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Sample records for chemical bond

  1. Chemical bond fundamental aspects of chemical bonding

    CERN Document Server

    Frenking, Gernot

    2014-01-01

    This is the perfect complement to ""Chemical Bonding - Across the Periodic Table"" by the same editors, who are two of the top scientists working on this topic, each with extensive experience and important connections within the community. The resulting book is a unique overview of the different approaches used for describing a chemical bond, including molecular-orbital based, valence-bond based, ELF, AIM and density-functional based methods. It takes into account the many developments that have taken place in the field over the past few decades due to the rapid advances in quantum chemica

  2. Coulombic Models in Chemical Bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacks, Lawrence J.

    1986-01-01

    Compares the coulumbic point charge model for hydrogen chloride with the valence bond model. It is not possible to assign either a nonpolar or ionic canonical form of the valence bond model, while the covalent-ionic bond distribution does conform to the point charge model. (JM)

  3. Graphene composites containing chemically bonded metal oxides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Pramoda; S Suresh; H S S Ramakrishna Matte; A Govindaraj

    2013-08-01

    Composites of graphene involving chemically bonded nano films of metal oxides have been prepared by reacting graphene containing surface oxygen functionalities with metal halide vapours followed by exposure to water vapour. The composites have been characterized by electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and other techniques. Magnetite particles chemically bonded to graphene dispersible in various solvents have been prepared and they exhibit fairly high magnetization.

  4. The correlation theory of the chemical bond

    CERN Document Server

    Szalay, Szilárd; Szilvási, Tibor; Veis, Libor; Legeza, Örs

    2016-01-01

    The notion of chemical bond is a very useful concept in chemistry. It originated at the beginning of chemistry, it is expressive for the classically thinking mind, and the errors arising from the approximative nature of the concept can often be ignored. In the first half of the twentieth century, however, we learned that the proper description of the microworld is given by quantum mechanics. Quantum mechanics gives more accurate results for chemical systems than any preceding model, however, it is very inexpressive for the classically thinking mind. The quantum mechanical description of the chemical bond is given in terms of delocalized bonding orbitals, or, alternatively, in terms of correlations of occupations of localized orbitals. However, in the latter case, multiorbital correlations were treated only in terms of two-orbital correlations, although the structure of multiorbital correlations is far richer; and, in the case of bonds established by more than two electrons, multiorbital correlations represent...

  5. Teaching Chemical Bonding through Jigsaw Cooperative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doymus, Kemal

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of jigsaw cooperative learning in teaching chemical bonding at tertiary level. This study was carried out in two different classes in the Department of Primary Science Education of Ataturk University during the 2005-2006 academic year. One of the classes was the non-jigsaw group (control) and the other was the…

  6. The chemical bond of stibium. Technological aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashcheulov A. A.

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Thin structure of the chemical bond of the hexagonal and rhombohedral modifications of stibium was investigated. The boundaries of their polymorphism were identified, which opens new technological possibilities of creating optical, photoelectric, thermoelectric, and other materials for electronic equipment components.

  7. The chemical bond structure and dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Zewail, Ahmed

    1992-01-01

    This inspired book by some of the most influential scientists of our time--including six Nobel laureates--chronicles our emerging understanding of the chemical bond through the last nine decades and into the future. From Pauling's early structural work using x-ray and electron diffraction to Zewail's femtosecond lasers that probe molecular dynamics in real time; from Crick's molecular biology to Rich's molecular recognition, this book explores a rich tradition of scientific heritage and accomplishment. The perspectives given by Pauling, Perutz, Rich, Crick, Porter, Polanyi, Herschbach, Zewail,

  8. Mercury stabilization in chemically bonded phosphate ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated mercury stabilization in chemically bonded phosphate ceramic (CBPC) using four surrogate waste streams that represent U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) ash, soil, and two secondary waste streams resulting from the destruction of DOE's high-organic wastes by the DETOXSM Wet Oxidation Process. Hg content in the waste streams was 0.1 to 0.5 wt.% (added as soluble salts). Sulfidation of Hg and its concurrent stabilization in the CBPC matrix yielded highly nonleachable waste forms. The Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure showed that leaching levels were well below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's regulatory limits. The American Nuclear Society's ANS 16.1 immersion test also gave very high leaching indices, indicating excellent retention of the contaminants. In particular, leaching levels of Hg in the ash waste form were below the measurement detection limit in neutral and alkaline water, negligibly low but measureable in the first 72 h of leaching in acid water, and below the detection limit after that. These studies indicate that the waste forms are stable in a wide range of chemical environments during storage. 9 refs., 5 tabs

  9. Upper Secondary Teachers' Knowledge for Teaching Chemical Bonding Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergqvist, Anna; Drechsler, Michal; Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu

    2016-01-01

    Researchers have shown a growing interest in science teachers' professional knowledge in recent decades. The article focuses on how chemistry teachers impart chemical bonding, one of the most important topics covered in upper secondary school chemistry courses. Chemical bonding is primarily taught using models, which are key for understanding…

  10. Gradient Bundle Analysis: A Full Topological Approach to Chemical Bonding

    CERN Document Server

    Morgenstern, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    The "chemical bond" is a central concept in molecular sciences, but there is no consensus as to what a bond actually is. Therefore, a variety of bonding models have been developed, each defining the structure of molecules in a different manner with the goal of explaining and predicting chemical properties. This thesis describes the initial development of gradient bundle analysis (GBA), a chemical bonding model that creates a high resolution picture of chemical interactions within the charge density framework. GBA is based on concepts from the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM), but uses a more complete picture of the topology and geometry of the electron charge density to understand and predict bonding interactions. Gradient bundles are defined as volumes bounded by zero-flux surfaces (ZFSs) in the gradient of the charge density with well-defined energies. The structure of gradient bundles provides an avenue for detecting the locations of valence electrons, which correspond to reactive regions in a ...

  11. Closing in on chemical bonds by opening up relativity theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Cynthia K

    2008-03-01

    This paper develops a connection between the phenomenology of chemical bonding and the theory of relativity. Empirical correlations between electron numbers in atoms and chemical bond stabilities in molecules are first reviewed and extended. Quantitative chemical bond strengths are then related to ionization potentials in elements. Striking patterns in ionization potentials are revealed when the data are viewed in an element-independent way, where element-specific details are removed via an appropriate scaling law. The scale factor involved is not explained by quantum mechanics; it is revealed only when one goes back further, to the development of Einstein's special relativity theory. PMID:19325749

  12. Closing in on chemical bonds by opening up relativity theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Cynthia K

    2008-03-01

    This paper develops a connection between the phenomenology of chemical bonding and the theory of relativity. Empirical correlations between electron numbers in atoms and chemical bond stabilities in molecules are first reviewed and extended. Quantitative chemical bond strengths are then related to ionization potentials in elements. Striking patterns in ionization potentials are revealed when the data are viewed in an element-independent way, where element-specific details are removed via an appropriate scaling law. The scale factor involved is not explained by quantum mechanics; it is revealed only when one goes back further, to the development of Einstein's special relativity theory.

  13. Chemical Bond Calculations of Crystal Growth of KDP and ADP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A novel method was proposed to calculate the crystal morphology (or growth habit) on the basis of chemical bond analysis. All constituent chemical bonds were distinguished as relevant and independent bonds according to their variations during the crystallization process. By employing the current method, the influence of specific growth conditions on the crystal morphology can be considered in the structure analysis process. The ideal morphologies of both KDP (KH2PO4) and ADP (NH4H2PO4) crystals were calculated and compared with our obtained crystallites at room temperature, which validates the present calculation method very well.

  14. Structure of adsorbed monolayers. The surface chemical bond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper attempts to provide a summary of what has been learned about the structure of adsorbed monolayers and about the surface chemical bond from molecular surface science. While the surface chemical bond is less well understood than bonding of molecules in the gas phase or in the solid state, our knowledge of its properties is rapidly accumulating. The information obtained also has great impact on many surface science based technologies, including heterogeneous catalysis and electronic devices. It is hoped that much of the information obtained from studies at solid-gas interfaces can be correlated with molecular behavior at solid-liquid interfaces. 31 references, 42 figures, 1 table

  15. The Bondons: The Quantum Particles of the Chemical Bond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai V. Putz

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available By employing the combined Bohmian quantum formalism with the U(1 and SU(2 gauge transformations of the non-relativistic wave-function and the relativistic spinor, within the Schrödinger and Dirac quantum pictures of electron motions, the existence of the chemical field is revealed along the associate bondon particle  characterized by its mass (mΒ, velocity (vΒ, charge (eΒ, and life-time (tΒ. This is quantized either in ground or excited states of the chemical bond in terms of reduced Planck constant ħ, the bond energy Ebond and length Xbond, respectively. The mass-velocity-charge-time quaternion properties of bondons’ particles were used in discussing various paradigmatic types of chemical bond towards assessing their covalent, multiple bonding, metallic and ionic features. The bondonic picture was completed by discussing the relativistic charge and life-time (the actual zitterbewegung problem, i.e., showing that the bondon equals the benchmark electronic charge through moving with almost light velocity. It carries negligible, although non-zero, mass in special bonding conditions and towards observable femtosecond life-time as the bonding length increases in the nanosystems and bonding energy decreases according with the bonding length-energy relationship Ebond[kcal/mol]*Xbond[A]=182019, providing this way the predictive framework in which the particle may be observed. Finally, its role in establishing the virtual states in Raman scattering was also established.

  16. Chemical bond cleavage induced by electron heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas emissions from titanium-metalloid compounds (titanium nitride and oxide) have been investigated to understand the effects of a microwave field on chemical reactions. We employed a high vacuum system (PO2 = 10−6 Pa) to observe in situ reductions. For titanium oxides, H-field heating significantly differed from conventional one in terms of oxygen emissions. For titanium nitride, the emissions were also induced by microwave heating. These tendencies were observed at temperatures above 1000 °C. A quantum chemical interpretation is provided to explain the emissions of the gases, and the experimental data is in good agreement with results predicted using the electronic energy band structure.

  17. Upper Secondary Teachers' Knowledge for Teaching Chemical Bonding Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergqvist, Anna; Drechsler, Michal; Rundgren, Shu-Nu Chang

    2016-01-01

    Researchers have shown a growing interest in science teachers' professional knowledge in recent decades. The article focuses on how chemistry teachers impart chemical bonding, one of the most important topics covered in upper secondary school chemistry courses. Chemical bonding is primarily taught using models, which are key for understanding science. However, many studies have determined that the use of models in science education can contribute to students' difficulties understanding the topic, and that students generally find chemical bonding a challenging topic. The aim of this study is to investigate teachers' knowledge of teaching chemical bonding. The study focuses on three essential components of pedagogical content knowledge (PCK): (1) the students' understanding, (2) representations, and (3) instructional strategies. We analyzed lesson plans about chemical bonding generated by 10 chemistry teachers with whom we also conducted semi-structured interviews about their teaching. Our results revealed that the teachers were generally unaware of how the representations of models they used affected student comprehension. The teachers had trouble specifying students' difficulties in understanding. Moreover, most of the instructional strategies described were generic and insufficient for promoting student understanding. Additionally, the teachers' rationale for choosing a specific representation or activity was seldom directed at addressing students' understanding. Our results indicate that both PCK components require improvement, and suggest that the two components should be connected. Implications for the professional development of pre-service and in-service teachers are discussed.

  18. Chemical cleaning agents and bonding to glass-fiber posts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Rodrigues Gonçalves

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The influence of chemical cleaning agents on the bond strength between resin cement and glass-fiber posts was investigated. The treatments included 10% hydrofluoric acid, 35% phosphoric acid, 50% hydrogen peroxide, acetone, dichloromethane, ethanol, isopropanol, and tetrahydrofuran. Flat glass-fiber epoxy substrates were exposed to the cleaners for 60 s. Resin cement cylinders were formed on the surfaces and tested in shear. All treatments provided increased bond strength compared to untreated control specimens. All failures were interfacial. Although all agents improved the bond strength, dichloromethane and isopropanol were particularly effective.

  19. Chemical cleaning agents and bonding to glass-fiber posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Ana Paula Rodrigues; Ogliari, Aline de Oliveira; Jardim, Patrícia dos Santos; Moraes, Rafael Ratto de

    2013-01-01

    The influence of chemical cleaning agents on the bond strength between resin cement and glass-fiber posts was investigated. The treatments included 10% hydrofluoric acid, 35% phosphoric acid, 50% hydrogen peroxide, acetone, dichloromethane, ethanol, isopropanol, and tetrahydrofuran. Flat glass-fiber epoxy substrates were exposed to the cleaners for 60 s. Resin cement cylinders were formed on the surfaces and tested in shear. All treatments provided increased bond strength compared to untreated control specimens. All failures were interfacial. Although all agents improved the bond strength, dichloromethane and isopropanol were particularly effective.

  20. Stability of Cu-Nb layered nanocomposite from chemical bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikia, Ujjal; Sahariah, Munima B.; Pandey, Ravindra

    2016-07-01

    The potential use of layered metallic nanocomposites in radiation-resistant materials has been recognized with ultra-high mechanical strengths. Here we present results on layered Cu-Nb composite examining its stability in terms of chemical bond via charge density and transfer analysis, QTAIM, electron localization function and density of states using DFT. An intermediate character of bonding with a significant amount of charge transfer at the interface has been predicted. Shortening of intraplanar bond length is a good manifestation of their observed structural stability which may be due to electron promotion of 3 d → (4 s, 4 p) orbitals associated with the constituent atoms of the composite.

  1. Closing in on Chemical Bonds by Opening up Relativity Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Kolb Whitney

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a connection between the phenomenology of chemical bonding and the theory of relativity. Empirical correlations between electron numbers in atoms and chemical bond stabilities in molecules are first reviewed and extended. Quantitative chemical bond strengths are then related to ionization potentials in elements. Striking patterns in ionization potentials are revealed when the data are viewed in an element-independent way, where element-specific details are removed via an appropriate scaling law. The scale factor involved is not explained by quantum mechanics; it is revealed only when one goes back further, to the development of Einstein’s special relativity theory.

  2. Chemical strategies for die/wafer submicron alignment and bonding.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, James Ellis; Baca, Alicia I.; Chu, Dahwey; Rohwer, Lauren Elizabeth Shea

    2010-09-01

    This late-start LDRD explores chemical strategies that will enable sub-micron alignment accuracy of dies and wafers by exploiting the interfacial energies of chemical ligands. We have micropatterned commensurate features, such as 2-d arrays of micron-sized gold lines on the die to be bonded. Each gold line is functionalized with alkanethiol ligands before the die are brought into contact. The ligand interfacial energy is minimized when the lines on the die are brought into registration, due to favorable interactions between the complementary ligand tails. After registration is achieved, standard bonding techniques are used to create precision permanent bonds. We have computed the alignment forces and torque between two surfaces patterned with arrays of lines or square pads to illustrate how best to maximize the tendency to align. We also discuss complex, aperiodic patterns such as rectilinear pad assemblies, concentric circles, and spirals that point the way towards extremely precise alignment.

  3. Chemical Bond Analysis of Single Crystal Growth of Magnesium Oxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Starting from the crystallographic structure of magnesium oxide (MgO), both the chemical bond model of solids and Pauling's third rule (polyhedral sharing rule) were employed to quantitatively analyze the chemical bonding structure of constituent atoms and single crystal growth. Our analytical results show that MgO single crystals prefer to grow along the direction and the growth rate of the {100} plane is the slowest one. Therefore, the results show that the {100} plane of MgO crystals can be the ultimate morphology face, which is in a good agreement with our previous experimental results. The study indicate that the structure analysis is an effective tool to control the single-crystal growth.

  4. Fast and accurate predictions of covalent bonds in chemical space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, K. Y. Samuel; Fias, Stijn; Ramakrishnan, Raghunathan; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole

    2016-05-01

    We assess the predictive accuracy of perturbation theory based estimates of changes in covalent bonding due to linear alchemical interpolations among molecules. We have investigated σ bonding to hydrogen, as well as σ and π bonding between main-group elements, occurring in small sets of iso-valence-electronic molecules with elements drawn from second to fourth rows in the p-block of the periodic table. Numerical evidence suggests that first order Taylor expansions of covalent bonding potentials can achieve high accuracy if (i) the alchemical interpolation is vertical (fixed geometry), (ii) it involves elements from the third and fourth rows of the periodic table, and (iii) an optimal reference geometry is used. This leads to near linear changes in the bonding potential, resulting in analytical predictions with chemical accuracy (˜1 kcal/mol). Second order estimates deteriorate the prediction. If initial and final molecules differ not only in composition but also in geometry, all estimates become substantially worse, with second order being slightly more accurate than first order. The independent particle approximation based second order perturbation theory performs poorly when compared to the coupled perturbed or finite difference approach. Taylor series expansions up to fourth order of the potential energy curve of highly symmetric systems indicate a finite radius of convergence, as illustrated for the alchemical stretching of H 2+ . Results are presented for (i) covalent bonds to hydrogen in 12 molecules with 8 valence electrons (CH4, NH3, H2O, HF, SiH4, PH3, H2S, HCl, GeH4, AsH3, H2Se, HBr); (ii) main-group single bonds in 9 molecules with 14 valence electrons (CH3F, CH3Cl, CH3Br, SiH3F, SiH3Cl, SiH3Br, GeH3F, GeH3Cl, GeH3Br); (iii) main-group double bonds in 9 molecules with 12 valence electrons (CH2O, CH2S, CH2Se, SiH2O, SiH2S, SiH2Se, GeH2O, GeH2S, GeH2Se); (iv) main-group triple bonds in 9 molecules with 10 valence electrons (HCN, HCP, HCAs, HSiN, HSi

  5. Fast and accurate predictions of covalent bonds in chemical space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, K Y Samuel; Fias, Stijn; Ramakrishnan, Raghunathan; von Lilienfeld, O Anatole

    2016-05-01

    We assess the predictive accuracy of perturbation theory based estimates of changes in covalent bonding due to linear alchemical interpolations among molecules. We have investigated σ bonding to hydrogen, as well as σ and π bonding between main-group elements, occurring in small sets of iso-valence-electronic molecules with elements drawn from second to fourth rows in the p-block of the periodic table. Numerical evidence suggests that first order Taylor expansions of covalent bonding potentials can achieve high accuracy if (i) the alchemical interpolation is vertical (fixed geometry), (ii) it involves elements from the third and fourth rows of the periodic table, and (iii) an optimal reference geometry is used. This leads to near linear changes in the bonding potential, resulting in analytical predictions with chemical accuracy (∼1 kcal/mol). Second order estimates deteriorate the prediction. If initial and final molecules differ not only in composition but also in geometry, all estimates become substantially worse, with second order being slightly more accurate than first order. The independent particle approximation based second order perturbation theory performs poorly when compared to the coupled perturbed or finite difference approach. Taylor series expansions up to fourth order of the potential energy curve of highly symmetric systems indicate a finite radius of convergence, as illustrated for the alchemical stretching of H2 (+). Results are presented for (i) covalent bonds to hydrogen in 12 molecules with 8 valence electrons (CH4, NH3, H2O, HF, SiH4, PH3, H2S, HCl, GeH4, AsH3, H2Se, HBr); (ii) main-group single bonds in 9 molecules with 14 valence electrons (CH3F, CH3Cl, CH3Br, SiH3F, SiH3Cl, SiH3Br, GeH3F, GeH3Cl, GeH3Br); (iii) main-group double bonds in 9 molecules with 12 valence electrons (CH2O, CH2S, CH2Se, SiH2O, SiH2S, SiH2Se, GeH2O, GeH2S, GeH2Se); (iv) main-group triple bonds in 9 molecules with 10 valence electrons (HCN, HCP, HCAs, HSiN, HSi

  6. Electrical control of the chemical bonding of fluorine on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofo, J. O.; Suarez, A. M.; Usaj, Gonzalo; Cornaglia, P. S.; Hernández-Nieves, A. D.; Balseiro, C. A.

    2011-02-01

    We study the electronic structure of diluted F atoms chemisorbed on graphene using density functional theory calculations. We show that the nature of the chemical bonding of a F atom adsorbed on top of a C atom in graphene strongly depends on carrier doping. In neutral samples the F impurities induce a sp3-like bonding of the C atom below, generating a local distortion of the hexagonal lattice. As the graphene is electron-doped, the C atom retracts back to the graphene plane and for high doping (1014 cm-2) its electronic structure corresponds to a nearly pure sp2 configuration. We interpret this sp3-sp2 doping-induced crossover in terms of a simple tight-binding model and discuss the physical consequences of this change.

  7. Electronic polarizability, optical properties and chemical bonding of oxide glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The current status of the polarizability approach to glass science has been considered. Four groups of oxide glasses have been established: glasses formed by two glass-forming acidic oxides; glasses formed by glass-forming acidic oxide and modifier's basic oxide; glasses formed by glass-forming acidic and conditional glass-forming basic oxide; glasses formed by two basic oxides. The role of the electronic ion polarizability, αo2.(n0) as well as of the average single bond strength, BMo, as basic parameters of linear and nonlinear optical properties of oxide glasses has been emphasized. More acidic glasses possess large BMo (450-350 kJ/mol) which means participation of an average oxide ion in more covalent M-BO (bridging oxygen) bonds such as P-O, Si-O, and Ge-O. The decrease of BM0 could be attributed to formation of M-NBO (non-bridging oxygen) or other bonds with increased ionicity such as La-O, Pb-O, etc. The smallest values of BM0 at about 250 kJ/mol have been obtained for basic tellurite and bismuthate glasses. It has been assumed that these values could be associated with the presence of Te-NBO, Te-BO, and Bi-BO chemical bonds with large ionic contribution. The results obtained probably provide a good basis for prediction of the type of bonding in oxide glasses based on refractive index as well as for prediction of new nonlinear optical materials

  8. Vitrified chemically bonded phosphate ceramics for immobilization of radioisotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagh, Arun S.

    2016-04-05

    A method of immobilizing a radioisotope and vitrified chemically bonded phosphate ceramic (CBPC) articles formed by the method are described. The method comprises combining a radioisotope-containing material, MgO, a source of phosphate, and optionally, a reducing agent, in water at a temperature of less than 100.degree. C. to form a slurry; curing the slurry to form a solid intermediate CBPC article comprising the radioisotope therefrom; comminuting the intermediate CBPC article, mixing the comminuted material with glass frits, and heating the mixture at a temperature in the range of about 900 to about 1500.degree. C. to form a vitrified CBPC article comprising the radioisotope immobilized therein.

  9. Describing the chemical bonding in C70 and C70O3 - a quantum chemical topology study

    OpenAIRE

    Morrison, Carole; Bil, Andzrej; Hutter, J.; Z, Latajka

    2014-01-01

    Cc–Cc and Ca–Cb bonds in C70 have dominant characteristics of double bonds, whereas the remaining six other types of bonds are single bonds with contributions from π-electron density. ‘Single’ bonds can act as active sites in chemical reactions which would typically require a multiple bond, such as addition of an ozone molecule, due to the fact that all adjacent bonds can serve as an efficient source of π-electron density. Thus any alteration in the electron density distribution following fun...

  10. Concept of chemical bond and aromaticity based on quantum information theory

    CERN Document Server

    Szilvási, T; Legeza, Ö

    2015-01-01

    Quantum information theory (QIT) emerged in physics as standard technique to extract relevant information from quantum systems. It has already contributed to the development of novel fields like quantum computing, quantum cryptography, and quantum complexity. This arises the question what information is stored according to QIT in molecules which are inherently quantum systems as well. Rigorous analysis of the central quantities of QIT on systematic series of molecules offered the introduction of the concept of chemical bond and aromaticity directly from physical principles and notions. We identify covalent bond, donor-acceptor dative bond, multiple bond, charge-shift bond, and aromaticity indicating unified picture of fundamental chemical models from ab initio.

  11. Effect of silica coating on bond strength between a gold alloy and metal bracket bonded with chemically cured resin

    OpenAIRE

    Ryu, Min-Ju; Gang, Sung-Nam; Lim, Sung-Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of three different surface conditioning methods on the shear bond strength (SBS) of metal brackets bonded directly to gold alloy with chemically cured resin. Methods Two hundred ten type III gold alloy specimens were randomly divided into six groups according to the combination of three different surface conditioning methods (aluminum oxide sandblasting only, application of a metal primer after aluminum oxide sandblasting, silica...

  12. Method of waste stabilization with dewatered chemically bonded phosphate ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagh, Arun; Maloney, Martin D.

    2010-06-29

    A method of stabilizing a waste in a chemically bonded phosphate ceramic (CBPC). The method consists of preparing a slurry including the waste, water, an oxide binder, and a phosphate binder. The slurry is then allowed to cure to a solid, hydrated CBPC matrix. Next, bound water within the solid, hydrated CBPC matrix is removed. Typically, the bound water is removed by applying heat to the cured CBPC matrix. Preferably, the quantity of heat applied to the cured CBPC matrix is sufficient to drive off water bound within the hydrated CBPC matrix, but not to volatalize other non-water components of the matrix, such as metals and radioactive components. Typically, a temperature range of between 100.degree. C.-200.degree. C. will be sufficient. In another embodiment of the invention wherein the waste and water have been mixed prior to the preparation of the slurry, a select amount of water may be evaporated from the waste and water mixture prior to preparation of the slurry. Another aspect of the invention is a direct anyhydrous CBPC fabrication method wherein water is removed from the slurry by heating and mixing the slurry while allowing the slurry to cure. Additional aspects of the invention are ceramic matrix waste forms prepared by the methods disclosed above.

  13. Chemical Bond Parameters in Sr3MRhO6 (M=Rare earth)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Chemical bond parameters, that is, bond covalency, bond valence, macroscopic linear susceptibility, and oxidation states of elements in Sr3MRhO6 (M=Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb) have been calculated. The results indicate that the bond covalency of M-O decreases sharply with the decrease of ionic radius of M3+ from Sm to Yb, while no obvious trend has been found for Rh-O and Sr-O bonds. The global instability index indicates that the crystal structures of Sr3MrhO6 (M = Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy, Ho) have strained bonds.

  14. Intermolecular atom-atom bonds in crystals - a chemical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Tejender S; Dubey, Ritesh; Desiraju, Gautam R

    2015-03-01

    Short atom-atom distances between molecules are almost always indicative of specific intermolecular bonding. These distances may be used to assess the significance of all hydrogen bonds, including the C-H⋯O and even weaker C-H⋯F varieties.

  15. Chemical bonding and electronic structure of fullerene-based compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This talk will focus on the nature of bonding of fullerenes with other materials as demonstrated by synchrotron radiation and x-ray photoemission. Adsorption of C60 on metallic and semiconducting substrates occurs via charge transfer from the substrate to a LUMO-derived resonance, resulting in Fermi level alignment and dipole formation. Bonding of metal atoms to C60 depends on the metal work function and bulk cohesive energy. Evaporation of high cohesive energy materials onto a fullerene substrate results in metal cluster nucleation and limited C60 disruption for transition metals. Low cohesive energy metals form compounds with a degree of ionic character related to the metal work function. Photoemission results show the formation of ionic K-fulleride compounds while greater hybridization is observed for Ca-rich fullerides. Finally the electronic structure of fluorinated and hydrogenated fullerenes demonstrate changes in states derived from C60 π bonds due to reaction of dangling bonds

  16. Effects of Mechanical and Chemical Pretreatments of Zirconia or Fiber Posts on Resin Cement Bonding

    OpenAIRE

    Rui Li; Hui Zhou; Wei Wei; Chen Wang,; Ying Chun Sun; Ping Gao

    2015-01-01

    The bonding strength between resin cement and posts is important for post and core restorations. An important method of improving the bonding strength is the use of various surface pretreatments of the post. In this study, the surfaces of zirconia (fiber) posts were treated by mechanical and/or chemical methods such as sandblasting and silanization. The bonding strength between the zirconia (fiber) post and the resin cement was measured by a push-out method after thermocycling based on the ad...

  17. Evaluation of Bonding Orbitals in Amorphous Silicon by Means of the Chemical Pseudopotential Method

    OpenAIRE

    Grado Caffaro, M. A.; Grado Caffaro, M.

    1994-01-01

    The chemical pseudopotential method has been used by a number of workers in order to study the valence bands of amorphous tetrahedrally bonded semiconductors. However, various problems related to this method are unsolved. In this paper, a theoretical formulation tending to clarify some of these. problems is presented. This formulation concerns bonding orbitals and is valid, in principle, for amorphous silicon.

  18. Innovations in bonding to zirconia-based materials. Part II: focusing on chemical interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.N. Aboushelib; H. Mirmohamadi; J.P. Matinlinna; E. Kukk; H.F. Ounsi; Z. Salameh

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The zirconia-resin bond strength was enhanced using novel engineered zirconia primers in combination with selective infiltration etching as a surface pre-treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of artificial aging on the chemical stability of the established bond and

  19. Cleavage enhancement of specific chemical bonds in DNA-Cisplatin complexes induced by X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical bond transformation of cisplatin-DNA complexes can be probed efficiently by XPS which provides a concomitant X-ray irradiation source as well. The presence to Pt could considerably increase formation of the SE induced by X-ray and that the further interaction of these LEE with DNA leads to the enhancement of bond cleavages.

  20. Describing the chemical bonding in C70 and C70O3 - A quantum chemical topology study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bil, Andrzej; Latajka, Zdzisław; Hutter, Jürg; Morrison, Carole A.

    2014-03-01

    Cc-Cc and Ca-Cb bonds in C70 have dominant characteristics of double bonds, whereas the remaining six other types of bonds are single bonds with contributions from π-electron density. 'Single' bonds can act as active sites in chemical reactions which would typically require a multiple bond, such as addition of an ozone molecule, due to the fact that all adjacent bonds can serve as an efficient source of π-electron density. Thus any alteration in the electron density distribution following functionalization has far-reaching impact. We note that formation of the most stable ozonide isomer causes the smallest total perturbation in the electron density of the parent fullerene and C-C bond evolution correlates well with the shape of the minimum energy path for the ozone ring opening reaction on the fullerene surface. Finally, we observe that the O-O bond in C70O3 is protocovalent, and as such resembles the O-O bond in H2O2.

  1. Describing the chemical bonding in C70 and C70O3 – A quantum chemical topology study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The C70 surface modification can lead to far-reaching changes in the electron density. • The relative stability of C70O3 isomer series is explained. • The mechanism of the ozone ring opening reaction on the C70 surface is analysed. - Abstract: Cc–Cc and Ca–Cb bonds in C70 have dominant characteristics of double bonds, whereas the remaining six other types of bonds are single bonds with contributions from π-electron density. ‘Single’ bonds can act as active sites in chemical reactions which would typically require a multiple bond, such as addition of an ozone molecule, due to the fact that all adjacent bonds can serve as an efficient source of π-electron density. Thus any alteration in the electron density distribution following functionalization has far-reaching impact. We note that formation of the most stable ozonide isomer causes the smallest total perturbation in the electron density of the parent fullerene and C–C bond evolution correlates well with the shape of the minimum energy path for the ozone ring opening reaction on the fullerene surface. Finally, we observe that the O–O bond in C70O3 is protocovalent, and as such resembles the O–O bond in H2O2

  2. EVALUATION OF CHEMICALLY BONDED PHOSPHATE CERAMICS FOR MERCURY STABILIZATION OF A MIXED SYNTHETIC WASTE

    Science.gov (United States)

    This experimental study was conducted to evaluate the stabilization and encapsulation technique developed by Argonne National Laboratory, called the Chemically Bonded Phosphate Ceramics technology for Hg- and HgCl2-contaminated synthetic waste materials. Leachability ...

  3. NEXAFS Chemical State and Bond Lengths of p-Aminobenzoic Acid in Solution and Solid State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, J. S.; Gainar, A.; Suljoti, E.; Xiao, J.; Golnak, R.; Aziz, E. F.; Schroeder, S. L. M.

    2016-05-01

    Solid-state and solution pH-dependent NEXAFS studies allow direct observation of the electronic state of para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) as a function of its chemical environment, revealing the chemical state and bonding of the chemical species. Variations in the ionization potential (IP) and 1s→π* resonances unequivocally identify the chemical species (neutral, cationic, or anionic) present and the varying local environment. Shifts in σ* shape resonances relative to the IP in the NEXAFS spectra vary with C-N bond length, and the important effect of minor alterations in bond length is confirmed with nitrogen FEFF calculations, leading to the possibility of bond length determination in solution.

  4. The Chemical Bond and Solid-state Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, James C.

    1970-01-01

    Proposes a new scale of ionicity, with which the ionic character of bonding in crystals can be predicted and measured. This new scale of ionicity has led to improved understanding of such crystalline properties as lattice structure, heats of formation, elastic constants, and nonlinear optical properties. Bibliography. (LC)

  5. Effects of chemical bonding on heat transport across interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losego, Mark D; Grady, Martha E; Sottos, Nancy R; Cahill, David G; Braun, Paul V

    2012-04-22

    Interfaces often dictate heat flow in micro- and nanostructured systems. However, despite the growing importance of thermal management in micro- and nanoscale devices, a unified understanding of the atomic-scale structural features contributing to interfacial heat transport does not exist. Herein, we experimentally demonstrate a link between interfacial bonding character and thermal conductance at the atomic level. Our experimental system consists of a gold film transfer-printed to a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) with systematically varied termination chemistries. Using a combination of ultrafast pump-probe techniques (time-domain thermoreflectance, TDTR, and picosecond acoustics) and laser spallation experiments, we independently measure and correlate changes in bonding strength and heat flow at the gold-SAM interface. For example, we experimentally demonstrate that varying the density of covalent bonds within this single bonding layer modulates both interfacial stiffness and interfacial thermal conductance. We believe that this experimental system will enable future quantification of other interfacial phenomena and will be a critical tool to stimulate and validate new theories describing the mechanisms of interfacial heat transport. Ultimately, these findings will impact applications, including thermoelectric energy harvesting, microelectronics cooling, and spatial targeting for hyperthermal therapeutics.

  6. Development and validation of a tool for diagnosing conceptual knowledge of chemical bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yayon, Malka

    Chemical bonding knowledge is fundamental and essential to the understanding of almost every topic in chemistry, but it is very difficult to learn. This study describes the development of an automatic on-line tool that diagnoses basic conceptual knowledge of chemical bonding among high school students. While many studies have characterized and diagnosed some of the central concepts of this topic, these concepts have not been systematically organized nor tested at a fine grain size. The design of the tool consisted of two main stages: A) the systematic characterization of the canonical conceptual knowledge of chemical bonding deemed relevant for high school chemistry majors in the form of a matrix, and B) the design of items and tests, their online version, and automatic feedback for two topics in chemical bonding, that represent the student's conceptual knowledge of chemical bonding compared with and linked to the matrix. The matrix contains three strands: the structure of matter at the nanoscopic level, electrostatic interactions between charged entities, and energy aspects related to bonding. In each strand there are hierarchically ordered cells that contain fine grain concepts. The matrix represents what Reif called the "Final performance (Sf)" - what a student should know after learning high school chemistry. The tests were designed to assess the student's knowledge of this canon at different stages along the learning trajectory. In this way, representing the student's knowledge with the matrix can show changes from the "Initial performance (Si)" as learning is taking place. Understanding of chemical bonding is more than just knowledge of the basic concepts, but without these basic concepts, a deep understanding of chemical bonding is impossible. Therefore, a diagnostic tool that can pinpoint the concepts that are used correctly, incorrectly, or not at all could be a helpful instructional and research tool. The development process described herein could serve

  7. Chemical Bonding and Charge Distribution at Metallic Nanocontacts

    OpenAIRE

    Schwingenschloegl, Udo; Schuster, Cosima

    2006-01-01

    We present results of electronic structure calculations for aluminium contacts of atomic size, based on density functional theory and the local density approximation. Addressing the atomic orbitals at the neck of the nanocontact, we find that the local band structure deviates strongly from bulk fcc aluminium. In particular, hybridization between Al 3s and 3p states is fully suppressed due to directed bonds at the contact. Moreover, a charge transfer of 0.6 electrons off the contact aluminium ...

  8. Developing and validating a chemical bonding instrument for Korean high school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Nak Han

    The major purpose of this study was to develop a reliable and valid instrument designed to collect and investigate on Korean high school students' understanding about concepts regarding chemical bonding. The Chemical Bonding Diagnostic Test (CBDT) was developed by the procedure by previously relevant researches (Treagust, 1985; Peterson, 1986; Tan, 1994). The final instrument consisted of 15 two-tier items. The reliability coefficient (Cronbach alpha) for the whole test was 0.74. Also, the range of values for the discrimination index was from 0.38 to 0.90 and the overall average difficulty index was 0.38. The test was administered to 716 science declared students in Korean high school. The 37 common misconceptions on chemical bonding were identified through analysis of the items from the CBDT. The grade 11 students had slightly more misconceptions than the grade 12 students for ionic bonding, covalent bonding, and hydrogen bonding while the grade 12 students had more misconceptions about octet rule and hydrogen bonding than the grade 11 students. From the analysis of ANCOVA, there was no significant difference in grades, and between grade levels and gender on the mean score of CBDT. However, there was a significant difference in gender and a significant interaction between grade levels and chemistry preference. In conclusion, Korean high school students had the most common misconception about the electron configuration on ionic bonding and the water density on hydrogen bonding. Korean students' understanding about the chemical bonding was dependent on the interaction between grade levels and the chemistry preference. Consequently, grade 12 chemistry-preferred students had the highest mean scores among student groups concerned by this study.

  9. Effects of Mechanical and Chemical Pretreatments of Zirconia or Fiber Posts on Resin Cement Bonding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Li

    Full Text Available The bonding strength between resin cement and posts is important for post and core restorations. An important method of improving the bonding strength is the use of various surface pretreatments of the post. In this study, the surfaces of zirconia (fiber posts were treated by mechanical and/or chemical methods such as sandblasting and silanization. The bonding strength between the zirconia (fiber post and the resin cement was measured by a push-out method after thermocycling based on the adhesion to Panavia F 2.0 resin cement. The zirconia and fiber posts exhibited different bonding strengths after sandblasting and/or silanization because of the different strengths and chemical structures. The zirconia post showed a high bonding strength of up to 17.1 MPa after a combined treatment of sandblasting and silanization because of the rough surface and covalent bonds at the interface. This effect was also enhanced by using 1,2-bis(trimethoxysilylethane for the formation of a flexible layer at the interface. In contrast, a high bonding strength of 13.9 MPa was obtained for the fiber post treated by silane agents because the sandblasting treatment resulted in damage to the fiber post, as observed by scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that the improvement in the bonding strength between the post and the resin cement could be controlled by different chemical and/or mechanical treatments. Enhanced bonding strength depended on covalent bonding and the surface roughness. A zirconia post with high bonding strength could potentially be used for the restoration of teeth in the future.

  10. Effects of Mechanical and Chemical Pretreatments of Zirconia or Fiber Posts on Resin Cement Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Zhou, Hui; Wei, Wei; Wang, Chen; Sun, Ying Chun; Gao, Ping

    2015-01-01

    The bonding strength between resin cement and posts is important for post and core restorations. An important method of improving the bonding strength is the use of various surface pretreatments of the post. In this study, the surfaces of zirconia (fiber) posts were treated by mechanical and/or chemical methods such as sandblasting and silanization. The bonding strength between the zirconia (fiber) post and the resin cement was measured by a push-out method after thermocycling based on the adhesion to Panavia F 2.0 resin cement. The zirconia and fiber posts exhibited different bonding strengths after sandblasting and/or silanization because of the different strengths and chemical structures. The zirconia post showed a high bonding strength of up to 17.1 MPa after a combined treatment of sandblasting and silanization because of the rough surface and covalent bonds at the interface. This effect was also enhanced by using 1,2-bis(trimethoxysilyl)ethane for the formation of a flexible layer at the interface. In contrast, a high bonding strength of 13.9 MPa was obtained for the fiber post treated by silane agents because the sandblasting treatment resulted in damage to the fiber post, as observed by scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that the improvement in the bonding strength between the post and the resin cement could be controlled by different chemical and/or mechanical treatments. Enhanced bonding strength depended on covalent bonding and the surface roughness. A zirconia post with high bonding strength could potentially be used for the restoration of teeth in the future. PMID:26066349

  11. Isotope effects on chemical shifts in the study of intramolecular hydrogen bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik

    2015-01-01

    The paper deals with the use of isotope effects on chemical shifts in characterizing intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Both so-called resonance-assisted (RAHB) and non-RAHB systems are treated. The importance of RAHB will be discussed. Another very important issue is the borderline between “static......” and tautomeric systems. Isotope effects on chemical shifts are particularly useful in such studies. All kinds of intramolecular hydrogen bonded systems will be treated, typical hydrogen bond donors: OH, NH, SH and NH+, typical acceptors C=O, C=N, C=S C=N−. The paper will be deal with both secondary...... and primary isotope effects on chemical shifts. These two types of isotope effects monitor the same hydrogen bond, but from different angles...

  12. Isotope effects on chemical shifts in the study of intramolecular hydrogen bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik

    2015-01-01

    The paper deals with the use of isotope effects on chemical shifts in characterizing intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Both so-called resonance-assisted (RAHB) and non-RAHB systems are treated. The importance of RAHB will be discussed. Another very important issue is the borderline between “static......” and tautomeric systems. Isotope effects on chemical shifts are particularly useful in such studies. All kinds of intramolecular hydrogen bonded systems will be treated, typical hydrogen bond donors: OH, NH, SH and NH+, typical acceptors C=O, C=N, C=S C=N−. The paper will be deal with both secondary and primary...... isotope effects on chemical shifts. These two types of isotope effects monitor the same hydrogen bond, but from different angles...

  13. Initiated chemical vapor deposited nanoadhesive for bonding National Ignition Facility's targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tom [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-05-19

    Currently, the target fabrication scientists in National Ignition Facility Directorate at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is studying the propagation force resulted from laser impulses impacting a target. To best study this, they would like the adhesive used to glue the target substrates to be as thin as possible. The main objective of this research project is to create adhesive glue bonds for NIF’s targets that are ≤ 1 μm thick. Polyglycidylmethacrylate (PGMA) thin films were coated on various substrates using initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD). Film quality studies using white light interferometry reveal that the iCVD PGMA films were smooth. The coated substrates were bonded at 150 °C under vacuum, with low inflow of Nitrogen. Success in bonding most of NIF’s mock targets at thicknesses ≤ 1 μm indicates that our process is feasible in bonding the real targets. Key parameters that are required for successful bonding were concluded from the bonding results. They include inert bonding atmosphere, sufficient contact between the PGMA films, and smooth substrates. Average bond strength of 0.60 MPa was obtained from mechanical shearing tests. The bonding failure mode of the sheared interfaces was observed to be cohesive. Future work on this project will include reattempt to bond silica aerogel to iCVD PGMA coated substrates, stabilize carbon nanotube forests with iCVD PGMA coating, and kinetics study of PGMA thermal crosslinking.

  14. The Trouble with Chemical Energy: Why Understanding Bond Energies Requires an Interdisciplinary Systems Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Melanie M.; Klymkowsky, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    Helping students understand "chemical energy" is notoriously difficult. Many hold inconsistent ideas about what energy is, how and why it changes during the course of a chemical reaction, and how these changes are related to bond energies and reaction dynamics. There are (at least) three major sources for this problem: 1) the way biologists talk…

  15. Relaxation of the chemical bond skin chemisorption size matter ZTP mechanics H2O myths

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Chang Q

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this book is to explore the detectable properties of a material to the parameters of bond and non-bond involved and to clarify the interdependence of various properties. This book is composed of four parts; Part I deals with the formation and relaxation dynamics of bond and non-bond during chemisorptions with uncovering of the correlation among the chemical bond, energy band, and surface potential barrier (3B) during reactions; Part II is focused on the relaxation of bonds between atoms with fewer neighbors than the ideal in bulk with unraveling of the bond order-length-strength (BOLS) correlation mechanism, which clarifies the nature difference between nanostructures and bulk of the same substance; Part III deals with the relaxation dynamics of bond under heating and compressing with revealing of rules on the temperature-resolved elastic and plastic properties of low-dimensional materials; Part IV is focused on the asymmetric relaxation dynamics of the hydrogen bond (O:H-O) and the anomalous behav...

  16. The Trouble with Chemical Energy: Why Understanding Bond Energies Requires an Interdisciplinary Systems Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, Melanie M.; Klymkowsky, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    Helping students understand “chemical energy” is notoriously difficult. Many hold inconsistent ideas about what energy is, how and why it changes during the course of a chemical reaction, and how these changes are related to bond energies and reaction dynamics. There are (at least) three major sources for this problem: 1) the way biologists talk about chemical energy (which is also the way we talk about energy in everyday life); 2) the macroscopic approach to energy concepts that is common in...

  17. Chemically bonded graphene/BiOCl nanocomposites as high-performance photocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Feidan; Zeng, Dawen; Huang, Qingwu; Tian, Shouqin; Xie, Changsheng

    2012-08-14

    After the successful solvothermal synthesis of graphene (GR) from ethanol and sodium, we obtained chemically bonded graphene/BiOCl (GR/BiOCl) nanocomposite photocatalysts via a facile chemical-bath method. A significant enhancement was observed in the photodegradation of methylbenzene, which was largely ascribed to the chemical coupling effects between Bi and C, as shown by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy also indicated an increased size of the sp(2) ring clusters and decreased disorder in the graphitic structure, as substitutions of defects like vacancies as well as oxygen containing carbonaceous groups with C-Bi attachment take place. Overall, information about chemical coupling effects between GR and BiOCl might take us a step further in GR-based hybrid materials, providing a very good reference to the fabrication of chemically bonded GR/semiconductor compounds and facilitating their applications in environmental protection, photo-electrochemical conversion and photocatalytic decomposition of water. PMID:22744132

  18. Effective solidification/stabilisation of mercury-contaminated wastes using zeolites and chemically bonded phosphate ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaoqing; Zhang, Xinyan; Xiong, Ya; Wang, Guoping; Zheng, Na

    2015-02-01

    In this study, two kinds of zeolites materials (natural zeolite and thiol-functionalised zeolite) were added to the chemically bonded phosphate ceramic processes to treat mercury-contaminated wastes. Strong promotion effects of zeolites (natural zeolite and thiol-functionalised zeolite) on the stability of mercury in the wastes were obtained and these technologies showed promising advantages toward the traditional Portland cement process, i.e. using Portland cement as a solidification agent and natural or thiol-functionalised zeolite as a stabilisation agent. Not only is a high stabilisation efficiency (lowered the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure Hg by above 10%) obtained, but also a lower dosage of solidification (for thiol-functionalised zeolite as stabilisation agent, 0.5 g g(-1) and 0.7 g g(-1) for chemically bonded phosphate ceramic and Portland cement, respectively) and stabilisation agents (for natural zeolite as stabilisation agent, 0.35 g g(-1) and 0.4 g g(-1) for chemically bonded phosphate ceramic and Portland cement, respectively) were used compared with the Portland cement process. Treated by thiol-functionalised zeolite and chemically bonded phosphate ceramic under optimum parameters, the waste containing 1500 mg Hg kg(-1) passed the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure test. Moreover, stabilisation/solidification technology using natural zeolite and chemically bonded phosphate ceramic also passed the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure test (the mercury waste containing 625 mg Hg kg(-1)). Moreover, the presence of chloride and phosphate did not have a negative effect on the chemically bonded phosphate ceramic/thiol-functionalised zeolite treatment process; thus, showing potential for future application in treatment of 'difficult-to-manage' mercury-contaminated wastes or landfill disposal with high phosphate and chloride content. PMID:25568090

  19. Chemical bonding in view of electron charge density and kinetic energy density descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Heiko

    2009-05-01

    Stalke's dilemma, stating that different chemical interpretations are obtained when one and the same density is interpreted either by means of natural bond orbital (NBO) and subsequent natural resonance theory (NRT) application or by the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM), is reinvestigated. It is shown that within the framework of QTAIM, the question as to whether for a given molecule two atoms are bonded or not is only meaningful in the context of a well-defined reference geometry. The localized-orbital-locator (LOL) is applied to map out patterns in covalent bonding interaction, and produces results that are consistent for a variety of reference geometries. Furthermore, LOL interpretations are in accord with NBO/NRT, and assist in an interpretation in terms of covalent bonding. PMID:19090572

  20. Chemical activation of molecules by metals: Experimental studies of electron distributions and bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formal relationship between measured molecular ionization energies and thermodynamic bond dissociation energies has been developed into a single equation which unifies the treatment of covalent bonds, ionic bonds, and partially ionic bonds. This relationship has been used to clarify the fundamental thermodynamic information relating to metal-hydrogen, metal-alkyl, and metal-metal bond energies. We have been able to obtain a direct observation and measurement of the stabilization energy provided by the agostic interaction of the C-H bond with the metal. The ionization energies have also been used to correlate the rates of carbonyl substitution reactions of (η5-C5H4X)Rh(CO)2 complexes, and to reveal the electronic factors that control the stability of the transition state. The extent that the electronic features of these bonding interactions transfer to other chemical systems is being investigated in terms of the principle of additivity of ligand electronic effects. Specific examples under study include metal- phosphines, metal-halides, and metallocenes. Especially interesting has been the recent application of these techniques to the characterization of the soccer-ball shaped C60 molecule, buckminsterfullerene, and its interaction with a metal surface. The high-resolution valence ionizations in the gas phase reveal the high symmetry of the molecule, and studies of thin films of C60 reveal weak intermolecular interactions. Scanning tunneling and atomic force microscopy reveal the arrangement of spherical molecules on gold substrates, with significant delocalization of charge from the metal surface. 21 refs

  1. Effect of Microwave Radiation on Enzymatic and Chemical Peptide Bond Synthesis on Solid Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Basso

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Peptide bond synthesis was performed on PEGA beads under microwave radiations. Classical chemical coupling as well as thermolysin catalyzed synthesis was studied, and the effect of microwave radiations on reaction kinetics, beads' integrity, and enzyme activity was assessed. Results demonstrate that microwave radiations can be profitably exploited to improve reaction kinetics in solid phase peptide synthesis when both chemical and biocatalytic strategies are used.

  2. Bench-Scale Evaluation Of Chemically Bonded Phosphate Ceramic Technology To Stabilize Mercury Waste Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    This bench-scale study was conducted to evaluate the stabilization of mercury (Hg) and mercuric chloride-containing surrogate test materials by the chemically bonded phosphate ceramics technology. This study was performed as part of a U.S. EPA program to evaluate treatment and d...

  3. Nuclear radiation as a probe of chemical bonding: the current interplay between theory and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newton, M D

    1978-01-01

    After a survey of appropriate theoretical formalisms, recent confrontations of theory and experiment in the areas of neutron scattering, Moessbauer spectroscopy, and positron chemistry are discussed, with major emphasis on the degree to which simple concepts of chemical bonding can be refined by complementary use of the above experimental probes and the powerful techniques of computational quantum chemistry.

  4. Electron-electron interactions in the chemical bond: ``1/3” Effect in the bond length of hydrogen molecule

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Ganguly

    2001-10-01

    The prominent ``1/3” effect observed in the Hall effect plateaus of twodimensional electron gas (2DEG) systems has been postulated to indicating 1/3 fractional charge quasiparticle excitations arising from electron-electron interactions. Tunneling shot-noise experiments on 2DEF exhibiting fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE) shows evidence for tunnelling of particles with and /3 charges for a constant band mass. A ``1/3” effect in the hydrogen molecule is seen in as much as its internuclear distance, - = - + +, with |+/-| = 1/3. This is examined in terms of electron-electron interactions involving electron- and hole quasiparticles, (-) and (ℎ+), equivalent to those observed in FQHE shot-noise experiments. The (/) ratio of the (-) and (ℎ+) quasiparticles is kept at 1: -3. Instead of a 2DEG, these particles are treated as being in flat Bohr orbits. A treatment in the language of charge-flux tube composites for the hydrogen atom as well as the hydrogen molecule is attempted. Such treatment gives important insights into changes in chemical potential and bond energy on crossing a phase boundary during the atom-bond transition as well as on models for FQHE itself.

  5. Electronic structure and chemical bonding of Li4Pt3Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matar, S. F.; Pöttgen, R.; Al Alam, A. F.; Ouaini, N.

    2012-07-01

    The electronic structure of rhombohedral Li4Pt3Si (space group R32) is examined from ab initio with an assessment of the properties of chemical bonding relating to the presence of different Li and Pt Wyckoff sites. The structure with totally de-intercalated Li keeps the characteristics of the pristine compound with a reduction of the volume albeit with less cohesive energy. The binding energies of Li point to different bonding intensities according to their different Wyckoff sites and indicate the possibility of delithiation.

  6. Electronic parameters of Sr2Nb2O7 and chemical bonding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atuchin, V.V.; Grivel, Jean-Claude; Korotkov, A.S.;

    2008-01-01

    /2)) and Delta(O-Sr) = BE(O 1s)-BE(Sr 3d(5/2)), were used to characterize the valence electron transfer on the formation of the Nb-O and Sr-O bonds. The chemical bonding effects were considered on the basis of our XPS results for Sr2Nb2O7 and earlier published structural and XPS data for other Sr- or Nb......-containing oxide compounds. The new data point for Sr2Nb2O7 is consistent with the previously derived relationship for a set of Nb5+ -niobates that Delta (O-Nb) increases with increasing mean Nb-O bond distance, L(Nb-O). A new empirical relationship between Delta(O-Sr) and L(Sr-O) was also obtained. Interestingly...

  7. Core level photoemission spectroscopy and chemical bonding in Sr2Ta2O7

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atuchin, V. V.; Grivel, Jean-Claude; Zhang, Z. M.

    2009-01-01

    -O bonds was characterized by the binding energy differences between the O 1s and cation core levels, Delta(O-Sr) = BE(O 1s) - BE(Sr 3d(5/2)) and Delta(O-Ta) = BE(O 1s) - BE(Ta 4f(7/2)). The chemical bonding effects were considered on the basis of our XPS results for Sr2Ta2O7 and earlier published...... structural and XPS data for other Sr- and Ta-containing oxide compounds. The new data point for Sr2Ta2O7 is consistent with the previously derived relationship for a set of Sr-bearing oxides. The binding energy difference Delta(O-Sr) was found to decrease with increasing bond distance L(Sr-O)....

  8. Developing density functional theory for Bose-Einstein condensates. The case of chemical bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the nowadays growing interest in Bose-Einstein condensates due to the expanded experimental evidence on various atomic systems within optical lattices in weak and strong coupling regimes, the connection with Density Functional Theory is firstly advanced within the mean field framework at three levels of comprehension: the many-body normalization condition, Thomas-Fermi limit, and the chemical hardness closure with the inter-bosonic strength and universal Hohenberg-Kohn functional. As an application the traditional Heitler-London quantum mechanical description of the chemical bonding for homopolar atomic systems is reloaded within the non-linear Schrödinger (Gross-Pitaevsky) Hamiltonian; the results show that a two-fold energetic solution is registered either for bonding and antibonding states, with the bosonic contribution being driven by the square of the order parameter for the Bose-Einstein condensate density in free (gas) motion, while the associate wave functions remain as in classical molecular orbital model

  9. Detection of sub-GeV Dark Matter and Solar Neutrinos via Chemical-Bond Breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Essig, Rouven; Slone, Oren; Volansky, Tomer

    2016-01-01

    We explore a new low-threshold direct-detection concept for dark matter, based on the breaking of chemical bonds between atoms. This includes the dissociation of molecules and the creation of defects in a lattice. With thresholds of a few to 10's of eV, such an experiment could probe the nuclear couplings of dark matter particles as light as a few MeV. We calculate the expected rates for dark matter to break apart diatomic molecules, which we take as a case study for more general systems. We briefly mention ideas for how chemical-bond breaking might be detected in practice. We also discuss the possibility of detecting solar neutrinos, including pp neutrinos, with this experimental concept. With an event rate of $\\mathcal{O}$(0.1/kg-year), large exposures are required, but measuring low-energy solar neutrinos would provide a crucial test of the solar model.

  10. Developing density functional theory for Bose-Einstein condensates. The case of chemical bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putz, Mihai V., E-mail: mvputz@cbg.uvt.ro [Laboratory of Physical and Computational Chemistry, Chemistry Department, West University of Timisoara, Str. Pestalozzi No. 16, 300115 Timisoara, Romania and Theoretical Physics Institute, Free University Berlin, Arnimallee 14, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-01-22

    Since the nowadays growing interest in Bose-Einstein condensates due to the expanded experimental evidence on various atomic systems within optical lattices in weak and strong coupling regimes, the connection with Density Functional Theory is firstly advanced within the mean field framework at three levels of comprehension: the many-body normalization condition, Thomas-Fermi limit, and the chemical hardness closure with the inter-bosonic strength and universal Hohenberg-Kohn functional. As an application the traditional Heitler-London quantum mechanical description of the chemical bonding for homopolar atomic systems is reloaded within the non-linear Schrödinger (Gross-Pitaevsky) Hamiltonian; the results show that a two-fold energetic solution is registered either for bonding and antibonding states, with the bosonic contribution being driven by the square of the order parameter for the Bose-Einstein condensate density in free (gas) motion, while the associate wave functions remain as in classical molecular orbital model.

  11. Investigation of Chemical Bond Properties and Mssbauer Spectroscopy in YBa2Cu3O7

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高发明; 李东春; 张思远

    2003-01-01

    Chemical bond properties of YBa2Cu3O7 were studied by using the average band-gap model. The calculated results show that the covalency of Cu(1)-O bond is 0.406, and one of Cu(2)-O is 0.276. Mssbauer isomer shifts of 57Fe in Y-123 were calculated by the chemical surrounding factor hv defined by covalency and electronic polarizability. The charge-state and site of Fe were determined. The relation between the coupling constant of electron-phonon interaction and covalency is employed to explain that the Cu(2)-O plane is more important than the Cu(1)-O chain on the superconductivity in the Y-123 compounds.

  12. Multi-layered, chemically bonded lithium-ion and lithium/air batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narula, Chaitanya Kumar; Nanda, Jagjit; Bischoff, Brian L; Bhave, Ramesh R

    2014-05-13

    Disclosed are multilayer, porous, thin-layered lithium-ion batteries that include an inorganic separator as a thin layer that is chemically bonded to surfaces of positive and negative electrode layers. Thus, in such disclosed lithium-ion batteries, the electrodes and separator are made to form non-discrete (i.e., integral) thin layers. Also disclosed are methods of fabricating integrally connected, thin, multilayer lithium batteries including lithium-ion and lithium/air batteries.

  13. PROBLEM SITUATION AS DIDACTIC STRATEGY IN THE CHEMICAL BOND TEACHING: RESEARCH CONTEXTS

    OpenAIRE

    Lucas dos S. Fernandes; Angela F. Campos

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the understanding of chemical bonding by students of Bachellor degree in Chemistry exposed to a situation-problem (SP) teaching approach. The methodology involved: development of a problem situation, educational tools, namely video, computer simulation and manual preparation of crystal structures from polexpan balls and sticks. After the educational intervention, groups of students recorded in writing their views on the SP. The SP strategy showed its potential for both, the...

  14. Effect of raw material ratios on the compressive strength of magnesium potassium phosphate chemically bonded ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ai-juan; Yuan, Zhi-long; Zhang, Jiao; Liu, Lin-tao; Li, Jun-ming; Liu, Zheng

    2013-12-01

    The compressive strength of magnesium potassium phosphate chemically bonded ceramics is important in biomedical field. In this work, the compressive strength of magnesium potassium phosphate chemically bonded ceramics was investigated with different liquid-to-solid and MgO-to-KH2PO4 ratios. X-ray diffractometer was applied to characterize its phase composition. The microstructure was imaged using a scanning electron microscope. The results showed that the compressive strength of the chemically bonded ceramics increased with the decrease of liquid-to-solid ratio due to the change of the packing density and the crystallinity of hydrated product. However, with the increase of MgO-to-KH2PO4 weight ratio, its compressive strength increased firstly and then decreased. The low compressive strength in lower MgO-to-KH2PO4 ratio might be explained by the existence of the weak phase KH2PO4. However, the low value of compressive strength with the higher MgO-to-KH2PO4 ratio might be caused by lack of the joined phase in the hydrated product. Besides, it has been found that the microstructures were different in these two cases by the scanning electron microscope. Colloidal structure appeared for the samples with lower liquid-to-solid and higher MgO-to-KH2PO4 ratios possibly because of the existence of amorphous hydrated products. The optimization of both liquid-to-solid and MgO-to-KH2PO4 ratios was important to improve the compressive strength of magnesium potassium phosphate chemically bonded ceramics.

  15. Chemically bonded phosphate ceramics for radioactive and mixed waste solidification and stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagh, A.S.; Cunnane, J.C.; Singh, D.; Reed, D.T.; Armstrong, S.; Subhan, W.; Chawla, N.

    1993-01-01

    Results of an initial investigation of low temperature setting chemically bonded magnesium ammonium phosphate (MAP) ceramics as waste form materials, for solidification and stabilization of radioactive and mixed waste, are reported. The suitability of MAP for solidifying and encapsulating waste materials was tested by encapsulating zeolites at loadings up to {approximately}50 wt%. The resulting composites exhibited very good compressive strength characteristics. Microstructure studies show that zeolite grains remain unreacted in the matrix. Potential uses for solidifying and stab wastes are discussed.

  16. Chemically bonded phosphate ceramics for radioactive and mixed waste solidification and stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagh, A.S.; Cunnane, J.C.; Singh, D.; Reed, D.T.; Armstrong, S.; Subhan, W.; Chawla, N.

    1993-01-01

    Results of an initial investigation of low temperature setting chemically bonded magnesium ammonium phosphate (MAP) ceramics as waste form materials, for solidification and stabilization of radioactive and mixed waste, are reported. The suitability of MAP for solidifying and encapsulating waste materials was tested by encapsulating zeolites at loadings up to [approximately]50 wt%. The resulting composites exhibited very good compressive strength characteristics. Microstructure studies show that zeolite grains remain unreacted in the matrix. Potential uses for solidifying and stab wastes are discussed.

  17. Dry chemical pretreatment of titanium and polymers for adhesive bonding. Trockenchemische Vorbehandlung von Titan und Kunststoffen fuer das Kleben

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krueger, G.; Hennemann, O.D. (Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Angewandte Materialforschung, Bremen (Germany))

    1993-01-01

    Titan alloys have to be pretreated to increase the adhesive bonding strength. Because of environmental reasons dry chemical pretreatment methods are preferred compared to wet chemical techniques. One successful method is a silicatisation referring to the Saco-technique. Layers generated by this method on titanium or polymer substrates lead to highly water-resistant adhesive bondings. Also adhesive joints of Ti with polymer show high bond strength when polymer and Ti are Saco treated. With a suitable optimization of the technological parameters it is possible to adhesively bond polymers also with anaerobic acrylic esters. (orig.).

  18. Chemically-bonded brick production based on burned clay by means of semidry pressing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voroshilov, Ivan; Endzhievskaya, Irina; Vasilovskaya, Nina

    2016-01-01

    We presented a study on the possibility of using the burnt rocks of the Krasnoyarsk Territory for production of chemically-bonded materials in the form of bricks which are so widely used in multistory housing and private house construction. The radiographic analysis of the composition of burnt rock was conducted and a modifier to adjust the composition uniformity was identified. The mixing moisture content was identified and optimal amount at 13-15% was determined. The method of semidry pressing has been chosen. The process of obtaining moldings has been theoretically proved; the advantages of chemically-bonded wall materials compared to ceramic brick were shown. The production of efficient artificial stone based on material burnt rocks, which is comparable with conventionally effective ceramic materials or effective with cell tile was proved, the density of the burned clay-based cell tile makes up to 1630-1785 kg m3, with compressive strength of 13.6-20.0 MPa depending on the compression ratio and cement consumption, frost resistance index is F50, and the thermal conductivity in the masonry is λ = 0,459-0,546 W m * °C. The clear geometric dimensions of pressed products allow the use of the chemically-bonded brick based on burnt clay as a facing brick.

  19. Chemically-bonded brick production based on burned clay by means of semidry pressing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voroshilov, Ivan, E-mail: Nixon.06@mail.ru; Endzhievskaya, Irina, E-mail: icaend@mail.ru; Vasilovskaya, Nina, E-mail: icaend@mail.ru [FSAEI HVE Siberian Federal University, 82 Svobodny Prospekt, Krasnoyarsk, 660130 (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    We presented a study on the possibility of using the burnt rocks of the Krasnoyarsk Territory for production of chemically-bonded materials in the form of bricks which are so widely used in multistory housing and private house construction. The radiographic analysis of the composition of burnt rock was conducted and a modifier to adjust the composition uniformity was identified. The mixing moisture content was identified and optimal amount at 13-15% was determined. The method of semidry pressing has been chosen. The process of obtaining moldings has been theoretically proved; the advantages of chemically-bonded wall materials compared to ceramic brick were shown. The production of efficient artificial stone based on material burnt rocks, which is comparable with conventionally effective ceramic materials or effective with cell tile was proved, the density of the burned clay-based cell tile makes up to 1630-1785 kg \\ m{sup 3}, with compressive strength of 13.6-20.0 MPa depending on the compression ratio and cement consumption, frost resistance index is F50, and the thermal conductivity in the masonry is λ = 0,459-0,546 W \\ m {sup *} °C. The clear geometric dimensions of pressed products allow the use of the chemically-bonded brick based on burnt clay as a facing brick.

  20. Development of chemically bonded phosphate ceramics for stabilizing low-level mixed wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Seung-Young

    1997-11-01

    Novel chemically bonded phosphate ceramics have been developed by acid-base reactions between magnesium oxide and an acid phosphate at room temperature for stabilizing U.S. Department of Energy's low-level mixed waste streams that include hazardous chemicals and radioactive elements. Newberyite (MgHPOsb4.3Hsb2O)-rich magnesium phosphate ceramic was formed by an acid-base reaction between phosphoric acid and magnesium oxide. The reaction slurry, formed at room-temperature, sets rapidly and forms stable mineral phases of newberyite, lunebergite, and residual MgO. Rapid setting also generates heat due to exothermic acid-base reaction. The reaction was retarded by partially neutralizing the phosphoric acid solution by adding sodium or potassium hydroxide. This reduced the rate of reaction and heat generation and led to a practical way of producing novel magnesium potassium phosphate ceramic. This ceramic was formed by reacting stoichiometric amount of monopotassium dihydrogen phosphate crystals, MgO, and water, forming pure-phase of MgKPOsb4.6Hsb2O (MKP) with moderate exothermic reaction. Using this chemically bonded phosphate ceramic matrix, low-level mixed waste streams were stabilized, and superior waste forms in a monolithic structure were developed. The final waste forms showed low open porosity and permeability, and higher compression strength than the Land Disposal Requirements (LDRs). The novel MKP ceramic technology allowed us to develop operational size waste forms of 55 gal with good physical integrity. In this improved waste form, the hazardous contaminants such as RCRA heavy metals (Hg, Pb, Cd, Cr, Ni, etc) were chemically fixed by their conversion into insoluble phosphate forms and physically encapsulated by the phosphate ceramic. In addition, chemically bonded phosphate ceramics stabilized radioactive elements such U and Pu. This was demonstrated with a detailed stabilization study on cerium used as a surrogate (chemically equivalent but nonradioactive

  1. Non-standard tests for process control in chemically bonded sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ramrattan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemically bonded sand cores and molds are more commonly referred to as precision sand systems in the high production automotive powertrain sector. Their behavior in contact with molten metal can lead to casting defects. Consequently, the interaction is of great interest and an important part of metal casting technology. The American Foundry Society (AFS sand testing is based on physical, mechanical, thermal and chemical properties of the sand system. Foundry engineers have long known that certain AFS sand tests provide limited information regarding control of molding and casting quality. The inadequacy is due to the fact that sand casting processes are inherently thermo-mechanical, thermo-chemical and thermo-physical. Non-standard foundry sand testing has proven useful for laboratory measurement of these characteristics in foundry sand using a disc-shaped specimen. Similarly, the equivalent disc-shaped specimens are used for casting trials. In order to accomplish near-net-shape casting with minimal defects, it is necessary to understand both the properties of the sand system, as well as the interface of molten metal when different binders, additives and/or refractory coatings are used. The methodology for the following non-standard chemically bonded sand tests is described: (1 disc transverse; (2 impact; (3 modified permeability; (4 abrasion; (5 thermal distortion; (6 quick loss on ignition. The data related to the non-standard sand tests were analyzed and interpreted. The test results indicate that there is relatively lower test-to-test variability with the disc-shaped specimens. The non-standard tests were able to discriminate between the chemically bonded polyurethane cold box sand specimens. Further studies should be conducted on various other sand and binder systems as well as on different specimen thicknesses.

  2. Four chemical methods of porcelain conditioning and their influence over bond strength and surface integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, João Paulo Fragomeni; Oliveira, Andrea Becker; Nojima, Lincoln Issamu; Marquezan, Mariana

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess four different chemical surface conditioning methods for ceramic material before bracket bonding, and their impact on shear bond strength and surface integrity at debonding. METHODS: Four experimental groups (n = 13) were set up according to the ceramic conditioning method: G1 = 37% phosphoric acid etching followed by silane application; G2 = 37% liquid phosphoric acid etching, no rinsing, followed by silane application; G3 = 10% hydrofluoric acid etching alone; and G4 = 10% hydrofluoric acid etching followed by silane application. After surface conditioning, metal brackets were bonded to porcelain by means of the Transbond XP system (3M Unitek). Samples were submitted to shear bond strength tests in a universal testing machine and the surfaces were later assessed with a microscope under 8 X magnification. ANOVA/Tukey tests were performed to establish the difference between groups (α= 5%). RESULTS: The highest shear bond strength values were found in groups G3 and G4 (22.01 ± 2.15 MPa and 22.83 ± 3.32 Mpa, respectively), followed by G1 (16.42 ± 3.61 MPa) and G2 (9.29 ± 1.95 MPa). As regards surface evaluation after bracket debonding, the use of liquid phosphoric acid followed by silane application (G2) produced the least damage to porcelain. When hydrofluoric acid and silane were applied, the risk of ceramic fracture increased. CONCLUSIONS: Acceptable levels of bond strength for clinical use were reached by all methods tested; however, liquid phosphoric acid etching followed by silane application (G2) resulted in the least damage to the ceramic surface. PMID:26352845

  3. Four chemical methods of porcelain conditioning and their influence over bond strength and surface integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo Fragomeni Stella

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess four different chemical surface conditioning methods for ceramic material before bracket bonding, and their impact on shear bond strength and surface integrity at debonding.METHODS: Four experimental groups (n = 13 were set up according to the ceramic conditioning method: G1 = 37% phosphoric acid etching followed by silane application; G2 = 37% liquid phosphoric acid etching, no rinsing, followed by silane application; G3 = 10% hydrofluoric acid etching alone; and G4 = 10% hydrofluoric acid etching followed by silane application. After surface conditioning, metal brackets were bonded to porcelain by means of the Transbond XP system (3M Unitek. Samples were submitted to shear bond strength tests in a universal testing machine and the surfaces were later assessed with a microscope under 8 X magnification. ANOVA/Tukey tests were performed to establish the difference between groups (α= 5%.RESULTS: The highest shear bond strength values were found in groups G3 and G4 (22.01 ± 2.15 MPa and 22.83 ± 3.32 Mpa, respectively, followed by G1 (16.42 ± 3.61 MPa and G2 (9.29 ± 1.95 MPa. As regards surface evaluation after bracket debonding, the use of liquid phosphoric acid followed by silane application (G2 produced the least damage to porcelain. When hydrofluoric acid and silane were applied, the risk of ceramic fracture increased.CONCLUSIONS: Acceptable levels of bond strength for clinical use were reached by all methods tested; however, liquid phosphoric acid etching followed by silane application (G2 resulted in the least damage to the ceramic surface.

  4. Revealing halogen bonding interactions with anomeric systems: an ab initio quantum chemical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Rabindranath; Ganguly, Bishwajit

    2015-02-01

    A computational study has been performed using MP2 and CCSD(T) methods on a series of O⋯X (X=Br, Cl and I) halogen bonds to evaluate the strength and characteristic of such highly directional noncovalent interactions. The study has been carried out on a series of dimeric complexes formed between interhalogen compounds (such as BrF, BrCl and BrI) and oxygen containing electron donor molecule. The existence and consequences of the anomeric effect of the electron donor molecule has also been investigated through an exploration of halogen bonding interactions in this halogen bonded complexes. The ab initio quantum chemical calculations have been employed to study both the nature and directionality of the halogen molecules toward the sp(3) oxygen atom in anomeric systems. The presence of anomeric nO→σ*CN interaction involves a dominant role for the availability of the axial and equatorial lone pairs of donor O atom to participate with interhalogen compounds in the halogen-bonded complexes. The energy difference between the axial and equatorial conformers with interhalogen compounds reaches up to 4.60 kJ/mol, which however depends upon the interacting halogen atoms and its attaching atoms. The energy decomposition analysis further suggests that the total halogen bond interaction energies are mainly contributed by the attractive electrostatic and dispersion components. The role of substituents attached with the halogen atoms has also been evaluated in this study. With the increase of halogen atom size and the positive nature of σ-hole, the halogen atom interacted more with the electron donor atom and the electrostatic contribution to the total interaction energy enhances appreciably. Further, noncovalent interaction (NCI) studies have been carried out to locate the noncovalent halogen bonding interactions in real space. PMID:25522359

  5. Structure and Chemical Bond of Thermoelectric Ce-Co-Sb Skutterudites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The correlations among composition,structure,chemical bond and thermoelectric property of skutterudites CoSb3 and CeCo5Fe3Sb12 have been studied by using density function and discrete variation (DFT-DVM) method.Three models for this study were proposed and calculated by which the "rattling" pattern was described.Model 1 is with Ce in the center,model 2 is with Ce away the center and near to Sb,and model 3 is also with Ce away the center but near to Fe.The calculated results show that in model 3,the ionic bond is the strongest,but the covalent bond is the weakest.Due to the different changes between ionic and covalent bond,there is less difference in the stability among the models 1,2 and 3.Therefore,these different models can exist at the same time,or can translate from one to another more easily.In other words,the "rattling" pattern has taken place.Unfilled model of CoSb3,without Ce and Fe,is called model 4.The covalent bond of Co-Sb or Fe-Sb in models 1,2 and 3 is weaker than that of Co-Sb in model 4,as some electrical cloud of Sb takes part in the covalent bond of Ce-Sb in the filled models.The result is consistent with the experimental result that the thermal conductivity of CeCo5Fe3Sb12 is lower than that of CoSb3,and the thermoelectric property of CeCo5Fe3Sb12 is superior to that of CoSb3.

  6. Electronic Structure and Chemical Bond of Ti3SiC2 and Adding Al Element

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIN Xinmin; LU Ning; MEI Bingchu

    2006-01-01

    The relation among electronic structure, chemical bond and property of Ti3SiC2 and Al-doped was studied by density function and discrete variation (DFT-DVM) method. When Al element is added into Ti3SiC2, there is a less difference of ionic bond, which does not play a leading role to influent the properties. After adding Al, the covalent bond of Al and the near Ti becomes somewhat weaker, but the covalent bond of Al and the Si in the same layer is obviously stronger than that of Si and Si before adding. Therefore, in preparation of Ti3SiC2, adding a proper quantity of Al can promote the formation of Ti3SiC2. The density of state shows that there is a mixed conductor character in both of Ti3SiC2 and adding Al element. Ti3SiC2 is with more tendencies to form a semiconductor. The total density of state near Fermi lever after adding Al is larger than that before adding, so the electric conductivity may increase after adding Al.

  7. Hybrid density functional study on lattice vibration, thermodynamic properties, and chemical bonding of plutonium monocarbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Yang; Bin, Tang; Tao, Gao; BingYun, Ao

    2016-06-01

    Hybrid density functional theory is employed to systematically investigate the structural, magnetic, vibrational, thermodynamic properties of plutonium monocarbide (PuC and PuC0.75). For comparison, the results obtained by DFT, DFT + U are also given. For PuC and PuC0.75, Fock-0.25 hybrid functional gives the best lattice constants and predicts the correct ground states of antiferromagnetic (AFM) structure. The calculated phonon spectra suggest that PuC and PuC0.75 are dynamically stable. Values of the Helmholtz free energy ΔF, internal energy ΔE, entropy S, and constant-volume specific heat C v of PuC and PuC0.75 are given. The results are in good agreement with available experimental or theoretical data. As for the chemical bonding nature, the difference charge densities, the partial densities of states and the Bader charge analysis suggest that the Pu-C bonds of PuC and PuC0.75 have a mixture of covalent character and ionic character. The effect of carbon vacancy on the chemical bonding is also discussed in detail. We expect that our study can provide some useful reference for further experimental research on the phonon density of states, thermodynamic properties of the plutonium monocarbide. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 21371160 and 21401173).

  8. Synthesis of chemically bonded graphene/carbon nanotube composites and their application in large volumetric capacitance supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Naeyoung; Kwon, Soongeun; Lee, Dongwook; Yoon, Dong-Myung; Park, Young Min; Benayad, Anass; Choi, Jae-Young; Park, Jong Se

    2013-12-17

    Chemically bonded graphene/carbon nanotube composites as flexible supercapacitor electrode materials are synthesized by amide bonding. Carbon nanotubes attached along the edges and onto the surface of graphene act as spacers to increase the electrolyte-accessible surface area. Our lamellar structure electrodes demonstrate the largest volumetric capacitance (165 F cm(-3) ) ever shown by carbon-based electrodes.

  9. Electronic Structures and Chemical Bonds of Cobaltite and Ni-Doped

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIN Xinmin; XING Xueling; ZHU Lei

    2005-01-01

    The relation among electronic structure, chemical bond and thermoelectric property of Ca3 Co2 O6 and Ni-doped was studied by density function theory and discrete variation method(DFT-DVM). The results indicate that the highest valence band (HVB) and the lowest conduction band(LCB) are mainly attributed to Co3 d, Ni3 d and O2 p atomic orbitals. The property of a semiconductor is shown from the gap between HVB and LCB. The gap of Ni-doped one is less than that of Ca3 Co2 O6. The non-metal bond or ceramic characteristic of Ni-doped one is weaker than that of Ca3 Co2 O6, but the metal characteristics of Ni-doped one are stronger than those of Ca3 Co2O6. The thermoelectric property should be improved by adding Ni element into the system of Ca3 Co2 O6.

  10. Nitrogen implantation effects on the chemical bonding and hardness of boron and boron nitride coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, S; Felter, T; Hayes, J; Jankowski, A F; Patterson, R; Poker, D; Stamler, T

    1999-02-08

    Boron nitride (BN) coatings are deposited by the reactive sputtering of fully dense, boron (B) targets utilizing an argon-nitrogen (Ar-N{sub 2}) reactive gas mixture. Near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure analysis reveals features of chemical bonding in the B 1s photoabsorption spectrum. Hardness is measured at the film surface using nanoindentation. The BN coatings prepared at low, sputter gas pressure with substrate heating are found to have bonding characteristic of a defected hexagonal phase. The coatings are subjected to post-deposition nitrogen (N{sup +} and N{sub 2}{sup +}) implantation at different energies and current densities. The changes in film hardness attributed to the implantation can be correlated to changes observed in the B 1s NEXAFS spectra.

  11. YNi and its hydrides: Phase stabilities, electronic structures and chemical bonding properties from first principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matar, S.F., E-mail: matar@icmcb-bordeaux.cnrs.fr [CNRS, Universite de Bordeaux, ICMCB, 87 avenue du Docteur Albert Schweitzer, F-33608 Pessac (France); Nakhl, M. [Universite Libanaise, Laboratoire de Chimie-Physique des Materiaux LCPM, Fanar (Lebanon); Al Alam, A.F.; Ouaini, N. [Universite Saint-Esprit de Kaslik, Faculte des Sciences et de Genie Informatique, Jounieh (Lebanon); Chevalier, B. [CNRS, Universite de Bordeaux, ICMCB, 87 avenue du Docteur Albert Schweitzer, F-33608 Pessac (France)

    2010-11-25

    Graphical abstract: Base centered orthorhombic YNiH{sub X} structure. For x = 3, only H1 and H2 are present. Highest hydrogen content YNiH{sub 4} is obtained when H3 are added. - Abstract: Within density functional theory, establishing the equations of states of YNi in two different controversial structures in the literature, leads to determine the orthorhombic FeB-type as the ground state one with small energy difference. For YNiH{sub 3} and YNiH{sub 4} hydrides crystallizing in the orthorhombic CrB-type structure the geometry optimization and the ab initio determination of the H atomic positions show that the stability of hydrogen decreases from the tri- to the tetra- hydride. New states brought by hydrogen within the valence band lead to its broadening and to enhanced localization of metal density of states. The chemical bonding analysis shows a preferential Ni-H bonding versus Y-H.

  12. Atom-specific look at the surface chemical bond using x-ray emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, A.; Wassdahl, N.; Weinelt, M. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    CO and N{sub 2} adsorbed on the late transition metals have become prototype systems regarding the general understanding of molecular adsorption. It is in general assumed that the bonding of molecules to transition metals can be explained in terms of the interaction of the frontier HOMO and LUMO molecular orbitals with the d-orbitals. In such a picture the other molecular orbitals should remain essentially the same as in the free molecule. For the adsorption of the isoelectronic molecules CO and N{sub 2} this has led to the so called Blyholder model i.e., a synergetic {sigma} (HOMO) donor and {pi} (LUMO) backdonation bond. The authors results at the ALS show that such a picture is oversimplified. The direct observation and identification of the states related to the surface chemical bond is an experimental challenge. For noble and transition metal surfaces, the adsorption induced states overlap with the metal d valence band. Their signature is therefore often obscured by bulk substrate states. This complication has made it difficult for techniques such as photoemission and inverse photoemission to provide reliable information on the energy of chemisorption induced states and has left questions unanswered regarding the validity of the frontier orbitals concept. Here the authors show how x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), in spite of its inherent bulk sensitivity, can be used to investigate adsorbed molecules. Due to the localization of the core-excited intermediate state, XE spectroscopy allows an atomic specific separation of the valence electronic states. Thus the molecular contributions to the surface measurements make it possible to determine the symmetry of the molecular states, i.e., the separation of {pi} and {sigma} type states. In all the authors can obtain an atomic view of the electronic states involved in the formation of the chemical bond to the surface.

  13. Processing–structure–property relations of chemically bonded phosphate ceramic composites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H A Colorado; C Hiel; H T Hahn

    2011-07-01

    Mechanical properties and microstructures of a chemically bonded phosphate ceramic (CBPC) and its composite with 1.0 wt% graphite nanoplatelets (GNPs) reinforcement have been investigated. Microstructure was identified by using optical and scanning electron microscopes, X-ray tomography, and X-ray diffraction. In addition, weight loss of the resin at room temperature was studied. The microstructure characterization shows that CBPC is itself a composite with several crystalline (wollastonite and brushite) and amorphous phases. SEM and micro tomography show a homogeneous distribution of crystalline phases. Bending and compression strength of the CBPC was improved by reducing bubbles via preparation in vacuum.

  14. Detection of sub-GeV Dark Matter and Solar Neutrinos via Chemical-Bond Breaking

    OpenAIRE

    Essig, Rouven(C.N. Yang Institute for Theoretical Physics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY, 11794, U.S.A.); Mardon, Jeremy; Slone, Oren; Volansky, Tomer

    2016-01-01

    We explore a new low-threshold direct-detection concept for dark matter, based on the breaking of chemical bonds between atoms. This includes the dissociation of molecules and the creation of defects in a lattice. With thresholds of a few to 10's of eV, such an experiment could probe the nuclear couplings of dark matter particles as light as a few MeV. We calculate the expected rates for dark matter to break apart diatomic molecules, which we take as a case study for more general systems. We ...

  15. Crystallization characteristics and chemical bonding properties of nickel carbide thin film nanocomposites

    OpenAIRE

    Furlan, Andrej; Lu, Jun; Hultman, Lars; Jansson, Ulf; Magnuson, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The crystal structure and chemical bonding of magnetron-sputtering deposited nickel carbide Ni$_{1-x}$C$_{x}$ (0.05$\\leq$x$\\leq$0.62) thin films have been investigated by high-resolution X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy. By using X-ray as well as electron diffraction, we found carbon-containing hcp-Ni (hcp-NiC$_{y}$ phase), instead of the expected rhombohedral-Ni$_{3}$C. At low car...

  16. Location and chemical bond of radionuclides in neutron-irradiated nuclear graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The locations and the chemical forms (chemical bonds) of radionuclides in neutron-irradiated nuclear graphite have been determined in order to develop principal strategies for the management of graphitic nuclear waste. Due to the relatively low concentration of radionuclides in neutron-irradiated nuclear graphite (<1 ppm) direct spectroscopic methods are not applicable to investigate chemical structures. Therefore, methods by analogy have been applied. Such methods are investigations of the chemically detectable precursors of radionuclides in neutron-irradiated nuclear graphite and subjection of irradiated graphite to different chemical reactions followed by measurements of the radionuclide-containing reaction products by sensitive radiochemical methods. The paper discusses the applicability of these methods. The radionuclides investigated in this study can be divided into three parts: tritium, radiocarbon and metallic activation and fission products. Tritium can be bound in neutron-irradiated nuclear graphite as strongly adsorbed tritiated water (HTO), in oxygen-containing functional groups (e.g. C–OT) and as hydrocarbons (C–T). Radiocarbon is covalently bound with the graphite structure. The activity can be described by a homogeneously distributed part and a heterogeneously distributed part (enriched on surfaces or in hotspots). Metallic radionuclides can be bound as ions or covalent metal–carbon compounds. The distribution of all these radionuclides is mainly dependent on the distribution of their inactive precursors

  17. Quantum chemical calculations of bond dissociation energies for COOH scission and electronic structure in some acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zeng Hui; Zhao Jun; Xiao Xun

    2013-01-01

    Quantum chemical calculations are performed to investigate the equilibrium C-COOH bond distances and the bond dissociation energies (BDEs) for 15 acids.These compounds are studied by utilizing the hybrid density functional theory (DFT) (B3LYP,B3PW91,B3P86,PBE1PBE) and the complete basis set (CBS-Q) method in conjunction with the 6-31 lG** basis as DFT methods have been found to have low basis sets sensitivity for small and medium molecules in our previous work.Comparisons between the computational results and the experimental values reveal that CBS-Q method,which can produce reasonable BDEs for some systems in our previous work,seems unable to predict accurate BDEs here.However,the B3P86 calculated results accord very well with the experimental values,within an average absolute error of 2.3 kcal/mol.Thus,B3P86 method is suitable for computing the reliable BDEs of C-COOH bond for carboxylic acid compounds.In addition,the energy gaps between the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of studied compounds are estimated,based on which the relative thermal stabilities of the studied acids are also discussed.

  18. Trigermanides AEGe{sub 3} (AE = Ca, Sr, Ba). Chemical bonding and superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo, Rodrigo; Schnelle, Walter; Baranov, Alexey I.; Burkhardt, Ulrich; Bobnar, Matej; Cardoso-Gil, Raul; Schwarz, Ulrich; Grin, Yuri [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik Fester Stoffe, Dresden (Germany)

    2016-08-01

    The crystal structures of the trigermanides AEGe{sub 3}(tI32) (AE = Ca, Sr, Ba; space group I4/mmm, for SrGe{sub 3}: a = 7.7873(1), c = 12.0622(3) Aa) comprise Ge{sub 2} dumbbells forming layered Ge substructures which enclose embedded AE atoms. The chemical bonding analysis by application of the electron localizability approach reveals a substantial charge transfer from the AE atoms to the germanium substructure. The bonding within the dumbbells is of the covalent two-center type. A detailed analysis of SrGe{sub 3} reveals that the interaction on the bond-opposite side of the Ge{sub 2} groups is not lone pair-like - as it would be expected from the Zintl-like interpretation of the crystal structure with anionic Ge layers separated by alkaline-earth cations - but multi-center strongly polar between the Ge{sub 2} dumbbells and the adjacent metal atoms. Similar atomic interactions are present in CaGe{sub 3} and BaGe{sub 3}. The variation of the alkaline-earth metal has a merely insignificant influence on the superconducting transition temperatures in the s,p-electron compounds AEGe{sub 3}.

  19. Quantum chemical calculations of bond dissociation energies for COOH scission and electronic structure in some acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantum chemical calculations are performed to investigate the equilibrium C—COOH bond distances and the bond dissociation energies (BDEs) for 15 acids. These compounds are studied by utilizing the hybrid density functional theory (DFT) (B3LYP, B3PW91, B3P86, PBE1PBE) and the complete basis set (CBS—Q) method in conjunction with the 6-311G** basis as DFT methods have been found to have low basis sets sensitivity for small and medium molecules in our previous work. Comparisons between the computational results and the experimental values reveal that CBS—Q method, which can produce reasonable BDEs for some systems in our previous work, seems unable to predict accurate BDEs here. However, the B3P86 calculated results accord very well with the experimental values, within an average absolute error of 2.3 kcal/mol. Thus, B3P86 method is suitable for computing the reliable BDEs of C—COOH bond for carboxylic acid compounds. In addition, the energy gaps between the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of studied compounds are estimated, based on which the relative thermal stabilities of the studied acids are also discussed. (atomic and molecular physics)

  20. Enhancing the Scratch Resistance by Introducing Chemical Bonding in Highly Stretchable and Transparent Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chuan Fei; Chen, Yan; Tang, Lu; Wang, Feng; Ren, Zhifeng

    2016-01-13

    Stretchable transparent electrodes are key elements in flexible electronics and e-skins. However, existing stretchable transparent electrodes, including graphene sheets, carbon nanotube, and metal nanowire networks, weakly adheres to the substrate by van der Waals forces. Such electrodes suffer from poor scratch-resistance or poor durability, and this issue has been one of the biggest problems for their applications in industry. Here we show that, by introducing a Au-S bond between a Au nanomesh (AuNM) and the underlying elastomeric substrate, the AuNM strongly adheres to the substrate and can withstand scratches of a pressure of several megapascals. We find that the strong chemical bond, on the other hand, leads to a stiffening effect and localized rupture of the AuNM upon stretching; thus the stretchability is poor. A prestraining process is applied to suppress the localized rupture and has successfully improved the stretchability: electrical resistance of the prestrained AuNM exhibits modest change by one-time stretching to 160%, or repeated stretching to 50% for 25 000 cycles. This conductor is an ideal platform for robust stretchable photoelectronics. The idea of introducing a covalent bond to improve the scratch-resistance may also be applied to other systems including Ag nanowire films, carbon nanotube films, graphene, and so forth. PMID:26674364

  1. Describing the chemical bonding in C{sub 70} and C{sub 70}O{sub 3} – A quantum chemical topology study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bil, Andrzej, E-mail: abil@elrond.chem.uni.wroc.pl [Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Zürich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zürich (Switzerland); Faculty of Chemistry, University of Wrocław, F. Joliot Curie 14, 50-383 Wrocław (Poland); Latajka, Zdzisław [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Wrocław, F. Joliot Curie 14, 50-383 Wrocław (Poland); Hutter, Jürg [Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Zürich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zürich (Switzerland); Morrison, Carole A. [School of Chemistry and EaSTCHEM Research School, The University of Edinburgh, King’s Buildings, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JJ (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-03

    Highlights: • The C{sub 70} surface modification can lead to far-reaching changes in the electron density. • The relative stability of C{sub 70}O{sub 3} isomer series is explained. • The mechanism of the ozone ring opening reaction on the C{sub 70} surface is analysed. - Abstract: C{sub c}–C{sub c} and C{sub a}–C{sub b} bonds in C{sub 70} have dominant characteristics of double bonds, whereas the remaining six other types of bonds are single bonds with contributions from π-electron density. ‘Single’ bonds can act as active sites in chemical reactions which would typically require a multiple bond, such as addition of an ozone molecule, due to the fact that all adjacent bonds can serve as an efficient source of π-electron density. Thus any alteration in the electron density distribution following functionalization has far-reaching impact. We note that formation of the most stable ozonide isomer causes the smallest total perturbation in the electron density of the parent fullerene and C–C bond evolution correlates well with the shape of the minimum energy path for the ozone ring opening reaction on the fullerene surface. Finally, we observe that the O–O bond in C{sub 70}O{sub 3} is protocovalent, and as such resembles the O–O bond in H{sub 2}O{sub 2}.

  2. Experimental evidence of chemical components in the bonding of helium and neon with neutral molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelletti, David; Bartocci, Alessio; Grandinetti, Felice; Falcinelli, Stefano; Belpassi, Leonardo; Tarantelli, Francesco; Pirani, Fernando

    2015-04-13

    The complexes of helium and neon with gaseous neutral molecules are generally perceived to be van der Waals adducts held together by physical (non-covalent) forces, owing to the combination of size (exchange) repulsion with dispersion/induction attraction. Molecular beam experiments confirm that this is the case for He-CF4 , Ne-CF4 adducts, but revealed that the interaction of He and Ne with CCl4 features an appreciable contribution of chemical components that arise from the anisotropy of the electron density of CCl4 that enhances a charge transfer from Ng (Ng=He, Ne). These findings furnish a novel assay of the bonding capabilities of helium and neon, and invite to revisit the neutral complexes of these elements as systems of chemical relevance. The CCl4 -Ng are also peculiar examples of halogen bonds, a group of interactions of major current concern. Finally, this investigation is a prelude to the development of semi-empirical models for force fields aimed to the unified description of static and dynamical properties of systems of comparable or higher complexity.

  3. Experimental evidence of chemical components in the bonding of helium and neon with neutral molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelletti, David; Bartocci, Alessio; Grandinetti, Felice; Falcinelli, Stefano; Belpassi, Leonardo; Tarantelli, Francesco; Pirani, Fernando

    2015-04-13

    The complexes of helium and neon with gaseous neutral molecules are generally perceived to be van der Waals adducts held together by physical (non-covalent) forces, owing to the combination of size (exchange) repulsion with dispersion/induction attraction. Molecular beam experiments confirm that this is the case for He-CF4 , Ne-CF4 adducts, but revealed that the interaction of He and Ne with CCl4 features an appreciable contribution of chemical components that arise from the anisotropy of the electron density of CCl4 that enhances a charge transfer from Ng (Ng=He, Ne). These findings furnish a novel assay of the bonding capabilities of helium and neon, and invite to revisit the neutral complexes of these elements as systems of chemical relevance. The CCl4 -Ng are also peculiar examples of halogen bonds, a group of interactions of major current concern. Finally, this investigation is a prelude to the development of semi-empirical models for force fields aimed to the unified description of static and dynamical properties of systems of comparable or higher complexity. PMID:25755007

  4. Stabilization of hazardous ash waste with newberyite-rich chemically bonded magnesium phosphate ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel newberyite-rich magnesium-phosphate ceramic, intended for the stabilization of the US Department of Energy's low-level mixed-waste streams, has been developed by an acid-base reaction between magnesium oxide and a phosphoric acid solution. The reaction slurry, formed at room temperature, sets rapidly and forms a lightweight hard ceramic with low open porosity and a high compression strength of ∼ 6,200 psi. It is a composite of stable mineral phases of newberyite, luenebergite, and residual Mg oxide. Using this matrix, the authors developed superior waste forms for a surrogate ash waste stream. The final waste form is a low-permeability structural-quality ceramic, in which hazardous contaminants are chemically fixed and physically encapsulated. The compression strength of the waste form is an order of magnitude higher than the land disposal requirement, even at high waste loading. The high compression strength is attributed to stronger bonds in the waste form that result from participation of ash waste in the setting reactions. Long-term leaching studies show that the waste form is stable in an aqueous environment. The chemically bonded phosphate ceramic approach in this study may be a simple, inexpensive, and efficient method for fabricating high-performance waste forms either for stabilizing waste streams or for developing value-added construction materials from high-volume benign waste streams

  5. Effect of surface moisture on chemically bonded phosphor for thermographic phosphor thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Tao; Kim, Dong; Kim, Mirae; Liu, Ying Zheng; Kim, Kyung Chun

    2016-09-01

    This study examined the effect of surface moisture on the calibration lifetime in chemically bonded phosphor paint preparation. Mg4FGeO6:Mn was used as a sensor material, which was excited by a pulsed UV LED. A high-speed camera with a frequency of 8000 Hz was used to conduct phosphor thermometry. Five samples with different degrees of surface moisture were selected during the preparation process, and each sample was calibrated 40 times at room temperature. A conventional post-processing method was used to acquire the phosphorescent lifetime for different samples with a 4  ×  4-pixel interrogation window. The measurement error and paint uniformity were also studied. The results showed that there was no obvious phosphorescence boundary between the wet parts and dry parts of phosphor paint. The lifetime increased by about 0.0345% per hour during the preparation process, showing the degree of surface moisture had almost no influence on the lifetime measurement. The lifetime changed only after annealing treatment. There was also no effect on the measurement error and uniformity. These results provide a reference for developing a real-time measurement method using thermographic phosphor thermometry. This study also provides a feasible basis for chemically bonded phosphor thermometry applications in humid and low-temperature environments.

  6. Application of chemical structure and bonding of actinide oxide materials for forensic science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkerson, Marianne Perry [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    We are interested in applying our understanding of actinide chemical structure and bonding to broaden the suite of analytical tools available for nuclear forensic analyses. Uranium- and plutonium-oxide systems form under a variety of conditions, and these chemical species exhibit some of the most complex behavior of metal oxide systems known. No less intriguing is the ability of AnO{sub 2} (An: U, Pu) to form non-stoichiometric species described as AnO{sub 2+x}. Environmental studies have shown the value of utilizing the chemical signatures of these actinide oxide materials to understand transport following release into the environment. Chemical speciation of actinide-oxide samples may also provide clues as to the age, source, or process history of the material. The scientific challenge is to identify, measure and understand those aspects of speciation of actinide analytes that carry information about material origin and history most relevant to forensics. Here, we will describe our efforts in material synthesis and analytical methods development that we will use to provide the fundamental science to characterize actinide oxide molecular structures for forensic science. Structural properties and initial results to measure structural variability of uranium oxide samples using synchrotron-based X-ray Absorption Fine Structure will be discussed.

  7. Application of chemical structure and bonding of actinide oxide materials for forensic science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are interested in applying our understanding of actinide chemical structure and bonding to broaden the suite of analytical tools available for nuclear forensic analyses. Uranium- and plutonium-oxide systems form under a variety of conditions, and these chemical species exhibit some of the most complex behavior of metal oxide systems known. No less intriguing is the ability of AnO2 (An: U, Pu) to form non-stoichiometric species described as AnO2+x. Environmental studies have shown the value of utilizing the chemical signatures of these actinide oxide materials to understand transport following release into the environment. Chemical speciation of actinide-oxide samples may also provide clues as to the age, source, or process history of the material. The scientific challenge is to identify, measure and understand those aspects of speciation of actinide analytes that carry information about material origin and history most relevant to forensics. Here, we will describe our efforts in material synthesis and analytical methods development that we will use to provide the fundamental science to characterize actinide oxide molecular structures for forensic science. Structural properties and initial results to measure structural variability of uranium oxide samples using synchrotron-based X-ray Absorption Fine Structure will be discussed.

  8. First-principles study of the chemical bonding and conduction behavior of LiFePO{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kou, Xiao-jing, E-mail: jing_kou@hit.edu.cn [School of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Heilongjiang Institute of Science and Technology, Harbin 150022 (China); Ke, Hua [Institute for Advanced Ceramics, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Zhu, Chun-bo; Rolfe, Peter [School of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2015-01-13

    Highlights: • Identified unstable chemical bonding between Fe–O1 and Fe–O2 during delithiation. • Demonstrated fundamental role of Fe–O3 chemical bonding on conductivity of LiFePO{sub 4.} • Hopping process can be described by the calculation of polarization of a charged supercell. - Abstract: The electronic structure and chemical bonding of LiFePO{sub 4} were calculated using maximally-localized Wannier functions within the framework of the first-principles method. Comparison of the shifts in Wannier centers between LiFePO{sub 4} and delithiated reference (FePO{sub 4}){sub r} structures demonstrated the unstable chemical bonding of Fe–O1 and Fe–O2 during delithiation. The contribution of each orbital to the small-polaron polarization field was discussed in detail. The small polaron hopping is accompanied by a very small polarization field with the value of 0.049 C/m{sup 2}. Results of our calculations showed that the chemical bonding of Fe–O3 has an important function in the low-temperature conductivity of LiFePO{sub 4}.

  9. Comparison of Marginal Gap and Microleakage in Copy-Milled and Cad-Milled Zirconia Copings Bonded Using Light Cure and Chemical Cure Resin Bonding Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Manoj; Rajalakshmi, S; Krishna Prasad, D

    2014-12-01

    This in vitro study assessed the marginal gap and marginal microleakage in zirconia copings fabricated using two computer aided techniques- CAD milling and Copy milling and cemented to respective tooth preparations using two resin bonding systems, light cure and self-cure resin bonding systems. 32 extracted premolars were prepared to receive zirconia copings fabricated using CAD/CAM and Copy milling techniques. Once the copings were fabricated, the samples were evaluated for marginal fit prior to cementation through microscopic observation. Evaluation of marginal gap was done again after cementation, in order to incorporate the influence of the resin bonding system on the marginal microgap. The specimens were evaluated under the stereomicroscope for micro-leakage using commercial software. A comparative statistical analysis was done following data collection using Mann-Whitney U test, Wilcoxon test and chi-square test. The data collected regarding marginal gap was well within 120 µ, which is in accordance with previous studies. However, Copy milled specimens showed statistically lesser marginal gap when compared to CAD milled specimens. While comparing microleakage, it was observed that the microleakage in Copy milled specimens bonded with light cure resin bonded cement was statistically lesser than that of specimens cemented with chemical cure resin cement.(P = 0.003). This in vitro study concluded that Copy milling technique fabricated zirconia restorations with lesser marginal gap and microleakage score in comparison to CAD milled samples. Light cure resin bonding system also proved to be more effective option compared to self cure resin bonding systems. However, the limitations of this study should be taken into concern and further research should be aimed at a larger sample size to validate the results. PMID:26199490

  10. Electronic parameters of Sr2M2O7 (M = V, Nb, Ta) and Sr-O chemical bonding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atuchin, Victor V.; Grivel, Jean-Claude; Zhang, Zhaoming

    2010-01-01

    on the formation of the Sr-O bonds. The chemical bonding effects were considered on the basis of our XPS results for Sr2Nb2O7 and Sr2Ta2O7 and the previously published structural and XPS data for other Sr-oxide compounds. A new empirical relationship between Δ(O-Sr) and L(Sr-O) was obtained. Possible applications...

  11. Structural and spectroscopic evidence for stable chemical bonds and the correlation with high Tc superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is discovered that in the high-Tc superconducting YBa2−xLaxCu3Oz system, by structural analysis and Raman spectroscopy, a stable ‘fixed triangle’ structure exists in the CuO2 planes. All chemical bonds and angles constituting the O(3)–Cu(2)–O(2) triangle are almost constant with doping. The frequencies and linewidths of the out-of-phase c-axis O(2)–O(3) buckling modes around 337 cm−1 and the in-plane Cu(2)–O(2) bond stretching modes around 534 cm−1 are both independent of the doping level, providing direct evidence for the stability of this fixed triangle. It was previously revealed that just these two phonons couple strongly with the antinodal and nodal electronic states, respectively, resulting in an anisotropic electron–phonon interaction in the cuprates. This work implies that the stability of the CuO2 subunit and phonons related to it might be quite important in inducing the d-wave high-Tc superconductivity and should be paid more attention. (paper)

  12. EPR study into the nature of Cu(2)-anion chemical bond in glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alkali-borate glasses with copper additions were the subject of the investigation. An attempt was made to trace the characteristics of copper surroundings and also to find out the possibility for chlorine to enter the first coordination sphere of paramagnetic ion. Substitution of Na2O for B2O3 was done changing the Na2O/B2O3 ratio from 1:3 to 1:19. Concentration of copper was constant and equal to 0.14 mass.%. Copper and chlorine were added to glass above the 100% of the main glass composition. The nature of the chemical bond Cu(2)-anion was studied by EPR method. It was established that the degree of covalence bond Cu-O increased with equimolecular substitution of glass-forming oxides in P2O5-B2O3-SiO2-GeO2 series and with increasing concentration of sodium oxide in alkali-borate glasses. Additions of chlorine to the glass lead to the formation mixed chlorine-oxygen complexes of copper. The probability of chlorine entry into the first coordination sphere of copper depends on the sodium oxide concentration in glass and increases with the decrease of the last

  13. Plutonium and transplutonium element trioxides: molecular structures, chemical bonding, and isomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsevskii, Andréi

    2015-10-14

    Ground-state equilibrium geometries, energetics, and vibrational frequencies of AnO3 molecules, An = Pu through Cf, and their isomers are calculated using an accurate small-core pseudopotential model and the two-component relativistic density functional theory. The qualitative features of chemical bonding in these molecules are discussed in terms of oxidation states and bond orders. The actinide oxidation state (VI) is reached only in the plutonium trioxide molecule, whereas heavier actinide atoms in T-shaped trioxide molecules should be considered as pentavalent. At least at low temperatures, PuO3 and, to a lesser degree, AmO3 and BkO3 molecules should be stable both with respect to the isomerization into oxoperoxides or oxosuperoxides and the decay into dioxides and molecular oxygen. These trioxides can form dimers with significant (above 250 kJ mol(-1)) dissociation energies; the oxidation states of actinide atoms in the lowest-energy configurations of these dimers coincide with those in the corresponding monomers. The ability to reach high oxidation states in oxygen compounds gradually decreases from Pu onwards, with the only exception being the unexpectedly stable Bk(v)O3. PMID:26343514

  14. Anatomy of bond formation. Bond length dependence of the extent of electron sharing in chemical bonds from the analysis of domain-averaged Fermi holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponec, Robert; Cooper, David L

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate that domain-average Fermi hole (DAFH) analysis, which has previously been used at the Hartree-Fock level, remains useful after the proper introduction of electron correlation. We perform a systematic investigation of the variation of the picture of bonding with increasing bond length in simple diatomic molecules such as N2 and LiH. Alongside values of a shared-electron distribution index (SEDI), this analysis provides further insight into the geometry dependence of the extent of electron sharing in polar and non-polar systems. We also use DAFH analysis, with correlated wave functions, to evaluate the (potential) multicentre bonding in the electron-deficient and electron-rich molecules CH2Li2 and CH2N2, respectively.

  15. Novel Chemically-Bonded Phosphate Ceramic Borehole Sealants (Ceramicretes) for Arctic Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirish Patil; Godwin A. Chukwu; Gang Chen; Santanu Khataniar

    2008-12-31

    Novel chemically bonded phosphate ceramic borehole sealant, i.e. Ceramicrete, has many advantages over conventionally used permafrost cement at Alaska North Slope (ANS). However, in normal field practices when Ceramicrete is mixed with water in blenders, it has a chance of being contaminated with leftover Portland cement. In order to identify the effect of Portland cement contamination, recent tests have been conducted at BJ services in Tomball, TX as well as at the University of Alaska Fairbanks with Ceramicrete formulations proposed by the Argonne National Laboratory. The tests conducted at BJ Services with proposed Ceramicrete formulations and Portland cement contamination have shown significant drawbacks which has caused these formulations to be rejected. However, the newly developed Ceramicrete formulation at the University of Alaska Fairbanks has shown positive results with Portland cement contamination as well as without Portland cement contamination for its effective use in oil well cementing operations at ANS.

  16. Fabrication of a molecular-level multilayer film on organic polymer surfaces via chemical bonding assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongchi; Yang, Peng; Deng, Jianping; Liu, Lianying; Zhu, Jianwu; Sui, Yuan; Lu, Jiaoming; Yang, Wantai

    2007-02-13

    A fresh multilayer film was fabricated on a molecular level and successfully tethered to the surface of a hydroxylated organic substrate via chemical bonding assembly (CBA). Sulfate anion groups (SO4-) were preintroduced onto the surface of biaxially oriented polypropylene (BOPP) films via a reference method. Upon hydrolysis of the SO4- groups, hydroxyl groups (--OH) were formed that subsequently acted as initial reagents for a series of alternate reactions with terephthalyl chloride (TPC) and bisphenol A (BPA). A stable and well-defined multilayer film was thus fabricated via the CBA method. As a result of the nanoscale multilayer fresh film being abundant with reactive groups, it is believed that the film and its fabrication method should provide a fundamental platform for further surface functionalization and direct the design of advanced materials with desired properties.

  17. Chemical Bonding in Aqueous Ferrocyanide: Experimental and Theoretical X-ray Spectroscopic Study

    CERN Document Server

    Engel, Nicholas; Suljoti, Edlira; Garcia-Diez, Raul; Lange, Kathrin M; Atak, Kaan; Golnak, Ronny; Kothe, Alexander; Dantz, Marcus; Kühn, Oliver; Aziz, Emad F

    2013-01-01

    Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) and X-ray absorption (XA) experiments at the iron L- and nitrogen K-edge are combined with high-level first principles restricted active space self-consistent field (RASSCF) calculations for a systematic investigation of the nature of the chemical bond in potassium ferrocyanide in aqueous solution. The atom- and site-specific RIXS excitations allow for direct observation of ligand-to-metal (Fe L-edge) and metal-to-ligand (N K-edge) charge transfer bands and thereby evidence for strong {\\sigma}-donation and {\\pi}-back-donation. The effects are identified by comparing experimental and simulated spectra related to both the unoccupied and occupied molecular orbitals in solution.

  18. Lattice dynamics and chemical bonding in Sb2Te3 from first-principles calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pressure effects on the lattice dynamics and the chemical bonding of the three-dimensional topological insulator, Sb2Te3, have been studied from a first-principles perspective in its rhombohedral phase. Where it is possible to compare, theory agrees with most of the measured phonon dispersions. We find that the inclusion of relativistic effects, in terms of the spin-orbit interaction, affects the vibrational features to some extend and creates large fluctuations on phonon density of state in high frequency zone. By investigations of structure and electronic structure, we analyze in detail the semiconductor to metal transition at ∼2 GPa followed by an electronic topological transition at a pressure of ∼4.25 GPa

  19. X-ray photoelectron spectra structure and chemical bonding in AmO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teterin Yury A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative analysis was done of the X-ray photoelectron spectra structure in the binding energy range of 0 eV to ~35 eV for americium dioxide (AmO2 valence electrons. The binding energies and structure of the core electronic shells (~35 eV-1250 eV, as well as the relativistic discrete variation calculation results for the Am63O216 and AmO8 (D4h cluster reflecting Am close environment in AmO2 were taken into account. The experimental data show that the many-body effects and the multiplet splitting contribute to the spectral structure much less than the effects of formation of the outer (0-~15 eV binding energy and the inner (~15 eV-~35 eV binding energy valence molecular orbitals. The filled Am 5f electronic states were shown to form in the AmO2 valence band. The Am 6p electrons participate in formation of both the inner and the outer valence molecular orbitals (bands. The filled Am 6p3/2 and the O 2s electronic shells were found to make the largest contributions to the formation of the inner valence molecular orbitals. Contributions of electrons from different molecular orbitals to the chemical bond in the AmO8 cluster were evaluated. Composition and sequence order of molecular orbitals in the binding energy range 0-~35 eV in AmO2 were established. The experimental and theoretical data allowed a quantitative scheme of molecular orbitals for AmO2, which is fundamental for both understanding the chemical bond nature in americium dioxide and the interpretation of other X-ray spectra of AmO2.

  20. Effect of cross-linking with riboflavin and ultraviolet A on the chemical bonds and ultrastructure of human sclera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Gyeong-Bok; Lee, Hui-Jae; Kim, Ji-Hye; Lim, Jin Ik; Choi, Samjin; Jin, Kyung-Hyun; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2011-12-01

    This study examined the effect of the cross-linking with riboflavin-ultraviolet A (UVA) irradiation on the chemical bonds and ultrastructural changes of human sclera tissues using Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Raman spectroscopy of the normal and cross-linked human sclera tissue revealed different types of the riboflavin-UVA and collagen interactions, which could be identified from their unique peaks, intensity, and shape. Raman spectroscopy can prove to be a powerful tool for examining the chemical bond of collagenous tissues at the molecular level. After riboflavin-UVA treatment, unlike a regular parallel arrangement of normal collagen fibrils, the AFM image revealed interlocking arrangements of collagen fibrils. The observed changes in the surface topography of the collagen fibrils, as well as in their chemical bonds in the sclera tissue, support the formation of interfibrilar cross-links in sclera tissues.

  1. Mechanical properties of chemically bonded sand core materials dipped in sol-gel coating impregnated with filter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nwaogu, Ugochukwu Chibuzoh; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2012-01-01

    A novel sol-gel coating impregnated with filter dust was applied on chemically bonded sand core materials by dipping. After curing, the strengths of the core materials were measured under uniaxial loading using a new strength testing machine (STM). The STM presents the loading history as a force......-displacement curve from which the mechanical properties of the materials are deduced. The fracture surfaces were examined using a stereomicroscope and a scanning electron microscope. From the results, the strengths of the core materials were slightly reduced by the coating in tensile and flexural modes, while...... the strengths were increased under compression. The mode of fracture of the chemically bonded sand core materials was observed to be intergranular through the binder. The stiffness of the chemically bonded sand core materials was determined. For better understanding of the mechanical properties...

  2. DFT modeling of the electronic and magnetic structures and chemical bonding properties of intermetallic hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis presents an ab initio study of several classes of intermetallics and their hydrides. These compounds are interesting from both a fundamental and an applied points of view. To achieve this aim two complementary methods, constructed within the DFT, were chosen: (i) pseudo potential based VASP for geometry optimization, structural investigations and electron localization mapping (ELF), and (ii) all-electrons ASW method for a detailed description of the electronic structure, chemical bonding properties following different schemes as well as quantities depending on core electrons such as the hyperfine field. A special interest is given with respect to the interplay between magneto-volume and chemical interactions (metal-H) effects within the following hydrided systems: binary Laves (e.g. ScFe2) and Haucke (e.g. LaNi5) phases on one hand, and ternary cerium based (e.g. CeRhSn) and uranium based (e.g. U2Ni2Sn) alloys on the other hand. (author)

  3. The nature of chemical bond in trioxide Mi-UO3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teterin Yury A.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-energy X-ray photoelectron and conversion electron spectra from uranium trioxide were measured, and calculations were done for the [UO2O4]-6 (D4b cluster which reflects the structure of uranium close environment in MI-UO3 in the non-relativistic and relativistic Xa-DVM approximation. This enabled a satisfactory qualitative and in some cases quantitative agreement between the experimental and theoretical data, and interpretation of such spectra. Despite the traditional opinion that before participation in the chemical binding, the U5f electrons could be promoted to the higher (for example - U6d levels, it was theoretically proved and experimentally confirmed that the U5f electrons (about two U5f electrons are able to participate directly in the chemical bond formation in uranium trioxide. The filled U5f states proved to be localized in the outer valence molecular orbitals energy range 4-9 eV, while the vacant U5f states were generally localized in the low-energy range (0-6 eV above zero. It was experimentally shown that U6p electrons not only participate effectively in the inner valence molecular orbital formation but also participate strongly (more than 1 U6p electron in the formation of die filled outer valence molecular orbitals.

  4. Valence XPS structure and chemical bond in Cs2UO2Cl4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teterin Yury A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative analysis was done of the valence electrons X-ray photoelectron spectra structure in the binding energy (BE range of 0 eV to ~35 eV for crystalline dicaesium tetrachloro-dioxouranium (VI (Cs2UO2Cl4. This compound contains the uranyl group UO2. The BE and structure of the core electronic shells (~35 eV-1250 eV, as well as the relativistic discrete variation calculation results for the UO2Cl4(D4h cluster reflecting U close environment in Cs2UO2Cl4 were taken into account. The experimental data show that many-body effects due to the presence of cesium and chlorine contribute to the outer valence (0-~15 eV BE spectral structure much less than to the inner valence (~15 eV-~35 eV BE one. The filled U5f electronic states were theoretically calculated and experimentally confirmed to be present in the valence band of Cs2UO2Cl4. It corroborates the suggestion on the direct participation of the U5f electrons in the chemical bond. Electrons of the U6p atomic orbitals participate in formation of both the inner (IVMO and the outer (OVMO valence molecular orbitals (bands. The filled U6p and the O2s, Cl3s electronic shells were found to make the largest contributions to the IVMO formation. The molecular orbitals composition and the sequence order in the binding energy range 0 eV-~35 eV in the UO2Cl4 cluster were established. The experimental and theoretical data allowed a quantitative molecular orbitals scheme for the UO2Cl4 cluster in the BE range 0-~35 eV, which is fundamental for both understanding the chemical bond nature in Cs2UO2Cl4 and the interpretation of other X-ray spectra of Cs2UO2Cl4. The contributions to the chemical binding for the UO2Cl4 cluster were evaluated to be: the OVMO contribution - 76%, and the IVMO contribution - 24 %.

  5. Electronic structure and chemical bond nature in Cs2PuO2Cl4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teterin Yury A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available X-ray photoelectron spectral analysis of dicaesiumtetrachlorodioxoplutonate (Cs2PuO2Cl4 single crystal was done in the binding energy range 0-~35 eV on the basis of binding energies and structure of the core electronic shells (~35 eV-1250 eV, as well as the relativistic discrete variation calculation results for the PuO2Cl4 (D4h. This cluster reflects Pu close environment in Cs2PuO2Cl4 containing the plutonyl group PuO2. The many-body effects due to the presence of cesium and chlorine were shown to contribute to the outer valence (0-~15 eV binding energy spectral structure much less than to the inner valence (~15 eV- ~35 eV binding energy one. The filled Pu 5f electronic states were theoretically calculated and experimentally con- firmed to present in the valence band of Cs2PuO2Cl4. It corroborates the suggestion on the direct participation of the Pu 5f electrons in the chemical bond. The Pu 6p atomic orbitals were shown to participate in formation of both the inner and the outer valence molecular orbitals (bands, while the filled Pu 6p and O 2s, Cl 3s electronic shells were found to take the largest part in formation of the inner valence molecular orbitals. The composition of molecular orbitals and the sequence order in the binding energy range 0-~35 eV in Cs2PuO2Cl4 were established. The quantitative scheme of molecular orbitals for Cs2PuO2Cl4 in the binding energy range 0-~15 eV was built on the basis of the experimental and theoretical data. It is fundamental for both understanding the chemical bond nature in Cs2PuO2Cl4 and the interpretation of other X-ray spectra of Cs2PuO2Cl4. The contributions to the chemical binding for the PuO2Cl4 cluster were evaluated to be: the contribution of the outer valence molecular orbitals -66 %, the contribution of the inner valence molecular orbitals -34 %.

  6. Chemical adhesion rather than mechanical retention enhances resin bond durability of a dental glass-ceramic with leucite crystallites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, X F [Department of Prosthodontics, The Stomatological Hospital Affiliated Medical School, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210008 (China); Yoshida, K [Division of Applied Prosthodontics, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8588 (Japan); Gu, N, E-mail: mengsoar@nju.edu.c [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Biomaterials and Devices, School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)

    2010-08-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of chemical adhesion by a silane coupler and mechanical retention by hydrofluoric acid (HFA) etching on the bond durability of resin to a dental glass ceramic with leucite crystallites. Half of the ceramic plates were etched with 4.8% HFA (HFA group) for 60 s, and the other half were not treated (NoHFA group). The scale of their surface roughness and rough area was measured by a 3D laser scanning microscope. These plates then received one of the following two bond procedures to form four bond test groups: HFA/cement, NoHFA/cement, HFA/silane/cement and NoHFA/silane/cement. The associated micro-shear bond strength and bond failure modes were tested after 0 and 30 000 thermal water bath cycles. Four different silane/cement systems (Monobond S/Variolink II, GC Ceramic Primer/Linkmax HV, Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Clearfil Esthetic Cement and Porcelain Liner M/SuperBond C and B) were used. The data for each silane/cement system were analyzed by three-way ANOVA. HFA treatment significantly increased the surface R{sub a} and R{sub y} values and the rough area of the ceramic plates compared with NoHFA treatment. After 30 000 thermal water bath cycles, the bond strength of all the test groups except the HFA/Linkmax HV group was significantly reduced, while the HFA/Linkmax HV group showed only adhesive interface failure. The other HFA/cement groups and all NoHFA/cement groups lost bond strength completely, and all NoHFA/silane/cement groups with chemical adhesion had significantly higher bond strength and more ceramic cohesive failures than the respective HFA/cement groups with mechanical retention. The result of the HFA/silane/cement groups with both chemical adhesion and mechanical retention revealed that HFA treatment could enhance the bond durability of resin/silanized glass ceramics, which might result from the increase of the chemical adhesion area on the ceramic rough surface and subsequently reduced degradation speed of the silane

  7. Chemical adhesion rather than mechanical retention enhances resin bond durability of a dental glass-ceramic with leucite crystallites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of chemical adhesion by a silane coupler and mechanical retention by hydrofluoric acid (HFA) etching on the bond durability of resin to a dental glass ceramic with leucite crystallites. Half of the ceramic plates were etched with 4.8% HFA (HFA group) for 60 s, and the other half were not treated (NoHFA group). The scale of their surface roughness and rough area was measured by a 3D laser scanning microscope. These plates then received one of the following two bond procedures to form four bond test groups: HFA/cement, NoHFA/cement, HFA/silane/cement and NoHFA/silane/cement. The associated micro-shear bond strength and bond failure modes were tested after 0 and 30 000 thermal water bath cycles. Four different silane/cement systems (Monobond S/Variolink II, GC Ceramic Primer/Linkmax HV, Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Clearfil Esthetic Cement and Porcelain Liner M/SuperBond C and B) were used. The data for each silane/cement system were analyzed by three-way ANOVA. HFA treatment significantly increased the surface Ra and Ry values and the rough area of the ceramic plates compared with NoHFA treatment. After 30 000 thermal water bath cycles, the bond strength of all the test groups except the HFA/Linkmax HV group was significantly reduced, while the HFA/Linkmax HV group showed only adhesive interface failure. The other HFA/cement groups and all NoHFA/cement groups lost bond strength completely, and all NoHFA/silane/cement groups with chemical adhesion had significantly higher bond strength and more ceramic cohesive failures than the respective HFA/cement groups with mechanical retention. The result of the HFA/silane/cement groups with both chemical adhesion and mechanical retention revealed that HFA treatment could enhance the bond durability of resin/silanized glass ceramics, which might result from the increase of the chemical adhesion area on the ceramic rough surface and subsequently reduced degradation speed of the silane coupler

  8. A Review of Chemical Bonding Studies: Needs, Aims, Methods of Exploring Students' Conceptions, General Knowledge Claims and Students' Alternative Conceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Suat; Calik, Muammer; Ayas, Alipasa; Coll, Richard K.

    2006-01-01

    The present paper presents a detailed thematic review of chemical bonding studies. To achieve this, a matrix is developed to summarize and present the findings by focusing on insights derived from the related studies. The matrix incorporates the following themes: needs, aims, methods of exploring students' conceptions, general knowledge claims,…

  9. The Effects of Conceptual Change Texts Accompanied with Animations on Overcoming 11th Grade Students' Alternative Conceptions of Chemical Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozmen, Haluk; Demircioglu, Hulya; Demircioglu, Gokhan

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims to determine the effect of conceptual change texts accompanied with computer animations on 11th grade students' understanding and alternative conceptions related to chemical bonding. One experimental group (EG; N = 28) and one comparison group (CG; N = 30) were used in the study. While the comparison group taught traditional…

  10. Nanoscale metals and semiconductors for the storage of solar energy in chemical bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manthiram, Karthish

    The transduction of electrical energy into chemical bonds represents one potential strategy for storing energy derived from intermittent sources such as solar and wind. Driving the electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide using light requires (1) developing light absorbers which convert photons into electron-hole pairs and (2) catalysts which utilize these electrons and holes to reduce carbon dioxide and oxidize water, respectively. For both the light absorbers and catalysts, the use of nanoscale particles is advantageous, as charge transport length scales are minimized in the case of nanoscale light absorbers and catalytic surface-area-to-volume ratio is maximized for nanoscale catalysts. In many cases, although semiconductors and metals in the form of thin films and foils are increasingly well-characterized as photoabsorbers and electrocatalysts for carbon dioxide reduction, respectively, the properties of their nanoscale counterparts remain poorly understood. This dissertation explores the nature of the light absorption mode of non-stoichiometric semiconductors which are utilized as light absorbers and the development of catalysts with enhanced stability, activity, and selectivity for carbon dioxide reduction. Chapter 1 provides an overview of the state of development of methods of transducing the energy of photons into chemical bonds. Chapters 2 and 3 investigate the development of stable, active, and selective catalysts for the electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide. Chapter 2 examines how copper nanoparticles have enhanced activities and selectivities for methanation compared to copper foils. Chapter 3 focuses on the development of strategies to stabilize high-surface-area catalysts to prevent surface area loss during electrochemical carbon dioxide reduction. Chapters 4 and 5 entail a fundamental understanding of the light absorption mode of nanoscale photoabsorbers used in both photoelectrochemical cells and in photovoltaics. Chapter 4 focuses on the

  11. Metalorganic chemical vapor deposition of few-layer sp2 bonded boron nitride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paduano, Qing; Snure, Michael; Weyburne, David; Kiefer, Arnold; Siegel, Gene; Hu, Jianjun

    2016-09-01

    A systematic study of the growth of atomically smooth few-layer sp2 bonded BN on 50 mm sapphire substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) using Triethylboron (TEB) and NH3 as precursors is described. Based on the experimental results obtained using Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray reflectance measurements and transmission electron microscopy, we explored the growth parameter space and identified three different growth modes: random three-dimensional (3D) growth, a self-terminating few-layer growth mode, and a very slow layer-by-layer mode. The growth mode depends on the temperature, pressure, V/III ratio, and surface nitridation conditions, as follows: 3D island growth is dominant in the low V/III range and is characterized by a decreasing growth rate with increasing deposition temperature. When the V/III ratio is increased this 3D island growth mode transitions to a self-terminating few-layer growth mode. An additional transition from self-terminating growth to 3D growth occurs when the growth pressure is increased. Very slow layer by layer growth is found at high temperature and low pressure. Finally, substrate surface nitridation promotes self-terminating growth that results in atomically smooth films.

  12. Microstructure and chemical bond evolution of diamond-like carbon films machined by femtosecond laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing; Wang, Chunhui [Science and Technology on Thermostructure Composite Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Liu, Yongsheng, E-mail: yongshengliu@nwpu.edu.cn [Science and Technology on Thermostructure Composite Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Cheng, Laifei [Science and Technology on Thermostructure Composite Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Li, Weinan [State Key Laboratory of Transient Optics and Photonics, Xi’an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi’an 10068 (China); Zhang, Qing [Science and Technology on Thermostructure Composite Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Yang, Xiaojun [State Key Laboratory of Transient Optics and Photonics, Xi’an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi’an 10068 (China)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • The machining depth was essentially proportional to the laser power. • The well patterned microgrooves and ripple structures with nanoparticles were formed distinctly in the channels. And the number of nanoparticles increased with the processing power as well. • It revealed a conversion from amorphous carbon to nanocrystalline graphite after laser treated with increasing laser power. • It showed that a great decrease of sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} after laser treatment. - Abstract: Femtosecond laser is of great interest for machining high melting point and hardness materials such as diamond-like carbon, SiC ceramic, et al. In present work, the microstructural and chemical bond evolution of diamond-like carbon films were investigated using electron microscopy and spectroscopy techniques after machined by diverse femtosecond laser power in air. The results showed the machining depth was essentially proportional to the laser power. The well patterned microgrooves and ripple structures with nanoparticles were formed distinctly in the channels. Considering the D and G Raman band parameters on the laser irradiation, it revealed a conversion from amorphous carbon to nanocrystalline graphite after laser treated with increasing laser power. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed a great decrease of sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} after laser treatment.

  13. Microstructure and chemical bond evolution of diamond-like carbon films machined by femtosecond laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The machining depth was essentially proportional to the laser power. • The well patterned microgrooves and ripple structures with nanoparticles were formed distinctly in the channels. And the number of nanoparticles increased with the processing power as well. • It revealed a conversion from amorphous carbon to nanocrystalline graphite after laser treated with increasing laser power. • It showed that a great decrease of sp3/sp2 after laser treatment. - Abstract: Femtosecond laser is of great interest for machining high melting point and hardness materials such as diamond-like carbon, SiC ceramic, et al. In present work, the microstructural and chemical bond evolution of diamond-like carbon films were investigated using electron microscopy and spectroscopy techniques after machined by diverse femtosecond laser power in air. The results showed the machining depth was essentially proportional to the laser power. The well patterned microgrooves and ripple structures with nanoparticles were formed distinctly in the channels. Considering the D and G Raman band parameters on the laser irradiation, it revealed a conversion from amorphous carbon to nanocrystalline graphite after laser treated with increasing laser power. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed a great decrease of sp3/sp2 after laser treatment

  14. Chemical Bonding States of TiC Films before and after Hydrogen Ion Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    TiC films deposited by rf magnetron sputtering followed by Ar+ ion bombardment were irradiated with a hydrogen ion beam. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used for characterization of the chemical bonding states of C and Ti elements of the TiC films before and after hydrogen ion irradiation, in order to understand the effect of hydrogen ion irradiation on the films and to study the mechanism of hydrogen resistance of TiC films. Conclusions can be drawn that ion bombardment at moderate energy can cause preferential physical sputtering of carbon atoms from the surface of low atomic number (Z) material. This means that ion beam bombardment leads to the formation of a non-stoichiometric composition of TiC on the surface.TiC films prepared by ion beam mixing have the more excellent characteristic of hydrogen resistance. One important cause, in addition to TiC itself, is that there are many vacant sites in TiC created by ion beam mixing.These defects can easily trap hydrogen and effectively enhance the effect of hydrogen resistance.

  15. Wollastonite based-Chemically Bonded Phosphate Ceramics with lead oxide contents under gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colorado, H.A., E-mail: hcoloradolopera@ucla.edu [University of California, Materials Science and Engineering Department, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Universidad de Antioquia, Mechanical Engineering Department, Medellin (Colombia); Pleitt, J. [Missouri University of Science and Technology, Nuclear Engineering Department, MO (United States); Hiel, C. [Composite Support and Solutions Inc., San Pedro, CA (United States); MEMC, University of Brussels (VUB), Brussels (Belgium); Yang, J.M.; Hahn, H.T. [University of California, Materials Science and Engineering Department, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Castano, C.H. [Missouri University of Science and Technology, Nuclear Engineering Department, MO (United States)

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of PbO on the attenuation coefficient of Wollastonite based-CBPCs is presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of PbO on the compressive strength and setting time of Wollastonite based-CBPCs is presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The attenuation coefficient of the CBPC was improved (between 32% to 193.8%) by the addition of Pb. - Abstract: The shielding properties to gamma rays as well as the effect of lead concentration incorporated into Chemically Bonded Phosphate Ceramics (CBPCs) composites are presented. The Wollastonite-based CBPC was fabricated by mixing a patented aqueous phosphoric acid formulation with Wollastonite powder. CBPC has been proved to be good structural material, with excellent thermal resistant properties, and research already showed their potential for radiation shielding applications. Wollastonite-based CBPC is a composite material itself with several crystalline and amorphous phases. Irradiation experiments were conducted on different Wollastonite-based CBPCs with lead oxide. Radiation shielding potential, attenuation coefficients in a broad range of energies pertinent to engineering applications and density experiments showing the effect of the PbO additions (to improve gamma shielding capabilities) are also presented. Microstructure was identified by using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction.

  16. Stabilization of Rocky Flats Pu-contaminated ash within chemically bonded phosphate ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A feasibility study was conducted on the use of chemically bonded phosphate ceramics for stabilization of combustion residue of high transuranic (TRU) wastes. Using a matrix of magnesium potassium phosphate formed by the room-temperature reaction of MgO and KH2PO4 solution, we made waste forms that contained 5 wt% Pu to satisfy the requirements of the waste isolation pilot plant. The waste forms were ceramics whose compression strength was twice that of conventional cement grout and whose connected porosity was ∝50% that of cement grout. Both surrogate and actual waste forms displayed high leaching resistance for both hazardous metals and Pu. Hydrogen generation resulting from the radiolytic decomposition of water and organic compounds present in the waste form did not appear to be a significant issue. Pu was present as PuO2 that was physically microencapsulated in the matrix. In the process, pyrophoricity was removed and leaching resistance was enhanced. The high leaching resistance was due to the very low solubility of PuO2 coupled with superior microencapsulation. As a result, the waste forms satisfied the current safeguard termination limit requirement for storage of TRU combustion residues. (orig.)

  17. Chemical Bonding of Transition-Metal Co13 Clusters with Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Lanza, Tomás; Ayuela, Andrés; Aguilera-Granja, Faustino

    2015-12-01

    We carried out density functional calculations to study the adsorption of Co13 clusters on graphene. Several free isomers were deposited at different positions with respect to the hexagonal lattice nodes, allowing us to study even the hcp 2d isomer, which was recently obtained as the most stable one. Surprisingly, the Co13 clusters attached to graphene prefer icosahedron-like structures in which the low-lying isomer is much distorted; in such structures, they are linked with more bonds than those reported in previous works. For any isomer, the most stable position binds to graphene by the Co atoms that can lose electrons. We find that the charge transfer between graphene and the clusters is small enough to conclude that the Co-graphene binding is not ionic-like but chemical. Besides, the same order of stability among the different isomers on doped graphene is kept. These findings could also be of interest for magnetic clusters on graphenic nanostructures such as ribbons and nanotubes.

  18. Coordination compounds of tetravalent silicon, germanium and tin: the structure, chemical bonding and intermolecular interactions in them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korlyukov, A. A.

    2015-04-01

    The review is devoted to analysis and generalization of the results of (i) quantum chemical studies on the structure, chemical bonding and intermolecular interactions in coordination compounds of tetravalent silicon, germanium and tin in crystals, in solutions and in the gas phase and (ii) experimental investigations of the electron density distribution in these systems. The bibliography includes 147 references. In memoriam of Corresponding Member of the Russian Academy of Sciences M Yu Antipin (1951 - 2013), Academician of the Russian Academy of Sciences M G Voronkov (1921 - 2014) and Dr. S P Knyazev, Lomonosov Moscow University of Fine Chemical Technology (1949 - 2012).

  19. The Influence of Computer-Assisted Instruction on Students' Conceptual Understanding of Chemical Bonding and Attitude toward Chemistry: A Case for Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozmen, Haluk

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the effect of computer-assisted instruction on conceptual understanding of chemical bonding and attitude toward chemistry was investigated. The study employed a quasi-experimental design involving 11 grade students; 25 in an experimental and 25 in a control group. The Chemical Bonding Achievement Test (CBAT) consisting of 15…

  20. Role of the chemical bonding for the time-dependent electron transport through an interacting quantum dot

    KAUST Repository

    Goker, Ali

    2011-06-01

    A combination of ab initio and many-body calculations is utilized to determine the effects of the bonding in Au electrodes on the time dependent current through a quantum dot suddenly shifted into the Kondo regime by a gate voltage. For an asymmetrically coupled system the instantaneous conductance exhibits fluctuations. The frequencies of the fluctuations turn out to be proportional to the energetic separation between the dominating peaks in the density of states and the Fermi level. The chemical bonding in the electrodes, thus, drastically alters the transient current, which can be accessed by ultrafast pump-probe techniques. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Chemical activation of molecules by metals: Experimental studies of electron distributions and bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenberger, D. L.

    1987-12-01

    Results are reported in the following areas: fundamental principles of ionization energy/bond energy relationships; relative strengths of early transition metal M-H and M-C bonds in substituted niobocenes and tantalocenes. Thermodynamic trends and electronic factors of olefin insertion into a metal-hydride bond; additivity of ligand electronic effects. Complete phosphine substitution of Group VI metal hexacarbonyls; organometallic methylene-bridged metal dimers; delocalization of metal electron density in metallacycle formation; metal-heteroatom and metal-alkylidyne multiple bonds; the electronic factors favoring intermediates in acetylene metathesis and polymerization; improvements in an electron energy analyzer.

  2. A Simple Visualization of Double Bond Properties: Chemical Reactivity and UV Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayson, Scott M.

    2012-01-01

    A simple, easily visualized thin-layer chromatography (TLC) staining experiment is presented that highlights the difference in reactivity between aromatic double bonds and nonaromatic double bonds. Although the stability of aromatic systems is a major theme in organic chemistry, the concept is rarely reinforced "visually" in the undergraduate…

  3. Intermolecular atom–atom bonds in crystals – a chemical perspective1

    OpenAIRE

    Thakur, Tejender S.; Ritesh Dubey; Gautam R. Desiraju

    2015-01-01

    Short atom–atom distances between molecules are almost always indicative of specific intermolecular bonding. These distances may be used to assess the significance of all hydrogen bonds, including the C–H⋯O and even weaker C–H⋯F varieties.

  4. Iron-phosphate-based chemically bonded phosphate ceramics for mixed waste stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an effort to develop chemically bonded phosphate ceramics for mixed waste stabilization, a collaborative project to develop iron-phosphate based ceramics has been initiated between Argonne National Laboratory and the V. G. Khlopin Radium Institute in St. Petersburg, Russia. The starter powders are oxides of iron that are generated as inexpensive byproduct materials in the iron and steel industry. They contain iron oxides as a mixture of magnetite (Fe3O4) and haematite (Fe2O3). In this initial phase of this project, both of these compounds were investigated independently. Each was reacted with phosphoric acid solution to form iron phosphate ceramics. In the case of magnetite, the reaction was rapid. Adding ash as the waste component containing hazardous contaminants resulted in a dense and hard ceramic rich in glassy phase. On the other hand, the reaction of phosphoric acid solution with a mixture of haematite and ash waste contaminated with cesium and americium was too slow. Samples had to be molded under pressure. They were cured for 2-3 weeks and then hardened by heating at 350 degrees C for 3 h. The resulting ceramics in both cases were subjected to physical tests for measurement of density, open porosity, compression strength, phase analyses using X-ray diffraction and differential thermal analysis, and leaching tests using toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and ANS 16.1 with 7 days of leaching. Using the preliminary information obtained from these tests, we evaluated these materials for stabilization of Department of Energy's mixed waste streams

  5. Research on the Interaction of Hydrogen-Bond Acidic Polymer Sensitive Sensor Materials with Chemical Warfare Agents Simulants by Inverse Gas Chromatography

    OpenAIRE

    Liu Yang; Qiang Han; Shuya Cao; Feng Huang; Molin Qin; Chenghai Guo; Mingyu Ding

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen-bond acidic polymers are important high affinity materials sensitive to organophosphates in the chemical warfare agent sensor detection process. Interactions between the sensor sensitive materials and chemical warfare agent simulants were studied by inverse gas chromatography. Hydrogen bonded acidic polymers, i.e., BSP3, were prepared for micro-packed columns to examine the interaction. DMMP (a nerve gas simulant) and 2-CEES (a blister agent simulant) were used as probes. Chemical an...

  6. The Load and Time Dependence of Chemical Bonding-Induced Frictional Ageing of Silica at the Nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, K.; Gosvami, N. N.; Goldsby, D. L.; Carpick, R. W.

    2015-12-01

    Rate and state friction (RSF) laws are empirical relationships that describe the frictional behavior of rocks and other materials in experiments, and reproduce a variety of observed natural behavior when employed in earthquake models. A pervasive observation from rock friction experiments is the linear increase of static friction with the log of contact time, or 'ageing'. Ageing is usually attributed to an increase in real area of contact associated with asperity creep. However, recent atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments demonstrate that ageing of nanoscale silica-silica contacts is due to progressive formation of interfacial chemical bonds in the absence of plastic deformation, in a manner consistent with the multi-contact ageing behavior of rocks [Li et al., 2011]. To further investigate chemical bonding-induced ageing, we explored the influence of normal load (and thus contact normal stress) and contact time on ageing. Experiments that mimic slide-hold-slide rock friction experiments were conducted in the AFM for contact loads and hold times ranging from 23 to 393 nN and 0.1 to 100 s, respectively, all in humid air (~50% RH) at room temperature. Experiments were conducted by sequentially sliding the AFM tip on the sample at a velocity V of 0.5 μm/s, setting V to zero and holding the tip stationary for a given time, and finally resuming sliding at 0.5 μm/s to yield a peak value of friction followed by a drop to the sliding friction value. Chemical bonding-induced ageing, as measured by the peak friction minus the sliding friction, increases approximately linearly with the product of normal load and the log of the hold time. Theoretical studies of the roles of reaction energy barriers in nanoscale ageing indicate that frictional ageing depends on the total number of reaction sites and the hold time [Liu & Szlufarska, 2012]. We combine chemical kinetics analyses with contact mechanics models to explain our results, and develop a new approach for curve

  7. Bader’s Theory of Atoms in Molecules (AIM) and its Applications to Chemical Bonding

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P SHYAM VINOD KUMAR; V RAGHAVENDRA; V SUBRAMANIAN

    2016-10-01

    In this perspective article, the basic theory and applications of the “Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules” have been presented with examples from different categories of weak and hydrogen bonded molecular systems.

  8. Chemical-assisted bonding of thermoplastics/elastomer for fabricating microfluidic valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Pan; Liu, Ke; Chen, Hong; Nishida, Toshikazu; Fan, Z Hugh

    2011-01-01

    Thermoplastics such as cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) have been increasingly used in fabricating microfluidic devices. However, the state-of-the-art microvalve technology is a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based three-layer structure. In order to integrate such a valve with a thermoplastics-based microfluidic device, a bonding method for thermoplastics/PDMS must be developed. We report here a method to bond COC with PDMS through surface activation by corona discharge, surface modification using 3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate (TMSPMA), and thermal annealing. The method is also applicable to PMMA. The bonding strength between thermoplastics and PDMS was represented by the peeling force, which was measured using a method established by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). The bonding strength measurement offered an objective and quantitative indicator for protocol optimization, as well as comparison with other PDMS-associated bonding methods. Using optimized bonding conditions, two valve arrays were fabricated in a COC/PDMS/COC device and cyclic operations of valve closing/opening were successfully demonstrated. The valve-containing devices withstood 100 psi (∼689 KPa) without delamination. Further, we integrated such valve arrays in a device for protein separation and demonstrated isoelectric focusing in the presence of valves.

  9. Stabilization of contaminated soil and wastewater with chemically bonded phosphate ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At Argonne National Laboratory, we have developed chemically Bonded phosphate ceramic (CBPC) technology to stabilize the U.S. Department of Energy's problem mixed waste streams, for which no other stabilization technology is suitable. In this technology, solid waste is mixed with MgO and reacted with aqueous solutions of phosphoric acid or acid phosphates at room temperature to form a slurry that sets in ∼2 h into a hard and dense ceramic waste form. Initial studies involved stabilizing the surrogate waste streams and then testing the waste forms for leaching of contaminants. After achieving satisfactory performance of the waste forms, we next incorporated actual waste streams at bench scale and produced waste forms that were then tested with the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). This presentation deals with stabilization of soil contaminated with Cd, Cr, Pb, Ag, Ba, and Hg, and of low-level radioactive wastewater. To enhance the contaminant levels in the soil, we further spiked the soil with additional amounts of Cd, Cr, Pb, and Hg. Both the soil and the wastewater were incorporated in the same waste form by stabilizing them with the CBPC process. The waste forms had a total waste loading of ∼77 wt.% and were dense with an open porosity of 2.7 vol.% and a density of 2.17 g/cm3. Compression strength was 4910 psi. The TCLP results showed excellent immobilization of all the RCRA metals, and radioactive contaminant levels were below the detection limit of 0.2 pCi/mL. Long-term leaching studies using the ANS 16.1 procedure showed that the retention of contaminants is excellent and comparable to or better than most of other stabilization processes. These results demonstrate that the CBPC process is a very superior process for treatment of low level mixed wastes; we therefore conclude that the CBPC process is well suited to the treatment of low-level mixed waste streams with high waste loading

  10. Chemical bonding and magnetic properties of gadolinium (Gd) substituted cobalt ferrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puli, Venkata Sreenivas, E-mail: vspuli@utep.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Adireddy, Shiva [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 (United States); Ramana, C.V. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States)

    2015-09-25

    Graphical abstract: Room temperature Raman spectra of CoFe{sub 2−x}Gd{sub x}O{sub 4} (CFGO, x = 0.0–0.3) compounds as a function of wavenumber (cm{sup −1}). - Highlights: • Gd substituted ferrites were synthesized under controlled concentration. • Gd ion induced lattice dynamical changes are significant. • Enhanced magnetization is observed upon Gd-incorporation in cobalt ferrite. • A correlation between lattice dynamics and magnetic properties is established. - Abstract: Polycrystalline gadolinium (Gd) substituted cobalt ferrites (CoFe{sub 2−x}Gd{sub x}O{sub 4}; x = 0–0.3, referred to CFGO) ceramics have been synthesized by solid state reaction method. Chemical bonding, crystal structure and magnetic properties of CFGO compounds have been evaluated as a function of Gd-content. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopic analyses confirmed the formation of inverse spinel cubic structure. However, a secondary ortho-ferrite phase (GdFeO{sub 3}) nucleates for higher values of Gd-content. A considerable increase in the saturation magnetization has been observed upon the initial substitution of Gd (x = 0.1). The saturation magnetization drastically decreases at higher Gd content (x ⩾ 0.3). No contribution from ortho-ferrite GdFeO{sub 3} phase is noted to the magnetic properties. The increase in the magnetic saturation magnetization is attributed to the higher magnetic moment of Gd{sup 3+} (4f{sup 7}) residing in octahedral sites is higher when compared to that of Fe{sup 3+} (3d{sup 5}) and as well due to the migration of Co{sup 2+} (3d{sup 7}) ions from the octahedral to the tetrahedral sites with a magnetic moment aligned anti-parallel to those of rare earth (RE{sup 3+}) ions in the spinel lattice. Increase in coercivity with increase in Gd{sup 3+} is content is attributed to magnetic anisotropy in the ceramics.

  11. Chemical activation of molecules by metals: Experimental studies of electron distributions and bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This quarter has witnessed further progress both in our experimental methods of photoelectron spectroscopy and in our understanding the fundamental relationships between ionization energies and the chemistry of transition metal species. Progress continues on the new gas phase photoelectron spectrometer that combine improved capabilities for HeI/HeII UPS, XPS, and Auger investigations of organometallic molecules. Several measurements have been accomplished this year that were not possible previously. We have published the formal relationship between measured molecular ionization energies and thermodynamic bond dissociation energies, and applied the relationships to homonuclear and heteronuclear diatomic molecules, multiple bonds, and metal-ligand bonds. Studies of C-H bond activation have continued with examination of different degrees of Si-H bond addition to metals. the electronic effects of intermolecular interactions have been observed by comparing the ionizations of metal complexes in the gas phase with the ionizations of monolayer solid organometallic films prepared in ultra-high vacuum. The orientations of the molecules have been determined by scanning tunneling microscopy. Especially interesting has been the recent application of these techniques to the characterization of the soccer-ball shaped C60 molecule, buckminsterfullerene. Studies of the following complexes are described : Fe, Os, Nb, Mo, Rh, Re, Al, and Mn. 19 refs

  12. Stretched chemical bonds in Si6H6: a transition from ring currents to localized π-electrons?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motivated by solid-state studies on the cleavage force in Si, and the consequent stretching of chemical bonds, we here study bond stretching in the, as yet unsynthesized, free space molecule Si6H6. We address the question as to whether substantial bond stretching (but constrained to uniform scaling on all bonds) can result in a transition from ring current behaviour, characteristic say of benzene at its equilibrium geometry, to localized π-electrons on Si atoms. Some calculations are also recorded on dissociation into 6 SiH radicals. While the main studies have been carried out by unrestricted Hartree-Fock (HF) theory, the influence of electron correlation has been examined using two forms of density functional theory. Planar Si6H6 treated by HF is bound to be unstable, not all vibrational frequencies being real. Some buckling is then allowed, which results in real frequencies and stability. Evidence is then provided that the non-planar structure, as the Si-Si distance is increased, exhibits π-electron localization in the range 1.2-1.5 times the equilibrium distance

  13. Analysis of the number of hydrogen bond groups of a multiwalled carbon nanotube probe tip for chemical force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we describe a statistical method of quantification of the number of functional groups at the contact area of a probe tip for atomic force microscopy from the result of repetitive pull-off force measurements. We have investigated laboratory-made carbon nanotube (CNT) probe tips to apply them for chemical force microscopy because limited number of functional groups at the tip-end is expected. Using a CNT tip, we conducted repetitive pull-off force measurements against a self-assembled monolayer terminated with carboxyl group and analyzed them in terms of the number of hydrogen bond groups at the CNT tip. The elementary hydrogen bond rupture force quantum in n-decane medium was estimated to be 84.2 ± 0.5 pN in the present system. Thus it was revealed that only a couple of hydrogen bond groups of the CNT tip were participating in hydrogen bonding with the sample on an average in this experimental system.

  14. Stretched chemical bonds in Si6H6: A transition from ring currents to localized pi-electrons?

    CERN Document Server

    Grassi, A; Pucci, R; Angilella, G G N; Bartha, F; March, N H

    2004-01-01

    Motivated by solid-state studies on the cleavage force in Si, and the consequent stretching of chemical bonds, we here study bond stretching in the, as yet unsynthesized, free space molecule Si6H6. We address the question as to whether substantial bond stretching (but constrained to uniform scaling on all bonds) can result in a transition from ring current behaviour, characteristic say of benzene at its equilibrium geometry, to localized pi-electrons on Si atoms. Some calculations are also recorded on dissociation into 6 SiH radicals. While the main studies have been carried out by unrestricted Hartree-Fock (HF) theory, the influence of electron correlation has been examined using two forms of density functional theory. Planar Si6H6 treated by HF is bound to be unstable, not all vibrational frequencies being real. Some buckling is then allowed, which results in real frequencies and stability. Evidence is then provided that the non-planar structure, as the Si-Si distance is increased, exhibits pi-electron loca...

  15. A periodic energy decomposition analysis method for the investigation of chemical bonding in extended systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raupach, Marc; Tonner, Ralf

    2015-05-01

    The development and first applications of a new periodic energy decomposition analysis (pEDA) scheme for extended systems based on the Kohn-Sham approach to density functional theory are described. The pEDA decomposes the bonding energy between two fragments (e.g., the adsorption energy of a molecule on a surface) into several well-defined terms: preparation, electrostatic, Pauli repulsion, and orbital relaxation energies. This is complemented by consideration of dispersion interactions via a pairwise scheme. One major extension toward a previous implementation [Philipsen and Baerends, J. Phys. Chem. B 110, 12470 (2006)] lies in the separate discussion of electrostatic and Pauli and the addition of a dispersion term. The pEDA presented here for an implementation based on atomic orbitals can handle restricted and unrestricted fragments for 0D to 3D systems considering periodic boundary conditions with and without the determination of fragment occupations. For the latter case, reciprocal space sampling is enabled. The new method gives comparable results to established schemes for molecular systems and shows good convergence with respect to the basis set (TZ2P), the integration accuracy, and k-space sampling. Four typical bonding scenarios for surface-adsorbate complexes were chosen to highlight the performance of the method representing insulating (CO on MgO(001)), metallic (H2 on M(001), M = Pd, Cu), and semiconducting (CO and C2H2 on Si(001)) substrates. These examples cover diverse substrates as well as bonding scenarios ranging from weakly interacting to covalent (shared electron and donor acceptor) bonding. The results presented lend confidence that the pEDA will be a powerful tool for the analysis of surface-adsorbate bonding in the future, enabling the transfer of concepts like ionic and covalent bonding, donor-acceptor interaction, steric repulsion, and others to extended systems.

  16. A periodic energy decomposition analysis method for the investigation of chemical bonding in extended systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raupach, Marc; Tonner, Ralf, E-mail: tonner@chemie.uni-marburg.de [Fachbereich Chemie, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Hans-Meerwein-Straße, 35032 Marburg (Germany)

    2015-05-21

    The development and first applications of a new periodic energy decomposition analysis (pEDA) scheme for extended systems based on the Kohn-Sham approach to density functional theory are described. The pEDA decomposes the bonding energy between two fragments (e.g., the adsorption energy of a molecule on a surface) into several well-defined terms: preparation, electrostatic, Pauli repulsion, and orbital relaxation energies. This is complemented by consideration of dispersion interactions via a pairwise scheme. One major extension toward a previous implementation [Philipsen and Baerends, J. Phys. Chem. B 110, 12470 (2006)] lies in the separate discussion of electrostatic and Pauli and the addition of a dispersion term. The pEDA presented here for an implementation based on atomic orbitals can handle restricted and unrestricted fragments for 0D to 3D systems considering periodic boundary conditions with and without the determination of fragment occupations. For the latter case, reciprocal space sampling is enabled. The new method gives comparable results to established schemes for molecular systems and shows good convergence with respect to the basis set (TZ2P), the integration accuracy, and k-space sampling. Four typical bonding scenarios for surface-adsorbate complexes were chosen to highlight the performance of the method representing insulating (CO on MgO(001)), metallic (H{sub 2} on M(001), M = Pd, Cu), and semiconducting (CO and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} on Si(001)) substrates. These examples cover diverse substrates as well as bonding scenarios ranging from weakly interacting to covalent (shared electron and donor acceptor) bonding. The results presented lend confidence that the pEDA will be a powerful tool for the analysis of surface-adsorbate bonding in the future, enabling the transfer of concepts like ionic and covalent bonding, donor-acceptor interaction, steric repulsion, and others to extended systems.

  17. The Microstructure and Chemical Bonds of β-C2S Under the High Energy Ball Grinding Function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Using the laser granularity survey technology, X- ray powder diffraction, scanning electron mi croscopy (SEM) and infrared spectrum analysis methods, we studied the microscopic structure and chemical bonds changes of β- C2 S monomineral under the high energy ball grinding function .The result indicates that, continuously under the mechanical power, β-C2 S crystal size would decrease, the micro strain and the effective Beff parameter would increase, and the amorphous phases would be presented. Furthermore, the mechanical power would cause Si- O bond broken and reorganized, the specific surface area would increase, the energy of micro-pow der agglomeration vibration would be enhanced and the crystal would be disordered .Finally, β- C2 S was caused to have the mechanochemical change and the activity enhancement.

  18. Marked influence of the nature of the chemical bond on CP-violating signature in molecular ions HBr+ and HI+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heavy polar molecules offer a great sensitivity to the electron electric dipole moment (EDM). To guide emerging searches for EDMs with molecular ions, we estimate the EDM-induced energy corrections for hydrogen halide ions HBr+ and HI+ in their respective ground X 2Π3/2 states. We find that the energy corrections due to EDM for the two ions differ by an unexpectedly large factor of 15. We demonstrate that a major part of this enhancement is due to a dissimilarity in the nature of the chemical bond for the two ions: the bond that is nearly of ionic character in HBr+ exhibits predominantly a covalent nature in HI+. We conclude that because of this enhancement the HI+ ion may be a potentially competitive candidate for the EDM search

  19. Dispersibility and chemical bonds between multi-walled carbon nanotubes and poly(ether ether ketone) in nanocomposite fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs)/poly(ether ether ketone)(PEEK) nanocomposite fibers were fabricated by mixing, melt extruding PEEK with different loadings and species of MWNTs, and melt-spun the blended chips. Nanocomposite fibers were heat-stretched and heat-treated. The morphology and dispersibility of MWNTs in nanocomposite fibers were observed using a field emission environmental scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The thermal and crystallization behavior of nanocomposite fibers were characterized using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and an X-ray diffractometer (XRD). Mechanical properties were tested using a tensile strength tester. MWNTs tend to aggregate when the loading exceeds 0.8 wt%. Functional groups on MWNTs improve the hydrophobicity and the dispersibility of MWNTs in PEEK matrix. The enhancement of mechanical properties depends on the loading and species of functional groups. The most effectively reinforced effect is in the sequence, carboxylic MWNTs (MWNT–COOH) > hydroxyl MWNTs (MWNT–OH) > MWNTs, which can be explained by the strong hydrogen bonding and the affinity between MWNT–COOH and PEEK, MWNT–OH and PEEK, and possible formation of a chemical bond between MWNT–COOH and PEEK. A nanocomposite fiber with excellent mechanical property was fabricated using 0.8 wt% MWNT–COOH as filler. The Young's modulus is 1.7 GPa; and the stress is 648 MPa. -- Highlights: ► Functional groups on MWNTs improve their hydrophobility and dispersability. ► Mechanical properties depend on the content and species of the functional groups. ► The reinforced effect is in the sequence, carboxylic MWNTs > hydroxyl MWNTs > MWNTs. ► The strength behavior was result of hydrogen bond, affinity and chemical bond. ► Dispersability of MWNTs in matrix was analyzed by calculating solubility parameter.

  20. CHEMICALLY BONDED CEMENTS FROM BOILER ASH AND SLUDGE WASTES. PHASE II REPORT, SEPT.1998-JULY 1999.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SUGAMA,T.YAGER,K.A.BLANKENHORN,D.(KEYSPAN R AND D INITIATIVE)

    1999-08-01

    Based upon the previous Phase I research program aimed at looking for ways of recycling the KeySpan-generated wastes, such as waste water treatment sludge (WWTS) and bottom ash (BA), into the potentially useful cementitious materials called chemically bonded cement (CBC) materials, the emphasis of this Phase II program done at Brookhaven National Laboratory, in a period of September 1998 through July 1999, was directed towards the two major subjects: One was to assess the technical feasibility of WWTS-based CBC material for use as Pb-exchange adsorbent (PEA) which remediates Pb-contaminated soils in the field; and the other was related to the establishment of the optimum-packaging storage system of dry BA-based CBC components that make it a promising matrix material for the steam-cured concrete products containing sand and coarse aggregate. To achieve the goal of the first subject, a small-scale field demonstration test was carried out. Using the PEA material consisting of 30 wt% WWTS, 13 wt% Type I cement and 57 wt% water, the PES slurry was prepared using a rotary shear concrete mixer, and then poured on the Pb-contaminated soil. The PEA-to-soil ratio by weight was a factor of 2.0. The placed PEA slurry was blended with soil using hand mixing tools such as claws and shovels. The wettability of soils with the PEA was very good, thereby facilitating the soil-PEA mix procedures. A very promising result was obtained from this field test; in fact, the mount of Pb leached out from the 25-day-aged PEA-treated soil specimen was only 0.74 mg/l, meeting the requirement for EPA safe regulation of < 5 mg/l. In contrast, a large amount (26.4 mg/l) of Pb was detected from the untreated soil of the same age. Thus, this finding demonstrated that the WWTS-based CBC has a potential for use as PEA material. Regarding the second subject, the dry-packed storage system consisting of 68.7 wt% BA, 13.0 wt% calcium aluminate cement (CAC), 13.0 wt% Type I portland cement and 5.3 wt

  1. The interplay between interface structure, energy level alignment and chemical bonding strength at organic-metal interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willenbockel, M; Lüftner, D; Stadtmüller, B; Koller, G; Kumpf, C; Soubatch, S; Puschnig, P; Ramsey, M G; Tautz, F S

    2015-01-21

    What do energy level alignments at metal-organic interfaces reveal about the metal-molecule bonding strength? Is it permissible to take vertical adsorption heights as indicators of bonding strengths? In this paper we analyse 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic acid dianhydride (PTCDA) on the three canonical low index Ag surfaces to provide exemplary answers to these questions. Specifically, we employ angular resolved photoemission spectroscopy for a systematic study of the energy level alignments of the two uppermost frontier states in ordered monolayer phases of PTCDA. Data are analysed using the orbital tomography approach. This allows the unambiguous identification of the orbital character of these states, and also the discrimination between inequivalent species. Combining this experimental information with DFT calculations and the generic Newns-Anderson chemisorption model, we analyse the alignments of highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals (HOMO and LUMO) with respect to the vacuum levels of bare and molecule-covered surfaces. This reveals clear differences between the two frontier states. In particular, on all surfaces the LUMO is subject to considerable bond stabilization through the interaction between the molecular π-electron system and the metal, as a consequence of which it also becomes occupied. Moreover, we observe a larger bond stabilization for the more open surfaces. Most importantly, our analysis shows that both the orbital binding energies of the LUMO and the overall adsorption heights of the molecule are linked to the strength of the chemical interaction between the molecular π-electron system and the metal, in the sense that stronger bonding leads to shorter adsorption heights and larger orbital binding energies. PMID:25475998

  2. Evolution of the chemical bonding nature and electrode activity of indium selenide upon the composite formation with graphene nanosheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted -- Highlights: • In4Se2.85@graphene nanocomposite is easily prepared by high energy mechanical milling process. • The bond covalency of In4Se2.85 is notably changed upon the composite formation with graphene. • In4Se2.85@graphene nanocomposite shows promising anode performance for lithium ion battery. -- Abstract: Evolution of the chemical bonding nature and electrochemical activity of indium selenide upon the composite formation with carbon species is systematically investigated. Nanocomposites of In4Se2.85@graphene and In4Se2.85@carbon-black are synthesized via a solid state reaction between In and Se elements, and the following high energy mechanical milling of In4Se2.85 with graphene and carbon-black, respectively. The high energy mechanical milling (HEMM) of In4Se2.85 with carbon species gives rise to a decrease of particle size with a significant depression of the crystallinity of In4Se2.85 phase. In contrast to the composite formation with carbon-black, that with graphene induces a notable decrease of (In−Se) bond covalency, underscoring significant chemical interaction between graphene and In4Se2.85. Both the nanocomposites of In4Se2.85@graphene and In4Se2.85@carbon-black show much better anode performance for lithium ion batteries with larger discharge capacity and better cyclability than does the pristine In4Se2.85 material, indicating the beneficial effect of composite formation on the electrochemical activity of indium selenide. Between the present nanocomposites, the electrode performance of the In4Se2.85@graphene nanocomposite is superior to that of the In4Se2.85@carbon-black nanocomposite, which is attributable to the weakening of (In−Se) bonds upon the composite formation with graphene as well as to the better mixing between In4Se2.85 and graphene. The present study clearly demonstrates that the composite formation with graphene has strong influence on the chemical bonds and electrode activity of indium

  3. Dissolution kinetics of tuff rock and mechanism of chemical bond formation at the interface with cement grout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of tuff rock and cement was studied to evaluate the effectiveness of sealing of tuff boreholes with cementitious grouts. Previous studies indicated chemical bond formation between tuff and cement. Dissolution studies were carried out on Topopah Spring member tuff and on tuff with cement. The results indicate the formation of calcium silicate and calcium aluminosilicate hydrates; phase identification is confirmed by XRD studies. The significance of the results obtained and their implications on properties of the interfacial region are included. 7 refs., 6 figs

  4. From Common Sense Concepts to Scientifically Conditioned Concepts of Chemical Bonding: An Historical and Textbook Approach Designed to Address Learning and Teaching Issues at the Secondary School Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, Michael; de Berg, Kevin

    2014-09-01

    This paper selects six key alternative conceptions identified in the literature on student understandings of chemical bonding and illustrates how a historical analysis and a textbook analysis can inform these conceptions and lead to recommendations for improving the teaching and learning of chemical bonding at the secondary school level. The historical analysis and the textbook analysis focus on the concepts of charge, octet, electron pair, ionic, covalent and metallic bonding. Finally, a table of recommendations is made for teacher and student in the light of four fundamental questions and the six alternative conceptions to enhance the quality of the curriculum resources available and the level of student engagement.

  5. Mobility and chemical bond of hydrogen in titanium and palladium hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The probabilities for π- meson capture by hydrogen are measured at 25, 155 and 200 deg C in TiHsub(1.65) hydride and at 25, -120 and -196 deg C in PdHsub(0.67) hydride. An analysis of the results obtained shows that within the accuracy of the measurements (approximately 10%) a sharp (up to 1012) change in the mobility of hydrogen in the hydrides induced by temperature changes within the ranges indicated does not noticeably affect the probabilities for π- meson capture by bound hydrogen, i.e. does not lead to appreciable changes in the Me-H bond. A comparison of the capture probabilities for palladium hydride and hydrides of neighboring transition metals shows that there are no pronounced anomalies in the Pd-H bond

  6. Aluminum germanides of the divalent lanthanoides Eu and Yb. Synthesis, structural chemistry and chemical bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the course of attempts to substitute Ca by Yb and Sr by Eu in known alkaline earth Al-germanides, the four new ternary compounds Eu3Al1.8Ge2.2, Eu3Al2Ge4, Yb2AlGe3, and Yb17Al8Ge19 have been synthesized from mixtures of the elements and their crystal structures determined by means of single-crystal X-ray data. The two europium compounds Eu3Al1.8Ge2.2 (Ta3B4 structure type, orthorhombic, space group Immm, a = 417.68(3), b = 470.70(3), c = 1897.2(2) pm, Z = 2, R1 = 0.0439) and Eu3Al2Ge4 (Sr3Al2Ge4 structure type, monoclinic, space group C2/m, a = 1235.9(6), b = 416.8(2), c = 878.4(4) pm, β = 110.615(13) , Z = 2, R1 = 0.0978) are isotypic with the corresponding strontium phases. After ionic decomposition, the layers [Al-2Ge-4]6- in Eu3Al2Ge4 with four-bonded Al and three-bonded Ge atoms can be interpreted as electron-precise Zintl anions. In contrast, the planar ribbons 1∞[Al2/2Ge2Al2/2] of condensed six-membered rings in Eu3Al1.8Ge2.2 exhibit considerably shorter Al-Ge bonds and an Al-Al bond length of only 251 pm. Yb2AlGe3 (orthorhombic, space group Pnma, a = 682.20(10), b = 417.87(9), c = 1813.9(3) pm, Z = 4, R1 = 0.0415) crystallizes with the Y2AlGe3 structure type. Folded [Al2Ge2] ladders, also found in Eu3Al2Ge4 and the known compound Yb7Al5Ge8, are connected by planar cis/trans chains of Ge atoms. The total density of states calculated within the FP-LAPW DFT band structure approach shows a distinct minimum at the Fermi level for the electron precise Zintl compound Eu3Al2Ge4, whereas π-bonding contributions are evident from the band structures of Eu3Al2Ge2 and Yb2AlGe3. In full accordance, the tDOS of both compounds exhibits no minimum at EF, small phase widths are possible for Eu3Al2Ge2 and related alkaline earth compounds, and Yb2AlGe3 is isotypic with several other more electron-rich LnIII compounds. The complicated structure of the new compound Yb17Al8Ge19 (tetragonal, space group P4/nmm, a = 1542.50(2), c = 788.285(8) pm, Z = 2, R1 = 0.0282) contains

  7. Electronic structure and the properties of solids the physics of the chemical bond

    CERN Document Server

    Harrison, Walter A

    1980-01-01

    "Should be widely read by practicing physicists, chemists and materials scientists." - Philosophical Magazine In this comprehensive and innovative text, Professor Harrison (Stanford University) offers a basic understanding of the electronic structure of covalent and ionic solids, simple metals, transition metals, and their compounds. The book illuminates the relationships of the electronic structures of these materials and shows how to calculate dielectric, conducting, and bonding properties for each.

  8. Controllable synthesis of silver and silver sulfide nanocrystals via selective cleavage of chemical bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A one-step colloidal process has been adopted to prepare silver (Ag) and silver sulfide (Ag2S) nanocrystals, thus avoiding presynthesis of an organometallic precursor and the injection of a toxic phosphine agent. During the reaction, a layered intermediate compound is first formed, which then acts as a precursor, decomposing into the nanocrystals. The composition of the as-obtained products can be controlled by selective cleavage of S–C bonds or Ag–S bonds. Pure Ag2S nanocrystals can be obtained by directly heating silver acetate (Ag(OAc)) and n-dodecanethiol (DDT) at 200 ° C without any surfactant, and pure Ag nanocrystals can be synthesized successfully if the reaction temperature is reduced to 190 ° C and the amount of DDT is decreased to 1 ml in the presence of a non-coordinating organic solvent (1-octadecene, ODE). Otherwise, the mixture of Ag and Ag2S is obtained by directly heating Ag(OAc) in DDT by increasing the reaction temperature or in a mixture of DDT and ODE at 200 ° C. The formation mechanism has been discussed in detail in terms of selective S–C and Ag–S bond dissociation due to the nucleophilic attack of DDT and the lower bonding energy of Ag–S. Interestingly, some products can easily self-assemble into two- or three-dimensional (2D or 3D) highly ordered superlattice structures on a copper grid without any additional steps. The excess DDT plays a key role in the superlattice structure due to the bundling and interdigitation of the thiolate molecules adsorbed on the as-obtained nanocrystals. (paper)

  9. Effect of applied dc bias voltage on composition, chemical bonding and mechanical properties of carbon nitride films prepared by PECVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hong-xuan; XU Tao; HAO Jun-ying; CHEN Jian-min; ZHOU Hui-di; XUE Qun-ji; LIU Hui-wen

    2004-01-01

    Carbon nitride films were deposited on Si (100) substrates using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) technique from CH4 and N2 at different applied dc bias voltage. The microstructure, composition and chemical bonding of the resulting films were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The mechanical properties such as hardness and elastic modulus of the films were evaluated using nano-indentation. As the results, the Raman spectra, showing the G and D bands, indicate the amorphous structure of the films. XPS and FTIR measurements demonstrate the existence of various carbon-nitride bonds in the films and the hydrogenation of carbon nitride phase. The composition ratio of N to C, the nano-hardness and the elastic modulus of the carbon nitride films increase with increasing dc bias voltage and reach the maximums at a dc bias voltage of 300 V, then they decrease with further increase of the dc bias voltage. Moreover, the XRD analyses indicate that the carbon nitride film contains some polycrystalline C3N4 phase embedded in the amorphous matrix at optimized deposition condition of dc bias voltage of 300 V.

  10. Anisotropy of chemical bonding in semifluorinated graphite C2F revealed with angle-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okotrub, Alexander V; Yudanov, Nikolay F; Asanov, Igor P; Vyalikh, Denis V; Bulusheva, Lyubov G

    2013-01-22

    Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite characterized by a low misorientation of crystallites is fluorinated using a gaseous mixture of BrF(3) with Br(2) at room temperature. The golden-colored product, easily delaminating into micrometer-size transparent flakes, is an intercalation compound where Br(2) molecules are hosted between fluorinated graphene layers of approximate C(2)F composition. To unravel the chemical bonding in semifluorinated graphite, we apply angle-resolved near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy and quantum-chemical modeling. The strong angular dependence of the CK and FK edge NEXAFS spectra on the incident radiation indicates that room-temperature-produced graphite fluoride is a highly anisotropic material, where half of the carbon atoms are covalently bonded with fluorine, while the rest of the carbon atoms preserve π electrons. Comparison of the experimental CK edge spectrum with theoretical spectra plotted for C(2)F models reveals that fluorine atoms are more likely to form chains. This conclusion agrees with the atomic force microscopy observation of a chain-like pattern on the surface of graphite fluoride layers. PMID:23214423

  11. A simple and surprisingly accurate approach to the chemical bond obtained from dimensional scaling

    CERN Document Server

    Svidzinsky, A A; Scully, M O

    2005-01-01

    We present a new dimensional scaling transformation of the Schrodinger equation for the two electron bond. This yields, for the first time, a good description of the two electron bond via D-scaling. There also emerges, in the large-D limit, an intuitively appealing semiclassical picture, akin to a molecular model proposed by Niels Bohr in 1913. In this limit, the electrons are confined to specific orbits in the scaled space, yet the uncertainty principle is maintained because the scaling leaves invariant the position-momentum commutator. A first-order perturbation correction, proportional to 1/D, substantially improves the agreement with the exact ground state potential energy curve. The present treatment is very simple mathematically, yet provides a strikingly accurate description of the potential energy curves for the lowest singlet, triplet and excited states of H_2. We find the modified D-scaling method also gives good results for other molecules. It can be combined advantageously with Hartree-Fock and ot...

  12. Carbene→N⁺ Coordination Bonds in Drugs: A Quantum Chemical Study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    DEEPIKA KATHURIA; MINHAJUL ARFEEN; APOORVA A BANKAR; PRASAD V BHARATAM

    2016-10-01

    Coordination chemistry of bonds between main group elements and electron donating ligands as in L→E (where E is electron acceptor centre like C⁰, Si⁰, N¹, P¹, As¹, B¹ and L is an electron donating N-heterocyclic carbene) have been recently gaining attention. Many important drugs have nitrogen atom as an electron acceptor center and can be represented by two general formulae:(L→N←L)⊕ and L→N-R. Divalent N¹ compounds possess two lone pairs at central nitrogen and low nucleophilicity associated with them are found to be of importance. In this article, electronic structure analysis of drug molecules like picloxydine, chlorhexidine, and moroxydine were performed at B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. Evaluation of electron localization function (ELF), molecular orbitals, charge density, nucleophilicity, proton affinity and complexation energy estimation confirm the presence of coordination bonds (L→N←L)⊕ in the above mentioned drug molecules in their cationic state. Further, electronic structure analysis of drugs like clonidine, apraclonidine, brimonidine and xylazine indicated the presence of electronic structure similar to L→N-R systems.

  13. Research on the Interaction of Hydrogen-Bond Acidic Polymer Sensitive Sensor Materials with Chemical Warfare Agents Simulants by Inverse Gas Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen-bond acidic polymers are important high affinity materials sensitive to organophosphates in the chemical warfare agent sensor detection process. Interactions between the sensor sensitive materials and chemical warfare agent simulants were studied by inverse gas chromatography. Hydrogen bonded acidic polymers, i.e., BSP3, were prepared for micro-packed columns to examine the interaction. DMMP (a nerve gas simulant and 2-CEES (a blister agent simulant were used as probes. Chemical and physical parameters such as heats of absorption and Henry constants of the polymers to DMMP and 2-CEES were determined by inverse gas chromatography. Details concerning absorption performance are also discussed in this paper.

  14. Evaluation of aziridine bonding agent by means of chemical and instrumental techniques of analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darci Cortes Pires

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method using wet chemistry and instrumental analysis has been developed for evaluating the ring-opening of aziridine tris [1-(2 methyl aziridinyl] phosphide oxide (MAPO of the bonding agent used in composite propellant. A reduction was observed in the intensity absorption bands in 1400 and 1040 cm-1, characteristic of aziridinic ring. It was also observed, in some cases, that when the number of open aziridinyl ring increases, the NH band in the range 3400-3300 cm-1, that appears with ring-opening, is located in the region of lower wave numbers. The study of the synthesis of MAPO derivative indicated side reactions such as homopolymerization of rings and also, with secondary hydroxyl of the 12-hydroxy stearic acid and probable humidity existent in the original sample.

  15. Composite biomaterials with chemical bonding between hydroxyapatite filler particles and PEG/PBT copolymer matrix

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Qing; Wijn, de Joost R.; Blitterswijk, van Clemens A.

    1998-01-01

    In an effort to make composites from hydroxyapatite and a PEG/PBT copolymer (PolyactiveTM 70/30), chemical linkages were introduced between the filler particles and polymer matrix using hexamethylene diisocyanate as a coupling agent. Infrared spectra (IR) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) confi

  16. Finite Size Effects in Chemical Bonding: From Small Clusters to Solids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleis, Jesper; Greeley, Jeffrey Philip; Romero, N. A.;

    2011-01-01

    We address the fundamental question of which size a metallic nano-particle needs to have before its surface chemical properties can be considered to be those of a solid, rather than those of a large molecule. Calculations of adsorption energies for carbon monoxide and oxygen on a series of gold...

  17. Effects of Jigsaw Cooperative Learning and Animation Techniques on Students' Understanding of Chemical Bonding and Their Conceptions of the Particulate Nature of Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karacop, Ataman; Doymus, Kemal

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of jigsaw cooperative learning and computer animation techniques on academic achievements of first year university students attending classes in which the unit of chemical bonding is taught within the general chemistry course and these students' learning of the particulate nature of matter of this unit. The sample of this study consisted of 115 first-year science education students who attended the classes in which the unit of chemical bonding was taught in a university faculty of education during the 2009-2010 academic year. The data collection instruments used were the Test of Scientific Reasoning, the Purdue Spatial Visualization Test: Rotations, the Chemical Bonding Academic Achievement Test, and the Particulate Nature of Matter Test in Chemical Bonding (CbPNMT). The study was carried out in three different groups. One of the groups was randomly assigned to the jigsaw group, the second was assigned to the animation group (AG), and the third was assigned to the control group, in which the traditional teaching method was applied. The data obtained with the instruments were evaluated using descriptive statistics, one-way ANOVA, and MANCOVA. The results indicate that the teaching of chemical bonding via the animation and jigsaw techniques was more effective than the traditional teaching method in increasing academic achievement. In addition, according to findings from the CbPNMT, the students from the AG were more successful in terms of correct understanding of the particulate nature of matter.

  18. The effect of working pressure on the chemical bond structure and hydrophobic properties of PET surface treated by N ion beams bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) surface was bombarded by N ion beams at room temperature. Varying the working pressure of the ion beams, PET surfaces with different composition and properties were obtained. Characterization by X-ray photoelectron spectrometry showed that only on film surface, ester bonds, especially C-O bonds, were broken and N element chemical bonded with C. The influence depth was less than 5 nm because of the lower ion energy (about 103 eV). Contact angle results revealed that with increasing the working pressure of ion beams, the contact angle of PET surface to pure water increased from 51 deg. to 130 deg.. With these results, one conclusion could be deduced that the hydrophilic and hydrophobic properties of PET surface could be influenced by N atom chemical bond with C, which in turn is controlled by the working pressure of N ion beams.

  19. Chemical bonding modifications of tetrahedral amorphous carbon and nitrogenated tetrahedral amorphous carbon films induced by rapid thermal annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCann, R. [NIBEC, School of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, University of Ulster at Jordanstown, Newtownabbey, Co. Antrim, BT37 OQB, N. Ireland (United Kingdom); Roy, S.S. [NIBEC, School of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, University of Ulster at Jordanstown, Newtownabbey, Co. Antrim, BT37 OQB, N. Ireland (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: s.sinha-roy@ulster.ac.uk; Papakonstantinou, P. [NIBEC, School of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, University of Ulster at Jordanstown, Newtownabbey, Co. Antrim, BT37 OQB, N. Ireland (United Kingdom); Bain, M.F. [Queens University of Belfast, School of Elect and Elect Engineering, Belfast, Antrim, N. Ireland (United Kingdom); Gamble, H.S. [Queens University of Belfast, School of Elect and Elect Engineering, Belfast, Antrim, N. Ireland (United Kingdom); McLaughlin, J.A. [NIBEC, School of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, University of Ulster at Jordanstown, Newtownabbey, Co. Antrim, BT37 OQB, N. Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2005-06-22

    Tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) and nitrogenated tetrahedral amorphous carbon films (ta-CN {sub x}), deposited by double bend off plane Filtered Vacuum Cathodic Arc were annealed up to 1000 deg. C in flowing argon for 2 min. Modifications on the chemical bonding structure of the rapidly annealed films, as a function of temperature, were investigated by NEXAFS, X-ray photoelectron and Raman spectroscopies. The interpretation of these spectra is discussed. The results demonstrate that the structure of undoped ta-C films prepared at floating potential with an arc current of 80 A remains stable up to 900 deg. C, whereas that of ta-CN {sub x} containing 12 at.% nitrogen is stable up to 700 deg. C. At higher temperatures, all the spectra indicated the predominant formation of graphitic carbon. Through NEXAFS studies, we clearly observed three {pi}* resonance peaks at the {sup '}N K edge structure. The origin of these three peaks is not well established in the literature. However our temperature-dependant study ascertained that the first peak originates from C=N bonds and the third peak originates from the incorporation of nitrogen into the graphite like domains.

  20. Line-imaging velocimetry for observing spatially heterogeneous mechanical and chemical responses in plastic bonded explosives during impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolme, C A; Ramos, K J

    2013-08-01

    A line-imaging velocity interferometer was implemented on a single-stage light gas gun to probe the spatial heterogeneity of mechanical response, chemical reaction, and initiation of detonation in explosives. The instrument is described in detail, and then data are presented on several shock-compressed materials to demonstrate the instrument performance on both homogeneous and heterogeneous samples. The noise floor of this diagnostic was determined to be 0.24 rad with a shot on elastically compressed sapphire. The diagnostic was then applied to two heterogeneous plastic bonded explosives: 3,3(')-diaminoazoxyfurazan (DAAF) and PBX 9501, where significant spatial velocity heterogeneity was observed during the build up to detonation. In PBX 9501, the velocity heterogeneity was consistent with the explosive grain size, however in DAAF, we observed heterogeneity on a much larger length scale than the grain size that was similar to the imaging resolution of the instrument. PMID:24007075

  1. Evidence for excited-state intramolecular proton transfer in 4-chlorosalicylic acid from combined experimental and computational studies: Quantum chemical treatment of the intramolecular hydrogen bonding interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Bijan Kumar [Department of Chemistry, University of Calcutta, 92 Acharya Prafulla Chandra Road, Calcutta 700009 (India); Guchhait, Nikhil, E-mail: nikhil.guchhait@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, University of Calcutta, 92 Acharya Prafulla Chandra Road, Calcutta 700009 (India)

    2012-07-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Experimental and computational studies on the photophysics of 4-chlorosalicylic acid. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spectroscopically established ESIPT reaction substantiated by theoretical calculation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantum chemical treatment of IMHB unveils strength, nature and directional nature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Superiority of quantum chemical treatment of H-bond over geometric criteria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Role of H-bond as a modulator of aromaticity. -- Abstract: The photophysical study of a pharmaceutically important chlorine substituted derivative of salicylic acid viz., 4-chlorosalicylic acid (4ClSA) has been carried out by steady-state absorption, emission and time-resolved emission spectroscopy. A large Stokes shifted emission band with negligible solvent polarity dependence marks the spectroscopic signature of excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) reaction in 4ClSA. Theoretical calculation by ab initio and Density Functional Theory methods yields results consistent with experimental findings. Theoretical potential energy surfaces predict the occurrence of proton transfer in S{sub 1}-state. Geometrical and energetic criteria, Atoms-In-Molecule topological parameters, Natural Bond Orbital population analysis have been exploited to evaluate the intramolecular hydrogen bond (IMHB) interaction and to explore its directional nature. The inter-correlation between aromaticity and resonance assisted H-bond is also discussed in this context. Our results unveil that the quantum chemical treatment is a more accurate tool to assess hydrogen bonding interaction in comparison to geometrical criteria.

  2. FONO: a difficult case for theory. The ELF and ELI-D topological studies on the chemical bonding using correlated wavefunctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berski, Slawomir; Gordon, Agnieszka J; Latajka, Zdzislaw

    2013-04-01

    The complicated nature of the chemical bonding in cis and trans isomers of F-O-N=O is discussed based on the results obtained from the topological analysis of electron localization function (η) (ELF), electron localizability index (Y(D)(σ)), and electron density (ρ). The calculations have been performed for correlated wavefunctions using the CCSD and CASSCF methods. The F-O1 bond with non-bonding basins, V(F) and V(')(O1), belongs to the protocovalent type (η,Y(D)(σ)) and its total population ranges between 0.2 and 0.4e. The central N-O1 bond in the cis form is protocovalent (η, Y(D)(σ)) with two basins, V(N) and V(O1). The total population oscillates between 0.7 and 0.9e. In the trans isomer, topology of ELF depends on used method. At the CCSD level only one non-bonding basin, V(N), is observed (η). Its population is about 0.5e. According to the definition of a heteronuclear charge-shift (CS) bond, only N-O1 bond in trans-FONO belongs to the CS class. A relation between η- and ρ-topology and N-O1 bond length is discussed.

  3. Research Update: Mechanical properties of metal-organic frameworks – Influence of structure and chemical bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs, a young family of functional materials, have been attracting considerable attention from the chemistry, materials science, and physics communities. In the light of their potential applications in industry and technology, the fundamental mechanical properties of MOFs, which are of critical importance for manufacturing, processing, and performance, need to be addressed and understood. It has been widely accepted that the framework topology, which describes the overall connectivity pattern of the MOF building units, is of vital importance for the mechanical properties. However, recent advances in the area of MOF mechanics reveal that chemistry plays a major role as well. From the viewpoint of materials science, a deep understanding of the influence of chemical effects on MOF mechanics is not only highly desirable for the development of novel functional materials with targeted mechanical response, but also for a better understanding of important properties such as structural flexibility and framework breathing. The present work discusses the intrinsic connection between chemical effects and the mechanical behavior of MOFs through a number of prototypical examples.

  4. Chemical Bonding of AlH3 Hydride by Al-L2,3 Electron Energy-Loss Spectra and First-Principles Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazutaka Ikeda

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In a previous study, we used transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss (EEL spectroscopy to investigate dehydrogenation of AlH3 particles. In the present study, we systematically examine differences in the chemical bonding states of Al-containing compounds (including AlH3 by comparing their Al-L2,3 EEL spectra. The spectral chemical shift and the fine peak structure of the spectra were consistent with the degree of covalent bonding of Al. This finding will be useful for future nanoscale analysis of AlH3 dehydrogenation toward the cell.

  5. Chemical Distribution and Bonding of Lithium in Intercalated Graphite: Identification with Optimized Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Y.; Wang, F.; Graetz, J.; Moreno, M.S.; Ma, C.; Wu, L.; Volkov, V.

    2011-02-01

    Direct mapping of the lithium spatial distribution and the chemical state provides critical information on structure-correlated lithium transport in electrode materials for lithium batteries. Nevertheless, probing lithium, the lightest solid element in the periodic table, poses an extreme challenge with traditional X-ray or electron scattering techniques due to its weak scattering power and vulnerability to radiation damage. Here, we report nanoscale maps of the lithium spatial distribution in electrochemically lithiated graphite using electron energy loss spectroscopy in the transmission electron microscope under optimized experimental conditions. The electronic structure of the discharged graphite was obtained from the near-edge fine structure of the Li and C K-edges and ab initio calculations. A 2.7 eV chemical shift of the Li K-edge, along with changes in the density of states, reveals the ionic nature of the intercalated lithium with significant charge transfer to the graphene sheets. Direct mapping of lithium in graphite revealed nanoscale inhomogeneities (nonstoichiometric regions), which are correlated with local phase separation and structural disorder (i.e., lattice distortion and dislocations) as observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The surface solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer was also imaged and determined to have a thickness of 10-50 nm, covering both edge and basal planes with LiF as its primary inorganic component. The Li K-edge spectroscopy and mapping, combined with electron microscopy-based structural analysis provide a comprehensive view of the structure-correlated lithium intercalation in graphite and of the formation of the SEI layer.

  6. Chemical Distribution and Bonding of Lithium in Intercalated Graphite: Identification with Optimized Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Feng [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Graetz, Jason [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Moreno, M. Sergio [Centro Atomico Bariloche (Argentina); Ma, Chao [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wu, Lijun [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Volkov, Vyacheslav [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zhu, Yimei [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2011-01-10

    Direct mapping of the lithium spatial distribution and the chemical state provides critical information on structure-correlated lithium transport in electrode materials for lithium batteries. Nevertheless, probing lithium, the lightest solid element in the periodic table, poses an extreme challenge with traditional X-ray or electron scattering techniques due to its weak scattering power and vulnerability to radiation damage. Here, we report nanoscale maps of the lithium spatial distribution in electrochemically lithiated graphite using electron energy loss spectroscopy in the transmission electron microscope under optimized experimental conditions. The electronic structure of the discharged graphite was obtained from the near-edge fine structure of the Li and C K-edges and ab initio calculations. A 2.7 eV chemical shift of the Li K-edge, along with changes in the density of states, reveals the ionic nature of the intercalated lithium with significant charge transfer to the graphene sheets. Direct mapping of lithium in graphite revealed nanoscale inhomogeneities (nonstoichiometric regions), which are correlated with local phase separation and structural disorder (i.e., lattice distortion and dislocations) as observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The surface solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer was also imaged and determined to have a thickness of 10-50 nm, covering both edge and basal planes with LiF as its primary inorganic component. The Li K-edge spectroscopy and mapping, combined with electron microscopy-based structural analysis provide a comprehensive view of the structure-correlated lithium intercalation in graphite and of the formation of the SEI layer.

  7. Correlation between topological band character and chemical bonding in a Bi14Rh3I9-based family of insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasche, Bertold; Isaeva, Anna; Ruck, Michael; Koepernik, Klaus; Richter, Manuel; van den Brink, Jeroen

    2016-02-01

    Recently the presence of topologically protected edge-states in Bi14Rh3I9 was confirmed by scanning tunnelling microscopy consolidating this compound as a weak 3D topological insulator (TI). Here, we present a density-functional-theory-based study on a family of TIs derived from the Bi14Rh3I9 parent structure via substitution of Ru, Pd, Os, Ir and Pt for Rh. Comparative analysis of the band-structures throughout the entire series is done by means of a unified minimalistic tight-binding model that evinces strong similarity between the quantum-spin-Hall (QSH) layer in Bi14Rh3I9 and graphene in terms of -molecular orbitals. Topologically non-trivial energy gaps are found for the Ir-, Rh-, Pt- and Pd-based systems, whereas the Os- and Ru-systems remain trivial. Furthermore, the energy position of the metal -band centre is identified as the parameter which governs the evolution of the topological character of the band structure through the whole family of TIs. The -band position is shown to correlate with the chemical bonding within the QSH layers, thus revealing how the chemical nature of the constituents affects the topological band character.

  8. Bond-length analysis of the omega structure in Ti,Zr,Hf and their alloys: experimental data, new correlations and implications for chemical bonding models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grad, G.B.; Benites, G.M. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina). Centro Atomico Bariloche; Aurelio, G. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad del Comahue, 8300, Neuquen (Argentina); Fernandez Guillermet, A. [Centro Atomico Bariloche, 8400, San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina)

    1999-12-15

    An analysis is performed of the experimental information on the key interatomic distances (IDs) of the AlB{sub 2} type structure, the so-called omega ({omega}) phase in Ti and Zr, as well as in Ti-V and Zr-Nb alloys. Various remarkable correlations are found between these IDs and standard measures of the atomic size, and with Pauling's bond-lengths. These observations are discussed in the light of the phenomenological bonding pictures of the {omega} structure, and with our recent ab initio calculations of the electronic structure of this phase. (orig.)

  9. On the structure and chemical bonding of Si62- and Si62- in NaSi6- upon Na+ coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubarev, Dmitry Yu.; Alexandrova, Anastassia N.; Boldyrev, Alexander I.; Cui, Li-Feng; Li, Xi; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2006-03-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy was combined with ab initio calculations to elucidate the structure and bonding in Si62- and NaSi6-. Well-resolved electronic transitions were observed in the photoelectron spectra of Si6- and NaSi6- at three photon energies (355, 266, and 193nm). The spectra of NaSi6- were observed to be similar to those of Si6- except that the electron binding energies of the former are lower, suggesting that the Si6 motif in NaSi6- is structurally and electronically similar to that in Si6-. The electron affinities of Si6 and NaSi6 were measured fairly accurately to be 2.23±0.03eV and 1.80±0.05eV, respectively. Global minimum structure searches for Si62- and NaSi6- were performed using gradient embedded genetic algorithm followed by B3LYP, MP2, and CCSD(T) calculations. Vertical electron detachment energies were calculated for the lowest Si6- and NaSi6- structures at the CCSD(T)/6-311+G(2df ), ROVGF/6-311+G(2df), UOVGF/6-311+G(2d), and time-dependent B3LYP/6-311+G(2df) levels of theory. Experimental vertical detachment energies were used to verify the global minimum structure for NaSi6-. Though the octahedral Si62-, analogous to the closo form of borane B6H62-, is the most stable form for the bare hexasilicon dianion, it is not the kernel for the NaSi6- global minimum. The most stable isomer of NaSi6- is based on a Si62- motif, which is distorted into C2v symmetry similar to the ground state structure of Si6-. The octahedral Si62- coordinated by a Na+ is a low-lying isomer and was also observed experimentally. The chemical bonding in Si62- and NaSi6- was understood using natural bond orbital, molecular orbital, and electron localization function analyses.

  10. The Effects of Reasoning, Use of Models, Sex Type, and Their Interactions on Posttest Achievement in Chemical Bonding after Constant Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staver, John R.; Halsted, Douglas A.

    1985-01-01

    Determined the effects of reasoning, use of models during testing, and sex type on posttest achievement in chemical bonding under controlled instruction. Indicates that chemistry students' (N=84) reasoning capabilities influenced performance; other variables were not significant. Other conclusions are noted and discussed. (DH)

  11. Effects of Jigsaw Cooperative Learning and Animation Techniques on Students' Understanding of Chemical Bonding and Their Conceptions of the Particulate Nature of Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karacop, Ataman; Doymus, Kemal

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of jigsaw cooperative learning and computer animation techniques on academic achievements of first year university students attending classes in which the unit of chemical bonding is taught within the general chemistry course and these students' learning of the particulate nature of matter of this…

  12. Survival of bonded lingual retainers with chemical or photo polymerization over a 2-year period: a single-center, randomized controlled clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pandis, N.; Fleming, P.S.; Kloukos, D.; Polychronopoulou, A.; Katsaros, C.; Eliades, T.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The objective of this trial was to compare the survival rates of mandibular lingual retainers bonded with either chemically cured or light-cured adhesive after orthodontic treatment. METHODS: Patients having undergone orthodontic treatment at a private orthodontic office were randomly

  13. Effects of lithium doping on microstructure, electrical properties, and chemical bonds of sol-gel derived NKN thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chun-Cheng [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Department of Mathematic and Physical Sciences, R.O.C. Air Force Academy, Kaohsiung 820, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chan-Ching; Weng, Chung-Ming [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Chu, Sheng-Yuan, E-mail: chusy@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Hong, Cheng-Shong [Department of Electronic Engineering, National Kaohsiung Normal University, Kaohsiung 802, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Cheng-Che [Department of Digital Game and Animation Design, Tung-Fang Design University, Kaohsiung 829, Taiwan (China)

    2015-02-28

    Highly (100/110) oriented lead-free Li{sub x}(Na{sub 0.5}K{sub 0.5}){sub 1−x}NbO{sub 3} (LNKN, x = 0, 0.02, 0.04, and 0.06) thin films are fabricated on Pt/Ti/SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates via a sol-gel processing method. The lithium (Li) dopants modify the microstructure and chemical bonds of the LNKN films, and therefore improve their electrical properties. The optimal values of the remnant polarization (P{sub r} = 14.3 μC/cm{sup 2}), piezoelectric coefficient (d{sub 33} = 48.1 pm/V), and leakage current (<10{sup −5} A/cm{sup 2}) are obtained for a lithium addition of x = 0.04 (i.e., 4 at. %). The observation results suggest that the superior electrical properties are the result of an improved crystallization, a larger grain size, and a smoother surface morphology. It is shown that the ion transport mechanism is dominated by an Ohmic behavior under low electric fields and the Poole-Frenkel emission effect under high electric fields.

  14. Structural,Electronic Properties and Chemical Bonding of Borate Li4CaB2O6 under High Pressure:an Ab Initio Investigation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hong; TANG Jin; CHENG Xin-Lu

    2008-01-01

    We calculate structural,electromc properties and chemical bonding of borate Li4CaB2O6 under high pressure by means of the local density-functional pseudopotential approach.The equilibrium lattice constants,density of states,Mulliken population,bond lengths,bond angles as well as the pressure dependence of the band gap are presented.Analysis of the simulated high pressure band structure suggests that borate Li4CaB2O6 can be used as the semi-conductor optical material.Based on the Mulliken population analysis,it is found that the electron transfer of the Li atom is very different from that of other atoms in the studied range of high pressures.The charge populations of the Li atom decrease with the pressure up to 60GPa,then increase with the pressure.

  15. The Nature of the Chemical Bond in Linear Three-Body Systems: From I3– to Mixed Chalcogen/Halogen and Trichalcogen Moieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Carla Aragoni

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The 3 centre-4 electrons (3c-4e and the donor/acceptor or charge-transfer models for the description of the chemical bond in linear three-body systems, such as I3– and related electron-rich (22 shell electrons systems, are comparatively discussed on the grounds of structural data from a search of the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD. Both models account for a total bond order of 1 in these systems, and while the former fits better symmetric systems, the latter describes better strongly asymmetric situations. The 3c-4e MO scheme shows that any linear system formed by three aligned closed-shell species (24 shell electrons overall has reason to exist provided that two electrons are removed from it to afford a 22 shell electrons three-body system: all combinations of three closed-shell halides and/or chalcogenides are considered here. A survey of the literature shows that most of these three-body systems exist. With some exceptions, their structural features vary continuously from the symmetric situation showing two equal bonds to very asymmetric situations in which one bond approaches to the value corresponding to a single bond and the second one to the sum of the van der Waals radii of the involved atoms. This indicates that the potential energy surface of these three-body systems is fairly flat, and that the chemical surrounding of the chalcogen/halogen atoms can play an important role in freezing different structural situations; this is well documented for the I3– anion. The existence of correlations between the two bond distances and more importantly the linearity observed for all these systems, independently on the degree of their asymmetry, support the state of hypervalency of the central atom.

  16. Solvent-free thermoplastic-poly(dimethylsiloxane) bonding mediated by UV irradiation followed by gas-phase chemical deposition of an adhesion linker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, S. Y.; Lee, N. Y.

    2015-07-01

    Here, we introduce a solvent-free strategy for bonding various thermoplastic substrates with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) using ultraviolet (UV) irradiation followed by the gas-phase chemical deposition of aminosilane on the UV-irradiated thermoplastic substrates. The thermoplastic substrates were first irradiated with UV for surface hydrophilic treatment and were then grafted with vacuum-evaporated aminosilane, where the alkoxysilane side reacted with the oxidized surface of the thermoplastic substrate. Next, the amine-terminated thermoplastic substrates were treated with corona discharge to oxidize the surface and were bonded with PDMS, which was also oxidized via corona discharge. The two substrates were then hermetically sealed and pressed under atmospheric pressure for 30 min at 60 °C. This process enabled the formation of a robust siloxane bond (Si-O-Si) between the thermoplastic substrate and PDMS under relatively mild conditions using an inexpensive and commercially available UV lamp and Tesla coil. Various thermoplastic substrates were examined for bonding with PDMS, including poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA), polycarbonate (PC), poly(ethyleneterephthalate) (PET) and polystyrene (PS). Surface characterizations were performed by measuring the contact angle and performing x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, and the bond strength was analyzed by conducting various mechanical force measurements such as pull, delamination, leak and burst tests. The average bond strengths for the PMMA-PDMS, PC-PDMS, PET-PDMS and PS-PDMS assemblies were measured at 823.6, 379.3, 291.2 and 229.0 kPa, respectively, confirming the highly reliable performance of the introduced bonding strategy.

  17. Tensile bond strength of silicone-based soft denture liner to two chemically different denture base resins after various surface treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, Hakan; Tugut, Faik; Guney, Umit; Kirmali, Omer; Akar, Turker

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of various surface treatments on the tensile bond strength of a silicone-based soft denture liner to two chemically different denture base resins, heat-cured polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), and light-activated urethane dimethacrylate or Eclipse denture base resin. PMMA test specimens were fabricated and relined with a silicone-based soft denture liner (group AC). Eclipse test specimens were prepared according to the manufacturer's recommendation. Before they were relined with a silicone-based soft denture liner, each received one of three surface treatments: untreated (control, group EC), Eclipse bonding agent applied (group EB), and laser-irradiated (group EL). Tensile bond strength tests (crosshead speed = 5 mm/min) were performed for all specimens, and the results were analyzed using the analysis of variance followed by Tukey's test (p = 0.05). Eclipse denture base and PMMA resins presented similar bond strengths to the silicone-based soft denture liner. The highest mean force was observed in group EL specimens, and the tensile bond strengths in group EL were significantly different (p < 0.05) from those in the other groups.

  18. The study of energy band structure and chemical bonding in yttrium carbide, yttrium and strontium dicarbides by the LMTO and Xα DV method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energy band structures of yttrium carbide, yttrium and strontium dicarbides are studied by the LMTO-method. The cohesive energies and the total and partial pressures are calculated. The local electronic structure of yttrium dicarbide is studied by the Xα discrete variational method; the cluster Y6C2 which includes the group C2-2 and all the nearest neighbours of this group is used in this study. The results of this calculations are used to analyse the chemical bonding and some properties of the compounds. It is shown that the main contribution to the chemical bonding between C2-2 group and yttrium atoms is provided by the orbital of the eg-local symmetry which belongs to the zone of metallic state. In the SrC2 this orbital is empty which explains the instablity of its crystal lattice. (author)

  19. Chemical bond properties and Mossbauer spectroscopy in (La1-xMx)2CuO4 (M=Ba, Sr)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    By using the average band-gap model, the chemical bond properties of (La1-x Mx)2CuO4(M=Ba, Sr) were calculated . The calculated covalencies for Cu(O and La(O bond in the compounds are 0.3 and 0.03 respectively. M?ssbauer isomer shifts of 57Fe doped in La2CuO4 and 119Sn doped in La2CuO4 were calculated by using the chemical surrounding factor defined by covalency and electronic polarizability. Four valence state tin and three valence iron sites were identified in 57Fe and 119Sn doped La2CuO4.

  20. Effects of the chemical bonding on the optical and mechanical properties for germanium carbide films used as antireflection and protection coating of ZnS windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chaoquan; Zheng, Weitao; Tian, Hongwei; LeXu; Jiang, Qing

    2006-05-01

    Germanium carbide (Ge1-xCx) films have been prepared by RF reactive sputtering a pure Ge(111) target at different flow rate ratios of CH4/(CH4+Ar) in a CH4/Ar mixture discharge, and it has been found that the composition, chemical bonding, optical and mechanical properties of Ge1-xCx films are remarkably influenced by the flow rate ratio of CH4/(CH4+Ar). The effects of the chemical bonding on the optical and mechanical properties of the Ge1-xCx films have been explored. In addition, an antireflection Ge1-xCx double-layer coating deposited on both sides of the ZnS substrate wafer has been developed for application as an infrared window. It is shown that the transmittance in the wavelength region between 8 and 12 µm and the hardness of the ZnS substrate have been significantly improved by the double-layer coating.

  1. Models of chemical bonding : Representations Used in School Textbooks and by Teachers and their Relation to Students´Difficulties in Understanding.

    OpenAIRE

    Bergqvist, Anna

    2012-01-01

    This thesis focuses on how school textbooks and teachers present models of chemical bonding in upper secondary schools in Sweden. In science, as well as in science education, models play a central role, but research has shown that they often are difficult for students to understand. In science education, models are presented to students mainly through textbooks and teachers, and textbooks influence teachers’ teaching. The aim of this thesis was to investigate how textbooks and teachers presen...

  2. Unique chemical properties of metal-carbon bonds in metal-carboranyl and metal-carboryne complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU ZaoZao; XIE ZuoWei

    2009-01-01

    The metal-carbon bonds in metal-carboranyl and metal-carboryne complexes behave very differently from those in classical organometallic complexes. The unique electronic and steric properties of icosahedral carboranyl moiety make the M-C bond in metal-carboranyl complexes inert toward unsaturated molecules, and on the other hand, the sterically demanding carborane cage can induce unexpected C-C coupling reactions. The M-C bonds in metal-carboryne complexes are, however, active toward various kinds of unsaturated molecules and the reactivity patterns are dependent upon the electronic configurations of the metal ions. This account provides an overview of our recent work in this area.

  3. Unique chemical properties of metal-carbon bonds in metal-carboranyl and metal-carboryne complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The metal-carbon bonds in metal-carboranyl and metal-carboryne complexes behave very differently from those in classical organometallic complexes. The unique electronic and steric properties of ico-sahedral carboranyl moiety make the M-C bond in metal-carboranyl complexes inert toward unsaturated molecules, and on the other hand, the sterically demanding carborane cage can induce unexpected C-C coupling reactions. The M-C bonds in metal-carboryne complexes are, however, active toward various kinds of unsaturated molecules and the reactivity patterns are dependent upon the electronic configurations of the metal ions. This account provides an overview of our recent work in this area.

  4. Probing the Electronic Structure and Chemical Bonding of Mono-Uranium Oxides with Different Oxidation States: UOx(-) and UOx (x = 3-5).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jing; Li, Wei-Li; Lopez, Gary V; Jian, Tian; Cao, Guo-Jin; Li, Wan-Lu; Schwarz, W H Eugen; Wang, Lai-Sheng; Li, Jun

    2016-02-25

    Uranium oxide clusters UOx(-) (x = 3-5) were produced by laser vaporization and characterized by photoelectron spectroscopy and quantum theory. Photoelectron spectra were obtained for UOx(-) at various photon energies with well-resolved detachment transitions and vibrational resolution for x = 3 and 4. The electron affinities of UOx were measured as 1.12, 3.60, and 4.02 eV for x = 3, 4, and 5, respectively. The geometric and electronic structures of both the anions and the corresponding neutrals were investigated by quasi-relativistic electron-correlation quantum theory to interpret the photoelectron spectra and to provide insight into their chemical bonding. For UOx clusters with x ≤ 3, the O atoms appear as divalent closed-shell anions around the U atom, which is in various oxidation states from U(II)(fds)(4) in UO to U(VI)(fds)(0) in UO3. For x > 3, there are no longer sufficient valence electrons from the U atom to fill the O(2p) shell, resulting in fractionally charged and multicenter delocalized valence states for the O ligands as well as η(1)- or η(2)-bonded O2 units, with unusual spin couplings and complicated electron correlations in the unfilled poly oxo shell. The present work expands our understanding of both the bonding capacities of actinide elements with extended spdf valence shells as well as the multitude of oxygen's charge and bonding states. PMID:26825216

  5. Golden Sections of Interatomic Distances as Exact Ionic Radii and Additivity of Atomic and Ionic Radii in Chemical Bonds

    CERN Document Server

    Heyrovska, Raji

    2009-01-01

    The Golden ratio which appears in the geometry of a variety of creations in Nature is found to arise right in the Bohr radius of the hydrogen atom due to the opposite charges of the electron and proton. The bond length of the hydrogen molecule is the diagonal of a square on the Bohr radius and hence also has two Golden sections, which form the cationic and anionic radii of hydrogen. It is shown here that these radii account for the bond lengths of many hydrides when added to the atomic and Golden ratio based ionic radii of many other atoms.

  6. Golden Sections of Interatomic Distances as Exact Ionic Radii and Additivity of Atomic and Ionic Radii in Chemical Bonds

    OpenAIRE

    Heyrovska, Raji

    2009-01-01

    The Golden ratio which appears in the geometry of a variety of creations in Nature is found to arise right in the Bohr radius of the hydrogen atom due to the opposite charges of the electron and proton. The bond length of the hydrogen molecule is the diagonal of a square on the Bohr radius and hence also has two Golden sections, which form the cationic and anionic radii of hydrogen. It is shown here that these radii account for the bond lengths of many hydrides when added to the atomic and Go...

  7. Band alignment and chemical bonding at the GaAs/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface: A hybrid functional study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colleoni, Davide, E-mail: davide.colleoni@epfl.ch; Miceli, Giacomo; Pasquarello, Alfredo [Chaire de Simulation à l' Echelle Atomique (CSEA), Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2015-11-23

    The band alignment at the interface between GaAs and amorphous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is studied through the use of hybrid functionals. For the oxide component, a disordered model is generated through density-functional molecular dynamics. The achieved structure shows good agreement with the experimental characterization. The potential line-up across the interface is obtained for two atomistic GaAs/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface models, which differ by the GaAs substrate termination. The calculated valence band offset amounts to 3.9 eV for an interface characterized by the occurrence of Ga–O bonds as dominant chemical bonding, favoring the high-energy side in the range of experimental values (2.6–3.8 eV). The effect of As antisite and As–As dimer defects on the band alignment is shown to be negligible.

  8. A comparative effect of various surface chemical treatments on the resin composite-composite repair bond strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaloo Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this in vitro study was an attempt to investigate the effect of different surface treatments on the bond strength between pre-existing composite and repair composite resin. Materials and Methods: Forty acrylic blocks were prepared in a cuboidal mould. In each block, a well of 5 mm diameter and 5 mm depth was prepared to retain the composite resin (Filtek™ Z350, 3M/ESPE. Aging of the composite discs was achieved by storing them in water at 37°C for 1 week, and after that were divided into 5 groups (n = 8 according to surface treatment: Group I- 37% phosphoric acid, Group II-10% hydrofluoric acid, Group III-30% citric acid, Group IV-7% maleic acid and Group V- Adhesive (no etchant. The etched surfaces were rinsed and dried followed by application of bonding agent (Adper™ Single Bond 2. 3M/ESPE. The repair composite was placed on aged composite, light-cured for 40 seconds and stored in water at 37°C for 1 week. Shear bond strength between the aged and the new composite resin was determined with a universal testing machine (crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Statistical Analysis: The compressive shear strengths were compared for differences using ANOVA test followed by Tamhane′s T2 post hoc analysis. Results: The surface treatment with 10% hydrofluoric acid showed the maximum bond strength followed by 30% citric acid, 7% maleic acid and 37% phosphoric acid in decreasing order. Conclusion: The use of 10% hydrofluoric acid can be a good alternative for surface treatment in repair of composite resin restoration as compared to commonly used 37% orthophosphoric acid.

  9. Nitrilotris(methylenephosphonato)potassium K[μ6-NH(CH2PO3)3H4]: Synthesis, structure, and the nature of the K-O chemical bond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somov, N. V.; Chausov, F. F.; Zakirova, R. M.

    2016-07-01

    The crystal structure of nitrilotris(methylenephosphonato)potassium K[μ6-NH(CH2PO3)3H4]—a three-dimensional coordination polymer—was determined. The potassium atom is coordinated by seven oxygen atoms belonging to the six nearest ligand molecules, resulting in distorted monocapped octahedral coordination geometry. The complex contains the four-membered chelate ring K-O-P-O. The K-O chemical bond is predominantly ionic. Meanwhile, the bonds of the potassium atom with some oxygen atoms have a noticeable covalent component. In addition to coordination bonds, the molecules in the crystal packing are linked by hydrogen bonds.

  10. Prevalence of Bimolecular Routes in the Activation of Diatomic Molecules with Strong Chemical Bonds (O2, NO, CO, N2) on Catalytic Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbitts, David; Iglesia, Enrique

    2015-05-19

    Dissociation of the strong bonds in O2, NO, CO, and N2 often involves large activation barriers on low-index planes of metal particles used as catalysts. These kinetic hurdles reflect the noble nature of some metals (O2 activation on Au), the high coverages of co-reactants (O2 activation during CO oxidation on Pt), or the strength of the chemical bonds (NO on Pt, CO and N2 on Ru). High barriers for direct dissociations from density functional theory (DFT) have led to a consensus that "defects", consisting of low-coordination exposed atoms, are required to cleave such bonds, as calculated by theory and experiments for model surfaces at low coverages. Such sites, however, bind intermediates strongly, rendering them unreactive at the high coverages prevalent during catalysis. Such site requirements are also at odds with turnover rates that often depend weakly on cluster size or are actually higher on larger clusters, even though defects, such as corners and edges, are most abundant on small clusters. This Account illustrates how these apparent inconsistencies are resolved through activations of strong bonds assisted by co-adsorbates on crowded low-index surfaces. Catalytic oxidations occur on Au clusters at low temperatures in spite of large activation barriers for O2 dissociation on Au(111) surfaces, leading to proposals that O2 activation requires low-coordination Au atoms or Au-support interfaces. When H2O is present, however, O2 dissociation proceeds with low barriers on Au(111) because chemisorbed peroxides (*OOH* and *HOOH*) form and weaken O-O bonds before cleavage, thus allowing activation on low-index planes. DFT-derived O2 dissociation barriers are much lower on bare Pt surfaces, but such surfaces are nearly saturated with CO* during CO oxidation. A dearth of vacant sites causes O2* to react with CO* to form *OOCO* intermediates that undergo O-O cleavage. NO-H2 reactions occur on Pt clusters saturated with NO* and H*; direct NO* dissociation requires vacant

  11. Chemical insight from density functional modeling of molecular adsorption: Tracking the bonding and diffusion of anthracene derivatives on Cu(111) with molecular orbitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyrick, Jonathan; Einstein, T. L.; Bartels, Ludwig

    2015-03-01

    We present a method of analyzing the results of density functional modeling of molecular adsorption in terms of an analogue of molecular orbitals. This approach permits intuitive chemical insight into the adsorption process. Applied to a set of anthracene derivates (anthracene, 9,10-anthraquinone, 9,10-dithioanthracene, and 9,10-diselenonanthracene), we follow the electronic states of the molecules that are involved in the bonding process and correlate them to both the molecular adsorption geometry and the species' diffusive behavior. We additionally provide computational code to easily repeat this analysis on any system.

  12. Chemical insight from density functional modeling of molecular adsorption: Tracking the bonding and diffusion of anthracene derivatives on Cu(111) with molecular orbitals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrick, Jonathan; Bartels, Ludwig, E-mail: ludwig.bartels@ucr.edu [Pierce Hall, University of California-Riverside, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Einstein, T. L. [Department of Physics and Condensed Matter Theory Center, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742-4111 (United States)

    2015-03-14

    We present a method of analyzing the results of density functional modeling of molecular adsorption in terms of an analogue of molecular orbitals. This approach permits intuitive chemical insight into the adsorption process. Applied to a set of anthracene derivates (anthracene, 9,10-anthraquinone, 9,10-dithioanthracene, and 9,10-diselenonanthracene), we follow the electronic states of the molecules that are involved in the bonding process and correlate them to both the molecular adsorption geometry and the species’ diffusive behavior. We additionally provide computational code to easily repeat this analysis on any system.

  13. New sol–gel refractory coatings on chemically-bonded sand cores for foundry applications to improve casting surface quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nwaogu, Ugochukwu Chibuzoh; Poulsen, T.; Stage, R.K.;

    2011-01-01

    Foundry refractory coatings protect bonded sand cores and moulds from producing defective castings during the casting process by providing a barrier between the core and the liquid metal. In this study, new sol–gel refractory coating on phenolic urethane cold box (PUCB) core was examined. The coa......Foundry refractory coatings protect bonded sand cores and moulds from producing defective castings during the casting process by providing a barrier between the core and the liquid metal. In this study, new sol–gel refractory coating on phenolic urethane cold box (PUCB) core was examined......–gel coated cores have better surface quality than those from uncoated cores and comparable surface quality with the commercial coatings. Therefore, the new sol–gel coating has a potential application in the foundry industry for improving the surface finish of castings thereby reducing the cost of fettling...... in the foundry industry since the raw materials and technology are easily affordable....

  14. Chemical bonding in copper-based transparent conducting oxides: CuMO(2) (M = In, Ga, Sc)

    OpenAIRE

    Scanlon, David; ALLEN, JEREMY; WATSON, GRAEME WILLIAM; GODINHO, KATHERINE GITANJALI

    2011-01-01

    PUBLISHED The geometry and electronic structure of copper-based p-type delafossite transparent conducting oxides, CuMO(2) (M = In, Ga, Sc), are studied using the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) corrected for on-site Coulomb interactions (GGA + U). The bonding and valence band compositions of these materials are investigated, and the origins of changes in the valence band features between group 3 and group 13 cations are discussed. Analysis of the effective masses at the valence an...

  15. Annealing-induced changes in chemical bonding and surface characteristics of chemical solution deposited Pb0.95La0.05Zr0.54Ti0.46O3 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Vaishali; Ramana, C. V.; Kotru, Sushma

    2016-08-01

    We report the effect of post deposition annealing temperature (Ta = 550 and 750 °C) on the surface morphology, chemical bonding and structural development of lanthanum doped lead zirconate titanate (Pb0.95La0.05Zr0.54Ti0.46O3; referred to PLZT) thin films prepared using chemical solution deposition method. Atomic force microscopy demonstrates formation of nanocrystallites in the film annealed at Ta = 750 °C. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses indicate that the binding energies (BE) of the Pb 4f, Zr 3d, and Ti 2p doublet experience a positive energy shift at Ta = 750 °C, whereas the BE of O 1s and La 3d doublet show a negative shift with respect to the BE of the films annealed at Ta = 750 °C. Thermal induced crystallization and chemical modification is evident from XPS results. The Ar+ sputtering of the films reveals change in oxidation state and chemical bonding between the constituent atoms, with respect to Ta. Raman spectroscopy used to study phonon-light interactions show shift in longitudinal and transverse optical modes with the change in Ta, confirming the change in phase and crystallinity of these films. The results suggest annealing at Ta = 750 °C yield crystalline perovskite PLZT films, which is essential to obtain photovoltaic response from devices based on such films.

  16. A quantum-chemical validation about the formation of hydrogen bonds and secondary interactions in intermolecular heterocyclic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boaz Galdino Oliveira

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available We have performed a detailed theoretical study in order to understand the charge density topology of the C2H4O···C2H2 and C2H4S···C2H2 heterocyclic hydrogen-bonded complexes. Through the calculations derived from Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM, it was observed the formation of hydrogen bonds and secondary interactions. Such analysis was performed through the determination of optimized geometries at B3LYP/6-31G(d,p level of theory, by which is that QTAIM topological operators were computed, such as the electronic density ρ(r, Laplacian Ñ2ρ(r, and ellipticity ε. The examination of the hydrogen bonds has been performed through the measurement of ρ(r, Ñ2ρ(r and ε between (O···H—C and (S···H—C, whereas the secondary interaction between axial hydrogen atoms Hα and carbon of acetylene. In this insight, it was verified the existence of secondary interaction only in C2H4S···C2H2 complex because its structure is propitious to form multiple interactions.

  17. Retention behavior of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in supercritical fluid chromatography on a chemically bonded stationary phases based upon liquid-crystalline polymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gritti [Bordeaux I Univ., Pessac (France). INSCPB; Bordeaux I Univ., Pessac (France). CRPP; Felix, G. [Bordeaux I Univ., Pessac (France). INSCPB; Achard, M.F.; Hardouin, F. [Bordeaux I Univ., Pessac (France). CRPP

    2001-02-01

    The retention behavior of a set of polycyclic hydrocarbons in supercritical fluid chromatography have been studied on a chemically bonded stationary phase based upon a side chain liquid crystalline polymer (LCP) with carbon dioxide-based mobile phase. The effects of the mobile phase pressure, column temperature and amount of mobile phase organic modifier have been investigated in order to detect a possible structural change in the liquid crystal polymer linked to the silica support. The influence of these factors on the selectivity coefficients has also been studied. Two distinctive behaviors with temperature are noted at low pressure on the one hand and at higher pressure on the other. This change in behavior is based on the density of the supercritical CO{sub 2} and the PAH volatility rather than on any specific stationary phase structural change. Both lower mobile phase pressure and amount of mobile phase modifier are required to obtain better selectivities. Better planarity recognition is observed in SFC than in HPLC with these new bonded liquid crystal stationary phases. The bonded liquid crystal phase is only weakly affected by the addition of organic modifier in the supercritical CO{sub 2}. (orig.)

  18. Impact of post-deposition annealing on interfacial chemical bonding states between AlGaN and ZrO{sub 2} grown by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Gang; Arulkumaran, Subramaniam; Ng, Geok Ing; Li, Yang; Ang, Kian Siong [Novitas, Nanoelectronics Center of Excellence, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Wang, Hong, E-mail: ewanghong@ntu.edu.sg [Novitas, Nanoelectronics Center of Excellence, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); CINTRA CNRS/NTU/Thales, UMI 3288, 50 Nanyang Drive (Singapore); Ng, Serene Lay Geok; Ji, Rong [Data Storage Institute, Agency for Science Technology and Research (A-STAR), 5 Engineering Drive 1, 117608 (Singapore); Liu, Zhi Hong [Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology, 1 CREATE Way, Singapore 138602 (Singapore)

    2015-03-02

    The effect of post-deposition annealing on chemical bonding states at interface between Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}N and ZrO{sub 2} grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) is studied by angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. It has been found that both of Al-O/Al 2p and Ga-O/Ga 3d area ratio decrease at annealing temperatures lower than 500 °C, which could be attributed to “clean up” effect of ALD-ZrO{sub 2} on AlGaN. Compared to Ga spectra, a much larger decrease in Al-O/Al 2p ratio at a smaller take-off angle θ is observed, which indicates higher effectiveness of the passivation of Al-O bond than Ga-O bond through “clean up” effect near the interface. However, degradation of ZrO{sub 2}/AlGaN interface quality due to re-oxidation at higher annealing temperature (>500 °C) is also found. The XPS spectra clearly reveal that Al atoms at ZrO{sub 2}/AlGaN interface are easier to get oxidized as compared with Ga atoms.

  19. The Different Sensitive Behaviors of a Hydrogen-Bond Acidic Polymer-Coated SAW Sensor for Chemical Warfare Agents and Their Simulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Long

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A linear hydrogen-bond acidic (HBA linear functionalized polymer (PLF, was deposited onto a bare surface acoustic wave (SAW device to fabricate a chemical sensor. Real-time responses of the sensor to a series of compounds including sarin (GB, dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP, mustard gas (HD, chloroethyl ethyl sulphide (2-CEES, 1,5-dichloropentane (DCP and some organic solvents were studied. The results show that the sensor is highly sensitive to GB and DMMP, and has low sensitivity to HD and DCP, as expected. However, the sensor possesses an unexpected high sensitivity toward 2-CEES. This good sensing performance can’t be solely or mainly attributed to the dipole-dipole interaction since the sensor is not sensitive to some high polarity solvents. We believe the lone pair electrons around the sulphur atom of 2-CEES provide an electron-rich site, which facilitates the formation of hydrogen bonding between PLF and 2-CEES. On the contrary, the electron cloud on the sulphur atom of the HD molecule is offset or depleted by its two neighbouring strong electron-withdrawing groups, hence, hydrogen bonding can hardly be formed.

  20. X-ray study of chemical bonding in actinides(IV) and lanthanides(III) hexa-cyanoferrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bimetallic cyanide molecular solids derived from Prussian blue are well known to foster long-range magnetic ordering and show an intense inter-valence charge transfer band resulting from an exchange interaction through the cyanide-bridge. For those reasons the ferrocyanide and ferricyanide building blocks have been chosen to study electronic delocalization and covalent character in actinide bonding using an experimental and theoretical approach based on X-ray absorption spectroscopy. In 2001, the actinide (IV) and early lanthanides (III) hexacyanoferrate have been found by powder X-ray diffraction to be isostructural (hexagonal, P63/m group). Here, extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) at the iron K-edge and actinide L3-edge have been undertaken to probe the local environment of both actinides and iron cations. In an effort to describe the cyano bridge, a double edge fitting procedure including both iron and actinide edges and based on multiple scattering approach has been developed. We have also investigated the electronic properties of these molecular solids. Low energy electronic transitions have been used iron L2,3 edge, nitrogen and carbon K-edge and also actinides N4,5 edge to directly probe the valence molecular orbitals of the complex. Using a phenomenological approach, a clear distinctive behaviour between actinides and lanthanides has been shown. Then a theoretical approach using quantum chemistry calculation has shown more specifically the effect of covalency in the actinide-ferrocyanide bond. More specifically, π interactions were underlined by both theoretical and experimental methods. Finally, in agreement with the ionic character of the lanthanide bonding no inter-valence charge transfer has been observed in the corresponding optical spectra of these compounds. On the contrary, optical spectra for actinides adducts (except for thorium) show an intense inter-valence charge transfer band like in the transition metal cases which is

  1. Exploring Conceptual Frameworks of Models of Atomic Structures and Periodic Variations, Chemical Bonding, and Molecular Shape and Polarity: A Comparison of Undergraduate General Chemistry Students with High and Low Levels of Content Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chia-Yu; Barrow, Lloyd H.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore students' conceptual frameworks of models of atomic structure and periodic variations, chemical bonding, and molecular shape and polarity, and how these conceptual frameworks influence their quality of explanations and ability to shift among chemical representations. This study employed a purposeful sampling…

  2. Chemical-shift tensors of heavy nuclei in network solids: a DFT/ZORA investigation of (207)Pb chemical-shift tensors using the bond-valence method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkan, Fahri; Dybowski, C

    2015-10-14

    Cluster models are used in calculation of (207)Pb NMR magnetic-shielding parameters of α-PbO, β-PbO, Pb3O4, Pb2SnO4, PbF2, PbCl2, PbBr2, PbClOH, PbBrOH, PbIOH, PbSiO3, and Pb3(PO4)2. We examine the effects of cluster size, method of termination of the cluster, charge on the cluster, introduction of exact exchange, and relativistic effects on calculation of magnetic-shielding tensors with density functional theory. Proper termination of the cluster for a network solid, including approximations such as compensation of charge by the bond-valence (BV) method, is essential to provide results that agree with experiment. The inclusion of relativistic effects at the spin-orbit level for such heavy nuclei is an essential factor in achieving agreement with experiment. PMID:26345261

  3. Changes in physical and chemical properties of a dental palladium-silver alloy during metal-porcelain bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payan, J; Moya, G E; Meyer, J M; Moya, F

    1986-07-01

    The hardening ability of a dental palladium-silver (Pd-Ag-Sn-In) bonding alloy has been investigated, and the distribution of the elements along the metal-ceramic interface have been studied by microprobe analysis. The alloy was found to be highly heterogeneous in its 'as-cast' condition, but homogenized alloy was obtained after heating the alloy at 1000 degrees C for 2 h. Hardening occurred after annealing at 650 degrees C for 1 h. A longer thermal treatment caused the hardness to decrease (over-ageing). The change in hardness could be attributed to an internal oxidation phenomenon. The additional elements tin and indium segregated towards the ceramic-metal interface, with a diffusion of indium only into the porcelain. Diffusion of silver in the ceramics, supposed to be the cause of the 'greening' of dental porcelains baked on silver-rich alloys, has not been detected by the microprobe across the interface. PMID:3531444

  4. Hydrogen bond driven chemical reactions: Beckmann rearrangement of cyclohexanone oxime into epsilon-caprolactam in supercritical water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boero, Mauro; Ikeshoji, Tamio; Liew, Chee Chin; Terakura, Kiyoyuki; Parrinello, Michele

    2004-05-26

    Recent experiments have shown that supercritical water (SCW) has the ability to accelerate and make selective synthetic organic reactions, thus replacing the common but environmentally harmful acid and basic catalysts. In an attempt to understand the intimate mechanism behind this observation, we analyze, via first-principles molecular dynamics, the Beckmann rearrangement of cyclohexanone oxime into epsilon-caprolactam in supercritical water, for which accurate experimental evidence has been reported. Differences in the wetting of the hydrophilic parts of the solute, enhanced by SCW, and the disrupted hydrogen bond network are shown to be crucial in triggering the reaction and in making it selective. Furthermore, the enhanced concentrations of H(+) in SCW play an important role in starting the reaction.

  5. The protein amide {sup 1}H{sup N} chemical shift temperature coefficient reflects thermal expansion of the N-H{center_dot}{center_dot}{center_dot}O=C hydrogen bond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong Jingbo; Jing Qingqing; Yao Lishan, E-mail: yaols@qibebt.ac.cn [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Laboratory of Biofuels, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology (China)

    2013-01-15

    The protein amide {sup 1}H{sup N} chemical shift temperature coefficient can be determined with high accuracy by recording spectra at different temperatures, but the physical mechanism responsible for this temperature dependence is not well understood. In this work, we find that this coefficient strongly correlates with the temperature coefficient of the through-hydrogen-bond coupling, {sup 3h}J{sub NC Prime }, based on NMR measurements of protein GB3. Parallel tempering molecular dynamics simulation suggests that the hydrogen bond distance variation at different temperatures/replicas is largely responsible for the {sup 1}H{sup N} chemical shift temperature dependence, from which an empirical equation is proposed to predict the hydrogen bond thermal expansion coefficient, revealing responses of individual hydrogen bonds to temperature changes. Different expansion patterns have been observed for various networks formed by {beta} strands.

  6. Gold as hydrogen: Structural and electronic properties and chemical bonding in Si3Au3+/0/- and comparisons to Si3H3+/0/-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiran, Boggavarapu; Li, Xi; Zhai, Hua-Jin; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2006-10-01

    A single Au atom has been shown to behave like H in its bonding to Si in several mono- and disilicon gold clusters. In the current work, we investigate the Au /H analogy in trisilicon gold clusters, Si3Au3+/0/-. Photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional calculations are combined to examine the geometric and electronic structure of Si3Au3-. We find that there are three isomers competing for the ground state of Si3Au3- as is the case for Si3H3-. Extensive structural searches show that the potential energy surfaces of the trisilicon gold clusters (Si3Au3-, Si3Au3, and Si3Au3+) are similar to those of the corresponding silicon hydrides. The lowest energy isomers for Si3Au3- and Si3Au3 are structurally similar to a Si3Au four-membered ring serving as a common structural motif. For Si3Au3+, the 2π aromatic cyclotrisilenylium auride ion, analogous to the aromatic cyclotrisilenylium ion (Si3H3+), is the most stable species. Comparison of the structures and chemical bonding between Si3Au3+/0/- and the corresponding silicon hydrides further extends the isolobal analogy between Au and H.

  7. Probing the structures and chemical bonding of boron-boronyl clusters using photoelectron spectroscopy and computational chemistry: B4(BO)(n)- (n = 1-3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiang; Zhai, Hua-Jin; Li, Si-Dian; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2012-07-28

    The electronic and structural properties of a series of boron oxide clusters, B(5)O(-), B(6)O(2)(-), and B(7)O(3)(-), are studied using photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional calculations. Vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectra are obtained, yielding electron affinities of 3.45, 3.54, and 4.94 eV for the corresponding neutrals, B(5)O, B(6)O(2), and B(7)O(3), respectively. Structural optimizations show that these oxide clusters can be formulated as B(4)(BO)(n)(-) (n = 1-3), which involve boronyls coordinated to a planar rhombic B(4) cluster. Chemical bonding analyses indicate that the B(4)(BO)(n)(-) clusters are all aromatic species with two π electrons. PMID:22852618

  8. Comparison of the Shear Bond Strength of Light-cured and Chemically-cured Resin Adhesive%光固化和化学固化树脂粘接剂剪切强度的对比研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张隆祺; 王野平

    2001-01-01

    Objective To compare the shear bond strength of light-cured and chemically-cured resin adhesive. Methods Twenty recently extracted human premolars were randomly divided into two groups of 10 each.: Group A, using the chemically-cured resin adhesive (Jing Jinenamel adhesive) and Group B, using the light-cured resin adhesive (Transbond XT,3M Unitek). The brackets were bonded to prepared enamel surfaces and the samples were placed in a water bath at 37℃ for 24 hours, then measured the shear bond strength and assessed the remaining adhesive after debonded. Results The shear bond strength and assessing the remaining adhesive after debonded both had no statistical significanct difference between two adhesives. Conclusion The light-cured and the chemically-cured resin adhesive both have strong bond strength, but the light-cured resin adhesive has the advantage to offer more sufficient time for positioning and bonding the brackets, so it is recommended for using.%-05)。结论光固化和化学固化树脂粘接剂均具有较强的粘接强度,但光固化树脂粘接剂能够为托槽的定位和粘接提供充足的时间,推荐使用。

  9. A periodic Energy Decomposition Analysis (pEDA) method for the Investigation of Chemical Bonding in Extended Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Raupach, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The development and first applications of a new periodic energy decomposition analysis (pEDA) scheme for extended systems based on the Kohn-Sham approach to density functional theory are described. The pEDA decomposes the binding energy between two fragments (e.g. the adsorption energy of a molecule on a surface) into several well-defined terms: preparation, electrostatic and dispersion interaction, Pauli repulsion and orbital relaxation energies. The pEDA presented here for an AO-based implementation can handle restricted and unrestricted fragments for 0D to 3D systems considering periodic boundary conditions with and without the determination of fragment occupations. For the latter case, reciprocal space sampling is enabled. The new method gives comparable results to established schemes for molecular systems and shows good convergence with respect to the basis set (TZ2P), the integration accuracy and k-space sampling. Four typical bonding scenarios for surface adsorbate complexes were chosen to highlight th...

  10. An ab-initio study of silicon adsorption on metallic surfaces (Au/Ag): Novel perspective to explore chemical bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, S.; Ghaisas, S. V.; Majumder, C.

    2012-07-01

    We report a first-principle investigation of the structure and electronic properties of small Sin (n = 1-6,9) clusters deposited on the Au(111) and Ag(111) surfaces. The calculations were performed using a plane wave based pseudopotential method under the framework of density functional theory. The results reveal the preference of Si atom to be adsorbed on the h.c.p. site of the metal (111) surfaces with strong binding energy. We study monolayer (ML) deposition as well as the cluster deposition on both the surfaces. The clusters introduce interlayer forces in the adsorbate. Based on PDOS (projected density of states) analysis it is found that Si atoms acquire charges from the Au/Ag surface. The binding energies are consistent with the known cohesive energy of Ag and Au silicides. The planar Sin cluster deposition on metal surfaces show that Au provides an adjustable surface with relatively strong Au-Si interaction while Ag-Si relatively weak interaction leading to dimerization of Si. The strong bonding with the surface atoms is a result of p-d hybridization. Some of the 3-D clusters show shape distortions after deposition on metal surfaces. This leads to internal stresses after deposition. A statistical parameter is defined over PDOS. It helps to measure the state delocalization in energy. Implications of the Si-Metal interaction on the initial stages of growth are discussed.

  11. Rod like attapulgite/poly(ethylene terephthalate nanocomposites with chemical bonding between the polymer chain and the filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Fu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Poly(ethylene terephthalate (PET nanocomposites containing rod-like silicate attapulgite (AT were prepared via in situ polymerization. It is presented that PET chains identical to the matrix have been successfully grafted onto simple organically pre-modified AT nanorods (MAT surface during the in situ polymerization process. The covalent bonding at the interface was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. The content of grafted PET polymer on the surface of MAT was about 26 wt%. This high grafting density greatly improved the dispersion of fillers, interfacial adhesion as well as the significant confinement of the segmental motion of PET, as compared to the nanocomposites of PET/pristine AT (PET/AT. Owing to the unique interfacial structure in PET/MAT composites, their thermal and mechanical properties have been greatly improved. Compared with neat PET, the elastic modulus and the yield strength of PET/MAT were significantly improved by about 39.5 and 36.8%, respectively, by incorporating only 2 wt % MAT. Our work provides a novel route to fabricate advanced PET nanocomposites using rod-like attapulgite as fillers, which has great potential for industrial applications.

  12. The effects of reasoning, use of models, sex type, and their interactions on posttest achievement in chemical bonding after constant instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staver, John R.; Halsted, Douglas A.

    The purpose of the authors in this study was to determine the effects of reasoning, use of models during testing, and sex type on posttest achievement in chemical bonding under controlled instruction. Eighty-four high school students taking chemistry were randomly assigned within their classes to models and no models groups for the posttest. Reasoning capabilities were assessed by the Piagetian Logical Operations Test (PLOT) (Staver & Gabel, JRST, Vol. 16, No. 6, 1979), prior to instruction. All students then received the same instruction on chemical bonding which included teacher demonstrations of concepts with three-dimensional molecular models, interspersed teacher questions during the introduction and development of concepts, student manipulation of three-dimensional molecular models during laboratory experiments, and text reading assignments on concepts prior to their instruction in class. The posttest on molecular geometry and shape contained three sections requiring memory and application (Bloom, Taxonomy of educational objective, handbook I: Cognitive domain. New York: David McKay, 1956). Data were analyzed by regression (Nie et al., Statistical package for the social sciences, 2nd ed. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1975). Results indicate that reasoning accounted for a significant portion (p 0.05) portion of the variance on total scores or any section of posttest. The three-way interaction of reasoning, model usage, and sex type accounted for a significant portion (p < 0.05) of the variance in total scores, and in the memory and application sections of the posttest. Discussion focused on the results, conclusions, and implications for science teaching.

  13. Contribution of Chemical Bonding to the Force in Atomic Force Microscopy%原子力显微镜中化学成键对力的贡献

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李娜; 陈曦; 薛其坤

    2014-01-01

    迄今非接触原子力显微镜已经成为一个非常强大的工具。它不仅能够得到表面的原子周期结构,还能给出分子内部的化学键信息。针尖和样品之间的相互作用是原子力显微镜的有效信号,主要包括三种,即范德瓦尔斯相互作用、静电相互作用和化学键相互作用。本文在生长于Si(111)-7×7的铅薄膜上测量了针尖和样品之间的化学键相互作用。通过获取该相互作用随偏压的变化,并且利用抛物线拟合有效局域接触势的位置,我们发现它是随着针尖和样品之间距离的增大而减小的。这种趋势来自于针尖和样品之间波函数的交叠。从而可以得到电子的衰减长度。我们还测量到了该衰减长度随着铅薄膜厚度的变化会发生振荡,这种振荡归因于平顶楔形铅岛内电子的量子尺寸效应。%Non-contact atomic force microscope (NC-AFM) has become a powerful tool. It can provide the atomic structure and chemical bonding information at the atomic scale. Three kinds of tip-sample interactions are often concerned: including van der Waals interaction, electrostatic interaction, and chemical bonding interaction. In this work, the chemical bonding interaction between the tip and a Pb film is clearly demonstrated by NC-AFM based on a Q-plus force sensor. The tip-sample interaction energy versus the bias voltage was obtained and fitted by a parabolic function to find the effective local contact potential difference, which decreased with increasing tip-sample distance. Such a trend is caused by the wave function overlap. Thus, the decay length of the electron wave function was estimated. Oscillation of the decay length with film thickness was also observed, which can be attributed to the thickness-dependent quantum wel states in the Pb islands.

  14. Water's Hydrogen Bond Strength

    CERN Document Server

    Chaplin, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Water is necessary both for the evolution of life and its continuance. It possesses particular properties that cannot be found in other materials and that are required for life-giving processes. These properties are brought about by the hydrogen bonded environment particularly evident in liquid water. Each liquid water molecule is involved in about four hydrogen bonds with strengths considerably less than covalent bonds but considerably greater than the natural thermal energy. These hydrogen bonds are roughly tetrahedrally arranged such that when strongly formed the local clustering expands, decreasing the density. Such low density structuring naturally occurs at low and supercooled temperatures and gives rise to many physical and chemical properties that evidence the particular uniqueness of liquid water. If aqueous hydrogen bonds were actually somewhat stronger then water would behave similar to a glass, whereas if they were weaker then water would be a gas and only exist as a liquid at sub-zero temperature...

  15. Bond Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Rachel H.

    2000-01-01

    Notes trends toward increased borrowing by colleges and universities and offers guidelines for institutions that are considering issuing bonds to raise money for capital projects. Discussion covers advantages of using bond financing, how use of bonds impacts on traditional fund raising, other cautions and concerns, and some troubling aspects of…

  16. Effect of surface pretreatment on interfacial chemical bonding states of atomic layer deposited ZrO{sub 2} on AlGaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Gang; Arulkumaran, Subramaniam; Ng, Geok Ing; Li, Yang; Ang, Kian Siong [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Wang, Hong, E-mail: ewanghong@ntu.edu.sg [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798, Singapore and CINTRA CNRS/NTU/Thales, UMI 3288, 50 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637553 (Singapore); Ng, Serene Lay Geok; Ji, Rong [Data Storage Institute, Agency for Science Technology and Research (A-STAR), 5 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117608 (Singapore); Liu, Zhi Hong [Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology, 1 CREATE Way, Singapore 138602 (Singapore)

    2015-09-15

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of ZrO{sub 2} on native oxide covered (untreated) and buffered oxide etchant (BOE) treated AlGaN surface was analyzed by utilizing x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Evidenced by Ga–O and Al–O chemical bonds by XPS, parasitic oxidation during deposition is largely enhanced on BOE treated AlGaN surface. Due to the high reactivity of Al atoms, more prominent oxidation of Al atoms is observed, which leads to thicker interfacial layer formed on BOE treated surface. The results suggest that native oxide on AlGaN surface may serve as a protecting layer to inhibit the surface from further parasitic oxidation during ALD. The findings provide important process guidelines for the use of ALD ZrO{sub 2} and its pre-ALD surface treatments for high-k AlGaN/GaN metal–insulator–semiconductor high electron mobility transistors and other related device applications.

  17. A study of vibrational spectra and investigations of charge transfer and chemical bonding features of 2-chloro benzimidazole based on DFT computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthunatesan, S.; Ragavendran, V.

    2015-01-01

    Benzimidazoles are bicyclic heteroatomic molecules. Polycyclic heteroatomic molecules have extensive coupling of different modes leading to strong coupling of force constants associated with the various chemical bonds of the molecules. To carry out a detailed vibrational spectroscopic analysis of such a bicyclic heteroatomic molecule, FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of 2-chloro benzimidazole (CBZ) have been recorded in the condensed phase. Density Functional Theory calculations in the B3LYP/6-31G* level have been carried out to determine the optimized geometry and vibrational frequencies. In order to obtain a close agreement between theoretical and observed frequencies and hence to perform a reliable assignment, the theoretical DFT force field was transformed from Cartesian to local symmetry co-ordinates and then scaled empirically using SQM methodology. The SQM treatment resulted in a RMS deviation of 9.4 cm-1. For visual comparison, the observed and calculated spectra are presented on a common wavenumber scale. From the NBO analysis, the electron density (ED) charge transfers in the σ* and π* antibonding orbitals and second order delocalization energies E(2) confirms the occurrence of intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) within the molecule. The calculated Homo and Lumo energies show that charge transfer occurs within the molecule. The results obtained from the vibrational, NBO and HOMO-LUMO analyses have been properly tabulated.

  18. Comparison of the effect of shear bond strength with silane and other three chemical presurface treatments of a glass fiber-reinforced post on adhesion with a resin-based luting agent: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaibhavi Ramkrishna Belwalkar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Loss of retention has been cited to be the most common cause of the failure of postretained restoration with irreversible consequences when materials with different compositions are in intimate contact at the post/adhesive interface. With this background, a study was conducted to improve the adhesion at the resin phase of fiber posts using silane and other chemical pretreatments. Materials and Methods: Hundred glass fiber-reinforced posts were tested with 4 different protocols (n = 25 using silane as a control (Group A and other three experimental groups, namely, Group B-20% potassium permanganate, Group C-4% hydrofluoric acid, and Group D-10% hydrogen peroxide were pretreated on the postsurface followed by silanization. These specimens were bonded with dual-polymerizing resin-based luting agent, which were then loaded at the crosshead speed of 1 mm/min to record the shear bond strength at the post/adhesive interface. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA test for multiple group comparisons and the post hoc Bonferroni test for pairwise comparisons (P < 0.05. Results: Group B showed more influence on the shear bond strength when compared to other protocols, respectively (P < 0.001. Conclusion: Alone silanization as a surface treatment did not improve the bond strength. Combination of chemical presurface treatments followed by silanization significantly enhanced the bond strength at the post/adhesive interface.

  19. Comparison of the effect of shear bond strength with silane and other three chemical presurface treatments of a glass fiber-reinforced post on adhesion with a resin-based luting agent: An in vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belwalkar, Vaibhavi Ramkrishna; Gade, Jaykumar; Mankar, Nikhil Purushottam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Loss of retention has been cited to be the most common cause of the failure of postretained restoration with irreversible consequences when materials with different compositions are in intimate contact at the post/adhesive interface. With this background, a study was conducted to improve the adhesion at the resin phase of fiber posts using silane and other chemical pretreatments. Materials and Methods: Hundred glass fiber-reinforced posts were tested with 4 different protocols (n = 25) using silane as a control (Group A) and other three experimental groups, namely, Group B-20% potassium permanganate, Group C-4% hydrofluoric acid, and Group D-10% hydrogen peroxide were pretreated on the postsurface followed by silanization. These specimens were bonded with dual-polymerizing resin-based luting agent, which were then loaded at the crosshead speed of 1 mm/min to record the shear bond strength at the post/adhesive interface. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA test for multiple group comparisons and the post hoc Bonferroni test for pairwise comparisons (P < 0.05). Results: Group B showed more influence on the shear bond strength when compared to other protocols, respectively (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Alone silanization as a surface treatment did not improve the bond strength. Combination of chemical presurface treatments followed by silanization significantly enhanced the bond strength at the post/adhesive interface. PMID:27307666

  20. Geometrical criteria versus quantum chemical criteria for assessment of intramolecular hydrogen bond (IMHB) interaction: A computational comparison into the effect of chlorine substitution on IMHB of salicylic acid in its lowest energy ground state conformer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Bijan Kumar [Department of Chemistry, University of Calcutta, 92 A.P.C. Road, Calcutta 700009 (India); Guchhait, Nikhil, E-mail: nikhil.guchhait@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, University of Calcutta, 92 A.P.C. Road, Calcutta 700009 (India)

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► Intramolecular hydrogen bonding (IMHB) in salicylic acid and its chloro derivatives. ► A complex effect of +R and −I effect of chlorine substituents on IMHB energy. ► Interplay between IMHB energy and aromaticity. ► Directional nature of IMHB from quantum chemical assessment. ► Quantum chemical treatment vs. geometrical criteria to assess weak interaction. - Abstract: Density functional theory based computational study has been performed to characterize intramolecular hydrogen bonding (IMHB) interaction in a series of salicylic acid derivatives varying in chlorine substitution on the benzene ring. The molecular systems studied are salicylic acid, 5-chlorosalicylic acid, 3,5-dichlorosalicylic acid and 3,5,6-tricholorosalicylic acid. Major emphasis is rendered on the analysis of IMHB interaction by calculation of electron density ρ(r) and Laplacian ∇{sup 2}ρ(r) at the bond critical point using atoms-in-molecule theory. Topological features, energy densities based on ρ(r) through perturbing the intramolecular H-bond distances suggest that at equilibrium geometry the IMHB interaction develops certain characteristics typical of covalent interaction. The interplay between aromaticity and resonance-assisted hydrogen bonding (RAHB) is discussed using both geometrical and magnetic criteria as the descriptors of aromaticity. The optimized geometry features, molecular electrostatic potential map analysis are also found to produce a consensus view in relation with the formation of RAHB in these systems.

  1. A Series of Diamagnetic Pyridine Monoimine Rhenium Complexes with Different Degrees of Metal-to-Ligand Charge Transfer: Correlating (13) C NMR Chemical Shifts with Bond Lengths in Redox-Active Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieh, Daniel; Kubiak, Clifford P

    2016-07-18

    A set of pyridine monoimine (PMI) rhenium(I) tricarbonyl chlorido complexes with substituents of different steric and electronic properties was synthesized and fully characterized. Spectroscopic (NMR and IR) and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses of these complexes showed that the redox-active PMI ligands are neutral and that the overall electronic structure is little affected by the choices of the substituent at the ligand backbone. One- and two-electron reduction products were prepared from selected starting compounds and could also be characterized by multiple spectroscopic methods and X-ray diffraction. The final product of a one-electron reduction in THF is a diamagnetic metal-metal-bonded dimer after loss of the chlorido ligand. Bond lengths in and NMR chemical shifts of the PMI ligand backbone indicate partial electron transfer to the ligand. Two-electron reduction in THF also leads to the loss of the chlorido ligand and a pentacoordinate complex is obtained. The comparison with reported bond lengths and (13) C NMR chemical shifts of doubly reduced free pyridine monoaldimine ligands indicates that both redox equivalents in the doubly reduced rhenium complex investigated here are located in the PMI ligand. With diamagnetic complexes varying over three formal reduction stages at the PMI ligand we were, for the first time, able to establish correlations of the (13) C NMR chemical shifts with the relevant bond lengths in redox-active ligands over a full redox series. PMID:27319753

  2. Mechanisms of formation of chemical bonding and defect formation at the a-SiO2/BaTiO3 interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure and mechanisms of bonding and defect formation at the interfaces between amorphous silica (a-SiO2) and BaTiO3(0 0 1) were investigated using ab initio molecular dynamics. It was found that the nature of interfacial bonds crucially depends on the BaTiO3 surface termination. In particular, the interface between silica and TiO2-terminated BaTiO3 (BTO) slab is characterised by strong covalent Ti–O–Si bonds, while the interface between silica and BaO-terminated BTO demonstrates ionic character of interfacial bonds and exhibits bond instability. In both cases, the dynamics of oxygen species at oxide interfaces is a driving force of the formation of interfacial bonds and defects. (paper)

  3. Interrelationships among biological activity, disulfide bonds, secondary structure, and metal ion binding for a chemically synthesized 34-amino-acid peptide derived from alpha-fetoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacColl, R; Eisele, L E; Stack, R F; Hauer, C; Vakharia, D D; Benno, A; Kelly, W C; Mizejewski, G J

    2001-10-01

    A 34-amino-acid peptide has been chemically synthesized based on a sequence from human alpha-fetoprotein. The purified peptide is active in anti-growth assays when freshly prepared in pH 7.4 buffer at 0.20 g/l, but this peptide slowly becomes inactive. This functional change is proven by mass spectrometry to be triggered by the formation of an intrapeptide disulfide bond between the two cysteine residues on the peptide. Interpeptide cross-linking does not occur. The active and inactive forms of the peptide have almost identical secondary structures as shown by circular dichroism (CD). Zinc ions bind to the active peptide and completely prevents formation of the inactive form. Cobalt(II) ions also bind to the peptide, and the UV-Vis absorption spectrum of the cobalt-peptide complex shows that: (1) a near-UV sulfur-to-metal-ion charge-transfer band had a molar extinction coefficient consistent with two thiolate bonds to Co(II); (2) the lowest-energy visible d-d transition maximum at 659 nm, also, demonstrated that the two cysteine residues are ligands for the metal ion; (3) the d-d molar extinction coefficient showed that the metal ion-ligand complex was in a distorted tetrahedral symmetry. The peptide has two cysteines, and it is speculated that the other two metal ion ligands might be the two histidines. The Zn(II)- and Co(II)-peptide complexes had similar peptide conformations as indicated by their ultraviolet CD spectra, which differed very slightly from that of the free peptide. Surprisingly, the cobalt ions acted in the reverse of the zinc ions in that, instead of stabilizing anti-growth form of the peptide, they catalyzed its loss. Metal ion control of peptide function is a saliently interesting concept. Calcium ions, in the conditions studied, apparently do not bind to the peptide. Trifluoroethanol and temperature (60 degrees C) affected the secondary structure of the peptide, and the peptide was found capable of assuming various conformations in solution

  4. Localization of double bonds in wax esters by high-performance liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry utilizing the fragmentation of acetonitrile-related adducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Háková, Martina; Pecková, Karolina; Urbanová, Klára; Cvačka, Josef

    2011-04-15

    Unsaturated wax esters (WEs) provided molecular adducts with C(3)H(5)N ([M + 55](+•)) in APCI sources in the presence of acetonitrile. CID MS/MS of [M + 55](+•) yielded fragments allowing the localization of double bond(s) in the hydrocarbon chains of the WEs. These fragments were formed by a cleavage on each side of the double bond. In methylene-interrupted polyunsaturated WEs, diagnostic fragments related to each double bond were detected; the most abundant were those corresponding to the cleavage of the C-C bond next to the first and the last double bond. To differentiate between those fragments differing in their structure or origin, a simple nomenclature based on α and ω ions has been introduced. Fragmentation of the α-type ions (fragments containing an ester bond) provided information on the occurrence of a double bond in the acid or alcohol part of the WEs. While no significant differences between the spectra of the WEs differing by cis/trans isomerism were found, the isomers were separated chromatographically. A data-dependent HPLC/APCI-MS(2) method for the comprehensive characterization of WEs in their complex mixtures has been developed and applied to natural mixtures of WEs isolated from jojoba oil and beeswax. More than 50 WE molecular species were completely identified, including the information on the acid and alcohol chain length and the position of the double bonds.

  5. Parental Bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Paul de Cock

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Estimating the early parent–child bonding relationship can be valuable in research and practice. Retrospective dimensional measures of parental bonding provide a means for assessing the experience of the early parent–child relationship. However, combinations of dimensional scores may provide information that is not readily captured with a dimensional approach. This study was designed to assess the presence of homogeneous groups in the population with similar profiles on parental bonding dimensions. Using a short version of the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI, three parental bonding dimensions (care, authoritarianism, and overprotection were used to assess the presence of unobserved groups in the population using latent profile analysis. The class solutions were regressed on 23 covariates (demographics, parental psychopathology, loss events, and childhood contextual factors to assess the validity of the class solution. The results indicated four distinct profiles of parental bonding for fathers as well as mothers. Parental bonding profiles were significantly associated with a broad range of covariates. This person-centered approach to parental bonding has broad utility in future research which takes into account the effect of parent–child bonding, especially with regard to “affectionless control” style parenting.

  6. Fusion bonding of silicon nitride surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reck, Kasper; Østergaard, Christian; Thomsen, Erik Vilain;

    2011-01-01

    While silicon nitride surfaces are widely used in many micro electrical mechanical system devices, e.g. for chemical passivation, electrical isolation or environmental protection, studies on fusion bonding of two silicon nitride surfaces (Si3N4–Si3N4 bonding) are very few and highly application...... results on bonding of thin and thick Si3N4 layers. The new results include high temperature bonding without any pretreatment, along with improved bonding ability achieved by thermal oxidation and chemical pretreatment. The bonded wafers include both unprocessed and processed wafers with a total silicon...... nitride thickness of up to 440 nm. Measurements of bonding strength, void characterization, oxidation rate and surface roughness are also presented. Bonding strengths for stoichiometric low pressure chemical vapor deposition Si3N4–Si3N4 direct fusion bonding in excess of 2 J cm−2 are found...

  7. CHEMICALS

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  8. Chemical bonding and electronic structures of the Al2SiO5 polymorphs, andalusite, sillimanite, and kyanite: X-ray photoelectron- and electron energy loss spectroscopy studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohuchi, Fumio S.; Ghose, Subrata; Engelhard, Mark H.; Baer, Donald R.

    2006-05-01

    We have undertaken a detailed analysis of the X-ray photoelectron spectra obtained from the three polymorphs of Al2SiO5; andalusite, sillimanite, and kyanite. Comparison of the spectra was made based on the chemical bonding and structural differences in the Al- and Si-coordination within each polymorph. The spectra for Si(2p) for all three polymorphs are nearly identical, consistent with the fact that all the Si atoms are in 4-fold (tetrahedral) coordination, whereas the binding energies, peak shapes, and peak widths for Al(2p) vary depending on the type of polymorph. The upper-valence band for all three polymorphs is characterized by four main features derived from O(2p), Al(3s), Al(2p), Si(3s), and Si(3p), and the differences in their contributions are observed. The density of state of the Al2SiO5 polymorphs is relatively featureless compared to those observed from ?-SiO2 and ?-Al2O3, suggesting that the orbital overlaps span a greater range in energy. The observed band gap energy for Al2SiO5 (sillimanite) was {approx}9.1eV, a value in between those for ?-SiO2 ({approx}8.6eV) and ?-Al2O3 ({approx}9.6eV). The conduction band feature of Al2SiO5 was experimentally compared to those of ?-SiO2 and ?-Al2O3, and shown that it is indeed intermediate between the ?-SiO2 and ?-Al2O3 phases.

  9. Comparative anti-inflammatory activities of curcumin and tetrahydrocurcumin based on the phenolic O-H bond dissociation enthalpy, ionization potential and quantum chemical descriptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Yukio; Ishii, Hiroaki; Takada, Naoki; Tanaka, Shoji; Machino, Mamoru; Ito, Shigeru; Fujisawa, Seiichiro

    2008-01-01

    Curcumin and its reduced derivative tetrahydrocurcumin have been shown to exhibit chemopreventive activity. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibition in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- or Porphyromonas gingivalis fimbria-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells was investigated using Northern blot analysis. The fimbria-stimulated expression of the COX-2 gene was inhibited by curcumin but not by tetrahydrocurcumin. LPS-stimulated COX-2 gene expression was completely inhibited by curcumin, but an increase in the concentration of tetrahydrocurcumin did not cause complete inhibition of COX-2 expression. The inhibitory effect of curcumin on nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) activation in the cells was clearly observed, but that of tetrahydrocurcumin was incomplete even at a concentration of 20 microM. To explain the difference in effect between the two compounds, analysis of the frontier orbital was performed using ab initio 6-31G* wave function. The calculated chemical hardness (eta) for curcumin was clearly smaller, whereas its electronegativity (chi) and electrophilicity (omega) were clearly greater than the corresponding values for the curcumin-related compounds tetrahydrocurcumin, isoeugenol and eugenol. This suggested that the anti-inflammatory activities of curcumin may be related to eta-, chi- and/or omega-controlled enzymes. In addition, the bond dissociation enthalpy (BDE) of the phenolic OH was calculated using the density function theory (DFT)/B3LY. The total BDE values of curcumin and tetrahydrocurcumin were almost identical, but the BDE of one-electron oxidation and ionization potential (IP) for curcumin were lower than those for tetrahydrocurcumin, suggesting the highly pro-oxidative activity of curcumin. Curcumin has both oxidant and antioxidant properties. A causal link between the anti-inflammatory activities and molecular properties of phenolic antioxidants is suggested. PMID:18507010

  10. Study on the covalence of Cu and chemical bonding in an inorganic fullerene-like molecule, [CuCl]20[Cp*FeP5]12[Cu-(CH3CN)2+Cl-]5, by a density functional approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Bingwu; XU Guangxian; CHEN Zhida

    2004-01-01

    The electronic structure and chemical bonding in a recently synthesized inorganic fullerene-like molecule, {[CuCl]20[Cp*FeP5]12 [Cu(CH3CN)+2Cl-]5}, has been studied by a density functional approach. Geometrical optimization of the three basic structural units of the molecule is performed with Amsterdam Density Functional Program. The results are in agreement with the experiment. Localized MO's obtained by Boys-Foster method give a clear picture of the chemical bonding in this molecule. The reason why CuCl can react with Cp*FeP5 in solvent CH3CN to form the fullerene-like molecule is explained in terms of the soft-hard Lewis acid base theory and a new concept of covalence.

  11. Inverted-sandwich-type and open-lantern-type dinuclear transition metal complexes: theoretical study of chemical bonds by electronic stress tensor

    CERN Document Server

    Ichikawa, Kazuhide; Kurokawa, Yusaku I; Sakaki, Shigeyoshi; Tachibana, Akitomo

    2011-01-01

    We study the electronic structure of two types of transition metal complexes, the inverted-sandwich-type and open-lantern-type, by the electronic stress tensor. In particular, the bond order b_e measured by the energy density which is defined from the electronic stress tensor is studied and compared with the conventional MO based bond order. We also examine the patterns found in the largest eigenvalue of the stress tensor and corresponding eigenvector field, the "spindle structure" and "pseudo-spindle structure". As for the inverted-sandwich-type complex, our bond order b_e calculation shows that relative strength of the metal-benzene bond among V, Cr and Mn complexes is V > Cr > Mn which is consistent with the MO based bond order. As for the open-lantern-type complex, we find that our energy density based bond order can properly describe the relative strength of Cr--Cr and Mo--Mo bonds by the surface integration of the energy density over the "Lagrange surface" which can take into account the spatial extent ...

  12. Computational Chemistry of Adhesive Bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Donald H.

    1999-01-01

    This investigation is intended to determine the electrical mechanical, and chemical properties of adhesive bonds at the molecular level. The initial determinations will be followed by investigations of the effects of environmental effects on the chemistry and properties of the bond layer.

  13. LAMMPS Framework for Directional Dynamic Bonding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    and bond types. When breaking bonds, all angular and dihedral interactions involving broken bonds are removed. The framework allows chemical reactions to be modeled, and use it to simulate a simplistic, coarse-grained DNA model. The resulting DNA dynamics illustrates the power of the present framework.......We have extended the Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator (LAMMPS) to support directional bonds and dynamic bonding. The framework supports stochastic formation of new bonds, breakage of existing bonds, and conversion between bond types. Bond formation can be controlled...... to limit the maximal functionality of a bead with respect to various bond types. Concomitant with the bond dynamics, angular and dihedral interactions are dynamically introduced between newly connected triplets and quartets of beads, where the interaction type is determined from the local pattern of bead...

  14. Bond Boom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The Ministry of Finance recently kick-started a pilot program allowing local governments of Shanghai and Shenzhen, and Zhejiang and Guangdong provinces to issue bonds for the first time. How will the new policy affect fiscal capacities of local governments and the broader economy? What else should the country do to build a healthy bond market? Economists and experts discussed these issues in an interview with the ShanghaiSecuritiesJournal. Edited excerpts follow:

  15. Bond Boom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The Ministry of Finance recently kick-started a pilot program allowing local governments of Shanghai and Shenzhen,and Zhejiang and Guangdong provinces to issue bonds for the first time.How will the new policy affect fiscal capacities of local governments and the broader economy? What else should the country do to build a healthy bond market? Economists and experts discussed these issues in an interview with the Shanghai Securities Journal.Edited excerpts follow.

  16. Development of Diversified Methods for Chemical Modification of the 5,6-Double Bond of Uracil Derivatives Depending on Active Methylene Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosaku Hirota

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The reaction of 5-halogenouracil and uridine derivatives 1 and 7 with active methylene compounds under basic conditions produced diverse and selective C-C bond formation products by virtue of the nature of the carbanions. Three different types of reactions such as the regioselective C-C bond formation at the 5- and 6-positions of uracil and uridine derivatives (products 2, 5, 8, 17, 20 and 21, and the formation of fused heterocycle derivatives 2,4-diazabicyclo[4.1.0]heptane (15 and 2,4-diazabicyclo-[4.1.0]nonane (16 via dual C-C bond formations at both the 5- and 6-positions were due to the different active methylene compounds used as reagents.

  17. Gd13Fe10C13: Indications of Fe-Fe Multiple Bonding Emerging from Chemical Frustration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadler, Amelia B; Fredrickson, Daniel C [UW

    2012-10-25

    We report the synthesis and crystal structure of the carbide Gd13Fe10C13. This compound adopts a new structure type that is remarkable for its 'H'-shaped C2FeFeC2 units, which have some of the shortest Fe-Fe contacts known. A bonding analysis using DFT-calibrated Hueckel calculations hints that Fe-Fe multiple bonding underlies these short distances. Gd13Fe10C13 undergoes ferromagnetic ordering at ~55 K.

  18. Thread bonds in molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Ivlev, B

    2015-01-01

    Unusual chemical bonds are proposed. Each bond is almost covalent but is characterized by the thread of a small radius $\\sim 0.6\\times 10^{-11}$cm, between two nuclei in a molecule. The main electron density is concentrated outside the thread as in a covalent bond. The thread is formed by the electron wave function which has a tendency to be singular on it. The singularity along the thread is cut off by electron "vibrations" due to the interaction with zero point electromagnetic oscillations. The electron energy has its typical value of (1-10)eV. Due to the small tread radius the uncertainty of the electron momentum inside the thread is large resulting in a large electron kinetic energy $\\sim 1 MeV$. This energy is compensated by formation of a potential well due to the reduction of the energy of electromagnetic zero point oscillations. This is similar to formation of a negative van der Waals potential. Thread bonds are stable and cannot be created or destructed in chemical or optical processes.

  19. Chemical activation of molecules by metals: Experimental studies of electron distributions and bonding. Technical progress report, March 1, 1992--February 28, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lichtenberger, D.L.

    1997-06-01

    During this period of the project we have (1) accomplished the high-resolution gas phase photoelectron spectra of C{sub 60} and C{sub 70}, (2) characterized the electronic features of imaging C{sub 60} on gold by STM, (3) evaluated the orbital distributions of C{sub 60} and the bonding interactions with metals, (4) revealed details of the bonding of phosphines to metals, including the subtleties of a geometrical twist in sterically crowded situations, (5) determined the formal electron distribution in the bonding of {eta}{sup 3} -cyclopropenyl with metals, (6) related gas-phase ionization energies to electron transfer kinetics and ion salvation thermochemistry of metallocenes, (7) correlated lone-pair ionization energies with proton affinities for a variety of amino acids and related compounds, (8) examined sigma-pi interactions in non-conjugated polyalkynes, (9) characterized extensive metal-ligand {pi} interactions in metal-acetylide compounds, and (10) continued to develop the experimental and theoretical methods for these studies. All of these studies have contributed significantly to expanding our understanding of the electronic structure and bonding of organic molecules and the ways this electronic structure is altered by interaction with metals. Further developments in the instrumentation and methods of gas phase and surface photoelectron spectroscopy are underway. Most notable is the progress on the new gas phase photoelectron spectrometer that combines improved capabilities for He I/He II UPS, XPS, and Auger investigations of organometallic molecules.

  20. Microstructures, Mechanical and Chemical Properties of TLP-Bonded Joints in a Duplex Stainless Steel with Amorphous Ni-Based Insert Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xinjian; Kim, Myung Bok; Cho, Young Ho; Kang, Chung Yun

    2012-06-01

    The changes in tensile strength and pitting corrosion resistance of transient liquid-phase (TLP)-bonded joints for a duplex stainless steel with MBF-80, MBF-30, and MBF-35 as functions of holding time and filler were interpreted with respect to the bond microstructure. Using MBF-80 after 300 seconds, the fracture strength of the joint reached the maximum value. The failure was dependent on the interplay between the reduction in residual liquid and the increase in interface precipitates. After 3600 seconds, the joint strength had the minimum value. At the same conditions, the tensile strength for MBF-80 was low compared with MBF-35 and MBF-30. In contrast with the tensile strength, the joint produced with MBF-80 for 3600 seconds exhibited the best corrosion resistance. Among the fillers used, the corrosion resistance of the joint using MBF-80 close to that of the substrate could be related intimately to the existence of Cr in this filler.

  1. Cholesteric bonded stationary phases for high performance liquid chromatography II: synthesis, physico-chemical characterization and chromatographic behavior of a phospho-cholesteric bonded support. A new way to mimic drug/membrane interactions?

    OpenAIRE

    Courtois, Cédric; Allais, Christophe; Constantieux, Thierry; Rodriguez, Jean; Caldarelli, Stefano; Delaurent, Corinne

    2008-01-01

    International audience Among the various methods exploitable to deter- mine the bioavailability of drugs, reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) appears to be suited to creation of patterns of prediction. In this context a new stationary phase was designed in this work to reproduce, in terms of chemical structure, as accurately as possible, the main elements of cellular membranes; which include phospholipids and cho- lesterol molecules. An efficient synthetic pathway was developed to ...

  2. Ab initio investigations of the electronic structures and chemical bonding in LiCo{sub 6}P{sub 4} and Li{sub 2}Co{sub 12}P{sub 7}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matar, Samir F. [CNRS, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F‐33600 Pessac (France); Université de Bordeaux, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F‐33600 Pessac (France); Al-Alam, Adel; Ouaini, Naïm [Université Saint-Esprit de Kaslik (USEK), Groupe OCM (Optimization et Caractérisation des Matériaux), CSR-USEK, CNRS-L, Jounieh (Lebanon); Pöttgen, Rainer, E-mail: pottgen@uni-muenster.de [Institut für Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, Universität Münster, Corrensstraße 30, D-48149 Münster (Germany)

    2013-06-15

    The electronic structures of the metal-rich phosphides LiCo{sub 6}P{sub 4} and Li{sub 2}Co{sub 12}P{sub 7} were studied by DFT calculations. Both phosphides consist of three-dimensional [Co{sub 6}P{sub 4}] and [Co{sub 12}P{sub 7}] polyanionic networks which leave hexagonal channels for the lithium atoms. COOP data show strong Co–P and Co–Co bonding within the polyanions. The lithium atoms have trigonal prismatic phosphorus coordination. Total energy calculations indicate stability upon de-lithiation towards the Co{sub 6}P{sub 4} and Co{sub 12}P{sub 7} substructures - Graphical abstract: The cobalt–phosphorus networks in LiCo{sub 6}P{sub 4} and Li{sub 2}Co{sub 12}P{sub 7}. - Highlights: • Chemical bonding resolved in the metal-rich phosphides LiCo{sub 6}P{sub 4} and Li{sub 2}Co{sub 12}P{sub 7}. • Strong covalent Co–P bonding character in the [Co{sub 6}P{sub 4}] and [Co{sub 12}P{sub 7}] substructures. • Total energy calculations indicate stability of the de-lithiated substructures.

  3. Diffusion bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Robert C.

    1976-06-22

    1. A method for joining beryllium to beryllium by diffusion bonding, comprising the steps of coating at least one surface portion of at least two beryllium pieces with nickel, positioning a coated surface portion in a contiguous relationship with an other surface portion, subjecting the contiguously disposed surface portions to an environment having an atmosphere at a pressure lower than ambient pressure, applying a force upon the beryllium pieces for causing the contiguous surface portions to abut against each other, heating the contiguous surface portions to a maximum temperature less than the melting temperature of the beryllium, substantially uniformly decreasing the applied force while increasing the temperature after attaining a temperature substantially above room temperature, and maintaining a portion of the applied force at a temperature corresponding to about maximum temperature for a duration sufficient to effect the diffusion bond between the contiguous surface portions.

  4. 水对液相氧化处理聚乙烯木塑复合材胶接性能的影响%Effect of water on bonding properties for liquidoid chemical oxidation treated wood/PE composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    滕晓磊; 邸明伟

    2011-01-01

    The surface of wood/polyethylene (PE) composites was treated by liquidoid chemical oxidation to improve its adhesion properties.The water-resistance of treated wood/PE composites bonding joint was studied and the failure mechanism at soaking in water for the bonding joint was investigated by using analysis of contact angle,scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) through effect of water on the surface properties of treated wood/PE composites in soaking experiments.The results showed that the untreated wood/PE composites were hard to be adhered due to the polyethylene component gathered on the surface of composites, and the bonding strength and water-resistance for wood/PE composites bonding joint were improved after liquidoid chemical oxidation treatment.Water showed a remarkable effect on the surface properties for oxidation treated wood/PE composites,the surface structure changed and the crack appeared on the surface due to the moisture absorption and expansion of the wood fiber within composites under soaking in water,which resulted in the failure of bonding joint for wood/PE composites.%采用液相氧化方法对木粉/聚乙烯木塑复合材料进行表面处理以改善其胶接性能研究了氧化处理后木塑复合材料胶接接头的耐水性,并利用接触角测试、SEM、FT-IR等分析手段,探讨了木塑复合材料胶接接头在水环境下的老化失效原因 结果表明,未处理的聚乙烯木塑复合材料难以胶接,经过液相氧化处理后,不但可以提高聚乙烯木塑复合材料的胶接强度,还可改善木塑复合材料胶接接头的耐水性 在水的作用下,液相氧化处理聚乙烯木塑复合材的表面结构会发生改变,复合材料中木质纤维的吸水膨胀也会导致材料表面出现裂纹,致使胶接接头失效.

  5. The chemisorptive bond basic concepts

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, Alfred

    1974-01-01

    The Chemisorptive Bond: Basic Concepts describes the basic concepts of the chemisorptive bond on solid surfaces from the simple analogies with ordinary chemical bonds to the quantum-mechanical approaches.This book is composed of 10 chapters and begins with discussions of simple formulas for correlating measurable quantities in chemisorptions and catalysis. The succeeding chapters deal with theories based on quantum-mechanical principles that describe the mutual interactions of atoms of the solid and foreign atoms on the surface. The remaining chapters consider the possible arrangements

  6. LaMgX and CeMgX (X = Ga, In, Tl, Pd, Ag, Pt, Au) with ZrNiAl type structure - A systematic view on electronic structure and chemical bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matar, Samir F.; Etourneau, Jean; Pöttgen, Rainer

    2015-05-01

    The intermetallic magnesium compounds LaMgX and CeMgX (X = Ga, In, Tl, Pd, Ag, Pt, Au) crystallize with the hexagonal ZrNiAl type structure, space group P 6 bar 2 m , with full Mg-X ordering. From density functional theory calculations carried out exemplarily on four representative compounds: LaMgX and CeMgX with X = Ga, Pd, significant differences were traced out as to the magnetism arising only for the Ce series leading to identify CeMgGa as an antiferromagnet in its ground state, in agreement with experiment. The bulk module magnitudes show the trend of harder transition metal based ternaries and the cohesive energies favor the X = Pd compounds versus X = Ga ones. Such features were clarified by examining the properties of chemical bonding which exhibit more directional bonds thanks to the Pd d states. Rationalizing the trends of charge transfers, negatively charged triel and transition element atoms are observed. The resulting chemical pictures assign these compounds as gallides and palladides.

  7. Relation between bond-length alternation and two-photon absorption of a push pull conjugated molecules: a quantum-chemical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartkowiak, W.; Zaleśny, R.; Leszczynski, J.

    2003-02-01

    The results of the semiempirical study of the structure/property relationships for the two-photon absorption cross-section ( δ) of a series of prototypical π-conjugated push-pull molecules are presented. The calculations of δ for the first charge-transfer (CT) excited state were performed as a function of the bond length alternation (BLA). The molecular hyperpolarizabilities ( β and γ) were calculated using the finite-field (FF) method. The obtained data were analyzed based on the simple two-state models. A strong dependence of δ on the BLA parameter was noticed.

  8. Relation between bond-length alternation and two-photon absorption of a push-pull conjugated molecules: a quantum-chemical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartkowiak, W.; Zalesny, R.; Leszczynski, J

    2003-02-01

    The results of the semiempirical study of the structure/property relationships for the two-photon absorption cross-section ({delta}) of a series of prototypical {pi}-conjugated push-pull molecules are presented. The calculations of {delta} for the first charge-transfer (CT) excited state were performed as a function of the bond length alternation (BLA). The molecular hyperpolarizabilities ({beta} and {gamma}) were calculated using the finite-field (FF) method. The obtained data were analyzed based on the simple two-state models. A strong dependence of {delta} on the BLA parameter was noticed.

  9. Ternary arsenides based on platinum–indium and palladium–indium fragments of the Cu{sub 3}Au-type: Crystal structures and chemical bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakharova, Elena Yu.; Andreeva, Natalia A.; Kazakov, Sergey M. [Department of Chemistry, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory 1-3, GSP-1, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kuznetsov, Alexey N., E-mail: alexei@inorg.chem.msu.ru [Department of Chemistry, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory 1-3, GSP-1, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); N.S. Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry of Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskii pr. 31, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-02-05

    Highlights: • Three metal-rich platinum–indium and palladium–indium arsenides were synthesized. • Their crystal structures were determined from powder XRD. • Electronic structures and bonding were studied using DFT/FP-LAPW calculations. • Multi-centered Pt–In or Pd–In bonding was revealed using ELF and ELI-D analysis. • Extra pairwise Pt–Pt interactions are observed only for Pt-based compounds. - Abstract: Three metal-rich palladium–indium and platinum–indium arsenides, Pd{sub 5}InAs, Pt{sub 5}InAs, and Pt{sub 8}In{sub 2}As, were synthesized using a high-temperature ampoule technique. Their crystal structures were determined from Rietveld analysis of powder diffraction data. All the compounds crystallize in tetragonal system with P4/mmm space group (Pd{sub 5}InAs: a = 3.9874(1) Å, c = 6.9848(2) Å, Z = 1, R{sub p} = 0.053; R{sub b} = 0.013; Pt{sub 5}InAs: a = 3.9981(2) Å, c = 7.0597(4) Å, Z = 1, R{sub p} = 0.058, R{sub b} = 0.016; Pt{sub 8}In{sub 2}As: a = 3.9872(3) Å, c = 11.1129(7) Å, Z = 1, R{sub p} = 0.047; R{sub b} = 0.014). The first two compounds belong to the Pd{sub 5}TlAs structure type, while the third one is isotypic with the recently discovered Pd{sub 8}In{sub 2}Se. Main structural units in all arsenides are indium-centered [TM{sub 12}In] cuboctahedra (TM = Pd, Pt) of the Cu{sub 3}Au type, single- and double-stacked along the c axis in TM{sub 5}InAs and Pt{sub 8}In{sub 2}As, respectively, alternating with [TM{sub 8}As] rectangular prisms. DFT electronic structure calculations predict all three compounds to be 3D metallic conductors and Pauli-like paramagnets. According to the bonding analysis based on the electron localization function and electron localizability indicator topologies, all compounds feature multi-centered interactions between transition metal and indium in their heterometallic fragments. Additionally, pairwise interactions between platinum atoms are also observed, indicating a somewhat more localized bonding

  10. Direct, simple derivatization of disulfide bonds in proteins with organic mercury in alkaline medium without any chemical pre-reducing agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campanella, Beatrice; Onor, Massimo [National Research Council of Italy, C.N.R., Istituto di Chimica dei Composti Organo Metallici-ICCOM- UOS Pisa, Area di Ricerca, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Ferrari, Carlo [National Research Council of Italy, C.N.R., Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, INO-UOS Pisa, Area di Ricerca, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); D’Ulivo, Alessandro [National Research Council of Italy, C.N.R., Istituto di Chimica dei Composti Organo Metallici-ICCOM- UOS Pisa, Area di Ricerca, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Bramanti, Emilia, E-mail: bramanti@pi.iccom.cnr.it [National Research Council of Italy, C.N.R., Istituto di Chimica dei Composti Organo Metallici-ICCOM- UOS Pisa, Area di Ricerca, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2014-09-16

    Highlights: • A simple procedure for the derivatization of proteins disulfide bonds. • Cysteine groups in several proteins derivatised with pHMB in alkaline media. • 75–100% labelling of cysteines in proteins with pHMB. - Abstract: In this work we have studied the derivatization of protein disulfide bonds with p-Hydroxymercurybenzoate (pHMB) in strong alkaline medium without any preliminary reduction. The reaction has been followed by the determination of the protein–pHMB complex using size exclusion chromatography coupled to a microwave/UV mercury oxidation system for the on-line oxidation of free and protein-complexed pHMB and atomic fluorescence spectrometry (SEC–CVG–AFS) detection. The reaction has been optimized by an experimental design using lysozyme as a model protein and applied to several thiolic proteins. The proposed method reports, for the first time, that it is possible to label 75–100% cysteines of proteins and, thus, to determine thiolic proteins without the need of any reducing step to obtain reduced -SH groups before mercury labelling. We obtained a detection limit of 100 nmol L{sup −1} based on a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 for unbound and complexed pHMB, corresponding to a detection limit of proteins ranged between 3 and 360 nmol L{sup −1}, depending on the number of cysteines in the protein sequence.

  11. Binary and Ternary Heterometallic (La3+, Gd3+, Y3+–Eu3+ Functionalized SBA-15 Mesoporous Hybrids: Chemically Bonded Assembly and Photoluminescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Bing

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A novel kind of organic–inorganic monomer SUASi has been achieved by modifying 5-sulfosalicylic acid (SUA with 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APS, subsequently binary and ternary Eu3+ mesoporous hybrid materials with 5-sulfosalicylic acid (SUA-functionalized SBA-15 and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen are synthesized by co-condensation of SUASi and TEOS in the presence of Eu3+ complex and Pluronic P123 as a template. Finally, luminescent hybrid mesoporous materials consisting of active rare earth ions (Eu3+—inert rare earth ions (Y3+, La3+, Gd3+ complex covalently bonded to the mesoporous materials network have been obtained via this sol–gel approach. The physical characterization and photoluminescence of all these resulting materials are studied in detail. Especially the luminescent behavior has been studied with the different ratios of Eu3+–(Y3+, La3+, Gd3+, which suggests that the existence of inert rare earth ions can enhance the luminescence intensity of Eu3+. This may be due to the intramolecular energy transfer between Y3+, La3+, Gd3+, and Eu3+ through the covalently bonded mesoporous framework.

  12. Definition and Application of Topological Index Based on Bond Connectivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhen-dong; YANG Feng; YANG Hai-lang; LUO Ming-dao; QU Song-sheng

    2003-01-01

    Bond connectivity topological index Si based on chemical bonds was defined by using a matrix method.And Si is formed by atomic parameters such as the number of valence electrons,the number of the highest main quantum of atoms and the bonding electrons and bond parameters such as the length of bonds,the electronegativity difference of bonding atoms.The molecular bond connectivity topological index S is composed of Si.The thermodynamic properties of saturated hydrocarbons,unsaturated hydrocarbons,oxygen organic,methane halide and transitional element compounds and the molecular bond connectivity topological index S have an optimal correlative relationship.

  13. Hexacoordinate bonding and aromaticity in silicon phthalocyanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang

    2010-12-23

    Si-E bondings in hexacoordinate silicon phthalocyanine were analyzed using bond order (BO), energy partition, atoms in molecules (AIM), electron localization function (ELF), and localized orbital locator (LOL). Bond models were proposed to explain differences between hexacoordinate and tetracoordinate Si-E bondings. Aromaticity of silicon phthalocyanine was investigated using nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS), harmonic oscillator model of aromaticity (HOMA), conceptual density functional theory (DFT), ring critical point (RCP) descriptors, and delocalization index (DI). Structure, energy, bonding, and aromaticity of tetracoordinate silicon phthalocyanine were studied and compared with hexacoordinate one. PMID:21105726

  14. The structure, energetics, and nature of the chemical bonding of phenylthiol adsorbed on the Au(111) surface: implications for density-functional calculations of molecular-electronic conduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilić, Ante; Reimers, Jeffrey R; Hush, Noel S

    2005-03-01

    The adsorption of phenylthiol on the Au(111) surface is modeled using Perdew and Wang density-functional calculations. Both direct molecular physisorption and dissociative chemisorption via S-H bond cleavage are considered as well as dimerization to form disulfides. For the major observed product, the chemisorbed thiol, an extensive potential-energy surface is produced as a function of both the azimuthal orientation of the adsorbate and the linear translation of the adsorbate through the key fcc, hcp, bridge, and top binding sites. Key structures are characterized, the lowest-energy one being a broad minimum of tilted orientation ranging from the bridge structure halfway towards the fcc one. The vertically oriented threefold binding sites, often assumed to dominate molecular electronics measurements, are identified as transition states at low coverage but become favored in dense monolayers. A similar surface is also produced for chemisorption of phenylthiol on Ag(111); this displays significant qualitative differences, consistent with the qualitatively different observed structures for thiol chemisorption on Ag and Au. Full contours of the minimum potential energy as a function of sulfur translation over the crystal face are described, from which the barrier to diffusion is deduced to be 5.8 kcal mol(-1), indicating that the potential-energy surface has low corrugation. The calculated bond lengths, adsorbate charge and spin density, and the density of electronic states all indicate that, at all sulfur locations, the adsorbate can be regarded as a thiyl species that forms a net single covalent bond to the surface of strength 31 kcal mol(-1). No detectable thiolate character is predicted, however, contrary to experimental results for alkyl thiols that indicate up to 20%-30% thiolate involvement. This effect is attributed to the asymptotic-potential error of all modern density functionals that becomes manifest through a 3-4 eV error in the lineup of the adsorbate and

  15. Predicted Chemical Activation Rate Constants for HO2 + CH2NH: The Dominant Role of a Hydrogen-Bonded Pre-reactive Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mohamad Akbar; Sonk, Jason A; Barker, John R

    2016-09-15

    The reaction of methanimine (CH2NH) with the hydroperoxy (HO2) radical has been investigated by using a combination of ab initio and density functional theory (CCSD(T)/CBSB7//B3LYP+Dispersion/CBSB7) and master equation calculations based on transition state theory (TST). Variational TST was used to compute both canonical (CVTST) and microcanonical (μVTST) rate constants for barrierless reactions. The title reaction starts with the reversible formation of a cyclic prereactive complex (PRC) that is bound by ∼11 kcal/mol and contains hydrogen bonds to both nitrogen and oxygen. The reaction path for the entrance channel was investigated by a series of constrained optimizations, which showed that the reaction is barrierless (i.e., no intrinsic energy barrier along the path). However, the variations in the potential energy, vibrational frequencies, and rotational constants reveal that the two hydrogen bonds are formed sequentially, producing two reaction flux bottlenecks (i.e., two transition states) along the reaction path, which were modeled using W. H. Miller's unified TST approach. The rate constant computed for the formation of the PRC is pressure-dependent and increases at lower temperatures. Under atmospheric conditions, the PRC dissociates rapidly and its lifetime is too short for it to undergo significant bimolecular reaction with other species. A small fraction isomerizes via a cyclic transition state and subsequent reactions lead to products normally expected from hydrogen abstraction reactions. The kinetics of the HO2 + CH2NH reaction system differs substantially from the analogous isoelectronic reaction systems involving C2H4 and CH2O, which have been the subjects of previous experimental and theoretical studies.

  16. Hydrogen bonding in tight environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirrotta, Alessandro; Solomon, Gemma C.; Franco, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    The single-molecule force spectroscopy of a prototypical class of hydrogen-bonded complexes is computationally investigated. The complexes consist of derivatives of a barbituric acid and a Hamilton receptor that can form up to six simultaneous hydrogen bonds. The force-extension (F-L) isotherms...... of the host-guest complexes are simulated using classical molecular dynamics and the MM3 force field, for which a refined set of hydrogen bond parameters was developed from MP2 ab initio computations. The F-L curves exhibit peaks that signal conformational changes during elongation, the most prominent...... of which is in the 60-180 pN range and corresponds to the force required to break the hydrogen bonds. These peaks in the F-L curves are shown to be sensitive to relatively small changes in the chemical structure of the host molecule. Thermodynamic insights into the supramolecular assembly were obtained...

  17. Thermoelectric, electronic, optical and chemical bonding properties of Ba{sub 2}PrRuO{sub 6}: At temperature 7 K and 150 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reshak, A.H. [New Technologies-Research Center, University of West Bohemia, Univerzitni 8, 306 14 Pilsen (Czech Republic); Center of Excellence Geopolymer and Green Technology, School of Material Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis, Kangar, Perlis 01007 Malaysia (Malaysia); Khan, Wilayat, E-mail: walayat76@gmail.com [New Technologies-Research Center, University of West Bohemia, Univerzitni 8, 306 14 Pilsen (Czech Republic)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • DFT-FPLAPW method used for calculating the electronic structure. • The Fermi surface of BPRO (7 K and 150 K) is also calculated. • The complex dielectric function has been calculated. • Thermoelectric properties were also calculated using BoltzTraP code. • Power factor shows that both compounds are good thermoelectric materials at 600 K. - Abstract: We present first principles calculations of the band structure, density of states, electronic charge density, Fermi surface and optical properties of Ba{sub 2}PrRuO{sub 6} single crystals at two different temperatures. The atomic positions were optimized by minimizing the forces acting on the atoms. We have employed the full potential linear augmented plane wave method within local density approximation, generalized gradient approximation and Engel–Vosko generalized gradient approximation to treat the exchange correlation potential. The calculation shows that the compound is superconductor with strong hybridization near the Fermi energy level. Fermi surface is composed of two sheets. The calculated electronic specific heat capacities indicate, very close agreement with the experimental one. The bonding features of the compounds are analyzed using the electronic charge density in the (1 0 0) and (0–10) crystallographic planes. The dispersion of the optical constants was calculated and discussed. The thermoelectric properties are also calculated using the BoltzTrap code.

  18. Density functional study of electronic, charge density, and chemical bonding properties of 9-methyl-3-Thiophen-2-YI-Thieno [3,2-e] [1, 2, 4] Thriazolo [4,3-c] pyrimidine-8-Carboxylic acid ethyl ester crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reshak, A.H., E-mail: maalidph@yahoo.co.uk [New Technologies – Research Center, University of West Bohemia, Univerzitni 8, 306 14 Pilsen (Czech Republic); Center of Excellence Geopolymer and Green Technology, School of Material Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis, 01007 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Kamarudin, H. [Center of Excellence Geopolymer and Green Technology, School of Material Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis, 01007 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Alahmed, Z.A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Auluck, S. [CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K S Krishnan Marg, New Delhi 110012 (India); Chyský, Jan [Department of Instrumentation and Control Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, CTU in Prague, Technicka 4, 166 07 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2014-06-01

    A comprehensive theoretical density functional investigation of the electronic crystal structure, chemical bonding, and the electron charge densities of 9-Methyl-3-Thiophen-2-YI-Thieno [3, 2-e] [1, 2, 4] Thriazolo [4,3-c] Pyrimidine-8-Carboxylic Acid Ethyl Ester (C{sub 15}H{sub 12}N{sub 4}O{sub 2}S{sub 2}) is performed. The density of states at Fermi level equal to 5.50 (3.45) states/Ry cell, and the calculated bare electronic specific heat coefficient is found to be 0.95 (0.59) mJ/mole-K{sup 2} for the local density approximation (Engel–Vosko generalized gradient approximation). The electronic charge density space distribution contours in (1 0 0) and (1 1 0) planes were calculated. We find that there are two independent molecules (A and B) in the asymmetric unit exhibit intramolecular C–H…O, C–H…N interactions. This intramolecular interaction is different in molecules A and B, where A molecule show C–H…O interaction while B molecule exhibit C–H…N interaction. We should emphasis that there is π–π interaction between the pyrimidine rings of the two neighbors B molecules gives extra strengths and stabilizations to the superamolecular structure. The calculated distance between the two neighbors pyrimidine rings found to be 3.345 Å, in good agreement with the measured one (3.424(1) Å). - Highlights: • Electronic structure, chemical bonding, and electron charge density were studied. • Density of states at Fermi level is 5.50 (3.45) states/Ry cell, for LDA (EVGGA). • Bare electronic specific heat coefficient is 0.95 (0.59) mJ/mole-K{sup 2} for LDA(EVGGA). • There are two independent molecules (A and B) in the asymmetric unit.

  19. Effect of pretreatment bias on the nucleation and growth mechanisms of ultrananocrystalline diamond films via bias-enhanced nucleation and growth: An approach to interfacial chemistry analysis via chemical bonding mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of pretreatment bias on the nucleation and growth mechanisms of the ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films on the Si substrate via bias-enhanced nucleation and bias-enhanced growth (BEN-BEG) was investigated using cross-sectional high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, chemical bonding mapping, and Raman spectroscopy. The mirror-polished substrate surface showed the formation of a triangular profile produced by a dominant physical sputtering mechanism induced by ion bombardment of ions from the hydrogen plasma accelerated toward the substrate due to biasing and a potential hydrogen-induced chemical reaction component before synthesizing the UNCD films. The BEN-BEG UNCD films grown on the Si substrate with biased and unbiased pretreatments in the hydrogen plasma were compared. In the case of the bias-pretreated substrate, the SiC phases were formed at the peaks of the Si surface triangular profile due to the active unsaturated Si bond and the enhanced local electrical field. The UNCD grains grew preferentially at the peaks of the triangular substrate surface profile and rapidly covered the amorphous carbon (a-C) and oriented graphite phases formed in the valley of the surface profile. In the case of the substrate with unbiased pretreatment, the SiC phases were formed via the reactions between the hydrocarbon species and the active Si atoms released from the substrate with assistance of the hydrogen plasma. The UNCD grains nucleated on the nucleating sites consisting of the SiC, a-C, and graphite phases. Growth mechanisms for the BEN-BEG UNCD films on both Si substrates were proposed to elucidate the different nucleation processes. Applying bias on the Si substrate pretreated in the hydrogen plasma optimized the nucleation sites for growth of UNCD grains, resulting in the low content of the nondiamond phases in UNCD films

  20. On double bonds in fullerenes

    OpenAIRE

    Stepenshchikov D. G.; Voytekhovsky Yu. L.

    2016-01-01

    Various distributions of double carbon bonds in the fullerenes have been considered in the paper from the point that they are absent in the pentagonal rings. The appropriate classification of the fullerenes has been built. The results may be used when modeling the fullerenes of a given topology and calculating their physical-chemical properties

  1. Quantum chemical investigation for structures and bonding analysis of molybdenum tetracarbonyl complexes with N-heterocyclic carbene and analogues: helpful information for plant biology research

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Thi Ai Nhung; Huynh, Thi Phuong Loan; Pham Van, Tat

    2015-01-01

    Quantum chemical calculations at the gradient-corrected (BP86) density-functional calculations with various basis sets (SVP, TZVPP) have been carried out for Mo(CO)4 complexes of Nheterocyclic carbene and analogues-NHEMe (called tetrylenes) with E = C, Si, Ge, Sn, Pb. The equilibrium structures of complexes [Mo(CO)4-NHEMe] (Mo4-NHEMe) exhibit an interesting trend which the lightest adduct Mo4-NHCMe has a trigonal bipyramidal coordination mode where the ligand NHCMe occupies an equatorial posi...

  2. LAMMPS Framework for Dynamic Bonding and an Application Modeling DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svaneborg, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    and bond types. When breaking bonds, all angular and dihedral interactions involving broken bonds are removed. The framework allows chemical reactions to be modeled, and use it to simulate a simplistic, coarse-grained DNA model. The resulting DNA dynamics illustrates the power of the present framework.......We have extended the Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator (LAMMPS) to support directional bonds and dynamic bonding. The framework supports stochastic formation of new bonds, breakage of existing bonds, and conversion between bond types. Bond formation can be controlled to...... limit the maximal functionality of a bead with respect to various bond types. Concomitant with the bond dynamics, angular and dihedral interactions are dynamically introduced between newly connected triplets and quartets of beads, where the interaction type is determined from the local pattern of bead...

  3. Chemically optimized antimyosin Fab conjugates with chelating polymers: importance of the nature of the protein-polymer single site covalent bond for biodistribution and infarction localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubetskoy, V S; Narula, J; Khaw, B A; Torchilin, V P

    1993-01-01

    Murine antimyosin Fab fragment was conjugated with 111In-labeled N-terminal-modified DTPA-polylysine using three bifunctional reagents: N-hydroxysuccinimide esters of 3-(2-pyridyldithio)propionic acid (SPDP conjugate), 4-(maleimidomethyl)cyclohexanecarboxylic acid (SMCC conjugate) and bromoacetic acid (BrAc conjugate) for potential localization of experimental myocardial infarction. Using various antibody preparations and a rabbit acute myocardial infarction model the following parameters were observed: (1) an in vitro antigen binding activity of SPDP conjugate = SMCC conjugate > BrAc conjugate, (2) a blood clearance rate of SPDP conjugate > BrAc conjugate > SMCC conjugate, (3) a liver and splenic accumulation of SPDP conjugate > BrAc conjugate > SMCC conjugate, and (4) the infarcted tissue activity showed an accumulation of SMCC conjugate > SPDP conjugate > BrAc conjugate. This study exemplifies the importance of rational chemical design of antimyosin Fab-chelating polymer conjugate for improved target tissue localization in vivo.

  4. A novel bonding method for fabrication of PET planar nanofluidic chip with low dimension loss and high bonding strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plastic planar nanofluidic chips are becoming increasingly important for biological and chemical applications. However, the majority of the present bonding methods for planar nanofluidic chips suffer from high dimension loss and low bonding strength. In this work, a novel thermal bonding technique based on O2 plasma and ethanol treatment was proposed. With the assistance of O2 plasma and ethanol, the PET (polyethylene terephthalate) planar nanofluidic chip can be bonded at a low bonding temperature of 50 °C. To increase the bonding rate and bonding strength, the O2 plasma parameters and thermal bonding parameters were optimized during the bonding process. The tensile test indicates that the bonding strength of the PET planar nanofluidic chip can reach 0.954 MPa, while the auto-fluorescence test demonstrates that there is no leakage or blockage in any of the bonded micro- or nanochannels. (paper)

  5. Cross Shear Roll Bonding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Bjerregaard, Henrik; Petersen, Søren. B;

    1994-01-01

    The present paper describes an investigation of roll bonding an AlZn alloy to mild steel. Application of cross shear roll bonding, where the two equal sized rolls run with different peripheral speed, is shown to give better bond strength than conventional roll bonding. Improvements of up to 20......-23% in bond strength are found and full bond strength is obtained at a reduction of 50% whereas 65% is required in case of conventional roll bonding. Pseudo cross shear roll bonding, where the cross shear effect is obtained by running two equal sized rolls with different speed, gives the same results....

  6. New insights into the interactions between cork chemical components and pesticides. The contribution of π-π interactions, hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivella, M À; Bazzicalupi, C; Bianchi, A; Fiol, N; Villaescusa, I

    2015-01-01

    The role of chemical components of cork in the sorption of several pesticides has been investigated. For this purpose raw cork and three cork extracted fractions (i.e. cork free of aliphatic extractives, cork free of all extractives and cork free of all extractives and suberin) were used as sorbent of three ionic pesticides (propazine, 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D) and alachlor) and five non-ionic pesticides (chlorpyrifos, isoproturon, metamitron, methomyl and oxamyl) with a logKow within the range -0.47 to 4.92. The effect of cations on the ionic pesticides, propazine and 2,4-D sorption was also analyzed. Results indicated that the highest yields were obtained for chlorpyrifos and alachlor sorption onto raw cork (>55%). After removal of aliphatic extractives sorption of all pesticides increased that ranged from 3% for propazine to 31% for alachlor. In contrast, removal of phenolic extractives caused a sorption decrease. Low sorption yields were obtained for hydrophobic pesticides such as metamitron, oxamyl and methomyl (cork fractions and extremely low when using raw cork (cork toward aromatic pesticides. Results presented in this paper gain insights into the cork affinities for pesticides and the interactions involved in the sorption process and also enables to envisage sorption affinity of cork for other organic pollutants.

  7. DICOR surface treatments for enhanced bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, L F; Bennett, R J

    1988-06-01

    Treatments for preparing castable ceramic surfaces for enhanced bonding to specially formulated resin-based cements were examined. An ammonium bifluoride etch combined with gamma-methacryloxypropyl-trimethoxysilane produced shear bond strengths higher than when an ammonium bifluoride treatment was used alone. The method of curing the silane was highly significant in the contribution to the cement/substrate bond strength, with the heat-cure producing the highest values. Long-term water storage tests indicated that the cement bond with etch plus silane-treated castable ceramic surfaces (whether heat or chemically cured silane was used) demonstrated no significant decrease in strength after a one-year period.

  8. Primary retention following nuclear recoil in β-decay: Proposed synthesis of a metastable rare gas oxide ((38)ArO4) from ((38)ClO4(-)) and the evolution of chemical bonding over the nuclear transmutation reaction path.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, Matthew J; Matta, Chérif F

    2014-12-01

    Argon tetroxide (ArO4) is the last member of the N=50 e(-) isoelectronic and isosteric series of ions: SiO4(4-), PO4(3-), SO4(2-), and ClO4(-). A high level computational study demonstrated that while ArO4 is kinetically stable it has a considerable positive enthalpy of formation (of ~298kcal/mol) (Lindh et al., 1999. J. Phys. Chem. A 103, pp. 8295-8302) confirming earlier predictions by Pyykkö (1990. Phys. Scr. 33, pp. 52-53). ArO4 can be expected to be difficult to synthesize by traditional chemistry due to its metastability and has not yet been synthesized at the time of writing. A computational investigation of the changes in the chemical bonding of chlorate (ClO4(-)) when the central chlorine atom undergoes a nuclear transmutation from the unstable artificial chlorine isotope (38)Cl to the stable rare argon isotope (38)Ar through β-decay, hence potentially leading to the formation of ArO4, is reported. A mathematical model is presented that allows for the prediction of yields following the recoil of a nucleus upon ejecting a β-electron. It is demonstrated that below a critical angle between the ejected β-electron and that of the accompanying antineutrino their respective linear momentums can cancel to such an extent as imparting a recoil to the daughter atom insufficient for breaking the Ar-O bond. As a result, a primary retention yield of ~1% of ArO4 is predicted following the nuclear disintegration. The study is conducted at the quadratic configuration interaction with single and double excitations [QCISD/6-311+G(3df)] level of theory followed by an analysis of the electron density by the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM). Crossed potential energy surfaces (PES) were used to construct a PES from the metastable ArO4 ground singlet state to the Ar-O bond dissociation product ArO3+O((3)P) from which the predicted barrier to dissociation is ca. 22kcal/mol and the exothermic reaction energy is ca. 28kcal/mol [(U)MP2/6-311+G(d)].

  9. Studies on pharmacological activation of human serum immunoglobulin G by chemical modification and active subfragments. IV. Induction of anti-inflammatory activity by chemical cleavage of interchain disulfide bonds in human immunoglobulin G and pharmacological activity of alkylated subfragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimura, T; Tsujikawa, K; Nakajima, H; Okabe, M; Kohama, Y; Iwai, M; Yokoyama, K

    1986-01-01

    Commercially available human serum immunoglobulin G (IgG, native IgG) was separated into two fractions (Fr.I and II) using a diethylaminoethyl cellulose column. Heavy and light chains containing fractions were obtained from these two fractions after carboxamide-methylation. Thus, these fractions were subjected to an anti-inflammatory screening procedure and were shown to have a potent inhibitory activity against rat carrageenin induced paw edema, while no effect was observed in native IgG, Fr.I or II. The reduction and alkylation of the interchain disulfide bonds were essential to induce the anti-inflammatory activity. The anti-inflammatory activity of alkylated heavy and light chains of Fr.I (Fr.I-H and I-L) was also noted in subacute inflammation caused by the felt pellet and croton oil granuloma methods. Moreover, strong membrane stabilizing activities of Fr.I-H and I-L were demonstrated in vitro using rat red blood cell membrane and liver lysosomal membrane. PMID:3712209

  10. Wire bonding in microelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Harman, George G

    2010-01-01

    Wire Bonding in Microelectronics, Third Edition, has been thoroughly revised to help you meet the challenges of today's small-scale and fine-pitch microelectronics. This authoritative guide covers every aspect of designing, manufacturing, and evaluating wire bonds engineered with cutting-edge techniques. In addition to gaining a full grasp of bonding technology, you'll learn how to create reliable bonds at exceedingly high yields, test wire bonds, solve common bonding problems, implement molecular cleaning methods, and much more. Coverage includes: Ultrasonic bonding systems and technologies, including high-frequency systems Bonding wire metallurgy and characteristics, including copper wire Wire bond testing Gold-aluminum intermetallic compounds and other interface reactions Gold and nickel-based bond pad plating materials and problems Cleaning to improve bondability and reliability Mechanical problems in wire bonding High-yield, fine-pitch, specialized-looping, soft-substrate, and extreme-temperature wire bo...

  11. Analysis of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Using a Chemical Bond Element Model%一种用于分析单壁碳纳米管的纳米有限元方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕计男; 陈海波

    2008-01-01

    提出了一种纳米尺度的有限元方法,碳纳米管中的碳-碳化学键被模拟为键单元.按照平衡关系,根据有限元理论,作用于每个碳原了上的作用力可以写成键单元的刚度矩阵与每个碳原了位移的乘积.在分子力学的基本假设下,键单元刚度矩阵的每个元素可以写为分子力学中力场常数的函数,这样建立起了宏观力学方法(有限元)与纳米尺度力学方法(分了力学)之间的联系.应用该方法模拟了扶椅型与锯齿型单壁碳纳米管的力学行为从而验证了该方法的有效性.分析结果说叫单壁碳纳米管的弹性模量与管厚度的选取直接相关.此外,弹性模量刈所选取的分了力学中的力场常数非常敏感,管的弹性模量显示山对半径的尺度依赖性,但是管长度对弹性模造的影响小到可以被忽略.%A three dimensional nano-scale finite element model (FEM),called the chemical bond element model,is proposed for the simulation of mechanical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes(SWCNTs) based upon molecular mechanics method.Chemical bonds between carbon atoms are modeled by chemical bond elements.The constants of a sub-stiffness matrix are determined by using a linkage between molecular mechanics and continuum mechanics.In order to evaluate the correctness and performance of the proposed model,simulation Was done to determine the influence of nanotube wall thickness.radius and length on the elastic modulus(Young's modulus and shear modulus)of SWCNTs.The simulation results show that the choice of wall thickness significantly affects the Young's modulus and shear modulus.The force field constants is also very important,because the elastic modulus is sensitive to force field constants and the elastic properties of SWCNT are related to the radii of the tubes.The contribution of length to elastic modulus is insignificant and can be ignored.In comparison with the Young's modulus and shear modulus reported in

  12. Thermoelectric, band structure, chemical bonding and dispersion of optical constants of new metal chalcogenides Ba{sub 4}CuGa{sub 5}Q{sub 12} (Q=S, Se)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reshak, A.H. [New Technologies – Research Center, University of West Bohemia, Univerzitni 8, 306 14 Pilsen (Czech Republic); Center of Excellence Geopolymer and Green Technology, School of Material Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis, 01007 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Azam, Sikander, E-mail: sikander.physicst@gmail.com [New Technologies – Research Center, University of West Bohemia, Univerzitni 8, 306 14 Pilsen (Czech Republic)

    2014-08-01

    The electronic structure and dispersion of optical constants of the Ba{sub 4}CuGa{sub 5}S{sub 12} and Ba{sub 4}CuGa{sub 5}Se{sub 12} compounds were calculated by the first-principles full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FPLAPW) method. We employed the local density approximation (LDA), generalized gradient approximation (GGA) and Engel–Vosko GGA (EVGGA) to calculate the electronic structures, Fermi surface, thermoelectric, chemical bonding and dispersion of optical constants of these compounds. By investigating the influence of replacing S by Se, it has been found that the charge density around ‘Ga’ is greater in Ba{sub 4}CuGa{sub 5}Se{sub 12} than Ba{sub 4}CuGa{sub 5}S{sub 12}. Fermi surface of Ba{sub 4}CuGa{sub 5}S{sub 12} consists of an electronic sheet only because there is no empty region while Ba{sub 4}CuGa{sub 5}Se{sub 12} contains both holes and electronic sheets because this compound contains both empty and shaded region. As we replace S by Se the heights of the peaks decreases as a results the reflectivity also decreases. It is noticed that the reflectivity is over 68% (60%) for Ba{sub 4}CuGa{sub 5}S{sub 12} (Ba{sub 4}CuGa{sub 5}Se{sub 12}) compounds within the energy range studied. This implies that the material will serve as a good reflector. By replacing S by Se the figure of merit values increases from 0.97 to 1.0, which shows the good thermoelectric behavior of both compounds. - Highlights: • DFT-FPLAPW method used for calculating the properties. • For predicting the chemical bonding the charge density behavior is studied in 2D. • The optical properties were also calculated and analyzed. • The Fermi surface is composed of two bands crossing along the EF level. • The thermoelectric properties have also been calculated.

  13. On Bond Portfolio Management

    OpenAIRE

    Vladislav Kargin

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes a new method of bond portfolio optimization based on stochastic string models of correlation structure in bond returns. The paper shows how to approximate correlation function of bond returns, compute the optimal portfolio allocation using Wiener-Hopf factorization, and check whether a collection of bonds presents arbitrage opportunities.

  14. Correlation of Fe2+ isomer shifts with bond lengths and bond strengths in neso- and sorosilicates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李哲; E.DeGrave

    1995-01-01

    An evaluation of Mbssbauer isomer shift and quadrupole splitting data of Fe2+ in a number of structurally well characterized neso- and sorosilicates is presented. It is found that the nearly linear correlations exist both between the isomer shift and the bond length and between the isomer shift and the bond strength. These correlations are discussed on the basis of the variation of the s-electron density at the Fe2+ nuclei with the chemical bond characteristics.

  15. Determination of Chemical Bond of Tetrahedral Amorphous Carbon Films by Ellipsometry Approach%椭偏法表征四面体非晶碳薄膜的化学键结构

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓伟; 周毅; 孙丽丽; 汪爱英

    2012-01-01

    Tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) films under different substrate negative bias are prepared by a home developed filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) technology with double bend shape. The film thickness is measured by a combined spectrophotometry and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) approach; the chemical bonds including sp2C and sp3C are gained by the fitted ellipsometry method. Furthermore,the accuracy of ellipsometry results is evaluated by comparing with those of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectra. The results indicate that the minimum thickness of ta-C film of 33. 9 nm is obtained when the bias voltage is -100 V; with the increase of bias voltage,the optical gaps and the content of sp3C atomic bond decrease,while the sp2C content increases correspondingly. By comparison with the results of XPS and Raman spectra,it is found that when the optical constants of sp2C model are represented by the glassy carbon and the fitting wavelength ranges are chosen from 250 to 1700 nm,the best fitting result of atomic bonds of ta-C films can be deduced by the ellipsometry method. Therefore,it could be said that the elliposometry method is a quite promising method to characterize the atomic bonds of ta-C films including sp2C and sp3C,as a new nondestructive,fast,quantitative and easy way.%采用自主研制的双弯曲磁过滤阴极真空电弧(FCVA)技术,在不同衬底负偏压下制备了四面体非晶碳(ta-C)薄膜.通过分光光度计和椭偏(SE)联用技术精确测量了薄膜厚度,重点采用椭偏法对不同偏压下制备的ta-C薄膜sp3C键和sp2C键结构进行了拟合表征,并与X射线光电子能谱(XPS)和拉曼光谱的实验结果相对比,分析了非晶碳结构的椭偏拟合新方法可靠性.结果表明,在-100 V偏压时薄膜厚度最小,为33.9 nm;随着偏压的增加,薄膜中的sp2C含量增加,sp3C含量减小,光学带隙下降.对比结果发现,椭偏法作为一种无损、简易、快速的表征

  16. Constructing Models in Teaching of Chemical Bonds: Ionic Bond, Covalent Bond, Double and Triple Bonds, Hydrogen Bond and Molecular Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uce, Musa

    2015-01-01

    Studies in chemistry education show that chemistry topics are considered as abstract, complicated and hard to understand by students. For this reason, it is important to develop new materials and use them in classes for better understanding of abstract concepts. Moving from this point, a student-centered research guided by a teacher was conducted…

  17. A natural orbital analysis of the long range behavior of chemical bonding and van der Waals interaction in singlet H2: the issue of zero natural orbital occupation numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, X W; Mentel, Ł M; Gritsenko, O V; Baerends, E J

    2013-04-28

    This paper gives a natural orbital (NO) based analysis of the van der Waals interaction in (singlet) H2 at long distance. The van der Waals interaction, even if not leading to a distinct van der Waals well, affects the shape of the interaction potential in the van der Waals distance range of 5-9 bohrs and can be clearly distinguished from chemical bonding effects. In the NO basis the van der Waals interaction can be quantitatively covered with, apart from the ground state configurations (1σ(g))(2) and (1σ(u))(2), just the 4 configurations (2σ(g))(2) and (2σ(u))(2), and (1π(u))(2) and (1π(g))(2). The physics of the dispersion interaction requires and explains the peculiar relatively large positive CI coefficients of the doubly excited electron configurations (2σ(u))(2) and (1π(g))(2) (the occupancy amplitudes of the 2σ(u) and 1π(gx, y) NOs) in the distance range 5-9 bohrs, which have been observed before by Cioslowski and Pernal [Chem. Phys. Lett. 430, 188 (2006)]. We show that such positive occupancy amplitudes do not necessarily lead to the existence of zero occupation numbers at some H-H distances.

  18. Effect of hot chemical etching on bond strength of zirconia to resin%热酸溶液蚀刻对氧化锆粘接强度的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴文雍; 印厚才; 陈晨; 谢海峰; 章非敏

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study aims to evaluate the influence of hot chemical etching on short- and long-term shear bond strength (SBS) of zirconia to resin. Methods Eighty zirconia ceramic slices were obtained and randomly divided into five groups based on the surface treatment to be applied-group A: H2SO4/(NH4)2SO4 hot solution etching + application of Clearfil; group B: HF/HNO3 hot solution etching + application of Clearfil; group C: H2SO4/HF/HNO3 hot solution etching + Clearfil; group D: alumina sandblasting + application of Clearfil; group E: tribochemical silica coating + application of silane coupling agent. Eighty composite cylinders were bonded to pretreated ceramic slices using a bis-GMA-based resin cement. Specimens in each group were divided into two fractions: the first half received 24 h water storage, and the second half re-ceived 40 d water storage. Then, SBS tests were conducted. Morphological analysis of sandblasted alumina and hot chemical-etched zirconia surfaces were performed by scanning electron microscopy(SEM). Results Group E displayed the highest SBS before artificial aging, and no statistical difference was found among the other groups. After 40 d water storage, groups A, B, and E showed significantly higher SBS than groups C and D. SBS increased significantly after artificial aging in groups A and B. No significant variations were found before and after artificial aging in the other groups. Conclusion The experi-mental hot chemical etching solution provides enhanced bonding for zirconia than sandblasting, and the bond strengths remain stable after artificial aging.%目的:研究牙科氧化锆经3种酸溶液加热处理后与树脂的初期粘接强度和粘接耐久性。方法将80枚氧化锆瓷片分为5组,进行不同的表面处理,随后制作陶瓷/树脂粘接试样。其中,A组:经H2SO4/(NH4)2SO4混合液热处理,使用氧化锆底涂剂;B组:HF/HNO3混合液热处理,使用氧化锆底涂剂;C组:经H2SO4

  19. Hydrogen bonded supramolecular structures

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Zhanting

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the advances in the studies of hydrogen-bonding-driven supramolecular systems  made over the past decade. It is divided into four parts, with the first introducing the basics of hydrogen bonding and important hydrogen bonding patterns in solution as well as in the solid state. The second part covers molecular recognition and supramolecular structures driven by hydrogen bonding. The third part introduces the formation of hollow and giant macrocycles directed by hydrogen bonding, while the last part summarizes hydrogen bonded supramolecular polymers. This book is designed to b

  20. Probing the Hydrogen Bond Strength at Single Bond Limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jing; Lü, Jing-Tao; Chen, Ji; Peng, Jinbo; Meng, Xiangzhi; Wang, Zhichang; Li, Xin-Zheng; Wang, Enge; Jiang, Ying

    2015-03-01

    Many extraordinary physical, chemical and biological properties of water are determined by hydrogen-bonding interaction between the water molecules. So far, the routine way to determine the hydrogen-bonding strength of water is probing the frequency shift of O-H stretching mode using various spectroscopic techniques, which all suffer from the difficulty of spectral assignment and the broadening of vibrational signals due to the lack of spatial resolution. In this talk, we show the ability to probe the hydrogen-bonding strength of interfacial water at single bond limit using resonantly enhanced inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The conventional IET signals of water molecules are extremely weak and far beyond the experimental detection limit due to the negligible molecular density of states (DOS) around the Fermi level. This difficulty can be surmounted by turning on the tip-water coupling, which shifts and broadens the frontier molecular orbitals of water to the proximity of Fermi level, resulting in a resonantly enhanced IET process. International Center for Quantum Materials, School of Physics, Peking University.

  1. 1H-MAS-NMR Chemical Shifts in Hydrogen-Bonded Complexes of Chlorophenols (Pentachlorophenol, 2,4,6-Trichlorophenol, 2,6-Dichlorophenol, 3,5-Dichlorophenol, and p-Chlorophenol) and Amine, and H/D Isotope Effects on 1H-MAS-NMR Spectra

    OpenAIRE

    Hisashi Honda

    2013-01-01

    Chemical shifts (CS) of the 1H nucleus in N···H···O type hydrogen bonds (H-bond) were observed in some complexes between chlorophenols [pentachlorophenol (PCP), 2,4,6-tricholorophenol (TCP), 2,6-dichlorophenol (26DCP), 3,5-dichlorophenol (35DCP), and p-chlorophenol (pCP)] and nitrogen-base (N-Base) by solid-state high-resolution 1H-NMR with the magic-angle-spinning (MAS) method. Employing N-Bases with a wide range of pKa values (0.65–10.75), 1H-MAS-NMR CS values of bridging H atoms in H-bonds...

  2. Australia's Bond Home Bias

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, Anil V; Umaru B. Conteh

    2014-01-01

    This paper constructs the float adjusted measure of home bias and explores the determinants of bond home bias by employing the International Monetary Fund's high quality dataset (2001 to 2009) on cross-border bond investment. The paper finds that Australian investors' prefer investing in countries with higher economic development and more developed bond markets. Exchange rate volatility appears to be an impediment for cross-border bond investment. Investors prefer investing in countries with ...

  3. Surface structured bonded composite-metal joint

    OpenAIRE

    Di Giandomenico, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    The design of structural joints is one of the critical challenges for the development of composite lightweight aircraft and motorsport structures. Despite the universal reliance upon mechanical fastening and adhesive bonding, the disadvantages of both when applied to high stiffness composites are considerable. For bolting and riveting these include added weight as laminates are thickened to account for stress concentrations. For bonding these include chemical uncertainties o...

  4. Bond percolation in films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korneta, W.; Pytel, Z.

    1988-04-01

    Bond percolation in films with simple cubic structure is considered. It is assumed that the probability of a bond being present between nearest-neighbor sites depends on the distances to surfaces. Based on the relation between the Potts model and the bond percolation model, and using the mean-field approximation, the phase diagram and profiles of the percolation probability have been obtained.

  5. Corporate Bonds in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tell, Michael

    2015-01-01

    to think in alternative ways such as issuing corporate bonds. A market for corporate bonds exists in countries such as Norway, Germany, France, the United Kingdom and the United States, while Denmark is still behind in this trend. Some large Danish corporations have instead used foreign corporate bonds...

  6. IMPACT OF PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL MUD CONTAMINATION ON WELLBORE CEMENT- FORMATION SHEAR BOND STRENGTH Authors: Arome Oyibo1 and Mileva Radonjic1 * 1. Craft and Hawkins Department of Petroleum Engineering, 2131 Patrick F. Taylor Hall, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, aoyibo1@tigers.lsu.edu, mileva@lsu.edu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyibo, A. E.

    2013-12-01

    Wellbore cement has been used to provide well integrity through zonal isolation in oil & gas wells and geothermal wells. Cementing is also used to provide mechanical support for the casing and protect the casing from corrosive fluids. Failure of cement could be caused by several factors ranging from poor cementing, failure to completely displace the drilling fluids to failure on the path of the casing. A failed cement job could result in creation of cracks and micro annulus through which produced fluids could migrate to the surface which could lead to sustained casing pressure, contamination of fresh water aquifer and blow out in some cases. In addition, cement failures could risk the release of chemicals substances from hydraulic fracturing into fresh water aquifer during the injection process. To achieve proper cementing, the drilling fluid should be completely displaced by the cement slurry. However, this is hard to achieve in practice, some mud is usually left on the wellbore which ends up contaminating the cement afterwards. The purpose of this experimental study is to investigate the impact of both physical and chemical mud contaminations on cement-formation bond strength for different types of formations. Physical contamination occurs when drilling fluids (mud) dries on the surface of the formation forming a mud cake. Chemical contamination on the other hand occurs when the drilling fluids which is still in the liquid form interacts chemically with the cement during a cementing job. We investigated the impact of the contamination on the shear bond strength and the changes in the mineralogy of the cement at the cement-formation interface to ascertain the impact of the contamination on the cement-formation bond strength. Berea sandstone and clay rich shale cores were bonded with cement cores with the cement-formation contaminated either physically or chemically. For the physically contaminated composite cores, we have 3 different sample designs: clean

  7. In vitro evaluation of marginal leakage in bonded restorations, with mechanical or chemical-mechanical (Carisolv removal of carious tissue Avaliação in vitro da infiltração marginal em restaurações adesivas, com remoção mecânica ou químico-mecânica (Carisolv do tecido cariado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Coelho Okida

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This study carried out an in vitro evaluation and comparison of the occurrence of marginal leakage in bonded restorations using mechanical or chemical-mechanical (Carisolv removal of carious tissue. For that purpose, 40 extracted decayed human molars were divided into 4 groups: GI (burs + Prime & Bond NT + TPH, GII (Carisolv + Prime & Bond NT + TPH, GIII (burs + SBMP + Z100 and GIV (Carisolv + SBMP + Z100. After accomplishment of the restorations and thermal cycling, the teeth were exposed to dye, sectioned and qualitatively evaluated. The results demonstrated that the system of removal of carious tissue did not influence the results of microleakage at any of the cavity margins. At dentinal margins, use of the Prime & Bond NT + TPH restorative system allowed the occurrence of less microleakage than the SBMP + Z100 system.Este estudo avaliou e comparou in vitro a ocorrência da infiltração marginal em restaurações adesivas, com a utilização de remoção mecânica e químico-mecânica do tecido cariado. Para a proposição, 40 dentes molares humanos extraídos cariados foram divididos em quatro grupos: GI (brocas + Prime & Bond NT + TPH, GII (Carisolv + Prime & Bond NT + TPH, GIII (brocas + SBMP + Z100 e GIV (Carisolv + SBMP + Z100. Após a execução das restaurações e termociclagem, os dentes foram expostos a corante, seccionados e avaliados qualitativamente. Os resultados demonstraram que o sistema de remoção de tecido cariado não influenciou a ocorrência de microinfiltração em quaisquer margens cavitárias. Nas margens dentinárias, a utilização do sistema restaurador Prime & Bond NT + TPH demonstrou menor ocorrência de microinfiltração do que o sistema SBMP + Z100.

  8. Bonding thermoplastic polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallow, Thomas I.; Hunter, Marion C.; Krafcik, Karen Lee; Morales, Alfredo M.; Simmons, Blake A.; Domeier, Linda A.

    2008-06-24

    We demonstrate a new method for joining patterned thermoplastic parts into layered structures. The method takes advantage of case-II permeant diffusion to generate dimensionally controlled, activated bonding layers at the surfaces being joined. It is capable of producing bonds characterized by cohesive failure while preserving the fidelity of patterned features in the bonding surfaces. This approach is uniquely suited to production of microfluidic multilayer structures, as it allows the bond-forming interface between plastic parts to be precisely manipulated at micrometer length scales. The bond enhancing procedure is easily integrated in standard process flows and requires no specialized equipment.

  9. Weak bond screening system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, S. Y.; Chang, F. H.; Bell, J. R.

    Consideration is given to the development of a weak bond screening system which is based on the utilization of a high power ultrasonic (HPU) technique. The instrumentation of the prototype bond strength screening system is described, and the adhesively bonded specimens used in the system developmental effort are detailed. Test results obtained from these specimens are presented in terms of bond strength and level of high power ultrasound irradiation. The following observations were made: (1) for Al/Al specimens, 2.6 sec of HPU irradiation will screen weak bond conditions due to improper preparation of bonding surfaces; (2) for composite/composite specimens, 2.0 sec of HPU irradiation will disrupt weak bonds due to under-cured conditions; (3) for Al honeycomb core with composite skin structure, 3.5 sec of HPU irradiation will disrupt weak bonds due to bad adhesive or oils contamination of bonding surfaces; and (4) for Nomex honeycomb with Al skin structure, 1.3 sec of HPU irradiation will disrupt weak bonds due to bad adhesive.

  10. The chemical life(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    You write this narrative autoethnography to open up a conversation about our chemical lives. You go through your day with chemical mindfulness, questioning taken-for-granted ideas about natural and artificial, healthy and unhealthy, dependency and addiction, trying to understand the chemical messages we consume through the experiences of everyday life. You reflect on how messages about chemicals influence and structure our lives and why some chemicals are celebrated and some are condemned. Using a second-person narrative voice, you show how the personal is relational and the chemical is cultural. You write because you seek a connection, a chemical bond. PMID:24905820

  11. The chemical life(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    You write this narrative autoethnography to open up a conversation about our chemical lives. You go through your day with chemical mindfulness, questioning taken-for-granted ideas about natural and artificial, healthy and unhealthy, dependency and addiction, trying to understand the chemical messages we consume through the experiences of everyday life. You reflect on how messages about chemicals influence and structure our lives and why some chemicals are celebrated and some are condemned. Using a second-person narrative voice, you show how the personal is relational and the chemical is cultural. You write because you seek a connection, a chemical bond.

  12. Bond energies of ThO+ and ThC+: A guided ion beam and quantum chemical investigation of the reactions of thorium cation with O2 and CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Richard M.; Citir, Murat; Armentrout, P. B.; Battey, Samuel R.; Peterson, Kirk A.

    2016-05-01

    Kinetic energy dependent reactions of Th+ with O2 and CO are studied using a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer. The formation of ThO+ in the reaction of Th+ with O2 is observed to be exothermic and barrierless with a reaction efficiency at low energies of k/kLGS = 1.21 ± 0.24 similar to the efficiency observed in ion cyclotron resonance experiments. Formation of ThO+ and ThC+ in the reaction of Th+ with CO is endothermic in both cases. The kinetic energy dependent cross sections for formation of these product ions were evaluated to determine 0 K bond dissociation energies (BDEs) of D0(Th+-O) = 8.57 ± 0.14 eV and D0(Th+-C) = 4.82 ± 0.29 eV. The present value of D0 (Th+-O) is within experimental uncertainty of previously reported experimental values, whereas this is the first report of D0 (Th+-C). Both BDEs are observed to be larger than those of their transition metal congeners, TiL+, ZrL+, and HfL+ (L = O and C), believed to be a result of lanthanide contraction. Additionally, the reactions were explored by quantum chemical calculations, including a full Feller-Peterson-Dixon composite approach with correlation contributions up to coupled-cluster singles and doubles with iterative triples and quadruples (CCSDTQ) for ThC, ThC+, ThO, and ThO+, as well as more approximate CCSD with perturbative (triples) [CCSD(T)] calculations where a semi-empirical model was used to estimate spin-orbit energy contributions. Finally, the ThO+ BDE is compared to other actinide (An) oxide cation BDEs and a simple model utilizing An+ promotion energies to the reactive state is used to estimate AnO+ and AnC+ BDEs. For AnO+, this model yields predictions that are typically within experimental uncertainty and performs better than density functional theory calculations presented previously.

  13. Dilemmas in zirconia bonding: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obradović-Đuričić Kosovka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a literature review on the resin bond to zirconia ceramic. Modern esthetic dentistry has highly recognized zirconia, among other ceramic materials. Biocompatibility of zirconia, chemical and dimensional stability, excellent mechanical properties, all together could guarantee optimal therapeutical results in complex prosthodontic reconstruction. On the other hand, low thermal degradation, aging of zirconia as well as problematic bonding of zirconia framework to dental luting cements and tooth structures, opened the room for discussion concerning their clinical durability. The well known methods of mechanical and chemical bonding used on glass-ceramics are not applicable for use with zirconia. Therefore, under critical clinical situations, selection of the bonding mechanism should be focused on two important points: high initial bond strength value and long term bond strength between zirconia-resin interface. Also, this paper emphases the use of phosphate monomer luting cements on freshly air-abraded zirconia as the simplest and most effective way for zirconia cementation procedure today.

  14. Bonds and bands in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Phillips, Jim

    2009-01-01

    This classic work on the basic chemistry and solid state physics of semiconducting materials is now updated and improved with new chapters on crystalline and amorphous semiconductors. Written by two of the world's pioneering materials scientists in the development of semiconductors, this work offers in a single-volume an authoritative treatment for the learning and understanding of what makes perhaps the world's most important engineered materials actually work. Readers will find: --' The essential principles of chemical bonding, electron energy bands and their relationship to conductive and s

  15. Copper wire bonding

    CERN Document Server

    Chauhan, Preeti S; Zhong, ZhaoWei; Pecht, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    This critical volume provides an in-depth presentation of copper wire bonding technologies, processes and equipment, along with the economic benefits and risks.  Due to the increasing cost of materials used to make electronic components, the electronics industry has been rapidly moving from high cost gold to significantly lower cost copper as a wire bonding material.  However, copper wire bonding has several process and reliability concerns due to its material properties.  Copper Wire Bonding book lays out the challenges involved in replacing gold with copper as a wire bond material, and includes the bonding process changes—bond force, electric flame off, current and ultrasonic energy optimization, and bonding tools and equipment changes for first and second bond formation.  In addition, the bond–pad metallurgies and the use of bare and palladium-coated copper wires on aluminum are presented, and gold, nickel and palladium surface finishes are discussed.  The book also discusses best practices and re...

  16. Equilibrium CO bond lengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demaison, Jean; Császár, Attila G.

    2012-09-01

    Based on a sample of 38 molecules, 47 accurate equilibrium CO bond lengths have been collected and analyzed. These ultimate experimental (reEX), semiexperimental (reSE), and Born-Oppenheimer (reBO) equilibrium structures are compared to reBO estimates from two lower-level techniques of electronic structure theory, MP2(FC)/cc-pVQZ and B3LYP/6-311+G(3df,2pd). A linear relationship is found between the best equilibrium bond lengths and their MP2 or B3LYP estimates. These (and similar) linear relationships permit to estimate the CO bond length with an accuracy of 0.002 Å within the full range of 1.10-1.43 Å, corresponding to single, double, and triple CO bonds, for a large number of molecules. The variation of the CO bond length is qualitatively explained using the Atoms in Molecules method. In particular, a nice correlation is found between the CO bond length and the bond critical point density and it appears that the CO bond is at the same time covalent and ionic. Conditions which permit the computation of an accurate ab initio Born-Oppenheimer equilibrium structure are discussed. In particular, the core-core and core-valence correlation is investigated and it is shown to roughly increase with the bond length.

  17. The Bond Market's q

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Philippon

    2006-01-01

    I propose an implementation of the q-theory of investment using bond prices instead of equity prices. Credit risk makes corporate bond prices sensitive to future asset values, and q can be inferred from bond prices. The bond market's q performs much better than the usual measure in standard investment equations. With aggregate data, the fit is three times better, cash flows are driven out and the implied adjustment costs are reduced by more than an order of magnitude. The new measure also imp...

  18. Electronic structure and bonding in crystalline peroxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Königstein, Markus; Sokol, Alexei A.; Catlow, C. Richard A.

    1999-08-01

    Hartree-Fock and density-functional PW91 theories as realized in the CRYSTAL95 code have been applied to investigate the structural and electronic properties of Ba, Sr, and Ca peroxide materials with the calcium carbide crystal structure, results for which are compared with those for the corresponding oxides. Special attention is paid to the stabilization of the peroxide molecular ion O2-2 in the ionic environment provided by the lattice, and to chemical bonding effects. In order to describe the covalent bonding within the O2-2 ion and the polarization of the O- ion in the crystal electrostatic field, it is essential to include an account of the effects of electron correlation. The PW91 density functional has allowed us to reproduce the crystallographic parameters within a 3% error. The chemical bonding within the peroxide molecular ion has a complex nature with a balance between the weak covalent bond of σz type and the strong electrostatic repulsion of the closed-shell electron groups occupying O 2s and O 2px and 2py states. Compression of the peroxide ion in the ionic crystals gives rise to an excessive overlap of the O 2s closed shells of the two O- ions of a peroxide molecular ion O2-2, which in turn determines the antibonding character of the interaction and chemical bonding in the O2-2 molecular ion.

  19. Red-Shifting versus Blue-Shifting Hydrogen Bonds: Perspective from Ab Initio Valence Bond Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Xin; Zhang, Yang; Weng, Xinzhen; Su, Peifeng; Wu, Wei; Mo, Yirong

    2016-05-01

    Both proper, red-shifting and improper, blue-shifting hydrogen bonds have been well-recognized with enormous experimental and computational studies. The current consensus is that there is no difference in nature between these two kinds of hydrogen bonds, where the electrostatic interaction dominates. Since most if not all the computational studies are based on molecular orbital theory, it would be interesting to gain insight into the hydrogen bonds with modern valence bond (VB) theory. In this work, we performed ab initio VBSCF computations on a series of hydrogen-bonding systems, where the sole hydrogen bond donor CF3H interacts with ten hydrogen bond acceptors Y (═NH2CH3, NH3, NH2Cl, OH(-), H2O, CH3OH, (CH3)2O, F(-), HF, or CH3F). This series includes four red-shifting and six blue-shifting hydrogen bonds. Consistent with existing findings in literature, VB-based energy decomposition analyses show that electrostatic interaction plays the dominating role and polarization plays the secondary role in all these hydrogen-bonding systems, and the charge transfer interaction, which denotes the hyperconjugation effect, contributes only slightly to the total interaction energy. As VB theory describes any real chemical bond in terms of pure covalent and ionic structures, our fragment interaction analysis reveals that with the approaching of a hydrogen bond acceptor Y, the covalent state of the F3C-H bond tends to blue-shift, due to the strong repulsion between the hydrogen atom and Y. In contrast, the ionic state F3C(-) H(+) leads to the red-shifting of the C-H vibrational frequency, owing to the attraction between the proton and Y. Thus, the relative weights of the covalent and ionic structures essentially determine the direction of frequency change. Indeed, we find the correlation between the structural weights and vibrational frequency changes. PMID:27074500

  20. Comparison of Gold Bonding with Mercury Bonding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraka, Elfi; Filatov, Michael; Cremer, Dieter

    2009-01-01

    Nine AuX molecules (X = H, O, S, Se, Te, F, Cl, Br, I), their isoelectronic HgX(+) analogues, and the corresponding neutral HgX diatomics have been investigated using NESC (Normalized Elimination of the Small Component) and B3LYP theory to determine relativistic effects for bond dissociation energie

  1. Bonding in Molecular Crystals from the Local Electronic Pressure Viewpoint

    CERN Document Server

    Tsirelson, Vladimir G; Tokatly, Ilya V

    2015-01-01

    The spatial distribution of the internal pressure of an electron fluid, which spontaneously arises at the formation of a molecule or a crystal, is linked to the main features of chemical bonding in molecular crystals. The local pressure is approximately expressed in terms of the experimental electron density and its derivatives using the density functional formalism and is applied to identify the bonding features in benzene, formamide and chromium hexacarbonyl. We established how the spatial regions of compression and stretching of the electron fluid in these solids reflect the typical features of chemical bonds of different types. Thus, the internal electronic pressure can serve as a bonding descriptor, which has a clear physical meaning and reveals the specific features of variety of the chemical bonds expressing them in terms of the electron density.

  2. Coupled valence bond theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havenith, R.W.A.

    2005-01-01

    In this Letter, the formulation and implementation of a parallel response property code for non-orthogonal, valence bond wave-functions are described. Test calculations on benzene and cyclobutadiene show that the polarisability and magnetisability tensors obtained using valence bond theory are compa

  3. Bonded labour in Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Ercelawn, Aly; Nauman, Muhammad

    2001-01-01

    Examines the continuing prevalence of debt bondage in the 1990s despite the introduction of national legislation banning the practice. Makes recommendations to the Government and the international community for actions to be taken to eliminate bonded labour and provide rehabilitation for freed workers. Includes texts of Land Reforms Regulations, 1972, the Sindh Tenancy Act, 1950 and the Bonded Labour System (Abolition) Act, 1992.

  4. Hydrogen bonding in polyanilines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahceci, S. (Department of Chemistry, Middle East Technical University, Ankara 06531 (Turkey)); Toppare, L. (Department of Chemistry, Middle East Technical University, Ankara 06531 (Turkey)); Yurtsever, E. (Department of Chemistry, Middle East Technical University, Ankara 06531 (Turkey))

    1994-11-29

    Hydrogen bonding between poly(bisphenol A carbonate) (PC) and polyaniline (PAn) is analyzed using semi-empirical quantum methodology. Fully optimized AM1 molecular orbital calculations are reported for various aniline structures (monomer, dimer and trimer), the monomer of the PC and the hydrogen-bonded model of PAn-PC oligomer. ((orig.))

  5. The dissociative bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Nirit

    2013-01-01

    Dissociation leaves a psychic void and a lingering sense of psychic absence. How do 2 people bond while they are both suffering from dissociation? The author explores the notion of a dissociative bond that occurs in the aftermath of trauma--a bond that holds at its core an understanding and shared detachment from the self. Such a bond is confined to unspoken terms that are established in the relational unconscious. The author proposes understanding the dissociative bond as a transitional space that may not lead to full integration of dissociated knowledge yet offers some healing. This is exemplified by R. Prince's (2009) clinical case study. A relational perspective is adopted, focusing on the intersubjective aspects of a dyadic relationship. In the dissociative bond, recognition of the need to experience mutual dissociation can accommodate a psychic state that yearns for relationship when the psyche cannot fully confront past wounds. Such a bond speaks to the need to reestablish a sense of human relatedness and connection when both parties in the relationship suffer from disconnection. This bond is bound to a silence that becomes both a means of protection against the horror of traumatic memory and a way to convey unspoken gestures toward the other.

  6. The samurai bond market

    OpenAIRE

    Frank Packer; Elizabeth Reynolds

    1997-01-01

    Issuance in the samurai bond market has more than tripled over the past several years. Some observers have attributed this growth to a systematic underestimation of credit risk in the market. A detailed review of credit quality, ratings differences, and initial issue pricing in the samurai bond market, however, turns up little evidence to support this concern.

  7. Resin cementation of zirconia ceramics with different bonding agents

    OpenAIRE

    Tanış, Merve Çakırbay; Akay, Canan; Karakış, Duygu

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of sandblasting and different chemical bonding agents on shear bond strength of zirconia and conventional resin cement. In this study, 35 zirconia specimens were treated as follows: Group I: control; Group II: sandblasting; Group III: sandblasting + Monobond S; Group IV: sandblasting + Monobond Plus; Group V: sandblasting + Z-Prime Plus. The specimens in each group were bonded with conventional composite resin cement Variolink II. After cement...

  8. A Statistical Theory for Hydrogen Bonding Networks: One Component Case

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hai-Jun; BA Xin-Wu; ZHAO Min; LI Ze-Sheng

    2000-01-01

    The theory of reversible gelation is shown to be applicable to the hydrogen bonding system by analyzing their similarities in statistical viewpoint. The size distribution of hydrogen bonding clusters, the gelation condition and the generalized scaling law can be obtained directly. These results show that such a system can undergo phase transition process. Furthermore, a relationship between Gibbs free energy of forming hydrogen bond and conversions of groups is given. As an example, the chemical shift of OH groups is considered.

  9. Characterization of dentine to assess bond strength of dental composites

    OpenAIRE

    Saad Liaqat; Anas Aljabo; Muhammad Adnan Khan; Hesham Ben Nuba; Laurent Bozec; Paul Ashley; Anne Young

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to develop alternating dentine adhesion models that could help in the evaluation of a self-bonding dental composite. For this purpose dentine from human and ivory was characterized chemically and microscopically before and after acid etching using Raman and SEM. Mechanical properties of dentine were determined using 3 point bend test. Composite bonding to dentine, with and without use of acid pre-treatment and/or the adhesive, were assessed using a shear bond test. F...

  10. Room-temperature intermediate layer bonding for microfluidic devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bart, J.; Tiggelaar, R.; Yang, M.L.; Schlautmann, S.; Zuilhof, H.; Gardeniers, H.

    2009-01-01

    In this work a novel room-temperature bonding technique based on chemically activated Fluorinated Ethylene Propylene (FEP) sheet as an intermediate between chemically activated substrates is presented. Surfaces of silicon and glass substrates are chemically modified with APTES bearing amine terminal

  11. Wood Bond Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    A joint development program between Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection Technologies and The Weyerhaeuser Company resulted in an internal bond analyzer (IBA), a device which combines ultrasonics with acoustic emission testing techniques. It is actually a spinoff from a spinoff, stemming from a NASA Lewis invented acousto-ultrasonic technique that became a system for testing bond strength of composite materials. Hartford's parent company, Acoustic Emission Technology Corporation (AET) refined and commercialized the technology. The IBA builds on the original system and incorporates on-line process control systems. The IBA determines bond strength by measuring changes in pulsar ultrasonic waves injected into a board. Analysis of the wave determines the average internal bond strength for the panel. Results are displayed immediately. Using the system, a mill operator can adjust resin/wood proportion, reduce setup time and waste, produce internal bonds of a consistent quality and automatically mark deficient products.

  12. Meta-analysis of bonding effectiveness to zirconia ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inokoshi, M; De Munck, J; Minakuchi, S; Van Meerbeek, B

    2014-04-01

    Dental zirconia can no longer be considered un-bondable to tooth tissue. In literature, an increasing number of papers indeed report on the bonding effectiveness of different luting techniques to zirconia. We aimed to disclose general trends in bonding to zirconia by systematically collecting zirconia bond-strength data. A search in PubMed and EMBASE revealed 1,371 bond-strength tests reported on in 144 papers. A macro-shear bond-strength protocol was most frequently used; it revealed significantly lower bond strengths and was less discriminative than the other test methods. Regarding luting technique, the combination of mechanical and chemical pre-treatment appeared particularly crucial to obtain durable bonding to zirconia ceramics. The cement choice was not revealed as a determining factor after aging conditions, as long as composite cement was used. Regarding test protocol, a tensile test appeared more discriminative, particularly when combined with 'water storage' aging. PMID:24563487

  13. Geometrical criteria versus quantum chemical criteria for assessment of intramolecular hydrogen bond (IMHB) interaction: A computational comparison into the effect of chlorine substitution on IMHB of salicylic acid in its lowest energy ground state conformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Bijan Kumar; Guchhait, Nikhil

    2013-02-01

    Density functional theory based computational study has been performed to characterize intramolecular hydrogen bonding (IMHB) interaction in a series of salicylic acid derivatives varying in chlorine substitution on the benzene ring. The molecular systems studied are salicylic acid, 5-chlorosalicylic acid, 3,5-dichlorosalicylic acid and 3,5,6-tricholorosalicylic acid. Major emphasis is rendered on the analysis of IMHB interaction by calculation of electron density ρ(r) and Laplacian ∇2ρ(r) at the bond critical point using atoms-in-molecule theory. Topological features, energy densities based on ρ(r) through perturbing the intramolecular H-bond distances suggest that at equilibrium geometry the IMHB interaction develops certain characteristics typical of covalent interaction. The interplay between aromaticity and resonance-assisted hydrogen bonding (RAHB) is discussed using both geometrical and magnetic criteria as the descriptors of aromaticity. The optimized geometry features, molecular electrostatic potential map analysis are also found to produce a consensus view in relation with the formation of RAHB in these systems.

  14. Amino Acid Patterns around Disulfide Bonds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett Drury

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Disulfide bonds provide an inexhaustible source of information on molecular evolution and biological specificity. In this work, we described the amino acid composition around disulfide bonds in a set of disulfide-rich proteins using appropriate descriptors, based on ANOVA (for all twenty natural amino acids or classes of amino acids clustered according to their chemical similarities and Scheffé (for the disulfide-rich proteins superfamilies statistics. We found that weakly hydrophilic and aromatic amino acids are quite abundant in the regions around disulfide bonds, contrary to aliphatic and hydrophobic amino acids. The density distributions (as a function of the distance to the center of the disulfide bonds for all defined entities presented an overall unimodal behavior: the densities are null at short distances, have maxima at intermediate distances and decrease for long distances. In the end, the amino acid environment around the disulfide bonds was found to be different for different superfamilies, allowing the clustering of proteins in a biologically relevant way, suggesting that this type of chemical information might be used as a tool to assess the relationship between very divergent sets of disulfide-rich proteins.

  15. Transversely Compressed Bonded Joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian Skodborg; Schmidt, Jacob Wittrup; Stang, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    The load capacity of bonded joints can be increased if transverse pressure is applied at the interface. The transverse pressure is assumed to introduce a Coulomb-friction contribution to the cohesive law for the interface. Response and load capacity for a bonded single-lap joint was derived using...... non-linear fracture mechanics. The results indicated a good correlation between theory and tests. Furthermore, the model is suggested as theoretical base for determining load capacity of bonded anchorages with transverse pressure, in externally reinforced concrete structures....

  16. Primary retention following nuclear recoil in β-decay: Proposed synthesis of a metastable rare gas oxide (38ArO4) from (38ClO4−) and the evolution of chemical bonding over the nuclear transmutation reaction path

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argon tetroxide (ArO4) is the last member of the N=50 e– isoelectronic and isosteric series of ions: SiO44−, PO43−, SO42−, and ClO4−. A high level computational study demonstrated that while ArO4 is kinetically stable it has a considerable positive enthalpy of formation (of ∼298 kcal/mol) (Lindh et al., 1999. J. Phys. Chem. A 103, pp. 8295–8302) confirming earlier predictions by Pyykkö (1990. Phys. Scr. 33, pp. 52–53). ArO4 can be expected to be difficult to synthesize by traditional chemistry due to its metastability and has not yet been synthesized at the time of writing. A computational investigation of the changes in the chemical bonding of chlorate (ClO4−) when the central chlorine atom undergoes a nuclear transmutation from the unstable artificial chlorine isotope 38Cl to the stable rare argon isotope 38Ar through β-decay, hence potentially leading to the formation of ArO4, is reported. A mathematical model is presented that allows for the prediction of yields following the recoil of a nucleus upon ejecting a β-electron. It is demonstrated that below a critical angle between the ejected β-electron and that of the accompanying antineutrino their respective linear momentums can cancel to such an extent as imparting a recoil to the daughter atom insufficient for breaking the Ar–O bond. As a result, a primary retention yield of ∼1% of ArO4 is predicted following the nuclear disintegration. The study is conducted at the quadratic configuration interaction with single and double excitations [QCISD/6−311+G(3df)] level of theory followed by an analysis of the electron density by the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM). Crossed potential energy surfaces (PES) were used to construct a PES from the metastable ArO4 ground singlet state to the Ar–O bond dissociation product ArO3+O(3P) from which the predicted barrier to dissociation is ca. 22 kcal/mol and the exothermic reaction energy is ca. 28 kcal/mol [(U)MP2/6–311+G

  17. Atomic bonding between metal and graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hongtao

    2013-03-07

    To understand structural and chemical properties of metal-graphene composites, it is crucial to unveil the chemical bonding along the interface. We provide direct experimental evidence of atomic bonding between typical metal nano structures and graphene, agreeing well with density functional theory studies. Single Cr atoms are located in the valleys of a zigzag edge, and few-atom ensembles preferentially form atomic chains by self-assembly. Low migration barriers lead to rich dynamics of metal atoms and clusters under electron irradiation. We demonstrate no electron-instigated interaction between Cr clusters and pristine graphene, though Cr has been reported to be highly reactive to graphene. The metal-mediated etching is a dynamic effect between metal clusters and pre-existing defects. The resolved atomic configurations of typical nano metal structures on graphene offer insight into modeling and simulations on properties of metal-decorated graphene for both catalysis and future carbon-based electronics. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  18. Discovering Chemistry With Natural Bond Orbitals

    CERN Document Server

    Weinhold, Frank

    2012-01-01

    This book explores chemical bonds, their intrinsic energies, and the corresponding dissociation energies which are relevant in reactivity problems. It offers the first book on conceptual quantum chemistry, a key area for understanding chemical principles and predicting chemical properties. It presents NBO mathematical algorithms embedded in a well-tested and widely used computer program (currently, NBO 5.9). While encouraging a "look under the hood" (Appendix A), this book mainly enables students to gain proficiency in using the NBO program to re-express complex wavefunctions in terms of intui

  19. Symmetry in bonding and spectra an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Douglas, Bodie E

    1985-01-01

    Many courses dealing with the material in this text are called ""Applications of Group Theory."" Emphasizing the central role and primary importance of symmetry in the applications, Symmetry in Bonding and Spectra enables students to handle applications, particularly applications to chemical bonding and spectroscopy. It contains the essential background in vectors and matrices for the applications, along with concise reviews of simple molecular orbital theory, ligand field theory, and treatments of molecular shapes, as well as some quantum mechanics. Solved examples in the text illustra

  20. Handbook of wafer bonding

    CERN Document Server

    Ramm, Peter; Taklo, Maaike M V

    2011-01-01

    Written by an author and editor team from microsystems companies and industry-near research organizations, this handbook and reference presents dependable, first-hand information on bonding technologies.In the first part, researchers from companies and institutions around the world discuss the most reliable and reproducible technologies for the production of bonded wafers. The second part is devoted to current and emerging applications, including microresonators, biosensors and precise measuring devices.

  1. Interfacial bonding characteristic of nanoclay/polymer composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan Molin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Lau Kintak, E-mail: 07900312r@polyu.edu.hk [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon (Hong Kong) and Centre of Excellence in Engineered Fibre Composites, Faculty of Engineering and Surveying, University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, Queensland (Australia); Wong, T.T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Cardona, Francisco [Centre of Excellence in Engineered Fibre Composites, Faculty of Engineering and Surveying, University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, Queensland (Australia)

    2011-11-01

    Using a small amount of nanoclay (montmorillonite (MMT)) can significantly enhance the thermal and mechanical properties of polymer-based composites. Therefore, an in depth understanding of the bonding characteristic between the nanoclay and its surrounding matrix is essential. In this study, Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were conducted to analyze the chemical composition between epoxy matrix and nanocomposite. These experiments revealed that a chemical bonding at an interface between the matrix and nanoclay of the composites did exist. Thus, such bonding can enhance the mechanical and thermal properties of resultant polymer composites as reported in many literatures.

  2. Bonding Energy and Growth Habit of Lithium Niobate Single Crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    On the basis of crystallographic structure of lithium niobate (LN), the bonding energy was quantitatively calculated by the bond valence sum model, which was employed to investigate the crystal growth. A possible relationship between the crystal growth habit and chemical bonding energy of LN crystals are found. It is found that the higher the bond energy, the slower the growth rate, and the more important the plane. The analytical results indicate that (012) plane is the most influential face for the LN crystal growth, which consists well with the standard card (JCPDS Card: 20-0631) and our previous experimental observation. The current work shows that the chemical bond analysis of LN crystals allows us to predict its growth habit and thus to obtain the expected morphology during the spontaneous growth.

  3. Repair Bond Strength of Aged Resin Composite after Different Surface and Bonding Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Wendler

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the effect of different mechanical surface treatments and chemical bonding protocols on the tensile bond strength (TBS of aged composite. Bar specimens were produced using a nanohybrid resin composite and aged in distilled water for 30 days. Different surface treatments (diamond bur, phosphoric acid, silane, and sandblasting with Al2O3 or CoJet Sand, as well as bonding protocols (Primer/Adhesive were used prior to application of the repair composite. TBS of the specimens was measured and the results were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA and the Student–Newman–Keuls test (α = 0.05. Mechanically treated surfaces were characterized under SEM and by profilometry. The effect of water aging on the degree of conversion was measured by means of FTIR-ATR spectroscopy. An important increase in the degree of conversion was observed after aging. No significant differences in TBS were observed among the mechanical surface treatments, despite variations in surface roughness profiles. Phosphoric acid etching significantly improved repair bond strength values. The cohesive TBS of the material was only reached using resin bonding agents. Application of an intermediate bonding system plays a key role in achieving reliable repair bond strengths, whereas the kind of mechanical surface treatment appears to play a secondary role.

  4. Widespread Disulfide Bonding in Proteins from Thermophilic Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Jorda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Disulfide bonds are generally not used to stabilize proteins in the cytosolic compartments of bacteria or eukaryotic cells, owing to the chemically reducing nature of those environments. In contrast, certain thermophilic archaea use disulfide bonding as a major mechanism for protein stabilization. Here, we provide a current survey of completely sequenced genomes, applying computational methods to estimate the use of disulfide bonding across the Archaea. Microbes belonging to the Crenarchaeal branch, which are essentially all hyperthermophilic, are universally rich in disulfide bonding while lesser degrees of disulfide bonding are found among the thermophilic Euryarchaea, excluding those that are methanogenic. The results help clarify which parts of the archaeal lineage are likely to yield more examples and additional specific data on protein disulfide bonding, as increasing genomic sequencing efforts are brought to bear.

  5. Cryogenic evaluation of epoxy bond strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albritton, N.; Young, W.

    The purpose of the work presented here was to determine methods of optimizing the adhesion of a particular epoxy (CTD-101K, Composite Technology Development Inc.) to a particular nickel-based alloy substrate (Incoloy ® 908, Inco Alloys International) for cryogenic applications. Initial efforts were focused on surface preparation of the substrate material via various mechanical and chemical cleaning techniques. Test samples, fabricated to simulate the conduit-to-insulation interface, were put through a mock heat treat and vacuum/pressure impregnation process. Samples were compression/shear load tested to compare the bond strengths at room temperature and liquid nitrogen temperature. The resulting data indicate that acid etching creates a higher bond strength than the other tested techniques and that the bond formed is stronger at cryogenic temperatures than at room temperature. A description of the experiment along with the resulting data is presented here.

  6. Romanian government bond market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia POP

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper aims to present the level of development reached by Romanian government bond market segment, as part of the country financial market. The analysis will be descriptive (the data series available for Romania are short, based on the secondary data offered by the official bodies involved in the process of issuing and trading the Romanian government bonds (Romanian Ministry of Public Finance, Romanian National Bank and Bucharest Stock Exchange, and also on secondary data provided by the Federation of European Stock Exchanges.To enhance the market credibility as a benchmark, a various combination of measures is necessary; among these measures are mentioned: the extension of the yield curve; the issuance calendars in order to improve transparency; increasing the disclosure of information on public debt issuance and statistics; holding regular meetings with dealers, institutional investors and rating agencies; introducing a system of primary dealers; establishing a repurchase (repo market in the government bond market. These measures will be discussed based on the evolution presented inside the paper.The paper conclude with the fact that, until now, the Romanian government bond market did not provide a benchmark for the domestic financial market and that further efforts are needed in order to increase the government bond market transparency and liquidity.

  7. 1H-MAS-NMR Chemical Shifts in Hydrogen-Bonded Complexes of Chlorophenols (Pentachlorophenol, 2,4,6-Trichlorophenol, 2,6-Dichlorophenol, 3,5-Dichlorophenol, and p-Chlorophenol and Amine, and H/D Isotope Effects on 1H-MAS-NMR Spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisashi Honda

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Chemical shifts (CS of the 1H nucleus in N···H···O type hydrogen bonds (H-bond were observed in some complexes between chlorophenols [pentachlorophenol (PCP, 2,4,6-tricholorophenol (TCP, 2,6-dichlorophenol (26DCP, 3,5-dichlorophenol (35DCP, and p-chlorophenol (pCP] and nitrogen-base (N-Base by solid-state high-resolution 1H-NMR with the magic-angle-spinning (MAS method. Employing N-Bases with a wide range of pKa values (0.65–10.75, 1H-MAS-NMR CS values of bridging H atoms in H-bonds were obtained as a function of the N-Base’s pKa. The result showed that the CS values were increased with increasing pKa values in a range of DpKa 2: The maximum CS values was recorded in the PCP (pKa = 5.26–4-methylpyridine (6.03, TCP (6.59–imidazole (6.99, 26DCP (7.02–2-amino-4-methylpyridine (7.38, 35DCP (8.04–4-dimethylaminopyridine (9.61, and pCP (9.47–4-dimethylaminopyridine (9.61 complexes. The largest CS value of 18.6 ppm was recorded in TCP–imidazole crystals. In addition, H/D isotope effects on 1H-MAS-NMR spectra were observed in PCP–2-amino-3-methylpyridine. Based on the results of CS simulation using a B3LYP/6-311+G** function, it can be explained that a little changes of the N–H length in H-bond contribute to the H/D isotope shift of the 1H-MAS-NMR peaks.

  8. Comparison of shear bond strength between unfilled resin to dry enamel and dentin bonding to moist and dry enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasini E.

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: The use of dentine bondings on enamel and dentin in total etch protocols has recently become popular. Unfilled resin is hydrophobic and dentin bonding is hydrophilic in nature. This chemical difference could be effective in enamel bonding process. Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of unfilled resin to dry enamel and dentin bonding to dry and moist enamel. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, a total of 30 incisor teeth were used. The specimens were randomly assigned to three groups of 10. 37% phosphoric acid etchant was applied to the enamel surfaces in each group for 15 seconds, rinsed with water for 20 seconds and dried for 20 seconds with compressed air in groups one and two. After conditioning, group 1 received unfilled resin (Margin Bond, Colten and group 2 received dentin bonding (Single Bond, 3M and in group 3 after conditioning and rinsing with water, a layer of dentin bonding (Single Bond was applied on wet enamel. The enamel and dentin bonding were light cured for 20 seconds. A ring mold 3.5 mm in diameter and 2 mm height was placed over the specimens to receive the composite filling material (Z100, 3M. The composite was cured for 40 seconds. The specimens were thermocycled and shear bond strengths were determined using an Instron Universal Testing Machine. The findings were analyzed by ANOVA One-Way and Tukey HSD tests. Results: Shear bond strength of dentin bonding to dry enamel was significantly less than unfilled resin to dry enamel (P<0.05. There was no significant difference between the bond strength of dentin bonding to moist and dry enamel. In addition bond strength of dentin bonding to wet enamel was not significantly different from unfilled resin to dry enamel. Conclusion: Based on the findings of this study, it is suggested that enamel surface should remain slightly moist after etching before bonding with single bond but when using unfilled resin, the

  9. Theoretical description of hydrogen bonding in oxalic acid dimer and trimer based on the combined extended-transition-state energy decomposition analysis and natural orbitals for chemical valence (ETS-NOCV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitoraj, Mariusz P.; Kurczab, Rafał; Boczar, Marek

    2010-01-01

    In the present study we have analyzed hydrogen bonding in dimer and trimer of oxalic acid, based on a recently proposed charge and energy decomposition scheme (ETS-NOCV). In the case of a dimer, two conformations, α and β, were considered. The deformation density contributions originating from NOCV’s revealed that the formation of hydrogen bonding is associated with the electronic charge deformation in both the σ—(Δρσ) and π-networks (Δρπ). It was demonstrated that σ-donation is realized by electron transfer from the lone pair of oxygen on one monomer into the empty \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document}$$ \\rho_{H - O}^* $$\\end{document} orbital of the second oxalic acid fragment. In addition, a covalent contribution is observed by the density transfer from hydrogen of H-O group in one oxalic acid monomer to the oxygen atom of the second fragment. The resonance assisted component (Δρπ), is based on the transfer of electron density from the π—orbital localized on the oxygen of OH on one oxalic acid monomer to the oxygen atom of the other fragment. ETS-NOCV allowed to conclude that the σ(O---HO) component is roughly eight times as important as π (RAHB) contribution in terms of energetic estimation. The electrostatic factor (ΔEelstat) is equally as important as orbital interaction term (ΔEorb). Finally, comparing β-dimer of oxalic acid with trimer we found practically no difference concerning each of the O---HO bonds, neither qualitative nor quantitative. Figure The contours of deformation density σ- and π-contributions describing the hydrogen bonding between the monomers in the oxalic acid dimer, together with the corresponding ETS-NOCV-based orbital-interaction energies (in kcal/mol). PMID:20505966

  10. Insulation bonding test system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beggs, J. M.; Johnston, G. D.; Coleman, A. D.; Portwood, J. N.; Saunders, J. M.; Redmon, J. W.; Porter, A. C. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A method and a system for testing the bonding of foam insulation attached to metal is described. The system involves the use of an impacter which has a calibrated load cell mounted on a plunger and a hammer head mounted on the end of the plunger. When the impacter strikes the insulation at a point to be tested, the load cell measures the force of the impact and the precise time interval during which the hammer head is in contact with the insulation. This information is transmitted as an electrical signal to a load cell amplifier where the signal is conditioned and then transmitted to a fast Fourier transform (FFT) analyzer. The FFT analyzer produces energy spectral density curves which are displayed on a video screen. The termination frequency of the energy spectral density curve may be compared with a predetermined empirical scale to determine whether a igh quality bond, good bond, or debond is present at the point of impact.

  11. The Illiquidity of Corporate Bonds

    OpenAIRE

    Bao, Jack; Pan, Jun; Wang, Jiang

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the illiquidity of corporate bonds and its asset-pricing implications. Using transactions data from 2003 to 2009, we show that the illiquidity in corporate bonds is substantial, significantly greater than what can be explained by bid–ask spreads. We establish a strong link between bond illiquidity and bond prices. In aggregate, changes in market-level illiquidity explain a substantial part of the time variation in yield spreads of high-rated (AAA through A) bonds, overshad...

  12. The Trouble With Bonds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ In early June,global financial markets gyrated downwards in the wake of central banks'tough language on inflation.At one point bond prices reflected expectations of four rate hikes by the US Federal Reserve (Fed) in the next 12 months.As a result,the dollar firmed,oil prices stabilized,and yield curves flattened around the world.If all these inflation-fighting measures are real,the situation bodes well for bonds.But,I think otherwise.

  13. Consistent descriptions of metal–ligand bonds and spin-crossover in inorganic chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2013-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) is today the unchallenged tool for routinely obtaining molecular information on chemical stability, reactivity, and electronic structure across the Periodic Table. The chemical bond is the fundamental unit of molecular structure and reactivity, and thus, large...

  14. Microleakage of bonded amalgam restorations using different adhesive agents with dye under vacuum: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Parolia

    2011-01-01

    Clinical Significance: Bonded amalgam restorations prevent over-preparation and reduce the tooth flexure. GIC type I under amalgam provides chemical bonding in between amalgam and tooth structure and thus reduces the microleakage.

  15. Photochemical tissue bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, Robert W.; Kochevar, Irene E.

    2012-01-10

    Photochemical tissue bonding methods include the application of a photosensitizer to a tissue and/or tissue graft, followed by irradiation with electromagnetic energy to produce a tissue seal. The methods are useful for tissue adhesion, such as in wound closure, tissue grafting, skin grafting, musculoskeletal tissue repair, ligament or tendon repair and corneal repair.

  16. Bonds Between Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Alan

    The field of inquiry into how atoms are bonded together to form molecules and solids crosses the borderlines between physics and chemistry encompassing methods characteristic of both sciences. At one extreme, the inquiry is pursued with care and rigor into the simplest cases; at the other extreme, suggestions derived from the more careful inquiry…

  17. Evaluation of an alternative technique to optimize direct bonding of orthodontic brackets to temporary crowns

    OpenAIRE

    Francilena Maria Campos Santos Dias; Célia Regina Maio Pinzan-Vercelino; Rudys Rodolfo de Jesus Tavares; Júlio de Araújo Gurgel; Fausto Silva Bramante; Melissa Nogueira Proença Fialho

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare shear bond strength of different direct bonding techniques of orthodontic brackets to acrylic resin surfaces. METHODS: The sample comprised 64 discs of chemically activated acrylic resin (CAAR) randomly divided into four groups: discs in group 1 were bonded by means of light-cured composite resin (conventional adhesive); discs in group 2 had surfaces roughened with a diamond bur followed by conventional direct bonding by means of light-cured composite resin; discs in gro...

  18. Evidence of Hydrogen Bonding in Chloroform and Polyacrylates from NMR Measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The presence of hydrogen bonding in chloroform and polyacrylate mixtures was demonstrated by observation of 1H- and 13C-NMR chemical shifts. Comparison of the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift in polymer solutions with their low molecular mass analogues showed the effect of steric hindrance on hydrogen bonding. This initial investigation is helpful for understanding the intermolecular interaction in relatively weak hydrogen bonding polymer solutions.

  19. Interfiber bonding and fiber segment activation in paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannu Paulapuro

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Bonding and activation in paper were studied with the help of laboratory test sheets and common paper strength tests. Different papermaking furnishes and raw material treatments were used to examine the effects they have on bonding and activation. Furthermore, various boundary conditions during drying were included to single out the influence of bonding and activation on paper properties. It was found that bonding is clearly increased by beating of kraft pulp, starch addition, and thermomechanical pulp fines, whereas activation benefited most from beating and addition of reinforcement fibers to mechanical pulp based furnishes. Subjecting test sheets to increasing amounts of drying stress affected activation positively, and bonding negatively. The increase in activation did not seem to be dependent on the beating degree of chemical pulp fibers. Bonding, on the other hand, deteriorated more significantly in sheets made of extensively beaten kraft fibers, i.e. in sheets where the initial bonding potential was higher. Commonly used paper strength measurements provide dependable and accurate tools for assessing the effect of different variables on both bonding and activation. A short literature survey of bonding and activation is also provided.

  20. Is There a Quadruple Bond in C2?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, David Wilian Oliveira; Nascimento, Marco Antonio Chaer

    2016-05-10

    The chemical structure of the ground state of C2 has been the subject of intense debate after the suggestion that the molecule could exhibit a "fourth" covalent bond. In this paper, we investigate this problem explicitly avoiding all the points of conflict from the previous papers to show that there is no quadruple bond in C2. The generalized product function energy partitioning (GPF-EP) method has been applied to calculate the interference energy (IE) that accounts for the formation of covalent bonds for each bond of the molecule. The IE analysis shows that for the standard σ and π bonds interference exhibits the expected behavior, while for the "fourth" bond interference is a destabilizing factor. To make sure this could not be attributed to a new kind of bond, we performed an equivalent analysis for the (3)Σ(-) excited state of C3 molecule in which similar "bonding" occurs between the two ending carbon atoms. We also show that the difference in force constants of C2 and acetylene can be rationalized in terms of the amount of charge density in the internuclear region by looking at the changes in the overlaps between orbitals along the bond axis. PMID:27045682

  1. Convertible bond valuation focusing on Chinese convertible bond market

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Ke

    2010-01-01

    This paper mainly discusses the methods of valuation of convertible bonds in Chinese market. Different from common convertible bonds in European market, considering the complicate features of Chinese convertible bond, this paper represents specific pricing approaches for pricing convertible bonds with different provisions along with the increment of complexity of these provisions. More specifically, this paper represents the decomposing method and binomial tree method for pricing both of Non-...

  2. Indirect bonding technique in orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kübra Yıldırım

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ‘Direct Bonding Technique’ which allows the fixed orthodontic appliances to be directly bonded to teeth without using bands decreased the clinic time for bracket bonding and increased esthetics and oral hygiene during orthodontic treatment. However, mistakes in bracket positioning were observed due to decreased direct visual sight and access to posterior teeth. ‘Indirect Bonding Technique’ was developed for eliminating these problems. Initially, decreased bond strength, higher bond failure rate, periodontal tissue irritation, compromised oral hygiene and increased laboratory time were the main disadvantages of this technique when compared to direct bonding. The newly developed materials and modified techniques help to eliminate these negative consequences. Today, the brackets bonded with indirect technique have similar bond strength with brackets bonded directly. Moreover, indirect and direct bonding techniques have similar effects on periodontal tissues. However, indirect bonding technique requires more attention and precision in laboratory and clinical stage, and has higher cost. Orthodontist's preference between these two bonding techniques may differ according to time spent in laboratory and clinic, cost, patient comfort and personal opinion.

  3. Valence bond study on excited states of molecules——Bonding features of the low-lying states of molecule B2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹泽星; 吴玮; 张乾二

    1997-01-01

    Based on the correspondence of the molecular orbital theory and valence bond theory to the description of chemical bonds,the ah imtio valence bond (VB) calculations of the low-lying states of diatomic molecules arc realized.The calculation results for the low-lying states of B2 show that the VB calculation has clear-cut physical significance,and its simulation of the behavior of the potential energy surface about the equilibrium position is superior to that of the molecular orbital theory.The valence bond calculation involving only a few bonded tableaus can correctly re fleet the effect of electronic correlation.

  4. Covalent bonding from alchemical linear response density functional theory

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, K Y Samuel; Ramakrishnan, Raghunathan; von Lilienfeld, O Anatole

    2015-01-01

    We assess the predictive accuracy of linear response based estimates of changes in covalent bonding due to linear alchemical interpolations among molecules. We have investigated single bonds to hydrogen, as well as single, double, and triple bonds between main-group elements, occurring in small iso-electronic molecular spaces with atomic elements drawn from rows 2-3 in the $p$-block of the periodic table. Numerical evidence suggests that first order estimates of bonding potentials can achieve chemical accuracy if the alchemical interpolation connects molecules containing late elements in the periodic table (3$^{rd}$ and 4$^{th}$ row) and identical number of atoms and molecular geometries. For these interpolations, changes in bonding potential are near-linear in the coupling parameter, resulting in accurate Hellmann-Feynman predictions. Second order estimates for such interpolations yield worse predictions. The predictions become substantially worse if initial and final molecules differ not only in composition...

  5. China-Russia Bond

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji Zhiye; Ma Zongshi

    2007-01-01

    @@ Thanks to China's successful launching of the Year of Russia, 2006 will surely go down as a milestone in the history of the China-Russia bond. Furthermore, a still-warmer climate will continue to prevail in 2007 when Moscow, in its turn, hosts the Year of China, trying to outshine its next-door neighbor in this regard, as Russian President Vladimir Putin promised in the exchange of new year greetings with his Chinese counterpart, President Hu Jintao.

  6. Direct bonded space maintainers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, V L; Almeida, M A; Mello, H S; Keith, O

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate clinically a bonded space maintainer, which would reduce chair-side time and cost. Sixty appliances were fabricated from 0.7 mm stainless steel round wire and bonded using light-cured composite to the two teeth adjacent to the site of extraction of a posterior primary tooth. Twenty males and sixteen females (age range 5-9-years-old) were selected from the Pedodontic clinic of the State University of Rio de Janeiro. The sixty space maintainers were divided into two groups according to the site in which they were placed: a) absent first primary molar and b) absent second primary molar. Impressions and study models were obtained prior to and 6 months after bonding the appliances. During this period only 8.3% of failures were observed, most of them from occlusal or facial trauma. Student t-test did not show statistically significant alterations in the sizes of the maintained spaces during the trial period.

  7. Statistical Parameters for Hydrogen Bonding Networks: One Component Case

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王海军; 洪晓钟; 赵敏; 巴信武

    2001-01-01

    Based on the analysis of network structures formed by hydrogen bonds as the sol-gel phase transition takesplace in a single component hydrogen bonding system, the theory of reversible gelation is applied to calculatesome statistical parameters that determine many physical and chemical properties of the networks. Then, thentunerical simulation of the number of active chains and dangling chains, the number of effective cross-linkages,the number of active and dangling mers and the modulus as a function of conversion are undertaken.

  8. Mittal bonded tongue thrusting appliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekha Mittal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available These days majority of orthodontist includes bonded molar attachment in their inventory to eliminate the discomfort of molar separation during initial appointment and band spaces left at the end of treatment. This article describes a innovative and economical method of attachment of bonded tongue crib if required during the initial or later stages of treatment along with bonded molar tubes.

  9. Hamiltonian formulation of bond graphs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golo, Goran; Schaft, van der Arjan; Breedveld, Peter C.; Maschke, Bernhard M.; Johansson, R.; Rantzer, A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper deals with the mathematical formulation of bond graphs. It is proven that the power continuous part of bond graphs, the junction structure, can be associated with a Dirac structure and that the equations describing a bond graph model correspond to a port Hamiltonian system. The conditions

  10. Using Diffusion Bonding in Making Piezoelectric Actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sager, Frank E.

    2003-01-01

    A technique for the fabrication of piezoelectric actuators that generate acceptably large forces and deflections at relatively low applied voltages involves the stacking and diffusion bonding of multiple thin piezoelectric layers coated with film electrodes. The present technique stands in contrast to an older technique in which the layers are bonded chemically, by use of urethane or epoxy agents. The older chemical-bonding technique entails several disadvantages, including the following: It is difficult to apply the bonding agents to the piezoelectric layers. It is difficult to position the layers accurately and without making mistakes. There is a problem of disposal of hazardous urethane and epoxy wastes. The urethane and epoxy agents are nonpiezoelectric materials. As such, they contribute to the thickness of a piezoelectric laminate without contributing to its performance; conversely, for a given total thickness, the performance of the laminate is below that of a unitary piezoelectric plate of the same thickness. The figure depicts some aspects of the fabrication of a laminated piezoelectric actuator by the present diffusion- bonding technique. First, stock sheets of the piezoelectric material are inspected and tested. Next, the hole pattern shown in the figure is punched into the sheets. Alternatively, if the piezoelectric material is not a polymer, then the holes are punched in thermoplastic films. Then both faces of each punched piezoelectric sheet or thermoplastic film are coated with a silver-ink electrode material by use of a silkscreen printer. The electrode and hole patterns are designed for minimal complexity and minimal waste of material. After a final electrical test, all the coated piezoelectric layers (or piezoelectric layers and coated thermoplastic films) are stacked in an alignment jig, which, in turn, is placed in a curved press for the diffusion-bonding process. In this process, the stack is pressed and heated at a specified curing temperature

  11. sup 1 H NMR studies of a biosynthetic lacto-ganglio hybrid glycosphingolipid: Confirmation of structure, interpretation of anomalous' chemical shifts, and evidence for interresidue amide-amide hydrogen bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levery, S.B.; Harris, D.D.; Hakomori, Senitiroh (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (United States)); Holmes, E.H. (Pacific Northwest Research Foundation, Seattle, WA (United States))

    1992-02-04

    Glycosphinogolipids bearing GlcNAc{beta}1 {yields} 3 and GalNAc{beta}1 {yields} 4 linked to {beta}-Gal of lactosylceramide first isolated from a murine myelogenous leukemia cell line have since been found as normal components of mullet roe and English sole liver. In order to clarify the biosynthetic pathways responsible for its occurrence both as a product of normal tissues and as a possible mammalian cancer-associated antigen, the lacto-ganglio hybrid core structure LcGg{sub 4}Cer was synthesized from Lc{sub 3}Cer using a GalNAc{beta}1 {yields} 4 transferase preparation from English sole liver. A preliminary characterization of the enzyme, which may be identical to the GalNAc T-1 responsible for synthesis of GM{sub 2} ganglioside, is presented. The enzymatically synthesized product was analyzed by 1- and 2-D {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy, confirming its primary structure as GalNAc{beta}1 {yields} 4-(GlcNAc{beta}1 {yields} 3)Gal{beta}1 {yields} 4Glc{beta}1 {yields} 1Cer. An approximate three-dimensional structure for LcGg{sub 4}Cer is proposed, consistent with all data obtained, which should be useful in discussing the results of {sup 1}H NMR analysis of compounds containing this core tetrasaccharide. The structure is characterized by an unusual arrangement of terminal N-acetylhexosamine residues, resulting in a {pi}-H hydrogen-bonding interaction between their acetamido groups.

  12. Seeking hydrogen bonds- with and without neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hydrogen-bond interaction can be studied using a variety of spectroscopic and crystallographic techniques, as well as theoretical studies based on quantum chemical principles, semi-empirical procedures, and statistical interpretations. A degree of specificity, along with flexibility, provides H-bonded systems with a variety of unusual and interesting physical, chemical and biological properties. Neutron diffraction is the method of choice for obtaining high-precision data on hydrogen-atom positions and hydrogen-bond stereo-chemistry in crystals. Neutron inelastic scattering can provide information on the dynamics of H-bonded systems. High-precision neutron diffraction studies on a variety of crystal hydrates, amino acids and small peptides, development of semi-empirical potential functions for bent-hydrogen bonds, and statistical analysis of H-bond populations associated with various donor and acceptor groups are some of the investigations on hydrogen bonding, carried out at Trombay during the past three decades. (author). 39 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  13. Bond additivity corrections for quantum chemistry methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. F. Melius; M. D. Allendorf

    1999-04-01

    In the 1980's, the authors developed a bond-additivity correction procedure for quantum chemical calculations called BAC-MP4, which has proven reliable in calculating the thermochemical properties of molecular species, including radicals as well as stable closed-shell species. New Bond Additivity Correction (BAC) methods have been developed for the G2 method, BAC-G2, as well as for a hybrid DFT/MP2 method, BAC-Hybrid. These BAC methods use a new form of BAC corrections, involving atomic, molecular, and bond-wise additive terms. These terms enable one to treat positive and negative ions as well as neutrals. The BAC-G2 method reduces errors in the G2 method due to nearest-neighbor bonds. The parameters within the BAC-G2 method only depend on atom types. Thus the BAC-G2 method can be used to determine the parameters needed by BAC methods involving lower levels of theory, such as BAC-Hybrid and BAC-MP4. The BAC-Hybrid method should scale well for large molecules. The BAC-Hybrid method uses the differences between the DFT and MP2 as an indicator of the method's accuracy, while the BAC-G2 method uses its internal methods (G1 and G2MP2) to provide an indicator of its accuracy. Indications of the average error as well as worst cases are provided for each of the BAC methods.

  14. Phosphate bonded ceramics as candidate final-waste-form materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Room-temperature setting phosphate-bonded ceramics were studied as candidate materials for stabilization of DOE low-level problem mixed wastes which cannot be treated by other established stabilization techniques. Phosphates of Mg, Mg-Na, Al and Zr were studied to stabilize ash surrogate waste containing RCRA metals as nitrates and RCRA organics. We show that for a typical loading of 35 wt.% of the ash waste, the phosphate ceramics pass the TCLP test. The waste forms have high compression strength exceeding ASTM recommendations for final waste forms. Detailed X-ray diffraction studies and differential thermal analyses of the waste forms show evidence of chemical reaction of the waste with phosphoric acid and the host matrix. The SEM studies show evidence of physical bonding. The excellent performance in the leaching tests is attributed to a chemical solidification and physical as well as chemical bonding of ash wastes in these phosphate ceramics

  15. ASEAN+3 Bond Market Guides

    OpenAIRE

    Asian Development Bank (ADB)

    2012-01-01

    The ASEAN+3 Bond Market Guide contains the comprehensive reports of the ASEAN+3 Bond Market Forum Sub-Forum 1 (SF1) and Sub-Forum 2 (SF2). The SF1 report (Volume 1) analyzes the harmonization and standardization of the existing bond markets in the ASEAN+3. It also contains the individual market guides of 11 economies under the ASEAN+3 Bond Market Forum (ABMF). The SF2 report (Volume 2) provides an overview of the ASEAN+3 bond markets and their infrastructures, as well as issues confronted by ...

  16. Optimal Investment in Structured Bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Pernille; Jørgensen, Peter Løchte

    The paper examines the role of structured bonds in the optimal portfolio of a small retail investor. We consider the typical structured bond essentially repacking an exotic option and a zero coupon bond, i.e. an investment with portfolio insurance. The optimal portfolio is found when the investment...... opportunities consist of a risky reference fund, a risk-free asset and a structured bond. Key model elements are the trading strategy and utility function of the investor. Our numerical results indicate structured bonds do have basis for consideration in the optimal portfolio. The product holdings...

  17. Hydrogen bonding in ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Patricia A; Ashworth, Claire R; Matthews, Richard P

    2015-03-01

    Ionic liquids (IL) and hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) are two diverse fields for which there is a developing recognition of significant overlap. Doubly ionic H-bonds occur when a H-bond forms between a cation and anion, and are a key feature of ILs. Doubly ionic H-bonds represent a wide area of H-bonding which has yet to be fully recognised, characterised or explored. H-bonds in ILs (both protic and aprotic) are bifurcated and chelating, and unlike many molecular liquids a significant variety of distinct H-bonds are formed between different types and numbers of donor and acceptor sites within a given IL. Traditional more neutral H-bonds can also be formed in functionalised ILs, adding a further level of complexity. Ab initio computed parameters; association energies, partial charges, density descriptors as encompassed by the QTAIM methodology (ρBCP), qualitative molecular orbital theory and NBO analysis provide established and robust mechanisms for understanding and interpreting traditional neutral and ionic H-bonds. In this review the applicability and extension of these parameters to describe and quantify the doubly ionic H-bond has been explored. Estimating the H-bonding energy is difficult because at a fundamental level the H-bond and ionic interaction are coupled. The NBO and QTAIM methodologies, unlike the total energy, are local descriptors and therefore can be used to directly compare neutral, ionic and doubly ionic H-bonds. The charged nature of the ions influences the ionic characteristics of the H-bond and vice versa, in addition the close association of the ions leads to enhanced orbital overlap and covalent contributions. The charge on the ions raises the energy of the Ylp and lowers the energy of the X-H σ* NBOs resulting in greater charge transfer, strengthening the H-bond. Using this range of parameters and comparing doubly ionic H-bonds to more traditional neutral and ionic H-bonds it is clear that doubly ionic H-bonds cover the full range of weak

  18. Probing the electronic structure and Au—C chemical bonding in AuCn- and AuCnH- (n = 2, 4, and 6) using high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Iker; Ruipérez, Fernando; Ugalde, Jesus M.; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2016-08-01

    We report a joint photoelectron spectroscopy and theoretical study on AuC4-, AuC6-, and AuCnH- (n = 2, 4, and 6) using high-resolution photoelectron imaging and ab initio calculations. The ground state of AuC2H-, AuC4H-, and AuC6H- is found to be linear, while that of AuC4- and AuC6- is bent. All the species are found to be linear in their neutral ground states. The electron affinities (EAs) are measured to be 3.366(1) and 3.593(1) eV for AuC4 and AuC6, respectively. Both bending and stretching frequencies are resolved in the spectra of AuC4- and AuC6-. High-resolution data of AuCnH- reveal major vibrational progressions in the Au—C stretching and bending modes. AuC2H- has a ground state stretching frequency of 445(10) cm-1 and a bending frequency of 260(10) cm-1; AuC4H- has a ground state stretching frequency of 340(10) cm-1; AuC6H- has a ground state stretching frequency of 260(10) cm-1 and a bending frequency of 55(10) cm-1. The EAs are measured to be 1.475(1), 1.778(1), and 1.962(1) eV for AuC2H, AuC4H, and AuC6H, respectively. The strength of the Au—C bond decreases as the number of carbon atoms increases. The current study provides a wealth of electronic structure information about AuC4-, AuC6-, and AuCnH- (n = 2, 4, and 6) and their corresponding neutrals.

  19. Additional disulfide bonds in insulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Tine N; Pettersson, Ingrid; Huus, Kasper;

    2015-01-01

    The structure of insulin, a glucose homeostasis-controlling hormone, is highly conserved in all vertebrates and stabilized by three disulfide bonds. Recently, we designed a novel insulin analogue containing a fourth disulfide bond located between positions A10-B4. The N-terminus of insulin's B......-chain is flexible and can adapt multiple conformations. We examined how well disulfide bond predictions algorithms could identify disulfide bonds in this region of insulin. In order to identify stable insulin analogues with additional disulfide bonds, which could be expressed, the Cβ cut-off distance had...... in comparison to analogues with additional disulfide bonds that were more difficult to predict. In contrast, addition of the fourth disulfide bond rendered all analogues resistant to fibrillation under stress conditions and all stable analogues bound to the insulin receptor with picomolar affinities. Thus...

  20. VB studies on bonding features of HNC(←→)HCN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖新丽; 吴玮; 莫亦荣; 张乾二

    2003-01-01

    Within the bonded tableau unitary group approach (BTUGA), a scheme, combined with Pauling's resonance theory to select the predominant valence bond structures for VB calculations, is proposed. This scheme ensures a reliable and illustrative bonding picture in the description of chemical reactions, as exemplified by the isomerization reaction HNCHCN. The computation results account for important bonding features about this isomerization at the ab initio level and explore the mechanism of phenomena such as (i) HCN is more stable than HNC; (ii) the C-N bond first lengthens and then shortens in the vicinity of the transition state; (iii) only H-atom migration is observed in the isomerization process, without the breaking of the CN bond. Our results demonstrate that only a few bonded tableau functions are sufficient enough to provide a visual and reliable bonding picture.

  1. Bond resistances in molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painelli, Anna

    2006-03-01

    The description of molecular contacts is one of the hardest problems in modeling molecular junctions. In common approaches macroscopic leads ensure a finite potential drop and hence a driving force for the current. Recently, a different strategy is emerging where a steady-state DC current is forced in the molecule, by making resort to Lagrange multipliers, or by drawing a magnetic flux through the molecule. The strategy is promising, but two main problems remain to be solved: (1) the calculation of the potential drop needed to sustain the current, and (2) the definition of the potential profile along the molecule. Here the Joule law is used to evaluate the potential drop from the electrical power spent on the molecule, and continuity constraints for steady-state DC current are implemented to get information on the potential profile. Borrowing powerful concepts from the field of molecular spectroscopy, emphasis is put on the molecule, while clamping information about contacts in the molecular relaxation matrix. The molecule is described in a real-space approach, leading to a suggestive analogy between the molecule and an electrical circuit where resistances are associated with chemical bonds.

  2. The role of surface and subsurface point defects for chemical model studies on TiO2: a first-principles theoretical study of formaldehyde bonding on rutile TiO2(110).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haubrich, Jan; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Friend, Cynthia M

    2011-04-11

    We report a systematic investigation of the effects of different surface and subsurface point defects on the adsorption of formaldehyde on rutile TiO(2)(110) surfaces using density functional theory (DFT). All point defects investigated--including surface bridging oxygen vacancies, titanium interstitials, and subsurface oxygen vacancies--stabilize the adsorption significantly by up to 56 kJ mol(-1) at a coverage of 0.1 monolayer (ML). The stabilization is due to a decrease of the coordination (covalent saturation) of the surface Ti adsorption sites adjacent to the defects, which leads to a stronger molecule-surface interaction. This change in the Ti is caused by the removal of a neighboring atom (oxygen vacancies) or substantial lattice relaxations induced by the subsurface defects. On the stoichiometric reference surface, the most stable adsorption geometry of formaldehyde is a tilted η(2)-dioxymethylene (with an adsorption energy E(ads)=-125 kJ mol(-1)), in which a bond forms to a nearby bridging O atom and the carbonyl-O atom in the formaldehyde binds to a Ti atom in the adjacent fivefold coordinated lattice site. The η(1)-top configuration on five-coordinate Ti(4+) is much less favorable (E(ads)=-69 kJ mol(-1)). The largest stabilization is exerted by subsurface Ti interstitials between the first and second layers. These defects stabilize the η(2)-dioxymethylene structure by nearly 40 kJ mol(-1) to an adsorption energy of -164 kJ mol(-1). Contrary to popular belief, adsorption in a bridging oxygen vacancy (E(ads)=-86 kJ mol(-1)) is much less favorable for formaldehyde compared to the η(2)-dioxymethylene structures. From these results we conclude that formaldehyde will bind in the η(2)-dioxymethylene structure on the stoichiometric surface as well as in the presence of Ti interstitials and bridging oxygen vacancies. In the light of these substantial effects, we conclude that it is essential to include all the types of point defects present in typical

  3. Unified description of hydrogen bonding by a two-state effective Hamiltonian

    CERN Document Server

    McKenzie, Ross H

    2011-01-01

    An effective Hamiltonian is considered for hydrogen bonding between two molecules due to the quantum mechanical interaction between the orbitals of the H-atom and the donor and acceptor atoms in the molecules. The Hamiltonian acts on two diabatic states and has a simple chemically motivated form for its matrix elements. The model gives insight into the "H-bond puzzle", describes different classes of bonds, and empirical correlations between the donor-acceptor distance $R$ and binding energies, bond lengths, and the softening of vibrational frequencies. A key prediction is the UV photo-dissociation of H-bonded complexes via an excited electronic state with an exalted vibrational frequency.

  4. Credit default swaps, bond spreads and the bond market

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Meicheng

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid development of the credit default swap (CDS) market, the issue of how the introduction of CDSs affects the corporate bond market has been of particular interest to researchers and policy makers. This has been investigated in the literature from two perspectives. One is to examine the relationship between the CDS and the bond markets in price discovery, and the other is concerned with researching the CDS trading effects on bond spreads. Referring to the former approach, most rel...

  5. Solder extrusion pressure bonding process and bonded products produced thereby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beavis, Leonard C.; Karnowsky, Maurice M.; Yost, Frederick G.

    1992-01-01

    Production of soldered joints which are highly reliable and capable of surviving 10,000 thermal cycles between about -40.degree. C. and 110.degree. C. Process involves interposing a thin layer of a metal solder composition between the metal surfaces of members to be bonded and applying heat and up to about 1000 psi compression pressure to the superposed members, in the presence of a reducing atmosphere, to extrude the major amount of the solder composition, contaminants including fluxing gases and air, from between the members being bonded, to form a very thin, strong intermetallic bonding layer having a thermal expansion tolerant with that of the bonded members.

  6. Avoiding silicon/glass bonding damage with fusion bonding method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daohong Yang(杨道虹); Chen Xu(徐晨); Guangdi Shen(沈光地)

    2004-01-01

    A novel fusion bonding method between silicon and glass with Nd:YAG laser is described.This method overcomes the movable mechanical parts damage caused by the electrostatics force in micro-electronic machine-system(MEMS)device during the anodic bonding. The diameter of laser spot is 300 μm,the power of laser is 100 W,the laser velocity for bonding is 0.05 m/s,the average bonding tension is 6.3 MPa.It could distinctly reduce and eliminate the defects and damage,especially in movable sensitive mechanical parts of MEMS device.

  7. Determining the Energetics of the Hydrogen Bond through FTIR: A Hands-On Physical Chemistry Lab Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerin, Abby C.; Riley, Kristi; Rupnik, Kresimir; Kuroda, Daniel G.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen bonds are very important chemical structures that are responsible for many unique and important properties of solvents, such as the solvation power of water. These distinctive features are directly related to the stabilization energy conferred by hydrogen bonds to the solvent. Thus, the characterization of hydrogen bond energetics has…

  8. Supersymmetric Valence Bond Solid States

    OpenAIRE

    Arovas, Daniel P.; Hasebe, Kazuki; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2009-01-01

    In this work we investigate the supersymmetric version of the valence bond solid (SVBS) state. In one dimension, the SVBS states continuously interpolate between the valence bond states for integer and half-integer spin chains, and they generally describe superconducting valence bond liquid states. Spin and superconducting correlation functions can be computed exactly for these states, and their correlation lengths are equal at the supersymmetric point. In higher dimensions, the wave function...

  9. Mezzanine finance and corporate bonds

    OpenAIRE

    Libena TETREVOVA

    2009-01-01

    The article deals with the problems of mezzanine finance in relation to corporate bonds. Firstly, attention is paid to definition of mezzanine finance. The term mezzanine finance is used as a term for hybrid forms of financing that combine elements of debt and equity financing. Mezzanine finance represents an alternative form of financing corporate activities. Secondly, possible forms of mezzanine finance are characterized. We can say that special types of corporate bonds (convertible bonds a...

  10. Hydrogen Bonds Involving Metal Centers

    OpenAIRE

    Pavlović, G.; Raos, N.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen bonds involving metal center as a hydrogen donor or hydrogen acceptor are only a specific type of metal-hydrogen interactions; it is therefore not easy to differentiate hydrogen bond from other metal-hydrogen interactions, especially agostic ones. The first part of the review is therefore devoted to the results of structural chemistry and molecular spectroscopy (NMR, IR), as a tool for differentiating hydrogen bondings from other hydrogen interactions. The classical examples of Pt···...

  11. Bond failure patterns in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linklater, Rognvald A; Gordon, Peter H

    2003-05-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the presence and pattern of differences in bond failure between tooth types in vivo when bonding orthodontic brackets with the no-mix orthodontic composite adhesive Right-On. In vivo bond failure for a single operator was recorded for 108 consecutive patients undergoing fixed-appliance orthodontic treatment. The bond failure data were analyzed by survival analysis. Time to first failure or censorship was recorded for each bonded attachment. Overall failure in the sample matched previous clinical studies but conflicted with previous ex vivo bond strength data. Mandibular and posterior teeth had significantly higher rates of failure than did maxillary and anterior teeth. The type of attachment used had a significant effect on bond survival. The results of this study confirm that in vivo bond survival is not uniform for all teeth. Comparisons between the findings of this study and those of a previous ex vivo study by the same authors failed to validate ex vivo bond strength testing as clinically relevant.

  12. Wafer bonding applications and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Gösele, Ulrich

    2004-01-01

    During the past decade direct wafer bonding has developed into a mature materials integration technology. This book presents state-of-the-art reviews of the most important applications of wafer bonding written by experts from industry and academia. The topics include bonding-based fabrication methods of silicon-on-insulator, photonic crystals, VCSELs, SiGe-based FETs, MEMS together with hybrid integration and laser lift-off. The non-specialist will learn about the basics of wafer bonding and its various application areas, while the researcher in the field will find up-to-date information about this fast-moving area, including relevant patent information.

  13. Photoinduced hydrogen-bonding dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Tian-Shu; Xu, Jinmei

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogen bonding dynamics has received extensive research attention in recent years due to the significant advances in femtolaser spectroscopy experiments and quantum chemistry calculations. Usually, photoexcitation would cause changes in the hydrogen bonding formed through the interaction between hydrogen donor and acceptor molecules on their ground electronic states, and such transient strengthening or weakening of hydrogen bonding could be crucial for the photophysical transformations and the subsequent photochemical reactions that occurred on a time scale from tens of femtosecond to a few nanoseconds. In this article, we review the combined experimental and theoretical studies focusing on the ultrafast electronic and vibrational hydrogen bonding dynamics. Through these studies, new mechanisms and proposals and common rules have been put forward to advance our understanding of the hydrogen bondings dynamics in a variety of important photoinduced phenomena like photosynthesis, dual fluorescence emission, rotational reorientation, excited-state proton transfer and charge transfer processes, chemosensor fluorescence sensing, rearrangements of the hydrogen-bond network including forming and breaking hydrogen bond in water. Graphical Abstract We review the recent advances on exploring the photoinduced hydrogen bonding dynamics in solutions through a joint approach of laser spectroscopy and theoretical calculation. The reviewed studies have put forward a new mechanism, new proposal, and new rule for a variety of photoinduced phenomena such as photosynthesis, dual fluorescence emission, rotational reorientation, excited-state proton transfer and charge transfer, chemosensor fluorescence sensing, and rearrangements of the hydrogen-bond network in water. PMID:27491849

  14. Bond Growth under Temperature Gradient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.K. Satyawali

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Grain and bond growth for dry snow are determined by the distribution of temperature andtemperature gradient in the snow matrix. From the standpoint of particle approach and based oncubic packing structure, a bond growth model has been developed for TG metamorphism. The paper.highlights the importance of bond formation and its effect on snow viscosity and finally on the rateof settlement. This is very important for developing a numerical snow pack model if microstructureis considered to be a basic parameter. A few experiments have been carried out to validate bond formation under temperature gradient.

  15. A simplified indirect bonding technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radha Katiyar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of lingual orthodontics, indirect bonding technique has become an integral part of practice. It involves placement of brackets initially on the models and then their transfer to teeth with the help of transfer trays. Problems encountered with current indirect bonding techniques used are (1 the possibility of adhesive flash remaining around the base of the brackets which requires removal (2 longer time required for the adhesive to gain enough bond strength for secure tray removal. The new simplified indirect bonding technique presented here overcomes both these problems.

  16. Reactive Bonding Film for Bonding Carbon Foam Through Metal Extrusion

    CERN Document Server

    Chertok, Maxwell; Irving, Michael; Neher, Christian; Tripathi, Mani; Wang, Ruby; Zheng, Gayle

    2016-01-01

    Future tracking detectors, such as those under development for the High Luminosity LHC, will require mechanical structures employing novel materials to reduce mass while providing excellent strength, thermal conductivity, and radiation tolerance. Adhesion methods for such materials are under study at present. This paper demonstrates the use of reactive bonding film as an adhesion method for bonding carbon foam.

  17. Digital Control of Bonding Force for Gold Wire Bonding Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaochu Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to digitally control the bonding force of a wire bonder precisely, this paper uses a DC solenoid as a force source, and by controlling the solenoid’s current, which causes the electromagnetic force, we can control the bonding force that capillary applies. The bonding force control system in this paper is composed of PC (Personal Computer and hypogyny MCU (Micro Controller Unit, which communicate using a RS485 interface. The digital value of a given bonding force is given by the PC to the MCU. By comparing the sampling current of the solenoid, and through PID regulation, D/A converter of the digital potentiometer and the solenoid driver circuit, the half-closed loop control system of bonding force is accomplished. Tuning of the PID parameters is accomplished with fuzzy adaptive control theory and simulated by Matlab simulink. The control system is tested by comparing the desired bonding force and the force actually applied and examming the relationship between bonding quality and bonding force.

  18. /sup 13/C NMR of diterpenes with isopimarane structure. Part 2: effects involving the double bond. delta. sup(8(9))

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha Pinto, A. da; Lima Pereira, A. de (Rio de Janeiro Univ. (Brazil). Nucleo de Pesquisas de Produtos Naturais)

    1984-01-01

    Several effects of the ..delta.. sup(8(9)) double bond on the /sup 13/C NMR data of isopimarane diterpenoids are discussed, including chemical shifts and acetylation of the C-7 hydroxyl radical on the above mentioned double bond.

  19. Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonding in (2-Hydroxybenzoyl)benzoylmethane Enol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Bjarke Knud Vilster; Winther, Morten; Spanget-Larsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    In the stable enol tautomer of the title compound (OHDBM), one carbonyl group is flanked by two β-hydroxy groups, giving rise to bifold intramolecular H-bonding. A similar situation is found in other β,β'-dihydroxy carbonyl compounds like chrysazin, anthralin, 2,2'-dihydroxybenzophenone, and the ......In the stable enol tautomer of the title compound (OHDBM), one carbonyl group is flanked by two β-hydroxy groups, giving rise to bifold intramolecular H-bonding. A similar situation is found in other β,β'-dihydroxy carbonyl compounds like chrysazin, anthralin, 2,2'-dihydroxybenzophenone......, and the dienol form of 1,3-dibenzoylacetone. But in these examples the two H-bonds are equivalent, while in the case of OHDBM they are chemically different, involving one enolic and one phenolic hydroxy group. OHDBM is thus an interesting model compound with two competing H-bonds to the same carbonyl group...

  20. Effect of surface pretreatments on resin composite bonding to PEEK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silthampitag, Patcharawan; Chaijareenont, Pisaisit; Tattakorn, Kittipong; Banjongprasert, Chaiyasit; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Arksornnukit, Mansuang

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of surface pretreatments on resin composite bonding to polyetheretherketone (PEEK). Four groups of surface pretreatment (no pretreatment, etched with 98% sulfuric acid, etched with piranha solution and sandblasting with 50 µm alumina) were performed on PEEK. Surface roughness, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis were examined. Shear bond strength (SBS) and interface characteristics were also evaluated after the specimens were bonded with resin materials. Two-way ANOVA analysis revealed significance on two main effects and interactions. Tukey's multiple comparisons test showed that the SBS of resin composite on PEEK were the highest in the group etched with 98% sulfuric acid and bonded with Heliobond(®) (p<0.05). All pretreatments produced similar spectra of FTIR patterns. SEM demonstrated porosities and pitting from chemical etching, which suggested a significant influence on the adhesion between PEEK and resin materials. PMID:27477234

  1. 29 CFR 2580.412-19 - Term of the bond, discovery period, other bond clauses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SECURITY ACT OF 1974 TEMPORARY BONDING RULES General Bond Rules § 2580.412-19 Term of the bond, discovery... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Term of the bond, discovery period, other bond clauses... new bond must be obtained each year. There is nothing in the Act that prohibits a bond for a...

  2. The new Resonating Valence Bond Method for ab-initio Electronic Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Sorella, Sandro

    2013-01-01

    The Resonating Valence Bond theory of the chemical bond was introduced soon after the discovery of quantum mechanics and has contributed to explain the role of electron correlation within a particularly simple and intuitive approach where the chemical bond between two nearby atoms is described by one or more singlet electron pairs. In this chapter Pauling's resonating valence bond theory of the chemical bond is revisited within a new formulation, introduced by P.W. Anderson after the discovery of High-Tc superconductivity. It is shown that this intuitive picture of electron correlation becomes now practical and efficient, since it allows us to faithfully exploit the locality of the electron correlation, and to describe several new phases of matter, such as Mott insulators, High-Tc superconductors, and spin liquid phases.

  3. Covalent bond indices and ionicities from similarity measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcoba, Diego R.; Bochicchio, Roberto C.; Lain, Luis; Torre, Alicia

    2007-07-01

    This work proposes the use of the mathematical concepts of similarity and distance in metric spaces to relate the covalency and ionicity indices of chemical bondings. Numerical results arising from the Bray-Curtis and divergence measures are reported and discussed in selected molecules. The procedure opens new possibilities to define and to relate complementary quantities.

  4. Visualizing phosphodiester-bond hydrolysis by an endonuclease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molina, Rafael; Stella, Stefano; Redondo, Pilar;

    2015-01-01

    The enzymatic hydrolysis of DNA phosphodiester bonds has been widely studied, but the chemical reaction has not yet been observed. Here we follow the generation of a DNA double-strand break (DSB) by the Desulfurococcus mobilis homing endonuclease I-DmoI, trapping sequential stages of a two-metal-...

  5. A direct bonded fixed partial dental prosthesis: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanoue, Naomi; Tanaka, Takuo

    2015-01-01

    A direct bonded fixed partial dental prosthesis, with a composite resin denture tooth as a pontic, a tri-n-butylborane initiated adhesive resin, and screw posts for reinforcement, was still functioning after an observation period of 20 years. The prosthesis was found to be reliable for long-term clinical use when chemically and mechanically reinforced. PMID:25277033

  6. A direct bonded fixed partial dental prosthesis: A clinical report

    OpenAIRE

    Tanoue, Naomi; Tanaka, Takuo

    2015-01-01

    A direct bonded fixed partial dental prosthesis, with a composite resin denture tooth as a pontic, a tri-n-butylborane initiated adhesive resin, and screw posts for reinforcement, was still functioning after an observation period of 20 years. The prosthesis was found to be reliable for long-term clinical use when chemically and mechanically reinforced.

  7. Reaction kinetics of bond rotations in graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Skowron, Stephen T.

    2016-04-12

    The formation and healing processes of the fundamental topological defect in graphitic materials, the Stone-Wales (SW) defect, are brought into a chemical context by considering the rotation of a carbon-carbon bond as chemical reaction. We investigate the rates and mechanisms of these SW transformations in graphene at the atomic scale using transmission electron microscopy. We develop a statistical atomic kinetics formalism, using direct observations obtained under different conditions to determine key kinetic parameters of the reactions. Based on the obtained statistics we quantify thermally and irradiation induced routes, identifying a thermal process of healing with an activation energy consistent with predicted adatom catalysed mechanisms. We discover exceptionally high rates for irradiation induced SW healing, incompatible with the previously assumed mechanism of direct knock-on damage and indicating the presence of an efficient nonadiabatic coupling healing mechanism involving beam induced electronic excitations of the SW defect.

  8. Quantum Confinement in Hydrogen Bond

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, Carlos da Silva dos; Ricotta, Regina Maria

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the quantum confinement effect is proposed as the cause of the displacement of the vibrational spectrum of molecular groups that involve hydrogen bonds. In this approach the hydrogen bond imposes a space barrier to hydrogen and constrains its oscillatory motion. We studied the vibrational transitions through the Morse potential, for the NH and OH molecular groups inside macromolecules in situation of confinement (when hydrogen bonding is formed) and non-confinement (when there is no hydrogen bonding). The energies were obtained through the variational method with the trial wave functions obtained from Supersymmetric Quantum Mechanics (SQM) formalism. The results indicate that it is possible to distinguish the emission peaks related to the existence of the hydrogen bonds. These analytical results were satisfactorily compared with experimental results obtained from infrared spectroscopy.

  9. A DFT Study on Intramolecular Hydrogen Bond in Substituted Catechols and Their Radicals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) at B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level was employed to calculate intramolecular hydrogen bond enthalpies (HIHB), O-H charge differences, O-H bond lengths and bond orders for various substituted catechols and their radicals generated after H-abstraction. It was found that although the charge difference between hydrogen-bonded H and O played a role in determining HIHB, HIHB was mainly governed by the hydrogen bond length. As the oxygen-centered radical has great tendency to form a chemical bond with the H atom, hydrogen bond lengths in catecholic radicals are systematically shorter than those in catechols. Hence, the HIHB for the former are higher than those for the latter.

  10. Dentin-bonding agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Carlos Gomes

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available New dental restorative materials have been developed to meet not only the functional demands, but esthetics as well, and in the last few years an enormous range of new materials has appeared for use in dentistry. Among them, several adhesive systems, and different operative techniques for each group materials. Therefore, is indispensable for the professional to know about the properties, characteristics, and association of these materials with the dental structures, in order to select and use them correctly. Should conventional self-etching adhesive systems be used? This question encouraged this literature review to be conducted, with the aim of comparing the conventional adhesive systems with the self-etching systems and to look for scientific data that would help professionals to choose which adhesive system to use. When compared to conventional systems, it was noted that the self-etching systems show less sensitivity to technique, especially as regards errors the operator could commit. The self-etching systems, particularly the 2-step type, have shown equivalent values of bond strength, marginal microleakage and performance, therefore, will be an option for direct composite resin restorations in posterior teeth.

  11. Bond selective chemistry beyond the adiabatic approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, L.J. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    One of the most important challenges in chemistry is to develop predictive ability for the branching between energetically allowed chemical reaction pathways. Such predictive capability, coupled with a fundamental understanding of the important molecular interactions, is essential to the development and utilization of new fuels and the design of efficient combustion processes. Existing transition state and exact quantum theories successfully predict the branching between available product channels for systems in which each reaction coordinate can be adequately described by different paths along a single adiabatic potential energy surface. In particular, unimolecular dissociation following thermal, infrared multiphoton, or overtone excitation in the ground state yields a branching between energetically allowed product channels which can be successfully predicted by the application of statistical theories, i.e. the weakest bond breaks. (The predictions are particularly good for competing reactions in which when there is no saddle point along the reaction coordinates, as in simple bond fission reactions.) The predicted lack of bond selectivity results from the assumption of rapid internal vibrational energy redistribution and the implicit use of a single adiabatic Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface for the reaction. However, the adiabatic approximation is not valid for the reaction of a wide variety of energetic materials and organic fuels; coupling between the electronic states of the reacting species play a a key role in determining the selectivity of the chemical reactions induced. The work described below investigated the central role played by coupling between electronic states in polyatomic molecules in determining the selective branching between energetically allowed fragmentation pathways in two key systems.

  12. Calamistrin E, the First Annonaceous Acetogenin with Double Bond in Aliphatic Chain from Genus Uvaria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Calamistrin E, the first Annonaceous acetogenin with C=C bond in the aliphatic chain from the genus Uvaria was isolated from U. calamistrata. Its structure including relative and absolute configurations was determined by chemical derivation and spectral analysis.

  13. Why are Hydrogen Bonds Directional?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ABHISHEK SHAHI; ELANGANNAN ARUNAN

    2016-10-01

    The recent IUPAC recommendation on the definition of hydrogen bonding points out that directionality is a defining characteristic of a hydrogen bond and the angle ∠X-H-Y is generally linear or 180◦. It also suggests that the X-H· · ·Y angle be greater than 110◦ for an interaction to be characterized as a hydrogenbond but does not provide any rationale for the same. This article reports a rationale for limiting the angle, based on the electron density topology using the quantum theory of atoms in molecules. Electron density topology for common hydrogen bond donors HF, HCl, HBr, HNC, HCN and HCCH are reported in this work. These calculations lead to an interesting observation that the atomic basins of H atom in all these donor molecules are limited justifying the restriction of hydrogen bond angle. Moreover, similar analysis on some hydrogen bonded complexes confirms that beyond this angle the acceptor atom Y starts interacting with the atomic basin on X. However, conclusions based on bond lengths and angles have to be treated with care and as the IUPAC recommendation points out that independent ‘evidence for bond formation’ in every case is important.

  14. Physical Nature of Hydrogen Bond

    CERN Document Server

    Zhyganiuk, I V

    2015-01-01

    The physical nature and the correct definition of hydrogen bond (H-bond) are considered.\\,\\,The influence of H-bonds on the thermodynamic, kinetic, and spectroscopic properties of water is analyzed.\\,\\,The conventional model of H-bonds as sharply directed and saturated bridges between water molecules is incompatible with the behavior of the specific volume, evaporation heat, and self-diffusion and kinematic shear viscosity coefficients of water. On the other hand, it is shown that the variation of the dipole moment of a water molecule and the frequency shift of valence vibrations of a hydroxyl group can be totally explained in the framework of the electrostatic model of H-bond.\\,\\,At the same time, the temperature dependences of the heat capacity of water in the liquid and vapor states clearly testify to the existence of weak H-bonds.\\,\\,The analysis of a water dimer shows that the contribution of weak H-bonds to its ground state energy is approximately 4--5 times lower in comparison with the energy of electr...

  15. Roll bonding of strained aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staun, Jakob M.

    2003-01-01

    This report investigates roll bonding of pre-strained (å ~ 4) aluminium sheets to produce high strain material from high purity aluminium (99.996%) and commercial pure aluminium (99.6%). The degree of bonding is investigated by optical microscopy and ultrasonic scanning. Under the right circumsta......This report investigates roll bonding of pre-strained (å ~ 4) aluminium sheets to produce high strain material from high purity aluminium (99.996%) and commercial pure aluminium (99.6%). The degree of bonding is investigated by optical microscopy and ultrasonic scanning. Under the right...... circumstances both materials show good bonding, but the high purity material is excluded because of recrystallisation and the resulting loss of mechanical properties. The effect of cross stacking and roll bonding pre-strained sheets of the commercial purity material is investigated and some dependence...... of the cross rolled volume fraction is found. To further asses this effect, and the anisotropy, it is necessary to acquire knowledge about both texture and microstructure, e.g. by TEM. Roll bonding of pre-strained aluminium is found to be a possible alternative to ARB in the quest for ultra-fine grained...

  16. Theoretical study of ZnO adsorption and bonding on Al2O3 (0001) surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yanrong; YANG Chun; XUE Weidong; LI Jinshan; LIU Yonghua

    2004-01-01

    ZnO adsorption on sapphire (0001) surface is theoretically calculated by using a plane wave ultrasoft pseudo-potential method based on ab initio molecular dynamics. The results reveal that the surface relaxation in the first layer Al-O is reduced, even eliminated after the surface adsorption of ZnO, and the chemical bonding energy is 434.3(±38.6) kJ·mol-1. The chemical bond of ZnO (0.185 ± 0.01 nm) has a 30° angle away from the adjacent Al-O bond, and the stable chemical adsorption position of the Zn is deflected from the surface O-hexagonal symmetry with an angle of about 30°. The analysis of the atomic populations, density of state and bonding electronic density before and after the adsorption indicates that the chemical bond formed by the O2- of the ZnO and the surface Al3+ has a strong ionic bonding characteristic, while the chemical bond formed by the Zn2+ and the surface O2- has an obvious covalent characteristic, which comes mainly from the hybridization of the Zn 4s and the O 2p and partially from that of the Zn 3d and the O 2p.

  17. Tensile Bond Strength of Latex-Modified Bonded Concrete Overlays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Cameron; Ramseyer, Chris

    2010-10-01

    The tensile bond strength of bonded concrete overlays was tested using the in-situ pull-off method described in ASTM C 1583 with the goal of determining whether adding latex to the mix design increases bond strength. One slab of ductile concrete (f'c > 12,000 psi) was cast with one half tined, i.e. roughened, and one half steel-troweled, i.e. smooth. The slab surface was sectioned off and overlay mixtures containing different latex contents cast in each section. Partial cores were drilled perpendicular to the surface through the overlay into the substrate. A tensile loading device applied a direct tensile load to each specimen and the load was increased until failure occurred. The tensile bond strength was then calculated for comparison between the specimens.

  18. DFT investigation on dihydrogen-bonded amine-borane complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shihai; Zou, Hongmei; Kang, Wukui; Sun, Lixiang

    2016-01-01

    The DFT method has been employed in the exploration on dihydrogen-bonded amine-borane complexes, with a special emphasis on the dimerization and substituent group effect. Stable dihydrogen bonded complexes can be generated from these amine-borane monomers with the appearance of NH(δ+)…H(δ-)B interactions. The binding energy decreases gradually with the increase of the steric effect of the substituents. The substituent group number mainly varies the C-N bond length. The dimerization generates close H…H and influences predominantly the N-B distance. The effect of dimerization on IR and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectra is stronger than that of the number of substituent groups, which leads to distinct NBO charge variation on α-C. Both the substituent group number and dimerization enhance the chemical shift difference between hydrogen atoms covalently bonded to N and B, Δδ H-H, which can be hired as an index for structural determination. It is proposed that amine-borane complexes with more substituent groups in higher degree of polymerization are potentially interesting materials for hydrogen storage. Graphical Abstract Both the number of substituent group and dimerization enhance the chemical shift difference of hydrogen atoms covalently bonded on N and B, Δδ H-H, which can be employed as an index for the structural determination.

  19. Direct Bonded Pontic (Laporan Kasus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhandi Sidjaja

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Advanced science and technology in dentistry enable dental practitioners to modified she bonding techniques in tooth replacement. A pontic made of composite resin bonded to etched enamel of the adjacent teeth can be used in the replacement of one missing anterior tooth with a virgin or sowed adpicent tooth. The advantages of this technique include a one visit treatment, cow cost, good esthetics, less side effects and easy repair or rebounding. Clinical evaluation showed a high success rate therefore with a proper diagnosis and a perfect skill of the direct bonded technique this treatment can be used as an alternative restoration.

  20. Optimal Investment in Structured Bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Pernille; Jørgensen, Peter Løchte

    2012-01-01

    of the article is to provide possible explanations for the puzzle of why small retail investors hold structured bonds. The investment universe consists of a stock index, a risk-free bank account, and a structured bond containing an option written on another index. We apply expected utility maximization...... and consider different utility functions and trading strategies. Our results show that investors should include structured bonds in their optimal portfolio only if they cannot access the index underlying the option directly and only if the products then provide sufficient diversification to compensate...

  1. Integration of European Bond Markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    I investigate the time variation in the integration of EU government bond markets. The integration is measured by the explanatory power of European factor portfolios for the individual bond markets for each year. The integration of the government bond markets is stronger for EMU than non-EMU memb......-EMU members and stronger for old than new EU members. For EMU countries, the integration is weaker the lower the credit rating is. During the recent crisis periods, the integration is weaker, particularly for EMU countries....

  2. Tensile bond strength of composite luting cements to metal alloys after various surface treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Denizoglu Saip; Hanyaloglu Cem; Aksakal Bunyamin

    2009-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the effects of two different surface treatments and bonding agents on tensile bond strength between a Co-Cr and a Ni-Cr cast alloy and two resin-luting cements. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and forty alloy samples were cast and subjected to surface treatments such as sandblasting, chemical etching, and sandblasting plus chemical etching. Panavia F and CandB cement were used as cementing mediums. The etching qualities were examined by a stereooptic microscope. Failur...

  3. Development and application of bond cleavage reactions in bioorthogonal chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Chen, Peng R

    2016-03-01

    Bioorthogonal chemical reactions are a thriving area of chemical research in recent years as an unprecedented technique to dissect native biological processes through chemistry-enabled strategies. However, current concepts of bioorthogonal chemistry have largely centered on 'bond formation' reactions between two mutually reactive bioorthogonal handles. Recently, in a reverse strategy, a collection of 'bond cleavage' reactions has emerged with excellent biocompatibility. These reactions have expanded our bioorthogonal chemistry repertoire, enabling an array of exciting new biological applications that range from the chemically controlled spatial and temporal activation of intracellular proteins and small-molecule drugs to the direct manipulation of intact cells under physiological conditions. Here we highlight the development and applications of these bioorthogonal cleavage reactions. Furthermore, we lay out challenges and propose future directions along this appealing avenue of research.

  4. Chemical bond parameters and photoluminescence of a natural-white-light Ca{sub 9}La(VO{sub 4}){sub 7}:Tm{sup 3+},Eu{sup 3+} with one O{sup 2−}→V{sup 5+} charge transfer and dual f-f transition emission centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ling; Liu, Xiao Guang [Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory for the Synthesis and Applications of Organic Functional Molecules, Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organochemical Materials, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Department of Physics, Pukyong National University, Busan 608-737 (Korea, Republic of); Noh, Hyeon Mi [Department of Physics, Pukyong National University, Busan 608-737 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Jung Hyun, E-mail: jhjeong@pknu.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Pukyong National University, Busan 608-737 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    The relationship between the photoluminescence properties and the crystal structure of undoped, Eu{sup 3+} or/ and Tm{sup 3+} singly or codoped Ca{sub 9}La(VO{sub 4}){sub 7} (CLaVO) samples was discussed. Under the excitation of UV light, CLaVO:Tm{sup 3+}, CLaVO, and CLaVO:Eu{sup 3+} exhibit the characteristic emissions of Tm{sup 3+} ({sup 1}G{sub 4}→{sup 3}H{sub 6}, blue), O{sup 2−}→V{sup 5+} charge transfer (CT), and Eu{sup 3+} ({sup 5}D{sub 0}→{sup 7}F{sub 2}, red), respectively. By adjusting the doping concentration of Tm{sup 3+} and Eu{sup 3+} ions in CLaVO, a natural white emission in a single composition with the color temperature at 6181 K was obtained. Based on the dielectric theory of complex crystal, the chemical bond parameters of La-O and V-O bonds were quantitatively calculated. The standard deviation of environmental factor of every bond (EFSD), which can be expressed as σ(h{sub e{sub i}})=√((1/N)∑{sub i=1}{sup N}(h{sub e{sub i}}−μ){sup 2}) (h{sub e{sub i}}=(f{sub c{sub i}}α{sub b{sub i}}){sup 1/2}Q{sub B{sub i}} and μ=(1/N)∑{sub i=1}{sup N}h{sub e{sub i}}), was proposed to quantitatively express the distortion degree of VO{sub 4}{sup 3−} from that of an ideal tetrahedron. The maximum change of EFSD comes from the [VO{sub 4}]{sup −} tetrahedra in CLaVO sample by comparison with that of EFSD of isostructural Ca{sub 9}Gd(VO{sub 4}){sub 7}. This is possible the key reason that the undoped CLaVO sample has self-activated emission while the self-activated emission of its isostructural Ca{sub 9}Gd(VO{sub 4}){sub 7} sample cannot be found. The quantitative calculation also demonstrated that the broad excitation bands at 319 nm in CLaVO:Tm and at 335 nm in CLaVO:Eu were due to the O-V2 and O-V3 (overlap with O-V2) CT, not the CT energy of O{sup 2−}-Eu1{sup 3+} (O{sup 2−}-Tm1{sup 3+}), O{sup 2−}-Eu2{sup 3+} (O{sup 2−}-Tm2{sup 3+}), and O{sup 2−}-Eu3{sup 3+} (O{sup 2−}-Tm3{sup 3+}). The environmental factors surrounding the

  5. A facile route for irreversible bonding of plastic-PDMS hybrid microdevices at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Linzhi; Lee, Nae Yoon

    2010-05-21

    Plastic materials do not generally form irreversible bonds with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) regardless of oxygen plasma treatment and a subsequent thermal process. In this paper, we perform plastic-PDMS bonding at room temperature, mediated by the formation of a chemically robust amine-epoxy bond at the interfaces. Various plastic materials, such as poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA), polycarbonate (PC), polyimide (PI), and poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) were adopted as choices for plastic materials. Irrespective of the plastic materials used, the surfaces were successfully modified with amine and epoxy functionalities, confirmed by the surface characterizations such as water contact angle measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and chemically robust and irreversible bonding was successfully achieved within 1 h at room temperature. The bonding strengths of PDMS with PMMA and PC sheets were measured to be 180 and 178 kPa, respectively, and their assemblies containing microchannel structures endured up to 74 and 84 psi (510 and 579 kPa) of introduced compressed air, respectively, without destroying the microdevices, representing a robust and highly stable interfacial bonding. In addition to microchannel-molded PDMS bonded with flat plastic substrates, microchannel-embossed plastics were also bonded with a flat PDMS sheet, and both types of bonded assemblies displayed sufficiently robust bonding, tolerating an intense influx of liquid whose per-minute injection volume was nearly 1000 to 2000 times higher than the total internal volume of the microchannel used. In addition to observing the bonding performance, we also investigated the potential of surface amine and epoxy functionalities as durable chemical adhesives by observing their storage-time-dependent bonding performances. PMID:20445880

  6. Chemical Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    When a hazardous chemical has been released, it may harm people's health. Chemical releases can be unintentional, as in the case of an ... the case of a terrorist attack with a chemical weapon. Some hazardous chemicals have been developed by ...

  7. Chemical Physics Electrons and Excitations

    CERN Document Server

    Larsson, Sven

    2012-01-01

    A full understanding of modern chemistry is impossible without quantum theory. Since the advent of quantum mechanics in 1925, a number of chemical phenomena have been explained, such as electron transfer, excitation energy transfer, and other phenomena in photochemistry and photo-physics. Chemical bonds can now be accurately calculated with the help of a personal computer. Addressing students of theoretical and quantum chemistry and their counterparts in physics, Chemical Physics: Electrons and Excitations introduces chemical physics as a gateway to fields such as photo physics, solid-state ph

  8. Characterization of Dentine to Assess Bond Strength of Dental Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Liaqat

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to develop alternating dentine adhesion models that could help in the evaluation of a self-bonding dental composite. For this purpose dentine from human and ivory was characterized chemically and microscopically before and after acid etching using Raman and SEM. Mechanical properties of dentine were determined using 3 point bend test. Composite bonding to dentine, with and without use of acid pre-treatment and/or the adhesive, were assessed using a shear bond test. Furthermore, micro gap formation after restoration of 3 mm diameter cavities in dentine was assessed by SEM. Initial hydroxyapatite level in ivory was half that in human dentine. Surface hydroxyapatites decreased by approximately half with every 23 s of acid etch. The human dentine strength (56 MPa was approximately double that of ivory, while the modulus was almost comparable to that of ivory. With adhesive use, average shear bond strengths were 30 and 26 MPa with and without acid etching. With no adhesive, average bond strength was 6 MPa for conventional composites. This, however, increased to 14 MPa with a commercial flowable “self–bonding” composite or upon addition of low levels of an acidic monomer to the experimental composite. The acidic monomer additionally reduced micro-gap formation with the experimental composite. Improved bonding and mechanical properties should reduce composite failures due to recurrent caries or fracture respectively.

  9. Effect of surface pretreatment with chemical etchants on bond strength between a silicone-based resilient liner and denture base resin%丙酮及甲基丙烯酸甲酯表面处理对基托树脂与软衬材料粘接效果的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张莹; 张怀勤; 马骏驰; 金思远

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of denture base resin surface pretreatment with chemical etchants on microleakage and bond strength between silicone-based resilient liner and denture base resin.The initial bending strength of denture base resin after surface pretreatment was also examined.Methods Thirty-six polymethyl methacrylate(PMMA) denture base resin blocks(30 mm × 30 mm × 2 mm)were prepared and divided into three groups:group acetone,group methyl methy acrylate(MMA) and group control.Subsequently,a 2 mm silicone-based resilient liner was applied between every two blocks.After 5000 cycles in the thermal cycler ( 5 and 55 ℃ ),they were immersed in the 131 Ⅰ solution for 24 hours and γ-ray counts were measured.Another 36 PMMA resin blocks( 30 mm× 10 mm ×7.5 mm) were prepared.The blocks were divided into three groups and treated as mentioned above.A 3 mm silicone-based resilient liner was applied between every two blocks.After 5000 thermal cycles,tensile bond strength of the sample was measured in a universal testing machine.Another 18 PMMA resin blocks (65 mm × 10 mm ×3.3 mm) were prepared.They were divided into 3 groups and treated in the same way.After an adhesive was applied,the bending strength was measured with three-piont bending test.Results Two experimental groups showed lower microleakage(520.0 ±562.2 and 493.5 ±447.9) and higher tensile bond strength[( 1.5 ±0.4) and ( 1.4 ± 0.5 ) MPa]than the group control [microleakage:( 1369.5 ± 590.2 ) ; tensile bond strength:(0.9 ± 0.2) MPa,P < 0.05].There was no statistically significant difference between group acetone and MMA in microleakage and tensile bond strength( P > 0.05 ).There was no statistically significant difference in bending strength among the three groups ( P > 0.05 ).Conclusions Treating the denture base resin surface with acetone and MMA decreased the microleakage,increased the tensile bond strength between the two materials and did not make the initial bending strength

  10. Effect of surface pretreatments with sandblasting and chemical etchants on bond strength between a silicone-based resilient liner and denture base resin%喷砂结合化学处理对软衬材料粘结效果的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁绿娟; 张莹; 张怀勤

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the effects of denture base resin surface pretreatments with sandblasting and chemical etchants in bond strength between a silicone-based resilient liner and denture base resin and the flexural strength of denture base resin .Methods:A total of 48 PMMA resin blocks (30 mm ×10 mm ×7.5 mm) were prepared and randomly divided into 4 groups:sandblasting;sand-blasting+acetone;sandblasting+monomer and control group ( no treatment ) .A 3 mm silicone-based denture liner was applied be-tween every two blocks .After 5000 thermal cyclings ,tensile bond strength was measured with a universal testing machine ,at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min.Another 24 PMMA resin specimens (65 mm ×10 mm ×3.3 mm) were prepared for flexural strength test ,and trea-ted as before .After an adhesive was applied ,the flexural strength was measured with a universal testing machine .Results:The tensile bond strength of sandblasting,sandblasting+acetone,sandblasting+monomer groups was (1.31 ±0.45)MPa,(1.75 ±0.34)MPa,and (1.96 ±0.50) MPa repectively,higher than that of control group (0.90 ±0.17) MPa.There was no statistically significant difference between group sandblasting +acetone and group sandblasting +monomer in the bonding strength (P>0.05).Compared with the control group,there was statistical difference between group sandblasting +acetone and sandblasting +monomer in tensile bond strength ( P<0. 05).Four experiment groups exhibited no statistical difference in flexural strength change .Conclusions:All three surface pretreatments increased the tensile bond strength between a silicone-based resilient liner and denture base resin , and did not make the flexural strength of denture base resine decline .%目的:研究喷砂结合化学处理对硅橡胶软衬材料与基托树脂间粘结强度及基托树脂挠曲强度的影响。方法:制备48块30 mm ×10 mm ×7.5 mm热凝聚甲基丙烯酸甲酯树脂块,每2个树脂块配成一个试件,24

  11. Modified bonded bridge space maintainer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liegeois, F; Limme, M

    1999-01-01

    The premature loss of primary teeth can create the need for space maintenance and restoration of function. This article presents a fixed bonded space maintainer, which allows space to be maintained with economy of dental tissues.

  12. Adhesives for orthodontic bracket bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Déborah Daniella Diniz Fonseca

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The advent of acid etching, introduced by Buonocore in 1955, brought the possibility of bonding between the bracket base and enamel, contributing to more esthetic and conservative orthodontics. This direct bracket bonding technique has brought benefits such as reduced cost and time in performing the treatment, as well as making it easier to perform oral hygiene. The aim of this study was to conduct a survey of published studies on orthodontic bracket bonding to dental enamel. It was verified that resin composites and glass ionomer are the most studied and researched materials for this purpose. Resin-modified glass ionomer, with its biocompatibility, capacity of releasing fluoride and no need for acid etching on the tooth structure, has become increasingly popular among dentists. However, due to the esthetic and mechanical properties of light polymerizable resin composite, it continues to be one of the adhesives of choice in the bracket bonding technique and its use is widely disseminated.

  13. On some hydrogen bond correlations at high pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikka, S. K.

    2007-09-01

    In situ high pressure neutron diffraction measured lengths of O H and H O pairs in hydrogen bonds in substances are shown to follow the correlation between them established from 0.1 MPa data on different chemical compounds. In particular, the conclusion by Nelmes et al that their high pressure data on ice VIII differ from it is not supported. For compounds in which the O H stretching frequencies red shift under pressure, it is shown that wherever structural data is available, they follow the stretching frequency versus H O (or O O) distance correlation. For compounds displaying blue shifts with pressure an analogy appears to exist with improper hydrogen bonds.

  14. The importance of bonding - A historic overview and future possibilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Täljsten, Björn

    2006-01-01

    An adhesive is a substance that has the capability to hold materials together. The manner by which adhesives are able to serve this function is due to a surface attachment that is resistant to separation. A bond occurs when the adhesive molecules adsorb onto a solid surface and chemically react...... transfer than welded structures. In this paper, an overview of the use of adhesive in the service of man is presented. The overview is brief, but nonetheless gives an idea of the possibilities of adhering materials by bonding. The paper briefly discusses the use of adhesives in the aerospace, automotive...

  15. Hydrogen Bonds in Polymer Folding

    OpenAIRE

    Borg, J; Jensen, M. H.; K. Sneppen; Tiana, G.

    2000-01-01

    The thermodynamics of a homopolymeric chain with both Van der Waals and highly-directional hydrogen bond interaction is studied. The effect of hydrogen bonds is to reduce dramatically the entropy of low-lying states and to give raise to long-range order and to conformations displaying secondary structures. For compact polymers a transition is found between helix-rich states and low-entropy sheet-dominated states. The consequences of this transition for protein folding and, in particular, for ...

  16. Weld bonding of stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, I. O.; Zhang, Wenqi; Goncalves, V.M.;

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive theoretical and experimental investigation of the weld bonding process with the purpose of evaluating its relative performance in case of joining stainless steel parts, against alternative solutions based on structural adhesives or conventional spot-welding. Th......This paper presents a comprehensive theoretical and experimental investigation of the weld bonding process with the purpose of evaluating its relative performance in case of joining stainless steel parts, against alternative solutions based on structural adhesives or conventional spot...

  17. AAA-DDD triple hydrogen bond complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blight, Barry A; Camara-Campos, Amaya; Djurdjevic, Smilja; Kaller, Martin; Leigh, David A; McMillan, Fiona M; McNab, Hamish; Slawin, Alexandra M Z

    2009-10-01

    Experiment and theory both suggest that the AAA-DDD pattern of hydrogen bond acceptors (A) and donors (D) is the arrangement of three contiguous hydrogen bonding centers that results in the strongest association between two species. Murray and Zimmerman prepared the first example of such a system (complex 3*2) and determined the lower limit of its association constant (K(a)) in CDCl(3) to be 10(5) M(-1) by (1)H NMR spectroscopy (Murray, T. J. and Zimmerman, S. C. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1992, 114, 4010-4011). The first cationic AAA-DDD pair (3*4(+)) was described by Bell and Anslyn (Bell, D. A. and Anslyn, E. A. Tetrahedron 1995, 51, 7161-7172), with a K(a) > 5 x 10(5) M(-1) in CH(2)Cl(2) as determined by UV-vis spectroscopy. We were recently able to quantify the strength of a neutral AAA-DDD arrangement using a more chemically stable AAA-DDD system, 6*2, which has an association constant of 2 x 10(7) M(-1) in CH(2)Cl(2) (Djurdjevic, S., Leigh, D. A., McNab, H., Parsons, S., Teobaldi, G. and Zerbetto, F. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2007, 129, 476-477). Here we report on further AA(A) and DDD partners, together with the first precise measurement of the association constant of a cationic AAA-DDD species. Complex 6*10(+)[B(3,5-(CF(3))(2)C(6)H(3))(4)(-)] has a K(a) = 3 x 10(10) M(-1) at RT in CH(2)Cl(2), by far the most strongly bound triple hydrogen bonded system measured to date. The X-ray crystal structure of 6*10(+) with a BPh(4)(-) counteranion shows a planar array of three short (NH...N distances 1.95-2.15 A), parallel (but staggered rather than strictly linear; N-H...N angles 165.4-168.8 degrees), primary hydrogen bonds. These are apparently reinforced, as theory predicts, by close electrostatic interactions (NH-*-N distances 2.78-3.29 A) between each proton and the acceptor atoms of the adjacent primary hydrogen bonds.

  18. Molecular cluster theory of chemical bonding in actinide oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electronic structure of actinide monoxides AcO and dioxides AcO2, where Ac = Th, U, Np, Pu, Am, Cm and Bk has been studied by molecular cluster methods based on the first-principles one-electron local density theory. Molecular orbitals for nearest neighbor clusters AcO10-6 and AcO12-8 representative of monoxide and dioxide lattices were obtained using non-relativistic spin-restricted and spin-polarized Hartree-Fock-Slater models for the entire series. Fully relativistic Dirac-Slater calculations were performed for ThO, UO and NpO in order to explore magnitude of spin-orbit splittings and level shifts in valence structure. Self-consistent iterations were carried out for NpO, in which the NpO6 cluster was embedded in the molecular field of the solid. Finally, a ''moment polarized'' model which combines both spin-polarization and relativistic effects in a consistent fashion was applied to the NpO system. Covalent mixing of oxygen 2p and Ac 5f orbitals was found to increase rapidly across the actinide series; metal s,p,d covalency was found to be nearly constant. Mulliken atomic population analysis of cluster eigenvectors shows that free-ion crystal field models are unreliable, except for the light actinides. X-ray photoelectron line shapes have been calculated and are found to compare rather well with experimental data on the dioxides

  19. Chemical bonding in hydrogen and lithium under pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumov, Ivan I; Hemley, Russell J; Hoffmann, Roald; Ashcroft, N W

    2015-08-14

    Though hydrogen and lithium have been assigned a common column of the periodic table, their crystalline states under common conditions are drastically different: the former at temperatures where it is crystalline is a molecular insulator, whereas the latter is a metal that takes on simple structures. On compression, however, the two come to share some structural and other similarities associated with the insulator-to-metal and metal-to-insulator transitions, respectively. To gain a deeper understanding of differences and parallels in the behaviors of compressed hydrogen and lithium, we performed an ab initio comparative study of these systems in selected identical structures. Both elements undergo a continuous pressure-induced s-p electronic transition, though this is at a much earlier stage of development for H. The valence charge density accumulates in interstitial regions in Li but not in H in structures examined over the same range of compression. Moreover, the valence charge density distributions or electron localization functions for the same arrangement of atoms mirror each other as one proceeds from one element to the other. Application of the virial theorem shows that the kinetic and potential energies jump across the first-order phase transitions in H and Li are opposite in sign because of non-local effects in the Li pseudopotential. Finally, the common tendency of compressed H and Li to adopt three-fold coordinated structures as found is explained by the fact that such structures are capable of yielding a profound pseudogap in the electronic densities of states at the Fermi level, thereby reducing the kinetic energy. These results have implications for the phase diagrams of these elements and also for the search for new structures with novel properties. PMID:26277151

  20. Chemical bonding in hydrogen and lithium under pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naumov, Ivan I.; Hemley, Russell J. [Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5251 Broad Branch Rd. NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); Hoffmann, Roald [Baker Laboratory, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Ashcroft, N. W. [Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics and Cornell Center for Materials Research, Cornell University, Clark Hall, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

    2015-08-14

    Though hydrogen and lithium have been assigned a common column of the periodic table, their crystalline states under common conditions are drastically different: the former at temperatures where it is crystalline is a molecular insulator, whereas the latter is a metal that takes on simple structures. On compression, however, the two come to share some structural and other similarities associated with the insulator-to-metal and metal-to-insulator transitions, respectively. To gain a deeper understanding of differences and parallels in the behaviors of compressed hydrogen and lithium, we performed an ab initio comparative study of these systems in selected identical structures. Both elements undergo a continuous pressure-induced s-p electronic transition, though this is at a much earlier stage of development for H. The valence charge density accumulates in interstitial regions in Li but not in H in structures examined over the same range of compression. Moreover, the valence charge density distributions or electron localization functions for the same arrangement of atoms mirror each other as one proceeds from one element to the other. Application of the virial theorem shows that the kinetic and potential energies jump across the first-order phase transitions in H and Li are opposite in sign because of non-local effects in the Li pseudopotential. Finally, the common tendency of compressed H and Li to adopt three-fold coordinated structures as found is explained by the fact that such structures are capable of yielding a profound pseudogap in the electronic densities of states at the Fermi level, thereby reducing the kinetic energy. These results have implications for the phase diagrams of these elements and also for the search for new structures with novel properties.

  1. Chemical bonding in hydrogen and lithium under pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumov, Ivan I; Hemley, Russell J; Hoffmann, Roald; Ashcroft, N W

    2015-08-14

    Though hydrogen and lithium have been assigned a common column of the periodic table, their crystalline states under common conditions are drastically different: the former at temperatures where it is crystalline is a molecular insulator, whereas the latter is a metal that takes on simple structures. On compression, however, the two come to share some structural and other similarities associated with the insulator-to-metal and metal-to-insulator transitions, respectively. To gain a deeper understanding of differences and parallels in the behaviors of compressed hydrogen and lithium, we performed an ab initio comparative study of these systems in selected identical structures. Both elements undergo a continuous pressure-induced s-p electronic transition, though this is at a much earlier stage of development for H. The valence charge density accumulates in interstitial regions in Li but not in H in structures examined over the same range of compression. Moreover, the valence charge density distributions or electron localization functions for the same arrangement of atoms mirror each other as one proceeds from one element to the other. Application of the virial theorem shows that the kinetic and potential energies jump across the first-order phase transitions in H and Li are opposite in sign because of non-local effects in the Li pseudopotential. Finally, the common tendency of compressed H and Li to adopt three-fold coordinated structures as found is explained by the fact that such structures are capable of yielding a profound pseudogap in the electronic densities of states at the Fermi level, thereby reducing the kinetic energy. These results have implications for the phase diagrams of these elements and also for the search for new structures with novel properties.

  2. Chemical Bond and Nonlinear Optical Effects of Crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Physicalpropertiesofacrystalarerelatedtoitsconstituentchemicalbonds,whichshowtheinteractionofalconstituentatoms.Chemicalbond...

  3. Preparation and characterization of carbosilane denddmer-bonded silica gel and its use in LC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Guowen; Zhao Shigui; Feng Shengyu

    2006-01-01

    Divergently synthesized carbosilane dendrimers generations 1(G1) and 2 (G2) with allyl end groups were bonded onto silica gel.Reactions between the dendrimers and acid-processed silica gel took place,with toluene reflux and organic base as catalyst.Chemically bonded silica gel was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM),infrared (IR),and other methods.The chemically modified silica gels were packed into high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) column and their separation characters were evaluated.G2-bonded silica gel was effective in separating homologous compounds of alcohol, alkyl-substituted benzene,N-substituted benzene,metacrylic acid ester and phthalate.

  4. The effect of enamel bleaching on the shear bond strengths of metal and ceramic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oztaş, E; Bağdelen, G; Kiliçoğlu, H; Ulukapi, H; Aydin, I

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of bleaching and delayed bonding on the shear bond strengths of metal and ceramic brackets bonded with light and chemically cure composite resin to human enamel. One hundred and twenty extracted human premolar teeth were randomly divided into three groups of 40 each. The first two groups were bleached with 20 per cent carbamide peroxide (CP) at-home bleaching agent. No bleaching procedures were applied to the third group and served as control. The first two and control groups were divided into equal subgroups according to different adhesive-bracket combinations. Specimens in group 1 (n = 40) were bonded 24 hours after bleaching process was completed while the specimens in group 2 (n = 40) were bonded 14 days after. The specimens in all groups were debonded with a Universal testing machine while the modified adhesive remnant index was used to evaluate fracture properties. No statistically significant differences were found between the shear bond strengths of metal and ceramic brackets bonded to bleached enamel after 24 hours, 14 days, and unbleached enamel with light or chemical cure adhesives (P > 0.05). The mode of failure was mostly at the bracket/adhesive interface and cohesive failures within the resin were also observed. Our findings indicated that at-home bleaching agents that contain 20 per cent CP did not significantly affect the shear bond strength of metal and ceramic orthodontic brackets to enamel when bonding is performed 24 hours or 14 days after bleaching.

  5. Catalysis of protein disulfide bond isomerization in a homogeneous substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersteen, Elizabeth A; Barrows, Seth R; Raines, Ronald T

    2005-09-13

    Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) catalyzes the rearrangement of nonnative disulfide bonds in the endoplasmic reticulum of eukaryotic cells, a process that often limits the rate at which polypeptide chains fold into a native protein conformation. The mechanism of the reaction catalyzed by PDI is unclear. In assays involving protein substrates, the reaction appears to involve the complete reduction of some or all of its nonnative disulfide bonds followed by oxidation of the resulting dithiols. The substrates in these assays are, however, heterogeneous, which complicates mechanistic analyses. Here, we report the first analysis of disulfide bond isomerization in a homogeneous substrate. Our substrate is based on tachyplesin I, a 17-mer peptide that folds into a beta hairpin stabilized by two disulfide bonds. We describe the chemical synthesis of a variant of tachyplesin I in which its two disulfide bonds are in a nonnative state and side chains near its N and C terminus contain a fluorescence donor (tryptophan) and acceptor (N(epsilon)-dansyllysine). Fluorescence resonance energy transfer from 280 to 465 nm increases by 28-fold upon isomerization of the disulfide bonds into their native state (which has a lower E(o') = -0.313 V than does PDI). We use this continuous assay to analyze catalysis by wild-type human PDI and a variant in which the C-terminal cysteine residue within each Cys-Gly-His-Cys active site is replaced with alanine. We find that wild-type PDI catalyzes the isomerization of the substrate with kcat/K(M) = 1.7 x 10(5) M(-1) s(-1), which is the largest value yet reported for catalysis of disulfide bond isomerization. The variant, which is a poor catalyst of disulfide bond reduction and dithiol oxidation, retains virtually all of the activity of wild-type PDI in catalysis of disulfide bond isomerization. Thus, the C-terminal cysteine residues play an insignificant role in the isomerization of the disulfide bonds in nonnative tachyplesin I. We conclude

  6. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Electronic structure and bonding properties in layered ternary carbide Ti3SiC2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanchun; Sun, Zhimei

    2000-07-01

    Ab initio calculations based on the density-functional pseudopotential approach have been used to study the electronic structure and chemical bonding in layered machinable Ti3SiC2 ceramic. The calculations reveal that all three types of bonding - metallic, covalent and ionic - contribute to the bonding in Ti3SiC2. The high electric conductivity is attributed to the metallic bonding parallel to the basal plane and the high modulus and high melting point are attributed to the strong Ti-C-Ti-C-Ti covalent bond chains in the structure.

  7. Students' Interdisciplinary Reasoning about "High-Energy Bonds" and ATP

    CERN Document Server

    Dreyfus, Benjamin W; Sawtelle, Vashti; Svoboda, Julia; Turpen, Chandra; Redish, Edward F

    2012-01-01

    Students' sometimes contradictory ideas about ATP (adenosine triphosphate) and the nature of chemical bonds have been studied in the biology and chemistry education literatures, but these topics are rarely part of the introductory physics curriculum. We present qualitative data from an introductory physics course for undergraduate biology majors that seeks to build greater interdisciplinary coherence and therefore includes these topics. In these data, students grapple with the apparent contradiction between the energy released when the phosphate bond in ATP is broken and the idea that an energy input is required to break a bond. We see that students' perceptions of how each scientific discipline bounds the system of interest can influence how they justify their reasoning about a topic that crosses disciplines. This has consequences for a vision of interdisciplinary education that respects disciplinary perspectives while bringing them into interaction in ways that demonstrate consistency amongst the perspectiv...

  8. Avaliação da resistência da união metal-resina usando sistemas de retenção mecânico e químico Evaluation of the resistance of metal-resin bond using mechanical and chemical retention systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Silva Andrade TAROZZO

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a resistência ao cisalhamento da união metal-resina empregando-se cinco tipos de retenção na estrutura metálica, em três ligas comerciais de Ni-Cr: Duceranium U, Wiron 99 e Wirocer. Um total de 90 corpos-de-prova foi submetido ao ensaio de cisalhamento e os resultados obtidos foram analisados estatisticamente, o que permitiu concluir que a interação retenção versus ligas foi estatisticamente significante em nível de 1% de probabilidade, sendo que o maior valor médio de resistência foi obtido com a liga Wirocer com retenção mecânica 0,6 mm, e o menor foi obtido com a liga Wiron 99 com retenção química.The objective of the present investigation was to evaluate the resistance of metal-resin bonding using the Silicoater® MD system (Kulzer, five types of retention in the metal structure, and three commercial Ni-Cr alloys: Duceranium U, Wiron 99 and Wirocer. A total of 90 samples were submitted to the shearing test. Statistical analysis of the results permitted us to conclude that retention versus alloy interaction was statistically significant at a 1% level of probability, the highest mean value being obtained with the Wirocer alloy with mechanical retention with 0.6 mm spheres. The lowest mean values were observed with the Wiron 99 alloy with chemical retention.

  9. Bonding and Moessbauer Isomer Shifts in (Hg,Pb)—1223 Cuprate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高发明; 田永君; 谌岩; 李东春; 董海峰; 张思远

    2003-01-01

    By using the chemical bond theory of dielectric description,the chemical bond parameters of(Hg,Pb)-1223 were calculated.The results show that the(Ba,Sr)-O and Ca-0 types of bond have higher ionic character,while the Cu-O and(Hg,Pb)-0 types of bond have more covalent character.Moessbauer isomer shifts of 57Fe and 119Sn doped in(Hg,Pb)-1223 were calculated by using the chemical environmental factor,he,defined by covalency and electronic polarizability.Four valence state tin and three valence iron sites were identified in 57Fe and 119Sn doped(Hg,Pb)-1223 superconductor.It can be concluded that all of the Fe atoms substitute the Cu at square planar Cu(1) site,Whereas Sn prefers to substitute the square pyramidal Cu(2) site.

  10. Bonding and M?ssbauer Isomer Shifts in (Tl,Pb) - 1223 Cuprate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    By using the chemical bond theory of dielectric description,the chemical bond parameters of (Tl,Pb) - 1223 was calculated.The results show that the Sr-O,Tl-O,and Ca-O types of bond have higher ionic character and the Cu-O types of bond have more covalent character.M?ssbauer isomer shifts of 57Fe and 119Sn doped in (Tl,Pb) -1223 were calculated by using the chemical environmental factor,he,defined by covalency and electronic polarizability.Four valence state tin and three valence iron sites were identified in 57Fe,and 119Sn doped (Tl,Pb) -1223 superconductor.We conclude that all of the Fe atoms substitute the Cu at square planar Cu (1) site,whereas Sn prefers to substitute the square pyramidal Cu (2) site.

  11. Quantification of the push-pull effect in substituted alkynes. Evaluation of +/-I/+/-M substituent effects in terms of C[triple bond]C bond length variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinpeter, Erich; Frank, Andrea

    2009-06-18

    (13)C chemical shifts of alkynes, published to date, were computed at the DFT (B3LYP/6-311G*) level of theory and compared with the experimental delta values, and the agreement was employed as a measure of quality for the underlying structures. For the corresponding global minima structures, thus obtained, the occupation quotients of antibonding pi* and bonding pi orbitals (pi*(C[triple bond]C)/pi(C[triple bond]C)) and the bond lengths (d(C[triple bond]C)) of the central C[triple bond]C triple bond were computed and correlated to each other. The linear dependence obtained for the two push-pull parameters d(C[triple bond]C) and pi*(C[triple bond]C)/pi(C[triple bond]C) quantifies changes in the push-pull effect of substituents while deviations from the best line of fit indicate and ascertain quantitatively to what extend the inductive (+/-I) substituent effect changes with respect to the bond length of the C[triple bond]C triple bond.

  12. Reduced form models of bond portfolios

    OpenAIRE

    Matti Koivu; Teemu Pennanen

    2010-01-01

    We derive simple return models for several classes of bond portfolios. With only one or two risk factors our models are able to explain most of the return variations in portfolios of fixed rate government bonds, inflation linked government bonds and investment grade corporate bonds. The underlying risk factors have natural interpretations which make the models well suited for risk management and portfolio design.

  13. Proton tunnelling in intermolecular hydrogen bonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horsewill, A.J. [Nottingham Univ. (United Kingdom); Johnson, M.R. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France); Trommsdorff, H.P. [Grenoble-1 Univ., 38 (France)

    1997-04-01

    The wavefunctions of particles extend beyond the classically accessible regions of potential energy-surfaces (PES). A manifestation of this partial delocalization is the quantum-mechanical tunneling effect which enables a particle to escape from a metastable potential-well. Tunnelling is most important for the lightest atoms, so that the determination of its contribution to proton transfer, one of the most fundamental chemical reactions, is an important issue. QENS and NMR techniques have been employed to study the motion of protons in the hydrogen bond of benzoic-acid crystals, a system which has emerged as a particularly suitable model since proton transfer occurs in a near symmetric double-well potential. The influence of quantum tunnelling was revealed and investigated in these experiments. This work provides an experimental benchmark for theoretical descriptions of translational proton-tunnelling. (author). 7 refs.

  14. Redundant internal coordinates, compliance constants and non-bonded interactions - some new insights

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Moumita Majumder; Sadasivam Manogaran

    2013-01-01

    A long standing problem in normal mode analysis is identifying the right internal coordinates given only the cartesian coordinates, the masses of the atoms and the cartesian force constants without using any other additional chemical information. A possible solution is suggested here as drawing the normal modes obtained from the mass weighted cartesian force constant matrix and identifying the correct bonds and angles from the normal mode pictures. If chosen properly, the internal coordinates will have minimum mixing in the normal mode representation. This can in principle lead to an automation algorithm. A complete basis of internal coordinates is defined as the minimum number of valence internal coordinates that describe all the normal modes as completely as possible. It was shown in the literature that the relaxed force constants could be used as a measure of bond order in all atom-atom distance coordinates. Some of the bonded and non-bonded atom pairs can have similar values of the relaxed force constants and hence to use the relaxed force constant as a measure of bond order we need to separate the bonded pairs from the non-bonded ones. This needs extra chemical information of which pairs are bonded. The new definition of complete basis of non-redundant valence internal coordinates helps to identify the bonded pairs effectively without extra information. The hydrogen bonded water clusters (H2O), n = 2-6, methane dimer and methane-water complex are used as examples to verify that the relaxed force constants of bonded pairs are indeed a measure of bond order.

  15. Halogen Bonding in Organic Synthesis and Organocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulfield, David; Huber, Stefan M

    2016-10-01

    Halogen bonding is a noncovalent interaction similar to hydrogen bonding, which is based on electrophilic halogen substituents. Hydrogen-bonding-based organocatalysis is a well-established strategy which has found numerous applications in recent years. In light of this, halogen bonding has recently been introduced as a key interaction for the design of activators or organocatalysts that is complementary to hydrogen bonding. This Concept features a discussion on the history and electronic origin of halogen bonding, summarizes all relevant examples of its application in organocatalysis, and provides an overview on the use of cationic or polyfluorinated halogen-bond donors in halide abstraction reactions or in the activation of neutral organic substrates.

  16. Understanding the hydrogen bonds in ionic liquids and their roles in properties and reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Kun; Zhang, Suojiang; Wang, Jianji

    2016-05-21

    Ionic liquids (ILs) have many potential applications in the chemical industry. In order to understand ILs, their molecular details have been extensively investigated. Intuitively, electrostatic forces are solely important in ILs. However, experiments and calculations have provided strong evidence for the existence of H-bonds in ILs and their roles in the properties and applications of ILs. As a structure-directing force, H-bonds are responsible for ionic pairing, stacking and self-assembling. Their geometric structure, interaction energy and electronic configuration in the ion-pairs of imidazolium-based ILs and protic ionic liquids (PILs) show a great number of differences compared to conventional H-bonds. In particular, their cooperation with electrostatic, dispersion and π interactions embodies the physical nature of H-bonds in ILs, which anomalously influences their properties, leading to a decrease in their melting points and viscosities and thus fluidizing them. Using ILs as catalysts and solvents, many reactions can be activated by the presence of H-bonds, which reduce the reaction barriers and stabilize the transition states. In the dissolution of lignocellulosic biomass by ILs, H-bonds exhibit a most important role in disrupting the H-bonding network of cellulose and controlling microscopic ordering into domains. In this article, a critical review is presented regarding the structural features of H-bonds in ILs and PILs, the correlation between H-bonds and the properties of ILs, and the roles of H-bonds in typical reactions. PMID:27042709

  17. Two Comments on Bond Angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaister, P.

    1997-09-01

    Tetrahedral Bond Angle from Elementary Trigonometry The alternative approach of using the scalar (or dot) product of vectors enables the determination of the bond angle in a tetrahedral molecule in a simple way. There is, of course, an even more straightforward derivation suitable for students who are unfamiliar with vectors, or products thereof, but who do know some elementary trigonometry. The starting point is the figure showing triangle OAB. The point O is the center of a cube, and A and B are at opposite corners of a face of that cube in which fits a regular tetrahedron. The required bond angle alpha = AÔB; and using Pythagoras' theorem, AB = 2(square root 2) is the diagonal of a face of the cube. Hence from right-angled triangle OEB, tan(alpha/2) = (square root 2) and therefore alpha = 2tan-1(square root 2) is approx. 109° 28' (see Fig. 1).

  18. Bond percolation on multiplex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Hackett, A; Gómez, S; Arenas, A; Gleeson, J P

    2015-01-01

    We present an analytical approach for bond percolation on multiplex networks and use it to determine the expected size of the giant connected component and the value of the critical bond occupation probability in these networks. We advocate the relevance of these tools to the modeling of multilayer robustness and contribute to the debate on whether any benefit is to be yielded from studying a full multiplex structure as opposed to its monoplex projection, especially in the seemingly irrelevant case of a bond occupation probability that does not depend on the layer. Although we find that in many cases the predictions of our theory for multiplex networks coincide with previously derived results for monoplex networks, we also uncover the remarkable result that for a certain class of multiplex networks, well described by our theory, new critical phenomena occur as multiple percolation phase transitions are present. We provide an instance of this phenomenon in a multipex network constructed from London rail and Eu...

  19. Anion Transport with Chalcogen Bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Sebastian; Macchione, Mariano; Verolet, Quentin; Mareda, Jiri; Sakai, Naomi; Matile, Stefan

    2016-07-27

    In this report, we introduce synthetic anion transporters that operate with chalcogen bonds. Electron-deficient dithieno[3,2-b;2',3'-d]thiophenes (DTTs) are identified as ideal to bind anions in the focal point of the σ holes on the cofacial endocyclic sulfur atoms. Anion binding in solution and anion transport across lipid bilayers are found to increase with the depth of the σ holes of the DTT anionophores. These results introduce DTTs and related architectures as a privileged motif to engineer chalcogen bonds into functional systems, complementary in scope to classics such as 2,2'-bipyrroles or 2,2'-bipyridines that operate with hydrogen bonds and lone pairs, respectively. PMID:27433964

  20. Chemical labeling of electrochemically cleaved peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeser, Julien; Alting, Niels F. A.; Permentier, Hjalmar P.; Bruins, Andries P.; Bischoff, Rainer P. H.

    2013-01-01

    RATIONALE Cleavage of peptide bonds C-terminal to tyrosine and tryptophan after electrochemical oxidation may become a complementary approach to chemical and enzymatic cleavage. A chemical labeling approach specifically targeting reactive cleavage products is presented here and constitutes a promisi

  1. Nanoparticle/Polymer Nanocomposite Bond Coat or Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sandi G.

    2011-01-01

    This innovation addresses the problem of coatings (meant to reduce gas permeation) applied to polymer matrix composites spalling off in service due to incompatibility with the polymer matrix. A bond coat/coating has been created that uses chemically functionalized nanoparticles (either clay or graphene) to create a barrier film that bonds well to the matrix resin, and provides an outstanding barrier to gas permeation. There is interest in applying clay nanoparticles as a coating/bond coat to a polymer matrix composite. Often, nanoclays are chemically functionalized with an organic compound intended to facilitate dispersion of the clay in a matrix. That organic modifier generally degrades at the processing temperature of many high-temperature polymers, rendering the clay useless as a nano-additive to high-temperature polymers. However, this innovation includes the use of organic compounds compatible with hightemperature polymer matrix, and is suitable for nanoclay functionalization, the preparation of that clay into a coating/bondcoat for high-temperature polymers, the use of the clay as a coating for composites that do not have a hightemperature requirement, and a comparable approach to the preparation of graphene coatings/bond coats for polymer matrix composites.

  2. To Bond or Not to Bond? That Is the Question

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzer, Wayne E.

    2015-01-01

    This case, inspired by a real school district scenario, was developed for use in a graduate-level course in school finance. James Spencer had just been selected as the new superintendent of a low-income, 400-student, rural school district in need of many capital improvements. The previous superintendent had refused to hold a bond election because…

  3. Elongated Silicon-Carbon Bonds at Graphene Edges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qu; Robertson, Alex W; He, Kuang; Gong, Chuncheng; Yoon, Euijoon; Kirkland, Angus I; Lee, Gun-Do; Warner, Jamie H

    2016-01-26

    We study the bond lengths of silicon (Si) atoms attached to both armchair and zigzag edges using aberration corrected transmission electron microscopy with monochromation of the electron beam. An in situ heating holder is used to perform imaging of samples at 800 °C in order to reduce chemical etching effects that cause rapid structure changes of graphene edges at room temperature under the electron beam. We provide detailed bond length measurements for Si atoms both attached to edges and also as near edge substitutional dopants. Edge reconstruction is also involved with the addition of Si dopants. Si atoms bonded to the edge of graphene are compared to substitutional dopants in the bulk lattice and reveal reduced out-of-plane distortion and bond elongation. An extended linear array of Si atoms at the edge is found to be energy-favorable due to inter-Si interactions. These results provide detailed structural information about the Si-C bonds in graphene, which may have importance in future catalytic and electronic applications.

  4. DNA adducts-chemical addons

    OpenAIRE

    T. R. Rajalakshmi; N AravindhaBabu; Shanmugam, K. T.; Masthan, K. M. K.

    2015-01-01

    DNA adduct is a piece of DNA covalently bond to a chemical (safrole, benzopyrenediol epoxide, acetaldehyde). This process could be the start of a cancerous cell. When a chemical binds to DNA, it gets damaged resulting in abnormal replication. This could be the start of a mutation and without proper DNA repair, this can lead to cancer. It is this chemical that binds with the DNA is our prime area of concern. Instead of performing the whole body analysis for diagnosing cancer, this test could b...

  5. Students' Interdisciplinary Reasoning about "High-Energy Bonds" and ATP

    OpenAIRE

    Dreyfus, Benjamin W.; Geller, Benjamin D.; Sawtelle, Vashti; Svoboda, Julia; Turpen, Chandra; Redish, Edward F.

    2012-01-01

    Students' sometimes contradictory ideas about ATP (adenosine triphosphate) and the nature of chemical bonds have been studied in the biology and chemistry education literatures, but these topics are rarely part of the introductory physics curriculum. We present qualitative data from an introductory physics course for undergraduate biology majors that seeks to build greater interdisciplinary coherence and therefore includes these topics. In these data, students grapple with the apparent contra...

  6. VB studies on bonding features of HNCHCN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAO; Xinli(

    2003-01-01

    [1]Skurski, P., Gutowski, M., Simons, J., Ab initio electronic structure of HCN- and HNC-dipole-bound anions and a description of electron loss upon tautomerization, J. Chem. Phys., 2001, 114(17): 7443-7449.[2]Jursic, B. S., Complete basis set ab initio study of potential energy surfaces of the dissociation recombination reaction HCNH++e(-), J. Mol. Struct., 1999, 487(3): 211-220.[3]Abashkin, Y., Russo, N., Toscano, M., Transition states and energy barriers from density functional studies: representative isomerization reactions, Int. J. Quantum Chem., 1994, 52: 695-704.[4]Bentley, J. A., Bowman, J. M., Gazdy, B. et al., A global ab initio potential for HCN/HNC exact vibrational energies and comparision to experiment, Chem. Phys. Lett., 1992, 198(6): 563-569.[5]Bentley, J. A., Huang, C. M., Wyatt, R. E., Highly vibrationally excited HCN/HNC: eigenvalues, wave functions, and stimulated emission pumping spectra, J. Chem. Phys., 1992, 98(7): 5207-5221.[6]Peric, M., Mladrenovic, M., Peyerimhoff, S. D. et al., Ab initio study of the isomerization HNC-HCN, 1. Ab initio calculation of the HNV reversible HCN potential surface and the corresponding energy-levels, Chem. Phys., 1983, 82: 317-336.[7]Zhang, Q. E., Li, X. Z., Bonded tableau method for many-electron systems, J. Mol. Struct. (Theochem.), 1989, 198: 413-425.[8]Li, X. Z., Zhang, Q. E., Bonded tableau unitary group approach to the many-electron correlation problem, Int. J. Quantum Chem., 1989, 36: 599-632.[9]Li, J. B., Wu, W., New algorithm for nonorthogonal ab initio valence-bond calculations, Theor. Chim. Acta, 1994, 89: 105-121.[10]Wu, W., Mo, Y. R., Zhang, Q. E., On the resonance theory, J. Mol. Struct., 1993, 283: 227-236.[11]Mo, Y. R., Wu, W., Zhang, Q. E., Valence bond description for the ground state and several low-lying excited states of LiH, J. Mol. Struct., 1993, 283: 237-249.[12]Pauling, L., The Nature of Chemical Bond, 3rd ed., Ithaca, New York: Cornell

  7. Covered bonds vs. assets securitization

    OpenAIRE

    Silviu Eduard DINCĂ

    2014-01-01

    During the past few years, in the recent post-crisis global banking and capital markets context, financial institutions around the globe are exploring new options to better secure their financing and refinancing demands. We will exhibit herewith a comparison between covered bonds and asset securitizations as financial markets-based funding techniques, highlighting certain key structuring and implementation specifics on each of them.

  8. Essays on European bond markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y.C. Cheung

    2005-01-01

    This dissertation focused on a number of issues that are of importance in the current European bond market. In the past years, the fiscal policy of the Eurozone members, advances in the technology of trading platforms and the introduction of a single currency have reshaped the fixed income markets i

  9. Análise química e morfológica do esmalte dentário humano tratado com laser argônio durante a colagem ortodôntica Chemical and morphological analysis of the human dental enamel treated with argon laser during orthodontic bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glaucio Serra Guimarães

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: as principais utilizações do laser argônio na Ortodontia são a redução do tempo de polimerização durante a colagem ortodôntica e o aumento da resistência à cárie do esmalte dentário. OBJETIVO: o objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar as alterações químicas e morfológicas do esmalte dentário humano tratado com laser argônio nos parâmetros da colagem ortodôntica. MÉTODOS: quinze primeiros pré-molares hígidos, extraídos por indicação ortodôntica, foram selecionados e seccionados no sentido do longo eixo em dois segmentos iguais. Uma metade de cada elemento dentário foi tratada e a outra permaneceu sem tratamento. Um total de 30 amostras foi analisado, criando o grupo laser (n = 15 e o grupo controle (n = 15. O tratamento foi feito com laser argônio com 250mW de potência por 5 segundos, com densidade de energia de 8J/cm². RESULTADOS: a análise de difração de raios X demonstrou duas fases em ambos os grupos, as fases apatita e monetita. A redução da fase monetita foi significativa após o tratamento com laser, sugerindo maior cristalinidade. A análise de Espectroscopia de Energia Dispersiva (EDS indicou aumento na razão cálcio-fósforo no grupo laser, compatível com a diminuição da fase monetita. A morfologia superficial do esmalte dentário apresentou-se mais lisa após o tratamento com laser argônio. CONCLUSÕES: o aumento de cristalinidade e a lisura superficial do esmalte no grupo laser são fatores sugestivos de aumento de resistência à cárie no esmalte dentário.INTRODUCTION: The main utilities of the argon laser in orthodontics are the high speed curing process in orthodontic bonding and the caries resistance promotion of the tooth enamel. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate the chemical and morphological changes in the tooth enamel treated with the argon laser in the orthodontic bonding parameters. METHODS: Fifteen sound human first premolars, removed for orthodontic

  10. Effect of moisture, saliva, and blood contamination on the shear bond strength of brackets bonded with a conventional bonding system and self-etched bonding system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Mandava; Mohamed, Shamil; Nayak, Krishna; Shetty, Sharath Kumar; Talapaneni, Ashok Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Background: The success of bonding brackets to enamel with resin bonding systems is negatively affected by contamination with oral fluids such as blood and saliva. The new self-etch primer systems combine conditioning and priming agents into a single application, making the procedure more cost effective. Objective: The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of moisture, saliva and blood contamination on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded with conventional bonding system and self-etch bonding system. Materials and Methods: Each system was examined under four enamel surface conditions (dry, water, saliva, and blood), and 80 human teeth were divided into two groups with four subgroups each of 10 according to enamel surface condition. Group 1 used conventional bonding system and Group 2 used self-etched bonding system. Subgroups 1a and 2a under dry enamel surface conditions; Subgroups 1b and 2b under moist enamel surface condition; Subgroups 3a and 3b under saliva enamel surface condition and Subgroup 4a and 4b under blood enamel surface condition. Brackets were bonded, and all the samples were then submitted to a shear bond test with a universal testing machine with a cross head speed of 1mm/sec. Results: The results showed that the contamination reduced the shear bond strength of all groups. In self-etch bonding system water and saliva had significantly higher bond strength when compared to other groups. Conclusion: It was concluded that the blood contamination showed lowest bond strength from both bonding systems. Self-etch bonding system resulted in higher bond strength than conventional bonding system under all conditions except the dry enamel surface. PMID:24678210

  11. Atomic Structures of Riboflavin (Vitamin B2) and its Reduced Form with Bond Lengths Based on Additivity of Atomic Radii

    OpenAIRE

    Heyrovska, Raji

    2008-01-01

    It has been shown recently that chemical bond lengths, in general, like those in the components of nucleic acids, caffeine related compounds, all essential amino acids, methane, benzene, graphene and fullerene are sums of the radii of adjacent atoms constituting the bond. Earlier, the crystal ionic distances in all alkali halides and lengths of many partially ionic bonds were also accounted for by the additivity of ionic as well as covalent radii. Here, the atomic structures of riboflavin and...

  12. Rhodium-Catalyzed C-C Bond Formation via Heteroatom-Directed C-H Bond Activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colby, Denise; Bergman, Robert; Ellman, Jonathan

    2010-05-13

    Once considered the 'holy grail' of organometallic chemistry, synthetically useful reactions employing C-H bond activation have increasingly been developed and applied to natural product and drug synthesis over the past decade. The ubiquity and relative low cost of hydrocarbons makes C-H bond functionalization an attractive alternative to classical C-C bond forming reactions such as cross-coupling, which require organohalides and organometallic reagents. In addition to providing an atom economical alternative to standard cross - coupling strategies, C-H bond functionalization also reduces the production of toxic by-products, thereby contributing to the growing field of reactions with decreased environmental impact. In the area of C-C bond forming reactions that proceed via a C-H activation mechanism, rhodium catalysts stand out for their functional group tolerance and wide range of synthetic utility. Over the course of the last decade, many Rh-catalyzed methods for heteroatom-directed C-H bond functionalization have been reported and will be the focus of this review. Material appearing in the literature prior to 2001 has been reviewed previously and will only be introduced as background when necessary. The synthesis of complex molecules from relatively simple precursors has long been a goal for many organic chemists. The ability to selectively functionalize a molecule with minimal pre-activation can streamline syntheses and expand the opportunities to explore the utility of complex molecules in areas ranging from the pharmaceutical industry to materials science. Indeed, the issue of selectivity is paramount in the development of all C-H bond functionalization methods. Several groups have developed elegant approaches towards achieving selectivity in molecules that possess many sterically and electronically similar C-H bonds. Many of these approaches are discussed in detail in the accompanying articles in this special issue of Chemical Reviews. One approach

  13. Method for fusion bonding thermoplastic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benatar, A.; Gutowski, T.G.

    1986-10-01

    Bonding of thermoplastic composites is a critical step in the manufacture of aerospace structures. The objective of this project is to investigate different methods for fusion bonding thermoplastic composites quickly, with a good bond strength, and without warping and deconsolidation. This is best accomplished by heating and melting the thermoplastic on the bond surface only, and then pressing the parts together for a fusion bond. For this purpose, a variety of surface heating techniques were examined for bonding of PEEK and J Polymer composites. These included: resistance heating, infrared heating, induction heating, dielectric/microwave heating, and ultrasonic welding. 20 references, 10 figures, 1 table.

  14. Strength of Bond Covenants and Bond Assessment Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel Yahanpath

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We examine bond covenants of 29 New Zealand bond issues between 2001 and 2007.Results from the study indicate that protection provided for bondholders is weak and limited.On average, only 2-3 types of covenants are embedded with the issues and only 27% of thesecovenants provide full protection to the bondholders. However, bondholders are not compensated for taking the additional risk. We propose an alternative assessment framework that directly assesses the level of protection offered to bondholders. We calculate thecovenant quality score for the issues and classify them into four levels of protection: very high protection, moderate, low and very low. Recent legislative changes will go some way towards improving investor protection and confidence, but the effect is yet to be seen. This proposed scoring framework can be used by potential investors to complement the traditional credit ratings when making their investment decisions.

  15. Statistical theory for hydrogen bonding fluid system of AaDd type (I): The geometrical phase transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Haijun; HONG Xiaozhong; GU Fang; BA Xinwu

    2006-01-01

    The influence of hydrogen bonds on the physical and chemical properties of hydrogen bonding fluid system of AaDd type is investigated from two viewpoints by the principle of statistical mechanics. In detail, we proposed two new ways that can be used to obtain the equilibrium size distribution of the hydrogen bonding clusters, and derived the analytical expression of a relationship between the hydrogen bonding free energy and hydrogen bonding degree. For the nonlinear hydrogen bonding systems, it is shown that the sol-gel phase transition can take place under proper conditions, which is further proven to be a kind of geometrical phase transition rather than a thermodynamic one. Moreover, several problems associated with the geometrical phase transition and liquid-solid phase transition in nonlinear hydrogen bonding systems are discussed.

  16. Protein Chemical Shift Prediction

    CERN Document Server

    Larsen, Anders S

    2014-01-01

    The protein chemical shifts holds a large amount of information about the 3-dimensional structure of the protein. A number of chemical shift predictors based on the relationship between structures resolved with X-ray crystallography and the corresponding experimental chemical shifts have been developed. These empirical predictors are very accurate on X-ray structures but tends to be insensitive to small structural changes. To overcome this limitation it has been suggested to make chemical shift predictors based on quantum mechanical(QM) calculations. In this thesis the development of the QM derived chemical shift predictor Procs14 is presented. Procs14 is based on 2.35 million density functional theory(DFT) calculations on tripeptides and contains corrections for hydrogen bonding, ring current and the effect of the previous and following residue. Procs14 is capable at performing predictions for the 13CA, 13CB, 13CO, 15NH, 1HN and 1HA backbone atoms. In order to benchmark Procs14, a number of QM NMR calculatio...

  17. Shear bond strength of two resin cements to human root dentin using three dentin bonding agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogos, C; Stavrianos, C; Kolokouris, I; Economides, N; Papadoyannis, I

    2007-01-01

    This study compared the bond strength of two resin cements to human root dentin when used with three bonding agents. The materials used were Rely X ARC and Perma Cem, two one-bottle bonding agents (Single Bond, Bond-1) and one self-etching bonding agent (Clearfil SE Bond). The dentin was obtained from single rooted human teeth, and the specimens were treated with either 15% EDTA or 37% phosphoric acid to remove the smear layer, except in groups where the self-etching bonding agent was used. The resin cements were placed on dentin surfaces with the use of bonding agents. Shear bond strength (SBS) was tested using a single plane shear test assembly. The dentin specimens were divided into 10 groups. Eight groups were pre-treated with EDTA or phosphoric acid to remove the smear layer, followed by a bonding agent (Bond-1 or Single Bond) and resin cement (Rely X or Perma Cem). In the two remaining groups, the smear layer was left intact, and the two resins cements were used in combination with the self-etching bonding agent (Clearfil SE Bond). No statistically significant differences were observed among the eight groups treated with one-bottle bonding agents. The mean bond strengths of the two groups treated with the self-etching bonding agent did not differ significantly from each other but were both significantly greater than the bond strengths of all the other groups. The results of this study also showed that EDTA can be used as an alternative to phosphoric acid in bonding procedures for resin cements. However, the bond strengths of resin cements, in combination with a self-etching bonding agent, were significantly greater than those of the same cements when used with one-bottle bonding agents.

  18. Molecular structure and intramolecular hydrogen bonding in 2-hydroxybenzophenones: A theoretical study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mansoureh Zahedi-Tabrizi; Sayyed Faramarz Tayyari; Farideh Badalkhani-Khamseh; Reihaneh Ghomi; Fatemeh Afshar-Qahremani

    2014-07-01

    The intramolecular hydrogen bonding (IHB) in a series of 3-, 4- and 5-substituted 2-hydroxybenzophenone (HBP) is studied using density functional theory calculations. All calculations are performed at the B3LYP level, using 6-311++G∗∗ basis set. To understand the substitution effects on the nature of IHB and the electronic structure of the chelated ring system, the vibrational frequencies, 1H chemical shift, topological parameters, natural bond orders and natural charges over atoms involved in the chelated ring of HBP and its derivatives were calculated. TheWiberg bond indices and the natural charges over atoms involved in the chelated ring have been computed using the natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. The computations were further complemented with an atoms-in-molecules (AIM) topological analysis to characterize the nature of the IHB in the considered molecules. Several correlations between geometrical parameters, 1H NMR chemical shift and topological parameters with the IHB strength are obtained.

  19. Iterative reactions of transient boronic acids enable sequential C-C bond formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battilocchio, Claudio; Feist, Florian; Hafner, Andreas; Simon, Meike; Tran, Duc N.; Allwood, Daniel M.; Blakemore, David C.; Ley, Steven V.

    2016-04-01

    The ability to form multiple carbon-carbon bonds in a controlled sequence and thus rapidly build molecular complexity in an iterative fashion is an important goal in modern chemical synthesis. In recent times, transition-metal-catalysed coupling reactions have dominated in the development of C-C bond forming processes. A desire to reduce the reliance on precious metals and a need to obtain products with very low levels of metal impurities has brought a renewed focus on metal-free coupling processes. Here, we report the in situ preparation of reactive allylic and benzylic boronic acids, obtained by reacting flow-generated diazo compounds with boronic acids, and their application in controlled iterative C-C bond forming reactions is described. Thus far we have shown the formation of up to three C-C bonds in a sequence including the final trapping of a reactive boronic acid species with an aldehyde to generate a range of new chemical structures.

  20. Recognizing molecular patterns by machine learning: an agnostic structural definition of the hydrogen bond

    CERN Document Server

    Gasparotto, Piero

    2014-01-01

    The concept of chemical bonding can ultimately be seen as a rationalization of the recurring structural patterns observed in molecules and solids. Chemical intuition is nothing but the ability to recognize and predict such patterns, and how they transform into one another. Here we discuss how to use a computer to identify atomic patterns automatically, so as to provide an algorithmic definition of a bond based solely on structural information. We concentrate in particular on hydrogen bonding -- a central concept to our understanding of the physical chemistry of water, biological systems and many technologically important materials. Since the hydrogen bond is a somewhat fuzzy entity that covers a broad range of energies and distances, many different criteria have been proposed and used over the years, based either on sophisticate electronic structure calculations followed by an energy decomposition analysis, or on somewhat arbitrary choices of a range of structural parameters that is deemed to correspond to a ...

  1. Universal solders for direct and powerful bonding on semiconductors, diamond, and optical materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavoori, Hareesh; Ramirez, Ainissa G.; Jin, Sungho

    2001-05-01

    The surfaces of electronic and optical materials such as nitrides, carbides, oxides, sulfides, fluorides, selenides, diamond, silicon, and GaAs are known to be very difficult to bond with low melting point solders (<300 °C). We have achieved a direct and powerful bonding on these surfaces by using low temperature solders doped with rare-earth elements. The rare earth is stored in micron-scale, finely-dispersed intermetallic islands (Sn3Lu or Au4Lu), and when released, causes chemical reactions at the interface producing strong bonds. These solders directly bond to semiconductor surfaces and provide ohmic contacts. They can be useful for providing direct electrical contacts and interconnects in a variety of electronic assemblies, dimensionally stable and reliable bonding in optical fiber, laser, or thermal management assemblies.

  2. Quantitative bond energetics in atomic-scale junctions with significant van der Waals character

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataraman, Latha; Aradhya, Sriharsha; Hybertsen, Mark

    2015-03-01

    A direct measurement of the potential energy surface that characterizes individual chemical bonds in complex materials has fundamental significance for many disciplines. Here, we demonstrate that the energy profile for metallic single-atom contacts and single-molecule junctions can be mapped by fitting ambient atomic force microscope measurements carried out in the near-equilibrium regime to a physical, but simple, functional form. In particular we are able to extract bond energies for metal-molecule link bonds in cases where the interaction has significant contribution from nonspecific interactions attributed to van der Waals (vdW) interactions at short length scale in addition to specific donor-acceptor bonds. Our approach significantly expands the quantitative information extracted from these measurements, allowing direct comparisons to density functional theory (DFT) calculations instead of relying on trends in bond rupture forces alone. Currently at Cornell University.

  3. Effects of forming gas plasma treatment on low-temperature Cu–Cu direct bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungdong; Nam, Youngju; Eunkyung Kim, Sarah

    2016-06-01

    Low-temperature Cu–Cu direct bonding becomes of great importance as Cu is widely used as an interconnection material in the packaging industry. Preparing a clean surface is a key to successful Cu–Cu direct bonding. We investigated the effects of forming gas plasma treatment on the reduction of Cu oxide and Cu–Cu bonding temperature. As plasma input power and treatment time increased, Cu oxide could be effectively reduced, and this could be attributed to the enhanced chemical reaction between forming gas plasma and Cu oxide. When the bonding temperature was reduced from 415 to 300 °C, the bonding strength of the plasma-treated interface was increased from 1.8 to 5.55 J/m2 while that of the wet-treated interface was decreased.

  4. XPS and AES investigations of the adhesive bonding properties of thin titanium coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bonding properties of PMMA-microstructures on Ti-coated Cu-substrates after an oxidative treatment in alkaline hydrogenperoxide solution were investigated. In order to clarify the basic mechanism, surface analytical investigations by XPS-, AES-, and depth profile measurements have been performed. It was demonstrated that for optimum bonding a TiO2 surface layer of ca. 30 nm thickness is necessary. Chemical effects as well as a mechanical bonding with open grain boundary structures (dimensions in the μm-range) could be ruled out as bonding mechanisms. A mechanical interlocking of the polymer with micropores (dimensions in the nm-range) of the oxidic overlayer is adopted as the most probable bonding mechanism. (orig.)

  5. Essays on European bond markets

    OpenAIRE

    Cheung, Y.C.

    2005-01-01

    This dissertation focused on a number of issues that are of importance in the current European bond market. In the past years, the fiscal policy of the Eurozone members, advances in the technology of trading platforms and the introduction of a single currency have reshaped the fixed income markets in Europe. These developments have resulted in a far going integration of Eurozone capital markets. Moreover, the massive amounts of debt issued by Japan and the United States combined with the dete...

  6. Two-Center/Three-Electron Sigma Half-Bonds in Main Group and Transition Metal Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, John F

    2016-01-19

    First proposed in a classic Linus Pauling paper, the two-center/three-electron (2c/3e) σ half-bond challenges the extremes of what may or may not be considered a chemical bond. Two electrons occupying a σ bonding orbital and one electron occupying the antibonding σ* orbital results in bond orders of ∼0.5 that are characteristic of metastable and exotic species, epitomized in the fleetingly stable He2(+) ion. In this Account, I describe the use of coordination chemistry to stabilize such fugacious three-electron bonded species at disparate ends of the periodic table. A recent emphasis in the chemistry of metal-metal bonds has been to prepare compounds with extremely short metal-metal distances and high metal-metal bond orders. But similar chemistry can be used to explore metal-metal bond orders less than one, including 2c/3e half-bonds. Bimetallic compounds in the Ni2(II,III) and Pd2(II,III) oxidation states were originally examined in the 1980s, but the evidence collected at that time suggested that they did not contain 2c/3e σ bonds. Both classes of compounds have been re-examined using EPR spectroscopy and modern computational methods that show the unpaired electron of each compound to occupy a M-M σ* orbital, consistent with 2c/3e Ni-Ni and Pd-Pd σ half-bonds. Elsewhere on the periodic table, a seemingly unrelated compound containing a trigonal bipyramidal Cu3S2 core caused a stir, leaving prominent theorists at odds with one another as to whether the compound contains a S-S bond. Due to my previous experience with 2c/3e metal-metal bonds, I suggested that the Cu3S2 compound could contain a 2c/3e S-S σ half-bond in the previously unknown oxidation state of S2(3-). By use of the Cambridge Database, a number of other known compounds were identified as potentially containing S2(3-) ligands, including a noteworthy set of cyclopentadienyl-supported compounds possessing diamond-shaped Ni2E2 units with E = S, Se, and Te. These compounds were subjected to

  7. Bond graph modeling of centrifugal compression systems

    OpenAIRE

    Uddin, Nur; Gravdahl, Jan Tommy

    2015-01-01

    A novel approach to model unsteady fluid dynamics in a compressor network by using a bond graph is presented. The model is intended in particular for compressor control system development. First, we develop a bond graph model of a single compression system. Bond graph modeling offers a different perspective to previous work by modeling the compression system based on energy flow instead of fluid dynamics. Analyzing the bond graph model explains the energy flow during compressor surge. Two pri...

  8. Diversification, original sin, and international bond portfolios

    OpenAIRE

    John D. Burger; Warnock, Francis E.

    2003-01-01

    This paper has two main goals: to analyze country allocations in international bond portfolios and to describe the development of bond markets around the world. In the primary analysis, we find that country weights in U.S. investors' foreign bond portfolios are determined by the openness of capital accounts and potential diversification benefits. Positions in local-currency-denominated bonds are particularly sensitive to past and prospective volatility of returns. Analysis of reallocations in...

  9. Three Essays on Corporate Bond Market Liquidity

    OpenAIRE

    Dick-Nielsen, Jens

    2010-01-01

    The three essays study the US corporate bond market with special attention to bond liquidity. All essays are empirical studies which rely heavily on the availability of transactions data. Earlier studies had to use quoted bond prices for empirical studies, but with the introduction of the TRACE system and with the following dissemination of transaction prices the data quality on corporate bonds has improved immensely. In the years after 2000 a range of studies assessed the p...

  10. European corporate bond liquidity and yield spreads

    OpenAIRE

    Pukka, Juhamatti

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY The purpose of this study is to provide new empirical evidence on European corporate bond liquidity determinants and the liquidity effect on yield spreads. European corporate bond market is mostly ignored in corporate bond liquidity literature and this thesis’ purpose is to contribute to literature by being among the first papers to estimate liquidity determinants with comprehensive European corporate bond data, covering both investment grade and speculative grade rati...

  11. Thermally activated solvent bonding of polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, S H; Tjeung, R. T.; Z. F. Wang; Lu, A. C. W.; Rodriguez, I.; de Rooij, Nicolaas F.

    2010-01-01

    We present a thermally activated solvent bonding technique for the formation of embedded microstructures in polymer. It is based on the temperature dependent solubility of polymer in a liquid that is not a solvent at room temperature. With thermal activation, the liquid is transformed into a solvent of the polymer, creating a bonding capability through segmental or chain interdiffusion at the bonding interface. The technique has advantages over the more commonly used thermal bonding due to it...

  12. Bonding, aromaticity and reactivity patterns in some all-metal and non-metal clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Duley; S Giri; A Chakraborty; P K Chattaraj

    2009-09-01

    Several sandwich-like metal clusters have been studied at the B3LYP/6-311 + G∗ level of theory. Bonding and reactivity have been analysed through various geometrical parameters and conceptual density functional theory based global reactivity descriptors. Aromaticity patterns have been understood in terms of the associated nucleus independent chemical shift values. Possibility of bond-stretch isomerism in some doped clusters is explored. Preferable sites for electrophilic and nucleophilic attacks have been identified using different local reactivity descriptors.

  13. Effect of concentration of wool keratin on the rebuilding of disulfur bond

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate the effect of concentration of extracted keratin on the rebuilding of disulfur bond during dialysis against deionized water: cross-linked networks can be formed in the aggregate when the concentration is high, whereas at low concentration, intramolecular disulfur bond is preferred. This preliminary study illustrates, for the first time, the potential of controlling the cross-linking between keratin chains by facile means without addition of other chemicals, which is helpful to construct the biomacromolecular self-assemblies.

  14. Calculation of Chemical Bond Parameters in La1-xNdxCrO3(0.0≤x≤1.0)%La1-xNdxCrO3(0.0≤x≤1.0)的化学键参数计算

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武志坚; 杨明; 张思远

    2001-01-01

    使用复杂晶体化学键理论计算了La1-xNdxCrO3(x=0.0,0.2,0.4,0.6,0.8,1.0)的化学键参数,如键性、键极化率等。结果表明,La-O,Nd-O和Cr-O键的共价性基本上不随Nd掺杂的变化而变化,这个结论与实验结果一致。键极化率和磁距则随着掺杂量的增加而增加。共价性的大小次序为La-O<Nd-O<Cr-O。%The bond covalency,bond susceptibility and macroscopic linear susceptibility in La1-xNdxCrO3(x=0.0,0.2,0.4,0.6,0.8,1.0)has been studied with a semiempirical method. The results indicate that the bond covalencies of La-O,Nd-O and Cr-O bonds are relatively constant with the increasing doping levels in reasonable agreement with experiment. With the increasing doping level,the macroscopic linear susceptibilities increase, as well as the calculated effective magnetic moments. The ordering of the magnitude for bond covalency is La-O<Nd-O<Cr-O.

  15. Implicit Hamiltonian formulation of bond graphs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golo, G.; Schaft, A.J. van der; Breedveld, P.C.; Maschke, B.M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper deals with mathematical formulation of bond graphs. It is proven that the power continuous part of bond graphs, the junction structure, can be associated with a Dirac structure and that equations describing a bond graph model correspond to an implicit port-controlled Hamiltonian system wi

  16. Low temperature anodic bonding to silicon nitride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weichel, Steen; Reus, Roger De; Bouaidat, Salim;

    2000-01-01

    Low-temperature anodic bonding to stoichiometric silicon nitride surfaces has been performed in the temperature range from 3508C to 4008C. It is shown that the bonding is improved considerably if the nitride surfaces are either oxidized or exposed to an oxygen plasma prior to the bonding. Both bulk...

  17. 25 CFR 214.4 - Bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bonds. 214.4 Section 214.4 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF OSAGE RESERVATION LANDS, OKLAHOMA, FOR... reserved to change the amount of the bond in any particular case, or to require a new bond in...

  18. Sensor/ROIC Integration using Oxide Bonding

    OpenAIRE

    Ye, Zhenyu; Group, for the Fermilab Pixel R&D

    2009-01-01

    We explore the Ziptronix Direct Bond Interconnect technology for the integration of sensors and readout integrated circuits (ROICs) for high energy physics. The technology utilizes an oxide bond to form a robust mechanical connection between layers which serves to assist with the formation of metallic interlayer connections. We report on testing results of sample sensors bonded to ROICs and thinned to 100 microns.

  19. Hydroxide catalysis bonding of silicon carbide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veggel, A.A. van; Ende, D.A. van den; Bogenstahl, J.; Rowan, S.; Cunningham, W.; Gubbels, G.H.M.; Nijmeijer, H.

    2008-01-01

    For bonding silicon carbide optics, which require extreme stability, hydroxide catalysis bonding is considered [Rowan, S., Hough, J. and Elliffe, E., Silicon carbide bonding. UK Patent 040 7953.9, 2004. Please contact Mr. D. Whiteford for further information: D.Whiteford@admin.gla.ac.uk]. This techn

  20. Hydrogen-bond acidity of ionic liquids: an extended scale†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurnia, Kiki A.; Lima, Filipa; Cláudio, Ana Filipa M.; Coutinho, João A. P.; Freire, Mara G.

    2015-01-01

    One of the main drawbacks comprising an appropriate selection of ionic liquids (ILs) for a target application is related to the lack of an extended and well-established polarity scale for these neoteric fluids. Albeit considerable progress has been made on identifying chemical structures and factors that influence the polarity of ILs, there still exists a high inconsistency in the experimental values reported by different authors. Furthermore, due to the extremely large number of possible ILs that can be synthesized, the experimental characterization of their polarity is a major limitation when envisaging the choice of an IL with a desired polarity. Therefore, it is of crucial relevance to develop correlation schemes and a priori predictive methods able to forecast the polarity of new (or not yet synthesized) fluids. In this context, and aiming at broadening the experimental polarity scale available for ILs, the solvatochromic Kamlet–Taft parameters of a broad range of bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide-([NTf2]−)-based fluids were determined. The impact of the IL cation structure on the hydrogen-bond donating ability of the fluid was comprehensively addressed. Based on the large amount of novel experimental values obtained, we then evaluated COSMO-RS, COnductor-like Screening MOdel for Real Solvents, as an alternative tool to estimate the hydrogen-bond acidity of ILs. A three-parameter model based on the cation–anion interaction energies was found to adequately describe the experimental hydrogen-bond acidity or hydrogen-bond donating ability of ILs. The proposed three-parameter model is also shown to present a predictive capacity and to provide novel molecular-level insights into the chemical structure characteristics that influence the acidity of a given IL. It is shown that although the equimolar cation–anion hydrogen-bonding energies (EHB) play the major role, the electrostatic-misfit interactions (EMF) and van der Waals forces (EvdW) also contribute