15 μm/h). Films gasification rates were measured under ion irradiation from ethanol-oxygen-helium plasma at different temperatures, with different ion energies and different gas mixtures. The maximum obtained removal rate was near 230 nm/h in case of ethanol-oxygen plasma and at 150°C of the sample temperature.

  11. Growth mechanisms of zinc oxide and zinc sulfide films by mist chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Kazuyuki; Yamasaki, Yuichiro; Tanaka, Ichiro

    2017-01-01

    The growth mechanisms of zinc oxide and zinc sulfide films by mist chemical vapor deposition (mist-CVD) were experimentally investigated from the viewpoint of mist behaviors and chemical reactions. The proper growth model, either vaporization or the Leidenfrost model, was studied by supplying two kinds of mists with different kinds of sources, such as H2 16O and H2 18O for ZnO growth and ZnCl2 and thiourea for ZnS growth. Moreover, the origin of the oxygen atoms of ZnO was investigated using a quantitative analysis. The role of chloro complex of zinc in the growth of ZnS from aqueous solutions was also examined by systematic studies.

  12. Structure and chemical characteristics of natural mineral deposit Terbunskaya (Lipetsk region, Russia)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motyleva, S., E-mail: motyleva-svetlana@mail.ru; Mertvishcheva, M. [All-Russian Horticular Institute for Breeding, Agrotechnology and Nursery Russian Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Moskow (Russian Federation); Shchuchka, R.; Gulidova, V. [Yelets state university named after I. A. Bunin, Yelets (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-22

    New knowledge about the mineralogical features Terbunsky mineral. Investigated 5 fractions isolated from the incision (2-2,5 m). Terbunskaya deposit belongs to minerals Santonian age. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive analysis of fractions isolated studied in detail. In the coarse fractions found ancient organic remains of algae and micro-organisms that have been sedimented together with the mineral component during geological periods. The share of organic inclusions does not exceed 1.5%. Chemical composition confirms the presence of silicon and carbonate organisms. Advantageously proportion of minerals having a layered structure with a plurality of micro and nano pore size 600 - 80-nm and an average chemical composition (wt%): Na (0,64), Mg (0,54), Al (13.48), Si (27 57), K (2.39) Ca (0.75)

  13. Characterization of the SiO2 film deposited by using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD with TEOS/N2/O2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meysam Zarchi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine how certain parameters like temperature, pressure, and gas composition affect the characteristics of SiO2 film by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD. We used of low temperature and an inductively coupled plasma (ICP for various with gas mixtures of TEOS/N2/O2 at a given RF power and dc bias voltage. For the gas mixture with 40 sccm of N2 in TEOS, 100 standard cubic centimeters per minute (sccm of N2, and 500 sccm of O2, transparent and scratch-resistant SiO2 could be deposited with a deposition rate of 30 nm/min when RF power of 500 W and a dc-bias voltage of 350V were applied. The characteristics of the deposited SiO2, such as the composition, the binding energy, etc. were compared with the SiO2 deposited by using thermal CVD and evaporation. It was found that the SiO2 deposited by PECVD with TEOS/N2/O2 exhibited properties typical of SiO2 deposited applying thermal CVD and evaporation. The surface roughness of the 100 nm-thick SiO2 deposited by PECVD was similar to that of the substrate.

  14. Properties of silicon nitride thin overlays deposited on optical fibers — Effect of fiber suspension in radio frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Śmietana, M., E-mail: M.Smietana@elka.pw.edu.pl [Institute of Microelectronics and Optoelectronics, Warsaw University of Technology, Koszykowa 75, Warsaw 00-662 (Poland); Dominik, M.; Myśliwiec, M.; Kwietniewski, N. [Institute of Microelectronics and Optoelectronics, Warsaw University of Technology, Koszykowa 75, Warsaw 00-662 (Poland); Mikulic, P. [Centre de Recherche en Photonique, Université du Québec en Outaouais, 101 rue Saint-Jean-Bosco, Gatineau, J8X 3X7, Québec (Canada); Witkowski, B.S. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, Warsaw 02-666 (Poland); Bock, W.J. [Centre de Recherche en Photonique, Université du Québec en Outaouais, 101 rue Saint-Jean-Bosco, Gatineau, J8X 3X7, Québec (Canada)

    2016-03-31

    This work discusses the effect of sample suspension in radio frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition process on properties of the obtained overlays. Silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) overlays were deposited on flat silicon wafers and cylindrical fused silica optical fibers. The influence of the suspension height and fiber diameter on SiN{sub x} deposition rate is investigated. It has been found that thickness of the SiN{sub x} overlay significantly increases with suspension height, and the deposition rate depends on fiber dimensions. Moreover, the SiN{sub x} overlays were also deposited on long-period gratings (LPGs) induced in optical fiber. Measurements of the LPG spectral response combined with its numerical simulations allowed for a discussion on properties of the deposited overlay. The measurements have proven higher overlay deposition rate on the suspended fiber than on flat Si wafer placed on the electrode. Results of this work are essential for precise tuning of the functional properties of new generations of optical devices such as optical sensors, filters and resonators, which typically are based on optical fibers and require the overlays with well defined properties. - Highlights: • The effect of optical fiber suspension in plasma process is discussed. • The deposition rate of silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) overlay depends on fiber dimensions. • Thickness of the SiN{sub x} overlay strongly increases with suspension height. • Measurements and simulations of long-period grating confirms experimental results.

  15. Metal-organic chemical vapour deposition of lithium manganese oxide thin films via single solid source precursor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyedotun K.O.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Lithium manganese oxide thin films were deposited on sodalime glass substrates by metal organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD technique. The films were prepared by pyrolysis of lithium manganese acetylacetonate precursor at a temperature of 420 °C with a flow rate of 2.5 dm3/min for two-hour deposition period. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS, UV-Vis spectrophotometry, X-ray diffraction (XRD spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM and van der Pauw four point probe method were used for characterizations of the film samples. RBS studies of the films revealed fair thickness of 1112.311 (1015 atoms/cm2 and effective stoichiometric relationship of Li0.47Mn0.27O0.26. The films exhibited relatively high transmission (50 % T in the visible and NIR range, with the bandgap energy of 2.55 eV. Broad and diffused X-ray diffraction patterns obtained showed that the film was amorphous in nature, while microstructural studies indicated dense and uniformly distributed layer across the substrate. Resistivity value of 4.9 Ω·cm was obtained for the thin film. Compared with Mn0.2O0.8 thin film, a significant lattice absorption edge shift was observed in the Li0.47Mn0.27O0.26 film.

  16. Determination of the optical parameters of a-Si:H thin films deposited by hot wire–chemical vapour deposition technique using transmission spectrum only

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nabeel A Bakr; A M Funde; V S Waman; M M Kamble; R R Hawaldar; D P Amalnerkar; S W Gosavi; S R Jadkar

    2011-03-01

    Three demonstration samples of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films were deposited using hot wire–chemical vapour deposition (HW–CVD) technique. The optical parameters and the thickness were determined from the extremes of the interference fringes of transmission spectrum in the range of 400–2500 nm using the envelope method. The calculated values of the refractive index () were fitted using the two-term Cauchy dispersion relation and the static refractive index values (0) obtained were 2.799, 2.629 and 3.043 which were in the range of the reported values. The calculated thicknesses for all samples were cross-checked with Taly-Step profilometer and found to be almost equal. Detailed analysis was carried out to obtain the optical band gap (g) using Tauc’s method and the estimated values were 1.99, 2.01 and 1.75 eV. The optical band gap values were correlated with the hydrogen content (H) in the samples calculated from Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis. An attempt was made to apply Wemple–DiDomenico single-effective oscillator model to the a-Si:H samples to calculate the optical parameters. The optical band gap obtained by Tauc’s method and the static refractive index calculated from Cauchy fitting are in good agreement with those obtained by the single-effective oscillator model. The real and the imaginary parts of dielectric constant (r, ), and the optical conductivity () were also calculated.

  17. Direct fabrication of 3D graphene on nanoporous anodic alumina by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Hualin; Garrett, David J.; Apollo, Nicholas V.; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Lau, Desmond; Prawer, Steven; Cervenka, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    High surface area electrode materials are of interest for a wide range of potential applications such as super-capacitors and electrochemical cells. This paper describes a fabrication method of three-dimensional (3D) graphene conformally coated on nanoporous insulating substrate with uniform nanopore size. 3D graphene films were formed by controlled graphitization of diamond-like amorphous carbon precursor films, deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD). Plasma-assisted graphitization was found to produce better quality graphene than a simple thermal graphitization process. The resulting 3D graphene/amorphous carbon/alumina structure has a very high surface area, good electrical conductivity and exhibits excellent chemically stability, providing a good material platform for electrochemical applications. Consequently very large electrochemical capacitance values, as high as 2.1 mF for a sample of 10 mm3, were achieved. The electrochemical capacitance of the material exhibits a dependence on bias voltage, a phenomenon observed by other groups when studying graphene quantum capacitance. The plasma-assisted graphitization, which dominates the graphitization process, is analyzed and discussed in detail.

  18. Controllable preparation of a nano-hydroxyapatite coating on carbon fibers by electrochemical deposition and chemical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xudong; Zhao, Xueni; Wang, Wanying; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Li; He, Fuzhen; Yang, Jianjun

    2016-06-01

    A nano-hydroxyapatite (HA) coating with appropriate thickness and morphology similar to that of human bone tissue was directly prepared onto the surfaces of carbon fibers (CFs). A mixed solution of nitric acid, hydrochloric acid, sulfuric acid, and hydrogen peroxide (NHSH) was used in the preparation process. The coating was fabricated by combining NHSH treatment and electrochemical deposition (ECD). NHSH treatment is easy to operate, produces rapid reaction, and highly effective. This method was first used to induce the nucleation and growth of HA crystals on the CF surfaces. Numerous O-containing functional groups, such as hydroxyl (-OH) and carboxyl (-COOH) groups, were grafted onto the CF surfaces by NHSH treatment (NHSH-CFs); as such, the amounts of these groups on the functionalized CFs increased by nearly 8- and 12-fold, respectively, compared with those on untreated CFs. After treatment, the NHSH-CFs not only acquired larger specific surface areas but retained surfaces free from serious corrosion or breakage. Hence, NHSH-CFs are ideal depositional substrates of HA coating during ECD. ECD was successfully used to prepare a nano-rod-like HA coating on the NHSH-CF surfaces. The elemental composition, structure, and morphology of the HA coating were effectively controlled by adjusting various technological parameters, such as the current density, deposition time, and temperature. The average central diameter of HA crystals and the coating density increased with increasing deposition time. The average central diameter of most HA crystals on the NHSH-CFs varied from approximately 60 nm to 210 nm as the deposition time increased from 60 min to 180 min. Further studies on a possible deposition mechanism revealed that numerous O-containing functional groups on the NHSH-CF surfaces could associate with electrolyte ions (Ca(2+)) to form special chemical bonds. These bonds can induce HA coating deposition and improve the interfacial bonding strength between the HA

  19. Uniform deposition of uranium hexafluoride (UF6): Standardized mass deposits and controlled isotopic ratios using a thermal fluorination method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Bruce K; O'Hara, Matthew J; Casella, Andrew M; Carter, Jennifer C; Addleman, R Shane; MacFarlan, Paul J

    2016-07-01

    We report a convenient method for the generation of volatile uranium hexafluoride (UF6) from solid uranium oxides and other U compounds, followed by uniform deposition of low levels of UF6 onto sampling coupons. Under laminar flow conditions, UF6 is shown to interact with surfaces within a fixed reactor geometry to a highly predictable degree. We demonstrate the preparation of U deposits that range between approximately 0.01 and 500ngcm(-2). The data suggest the method can be extended to creating depositions at the sub-picogramcm(-2) level. The isotopic composition of the deposits can be customized by selection of the U source materials and we demonstrate a layering technique whereby two U solids, each with a different isotopic composition, are employed to form successive layers of UF6 on a surface. The result is an ultra-thin deposit that bears an isotopic signature that is a composite of the two U sources. The reported deposition method has direct application to the development of unique analytical standards for nuclear safeguards and forensics. Further, the method allows access to very low atomic or molecular coverages of surfaces.

  20. Recovery of metal values from spent lithium-ion batteries with chemical deposition and solvent extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Junmin; Han, Dongmei; Zuo, Xiaoxi

    This paper describes a new recycling process of metal values from spent lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). After the dismantling of the spent batteries steel crusts, the leaching of battery internal substances with alkaline solution and the dissolving of the residues with H 2SO 4 solution were carried out. Then mass cobalt was chemically deposited as oxalate, and Acorga M5640 and Cyanex272 extracted the small quantities of copper and cobalt, respectively. Lithium was recovered as deposition of lithium carbonate. It is shown that about 90% cobalt was deposited as oxalate with less than 0.5% impurities, and Acorga M5640 and Cyanex272 were efficient and selective for the extraction of copper and cobalt in sulfate solution. Over 98% of the copper and 97% of the cobalt was recovered in the given process. In addition, the waste solution was treated innocuously, and LiCoO 2 positive electrode material with good electrochemical performance was also synthesized by using the recovered compounds of cobalt and lithium as precursors. The process is feasible for the recycling of spent LIBs in scale-up.

  1. Growth of High TcYBaCuO Thin Films by Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirlin, Peter S.; Binder, R.; Gardiner, R.; Brown, Duncan W.

    1990-03-01

    Thin films of YBa2Cu3O7-x were grown on MgO(100) by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Low pressure growth studies were carried out between 400 and 600°C using metal β-diketonate complexes as source reagents for Y, Ba, and Cu. As-deposited films were amorphous and a two stage annealing protocol was used in which fluorine was first removed in a Ar/H20 stream between 700 and 850°C, followed by calcination in flowing oxygen between 500 and 950°C. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive analysis indicate that good compositional and dimensional uniformity could be achieved. The temperature of the oxygen annealing step was shown to have a dramatic impact on the physical and electrical properties of the YBa2Cu307-x thin films. Annealing temperatures exceeding 910°C gave large crystallites and semiconducting resistivity above Tc; annealing temperatures below 910°C yielded films with metallic conductivity whose density and superconducting transition varied inversely with maximum annealing temperature. Optimized deposition/annealing protocols yielded films with a preferred c-axis orientation, R273/R100 ratios of 2, onsets as high as 94K and zero resistance exceeding 90K.

  2. Diamond synthesis at atmospheric pressure by microwave capillary plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemawan, Kadek W.; Gou, Huiyang; Hemley, Russell J. [Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5251 Broad Branch Rd., NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States)

    2015-11-02

    Polycrystalline diamond has been synthesized on silicon substrates at atmospheric pressure, using a microwave capillary plasma chemical vapor deposition technique. The CH{sub 4}/Ar plasma was generated inside of quartz capillary tubes using 2.45 GHz microwave excitation without adding H{sub 2} into the deposition gas chemistry. Electronically excited species of CN, C{sub 2}, Ar, N{sub 2}, CH, H{sub β}, and H{sub α} were observed in the emission spectra. Raman measurements of deposited material indicate the formation of well-crystallized diamond, as evidenced by the sharp T{sub 2g} phonon at 1333 cm{sup −1} peak relative to the Raman features of graphitic carbon. Field emission scanning electron microscopy images reveal that, depending on the growth conditions, the carbon microstructures of grown films exhibit “coral” and “cauliflower-like” morphologies or well-facetted diamond crystals with grain sizes ranging from 100 nm to 10 μm.

  3. Metal Organic Chemical Vapour Deposited Thin Films of Cobalt Oxide Prepared via Cobalt Acetylacetonate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C.U. Mordi; M.A. Eleruja; B.A. Taleatu; G.O. Egharevba; A.V. Adedeji; 0.0. Akinwunmi; B. Olofinjana; C. Jeynes; E.O.B. Ajayi

    2009-01-01

    The single solid source precursor, cobalt (Ⅱ) acetylacetonate was prepared and characterized by infrared spec-troscopy. Thin films of cobalt oxide were deposited on soda lime glass substrates through the pyrolysis (metal organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD)) of single solid source precursor, cobalt acetylaceto-nate, Co[C5H7O2]2 at a temperature of 420℃. The compositional characterization carried out by rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD), showed that the films have a stoichiometry of Co2O3 and an average thickness of 227±0.2 nm. A direct energy gap of 2.15±0.01 eV was calculated by the data obtained by optical absorption spectroscopy. The morphology of the films obtained by scanning electron mi-croscopy, showed that the grains were continuous and uniformly distributed at various magnifications, while the average grain size was less than 1 micron for the deposited thin films of cobalt oxide.

  4. Microstructural characterization of chemical bath deposited and sputtered Zn(O,S) buffer layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gautron, E., E-mail: eric.gautron@cnrs-imn.fr [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel (IMN)-UMR 6502, Université de Nantes, CNRS, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP 32229, 44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Buffière, M. [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel (IMN)-UMR 6502, Université de Nantes, CNRS, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP 32229, 44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); 44solar, 14 rue Kepler, 44240 La Chapelle sur Erdre (France); Harel, S.; Assmann, L.; Arzel, L.; Brohan, L. [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel (IMN)-UMR 6502, Université de Nantes, CNRS, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP 32229, 44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Kessler, J. [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel (IMN)-UMR 6502, Université de Nantes, CNRS, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP 32229, 44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); 44solar, 14 rue Kepler, 44240 La Chapelle sur Erdre (France); Barreau, N. [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel (IMN)-UMR 6502, Université de Nantes, CNRS, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP 32229, 44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France)

    2013-05-01

    The present work aims at investigating the microstructure of Zn(O,S) buffer layers relative to their deposition route, namely either chemical bath deposition (CBD) or RF co-sputtering process (PVD) under pure Ar. The core of the study consists of cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) characterization of the differently grown Zn(O,S) thin films on co-evaporated Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGSe) absorbers. It shows that the morphology of Zn(O,S) layer deposited on CIGSe using CBD process is made of a thin layer of well oriented ZnS sphalerite-(111) and/or ZnS wurtzite-(0002) planes parallel to CIGSe chalcopyrite-(112) planes at the interface with CIGSe followed by misoriented nanometer-sized ZnS crystallites in an amorphous phase. As far as (PVD)Zn(O,S) is concerned, the TEM analyses reveal two different microstructures depending on the S-content in the films: for [S] / ([O] + [S]) = 0.6, the buffer layer is made of ZnO zincite and ZnS wurtzite crystallites grown nearly coherently to each other, with (0002) planes nearly parallel with CIGSe-(112) planes, while for [S] / ([O] + [S]) = 0.3, it is made of ZnO zincite type crystals with O atoms substituted by S atoms, with (0002) planes perfectly aligned with CIGSe-(112) planes. Such microstructural differences can explain why photovoltaic performances are dependent on the Zn(O,S) buffer layer deposition route. - Highlights: ► Zn(O,S) layers were grown by chemical bath (CBD) or physical vapor (PVD) deposition. ► For CBD, a 3 nm ZnS layer is followed by ZnS nano-crystallites in an amorphous phase. ► For PVD with [S] / ([O] + [S]) = 0.3, the layer has a Zn(O,S) zincite structure. ► For PVD with [S] / ([O] + [S]) = 0.6, ZnS wurtzite and ZnO zincite phases are mixed.

  5. Comparison of laser-ablation and hot-wall chemical vapour deposition techniques for nanowire fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, E.; Cheng, G.; Guthrie, S.; Turner-Evans, D.; Broomfield, E.; Lei, B.; Li, C.; Zhang, D.; Zhou, C.; Reed, M. A.

    2006-06-01

    A comparison of the transport properties of populations of single-crystal, In2O3 nanowires (NWs) grown by unassisted hot-wall chemical vapour deposition (CVD) versus NWs grown by laser-ablation-assisted chemical vapour deposition (LA-CVD) is presented. For nominally identical growth conditions across the two systems, NWs fabricated at 850 °C with laser-ablation had significantly higher average mobilities at the 99.9% confidence level, 53.3 ± 5.8 cm2 V-1 s-1 versus 10.2 ± 1.9 cm2 V-1 s-1. It is also observed that increasing growth temperature decreases mobility for LA-CVD NWs. Transmission electron microscopy studies of CVD-fabricated samples indicate the presence of an amorphous In2O3 region surrounding the single-crystal core. Further, low-temperature measurements verify the presence of ionized impurity scattering in low-mobility CVD-grown NWs.

  6. Deposition of carbon nanotubes onto aramid fibers using as-received and chemically modified fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Uicab, O.; Avilés, F.; Gonzalez-Chi, P. I.; Canché-Escamilla, G.; Duarte-Aranda, S.; Yazdani-Pedram, M.; Toro, P.; Gamboa, F.; Mazo, M. A.; Nistal, A.; Rubio, J.

    2016-11-01

    Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) oxidized by an acid treatment were deposited on the surface of as-received commercial aramid fibers containing a surface coating ("sizing"), and fibers modified by either a chlorosulfonic treatment or a mixture of nitric and sulfuric acids. The surface of the aramid fiber activated by the chemical treatments presents increasing density of CO, COOH and OH functional groups. However, these chemical treatments reduced the tensile mechanical properties of the fibers, especially when the nitric and sulfuric acid mixture was used. Characterization of the MWCNTs deposited on the fiber surface was conducted by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy mapping and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. These characterizations showed higher areal concentration and more homogeneous distribution of MWCNTs over the aramid fibers for as-received fibers and for those modified with chlorosulfonic acid, suggesting the existence of interaction between the oxidized MWCNTs and the fiber coating. The electrical resistance of the MWCNT-modified aramid yarns comprising ∼1000 individual fibers was in the order of MΩ/cm, which renders multifunctional properties.

  7. Diagnostic Techniques Used to Study Chemical-Vapor-Deposited Diamond Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    2000-01-01

    The advantages and utility of chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond as an industrial ceramic can only be realized if the price and quality are right. Until recently, this technology was of interest only to the academic and basic research community. However, interest has grown because of advances made by leading CVD diamond suppliers: 1) Reduction of the cost of CVD polycrystalline diamond deposition below $5/carat ($8/sq cm); 2) Installation of production capacity; 3) Epitaxial growth of CVD single-crystal diamond. Thus, CVD diamond applications and business are an industrial reality. At present, CVD diamond is produced in the form of coatings or wafers. CVD diamond film technology offers a broader technological potential than do natural and high-pressure synthetic diamonds because size, geometry, and eventually cost will not be as limiting. Now that they are cost effective, diamond coatings - with their extreme properties - can be used in a variety of applications. Diamond coatings can improve many of the surface properties of engineering substrate materials, including erosion, corrosion, and wear resistance. Examples of actual and potential applications, from microelectromechanical systems to the wear parts of diamond coatings and related superhard coatings are described. For example, diamond coatings can be used as a chemical and mechanical barrier for the space shuttles check valves, particularly on the guide pins and seat assemblies.

  8. Chemical bath deposition of CdS thin films doped with Zn and Cu

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A I Oliva; J E Corona; R Patiño; A I Oliva-Avilés

    2014-04-01

    Zn- and Cu-doped CdS thin films were deposited onto glass substrates by the chemical bath technique. ZnCl2 and CuCl2 were incorporated as dopant agents into the conventional CdS chemical bath in order to promote the CdS doping process. The effect of the deposition time and the doping concentration on the physical properties of CdS films were investigated. The morphology, thickness, bandgap energy, crystalline structure and elemental composition of Zn- and Cu-doped CdS films were investigated and compared to the undoped CdS films properties. Both Zn- and Cu-doped CdS films presented a cubic crystalline structure with (1 1 1) as the preferential orientation. Lower values of the bandgap energy were observed for the doped CdS films as compared to those of the undoped CdS films. Zn-doped CdS films presented higher thickness and roughness values than those of Cu-doped CdS films. From the photoluminescence results, it is suggested that the inclusion of Zn and Cu into CdS crystalline structure promotes the formation of acceptor levels above the CdS valence band, resulting in lower bandgap energy values for the doped CdS films.

  9. Magnetic and magneto-optical properties of Co-P films prepared by chemical deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chzhan, A.V., E-mail: avchz@mail.ru [Kirensky Institute of Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Siberian Branch, Krasnoyarsk 660036 (Russian Federation); Siberian Federal University, Krasnoyarsk 660041 (Russian Federation); Patrin, G.S. [Kirensky Institute of Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Siberian Branch, Krasnoyarsk 660036 (Russian Federation); Siberian Federal University, Krasnoyarsk 660041 (Russian Federation); Kiparisov, S.Ya.; Seredkin, V.A.; Burkova, L.V.; Velikanov, D.A. [Kirensky Institute of Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Siberian Branch, Krasnoyarsk 660036 (Russian Federation)

    2011-10-15

    Features in the formation of chemically deposited polycrystalline Co-P films with thicknesses of a few nanometers are established by analyzing film surface morphology and variation in the film magnetization. It is shown that in the thickness range below 30 nm the polar Kerr effect value {theta}{sub K} changes nonmonotonically and depends on a wavelength of the incident light. For the films thicker than 30 nm, this value depends weakly on both the thickness and the wavelength. These features in the {theta}{sub K} behavior are attributed to the Faraday effect, which is revealed at small thicknesses upon light reflection from the lower surface of a magnetic layer. It is found that the Faraday effect in the Co-P films exceeds that in the Co films by a factor of more than two. This effect is assumed to be caused by the presence of a Pd underlayer in the samples under study. - Highlights: > Chemically deposited Co-P films are investigated. > Features of the polar Kerr effect in these films with thickness from 1 to 50 nm are considered. > It is shown that the Faraday rotation angle in the Co-P films exceeds that in the Co films by a factor of two. > Hysteresis loops and magnetization values are presented.

  10. Chemical Stability of Titania and Alumina Thin Films Formed by Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Gabriela C; Bao, Bo; Strandwitz, Nicholas C

    2015-07-15

    Thin films formed by atomic layer deposition (ALD) are being examined for a variety of chemical protection and diffusion barrier applications, yet their stability in various fluid environments is not well characterized. The chemical stability of titania and alumina thin films in air, 18 MΩ water, 1 M KCl, 1 M HNO3, 1 M H2SO4, 1 M HCl, 1 M KOH, and mercury was studied. Films were deposited at 150 °C using trimethylaluminum-H2O and tetrakis(dimethylamido)titanium-H2O chemistries for alumina and titania, respectively. A subset of samples were heated to 450 and 900 °C in inert atmosphere. Films were examined using spectroscopic ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Notably, alumina samples were found to be unstable in pure water, acid, and basic environments in the as-synthesized state and after 450 °C thermal treatment. In pure water, a dissolution-precipitation mechanism is hypothesized to cause surface roughening. The stability of alumina films was greatly enhanced after annealing at 900 °C in acidic and basic solutions. Titania films were found to be stable in acid after annealing at or above 450 °C. All films showed a composition-independent increase in measured thickness when immersed in mercury. These results provide stability-processing relationships that are important for controlled etching and protective barrier layers.

  11. Role of the buffer solution in the chemical deposition of CdS films for CIGS solar cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sooho; Kim, Donguk; Baek, Dohyun; Hong, Byoungyou; Yi, Junsin; Lee, Jaehyeong [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yongseob [Chosun College of Science and and Technology, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Wonseok [Hanbat National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    In this work, the effects of NH{sub 4}Ac on the structural and the electro-optical properties of CdS films were investigated. CdS thin films were deposited on soda-lime glass and indium-tin-oxide (ITO) coated glass from a chemical bath containing 0.025 M cadmium acetate, 0 M ∼ 0.2 M ammonium acetate, 0.5 M thiourea, and ammonia. Cadmium acetate was the cadmium source, ammonium acetate served as a buffer, ammonia was the complexing agent, and thiourea was the source of sulfur. A commonly- available chemical bath deposition system was successfully modified to obtain precise control over the pH of the solution at 75 .deg. C during the deposition. Chemically deposited CdS films were studied by using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical transmittance, and electrical resistivity measurements.

  12. Diamond films grown on seeded substrates by hot-filament chemical vapour deposition with H sub 2 as the only feeding gas

    CERN Document Server

    LiuHongWu; Gao Chun Xi; Han Yong; Luo Ji Feng; Zou Guang Tian; Wen Chao

    2002-01-01

    Diamond films have been grown on polished Si substrates seeded with nanocrystalline diamond powder colloid using hot-filament chemical vapour deposition. Instead of using the conventional gaseous carbon source, a carbonized W filament was used as the carbon source. The only feeding gas was hydrogen. Compared with those produced by traditional methods, the polycrystalline diamond grown by this new method has smaller grain size. The growth mechanism is also discussed.

  13. Chemically deposited thin films of sulfides and selenides of antimony and bismuth as solar energy materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, M. T. S.; Nair, Padmanabhan K.; Garcia, Victor M.; Pena, Y.; Arenas, O. L.; Garcia, J. C.; Gomez-Daza, O.

    1997-10-01

    Chemical bath deposition techniques for bismuth sulfide, bismuth selenide, antimony sulfide, and antimony selenide thin films of about 0.20 - 0.25 micrometer thickness are reported. All these materials may be considered as solar absorber films: strong optical absorption edges, with absorption coefficient, (alpha) , greater than 104 cm-1, are located at 1.31 eV for Bi2Se3, 1.33 eV for Bi2S3, 1.8 eV for Sb2S3, and 1.35 eV for Sb2Se3. As deposited, all the films are nearly amorphous. However, well defined crystalline peaks matching bismuthinite (JCPDS 17- 0320), paraguanajuatite (JCPDS 33-0214), and stibnite (JCPDS 6-0474) and antimony selenide (JCPDS 15-0861) for Bi2S3, Bi2Se3, Sb2S3 and Sb2Se3 respectively, are observed when the films are annealed in nitrogen at 300 degrees Celsius. This is accompanied by a substantial modification of the electrical conductivity in the films: from 10-7 (Omega) -1 cm-1 (in as prepared films) to 10 (Omega) -1 cm-1 in the case of bismuth sulfide and selenide films, and enhancement of photosensitivity in the case of antimony sulfide films. The chemical deposition of a CuS/CuxSe film on these Vx- VIy films and subsequent annealing at 300 degrees Celsius for 1 h at 1 torr of nitrogen leads to the formation of p-type films (conductivity of 1 - 100 (Omega) -1 cm-1) of multinary composition. Among these, the formation of Cu3BiS3 (JCPDS 9-0488) and Cu3SbS4 (JCPDS 35- 0581), CuSbS2 (JCPDS 35-0413) have been clearly detected. Solar energy applications of these films are suggested.

  14. Industrialization of Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition for thin film applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schropp, R.E.I., E-mail: r.e.i.schropp@tue.nl

    2015-11-30

    The consequences of implementing a Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (HWCVD) chamber into an existing in-line or roll-to-roll reactor are described. The hardware and operation of the HWCVD production reactor is compared to that of existing roll-to-roll reactors based on Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition. The most important consequences are the technical consequences and the economic consequences, which are both discussed. The technical consequences are adaptations needed to the hardware and to the processing sequences due to the different interaction of the HWCVD process with the substrate and already deposited layers. The economic consequences are the reduced investments in radio frequency (RF) supplies and RF components. This is partially offset by investments that have to be made in higher capacity pumping systems. The most mature applications of HWCVD are moisture barrier coatings for thin film flexible devices such as Organic Light Emitting Diodes and Organic Photovoltaics, and passivation layers for multicrystalline Si solar cells, high mobility field effect transistors, and silicon heterojunction cells (also known as heterojunction cells with intrinsic thin film layers). Another example is the use of Si in thin film photovoltaics. The cost perspective per unit of thin film photovoltaic product using HWCVD is estimated at 0.07 €/Wp for the Si thin film component. - Highlights: • Review of consequences of implementing Hot Wire CVD into a manufacturing plant • Aspects of scaling up to large area and continuous manufacturing are discussed • Economic advantage of introducing a HWCVD process in a production system is estimated • Using HWCVD, the cost for the Si layers in photovoltaic products is 0.08 €/Wp.

  15. Preparation of rutile TiO(2) coating by thermal chemical vapor deposition for anticoking applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shiyun; Wang, Jianli; Zhu, Quan; Chen, Yaoqiang; Li, Xiangyuan

    2014-10-08

    To inhibit the metal catalytic coking and improve the oxidation resistance of TiN coating, rutile TiO2 coating has been directly designed as an efficient anticoking coating for n-hexane pyrolysis. TiO2 coatings were prepared on the inner surface of SS304 tubes by a thermal CVD method under varied temperatures from 650 to 900 °C. The rutile TiO2 coating was obtained by annealing the as-deposited TiO2 coating, which is an alternative route for the deposition of rutile TiO2 coating. The morphology, elemental and phase composition of TiO2 coatings were characterized by SEM, EDX and XRD, respectively. The results show that deposition temperature of TiO2 coatings has a strong effect on the morphology and thickness of as-deposited TiO2 coatings. Fe, Cr and Ni at.% of the substrate gradually changes to 0 when the temperature is increased to 800 °C. The thickness of TiO2 coating is more than 6 μm and uniform by metalloscopy, and the films have a nonstoichiometric composition of Ti3O8 when the deposition temperature is above 800 °C. The anticoking tests show that the TiO2 coating at a deposition temperature of 800 °C is sufficiently thick to cover the cracks and gaps on the surface of blank substrate and cut off the catalytic coke growth effect of the metal substrate. The anticoking ratio of TiO2 coating corresponding to each 5 cm segments is above 65% and the average anticoking ratio of TiO2 coating is up to 76%. Thus, the TiO2 coating can provide a very good protective layer to prevent the substrate from severe coking efficiently.

  16. Uniform deposition of uranium hexafluoride (UF6): Standardized mass deposits and controlled isotopic ratios using a thermal fluorination method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNamara, Bruce K.; O’Hara, Matthew J.; Casella, Andrew M.; Carter, Jennifer C.; Addleman, R. Shane; MacFarlan, Paul J.

    2016-07-01

    Abstract: We report a convenient method for the generation of volatile uranium hexafluoride (UF6) from solid uranium oxides and other uranium compounds, followed by uniform deposition of low levels of UF6 onto sampling coupons. Under laminar flow conditions, UF6 is shown to interact with surfaces within the chamber to a highly predictable degree. We demonstrate the preparation of uranium deposits that range between ~0.01 and 470±34 ng∙cm-2. The data suggest the method can be extended to creating depositions at the sub-picogram∙cm-2 level. Additionally, the isotopic composition of the deposits can be customized by selection of the uranium source materials. We demonstrate a layering technique whereby two uranium solids, each with a different isotopic composition, are employed to form successive layers of UF6 on a surface. The result is an ultra-thin deposit of UF6 that bears an isotopic signature that is a composite of the two uranium sources. The reported deposition method has direct application to the development of unique analytical standards for nuclear safeguards and forensics.

  17. In Vitro Evaluation of Bioactivity of Chemically Deposited Hydroxyapatite on Polyether Ether Ketone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Almasi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyether ether ketone (PEEK is considered the best alternative material for titanium for spinal fusion cage implants due to its low elasticity modulus and radiolucent property. The main problem of PEEK is its bioinert properties. Coating with hydroxyapatite (HA showed very good improvement in bioactivity of the PEEK implants. However the existing methods for deposition of HA have some disadvantages and damage the PEEK substrate. In our previous study a new method for deposition of HA on PEEK was presented. In this study cell proliferation of mesenchymal stem cell and apatite formation in simulated body fluid (SBF tests were conducted to probe the effect of this new method in improvement of the bioactivity of PEEK. The mesenchymal stem cell proliferation result showed better cells proliferation on the treated layer in comparison with untreated PEEK. The apatite formation results showed the growth of the HA on the treated PEEK but there was not any sight of the growth of HA on the untreated PEEK even after 2 weeks. The results showed the new method of the HA deposition improved the bioactivity of the treated PEEK in comparison with the bare PEEK.

  18. Effect of the initial structure on the electrical property of crystalline silicon films deposited on glass by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yung-Bin; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Bae, Sung-Hwan; Park, Hyung-Ki; Jung, Jae-Soo; Hwang, Nong-Moon

    2012-07-01

    Crystalline silicon films on an inexpensive glass substrate are currently prepared by depositing an amorphous silicon film and then crystallizing it by excimer laser annealing, rapid thermal annealing, or metal-induced crystallization because crystalline silicon films cannot be directly deposited on glass at a low temperature. It was recently shown that by adding HCI gas in the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) process, the crystalline silicon film can be directly deposited on a glass substrate without additional annealing. The electrical properties of silicon films prepared using a gas mixture of SiH4 and HCl in the HWCVD process could be further improved by controlling the initial structure, which was achieved by adjusting the delay time in deposition. The size of the silicon particles in the initial structure increased with increasing delay time, which increased the mobility and decreased the resistivity of the deposited films. The 0 and 5 min delay times produced the silicon particle sizes of approximately 10 and approximately 28 nm, respectively, in the initial microstructure, which produced the final films, after deposition for 300 sec, of resistivities of 0.32 and 0.13 Omega-cm, mobilities of 1.06 and 1.48 cm2 V(-1) S(-1), and relative densities of 0.87 and 0.92, respectively.

  19. Methods of optimization of reactive sputtering conditions of Al target during AlN films deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chodun Rafal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Encouraged by recent studies and considering the well-documented problems occurring during AlN synthesis, we have chosen two diagnostic methods which would enable us to fully control the process of synthesis and characterize the synthesized aluminum nitride films. In our experiment we have compared the results coming from OES measurements of plasma and circulating power characteristics of the power supply with basic features of the deposited layers. The dual magnetron system operating in AC mode was used in our studies. Processes of aluminum target sputtering were carried out in an atmosphere of a mixture of argon and nitrogen. The plasma emission spectra were measured with the use of a monochromator device. Analyses were made by comparing the positions and intensities of spectral lines of the plasma components. The results obtained allowed us to characterize the sputtering process under various conditions of gas mixture compositions as well as power distribution more precisely, which is reported in this work. The measured spectra were related to the deposition rate, the structure morphology of the films and chemical composition. Our work proved that the use of plasma OES and circulating power measurements make possible to control the process of sputtering and synthesis of deposited films in situ.

  20. Incorporation of precious metal nanoparticles into various aerogels by different supercritical deposition methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saquing, Carl D.

    2005-11-01

    One major hurdle in nanoparticle fabrication is the difficulty in controlling size, distribution and concentration. Conventional methods in nanoparticle formation require high temperatures which lead to particle agglomeration and size broadening, or involve substantial amount of organic solvents. A clean route to supported-nanoparticles fabrication was investigated using various supercritical (SC) based deposition methods. The SC deposition involves the organometallic precursor (OP) (dimethyl(1,5-cyclooctadiene)platinum(II)[CODPtMe 2] or bis(2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionato) (1,5-cyclooctadiene) ruthenium(II)) dissolution in SC fluid and contacting this solution with a substrate. The OP is adsorbed and subsequent reduction of the OP-impregnated substrate produces metal/substrate composites. The various methods were: (1) thermal reduction at atmospheric pressure in an inert atmosphere; (2) thermal reduction in SC carbon dioxide (scCO2); (3) chemical reduction in scCO2 with H2; and (4) chemical reduction at atmospheric pressure with H2. The synthesis of resorcinol-formaldehyde aerogels (RFAs) and carbon aerogels (CAs) was also studied and used as substrates (along with commercial silica aerogels (SAs)) in the SC deposition. The surface area, pore properties, and density of these aerogels were evaluated and the effects of reactant concentration, pyrolysis and SC deposition on these properties were determined. Using a static method, the adsorption isotherms of CODPtMe2 in scCO2 on two CAs with different pore sizes were measured at 28 MPa and 80°C to determine the maximum metal loading and the effect of pore properties on adsorption and to examine the interactions between the three components. The isotherms could be represented by the Langmuir model and the adsorption data indicated a strong CODPtMe2-CA interaction and that almost all the preexistent micropore area was covered with CODPtMe 2 molecules even at adsorption lower than the maximum capacity. The