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Sample records for chattanooga

  1. CHATTANOOGA AIR TOXICS (CATS) MONITORING RISK ASSESSMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Chattanooga-Hamilton County Air Pollution Control Bureau (CHCAPCB), the United States Environmental Protection Agency Region 4 (Region 4), and other stakeholders, in a cooperative effort, conducted an air toxics study in the Chattanooga area (city population approximately 285...

  2. 40 CFR 81.42 - Chattanooga Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chattanooga Interstate Air Quality...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.42 Chattanooga Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The...

  3. Human Health Risk Assessment of 16 Priority Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Soils of Chattanooga, Tennessee, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussar, Erika; Richards, Sean; Lin, Zhi-Qing; Dixon, Robert P; Johnson, Kevin A

    2012-11-01

    South Chattanooga has been home to foundries, coke furnaces, chemical, wood preserving, tanning and textile plants for over 100 years. Most of the industries were in place before any significant development of residential property in the area. During the 1950s and 1960s, however, the government purchased inexpensive property and constructed public housing projects in South Chattanooga. Many neighborhoods that surround the Chattanooga Creek were previous dumping grounds for industry. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) comprised the largest component of the dumping and airborne industrial emissions. To address the human exposure to these PAHs, a broad study of South Chattanooga soil contaminant concentrations was conducted on 20 sites across the city. Sixteen priority pollutant PAHs were quantified at two depths (0-10cm and 10-20cm) and compared against reference site soils, as well as to soils from industrially-impacted areas in Germany, China, and the US. From these data, the probability that people would encounter levels exceeding EPA Residential Preliminary Remediation Goals (PRG) was calculated. Results indicate that South Chattanooga soils have relatively high concentrations of total PAHs, specifically Benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P). These high concentrations of B[a]P were somewhat ubiquitous in South Chattanooga. Indeed, there is a high probability (88%) of encountering soil in South Chattanooga that exceeds the EPA PRG for B[a]P. However, there is a low probability (15%) of encountering a site with ∑PAHs exceeding EPA PRG guidelines. PMID:23243323

  4. Mine design for producing 100,000 tons per day of uranium-bearing Chattanooga Shale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattanooga Shale, underlying some 40,000 square miles in the southeastern United States, is considered to be a potentially large, low-grade source of uranium. The area in and near Dekalb County, Tennessee, appears to be the most likely site for commercial development. This paper deals with the mine design, mining procedures, equipment requirements, and operating maintenance costs for an underground mining complex capable of producing 100,000 tons of Chattanooga Shale per day for delivery to a beneficiation process

  5. Chattanooga Electric Power Board Case Study Distribution Automation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, Jim [Chattanooga Electric Power Board (EPB), TN (United States); Melin, Alexander M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Starke, Michael R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-10-01

    In 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) awarded a grant to the Chattanooga, Tennessee, Electric Power Board (EPB) as part of the Smart Grid Investment Grant Program. The grant had the objective “to accelerate the transformation of the nation’s electric grid by deploying smart grid technologies.” This funding award enabled EPB to expedite the original smart grid implementation schedule from an estimated 10-12 years to 2.5 years. With this funding, EPB invested heavily in distribution automation technologies including installing over 1,200 automated circuit switches and sensors on 171 circuits. For utilities considering a commitment to distribution automation, there are underlying questions such as the following: “What is the value?” and “What are the costs?” This case study attempts to answer these questions. The primary benefit of distribution automation is increased reliability or reduced power outage duration and frequency. Power outages directly impact customer economics by interfering with business functions. In the past, this economic driver has been difficult to effectively evaluate. However, as this case study demonstrates, tools and analysis techniques are now available. In this case study, the impact on customer costs associated with power outages before and after the implementation of distribution automation are compared. Two example evaluations are performed to demonstrate the benefits: 1) a savings baseline for customers under normal operations1 and 2) customer savings for a single severe weather event. Cost calculations for customer power outages are performed using the US Department of Energy (DOE) Interruption Cost Estimate (ICE) calculator2. This tool uses standard metrics associated with outages and the customers to calculate cost impact. The analysis shows that EPB customers have seen significant reliability improvements from the implementation of distribution automation. Under

  6. Engineering assessment and feasibility study of Chattanooga Shale as a future source of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume characterizes the major baseline environmental features of the Chattanooga Shale study and projects the effects which may accrue from implementation of a large scale development to recover uranium from the shale. Environmental, socioeconomic, and regulatory impacts are covered. The prototype project is located in Dekalb County in Tennessee

  7. Fun While Learning and Earning. A Look Into Chattanooga Public Schools' Token Reinforcement Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, William F.; Sanders, Frank J.

    A token reinforcement program was used by the Piney Woods Research and Demonstration Center in Chattanooga, Tennessee. Children who were from economically deprived homes received tokens for positive behavior. The tokens were redeemable for recess privileges, ice cream, candy, and other such reinforcers. All tokens were spent on the day earned so…

  8. Engineering assessment and feasibility study of Chattanooga Shale as a future source of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains five appendixes: Chattanooga Shale preliminary mining study, soils data, meteorologic data, water resources data, and biological resource data. The area around DeKalb County in Tennessee is the most likely site for commercial development for recovery of uranium

  9. Engineering assessment and feasibility study of Chattanooga Shale as a future source of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the engineering, feasibility, economics, and environmental aspects of exploitation of Chattanooga Shale to recover U, synthetic crude oil, and byproduct Th, NH3, S, Mo, V, Ni, and Co. It is concluded that the shale is a potential source of U, energy, and byproduct metals. This volume of the report covers the engineering description, feasibility, and economics of exploitation of the shale

  10. Engineering assessment and feasibility study of Chattanooga Shale as a future source of uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-06-01

    This report describes the engineering, feasibility, economics, and environmental aspects of exploitation of Chattanooga Shale to recover U, synthetic crude oil, and byproduct Th, NH/sub 3/, S, Mo, V, Ni, and Co. It is concluded that the shale is a potential source of U, energy, and byproduct metals. This volume of the report covers the engineering description, feasibility, and economics of exploitation of the shale. (DLC)

  11. Engineering assessment and feasibility study of Chattanooga Shale as a future source of uranium. [Environmental, socioeconomic, regulatory impacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-06-01

    This volume characterizes the major baseline environmental features of the Chattanooga Shale study and projects the effects which may accrue from implementation of a large scale development to recover uranium from the shale. Environmental, socioeconomic, and regulatory impacts are covered. The prototype project is located in Dekalb County in Tennessee. (DLC)

  12. Engineering assessment and feasibility study of Chattanooga Shale as a future source of uranium. [Preliminary mining; data on soils, meteorology, water resources, and biological resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-06-01

    This volume contains five appendixes: Chattanooga Shale preliminary mining study, soils data, meteorologic data, water resources data, and biological resource data. The area around DeKalb County in Tennessee is the most likely site for commercial development for recovery of uranium. (DLC)

  13. Chattanooga Shale conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-11-01

    Seven papers are included, relating to the exploitation of the uranium contained in shales. One of these papers discusses the IGT Hytort process, and was previously abstracted. Separate abstracts were prepared for the remaining six papers. (DLC)

  14. Basal Ottawa Limestone, Chattanooga Shale, Floyd Shale, Porters Creek Clay, and Yazoo Clay in parts of Alabama, Mississippi and Tennessee as potential host rocks for underground emplacement of waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mellen, F.F.

    1976-02-28

    Impermeable rock units, preferably at least 500 feet thick and lying 1000 to 3000 feet below land surface, were sought in the region consisting roughly of the western /sup 3///sub 5/ths of Tennessee and the northern /sup 3///sub 5/ths of Alabama and Mississippi. All rock sequences, Cambrian through Eocene, were examined in varying detail, except the Cretaceous Selma Chalk and except the diapiric salt. These rocks were studied for their relative impermeable homogeneity, their continuity, their background of structural and seismic stability and their hydrologic associations. The Central Mississippi Ridge of north-central Mississippi is overlain by a long-stable mass of Porters Creek Clay 500-700 feet thick, in an area roughly 50-60 miles wide and about 150 miles long. The Yazoo Clay, where best developed in the west-central and southwest part of Mississippi, is in the 400-500 foot thickness range, but locally exceeds 500 feet. The entire area mapped is underlain by the Louann Salt which has produced many deep-seated salt domes and numerous piercement salt domes. Salt flow has complicated shallow structural geology throughout that area. The Chattanooga Shale rarely exceeds 60 feet in thickness in the region studied and is generally much thinner and is absent in many places. In the lower part of the Middle Ordovician (Ottawa Megagroup), the Murphreesboro and associated dense limestones appear to offer a potential disposal unit 250-400 feet thick, having the advantages of rock competency and freedom from association with prolific aquifers in the overburden or beneath. Other less conspicuous stratigraphic units are reviewed.

  15. Experience from the Inspection of Licensees' Outage Activities, Including Fire Protection Programmes, Event Response Inspections, and the Impact of the Fukushima Daiichi NPP Accident on Inspection Programmes. Workshop Proceedings, Chattanooga, Tennessee, United States, 7-10 April 2014 - Appendix: Compilation of Survey Responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This appendix provides the complete compilation of responses received to the questionnaire issued in conjunction with the workshop announcements. The responses are provided as received, with changes made only to the formatting. The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA) Working Group on Inspection Practices (WGIP) sponsored the 12. International Workshop on Nuclear Regulatory Inspection Activities. The workshop was hosted by the U.S. NRC, in Chattanooga, Tennessee, United States of America on 7 -10 April 2014. The three workshop topics that were addressed were as follows: - Inspection of Outage Activities Including Fire Protection Programmes. - Event Response Inspections. - The Impact of Inspection Programmes of the Fukushima Daiichi NPP Accident. Each of the respondents was given the following instructions in relation to their response: - Only one response per country is required. If more than one person from your country is participating, please co-ordinate the responses accordingly. - Please provide responses on separate sheet and clearly identify the questionnaire part and topic. For preparation of the workshop, participants are invited to supply their national inspection approaches used in inspection of events and incidents according to the surveys. Actual issues that were discussed during the workshop were generated by the topic leaders based on the responses submitted by participants with their registration forms. This formats helps to ensure that issues considered most important by the workshop participants are covered during the group discussions. (authors)

  16. 78 FR 28190 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 134-Chattanooga, Tennessee; Notification of Proposed Production Activity...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-14

    ...; adhesive plates; O-rings; rubber bolts/rods; hoses/tubes (including reinforced); floor mats; gaskets/washers/seals; rubber caps; glass; mirrors; insulating covers; tubes/pipes; elbows; nipples; fuel tanks... the notification will be available for public inspection at the Office of the Executive...

  17. Psychosocial challenges of young people affected by HIV: experiences from Hamilton County, Chattanooga, Tennessee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chama, Samson; Ramirez, Octavio

    2015-01-01

    The number of young people affected by HIV and AIDS in Tennessee has steadily grown over the last few years. As a response to this situation, several organizations are working hard to address the needs of families impacted by HIV and AIDS. However, a close examination of some of the services provided suggests that young people within these families are ignored. Most of the services are geared toward HIV and AIDS-infected adult members of these families. Young people within these household are not targeted, and little is known about psychosocial challenges they experience in living with HIV-positive parents or guardians. In an attempt to address this gap, this small-scale qualitative study investigated the psychosocial challenges of young people affected by HIV and AIDS as a result of living with HIV-positive parents or guardians. Perceived sense of depression, experiencing stigma, self-blame, and lack of communication and loneliness were challenges that young people faced regularly. PMID:25495702

  18. Atmospheric Dispersion at Spatial Resolutions Below Mesoscale for university of Tennessee SimCenter at Chattanooga: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. David Whitfield; Dr. Daniel Hyams

    2009-09-14

    In Year 1 of this project, items 1.1 and 1.2 were addressed, as well as item 2.2. The baseline parallel computational simulation tool has been refined significantly over the timeline of this project for the purpose of atmospheric dispersion and transport problems; some of these refinements are documented in Chapter 3. The addition of a concentration transport capability (item 1.2) was completed, along with validation and usage in a highly complex urban environment. Multigrid capability (item 2.2) was a primary focus of Year 1 as well, regardless of the fact that it was scheduled for Year 2. It was determined by the authors that due to the very large nature of the meshes required for atmospheric simulations at mesoscale, multigrid was a key enabling technology for the rest of the project to be successful. Therefore, it was addressed early according to the schedule laid out in the original proposal. The technology behind the multigrid capability is discussed in detail in Chapter 5. Also in Year 1, the issue of ground topography specification is addressed. For simulations of pollutant transport in a given region, a key prerequisite is the specification of the detailed ground topography. The local topography must be placed into a form suitable for generating an unstructured grid both on the topography itself and the atmospheric volume above it; this effort is documented in Chapter 6. In Year 2 of this project, items 1.3 and 2.1 were addressed. Weather data in the form of wind speeds, relative humidity, and baseline pollution levels may be input into the code in order to improve the real-world fidelity of the solutions. Of course, the computational atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) boundary condition developed in Year 1 may still be used when necessary. Cloud cover may be simulated via the levels of actinic flux allowed in photochemical reactions in the atmospheric chemistry model. The primary focus of Year 2 was the formulation of a multispecies capability with included chemical reactions (item 2.1). This proved to be a very arduous task, taking the vast majority of the time and personnel allocation for Year Two. The addition of this capability and related verification is documented in Chapter 7. A discussion of available tropospheric chemistry models is located in Chapter 8; and, a technology demonstrator for the full multispecies capability is detailed in Chapter 9. Item 2.3 has been partially addressed, in that the computation of sensitivity derivatives have been incorporated in the Tenasi code [7]. However, it has not been utilized in this project in order to compute probability distribution functions for pollutant deposition. In order to completely address the integration of weather and sensor data into the code (item 1.3) and integrate with existing sensor networks (item 3.1), a customizable interface was established. Weather data is most commonly available via a real database, and as such, support for accessing these databases is present in the solver source code. For integration functionality, a method of dynamic code customization was developed in Year 3, which is documented in Chapter 11.

  19. 18 CFR 1304.406 - Removal of unauthorized, unsafe, and derelict structures or facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... derelict structures or facilities. If, at any time, any dock, wharf, boathouse (fixed or floating), nonnavigable houseboat, outfall, aerial cable, or other fixed or floating structure or facility (including any... Procurement, 1101 Market Street, Chattanooga, Tennessee 37402-2801....

  20. 76 FR 4147 - Putnam-Cumberland, TN-Improve Power Supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY Putnam-Cumberland, TN--Improve Power Supply AGENCY: Tennessee Valley Authority. ACTION: Notice of intent..., Tennessee Valley Authority, 1101 Market Street (MR 4G), Chattanooga, Tennessee 37402-2801; telephone:...

  1. 77 FR 29366 - Investigations Regarding Eligibility To Apply for Worker Adjustment Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-17

    ... (Company). 81526 Philips Healthcare/ Murrysville, PA....... 04/23/12 03/15/12 Respironics (Workers). 81527... Industries TG Chehalis, WA 04/26/12 04/25/12 (Company). 81536 Cannon Equipment (Company).. Chattanooga, TN... Healthcare/ Murrysville, PA....... 04/26/12 04/25/12 Respironic (Workers). 81540 Rock Creek Athletics,...

  2. Building the Future with Cohorts: Communities of Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rausch, David W.; Crawford, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    With recent interest in communities of practice, learning communities, and critical inquiry theory, the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga (UTC) developed, implemented, and studied the relationship of community and the cohort model. This paper shares information about successes and opportunities for improvement. Cohort-based learners across a…

  3. Students' Race and Gender in Introductory Business Statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiszadeh, Farhad M. E.; Ahmadi, Mohammad

    1987-01-01

    Grade, sex, and race information of 1,391 students registered in Introduction to Business Statistics at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga were gathered to investigate sex and race differences in achieving quantitative competencies. Results indicated that females scored significantly higher than males, whereas blacks scored significantly…

  4. A Survey of Engineers: Writing Attitudes and Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfken, Deborah E.; Henry, Jim M.

    A study examined attitudes toward writing that affect productivity and the extent of their influence. Subjects, 160 engineers practicing in the Chattanooga, Tennessee region, completed a questionnaire concerning writing attitudes, including anxiety and confidence, and levels of productivity. Findings show that confident engineers produce…

  5. 大学柔道部員と一般学生における膝屈筋・伸筋の求心性収縮および遠心性収縮について

    OpenAIRE

    坂本, 雅昭; 渡邉, 純; 山路, 雄彦; 中嶋, 宣夫; 茂原, 重雄

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare isokinetic muscle strength between concentric and eccentric torque for knee flexion and extension in college Judo men and college students. Subjects consisted of 19 college Judo men (JM) and 10 college students (CS), none of whom had any history of knee injury. Muscle strength was measured by using KIN-COM (Japan Chattanooga), corrected for gravity. Peak torque expressed in newton meters was divided by body weight in kilograms to produce torque...

  6. Spinning Your Own Story - Marketing the Geosciences to the Public

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, D.; Jones, T. S.

    2006-12-01

    Studies of high achieving African-American and Hispanic students have shown the students do not go into STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) disciplines due to the poor teaching by some STEM teachers, lack of encouragement from teachers or parents and a self perception the students will not be successful. One underlying component to this problem is the issue of perception of the STEM disciplines by the general public. This study focuses on changing the often negative or neutral perception into one more positive and diverse. This study utilizes clear, and hopefully effective, media communication through the use of traditional marketing strategies to promote the geosciences and the geology program at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga to the general public in the Chattanooga metropolitan area. Average citizens are generally unaware of the various geoscience divisions and career opportunities available. Pioneer marketing, used in this study, introduces new ideas and concepts to the general public, but does not ask for direct action to be taken. The primary goal is to increase awareness of the geosciences. The use of printed and online media delivers the message to the public. In the media, personal interviews with geoscientists from all races and backgrounds were included to demonstrate diversity. An invitation was made to all high school students to participate in an associated after-school program. Elements developed for this program include: 1) clearly defining goals for the marketing effort; 2) delineating the target market by age, education, race and gender; 3) developing a story to tell in the marketing effort; and 4) producing products to achieve the marketing goals. For this effort, the product results included: an annual newspaper tabloid, an associated website and a departmental brochure. The marketing results show increased public awareness, increased awareness of the geology program within the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

  7. Perspectives on reactor safety. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haskin, F.E. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering; Camp, A.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hodge, S.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Engineering Technology Div.

    1997-11-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) maintains a technical training center at Chattanooga, Tennessee to provide appropriate training to both new and experienced NRC employees. This document describes a one-week course in reactor safety concepts. The course consists of five modules: (1) the development of safety concepts; (2) severe accident perspectives; (3) accident progression in the reactor vessel; (4) containment characteristics and design bases; and (5) source terms and offsite consequences. The course text is accompanied by slides and videos during the actual presentation of the course.

  8. The design and use of proficiency based BWR reactor maintenance and refuelling training mockups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the ABB experience with the design and use of boiling water reactor training facilities. The training programs were developed and implemented in cooperation with the nuclear utilities. ABB operates two facilities, the ABB ATOM Light Water Reactor Service Center located in Vasteras, Sweden, and the ABB Combustion Engineering Nuclear Operations BWR Training Center located in Chattanooga, Tennessee, USA. The focus of the training centers are reactor maintenance and refueling activities plus the capability to develop and qualify tools, procedures and repair techniques

  9. Perspectives on reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) maintains a technical training center at Chattanooga, Tennessee to provide appropriate training to both new and experienced NRC employees. This document describes a one-week course in reactor, safety concepts. The course consists of five modules: (1) historical perspective; (2) accident sequences; (3) accident progression in the reactor vessel; (4) containment characteristics and design bases; and (5) source terms and offsite consequences. The course text is accompanied by slides and videos during the actual presentation of the course

  10. Perspectives on reactor safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haskin, F.E. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering; Camp, A.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-03-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) maintains a technical training center at Chattanooga, Tennessee to provide appropriate training to both new and experienced NRC employees. This document describes a one-week course in reactor, safety concepts. The course consists of five modules: (1) historical perspective; (2) accident sequences; (3) accident progression in the reactor vessel; (4) containment characteristics and design bases; and (5) source terms and offsite consequences. The course text is accompanied by slides and videos during the actual presentation of the course.

  11. Fabrication, evaluation, and inspection of cold-reduced and cold-drawn tubes of modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel is being developed and commercialized jointly by ORNL and Combustion Engineering (CE), Chattanooga Tennessee, as an alternate steam generator material for breeder reactors. The alloy has been commercially melted by the argon-oxygen decarburization (AOD) process and refined by electroslag remelting (ESR). It has also been commercially fabricated into plate, bar, tube hollows, and centrifugally cast and cold-pilgered tubes. The purpose of this study was to develop procedures for fabricating tubes of various sizes by cold-reducing and drawing processes. Fabricated tubes were subjected to microstructural analysis, hardness measurements, and ultrasonic inspection

  12. Perspectives on reactor safety. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) maintains a technical training center at Chattanooga, Tennessee to provide appropriate training to both new and experienced NRC employees. This document describes a one-week course in reactor safety concepts. The course consists of five modules: (1) the development of safety concepts; (2) severe accident perspectives; (3) accident progression in the reactor vessel; (4) containment characteristics and design bases; and (5) source terms and offsite consequences. The course text is accompanied by slides and videos during the actual presentation of the course

  13. Diagnostic and treatment challenges in traumatic brain injury patients with severe neuropsychiatric symptoms: insights into psychiatric practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauterbach MD

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Margo D Lauterbach,1 Paula L Notarangelo,1 Stephen J Nichols,2 Kristy S Lane,1 Vassilis E Koliatsos11The Neuropsychiatry Program at Sheppard Pratt, Sheppard Pratt Health System, Baltimore, MD, 2Department of Emergency Medicine, The University of Tennessee College of Medicine Chattanooga, Chattanooga, TN, USAAbstract: Traumatic brain injury (TBI causes a variety of neuropsychiatric problems that pose diagnostic and treatment challenges for providers. In this report, we share our experience as a referral neuropsychiatry program to assist the general psychiatrist when adult TBI patients with psychiatric symptoms present for evaluation and treatment. We completed a retrospective study of patients with moderate-to-severe TBI and severe neuropsychiatric impairments. We collected information on demographics, nature of injury, symptomatology, diagnoses, and treatments. Data analysis indicates that mood stabilization was a key concern, often requiring aggressive pharmacological management. Cognitive dysfunction was a problem for the majority of patients, but was only medicated in a third, due to poor efficacy or behavioral side effects. The co-occurrence of multiple TBI-related symptoms and diagnoses in this patient cohort emphasizes the need for individualized psychopharmacological approaches and interventions.Keywords: traumatic brain injury, neurobehavioral, treatment

  14. Very-low-frequency and low-frequency electric and magnetic fields associated with electric shuttle bus wireless charging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tell, R A; Kavet, Robert; Bailey, J R; Halliwell, John

    2014-01-01

    Tests conducted to date at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga (UTC) indicate that wireless charging of the Chattanooga Area Regional Transportation Authority's (CARTA) downtown shuttle bus, currently operating with off-board battery charging technology, offers significant improvements in performance and cost. The system operates at a frequency of 20 kHz and a peak power of 60 kW. Because the system's wireless charging is expected to occur during a nominal 3-min charging period with passengers on-board, the magnetic and electric fields associated with charging were characterised at UTC's Advanced Vehicle Test Facility and compared with established human exposure limits. The two most prominent exposure limits are those published by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) and the Institute for Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE). Both organisations include limits for groups who are trained (workers in specific industries) to be aware of electromagnetic environments and their potential hazards, as well as a lower set of limits for the general public, who are assumed to lack such awareness. None of the magnetic or electric fields measured either within or outside the bus during charging exceeded either the ICNIRP or the IEEE exposure limits for the general public.

  15. Solar-Assisted Electric Vehicle Charging Station Interim Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapsa, Melissa Voss [ORNL; Durfee, Norman [ORNL; Maxey, L Curt [ORNL; Overbey, Randall M [ORNL

    2011-09-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been awarded $6.8 million in the Department of Energy (DOE) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds as part of an overall $114.8 million ECOtality grant with matching funds from regional partners to install 125 solar-assisted Electric Vehicle (EV) charging stations across Knoxville, Nashville, Chattanooga, and Memphis. Significant progress has been made toward completing the scope with the installation of 25 solar-assisted charging stations at ORNL; six stations at Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI); and 27 stations at Nissan's Smyrna and Franklin sites, with three more stations under construction at Nissan's new lithium-ion battery plant. Additionally, the procurement process for contracting the installation of 34 stations at Knoxville, the University of Tennessee Knoxville (UTK), and Nashville sites is underway with completion of installation scheduled for early 2012. Progress is also being made on finalizing sites and beginning installations of 30 stations in Nashville, Chattanooga, and Memphis by EPRI and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). The solar-assisted EV charging station project has made great strides in fiscal year 2011. A total of 58 solar-assisted EV parking spaces have been commissioned in East and Middle Tennessee, and progress on installing the remaining 67 spaces is well underway. The contract for the 34 stations planned for Knoxville, UTK, and Nashville should be underway in October with completion scheduled for the end of March 2012; the remaining three Nissan stations are under construction and scheduled to be complete in November; and the EPRI/TVA stations for Chattanooga, Vanderbilt, and Memphis are underway and should be complete by the end of March 2012. As additional Nissan LEAFs are being delivered, usage of the charging stations has increased substantially. The project is on course to complete all 125 solar-assisted EV charging stations in time to collect meaningful data

  16. Demonstration of an automated on-line surveillance system at a commercial nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a first step in demonstrating the practicality of performing continuous on-line surveillance of the performance of nuclear steam supply systems using noise related techniques, Oak Ridge National Laboratory is operating a computerized noise signal data acquisition and processing system at the Sequoyah Unit 1 Nuclear Plant, an 1148 MWe four-loop Westinghouse pressurized water reactor (PWR) located near Chattanooga, Tennessee. The principal objective is to establish, with a degree of continuity and completeness not previously achieved, the long-term characteristics of signals from neutron detectors and process sensors in order to evaluate the feasibility of detecting and diagnosing anomalous reactor conditions by means of changes in these signals. The system is designed to automatically screen the gathered data, using a number of descriptors derived from the power spectra of the monitored signals, and thereby select for the noise analyst's perusal only those data which differ statistically from norms which the system has previously established

  17. Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units within the Ozark Plateaus aquifer system, northwestern Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecki, John B.; Bolyard, Susan E.; Hart, Rheannon M.; Clark, Jimmy M.

    2014-01-01

    Digital surfaces and thicknesses of nine hydrogeologic units of the Ozark Plateaus aquifer system from land surface to the top of the Gunter Sandstone in northwestern Arkansas were created using geophysical logs, drillers’ logs, geologist-interpreted formation tops, and previously published maps. The 6,040 square mile study area in the Ozark Plateaus Province includes Benton, Washington, Carroll, Madison, Boone, Newton, Marion, and Searcy Counties. The top of each hydrogeologic unit delineated on geophysical logs was based partly on previously published reports and maps and also from drillers’ logs. These logs were then used as a basis to contour digital surfaces showing the top and thickness of the Fayetteville Shale, the Boone Formation, the Chattanooga Shale, the Everton Formation, the Powell Dolomite, the Cotter Dolomite, the Roubidoux Formation, the Gasconade Dolomite, and the Gunter Sandstone.

  18. Modifications to hydra-gym equipment provide for clinically useful strength measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, M S; Lovely, D F; McInnis, M D; Sexsmith, J R

    1994-04-01

    Modifications were made to the Series III-311 Omnikinetic Hydra-Gym apparatus (Hydra-Fitness Industries Inc., Belton, TX) in an effort to provide relatively inexpensive yet clinically useful isokinetic strength measurements. Signal transmission and processing functions were installed to calculate relevant strength characteristics for knee extension/flexion motions. Results from the modified Hydra-Gym were compared with matched procedures on the Kin-Com (model 500-10, Chattecx Corporation, Chattanooga, TN). Subjects (N = 10) performed three maximal concentric right knee extension/flexion cycles at different resistance settings (2, 4, and 6) on the Hydra-Gym and the corresponding angular velocities on the Kin-Com (190, 125, and 40 degrees/sec, respectively). Each subject completed eight testing sessions, four on each dynamometer. A five-way analysis of variance on the peak torque data revealed no significant difference between dynamometers; however, there was a significant interaction between dynamometer and extension/flexion measurements. The variance in angle of peak torque data was significantly different between dynamometers, with Hydra-Gym showing superior reproducibility (p Gym because the interaction noticed between dynamometer and extension/flexion may exaggerate muscle imbalances. In summary, modifications to the Hydra-Gym appear to provide clinicians with a reliable and clinically useful strength testing alternative.

  19. Exploring Use of Nontraditional Tobacco Products Through Focus Groups with Young Adult Smokers, 2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda L. Pederson, PhD

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionIn 2002, 16 focus groups with young adult smokers who used or had tried nontraditional tobacco products (e.g., bidis, shisha, herbal cigarettes, kreteks, cigars, herbal smokeless products were conducted in Dallas, Texas, and Chattanooga, Tennessee, to gain an understanding of the appeal of these products. MethodsIn each city, groups were segmented by race or ethnicity and by educational status. ResultsMany consistent themes emerged across the groups. Nontraditional tobacco use is not common among young adult smokers. Although some products such as Black & Mild and Swisher Sweets cigars are used frequently by some groups, other products such as shisha, kreteks, and herbal cigarettes are less well known and infrequently used. Among focus group participants, use of nontraditional tobacco products tends to occur in clubs, during social gatherings, or at times when cigarettes are unavailable. More college students than those who were not in college cited cost and inconvenience of purchasing nontraditional tobacco products as reasons for not using them. All focus group participants agreed that African Americans use cigars more than any other racial or ethnic group. ConclusionOverall, findings suggest that the reasons for trying nontraditional tobacco products did not differ by race or ethnicity. Family members and peers were mentioned as the source of nontraditional tobacco products when first used. Cost, convenience, taste, smell, and strength were given as reasons both for using these products and for discontinuing their use.

  20. Facilitating access to antiviral medications and information during an influenza pandemic: engaging with the public on possible new strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fain, Barbara A; Koonin, Lisa M; Stoto, Michael A; Shah, Umair A; Cooper, Susan R; Piltch-Loeb, Rachael N; Kellermann, Arthur L

    2014-01-01

    Antiviral medications can decrease the severity and duration of influenza, but they are most effective if started within 48 hours of the onset of symptoms. In a severe influenza pandemic, normal channels of obtaining prescriptions and medications could become overwhelmed. To assess public perception of the acceptability and feasibility of alternative strategies for prescribing, distributing, and dispensing antivirals and disseminating information about influenza and its treatment, the Institute of Medicine, with technical assistance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), convened public engagement events in 3 demographically and geographically diverse communities: Fort Benton, MT; Chattanooga, TN; and Los Angeles, CA. Participants were introduced to the issues associated with pandemic influenza and the challenges of ensuring timely public access to information and medications. They then discussed the advantages and disadvantages of 5 alternative strategies currently being considered by the CDC and its partners. Participants at all 3 venues expressed high levels of acceptance for each of the proposed strategies and contributed useful ideas to support their implementation. This article discusses the key findings from these sessions. PMID:24552360

  1. Reed B. Bontecou, M.D.--his role in Civil War surgery and medical photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, B O

    2000-01-01

    This third article on the subject of Civil War injuries and their surgical repair is devoted to Reed B. Bontecou, M.D., a New York surgeon who contributed greatly to the use of photography to document the casualties of the battlefield as seen in the Northern as well as the Southern states. Photographs of the wounded soldiers helped to verify the severity of their injuries, and helped to determine the degree and amount of the post-war pension payments. These photographs were one of the largest sources which were used in the creation of the Otis Archives of the present-day National Museum of Health and Medicine in Washington, D.C. Some of the wounded soldiers' photographs in the Otis Archives demonstrate the use of plastic surgery techniques to repair the wounded face, head and neck, torso, and the extremities by only a handful of Northern and Confederate surgeons including Gurdon Buck, J.S. Gouley and Henry B. Sands of New York City; H. Culbertson, U.S.V. of Madison, Wisconsin; J. Cooper McKee of Washington, D.C., W.W. Keen, Jr. of Philadelphia; and C.B. Gibson, P.A.C.S. of Richmond; S.H. Stout of Tennessee; and J.B. Bean, a dentist of Chattanooga.

  2. Economic analysis of solar assisted absorption chiller for a commercial building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonyraj, Gnananesan

    Dwindling fossil fuels coupled with changes in global climate intensified the drive to make use of renewable energy resources that have negligible impact on the environment. In this attempt, the industrial community produced various devices and systems to make use of solar energy for heating and cooling of building space as well as generate electric power. The most common components employed for collection of solar energy are the flat plate and evacuated tube collectors that produce hot water that can be employed for heating the building space. In order to cool the building, the absorption chiller is commonly employed that requires hot water at high temperatures for its operation. This thesis deals with economic analysis of solar collector and absorption cooling system to meet the building loads of a commercial building located in Chattanooga, Tennessee. Computer simulations are employed to predict the hourly building loads and performance of the flat plate and evacuated tube solar collectors using the hourly weather data. The key variables affecting the economic evaluation of such system are identified and the influence of these parameters is presented. The results of this investigation show that the flat plate solar collectors yield lower payback period compared to the evacuated tube collectors and economic incentives offered by the local and federal agencies play a major role in lowering the payback period.

  3. Comparison between dispersed nuclear power plants and a nuclear energy center at a hypothetical site on Kentucky Lake, Tennessee. Volume II. Transmission of power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparison is made among power transmission systems required to serve a single set of load center demands from four modes of siting the generating facilities: a single generation site with an ultimate generation capacity of 48,000 MW; four generation sites each with a generation capacity of 12,000 MW; 10 generation sites each with a generation capacity of 4,800 MW; and a system that resulted when the existing utility plan for future generation was logically expanded. The time period for the study is from the year 1985 to the year 2020, when the full 48,000 MW of new capacity from the single large nuclear energy center is on-line. The load centers served are Huntsville, Alabama; Evansville, Indiana; Paducah, Kentucky; and Chattanooga, Nashville, and Memphis, Tennessee. Generation sites are real locations but are hypothetical in terms of miles of transmission lines, the product of the amount of power transmitted and the distance transmitted (GW-miles), and cost

  4. Colesevelam hydrochloride: evidence for its use in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus with insights into mechanism of action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zema MJ

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Michael James ZemaUniversity Tennessee College of Medicine, Chattanooga, TN, USAAbstract: Colesevelam hydrochloride is a molecularly engineered, second-generation bile acid sequestrant demonstrating enhanced specificity for bile acids which has been approved for use as adjunctive therapy to diet and exercise as monotherapy or in combination with a ß-hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitor for the reduction of elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in patients with primary hypercholesterolemia. It is also the only lipid-lowering agent currently available in the United States which has been approved for use as adjunctive therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus whose glycemia remains inadequately controlled on therapy with metformin, sulfonylurea, or insulin. With the recent emphasis upon drug safety by the Food and Drug Administration and various consumer agencies, it is fitting that the role of nonsystemic lipid-lowering therapies such as bile acid sequestrants – with nearly 90 years of in-class, clinically safe experience – should be reexamined. This paper presents information on the major pharmacologic effects of colesevelam, including a discussion of recent data derived from both in vitro and in vivo rodent and human studies, which shed light on the putative mechanisms involved.Keywords: colesevelam, bile acid sequestrants, cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein

  5. Radon and radon progeny in 70 houses in the Tennessee Valley area: study design and measurement methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudney, C.S.; Hawthorne, A.R.; Monar, K.P.; Quillen, J.L.; Clark, C. Jr.; Doane, R.W.; Wallace, R.G.; Reed, R.P.

    1986-01-01

    Levels of radon and its short-lived airborne progeny are being measured in a year-long study of 70 houses in four states in the Tennessee Valley. Various methods were used to solicit volunteers with differing degrees of success. Criteria for selection of houses in the study included presence of a lower level with cement floor and one or more block walls in contact with the soil, absence of obvious indications of technologically enhanced sources of radium, and proximity to one of four cities (Knoxville, Chattanooga, Birmingham, or Florence). By design, most houses in the study are in the same neighborhood as at least one other house in the study. Houses range in age from newly constructed to about 40 years old. Most of the houses have more than 2000 square feet of finished floor space. The lower level encompasses a garage in most cases. More complete information pertaining to house characteristics will be gathered in the course of the study. 19 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Revisions to the original extent of the Devonian Shale-Middle and Upper Paleozoic Total Petroleum System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enomoto, Catherine B.; Rouse, William A.; Trippi, Michael H.; Higley, Debra K.

    2016-04-11

    Technically recoverable undiscovered hydrocarbon resources in continuous accumulations are present in Upper Devonian and Lower Mississippian strata in the Appalachian Basin Petroleum Province. The province includes parts of New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Maryland, West Virginia, Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, and Alabama. The Upper Devonian and Lower Mississippian strata are part of the previously defined Devonian Shale-Middle and Upper Paleozoic Total Petroleum System (TPS) that extends from New York to Tennessee. This publication presents a revision to the extent of the Devonian Shale-Middle and Upper Paleozoic TPS. The most significant modification to the maximum extent of the Devonian Shale-Middle and Upper Paleozoic TPS is to the south and southwest, adding areas in Tennessee, Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi where Devonian strata, including potential petroleum source rocks, are present in the subsurface up to the outcrop. The Middle to Upper Devonian Chattanooga Shale extends from southeastern Kentucky to Alabama and eastern Mississippi. Production from Devonian shale has been established in the Appalachian fold and thrust belt of northeastern Alabama. Exploratory drilling has encountered Middle to Upper Devonian strata containing organic-rich shale in west-central Alabama. The areas added to the TPS are located in the Valley and Ridge, Interior Low Plateaus, and Appalachian Plateaus physiographic provinces, including the portion of the Appalachian fold and thrust belt buried beneath Cretaceous and younger sediments that were deposited on the U.S. Gulf Coastal Plain.

  7. Petrology of the Viola Formation, El Dorado Field, Butler County, Kansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biederman, E.W. Jr.

    1966-01-01

    The El Dorado Field has produced over 261 million bbl of oil since its discovery in 1915, and ranks as one of the giant oil fields in the U.S. The petrographic evidence suggests the following sequence of events: In those parts of the formation where quartz sand is present, silica cement began to form soon after deposition. Quartz cementation stopped and began again on several occasions as is evidenced by the ''zoned'' quartz overgrowths. The first cessation probably took place with the deposition of the Chattanooga. The remaining zones appear to be related to movements along the Nemaha fault system. At one time during the second cycle of erosion (pre-Cherokee) calcite cement began to fill in the remaining pore space, including some dolomite rhombs; however, conditions again changed and some of the calcite was redissolved. The zoning of some of the dolomite rhombs indicates that the growth of these crystals took place unevenly in time.

  8. Mineralogical characterization of selected shales in support of nuclear waste repository studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One objective of the Sedimentary Rock Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been to examine end-member shales to develop a data base that will aid in evaluations if shales are ever considered as a repository host rock. Five end-member shales were selected for comprehensive characterization: the Chattanooga Shale from Fentress County, Tennessee; the Pierre Shale from Gregory County, South Dakota; the Green River Formation from Garfield County, Colorado; and the Nolichucky Shale and Pumpkin Valley Shale from Roane County, Tennessee. Detailed micromorphological and mineralogical characterizations of the shales were completed by Lee et al. (1987) in ORNL/TM-10567. This report is a supplemental characterization study that was necessary because second batches of the shale samples were needed for additional studies. Selected physical, chemical, and mineralogical properties were determined for the second batches; and their properties were compared with the results from the first batches. Physical characterization indicated that the second-batch and first-batch samples had a noticeable difference in apparent-size distributions but had similar primary-particle-size distributions. There were some differences in chemical composition between the batches, but these differences were not considered important in comparison with the differences among the end-member shales. The results of x-ray diffraction analyses showed that the second batches had mineralogical compositions very similar to the first batches. 9 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs

  9. Mineralogical characterization of selected shales in support of nuclear waste repository studies: Progress report, October 1987--September 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S. Y. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hyder, L. K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Baxter, P. M. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    1989-07-01

    One objective of the Sedimentary Rock Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been to examine end-member shales to develop a data base that will aid in evaluations if shales are ever considered as a repository host rock. Five end-member shales were selected for comprehensive characterization: the Chattanooga Shale from Fentress County, Tennessee; the Pierre Shale from Gregory County, South Dakota; the Green River Formation from Garfield County, Colorado; and the Nolichucky Shale and Pumpkin Valley Shale from Roane County, Tennessee. Detailed micromorphological and mineralogical characterizations of the shales were completed by Lee et al. (1987) in ORNL/TM-10567. This report is a supplemental characterization study that was necessary because second batches of the shale samples were needed for additional studies. Selected physical, chemical, and mineralogical properties were determined for the second batches; and their properties were compared with the results from the first batches. Physical characterization indicated that the second-batch and first-batch samples had a noticeable difference in apparent-size distributions but had similar primary-particle-size distributions. There were some differences in chemical composition between the batches, but these differences were not considered important in comparison with the differences among the end-member shales. The results of x-ray diffraction analyses showed that the second batches had mineralogical compositions very similar to the first batches. 9 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. (Environmental technology)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boston, H.L.

    1990-10-12

    The traveler participated in a conference on environmental technology in Paris, sponsored by the US Embassy-Paris, US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the French Environmental Ministry, and others. The traveler sat on a panel for environmental aspects of energy technology and made a presentation on the potential contributions of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to a planned French-American Environmental Technologies Institute in Chattanooga, Tennessee, and Evry, France. This institute would provide opportunities for international cooperation on environmental issues and technology transfer related to environmental protection, monitoring, and restoration at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The traveler also attended the Fourth International Conference on Environmental Contamination in Barcelona. Conference topics included environmental chemistry, land disposal of wastes, treatment of toxic wastes, micropollutants, trace organics, artificial radionuclides in the environment, and the use biomonitoring and biosystems for environmental assessment. The traveler presented a paper on The Fate of Radionuclides in Sewage Sludge Applied to Land.'' Those findings corresponded well with results from studies addressing the fate of fallout radionuclides from the Chernobyl nuclear accident. There was an exchange of new information on a number of topics of interest to DOE waste management and environmental restoration needs.

  11. Experimental stress analysis and fatigue tests of five 24-in. NPS ANSI Standard B16.9 tees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental stress analyses and low-cycle fatigue tests of five 24-in. nominal pipe size American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Standard B16.9 forged tees are documented in this report. The tees, designated as Oak Ridge National Laboratory tees T10, T11, T12, T13, and T16, were tested under subcontract at Combustion Engineering, Inc. in Chattanooga, Tennessee. Experimental stress analyses were conducted for 12 individual loadings on each tee. Each test model was instrumented with approx. 225, 1/8-in. three-gage, 450 strain rosettes on the inside and outside surfaces; and 6 linear variable differential transformers mounted on special nonflexible holding frames for measuring deflections and rotations of the pipe extensions. Following completion of the strain-gate tests, each tee was fatigue tested to failure with either a fully reversed displacement controlled in-plane bending moment on the branch or a cyclic internal pressure that ranged from a value slightly above zero to about 90% of the nominal yield pressure of the pipe extensions

  12. Future Recovery of Energy and Mineral Values from Organic-Rich Shales (Summary L'avenir de la production d'énergie et de la valeur minérale des schistes riches en matière organique (résumé

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park W. C.

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Oil shale deposits vary significantly in their geological nature and can represent enormous reserves of low grades ores for various minerals such as alumina, sodium carbonates, molybdenum, nickel, vanadium, and uranium. The treatment of these rocks for mineral values can be economically attractive when coupled with the production of synthetic oil. Mutually shared costs for extractinq the mineral values can be favorably affected by utilizing by-products from the oil shale retorting. These can include the residual char for a carbonaceous reductant or fuel, C02 for acidification, or lime and soda ash for caustic. Conversely, an inappropriate choice of oil shale retorting conditions can substantially lower subsequent recovery of mineral values from the spent shale. The proceeding considerations will be discussed for several oil shale deposits including: 1. The Green River formation in the mid-western United States which is not only oil rich but also represents a nearly inexhaustible domestic supply of alumina and sodium carbonates and 2. The block shale of Julia Creek, Queensland, Australia, the Devonian Chattanooga shale in the United States, the Cambrian Kulm shale in Sweden, the Permian Lodeve shale in southern France, and the Paleozoic shales from Korea and USSR for energy and metal values such as molybdenum, nickel, vanadium, and uranium. La nature géologique des dépôts de schistes à huile est très variée ; ces schistes peuvent représenter des réserves énormes de minerais à faible teneur de métaux tels que l'aluminium, le molybdène, le nickel, le vanadium, l'uranium, sans oublier le carbonate de sodium. Le traitement de ces roches pour leur valeur minérale peut être attractif économiquement s'il est associé à la production d'huile synthétique. La répartition des coûts d'extraction des métaux peut être favorablement affectée en utilisant les sous-produits du traitement des schistes à huile. Ceci peut comprendre le goudron

  13. Effects of irradiation on strength and toughness of commercial LWR vessel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential for stainless steel cladding to improve the fracture behavior of an operating nuclear reactor pressure vessel, particularly during certain overcooling transients, may depend greatly on the properties of the irradiated cladding. Therefore, weld overlay cladding irradiated at temperatures and to fluences relevant to power reactor operation was examined. The cladding was applied to a pressure vessel steel plate by the three-wire series-arc commercial method. Cladding was applied in three layers to provide adequate thickness for the fabrication of test specimens. The three-wire series-arc procedure, developed by Combustion Engineering, Incl, Chattanooga, Tennessee, produced a highly controlled weld chemistry, microstructure, and fracture properties in all three layers of the weld. Charpy V-notch and tensile specimens were irradiated at 288 deg. C to fluence levels of 2 and 5x1019 neutrons/cm2 (>1 MeV). Postirradiation testing results show that, in the test temperature range from -125 to 288 deg. C, the yield strength increased by 8 to 30%, ductility insignificantly increased, while there was almost no change in ultimate tensile strength. All cladding exhibited ductile-to-brittle transition behavior during Charpy impact testing, due to the dominance of delta-ferrite failures at low temperatures. On the upper shelf, energy was reduced, due to irradiation exposure, 15 to 20%, while the lateral expansion was reduced 43 to 41%, at 2 and 5x1019 neutrons/cm2 (>1 MeV), respectively. In addition, radiation damage resulted in 13 and 28 deg. C shifts of the Charpy impact transition temperature at the 41-J level for the low and high fluences, respectively. (author)

  14. Inspector qualification guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA) has a Working Group on Inspection Practices (WGIP). The WGIP provides a forum for the exchange of Information and experience on the safety Inspection practices of regulatory authorities In the CNRA member countries. A consistent qualification process and well defined level of training for all Inspectors who participate In the safety Inspections are needed to provide consistent Inspections and reliable Inspection results. The WGIP organized in 1992 a workshop on the conduct of inspections, inspector qualification and training, and shutdown inspections at the Technical Training Center of the US NRC in Chattanooga, Tennessee. In the connection of workshop the WGIP identified a need to develop guidance for inspector qualification which could be used as a model by those who are developing their qualification practices. The inspector qualification journals of US NRC provided a good basis for the work. The following inspector qualification guideline has been developed for guidance of qualification of a new inspector recruited to the regulatory body. This guideline has been developed for helping the supervisors and training officers to give the initial training and familiarization to the duties of a new inspector in a controlled manner. US NRC inspector qualification journals have been used to define the areas of attention. This guideline provides large flexibility for application in different type organizations. Large organizations can develop separate qualification journals for each inspector positions. Small regulatory bodies can develop individual training programmes by defining the necessary training topics on case by case basis. E.g. the guideline can be used to define the qualifications of contracted inspectors used in some countries. The appropriate part would apply. Annex 1 gives two examples how this guideline could be applied

  15. Impacts of invasive nonnative plant species on the rare forest herb Scutellaria montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikkema, Jordan J.; Boyd, Jennifer N.

    2015-11-01

    Invasive plant species and overabundant herbivore populations have the potential to significantly impact rare plant species given their increased risk for local extirpation and extinction. We used interacting invasive species removal and grazer exclusion treatments replicated across two locations in an occurrence of rare Scutellaria montana (large-flowered skullcap) in Chattanooga, Tennessee, USA, to assess: 1) competition by invasive Ligustrum sinense (Chinese privet) and Lonicera japonica (Japanese honeysuckle) and 2) the role of invasive species in mediating Oedocoilus virginianus (white-tailed deer) grazing of S. montana. Contrary to our hypothesis that invasive species presence would suppress S. montana directly via competition, S. montana individuals experienced a seasonal increase in stem height when invasive species were intact but not when invasive species were removed. Marginally significant results indicated that invasive species may afford S. montana protection from grazers, and we suggest that invasive species also could protect S. montana from smaller herbivores and/or positively influence abiotic conditions. In contrast to growth responses, S. montana individuals protected from O. virginianus exhibited a decrease in flowering between seasons relative to unprotected plants, but invasive species did not affect this variable. Although it has been suggested that invasive plant species may negatively influence S. montana growth and fecundity, our findings do not support related concerns. As such, we suggest that invasive species eradication efforts in S. montana habitat could be more detrimental than positive due to associated disturbance. However, the low level of invasion of our study site may not be representative of potential interference in more heavily infested habitat.

  16. Radioactivity and uranium content of some Cretaceous shales, central Great Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourtelot, Harry A.

    1955-01-01

    The Sharon Springs member of the Pierre shale of Cretaceous age, a hard black organic-rich shale similar to the Chattanooga shale, is radioactive throughout central and western South Dakota, most of Nebraska, northern Kansas, and northeastern Colorado. In the Missouri River valley, thin beds of the shale contain as much as 0.01 percent uranium. Beds as much as 20 feet thick or more have a radioactivity of about 0.01 percent equivalent uranium in southwestern Nebraska according to interpretation of gamma-ray well logs. The radioactivity and uranium content is highest in the Missouri River valley in South Dakota and in southwestern Nebraska where the shale rests disconformably on the underlying Niobrara formation of Cretaceous age. Near the Black Hills, and in the area to the north, the shale of the Sharon Springs member rests on a wedge of the Gammon ferruginous member of the Pierre, which is represented by a disonformity to the east and south, and the radioactivity of the shale is low although greater than that of over-lying strata. The shale also contains a suite of trace elements in which arsenic, boron, chromium, copper, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, and vanadium are conspicuous. Molybdenum and tin are less abundant in the Sharon Springs than in similar shales of Palezoic age and silver and selenium are more abundant. In the Great Plains region, the upper 30-50 feet of Cretaceous shales overlain unconformably by the White River group of Oligocene age has been altered to bright-colored material. This altered zone is chiefly the result of pre-Oligocene weathering although post-Oligocene ground water conditions also have affected the zone. The greatest radioactivity occurs in masses of unaltered shale measuring about 1 x 4 feet in cross section included in the lower part of the altered zone. Where the zone is developed on shale and marl of the Niobrara formation, parts of the included unaltered shale contains as much as 0.1 percent equivalent uranium and 0

  17. Fracture toughness curve shift in low upper-shelf welds (series 8)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This task examines the fracture toughness curve shifts and changes in shape for irradiated welds with low CVN upper-shelf energy (USE). The information developed under this task will augment information obtained from other HSSI tasks performed on two high-USE weldments under the Fifth and Sixth Irradiation Series and on a commercial, low USE under the Tenth Irradiation Series. The results will provide an expanded basis for accounting for irradiation-induced embrittlement in RPV materials. Three low-USE welds have been ordered from ABB-Combustion Engineering (ABB-CE), Chattanooga, Tennessee, and two of them have been delivered to ORNL. ABB-CE fabricated the welds for the Fifth and Sixth Series. Preliminary results of mechanical and chemical tests from these two welds are presented below. The Linde 80 flux was used for all three welds. One weld, Weld 1, was made with the 73W weld wire. Weld wire 73W had copper added to the melt to reduce the variations that are associated with copper-coated weld wire. The other two welds were fabricated with a commercially available copper-coated weld wire, L-TEC 44 heat 44112. One of these two welds, Weld 2, has a target copper level of 0.31 %. This copper level could not be attained using the copper-coated wire, and the coating will be stripped from the wire, which contains 0.07 % Cu. To attain the target copper level, supplemental copper will be added to the weld puddle using an ABB-CE proprietary process. This will slightly delay the delivery of weld 2, the expected delivery date is now the end of April 1995. Weld 3 was fabricated with the same heat of the L-TEC 44 copper-coated weld wire as weld 2, but with supplemental copper added to the weld puddle, which resulted in a weldment containing an average of 0.424 % Cu. The semiannual report for October 1993 through March 1994 discusses the reasons for the above choices of copper content and welding wire

  18. Pipeline transportation of emerging partially upgraded bitumen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    upgrading heavy oil, and the tank bottom recovery and remediation (TaBoRR) process, the value creation upgrading process, Genoil hydro-processor upgrading, Albian Muskeg River oil sands mining, Vapex Process for in situ upgrading, super critical partial oxidation (SUPOX), ionic liquid catalysts, biocatalyst upgrading, CAPRI in situ upgrading, the aquaconversion process, the ROSE process for partial upgrading, the Chattanooga process, the CANMET emulsion upgrading process, the UniPure sulphur removal and upgrading, and the Geotreater process. 40 refs., 14 tabs., 3 figs

  19. Conceptual models of the formation of acid-rock drainage at road cuts in Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Michael W.; Worland, Scott; Byl, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Pyrite and other minerals containing sulfur and trace metals occur in several rock formations throughout Middle and East Tennessee. Pyrite (FeS2) weathers in the presence of oxygen and water to form iron hydroxides and sulfuric acid. The weathering and interaction of the acid on the rocks and other minerals at road cuts can result in drainage with low pH (< 4) and high concentrations of trace metals. Acid-rock drainage can cause environmental problems and damage transportation infrastructure. The formation and remediation of acid-drainage from roads cuts has not been researched as thoroughly as acid-mine drainage. The U.S Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Tennessee Department of Transportation, is conducting an investigation to better understand the geologic, hydrologic, and biogeochemical factors that control acid formation at road cuts. Road cuts with the potential for acid-rock drainage were identifed and evaluated in Middle and East Tennessee. The pyrite-bearing formations evaluated were the Chattanooga Shale (Devonian black shale), the Fentress Formation (coal-bearing), and the Precambrian Anakeesta Formation and similar Precambrian rocks. Conceptual models of the formation and transport of acid-rock drainage (ARD) from road cuts were developed based on the results of a literature review, site reconnaissance, and the initial rock and water sampling. The formation of ARD requires a combination of hydrologic, geochemical, and microbial interactions which affect drainage from the site, acidity of the water, and trace metal concentrations. The basic modes of ARD formation from road cuts are; 1 - seeps and springs from pyrite-bearing formations and 2 - runoff over the face of a road cut in a pyrite-bearing formation. Depending on site conditions at road cuts, the basic modes of ARD formation can be altered and the additional modes of ARD formation are; 3 - runoff over and through piles of pyrite-bearing material, either from construction or breakdown

  20. Micromorphology and stable-isotope geochemistry of historical pedogenic siderite formed in PAH-contaminated alluvial clay soils, Tennessee, U.S.A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driese, S.G.; Ludvigson, Greg A.; Roberts, J.A.; Fowle, D.A.; Gonzalez, Luis A.; Smith, J.J.; Vulava, V.M.; McKay, L.D.

    2010-01-01

    Alluvial clay soil samples from six boreholes advanced to depths of 400-450 cm (top of limestone bedrock) from the Chattanooga Coke Plant (CCP) site were examined micromorphologically and geochemically in order to determine if pedogenic siderite (FeCO3) was present and whether siderite occurrence was related to organic contaminant distribution. Samples from shallow depths were generally more heavily contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) than those at greater depth. The upper 1 m in most boreholes consisted of mixtures of anthropogenically remolded clay soil fill containing coal clinker, cinder grains, and limestone gravel; most layers of coarse fill were impregnated with creosote and coal tar. Most undisturbed soil (below 1 m depth) consisted of highly structured clays exhibiting fine subangular blocky ped structures, as well as redox-related features. Pedogenic siderite was abundant in the upper 2 m of most cores and in demonstrably historical (< 100 years old) soil matrices. Two morphologies were identified: (1) sphaerosiderite crystal spherulites ranging from 10 to 200 um in diameter, and (2) coccoid siderite comprising grape-like "clusters" of crystals 5-20 ??n in diameter. The siderite, formed in both macropores and within fine-grained clay matrices, indicates development of localized anaerobic, low-Eh conditions, possibly due to microbial degradation of organic contaminants. Stable-isotope compositions of the siderite have ??13C values spanning over 25%o (+7 to - 18%o VPDB) indicating fractionation of DIC by multiple microbial metabolic pathways, but with relatively constant ??18O values from (-4.8 ?? 0.66%o VPDB) defining a meteoric sphaerosiderite line (MSL). Calculated isotope equilibrium water ??18O values from pedogenic siderites at the CCP site are from 1 to 5 per mil lighter than the groundwater ??18O values that we estimate for the site. If confirmed by field studies in progress, this observation might call for a reevaluation of

  1. The effects of hydraulic resistance strength training in pre-pubertal males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weltman, A; Janney, C; Rians, C B; Strand, K; Berg, B; Tippitt, S; Wise, J; Cahill, B R; Katch, F I

    1986-12-01

    In order to examine the effectiveness and safety of hydraulic resistance strength training in young males, 26 pre-pubertal males (mean age = 8.2 +/- 1.3 yr) completed a 14-wk strength training study. Subjects were evaluated before and after the 14-wk experimental period for pubertal state (Tanner's sexual maturity rating, serum testosterone, and serum dihydroepiandrosterone sulfate). Effectiveness of the strength training program was determined by measuring pre-post differences in: isokinetic strength for flexion and extension at the knee and elbow joints at two speeds (30 degrees and 90 degrees X s-1) (KIN COM, Chattecx, Inc., Chattanooga, TN), flexibility, standing long jump, vertical jump, body composition parameters, maximal oxygen consumption, and creatinine phosphokinase. Safety of strength training was assessed by biphasic musculoskeletal scintigraphy before and after the program and by physician evaluation of complaints by subjects. Strength training subjects (N = 16) participated in a 45 min/session, 3 session/wk, 14-wk supervised strength training program with an attendance rate of 91.5%. Participants performed concentric work using hydraulic resistance equipment (Hydra-Fitness Industries, Belton, TX). Eccentric work was not performed. Control subjects (N = 10) did not strength train but did participate in sport activities and activities of daily living. Results indicated that strength training subjects increased isokinetic strength as a result of strength training (average concentric work/repetition increases by 18.5 to 36.6% for the eight motions tested; torque scores over the first 90% of the range of motion increases by 13.1 to 45.1% for the eight motions tested). These changes were significantly greater than changes seen in the control group (P less than 0.05). Strength training subjects also demonstrated significant improvements (as compared to control subjects) in vertical jump (+10.4%), flexibility (+8.4%), and maximal oxygen consumption [+19

  2. Hydrogeology of the area near the J4 test cell, Arnold Air Force Base, Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugh, C.J.

    1996-01-01

    . The occurrence, distribution, and orientation of these features has a great effect on ground-water flow to the J4 test cell. The depression caused by dewatering extends out horizontally through the aquifers along the most permeable pathways. Since the aquifers above the Chattanooga Shale are not separated by distinct confining units, areas in adjacent aquifers above and below these zones of high permeability in the Manchester aquifer are also dewatered. Conditions in all Highland Rim aquifers approximate steady-state equilibrium because ground-water withdrawal at the test cell has been continuous since the late 1960's. The average ground-water discharge from the dewatering system at the J4 test cell was 105 gallons per minute, for 1992-95. The ground-water capture areas in each aquifer extend into all or parts of landfill #2 and leaching pit #2 (IRP site 1), the main testing area (IRP site 7), and the old fire training area (IRP site 10). IRP sites 8 and 12 are outside the ground-water capture areas. Of the 35 sampled wells in the J4 area, 10 produced water samples containing chlorinated organic compounds such as 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA), 1,1-dichloroethylene (1,1-DCE), and trichloroethylene (TCE) in concentrations which exceeded the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCL's) for public water-supply systems. The highest concentrations were detected in samples from well AEDC-274 with 45 micrograms per liter (mg/L) 1,2-DCA, 320 mg/L 1,1-DCE, and 1,200 mg/L TCE. These compounds are synthetic and do not occur naturally in the environment. A sample of the ground-water discharge from the J4 test cell also contained concentrations of these compounds that exceed MCL's. Chlorinated organic compounds, including 1,2-DCA; 1,1-DCE; and TCE also have been detected at IRP sites 1, 7, 8, nd 10. The six dewatering wells surrounding the J4 test cell penetrate the Chattanooga Shale and are open to the Highland Rim aquifer system, there

  3. The new 2.0 l TDI {sup registered} to fulfill American emission standards in Volkswagens new Passat; Der neue 2,0l TDI {sup registered} zur Erfuellung der amerikanischen Emissionsgesetze in Volkswagens neuem Passat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahrstedt, Joern; Dorenkamp, Richard; Kuiken, Sander; Greiner, Michael; Kuehne, Ingo; Nigro, Giampaolo; Duesterdiek, Thorsten; Veldeten, Burkhard; Thoem, Norbert [Volkswagen AG, Wolfsburg (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Volkswagen introduced the all-new Passat in 2011 at the Detroit Motor Show in the USA. It is a new midsize sedan designed exclusively for the American market and will be built at a completely new plant in Chattanooga, Tennessee. The second-generation 2.0l TDI {sup registered} engine familiar from Europe was extensively modified and further developed for the new Passat, in order to comply with the American BIN5/ULEV emission limits. For this purpose the engine's untreated emissions had to be lowered and, in combination with exhaust emission control by selective catalytic reduction (SCR), compliance with the emission limits throughout the car's operating life ensured. An effective measure for lowering the engine's untreated emissions has proved to be the low-pressure EGR system (LP EGR) [1] introduced on the first-generation 2.0l TDI {sup registered} BIN5 engine. In the course of ongoing development of the LP EGR system, work continued on reducing pressure losses in the system, and charge-air cooling was converted from air to water cooling. Water-cooled charge-air cooling enables intake pipe temperature control independent of ambient temperature, and due to the elimination of throttling and the associated reduction in volume improves road dynamics. Systematic elimination of throttling restrictions in the gas system, combined with improved turbocharging, led to a significant drop in fuel consumption and optimal road performance. As a means of stabilizing untreated emissions in the engine, cylinder-pressure control of combustion was carried-over from the first-generation 2.0l TDI BIN5 engine. Thanks to the closed-loop control of the indicated mean pressure and the centre of combustion with the pressure sensor integrated into the glow-plug, it was possible to minimize the influences of fluctuating fuel quality and component tolerances. The exhaust system was completely revised in order to achieve maximum NOX conversion in the SCR catalytic converter. The

  4. A Roadmap for NEAMS Capability Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernholdt, David E [ORNL

    2011-11-01

    The vision of the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program is to bring truly predictive modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities to the nuclear engineering community in order to enable a new approach to the design and analysis of nuclear energy systems. From its inception, the NEAMS program has always envisioned a broad user base for its software and scientific products, including researchers within the DOE complex, nuclear industry technology developers and vendors, and operators. However activities to date have focused almost exclusively on interactions with NEAMS sponsors, who are also near-term users of NEAMS technologies. The task of the NEAMS Capability Transfer (CT) program element for FY2011 is to develop a comprehensive plan to support the program's needs for user outreach and technology transfer. In order to obtain community input to this plan, a 'NEAMS Capability Transfer Roadmapping Workshop' was held 4-5 April 2011 in Chattanooga, TN, and is summarized in this report. The 30 workshop participants represented the NEAMS program, the DOE and industrial user communities, and several outside programs. The workshop included a series of presentations providing an overview of the NEAMS program and presentations on the user outreach and technology transfer experiences of (1) The Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program, (2) The Standardized Computer Analysis for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE) project, and (3) The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), followed by discussion sessions. Based on the workshop and other discussions throughout the year, we make a number of recommendations of key areas for the NEAMS program to develop the user outreach and technology transfer activities: (1) Engage not only DOE, but also industrial users sooner and more often; (2) Engage with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to facilitate their understanding and acceptance of NEAMS approach to predictive M&S; (3

  5. Decommissioning the physics laboratory, building 777-10A, at the Savannah River Site (SRS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    metal beams above-grade. The roofs were flat concrete slabs on metal beams. Building 777-10A was an important SRS research and development location. The reactors helped determine safe operational limits and loading patterns for fuel used in the SRS production reactors, and supported various low power reactor physics studies. All four reactors were shut down and de-inventoried in the 1970's. The building was DD and R 2007, Chattanooga, Tennessee, September 16-19, 2007 169 subsequently used by various SRS organizations for office space, audio/visual studio, and computer network hub. SRS successfully decommissioned Building 777-10A over a thirty month period at a cost of ∼$14 M (∼$290/ft2). The decommissioning was a complex and difficult effort due to the building's radiological contamination, height, extensive basement, and thick concrete walls. Extensive planning and extensive hazard analysis (e.g. of structural loads/modifications leading to unplanned collapse) ensured the decommissioning was completed safely and without incident. The decommissioning met contract standards for residual contamination and physical/chemical hazards, and was the last in a series of decommissioning projects that prepared the lower A/M-Area for SRS's environmental restoration program

  6. Environmental setting and water-quality issues in the lower Tennessee River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsbury, James A.; Hoos, Anne B.; Woodside, M.D.

    1999-01-01

    The goals of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program are to describe current water-quality conditions for a large part of the Nation's water resources, identify water-quality changes over time, and identify the primary natural and human factors that affect water quality. The lower Tennessee River Basin is one of 59 river basins selected for study. The water-quality assessment of the lower Tennessee River Basin study unit began in 1997. The lower Tennessee River Basin study unit encompasses an area of about 19,500 square miles and extends from Chattanooga, Tennessee, to Paducah, Kentucky. The study unit had a population of about 1.5 million people in 1995.The study unit was subdivided into subunits with relatively homogeneous geology and physiography. Subdivision of the study unit creates a framework to assess the effects of natural and cultural settings on water quality. Nine subunits were delineated in the study unit; their boundaries generally coincide with level III and level IV ecoregion boundaries. The nine subunits are the Coastal Plain, Transition, Western Highland Rim, Outer Nashville Basin, Inner Nashville Basin, Eastern Highland Rim, Plateau Escarpment and Valleys, Cumberland Plateau, and Valley and Ridge.The lower Tennessee River Basin consists of predominantly forest (51 percent) and agricultural land (40 percent). Activities related to agricultural land use, therefore, are the primary cultural factors likely to have a widespread effect on surface- and ground-water quality in the study unit. Inputs of total nitrogen and phosphorus from agricultural activities in 1992 were about 161,000 and 37,900 tons, respectively. About 3.7 million pounds (active ingredient) of pesticides was applied to crops in the lower Tennessee River Basin in 1992.State water-quality agencies identified nutrient enrichment and pathogens as water-quality issues affecting both surface and ground water in the lower Tennessee River Basin. Water-quality data collected by State

  7. News & Announcements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-02-01

    Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (mail code 7406), U. S. Environmental Protection Agency, 401 M Street, SW, Washington, DC 20560; phone: 202/260-2659; fax: 202/260-0816; http://www.epa.gov/greenchemistry. 16th BCCE, July 30-August 3, 2000 The 16th Biennial Conference on Chemical Education will be held at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, between July 30 and August 3, 2000. The meeting is promising to have a very full program. As of December 3, 1999 (the deadline for the submission of proposals for symposia and workshops), 64 of each had been submitted. Information about these proposed presentations, as well as about other aspects of the conference, are posted on the BCCE website at http://www.umich.edu/ bcce. If you wish to hold a meeting of your organization at the time of the conference, please let the organizers know at bcce@umich.edu so that space can be set aside. And please plan to attend! Teaching/Research Sabbatical Fellowships The University of Tennessee-Knoxville announces its designation by the National Science Foundation as one of three Research Sites for Educators in Chemistry (RSE). The program offers 12- 15-month teaching/research sabbatical fellowships. Fellows will spend a semester at University of Tennessee-Knoxville, a semester at a research-active partner (Berea College, the University of the South-Sewanee, or the University of Tennessee-Chattanooga), and a summer in research at UT-K, a partner school, or in industry. Fellows will have minimal teaching loads, continuous involvement in collaborative research in environmental and/or chemical analysis, and exposure to a successful model for establishing a thriving undergraduate research program. For information contact Kelsey D. Cook; kcook@utk.edu; phone: 865-974-8019. The other two RSEC sites are Georgia Tech (contact is Kent Barefield; kent.barefield@chemistry.gatech.edu) and the University of New Mexico (contact is Dana Brabson; gb6s@unm.edu). Soaring Endowments: Research Corp. Report